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Sample records for multi-gamma emitters 166mho

  1. Brownian Emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsekov, Roumen

    2016-06-01

    A Brownian harmonic oscillator, which dissipates energy either by friction or via emission of electromagnetic radiation, is considered. This Brownian emitter is driven by the surrounding thermo-quantum fluctuations, which are theoretically described by the fluctuation-dissipation theorem. It is shown how the Abraham-Lorentz force leads to dependence of the half-width on the peak frequency of the oscillator amplitude spectral density. It is found that for the case of a charged particle moving in vacuum at zero temperature, its root-mean-square velocity fluctuation is a universal constant, equal to roughly 1/18 of the speed of light. The relevant Fokker-Planck and Smoluchowski equations are also derived.

  2. Asymmetrical field emitter

    DOEpatents

    Fleming, James G.; Smith, Bradley K.

    1995-01-01

    Providing a field emitter with an asymmetrical emitter structure having a very sharp tip in close proximity to its gate. One preferred embodiment of the present invention includes an asymmetrical emitter and a gate. The emitter having a tip and a side is coupled to a substrate. The gate is connected to a step in the substrate. The step has a top surface and a side wall that is substantially parallel to the side of the emitter. The tip of the emitter is in close proximity to the gate. The emitter is at an emitter potential, and the gate is at a gate potential such that with the two potentials at appropriate values, electrons are emitted from the emitter. In one embodiment, the gate is separated from the emitter by an oxide layer, and the emitter is etched anisotropically to form its tip and its asymmetrical structure.

  3. Asymmetrical field emitter

    DOEpatents

    Fleming, J.G.; Smith, B.K.

    1995-10-10

    A method is disclosed for providing a field emitter with an asymmetrical emitter structure having a very sharp tip in close proximity to its gate. One preferred embodiment of the present invention includes an asymmetrical emitter and a gate. The emitter having a tip and a side is coupled to a substrate. The gate is connected to a step in the substrate. The step has a top surface and a side wall that is substantially parallel to the side of the emitter. The tip of the emitter is in close proximity to the gate. The emitter is at an emitter potential, and the gate is at a gate potential such that with the two potentials at appropriate values, electrons are emitted from the emitter. In one embodiment, the gate is separated from the emitter by an oxide layer, and the emitter is etched anisotropically to form its tip and its asymmetrical structure. 17 figs.

  4. Emittance Theory for Thin Film Selective Emitter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chubb, Donald L.; Lowe, Roland A.; Good, Brian S.

    1994-01-01

    Thin films of high temperature garnet materials such as yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG) doped with rare earths are currently being investigated as selective emitters. This paper presents a radiative transfer analysis of the thin film emitter. From this analysis the emitter efficiency and power density are calculated. Results based on measured extinction coefficients for erbium-YAG and holmium-YAG are presented. These results indicated that emitter efficiencies of 50 percent and power densities of several watts/sq cm are attainable at moderate temperatures (less than 1750 K).

  5. Multi-gamma-source CT imaging system: a feasibility study with the Poisson noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wi, Sunhee; Cho, Seungryong

    2016-03-01

    This study was performed to test the feasibility of multi-gamma-source CT imaging system. Gamma-source CT employs radioisotopes that emit monochromatic energy gamma-rays. The advantages of gamma-source CT include its immunity to beam hardening artifacts, its capacity of quantitative CT imaging, and its higher performance in low contrast imaging compared to the conventional x-ray CT. Radioisotope should be shielded by use of a pin-hole collimator so as to make a fine focal spot. Due to its low gamma-ray flux in general, the reconstructed image from a single gamma-source CT would suffer from high noise in data. To address this problem, we proposed a multi-gamma source CT imaging system and developed an iterative image reconstruction algorithm accordingly in this work. Conventional imaging model assumes a single linear imaging system typically represented by Mf = g. In a multi-gamma-source CT system however, the inversion problem is not any more based on a single linear system since one cannot separate a detector pixel value into multiple ones that are corresponding to each rays from the sources. Instead, the imaging model can be constructed by a set of linear system models each of which assumes an estimated measurement g. Based on this model, the proposed algorithm has a weighting step which distributes each projection data into multiple estimated measurements. We used two gamma sources at various positions and with varying intensities in this numerical study to demonstrate its feasibility. Therefore, the measured projection data(g) is separated into each estimated projection data(g1, g2) in this study. The proposed imaging protocol is believed to contribute to both medical and industrial applications.

  6. Aberration corrected emittance exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nanni, E. A.; Graves, W. S.

    2015-08-01

    Full exploitation of emittance exchange (EEX) requires aberration-free performance of a complex imaging system including active radio-frequency (rf) elements which can add temporal distortions. We investigate the performance of an EEX line where the exchange occurs between two dimensions with normalized emittances which differ by multiple orders of magnitude. The transverse emittance is exchanged into the longitudinal dimension using a double dogleg emittance exchange setup with a five cell rf deflector cavity. Aberration correction is performed on the four most dominant aberrations. These include temporal aberrations that are corrected with higher order magnetic optical elements located where longitudinal and transverse emittance are coupled. We demonstrate aberration-free performance of an EEX line with emittances differing by four orders of magnitude, i.e., an initial transverse emittance of 1 pm-rad is exchanged with a longitudinal emittance of 10 nm-rad.

  7. Emittance Theory for Cylindrical Fiber Selective Emitter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chubb, Donald L.

    1998-01-01

    A fibrous rare earth selective emitter is approximated as an infinitely long, cylinder. The spectral emittance, e(sub x), is obtained L- by solving the radiative transfer equations with appropriate boundary conditions and uniform temperature. For optical depth, K(sub R), where alpha(sub lambda), is the extinction coefficient and R is the cylinder radius, greater than 1 the spectral emittance depths, K(sub R) alpha(sub lambda)R, is nearly at its maximum value. There is an optimum cylinder radius, R(sub opt) for maximum emitter efficiency, n(sub E). Values for R(sub opt) are strongly dependent on the number of emission bands of the material. The optimum radius decreases slowly with increasing emitter temperature, while the maximum efficiency and useful radiated power increase rapidly with increasing, temperature.

  8. Floating emitter solar cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chih, Sah (Inventor); Cheng, Li-Jen (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    A front surface contact floating emitter solar cell transistor is provided in a semiconductor body (n-type), in which floating emitter sections (p-type) are diffused or implanted in the front surface. Between the emitter sections, a further section is diffused or implanted in the front surface, but isolated from the floating emitter sections, for use either as a base contact to the n-type semiconductor body, in which case the section is doped n+, or as a collector for the adjacent emitter sections.

  9. Photonically Engineered Incandescent Emitter

    DOEpatents

    Gee, James M.; Lin, Shawn-Yu; Fleming, James G.; Moreno, James B.

    2005-03-22

    A photonically engineered incandescence is disclosed. The emitter materials and photonic crystal structure can be chosen to modify or suppress thermal radiation above a cutoff wavelength, causing the emitter to selectively emit in the visible and near-infrared portions of the spectrum. An efficient incandescent lamp is enabled thereby. A method for fabricating a three-dimensional photonic crystal of a structural material, suitable for the incandescent emitter, is also disclosed.

  10. Diamond fiber field emitters

    DOEpatents

    Blanchet-Fincher, Graciela B.; Coates, Don M.; Devlin, David J.; Eaton, David F.; Silzars, Aris K.; Valone, Steven M.

    1996-01-01

    A field emission electron emitter comprising an electrode formed of at least one diamond, diamond-like carbon or glassy carbon composite fiber, said composite fiber having a non-diamond core and a diamond, diamond-like carbon or glassy carbon coating on said non-diamond core, and electronic devices employing such a field emission electron emitter.

  11. Pulsed hybrid field emitter

    SciTech Connect

    Sampayan, Stephen E.

    1998-01-01

    A hybrid emitter exploits the electric field created by a rapidly depoled ferroelectric material. Combining the emission properties of a planar thin film diamond emitter with a ferroelectric alleviates the present technological problems associated with both types of emitters and provides a robust, extremely long life, high current density cathode of the type required by emerging microwave power generation, accelerator technology and display applications. This new hybrid emitter is easy to fabricate and not susceptible to the same failures which plague microstructure field emitter technology. Local electrode geometries and electric field are determined independently from those for optimum transport and brightness preservation. Due to the large amount of surface charge created on the ferroelectric, the emitted electrons have significant energy, thus eliminating the requirement for specialized phosphors in emissive flat-panel displays.

  12. Pulsed hybrid field emitter

    SciTech Connect

    Sampayan, S.E.

    1998-03-03

    A hybrid emitter exploits the electric field created by a rapidly depoled ferroelectric material. Combining the emission properties of a planar thin film diamond emitter with a ferroelectric alleviates the present technological problems associated with both types of emitters and provides a robust, extremely long life, high current density cathode of the type required by emerging microwave power generation, accelerator technology and display applications. This new hybrid emitter is easy to fabricate and not susceptible to the same failures which plague microstructure field emitter technology. Local electrode geometries and electric field are determined independently from those for optimum transport and brightness preservation. Due to the large amount of surface charge created on the ferroelectric, the emitted electrons have significant energy, thus eliminating the requirement for specialized phosphors in emissive flat-panel displays. 11 figs.

  13. Portable emittance measurement device

    SciTech Connect

    Liakin, D.; Seleznev, D.; Orlov, A.; Kuibeda, R.; Kropachev, G.; Kulevoy, T.; Yakushin, P.

    2010-02-15

    In Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics (ITEP) the portable emittance measurements device is developed. It provides emittance measurements both with ''pepper-pot'' and ''two slits'' methods. Depending on the method of measurements, either slits or pepper-pot mask with scintillator are mounted on the two activators and are installed in two standard Balzer's cross chamber with CF-100 flanges. To match the angle resolution for measured beam, the length of the stainless steel pipe between two crosses changes is adjusted. The description of the device and results of emittance measurements at the ITEP ion source test bench are presented.

  14. DIAMOND SECONDARY EMITTER

    SciTech Connect

    BEN-ZVI, I.; RAO, T.; BURRILL, A.; CHANG, X.; GRIMES, J.; RANK, J.; SEGALOV, Z.; SMEDLEY, J.

    2005-10-09

    We present the design and experimental progress on the diamond secondary emitter as an electron source for high average power injectors. The design criteria for average currents up to 1 A and charge up to 20 nC are established. Secondary Electron Yield (SEY) exceeding 200 in transmission mode and 50 in emission mode have been measured. Preliminary results on the design and fabrication of the self contained capsule with primary electron source and secondary electron emitter will also be presented.

  15. Cancer from internal emitters

    SciTech Connect

    Boecker, B.B.; Griffith, W.C. Jr.

    1995-10-01

    Irradiation from internal emitters, or internally deposited radionuclides, is an important component of radiation exposures encountered in the workplace, home, or general environment. Long-term studies of human populations exposed to various internal emitters by different routes of exposure are producing critical information for the protection of workers and members of the general public. The purpose of this report is to examine recent developments and discuss their potential importance for understanding lifetime cancer risks from internal emitters. The major populations of persons being studied for lifetime health effects from internally deposited radionuclides are well known: Lung cancer in underground miners who inhaled Rn progeny, liver cancer from persons injected with the Th-containing radiographic contrast medium Thorotrast, bone cancer from occupational or medical intakes of {sup 226}Ra or medical injections of {sup 224}Ra, and thyroid cancer from exposures to iodine radionuclides in the environment or for medical purposes.

  16. Electrochemical formation of field emitters

    DOEpatents

    Bernhardt, Anthony F.

    1999-01-01

    Electrochemical formation of field emitters, particularly useful in the fabrication of flat panel displays. The fabrication involves field emitting points in a gated field emitter structure. Metal field emitters are formed by electroplating and the shape of the formed emitter is controlled by the potential imposed on the gate as well as on a separate counter electrode. This allows sharp emitters to be formed in a more inexpensive and manufacturable process than vacuum deposition processes used at present. The fabrication process involves etching of the gate metal and the dielectric layer down to the resistor layer, and then electroplating the etched area and forming an electroplated emitter point in the etched area.

  17. Thermophotovoltaic emitter development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Robert E.

    1995-01-01

    Many refractory oxide ceramics in fibrous form are efficient converters of the heat of combustion into radiant energy. Rare earth oxide ceramics, which are refractory and stable in flames, exhibit selective emission in the near IR where semiconductor photoconverters are efficient in converting radiant energy directly into electrical power. Ytterbia emitters and silicon photoconverters, in particular, constitute the basis for a high performance thermophotovoltaic energy conversion system. Ceramic fiber fabrication techniques are described that yield mechanically durable emitters in classical mantle geometries and in a novel planar form. This work has been supported by the Basic Research Group of the Gas Research Institute, Chicago, Illinois.

  18. FACET Emittance Growth

    SciTech Connect

    Frederico, J; Hogan, M.J.; Nosochkov, Y.; Litos, M.D.; Raubenheimer, T.; /SLAC

    2011-04-05

    FACET, the Facility for Advanced Accelerator and Experimental Tests, is a new facility being constructed in sector 20 of the SLAC linac primarily to study beam driven plasma wakefield acceleration. The FACET beamline consists of a chicane and final focus system to compress the 23 GeV, 3.2 nC electron bunches to {approx}20 {micro}m long and {approx}10 {micro}m wide. Simulations of the FACET beamline indicate the short-duration and large, 1.5% rms energy spread beams may suffer a factor of four emittance growth from a combination of chromaticity, incoherent synchrotron radiation (ISR), and coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR). Emittance growth is directly correlated to head erosion in plasma wakefield acceleration and is a limiting factor in single stage performance. Studies of the geometric, CSR, and ISR components are presented. Numerical calculation of the rms emittance can be overwhelmed by long tails in the simulated phase space distributions; more useful definitions of emittance are given. A complete simulation of the beamline is presented as well, which agrees with design specifications.

  19. Effect of Temperature Gradient on Thick Film Selective Emitter Emittance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chubb, Donald L.; Good, Brian S.; Clark, Eric B.; Chen, Zheng

    1997-01-01

    A temperature gradient across a thick (greater than or equal to .1 mm) film selective emitter will produce a significant reduction in the spectral emittance from the no temperature gradient case. Thick film selective emitters of rare earth doped host materials such as yttrium-aluminum-garnet (YAG) are examples where temperature gradient effects are important. In this paper a model is developed for the spectral emittance assuming a linear temperature gradient across the film. Results of the model indicate that temperature gradients will result in reductions the order of 20% or more in the spectral emittance.

  20. Reappraisal of solid selective emitters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chubb, Donald L.

    1990-01-01

    New rare earth oxide emitters show greater efficiency than previous emitters. As a result, based on a simple model the efficiency of these emitters was calculated. Results indicate that the emission band of the selective emitter must be at relatively low energy (less than or equal to .52 eV) to obtain maximum efficiency at moderate emitter temperatures (less than or equal to 1500 K). Thus low bandgap energy PV materials are required to obtain an efficient thermophotovoltaic (TPV) system. Of the 4 specific rare earths (Nd, Ho, Er, Yb) studied Ho has the largest efficiency at moderate temperatures (72 percent at 1500 K). A comparison was made between a selective emitter TPV system and a TPV system that uses a thermal emitter plus a band pass filter to make the thermal emitter behave like a selective emitter. Results of the comparison indicate that only for very optimistic filter and thermal emitter properties will the filter TPV system have a greater efficiency than the selective emitter system.

  1. Rare Earth Garnet Selective Emitter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowe, Roland A.; Chubb, Donald L.; Farmer, Serene C.; Good, Brian S.

    1994-01-01

    Thin film Ho-YAG and Er-YAG emitters with a platinum substrate exhibit high spectral emittance in the emission band (epsilon(sub lambda) approx. = 0.75, sup 4)|(sub 15/2) - (sup 4)|(sub 13/2),for Er-YAG and epsilon(sub lambda) approx. = 0.65, (sup 5)|(sub 7) - (sup 5)|(sub 8) for Ho-YAG) at 1500 K. In addition, low out-of-band spectral emittance, epsilon(sub lambda) less than 0.2, suggest these materials would be excellent candidates for high efficiency selective emitters in thermophotovoltaic (TPV) systems operating at moderate temperatures (1200-1500 K). Spectral emittance measurements of the thin films were made (1.2 less than lambda less than 3.0 microns) and compared to the theoretical emittances calculated using measured values of the spectral extinction coefficient. In this paper we present the results for a new class of rare earth ion selective emitters. These emitters are thin sections (less than 1 mm) of yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG) single crystal with a rare earth substitutional impurity. Selective emitters in the near IR are of special interest for thermophotovoltaic (TPV) energy conversion. The most promising solid selective emitters for use in a TPV system are rare earth oxides. Early spectral emittance work on rare earth oxides showed strong emission bands in the infrared (0.9 - 3 microns). However, the emittance outside the emission band was also significant and the efficiency of these emitters was low. Recent improvements in efficiency have been made with emitters fabricated from fine (5 - 10 microns) rare earth oxide fibers similar to the Welsbach mantle used in gas lanterns. However, the rare earth garnet emitters are more rugged than the mantle type emitters. A thin film selective emitter on a low emissivity substrate such as gold, platinum etc., is rugged and easily adapted to a wide variety of thermal sources. The garnet structure and its many subgroups have been successfully used as hosts for rare earth ions, introduced as substitutional

  2. Rare earth garnet selective emitter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowe, Roland A.; Chubb, Donald L.; Farmer, Serene C.; Good, Brian S.

    1994-01-01

    Thin film Ho-YAG and Er-YAG emitters with a platinum substrate exhibit high spectral emittance in the emission band (epsilon(sub lambda) approximately equal to 0.74, ((4)l(sub 15/2)) - ( (4)l(sub13/2)), for Er-YAG and epsilon(sub lambda) approximately equal to 0.65, ((5)l(sub 7))-((5)l(sub 8)) for Ho-YAG) at excellent candidates for high efficiency selective emitters in the thermophotovoltaics (TPV) systems operating at moderate temperatures (1200-1500K). Spectral emittance measurements of the thin films were made (1.2 less than lambda less than 3.0 microns) and compared to the theoretical emittances calculated using measured values of the spectral extinction coefficient. In this paper we present the results for a new class of rare earth ion selective emitters. These emitters are thin sections (less than 1 mm) of yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG) single crystal with a rare earth substitutional impurity. This paper presents normal spectral emittance, epsilon(sub lambda), measurements of holmium (Ho), and erbium (Er) doped YAG thin film selective emitters at 1500 K, and compares those results with the theoretical spectral emittance.

  3. Monolithic multinozzle emitters for nanoelectrospray mass spectrometry

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Daojing; Yang, Peidong; Kim, Woong; Fan, Rong

    2011-09-20

    Novel and significantly simplified procedures for fabrication of fully integrated nanoelectrospray emitters have been described. For nanofabricated monolithic multinozzle emitters (NM.sup.2 emitters), a bottom up approach using silicon nanowires on a silicon sliver is used. For microfabricated monolithic multinozzle emitters (M.sup.3 emitters), a top down approach using MEMS techniques on silicon wafers is used. The emitters have performance comparable to that of commercially-available silica capillary emitters for nanoelectrospray mass spectrometry.

  4. Amorphous-diamond electron emitter

    DOEpatents

    Falabella, Steven

    2001-01-01

    An electron emitter comprising a textured silicon wafer overcoated with a thin (200 .ANG.) layer of nitrogen-doped, amorphous-diamond (a:D-N), which lowers the field below 20 volts/micrometer have been demonstrated using this emitter compared to uncoated or diamond coated emitters wherein the emission is at fields of nearly 60 volts/micrometer. The silicon/nitrogen-doped, amorphous-diamond (Si/a:D-N) emitter may be produced by overcoating a textured silicon wafer with amorphous-diamond (a:D) in a nitrogen atmosphere using a filtered cathodic-arc system. The enhanced performance of the Si/a:D-N emitter lowers the voltages required to the point where field-emission displays are practical. Thus, this emitter can be used, for example, in flat-panel emission displays (FEDs), and cold-cathode vacuum electronics.

  5. Electrochemical formation of field emitters

    DOEpatents

    Bernhardt, A.F.

    1999-03-16

    Electrochemical formation of field emitters, particularly useful in the fabrication of flat panel displays is disclosed. The fabrication involves field emitting points in a gated field emitter structure. Metal field emitters are formed by electroplating and the shape of the formed emitter is controlled by the potential imposed on the gate as well as on a separate counter electrode. This allows sharp emitters to be formed in a more inexpensive and manufacturable process than vacuum deposition processes used at present. The fabrication process involves etching of the gate metal and the dielectric layer down to the resistor layer, and then electroplating the etched area and forming an electroplated emitter point in the etched area. 12 figs.

  6. Thin-Film Selective Emitter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chubb, Donald L.; Lowe, Roland A.

    1993-01-01

    Direct conversion of thermal energy into electrical energy using a photovoltaic cell is called thermophotovoltaic energy conversion. One way to make this an efficient process is to have the thermal energy source be an efficient selective emitter of radiation. The emission must be near the band-gap energy of the photovoltaic cell. One possible method to achieve an efficient selective emitter is the use of a thin film of rare-earth oxides. The determination of the efficiency of such an emitter requires analysis of the spectral emittance of the thin film including scattering and reflectance at the vacuum-film and film-substrate interfaces. Emitter efficiencies (power emitted in emission band/total emitted power) in the range 0.35-0.7 are predicted. There is an optimum optical depth to obtain maximum efficiency. High emitter efficiencies are attained only for low (less than 0.05) substrate emittance values, both with and without scattering. The low substrate emittance required for high efficiency limits the choice of substrate materials to highly reflective metals or high-transmission materials such as sapphire.

  7. EMITTANCE COMPENSATION FOR MAGNETIZED BEAMS

    SciTech Connect

    KEWISCH,J.; CHANG, X.

    2007-06-25

    Emittance compensation is a well established technique for minimizing the emittance of an electron beam from a RF photo-cathode gun. Longitudinal slices of a bunch have a small emittance, but due to the longitudinal charge distribution of the bunch and time dependent RF fields they are not focused in the same way, so that the direction of their phase ellipses diverges in phase space and the projected emittance is much larger. Emittance compensation reverses the divergence. At the location where the slopes of the phase ellipses coincide the beam is accelerated, so that the space charge forces are reduced. A recipe for emittance compensation is given in. For magnetized beams (where the angular momentum is non-zero) such emittance compensation is not sufficient because variations in the slice radius lead to variations in the angular speed and therefore to an increase of emittance in the rotating game. We describe a method and tools for a compensation that includes the beam magnetization.

  8. Highly directional thermal emitter

    DOEpatents

    Ribaudo, Troy; Shaner, Eric A; Davids, Paul; Peters, David W

    2015-03-24

    A highly directional thermal emitter device comprises a two-dimensional periodic array of heavily doped semiconductor structures on a surface of a substrate. The array provides a highly directional thermal emission at a peak wavelength between 3 and 15 microns when the array is heated. For example, highly doped silicon (HDSi) with a plasma frequency in the mid-wave infrared was used to fabricate nearly perfect absorbing two-dimensional gratings structures that function as highly directional thermal radiators. The absorption and emission characteristics of the HDSi devices possessed a high degree of angular dependence for infrared absorption in the 10-12 micron range, while maintaining high reflectivity of solar radiation (.about.64%) at large incidence angles.

  9. Coherent Hot-Electron Emitter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machida, Nobuya; Furuya, Kazuhito

    2001-01-01

    The structure and principle of an electron emitter ejecting electron waves with ultimate value of product of wavefront spread and current density in a solid-state condition is proposed. By introducing an additional electrode, the gate, to a double-barrier resonant-tunneling emitter, an electron flux with a single wavelength, a wide wavefront spread and high current density can be achieved. We justify the principle by electrostatic theory. This emitter might also be used for various types of solid-state spectroscopy.

  10. Beam emittance measurements in RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Zelenski,A.; Bazilevsky, A.; Bunce, G.; Gill, R.; Huang, H.; Makdisi, Y.; Morozov, B.; Nemesure, S.; Russo, t.; Steski, D.; Sivertz, M.

    2009-05-04

    The RHIC proton polarimeters can operate in scanning mode, giving polarization profiles and transverse beam intensity profile (beam emittance) measurements. The polarimeters function as wire scanners, providing a very good signal/noise ratio and high counting rate. This allows accurate bunch-by-bunch emittance measurements during fast target sweeps (<1 s) through the beam. Very thin carbon strip targets make these measurements practically non-destructive. Bunch by bunch emittance measurements are a powerful tool for machine set-up; in RHIC, individual proton beam transverse emittances can only be measured by CNI polarimeter scans. We discuss the consistency of these measurements with Ionization Profile Monitors (IPMs) and vernier scan luminosity measurements. Absolute accuracy limitations and cross-calibration of different techniques are also discussed.

  11. Diamondoid monolayers as electron emitters

    DOEpatents

    Yang, Wanli; Fabbri, Jason D.; Melosh, Nicholas A.; Hussain, Zahid; Shen, Zhi-Xun

    2013-10-29

    Provided are electron emitters based upon diamondoid monolayers, preferably self-assembled higher diamondoid monolayers. High intensity electron emission has been demonstrated employing such diamondoid monolayers, particularly when the monolayers are comprised of higher diamondoids. The application of such diamondoid monolayers can alter the band structure of substrates, as well as emit monochromatic electrons, and the high intensity electron emissions can also greatly improve the efficiency of field-effect electron emitters as applied to industrial and commercial applications.

  12. Diamondoid monolayers as electron emitters

    DOEpatents

    Yang, Wanli; Fabbri, Jason D.; Melosh, Nicholas A.; Hussain, Zahid; Shen, Zhi-Xun

    2012-04-10

    Provided are electron emitters based upon diamondoid monolayers, preferably self-assembled higher diamondoid monolayers. High intensity electron emission has been demonstrated employing such diamondoid monolayers, particularly when the monolayers are comprised of higher diamondoids. The application of such diamondoid monolayers can alter the band structure of substrates, as well as emit monochromatic electrons, and the high intensity electron emissions can also greatly improve the efficiency of field-effect electron emitters as applied to industrial and commercial applications.

  13. Thermionic converter emitter support arrangement

    DOEpatents

    Allen, Daniel T.

    1990-01-01

    A support is provided for use in a therminonic converter to support an end of an emitter to keep it out of contact with a surrounding collector while allowing the emitter end to move axially as its temperature changes. The emitter end (34) is supported by a spring structure (44) that includes a pair of Belleville springs, and the spring structure is supported by a support structure (42) fixed to the housing that includes the collector. The support structure is in the form of a sandwich with a small metal spring-engaging element (74) at the front end, a larger metal main support (76) at the rear end that is attached to the housing, and with a ceramic layer (80) between them that is bonded by hot isostatic pressing to the metal element and metal main support. The spring structure can include a loose wafer (120) captured between the Belleville springs.

  14. Thermionic converter emitter support arrangement

    DOEpatents

    Allen, Daniel T.

    1990-01-01

    A support is provided for use in a thermionic converter to support an end an emitter to keep it out of contact with a surrounding collector while allowing the emitter end to move axially at its temperatures changes. The emitter end (34) is supported by a spring structure (44) that includes a pair of Belleville springs, and the spring structure is supported by a support structure (42) fixed to the housing that includes the collector. The support structure is in the form of a sandwich with a small metal spring-engaging element (74) at the front end, a larger metal main support (76) at the rear end that is attached to the housng, and with a ceramic layer (80) between them that is bonded by hot isostatic pressing to the metal element and metal main support. The spring structure can include a loose wafer (120) captured between the Belleville springs.

  15. Thermionic converter emitter support arrangement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Daniel T.

    1989-07-01

    A support is discussed which was provided for use in a thermionic converter to support an end of an emitter to keep it out of contact with a surrounding collector while allowing the emitter end to move axially as its temperature changes. The emitter end is supported by a spring structure that includes a pair of Belleville springs, and the spring structure is supported by a support structure fixed to the housing that includes the collector. The support structure is in the form of a sandwich with a small metal spring-engaging element at the front end, a larger metal main support at the rear end that is attached to the housing, and with a ceramic layer between them that is bonded by hot isostatic pressing to the metal element and metal main support. The spring structure can include a loose wafer captured between the Belleville springs.

  16. Thermionic converter emitter support arrangement

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, D.T.

    1990-05-22

    This patent describes a support provided for use in a therminonic converter to support an end of an emitter to keep it out of contact with a surrounding collector while allowing the emitter end to move axially as its temperature changes. The emitter end is supported by a spring structure that includes a pair of Belleville springs, and the spring structure is supported by a support structure fixed to the housing that includes the collector. The support structure is in the form of a sandwich with a small metal spring-engaging element at the front end, a larger metal main support at the rear end that is attached to the housing, and with a ceramic layer between them that is bonded by hot isostatic pressing to the metal element and metal main support. The spring structure can include a loose wafer captured between the Belleville springs.

  17. Thermionic converter emitter support arrangement

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, D.T.

    1989-07-06

    This document discusses a support provided for use in a thermionic converter to support an end of an emitter to keep it out of contact with a surrounding collector while allowing the emitter end to move axially as its temperature changes. The emitter end is supported by a spring structure that includes a pair of Belleville springs, and the spring structure is supported by a support structure fixed to the housing that includes the collector. The support structure is in the form of a sandwich with a small metal spring-engaging element at the front end, a larger metal main support at the rear end that is attached to the housing, and with a ceramic layer between them that is bonded by hot isostatic pressing to the metal element and metal main support. The spring structure can include a loose wafer captured between the Belleville springs. 7 figs.

  18. Thermionic converter emitter support arrangement

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, D.T.

    1990-10-16

    A support is presented for use in a thermionic converted to support an end of an emitter to keep it out of contact with a surrounding collector while allowing the emitter end to move axially at its temperatures changes. The emitter end is supported by a spring structure that includes a pair of Belleville springs, and the spring structure is supported by a support structure fixed to the housing that includes the collector. The support structure is in the form of a sandwich with a small metal spring-engaging element at the front end, a large metal main support at the rear end that is attached to the housing, and metal main support. The spring structure can include a loose wafer captured between the Belleville springs.

  19. Combustion powered thermophotovoltaic emitter system

    SciTech Connect

    McHenry, R.S.

    1995-07-01

    The US Naval Academy (USNA) has recently completed an engineering design project for a high temperature thermophotovoltaic (TPV) photon emitter. The final apparatus was to be portable, completely self contained, and was to incorporate cycle efficiency optimization such as exhaust stream recuperation. Through computer modeling and prototype experimentation, a methane fueled emitter system was designed from structural ceramic materials to fulfill the high temperature requirements necessary for high system efficiency. This paper outlines the engineering design process, discusses obstacles and solutions encountered, and presents the final design.

  20. Emittance concept and growth mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Wangler, T.P.

    1996-05-01

    The authors present an introduction to the subjects of emittance and space-charge effects in charged-particle beams. This is followed by a discussion of three important topics that are at the frontier of this field. The first is a simple model, describing space-charge-induced emittance growth, which yields scaling formulas and some physical explanations for some of the surprising results. The second is a discussion of beam halo, an introduction to the particle-core model, and a brief summary of its results. The third topic is an introduction to the hypothesis of equipartitioning for collisionless particle beams.

  1. Emittance of investment casting molds

    SciTech Connect

    Havstad, M.A.

    1994-07-15

    This document describes measurements of the directional spectral emittance of four ceramic mold materials. The work was performed with the samples at {approximately} 900{degree}C in a vacuum vessel pumped to {approximately}3 {times} 10{sup {minus}6}Torr. Results conform to expectations derived from prior work done with similar samples.

  2. Ultra Low Emittance Light Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Bengtsson,J.

    2008-06-23

    This paper outlines the special issues for reaching sub-nm emittance in a storage ring. Effects of damping wigglers, intra-beam scattering and lifetime issues, dynamic aperture optimization, control of optics, and their interrelations are covered in some detail. The unique choices for the NSLS-II are given as one example.

  3. Shielding in ungated field emitter arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, J. R.; Jensen, K. L.; Shiffler, D. A.; Petillo, J. J.

    2015-05-18

    Cathodes consisting of arrays of high aspect ratio field emitters are of great interest as sources of electron beams for vacuum electronic devices. The desire for high currents and current densities drives the cathode designer towards a denser array, but for ungated emitters, denser arrays also lead to increased shielding, in which the field enhancement factor β of each emitter is reduced due to the presence of the other emitters in the array. To facilitate the study of these arrays, we have developed a method for modeling high aspect ratio emitters using tapered dipole line charges. This method can be used to investigate proximity effects from similar emitters an arbitrary distance away and is much less computationally demanding than competing simulation approaches. Here, we introduce this method and use it to study shielding as a function of array geometry. Emitters with aspect ratios of 10{sup 2}–10{sup 4} are modeled, and the shielding-induced reduction in β is considered as a function of tip-to-tip spacing for emitter pairs and for large arrays with triangular and square unit cells. Shielding is found to be negligible when the emitter spacing is greater than the emitter height for the two-emitter array, or about 2.5 times the emitter height in the large arrays, in agreement with previously published results. Because the onset of shielding occurs at virtually the same emitter spacing in the square and triangular arrays, the triangular array is preferred for its higher emitter density at a given emitter spacing. The primary contribution to shielding in large arrays is found to come from emitters within a distance of three times the unit cell spacing for both square and triangular arrays.

  4. Electric field distribution of electron emitter surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tagawa, M.; Takenobu, S.; Ohmae, N.; Umeno, M.

    1987-03-01

    The electric field distribution of a tungsten field emitter surface and a LaB6 thermionic emitter surface has been studied. The computer simulation of electric field distribution on the emitter surface was carried out with a charge simulation method. The electric field distribution of the LaB6 thermionic emitter was experimentally evaluated by the Schottky plot. Two independent equations are necessary for obtaining local electric field and work function; the Fowler-Nordheim equation and the equation of total energy distribution of emitted electron being used to evaluate the electric field distribution of the tungsten field emitter. The experimental results agreed with the computer simulation.

  5. Beam emittance measurements at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Wendt, Manfred; Eddy, Nathan; Hu, Martin; Scarpine, Victor; Syphers, Mike; Tassotto, Gianni; Thurman-Keup, Randy; Yang, Ming-Jen; Zagel, James; /Fermilab

    2008-01-01

    We give short overview of various beam emittance measurement methods, currently applied at different machine locations for the Run II collider physics program at Fermilab. All these methods are based on beam profile measurements, and we give some examples of the related instrumentation techniques. At the end we introduce a multi-megawatt proton source project, currently under investigation at Fermilab, with respect to the beam instrumentation challenges.

  6. Metamaterial selective emitters for photodiodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeMeo, Dante F.; Pfeister, Nicole A.; Shemelya, Corey M.; Vandervelde, Thomas

    2014-03-01

    This work demonstrates metamaterial (MM) selective thermal emitters for potential use with energy harvesting photodiodes, such as thermophotovoltaic cells. Preliminary structures have been designed, simulated, and fabricated using CST Microwave Studio and microfabrication techniques including electron beam evaporation, atomic layer deposition, and electron beam lithography, respectively. Samples were tested to determine the effect of top layer metal thickness on the absorption of these devices. Preliminary simulation and testing was also performed to design a device for operation at 500°C.

  7. Metal halide perovskite light emitters

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young-Hoon; Cho, Himchan; Lee, Tae-Woo

    2016-01-01

    Twenty years after layer-type metal halide perovskites were successfully developed, 3D metal halide perovskites (shortly, perovskites) were recently rediscovered and are attracting multidisciplinary interest from physicists, chemists, and material engineers. Perovskites have a crystal structure composed of five atoms per unit cell (ABX3) with cation A positioned at a corner, metal cation B at the center, and halide anion X at the center of six planes and unique optoelectronic properties determined by the crystal structure. Because of very narrow spectra (full width at half-maximum ≤20 nm), which are insensitive to the crystallite/grain/particle dimension and wide wavelength range (400 nm ≤ λ ≤ 780 nm), perovskites are expected to be promising high-color purity light emitters that overcome inherent problems of conventional organic and inorganic quantum dot emitters. Within the last 2 y, perovskites have already demonstrated their great potential in light-emitting diodes by showing high electroluminescence efficiency comparable to those of organic and quantum dot light-emitting diodes. This article reviews the progress of perovskite emitters in two directions of bulk perovskite polycrystalline films and perovskite nanoparticles, describes current challenges, and suggests future research directions for researchers to encourage them to collaborate and to make a synergetic effect in this rapidly emerging multidisciplinary field. PMID:27679844

  8. Alpha particle emitters in medicine

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, D.R.

    1989-09-01

    Radiation-induced cancer of bone, liver and lung has been a prominent harmful side-effect of medical applications of alpha emitters. In recent years, however, the potential use of antibodies labeled with alpha emitting radionuclides against cancer has seemed promising because alpha particles are highly effective in cell killing. High dose rates at high LET, effectiveness under hypoxic conditions, and minimal expectancy of repair are additional advantages of alpha emitters over antibodies labeled with beta emitting radionuclides for cancer therapy. Cyclotron-produced astatine-211 ({sup 211}At) and natural bismuth-212 ({sup 212}Bi) have been proposed and are under extensive study in the United States and Europe. Radium-223 ({sup 223}Ra) also has favorable properties as a potential alpha emitting label, including a short-lived daughter chain with four alpha emissions. The radiation dosimetry of internal alpha emitters is complex due to nonuniformly distributed sources, short particle tracks, and high relative specific ionization. The variations in dose at the cellular level may be extreme. Alpha-particle radiation dosimetry, therefore, must involve analysis of statistical energy deposition probabilities for cellular level targets. It must also account fully for nonuniform distributions of sources in tissues, source-target geometries, and particle-track physics. 18 refs., 4 figs.

  9. Transverse Emittance Reduction with Tapered Foil

    SciTech Connect

    Jiao, Yi; Chao, Alex; Cai, Yunhai; /SLAC

    2011-12-09

    The idea of reducing transverse emittance with tapered energy-loss foil is proposed by J.M. Peterson in 1980s and recently by B. Carlsten. In this paper, we present the physical model of tapered energy-loss foil and analyze the emittance reduction using the concept of eigen emittance. The study shows that, to reduce transverse emittance, one should collimate at least 4% of particles which has either much low energy or large transverse divergence. The multiple coulomb scattering is not trivial, leading to a limited emittance reduction ratio. Small transverse emittances are of essential importance for the accelerator facilities generating free electron lasers, especially in hard X-ray region. The idea of reducing transverse emittance with tapered energy-loss foil is recently proposed by B. Carlsten [1], and can be traced back to J.M. Peterson's work in 1980s [2]. Peterson illustrated that a transverse energy gradient can be produced with a tapered energy-loss foil which in turn leads to transverse emittance reduction, and also analyzed the emittance growth from the associated multiple coulomb scattering. However, what Peterson proposed was rather a conceptual than a practical design. In this paper, we build a more complete physical model of the tapered foil based on Ref. [2], including the analysis of the transverse emittance reduction using the concept of eigen emittance and confirming the results by various numerical simulations. The eigen emittance equals to the projected emittance when there is no cross correlation in beam's second order moments matrix [3]. To calculate the eigen emittances, it requires only to know the beam distribution at the foil exit. Thus, the analysis of emittance reduction and the optics design of the subsequent beam line section can be separated. In addition, we can combine the effects of multiple coulomb scattering and transverse energy gradient together in the beam matrix and analyze their net effect. We find that,when applied to an

  10. Emittance Growth in the NLCTA First Chicane

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Yipeng; Adolphsen, Chris; /SLAC

    2011-08-19

    In this paper, the emittance growth in the NLCTA (Next Linear Collider Test Accelerator) first chicane region is evaluated by simulation studies. It is demonstrated that the higher order fields of the chicane dipole magnet and the dipole corrector magnet (which is attached on the quadrupoles) are the main contributions for the emittance growth, especially for the case with a large initial emittance ({gamma}{epsilon}{sub 0} = 5 {micro}m for instance). These simulation results agree with the experimental observations.

  11. Minimum emittance in TBA and MBA lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Gang; Peng, Yue-Mei

    2015-03-01

    For reaching a small emittance in a modern light source, triple bend achromats (TBA), theoretical minimum emittance (TME) and even multiple bend achromats (MBA) have been considered. This paper derived the necessary condition for achieving minimum emittance in TBA and MBA theoretically, where the bending angle of inner dipoles has a factor of 31/3 bigger than that of the outer dipoles. Here, we also calculated the conditions attaining the minimum emittance of TBA related to phase advance in some special cases with a pure mathematics method. These results may give some directions on lattice design.

  12. PROTON BEAM EMITTANCE GROWTH AT RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    ZHANG,S.; PTITSYN, V.

    2007-06-25

    With significant beam intensity improvement in RHIC polarized proton runs in 2005 and 2006, the emittance growth becomes a luminosity limiting factor. The beam emittance growth has a dependence on the dynamic pressure rise, which in RHIC proton runs is mainly caused by the electron cloud. The beam instability is usually absent, and the emittance growth rate is much slower than the ones caused by the head-tail instability. It is suspected that the emittance growth is caused by the electron cloud below the instability threshold.

  13. Hybrid emitter all back contact solar cell

    DOEpatents

    Loscutoff, Paul; Rim, Seung

    2016-04-12

    An all back contact solar cell has a hybrid emitter design. The solar cell has a thin dielectric layer formed on a backside surface of a single crystalline silicon substrate. One emitter of the solar cell is made of doped polycrystalline silicon that is formed on the thin dielectric layer. The other emitter of the solar cell is formed in the single crystalline silicon substrate and is made of doped single crystalline silicon. The solar cell includes contact holes that allow metal contacts to connect to corresponding emitters.

  14. Thermophotovoltaic Generators Using Selective Metallic Emitters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fraas, Lewis M.; Samaras, John E.; Avery, James E.; Ewell, Richard

    1995-01-01

    In the literature to date on thermophotovoltaic (TPV) generators, two types of infrared emitter's have been emphasized : gray body emitters and rare earth oxide selective emitters. The gray body emitter is defined as an emitter with a spectral emissivity independent of wavelength whereas the rare earth oxide selective emitter is idealized as a delta function emitter with a high emissivity at a select wavelength and a near zero emissivity at all other wavelengths. Silicon carbide is an example of a gray body emitter and ER-YAG is an example of a selective emitter. The Welsbach mantle in a common lantern is another example of an oxide selective emitter. Herein, we describe an alternative type of selective emitter, a selective metallic emitter. These metallic emitters are characterized by a spectral emissivity curve wherein the emissivity monotonically increases with shorter infrared wavelengths as is shown. The metal of curve "A", tungsten, typifies this class of selective metallic emitter's. In a thermophotovoltaic generator, a photovoltaic cell typically converts infrared radiation to electricity out to some cut-off wavelength. For example, Gallium Antimonide (GaSb) TPV cells respond out to 1.7 microns. The problem with gray body emitters is that they emit at all wavelengths. Therefore, a large fraction of the energy emitted will be outside of the response band of the TPV cell. The argument for the selective emitter is that, ideally, all the emitted energy can be in the cells response band. Unfortunately, rare earth oxide emitters are not ideal. In order to suppress the emissivity toward zero away from the select wavelength, the use of thin fiber's is necessary. This leads to a fragile emitter typical of a lantern mantle. Even given a thin ER-YAG emitter, the measured emissivity at the select wavelength of 1.5 microns has been reported to be 0.6 while the off wavelength background emissivity falls to only 0.2 at 5 microns. This gives a selectivity ratio of only 3

  15. Selective Emitter Pumped Rare Earth Laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chubb, Donald L. (Inventor); Patton, Martin O. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A selective emitter pumped rare earth laser provides an additional type of laser for use in many laser applications. Rare earth doped lasers exist which are pumped with flashtubes or laser diodes. The invention uses a rare earth emitter to transform thermal energy input to a spectral band matching the absorption band of a rare earth in the laser in order to produce lasing.

  16. Bright Single Photon Emitter in Silicon Carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lienhard, Benjamin; Schroeder, Tim; Mouradian, Sara; Dolde, Florian; Trong Tran, Toan; Aharonovich, Igor; Englund, Dirk

    Efficient, on-demand, and robust single photon emitters are of central importance to many areas of quantum information processing. Over the past 10 years, color centers in solids have emerged as excellent single photon emitters. Color centers in diamond are among the most intensively studied single photon emitters, but recently silicon carbide (SiC) has also been demonstrated to be an excellent host material. In contrast to diamond, SiC is a technologically important material that is widely used in optoelectronics, high power electronics, and microelectromechanical systems. It is commercially available in sizes up to 6 inches and processes for device engineering are well developed. We report on a visible-spectrum single photon emitter in 4H-SiC. The emitter is photostable at both room and low temperatures, and it enables 2 million photons/second from unpatterned bulk SiC. We observe two classes of orthogonally polarized emitters, each of which has parallel absorption and emission dipole orientations. Low temperature measurements reveal a narrow zero phonon line with linewidth < 0.1 nm that accounts for more than 30% of the total photoluminescence spectrum. To our knowledge, this SiC color emitter is the brightest stable room-temperature single photon emitter ever observed.

  17. Robust multiplatform RF emitter localization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al Issa, Huthaifa; Ordóñez, Raúl

    2012-06-01

    In recent years, position based services has increase. Thus, recent developments in communications and RF technology have enabled system concept formulations and designs for low-cost radar systems using state-of-the-art software radio modules. This research is done to investigate a novel multi-platform RF emitter localization technique denoted as Position-Adaptive RF Direction Finding (PADF). The formulation is based on the investigation of iterative path-loss (i.e., Path Loss Exponent, or PLE) metrics estimates that are measured across multiple platforms in order to autonomously adapt (i.e. self-adjust) of the location of each distributed/cooperative platform. Experiments conducted at the Air-Force Research laboratory (AFRL) indicate that this position-adaptive approach exhibits potential for accurate emitter localization in challenging embedded multipath environments such as in urban environments. The focus of this paper is on the robustness of the distributed approach to RF-based location tracking. In order to localize the transmitter, we use the Received Signal Strength Indicator (RSSI) data to approximate distance from the transmitter to the revolving receivers. We provide an algorithm for on-line estimation of the Path Loss Exponent (PLE) that is used in modeling the distance based on Received Signal Strength (RSS) measurements. The emitter position estimation is calculated based on surrounding sensors RSS values using Least-Square Estimation (LSE). The PADF has been tested on a number of different configurations in the laboratory via the design and implementation of four IRIS wireless sensor nodes as receivers and one hidden sensor as a transmitter during the localization phase. The robustness of detecting the transmitters position is initiated by getting the RSSI data through experiments and then data manipulation in MATLAB will determine the robustness of each node and ultimately that of each configuration. The parameters that are used in the functions are

  18. Directional emittance surface measurement system and process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Puram, Chith K. (Inventor); Daryabeigi, Kamran (Inventor); Wright, Robert (Inventor); Alderfer, David W. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    Apparatus and process for measuring the variation of directional emittance of surfaces at various temperatures using a radiometric infrared imaging system. A surface test sample is coated onto a copper target plate provided with selective heating within the desired incremental temperature range to be tested and positioned onto a precision rotator to present selected inclination angles of the sample relative to the fixed positioned and optically aligned infrared imager. A thermal insulator holder maintains the target plate on the precision rotator. A screen display of the temperature obtained by the infrared imager, and inclination readings are provided with computer calculations of directional emittance being performed automatically according to equations provided to convert selected incremental target temperatures and inclination angles to relative target directional emittance values. The directional emittance of flat black lacquer and an epoxy resin measurements obtained are in agreement with the predictions of the electromagnetic theory and with directional emittance data inferred from directional reflectance measurements made on a spectrophotometer.

  19. Positron emitter labeled enzyme inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Fowler, J.S.; MacGregor, R.R.; Wolf, A.P.; Langstrom, B.

    1990-04-03

    This invention involves a new strategy for imaging and mapping enzyme activity in the living human and animal body using positron emitter-labeled suicide enzyme inactivators or inhibitors which become covalently bound to the enzyme as a result of enzymatic catalysis. Two such suicide inactivators for monoamine oxidase have been labeled with carbon-11 and used to map the enzyme subtypes in the living human and animal body using PET. By using positron emission tomography to image the distribution of radioactivity produced by the body penetrating radiation emitted by carbon-11, a map of functionally active monoamine oxidase activity is obtained. Clorgyline and L-deprenyl are suicide enzyme inhibitors and irreversibly inhibit monoamine oxidase. When these inhibitors are labeled with carbon-11 they provide selective probes for monoamine oxidase localization and reactivity in vivo using positron emission tomography.

  20. Positron emitter labeled enzyme inhibitors

    DOEpatents

    Fowler, J.S.; MacGregor, R.R.; Wolf, A.P.

    1987-05-22

    This invention involved a new strategy for imaging and mapping enzyme activity in the living human and animal body using positron emitter-labeled suicide enzyme inactivators or inhibitors which become covalently bound to the enzyme as a result of enzymatic catalysis. Two such suicide in activators for monoamine oxidase have been labeled with carbon-11 and used to map the enzyme subtypes in the living human and animal body using PET. By using positron emission tomography to image the distribution of radioactivity produced by the body penetrating radiation emitted by carbon-11, a map of functionally active monoamine oxidase activity is obtained. Clorgyline and L-deprenyl are suicide enzyme inhibitors and irreversibly inhibit monoamine oxidase. When these inhibitors are labeled with carbon-11 they provide selective probes for monoamine oxidase localization and reactivity in vivo using positron emission tomography. 2 figs.

  1. Positron emitter labeled enzyme inhibitors

    DOEpatents

    Fowler, Joanna S.; MacGregor, Robert R.; Wolf, Alfred P.; Langstrom, Bengt

    1990-01-01

    This invention involves a new strategy for imaging and mapping enzyme activity in the living human and animal body using positron emitter-labeled suicide enzyme inactivators or inhibitors which become covalently bound to the enzyme as a result of enzymatic catalysis. Two such suicide inactivators for monoamine oxidase have been labeled with carbon-11 and used to map the enzyme subtypes in the living human and animal body using PET. By using positron emission tomography to image the distribution of radioactivity produced by the body penetrating radiation emitted by carbon-11, a map of functionally active monoamine oxidase activity is obtained. Clorgyline and L-deprenyl are suicide enzyme inhibitors and irreversibly inhibit monoamine oxidase. When these inhibitors are labeled with carbon-11 they provide selective probes for monoamine oxidase localization and reactivity in vivo using positron emission tomography.

  2. Low Emittance Electron Beam Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Tikhoplav, Rodion

    2006-01-01

    We have studied the properties of a low emittance electron beam produced by laser pulses incident onto an rf gun photocathode. The experiments were carried out at the A0 photoinjector at Fermilab. Such beam studies are necessary for fixing the design of new Linear Colliders as well as for the development of Free Electron Lasers. An overview of the A0 photoinjector is given in Chapter 1. In Chapter 2 we describe the A0 photoinjector laser system. A stable laser system is imperative for reliable photoinjector operation. After the recent upgrade, we have been able to reach a new level of stability in the pulse-to-pulse fluctuations of the pulse amplitude, and of the temporal and transverse profiles. In Chapter 3 we present a study of transverse emittance versus the shape of the photo-cathode drive-laser pulse. For that purpose a special temporal profile laser shaping device called a pulse-stacker was developed. In Chapter 4 we discuss longitudinal beam dynamics studies using a two macro-particle bunch; this technique is helpful in analyzing pulse compression in the magnetic chicane, as well as velocity bunching effects in the rf-gun and the 9-cell accelerating cavity. In Chapter 5 we introduce a proposal for laser acceleration of electrons. We have developed a laser functioning on the TEM*01 mode, a mode with a longitudinal electric field component which is suitable for such a process. Using this technique at energies above 40 MeV, one would be able to observe laser-based acceleration.

  3. Multinozzle Emitter Arrays for Nanoelectrospray Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Mao, Pan; Wang, Hung-Ta; Yang, Peidong; Wang, Daojing

    2011-06-16

    Mass spectrometry (MS) is the enabling technology for proteomics and metabolomics. However, dramatic improvements in both sensitivity and throughput are still required to achieve routine MS-based single cell proteomics and metabolomics. Here, we report the silicon-based monolithic multinozzle emitter array (MEA), and demonstrate its proof-of-principle applications in high-sensitivity and high-throughput nanoelectrospray mass spectrometry. Our MEA consists of 96 identical 10-nozzle emitters in a circular array on a 3-inch silicon chip. The geometry and configuration of the emitters, the dimension and number of the nozzles, and the micropillar arrays embedded in the main channel, can be systematically and precisely controlled during the microfabrication process. Combining electrostatic simulation and experimental testing, we demonstrated that sharpened-end geometry at the stem of the individual multinozzle emitter significantly enhanced the electric fields at its protruding nozzle tips, enabling sequential nanoelectrospray for the high-density emitter array. We showed that electrospray current of the multinozzle emitter at a given total flow rate was approximately proportional to the square root of the number of its spraying-nozzles, suggesting the capability of high MS sensitivity for multinozzle emitters. Using a conventional Z-spray mass spectrometer, we demonstrated reproducible MS detection of peptides and proteins for serial MEA emitters, achieving sensitivity and stability comparable to the commercial capillary emitters. Our robust silicon-based MEA chip opens up the possibility of a fully-integrated microfluidic system for ultrahigh-sensitivity and ultrahigh-throughput proteomics and metabolomics.

  4. Emittance growth due to Tevatron flying wires

    SciTech Connect

    Syphers, M; Eddy, Nathan

    2004-06-01

    During Tevatron injection, Flying Wires have been used to measure the transverse beam size after each transfer from the Main Injector in order to deduce the transverse emittances of the proton and antiproton beams. This amounts to 36 + 9 = 45 flies of each of 3 wire systems, with an individual wire passing through each beam bunch twice during a single ''fly''. below they estimate the emittance growth induced by the interaction of the wires with the particles during these measurements. Changes of emittance from Flying Wire measurements conducted during three recent stores are compared with the estimations.

  5. Intrinsic emittance reduction in transmission mode photocathodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hyeri; Cultrera, Luca; Bazarov, Ivan

    2016-03-01

    High quantum efficiency (QE) and low emittance electron beams provided by multi-alkali photocathodes make them of great interest for next generation high brightness photoinjectors. Spicer's three-step model well describes the photoemission process; however, some photocathode characteristics such as their thickness have not yet been completely exploited to further improve the brightness of the generated electron beams. In this work, we report on the emittance and QE of a multi-alkali photocathode grown onto a glass substrate operated in transmission and reflection modes at different photon energies. We observed a 20% reduction in the intrinsic emittance from the reflection to the transmission mode operation. This observation can be explained by inelastic electron-phonon scattering during electrons' transit towards the cathode surface. Due to this effect, we predict that thicker photocathode layers will further reduce the intrinsic emittance of electron beams generated by photocathodes operated in transmission mode.

  6. Energy efficiency of electron plasma emitters

    SciTech Connect

    Zalesski, V. G.

    2011-12-15

    Electron emission influence from gas-discharge plasma on plasma emitter energy parameters is considered. It is shown, that electron emission from plasma is accompanied by energy contribution redistribution in the gas-discharge from plasma emitter supplies sources-the gas-discharge power supply and the accelerating voltage power supply. Some modes of electron emission as a result can be realized: 'a probe measurements mode,' 'a transitive mode,' and 'a full switching mode.'.

  7. Emission current formation in plasma electron emitters

    SciTech Connect

    Gruzdev, V. A.; Zalesski, V. G.

    2010-12-15

    A model of the plasma electron emitter is considered, in which the current redistribution over electrodes of the emitter gas-discharge structure and weak electric field formation in plasma are taken into account as functions of the emission current. The calculated and experimental dependences of the switching parameters, extraction efficiency, and strength of the electric field in plasma on the accelerating voltage and geometrical sizes of the emission channel are presented.

  8. Coaxial inverted geometry transistor having buried emitter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hruby, R. J.; Cress, S. B.; Dunn, W. R. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    The invention relates to an inverted geometry transistor wherein the emitter is buried within the substrate. The transistor can be fabricated as a part of a monolithic integrated circuit and is particularly suited for use in applications where it is desired to employ low actuating voltages. The transistor may employ the same doping levels in the collector and emitter, so these connections can be reversed.

  9. Alpha-emitters for medical therapy workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Feinendegen, L.E.; McClure, J.J.

    1996-12-31

    A workshop on ``Alpha-Emitters for Medical Therapy`` was held May 30-31, 1996 in Denver Colorado to identify research goals and potential clinical needs for applying alpha-particle emitters and to provide DOE with sufficient information for future planning. The workshop was attended by 36 participants representing radiooncology, nuclear medicine, immunotherapy, radiobiology, molecular biology, biochemistry, radiopharmaceutical chemistry, dosimetry, and physics. This report provides a summary of the key points and recommendations arrived at during the conference.

  10. Current limiting of field emitter array cathodes

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, K.J.

    1986-01-01

    The Field Emitter Array (FEA) cathode possesses high emission potential (approx.30A/cm/sup 2/) at low applied voltages (100-200 volts) but performance has been hampered by non-uniform emission across the array. Poor emission uniformity is mainly related to small variations in emitter tip geometry (of the order of 10-100A), which cannot be rectified by present fabrication techniques. To improve emission uniformity from the arrays, this dissertation investigated the use of current-limiting resistors, individually dedicated to and in series with each emitter, to compensate for the differences in emission. A thin film of silicon was deposited on the backside of a ZrO/sub 2/-W composite chip (the substrate on which emitter structure was based) to form series resistors. Characterization of the silicon film was carried out in a SEM with a micromanipulator capable of making contact with a single tungsten pin so that direct I-V measurement of individual series resistors was possible. To supplement the experimental effort, a mathematical mode of the Current-Limited Field Emitter Array (CLFEA) cathode was devised. A study of the model indicated the Fowler-Nordheim (F-N) plot of resistor current-limited emission from an array would have an upturning curvature.

  11. Integrated photonic crystal selective emitter for thermophotovoltaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Zhiguang; Yehia, Omar; Bermel, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Converting blackbody thermal radiation to electricity via thermophotovoltaics (TPV) is inherently inefficient. Photon recycling using cold-side filters offers potentially improved performance but requires extremely close spacing between the thermal emitter and the receiver, namely a high view factor. Here, we propose an alternative approach for thermal energy conversion, the use of an integrated photonic crystal selective emitter (IPSE), which combines two-dimensional photonic crystal selective emitters and filters into a single device. Finite difference time domain and current transport simulations show that IPSEs can significantly suppress sub-bandgap photons. This increases heat-to-electricity conversion for photonic crystal based emitters from 35.2 up to 41.8% at 1573 K for a GaSb photovoltaic (PV) diode with matched bandgaps of 0.7 eV. The physical basis of this enhancement is a shift from a perturbative to a nonperturbative regime, which maximized photon recycling. Furthermore, combining IPSEs with nonconductive optical waveguides eliminates a key difficulty associated with TPV: the need for precise alignment between the hot selective emitter and cool PV diode. The physical effects of both the IPSE and waveguide can be quantified in terms of an extension of the concept of an effective view factor.

  12. Longitudinal emittance measurements at REX-ISOLDE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraser, M. A.; Zocca, F.; Jones, R. M.; Pasini, M.; Posocco, P. A.; Voulot, D.; Wenander, F.

    2012-01-01

    We report on measurements of the longitudinal emittance at the Radioactive ion beam EXperiment (REX) at ISOLDE, CERN. The rms longitudinal emittance was measured as 0.34±0.08 π ns keV/u at the output of the RFQ and as 0.36±0.04 π ns keV/ u in front of the third 7-gap split-ring resonator (7G3) using the three-gradient technique; systematic errors are not included but are estimated at approximately 10%. The 86% emittance was measured a factor of approximately 4.4 times larger than the rms emittance at 1.48±0.2 and 1.55±0.12 π ns keV/ u at the RFQ and 7G3, respectively. The REX switchyard magnet was used as a spectrometer to analyse the energy spread of the beam as it was manipulated by varying the voltage of the rebuncher (ReB) and 7G3 cavities operating at non-accelerating phases. The transfer matrix for a multi-gap bunching cavity is derived and suitably truncated to allow for the accurate reconstruction of the beam parameters from measurement. The technique for measuring the energy spread was rigorously simulated and validated. A silicon detector, in its development phase, was also exploited to measure the longitudinal beam properties. The measured longitudinal emittance is compatible with the acceptance of the HIE-ISOLDE superconducting linac upgrade.

  13. Field-emitter arrays for vacuum microelectronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spindt, C. A.; Holland, C. E.; Rosengreen, A.; Brodie, Ivor

    1991-01-01

    An ongoing program on microfabricated field-emitter arrays has produced a gated field-emitter tip structure with submicrometer dimensions and techniques for fabricating emitter arrays with tip packaging densities of up to 1.5 x 10 exp 7 tips/sq cm. Arrays have been fabricated over areas varying from a few micrometers up to 13 cm in diameter. Very small overall emitter size, materials selection, and rigorous emitter-tip processing procedures have contributed to reducing the potential required for field emission to tens of volts. Emission current densities of up to 100 A/sq cm have been achieved with small arrays of tips, and 100-mA total emission is commonly produced with arrays 1 mm in diameter containing 10,000 tips. Transconductances of 5.0 micro-S per tip have been demonstrated, indicating that 50 S/sq cm should be achievable with tip densities of 10 exp 7 tips/sq cm. Details of the cathode arrays and a variety of performance characteristics are discussed.

  14. Integrated photonic crystal selective emitter for thermophotovoltaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Zhiguang; Yehia, Omar; Bermel, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Converting blackbody thermal radiation to electricity via thermophotovoltaics (TPV) is inherently inefficient. Photon recycling using cold-side filters offers potentially improved performance but requires extremely close spacing between the thermal emitter and the receiver, namely a high view factor. Here, we propose an alternative approach for thermal energy conversion, the use of an integrated photonic crystal selective emitter (IPSE), which combines two-dimensional photonic crystal selective emitters and filters into a single device. Finite difference time domain and current transport simulations show that IPSEs can significantly suppress sub-bandgap photons. This increases heat-to-electricity conversion for photonic crystal based emitters from 35.2 up to 41.8% at 1573 K for a GaSb photovoltaic (PV) diode with matched bandgaps of 0.7 eV. The physical basis of this enhancement is a shift from a perturbative to a nonperturbative regime, which maximized photon recycling. Furthermore, combining IPSEs with nonconductive optical waveguides eliminates a key difficulty associated with TPV: the need for precise alignment between the hot selective emitter and cool PV diode. The physical effects of both the IPSE and waveguide can be quantified in terms of an extension of the concept of an effective view factor.

  15. ETAII 6 MEV PEPPERPOT EMITTANCE MEASUREMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Paul, A C; Richardson, R; Weir, J

    2004-10-18

    We measured the beam emittance at the ETAII accelerator using a pepper-pot diagnostic at nominal parameters of 6 MeV and 2000 Amperes. During the coarse of these experiments, a ''new tune'' was introduced which significantly improved the beam quality. The source of a background pedestal was investigated and eliminated. The measured ''new tune'' emittance is {var_epsilon}= 8.05 {plus_minus} 0. 53 cm - mr or a normalized emittance of {var_epsilon}{sub n} = 943 {plus_minus} 63 mm - mr In 1990 the ETAII programmatic emphasis was on free electron lasers and the paramount parameter was whole beam brightness. The published brightness for ETAII after its first major rebuild was J = 1 - 3 x 10{sup 8} A/(m - rad){sup 2} at a current and energy of 1000-1400 Amperes and 2.5 MeV. The average normalized emittance derived from table 2 of that report is 864 mm-mr corresponding to a real emittance of 14.8 cm-mr.

  16. Variable emittance behavior of smart radiative coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Li; Fan, Desong; Li, Qiang

    2016-02-01

    Smart radiative coating on yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) substrate was prepared by the sol-gel La{}1-xSr x MnO3 (x = 0.125, 0.175 and 0.2) nanoparticles and the binder composed of terpineol and ethyl cellulose. The crystallized structure, grain size, chemical compositions, magnetization and the surface morphology were characterized. The thermal radiative properties of coating in the infrared range was evaluated from infrared reflectance spectra at various temperatures. A single perovskite structure is detected in sol-gel nanoparticles with size 200 nm. Magnetization measurement reveals that room temperature phase transition samples can be obtained by appropriate Sr substitution. The influence of surface conditions and sintering temperature on the emittance of coating was observed. For rough coatings with root-mean-square roughness 640 nm (x = 0.125) and 800 nm (x = 0.175) , its emittance increment is 0.24 and 0.26 in in the temperature range of 173-373 K. Increasing sintering temperature to 1673 K, coating emittance variation improves to 0.3 and 0.302 respectively. After mechanical polishing treatment, the emittance increment of coatings are enhanced to 0.31 and 0.3, respectively. The results suggested that the emittance variation can be enhanced by reducing surface roughness and increasing sintering temperature of coating.

  17. Electron emitter pulsed-type cylindrical IEC

    SciTech Connect

    Miley, G.H.; Gu, Y.; Stubbers, R.; Zich, R.; Sved, J.; Anderl, R.; Hartwell, J.

    1997-12-31

    A cylindrical version of the single grid Inertial Electrostatic Confinement (IEC) device (termed the C-device) has been developed for use as a 2.5-MeV D-D fusion neutron source for neutron activation analysis. The C-device employs a hollow-tube type cathode with similar anodes backed up by ``reflector`` dishes. The resulting discharge differs from a conventional hollow cathode discharge, by creating an explicit ion beam which is ``pinched`` in the cathode region. Resulting fusion reactions generate {approximately}10{sup 6} neutron/s. A pulsed version is under development for applications requiring higher fluxes. Several pulsing techniques are under study, including an electron emitter (e-emitter) assisted discharge in a thorated tungsten wire emitter located behind a slotted area in the reflector dishes. Pulsing is initiated after establishing a low power steady-state discharge by pulsing the e-emitter current using a capacitor switch type circuit. The resulting electron jet, coupled with the discharge by the biased slot array, creates a strong pulse in the pinched ion beam. The pulse length/repetition rate are controlled by the e-emitter pulse circuit. Typical parameters in present studies are {approximately}30{micro}s, 10Hz and 1-amp ion current. Corresponding neutron measurements are an In-foil type activation counter for time averaged rates. Results for a wide variety of operating conditions are presented.

  18. Head erosion with emittance growth in PWFA

    SciTech Connect

    Li, S. Z.; Adli, E.; England, R. J.; Frederico, J.; Gessner, S. J.; Hogan, M. J.; Litos, M. D.; Walz, D. R.; Muggli, P.; An, W.; Clayton, C. E.; Joshi, C.; Lu, W.; Marsh, K. A.; Mori, W.; Vafaei, N.

    2012-12-21

    Head erosion is one of the limiting factors in plasma wakefield acceleration (PWFA). We present a study of head erosion with emittance growth in field-ionized plasma from the PWFA experiments performed at the FACET user facility at SLAC. At FACET, a 20.3 GeV bunch with 1.8 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 10} electrons is optimized in beam transverse size and combined with a high density lithium plasma for beam-driven plasma wakefield acceleration experiments. A target foil is inserted upstream of the plasma source to increase the bunch emittance through multiple scattering. Its effect on beamplasma interaction is observed with an energy spectrometer after a vertical bend magnet. Results from the first experiments show that increasing the emittance has suppressed vapor field-ionization and plasma wakefields excitation. Plans for the future are presented.

  19. Solid-state single-photon emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aharonovich, Igor; Englund, Dirk; Toth, Milos

    2016-10-01

    Single-photon emitters play an important role in many leading quantum technologies. There is still no 'ideal' on-demand single-photon emitter, but a plethora of promising material systems have been developed, and several have transitioned from proof-of-concept to engineering efforts with steadily improving performance. Here, we review recent progress in the race towards true single-photon emitters required for a range of quantum information processing applications. We focus on solid-state systems including quantum dots, defects in solids, two-dimensional hosts and carbon nanotubes, as these are well positioned to benefit from recent breakthroughs in nanofabrication and materials growth techniques. We consider the main challenges and key advantages of each platform, with a focus on scalable on-chip integration and fabrication of identical sources on photonic circuits.

  20. Field emitter technologies for nanovision science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mimura, H.; Neo, Y.; Aoki, T.; Nagao, M.; Yoshida, T.; Kanemaru, S.

    2009-10-01

    We have been investigating an ultra fine field emission display (FED) and an ultra fine CdTe X-ray image sensor for creating nanovision science. For an ultra fine FED with a sub-micron pixel, we have developed a volcano-structured double-gated field emitter arrays with a capability of focusing electron beam without serous reduction in emission current. For an ultra fine X-ray image sensor, we have proposed and demonstrated a novel CdTe X-ray sensor consisting of a CdTe diode and field emitter array.

  1. Heterojunction solar cell with passivated emitter surface

    DOEpatents

    Olson, J.M.; Kurtz, S.R.

    1994-05-31

    A high-efficiency heterojunction solar cell is described wherein a thin emitter layer (preferably Ga[sub 0.52]In[sub 0.48]P) forms a heterojunction with a GaAs absorber layer. A passivating window layer of defined composition is disposed over the emitter layer. The conversion efficiency of the solar cell is at least 25.7%. The solar cell preferably includes a passivating layer between the substrate and the absorber layer. An anti-reflection coating is preferably disposed over the window layer. 1 fig.

  2. Technology for producing carbon field emitters

    SciTech Connect

    Khatapova, R.M.; Demskaya, L.L.; Romanova, V.K.

    1985-12-01

    This paper describes methods for producing field emitters from carbon filaments. Coating of Ni and two-layer coatings of Ni-Mo with a thickness of 10-40 um are applied to the carbon filaments by electrochemical deposition so that they can be spot welded to a metal holder. A technology for attaching carbon filaments with a refractory adhesive composition is also described. Field emitters with point radius of curvature of 0.2-0.4 um are made from three types of carbon filament.

  3. Coupling single emitters to quantum plasmonic circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huck, Alexander; Andersen, Ulrik L.

    2016-09-01

    In recent years, the controlled coupling of single-photon emitters to propagating surface plasmons has been intensely studied, which is fueled by the prospect of a giant photonic nonlinearity on a nanoscaled platform. In this article, we will review the recent progress on coupling single emitters to nanowires towards the construction of a new platform for strong light-matter interaction. The control over such a platform might open new doors for quantum information processing and quantum sensing at the nanoscale and for the study of fundamental physics in the ultrastrong coupling regime.

  4. Heterojunction solar cell with passivated emitter surface

    DOEpatents

    Olson, Jerry M.; Kurtz, Sarah R.

    1994-01-01

    A high-efficiency heterojunction solar cell wherein a thin emitter layer (preferably Ga.sub.0.52 In.sub.0.48 P) forms a heterojunction with a GaAs absorber layer. A passivating window layer of defined composition is disposed over the emitter layer. The conversion efficiency of the solar cell is at least 25.7%. The solar cell preferably includes a passivating layer between the substrate and the absorber layer. An anti-reflection coating is preferably disposed over the window layer.

  5. Nanoelectrospray Emitter Arrays Providing Interemitter Electric Field Uniformity

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, Ryan T.; Page, Jason S.; Marginean, Ioan; Tang, Keqi; Smith, Richard D.

    2008-07-15

    Arrays of electrospray ionization (ESI) emitters have been reported previously as a means of achieving the enhanced ionization efficiencies. A key challenge when working with multiple, closely spaced ESI emitters is overcoming the deleterious effects caused by electrical interference among neighboring emitters. Individual emitters experience different electric fields depending on their relative position in the array, such that it becomes difficult to operate all of the emitters optimally for a given applied potential. In this work, we have developed multi-nanoESI emitters arranged with a circular pattern, which enable the constituent emitters to experience a uniform electric field. The performance of the circular emitter array was compared to a single emitter and to a previously developed linear emitter array, which verified that improved electric field uniformity was achieved with the circular arrangement. The circular arrays were also interfaced with a mass spectrometer via a matching multi-capillary inlet, and the results were compared with those obtained using a single emitter. By minimizing inter-emitter electric field inhomogeneities, much larger arrays having closer emitter spacing should be feasible.

  6. Determination and error analysis of emittance and spectral emittance measurements by remote sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dejesusparada, N. (Principal Investigator); Kumar, R.

    1977-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. From the theory of remote sensing of surface temperatures, an equation of the upper bound of absolute error of emittance was determined. It showed that the absolute error decreased with an increase in contact temperature, whereas, it increased with an increase in environmental integrated radiant flux density. Change in emittance had little effect on the absolute error. A plot of the difference between temperature and band radiance temperature vs. emittance was provided for the wavelength intervals: 4.5 to 5.5 microns, 8 to 13.5 microns, and 10.2 to 12.5 microns.

  7. A study of emittance growth in the recycler ring

    SciTech Connect

    Krishnaswamy Gounder et al.

    2001-07-20

    We investigate processes contributing to emittance growth in the Fermilab Recycler Ring. In addition to beam-gas multiple scattering, we also examine other external factors such as Main Injector ramping affecting the emittance growth.

  8. Emittance Characteristics of High-Brightness H- Ion Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welton, R. F.; Stockli, M. P.; Keller, R.; Thomae, R. W.; Thomason, J.; Sherman, J.; Alessi, J.

    2002-11-01

    A survey of emittance characteristics from high-brightness, H- ion sources has been undertaken. Representative examples of each important type of H- source for accelerator application are investigated: A magnetron surface plasma source (BNL) a multi-cusp-surface-conversion source (LANL) a Penning source (RAL-ISIS) and a multi-cusp-volume source (LBNL). Presently, comparisons between published emittance values from different ion sources are difficult largely because of different definitions used in reported emittances and the use of different data reduction techniques in analyzing data. Although seldom discussed in the literature, rms-emittance values often depend strongly on the method employed to separate real beam from background. In this work, the problem of data reduction along with software developed for emittance analysis is discussed. Raw emittance data, obtained from the above laboratories, is analyzed using a single technique and normalized rms and 90% area-emittance values are determined along with characteristic emittance versus beam fraction curves.

  9. THz imaging system with the IJJ emitter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsujimoto, Manabu; Minami, Hidetoshi; Sawamura, Masashi; Delfanazari, Kaveh; Yamamoto, Takashi; Kashiwagi, Takanari; Kadowaki, Kazuo

    2011-03-01

    The intrinsic Josephson junction (IJJ) emitter consisted of thousands of IJJs uniformly stacked in single crystalline high-Tc superconductor Bi 2 Sr 2 CaCu 2 O8 + δ (Bi-2212) [L. Ozyuzer et al., Science 318, (2007) 1291.] is expected to be a novel source of the continuous terahertz electromagnetic waves (THz-waves). The maximum emission power of tens of microwatts recently obtained with the mesa structure of IJJs seems to be sufficient to make use of the IJJ emitter for some practical applications such as THz imaging. According to the cavity resonance condition, we can control the radiation frequency by changing the geometrical size of the mesa. In this study, we develop the THz imaging system with IJJ emitter. In the presentation, we will show some transparent images of standard specimens obtained by the raster scanning method. Also, we will mention some problems to be solved for the future applications of the IJJ emitter. CREST-JST, WPI-MANA, Strategic Initiative A (University of Tsukuba).

  10. Aluminum oxide film thickness and emittance

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, J.K.; Ondrejcin, R.S.

    1991-11-01

    Aluminum reactor components which are not actively cooled could be subjected to high temperatures due to gamma heating after the core coolant level dropped during the ECS phase of a hypothetical LOCA event. Radiative heat transfer is the dominant heat transfer process in this scenario and therefore the emittance of these components is of interest. Of particular interest are the safety rod thimbles and Mark 60B blanket assemblies; for the K Reactor, these components have been exposed to low temperature (< 55{degrees}C) moderator for about a year. The average moderator temperature was assumed to be 30{degrees}C. The Al oxide film thickness at this temperature, after one year of exposure, is predicted to be 6.4 {mu}m {plus minus} 10%; insensitive to exposure time. Dehydration of the film during the gamma heating accident would result in a film thickness of 6.0 {mu}m {plus minus} 11%. Total hemispherical emittance is predicted to be 0.69 at 96{degrees}C, decreasing to 0.45 at 600{degrees}C. Some phenomena which would tend to yield thicker oxide films in the reactor environment relative to those obtained under experimental conditions were neglected and the predicted film thickness values are therefore conservative. The emittance values predicted for a given film thickness are also conservative. The conservativisms inherent in the predicted emittance are particularly relevant for uncertainty analysis of temperatures generated using these values.

  11. Aluminum oxide film thickness and emittance

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, J.K.; Ondrejcin, R.S.

    1991-11-01

    Aluminum reactor components which are not actively cooled could be subjected to high temperatures due to gamma heating after the core coolant level dropped during the ECS phase of a hypothetical LOCA event. Radiative heat transfer is the dominant heat transfer process in this scenario and therefore the emittance of these components is of interest. Of particular interest are the safety rod thimbles and Mark 60B blanket assemblies; for the K Reactor, these components have been exposed to low temperature (< 55{degrees}C) moderator for about a year. The average moderator temperature was assumed to be 30{degrees}C. The Al oxide film thickness at this temperature, after one year of exposure, is predicted to be 6.4 {mu}m {plus_minus} 10%; insensitive to exposure time. Dehydration of the film during the gamma heating accident would result in a film thickness of 6.0 {mu}m {plus_minus} 11%. Total hemispherical emittance is predicted to be 0.69 at 96{degrees}C, decreasing to 0.45 at 600{degrees}C. Some phenomena which would tend to yield thicker oxide films in the reactor environment relative to those obtained under experimental conditions were neglected and the predicted film thickness values are therefore conservative. The emittance values predicted for a given film thickness are also conservative. The conservativisms inherent in the predicted emittance are particularly relevant for uncertainty analysis of temperatures generated using these values.

  12. Emittance growth from electron beam modulation

    SciTech Connect

    Blaskiewicz, M.

    2009-12-01

    In linac ring colliders like MeRHIC and eRHIC a modulation of the electron bunch can lead to a modulation of the beam beam tune shift and steering errors. These modulations can lead to emittance growth. This note presents simple formulas to estimate these effects which generalize some previous results.

  13. Emitters of N-photon bundles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muñoz, C. Sánchez; Del Valle, E.; Tudela, A. González; Müller, K.; Lichtmannecker, S.; Kaniber, M.; Tejedor, C.; Finley, J. J.; Laussy, F. P.

    2014-07-01

    Controlling the output of a light emitter is one of the basic tasks in photonics, with landmarks such as the development of the laser and single-photon sources. The ever growing range of quantum applications is making it increasingly important to diversify the available quantum sources. Here, we propose a cavity quantum electrodynamics scheme to realize emitters that release their energy in groups (or `bundles') of N photons (where N is an integer). Close to 100% of two-photon emission and 90% of three-photon emission is shown to be within reach of state-of-the-art samples. The emission can be tuned with the system parameters so that the device behaves as a laser or as an N-photon gun. Here, we develop the theoretical formalism to characterize such emitters, with the bundle statistics arising as an extension of the fundamental correlation functions of quantum optics. These emitters will be useful for quantum information processing and for medical applications.

  14. Beam emittance from ARPES for photoinjectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harkay, Katherine; Spentzouris, Linda; Nemeth, Karoly; Droubay, Timothy; Chambers, Scott; Joly, Alan; Hess, Wayne

    2014-03-01

    A commonly-used beam emittance measurement for photoinjector sources involves accelerating a low-charge beam to a few megavolts in an electron gun, then using a pepper-pot emittance diagnostic to image the transverse charge distribution. The emission distribution at the cathode surface could in principle be deduced through simulations, but cannot be measured directly with this method. In the quest to develop ultra-bright photoinjectors, it would be advantageous to be able to measure the emission distribution directly, and use this as a screening process to characterize different photocathode candidates. Angle-resolved photoemission sepctroscopy (ARPES), used widely in surface science, has been proposed [H. Padmore (private communication)] as a method to measure the photocathode intrinsic emittance. A promising novel photocathode, a thin layer of MgO on Ag was recently fabricated and ARPES measurements were carried out [T.C. Droubay et al., PRL (in press)]. The analysis of these data and resulting emittance will be presented. Implications for its use in simulations and design of future photoinjectors will also be presented. This work was supported by the U.S. DOE Office of Science (DE-AC02-06CH11357) and the National Science Foundation (No. PHY-0969989). The measurements were carried out at the EMSL user facility at PNNL.

  15. Emittance and lifetime measurement with damping wigglers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, G. M.; Shaftan, T.; Cheng, W. X.; Guo, W.; Ilinsky, P.; Li, Y.; Podobedov, B.; Willeke, F.

    2016-03-01

    National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II) is a new third-generation storage ring light source at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The storage ring design calls for small horizontal emittance (<1 nm-rad) and diffraction-limited vertical emittance at 12 keV (8 pm-rad). Achieving low value of the beam size will enable novel user experiments with nm-range spatial and meV-energy resolution. The high-brightness NSLS-II lattice has been realized by implementing 30-cell double bend achromatic cells producing the horizontal emittance of 2 nm rad and then halving it further by using several Damping Wigglers (DWs). This paper is focused on characterization of the DW effects in the storage ring performance, namely, on reduction of the beam emittance, and corresponding changes in the energy spread and beam lifetime. The relevant beam parameters have been measured by the X-ray pinhole camera, beam position monitors, beam filling pattern monitor, and current transformers. In this paper, we compare the measured results of the beam performance with analytic estimates for the complement of the 3 DWs installed at the NSLS-II.

  16. Emittance growth from space-charge forces

    SciTech Connect

    Wangler, T.P.

    1991-01-01

    Space-charge-induced emittance growth has become a topic of much recent interest for designing the low-velocity sections of high- intensity, high-brightness accelerators and beam-transport channels. In this paper we review the properties of the space-charge force, and discuss the concepts of matching, space-charge and emittance-dominated beams, and equilibrium beams and their characteristics. This is followed by a survey of some of the work over the past 25 years to identify the mechanisms of this emittance growth in both ion and electron accelerators. We summarize the overall results in terms of four distinct mechanisms whose characteristics we describe. Finally, we show numerical simulation results for the evolution of initial rms-mismatched laminar beams. The examples show that for space-charge dominated beams, the nonlinear space-charge forces produce a highly choatic filamentation pattern, which in projection to the 2-D phase spaces results in a 2-component beam consisting of an inner core and a diffuse outer halo. In the examples we have studied the halo contains only a few percent of the particles, but contributes about half of the emittance growth. 39 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Light modulated electron beam driven radiofrequency emitter

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, M.T.; Tallerico, P.J.

    1979-10-10

    The disclosure relates to a light modulated electron beam-driven radiofrequency emitter. Pulses of light impinge on a photoemissive device which generates an electron beam having the pulse characteristics of the light. The electron beam is accelerated through a radiofrequency resonator which produces radiofrequency emission in accordance with the electron, hence, the light pulses.

  18. Light modulated switches and radio frequency emitters

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, Mahlon T.; Tallerico, Paul J.

    1982-01-01

    The disclosure relates to a light modulated electron beam driven radiofrequency emitter. Pulses of light impinge on a photoemissive device which generates an electron beam having the pulse characteristics of the light. The electron beam is accelerated through a radiofrequency resonator which produces radiofrequency emission in accordance with the electron, hence, the light pulses.

  19. Facet engineering of high power single emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanson, Dan; Levi, Moshe; Shamay, Moshe; Tesler, Renana; Rappaport, Noam; Don, Yaroslav; Karni, Yoram; Schnitzer, Itzhak; Sicron, Noam; Shusterman, Sergey

    2011-03-01

    The ever increasing demand for high-power, high-reliability operation of single emitters at 9xx nm wavelengths requires the development of laser diodes with improved facet regions immune to both catastrophic and wear-out failure modes. In our study, we have evaluated several laser facet definition technologies in application to 90 micron aperture single emitters in asymmetric design (In)GaAs/AlGaAs based material emitting at 915, 925 and 980nm. A common epitaxy and emitter design makes for a straightforward comparison of the facet technologies investigated. Our study corroborates a clear trend of increasing difficulty in obtaining reliable laser operation from 980nm down to 915nm. At 980nm, one can employ dielectric facet passivation with a pre-clean cycle delivering a device lifetime in excess of 3,000 hours at increasing current steps. At 925nm, quantum-well intermixing can be used to define non-absorbing mirrors giving good device reliability, albeit with a large efficiency penalty. Vacuum cleaved emitters have delivered excellent reliability at 915nm, and can be expected to perform just as well at 925 and 980nm. Epitaxial regrowth of laser facets is under development and has yet to demonstrate an appreciable reliability improvement. Only a weak correlation between start-of-life catastrophic optical mirror damage (COMD) levels and reliability was established. The optimized facet design has delivered maximum powers in excess of 19 MW/sq.cm (rollover limited) and product-grade 980nm single emitters with a slope efficiency of >1 W/A and a peak efficiency of >60%. The devices have accumulated over 1,500 hours of CW operation at 11W. A fiber-coupled device emits 10W ex-fiber with 47% efficiency.

  20. What is so super about super-emitters? Characterizing methane high emitters from natural gas infrastructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zavala Araiza, D.; Lyon, D. R.; Alvarez, R.; Harriss, R. C.; Palacios, V.; Hamburg, S.

    2015-12-01

    Methane emissions across the natural gas supply chain are dominated at any one time by a few high-emitters (super-emitters or fat-tail of the distribution), often underrepresented in published datasets used to construct emission inventories. Characterization of high-emitters is essential for improving emission estimates based on atmospheric data (top-down) and emission inventories (bottom-up). The population of high-emitters (e.g. 10-20% of sites that account for 80-90% of the emissions) is temporally and spatially dynamic. As a consequence, it is challenging to design sampling methods and construct estimates that accurately represent their frequency and magnitude of emissions. We present new methods to derive facility-specific emission distribution functions that explicitly integrate the influence of the relatively rare super-emitters. These methods were applied in the Barnett Shale region to construct a custom emission inventory that is then compared to top-down emission estimates for the region. We offer a methodological framework relevant to the design of future sampling campaigns, in which these high-emitters are seamlessly incorporated to representative emissions distributions. This framework can be applied to heterogeneous oil and gas production regions across geographies to obtain accurate regional emission estimates. Additionally, we characterize emissions relative to the fraction of a facility's total methane throughput; an effective metric to identify sites with excess emissions resulting from avoidable operating conditions, such as malfunctioning equipment (defined here as functional super-emitters). This work suggests that identifying functional super-emitters and correcting their avoidable operating conditions would result in significant emission reductions. However, due to their spatiotemporal dynamic behavior, achieving and maintaining uniformly low emissions across the entire population of sites will require mitigation steps (e.g. leak detection

  1. Studying fringe field effect of a field emitter array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayfullin, M. F.; Nikiforov, K. A.

    2014-10-01

    Field emitter arrays on heavy As-doped Si wafer are studied in vacuum nanoelectronics diode configuration. Different shapes of emitters are considered: cone-shaped point-emitters and cylinder-shaped sharp-edge-emitters are compared. Micro scale field enhancement factor on the edge of cylindrical emitter was calculated via home-developed Matlab application and the results are presented. Two types of anode geometry are proposed: plane anode and spherical anode. Experimental and modelling results of surface electric field distribution are presented. The spherical shape of anode allows higher voltage (and higher field emission current) without destructive arcs risk.

  2. Temperature Distributions in Hollow Cathode Emitters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polk, Jay; Marrese, Colleen; Thornber, Ben; Dang, Lisa; Johnson, Lee

    2004-01-01

    Life-limiting processes in hollow cathodes are determined largely by the temperature of the emitter. To support development of cathode life models we have developed a noncontact temperature measurement technique which employs a stepper motor-driven fiber optic probe. The probe is driven inside the hollow cathode and collects light radiated by the hot interior surface of the emitter. Ratio pyrometry is used determine the axial temperature profile. Thermocouples on the orifice plate provide measurements ofthe external temperature during cathode operation and are used to calibrate the pyrometer system in situ with a small oven enclosing the externally heated cathode. Initial measurements of the temperature distribution in a hollow cathode with the same geometry as a cathode that failed after operating at 12 A emission current for 27800 hours are discussed.

  3. Photonic Crystal Emitters for Thermophotovoltaic Energy Conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stelmakh, Veronika; Chan, Walker R.; Ghebrebrhan, Michael; Soljacic, Marin; Joannopoulos, John D.; Celanovic, Ivan

    2015-12-01

    This paper reports the design, fabrication, and characterization of 2D photonic crystal (PhC) thermal emitters for a millimeter-scale hydrocarbon TPV microgenerator as a possible replacement for batteries in portable microelectronics, robotics, etc. In our TPV system, combustion heats a PhC emitter to incandescence and the resulting radiation is converted by a low-bandgap TPV cell. The PhC tailors the photonic density of states to produce spectrally confined thermal emission that matches the bandgap of the TPV cell, enabling high heat-to-electricity conversion efficiency. The work builds on a previously developed fabrication process to produce a square array of cylindrical cavities in a metal substrate. We will present ongoing incremental improvements in the optical and thermo-mechanical properties, the fabrication process, and the system integration, as recently combined with fabrication using novel materials, such as sputtered coatings, to enable a monolithic system.

  4. Ghost signals in Allison emittance scanners

    SciTech Connect

    Stockli, Martin P.; Leitner, M.; Moehs, D.P.; Keller, R.; Welton, R.F.; /SNS Project, Oak Ridge /Tennessee U.

    2004-12-01

    For over 20 years, Allison scanners have been used to measure emittances of low-energy ion beams. We show that scanning large trajectory angles produces ghost signals caused by the sampled beamlet impacting on an electric deflection plate. The ghost signal strength is proportional to the amount of beam entering the scanner. Depending on the ions, and their velocity, the ghost signals can have the opposite or the same polarity as the main beam signals. The ghost signals cause significant errors in the emittance estimates because they appear at large trajectory angles. These ghost signals often go undetected because they partly overlap with the real signals, are mostly below the 1% level, and often hide in the noise. A simple deflection plate modification is shown to reduce the ghost signal strength by over 99%.

  5. Ghost Signals In Allison Emittance Scanners

    SciTech Connect

    Stockli, Martin P.; Leitner, M.; Keller, R.; Moehs, D.P.; Welton, R. F.

    2005-03-15

    For over 20 years, Allison scanners have been used to measure emittances of low-energy ion beams. We show that scanning large trajectory angles produces ghost signals caused by the sampled beamlet impacting on an electric deflection plate. The ghost signal strength is proportional to the amount of beam entering the scanner. Depending on the ions, and their velocity, the ghost signals can have the opposite or the same polarity as the main beam signals. The ghost signals cause significant errors in the emittance estimates because they appear at large trajectory angles. These ghost signals often go undetected because they partly overlap with the real signals, are mostly below the 1% level, and often hide in the noise. A simple deflection plate modification is shown to reduce the ghost signal strength by over 99%.

  6. Front contact solar cell with formed emitter

    DOEpatents

    Cousins, Peter John

    2012-07-17

    A bipolar solar cell includes a backside junction formed by an N-type silicon substrate and a P-type polysilicon emitter formed on the backside of the solar cell. An antireflection layer may be formed on a textured front surface of the silicon substrate. A negative polarity metal contact on the front side of the solar cell makes an electrical connection to the substrate, while a positive polarity metal contact on the backside of the solar cell makes an electrical connection to the polysilicon emitter. An external electrical circuit may be connected to the negative and positive metal contacts to be powered by the solar cell. The positive polarity metal contact may form an infrared reflecting layer with an underlying dielectric layer for increased solar radiation collection.

  7. Front contact solar cell with formed emitter

    DOEpatents

    Cousins, Peter John

    2014-11-04

    A bipolar solar cell includes a backside junction formed by an N-type silicon substrate and a P-type polysilicon emitter formed on the backside of the solar cell. An antireflection layer may be formed on a textured front surface of the silicon substrate. A negative polarity metal contact on the front side of the solar cell makes an electrical connection to the substrate, while a positive polarity metal contact on the backside of the solar cell makes an electrical connection to the polysilicon emitter. An external electrical circuit may be connected to the negative and positive metal contacts to be powered by the solar cell. The positive polarity metal contact may form an infrared reflecting layer with an underlying dielectric layer for increased solar radiation collection.

  8. FIrpic: archetypal blue phosphorescent emitter for electroluminescence.

    PubMed

    Baranoff, Etienne; Curchod, Basile F E

    2015-05-14

    FIrpic is the most investigated bis-cyclometallated iridium complex in particular in the context of organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs) because of its attractive sky-blue emission, high emission efficiency, and suitable energy levels. In this Perspective we review the synthesis, structural characterisations, and key properties of this emitter. We also survey the theoretical studies and summarise a series of selected monochromatic electroluminescent devices using FIrpic as the emitting dopant. Finally we highlight important shortcomings of FIrpic as an emitter for OLEDs. Despite the large body of work dedicated to this material, it is manifest that the understanding of photophysical and electrochemical processes are only broadly understood mainly because of the different environment in which these properties are measured, i.e., isolated molecules in solvent vs. device. PMID:25388935

  9. Reverse Emittance Exchange for Muon Colliders

    SciTech Connect

    V. Ivanov, A. Afanasev, C.M. Ankenbrandt, R.P. Johnson, G.M. Wang, S.A. Bogacz, Y.S. Derbenev

    2009-05-01

    Muon collider luminosity depends on the number of muons in the storage ring and on the transverse size of the beams in collision. Ionization cooling as it is currently envisioned will not cool the beam sizes sufficiently well to provide adequate luminosity without large muon intensities. Six-dimensional cooling schemes will reduce the longitudinal emittance of a muon beam so that smaller high frequency RF cavities can be used for later stages of cooling and for acceleration. However, the bunch length at collision energy is then shorter than needed to match the interaction region beta function. New ideas to shrink transverse beam dimensions by lengthening each bunch will help achieve high luminosity in muon colliders. Analytic expressions for the reverse emittance exchange mechanism were derived, including a new resonant method of beam focusing.

  10. Large-area lanthanum hexaboride electron emitter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goebel, D. M.; Hirooka, Y.; Sketchley, T. A.

    1985-09-01

    The characteristics of lanthanum-boron thermionic electron emitters are discussed, and a large-area, continuously operating cathode assembly and heater are described. Impurity production and structural problems involving the support of the LaB6 have been eliminated in the presented configuration. The performance of the cathode in a plasma discharge, where surface modification occurs by ion sputtering, is presented. Problem areas which affect lifetime and emission current capability are discussed.

  11. Carbon nanotube emitters and field emission triode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Zhiqin; Zhang, Binglin; Yao, Ning; Zhang, Lan; Ma, Huizhong; Deng, Jicai

    2006-05-01

    Based on our study on field emission from multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs), we experimentally manufactured field emission display (FED) triode with a MWNTs cold cathode, and demonstrated an excellent performance of MWNTs as field emitters. The measured luminance of the phosphor screens was 1.8*10^(3) cd/m2 for green light. The emission is stable with a fluctuation of only 1.5% at an average current of 260 'mu'A.

  12. Complementary methods of transverse emittance measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Zagel, James; Hu, Martin; Jansson, Andreas; Thurman-Keup, Randy; Yan, Ming-Jen; /Fermilab

    2008-05-01

    Several complementary transverse emittance monitors have been developed and used at the Fermilab accelerator complex. These include Ionization profile Monitors (IPM), Flying Wires, Schottky detectors and a Synchrotron Light Monitor (Synchlite). Mechanical scrapers have also been used for calibration purposes. This paper describes the various measurement devices by examining their basic features, calibration requirements, systematic uncertainties, and applications to collider operation. A comparison of results from different kinds of measurements is also presented.

  13. Terahertz waveguide emitter with subwavelength confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martl, Michael; Darmo, Juraj; Dietze, Daniel; Unterrainer, Karl; Gornik, Erich

    2010-01-01

    The generation of broadband terahertz pulses on the facet of waveguides is presented as an alternative to widely used coupling techniques. Dielectric loaded subwavelength waveguide structures with lateral confinement are investigated with respect to propagating modes and waveguide losses. The results show the terahertz waveguide emitter to be a promising tool for terahertz spectroscopy in the near field and for the probing of microstructured devices such as quantum cascade lasers.

  14. Calculation of day and night emittance values

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahle, Anne B.

    1986-01-01

    In July 1983, the Thermal Infrared Multispectral Scanner (TIMS) was flown over Death Valley, California on both a midday and predawn flight within a two-day period. The availability of calibrated digital data permitted the calculation of day and night surface temperature and surface spectral emittance. Image processing of the data included panorama correction and calibration to radiance using the on-board black bodies and the measured spectral response of each channel. Scene-dependent isolated-point noise due to bit drops, was located by its relatively discontinuous values and replaced by the average of the surrounding data values. A method was developed in order to separate the spectral and temperature information contained in the TIMS data. Night and day data sets were processed. The TIMS is unique in allowing collection of both spectral emittance and thermal information in digital format with the same airborne scanner. For the first time it was possible to produce day and night emittance images of the same area, coregistered. These data add to an understanding of the physical basis for the discrimination of difference in surface materials afforded by TIMS.

  15. Low Emittance Electron Gun for XFEL Application

    SciTech Connect

    Gough, C.; Paraliev, M.; Ivkovic, S.

    2009-08-04

    The Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI) in Switzerland is planning to build a cost-effective X-ray Free Electron Laser (XFEL) facility for 0.1-10 nm wavelength and 10-100 fsec pulse length, requiring only 6 GeV electron energy. The facility will consist of a Low Emittance electron Gun (LEG) with high gradient acceleration and advanced accelerator technology for preserving the emittance during acceleration and bunch compression. To demonstrate feasibility of the project, a 4 MeV test stand followed by a new 250 MeV test stand will be used at PSI. An emittance of <0.1 mm-mrad is desired, and this extreme value has prompted the development of several novel features: gated field emitting array, a pulsed high gradient gun, combined photo-field emission, pulsed solenoid focusing and a two-frequency cavity. The LEG should give stable emission of >200 pC, with >700 keV energy and >125 MV/m gradient.

  16. An ultracold low emittance electron source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, G.; Harvey, M.; Murray, A. J.; Bellan, L.; Bertsche, W.; Appleby, R. B.; Mete, O.; Chattopadhyay, S.

    2014-06-01

    Ultracold atom-based electron sources have recently been proposed as an alternative to the conventional photo-injectors or thermionic electron guns widely used in modern particle accelerators. The advantages of ultracold atom-based electron sources lie in the fact that the electrons extracted from the plasma (created from near threshold photo-ionization of ultracold atoms) have a very low temperature, i.e. down to tens of Kelvin. Extraction of these electrons has the potential for producing very low emittance electron bunches. These features are crucial for the next generation of particle accelerators, including free electron lasers, plasma-based accelerators and future linear colliders. The source also has many potential direct applications, including ultrafast electron diffraction (UED) and electron microscopy, due to its intrinsically high coherence. In this paper, the basic mechanism of ultracold electron beam production is discussed and our new research facility for an ultracold, low emittance electron source is introduced. This source is based on a novel alternating current Magneto-Optical Trap (the AC-MOT). Detailed simulations for a proposed extraction system have shown that for a 1 pC bunch charge, a beam emittance of 0.35 mm mrad is obtainable, with a bunch length of 3 mm and energy spread 1%.

  17. Low-Energy Emittance Studies with the new Allison Emittance Scanner

    SciTech Connect

    Stockli, Martin P; Blokland, Willem; Gorlov, Timofey V; Han, Baoxi; Long, Cary D; Pennisi, Terry R; Assadi, Saeed

    2010-01-01

    The new SNS Allison emittance scanner measures emittances of 65 kV ion beams over a range of +/- 116 mrad. Its versatile control system allows for time-dependent emittance measurements using an external trigger to synchronize with pulsed ion beam systems. After an adjustable initial delay, the system acquires an array of equally-delayed beam current measurements, each averaged over a certain time span, where all three time parameters are user selectable. The zero offset of the beam current measurements is determined by averaging a fraction of 1 ms shortly before the start of the ion beam pulse. This paper discusses the optimization of the angular range. In addition it presents the first results and reports an unresolved artefact. Data are presented on the time evolution of emittance ellipses during 0.8 ms long H- beam pulses emerging from the SNS test LEBT, which is important for loss considerations in the SNS accelerator. Additional data explore the emittance growth observed with increasing beam current and/or increasing RF-power.

  18. Emissivity Tuned Emitter for RTPV Power Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Carl M. Stoots; Robert C. O'Brien; Troy M. Howe

    2012-03-01

    Every mission launched by NASA to the outer planets has produced unexpected results. The Voyager I and II, Galileo, and Cassini missions produced images and collected scientific data that totally revolutionized our understanding of the solar system and the formation of the planetary systems. These missions were enabled by the use of nuclear power. Because of the distances from the Sun, electrical power was produced using the radioactive decay of a plutonium isotope. Radioisotopic Thermoelectric Generators (RTGs) used in the past and currently used Multi-Mission RTGs (MMRTGs) provide power for space missions. Unfortunately, RTGs rely on thermocouples to convert heat to electricity and are inherently inefficient ({approx} 3-7% thermal to electric efficiency). A Radioisotope Thermal Photovoltaic (RTPV) power source has the potential to reduce the specific mass of the onboard power supply by increasing the efficiency of thermal to electric conversion. In an RTPV, a radioisotope heats an emitter, which emits light to a photovoltaic (PV) cell, which converts the light into electricity. Developing an emitter tuned to the desired wavelength of the photovoltaic is a key part in increasing overall performance. Researchers at the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) have built a Thermal Photovoltaic (TPV) system, that utilizes a simulated General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) from a MMRTG to heat a tantalum emitter. The GPHS is a block of graphite roughly 10 cm by 10 cm by 5 cm. A fully loaded GPHS produces 250 w of thermal power and weighs 1.6 kgs. The GRC system relies on the GPHS unit radiating at 1200 K to a tantalum emitter that, in turn, radiates light to a GaInAs photo-voltaic cell. The GRC claims system efficiency of conversion of 15%. The specific mass is around 167 kg/kWe. A RTPV power source that utilized a ceramic or ceramic-metal (cermet) matrix would allow for the combination of the heat source, canister, and emitter into one compact unit, and allow variation in size

  19. Polyaniline: a conductive polymer coating for durable nanospray emitters

    PubMed

    Maziarz; Lorenz; White; Wood

    2000-07-01

    Despite the tremendous sensitivity and lower sample requirements for nanospray vs. conventional electrospray, metallized nanospray emitters have suffered from one of two problems: low mechanical stability (leading to emitter failure) or lengthy, tedious production methods. Here, we describe a simple alternative to metallized tips using polyaniline (PANI), a synthetic polymer well known for its high conductivity, anticorrosion properties, antistatic properties, and mechanical stability. A simple method for coating borosilicate emitters (1.2 mm o.d.) pulled to fine tapers (4 +/- 1 microm) with water-soluble and xylene-soluble dispersions of conductive polyaniline (which allows for electrical contact at the emitter outlet) is described. The polyaniline-coated emitters show high durability and are resistant to electrical discharge, likely because of the thick (yet optically transparent) coatings; a single emitter can be used over a period of days for multiple samples with no visible indication of the destruction of the polyaniline coating. The optical transparency of the coating also allows the user to visualize the sample plug loaded into the emitter. Examples of nanospray using coatings of the water-soluble and xylene-soluble polyaniline dispersions are given. A comparison of PANI-coated and gold-coated nanospray emitters to conventional electrospray ionization (ESI) show that PANI-coated emitters provide similar enhanced sensitivity that gold-coated emitters exhibit vs. conventional ESI.

  20. Wavelength locking of single emitters and multi-emitter modules: simulation and experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanson, Dan; Rappaport, Noam; Peleg, Ophir; Berk, Yuri; Dahan, Nir; Klumel, Genady; Baskin, Ilya; Levy, Moshe

    2016-03-01

    Wavelength-stabilized high-brightness single emitters are commonly used in fiber-coupled laser diode modules for pumping Yb-doped lasers at 976 nm, and Nd-doped ones at 808 nm. We investigate the spectral behavior of single emitters under wavelength-selective feedback from a volume Bragg (or hologram) grating (VBG) in a multi-emitter module. By integrating a full VBG model as a multi-layer thin film structure with commercial raytracing software, we simulated wavelength locking conditions as a function of beam divergence and angular alignment tolerances. Good correlation between the simulated VBG feedback strength and experimentally measured locking ranges, in both VBG misalignment angle and laser temperature, is demonstrated. The challenges of assembling multi-emitter modules based on beam-stacked optical architectures are specifically addressed, where the wavelength locking conditions must be achieved simultaneously with high fiber coupling efficiency for each emitter in the module. It is shown that angular misorientation between fast and slow-axis collimating optics can have a dramatic effect on the spectral and power performance of the module. We report the development of our NEON-S wavelength-stabilized fiber laser pump module, which uses a VBG to provide wavelength-selective optical feedback in the collimated portion of the beam. Powered by our purpose-developed high-brightness single emitters, the module delivers 47 W output at 11 A from an 0.15 NA fiber and a 0.3 nm linewidth at 976 nm. Preliminary wavelength-locking results at 808 nm are also presented.

  1. Delay modeling of bipolar ECL/EFL (Emitter-Coupled Logic/Emitter-Follower-Logic) circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Andrew T.

    1986-08-01

    This report deals with the development of a delay-time model for timing simulation of large circuits consisting of Bipolar ECL(Emitter-Coupled Logic) and EFL (Emitter-Follower-Logic) networks. This model can provide adequate information on the performance of the circuits with a minimum expenditure of computation time. This goal is achieved by the use of proper circuit transient models on which analytical delay expressions can be derived with accurate results. The delay-model developed in this report is general enough to handle complex digital circuits with multiple inputs or/and multiple levels. The important effects of input slew rate are also included in the model.

  2. The Quantum Efficiency and Thermal Emittance of Metal Photocathodes

    SciTech Connect

    Dowell, David H.; Schmerge, John F.; /SLAC

    2009-03-04

    Modern electron beams have demonstrated the brilliance needed to drive free electron lasers at x-ray wavelengths, with the principle improvements occurring since the invention of the photocathode gun. The state-of-the-art normalized emittance electron beams are now becoming limited by the thermal emittance of the cathode. In both DC and RF photocathode guns, details of the cathode emission physics strongly influence the quantum efficiency and the thermal emittance. Therefore improving cathode performance is essential to increasing the brightness of beams. It is especially important to understand the fundamentals of cathode quantum efficiency and thermal emittance. This paper investigates the relationship between the quantum efficiency and the thermal emittance of metal cathodes using the Fermi-Dirac model for the electron distribution. We derive the thermal emittance and its relationship to the quantum efficiency, and compare our results to those of others.

  3. Rare Earth Doped Yttrium Aluminum Garnet (YAG) Selective Emitters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chubb, Donald L.; Pal, AnnaMarie T.; Patton, Martin O.; Jenkins, Phillip P.

    1999-01-01

    As a result of their electron structure, rare earth ions in crystals at high temperature emit radiation in several narrow bands rather than in a continuous blackbody manner. This study presents a spectral emittance model for films and cylinders of rare earth doped yttrium aluminum garnets. Good agreement between experimental and theoretical film spectral emittances was found for erbium and holmium aluminum garnets. Spectral emittances of films are sensitive to temperature differences across the film. For operating conditions of interest, the film emitter experiences a linear temperature variation whereas the cylinder emitter has a more advantageous uniform temperature. Emitter efficiency is also a sensitive function of temperature. For holminum aluminum garnet film the efficiency is 0.35 at 1446K but only 0.27 at 1270 K.

  4. Ballasted and electrically steerable carbon nanotube field emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cole, M. T.; Li, C.; Qu, K.; Zhang, Y.; Wang, B.; Pribat, D.; Milne, W. I.

    2012-09-01

    Here we present our on-going efforts toward the development of stable ballasted carbon nanotube-based field emitters employing hydrothermally synthesized zinc oxide nanowires and thin film silicon-on-insulator substrates. The semiconducting channel in each controllably limits the emission current thereby preventing detrimental burn-out of individual emitters that occurs due to unavoidable statistical variability in emitter characteristics, particularly in their length. Fabrication details and emitter characterization are discussed in addition to their field emission performance. The development of a beam steerable triode electron emitter formed from hexagonal carbon nanotube arrays with central focusing nanotube electrodes, is also described. Numerical ab-initio simulations are presented to account for the empirical emission characteristics. Our engineered ballasted emitters have shown some of the lowest reported lifetime variations (< 0.7%) with on-times of < 1 ms, making them ideally-suited for next-generation displays, environmental lighting and portable x-rays sources.

  5. Infrared spectral normal emittance/emissivity comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanssen, L.; Wilthan, B.; Filtz, J.-R.; Hameury, J.; Girard, F.; Battuello, M.; Ishii, J.; Hollandt, J.; Monte, C.

    2016-01-01

    The National Measurement Institutes (NMIs) of the United States, Germany, France, Italy and Japan, have joined in an inter-laboratory comparison of their infrared spectral emittance scales. This action is part of a series of supplementary inter-laboratory comparisons (including thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity) sponsored by the Consultative Committee on Thermometry (CCT) Task Group on Thermophysical Quantities (TG-ThQ). The objective of this collaborative work is to strengthen the major operative National Measurement Institutes' infrared spectral emittance scales and consequently the consistency of radiative properties measurements carried out worldwide. The comparison has been performed over a spectral range of 2 μm to 14 μm, and a temperature range from 23 °C to 800 °C. Artefacts included in the comparison are potential standards: oxidized Inconel, boron nitride, and silicon carbide. The measurement instrumentation and techniques used for emittance scales are unique for each NMI, including the temperature ranges covered as well as the artefact sizes required. For example, all three common types of spectral instruments are represented: dispersive grating monochromator, Fourier transform and filter-based spectrometers. More than 2000 data points (combinations of material, wavelength and temperature) were compared. Ninety-eight percent (98%) of the data points were in agreement, with differences to weighted mean values less than the expanded uncertainties calculated from the individual NMI uncertainties and uncertainties related to the comparison process. Main text To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCT, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  6. Emittance Measurements of Trapped Electrons from a Plasma Wakefield Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Kirby, N.; Berry, M.; Blumenfeld, I.; Decker, F.-J.; Hogan, M.J.; Ischebeck, R.; Iverson, R.; Siemann, R.; Walz, D.; Clayton, C.E.; Huang, C.; Joshi, C.; Lu, W.; Marsh, K.A.; Mori, W.B.; Zhou, M.; Katsouleas, T.C.; Muggli, P.; Oz, E.; /Southern California U.

    2007-06-28

    Recent electron beam driven plasma wakefield accelerator experiments carried out at SLAC showed trapping of plasma electrons. These trapped electrons appeared on an energy spectrometer with smaller transverse size than the beam driving the wake. A connection is made between transverse size and emittance; due to the spectrometer's resolution, this connection allows for placing an upper limit on the trapped electron emittance. The upper limit for the lowest normalized emittance measured in the experiment is 1 mm {center_dot} mrad.

  7. Active spacecraft potential control: An ion emitter experiment. [Cluster mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riedler, W.; Goldstein, R.; Hamelin, M.; Maehlum, B. N.; Troim, J.; Olsen, R. C.; Pedersen, A.; Grard, R. J. L.; Schmidt, R.; Rudenauer, F.

    1988-01-01

    The cluster spacecraft are instrumented with ion emitters for charge neutralization. The emitters produce indium ions at 6 keV. The ion current is adjusted in a feedback loop with instruments measuring the spacecraft potential. The system is based on the evaporation of indium in the apex field of a needle. The design of the active spacecraft potential control instruments, and the ion emitters is presented.

  8. Emittance calculations for the Stanford Linear Collider injector

    SciTech Connect

    Sheppard, J.C.; Clendenin, J.E.; Helm, R.H.; Lee, M.J.; Miller, R.H.; Blocker, C.A.

    1983-03-01

    A series of measurements have been performed to determine the emittance of the high intensity, single bunch beam that is to be injected into the Stanford Linear Collider. On-line computer programs were used to control the Linac for the purpose of data acquisition and to fit the data to a model in order to deduce the beam emittance. This paper will describe the method of emittance calculation and present some of the measurement results.

  9. Sub-nm emittance lattice design for CANDLE storage ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sargsyan, A.; Zanyan, G.; Sahakyan, V.; Tsakanov, V.

    2016-10-01

    The most effective way to increase the brilliance of synchrotron light sources is the reduction of beam emittance. Following the recent developments in low emittance lattice design, a new sub-nm emittance lattice based on implementation of multi-band achromat concept and application of longitudinal gradient bending magnets was developed for CANDLE storage ring. The paper presents the main design considerations, linear and non-linear beam dynamics aspects of the new lattice proposed.

  10. Multi-channel polarized thermal emitter

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Jae-Hwang; Ho, Kai-Ming; Constant, Kristen P

    2013-07-16

    A multi-channel polarized thermal emitter (PTE) is presented. The multi-channel PTE can emit polarized thermal radiation without using a polarizer at normal emergence. The multi-channel PTE consists of two layers of metallic gratings on a monolithic and homogeneous metallic plate. It can be fabricated by a low-cost soft lithography technique called two-polymer microtransfer molding. The spectral positions of the mid-infrared (MIR) radiation peaks can be tuned by changing the periodicity of the gratings and the spectral separation between peaks are tuned by changing the mutual angle between the orientations of the two gratings.

  11. Atmospheric corrections for TIMS estimated emittance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warner, T. A.; Levandowski, D. W.

    1992-01-01

    The estimated temperature of the average of 500 lines of Thermal Infrared Multispectral Scanner (TIMS) data of the Pacific Ocean, from flight line 94, collected on 30 Sep. 1988, at 1931 GMT is shown. With no atmospheric corrections, estimated temperature decreases away from nadir (the center of the scan line). A LOWTRAN modeled correction, using local radiosonde data and instrument scan angle information, results in reversed limb darkening effects for most bands, and does not adequately correct all bands to the same temperature. The atmosphere tends to re-radiate energy at the wavelengths at which it most absorbs, and thus the overall difference between corrected and uncorrected temperatures is approximately 40 C, despite the average LOWTRAN calculated transmittance of only 60 percent between 8.1 and 11.6 microns. An alternative approach to atmospheric correction is a black body normalization. This is done by calculating a normalization factor for each pixel position and wavelength, which when applied results in a single calculated temperature, as would be expected for a gray body with near uniform emittance. The black body adjustment is based on the atmospheric conditions over the sea. The ground elevation profile along the remaining 3520 scan lines (approximately 10 km) of flight line 94, up the slopes of Kilauea, determined from aircraft pressure and laser altimeter data is shown. This flight line includes a large amount of vegetation that is clearly discernible on the radiance image, being much cooler than the surrounding rocks. For each of the 3520 scan lines, pixels were classified as vegetation or 'other'. A moving average of 51 lines was applied to the composite vegetation emittance for each scan line, to reduce noise. Assuming vegetation to be like water, and to act as gray body with an emittance of 0.986 across the spectrum, it is shown that that the LOWTRAN induced artifacts are severe, and other than for the 0.9.9 micron channel, not significantly

  12. Multiple emitter location and signal parameter estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, R. O.

    1986-03-01

    Multiple signal classification (MUSIC) techniques involved in determining the parameters of multiple wavefronts arriving at an antenna array are discussed. A MUSIC algorithm is described, which provides asymptotically unbiased estimates of (1) the number of signals, (2) directions of arrival (or emitter locations), (3) strengths and cross correlations among the incident waveforms, and (4) the strength of noise/interference. The example of the use of the algorithm as a multiple frequency estimator operating on time series is examined. Comparisons of this method with methods based on maximum likelihood and maximum entropy, as well as conventional beamforming, are presented.

  13. Summary report on transverse emittance preservation

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, W.; Vos, L.

    1997-12-01

    During the past years, significant progress has been made in understanding the beam transverse emittance blow-up and its preservation. However, one often finds him-/herself ignorant when he/she tries to explain what was observed in an existing machine or to predict what will happen in a machine under design. There are a number of such examples given in this report. Some of them are even fundamental. These are the challenges. But they are also the directions leading to new achievements. The workshop gladly acknowledged them and promised to work on them.

  14. High efficiency quasi-monochromatic infrared emitter

    SciTech Connect

    Brucoli, Giovanni; Besbes, Mondher; Benisty, Henri Greffet, Jean-Jacques; Bouchon, Patrick; Haïdar, Riad

    2014-02-24

    Incandescent radiation sources are widely used as mid-infrared emitters owing to the lack of alternative for compact and low cost sources. A drawback of miniature hot systems such as membranes is their low efficiency, e.g., for battery powered systems. For targeted narrow-band applications such as gas spectroscopy, the efficiency is even lower. In this paper, we introduce design rules valid for very generic membranes demonstrating that their energy efficiency for use as incandescent infrared sources can be increased by two orders of magnitude.

  15. Efficient low-temperature thermophotovoltaic emitters from metallic photonic crystals.

    PubMed

    Nagpal, Prashant; Han, Sang Eon; Stein, Andreas; Norris, David J

    2008-10-01

    We examine the use of metallic photonic crystals as thermophotovoltaic emitters. We coat silica woodpile structures, created using direct laser writing, with tungsten or molybdenum. Optical reflectivity and thermal emission measurements near 650 degrees C demonstrate that the resulting structures should provide efficient emitters at relatively low temperatures. When matched to InGaAsSb photocells, our structures should generate over ten times more power than solid emitters while having an optical-to-electrical conversion efficiency above 32%. At such low temperatures, these emitters have promise not only in solar energy but also in harnessing geothermal and industrial waste heat.

  16. Theoretical study of transverse-longitudinal emittance coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Qin, H; Davidson, R C; Chung, M; Barnard, J J; Wang, T F

    2011-04-14

    The effect of a weakly coupled periodic lattice in terms of achieving emittance exchange between the transverse and longitudinal directions is investigated using the generalized Courant-Snyder theory for coupled lattices. Recently, the concept and technique of transverse-longitudinal emittance coupling have been proposed for applications in the Linac Coherent Light Source and other free-electron lasers to reduce the transverse emittance of the electron beam. Such techniques can also be applied to the driver beams for the heavy ion fusion and beam-driven high energy density physics, where the transverse emittance budget is typically tighter than the longitudinal emittance. The proposed methods consist of one or several coupling components which completely swap the emittances of one of the transverse directions and the longitudinal direction at the exit of the coupling components. The complete emittance exchange is realized in one pass through the coupling components. In the present study, we investigate the effect of a weakly coupled periodic lattice in terms of achieving emittance exchange between the transverse and longitudinal directions. A weak coupling component is introduced at every focusing lattice, and we would like to determine if such a lattice can realize the function of emittance exchange.

  17. Injection of large transverse emittance EBIS beams in booster

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner, C.

    2011-10-10

    During the commissioning of EBIS beams in Booster in November 2010 and in April, May and June 2011, it was found that the transverse emittances of the EBIS beams just upstream of Booster were much larger than expected. Beam emittances of 11{pi} mm milliradians had been expected, but numbers 3 to 4 times larger were measured. Here and throughout this note the beam emittance, {pi}{epsilon}{sub 0}, is taken to be the area of the smallest ellipse that contains 95% of the beam. We call this smallest ellipse the beam ellipse. If the beam distribution is gaussian, the rms emittance of the distribution is very nearly one sixth the area of the beam ellipse. The normalized rms emittance is the rms emittance times the relativistic factor {beta}{gamma} = 0.06564. This amounts to 0.12{pi} mm milliradians for the 11{pi} mm milliradian beam ellipse. In [1] we modeled the injection and turn-by-turn evolution of an 11{pi} mm milliradian beam ellipse in the horizontal plane in Booster. It was shown that with the present injection system, up to 4 turns of this beam could be injected and stored in Booster without loss. In the present note we extend this analysis to the injection of larger emittance beams. We consider only the emittance in the horizontal plane. Emittance in the vertical plane and the effects of dispersion are treated in [2].

  18. Analysis of Slice Transverse Emittance Evolution ina Photocathode RF Gun

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Z.; Ding, Y.; Qiang, J.; /LBL, Berkeley

    2007-10-17

    The slice transverse emittance of an electron beam is of critical significance for an x-ray FEL. In a photocathode RF gun, the slice transverse emittance is not only determined by the emission process, but also influenced strongly by the non-linear space charge effect. In this paper, we study the slice transverse emittance evolution in a photocathode RF gun using a simple model that includes effects of RF acceleration, focusing, and space charge force. The results are compared with IMPACT-T space charge simulations and may be used to understand the development of the slice emittance in an RF gun.

  19. Narrowband infrared emitters for combat ID

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pralle, Martin U.; Puscasu, Irina; Daly, James; Fallon, Keith; Loges, Peter; Greenwald, Anton; Johnson, Edward

    2007-04-01

    There is a strong desire to create narrowband infrared light sources as personnel beacons for application in infrared Identify Friend or Foe (IFF) systems. This demand has augmented dramatically in recent years with the reports of friendly fire casualties in Afghanistan and Iraq. ICx Photonics' photonic crystal enhanced TM (PCE TM) infrared emitter technology affords the possibility of creating narrowband IR light sources tuned to specific IR wavebands (near 1-2 microns, mid 3-5 microns, and long 8-12 microns) making it the ideal solution for infrared IFF. This technology is based on a metal coated 2D photonic crystal of air holes in a silicon substrate. Upon thermal excitation the photonic crystal modifies the emitted yielding narrowband IR light with center wavelength commensurate with the periodicity of the lattice. We have integrated this technology with microhotplate MEMS devices to yield 15mW IR light sources in the 3-5 micron waveband with wall plug efficiencies in excess of 10%, 2 orders of magnitude more efficient that conventional IR LEDs. We have further extended this technology into the LWIR with a light source that produces 9 mW of 8-12 micron light at an efficiency of 8%. Viewing distances >500 meters were observed with fielded camera technologies, ideal for ground to ground troop identification. When grouped into an emitter panel, the viewing distances were extended to 5 miles, ideal for ground to air identification.

  20. Barium depletion in hollow cathode emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polk, James E.; Mikellides, Ioannis G.; Capece, Angela M.; Katz, Ira

    2016-01-01

    Dispenser hollow cathodes rely on a consumable supply of Ba released by BaO-CaO-Al2O3 source material in the pores of a tungsten matrix to maintain a low work function surface. The examination of cathode emitters from long duration tests shows deposits of tungsten at the downstream end that appear to block the flow of Ba from the interior. In addition, a numerical model of Ba transport in the cathode plasma indicates that the Ba partial pressure in the insert may exceed the equilibrium vapor pressure of the dominant Ba-producing reaction, and it was postulated previously that this would suppress Ba loss in the upstream part of the emitter. New measurements of the Ba depletion depth from a cathode insert operated for 8200 h reveal that Ba loss is confined to a narrow region near the downstream end, confirming this hypothesis. The Ba transport model was modified to predict the depletion depth with time. A comparison of the calculated and measured depletion depths gives excellent qualitative agreement, and quantitative agreement was obtained assuming an insert temperature 70 °C lower than measured beginning-of-life values.

  1. Muon Emittance Exchange with a Potato Slicer

    SciTech Connect

    Summers, D. J.; Hart, T. L.; Acosta, J. G.; Cremaldi, L. M.; Oliveros, S. J.; Perera, L. P.; Neuffer, D. V.

    2015-04-15

    We propose a novel scheme for final muon ionization cooling with quadrupole doublets followed by emittance exchange in vacuum to achieve the small beam sizes needed by a muon collider. A flat muon beam with a series of quadrupole doublet half cells appears to provide the strong focusing required for final cooling. Each quadrupole doublet has a low beta region occupied by a dense, low Z absorber. After final cooling, normalized transverse, longitudinal, and angular momentum emittances of 0.100, 2.5, and 0.200 mm-rad are exchanged into 0.025, 70, and 0.0 mm-rad. A skew quadrupole triplet transforms a round muon bunch with modest angular momentum into a flat bunch with no angular momentum. Thin electrostatic septa efficiently slice the flat bunch into 17 parts. The 17 bunches are interleaved into a 3.7 meter long train with RF deflector cavities. Snap bunch coalescence combines the muon bunch train longitudinally in a 21 GeV ring in 55 µs, one quarter of a synchrotron oscillation period. A linear long wavelength RF bucket gives each bunch a different energy causing the bunches to drift in the ring until they merge into one bunch and can be captured in a short wavelength RF bucket with a 13% muon decay loss and a packing fraction as high as 87 %.

  2. Emittance measurements from the LLUMC proton accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coutrakon, G.; Gillespie, G. H.; Hubbard, J.; Sanders, E.

    2005-12-01

    A new method of calculating beam emittances at the extraction point of a particle accelerator is presented. The technique uses the optimization programs NPSOL and MINOS developed at Stanford University in order to determine the initial values of beam size, divergence and correlation parameters (i.e. beam sigma matrix, σij) that best fit measured beam parameters. These σij elements are then used to compute the Twiss parameters α, β, and the phase space area, ε, of the beam at the extraction point. Beam size measurements in X and Y throughout the transport line were input to the optimizer along with the magnetic elements of bends, quads, and drifts. The σij parameters were optimized at the accelerator's extraction point by finding the best agreement between these measured beam sizes and those predicted by TRANSPORT. This expands upon a previous study in which a "trial and error" technique was used instead of the optimizer software, and which yielded similar results. The Particle Beam Optics Laboratory (PBO Lab™) program used for this paper integrates particle beam optics and other codes into a single intuitive graphically-based computing environment. This new software provides a seamless interface between the NPSOL and MINOS optimizer and TRANSPORT calculations. The results of these emittance searches are presented here for the eight clinical energies between 70 and 250 MeV currently being used at LLUMC.

  3. Compact Rare Earth Emitter Hollow Cathode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watkins, Ronald; Goebel, Dan; Hofer, Richard

    2010-01-01

    A compact, high-current, hollow cathode utilizing a lanthanum hexaboride (LaB6) thermionic electron emitter has been developed for use with high-power Hall thrusters and ion thrusters. LaB6 cathodes are being investigated due to their long life, high current capabilities, and less stringent xenon purity and handling requirements compared to conventional barium oxide (BaO) dispenser cathodes. The new cathode features a much smaller diameter than previously developed versions that permit it to be mounted on axis of a Hall thruster ( internally mounted ), as opposed to the conventional side-mount position external to the outer magnetic circuit ("externally mounted"). The cathode has also been reconfigured to be capable of surviving vibrational loads during launch and is designed to solve the significant heater and materials compatibility problems associated with the use of this emitter material. This has been accomplished in a compact design with the capability of high-emission current (10 to 60 A). The compact, high-current design has a keeper diameter that allows the cathode to be mounted on the centerline of a 6- kW Hall thruster, inside the iron core of the inner electromagnetic coil. Although designed for electric propulsion thrusters in spacecraft station- keeping, orbit transfer, and interplanetary applications, the LaB6 cathodes are applicable to the plasma processing industry in applications such as optical coatings and semiconductor processing where reactive gases are used. Where current electrical propulsion thrusters with BaO emitters have limited life and need extremely clean propellant feed systems at a significant cost, these LaB6 cathodes can run on the crudest-grade xenon propellant available without impact. Moreover, in a laboratory environment, LaB6 cathodes reduce testing costs because they do not require extended conditioning periods under hard vacuum. Alternative rare earth emitters, such as cerium hexaboride (CeB6) can be used in this

  4. Group-III Nitride Field Emitters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bensaoula, Abdelhak; Berishev, Igor

    2008-01-01

    Field-emission devices (cold cathodes) having low electron affinities can be fabricated through lattice-mismatched epitaxial growth of nitrides of elements from group III of the periodic table. Field emission of electrons from solid surfaces is typically utilized in vacuum microelectronic devices, including some display devices. The present field-emission devices and the method of fabricating them were developed to satisfy needs to reduce the cost of fabricating field emitters, make them compatible with established techniques for deposition of and on silicon, and enable monolithic integration of field emitters with silicon-based driving circuitry. In fabricating a device of this type, one deposits a nitride of one or more group-III elements on a substrate of (111) silicon or other suitable material. One example of a suitable deposition process is chemical vapor deposition in a reactor that contains plasma generated by use of electron cyclotron resonance. Under properly chosen growth conditions, the large mismatch between the crystal lattices of the substrate and the nitride causes strains to accumulate in the growing nitride film, such that the associated stresses cause the film to crack. The cracks lie in planes parallel to the direction of growth, so that the growing nitride film becomes divided into microscopic growing single-crystal columns. The outer ends of the fully-grown columns can serve as field-emission tips. By virtue of their chemical compositions and crystalline structures, the columns have low work functions and high electrical conductivities, both of which are desirable for field emission of electrons. From examination of transmission electron micrographs of a prototype device, the average column width was determined to be about 100 nm and the sharpness of the tips was determined to be characterized by a dimension somewhat less than 100 nm. The areal density of the columns was found to about 5 x 10(exp 9)/sq cm . about 4 to 5 orders of magnitude

  5. Sharpening of field emitter tips using high-energy ions

    DOEpatents

    Musket, Ronald G.

    1999-11-30

    A process for sharpening arrays of field emitter tips of field emission cathodes, such as found in field-emission, flat-panel video displays. The process uses sputtering by high-energy (more than 30 keV) ions incident along or near the longitudinal axis of the field emitter to sharpen the emitter with a taper from the tip or top of the emitter down to the shank of the emitter. The process is particularly applicable to sharpening tips of emitters having cylindrical or similar (e.g., pyramidal) symmetry. The process will sharpen tips down to radii of less than 12 nm with an included angle of about 20 degrees. Because the ions are incident along or near the longitudinal axis of each emitter, the tips of gated arrays can be sharpened by high-energy ion beams rastered over the arrays using standard ion implantation equipment. While the process is particularly applicable for sharpening of arrays of field emitters in field-emission flat-panel displays, it can be effectively utilized in the fabrication of other vacuum microelectronic devices that rely on field emission of electrons.

  6. Emittance formula for slits and pepper-pot measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, M.

    1996-10-01

    In this note, a rigid formula for slits and pepper-pot emittance measurement is derived. The derivation is based on the one- dimensional slit measurement setup. A mathematical generalization of the slit emittance formula to the pepper-pot measurement is discussed.

  7. Spectral beam combining of multi-single emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Baohua; Guo, Weirong; Guo, Zhijie; Xu, Dan; Zhu, Jing; Zhang, Qiang; Yang, Thomas; Chen, Xiaohua

    2016-03-01

    Spectral beam combination expands the output power while keeps the beam quality of the combined beam almost the same as that of a single emitter. Spectral beam combination has been successfully achieved for high power fiber lasers, diode laser arrays and diode laser stacks. We have recently achieved the spectral beam combination of multiple single emitter diode lasers. Spatial beam combination and beam transformation are employed before beams from 25 single emitter diode lasers can be spectrally combined. An average output power about 220W, a spectral bandwidth less than 9 nm (95% energy), a beam quality similar to that of a single emitter and electro-optical conversion efficiency over 46% are achieved. In this paper, Rigorous Coupled Wave analysis is used to numerically evaluate the influence of emitter width, emitter pitch and focal length of transform lens on diffraction efficiency of the grating and spectral bandwidth. To assess the chance of catastrophic optical mirror damage (COMD), the optical power in the internal cavity of a free running emitter and the optical power in the grating external cavity of a wavelength locked emitter are theoretically analyzed. Advantages and disadvantages of spectral beam combination are concluded.

  8. Emitter space charge layer transit time in bipolar junction transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rustagi, S. C.; Chattopadhyaya, S. K.

    1981-04-01

    The charge defined emitter space charge layer transit times of double diffused transistors have been calculated using a regional approach, and compared with the corresponding base transit times. The results obtained for emitter space-charge layer transit times have been discussed with reference to the capacitance analysis of Morgan and Smit (1960) for graded p-n junctions.

  9. Radiative Performance of Rare Earth Garnet Thin Film Selective Emitters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowe, Roland A.; Chubb, Donald L.; Good, Brian S.

    1994-01-01

    In this paper we present the first emitter efficiency results for the thin film 40 percent Er-1.5 percent Ho YAG (Yttrium Aluminum Garnet, Y3Al5O12) and 25 percent Ho YAG selective emitter at 1500 K with a platinum substrate. Spectral emittance and emissive power measurements were made (1.2 less than lambda less than 3.2 microns). Emitter efficiency and power density are significantly improved with the addition of multiple rare earth dopants. Predicted efficiency results are presented for an optimized (equal power density in the Er, (4)I(sub 15/2)-(4)I(sub 13/2) at 1.5 microns, and Ho, (5)I(sub 7)-(5)I(sub 8) at 2.0 micron emission bands) Er-Ho YAG thin film selective emitter.

  10. Emittance of positron beams produced in intense laser plasma interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Hui; Hazi, A.; Link, A.; Anderson, S.; Gronberg, J.; Izumi, N.; Tommasini, R.; Wilks, S.; Sheppard, J. C.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Baldis, H. A.; Marley, E.; Park, J.; Williams, G. J.; Fedosejev, R.; Kerr, S.

    2013-01-15

    The first measurement of the emittance of intense laser-produced positron beams has been made. The emittance values were derived through measurements of positron beam divergence and source size for different peak positron energies under various laser conditions. For one of these laser conditions, we used a one dimensional pepper-pot technique to refine the emittance value. The laser-produced positrons have a geometric emittance between 100 and 500 mm{center_dot}mrad, comparable to the positron sources used at existing accelerators. With 10{sup 10}-10{sup 12} positrons per bunch, this low emittance beam, which is quasi-monoenergetic in the energy range of 5-20 MeV, may be useful as an alternative positron source for future accelerators.

  11. Vacuum Rabi spectra of a single quantum emitter.

    PubMed

    Ota, Yasutomo; Ohta, Ryuichi; Kumagai, Naoto; Iwamoto, Satoshi; Arakawa, Yasuhiko

    2015-04-10

    We report the observation of the vacuum Rabi splitting of a single quantum emitter by measuring its direct spontaneous emission into free space. We use a semiconductor quantum dot inside a photonic crystal nanocavity, in conjunction with an appropriate cavity design and filtering with a polarizer and an aperture, enabling the extraction of the inherently weak emitter's signal. The emitter's vacuum Rabi spectra exhibit clear differences from those measured by detecting the cavity photon leakage. Moreover, we observe an asymmetric vacuum Rabi spectrum induced by interference between the emitter and cavity detection channels. Our observations lay the groundwork for accessing various cavity quantum electrodynamics phenomena that manifest themselves only in the emitter's direct spontaneous emission. PMID:25910123

  12. Vacuum Rabi spectra of a single quantum emitter.

    PubMed

    Ota, Yasutomo; Ohta, Ryuichi; Kumagai, Naoto; Iwamoto, Satoshi; Arakawa, Yasuhiko

    2015-04-10

    We report the observation of the vacuum Rabi splitting of a single quantum emitter by measuring its direct spontaneous emission into free space. We use a semiconductor quantum dot inside a photonic crystal nanocavity, in conjunction with an appropriate cavity design and filtering with a polarizer and an aperture, enabling the extraction of the inherently weak emitter's signal. The emitter's vacuum Rabi spectra exhibit clear differences from those measured by detecting the cavity photon leakage. Moreover, we observe an asymmetric vacuum Rabi spectrum induced by interference between the emitter and cavity detection channels. Our observations lay the groundwork for accessing various cavity quantum electrodynamics phenomena that manifest themselves only in the emitter's direct spontaneous emission.

  13. Self-consistent, unbiased root-mean-square emittance analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stockli, Martin P.; Welton, R. F.; Keller, R.

    2004-05-01

    We present a self-consistent method for analyzing measured emittance data that yields unbiased estimates for the root-mean-square (rms) emittance. The self-consistent, unbiased elliptical exclusion analysis uses an ellipse to determine the bias from the data outside the ellipse, before calculating the rms emittance from the bias-subtracted data within the ellipse. Increasing the ellipse size until the rms emittance estimate saturates allows for determining the minimum elliptical area that includes all real signals, even those buried in the noise. Variations of the ellipse shape and orientations are used to test the robustness of the results. Background fluctuations cause fluctuations in the rms emittance estimate, which are an estimate of the uncertainty incurred through the analysis.

  14. Transit time and charge storage measurements in heavily doped emitters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neugroschel, A.; Park, J. S.; Hwang, B. Y.

    1986-01-01

    A first direct measurement of the minority-carrier transit time in a transparent heavily doped emitter layer is reported. The value was obtained by a high-frequency conductance method recently developed and used for low-doped Si. The transit time coupled with the steady-state current enables the determination of the quasi-static charge stored in the emitter and the quasi-static emitter capacitance. Using a transport model, from the measured transit time, the value for the minority-carrier diffusion coefficient and mobility is estimated. The measurements were done using a heavily doped emitter of the Si p(+)-n-p bipolar transistor. The new result indicates that the position-averaged minority-carrier diffusion coefficients may be much smaller than the corresponding majority-carrier values for emitters having a concentration ranging from about 3 x 10 to the 19th per cu cm to 10 to the 20th per cu cm.

  15. GTF Transverse and Longitudinal Emittance Data Analysis Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2010-12-07

    The SSRL Gun Test Facility (GTF) was built to develop a high brightness electron injector for the LCLS and has been operational since 1996. Measurements at the GTF include quadrupole scan transverse emittance measurements and linac phase scan longitudinal emittance measurements. Typically the beam size is measured on a screen as a function of a quadrupole current or linac phase and the beam matrix is then fit to the measured data. Often the emittance which is the final result of the measurement is the only number reported. However, the method used to reduce the data to the final emittance value can have a significant effect on the result. This paper describes in painful detail the methods used to analyze the transverse and longitudinal emittance data collected at the GTF.

  16. Magnetic field emission gun with zirconiated emitter.

    PubMed

    Troyon, M

    1989-03-01

    A magnetic-field-superimposed field emission gun with low aberrations and equipped with a zirconiated tungsten emitter has been developed for applications where very stable high probe currents are required. It has been tested on a conventional electron microscope at 10 kV and on an electron beam testing system at 1 kV. Probe current i = 250 nA in a probe size d = 0.4 micron is obtained at 10 kV; at 1 kV the resolution is 0.1 micron with i = 5 nA, and 0.4 micron with i = 30 nA. For these probe currents, the spatial broadening effect due to electron-electron interactions in the beam is the preponderant factor limiting the probe size.

  17. Radiation risks from inhaled alpha emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simmons, Jack A.

    2001-06-01

    The alpha emitter that gives rise to the greatest concern over its link to the induction of lung cancer is radon. As noted by the ICRP, attempts to relate the risk of cancer induction to the dose delivered by the alpha particles result in a value for this risk which is unrealistically high. Instead, an estimate based on the epidemiology of radon in mines is preferred. The logical result, that the weighting factor for these alpha particles should be very much lesser than the recommended value of 20, appears to have been ignored. It will be shown that there are two fundamental reasons for this large discrepancy. The first is that the implied "linear non-threshold" hypothesis is not supported by recent investigations. The second is that the concept of "dose" is meaningless at the levels of exposure considered in this context. Alternative proposals in terms of fluence and the effect cross-section will be presented.

  18. Plasma treatment for producing electron emitters

    DOEpatents

    Coates, Don Mayo; Walter, Kevin Carl

    2001-01-01

    Plasma treatment for producing carbonaceous field emission electron emitters is disclosed. A plasma of ions is generated in a closed chamber and used to surround the exposed surface of a carbonaceous material. A voltage is applied to an electrode that is in contact with the carbonaceous material. This voltage has a negative potential relative to a second electrode in the chamber and serves to accelerate the ions toward the carbonaceous material and provide an ion energy sufficient to etch the exposed surface of the carbonaceous material but not sufficient to result in the implantation of the ions within the carbonaceous material. Preferably, the ions used are those of an inert gas or an inert gas with a small amount of added nitrogen.

  19. Determination and error analysis of emittance and spectral emittance measurements by remote sensing. [of leaves, soil and plant canopies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumar, R.

    1977-01-01

    Theoretical and experimental determinations of the emittance of soils and leaves are reviewed, and an error analysis of emittance and spectral emittance measurements is developed as an aid to remote sensing applications. In particular, an equation for the upper bound of the absolute error in an emittance determination is derived. The absolute error is found to decrease with an increase in contact temperature and to increase with an increase in environmental integrated radiant flux density. The difference between temperature and band radiance temperature is plotted as a function of emittance for the wavelength intervals 4.5 to 5.5 microns, 8 to 13.5 microns and 10.2 to 12.5 microns.

  20. Physical electrostatics of small field emitter arrays/clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forbes, Richard G.

    2016-08-01

    This paper aims to improve qualitative understanding of electrostatic influences on apex field enhancement factors (AFEFs) for small field emitter arrays/clusters. Using the "floating sphere at emitter-plate potential" (FSEPP) model, it re-examines the electrostatics and mathematics of three simple systems of identical post-like emitters. For the isolated emitter, various approaches are noted. An adequate approximation is to consider only the effects of sphere charges and (for significantly separated emitters) image charges. For the 2-emitter system, formulas are found for charge-transfer ("charge-blunting") effects and neighbor-field effects, for widely spaced and for "sufficiently closely spaced" emitters. Mutual charge-blunting is always the dominant effect, with a related (negative) fractional AFEF-change δtwo. For sufficiently small emitter spacing c, |δtwo| varies approximately as 1/c; for large spacing, |δtwo| decreases as 1/c3. In a 3-emitter equispaced linear array, differential charge-blunting and differential neighbor-field effects occur, but differential charge-blunting effects are dominant, and cause the "exposed" outer emitters to have higher AFEF (γ0) than the central emitter (γ1). Formulas are found for the exposure ratio Ξ = γ0/γ1, for large and for sufficiently small separations. The FSEPP model for an isolated emitter has accuracy around 30%. Line-charge models (LCMs) are an alternative, but an apparent difficulty with recent LCM implementations is identified. Better descriptions of array electrostatics may involve developing good fitting equations for AFEFs derived from accurate numerical solution of Laplace's equation, perhaps with equation form(s) guided qualitatively by FSEPP-model results. In existing fitting formulas, the AFEF-reduction decreases exponentially as c increases, which is different from the FSEPP-model formulas. This discrepancy needs to be investigated, using systematic Laplace-based simulations and appropriate results

  1. Emittance Adapter for a Diffraction Limited Synchrotron Radiation Source

    SciTech Connect

    Chao, Alexander Wu; Raimondi, Pantaleo; /Frascati

    2012-03-01

    We investigate the possibility of reaching very small horizontal and vertical emittances inside an undulator in a storage ring, by means of a local exchange of the apparent horizontal and vertical emittances, performed with a combination of skew quadrupoles and one solenoid in a dedicated insertion line in the storage ring. The insertion leaves the ring parameters and its optical properties unaffected. This scheme could greatly relax the emittance requirements for a diffraction limited synchrotron light source. The lattice derivation and design is described.

  2. Surface-modified GaAs terahertz plasmon emitter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darmo, J.; Strasser, G.; Muller, T.; Bratschitsch, R.; Unterrainer, K.

    2002-07-01

    We studied the THz emission from n-GaAs plasmon emitters modified by low-temperature-grown (LT) GaAs surface layers. The THz emission is increased since the LT GaAs pins the Fermi level at a midgap position, increasing the surface depletion field. For a THz emitter with a 70-nm-thick LT GaAs layer we observe without external fields a THz emission intensity of 140 nW. In addition, the long-term performance of the modified emitters is improved by the LT GaAs surface layer.

  3. Optical Properties of Selective Emitter Materials for Thermophotovoltaic Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hambourger, Paul D.

    1996-01-01

    We investigate the optical properties of new "selective emitter" materials for possible use in high-efficiency thermophotovoltaic power systems. These are systems which directly convert heat to radiation at a wavelength closely matched to the bandgap energy of the solar cell. Candidate materials which have strong absorption lines fairly close to the bandgap of good solar-cell materials were chosen for study. Their emittance was measured as a function of wavelength to evaluate their promise as selective TPV emitters. Useful and informative results were obtained. Some of these results were presented at a January 1996 solar energy conference of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics.

  4. Remote detection of single emitters via optical waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Then, Patrick; Razinskas, Gary; Feichtner, Thorsten; Haas, Philippe; Wild, Andreas; Bellini, Nicola; Osellame, Roberto; Cerullo, Giulio; Hecht, Bert

    2014-05-01

    The integration of lab-on-a-chip technologies with single-molecule detection techniques may enable new applications in analytical chemistry, biotechnology, and medicine. We describe a method based on the reciprocity theorem of electromagnetic theory to determine and optimize the detection efficiency of photons emitted by single quantum emitters through truncated dielectric waveguides of arbitrary shape positioned in their proximity. We demonstrate experimentally that detection of single quantum emitters via such waveguides is possible, confirming the predicted behavior of the detection efficiency. Our findings blaze the trail towards efficient lensless single-emitter detection compatible with large-scale optofluidic integration.

  5. Direct Observation of Ultralow Vertical Emittance using a Vertical Undulator

    SciTech Connect

    Wootton, Kent

    2015-09-17

    In recent work, the first quantitative measurements of electron beam vertical emittance using a vertical undulator were presented, with particular emphasis given to ultralow vertical emittances [K. P. Wootton, et al., Phys. Rev. ST Accel. Beams, 17, 112802 (2014)]. Using this apparatus, a geometric vertical emittance of 0.9 #6;± 0.3 pm rad has been observed. A critical analysis is given of measurement approaches that were attempted, with particular emphasis on systematic and statistical uncertainties. The method used is explained, compared to other techniques and the applicability of these results to other scenarios discussed.

  6. New Low Emittance Lattice for the Super-B Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Biagini, M.E.; Boscolo, M.; Raimondi, P.; Tomassini, S.; Zobov, M.; Seeman, J.; Sullivan, M.; Wienands, U.; Wittmer, W.; Bettoni, S.; Paoloni, E.; Bogomyagkov, A.; Koop, I.; Levichev, E.; Nikitin, S.; Piminov, P.; Shatilov, D.; /Novosibirsk, IYF

    2011-10-21

    New low emittance lattices have been designed for the asymmetric SuperB accelerator, aiming at a luminosity of 10{sup 36} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}. Main optics features are two alternating arc cells with different horizontal phase advance, decreasing beam emittance and allowing at the same time for easy chromaticity correction in the arcs. Emittance can be further reduced by a factor of two for luminosity upgrade. Spin rotation schemes for the e{sup -} beam have been studied to provide longitudinal polarization at the IP, and implementation into the lattice is in progress.

  7. The dust nature of micro field emitters in accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volkov, V.; Petrov, V. M.

    2016-11-01

    Field emission currents emitted by micro-emitters are a limiting factor for the operational gradients of accelerating radio frequency (rf) cavities. Within the rf field emission theory the existence of needle like micro field emitters with very high length relative to the radius and corresponding high enhancement factor (β) is assumed. In this article the hypothesis that micro field emitters consists of long chains of conductive micro-particles is considered. Five different forces acting onto the particles in a high rf field are considered and the respective equations are derived. Some experimental observations and their explanation within this hypothesis are discussed.

  8. Thermal limit to the intrinsic emittance from metal photocathodes

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Jun Nasiatka, J.; Wan, Weishi; Karkare, Siddharth; Padmore, Howard A.; Smedley, John

    2015-09-28

    Measurements of the intrinsic emittance and transverse momentum distributions obtained from a metal (antimony thin film) photocathode near and below the photoemission threshold are presented. Measurements show that the intrinsic emittance is limited by the lattice temperature of the cathode as the incident photon energy approaches the photoemission threshold. A theoretical model to calculate the transverse momentum distributions near this photoemission threshold is presented. An excellent match between the experimental measurements and the theoretical calculations is demonstrated. These measurements are relevant to low emittance electron sources for Free Electron Lasers and Ultrafast Electron Diffraction experiments.

  9. Observation of Picometer Vertical Emittance with a Vertical Undulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wootton, K. P.; Boland, M. J.; Dowd, R.; Tan, Y.-R. E.; Cowie, B. C. C.; Papaphilippou, Y.; Taylor, G. N.; Rassool, R. P.

    2012-11-01

    Using a vertical undulator, picometer vertical electron beam emittances have been observed at the Australian Synchrotron storage ring. An APPLE-II type undulator was phased to produce a horizontal magnetic field, which creates a synchrotron radiation field that is very sensitive to the vertical electron beam emittance. The measured ratios of undulator spectral peak heights are evaluated by fitting to simulations of the apparatus. With this apparatus immediately available at most existing electron and positron storage rings, we find this to be an appropriate and novel vertical emittance diagnostic.

  10. Method and apparatus for multispray emitter for mass spectrometry

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Richard D.; Tang, Keqi; Lin, Yuehe

    2004-12-14

    A method and apparatus that utilizes two or more emitters simultaneously to form an electrospray of a sample that is then directed into a mass spectrometer, thereby increasing the total ion current introduced into an electrospray ionization mass spectrometer, given a liquid flow rate of a sample. The method and apparatus are most conveniently constructed as an array of spray emitters fabricated on a single chip, however, the present invention encompasses any apparatus wherein two or more emitters are simultaneously utilized to form an electrospray of a sample that is then directed into a mass spectrometer.

  11. Improved Rare-Earth Emitter Hollow Cathode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goebel, Dan M.

    2011-01-01

    An improvement has been made to the design of the hollow cathode geometry that was created for the rare-earth electron emitter described in Compact Rare Earth Emitter Hollow Cathode (NPO-44923), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 34, No. 3 (March 2010), p. 52. The original interior assembly was made entirely of graphite in order to be compatible with the LaB6 material, which cannot be touched by metals during operation due to boron diffusion causing embrittlement issues in high-temperature refractory materials. Also, the graphite tube was difficult to machine and was subject to vibration-induced fracturing. This innovation replaces the graphite tube with one made out of refractory metal that is relatively easy to manufacture. The cathode support tube is made of molybdenum or molybdenum-rhenium. This material is easily gun-bored to near the tolerances required, and finish machined with steps at each end that capture the orifice plate and the mounting flange. This provides the manufacturability and robustness needed for flight applications, and eliminates the need for expensive e-beam welding used in prior cathodes. The LaB6 insert is protected from direct contact with the refractory metal tube by thin, graphite sleeves in a cup-arrangement around the ends of the insert. The sleeves, insert, and orifice plate are held in place by a ceramic spacer and tungsten spring inserted inside the tube. To heat the cathode, an insulating tube is slipped around the refractory metal hollow tube, which can be made of high-temperature materials like boron nitride or aluminum nitride. A screw-shaped slot, or series of slots, is machined in the outside of the ceramic tube to constrain a refractory metal wire wound inside the slot that is used as the heater. The screw slot can hold a single heater wire that is then connected to the front of the cathode tube by tack-welding to complete the electrical circuit, or it can be a double slot that takes a bifilar wound heater with both leads coming out

  12. HETDEX: Evolution of Lyman Alpha Emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanc, Guillermo A.; Gebhardt, K.; Hill, G. J.; Gronwall, C.; Ciardullo, R.; Finkelstein, S.; Gawiser, E.; HETDEX Collaboration

    2012-01-01

    The Hobby Eberly Telescope Dark Energy Experiment (HETDEX) will produce a sample of 800,000 Lyman Alpha Emitters (LAEs) over the 1.9

  13. Vertical Arc for ILC Low Emittance Transport

    SciTech Connect

    Tenenbaum, P.; Woodley, M.; /SLAC

    2005-06-07

    The design and parameters of a vertical arc for the ILC Low Emittance Transport (LET) are reviewed. A 1 TeV CM ILC which relies upon 30 MV/m accelerating cavities with a packing fraction of 65% will require almost 48 km of main linac, which suggests that the total site length including BDS and bunch compressors will be on the order of 53 km. If built in a laser-straight tunnel with the low-energy ends near the surface, and assuming a perfectly spherical ''cue ball'' planetary surface with radius 6370 km, the collider halls will necessarily be 55 meters below grade, as shown in the top plot of Figure 1. Such depths would demand extensive use of deep tunneling, which would potentially drive up the cost and difficulty of ILC construction. An alternate solution is to use discrete vertical arcs at a few locations to allow a ''piecewise straight'' construction in which the depth of the tunnel below grade does not vary by more than a few meters. This approach is shown schematically in the bottom plot of Figure 1. In this Note we consider the issues for a design with one such vertical arc at the 250 GeV/c point (ie, midway down the linac for 1 TeV CM), and a second arc at the entrance to the BDS (ie, the entire BDS lies in one plane, with vertical arcs at each end).

  14. Targeted radiotherapy using Auger electron emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Donoghue, J. A.; Wheldon, T. E.

    1996-10-01

    Auger-emitting radionuclides have potential for the therapy of cancer due to their high level of cytotoxicity and short-range biological effectiveness. Biological effects are critically dependent on the sub-cellular (and sub-nuclear) localization of Auger emitters. Mathematical modelling studies suggest that there are theoretical advantages in the use of radionuclides with short half-lives (such as ) in preference to those (such as ) with long half-lives. In addition, heterogeneity of radionuclide uptake is predicted to be a serious limitation on the ultimate therapeutic effect of targeted Auger therapy. Possible methods of targeting include the use of analogues of DNA precursors such as iodo-deoxyuridine and molecules which bind DNA such as steroid hormones or growth factors. A longer term possibility may be the use of molecules such as oligonucleotides which can discriminate at the level of DNA sequence. It seems likely that the optimal clinical role of targeted Auger therapy will be as one component of a multi-modality therapeutic strategy for the treatment of selected malignant diseases.

  15. Optimization of Metamaterial Selective Emitters for Use in Thermophotovoltaic Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfiester, Nicole A.

    The increasing costs of fossil fuels, both financial and environmental, has motivated many to look into sustainable energy sources. Thermophotovoltaics (TPVs), specialized photovoltaic cells focused on the infrared range, offer an opportunity to achieve both primary energy capture, similar to traditional photovoltaics, as well as secondary energy capture in the form of waste heat. However, to become a feasible energy source, TPV systems must become more efficient. One way to do this is through the development of selective emitters tailored to the bandgap of the TPV diode in question. This thesis proposes the use of metamaterial emitters as an engineerable, highly selective emitter that can withstand the temperatures required to collect waste heat. Metamaterial devices made of platinum and a dielectric such as alumina or silicon nitride were initially designed and tested as perfect absorbers. High temperature robustness testing demonstrates the device's ability to withstand the rigors of operating as a selective emitter.

  16. Measurement of Emittance of Beam in the Debuncher During Stacking

    SciTech Connect

    Halling, Mike

    1991-12-11

    The emittance of antiprotons in the debuncher was measured using two methods during normal stacking conditions. With 2.3 seconds of cooling the vertical emittance was found to be 3.6 {pi} mm-mr using scraper D:TJ308, and 2.9 {pi} mm-mr using the profile on SEM806. With 6.9 seconds of cooling time time the measured horizontal emittance was 2.1 {pi} mm-mr using D:RJ306 v.s. 1.9 {pi} mm-mr using SEM806; but with 2.3 seconds of cooling the measured emittance in the debuncher was larger than in the DTOA line, 4.5 {pi} mm-mr v.s. 2.8 {pi} mm-mr. This suggests that some beam is being scraped on a horizontal aperture restriction someplace in the extraction process.

  17. FXR LIA Optimization - Time-resolved OTR Emittance Measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Jacob, J; Ong, M; Wargo, P; LeSage, G

    2005-07-21

    The Flash X-Ray Radiography (FXR) facility at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory utilizes a high current, long pulse linear induction accelerator to produce high doses of x-ray radiation. Accurate characterization of the transverse beam emittance is required in order to facilitate accelerator modeling and tuning efforts and, ultimately, to optimize the final focus spot size, yielding higher resolution radiographs. In addition to conventional magnet scan, pepper-pot, and multiple screen techniques, optical transition radiation (OTR) has been proven as a useful emittance measurement diagnostic and is particularly well suited to the FXR accelerator. We shall discuss the time-resolved emittance characterization of an induction linac electron beam using OTR, and we will present our experimental apparatus and analysis software. We shall also develop the theoretical background of beam emittance and transition radiation.

  18. Halo Formation And Emittance Growth of Positron Beams in Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Muggli, P.; Blue, B.E.; Clayton, C.E.; Decker, F.J.; Hogan, M.J.; Huang, C.; Joshi, C.; Katsouleas, Thomas C.; Lu, W.; Mori, W.B.; O'Connell, C.L.; Siemann, R.H.; Walz, D.; Zhou, M.; /UCLA

    2011-10-25

    An ultrarelativistic 28.5 GeV, 700-{micro}m-long positron bunch is focused near the entrance of a 1.4-m-long plasma with a density n{sub e} between {approx}10{sup 13} and {approx}5 x 10{sup 14} cm{sup -3}. Partial neutralization of the bunch space charge by the mobile plasma electrons results in a reduction in transverse size by a factor of {approx}3 in the high emittance plane of the beam {approx}1 m downstream from the plasma exit. As n{sub e} increases, the formation of a beam halo containing {approx}40% of the total charge is observed, indicating that the plasma focusing force is nonlinear. Numerical simulations confirm these observations. The bunch with an incoming transverse size ratio of {approx}3 and emittance ratio of {approx}5 suffers emittance growth and exits the plasma with approximately equal sizes and emittances.

  19. Emission Characteristics of Ion-Implanted Silicon Emitter Tips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirano, Takayuki; Kanemaru, Seigo; Tanoue, Hisao; Itoh, Junji

    1995-12-01

    An ion implantation technique has been applied to control the energy band structure of Si field-emitter tip surface. B+ or P+ ions were implanted after fabrication of a gated emitter structure. No changes in emitter structure were observed after ion implantation and successive annealing at 800° C. Current-voltage ( I-V ) characteristics of n, p, p/n and n/p emitter tips were measured: p/n indicates an n-type tip with B+ ions implanted into the tip surface. It was found from the experimental results that n and p/n tips had I-V characteristics in agreement with the Fowler-Nordheim theory. The p and n/p tips, on the other hand, exhibited a current saturation property in high electric field. The present saturation mechanism is explained by considering the energy band structure of the tip surface.

  20. Rare Earth Doped High Temperature Ceramic Selective Emitters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chubb, Donald L.; Pal, AnnaMarie; Patton, Martin O.; Jenkins, Phillip P.

    1999-01-01

    As a result of their electron structure, rare earth ions in crystals at high temperature emit radiation in several narrow bands rather than in a continuous blackbody manner. This study develops a spectral emittance model for films of rare earth containing materials. Although there are several possible rare earth doped high temperature materials, this study was confined to rare earth aluminum garnets. Good agreement between experimental and theoretical spectral emittances was found for erbium, thulium and erbium-holmium aluminum garnets. Spectral emittances of these films are sensitive to temperature differences across the film. Emitter efficiency is also a sensitive function of temperature. For thulium aluminum garnet the efficiency is 0.38 at 1700 K but only 0.19 at 1262 K.

  1. Non-blinking single-photon emitters in silica.

    PubMed

    Rabouw, Freddy T; Cogan, Nicole M B; Berends, Anne C; Stam, Ward van der; Vanmaekelbergh, Daniel; Koenderink, A Femius; Krauss, Todd D; Donega, Celso de Mello

    2016-01-01

    Samples for single-emitter spectroscopy are usually prepared by spin-coating a dilute solution of emitters on a microscope cover slip of silicate based glass (such as quartz). Here, we show that both borosilicate glass and quartz contain intrinsic defect colour centres that fluoresce when excited at 532 nm. In a microscope image the defect emission is indistinguishable from spin-coated emitters. The emission spectrum is characterised by multiple peaks with the main peak between 2.05 and 2.20 eV, most likely due to coupling to a silica vibration with an energy that varies between 160 and 180 meV. The defects are single-photon emitters, do not blink, and have photoluminescence lifetimes of a few nanoseconds. Photoluminescence from such defects may previously have been misinterpreted as originating from single nanocrystal quantum dots. PMID:26892489

  2. CSR-induced emittance growth in achromats: Linear formalism revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venturini, M.

    2015-09-01

    We review the R-matrix formalism used to describe Coherent Synchrotron Radiation (CSR)-induced projected emittance growth in electron beam transport lines and establish the connection with a description in terms of the dispersion-invariant function.

  3. Absolute beam emittance measurements at RHIC using ionization profile monitors

    SciTech Connect

    Minty, M.; Connolly, R; Liu, C.; Summers, T.; Tepikian, S.

    2014-08-15

    In the past, comparisons between emittance measurements obtained using ionization profile monitors, Vernier scans (using as input the measured rates from the zero degree counters, or ZDCs), the polarimeters and the Schottky detectors evidenced significant variations of up to 100%. In this report we present studies of the RHIC ionization profile monitors (IPMs). After identifying and correcting for two systematic instrumental errors in the beam size measurements, we present experimental results showing that the remaining dominant error in beam emittance measurements at RHIC using the IPMs was imprecise knowledge of the local beta functions. After removal of the systematic errors and implementation of measured beta functions, precise emittance measurements result. Also, consistency between the emittances measured by the IPMs and those derived from the ZDCs was demonstrated.

  4. Emittance measurement at the NSLS x-ray ring

    SciTech Connect

    Safranek, J.; Stefan, P.M.

    1996-12-31

    A pinhole camera for imaging x-ray synchrotron radiation from a dipole magnet is now in operation at the NSLS X-Ray Ring. The pinhole camera detector is a 0.5 mm thick YAG phosphor screen viewed by a video camera. Both the theoretical pinhole diffraction pattern and the measured modulation transfer function (MTF) of the phosphor and camera have been deconvolved from the measured profile in order to derive the true transverse profile of the electron beam. This profile was then fit to a 2-dimensional Gaussian. The electron beam emittance as a function of the phase space acceptance of the pinhole camera has been derived, so the horizontal and vertical electron emittances can be deduced from the major and minor sigmas of the fit Gaussian. In the X-Ray Ring, the vertical emittance is kept small to maximize the synchrotron radiation brightness. The ratio of the measured vertical to horizontal emittance is 0.001.

  5. Non-blinking single-photon emitters in silica

    PubMed Central

    Rabouw, Freddy T.; Cogan, Nicole M. B.; Berends, Anne C.; Stam, Ward van der; Vanmaekelbergh, Daniel; Koenderink, A. Femius; Krauss, Todd D.; Donega, Celso de Mello

    2016-01-01

    Samples for single-emitter spectroscopy are usually prepared by spin-coating a dilute solution of emitters on a microscope cover slip of silicate based glass (such as quartz). Here, we show that both borosilicate glass and quartz contain intrinsic defect colour centres that fluoresce when excited at 532 nm. In a microscope image the defect emission is indistinguishable from spin-coated emitters. The emission spectrum is characterised by multiple peaks with the main peak between 2.05 and 2.20 eV, most likely due to coupling to a silica vibration with an energy that varies between 160 and 180 meV. The defects are single-photon emitters, do not blink, and have photoluminescence lifetimes of a few nanoseconds. Photoluminescence from such defects may previously have been misinterpreted as originating from single nanocrystal quantum dots. PMID:26892489

  6. Non-blinking single-photon emitters in silica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabouw, Freddy T.; Cogan, Nicole M. B.; Berends, Anne C.; Stam, Ward Van Der; Vanmaekelbergh, Daniel; Koenderink, A. Femius; Krauss, Todd D.; Donega, Celso De Mello

    2016-02-01

    Samples for single-emitter spectroscopy are usually prepared by spin-coating a dilute solution of emitters on a microscope cover slip of silicate based glass (such as quartz). Here, we show that both borosilicate glass and quartz contain intrinsic defect colour centres that fluoresce when excited at 532 nm. In a microscope image the defect emission is indistinguishable from spin-coated emitters. The emission spectrum is characterised by multiple peaks with the main peak between 2.05 and 2.20 eV, most likely due to coupling to a silica vibration with an energy that varies between 160 and 180 meV. The defects are single-photon emitters, do not blink, and have photoluminescence lifetimes of a few nanoseconds. Photoluminescence from such defects may previously have been misinterpreted as originating from single nanocrystal quantum dots.

  7. Emittance of TD-NiCr after simulated reentry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, R. K.; Dicus, D. L.; Lisagor, W. B.

    1978-01-01

    The effects of simulated reentry heating on the emittance of TD-NiCr were investigated. Groups of specimens with three different preconditioning treatments were exposed to 6, 24, and 30 half-hour simulated reentry exposure cycles in a supersonic arc tunnel at each of three conditions intended to produce surface temperatures of 1255, 1365, and 1475 K. Emittance was determined at 1300 K on specimens which were preconditioned only and specimens after completion of reentry simulation exposure. Oxide morphology and chemistry were studied by scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction analysis. A consistent relationship was established between oxide morphology and total normal emittance. Specimens with coarser textured oxides tended to have lower emittances than specimens with finer textured oxides.

  8. Beam dynamics in rf guns and emittance correction techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serafini, Luca

    1994-02-01

    In this paper we present a general review of beam dynamics in a laser-driven rf gun. The peculiarity of such an accelerating structure versus other conventional multi-cell linac structures is underlined on the basis of the Panofsky-Wenzel theorem, which is found to give a theoretical background for the well known Kim's model. A basic explanation for some proposed methods to correct rf induced emittance growth is also derived from the theorem. We also present three emittance correction techniques for the recovery of space-charge induced emittance growth, namely the optimum distributed disk-like bunch technique, the use of rf spatial harmonics to correct spherical aberration induced by space charge forces and the technique of emittance filtering by clipping the electron beam. The expected performances regarding the beam quality achievable with different techniques, as predicted by scaling laws and simulations, are analyzed, and, where available, compared to experimental results.

  9. Non-blinking single-photon emitters in silica

    DOE PAGES

    Rabouw, Freddy T.; Cogan, Nicole M. B.; Berends, Anne C.; Stam, Ward van der; Vanmaekelbergh, Daniel; Koenderink, A. Femius; Krauss, Todd D.; Donega, Celso de Mello

    2016-02-19

    Samples for single-emitter spectroscopy are usually prepared by spin-coating a dilute solution of emitters on a microscope cover slip of silicate based glass (such as quartz). Here, we show that both borosilicate glass and quartz contain intrinsic defect colour centres that fluoresce when excited at 532 nm. In a microscope image the defect emission is indistinguishable from spin-coated emitters. The emission spectrum is characterised by multiple peaks with the main peak between 2.05 and 2.20 eV, most likely due to coupling to a silica vibration with an energy that varies between 160 and 180 meV. The defects are single-photon emitters,more » do not blink, and have photoluminescence lifetimes of a few nanoseconds. Furthermore, photoluminescence from such defects may previously have been misinterpreted as originating from single nanocrystal quantum dots.« less

  10. Single-knob beam line for transverse emittance partitioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, C.; Kester, O. K.; Groening, L.; Leibrock, H.; Maier, M.; Rottländer, P.

    2013-04-01

    Flat beams feature unequal emittances in the horizontal and vertical phase space. Such beams were created successfully in electron machines by applying effective stand-alone solenoid fringe fields in the electron gun. Extension of this method to ion beams was proposed conceptually. The present paper is on the decoupling capabilities of an ion beam emittance transfer line. The proposed beam line provides a single-knob tool to partition the horizontal and vertical rms emittances, while keeping the product of the two emittances constant as well as the transverse rms Twiss parameters (αx,y and βx,y) in both planes. It is shown that this single knob is the solenoid field strength.

  11. Spectroscopic research on infrared emittance of coal ash deposits

    SciTech Connect

    Saljnikov, Aleksandar; Komatina, Mirko; Gojak, Milan; Vucicevic, Biljana; Goricanec, Darko; Stevanovic, Zoran

    2009-11-15

    This paper deals with thermal radiation characteristics of ash deposits on a pulverized coal combustion boiler of an electric power plant. Normal emittance spectra in the near to medium infrared (2.5-25 {mu}m) region and total normal emittances were measured on four kinds of ground ash deposits. Measurements were conducted in the 570-1460 K temperature range which is common for boiler furnaces, by both heating and cooling the ash samples, with the aim to study the effect of their thermal history. Dependence of emittance on wavelength, temperature and chemical composition was studied, too. Samples were tested for transparency (opacity) to verify the accuracy of results. It was determined that the thicknesses used for the ash powders are opaque for infrared radiation for thicknesses in the order of a millimeter. Tests have shown that spectral emittance increases with an increase of wavelength with a characteristic pattern common for all samples. Spectral normal emittance increases strongly with temperature at shorter wavelengths and remains high and unchanged at longer ones. Emittance spectra are not very sensitive to chemical composition of ashes especially beyond {lambda} {approx} 5 {mu}m. With an increase of temperature, total emittance of the powdered sample decreases to a minimum value around 1200 K. Further temperature rise induces an increase of total emittance due to sintering in the ash. On cooling, the emittance increases monotonically following the hysteresis. Quantitative directions for evaluating thermal radiation characteristics of ash deposits for the merits of the safety design of boiler furnaces were proposed. That comprises correlating the experimentally obtained emittance spectra with curves of simple analytical form, i.e., a continuous function of minimum emittance vs. wavelength. The proposed method can be extended to other specimens from the same furnace and used to determine correlations for thermal calculation of old and design of new furnaces

  12. Final report for Frequency selective surfaces for rugged thermophotovoltaic emitters

    SciTech Connect

    Daly, James

    2001-04-05

    Ion Optics created an array of regularly spaced holes in a thin conductive surface film on a dielectric substrate. When heated, this pattern behaved as a selective emitter, with more than 50% of total radiation in a well-defined peak with a center frequency determined by geometrical spacing. Peak wavelength did not alter with change in temperature, and materials easily survived 10 hours at 1000 C in air. The selective emitter will increase efficiency of thermophotovoltaic power converters.

  13. Analysis of emittance growth in the Fermilab Booster

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, K.Y.; Huang, X.; Lee, S.Y.; /Indiana U.

    2006-05-01

    Multi-particle simulations are performed to study emittance growth in the Fermilab Booster. Analysis shows that the source of vertical emittance growth comes mostly from random errors in skew quadrupoles in the presence of a strong transverse space-charge force. [1] Random errors in dipole rolls and the Montague resonance do contribute but to lesser extent. The effect of random errors in the quadrupoles is small because the betatron envelope tunes are reasonably far away from the half-integer stopband.

  14. Lambertian thermal emitter based on plasmonic enhanced absorption.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chih-Ming; Tsai, Din Ping

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, a narrow band thermal emission at 10 μm is demonstrated using a one dimensional metasurface. The proposed metasurface structure provides magnetic resonance mode that enhances the phonon absorption of SiO2. The proposed metasurface thermal emitter shows a Lambertian distribution. Additionally, 5.8-folds enhancement of emissivity is achieved by optimizing the cavity thickness of the metasurfaces. This type of thermal emitter will be useful for IR sensing applications. PMID:27505801

  15. Study of ultra-low emittance design for SPEAR3

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, M. -H.; Huang, X.; Safranek, J.; /SLAC

    2015-09-17

    Since its 2003 construction, the SPEAR3 synchrotron light source at SLAC has continuously improved its performance by raising beam current, top-off injection, and smaller emittance. This makes SPEAR3 one of the most productive light sources in the world. Now, to further enhance the performance of SPEAR3, we are looking into the possibility of converting SPEAR3 to an ultra-low emittance storage ring within its site constraint.

  16. Internal emitter limits for iodine, radium and radon daughters

    SciTech Connect

    Schlenker, R.A.

    1984-08-15

    This paper identifies some of the issues which arise in the consideration of the derivation of new limits on exposure to internal emitters. Basic and secondary radiation protection limits are discussed. Terms are defined and applied to the limitation of risk from stochastic effects. Non-stochastic data for specific internal emitters (/sup 131/I and the radium isotopes) are presented. Emphasis is placed on the quantitative aspects of the limit setting problem. 65 references, 2 figures, 12 tables.

  17. Validated Analytical Model of a Pressure Compensation Drip Irrigation Emitter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shamshery, Pulkit; Wang, Ruo-Qian; Taylor, Katherine; Tran, Davis; Winter, Amos

    2015-11-01

    This work is focused on analytically characterizing the behavior of pressure-compensating drip emitters in order to design low-cost, low-power irrigation solutions appropriate for off-grid communities in developing countries. There are 2.5 billion small acreage farmers worldwide who rely solely on their land for sustenance. Drip, compared to flood, irrigation leads to up to 70% reduction in water consumption while increasing yields by 90% - important in countries like India which are quickly running out of water. To design a low-power drip system, there is a need to decrease the pumping pressure requirement at the emitters, as pumping power is the product of pressure and flow rate. To efficiently design such an emitter, the relationship between the fluid-structure interactions that occur in an emitter need to be understood. In this study, a 2D analytical model that captures the behavior of a common drip emitter was developed and validated through experiments. The effects of independently changing the channel depth, channel width, channel length and land height on the performance were studied. The model and the key parametric insights presented have the potential to be optimized in order to guide the design of low-pressure, clog-resistant, pressure-compensating emitters.

  18. Decoupling Intensity Radiated by the Emitter in Distance Estimation from Camera to IR Emitter

    PubMed Central

    Cano-García, Angel E.; Galilea, José Luis Lázaro; Fernández, Pedro; Infante, Arturo Luis; Pompa-Chacón, Yamilet; Vázquez, Carlos Andrés Luna

    2013-01-01

    Various models using radiometric approach have been proposed to solve the problem of estimating the distance between a camera and an infrared emitter diode (IRED). They depend directly on the radiant intensity of the emitter, set by the IRED bias current. As is known, this current presents a drift with temperature, which will be transferred to the distance estimation method. This paper proposes an alternative approach to remove temperature drift in the distance estimation method by eliminating the dependence on radiant intensity. The main aim was to use the relative accumulated energy together with other defined models, such as the zeroth-frequency component of the FFT of the IRED image and the standard deviation of pixel gray level intensities in the region of interest containing the IRED image. By using the abovementioned models, an expression free of IRED radiant intensity was obtained. Furthermore, the final model permitted simultaneous estimation of the distance between the IRED and the camera and the IRED orientation angle. The alternative presented in this paper gave a 3% maximum relative error over a range of distances up to 3 m. PMID:23727954

  19. Barium Depletion in Hollow Cathode Emitters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polk, James E.; Capece, Angela M.; Mikellides, Ioannis G.; Katz, Ira

    2009-01-01

    The effect of tungsten erosion, transport and redeposition on the operation of dispenser hollow cathodes was investigated in detailed examinations of the discharge cathode inserts from an 8200 hour and a 30,352 hour ion engine wear test. Erosion and subsequent re-deposition of tungsten in the electron emission zone at the downstream end of the insert reduces the porosity of the tungsten matrix, preventing the ow of barium from the interior. This inhibits the interfacial reactions of the barium-calcium-aluminate impregnant with the tungsten in the pores. A numerical model of barium transport in the internal xenon discharge plasma shows that the barium required to reduce the work function in the emission zone can be supplied from upstream through the gas phase. Barium that flows out of the pores of the tungsten insert is rapidly ionized in the xenon discharge and pushed back to the emitter surface by the electric field and drag from the xenon ion flow. This barium ion flux is sufficient to maintain a barium surface coverage at the downstream end greater than 0.6, even if local barium production at that point is inhibited by tungsten deposits. The model also shows that the neutral barium pressure exceeds the equilibrium vapor pressure of the impregnant decomposition reaction over much of the insert length, so the reactions are suppressed. Only a small region upstream of the zone blocked by tungsten deposits is active and supplies the required barium. These results indicate that hollow cathode failure models based on barium depletion rates in vacuum dispenser cathodes are very conservative.

  20. Silicon Carbide Emitter Turn-Off Thyristor

    DOE PAGES

    Wang, Jun; Wang, Gangyao; Li, Jun; Huang, Alex Q.; Melcher, Jerry; Atcitty, Stan

    2008-01-01

    A novel MOS-conmore » trolled SiC thyristor device, the SiC emitter turn-off thyristor (ETO) is a promising technology for future high-voltage switching applications because it integrates the excellent current conduction capability of a SiC thyristor with a simple MOS-control interface. Through unity-gain turn-off, the SiC ETO also achieves excellent Safe Operation Area (SOA) and faster switching speeds than silicon ETOs. The world's first 4.5-kV SiC ETO prototype shows a forward voltage drop of 4.26 V at 26.5  A / cm 2 current density at room and elevated temperatures. Tested in an inductive circuit with a 2.5 kV DC link voltage and a 9.56-A load current, the SiC ETO shows a fast turn-off time of 1.63 microseconds and a low 9.88 mJ turn-off energy. The low switching loss indicates that the SiC ETO could operate at about 4 kHz if 100  W / cm 2 conduction and the 100  W / cm 2 turn-off losses can be removed by the thermal management system. This frequency capability is about 4 times higher than 4.5-kV-class silicon power devices. The preliminary demonstration shows that the SiC ETO is a promising candidate for high-frequency, high-voltage power conversion applications, and additional developments to optimize the device for higher voltage (>5 kV) and higher frequency (10 kHz) are needed.« less

  1. Nanostructure-Induced Distortion in Single-Emitter Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Lim, Kangmook; Ropp, Chad; Barik, Sabyasachi; Fourkas, John; Shapiro, Benjamin; Waks, Edo

    2016-09-14

    Single-emitter microscopy has emerged as a promising method of imaging nanostructures with nanoscale resolution. This technique uses the centroid position of an emitter's far-field radiation pattern to infer its position to a precision that is far below the diffraction limit. However, nanostructures composed of high-dielectric materials such as noble metals can distort the far-field radiation pattern. Previous work has shown that these distortions can significantly degrade the imaging of the local density of states in metallic nanowires using polarization-resolved imaging. But unlike nanowires, nanoparticles do not have a well-defined axis of symmetry, which makes polarization-resolved imaging difficult to apply. Nanoparticles also exhibit a more complex range of distortions, because in addition to introducing a high dielectric surface, they also act as efficient scatterers. Thus, the distortion effects of nanoparticles in single-emitter microscopy remains poorly understood. Here we demonstrate that metallic nanoparticles can significantly distort the accuracy of single-emitter imaging at distances exceeding 300 nm. We use a single quantum dot to probe both the magnitude and the direction of the metallic nanoparticle-induced imaging distortion and show that the diffraction spot of the quantum dot can shift by more than 35 nm. The centroid position of the emitter generally shifts away from the nanoparticle position, which is in contradiction to the conventional wisdom that the nanoparticle is a scattering object that will pull in the diffraction spot of the emitter toward its center. These results suggest that dielectric distortion of the emission pattern dominates over scattering. We also show that by monitoring the distortion of the quantum dot diffraction spot we can obtain high-resolution spatial images of the nanoparticle, providing a new method for performing highly precise, subdiffraction spatial imaging. These results provide a better understanding of the

  2. Process for making a cesiated diamond film field emitter and field emitter formed therefrom

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, D.F.; Kwan, S.W.

    1999-03-30

    A process for making a cesiated diamond film comprises (a) depositing a quantity of cesium iodide on the diamond film in a vacuum of between about 10{sup {minus}4} Torr and about 10{sup {minus}7} Torr, (b) increasing the vacuum to at least about 10{sup {minus}8} Torr, and (c) imposing an electron beam upon the diamond film, said electron beam having an energy sufficient to dissociate said cesium iodide and to incorporate cesium into interstices of the diamond film. The cesiated diamond film prepared according to the process has an operating voltage that is reduced by a factor of at least approximately 2.5 relative to conventional, non-cesiated diamond film field emitters. 2 figs.

  3. Process for making a cesiated diamond film field emitter and field emitter formed therefrom

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, David F.; Kwan, Simon W.

    1999-01-01

    A process for making a cesiated diamond film comprises (a) depositing a quantity of cesium iodide on the diamond film in a vacuum of between about 10.sup.-4 Torr and about 10.sup.-7 Torr, (b) increasing the vacuum to at least about 10.sup.-8 Torr, and (c) imposing an electron beam upon the diamond film, said electron beam having an energy sufficient to dissociate said cesium iodide and to incorporate cesium into interstices of the diamond film. The cesiated diamond film prepared according to the process has an operating voltage that is reduced by a factor of at least approximately 2.5 relative to conventional, non-cesiated diamond film field emitters.

  4. Transverse emittance dilution due to coupler kicks in linear accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buckley, Brandon; Hoffstaetter, Georg H.

    2007-11-01

    One of the main concerns in the design of low emittance linear accelerators (linacs) is the preservation of beam emittance. Here we discuss one possible source of emittance dilution, the coupler kick, due to transverse electromagnetic fields in the accelerating cavities of the linac caused by the power coupler geometry. In addition to emittance growth, the coupler kick also produces orbit distortions. It is common wisdom that emittance growth from coupler kicks can be strongly reduced by using two couplers per cavity mounted opposite each other or by having the couplers of successive cavities alternate from above to below the beam pipe so as to cancel each individual kick. While this is correct, including two couplers per cavity or alternating the coupler location requires large technical changes and increased cost for superconducting cryomodules where cryogenic pipes are arranged parallel to a string of several cavities. We therefore analyze consequences of alternate coupler placements. We show here that alternating the coupler location from above to below compensates the emittance growth as well as the orbit distortions. For sufficiently large Q values, alternating the coupler location from before to after the cavity leads to a cancellation of the orbit distortion but not of the emittance growth, whereas alternating the coupler location from before and above to behind and below the cavity cancels the emittance growth but not the orbit distortion. We show that cancellations hold for sufficiently large Q values. These compensations hold even when each cavity is individually detuned, e.g., by microphonics. Another effective method for reducing coupler kicks that is studied is the optimization of the phase of the coupler kick so as to minimize the effects on emittance from each coupler. This technique is independent of the coupler geometry but relies on operating on crest. A final technique studied is symmetrization of the cavity geometry in the coupler region with

  5. Tuning the Magnetic Transport of an Induction LINAC using Emittance

    SciTech Connect

    Houck, T L; Brown, C G; Ong, M M; Paul, A C; Wargo, P E; Zentler, J M

    2006-08-11

    The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Flash X-Ray (FXR) machine is a linear induction accelerator used to produce a nominal 18 MeV, 3 kA, 65 ns pulse width electron beam for hydrodynamic radiographs. A common figure of merit for this type of radiographic machine is the x-ray dose divided by the spot area on the bremsstrahlung converter where a higher FOM is desired. Several characteristics of the beam affect the minimum attainable x-ray spot size. The most significant are emittance (chaotic transverse energy), chromatic aberration (energy variation), and beam motion (transverse instabilities and corkscrew motion). FXR is in the midst of a multi-year optimization project to reduce the spot size. This paper describes the effort to reduce beam emittance by adjusting the fields of the transport solenoids and position of the cathode. If the magnetic transport is not correct, the beam will be mismatched and undergo envelope oscillations increasing the emittance. We measure the divergence and radius of the beam in a drift section after the accelerator by imaging the optical transition radiation (OTR) and beam envelope on a foil. These measurements are used to determine an emittance. Relative changes in the emittance can be quickly estimated from the foil measurements allowing for an efficient, real-time study. Once an optimized transport field is determined, the final focus can be adjusted and the new x-ray spot measured. A description of the diagnostics and analysis is presented.

  6. Study of Abnormal Vertical Emittance Growth in ATF Extraction Line

    SciTech Connect

    Alabau, M.; Faus-Golfe, A.; Alabau, M.; Bambade, P.; Brossard, J.; Le Meur, G.; Rimbault, C.; Touze, F.; Angal-Kalinin, D.; Jones, J.K.; Appleby, R.; Scarfe, A.; Kuroda, S.; White, G.R.; Woodley, M.; Zimmermann, F.; /CERN

    2011-11-04

    Since several years, the vertical beam emittance measured in the Extraction Line (EXT) of the Accelerator Test Facility (ATF) at KEK, that will transport the electron beam from the ATF Damping Ring (DR) to the future ATF2 Final Focus beam line, is significantly larger than the emittance measured in the DR itself, and there are indications that it grows rapidly with increasing beam intensity. This longstanding problem has motivated studies of possible sources of this anomalous emittance growth. One possible contribution is non-linear magnetic fields in the extraction region experimented by the beam while passing off-axis through magnets of the DR during the extraction process. In this paper, simulations of the emittance growth are presented and compared to observations. These simulations include the effects of predicted non-linear field errors in the shared DR magnets and orbit displacements from the reference orbit in the extraction region. Results of recent measurements using closed orbit bumps to probe the relation between the extraction trajectory and the anomalous emittance growth are also presented.

  7. Modeling field emitter arrays using nonlinear line charge distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswas, Debabrata; Singh, Gaurav; Kumar, Raghwendra

    2016-09-01

    Modeling high aspect ratio field emitter arrays is a computational challenge due to the enormity of the resources involved. The line charge model (LCM) provides an alternate semi-analytical tool that has been used to model both infinite as well as finite sized arrays. It is shown that the linearly varying charge density used in the LCM generically mimics ellipsoidal emitters rather than a Cylindrical-Post-with-an-Ellipsoidal-Tip (CPET) that is typical of nanowires. Furthermore, generalizing the charge density beyond the linear regime allows for modeling shapes that are closer to a CPET. Emitters with a fixed base radius and a fixed apex radius are studied with a view to understanding the effect of nonlinearity on the tip enhancement factor and the emitter current in each case. Furthermore, an infinite square array of the CPET emitters is studied using the nonlinear line charge model, each having a height h =1500 μm and a base radius b =1.5 μm . It is found that for moderate external field strengths ( 0.3 -0.4 V /μm ), the array current density falls sharply for lattice spacings smaller than 4/3 h . Beyond this value, the maximal array current density can be observed over a range of lattice spacings and falls gradually thereafter.

  8. Measurement of Transverse Emittance in the Fermilab Booster.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graves, William Sproull

    A new beam profile monitor has been built and installed in the Fermilab Booster synchrotron. It nondestructively measures the beam's vertical density distribution on a fast turn-by-turn basis. This enables one to measure the beam's transverse emittance and to observe emittance growth as it occurs. For high intensities (>2 times 10^{12 } protons), the normalized 95% emittance was observed to grow from 6pi mm-mrad at injection to 16pi mm-mrad at extraction. The initial (<5 msec) emittance growth and beam losses are shown to be caused by the space charge tune shift onto integer and 1/2 integer resonance lines. The growth near injection accounts for approximately 40% of the observed emittance increase throughout the acceleration cycle. The remaining 60% is due to two factors: slow linear growth due to betatron-motion driven by noise in the rf system; and faster growth after the transition energy that is caused by coupling of the longitudinal beam motion into the transverse planes.

  9. Field emitter arrays for plasma and microwave source applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, K. L.

    1999-05-01

    Field emitter arrays (FEAs) stand to strongly impact device performance when physical size, weight, power consumption, beam current, and/or high pulse repetition frequencies are an issue. FEAs are capable of instant ON/OFF performance, high brightness, high current density, large transconductance to capacitance ratio, and low voltage operation characteristics. Advanced microwave power tubes, and in particular, inductive output amplifiers, are by far the most technically challenging use to date. Other important uses include, e.g., electron sources for micropropulsion systems-Hall thrusters-and tethers for satellites, and (the most widely pursued application) field emission displays. The characteristics of field emitters that make them attractive to such applications shall be surveyed. A thorough analytical model of a field emitter array, beginning with a review of the nature of field emission and continuing with an analytical model of a single emitter and the operation of an array of emitters, shall be presented. In particular, attention shall be directed towards those features of FEAs that render them attractive as cold cathode candidates for electron beam generation. Tip characteristics, such as emission distribution, and array operation, such as space charge effects, will be analyzed in the context of the model. Finally, restricting attention to microwave applications, the performance of a tapered-helix inductive output amplifier to highlight the advantages of high frequency emission gating of the electron beam in a power tube shall be investigated.

  10. Emittance measurements in Grumman 1 MeV beamline

    SciTech Connect

    Debiak, T.; Gammel, G.; Melnychuk, S.

    1992-12-01

    The emittance of a 30 keV H{sup {minus}} beam has been measured with an Allison type electrostatic analyser at two positions separated by 85 cm along the Grumman 1 MeV beamline LEBT at low currents (about 4 mA, no Cs{sub 2}O additive in the source) and at higher currents (10-15 mA, with Cs{sub 2}O additive in the source). No emittance growth was observed between the two positions, but, at the higher current level, the emittance was about 60% higher than at the low current level ({Sigma}{sub n},rms = .0045 {pi} cm-mrad vs. 0070 {pi} cm-mrad). Argon was then introduced up to a partial pressure of 4x10{sup {minus}5} torr, and the emittance decreased back to a range corresponding to that found at the lower currents. However, beam noise was observed at the downstream position, and there is evidence for a small amount of emittance growth (<20%) between the two positions.

  11. Emittance growth in the DARHT Axis-II Downstream Transport

    SciTech Connect

    Ekdahl, Jr., Carl August; Schulze, Martin E.

    2015-04-14

    Using a particle-in-cell (PIC) code, we investigated the possibilities for emittance growth through the quadrupole magnets of the system used to transport the high-current electron beam from an induction accelerator to the bremsstrahlung converter target used for flash radiography. We found that even highly mismatched beams exhibited little emittance growth (< 6%), which we attribute to softening of their initial hard edge current distributions. We also used this PIC code to evaluate the accuracy of emittance measurements using a solenoid focal scan following the quadrupole magnets. If the beam is round after the solenoids, the simulations indicate that the measurement is highly accurate, but it is substantially inaccurate for elliptical beams

  12. Longitudinal emittance measurements in the Fermilab Recycler Ring

    SciTech Connect

    C. M. Bhat; John P. Marriner

    2003-06-10

    The Recycler Ring (RR) is a new 8Gev antiproton storage ring at Fermilab. Presently, this machine is being commissioned using protons from the Booster. It uses barrier buckets for stacking, un-stacking and storing the beam. At any given time, the RR is capable of storing proton or antiproton beams in multiple segments azimuthally. These segments of the beam may have widely differing longitudinal emittance and beam intensities and bunch lengths. It is highly essential to be able to measure the longitudinal emittance and keep track of the longitudinal dynamics at various stages of the operation of the RR. In this paper, the authors discuss a few methods of longitudinal emittance measurements in barrier buckets and discuss their merits and demerits

  13. Spring structure for a thermionic converter emitter support arrangement

    DOEpatents

    Allen, D.T.

    1992-03-17

    A support is provided for use in a thermionic converter to support an end of an emitter to keep it out of contact with a surrounding collector while allowing the emitter end to move axially as its temperature changes. The emitter end is supported by a spring structure that includes a pair of Belleville springs, and the spring structure is supported by a support structure fixed to the housing that includes the collector. The support structure is in the form of a sandwich with a small metal spring-engaging element at the front end, a larger metal main support at the rear end that is attached to the housing, and with a ceramic layer between them that is bonded by hot isostatic pressing to the metal element and metal main support. The spring structure can include a loose wafer captured between the Belleville springs. 7 figs.

  14. Spring structure for a thermionic converter emitter support arrangement

    DOEpatents

    Allen, Daniel T.

    1992-01-01

    A support is provided for use in a thermionic converter to support an end of an emitter to keep it out of contact with a surrounding collector while allowing the emitter end to move axially as its temperature changes. The emitter end (34) is supported by a spring structure (44) that includes a pair of Belleville springs, and the spring structure is supported by a support structure (42) fixed to the housing that includes the collector. The support structure is in the form of a sandwich with a small metal spring-engaging element (74) at the front end, a larger metal main support (76) at the rear end that is attached to the housing, and with a ceramic layer (80) between them that is bonded by hot isostatic pressing to the metal element and metal main support. The spring structure can include a loose wafer (120) captured between the Belleville springs.

  15. Laser Assisted Emittance Transfer for Storage Ring Lasing

    SciTech Connect

    Xiang, Dao; /SLAC

    2011-06-01

    In modern storage rings the transverse emittance of electron beams can be comparable to that from state-of-art photoinjectors, but the intrinsic low peak current and large energy spread pre-cludes the possibility of realizing short-wavelength high-gain free electron lasers (FELs) in storage rings. In this note I propose a technique to significantly increase beam peak current without greatly increasing beam energy spread, which is achieved by transferring part of the longitudinal emittance to transverse plane. It is shown that by properly repartitioning the emittance in 6-D phase space, the beam from a large storage ring may be used to drive a single-pass high-gain FEL in soft x-ray wavelength range.

  16. SiC IR emitter design for thermophotovoltaic generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraas, Lewis M.; Ferguson, Luke; McCoy, Larry G.; Pernisz, Udo C.

    1996-02-01

    An improved ceramic spine disc burner/emitter for use in a thermophotovoltaic (TPV) generator is described. A columnar infrared (IR) emitter consisting of a stack of silicon carbide (SiC) spine discs provides for both high conductance for the combustion gases and efficient heat transfer from the hot combustion gases to the emitter. Herein, we describe the design, fabrication, and testing of this SiC burner as well as the characterization of the IR spectrum it emits. We note that when the SiC column is surrounded with fused silica heat shields, these heat shields suppress the emitted power beyond 4 microns. Thus, a TPV generator using GaSb photovoltaic cells covered by simple dielectric filters can convert over 30% of the emitted IR radiation to DC electric power.

  17. HIGH RESOLUTION EMITTANCE MEASUREMENTS AT SNS FRONT END

    SciTech Connect

    Aleksandrov, Alexander V; Zhukov, Alexander P

    2013-01-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) linac accelerates an H- beam from 2.5MeV up to 1GeV. Recently the emittance scanner in the MEBT (2.5 MeV) was upgraded. In addition to the slit - harp measurement, we now can use a slit installed on the same actuator as the harp. In combination with a faraday cup located downstream in DTL part of the linac, it represents a classical slit-slit emittance measurement device. While a slit slit scan takes much longer, it is immune to harp related problems such as wire cross talk, and thus looks promising for accurate halo measurements. Time resolution of the new device seems to be sufficient to estimate the amount of beam in the chopper gap (the scanner is downstream of the chopper), and probably to measure its emittance. This paper describes the initial measurements with the new device and some model validation data.

  18. Study of narrowband single photon emitters in polycrystalline diamond films

    SciTech Connect

    Sandstrom, Russell G.; Shimoni, Olga; Martin, Aiden A.; Aharonovich, Igor

    2014-11-03

    Quantum information processing and integrated nanophotonics require robust generation of single photon emitters on demand. In this work, we demonstrate that diamond films grown on a silicon substrate by microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition can host bright, narrowband single photon emitters in the visible—near infra-red spectral range. The emitters possess fast lifetime (∼several ns), absolute photostability, and exhibit full polarization at excitation and emission. Pulsed and continuous laser excitations confirm their quantum behaviour at room temperature, while low temperature spectroscopy is performed to investigate inhomogeneous broadening. Our results advance the knowledge of solid state single photon sources and open pathways for their practical implementation in quantum communication and quantum information processing.

  19. Low Emittance Tuning Studies for SuperB

    SciTech Connect

    Liuzzo, Simone; Biagini, Maria; Raimondi, Pantaleo; Donald, Martin; /SLAC

    2012-07-06

    SuperB[1] is an international project for an asymmetric 2 rings collider at the B mesons cm energy to be built in the Rome area in Italy. The two rings will have very small beam sizes at the Interaction Point and very small emittances, similar to the Linear Collider Damping Rings ones. In particular, the ultra low vertical emittances, 7 pm in the LER and 4 pm in the HER, need a careful study of the misalignment errors effects on the machine performances. Studies on the closed orbit, vertical dispersion and coupling corrections have been carried out in order to specify the maximum allowed errors and to provide a procedure for emittance tuning. A new tool which combines MADX and Matlab routines has been developed, allowing for both corrections and tuning. Results of these studies are presented.

  20. Hybrid genetic optimization for design of photonic crystal emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rammohan, R. R.; Farfan, B. G.; Su, M. F.; El-Kady, I.; Reda Taha, M. M.

    2010-09-01

    A unique hybrid-optimization technique is proposed, based on genetic algorithms (GA) and gradient descent (GD) methods, for the smart design of photonic crystal (PhC) emitters. The photonic simulation is described and the granularity of photonic crystal dimensions is considered. An innovative sliding-window method for performing local heuristic search is demonstrated. Finally, the application of the proposed method on two case studies for the design of a multi-pixel photonic crystal emitter and the design of thermal emitter in thermal photovoltaic is demonstrated. Discussion in the report includes the ability of the optimal PhC structures designed using the proposed method, to produce unprecedented high emission efficiencies of 54.5% in a significantly long wavelength region and 84.9% at significantly short wavelength region.

  1. Fully tuneable, Purcell-enhanced solid-state quantum emitters

    SciTech Connect

    Petruzzella, M. Xia, T.; Pagliano, F.; Birindelli, S.; Zobenica, Z.; Fiore, A.; Midolo, L.; Li, L. H.; Linfield, E. H.

    2015-10-05

    We report the full energy control over a semiconductor cavity-emitter system, consisting of single Stark-tunable quantum dots embedded in mechanically reconfigurable photonic crystal membranes. A reversible wavelength tuning of the emitter over 7.5 nm as well as an 8.5 nm mode shift are realized on the same device. Harnessing these two electrical tuning mechanisms, a single exciton transition is brought on resonance with the cavity mode at several wavelengths, demonstrating a ten-fold enhancement of its spontaneous emission. These results open the way to bring several cavity-enhanced emitters mutually into resonance and therefore represent a key step towards scalable quantum photonic circuits featuring multiple sources of indistinguishable single photons.

  2. High-efficiency photonic crystal narrowband thermal emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farfan, G. B.; Su, M. F.; Reda Taha, M. M.; El-Kady, I.

    2010-02-01

    Photonic crystals (PhC) are artificial structures fabricated with a periodicity in the dielectric function. This periodic electromagnetic potential results in creation of energy bandgaps where photon propagation is prohibited. PhC structures have promising use in thermal applications if optimized to operate at specific thermal emission spectrum. Here, novel utilization of optimized PhC's in thermal applications is presented. We demonstrate through numerical simulation the modification of the thermal emission spectrum by a metallic photonic crystal (PhC) to create high-efficiency multispectral thermal emitters. These emitters funnel radiation from a broad emission spectrum associated with a Plancklike distribution into a prescribed narrow emission band. A detailed quantitative evaluation of the spectral and power efficiencies of a PhC thermal emitter and its portability across infrared (IR) spectral bands are provided. We show an optimized tungsten PhC with a predominant narrow-band emission profile with an emitter efficiency that is more than double that of an ideal blackbody and ~65-75% more power-efficiency across the IR spectrum. We also report on using optimal three-dimensional Lincoln log photonic crystal (LL-PhC) emitters for thermophotovoltaic (TPV) generation as opposed to using a passive filtering approach to truncate the broadband thermal source emission to match the bandgap of a photovoltaic (PV) cell. The emitter performance is optimized for the 1-2μm PV band using different PhC materials, specifically copper, silver and gold. The use of the proposed PhC in TPV devices can produce significant energy savings not reported before. The optimal design of the PhC geometry is obtained by implementing a variety of optimization methods integrated with artificial intelligence (AI) algorithms.

  3. Distributed proximity sensor system having embedded light emitters and detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Sukhan (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A distributed proximity sensor system is provided with multiple photosensitive devices and light emitters embedded on the surface of a robot hand or other moving member in a geometric pattern. By distributing sensors and emitters capable of detecting distances and angles to points on the surface of an object from known points in the geometric pattern, information is obtained for achieving noncontacting shape and distance perception, i.e., for automatic determination of the object's shape, direction and distance, as well as the orientation of the object relative to the robot hand or other moving member.

  4. LOW EMITTANCE ELECTRON BEAMS FOR THE RHIC ELECTRON COOLER

    SciTech Connect

    KEWISCH,J.; CHANG, X.

    2007-06-25

    An electron cooler, based on an Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) is under development for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RMIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory. This will be the first electron cooler operating at high energy with bunched beams. In order to achieve sufficient cooling of the ion beams the electron have to have a charge of 5 nC and a normalized emittance less than 4 {mu}. This paper presents the progress in optimizing the injector and the emittance improvements from shaping the charge distribution in the bunch.

  5. Mirrorless lasing from light emitters in percolating clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burlak, Gennadiy; Rubo, Y. G.

    2015-07-01

    We describe the lasing effect in the three-dimensional percolation system, where the percolating cluster is filled by active media composed by light emitters excited noncoherently. We show that, due to the presence of a topologically nontrivial photonic structure, the stimulated emission is modified with respect to both conventional and random lasers. The time dynamics and spectra of the lasing output are studied numerically with finite-difference time-domain approach. The Fermat principle and Monte Carlo approach are applied to characterize the optimal optical path and interconnection between the radiating emitters. The spatial structure of the laser mode is found by a long-time FDTD simulation.

  6. Ultra-Sensitivity Glucose Sensor Based on Field Emitters

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    A new glucose sensor based on field emitter of ZnO nanorod arrays (ZNA) was fabricated. This new type of ZNA field emitter-based sensor shows high sensitivity with experimental limit of detection of 1 nM glucose solution and a detection range from 1 nM to 50 μM in air at room temperature, which is lower than that of glucose sensors based on surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy, fluorescence signal transmission, and electrochemical signal transduction. The new glucose sensor provides a key technique for promising consuming application in biological system for detecting low levels of glucose on single cells or bacterial cultures. PMID:20596378

  7. Emittance Measurements at the Langley Chemical Physics Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, B. W.

    1960-01-01

    Total hemispherical emittance measurements are made routinely for materials which may be heated by electrical resistance methods over the temperature range of 600 degrees to 2,000 F by using a black-body reference method. This employs a conical black body and a thermopile detector with a calcium fluoride lens. Emittance is obtained by measuring the radiant flux from the specimen strip and comparing it with the flux from an equal area of the black-body cone at the same temperature. The temperature measurements are made by use of thermocouples. It is planned to extend the temperature range of this type of measurement to temperatures above 2,000 F. Another technique has been investigated for measuring emittance of materials not amenable to electrical heating or thermocouple attachment. This method uses a black-body-cavity furnace similar to that used in reference 5 to measure emittance of transparent materials such as glass. The method employs a heated black-body cavity in which the semicircular specimen is allowed to come to the equilibrium temperature of the cavity and then is rotated in front of a water-cooled viewing port where a sensitive thermistor detector alternately views the specimen surface and the black-body cavity. The ratio of the two readings gives the specimen emittance directly, for the temperature of the black body. The detector output is recorded on a fast Brown self-balancing potentiometer. The furnace is provided with a water-cooled blackened shutter which may be inserted behind the specimen to eliminate any transmitted black-body radiation if the specimen is transparent. This apparatus is capable of measuring total normal emittance over the temperature range of 1,000 degrees to 2,000 F. Preliminary data for boron nitride specimens of two thicknesses are shown where total normal emittance is plotted against temperature for two experimental conditions: (1) black-body radiation incident on the back of the specimen and (2) no black-body radiation

  8. Spectrum of classes of point emitters of electromagnetic wave fields.

    PubMed

    Castañeda, Román

    2016-09-01

    The spectrum of classes of point emitters has been introduced as a numerical tool suitable for the design, analysis, and synthesis of non-paraxial optical fields in arbitrary states of spatial coherence. In this paper, the polarization state of planar electromagnetic wave fields is included in the spectrum of classes, thus increasing its modeling capabilities. In this context, optical processing is realized as a filtering on the spectrum of classes of point emitters, performed by the complex degree of spatial coherence and the two-point correlation of polarization, which could be implemented dynamically by using programmable optical devices. PMID:27607498

  9. Beam emittance reduction during operation of Indus-2

    SciTech Connect

    Fakhri, Ali Akbar Kant, Pradeep; Ghodke, A. D.; Singh, Gurnam

    2015-11-15

    Indus-2 storage ring is a 2.5 GeV third generation synchrotron radiation source. This source was commissioned using a moderate optics. Beam injection was accomplished using an off momentum electron beam to avoid difficulties faced in storage of beam at 550 MeV. The injection procedure and relevant beam dynamical studies are discussed. The switch over from the moderate optics to low emittance optics is done at 2.5 GeV after storing the electron beam. The procedure evolved to reduce the beam emittance and its implementation during the operation is discussed.

  10. Spectrum of classes of point emitters of electromagnetic wave fields.

    PubMed

    Castañeda, Román

    2016-09-01

    The spectrum of classes of point emitters has been introduced as a numerical tool suitable for the design, analysis, and synthesis of non-paraxial optical fields in arbitrary states of spatial coherence. In this paper, the polarization state of planar electromagnetic wave fields is included in the spectrum of classes, thus increasing its modeling capabilities. In this context, optical processing is realized as a filtering on the spectrum of classes of point emitters, performed by the complex degree of spatial coherence and the two-point correlation of polarization, which could be implemented dynamically by using programmable optical devices.

  11. Observation of negative differential transconductance in tunneling emitter bipolar transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Veenhuizen, Marc J.; Locatelli, Nicolas; Moodera, Jagadeesh; Chang, Joonyeon

    2009-08-01

    We report on measurement of negative differential transconductance (NDTC) of iron (Fe)/magnesium-oxide (MgO)/silicon tunneling emitter NPN bipolar transistors. Device simulations reveal that the NDTC is a consequence of an inversion layer at the tunneling-oxide/P-silicon interface for low base voltages. Electrons travel laterally through the inversion layer into the base and give rise to an increase in collector current. The NDTC results from the recombination of those electrons at the interface between emitter and base contact which is dependent on the base voltage. For larger base voltages, the inversion layer disappears marking the onset of normal bipolar transistor behavior.

  12. Emittance conservation by tailored focusing profiles in a plasma accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dornmair, I.; Floettmann, K.; Maier, A. R.

    2015-04-01

    Laser-plasma accelerators, providing high electric field gradients, are promising candidates to drive next-generation compact light sources and high-energy applications. However, conservation of beam emittance, a prerequisite for future applications, is very challenging, as the accelerated beam has to be matched to the plasma's strong focusing forces. Here we derive with simulations ideal laser and plasma density profiles to match an electron beam in and out of a plasma stage, thus relaxing required beta functions for injection and minimizing divergence and emittance growth after the plasma.

  13. Pyrometric method for measuring emittances at high temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballestrín, J.; Rodríguez, J.; Carra, M. E.; Cañadas, I.; Roldan, M. I.; Barbero, J.; Marzo, A.

    2016-05-01

    In this work an alternative method for emittance determination based on pyrometric measurements is presented. The measurement procedure has been applied to AISI 310S steel samples in the Plataforma Solar de Almería vertical axis solar furnace SF5. The experimental results show that emittance increases with increasing temperature and decreases with increasing wavelength. This behaviour is in agreement with experimental results obtained by other authors. Analysis of tests has revealed a good repeatability (1%) and accuracy (< 2%) of this measurement procedure.

  14. The effects of emitter-tied field plates on lateral PNP ionizing radiation response

    SciTech Connect

    Barnaby, H.J.; Schrimpf, R.D.; Cirba, C.R.; Pease, R.L.; Fleetwood, D.M.; Kosier, S.L.

    1998-03-01

    Radiation response comparisons of lateral PNP bipolar technologies reveal that device hardening may be achieved by extending the emitter contact over the active base. The emitter-tied field plate suppresses recombination of carriers with interface traps.

  15. A novel inexpensive device for the electrochemical generation of metallic emitters for field desorption.

    PubMed

    Rechsteiner, C E; Mathis, D E; Bursey, M M; Buck, R P

    1977-02-01

    Details for the construction of a novel, inexpensive device for the electrochemical generation of metallic emitters for field desorption mass spectrometry are described. Use of the device for the generation of cobalt and nickel emitters is demonstrated. PMID:836944

  16. Magnetized Plasma Experiments Using Thermionic- Thermoelectronic Plasma Emitter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawamori, Eiichirou; Cheng, C. Z.; Fujikawa, Nobuko; Lee, Jyun-Yi; Peng, Albert

    2008-11-01

    We are developing a magnetic mirror device, which is the first magnetized plasma device in Taiwan, to explore basic plasma sciences relevant to fusion, space and astrophysical plasmas. Our research subjects include electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT), Alfven wave physics, and plasma turbulence. A large diameter (> 200 mm) plasma emitter1, which utilizes thermionic- thermoelectronic emission from a mixture of LaB6 (Lanthanum-hexaboride) and beta-eucryptite (lithium type aluminosylicate) powders, is employed as a plasma source because of its production ability of fully ionized plasma and controllability of plasma emission rate. The plasma emitter has been installed recently and investigation of its characteristics will be started. The employment of beta-eucryptite in plasma emitter is the first experimental test because such investigation of beta-eucryptite has previously been used only for Li+-ion source2. Our plan for magnetized plasma experiments and results of the plasma emitter investigation will be presented. 1. K. Saeki, S. Iizuka, N. Sato, and Y. Hatta, Appl. Phys. Lett., 37, 1980, pp. 37-38. 2. M. Ueda, R. R. Silva, R. M. Oliveira, H. Iguchi, J. Fujita and K. Kadota, J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys. 30 1997, pp. 2711--2716.

  17. Emittance control and RF bunch compression in the NSRRC photoinjector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lau, W. K.; Hung, S. B.; Lee, A. P.; Chou, C. S.; Huang, N. Y.

    2011-05-01

    The high-brightness photoinjector being constructed at the National Synchrotron Radiation Research Center is for testing new accelerator and light-source concepts. It is the so-called split photoinjector configuration in which a short solenoid magnet is used for emittance compensation. The UV-drive laser pulses are also shaped to produce uniform cylindrical bunches for further reduction of beam emittance. However, limited by the available power from our microwave power system, the nominal accelerating gradient in the S-band booster linac is set at 18 MV/m. A simulation study with PARMELA shows that the linac operating at this gradient fails to freeze the electron beam emittance at low value. A background solenoid magnetic field is applied for beam emittance control in the linac during acceleration. A satisfactory result that meets our preliminary goal has been achieved with the solenoid magnetic field strength at 0.1 T. RF bunch compression as a means to achieve the required beam brightness for high-gain free-electron laser experiments is also examined. The reduction of bunch length to a few hundred femtoseconds can be obtained.

  18. Silicon photonic crystal thermal emitter at near-infrared wavelengths

    PubMed Central

    O’Regan, Bryan J.; Wang, Yue; Krauss, Thomas F.

    2015-01-01

    Controlling thermal emission with resonant photonic nanostructures has recently attracted much attention. Most of the work has concentrated on the mid-infrared wavelength range and/or was based on metallic nanostructures. Here, we demonstrate the experimental operation of a resonant thermal emitter operating in the near-infrared (≈1.5 μm) wavelength range. The emitter is based on a doped silicon photonic crystal consisting of a two dimensional square array of holes and using silicon-on-insulator technology with a device-layer thickness of 220 nm. The device is resistively heated by passing current through the photonic crystal membrane. At a temperature of ≈1100 K, we observe relatively sharp emission peaks with a Q factor around 18. A support structure system is implemented in order to achieve a large area suspended photonic crystal thermal emitter and electrical injection. The device demonstrates that weak absorption together with photonic resonances can be used as a wavelength-selection mechanism for thermal emitters, both for the enhancement and the suppression of emission. PMID:26293111

  19. Low emittance injector design for free electron lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bettoni, S.; Pedrozzi, M.; Reiche, S.

    2015-12-01

    Several parameters determine the performance of free electron lasers: the slice and the projected emittance, the slice energy spread, and the peak current are the most crucial ones. The peak current is essentially obtained by magnetic compression stages along the machine or occasionally assisted by velocity bunching at low energy. The minimum emittance and the alignment of the slices along the bunch are mainly determined in the low energy part of the accelerator (injector). Variations at the per-mille level of several parameters in this section of the machine strongly influence these quantities with highly nonlinear dynamic. We developed a numerical tool to perform the optimization of the injector. We applied this code to optimize the SwissFEL injector, assuming different gun designs, initial bunch lengths and intrinsic emittances. We obtained an emittance along the bunch of 0.14 mm mrad and around 0.08 mm mrad for the maximum and the minimum SwissFEL charges (200 and 10 pC, respectively). We applied the same tool to a running injector, where we automatized the optimization of the machine.

  20. Display System by Light Emitter Embedding Windmill Blade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Masaatsu; Kamiya, Takashi; Yukita, Kazuto; Goto, Yasuyuki; Ichiyanagi, Katsuhiro; Kusakabe, Tetsuro

    This paper proposes the new display system by windmill blade. The proposed method is a system by the visual afterimage phenomenon, using windmill blade in which the light emitter has been embedded. This system shows new effectiveness of the wind power generator system.

  1. Imaging of alpha emitters in a field environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sand, Johan; Ihantola, Sakari; Peräjärvi, Kari; Nicholl, Adrian; Hrnecek, Erich; Toivonen, Harri; Toivonen, Juha

    2015-05-01

    Cameras sensitive to ultraviolet light can be applied to detection of surface contamination induced by alpha particle emitters. When absorbed in air, alpha particles excite nitrogen molecules and the radiative relaxation creates a faint light emission. This radioluminescence can be used for detection purposes, provided that background lighting levels are low. In this work, three low-light sensitive camera technologies (CCD, EMCCD and ICCD) were utilized in a nuclear facility, and their performance in detecting alpha emitters was investigated. The results show that low readout noise is essential for the detection of radioluminescence, as it allows short exposure times to be used. The ICCD camera was found to perform slightly better than the EMCCD camera in the field, while both enable the detection of MBq level alpha activities in 100 s in the test configuration (camera-target distance 0.5 m). Overall, the cameras and techniques used in this study are shown to be effective in detecting alpha emitters in a standard glovebox. This technology can be applied to nuclear security, safety and safeguards, when stand-off detection of alpha emitters is required.

  2. Achieving ultra-high temperatures with a resistive emitter array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danielson, Tom; Franks, Greg; Holmes, Nicholas; LaVeigne, Joe; Matis, Greg; McHugh, Steve; Norton, Dennis; Vengel, Tony; Lannon, John; Goodwin, Scott

    2016-05-01

    The rapid development of very-large format infrared detector arrays has challenged the IR scene projector community to also develop larger-format infrared emitter arrays to support the testing of systems incorporating these detectors. In addition to larger formats, many scene projector users require much higher simulated temperatures than can be generated with current technology in order to fully evaluate the performance of their systems and associated processing algorithms. Under the Ultra High Temperature (UHT) development program, Santa Barbara Infrared Inc. (SBIR) is developing a new infrared scene projector architecture capable of producing both very large format (>1024 x 1024) resistive emitter arrays and improved emitter pixel technology capable of simulating very high apparent temperatures. During earlier phases of the program, SBIR demonstrated materials with MWIR apparent temperatures in excess of 1400 K. New emitter materials have subsequently been selected to produce pixels that achieve even higher apparent temperatures. Test results from pixels fabricated using the new material set will be presented and discussed. A 'scalable' Read In Integrated Circuit (RIIC) is also being developed under the same UHT program to drive the high temperature pixels. This RIIC will utilize through-silicon via (TSV) and Quilt Packaging (QP) technologies to allow seamless tiling of multiple chips to fabricate very large arrays, and thus overcome the yield limitations inherent in large-scale integrated circuits. Results of design verification testing of the completed RIIC will be presented and discussed.

  3. Silicon photonic crystal thermal emitter at near-infrared wavelengths.

    PubMed

    O'Regan, Bryan J; Wang, Yue; Krauss, Thomas F

    2015-08-21

    Controlling thermal emission with resonant photonic nanostructures has recently attracted much attention. Most of the work has concentrated on the mid-infrared wavelength range and/or was based on metallic nanostructures. Here, we demonstrate the experimental operation of a resonant thermal emitter operating in the near-infrared (≈1.5 μm) wavelength range. The emitter is based on a doped silicon photonic crystal consisting of a two dimensional square array of holes and using silicon-on-insulator technology with a device-layer thickness of 220 nm. The device is resistively heated by passing current through the photonic crystal membrane. At a temperature of ≈1100 K, we observe relatively sharp emission peaks with a Q factor around 18. A support structure system is implemented in order to achieve a large area suspended photonic crystal thermal emitter and electrical injection. The device demonstrates that weak absorption together with photonic resonances can be used as a wavelength-selection mechanism for thermal emitters, both for the enhancement and the suppression of emission.

  4. A Study of Emittance Measurement at the ILC

    SciTech Connect

    Blair, G.A.; Agapov, I.V.; Carter, J.; Deacon, L.; Angal-Kalinin, D.A.K.; Jenner, L.J.; Ross, M.C.; Seryi, A.; Woodley, M.; /SLAC

    2007-04-16

    The measurement of the International Linear Collider (ILC) emittance in the ILC beam delivery system (BDS) is simulated. Estimates of statistical and machine-related errors are discussed and the implications for related diagnostics R&D are inferred. A simulation of the extraction of the laser-wire Compton signal is also presented.

  5. What Exactly Is the Light Emitter of a Firefly?

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yuan-Yuan; Liu, Ya-Jun

    2015-11-10

    Firefly bioluminescence attracts people by its glaring beauty and fascinating applications, but what is the light emitter of a firefly? The answer to this question has been explored since before the 1960s. The unanimously accepted answer is that excited-state oxyluciferin is the light emitter. The complexity of this question arises from the existence of six chemical forms (keto, enol, keto-1, enol-1, enol-1′, and enol-2) of oxyluciferin. After decades of experimental and theoretical efforts, a consistent conclusion was almost reached in 2011: excited-state keto-1 is the only light emitter in fireflies. However, the debate is raised again by the latest in vitro experimental results. This study will solve this contradiction via hybrid quantum mechanics and molecular mechanics (QM/MM) calculations combined with molecular dynamics (MD). The calculations were performed in the real protein for the six chemical forms of oxyluciferin and their corresponding analogues employed in the latest experiments. By considering the real environment, the pH value, and a possible equilibrium of the chemical forms of oxyluciferin in vivo, the calculated results indicate that the main emitter is still the excited-state keto-1 form.

  6. Transverse beam emittance measurement using quadrupole variation at KIRAMS-430

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Dong Hyun; Hahn, Garam; Park, Chawon

    2015-02-01

    In order to produce a 430 MeV/u carbon ion (12 C 6+) beam for medical therapy, the Korea Institute of Radiological & Medical Sciences (KIRAMS) has carried out the development of a superconducting isochronous cyclotron, the KIRAMS-430. At the extraction of the cyclotron, an Energy Selection System (ESS) is located to modulate the fixed beam energy and to drive the ion beam through High Energy Beam Transport (HEBT) into the treatment room. The beam emittance at the ion beamline is to be measured to provide information on designing a beam with high quality. The well-known quadrupole variation method was used to determine the feasibility of measuring the transverse beam emittance. The beam size measured at the beam profile monitor (BPM) is to be utilized and the transformation of beam by transfer matrix is to be applied being taken under various transport condition of varying quadrupole magnetic strength. Two different methods where beam optics are based on the linear matrix formalism and particle tracking with a 3-D magnetic field distribution obtained by using OPERA3D TOSCA, are applied to transport the beam. The fittings for the transformation parameters are used to estimate the transverse emittance and the twiss parameters at the entrance of the quadrupole in the ESS. Including several systematic studies, we conclude that within the uncertainty the estimated emittances are consistent with the ones calculated by using Monte Carlo simulations.

  7. High-absorptance high-emittance anodic coating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Le, Huong Giang (Inventor); Chesterfield, John L. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A colored anodic coating for use on surfaces of substrates, e.g. aluminum substrates in which it is desirable to maintain a high solar absorptance (.alpha.) and a high infrared emittance (.epsilon.), particularly in low earth orbit space environments. This anodic coating is preferably a dark colored coating, and even more preferably a black coating. This coating allows a touch temperature within an acceptable design range to preclude burning of an astronaut in case of contact, but also allows a solar radiation absorption in an amount such that an .alpha./.epsilon. ratio of unity is achieved. The coating of the invention comprises a first layer in the form of an acid anodized colored anodic layer for achieving a high solar absorptance and a second or high emittance layer in the form of a clear acid anodized layer for achieving a high emittance. The entire coating is quite thin, e.g. 1-2 mils and is quite stable in a hostile space environment of the type encountered in a low earth orbit. The coating is obtained by first creating the high emittance clear anodized coating on the metal surface followed by anodizing using a colored anodizing process.

  8. High-absorptance high-emittance anodic coating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Le, Huong Giang (Inventor); Chesterfield, John L. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    A colored anodic coating for use on surfaces of substrates, e.g. aluminum substrates in which it is desirable to maintain a high solar absorptance (a) and a high infrared emittance (e), particularly in low earth orbit space environments. This anodic coating is preferably a dark colored coating, and even more preferably a black coating. This coating allows a touch temperature within an acceptable design range to preclude burning of an astronaut in case of contact, but also allows a solar radiation absorption in an amount such that an a/e ratio of unity is achieved. The coating of the invention comprises a first layer in the form of an acid anodized colored anodic layer for achieving a high solar absorptance and a second or high emittance layer in the form of a clear acid anodized layer for achieving a high emittance. The entire coating is quite thin, e.g. 1-2 mils and is quite stable in a hostile space environment of the type encountered in a low earth orbit. The coating is obtained by first creating the high emittance clear anodized coating on the metal surface followed by anodizing using a colored anodizing process.

  9. Improved Photoresist Coating for Making CNT Field Emitters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toda, Risaku; Manohara, Harish

    2009-01-01

    An improved photoresist-coating technique has been developed for use in the fabrication of carbon-nanotube- (CNT) based field emitters is described. The improved photoresist coating technique overcomes what, heretofore, has been a major difficulty in the fabrication process.

  10. Improving Emittance of High-Temperature Insulating Tile

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gzowski, E. R.

    1985-01-01

    Simple addition to ceramic insulating tiles provides backup properties that minimize transfer of heat through tiles when their surfaces become damaged. Addition of 3 percent by weight of 320- or 600-grit silicon carbide powder to ceramic during production results in impregnated tile material that resists overheating. Silicon carbide increases emittance and decreases transmittance of ceramic.

  11. Emitter/absorber interface of CdTe solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Tao; Kanevce, Ana; Sites, James R.

    2016-06-01

    The performance of CdTe solar cells can be very sensitive to the emitter/absorber interface, especially for high-efficiency cells with high bulk lifetime. Performance losses from acceptor-type interface defects can be significant when interface defect states are located near mid-gap energies. Numerical simulations show that the emitter/absorber band alignment, the emitter doping and thickness, and the defect properties of the interface (i.e., defect density, defect type, and defect energy) can all play significant roles in the interface recombination. In particular, a type I heterojunction with small conduction-band offset (0.1 eV ≤ ΔEC ≤ 0.3 eV) can help maintain good cell efficiency in spite of high interface defect density, much like with Cu(In,Ga)Se2 (CIGS) cells. The basic principle is that positive ΔEC, often referred to as a "spike," creates an absorber inversion and hence a large hole barrier adjacent to the interface. As a result, the electron-hole recombination is suppressed due to an insufficient hole supply at the interface. A large spike (ΔEC ≥ 0.4 eV), however, can impede electron transport and lead to a reduction of photocurrent and fill-factor. In contrast to the spike, a "cliff" (ΔEC < 0 eV) allows high hole concentration in the vicinity of the interface, which will assist interface recombination and result in a reduced open-circuit voltage. Another way to mitigate performance losses due to interface defects is to use a thin and highly doped emitter, which can invert the absorber and form a large hole barrier at the interface. CdS is the most common emitter material used in CdTe solar cells, but the CdS/CdTe interface is in the cliff category and is not favorable from the band-offset perspective. The ΔEC of other n-type emitter choices, such as (Mg,Zn)O, Cd(S,O), or (Cd,Mg)Te, can be tuned by varying the elemental ratio for an optimal positive value of ΔEC. These materials are predicted to yield higher voltages and would therefore be

  12. Beam Loss and Longitudinal Emittance Growth in SIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirk, M.; Hofmann, I.; Boine-Frankenheim, O.; Spiller, P.; Hülsmann, P.; Franchetti, G.; Damerau, H.; König, H. Günter; Klingbeil, H.; Kumm, M.; Moritz, P.; Schütt, P.; Redelbach, A.

    2005-06-01

    Beam losses of several percent occur regularly in SIS. The onset occurs during the RF capture of the beam. Previous studies have revealed that the losses can come from the RF bucket at the start of acceleration being over filled due to the longitudinal bucket acceptance being too small, or due to the mismatch between the mean energy from the UNILAC and synchronous energy of the SIS. The beam losses as measured by a DC beam transformer however show in addition to the sharp initial drop, for the above reasons, a much slower decay in the beam intensity. The speculated cause comes from the incoherent transverse tune shift of the bunched beam, which forces particles into transverse resonant conditions. The longitudinal emittance growth is also another important issue for SIS. Past measurements from Schottky-noise pick-ups have shown a factor of 3-5 increase in the longitudinal emittance depending on the extraction energy; a large factor when compared against expectations from theory. These factors were calculated from the ratio between the normalized relative momentum spread of the DC beam before RF capture and after debunching. In this present work, tomographical techniques have been used to reconstruct the phasespace from a series of bunch profile measurements from a Beam Position Monitor (BPM). Therefore one can find the rate of growth in the longitudinal emittance from a series of high resolution BPM measurements along the RF ramp. Furthermore the initial phasespace density matrix from these reconstructions has been used to generate the initial population of macroparticles for the ESME longitudinal dynamics Particle-In-Cell code, thereby enabling a comparison between the longitudinal emittance growth of the beam under ideal conditions and that of the experiment. The longitudinal emittance growth (rms) during the acceleration (˜540ms) was approximately 20%, and that during the RF capture was estimated to have an upper limit of about 40%. Later measurements have also

  13. Emittance studies of the SNS external-antenna H- ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Baoxi; Stockli, Martin P; Welton, Robert F; Pennisi, Terry R; Murray Jr, S N; Santana, Manuel; Long, Cary D

    2010-01-01

    A new Allison-type emittance scanner has been built to characterize the ion sources and low energy beam transport systems at SNS. In this work, the emittance characteristics of the H- beam produced with the external-antenna RF-driven ion source and transported through the 2-lens electrostatic LEBT are studied. The beam emittance dependence on beam intensity, extraction parameters, and the evolution of the emittance and twiss parameters over beam pulse duration are presented.

  14. Experimentally minimized beam emittance from an L-band photoinjector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krasilnikov, M.; Stephan, F.; Asova, G.; Grabosch, H.-J.; Groß, M.; Hakobyan, L.; Isaev, I.; Ivanisenko, Y.; Jachmann, L.; Khojoyan, M.; Klemz, G.; Köhler, W.; Mahgoub, M.; Malyutin, D.; Nozdrin, M.; Oppelt, A.; Otevrel, M.; Petrosyan, B.; Rimjaem, S.; Shapovalov, A.; Vashchenko, G.; Weidinger, S.; Wenndorff, R.; Flöttmann, K.; Hoffmann, M.; Lederer, S.; Schlarb, H.; Schreiber, S.; Templin, I.; Will, I.; Paramonov, V.; Richter, D.

    2012-10-01

    High brightness electron sources for linac based free-electron lasers (FELs) are being developed at the Photo Injector Test facility at DESY, Zeuthen site (PITZ). Production of electron bunches with extremely small transverse emittance is the focus of the PITZ scientific program. The photoinjector optimization in 2008-2009 for a bunch charge of 1, 0.5, 0.25, and 0.1 nC resulted in measured emittance values which are beyond the requirements of the European XFEL [S. Rimjaem , Nucl. Instrum. Methods Phys. Res., Sect. A 671, 62 (2012)NIMAER0168-900210.1016/j.nima.2011.12.101]. Several essential modifications were commissioned in 2010-2011 at PITZ, resulting in further improvement of the photoinjector performance. Significant improvement of the rf gun phase stability is a major contribution in the reduction of the measured transverse emittance. The old TESLA prototype booster was replaced by a new cut disk structure cavity. This allows acceleration of the electron beam to higher energies and supports much higher flexibility for stable booster operation as well as for longer rf pulses which is of vital importance especially for the emittance optimization of low charge bunches. The transverse phase space of the electron beam was optimized at PITZ for bunch charges in the range between 0.02 and 2 nC, where the quality of the beam measurements was preserved by utilizing long pulse train operation. The experimental optimization yielded worldwide unprecedented low normalized emittance beams in the whole charge range studied.

  15. Low Emittance Guns for the ILC Polarized Electron Beam

    SciTech Connect

    Clendenin, J.E.; Brachmann, A.; Ioakeimidi, K.; Kirby, R.E.; Maruyama, T.; Miller, R.H.; Wang, J.W.; Zhou, F.; /SLAC

    2006-12-01

    Polarized electron beams generated by DC guns are routinely available at several accelerators including JLAB, Mainz and SLAC. These guns operate with a cathode bias on the order of -100 kV. To minimize space charge effects, relatively long bunches are generated at the gun and then compressed longitudinally external to the gun just before and during initial acceleration. For linear colliders, this compression is accomplished using a combination of rf bunchers. For the basic design of the International Linear Collider (ILC), a 120 kV DC photocathode gun is used to produce a series of nanosecond bunches that are each compressed by two sub-harmonic bunchers (SHBs) followed by an L-band buncher and capture section. The longitudinal bunching process results in a significantly higher emittance than produced by the gun alone. While high-energy experiments using polarized beams are not generally sensitive to the source emittance, there are several benefits to a lower source emittance including a simpler more efficient injector system and a lower radiation load during transport especially at bends as at the damping ring. For the ILC, the SHBs could be eliminated if the voltage of the gun is raised sufficiently. Simulations using the General Particle Tracer (GPT) package indicate that a cathode bias voltage of {ge}200 kV should allow both SHBs to be operated at 433 or even 650 MHz, while {ge}500 kV would be required to eliminate the SHBs altogether. Simulations can be used to determine the minimum emittance possible if the injector is designed for a given increased voltage. A possible alternative to the DC gun is an rf gun. Emittance compensation, routinely used with rf guns, is discussed for higher-voltage DC guns.

  16. Low Emittance Guns for the ILC Polarized Electron Beam

    SciTech Connect

    Clendenin, J. E.; Brachmann, A.; Ioakeimidi, K.; Kirby, R. E.; Maruyama, T.; Miller, R. H.; Wang, J. W.; Zhou, F.

    2007-06-13

    Polarized electron beams generated by DC guns are routinely available at several accelerators including JLAB, Mainz and SLAC. These guns operate with a cathode bias on the order of -100 kV. To minimize space charge effects, relatively long bunches are generated at the gun and then compressed longitudinally external to the gun just before and during initial acceleration. For linear colliders, this compression is accomplished using a combination of rf bunchers. For the basic design of the International Linear Collider (ILC), a 120 kV DC photocathode gun is used to produce a series of nanosecond bunches that are each compressed by two sub-harmonic bunchers (SHBs) followed by an L-band buncher and capture section. The longitudinal bunching process results in a significantly higher emittance than produced by the gun alone. While high-energy experiments using polarized beams are not generally sensitive to the source emittance, there are several benefits to a lower source emittance including a simpler more efficient injector system and a lower radiation load during transport especially at bends as at the damping ring. For the ILC, the SHBs could be eliminated if the voltage of the gun is raised sufficiently. Simulations using the General Particle Tracer (GPT) package indicate that a cathode bias voltage of {>=}200 kV should allow both SHBs to be operated at 433 or even 650 MHz, while {>=}500 kV would be required to eliminate the SHBs altogether. Simulations can be used to determine the minimum emittance possible if the injector is designed for a given increased voltage. A possible alternative to the DC gun is an rf gun. Emittance compensation, routinely used with rf guns, is discussed for higher-voltage DC guns.

  17. Spacecraft charging control by thermal, field emission with lanthanum-hexaboride emitters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, J. F.

    1978-01-01

    Thermal, field emitters of lanthanum (or perhaps cerium) hexaboride (LaB6) with temperature variability up to about 1500K are suggested for spacecraft charging control. Such emitters operate at much lower voltages with considerably more control and add plasma-diagnostic versatility. These gains should outweigh the additional complexity of providing heat for the LaB6 thermal, field emitter.

  18. Using antennas separated in flight direction to avoid effect of emitter clock drift in geolocation

    DOEpatents

    Ormesher, Richard C.; Bickel, Douglas L

    2012-10-23

    The location of a land-based radio frequency (RF) emitter is determined from an airborne platform. RF signaling is received from the RF emitter via first and second antennas. In response to the received RF signaling, signal samples for both antennas are produced and processed to determine the location of the RF emitter.

  19. Emittance measurements from a laser-driven electron injector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reis, David A.

    1999-11-01

    The Gun Test Facility (GTF) at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center was constructed to develop an appropriate electron beam suitable for driving a short wavelength free electron laser (FEL) such as the proposed Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). For operation at a wavelength of 1.5 Å, the LCLS requires an electron injector that can produce an electron beam with approximately I π mm-mrad normalized rms emittance with at least 1 nC of charge in a 10 ps or shorter bunch. The GTF consists of a photocathode rf gun, emittance- compensation solenoid, 3 m linear accelerator (linac), drive laser, and diagnostics to measure the beam. The rf gun is a symmetrized 1.6 cell, S-band, high gradient, room temperature, photocathode structure. Simulations show that this gun when driven by a temporally and spatially shaped drive laser, appropriately focused with the solenoid, and further accelerated in linac can produce a beam that meets the LCLS requirements. This thesis describes the initial characterization of the laser and electron beam at the GTF. A convolved measurement of the relative timing between the laser and the rf phase in the gun shows that the jitter is less than 2.5 ps rms. Emittance measurements of the electron beam at 35 MeV are reported as a function of the (Gaussian) pulse length and transverse profile of the laser as well as the charge of the electron beam at constant phase and gradient in both the gun and linac. At 1 nC the emittance was found to be ~13 π mm-mrad for 5 ps, and 8 ps long laser pulses. At 0.5 nC the measured emittance decreased approximately 20% in the 5 ps case and 40% in the 8 ps case. These measurements are between 40-80% higher than simulations for similar experimental conditions. In addition, the thermal emittance of the electron beam was measured to be 0.15 π mm-mrad.

  20. High-current lanthanum-hexaboride electron emitter for a quasi-stationary arc plasma generator

    SciTech Connect

    Davydenko, V. I. Ivanov, A. A. Shul’zhenko, G. I.

    2015-11-15

    A high-current electron emitter on the basis of lanthanum hexaboride is developed for quasi-stationary arc plasma generators of ion sources. The emitter consists of a set of LaB{sub 6} washers interleaved with washers made of thermally extended graphite. The emitter is heated by the current flowing through the graphite washers. The thermal regime of emitter operation during plasma generation is considered. The emitter has been successfully used in the ion sources of the diagnostic injectors of fast hydrogen atomic beams.

  1. High-current lanthanum-hexaboride electron emitter for a quasi-stationary arc plasma generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davydenko, V. I.; Ivanov, A. A.; Shul'zhenko, G. I.

    2015-11-01

    A high-current electron emitter on the basis of lanthanum hexaboride is developed for quasi-stationary arc plasma generators of ion sources. The emitter consists of a set of LaB6 washers interleaved with washers made of thermally extended graphite. The emitter is heated by the current flowing through the graphite washers. The thermal regime of emitter operation during plasma generation is considered. The emitter has been successfully used in the ion sources of the diagnostic injectors of fast hydrogen atomic beams.

  2. Experimental study of coherent synchrotron radiation in the emittance exchange line at the A0-photoinjector

    SciTech Connect

    Thangaraj, Jayakar C.T.; Thurman-Keup, R.; Johnson, A.; Lumpkin, A.H.; Edwards, H.; Ruan, J.; Santucci, J.; Sun, Y.E.-; Church, M.; Piot, P.; /Fermilab /Northern Illinois U.

    2010-08-01

    Next generation accelerators will require a high current, low emittance beam with a low energy spread. Such accelerators will employ advanced beam conditioning systems such as emittance exchanger to manipulate high brightness beams. One of the goals of the Fermilab A0 photoinjector is to investigate the transverse to longitudinal emittance exchange principle. Coherent synchrotron radiation could limit high current operation of the emittance exchanger. In this paper, we report on the preliminary experimental and simulation study of the coherent synchroton radiation (CSR) in the emittance exchange line at A0 photoinjector.

  3. Emittance Measurements Relevant to a 250 W(sub t) Class RTPV Generator for Space Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolford, Dave; Chubb, Donald; Clark, Eric; Pal, Anna Maria; Scheiman, Dave; Colon, Jack

    2009-01-01

    A proposed 250 Wt Radioisotope Thermophotovoltaic (RTPV) power system for utilization in lunar exploration and the subsequent exploration of Mars is described. Details of emitter selection are outlined for use in a maintenance free power supply that is productive over a 14-year mission life. Thorough knowledge of a material s spectral emittance is essential for accurate modeling of the RTPV system. While sometimes treated as a surface effect, emittance involves radiation from within a material. This creates a complex thermal gradient which is a combination of conductive and radiative heat transfer mechanisms. Emittance data available in the literature is a valuable resource but it is particular to the test sample s physical characteristics and the test environment. Considerations for making spectral emittance measurements relevant to RTPV development are discussed. Measured spectral emittance data of refractory emitter materials is given. Planned measurement system modifications to improve relevance to the current project are presented.

  4. Effect of beam emittance on self-modulation of long beams in plasma wakefield accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Lotov, K. V.

    2015-12-15

    The initial beam emittance determines the maximum wakefield amplitude that can be reached as a result of beam self-modulation in the plasma. The wakefield excited by the fully self-modulated beam decreases linearly with the increase in the beam emittance. There is a value of initial emittance beyond which the self-modulation does not develop even if the instability is initiated by a strong seed perturbation. The emittance scale at which the wakefield is suppressed by a factor of two with respect to the zero-emittance case (the so called critical emittance) is determined by inability of the excited wave to confine beam particles radially and is related to beam and plasma parameters by a simple formula. The effect of beam emittance can be observed in several discussed self-modulation experiments.

  5. Developments of fast emittance monitors for ion sources at RCNP.

    PubMed

    Yorita, T; Hatanaka, K; Fukuda, M; Shimada, K; Yasuda, Y; Saito, T; Tamura, H; Kamakura, K

    2016-02-01

    Recently, several developments of low energy beam transport line and its beam diagnostic systems have been performed to improve the injection efficiency of ion beam to azimuthally varying field cyclotron at Research Center for Nuclear Physics, Osaka University. One of those is the fast emittance monitor which can measure within several seconds for the efficient beam development and a Pepper-Pot Emittance Monitor (PPEM) has been developed. The PPEM consists of pepper-pot mask, multichannel plate, fluorescent screen, mirror, and CCD camera. The CCD image is taken via IEEE1394b to a personal computer and analyzed immediately and frequently, and then real time measurement with about 2 Hz has been achieved.

  6. Coupling of individual quantum emitters to channel plasmons

    PubMed Central

    Bermúdez-Ureña, Esteban; Gonzalez-Ballestero, Carlos; Geiselmann, Michael; Marty, Renaud; Radko, Ilya P.; Holmgaard, Tobias; Alaverdyan, Yury; Moreno, Esteban; García-Vidal, Francisco J.; Bozhevolnyi, Sergey I.; Quidant, Romain

    2015-01-01

    Efficient light-matter interaction lies at the heart of many emerging technologies that seek on-chip integration of solid-state photonic systems. Plasmonic waveguides, which guide the radiation in the form of strongly confined surface plasmon-polariton modes, represent a promising solution to manipulate single photons in coplanar architectures with unprecedented small footprints. Here we demonstrate coupling of the emission from a single quantum emitter to the channel plasmon polaritons supported by a V-groove plasmonic waveguide. Extensive theoretical simulations enable us to determine the position and orientation of the quantum emitter for optimum coupling. Concomitantly with these predictions, we demonstrate experimentally that 42% of a single nitrogen-vacancy centre emission efficiently couples into the supported modes of the V-groove. This work paves the way towards practical realization of efficient and long distance transfer of energy for integrated solid-state quantum systems. PMID:26249363

  7. Emittance Correction in the 2006 ILC Bunch Compressor

    SciTech Connect

    Tenenbaum, P.; /SLAC

    2007-03-05

    A recent study [1] has indicated substantial potential emittance growth in the ILC bunch compressor due to quad misalignments, BPM misalignments, and pitches in the RF cavities. Table 1 summarizes several results from [1]. In this simulation, quad misalignments and cavity pitches are Gaussian distributed and are considered with respect to the nominal survey line; BPM misalignments are also Gaussian-distributed but are considered with respect to the quadrupole axis. It is assumed that the BPM offsets with respect to the quads are found in a previous quad-shunting BBA step which is not simulated. In this study we seek to repeat the studies documented above, and additionally to perform a study in which additional dispersion bumps are used to further reduce the projected emittance.

  8. Emittance preservation during bunch compression with a magnetized beam

    SciTech Connect

    Stratakis, Diktys

    2015-09-02

    The deleterious effects of coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) on the phase-space and energy spread of high-energy beams in accelerator light sources can significantly constrain the machine design and performance. In this paper, we present a simple method to preserve the beam emittance by means of using magnetized beams that exhibit a large aspect ratio on their transverse dimensions. The concept is based on combining a finite solenoid field where the beam is generated together with a special optics adapter. Numerical simulations of this new type of beam source show that the induced phase-space density growth can be notably suppressed to less than 1% for any bunch charge. This work elucidates the key parameters that are needed for emittance preservation, such as the required field and aspect ratio for a given bunch charge.

  9. Numerical model and analysis of transistors with polysilicon emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Z.

    With the advent of Very Large Scale Integration (VLS) technology, innovative bipolar devices with shallow junctions and high performances are being developed both for silicon and compound semiconductor materials. In the composite structure, such as HBJT (Heterojunction Bipolar Junction Transistor), the device characteristics are controlled not only by the doping profile but also by the composition of the structure. A complete physical and numerical model was developed to handle the carrier transport in such composite structure. An analytical approach (the introduction of an effective recombination velocity) to analyze carrier transport in the emitter of the bipolar transistor is discussed. Both analytical and numerical methods are then applied to the analysis of the device characteristics of transistors with polysilicon emitters. Good agreement between simulations and experimental results is achieved, and a regime of carrier distribution in the base space charge region is revealed. The numerical implementation of the model--a general purpose, one dimensional device simulation program (SEDAN) is briefly discussed.

  10. Coupling of individual quantum emitters to channel plasmons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bermúdez-Ureña, Esteban; Gonzalez-Ballestero, Carlos; Geiselmann, Michael; Marty, Renaud; Radko, Ilya P.; Holmgaard, Tobias; Alaverdyan, Yury; Moreno, Esteban; García-Vidal, Francisco J.; Bozhevolnyi, Sergey I.; Quidant, Romain

    2015-08-01

    Efficient light-matter interaction lies at the heart of many emerging technologies that seek on-chip integration of solid-state photonic systems. Plasmonic waveguides, which guide the radiation in the form of strongly confined surface plasmon-polariton modes, represent a promising solution to manipulate single photons in coplanar architectures with unprecedented small footprints. Here we demonstrate coupling of the emission from a single quantum emitter to the channel plasmon polaritons supported by a V-groove plasmonic waveguide. Extensive theoretical simulations enable us to determine the position and orientation of the quantum emitter for optimum coupling. Concomitantly with these predictions, we demonstrate experimentally that 42% of a single nitrogen-vacancy centre emission efficiently couples into the supported modes of the V-groove. This work paves the way towards practical realization of efficient and long distance transfer of energy for integrated solid-state quantum systems.

  11. Measurement of ultra low transverse emittance at REGAE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hachmann, M.; Flöttmann, K.

    2016-09-01

    The linear accelerator REGAE at DESY produces short and low charged electron bunches, on the one hand to resolve the excitation transitions of atoms temporally by pump-probe electron diffraction experiments and on the other hand to investigate principal mechanisms of laser plasma acceleration. For both cases a high quality electron beam is required which can be identified with a small beam emittance. A standard magnet scan is used for the emittance measurement which is in case of a low charged bunch most sensitive to the beam size determination (RMS or 2nd central moment of a distribution). Therefore the diagnostic and a routine to calculate proper central moments of an arbitrary distribution will be introduced and discussed.

  12. Extended Emitter Target Tracking Using GM-PHD Filter

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Youqing; Zhou, Shilin; Gao, Gui; Zou, Huanxin; Lei, Lin

    2014-01-01

    If equipped with several radar emitters, a target will produce more than one measurement per time step and is denoted as an extended target. However, due to the requirement of all possible measurement set partitions, the exact probability hypothesis density filter for extended target tracking is computationally intractable. To reduce the computational burden, a fast partitioning algorithm based on hierarchy clustering is proposed in this paper. It combines the two most similar cells to obtain new partitions step by step. The pseudo-likelihoods in the Gaussian-mixture probability hypothesis density filter can then be computed iteratively. Furthermore, considering the additional measurement information from the emitter target, the signal feature is also used in partitioning the measurement set to improve the tracking performance. The simulation results show that the proposed method can perform better with lower computational complexity in scenarios with different clutter densities. PMID:25490206

  13. Modal Coupling of Single Photon Emitters Within Nanofiber Waveguides

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Nanoscale generation of individual photons in confined geometries is an exciting research field aiming at exploiting localized electromagnetic fields for light manipulation. One of the outstanding challenges of photonic systems combining emitters with nanostructured media is the selective channelling of photons emitted by embedded sources into specific optical modes and their transport at distant locations in integrated systems. Here, we show that soft-matter nanofibers, electrospun with embedded emitters, combine subwavelength field localization and large broadband near-field coupling with low propagation losses. By momentum spectroscopy, we quantify the modal coupling efficiency identifying the regime of single-mode coupling. These nanofibers do not rely on resonant interactions, making them ideal for room-temperature operation, and offer a scalable platform for future quantum information technology. PMID:27203403

  14. THE LASER EMITTANCE SCANNER FOR 1 GEV H- BEAM

    SciTech Connect

    Jeon, Dong-O; Pogge, James R; Menshov, Alexander A; Nesterenko, Igor N; Aleksandrov, Alexander V; Webster, Anthony W; Grice, Warren P

    2009-01-01

    A transverse phase space laser emittance scanner is proposed [1] and under development for the 1-GeV H- SNS linac, using a laser beam as a slit. For a 1-GeV H- beam, it is difficult to build a slit because the stopping distance is more than 50 cm in copper. We propose a Laser Emittance Scanner (LES) to use a laser beam as an effective slit by stripping off the outer electron of the H- (making it neutral) upstream of a bend magnet and measuring the stripped component downstream of the bend magnet. The design and modeling of the system will be discussed. We are expecting to make a preliminary measurement in 2009.

  15. Selective protected state preparation of coupled dissipative quantum emitters

    PubMed Central

    Plankensteiner, D.; Ostermann, L.; Ritsch, H.; Genes, C.

    2015-01-01

    Inherent binary or collective interactions in ensembles of quantum emitters induce a spread in the energy and lifetime of their eigenstates. While this typically causes fast decay and dephasing, in many cases certain special entangled collective states with minimal decay can be found, which possess ideal properties for spectroscopy, precision measurements or information storage. We show that for a specific choice of laser frequency, power and geometry or a suitable configuration of control fields one can efficiently prepare these states. We demonstrate this by studying preparation schemes for strongly subradiant entangled states of a chain of dipole-dipole coupled emitters. The prepared state fidelity and its entanglement depth is further improved via spatial excitation phase engineering or tailored magnetic fields. PMID:26549501

  16. Multipolar radiation of quantum emitters with nanowire optical antennas.

    PubMed

    Curto, Alberto G; Taminiau, Tim H; Volpe, Giorgio; Kreuzer, Mark P; Quidant, Romain; van Hulst, Niek F

    2013-01-01

    Multipolar transitions other than electric dipoles are generally too weak to be observed at optical frequencies in single quantum emitters. For example, fluorescent molecules and quantum dots have dimensions much smaller than the wavelength of light and therefore emit predominantly as electric dipoles. Here we demonstrate controlled emission of a quantum dot into multipolar radiation through selective coupling to a linear nanowire antenna. The antenna resonance tailors the interaction of the quantum dot with light, effectively creating a hybrid nanoscale source beyond the simple Hertz dipole. Our findings establish a basis for the controlled driving of fundamental modes in nanoantennas and metamaterials, for the understanding of the coupling of quantum emitters to nanophotonic devices such as waveguides and nanolasers, and for the development of innovative quantum nano-optics components with properties not found in nature.

  17. Optimization of receiver arrangements for passive emitter localization methods.

    PubMed

    Flückiger, M; Neild, A; Nelson, B J

    2012-03-01

    Passive localization of an object from its emission can be based on time difference of arrival or phase shift measurements for different receiver groups in sensor arrays. The accuracy of the localization primarily depends on accurate time and/or phase measurements. The frequency of the emission and the number and arrangement of the receivers mainly effect the resolution of the emitter localization. In this paper optimal receiver positions for passive localization methods are proposed, resulting in a maximal resolution for the emitter location estimate. The optimization is done by analyzing the uncertainty of the emitted signal, including its frequency. The technique has been developed specifically for ultrasound signals obtained from omnidirectional transducers, although the results apply for other application using passive localization techniques.

  18. Electron Cloud at Low Emittance in CesrTA

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, Mark; Alexander, James; Billing, Michael; Calvey, Joseph; Conolly, Christopher; Crittenden, James; Dobbins, John; Dugan, Gerald; Eggert, Nicholas; Fontes, Ernest; Forster, Michael; Gallagher, Richard; Gray, Steven; Greenwald, Shlomo; Hartill, Donald; Hopkins, Walter; Kreinick, David; Kreis, Benjamin; Leong, Zhidong; Li, Yulin; Liu, Xianghong; /more authors..

    2012-07-06

    The Cornell Electron Storage Ring (CESR) has been reconfigured as a test accelerator (CesrTA) for a program of electron cloud (EC) research at ultra low emittance. The instrumentation in the ring has been upgraded with local diagnostics for measurement of cloud density and with improved beam diagnostics for the characterization of both the low emittance performance and the beam dynamics of high intensity bunch trains interacting with the cloud. A range of EC mitigation methods have been deployed and tested and their effectiveness is discussed. Measurements of the electron cloud's effect on the beam under a range of conditions are discussed along with the simulations being used to quantitatively understand these results.

  19. Emittance preservation during bunch compression with a magnetized beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stratakis, Diktys

    2016-03-01

    The deleterious effects of coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) on the phase-space and energy spread of high-energy beams in accelerator light sources can significantly constrain the machine design and performance. In this paper, we present a simple method to preserve the beam emittance by means of using magnetized beams that exhibit a large aspect ratio on their transverse dimensions. The concept is based in combining a finite solenoid field where the beam is generated with a special optics adapter. Numerical simulations of this new type of beam source show that the induced phase-space density growth from CSR can be notably suppressed to less than 1% for any bunch charge. This work elucidates the key parameters that are needed for emittance preservation, such as the required field and aspect ratio for a given bunch charge.

  20. Refractory absorber/emitter using monolayer of ceramic microparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyachenko, P. N.; do Rosário, J. J.; Leib, E. W.; Petrov, A. Y.; Störmer, M.; Weller, H.; Vossmeyer, T.; Schneider, G. A.; Eich, M.

    2016-04-01

    We present a self-assembled refractory absorber/emitter without the necessity to structure the metallic surface itself, still retaining the feature of tailored optical properties for visible light emission and thermophotovoltaic (TPV) applications. We have demonstrated theoretically and experimentally that monolayers of zirconium dioxide (ZrO2) microparticles on a tungsten layer can be used as large area, efficient and thermally stable selective absorbers/emitters. The band edge of the absorption is based on critically coupled microsphere resonances. It can be tuned from visible to near-infrared range by varying the diameter of the microparticles. We demonstrated the optical functionality of the structure after annealing up to temperatures of 1000°C under vacuum conditions. In particular it opens up the route towards high efficiency TPV systems with emission matched to the photovoltaic cell.

  1. Developments of fast emittance monitors for ion sources at RCNP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yorita, T.; Hatanaka, K.; Fukuda, M.; Shimada, K.; Yasuda, Y.; Saito, T.; Tamura, H.; Kamakura, K.

    2016-02-01

    Recently, several developments of low energy beam transport line and its beam diagnostic systems have been performed to improve the injection efficiency of ion beam to azimuthally varying field cyclotron at Research Center for Nuclear Physics, Osaka University. One of those is the fast emittance monitor which can measure within several seconds for the efficient beam development and a Pepper-Pot Emittance Monitor (PPEM) has been developed. The PPEM consists of pepper-pot mask, multichannel plate, fluorescent screen, mirror, and CCD camera. The CCD image is taken via IEEE1394b to a personal computer and analyzed immediately and frequently, and then real time measurement with about 2 Hz has been achieved.

  2. Status of the Trasco Intense Proton Source and emittance measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celona, L.; Ciavola, G.; Gammino, S.; Chines, F.; Presti, M.; Andò, L.; Guo, X. H.; Gobin, R.; Ferdinand, R.

    2004-05-01

    The Trasco Intense Proton Source (TRIPS) was installed at INFN-LNS in May 2000 and has been fully operational since the Fall of 2000; now the source fulfills all the requirements of the TRASCO (Trasmutazione Scorie) project. The proton beam intensity easily exceeds 40 mA at the operating voltage of 80 kV. A set of emittance measurements was carried out for different source conditions and confirmed the simulations performed with the AXCEL code: in all the cases the rms normalized emittance is well lower than the value required for the injection into the RFQ (0.2 π mm mrad); the results will be shown and discussed. Finally a beam reliability of 99.8% has been found during a long run test lasting over 142 h.

  3. Crystalline silicon solar cells with high resistivity emitter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panek, P.; Drabczyk, K.; Zięba, P.

    2009-06-01

    The paper presents a part of research targeted at the modification of crystalline silicon solar cell production using screen-printing technology. The proposed process is based on diffusion from POCl3 resulting in emitter with a sheet resistance on the level of 70 Ω/□ and then, shaped by high temperature passivation treatment. The study was focused on a shallow emitter of high resistivity and on its influence on output electrical parameters of a solar cell. Secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) has been employed for appropriate distinguishing the total donor doped profile. The solar cell parameters were characterized by current-voltage characteristics and spectral response (SR) methods. Some aspects playing a role in suitable manufacturing process were discussed. The situation in a photovoltaic industry with emphasis on silicon supply and current prices of solar cells, modules and photovoltaic (PV) systems are described. The economic and quantitative estimation of the PV world market is shortly discussed.

  4. First observation of the exchange of transverse and longitudinal emittances

    SciTech Connect

    Ruan, J.; Johnson, A.S.; Lumpkin, A.H.; Thurman-Keup, R.; Edwards, H.; Fliller, R.P.; Koeth, T.; Sun, Y.-E; /Fermilab

    2011-02-01

    An experimental program to demonstrate a novel phase space manipulation in which the horizontal and longitudinal emittances of a particle beam are exchanged has been completed at the Fermilab A0 Photoinjector. A new beamline, consisting of a TM{sub 110} deflecting mode cavity flanked by two horizontally dispersive doglegs has been installed. We report on the first direct observation of transverse and longitudinal emittance exchange: {l_brace}{var_epsilon}{sub x}{sup n}, {var_epsilon}{sub y}{sup n}, {var_epsilon}{sub z}{sup n}{r_brace} = {l_brace} 2.9 {+-} 0.1, 2.4 {+-} 0.1, 13.1 {+-} 1.3{r_brace} {yields} {l_brace}11.3 {+-} 1.1, 2.9 {+-} 0.5, 3.1 {+-} 0.3{r_brace} mm-mrad.

  5. High brightness symmetric emittance rf photoinjector preliminary design report

    SciTech Connect

    Colby, E.R.; Ostiguy, J.F.; Rosenzweig, J.B.

    1994-08-01

    A preliminary design for a high bunch charge (8 nC), low emittance (< 20 mm-mr) radiofrequency electron photoinjector matched to the requirements of the Tesla Test Facility is presented. A 1.5 cell iris coupled {pi}mode structure with high average accelerating gradient is chosen for its high shunt impedance, simplicity, and ability to accommodate an externally mounted solenoid for simultaneous beam divergence control and emittance compensation. Beam optics are optimized for an overall injector consisting of the electron gun followed by one linac capture section, a dipole chicane for magnetic bunch compression to achieve a bunch length corresponding to {sigma}{sub z} = 1 mm. Electrical and beam dynamical aspects of the photoinjector design are presented. A description of the proposed experimental program is included.

  6. High efficiency rare-earth emitter for thermophotovoltaic applications

    SciTech Connect

    Sakr, E. S.; Zhou, Z.; Bermel, P.

    2014-09-15

    In this work, we propose a rare-earth-based ceramic thermal emitter design that can boost thermophotovoltaic (TPV) efficiencies significantly without cold-side filters at a temperature of 1573 K (1300 °C). The proposed emitter enhances a naturally occurring rare earth transition using quality-factor matching, with a quarter-wave stack as a highly reflective back mirror, while suppressing parasitic losses via exponential chirping of a multilayer reflector transmitting only at short wavelengths. This allows the emissivity to approach the blackbody limit for wavelengths overlapping with the absorption peak of the rare-earth material, while effectively reducing the losses associated with undesirable long-wavelength emission. We obtain TPV efficiencies of 34% using this layered design, which only requires modest index contrast, making it particularly amenable to fabrication via a wide variety of techniques, including sputtering, spin-coating, and plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition.

  7. MICE Step 1: Beam Line Commissioning and First Emittance Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coney, Linda R.; MICE Collaboration

    2012-08-01

    The MICE beam line provides a pulsed muon beam in order to measure ionization cooling on a muon-by-muon basis. Commissioned in 2009, it now routinely produces beams of pions, muons, and electrons between 100-450 MeV/c. Particle ID is provided by Cherenkov detectors, time-of-flight hodoscopes (TOFs), and a lead-fiber electron pre-shower (KL). Particle production rates were determined and a first measurement of emittance has been performed.

  8. Light emitters and modulators on SOI for optical interconnects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Yikai; Qiu, Ciyuan; Zhang, Yong; Liu, Ruili

    2016-03-01

    We discuss light emitters and modulators in silicon photonic interconnects. In particular, we experimentally demonstrate resonant luminescence from Ge quantum dots embedded in a photonic crystal ring resonator (PCRR) at room temperature. Six sharp resonant peaks are observed, which correspond to the resonant modes supported by the PCRR. We further study a high speed silicon-graphene nanobeam modulator, and a silicon spatial light modulator. These devices show great potential in future high density and high capacity interconnection systems.

  9. Compliance with High-Intensity Radiated Fields Regulations - Emitter's Perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Statman, Joseph; Jamnejad, Vahraz; Nguyen, Lee

    2012-01-01

    NASA's Deep Space Network (DSN) uses high-power transmitters on its large antennas to communicate with spacecraft of NASA and its partner agencies. The prime reflectors of the DSN antennas are parabolic, at 34m and 70m in diameter. The DSN transmitters radiate Continuous Wave (CW) signals at 20 kW - 500 kW at X-band and S-band frequencies. The combination of antenna reflector size and high frequency results in a very narrow beam with extensive oscillating near-field pattern. Another unique feature of the DSN antennas is that they (and the radiated beam) move mostly at very slow sidereal rate, essentially identical in magnitude and at the opposite direction of Earth rotation.The DSN is in the process of revamping its documentation to provide analysis of the High Intensity Radiation Fields (HIRF) environment resulting from radio frequency radiation from DSN antennas for comparison to FAA regulations regarding certification of HIRF protection as outlined in the FAA regulations on HIRF protection for aircraft electrical and electronic systems (Title 14, Code of Federal Regulations (14 CFR) [section sign][section sign] 23.1308, 25.1317, 27.1317, and 29.1317).This paper presents work done at JPL, in consultation with the FAA. The work includes analysis of the radiated field structure created by the unique DSN emitters (combination of transmitters and antennas) and comparing it to the fields defined in the environments in the FAA regulations. The paper identifies areas that required special attention, including the implications of the very narrow beam of the DSN emitters and the sidereal rate motion. The paper derives the maximum emitter power allowed without mitigation and the mitigation zones, where required.Finally, the paper presents summary of the results of the analyses of the DSN emitters and the resulting DSN process documentation.

  10. Cancer therapy with alpha-emitters labeled peptides.

    PubMed

    Dadachova, Ekaterina

    2010-05-01

    Actively targeted alpha-particles offer specific tumor cell killing action with less collateral damage to surrounding normal tissues than beta-emitters. During the last decade, radiolabeled peptides that bind to different receptors on the tumors have been investigated as potential therapeutic agents both in the preclinical and clinical settings. Advantages of radiolabeled peptides over antibodies include relatively straightforward chemical synthesis, versatility, easier radiolabeling, rapid clearance from the circulation, faster penetration and more uniform distribution into tissues, and less immunogenicity. Rapid internalization of the radiolabeled peptides with equally rapid re-expression of the cell surface target is a highly desirable property that enhances the total delivery of these radionuclides into malignant sites. Peptides, such as octreotide, alpha-melanocyte-stimulating hormone analogues, arginine-glycine-aspartic acid-containing peptides, bombesin derivatives, and others may all be feasible for use with alpha-emitters. The on-going preclinical work has primarily concentrated on octreotide and octreotate analogues labeled with Bismuth-213 and Astatine-211. In addition, alpha-melanocyte-stimulating hormone analogue has been labeled with Lead-212/Bismuth-212 in vivo generator and demonstrated the encouraging therapeutic efficacy in treatment of experimental melanoma. Obstacles that continue to obstruct widespread acceptance of alpha-emitter-labeled peptides are primarily the supply of these radionuclides and concerns about potential kidney toxicity. New sources and methods for production of these medically valuable radionuclides and better understanding of mechanisms related to the peptide renal uptake and clearance should speed up the introduction of alpha-emitter-labeled peptides into the clinic. PMID:20350629

  11. T-Shaped Emitter Metal Structures for HBTs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fung, King Man; Samoska, Lorene; Velebir, James; Muller, Richard; Echternach, Pierre; Siegel, Peter; Smith, Peter; Martin, Suzanne; Malik, Roger; Rodwell, Mark; Urteaga, Miguel; Paidi, Vamsi; Griffith, Zack

    2006-01-01

    Metal emitter structures in a class of developmental InP-based high-speed heterojunction bipolar transistors (HBTs) have been redesigned to have T-shaped cross sections. T-cross-section metal features have been widely used in Schottky diodes and high-electron-mobility transistors, but not in HBTs. As explained, the purpose served by the present T cross-sectional shapes is to increase fabrication yields beyond those achievable with the prior cross-sectional shapes.

  12. Coulomb interactions in sharp tip pulsed photo field emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, Ben; Kruit, Pieter

    2016-10-01

    Photofield emitters show great potential for many single electron pulsed applications. However, for the brightest pulses > 10 11 A / ( m 2 sr V ) , our simulations show that Poisson statistics and stochastic Coulomb interactions limit the brightness and increase the energy spread even with an average of a single electron per pulse. For the systems, we study we find that the energy spread is probably the limiting factor for most applications.

  13. Analysis of kicker noise induced beam emittance growth

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang W.; Sandberg, J.; Ahrens, L.; Blacker, I.M.; Brennan, M.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Fischer, W.; Hahn, H.; Huang, H.; Kling, N.; Lafky, M.; Marr, G.; Mernick, K.; Mi, J.; Minty, M.; Naylor, C.; Roser, T.; Shrey, T.; van Kuik, B.; Zelenski, A.

    2012-05-20

    Over the last few years, physicists have occasionally observed the presence of noise acting on the RHIC beams leading to emittance growth at high beam energies. While the noise was sporadic in the past, it became persistent during the Run-11 setup period. An investigation diagnosed the source as originating from the RHIC dump kicker system. Once identified the issue was quickly resolved. We report in this paper the investigation result, circuit analysis, measured and simulated waveforms, solutions, and future plans.

  14. Short-lived positron emitter labeled radiotracers - present status

    SciTech Connect

    Fowler, J.S.; Wolf, A.P.

    1982-01-01

    The preparation of labelled compounds is important for the application of positron emission transaxial tomography (PETT) in biomedical sciences. This paper describes problems and progress in the synthesis of short-lived positron emitter (/sup 11/C, /sup 18/F, /sup 13/N) labelled tracers for PETT. Synthesis of labelled sugars, amino acids, and neurotransmitter receptors (pimozide and spiroperidol tagged with /sup 11/C) is discussed in particular. (DLC)

  15. Nonlocality from N>2 independent single-photon emitters

    SciTech Connect

    Thiel, C.; Wiegner, R.; Zanthier, J. von; Agarwal, G. S.

    2010-09-15

    We demonstrate that intensity correlations of second order in the fluorescence light of N>2 single-photon emitters may violate locality while the visibility of the signal remains below 1/{radical}(2){approx_equal}71%. For this, we derive a homogeneous Bell-Wigner-type inequality, which can be applied to a broad class of experimental setups. We trace the violation of this inequality back to path entanglement created by the process of detection.

  16. Gas ionization sensors with carbon nanotube/nickel field emitters.

    PubMed

    Huang, Bohr-Ran; Lin, Tzu-Ching; Yang, Ying-Kan; Tzeng, Shien-Der

    2011-12-01

    Gas ionization sensors based on the field emission properties of the carbon nanotube/nickel (CNT/Ni) field emitters were first developed in this work. It is found that the breakdown electric field (E(b)) slightly decreases from 2.2 V/microm to 1.9 V/microm as the pressure of H2 gas increases from 0.5 Torr to 100 Torr. On the contrary, E(b) obviously increases from 2.9 V/microm to 6.5 V/microm as O2 gas pressure increases from 0.5 Torr to 100 Torr. This may be explained by the depression of the electron emission that caused by the adsorption of the O2 gas on the CNT emitters. The Raman spectra of the CNT/Ni emitters also show that more defects were generated on the CNTs after O2 gas sensing. The Joule heating effect under high current density as performing H2 sensing was also observed. These effects may contribute the pressure dependence on the breakdown electric field of the CNT/Ni gas ionization sensors. PMID:22409010

  17. Biologic data, models, and dosimetric methods for internal emitters

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, D.A.

    1990-01-01

    The absorbed radiation dose from internal emitters has been and will remain a pivotal factor in assessing risk and therapeutic utility in selecting radiopharmaceuticals for diagnosis and treatment. Although direct measurements of absorbed dose and dose distributions in vivo have been and will continue to be made in limited situations, the measurement of the biodistribution and clearance of radiopharmaceuticals in human subjects and the use of this data is likely to remain the primary means to approach the calculation and estimation of absorbed dose from internal emitters over the next decade. Since several approximations are used in these schema to calculate dose, attention must be given to inspecting and improving the application of this dosimetric method as better techniques are developed to assay body activity and as more experience is gained in applying these schema to calculating absorbed dose. Discussion of the need for considering small scale dosimetry to calculate absorbed dose at the cellular level will be presented in this paper. Other topics include dose estimates for internal emitters, biologic data mathematical models and dosimetric methods employed. 44 refs.

  18. Emittance Growth in Intense Non-Circular Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, O. A.

    1997-05-01

    The electrostatic energy of intense beams in linear uniform focusing channels is minimized when the initial beam configuration is both uniform and round.(In the case of quadrupole focusing, this means round on the average.) Deviations from either uniformity or roundness produce free energy and emittance growth. Over the past 25 years, the consequences of beam nonuniformity have been thoroughly investigated for the case of round beams. Recently, there has been interest in more complex beam configurations such as those that occur in Heavy Ion Fusion (HIF) combiners or splitters. We discuss free energy and emittance growth for a variety of cases: (a) square beams, (b) hexagonal beams, (c) beams bounded by a quadrant or sextant of a circle, (d) rectangular beams, (e) elliptical beams, (f) pairs of beamlets, and (g) arrays of many beamlets. Cases (a) and (b) are approximations for large arrays of beamlets as proposed for HIF combiners or for negative-ion sources. Beam splitting, suggested for a particular HIF final focus scheme, leads to (c). The large emittance growth in cases (d)-(f), calculated by a new method,(O.A. Anderson, Proceedings of EPAC 96 conference.) illustrates the importance of maintaining symmetry. Practical examples are given for several cases.

  19. Variable Emittance Electrochromic Devices for Satellite Thermal Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demiryont, Hulya; Shannon, Kenneth C.

    2007-01-01

    An all-solid-state electrochromic device (ECD) was designed for electronic variable emissivity (VE) control. In this paper, a low weight (5g/m2) electrochromic thermal control device, the EclipseVEECD™, is detailed as a viable thermal control system for spacecraft outer surface temperatures. Discussion includes the technology's performance, satellite applications, and preparations for space based testing. This EclipseVEECD™ system comprises substrate/mirror electrode/active element/IR transparent electrode layers. This system tunes and modulates reflection/emittance from 5 μm to 15 μm region. Average reflectance/emittance modulation of the system from the 400 K to 250 K region is about 75%, while at room temperature (9.5 micron) reflectance/emittance is around 90%. Activation voltage of the EclipseVEECD™ is around ±1 Volt. The EclipseVEECD™ can be used as a smart thermal modulator for the thermal control of satellites and spacecraft by monitoring and adjusting the amount of energy emitted from the outer surfaces. The functionality of the EclipseVEECD™ was successfully demonstrated in vacuum using a multi-purpose heat dissipation/absorption test module, the EclipseHEAT™. The EclipseHEAT™ has been successfully flight checked and integrated onto the United States Naval Alchemy MidSTAR satellite, scheduled to launch December 2006.

  20. Cool and warm hybrid white organic light-emitting diode with blue delayed fluorescent emitter both as blue emitter and triplet host

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Yong Joo; Yook, Kyoung Soo; Lee, Jun Yeob

    2015-01-01

    A hybrid white organic light-emitting diode (WOLED) with an external quantum efficiency above 20% was developed using a new blue thermally activated delayed fluorescent material, 4,6-di(9H-carbazol-9-yl)isophthalonitrile (DCzIPN), both as a blue emitter and a host for a yellow phosphorescent emitter. DCzIPN showed high quantum efficiency of 16.4% as a blue emitter and 24.9% as a host for a yellow phosphorescent emitter. The hybrid WOLEDs with the DCzIPN host based yellow emitting layer sandwiched between DCzIPN emitter based blue emitting layers exhibited high external quantum efficiency of 22.9% with a warm white color coordinate of (0.39, 0.43) and quantum efficiency of 21.0% with a cool white color coordinate of (0.31, 0.33) by managing the thickness of the yellow emitting layer. PMID:25598436

  1. IMPROVEMENTS IN EMITTANCE WAKE FIELD OPTIMIZATION FOR THE SLAC LINEAR COLLIDER

    SciTech Connect

    Decker, Franz-Josef

    2003-05-01

    The transverse emittances in the SLAC Linear Collider can be severely diluted by collective wakefield effects and dispersion. For the 1997/98 SLC/SLD run important changes were implemented in the way the emittance is optimized. Early in the linac, where the energy spread is large due to BNS damping, the emittance growth is dominated by dispersion. In this regime emittance tuning bumps may introduce additional wakefield tails and their use is now avoided. At the end of the linac the energy spread is minimal and the emittance measurement is most sensitive to wakefield emittance dilution. In previous years, the emittances were tuned on wire scanners located near but not at the end of the linac (after about 90% of its length). Simulations show that emittance growth of up to 100% can occur in the remaining 10%. In this run wire scanners at the entrance of the Final Focus, the last place where the emittances can be measured, were used for the optimization. Screens at the end of the linac allow additional real time monitoring of the beam sizes. We show that the different tuning strategy provided significantly improved emittances at the interaction point of the SLC.

  2. Surface Analysis of LaB6 Single Crystal Thermionic Emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakazawa, Masatoshi; Futamoto, Masaaki; Hosoki, Shigeyuki; Usami, Katuhisa

    1980-07-01

    Surface analysis of heated LaB6 thermionic emitter is made by means of Auger electron spectroscopy. Changes in surface state with changing emitter temperature and ambient oxygen pressure are investigated. The emitter temperature is varied from room temperature to 1700°C, and the oxygen pressure from 1× 10-5 Pa to 7× 10-3 Pa. With the increase of temperature the emitter surface passes through four states depending on oxygen pressure, before it reaches a clean state. Among them a state is particularly noteworthy that the emitter surface is covered with a layer of lanthanum oxide just before assuming the clean surface state. A surface state diagram is shown. The optimum conditions of emitter temperature and oxygen gas pressure to exhibit high emission properties are described.

  3. Recent progress on the self-aligned, selective-emitter silicon solar cell

    SciTech Connect

    Ruby, D.S.; Yang, P.; Roy, M.

    1997-10-01

    We developed a self-aligned emitter etchback technique that requires only a single emitter diffusion and no alignments to form self-aligned, patterned-emitter profiles. Standard commercial, screen-printed gridlines mask a plasma-etchback of the emitter. A subsequent PECVD-nitride deposition provides good surface and bulk passivation and an antireflection coating. We succeeded in finding a set of parameters which resulted in good emitter uniformity and improved cell performance. We used full-size multicrystalline silicon (mc-Si) cells processed in a commercial production line and performed a statistically designed, multiparameter experiment to optimize the use of a hydrogenation treatment to increase performance. Our initial results found a statistically significant improvement of half an absolute percentage point in cell efficiency when the self-aligned emitter etchback was combined with a 3-step PECVD-nitride surface passivation and hydrogenation treatment. 12 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  4. Emittance and proton fraction measurement in High current electron cyclotron resonance proton ion source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roychowdhury, P.; Kewlani, H.; Mishra, L.; Gharat, S.; Rajawat, R. K.

    2015-09-01

    The beam characterization studies in terms of emittance and proton fraction have been carried out in the high current Electron Cyclotron Resonance (ECR) proton ion source developed for Low Energy High Intensity Proton Accelerator (LEHIPA). The beam emittance was measured using two slit emittance measurement units (EMU). The emittance was measured at three locations (1) after beam extraction at ion source end, (2) after focusing the beam using solenoid magnet and (3) after focusing and separating H+ using solenoid magnet and analyzing magnet. The beam emittance measured in all three cases was found to be less than 0.2π mm-mrad (rms-normalized). The proton fraction in the beam measured using analyzing magnet was found to be more than 90%. The variations of beam emittance and proton fraction have been studied as a function of microwave power and neutral gas pressure.

  5. Measurement of radiation property of long infrared emitter and examination of infrared radiation heating process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakano, Y.; Miyanaga, T.; Miyakawa, M.

    1989-05-01

    Long infrared radiation is becoming widely used for process heating, drying and space heating. In order to make more effective use of long infrared radiation, the investigations on measuring method of radiation property of long infrared emitter, the measuring results, and selection of suitable emitters for heating objects, were carried out. Using Fourier transform infrared radiation spectrophotometer, trial manufacture of an apparatus for measuring spectral emissivity of long infrared emitters was conducted and the measuring method was established. By this, the following knowledges on ceramic long infrared emitter were obtained: spectral emissivity almost never depends on temperature of the emitter, variation with time is hardly shown, and radiation efficiency is shown to be 50 to 60 percent. Infrared radiation heating processes on foods and synthetic resins were investigated, and an examination on the method for selecting emitters, which are suitable to materials to be heated, was conducted.

  6. 4D Emittance Measurements Using Multiple Wire and Waist Scan Methods in the ATF Extraction Line

    SciTech Connect

    Rimbault, C.; Bambade, P.; Brossard, J.; Alabau, M.; Kuroda, S.; Scarfe, A.; Woodley, M.; /SLAC

    2011-11-02

    Emittance measurements performed in the diagnostic section of the Accelerator Test Facility (ATF) extraction line since 1998 led to vertical emittances three times larger than the expected ones, with a strong dependence on intensity. An experimental program is pursued to investigate potential sources of emittance growth and find possible remedies. This requires efficient and reliable emittance measurement techniques. In the past, several phase-space reconstruction methods developed at SLAC and KEK have been used to estimate the vertical emittance, based on multiple location beam size measurements and dedicated quadrupole scans. These methods have been shown to be very sensitive to measurement errors and other fluctuations in the beam conditions. In this context new emittance measurements have been performed revisiting these methods and newly developed ones with a systematic approach to compare and characterise their performance in the ATF extraction line.

  7. Effective hybrid graphene/carbon nanotubes field emitters by electrophoretic deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koh, Angel T. T.; Chen, Ting; Pan, Likun; Sun, Zhuo; Chua, Daniel H. C.

    2013-05-01

    Hybrid graphene and carbon nanotube (CNT) field emitters were fabricated with electrophoretic deposition (EPD). The combination of both materials was used to improve the turn-on field for pure carbon nanotubes emitters and the reliability of pure graphene emitters deposited by the same method. The CNT was envisioned to hold down the graphene flakes, like a safety belt or Velcro, at high voltages to prevent an early short circuit at relatively low voltages. These hybrid emitters were studied for their field emission performance in relation to the EPD deposition duration. It was observed that the emitters performed better when the EPD duration was increased due to the increase in the amount and density of graphene flakes. Possible reasons for the improvement of field emission performance were suggested. The roles of graphene and CNT in these hybrid emitters were also discussed.

  8. Emission Testing Results of Thermally Stable, Metamaterial, Selective-Emitters for Thermophotovoltaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levinson, Katherine; Naka, Norihito; Pfiester, Nicole; Licht, Abigail; Vandervelde, Tom

    2015-03-01

    In thermophotovoltaics, the energy from a heated emitter is converted to electricity by a photovoltaic diode. A selective emitter can be used to emit a narrow band of wavelengths tailored to the bandgap of the photovoltaic diode. This spectral shaping improves the conversion efficiency of the diode and reduces undesirable diode heating. In our research, we study selective emitters based on metamaterials composed of repeating nanoscale structures. The emission characteristics of these materials vary based on the compositional structure, allowing the emitted spectrum to be tunable. Simulations were performed with CST Microwave Studio to design emitters with peak wavelengths ranging from 1-10 microns. The structures were then fabricated using physical vapor deposition and electron beam lithography on a sapphire substrate. Emitter materials studied include gold, platinum, and iridium. Here we report on the emission spectra of the selective emitters and the post-heating structural integrity.

  9. Role of the optical pulse repetition rate in the efficiency of terahertz emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reklaitis, Antanas

    2016-07-01

    Excitation of n-GaAs and p-InAs terahertz emitters by the series of optical pulses is studied by ensemble Monte Carlo simulations. It is found that the spatial separation of photoexcited electrons and holes dramatically reduces the recombination intensity in n-GaAs emitter, the operation of which is based on the surface field effect. The spatial separation of carriers does not affect the recombination intensity in p-InAs emitter, the operation of which is based on the photo-Dember effect. Therefore, the recovery time of equilibrium state after optical pulse in n-GaAs emitter significantly exceeds the corresponding recovery time in p-InAs emitter. This fact leads to a substantial reduction of photocurrent amplitude in n-GaAs emitter excited by the optical pulse series at high repetition rate.

  10. Radial arrays of nano-electrospray ionization emitters and methods of forming electrosprays

    DOEpatents

    Kelly, Ryan T [West Richland, WA; Tang, Keqi [Richland, WA; Smith, Richard D [Richland, WA

    2010-10-19

    Electrospray ionization emitter arrays, as well as methods for forming electrosprays, are described. The arrays are characterized by a radial configuration of three or more nano-electrospray ionization emitters without an extractor electrode. The methods are characterized by distributing fluid flow of the liquid sample among three or more nano-electrospray ionization emitters, forming an electrospray at outlets of the emitters without utilizing an extractor electrode, and directing the electrosprays into an entrance to a mass spectrometry device. Each of the nano-electrospray ionization emitters can have a discrete channel for fluid flow. The nano-electrospray ionization emitters are circularly arranged such that each is shielded substantially equally from an electrospray-inducing electric field.

  11. HETDEX: The Physical Properties of [O II] Emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciardullo, Robin; Gronwall, C.; Blanc, G.; Gebhardt, K.; Jogee, S.; HETDEX Collaboration

    2012-01-01

    Beginning in Fall 2012, the Hobby-Eberly Telescope Dark Energy Experiment (HETDEX) will map out 300 square degrees of sky via a blind integral-field spectroscopic survey. While the main goal of the project is to measure the power spectrum of 800,000 Lyα emitters between 1.9 < z < 3.5, the survey will also identify 1,000,000 [O II] emitting galaxies with z < 0.5. Together, these data will provide an unprecedented view of the emission-line universe and allow us to not only examine the history star formation, but to study the properties of star-forming galaxies as a function of environment. To prepare for HETDEX, a 3 year pilot survey was undertaken with a proto-type integral-field spectrograph (VIRUS-P) on the McDonald 2.7-m telescope. This program, which tested the HETDEX instrumentation, data reduction, target properties, observing procedures, and ancillary data requirements, produced R=800 spectra between 350 nm and 580 nm for 169 square arcmin of sky in the COSMOS, GOODS-N, MUNICS-S2, and XMM-LSS fields. The survey found 397 emission-line objects, including 104 Lyα emitters between 1.9 < z < 3.8 and 284 [O II] galaxies with z < 0.56. We present the properties of the [O II] emitters found in this survey, and detail their line strengths, internal extinction, and emission-line luminosity function. We use these data to show that over the past 5 Gyr, star-formation in the universe has decreased linearly, in both in an absolute and relative sense. We compare the star formation rates measured via [O II] fluxes to those determined via the rest-frame ultraviolet, explore the extinction corrections for our sample, and discuss the implications of our work for the main HETDEX survey.

  12. Arrays of Bundles of Carbon Nanotubes as Field Emitters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manohara, Harish; Bronkowski, Michael

    2007-01-01

    Experiments have shown that with suitable choices of critical dimensions, planar arrays of bundles of carbon nanotubes (see figure) can serve as high-current-density field emitter (cold-cathode) electron sources. Whereas some hot-cathode electron sources must be operated at supply potentials of thousands of volts, these cold-cathode sources generate comparable current densities when operated at tens of volts. Consequently, arrays of bundles of carbon nanotubes might prove useful as cold-cathode sources in miniature, lightweight electron-beam devices (e.g., nanoklystrons) soon to be developed. Prior to the experiments, all reported efforts to develop carbon-nanotube-based field-emission sources had yielded low current densities from a few hundred microamperes to a few hundred milliamperes per square centimeter. An electrostatic screening effect, in which taller nanotubes screen the shorter ones from participating in field emission, was conjectured to be what restricts the emission of electrons to such low levels. It was further conjectured that the screening effect could be reduced and thus emission levels increased by increasing the spacing between nanotubes to at least by a factor of one to two times the height of the nanotubes. While this change might increase the emission from individual nanotubes, it would decrease the number of nanotubes per unit area and thereby reduce the total possible emission current. Therefore, to maximize the area-averaged current density, it would be necessary to find an optimum combination of nanotube spacing and nanotube height. The present concept of using an array of bundles of nanotubes arises partly from the concept of optimizing the spacing and height of field emitters. It also arises partly from the idea that single nanotubes may have short lifetimes as field emitters, whereas bundles of nanotubes could afford redundancy so that the loss of a single nanotube would not significantly reduce the overall field emission.

  13. Emittance Measurements for a Thin Liquid Sheet Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Englehart, Amy N.; McConley, Marc W.; Chubb, Donald L.

    1996-01-01

    The Liquid Sheet Radiator (LSR) is an external flow radiator that uses a triangular-shaped flowing liquid sheet as the radiating surface. It has potentially much lower mass than solid wall radiators such as pumped loop and heat pipe radiators, along with being nearly immune to micrometeoroid penetration. The LSR has an added advantage of simplicity. Surface tension causes a thin (100-300 microns) liquid sheet to coalesce to a point, causing the sheet flow to have a triangular shape. Such a triangular sheet is desirable since it allows for simple collection of the flow at a single point. A major problem for all external flow radiators is the requirement that the working fluid be of very low (approx. 10(sup -8) torr) vapor pressure to keep evaporative losses low. As a result, working fluids are limited to certain oils (such as used in diffusion pumps) for low temperatures (300-400 K) and liquid metals for higher temperatures. Previous research on the LSR has been directed at understanding the fluid mechanics of thin sheet flows and assessing the stability of such flows, especially with regard to the formation of holes in the sheet. Taylor studied extensively the stability of thin liquid sheets both theoretically and experimentally. He showed that thin sheets in a vacuum are stable. The latest research has been directed at determining the emittance of thin sheet flows. The emittance was calculated from spectral transmittance data for the Dow Corning 705 silicone oil. By experimentally setting up a sheet flow, the emittance was also determined as a function of measurable quantities, most importantly, the temperature drop between the top of the sheet and the temperature at the coalescence point of the sheet. Temperature fluctuations upstream of the liquid sheet were a potential problem in the analysis and were investigated.

  14. Emittance Preservation in the International Linear Collider Ring to Main Linac Transfer Line

    SciTech Connect

    Tenenbaum, P.; Latina, A.; Smith, J.C.; Kubo, K.; /KEK, Tsukuba

    2007-06-27

    The very small vertical beam emittance in the International Linear Collider (ILC) can be degraded by dispersion, xy coupling, transverse wakefields, and time-varying transverse fields introduced by elements with misalignments, strength errors, xy rotation errors, or yz rotation errors in the Ring to Main Linac (RTML) transfer line. We present a plan for emittance preservation in this beamline which uses local, quasi-local, and global correction schemes. Results of simulations of the emittance preservation algorithm are also presented and discussed.

  15. The MICE spectrometers for the measurement of muon beam emittance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakamoto, Hideyuki

    2010-11-01

    Tracking detectors based on 350-μm scintillating fibers have been developed to measure muon-beam emittance at the Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE), the goal of which is to demonstrate ionization cooling by constructing and testing part of a cooling channel designed for a Neutrino Factory. The upstream and downstream trackers were assembled at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL) in 2008 and 2009. The mechanical design and construction (including quality assurance) procedures used for the trackers are described in this paper. Results from the cosmic-ray test performed for the upstream tracker at RAL in 2008 are also presented.

  16. Feasibility of a ring FEL at low emittance storage rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agapov, I.

    2015-09-01

    A scheme for generating coherent radiation at latest generation low emittance storage rings such as PETRA III at DESY (Balewski et al., 2004 [1]) is proposed. The scheme is based on focusing and subsequent defocusing of the electron beam in the longitudinal phase space at the undulator location. The expected performance characteristics are estimated for radiation in the wavelength range of 500-1500 eV. It is shown that the average brightness is increased by several orders of magnitude compared to spontaneous undulator radiation, which can open new perspectives for photon-hungry soft X-ray spectroscopy techniques.

  17. Pepper-pot based emittance measurements of the AWA photoinjector.

    SciTech Connect

    Power, J. G.; Conde, M. E.; Gai, W.; Gao, F.; Konecny, D.; Liu, W.; Yusof, Z.; Rihaoui, M.; Piot, Ph.; High Energy Physics; Northern Illinois Univ.

    2008-01-01

    The Argonne Wakefield Accelerator (AWA) RF photocathode gun is a 1.5 cell, L-band, RF photocathode gun operating at 77 MV/m, with emittance compensating solenoids, a magnesium photocathode, and generates an 8 MeV, 1 nC - 100 nC beam. In this paper, we report on a parametric set of measurements to characterize the transverse trace space of the 1 nC electron beam directly out of the gun. We emphasize details of the experimental setup, image analysis, and end with a comparison of the measurements to PARMELA simulations.

  18. Applications using high-Tc superconducting terahertz emitters

    PubMed Central

    Nakade, Kurama; Kashiwagi, Takanari; Saiwai, Yoshihiko; Minami, Hidetoshi; Yamamoto, Takashi; Klemm, Richard A.; Kadowaki, Kazuo

    2016-01-01

    Using recently-developed THz emitters constructed from single crystals of the high-Tc superconductor Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+δ, we performed three prototype tests of the devices to demonstrate their unique characteristic properties for various practical applications. The first is a compact and simple transmission type of THz imaging system using a Stirling cryocooler. The second is a high-resolution Michelson interferometer used as a phase-sensitive reflection-type imaging system. The third is a system with precise temperature control to measure the liquid absorption coefficient. The detailed characteristics of these systems are discussed. PMID:26983905

  19. BEAM EMITTANCE DIAGNOSTIC FOR THE DARHT SECOND AXIS INJECTOR

    SciTech Connect

    R. BARTSCH; C. EKDAHL; ET AL

    2001-06-01

    Low beam emittance is key to achieving the required spot size at the output focus of the DARHT Second Axis. The nominal electron beam parameters at the output of the injector are 2 kA, 4.6 MeV, 2-microsecond pulse width and an rms radius less than 1 cm. Emittance is measured by bringing the beam to a focus in which the emittance is a dominant influence in determining the spot size. The spot size is measured from Cerenkov or optical transition radiation (OTR) generated from a target intercepted by the beam. The current density in the focused DARHT beam would melt this target in less than 1/2 microsec. To prevent this we have designed a DC magnetic transport system that defocuses the beam on the emittance target to prevent overheating, and uses a 125-ns half period pulsed solenoid to selectively focus the beam for short times during the beam pulse. During the development of the fast-focusing portion of this diagnostic it has been determined that the focusing pulse must rapidly sweep through the focus at the target to an over-focused condition to avoid target damage due to overheating. The fast focus produces {approx}1 kilogauss field over an effective length of {approx}50 cm to bring the beam to a focus on the target. The fast focus field is generated with a 12-turn coil located inside the beam-transport vacuum chamber with the entire fast coil structure within the bore of a D.C. magnet. The pulsed coil diameter of {approx}15 cm is dictated by the return current path at the nominal vacuum wall. Since the drive system is to use 40 kV to 50 kV technology and much of the inductance is in the drive and feed circuit, the coil design has three 120 degree segments. The coil, driver and feed system design, as well as beam envelope calculations and target heating calculations are presented below. Operation of the OTR imaging system will be discussed in separate publication (Ref. 1).

  20. Applications using high-Tc superconducting terahertz emitters.

    PubMed

    Nakade, Kurama; Kashiwagi, Takanari; Saiwai, Yoshihiko; Minami, Hidetoshi; Yamamoto, Takashi; Klemm, Richard A; Kadowaki, Kazuo

    2016-03-17

    Using recently-developed THz emitters constructed from single crystals of the high-Tc superconductor Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+δ, we performed three prototype tests of the devices to demonstrate their unique characteristic properties for various practical applications. The first is a compact and simple transmission type of THz imaging system using a Stirling cryocooler. The second is a high-resolution Michelson interferometer used as a phase-sensitive reflection-type imaging system. The third is a system with precise temperature control to measure the liquid absorption coefficient. The detailed characteristics of these systems are discussed.

  1. Applications using high-Tc superconducting terahertz emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakade, Kurama; Kashiwagi, Takanari; Saiwai, Yoshihiko; Minami, Hidetoshi; Yamamoto, Takashi; Klemm, Richard A.; Kadowaki, Kazuo

    2016-03-01

    Using recently-developed THz emitters constructed from single crystals of the high-Tc superconductor Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+δ, we performed three prototype tests of the devices to demonstrate their unique characteristic properties for various practical applications. The first is a compact and simple transmission type of THz imaging system using a Stirling cryocooler. The second is a high-resolution Michelson interferometer used as a phase-sensitive reflection-type imaging system. The third is a system with precise temperature control to measure the liquid absorption coefficient. The detailed characteristics of these systems are discussed.

  2. Oxidation and Emittance Studies of Coated Mo-Re

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glass, David E.

    1997-01-01

    A commercially available Fe-Cr-Si coating (R512E) and a silicide coating were evaluated regarding their ability to protect Mo-Re from oxidation. The R512E coating provided very good oxidation protection at 1260 C in atmospheric air. Oxidation tests were also performed at Mach 4 in the HYMETS facility at NASA Langley Research Center where again the R512E provided good oxidation protection but for much shorter times. Emittance measurements as a function of wavelength were also obtained for the R512E coating on Mo-Re after exposure to the Mach 4 environment at 1150 C and 1230 C.

  3. Light-trapping in photon enhanced thermionic emitters.

    PubMed

    Buencuerpo, Jerónimo; Llorens, José M; Zilio, Pierfrancesco; Raja, Waseem; Cunha, Joao; Alabastri, Alessandro; Zaccaria, Remo Proietti; Martí, Antonio; Versloot, Thijs

    2015-09-21

    A series of photonic crystal structures are optimized for a photon enhanced thermionic emitter. With realistic parameter values to describe a p-type GaAs device we find an efficiency above 10%. The light-trapping structures increases the performance by 2% over an optimal bilayer anti-reflective coating. We find a device efficiency very close to the case of a Lambertian absorber, but below its maximum performance. To prevent an efficiency below 10% the vacuum gap must be dimensioned according to the concentration factor of the solar irradiance.

  4. Antenna-coupled Photoemission from Single Quantum Emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bharadwaj, Palash

    Optical antennas are analogs of their radiowave and microwave counterparts, and can be defined as devices that serve to efficiently convert free-propagating optical radiation to localized energy, and vice-versa. Colloidal metal nanoparticles with their strong plasmonic optical response offer a convenient realization of optical antennas. Such nanoparticle antennas serve to spatially enhance and localize fields, and modify the excitation rate and the radiative decay rate when placed close to single emitters (molecules, quantum dots, etc.). In addition, they can also cause undesirable losses, leading to an increase in the non-radiative decay rates of these emitters. This interplay of rates can lead to a strong modification of the emission characteristics over the intrinsic behavior. We study photoemission from single emitters coupled to antennas of different geometries made from colloidal metal nanoparticles. We demonstrate enhancements of fluorescence from single quantum emitters by a factor 10 to 100, with the highest enhancements resulting for molecules with very low intrinsic quantum yields. Such enhancements afford an improvement in resolution for fluorescence imaging down to lambda/40. We also investigate changes to fluorescence blinking of a colloidal quantum dots (QD) coupled to an antenna, as a function of antenna-QD distance. We find that power-law blinking is preserved unaltered even as the antenna drastically modifies the excitonic decay rate in the QD, and reduces the blinking probability. This resilience of the power-law to change provides evidence that blinking statistics are not swayed by environment-induced variations in kinetics, and offers clues towards identifying the as-yet unknown mechanism behind universal fluorescence intermittency. Finally, in analogy with traditional electromagnetic antennas, we excite proto-typical optical antennas using electrons (current) instead of photons (fields). We excite localized plasmons using low energy tunneling

  5. Robot path obstacle locator using webcam and laser emitter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shojaeipour, Shahed; Haris, Sallehuddin Mohamed; Shojaeipour, Ali; Shirvan, Rassoul Keshvari; Zakaria, Muhammad Khalid

    In this paper, a method to measure distance using a laser-pointer is presented. This method calculates the distance of the robot from obstacles to enable it to traverse to its target location, while avoiding obstacles along the way. Images of the workspace environment are first captured using a webcam. Image processing techniques are then used to identify the existence of obstacles. Using a laser emitter, the distance to obstacles can be calculated. The rangefinder system consists of a single robot mounted webcam and a laser-pointer. The program is written in MATLAB with the Image Processing Toolbox.

  6. Elementary framework for cold field emission from quantum-confined, non-planar emitters

    SciTech Connect

    Patterson, A. A. Akinwande, A. I.

    2015-05-07

    For suitably small field emitters, the effects of quantum confinement at the emitter tip may have a significant impact on the emitter performance and total emitted current density (ECD). Since the geometry of a quantum system uniquely determines the magnitude and distribution of its energy levels, a framework for deriving ECD equations from cold field electron emitters of arbitrary geometry and dimensionality is developed. In the interest of obtaining semi-analytical ECD equations, the framework is recast in terms of plane wave solutions to the Schrödinger equation via the use of the Jeffreys-Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin approximation. To demonstrate the framework's consistency with our previous work and its capabilities in treating emitters with non-planar geometries, ECD equations were derived for the normally unconfined cylindrical nanowire (CNW) and normally confined (NC) CNW emitter geometries. As a function of the emitter radius, the NC CNW emitter ECD profile displayed a strong dependence on the Fermi energy and had an average ECD that exceeded the Fowler-Nordheim equation for typical values of the Fermi energy due to closely spaced, singly degenerate energy levels (excluding electron spin), comparatively large electron supply values, and the lack of a transverse, zero-point energy. Such characteristics suggest that emitters with non-planar geometries may be ideal for emission from both an electron supply and electrostatics perspective.

  7. Silicon solar cells made by a self-aligned, selective-emitter, plasma-etchback process

    DOEpatents

    Ruby, Douglas S.; Schubert, William K.; Gee, James M.

    1999-01-01

    A potentially low-cost process for forming and passivating a selective emitter. The process uses a plasma etch of the heavily doped emitter to improve its performance. The grids of the solar cell are used to mask the plasma etch so that only the emitter in the region between the grids is etched, while the region beneath the grids remains heavily doped for low contact resistance. This process is potentially low-cost because it requires no alignment. After the emitter etch, a silicon nitride layer is deposited by plasma-enhanced, chemical vapor deposition, and the solar cell is annealed in a forming gas.

  8. Silicon solar cells made by a self-aligned, selective-emitter, plasma-etchback process

    DOEpatents

    Ruby, D.S.; Schubert, W.K.; Gee, J.M.

    1999-02-16

    A potentially low-cost process for forming and passivating a selective emitter. The process uses a plasma etch of the heavily doped emitter to improve its performance. The grids of the solar cell are used to mask the plasma etch so that only the emitter in the region between the grids is etched, while the region beneath the grids remains heavily doped for low contact resistance. This process is potentially low-cost because it requires no alignment. After the emitter etch, a silicon nitride layer is deposited by plasma-enhanced, chemical vapor deposition, and the solar cell is annealed in a forming gas. 5 figs.

  9. Strategies for minimizing emittance growth in high charge CW FEL injectors

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, H.

    1995-12-31

    This paper is concerned with the best strategies for designing low emittance, high charge CW FEL injectors. This issue has become more and more critical as today`s interest in FELs is toward UV wavelength high average power operation. The challenge of obtaining the smallest possible emittance is discussed from both the practical point of view and the beam physics point of view. Various mechanisms responsible for beam emittance growth are addressed in detail. Finally, the design of a high charge injector test stand at CEBAF is chosen to help illustrate the design strategies and emittance growth mechanisms discussed in this paper.

  10. Tunable graphene micro-emitters with fast temporal response and controllable electron emission

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Gongtao; Wei, Xianlong; Gao, Song; Chen, Qing; Peng, Lianmao

    2016-01-01

    Microfabricated electron emitters have been studied for half a century for their promising applications in vacuum electronics. However, tunable microfabricated electron emitters with fast temporal response and controllable electron emission still proves challenging. Here, we report the scaling down of thermionic emitters to the microscale using microfabrication technologies and a Joule-heated microscale graphene film as the filament. The emission current of the graphene micro-emitters exhibits a tunability of up to six orders by a modest gate voltage. A turn-on/off time of less than 1 μs is demonstrated for the graphene micro-emitters, indicating a switching speed about five orders of magnitude faster than their bulky counterparts. Importantly, emission performances of graphene micro-emitters are controllable and reproducible through engineering graphene dimensions by microfabrication technologies, which enables us to fabricate graphene micro-emitter arrays with uniform emission performances. Graphene micro-emitters offer an opportunity of realizing large-scale addressable micro-emitter arrays for vacuum electronics applications. PMID:27160693

  11. [The theory of a low-frequency emitter for ultrasonic therapy].

    PubMed

    Budenkov, G A; Bulatova, E G; Nedzvetskaia, O V

    1995-01-01

    While performing ultrasonic therapy for some soft tissue diseases, a deep tissue ultrasound penetration should be prevented since there may be potential thermal effects on the borderline surfaces (the periostrium, articular menisci, etc.) with greatly varying acoustic properties. For this, a bimorphic low-wave emitter should be used. A emitter-generated pressure-distance relationship has been theoretically derived and experimentally tested. There is an abrupt pressure decline when the emitter is removed from the surface, which recommends that the emitter of this type should be applied to the physiotherapy for diseases needed only near-surface exposure.

  12. Emittance studies of the Spallation Neutron Source external-antenna H{sup -} ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Han, B. X.; Stockli, M. P.; Welton, R. F.; Pennisi, T. R.; Murray, S. N.; Santana, M.; Long, C. D.

    2010-02-15

    A new Allison-type emittance scanner has been built to characterize the ion sources and low energy beam transport systems at Spallation Neutron Source. In this work, the emittance characteristics of the H{sup -} beam produced with the external-antenna rf-driven ion source and transported through the two-lens electrostatic low energy beam transport are studied. The beam emittance dependence on beam intensity, extraction parameters, and the evolution of the emittance and twiss parameters over beam pulse duration are presented.

  13. The Effect of Temperature on the Radiative Performance of Ho-Yag Thin Film Selective Emitters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowe, Roland A.; Chubb, Donald L.; Good, Brian S.

    1995-01-01

    We present the emitter efficiency results for the thin film 25 percent Ho YAG (Yttrium Aluminum Garnet, Y3Al5O12) selective emitter from 1000 to 1700 K with a platinum substrate. Spectral emittance and emissive power measurements were made (1.2 less than lambda less than 3.2 microns) and used to calculate the radiative efficiency. The radiative efficiency and power density of rare earth doped selective emitters are strongly dependent on temperature and experimental results indicate an optimum temperature (1650 K for Ho YAG) for thermophotovoltaic (TPV) applications.

  14. Minimum emittance in electron storage rings with uniform or nonuniform dipoles.

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, C.-x.; Accelerator Systems Division

    2009-06-01

    A simple treatment of minimum emittance theory in storage rings is presented, favoring vector and matrix forms for a more concise picture. Both conventional uniform dipoles and nonuniform dipoles with bending radius variation are treated. Simple formulas are given for computing the minimum emittance, optimal lattice parameters, as well as effects of nonoptimal parameters. For nonuniform dipoles, analytical results are obtained for a three-piece sandwich dipole model. Minimization of the effective emittance for light sources is given in detail. Usefulness of gradient and/or nonuniform dipoles for reducing the effective emittance is addressed.

  15. Solar absorptance and thermal emittance of some common spacecraft thermal-control coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henninger, J. H.

    1984-01-01

    Solar absorptance and thermal emittance of spacecraft materials are critical parameters in determining spacecraft temperature control. Because thickness, surface preparation, coatings formulation, manufacturing techniques, etc. affect these parameters, it is usually necessary to measure the absorptance and emittance of materials before they are used. Absorptance and emittance data for many common types of thermal control coatings, are together with some sample spectral data curves of absorptance. In some cases for which ultraviolet and particle radiation data are available, the degraded absorptance and emittance values are also listed.

  16. Tunable graphene micro-emitters with fast temporal response and controllable electron emission.

    PubMed

    Wu, Gongtao; Wei, Xianlong; Gao, Song; Chen, Qing; Peng, Lianmao

    2016-05-10

    Microfabricated electron emitters have been studied for half a century for their promising applications in vacuum electronics. However, tunable microfabricated electron emitters with fast temporal response and controllable electron emission still proves challenging. Here, we report the scaling down of thermionic emitters to the microscale using microfabrication technologies and a Joule-heated microscale graphene film as the filament. The emission current of the graphene micro-emitters exhibits a tunability of up to six orders by a modest gate voltage. A turn-on/off time of less than 1 μs is demonstrated for the graphene micro-emitters, indicating a switching speed about five orders of magnitude faster than their bulky counterparts. Importantly, emission performances of graphene micro-emitters are controllable and reproducible through engineering graphene dimensions by microfabrication technologies, which enables us to fabricate graphene micro-emitter arrays with uniform emission performances. Graphene micro-emitters offer an opportunity of realizing large-scale addressable micro-emitter arrays for vacuum electronics applications.

  17. Super-resolution of dense nanoscale emitters beyond the diffraction limit using spatial and temporal information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barsic, Anthony; Piestun, Rafael

    2013-06-01

    We propose a super-resolution technique for dense clusters of blinking emitters. The method relies on two basic assumptions: the emitters are statistically independent and a model of the imaging system is known. We numerically analyze the performance limits of the method as a function of emitter density and noise level. Numerical simulations show that five closely packed emitters can be resolved and localized to a precision of 17 nm. The experimental resolution of five quantum dots located within a diffraction-limited spot confirms the applicability of this approach. Statistical tests validate the independence of our quantum dots separated by nanoscale distances.

  18. Theory and measurement of emittance properties for radiation thermometry applications.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dewitt, D. P.; Hernicz, R. S.

    1972-01-01

    Some basic concepts of radiation physics are briefly reviewed to provide an introduction to the radiative properties - including emittance, reflectance, absorptance, and transmittance - their definitions, interrelations, theory and methods of measurement. Analyzed data showing typical characteristics of temperature and wavelength dependence, surface effects and environmental influences on the radiation properties of selected classes of materials are presented. Emphasis is placed on those emittance properties of particular interest to conventional radiation thermometry applications, but sufficient generality on all properties is presented to be useful for new or unusual techniques where a more detailed understanding of the behavior of materials is desirable. Data sources are identified to assist the reader in locating property information. It is the intention of the paper to give the reader a background to become more fully aware of the pitfalls, limitations, but of course, advantages in the use of data from the literature. The paper is written in the form of an abbreviated review fully documenting the more important topics and concepts which can only be treated briefly.

  19. Single photon emitters in exfoliated WSe2 structures.

    PubMed

    Koperski, M; Nogajewski, K; Arora, A; Cherkez, V; Mallet, P; Veuillen, J-Y; Marcus, J; Kossacki, P; Potemski, M

    2015-06-01

    Crystal structure imperfections in solids often act as efficient carrier trapping centres, which, when suitably isolated, act as sources of single photon emission. The best known examples of such attractive imperfections are well-width or composition fluctuations in semiconductor heterostructures (resulting in the formation of quantum dots) and coloured centres in wide-bandgap materials such as diamond. In the recently investigated thin films of layered compounds, the crystal imperfections may logically be expected to appear at the edges of commonly investigated few-layer flakes of these materials exfoliated on alien substrates. Here, we report comprehensive optical micro-spectroscopy studies of thin layers of tungsten diselenide (WSe2), a representative semiconducting dichalcogenide with a bandgap in the visible spectral range. At the edges of WSe2 flakes (transferred onto Si/SiO2 substrates) we discover centres that, at low temperatures, give rise to sharp emission lines (100 μeV linewidth). These narrow emission lines reveal the effect of photon antibunching, the unambiguous attribute of single photon emitters. The optical response of these emitters is inherently linked to the two-dimensional properties of the WSe2 monolayer, as they both give rise to luminescence in the same energy range, have nearly identical excitation spectra and have very similar, characteristically large Zeeman effects. With advances in the structural control of edge imperfections, thin films of WSe2 may provide added functionalities that are relevant for the domain of quantum optoelectronics. PMID:25938573

  20. Extension of the general thermal field equation for nanosized emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kyritsakis, A.; Xanthakis, J. P.

    2016-01-01

    During the previous decade, Jensen et al. developed a general analytical model that successfully describes electron emission from metals both in the field and thermionic regimes, as well as in the transition region. In that development, the standard image corrected triangular potential barrier was used. This barrier model is valid only for planar surfaces and therefore cannot be used in general for modern nanometric emitters. In a recent publication, the authors showed that the standard Fowler-Nordheim theory can be generalized for highly curved emitters if a quadratic term is included to the potential model. In this paper, we extend this generalization for high temperatures and include both the thermal and intermediate regimes. This is achieved by applying the general method developed by Jensen to the quadratic barrier model of our previous publication. We obtain results that are in good agreement with fully numerical calculations for radii R > 4 nm, while our calculated current density differs by a factor up to 27 from the one predicted by the Jensen's standard General-Thermal-Field (GTF) equation. Our extended GTF equation has application to modern sharp electron sources, beam simulation models, and vacuum breakdown theory.

  1. A Laboratory Goniometer System for Measuring Reflectance and Emittance Anisotropy

    PubMed Central

    Roosjen, Peter P. J.; Clevers, Jan G. P. W.; Bartholomeus, Harm M.; Schaepman, Michael E.; Schaepman-Strub, Gabriela; Jalink, Henk; van der Schoor, Rob; de Jong, Arjan

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, a laboratory goniometer system for performing multi-angular measurements under controlled illumination conditions is described. A commercially available robotic arm enables the acquisition of a large number of measurements over the full hemisphere within a short time span making it much faster than other goniometers. In addition, the presented set-up enables assessment of anisotropic reflectance and emittance behaviour of soils, leaves and small canopies. Mounting a spectrometer enables acquisition of either hemispherical measurements or measurements in the horizontal plane. Mounting a thermal camera allows directional observations of the thermal emittance. This paper also presents three showcases of these different measurement set-ups in order to illustrate its possibilities. Finally, suggestions for applying this instrument and for future research directions are given, including linking the measured reflectance anisotropy with physically-based anisotropy models on the one hand and combining them with field goniometry measurements for joint analysis with remote sensing data on the other hand. The speed and flexibility of the system offer a large added value to the existing pool of laboratory goniometers. PMID:23443402

  2. Scalable emitter array development for infrared scene projector systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sparkman, Kevin; LaVeigne, Joe; McHugh, Steve; Kulick, Jason; Lannon, John; Goodwin, Scott

    2014-05-01

    Several new technologies have been developed over recent years that make a fundamental change in the scene projection for infrared hardware in the loop test. Namely many of the innovations are in Read In Integrated Circuit (RIIC) architecture, which can lead to an operational and cost effective solution for producing large emitter arrays based on the assembly of smaller sub-arrays. Array sizes of 2048x2048 and larger are required to meet the high fidelity test needs of today's modern infrared sensors. The Test Resource Management Center (TRMC) Test and Evaluation/Science and Technology (T and E/S and T) Program through the U.S. Army Program Executive Office for Simulation, Training and Instrumentations (PEO STRI) has contracted with SBIR and its partners to investigate integrating new technologies in order to achieve array sizes much larger than are available today. SBIR and its partners have undertaken several proof-of-concept experiments that provide the groundwork for producing a tiled emitter array. Herein we will report on the results of these experiments, including the demonstration of edge connections formed between different ICs with a gap of less than 10µm.

  3. Operating single quantum emitters with a compact Stirling cryocooler

    SciTech Connect

    Schlehahn, A.; Krüger, L.; Gschrey, M.; Schulze, J.-H.; Rodt, S.; Strittmatter, A.; Heindel, T. Reitzenstein, S.

    2015-01-15

    The development of an easy-to-operate light source emitting single photons has become a major driving force in the emerging field of quantum information technology. Here, we report on the application of a compact and user-friendly Stirling cryocooler in the field of nanophotonics. The Stirling cryocooler is used to operate a single quantum emitter constituted of a semiconductor quantum dot (QD) at a base temperature below 30 K. Proper vibration decoupling of the cryocooler and its surrounding enables free-space micro-photoluminescence spectroscopy to identify and analyze different charge-carrier states within a single quantum dot. As an exemplary application in quantum optics, we perform a Hanbury-Brown and Twiss experiment demonstrating a strong suppression of multi-photon emission events with g{sup (2)}(0) < 0.04 from this Stirling-cooled single quantum emitter under continuous wave excitation. Comparative experiments performed on the same quantum dot in a liquid helium (LHe)-flow cryostat show almost identical values of g{sup (2)}(0) for both configurations at a given temperature. The results of this proof of principle experiment demonstrate that low-vibration Stirling cryocoolers that have so far been considered exotic to the field of nanophotonics are an attractive alternative to expensive closed-cycle cryostats or LHe-flow cryostats, which could pave the way for the development of high-quality table-top non-classical light sources.

  4. Operating single quantum emitters with a compact Stirling cryocooler.

    PubMed

    Schlehahn, A; Krüger, L; Gschrey, M; Schulze, J-H; Rodt, S; Strittmatter, A; Heindel, T; Reitzenstein, S

    2015-01-01

    The development of an easy-to-operate light source emitting single photons has become a major driving force in the emerging field of quantum information technology. Here, we report on the application of a compact and user-friendly Stirling cryocooler in the field of nanophotonics. The Stirling cryocooler is used to operate a single quantum emitter constituted of a semiconductor quantum dot (QD) at a base temperature below 30 K. Proper vibration decoupling of the cryocooler and its surrounding enables free-space micro-photoluminescence spectroscopy to identify and analyze different charge-carrier states within a single quantum dot. As an exemplary application in quantum optics, we perform a Hanbury-Brown and Twiss experiment demonstrating a strong suppression of multi-photon emission events with g((2))(0) < 0.04 from this Stirling-cooled single quantum emitter under continuous wave excitation. Comparative experiments performed on the same quantum dot in a liquid helium (LHe)-flow cryostat show almost identical values of g((2))(0) for both configurations at a given temperature. The results of this proof of principle experiment demonstrate that low-vibration Stirling cryocoolers that have so far been considered exotic to the field of nanophotonics are an attractive alternative to expensive closed-cycle cryostats or LHe-flow cryostats, which could pave the way for the development of high-quality table-top non-classical light sources.

  5. Operating single quantum emitters with a compact Stirling cryocooler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlehahn, A.; Krüger, L.; Gschrey, M.; Schulze, J.-H.; Rodt, S.; Strittmatter, A.; Heindel, T.; Reitzenstein, S.

    2015-01-01

    The development of an easy-to-operate light source emitting single photons has become a major driving force in the emerging field of quantum information technology. Here, we report on the application of a compact and user-friendly Stirling cryocooler in the field of nanophotonics. The Stirling cryocooler is used to operate a single quantum emitter constituted of a semiconductor quantum dot (QD) at a base temperature below 30 K. Proper vibration decoupling of the cryocooler and its surrounding enables free-space micro-photoluminescence spectroscopy to identify and analyze different charge-carrier states within a single quantum dot. As an exemplary application in quantum optics, we perform a Hanbury-Brown and Twiss experiment demonstrating a strong suppression of multi-photon emission events with g(2)(0) < 0.04 from this Stirling-cooled single quantum emitter under continuous wave excitation. Comparative experiments performed on the same quantum dot in a liquid helium (LHe)-flow cryostat show almost identical values of g(2)(0) for both configurations at a given temperature. The results of this proof of principle experiment demonstrate that low-vibration Stirling cryocoolers that have so far been considered exotic to the field of nanophotonics are an attractive alternative to expensive closed-cycle cryostats or LHe-flow cryostats, which could pave the way for the development of high-quality table-top non-classical light sources.

  6. Gallium arsenide deep-level optical emitter for fibre optics.

    PubMed

    Pan, Janet L; McManis, Joseph E; Osadchy, Thomas; Grober, Louise; Woodall, Jerry M; Kindlmann, Peter J

    2003-06-01

    Fibre-optic components fabricated on the same substrate as integrated circuits are important for future high-speed communications. One industry response has been the costly push to develop indium phosphide (InP) electronics. However, for fabrication simplicity, reliability and cost, gallium arsenide (GaAs) remains the established technology for integrated optoelectronics. Unfortunately, the GaAs bandgap wavelength (0.85 microm) is far too short for fibre optics at 1.3-1.5 microm. This has led to work on materials that have a large lattice mismatch on GaAs. Here we demonstrate the first light-emitting diode (LED) that emits at 1.5 microm fibre-optic wavelengths in GaAs using optical transitions from arsenic antisite (As(Ga)) deep levels. This is an enabling technology for fibre-optic components that are lattice-matched to GaAs integrated circuits. We present experimental results showing significant internal optical power (24 mW) and speed (in terahertz) from GaAs optical emitters using deep-level transitions. Finally, we present theory showing the ultimate limit to the efficiency-bandwidth product of semiconductor deep-level optical emitters.

  7. Electrically pumped single-defect light emitters in WSe2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarz, S.; Kozikov, A.; Withers, F.; Maguire, J. K.; Foster, A. P.; Dufferwiel, S.; Hague, L.; Makhonin, M. N.; Wilson, L. R.; Geim, A. K.; Novoselov, K. S.; Tartakovskii, A. I.

    2016-06-01

    Recent developments in fabrication of van der Waals heterostructures enable new type of devices assembled by stacking atomically thin layers of two-dimensional materials. Using this approach, we fabricate light-emitting devices based on a monolayer WSe2, and also comprising boron nitride tunnelling barriers and graphene electrodes, and observe sharp luminescence spectra from individual defects in WSe2 under both optical and electrical excitation. This paves the way towards the realisation of electrically-pumped quantum emitters in atomically thin semiconductors. In addition we demonstrate tuning by more than 1 meV of the emission energy of the defect luminescence by applying a vertical electric field. This provides an estimate of the permanent electric dipole created by the corresponding electron–hole pair. The light-emitting devices investigated in our work can be assembled on a variety of substrates enabling a route to integration of electrically pumped single quantum emitters with existing technologies in nano-photonics and optoelectronics.

  8. Final Muon Emittance Exchange in Vacuum for a Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Summers, Don; Acosta, John; Cremaldi, Lucien; Hart, Terry; Oliveros, Sandra; Perera, Lalith; Wu, Wanwei; Neuffer, David

    2015-05-07

    We outline a plan for final muon ionization cooling with quadrupole doublets focusing onto short absorbers followed by emittance exchange in vacuum to achieve the small transverse beam sizes needed by a muon collider. A flat muon beam with a series of quadrupole doublet half cells appears to provide the strong focusing required for final cooling. Each quadrupole doublet has a low β region occupied by a dense, low Z absorber. After final cooling, normalized xyz emittances of (0.071, 0.141, 2.4) mm-rad are exchanged into (0.025, 0.025, 70) mm-rad. Thin electrostatic septa efficiently slice the bunch into 17 parts. The 17 bunches are interleaved into a 3.7 meter long train with RF deflector cavities. Snap bunch coalescence combines the muon bunch train longitudinally in a 21 GeV ring in 55 μs, one quarter of a synchrotron oscillation period. A linear long wavelength RF bucket gives each bunch a different energy causing the bunches to drift until they merge into one bunch and can be captured in a short wavelength RF bucket with a 13% muon decay loss and a packing fraction as high as 87%.

  9. Discrete space charge affected field emission: Flat and hemisphere emitters

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, Kevin L.; Shiffler, Donald A.; Tang, Wilkin; Rittersdorf, Ian M.; Lebowitz, Joel L.; Harris, John R.; Lau, Y. Y.; Petillo, John J.; Luginsland, John W.

    2015-05-21

    Models of space-charge affected thermal-field emission from protrusions, able to incorporate the effects of both surface roughness and elongated field emitter structures in beam optics codes, are desirable but difficult. The models proposed here treat the meso-scale diode region separate from the micro-scale regions characteristic of the emission sites. The consequences of discrete emission events are given for both one-dimensional (sheets of charge) and three dimensional (rings of charge) models: in the former, results converge to steady state conditions found by theory (e.g., Rokhlenko et al. [J. Appl. Phys. 107, 014904 (2010)]) but show oscillatory structure as they do. Surface roughness or geometric features are handled using a ring of charge model, from which the image charges are found and used to modify the apex field and emitted current. The roughness model is shown to have additional constraints related to the discrete nature of electron charge. The ability of a unit cell model to treat field emitter structures and incorporate surface roughness effects inside a beam optics code is assessed.

  10. Electrically pumped single-defect light emitters in WSe2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarz, S.; Kozikov, A.; Withers, F.; Maguire, J. K.; Foster, A. P.; Dufferwiel, S.; Hague, L.; Makhonin, M. N.; Wilson, L. R.; Geim, A. K.; Novoselov, K. S.; Tartakovskii, A. I.

    2016-06-01

    Recent developments in fabrication of van der Waals heterostructures enable new type of devices assembled by stacking atomically thin layers of two-dimensional materials. Using this approach, we fabricate light-emitting devices based on a monolayer WSe2, and also comprising boron nitride tunnelling barriers and graphene electrodes, and observe sharp luminescence spectra from individual defects in WSe2 under both optical and electrical excitation. This paves the way towards the realisation of electrically-pumped quantum emitters in atomically thin semiconductors. In addition we demonstrate tuning by more than 1 meV of the emission energy of the defect luminescence by applying a vertical electric field. This provides an estimate of the permanent electric dipole created by the corresponding electron-hole pair. The light-emitting devices investigated in our work can be assembled on a variety of substrates enabling a route to integration of electrically pumped single quantum emitters with existing technologies in nano-photonics and optoelectronics.

  11. Single photon emitters in exfoliated WSe2 structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koperski, M.; Nogajewski, K.; Arora, A.; Cherkez, V.; Mallet, P.; Veuillen, J.-Y.; Marcus, J.; Kossacki, P.; Potemski, M.

    2015-06-01

    Crystal structure imperfections in solids often act as efficient carrier trapping centres, which, when suitably isolated, act as sources of single photon emission. The best known examples of such attractive imperfections are well-width or composition fluctuations in semiconductor heterostructures (resulting in the formation of quantum dots) and coloured centres in wide-bandgap materials such as diamond. In the recently investigated thin films of layered compounds, the crystal imperfections may logically be expected to appear at the edges of commonly investigated few-layer flakes of these materials exfoliated on alien substrates. Here, we report comprehensive optical micro-spectroscopy studies of thin layers of tungsten diselenide (WSe2), a representative semiconducting dichalcogenide with a bandgap in the visible spectral range. At the edges of WSe2 flakes (transferred onto Si/SiO2 substrates) we discover centres that, at low temperatures, give rise to sharp emission lines (100 μeV linewidth). These narrow emission lines reveal the effect of photon antibunching, the unambiguous attribute of single photon emitters. The optical response of these emitters is inherently linked to the two-dimensional properties of the WSe2 monolayer, as they both give rise to luminescence in the same energy range, have nearly identical excitation spectra and have very similar, characteristically large Zeeman effects. With advances in the structural control of edge imperfections, thin films of WSe2 may provide added functionalities that are relevant for the domain of quantum optoelectronics.

  12. Evaluation of wetting area and water distribution on different soils in subsurface drip irrigation emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karimi, B.; Sohrabi, T.; Mirzaei, F.; Rodríguez-Sinobas, L.

    2012-04-01

    Growing pressure on the world's available water resources has led to an increase in the efficiency and productivity of water-use of irrigation systems in arid and semi-arid regions with water scarcity. In this context, sub-surface drip irrigation, where emitters discharge water underneath the soil surface, might help by saving water since soil evaporation, surface runoff, and deep percolation are greatly reduced or eliminated. In this paper, the wetting area and water distribution on light, medium and heavy texture homogeneous soils in subsurface drip irrigation emitters were evaluated. Experimental tests were carried out in a plexiglass lysimeter container with transparent walls. Emitters were buried at 15, 30 and 45 cm depths and discharge rates of 2 and 4 L/h were applied. Observations of wetting bulbs dimensions showed that water moved more laterally than downwards for higher emitter discharges. However, small emitter discharges enhanced water to move downwards. Likewise, higher emitter discharges also favored water to move upwards toward the soil surface. Water redistribution was affected by emitter depth. For the same emitter discharge, the deepest depth showed less water redistributed in the down vertical and horizontal directions but the contrary was observed for shallow depths. This could be explained considering the dry soil area above the emitter that is larger in the deepest emitters. Observations on wetting bulb dimensions and water distributions could aim at the selection of proper design variables (emitter depth), and/or operation variables (inlet head and irrigation time) in the studied soils under different scenarios of cropping patterns. Key Words: subsurface drip irrigation, wetting bulb, soil water distribution, water redistribution, optimum management

  13. Direct Observation of Ultralow Vertical Emittance using a Vertical Undulator - presentation slides

    SciTech Connect

    Wootton, Kent

    2015-09-17

    Direct emittance measurement based on vertical undulator is discussed. Emittance was evaluated from peak ratios, the smallest measured being 𝜀𝑦 =0.9 ±0.3 pm rad. The angular distribution of undulator radiation departs from Gaussian approximations, a fact of which diffraction-limited light sources should be aware.

  14. New format presentation for infrared spectral emittance data. Infrared spectrometry studies, phase 5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyon, R. J. P.; Green, A. A.

    1972-01-01

    Methods for infrared radiance measurements from geological materials were studied for airborne use over terrains with minimal vegetation. The tasks of the investigation were: (1) calculation of emittance ratios, (2) comparison of IR spectral emittance data with K-band scatterometer data over Pisgah Crater, and (3) standard infrared spectral file. Published papers reporting the research are included.

  15. Relaxation and emittance growth of a thermal charged-particle beam

    SciTech Connect

    Teles, Tarcisio N.; Pakter, Renato; Levin, Yan

    2009-10-26

    We present a theory that allows us to accurately calculate the distribution functions and the emittance growth of a thermal charged-particle beam after it relaxes to equilibrium. The theory can be used to obtain the fraction of particles, which will evaporate from the beam to form a halo. The calculated emittance growth is found to be in excellent agreement with the simulations.

  16. Chemically Etched Open Tubular and Monolithic Emitters for Nanoelectrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, Ryan T.; Page, Jason S.; Luo, Quanzhou; Moore, Ronald J.; Orton, Daniel J.; Tang, Keqi; Smith, Richard D.

    2006-11-15

    We have developed a new procedure for fabricating fused silica emitters for electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) in which the end of a bare fused silica capillary is immersed into aqueous hydrofluoric acid, and water is pumped through the capillary to prevent etching of the interior. Surface tension causes the etchant to climb the capillary exterior, and the etch rate in the resulting meniscus decreases as a function of distance from the bulk solution. Etching continues until the silica touching the hydrofluoric acid reservoir is completely removed, essentially stopping the etch process. The resulting emitters have no internal taper, making them much less prone to clogging compared to e.g. pulled emitters. The high aspect ratios and extremely thin walls at the orifice facilitate very low flow rate operation; stable ESI-MS signals were obtained for model analytes from 5-μm-diameter emitters at a flow rate of 5 nL/min with a high degree of inter-emitter reproducibility. In extensive evaluation, the etched emitters were found to enable approximately four times as many LC-MS analyses of proteomic samples before failing compared with conventional pulled emitters. The fabrication procedure was also employed to taper the ends of polymer monolith-containing silica capillaries for use as ESI emitters. In contrast to previous work, the monolithic material protrudes beyond the fused silica capillaries, improving the monolith-assisted electrospray process.

  17. A transverse emittance and acceptance measurement system in a low-energy beam transport line

    SciTech Connect

    Kashiwagi, H. Miyawaki, N.; Kurashima, S.; Okumura, S.

    2014-02-15

    A transverse beam emittance and acceptance measurement system has been developed to visualize the relationship between the injected beam emittance and the acceptance of a cyclotron. The system is composed of a steering magnet, two pairs of slits to limit the horizontal and vertical phase-space, a beam intensity detector just behind the slits for the emittance measurement, and a beam intensity detector in the cyclotron for the acceptance measurement. The emittance is obtained by scanning the slits and measuring the beam intensity distribution. The acceptance is obtained by measuring the distribution of relative beam transmission by injecting small emittance beams at various positions in a transverse phase-space using the slits. In the acceptance measurement, the beam from an ion source is deflected to the defined region by the slits using the steering magnet so that measurable acceptance area covers a region outside the injection beam emittance. Measurement tests were carried out under the condition of accelerating a beam of {sup 16}O{sup 6+} from 50.2 keV to 160 MeV. The emittance of the injected beam and the acceptance for accelerating and transporting the beam to the entrance of the extraction deflector were successfully measured. The relationship between the emittance and acceptance is visualized by displaying the results in the same phase-plane.

  18. Emittance growth of an nonequilibrium intense electron beam in a transport channel with discrete focusing

    SciTech Connect

    Carlsten, B.E.

    1997-02-01

    The author analyzes the emittance growth mechanisms for a continuous, intense electron beam in a focusing transport channel, over distances short enough that the beam does not reach equilibrium. The emittance grows from the effect of nonlinear forces arising from (1) current density nonuniformities, (2) energy variations leading to nonlinearities in the space-charge force even if the current density is uniform, (3) axial variations in the radial vector potential, (4) an axial velocity shear along the beam, and (5) an energy redistribution of the beam as the beam compresses or expands. The emittance growth is studied analytically and numerically for the cases of balanced flow, tight focusing, and slight beam scalloping, and is additionally studied numerically for an existing 6-MeV induction linear accelerator. Rules for minimizing the emittance along a beamline are established. Some emittance growth will always occur, both from current density nonuniformities that arise along the transport and from beam radius changes along the transport.

  19. Robust Radar Emitter Recognition Based on the Three-Dimensional Distribution Feature and Transfer Learning

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Zhutian; Qiu, Wei; Sun, Hongjian; Nallanathan, Arumugam

    2016-01-01

    Due to the increasing complexity of electromagnetic signals, there exists a significant challenge for radar emitter signal recognition. To address this challenge, multi-component radar emitter recognition under a complicated noise environment is studied in this paper. A novel radar emitter recognition approach based on the three-dimensional distribution feature and transfer learning is proposed. The cubic feature for the time-frequency-energy distribution is proposed to describe the intra-pulse modulation information of radar emitters. Furthermore, the feature is reconstructed by using transfer learning in order to obtain the robust feature against signal noise rate (SNR) variation. Last, but not the least, the relevance vector machine is used to classify radar emitter signals. Simulations demonstrate that the approach proposed in this paper has better performances in accuracy and robustness than existing approaches. PMID:26927111

  20. Robust Radar Emitter Recognition Based on the Three-Dimensional Distribution Feature and Transfer Learning.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhutian; Qiu, Wei; Sun, Hongjian; Nallanathan, Arumugam

    2016-02-25

    Due to the increasing complexity of electromagnetic signals, there exists a significant challenge for radar emitter signal recognition. To address this challenge, multi-component radar emitter recognition under a complicated noise environment is studied in this paper. A novel radar emitter recognition approach based on the three-dimensional distribution feature and transfer learning is proposed. The cubic feature for the time-frequency-energy distribution is proposed to describe the intra-pulse modulation information of radar emitters. Furthermore, the feature is reconstructed by using transfer learning in order to obtain the robust feature against signal noise rate (SNR) variation. Last, but not the least, the relevance vector machine is used to classify radar emitter signals. Simulations demonstrate that the approach proposed in this paper has better performances in accuracy and robustness than existing approaches.

  1. High efficiency thermophotovoltaic emitter by metamaterial-based nano-pyramid array.

    PubMed

    Gu, Wei; Tang, Guihua; Tao, Wenquan

    2015-11-30

    A 2D pyramidal metamaterial-based nano-structure is proposed as a wavelength-selective Thermophotovoltaic (TPV) emitter. Rigorous coupled-wave analysis complemented with normal field method is used to predict the emittance as well as the electromagnetic field and Poynting vector distributions. The proposed emitter is shown to be wavelength-selective, polarization-insensitive, and direction-insensitive in emittance. The mechanisms supporting the emittance close to 1.0 in the wavelength range of 0.3-2.0 μm are elucidated by the distribution of electromagnetic field and Poynting vectors in the proposed structure. Finally, thermal stability and radiant heat-to-electricity TPV efficiency for a realistic InGaAsSb TPV system are discussed.

  2. Robust Radar Emitter Recognition Based on the Three-Dimensional Distribution Feature and Transfer Learning.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhutian; Qiu, Wei; Sun, Hongjian; Nallanathan, Arumugam

    2016-01-01

    Due to the increasing complexity of electromagnetic signals, there exists a significant challenge for radar emitter signal recognition. To address this challenge, multi-component radar emitter recognition under a complicated noise environment is studied in this paper. A novel radar emitter recognition approach based on the three-dimensional distribution feature and transfer learning is proposed. The cubic feature for the time-frequency-energy distribution is proposed to describe the intra-pulse modulation information of radar emitters. Furthermore, the feature is reconstructed by using transfer learning in order to obtain the robust feature against signal noise rate (SNR) variation. Last, but not the least, the relevance vector machine is used to classify radar emitter signals. Simulations demonstrate that the approach proposed in this paper has better performances in accuracy and robustness than existing approaches. PMID:26927111

  3. Fast two-dimensional super-resolution image reconstruction algorithm for ultra-high emitter density.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jiaqing; Gumpper, Kristyn; Chi, Yuejie; Sun, Mingzhai; Ma, Jianjie

    2015-07-01

    Single-molecule localization microscopy achieves sub-diffraction-limit resolution by localizing a sparse subset of stochastically activated emitters in each frame. Its temporal resolution is limited by the maximal emitter density that can be handled by the image reconstruction algorithms. Multiple algorithms have been developed to accurately locate the emitters even when they have significant overlaps. Currently, compressive-sensing-based algorithm (CSSTORM) achieves the highest emitter density. However, CSSTORM is extremely computationally expensive, which limits its practical application. Here, we develop a new algorithm (MempSTORM) based on two-dimensional spectrum analysis. With the same localization accuracy and recall rate, MempSTORM is 100 times faster than CSSTORM with ℓ(1)-homotopy. In addition, MempSTORM can be implemented on a GPU for parallelism, which can further increase its computational speed and make it possible for online super-resolution reconstruction of high-density emitters.

  4. Emittance Studies of the BNL/SLAC/UCLA 1.6 Cell Photocathode RF Gun

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, D.T.; Wang, X.J.; Miller, R.H.; Babzien, M.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Pellegrini, C.; Sheehan, J.; Skaritka, J.; Winick, H.; Woodle, M.; Yakimenko, V.; /Brookhaven

    2011-09-09

    The symmetrized 1.6 cell S-band photocathode gun developed by the BNL/SLAC/UCLA collaboration is in operation at the Brookhaven Accelerator Test Facility (ATF). A novel emittance compensation solenoid magnet has also been designed, built and is in operation at the ATF. These two subsystems form an emittance compensated photoinjector used for beam dynamics, advanced acceleration and free electron laser experiments at the ATF. The highest acceleration field achieved on the copper cathode is 150 MV/m, and the guns normal operating field is 130 MV/m. The maximum rf pulse length is 3 {mu}s. The transverse emittance of the photoelectron beam were measured for various injection parameters. The 1 nC emittance results are presented along with electron bunch length measurements that indicated that at above the 400 pC, space charge bunch lengthening is occurring. The thermal emittance, {epsilon}{sub o}, of the copper cathode has been measured.

  5. Emittance Characterization of a Hot-Cavity Laser Ion Source at HRIBF

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yuan; Baktash, Cyrus; Beene, James R; Havener, Charles C; Krause, Herbert F; Schultz, David Robert; Stracener, Daniel W; Vane, C Randy; Geppert, C.; Gottwald, T.; Kessler, T.; Wies, K.; Wendt, K.

    2009-01-01

    The first investigation of the transverse emittance of a hot-cavity laser ion source based on all-solid-state Ti:Sapphire lasers is presented. The emittances of 63Cu ion beams generated by three-photon resonant ionization are measured and compared with that of the 69Ga and 39K ion beams resulting from surface ionization in the same ion source. A Self-Consistent, Unbiased Elliptical Exclusion (SCUBEEx) method is adapted for noise reduction and emittance analysis. Typical values of the rms and 90% fractional emittances of the Cu ion beams at 20 keV energy are found to be about 2 -mm-mrad and 8 -mm-mrad, respectively, for the ion currents of 2 to 40 nA investigated. The emittances of the laser-produced Cu ion beams are smaller than those of the surface-ionized Ga and K ion beams.

  6. Interaction of single quantum emitter and dark plasmon supported by a metal nanoring

    SciTech Connect

    Deinega, Alexei Seideman, Tamar

    2014-06-21

    We explore the interaction between a quantum emitter and a metal nanoring by numerical solution of coupled Maxwell-Liouville equations. When the quantum emitter and nanoring are subjected to an incident plane wave, coupling between the quantum emitter and a dark plasmon supported by the nanoring gives rise to a similar lineshape to the familiar Fano type. It results from the excitation of a dark plasmon via intermediary participation of the quantum emitter. The dark plasmon is characterized through the width and shift parameters of the emitter peak in the absorption spectrum of the nanoparticle. Our results are obtained with the help of finite-difference time-domain method and a recently proposed symmetry-adapted averaging approach.

  7. Universal envelope equation and emittance evolution of high-brightness beam in linac.

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, C.-X.; Accelerator Systems Division

    2009-01-01

    We report a universal beam envelope equation that governs the transverse linear dynamics of high-intensity and high-brightness relativistic beams under constant acceleration in axisymmetric linear accelerators. This dimensionless and almost parameter-free nonlinear equation is useful for understanding scaling properties and for investigating nonlinear behaviors that are beyond analytical analysis. Particularly, we explore emittance compensation in high-brightness beams evolving from the space-charge regime to the thermal-emittance regime, a transition that commonly occurs during acceleration but is not well studied. A new formula is given for correctly computing the rms bunch emittance from slice envelopes, which is different from the commonly used quadratic sum of the thermal emittance and the rms emittance in the envelope phase space.

  8. Observations on the luminosity lifetimes, emittance growth rates and intra-beam scattering at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Paul L.G. Lebrun et al.

    2003-05-22

    A record luminosity of 4.2 10{sup 31}has been reached at the Fermilab p-{bar p} collider. The lifetime of this luminosity at the beginning of the store is about 10 hours. This lifetime can be explained by the measured loss of anti-protons and protons due to collisions and emittance growths. We report on transverse emittance growth rates based on our Synchrotron Light Monitor. Longitudinal emittance growth rate measurements are based on the TeV Sampled Bunch Display data. It is shown that Intra Beam Scattering is a significant source of emittance growth rates. We comment on other possible factors for these observed emittance growth rates. Finally, we comment on future luminosity lifetimes, as we hope to further increase our peak luminosity.

  9. Membrane-Based Emitter for Coupling Microfluidics with Ultrasensitive Nanoelectrospray Ionization-Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Xuefei; Kelly, Ryan T.; Tang, Keqi; Smith, Richard D.

    2011-06-09

    An integrated poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) membrane-based microfluidic emitter for high performance nanoelectrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (nanoESI-MS) has been fabricated and evaluated. The ~100-μm-thick emitter was created by cutting a PDMS membrane that protrudes beyond the bulk substrate. The reduced surface area at the emitter enhances the electric field and reduces wetting of the surface by the electrospray solvent. As such, the emitter provides highly stable electrospray at flow rates as low as 10 nL/min, and is compatible with electrospray solvents containing a large organic component (e.g., 90% methanol). This approach enables facile emitter construction, and provides excellent stability, reproducibility and sensitivity, as well as compatibility with multilayer soft lithography.

  10. Energy distribution for undergate-type triode carbon nanotube field emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, SeGi; Yi, Whikun; Lee, Jeonghee; Jeong, Taewon; Jin, Sunghwan; Heo, Jungna; Kang, J. H.; Choi, Y. S.; Lee, Chang Soo; Yoo, Ji-Beom; Kim, J. M.

    2002-05-01

    Field emission energy distribution (FEED) has been measured for undergate-type triode carbon nanotube (CNT) field emitters where the gate electrodes are located underneath the cathode electrodes. The diode-type emission for these CNT emitters was found to follow the Fowler-Nordheim relation, whereas the triode-type emission exhibited the deviation from this relation. The FEED peaks for the undergate CNT emitters under the triode-type emission shifted to lower energy as the gate voltage increased, indicating nonmetallic behavior for the CNT emitters. There exist two different characteristic FEED peaks, where their peak energy shifts as a function of the gate voltage belong to two different slopes. From the difference in the position and intensity of the peaks, it was found that one was field emission directly from CNTs and the other might be emitted from CNTs through glass powders which were added during the CNT field emitter fabrication process.

  11. Rare-Earth Oxide (Yb2O3) Selective Emitter Fabrication and Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jennette, Bryan; Gregory, Don A.; Herren, Kenneth; Tucker, Dennis; Smith, W. Scott (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This investigation involved the fabrication and evaluation of rare-earth oxide selective emitters. The first goal of this study was to successfully fabricate the selective emitter samples using paper and ceramic materials processing techniques. The resulting microstructure was also analyzed using a Scanning Electron Microscope. All selective emitter samples fabricated for this study were made with ytterbium oxide (Yb2O3). The second goal of this study involved the measurement of the spectral emission and the radiated power of all the selective emitter samples. The final goal of this study involved the direct comparison of the radiated power emitted by the selective emitter samples to that of a standard blackbody at the same temperature and within the same wavelength range.

  12. Rare earth boride electron emitter materials fabrication and evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swanson, L. W.; Davis, P. R.; Gesley, M. A.

    1982-03-01

    Techniques were developed for routine preparation of single crystal rods of LaB6, CeB6 and PrB6 by arc float zone refining. Single crystal, oriented samples were prepared from these rods and mounted as cathodes for testing. Several mounting systems were used, and flat, pointed cone and truncated cone thermionic cathodes were studied. Pointed field emitters of LaB6(100) were also investigated. Variation of thermionic emitted current density and thermal stability of materials were studied as functions of rare earth element, bulk stoichiometry and crystal orientation. Life tests were performed on several different LaB6(100) cathodes. One such cathode operated for over 3000 hours at approximately 10 A/sq cm emitted current density with no serious physical degradation. Surface properties of the materials were investigated by various surface analysis techniques.

  13. Electron gun using carbon-nanofiber field emitter.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Y; Haga, A; Sugita, S; Kita, S; Tanaka, S-I; Okuyama, F; Kobayashi, N

    2007-01-01

    An electron gun constructed using carbon-nanofiber (CNF) emitters and an electrostatic Einzel lens system has been characterized for the development of a high-resolution x-ray source. The CNFs used were grown on tungsten and palladium tips by plasma-enhanced chemical-vapor deposition. Electron beams with the energies of 10

  14. Procedure of measuring the longitudinal emittance of electron beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vladimirov, I. Yu

    2016-09-01

    The procedure of measuring the longitudinal emittance of electron beam generated by RF gun and reconstruction of its longitudinal phase portrait is proposed. Measuring system consists of vertical deflecting RF cavity, horizontal bending dipole and screen. The beam spot on the screen is used to reconstruct the longitudinal phase portrait. In the proposed procedure an electromagnetic field of the vertical deflecting RF cavity can be approximated by the TM110 mode of pillbox cavity. This approximation allows analytically solve the motion equations of the electron motion in the vertical deflecting RF cavity. The report contains description of the vertical deflecting RF cavity and the dipole, the formulae underlying the procedure and the results of numerical simulation.

  15. ROLE OF DIAMOND SECONDARY EMITTERS IN HIGH BRIGHTNESS ELECTRON SOURCES.

    SciTech Connect

    RAO, T.; BEN-ZVI, I.; BURRILL, A.; CHANG, X.; GRIMES, J.; RANK, J.; SEGALOV, Z.; SMEDLEY, J.

    2005-09-20

    In this paper we explore the possibility of using diamond secondary emitter in a high average current electron injector to amplify the current from the photocathode and to isolate the cathode and the injector from each other to increase the life time of the cathode and preserve the performance of the injector. Secondary electron yield of 225 and current density of 0.8 a/cm{sup 2} have been measured in the transmission mode from type 2 a natural diamond. Although the diamond will be heated during normal operation in the injector, calculations indicate that by cryogenically cooling the diamond, the temperature gradient along the diamond can be maintained within the acceptable range. The electron energy and temporal distributions are expected to be narrow from this device resulting in high brightness beams. Plans are underway to measure the SEY in emission mode, fabricate photocathode-diamond capsule and test diamond and capsule in superconducting RF injector.

  16. Quantum emitters dynamically coupled to a quantum field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acevedo, O. L.; Quiroga, L.; Rodríguez, F. J.; Johnson, N. F.

    2013-12-01

    We study theoretically the dynamical response of a set of solid-state quantum emitters arbitrarily coupled to a single-mode microcavity system. Ramping the matter-field coupling strength in round trips, we quantify the hysteresis or irreversible quantum dynamics. The matter-field system is modeled as a finite-size Dicke model which has previously been used to describe equilibrium (including quantum phase transition) properties of systems such as quantum dots in a microcavity. Here we extend this model to address non-equilibrium situations. Analyzing the system's quantum fidelity, we find that the near-adiabatic regime exhibits the richest phenomena, with a strong asymmetry in the internal collective dynamics depending on which phase is chosen as the starting point. We also explore signatures of the crossing of the critical points on the radiation subsystem by monitoring its Wigner function; then, the subsystem can exhibit the emergence of non-classicality and complexity.

  17. Characterisation of the PXIE Allison-type emittance scanner

    DOE PAGES

    D'Arcy, R.; Alvarez, M.; Gaynier, J.; Prost, L.; Scarpine, V.; Shemyakin, A.

    2016-01-26

    An Allison-type emittance scanner has been designed for PXIE at FNAL with the goal of providing fast and accurate phase space reconstruction. The device has been modified from previous LBNL/SNS designs to operate in both pulsed and DC modes with the addition of water-cooled front slits. Extensive calibration techniques and error analysis allowed confinement of uncertainty to the <5% level (with known caveats). With a 16-bit, 1 MHz electronics scheme the device is able to analyse a pulse with a resolution of 1 μs, allowing for analysis of neutralisation effects. As a result, this paper describes a detailed breakdown ofmore » the R&D, as well as post-run analysis techniques.« less

  18. Characterisation of the PXIE Allison-type emittance scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D`Arcy, R.; Alvarez, M.; Gaynier, J.; Prost, L.; Scarpine, V.; Shemyakin, A.

    2016-04-01

    An Allison-type emittance scanner has been designed for PXIE at FNAL with the goal of providing fast and accurate phase space reconstruction. The device has been modified from previous LBNL/SNS designs to operate in both pulsed and DC modes with the addition of water-cooled front slits. Extensive calibration techniques and error analysis allowed confinement of uncertainty to the < 5 % level (with known caveats). With a 16-bit, 1 MHz electronics scheme the device is able to analyse a pulse with a resolution of 1 μs, allowing for analysis of neutralisation effects. This paper describes a detailed breakdown of the R&D, as well as post-run analysis techniques.

  19. Position Effect Based on Anthracene Core for OLED Emitters.

    PubMed

    Kang, Hyeonmi; Shin, Hwangyu; Kim, Beomjin; Park, Jongwook

    2016-03-01

    Green-orange emitters based on anthracene core have been successfully synthesized by substitution with triphenylamine side group in the 9, 10 or 2, 6 positions. There are larger blue shifts in the UV-visible absorption and PL spectra of the synthesized 2,6-substituted derivative compared to the 9,10-substituted derivative. When the synthesized compounds were used as emitting layers in non-doped OLED devices, a related trend was observed in their optical properties. In particular, the OLED device containing the 2,6-substituted derivative was found to exhibit excellent characteristics, with maximum EL emission at 518 nm, pure green emission with CIE coordinates of (0.334, 0.604), and external quantum efficiency of 2.83%.

  20. Multinozzle Emitter Array Chips for Small-Volume Proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Pan; Gomez-Sjoberg, Rafael; Wang, Daojing

    2013-01-01

    High-throughput multiplexed proteomics of small-volume biospecimens will generate new opportunities in theranostics. Achieving parallel top-down and bottom-up mass spectrometry analyses of target proteins using a unified apparatus will improve proteome characterization. We have developed a novel silicon-based microfluidic device, multinozzle emitter array chip (MEA chip), as a new platform for small-volume proteomics using liquid chromatography-nanoelectrospray ionization mass spectrometry (LC-nanoESI-MS). We demonstrate parallel, on-chip, and on-line LC-MS analysis of hemoglobin and its tryptic digests directly from microliters of blood, achieving a detection limit of less than 5 red blood cells. Our MEA chip will enable clinical proteomics of small-volume samples. PMID:23252432

  1. The development of corannulene-based blue emitters.

    PubMed

    Mack, James; Vogel, Philip; Jones, Derek; Kaval, Necati; Sutton, Art

    2007-08-01

    Novel blue emitters were synthesized based on the fullerene fragment corannulene. 1,2- bis(corannulenylethynyl)benzene and 1,4-bis(corannulenylethynyl)benzene were designed, synthesized, and shown to exhibit significant red shifts in their absorption spectra as compared to that of the parent corannulene. Photoluminescence studies show both 1,2- bis(corannulenylethynyl)benzene and 1,4- bis(corannulenylethynyl)benzene gives enhanced blue luminescence compared to the parent corannulene structure. 1,4-bis(corannulenylethynyl)benzene was observed to give intense blue luminescence when excited at 400 nm. DFT and TD-DFT calculations were performed and shown to be consistent with the observed experimental results.

  2. High-density Au nanorod optical field-emitter arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hobbs, R. G.; Yang, Y.; Keathley, P. D.; Swanwick, M. E.; Velásquez-García, L. F.; Kärtner, F. X.; Graves, W. S.; Berggren, K. K.

    2014-11-01

    We demonstrate the design, fabrication, characterization, and operation of high-density arrays of Au nanorod electron emitters, fabricated by high-resolution electron beam lithography, and excited by ultrafast femtosecond near-infrared radiation. Electron emission characteristic of multiphoton absorption has been observed at low laser fluence, as indicated by the power-law scaling of emission current with applied optical power. The onset of space-charge-limited current and strong optical field emission has been investigated so as to determine the mechanism of electron emission at high incident laser fluence. Laser-induced structural damage has been observed at applied optical fields above 5 GV m-1, and energy spectra of emitted electrons have been measured using an electron time-of-flight spectrometer.

  3. Field Emitter Arrays and Displays Produced by Ion Tracking Lithography

    SciTech Connect

    Felter, T E; Musket, R G; Bernhardt, A F

    2004-12-28

    When ions of sufficient electronic energy loss traverse a dielectric film or foil, they alter the chemical bonding along their nominally straight path within the material. A suitable etchant can quickly dissolve these so-called latent tracks leaving holes of small diameter ({approx}10nm) but long length - several microns. Continuing the etching process gradually increases the diameter reproducibly and uniformly. The trackable medium can be applied as a uniform film onto large substrates. The small, monodisperse holes produced by this track etching can be used in conjunction with additional thin film processing to create functional structures attached to the substrate. For example, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and Candescent Technologies Corporation (CTC) co-developed a process to make arrays of gated field emitters ({approx}100nm diameter electron guns) for CTC's ThinCRT{trademark} displays, which have been fabricated to diagonal dimensions > 13. Additional technological applications of ion tracking lithography will be briefly covered.

  4. FIM/IAP/TEM studies of ion implanted nickel emitters

    SciTech Connect

    Walck, S.D.; Hren, J.J.

    1985-01-01

    Accurate depth profiling of implanted hydrogen and its isotopes in metals is extremely important. Field ion microscopy and atom-probe techniques provide the most accurate depth profiling analytical method of any available. In addition, they are extremely sensitive to hydrogen. This paper reports our early work on hydrogen trapping at defects in metals using the Field Ion Microscope/Imaging Atom Probe (FIM/IAP). Our results deal primarily with the control experiments required to overcome instrumental difficulties associated with in situ implantation and the influence of a high electric field. Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) has been used extensively to independently examine the influence of high electric fields on emitters. 11 references, 7 figures.

  5. Quantum emitters dynamically coupled to a quantum field

    SciTech Connect

    Acevedo, O. L.; Quiroga, L.; Rodríguez, F. J.; Johnson, N. F.

    2013-12-04

    We study theoretically the dynamical response of a set of solid-state quantum emitters arbitrarily coupled to a single-mode microcavity system. Ramping the matter-field coupling strength in round trips, we quantify the hysteresis or irreversible quantum dynamics. The matter-field system is modeled as a finite-size Dicke model which has previously been used to describe equilibrium (including quantum phase transition) properties of systems such as quantum dots in a microcavity. Here we extend this model to address non-equilibrium situations. Analyzing the system’s quantum fidelity, we find that the near-adiabatic regime exhibits the richest phenomena, with a strong asymmetry in the internal collective dynamics depending on which phase is chosen as the starting point. We also explore signatures of the crossing of the critical points on the radiation subsystem by monitoring its Wigner function; then, the subsystem can exhibit the emergence of non-classicality and complexity.

  6. A numerical simulation study of gallium-phosphide/silicon heterojunction passivated emitter and rear solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Hannes; Ohrdes, Tobias; Dastgheib-Shirazi, Amir; Puthen-Veettil, Binesh; König, Dirk; Altermatt, Pietro P.

    2014-01-01

    The performance of passivated emitter and rear (PERC) solar cells made of p-type Si wafers is often limited by recombination in the phosphorus-doped emitter. To overcome this limitation, a realistic PERC solar cell is simulated, whereby the conventional phosphorus-doped emitter is replaced by a thin, crystalline gallium phosphide (GaP) layer. The resulting GaP/Si PERC cell is compared to Si PERC cells, which have (i) a standard POCl3 diffused emitter, (ii) a solid-state diffused emitter, or (iii) a high efficiency ion-implanted emitter. The maximum efficiencies for these realistic PERC cells are between 20.5% and 21.2% for the phosphorus-doped emitters (i)-(iii), and up to 21.6% for the GaP emitter. The major advantage of this GaP hetero-emitter is a significantly reduced recombination loss, resulting in a higher Voc. This is so because the high valence band offset between GaP and Si acts as a nearly ideal minority carrier blocker. This effect is comparable to amorphous Si. However, the GaP layer can be contacted with metal fingers like crystalline Si, so no conductive oxide is necessary. Compared to the conventional PERC structure, the GaP/Si PERC cell requires a lower Si base doping density, which reduces the impact of the boron-oxygen complexes. Despite the lower base doping, fewer rear local contacts are necessary. This is so because the GaP emitter shows reduced recombination, leading to a higher minority electron density in the base and, in turn, to a higher base conductivity.

  7. A numerical simulation study of gallium-phosphide/silicon heterojunction passivated emitter and rear solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, Hannes; Ohrdes, Tobias; Dastgheib-Shirazi, Amir; Puthen-Veettil, Binesh; König, Dirk; Altermatt, Pietro P.

    2014-01-28

    The performance of passivated emitter and rear (PERC) solar cells made of p-type Si wafers is often limited by recombination in the phosphorus-doped emitter. To overcome this limitation, a realistic PERC solar cell is simulated, whereby the conventional phosphorus-doped emitter is replaced by a thin, crystalline gallium phosphide (GaP) layer. The resulting GaP/Si PERC cell is compared to Si PERC cells, which have (i) a standard POCl{sub 3} diffused emitter, (ii) a solid-state diffused emitter, or (iii) a high efficiency ion-implanted emitter. The maximum efficiencies for these realistic PERC cells are between 20.5% and 21.2% for the phosphorus-doped emitters (i)–(iii), and up to 21.6% for the GaP emitter. The major advantage of this GaP hetero-emitter is a significantly reduced recombination loss, resulting in a higher V{sub oc}. This is so because the high valence band offset between GaP and Si acts as a nearly ideal minority carrier blocker. This effect is comparable to amorphous Si. However, the GaP layer can be contacted with metal fingers like crystalline Si, so no conductive oxide is necessary. Compared to the conventional PERC structure, the GaP/Si PERC cell requires a lower Si base doping density, which reduces the impact of the boron-oxygen complexes. Despite the lower base doping, fewer rear local contacts are necessary. This is so because the GaP emitter shows reduced recombination, leading to a higher minority electron density in the base and, in turn, to a higher base conductivity.

  8. Enhancing selectivity of infrared emitters through quality-factor matching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakr, Enas; Zhou, Zhiguang; Bermel, Peter

    2015-09-01

    It has recently been proposed that designing selective emitters with photonic crystals (PhCs) or plasmonic metamaterials can suppress low-energy photon emission, while enhancing higher-energy photon emission. Here, we will consider multiple approaches to designing and fabricating nanophotonic structures concentrating infrared thermal radiation at energies above a critical threshold. These are based on quality factor matching, in which one creates resonant cavities that couple light out at the same rate that the underlying materials emit it. When this quality-factor matching is done properly, emissivities can approach those of a blackbody, but only within a selected range of thermal photon energies. One potential application is for improving the conversion of heat to electricity via a thermophotovoltaic (TPV) system, by using thermal radiation to illuminate a photovoltaic (PV) diode. In this study, realistic simulations of system efficiencies are performed using finite-difference time domain (FDTD) and rigorous coupled wave analysis (RCWA) to capture both thermal radiation and PV diode absorption. We first consider a previously studied 2D molybdenum photonic crystal with a commercially-available silicon PV diode, which can yield TPV efficiencies up to 26.2%. Second, a 1D-periodic samarium-doped glass emitter with a gallium antimonide (GaSb) PV diode is presented, which can yield efficiencies up to 38.5%. Finally, a 2D tungsten photonic crystal with a 1D integrated, chirped filter and the GaSb PV diode can yield efficiencies up to 38.2%; however, the fabrication procedure is expected to be more challenging. The advantages and disadvantages of each strategy will be discussed.

  9. Measurement of the microwave emitter's inhomogeneity using optical fiber DTS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaros, Jakub; Papes, Martin; Liner, Andrej; Vašinek, Vladimir; Smira, Pavel; Nasswettrova, Andrea; Cubik, Jakub; Kepak, Stanislav

    2014-06-01

    Researcher's teams were dealing with the microwave emitter's inhomogeneity problem since the microwaves were used. One possible way, how to measure electromagnetic field is the measurement on inhomogeneous temperature distribution on the irradiated sample, which can cause problems as in other material processing, so in the undesirable change of properties and even security. Inhomogeneity of electromagnetic field is specific by creating spots with higher or lower temperature called "hot spots". This inhomogeneity strongly affects the temperature distribution in the cross section of the material and its resultant heating. Given the impossibility of using classical electronic devices with metal temperature sensors were various indirect methods used in the past. This paper deals with experimental measurement of the microwave emitter's inhomogeneity (2.45 GHz) using the optical fiber DTS. The greatest advantage of this sensor system is just in using of the optical fiber (electromagnetic resistance, small size, safety using in inflammable and explosive area, easy installation). Due to these properties of the optical fiber sensor it's possible to measure the temperature of the sample in real time. These sensor are able to measure the temperature along the fiber, in some cases they use nonlinear effect in optical fiber (Raman nonlinear effect). The verification of non-homogeneity consists in experimental measuring of the temperature distribution within the wooden sample. The method is based on heat exchange in an isolated system where wooden sample serves as an absorber of the irradiated energy. To identify locations with different power density was used DTS system, based on nonlinear phenomena in optical fibers.

  10. Signatures of reionization on Lyα emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dayal, Pratika; Ferrara, Andrea; Gallerani, Simona

    2008-10-01

    We use a semi-analytic model of Lyα emitters (LAEs) to constrain the reionization history. By considering two physically motivated scenarios in which reionization ends either early [early reionization model (ERM), zi ~ 7] or late [late reionization model (LRM), zi ~ 6], we fix the global value of the intergalactic medium neutral fraction (e.g. χHI = 3 × 10-4, 0.15 at z = 6.56 for the ERM and LRM, respectively) leaving only the star formation efficiency and the effective escape fraction of Lyα photons as free parameters. The ERM fits the observed LAE luminosity function (LF) at z = 5.7 and 6.56 requiring no redshift evolution or mass dependence of the star formation efficiency, and LAE star formation rates (SFR) of , contributing ~8 per cent of the cosmic SFR density at z = 5.7. The LRM requires a physically uncomfortable drop of ~4.5 times in the SFR of the emitters from z = 6.5 to 5.7. Thus, the data seem to imply that the Universe was already highly ionized at z = 6.56. The mass-dependent Lyα transmissivity is 0.36 <~ Tα <~ 0.51 (ERM) and Tα <~ 0.26 (LRM) at z = 6.56. The LF data at z = 4.5 imply an extra Lyα line damping factor of ~ 0.25 possibly due to dust; the presence of a (clumpy) dust component with E(B - V) <~ 0.28 is also required to reproduce the observed large Lyα equivalent widths at the same redshift. Additional useful information can be extracted from the line profile (weighted) skewness, found to be SW = 10-17 Å for the two reionization models, which shows an interesting Lα - χHI anti-correlation, holding under the model assumptions. The shortcomings of the model and strategies to overcome them are discussed.

  11. Prototype of a subsurface drip irrigation emitter: Manufacturing, hydraulic evaluation and experimental analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souza, Wanderley De Jesus; Rodrigues Sinobas, Leonor; Sánchez, Raúl; Arriel Botrel, Tarlei; Duarte Coelho, Rubens

    2013-04-01

    Root and soil intrusion into the conventional emitters is one of the major disadvantages to obtain a good uniformity of water application in subsurface drip irrigation (SDI). In the last years, there have been different approaches to reduce these problems such as the impregnation of emitters with herbicide, and the search for an emitter geometry impairing the intrusion of small roots. Within the last this study, has developed and evaluated an emitter model which geometry shows specific physical features to prevent emitter clogging. This work was developed at the Biosystems Engineering Department at ESALQ-USP/Brazil, and it is a part of a research in which an innovated emitteŕs model for SDI has been developed to prevent root and soil particles intrusion. An emitter with a mechanical-hydraulic mechanism (opening and closing the water outlet) for SDI was developed and manufactured using a mechanical lathe process. It was composed by a silicon elastic membrane a polyethylene tube and a Vnyl Polychloride membrane protector system. In this study the performance of the developed prototype was assessed in the laboratory and in the field conditions. In the laboratory, uniformity of water application was calculated by the water emission uniformity coefficient (CUE), and the manufacturer's coefficient of variation (CVm). In addition, variation in the membrane diameter submitted to internal pressures; head losses along the membrane, using the energy equation; and, precision and accuracy of the equation model, analyzed by Pearson's correlation coefficient (r), and by Willmott's concordance index (d) were also calculated with samples of the developed emitters. In the field, the emitters were installed in pots with and without sugar cane culture from October 2010 to January 2012. During this time, flow rate in 20 emitters were measured periodically, and the aspects of them about clogging at the end of the experiment. Emitters flow rates were measured quarterly to calculate

  12. Field emission from optimized structure of carbon nanotube field emitter array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chouhan, V.; Noguchi, T.; Kato, S.

    2016-04-01

    The authors report a detail study on the emission properties of field emitter array (FEA) of micro-circular emitters of multiwall carbon nanotubes (CNTs). The FEAs were fabricated on patterned substrates prepared with an array of circular titanium (Ti) islands on titanium nitride coated tantalum substrates. CNTs were rooted into these Ti islands to prepare an array of circular emitters. The circular emitters were prepared in different diameters and pitches in order to optimize their structure for acquiring a high emission current. The pitch was varied from 0 to 600 μm, while a diameter of circular emitters was kept constant to be 50 μm in order to optimize a pitch. For diameter optimization, a diameter was changed from 50 to 200 μm while keeping a constant edge-to-edge distance of 150 μm between the circular emitters. The FEA with a diameter of 50 μm and a pitch of 120 μm was found to be the best to achieve an emission current of 47 mA corresponding to an effective current density of 30.5 A/cm2 at 7 V/μm. The excellent emission current was attributed to good quality of CNT rooting into the substrate and optimized FEA structure, which provided a high electric field on a whole circular emitter of 50 μm and the best combination of the strong edge effect and CNT coverage. The experimental results were confirmed with computer simulation.

  13. Freeform microstructure linear light emitter design for a natural light illumination system.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bo-Jian; Gao, Bo-Yuan; Ullah, Irfan; Chen, Kuan-Yu; Chou, Chun-Han; Lin, Chia-Min; Chang, Cheng-Ming; Jhan, Kai-Cyuan; Whang, Allen Jong-Woei

    2015-10-01

    The major factors of an illuminative environment are a high rendering index and uniformity. The natural light illumination system (NLIS) is used to guide sunlight for indoor illumination. The NLIS consists of three subsystems: collecting, transmitting, and emitting. Nowadays, a variety of light emitters are available for different illuminative environments. This paper proposes a linear microstructure to diffuse parallel light for indoor illumination. To increase uniformity and promote the illuminative area, the light emitter includes two microstructures for the distribution of light. Finally, the proposed light emitter gives illuminance uniformity and efficiency of 0.55% and 74.18%, respectively. PMID:26479647

  14. Phase correlation of ensemble of quantum emitters and timed Dicke state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Jae Seok; Hong, Suc-Kyoung; Nam, Seog Woo; Yang, Hyung Jin

    2016-06-01

    We study the phase-correlated state which is introduced by the instantaneous excitation of an ensemble of identical two-level quantum emitters and its relation with the Dicke states. Under weak coupling regime, the time evolution of the phase-correlated system of the emitters is also derived to see the characteristics of the collective spontaneous emission of the emitters. It is found that the effective coupling of the ensemble in the phase-correlated state with the emitted field is directly determined by the collective phase of the system. Hence, the collective phase is considered for several specified distributions in brief.

  15. Influence of emittance on transverse dynamics of accelerated bunches in the plasma-dielectric wakefield accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kniaziev, R. R.; Sotnikov, G. V.

    2016-09-01

    We study theoretically transverse dynamics of the bunch of charged particles with the finite emittance in the plasma-dielectric wakefield accelerator. Parameters of bunches are chosen the same as available from the 15 MeV Argonne Wakefield Accelerator beamline. The goal of the paper is to study the behavior of bunches of charged particles with different emittances while accelerating these bunches by wakefields in plasma-dielectric structures. Obtained results allow us to determine the limits of the emittance of the bunch where dynamics of the accelerated particles remains stable.

  16. Nonclassical light from a large number of independent single-photon emitters

    PubMed Central

    Lachman, Lukáš; Slodička, Lukáš; Filip, Radim

    2016-01-01

    Nonclassical quantum effects gradually reach domains of physics of large systems previously considered as purely classical. We derive a hierarchy of operational criteria suitable for a reliable detection of nonclassicality of light from an arbitrarily large ensemble of independent single-photon emitters. We show, that such large ensemble can always emit nonclassical light without any phase reference and under realistic experimental conditions including incoherent background noise. The nonclassical light from the large ensemble of the emitters can be witnessed much better than light coming from a single or a few emitters. PMID:26813774

  17. Space-charge driven emittance growth in a 3D mismatched anisotropic beam

    SciTech Connect

    Qiang, J.; Ryne, R.D.; Hofmann, I.

    2002-12-03

    In this paper we present a 3D simulation study of the emittance growth in a mismatched anisotropic beam. The equipartitioning driven by a 4th order space-charge resonance can be significantly modified by the presence of mismatch oscillation and halo formation. This causes emittance growth in both the longitudinal and transverse directions which could drive the beam even further away from equipartition. The averaged emittance growth per degree freedom follows the upper bound of the 2D free energy limit plus the contributions from equipartitioning.

  18. Filter-free nondispersive infrared sensing using narrow-bandwidth mid-infrared thermal emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, Takuya; De Zoysa, Menaka; Asano, Takashi; Noda, Susumu

    2014-01-01

    We experimentally demonstrate filter-free nondispersive infrared (NDIR) sensing of organic solvents using single-peak narrow-bandwidth mid-infrared thermal emitters. Our emitters are based on multiple quantum wells (MQWs) and two-dimensional (2D) photonic crystal (PC) slabs, and show a single thermal emission peak with a quality factor of over 100 at the fingerprint wavelength (around 9 µm) of the target organic solvents. Using these narrow-bandwidth thermal emitters and commercial pyroelectric sensors without any optical bandpass filters, we successfully distinguish and determine the concentration of the target solvents among other solvents.

  19. Possible emittance growth induced by nonlinear space charge fields for arbitrary particle distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kikuchi, Takashi; Horioka, Kazuhiko

    2016-06-01

    A procedure to obtain a ratio of beam radii at final and initial states in arbitrary particle distributions is proposed, and is applied to the estimation of possible emittance growth for Gaussian and thermal equilibrium distributions. The ratios are estimated for Gaussian and thermal equilibrium distributions as a function of tune depression. The possible emittance growth as a function of tune depression and nonlinear field energy factor is also estimated with and without a constant radius ratio approximation. It is confirmed that the possible emittance growths are almost the same in comparison to the cases with and without the constant radius ratio approximation at each distribution.

  20. Experimental generation of longitudinally-modulated electron beams using an emittance exchange technique

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Y.-E; Piot, P.; Johnson, A.; Lumpkin, A.; Maxwell, T.; Ruan, J.; Thurman-Keup, R.; /FERMILAB

    2010-08-01

    We report our experimental demonstration of longitudinal phase space modulation using a transverse-to-longitudinal emittance exchange technique. The experiment is carried out at the A0 photoinjector at Fermi National Accelerator Lab. A vertical multi-slit plate is inserted into the beamline prior to the emittance exchange, thus introducing beam horizontal profile modulation. After the emittance exchange, the longitudinal phase space coordinates (energy and time structures) of the beam are modulated accordingly. This is a clear demonstration of the transverse-to-longitudinal phase space exchange. In this paper, we present our experimental results on the measurement of energy profile as well as numerical simulations of the experiment.

  1. Freeform microstructure linear light emitter design for a natural light illumination system.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bo-Jian; Gao, Bo-Yuan; Ullah, Irfan; Chen, Kuan-Yu; Chou, Chun-Han; Lin, Chia-Min; Chang, Cheng-Ming; Jhan, Kai-Cyuan; Whang, Allen Jong-Woei

    2015-10-01

    The major factors of an illuminative environment are a high rendering index and uniformity. The natural light illumination system (NLIS) is used to guide sunlight for indoor illumination. The NLIS consists of three subsystems: collecting, transmitting, and emitting. Nowadays, a variety of light emitters are available for different illuminative environments. This paper proposes a linear microstructure to diffuse parallel light for indoor illumination. To increase uniformity and promote the illuminative area, the light emitter includes two microstructures for the distribution of light. Finally, the proposed light emitter gives illuminance uniformity and efficiency of 0.55% and 74.18%, respectively.

  2. Replacement of oxide glass with metallic glass for Ag screen printing metallization on Si emitter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Se Yun; Jee, Sang Soo; Lim, Ka Ram; Kim, Won Tae; Kim, Do Hyang; Lee, Eun-Sung; Kim, Young Hwan; Lee, Sang Mock; Lee, Jun Ho; Eckert, Jürgen

    2011-05-01

    Cu-Zr-based metallic glass (MG) has been applied as a binding agent of Ag paste for front contact formation in Si solar cell by screen printing process. Use of electroconductive MG binder significantly improves the quality of the contact by the formation of highly dense 10-50 nm size Ag crystallites and the noncorrugation of the emitter surface with a very shallow Ag crystallite penetration depth of 10-30 nm. Nanoscale Ag crystallites form on the emitter surface by local Si-Cu-Ag eutectic melting, leading to the formation of pyramidal pits on the Si emitter surface, followed by precipitation of Ag crystallites during cooling.

  3. Single shot 3 GeV electron transverse emittance with a pepper-pot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Cyrille; Delerue, Nicolas; Bartolini, Riccardo

    2013-11-01

    We present the first measurement of the transverse emittance of an electron bunch at 3 GeV using the pepper-pot technique. The measurements presented in this paper demonstrate the possibility to use such a method for single shot emittance measurement of high energy particles. This measurement presents also the experimental verification of a previous theoretical study, which was predicting in which condition such a measurement can be done. The method may present some technical limitations which are discussed in view of the application to future very small emittance multi-GeV particle accelerators.

  4. Influence Of Emitter-Collector Axial Asymmetry on the Temperature Distribution in a Thermionic Converter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheglov, Alexander S.; Sinyavskiy, Victor V.; Allen, Daniel T.

    1994-07-01

    The emitters in real thermionic reactor TFEs are not ideally circular nor concentric within their collectors. Also, heat generation within the fuel inside the emitter is not uniform nor symmetric. A two-dimensional thermophysical computer program based upon finite element methods has been developed for calculation of the temperature field in a TFE with eccentricity of the electrodes. The paper presents details of the calculational method and typical results. In addition, we discuss some generalizations from these and other calculational investigations. Generally, it can be concluded that emitter-collector asymmetry is not a problem in TFEs.

  5. Verification of the AWA Photoinjector Beam Parameters Required for a Transverse-to-Longitudinal Emittance Exchange Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Rihaoui, M.M.; Piot, P.; Power, J.G.; Mihalcea, D.; Gai, W.; /Argonne

    2009-05-01

    A transverse-to-longitudinal emittance exchange experiment is in preparation at the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator (AWA). The experiment aims at exchanging a low ({var_epsilon}{sub z} < 5 {micro}m) longitudinal emittance with a large ({var_epsilon}{sub x} > 15 {micro}m) transverse horizontal emittance for a bunch charge of {approx}100 pC. Achieving such initial emittance partitioning, though demonstrated via numerical simulations, is a challenging task and needs to be experimentally verified. In this paper, we report preliminary emittance measurements of the beam in the transverse and longitudinal planes performed at {approx}12 MeV. The measurements are compared with numerical simulations.

  6. Nanophotonic structures for coupling to quantum emitters in the visible

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choy, Jennifer Tze-Heng

    This thesis is about the design, fabrication, and characterization of nanophotonic elements in the visible that can enhance light-matter interaction for single quantum emitters. We focus on two material systems: single photon sources based on the nitrogen-vacancy (NV) center in diamond with improved spontaneous emission rates and collection efficiencies, and passive TiO 2 devices that comprise a potentially broadband (from the visible to the infrared), low loss photonics platform and that are suitable for probing and manipulating single colloidal quantum dots. We first discuss the requirements for using color center emission in bulk diamond crystals for potential applications in quantum information processing, and provide examples of using nanowire structures and planar resonators made in diamond for engineering the NV center's pump and collection efficiencies, and spontaneous emission rates, respectively. We also describe the integration of diamond with plasmonic structures. We have designed and implemented diamond-silver apertures for broadband enhancements of the spontaneous emission rates of NV centers. We show that shallow-implanted NV centers in diamond nanoposts provide a good system for controlling the NV center spontaneous emission rates, allowing for quenched emission with long lifetimes in the bare case, and enhanced emission with fast decay rates (corresponding to a Purcell factor of around 6) when coated with silver. We add plasmonic gratings around the diamond-silver apertures to improve the collection efficiency of the system, and observe over two-fold improvement in collection. We demonstrate the fabrication of chip-scale linear optical elements such as waveguides and racetrack resonators in low-loss TiO2 thin films. The fabricated waveguides operate over a wide bandwidth with propagation losses from 30 dB/cm in the visible to 4 dB/cm in the IR, while racetrack resonators can critically couple to waveguides and have quality factors as high as

  7. Analytical Approach to Eigen-Emittance Evolution in Storage Rings

    SciTech Connect

    Nash, Boaz; /SLAC

    2006-05-16

    This dissertation develops the subject of beam evolution in storage rings with nearly uncoupled symplectic linear dynamics. Linear coupling and dissipative/diffusive processes are treated perturbatively. The beam distribution is assumed Gaussian and a function of the invariants. The development requires two pieces: the global invariants and the local stochastic processes which change the emittances, or averages of the invariants. A map based perturbation theory is described, providing explicit expressions for the invariants near each linear resonance, where small perturbations can have a large effect. Emittance evolution is determined by the damping and diffusion coefficients. The discussion is divided into the cases of uniform and non-uniform stochasticity, synchrotron radiation an example of the former and intrabeam scattering the latter. For the uniform case, the beam dynamics is captured by a global diffusion coefficient and damping decrement for each eigen-invariant. Explicit expressions for these quantities near coupling resonances are given. In many cases, they are simply related to the uncoupled values. Near a sum resonance, it is found that one of the damping decrements becomes negative, indicating an anti-damping instability. The formalism is applied to a number of examples, including synchrobetatron coupling caused by a crab cavity, a case of current interest where there is concern about operation near half integer {nu}{sub x}. In the non-uniform case, the moment evolution is computed directly, which is illustrated through the example of intrabeam scattering. Our approach to intrabeam scattering damping and diffusion has the advantage of not requiring a loosely-defined Coulomb Logarithm. It is found that in some situations there is a small difference between our results and the standard approaches such as Bjorken-Mtingwa, which is illustrated by comparison of the two approaches and with a measurement of Au evolution in RHIC. Finally, in combining IBS

  8. Silicon based solar cells using a multilayer oxide as emitter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Jie; Wu, Weiliang; Liu, Zongtao; Shen, Hui

    2016-08-01

    In this work, n-type silicon based solar cells with WO3/Ag/WO3 multilayer films as emitter (WAW/n-Si solar cells) were presented via simple physical vapor deposition (PVD). Microstructure and composition of WAW/n-Si solar cells were studied by TEM and XPS, respectively. Furthermore, the dependence of the solar cells performances on each WO3 layer thickness was investigated. The results indicated that the bottom WO3 layer mainly induced band bending and facilitated charge-carriers separation, while the top WO3 layer degraded open-circuit voltage but actually improved optical absorption of the solar cells. The WAW/n-Si solar cells, with optimized bottom and top WO3 layer thicknesses, exhibited 5.21% efficiency on polished wafer with area of 4 cm2 under AM 1.5 condition (25 °C and 100 mW/cm2). Compared with WO3 single-layer film, WAW multilayer films demonstrated better surface passivation quality but more optical loss, while the optical loss could be effectively reduced by implementing light-trapping structures. These results pave a new way for dopant-free solar cells in terms of low-cost and facile process flow.

  9. Radiative interactions with micromachined surfaces: Spectral polarized emittance

    SciTech Connect

    Zemel, J.N.

    1991-01-01

    The spectral, angular, polarized emittance (SAPE) is a simple means for observing the allowed electromagnetic energy states associated with periodic structures whose dimensions are comparable to the wavelength of the observed light. Other methods for measuring absorption are far more time consuming when a broad survey is of interest. An extensive body of SAPE data was obtained on 350-- 400{degrees}C intrinsic silicon lamellar gratings. Current approximations to the vector wave equation such as guided wave, modal and Bloch wave methods provided insight into our experiments. A qualitative picture of the stationary electromagnetic states (SES) of lamellar gratings has been developed which agrees with experiment for a number of polarizations, and angular orientations of the emission k vector relative to the gratings. However, one type of emission does not fit any simple model we have examined and raises intriguing questions about emission from grating structures. A new, higher angular resolution emissometer (0.8{degrees} instead of 5{degrees}) has been completed. This system significantly increases the wavelength range from the current 3--14 {mu}m range to 2-25{mu}m, a doubling of the spectral regime. The system is currently in a shakedown'' mode. Preliminary data indicates that the new emissometer meets the design goals. 24 refs., 10 figs.

  10. Magnet design for a low-emittance storage ring

    PubMed Central

    Johansson, Martin; Anderberg, Bengt; Lindgren, Lars-Johan

    2014-01-01

    The MAX IV 3 GeV storage ring, currently under construction, pursues the goal of low electron beam emittance by using a multi-bend achromat magnet lattice, which is realised by having several consecutive magnet elements precision-machined out of a common solid iron block, 2.3–3.4 m long. With this magnet design solution, instead of having 1320 individual magnets, the MAX IV 3 GeV storage ring is built up using 140 integrated ‘magnet block’ units, containing all these magnet elements. Major features of this magnet block design are compactness, vibration stability and that the alignment of magnet elements within each unit is given by the mechanical accuracy of the CNC machining rather than individual field measurement and adjustment. This article presents practical engineering details of implementing this magnet design solution, and mechanical + magnetic field measurement results from the magnet production series. At the time of writing (spring 2014), the production series, which is totally outsourced to industry, is roughly half way through, with mechanical/magnetic QA conforming to specifications. It is the conclusion of the authors that the MAX IV magnet block concept, which has sometimes been described as new or innovative, is from a manufacturing point of view simply a collection of known mature production methods and measurement procedures, which can be executed at fixed cost with a low level of risk. PMID:25177980

  11. Noninvasive emittance and energy spread monitor using optical synchrotron radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiorito, R.; Shkvarunets, A.; Castronovo, D.; Cornacchia, M.; Di Mitri, S.; Kishek, R.; Tschalaer, C.; Veronese, M.

    2014-12-01

    We propose a design for a minimally perturbing diagnostic minichicane, which utilizes optical synchrotron radiation (OSR) generated from magnetic bends in the chicane, to measure the rms horizontal and vertical beam sizes, divergences, emittances, Twiss parameters and energy spread of a relativistic electron beam. The beam is externally focused to a waist at the first bend and the OSR generated there can be used to measure the rms beam size. Subsequent pairs of bends produce far field OSR interferences (OSRI) whose visibility depends on the beam energy spread and the angular divergence. Under proper conditions, one of these two effects will dominate the OSRI visibility from a particular pair of bends and can be used to diagnose the dominant effect. The properties of different configuration of bends in the chicane have been analyzed to provide an optimum diagnostic design for a given set of beam parameters to: (1) provide a sufficient number of OSR interferences to allow a measurement of the fringe visibility; (2) minimize the effect of coherent synchrotron radiation and space charge forces on the particles motion; and (3) minimize the effect of compression on the bunch length as the beam passes through the chicane. A design for the chicane has been produced for application to the FERMI free electron laser facility and by extension to similar high brightness linear accelerators. Such a diagnostic promises to greatly improve control of the electron beam optics with a noninvasive measurement of beam parameters and allow on-line optics matching and feedback.

  12. Ionic liquid ion sources: characterization of externally wetted emitters.

    PubMed

    Lozano, Paulo; Martínez-Sánchez, Manuel

    2005-02-15

    The feasibility of electrostatically extracting and accelerating ions from room temperature ionic liquids in a high vacuum environment is investigated using externally wetted emitters similar to those manufactured for liquid metal ion sources, made out of tungsten wire and electrochemically treated to produce a sharp tip and to increase surface wettability. The ionic liquid EMI-BF4 is used as a prototypical example. The temperature dependence on emission current suggests that liquid flow over the metallic surface is limited by viscosity. Time-of-flight spectrometry indicates that the beam is composed of EMI+ and (EMI-BF4)EMI+ ions in the positive polarity and BF4- and (EMI-BF4)BF4- ions in the negative polarity, and that these ions are emitted with energies very close to their applied potentials. Angular distribution measurements in positive and negative polarities show that ions travel near the propagation axis, diverging by not more than 18 degrees from the centerline. Thanks to the extraordinary variety of ionic liquids it should be possible to generate a correspondingly large number of bipolar nonmetallic ion beams each with unique properties and applicability in fields as diverse as ion lithography, analytical equipment and space propulsion.

  13. Nanostructured ultrafast silicon-tip optical field-emitter arrays.

    PubMed

    Swanwick, Michael E; Keathley, Phillip D; Fallahi, Arya; Krogen, Peter R; Laurent, Guillaume; Moses, Jeffrey; Kärtner, Franz X; Velásquez-García, Luis F

    2014-09-10

    Femtosecond ultrabright electron sources with spatially structured emission are an enabling technology for free-electron lasers, compact coherent X-ray sources, electron diffractive imaging, and attosecond science. In this work, we report the design, modeling, fabrication, and experimental characterization of a novel ultrafast optical field emission cathode comprised of a large (>100,000 tips), dense (4.6 million tips·cm(-2)), and highly uniform (<1 nm tip radius deviation) array of nanosharp high-aspect-ratio silicon columns. Such field emitters offer an attractive alternative to UV photocathodes while providing a direct means of structuring the emitted electron beam. Detailed measurements and simulations show pC electron bunches can be generated in the multiphoton and tunneling regime within a single optical cycle, enabling significant advances in electron diffractive imaging and coherent X-ray sources on a subfemtosecond time scale, not possible before. At high charge emission yields, a slow rollover in charge is explained as a combination of the onset of tunneling emission and the formation of a virtual cathode. PMID:25075552

  14. Mesoscopic quantum emitters from deterministic aggregates of conjugated polymers

    PubMed Central

    Stangl, Thomas; Wilhelm, Philipp; Remmerssen, Klaas; Höger, Sigurd; Vogelsang, Jan; Lupton, John M.

    2015-01-01

    An appealing definition of the term “molecule” arises from consideration of the nature of fluorescence, with discrete molecular entities emitting a stream of single photons. We address the question of how large a molecular object may become by growing deterministic aggregates from single conjugated polymer chains. Even particles containing dozens of individual chains still behave as single quantum emitters due to efficient excitation energy transfer, whereas the brightness is raised due to the increased absorption cross-section of the suprastructure. Excitation energy can delocalize between individual polymer chromophores in these aggregates by both coherent and incoherent coupling, which are differentiated by their distinct spectroscopic fingerprints. Coherent coupling is identified by a 10-fold increase in excited-state lifetime and a corresponding spectral red shift. Exciton quenching due to incoherent FRET becomes more significant as aggregate size increases, resulting in single-aggregate emission characterized by strong blinking. This mesoscale approach allows us to identify intermolecular interactions which do not exist in isolated chains and are inaccessible in bulk films where they are present but masked by disorder. PMID:26417079

  15. Ultrahigh-temperature emitter pixel development for scene projectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sparkman, Kevin; LaVeigne, Joe; McHugh, Steve; Lannon, John; Goodwin, Scott

    2014-05-01

    To meet the needs of high fidelity infrared sensors, under the Ultra High Temperature (UHT) development program, Santa Barbara Infrared Inc. (SBIR) has developed new infrared emitter materials capable of achieving extremely high temperatures. The current state of the art arrays based on the MIRAGE-XL generation of scene projectors is capable of producing imagery with mid-wave infrared (MWIR) apparent temperatures up to 700K with response times of 5 ms. The Test Resource Management Center (TRMC) Test and Evaluation/Science and Technology (TandE/SandT) Program through the U.S. Army Program Executive Office for Simulation, Training and Instrumentations (PEO STRI) has contracted with SBIR and its partners to develop a new resistive array based on these new materials, using a high current Read-In Integrated Circuit (RIIC) capable of achieving higher temperatures as well as faster frame rates. The status of that development will be detailed within this paper, including performance data from prototype pixels.

  16. Iodine-124: a promising positron emitter for organic PET chemistry.

    PubMed

    Koehler, Lena; Gagnon, Katherine; McQuarrie, Steve; Wuest, Frank

    2010-04-13

    The use of radiopharmaceuticals for molecular imaging of biochemical and physiological processes in vivo has evolved into an important diagnostic tool in modern nuclear medicine and medical research. Positron emission tomography (PET) is currently the most sophisticated molecular imaging methodology, mainly due to the unrivalled high sensitivity which allows for the studying of biochemistry in vivo on the molecular level. The most frequently used radionuclides for PET have relatively short half-lives (e.g. 11C: 20.4 min; 18F: 109.8 min) which may limit both the synthesis procedures and the time frame of PET studies. Iodine-124 (124I, t1/2 = 4.2 d) is an alternative long-lived PET radionuclide attracting increasing interest for long term clinical and small animal PET studies. The present review gives a survey on the use of 124I as promising PET radionuclide for molecular imaging. The first part describes the production of 124I. The second part covers basic radiochemistry with 124I focused on the synthesis of 124I-labeled compounds for molecular imaging purposes. The review concludes with a summary and an outlook on the future prospective of using the long-lived positron emitter 124I in the field of organic PET chemistry and molecular imaging.

  17. Recent advances in the chemistry of positron emitters

    SciTech Connect

    Wolf, A.P.; Fowler, J.S.

    1985-01-01

    With the increasing active interest in PET as a method for studying biochemistry in normal and pathological states in humans we can expect to see the development of new techniques for precursor preparation and synthesis. We have seen a doubling of the publication rate in the past three to four years over the previous three to four year period. As the need for these compounds, especially in the tumor and receptor areas, in a purely clinical setting, increases the trend towards true automation of production of the most needeed compounds will accelerate. The cyclotron manufacturers all offer ''black boxes'' for synthesis but the optimum approach to user friendly automation yet needs to be defined. I would note that this paper was not intended as a comprehensive review but rather my goal was to highlight just some of the exciting developments of the past several years. We are entering what may well be the most extensive and active period of research in the synthesis of positron emitter labeled compounds. If 1984 to 1985 is any gauge, many new methods and compounds will appear in the next several years. 37 refs.

  18. A new shipping container for an intense neutron emitter

    SciTech Connect

    Bigelow, J.E.; Alexander, C.W.; Pace, J.V. III; Simmons, C.M.

    1994-06-01

    Californium-252 is an intense neutron emitter (2.34 {times} 10{sup 12} n/s{center_dot}g) used in medicine, research, and industry. The western world`s sole source of this rare radioisotope is the Californium Facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory`s Radiochemical Engineering Development Center (REDC). A project has been initiated at the REDC to design a new Type B Californium Shipping Container. This effort is essential for future transportation of californium to meet the needs of users all over the world. The shipping container must meet all requirements for transport by motor freight, air, vessel, and rail, both domestic and foreign. There are unique problems in the design, fabrication, and licensing of a new Type B shipping container that will accommodate up to 60 milligrams of californium-252. One of the first challenges in the design phase of the project is the selection of a material to shield the high neutron flux. The more stringent safety precautions of today`s world impel us to consider more exotic materials for such a purpose. The candidate materials must be examined not just for their neutron shielding properties, but also in conjunction with other properties such as thermal and structural requirements to withstand the hypothetical accident conditions. The design and building of such a container is a formidable task requiring much planning. The licensing process, with the complex, interactive federal codes, is a special challenge and may be the biggest on the project in terms of time and money.

  19. Controlling Variable Emittance (MEMS) Coatings for Space Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farrar, D.; Schneider, W.; Osiander, R.; Champion, J. L.; Darrin, A. G.; Douglas, Donya; Swanson, Ted D.

    2003-01-01

    Small spacecraft, including micro and nanosats, as they are envisioned for future missions, will require an alternative means to achieve thermal control due to their small power and mass budgets. One of the proposed alternatives is Variable Emittance (Vari-E) Coatings for spacecraft radiators. Space Technology-5 (ST-5) is a technology demonstration mission through NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) that will utilize Vari-E Coatings. This mission involves a constellation of three (3) satellites in a highly elliptical orbit with a perigee altitude of approximately 200 kilometers and an apogee of approximately 38,000 kilometers. Such an environment will expose the spacecraft to a wide swing in the thermal and radiation environment of the earth's atmosphere. There are three (3) different technologies associated with this mission. The three technologies are electrophoretic, electrochromic, and Micro ElectroMechanical Systems (MEMS). The ultimate goal is to make use of Van-E coatings, in order to achieve various levels of thermal control. The focus of this paper is to highlight the Vari-E Coating MEMS instrument, with an emphasis on the Electronic Control Unit responsible for operating the MEMS device. The Test & Evaluation approach, along with the results, is specific for application on ST-5, yet the information provides a guideline for future experiments and/or thermal applications on the exterior structure of a spacecraft.

  20. Radiation from an emitter in the ghost free scalar theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frolov, Valeri P.; Zelnikov, Andrei

    2016-05-01

    We study radiation emitted by a time-dependent source of a scalar massless field in the framework of the ghost-free modifications of the theory. We consider a simple model of the emitter: namely, we assume that it is point-like and monochromatic. We focus on the most common versions of the ghost-free theory, where the propagator □-1 is modified as follows: exp (-(□/μ2)N)□-1, where μ is the characteristic mass scale of such a G FN theory. We demonstrate that far from the source, in the wave zone, the radiation asymptotically converges to its "classical" value for any N ≥1 . However, in the near zone the behavior of the field is quite different from the "classical" case. The difference of the field amplitude for the ghost-free field and for the classical one has an oscillatory behavior in this domain. The number of oscillations increases with N . The amplitude of these oscillations remains finite for even N , while it infinitely grows with frequency for odd N . This behavior indicates that even in the classical domain G FN theories might have pathological behavior.

  1. Emittance Analysis of the DIII-D Neutral Beam Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez, N. A.; Crowley, B.

    2014-10-01

    In a high powered neutral beam system ions are extracted from a low temperature plasma, through apertures in the arc chamber, by application of a potential to an external electrode. It has been determined that to increase the beam energy of the DIII-D neutral beam system beyond 95 keV the accelerator must be reconfigured to avoid excessive electrical breakdown in the grid gaps. Deciding exactly what modifications are to be made requires modeling and experimental effort. A basic problem is to find a geometry with which the extracted beam is intense, low divergence, free of aberrations, and does not strike the focusing electrodes. We present the results of modeling proposed reconfigurations to the accelerator geometry and source conditions. The quality of the beam produced from the various accelerator configurations is quantified through metrics such as the beam emittance and the average divergence per beamlet. By comparing the beam quality and power delivered for each proposed reconfiguration an optimal design is selected and recommended. Work supported in part by the National Undergraduate Fellowship Program in Plasma Physics and Fusion Energy Sciences and the US DOE under DE-FG02-94ER54235, DE-FC02-04ER54698.

  2. Optimization of SERS Tag Intensity, Binding Footprint, and Emittance

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Nanoparticle surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) tags have attracted interest as labels for use in a variety of applications, including biomolecular assays. An obstacle to progress in this area is a lack of standardized approaches to compare the brightness of different SERS tags within and between laboratories. Here we present an approach based on binding of SERS tags to beads with known binding capacities that allows evaluation of the average intensity, the relative binding footprint of particles in a SERS tag preparation, and the size-normalized intensity or emittance. We tested this on four different SERS tag compositions and show that aggregated gold nanorods produce SERS tags that are 2–4 times brighter than relatively more monodisperse nanorods, but that the aggregated nanorods are also correspondingly larger, which may negate the intensity if steric hindrance limits the number of tags bound to a target. By contrast, SERS tags prepared from smaller gold nanorods coated with a silver shell produce SERS tags that are 2–3 times brighter, on a size-normalized basis, than the Au nanorod-based tags, resulting in labels with improved performance in SERS-based image and flow cytometry assays. SERS tags based on red-resonant Ag plates showed similarly bright signals and small footprint. This approach to evaluating SERS tag brightness is general, uses readily available reagents and instruments, and should be suitable for interlab comparisons of SERS tag brightness. PMID:24892497

  3. Multiplexing and scaling-down of nanostructured photon-triggered silicon field emitter arrays for maximum total electron yield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Chen D.; Swanwick, Michael E.; Keathley, Phillip D.; Kärtner, Franz X.; Velásquez-García, Luis F.

    2015-07-01

    Femtosecond ultrabright cathodes with spatially structured emission are a critical technology for applications such as free-electron lasers, tabletop coherent x-ray sources, and ultrafast imaging. In this work, the optimization of the total electron yield of ultrafast photon-triggered field emission cathodes composed of arrays of nanosharp, high-aspect-ratio, single-crystal silicon pillars is explored through the variation of the emitter pitch and height. Arrays of 6 nm tip radius silicon emitters with emitter densities between 1.2 and 73.9 million tips cm-2 (hexagonally packed arrays with emitter pitch between 1.25 and 10 μm) and emitter height between 2.0 and 8.5 μm were characterized using 35 fs 800 nm laser pulses. Three-photon electron emission for low-energy (<0.3 μJ) light pulses and strong-field emission for high-energy (>1 μJ) light pulses was observed, in agreement with the literature. Of the devices tested, the arrays with emitter pitch equal to 2.5 μm produced the highest total electron yield; arrays with larger emitter pitch suffer area sub-utilization, and in devices with smaller emitter pitch the larger emitter density does not compensate the smaller per-emitter current due to the electric field shadowing that results from the proximity of the adjacent tips. Experimental data and simulations suggest that 2 μm tall emitters achieve practical optimal performance as shorter emitters have visibly smaller field factors due to the proximity of the emitter tip to the substrate, and taller emitters show marginal improvement in the electron yield at the expense of greater fabrication difficulty.

  4. Multiplexing and scaling-down of nanostructured photon-triggered silicon field emitter arrays for maximum total electron yield.

    PubMed

    Dong, Chen D; Swanwick, Michael E; Keathley, Phillip D; Kärtner, Franz X; Velásquez-García, Luis F

    2015-07-01

    Femtosecond ultrabright cathodes with spatially structured emission are a critical technology for applications such as free-electron lasers, tabletop coherent x-ray sources, and ultrafast imaging. In this work, the optimization of the total electron yield of ultrafast photon-triggered field emission cathodes composed of arrays of nanosharp, high-aspect-ratio, single-crystal silicon pillars is explored through the variation of the emitter pitch and height. Arrays of 6 nm tip radius silicon emitters with emitter densities between 1.2 and 73.9 million tips cm(-2) (hexagonally packed arrays with emitter pitch between 1.25 and 10 μm) and emitter height between 2.0 and 8.5 μm were characterized using 35 fs 800 nm laser pulses. Three-photon electron emission for low-energy (<0.3 μJ) light pulses and strong-field emission for high-energy (>1 μJ) light pulses was observed, in agreement with the literature. Of the devices tested, the arrays with emitter pitch equal to 2.5 μm produced the highest total electron yield; arrays with larger emitter pitch suffer area sub-utilization, and in devices with smaller emitter pitch the larger emitter density does not compensate the smaller per-emitter current due to the electric field shadowing that results from the proximity of the adjacent tips. Experimental data and simulations suggest that 2 μm tall emitters achieve practical optimal performance as shorter emitters have visibly smaller field factors due to the proximity of the emitter tip to the substrate, and taller emitters show marginal improvement in the electron yield at the expense of greater fabrication difficulty. PMID:26057050

  5. Transparent conductor-embedding nanocones for selective emitters: optical and electrical improvements of Si solar cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Joondong; Yun, Ju-Hyung; Kim, Hyunyub; Cho, Yunae; Park, Hyeong-Ho; Kumar, M Melvin David; Yi, Junsin; Anderson, Wayne A; Kim, Dong-Wook

    2015-01-01

    Periodical nanocone-arrays were employed in an emitter region for high efficient Si solar cells. Conventional wet-etching process was performed to form the nanocone-arrays for a large area, which spontaneously provides the graded doping features for a selective emitter. This enables to lower the electrical contact resistance and enhances the carrier collection due to the high electric field distribution through a nanocone. Optically, the convex-shaped nanocones efficiently reduce light-reflection and the incident light is effectively focused into Si via nanocone structure, resulting in an extremely improved the carrier collection performances. This nanocone-arrayed selective emitter simultaneously satisfies optical and electrical improvement. We report the record high efficiency of 16.3% for the periodically nanoscale patterned emitter Si solar cell.

  6. The HETDEX Pilot Survey & 3DHST: What Makes a Lyman-alpha Emitter?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagen, Alex; Zeimann, Gregory; Gronwall, Caryl; Ciardullo, Robin; Bridge, Joanna; Hetdex

    2015-01-01

    We compare the 3D-HST H-beta emitters at z~2 to Lyman-alpha emitters found in the same redshift range by the HETDEX Pilot Survey to investigate any differences in the physical and morphological parameters that could elucidate how or why Lyman-alpha is escaping. We use one-dimensional and multi-dimensional statistics, as well as machine learning techniques to try to find differences between these datasets. However, we are unable to find statistically significant differences between these populations. This demonstrates that Lyman-alpha emitters are pulled randomly from the distribution of star-forming galaxies, and there are seemly no strong physical or morphological requirements to be a Lyman-alpha emitter. We also use this information to inform a toy model of Lyman-alpha emission that poses all star-forming galaxies are LAEs if view along certain lines of sight.

  7. Preliminary Assessment of the Functional Fitness of Alpha Emitter At-211 for Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Eremenko, D. O.; Fotina, O. V.; Platonov, S. Yu.; Subbotina, E. A.; Yuminov, O. A.; Pankratova, T. V.; Sirotkina, E. B.; Tultaev, A. V.

    2010-01-05

    The functional fitness of the alpha-emitter At-211 for radiotherapy of the thyroid gland cancer is evaluated. Radiation doses are calculated using the MIRD method and previously obtained pharmacokinetic data for At-211 in isotonic solution.

  8. Transparent conductor-embedding nanocones for selective emitters: optical and electrical improvements of Si solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Joondong; Yun, Ju-Hyung; Kim, Hyunyub; Cho, Yunae; Park, Hyeong-Ho; Kumar, M. Melvin David; Yi, Junsin; Anderson, Wayne A.; Kim, Dong-Wook

    2015-03-01

    Periodical nanocone-arrays were employed in an emitter region for high efficient Si solar cells. Conventional wet-etching process was performed to form the nanocone-arrays for a large area, which spontaneously provides the graded doping features for a selective emitter. This enables to lower the electrical contact resistance and enhances the carrier collection due to the high electric field distribution through a nanocone. Optically, the convex-shaped nanocones efficiently reduce light-reflection and the incident light is effectively focused into Si via nanocone structure, resulting in an extremely improved the carrier collection performances. This nanocone-arrayed selective emitter simultaneously satisfies optical and electrical improvement. We report the record high efficiency of 16.3% for the periodically nanoscale patterned emitter Si solar cell.

  9. An Improved Formulation for Calorimetric Emittance Testing of Spacecraft Thermal Control Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kauder, Lonny R.

    2008-01-01

    Spacecraft often really heavily on passive thermal control to maintain operating temperature. An important parameter in the spacecraft heat balance equation is the emittance of thermal control coatings as a function of coating temperature. One method for determining the emittance of spacecraft thermal control from elevated temperature to cryogenic temperatures relies on a calorimetric technique. The fundamental equation governing this test method can be found in numerous places in the literature and although it generally provides reasonable results, its formulation is based on a conceptual flaw that only becomes apparent when the sample temperature approaches the wall temperature during testing. This paper investigates the cause for this error and develops the correct formulation for calorimetric emittance testing. Experimental data will also be presented that illustrates the difference between the two formulations and the resulting difference in the calculated emittance.

  10. A high-current microwave ion source with permanent magnet and its beam emittance measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Yao Zeen; Tan Xinjian; Du Hongxin; Luo Ben; Liu Zhanwen

    2008-07-15

    The progress of a 2.45 GHz high-current microwave ion source with permanent magnet for T(d,n){sup 4}He reaction neutron generator is reported in this paper. At 600 W microwave power and 22 kV extraction voltage, 90 mA peak hydrogen ion beam is extracted from a single aperture of 6 mm diameter. The beam emittance is measured using a simplified pepper-pot method. The (x,x{sup '}) emittance and the (y,y{sup '}) emittance for 14 keV hydrogen ion beam are 55.3{pi} and 58.2{pi} mm mrad, respectively. The normalized emittances are 0.302{pi} and 0.317{pi} mm mrad, respectively.

  11. Time-Resolved Emittance Characterization of an Induction Linac Beam using Optical Transition Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Le Sage, G P

    2002-11-05

    An induction linac is used by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory to perform radiographic testing at the Flash X-ray Radiography facility. Emittance characterization is important since x-ray spot size impacts the resolution of shadow-graphs. Due to the long pulse length, high current, and beam energy, emittance measurement using Optical Transition Radiation is an attractive alternative for reasons that will be described in the text. The utility of OTR-based emittance measurement has been well demonstrated for both RF and induction linacs. We describe the time-resolved emittance characterization of an induction linac electron beam. We have refined the optical collection system for the induction linac application, and have demonstrated a new technique for probing the divergence of a subset of the beam profile. The experimental apparatus, data reduction, and conclusions will be presented. Additionally, a new scheme for characterizing the correlation between beam divergence and spatial coordinates within the beam profile will be described.

  12. Characterizing and Optimizing Photocathode Laser Distributions for Ultra-low Emittance Electron Beam Operations

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, F.; Bohler, D.; Ding, Y.; Gilevich, S.; Huang, Z.; Loos, H.; Ratner, D.; Vetter, S.

    2015-12-07

    Photocathode RF gun has been widely used for generation of high-brightness electron beams for many different applications. We found that the drive laser distributions in such RF guns play important roles in minimizing the electron beam emittance. Characterizing the laser distributions with measurable parameters and optimizing beam emittance versus the laser distribution parameters in both spatial and temporal directions are highly desired for high-brightness electron beam operation. In this paper, we report systematic measurements and simulations of emittance dependence on the measurable parameters represented for spatial and temporal laser distributions at the photocathode RF gun systems of Linac Coherent Light Source. The tolerable parameter ranges for photocathode drive laser distributions in both directions are presented for ultra-low emittance beam operations.

  13. Multiple intrinsically identical single-photon emitters in the solid state.

    PubMed

    Rogers, L J; Jahnke, K D; Teraji, T; Marseglia, L; Müller, C; Naydenov, B; Schauffert, H; Kranz, C; Isoya, J; McGuinness, L P; Jelezko, F

    2014-01-01

    Emitters of indistinguishable single photons are crucial for the growing field of quantum technologies. To realize scalability and increase the complexity of quantum optics technologies, multiple independent yet identical single-photon emitters are required. However, typical solid-state single-photon sources are inherently dissimilar, necessitating the use of electrical feedback or optical cavities to improve spectral overlap between distinct emitters. Here we demonstrate bright silicon vacancy (SiV(-)) centres in low-strain bulk diamond, which show spectral overlap of up to 91% and nearly transform-limited excitation linewidths. This is the first time that distinct single-photon emitters in the solid state have shown intrinsically identical spectral properties. Our results have impact on the application of single-photon sources for quantum optics and cryptography. PMID:25162729

  14. Reduction of Thermal Emittance by using P-polarized Laser at Oblique Incidence

    SciTech Connect

    Xiang,D.; Park, S.; Park, J.; Parc, Y.; Wang, X.

    2006-01-01

    High charge low emittance electron beam is crucial for the 4th generation light source. Conventionally the beam is generated by photoinjector with laser illuminating the cathode at nearly normal incidence. In this paper attention was called to the use of laser at oblique incidence, which we believe, may be more beneficial. It is found that when the laser illuminates the cathode at oblique incidence, the quantum efficiency (QE) and thermal emittance show strong dependence on incidence angle and polarization state. By using p-polarized laser at oblique incidence, surface photoemission is initiated by the presence of the normal electric field which results in a higher QE and lower thermal emittance. With this technique, the increase in QE by almost 5 times and the reduction of thermal emittance by 40% should be quite expectable for a Copper photo-cathode with atomically smooth surface.

  15. Low Emittance, High Brilliance Relativistic Electron Beams from a Laser-Plasma Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Brunetti, E.; Shanks, R. P.; Manahan, G. G.; Islam, M. R.; Ersfeld, B.; Anania, M. P.; Cipiccia, S.; Issac, R. C.; Raj, G.; Vieux, G.; Welsh, G. H.; Wiggins, S. M.; Jaroszynski, D. A.

    2010-11-19

    Progress in laser wakefield accelerators indicates their suitability as a driver of compact free-electron lasers (FELs). High brightness is defined by the normalized transverse emittance, which should be less than 1{pi} mm mrad for an x-ray FEL. We report high-resolution measurements of the emittance of 125 MeV, monoenergetic beams from a wakefield accelerator. An emittance as low as 1.1{+-}0.1{pi} mm mrad is measured using a pepper-pot mask. This sets an upper limit on the emittance, which is comparable with conventional linear accelerators. A peak transverse brightness of 5x10{sup 15} A m{sup -1} rad{sup -1} makes it suitable for compact XUV FELs.

  16. Novel and efficient Mie-metamaterial thermal emitter for thermophotovoltaic systems.

    PubMed

    Ghanekar, Alok; Lin, Laura; Zheng, Yi

    2016-05-16

    We theoretically demonstrate a novel, efficient and cost effective thermal emitter using a Mie-resonance metamaterial for thermophotovoltaic (TPV) applications. We propose for the first time the design of a thermal emitter which is based on nanoparticle-embedded thin film. The emitter consists of a thin film of SiO2 on the top of tungsten layer deposited on a substrate. The thin film is embedded with tungsten nanoparticles which alter the refractive index of the film. This gives rise to desired emissive properties in the wavelength range of 0.4 μm to 2 μm suitable for GaSb and InGaAs based photovoltaics. Effective dielectric properties are calculated using Maxwell-Garnett-Mie theory. Our calculations indicate this would significantly improve the efficiency of TPV cells. We introduce a new parameter to gauge the efficacy of thermal emitters and use it to compare different designs. PMID:27409959

  17. Transverse to longitudinal emittance exchange beamline at the A0 photoinjector.

    SciTech Connect

    Fililler, R. P.; Edwards, D. A.; Koeth, T.; Harkay, K. C.; Kim, K.-J.; Edwards, H. T.; Accelerator Systems Division; Fermilab; Rutgers Univ.

    2007-08-01

    The FNAL A0 Photoinjector is being reconfigured to test the principal of transverse to longitudinal emittance exchange as proposed by Cornacchia and Emma, Kim and Sessler, and others. The ability to perform such an exchange could have major advantages to FELs by reducing the transverse emittance. Several schemes to carry out the exchange are possible and will be reported separately. At the Fermilab A0 Photoinjector we are constructing a beamline to demonstrate this transverse to longitudinal emittance exchange. This beamline will consist of a dogleg, a TM{sub 110} 5 cell copper cavity, and another dogleg. The beamline is designed to reuse the bunch compressor dipoles of the photoinjector, along with some existing diagnostics. Beamline layout and simulations are presented. Emittance dilution effects are also discussed.

  18. Optimal dipole-field profiles for emittance reduction in storage rings.

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, C.-X.; Wang, Y.; Peng, Y. )

    2011-03-21

    In recent years nonuniform dipoles with bending-radius variation have been studied for reducing storage ring emittance. According to a new minimum-emittance theory, the effects of an arbitrary dipole can be characterized with two parameters determined by the dipole. To have a better idea of the potentials of nonuniform dipoles, here we numerically explore the possible values of these two parameters and associated bending profiles for optimal emittance reduction. Such optimization results provide a useful reference for lattice designs involving nonuniform bending. Simple bending-radius profiles (a short segment of constant radius with linear ramps on the sides) were found to be close to the optimal. Basic beam and lattice properties such as emittance, energy spread, and phase advances are presented based on the optimal dipole solutions.

  19. Shaping single emitter emission with metallic hole arrays: strong focusing of dipolar radiation.

    PubMed

    Moerland, Robert J; Eguiluz, Lur; Kaivola, Matti

    2013-02-25

    Nanoscale plasmonic structures allow for control of the emission of single emitters, such as fluorescent molecules and quantum dots, enabling phenomena such as lifetime reduction, emission redirection and color sorting of photons. We present single emitter emission tailored with arrays of holes of heterogeneous size, perforated in a gold film. With spatial control of the local amplitude and phase of the electromagnetic field radiated by the emitter, a desired near- or far-field distribution of the electromagnetic waves can be obtained. This control is established by varying the aspect ratio of the individual holes and the periodicity of the array surrounding the emitter. As an example showing the versatility of the technique, we present the strong focusing of the radiation of a highly divergent dipole source, for both p- and s-polarized waves.

  20. Transverse Emittance and Current of Multi-GeV Trapped Electrons in a Plasma Wakefield Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Kirby, N.; Blumenfeld, I.; Clayton, C.E.; Decker, F.J.; Hogan, M.J.; Huang, C.; Ischebeck, R.; Iverson, R.H.; Joshi, C.; Katsouleas, T.; Lu, W.; Marsh, K.A.; Martins, S.F.; Mori, W.B.; Muggli, P.; Oz, E.; Siemann, R.H.; Walz, D.R.; Zhou, M.; /UCLA

    2009-10-17

    Multi-GeV trapped electron bunches in a plasma wakefield accelerator (PWFA) are observed with normalized transverse emittance divided by peak current, {epsilon}{sub N,x}/I{sub t}, below the level of 0.2 {micro}m/kA. A theoretical model of the trapped electron emittance, developed here, indicates that emittance scales inversely with the square root of the plasma density in the nonlinear 'bubble' regime of the PWFA. This model and simulations indicate that the observed values of {epsilon}{sub N,x}/I{sub t} result from multi-GeV trapped electron bunches with emittances of a few {micro}m and multi-kA peak currents.

  1. Demonstration of cathode emittance dominated high bunch charge beams in a DC gun-based photoinjector

    SciTech Connect

    Gulliford, Colwyn Bartnik, Adam Bazarov, Ivan; Dunham, Bruce; Cultrera, Luca

    2015-03-02

    We present the results of transverse emittance and longitudinal current profile measurements of high bunch charge (≥100 pC) beams produced in the DC gun-based Cornell energy recovery linac photoinjector. In particular, we show that the cathode thermal and core beam emittances dominate the final 95% and core emittances measured at 9–9.5 MeV. Additionally, we demonstrate excellent agreement between optimized 3D space charge simulations and measurement, and show that the quality of the transverse laser distribution limits the optimal simulated and measured emittances. These results, previously thought achievable only with RF guns, demonstrate that DC gun based photoinjectors are capable of delivering beams with sufficient single bunch charge and beam quality suitable for many current and next generation accelerator projects such as Energy Recovery Linacs and Free Electron Lasers.

  2. Transverse Beam Emittance Measurements of a 16 MeV Linac at the Idaho Accelerator Center

    SciTech Connect

    S. Setiniyaz, T.A. Forest, K. Chouffani, Y. Kim, A. Freyberger

    2012-07-01

    A beam emittance measurement of the 16 MeV S-band High Repetition Rate Linac (HRRL) was performed at Idaho State University's Idaho Accelerator Center (IAC). The HRRL linac structure was upgraded beyond the capabilities of a typical medical linac so it can achieve a repetition rate of 1 kHz. Measurements of the HRRL transverse beam emittance are underway that will be used to optimize the production of positrons using HRRL's intense electron beam on a tungsten converter. In this paper, we describe a beam imaging system using on an OTR screen and a digital CCD camera, a MATLAB tool to extract beamsize and emittance, detailed measurement procedures, and the measured transverse emittances for an arbitrary beam energy of 15 MeV.

  3. Novel and efficient Mie-metamaterial thermal emitter for thermophotovoltaic systems.

    PubMed

    Ghanekar, Alok; Lin, Laura; Zheng, Yi

    2016-05-16

    We theoretically demonstrate a novel, efficient and cost effective thermal emitter using a Mie-resonance metamaterial for thermophotovoltaic (TPV) applications. We propose for the first time the design of a thermal emitter which is based on nanoparticle-embedded thin film. The emitter consists of a thin film of SiO2 on the top of tungsten layer deposited on a substrate. The thin film is embedded with tungsten nanoparticles which alter the refractive index of the film. This gives rise to desired emissive properties in the wavelength range of 0.4 μm to 2 μm suitable for GaSb and InGaAs based photovoltaics. Effective dielectric properties are calculated using Maxwell-Garnett-Mie theory. Our calculations indicate this would significantly improve the efficiency of TPV cells. We introduce a new parameter to gauge the efficacy of thermal emitters and use it to compare different designs.

  4. Generation of low-emittance electron beams in electrostatic accelerators for FEL applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teng, Chen; Elias, Luis R.

    1995-02-01

    This paper reports results of transverse emittance studies and beam propagation in electrostatic accelerators for free electron laser applications. In particular, we discuss emittance growth analysis of a low current electron beam system consisting of a miniature thermoionic electron gun and a National Electrostatics Accelerator (NEC) tube. The emittance growth phenomenon is discussed in terms of thermal effects in the electron gun cathode and aberrations produced by field gradient changes occurring inside the electron gun and throughout the accelerator tube. A method of reducing aberrations using a magnetic solenoidal field is described. Analysis of electron beam emittance was done with the EGUN code. Beam propagation along the accelerator tube was studied using a cylindrically symmetric beam envelope equation that included beam self-fields and the external accelerator fields which were derived from POISSON simulations.

  5. Optimization of the Dynamic Aperture for SPEAR3 Low-Emittance Upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Lanfa; Huang, Xiaobiao; Nosochkov, Yuri; Safranek, James A.; Borland, Michael; /Argonne

    2012-05-30

    A low emittance upgrade is planned for SPEAR3. As the first phase, the emittance is reduced from 10nm to 7nm without additional magnets. A further upgrade with even lower emittance will require a damping wiggler. There is a smaller dynamic aperture for the lower emittance optics due to a stronger nonlinearity. Elegant based Multi-Objective Genetic Algorithm (MOGA) is used to maximize the dynamic aperture. Both the dynamic aperture and beam lifetime are optimized simultaneously. Various configurations of the sextupole magnets have been studied in order to find the best configuration. The betatron tune also can be optimized to minimize resonance effects. The optimized dynamic aperture increases more than 15% from the nominal case and the lifetime increases from 14 hours to 17 hours. It is important that the increase of the dynamic aperture is mainly in the beam injection direction. Therefore the injection efficiency will benefit from this improvement.

  6. Improvement of beam emittance of the CEA high intensity proton source SILHI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gobin, R.; Beauvais, P.-Y.; Ferdinand, R.; Leroy, P.-A.; Celona, L.; Ciavola, G.; Gammino, S.

    1999-06-01

    The emittance of the intense proton beam extracted by the source SILHI at Commisariat à l'Energie Atomique (CEA)-Saclay is a key parameter for the design of the IPHI Project RFQ. This parameter has a relevant role even for the design of an intense proton source for the TRASCO project of Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN). The tests performed in the framework of CEA-INFN collaboration have been mainly devoted to a 75 mA beam emittance investigation injecting different gases in the beam line. The results show that the rms normalized emittance decreases up to a factor 3 while the beam losses induced by recombination are contained within 5%. Normalized emittance in r-r' plane of about 0.1 π min mrad have been obtained using Ar and Kr.

  7. Resonant tunneling device with two-dimensional quantum well emitter and base layers

    DOEpatents

    Simmons, Jerry A.; Sherwin, Marc E.; Drummond, Timothy J.; Weckwerth, Mark V.

    1998-01-01

    A double electron layer tunneling device is presented. Electrons tunnel from a two dimensional emitter layer to a two dimensional tunneling layer and continue traveling to a collector at a lower voltage. The emitter layer is interrupted by an isolation etch, a depletion gate, or an ion implant to prevent electrons from traveling from the source along the emitter to the drain. The collector is similarly interrupted by a backgate, an isolation etch, or an ion implant. When the device is used as a transistor, a control gate is added to control the allowed energy states of the emitter layer. The tunnel gate may be recessed to change the operating range of the device and allow for integrated complementary devices. Methods of forming the device are also set forth, utilizing epoxy-bond and stop etch (EBASE), pre-growth implantation of the backgate or post-growth implantation.

  8. Resonant tunneling device with two-dimensional quantum well emitter and base layers

    DOEpatents

    Simmons, J.A.; Sherwin, M.E.; Drummond, T.J.; Weckwerth, M.V.

    1998-10-20

    A double electron layer tunneling device is presented. Electrons tunnel from a two dimensional emitter layer to a two dimensional tunneling layer and continue traveling to a collector at a lower voltage. The emitter layer is interrupted by an isolation etch, a depletion gate, or an ion implant to prevent electrons from traveling from the source along the emitter to the drain. The collector is similarly interrupted by a backgate, an isolation etch, or an ion implant. When the device is used as a transistor, a control gate is added to control the allowed energy states of the emitter layer. The tunnel gate may be recessed to change the operating range of the device and allow for integrated complementary devices. Methods of forming the device are also set forth, utilizing epoxy-bond and stop etch (EBASE), pre-growth implantation of the backgate or post-growth implantation. 43 figs.

  9. Preliminary Assessment of the Functional Fitness of Alpha Emitter At-211 for Radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eremenko, D. O.; Fotina, O. V.; Pankratova, T. V.; Platonov, S. Yu.; Sirotkina, E. B.; Subbotina, E. A.; Yuminov, O. A.; Tultaev, A. V.

    2010-01-01

    The functional fitness of the alpha-emitter At-211 for radiotherapy of the thyroid gland cancer is evaluated. Radiation doses are calculated using the MIRD method and previously obtained pharmacokinetic data for At-211 in isotonic solution.

  10. Quantum emitter coupled to plasmonic nanotriangle: Spatially dependent emission and thermal mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasista, Adarsh B.; Kumar, G. V. Pavan

    2016-12-01

    Herein we report on our studies of radiative and non-radiative interaction between an individual quantum emitter and an anisotropic plasmonic nanostructure: a gold nanotriangle. Our theoretical and three-dimensional electromagnetic simulation studies highlight an interesting connection between: dipole-orientation of the quantum emitter, anisotropy of the plasmonic nanostructure and, radiative and non-radiative energy transfer processes between the emitter and the plasmonic geometry. For the out of plane orientation of quantum emitter, the total decay rate and non-radiative decay rate was found to be maximum, showing radiation extraction efficiency of 0.678. Also the radiative decay rate was greater for the same orientation, and showed a pronounced spatial dependence with respect to the nanotriangle. Our study has direct implication on two aspects: designing nanoparticle optical antennas to control emission from individual atoms and molecules and geometrical control of quenching of emission into plasmonic decay channels.

  11. On the Importance of Symmetrizing RF Coupler Fields for Low Emittance Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Zenghai; Zhou, Feng; Vlieks, Arnold; Adolphsen, Chris; /SLAC

    2011-06-23

    The input power of accelerator structure is normally fed through a coupling slot(s) on the outer wall of the accelerator structure via magnetic coupling. While providing perfect matching, the coupling slots may produce non-axial-symmetric fields in the coupler cell that can induce emittance growth as the beam is accelerated in such a field. This effect is especially important for low emittance beams at low energies such as in the injector accelerators for light sources. In this paper, we present studies of multipole fields of different rf coupler designs and their effect on beam emittance for an X-band photocathode gun being jointly designed with LLNL, and X-band accelerator structures. We will present symmetrized rf coupler designs for these components to preserve the beam emittance.

  12. Demonstration of cathode emittance dominated high bunch charge beams in a DC gun-based photoinjector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulliford, Colwyn; Bartnik, Adam; Bazarov, Ivan; Dunham, Bruce; Cultrera, Luca

    2015-03-01

    We present the results of transverse emittance and longitudinal current profile measurements of high bunch charge (≥100 pC) beams produced in the DC gun-based Cornell energy recovery linac photoinjector. In particular, we show that the cathode thermal and core beam emittances dominate the final 95% and core emittances measured at 9-9.5 MeV. Additionally, we demonstrate excellent agreement between optimized 3D space charge simulations and measurement, and show that the quality of the transverse laser distribution limits the optimal simulated and measured emittances. These results, previously thought achievable only with RF guns, demonstrate that DC gun based photoinjectors are capable of delivering beams with sufficient single bunch charge and beam quality suitable for many current and next generation accelerator projects such as Energy Recovery Linacs and Free Electron Lasers.

  13. Undulator-Based Laser Wakefield Accelerator Electron Beam Energy Spread and Emittance Diagnostic

    SciTech Connect

    Bakeman, M.S.; Van Tilborg, J.; Nakamura, K.; Gonsalves, A.; Osterhoff, J.; Sokollik, T.; Lin, C.; Robinson, K.E.; Schroeder, C.B.; Toth, Cs.; Weingartner, R.; Gruner, F.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W.P.

    2010-06-01

    The design and current status of experiments to couple the Tapered Hybrid Undulator (THUNDER) to the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) laser plasma accelerator (LPA) to measure electron beam energy spread and emittance are presented.

  14. Transparent conductor-embedding nanocones for selective emitters: optical and electrical improvements of Si solar cells

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Joondong; Yun, Ju-Hyung; Kim, Hyunyub; Cho, Yunae; Park, Hyeong-Ho; Kumar, M. Melvin David; Yi, Junsin; Anderson, Wayne A.; Kim, Dong-Wook

    2015-01-01

    Periodical nanocone-arrays were employed in an emitter region for high efficient Si solar cells. Conventional wet-etching process was performed to form the nanocone-arrays for a large area, which spontaneously provides the graded doping features for a selective emitter. This enables to lower the electrical contact resistance and enhances the carrier collection due to the high electric field distribution through a nanocone. Optically, the convex-shaped nanocones efficiently reduce light-reflection and the incident light is effectively focused into Si via nanocone structure, resulting in an extremely improved the carrier collection performances. This nanocone-arrayed selective emitter simultaneously satisfies optical and electrical improvement. We report the record high efficiency of 16.3% for the periodically nanoscale patterned emitter Si solar cell. PMID:25787933

  15. Theoretical studies on performance evaluation of solar thermoelectronic energy converter with graphene emitter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olawole, Olukunle; de, Dilip

    In this paper we consider detailed energy dynamics of solar thermoelectronic energy converter using graphene as the emitter. The emitter is heated by solar energy concentrated by a parabolic mirror concentrator. We study the performance evaluation of the energy conversion using temperature dependent work function of graphene and model the space charge problem by introducing a factor in the emitter and collector current densities. We present computations on power output and efficiency as function of solar insolation, height of emitter from the base of the mirror, reflection coefficient of the mirror, temperature and work function of collector. Effect of molecular doping on the performance of the graphene solar tech is also discussed. Please schedule our papers so that they are well separated in time for presentations.

  16. Development of a pepper pot emittance probe and its application for ECR ion beam studies.

    SciTech Connect

    Kondrashev, S.; Barcikowski, A.; Mustapha, B.; Ostroumov, P.N.; Vinogradov, N.; Northern Illinois Univ.

    2009-07-21

    A pepper pot-scintillator screen system has been developed and used to measure the emittance of DC ion beams extracted from a high-intensity permanent magnet ECR ion source. The system includes a fast beam shutter with a minimum dwell time of 18 ms to reduce the degradation of the CsI(Tl) scintillator by DC ion beam irradiation and a CCD camera with a variable shutter speed in the range of 1 {micro}s-65 s. On-line emittance measurements are performed by an application code developed on a LabVIEW platform. The sensitivity of the device is sufficient to measure the emittance of DC ion beams with current densities down to about 100 nA/cm{sup 2}. The emittance of all ion species extracted from the ECR ion source and post-accelerated to an energy of 75-90 keV/charge have been measured downstream of the LEBT. As the mass-to-charge ratio of ion species increases, the normalized RMS emittances in both transverse phase planes decrease from 0.5-1.0 {pi} mm mrad for light ions to 0.05-0.09 {pi} mm mrad for highly charged {sup 209}Bi ions. The dependence of the emittance on ion's mass-to-charge ratio follows very well the dependence expected from beam rotation induced by decreasing ECR axial magnetic field. The measured emittance values cannot be explained by only ion beam rotation for all ion species and the contribution to emittance of ion temperature in plasma, non-linear electric fields and non-linear space charge is comparable or even higher than the contribution of ion beam rotation.

  17. Extracting the emitter orientation in organic light-emitting diodes from external quantum efficiency measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, Tobias D. Reichardt, Lukas J.; Wehrmeister, Sebastian; Scholz, Bert J.; Mayr, Christian; Brütting, Wolfgang; Rausch, Andreas F.; Wehlus, Thomas; Reusch, Thilo C. G.; Ciarnáin, Rossá Mac; Danz, Norbert

    2014-07-28

    Emitter orientation will play a major role in future applications of organic light-emitting diodes due to its strong impact on the efficiency of the devices. Up to now, determining the orientation of transition dipole moments required elaborate angular-dependent measurements of the light emission pattern. In this paper, we present a simplified and straightforward method to extract the emitter orientation from external quantum efficiency measurements. We demonstrate the validity of the method on three different dye-doped emitting systems.

  18. Static analysis of possible emittance growth of intense charged particle beams with thermal equilibrium distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Kikuchi, Takashi; Horioka, Kazuhiko

    2009-05-15

    Possible emittance growths of intense, nonuniform beams during a transport in a focusing channel are derived as a function of nonlinear field energy and space charge tune depression factors. The nonlinear field energy of the beam with thermal equilibrium distribution is estimated by considering the particle distribution across the cross section of the beam. The results show that the possible emittance growth can be suppressed by keeping the beam particle in thermal equilibrium distribution during the beam transport.

  19. Optical characterization and modelling of paint top-coatings for low-emittance applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wäckelgård, Ewa; Svedung, Harald

    2016-09-01

    The study reports on characterization of low-infrared-emittance paint top-coatings for interior building applications in which the thermal radiation becomes important in comparison with thermal conductance. The top-coating that consist of a binder with aluminium flakes has been optically characterized in the infrared wavelength range in order to determine single flake and binder emittance from reflectance measurements. The single flake emittance was found to be 0.12 for non-leafing cornflake. The absorption coefficient that determines the binder emittance as a function of binder thickness was 0.060 [μm]-2 and 0.085 [μm]-2 for Lumiflon and polyester respectively. These results were used as parameters in a simple model of the flake-binder top-coating to investigate how the emittance of the top-coating was influence by the two components and compared with a state-of-art low-emittance commercial paint. It was found from the modelling that replacing the polyester binder with Lumiflon reduces the infrared emittance (at room temperature) from 0.36 to 0.30. Increasing flake reflectance from 0.88 to 0.96 and at the same time reduce flake thickness from 2 to 1 μm gives an emittance of 0.20. However, the real samples prepared with Lumiflon showed a severe degradation caused by the flakes floating up closer to the surface which indicates a viscosity problem that needs to be solved for practical use. Thinner flakes with higher reflectance can be found if vacuum metallised pigments are used instead of ball-milled.

  20. Ultra low emittance electron beams from multi-alkali antimonide photocathode operated with infrared light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cultrera, L.; Gulliford, C.; Bartnik, A.; Lee, H.; Bazarov, I.

    2016-03-01

    The intrinsic emittance of electron beams generated from a multi-alkali photocathode operated in a high voltage DC gun is reported. The photocathode showed sensitivity extending to the infrared part of the spectrum up to 830 nm. The measured intrinsic emittances of electron beams generated with light having wavelength longer than 800 nm are approaching the limit imposed by the thermal energy of electrons at room temperature with quantum efficiencies comparable to metallic photocathodes used in operation of modern photoinjectors.

  1. Study of ultra-low emittance design for Spear3 using longitudinal gradient dipole

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, M. -H.; Huang, X.; Safranek, J.

    2015-09-24

    Since its 2003 construction, the SPEAR3 synchrotron light source at SLAC has continuously improved its performance by raising beam current, top-off injection, and smaller emittance. This makes SPEAR3 one of the most productive light sources in the world. Now to further enhance the performance of SPEAR3, we are looking into the possibility of converting SPEAR3 to an ultra-low emittance storage ring within its site constraint.

  2. Influence of emitter ring manufacturing tolerances on electron beam quality of high power gyrotrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pagonakis, Ioannis Gr.; Illy, Stefan; Thumm, Manfred

    2016-08-01

    A sensitivity analysis of manufacturing imperfections and possible misalignments of the emitter ring in the gyrotron cathode structure on the electron beam quality has been performed. It has been shown that a possible radial displacement of the emitter ring of the order of few tens of microns can cause dramatic effects on the beam quality and therefore the gyrotron operation. Two different design approaches are proposed in order to achieve an electron beam which is less sensitive to manufacturing imperfections.

  3. Thin-film ‘Thermal Well’ Emitters and Absorbers for High-Efficiency Thermophotovoltaics

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Jonathan K.; Hsu, Wei-Chun; Huang, Yi; Boriskina, Svetlana V.; Chen, Gang

    2015-01-01

    A new approach is introduced to significantly improve the performance of thermophotovoltaic (TPV) systems using low-dimensional thermal emitters and photovoltaic (PV) cells. By reducing the thickness of both the emitter and the PV cell, strong spectral selectivity in thermal emission and absorption can be achieved by confining photons in trapped waveguide modes inside the thin-films that act as thermal analogs to quantum wells. Simultaneously, photo-excited carriers travel shorter distances across the thin-films reducing bulk recombination losses resulting in a lower saturation current in the PV cell. We predict a TPV efficiency enhancement with near-field coupling between the thermal emitter and the PV cell up to 38.7% using a thin-film germanium (Ge) emitter at 1000 K and an ultra-thin gallium antimonide (GaSb) cell supported by perfect back reflectors separated by 100 nm. Even in the far-field limit, the efficiency is predicted to reach 31.5%, which is over an order of magnitude higher than the Shockley Queisser limit of 1.6% for a bulk GaSb cell and a blackbody emitter at 1000 K. The proposed design approach does not require nanoscale patterning of the emitter and PV cell surfaces, but instead offers a simple low-cost solution to improve the performance of thermophotovoltaic systems. PMID:26030711

  4. Improved performance of self-aligned, selective-emitter silicon solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ruby, D.S.; Yang, P.; Zaidi, S.; Brueck, S.; Roy, M.; Narayanan, S.

    1998-08-01

    The authors improved a self-aligned emitter etchback technique that requires only a single emitter diffusion and no alignment to form self-aligned, patterned-emitter profiles. Standard commercial screen-printed gridlines mask a plasma-etchback of the emitter. A subsequent PECVD-nitride deposition provides good surface and bulk passivation and an antireflection coating. They used full-size multicrystalline silicon (mc-Si) cells processed in a commercial production line and performed a statistically designed multiparameter experiment to optimize the use of a hydrogenation treatment to increase performance. They obtained an improvement of almost a full percentage point in cell efficiency when the self-aligned emitter etchback was combined with an optimized 3-step PECVD-nitride surface passivation and hydrogenation treatment. They also investigated the inclusion of a plasma-etching process that results in a low-reflectance, textured surface on multicrystalline silicon cells. Preliminary results indicate reflectance can be significantly reduced without etching away the emitter diffusion.

  5. Improved performance of self-aligned, selective-emitter silicon solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ruby, D.S.; Yang, P.; Zaidi, S.; Brueck, S.; Roy, M.; Narayanan, S.

    1997-12-31

    The authors improved a self-aligned emitter etchback technique that requires only a single emitter diffusion and no alignments to form self-aligned, patterned-emitter profiles. Standard commercial screen-printed gridlines mask a plasma-etchback of the emitter. A subsequent PECVD-nitride deposition provides good surface and bulk passivation and an antireflection coating. They used full-size multicrystalline silicon (mc-Si) cells processed in a commercial production line and performed a statistically designed multiparameter experiment to optimize the use of a hydrogenation treatment to increase performance. They obtained an improvement of almost a full percentage point in cell efficiency when the self-aligned emitter etchback was combined with an optimized 3-step PECVD-nitride surface passivation and hydrogenation treatment. The authors also investigated the inclusion of a plasma-etching process that results in a low-reflectance, textured surface on multicrystalline silicon cells. Preliminary results indicate reflectance can be significantly reduced without etching away the emitter diffusion.

  6. Transverse emittance measurements from a photocathode RF gun with variable laser pulse length

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reis, D. A.; Hernandez, M.; Schmerge, J. F.; Winick, H.; Hogan, M. J.

    1999-06-01

    The gun test facility (GTF) at SSRL was started in 1996 to develop an appropriate injector for the proposed linac coherent light source (LCLS) at SLAC. The LCLS design requires the injector to produce a beam with at least 1 nC of charge in a 10 ps or shorter pulse with no greater than 1π mm mrad normalized rms emittance. The photoinjector at the GTF is 1.6 cell S-band symmetrized gun and emittance compensation solenoid. Emittance measurements, reported here, were made as function of laser pulse width using Gaussian longitudinal pulses. The lowest achieved emittance to date with 1 nC of charge is 5.6π mm mrad and was obtained with a pulse width of 5 ps (FWHM) and is in agreement with simulation. There are indications that the accelerator settings for these results may not have been optimal. Simulations also indicate that a normalized emittance meeting the LCLS requirement can be obtained using appropriately shaped transverse and temporal laser/electron beam pulses. Work has begun on producing temporal flat top laser pulses which combined with transverse clipping of the laser is expected to lower the emittance to approximately 1π mm mrad for 1 nC with optimal accelerator settings.

  7. Photocathode rf gun emittance measurements using variable-length laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmerge, John F.; Hernandez, Mike; Hogan, Mark J.; Reis, David A.; Winick, Herman

    1999-07-01

    The Gun Test Facility (GTF) at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) was created to develop an appropriate injector for the proposed Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) at SLAC. The LCLS design requires the injector to produce a beam with at least 1 nC of charge in a 10 ps or shorter pulse with no greater than 1 (pi) mm-mrad normalized rms emittance. The first photoinjector under study at the GTF is a 1.6 cell S-band symmetrized gun with an emittance compensation solenoid. Emittance measurements, reported here, were made as function of the transverse laser pulse shape and the Gaussian longitudinal laser pulse length. The lowest achieved emittance to data with 1 nC of charge is 5.6 (pi) mm-mrad and was obtained with both a Gaussian longitudinal and transverse pulse shape with 5 ps FWHM and 2.4 mm FWHM respectively. The measurement is in agreement with a PARMELA simulation using measured beam parameters. There are indications that the accelerator settings used in the results presented here were not optimal. Simulations indicate that a normalized emittance meeting the LCLS requirement can be obtained using appropriately shaped transverse and temporal laser/electron beam pulses. Work has begun on producing temporal flat top laser pulses which combined with transverse clipping of the laser is expected to lower the emittance to approximately 1 (pi) mm-mrad for 1 nC beams with optimal accelerator settings.

  8. MICE Step I: first measurement of emittance with particle physics detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palladino, Vittorio

    2012-03-01

    The muon ionization cooling experiment (MICE) is a strategic R&D project intending to demonstrate the only practical solution to prepare high brilliance beams necessary for a neutrino factory or muon colliders. MICE is under development at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (UK). It comprises a dedicated beam line to generate a range of input emittance and momentum, with time-of-flight and Cherenkov detectors to ensure a pure muon beam. The emittance of the incoming beam is measured in the upstream magnetic spectrometer with a sci-fiber tracker. A cooling cell will then follow, alternating energy loss in Li-H absorbers and RF acceleration. A second spectrometer identical to the first and a second muon identification system measure the outgoing emittance. In the 2010-11 run the beam and most detectors have been fully commissioned and a first measurement of the emittance of a beam with particle physics (time-of-flight) detectors has been performed. The analysis of these data should be completed by the time of the Conference. The next steps of more precise measurements, of emittance and emittance reduction (cooling), that will follow in 2012 and later, will also be outlined.

  9. MICE Step 1: First measurements of emittance using particle physics detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adey, David; MICE Collaboration

    2013-02-01

    The muon ionization cooling experiment (MICE) is a strategic R&D project intended to demonstrate the only practical solution to prepare high brilliance beams necessary for a neutrino factory or muon colliders. MICE is under development at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (UK). It comprises a dedicated beam line to generate a range of input emittance and momentum, with time-of-flight and Cherenkov detectors to ensure a pure muon beam. The emittance of the incoming beam is measured in the upstream magnetic spectrometer with a fibre tracker. A cooling cell will then follow, alternating energy loss in LH2 absorbers and RF acceleration. A second spectrometer identical to the first and a second muon identification system measure the outgoing emittance. In the 2010 run the beam and most detectors have been fully commissioned and a first measurement of the emittance of a beam with particle physics (time-of-flight) detectors has been performed. The next steps of more precise measurements, of emittance and emittance reduction (cooling), that will follow in 2011 and later, will also be outlined.

  10. Ag Nanodots Emitters Embedded in a Nanocrystalline Thin Film Deposited on Crystalline Si Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Park, Seungil; Ryu, Sel Gi; Ji, HyungYong; Kim, Myeong Jun; Peck, Jong Hyeon; Kim, Keunjoo

    2016-06-01

    We fabricated crystalline Si solar cells with the inclusion of various Ag nanodots into the additional emitters of nanocrystallite Si thin films. The fabricated process was carried out on the emitter surface of p-n junction for the textured p-type wafer. The Ag thin films were deposited on emitter surfaces and annealed at various temperatures. The amorphous Si layers were also deposited on the Ag annealed surfaces by hot-wire chemical vapor deposition and then the deposited layers were doped by the second n-type doping process to form an additional emitter. From the characterization, both the Ag nanodots and the deposited amorphous Si thin films strongly reduce photo-reflectances in a spectral region between 200-400 nm. After embedding Ag nanodots in nanocrystallite Si thin films, a conversion efficiency of the sample with added emitter was achieved to 15.1%, which is higher than the 14.1% of the reference sample and the 14.7% of the de-posited sample with a-Si:H thin film after the Ag annealing process. The additional nanocrystallite emitter on crystalline Si with Ag nanodots enhances cell properties. PMID:27427665

  11. IR emitter non-uniformity correction (NUC): making sense of the data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oleson, Jim; Greer, Derek

    2011-06-01

    Several organizations in the government and industry are actively developing IR emitter array nonuniformity correction (NUC) algorithms. While significant effort has been expended and progress has been made, there are no standard and comprehensive metrics for describing post NUC emitter nonuniformity. Subsequently, the nonuniformity data reported by one organization may not be comparable with data from another. Further, the sigma/mean uniformity values typically reported do not shed light on fixed pattern noise such as row and column offsets. As a result, NUC reporting often does not give a customer adequate insight into the value of emitter nonuniformity correction. This paper offers standard metrics for measuring and reporting IR emitter array nonuniformity. The metrics established here allow data from one measuring organization to be directly compared with that of another. Further, more practical aspects of nonuniformity correction are addressed which shed light on issues such as fixed pattern noise (FPN), emission gradients and other undesirable artifacts. Data analysis techniques described in this paper demonstrate the new metrics and their descriptive role in the NUC process. The NUC parameters established here characterize the ability of IR emitter arrays to accurately represent terrestrial scenes as well as hot objects and gases. This paper also explores areas in the emitter dynamic range that provide special challenges for generating a NUC table and their influence in the selection of nonuniformity correction radiance levels.

  12. Fast transient temperature operating micromachined emitter for mid-infrared for optical gas sensing systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hildenbrand, J.; Peter, C.; Lamprecht, F.; Kürzinger, A.; Naumann, F.; Ebert, M.; Wehrspohn, R.; Wöllenstein, J.

    2009-05-01

    A novel micromachined thermal emitter for fast transient temperature operation is presented. Compared to most commercial available thermal emitters, the one here presented, is able to operate in a pulsed mode. This allows the use of lock-in techniques or pyrodetectors in the data acquisition without the use of an optical chopper for light modulation. Therefore, these types of thermal emitters are very important for small filter photometers. Several spider type hotplate concepts were studied in order to find a design with excellent mechanical stability and high thermal decoupling. The thermal emitters are fabricated using silicon on insulator (SOI) technology and KOH-etching. The emitters are heated with Pt-meanders. For temperature determination an additional Pt-structure is deposited onto the hotplates. The emitters are mounted in TO-5 housings using a ceramic adhesive and gold wire bonding. The used operation temperature is 750°C. In pulsed operation it's important to have a large modulation depth in terms of thermal radiation intensity in the needed spectral range. The maximal reachable modulation depth ranges from ambient temperature to steady state temperature. A modulation frequency of 5 Hz still allows using nearly the maximum modulation depth.

  13. Close-spaced thermionic converters with active spacing control and heat-pipe isothermal emitters

    SciTech Connect

    Fitzpatrick, G.O.; Koester, J.K.; Chang, J.; Britt, E.J.; McVey, J.B.

    1996-12-31

    Thermionic converters with interelectrode gaps smaller than 10 microns are capable of substantial performance improvements over conventional ignited mode diodes. Previous devices which have demonstrated operation at such small gaps have done so at low power densities and emitter temperatures. Higher power operation requires overcoming two primary design issues: thermal distortion of the emitter due to temperature gradients and degradation of the in-gap spacers at higher emitter temperatures. This work describes two innovations for solution of these issues. The issue of thermal distortion was addressed by an isothermal emitter incorporating a heat-pipe into its structure. Such a heat-pipe emitter, with a single-crystal emitting surface, was fabricated and characterized. Finite-element computational modeling was used to analyze its distortion with an applied heat flux. The calculations suggested that thermal distortion would be significantly reduced as compared with a solid emitter. Ongoing work and preliminary experimental results are described for a system of active interelectrode gap control. In the present design an integral transducer determines the interelectrode gap of the converter. Initial designs for spacing actuators and their required cesium vapor seals are discussed. A novel hot-shell converter design incorporating active spacing control and low-temperature seals is presented. A converter incorporating the above features would be capable of near ideal-converter performance at high power densities. In addition, active spacing control can potentially completely eliminate short-circuit failures in thermionic converter systems.

  14. Review and Understanding of Screen-Printed Contacts and Selective-Emitter Formation: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Hilali, M. M.; Rohatgi, A.; To, B.

    2004-08-01

    A comparison of the loss mechanisms in screen-printed solar cells relative to buried contact cells and cells with photolithography-defined contacts is presented in this paper. Model calculations show that emitter recombination accounts for about 0.5% absolute efficiency loss in conventional screen-printed cells with low-sheet-resistance emitters. Ohmic contact to high-sheet-resistance emitters by screen-printing has been investigated to regain this efficiency loss. Our work shows that good quality ohmic contacts to high sheet-resistance emitters can be achieved if the glass frit chemistry and Ag particle size are carefully tailored. The melting characteristics of the glass frit determine the firing scheme suitable for low contact resistance and high fill factors. In addition, small to regular Ag particles were found to help achieve a higher open-circuit voltage and maintain a low contact resistance. This work has resulted in cells with high fill factors (0.782) on high sheet-resistance emitters and efficiencies of 17.4% on planar float zone Si substrates, without the need for a selective emitter.

  15. Accurate estimation of the RMS emittance from single current amplifier data

    SciTech Connect

    Stockli, Martin P.; Welton, R.F.; Keller, R.; Letchford, A.P.; Thomae, R.W.; Thomason, J.W.G.

    2002-05-31

    This paper presents the SCUBEEx rms emittance analysis, a self-consistent, unbiased elliptical exclusion method, which combines traditional data-reduction methods with statistical methods to obtain accurate estimates for the rms emittance. Rather than considering individual data, the method tracks the average current density outside a well-selected, variable boundary to separate the measured beam halo from the background. The average outside current density is assumed to be part of a uniform background and not part of the particle beam. Therefore the average outside current is subtracted from the data before evaluating the rms emittance within the boundary. As the boundary area is increased, the average outside current and the inside rms emittance form plateaus when all data containing part of the particle beam are inside the boundary. These plateaus mark the smallest acceptable exclusion boundary and provide unbiased estimates for the average background and the rms emittance. Small, trendless variations within the plateaus allow for determining the uncertainties of the estimates caused by variations of the measured background outside the smallest acceptable exclusion boundary. The robustness of the method is established with complementary variations of the exclusion boundary. This paper presents a detailed comparison between traditional data reduction methods and SCUBEEx by analyzing two complementary sets of emittance data obtained with a Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and an ISIS H{sup -} ion source.

  16. Field emission behavior of carbon nanotube field emitters after high temperature thermal annealing

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Yuning; Shin, Dong Hoon; Yun, Ki Nam; Leti, Guillaume; Hwang, Yeon Mo; Song, Yenan; Saito, Yahachi; Lee, Cheol Jin

    2014-07-15

    The carbon nanotube (CNT) field emitters have been fabricated by attaching a CNT film on a graphite rod using graphite adhesive material. The CNT field emitters showed much improved field emission properties due to increasing crystallinity and decreasing defects in CNTs after the high temperature thermal annealing at 900 °C in vacuum ambient. The CNT field emitters showed the low turn-on electric field of 1.15 V/μm, the low threshold electric field of 1.62 V/μm, and the high emission current of 5.9 mA which corresponds to a current density of 8.5 A/cm{sup 2}. In addition, the CNT field emitters indicated the enhanced field emission properties due to the multi-stage effect when the length of the graphite rod increases. The CNT field emitter showed good field emission stability after the high temperature thermal annealing. The CNT field emitter revealed a focused electron beam spot without any focusing electrodes and also showed good field emission repeatability.

  17. Improving the Sensitivity of Mass Spectrometry by Using a New Sheath Flow Electrospray Emitter Array at Subambient Pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Cox, Jonathan T.; Marginean, Ioan; Kelly, Ryan T.; Smith, Richard D.; Tang, Keqi

    2014-03-28

    Arrays of chemically etched emitters with individualized sheath gas capillaries have been developed to enhance electrospray ionization (ESI) at subambient pressures. By including an emitter array in a subambient pressure ionization with nanoelectrospray (SPIN) source, ionization and transmission efficiency can be maximized allowing for increased sensitivity in mass spectrometric analyses. The SPIN source eliminates the major ion losses at conventional ESI-mass spectrometry (MS) interface by placing the emitter in the first vacuum region of the instrument. To facilitate stable electrospray currents in such conditions we have developed an improved emitter array with individualized sheath gas around each emitter. The utility of the new emitter arrays for generating stable multi-electrosprays at subambient pressures was probed by coupling the emitter array/SPIN source with a time of flight (TOF) mass spectrometer. The instrument sensitivity was compared between single emitter/SPIN-MS and multi-emitter/SPIN-MS configurations using an equimolar solution of 9 peptides. An increase in sensitivity correlative to the number of emitters in the array was observed.

  18. Improving the Sensitivity of Mass Spectrometry by Using a New Sheath Flow Electrospray Emitter Array at Subambient Pressures

    DOE PAGES

    Cox, Jonathan T.; Marginean, Ioan; Kelly, Ryan T.; Smith, Richard D.; Tang, Keqi

    2014-03-28

    Arrays of chemically etched emitters with individualized sheath gas capillaries have been developed to enhance electrospray ionization (ESI) at subambient pressures. By including an emitter array in a subambient pressure ionization with nanoelectrospray (SPIN) source, ionization and transmission efficiency can be maximized allowing for increased sensitivity in mass spectrometric analyses. The SPIN source eliminates the major ion losses at conventional ESI-mass spectrometry (MS) interface by placing the emitter in the first vacuum region of the instrument. To facilitate stable electrospray currents in such conditions we have developed an improved emitter array with individualized sheath gas around each emitter. The utilitymore » of the new emitter arrays for generating stable multi-electrosprays at subambient pressures was probed by coupling the emitter array/SPIN source with a time of flight (TOF) mass spectrometer. The instrument sensitivity was compared between single emitter/SPIN-MS and multi-emitter/SPIN-MS configurations using an equimolar solution of 9 peptides. An increase in sensitivity correlative to the number of emitters in the array was observed.« less

  19. HETDEX: The Physical Properties of Lyman-alpha Emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gronwall, Caryl; Blanc, G.; Ciardullo, R.; Finkelstein, S.; Gawiser, E.; Gebhardt, K.; HETDEX Collaboration

    2012-01-01

    Beginning in Fall 2012, the Hobby-Eberly Telescope Dark Energy Experiment (HETDEX) will map out 300 square degrees via a blind integral-field spectroscopic survey which will detect 800,000 Lyman-alpha emitters (LAEs) at 1.9 < z < 3.5. The goal of HETDEX is to explore the expansion history of the universe via the LAE power spectrum, but these emission-line sources are also important probes of galaxy evolution. LAEs are observed "in the act" of formation with low mass, little dust, very young ages, and a two-dimensional clustering scale-length that implies that they are the progenitors of today's Milky Way type galaxies. The unprecedented size of the HETDEX survey will allow us to explore the 3-D clustering of these objects and to measure their halo masses as a function of redshift. We will also be able to explore the physical properties of LAEs over a wide range of environments, and study how their luminosity functions, equivalent width distributions, and star formation rates change with galaxy density and redshift. In preparation for HETDEX, we undertook a 3 year pilot survey to test the feasibility of the experiment and design an optimal observing strategy. These observations were performed with a proto-type HETDEX spectrograph (VIRUS-P) on the McDonald 2.7-m telescope, and covered Ly-alpha in the redshift range 1.9 < z < 3.8. This survey discovered 104 Ly-alpha emitting galaxies in 169 sq. arcmin of sky, and reached objects with Ly-alpha line luminosities as faint as 3 x 1042 ergs/s. We will present the Ly-alpha luminosity function, equivalent width distributions, and star formation rates measured for this sample and discuss the implications of the pilot survey results for HETDEX.

  20. Nonstochastic effects of different energy beta emitters on pig skin.

    PubMed

    Peel, D M; Hopewell, J W; Wells, J; Charles, M W

    1984-08-01

    Circular areas of pig skin from 1- to 40-mm diameter were irradiated with beta emitters of high, medium, and low energies, 90Sr, 170Tm, and 147Pm, respectively. The study provides information for radiological protection problems of localized skin exposures. During the first 16 weeks after irradiation 90Sr produced a first reaction due to epithelial cell death followed by a second reaction attributable to damage to the dermal blood vessels. 170Tm and 147Pm produced the epithelial reaction only. The epithelial dose response varied as a function of beta energy. The doses required to produce moist desquamation in 50% of 15- to 22.5-mm fields (ED50) were 30-45 Gy from 90Sr, approximately 80 Gy from 170Tm, and approximately 500 Gy from 147Pm. A model involving different methods of epithelial repopulation is proposed to explain this finding. An area effect was observed in the epithelial response to 90Sr irradiation. The ED50 for moist desquamation ranged from approximately 25 Gy for a 40-mm source to approximately 450 Gy for a 1-mm source. The 5-, 9-, and 19-mm 170Tm sources all produced an ED50 of approximately 80 Gy, while the value for the 2-mm source was approximately 250 Gy. It is also suggested that the area effects could be explained by different modes of epithelial repopulation after irradiation. After high energy beta irradiation repopulation would be mainly from the field periphery, while after lower energy irradiation repopulation from hair follicle epithelium would predominate.

  1. Enhanced thermaly managed packaging for III-nitride light emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudsieh, Nicolas

    In this Dissertation our work on `enhanced thermally managed packaging of high power semiconductor light sources for solid state lighting (SSL)' is presented. The motivation of this research and development is to design thermally high stable cost-efficient packaging of single and multi-chip arrays of III-nitrides wide bandgap semiconductor light sources through mathematical modeling and simulations. Major issues linked with this technology are device overheating which causes serious degradation in their illumination intensity and decrease in the lifetime. In the introduction the basics of III-nitrides WBG semiconductor light emitters are presented along with necessary thermal management of high power cingulated and multi-chip LEDs and laser diodes. This work starts at chip level followed by its extension to fully packaged lighting modules and devices. Different III-nitride structures of multi-quantum well InGaN/GaN and AlGaN/GaN based LEDs and LDs were analyzed using advanced modeling and simulation for different packaging designs and high thermal conductivity materials. Study started with basic surface mounted devices using conventional packaging strategies and was concluded with the latest thermal management of chip-on-plate (COP) method. Newly discovered high thermal conductivity materials have also been incorporated for this work. Our study also presents the new approach of 2D heat spreaders using such materials for SSL and micro LED array packaging. Most of the work has been presented in international conferences proceedings and peer review journals. Some of the latest work has also been submitted to well reputed international journals which are currently been reviewed for publication. .

  2. Performance and durability of high emittance heat receiver surfaces for solar dynamic power systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Degroh, Kim K.; Roig, David M.; Burke, Christopher A.; Shah, Dilipkumar R.

    1994-01-01

    Haynes 188, a cobalt-based superalloy, will be used to make thermal energy storage (TES) containment canisters for a 2 kW solar dynamic ground test demonstrator (SD GTD). Haynes 188 containment canisters with a high thermal emittance (epsilon) are desired for radiating heat away from local hot spots, improving the heating distribution, which will in turn improve canister service life. In addition to needing a high emittance, the surface needs to be durable in an elevated temperature, high vacuum environment for an extended time period. Thirty-five Haynes 188 samples were exposed to 14 different types of surface modification techniques for emittance and vacuum heat treatment (VHT) durability enhancement evaluation. Optical properties were obtained for the modified surfaces. Emittance enhanced samples were exposed to VHT for up to 2692 hours at 827 C and less than or equal to 10(exp -6) torr with integral thermal cycling. Optical properties were taken intermittently during exposure, and after final VHT exposure. The various surface modification treatments increased the emittance of pristine Haynes 188 from 0.11 up to 0.86. Seven different surface modification techniques were found to provide surfaces which met the SD GTD receiver VHT durability requirement. Of the 7 surface treatments, 2 were found to display excellent VHT durability: an alumina based (AB) coating and a zirconia based coating. The alumina based coating was chosen for the epsilon enhancement surface modification technique for the SD GTD receiver. Details of the performance and vacuum heat treatment durability of this coating and other Haynes 188 emittance surface modification techniques are discussed. Technology from this program will lead to successful demonstration of solar dynamic power for space applications, and has potential for application in other systems requiring high emittance surfaces.

  3. Discovery of a Giant Lya Emitter Near the Reionization Epoch

    SciTech Connect

    Ouchi, Masami; Ono, Yoshiaki; Egami, Eiichi; Saito, Tomoki; Oguri, Masamune; McCarthy, Patrick J.; Farrah, Duncan; Kashikawa, Nobunari; Momcheva, Ivelina; Shimasaku, Kazuhiro; Nakanishi, Kouichiro; Furusawa, Hisanori; Akiyama, Masayuki; Dunlop, James S.; Mortier, Angela M.J.; Okamura, Sadanori; Hayashi, Masao; Cirasuolo, Michele; Dressler, Alan; Iye, Masanori; Jarvis, Matt.J.

    2008-08-01

    We report the discovery of a giant Ly{alpha} emitter (LAE) with a Spitzer/IRAC counterpart near the reionization epoch at z = 6.595. The giant LAE is found from the extensive 1 deg{sup 2} Subaru narrow-band survey for z = 6.6 LAEs in the Subaru/XMM-Newton Deep Survey (SXDS) field, and subsequently identified by deep spectroscopy of Keck/DEIMOS and Magellan/IMACS. Among our 207 LAE candidates, this LAE is not only the brightest narrow-band object with L(Ly{alpha}) = 3.9 {+-} 0.2 x 10{sup 43} erg s{sup -1} in our survey volume of 10{sup 6} Mpc{sup 3}, but also a spatially extended Ly{alpha} nebula with the largest isophotal area whose major axis is at least {approx_equal} 3-inches. This object is more likely to be a large Ly{alpha} nebula with a size of {approx}> 17-kpc than to be a strongly-lensed galaxy by a foreground object. Our Keck spectrum with medium-high spectral and spatial resolutions suggests that the velocity width is v{sub FWHM} = 251 {+-} 21 km s{sup -1}, and that the line-center velocity changes by {approx_equal} 60 km s{sup -1} in a 10-kpc range. The stellar mass and star-formation rate are estimated to be 0.9-5.0 x 10{sup 10}M{sub {circle_dot}} and > 34 M{sub {circle_dot}}yr{sup -1}, respectively, from the combination of deep optical to infrared images of Subaru, UKIDSS-Ultra Deep Survey, and Spitzer/IRAC. Although the nature of this object is not yet clearly understood, this could be an important object for studying cooling clouds accreting onto a massive halo, or forming-massive galaxies with significant outflows contributing to cosmic reionization and metal enrichment of inter-galactic medium.

  4. Lyman alpha emitter evolution in the reionization epoch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dayal, P.; Ferrara, A.; Saro, A.; Salvaterra, R.; Borgani, S.; Tornatore, L.

    2009-12-01

    Combining cosmological smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) simulations with a previously developed Lyα production/transmission model and the Early Reionization Model (ERM; reionization ends at redshift z ~ 7), we obtain Lyα and UV luminosity functions (LFs) for lyman alpha emitters (LAEs) at 5.7 <= z <= 7.6. Matching model results to observations at z ~ 5.7 requires escape fractions of Lyα,fα = 0.3, and UV (non-ionizing) continuum photons, fc = 0.22, corresponding to a colour excess, E(B - V) = 0.15. We find that (i) fc increases towards higher redshifts, due the decreasing mean dust content of galaxies, (ii) the evolution of fα/fc hints at the dust content of the interstellar medium becoming progressively inhomogeneous/clumped with decreasing redshift. Using the model assumptions, clustering of sources has little effect on the Lyα LF for a cosmic hydrogen neutral fraction χHI <= 10-4, a value attained at z <= 6.6 in the ERM. However, during the initial reionization phases (z >~ 7), the clustering photoionization boost becomes important. We quantify the physical properties of observed LAEs and their redshift evolution, for which we give handy analytical fitting functions. Halo (stellar) masses are in the range 10.0 < logMh < 11.8 (8.1 < logM* < 10.4) with Mh ~ M0.64*. The star formation rates are , mass-weighted mean ages are t* > 20 Myr at all redshifts, while the mean stellar metallicity increases from Z = 0.12Zsolar at z ~ 7.6 to Z = 0.22Zsolar at z ~ 5.7; both t* and Z positively correlate with stellar mass. The brightest LAEs are all characterized by large and intermediate ages (~200Myr), while objects in the faint end of the Lyα LF show large age and star formation rate spreads. With no more free parameters, the spectral energy distributions of three LAE at z ~ 5.7 observed by Lai et al. (2007) are well reproduced by an intermediate age (182-220 Myr) stellar population and the above E(B - V) value. The model uncertainties, mostly related to the

  5. Emittance growth and instability induced by space charge effect during final beam bunching in HIF accelerator system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kikuchi, T.; Someya, T.; Kawata, S.; Nakajima, M.; Horioka, K.

    2006-06-01

    Beam dynamics and emittance growth are investigated by using particle-in-cell simulations during a final beam bunching for a driver system of inertial fusion driven by intense heavy ion beams. Space-charge-dominated beams are transported by a transverse confinement lattice with longitudinal compression, and the emittance increases along the longitudinal beam bunching. Dipole oscillations are excited due to the initial displacement of the beam center. The displacement causes the additional emittance growth during the final beam bunching.

  6. Array of Chemically Etched Fused Silica Emitters for Improving the Sensitivity and Quantitation of Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, Ryan T.; Page, Jason S.; Tang, Keqi; Smith, Richard D.

    2007-06-01

    An array of emitters has been developed for increasing the sensitivity of electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). The linear array consists of 19 chemically etched fused silica capillaries arranged with 500 µm (center-to-center) spacing. The multi-emitter device has a low dead volume to facilitate coupling to capillary liquid chromatography (LC) separations. The high aspect ratio of the emitters enables operation at flow rates as low as 20 nL/min/emitter, effectively extending the benefits of nanoelectrospray to higher flow rate analyses. To accommodate the larger ion current produced by the emitter array, a multi-capillary inlet to the mass spectrometer was also constructed. The inlet, which matched the dimensions of the emitter array, effectively preserved ion transmission efficiency. Standard reserpine solutions of varying concentration were electrosprayed at 1 µL/min using the multi-emitter/multi-inlet combination, and compared to a standard, single emitter configuration. A nine-fold sensitivity enhancement was observed for the multi-emitter relative to the single emitter. A bovine serum albumin tryptic digest was also analyzed and resulted in a sensitivity increase ranging from 2.4 to 12.3-fold for the detected tryptic peptides; the varying response was attributed to reduced ion suppression under the nano-ESI conditions afforded by the emitter array. An equimolar mixture of leucine enkephalin and maltopentaose was studied to verify that ion suppression is indeed reduced for the multi-ESI array relative to a single emitter over a range of flow rates.

  7. Spectral Emittance of Uncoated and Ceramic-Coated Inconel and Type 321 Stainless Steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richmond, Joseph C.; Stewart, James E.

    1959-01-01

    The normal spectral emittance of Inconel and type 321 stainless steel with different surface treatments was measured at temperatures of 900, 1,200, 1,500, and 1,800 F over a wavelength range of 1.5 to 15 microns. The measurements involved comparison of the radiant energy emitted by the heated specimen with that emitted by a comparison standard at the same temperature by means of a recording double-beam infrared spectrophotometer. The silicon carbide comparison standard had previously been calibrated against a laboratory black-body furnace. Surface treatments included electropolishing, sandblasting, electro-polishing followed by oxidation in air for 1/2 hour at 1,800 F, sandblasting followed by oxidation in air for 1/2 hour at 1,800 F, application of National Bureau of Standards coating A-418, and application of NBS ceramic coating N-143. The normal spectral emittance of both alloys in the electropolished condition was low and decreased very slightly with increasing wavelength while in the sandblasted condition it was somewhat higher and did not vary appreciably with wavelength. The oxidation treatment greatly increased the normal spectral emittance of both the electropolished and sandblasted type 321 stainless steel specimens and of the electropolished Inconel specimens and introduced some spectral selectivity into the curves. The oxidation increased the normal spectral emittance of the sandblasted Inconel specimens only moderately. Of the specimens to which a coating about 0.002 inch thick was applied, those coated with A-418 had higher emittance at all wavelengths than did those coated with N-143, and the coated specimens of Inconel had higher spectral emittance at all wavelengths than did the corresponding specimens of type 321 stainless steel. Both coatings were found to be partially transparent to the emitted energy at this thickness but essentially opaque at a thickness of 0.005 inch. Coated specimens with 0.005 inch or more of coating did not show the effect

  8. Strongly coupling a cavity to inhomogeneous ensembles of emitters: Potential for long-lived solid-state quantum memories

    SciTech Connect

    Diniz, I.; Portolan, S.; Auffeves, A.

    2011-12-15

    We investigate theoretically the coupling of a cavity mode to a continuous distribution of emitters. We discuss the influence of the emitters' inhomogeneous broadening on the existence and on the coherence properties of the polaritonic peaks. We find that their coherence depends crucially on the shape of the distribution and not only on its width. Under certain conditions the coupling to the cavity protects the polaritonic states from inhomogeneous broadening, resulting in a longer storage time for a quantum memory based on emitter ensembles. When two different ensembles of emitters are coupled to the resonator, they support a peculiar collective dark state, which is also very attractive for the storage of quantum information.

  9. Optimization of oxidation processes to improve crystalline silicon solar cell emitters

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, L.; Liang, Z. C. Liu, C. F.; Long, T. J.; Wang, D. L.

    2014-02-15

    Control of the oxidation process is one key issue in producing high-quality emitters for crystalline silicon solar cells. In this paper, the oxidation parameters of pre-oxidation time, oxygen concentration during pre-oxidation and pre-deposition and drive-in time were optimized by using orthogonal experiments. By analyzing experimental measurements of short-circuit current, open circuit voltage, series resistance and solar cell efficiency in solar cells with different sheet resistances which were produced by using different diffusion processes, we inferred that an emitter with a sheet resistance of approximately 70 Ω/□ performed best under the existing standard solar cell process. Further investigations were conducted on emitters with sheet resistances of approximately 70 Ω/□ that were obtained from different preparation processes. The results indicate that emitters with surface phosphorus concentrations between 4.96 × 10{sup 20} cm{sup −3} and 7.78 × 10{sup 20} cm{sup −3} and with junction depths between 0.46 μm and 0.55 μm possessed the best quality. With no extra processing, the final preparation of the crystalline silicon solar cell efficiency can reach 18.41%, which is an increase of 0.4%{sub abs} compared to conventional emitters with 50 Ω/□ sheet resistance.

  10. Two-dimensional trilayer grating with a metal/insulator/metal structure as a thermophotovoltaic emitter.

    PubMed

    Song, Jinlin; Si, Mengting; Cheng, Qiang; Luo, Zixue

    2016-02-20

    A thermophotovoltaic system that converts thermal energy into electricity has considerable potential for applications in energy utilization fields. However, intensive emission in a wide spectral and angular range remains a challenge in improving system efficiency. This study proposes the use of a 2D trilayer grating with a tungsten/silica/tungsten (W/SiO2/W) structure on a tungsten substrate as a thermophotovoltaic emitter. The finite-difference time-domain method is employed to simulate the radiative properties of the proposed structure. A broadband high emittance with an average spectral emittance of 0.953 between 600 and 1800 nm can be obtained for both transverse magnetic and transverse electric polarized waves. On the basis of the inductance-capacitance circuit model and dispersion relation analyses, this phenomenon is mainly considered as the combined contribution of surface plasmon polaritons and magnetic polaritons. A parametric study is also conducted on the emittance spectrum of the proposed structure, considering geometric parameters, polar angles, and azimuthal angles for both TM and TE waves. The study demonstrates that the emitter has good wavelength selectivity and polarization insensitivity in a wide geometric and angular range.

  11. Wavelength-selective emitters with pyramid nanogratings enhanced by multiple resonance modes.

    PubMed

    Nguyen-Huu, Nghia; Pištora, Jaromír; Cada, Michael

    2016-04-15

    Binary gratings with high or low metal filling ratios in a grating region have been demonstrated as successful candidates in enhancing the emittance of emitters for thermophotovoltaics since they could support surface plasmons (SPs), the Rayleigh-Wood anomaly (RWA), or cavity resonance (CR) within their geometries. This work shows that combining a tungsten binary grating with a low and high filling ratio to form a pyramid grating can significantly increase the emittance, which is nearly perfect in the wavelength region from 0.6 to 1.72 μm, while being 0.1 at wavelengths longer than 2.5 μm. Moreover, the emittance spectrum of the hybrid tungsten grating is insensitive to the angle of incidence. The enhancement demonstrated by magnetic field and Poynting vector patterns is due to the interplay between SPs and RWA modes at short wavelengths, and CR at long wavelengths. Furthermore, a combined grating made of nickel is also proposed providing enhanced emittance in a wide angle of incidence.

  12. Beam emittance measurements and simulations of injector line for radio frequency quadrupole.

    PubMed

    Mathew, Jose V; Rao, S V L S; Pande, Rajni; Singh, P

    2015-07-01

    A 400 keV deuteron (D(+)) radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ) accelerator has been designed, built, and commissioned at the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, India. A beam line has been developed for injecting deuterons into the 400 keV RFQ. This comprises of a RF plasma ion source and a low energy beam transport (LEBT) system, consisting of two solenoid magnets and two steerer magnets. The ion source is characterized in terms of transverse beam emittance. A slit-wire scanner based emittance measurement setup has been developed for the transverse emittance measurements of H(+) and D(+) beams. The measured emittance values are found to be well within the acceptance value for the RFQ. These measured emittance parameters are used to optimize the solenoid fields in LEBT to match the beam from the ion source to RFQ. TRACEWIN simulation code is used for the beam transport simulations. The simulations show 99% transmission of D(+) beam through the RFQ, while 95% transmission has been measured experimentally. PMID:26233371

  13. Enhanced thermal emittance of space radiators by ion-discharge chamber texturing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mirtich, Michael J.; Kussmaul, Michael T.

    1987-01-01

    The discharge chamber of a 30-cm argon ion source was successfully used to texture potential space radiator materials for the purpose of obtaining values of thermal emittance greater than 0.85 at 700 and 900 K. Some samples were also treated in acid prior to texturing. To evaluate the durability of the textured materials to atomic oxygen, samples were exposed to an RF air plasma environment. The spectral emittance between 2.0 anf 15.0 microns was measured before and after the textured materials were exposed to the plasma asher. The results indicate that copper with extremely high values of emittance after texturing (0.978 and 0.983) at 700 and 900 K, respectively,did not change its values of emittance after ashing, whereas the emittance of stainless steel fell below 0.85 after ashing. These data, along with scanning electron photomicrographs, and the results of texturing and ashing titanium and Nb(1)Zr are presented .

  14. Plexciton quenching by resonant electron transfer from quantum emitter to metallic nanoantenna.

    PubMed

    Marinica, D C; Lourenço-Martins, H; Aizpurua, J; Borisov, A G

    2013-01-01

    Coupling molecular excitons and localized surface plasmons in hybrid nanostructures leads to appealing, tunable optical properties. In this respect, the knowledge about the excitation dynamics of a quantum emitter close to a plasmonic nanoantenna is of importance from fundamental and practical points of view. We address here the effect of the excited electron tunneling from the emitter into a metallic nanoparticle(s) in the optical response. When close to a plasmonic nanoparticle, the excited state localized on a quantum emitter becomes short-lived because of the electronic coupling with metal conduction band states. We show that as a consequence, the characteristic features associated with the quantum emitter disappear from the optical absorption spectrum. Thus, for the hybrid nanostructure studied here and comprising quantum emitter in the narrow gap of a plasmonic dimer nanoantenna, the quantum tunneling might quench the plexcitonic states. Under certain conditions the optical response of the system approaches that of the individual plasmonic dimer. Excitation decay via resonant electron transfer can play an important role in many situations of interest such as in surface-enhanced spectroscopies, photovoltaics, catalysis, or quantum information, among others. PMID:24206447

  15. Low emittance chromated chemical conversion coatings for spacecraft thermal control in low earth orbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LeVesque, R. J.; DeJesus, R. R.; Jones, C. A.; Babel, H. W.

    1996-03-01

    Low emittance coatings were required on the inner side of micro-meteoroid shielding and other structures to minimize heat transfer from the sun illuminated side to the underlying structure. A program was undertaken to evaluate conversion coatings for long term use in space. The conversion coatings evaluated were Alodine 1200 with three different bath chemistries, Iridite 14-2, and Alodine 600. Although the primary emphasis was on evaluating how processing conditions influenced the infrared emittance, corrosion resistance and electrical bonding characteristics were also evaluated. All of the conversion coatings were able to provide the target emittance value of less than 0.10, although baths with ferricyanide accelerators required shorter immersion times than typical of standard shop practices. The balance between emittance, corrosion resistance, and electrical bonding were defined. Space environmental stability tests were conducted on conversion coated 2219 and 7075 aluminum. The emittance and the electrical bonding characteristics were not affected by the space exposure even though the coating dehydrated and mud cracking is evident under a microscope. The dehydration resulted in a loss of corrosion resistance which is a consideration for hardware returned to Earth. It was concluded that conversion coatings are acceptable thermal control coatings for long life spacecraft although additional work is recommended for solar exposed surfaces.

  16. Two-dimensional trilayer grating with a metal/insulator/metal structure as a thermophotovoltaic emitter.

    PubMed

    Song, Jinlin; Si, Mengting; Cheng, Qiang; Luo, Zixue

    2016-02-20

    A thermophotovoltaic system that converts thermal energy into electricity has considerable potential for applications in energy utilization fields. However, intensive emission in a wide spectral and angular range remains a challenge in improving system efficiency. This study proposes the use of a 2D trilayer grating with a tungsten/silica/tungsten (W/SiO2/W) structure on a tungsten substrate as a thermophotovoltaic emitter. The finite-difference time-domain method is employed to simulate the radiative properties of the proposed structure. A broadband high emittance with an average spectral emittance of 0.953 between 600 and 1800 nm can be obtained for both transverse magnetic and transverse electric polarized waves. On the basis of the inductance-capacitance circuit model and dispersion relation analyses, this phenomenon is mainly considered as the combined contribution of surface plasmon polaritons and magnetic polaritons. A parametric study is also conducted on the emittance spectrum of the proposed structure, considering geometric parameters, polar angles, and azimuthal angles for both TM and TE waves. The study demonstrates that the emitter has good wavelength selectivity and polarization insensitivity in a wide geometric and angular range. PMID:26906580

  17. Beam emittance measurements and simulations of injector line for radio frequency quadrupole

    SciTech Connect

    Mathew, Jose V. Rao, S. V. L. S.; Pande, Rajni; Singh, P.

    2015-07-15

    A 400 keV deuteron (D{sup +}) radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ) accelerator has been designed, built, and commissioned at the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, India. A beam line has been developed for injecting deuterons into the 400 keV RFQ. This comprises of a RF plasma ion source and a low energy beam transport (LEBT) system, consisting of two solenoid magnets and two steerer magnets. The ion source is characterized in terms of transverse beam emittance. A slit-wire scanner based emittance measurement setup has been developed for the transverse emittance measurements of H{sup +} and D{sup +} beams. The measured emittance values are found to be well within the acceptance value for the RFQ. These measured emittance parameters are used to optimize the solenoid fields in LEBT to match the beam from the ion source to RFQ. TRACEWIN simulation code is used for the beam transport simulations. The simulations show 99% transmission of D{sup +} beam through the RFQ, while 95% transmission has been measured experimentally.

  18. Positioning with stationary emitters in a two-dimensional space-time

    SciTech Connect

    Coll, Bartolome; Ferrando, Joan Josep; Morales, Juan Antonio

    2006-11-15

    The basic elements of the relativistic positioning systems in a two-dimensional space-time have been introduced in a previous work [Phys. Rev. D 73, 084017 (2006)] where geodesic positioning systems, constituted by two geodesic emitters, have been considered in a flat space-time. Here, we want to show in what precise senses positioning systems allow to make relativistic gravimetry. For this purpose, we consider stationary positioning systems, constituted by two uniformly accelerated emitters separated by a constant distance, in two different situations: absence of gravitational field (Minkowski plane) and presence of a gravitational mass (Schwarzschild plane). The physical coordinate system constituted by the electromagnetic signals broadcasting the proper time of the emitters are the so called emission coordinates, and we show that, in such emission coordinates, the trajectories of the emitters in both situations, the absence and presence of a gravitational field, are identical. The interesting point is that, in spite of this fact, particular additional information on the system or on the user allows us not only to distinguish both space-times, but also to complete the dynamical description of emitters and user and even to measure the mass of the gravitational field. The precise information under which these dynamical and gravimetric results may be obtained is carefully pointed out.

  19. To study the emittance dilution in Superconducting Linear Accelerator Design for International Linear Collider (ILC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranjan, Kirti; Solyak, Nikolay; Tenenbaum, Peter

    2005-04-01

    Recently the particle physics community has chosen a single technology for the new accelerator, opening the way for the world community to unite and concentrate resources on the design of an International Linear collider (ILC) using superconducting technology. One of the key operational issues in the design of the ILC will be the preservation of the small beam emittances during passage through the main linear accelerator (linac). Sources of emittance dilution include incoherent misalignments of the quadrupole magnets and rf-structure misalignments. In this work, the study of emittance dilution for the 500-GeV center of mass energy main linac of the Superconducting Linear Accelerator design, based on adaptation of the TESLA TDR design is performed using LIAR simulation program. Based on the tolerances of the present design, effect of two important Beam-Based steering algorithms, Flat Steering and Dispersion Free Steering, are compared with respect to the emittance dilution in the main linac. We also investigated the effect of various misalignments on the emittance dilution for these two steering algorithms.

  20. Spectrally selective, matched emitters for thermophotovoltaic energy conversion fabricated by tape casting process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferguson, Lucian Garret

    The thermophotovoltaic (TPV) generator converts radiant energy from a high temperature emitter element into electric power using infrared responding photovoltaic cells. Spectral control is a primary issue in TPV applications. Conventional TPV generators have relied on filters to achieve selectivity and spectral control with near-blackbody ceramic emitters. Several practical problems have limited the success of this approach, particularly the present lack of a satisfactory wide-band infrared filter. A new, spectrally selective emitter is described in this work, and will be called the "bandgap matched emitter" because its emissive power spectrum is very efficiently matched with the infrared response of the GaSb photovoltaic cell. The superior spectral efficiency has been achieved with a novel combination of spectrally active, transition-metal dopants within an infrared-transparent magnesium oxide ceramic matrix. High mechanical integrity, thermal shock resistance, excellent heat transfer characteristics, and near-ideal spectral efficiency have all been achieved for the first time by fabricating composite emitters from thin sheets of flexible ceramic ribbons made by the tape casting process.