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Sample records for multi-isotope imaging mass

  1. Quantitative imaging of subcellular metabolism with stable isotopes and multi-isotope imaging mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Steinhauser, Matthew L; Lechene, Claude P

    2013-01-01

    Multi-isotope imaging mass spectrometry (MIMS) is the quantitative imaging of stable isotope labels in cells with a new type of secondary ion mass spectrometer (NanoSIMS). The power of the methodology is attributable to (i) the immense advantage of using non-toxic stable isotope labels, (ii) high resolution imaging that approaches the resolution of usual transmission electron microscopy and (iii) the precise quantification of label down to 1 part-per-million and spanning several orders of magnitude. Here we review the basic elements of MIMS and describe new applications of MIMS to the quantitative study of metabolic processes including protein and nucleic acid synthesis in model organisms ranging from microbes to humans.

  2. Quantitative imaging of selenoprotein with multi-isotope imaging mass spectrometry (MIMS).

    PubMed

    Tang, Shiow-Shih; Guillermier, Christelle; Wang, Mei; Poczatek, Joseph Collin; Suzuki, Noriyuki; Loscalzo, Joseph; Lechene, Claude

    2014-11-01

    Multi-isotope imaging mass spectrometry (MIMS) allows high resolution quantitative imaging of protein and nucleic acid synthesis at the level of a single cell using stable isotope labels. We employed MIMS to determine the compartmental localization of selenoproteins tagged with stable isotope selenium compounds in human aortic endothelial cells (HAEC), and to compare the efficiency of labeling (to determine the ideal selenium source) from these compounds: [(82)Se]-selenite, [(77)Se]-seleno-methionine, and [(76)Se]-methyl-selenocysteine. We found that all three selenium sources appear to be localized in the nucleus as well as in the cytoplasm in HAEC. Seleno-methionine appears to be a better source for (seleno)protein synthesis. For MIMS detection, we compared freeze-drying to thin layer vs. thin sectioning for sample preparation. MIMS provides a unique and novel way to dissect selenoprotein synthesis in cells.

  3. Quantitative imaging of inositol distribution in yeast using multi-isotope imaging mass spectrometry (MIMS).

    PubMed

    Saiardi, A; Guillermier, C; Loss, O; Poczatek, J C; Lechene, C

    2014-11-01

    Despite the widely recognized importance of the several species of inositol polyphosphates in cell biology, inositol has not been successfully imaged and quantified inside cells using traditional spectrophotometry. Multi-isotope imaging mass spectrometry (MIMS) technology, however, has facilitated direct imaging and measurement of cellular inositol. After pulsing cells with inositol labeled with the stable isotope Carbon-13 ((13)C), the label was detected in subcellular volumes by MIMS. The tridimensional localization of (13)C within the cell illustrated cellular distribution and local accumulation of inositol. In parallel, we performed control experiments with (13)C-Glucose to compare a different (13)C distribution pattern. Because many functions recently attributed to inositol polyphosphates are localized in the nucleus, we analyzed its relative nuclear concentration. We engineered yeast with human thymidine permease and viral thymidine kinase, then fed them with (15)N-thymidine. This permitted direct analysis of the nuclear DNA through the detection of the (15)N isotopic signal. We found practically no co-localization between inositol signal ((13)C-isotope) and nuclear signal ((15)N-isotope). The (13)C-tag (inositol) accumulation was highest at the plasma membrane and in cytoplasmic domains. In time-course labeling experiments performed with wild type yeast (WT) or modified yeast unable to synthesize inositol from glucose (ino1Δ), the half-time of labeled inositol accumulation was ~1 hour in WT and longer in ino1Δ. These studies should serve as a template to study metabolism and physiological role of inositol using genetically modified yeasts.

  4. Multi-isotope imaging mass spectrometry reveals slow protein turnover in hair-cell stereocilia.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Duan-Sun; Piazza, Valeria; Perrin, Benjamin J; Rzadzinska, Agnieszka K; Poczatek, J Collin; Wang, Mei; Prosser, Haydn M; Ervasti, James M; Corey, David P; Lechene, Claude P

    2012-01-15

    Hair cells of the inner ear are not normally replaced during an animal's life, and must continually renew components of their various organelles. Among these are the stereocilia, each with a core of several hundred actin filaments that arise from their apical surfaces and that bear the mechanotransduction apparatus at their tips. Actin turnover in stereocilia has previously been studied by transfecting neonatal rat hair cells in culture with a β-actin-GFP fusion, and evidence was found that actin is replaced, from the top down, in 2-3 days. Overexpression of the actin-binding protein espin causes elongation of stereocilia within 12-24 hours, also suggesting rapid regulation of stereocilia lengths. Similarly, the mechanosensory 'tip links' are replaced in 5-10 hours after cleavage in chicken and mammalian hair cells. In contrast, turnover in chick stereocilia in vivo is much slower. It might be that only certain components of stereocilia turn over quickly, that rapid turnover occurs only in neonatal animals, only in culture, or only in response to a challenge like breakage or actin overexpression. Here we quantify protein turnover by feeding animals with a (15)N-labelled precursor amino acid and using multi-isotope imaging mass spectrometry to measure appearance of new protein. Surprisingly, in adult frogs and mice and in neonatal mice, in vivo and in vitro, the stereocilia were remarkably stable, incorporating newly synthesized protein at <10% per day. Only stereocilia tips had rapid turnover and no treadmilling was observed. Other methods confirmed this: in hair cells expressing β-actin-GFP we bleached fiducial lines across hair bundles, but they did not move in 6 days. When we stopped expression of β- or γ-actin with tamoxifen-inducible recombination, neither actin isoform left the stereocilia, except at the tips. Thus, rapid turnover in stereocilia occurs only at the tips and not by a treadmilling process.

  5. Quantitative imaging of cells with multi-isotope imaging mass spectrometry (MIMS)—Nanoautography with stable isotope tracers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMahon, Greg; Glassner, Brian J.; Lechene, Claude P.

    2006-07-01

    We describe some technical aspects of the application of multi-isotope imaging mass spectrometry (MIMS) to biological research, particularly the use of isotopic tags to localize and measure their incorporation into intracellular compartments. We touch on sample preparation, on image formation, on drift correction and on extraction of quantitative data from isotope ratio imaging. We insist on the wide variety of sample types that can be used, ranging from whole cells prepared directly on Si supports, to thin sections of cells and tissues on Si supports, to ultrathin TEM sections on carbon-coated grid. We attempt to dispel the myth of difficulties in sample preparation, which we view as a needless deterrent to the application of MIMS to the general biological community. We present protocols for the extraction of isotope ratio data from mass images. We illustrate the benefits of using sequential image plane acquisition followed by the application of an autocorrelation algorithm (nanotracking) to remove the effects of specimen drift. We insist on the advantages to display the isotope ratios as hue saturation intensity images.

  6. Study of protein and RNA in dendritic spines using multi-isotope imaging mass spectrometry (MIMS).

    PubMed

    Brismar, H; Aperia, A; Westin, L; Moy, J; Wang, M; Guillermier, C; Poczatek, C; Lechene, C

    2014-11-01

    The classical view of neuronal protein synthesis is that proteins are made in the cell body and then transported to their functional sites in the dendrites and the dendritic spines. Indirect evidence, however, suggests that protein synthesis can directly occur in the distal dendrites, far from the cell body. We are developing protocols for dual labeling of RNA and proteins using (15)N-uridine and (18)O- or (13)C-leucine pulse chase in cultured neurons to identify and localize both protein synthesis and fate of newly synthesized proteins. Pilot experiments show discrete localization of both RNA and newly synthesized proteins in dendrites, close to dendritic spines. We have for the first time directly imaged and measured the production of proteins at the subcellular level in the neuronal dendrites, close to the functional sites, the dendritic spines. This will open a powerful way to study neural growth and synapse plasticity in health and disease.

  7. Quantifying cell division with deuterated water and multi-isotope imaging mass spectrometry (MIMS).

    PubMed

    Steinhauser, Matthew L; Guillermier, Christelle; Wang, Mei; Lechene, Claude P

    2014-11-01

    Cell division is commonly quantified by the administration of nucleotide labels that are incorporated by the nucleotide salvage pathway. A new approach uses precursors of the de novo nucleotide synthesis pathway, such as labeled water or glucose. Because such precursors are not specific for DNA synthesis, studies utilizing this approach have analyzed isolated genomic DNA to exclude nonspecific background labeling. We hypothesized that pulse-chase administration of stable isotope labeled water would result in sufficient nuclear labeling to enable discrimination of recently divided cells by quantitative ion microscopy. We administered deuterated (D)-water and (15)N-thymidine to mice concurrently, guided by the rationale that (15)N-thymidine incorporation would serve as a "gold standard" to identify dividing cells. We show both qualitatively and quantitatively that dividing cells in the small intestine ((15)N-labeled) demonstrate a discernable D-signal in the nucleus not observed in undivided cells ((15)N-unlabled). Correlation with (31)P(-) and (12)C(15)N(-):(12)C(14)N(-) images demonstrate preferential localization of (2)H labeling in regions of the nucleus with high DNA content as expected of labeling being incorporated during DNA synthesis and cell division. These data support the concept that stable isotope tagged precursors of the de novo nucleotide synthesis pathway can be used in concert with NanoSIMS to study cell division in vivo. A major implication of this study then is the possibility of using stable isotope tagged water and MIMS to study human cell turnover.

  8. The new frontiers of multimodality and multi-isotope imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behnam Azad, Babak; Nimmagadda, Sridhar

    2014-06-01

    Technological advances in imaging systems and the development of target specific imaging tracers has been rapidly growing over the past two decades. Recent progress in "all-in-one" imaging systems that allow for automated image coregistration has significantly added to the growth of this field. These developments include ultra high resolution PET and SPECT scanners that can be integrated with CT or MR resulting in PET/CT, SPECT/CT, SPECT/PET and PET/MRI scanners for simultaneous high resolution high sensitivity anatomical and functional imaging. These technological developments have also resulted in drastic enhancements in image quality and acquisition time while eliminating cross compatibility issues between modalities. Furthermore, the most cutting edge technology, though mostly preclinical, also allows for simultaneous multimodality multi-isotope image acquisition and image reconstruction based on radioisotope decay characteristics. These scientific advances, in conjunction with the explosion in the development of highly specific multimodality molecular imaging agents, may aid in realizing simultaneous imaging of multiple biological processes and pave the way towards more efficient diagnosis and improved patient care.

  9. LaBr3:Ce small FOV gamma camera with excellent energy resolution for multi-isotope imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pani, R.; Fabbri, A.; Cinti, M. N.; Orlandi, C.; Pellegrini, R.; Scafè, R.; Artibani, M.

    2015-06-01

    The simultaneous administration of radiopharmaceuticals labeled with more than one radioisotope is becoming of increasing interest in clinical practice. Because the photon energies of the utilized radioisotopes could be very close (less than 15% difference), a gamma camera with adequate energy resolution is required. The availability of scintillation crystals with high light yield, as lanthanum tri-bromide (LaBr3:Ce), is particularly appealing for these applications. In this work, a new small field of view gamma camera prototype is presented, based on a planar LaBr3:Ce scintillation crystal with surfaces treatment typical of spectrometric devices, in order to enhance energy resolution performances. The crystal has round shape and has been optically coupled with a position sensitive photomultiplier tube with high quantum efficiency. The presented gamma camera shows outstanding energy resolution results in the investigated energy range (32-662 keV). These relevant performances have been obtained through the application of uniformity correction on the raw data, necessary due to the presence of position sensitive phototube, characterized by a spread of anodic gain values. In spite of position linearity degradation at crystal edges, due to reflective treatment of surfaces, intrinsic spatial resolution values are satisfactory on the useful field of view.The characterization of the presented gamma camera, based on a continuous LaBr3:Ce scintillation crystal with reflective surfaces, indicates good performances in multi-isotope imaging due to the excellent energy resolution results, also in comparison with similar detectors.

  10. Multi-isotope SPECT imaging of the 225Ac decay chain: feasibility studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, A. K. H.; Ramogida, C. F.; Rodríguez-Rodríguez, C.; Blinder, Stephan; Kunz, Peter; Sossi, Vesna; Schaffer, Paul

    2017-06-01

    Effective use of the {}225Ac decay chain in targeted internal radioimmunotherapy requires the retention of both {}225Ac and progeny isotopes at the target site. Imaging-based pharmacokinetic tests of these pharmaceuticals must therefore separately yet simultaneously image multiple isotopes that may not be colocalized despite being part of the same decay chain. This work presents feasibility studies demonstrating the ability of a microSPECT/CT scanner equipped with a high energy collimator to simultaneously image two components of the {}225Ac decay chain: {}221Fr (218 keV) and {}213Bi (440 keV). Image quality phantoms were used to assess the performance of two collimators for simultaneous {}221Fr and {}213Bi imaging in terms of contrast and noise. A hotrod resolution phantom containing clusters of thin rods with diameters ranging between 0.85 and 1.70 mm was used to assess resolution. To demonstrate ability to simultaneously image dynamic {}221Fr and {}213Bi activity distributions, a phantom containing a {}213Bi generator from {}225Ac was imaged. These tests were performed with two collimators, a high-energy ultra-high resolution (HEUHR) collimator and an ultra-high sensitivity (UHS) collimator. Values consistent with activity concentrations determined independently via gamma spectroscopy were observed in high activity regions of the images. In hotrod phantom images, the HEUHR collimator resolved all rods for both {}221Fr and {}213Bi images. With the UHS collimator, no rods were resolvable in {}213Bi images and only rods  ⩾1.3 mm were resolved in {}221Fr images. After eluting the {}213Bi generator, images accurately visualized the reestablishment of transient equilibrium of the {}225Ac decay chain. The feasibility of evaluating the pharmacokinetics of the {}225Ac decay chain in vivo has been demonstrated. This presented method requires the use of a high-performance high-energy collimator.

  11. Multi-isotope SPECT imaging of the 225Ac decay chain: feasibility studies.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Andrew K H; Ramogida, Caterina; Rodriguez-Rodriguez, Cristina; Blinder, Stephan; Kunz, Peter; Sossi, Vesna; Schaffer, Paul

    2017-03-31

    Purpose: Effective use of the 225Ac decay chain in targeted internal radioimmunotherapy requires the retention of both 225Ac and progeny isotopes at the target site. Imaging-based pharmacokinetic tests of these pharmaceuticals must therefore separately yet simultaneously image multiple isotopes that may not be colocalized despite being part of the same decay chain. This work presents feasibility studies demonstrating the ability of a microSPECT/CT scanner equipped with a high energy collimator to simultaneously image two components of the 225Ac decay chain: 221Fr (218 keV) and 213Bi (440 keV). Methods: Image quality phantoms were used to assess the performance of two collimators for simultaneous 221Fr and 213Bi imaging in terms of contrast and noise. A hotrod resolution phantom containing clusters of thin rods with diameters ranging between 0.85 and 1.70 mm was used to assess resolution. To demonstrate ability to image dynamic 221Fr and 213Bi activity distributions, a phantom containing a 213Bi generator from 225Ac was imaged. These tests were performed with two collimators, a high-energy ultra-high resolution (HEUHR) collimator and an ultra-high sensitivity (UHS) collimator. Results: Values consistent with activity concentrations determined independently via gamma spectroscopy observed in high activity regions of the images. In hotrod phantom images, the HEUHR collimator resolved all rods for both 221Fr and 213Bi images. With the UHS collimator, no rods were resolvable in 213Bi images and only rods ≥1.3 mm were resolved in 221Fr images. After eluting the 213Bi generator, images accurately visualized the reestablishment of transient equilibrium of the 225Ac decay chain. Conclusion: A novel imaging method with potential to evaluate the pharmacokinetics of the 225

  12. Improved analysis of micro- and nanomole-scale sulfur multi-isotope compositions by gas source isotope ratio mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Au Yang, David; Landais, Guillaume; Assayag, Nelly; Widory, David; Cartigny, Pierre

    2016-04-15

    Multiple sulfur isotope compositions are usually measured on relatively large samples (in the range of micromoles); however, sometimes only small amounts are available and thus it is necessary to analyze small (sub-micromole) samples. We report an improved method to measure multiple sulfur isotope compositions: δ(33) S, δ(34) S and δ(36) S values on the SF6 molecule (m/z 127, 128, 129, 131) for quantities down to 0.1 micromole, and δ(33) S and δ(34) S values for quantities down to 20 nanomoles. Multiple sulfur isotope analyses including fluorination and purification of two international Ag2 S standards, IAEA-S1 and IAEA-S3, were carried out at various low concentrations on a dual-inlet isotope ratio mass spectrometer using a microvolume and modified resistor capacities. The analyses yielded a narrow range of δ(34) S values vs CDT (the international standard), with an overall standard deviation of ±0.2 ‰, which was within the range of certified values. This demonstrates the feasibility of determining both Δ(33) S and Δ(36) S values on the sub-micromole scale, and Δ(33) S values on the nanomole scale with similar accuracy to conventional dual-inlet analyses. The analysis of the three S-isotope ratios on the SF6 molecule using the so-called conventional fluorination method and dual-inlet ion ratio mass spectrometry is reliable for sample sizes down to ~20 nanomoles. Despite being close to the theoretical limits for maintaining the viscous flow regime of gas in the capillary, errors were not limited by counting statistics, but probably relate to sample gas purification. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Brain stem cell division and maintenance studied using multi-isotope imaging mass spectrometry (MIMS).

    PubMed

    Enikolopov, G; Guillermier, C; Wang, M; Trakimas, L; Steinhauser, M; Lechene, C

    2014-11-01

    New neurons are continuously produced from neural stem cells in specific regions of the adult brain of animals and humans. In the hippocampus, a region crucial for cognitive function, neurogenesis responds to a multitude of extrinsic stimuli; emerging evidence indicates that it may be important for behavior, pathophysiology, brain repair, and response to drugs. We have developed an approach to identify and quantify the cellular targets of pro- and anti-neurogenic stimuli, based on reporter transgenic mouse lines in which neural stem and progenitor cells or their progeny are marked by fluorescent proteins. Here, we demonstrate the feasibility of using MIMS for studying adult neurogenesis.

  14. Detection of immunolabels with multi-isotope imaging mass spectrometry (MIMS).

    PubMed

    Thiery-Lavenant, G; Guillermier, C; Wang, M; Lechene, C

    2014-11-01

    We have developed a method that combines the use of stable isotopes, MIMS and antibody. We began with using well-established antibodies, anti-actin and anti-synaptophysin, in mouse intestinal cells. We extended the method to an immunogold assay to specifically localize Ribeye, a major protein component of retina synaptic ribbons, or to localize a synaptic vesicle-containing protein, synaptophysin. Both are localized in presynaptic nerve terminal of photoreceptors cells in retina. Our results show that by MIMS analysis of the Au signal we can directly identify antibodies tagged with non amplified 1.4 nm gold nanoparticles. They also demonstrate that the gold nanoparticle-tagged antibodies do not dilute the (15)N/(14)N signal used for measuring protein turnover. Thus we can simultaneously and directly use MIMS to measure protein turnover and to identify cell type or specific protein.

  15. Multi-Isotope Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry Combining Heavy Water 2H with 15N Labeling As Complementary Tracers for Metabolic Heterogeneity at the Single-Cell Level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopf, S.; McGlynn, S.; Cowley, E.; Green, A.; Newman, D. K.; Orphan, V. J.

    2014-12-01

    Metabolic rates of microbial communities constitute a key physiological parameter for understanding the in situ growth constraints for life in any environment. Isotope labeling techniques provide a powerful approach for measuring such biological activity, due to the use of isotopically enriched substrate tracers whose incorporation into biological materials can be detected with high sensitivity by isotope-ratio mass spectrometry. Nano-meter scale secondary ion mass spectrometry (NanoSIMS) combined with stable isotope labeling provides a unique tool for studying the spatiometabolic activity of microbial populations at the single cell level in order to assess both community structure and population diversity. However, assessing the distribution and range of microbial activity in complex environmental systems with slow-growing organisms, diverse carbon and nitrogen sources, or heterotrophic subpopulations poses a tremendous technical challenge because the introduction of isotopically labeled substrates frequently changes the nutrient availability and can inflate or bias measures of activity. Here, we present the use of hydrogen isotope labeling with deuterated water as an important new addition to the isotopic toolkit and apply it for the determination of single cell microbial activities by NanoSIMS imaging. This tool provides a labeling technique that minimally alters any aquatic chemical environment, can be administered with strong labels even in minimal addition (natural background is very low), is an equally universal substrate for all forms of life even in complex, carbon and nitrogen saturated systems, and can be combined with other isotopic tracers. The combination of heavy water labeling with the most commonly used NanoSIMS tracer, 15N, is technically challenging but opens up a powerful new set of multi-tracer experiments for the study of microbial activity in complex communities. We present the first truly simultaneous single cell triple isotope system

  16. Multi-isotopic determination of plutonium (239Pu, 240Pu, 241Pu and 242Pu) in marine sediments using sector-field inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Donard, O F X; Bruneau, F; Moldovan, M; Garraud, H; Epov, V N; Boust, D

    2007-03-28

    Among the transuranic elements present in the environment, plutonium isotopes are mainly attached to particles, and therefore they present a great interest for the study and modelling of particle transport in the marine environment. Except in the close vicinity of industrial sources, plutonium concentration in marine sediments is very low (from 10(-4) ng kg(-1) for (241)Pu to 10 ng kg(-1) for (239)Pu), and therefore the measurement of (238)Pu, (239)Pu, (240)Pu, (241)Pu and (242)Pu in sediments at such concentration level requires the use of very sensitive techniques. Moreover, sediment matrix contains huge amounts of mineral species, uranium and organic substances that must be removed before the determination of plutonium isotopes. Hence, an efficient sample preparation step is necessary prior to analysis. Within this work, a chemical procedure for the extraction, purification and pre-concentration of plutonium from marine sediments prior to sector-field inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (SF-ICP-MS) analysis has been optimized. The analytical method developed yields a pre-concentrated solution of plutonium from which (238)U and (241)Am have been removed, and which is suitable for the direct and simultaneous measurement of (239)Pu, (240)Pu, (241)Pu and (242)Pu by SF-ICP-MS.

  17. Imaging Mass Cytometry.

    PubMed

    Chang, Qing; Ornatsky, Olga I; Siddiqui, Iram; Loboda, Alexander; Baranov, Vladimir I; Hedley, David W

    2017-02-01

    Imaging Mass Cytometry (IMC) is an expansion of mass cytometry, but rather than analyzing single cells in suspension, it uses laser ablation to generate plumes of particles that are carried to the mass cytometer by a stream of inert gas. Images reconstructed from tissue sections scanned by IMC have a resolution comparable to light microscopy, with the high content of mass cytometry enabled through the use of isotopically labeled probes and ICP-MS detection. Importantly, IMC can be performed on paraffin-embedded tissue sections, so can be applied to the retrospective analysis of patient cohorts whose outcome is known, and eventually to personalized medicine. Since the original description in 2014, IMC has evolved rapidly into a commercial instrument of unprecedented power for the analysis of histological sections. In this Review, we discuss the underlying principles of this new technology, and outline emerging applications of IMC in the analysis of normal and pathological tissues. © 2017 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry.

  18. FY09 PROGRESS: MULTI-ISOTOPE PROCESS (MIP) MONITOR

    SciTech Connect

    Schwantes, Jon M.; Orton, Christopher R.; Fraga, Carlos G.; Christensen, Richard; Laspe, Amy R.; Ward, Rebecca M.

    2009-10-18

    Model and experimental estimates of the Multi-Isotope Process Monitor performance for determining burnup after dissolution and acid concentration during solvent extraction steps during reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel are presented.

  19. MR imaging of cardiac masses.

    PubMed

    Syed, Imran S; Feng, Dali; Harris, Scott R; Martinez, Matthew W; Misselt, Andrew J; Breen, Jerome F; Miller, Dylan V; Araoz, Philip A

    2008-05-01

    Cardiac MR imaging is the preferred method for assessment of cardiac masses. A comprehensive cardiac MR imaging examination for a cardiac mass consists of static morphologic images using fast spin-echo sequences, including single-shot techniques, with T1 and T2 weighting and fat suppression pulses as well as dynamic imaging with cine steady-state free precession techniques. Further tissue characterization is provided with perfusion and delayed enhancement imaging. Specific cardiac tumoral characterization is possible in many cases. When specific tumor characterization is not possible, MR imaging often can demonstrate aggressive versus nonaggressive features that help in differentiating malignant from benign tumors.

  20. Imaging of pediatric neck masses.

    PubMed

    Friedman, Elliott R; John, Susan D

    2011-07-01

    Palpable neck masses are a common indication for pediatric imaging. Such lesions may be caused by infectious, inflammatory, tumoral, traumatic, lymphovascular, immunologic, or congenital etiologies. Radiological assessment of neck masses in young children should be tailored based on patient presentation and physical examination, as well as clinical suspicion. The goal of imaging should be to help arrive at a diagnosis or limited differential in an efficient manner while minimizing radiation exposure.

  1. The Solar Mass Ejection Imager

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, B. V.; Buffington, A.; Hick, P. L.; Kahler, S. W.; Altrock, R. C.; Gold, R. E.; Webb, D. F.

    1995-01-01

    We are designing a Solar Mass Ejection Imager (SMEI) capable of observing the Thomson-scattered signal from transient density features in the heliosphere from a spacecraft situated near AU. The imager is designed to trace these features, which include coronal mass ejections. corotating structures and shock waves, to elongations greater than 90 deg from the Sun. The instrument may be regarded as a progeny of the heliospheric imaging capability shown possible by the zodiacal-light photometers of the HELIOS spacecraft. The instrument we are designing would make more effective use of in-situ solar wind data from spacecraft in the vicinity of the imager by extending these observations to the surrounding environment. The observations from the instrument should allow deconvolution of these structures from the perspective views obtained as they pass the spacecraft. An imager at Earth could allow up to three days warning of the arrival of a mass ejection from the Sun .

  2. Imaging of Solid Renal Masses.

    PubMed

    Kay, Fernando U; Pedrosa, Ivan

    2017-03-01

    Detection of solid renal masses has increased, although it has not resulted in significant mortality reduction from renal cell carcinoma. Efforts for improved lesion characterization have been pursued and incorporated in management algorithms, in order to distinguish clinically significant tumors from favorable or benign conditions. Concurrently, imaging methods have produced evidence supporting their role as useful tools not only in lesion detection but also characterization. In addition, newer modalities, such as contrast-enhanced ultrasonography, and advanced applications of MR imaging, are being investigated. This article reviews the current role of different imaging methods in the characterization of solid renal masses.

  3. Imaging mass spectrometry in microbiology

    PubMed Central

    Watrous, Jeramie D.; Dorrestein, Pieter C.

    2013-01-01

    Mass spectrometry tools which allow for the 2-D visualization of the distribution of trace metals, metabolites, surface lipids, peptides and proteins directly from biological samples without the need for chemical tagging or antibodies are becoming increasingly useful for microbiology applications. These tools, comprised of different imaging mass spectrometry techniques, are ushering in an exciting new era of discovery by allowing for the generation of chemical hypotheses based on of the spatial mapping of atoms and molecules that can correlate to or transcend observed phenotypes. In this review, we explore the wide range of imaging mass spectrometry techniques available to microbiologists and describe their unique applications to microbiology with respect to the types of microbiology samples to be investigated. PMID:21822293

  4. Imaging Mass Spectrometry in Neuroscience

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Imaging mass spectrometry is an emerging technique of great potential for investigating the chemical architecture in biological matrices. Although the potential for studying neurobiological systems is evident, the relevance of the technique for application in neuroscience is still in its infancy. In the present Review, a principal overview of the different approaches, including matrix assisted laser desorption ionization and secondary ion mass spectrometry, is provided with particular focus on their strengths and limitations for studying different neurochemical species in situ and in vitro. The potential of the various approaches is discussed based on both fundamental and biomedical neuroscience research. This Review aims to serve as a general guide to familiarize the neuroscience community and other biomedical researchers with the technique, highlighting its great potential and suitability for comprehensive and specific chemical imaging. PMID:23530951

  5. Imaging mass spectrometry demonstrates age-related decline in human adipose plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Fazeli, Pouneh K.; Kim, Soomin; Lun, Mingyue; Zuflacht, Jonah P.; Milian, Jessica; Lee, Hang; Francois-Saint-Cyr, Hugues; Horreard, Francois; Larson, David; Rosen, Evan D.; Lee, Richard T.; Lechene, Claude P.; Steinhauser, Matthew L.

    2017-01-01

    Quantification of stable isotope tracers has revealed the dynamic state of living tissues. A new form of imaging mass spectrometry quantifies isotope ratios in domains much smaller than a cubic micron, enabling measurement of cell turnover and metabolism with stable isotope tracers at the single-cell level with a methodology we refer to as multi-isotope imaging mass spectrometry. In a first-in-human study, we utilize stable isotope tracers of DNA synthesis and de novo lipogenesis to prospectively measure cell birth and adipocyte lipid turnover. In a study of healthy adults, we elucidate an age-dependent decline in new adipocyte generation and adipocyte lipid turnover. A linear regression model suggests that the aging effect could be mediated by a decline in insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1). This study therefore establishes a method for measurement of cell turnover and metabolism in humans with subcellular resolution while implicating the growth hormone/IGF-1 axis in adipose tissue aging. PMID:28289709

  6. Imaging mass spectrometer with mass tags

    DOEpatents

    Felton, James S.; Wu, Kuang Jen; Knize, Mark G.; Kulp, Kristen S.; Gray, Joe W.

    2010-06-01

    A method of analyzing biological material by exposing the biological material to a recognition element, that is coupled to a mass tag element, directing an ion beam of a mass spectrometer to the biological material, interrogating at least one region of interest area from the biological material and producing data, and distributing the data in plots.

  7. Imaging mass spectrometer with mass tags

    DOEpatents

    Felton, James S.; Wu, Kuang Jen J.; Knize, Mark G.; Kulp, Kristen S.; Gray, Joe W.

    2013-01-29

    A method of analyzing biological material by exposing the biological material to a recognition element, that is coupled to a mass tag element, directing an ion beam of a mass spectrometer to the biological material, interrogating at least one region of interest area from the biological material and producing data, and distributing the data in plots.

  8. Mass Spectrometry Imaging Quick View

    SciTech Connect

    2013-01-24

    MSI QuickView is a software designed to provide a graphical user interface (GUI) for greatly speeding up experimental feedback (visualization and analysis) of mass spectrometry imaging (MSI or IMS) data during data acquisition. Often different software loads the entire data set, i.e., all lines of data into computer memory (RAM). This causes out of memory errors for larger datasets. We solved this in MSI QuickView by reading in the data one line at a time. Only the required information (e.g. the final pixel values for that line of heat map) is maintained in RAM. Interim analysis options include the mean intensity vs. m/z spectrum, intensity vs. time spectrums for up to 6 different m/z values or ranges chosen by the user and heat maps for each line. This assists in validating the usefulness of the particular experiment after scanning the first few lines. In addition, the tool facilitates further processing and analysis of the massive datasets. The user can manually pick different m/z values, time ranges, scroll through the spectra for any line in the data without having to load it in manually, save multiple images, change aspect ratios for the heat maps, and process the heat maps in multiple ways including overlaying images at different m/z values, displaying up to 9 different heat maps, alignment of scans along each line etc. There is no manipulation of the data required by the user to visualize the data.

  9. Experimental Validation of the Multi-Isotope Process Monitor Concept

    SciTech Connect

    Orton, Christopher R.; Schwantes, Jon M.; Fraga, Carlos G.; Douglas, Matthew; Christensen, Richard

    2010-05-13

    Researchers from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, in conjunction with personnel from The Ohio State University, are working to develop a system for monitoring spent nuclear fuel reprocessing facilities on-line, non-destructively, and in near-real-time. This method, known as the Multi-Isotope Process (MIP) Monitor, is based upon the measurement of distribution patterns of a suite of indicator (radioactive) isotopes present within particular process streams. Distribution patterns, monitored on-line by gamma spectrometry, are then compared in near-real-time to patterns representing "normal" process conditions using multivariate pattern recognition software. By targeting gamma-emitting indicator isotopes, the MIP Monitor approach is compatible with the use of small, portable, high-resolution gamma detectors that may be easily deployed throughout the facility. In addition, utilization of a suite of radio-elements, including ones with multiple oxidation states, increases the likelihood that attempts to divert material via process manipulation would be detected. Proof-of-principle modeling exercises simulating changes in acid strength have been completed and the results are promising. Laboratory validation is currently under way and significant results are available. The latest experimental results, along with an overview of the method will be presented.

  10. Cluster secondary ion mass spectrometry microscope mode mass spectrometry imaging.

    PubMed

    Kiss, András; Smith, Donald F; Jungmann, Julia H; Heeren, Ron M A

    2013-12-30

    Microscope mode imaging for secondary ion mass spectrometry is a technique with the promise of simultaneous high spatial resolution and high-speed imaging of biomolecules from complex surfaces. Technological developments such as new position-sensitive detectors, in combination with polyatomic primary ion sources, are required to exploit the full potential of microscope mode mass spectrometry imaging, i.e. to efficiently push the limits of ultra-high spatial resolution, sample throughput and sensitivity. In this work, a C60 primary source was combined with a commercial mass microscope for microscope mode secondary ion mass spectrometry imaging. The detector setup is a pixelated detector from the Medipix/Timepix family with high-voltage post-acceleration capabilities. The system's mass spectral and imaging performance is tested with various benchmark samples and thin tissue sections. The high secondary ion yield (with respect to 'traditional' monatomic primary ion sources) of the C60 primary ion source and the increased sensitivity of the high voltage detector setup improve microscope mode secondary ion mass spectrometry imaging. The analysis time and the signal-to-noise ratio are improved compared with other microscope mode imaging systems, all at high spatial resolution. We have demonstrated the unique capabilities of a C60 ion microscope with a Timepix detector for high spatial resolution microscope mode secondary ion mass spectrometry imaging. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Multi-isotopic transuranic waste interrogation using delayed neutron nondestructive assay and iterative quadratic programming techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Cheng-Wei

    1997-11-01

    Nuclear safeguards for Special Nuclear Materials is to protect the nuclear materials against malevolent use and to insure their peaceful usage. The nondestructive assay technique (NDA) offers an efficient and proliferation resistance method for nuclear safeguards technology. NDA techniques were investigated for multi-isotopic transuranic waste interrogation. This work was originally intended for the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) under development at Argonne National Laboratory. One major feature of the IFR is its integral fuel cycle based on a pyrometallurgical process. More than 99% of transuranics produced in the fuel are returned to the makeup fuel and burned in the reactor. With the long-lived actinides removed from the waste stream, the waste produced will decay sufficiently in 300 years dropping below the cancer risk level of natural uranium ore and easing the perceived waste management problem. The feasibility of using nondestructive assay techniques for the IFR fuel cycle waste interrogation were studied. A special DNNDA experimental device was designed and analysis techniques were developed. The DNNDA technique uses the delayed neutrons emitted after the activation of a 14 MeV neutron source as the characteristic signature for each fissionable isotope. A tantalum/polyethylene filter was employed to enhance the discrimination between the fissile and the fissionable isotopes. Spontaneous fissions from 240Pu were also measured to assist the mass assay. A nonlinear overdetermined system was established based on the DNNDA measurements. An Iterative Quadratic Programming (IQP) method was applied to perform the estimates. The IQP method has several advantages over the linear least squares and Kalman filter methods, it has the flexibility of adding additional constraints, it has superlinear global convergence and it can be utilized for nonlinear problems. The results show that using the IQP method with the DNNDA technique is quite promising for multi-isotopic assay

  12. Absorption mode FTICR mass spectrometry imaging.

    PubMed

    Smith, Donald F; Kilgour, David P A; Konijnenburg, Marco; O'Connor, Peter B; Heeren, Ron M A

    2013-12-03

    Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry offers the highest mass resolving power for molecular imaging experiments. This high mass resolving power ensures that closely spaced peaks at the same nominal mass are resolved for proper image generation. Typically higher magnetic fields are used to increase mass resolving power. However, a gain in mass resolving power can also be realized by phase correction of the data for absorption mode display. In addition to mass resolving power, absorption mode offers higher mass accuracy and signal-to-noise ratio over the conventional magnitude mode. Here, we present the first use of absorption mode for Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry imaging. The Autophaser algorithm is used to phase correct each spectrum (pixel) in the image, and then, these parameters are used by the Chameleon work-flow based data processing software to generate absorption mode "Datacubes" for image and spectral viewing. Absorption mode reveals new mass and spatial features that are not resolved in magnitude mode and results in improved selected ion image contrast.

  13. High-resolution quantitative imaging of mammalian and bacterial cells using stable isotope mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Lechene, Claude; Hillion, Francois; McMahon, Greg; Benson, Douglas; Kleinfeld, Alan M; Kampf, J Patrick; Distel, Daniel; Luyten, Yvette; Bonventre, Joseph; Hentschel, Dirk; Park, Kwon Moo; Ito, Susumu; Schwartz, Martin; Benichou, Gilles; Slodzian, Georges

    2006-01-01

    Background Secondary-ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) is an important tool for investigating isotopic composition in the chemical and materials sciences, but its use in biology has been limited by technical considerations. Multi-isotope imaging mass spectrometry (MIMS), which combines a new generation of SIMS instrument with sophisticated ion optics, labeling with stable isotopes, and quantitative image-analysis software, was developed to study biological materials. Results The new instrument allows the production of mass images of high lateral resolution (down to 33 nm), as well as the counting or imaging of several isotopes simultaneously. As MIMS can distinguish between ions of very similar mass, such as 12C15N- and 13C14N-, it enables the precise and reproducible measurement of isotope ratios, and thus of the levels of enrichment in specific isotopic labels, within volumes of less than a cubic micrometer. The sensitivity of MIMS is at least 1,000 times that of 14C autoradiography. The depth resolution can be smaller than 1 nm because only a few atomic layers are needed to create an atomic mass image. We illustrate the use of MIMS to image unlabeled mammalian cultured cells and tissue sections; to analyze fatty-acid transport in adipocyte lipid droplets using 13C-oleic acid; to examine nitrogen fixation in bacteria using 15N gaseous nitrogen; to measure levels of protein renewal in the cochlea and in post-ischemic kidney cells using 15N-leucine; to study DNA and RNA co-distribution and uridine incorporation in the nucleolus using 15N-uridine and 81Br of bromodeoxyuridine or 14C-thymidine; to reveal domains in cultured endothelial cells using the native isotopes 12C, 16O, 14N and 31P; and to track a few 15N-labeled donor spleen cells in the lymph nodes of the host mouse. Conclusion MIMS makes it possible for the first time to both image and quantify molecules labeled with stable or radioactive isotopes within subcellular compartments. PMID:17010211

  14. Imaging of pediatric head and neck masses.

    PubMed

    Stern, Jessica S; Ginat, Daniel T; Nicholas, Jennifer L; Ryan, Maura E

    2015-02-01

    Medical imaging is an important tool in the evaluation and classification of pediatric head and neck masses. Such lesions may include congenital, inflammatory, infectious, vascular, or neoplastic processes. Ultrasound is often the first line modality in the workup of a neck mass in a child, followed by MRI or CT depending on the scenario. This information must be interpreted in the context of the patient's clinical history, physical examination, and demographics. The medical imaging workup of a neck mass in a child must be focused to yield the maximum information possible while minimizing the risks of radiation and sedation.

  15. Imaging of granulomatous neck masses in children.

    PubMed

    Nadel, D M; Bilaniuk, L; Handler, S D

    1996-10-01

    Non-tuberculous mycobacterial (NTM) infection is the most common cause of granulomatous inflammation in pediatric neck masses. Diagnosis relies upon culture, acid-fast bacilli (AFB) staining, chest radiograph, purified protein derivative (PPD) test, and clinical features. Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging may provide valuable information in the work-up of children with cervical masses. We reviewed 11 CT and 5 MR studies of children with a clinical diagnosis of NTM infection. Specific findings included stranding of the subcutaneous fat, thickening and enhancement of the overlying skin, obliteration of the tissue palnes, and multichambered masses. One patient had calcifications within the mass. MR with contrast better demonstrated the soft tissues and is our recommended imaging modality, although CT is more likely to detect calcifications within the neck mass.

  16. Gynecologic masses: value of magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Hricak, H; Lacey, C; Schriock, E; Fisher, M R; Amparo, E; Dooms, G; Jaffe, R

    1985-09-01

    Forty-two women with gynecologic abnormalities were studied with the use of magnetic resonance imaging. Magnetic resonance imaging correctly assessed the origin of the pelvic mass in all patients. In the evaluation of leiomyoma, magnetic resonance imaging accurately depicted the number, size, and location of the lesion. In the evaluation of endometrial carcinoma, magnetic resonance imaging depicted the location of the lesion, the presence of cervical extension, and the depth of myometrial penetration in the majority of the cases. In the analysis of adnexal cysts, magnetic resonance imaging was sensitive in localizing the lesion and was able to distinguish serous from hemorrhagic fluid. This preliminary report indicates that magnetic resonance imaging may become a valuable imaging modality in the diagnosis of gynecologic abnormalities.

  17. Cu-Zn-Pb multi isotopic characterization of a small watershed (Loire river basin, France)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desaulty, A. M.; Millot, R.; Perret, S.; Bourrain, X.

    2015-12-01

    Combating metal pollution in surface water is a major environmental, public health and economic issue. Knowledge of the behavior of metals, such as copper (Cu), zinc (Zn) and lead (Pb) in sediments and dissolved load, is a key factor to improve the management of rivers. Recent advances in mass spectrometry related to the development of MC-ICPMS allow to analyze the isotopic composition of these elements, and previous studies show the effectiveness of isotopic analyses to determine the anthropogenic sources of pollution in environment. The goal of this study is to use the Cu-Zn-Pb multi-isotopic signature to track the pollutions in surface water, and to understand the complex processes causing the metals mobilization and transport in environment. More particularly we investigate the mechanisms of distribution between the dissolved load and particulate load, known to play an important role in the transport of metals through river systems. As case study, we chose a small watershed, poorly urbanized in the Loire river basin. Its spring is in a pristine area, while it is only impacted some kilometers further by the releases rich in metals coming from a hospital water treatment plant. First a sampling of these liquid effluents as well as dissolved load and sediment from upstream to downstream was realized and their concentrations and isotopic data were determined. Then to simulate a lot of potential natural and anthropogenic modifications of environmental conditions, we made sequential extraction protocol using various reagents on the sediments. Isotopic analyzes were performed also on the various extracting solutions. Isotopic ratios were measured using a Neptune MC-ICPMS at the BRGM, after a protocol of purification for Zn and Cu. The results showed that, these isotopic systematics reveal important informations about the mechanists of mobilization and transport of metals through river systems. However experiments performed under laboratory conditions will be necessary

  18. A mass spectrometry primer for mass spectrometry imaging

    PubMed Central

    Rubakhin, Stanislav S.; Sweedler, Jonathan V.

    2011-01-01

    Mass spectrometry imaging (MSI), a rapidly growing subfield of chemical imaging, employs mass spectrometry (MS) technologies to create single- and multi-dimensional localization maps for a variety of atoms and molecules. Complimentary to other imaging approaches, MSI provides high chemical specificity and broad analyte coverage. This powerful analytical toolset is capable of measuring the distribution of many classes of inorganics, metabolites, proteins and pharmaceuticals in chemically and structurally complex biological specimens in vivo, in vitro, and in situ. The MSI approaches highlighted in this Methods in Molecular Biology volume provide flexibility of detection, characterization, and identification of multiple known and unknown analytes. The goal of this chapter is to introduce investigators who may be unfamiliar with MS to the basic principles of the mass spectrometric approaches as used in MSI. In addition to guidelines for choosing the most suitable MSI method for specific investigations, cross-references are provided to the chapters in this volume that describe the appropriate experimental protocols. PMID:20680583

  19. MALDI mass spectrometry imaging in rheumatic diseases.

    PubMed

    Rocha, Beatriz; Cillero-Pastor, Berta; Blanco, Francisco J; Ruiz-Romero, Cristina

    2017-07-01

    Mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) is a technique used to visualize the spatial distribution of biomolecules such as peptides, proteins, lipids or other organic compounds by their molecular masses. Among the different MSI strategies, MALDI-MSI provides a sensitive and label-free approach for imaging of a wide variety of protein or peptide biomarkers from the surface of tissue sections, being currently used in an increasing number of biomedical applications such as biomarker discovery and tissue classification. In the field of rheumatology, MALDI-MSI has been applied to date for the analysis of joint tissues such as synovial membrane or cartilage. This review summarizes the studies and key achievements obtained using MALDI-MSI to increase understanding on rheumatic pathologies and to describe potential diagnostic or prognostic biomarkers of these diseases. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: MALDI Imaging, edited by Dr. Corinna Henkel and Prof. Peter Hoffmann. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Imaging the renal mass: a historical review.

    PubMed

    McClennan, Bruce L

    2014-11-01

    A matter of months after Roentgen's landmark discovery in 1895, Roentgen's rays were focused on diseases and disorders of the urinary tract, specifically the kidney. At the dawn of the 20th century, urologists in the United States and around the world quickly recognized that by using a variety of metal stylets and radiopaque contrast agents, such as silver salts, the upper urinary tract, namely the ureter, pelvis, and calyces, could be depicted with radiography. Renal cysts and tumors were diagnosed on the basis of deformities in the kidney. Retrograde pyelography dominated the imaging evaluation of the kidney until the discovery of a safe intravenous method for urinary tract imaging (ie, intravenous pyelography). Pioneers and pathfinders in the field of contrast media development and radiologic procedures helped give radiologists the lead role in the work-up of renal masses, an area where urologists once held forth. The subspecialty of uroradiology was born in the middle of the 20th century. Intravenous urography, nephrotomography, and diagnostic angiography with pharmacologic manipulation followed by cyst or mass puncture and biopsy yielded unrivaled specificity for the diagnosis and staging of benign and malignant renal masses. The advent of cross-sectional and multiplanar imaging and the profound effects they had and continue to have on the discovery and characterization of renal masses has been detailed in the pages of Radiology since the 1920s. Ultrasonography, nuclear imaging, computed tomographic scanning, magnetic resonance imaging, and positron emission tomography each have made a claim to a part of the imaging algorithm of modern uroradiologic practice.

  1. Imaging thermal ion mass and velocity analyzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yau, A. W.; King, E. P.; Amerl, P.; Berg, K.; Enno, G.; Howarth, A.; Wevers, I.; White, A.

    2013-11-01

    The aim of an imaging thermal ion mass and velocity analyzer is to apply imaging techniques to measure in-situ the mass composition and detailed velocity phase space distributions of a thermal plasma population in a planetary ionosphere or magnetosphere and use the measured distributions to derive the bulk plasma parameters and to detect the possible presence of non-thermal distributions. A hemispherical electrostatic analyzer (HEA) with a planar entrance aperture can sample simultaneously incident ions or electrons over an extended energy range and the full 360° range of incident azimuth, and disperse them by their energy-per-charge while retaining their incident azimuth, thus providing a means to image the 2-dimensional (2D) ion or electron energy-per-charge and angular (azimuth) distribution. Therefore an ion mass and velocity analyzer consisting of a HEA embedded with an ion-mass spectrometer is capable of imaging the 2-D detailed ion velocity distribution—and measuring the 3D distribution on a spinning spacecraft if the planar entrance aperture is aligned along the spacecraft spin axis. For 3D velocity distribution measurements on a 3-axis stabilized spacecraft, an analyzer with electrostatic deflection capability will be required to deflect ions at arbitrary incident elevation angles into the planar entrance aperture for sampling. An imaging thermal ion mass and velocity analyzer is presented that combines a HEA, a time-of-flight ion mass spectrometer, and a pair of electrostatic deflectors, and is capable of sampling low-energy ions (˜1 to 100 eV/e) of all mass species (1 to > 40 AMU/e) from all incident directions on a non-spinning platform, at up to (10% energy resolution (ΔE/E) and ˜5° angular resolution. Using the HEA to measure the energy-percharge of each detected ion and the time-of-flight gate to measure the transit time of the ion inside the analyzer, this instrument can resolve all major ion species in the ionosphere including H+, He+ and O

  2. Multiplex mass spectrometry imaging for latent fingerprints.

    PubMed

    Yagnik, Gargey B; Korte, Andrew R; Lee, Young Jin

    2013-01-01

    We have previously developed in-parallel data acquisition of orbitrap mass spectrometry (MS) and ion trap MS and/or MS/MS scans for matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization MS imaging (MSI) to obtain rich chemical information in less data acquisition time. In the present study, we demonstrate a novel application of this multiplex MSI methodology for latent fingerprints. In a single imaging experiment, we could obtain chemical images of various endogenous and exogenous compounds, along with simultaneous MS/MS images of a few selected compounds. This work confirms the usefulness of multiplex MSI to explore chemical markers when the sample specimen is very limited. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Single-Cell Imaging Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Passarelli, Melissa K.; Ewing, Andrew G.

    2013-01-01

    Single-cell imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) is a powerful technique used to map the distributions of endogenous biomolecules with sub-cellular resolution. Currently, secondary ion mass spectrometry is the predominant technique for single-cell IMS, thanks to its sub-micron lateral resolution and surface sensitivity. However, recent methodological and technological developments aimed at improving the spatial resolution of matrix assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) have made this technique a potential platform of single-cell IMS. MALDI opens the field of single-cell IMS to new possibilities, including single cell proteomic imaging and atmospheric pressure analyses; however, sensitivity is a challenge. In this report, we estimate the availability of proteins and lipids in a single cell and discuss strategies employed to improve sensitivity at the single-cell level. PMID:23948695

  4. Integrated imaging of neonatal renal masses.

    PubMed

    Kirks, D R; Rosenberg, E R; Johnson, D G; King, L R

    1985-01-01

    Thirty-three neonatal renal masses were evaluated during a 2-year interval. The final diagnoses in these 33 patients were hydronephrosis [14], multicystic dysplastic kidney [10], renal vein thrombosis [3], obstructed upper pole duplication [2], polycystic kidney disease [2], nephroblastomatosis [1], and mesoblastic nephroma [1]. We recommend an integrated imaging approach that utilizes sonography to clarify anatomy and renal scintigraphy or excretory urography to determine renal function.

  5. Pb-Zn-Cd-Hg multi isotopic characterization of the Loire River Basin, France

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Millot, R.; Widory, D.; Innocent, C.; Guerrot, C.; Bourrain, X.; Johnson, T. M.

    2012-12-01

    metal pollutants. The main objective of this study is to characterize the sources and the behavior of these heavy metals in the aquatic environment, and their spatial distribution using a multi-isotope approach. Each of these isotope systematics on their own reveals important information about their geogenic or anthropogenic origin but, considered together, provide a more integrated understanding of the budgets of these pollutants within the Loire River Basin.

  6. Diffusion of multi-isotopic chemical species in molten silicates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watkins, James M.; Liang, Yan; Richter, Frank; Ryerson, Frederick J.; DePaolo, Donald J.

    2014-08-01

    Diffusion experiments in a simplified Na2O-CaO-SiO2 liquid system are used to develop a general formulation for the fractionation of Ca isotopes during liquid-phase diffusion. Although chemical diffusion is a well-studied process, the mathematical description of the effects of diffusion on the separate isotopes of a chemical element is surprisingly underdeveloped and uncertain. Kinetic theory predicts a mass dependence on isotopic mobility, but it is unknown how this translates into a mass dependence on effective binary diffusion coefficients, or more generally, the chemical diffusion coefficients that are housed in a multicomponent diffusion matrix. Our experiments are designed to measure Ca mobility, effective binary diffusion coefficients, the multicomponent diffusion matrix, and the effects of chemical diffusion on Ca isotopes in a liquid of single composition. We carried out two chemical diffusion experiments and one self-diffusion experiment, all at 1250 °C and 0.7 GPa and using a bulk composition for which other information is available from the literature. The self-diffusion experiment is used to determine the mobility of Ca in the absence of diffusive fluxes of other liquid components. The chemical diffusion experiments are designed to determine the effect on Ca isotope fractionation of changing the counter-diffusing component from fast-diffusing Na2O to slow-diffusing SiO2. When Na2O is the main counter-diffusing species, CaO diffusion is fast and larger Ca isotopic effects are generated. When SiO2 is the main counter-diffusing species, CaO diffusion is slow and smaller Ca isotopic effects are observed. In both experiments, the liquid is initially isotopically homogeneous, and during the experiment Ca isotopes become fractionated by diffusion. The results are used as a test of a new general expression for the diffusion of isotopes in a multicomponent liquid system that accounts for both self diffusion and the effects of counter-diffusing species. Our

  7. Mass Spectrometry Imaging under Ambient Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Chunping; Dill, Allison L.; Eberlin, Livia S.; Cooks, R. Graham; Ifa, Demian R.

    2012-01-01

    Mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) has emerged as an important tool in the last decade and it is beginning to show potential to provide new information in many fields owing to its unique ability to acquire molecularly specific images and to provide multiplexed information, without the need for labeling or staining. In MSI, the chemical identity of molecules present on a surface is investigated as a function of spatial distribution. In addition to now standard methods involving MSI in vacuum, recently developed ambient ionization techniques allow MSI to be performed under atmospheric pressure on untreated samples outside the mass spectrometer. Here we review recent developments and applications of MSI emphasizing the ambient ionization techniques of desorption electrospray ionization (DESI), laser ablation electrospray ionization (LAESI), probe electrospray ionization (PESI), desorption atmospheric pressure photoionization (DAPPI), femtosecond laser desorption ionization (fs-LDI), laser electrospray mass spectrometry (LEMS), infrared laser ablation metastable-induced chemical ionization (IR-LAMICI), liquid microjunction surface sampling probe mass spectrometry (LMJ-SSP MS), nanospray desorption electrospray ionization (nano-DESI), and plasma sources such as the low temperature plasma (LTP) probe and laser ablation coupled to flowing atmospheric-pressure afterglow (LA-FAPA). Included are discussions of some of the features of ambient MSI including the ability to implement chemical reactions with the goal of providing high abundance ions characteristic of specific compounds of interest and the use of tandem mass spectrometry to either map the distribution of targeted molecules with high specificity or to provide additional MS information in the structural identification of compounds. We also describe the role of bioinformatics in acquiring and interpreting the chemical and spatial information obtained through MSI, especially in biological applications for tissue

  8. Magnetic Resonance Imaging Evaluation of Cardiac Masses

    PubMed Central

    Braggion-Santos, Maria Fernanda; Koenigkam-Santos, Marcel; Teixeira, Sara Reis; Volpe, Gustavo Jardim; Trad, Henrique Simão; Schmidt, André

    2013-01-01

    Background Cardiac tumors are extremely rare; however, when there is clinical suspicion, proper diagnostic evaluation is necessary to plan the most appropriate treatment. In this context, cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging (CMRI) plays an important role, allowing a comprehensive characterization of such lesions. Objective To review cases referred to a CMRI Department for investigation of cardiac and paracardiac masses. To describe the positive case series with a brief review of the literature for each type of lesion and the role of cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging in evaluation. Methods Between August 2008 and December 2011, all cases referred for CMRI with suspicion of tumor involving the heart were reviewed. Cases with positive histopathological diagnosis, clinical evolution or therapeutic response compatible with the clinical suspicion and imaging findings were selected. Results Among the 13 cases included in our study, eight (62%) had histopathological confirmation. We describe five benign tumors (myxomas, rhabdomyoma and fibromas), five malignancies (sarcoma, lymphoma, Richter syndrome involving the heart and metastatic disease) and three non-neoplastic lesions (pericardial cyst, intracardiac thrombus and infectious vegetation). Conclusion CMRI plays an important role in the evaluation of cardiac masses of non-neoplastic and neoplastic origin, contributing to a more accurate diagnosis in a noninvasive manner and assisting in treatment planning, allowing safe clinical follow-up with good reproducibility. PMID:23887734

  9. Improving Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry Image Quality with Image Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Tarolli, Jay G.; Jackson, Lauren M.; Winograd, Nicholas

    2014-01-01

    The spatial resolution of chemical images acquired with cluster secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) is limited not only by the size of the probe utilized to create the images, but also by detection sensitivity. As the probe size is reduced to below 1 µm, for example, a low signal in each pixel limits lateral resolution due to counting statistics considerations. Although it can be useful to implement numerical methods to mitigate this problem, here we investigate the use of image fusion to combine information from scanning electron microscope (SEM) data with chemically resolved SIMS images. The advantage of this approach is that the higher intensity and, hence, spatial resolution of the electron images can help to improve the quality of the SIMS images without sacrificing chemical specificity. Using a pan-sharpening algorithm, the method is illustrated using synthetic data, experimental data acquired from a metallic grid sample, and experimental data acquired from a lawn of algae cells. The results show that up to an order of magnitude increase in spatial resolution is possible to achieve. A cross-correlation metric is utilized for evaluating the reliability of the procedure. PMID:24912432

  10. Improving Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry Image Quality with Image Fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarolli, Jay G.; Jackson, Lauren M.; Winograd, Nicholas

    2014-12-01

    The spatial resolution of chemical images acquired with cluster secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) is limited not only by the size of the probe utilized to create the images but also by detection sensitivity. As the probe size is reduced to below 1 μm, for example, a low signal in each pixel limits lateral resolution because of counting statistics considerations. Although it can be useful to implement numerical methods to mitigate this problem, here we investigate the use of image fusion to combine information from scanning electron microscope (SEM) data with chemically resolved SIMS images. The advantage of this approach is that the higher intensity and, hence, spatial resolution of the electron images can help to improve the quality of the SIMS images without sacrificing chemical specificity. Using a pan-sharpening algorithm, the method is illustrated using synthetic data, experimental data acquired from a metallic grid sample, and experimental data acquired from a lawn of algae cells. The results show that up to an order of magnitude increase in spatial resolution is possible to achieve. A cross-correlation metric is utilized for evaluating the reliability of the procedure.

  11. Imaging of pleural masses: which to choose?

    PubMed

    Bruns, Aaron S; Mastronarde, John G

    2008-03-01

    The differential diagnosis of pleural masses is limited. Asbestos-related disease and invasive bronchogenic carcinoma make up the majority of cases. The diagnostic yield of biopsies is low, and invasive procedures are often required to achieve diagnosis. A variety of imaging techniques are available to help differentiate between benign and malignant disease to help discern which patients to biopsy. While computed tomography has a relatively good sensitivity and specificity, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and positron emission tomography (PET) both appear to have higher accuracy. MRI has the added benefit of being an excellent aid in determining surgical resectability of tumors. MRI and PET are limited, however, by their cost and availability in certain regions.

  12. MASS SPECTROMETRY IMAGING FOR DRUGS AND METABOLITES

    PubMed Central

    Greer, Tyler; Sturm, Robert; Li, Lingjun

    2011-01-01

    Mass spectrometric imaging (MSI) is a powerful analytical technique that provides two- and three-dimensional spatial maps of multiple compounds in a single experiment. This technique has been routinely applied to protein, peptide, and lipid molecules with much less research reporting small molecule distributions, especially pharmaceutical drugs. This review’s main focus is to provide readers with an up-to-date description of the substrates and compounds that have been analyzed for drug and metabolite composition using MSI technology. Additionally, ionization techniques, sample preparation, and instrumentation developments are discussed. PMID:21515430

  13. Heliospheric Imagers for Tracking Coronal Mass Ejections: Lessons Learned from the Solar Mass Ejection Imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnston, J. C.; Mozer, J. B.; Radick, R. R.; Holladay, P. E.; Kuchar, T. A.; Mizuno, D. R.; Webb, D. F.

    2004-12-01

    The Solar Mass Ejection Imager (SMEI) was launched on board the DoD Space Test Program's Coriolis satellite on January 6, 2003. The SMEI instrument represents a new kind of imager designed specifically to observe Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) and other dense structures in the solar wind as they propagate through the heliosphere. Its viewing range starts at 20 degrees elongation from the Sun and extends to beyond 1 A.U.. More than 120 CMEs have been detected with the SMEI instrument, including three well-documented "halo" events that led to geomagnetic storm conditions on Earth. These observations demonstrate the potential of a heliospheric imager for space weather specification and prediction purposes. More than halfway through SMEI's planned three-year lifetime, we look ahead towards an operational heliospheric imager. We will briefly reveal some of the lessons learned from the SMEI mission and offer recommendations for a future system with operational capability.

  14. Mass Determination Of Directly Imaged Planet Candidates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Tobias; Neuhauser, R.; Seifahrt, A.

    2011-09-01

    About 20 sub-stellar companions with large separations (> 50 AU) to their young primary stars and brown dwarfs are confirmed by both common proper motion and late-M / early-L type spectra. The origin and early evolution of these objects is still under debate. While often these sub-stellar companions are regarded as brown dwarfs, they could possibly also be massive planets, the mass estimates are very uncertain so far. They are companions to primary stars or brown dwarfs in young associations and star forming regions like Taurus, Upper Scorpius, the TW Hya association, Beta Pic moving group, TucHor association, Lupus, Ophiuchus, and Chamaeleon, hence their ages and distances are well known, in contrast to free-floating brown dwarfs. Here we present how mass estimates of such young directly imaged companions can be derived, using e.g. evolutionary models, which are however currently almost uncalibrated by direct mass measurements of young objects. An empirical classification by medium-resolution spectroscopy is currently not possible, because a spectral sequence that is taking the lower gravity into account, is not existing. This problem leads to an apparent mismatch between spectra of old field type objects and young low-mass companions at the same effective temperature, hampering a determination of temperature and surface gravity independent from models. We show that from spectra of the objects, using the advantages of light concentration by an AO-assisted integral field spectrograph, temperature, extinction, metallicity and surface gravity can be derived using non-equilibrium radiative transfer atmosphere models as comparison and that this procedure as well allows a mass determination in combination with the luminosities found by the direct observations, as has recently been done by us for several young sub-stellar companions, as e.g. GQ Lup, CT Cha or UScoCTIO 108.

  15. Preparation of a multi-isotope plutonium AMS standard and preliminary results of a first inter-lab comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dittmann, B.-A.; Dunai, T. J.; Dewald, A.; Heinze, S.; Feuerstein, C.; Strub, E.; Fifield, L. K.; Froehlich, M. B.; Tims, S. G.; Wallner, A.; Christl, M.

    2015-10-01

    The motivation of this work is to establish a new multi-isotope plutonium standard for isotopic ratio measurements with accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS), since stocks of existing solutions are declining. To this end, certified reference materials (CRMs) of each of the individual isotopes 239Pu, 240Pu, 242Pu and 244Pu were obtained from JRC IRMM (Joint Research Center Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements). These certified reference materials (IRMM-081a, IRMM-083, IRMM-043 and IRMM-042a) were diluted with nitric acid and mixed to obtain a stock standard solution with an isotopic ratio of approximately 1.0:1.0:1.0:0.1 (239Pu:240Pu:242Pu:244Pu). From this stock solution, samples were prepared for measurement of the plutonium isotopic composition by AMS. These samples have been measured in a round-robin exercise between the AMS facilities at CologneAMS, at the ANU Canberra and ETH Zurich to verify the isotopic ratio and to demonstrate the reproducibility of the measurements. The results show good agreement both between the different AMS measurements and with the gravimetrically determined nominal ratios.

  16. Lipid imaging by mass spectrometry - a review.

    PubMed

    Gode, David; Volmer, Dietrich A

    2013-03-07

    Mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) has proven to be extremely useful for applications such as the spatial analysis of peptides and proteins in biological tissue, the performance assessment of drugs in vivo or the measurement of protein or metabolite expression as tissue classifiers or biomarkers from disease versus control tissue comparisons. The most popular MSI technique is MALDI mass spectrometry. First invented by Richard Caprioli in the mid-1990s, it is the highest performing MSI technique in terms of spatial resolution, sensitivity for intact biomolecules and application range today. The unique ability to identify and spatially resolve numerous compounds simultaneously, based on m/z values has inter alia been applied to untargeted and targeted chemical mapping of biological compartments, revealing changes of physiological states, disease pathologies and metabolic faith and distribution of xenobiotics. Many MSI applications focus on lipid species because of the lipids' diverse roles as structural components of cell membranes, their function in the surfactant cycle, and their involvement as second messengers in signalling cascades of tissues and cells. This article gives a comprehensive overview of lipid imaging techniques and applications using established MALDI and SIMS methods but also other promising MSI techniques such as DESI.

  17. imzML: Imaging Mass Spectrometry Markup Language: A common data format for mass spectrometry imaging.

    PubMed

    Römpp, Andreas; Schramm, Thorsten; Hester, Alfons; Klinkert, Ivo; Both, Jean-Pierre; Heeren, Ron M A; Stöckli, Markus; Spengler, Bernhard

    2011-01-01

    Imaging mass spectrometry is the method of scanning a sample of interest and generating an "image" of the intensity distribution of a specific analyte. The data sets consist of a large number of mass spectra which are usually acquired with identical settings. Existing data formats are not sufficient to describe an MS imaging experiment completely. The data format imzML was developed to allow the flexible and efficient exchange of MS imaging data between different instruments and data analysis software.For this purpose, the MS imaging data is divided in two separate files. The mass spectral data is stored in a binary file to ensure efficient storage. All metadata (e.g., instrumental parameters, sample details) are stored in an XML file which is based on the standard data format mzML developed by HUPO-PSI. The original mzML controlled vocabulary was extended to include specific parameters of imaging mass spectrometry (such as x/y position and spatial resolution). The two files (XML and binary) are connected by offset values in the XML file and are unambiguously linked by a universally unique identifier. The resulting datasets are comparable in size to the raw data and the separate metadata file allows flexible handling of large datasets.Several imaging MS software tools already support imzML. This allows choosing from a (growing) number of processing tools. One is no longer limited to proprietary software, but is able to use the processing software which is best suited for a specific question or application. On the other hand, measurements from different instruments can be compared within one software application using identical settings for data processing. All necessary information for evaluating and implementing imzML can be found at http://www.imzML.org .

  18. Status of the Solar Mass Ejection Imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnston, J. C.; Radick, R. R.; Webb, D. F.

    2001-05-01

    The Solar Mass Ejection Imager (SMEI) is a proof-of-concept experiment designed to detect and track coronal mass ejections (CMEs) as they propagate from the Sun through interplanetary space to the Earth and beyond. SMEI will Image CMEs by sensing sunlight scattered from the free electrons in these structures (Thomson scattering). SMEI will be launched by a Titan II rocket into a circular, sun-synchronous (830 km) orbit in 2002 as part of the Space Test Program's CORIOLIS mission. SMEI will image the entire sky once per spacecraft orbit over a mission lifetime of three years. The major subsystems of SMEI are three electronic camera assemblies and a data-handling unit. Each camera consists of a baffle, a radiator, a bright object sensor, an electronics box, and a strongbox containing a shutter, optics and a CCD. Each camera images a 3x60 degree field. Together, they view a 180-degree slice of sky, and sweep over the entire sky once per orbit. SMEI's basic data product will be a 100-minute cadence of all-sky maps of heliospheric brightness, with stars removed, having an angular resolution of about one degree and a photometric precision of about 0.1%. Successful operation of SMEI will represent a major step in improving space weather forecasts. When combined with in-situ solar wind measurements from upstream monitors such as WIND and ACE, SMEI will provide one- to three-day predictions of impending geomagnetic storms at the Earth. SMEI will complement missions such as SoHO, GOES SXI, Solar-B, and STEREO by providing data relating solar drivers to terrestrial effects. Other benefits of SMEI will include observations of variable stars, extra-Solar planetary transits, novae and supernovae, comets and asteroids. The SMEI experiment is being designed and constructed by a team of scientists and engineers from the Air Force Research Laboratory, the University of Birmingham (UB) in the United Kingdom, the University of California at San Diego (UCSD), and Boston University. The

  19. Mass Spectrometry Imaging in Oncology Drug Discovery.

    PubMed

    Goodwin, R J A; Bunch, J; McGinnity, D F

    2017-01-01

    Over the last decade mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) has been integrated in to many areas of drug discovery and development. It can have significant impact in oncology drug discovery as it allows efficacy and safety of compounds to be assessed against the backdrop of the complex tumour microenvironment. We will discuss the roles of MSI in investigating compound and metabolite biodistribution and defining pharmacokinetic -pharmacodynamic relationships, analysis that is applicable to all drug discovery projects. We will then look more specifically at how MSI can be used to understand tumour metabolism and other applications specific to oncology research. This will all be described alongside the challenges of applying MSI to industry research with increased use of metrology for MSI. © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Imaging thermal plasma mass and velocity analyzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yau, Andrew W.; Howarth, Andrew

    2016-07-01

    We present the design and principle of operation of the imaging ion mass and velocity analyzer on the Enhanced Polar Outflow Probe (e-POP), which measures low-energy (1-90 eV/e) ion mass composition (1-40 AMU/e) and velocity distributions using a hemispherical electrostatic analyzer (HEA), a time-of-flight (TOF) gate, and a pair of toroidal electrostatic deflectors (TED). The HEA and TOF gate measure the energy-per-charge and azimuth of each detected ion and the ion transit time inside the analyzer, respectively, providing the 2-D velocity distribution of each major ionospheric ion species and resolving the minor ion species under favorable conditions. The TED are in front of the TOF gate and optionally sample ions at different elevation angles up to ±60°, for measurement of 3-D velocity distribution. We present examples of observation data to illustrate the measurement capability of the analyzer, and show the occurrence of enhanced densities of heavy "minor" O++, N+, and molecular ions and intermittent, high-velocity (a few km/s) upward and downward flowing H+ ions in localized regions of the quiet time topside high-latitude ionosphere.

  1. Tracking Coronal Mass Ejections with a Heliospheric Imager: Case Studies from the Solar Mass Ejection Imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnston, J. C.; Mizuno, D. R.; Webb, D. F.; Kuchar, T. A.; Howard, T. A.

    2005-05-01

    The Solar Mass Ejection Imager (SMEI) was launched on board the DoD Space Test Program's Coriolis satellite in January 2003. Two-thirds through its planned 3-year lifetime, SMEI has observed Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs), comets and asteroids as they move through the heliosphere. More than 140 CMEs have been detected with the SMEI instrument, including well-documented "halo" events that led to geomagnetic storm conditions on Earth. These observations demonstrate the potential of a heliospheric imager for space weather specification and prediction purposes. We present several case studies of CMEs as they propagate through the SOHO LASCO and SMEI fields of view, and examine SMEI's "hit" rate for detection of geoeffective CMEs.

  2. 3D Imaging by Mass Spectrometry: A New Frontier

    PubMed Central

    Seeley, Erin H.; Caprioli, Richard M.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Imaging mass spectrometry can generate three-dimensional volumes showing molecular distributions in an entire organ or animal through registration and stacking of serial tissue sections. Here we review the current state of 3D imaging mass spectrometry as well as provide insights and perspectives on the process of generating 3D mass spectral data along with a discussion of the process necessary to generate a 3D image volume. PMID:22276611

  3. Structurally selective imaging mass spectrometry by imaging ion mobility-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    McLean, John A; Fenn, Larissa S; Enders, Jeffrey R

    2010-01-01

    This chapter describes the utility of structurally based separations combined with imaging mass spectrometry (MS) by ion mobility-MS (IM-MS) approaches. The unique capabilities of combining rapid (mus-ms) IM separations with imaging MS are detailed for an audience ranging from new to potential practitioners in IM-MS technology. Importantly, imaging IM-MS provides the ability to rapidly separate and elucidate various types of endogenous and exogenous biomolecules (e.g., nucleotides, carbohydrates, peptides, and lipids), including isobaric species. Drift tube and traveling wave IM-MS instrumentation are described and specific protocols are presented for calculating ion-neutral collision cross sections (i.e., apparent ion surface area or structure) from experimentally obtained IM-MS data. Special emphasis is placed on the use of imaging IM-MS for the analysis of samples in life sciences research (e.g., thin tissue sections), including selective imaging for peptide/protein and lipid distributions. Future directions for rapid and multiplexed imaging IM-MS/MS are detailed.

  4. Mass Spectrometry Imaging of Complex Microbial Communities

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Conspectus In the two decades since mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) was first applied to visualize the distribution of peptides across biological tissues and cells, the technique has become increasingly effective and reliable. MSI excels at providing complementary information to existing methods for molecular analysis—such as genomics, transcriptomics, and metabolomics—and stands apart from other chemical imaging modalities through its capability to generate information that is simultaneously multiplexed and chemically specific. Today a diverse family of MSI approaches are applied throughout the scientific community to study the distribution of proteins, peptides, and small-molecule metabolites across many biological models. The inherent strengths of MSI make the technique valuable for studying microbial systems. Many microbes reside in surface-attached multicellular and multispecies communities, such as biofilms and motile colonies, where they work together to harness surrounding nutrients, fend off hostile organisms, and shield one another from adverse environmental conditions. These processes, as well as many others essential for microbial survival, are mediated through the production and utilization of a diverse assortment of chemicals. Although bacterial cells are generally only a few microns in diameter, the ecologies they influence can encompass entire ecosystems, and the chemical changes that they bring about can occur over time scales ranging from milliseconds to decades. Because of their incredible complexity, our understanding of and influence over microbial systems requires detailed scientific evaluations that yield both chemical and spatial information. MSI is well-positioned to fulfill these requirements. With small adaptations to existing methods, the technique can be applied to study a wide variety of chemical interactions, including those that occur inside single-species microbial communities, between cohabitating microbes, and between microbes

  5. Example-based segmentation for breast mass images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Qingying; Xu, Songhua; Luo, Xiaonan

    2013-03-01

    A new example-based mass segmentation algorithm is proposed for breast mass images. The training examples used in the new algorithm are prepared by three medical imaging professionals who manually outlined mass contours of 45 sample breast mass images. These manually segmented mass images are then partitioned into small regular grid cells, which are used as reference samples by the algorithm. Each time when the algorithm is applied to segment a previously unseen breast mass image, it first detects grid cell regions in the image that likely overlap with the underlying mass region. Upon identifying such candidate regions, the algorithm then locates the exact mass contour through an example based segmentation procedure where the algorithm retrieves, transfers, and re-applies the human expert knowledge regarding mass segmentation as encoded in the reference samples. The key advantage of our approach lies in its adaptability in tailoring to the skills and preferences of multiple experts through simply switching to a different corpus of human segmentation samples. To explore the effectiveness of the new approach, we comparatively evaluated the accuracy of the algorithm for mass segmentation against segmentation results both manually produced by several medical imaging professionals and automatically by a state-of-the-art level set based method. The comparison results demonstrate that the new algorithm achieves a higher accuracy than the level set based peer method with statistical significance.2

  6. A Multi-isotope Tracer Approach Linking Land Use With Carbon and Nitrogen Cycling in the San Joaquin River System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, M. B.; Kendall, C.; Silva, S. R.; Dahlgren, R. A.; Stringfellow, W. T.

    2008-12-01

    The San Joaquin River (SJR) is a large hypereutrophic river located in the Central Valley, California, a major agricultural region. Nutrient subsidies, algae, and other organic material from the San Joaquin River contribute to periods of low dissolved oxygen in the Stockton Deep Water Ship Channel, inhibiting salmon migration. We used a multi-isotope approach to link nitrate and particulate organic matter (POM) to different sources and related land uses. The isotope data was also used to better understand the physical and biological processes controlling the distribution of nitrate and POM throughout the river system. Samples collected from the mainstem SJR and tributaries twice-monthly to monthly between March 2005 and December 2007 were analyzed for nitrate, POM, and water isotopes. There are many land uses surrounding the SJR and its tributaries, including multiple types of agriculture, dairies, wetlands, and urban areas. Samples from SJR tributaries containing both major and minor contributions of wetland discharge generally had distinct nitrate and POM isotope signatures compared to other tributaries. Unique nitrate and POM isotope signatures associated with wetland discharges may reflect anaerobic biological processes occurring in flooded soils. For the mainstem SJR, we applied an isotope mass balance approach using nitrate and water isotopes to calculate the expected downstream isotope values based upon measured inputs from known water sources such as drains and tributaries. Differences between the calculated downstream isotope values and the measured values indicate locations and time periods when either biological processes such as algal uptake, or physical process such as the input of unidentified water sources, significantly altered the isotope signatures of water, POM, or nitrate within the SJR. This research will provide a better understanding of how different land uses affect the delivery of carbon and nitrogen to the SJR, and will provide a better

  7. Absorption Mode FT-ICR Mass Spectrometry Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Donald F.; Kilgour, David P.; Konijnenburg, Marco; O'Connor, Peter B.; Heeren, Ronald M.

    2013-12-03

    Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry offers the highest mass resolving power for molecular imaging experiments. This high mass resolving power ensures that closely spaced peaks at the same nominal mass are resolved for proper image generation. Typically higher magnetic fields are used to increase mass resolving power. However, a gain in mass resolving power can also be realized by phase correction of the data for absorption mode display. In addition to mass resolving power, absorption mode offers higher mass accuracy and signal-to-noise ratio over the conventional magnitude mode. Here we present the first use of absorption mode for Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry imaging. The Autophaser algorithm is used to phase correct each spectrum (pixel) in the image and then these parameters are used by the Chameleon work-flow based data processing software to generate absorption mode ?Datacubes? for image and spectral viewing. Absorption mode reveals new mass and spatial features that are not resolved in magnitude mode and results in improved selected ion image contrast.

  8. Mass Spectrometry Imaging: facts and perspectives from a non-mass spectrometrist point of view.

    PubMed

    Cameron, L C

    2012-08-01

    Mass Spectrometry Imaging (MSI, also called Imaging Mass Spectrometry) can be used to map molecules according to their chemical abundance and spatial distribution. This technique is not widely used in mass spectrometry circles and is barely known by other scientists. In this review, a brief overview of the mass spectrometer hardware used in MSI and some of the possible applications of this powerful technique are discussed. I intend to call attention to MSI uses from cell biology to histopathology for biological scientists who have little background in mass spectrometry. MSI facts and perspectives are presented from a non-mass spectrometrist point of view.

  9. Mass preserving registration for heart MR images.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Lei; Haker, Steven; Tannenbaum, Allen

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents a new algorithm for non-rigid registration between two doubly-connected regions. Our algorithm is based on harmonic analysis and the theory of optimal mass transport. It assumes an underlining continuum model, in which the total amount of mass is exactly preserved during the transformation of tissues. We use a finite element approach to numerically implement the algorithm.

  10. Multimodality imaging of placental masses: a pictorial review.

    PubMed

    Jha, Priyanka; Paroder, Viktoriya; Mar, Winnie; Horowtiz, Jeanne M; Poder, Liina

    2016-12-01

    Placental masses are uncommonly identified at the time of obstetric ultrasound evaluation. Understanding the pathologies presenting as placental masses is key for providing a differential diagnosis and guiding subsequent management, which may include additional imaging with magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. Potential benign entities include chorioangiomas and teratomas. Larger chorioangiomas can cause fetal cardiovascular issues from volume overload. Placental mesenchymal dysplasia has an association with fetal anomalies and detailed fetal evaluation should be performed when it is suspected. Identifying other cystic masses such as partial and complete moles is crucial to prevent erroneous pregnancy termination. This review addresses normal imaging appearance of the placenta on ultrasound and MR imaging and describes various trophoblastic and nontrophoblastic placental masses. Potential placental mass mimics including uterine contractions and thrombo-hematomas are also presented.

  11. Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry Imaging of Dictyostelium discoideum Aggregation Streams

    SciTech Connect

    Debord, J. Daniel; Smith, Donald F.; Anderton, Christopher R.; Heeren, Ronald M.; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana; Gomer, Richard H.; Fernandez-Lima, Francisco A.

    2014-06-09

    High resolution imaging mass spectrometry could become a valuable tool for cell and developmental biology, but both, high spatial and mass spectral resolution are needed to enable this. In this report, we employed Bi3 bombardment time-of-flight (Bi3 ToF-SIMS) and C60 bombardment Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance secondary ion mass spectrometry (C60 FTICR-SIMS) to image Dictyostelium discoideum aggregation streams. Nearly 300 lipid species were identified from the aggregation streams. High resolution mass spectrometry imaging (FTICR-SIMS) enabled the generation of multiple molecular ion maps at the nominal mass level and provided good coverage for fatty acyls, prenol lipids, and sterol lipids. The comparison of Bi3 ToF-SIMS and C60 FTICR-SIMS suggested that while the first provides fast, high spatial resolution molecular ion images, the chemical complexity of biological samples warrants the use of high resolution analyzers for accurate ion identification.

  12. Advances in imaging secondary ion mass spectrometry for biological samples

    SciTech Connect

    Boxer, Steven G.; Kraft, Mary L.; Weber, Peter K.

    2008-12-16

    Imaging mass spectrometry combines the power of mass spectrometry to identify complex molecules based on mass with sample imaging. Recent advances in secondary ion mass spectrometry have improved sensitivity and spatial resolution, so that these methods have the potential to bridge between high-resolution structures obtained by X-ray crystallography and cyro-electron microscopy and ultrastructure visualized by conventional light microscopy. Following background information on the method and instrumentation, we address the key issue of sample preparation. Because mass spectrometry is performed in high vacuum, it is essential to preserve the lateral organization of the sample while removing bulk water, and this has been a major barrier for applications to biological systems. Furthermore, recent applications of imaging mass spectrometry to cell biology, microbial communities, and biosynthetic pathways are summarized briefly, and studies of biological membrane organization are described in greater depth.

  13. Advances in imaging secondary ion mass spectrometry for biological samples

    DOE PAGES

    Boxer, Steven G.; Kraft, Mary L.; Weber, Peter K.

    2008-12-16

    Imaging mass spectrometry combines the power of mass spectrometry to identify complex molecules based on mass with sample imaging. Recent advances in secondary ion mass spectrometry have improved sensitivity and spatial resolution, so that these methods have the potential to bridge between high-resolution structures obtained by X-ray crystallography and cyro-electron microscopy and ultrastructure visualized by conventional light microscopy. Following background information on the method and instrumentation, we address the key issue of sample preparation. Because mass spectrometry is performed in high vacuum, it is essential to preserve the lateral organization of the sample while removing bulk water, and this hasmore » been a major barrier for applications to biological systems. Furthermore, recent applications of imaging mass spectrometry to cell biology, microbial communities, and biosynthetic pathways are summarized briefly, and studies of biological membrane organization are described in greater depth.« less

  14. High Mass Accuracy and High Mass Resolving Power FT-ICR Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry for Biological Tissue Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Donald F.; Kiss, Andras; Leach, Franklin E.; Robinson, Errol W.; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana; Heeren, Ronald M.

    2013-07-01

    Biological tissue imaging by secondary ion mass spectrometry has seen rapid development with the commercial availability of polyatomic primary ion sources. Endogenous lipids and other small bio-molecules can now be routinely mapped on the micrometer scale. Such experiments are typically performed on time-of-flight mass spectrometers for high sensitivity and high repetition rate imaging. However, such mass analyzers lack the mass resolving power to ensure separation of isobaric ions and the mass accuracy for exact mass elemental formula assignment. We have recently reported a secondary ion mass spectrometer with the combination of a C60 primary ion gun with a Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer (FT-ICR MS) for high mass resolving power, high mass measurement accuracy and tandem mass spectrometry capabilities. In this work, high specificity and high sensitivity secondary ion FT-ICR MS was applied to chemical imaging of biological tissue. An entire rat brain tissue was measured with 150 μm spatial resolution (75 μm primary ion spot size) with mass resolving power (m/Δm50%) of 67,500 (at m/z 750) and root-mean-square measurement accuracy less than two parts-per-million for intact phospholipids, small molecules and fragments. For the first time, ultra-high mass resolving power SIMS has been demonstrated, with m/Δm50% > 3,000,000. Higher spatial resolution capabilities of the platform were tested at a spatial resolution of 20 μm. The results represent order of magnitude improvements in mass resolving power and mass measurement accuracy for SIMS imaging and the promise of the platform for ultra-high mass resolving power and high spatial resolution imaging.

  15. Mass spectrometry imaging for in situ kinetic histochemistry

    PubMed Central

    Louie, Katherine B.; Bowen, Benjamin P.; McAlhany, Stephanie; Huang, Yurong; Price, John C.; Mao, Jian-hua; Hellerstein, Marc; Northen, Trent R.

    2013-01-01

    Tissues are composed of diverse cell subpopulations each with distinct metabolic characteristics that influence overall behavior. Unfortunately, traditional histopathology imaging techniques are ‘blind’ to the spatially ordered metabolic dynamics within tissue. While mass spectrometry imaging enables spatial mapping of molecular composition, resulting images are only a static snapshot in time of molecules involved in highly dynamic processes; kinetic information of flux through metabolic pathways is lacking. To address this limitation, we developed kinetic mass spectrometry imaging (kMSI), a novel technique integrating soft desorption/ionization mass spectrometry with clinically accepted in vivo metabolic labeling of tissue with deuterium to generate images of kinetic information of biological processes. Applied to a tumor, kMSI revealed heterogeneous spatial distributions of newly synthesized versus pre-existing lipids, with altered lipid synthesis patterns distinguishing region-specific intratumor subpopulations. Images also enabled identification and correlation of metabolic activity of specific lipids found in tumor regions of varying grade. PMID:23584513

  16. Mass Preserving Registration for Heart MR Images

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Lei; Haker, Steven; Tannenbaum, Allen

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a new algorithm for non-rigid registration between two doubly-connected regions. Our algorithm is based on harmonic analysis and the theory of optimal mass transport. It assumes an underlining continuum model, in which the total amount of mass is exactly preserved during the transformation of tissues. We use a finite element approach to numerically implement the algorithm. PMID:16685954

  17. An image morphing technique based on optimal mass preserving mapping.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Lei; Yang, Yan; Haker, Steven; Tannenbaum, Allen

    2007-06-01

    Image morphing, or image interpolation in the time domain, deals with the metamorphosis of one image into another. In this paper, a new class of image morphing algorithms is proposed based on the theory of optimal mass transport. The L(2) mass moving energy functional is modified by adding an intensity penalizing term, in order to reduce the undesired double exposure effect. It is an intensity-based approach and, thus, is parameter free. The optimal warping function is computed using an iterative gradient descent approach. This proposed morphing method is also extended to doubly connected domains using a harmonic parameterization technique, along with finite-element methods.

  18. An Image Morphing Technique Based on Optimal Mass Preserving Mapping

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Lei; Yang, Yan; Haker, Steven; Tannenbaum, Allen

    2013-01-01

    Image morphing, or image interpolation in the time domain, deals with the metamorphosis of one image into another. In this paper, a new class of image morphing algorithms is proposed based on the theory of optimal mass transport. The L2 mass moving energy functional is modified by adding an intensity penalizing term, in order to reduce the undesired double exposure effect. It is an intensity-based approach and, thus, is parameter free. The optimal warping function is computed using an iterative gradient descent approach. This proposed morphing method is also extended to doubly connected domains using a harmonic parameterization technique, along with finite-element methods. PMID:17547128

  19. Mass spectrometry imaging, an emerging technology in neuropsychopharmacology.

    PubMed

    Shariatgorji, Mohammadreza; Svenningsson, Per; Andrén, Per E

    2014-01-01

    Mass spectrometry imaging is a powerful tool for directly determining the distribution of proteins, peptides, lipids, neurotransmitters, metabolites and drugs in neural tissue sections in situ. Molecule-specific imaging can be achieved using various ionization techniques that are suited to different applications but which all yield data with high mass accuracies and spatial resolutions. The ability to simultaneously obtain images showing the distributions of chemical species ranging from metal ions to macromolecules makes it possible to explore the chemical organization of a sample and to correlate the results obtained with specific anatomical features. The imaging of biomolecules has provided new insights into multiple neurological diseases, including Parkinson's and Alzheimer's disease. Mass spectrometry imaging can also be used in conjunction with other imaging techniques in order to identify correlations between changes in the distribution of important chemical species and other changes in the properties of the tissue. Here we review the applications of mass spectrometry imaging in neuroscience research and discuss its potential. The results presented demonstrate that mass spectrometry imaging is a useful experimental method with diverse applications in neuroscience.

  20. Mass Spectrometry Imaging, an Emerging Technology in Neuropsychopharmacology

    PubMed Central

    Shariatgorji, Mohammadreza; Svenningsson, Per; Andrén, Per E

    2014-01-01

    Mass spectrometry imaging is a powerful tool for directly determining the distribution of proteins, peptides, lipids, neurotransmitters, metabolites and drugs in neural tissue sections in situ. Molecule-specific imaging can be achieved using various ionization techniques that are suited to different applications but which all yield data with high mass accuracies and spatial resolutions. The ability to simultaneously obtain images showing the distributions of chemical species ranging from metal ions to macromolecules makes it possible to explore the chemical organization of a sample and to correlate the results obtained with specific anatomical features. The imaging of biomolecules has provided new insights into multiple neurological diseases, including Parkinson's and Alzheimer's disease. Mass spectrometry imaging can also be used in conjunction with other imaging techniques in order to identify correlations between changes in the distribution of important chemical species and other changes in the properties of the tissue. Here we review the applications of mass spectrometry imaging in neuroscience research and discuss its potential. The results presented demonstrate that mass spectrometry imaging is a useful experimental method with diverse applications in neuroscience. PMID:23966069

  1. Imaging mass spectrometry with nuclear microprobes for biological applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakata, Y.; Yamada, H.; Honda, Y.; Ninomiya, S.; Seki, T.; Aoki, T.; Matsuo, J.

    2009-06-01

    A mass spectrometric technique using nuclear microprobes is presented in this paper for biological applications. In recent years, imaging mass spectrometry has become an increasingly important technique for visualizing the spatial distribution of molecular species in biological tissues and cells. However, due to low yields of large molecular ions, the conventional secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS), that uses keV primary ion beams, is typically applied for imaging of either elements or low mass compounds. In this study, we performed imaging mass spectrometry using MeV ion beams collimated to about 10 μm, and successfully obtained molecular ion images from plant and animal cell sections. The molecular ion imaging of the pollen section showed high intensities of PO3- ions in the pollen cytoplasm, compared to the pollen wall, and indicated the heterogeneous distribution in the cytoplasm. The 3T3-L1 cell image revealed the high intensity of PO3- ions, in particular from the cell nucleus. The result showed that not only the individual cell, but also the cell nucleus could be identified with the present imaging technique.

  2. Mesenteric lymphangioma mimicking a cystic ovarian mass on imaging.

    PubMed

    Hitzerd, Emilie; van Hamont, Dennis; Pijnenborg, Johanna M A

    2016-02-01

    Pelvic cystic masses are frequently observed in women. Most lesions are benign and of ovarian origin. However, non-ovarian lesions can be easily confused with cystic ovarian masses on imaging, which hampers diagnostic and therapeutic management. In this report, a rare case of mesenteric lymphangioma mimicking an ovarian cystic mass, discovered as an incidental finding on orthopaedic MRI in an adult female, is presented. The report highlights the sometimes difficult diagnostic process of pelvic cystic masses, due to an extensive differential diagnosis and the fact that imaging is often inconclusive. Even though most cystic masses are of ovarian origin, non-ovarian causes can mimic ovarian masses and should be considered as differential diagnoses. Surgical exploration may be necessary to exclude malignant causes. 2016 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  3. Creating images by adding masses to gravitational point lenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sète, Olivier; Luce, Robert; Liesen, Jörg

    2015-04-01

    A well-studied maximal gravitational point lens construction of S. H. Rhie produces images of a light source using deflector masses. The construction arises from a circular, symmetric deflector configuration on masses (producing only images) by adding a tiny mass in the center of the other mass positions (and reducing all the other masses a little bit). In a recent paper we studied this "image creating effect" from a purely mathematical point of view (Sète, Luce & Liesen, Comput. Methods Funct. Theory 15(1), 2014). Here we discuss a few consequences of our findings for gravitational microlensing models. We present a complete characterization of the effect of adding small masses to these point lens models, with respect to the number of images. In particular, we give several examples of maximal lensing models that are different from Rhie's construction and that do not share its highly symmetric appearance. We give generally applicable conditions that allow the construction of maximal point lenses on masses from maximal lenses on masses.

  4. Imaging Teachers: In Fact and in the Mass Media.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reyes, Xae Alicia; Rios, Diana I.

    2003-01-01

    The impact of mass media on public images of teachers and students is considered in a dialogue between two educational and mass media researchers. Stereotypes in films, such as teacher-savior and student-failure, and abundant reports about Latino dropout rates and low academic achievement impact teachers and the public, who accept negative images…

  5. The Multi-Isotope Process (MIP) Monitor Project: FY13 Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Meier, David E.; Coble, Jamie B.; Jordan, David V.; Mcdonald, Luther W.; Forrester, Joel B.; Schwantes, Jon M.; Unlu, Kenan; Landsberger, Sheldon; Bender, Sarah; Dayman, Kenneth J.; Reilly, Dallas D.

    2013-09-01

    The Multi-Isotope Process (MIP) Monitor provides an efficient approach to monitoring the process conditions in reprocessing facilities in support of the goal of “… (minimization of) the risks of nuclear proliferation and terrorism.” The MIP Monitor measures the distribution of the radioactive isotopes in product and waste streams of a nuclear reprocessing facility. These isotopes are monitored online by gamma spectrometry and compared, in near-real-time, to spectral patterns representing “normal” process conditions using multivariate analysis and pattern recognition algorithms. The combination of multivariate analysis and gamma spectroscopy allows us to detect small changes in the gamma spectrum, which may indicate changes in process conditions. By targeting multiple gamma-emitting indicator isotopes, the MIP Monitor approach is compatible with the use of small, portable, relatively high-resolution gamma detectors that may be easily deployed throughout an existing facility. The automated multivariate analysis can provide a level of data obscurity, giving a built-in information barrier to protect sensitive or proprietary operational data. Proof-of-concept simulations and experiments have been performed in previous years to demonstrate the validity of this tool in a laboratory setting for systems representing aqueous reprocessing facilities. However, pyroprocessing is emerging as an alternative to aqueous reprocessing techniques.

  6. The Multi-Isotope Process Monitor Project: FY11 Progress and Accomplishments

    SciTech Connect

    Orton, Christopher R.; Fraga, Carlos G.; Hayes, John W.; Schwantes, Jon M.; Bender, Sarah E.; Unlu, Kenan; Dayman, Kenneth J.; Schreiber, S. S.; Landsberger, Sheldon

    2012-08-01

    Summary The Multi-Isotope Process (MIP) Monitor represents a potentially new and efficient approach to monitoring process conditions in reprocessing facilities with the high-level goal of aiding in the “...(minimization of) the risks of nuclear proliferation and terrorism” (Office of Technology Assessment 1995). This approach relies on multivariate analysis and gamma spectroscopy of spent fuel product and waste streams to automatically and simultaneously monitor a variety of process conditions (e.g., acid concentrations, burnup, cooling time, etc.) in near real-time (NRT). While the conceptual basis for the MIP Monitor has been shown to be effective in an aqueous reprocessing system, the fundamental approach should also be viable in a pyro-processing recycle system. The MIP Monitor may be calibrated to provide online quantitative information about process variables for process control or domestic safeguards applications; or it can simply monitor, with a built-in information barrier, for off-normal conditions in process streams, making the approach well-suited for applications were it is necessary to respect proprietary information or for international safeguards applications. Proof-of-concept simulations and experiments were performed in previous years demonstrating the validity of this tool in a laboratory setting. This report details follow-on research and development efforts sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy Fuel Cycle Research and Development (FCR&D) related to the MIP Monitor for fiscal year 2011 (FY11).

  7. Soluble salt sources in medieval porous limestone sculptures: a multi-isotope (N, O, S) approach.

    PubMed

    Kloppmann, W; Rolland, O; Proust, E; Montech, A T

    2014-02-01

    The sources and mechanisms of soluble salt uptake by porous limestone and the associated degradation patterns were investigated for the life-sized 15th century "entombment of Christ" sculpture group located in Pont-à-Mousson, France, using a multi-isotope approach on sulphates (δ(34)S and δ(18)O) and nitrates (δ(15)N and δ(18)O). The sculpture group, near the border of the Moselle River, is within the potential reach of capillary rise from the alluvial aquifer. Chemical analyses show a vertical zonation of soluble salts with a predominance of sulphates in the lower parts of the statues where crumbling and blistering prevail, and higher concentrations of nitrates and chloride in the high parts affected by powdering and efflorescence. Isotope fingerprints of sulphates suggest a triple origin: (1) the lower parts are dominated by capillary rise of dissolved sulphate from the Moselle water with characteristic Keuper evaporite signatures that progressively decreases with height; (2) in the higher parts affected by powdering the impact of atmospheric sulphur becomes detectable; and (3) locally, plaster reparations impact the neighbouring limestone through dissolution and re-precipitation of gypsum. Nitrogen and oxygen isotopes suggest an organic origin of nitrates in all samples. N isotope signatures are compatible with those measured in the alluvial aquifer of the Moselle River further downstream. This indicates contamination by sewage or organic fertilisers. Significant isotopic contrasts are observed between the different degradation features depending on the height and suggest historical changes of nitrate sources. © 2013.

  8. Multi-Isotope Process (MIP) Monitor: A Near-Real-Time Monitor For Reprocessing Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Schwantes, Jon M.; Douglas, Matthew; Orton, Christopher R.; Fraga, Carlos G.; Christensen, Richard

    2008-06-01

    INTRODUCTION The threat of protracted diversion of Pu from commercial reprocessing operations is perhaps the greatest concern to national and international agencies tasked with safeguarding these facilities. While it is generally understood that a method for direct monitoring of process on-line and in near-real time (NRT) would be the best defense against protracted diversion scenarios, an effective method with these qualities has yet to be developed. Here, we attempt to bridge this gap by proposing an on-line NRT process monitoring method that should be sensitive to minor alterations in process conditions and compatible with small, easily deployable, detection systems. This Approach is known as the Multi-Isotope Process (MIP) Monitor and involves the determination and recognition of the contaminant pattern within a process stream for a suite of indicator (radioactive) elements present in the spent fuel as a function of process variables. Utilization of a suite of radio-elements, including ones with multiple oxidation states, decreases the likelihood that attempts to divert Pu by altering the ReDox environment within the process would go undetected. In addition, by identifying gamma-emitting indicator isotopes, this Approach might eliminate the need for bulky neutron detection systems, relying instead on small, portable, high-resolution gamma detectors easily deployable throughout the facility.

  9. The Multi-Isotope Process Monitor: Multivariate Analysis of Gamma Spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Orton, Christopher R.; Rutherford, Crystal E.; Fraga, Carlos G.; Schwantes, Jon M.

    2011-10-30

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has established international safeguards standards for fissionable material at spent fuel reprocessing plants to ensure that significant quantities of nuclear material are not diverted from these facilities. Currently, methods to verify material control and accountancy (MC&A) at these facilities require time-consuming and resource-intensive destructive assay (DA). The time delay between sampling and subsequent DA provides a potential opportunity to divert the material out of the appropriate chemical stream. Leveraging new on-line nondestructive assay (NDA) techniques in conjunction with the traditional and highly precise DA methods may provide a more timely, cost-effective and resource efficient means for MC&A verification at such facilities. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is developing on-line NDA process monitoring technologies, including the Multi-Isotope Process (MIP) Monitor. The MIP Monitor uses gamma spectroscopy and pattern recognition software to identify off-normal conditions in process streams. Recent efforts have been made to explore the basic limits of using multivariate analysis techniques on gamma-ray spectra. This paper will provide an overview of the methods and report our on-going efforts to develop and demonstrate the technology.

  10. Identification of the geographical place of origin of an unidentified individual by multi-isotope analysis.

    PubMed

    Font, Laura; van der Peijl, Gerard; van Leuwen, Carina; van Wetten, Isis; Davies, Gareth R

    2015-01-01

    A multi-isotope investigation (Sr and Pb isotopes and δ18O, δ13C and δ15N) was applied to bone and teeth from an unidentified male found drowned in the"IJ" Ruyterkade in Amsterdam, The Netherlands in March of 1999. The individual remained unidentified until mid 2013, after the isotope study was completed. Coupled δ13C and δ15N values in bone collagen recovered from rib and femur are consistent with an omnivore living in a region where C3-type diet dominates (i.e. Europe). Integrated Sr and Pb isotopes and δ18O values in canine and third molar teeth and femur and rib bone data exclude extended residence in north-west Europe and particularly The Netherlands. Characteristic Pb isotope ratios coupled with inferred δ18O values of drinking water argue for a most probable place of origin for the unidentified individual in west and south Poland, south-east Slovakia and the region of Ukraine-Romania-Bulgaria, specifically the region associated with the Carpathian Mountains. Independent of the isotope study, the Cold Case Team made a positive identification with an individual from south-west Poland, validating the results of the multiple-isotopic approach.

  11. Method for detecting a mass density image of an object

    DOEpatents

    Wernick, Miles N.; Yang, Yongyi

    2008-12-23

    A method for detecting a mass density image of an object. An x-ray beam is transmitted through the object and a transmitted beam is emitted from the object. The transmitted beam is directed at an angle of incidence upon a crystal analyzer. A diffracted beam is emitted from the crystal analyzer onto a detector and digitized. A first image of the object is detected from the diffracted beam emitted from the crystal analyzer when positioned at a first angular position. A second image of the object is detected from the diffracted beam emitted from the crystal analyzer when positioned at a second angular position. A refraction image is obtained and a regularized mathematical inversion algorithm is applied to the refraction image to obtain a mass density image.

  12. Radiological reasoning: imaging characterization of bilateral adnexal masses.

    PubMed

    Lee, Susanna I

    2006-09-01

    A 46-year-old woman presented with bilateral adnexal masses on pelvic sonography, a complex cystic mass on the right, and a homogeneously hypoechoic, solid-appearing mass on the left. Pelvic MRI showed a T1 hypointense, T2 hyperintense, nonenhancing mass in the right ovary and a homogeneously T1 hyperintense lesion with mixed T2 signal in the left ovary. Fat-saturated T1-weighted sequences showed the left ovarian lesion to be an endometrioma containing a high concentration of hemoglobin breakdown products and revealed other endometriotic implants in the right ovary, broad ligament, and cul-de-sac. Follow-up pelvic sonography 9 weeks later showed resolution of the right complex cystic ovarian mass, indicating that it was a physiologic hemorrhagic cyst. Imaging features of benign and malignant ovarian masses overlap. If imaging is inconclusive in characterizing an adnexal mass as benign, the mass will be resected rather than followed up because of the concern for a rapidly growing ovarian cancer. Thus, the goal of imaging is to identify unequivocally the benign lesions that can be left untreated. Pelvic MRI provides a powerful adjunct to pelvic sonography in characterizing adnexal masses as benign.

  13. Determination of left ventricular mass through SPECT imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Zarate-Morales, A.; Rodriguez-Villafuerte, M.; Martinez-Rodriguez, F.; Arevila-Ceballos, N.

    1998-08-28

    An edge detection algorithm has been applied to estimate left ventricular (LV) mass from single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) thallium-201 images. The algorithm was validated using SPECT images of a phantom. The algorithm was applied to 20 patient studies from the Hospital de Cardiologia, Centro Medico Nacional Siglo XXI. Left ventricular masses derived from the stress and redistribution studies were highly correlated (r=0.96). The average LV masses obtained were 162{+-}37 g and 169{+-}34 g in the redistribution and stress studies, respectively.

  14. Determination of left ventricular mass through SPECT imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zárate-Morales, A.; Rodríguez-Villafuerte, M.; Martínez-Rodríguez, F.; Arévila-Ceballos, N.

    1998-08-01

    An edge detection algorithm has been applied to estimate left ventricular (LV) mass from single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) thallium-201 images. The algorithm was validated using SPECT images of a phantom. The algorithm was applied to 20 patient studies from the Hospital de Cardiologia, Centro Médico Nacional Siglo XXI. Left ventricular masses derived from the stress and redistribution studies were highly correlated (r=0.96). The average LV masses obtained were 162±37 g and 169±34 g in the redistribution and stress studies, respectively.

  15. Molecular mass spectrometry imaging in biomedical and life science research.

    PubMed

    Pól, Jaroslav; Strohalm, Martin; Havlíček, Vladimír; Volný, Michael

    2010-11-01

    This review describes the current state of mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) in life sciences. A brief overview of mass spectrometry principles is presented followed by a thorough introduction to the MSI workflows, principles and areas of application. Three major desorption-ionization techniques used in MSI, namely, secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS), matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI), and desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) are described, and biomedical and life science imaging applications of each ionization technique are reviewed. A separate section is devoted to data handling and current challenges and future perspectives are briefly discussed at the end.

  16. Renal masses in children. An integrated imaging approach to diagnosis

    SciTech Connect

    Wolfson, B.J.; Gainey, M.A.; Faerber, E.N.; Capitanio, M.A.

    1985-11-01

    In view of the continuing technologic advancements in the development and availability of diagnostic imaging modalities, it is appropriate to assess periodically the currently accepted approaches to the evaluation of renal masses in children. The roles, advantages, and disadvantages of plain film, intravenous urography, ultrasonography, radionuclide scintigraphy, computed tomography, angiography, and magnetic resonance imaging in the approach to the evaluation of renal masses in children are discussed. An integrated imaging approach that provides the most accurate and necessary information for diagnosis and treatment is recommended. 70 references.

  17. Mass Spectrometry-Based Tissue Imaging of Small Molecules

    PubMed Central

    Ferguson, Carly N.; Fowler, Joseph W.M.; Waxer, Jonathan F.; Gatti, Richard A.; Loo, Joseph A.

    2014-01-01

    Mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) of tissue samples is a promising analytical tool that has quickly become associated with biomedical and pharmacokinetic studies. It eliminates several labor-intensive protocols associated with more classical imaging techniques, and provides accurate, histological data at a rapid pace. Because mass spectrometry is used as the readout, MSI can be applied to almost any molecule, especially those that are biologically relevant. Many examples of its utility in the study of peptides and proteins have been reported; here we discuss its value in the mass range of small molecules. We explore its success and potential in the analysis of lipids, medicinals, and metal-based compounds by featuring representative studies from mass spectrometry imaging laboratories around the globe. PMID:24952187

  18. Mass spectrometry imaging and profiling of single cells

    PubMed Central

    Lanni, Eric J.; Rubakhin, Stanislav S.; Sweedler, Jonathan V.

    2012-01-01

    Mass spectrometry imaging and profiling of individual cells and subcellular structures provide unique analytical capabilities for biological and biomedical research, including determination of the biochemical heterogeneity of cellular populations and intracellular localization of pharmaceuticals. Two mass spectrometry technologies—secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) and matrix assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI MS)—are most often used in micro-bioanalytical investigations. Recent advances in ion probe technologies have increased the dynamic range and sensitivity of analyte detection by SIMS, allowing two- and three-dimensional localization of analytes in a variety of cells. SIMS operating in the mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) mode can routinely reach spatial resolutions at the submicron level; therefore, it is frequently used in studies of the chemical composition of subcellular structures. MALDI MS offers a large mass range and high sensitivity of analyte detection. It has been successfully applied in a variety of single-cell and organelle profiling studies. Innovative instrumentation such as scanning microprobe MALDI and mass microscope spectrometers enable new subcellular MSI measurements. Other approaches for MS-based chemical imaging and profiling include those based on near-field laser ablation and inductively-coupled plasma MS analysis, which offer complementary capabilities for subcellular chemical imaging and profiling. PMID:22498881

  19. Fluxomics: mass spectrometry versus quantitative imaging

    PubMed Central

    Wiechert, Wolfgang; Schweissgut, Oliver; Takanaga, Hitomi; Frommer, Wolf B

    2010-01-01

    The recent development of analytic high-throughput technologies enables us to take a bird’s view of how metabolism is regulated in real time. We have known for a long time that metabolism is highly regulated at all levels, including transcriptional, posttranslational and allosteric controls. Flux through a metabolic or signaling pathway is determined by the activity of its individual components. Fluxomics aims to define the genes involved in regulation by following the flux. Two technologies are used to monitor fluxes. Pulse labeling of the organism or cell with a tracer, such as 13C, followed by mass spectrometric analysis of the partitioning of label into different compounds provides an efficient tool to study flux and to compare the effect of mutations on flux. The second approach is based on the use of flux sensors, proteins that respond with a conformational change to ligand binding. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) detects the conformational change and serves as a proxy for ligand concentration. In contrast to the mass spectrometry assays, FRET nanosensors monitor only a single compound. Both methods provide high time resolution. The major advantages of FRET nanosensors are that they yield data with cellular and subcellular resolution and the method is minimally invasive. PMID:17481942

  20. Fluxomics: mass spectrometry versus quantitative imaging.

    PubMed

    Wiechert, Wolfgang; Schweissgut, Oliver; Takanaga, Hitomi; Frommer, Wolf B

    2007-06-01

    The recent development of analytic high-throughput technologies enables us to take a bird's view of how metabolism is regulated in real time. We have known for a long time that metabolism is highly regulated at all levels, including transcriptional, posttranslational and allosteric controls. Flux through a metabolic or signaling pathway is determined by the activity of its individual components. Fluxomics aims to define the genes involved in regulation by following the flux. Two technologies are used to monitor fluxes. Pulse labeling of the organism or cell with a tracer, such as 13C, followed by mass spectrometric analysis of the partitioning of label into different compounds provides an efficient tool to study flux and to compare the effect of mutations on flux. The second approach is based on the use of flux sensors, proteins that respond with a conformational change to ligand binding. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) detects the conformational change and serves as a proxy for ligand concentration. In contrast to the mass spectrometry assays, FRET nanosensors monitor only a single compound. Both methods provide high time resolution. The major advantages of FRET nanosensors are that they yield data with cellular and subcellular resolution and the method is minimally invasive.

  1. Phase-imaging Mass Measurements with the Canadian Penning Trap Mass Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orford, Rodney; Clark, Jason A.; Nystrom, Andrew; Savard, Guy; Aprahamian, Ani; Brodeur, Maxime; Buchinger, Fritz; Burdette, Daniel; Burkey, Mary T.; Hirsh, Tsviki Y.; Kelly, James; Lascar, Daniel; Ling-Ying, Lin; Morgan, Graeme E.; Sharma, Kumar S.; Siegl, Kevin

    The Canadian Penning trap mass spectrometer (CPT) is currently dedicated to making precision mass measurements of neutron-rich nuclei approaching the astrophysical r-process path. Over the past two years, upgrades to CARIBU and to the detector system of the CPT have been made in order to probe shorter-lived nuclei further from stability. The installation of the MR-TOF and the commissioning of the modern phase-imaging mass measurement technique at the CPT are reported.

  2. The Automatic Detection of Coronal Mass Ejections Using the Solar Mass Ejection Imager

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-10-30

    Res., 112, A09103, doi: 10.1029/2007JA012358, 2007. Low, B.C., Solar activity and the corona , Solar Phys. 167, p217, 1996. Robbrecht, E., and D...AFRL-RV-HA-TR-2009-1104 Q- o o o p o The Automatic Detection of Coronal Mass Ejections Using the Solar Mass Ejection Imager Timothy A. Howard... Solar Mass Ejection Imager 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6340IF 6. AUTHORS Timothy A. Howard S. James Tappin

  3. Observations of Low-Lying Electronic States of NiD, and Multi-Isotope Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbasi, Mahdi; Shayesteh, Alireza; Crozet, Patrick; Ross, Amanda J.

    2017-06-01

    Resolved laser induced fluorescence spectra of NiD, recorded at Doppler resolution between 11500 and 18000 {cm^{-1}}, have defined some 200 term energies in two of the three strongly-interacting, low-lying ({X ^2Δ}, {W ^2Π} and {V ^2Σ^+}) states of NiD associated with an Ni{^+(3d^9})-D^- configuration. Our observations span v = 0 - 5 in the lowest spin-orbit component of the ground state, {X_1 ^2Δ_{5/2} }, v = 0 - 3 in {X_2 ^2Δ_{3/2} } and v = 0 - 1 in {W_1 ^2Π_{3/2} }, the lower component of the {W ^2Π } state. Spin-orbit and rotation-electronic interactions are strong in NiD. Large parity splittings are seen, due to interactions with the unobserved ^2Σ^+ state. We have attempted a global, multi-isotope fit to reproduce observed term energies up to 6000 {cm^{-1}} in NiD and ^{58,60,62}NiH, in an extension of the `Supermultiplet' model proposed by Gray and co-workers, because fits with NiD term energies alone failed to converge to sensible solutions. Dunham-type parameters have been used to represent the unperturbed X ^2Δ, W ^2Π and V ^2Σ^+ states, with off-diagonal matrix elements (treating spin-orbit, L- and S-uncoupling effects) based on Ni^+ atomic properties. Some electronic Born-Oppenheimer breakdown terms were included in the model. The spectra show emission from several excited states close to the unique level populated by the single-mode laser. Bands of collisionally-induced fluorescence identify three levels (A (Ω = 5/2) v = 1, E (Ω = 3/2) v = 1 and I (Ω = 3/2) v = 0) that have not been reported before. Gray, Li, Nelis, and Field, {J. Chem. Phys. 95, 7164 (1991)

  4. The Multi-Isotope Process (MIP) Monitor Project: FY12 Progress and Accomplishments

    SciTech Connect

    Coble, Jamie B.; Orton, Christopher R.; Jordan, David V.; Schwantes, Jon M.; Bender, Sarah; Dayman, Kenneth J.; Unlu, Kenan; Landsberger, Sheldon

    2012-09-27

    The Multi-Isotope Process (MIP) Monitor, being developed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), provides an efficient approach to monitoring the process conditions in reprocessing facilities in support of the goal of "...(minimization of) the risks of nuclear proliferation and terrorism." The MIP Monitor measures distributions of a suite of indicator (radioactive) isotopes present within product and waste streams of a nuclear reprocessing facility. These indicator isotopes are monitored on-line by gamma spectrometry and compared, in near-real-time, to spectral patterns representing "normal" process conditions using multivariate pattern recognition software. The monitor utilizes this multivariate analysis and gamma spectroscopy of reprocessing streams to detect small changes in the gamma spectrum, which may indicate changes in process conditions. Multivariate analysis methods common in chemometrics, such as principal component analysis (PCA) and partial least squares regression (PLS), act as pattern recognition techniques, which can detect small deviations from the expected, nominal condition. By targeting multiple gamma-emitting indicator isotopes, the MIP Monitor approach is compatible with the use of small, portable, relatively high-resolution gamma detectors that may be easily deployed throughout an existing facility. The automated multivariate analysis can provide a level of data obscurity, giving a built-in information barrier to protect sensitive or proprietary operational data. Proof-of-concept simulations and experiments have been performed in previous years to demonstrate the validity of this tool in a laboratory setting. Development of the MIP Monitor approach continues to evaluate the efficacy of the monitor for automated, real-time or near-real-time application. This report details follow-on research and development efforts sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy Fuel Cycle Research and Development related to the MIP Monitor for fiscal year

  5. Image resolution influence on determination of resin injection rock mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Weixing; Hakami, Eva

    2006-01-01

    In the context of nuclear waste repositories, an important approach to understanding brittle rock mass behavior to integrate new and powerful observational and numerical methods with multi-functional 3-D imaging and visualization techniques. Since 1994, Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Company (SKB) have identified the need for a better understanding of radionuclide transport and retention processes in fractured rock. As a cooperation project between Sweden and China, we sampled a number of rock specimens for analyze rock fracture network by optical image technique. The samples are resin injected, in which way; opened fractures can be seen clearly by means of UV (Ultraviolet) light illumination. In the study period, we used different optical focuses to obtain the images from the same samples; we found that Image resolution influences on porosity determination of resin injected rock mass. This paper presents and discusses the six issues based on our research results: (1) Fracture porosity increases as camera focus distance decreases; (2) Porosity increases as illumination increases in resin injected fracture images; (3) To roughly estimate the porosity, the low resolution image can be used; (4) To collect more details of fracture information, the high resolution image is needed; (5) The resolution of image should be determined based on the aim of fracture analysis; (6) To acquire high resolution image, constructing a special illumination (standard) box maybe helpful to avoid light reflection and diffusion.

  6. Silver Coating for High-Mass-Accuracy Imaging Mass Spectrometry of Fingerprints on Nanostructured Silicon.

    PubMed

    Guinan, Taryn M; Gustafsson, Ove J R; McPhee, Gordon; Kobus, Hilton; Voelcker, Nicolas H

    2015-11-17

    Nanostructure imaging mass spectrometry (NIMS) using porous silicon (pSi) is a key technique for molecular imaging of exogenous and endogenous low molecular weight compounds from fingerprints. However, high-mass-accuracy NIMS can be difficult to achieve as time-of-flight (ToF) mass analyzers, which dominate the field, cannot sufficiently compensate for shifts in measured m/z values. Here, we show internal recalibration using a thin layer of silver (Ag) sputter-coated onto functionalized pSi substrates. NIMS peaks for several previously reported fingerprint components were selected and mass accuracy was compared to theoretical values. Mass accuracy was improved by more than an order of magnitude in several cases. This straightforward method should form part of the standard guidelines for NIMS studies for spatial characterization of small molecules.

  7. Advanced Mass Calibration and Visualization for FT-ICR Mass Spectrometry Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Donald F.; Kharchenko, Andriy; Konijnenburg, Marco; Klinkert, Ivo; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana; Heeren, Ronald M.

    2012-11-01

    Mass spectrometry imaging by Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) yields hundreds of unique peaks, many of which cannot be resolved by lower performance mass spectrometers. The high mass accuracy and high mass resolving power allow confident identification of small molecules and lipids directly from biological tissue sections. Here, calibration strategies for FT-ICR MS imaging were investigated. Sub-parts-per-million mass accuracy is demonstrated over an entire tissue section. Ion abundance fluctuations are corrected by addition of total and relative ion abundances for a root-mean-square error of 0.158 ppm on 16,764 peaks. A new approach for visualization of FT-ICR MS imaging data at high resolution is presented. The "Mosaic Datacube" provides a flexible means to visualize the entire mass range at a mass spectral bin width of 0.001 Da. The high resolution Mosaic Datacube resolves spectral features not visible at lower bin widths, while retaining the high mass accuracy from the calibration methods discussed.

  8. Tissue MALDI Mass Spectrometry Imaging (MALDI MSI) of Peptides.

    PubMed

    Beine, Birte; Diehl, Hanna C; Meyer, Helmut E; Henkel, Corinna

    2016-01-01

    Matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry imaging (MALDI MSI) is a technique to visualize molecular features of tissues based on mass detection. This chapter focuses on MALDI MSI of peptides and provides detailed operational instructions for sample preparation of cryoconserved and formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue. Besides sample preparation we provide protocols for the MALDI measurement, tissue staining, and data analysis. On-tissue digestion and matrix application are described for two different commercially available and commonly used spraying devices: the SunCollect (SunChrom) and the ImagePrep (Bruker Daltonik GmbH).

  9. Magnetic resonance imaging of the saccular otolithic mass.

    PubMed Central

    Sbarbati, A; Leclercq, F; Antonakis, K; Osculati, F

    1992-01-01

    The frog's inner ear was studied in vivo by high spatial resolution magnetic resonance imaging at 7 Tesla. The vestibule, the internal acoustic meatus, and the auditory tube have been identified. The large otolithic mass contained in the vestibule showed a virtual absence of magnetic resonance signal probably due to its composition of closely packed otoconia. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 5 PMID:1295875

  10. Interlabial masses in little girls: review and imaging recommendations

    SciTech Connect

    Nussbaum, A.R.; Lebowitz, R.L.

    1983-07-01

    When an interlabial mass is seen on physical examination in a little girl, there is often confusion about its etiology, its implications, and what should be done next. Five common interlabial masses, which superficially are strikingly similar, include a prolapsed ectopic ureterocele, a prolapsed urethra, a paraurethral cyst, hydro(metro)colpos, and rhabdomyosarcoma of the vagina (botryoid sarcoma). A prolapsed ectopic ureterocele occurs in white girls as a smooth mass which protrudes from the urethral meatus so that urine exits circumferentially. A prolapsed urethra occurs in black girls and resembles a donut with the urethral meatus in the center. A paraurethral cyst is smaller and displaces the meatus, so that the urinary stream is eccentric. Hydro(metro)colpos from hymenal imperforation presents as a smooth mass that fills the vaginal introitus, as opposed to the introital grapelike cluster of masses of botryoid sarcoma. Recommendations for efficient imaging are presented.

  11. Atomic force microscope controlled topographical imaging and proximal probe thermal desorption/ionization mass spectrometry imaging.

    PubMed

    Ovchinnikova, Olga S; Kjoller, Kevin; Hurst, Gregory B; Pelletier, Dale A; Van Berkel, Gary J

    2014-01-21

    This paper reports on the development of a hybrid atmospheric pressure atomic force microscopy/mass spectrometry imaging system utilizing nanothermal analysis probes for thermal desorption surface sampling with subsequent atmospheric pressure chemical ionization and mass analysis. The basic instrumental setup and the general operation of the system were discussed, and optimized performance metrics were presented. The ability to correlate topographic images of a surface with atomic force microscopy and a mass spectral chemical image of the same surface, utilizing the same probe without moving the sample from the system, was demonstrated. Co-registered mass spectral chemical images and atomic force microscopy topographical images were obtained from inked patterns on paper as well as from a living bacterial colony on an agar gel. Spatial resolution of the topography images based on pixel size (0.2 μm × 0.8 μm) was better than the resolution of the mass spectral images (2.5 μm × 2.0 μm), which were limited by current mass spectral data acquisition rate and system detection levels.

  12. Atomic Force Microscope Controlled Topographical Imaging and Proximal Probe Thermal Desorption/Ionization Mass Spectrometry Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Ovchinnikova, Olga S; Kjoller, Kevin; Hurst, Gregory {Greg} B; Pelletier, Dale A; Van Berkel, Gary J

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports on the development of a hybrid atmospheric pressure atomic force microscopy/mass spectrometry imaging system utilizing nano-thermal analysis probes for thermal desorption surface sampling with subsequent atmospheric pressure chemical ionization and mass analysis. The basic instrumental setup and the general operation of the system were discussed and optimized performance metrics were presented. The ability to correlate topographic images of a surface with atomic force microscopy and a mass spectral chemical image of the same surface, utilizing the same probe without moving the sample from the system, was demonstrated. Co-registered mass spectral chemical images and atomic force microscopy topographical images were obtained from inked patterns on paper as well as from a living bacterial colony on an agar gel. Spatial resolution of the topography images based on pixel size (0.2 m x 0.8 m) was better than the resolution of the mass spectral images (2.5 m x 2.0 m), which were limited by current mass spectral data acquisition rate and system detection levels.

  13. Coming to a hospital near you: mass spectrometry imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Bowen, Ben

    2013-10-31

    Berkeley Lab's Ben Bowen discusses "Coming to a hospital near you: mass spectrometry imaging" in this Oct. 28, 2013 talk, which is part of a Science at the Theater event entitled Eight Big Ideas. Go here to watch the entire event with all 8 speakers.

  14. Coming to a hospital near you: mass spectrometry imaging

    ScienceCinema

    Bowen, Ben

    2016-07-12

    Berkeley Lab's Ben Bowen discusses "Coming to a hospital near you: mass spectrometry imaging" in this Oct. 28, 2013 talk, which is part of a Science at the Theater event entitled Eight Big Ideas. Go here to watch the entire event with all 8 speakers.

  15. Current Status and Future Perspectives of Mass Spectrometry Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Nimesh, Surendra; Mohottalage, Susantha; Vincent, Renaud; Kumarathasan, Prem

    2013-01-01

    Mass spectrometry imaging is employed for mapping proteins, lipids and metabolites in biological tissues in a morphological context. Although initially developed as a tool for biomarker discovery by imaging the distribution of protein/peptide in tissue sections, the high sensitivity and molecular specificity of this technique have enabled its application to biomolecules, other than proteins, even in cells, latent finger prints and whole organisms. Relatively simple, with no requirement for labelling, homogenization, extraction or reconstitution, the technique has found a variety of applications in molecular biology, pathology, pharmacology and toxicology. By discriminating the spatial distribution of biomolecules in serial sections of tissues, biomarkers of lesions and the biological responses to stressors or diseases can be better understood in the context of structure and function. In this review, we have discussed the advances in the different aspects of mass spectrometry imaging processes, application towards different disciplines and relevance to the field of toxicology. PMID:23759983

  16. Exoplanet mass determination using precision imaging astrometry and coronagraphy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bendek, Eduardo; Belikov, Ruslan; Finan, Emily R.; Guyon, Olivier; Pluzhnik, Eugene; Ammons, Stephen

    2017-01-01

    Performing simultaneous high-contrast imaging and astrometry observations of a star increases the detection efficiency and characterization accuracy of single- and multiple- planetary systems around nearby stars. Combining the data generated with both techniques allows solving the Semi-Major Axis, period, and planetary mass in the system faster and more precisely than using imaging or astrometry data separately. In addition, it allows the planetary mass to be measured independently from its brightness, resolving the mass/albedo degeneracy when only direct imaging observations are available. Independent albedo determination allows calibrated planet photometry to be obtained, enabling better atmosphere characterization. To perform both direct imaging and astrometry observations, the telescope requires two instruments: a high-performance coronagraph to perform direct imaging, and a wide field camera astrometry accuracy able to deliver sub-micro arc second astrometry accuracy if earth-like planetary science is pursued. Such accuracy is only possible after calibrating relative distortions between astrometry observations, which at the sub-micro arc second regime dominates the error budget. We propose to utilize a diffractive pupil, in which an array of dots on the primary mirror generates polychromatic diffraction spikes in the focal plane, to calibrate the dynamic distortions of the optical system. In this talk, we present the results of the NASA TDEM effort to demonstrate the diffractive pupil concept on wide-field images while simultaneously performing high-contrast imaging. We also discuss the opportunity that this mission architecture could offer to future probe missions and flagships such as HabEX and LUVOIR.

  17. Use of mass spectrometry for imaging metabolites in plants

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Young-Jin; Perdian, David; Song, Zhihong; Yeung, Edward; Nikolau, Basil

    2012-03-27

    We discuss and illustrate recent advances that have been made to image the distribution of metabolites among cells and tissues of plants using different mass spectrometry technologies. These technologies include matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization, desorption electrospray ionization, and secondary ion mass spectrometry. These are relatively new technological applications of mass spectrometry and they are providing highly spatially resolved data concerning the cellular distribution of metabolites. We discuss the advantages and limitations of each of these mass spectrometric methods, and provide a description of the technical barriers that are currently limiting the technology to the level of single-cell resolution. However, we anticipate that advances in the next few years will increase the resolving power of the technology to provide unprecedented data on the distribution of metabolites at the subcellular level, which will increase our ability to decipher new knowledge concerning the spatial organization of metabolic processes in plants.

  18. Use of Mass spectrometry for imaging metabolites in plants

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Young Jin; Perdian, David C.; Song, Zhihong; Yeung, Edward S.; Nikolau, Basil

    2012-03-27

    We discuss and illustrate recent advances that have been made to image the distribution of metabolites among cells and tissues of plants using different mass spectrometry technologies. These technologies include matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization, desorption electrospray ionization, and secondary ion mass spectrometry. These are relatively new technological applications of mass spectrometry and they are providing highly spatially resolved data concerning the cellular distribution of metabolites. We discuss the advantages and limitations of each of these mass spectrometric methods, and provide a description of the technical barriers that are currently limiting the technology to the level of single-cell resolution. However, we anticipate that advances in the next few years will increase the resolving power of the technology to provide unprecedented data on the distribution of metabolites at the subcellular level, which will increase our ability to decipher new knowledge concerning the spatial organization of metabolic processes in plants.

  19. Laser ablation sample transfer for mass spectrometry imaging.

    PubMed

    Park, Sung-Gun; Murray, Kermit K

    2015-01-01

    Infrared laser ablation sample transfer (IR-LAST) is a novel ambient sampling technique for mass spectrometry. In this technique, a pulsed mid-IR laser is used to ablate materials that are collected for mass spectrometry analysis; the material can be a solid sample or deposited on a sample target. After collection, the sample can be further separated or analyzed directly by mass spectrometry. For IR-LAST sample transfer tissue imaging using MALDI mass spectrometry, a tissue section is placed on a sample slide and material transferred to a target slide by scanning the tissue sample under a focused laser beam using transmission-mode (back side) IR laser ablation. After transfer, the target slide is analyzed using MALDI imaging. The spatial resolution is approximately 400 μm and limited by the spread of the laser desorption plume. IR-LAST for MALDI imaging provides several new capabilities including ambient sampling, area to spot concentration of ablated material, multiple ablation and analysis from a single section, and direct deposition on matrix-free nanostructured targets.

  20. Mass spectrometry imaging of plant metabolites--principles and possibilities.

    PubMed

    Bjarnholt, Nanna; Li, Bin; D'Alvise, Janina; Janfelt, Christian

    2014-06-01

    Covering: up to the end of 2013 New mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) techniques are gaining importance in the analysis of plant metabolite distributions, and significant technological improvements have been introduced in the past decade. This review provides an introduction to the different MSI techniques and their applications in plant science. The most common methods for sample preparation are described, and the review also features a comprehensive table of published studies in MSI of plant material. A number of significant works are highlighted for their contributions to advance the understanding of plant biology through applications of plant metabolite imaging. Particular attention is given to the possibility for imaging of surface metabolites since this is highly dependent on the methods and techniques which are applied in imaging studies.

  1. MALDI imaging mass spectrometry and analysis of endogenous peptides.

    PubMed

    Chatterji, Bijon; Pich, Andreas

    2013-08-01

    In recent years, MALDI imaging mass spectrometry (MALDI-IMS) has developed as a promising tool to investigate the spatial distribution of biomolecules in intact tissue specimens. Ion densities of various molecules can be displayed as heat maps while preserving anatomical structures. In this short review, an overview of different biomolecules that can be analyzed by MALDI-IMS is given. Many reviews have covered imaging of lipids, small metabolites, whole proteins and enzymatically digested proteins in the past. However, little is known about imaging of endogenous peptides, for example, in the rat brain, and this will therefore be highlighted in this review. Furthermore, sample preparation of frozen or formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue is crucial for imaging experiments. Therefore, some aspects of sample preparation will be addressed, including washing and desalting, the choice of MALDI matrix and its deposition. Apart from mapping endogenous peptides, their reliable identification in situ still remains challenging and will be discussed as well.

  2. High-Speed Tandem Mass Spectrometric in Situ Imaging by Nanospray Desorption Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Lanekoff, Ingela T.; Burnum-Johnson, Kristin E.; Thomas, Mathew; Short, Joshua TL; Carson, James P.; Cha, Jeeyeon; Dey, Sudhansu K.; Yang, Pengxiang; Prieto Conaway, Maria C.; Laskin, Julia

    2013-10-15

    Nanospray desorption electrospray ionization (nano-DESI) combined with tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS), high-resolution mass analysis (m/m=17,500 at m/z 200), and rapid spectral acquisition enabled simultaneous imaging and identification of more than 300 molecules from 92 selected m/z windows (± 1 Da) with a spatial resolution of better than 150 um. Uterine sections of implantation sites on day 6 of pregnancy were analyzed in the ambient environment without any sample pre-treatment. MS/MS imaging was performed by scanning the sample under the nano-DESI probe at 10 um/s while acquiring higher-energy collision-induced dissociation (HCD) spectra for a targeted inclusion list of 92 m/z values at a rate of ~6.3 spectra/s. Molecular ions and their corresponding fragments, separated using high-resolution mass analysis, were assigned based on accurate mass measurement. Using this approach, we were able to identify and image both abundant and low-abundance isobaric species within each m/z window. MS/MS analysis enabled efficient separation and identification of isobaric sodium and potassium adducts of phospholipids. Furthermore, we identified several metabolites associated with early pregnancy and obtained the first 2D images of these molecules.

  3. High-speed tandem mass spectrometric in situ imaging by nanospray desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Lanekoff, Ingela; Burnum-Johnson, Kristin; Thomas, Mathew; Short, Joshua; Carson, James P; Cha, Jeeyeon; Dey, Sudhansu K; Yang, Pengxiang; Prieto Conaway, Maria C; Laskin, Julia

    2013-10-15

    Nanospray desorption electrospray ionization (nano-DESI) combined with tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS), high-resolution mass analysis of the fragment ions (m/Δm = 17 500 at m/z 200), and rapid spectral acquisition enabled simultaneous imaging and identification of a large number of metabolites and lipids from 92 selected m/z windows (±1 Da) with a spatial resolution of better than 150 μm. Mouse uterine sections of implantation sites on day 6 of pregnancy were analyzed in the ambient environment without any sample pretreatment. MS/MS imaging was performed by scanning the sample under the nano-DESI probe at 10 μm/s, while higher-energy collision-induced dissociation (HCD) spectra were acquired for a targeted inclusion list of 92 m/z values at a rate of ∼6.3 spectra/s. Molecular ions and their corresponding fragments, separated by high-resolution mass analysis, were assigned on the basis of accurate mass measurement. Using this approach, we were able to identify and image both abundant and low-abundance isobaric and isomeric species within each m/z window. MS/MS analysis enabled efficient separation and identification of isomeric and isobaric phospholipids that are difficult to separate in full-scan mode. Furthermore, we identified several metabolites associated with early pregnancy and obtained the first 2D images of these molecules.

  4. Challenges and recent advances in mass spectrometric imaging of neurotransmitters

    PubMed Central

    Gemperline, Erin; Chen, Bingming; Li, Lingjun

    2014-01-01

    Mass spectrometric imaging (MSI) is a powerful tool that grants the ability to investigate a broad mass range of molecules, from small molecules to large proteins, by creating detailed distribution maps of selected compounds. To date, MSI has demonstrated its versatility in the study of neurotransmitters and neuropeptides of different classes toward investigation of neurobiological functions and diseases. These studies have provided significant insight in neurobiology over the years and current technical advances are facilitating further improvements in this field. neurotransmitters, focusing specifically on the challenges and recent Herein, we advances of MSI of neurotransmitters. PMID:24568355

  5. Pineal region masses--imaging findings and surgical approaches.

    PubMed

    Lensing, Forrester D; Abele, Travis A; Sivakumar, Walavan; Taussky, Philipp; Shah, Lubdha M; Salzman, Karen L

    2015-01-01

    The anatomy of the pineal region is complex. Despite advances in surgical techniques since the first reported successful pineal region surgery in the early 20th century, pineal region surgery remains challenging owing to the proximity of deep cerebral veins and dorsal midbrain structures critical for vision. In this article, we review the relevant surgical anatomy of the pineal region and discuss historically important and current surgical approaches. We describe specific imaging features of pineal region masses that may affect surgical planning and review neoplastic and nonneoplastic masses that occur in the pineal region.

  6. Imaging of Cells and Tissues with Mass Spectrometry: Adding Chemical Information to Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Zimmerman, Tyler A.; Monroe, Eric B.; Tucker, Kevin R.; Rubakhin, Stanislav S.; Sweedler, Jonathan V.

    2009-01-01

    Techniques that map the distribution of compounds in biological tissues can be invaluable in addressing a number of critical questions in biology and medicine. One of the newest methods, mass spectrometric imaging, has enabled investigation of spatial localization for a variety of compounds ranging from atomics to proteins. The ability of mass spectrometry to detect and differentiate a large number of unlabeled compounds makes the approach amenable to the study of complex biological tissues. This chapter focuses on recent advances in the instrumentation and sample preparation protocols that make mass spectrometric imaging of biological samples possible, including strategies for both tissue and single cell imaging using the following mass spectrometric ionization methods: matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization, secondary ion, electrospray and desorption electrospray. PMID:19118682

  7. Preparation of Single Cells for Imaging Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Berman, E S; Fortson, S L; Kulp, K S; Checchi, K D; Wu, L; Felton, J S; Wu, K J

    2007-10-24

    Characterizing chemical changes within single cells is important for determining fundamental mechanisms of biological processes that will lead to new biological insights and improved disease understanding. Imaging biological systems with mass spectrometry (MS) has gained popularity in recent years as a method for creating precise chemical maps of biological samples. In order to obtain high-quality mass spectral images that provide relevant molecular information about individual cells, samples must be prepared so that salts and other cell-culture components are removed from the cell surface and the cell contents are rendered accessible to the desorption beam. We have designed a cellular preparation protocol for imaging MS that preserves the cellular contents for investigation and removes the majority of the interfering species from the extracellular matrix. Using this method, we obtain excellent imaging results and reproducibility in three diverse cell types: MCF7 human breast cancer cells, Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells, and NIH/3T3 mouse fibroblasts. This preparation technique allows routine imaging MS analysis of cultured cells, allowing for any number of experiments aimed at furthering scientific understanding of molecular processes within individual cells.

  8. Atmospheric pressure molecular imaging by infrared MALDI mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Li, Yue; Shrestha, Bindesh; Vertes, Akos

    2007-01-15

    An atmospheric pressure (AP) MALDI imaging interface was developed for an orthogonal acceleration time-of-flight mass spectrometer and utilized to analyze peptides, carbohydrates, and other small biomolecules using infrared laser excitation. In molecular imaging experiments, the spatial distribution of mock peptide patterns was recovered with a detection limit of approximately 1 fmol/pixel from a variety of MALDI matrixes. With the use of oversampling for the image acquisition, a spatial resolution of 40 microm, 5 times smaller than the laser spot size, was achieved. This approach, however, required that the analyte was largely removed at the point of analysis before the next point was interrogated. Native water in plant tissue was demonstrated to be an efficient natural matrix for AP infrared laser desorption ionization. In soft fruit tissues from bananas, grapes, and strawberries, potassiated ions of the most abundant metabolites, small carbohydrates, and their clusters produced the strongest peaks in the spectra. Molecular imaging of a strawberry skin sample revealed the distribution of the sucrose, glucose/fructose, and citric acid species around the embedded seeds. Infrared AP MALDI mass spectrometric imaging without the addition of an artificial matrix enables the in vivo investigation of small biomolecules and biological processes (e.g., metabolomics) in their natural environment.

  9. Computation of Mass Density Images from X-ray Refraction-Angle Images

    SciTech Connect

    Wernick,M.; Yang, Y.; Mondal, I.; Chapman, D.; Hasnah, M.; Parham, C.; Pisano, E.; Zhong, Z.

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate the possibility of computing quantitatively accurate images of mass density variations in soft tissue. This is a challenging task, because density variations in soft tissue, such as the breast, can be very subtle. Beginning from an image of refraction angle created by either diffraction-enhanced imaging (DEI) or multiple-image radiography (MIR), we estimate the mass-density image using a constrained least squares (CLS) method. The CLS algorithm yields accurate density estimates while effectively suppressing noise. Our method improves on an analytical method proposed by Hasnah et al (2005 Med. Phys. 32 549-52), which can produce significant artifacts when even a modest level of noise is present. We present a quantitative evaluation study to determine the accuracy with which mass density can be determined in the presence of noise. Based on computer simulations, we find that the mass-density estimation error can be as low as a few per cent for typical density variations found in the breast. Example images computed from less-noisy real data are also shown to illustrate the feasibility of the technique. We anticipate that density imaging may have application in assessment of water content of cartilage resulting from osteoarthritis, in evaluation of bone density, and in mammographic interpretation.

  10. Imaging Mass Spectrometry on the Nanoscale with Cluster Ion Beams

    DOE PAGES

    Winograd, Nicholas

    2014-12-02

    Imaging with cluster secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) is reaching a mature level of development. When, using a variety of molecular ion projectiles to stimulate desorption, 3-dimensional imaging with the selectivity of mass spectrometry can now be achieved with submicrometer spatial resolution and <10 nm depth resolution. In this Perspective, stock is taken regarding what it will require to routinely achieve these remarkable properties. Some issues include the chemical nature of the projectile, topography formation, differential erosion rates, and perhaps most importantly, ionization efficiency. Shortcomings of existing instrumentation are also noted. One key part of this discussion involves speculation onmore » how best to resolve these issues.« less

  11. Tissue Imaging Using Nanospray Desorption Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Laskin, Julia; Heath, Brandi S.; Roach, Patrick J.; Cazares, Lisa H.; Semmes, O. John

    2012-01-03

    We present the first results showing the ambient imaging of biological samples in their native environment using nanospray desorption ionization (nanoDESI) mass spectrometry. NanoDESI is an ambient pressure ionization technique that enables precise control of ionization of molecules from substrates. We demonstrate highly sensitive and robust analysis of tissue samples with high spatial resolution (<12 {mu}m) without sample preparation, which will be essential for applications in clinical diagnostics, drug discovery, molecular biology, and biochemistry.

  12. Current cardiac imaging techniques for detection of left ventricular mass

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Estimation of left ventricular (LV) mass has both prognostic and therapeutic value independent of traditional risk factors. Unfortunately, LV mass evaluation has been underestimated in clinical practice. Assessment of LV mass can be performed by a number of imaging modalities. Despite inherent limitations, conventional echocardiography has fundamentally been established as most widely used diagnostic tool. 3-dimensional echocardiography (3DE) is now feasible, fast and accurate for LV mass evaluation. 3DE is also superior to conventional echocardiography in terms of LV mass assessment, especially in patients with abnormal LV geometry. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) and cardiovascular computed tomography (CCT) are currently performed for LV mass assessment and also do not depend on cardiac geometry and display 3-dimensional data, as well. Therefore, CMR is being increasingly employed and is at the present standard of reference in the clinical setting. Although each method demonstrates advantages over another, there are also disadvantages to receive attention. Diagnostic accuracy of methods will also be increased with the introduction of more advanced systems. It is also likely that in the coming years new and more accurate diagnostic tests will become available. In particular, CMR and CCT have been intersecting hot topic between cardiology and radiology clinics. Thus, good communication and collaboration between two specialties is required for selection of an appropriate test. PMID:20515461

  13. Contrast-enhanced ultrasound for imaging of adrenal masses.

    PubMed

    Dietrich, C F; Ignee, A; Barreiros, A P; Schreiber-Dietrich, D; Sienz, M; Bojunga, J; Braden, B

    2010-04-01

    The number of incidentally discovered adrenal masses is growing due to the increased use of modern high-resolution imaging techniques. However, the characterization and differentiation of benign and malignant adrenal lesions is challenging. This study aimed to evaluate contrast-enhanced ultrasound for the characterization of adrenal masses. We studied 58 patients with adrenal masses detected with computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, or ultrasound. 7 patients had bilateral adrenal lesions. Contrast-enhanced ultrasound was performed using high-resolution ultrasound (3.5 - 7 MHz) and intravenous injection of 2.4 ml SonoVue. The contrast enhancement pattern of all adrenal lesions was documented. The 18 malignant adrenal tumors were significantly larger at the time of diagnosis compared to the 40 benign lesions (p < 0.03). The majority of benign adrenal lesions (37 / 40) had a nonspecific type of contrast enhancement (24 / 40) or a peripheral to central contrast filling (13 / 40) described as the iris phenomenon. Similar findings were observed in malignant adrenal tumors: most malignant lesions also showed nonspecific (6 / 18) or peripheral to central contrast filling (9 / 18). Peripheral to central contrast filling had 50 % sensitivity (26 - 74 %) and 68 % specificity (51 - 81 %) for indicating malignancy. Contrast-enhanced ultrasound facilitates the visualization of vascularization even in small adrenal masses, but it does not help to distinguish malignant and benign lesions. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart . New York.

  14. Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging in cystic renal masses

    PubMed Central

    Balyemez, Fikret; Aslan, Ahmet; Inan, Ibrahim; Ayaz, Ercan; Karagöz, Vildan; Özkanli, Sıdıka Şeyma; Acar, Murat

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: We aimed to introduce the diagnostic value of diffusion-weighted (DWI) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for distinguishing benign and malignant renal cystic masses. Methods: Abdominal DWI-MRIs of patients with Bosniak categories 2F, 3, and 4 cystic renal masses were evaluated retrospectively. Cystic masses were assigned as benign or malignant according to histopathological or followup MRI findings and compared with apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values. Results: There were 30 patients (18 males and 12 females, mean age was 59.23 ± 12.08 years [range 38–83 years]) with cystic renal masses (eight Bosniak category 2F, 12 Bosniak category 3, 10 Bosniak category 4). Among them, 14 cysts were diagnosed as benign and 16 as malignant by followup imaging or histopathological findings. For the malignant lesions, the mean ADC values were lower than for benign lesions (p=0.001). An ADC value of ≤2.28 ×10−6 mm2/s or less had a sensitivity of 75% and a specificity of 92.86% for detecting malignancy. Conclusions: ADC can improve the diagnostic performance of MRI in the evaluation of complex renal cysts when used together with conventional MRI sequences. PMID:28163806

  15. Multigrid optimal mass transport for image registration and morphing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rehman, Tauseef ur; Tannenbaum, Allen

    2007-02-01

    In this paper we present a computationally efficient Optimal Mass Transport algorithm. This method is based on the Monge-Kantorovich theory and is used for computing elastic registration and warping maps in image registration and morphing applications. This is a parameter free method which utilizes all of the grayscale data in an image pair in a symmetric fashion. No landmarks need to be specified for correspondence. In our work, we demonstrate significant improvement in computation time when our algorithm is applied as compared to the originally proposed method by Haker et al [1]. The original algorithm was based on a gradient descent method for removing the curl from an initial mass preserving map regarded as 2D vector field. This involves inverting the Laplacian in each iteration which is now computed using full multigrid technique resulting in an improvement in computational time by a factor of two. Greater improvement is achieved by decimating the curl in a multi-resolutional framework. The algorithm was applied to 2D short axis cardiac MRI images and brain MRI images for testing and comparison.

  16. Multiplex mass spectrometric imaging with polarity switching for concurrent acquisition of positive and negative ion images.

    PubMed

    Korte, Andrew R; Lee, Young Jin

    2013-06-01

    We have recently developed a multiplex mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) method which incorporates high mass resolution imaging and MS/MS and MS(3) imaging of several compounds in a single data acquisition utilizing a hybrid linear ion trap-Orbitrap mass spectrometer (Perdian and Lee, Anal. Chem. 82, 9393-9400, 2010). Here we extend this capability to obtain positive and negative ion MS and MS/MS spectra in a single MS imaging experiment through polarity switching within spiral steps of each raster step. This methodology was demonstrated for the analysis of various lipid class compounds in a section of mouse brain. This allows for simultaneous imaging of compounds that are readily ionized in positive mode (e.g., phosphatidylcholines and sphingomyelins) and those that are readily ionized in negative mode (e.g., sulfatides, phosphatidylinositols and phosphatidylserines). MS/MS imaging was also performed for a few compounds in both positive and negative ion mode within the same experimental set-up. Insufficient stabilization time for the Orbitrap high voltage leads to slight deviations in observed masses, but these deviations are systematic and were easily corrected with a two-point calibration to background ions.

  17. Improved Imaging Resolution in Desorption Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Kertesz, Vilmos; Van Berkel, Gary J

    2008-01-01

    Imaging resolution of desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (DESI-MS) was investigated using printed patterns on paper and thin-layer chromatography (TLC) plate surfaces. Resolution approaching 40 m was achieved with a typical DESI-MS setup, which is approximately 5 times better than the best resolution reported previously. This improvement was accomplished with careful control of operational parameters (particularly spray tip-to-surface distance, solvent flow rate, and spacing of lane scans). Also, an appropriately strong analyte/surface interaction and uniform surface texture on the size scale no larger that the desired imaging resolution were required to achieve this resolution. Overall, conditions providing the smallest possible effective desorption/ionization area in the DESI impact plume region and minimizing the analyte redistribution on the surface during analysis led to the improved DESI-MS imaging resolution.

  18. Qualitative and quantitative mass spectrometry imaging of drugs and metabolites

    PubMed Central

    Lietz, Christopher B.; Gemperline, Erin; Li, Lingjun

    2013-01-01

    Mass spectrometric imaging (MSI) has rapidly increased its presence in the pharmaceutical sciences. While quantitative whole-body autoradiography and microautoradiography are the traditional techniques for molecular imaging of drug delivery and metabolism, MSI provides advantageous specificity that can distinguish the parent drug from metabolites and modified endogenous molecules. This review begins with the fundamentals of MSI sample preparation/ionization, and then moves on to both qualitative and quantitative applications with special emphasis on drug discovery and delivery. Cutting-edge investigations on sub-cellular imaging and endogenous signaling peptides are also highlighted, followed by perspectives on emerging technology and the path for MSI to become a routine analysis technique. PMID:23603211

  19. Computer-Aided Diagnostic System For Mass Survey Chest Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasuda, Yoshizumi; Kinoshita, Yasuhiro; Emori, Yasufumi; Yoshimura, Hitoshi

    1988-06-01

    In order to support screening of chest radiographs on mass survey, a computer-aided diagnostic system that automatically detects abnormality of candidate images using a digital image analysis technique has been developed. Extracting boundary lines of lung fields and examining their shapes allowed various kind of abnormalities to be detected. Correction and expansion were facilitated by describing the system control, image analysis control and judgement of abnormality in the rule type programing language. In the experiments using typical samples of student's radiograms, good results were obtained for the detection of abnormal shape of lung field, cardiac hypertrophy and scoliosis. As for the detection of diaphragmatic abnormality, relatively good results were obtained but further improvements will be necessary.

  20. Mass spectrometry imaging with laser-induced postionization.

    PubMed

    Soltwisch, Jens; Kettling, Hans; Vens-Cappell, Simeon; Wiegelmann, Marcel; Müthing, Johannes; Dreisewerd, Klaus

    2015-04-10

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry imaging (MALDI-MSI) can simultaneously record the lateral distribution of numerous biomolecules in tissue slices, but its sensitivity is restricted by limited ionization. We used a wavelength-tunable postionization laser to initiate secondary MALDI-like ionization processes in the gas phase. In this way, we could increase the ion yields for numerous lipid classes, liposoluble vitamins, and saccharides, imaged in animal and plant tissue with a 5-micrometer-wide laser spot, by up to two orders of magnitude. Critical parameters for initiation of the secondary ionization processes are pressure of the cooling gas in the ion source, laser wavelength, pulse energy, and delay between the two laser pulses. The technology could enable sensitive MALDI-MS imaging with a lateral resolution in the low micrometer range. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  1. Optimization of Whole-Body Zebrafish Sectioning Methods for Mass Spectrometry Imaging

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mass spectrometry imaging methods and protocols have become widely adapted to a variety of tissues and species. However, the mass spectrometry imaging literature contains minimal information on whole-body cryosection preparation for the zebrafish (Danio rerio), a model organism ...

  2. Optimization of Whole-Body Zebrafish Sectioning Methods for Mass Spectrometry Imaging

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mass spectrometry imaging methods and protocols have become widely adapted to a variety of tissues and species. However, the mass spectrometry imaging literature contains minimal information on whole-body cryosection preparation for the zebrafish (Danio rerio), a model organism ...

  3. Multigrid MALDI mass spectrometry imaging (mMALDI MSI).

    PubMed

    Urbanek, Annett; Hölzer, Stefan; Knop, Katrin; Schubert, Ulrich S; von Eggeling, Ferdinand

    2016-05-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry imaging (MALDI MSI) is an important technique for the spatially resolved molecular analysis of tissue sections. The selection of matrices influences the resulting mass spectra to a high degree. For extensive and simultaneous analysis, the application of different matrices to one tissue sample is desirable. To date, only a single matrix could be applied to a tissue section per experiment. However, repetitive removal of the matrix makes this approach time-consuming and damaging to tissue samples. To overcome these drawbacks, we developed a multigrid MALDI MSI technique (mMALDI MSI) that relies on automated inkjet printing to place differing matrices onto predefined dot grids. We used a cooled printhead to prevent cavitation of low viscosity solvents in the printhead nozzle. Improved spatial resolution of the dot grids was achieved by using a triple-pulse procedure that reduced droplet volume. The matrices can either be applied directly to the thaw-mounted tissue sample or by precoating the slide followed by mounting of the tissue sample. During the MALDI imaging process, we were able to precisely target different matrix point grids with the laser to simultaneously produce distinct mass spectra. Unlike the standard method, the prespotting approach optimizes the spectra quality, avoids analyte delocalization, and enables subsequent hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining. Graphical Abstract Scheme of the pre-spotted multigrid MALDI MSI workflow.

  4. Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging of the kidney: renal masses

    SciTech Connect

    Hricak, H.; Williams, R.D.; Moon, K.L. Jr.; Moss, A.A.; Alpers, C.; Crooks, L.E.; Kaufman, L.

    1983-06-01

    Fifteen patients with a variety of renal masses were examined by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), computed tomography, ultrasound, and intravenous urography. NMR clearly differentiated between simple renal cysts and other renal masses. On spin echo images, the simple renal cyst appeared as a round or slightly oval, homogeneous low-intensity mass with characteristically long T1 and T2 values. The thickness of the cyst wall was not measurable. The cyst had a smooth outer margin and a distict, sharp interface with normal parenchyma. Hemorrhagic cysts were seen as high-intensity lesions. Renal cell carcinomas displayed a wide range of intensity. The T1 and T2 values of the tumors were always different from those of the surrounding renal parenchyma. Tumor pseudocapsule was identified in four of five patients examined. All carcinomas were accurately staged by NMR and extension of the tumor thrombus into the inferior vena cava was demonstrated. The authors predict that if these preliminary results are confirmed by data from a larger number of patients, NMR will play a significant role in renal imaging.

  5. Mass spectrometry imaging: a novel technology in rheumatology.

    PubMed

    Rocha, Beatriz; Ruiz-Romero, Cristina; Blanco, Francisco J

    2017-01-01

    Mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) is used to determine the relative abundance and spatial distribution of biomolecules such as peptides, proteins, lipids and other organic compounds in tissue sections by their molecular masses. This technique provides a sensitive and label-free approach for high-resolution imaging, and is currently used in an increasing number of biomedical applications such as biomarker discovery, tissue classification and drug monitoring. Owing to technological advances in the past 5 years in diverse MSI strategies, this technology is expected to become a standard tool in clinical practice and provides information complementary to that obtained using existing methods. Given that MSI is able to extract mass-spectral signatures from pathological tissue samples, this technique provides a novel platform to study joint-related tissues affected by rheumatic diseases. In rheumatology, MSI has been performed on articular cartilage, synovium and bone to increase the understanding of articular destruction and to characterize diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers for osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis and osteoporosis. In this Review, we provide an overview of MSI technology and of the studies in which joint tissues have been analysed by use of this methodology. This approach might increase knowledge of rheumatic pathologies and ultimately prompt the development of targeted strategies for their management.

  6. Automatic analysis of double coronal mass ejections from coronagraph images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobs, Matthew; Chang, Lin-Ching; Pulkkinen, Antti; Romano, Michelangelo

    2015-11-01

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) can have major impacts on man-made technology and humans, both in space and on Earth. These impacts have created a high interest in the study of CMEs in an effort to detect and track events and forecast the CME arrival time to provide time for proper mitigation. A robust automatic real-time CME processing pipeline is greatly desired to avoid laborious and subjective manual processing. Automatic methods have been proposed to segment CMEs from coronagraph images and estimate CME parameters such as their heliocentric location and velocity. However, existing methods suffered from several shortcomings such as the use of hard thresholding and an inability to handle two or more CMEs occurring within the same coronagraph image. Double-CME analysis is a necessity for forecasting the many CME events that occur within short time frames. Robust forecasts for all CME events are required to fully understand space weather impacts. This paper presents a new method to segment CME masses and pattern recognition approaches to differentiate two CMEs in a single coronagraph image. The proposed method is validated on a data set of 30 halo CMEs, with results showing comparable ability in transient arrival time prediction accuracy and the new ability to automatically predict the arrival time of a double-CME event. The proposed method is the first automatic method to successfully calculate CME parameters from double-CME events, making this automatic method applicable to a wider range of CME events.

  7. Is it really organic?--multi-isotopic analysis as a tool to discriminate between organic and conventional plants.

    PubMed

    Laursen, K H; Mihailova, A; Kelly, S D; Epov, V N; Bérail, S; Schjoerring, J K; Donard, O F X; Larsen, E H; Pedentchouk, N; Marca-Bell, A D; Halekoh, U; Olesen, J E; Husted, S

    2013-12-01

    Novel procedures for analytical authentication of organic plant products are urgently needed. Here we present the first study encompassing stable isotopes of hydrogen, carbon, nitrogen, oxygen, magnesium and sulphur as well as compound-specific nitrogen and oxygen isotope analysis of nitrate for discrimination of organically and conventionally grown plants. The study was based on wheat, barley, faba bean and potato produced in rigorously controlled long-term field trials comprising 144 experimental plots. Nitrogen isotope analysis revealed the use of animal manure, but was unable to discriminate between plants that were fertilised with synthetic nitrogen fertilisers or green manures from atmospheric nitrogen fixing legumes. This limitation was bypassed using oxygen isotope analysis of nitrate in potato tubers, while hydrogen isotope analysis allowed complete discrimination of organic and conventional wheat and barley grains. It is concluded, that multi-isotopic analysis has the potential to disclose fraudulent substitutions of organic with conventionally cultivated plants. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Using Multi-Isotopic Analysis To Track The Origin Of NO3 In Groundwater And To Trace Natural Attenuation Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otero, N.; Soler, A.

    2008-12-01

    Nitrate pollution has become a major threat to groundwater quality as the maximum nitrate concentration allowed by the European Directive 98/83/CE in waters for human consumption, 50 mg/L, is reached in most of the regional aquifers in Europe. In Catalonia, according to the nitrate directive, nine areas have been declared as vulnerable to nitrate pollution from agricultural sources. Five of these areas have been studied coupling hydro chemical data with a multi-isotopic approach, in an ongoing research project looking for an integrated application of classical hydrochemistry data, with a comprehensive isotopic characterisation (δ15N and δ18O of dissolved nitrate, δ34S and δ18O of dissolved sulphate, δ13C of dissolved inorganic carbon, and δ D and δ18O of water) in order to assess groundwater management in this area. The nitrogen isotopes have allowed to determine the origin of nitrate pollution for the different areas: fertilisers in the Maresme area, animal manure in the Osona and Empordà areas, and a mixed origin in Selva and Garrotxa areas. The coupled use of δ15N and δ18O permitted to determine the existence of denitrification processes (natural attenuation of pollution), and showed that this process is effective in the Osona, Selva and the Empordà areas, but not significant in the Maresme and Garrotxa areas. The multi-isotopic approach, coupling δ15N and δ18O of nitrate, with the isotopic composition of the ions involved in denitrification reactions (δ34S, δ18O, and δ13C ), showed the relationship between sulphide oxidation and nitrate attenuation in the Osona area. In the Empordà and Selva areas, the denitrification is not linked to sulphide oxidation, and organic matter must be the electron donor for denitrification, though further research is needed to confirm the role of organic matter. The observed denitrification processes reveal optional strategies for nitrogen attenuation.

  9. Myofiber metabolic type determination by mass spectrometry imaging.

    PubMed

    Centeno, Delphine; Vénien, Annie; Pujos-Guillot, Estelle; Astruc, Thierry; Chambon, Christophe; Théron, Laëtitia

    2017-08-01

    Matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry imaging is a powerful tool that opens new research opportunities in the field of biology. In this work, predictive model was developed to discriminate metabolic myofiber types using the MALDI spectral data. Rat skeletal muscles are constituted of type I and type IIA fiber, which have an oxidative metabolism for glycogen degradation, and type IIX and type IIB fiber which have a glycolytic metabolism, present in different proportions according to the muscle function and physiological state. So far, myofiber type is determined by histological methods that are time consuming. Thanks to the predictive model, we were able to predict not only the metabolic fiber type but also their location, on the same muscle section that was used for MALDI imaging. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. The Solar Mass Ejection Imager (SMEI) Space Experiment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-01-30

    Howard, T. A. and DeForest , C. E., “Inner Heliosphere Flux Rope Evolution via Imaging of Coronal Mass Ejections,” Astrophys. J., 746, Feb 2012...L109-L112. [51] Howard, T. A., DeForest , C. E., and Reinard, A. A., “White-Light Observations of Solar Wind Transients and Comparison with... DeForest , C. E., Howard, T. A., and Tappin, S. J., “The Thomson Surface: Polarization,” Astrophys. J., 765, Mar 2013, doi:10.1088/0004-637X/765/44

  11. Toward Digital Staining using Imaging Mass Spectrometry and Random Forests

    PubMed Central

    Hanselmann, Michael; Köthe, Ullrich; Kirchner, Marc; Renard, Bernhard Y.; Amstalden, Erika R.; Glunde, Kristine; Heeren, Ron M. A.; Hamprecht, Fred A.

    2009-01-01

    We show on Imaging Mass Spectrometry (IMS) data that the Random Forest classifier can be used for automated tissue classification and that it results in predictions with high sensitivities and positive predictive values, even when inter-sample variability is present in the data. We further demonstrate how Markov Random Fields and vector-valued median filtering can be applied to reduce noise effects to further improve the classification results in a post-hoc smoothing step. Our study gives clear evidence that digital staining by means of IMS constitutes a promising complement to chemical staining techniques. PMID:19469555

  12. Magnetic resonance imaging of abdominal masses in the pediatric patient.

    PubMed

    Hoffer, Fredric A

    2005-08-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) plays a unique role in the diagnosis and management of pediatric abdominal masses. The "as low as reasonably achievable" (ALARA) radiation dose of CT is zero when substituted by MR. Whole body MR may also compete with PET imaging to stage abdominal tumors. Specific advantages of MR include determination of resectability of hepatic tumors using MRI and MRA; staging of neuroblastoma in the bone marrow, lymph nodes, liver, and spinal canal; response of bilateral Wilms tumor and nephroblastomatosis; detection of pelvic tumors with sagittal sectioning, and peritoneal tumors with contrast enhancement.

  13. New image of psychiatry, mass media impact and public relations.

    PubMed

    Jakovljević, Miro; Tomić, Zoran; Maslov, Boris; Skoko, Iko

    2010-06-01

    The mass media has a powerful impact on public attitudes about mental health and psychiatry. The question of identity of psychiatry as a medical profession as well as of the future of psychiatry has been the subject of much controversial discussion. Psychiatry today has the historical opportunity to shape the future of mental health care, medicine and society. It has gained in scientific and professional status by the tremendous increase of knowledge and treatment skills. Psychiatry should build up new transdisciplinary and integrative image of a specialized profession, promote it and make it public. Good public relations are very important for the future of psychiatry.

  14. Determining the mass of Didymos' secondary by visual imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grieger, Bjoern; Kueppers, Michael

    2016-10-01

    A critical requirement for the Asteroid Impact Mission (AIM) is the ability to determine the mass of Didymos' secondary with an accuracy of about 10 %. The conventional approach to estimate the mass of a solar system body through its gravitational effect by tracking the spacecraft trajectory is only marginally viable for Didymos' secondary. Instead, the idea to measure the "wobble" of the primary around the common centre of gravity has been put forward. This wobble with an expected radius of about 10 m can possible be measured either by means of optical or radar ranging devices or by direct observation with the Visual Imaging System (VIS). Here, we investigate the latter approach.We approach the problem of estimating the wobble in two steps: In the first step, the spacecraft trajectory relative to the primary asteroid is reconstructed from the locations of landmarks in images. This relative trajectory comprises the wobble. In the second step, the magnitude of the wobble is extracted from the reconstructed trajectory.In this preliminary investigation, we do not deal with the problem of landmark identification and determination of their location in images. We just randomly generate landmark positions in the body fixed frame employing a shape model based on radar observations and simulate observations as inertial viewing directions from the spacecraft (with some error). Then we solve simultaneously for the landmark positions in the body fixed frame, the orientation of the asteroid at each image acquisition time, and the spacecraft trajectory relative to the asteroid. This reconstruction is done without any a priori knowledge or modelling of spacecraft trajectory or asteroid rotation. In order to extract the wobble from the reconstructed trajectory in the second step, we only assume that we know the period and the direction of the wobble from the orbit of the secondary.We conduct Monte Carlo simulations for various scenarios and assess the accuracy of the determination

  15. Mass movement slope streaks imaged by the Mars Orbiter Camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sullivan, Robert; Thomas, Peter; Veverka, Joseph; Malin, Michael; Edgett, Kenneth S.

    2001-10-01

    Narrow, fan-shaped dark streaks on steep Martian slopes were originally observed in Viking Orbiter images, but a definitive explanation was not possible because of resolution limitations. Pictures acquired by the Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) aboard the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) spacecraft show innumerable examples of dark slope streaks distributed widely, but not uniformly, across the brighter equatorial regions, as well as individual details of these features that were not visible in Viking Orbiter data. Dark slope streaks (as well as much rarer bright slope streaks) represent one of the most widespread and easily recognized styles of mass movement currently affecting the Martian surface. New dark streaks have formed since Viking and even during the MGS mission, confirming earlier suppositions that higher contrast dark streaks are younger, and fade (brighten) with time. The darkest slope streaks represent ~10% contrast with surrounding slope materials. No small outcrops supplying dark material (or bright material, for bright streaks) have been found at streak apexes. Digitate downslope ends indicate slope streak formation involves a ground-hugging flow subject to deflection by minor topographic obstacles. The model we favor explains most dark slope streaks as scars from dust avalanches following oversteepening of air fall deposits. This process is analogous to terrestrial avalanches of oversteepened dry, loose snow which produce shallow avalanche scars with similar morphologies. Low angles of internal friction typically 10-30¡ for terrestrial loess and clay materials suggest that mass movement of (low-cohesion) Martian dusty air fall is possible on a wide range of gradients. Martian gravity, presumed low density of the air fall deposits, and thin (unresolved by MOC) failed layer depths imply extremely low cohesive strength at time of failure, consistent with expectations for an air fall deposit of dust particles. As speed increases during a dust avalanche, a

  16. Atmospheric pressure infrared MALDI imaging mass spectrometry for plant metabolomics.

    PubMed

    Li, Yue; Shrestha, Bindesh; Vertes, Akos

    2008-01-15

    The utility of atmospheric pressure infrared MALDI mass spectrometry (AP IR-MALDI) was assessed for plant metabolomics studies. Tissue sections from plant organs, including flowers, ovaries, aggregate fruits, fruits, leaves, tubers, bulbs, and seeds were studied in both positive and negative ion modes. For leaves, single laser pulses sampled the cuticle and upper epidermal cells, whereas multiple pulses were demonstrated to ablate some mesophyll layers. Tandem mass spectra were obtained with collision-activated dissociation to aid with the identification of some observed ions. In the positive mode, most ions were produced as potassium, proton, or sometimes sodium ion adducts, whereas proton loss was dominant in the negative ion mode. Over 50 small metabolites and various lipids were detected in the spectra including, for example, 7 of the 10 intermediates in the citric acid cycle. Key components of the glycolysis pathway occurring in the plant cytosol were found along with intermediates of phospholipid biosynthesis and reactants or products of amino acid, nucleotide, oligosaccharide, and flavonoid biosynthesis. AP IR-MALDI mass spectrometry was used to follow the fluid transport driven by transpiration and image the spatial distributions of several metabolites in a white lily (Lilium candidum) flower petal.

  17. Significant advancement of mass spectrometry imaging for food chemistry.

    PubMed

    Yoshimura, Yukihiro; Goto-Inoue, Naoko; Moriyama, Tatsuya; Zaima, Nobuhiro

    2016-11-01

    Food contains various compounds that have an impact on our daily lives. Many technologies have been established to analyze these molecules of interest in foods. However, the analysis of the spatial distribution of these compounds in foods using conventional technology, such as high-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry or gas chromatography-mass spectrometry is difficult. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry imaging (MALDI-MSI) is considered an ideal complementary approach. MALDI-MSI is a two-dimensional MALDI-MS technology that can detect compounds in a tissue section without extraction, purification, separation, or labeling. MALDI-MSI can be used to visualize the spatial distribution of chemical compounds or biomolecules in foods. Although the methodology of MALDI-MSI in food science is not yet fully established, the versatility of MALDI-MSI is expected to open a new frontier in food science. Herein, we describe the principles and applications of MALDI-MSI in food science and related fields.

  18. IMAGING MASS SPECTROMETRY OF A CORAL MICROBE INTERACTION WITH FUNGI

    PubMed Central

    ZHAO, XILING; LIU, WEI-TING; APARICIO, MARYSTELLA; ATENCIO, LIBRADA; BALLESTEROS, JAVIER; SÁNCHEZ, JOEL; GAVILÁN, RONNIE G.; GUTIÉRREZ, MARCELINO; DORRESTEIN, PIETER C.

    2013-01-01

    Fungal infections are increasing worldwide, including in the aquatic environment. Microbiota that coexist with marine life can provide protection against fungal infections by secretion of metabolites with antifungal properties. Our laboratory has developed mass spectrometric methodologies with the goal of improving our functional understanding of microbial metabolites and guiding the discovery process of anti-infective agents from natural sources. GA40, a Bacillus amyloliquefaciens strain isolated from an octocoral in Panama, displayed antifungal activity against various terrestrial and marine fungal strains. Using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-imaging mass spectrometry (MALDI-IMS), the molecular species produced by this microbe were visualized in a side-by-side interaction with two representative fungal strains, Aspergillus fumigatus and Aspergillus niger. The visualization was performed directly on the agar without the need for extraction. By comparison of spatial distributions, relative intensities and m/z values of GA40 secreted metabolites in the fungal interactions versus singly grown control colonies, we obtained insight into the antifungal activity of secreted metabolites. Annotation of GA40 metabolites observed in MALDI-IMS was facilitated by MS/MS networking analysis, a mass spectrometric technique that clusters metabolites with similar MS/MS fragmentation patterns. This analysis established that the predominant GA40 metabolites belong to the iturin family. In a fungal inhibition assay of A. fumigatus, the GA40 iturin metabolites were found to be responsible for the antifungal properties of this Bacillus strain. PMID:23881443

  19. Imaging mass spectrometry of a coral microbe interaction with fungi.

    PubMed

    Moree, Wilna J; Yang, Jane Y; Zhao, Xiling; Liu, Wei-Ting; Aparicio, Marystella; Atencio, Librada; Ballesteros, Javier; Sánchez, Joel; Gavilán, Ronnie G; Gutiérrez, Marcelino; Dorrestein, Pieter C

    2013-07-01

    Fungal infections are increasing worldwide, including in the aquatic environment. Microbiota that coexist with marine life can provide protection against fungal infections by secretion of metabolites with antifungal properties. Our laboratory has developed mass spectrometric methodologies with the goal of improving our functional understanding of microbial metabolites and guiding the discovery process of anti-infective agents from natural sources. GA40, a Bacillus amyloliquefaciens strain isolated from an octocoral in Panama, displayed antifungal activity against various terrestrial and marine fungal strains. Using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-imaging mass spectrometry (MALDI-IMS), the molecular species produced by this microbe were visualized in a side-by-side interaction with two representative fungal strains, Aspergillus fumigatus and Aspergillus niger. The visualization was performed directly on the agar without the need for extraction. By evaluating the spatial distributions, relative intensities and m/z values of GA40 secreted metabolites in the fungal interactions and singly grown control colonies, we obtained insight into the antifungal activity of secreted metabolites. Annotation of GA40 metabolites observed in MALDI-IMS was facilitated by MS/MS networking analysis, a mass spectrometric technique that clusters metabolites with similar MS/MS fragmentation patterns. This analysis established that the predominant GA40 metabolites belong to the iturin family. In a fungal inhibition assay of A. fumigatus, the GA40 iturin metabolites were found to be responsible for the antifungal properties of this Bacillus strain.

  20. Ambient Mass Spectrometry Imaging Using Direct Liquid Extraction Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Laskin, Julia; Lanekoff, Ingela

    2015-11-13

    Mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) is a powerful analytical technique that enables label-free spatial localization and identification of molecules in complex samples.1-4 MSI applications range from forensics5 to clinical research6 and from understanding microbial communication7-8 to imaging biomolecules in tissues.1, 9-10 Recently, MSI protocols have been reviewed.11 Ambient ionization techniques enable direct analysis of complex samples under atmospheric pressure without special sample pretreatment.3, 12-16 In fact, in ambient ionization mass spectrometry, sample processing (e.g., extraction, dilution, preconcentration, or desorption) occurs during the analysis.17 This substantially speeds up analysis and eliminates any possible effects of sample preparation on the localization of molecules in the sample.3, 8, 12-14, 18-20 Venter and co-workers have classified ambient ionization techniques into three major categories based on the sample processing steps involved: 1) liquid extraction techniques, in which analyte molecules are removed from the sample and extracted into a solvent prior to ionization; 2) desorption techniques capable of generating free ions directly from substrates; and 3) desorption techniques that produce larger particles subsequently captured by an electrospray plume and ionized.17 This review focuses on localized analysis and ambient imaging of complex samples using a subset of ambient ionization methods broadly defined as “liquid extraction techniques” based on the classification introduced by Venter and co-workers.17 Specifically, we include techniques where analyte molecules are desorbed from solid or liquid samples using charged droplet bombardment, liquid extraction, physisorption, chemisorption, mechanical force, laser ablation, or laser capture microdissection. Analyte extraction is followed by soft ionization that generates ions corresponding to intact species. Some of the key advantages of liquid extraction techniques include the ease

  1. MALDI Mass Spectrometry Imaging of Neuronal Cell Cultures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmerman, Tyler A.; Rubakhin, Stanislav S.; Sweedler, Jonathan V.

    2011-05-01

    Mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) provides the ability to detect and identify a broad range of analytes and their spatial distributions from a variety of sample types, including tissue sections. Here we describe an approach for probing neuropeptides from sparse cell cultures using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) MSI—at single cell spatial resolution—in both MS and tandem MS modes. Cultures of Aplysia californica neurons are grown on an array of glass beads embedded in a stretchable layer of Parafilm M. As the membrane is stretched, the beads/neurons are separated physically and the separated beads/neurons analyzed via MALDI TOF MS. Compared with direct MS imaging of samples, the stretching procedure enhances analyte extraction and incorporation into the MALDI matrix, with negligible analyte spread between separated beads. MALDI tandem MSI using the stretched imaging approach yields localization maps of both parent and fragment ions from Aplysia pedal peptide, thereby confirming peptide identification. This methodology represents a flexible platform for MSI investigation of a variety of cell cultures, including functioning neuronal networks.

  2. Protocols for three-dimensional molecular imaging using mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wucher, Andreas; Cheng, Juan; Winograd, Nicholas

    2007-08-01

    A protocol for three-dimensional molecular thin-film analysis is described that utilizes imaging time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry and large-area atomic force microscopy. As a test study, a 300-nm trehalose film deposited on a Si substrate was structured by bombardment with a focused 15-keV Ga+ ion beam and analyzed using a 40-keV C60+ cluster ion beam. A three-dimensional sputter depth profile was acquired as a series of high-resolution lateral SIMS images with intermittent erosion cycles. As the most important result of this study, we find that the structured film exhibits a highly nonuniform erosion rate, thus preventing a simple conversion of primary ion fluence into eroded depth. Instead, the depth scale calibration must be performed individually on each pixel of the imaged area. The resulting laterally resolved depth profiles are discussed in terms of the chemical damage induced by the Ga+ bombardment along with the physics of the C60+ induced erosion process.

  3. Preliminary Three Dimensional CME Mass and Energy Using Solar Mass Ejection Imager (SMEI) Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, B. V.; Buffington, A.; Hick, P. P.; Yu, Y.; Webb, D.; Mizuno, D.; Kuchar, T.

    2005-05-01

    White-light Thomson scattering observations from the Solar Mass Ejection Imager (SMEI) have recorded the inner heliospheric response to several hundred CMEs including the May 28, 2003 halo CME, the October 28, 2003 halo CME, and numerous other heliospheric structures. Here we show the extent of several well-observed CMEs in SMEI observations, and show how we are able to track events from their first measurements in SMEI approximately 20° from the solar disk until they vanish from the SMEI 180° field of view. Several portions of large CMEs observed by the LASCO coronagraphs can be tracked into the interplanetary medium associated with the initial CME response and the underlying erupting prominence structure. We use a 3D reconstruction technique that obtains perspective views from outward-flowing solar wind as observed from Earth, iteratively fitting a kinematic solar wind density model using the SMEI white light observations and, when available, the Solar-Terrestrial Environment Laboratory (STELab), Japan interplanetary scintillation (IPS) velocity data. This 3D modeling technique allows us to separate the heliospheric response in SMEI from background noise, and to estimate the 3D structure of the CME and its mass. For instance, the analysis shows and tracks outward the northward portion of the loop structure of the October 28, 2003 CME observed as a halo in LASCO images that passes Earth on October 29. We determine an excess mass for this structure of 6.7×1016g and a total mass including an ambient background of 8.3×1016g. The very fast structure compared in a 3D pixel to pixel comparison with the IPS velocity data gives a kinetic energy for the northward portion of this event of 2.0×1034erg as it passes Earth.

  4. Matrix Factorization Techniques for Analysis of Imaging Mass Spectrometry Data

    PubMed Central

    Siy, Peter W.; Moffitt, Richard A.; Parry, R. Mitchell; Chen, Yanfeng; Liu, Ying; Sullards, M. Cameron; Merrill, Alfred H.; Wang, May D.

    2016-01-01

    Imaging mass spectrometry is a method for understanding the molecular distribution in a two-dimensional sample. This method is effective for a wide range of molecules, but generates a large amount of data. It is difficult to extract important information from these large datasets manually and automated methods for discovering important spatial and spectral features are needed. Independent component analysis and non-negative matrix factorization are explained and explored as tools for identifying underlying factors in the data. These techniques are compared and contrasted with principle component analysis, the more standard analysis tool. Independent component analysis and non-negative matrix factorization are found to be more effective analysis methods. A mouse cerebellum dataset is used for testing.

  5. Imaging Mass Spectrometric Analysis of Neurotransmitters: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Romero-Perez, Gustavo A.; Takei, Shiro; Yao, Ikuko

    2014-01-01

    Imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) is a toolbox of versatile techniques that enable us to investigate analytes in samples at molecular level. In recent years, IMS, and especially matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation (MALDI), has been used to visualise a wide range of metabolites in biological samples. Simultaneous visualisation of the spatial distribution of metabolites in a single sample with little tissue disruption can be considered as one important advantage of MALDI over other techniques. However, several technical hurdles including low concentrations and rapid degradation rates of small molecule metabolites, matrix interference of signals and poor ionisation, need to be addressed before MALDI can be considered as a reliable tool for the analysis of metabolites such as neurotransmitters in brain tissues from different sources including humans. In the present review we will briefly describe current MALDI IMS techniques used to study neurotransmitters and discuss their current status, challenges, as well as future prospects. PMID:26819893

  6. Imaging Mass Spectrometric Analysis of Neurotransmitters: A Review.

    PubMed

    Romero-Perez, Gustavo A; Takei, Shiro; Yao, Ikuko

    2014-01-01

    Imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) is a toolbox of versatile techniques that enable us to investigate analytes in samples at molecular level. In recent years, IMS, and especially matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation (MALDI), has been used to visualise a wide range of metabolites in biological samples. Simultaneous visualisation of the spatial distribution of metabolites in a single sample with little tissue disruption can be considered as one important advantage of MALDI over other techniques. However, several technical hurdles including low concentrations and rapid degradation rates of small molecule metabolites, matrix interference of signals and poor ionisation, need to be addressed before MALDI can be considered as a reliable tool for the analysis of metabolites such as neurotransmitters in brain tissues from different sources including humans. In the present review we will briefly describe current MALDI IMS techniques used to study neurotransmitters and discuss their current status, challenges, as well as future prospects.

  7. Research and design of high speed mass image storage system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yu-feng; Xue, Rong-kun; Liang, Fei

    2009-07-01

    The design of the high mass image storage system is introduced using DSP, FPGA and Flash structure. Texas Instruments Corporation DSP chip (TMS320VC5509APEG) is used as the main controller, Samsung's Flash chips (K9F2G08U0M) used as the main storage medium, and the Xilinx Corporation FPGA chip (XCV600E) used as logic control modules. In this system, Storage module consists of 32 Flash memory chips, which are divided into 8 groups that correspond to 8-level pipeline. The 4-Flash memory chip forms a basic 32-bit memory module. The entire system storage space is 64 G bit. Through simulation and verification, the storage speed is up to 352Mbps and readout speed is up to 290Mbps, it can meet the demand to the high-speed access, and which has strong environmental adaptability.

  8. MALDI imaging mass spectrometry of neuropeptides in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Hanrieder, Jörg; Ljungdahl, Anna; Andersson, Malin

    2012-02-14

    MALDI imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) is a powerful approach that facilitates the spatial analysis of molecular species in biological tissue samples(2) (Fig.1). A 12 μm thin tissue section is covered with a MALDI matrix, which facilitates desorption and ionization of intact peptides and proteins that can be detected with a mass analyzer, typically using a MALDI TOF/TOF mass spectrometer. Generally hundreds of peaks can be assessed in a single rat brain tissue section. In contrast to commonly used imaging techniques, this approach does not require prior knowledge of the molecules of interest and allows for unsupervised and comprehensive analysis of multiple molecular species while maintaining high molecular specificity and sensitivity(2). Here we describe a MALDI IMS based approach for elucidating region-specific distribution profiles of neuropeptides in the rat brain of an animal model Parkinson's disease (PD). PD is a common neurodegenerative disease with a prevalence of 1% for people over 65 of age(3,4). The most common symptomatic treatment is based on dopamine replacement using L-DOPA(5). However this is accompanied by severe side effects including involuntary abnormal movements, termed L-DOPA-induced dyskinesias (LID)(1,3,6). One of the most prominent molecular change in LID is an upregulation of the opioid precursor prodynorphin mRNA(7). The dynorphin peptides modulate neurotransmission in brain areas that are essentially involved in movement control(7,8). However, to date the exact opioid peptides that originate from processing of the neuropeptide precursor have not been characterized. Therefore, we utilized MALDI IMS in an animal model of experimental Parkinson's disease and L-DOPA induced dyskinesia. MALDI imaging mass spectrometry proved to be particularly advantageous with respect to neuropeptide characterization, since commonly used antibody based approaches targets known peptide sequences and previously observed post-translational modifications. By

  9. MALDI Imaging Mass Spectrometry of Neuropeptides in Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hanrieder, Jörg; Ljungdahl, Anna; Andersson, Malin

    2012-01-01

    MALDI imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) is a powerful approach that facilitates the spatial analysis of molecular species in biological tissue samples2 (Fig.1). A 12 μm thin tissue section is covered with a MALDI matrix, which facilitates desorption and ionization of intact peptides and proteins that can be detected with a mass analyzer, typically using a MALDI TOF/TOF mass spectrometer. Generally hundreds of peaks can be assessed in a single rat brain tissue section. In contrast to commonly used imaging techniques, this approach does not require prior knowledge of the molecules of interest and allows for unsupervised and comprehensive analysis of multiple molecular species while maintaining high molecular specificity and sensitivity2. Here we describe a MALDI IMS based approach for elucidating region-specific distribution profiles of neuropeptides in the rat brain of an animal model Parkinson's disease (PD). PD is a common neurodegenerative disease with a prevalence of 1% for people over 65 of age3,4. The most common symptomatic treatment is based on dopamine replacement using L-DOPA5. However this is accompanied by severe side effects including involuntary abnormal movements, termed L-DOPA-induced dyskinesias (LID)1,3,6. One of the most prominent molecular change in LID is an upregulation of the opioid precursor prodynorphin mRNA7. The dynorphin peptides modulate neurotransmission in brain areas that are essentially involved in movement control7,8. However, to date the exact opioid peptides that originate from processing of the neuropeptide precursor have not been characterized. Therefore, we utilized MALDI IMS in an animal model of experimental Parkinson's disease and L-DOPA induced dyskinesia. MALDI imaging mass spectrometry proved to be particularly advantageous with respect to neuropeptide characterization, since commonly used antibody based approaches targets known peptide sequences and previously observed post-translational modifications. By contrast MALDI

  10. Multi-isotope approach: a tool to better constrain both sources and processes affecting NO3 pollution in watersheds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Widory, D.

    2006-12-01

    Nitrate is one of the major pollutants of drinking water resources worldwide. Recent European directives reduced inputs from intensive agriculture, but in most places NO3 levels are approaching the potable limit of 50 mg.l-1 in groundwater. Determining the source(s) of contamination in groundwater is an important first step for improving its quality by emission control. It is with this aim that we review here the benefit of using a multi- isotope approach (d15N, d180, d11B and 87Sr/86Sr), in addition to conventional hydrogeological analysis, to both constrain the watersheds hydrology and trace the origin of their NO3 pollution. Watersheds presented here include both fractured bedrock and alluvial (subsurface and deep) hydrogeological contexts. The strontium budget in watersheds is mainly controlled by the water-rock interactions (human inputs usually represents negligible fluxes). With the example of the Allier river (Central France), we show that, even on a very small watershed, the main water flows can usually be determined by the use of the 87Sr/86Sr ratios, thus helping understanding the hydrology controlling pollution processes. The characterisation of the different usual nitrate sources of pollution in groundwater (mineral fertilisers, wastewater and animals manure) shows that they can clearly be discriminated using isotopes. The isotopic composition of the dissolved nitrogen species has been used extensively to better constrain the sources and fate of nitrate in groundwater. The possibility of quantifying both origin and secondary processes affecting N concentrations by means of a single tracer appears more limited however. Nitrogen cannot be considered conservative because it is biologically modified through nitrification and denitrification reactions, both during infiltration of the water and in the groundwater body, causing isotopic fractionation that modifies the d15N-n signatures of the dissolved N species. Discriminating multiple NO3 sources by their N

  11. High Resolution MALDI Imaging Mass Spectrometry of Retinal Tissue Lipids

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, David M. G.; Ablonczy, Zsolt; Koutalos, Yiannis; Spraggins, Jeffrey; Crouch, Rosalie K.; Caprioli, Richard M.; Schey, Kevin L.

    2014-01-01

    Matrix assisted laser desorption ionization imaging mass spectrometry (MALDI IMS) has the ability to provide an enormous amount of information on the abundances and spatial distributions of molecules within biological tissues. The rapid progress in the development of this technology significantly improves our ability to analyze smaller and smaller areas and features within tissues. The mammalian eye has evolved over millions of years to become an essential asset for survival, providing important sensory input of an organism’s surroundings. The highly complex sensory retina of the eye is comprised of numerous cell types organized into specific layers with varying dimensions, the thinnest of which is the 10 μm retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). This single cell layer and the photoreceptor layer contain the complex biochemical machinery required to convert photons of light into electrical signals that are transported to the brain by axons of retinal ganglion cells. Diseases of the retina including age related macular degeneration (AMD), retinitis pigmentosa, and diabetic retinopathy occur when the functions of these cells are interrupted by molecular processes that are not fully understood. In this report, we demonstrate the use of high spatial resolution MALDI IMS and FT-ICR tandem mass spectrometry in the Abca4−/− knockout mouse model of Stargardt disease, a juvenile onset form of macular degeneration. The spatial distributions and identity of lipid and retinoid metabolites are shown to be unique to specific retinal cell layers. PMID:24819461

  12. High resolution MALDI imaging mass spectrometry of retinal tissue lipids.

    PubMed

    Anderson, David M G; Ablonczy, Zsolt; Koutalos, Yiannis; Spraggins, Jeffrey; Crouch, Rosalie K; Caprioli, Richard M; Schey, Kevin L

    2014-08-01

    Matrix assisted laser desorption ionization imaging mass spectrometry (MALDI IMS) has the ability to provide an enormous amount of information on the abundances and spatial distributions of molecules within biological tissues. The rapid progress in the development of this technology significantly improves our ability to analyze smaller and smaller areas and features within tissues. The mammalian eye has evolved over millions of years to become an essential asset for survival, providing important sensory input of an organism's surroundings. The highly complex sensory retina of the eye is comprised of numerous cell types organized into specific layers with varying dimensions, the thinnest of which is the 10 μm retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). This single cell layer and the photoreceptor layer contain the complex biochemical machinery required to convert photons of light into electrical signals that are transported to the brain by axons of retinal ganglion cells. Diseases of the retina, including age-related macular degeneration (AMD), retinitis pigmentosa, and diabetic retinopathy, occur when the functions of these cells are interrupted by molecular processes that are not fully understood. In this report, we demonstrate the use of high spatial resolution MALDI IMS and FT-ICR tandem mass spectrometry in the Abca4(-/-) knockout mouse model of Stargardt disease, a juvenile onset form of macular degeneration. The spatial distributions and identity of lipid and retinoid metabolites are shown to be unique to specific retinal cell layers.

  13. High Resolution MALDI Imaging Mass Spectrometry of Retinal Tissue Lipids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, David M. G.; Ablonczy, Zsolt; Koutalos, Yiannis; Spraggins, Jeffrey; Crouch, Rosalie K.; Caprioli, Richard M.; Schey, Kevin L.

    2014-08-01

    Matrix assisted laser desorption ionization imaging mass spectrometry (MALDI IMS) has the ability to provide an enormous amount of information on the abundances and spatial distributions of molecules within biological tissues. The rapid progress in the development of this technology significantly improves our ability to analyze smaller and smaller areas and features within tissues. The mammalian eye has evolved over millions of years to become an essential asset for survival, providing important sensory input of an organism's surroundings. The highly complex sensory retina of the eye is comprised of numerous cell types organized into specific layers with varying dimensions, the thinnest of which is the 10 μm retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). This single cell layer and the photoreceptor layer contain the complex biochemical machinery required to convert photons of light into electrical signals that are transported to the brain by axons of retinal ganglion cells. Diseases of the retina, including age-related macular degeneration (AMD), retinitis pigmentosa, and diabetic retinopathy, occur when the functions of these cells are interrupted by molecular processes that are not fully understood. In this report, we demonstrate the use of high spatial resolution MALDI IMS and FT-ICR tandem mass spectrometry in the Abca4 -/- knockout mouse model of Stargardt disease, a juvenile onset form of macular degeneration. The spatial distributions and identity of lipid and retinoid metabolites are shown to be unique to specific retinal cell layers.

  14. Improved mass resolution and mass accuracy in TOF-SIMS spectra and images using argon gas cluster ion beams.

    PubMed

    Shon, Hyun Kyong; Yoon, Sohee; Moon, Jeong Hee; Lee, Tae Geol

    2016-06-09

    The popularity of argon gas cluster ion beams (Ar-GCIB) as primary ion beams in time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS) has increased because the molecular ions of large organic- and biomolecules can be detected with less damage to the sample surfaces. However, Ar-GCIB is limited by poor mass resolution as well as poor mass accuracy. The inferior quality of the mass resolution in a TOF-SIMS spectrum obtained by using Ar-GCIB compared to the one obtained by a bismuth liquid metal cluster ion beam and others makes it difficult to identify unknown peaks because of the mass interference from the neighboring peaks. However, in this study, the authors demonstrate improved mass resolution in TOF-SIMS using Ar-GCIB through the delayed extraction of secondary ions, a method typically used in TOF mass spectrometry to increase mass resolution. As for poor mass accuracy, although mass calibration using internal peaks with low mass such as hydrogen and carbon is a common approach in TOF-SIMS, it is unsuited to the present study because of the disappearance of the low-mass peaks in the delayed extraction mode. To resolve this issue, external mass calibration, another regularly used method in TOF-MS, was adapted to enhance mass accuracy in the spectrum and image generated by TOF-SIMS using Ar-GCIB in the delayed extraction mode. By producing spectra analyses of a peptide mixture and bovine serum albumin protein digested with trypsin, along with image analyses of rat brain samples, the authors demonstrate for the first time the enhancement of mass resolution and mass accuracy for the purpose of analyzing large biomolecules in TOF-SIMS using Ar-GCIB through the use of delayed extraction and external mass calibration.

  15. Distinguishing splenosis from renal masses using ferumoxide-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Berman, Adam J; Zahalsky, Michael P; Okon, Stephen A; Wagner, Joseph R

    2003-10-01

    A 43-year-old man with a history of splenectomy was found to have a solid renal mass on computed tomography. Magnetic resonance imaging with ferumoxide characterized this mass as ectopic splenic tissue and nephrectomy was avoided.

  16. Interkingdom metabolic transformations captured by microbial imaging mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Moree, Wilna J.; Phelan, Vanessa V.; Wu, Cheng-Hsuan; Bandeira, Nuno; Cornett, Dale S.; Duggan, Brendan M.; Dorrestein, Pieter C.

    2012-01-01

    In polymicrobial infections, microbes can interact with both the host immune system and one another through direct contact or the secretion of metabolites, affecting disease progression and treatment options. The thick mucus in the lungs of patients with cystic fibrosis is highly susceptible to polymicrobial infections by opportunistic pathogens, including the bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa and the fungus Aspergillus fumigatus. Unravelling the hidden molecular interactions within such polymicrobial communities and their metabolic exchange processes will require effective enabling technologies applied to model systems. In the present study, MALDI-TOF and MALDI-FT-ICR imaging mass spectrometry (MALDI-IMS) combined with MS/MS networking were used to provide insight into the interkingdom interaction between P. aeruginosa and A. fumigatus at the molecular level. The combination of these technologies enabled the visualization and identification of metabolites secreted by these microorganisms grown on agar. A complex molecular interplay was revealed involving suppression, increased production, and biotransformation of a range of metabolites. Of particular interest is the observation that P. aeruginosa phenazine metabolites were converted by A. fumigatus into other chemical entities with alternative properties, including enhanced toxicities and the ability to induce fungal siderophores. This work highlights the capabilities of MALDI-IMS and MS/MS network analysis to study interkingdom interactions and provides insight into the complex nature of polymicrobial metabolic exchange and biotransformations. PMID:22869730

  17. Matrix Effects in Biological Mass Spectrometry Imaging: Identification and Compensation

    SciTech Connect

    Lanekoff, Ingela T.; Stevens, Susan; Stenzel-Poore, Mary; Laskin, Julia

    2014-07-21

    Matrix effects in mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) may affect the observed molecular distribution in chemical and biological systems. In this study, we introduce an experimental approach that efficiently compensates for matrix effects in nanospray desorption electrospray ionization (nano-DESI) MSI without introducing any complexity into the experimental protocol. We demonstrate compensation for matrix effects in nano-DESI MSI of phosphatidylcholine (PC) in normal and ischemic mouse brain tissue by doping the nano-DESI solvent with PC standards. Specifically, we use mouse brain tissue of a middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) stroke model with an ischemic region localized to one hemisphere of the brain. Due to similar suppression in ionization of endogenous PC molecules extracted from the tissue and PC standards added to the solvent, matrix effects are eliminated by normalizing the intensity of the sodium and potassium adducts of endogenous PC to the intensity of the corresponding adduct of the PC standard. This approach efficiently compensates for signal variations resulting from differences in the local concentrations of sodium and potassium in tissue sections and from the complexity of the extracted analyte mixture derived from local variations in molecular composition.

  18. Magnetic resonance imaging safety of the floating mass transducer.

    PubMed

    Todt, Ingo; Rademacher, Grit; Wagner, Friederike; Schedlbauer, Eva; Wagner, Jan; Basta, Dietmar; Ernst, Arne

    2010-12-01

    The goals of this study are to observe 1.5-T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-related changes to the Vibrant Soundbridge floating mass transducer (FMT) magnetization, function, and position in different coupling modes within the middle ear; changes to middle ear structures; and effects on the transfer function to the inner ear. The MRI safety of implantable hearing devices is important in daily routine clinical care as well as in urgent care. Nine FMTs were repeatedly investigated before and after MRI scanning. Changes in the position of the FMT (round window, incus, and stapes) and in the ossicular chain in temporal bones were estimated by microscopy, microendoscopy, and flat panel angiography. Functional investigations of the FMT in different coupling modes were done using laser Doppler vibrometry. Qualitative demagnetization could be ruled out in all specimens after up to 11 MRI scans. In FMT couplings to the long process of the incus (n = 18), positional changes were found in 5 temporal bones. A disarticulation or exarticulation of the ossicles was not observed. Mean laser Doppler vibrometry measurements showed MRI-related changes in the stapes velocity. In FMT couplings to the round window (n = 23), we observed a fixation-dependent influence of MRI scanning on the FMT position and mean transfer function. The functional integrity of the FMT was not significantly influenced after multiple MRI scans. Positional changes of the FMT within the middle ear are possible, but we observed no structural damage to middle ear structures. Effects on the transfer function are possible.

  19. A fast microchannel plate-scintillator detector for velocity map imaging and imaging mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Winter, B.; King, S. J.; Vallance, C.; Brouard, M.

    2014-02-15

    The time resolution achievable using standard position-sensitive ion detectors, consisting of a chevron pair of microchannel plates coupled to a phosphor screen, is primarily limited by the emission lifetime of the phosphor, around 70 ns for the most commonly used P47 phosphor. We demonstrate that poly-para-phenylene laser dyes may be employed extremely effectively as scintillators, exhibiting higher brightness and much shorter decay lifetimes than P47. We provide an extensive characterisation of the properties of such scintillators, with a particular emphasis on applications in velocity-map imaging and microscope-mode imaging mass spectrometry. The most promising of the new scintillators exhibits an electron-to-photon conversion efficiency double that of P47, with an emission lifetime an order of magnitude shorter. The new scintillator screens are vacuum stable and show no signs of signal degradation even over longer periods of operation.

  20. A fast microchannel plate-scintillator detector for velocity map imaging and imaging mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Winter, B; King, S J; Brouard, M; Vallance, C

    2014-02-01

    The time resolution achievable using standard position-sensitive ion detectors, consisting of a chevron pair of microchannel plates coupled to a phosphor screen, is primarily limited by the emission lifetime of the phosphor, around 70 ns for the most commonly used P47 phosphor. We demonstrate that poly-para-phenylene laser dyes may be employed extremely effectively as scintillators, exhibiting higher brightness and much shorter decay lifetimes than P47. We provide an extensive characterisation of the properties of such scintillators, with a particular emphasis on applications in velocity-map imaging and microscope-mode imaging mass spectrometry. The most promising of the new scintillators exhibits an electron-to-photon conversion efficiency double that of P47, with an emission lifetime an order of magnitude shorter. The new scintillator screens are vacuum stable and show no signs of signal degradation even over longer periods of operation.

  1. Determination of geographic provenance of cotton fibres using multi-isotope profiles and multivariate statistical analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daeid, N. Nic; Meier-Augenstein, W.; Kemp, H. F.

    2012-04-01

    The analysis of cotton fibres can be particularly challenging within a forensic science context where discrimination of one fibre from another is of importance. Normally cotton fibre analysis examines the morphological structure of the recovered material and compares this with that of a known fibre from a particular source of interest. However, the conventional microscopic and chemical analysis of fibres and any associated dyes is generally unsuccessful because of the similar morphology of the fibres. Analysis of the dyes which may have been applied to the cotton fibre can also be undertaken though this can be difficult and unproductive in terms of discriminating one fibre from another. In the study presented here we have explored the potential for Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry (IRMS) to be utilised as an additional tool for cotton fibre analysis in an attempt to reveal further discriminatory information. This work has concentrated on un-dyed cotton fibres of known origin in order to expose the potential of the analytical technique. We report the results of a pilot study aimed at testing the hypothesis that multi-element stable isotope analysis of cotton fibres in conjunction with multivariate statistical analysis of the resulting isotopic abundance data using well established chemometric techniques permits sample provenancing based on the determination of where the cotton was grown and as such will facilitate sample discrimination. To date there is no recorded literature of this type of application of IRMS to cotton samples, which may be of forensic science relevance.

  2. Multi isotopic characterization (Li-Cu-Zn-Pb) of waste waters pollution in a small watershed (Loire River basin, France)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Millot, R.; Desaulty, A. M.; Perret, S.; Bourrain, X.

    2016-12-01

    The goal of this study is to use multi-isotopic signature to track the pollution in surface waters, and to understand the complex processes causing the metals mobilization and transport in the environment. In the present study, we investigate waste water releases from a hospital water treatment plant and its potential impact in a small river basin near Orléans in France (Egoutier watershed: 15 km²and 5 km long). We decided to monitor this small watershed which is poorly urbanized in the Loire river basin. Its spring is located in a pristine area (forested area), while it is only impacted some kilometers further by the releases rich in metals coming from a hospital water treatment plant. A sampling of these liquid effluents as well as dissolved load and sediment from upstream to downstream was realized and their concentrations and isotopic data were determined. Isotopic ratios were measured using a MC-ICP-MS at BRGM, after a specific protocol of purification for each isotopic systematics. Lithium isotopic compositions are rather homogeneous in river waters along the main course of the stream. The waste water signal is very different from the natural background with significant heavy lithium contribution (high δ7Li). Lead isotopic compositions are rather homogenous in river waters and sediments with values close to geologic background. For Zn, the sediments with high concentrations and depleted isotopic compositions (low δ66Zn), typical of an anthropic pollution, are strongly impacted. The analyses of Cu isotopes in sediments show the impact of waster waters, but also isotopic fractionations due to redox processes in the watershed. To better understand these processes controlling the release of metals in water, sequential extractions on sediments are in progress under laboratory conditions and will provide important constraints for metal distribution in this river basin.

  3. The multi-isotope process monitor: Non-destructive, near-real-time nuclear safeguards monitoring at a reprocessing facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orton, Christopher Robert

    The IAEA will require advanced technologies to effectively safeguard nuclear material at envisioned large scale nuclear reprocessing plants. This dissertation describes results from simulations and experiments designed to test the Multi-Isotope Process (MIP) Monitor, a novel safeguards approach for process monitoring in reprocessing plants. The MIP Monitor combines the detection of intrinsic gamma ray signatures emitted from process solutions with multivariate analysis to detect off-normal conditions in process streams, nondestructively and in near-real time (NRT). Three different models were used to predict spent nuclear fuel composition, estimate chemical distribution during separation, and simulate spectra from a variety of gamma detectors in product and raffinate streams for processed fuel. This was done for fuel with various irradiation histories and under a variety of plant operating conditions. Experiments were performed to validate the results from the model. Three segments of commercial spent nuclear fuel with variations in burnup and cooling time were dissolved and subjected to a batch PUREX method to separate the uranium and plutonium from fission and activation products. Gamma spectra were recorded by high purity germanium (HPGe) and cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) detectors. Hierarchal Cluster Analysis (HCA) and Principal Component Analysis (PCA) were applied to spectra from both model and experiment to investigate spectral variations as a function of acid concentration, burnup level and cooling time. Partial Least Squares was utilized to extract quantitative information about process variables, such as acid concentration or burnup. The MIP Monitor was found to be sensitive to the induced variations of the process and was capable of extracting quantitative process information from the analyzed spectra.

  4. Origins and processes of groundwater salinization in the urban coastal aquifers of Recife (Pernambuco, Brazil): A multi-isotope approach.

    PubMed

    Cary, Lise; Petelet-Giraud, Emmanuelle; Bertrand, Guillaume; Kloppmann, Wolfram; Aquilina, Luc; Martins, Veridiana; Hirata, Ricardo; Montenegro, Suzana; Pauwels, Hélène; Chatton, Eliot; Franzen, Melissa; Aurouet, Axel

    2015-10-15

    In the coastal multilayer aquifer system of a highly urbanized southern city (Recife, Brazil), where groundwaters are affected by salinization, a multi-isotope approach (Sr, B, O, H) was used to investigate the sources and processes of salinization. The high diversity of the geological bodies, built since the Atlantic opening during the Cretaceous, highly constrains the heterogeneity of the groundwater chemistry, e.g. Sr isotope ratios, and needs to be integrated to explain the salinization processes and groundwater pathways. A paleoseawater intrusion, most probably the 120 kyB.P. Pleistocene marine transgression, and cationic exchange are clearly evidenced in the most salinized parts of the Cabo and Beberibe aquifers. All (87)Sr/(86)Sr values are above the past and present-day seawater signatures, meaning that the Sr isotopic signature is altered due to additional Sr inputs from dilution with different freshwaters, and water-rock interactions. Only the Cabo aquifer presents a well-delimitated area of Na-HCO3 water typical of a freshening process. The two deep aquifers also display a broad range of B concentrations and B isotope ratios with values among the highest known to date (63-68.5‰). This suggests multiple sources and processes affecting B behavior, among which mixing with saline water, B sorption on clays and mixing with wastewater. The highly fractionated B isotopic values were explained by infiltration of relatively salty water with B interacting with clays, pointing out the major role played by (palaeo)-channels for the deep Beberibe aquifer recharge. Based on an increase of salinity at the end of the dry season, a present-day seawater intrusion is identified in the surficial Boa Viagem aquifer. Our conceptual model presents a comprehensive understanding of the major groundwater salinization pathways and processes, and should be of benefit for other southern Atlantic coastal aquifers to better address groundwater management issues. Copyright © 2015

  5. Magnetic resonance imaging of mass transport and structure inside a phototrophic biofilm.

    PubMed

    Ramanan, Baheerathan; Holmes, William M; Sloan, William T; Phoenix, Vernon R

    2013-05-01

    The aim of this study was to utilize magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to image structural heterogeneity and mass transport inside a biofilm which was too thick for photon based imaging. MRI was used to map water diffusion and image the transport of the paramagnetically tagged macromolecule, Gd-DTPA, inside a 2.5 mm thick cyanobacterial biofilm. The structural heterogeneity of the biofilm was imaged at resolutions down to 22 × 22 μm, enabling the impact of biofilm architecture on the mass transport of both water and Gd-DTPA to be investigated. Higher density areas of the biofilm correlated with areas exhibiting lower relative water diffusion coefficients and slower transport of Gd-DTPA, highlighting the impact of biofilm structure on mass transport phenomena. This approach has potential for shedding light on heterogeneous mass transport of a range of molecular mass molecules in biofilms.

  6. Tools and strategies for visualization of large image data sets in high-resolution imaging mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klinkert, Ivo; McDonnell, Liam A.; Luxembourg, Stefan L.; Maarten Altelaar, A. F.; Amstalden, Erika R.; Piersma, Sander R.; Heeren, Ron M. A.

    2007-05-01

    Mass spectrometry based proteomics is one of the scientific domains in which experiments produce a large amount of data that need special environments to interpret the results. Without the use of suitable tools and strategies, the transformation of the large data sets into information is not easily achievable. Therefore, in the context of the virtual laboratory of enhanced science, software tools are developed to handle mass spectrometry data sets. Using different data processing strategies for visualization, it enables fast mass spectrometric imaging of large surfaces at high-spatial resolution and thus aids in the understanding of various diseases and disorders. This article describes how to optimize the handling and processing of the data sets, including the selection of the most optimal data formats and the use of parallel processing. It also describes the tools and solutions and their application in mass spectrometric imaging strategies, including new measurement principles, image enhancement, and image artifact suppression.

  7. The Relationships among Body Image, Body Mass Index, Exercise, and Sexual Functioning in Heterosexual Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weaver, Angela D.; Byers, E. Sandra

    2006-01-01

    Problems related to negative body image are very common among young women. In this study, we examined the relationship between women's body image and their sexual functioning over and above the effects of physical exercise and body mass index (BMI) in a sample of 214 university women. Low situational body image dysphoria and low body…

  8. The Relationships among Body Image, Body Mass Index, Exercise, and Sexual Functioning in Heterosexual Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weaver, Angela D.; Byers, E. Sandra

    2006-01-01

    Problems related to negative body image are very common among young women. In this study, we examined the relationship between women's body image and their sexual functioning over and above the effects of physical exercise and body mass index (BMI) in a sample of 214 university women. Low situational body image dysphoria and low body…

  9. Lung mass, right upper lung - chest x-ray (image)

    MedlinePlus

    This picture is a chest x-ray of a person with a lung mass. This is a front view, where the lungs are the two dark areas and ... visible in the middle of the chest. The x-ray shows a mass in the right upper lung, ...

  10. Mass recalibration of FT-ICR mass spectrometry imaging data using the average frequency shift of ambient ions

    PubMed Central

    Barry, Jeremy A.; Robichaud, Guillaume; Muddiman, David C.

    2013-01-01

    Achieving and maintaining high mass measurement accuracy (MMA) throughout a mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) experiment is vital to the identification of the observed ions. However, when using FTMS instruments, fluctuations in the total ion abundance at each pixel due to inherent biological variation in the tissue section can introduce space charge effects that systematically shift the observed mass. Herein we apply a recalibration based on the observed cyclotron frequency shift of ions found in the ambient laboratory environment, polydimethylcyclosiloxanes (PDMS). This calibration method is capable of achieving part per billion (ppb) mass accuracy with relatively high precision for an infrared matrix-assisted laser desorption electrospray ionization (IR-MALDESI) MSI dataset. Comparisons with previously published mass calibration approaches are also presented. PMID:23715870

  11. Label-free imaging, detection, and mass measurement of single viruses by surface plasmon resonance

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shaopeng; Shan, Xiaonan; Patel, Urmez; Huang, Xinping; Lu, Jin; Li, Jinghong; Tao, Nongjian

    2010-01-01

    We report on label-free imaging, detection, and mass/size measurement of single viral particles in solution by high-resolution surface plasmon resonance microscopy. Diffraction of propagating plasmon waves along a metal surface by the viral particles creates images of the individual particles, which allow us to detect the binding of the viral particles to surfaces functionalized with and without antibodies. We show that the intensity of the particle image is related to the mass of the particle, from which we determine the mass and mass distribution of influenza viral particles with a mass detection limit of approximately 1 ag (or 0.2 fg/mm2). This work demonstrates a multiplexed method to measure the masses of individual viral particles and to study the binding activity of the viral particles. PMID:20798340

  12. Disentangling the complexity of nitrous oxide cycling in coastal sediments: Results from a novel multi-isotope approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wankel, S. D.; Buchwald, C.; Charoenpong, C.; Ziebis, W.

    2014-12-01

    with water in influencing the O isotope composition of N2O from the sediment-water interface. A steady-state multi-isotope flux model will help to constraining rates and isotope effects of these processes and improve our understanding of the dynamics and pathways of N2O production and emission under varying scenarios of environmental change.

  13. Evaluation of risks of groundwater quality alteration in Recife urban area (Pernambuco, Brazil) using a multi-isotopic approach.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertrand, Guillaume; Hirata, Ricardo; Martins, Veridiana; Batista, Jonathan; Bertolo, Reginaldo; Santos, Jeane-Glaucia; Montenegro, Suzanna; Cary, Lise; Petelet-Giraud, Emmanuelle; Pauwels, Hélène; Picot, Géraldine; Braibant, Gilles; Chatton, Eliot; Aquilina, Luc; Labasque, Thierry; Hochreutener, Rebecca; Aurouet, Axel; Franzen, Melissa

    2015-04-01

    The Recife Metropolitan Region (RMR) is a heavily urbanized area located in a estuary zone and over a multi-layered sedimentary system on the Brazilian Atlantic coast. In a context of increasing land use pressures, involving aquifer overexploitation and surface water contamination, and repeated droughts, the identification of groundwater quality risks in RMR is a necessary management requirement. In this perspective, this work focused on the two shallow aquifer systems, named Boa Viagem and Barreiras aquifers, located at the interface between the city (the consumers) and the deeper semi-confined Cretaceous Cabo and Beberibe aquifers. The Holocenic Boa Viagem and Tertiary Barreiras formations conform unconfined sedimentary aquifers, with no more than 80 m of thickness. Cabo is the most important groundwater body for Recife private complementary water supply and it has experienced an intense exploitation in the last three decades. In contrast, Boa Viagem and Barreiras aquifers are more restrictively used, but it is important to understand their water quality degradation,because of hydraulic connections with deeper aquifers, mainly in the littoral part of Recife, where hydraulic potentiometric head of the Cabo aquifer is 60 m below sea water level in some places, with conditions for recharge from shallower aquifers. Through a multi-isotopic characterization (87Sr/86Sr, δ11B, δ18O-SO4, δ34S-SO4) of sampling of 19 wells and 3 surface waters, carried out during two field campaigns with additional geochemical parameters (major ions, noble and major gases, CFC' s and SF6), the spatio-temporal variability of groundwater quality was investigated. The detection of CFC' s, implying a modern recharge component, highlighted the vulnerability of Boa Viagem and Barreiras to surface contaminations. The increasing mineralization and decreasing 87Sr/86Sr from the inland sector wells to the wells located close to the coast or estuary, with higher well and population densities, were

  14. A spatially explicit multi-isotope approach to map influence regions of plant-plant interactions after exotic plant invasion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hellmann, Christine; Oldeland, Jens; Werner, Christiane

    2015-04-01

    Exotic plant invasions impose profound alterations to native ecosystems, including changes of water, carbon and nutrient cycles. However, explicitly quantifying these impacts remains a challenge. Stable isotopes, by providing natural tracers of biogeochemical processes, can help to identify and measure such alterations in space and time. Recently, δ15N isoscapes, i.e. spatially continuous representations of isotopic values, derived from native plant foliage, enabled to accurately trace nitrogen introduced by the N2-fixing invasive Acacia longifolia into a native Portuguese dune system. It could be shown that the area of the system which was altered by the invasive species exceeded the area which was covered by the invader by far. But still, definition of clear regions of influence is to some extent ambiguous. Here, we present an approach using multiple isoscapes derived from measured foliar δ13C and δ15N values of a native, non-fixing species, Corema album. By clustering isotopic information, we obtained an objective classification of the study area. Properties and spatial position of clusters could be interpreted to distinguish areas that were or were not influenced by A. longifolia. Spatial clusters at locations where A. longifolia was present had δ15N values that were enriched, i.e. close to the atmospheric signal of 0 o compared to the depleted values of the uninvaded system (ca. -11 o). Furthermore, C. album individuals in these clusters were characterized by higher foliar N content and enriched δ13C. These results indicate that the N2-fixing A. longifolia added nitrogen to the system which originated from the atmosphere and was used by the native C. album, inducing functional changes, i.e. an increase in WUE. Additionally, clusters were identified that were presumably determined by inherent properties of the native system. Thus, combining isotope ecology with geostatistical methods is a promising approach for mapping regions of influence in multi-isotope

  15. High mass and spatial resolution mass spectrometry imaging of Nicolas Poussin painting cross section by cluster TOF-SIMS.

    PubMed

    Noun, Manale; Van Elslande, Elsa; Touboul, David; Glanville, Helen; Bucklow, Spike; Walter, Philippe; Brunelle, Alain

    2016-12-01

    Time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS) imaging using cluster primary ion beams is used for the identification of the pigments in the painting of Rebecca and Eliezer at the Well by Nicolas Poussin. The combination of the high mass resolution of the technique with a sub-micrometer spatial resolution offered by a delayed extraction of the secondary ions, together with the possibility to simultaneously identifying both minerals and organics, has proved to be the method of choice for the study of the stratigraphy of a paint cross section. The chemical compositions of small grains are shown with the help of a thorough processing of the data, with images of specific ions, mass spectra extracted from small regions of interest, and profiles drawn along the different painting layers. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Magnetic resonance imaging of the pediatric kidney: benign and malignant masses.

    PubMed

    Gee, Michael S; Bittman, Mark; Epelman, Monica; Vargas, Sara O; Lee, Edward Y

    2013-11-01

    The differential diagnosis of renal masses in pediatric patients includes benign and malignant tumors, as well as nonneoplastic mass-like lesions mimicking tumors. Although the spectrum of renal masses in children has some overlap with that of adults, it is important to understand the renal pathologic processes specific to the pediatric population, as well as their characteristic imaging appearances and clinical presentations. This article reviews benign and malignant renal masses in children, with an emphasis on magnetic resonance imaging and clinical features that are specific to each lesion type. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Sonography of Abdominal Wall Masses and Masslike Lesions: Correlation With Computed Tomography and Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Sung Eun; Park, Seong Jin; Moon, Sung Kyoung; Lee, Dong Ho; Lim, Joo Won

    2016-01-01

    Sonography is usually regarded as a first-line imaging modality for masses and masslike lesions in the abdominal wall. A dynamic study focusing on a painful area or palpable mass and the possibility of ultrasound-guided aspiration or biopsy are the major advantages of sonography. On the other hand, cross-sectional imaging clearly shows anatomy of the abdominal wall; thereby, it is valuable for diagnosing and evaluating the extent of diseases. Cross-sectional imaging can help differentiate neoplastic lesions from non-neoplastic lesions. This pictorial essay focuses on sonographic findings of abdominal wall lesions compared with computed tomographic and magnetic resonance imaging findings.

  18. DVP parametric imaging for characterizing ovarian masses in contrast-enhanced ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Sha-sha, H; Li, H; Jie, M; Gui, F; Wen-jun, G; Ming, H; Yang, Z; Qing, Y

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate whether parametric imaging with contrast-enhanced ultrasound is an approach capable of for the differential diagnosis of ovarian masses. The authors analysed 50 cases of ovarian masses by routine ultrasound and contrast-enhanced ultrasound with a new dedicated parametric image processing software-Sonoliver. The angiogenesis and blood perfusion mode on a digital video recorder were recorded and the morphological characteristics of time-intensity curve (TIC) and dynamic vascular pattern (DVP) curve were subsequently described. The quantity factor, including time to peak (TTP), maximum intensity (IMAX), rise time, (RT), mean transit time (mTT), generated by Sonoliver software were compared in both histological gradings. There were 24 cases (86%) displaying mainly hypo-enhanced with blue imaging in those with benign masses and 15 cases (68%) displaying mainly hyper-enhanced imaging with red in those with malignant masses. The difference was statistically significant (p < 0.05). DVP curves were unipolar below the baseline in 23 cases (82%) of benign masses and unipolar above the baseline in 15 cases (68%) of malignant masses. IMAX, TTP, and mTT were all significantly higher in those with malignant masses than those with benign ones (all p < 0.05), but, no statistical difference in the RT between the two groups was found (p > 0.05). According to the results, DVP parametric imaging is a new approach capable of differential diagnoses of overian masses with contrast-enhanced ultrasound.

  19. Fractal morphology, imaging and mass spectrometry of single aerosol particles in flight (CXIDB ID 16)

    DOE Data Explorer

    Loh, N. Duane

    2012-06-20

    This deposition includes the aerosol diffraction images used for phasing, fractal morphology, and time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Files in this deposition are ordered in subdirectories that reflect the specifics.

  20. Multimass velocity-map imaging with the Pixel Imaging Mass Spectrometry (PImMS) sensor: an ultra-fast event-triggered camera for particle imaging.

    PubMed

    Clark, Andrew T; Crooks, Jamie P; Sedgwick, Iain; Turchetta, Renato; Lee, Jason W L; John, Jaya John; Wilman, Edward S; Hill, Laura; Halford, Edward; Slater, Craig S; Winter, Benjamin; Yuen, Wei Hao; Gardiner, Sara H; Lipciuc, M Laura; Brouard, Mark; Nomerotski, Andrei; Vallance, Claire

    2012-11-15

    We present the first multimass velocity-map imaging data acquired using a new ultrafast camera designed for time-resolved particle imaging. The PImMS (Pixel Imaging Mass Spectrometry) sensor allows particle events to be imaged with time resolution as high as 25 ns over data acquisition times of more than 100 μs. In photofragment imaging studies, this allows velocity-map images to be acquired for multiple fragment masses on each time-of-flight cycle. We describe the sensor architecture and present bench-testing data and multimass velocity-map images for photofragments formed in the UV photolysis of two test molecules: Br(2) and N,N-dimethylformamide.

  1. An Image Morphing Technique Based on Optimal Mass Preserving Mapping

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-06-01

    Yan Yang, Steven Haker , and Allen Tannenbaum Abstract—Image morphing, or image interpolation in the time domain, deals with the metamorphosis of one...of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332 USA (e-mail: zlzl@ece.gatech.edu; zhulei1976@hotmail.com; yan.yang@gatech.edu; tannenba@ece.gatech.edu). S. Haker is...with the Surgical Planning Laboratory, Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115 USA (e-mail: haker @bwh.harvard.edu

  2. The Image of Public Relations in Mass Comm Texts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cline, Carolyn

    1982-01-01

    Compared public relations sections in 12 introductory mass communication texts and found a confusion about the relationship of advertising and public relations, a lack of historical background, and an antipublic relations stance. Journal available from Communication Research Associates, 7100 Baltimore Blvd., Suite 500, College Park, MD 20740; sc…

  3. MALDI mass spectrometry imaging of gangliosides in mouse brain using ionic liquid matrix.

    PubMed

    Chan, Kenneth; Lanthier, Patricia; Liu, Xin; Sandhu, Jagdeep K; Stanimirovic, Danica; Li, Jianjun

    2009-04-20

    Mass spectrometry imaging has emerged as a powerful tool for the direct detection of biomolecules, mainly phospholipids, proteins and peptides, in tissue samples. To date, there is very little information available on the direct analysis of gangliosides in brain tissue. One major hurdle for imaging gangliosides in tissue using mass spectrometry is that sialic acid residues can be dissociated in ionization process. In this report, we investigated an ionic liquid matrix for mass spectrometry imaging of gangliosides. This ionic liquid matrix offered excellent sensitivity for detection gangliosides without significant loss of sialic acid residues. Thus, it can be used to study the abundance and anatomical localization of gangliosides in mouse brain using mass spectrometry imaging technique. Mass spectrometry image analyses of the mouse brain tissue sections demonstrated that the N-fatty acyl chains of gangliosides were differentially distributed in mouse hippocampal regions, whereby the gangliosides with N-C(18) acyl chain were enriched in CA1 region, while gangliosides with N-C(20) acyl chain were enriched in dentate gyrus. In addition, this observation is true for mono-, di- and tri-sialylated gangliosides. Although the linkage information was not determined, the mass spectrometry imaging technique was capable of spatial tissue mapping of ceramide structures in gangliosides.

  4. Magnetic resonance diffusion imaging of ovarian masses: a first experience with 12 cases.

    PubMed

    Sarty, Gordon E; Kendall, Edward J; Loewy, John; Dhir, Anita; Olatunbosun, Olufemi A; Pierson, Roger A

    2004-03-01

    The objective of the study was to determine the feasibility of using apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) measurement for the differential diagnosis of malignancy in ovarian masses. Twelve cases involving ovarian masses were imaged using spin echo diffusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Five cases involved malignant ovarian masses, on the basis of postoperative histologic examination, and the rest involved benign masses. The ovarian masses were imaged in vivo (10 cases) before surgery and ex vivo (8 cases) after surgical resection. Diffusion-weighted data were corrected for motion using the phase data from unweighted data in nine cases. Multifactorial analysis of variance was used to evaluate the effects of malignancy, location (in vivo versus ex vivo), and motion correction on the measurement of ADC intensity and texture. Motion correction caused an undesirable spatial smoothing of the ADC maps and a significant interaction (p=0.047) was found between location and motion correction. ADC value (p=0.028) and texture (p=0.001) differences were found between malignant and nonmalignant ovarian masses. Measurement of ADC intensity and texture has the potential to differentially diagnose malignancy in individual ovarian masses if the problem of image motion artifact can be eliminated through the use of faster imaging sequences.

  5. Diagnostic value of magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography for oral masses in dogs.

    PubMed

    Kafka, U C M; Carstens, A; Steenkamp, G; Symington, H

    2004-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the diagnostic value of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT) in oral masses of dogs. Nineteen dogs underwent clinical, MR and CT examinations. Eleven malignant and ten non-malignant masses were evaluated. Osteosarcoma was the most commonly found malignant oral mass and gingival hyperplasia was the most commonly found benign mass. The results showed that MRI provided more accurate information regarding the size of the masses and invasion of adjacent structures although MRI and CT show similar accuracy in assessment of bone invasion. Calcification and cortical bone erosion was better seen on CT images. Whereas contrast-MRI provided useful additional information, contrast-CT had no added benefit. In general, oral masses located in the caudal mandible, oropharynx and maxilla are better evaluated using MRI, once the histological type has been verified.

  6. Optimization of Tomosynthesis Imaging for Improved Mass and Microcalcification Detection in the Breast

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-04-01

    AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH-06-1-0431 TITLE: Optimization of Tomosynthesis Imaging...5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Optimization of Tomosynthesis Imaging for Improved Mass and Microcalcification Detection in the Breast 5b. GRANT NUMBER...progress has been made for the breast tomosynthesis , there are still some issues should be addressed before it becomes suitable for routine clinical use: (1

  7. Temporal Subtraction of Digital Breast Tomosynthesis Images for Improved Mass Detection

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-10-01

    Tomosynthesis Images for Improved Mass Detection PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Christina M. Li...DATES COVERED 15 Sep 2006 – 14 Sep 2007 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Temporal Subtraction of Digital Breast Tomosynthesis Images for...13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT Digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) strives to overcome the obstacles presented in conventional 2D

  8. How to Determine the Centre of Mass of Bodies from Image Modelling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dias, Marco Adriano; Carvalho, Paulo Simeão; Rodrigues, Marcelo

    2016-01-01

    Image modelling is a recent technique in physics education that includes digital tools for image treatment and analysis, such as digital stroboscopic photography (DSP) and video analysis software. It is commonly used to analyse the motion of objects. In this work we show how to determine the position of the centre of mass (CM) of objects with…

  9. How to Determine the Centre of Mass of Bodies from Image Modelling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dias, Marco Adriano; Carvalho, Paulo Simeão; Rodrigues, Marcelo

    2016-01-01

    Image modelling is a recent technique in physics education that includes digital tools for image treatment and analysis, such as digital stroboscopic photography (DSP) and video analysis software. It is commonly used to analyse the motion of objects. In this work we show how to determine the position of the centre of mass (CM) of objects with…

  10. Co-registered Topographical, Band Excitation Nanomechanical, and Mass Spectral Imaging Using a Combined Atomic Force Microscopy/Mass Spectrometry Platform

    SciTech Connect

    Ovchinnikova, Olga S.; Tai, Tamin; Bocharova, Vera; Okatan, Mahmut Baris; Belianinov, Alex; Kertesz, Vilmos; Jesse, Stephen; Van Berkel, Gary J.

    2015-03-18

    The advancement of a hybrid atomic force microscopy/mass spectrometry imaging platform demonstrating for the first time co-registered topographical, band excitation nanomechanical, and mass spectral imaging of a surface using a single instrument is reported. The mass spectrometry-based chemical imaging component of the system utilized nanothermal analysis probes for pyrolytic surface sampling followed by atmospheric pressure chemical ionization of the gas phase species produced with subsequent mass analysis. We discuss the basic instrumental setup and operation and the multimodal imaging capability and utility are demonstrated using a phase separated polystyrene/poly(2-vinylpyridine) polymer blend thin film. The topography and band excitation images showed that the valley and plateau regions of the thin film surface were comprised primarily of one of the two polymers in the blend with the mass spectral chemical image used to definitively identify the polymers at the different locations. Data point pixel size for the topography (390 nm x 390 nm), band excitation (781 nm x 781 nm), mass spectrometry (690 nm x 500 nm) images was comparable and submicrometer in all three cases, but the data voxel size for each of the three images was dramatically different. The topography image was uniquely a surface measurement, whereas the band excitation image included information from an estimated 10 nm deep into the sample and the mass spectral image from 110-140 nm in depth. Moreover, because of this dramatic sampling depth variance, some differences in the band excitation and mass spectrometry chemical images were observed and were interpreted to indicate the presence of a buried interface in the sample. The spatial resolution of the mass spectral image was estimated to be between 1.5 m 2.6 m, based on the ability to distinguish surface features in that image that were also observed in the other images.

  11. Co-registered Topographical, Band Excitation Nanomechanical, and Mass Spectral Imaging Using a Combined Atomic Force Microscopy/Mass Spectrometry Platform

    DOE PAGES

    Ovchinnikova, Olga S.; Tai, Tamin; Bocharova, Vera; ...

    2015-03-18

    The advancement of a hybrid atomic force microscopy/mass spectrometry imaging platform demonstrating for the first time co-registered topographical, band excitation nanomechanical, and mass spectral imaging of a surface using a single instrument is reported. The mass spectrometry-based chemical imaging component of the system utilized nanothermal analysis probes for pyrolytic surface sampling followed by atmospheric pressure chemical ionization of the gas phase species produced with subsequent mass analysis. We discuss the basic instrumental setup and operation and the multimodal imaging capability and utility are demonstrated using a phase separated polystyrene/poly(2-vinylpyridine) polymer blend thin film. The topography and band excitation images showedmore » that the valley and plateau regions of the thin film surface were comprised primarily of one of the two polymers in the blend with the mass spectral chemical image used to definitively identify the polymers at the different locations. Data point pixel size for the topography (390 nm x 390 nm), band excitation (781 nm x 781 nm), mass spectrometry (690 nm x 500 nm) images was comparable and submicrometer in all three cases, but the data voxel size for each of the three images was dramatically different. The topography image was uniquely a surface measurement, whereas the band excitation image included information from an estimated 10 nm deep into the sample and the mass spectral image from 110-140 nm in depth. Moreover, because of this dramatic sampling depth variance, some differences in the band excitation and mass spectrometry chemical images were observed and were interpreted to indicate the presence of a buried interface in the sample. The spatial resolution of the mass spectral image was estimated to be between 1.5 m 2.6 m, based on the ability to distinguish surface features in that image that were also observed in the other images.« less

  12. Multi-Isotope Analysis as a Natural Reaction Probe of Biodegradation Mechanisms of 1,2- Dichloroethane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirschorn, S. K.; Dinglasan-Panlilio, M.; Edwards, E. A.; Lacrampe-Couloume, G.; Sherwood Lollar, B.

    2006-12-01

    1,2-Dichloroethane (1,2-DCA), a chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbon, is an EPA priority pollutant and a widespread groundwater contaminant. Stable isotope fractionation during biodegradation of 1,2-DCA occurs due to differences in the reaction rates of heavy versus light atoms present at a reacting bond in the 1,2-DCA molecule. In general, light isotopic bonds react more quickly, producing a relative enrichment in the heavy isotope in the remaining contaminant pool. Compound specific isotope analysis has the potential to demonstrate the occurrence and extent of biodegradation at chlorinated solvent contaminated groundwater sites. In this study, stable carbon isotope fractionation was used as a novel reaction probe to provide information about the mechanism of 1,2-DCA biodegradation. Isotopic fractionation was measured during 1,2-DCA degradation by a microbial culture capable of degrading 1,2-DCA under O2-reducing and NO3-reducing conditions. The microbial culture produced isotopic enrichment values that are not only large and reproducible, but are the same whether O2 or NO3 was used as an electron acceptor. The mean isotopic enrichment value of -25.8 permil measured for the microbial culture during 1,2-DCA degradation under both O2 and NO3- reducing conditions can be converted into a kinetic isotope effect (KIE) value to relate the observed isotopic fractionation to the mechanism of degradation. This KIE value (1.05) is consistent with degradation via a hydrolysis (SN2) reaction under both electron-accepting conditions. Isotope analysis was able to provide a first line of evidence for the reaction mechanism of 1,2-DCA biodegradation by the microbial culture. Using a multi-isotope approach incorporating both carbon and hydrogen isotopic data, compound specific isotope analysis also has the potential to determine degradation mechanisms for 1,2-DCA under aerobic conditions where 1,2-DCA is known to be degraded by two distinct enzymatic pathways. Biodegradation of 1

  13. Constraints of costal aquifer functioning in a deeply antropized area through a multi-isotope fingerprinting (Recife, Brazil)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petelet-Giraud, Emmanuelle; Cary, Lise; Bertrand, Guillaume; Hirata, Ricardo; Martins, Veridiana; Montenegro, Suzana; Pauwels, Hélène; Kloppmann, Wolfram; Aquilina, Luc

    2014-05-01

    The Metropolitan Region of Recife (RMR) went through large changes of water and land uses over the last decades due to an increasing demographic pressure (1.5 M of inhabitants). These evolutions gave rise to numerous environmental consequences, such as a dramatic decline of the water levels, groundwater salinization and contamination. This degradation of natural resources is linked to the increase of water demand that is also punctually amplified by drought periods, inducing the construction of thousands of private wells. Recife city was built on an estuarine area, at the geological limits of the two sedimentary basins of Pernambuco (north of the city) and Paraíba (south of the city) separated by a famous shear zone (the Pernambuco lineament). Tectonic and sedimentary events involved in the genesis and evolution of these basins were mainly controlled by the opening of the Atlantic Ocean leading to the deposition of cretaceous sediments which now constitute the two main exploited aquifers, the Beberibe and Cabo aquifers. These two deep aquiferous formations are topped by the unconfined Boa Viagem aquifer of quaternary sediments. It is the most directly exposed to contamination, since it is connected to mangroves, rivers, estuaries and highly urbanized areas. Both the Beberibe and Cabo aquifers contain large clay levels and are separated by a rather continuous clayed formation which seems to play a consistent role of screen and to interfere in the hydraulic connections between the three aquifers. Previous isotopic studies have shown that recharge processes are similar in the aquifers, suggesting that exchanges may occur and may be modified or amplified by overexploitation. This very complex aquifer system is studied through more than 60 water samples, including some surface water samples from the main rivers. A methodology based on multi-isotopes fingerprinting is applied, including stable isotopes of the water molecule, strontium isotopes, boron isotopes, sulfur

  14. Nanostructure-initiator mass spectrometry metabolite analysis and imaging.

    PubMed

    Greving, Matthew P; Patti, Gary J; Siuzdak, Gary

    2011-01-01

    Nanostructure-Initiator Mass Spectrometry (NIMS) is a matrix-free desorption/ionization approach that is particularly well-suited for unbiased (untargeted) metabolomics. An overview of the NIMS technology and its application in the detection of biofluid and tissue metabolites are presented. (To listen to a podcast about this feature, please go to the Analytical Chemistry multimedia page at pubs.acs.org/page/ancham/audio/index.html .).

  15. Quantifying Stellar Mass Loss with High Angular Resolution Imaging

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-02-19

    material – via massive winds, planetary nebulae and supernova explosions – seeding the interstellar medium with heavier elements. Subsequent...of Planetary Nebulae (Harpaz, ApJ, 498,293, (1998)), impacts the pre-explosion characteristic of SNII (Taylor, “The Stars”, Cambridge (1994)), and...A 464, 119) or may have an important role, such as Be Stars, W-R stars, and planetary nebulae . The Future of Interferometric O/IR Imaging. The

  16. Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry Imaging of Tissues, Cells, and Microbial Systems

    PubMed Central

    Gamble, Lara J.; Anderton, Christopher R.

    2016-01-01

    Secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) is a technique capable of imaging tissues, single cells, and microbes revealing chemical species with sub-micrometer spatial resolution. The recently developed Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FTICR) SIMS instrument provides high mass resolving power and mass accuracy, ToF-SIMS can generate chemical maps with an order of magnitude better lateral resolution than the FTICR-SIMS, and the NanoSIMS instrument offers sub-100 nm spatial resolution in chemical imaging. Many commercial ToF-SIMS instruments are also capable of depth profiling that allows three-dimensional reconstructions of cell and tissue structure. PMID:27660591

  17. Three-dimensional nanoscale molecular imaging by extreme ultraviolet laser ablation mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Kuznetsov, Ilya; Filevich, Jorge; Dong, Feng; Woolston, Mark; Chao, Weilun; Anderson, Erik H.; Bernstein, Elliot R.; Crick, Dean C.; Rocca, Jorge J.; Menoni, Carmen S.

    2015-01-01

    Analytical probes capable of mapping molecular composition at the nanoscale are of critical importance to materials research, biology and medicine. Mass spectral imaging makes it possible to visualize the spatial organization of multiple molecular components at a sample's surface. However, it is challenging for mass spectral imaging to map molecular composition in three dimensions (3D) with submicron resolution. Here we describe a mass spectral imaging method that exploits the high 3D localization of absorbed extreme ultraviolet laser light and its fundamentally distinct interaction with matter to determine molecular composition from a volume as small as 50 zl in a single laser shot. Molecular imaging with a lateral resolution of 75 nm and a depth resolution of 20 nm is demonstrated. These results open opportunities to visualize chemical composition and chemical changes in 3D at the nanoscale. PMID:25903827

  18. Body Image and its Relation with Body Mass Index among Indian Adolescents.

    PubMed

    Deshmukh, Vaishali R; Kulkarni, Aditi A

    2017-08-24

    To evaluate association of body mass index with perception and attitude towards body weight, shape and body image among adolescents. This cross sectional study was done on 1811 adolescents. Attitude towards body image was assessed by using a self-administered Multidimensional Body-Self Relations Questionnaire. Perceived body shape was measured using the Stunkard scale. Adolescents showed significant difference (P<0.005) in perceptions and behaviors related to appearance, fitness, health, body areas and weight in various body mass index and socioeconomic categories. Girls articulated significantly higher (P<0.005) body dissatisfaction than boys. Adolescents have major concerns regarding body image. Attitudes and perceptions towards body image differ with sex, body mass index and socioeconomic class.

  19. Imaging of Lipids and Metabolites Using Nanospray Desorption Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Lanekoff, Ingela; Laskin, Julia

    2015-01-17

    In recent years, mass spectroscopy imaging (MSI) has emerged as a foundational technique in metabolomics and drug screening providing deeper understanding of complex mechanistic pathways within biochemical systems and biological organisms. We have been invited to contribute a chapter to a new Springer series volume, entitled “Mass Spectrometry Imaging of Small Molecules”. The volume is planned for the highly successful lab protocol series Methods in Molecular Biology, published by Humana Press, USA. The volume is aimed to equip readers with step-by-step mass spectrometric imaging protocols and bring rapidly maturing methods of MS imaging to life science researchers. The chapter will provide a detailed protocol of ambient MSI by use of nanospray desorption electrospray ionization.

  20. Co-registered Topographical, Band Excitation Nanomechanical, and Mass Spectral Imaging Using a Combined Atomic Force Microscopy/Mass Spectrometry Platform.

    PubMed

    Ovchinnikova, Olga S; Tai, Tamin; Bocharova, Vera; Okatan, Mahmut Baris; Belianinov, Alex; Kertesz, Vilmos; Jesse, Stephen; Van Berkel, Gary J

    2015-04-28

    The advancement of a hybrid atomic force microscopy/mass spectrometry imaging platform demonstrating the co-registered topographical, band excitation nanomechanical, and mass spectral imaging of a surface using a single instrument is reported. The mass spectrometry-based chemical imaging component of the system utilized nanothermal analysis probes for pyrolytic surface sampling followed by atmospheric pressure chemical ionization of the gas-phase species produced with subsequent mass analysis. The basic instrumental setup and operation are discussed, and the multimodal imaging capability and utility are demonstrated using a phase-separated polystyrene/poly(2-vinylpyridine) polymer blend thin film. The topography and band excitation images showed that the valley and plateau regions of the thin film surface were comprised primarily of one of the two polymers in the blend with the mass spectral chemical image used to definitively identify the polymers at the different locations. Data point pixel size for the topography (390 nm × 390 nm), band excitation (781 nm × 781 nm), and mass spectrometry (690 nm × 500 nm) images was comparable and submicrometer in all three cases, but the data voxel size for each of the three images was dramatically different. The topography image was uniquely a surface measurement, whereas the band excitation image included information from an estimated 20 nm deep into the sample and the mass spectral image from 110 to 140 nm in depth. Because of this dramatic sampling depth variance, some differences in the band excitation and mass spectrometry chemical images were observed and were interpreted to indicate the presence of a buried interface in the sample. The spatial resolution of the chemical image was estimated to be between 1.5 and 2.6 μm, based on the ability to distinguish surface features in that image that were also observed in the other images.

  1. Retrospective sputter depth profiling using 3D mass spectral imaging.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Leiliang; Wucher, Andreas; Winograd, Nicholas

    2011-02-01

    A molecular multilayer stack composed of alternating Langmuir-Blodgett films was analyzed by ToF-SIMS imaging in combination with intermediate sputter erosion using a focused C60(+) cluster ion beam. From the resulting dataset, depth profiles of any desired lateral portion of the analyzed field-of-view can be extracted in retrospect, allowing the influence of the gating area on the apparent depth resolution to be assessed. In a similar way, the observed degradation of depth resolution with increasing depth of the analyzed interface can be analyzed in order to determine the 'intrinsic' depth resolution of the method.

  2. Large-scale inhomogeneity in sapphire test masses revealed by Rayleigh scattering imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Zewu; Ju, Li; Eon, François; Gras, Slawomir; Zhao, Chunnong; Jacob, John; Blair, David G.

    2004-03-01

    Rayleigh scattering in test masses can introduce noise and reduce the sensitivity of laser interferometric gravitational wave detectors. In this paper, we present laser Rayleigh scattering imaging as a technique to investigate sapphire test masses. The system provides three-dimensional Rayleigh scattering mapping of entire test masses and quantitative evaluation of the Rayleigh scattering coefficient. Rayleigh scattering mapping of two sapphire samples reveals point defects as well as inhomogeneous structures in the samples. We present results showing significant non-uniform scattering within two 4.5 kg sapphire test masses manufactured by the heat exchanger method.

  3. Nanostructure Initiator Mass Spectrometry: Tissue Imaging and Direct Biofluid Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Yanes, Oscar; Woo, Hin-Koon; Northen, Trent R.; Oppenheimer, Stacey R.; Shriver, Leah; Apon, Jon; Estrada, Mayra N.; Potchoiba, Michael J.; Steenwyk, Rick; Manchester, Marianne; Siuzdak, Gary

    2009-01-01

    Nanostructure initiator mass spectrometry (NIMS) is a recently introduced matrix-free desorption/ionization platform that requires minimal sample preparation. Its application to xenobiotics and endogenous metabolites in tissues is demonstrated, where clozapine and N-desmethylclozapine were observed from mouse and rat brain sections. It has also been applied to direct biofluid analysis where ketamine and norketamine were observed from plasma and urine. Detection of xenobiotics from biofluids was made even more effective using a novel NIMS on-surface extraction method taking advantage of the hydrophobic nature of the initiator. Linear response and limit of detection were also evaluated for xenobiotics such as methamphetamine, codeine, alprazolam, and morphine, revealing that NIMS can be used for quantitative analysis. Overall, our results demonstrate the capacity of NIMS to perform sensitive, simple, and rapid analyses from highly complex biological tissues and fluids. PMID:19301920

  4. Analysis of shear strain imaging for classifying breast masses: Finite element and phantom results

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Haiyan; Varghese, Tomy; Madsen, Ernest L.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Features extracted from axial-shear strain images of breast masses have been previously utilized to differentiate and classify benign from malignant breast masses. In this paper, we compare shear strain patterns exhibited by both the full-shear (axial and lateral component) versus only the axial-shear strain component for differentiating between bound masses (malignant) when compared to unbound masses (benign). Methods: We examine different breast mass characteristics such as mass shape, asymmetric location of masses, stiffness variations, and mass bonding characteristics to background tissue to assess their impact on shear strain patterns generated due to a uniaxial applied deformation. Two-dimensional finite element simulations of both circular and elliptical inclusions embedded within a uniform background were utilized. Different degrees of bonding were characterized using friction coefficient values ranging from 0.01 to 100 denoting loosely bound to firmly bound masses. Single-inclusion tissue-mimicking phantoms mimicking firmly bound and loosely bound ellipsoidal masses oriented at four different angles to the applied deformation were studied to corroborate the mass differentiation performance. Results: Our results indicate that the normalized axial-shear strain and full-shear strain area features are larger for bound when compared to unbound masses. A higher stiffness ratio or contrast between the inclusion and background also improves differentiation. Larger applied deformations reduce the discrimination performance for masses with friction coefficients lower than 0.4, due to increased mass slippage with applied deformations. Potential errors with the use of these features would occur for unbound inclusions at larger applied deformations and for asymmetric mass positions within the background normal tissue. Conclusions: Finite element and tissue-mimicking phantom results demonstrate the feasibility of utilizing both the normalized axial-shear and

  5. Analysis of shear strain imaging for classifying breast masses: finite element and phantom results.

    PubMed

    Xu, Haiyan; Varghese, Tomy; Madsen, Ernest L

    2011-11-01

    Features extracted from axial-shear strain images of breast masses have been previously utilized to differentiate and classify benign from malignant breast masses. In this paper, we compare shear strain patterns exhibited by both the full-shear (axial and lateral component) versus only the axial-shear strain component for differentiating between bound masses (malignant) when compared to unbound masses (benign). We examine different breast mass characteristics such as mass shape, asymmetric location of masses, stiffness variations, and mass bonding characteristics to background tissue to assess their impact on shear strain patterns generated due to a uniaxial applied deformation. Two-dimensional finite element simulations of both circular and elliptical inclusions embedded within a uniform background were utilized. Different degrees of bonding were characterized using friction coefficient values ranging from 0.01 to 100 denoting loosely bound to firmly bound masses. Single-inclusion tissue-mimicking phantoms mimicking firmly bound and loosely bound ellipsoidal masses oriented at four different angles to the applied deformation were studied to corroborate the mass differentiation performance. Our results indicate that the normalized axial-shear strain and full-shear strain area features are larger for bound when compared to unbound masses. A higher stiffness ratio or contrast between the inclusion and background also improves differentiation. Larger applied deformations reduce the discrimination performance for masses with friction coefficients lower than 0.4, due to increased mass slippage with applied deformations. Potential errors with the use of these features would occur for unbound inclusions at larger applied deformations and for asymmetric mass positions within the background normal tissue. Finite element and tissue-mimicking phantom results demonstrate the feasibility of utilizing both the normalized axial-shear and full-shear strain area features to

  6. microMS: A Python Platform for Image-Guided Mass Spectrometry Profiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Comi, Troy J.; Neumann, Elizabeth K.; Do, Thanh D.; Sweedler, Jonathan V.

    2017-09-01

    Image-guided mass spectrometry (MS) profiling provides a facile framework for analyzing samples ranging from single cells to tissue sections. The fundamental workflow utilizes a whole-slide microscopy image to select targets of interest, determine their spatial locations, and subsequently perform MS analysis at those locations. Improving upon prior reported methodology, a software package was developed for working with microscopy images. microMS, for microscopy-guided mass spectrometry, allows the user to select and profile diverse samples using a variety of target patterns and mass analyzers. Written in Python, the program provides an intuitive graphical user interface to simplify image-guided MS for novice users. The class hierarchy of instrument interactions permits integration of new MS systems while retaining the feature-rich image analysis framework. microMS is a versatile platform for performing targeted profiling experiments using a series of mass spectrometers. The flexibility in mass analyzers greatly simplifies serial analyses of the same targets by different instruments. The current capabilities of microMS are presented, and its application for off-line analysis of single cells on three distinct instruments is demonstrated. The software has been made freely available for research purposes. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  7. microMS: A Python Platform for Image-Guided Mass Spectrometry Profiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Comi, Troy J.; Neumann, Elizabeth K.; Do, Thanh D.; Sweedler, Jonathan V.

    2017-06-01

    Image-guided mass spectrometry (MS) profiling provides a facile framework for analyzing samples ranging from single cells to tissue sections. The fundamental workflow utilizes a whole-slide microscopy image to select targets of interest, determine their spatial locations, and subsequently perform MS analysis at those locations. Improving upon prior reported methodology, a software package was developed for working with microscopy images. microMS, for microscopy-guided mass spectrometry, allows the user to select and profile diverse samples using a variety of target patterns and mass analyzers. Written in Python, the program provides an intuitive graphical user interface to simplify image-guided MS for novice users. The class hierarchy of instrument interactions permits integration of new MS systems while retaining the feature-rich image analysis framework. microMS is a versatile platform for performing targeted profiling experiments using a series of mass spectrometers. The flexibility in mass analyzers greatly simplifies serial analyses of the same targets by different instruments. The current capabilities of microMS are presented, and its application for off-line analysis of single cells on three distinct instruments is demonstrated. The software has been made freely available for research purposes.

  8. MALDI imaging mass spectrometry reveals multiple clinically relevant masses in colorectal cancer using large-scale tissue microarrays.

    PubMed

    Hinsch, A; Buchholz, M; Odinga, S; Borkowski, C; Koop, C; Izbicki, J R; Wurlitzer, M; Krech, T; Wilczak, W; Steurer, S; Jacobsen, F; Burandt, E-C; Stahl, P; Simon, R; Sauter, G; Schlüter, H

    2017-03-01

    For identification of clinically relevant masses to predict status, grade, relapse and prognosis of colorectal cancer, we applied Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) to a tissue micro array containing formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded tissue samples from 349 patients. Analysis of our MALDI-IMS data revealed 27 different m/z signals associated with epithelial structures. Comparison of these signals showed significant association with status, grade and Ki-67 labeling index. Fifteen out of 27 IMS signals revealed a significant association with survival. For seven signals (m/z 654, 776, 788, 904, 944, 975 and 1013) the absence and for eight signals (m/z 643, 678, 836, 886, 898, 1095, 1459 and 1477) the presence were associated with decreased life expectancy, including five masses (m/z 788, 836, 904, 944 and 1013) that provided prognostic information independently from the established prognosticators pT and pN. Combination of these five masses resulted in a three-step classifier that provided prognostic information superior to univariate analysis. In addition, a total of 19 masses were associated with tumor stage, grade, metastasis and cell proliferation. Our data demonstrate the suitability of combining IMS and large-scale tissue micro arrays to simultaneously identify and validate clinically useful molecular marker. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Mass Spectrometry Imaging of Biological Tissue: An Approach for Multicenter Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Rompp, Andreas; Both, Jean-Pierre; Brunelle, Alain; Heeren, Ronald M.; Laprevote, Olivier; Prideaux, Brendan; Seyer, Alexandre; Spengler, Bernhard; Stoeckli, Markus; Smith, Donald F.

    2015-03-01

    Mass spectrometry imaging has become a popular tool for probing the chemical complexity of biological surfaces. This led to the development of a wide range of instrumentation and preparation protocols. It is thus desirable to evaluate and compare the data output from different methodologies and mass spectrometers. Here, we present an approach for the comparison of mass spectrometry imaging data from different laboratories (often referred to as multicenter studies). This is exemplified by the analysis of mouse brain sections in five laboratories in Europe and the USA. The instrumentation includes matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI)-time-of-flight (TOF), MALDI-QTOF, MALDIFourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FTICR), atmospheric-pressure (AP)-MALDI-Orbitrap, and cluster TOF-secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS). Experimental parameters such as measurement speed, imaging bin width, and mass spectrometric parameters are discussed. All datasets were converted to the standard data format imzML and displayed in a common open-source software with identical parameters for visualization, which facilitates direct comparison of MS images. The imzML conversion also allowed exchange of fully functional MS imaging datasets between the different laboratories. The experiments ranged from overview measurements of the full mouse brain to detailed analysis of smaller features (depending on spatial resolution settings), but common histological features such as the corpus callosum were visible in all measurements. High spatial resolution measurements of AP-MALDI-Orbitrap and TOF-SIMS showed comparable structures in the low-micrometer range. We discuss general considerations for planning and performing multicenter studies in mass spectrometry imaging. This includes details on the selection, distribution, and preparation of tissue samples as well as on data handling. Such multicenter studies in combination with ongoing activities for reporting guidelines, a common

  10. V are Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejections Observed with the SOlar Mass Ejection Imager

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-01

    coordinates. determine their radial projections onto the solar disk . The SMEI image maps are produced only in sidereal and solar ecliptic... SECCHI instrument suite on the new STEREO mission [Howard et al., 2000]. 4. Conclusions [21] The V arc ICMEs of this study are only a small...coronal and heliosphcric investigation ( SECCHI ). in Instrumentation for UV/EVV Astronomy ami Solar Missions, edited by S. Fincschi et al.. Proc. SPIE

  11. Diagnostic imaging of benign and malignant neck masses in children—a pictorial review

    PubMed Central

    Harave, Srikrishna

    2016-01-01

    Neck masses are frequently encountered in pediatric medicine, and can present a diagnostic dilemma for the clinicians involved. There are several means by which neck masses in children can be subdivided, for example by age at presentation, anatomical location including compartments and fascia of the neck, their classical appearance when imaged, or by etiology. When imaging children the clinicians must be mindful of radiation exposure and as such ultrasound (US) is often attempted first. Cross sectional imaging can be helpful for problem solving with CT being particularly useful for assessing the patient in more acute scenarios, for example when there is airway compromise. Nuclear medicine scintigraphy has a role in specific circumstances and can aid in staging in the presence of malignancy. If required, additional acquisition by means of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT) can be considered. This pictorial review describe the diagnostic imaging of (I) congenital and Developmental Pathologies, including thyroglossal duct cyst, branchial cleft cyst, cystic hygroma, dermoid cyst, thymic cyst and ectopic thymus; (II) neoplastic lesions, including hemangiomas and vascular malformations, pilomatrixoma, neurofibroma, neuroblastoma, rhabdomyosarcoma, papillary thyroid cancer, lymphoma & leukemia; (III) neck masses of Infective causes, including lymphadenitis, retropharyngeal and peritonsilar abscess, salivary gland inflammation; and (IV) other miscellaneous lesions, including ranula, sternocleidomastoid fibromatosis coli, and goiter. Neck masses are common in the pediatric population with a broad and varied differential; malignant etiologies are less frequently encountered when compared with adults but an awareness of its potential is important when reviewing imaging. PMID:27942480

  12. LensPerfect: Gravitational Lens Mass Map Reconstructions Yielding Exact Reproduction of All Multiple Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coe, D.; Fuselier, E.; Benítez, N.; Broadhurst, T.; Frye, B.; Ford, H.

    2008-07-01

    We present a new approach to gravitational lens mass map reconstruction. Our mass map solutions perfectly reproduce the positions, fluxes, and shears of all multiple images, and each mass map accurately recovers the underlying mass distribution to a resolution limited by the number of multiple images detected. We demonstrate our technique given a mock galaxy cluster similar to Abell 1689, which gravitationally lenses 19 mock background galaxies to produce 93 multiple images. We also explore cases in which as few as four multiple images are observed. Mass map solutions are never unique, and our method makes it possible to explore an extremely flexible range of physical (and unphysical) solutions, all of which perfectly reproduce the data given. Each reconfiguration of the source galaxies produces a new mass map solution. An optimization routine is provided to find those source positions (and redshifts, within uncertainties) that produce the "most physical" mass map solution, according to a new figure of merit developed here. Our method imposes no assumptions about the slope of the radial profile or mass following light. However, unlike "nonparametric" grid-based methods, the number of free parameters that we solve for is only as many as the number of observable constraints (or slightly greater if fluxes are constrained). For each set of source positions and redshifts, mass map solutions are obtained "instantly" via direct matrix inversion by smoothly interpolating the deflection field using a recently developed mathematical technique. Our LensPerfect software is straightforward and easy to use, and is publicly available on our Web site.

  13. Development of a fully automatic scheme for detection of masses in whole breast ultrasound images.

    PubMed

    Ikedo, Yuji; Fukuoka, Daisuke; Hara, Takeshi; Fujita, Hiroshi; Takada, Etsuo; Endo, Tokiko; Morita, Takako

    2007-11-01

    Ultrasonography has been used for breast cancer screening in Japan. Screening using a conventional hand-held probe is operator dependent and thus it is possible that some areas of the breast may not be scanned. To overcome such problems, a mechanical whole breast ultrasound (US) scanner has been proposed and developed for screening purposes. However, another issue is that radiologists might tire while interpreting all images in a large-volume screening; this increases the likelihood that masses may remain undetected. Therefore, the aim of this study is to develop a fully automatic scheme for the detection of masses in whole breast US images in order to assist the interpretations of radiologists and potentially improve the screening accuracy. The authors database comprised 109 whole breast US imagoes, which include 36 masses (16 malignant masses, 5 fibroadenomas, and 15 cysts). A whole breast US image with 84 slice images (interval between two slice images: 2 mm) was obtained by the ASU-1004 US scanner (ALOKA Co., Ltd., Japan). The feature based on the edge directions in each slice and a method for subtracting between the slice images were used for the detection of masses in the authors proposed scheme. The Canny edge detector was applied to detect edges in US images; these edges were classified as near-vertical edges or near-horizontal edges using a morphological method. The positions of mass candidates were located using the near-vertical edges as a cue. Then, the located positions were segmented by the watershed algorithm and mass candidate regions were detected using the segmented regions and the low-density regions extracted by the slice subtraction method. For the removal of false positives (FPs), rule-based schemes and a quadratic discriminant analysis were applied for the distribution between masses and FPs. As a result, the sensitivity of the authors scheme for the detection of masses was 80.6% (29/36) with 3.8 FPs per whole breast image. The authors scheme

  14. An Automated Platform for High-Resolution Tissue Imaging Using Nanospray Desorption Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Lanekoff, Ingela T.; Heath, Brandi S.; Liyu, Andrey V.; Thomas, Mathew; Carson, James P.; Laskin, Julia

    2012-10-02

    An automated platform has been developed for acquisition and visualization of mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) data using nanospray desorption electrospray ionization (nano-DESI). The new system enables robust operation of the nano-DESI imaging source over many hours. This is achieved by controlling the distance between the sample and the probe by mounting the sample holder onto an automated XYZ stage and defining the tilt of the sample plane. This approach is useful for imaging of relatively flat samples such as thin tissue sections. Custom software called MSI QuickView was developed for visualization of large data sets generated in imaging experiments. MSI QuickView enables fast visualization of the imaging data during data acquisition and detailed processing after the entire image is acquired. The performance of the system is demonstrated by imaging rat brain tissue sections. High resolution mass analysis combined with MS/MS experiments enabled identification of lipids and metabolites in the tissue section. In addition, high dynamic range and sensitivity of the technique allowed us to generate ion images of low-abundance isobaric lipids. High-spatial resolution image acquired over a small region of the tissue section revealed the spatial distribution of an abundant brain metabolite, creatine, in the white and gray matter that is consistent with the literature data obtained using magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

  15. Multi-isotope (carbon and chlorine) analysis for fingerprinting and site characterization at a fractured bedrock aquifer contaminated by chlorinated ethenes.

    PubMed

    Palau, Jordi; Marchesi, Massimo; Chambon, Julie C C; Aravena, Ramon; Canals, Àngels; Binning, Philip J; Bjerg, Poul L; Otero, Neus; Soler, Albert

    2014-03-15

    The use of compound specific multi-isotope approach (C and Cl) in the characterization of a chlorinated ethenes contaminated fractured aquifer allows the identification of several sources and contaminant plumes, as well as the occurrence of biodegradation and mixing processes. The study site is located in Spain with contamination resulting in groundwater concentrations of up to 50mg/L of trichloroethene (TCE), the most abundant chlorinated ethene, and 7 mg/L of tetrachloroethene (PCE). The potential sources of contamination including abandoned barrels, an underground tank, and a disposal lagoon, showed a wide range in δ(13)C values from -15.6 to -40.5‰ for TCE and from -18.5 to -32.4‰ for PCE, allowing the use of isotope fingerprinting for tracing of the origin and migration of these contaminants in the aquifer. In contrast, there is no difference between the δ(37)Cl values for TCE in the contaminant sources, ranging from +0.53 to +0.66‰. Variations of δ(37)Cl and δ(13)C in the different contaminant plumes were used to investigate the role of biodegradation in groundwater. Moreover, the isotopic data were incorporated into a reactive transport model for determination of whether the isotope pattern observed downstream from the tank's source could be explained by the simultaneous effect of mixing and biodegradation. The results demonstrate that a multi-isotope approach is a valuable tool for characterization of complex sites such as fractured bedrock aquifer contaminated by multiple sources, providing important information which can be used by consultants and site managers to prioritize and design more successful remediation strategies. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Characterizing sources and natural attenuation of nitrate contamination in the Baix Ter aquifer system (NE Spain) using a multi-isotope approach.

    PubMed

    Puig, Roger; Soler, Albert; Widory, David; Mas-Pla, Josep; Domènech, Cristina; Otero, Neus

    2017-02-15

    Nitrate pollution is a widespread issue affecting global water resources with significant economic and health effects. Knowledge of both the corresponding pollution sources and of processes naturally attenuating them is thus of crucial importance in assessing water management policies and the impact of anthropogenic activities. In this study, an approach combining hydrodynamic, hydrochemical and multi-isotope systematics (8 isotopes) is used to characterize the sources of nitrate pollution and potential natural attenuation processes in a polluted basin of NE Spain. δ(2)H and δ(18)O isotopes were used to further characterize the sources of recharge of the aquifers. Results show that NO3(-) is not homogeneously distributed and presents a large range of concentrations, from no NO3(-) to up to 480mgL(-1). δ(15)N and δ(18)O of dissolved NO3(-) identified manure as the main source of nitrate, although sewage and mineral fertilizers can also be isotopically detected using boron isotopes (δ(11)B) and δ(34)S and δ(18)O of dissolved sulphate, respectively. The multi-isotope approach proved that natural denitrification is occurring, especially in near-river environments or in areas hydrologically related to fault zones. δ(34)S and δ(18)O indicated that denitrification is not driven by pyrite oxidation but rather by the oxidation of organic matter. This could not be confirmed by the study of δ(13)CHCO3 that was buffered by the entanglement of other processes and sources. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Developing a visual sensitive image features based CAD scheme to assist classification of mammographic masses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yunzhi; Aghaei, Faranak; Tan, Maxine; Qiu, Yuchen; Liu, Hong; Zheng, Bin

    2017-03-01

    Computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) schemes of mammograms have been previously developed and tested. However, due to using "black-box" approaches with a large number of complicated features, radiologists have lower confidence to accept or consider CAD-cued results. In order to help solve this issue, this study aims to develop and evaluate a new CAD scheme that uses visual sensitive image features to classify between malignant and benign mammographic masses. A dataset of 301 masses detected on both craniocaudal (CC) and mediolateraloblique (MLO) view images was retrospectively assembled. Among them, 152 were malignant and 149 were benign. An iterative region-growing algorithm was applied to the special Gaussian-kernel filtered images to segment mass regions. Total 13 Image features were computed to mimic 5 categories of visually sensitive features that are commonly used by radiologists in classifying suspicious mammographic masses namely, mass size, shape factor, contrast, homogeneity and spiculation. We then selected one optimal feature in each of 5 feature categories by using a student t-test, and applied two logistic regression classifiers using either CC or MLO view images to distinguish between malignant and benign masses. Last, a fusion method of combining two classification scores was applied and tested. By applying a 10-fold cross-validation method, the area under receiver operating characteristic curves was 0.806+/-0.025. This study demonstrated a new approach to develop CAD scheme based on 5 visually sensitive image features. Combining with a "visual-aid" interface, CAD results are much more easily explainable to the observers and may increase their confidence to consider CAD-cued results.

  18. WFC3-IR Imaging of Dense, Embedded Outflows from Intermediate-Mass Protostars in Carina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Nathan

    2013-10-01

    Based on H-alpha imaging of the Carina Nebula with ACS, we discovered 40 new Herbig-Haro {HH} jets marking outflows from young stars. This is valuable because {1} it is a large sample of jets at one distance, {2} the driving sources are intermediate-mass {IM} stars {1-8 Msun}, allowing us to investigate the bridge between low- and high-mass star formation, and {3} the jets are exposed to the same feedback source and trace various stages of being uncovered by the advancing ionization front. This sample is all the more valuable because it can be placed in the context of a well-understood environment that has been studied extensively with HST, Spitzer, Chandra, and from the ground. We propose to image 13 of these jets in the [Fe II] 1.26-micron and 1.64-micron lines. These lines suffer less extincton than optical lines, trace embedded jets, and are essential to measure the total mass in these dense outflows. Four jets have already been imaged in the F126N and F164N filters to make public release images; these images demonstrate that [FeII] emission traces a large mass of neutral gas not seen in H-alpha emission and traces the jet back into the cloud to the Spitzer-identified driving source. This study will permit a detailed comparison of the jet properties {e.g. mass-loss rate, momentum injection, mass-loss history} to IM protostar properties {e.g. accretion rate, luminosity, envelope mass and structure} during the most active accretion. These relationships are poorly determined for IM protostars. Additionally, the flux ratio of [Fe II] lines will trace the spatially dependent extinction through the cloud, providing a map of the density structure in the extended envelope.

  19. Direct imaging of elemental distributions in tissue sections by laser ablation mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Shariatgorji, Mohammadreza; Nilsson, Anna; Bonta, Maximilian; Gan, Jinrui; Marklund, Niklas; Clausen, Fredrik; Källback, Patrik; Loden, Henrik; Limbeck, Andreas; Andrén, Per E

    2016-07-15

    We present a strategy for imaging of elements in biological tissues using laser ablation (LA) mass spectrometry (MS), which was compared to laser ablation inductively coupled plasma (LA-ICP) MS. Both methods were adopted for quantitative imaging of elements in mouse kidney, as well as traumatic brain injury model tissue sections. MS imaging (MSI) employing LA provides quantitative data by comparing signal abundances of sodium from tissues to those obtained by imaging quantitation calibration standards of the target element applied to adjacent control tissue sections. LA-ICP MSI provided quantitative data for several essential elements in both brain and kidney tissue sections using a dried-droplet approach. Both methods were used to image a rat model of traumatic brain injury, revealing accumulations of sodium and calcium in the impact area and its peripheral regions. LA MSI is shown to be a viable option for quantitative imaging of specific elements in biological tissue sections.

  20. The use of random projections for the analysis of mass spectrometry imaging data.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Andrew D; Bunch, Josephine; Styles, Iain B

    2015-02-01

    The 'curse of dimensionality' imposes fundamental limits on the analysis of the large, information rich datasets that are produced by mass spectrometry imaging. Additionally, such datasets are often too large to be analyzed as a whole and so dimensionality reduction is required before further analysis can be performed. We investigate the use of simple random projections for the dimensionality reduction of mass spectrometry imaging data and examine how they enable efficient and fast segmentation using k-means clustering. The method is computationally efficient and can be implemented such that only one spectrum is needed in memory at any time. We use this technique to reveal histologically significant regions within MALDI images of diseased human liver. Segmentation results achieved following a reduction in the dimensionality of the data by more than 99% (without peak picking) showed that histologic changes due to disease can be automatically visualized from molecular images.

  1. The Use of Random Projections for the Analysis of Mass Spectrometry Imaging Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmer, Andrew D.; Bunch, Josephine; Styles, Iain B.

    2015-02-01

    The `curse of dimensionality' imposes fundamental limits on the analysis of the large, information rich datasets that are produced by mass spectrometry imaging. Additionally, such datasets are often too large to be analyzed as a whole and so dimensionality reduction is required before further analysis can be performed. We investigate the use of simple random projections for the dimensionality reduction of mass spectrometry imaging data and examine how they enable efficient and fast segmentation using k-means clustering. The method is computationally efficient and can be implemented such that only one spectrum is needed in memory at any time. We use this technique to reveal histologically significant regions within MALDI images of diseased human liver. Segmentation results achieved following a reduction in the dimensionality of the data by more than 99% (without peak picking) showed that histologic changes due to disease can be automatically visualized from molecular images.

  2. Application of imaging mass spectrometry approaches to facilitate metal-based anticancer drug research.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ronald F S; Theiner, Sarah; Meibom, Anders; Koellensperger, Gunda; Keppler, Bernhard K; Dyson, Paul J

    2017-02-03

    Mass spectrometry imaging is being increasingly used in metal-based anticancer drug development to study elemental and/or molecular drug distributions in different biological systems. The main analytical tools employed are SIMS (especially nanoSIMS), LA-ICP-MSI and MALDI-MSI as well as a combination of complementary imaging techniques. Main challenges are appropriate sample preparation methods, reliable and validated quantification strategies and a trade-off between sensitivity and spatial resolution. So far, research has mostly focused on the development of analytical methods for imaging with the long term goal to study drug uptake into tumor tissue and toxicity affected organs and to identify cellular targets of metal-based drugs. In this review we cover the technological features of the mass spectrometry imaging methods used and give an overview of the applications in metal-based anticancer drug research as well as some future perspectives.

  3. Sample Preparation for Mass Spectrometry Imaging of Plant Tissues: A Review.

    PubMed

    Dong, Yonghui; Li, Bin; Malitsky, Sergey; Rogachev, Ilana; Aharoni, Asaph; Kaftan, Filip; Svatoš, Aleš; Franceschi, Pietro

    2016-01-01

    Mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) is a mass spectrometry based molecular ion imaging technique. It provides the means for ascertaining the spatial distribution of a large variety of analytes directly on tissue sample surfaces without any labeling or staining agents. These advantages make it an attractive molecular histology tool in medical, pharmaceutical, and biological research. Likewise, MSI has started gaining popularity in plant sciences; yet, information regarding sample preparation methods for plant tissues is still limited. Sample preparation is a crucial step that is directly associated with the quality and authenticity of the imaging results, it therefore demands in-depth studies based on the characteristics of plant samples. In this review, a sample preparation pipeline is discussed in detail and illustrated through selected practical examples. In particular, special concerns regarding sample preparation for plant imaging are critically evaluated. Finally, the applications of MSI techniques in plants are reviewed according to different classes of plant metabolites.

  4. Early detection of tumor masses by in vivo hematoporphyrin-mediated fluorescence imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Autiero, Maddalena; Celentano, Luigi; Cozzolino, Rosanna; Laccetti, Paolo; Marotta, Marcello; Mettivier, Giovanni; Cristina Montesi, Maria; Quarto, Maria; Riccio, Patrizia; Roberti, Giuseppe; Russo, Paolo

    2007-02-01

    We investigated the capability of fluorescence reflectance imaging (FRI) for the early detection of surface tumors in mice. We used a hematoporphyrin (HP) compound (HP dichlorohydrate) as a red fluorescent marker and a low noise, high sensitivity, digital CCD camera for fluorescence imaging. In this preliminary study, highly malignant anaplastic human thyroid carcinoma cells were implanted subcutaneously in one mouse and their growth was monitored daily for 5 days by FRI. The selective HP uptake by the tumor tissues was successfully observed: we observed the fluorescence of tumor only 3 days after cancer cells injection, i.e. when the tumor mass was neither visible (to the naked eye) or palpable. These measurements indicate that FRI is a suitable technique to detect minute subcutaneous tumor masses. This FRI system will be coupled to a radionuclide imaging system based on a CdTe detector for in vivo multimodal imaging in mice.

  5. Dual-Mode Mass Spectrometric Imaging for Determination of in Vivo Stability of Nanoparticle Monolayers.

    PubMed

    Elci, S Gokhan; Yesilbag Tonga, Gulen; Yan, Bo; Kim, Sung Tae; Kim, Chang Soo; Jiang, Ying; Saha, Krishnendu; Moyano, Daniel F; Marsico, Alyssa L M; Rotello, Vincent M; Vachet, Richard W

    2017-07-25

    Effective correlation of the in vitro and in vivo stability of nanoparticle-based platforms is a key challenge in their translation into the clinic. Here, we describe a dual imaging method that site-specifically reports the stability of monolayer-functionalized nanoparticles in vivo. This approach uses laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) imaging to monitor the distributions of the nanoparticle core material and laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (LDI-MS) imaging to report on the monolayers on the nanoparticles. Quantitative comparison of the images reveals nanoparticle stability at the organ and suborgan level. The stability of particles observed in the spleen was location-dependent and qualitatively similar to in vitro studies. In contrast, in vivo stability of the nanoparticles in the liver differed dramatically from in vitro studies, demonstrating the importance of in vivo assessment of nanoparticle stability.

  6. Sample Preparation for Mass Spectrometry Imaging of Plant Tissues: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Yonghui; Li, Bin; Malitsky, Sergey; Rogachev, Ilana; Aharoni, Asaph; Kaftan, Filip; Svatoš, Aleš; Franceschi, Pietro

    2016-01-01

    Mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) is a mass spectrometry based molecular ion imaging technique. It provides the means for ascertaining the spatial distribution of a large variety of analytes directly on tissue sample surfaces without any labeling or staining agents. These advantages make it an attractive molecular histology tool in medical, pharmaceutical, and biological research. Likewise, MSI has started gaining popularity in plant sciences; yet, information regarding sample preparation methods for plant tissues is still limited. Sample preparation is a crucial step that is directly associated with the quality and authenticity of the imaging results, it therefore demands in-depth studies based on the characteristics of plant samples. In this review, a sample preparation pipeline is discussed in detail and illustrated through selected practical examples. In particular, special concerns regarding sample preparation for plant imaging are critically evaluated. Finally, the applications of MSI techniques in plants are reviewed according to different classes of plant metabolites. PMID:26904042

  7. Astronomers Image Lowest-mass Exoplanet Around a Sun-like Star

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-09-27

    Caption: Glowing a dark magenta, the newly discovered exoplanet GJ 504b weighs in with about four times Jupiter's mass, making it the lowest-mass planet ever directly imaged around a star like the sun. Credit: NASA/Goddard/S. Wiessinger Using infrared data from the Subaru Telescope in Hawaii, an international team of astronomers has imaged a giant planet around the bright star GJ 504. Several times the mass of Jupiter and similar in size, the new world, dubbed GJ 504b, is the lowest-mass planet ever detected around a star like the sun using direct imaging techniques. "If we could travel to this giant planet, we would see a world still glowing from the heat of its formation with a color reminiscent of a dark cherry blossom, a dull magenta," said Michael McElwain, a member of the discovery team at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md. "Our near-infrared camera reveals that its color is much more blue than other imaged planets, which may indicate that its atmosphere has fewer clouds." Read more: 1.usa.gov/15Ba6fI NASA image use policy. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission. Follow us on Twitter Like us on Facebook Find us on Instagram

  8. Computer-aided classification of mammographic masses using visually sensitive image features.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yunzhi; Aghaei, Faranak; Zarafshani, Ali; Qiu, Yuchen; Qian, Wei; Zheng, Bin

    2017-01-01

    To develop a new computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) scheme that computes visually sensitive image features routinely used by radiologists to develop a machine learning classifier and distinguish between the malignant and benign breast masses detected from digital mammograms. An image dataset including 301 breast masses was retrospectively selected. From each segmented mass region, we computed image features that mimic five categories of visually sensitive features routinely used by radiologists in reading mammograms. We then selected five optimal features in the five feature categories and applied logistic regression models for classification. A new CAD interface was also designed to show lesion segmentation, computed feature values and classification score. Areas under ROC curves (AUC) were 0.786±0.026 and 0.758±0.027 when to classify mass regions depicting on two view images, respectively. By fusing classification scores computed from two regions, AUC increased to 0.806±0.025. This study demonstrated a new approach to develop CAD scheme based on 5 visually sensitive image features. Combining with a "visual aid" interface, CAD results may be much more easily explainable to the observers and increase their confidence to consider CAD generated classification results than using other conventional CAD approaches, which involve many complicated and visually insensitive texture features.

  9. Digital image processing based mass flow rate measurement of gas/solid two-phase flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Ding; Peng, Lihui; Lu, Geng; Yang, Shiyuan; Yan, Yong

    2009-02-01

    With the rapid growth of the process industry, pneumatic conveying as a tool for the transportation of a wide variety of pulverized and granular materials has become widespread. In order to improve plant control and operational efficiency, it is essential to know the parameters of the particle flow. This paper presents a digital imaging based method which is capable of measuring multiple flow parameters, including volumetric concentration, velocity and mass flow rate of particles in the gas/solid two phase flow. The measurement system consists of a solid state laser for illumination, a low-cost CCD camera for particle image acquisition and a microcomputer with bespoke software for particle image processing. The measurements of particle velocity and volumetric concentration share the same sensing hardware but use different exposure time and different image processing methods. By controlling the exposure time of the camera a clear image and a motion blurred image are obtained respectively. The clear image is thresholded by OTSU method to identify the particles from the dark background so that the volumetric concentration is determined by calculating the ratio between the particle area and the total area. Particle velocity is derived from the motion blur length, which is estimated from the motion blurred images by using the travelling wave equation method. The mass flow rate of particles is calculated by combining the particle velocity and volumetric concentration. Simulation and experiment results indicate that the proposed method is promising for the measurement of multiple parameters of gas/solid two-phase flow.

  10. Development of capabilities for imaging mass spectrometry under ambient conditions with desorption electrospray ionization (DESI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ifa, Demian R.; Wiseman, Justin M.; Song, Qingyu; Cooks, R. Graham

    2007-01-01

    Aspects of the development of mass spectrometry over the past three decades are briefly reviewed and growth points in the subject are identified. Molecular imaging by mass spectrometry is one such growth area. The development of a capability for 2D chemical imaging of surfaces is described, based on the combination of a desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) ion source with an automated surface stage capable of x, y translational motion. The lateral resolution of this new system is found to be less than 200 microns, using a test ink pattern. Chemical imaging of surfaces is demonstrated using model examples of organic and biological systems: (i) imaging of a 2D pattern written in different colored inks on photographic paper and (ii) imaging of thin coronal sections of rat brain tissue fixed onto a glass microscope slide. In both cases, full mass spectra are recorded as a function of x,y-position on the surface. In the chemical imaging example, the distributions of the two different inks on the paper surface were mapped by tracking the abundance of the intact organic cation which characterizes each particular ink dye. In the tissue imaging example, distributions of specific lipids in coronal sections of rat brain tissue were followed from the abundance distributions in 2D space of the deprotonated lipid molecules recorded in the negative ion mass spectra. These latter distributions reveal distinct anatomical features of the rat brain. The results of these studies demonstrate the feasibility of performing surface imaging studies using DESI and show that at this stage of its development it has a lateral spatial resolution of a few hundred microns.

  11. Characterization of atypical cystic renal masses with MDCT: comparison of 5-mm axial images and thin multiplanar reconstructed images.

    PubMed

    Bertolotto, Michele; Zappetti, Roberta; Cavallaro, Marco; Perrone, Rosaria; Perretti, Leonardo; Cova, Maria Assunta

    2010-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether cystic renal masses are better characterized on thin axial and multiplanar reconstructed MDCT images than on 5-mm images. The records of 70 complex cystic renal masses in 59 patients (45 men, 14 women; mean age, 68 +/- 13 years) who underwent 64-MDCT at two medical centers were studied. Twenty-three of the masses were confirmed on the basis of the histologic findings and 47 in 2-4 years of follow-up. Images were reviewed in two sessions by two radiologists with 12 and 2 years of experience. In the first session, 5-mm axial images were analyzed, and in the second, thin axial images and multiplanar reconstructions. To assess intraobserver variability, analysis was repeated after 1 month. Statistical analysis was performed with Wilcoxon's signed rank test, receiver operating characteristic analysis, and weighted kappa statistics. Radiologists 1 and 2 detected thicker cystic walls (p < 0.001, p < 0.005) and septa (p < 0.03, p < 0.05) and fewer septa (p < 0.005, p < 0.002) on 5-mm axial images and assigned significantly different Bosniak categories than they did in analysis of the volume data (p < 0.04, p < 0.05). Variability was reduced in thin axial and multiplanar views. No significant differences were found in characterization of lesions as benign or malignant in review of 5-mm axial images and volume data sets. The areas under the receiver operating characteristic curve were 0.89 for 5-mm images and 0.96 for volume data sets for radiologist 1 and 0.87 and 0.90 for radiologist 2. Analysis of volume data sets is associated with less intraobserver and interobserver variability than review of 5-mm axial images. Wall thickness and the number and thickness of septa may differ, resulting in assignment of different Bosniak categories. Diagnostic performance in characterizing lesions as benign or malignant, however, is not statistically different for the thick and thin images.

  12. High-Speed MALDI-TOF Imaging Mass Spectrometry: Rapid Ion Image Acquisition and Considerations for Next Generation Instrumentation

    PubMed Central

    Spraggins, Jeffrey M.; Caprioli, Richard M.

    2012-01-01

    A prototype matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometer has been used for high-speed ion image acquisition. The instrument incorporates a Nd:YLF solid state laser capable of pulse repetition rates up to 5 kHz and continuous laser raster sampling for high-throughput data collection. Lipid ion images of a sagittal rat brain tissue section were collected in 10 min with an effective acquisition rate of roughly 30 pixels/s. These results represent more than a 10-fold increase in throughput compared with current commercially available instrumentation. Experiments aimed at improving conditions for continuous laser raster sampling for imaging are reported, highlighting proper laser repetition rates and stage velocities to avoid signal degradation from significant oversampling. As new high spatial resolution and large sample area applications present themselves, the development of high-speed microprobe MALDI imaging mass spectrometry is essential to meet the needs of those seeking new technologies for rapid molecular imaging. PMID:21953043

  13. MISSING LENSED IMAGES AND THE GALAXY DISK MASS IN CXOCY J220132.8-320144

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Jacqueline; Lee, Samuel K.; Schechter, Paul L.; Castander, Francisco-Javier; Maza, Jose

    2013-05-20

    The CXOCY J220132.8-320144 system consists of an edge-on spiral galaxy lensing a background quasar into two bright images. Previous efforts to constrain the mass distribution in the galaxy have suggested that at least one additional image must be present. These extra images may be hidden behind the disk which features a prominent dust lane. We present and analyze Hubble Space Telescope observations of the system. We do not detect any extra images, but the observations further narrow the observable parameters of the lens system. We explore a range of models to describe the mass distribution in the system and find that a variety of acceptable model fits exist. All plausible models require 2 mag of dust extinction in order to obscure extra images from detection, and some models may require an offset between the center of the galaxy and the center of the dark matter halo of 1 kpc. Currently unobserved images will be detectable by future James Webb Space Telescope observations and will provide strict constraints on the fraction of mass in the disk.

  14. Note: A novel dual-channel time-of-flight mass spectrometer for photoelectron imaging spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Qin Zhengbo; Wu Xia; Tang Zichao

    2013-06-15

    A novel dual-channel time-of-flight mass spectrometer (D-TOFMS) has been designed to select anions in the photoelectron imaging measurements. In this instrument, the radiation laser can be triggered precisely to overlap with the selected ion cloud at the first-order space focusing plane. Compared with that of the conventional single channel TOFMS, the in situ mass selection performance of D-TOFMS is significantly improved. Preliminary experiment results are presented for the mass-selected photodetachment spectrum of F{sup -} to demonstrate the capability of the instrument.

  15. Automated platform for high-resolution tissue imaging using nanospray desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Lanekoff, Ingela; Heath, Brandi S; Liyu, Andrey; Thomas, Mathew; Carson, James P; Laskin, Julia

    2012-10-02

    An automated platform has been developed for acquisition and visualization of mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) data using nanospray desorption electrospray ionization (nano-DESI). The new system enables robust operation of the nano-DESI imaging source over many hours by precisely controlling the distance between the sample and the nano-DESI probe. This is achieved by mounting the sample holder onto an automated XYZ stage, defining the tilt of the sample plane, and recalculating the vertical position of the stage at each point. This approach is useful for imaging of relatively flat samples such as thin tissue sections. Custom software called MSI QuickView was developed for visualization of large data sets generated in imaging experiments. MSI QuickView enables fast visualization of the imaging data during data acquisition and detailed processing after the entire image is acquired. The performance of the system is demonstrated by imaging rat brain tissue sections. Low background noise enables simultaneous detection of lipids and metabolites in the tissue section. High-resolution mass analysis combined with tandem mass spectometry (MS/MS) experiments enabled identification of the observed species. In addition, the high dynamic range (>2000) of the technique allowed us to generate ion images of low-abundance isobaric lipids. A high-spatial resolution image was acquired over a small region of the tissue section revealing the distribution of an abundant brain metabolite, creatine, on the boundary between the white and gray matter. The observed distribution is consistent with the literature data obtained using magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

  16. Mass spectrometry imaging of cassette-dosed drugs for higher throughput pharmacokinetic and biodistribution analysis.

    PubMed

    Swales, John G; Tucker, James W; Strittmatter, Nicole; Nilsson, Anna; Cobice, Diego; Clench, Malcolm R; Mackay, C Logan; Andren, Per E; Takáts, Zoltán; Webborn, Peter J H; Goodwin, Richard J A

    2014-08-19

    Cassette dosing of compounds for preclinical drug plasma pharmacokinetic analysis has been shown to be a powerful strategy within the pharmaceutical industry for increasing throughput while decreasing the number of animals used. Presented here for the first time is data on the application of a cassette dosing strategy for label-free tissue distribution studies. The aim of the study was to image the spatial distribution of eight nonproprietary drugs (haloperidol, bufuralol, midazolam, clozapine, terfenadine, erlotinib, olanzapine, and moxifloxacin) in multiple tissues after oral and intravenous cassette dosing (four compounds per dose route). An array of mass spectrometry imaging technologies, including matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry imaging (MALDI MSI), liquid extraction surface analysis tandem mass spectrometry (LESA-MS/MS), and desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (DESI-MS) was used. Tissue analysis following intravenous and oral administration of discretely and cassette-dosed compounds demonstrated similar relative abundances across a range of tissues indicating that a cassette dosing approach was applicable. MALDI MSI was unsuccessful in detecting all of the target compounds; therefore, DESI MSI, a complementary mass spectrometry imaging technique, was used to detect additional target compounds. In addition, by adapting technology used for tissue profiling (LESA-MS/MS) low spatial resolution mass spectrometry imaging (∼1 mm) was possible for all targets across all tissues. This study exemplifies the power of multiplatform MSI analysis within a pharmaceutical research and development (R&D) environment. Furthermore, we have illustrated that the cassette dosing approach can be readily applied to provide combined, label-free pharmacokinetic and drug distribution data at an early stage of the drug discovery/development process while minimizing animal usage.

  17. MALDI-TOF imaging mass spectrometry of artifacts in "dried droplet" polymer samples.

    PubMed

    Weidner, Steffen; Knappe, Patrick; Panne, Ulrich

    2011-07-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) imaging of polystyrenes with various molecular masses was applied to study spatial molecular mass distribution of polymers in sample spots prepared by the "dried droplet" method. When different solvents and target surfaces were examined, a segregation of single homologous polymers was observed depending upon the evaporation rate of the solvent. For the observed patterns left by the evaporating droplet, a hypothesis is offered taking into account different hydrodynamic interactions and diffusion. The results illustrate that spot preparation using the conventionally "dried droplet" method is prone to artifacts and should be avoided for reliable and reproducible MALDI mass spectrometry experiments with regards to the determination of molecular masses and mass distributions.

  18. Quantitative Mass Density Image Reconstructed from the Complex X-Ray Refractive Index

    PubMed Central

    Mukaide, Taihei; Iida, Atsuo; Watanabe, Masatoshi; Takada, Kazuhiro; Noma, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate a new analytical X-ray computed tomography technique for visualizing and quantifying the mass density of materials comprised of low atomic number elements with unknown atomic ratios. The mass density was obtained from the experimentally observed ratio of the imaginary and real parts of the complex X-ray refractive index. An empirical linear relationship between the X-ray mass attenuation coefficient of the materials and X-ray energy was found for X-ray energies between 8 keV and 30 keV. The mass density image of two polymer fibers was quantified using the proposed technique using a scanning-type X-ray microbeam computed tomography system equipped with a wedge absorber. The reconstructed mass density agrees well with the calculated one. PMID:26114770

  19. Image-guided percutaneous core needle biopsy of soft-tissue masses in the pediatric population.

    PubMed

    Metz, Terrence; Heider, Amer; Vellody, Ranjith; Jarboe, Marcus D; Gemmete, Joseph J; Grove, Jason J; Smith, Ethan A; Mody, Rajen; Newman, Erika A; Dillman, Jonathan R

    2016-07-01

    A paucity of literature describes the use of imaged-guided percutaneous core needle biopsy for the diagnosis and characterization of pediatric soft-tissue masses and lesions. To retrospectively determine whether image-guided percutaneous core needle biopsy is adequate for diagnosing and characterizing benign and malignant pediatric soft-tissue masses and lesions. We identified children (≤18 years old) who underwent US- or CT-guided percutaneous core needle biopsy of a soft-tissue mass or other lesion between January 2012 and March 2014. Using medical records, we documented the following data: age and gender, site of the mass or lesion, size and number of biopsy specimens, whether the biopsy procedure was diagnostic, whether sufficient tissue was obtained for necessary ancillary testing (e.g., cytogenetic evaluation), and whether there was a procedural complication within 1 week. One hundred eight soft-tissue masses or lesions were biopsied under imaging guidance in 84 children; 39 (46%) were girls. Mean age ± standard deviation (SD) was 12.1 ± 5.1 years (range 6 months to 18 years). Of these procedures, 105/108 (97%) were diagnostic; 82/108 (76%) were US-guided; 87/108 (81%) were performed using a 17-gauge introducer needle/18-gauge biopsy instrument. The mean number ± SD of core needle biopsy specimens obtained was 8.9 ± 5.0. For newly diagnosed malignancies, adequate tissue was obtained for ancillary testing in 28/30 (93%) masses. One minor complication was documented. Image-guided percutaneous core needle biopsy of pediatric soft-tissue masses is safe, has a high diagnostic rate, and provides sufficient tissue for ancillary testing.

  20. IMAGE-PLANE ANALYSIS OF n-POINT-MASS LENS CRITICAL CURVES AND CAUSTICS

    SciTech Connect

    Danek, Kamil; Heyrovský, David E-mail: heyrovsky@utf.mff.cuni.cz

    2015-06-10

    The interpretation of gravitational microlensing events caused by planetary systems or multiple stars is based on the n-point-mass lens model. The first planets detected by microlensing were well described by the two-point-mass model of a star with one planet. By the end of 2014, four events involving three-point-mass lenses had been announced. Two of the lenses were stars with two planetary companions each; two were binary stars with a planet orbiting one component. While the two-point-mass model is well understood, the same cannot be said for lenses with three or more components. Even the range of possible critical-curve topologies and caustic geometries of the three-point-mass lens remains unknown. In this paper we provide new tools for mapping the critical-curve topology and caustic cusp number in the parameter space of n-point-mass lenses. We perform our analysis in the image plane of the lens. We show that all contours of the Jacobian are critical curves of re-scaled versions of the lens configuration. Utilizing this property further, we introduce the cusp curve to identify cusp-image positions on all contours simultaneously. In order to track cusp-number changes in caustic metamorphoses, we define the morph curve, which pinpoints the positions of metamorphosis-point images along the cusp curve. We demonstrate the usage of both curves on simple two- and three-point-mass lens examples. For the three simplest caustic metamorphoses we illustrate the local structure of the image and source planes.

  1. Combined X-ray CT and mass spectrometry for biomedical imaging applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schioppa, E., Jr.; Ellis, S.; Bruinen, A. L.; Visser, J.; Heeren, R. M. A.; Uher, J.; Koffeman, E.

    2014-04-01

    Imaging technologies play a key role in many branches of science, especially in biology and medicine. They provide an invaluable insight into both internal structure and processes within a broad range of samples. There are many techniques that allow one to obtain images of an object. Different techniques are based on the analysis of a particular sample property by means of a dedicated imaging system, and as such, each imaging modality provides the researcher with different information. The use of multimodal imaging (imaging with several different techniques) can provide additional and complementary information that is not possible when employing a single imaging technique alone. In this study, we present for the first time a multi-modal imaging technique where X-ray computerized tomography (CT) is combined with mass spectrometry imaging (MSI). While X-ray CT provides 3-dimensional information regarding the internal structure of the sample based on X-ray absorption coefficients, MSI of thin sections acquired from the same sample allows the spatial distribution of many elements/molecules, each distinguished by its unique mass-to-charge ratio (m/z), to be determined within a single measurement and with a spatial resolution as low as 1 μm or even less. The aim of the work is to demonstrate how molecular information from MSI can be spatially correlated with 3D structural information acquired from X-ray CT. In these experiments, frozen samples are imaged in an X-ray CT setup using Medipix based detectors equipped with a CO2 cooled sample holder. Single projections are pre-processed before tomographic reconstruction using a signal-to-thickness calibration. In the second step, the object is sliced into thin sections (circa 20 μm) that are then imaged using both matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) and secondary ion (SIMS) mass spectrometry, where the spatial distribution of specific molecules within the sample is determined. The

  2. Quantification of left ventricular mass using cardiac magnetic resonance imaging compared with echocardiography in domestic cats.

    PubMed

    MacDonald, Kristin A; Kittleson, Mark D; Reed, Tracy; Larson, Richard; Kass, Philip; Wisner, Erik R

    2005-01-01

    The hypotheses were that cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (cMRI) would accurately determine LV mass in domestic cats and would do so more accurately than echocardiography (ECHO). ECHO was performed on seven sedated cats. LV mass was calculated using the truncated ellipse formula from a right parasternal long-axis view. T1 weighted gradient echo cMRI was acquired from anesthetized cats during multiple phases of the cardiac cycle. Short-axis images were obtained by acquiring 3 mm thick contiguous slices perpendicular to the cardiac long axis. LV mass was determined using Simpson's rule. Endocardial and epicardial borders were traced on each slice at end-systole, end-diastole, and mid-cycle and the difference in areas was myocardial area. Myocardial area was multiplied by slice thickness to calculate myocardial volume. Total (summated) myocardial volume was multiplied by myocardial density (1.05) to obtain LV mass at three measured phases of the cardiac cycle. Cats were euthanized and the LV was dissected and weighed to determine true mass. CMRI at end-systole most accurately quantified LV mass and was more accurate than echocardiography (P = 0.0078). Actual LV mass ranged from 6.5 to 10.5 g (mean = 8.5 g, SD = 1.6 g) compared with MRI LV mass at end-systole, which ranged from 6.7 to 11.1 g (mean = 8.7 g, SD = 1.7 g) and echocardiographic LV mass at enddiastole, which ranged from 5.2 to 9.1 g (mean= 7.1 g, SD = 1.8 g). Inter- and intraobserver variability for cMRI was 2%. CMRI obtained at end-systole accurately and reliably quantifies LV mass in domestic cats. It is more accurate than the echocardiographic method used in this study.

  3. Complementarity of MALDI and LA ICP mass spectrometry for platinum anticancer imaging in human tumor.

    PubMed

    Bianga, Juliusz; Bouslimani, Amina; Bec, Nicole; Quenet, François; Mounicou, Sandra; Szpunar, Joanna; Bouyssiere, Brice; Lobinski, Ryszard; Larroque, Christian

    2014-08-01

    The follow-up of the Heated Intraoperative Chemotherapy (HIPEC) of peritoneal carcinomatosis would benefit from the monitoring of the penetration, distribution and metabolism of the drug within the tumor. As tumor nodules can be resected during the therapy, mass spectrometry imaging is a suitable tool for the evaluation of treatment efficacy, and, as a result, the therapy can be re-optimized. In this work we demonstrate the complementarity of laser ablation (LA) ICP mass spectrometry and MALDI imaging to study the penetration and distribution of two Pt-based metallodrugs (cisplatin and oxaliplatin) in human tumor samples removed from patients diagnosed with colorectal or ovarian peritoneal carcinomatosis. LA ICP MS offered sensitive (LOD for (195)Pt 4.8 pg s(-1)) imaging of platinum quasi-independently of the original species and the sample matrix and thus an ultimate way of verifying the penetration of the Pt-containing drug or its moieties into the tumor. MALDI imaging was found to suffer in some cases from signal suppression by the matrix leading to false negatives. In the case of the oxaliplatin metallodrug, the results obtained from ICP and MALDI MS imaging were coherent whereas in the case of cisplatin, species detected by ICP MS imaging could not be validated by MALDI MS. The study is the first application of the dual ICP and MALDI MS imaging to the follow-up of metallodrugs in human tumors.

  4. Matrix Sublimation/Recrystallization for Imaging Proteins by Mass Spectrometry at High Spatial Resolution

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Junhai; Caprioli, Richard M.

    2011-01-01

    We have employed matrix deposition by sublimation for protein image analysis on tissue sections using a hydration/recrystallization process that produces high quality MALDI mass spectra and high spatial resolution ion images. We systematically investigated different washing protocols, the effect of tissue section thickness, the amount of sublimated matrix per unit area and different recrystallization conditions. The results show that an organic solvent rinse followed by ethanol/water rinses substantially increased sensitivity for the detection of proteins. Both the thickness of tissue section and amount of sinapinic acid sublimated per unit area have optimal ranges for maximal protein signal intensity. Ion images of mouse and rat brain sections at 50, 20 and 10 µm spatial resolution are presented and are correlated with H&E stained optical images. For targeted analysis, histology directed imaging can be performed using this protocol where MS analysis and H&E staining are performed on the same section. PMID:21639088

  5. Retrieving the Velocity of Motion of Air Masses from Digital Images of Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakalova, Kalinka; Bakalov, Dimitar

    2007-04-01

    An interdisciplinary project, aimed at developing tools for the determination of physical characteristics of the atmosphere by means of ground-based digital imaging in the visible range is in progress. Determining the 3-dimensional field of velocities of motion of the air masses from digital images of clouds is among the central tasks. The approach consists in identifying patterns of the cloud structure with characteristic shape and measuring their angular displacement by tracking them in series of consecutive digital images, taken at optimal time intervals. The geometrical mapping of the cloud of an image onto the following image (including translation, rotation, dilatation and additional small irregular deformations) is parameterized, and the numerical values of the parameters are computed by minimizing the sum over pixels of the squared deviation of the brightness, weighed with factors accounting for the representativeness of the group of pixels, and with constrains on the parameters describing irregular deformations.

  6. Abdominal masses in children: multiorgan imaging with /sup 99m/Tc methylene diphosphonate

    SciTech Connect

    Siddiqui, A.R.; Cohen, M.; Moran, D.P.

    1982-07-01

    /sup 99m/Tc methylene diphosphonate (/sup 99m/Tc MDP) imaging was performed in 29 consecutive children with abdominal masses. Dynamic images of the inferior vena cava were obtained by injecting the radiotracer in the feet. Serial renal images were obtained for the next 30 min. Routine bone imaging was performed at about 3 hr. The radionuclide studies of the inferior vena cava accurately diagnosed total obstruction and displacement to the left but not partial obstruction and displacement to the right. The abnormalities on early renal imaging included displacement (14), distortion (seven), obstruction (eight), and nonvisualization (one). All patients with Wilms tumor (eight) had either nonvisualized or distorted renal parenchyma. Patients with neuroblastoma (17) and other tumors (four) had displacement and obstruction. Soft-tissue accumulation of /sup 99m/Tc MDP was noted in two Wilms tumors and 12 neuroblastomas.

  7. Optimization of Whole-body Zebrafish Sectioning Methods for Mass Spectrometry Imaging

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) methods and protocols have become widely adapted to a variety of tissues and species. However, the MSI literature lacks information on whole-body cryosection preparation for the zebrafish (ZF; Danio rerio), a model organism routinely used in devel...

  8. Body image, body mass index, and body composition in young adults.

    PubMed

    Streeter, Veronica M; Milhausen, Robin R; Buchholz, Andrea C

    2012-01-01

    Associations were examined between body image and body mass index (BMI) in comparison with body composition in healthy weight, overweight, and obese young adults. Weight and height were determined, and the percentage of fat mass (%FM) and percentage of fat-free mass (%FFM) were measured by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry in 75 male and 87 female young adults (21.1 ± 1.9 years; 25.2 ± 4.4 kg/m² [mean ± standard deviation]). Body image was measured using the three subscales Weight Esteem, Appearance Esteem, and External Attribution of the Body-Esteem Scale for Adolescents and Adults (BESAA). Body mass index and %FM were highly correlated (r for males = 0.74, r for females = 0.82; both p<0.001), and were inversely associated with body image, particularly Weight Esteem. After adjustment for physical activity, BMI and %FM (and %FFM, although in the opposite direction) were associated with each BESAA subscale: %FM, %FFM, and BMI explained 12% to 14% of the variance in Appearance Esteem for both sexes, 33% to 41% in Weight Esteem in women and 16% to 18% in men, and 8% to 10% in External Attribution in women (all p<0.05) and <5% for men (NS). Clinicians should be aware that as their clients' BMI and %FM increase, body image decreases, particularly in women.

  9. Optimization of Whole-body Zebrafish Sectioning Methods for Mass Spectrometry Imaging

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) methods and protocols have become widely adapted to a variety of tissues and species. However, the MSI literature lacks information on whole-body cryosection preparation for the zebrafish (ZF; Danio rerio), a model organism routinely used in devel...

  10. Anatomical Distribution of Lipids in Human Brain Cortex by Imaging Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veloso, Antonio; Astigarraga, Egoitz; Barreda-Gómez, Gabriel; Manuel, Iván; Ferrer, Isidro; Teresa Giralt, María; Ochoa, Begoña; Fresnedo, Olatz; Rodríguez-Puertas, Rafael; Fernández, José A.

    2011-02-01

    Molecular mass images of tissues will be biased if differences in the physicochemical properties of the microenvironment affect the intensity of the spectra. To address this issue, we have performed—by means of MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry—imaging on slices and lipidomic analysis in extracts of frontal cortex, both from the same postmortem tissue samples of human brain. An external calibration was used to achieve a mass accuracy of 10 ppm (1 σ) in the spectra of the extracts, although the final assignment was based on a comparison with previously reported species. The spectra recorded directly from tissue slices (imaging) show excellent s/n ratios, almost comparable to those obtained from the extracts. In addition, they retain the information about the anatomical distribution of the molecular species present in autopsied frozen tissue. Further comparison between the spectra from lipid extracts devoid of proteins and those recorded directly from the tissue unambiguously show that the differences in lipid composition between gray and white matter observed in the mass images are not an artifact due to microenvironmental influences of each anatomical area on the signal intensity, but real variations in the lipid composition.

  11. Relationship between Body Image and Body Mass Index in College Men

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watkins, Julia A.; Christie, Catherine; Chally, Pamela

    2008-01-01

    Objective and Participants: The authors examined cognitive and affective dimensions of body image of a randomized sample of 188 college men on the basis of body mass index (BMI). Methods: They conducted chi-square tests and ANOVAs to determine differences between 4 BMI groups (underweight, normal weight, overweight, and obese) on demographics and…

  12. Spatial correlation of confocal Raman scattering and secondary ion mass spectrometric molecular images of lignocellulosic materials.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhen; Chu, Li-Qiang; Sweedler, Jonathan V; Bohn, Paul W

    2010-04-01

    A detailed chemical and structural understanding of pre-enzymatic processing of lignocellulosic materials (LCMs) is a key objective in the development of renewable energy. Efficient rendering of biomass components into fermentable substrates for conversion into biofuel feedstocks would benefit greatly from the development of new technologies to provide high-quality, spatially resolved chemical information about LCMs during the various processing states. In an effort to realize this important goal, spatially correlated confocal Raman and mass spectrometric images allow the extraction of three-dimensional information from the perennial grass, Miscanthus x giganteus. An optical microscopy-based landmark registry scheme was developed that allows samples to be transferred between laboratories at different institutions, while retaining the capability to access the same physical regions of the samples. Subsequent to higher resolution imaging via confocal Raman microscopy and secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS), laser desorption-ionization mass spectrometry was used to place these regions within the overall sample architecture. Excellent sample registry was evident in the highly correlated Raman and SIMS images. In addition, the correlation of vibrational Raman scattering with mass spectra from specific spatial locations allowed confirmation of the assignment of intracellular globular structures to hemicellulose-rich lignin complexes, an assignment which could only be made tentatively from either image alone.

  13. Relationship between Body Image and Body Mass Index in College Men

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watkins, Julia A.; Christie, Catherine; Chally, Pamela

    2008-01-01

    Objective and Participants: The authors examined cognitive and affective dimensions of body image of a randomized sample of 188 college men on the basis of body mass index (BMI). Methods: They conducted chi-square tests and ANOVAs to determine differences between 4 BMI groups (underweight, normal weight, overweight, and obese) on demographics and…

  14. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation mass spectrometry imaging and its development for plant protein imaging

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionisation (MALDI) mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) uses the power of high mass resolution time of flight (ToF) mass spectrometry coupled to the raster of lasers shots across the cut surface of tissues to provide new insights into the spatial distribution of biomolecules within biological tissues. The history of this technique in animals and plants is considered and the potential for analysis of proteins by this technique in plants is discussed. Protein biomarker identification from MALDI-MSI is a challenge and a number of different approaches to address this bottleneck are discussed. The technical considerations needed for MALDI-MSI are reviewed and these are presented alongside examples from our own work and a protocol for MALDI-MSI of proteins in plant samples. PMID:21726462

  15. High-Contrast Imaging of Intermediate-Mass Giants with Long-Term Radial Velocity Trends

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryu, Tsuguru; Sato, Bun'ei; Kuzuhara, Masayuki; Narita, Norio; Takahashi, Yasuhiro; Uyama, Taichi; Kudo, Tomoyuki; Kusakabe, Nobuhiko; Hashimoto, Jun; Omiya, Masashi; hide

    2016-01-01

    A radial velocity (RV) survey for intermediate-mass giants has been operated for over a decade at Okayama Astrophysical Observatory (OAO). The OAO survey has revealed that some giants show long-term linear RV accelerations (RV trends), indicating the presence of outer companions. Direct imaging observations can help clarify what objects generate these RV trends. We present the results of high-contrast imaging observations of six intermediate-mass giants with long-term RV trends using the Subaru Telescope and HiCIAO camera. We detected co-moving companions to gamma Hya B (0.61+0.12 -0.14 Stellar Mass), HD 5608 B (0.10 +/- 0.01 Stellar Mass), and HD 109272 B (0.28 +/- 0.06 Stellar Mass). For the remaining targets( Dra, 18 Del, and HD 14067) we exclude companions more massive than 30-60 M(sub Jup) at projected separations of 1''-7''. We examine whether these directly imaged companions or unidentified long-period companions can account for the RV trends observed around the six giants. We find that the Kozai mechanism can explain the high eccentricity of the inner planets Dra b, HD 5608 b, and HD 14067 b.

  16. Classification of breast masses by ultrasonic Nakagami imaging: a feasibility study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsui, Po-Hsiang; Yeh, Chih-Kuang; Chang, Chien-Cheng; Liao, Yin-Yin

    2008-11-01

    Ultrasound is an important clinical tool in noninvasive diagnoses of breast cancer. The Nakagami statistical parameter estimated from the ultrasonic backscattered envelope has been demonstrated to be useful in complementing conventional B-mode scans when classifying breast masses. However, the shadowing effect caused by certain high-attenuation tumors in the B-mode image makes the tumor contour unclear, and thus it is more difficult to choose an appropriate region of interest from which to collect tumor data for estimating the Nakagami parameter. This study explored the feasibility of using the Nakagami parametric image to overcome the shadowing effect for visualizing the properties of breast masses. Experiments were performed on a breast-mimicking phantom and on some typical clinical cases for cysts, fat and tumors (fibroadenoma) (n = 18) in order to explore the performance of the Nakagami image under ideal and practical conditions. The experimental results showed that the Nakagami image pixels (i.e. the local Nakagami parameter) in the cyst, tumor and fat are 0.21 ± 0.01, 0.65 ± 0.05 and 0.98 ± 0.07, respectively, for six independent phantom measurements, and 0.14 ± 0.03, 0.67 ± 0.11 and 0.89 ± 0.08, respectively, for clinical experiments. This suggests that the Nakagami image is able to classify various breast masses (p < 0.005) although the clinical results from tumors of different cases have a larger variance that may be caused by the complexity of real breast tissues. In particular, unlike the B-mode image, the Nakagami image is not subject to significant shadowing effects, making it useful to complement the B-mode image to describe the tumor contour for identifying the tumor-related region when the shadowing effect is stronger or a low system gain is used.

  17. Classification of breast masses by ultrasonic Nakagami imaging: a feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Tsui, Po-Hsiang; Yeh, Chih-Kuang; Chang, Chien-Cheng; Liao, Yin-Yin

    2008-11-07

    Ultrasound is an important clinical tool in noninvasive diagnoses of breast cancer. The Nakagami statistical parameter estimated from the ultrasonic backscattered envelope has been demonstrated to be useful in complementing conventional B-mode scans when classifying breast masses. However, the shadowing effect caused by certain high-attenuation tumors in the B-mode image makes the tumor contour unclear, and thus it is more difficult to choose an appropriate region of interest from which to collect tumor data for estimating the Nakagami parameter. This study explored the feasibility of using the Nakagami parametric image to overcome the shadowing effect for visualizing the properties of breast masses. Experiments were performed on a breast-mimicking phantom and on some typical clinical cases for cysts, fat and tumors (fibroadenoma) (n = 18) in order to explore the performance of the Nakagami image under ideal and practical conditions. The experimental results showed that the Nakagami image pixels (i.e. the local Nakagami parameter) in the cyst, tumor and fat are 0.21 +/- 0.01, 0.65 +/- 0.05 and 0.98 +/- 0.07, respectively, for six independent phantom measurements, and 0.14 +/- 0.03, 0.67 +/- 0.11 and 0.89 +/- 0.08, respectively, for clinical experiments. This suggests that the Nakagami image is able to classify various breast masses (p < 0.005) although the clinical results from tumors of different cases have a larger variance that may be caused by the complexity of real breast tissues. In particular, unlike the B-mode image, the Nakagami image is not subject to significant shadowing effects, making it useful to complement the B-mode image to describe the tumor contour for identifying the tumor-related region when the shadowing effect is stronger or a low system gain is used.

  18. Air flow-assisted ionization imaging mass spectrometry method for easy whole-body molecular imaging under ambient conditions.

    PubMed

    Luo, Zhigang; He, Jiuming; Chen, Yi; He, Jingjing; Gong, Tao; Tang, Fei; Wang, Xiaohao; Zhang, Ruiping; Huang, Lan; Zhang, Lianfeng; Lv, Haining; Ma, Shuanggang; Fu, Zhaodi; Chen, Xiaoguang; Yu, Shishan; Abliz, Zeper

    2013-03-05

    Whole-body molecular imaging is able to directly map spatial distribution of molecules and monitor its biotransformation in intact biological tissue sections. Imaging mass spectrometry (IMS), a label-free molecular imaging method, can be used to image multiple molecules in a single measurement with high specificity. Herein, a novel easy-to-implement, whole-body IMS method was developed with air flow-assisted ionization in a desorption electrospray ionization mode. The developed IMS method can effectively image molecules in a large whole-body section in open air without sample pretreatment, such as chemical labeling, section division, or matrix deposition. Moreover, the signal levels were improved, and the spatial assignment errors were eliminated; thus, high-quality whole-body images were obtained. With this novel IMS method, in situ mapping analysis of molecules was performed in adult rat sections with picomolar sensitivity under ambient conditions, and the dynamic information of molecule distribution and its biotransformation was provided to uncover molecular events at the whole-animal level. A global view of the differential distribution of an anticancer agent and its metabolites was simultaneously acquired in whole-body rat and model mouse bearing neuroglioma along the administration time. The obtained drug distribution provided rich information for identifying the targeted organs and predicting possible tumor spectrum, pharmacological activity, and potential toxicity of drug candidates.

  19. High resolution mass spectrometry imaging of plant tissues: towards a plant metabolite atlas.

    PubMed

    Bhandari, Dhaka Ram; Wang, Qing; Friedt, Wolfgang; Spengler, Bernhard; Gottwald, Sven; Römpp, Andreas

    2015-11-21

    Mass spectrometry (MS) imaging provides spatial and molecular information for a wide range of compounds. This tool can be used to investigate metabolic changes in plant physiology and environmental interactions. A major challenge in our study was to prepare tissue sections that were compatible with high spatial resolution analysis and therefore dedicated sample preparation protocols were established and optimized for the physicochemical properties of all major plant organs. We combined high spatial resolution (5 μm), in order to detect cellular features, and high mass accuracy (<2 ppm root mean square error), for molecular specificity. Mass spectrometry imaging experiments were performed in positive and negative ion mode. Changes in metabolite patterns during plant development were investigated for germination of oilseed rape. The detailed localization of more than 90 compounds allowed assignment to metabolic processes and indicated possible functions in plant tissues. The 'untargeted' nature of MS imaging allows the detection of marker compounds for the physiological status, as demonstrated for plant-pathogen interactions. Our images show excellent correlation with optical/histological examination. In contrast to previous MS imaging studies of plants, we present a complete workflow that covers multiple species, such as oilseed rape, wheat seed and rice. In addition, different major plant organs and a wide variety of compound classes were analyzed. Thus, our method could be used to develop a plant metabolite atlas as a reference to investigate systemic and local effects of pathogen infection or environmental stress.

  20. [Breast imaging of mass, architectural distortion and asymmetry: Clinical practice guidelines].

    PubMed

    Chopier, J; Roedlich, M N; Mathelin, C

    2015-12-01

    The development of the mammary imaging (mammography, ultrasound, MRI) enables the discovery of more and more lesions. The BI-RADS lexicon is the reference book for their descriptive analysis. Four elementary images must be individualized: masses and architectural distortion described in 3 imaging techniques, asymmetries and microcalcifications described in mammography. The aim of this work was to review three of these images: mass, architectural distortion and asymmetry, allowing the various actors involved in senology to propose an up-to-date diagnostic and interventional strategy, based on their positive predictive values (PPV) or negative predictive values of cancer and allowing the classification BI-RADS of the lesion. The masses are the most often encountered lesions as well in screening as in diagnosis. Their PPV is superior in diagnosis than in screening and it increases with the age. Their irregular forms, their spiculated outlines and their evolutionary character are the most relevant elements of suspicion. The architectural distortion is the rarest image and always classified suspect BI-RADS 4, except in case of a known scar. The asymmetry is less common; its PPV is low and rises only in case of evolutionary asymmetry.

  1. High-mass-resolution MALDI mass spectrometry imaging of metabolites from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue.

    PubMed

    Ly, Alice; Buck, Achim; Balluff, Benjamin; Sun, Na; Gorzolka, Karin; Feuchtinger, Annette; Janssen, Klaus-Peter; Kuppen, Peter J K; van de Velde, Cornelis J H; Weirich, Gregor; Erlmeier, Franziska; Langer, Rupert; Aubele, Michaela; Zitzelsberger, Horst; McDonnell, Liam; Aichler, Michaela; Walch, Axel

    2016-08-01

    Formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue specimens are the gold standard for histological examination, and they provide valuable molecular information in tissue-based research. Metabolite assessment from archived tissue samples has not been extensively conducted because of a lack of appropriate protocols and concerns about changes in metabolite content or chemical state due to tissue processing. We present a protocol for the in situ analysis of metabolite content from FFPE samples using a high-mass-resolution matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry imaging (MALDI-FT-ICR-MSI) platform. The method involves FFPE tissue sections that undergo deparaffinization and matrix coating by 9-aminoacridine before MALDI-MSI. Using this platform, we previously detected ∼1,500 m/z species in the mass range m/z 50-1,000 in FFPE samples; the overlap compared with fresh frozen samples is 72% of m/z species, indicating that metabolites are largely conserved in FFPE tissue samples. This protocol can be reproducibly performed on FFPE tissues, including small samples such as tissue microarrays and biopsies. The procedure can be completed in a day, depending on the size of the sample measured and raster size used. Advantages of this approach include easy sample handling, reproducibility, high throughput and the ability to demonstrate molecular spatial distributions in situ. The data acquired with this protocol can be used in research and clinical practice.

  2. Submicrometer Imaging by Laser Ablation-Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry via Signal and Image Deconvolution Approaches.

    PubMed

    Van Malderen, Stijn J M; van Elteren, Johannes T; Vanhaecke, Frank

    2015-06-16

    In this work, pre- and postacquisition procedures for enhancing the lateral resolution of laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICPMS) in two- and three-dimensional (2D, 3D) nuclide distribution mapping beyond the laser beam waist are described. 2D images were constructed by projecting a rectangular grid of discrete LA positions, arranged at interspacings smaller than the dimensions of the laser beam waist, onto the sample surface, thus oversampling the region of interest and producing a 2D image convolved in the spatial domain. The pulse response peaks of a low-dispersion LA cell were isolated via signal deconvolution of the transient mass analyzer response. A 3D stack of 2D images was deconvolved by an iterative Richardson-Lucy algorithm with Total Variance regularization, enabling submicrometer image fidelity, demonstrated in the analysis of trace level features in corroded glass. A point spread function (PSF) could be derived from topography maps of single pulse craters from atomic force microscopy. This experimental PSF allows the approach to take into account the laser beam shape, beam aberrations, and the laser-solid interaction, which in turn enhances the spatial resolution of the reconstructed volume.

  3. Targeted Multiplex Imaging Mass Spectrometry with Single Chain Fragment Variable (scfv) Recombinant Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Thiery, Gwendoline; Mernaugh, Ray L.; Yan, Heping; Spraggins, Jeffrey M.; Yang, Junhai; Parl, Fritz F.; Caprioli, Richard M.

    2012-01-01

    Recombinant scfv antibodies specific for CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 P450 enzymes were combined with targeted imaging mass spectrometry to simultaneously detect the P450 enzymes present in archived, paraffin-embedded, human breast cancer tissue sections. By using CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 specific scfv, each coupled to a unique reporter molecule (i.e., a mass tag) it was possible to simultaneously detect multiple antigens within a single tissue sample with high sensitivity and specificity using mass spectrometry. The capability of imaging multiple antigens at the same time is a significant advance that overcomes technical barriers encountered when using present day approaches to develop assays that can simultaneously detect more than a single antigen in the same tissue sample. PMID:22869296

  4. Bilateral ectopic cervical thymus presenting as a neck mass: Ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Tanrivermis Sayit, Asli; Elmali, Muzaffer; Hashimov, Jalal; Ceyhan Bilgici, Meltem; Dağdemir, Ayhan

    2016-09-01

    Ectopic cervical thymus (ECT) is a rare cause of neck mass in the pediatric age group. It is extremely uncommon in infants. Overall more than 100 cases have been reported in the literature, though fewer than 10% involved infants. Furthermore, ECT is usually unilateral and more frequently seen in men than in women. Ultrasound (US) is the preferred initial imaging modality, especially in pediatric neck masses given its wide availability, low cost and lack of radiation exposure. US can show the location, extension, and echotexture of the ECT. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can be performed to verify the diagnosis and confirm communication between the ECT and the mediastinal thymus. Diffusion restriction can aid diagnosis when seen in a neck mass similar to that in the mediastinal thymus. Herein is described a case of bilateral ECT in a 2-month-old boy with associated US and MRI findings. © 2016 Japan Pediatric Society.

  5. Imaging Findings of an Unusually Located Hydatid Cyst Presented as a Sacrococcygeal Mass

    PubMed Central

    Yilmaz, Guliz; Halil Akpinar, Suha

    2015-01-01

    Hydatid disease (HD) is a parasitic infection that is most commonly caused by the larval stage of Echinococcus granulosus. Unusual location for this disease can cause diagnostic and therapeutic problems. We herein report a case of sacrococcygeal HD at an unusual location in a 30-year-old woman. She was evaluated using computed tomography (CT) imaging and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) after the demonstration of the lucent bone lesion on plain pelvic radiography. There was an expansile lytic mass without contrast enhancement suggesting a cystic mass in the sacrococcygeal region. Medical history revealed that she had undergone surgery for liver HD and the serological test results were diagnostic for HD. In light of this, no surgery was carried out for this cystic mass and she was followed with the diagnosis of sacrococcygeal HD. PMID:25901257

  6. Homogeneous Matrix Deposition on Dried Agar for MALDI Imaging Mass Spectrometry of Microbial Cultures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, Thomas; Dorrestein, Pieter C.

    2015-11-01

    Matrix deposition on agar-based microbial colonies for MALDI imaging mass spectrometry is often complicated by the complex media on which microbes are grown. This Application Note demonstrates how consecutive short spray pulses of a matrix solution can form an evenly closed matrix layer on dried agar. Compared with sieving dry matrix onto wet agar, this method supports analyte cocrystallization, which results in significantly more signals, higher signal-to-noise ratios, and improved ionization efficiency. The even matrix layer improves spot-to-spot precision of measured m/z values when using TOF mass spectrometers. With this technique, we established reproducible imaging mass spectrometry of myxobacterial cultures on nutrient-rich cultivation media, which was not possible with the sieving technique.

  7. Homogeneous matrix deposition on dried agar for MALDI imaging mass spectrometry of microbial cultures.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Thomas; Dorrestein, Pieter C

    2015-11-01

    Matrix deposition on agar-based microbial colonies for MALDI imaging mass spectrometry is often complicated by the complex media on which microbes are grown. This Application Note demonstrates how consecutive short spray pulses of a matrix solution can form an evenly closed matrix layer on dried agar. Compared with sieving dry matrix onto wet agar, this method supports analyte cocrystallization, which results in significantly more signals, higher signal-to-noise ratios, and improved ionization efficiency. The even matrix layer improves spot-to-spot precision of measured m/z values when using TOF mass spectrometers. With this technique, we established reproducible imaging mass spectrometry of myxobacterial cultures on nutrient-rich cultivation media, which was not possible with the sieving technique. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  8. Targeted Multiplex Imaging Mass Spectrometry with Single Chain Fragment Variable (scfv) Recombinant Antibodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiery, Gwendoline; Mernaugh, Ray L.; Yan, Heping; Spraggins, Jeffrey M.; Yang, Junhai; Parl, Fritz F.; Caprioli, Richard M.

    2012-10-01

    Recombinant scfv antibodies specific for CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 P450 enzymes were combined with targeted imaging mass spectrometry to simultaneously detect the P450 enzymes present in archived, paraffin-embedded, human breast cancer tissue sections. By using CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 specific scfv, each coupled to a unique reporter molecule (i.e., a mass tag) it was possible to simultaneously detect multiple antigens within a single tissue sample with high sensitivity and specificity using mass spectrometry. The capability of imaging multiple antigens at the same time is a significant advance that overcomes technical barriers encountered when using present day approaches to develop assays that can simultaneously detect more than a single antigen in the same tissue sample.

  9. Mass

    SciTech Connect

    Quigg, Chris

    2007-12-05

    In the classical physics we inherited from Isaac Newton, mass does not arise, it simply is. The mass of a classical object is the sum of the masses of its parts. Albert Einstein showed that the mass of a body is a measure of its energy content, inviting us to consider the origins of mass. The protons we accelerate at Fermilab are prime examples of Einsteinian matter: nearly all of their mass arises from stored energy. Missing mass led to the discovery of the noble gases, and a new form of missing mass leads us to the notion of dark matter. Starting with a brief guided tour of the meanings of mass, the colloquium will explore the multiple origins of mass. We will see how far we have come toward understanding mass, and survey the issues that guide our research today.

  10. Mass

    SciTech Connect

    Chris Quigg

    2007-12-05

    In the classical physics we inherited from Isaac Newton, mass does not arise, it simply is. The mass of a classical object is the sum of the masses of its parts. Albert Einstein showed that the mass of a body is a measure of its energy content, inviting us to consider the origins of mass. The protons we accelerate at Fermilab are prime examples of Einsteinian matter: nearly all of their mass arises from stored energy. Missing mass led to the discovery of the noble gases, and a new form of missing mass leads us to the notion of dark matter. Starting with a brief guided tour of the meanings of mass, the colloquium will explore the multiple origins of mass. We will see how far we have come toward understanding mass, and survey the issues that guide our research today.

  11. Polychromatic sparse image reconstruction and mass attenuation spectrum estimation via B-spline basis function expansion

    SciTech Connect

    Gu, Renliang E-mail: ald@iastate.edu; Dogandžić, Aleksandar E-mail: ald@iastate.edu

    2015-03-31

    We develop a sparse image reconstruction method for polychromatic computed tomography (CT) measurements under the blind scenario where the material of the inspected object and the incident energy spectrum are unknown. To obtain a parsimonious measurement model parameterization, we first rewrite the measurement equation using our mass-attenuation parameterization, which has the Laplace integral form. The unknown mass-attenuation spectrum is expanded into basis functions using a B-spline basis of order one. We develop a block coordinate-descent algorithm for constrained minimization of a penalized negative log-likelihood function, where constraints and penalty terms ensure nonnegativity of the spline coefficients and sparsity of the density map image in the wavelet domain. This algorithm alternates between a Nesterov’s proximal-gradient step for estimating the density map image and an active-set step for estimating the incident spectrum parameters. Numerical simulations demonstrate the performance of the proposed scheme.

  12. Mass spectrometry imaging reveals the sub-organ distribution of carbon nanomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Suming; Xiong, Caiqiao; Liu, Huihui; Wan, Qiongqiong; Hou, Jian; He, Qing; Badu-Tawiah, Abraham; Nie, Zongxiu

    2015-02-01

    Label and label-free methods to image carbon-based nanomaterials exist. However, label-based approaches are limited by the risk of tag detachment over time, and label-free spectroscopic methods have slow imaging speeds, weak photoluminescence signals and strong backgrounds. Here, we present a label-free mass spectrometry imaging method to detect carbon nanotubes, graphene oxide and carbon nanodots in mice. The large molecular weights of nanoparticles are difficult to detect using conventional mass spectrometers, but our method overcomes this problem by using the intrinsic carbon cluster fingerprint signal of the nanomaterials. We mapped and quantified the sub-organ distribution of the nanomaterials in mice. Our results showed that most carbon nanotubes and nanodots were found in the outer parenchyma of the kidney, and all three materials were seen in the red pulp of the spleen. The highest concentrations of nanotubes in the spleen were found within the marginal zone.

  13. How to determine the centre of mass of bodies from image modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adriano Dias, Marco; Simeão Carvalho, Paulo; Rodrigues, Marcelo

    2016-03-01

    Image modelling is a recent technique in physics education that includes digital tools for image treatment and analysis, such as digital stroboscopic photography (DSP) and video analysis software. It is commonly used to analyse the motion of objects. In this work we show how to determine the position of the centre of mass (CM) of objects with either isotropic or anisotropic mass density, by video analyses as a video based experimental activity (VBEA). Strobe imaging is also presented in an educational view, helping students to visualize the complex motion of a rigid body with heterogeneous structure. As an example, we present a hammer tossed with translation and rotation. The technique shown here is valid for almost any kind of objects and it is very useful to work with the concept of CM.

  14. Sample Preparation of Corn Seed Tissue to Prevent Analyte Relocations for Mass Spectrometry Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Shin Hye; Kim, Jeongkwon; Lee, Young Jin; Lee, Tae Geol; Yoon, Sohee

    2017-08-01

    Corn seed tissue sections were prepared by the tape support method using an adhesive tape, and mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) was performed. The effect of heat generated during sample preparation was investigated by time-of-flight secondary mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS) imaging of corn seed tissue prepared by the tape support and the thaw-mounted methods. Unlike thaw-mounted sample preparation, the tape support method does not cause imaging distortion because of the absence of heat, which can cause migration of the analytes on the sample. By applying the tape-support method, the corn seed tissue was prepared without structural damage and MSI with accurate spatial information of analytes was successfully performed.

  15. Sample Preparation of Corn Seed Tissue to Prevent Analyte Relocations for Mass Spectrometry Imaging.

    PubMed

    Kim, Shin Hye; Kim, Jeongkwon; Lee, Young Jin; Lee, Tae Geol; Yoon, Sohee

    2017-08-01

    Corn seed tissue sections were prepared by the tape support method using an adhesive tape, and mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) was performed. The effect of heat generated during sample preparation was investigated by time-of-flight secondary mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS) imaging of corn seed tissue prepared by the tape support and the thaw-mounted methods. Unlike thaw-mounted sample preparation, the tape support method does not cause imaging distortion because of the absence of heat, which can cause migration of the analytes on the sample. By applying the tape-support method, the corn seed tissue was prepared without structural damage and MSI with accurate spatial information of analytes was successfully performed. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  16. Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization Imaging Mass Spectrometry: In Situ Molecular Mapping

    PubMed Central

    Angel, Peggi M.; Caprioli, Richard M.

    2013-01-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) is a relatively new imaging modality that allows mapping of a wide range of biomolecules within a thin tissue section. The technology uses a laser beam to directly desorb and ionize molecules from discrete locations on the tissue that are subsequently recorded in a mass spectrometer. IMS is distinguished by the ability to directly measure molecules in situ ranging from small metabolites to proteins, reporting hundreds to thousands of expression patterns from a single imaging experiment. This article reviews recent advances in IMS technology, applications, and experimental strategies that allow it to significantly aid in the discovery and understanding of molecular processes in biological and clinical samples. PMID:23259809

  17. The Planets Around Low-Mass Stars (PALMS) Direct Imaging Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowler, Brendan P.; Liu, M. C.; Shkolnik, E.; Mann, A.; Tamura, M.

    2013-01-01

    Direct imaging is the only method to study the outer architecture (>10 AU) of extrasolar planetary systems in a targeted fashion. Previous imaging surveys have primarily focused on intermediate- and high-mass stars because of the relative dearth of known nearby young M dwarfs. As a result, even though M dwarfs make up 70% of stars in our galaxy, there are few constraints on the population of giant planets at moderate separations (10-100 AU) in this stellar mass regime. We present results from an ongoing high-contrast adaptive optics imaging survey targeting newly identified nearby (<35 pc) young (<300 Myr) M dwarfs with Keck-2/NIRC2 and Subaru/HiCIAO. We have already discovered four young brown dwarf companions with masses between 30-70 Mjup; two of these are members of the ~120 Myr AB Dor moving group, and another one will yield a dynamical mass in the near future. Follow-up optical and near-infrared spectroscopy of these companions reveal spectral types of late-M to early-L and spectroscopic indicators of youth such as angular H-band morphologies, weak J-band alkali lines, and Li absorption and Halpha emission in one target. Altogether our survey is sensitive to planet masses a few times that of Jupiter at separations down to ~10 AU. With a sample size of roughly 80 single M dwarfs, this program represents the deepest and most extensive imaging search for planets around young low-mass stars to date.

  18. Investigation of psychophysical measure for evaluation of similar images for mammographic masses: Preliminary results

    SciTech Connect

    Muramatsu, Chisako; Li Qiang; Suzuki, Kenji; Schmidt, Robert A.; Shiraishi, Junji; Newstead, Gillian M.; Doi, Kunio

    2005-07-15

    We investigated a psychophysical similarity measure for selection of images similar to those of unknown masses on mammograms, which may assist radiologists in the distinction between benign and malignant masses. Sixty pairs of masses were selected from 1445 mass images prepared for this study, which were obtained from the Digital Database for Screening Mammography by the University of South Florida. Five radiologists provided subjective similarity ratings for these 60 pairs of masses based on the overall impression for diagnosis. Radiologists' subjective ratings were marked on a continuous rating scale and quantified between 0 and 1, which correspond to pairs not similar at all and pairs almost identical, respectively. By use of the subjective ratings as 'gold standard', similarity measures based on the Euclidean distance between pairs in feature space and the psychophysical measure were determined. For determination of the psychophysical similarity measure, an artificial neural network (ANN) was employed to learn the relationship between radiologists' average subjective similarity ratings and computer-extracted image features. To evaluate the usefulness of the similarity measures, the agreement with the radiologists' subjective similarity ratings was assessed in terms of correlation coefficients between the average subjective ratings and the similarity measures. A commonly used similarity measure based on the Euclidean distance was moderately correlated (r=0.644) with the radiologists' average subjective ratings, whereas the psychophysical measure by use of the ANN was highly correlated (r=0.798). The preliminary result indicates that a psychophysical similarity measure would be useful in the selection of images similar to those of unknown masses on mammograms.

  19. Investigation of psychophysical measure for evaluation of similar images for mammographic masses: Preliminary results.

    PubMed

    Muramatsu, Chisako; Li, Qiang; Suzuki, Kenji; Schmidt, Robert A; Shiraishi, Junji; Newstead, Gillian M; Doi, Kunio

    2005-07-01

    We investigated a psychophysical similarity measure for selection of images similar to those of unknown masses on mammograms, which may assist radiologists in the distinction between benign and malignant masses. Sixty pairs of masses were selected from 1445 mass images prepared for this study, which were obtained from the Digital Database for Screening Mammography by the University of South Florida. Five radiologists provided subjective similarity ratings for these 60 pairs of masses based on the overall impression for diagnosis. Radiologists' subjective ratings were marked on a continuous rating scale and quantified between 0 and 1, which correspond to pairs not similar at all and pairs almost identical, respectively. By use of the subjective ratings as "gold standard," similarity measures based on the Euclidean distance between pairs in feature space and the psychophysical measure were determined. For determination of the psychophysical similarity measure, an artificial neural network (ANN) was employed to learn the relationship between radiologists' average subjective similarity ratings and computer-extracted image features. To evaluate the usefulness of the similarity measures, the agreement with the radiologists' subjective similarity ratings was assessed in terms of correlation coefficients between the average subjective ratings and the similarity measures. A commonly used similarity measure based on the Euclidean distance was moderately correlated (r=0.644) with the radiologists' average subjective ratings, whereas the psychophysical measure by use of the ANN was highly correlated (r=0.798). The preliminary result indicates that a psychophysical similarity measure would be useful in the selection of images similar to those of unknown masses on mammograms. © 2005 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  20. Investigation of psychophysical measure for evaluation of similar images for mammographic masses: preliminary results.

    PubMed

    Muramatsu, Chisako; Li, Qiang; Suzuki, Kenji; Schmidt, Robert A; Shiraishi, Junji; Newstead, Gillian M; Doi, Kunio

    2005-07-01

    We investigated a psychophysical similarity measure for selection of images similar to those of unknown masses on mammograms, which may assist radiologists in the distinction between benign and malignant masses. Sixty pairs of masses were selected from 1445 mass images prepared for this study, which were obtained from the Digital Database for Screening Mammography by the University of South Florida. Five radiologists provided subjective similarity ratings for these 60 pairs of masses based on the overall impression for diagnosis. Radiologists' subjective ratings were marked on a continuous rating scale and quantified between 0 and 1, which correspond to pairs not similar at all and pairs almost identical, respectively. By use of the subjective ratings as "gold standard," similarity measures based on the Euclidean distance between pairs in feature space and the psychophysical measure were determined. For determination of the psychophysical similarity measure, an artificial neural network (ANN) was employed to learn the relationship between radiologists' average subjective similarity ratings and computer-extracted image features. To evaluate the usefulness of the similarity measures, the agreement with the radiologists' subjective similarity ratings was assessed in terms of correlation coefficients between the average subjective ratings and the similarity measures. A commonly used similarity measure based on the Euclidean distance was moderately correlated (r=0.644) with the radiologists' average subjective ratings, whereas the psychophysical measure by use of the ANN was highly correlated (r=0.798). The preliminary result indicates that a psychophysical similarity measure would be useful in the selection of images similar to those of unknown masses on mammograms.

  1. Uncertainties and biases of source masses derived from fits of integrated fluxes or image intensities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Men'shchikov, A.

    2016-09-01

    Fitting spectral distributions of total fluxes or image intensities are two standard methods for estimating the masses of starless cores and protostellar envelopes. These mass estimates, which are the main source and basis of our knowledge of the origin and evolution of self-gravitating cores and protostars, are uncertain. It is important to clearly understand sources of statistical and systematic errors stemming from the methods and minimize the errors. In this model-based study, a grid of radiative transfer models of starless cores and protostellar envelopes was computed and their total fluxes and image intensities were fitted to derive the model masses. To investigate intrinsic effects related to the physical objects, all observational complications were explicitly ignored. Known true values of the numerical models allow assessment of the qualities of the methods and fitting models, as well as the effects of nonuniform temperatures, far-infrared opacity slope, selected subsets of wavelengths, background subtraction, and angular resolutions. The method of fitting intensities gives more accurate masses for more resolved objects than the method of fitting fluxes. With the latter, a fitting model that assumes optically thin emission gives much better results than the one allowing substantial optical depths. Temperature excesses within the objects above the mass-averaged values skew their spectral shapes towards shorter wavelengths, leading to masses underestimated typically by factors 2-5. With a fixed opacity slope deviating from the true value by a factor of 1.2, masses are inaccurate within a factor of 2. The most accurate masses are estimated by fitting just two or three of the longest wavelength measurements. Conventional algorithm of background subtraction is a likely source of large systematic errors. The absolute values of masses of the unresolved or poorly resolved objects in star-forming regions are uncertain to within at least a factor of 2-3.

  2. Pituitary Magnetic Resonance Imaging for Sellar and Parasellar Masses: Ten-Year Experience in 2598 Patients

    PubMed Central

    Famini, Pouyan; Maya, Marcel M.

    2011-01-01

    Context: Sellar and parasellar masses present with overlapping clinical and radiological features ranging from asymptomatic incidental presentations and hormonal effects to compressive local mass effects. Pituitary masses are diagnosed with increased frequency with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) advancements and availability, but indications and diagnostic outcomes of MRI screening for sellar lesions are not defined. Although pituitary adenomas are the most frequently encountered sellar mass lesions, other etiologies should be considered in the differential diagnosis of a sellar mass. Setting: The study was conducted at a tertiary pituitary center. Patients: This study was a retrospective review of 2598 subjects undergoing at least one pituitary MRI scan from 1999 to 2009. Main Outcome Measure: Prevalence and diagnosis of specific sellar and parasellar masses as screened by pituitary MRI. Results: The most common indications for pituitary imaging, excluding known mass follow-up, were for evaluation of hyperprolactinemia or hypogonadism. A normal pituitary gland was reported in 47% of subjects undergoing pituitary MRI. The most common pituitary adenomas initially identified by MRI included prolactinoma (40%), nonfunctioning adenoma (37%), and GH adenoma (13%). Nonadenomatous sellar masses accounted for 18% of visible lesions, of which the most common were Rathke's cleft cyst (19%), craniopharyngioma (15%), and meningioma (15%). Metastases accounted for 5% of nonpituitary lesions and breast cancer was the most common primary source. Conclusions: Half of all pituitary MRI scans performed in a large patient population yielded no visible lesion. Nonadenomatous pituitary lesions should be considered in the diagnosis of sellar masses observed on MRI, and a high clinical suspicion is required to exclude the presence of a nonfunctioning pituitary adenoma. PMID:21470998

  3. Targeted Multiplex Imaging Mass Spectrometry in Transmission Geometry for Subcellular Spatial Resolution

    PubMed Central

    Lavenant, Gwendoline Thiery; Zavalin, Andrey I.; Caprioli, Richard M.

    2013-01-01

    Targeted multiplex Imaging Mass Spectrometry utilizes several different antigen-specific primary antibodies, each directly labeled with a unique photocleavable mass tag, to detect multiple antigens in a single tissue section. Each photocleavable mass tag bound to an antibody has a unique molecular weight and can be readily ionized by laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry. This manuscript describes a mass spectrometry method that allows imaging of targeted single cells within tissue using transmission geometry laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry. Transmission geometry focuses the laser beam on the back side of the tissue placed on a glass slide, providing a 2 μm diameter laser spot irradiating the biological specimen. This matrix-free method enables simultaneous localization at the sub-cellular level of multiple antigens using specific tagged antibodies. We have used this technology to visualize the co-expression of synaptophysin and two major hormones peptides, insulin and somatostatin, in duplex assays in beta and delta cells contained in a human pancreatic islet. PMID:23397138

  4. Targeted Multiplex Imaging Mass Spectrometry in Transmission Geometry for Subcellular Spatial Resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiery-Lavenant, Gwendoline; Zavalin, Andre I.; Caprioli, Richard M.

    2013-04-01

    Targeted multiplex imaging mass spectrometry utilizes several different antigen-specific primary antibodies, each directly labeled with a unique photocleavable mass tag, to detect multiple antigens in a single tissue section. Each photocleavable mass tag bound to an antibody has a unique molecular weight and can be readily ionized by laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry. This article describes a mass spectrometry method that allows imaging of targeted single cells within tissue using transmission geometry laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry. Transmission geometry focuses the laser beam on the back side of the tissue placed on a glass slide, providing a 2 μm diameter laser spot irradiating the biological specimen. This matrix-free method enables simultaneous localization at the sub-cellular level of multiple antigens using specific tagged antibodies. We have used this technology to visualize the co-expression of synaptophysin and two major hormones peptides, insulin and somatostatin, in duplex assays in beta and delta cells contained in a human pancreatic islet.

  5. Software tools of the Computis European project to process mass spectrometry images.

    PubMed

    Robbe, Marie-France; Both, Jean-Pierre; Prideaux, Brendan; Klinkert, Ivo; Picaud, Vincent; Schramm, Thorsten; Hester, Atfons; Guevara, Victor; Stoeckli, Markus; Roempp, Andreas; Heeren, Ron M A; Spengler, Bernhard; Gala, Olivier; Haan, Serge

    2014-01-01

    Among the needs usually expressed by teams using mass spectrometry imaging, one that often arises is that for user-friendly software able to manage huge data volumes quickly and to provide efficient assistance for the interpretation of data. To answer this need, the Computis European project developed several complementary software tools to process mass spectrometry imaging data. Data Cube Explorer provides a simple spatial and spectral exploration for matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation-time of flight (MALDI-ToF) and time of flight-secondary-ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) data. SpectViewer offers visualisation functions, assistance to the interpretation of data, classification functionalities, peak list extraction to interrogate biological database and image overlay, and it can process data issued from MALDI-ToF, ToF-SIMS and desorption electrospray ionisation (DESI) equipment. EasyReg2D is able to register two images, in American Standard Code for Information Interchange (ASCII) format, issued from different technologies. The collaboration between the teams was hampered by the multiplicity of equipment and data formats, so the project also developed a common data format (imzML) to facilitate the exchange of experimental data and their interpretation by the different software tools. The BioMap platform for visualisation and exploration of MALDI-ToF and DESI images was adapted to parse imzML files, enabling its access to all project partners and, more globally, to a larger community of users. Considering the huge advantages brought by the imzML standard format, a specific editor (vBrowser) for imzML files and converters from proprietary formats to imzML were developed to enable the use of the imzML format by a broad scientific community. This initiative paves the way toward the development of a large panel of software tools able to process mass spectrometry imaging datasets in the future.

  6. Atmospheric-pressure Molecular Imaging of Biological Tissues and Biofilms by LAESI Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Nemes, Peter; Vertes, Akos

    2010-01-01

    Ambient ionization methods in mass spectrometry allow analytical investigations to be performed directly on a tissue or biofilm under native-like experimental conditions. Laser ablation electrospray ionization (LAESI) is one such development and is particularly well-suited for the investigation of water-containing specimens. LAESI utilizes a mid-infrared laser beam (2.94 μm wavelength) to excite the water molecules of the sample. When the ablation fluence threshold is exceeded, the sample material is expelled in the form of particulate matter and these projectiles travel to tens of millimeters above the sample surface. In LAESI, this ablation plume is intercepted by highly charged droplets to capture a fraction of the ejected sample material and convert its chemical constituents into gas-phase ions. A mass spectrometer equipped with an atmospheric-pressure ion source interface is employed to analyze and record the composition of the released ions originating from the probed area (pixel) of the sample. A systematic interrogation over an array of pixels opens a way for molecular imaging in the microprobe analysis mode. A unique aspect of LAESI mass spectrometric imaging is depth profiling that, in combination with lateral imaging, enables three-dimensional (3D) molecular imaging. With current lateral and depth resolutions of ~100 μm and ~40 μm, respectively, LAESI mass spectrometric imaging helps to explore the molecular structure of biological tissues. Herein, we review the major elements of a LAESI system and provide guidelines for a successful imaging experiment. PMID:20834223

  7. Benchmark datasets for 3D MALDI- and DESI-imaging mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Oetjen, Janina; Veselkov, Kirill; Watrous, Jeramie; McKenzie, James S; Becker, Michael; Hauberg-Lotte, Lena; Kobarg, Jan Hendrik; Strittmatter, Nicole; Mróz, Anna K; Hoffmann, Franziska; Trede, Dennis; Palmer, Andrew; Schiffler, Stefan; Steinhorst, Klaus; Aichler, Michaela; Goldin, Robert; Guntinas-Lichius, Orlando; von Eggeling, Ferdinand; Thiele, Herbert; Maedler, Kathrin; Walch, Axel; Maass, Peter; Dorrestein, Pieter C; Takats, Zoltan; Alexandrov, Theodore

    2015-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) imaging mass spectrometry (MS) is an analytical chemistry technique for the 3D molecular analysis of a tissue specimen, entire organ, or microbial colonies on an agar plate. 3D-imaging MS has unique advantages over existing 3D imaging techniques, offers novel perspectives for understanding the spatial organization of biological processes, and has growing potential to be introduced into routine use in both biology and medicine. Owing to the sheer quantity of data generated, the visualization, analysis, and interpretation of 3D imaging MS data remain a significant challenge. Bioinformatics research in this field is hampered by the lack of publicly available benchmark datasets needed to evaluate and compare algorithms. High-quality 3D imaging MS datasets from different biological systems at several labs were acquired, supplied with overview images and scripts demonstrating how to read them, and deposited into MetaboLights, an open repository for metabolomics data. 3D imaging MS data were collected from five samples using two types of 3D imaging MS. 3D matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization imaging (MALDI) MS data were collected from murine pancreas, murine kidney, human oral squamous cell carcinoma, and interacting microbial colonies cultured in Petri dishes. 3D desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) imaging MS data were collected from a human colorectal adenocarcinoma. With the aim to stimulate computational research in the field of computational 3D imaging MS, selected high-quality 3D imaging MS datasets are provided that could be used by algorithm developers as benchmark datasets.

  8. Automatic registration of imaging mass spectrometry data to the Allen Brain Atlas transcriptome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdelmoula, Walid M.; Carreira, Ricardo J.; Shyti, Reinald; Balluff, Benjamin; Tolner, Else; van den Maagdenberg, Arn M. J. M.; Lelieveldt, B. P. F.; McDonnell, Liam; Dijkstra, Jouke

    2014-03-01

    Imaging Mass Spectrometry (IMS) is an emerging molecular imaging technology that provides spatially resolved information on biomolecular structures; each image pixel effectively represents a molecular mass spectrum. By combining the histological images and IMS-images, neuroanatomical structures can be distinguished based on their biomolecular features as opposed to morphological features. The combination of IMS data with spatially resolved gene expression maps of the mouse brain, as provided by the Allen Mouse Brain atlas, would enable comparative studies of spatial metabolic and gene expression patterns in life-sciences research and biomarker discovery. As such, it would be highly desirable to spatially register IMS slices to the Allen Brain Atlas (ABA). In this paper, we propose a multi-step automatic registration pipeline to register ABA histology to IMS- images. Key novelty of the method is the selection of the best reference section from the ABA, based on pre-processed histology sections. First, we extracted a hippocampus-specific geometrical feature from the given experimental histological section to initially localize it among the ABA sections. Then, feature-based linear registration is applied to the initially localized section and its two neighbors in the ABA to select the most similar reference section. A non-rigid registration yields a one-to-one mapping of the experimental IMS slice to the ABA. The pipeline was applied on 6 coronal sections from two mouse brains, showing high anatomical correspondence, demonstrating the feasibility of complementing biomolecule distributions from individual mice with the genome-wide ABA transcriptome.

  9. A ranklet-based image representation for mass classification in digital mammograms

    SciTech Connect

    Masotti, Matteo

    2006-10-15

    Regions of interest (ROIs) found on breast radiographic images are classified as either tumoral mass or normal tissue by means of a support vector machine classifier. Classification features are the coefficients resulting from the specific image representation used to encode each ROI. Pixel and wavelet image representations have already been discussed in one of our previous works. To investigate the possibility of improving classification performances, a novel nonparametric, orientation-selective, and multiresolution image representation is developed and evaluated, namely a ranklet image representation. A dataset consisting of 1000 ROIs representing biopsy-proven tumoral masses (either benign or malignant) and 5000 ROIs representing normal breast tissue is used. ROIs are extracted from the digital database for screening mammography collected by the University of South Florida. Classification performances are evaluated using the area A{sub z} under the receiver operating characteristic curve. By achieving A{sub z} values of 0.978{+-}0.003 and 90% sensitivity with a false positive fraction value of 4.5%, experiments demonstrate classification results higher than those reached by the previous image representations. In particular, the improvement on the A{sub z} value over that achieved by the wavelet image representation is statistically relevant with the two-tailed p value <0.0001. Besides, owing to the tolerance that the ranklet image representation reveals to variations in the ROIs' gray-level intensity histogram, this approach discloses to be robust also when tested on radiographic images having gray-level intensity histogram remarkably different from that used for training.

  10. Comparison of Echo and MRI in the Imaging Evaluation of Intracardiac Masses

    SciTech Connect

    Gulati, G. Sharma, S.; Kothari, S.S.; Juneja, R.; Saxena, A.; Talwar, K.K.

    2004-09-15

    We compared the efficacy of echocardiography (ECHO) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for evaluating intracardiac masses. Over an 8-yr period, 28 patients, 21 males, 7 females, 16 days-60 years of age (mean 25 years) with a suspected intracardiac mass on ECHO (transthoracic in all; transesophageal in 9) underwent an MRI examination. Five patients had a contrast-enhanced MRI. ECHO and MRI were compared with respect to their technical adequacy, ability to detect and suggest the likely etiology of the mass, and provide additional information (masses not seen with the other technique, inflow or outflow obstruction, and intramural component of an intracavitary mass). With MRI, the image morphology (including signal intensity changes on the various sequences) and extracardiac manifestations were also evaluated. The diagnosis was confirmed by histopathology in 18, surgical inspection in 4, by follow- up imaging on conservative management in 5, and by typical extracardiac manifestations of the disease in 1 patient.Fifteen (54%) patients had tumors (benign 12, malignant 3), 5 had a thrombus or hematoma, and 4 each had infective or vascular lesions. Thirty-four masses (13 in ventricle, 11 septal, 7 atrial, 2 on valve and 1 in pulmonary artery) were seen on MRI, 28 of which were detected by ECHO. Transthoracic ECHO (TTE) and MRI were technically optimal in 82% and 100% of cases, respectively. Nine patients needed an additional transesophageal ECHO (TEE). Overall, MRI showed a mass in all patients, whereas ECHO missed it in 2 cases. In cases with a mass on both modalities, MRI detected 4 additional masses not seen on ECHO. MRI suggested the etiology in 21 (75%) cases, while the same was possible with ECHO (TTE and TEE) in 8 (29%) cases. Intramural component, extension into the inflow or outflow, outflow tract obstruction, and associated pericardial or extracardiac masses were better depicted on MRI. We conclude that MRI is advantageous over a combination of TTE and TEE for

  11. Characterization of benign and malignant solid breast masses: comparison of conventional US and tissue harmonic imaging.

    PubMed

    Cha, Joo Hee; Moon, Woo Kyung; Cho, Nariya; Kim, Sun Mi; Park, Seong Ho; Han, Boo-Kyung; Choe, Yeon Hyeon; Park, Jeong Mi; Im, Jung-Gi

    2007-01-01

    To prospectively compare the diagnostic performance of radiologists by using conventional ultrasonography (US) and tissue harmonic imaging for the differentiation of benign from malignant solid breast masses, with histologic results used as the reference standard. The study was approved by the institutional review board, and informed consent was obtained from all patients. Images were obtained with conventional US and tissue harmonic imaging in 88 patients (age range, 25-67 years; mean age, 45 years) with 91 solid breast masses (30 cancers and 61 benign lesions) before excisional or needle biopsy. Three experienced radiologists, who did not perform the examinations, independently analyzed the US findings and provided a level of suspicion to indicate the probability of malignancy. Results were evaluated by using kappa statistics and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analyses. Regarding the descriptions of US findings, echogenicity (kappa=0.205) was the most discordant between conventional US and tissue harmonic imaging, followed by margin (kappa=0.495), lesion boundary (kappa=0.495), calcifications (kappa=0.537), posterior acoustic transmission (kappa=0.546), echotexture (kappa=0.586), shape (kappa=0.591), and orientation (kappa=0.594). The area under the ROC curve (Az) for conventional US and tissue harmonic imaging was 0.84 and 0.79, respectively, for reader 1; 0.88 and 0.85, respectively, for reader 2; and 0.91 and 0.89, respectively, for reader 3. The overall Az value for the three readers was 0.88 for conventional US and 0.84 for tissue harmonic imaging (95% confidence interval: -0.0950, 0.1646; P=.595). The performance of the radiologists with respect to the characterization of solid breast masses as benign or malignant was not significantly improved with tissue harmonic imaging. Copyright (c) RSNA, 2006.

  12. Mass spectrometric monitoring of interfacial photoelectron transfer and imaging of active crystalline facets of semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Hongying; Zhang, Juan; Tang, Xuemei; Zhang, Wenyang; Jiang, Ruowei; Li, Rui; Chen, Disong; Wang, Peng; Yuan, Zhiwei

    2017-02-01

    Monitoring of interfacial electron transfer (ET) in situ is important to understand the ET mechanism and designing efficient photocatalysts. We describe herein a mass spectrometric approach to investigate the ultrafast transfer of photoelectrons that are generated by ultraviolet irradiation on surfaces of semiconductor nanoparticles or crystalline facets. The mass spectrometric approach can not only untargetedly detect various intermediates but also monitor their reactivity through associative or dissociative photoelectron capture dissociation, as well as electron detachment dissociation of adsorbed molecules. Proton-coupled electron transfer and proton-uncoupled electron transfer with radical initiated polymerization or hydroxyl radical abstraction have been unambiguously demonstrated with the mass spectrometric approach. Active crystalline facets of titanium dioxide for photocatalytic degradation of juglone and organochlorine dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane are visualized with mass spectrometry imaging based on ion scanning and spectral reconstruction. This work provides a new technique for studying photo-electric properties of various materials.

  13. Mass spectrometric monitoring of interfacial photoelectron transfer and imaging of active crystalline facets of semiconductors

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Hongying; Zhang, Juan; Tang, Xuemei; Zhang, Wenyang; Jiang, Ruowei; Li, Rui; Chen, Disong; Wang, Peng; Yuan, Zhiwei

    2017-01-01

    Monitoring of interfacial electron transfer (ET) in situ is important to understand the ET mechanism and designing efficient photocatalysts. We describe herein a mass spectrometric approach to investigate the ultrafast transfer of photoelectrons that are generated by ultraviolet irradiation on surfaces of semiconductor nanoparticles or crystalline facets. The mass spectrometric approach can not only untargetedly detect various intermediates but also monitor their reactivity through associative or dissociative photoelectron capture dissociation, as well as electron detachment dissociation of adsorbed molecules. Proton-coupled electron transfer and proton-uncoupled electron transfer with radical initiated polymerization or hydroxyl radical abstraction have been unambiguously demonstrated with the mass spectrometric approach. Active crystalline facets of titanium dioxide for photocatalytic degradation of juglone and organochlorine dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane are visualized with mass spectrometry imaging based on ion scanning and spectral reconstruction. This work provides a new technique for studying photo-electric properties of various materials. PMID:28224986

  14. Mass spectrometry-based metabolomics, analysis of metabolite-protein interactions, and imaging.

    PubMed

    Lee, Do Yup; Bowen, Benjamin P; Northen, Trent R

    2010-08-01

    Our understanding of biology has been greatly improved through recent developments in mass spectrometry, which is providing detailed information on protein and metabolite composition as well as protein-metabolite interactions. The high sensitivity and resolution of mass spectrometry achieved with liquid or gas chromatography allows for detection and quantification of hundreds to thousands of molecules in a single measurement. Where homogenization-based sample preparation and extraction methods result in a loss of spatial information, mass spectrometry imaging technologies provide the in situ distribution profiles of metabolites and proteins within tissues. Mass spectrometry-based analysis of metabolite abundance, protein-metabolite interactions, and spatial distribution of compounds facilitates the high-throughput screening of biochemical reactions, the reconstruction of metabolic networks, biomarker discovery, determination of tissue compositions, and functional annotation of both proteins and metabolites.

  15. Mass spectrometry–based metabolomics, analysis of metabolite-protein interactions, and imaging

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Do Yup; Bowen, Benjamin P.; Northen, Trent R.

    2010-01-01

    Our understanding of biology has been greatly improved through recent developments in mass spectrometry, which is providing detailed information on protein and metabolite composition as well as protein-metabolite interactions. The high sensitivity and resolution of mass spectrometry achieved with liquid or gas chromatography allows for detection and quantification of hundreds to thousands of molecules in a single measurement. Where homogenization-based sample preparation and extraction methods result in a loss of spatial information, mass spectrometry imaging technologies provide the in situ distribution profiles of metabolites and proteins within tissues. Mass spectrometry–based analysis of metabolite abundance, protein-metabolite interactions, and spatial distribution of compounds facilitates the high-throughput screening of biochemical reactions, the reconstruction of metabolic networks, biomarker discovery, determination of tissue compositions, and functional annotation of both proteins and metabolites. PMID:20701590

  16. Resolving brain regions using nanostructure initiator mass spectrometry imaging of phospholipids.

    PubMed

    Lee, Do Yup; Platt, Virginia; Bowen, Ben; Louie, Katherine; Canaria, Christie A; McMurray, Cynthia T; Northen, Trent

    2012-06-01

    In a variety of neurological diseases, pathological progression is cell type and region specific. Previous reports suggest that mass spectrometry imaging has the potential to differentiate between brain regions enriched in specific cell types. Here, we utilized a matrix-free surface mass spectrometry approach, nanostructure initiator mass spectrometry (NIMS), to show that spatial distributions of multiple lipids can be used as a 'fingerprint' to discriminate between neuronal- and glial- enriched brain regions. In addition, glial cells from different brain regions can be distinguished based on unique lipid profiles. NIMS images were generated from sagittal brain sections and were matched with immunostained serial sections to define glial cell enriched areas. Tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS QTOF) on whole brain extracts was used to identify 18 phospholipids. Multivariate statistical analysis (Nonnegative Matrix Factorization) enhanced differentiation of brain regions and cell populations compared to single ion imaging methods. This analysis resolved brain regions that are difficult to distinguish using conventional stains but are known to have distinct physiological functions. This method accurately distinguished the frontal (or somatomotor) and dorsal (or retrosplenial) regions of the cortex from each other and from the pons region.

  17. Laser Microdissection and Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry Coupled for Multimodal Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Lorenz, Matthias; Ovchinnikova, Olga S; Kertesz, Vilmos; Van Berkel, Gary J

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes the coupling of ambient laser ablation surface sampling, accomplished using a laser capture microdissection system, with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry for high spatial resolution multimodal imaging. A commercial laser capture microdissection system was placed in close proximity to a modified ion source of a mass spectrometer designed to allow for sampling of laser ablated material via a transfer tube directly into the ionization region. Rhodamine 6G dye of red sharpie ink in a laser etched pattern as well as cholesterol and phosphatidylcholine in a cerebellum mouse brain thin tissue section were identified and imaged from full scan mass spectra. A minimal spot diameter of 8 m was achieved using the 10X microscope cutting objective with a lateral oversampling pixel resolution of about 3.7 m. Distinguishing between features approximately 13 m apart in a cerebellum mouse brain thin tissue section was demonstrated in a multimodal fashion including co-registered optical and mass spectral chemical images.

  18. Automatic detection and analysis of discontinuity geometry of rock mass from digital images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deb, D.; Hariharan, S.; Rao, U. M.; Ryu, Chang-Ha

    2008-02-01

    The inaccessibility of rock exposures is an inherent problem in geotechnical data acquisition that compromises effective geotechnical evaluation. The digital image processing method is a tool that permits a fast, complete, and accurate acquisition of information. Using digital images in photogrammetry, the present study analyzes the discontinuity geometry of rock mass exposures. The study has demonstrated that (a) the transformation function is appropriate for images without any perspective error; (b) the developed system is versatile and can detect both lines as well as curves in multilinear form; (c) the Hough transform algorithm can provide excellent results for rock mass with multiple joint sets having considerable amount of noise; and (d) the beamlets can be classified in an automated manner. The authors recommend the digital face mapping method to characterize rock masses, as it reduces the time spent in the field, thus preserving data integrity. Furthermore, this technique allows for systematic mapping and the building of a permanent and huge database for rock mass characterization.

  19. Fluorescence Imaging for Visualization of the Ion Cloud in a Quadrupole Ion Trap Mass Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talbot, Francis O.; Sciuto, Stephen V.; Jockusch, Rebecca A.

    2013-12-01

    Laser-induced fluorescence is used to visualize populations of gaseous ions stored in a quadrupole ion trap (QIT) mass spectrometer. Presented images include the first fluorescence image of molecular ions collected under conditions typically used in mass spectrometry experiments. Under these "normal" mass spectrometry conditions, the radial ( r) and axial ( z) full-width at half maxima (FWHM) of the detected ion cloud are 615 and 214 μm, respectively, corresponding to ~6 % of r 0 and ~3 % of z 0 for the QIT used. The effects on the shape and size of the ion cloud caused by varying the pressure of helium bath gas, the number of trapped ions, and the Mathieu parameter q z are visualized and discussed. When a "tickle voltage" is applied to the exit end-cap electrode, as is done in collisionally activated dissociation, a significant elongation in the axial, but not the radial, dimension of the ion cloud is apparent. Finally, using spectroscopically distinguishable fluorophores of two different m/ z values, images are presented that illustrate stratification of the ion cloud; ions of lower m/ z (higher q z ) are located in the center of the trapping region, effectively excluding higher m/ z (lower q z ) ions, which form a surrounding layer. Fluorescence images such as those presented here provide a useful reference for better understanding the collective behavior of ions in radio frequency (rf) trapping devices and how phenomena such as collisions and space-charge affect ion distribution.

  20. Molecular Imaging of Tissue Sections by Mass Spectrometry: Looking Beyond the Microscope

    PubMed Central

    Caprioli, Richard

    2012-01-01

    Imaging MALDI MS (matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry) produces molecular images of peptides, proteins, lipids and metabolites present in intact tissue sections. It employs desorption of molecules by direct laser irradiation to map the location of specific molecules from fresh frozen and formalin fixed tissue sections without the need of target specific reagents such as antibodies. Molecular maps can be directly correlated to known histological regions within the tissue. A high density of spots (pixels) ablated by the laser over the entire tissue produces many hundreds of molecular images or density maps with spatial resolutions from 5–200 microns. Images are produced in specific m/z (mass-to-charge) values, or ranges of values, typically covering the MW range 1000-100,000. Individual m/z values derived from each pixel can then be assembled to produce selected molecular images. Similarly, the approach has also been applied to a protocol termed histology-directed molecular analysis whereby only selected areas of cells in the tissue are of interest are ablated and analyzed based on studies performed by microscopy and other histology protocols. Both fresh frozen and formalin fixed tissues can be analyzed. The technology is extraordinarily high throughput with high molecular specificity, easily lending itself to the analysis of tissue microarrays. Sections obtained from any tissue type can be imaged, including sections through whole organs or animals. We have employed Imaging MS in studies of a variety of diseases, including several types of cancers, neurodegenerative diseases and kidney diseases, comparing proteins differentially expressed in diseased tissue with those in the corresponding normal tissue. From such comparisons, molecular signatures are developed that differentiate these tissues, typically consisting of 10-20 or more different proteins. Imaging MS has been applied to drug targeting and metabolic studies following drug

  1. Identifying source and formation altitudes of nitrates in drinking water from Réunion Island, France, using a multi-isotopic approach.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Karyne M; Nicolini, Eric; Gauthier, Virginie

    2012-09-01

    Nitrate concentrations, water isotopes (δ(2)H and δ(18)O(water)) and associated nitrate isotopes (δ(15)N(nitrate) and δ(18)O(nitrate)) from 10 drinking water wells, 5 fresh water springs and the discharge from 3 wastewater treatment stations in Réunion Island, located in the Indian Ocean, were analysed. We used a multi isotopic approach to investigate the extent of nitrate contamination, nitrate formation altitude and source of nitrates in Réunion Island's principal aquifer. Water from these study sites contained between 0.1 and 85.3 mg/L nitrate. δ(15)N(nitrate) values between +6 and +14‰ suggested the main sources of contamination were animal and/or human waste, rather than inorganic (synthetic) fertilisers, infiltrating through the subsurface into the saturated zone, due to rainfall leaching of the unsaturated zone at various altitudes of precipitation. Based on δ(15)N(nitrate) values alone, it was not possible to distinguish between animal and human activities responsible for the contamination of each specific catchment. However, using a multi isotope approach (δ(18)O(water) and δ(15)N(nitrate)), it was possible to relate the average altitude of rainfall infiltration (δ(18)O(water)) associated with the nitrate contamination (δ(18)O(nitrate)). This relationship between land use, rainfall recharge altitude and isotopic composition (δ(15)N(nitrate) and δ(18)O(water)) discriminated between the influences of human waste at lower (below 600 m elevation) or animal derived contamination (at elevations between 600 and 1300 m). By further comparing the theoretical altitude of nitrate formation calculated by the δ(18)O(nitrate), it was possible to determine that only 5 out of 15 fresh water wells and springs followed the conservative nitrate formation mechanism of 2/3δ(18)O(water)+1/3δ(18)O(air), to give nitrate formation altitudes which corresponded to land use activities.

  2. Body Image, Food Addiction, Depression, and Body Mass Index in University Students.

    PubMed

    Şanlier, Nevin; Türközü, Duygu; Toka, Onur

    2016-01-01

    The relationship between body image, depression, food addiction and body mass index (BMI) and differences in these variables due to gender and field of education have not been studied extensively. This study was conducted on a total of 793 university students (20.19 ± 1.90 years). The Beck Depression Inventory, Yale Food Addiction, and Body Image Scale were used. It was determined that body image scores of females and individuals enrolled in health sciences programs were lower compared to those of males and those enrolled in the social sciences. There was a negative relationship between body image and depression and food addiction scores. There was a positive relationship between food addiction and depression scores, in addition to a positive relationship between food addiction and BMI.

  3. The Sheath Transport Observer for the Redistribution of Mass (STORM) Image

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuntz, Kip; Collier, Michael; Sibeck, David G.; Porter, F. Scott; Carter, J. A.; Cravens, Thomas; Omidi, N.; Robertson, Ina; Sembay, S.; Snowden, Steven L.

    2008-01-01

    All of the solar wind energy that powers magnetospheric processes passes through the magnetosheath and magnetopause. Global images of the magnetosheath and magnetopause boundary layers will resolve longstanding controversy surrounding fundamental phenomena that occur at the magnetopause and provide information needed to improve operational space weather models. Recent developments showing that soft X-rays (0.15-1 keV) result from high charge state solar wind ions undergoing charge exchange recombination through collisions with exospheric neutral atoms has led to the realization that soft X-ray imaging can provide global maps of the high-density shocked solar wind within the magnetosheath and cusps, regions lying between the lower density solar wind and magnetosphere. We discuss an instrument concept called the Sheath Transport Observer for the Redistribution of Mass (STORM), an X-ray imager suitable for simultaneously imaging the dayside magnetosheath, the magnetopause boundary layers, and the cusps.

  4. The Sheath Transport Observer for the Redistribution of Mass (STORM) Imager

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collier, Michael R.; Sibeck, David G.; Porter, F. Scott; Burch, J.; Carter, J. A.; Cravens, Thomas; Kuntz, Kip; Omidi, N.; Read, A.; Robertson, Ina; Sembay, S.; Snowden, Steven L.

    2010-01-01

    All of the solar wind energy that powers magnetospheric processes passes through the magnetosheath and magnetopause. Global images of the magnetosheath and magnetopause boundary layers will resolve longstanding controversies surrounding fundamental phenomena that occur at the magnetopause and provide information needed to improve operational space weather models. Recent developments showing that soft X-rays (0.15-1 keV) result from high charge state solar wind ions undergoing charge exchange recombination through collisions with exospheric neutral atoms has led to the realization that soft X-ray imaging can provide global maps of the high-density shocked solar wind within the magnetosheath and cusps, regions lying between the lower density solar wind and magnetosphere. We discuss an instrument concept called the Sheath Transport Observer for the Redistribution of Mass (STORM), an X-ray imager suitable for simultaneously imaging the dayside magnetosheath, the magnetopause boundary layers, and the cusps.

  5. The Sheath Transport Observer for the Redistribution of Mass (STORM) Image

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuntz, Kip; Collier, Michael; Sibeck, David G.; Porter, F. Scott; Carter, J. A.; Cravens, Thomas; Omidi, N.; Robertson, Ina; Sembay, S.; Snowden, Steven L.

    2008-01-01

    All of the solar wind energy that powers magnetospheric processes passes through the magnetosheath and magnetopause. Global images of the magnetosheath and magnetopause boundary layers will resolve longstanding controversy surrounding fundamental phenomena that occur at the magnetopause and provide information needed to improve operational space weather models. Recent developments showing that soft X-rays (0.15-1 keV) result from high charge state solar wind ions undergoing charge exchange recombination through collisions with exospheric neutral atoms has led to the realization that soft X-ray imaging can provide global maps of the high-density shocked solar wind within the magnetosheath and cusps, regions lying between the lower density solar wind and magnetosphere. We discuss an instrument concept called the Sheath Transport Observer for the Redistribution of Mass (STORM), an X-ray imager suitable for simultaneously imaging the dayside magnetosheath, the magnetopause boundary layers, and the cusps.

  6. Testing for Multivariate Normality in Mass Spectrometry Imaging Data: A Robust Statistical Approach for Clustering Evaluation and the Generation of Synthetic Mass Spectrometry Imaging Data Sets.

    PubMed

    Dexter, Alex; Race, Alan M; Styles, Iain B; Bunch, Josephine

    2016-11-15

    Spatial clustering is a powerful tool in mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) and has been demonstrated to be capable of differentiating tumor types, visualizing intratumor heterogeneity, and segmenting anatomical structures. Several clustering methods have been applied to mass spectrometry imaging data, but a principled comparison and evaluation of different clustering techniques presents a significant challenge. We propose that testing whether the data has a multivariate normal distribution within clusters can be used to evaluate the performance when using algorithms that assume normality in the data, such as k-means clustering. In cases where clustering has been performed using the cosine distance, conversion of the data to polar coordinates prior to normality testing should be performed to ensure normality is tested in the correct coordinate system. In addition to these evaluations of internal consistency, we demonstrate that the multivariate normal distribution can then be used as a basis for statistical modeling of MSI data. This allows the generation of synthetic MSI data sets with known ground truth, providing a means of external clustering evaluation. To demonstrate this, reference data from seven anatomical regions of an MSI image of a coronal section of mouse brain were modeled. From this, a set of synthetic data based on this model was generated. Results of r(2) fitting of the chi-squared quantile-quantile plots on the seven anatomical regions confirmed that the data acquired from each spatial region was found to be closer to normally distributed in polar space than in Euclidean. Finally, principal component analysis was applied to a single data set that included synthetic and real data. No significant differences were found between the two data types, indicating the suitability of these methods for generating realistic synthetic data.

  7. MALDI-LTQ-Orbitrap mass spectrometry imaging for lipidomic analysis in kidney under cisplatin chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Moreno-Gordaliza, Estefanía; Esteban-Fernández, Diego; Lázaro, Alberto; Humanes, Blanca; Aboulmagd, Sarah; Tejedor, Alberto; Linscheid, Michael W; Gómez-Gómez, M Milagros

    2017-03-01

    Imaging techniques for mapping molecular distributions in tissue sections can reveal valuable information on biomolecules involved in relevant biochemical processes. A method has been developed for comprehensive, reproducible and sensitive lipid imaging by matrix-assisted laser/desorption ionization-LTQ-Orbitrap mass spectrometry in kidney sections, showing the benefits of exact mass determination. Matrix deposition parameters for positive and negative lipid ion imaging using different matrices such as 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid (DHB), 9-aminoacridine (9-AA) or α-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid (CHCA) have been optimized for the broadest detection and identification of renal lipids. The combination of 9-AA and DHB was found as the most suitable for negative and positive ion mode lipid imaging, respectively. Lipid mapping and related identification strategies and limitations have also been discussed. Production of 100-µm resolution images was proved to be enough for discerning lipid distribution in kidney substructures. Imaging reproducibility was assessed on parallel kidney slices with time. This method has been applied to the lipidomics analysis on kidney sections from rats treated with the antitumor drug cisplatin and compared to healthy control rats. Up to 66 different renal lipids out of 450 extracted ion images (mainly phospholipid species, in addition to sulfatides and cholesterol sulfate) have been found and identified showing a modified distribution pattern due to cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity. These lipid species reflect either topographic, signaling or structural processes in damaged kidney and could potentially be used for nephrotoxicity assessment or as therapeutic targets. This is, to our knowledge, the first imaging lipidomics study for nephrotoxicity assessment of cisplatin chemotherapy.

  8. Surface analysis of lipids by mass spectrometry: more than just imaging.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Shane R; Brown, Simon H; In Het Panhuis, Marc; Blanksby, Stephen J; Mitchell, Todd W

    2013-10-01

    Mass spectrometry is now an indispensable tool for lipid analysis and is arguably the driving force in the renaissance of lipid research. In its various forms, mass spectrometry is uniquely capable of resolving the extensive compositional and structural diversity of lipids in biological systems. Furthermore, it provides the ability to accurately quantify molecular-level changes in lipid populations associated with changes in metabolism and environment; bringing lipid science to the "omics" age. The recent explosion of mass spectrometry-based surface analysis techniques is fuelling further expansion of the lipidomics field. This is evidenced by the numerous papers published on the subject of mass spectrometric imaging of lipids in recent years. While imaging mass spectrometry provides new and exciting possibilities, it is but one of the many opportunities direct surface analysis offers the lipid researcher. In this review we describe the current state-of-the-art in the direct surface analysis of lipids with a focus on tissue sections, intact cells and thin-layer chromatography substrates. The suitability of these different approaches towards analysis of the major lipid classes along with their current and potential applications in the field of lipid analysis are evaluated.

  9. Mass Spectrometric Imaging Using Laser Ablation and Solvent Capture by Aspiration (LASCA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brauer, Jonathan I.; Beech, Iwona B.; Sunner, Jan

    2015-09-01

    A novel interface for ambient, laser ablation-based mass spectrometric imaging (MSI) referred to as laser ablation and solvent capture by aspiration (LASCA) is presented and its performance demonstrated using selected, unaltered biological materials. LASCA employs a pulsed 2.94 μm laser beam for specimen ablation. Ablated materials in the laser plumes are collected on a hanging solvent droplet with electric field-enhanced trapping, followed by aspiration of droplets and remaining plume material in the form of a coarse aerosol into a collection capillary. The gas and liquid phases are subsequently separated in a 10 μL-volume separatory funnel, and the solution is analyzed with electrospray ionization in a high mass resolution Q-ToF mass spectrometer. The LASCA system separates the sampling and ionization steps in MSI and combines high efficiencies of laser plume sampling and of electrospray ionization (ESI) with high mass resolution MS. Up to 2000 different compounds are detected from a single ablation spot (pixel). Using the LASCA platform, rapid (6 s per pixel), high sensitivity, high mass-resolution ambient imaging of "as-received" biological material is achieved routinely and reproducibly.

  10. Activity-Based Probes linked with Laser-Cleavable Mass Tags for Signal Amplification in Imaging Mass Spectrometry: Analysis of Serine Hydrolase Enzymes in Mammalian Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Junhai; Chaurand, Pierre; Norris, Jeremy L.; Porter, Ned A.; Caprioli, Richard M.

    2012-01-01

    A novel functional Imaging Mass Spectrometry technology is described that utilizes activity-based probes for imaging enzyme active sites in tissue sections. We demonstrate this technology using an activity-based probe (fluorophosphate) that is specific for serine hydrolases. A dendrimer containing multiple mass tags that is attached to the activity-based probe is used to analyze the binding sites of the probe through release and measurement of the mass tags on laser irradiation. A generation 8 Poly(amido amine) dendrimer with 1024 amino groups was labeled with an azide group and then more than 900 mass tags were attached in order to achieve signal amplification of nearly three orders of magnitude. The experimental protocol first involves binding of the activity-based probe containing an alkyne group to serine hydrolases in the tissue section followed by attachment of the dendrimer labeled with mass tags to the bound probe by Click chemistry. On irradiation of the labeled tissue by the laser beam in a raster pattern, the mass tags are liberated and recorded by the mass analyzer, consequently, the ion image of the mass tag reveals the distribution of serine hydrolases in the tissue. This process was shown using rat brain and mouse embryo sections. Targeted imaging has the advantage of providing high spatial resolution and high sensitivity through the use of signal amplification chemistry with high target specificity through the use of an enzyme activity probe. PMID:22424244

  11. Skeletal muscle fiber analysis by atmospheric pressure scanning microprobe matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometric imaging at high mass and high spatial resolution.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Yu-Hsuan; Bhandari, Dhaka Ram; Garrett, Timothy J; Carter, Christy S; Spengler, Bernhard; Yost, Richard A

    2016-06-01

    Skeletal muscles are composed of heterogeneous muscle fibers with various fiber types. These fibers can be classified into different classes based on their different characteristics. MALDI mass spectrometric imaging (MSI) has been applied to study and visualize different metabolomics profiles of different fiber types. Here, skeletal muscles were analyzed by atmospheric pressure scanning microprobe MALDI-MSI at high spatial and high mass resolution.

  12. Multi-matrix, dual polarity, tandem mass spectrometry imaging strategy applied to a germinated maize seed: toward mass spectrometry imaging of an untargeted metabolome

    SciTech Connect

    Feenstra, Adam D.; Hansen, Rebecca L.; Lee, Young Jin

    2015-08-27

    Mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) provides high spatial resolution information that is unprecedented in traditional metabolomics analyses; however, the molecular coverage is often limited to a handful of compounds and is insufficient to understand overall metabolomic changes of a biological system. Here, we propose an MSI methodology to increase the diversity of chemical compounds that can be imaged and identified, in order to eventually perform untargeted metabolomic analysis using MSI. We use the desorption/ionization bias of various matrixes for different metabolite classes along with dual polarities and a tandem MSI strategy. The use of multiple matrixes and dual polarities allows us to visualize various classes of compounds, while data-dependent MS/MS spectra acquired in the same MSI scans allow us to identify the compounds directly on the tissue. In a proof of concept application to a germinated corn seed, a total of 166 unique ions were determined to have high-quality MS/MS spectra, without counting structural isomers, of which 52 were identified as unique compounds. According to an estimation based on precursor MSI datasets, we expect over five hundred metabolites could be potentially identified and visualized once all experimental conditions are optimized and an MS/MS library is available. Finally, metabolites involved in the glycolysis pathway and tricarboxylic acid cycle were imaged to demonstrate the potential of this technology to better understand metabolic biology.

  13. Multi-matrix, dual polarity, tandem mass spectrometry imaging strategy applied to a germinated maize seed: toward mass spectrometry imaging of an untargeted metabolome

    DOE PAGES

    Feenstra, Adam D.; Hansen, Rebecca L.; Lee, Young Jin

    2015-08-27

    Mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) provides high spatial resolution information that is unprecedented in traditional metabolomics analyses; however, the molecular coverage is often limited to a handful of compounds and is insufficient to understand overall metabolomic changes of a biological system. Here, we propose an MSI methodology to increase the diversity of chemical compounds that can be imaged and identified, in order to eventually perform untargeted metabolomic analysis using MSI. We use the desorption/ionization bias of various matrixes for different metabolite classes along with dual polarities and a tandem MSI strategy. The use of multiple matrixes and dual polarities allows usmore » to visualize various classes of compounds, while data-dependent MS/MS spectra acquired in the same MSI scans allow us to identify the compounds directly on the tissue. In a proof of concept application to a germinated corn seed, a total of 166 unique ions were determined to have high-quality MS/MS spectra, without counting structural isomers, of which 52 were identified as unique compounds. According to an estimation based on precursor MSI datasets, we expect over five hundred metabolites could be potentially identified and visualized once all experimental conditions are optimized and an MS/MS library is available. Finally, metabolites involved in the glycolysis pathway and tricarboxylic acid cycle were imaged to demonstrate the potential of this technology to better understand metabolic biology.« less

  14. MALDI Imaging Mass Spectrometry: Spatial Molecular Analysis to Enable a New Age of Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Gessel, Megan M.; Norris, Jeremy L.; Caprioli, Richard M.

    2014-01-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization imaging mass spectrometry (MALDI IMS) combines the sensitivity and selectivity of mass spectrometry with spatial analysis to provide a new dimension for histological analyses to provide unbiased visualization of the arrangement of biomolecules in tissue. As such, MALDI IMS has the capability to become a powerful new molecular technology for the biological and clinical sciences. In this review, we briefly describe several applications of MALDI IMS covering a range of molecular weights, from drugs to proteins. Current limitations and challenges are discussed along with recent developments to address these issues. PMID:24686089

  15. The Need for Speed in Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Imaging Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Prentice, Boone M.; Caprioli, Richard M.

    2016-01-01

    Imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) has emerged as a powerful analytical tool enabling the direct molecular mapping of many types of tissue. Specifically, matrix-assisted laser desorption/ ionization (MALDI) represents one of the most broadly applicable IMS technologies. In recent years, advances in solid state laser technology, mass spectrometry instrumentation, computer technology, and experimental methodology have produced IMS systems capable of unprecedented data acquisition speeds (>50 pixels/second). In applications of this technology, throughput is an important consideration when designing an IMS experiment. As IMS becomes more widely adopted, continual improvements in experimental setups will be important to address biologically and clinically relevant time scales. PMID:27570788

  16. Natural products in Glycyrrhiza glabra (licorice) rhizome imaged at the cellular level by atmospheric pressure matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization tandem mass spectrometry imaging.

    PubMed

    Li, Bin; Bhandari, Dhaka Ram; Janfelt, Christian; Römpp, Andreas; Spengler, Bernhard

    2014-10-01

    The rhizome of Glycyrrhiza glabra (licorice) was analyzed by high-resolution mass spectrometry imaging and tandem mass spectrometry imaging. An atmospheric pressure matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization imaging ion source was combined with an orbital trapping mass spectrometer in order to obtain high-resolution imaging in mass and space. Sections of the rhizome were imaged with a spatial resolution of 10 μm in the positive ion mode, and a large number of secondary metabolites were localized and identified based on their accurate mass and MS/MS fragmentation patterns. Major tissue-specific metabolites, including free flavonoids, flavonoid glycosides and saponins, were successfully detected and visualized in images, showing their distributions at the cellular level. The analytical power of the technique was tested in the imaging of two isobaric licorice saponins with a mass difference of only 0.02 Da. With a mass resolving power of 140 000 and a bin width of 5 ppm in the image processing, the two compounds were well resolved in full-scan mode, and appeared with different distributions in the tissue sections. The identities of the compounds and their distributions were validated in a subsequent MS/MS imaging experiment, thereby confirming their identities and excluding possible analyte interference. The use of high spatial resolution, high mass resolution and tandem mass spectrometry in imaging experiments provides significant information about the biosynthetic pathway of flavonoids and saponins in legume species, combing the spatially resolved chemical information with morphological details at the microscopic level. Furthermore, the technique offers a scheme capable of high-throughput profiling of metabolites in plant tissues. © 2014 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Enhanced Sensitivity for High Spatial Resolution Lipid Analysis by Negative Ion Mode MALDI Imaging Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Angel, Peggi M.; Spraggins, Jeffrey M.; Baldwin, H. Scott; Caprioli, Richard

    2012-01-01

    We have achieved enhanced lipid imaging to a ~10 μm spatial resolution using negative ion mode matrix assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) imaging mass spectrometry, sublimation of 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid as the MALDI matrix and a sample preparation protocol that uses aqueous washes. We report on the effect of treating tissue sections by washing with volatile buffers at different pHs prior to negative ion mode lipid imaging. The results show that washing with ammonium formate, pH 6.4, or ammonium acetate, pH 6.7, significantly increases signal intensity and number of analytes recorded from adult mouse brain tissue sections. Major lipid species measured were glycerophosphoinositols, glycerophosphates, glycerolphosphoglycerols, glycerophosphoethanolamines, glycerophospho-serines, sulfatides, and gangliosides. Ion images from adult mouse brain sections that compare washed and unwashed sections are presented and show up to fivefold increases in ion intensity for washed tissue. The sample preparation protocol has been found to be applicable across numerous organ types and significantly expands the number of lipid species detectable by imaging mass spectrometry at high spatial resolution. PMID:22243218

  18. Imaging of β-cell mass and insulitis in insulin-dependent (Type 1) diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Di Gialleonardo, Valentina; de Vries, Erik F J; Di Girolamo, Marco; Quintero, Ana M; Dierckx, Rudi A J O; Signore, Alberto

    2012-12-01

    Insulin-dependent (type 1) diabetes mellitus is a metabolic disease with a complex multifactorial etiology and a poorly understood pathogenesis. Genetic and environmental factors cause an autoimmune reaction against pancreatic β-cells, called insulitis, confirmed in pancreatic samples obtained at autopsy. The possibility to noninvasively quantify β-cell mass in vivo would provide important biological insights and facilitate aspects of diagnosis and therapy, including follow-up of islet cell transplantation. Moreover, the availability of a noninvasive tool to quantify the extent and severity of pancreatic insulitis could be useful for understanding the natural history of human insulin-dependent (type 1) diabetes mellitus, to early diagnose children at risk to develop overt diabetes, and to select patients to be treated with immunotherapies aimed at blocking the insulitis and monitoring the efficacy of these therapies. In this review, we outline the imaging techniques currently available for in vivo, noninvasive detection of β-cell mass and insulitis. These imaging techniques include magnetic resonance imaging, ultrasound, computed tomography, bioluminescence and fluorescence imaging, and the nuclear medicine techniques positron emission tomography and single-photon emission computed tomography. Several approaches and radiopharmaceuticals for imaging β-cells and lymphocytic insulitis are reviewed in detail.

  19. Image-based mass-spring model of mitral valve closure for surgical planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammer, Peter E.; Perrin, Douglas P.; del Nido, Pedro J.; Howe, Robert D.

    2008-03-01

    Surgical repair of the mitral valve is preferred in most cases over valve replacement, but replacement is often performed instead due to the technical difficulty of repair. A surgical planning system based on patient-specific medical images that allows surgeons to simulate and compare potential repair strategies could greatly improve surgical outcomes. In such a surgical simulator, the mathematical model of mechanics used to close the valve must be able to compute the closed state quickly and to handle the complex boundary conditions imposed by the chords that tether the valve leaflets. We have developed a system for generating a triangulated mesh of the valve surface from volumetric image data of the opened valve. We then compute the closed position of the mesh using a mass-spring model of dynamics. The triangulated mesh is produced by fitting an isosurface to the volumetric image data, and boundary conditions, including the valve annulus and chord endpoints, are identified in the image data using a graphical user interface. In the mass-spring model, triangle sides are treated as linear springs, and sides shared by two triangles are treated as bending springs. Chords are treated as nonlinear springs, and self-collisions are detected and resolved. Equations of motion are solved using implicit numerical integration. Accuracy was assessed by comparison of model results with an image of the same valve taken in the closed state. The model exhibited rapid valve closure and was able to reproduce important features of the closed valve.

  20. Chemical Imaging of Lipid Domains by High-Resolution Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Kraft, M L; Weber, P K; Longo, M L; Hutcheon, I D; Boxer, S G

    2005-09-30

    Lipid microdomains within supported lipid bilayers composed of binary phosphocholine mixtures were chemically imaged by high-resolution secondary ion mass spectrometry performed with the NanoSIMS 50 (Cameca Instruments). This instrument images the sample components based on the elemental or isotopic composition of their atomic and small molecular secondary ions. Up to five different secondary ions can be simultaneously detected, and a lateral resolution of 50 nm can be achieved with high sensitivity at high mass resolution. In our experiments, the NanoSIMS 50 extensively fragmented the supported membrane, therefore an isotopic labeling strategy was used to encode the identities of the lipid components. Supported lipid membranes that contained distinct lipid microdomains were freeze-dried to preserve their lateral organization and analyzed with the NanoSIMS 50. Lipid microdomains as small as 100 nm in diameter were successfully imaged, and this was validated by comparison to AFM images taken at the same region prior to chemical imaging. Quantitative information on the lipid distribution within the domain was also determined by calibrating against supported membranes of known composition. We believe this will be a valuable approach for analyzing the composition of complex membrane domains with high spatial resolution.

  1. High mass and spatial resolution mass spectrometry imaging of Nicolas Poussin painting cross section by cluster TOF-SIMS.

    PubMed

    Noun, M; Van Elslande, E; Touboul, D; Glanville, H; Bucklow, S; Walter, P; Brunelle, A

    2016-12-01

    The painting Rebecca and Eliezer at the Well, which hangs in the Fitzwilliam Museum, Cambridge, UK, is possibly one of the last figure painting executed by Nicolas Poussin at the very end of his life and is usually dated to the early 1660s. In this perspective special feature, Philippe Walter, Alain Brunelle and colleagues give new insights on the artist's working methods by a careful stateof-the-art imaging ToF-SIMS study of one sample taken on the edge of the painting. This approach allowed for the identification of the pigments used in the painting, their nature and components and those of the ground and preparatory layers, with the identification of the binder(s) and possible other additions of organic materials such as glue. This study paves the way to a wider use of ToF-SIMS for the analysis of ancient cultural heritage artefacts. Dr. Walter is the Director of the Molecular and Structural Archeology Laboratory (Université Pierre et Marie Curie, Paris, France). Dr. Brunelle is Head of the Mass Spectrometry Laboratory at the Institut de Chimie des Substances Naturelles (CNRS, Gif-sur-Yvette, France). Their long standing collaboration has led to several seminal publications on the analysis of ancient artefacts by mass spectrometry. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Magnetic resonance imaging of the pediatric liver: benign and malignant masses.

    PubMed

    Keup, Christopher P; Ratnaraj, Felicia; Chopra, Pooja R; Lawrence, Charles A; Lowe, Lisa H

    2013-11-01

    Hepatic neoplasms constitute approximately 5% to 6% of all pediatric intra-abdominal masses, most of which are malignant. When compared with traditional multiphase computed tomography protocols that are often used in adults, magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is particularly desirable for evaluating liver lesions in children because of the lack of ionizing radiation and superb soft tissue contrast resolution. The goal of this article is to discuss common benign and malignant pediatric hepatic lesions and their key MR imaging findings. Particular emphasis is placed on the utility of new hepatocyte-specific contrast agents to narrow the differential diagnosis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. MALDI imaging mass spectrometry: statistical data analysis and current computational challenges

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) imaging mass spectrometry, also called MALDI-imaging, is a label-free bioanalytical technique used for spatially-resolved chemical analysis of a sample. Usually, MALDI-imaging is exploited for analysis of a specially prepared tissue section thaw mounted onto glass slide. A tremendous development of the MALDI-imaging technique has been observed during the last decade. Currently, it is one of the most promising innovative measurement techniques in biochemistry and a powerful and versatile tool for spatially-resolved chemical analysis of diverse sample types ranging from biological and plant tissues to bio and polymer thin films. In this paper, we outline computational methods for analyzing MALDI-imaging data with the emphasis on multivariate statistical methods, discuss their pros and cons, and give recommendations on their application. The methods of unsupervised data mining as well as supervised classification methods for biomarker discovery are elucidated. We also present a high-throughput computational pipeline for interpretation of MALDI-imaging data using spatial segmentation. Finally, we discuss current challenges associated with the statistical analysis of MALDI-imaging data. PMID:23176142

  4. MALDI imaging mass spectrometry: statistical data analysis and current computational challenges.

    PubMed

    Alexandrov, Theodore

    2012-01-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) imaging mass spectrometry, also called MALDI-imaging, is a label-free bioanalytical technique used for spatially-resolved chemical analysis of a sample. Usually, MALDI-imaging is exploited for analysis of a specially prepared tissue section thaw mounted onto glass slide. A tremendous development of the MALDI-imaging technique has been observed during the last decade. Currently, it is one of the most promising innovative measurement techniques in biochemistry and a powerful and versatile tool for spatially-resolved chemical analysis of diverse sample types ranging from biological and plant tissues to bio and polymer thin films. In this paper, we outline computational methods for analyzing MALDI-imaging data with the emphasis on multivariate statistical methods, discuss their pros and cons, and give recommendations on their application. The methods of unsupervised data mining as well as supervised classification methods for biomarker discovery are elucidated. We also present a high-throughput computational pipeline for interpretation of MALDI-imaging data using spatial segmentation. Finally, we discuss current challenges associated with the statistical analysis of MALDI-imaging data.

  5. SPECT-OPT multimodal imaging enables accurate evaluation of radiotracers for β-cell mass assessments

    PubMed Central

    Eter, Wael A.; Parween, Saba; Joosten, Lieke; Frielink, Cathelijne; Eriksson, Maria; Brom, Maarten; Ahlgren, Ulf; Gotthardt, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) has become a promising experimental approach to monitor changes in β-cell mass (BCM) during diabetes progression. SPECT imaging of pancreatic islets is most commonly cross-validated by stereological analysis of histological pancreatic sections after insulin staining. Typically, stereological methods do not accurately determine the total β-cell volume, which is inconvenient when correlating total pancreatic tracer uptake with BCM. Alternative methods are therefore warranted to cross-validate β-cell imaging using radiotracers. In this study, we introduce multimodal SPECT - optical projection tomography (OPT) imaging as an accurate approach to cross-validate radionuclide-based imaging of β-cells. Uptake of a promising radiotracer for β-cell imaging by SPECT, 111In-exendin-3, was measured by ex vivo-SPECT and cross evaluated by 3D quantitative OPT imaging as well as with histology within healthy and alloxan-treated Brown Norway rat pancreata. SPECT signal was in excellent linear correlation with OPT data as compared to histology. While histological determination of islet spatial distribution was challenging, SPECT and OPT revealed similar distribution patterns of 111In-exendin-3 and insulin positive β-cell volumes between different pancreatic lobes, both visually and quantitatively. We propose ex vivo SPECT-OPT multimodal imaging as a highly accurate strategy for validating the performance of β-cell radiotracers. PMID:27080529

  6. SPECT-OPT multimodal imaging enables accurate evaluation of radiotracers for β-cell mass assessments.

    PubMed

    Eter, Wael A; Parween, Saba; Joosten, Lieke; Frielink, Cathelijne; Eriksson, Maria; Brom, Maarten; Ahlgren, Ulf; Gotthardt, Martin

    2016-04-15

    Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) has become a promising experimental approach to monitor changes in β-cell mass (BCM) during diabetes progression. SPECT imaging of pancreatic islets is most commonly cross-validated by stereological analysis of histological pancreatic sections after insulin staining. Typically, stereological methods do not accurately determine the total β-cell volume, which is inconvenient when correlating total pancreatic tracer uptake with BCM. Alternative methods are therefore warranted to cross-validate β-cell imaging using radiotracers. In this study, we introduce multimodal SPECT - optical projection tomography (OPT) imaging as an accurate approach to cross-validate radionuclide-based imaging of β-cells. Uptake of a promising radiotracer for β-cell imaging by SPECT, (111)In-exendin-3, was measured by ex vivo-SPECT and cross evaluated by 3D quantitative OPT imaging as well as with histology within healthy and alloxan-treated Brown Norway rat pancreata. SPECT signal was in excellent linear correlation with OPT data as compared to histology. While histological determination of islet spatial distribution was challenging, SPECT and OPT revealed similar distribution patterns of (111)In-exendin-3 and insulin positive β-cell volumes between different pancreatic lobes, both visually and quantitatively. We propose ex vivo SPECT-OPT multimodal imaging as a highly accurate strategy for validating the performance of β-cell radiotracers.

  7. Breast imaging reporting and data system lexicon for US: interobserver agreement for assessment of breast masses.

    PubMed

    Abdullah, Nouf; Mesurolle, Benoît; El-Khoury, Mona; Kao, Ellen

    2009-09-01

    To retrospectively evaluate the interobserver agreement of radiologists who used the Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) lexicon to characterize and categorize ultrasonographic (US) features of breast masses. No institutional review board approval or patient consent was required. Five breast radiologists retrospectively independently evaluated 267 breast masses (113 benign and 154 malignant masses in 267 patients) by using the BI-RADS US lexicon. Reviewers were blinded to mammographic images, medical history, and pathologic findings. Interobserver agreement was assessed with the Aickin revised kappa statistic. Interobserver agreement varied from fair for evaluation of mass margins (kappa = 0.36) to moderate for evaluation of lesion boundary (kappa = 0.48), echo pattern (kappa = 0.58), and posterior acoustic features (kappa = 0.47) to substantial for evaluation of mass orientation (kappa = 0.70) and shape (kappa = 0.64). For small (< or =0.7 cm; n = 49) or malignant (n = 154) masses, low concordance was noted for margin descriptors (kappa = 0.30 and 0.28, respectively) and BI-RADS category (kappa = 0.21 and 0.26, respectively). Overall, only fair agreement was obtained for BI-RADS category (kappa = 0.30). Agreement for subdivisions 4a, 4b, and 4c of BI-RADS category 4 was fair (kappa = 0.33), fair (kappa = 0.32), and poor (kappa = 0.17), respectively. Reproducibility of US BI-RADS terminology is good except for margin evaluation. A trend toward lower concordance was noted for the evaluation of small masses and malignant lesions. Classification into subdivisions 4a, 4b, and 4c was poorly reproducible.

  8. Polymeric spatial resolution test patterns for mass spectrometry imaging using nano-thermal analysis with atomic force microscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Tai, Tamin; Kertesz, Vilmos; Lin, Ming -Wei; ...

    2017-05-11

    As the spatial resolution of mass spectrometry imaging technologies has begun to reach into the nanometer regime, finding readily available or easily made resolution reference materials has become particularly challenging for molecular imaging purposes. This study describes the fabrication, characterization and use of vertical line array polymeric spatial resolution test patterns for nano-thermal analysis/atomic force microscopy/mass spectrometry chemical imaging.

  9. Detection of high molecular weight proteins by MALDI imaging mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Mainini, Veronica; Bovo, Giorgio; Chinello, Clizia; Gianazza, Erica; Grasso, Marco; Cattoretti, Giorgio; Magni, Fulvio

    2013-06-01

    MALDI imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) is a unique technology to explore the spatial distribution of biomolecules directly on tissues. It allows the in situ investigation of a large number of small proteins and peptides. Detection of high molecular weight proteins through MALDI IMS still represents an important challenge, as it would allow the direct investigation of the distribution of more proteins involved in biological processes, such as cytokines, enzymes, neuropeptide precursors and receptors. In this work we compare the traditional method performed with sinapinic acid with a comparable protocol using ferulic acid as the matrix. Data show a remarkable increase of signal acquisition in the mass range of 20k to 150k Th. Moreover, we report molecular images of biomolecules above 70k Th, demonstrating the possibility of expanding the application of this technology both in clinical investigations and basic science.

  10. Experimental study on acoustic subwavelength imaging based on zero-mass metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xianchen; Li, Pei; Zhou, Xiaoming; Hu, Gengkai

    2015-01-01

    Anisotropic zero-mass acoustic metamaterials are able to transmit evanescent waves without decaying to a far distance, and have been used for near-field acoustic subwavelength imaging. In this work, we design and fabricate such metamaterial lens based on clamped paper membrane units. The zero-mass frequency is determined by normal-incidence acoustic transmission measurement. At this frequency, we verify in experiment that the fabricated metamaterial lens is able to distinguish clearly two sound sources separated with a distance 0.16λ0 (λ0 is the wavelength in air) below the diffraction limit. We also demonstrate that the imaging frequency is invariant to the change of the lens thickness.

  11. Mass Spectrometry Imaging and GC-MS Profiling of the Mammalian Peripheral Sensory-Motor Circuit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubakhin, Stanislav S.; Ulanov, Alexander; Sweedler, Jonathan V.

    2015-06-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) has evolved to become an effective discovery tool in science and clinical diagnostics. Here, chemical imaging approaches are applied to well-defined regions of the mammalian peripheral sensory-motor system, including the dorsal root ganglia (DRG) and adjacent nerves. By combining several MSI approaches, analyte coverage is increased and 195 distinct molecular features are observed. Principal component analysis suggests three chemically different regions within the sensory-motor system, with the DRG and adjacent nerve regions being the most distinct. Investigation of these regions using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry corroborate these findings and reveal important metabolic markers related to the observed differences. The heterogeneity of the structurally, physiologically, and functionally connected regions demonstrates the intricate chemical and spatial regulation of their chemical composition.

  12. MALDI mass spectrometry imaging for the simultaneous location of resveratrol, pterostilbene and viniferins on grapevine leaves.

    PubMed

    Becker, Loïc; Carré, Vincent; Poutaraud, Anne; Merdinoglu, Didier; Chaimbault, Patrick

    2014-07-21

    To investigate the in-situ response to a stress, grapevine leaves have been subjected to mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) experiments. The Matrix Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionisation (MALDI) approach using different matrices has been evaluated. Among all the tested matrices, the 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid (DHB) was found to be the most efficient matrix allowing a broader range of detected stilbene phytoalexins. Resveratrol, but also more toxic compounds against fungi such as pterostilbene and viniferins, were identified and mapped. Their spatial distributions on grapevine leaves irradiated by UV show their specific colocation around the veins. Moreover, MALDI MSI reveals that resveratrol (and piceids) and viniferins are not specifically located on the same area when leaves are infected by Plasmopara viticola. Results obtained by MALDI mass spectrometry imaging demonstrate that this technique would be essential to improve the level of knowledge concerning the role of the stilbene phytoalexins involved in a stress event.

  13. Mass MOVEMENTS' Detection in Hirise Images of the North Pole of Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fanara, L.; Gwinner, K.; Hauber, E.; Oberst, J.

    2016-06-01

    We are investigating change detection techniques to automatically detect mass movements at the steep north polar scarps of Mars, in order to improve our understanding of these dynamic processes. Here we focus on movements of blocks specifically. The precise detection of such small changes requires an accurate co-registration of the images, which is achieved by ortho-rectifying them using High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) Digital Terrain Models (DTMs). Moreover, we deal with the challenge of deriving the true shape of the moved blocks. In a next step, these results are combined with findings based on HiRISE DTMs from different points in time in order to estimate the volume of mass movements.

  14. THE MULTI-ISOTOPE PROCESS (MIP) MONITOR: A NEAR-REAL-TIME, NON-DESTRUCTIVE, INDICATOR OF SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL REPROCESSING CONDITIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Schwantes, Jon M.; Orton, Christopher R.; Fraga, Carlos G.; Douglas, Matthew; Christensen, Richard

    2010-05-07

    Researchers from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and The Ohio State University are working to develop a system for monitoring spent nuclear fuel reprocessing facilities on-line, non-destructively, and in near-real-time. This method, known as the Multi-Isotope Process (MIP) Monitor, is based upon the measurement of distribution patterns of a suite of indicator (radioactive) isotopes present within product and waste streams of a nuclear reprocessing facility. Signatures from these indicator isotopes are monitored on-line by gamma spectrometry and compared, in near-real-time, to patterns representing "normal" process conditions using multivariate pattern recognition software. By targeting gamma-emitting indicator isotopes, the MIP Monitor approach is compatible with the use of small, portable, high-resolution gamma detectors that may be easily deployed throughout an existing facility. In addition, utilization of a suite of radio-elements, including ones with multiple oxidation states, increases the likelihood that attempts to divert material via process manipulation would be detected. Proof-of-principle modeling exercises simulating changes in acid strength have been completed and the results are promising. Laboratory validation is currently under way and significant results are available. The latest experimental results, along with an overview of the method will be presented.

  15. MONITORING SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL REPROCESSING CONDITIONS NON-DESTRUCTIVELY AND IN NEAR-REAL-TIME USING THE MULTI-ISOTOPE PROCESS (MIP) MONITOR

    SciTech Connect

    Orton, Christopher R.; Fraga, Carlos G.; Douglas, Matthew; Christensen, Richard; Schwantes, Jon M.

    2010-05-07

    Researchers from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and The Ohio State University are working to develop a system for monitoring spent nuclear fuel reprocessing facilities on-line, nondestructively, and in near-real-time. This method, known as the Multi-Isotope Process (MIP) Monitor, is based upon the measurement of distribution patterns of a suite of indicator (radioactive) isotopes present within product and waste streams of a nuclear reprocessing facility. Signatures from these indicator isotopes are monitored on-line by gamma spectrometry and compared, in near-real-time, to patterns representing "normal" process conditions using multivariate pattern recognition software. By targeting gamma-emitting indicator isotopes, the MIP Monitor approach is compatible with the use of small, portable, high-resolution gamma detectors that may be easily deployed throughout an existing facility. In addition, utilization of a suite of radio-elements, including ones with multiple oxidation states, increases the likelihood that attempts to divert material via process manipulation would be detected. Proof-of-principle modeling exercises simulating changes in acid strength have been completed and the results are promising. Laboratory testing is currently under way and significant results are available. Recent experimental results, along with an overview of the method are presented.

  16. Identifying the African wintering grounds of hybrid flycatchers using a multi-isotope (δ2H, δ13C, δ15N) assignment approach.

    PubMed

    Veen, Thor; Hjernquist, Mårten B; Van Wilgenburg, Steven L; Hobson, Keith A; Folmer, Eelke; Font, Laura; Klaassen, Marcel

    2014-01-01

    Migratory routes and wintering grounds can have important fitness consequences, which can lead to divergent selection on populations or taxa differing in their migratory itinerary. Collared (Ficedula albicollis) and pied (F. hypoleuca) flycatchers breeding in Europe and wintering in different sub-Saharan regions have distinct migratory routes on the eastern and western sides of the Sahara desert, respectively. In an earlier paper, we showed that hybrids of the two species did not incur reduced winter survival, which would be expected if their migration strategy had been a mix of the parent species' strategies potentially resulting in an intermediate route crossing the Sahara desert to different wintering grounds. Previously, we compared isotope ratios and found no significant difference in stable-nitrogen isotope ratios (δ15N) in winter-grown feathers between the parental species and hybrids, but stable-carbon isotope ratios (δ13C) in hybrids significantly clustered only with those of pied flycatchers. We followed up on these findings and additionally analyzed the same feathers for stable-hydrogen isotope ratios (δ2H) and conducted spatially explicit multi-isotope assignment analyses. The assignment results overlapped with presumed wintering ranges of the two species, highlighting the efficacy of the method. In contrast to earlier findings, hybrids clustered with both parental species, though most strongly with pied flycatcher.

  17. Proof of concept simulations of the Multi-Isotope Process monitor: An online, nondestructive, near-real-time safeguards monitor for nuclear fuel reprocessing facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orton, Christopher R.; Fraga, Carlos G.; Christensen, Richard N.; Schwantes, Jon M.

    2011-02-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency will require the development of advanced technologies to effectively safeguard nuclear material at increasingly large-scale nuclear recycling facilities. Ideally, the envisioned technologies would be capable of nondestructive, near-real-time, autonomous process monitoring. This paper describes recent results from model simulations designed to test the Multi-Isotope Process (MIP) monitor, a novel addition to a safeguards system for reprocessing facilities. The MIP monitor combines the detection of intrinsic gamma ray signatures emitted from process solutions with multivariate analysis to detect off-normal conditions in process streams nondestructively and in near-real-time. Three computer models including ORIGEN-ARP, AMUSE, and SYNTH were used in series to predict spent nuclear fuel composition, estimate element partitioning during separation, and simulate spectra from product and raffinate streams using a variety of gamma detectors, respectively. Simulations were generated for fuel with various irradiation histories and under a variety of plant operating conditions. Principal component analysis was applied to the simulated gamma spectra to investigate pattern variations as a function of acid concentration, burnup, and cooling time. Hierarchical cluster analysis and partial least squares (PLS) were also used in the analysis. The MIP monitor was found to be sensitive to induced variations of several operating parameters including distinguishing ±2.5% variation from normal process acid concentrations. The ability of PLS to predict burnup levels from simulated spectra was also demonstrated to be within 3.5% of measured values.

  18. Automatic Extraction of Myocardial Mass and Volume Using Parametric Images from Dynamic Nongated PET.

    PubMed

    Harms, Hendrik Johannes; Stubkjær Hansson, Nils Henrik; Tolbod, Lars Poulsen; Kim, Won Yong; Jakobsen, Steen; Bouchelouche, Kirsten; Wiggers, Henrik; Frøkiaer, Jørgen; Sörensen, Jens

    2016-09-01

    Dynamic cardiac PET is used to quantify molecular processes in vivo. However, measurements of left ventricular (LV) mass and volume require electrocardiogram-gated PET data. The aim of this study was to explore the feasibility of measuring LV geometry using nongated dynamic cardiac PET. Thirty-five patients with aortic-valve stenosis and 10 healthy controls underwent a 27-min (11)C-acetate PET/CT scan and cardiac MRI (CMR). The controls were scanned twice to assess repeatability. Parametric images of uptake rate K1 and the blood pool were generated from nongated dynamic data. Using software-based structure recognition, the LV wall was automatically segmented from K1 images to derive functional assessments of LV mass (mLV) and wall thickness. End-systolic and end-diastolic volumes were calculated using blood pool images and applied to obtain stroke volume and LV ejection fraction (LVEF). PET measurements were compared with CMR. High, linear correlations were found for LV mass (r = 0.95), end-systolic volume (r = 0.93), and end-diastolic volume (r = 0.90), and slightly lower correlations were found for stroke volume (r = 0.74), LVEF (r = 0.81), and thickness (r = 0.78). Bland-Altman analyses showed significant differences for mLV and thickness only and an overestimation for LVEF at lower values. Intra- and interobserver correlations were greater than 0.95 for all PET measurements. PET repeatability accuracy in the controls was comparable to CMR. LV mass and volume are accurately and automatically generated from dynamic (11)C-acetate PET without electrocardiogram gating. This method can be incorporated in a standard routine without any additional workload and can, in theory, be extended to other PET tracers. © 2016 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Inc.

  19. Ambient Mass Spectrometry Imaging with Picosecond Infrared Laser Ablation Electrospray Ionization (PIR-LAESI).

    PubMed

    Zou, Jing; Talbot, Francis; Tata, Alessandra; Ermini, Leonardo; Franjic, Kresimir; Ventura, Manuela; Zheng, Jinzi; Ginsberg, Howard; Post, Martin; Ifa, Demian R; Jaffray, David; Miller, R J Dwayne; Zarrine-Afsar, Arash

    2015-12-15

    A picosecond infrared laser (PIRL) is capable of cutting through biological tissues in the absence of significant thermal damage. As such, PIRL is a standalone surgical scalpel with the added bonus of minimal postoperative scar tissue formation. In this work, a tandem of PIRL ablation with electrospray ionization (PIR-LAESI) mass spectrometry is demonstrated and characterized for tissue molecular imaging, with a limit of detection in the range of 100 nM for reserpine or better than 5 nM for verapamil in aqueous solution. We characterized PIRL crater size using agar films containing Rhodamine. PIR-LAESI offers a 20-30 μm vertical resolution (∼3 μm removal per pulse) and a lateral resolution of ∼100 μm. We were able to detect 25 fmol of Rhodamine in agar ablation experiments. PIR-LAESI was used to map the distribution of endogenous methoxykaempferol glucoronide in zebra plant (Aphelandra squarrosa) leaves producing a localization map that is corroborated by the literature. PIR-LAESI was further used to image the distribution inside mouse kidneys of gadoteridol, an exogenous magnetic resonance contrast agent intravenously injected. Parallel mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) using desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) and matrix assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) were performed to corroborate PIR-LAESI images of the exogenous agent. We further show that PIR-LAESI is capable of desorption ionization of proteins as well as phospholipids. This comparative study illustrates that PIR-LAESI is an ion source for ambient mass spectrometry applications. As such, a future PIRL scalpel combined with secondary ionization such as ESI and mass spectrometry has the potential to provide molecular feedback to guide PIRL surgery.

  20. Low Frequency (30-110 MHz) Radio Imaging Observations Of Solar Coronal Mass Ejections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramesh, R.

    Ground based radio imaging observations play an useful role in the study of mass ejections from the solar corona since they do not have the limitation of an occulter and both the disk/limb events can be detected early in their development, particularly via the thermal bremmstrahlung emission from the frontal loop of the CME. I present here some of the recent results on the above topic using data obtained with the Gauribidanur radioheliograph, near Bangalore in India.

  1. Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry Imaging of Tissues, Cells, and Microbial Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Anderton, Christopher R.; Gamble, Lara J.

    2016-03-01

    Mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) techniques are increasingly being utilized within many biological fields, including medicine, pathology, microbial ecology, and more. Of the MSI methods available, secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) offers the highest lateral resolution of any technique. Moreover, SIMS versatility in the number of different operating modes and types of mass spectrometers available has made it an increasing popular method for bio-related measurements. Here, we discuss SIMS ability to image tissues, single cells, and microbes with a particular emphasis on the types chemical and spatial information that can be ascertained by the different types of SIMS instruments and methods. The recently developed Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FTICR) SIMS located at PNNL is capable of generating molecular maps of tissues with an unprecedented mass resolving power and mass accuracy, with respect to SIMS measurements. ToF-SIMS can generate chemical maps, where detection of small molecules and fragments can be acquired with an order of magnitude better lateral resolution than the FTICR-SIMS. Furthermore, many of commercially available ToF-SIMS instruments are capable of depth profiling measurements, offering the ability to attain three-dimensional information of one’s sample. The NanoSIMS instrument offers the highest lateral resolution of any MSI method available. In practice, NanoSIMS regularly achieves sub-100 nm resolution of atomic and diatomic secondary ions within biological samples. The strengths of the different SIMS methods are more and more being leveraged in both multimodal-imaging endeavors that use complementary MSI techniques as well with optical, fluorescence, and force microscopy methods.

  2. Mapping drug distribution in brain tissue using liquid extraction surface analysis mass spectrometry imaging.

    PubMed

    Swales, John G; Tucker, James W; Spreadborough, Michael J; Iverson, Suzanne L; Clench, Malcolm R; Webborn, Peter J H; Goodwin, Richard J A

    2015-10-06

    Liquid extraction surface analysis mass spectrometry (LESA-MS) is a surface sampling technique that incorporates liquid extraction from the surface of tissue sections with nanoelectrospray mass spectrometry. Traditional tissue analysis techniques usually require homogenization of the sample prior to analysis via high-performance liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS), but an intrinsic weakness of this is a loss of all spatial information and the inability of the technique to distinguish between actual tissue penetration and response caused by residual blood contamination. LESA-MS, in contrast, has the ability to spatially resolve drug distributions and has historically been used to profile discrete spots on the surface of tissue sections. Here, we use the technique as a mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) tool, extracting points at 1 mm spatial resolution across tissue sections to build an image of xenobiotic and endogenous compound distribution to assess drug blood-brain barrier penetration into brain tissue. A selection of penetrant and "nonpenetrant" drugs were dosed to rats via oral and intravenous administration. Whole brains were snap-frozen at necropsy and were subsequently sectioned prior to analysis by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry imaging (MALDI-MSI) and LESA-MSI. MALDI-MSI, as expected, was shown to effectively map the distribution of brain penetrative compounds but lacked sufficient sensitivity when compounds were marginally penetrative. LESA-MSI was used to effectively map the distribution of these poorly penetrative compounds, highlighting its value as a complementary technique to MALDI-MSI. The technique also showed benefits when compared to traditional homogenization, particularly for drugs that were considered nonpenetrant by homogenization but were shown to have a measurable penetration using LESA-MSI.

  3. Identification of Biomarkers of Necrosis in Xenografts Using Imaging Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Roberto; Garate, Jone; Lage, Sergio; Terés, Silvia; Higuera, Mónica; Bestard-Escalas, Joan; López, Daniel H; Guardiola-Serrano, Francisca; Escribá, Pablo V; Barceló-Coblijn, Gwendolyn; Fernández, José A

    2016-02-01

    Xenografts are commonly used to test the effect of new drugs on human cancer. However, because of their heterogeneity, analysis of the results is often controversial. Part of the problem originates in the existence of tumor cells at different metabolic stages: from metastatic to necrotic cells, as it happens in real tumors. Imaging mass spectrometry is an excellent solution for the analysis of the results as it yields detailed information not only on the composition of the tissue but also on the distribution of the biomolecules within the tissue. Here, we use imaging mass spectrometry to determine the distribution of phosphatidylcholine (PC), phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), and their plasmanyl- and plasmenylether derivatives (PC-P/O and PE-P/O) in xenografts of five different tumor cell lines: A-549, NCI-H1975, BX-PC3, HT29, and U-87 MG. The results demonstrate that the necrotic areas showed a higher abundance of Na(+) adducts and of PC-P/O species, whereas a large abundance of PE-P/O species was found in all the xenografts. Thus, the PC/PC-ether and Na(+)/K(+) ratios may highlight the necrotic areas while an increase on the number of PE-ether species may be pointing to the existence of viable tumor tissues. Furthermore, the existence of important changes in the concentration of Na(+) and K(+) adducts between different tissues has to be taken into account while interpreting the imaging mass spectrometry results. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  4. Identification of Biomarkers of Necrosis in Xenografts Using Imaging Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández, Roberto; Garate, Jone; Lage, Sergio; Terés, Silvia; Higuera, Mónica; Bestard-Escalas, Joan; López, Daniel H.; Guardiola-Serrano, Francisca; Escribá, Pablo V.; Barceló-Coblijn, Gwendolyn; Fernández, José A.

    2016-02-01

    Xenografts are commonly used to test the effect of new drugs on human cancer. However, because of their heterogeneity, analysis of the results is often controversial. Part of the problem originates in the existence of tumor cells at different metabolic stages: from metastatic to necrotic cells, as it happens in real tumors. Imaging mass spectrometry is an excellent solution for the analysis of the results as it yields detailed information not only on the composition of the tissue but also on the distribution of the biomolecules within the tissue. Here, we use imaging mass spectrometry to determine the distribution of phosphatidylcholine (PC), phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), and their plasmanyl- and plasmenylether derivatives (PC-P/O and PE-P/O) in xenografts of five different tumor cell lines: A-549, NCI-H1975, BX-PC3, HT29, and U-87 MG. The results demonstrate that the necrotic areas showed a higher abundance of Na+ adducts and of PC-P/O species, whereas a large abundance of PE-P/O species was found in all the xenografts. Thus, the PC/PC-ether and Na+/K+ ratios may highlight the necrotic areas while an increase on the number of PE-ether species may be pointing to the existence of viable tumor tissues. Furthermore, the existence of important changes in the concentration of Na+ and K+ adducts between different tissues has to be taken into account while interpreting the imaging mass spectrometry results.

  5. Value of ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging in the preoperative evaluation of suspected ovarian masses.

    PubMed

    Huber, Sabine; Medl, Michael; Baumann, Louis; Czembirek, Heinrich

    2002-01-01

    The stage of ovarian carcinoma at diagnosis directly affects prognosis. Thus, thorough pretreatment evaluation is basic to the successful management of suspected ovarian masses. Among currently available imaging techniques in characterization of suspected ovarian neoplasms, sonography (US) is indisputedly the primary imaging approach. When US is inconclusive, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is generally prefered to computed tomography (CT). 93 patients, who on the basis of clinical findings were suspected to have ovarian cancer and who were scheduled for subsequent surgical staging underwent preoperative transvaginal and abdominal ultrasound as well as magnetic resonance imaging in a prospective comparative study. US and MR images were evaluated for their information on the characterization and staging of the ovarian masses. MRI correctly characterized malignant and benign tumors in 89% of cases versus 85% by ultrasound. The site of the primary tumor was correctly diagnosed in 94% of cases by MRI vs. 90% by ultrasound. For US, the positive predictive value was 85%, the negative predictive value 73% vs. 92% and 89% for MRI. In differentiation of nonadvanced disease from advanced malignancy, US showed a false-positive rate of 0.416 and false-negative rate of 0.258 vs. 0.125 and 0.032 respectively, for MRI. MRI was superior in diagnosis of malignant ovarian masses though US, too, performed well at lesion detection and characterization. With regard to tumor staging MRI is emerging as a problem-solving modality and may allow more appropriate clinical decisions to be made in selected patients with complex adnexal disease.

  6. Hybrid Imaging Labels: Providing the Link Between Mass Spectrometry-Based Molecular Pathology and Theranostics

    PubMed Central

    Buckle, Tessa; van der Wal, Steffen; van Malderen, Stijn J.M.; Müller, Larissa; Kuil, Joeri; van Unen, Vincent; Peters, Ruud J.B.; van Bemmel, Margaretha E.M.; McDonnell, Liam A.; Velders, Aldrik H.; Koning, Frits; Vanhaeke, Frank; van Leeuwen, Fijs W. B.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Development of theranostic concepts that include inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and laser ablation ICP-MS (LA-ICP-MS) imaging can be hindered by the lack of a direct comparison to more standardly used methods for in vitro and in vivo evaluation; e.g. fluorescence or nuclear medicine. In this study a bimodal (or rather, hybrid) tracer that contains both a fluorescent dye and a chelate was used to evaluate the existence of a direct link between mass spectrometry (MS) and in vitro and in vivo molecular imaging findings using fluorescence and radioisotopes. At the same time, the hybrid label was used to determine whether the use of a single isotope label would allow for MS-based diagnostics. Methods: A hybrid label that contained both a DTPA chelate (that was coordinated with either 165Ho or 111In) and a Cy5 fluorescent dye was coupled to the chemokine receptor 4 (CXCR4) targeting peptide Ac-TZ14011 (hybrid-Cy5-Ac-TZ4011). This receptor targeting tracer was used to 1) validate the efficacy of (165Ho-based) mass-cytometry in determining the receptor affinity via comparison with fluorescence-based flow cytometry (Cy5), 2) evaluate the microscopic binding pattern of the tracer in tumor cells using both fluorescence confocal imaging (Cy5) and LA-ICP-MS-imaging (165Ho), 3) compare in vivo biodistribution patterns obtained with ICP-MS (165Ho) and radiodetection (111In) after intravenous administration of hybrid-Cy5-Ac-TZ4011 in tumor-bearing mice. Finally, LA-ICP-MS-imaging (165Ho) was linked to fluorescence-based analysis of excised tissue samples (Cy5). Results: Analysis with both mass-cytometry and flow cytometry revealed a similar receptor affinity, respectively 352 ± 141 nM and 245 ± 65 nM (p = 0.08), but with a much lower detection sensitivity for the first modality. In vitro LA-ICP-MS imaging (165Ho) enabled clear discrimination between CXCR4 positive and negative cells, but fluorescence microscopy was required to determine the

  7. Probing Neuropeptide Signaling at the Organ and Cellular Domains via Imaging Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Hui; Greer, Tyler; Li, Lingjun

    2012-01-01

    Imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) has evolved to be a promising technology due to its ability to detect a broad mass range of molecular species and create density maps for selected compounds. It is currently one of the most useful techniques to determine the spatial distribution of neuropeptides in cells and tissues. Although IMS is conceptually simple, sample preparation steps, mass analyzers, and software suites are just a few of the factors that contribute to the successful design of a neuropeptide IMS experiment. This review provides a brief overview of IMS sampling protocols, instrumentation, data analysis tools, technological advancements and applications to neuropeptide localization in neurons and endocrine tissues. Future perspectives in this field are also provided, concluding that neuropeptide IMS could revolutionize neuronal network and biomarker discovery studies. PMID:22465716

  8. Mass spectrometry imaging for clinical research - latest developments, applications, and current limitations.

    PubMed

    Vaysse, Pierre-Maxence; Heeren, Ron M A; Porta, Tiffany; Balluff, Benjamin

    2017-07-24

    Mass spectrometry is being used in many clinical research areas ranging from toxicology to personalized medicine. Of all the mass spectrometry techniques, mass spectrometry imaging (MSI), in particular, has continuously grown towards clinical acceptance. Significant technological and methodological improvements have contributed to enhance the performance of MSI recently, pushing the limits of throughput, spatial resolution, and sensitivity. This has stimulated the spread of MSI usage across various biomedical research areas such as oncology, neurological disorders, cardiology, and rheumatology, just to name a few. After highlighting the latest major developments and applications touching all aspects of translational research (i.e. from early pre-clinical to clinical research), we will discuss the present challenges in translational research performed with MSI: data management and analysis, molecular coverage and identification capabilities, and finally, reproducibility across multiple research centers, which is the largest remaining obstacle in moving MSI towards clinical routine.

  9. From pixel to voxel: a deeper view of biological tissue by 3D mass spectral imaging

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Hui; Greer, Tyler; Li, Lingjun

    2011-01-01

    Three dimensional mass spectral imaging (3D MSI) is an exciting field that grants the ability to study a broad mass range of molecular species ranging from small molecules to large proteins by creating lateral and vertical distribution maps of select compounds. Although the general premise behind 3D MSI is simple, factors such as choice of ionization method, sample handling, software considerations and many others must be taken into account for the successful design of a 3D MSI experiment. This review provides a brief overview of ionization methods, sample preparation, software types and technological advancements driving 3D MSI research of a wide range of low- to high-mass analytes. Future perspectives in this field are also provided to conclude that the positive and promises ever-growing applications in the biomedical field with continuous developments of this powerful analytical tool. PMID:21320052

  10. Higher sensitivity secondary ion mass spectrometry of biological molecules for high resolution, chemically specific imaging.

    PubMed

    McDonnell, Liam A; Heeren, Ron M A; de Lange, Robert P J; Fletcher, Ian W

    2006-09-01

    To expand the role of high spatial resolution secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) in biological studies, numerous developments have been reported in recent years for enhancing the molecular ion yield of high mass molecules. These include both surface modification, including matrix-enhanced SIMS and metal-assisted SIMS, and polyatomic primary ions. Using rat brain tissue sections and a bismuth primary ion gun able to produce atomic and polyatomic primary ions, we report here how the sensitivity enhancements provided by these developments are additive. Combined surface modification and polyatomic primary ions provided approximately 15.8 times more signal than using atomic primary ions on the raw sample, whereas surface modification and polyatomic primary ions yield approximately 3.8 and approximately 8.4 times more signal. This higher sensitivity is used to generate chemically specific images of higher mass biomolecules using a single molecular ion peak.

  11. Characterization of extreme ultraviolet laser ablation mass spectrometry for actinide trace analysis and nanoscale isotopic imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Green, Tyler; Kuznetsov, Ilya; Willingham, David; Naes, Benjamin E.; Eiden, Gregory C.; Zhu, Zihua; Chao, W.; Rocca, Jorge J.; Menoni, Carmen S.; Duffin, Andrew M.

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to characterize Extreme Ultraviolet Time-of-Flight (EUV TOF) Laser Ablation Mass Spectrometry for high spatial resolution elemental and isotopic analysis. We compare EUV TOF results with Secondary Ionization Mass Spectrometry (SIMS) to orient the EUV TOF method within the overall field of analytical mass spectrometry. Using the well-characterized NIST 61x glasses, we show that the EUV ionization approach produces relatively few molecular ion interferences in comparison to TOF SIMS. We demonstrate that the ratio of element ion to element oxide ion is adjustable with EUV laser pulse energy and that the EUV TOF instrument has a sample utilization efficiency of 0.014%. The EUV TOF system also achieves a lateral resolution of 80 nm and we demonstrate this lateral resolution with isotopic imaging of closely spaced particles or uranium isotopic standard materials.

  12. Identification and imaging of modern paints using Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry with MeV ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogdanović Radović, Iva; Siketić, Zdravko; Jembrih-Simbürger, Dubravka; Marković, Nikola; Anghelone, Marta; Stoytschew, Valentin; Jakšić, Milko

    2017-09-01

    Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry using MeV ion excitation was applied to analyse modern paint materials containing synthetic organic pigments and binders. It was demonstrated that synthetic organic pigments and binder components with molecular masses in the m/z range from 1 to 1200 could be identified in different paint samples with a high efficiency and in a single measurement. Different ways of mounting of mostly insulating paint samples were tested prior to the analysis in order to achieve the highest possible yield of pigment main molecular ions. As Time-of-Flight mass spectrometer for MeV Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry is attached to the heavy ion microprobe, molecular imaging on cross-sections of small paint fragments was performed using focused ions. Due to the fact that molecules are extracted from the uppermost layer of the sample and to avoid surface contamination, the paint samples were not embedded in the resin as is usually done when imaging of paint samples using different techniques in the field of cultural heritage.

  13. A multi-isotope (radium, boron,strontium, sulfur, carbon, oxygen, hydrogen) investigation of fossil groundwater from the Disi Aquifer in southern Jordan: tracing water sources, water-rock interactions, and residence time (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vengosh, A.; Rimawi, O.; Al-Zoubi, A.; Marie, A.; Ganor, J.

    2010-12-01

    The rise in population, consecutive droughts induced from climate change, and associated increased water demands in the Middle East have placed an increasing pressure on available water resources, which in turn has accelerated the rates of their depletion and contamination. In addition to desalination and recycling waste water, exploitation of non-renewable (“fossil”) groundwater has become an alternative water source. Most of the fossil groundwater in the Middle East and Northern Africa occupies confined sandstone aquifers and is typically characterized by high water quality. Recent findings have shown, however, that fossil groundwater from the Nubian Sandstone aquifers in southern Jordan and Israel has high levels of naturally occurring and carcinogenic radium isotopes that largely exceed the international drinking water standards, and poses a health risk upon long-term utilization. Here we present the results of a multi-isotope study of low-saline (TDS=250-450 mg/L) groundwater from the Cambro-Ordovician Disi-Mudawarra sandstone aquifer systems in southern Jordan. The δ18O, δ2H, and 14C variations show at least three recharge phases into the confined and unconfined zones of the aquifer. High δ11B values (34-47‰) and B/Cl ratios (>>seawater ratio) suggests that the recharge water originated from rainwater of an early stage of air mass evolution, with negligible water-rock interaction in the aquifer. This meteoric composition is consistent with 87Sr/86Sr (70804 to 0.70860) and δ34S (9-16‰) values, and infers minimum dissolution of diagenetic carbonates that could have contributed depleted 11B, high 87Sr/86Sr, and dead carbon. The uncorrected 14C ages point to three major recharge episodes to the northwestern Arabian Peninsula: (1) >30 ka (Khrein aquifer); (2) 15-29 ka (confined Disi aquifer); and (3) 8-12 ka (unconfined Disi aquifer), in which the latter coincide with the “pluvial maximum” of Early Holocene. The stable isotope composition of the

  14. Relationship between perceived body image and recorded body mass index among Kuwaiti female university students.

    PubMed

    Kabir, Yearul; Zafar, Tasleem A; Waslien, Carol

    2013-01-01

    The associations between body image and attitudes toward obesity and thinness and their associations with measured body mass index (BMI) among female students of Kuwait University (n = 137) was examined in 2008. The body image perceptions were assessed using nine female silhouettes figures. The difference between current perceived body image (PBI) and ideal body image (IBI) was used as a measure of body image dissatisfaction (BID). Students tended to have a bigger PBI and smaller IBI than would be expected from their BMI category, leading to high levels of BID in each BMI category. PBI, IBI, BID, RBI were highly correlated with each other, and BMI was significantly correlated with each of them. The coefficients of these associations were not significantly altered in multiple regression analysis by the addition of potential confounding variables, such as age, marital status, physical activity, dieting behavior, parental education, and family size. These results suggest that PBI and a desire to be thinner were strongly related to BID and that thinness is becoming more desired in Kuwaiti society than the plump body image of the past.

  15. DENSITY DIAGNOSTICS OF CORONAL MASS EJECTION CORES WITH THE SOLAR DYNAMICS OBSERVATORY/ATMOSPHERIC IMAGING ASSEMBLY

    SciTech Connect

    Landi, E.; Miralles, M. P.

    2014-01-01

    In this Letter, we investigate the application of the intensity ratio from pairs of narrow-band images from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) on the Solar Dynamics Observatory, the Extreme Ultraviolet (EUV) Imager (EUVI) on board the Sun Earth Connection Coronal and Heliospheric Investigation, and the EUV Imaging Telescope (EIT) on board the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory, to density diagnostics of optically thin plasmas. By inspecting the filtered spectra allowed by each instrument's effective area, we find that ratios between AIA images in the 171 Å and 193 Å channels can be used to determine the plasma electron density at transition region temperatures. This diagnostic potential is due to a pair of O V transitions which dominate the effective spectra of these two channels at temperatures around ≈2.5-3.0 × 10{sup 5} K. The temperature and electron density ranges where the 171/193 ratio is density sensitive are relevant for the cores of accelerating coronal mass ejections (CMEs) in the inner solar corona. We discuss how AIA series of images can be used for simultaneous temperature and density diagnostics of CME cores.

  16. Mass Spectrometry Imaging and Identification of Peptides Associated with Cephalic Ganglia Regeneration in Schmidtea mediterranea*

    PubMed Central

    Ong, Ta-Hsuan; Romanova, Elena V.; Roberts-Galbraith, Rachel H.; Yang, Ning; Zimmerman, Tyler A.; Collins, James J.; Lee, Ji Eun; Kelleher, Neil L.; Newmark, Phillip A.; Sweedler, Jonathan V.

    2016-01-01

    Tissue regeneration is a complex process that involves a mosaic of molecules that vary spatially and temporally. Insights into the chemical signaling underlying this process can be achieved with a multiplex and untargeted chemical imaging method such as mass spectrometry imaging (MSI), which can enable de novo studies of nervous system regeneration. A combination of MSI and multivariate statistics was used to differentiate peptide dynamics in the freshwater planarian flatworm Schmidtea mediterranea at different time points during cephalic ganglia regeneration. A protocol was developed to make S. mediterranea tissues amenable for MSI. MS ion images of planarian tissue sections allow changes in peptides and unknown compounds to be followed as a function of cephalic ganglia regeneration. In conjunction with fluorescence imaging, our results suggest that even though the cephalic ganglia structure is visible after 6 days of regeneration, the original chemical composition of these regenerated structures is regained only after 12 days. Differences were observed in many peptides, such as those derived from secreted peptide 4 and EYE53-1. Peptidomic analysis further identified multiple peptides from various known prohormones, histone proteins, and DNA- and RNA-binding proteins as being associated with the regeneration process. Mass spectrometry data also facilitated the identification of a new prohormone, which we have named secreted peptide prohormone 20 (SPP-20), and is up-regulated during regeneration in planarians. PMID:26884331

  17. Interpolation of longitudinal shape and image data via optimal mass transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Yi; Zhu, Liang-Jia; Bouix, Sylvain; Tannenbaum, Allen

    2014-03-01

    Longitudinal analysis of medical imaging data has become central to the study of many disorders. Unfortunately, various constraints (study design, patient availability, technological limitations) restrict the acquisition of data to only a few time points, limiting the study of continuous disease/treatment progression. Having the ability to produce a sensible time interpolation of the data can lead to improved analysis, such as intuitive visualizations of anatomical changes, or the creation of more samples to improve statistical analysis. In this work, we model interpolation of medical image data, in particular shape data, using the theory of optimal mass transport (OMT), which can construct a continuous transition from two time points while preserving "mass" (e.g., image intensity, shape volume) during the transition. The theory even allows a short extrapolation in time and may help predict short-term treatment impact or disease progression on anatomical structure. We apply the proposed method to the hippocampus-amygdala complex in schizophrenia, the heart in atrial fibrillation, and full head MR images in traumatic brain injury.

  18. Mass Spectrometry Imaging and Identification of Peptides Associated with Cephalic Ganglia Regeneration in Schmidtea mediterranea.

    PubMed

    Ong, Ta-Hsuan; Romanova, Elena V; Roberts-Galbraith, Rachel H; Yang, Ning; Zimmerman, Tyler A; Collins, James J; Lee, Ji Eun; Kelleher, Neil L; Newmark, Phillip A; Sweedler, Jonathan V

    2016-04-08

    Tissue regeneration is a complex process that involves a mosaic of molecules that vary spatially and temporally. Insights into the chemical signaling underlying this process can be achieved with a multiplex and untargeted chemical imaging method such as mass spectrometry imaging (MSI), which can enablede novostudies of nervous system regeneration. A combination of MSI and multivariate statistics was used to differentiate peptide dynamics in the freshwater planarian flatwormSchmidtea mediterraneaat different time points during cephalic ganglia regeneration. A protocol was developed to makeS. mediterraneatissues amenable for MSI. MS ion images of planarian tissue sections allow changes in peptides and unknown compounds to be followed as a function of cephalic ganglia regeneration. In conjunction with fluorescence imaging, our results suggest that even though the cephalic ganglia structure is visible after 6 days of regeneration, the original chemical composition of these regenerated structures is regained only after 12 days. Differences were observed in many peptides, such as those derived from secreted peptide 4 and EYE53-1. Peptidomic analysis further identified multiple peptides from various known prohormones, histone proteins, and DNA- and RNA-binding proteins as being associated with the regeneration process. Mass spectrometry data also facilitated the identification of a new prohormone, which we have named secreted peptide prohormone 20 (SPP-20), and is up-regulated during regeneration in planarians.

  19. [Sex differences in body image, weight control and Body Mass Index of Spanish adolescents].

    PubMed

    Ramos Valverde, Pilar; Rivera de Los Santos, Francisco; Moreno Rodríguez, Carmen

    2010-02-01

    Sex differences in body image, weight control and Body Mass Index of Spanish adolescents. This research paper studied the differences among 21,811 adolescents (between the ages of 11 and 18) in key variables in the development of eating disorders, including the Body Mass Index, the perception of and satisfaction with their body image, and the behaviours used to control weight. In spite of the fact that the girls had a better adjusted BMI and a lesser degree of overweight and obesity, we found that they perceived themselves as being fatter, were less satisfied with body image, and the ones who dieted the most to lose weight. On the other hand, we found that the main reason for boys and girls to diet in an effort to lose weight was not their real body weight, but rather their perception of their own bodies, followed by just how satisfied they were with their bodies. Therefore, important differences are revealed between boys and girls in this article, which must be taken into consideration in the design and development of the various programs that are aimed at the prevention of problems with body image and diet behaviour.

  20. Spatial mapping by imaging mass spectrometry offers advancements for rapid definition of human skin proteomic signatures.

    PubMed

    Taverna, Domenico; Nanney, Lillian B; Pollins, Alonda C; Sindona, Giovanni; Caprioli, Richard

    2011-08-01

    Investigations into the human skin proteome by classical analytical procedures have not addressed spatial molecular distributions in whole-skin biopsies. The aim of this study was to develop methods for the detection of protein signatures and their spatial disposition in human skin using advanced molecular imaging technology based on mass spectrometry technologies. This technology allows for the generation of protein images at specific molecular weight values without the use of antibody while maintaining tissue architecture. Two experimental approaches were employed: MALDI-MS profiling, where mass spectra were taken from discrete locations based on histology, and MALDI-IMS imaging, where complete molecular images were obtained at various MW values. In addition, proteins were identified by in situ tryptic digestion, sequence analysis of the fragment peptides and protein database searching. We have detected patterns of protein differences that exist between epidermis and dermis as well as subtle regional differences between the papillary and reticular dermis. Furthermore, we were able to detect proteins that are constitutive features of human skin as well as those associated with unique markers of individual variability.

  1. Active learning for convenient annotation and classification of secondary ion mass spectrometry images.

    PubMed

    Hanselmann, Michael; Röder, Jens; Köthe, Ullrich; Renard, Bernhard Y; Heeren, Ron M A; Hamprecht, Fred A

    2013-01-02

    Digital staining for the automated annotation of mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) data has previously been achieved using state-of-the-art classifiers such as random forests or support vector machines (SVMs). However, the training of such classifiers requires an expert to label exemplary data in advance. This process is time-consuming and hence costly, especially if the tissue is heterogeneous. In theory, it may be sufficient to only label a few highly representative pixels of an MS image, but it is not known a priori which pixels to select. This motivates active learning strategies in which the algorithm itself queries the expert by automatically suggesting promising candidate pixels of an MS image for labeling. Given a suitable querying strategy, the number of required training labels can be significantly reduced while maintaining classification accuracy. In this work, we propose active learning for convenient annotation of MSI data. We generalize a recently proposed active learning method to the multiclass case and combine it with the random forest classifier. Its superior performance over random sampling is demonstrated on secondary ion mass spectrometry data, making it an interesting approach for the classification of MS images.

  2. On the autonomous detection of coronal mass ejections in heliospheric imager data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tappin, S. J.; Howard, T. A.; Hampson, M. M.; Thompson, R. N.; Burns, C. E.

    2012-05-01

    We report on the development of an Automatic Coronal Mass Ejection (CME) Detection tool (AICMED) for the Solar Mass Ejection Imager (SMEI). CMEs observed with heliospheric imagers are much more difficult to detect than those observed by coronagraphs as they have a lower contrast compared with the background light, have a larger range of intensity variation and are easily confused with other transient activity. CMEs appear in SMEI images as very faint often-fragmented arcs amongst a much brighter and often variable background. AICMED operates along the same lines as Computer Aided CME Tracking (CACTus), using the Hough Transform on elongation-time J-maps to extract straight lines from the data set. We compare AICMED results with manually measured CMEs on almost three years of data from early in SMEI operations. AICMED identified 83 verifiable events. Of these 46 could be matched with manually identified events, the majority of the non-detections can be explained. The remaining 37 AICMED events were newly discovered CMEs. The proportion of false identification was high, at 71% of the autonomously detected events. We find that AICMED is very effective as a region of interest highlighter, and is a promising first step in autonomous heliospheric imager CME detection, but the SMEI data are too noisy for the tool to be completely automated.

  3. MALDI imaging mass spectrometry of Pacific White Shrimp L. vannamei and identification of abdominal muscle proteins.

    PubMed

    Schey, Kevin L; Hachey, Amanda J; Rose, Kristie L; Grey, Angus C

    2016-06-01

    MALDI imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) has been applied to whole animal tissue sections of Pacific White Shrimp, Litopenaeus vannamei, in an effort to identify and spatially localize proteins in specific organ systems. Frozen shrimp were sectioned along the ventral-dorsal axis and methods were optimized for matrix application. In addition, tissue microextraction and homogenization was conducted followed by top-down LC-MS/MS analysis of intact proteins and searches of shrimp EST databases to identify imaged proteins. IMS images revealed organ system specific protein signals that highlighted the hepatopancreas, heart, nervous system, musculature, and cuticle. Top-down proteomics identification of abdominal muscle proteins revealed the sequence of the most abundant muscle protein that has no sequence homology to known proteins. Additional identifications of abdominal muscle proteins included titin, troponin-I, ubiquitin, as well as intact and multiple truncated forms of flightin; a protein known to function in high frequency contraction of insect wing muscles. The combined use of imaging mass spectrometry and top-down proteomics allowed for identification of novel proteins from the sparsely populated shrimp protein databases.

  4. Imaging features of periosteal chondroma manifesting as a subcutaneous mass in the index finger.

    PubMed

    Kosaka, Hidetomo; Nishio, Jun; Matsunaga, Taiki; Aoki, Mikiko; Iwasaki, Hiroshi; Naito, Masatoshi

    2014-01-01

    Periosteal chondroma is a rare benign hyaline cartilage neoplasm that occurs most commonly in the metaphases of long tubular bones. We present a unique case of periosteal chondroma arising in the proximal phalanx of the left index finger in a 12-year-old boy. Physical examination revealed a slightly protuberant, subcutaneous mass. Plain radiographs and computed tomography scans showed a periosteal lesion producing saucerization of the cortex and subjacent cortical sclerosis, without internal matrix calcification. On magnetic resonance imaging, the lesion exhibited intermediate signal intensity on T1-weighted images and high signal intensity on T2-weighted images. Contrast-enhanced fat-suppressed T1-weighted images demonstrated peripheral and septal enhancement. The patient underwent a marginal excision with curettage of the underlying bone cortex. Histological examination confirmed the diagnosis of periosteal chondroma. There has been no evidence of local recurrence eight months after surgery. Periosteal chondroma can protrude into the subcutaneous soft tissue causing a palpable mass. Recognition of the typical radiological features can lead to an accurate diagnosis of this rare condition.

  5. Concordance of computer-extracted image features with BI-RADS descriptors for mammographic mass margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahiner, Berkman; Hadjiiski, Lubomir M.; Chan, Heang-Ping; Paramagul, Chintana; Nees, Alexis; Helvie, Mark; Shi, Jiazheng

    2008-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop and evaluate computer-extracted features for characterizing mammographic mass margins according to BI-RADS spiculated and circumscribed categories. The mass was automatically segmented using an active contour model. A spiculation measure for a pixel on the mass boundary was defined by using the angular difference between the image gradient vector and the normal to the mass, averaged over pixels in a spiculation search region. For the circumscribed margin feature, the angular difference between the principal eigenvector of the Hessian matrix and the normal to the mass was estimated in a band of pixels centered at each point on the boundary, and the feature was extracted from the resulting profile along the boundary. Three MQSA radiologists provided BI-RADS margin ratings for a data set of 198 regions of interest containing breast masses. The features were evaluated with respect to the individual radiologists' characterization using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis, as well as with respect to that from the majority rule, in which a mass was labeled as spiculated (circumscribed) if it was characterized as such by 2 or 3 radiologists, and non-spiculated (non-circumscribed) otherwise. We also investigated the performance of the features for consensus masses, defined as those labeled as spiculated (circumscribed) or nonspiculated (non-circumscribed) by all three radiologists. When masses were labeled according to radiologists R1, R2, and R3 individually, the spiculation feature had an area A z under the ROC curve of 0.90+/-0.04, 0.90+/-0.03, 0.88+/-0.03, respectively, while the circumscribed margin feature had an A z value of 0.77+/-0.04, 0.74+/-0.04, and 0.80+/-0.03, respectively. When masses were labeled according to the majority rule, the A z values for the spiculation and the circumscribed margin features were 0.92+/-0.03 and 0.80+/-+/-0.03, respectively. When only the consensus masses were considered, the A z

  6. Laser Beam Filtration for High Spatial Resolution MALDI Imaging Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Zavalin, Andre; Yang, Junhai; Caprioli, Richard

    2013-01-01

    We describe an easy and inexpensive way to provide a highly defined Gaussian shaped laser spot on target of 5 μm diameter for Imaging Mass Spectrometry using a commercial MALDI TOF instrument that is designed to produce a 20 μm diameter laser beam on target at its lowest setting. A 25 μm pinhole filter on a swivel arm was installed in the laser beam optics outside the vacuum ion source chamber so it is easily flipped into or out of the beam as desired by the operator. The resulting ion images at 5 μm spatial resolution are sharp since the satellite secondary laser beam maxima have been removed by the filter. Ion images are shown to demonstrate the performance and are compared to the method of oversampling to achieve higher spatial resolution when only a larger laser beam spot on target is available. PMID:23661425

  7. Imaging in Rare and Atypical Sinonasal Masses: An Interesting Case Series.

    PubMed

    Sanyal, Shantiranjan; Prasad, Akhila; Baruah, Deb Kumar; Garga, Umesh Chandra

    2015-12-01

    Sinonasal tumours present a myriad of radiographic findings. While many of these tumours have been well described with regard to their typical sites of origin, age group and radiological appearance we have come across lesions in our daily practice which are exceedingly rare with regard to site of origin in sinonasal cavity. The radiological appearances of 4 such rare and unusual tumours arising in sinonasal region evaluated by cross sectional imaging (CT/MRI) have been illustrated in this article with a purpose to review the radio-pathological correlation of these tumours and to explain the utility of cross-sectional imaging CT and MRI in exploring diagnostic clues. Morphological features and radiological patterns of each tumour have been graded into mild, moderate and severe based on the extent of tumoural involvement. This review is intended to acquaint radiologists with the appearance of atypical sinonasal masses and their radiological appearance on cross sectional imaging to make an early diagnosis.

  8. Seismic reflection imaging of water mass boundaries in the Norwegian Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nandi, Papia; Holbrook, W. Steven; Pearse, Scott; Páramo, Pedro; Schmitt, Raymond W.

    2004-12-01

    Results from the first joint temperature and seismic reflection study of the ocean demonstrate that water mass boundaries can be acoustically mapped. Multichannel seismic profiles collected in the Norwegian Sea show reflections between the Norwegian Atlantic Current and Norwegian Sea Deep Water. The images were corroborated with a dense array of expendable bathythermographs and expendable conductivity-temperature depth profiles delineating sharp temperature gradients over vertical distances of ~5-15 m at depths over which reflections occur. Fine structure from both thermohaline intrusions and internal wave strains is imaged. Low-amplitude acoustic reflections correspond to temperature changes as small as 0.03°C implying that seismic reflection methods can image even weak fine structure.

  9. Laser beam filtration for high spatial resolution MALDI imaging mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zavalin, Andre; Yang, Junhai; Caprioli, Richard

    2013-07-01

    We describe an easy and inexpensive way to provide a highly defined Gaussian shaped laser spot on target of 5 μm diameter for imaging mass spectrometry using a commercial MALDI TOF instrument that is designed to produce a 20 μm diameter laser beam on target at its lowest setting. A 25 μm pinhole filter on a swivel arm was installed in the laser beam optics outside the vacuum ion source chamber so it is easily flipped into or out of the beam as desired by the operator. The resulting ion images at 5 μm spatial resolution are sharp since the satellite secondary laser beam maxima have been removed by the filter. Ion images are shown to demonstrate the performance and are compared with the method of oversampling to achieve higher spatial resolution when only a larger laser beam spot on target is available.

  10. Modeling of errors in Nakagami imaging: illustration on breast mass characterization.

    PubMed

    Larrue, Aymeric; Noble, J Alison

    2014-05-01

    Nakagami imaging is an attractive tissue characterization method, as the parameter estimated at each location is related to properties of the tissues. The application to clinical ultrasound images is problematic, as the estimation of the parameters is disturbed by the presence of complex structures. We propose to consider separately the different aspects potentially affecting the value of the Nakagami parameters and quantify their effects on the estimation. This framework is applied to the classification of breast masses. Quantitative parameters are computed on two groups of ultrasound images of benign and malignant tumors. A statistical analysis of the result indicated that the previously observed difference between average values of the Nakagami parameters is explained mostly by estimation errors. In the future, new methods for reliable computation of Nakagami parameters need to be developed, and factors of error should be considered in studies using Nakagami parameters.

  11. The accumulation mechanism of the hypoxia imaging probe "FMISO" by imaging mass spectrometry: possible involvement of low-molecular metabolites.

    PubMed

    Masaki, Yukiko; Shimizu, Yoichi; Yoshioka, Takeshi; Tanaka, Yukari; Nishijima, Ken-Ichi; Zhao, Songji; Higashino, Kenichi; Sakamoto, Shingo; Numata, Yoshito; Yamaguchi, Yoshitaka; Tamaki, Nagara; Kuge, Yuji

    2015-11-19

    (18)F-fluoromisonidazole (FMISO) has been widely used as a hypoxia imaging probe for diagnostic positron emission tomography (PET). FMISO is believed to accumulate in hypoxic cells via covalent binding with macromolecules after reduction of its nitro group. However, its detailed accumulation mechanism remains unknown. Therefore, we investigated the chemical forms of FMISO and their distributions in tumours using imaging mass spectrometry (IMS), which visualises spatial distribution of chemical compositions based on molecular masses in tissue sections. Our radiochemical analysis revealed that most of the radioactivity in tumours existed as low-molecular-weight compounds with unknown chemical formulas, unlike observations made with conventional views, suggesting that the radioactivity distribution primarily reflected that of these unknown substances. The IMS analysis indicated that FMISO and its reductive metabolites were nonspecifically distributed in the tumour in patterns not corresponding to the radioactivity distribution. Our IMS search found an unknown low-molecular-weight metabolite whose distribution pattern corresponded to that of both the radioactivity and the hypoxia marker pimonidazole. This metabolite was identified as the glutathione conjugate of amino-FMISO. We showed that the glutathione conjugate of amino-FMISO is involved in FMISO accumulation in hypoxic tumour tissues, in addition to the conventional mechanism of FMISO covalent binding to macromolecules.

  12. Quantification of Absolute Fat Mass by Magnetic Resonance Imaging: a Validation Study against Chemical Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Houchun H.; Li, Yan; Nagy, Tim R.; Goran, Michael I.; Nayak, Krishna S.

    2011-01-01

    Objective To develop a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-based approach for quantifying absolute fat mass in organs, muscles, and adipose tissues, and to validate its accuracy against reference chemical analysis (CA). Methods Chemical-shift imaging can accurately decompose water and fat signals from the acquired MRI data. A proton density fat fraction (PDFF) can be computed from the separated images, and reflects the relative fat content on a voxel-by-voxel basis. The PDFF is mathematically closely related to the fat mass fraction and can be converted to absolute fat mass in grams by multiplying by the voxel volume and the mass density of fat. In this validation study, 97 freshly excised and unique samples from four pigs, comprising of organs, muscles, and adipose and lean tissues were imaged by MRI and then analyzed independently by CA. Linear regression was used to assess correlation, agreement, and measurement differences between MRI and CA. Results Considering all 97 samples, a strong correlation and agreement was obtained between MRI and CA-derived fat mass (slope = 1.01, intercept = 1.99g, r2 = 0.98, p < 0.01). The mean difference d between MRI and CA was 2.17±3.40g. MRI did not exhibit any tendency to under or overestimate CA (p > 0.05). When considering samples from each pig separately, the results were (slope = 1.05, intercept = 1.11g, r2 = 0.98, d = 2.66±4.36g), (slope = 0.99, intercept = 2.33g, r2 = 0.99, d = 1.88±2.68g), (slope = 1.07, intercept = 1.52g, r2 = 0.96, d = 2.73±2.50g), and (slope=0.92, intercept=2.84g, r2 = 0.97, d = 1.18±3.90g), respectively. Conclusion Chemical-shift MRI and PDFF provides an accurate means of determining absolute fat mass in organs, muscles, and adipose and lean tissues. PMID:23204926

  13. Analysis of Mammalian Sphingolipids by Liquid Chromatography Tandem Mass Spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) and Tissue Imaging Mass Spectrometry (TIMS)

    PubMed Central

    Sullards, M. Cameron; Liu, Ying; Chen, Yanfeng; Merrill, Alfred H.

    2011-01-01

    Sphingolipids are a highly diverse category of molecules that serve not only as components of biological structures but also as regulators of numerous cell functions. Because so many of the structural features of sphingolipids give rise to their biological activity, there is a need for comprehensive or “sphingolipidomic” methods for identification and quantitation of as many individual subspecies as possible. This review defines sphingolipids as a class, briefly discusses classical methods for their analysis, and focuses primarily on liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) and tissue imaging mass spectrometry (TIMS). Recently, a set of evolving and expanding methods have been developed and rigorously validated for the extraction, identification, separation, and quantitation of sphingolipids by LC-MS/MS. Quantitation of these biomolecules is made possible via the use of an internal standard cocktail. The compounds that can be readily analyzed are free long-chain (sphingoid) bases, sphingoid base 1-phosphates, and more complex species such as ceramides, ceramide 1-phosphates, sphingomyelins, mono- and di-hexosylceramides sulfatides, and novel compounds such as the 1-deoxy- and 1-(deoxymethyl)-sphingoid bases and their N-acyl-derivatives. These methods can be altered slightly to separate and quantitate isomeric species such as glucosyl/galactosylceramide. Because these techniques require the extraction of sphingolipids from their native environment, any information regarding their localization in histological slices is lost. Therefore, this review also describes methods for TIMS. This technique has been shown to be a powerful tool to determine the localization of individual molecular species of sphingolipids directly from tissue slices. PMID:21749933

  14. High-Spatial and High-Mass Resolution Imaging of Surface Metabolites of Arabidopsis thaliana by Laser Desorption-Ionization Mass Spectrometry Using Colloidal Silver

    SciTech Connect

    Jun, Ji Hyun; Song, Zhihong; Liu, Zhenjiu; Nikolau, Basil J.; Yeung, Edward S.; and Lee, Young Jin

    2010-03-17

    High-spatial resolution and high-mass resolution techniques are developed and adopted for the mass spectrometric imaging of epicuticular lipids on the surface of Arabidopsis thaliana. Single cell level spatial resolution of {approx}12 {micro}m was achieved by reducing the laser beam size by using an optical fiber with 25 {micro}m core diameter in a vacuum matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-linear ion trap (vMALDI-LTQ) mass spectrometer and improved matrix application using an oscillating capillary nebulizer. Fine chemical images of a whole flower were visualized in this high spatial resolution showing substructure of an anther and single pollen grains at the stigma and anthers. The LTQ-Orbitrap with a MALDI ion source was adopted to achieve MS imaging in high mass resolution. Specifically, isobaric silver ion adducts of C29 alkane (m/z 515.3741) and C28 aldehyde (m/z 515.3377), indistinguishable in low-resolution LTQ, can now be clearly distinguished and their chemical images could be separately constructed. In the application to roots, the high spatial resolution allowed molecular MS imaging of secondary roots and the high mass resolution allowed direct identification of lipid metabolites on root surfaces.

  15. Mapping of Neuropeptides in the Crustacean Stomatogastric Nervous System by Imaging Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Hui; Hui, Limei; Kellersberger, Katherine; Li, Lingjun

    2013-01-01

    Considerable effort has been devoted to characterizing the crustacean stomatogastric nervous system (STNS) with great emphasis on comprehensive analysis and mapping distribution of its diverse neuropeptide complement. Previously, immunohistochemistry (IHC) has been applied to this endeavor, yet with identification accuracy and throughput compromised. Therefore, molecular imaging methods are pursued to unequivocally determine the identity and location of the neuropeptides at a high spatial resolution. In this work, we developed a novel, multi-faceted mass spectrometric strategy combining profiling and imaging techniques to characterize and map neuropeptides from the blue crab Callinectes sapidus STNS at the network level. In total, 55 neuropeptides from 10 families were identified from the major ganglia in the C. sapidus STNS for the first time, including the stomatogastric ganglion (STG), the paired commissural ganglia (CoG), the esophageal ganglion (OG), and the connecting nerve stomatogastric nerve ( stn) using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization tandem time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF/TOF) and the MS/MS capability of this technique. In addition, the locations of multiple neuropeptides were documented at a spatial resolution of 25 μm in the STG and upstream nerve using MALDI-TOF/TOF and high-mass-resolution and high-mass-accuracy MALDI-Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) instrument. Furthermore, distributions of neuropeptides in the whole C. sapidus STNS were examined by imaging mass spectrometry (IMS). Different isoforms from the same family were simultaneously and unambiguously mapped, facilitating the functional exploration of neuropeptides present in the crustacean STNS and exemplifying the revolutionary role of this novel platform in neuronal network studies.

  16. Predicting muscle mass from anthropometry using magnetic resonance imaging as reference: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Al-Gindan, Yasmin Y; Hankey, Catherine R; Leslie, Wilma; Govan, Lindsay; Lean, Michael E J

    2014-02-01

    Identification and management of sarcopenia are limited by lack of reliable simple approaches to assess muscle mass. The aim of this review is to identify and evaluate simple methods to quantify muscle mass/volume of adults. Using Cochrane Review methodology, Medline (1946-2012), Embase (1974-2012), Web of Science (1898-2012), PubMed, and the Cochrane Library (to 08/2012) were searched for publications that included prediction equations (from anthropometric measurements) to estimate muscle mass by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in adults. Of 257 papers identified from primary search terms, 12 studies met the inclusion criteria. Most studies (n = 10) assessed only regional/limb muscle mass/volume. Many studies (n = 9) assessed limb circumference adjusted for skinfold thickness, which limits their practical applications. Only two included validation in separate subject-samples, and two reported relationships between whole-body MRI-measured muscle mass and anthropometry beyond linear correlations. In conclusion, one simple prediction equation shows promise, but it has not been validated in a separate population with different investigators. Furthermore, it did not incorporate widely available trunk/limb girths, which have offered valuable prediction of body composition in other studies.

  17. A new and fast image feature selection method for developing an optimal mammographic mass detection scheme

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Maxine; Pu, Jiantao; Zheng, Bin

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Selecting optimal features from a large image feature pool remains a major challenge in developing computer-aided detection (CAD) schemes of medical images. The objective of this study is to investigate a new approach to significantly improve efficacy of image feature selection and classifier optimization in developing a CAD scheme of mammographic masses. Methods: An image dataset including 1600 regions of interest (ROIs) in which 800 are positive (depicting malignant masses) and 800 are negative (depicting CAD-generated false positive regions) was used in this study. After segmentation of each suspicious lesion by a multilayer topographic region growth algorithm, 271 features were computed in different feature categories including shape, texture, contrast, isodensity, spiculation, local topological features, as well as the features related to the presence and location of fat and calcifications. Besides computing features from the original images, the authors also computed new texture features from the dilated lesion segments. In order to select optimal features from this initial feature pool and build a highly performing classifier, the authors examined and compared four feature selection methods to optimize an artificial neural network (ANN) based classifier, namely: (1) Phased Searching with NEAT in a Time-Scaled Framework, (2) A sequential floating forward selection (SFFS) method, (3) A genetic algorithm (GA), and (4) A sequential forward selection (SFS) method. Performances of the four approaches were assessed using a tenfold cross validation method. Results: Among these four methods, SFFS has highest efficacy, which takes 3%–5% of computational time as compared to GA approach, and yields the highest performance level with the area under a receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) = 0.864 ± 0.034. The results also demonstrated that except using GA, including the new texture features computed from the dilated mass segments improved the AUC

  18. A new and fast image feature selection method for developing an optimal mammographic mass detection scheme.

    PubMed

    Tan, Maxine; Pu, Jiantao; Zheng, Bin

    2014-08-01

    Selecting optimal features from a large image feature pool remains a major challenge in developing computer-aided detection (CAD) schemes of medical images. The objective of this study is to investigate a new approach to significantly improve efficacy of image feature selection and classifier optimization in developing a CAD scheme of mammographic masses. An image dataset including 1600 regions of interest (ROIs) in which 800 are positive (depicting malignant masses) and 800 are negative (depicting CAD-generated false positive regions) was used in this study. After segmentation of each suspicious lesion by a multilayer topographic region growth algorithm, 271 features were computed in different feature categories including shape, texture, contrast, isodensity, spiculation, local topological features, as well as the features related to the presence and location of fat and calcifications. Besides computing features from the original images, the authors also computed new texture features from the dilated lesion segments. In order to select optimal features from this initial feature pool and build a highly performing classifier, the authors examined and compared four feature selection methods to optimize an artificial neural network (ANN) based classifier, namely: (1) Phased Searching with NEAT in a Time-Scaled Framework, (2) A sequential floating forward selection (SFFS) method, (3) A genetic algorithm (GA), and (4) A sequential forward selection (SFS) method. Performances of the four approaches were assessed using a tenfold cross validation method. Among these four methods, SFFS has highest efficacy, which takes 3%-5% of computational time as compared to GA approach, and yields the highest performance level with the area under a receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) = 0.864 ± 0.034. The results also demonstrated that except using GA, including the new texture features computed from the dilated mass segments improved the AUC results of the ANNs optimized

  19. Detection systems for mass spectrometry imaging: a perspective on novel developments with a focus on active pixel detectors.

    PubMed

    Jungmann, Julia H; Heeren, Ron M A

    2013-01-15

    Instrumental developments for imaging and individual particle detection for biomolecular mass spectrometry (imaging) and fundamental atomic and molecular physics studies are reviewed. Ion-counting detectors, array detection systems and high mass detectors for mass spectrometry (imaging) are treated. State-of-the-art detection systems for multi-dimensional ion, electron and photon detection are highlighted. Their application and performance in three different imaging modes--integrated, selected and spectral image detection--are described. Electro-optical and microchannel-plate-based systems are contrasted. The analytical capabilities of solid-state pixel detectors--both charge coupled device (CCD) and complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) chips--are introduced. The Medipix/Timepix detector family is described as an example of a CMOS hybrid active pixel sensor. Alternative imaging methods for particle detection and their potential for future applications are investigated. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. MALDI FTICR IMS of intact proteins: Using mass accuracy to link protein images with proteomics data

    PubMed Central

    Spraggins, Jeffrey M.; Rizzo, David G.; Moore, Jessica L.; Rose, Kristie L.; Hammer, Neal D.; Skaar, Eric P.; Caprioli, Richard M.

    2015-01-01

    MALDI imaging mass spectrometry is a highly sensitive and selective tool used to visualize biomolecules in tissue. However, identification of detected proteins remains a difficult task. Indirect identifications strategies have been limited by insufficient mass accuracy to confidently link ion images to proteomics data. Here we demonstrate the capabilities of MALDI FTICR MS for imaging intact proteins. MALDI FTICR IMS provides an unprecedented combination of mass resolving power (∼75,000 at m/z 5,000) and accuracy (<5 ppm) for proteins up to ∼12 kDa enabling identification based on correlation with LC-MS/MS proteomics data. Analysis of rat brain tissue was performed as a proof-of-concept highlighting the capabilities of this approach by imaging and identifying a number of proteins including N-terminally acetylated Thymosin β4 (m/z 4,963.502, 0.6 ppm) and ATP Synthase subunit ε (m/z 5,636.074, −2.3 ppm). MALDI FTICR IMS was also used to differentiate a series of oxidation products of S100A8 (m/z 10,164.03, −2.1 ppm), a subunit of the heterodimer calprotectin, in kidney tissue from mice infected with Staphylococcus aureus. S100A8 – M37O/C42O3 (m/z 10228.00, −2.6 ppm) was found to co-localize with bactierial microcolonies at the center of infectious foci. The ability of MALDI FTICR IMS to distinguish S100A8 modifications is critical to understanding calprotectin’s roll in nutritional immunity. PMID:25904064

  1. MALDI FTICR IMS of Intact Proteins: Using Mass Accuracy to Link Protein Images with Proteomics Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spraggins, Jeffrey M.; Rizzo, David G.; Moore, Jessica L.; Rose, Kristie L.; Hammer, Neal D.; Skaar, Eric P.; Caprioli, Richard M.

    2015-06-01

    MALDI imaging mass spectrometry is a highly sensitive and selective tool used to visualize biomolecules in tissue. However, identification of detected proteins remains a difficult task. Indirect identification strategies have been limited by insufficient mass accuracy to confidently link ion images to proteomics data. Here, we demonstrate the capabilities of MALDI FTICR MS for imaging intact proteins. MALDI FTICR IMS provides an unprecedented combination of mass resolving power (~75,000 at m/z 5000) and accuracy (<5ppm) for proteins up to ~12kDa, enabling identification based on correlation with LC-MS/MS proteomics data. Analysis of rat brain tissue was performed as a proof-of-concept highlighting the capabilities of this approach by imaging and identifying a number of proteins including N-terminally acetylated thymosin β4 ( m/z 4,963.502, 0.6ppm) and ATP synthase subunit ɛ ( m/z 5,636.074, -2.3ppm). MALDI FTICR IMS was also used to differentiate a series of oxidation products of S100A8 ( m/z 10,164.03, -2.1ppm), a subunit of the heterodimer calprotectin, in kidney tissue from mice infected with Staphylococcus aureus. S100A8 - M37O/C42O3 ( m/z 10228.00, -2.6ppm) was found to co-localize with bacterial microcolonies at the center of infectious foci. The ability of MALDI FTICR IMS to distinguish S100A8 modifications is critical to understanding calprotectin's roll in nutritional immunity.

  2. Validation of Fuzzy Logic Method for Automated Mass Spectral Classification for Mineral Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    B. Yan; B. Yan; T. R. McJunkiin; D. L. Stoner

    2006-12-01

    Imaging mass spectrometry requires the acquisition and interpretation of hundreds to thousands of individual spectra in order to map the mineral phases within heterogeneous geomatrices. A fuzzy logic inference engine (FLIE) was developed to automate data interpretation. To evaluate the strengths and limitations of FLIE, the chemical images obtained using FLIE were compared with those developed using two chemometric methods: principle component analysis (PCA) and cluster analysis (K-Means). Two heterogeneous geomatrices, a low-grade chalcopyrite ore and basalt, were imaged using a laser-desorption Fourier transform mass spectrometer. Similar mineral distribution patterns in the chalcopyrite ore sample were obtained by the three data analysis methods with most of the differences occurring at the interfaces between mineral phases. PCA missed one minor mineral phase in the chalcopyrite ore sample and did not clearly differentiate among the mineral classes of the basalt. K-Means cluster analysis differentiated among the various mineral phases in both samples, but improperly grouped some spectra in the chalcopyrite sample that only contained unanticipated high mass peaks. Unlike the chemometric methods, FLIE was able to classify spectra as unknowns for those spectra that fell below the confidence level threshold. A nearest neighbor approach, included in FLIE, was used to classify the unknowns to form a visually complete image; however, the unknowns identified by FLIE can be informative because they highlight potential problems or overlooked results. In conclusion, this study validated the fuzzy logic-based approach used in our laboratory and reveald some limitations in the three techniques that were evaluated.

  3. NICMOS Imaging Survey of Dusty Debris Around Nearby Stars Across the Stellar Mass Spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhee, Joseph

    2007-07-01

    Association of planetary systems with dusty debris disks is now quite secure, and advances in our understanding of planet formation and evolution can be achieved by the identification and characterization of an ensemble of debris disks orbiting a range of central stars with different masses and ages. Imaging debris disks in starlight scattered by dust grains remains technically challenging so that only about a dozen systems have thus far been imaged. A further advance in this field needs an increased number of imaged debris disks. However, the technical challege of such observations, even with the superb combination of HST and NICMOS, requires the best targets. Recent HST imaging investigations of debris disks were sample-limited not limited by the technology used. We performed a search for debris disks from a IRAS/Hipparcos cross correlation which involved an exhaustive background contamination check to weed out false excess stars. Out of ~140 identified debris disks, we selected 22 best targets in terms of dust optical depth and disk angular size. Our target sample represents the best currently available target set in terms of both disk brightness and resolvability. For example, our targets have higher dust optical depth, in general, than newly identified Spitzer disks. Also, our targets cover a wider range of central star ages and masses than previous debris disk surveys. This will help us to investigate planetary system formation and evolution across the stellar mass spectrum.The technical feasibility of this program in two-gyro mode guiding has been proven with on-orbit calibration and science observations during HST cycles 13, 14, and 15.

  4. MALDI imaging mass spectrometry of integral membrane proteins from ocular lens and retinal tissue.

    PubMed

    Grey, Angus C; Chaurand, Pierre; Caprioli, Richard M; Schey, Kevin L

    2009-07-01

    A tissue preparation protocol for MALDI (matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization) imaging mass spectrometry of integral membrane proteins was developed using ocular lens and retinal tissues as model samples. Frozen bovine and human lenses were cryosectioned equatorially or axially at -20 degrees C into 20 mum-thick tissue sections. Lens sections were mounted onto gold-coated MALDI targets by methanol soft-landing to maintain tissue integrity. Tissue sections underwent extensive water washing to deplete the samples of highly abundant water-soluble proteins. Automated matrix deposition was achieved using an acoustic reagent multispotter, with sinapinic acid as matrix and high percentage acetonitrile as solvent, with a center-to-center spot spacing of 200-300 mum. Molecular images of full-length Aquaporin-0 (AQP0) and its most abundant truncation products were obtained from mass spectral data acquired across whole bovine and human lens sections. In equatorial and axial sections of bovine lenses, full-length AQP0 was detected throughout the lens. A truncation product corresponding to AQP0 (1-260) was detected in the bovine lens core at low abundance. In axial lens sections, no antero-posterior variation was detected. In 11 year-old human lens sections, full-length AQP0 was most abundant in the lens periphery, but was detected throughout the lens. The major truncation product, consisting of AQP0 residues 1-246, was absent from the lens periphery and increased in abundance in the lens core. This tissue preparation protocol was then applied to image the distribution of the G-protein coupled receptor, opsin, in the rabbit retina. This protocol has expanded the variety of target analytes which can be detected by MALDI imaging mass spectrometry to include intact integral membrane proteins.

  5. Molecular typing of Meningiomas by Desorption Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry Imaging for Surgical Decision-Making

    PubMed Central

    Calligaris, David; Feldman, Daniel R.; Norton, Isaiah; Brastianos, Priscilla K.; Dunn, Ian F.; Santagata, Sandro; Agar, Nathalie Y. R.

    2014-01-01

    Meningiomas are the most frequent intracranial tumors. The majority is benign slow-growing tumors but they can be difficult to treat depending on their location and size. While meningiomas are well delineated on magnetic resonance imaging by their uptake of contrast, surgical limitations still present themselves from not knowing the extent of invasion of the dura matter by meningioma cells. The development of tools to characterize tumor tissue in real or near real time could prevent recurrence after tumor resection by allowing for more precise surgery, i.e. removal of tumor with preservation of healthy tissue. The development of ambient ionization mass spectrometry for molecular characterization of tissue and its implementation in the surgical decision-making workflow carry the potential to fulfill this need. Here, we present the characterization of meningioma and dura mater by desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry to validate the technique for the molecular assessment of surgical margins and diagnosis of meningioma from surgical tissue in real-time. Nine stereotactically resected surgical samples and three autopsy samples were analyzed by standard histopathology and mass spectrometry imaging. All samples indicated a strong correlation between results from both techniques. We then highlight the value of desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry for the molecular subtyping/subgrouping of meningiomas from a series of forty genetically characterized specimens. The minimal sample preparation required for desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry offers a distinct advantage for applications relying on real-time information such as surgical decision-making. The technology here was tested to distinguish meningioma from dura mater as an approach to precisely define surgical margins. In addition we classify meningiomas into fibroblastic and meningothelial subtypes and more notably recognize meningiomas with NF2 genetic aberrations. PMID

  6. CLASH: NEW MULTIPLE IMAGES CONSTRAINING THE INNER MASS PROFILE OF MACS J1206.2-0847

    SciTech Connect

    Zitrin, A.; Rosati, P.; Nonino, M.; Grillo, C.; Postman, M.; Coe, D.; Bradley, L.; Koekemoer, A.; Seitz, S.; Eichner, T.; Broadhurst, T.; Jouvel, S.; Host, O.; Balestra, I.; Mercurio, A.; Scodeggio, M.; Benitez, N.; Jimenez-Teja, Y.; and others

    2012-04-20

    We present a strong-lensing analysis of the galaxy cluster MACS J1206.2-0847 (z = 0.44) using UV, Optical, and IR, HST/ACS/WFC3 data taken as part of the CLASH multi-cycle treasury program, with VLT/VIMOS spectroscopy for some of the multiply lensed arcs. The CLASH observations, combined with our mass model, allow us to identify 47 new multiply lensed images of 12 distant sources. These images, along with the previously known arc, span the redshift range 1 {approx}< z {approx}< 5.5, and thus enable us to derive a detailed mass distribution and to accurately constrain, for the first time, the inner mass profile of this cluster. We find an inner profile slope of dlog {Sigma}/dlog {theta} {approx_equal} -0.55 {+-} 0.1 (in the range [1'', 53''], or 5 kpc {approx}< r {approx}< 300 kpc), as commonly found for relaxed and well-concentrated clusters. Using the many systems uncovered here we derive credible critical curves and Einstein radii for different source redshifts. For a source at z{sub s} {approx_equal} 2.5, the critical curve encloses a large area with an effective Einstein radius of {theta}{sub E} = 28'' {+-} 3'', and a projected mass of (1.34 {+-} 0.15) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 14} M{sub Sun }. From the current understanding of structure formation in concordance cosmology, these values are relatively high for clusters at z {approx} 0.5, so that detailed studies of the inner mass distribution of clusters such as MACS J1206.2-0847 can provide stringent tests of the {Lambda}CDM paradigm.

  7. Characterization of mammographic masses based on level set segmentation with new image features and patient information

    SciTech Connect

    Shi Jiazheng; Sahiner, Berkman; Chan Heangping; Ge Jun; Hadjiiski, Lubomir; Helvie, Mark A.; Nees, Alexis; Wu Yita; Wei Jun; Zhou Chuan; Zhang Yiheng; Cui Jing

    2008-01-15

    Computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) for characterization of mammographic masses as malignant or benign has the potential to assist radiologists in reducing the biopsy rate without increasing false negatives. The purpose of this study was to develop an automated method for mammographic mass segmentation and explore new image based features in combination with patient information in order to improve the performance of mass characterization. The authors' previous CAD system, which used the active contour segmentation, and morphological, textural, and spiculation features, has achieved promising results in mass characterization. The new CAD system is based on the level set method and includes two new types of image features related to the presence of microcalcifications with the mass and abruptness of the mass margin, and patient age. A linear discriminant analysis (LDA) classifier with stepwise feature selection was used to merge the extracted features into a classification score. The classification accuracy was evaluated using the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve. The authors' primary data set consisted of 427 biopsy-proven masses (200 malignant and 227 benign) in 909 regions of interest (ROIs) (451 malignant and 458 benign) from multiple mammographic views. Leave-one-case-out resampling was used for training and testing. The new CAD system based on the level set segmentation and the new mammographic feature space achieved a view-based A{sub z} value of 0.83{+-}0.01. The improvement compared to the previous CAD system was statistically significant (p=0.02). When patient age was included in the new CAD system, view-based and case-based A{sub z} values were 0.85{+-}0.01 and 0.87{+-}0.02, respectively. The study also demonstrated the consistency of the newly developed CAD system by evaluating the statistics of the weights of the LDA classifiers in leave-one-case-out classification. Finally, an independent test on the publicly available digital database

  8. High-Speed MALDI MS/MS Imaging Mass Spectrometry Using Continuous Raster Sampling

    PubMed Central

    Prentice, Boone M.; Chumbley, Chad W.; Caprioli, Richard M.

    2015-01-01

    A matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time of flight/time of flight tandem mass spectrometer (MALDI TOF/TOF) has been used for high-speed precursor/fragment ion transition image acquisition. High throughput analysis is facilitated by a Nd:YLF solid state laser capable of pulse repetition rates up to 5 kHz, a high digitizer acquisition rate (up to 50 pixels/second), and continuous laser raster sampling. MS/MS experiments are enabled through the use of a precision timed ion selector, second source acceleration, and a dedicated collision cell. Continuous raster sampling is shown here to facilitate rapid MS/MS ion image acquisition from thin tissue sections for the drug rifampicin and of a common kidney lipid, SM4s(d18:1/24:1). The ability to confirm the structural identity of an analyte as part of the MS/MS imaging experiment is an essential part of the analysis. Additionally, the increase in sensitivity and specificity afforded by an MS/MS approach is highly advantageous, especially when interrogating complex chemical environments such as those in biological tissues. Herein, we report continuous laser raster sampling TOF/TOF imaging methodologies which demonstrate 8-14 fold increases in throughput compared to existing MS/MS instrumentation, an important advantage when imaging large areas on tissues. PMID:26149115

  9. Agreement and association between different indicators of body image and body mass index in adolescents.

    PubMed

    Santos, Carla Fernandez Dos; Castro, Inês Rugani Ribeiro de; Cardoso, Letícia de Oliveira; Tavares, Letícia Ferreira

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the study was to examine the correlation among different indicators of body image; between each one of these and nutritional status; and the association of these indicators with the Body Mass Index (BMI) of adolescents. A random sample of 152 students from public and private schools in the city of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, was studied. On four occasions, two silhouette scales and two questions regarding the opinion of the student about his/her body and weight were applied and weight and height were measured. The BMI was examined both as a continuous and as a categorical variable. The agreement between the variables was analyzed using the quadratic weighted Kappa statistics. The association between body image variables and BMI was examined by the comparison among median, mean, standard deviation and 95% confidence interval of BMI for each category of the body image variables. In general, the correlation among the body image variables ranged from reasonable to good; between these and the variable nutritional status, correlation ranged from regular to reasonable. Best results were observed among boys and students from private schools. All body image variables showed good discriminatory power for BMI, when it was analyzed as a continuous variable, even when controlling for potential confounders. The question about body seems to be better than that about weight to compose the questionnaire of a surveillance system for risk and protective factors for adolescent health.

  10. Document authentication at molecular levels using desorption atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry imaging.

    PubMed

    Li, Ming; Jia, Bin; Ding, Liying; Hong, Feng; Ouyang, Yongzhong; Chen, Rui; Zhou, Shumin; Chen, Huanwen; Fang, Xiang

    2013-09-01

    Molecular images of documents were obtained by sequentially scanning the surface of the document using desorption atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry (DAPCI-MS), which was operated in either a gasless, solvent-free or methanol vapor-assisted mode. The decay process of the ink used for handwriting was monitored by following the signal intensities recorded by DAPCI-MS. Handwritings made using four types of inks on four kinds of paper surfaces were tested. By studying the dynamic decay of the inks, DAPCI-MS imaging differentiated a 10-min old from two 4 h old samples. Non-destructive forensic analysis of forged signatures either handwritten or computer-assisted was achieved according to the difference of the contour in DAPCI images, which was attributed to the strength personalized by different writers. Distinction of the order of writing/stamping on documents and detection of illegal printings were accomplished with a spatial resolution of about 140 µm. A Matlab® written program was developed to facilitate the visualization of the similarity between signature images obtained by DAPCI-MS. The experimental results show that DAPCI-MS imaging provides rich information at the molecular level and thus can be used for the reliable document analysis in forensic applications.

  11. The utilization of fluorescence to identify the components of lipofuscin by imaging mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Ablonczy, Zsolt; Smith, Noah; Anderson, David M; Grey, Angus C.; Spraggins, Jeffrey; Koutalos, Yiannis; Schey, Kevin L.; Crouch, Rosalie K.

    2014-01-01

    Lipofuscin, an aging marker in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) associated with the development of age-related macular degeneration, is primarily characterized by its fluorescence. The most abundant component of RPE lipofuscin is N-retinylidene-N-retinylethanolamine (A2E) but its exact composition is not known due to the complexity of the RPE extract. In this study, we utilized MALDI imaging to find potential molecules responsible for lipofuscin fluorescence in RPE tissue from Abca4−/−, Sv129, and C57Bl6/J mice ages 2 and 6 month. To assert relationships, the individual images in the MALDI imaging datasets were correlated with lipofuscin fluorescence recorded from the same tissues following proper registration. Spatial correlation information, which is usually is lost in bioanalytics, pinpointed a relatively small number of potential lipofuscin components. The comparison of four samples in each condition further limited the possibility of false positives and provided various new, age- and strain-specific targets. Validating the usefulness of the fluorescence-enhanced imaging strategy, many known adducts of A2E were identified in the short list of lipofuscin components. These results provided evidence that mass spectrometric imaging can be utilized as a tool to begin to identify the molecular substructure of clinically-relevant diagnostic information. PMID:24453194

  12. Interactive content-based image retrieval (CBIR) computer-aided diagnosis (CADx) system for ultrasound breast masses using relevance feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Hyun-chong; Hadjiiski, Lubomir; Sahiner, Berkman; Chan, Heang-Ping; Paramagul, Chintana; Helvie, Mark; Nees, Alexis V.

    2012-03-01

    We designed a Content-Based Image Retrieval (CBIR) Computer-Aided Diagnosis (CADx) system to assist radiologists in characterizing masses on ultrasound images. The CADx system retrieves masses that are similar to a query mass from a reference library based on computer-extracted features that describe texture, width-to-height ratio, and posterior shadowing of a mass. Retrieval is performed with k nearest neighbor (k-NN) method using Euclidean distance similarity measure and Rocchio relevance feedback algorithm (RRF). In this study, we evaluated the similarity between the query and the retrieved masses with relevance feedback using our interactive CBIR CADx system. The similarity assessment and feedback were provided by experienced radiologists' visual judgment. For training the RRF parameters, similarities of 1891 image pairs obtained from 62 masses were rated by 3 MQSA radiologists using a 9-point scale (9=most similar). A leave-one-out method was used in training. For each query mass, 5 most similar masses were retrieved from the reference library using radiologists' similarity ratings, which were then used by RRF to retrieve another 5 masses for the same query. The best RRF parameters were chosen based on three simulated observer experiments, each of which used one of the radiologists' ratings for retrieval and relevance feedback. For testing, 100 independent query masses on 100 images and 121 reference masses on 230 images were collected. Three radiologists rated the similarity between the query and the computer-retrieved masses. Average similarity ratings without and with RRF were 5.39 and 5.64 on the training set and 5.78 and 6.02 on the test set, respectively. The average Az values without and with RRF were 0.86+/-0.03 and 0.87+/-0.03 on the training set and 0.91+/-0.03 and 0.90+/-0.03 on the test set, respectively. This study demonstrated that RRF improved the similarity of the retrieved masses.

  13. Molecular Morphology of the Chick Heart Visualized by MALDI Imaging Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Grey, Angus C.; Gelasco, Andrew K.; Section, Jarren; Moreno-Rodriguez, Ricardo A.; Krug, Edward L.; Schey, Kevin L.

    2011-01-01

    Utilization of MALDI-MS (matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry) for tissue imaging is a relatively new proteomic technique that simultaneously maps the spatial distribution of multiple proteins directly within a single frozen tissue section. Here we report the development of a methodology to apply MALDI tissue imaging to chick heart tissue sections acquired from fixed and paraffin-embedded samples. This protocol produces molecular images that can be related to the high quality histological tissue sections. Perfused term chick hearts were fixed in acidic ethanol and embedded in paraffin wax. Tissue sections (15 μm) were collected onto conductive slides, deparaffinized with xylene and transitioned into water with graded ethanol washes and allowed to air dry. In separate experiments three different MALDI matrices were applied to chick heart tissue sections through repeated cycles from a glass nebulizer. Tissue sections were then analyzed by MALDI mass spectrometry using a raster step-size of 75–100 μm, and molecular images for specific m/z ratios reconstituted. MALDI tissue imaging revealed spatially-resolved protein signals within single heart sections that are specific to structures or regions of the heart, e.g., vessels, valves, endocardium, myocardium, or septa. Moreover, no prior knowledge of protein expression is required as is the case for immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization methodologies. The ability to simultaneously localize a large number of unique protein signals within a single tissue section, with good preservation of histological features, provides cardiovascular researchers a new tool to give insight into the molecular mechanisms underlying normal and pathological conditions. PMID:20186963

  14. In situ cell-by-cell imaging and analysis of small cell populations by mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Shrestha, Bindesh; Patt, Joseph M; Vertes, Akos

    2011-04-15

    Molecular imaging by mass spectrometry (MS) is emerging as a tool to determine the distribution of proteins, lipids, and metabolites in tissues. The existing imaging methods, however, mostly rely on predefined rectangular grids for sampling that ignore the natural cellular organization of the tissue. Here we demonstrate that laser ablation electrospray ionization (LAESI) MS can be utilized for in situ cell-by-cell imaging of plant tissues. The cell-by-cell molecular image of the metabolite cyanidin, the ion responsible for purple pigmentation in onion (Allium cepa) epidermal cells, correlated well with the color of cells in the tissue. Chemical imaging using single-cells as voxels reflects the spatial distribution of biochemical differences within a tissue without the distortion stemming from sampling multiple cells within the laser focal spot. Microsampling by laser ablation also has the benefit of enabling the analysis of very small cell populations for biochemical heterogeneity. For example, with a ∼30 μm ablation spot we were able to analyze 3-4 achlorophyllous cells within an oil gland on a sour orange (Citrus aurantium) leaf. To explore cell-to-cell variations within and between tissues, multivariate statistical analysis on LAESI-MS data from epidermal cells of an A. cepa bulb and a C. aurantium leaf and from human buccal epithelial cell populations was performed using the method of orthogonal projections to latent structures discriminant analysis (OPLS-DA). The OPLS-DA analysis of mass spectra, containing over 300 peaks each, provided guidance in identifying a small number of metabolites most responsible for the variance between the cell populations. These metabolites can be viewed as promising candidates for biomarkers that, however, require further verification. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  15. Molecular morphology of the chick heart visualized by MALDI imaging mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Grey, Angus C; Gelasco, Andrew K; Section, Jarren; Moreno-Rodriguez, Ricardo A; Krug, Edward L; Schey, Kevin L

    2010-05-01

    Utilization of MALDI-MS (matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry) for tissue imaging is a relatively new proteomic technique that simultaneously maps the spatial distribution of multiple proteins directly within a single frozen tissue section. Here, we report the development of a methodology to apply MALDI tissue imaging to chick heart tissue sections acquired from fixed and paraffin-embedded samples. This protocol produces molecular images that can be related to the high-quality histological tissue sections. Perfused term chick hearts were fixed in acidic ethanol and embedded in paraffin wax. Tissue sections (15 microm) were collected onto conductive slides, deparaffinized with xylene, and transitioned into water with graded ethanol washes and allowed to air dry. In separate experiments, three different MALDI matrices were applied to chick heart tissue sections through repeated cycles from a glass nebulizer. Tissue sections were then analyzed by MALDI mass spectrometry using a raster step-size of 75-100 microm, and molecular images for specific m/z ratios reconstituted. MALDI tissue imaging revealed spatially resolved protein signals within single heart sections that are specific to structures or regions of the heart, for example, vessels, valves, endocardium, myocardium, or septa. Moreover, no prior knowledge of protein expression is required as is the case for immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization methodologies. The ability to simultaneously localize a large number of unique protein signals within a single tissue section, with good preservation of histological features, provides cardiovascular researchers a new tool to give insight into the molecular mechanisms underlying normal and pathological conditions.

  16. Next-generation technologies for spatial proteomics: Integrating ultra-high speed MALDI-TOF and high mass resolution MALDI FTICR imaging mass spectrometry for protein analysis

    PubMed Central

    Spraggins, Jeffrey M.; Rizzo, David G.; Moore, Jessica L.; Noto, Michael J.; Skaar, Eric P.; Caprioli, Richard M.

    2016-01-01

    MALDI imaging mass spectrometry is a powerful analytical tool enabling the visualization of biomolecules in tissue. However, there are unique challenges associated with protein imaging experiments including the need for higher spatial resolution capabilities, improved image acquisition rates, and better molecular specificity. Here we demonstrate the capabilities of ultra-high speed MALDI-TOF and high mass resolution MALDI FTICR IMS platforms as they relate to these challenges. High spatial resolution MALDI-TOF protein images of rat brain tissue and cystic fibrosis lung tissue were acquired at image acquisition rates >25 pixels/s. Structures as small as 50 μm were spatially resolved and proteins associated with host immune response were observed in cystic fibrosis lung tissue. Ultra-high speed MALDI-TOF enables unique applications including megapixel molecular imaging as demonstrated for lipid analysis of cystic fibrosis lung tissue. Additionally, imaging experiments using MALDI FTICR IMS were shown to produce data with high mass accuracy (<5 ppm) and resolving power (∼75 000 at m/z 5000) for proteins up to ∼20 kDa. Analysis of clear cell renal cell carcinoma using MALDI FTICR IMS identified specific proteins localized to healthy tissue regions, within the tumor, and also in areas of increased vascularization around the tumor. PMID:27060368

  17. Next-generation technologies for spatial proteomics: Integrating ultra-high speed MALDI-TOF and high mass resolution MALDI FTICR imaging mass spectrometry for protein analysis.

    PubMed

    Spraggins, Jeffrey M; Rizzo, David G; Moore, Jessica L; Noto, Michael J; Skaar, Eric P; Caprioli, Richard M

    2016-06-01

    MALDI imaging mass spectrometry is a powerful analytical tool enabling the visualization of biomolecules in tissue. However, there are unique challenges associated with protein imaging experiments including the need for higher spatial resolution capabilities, improved image acquisition rates, and better molecular specificity. Here we demonstrate the capabilities of ultra-high speed MALDI-TOF and high mass resolution MALDI FTICR IMS platforms as they relate to these challenges. High spatial resolution MALDI-TOF protein images of rat brain tissue and cystic fibrosis lung tissue were acquired at image acquisition rates >25 pixels/s. Structures as small as 50 μm were spatially resolved and proteins associated with host immune response were observed in cystic fibrosis lung tissue. Ultra-high speed MALDI-TOF enables unique applications including megapixel molecular imaging as demonstrated for lipid analysis of cystic fibrosis lung tissue. Additionally, imaging experiments using MALDI FTICR IMS were shown to produce data with high mass accuracy (<5 ppm) and resolving power (∼75 000 at m/z 5000) for proteins up to ∼20 kDa. Analysis of clear cell renal cell carcinoma using MALDI FTICR IMS identified specific proteins localized to healthy tissue regions, within the tumor, and also in areas of increased vascularization around the tumor. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Imaging of Endogenous Metabolites of Plant Leaves by Mass Spectrometry Based on Laser Activated Electron Tunneling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Lulu; Tang, Xuemei; Zhang, Wenyang; Jiang, Ruowei; Chen, Disong; Zhang, Juan; Zhong, Hongying

    2016-04-01

    A new mass spectrometric imaging approach based on laser activated electron tunneling (LAET) was described and applied to analysis of endogenous metabolites of plant leaves. LAET is an electron-directed soft ionization technique. Compressed thin films of semiconductor nanoparticles of bismuth cobalt zinc oxide were placed on the sample plate for proof-of-principle demonstration because they can not only absorb ultraviolet laser but also have high electron mobility. Upon laser irradiation, electrons are excited from valence bands to conduction bands. With appropriate kinetic energies, photoexcited electrons can tunnel away from the barrier and eventually be captured by charge deficient atoms present in neutral molecules. Resultant unpaired electron subsequently initiates specific chemical bond cleavage and generates ions that can be detected in negative ion mode of the mass spectrometer. LAET avoids the co-crystallization process of routinely used organic matrix materials with analyzes in MALDI (matrix assisted-laser desorption ionization) analysis. Thus uneven distribution of crystals with different sizes and shapes as well as background peaks in the low mass range resulting from matrix molecules is eliminated. Advantages of LAET imaging technique include not only improved spatial resolution but also photoelectron capture dissociation which produces predictable fragment ions.

  19. Mass spectrometry imaging of small molecules in biological tissues using graphene oxide as a matrix.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Dan; Guo, Shuai; Zhang, Mo; Liu, Yujie; Chen, Tianjing; Li, Zhili

    2017-04-15

    With the development of matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-mass spectrometry imaging (MALDI-MSI), molecular interrogation of tissue sections over a wide mass range has become feasible, but small molecule analysis is still far from being fully reached due to the limited sensitivity and matrix interference. Herein, graphene oxide (GO) is used as a MALDI matrix to image small molecules in tissues in negative ion mode. Finally, 212 of molecules including 190 of lipids and 22 of low molecular weight metabolites were detected and spatially visualized in mouse brain tissue sections without the interference of matrix ions/clusters, and the structures of 69 of the lipids were confirmed by using in situ tandem mass spectrometry. A further application of GO matrix could reveal distinct spatio-molecular signatures in viable and necrotic tumor regions derived from a mouse breast cancer tissue. In addition, GO as a MALDI matrix has exhibited a better performance in MSI of lipids relative to N-(1-naphthyl) ethylenediamine dihydrochloride and 9-aminoacridine. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Imaging of Endogenous Metabolites of Plant Leaves by Mass Spectrometry Based on Laser Activated Electron Tunneling.

    PubMed

    Huang, Lulu; Tang, Xuemei; Zhang, Wenyang; Jiang, Ruowei; Chen, Disong; Zhang, Juan; Zhong, Hongying

    2016-04-07

    A new mass spectrometric imaging approach based on laser activated electron tunneling (LAET) was described and applied to analysis of endogenous metabolites of plant leaves. LAET is an electron-directed soft ionization technique. Compressed thin films of semiconductor nanoparticles of bismuth cobalt zinc oxide were placed on the sample plate for proof-of-principle demonstration because they can not only absorb ultraviolet laser but also have high electron mobility. Upon laser irradiation, electrons are excited from valence bands to conduction bands. With appropriate kinetic energies, photoexcited electrons can tunnel away from the barrier and eventually be captured by charge deficient atoms present in neutral molecules. Resultant unpaired electron subsequently initiates specific chemical bond cleavage and generates ions that can be detected in negative ion mode of the mass spectrometer. LAET avoids the co-crystallization process of routinely used organic matrix materials with analyzes in MALDI (matrix assisted-laser desorption ionization) analysis. Thus uneven distribution of crystals with different sizes and shapes as well as background peaks in the low mass range resulting from matrix molecules is eliminated. Advantages of LAET imaging technique include not only improved spatial resolution but also photoelectron capture dissociation which produces predictable fragment ions.

  1. Imaging of Endogenous Metabolites of Plant Leaves by Mass Spectrometry Based on Laser Activated Electron Tunneling

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Lulu; Tang, Xuemei; Zhang, Wenyang; Jiang, Ruowei; Chen, Disong; Zhang, Juan; Zhong, Hongying

    2016-01-01

    A new mass spectrometric imaging approach based on laser activated electron tunneling (LAET) was described and applied to analysis of endogenous metabolites of plant leaves. LAET is an electron-directed soft ionization technique. Compressed thin films of semiconductor nanoparticles of bismuth cobalt zinc oxide were placed on the sample plate for proof-of-principle demonstration because they can not only absorb ultraviolet laser but also have high electron mobility. Upon laser irradiation, electrons are excited from valence bands to conduction bands. With appropriate kinetic energies, photoexcited electrons can tunnel away from the barrier and eventually be captured by charge deficient atoms present in neutral molecules. Resultant unpaired electron subsequently initiates specific chemical bond cleavage and generates ions that can be detected in negative ion mode of the mass spectrometer. LAET avoids the co-crystallization process of routinely used organic matrix materials with analyzes in MALDI (matrix assisted-laser desorption ionization) analysis. Thus uneven distribution of crystals with different sizes and shapes as well as background peaks in the low mass range resulting from matrix molecules is eliminated. Advantages of LAET imaging technique include not only improved spatial resolution but also photoelectron capture dissociation which produces predictable fragment ions. PMID:27053227

  2. Case 246: MR Imaging of a Complex Cystic Mass in a Newborn Girl.

    PubMed

    Shruti, Aditi; Wu, George S

    2017-10-01

    History A 6-day-old female neonate presented to the outpatient pediatric surgery clinic for evaluation of a possible prenatal abdominal mass. The neonate was delivered at term via cesarean section due to macrosomia, with a reported birth weight of 11 lb 8.7 oz (5.23 kg). The patient's postnatal course was remarkable for resolving neonatal hyperbilirubinemia. A physical examination was remarkable for a palpable mass in the abdomen. Maternal risk factors included class II obesity, type 2 diabetes, and metabolic syndrome. Prenatal images obtained at an outside institution were not available at this time. Ultrasonography (US) of the abdomen and pelvis was performed 6 days after birth. Follow-up US at 29 days of life revealed no substantial change in the appearance of the findings. This patient remained asymptomatic, and gadolinium-enhanced (Magnevist; Bayer Pharma, Berlin, Germany) magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of the abdomen and pelvis was performed at 84 days of life. The mass was excised surgically at 89 days of life, and the patient had an uncomplicated postoperative course.

  3. Development of imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) dataset extractor software, IMS convolution.

    PubMed

    Hayasaka, Takahiro; Goto-Inoue, Naoko; Ushijima, Masaru; Yao, Ikuko; Yuba-Kubo, Akiko; Wakui, Masatoshi; Kajihara, Shigeki; Matsuura, Masaaki; Setou, Mitsutoshi

    2011-07-01

    Imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) is a powerful tool for detecting and visualizing biomolecules in tissue sections. The technology has been applied to several fields, and many researchers have started to apply it to pathological samples. However, it is very difficult for inexperienced users to extract meaningful signals from enormous IMS datasets, and the procedure is time-consuming. We have developed software, called IMS Convolution with regions of interest (ROI), to automatically extract meaningful signals from IMS datasets. The processing is based on the detection of common peaks within the ordered area in the IMS dataset. In this study, the IMS dataset from a mouse eyeball section was acquired by a mass microscope that we recently developed, and the peaks extracted by manual and automatic procedures were compared. The manual procedure extracted 16 peaks with higher intensity in mass spectra averaged in whole measurement points. On the other hand, the automatic procedure using IMS Convolution easily and equally extracted peaks without any effort. Moreover, the use of ROIs with IMS Convolution enabled us to extract the peak on each ROI area, and all of the 16 ion images on mouse eyeball tissue were from phosphatidylcholine species. Therefore, we believe that IMS Convolution with ROIs could automatically extract the meaningful peaks from large-volume IMS datasets for inexperienced users as well as for researchers who have performed the analysis.

  4. MALDI-Imaging Mass Spectrometry of Ochratoxin A and Fumonisins in Mold-Infected Food.

    PubMed

    Hickert, Sebastian; Cramer, Benedikt; Letzel, Matthias C; Humpf, Hans-Ulrich

    2016-09-06

    Mycotoxins are toxic secondary metabolites produced by various fungi. Their distribution within contaminated material is of high interest to obtain insight into infection mechanisms and the possibility of reducing contamination during food processing. Various vegetable foodstuffs were infected with fungi of the genera Fusarium and Aspergillus. The localization of the produced mycotoxins was studied by matrix assisted laser desorption ionization time of flight imaging mass spectrometry (MALDI-MSI) of cryosections obtained from infected material. The results were confirmed by HPLC-electrospray ionization triple quadrupole mass spectrometry (HPLC/MS/MS). The mycotoxins ochratoxin A (OTA) and fumonisins of the B- and C-series (FB1 , FB2 , FB3 , FB4 , FC2/3 , and FC4 ) as well as partially hydrolyzed fumonisins (pHFB1 , pHFB2 , pHFB3 , pHFC1 , and pHFC2/3 ) could successfully be detected by MALDI-IMS in mold-infested foodstuffs. The toxins are distributed differently in the material: OTA is co-localized with visible fungal spoilage while fumonisins could be detected throughout the whole sample. This work shows the applicability of MALDI-Imaging Mass Spectrometry (MALDI-MSI) to mycotoxin analysis. It has been demonstrated that the analyzed mycotoxins are differently distributed within moldy foodstuffs. These findings show the potential of MALDI-MSI for the localization of these hazardous compounds in various plant tissues. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  5. DESI then MALDI mass spectrometry imaging of lipid and protein distributions in single tissue sections

    PubMed Central

    Eberlin, Livia S; Liu, Xioahui; Ferreira, Christina R.; Santagata, Sandro; Agar, Nathalie Y.R.; Cooks, R. Graham

    2011-01-01

    Imaging mass spectrometry (MS) is a powerful technique for mapping the spatial distributions of a wide range of chemical compounds simultaneously from a tissue section. Co-localization of the distribution of individual molecular species including particular lipids and proteins, and correlation with the morphological features of a single tissue section is highly desirable for comprehensive tissue analysis and disease diagnosis. We now report on the use, in turn, of desorption electrospray ionization (DESI), matrix assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) and then optical microscopy to image lipid and protein distributions in a single tissue section. This is possible through the use of histologically compatible DESI solvent systems, which allow for sequential analyses of the same section by DESI then MALDI. Hematoxylin and Eosin (H&E) staining was performed on the same section after removal of the MALDI matrix. This workflow allowed chemical information to be unambiguously matched to histological features in mouse brain tissue sections. The lipid sulfatide(24:1), detected at m/z 888.8 by DESI imaging, was co-localized with the protein MBP isoform 8, detected at m/z 14117 by MALDI imaging, in regions corresponding to the corpus callosum substructure of the mouse brain, as confirmed in the H&E images. Correlation of lipid and protein distributions with histopathological features was also achieved for human brain cancer samples. Higher tumor cell density was observed in regions demonstrating higher relative abundances of oleic acid, detected by DESI imaging at m/z 281.4, and the protein calcyclin, detected by MALDI at m/z 10085, for a human glioma sample. Since correlation between molecular signatures and disease state can be achieved, we expect that this methodology will significantly enhance the value of MS imaging in molecular pathology for diagnosis. PMID:21975048

  6. Connecting Imaging Mass Spectrometry and Magnetic Resonance Imaging-based Anatomical Atlases for Automated Anatomical Interpretation and Differential Analysis.

    PubMed

    Verbeeck, Nico; Spraggins, Jeffrey M; Murphy, Monika J M; Wang, Hui-Dong; Deutch, Ariel Y; Caprioli, Richard M; de Plas, Raf Van

    2017-02-27

    Imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) is a molecular imaging technology that can measure thousands of biomolecules concurrently without prior tagging, making it particularly suitable for exploratory research. However, the data size often makes thorough extraction of relevant information impractical. To help guide and accelerate IMS data analysis, we recently developed a framework that integrates IMS measurements with anatomical atlases, opening up opportunities for anatomy-driven exploration of IMS data. One example is the automated anatomical interpretation of ion images, where empirically measured ion distributions are automatically decomposed into their underlying anatomical structures. While offering significant potential, IMS-atlas integration has thus far been restricted to the Allen Mouse Brain Atlas (AMBA) and mouse brain samples. Here, we expand the applicability of this framework by extending towards new animal species and a new set of anatomical atlases retrieved from the Scalable Brain Atlas (SBA). Furthermore, as many SBA atlases are based on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data, a new registration pipeline was developed that enables direct non-rigid IMS-to-MRI registration. These developments are demonstrated on protein-focused FTICR IMS measurements from coronal brain sections of a Parkinson's disease (PD) rat model, which are integrated with an MRI-based rat brain atlas from the SBA. The new rat-focused IMS-atlas integration is used to perform automated anatomical interpretation and to find differential ions between healthy and diseased tissue. IMS-atlas integration can serve as an important accelerator in IMS data exploration, and with these new developments it can now be applied to a wider variety of animal species and modalities.

  7. High-contrast Imaging of Intermediate-mass Giants with Long-term Radial Velocity Trends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryu, Tsuguru; Sato, Bun'ei; Kuzuhara, Masayuki; Narita, Norio; Takahashi, Yasuhiro H.; Uyama, Taichi; Kudo, Tomoyuki; Kusakabe, Nobuhiko; Hashimoto, Jun; Omiya, Masashi; Harakawa, Hiroki; Abe, Lyu; Ando, Hiroyasu; Brandner, Wolfgang; Brandt, Timothy D.; Carson, Joseph C.; Currie, Thayne; Egner, Sebastian; Feldt, Markus; Goto, Miwa; Grady, Carol A.; Guyon, Olivier; Hayano, Yutaka; Hayashi, Masahiko; Hayashi, Saeko S.; Hełminiak, Krzysztof G.; Henning, Thomas; Hodapp, Klaus W.; Ida, Shigeru; Ishii, Miki; Itoh, Yoichi; Iye, Masanori; Izumiura, Hideyuki; Janson, Markus; Kambe, Eiji; Kandori, Ryo; Knapp, Gillian R.; Kokubo, Eiichiro; Kwon, Jungmi; Matsuo, Taro; Mayama, Satoshi; McElwain, Michael W.; Mede, Kyle; Miyama, Shoken; Morino, Jun-Ichi; Moro-Martin, Amaya; Nishimura, Tetsuo; Pyo, Tae-Soo; Serabyn, Eugene; Suenaga, Takuya; Suto, Hiroshi; Suzuki, Ryuji; Takami, Michihiro; Takato, Naruhisa; Takeda, Yoichi; Terada, Hiroshi; Thalmann, Christian; Turner, Edwin L.; Watanabe, Makoto; Wisniewski, John; Yamada, Toru; Yoshida, Michitoshi; Takami, Hideki; Usuda, Tomonori; Tamura, Motohide

    2016-07-01

    A radial velocity (RV) survey for intermediate-mass giants has been in operation for over a decade at Okayama Astrophysical Observatory (OAO). The OAO survey has revealed that some giants show long-term linear RV accelerations (RV trends), indicating the presence of outer companions. Direct-imaging observations can help clarify what objects generate these RV trends. We present the results of high-contrast imaging observations of six intermediate-mass giants with long-term RV trends using the Subaru Telescope and HiCIAO camera. We detected co-moving companions to γ Hya B ({0.61}-0.14+0.12{M}⊙ ), HD 5608 B (0.10+/- 0.01{M}⊙ ), and HD 109272 B (0.28+/- 0.06{M}⊙ ). For the remaining targets (ι Dra, 18 Del, and HD 14067), we exclude companions more massive than 30-60 M Jup at projected separations of 1″-7″. We examine whether these directly imaged companions or unidentified long-period companions can account for the RV trends observed around the six giants. We find that the Kozai mechanism can explain the high eccentricity of the inner planets ι Dra b, HD 5608 b, and HD 14067 b.

  8. On-tissue chemical derivatization of 3-methoxysalicylamine for MALDI-imaging mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Chacon, Almary; Zagol-Ikapitte, Irene; Amarnath, Venkataraman; Reyzer, Michelle L.; Oates, John A.; Caprioli, Richard M.; Boutaud, Olivier

    2011-01-01

    MALDI-imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) has been shown to be a powerful tool to study drug distributions in organ tissue as well as whole animal bodies. Nevertheless, not all drugs are amenable to MALDI while others may be limited by poor sensitivity poor sensitivity. The use of chemical derivatization to improve detection of small molecules by mass spectrometry techniques is well documented. To our knowledge, however, this approach has not been applied to direct tissue analysis of small organic molecules. In this manuscript, we demonstrate the use of on-tissue chemical derivatization of a small organic molecule, 3-methoxysalicylamine (3-MoSA) a scavenger of γ -ketoaldehydes. Derivatization of 3-MoSA with 1,1′-thiocarbonyldiimidazole (TCDI) results in an oxothiazolidine derivative which is detected with much greater sensitivity by MALDI than 3-MoSA itself. TCDI treatment of tissue from mice dosed with 3-MoSA allowed images to be obtained showing its spatial distribution as well as its pharmacokinetic profile in different organs. These images correlated well with results obtained from HPLC-MS/MS analyses of the same tissues. These results provide proof-of-concept that on-tissue chemical derivatization can be used to improve detection of a small organic molecule by MALDI-IMS. PMID:21834023

  9. Anti-theft device staining on banknotes detected by mass spectrometry imaging.

    PubMed

    Correa, Deleon Nascimento; Zacca, Jorge Jardim; Rocha, Werickson Fortunato de Carvalho; Borges, Rodrigo; de Souza, Wanderley; Augusti, Rodinei; Eberlin, Marcos Nogueira; Vendramini, Pedro Henrique

    2016-03-01

    We describe the identification and limits of detection of ink staining by mass spectrometry imaging (MSI), as used in anti-theft devices (ATDs). Such ink staining is applied to banknotes during automated teller machine (ATM) explosions. Desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) coupled with high-resolution and high-accuracy orbitrap mass spectrometry (MS) and a moving stage device were applied to obtain 2D molecular images of the major dyes used for staining, that is, 1-methylaminoanthraquinone (MAAQ), rhodamine B (RB) and rhodamine 6G (R6G). MAAQ could not be detected because of its inefficient desorption by DESI from the banknote cellulose surface. By contrast, ATD staining on banknotes is perceptible by the human naked eye only at concentrations higher than 0.2 μg cm(-2), whereas both RB and R6G at concentrations 200 times lower (as low as 0.001 μg cm(-2)) could be easily detected and imaged by DESI-MSI, with selective and specific identification of each analyte and their spatial distribution on samples from suspects. This technique is non-destructive, and no sample preparation is required, which ensures sample preservation for further forensic investigations.

  10. BASTet: Shareable and reproducible analysis and visualization of mass spectrometry imaging data via OpenMSI.

    PubMed

    Rubel, Oliver; Bowen, Benjamin P

    2017-08-29

    Mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) is a transformative imaging method that supports the untargeted, quantitative measurement of the chemical composition and spatial heterogeneity of complex samples with broad applications in life sciences, bioenergy, and health. While MSI data can be routinely collected, its broad application is currently limited by the lack of easily accessible analysis methods that can process data of the size, volume, diversity, and complexity generated by MSI experiments. The development and application of cutting-edge analytical methods is a core driver in MSI research for new scientific discoveries, medical diagnostics, and commercial-innovation. However, the lack of means to share, apply, and reproduce analyses hinders the broad application, validation, and use of novel MSI analysis methods. To address this central challenge, we introduce the Berkeley Analysis and Storage Toolkit (BASTet), a novel framework for shareable and reproducible data analysis that supports standardized data and analysis interfaces, integrated data storage, data provenance, workflow management, and a broad set of integrated tools. Based on BASTet, we describe the extension of the OpenMSI mass spectrometry imaging science gateway to enable web-based sharing, reuse, analysis, and visualization of data analyses and derived data products. We demonstrate the application of BASTet and OpenMSI in practice to identify and compare characteristic substructures in the mouse brain based on their chemical composition measured via MSI.

  11. Imaging and Rapid-Scanning Ion Mass Spectrometer (IRM) for the CASSIOPE e-POP Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yau, Andrew W.; Howarth, Andrew; White, Andrew; Enno, Greg; Amerl, Peter

    2015-06-01

    The imaging and rapid-scanning ion mass spectrometer (IRM) is part of the Enhanced Polar Outflow Probe (e-POP) instrument suite on the Canadian CASSIOPE small satellite. Designed to measure the composition and detailed velocity distributions of ions in the ˜1-100 eV/q range on a non-spinning spacecraft, the IRM sensor consists of a planar entrance aperture, a pair of electrostatic deflectors, a time-of-flight (TOF) gate, a hemispherical electrostatic analyzer, and a micro-channel plate (MCP) detector. The TOF gate measures the transit time of each detected ion inside the sensor. The hemispherical analyzer disperses incident ions by their energy-per-charge and azimuth in the aperture plane onto the detector. The two electrostatic deflectors may be optionally programmed to step through a sequence of deflector voltages, to deflect ions of different incident elevation out of the aperture plane and energy-per-charge into the sensor aperture for sampling. The position and time of arrival of each detected ion at the detector are measured, to produce an image of 2-dimensional (2D), mass-resolved ion velocity distribution up to 100 times per second, or to construct a composite 3D velocity distribution by combining successive images in a deflector voltage sequence. The measured distributions are then used to investigate ion composition, density, drift velocity and temperature in polar ion outflows and related acceleration and transport processes in the topside ionosphere.

  12. Examination of Endogenous Peptides in Medicago truncatula Using Mass Spectrometry Imaging.

    PubMed

    Gemperline, Erin; Keller, Caitlin; Jayaraman, Dhileepkumar; Maeda, Junko; Sussman, Michael R; Ané, Jean-Michel; Li, Lingjun

    2016-12-02

    Plant science is an important, rapidly developing area of study. Within plant science, one area of study that has grown tremendously with recent technological advances, such as mass spectrometry, is the field of plant-omics; however, plant peptidomics is relatively underdeveloped in comparison with proteomics and metabolomics. Endogenous plant peptides can act as signaling molecules and have been shown to affect cell division, development, nodulation, reproduction, symbiotic associations, and defense reactions. There is a growing need to uncover the role of endogenous peptides on a molecular level. Mass spectrometric imaging (MSI) is a valuable tool for biological analyses as it allows for the detection of thousands of analytes in a single experiment and also displays spatial information for the detected analytes. Despite the prediction of a large number of plant peptides, their detection and imaging with spatial localization and chemical specificity is currently lacking. Here we analyzed the endogenous peptides and proteins in Medicago truncatula using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI)-MSI. Hundreds of endogenous peptides and protein fragments were imaged, with interesting peptide spatial distribution changes observed between plants in different developmental stages.

  13. Polarization of Directly Imaged Young Giant Planets as a Probe of Mass, Rotation, and Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marley, Mark Scott; Sengupta, Sujan

    2012-01-01

    Young, hot gas giant planets at large separations from their primaries have been directly imaged around several nearby stars. More such planets will likely be detected by ongoing and new imaging surveys with instruments such as the Gemini Planet Imager (GPI). Efforts continue to model the spectra of these planets in order to constrain their masses, effective temperatures, composition, and cloud structure. One potential tool for analyzing these objects, which has received relatively less attention, is polarization. Linear polarization of gas giant exoplanets can arise from the combined influences of light scattering by atmospheric dust and a rotationally distorted shape. The oblateness of gas giant planet increases of course with rotation rate and for fixed rotation also rises with decreasing gravity. Thus young, lower mass gas giant planets with youthful inflated radii could easily have oblateness greater than that of Saturn s 10%. We find that polarizations of over 1% may easily be produced in the near-infrared in such cases. This magnitude of polarization may be measurable by GPI and other instruments. Thus if detected, polarization of a young Jupiter places constraints on the combination of its gravity, rotation rate, and degree of cloudiness. We will present results of our multiple scattering analysis coupled with a self-consistent dusty atmospheric models to demonstrate the range of polarizations that might be expected from resolved exoplanets and the range of parameter space that such observations may inform.

  14. A Simple Method for Improving the Spatial Resolution in Infrared Laser Ablation Mass Spectrometry Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hieta, Juha-Pekka; Vaikkinen, Anu; Auno, Samuli; Räikkönen, Heikki; Haapala, Markus; Scotti, Gianmario; Kopra, Jaakko; Piepponen, Petteri; Kauppila, Tiina J.

    2017-06-01

    In mass spectrometry imaging of tissues, the size of structures that can be distinguished is determined by the spatial resolution of the imaging technique. Here, the spatial resolution of IR laser ablation is markedly improved by increasing the distance between the laser and the focusing lens. As the distance between the laser and the lens is increased from 1 to 18 m, the ablation spot size decreases from 440 to 44 μm. This way, only the collimated center of the divergent laser beam is directed on the focusing lens, which results in better focusing of the beam. Part of the laser energy is lost at longer distance, but this is compensated by focusing of the radiation to a smaller area on the sample surface. The long distance can also be achieved by a set of mirrors, between which the radiation travels before it is directed to the focusing lens and the sample. This method for improving the spatial resolution can be utilized in mass spectrometry imaging of tissues by techniques that utilize IR laser ablation, such as laser ablation electrospray ionization, laser ablation atmospheric pressure photoionization, and matrix-assisted laser desorption electrospray ionization. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  15. A Simple Method for Improving the Spatial Resolution in Infrared Laser Ablation Mass Spectrometry Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hieta, Juha-Pekka; Vaikkinen, Anu; Auno, Samuli; Räikkönen, Heikki; Haapala, Markus; Scotti, Gianmario; Kopra, Jaakko; Piepponen, Petteri; Kauppila, Tiina J.

    2017-01-01

    In mass spectrometry imaging of tissues, the size of structures that can be distinguished is determined by the spatial resolution of the imaging technique. Here, the spatial resolution of IR laser ablation is markedly improved by increasing the distance between the laser and the focusing lens. As the distance between the laser and the lens is increased from 1 to 18 m, the ablation spot size decreases from 440 to 44 μm. This way, only the collimated center of the divergent laser beam is directed on the focusing lens, which results in better focusing of the beam. Part of the laser energy is lost at longer distance, but this is compensated by focusing of the radiation to a smaller area on the sample surface. The long distance can also be achieved by a set of mirrors, between which the radiation travels before it is directed to the focusing lens and the sample. This method for improving the spatial resolution can be utilized in mass spectrometry imaging of tissues by techniques that utilize IR laser ablation, such as laser ablation electrospray ionization, laser ablation atmospheric pressure photoionization, and matrix-assisted laser desorption electrospray ionization.

  16. Three-dimensional segmentation of the tumor mass in computed tomographic images of neuroblastoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deglint, Hanford J.; Rangayyan, Rangaraj M.; Boag, Graham S.

    2004-05-01

    Tumor definition and diagnosis require the analysis of the spatial distribution and Hounsfield unit (HU) values of voxels in computed tomography (CT) images, coupled with a knowledge of normal anatomy. Segmentation of the tumor in neuroblastoma is complicated by the fact that the mass is almost always heterogeneous in nature; furthermore, viable tumor, necrosis, fibrosis, and normal tissue are often intermixed. Rather than attempt to separate these tissue types into distinct regions, we propose to explore methods to delineate the normal structures expected in abdominal CT images, remove them from further consideration, and examine the remaining parts of the images for the tumor mass. We explore the use of fuzzy connectivity for this purpose. Expert knowledge provided by the radiologist in the form of the expected structures and their shapes, HU values, and radiological characteristics are also incorporated in the segmentation algorithm. Segmentation and analysis of the tissue composition of the tumor can assist in quantitative assessment of the response to chemotherapy and in the planning of delayed surgery for resection of the tumor. The performance of the algorithm is evaluated using cases acquired from the Alberta Children's Hospital.

  17. Ultrasound Image Discrimination between Benign and Malignant Adnexal Masses Based on a Neural Network Approach.

    PubMed

    Aramendía-Vidaurreta, Verónica; Cabeza, Rafael; Villanueva, Arantxa; Navallas, Javier; Alcázar, Juan Luis

    2016-03-01

    The discrimination between benign and malignant adnexal masses in ultrasound images represents one of the most challenging problems in gynecologic practice. In the study described here, a new method for automatic discrimination of adnexal masses based on a neural networks approach was tested. The proposed method first calculates seven different types of characteristics (local binary pattern, fractal dimension, entropy, invariant moments, gray level co-occurrence matrix, law texture energy and Gabor wavelet) from ultrasound images of the ovary, from which several features are extracted and collected together with the clinical patient age. The proposed technique was validated using 106 benign and 39 malignant images obtained from 145 patients, corresponding to its probability of appearance in general population. On evaluation of the classifier, an accuracy of 98.78%, sensitivity of 98.50%, specificity of 98.90% and area under the curve of 0.997 were calculated. Copyright © 2016 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Identifying important ions and positions in mass spectrometry imaging data using CUR matrix decompositions.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jiyan; Rübel, Oliver; Prabhat; Mahoney, Michael W; Bowen, Benjamin P

    2015-01-01

    Mass spectrometry imaging enables label-free, high-resolution spatial mapping of the chemical composition of complex, biological samples. Typical experiments require selecting ions and/or positions from the images: ions for fragmentation studies to identify keystone compounds and positions for follow up validation measurements using microdissection or other orthogonal techniques. Unfortunately, with modern imaging machines, these must be selected from an overwhelming amount of raw data. Existing techniques to reduce the volume of data, the most popular of which are principle component analysis and non-negative matrix factorization, have the disadvantage that they return difficult-to-interpret linear combinations of actual data elements. In this work, we show that CX and CUR matrix decompositions can be used directly to address this selection need. CX and CUR matrix decompositions use empirical statistical leverage scores of the input data to provide provably good low-rank approximations of the measured data that are expressed in terms of actual ions and actual positions, as opposed to difficult-to-interpret eigenions and eigenpositions. We show that this leads to effective prioritization of information for both ions and positions. In particular, important ions can be found either by using the leverage scores as a ranking function and using a deterministic greedy selection algorithm or by using the leverage scores as an importance sampling distribution and using a random sampling algorithm; however, selection of important positions from the original matrix performed significantly better when they were chosen with the random sampling algorithm. Also, we show that 20 ions or 40 locations can be used to reconstruct the original matrix to a tolerance of 17% error for a widely studied image of brain lipids; and we provide a scalable implementation of this method that is applicable for analysis of the raw data where there are often more than a million rows and/or columns

  19. Building materials as intrinsic sources of sulphate: a hidden face of salt weathering of historical monuments investigated through multi-isotope tracing (B, O, S).

    PubMed

    Kloppmann, W; Bromblet, P; Vallet, J M; Vergès-Belmin, V; Rolland, O; Guerrot, C; Gosselin, C

    2011-04-01

    Sulphate neoformation is a major factor of degradation of stone monuments. Boron, sulphur and oxygen isotope signatures were investigated for five French historical monuments (Bourges, Chartres and Marseille cathedrals, Chenonceau castle, and Versailles garden statues) to investigate the role of intrinsic sulphate sources (gypsum plasters and mortars) in stone degradation, compared to the influence of extrinsic sources such as atmospheric pollution. Gypsum plasters and gypsum-containing mortars fall systematically in the δ(34)S and δ(18)O range of Paris Basin Eocene evaporites indicating the origin of the raw materials (so-called "Paris plaster"). Black crusts show the typical S and O isotope signatures observed elsewhere in Europe that can be attributed to atmospheric pollution, together with a marine component for Marseille. Boron isotopes for black crusts indicate coal combustion as principal boron source. Mortar isotope compositions discriminate three types, one similar to gypsum plasters, one strongly depleted in (34)S, attributed to pyrite oxidation, and a third one close to atmospheric sulphates. The isotopic composition of sulphates and boron of most degraded building stones of the different monuments is well explained by the identified sulphate sources. In several cases (in particular for Chenonceau and Bourges, to some extent for Chartres), the impact of gypsum plaster as building and restoration material on the degradation of the stones in its vicinity was clearly demonstrated. The study illustrates the usefulness of multi-isotope studies to investigate stone degradation factors, as the combination of several isotope systematics increases the discriminatory power of isotope studies with respect to contaminant sources. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Proof of concept experiments of the multi-isotope process monitor: An online, nondestructive, near real-time monitor for spent nuclear fuel reprocessing facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orton, Christopher R.; Fraga, Carlos G.; Christensen, Richard N.; Schwantes, Jon M.

    2012-04-01

    Operators, national regulatory agencies and the IAEA will require the development of advanced technologies to efficiently control and safeguard nuclear material at increasingly large-scale nuclear recycling facilities. Ideally, the envisioned technologies would be capable of non-destructive, near real-time (NRT), autonomous process monitoring. This paper describes results from proof-of-principle experiments designed to test the multi-isotope process (MIP) monitor, a novel approach to monitoring and safeguarding reprocessing facilities. The MIP Monitor combines the detection of intrinsic gamma ray signatures emitted from process solutions with multivariate analysis to detect off-normal conditions in process streams nondestructively and in NRT. Commercial spent nuclear fuel of various irradiation histories was dissolved and separated using a PUREX-based batch solvent extraction. Extractions were performed at various nitric acid concentrations to mimic both normal and off-normal industrial plant operating conditions. Principal component analysis (PCA) was applied to the simulated gamma spectra to investigate pattern variations as a function of acid concentration, burnup and cooling time. Partial least squares (PLS) regression was applied to attempt to quantify both the acid concentration and burnup of the dissolved spent fuel during the initial separation stage of recycle. The MIP Monitor demonstrated sensitivity to induced variations of acid concentration, including the distinction of ±1.3 M variation from normal process conditions by way of PCA. Acid concentration was predicted using measurements from the organic extract and PLS resulting in predictions with <0.7 M relative error. Quantification of burnup levels from dissolved fuel spectra using PLS was demonstrated to be within 2.5% of previously measured values.

  1. Mass spectrometry imaging of surface lipids on intact Drosophila melanogaster flies.

    PubMed

    Kaftan, Filip; Vrkoslav, Vladimír; Kynast, Philipp; Kulkarni, Purva; Böcker, Sebastian; Cvačka, Josef; Knaden, Markus; Svatoš, Aleš

    2014-03-01

    The spatial distribution of neutral lipids and semiochemicals on the surface of six-day-old separately reared naive Drosophila melanogaster flies has been visualized and studied using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry and laser-assisted desorption/ionization (LDI)-TOF imaging (MSI). Metal targets were designed for two-dimensional MSI of the surface of 3-D biological objects. Targets with either simple grooves or profiled holes designed to accurately accommodate the male and female bodies were fabricated. These grooves and especially holes ensured correct height fixation and spatial orientation of the flies on the targets after matrix application and sample drying. For LDI-TOF to be used, the flies were arranged into holes and fixed to a plane of the target using fast-setting glue. In MALDI-TOF mode, the flies were fixed as above and sprayed with a lithium 2,5-dihydroxybenzoate matrix using up to 100 airbrush spray cycles. The scanning electron microscopy images revealed that the deposits of matrix were homogenous and the matrix formed mostly into the clusters of crystals (40-80 µm) that were separated from each other by an uncovered cuticle surface (30-40 µm). The MSI using target with profiled holes provided superior results to the targets with simple grooves, eliminating the ion suppression/mass deviation due to the 3-D shape of the flies. Attention was paid to neutral lipids and other compounds including the male anti-attractant 11-cis-vaccenyl acetate for which the expected distribution with high concentration on the tip of the male abdomen was confirmed. The red and blue mass shift (PlusMinus1 colour scale) was observed associated with mass deviation predominantly between ±0.2 and 0.3 Da. We use in-house developed software for mass recalibration, to eliminate the mass deviation effects and help with the detection of low-intensity mass signals.

  2. Automated correlation and classification of secondary ion mass spectrometry images using a k-means cluster method.

    PubMed

    Konicek, Andrew R; Lefman, Jonathan; Szakal, Christopher

    2012-08-07

    We present a novel method for correlating and classifying ion-specific time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) images within a multispectral dataset by grouping images with similar pixel intensity distributions. Binary centroid images are created by employing a k-means-based custom algorithm. Centroid images are compared to grayscale SIMS images using a newly developed correlation method that assigns the SIMS images to classes that have similar spatial (rather than spectral) patterns. Image features of both large and small spatial extent are identified without the need for image pre-processing, such as normalization or fixed-range mass-binning. A subsequent classification step tracks the class assignment of SIMS images over multiple iterations of increasing n classes per iteration, providing information about groups of images that have similar chemistry. Details are discussed while presenting data acquired with ToF-SIMS on a model sample of laser-printed inks. This approach can lead to the identification of distinct ion-specific chemistries for mass spectral imaging by ToF-SIMS, as well as matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI), and desorption electrospray ionization (DESI).

  3. Application of Tapping-Mode Scanning Probe Electrospray Ionization to Mass Spectrometry Imaging of Additives in Polymer Films

    PubMed Central

    Shimazu, Ryo; Yamoto, Yoshinari; Kosaka, Tomoya; Kawasaki, Hideya; Arakawa, Ryuichi

    2014-01-01

    We report the application of tapping-mode scanning probe electrospray ionization (t-SPESI) to mass spectrometry imaging of industrial materials. The t-SPESI parameters including tapping solvent composition, solvent flow rate, number of tapping at each spot, and step-size were optimized using a quadrupole mass spectrometer to improve mass spectrometry (MS) imaging of thin-layer chromatography (TLC) and additives in polymer films. Spatial resolution of approximately 100 μm was achieved by t-SPESI imaging mass spectrometry using a fused-silica capillary (50 μm i.d., 150 μm o.d.) with the flow rate set at 0.2 μL/min. This allowed us to obtain discriminable MS imaging profiles of three dyes separated by TLC and the additive stripe pattern of a PMMA model film depleted by UV irradiation. PMID:26819894

  4. Left ventricular dimensions and mass using magnetic resonance imaging in female endurance athletes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riley-Hagan, M.; Peshock, R. M.; Stray-Gundersen, J.; Katz, J.; Ryschon, T. W.; Mitchell, J. H.

    1992-01-01

    Few published studies of left ventricular (LV) mass in female endurance athletes have been performed with M-mode echocardiography, which involves assumptions of LV geometry. Therefore, magnetic resonance imaging, a 3-dimensional technique, was used to examine LV mass, LV end-diastolic volume and mean wall thickness in female long distance runners (n = 13; mean age 29 years), cyclists (n = 12; mean age 26 years) and cross-country skiers (n = 11; mean age 24 years), and the findings were compared with sedentary control subjects (n = 10; mean age 27 years) matched for height and body weight. The physical characteristics for all subjects included height (mean 166 cm, and body weight (mean 56 kg). The percent body fat (mean 11.7) and maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max, mean 63 ml.kg-1.min-1) were similar (p greater than 0.05) among all athletic groups, but significantly different from the control group (body fat, mean 22.5%; VO2max, mean 35 ml.kg-1.min-1). LV mass (mean 159 kg), LV end-diastolic volume (mean 122 ml), and mean wall thickness (mean 11.5 mm) were also similar among the athletic groups and significantly larger than the following control values: LV mass (mean 115 g), LV end-diastolic volume (mean 93 ml) and mean wall thickness (mean 9.8 mm). Ratios of LV mass to lean body weight were similar among all athletic groups, although athletic groups had larger ratios (p less than 0.05) than the sedentary control subjects. LV mass/LV end-diastolic volume ratio was similar (p greater than 0.05) among all groups.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS).

  5. Left ventricular dimensions and mass using magnetic resonance imaging in female endurance athletes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riley-Hagan, M.; Peshock, R. M.; Stray-Gundersen, J.; Katz, J.; Ryschon, T. W.; Mitchell, J. H.

    1992-01-01

    Few published studies of left ventricular (LV) mass in female endurance athletes have been performed with M-mode echocardiography, which involves assumptions of LV geometry. Therefore, magnetic resonance imaging, a 3-dimensional technique, was used to examine LV mass, LV end-diastolic volume and mean wall thickness in female long distance runners (n = 13; mean age 29 years), cyclists (n = 12; mean age 26 years) and cross-country skiers (n = 11; mean age 24 years), and the findings were compared with sedentary control subjects (n = 10; mean age 27 years) matched for height and body weight. The physical characteristics for all subjects included height (mean 166 cm, and body weight (mean 56 kg). The percent body fat (mean 11.7) and maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max, mean 63 ml.kg-1.min-1) were similar (p greater than 0.05) among all athletic groups, but significantly different from the control group (body fat, mean 22.5%; VO2max, mean 35 ml.kg-1.min-1). LV mass (mean 159 kg), LV end-diastolic volume (mean 122 ml), and mean wall thickness (mean 11.5 mm) were also similar among the athletic groups and significantly larger than the following control values: LV mass (mean 115 g), LV end-diastolic volume (mean 93 ml) and mean wall thickness (mean 9.8 mm). Ratios of LV mass to lean body weight were similar among all athletic groups, although athletic groups had larger ratios (p less than 0.05) than the sedentary control subjects. LV mass/LV end-diastolic volume ratio was similar (p greater than 0.05) among all groups.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS).

  6. Proteomic analysis of formalin-fixed paraffin embedded tissue by MALDI imaging mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Casadonte, Rita; Caprioli, Richard M

    2012-01-01

    Archived formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue collections represent a valuable informational resource for proteomic studies. Multiple FFPE core biopsies can be assembled in a single block to form tissue microarrays (TMAs). We describe a protocol for analyzing protein in FFPE -TMAs using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MAL DI) imaging mass spectrometry (IMS). The workflow incorporates an antigen retrieval step following deparaffinization, in situ trypsin digestion, matrix application and then mass spectrometry signal acquisition. The direct analysis of FFPE -TMA tissue using IMS allows direct analysis of multiple tissue samples in a single experiment without extraction and purification of proteins. The advantages of high speed and throughput, easy sample handling and excellent reproducibility make this technology a favorable approach for the proteomic analysis of clinical research cohorts with large sample numbers. For example, TMA analysis of 300 FFPE cores would typically require 6 h of total time through data acquisition, not including data analysis. PMID:22011652

  7. Depth profiling and imaging capabilities of an ultrashort pulse laser ablation time of flight mass spectrometer

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Yang; Moore, Jerry F.; Milasinovic, Slobodan; Liu, Yaoming; Gordon, Robert J.; Hanley, Luke

    2012-01-01

    An ultrafast laser ablation time-of-flight mass spectrometer (AToF-MS) and associated data acquisition software that permits imaging at micron-scale resolution and sub-micron-scale depth profiling are described. The ion funnel-based source of this instrument can be operated at pressures ranging from 10−8 to ∼0.3 mbar. Mass spectra may be collected and stored at a rate of 1 kHz by the data acquisition system, allowing the instrument to be coupled with standard commercial Ti:sapphire lasers. The capabilities of the AToF-MS instrument are demonstrated on metal foils and semiconductor wafers using a Ti:sapphire laser emitting 800 nm, ∼75 fs pulses at 1 kHz. Results show that elemental quantification and depth profiling are feasible with this instrument. PMID:23020378

  8. Quantitative, nondestructive assessment of beech scale (Hemiptera: Cryptococcidae) density using digital image analysis of wax masses.

    PubMed

    Teale, Stephen A; Letkowski, Steven; Matusick, George; Stehman, Stephen V; Castello, John D

    2009-08-01

    Beech scale, Cryptococcus fagisuga Lindinger, is a non-native invasive insect associated with beech bark disease. A quantitative method of measuring viable scale density at the levels of the individual tree and localized bark patches was developed. Bark patches (10 cm(2)) were removed at 0, 1, and 2 m above the ground and at the four cardinal directions from 13 trees in northern New York and 12 trees in northern Michigan. Digital photographs of each patch were made, and the wax mass area was measured from two random 1-cm(2) subsamples on each bark patch using image analysis software. Viable scale insects were counted after removing the wax under a dissecting microscope. Separate regression analyses at the whole tree level for the New York and Michigan sites each showed a strong positive relationship of wax mass area with the number of underlying viable scale insects. The relationships for the New York and Michigan data were not significantly different from each other, and when pooling data from the two sites, there was still a significant positive relationship between wax mass area and the number of scale insects. The relationships between viable scale insects and wax mass area were different at the 0-, 1-, and 2-m sampling heights but do not seem to affect the relationship. This method does not disrupt the insect or its interactions with the host tree.

  9. STABILITY OF THE DIRECTLY IMAGED MULTIPLANET SYSTEM HR 8799: RESONANCE AND MASSES

    SciTech Connect

    Fabrycky, Daniel C.; Murray-Clay, Ruth A.

    2010-02-20

    A new era of directly imaged extrasolar planets has produced a three-planet system, where the masses of the planets have been estimated by untested cooling models. We point out that the nominal circular, face-on orbits of the planets lead to a dynamical instability in {approx}10{sup 5} yr, a factor of at least 100 shorter than the estimated age of the star. Reduced planetary masses produce stability only for unreasonably small planets ({approx}<2 M{sub Jup}). Relaxing the face-on assumption, but still requiring circular orbits while fitting the observed positions, makes the instability time even shorter. A promising solution is that the inner two planets have a 2:1 commensurability between their periods, and they avoid close encounters with each other through this resonance. The fact that the inner resonance has lasted until now, in spite of the perturbations of the outer planet, leads to a limit {approx}<10 M{sub Jup} on the masses unless the outer two planets are also engaged in a 2:1 mean-motion resonance. In a double resonance, which is consistent with the current data, the system could survive until now even if the planets have masses of {approx}20 M{sub Jup}. Apsidal alignment can further enhance the stability of a mean-motion resonant system. A completely different dynamical configuration, with large eccentricities and large mutual inclinations among the planets, is possible but finely tuned.

  10. Test Sample for the Spatially Resolved Quantification of Illicit Drugs on Fingerprints Using Imaging Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Muramoto, Shin; Forbes, Thomas P; van Asten, Arian C; Gillen, Greg

    2015-01-01

    A novel test sample for the spatially resolved quantification of illicit drugs on the surface of a fingerprint using time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) and desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (DESI-MS) was demonstrated. Calibration curves relating the signal intensity to the amount of drug deposited on the surface were generated from inkjet-printed arrays of cocaine, methamphetamine, and heroin with a deposited-mass ranging nominally from 10 pg to 50 ng per spot. These curves were used to construct concentration maps that visualized the spatial distribution of the drugs on top of a fingerprint, as well as being able to quantify the amount of drugs in a given area within the map. For the drugs on the fingerprint on silicon, ToF-SIMS showed great success, as it was able to generate concentration maps of all three drugs. On the fingerprint on paper, only the concentration map of cocaine could be constructed using ToF-SIMS and DESI-MS, as the signals of methamphetamine and heroin were completely suppressed by matrix and substrate effects. Spatially resolved quantification of illicit drugs using imaging mass spectrometry is possible, but the choice of substrates could significantly affect the results.

  11. Enzymatic resistance to the lipopeptide surfactin as identified through imaging mass spectrometry of bacterial competition

    PubMed Central

    Hoefler, B. Christopher; Gorzelnik, Karl V.; Yang, Jane Y.; Hendricks, Nathan; Dorrestein, Pieter C.; Straight, Paul D.

    2012-01-01

    Many species of bacteria secrete natural products that inhibit the growth or development of competing species. In turn, competitors may develop or acquire resistance to antagonistic molecules. Few studies have investigated the interplay of these countervailing forces in direct competition between two species. We have used an imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) approach to track metabolites exchanged between Bacillus subtilis and Streptomyces sp. Mg1 cultured together. Surfactin is a cyclic lipopeptide produced by B. subtilis that inhibits the formation of aerial hyphae by streptomycetes. IMS analysis exposed an addition of 18 mass units to surfactin in the agar proximal to Streptomyces sp. Mg1 but not other streptomycetes tested. The spatially resolved change in the mass of surfactin indicated hydrolysis of the molecule. We observed that the aerial growth of Streptomyces sp. Mg1 was resistant to inhibition by surfactin, which suggests that hydrolysis was a mechanism of resistance. To identify possible enzymes from Streptomyces sp. Mg1 with surfactin hydrolase activity, we isolated secreted proteins and identified candidates by mass spectrometry. We purified one candidate enzyme that hydrolyzed surfactin in vitro. We tested the role of this enzyme in surfactin resistance by deleting the corresponding gene from the S. Mg1 genome. We observed that aerial growth by the ΔsfhA mutant strain was now sensitive to surfactin. Our results identify an enzyme that hydrolyzes surfactin and confers resistance to aerial growth inhibition, which demonstrates the effective use of an IMS approach to track natural product modifications during interspecies competition. PMID:22826229

  12. Diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging in the diagnosis of parotid masses. Preliminary results

    PubMed Central

    Yologlu, Zeynel; Aydin, Hasan; Alp, Nalan A.; Aribas, Bilgin K.; Kizilgoz, Volkan; Arda, Kemal

    2016-01-01

    Objective To demonstrate the diagnostic potentials of MRI, diffusion weighted imaging (DWI), and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) mapping in the detection of parotid masses correlated to the histopathological results. Methods Study design was retrospective. Fifteen patients with parotid gland masses were included as the study group and contralateral normal parotis glands of same patients were taken as the control group. Patients with bilateral parotid gland tumors were excluded, 7 right-sided and 8 left-sided parotid masses were included in the research. The study took place at the Department of Radiology, Ankara, Turkey, between May 2012 and September 2014. Results Apparent diffusion coefficient measurements of 15 parotis tumors in 1000 and 750 sec/mm2 b-values with comparison to the contralateral normal gland parenchyma were demonstrated. Neurofibromas was predicted as the highest, and lipomas as the lowest ADC values. Pleomorphic adenomas, Warthin’s tumor, and normal parotid parenchyma indicate significant statistical differences from each other on the basis of mean ADC values (p<0.05). Conclusion The DWI and ADC mapping of parotis gland could aid in the differential diagnosis of benign and malignant masses. PMID:27874161

  13. Tracking Nonradial Motions and Azimuthal Expansions of Interplanetary CMEs with the Solar Mass Ejection Imager

    SciTech Connect

    Kahler, Stephen

    2010-03-25

    The trajectories of interplanetary CMEs (ICMEs) are modified by their interactions with solar wind streams. These interactions can result in non-radial deflections of ICME trajectories and changes to their rates of azimuthal expansion. The Solar Mass Ejection Imager (SMEI), launched earlier in 2003 January, has provided heliospheric images of several hundred ICMEs during the declining portion of solar cycle 23. We selected three SMEI ICMEs, each traversing a range of solar elongation angles epsilon>20 deg. , and measured the time changes of their leading-edge profiles plotted against position angle, PA. The parabolic fits to those profiles yielded the propagation directions of the ICMEs as well as their leading-edge curvatures and time profiles. The selected ICMEs were associated with LASCO CMEs, so we tracked the PA variations in their propagation over 1 to 3-day periods. We found good fits for two of the ICMEs, but one yielded generally poor fits.

  14. Imaging mass spectrometry of elements in forensic cases by LA-ICP-MS.

    PubMed

    Lauer, Estelle; Villa, Max; Jotterand, Morgane; Vilarino, Raquel; Bollmann, Marc; Michaud, Katarzyna; Grabherr, Silke; Augsburger, Marc; Thomas, Aurélien

    2017-03-01

    Laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) was performed to map elements in thin formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue sections of two forensic cases with firearm and electrocution injuries, respectively. In both cases, histological examination of the wounded tissue regions revealed the presence of exogenous aggregates that may be interpreted as metallic depositions. The use of imaging LA-ICP-MS allowed us to unambiguously determine the elemental composition of the observed aggregates assisting the pathologist in case assessments. To the best of our knowledge, we demonstrate for the first time the use of imaging LA-ICP-MS as a complementary tool for forensic pathologists and toxicologists in order to map the presence of metals and other elements in thin tissue sections of post-mortem cases.

  15. Magnetic resonance imaging of Whipple's disease confined to the CNS presenting with multiple intracerebral mass lesions.

    PubMed

    Poureisa, Masoud; Daghighi, Mohammad Hossein; Esmaili, Haidar; Mazaheri-Khameneh, Ramin

    2015-01-01

    We report a patient diagnosed with Whipple's disease (WD) who presented only with neurological symptoms. Neuroimaging (MRI) showed lesions with marked mass effect similar to infiltrative tumors, which were hypersignal on long TR and hyposignal on short TR images, located in several areas of the brain. In serial controls, lesions resolved with gliosis and atrophic changes as well as migration of active infiltrative-like lesions to new areas. MR findings of the brain WD are discussed, which confirmed by stereotactic brain biopsy. Familiarity with the range of possible MR imaging appearances of WD enables the radiologist to place WD more effectively on the differential diagnosis which motivates the clinician to consider both the diagnosis and early initiation of treatment; so, this may significantly impact outcome. Moreover, repeated MR investigations may serve as a valuable method to evaluate efficacy of treatment and long term follow-up of WD involving the CNS.

  16. Shotgun Approach for Quantitative Imaging of Phospholipids Using Nanospray Desorption Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Lanekoff, Ingela T.; Thomas, Mathew; Laskin, Julia

    2014-02-04

    Mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) has been extensively used for determining spatial distributions of molecules in biological samples, and there is increasing interest in using MSI for quantification. Nanospray desorption electrospray ionization, or nano-DESI, is an ambient MSI technique where a solvent is used for localized extraction of molecules followed by nanoelectrospray ionization. Doping the nano-DESI solvent with carefully selected standards enables online quantification during MSI experiments. In this proof-of-principle study, we demonstrate this quantification approach can be extended to provide shotgun-like quantification of phospholipids in thin brain tissue sections. Specifically, two phosphatidylcholine (PC) standards were added to the nano-DESI solvent for simultaneous imaging and quantification of 22 PC species observed in nano-DESI MSI. Furthermore, by combining the quantitative data obtained in the individual pixels, we demonstrate quantification of these PC species in seven different regions of a rat brain tissue section.

  17. IR-MALDESI Mass Spectrometry Imaging at 50 Micron Spatial Resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bokhart, Mark T.; Manni, Jeffrey; Garrard, Kenneth P.; Ekelöf, Måns; Nazari, Milad; Muddiman, David C.

    2017-10-01

    High spatial resolution in mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) is crucial to understanding the biology dictated by molecular distributions in complex tissue systems. Here, we present MSI using infrared matrix-assisted laser desorption electrospray ionization (IR-MALDESI) at 50 μm resolution. An adjustable iris, beam expander, and an aspherical focusing lens were used to reduce tissue ablation diameters for MSI at high resolution. The laser beam caustic was modeled using laser ablation paper to calculate relevant laser beam characteristics. The minimum laser spot diameter on the tissue was determined using tissue staining and microscopy. Finally, the newly constructed optical system was used to image hen ovarian tissue with and without oversampling, detailing tissue features at 50 μm resolution. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  18. Label free biochemical 2D and 3D imaging using secondary ion mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, John S; Vickerman, John C; Winograd, Nicholas

    2011-10-01

    Time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) provides a method for the detection of native and exogenous compounds in biological samples on a cellular scale. Through the development of novel ion beams the amount of molecular signal available from the sample surface has been increased. Through the introduction of polyatomic ion beams, particularly C(60), ToF-SIMS can now be used to monitor molecular signals as a function of depth as the sample is eroded thus proving the ability to generate 3D molecular images. Here we describe how this new capability has led to the development of novel instrumentation for 3D molecular imaging while also highlighting the importance of sample preparation and discuss the challenges that still need to be overcome to maximise the impact of the technique.

  19. Localization of tamoxifen in human breast cancer tumors by MALDI mass spectrometry imaging.

    PubMed

    Végvári, Ákos; Shavkunov, Alexander S; Fehniger, Thomas E; Grabau, Dorthe; Niméus, Emma; Marko-Varga, György

    2016-03-01

    Tamoxifen is used in endocrine treatment of breast cancer to inhibit estrogen signaling. A set of stratified ER-positive and ER-negative tumor sections was subjected to manual deposition of tamoxifen solution in order to investigate its spatial distribution upon exposure to interaction within thin tissue sections. The localization of tamoxifen in tumor sections was assessed by matrix assisted laser deposition/ionization mass spectrometry imaging. The images of extracted ion maps were analyzed for comparison of signal intensity distributions. The precursor ion of tamoxifen (m/z 372.233) displayed heterogeneous signal intensity distributions in histological compartments of tumor tissue sections. The levels of tamoxifen in tumor cells compared with stroma were higher in ER-positive tissues, whereas ER-negative tissue sections showed lower signal intensities in tumor cells. The experimental model was successfully applied on frozen tumor samples allowing for differentiation between ER groups based on distribution of tamoxifen.

  20. MALDI Imaging Mass Spectrometry-A Mini Review of Methods and Recent Developments.

    PubMed

    Eriksson, Cecilia; Masaki, Noritaka; Yao, Ikuko; Hayasaka, Takahiro; Setou, Mitsutoshi

    2013-01-01

    As the only imaging method available, Imaging Mass Spectrometry (IMS) can determine both the identity and the distribution of hundreds of molecules on tissue sections, all in one single run. IMS is becoming an established research technology, and due to recent technical and methodological improvements the interest in this technology is increasing steadily and within a wide range of scientific fields. Of the different IMS methods available, matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) IMS is the most commonly employed. The course at IMSC 2012 in Kyoto covered the fundamental principles and techniques of MALDI-IMS, assuming no previous experience in IMS. This mini review summarizes the content of the one-day course and describes some of the most recent work performed within this research field.

  1. Results from the AFRL Solar Mass Ejection Imager Mission - Four Years of Operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnston, J. C.; Radick, R. R.

    2006-12-01

    This January marks the fourth anniversary of the launch of the Coriolis spacecraft that carries SMEI. Since 2003, SMEI has been recording nearly-full sky images every orbit (103 minutes) to at least 9th magnitude with 1o resolution and transmitting them to Earth. SMEI's main mission was to demonstrate that coronal mass ejections (CMEs) could be detected and tracked through the inner heliosphere en route to Earth to improve space weather forecasts. Besides mission applications, this unique dataset has provided insight into CME morphology and driving forces, interactions between comet tails and the heliosphere, zodiacal light, stellar variability and high altitude auroral phenomena. SMEI also observes asteroids and debris. This talk will briefly highlight accomplishments of the SMEI team and discuss future directions for the SMEI research program, such as tracking CMEs to other planets, searching for streamers and co-rotating interactive regions, and what might be the next step in operational heliospheric imaging of CMEs.

  2. Evaluation of C60 secondary ion mass spectrometry for the chemical analysis and imaging of fingerprints.

    PubMed

    Sisco, Edward; Demoranville, Leonard T; Gillen, Greg

    2013-09-10

    The feasibility of using C60(+) cluster primary ion bombardment secondary ion mass spectrometry (C60(+) SIMS) for the analysis of the chemical composition of fingerprints is evaluated. It was found that C60(+) SIMS could be used to detect and image the spatial localization of a number of sebaceous and eccrine components in fingerprints. These analyses were also found to not be hindered by the use of common latent print powder development techniques. Finally, the ability to monitor the depth distribution of fingerprint constituents was found to be possible - a capability which has not been shown using other chemical imaging techniques. This paper illustrates a number of strengths and potential weaknesses of C60(+) SIMS as an additional or complimentary technique for the chemical analysis of fingerprints.

  3. Fuzzy Logic Classification of Imaging Laser Desorption Fourier Transform Mass Spectrometry Data

    SciTech Connect

    Timothy R. McJunkin; Jill R. Scott

    2008-06-01

    The fuzzy logic method is applied to classification of mass spectra obtained with an imaging internal source Fourier transform mass spectrometer (I2LD-FTMS). Traditionally, an operator uses the relative abundance of ions with specific mass-to-charge (m/z) ratios to categorize spectra. An operator does this by comparing the spectrum of m/z versus abundance of an unknown sample against a library of spectra from known samples. Automated positioning and acquisition allow the I2LD-FTMS to acquire data from very large grids, which would require classification of up to 3600 spectra per hour to keep pace with the acquisition. The tedious job of classifying numerous spectra generated in an I2LD-FTMS imaging application can be replaced by a fuzzy rule base if the cues an operator uses can be encapsulated. Appropriate methods for assigning fuzzy membership values for inputs (e.g., mass spectrum abundances) and choice of fuzzy inference operators to translate linguistic antecedent into confidence values for the consequence (or in this case the classification) is followed by using the maximum confidence and a necessary minimum threshold for making a crisp decision. This paper also describes a method for gathering statistics on ions, which are not currently used in the rule base, but which may be candidates for making the rule base more accurate and complete or to form new rule bases based on data obtained from known samples. A spatial method for classifying spectra with low membership values, based on neighboring sample classifications, is also presented.

  4. Applications of the Single-probe: Mass Spectrometry Imaging and Single Cell Analysis under Ambient Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Wei; Pan, Ning; Yang, Zhibo

    2016-01-01

    Mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) and in-situ single cell mass spectrometry (SCMS) analysis under ambient conditions are two emerging fields with great potential for the detailed mass spectrometry (MS) analysis of biomolecules from biological samples. The single-probe, a miniaturized device with integrated sampling and ionization capabilities, is capable of performing both ambient MSI and in-situ SCMS analysis. For ambient MSI, the single-probe uses surface micro-extraction to continually conduct MS analysis of the sample, and this technique allows the creation of MS images with high spatial resolution (8.5 µm) from biological samples such as mouse brain and kidney sections. Ambient MSI has the advantage that little to no sample preparation is needed before the analysis, which reduces the amount of potential artifacts present in data acquisition and allows a more representative analysis of the sample to be acquired. For in-situ SCMS, the single-probe tip can be directly inserted into live eukaryotic cells such as HeLa cells, due to the small sampling tip size (< 10 µm), and this technique is capable of detecting a wide range of metabolites inside individual cells at near real-time. SCMS enables a greater sensitivity and accuracy of chemical information to be acquired at the single cell level, which could improve our understanding of biological processes at a more fundamental level than previously possible. The single-probe device can be potentially coupled with a variety of mass spectrometers for broad ranges of MSI and SCMS studies. PMID:27341402

  5. Imaging mass spectrometry: enabling a new age of discovery in biology and medicine through molecular microscopy.

    PubMed

    Caprioli, Richard M

    2015-06-01

    Imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) has become a valuable tool for the production of molecular maps in samples ranging from solid inorganic materials to biologicals such as cells and tissues. The unique features of IMS are its ability to map a wide variety of different types of molecules, its superb molecular specificity, and its potential for discovery since no target-specific reagents are needed. IMS has made significant contributions in biology and medicine and promises to be a next generation tool in anatomic pathology.

  6. Imaging Mass Spectrometry: Enabling a New Age of Discovery in Biology and Medicine Through Molecular Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Caprioli, Richard M.

    2015-01-01

    Imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) has become a valuable tool for the production of molecular maps in samples ranging from solid inorganic materials to biologicals such as cells and tissues. The unique features of IMS are its ability to map a wide variety of different types of molecules, its superb molecular specificity, and its potential for discovery since no target specific reagents are needed. IMS has made significant contributions in biology and medicine and promises to be a next generation tool in anatomic pathology. PMID:25801587

  7. Imaging time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry of solid-phase peptide syntheses.

    PubMed

    Aubagnac, J L; Enjalbal, C; Drouot, C; Combarieu, R; Martinez, J

    1999-07-01

    Imaging time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS) of solid-phase peptide syntheses carried out by the Merrifield and Sheppard strategies is described. Mixtures of resin beads mixed at random from batch syntheses or obtained in combinatorial chemistry by the mix and split technique, where each bead is functionalized by a unique peptide, were analyzed directly without any chemical cleavage of the growing chains to assess the nature of the growing structure on any bead of the mixture without its isolation.

  8. Microbial competition between Bacillus subtilis and Staphylococcus aureus monitored by imaging mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, David J; Haste, Nina M; Hollands, Andrew; Fleming, Tinya C; Hamby, Matthew; Pogliano, Kit; Nizet, Victor; Dorrestein, Pieter C

    2011-09-01

    Microbial competition exists in the general environment, such as soil or aquatic habitats, upon or within unicellular or multicellular eukaryotic life forms. The molecular actions that govern microbial competition, leading to niche establishment and microbial monopolization, remain undetermined. The emerging technology of imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) enabled the observation that there is directionality in the metabolic output of the organism Bacillus subtilis when co-cultured with Staphylococcus aureus. The directionally released antibiotic alters S. aureus virulence factor production and colonization. Therefore, IMS provides insight into the largely hidden nature of competitive microbial encounters and niche establishment, and provides a paradigm for future antibiotic discovery.

  9. Mass Spectrometry Imaging of Therapeutics from Animal Models to Three-Dimensional Cell Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xin; Hummon, Amanda B.

    2016-01-01

    Mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) is a powerful label-free technique for the investigation of the spatial distribution of molecules at complex surfaces and has been widely used in the pharmaceutical sciences to understand the distribution of different drugs and their metabolites in various biological samples, ranging from cell-based models to tissues. Here, we review the current applications of MSI for drug studies in animal models, followed by a discussion of the novel advances of MSI in three-dimensional (3D) cell cultures for accurate, efficient and high-throughput analyses to evaluate therapeutics. PMID:26084404

  10. Mass spectrometry imaging of therapeutics from animal models to three-dimensional cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xin; Hummon, Amanda B

    2015-10-06

    Mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) is a powerful label-free technique for the investigation of the spatial distribution of molecules at complex surfaces and has been widely used in the pharmaceutical sciences to understand the distribution of different drugs and their metabolites in various biological samples, ranging from cell-based models to tissues. Here, we review the current applications of MSI for drug studies in animal models, followed by a discussion of the novel advances of MSI in three-dimensional (3D) cell cultures for accurate, efficient, and high-throughput analyses to evaluate therapeutics.

  11. Imaging mass spectrometry: Molecular microscopy for the new age of biology and medicine.

    PubMed

    Caprioli, Richard M

    2016-06-01

    Imaging mass spectrometry provides a powerful tool for monitoring and discovery of molecular processes in the spatial domain in tissues for research and practical applications in both biology and medicine. This technology directly measures molecular compounds in tissues without the use of target-specific reagents such as antibodies, is applicable to a wide variety of analytes, and can provide spatial resolutions below the single cell level. Importantly, it has paradigm shifting capabilities in clinical applications, especially for anatomic pathology. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Imaging Mass Spectrometry: Enabling a New Age of Discovery in Biology and Medicine Through Molecular Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caprioli, Richard M.

    2015-06-01

    Imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) has become a valuable tool for the production of molecular maps in samples ranging from solid inorganic materials to biologicals such as cells and tissues. The unique features of IMS are its ability to map a wide variety of different types of molecules, its superb molecular specificity, and its potential for discovery since no target-specific reagents are needed. IMS has made significant contributions in biology and medicine and promises to be a next generation tool in anatomic pathology.

  13. Direct imaging search for planets around low-mass stars and spectroscopic characterization of young exoplanets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowler, Brendan Peter

    Low--mass stars between 0.1--0.6 M⊙ are the most abundant members our galaxy and may be the most common sites of planet formation, but little is known about the outer architecture of their planetary systems. We have carried out a high-contrast adaptive imaging search for gas giant planets between 1--13 MJup around 122 newly identified young M dwarfs in the solar neighborhood ( ≲ 35 pc). Half of our targets are younger than 145 Myr, and 90% are younger than 580 Myr. After removing 39 resolved stellar binaries, our homogeneous sample of 83 single young M dwarfs makes it the largest imaging search for planets around low--mass stars to date. Our H- and K- band coronagraphic observations with Subaru/HiCIAO and Keck/NIRC2 achieve typical contrasts of 9--13 mag and 12--14 mag at 100, respectively, which corresponds to limiting masses of ˜1--10 M Jup at 10--30 AU for most of our sample. We discovered four brown dwarfs with masses between 25--60 MJup at projected separations of 4--190 AU. Over 100 candidate planets were discovered, nearly all of which were found to be background stars from follow-up second epoch imaging. Our null detection of planets nevertheless provides strong statistical constraints on the occurrence rate of giant planets around M dwarfs. Assuming circular orbits and a logarithmically-flat power law distribution in planet mass and semi--major axis of the form d 2N=(dloga dlogm) infinity m0 a0, we measure an upper limit (at the 95% confidence level) of 8.8% and 12.6% for 1--13 MJup companions between 10--100 AU for hot start and cold start evolutionary models, respectively. For massive gas giant planets in the 5--13 M Jup range like those orbiting HR 8799, GJ 504, and beta Pictoris, we find that fewer than 5.3% (7.8%) of M dwarfs harbor these planets between 10--100 AU for a hot start (cold start) formation scenario. Our best constraints are for brown dwarf companions; the frequency of 13--75 MJup companions between (de--projected) physical

  14. Ultrafast High-Resolution Mass Spectrometric Finger Pore Imaging in Latent Finger Prints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elsner, Christian; Abel, Bernd

    2014-11-01

    Latent finger prints (LFPs) are deposits of sweat components in ridge and groove patterns, left after human fingers contact with a surface. Being important targets in biometry and forensic investigations they contain more information than topological patterns. With laser desorption mass spectrometry imaging (LD-MSI) we record `three-dimensional' finger prints with additional chemical information as the third dimension. Here we show the potential of fast finger pore imaging (FPI) in latent finger prints employing LD-MSI without a classical matrix in a high- spatial resolution mode. Thin films of gold rapidly sputtered on top of the sample are used for desorption. FPI employing an optical image for rapid spatial orientation and guiding of the desorption laser enables the rapid analysis of individual finger pores, and the chemical composition of their excretions. With this approach we rapidly detect metabolites, drugs, and characteristic excretions from the inside of the human organism by a minimally-invasive strategy, and distinguish them from chemicals in contact with fingers without any labeling. The fast finger pore imaging, analysis, and screening approach opens the door for a vast number of novel applications in such different fields as forensics, doping and medication control, therapy, as well as rapid profiling of individuals.

  15. A Nanostructured Matrices Assessment to Study Drug Distribution in Solid Tumor Tissues by Mass Spectrometry Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Giordano, Silvia; Pifferi, Valentina; Morosi, Lavinia; Morelli, Melinda; Falciola, Luigi; Cappelletti, Giuseppe; Visentin, Sonja; Licandro, Simonetta A.; Frapolli, Roberta; Zucchetti, Massimo; Pastorelli, Roberta; Brunelli, Laura; D’Incalci, Maurizio; Davoli, Enrico

    2017-01-01

    The imaging of drugs inside tissues is pivotal in oncology to assess whether a drug reaches all cells in an adequate enough concentration to eradicate the tumor. Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization Mass Spectrometry Imaging (MALDI-MSI) is one of the most promising imaging techniques that enables the simultaneous visualization of multiple compounds inside tissues. The choice of a suitable matrix constitutes a critical aspect during the development of a MALDI-MSI protocol since the matrix ionization efficiency changes depending on the analyte structure and its physico-chemical properties. The objective of this study is the improvement of the MALDI-MSI technique in the field of pharmacology; developing specifically designed nanostructured surfaces that allow the imaging of different drugs with high sensitivity and reproducibility. Among several nanomaterials, we tested the behavior of gold and titanium nanoparticles, and halloysites and carbon nanotubes as possible matrices. All nanomaterials were firstly screened by co-spotting them with drugs on a MALDI plate, evaluating the drug signal intensity and the signal-to-noise ratio. The best performing matrices were tested on control tumor slices, and were spotted with drugs to check the ion suppression effect of the biological matrix. Finally; the best nanomaterials were employed in a preliminary drug distribution study inside tumors from treated mice. PMID:28336905

  16. DetectTLC: Automated Reaction Mixture Screening Utilizing Quantitative Mass Spectrometry Image Features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaddi, Chanchala D.; Bennett, Rachel V.; Paine, Martin R. L.; Banks, Mitchel D.; Weber, Arthur L.; Fernández, Facundo M.; Wang, May D.

    2016-02-01

    Full characterization of complex reaction mixtures is necessary to understand mechanisms, optimize yields, and elucidate secondary reaction pathways. Molecular-level information for species in such mixtures can be readily obtained by coupling mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) with thin layer chromatography (TLC) separations. User-guided investigation of imaging data for mixture components with known m/z values is generally straightforward; however, spot detection for unknowns is highly tedious, and limits the applicability of MSI in conjunction with TLC. To accelerate imaging data mining, we developed DetectTLC, an approach that automatically identifies m/z values exhibiting TLC spot-like regions in MS molecular images. Furthermore, DetectTLC can also spatially match m/z values for spots acquired during alternating high and low collision-energy scans, pairing product ions with precursors to enhance structural identification. As an example, DetectTLC is applied to the identification and structural confirmation of unknown, yet significant, products of abiotic pyrazinone and aminopyrazine nucleoside analog synthesis.

  17. Ultrafast High-Resolution Mass Spectrometric Finger Pore Imaging in Latent Finger Prints

    PubMed Central

    Elsner, Christian; Abel, Bernd

    2014-01-01

    Latent finger prints (LFPs) are deposits of sweat components in ridge and groove patterns, left after human fingers contact with a surface. Being important targets in biometry and forensic investigations they contain more information than topological patterns. With laser desorption mass spectromet