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Sample records for multi-national general paediatric

  1. In the beginning, there was general paediatrics ….

    PubMed

    Gunasekera, Hasantha; Kilham, Henry

    2015-01-01

    In this article, we address how general paediatrics has evolved and adapted to change over the past 50 years and speculate on its future directions. We compare the state of general paediatrics with that of general adult medicine. We argue that general paediatrics must continue to have a strong role both in paediatric teaching hospitals and the community.

  2. Resuscitation of general paediatrics in the UK.

    PubMed

    Wacogne, I; Scott-Jupp, R; Chambers, T

    2006-12-01

    "The report of my death was an exaggeration", said Mark Twain. For a dying specialty, general paediatrics has certainly been looking very healthy recently. It is timely to examine why our specialty was thought to be at such risk, and to explore why, although in many cases shocked and confused, it is well on the way to recovery. This article explores what is needed to keep it healthy to ensure that the general paediatrician is at the centre of the delivery of paediatrics in the UK.

  3. Are general paediatric surgery outcomes comparable between district general hospital and regional referral centres?

    PubMed Central

    Prieto, MC Hart; Jones, PA

    2011-01-01

    INTRODUCTION This study recorded the complication rates for general paediatric surgery undertaken in our district general hospital (DGH) and compared them with the limited amount of data published in this field. There has been a gradual diminution in the numbers of general paediatric surgeons throughout the UK. The Royal College of Surgeons of England has produced guidelines to safeguard the provision of paediatric surgery in DGHs. There are minimal data on the acceptable outcomes and complication rates for elective general paediatric operations. METHODS The following operations undertaken by the paediatric urologist in our unit between November 2006 and May 2010 were scrutinised: orchidopexy, laparoscopy for undescended testes, herniotomy and circumcision. The results were compared to those in the literature and current guidelines. Complications were recorded via audit records, clinic letters or records of attendance at the accident and emergency department. RESULTS A total of 306 paediatric operations (125 orchidopexies, 28 laparoscopies, 41 herniotomies and 51 circumcisions) were undertaken over the 42-month study period. Only 4.5% of cases experienced post-operative complications. The majority of these were testicular atrophy and infection. There were no intra-operative complications. CONCLUSIONS In our DGH the complication rates for general paediatric operations compare favourably with those set out by the literature and guidelines, which support the training and delivery of general paediatric surgery within DGHs. PMID:22004639

  4. Continuous positive airway pressure for bronchiolitis in a general paediatric ward; a feasibility study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is commonly used to relieve respiratory distress in infants with bronchiolitis, but has mostly been studied in an intensive care setting. Our prime aim was to evaluate the feasibility of CPAP for infants with bronchiolitis in a general paediatric ward, and secondary to assess capillary PCO2 (cPCO2) levels before and during treatment. Methods From May 1st 2008 to April 30th 2012, infants with bronchiolitis at Stavanger University Hospital were treated with CPAP in a general paediatric ward, but could be referred to an intensive care unit (ICU) when needed, according to in-house guidelines. Levels of cPCO2 were prospectively registered before the start of CPAP and at approximately 4, 12, 24 and 48 hours of treatment as long as CPAP was given. We had a continuous updating program for the nurses and physicians caring for the infants with CPAP. The study was population based. Results 672 infants (3.4%) were hospitalized with bronchiolitis. CPAP was initiated in 53 infants (0.3%; 7.9% of infants with bronchiolitis), and was well tolerated in all but three infants. 46 infants were included in the study, the majority of these (n = 33) were treated in the general ward only. These infants had lower cPCO2 before treatment (8.0; 7.7, 8.6)(median; quartiles) than those treated at the ICU (n = 13) (9.3;8.5, 9.9) (p < 0.001). The level of cPCO2 was significantly reduced after 4 h in both groups; 1.1 kPa (paediatric ward) (p < 0.001) and 1.3 kPa (ICU) (p = 0.002). Two infants on the ICU did not respond to CPAP (increasing cPCO2 and severe apnoe) and were given mechanical ventilation, otherwise no side effects were observed in either group treated with CPAP. Conclusion Treatment with CPAP for infants with bronchiolitis may be feasible in a general paediatric ward, providing sufficient staffing and training, and the possibility of referral to an ICU when needed. PMID:24886569

  5. General paediatric surgery for patients aged under 5 years: a 5-year experience at a district general hospital

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, AC

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The gradual shift of general paediatric surgery (GPS) provision from district general hospitals (DGH) to specialised units is well recognised in the UK. The consequences of centralisation include a reduction in exposure to GPS for current surgical trainees. The GPS practice of a DGH is examined here. Methods All operations performed on children aged under 5 years over a 5-year period were identified using the local electronic operation database. Electronic hospital records and clinic letters were accessed to collect data on demographics, operations performed and outcome measures. Results 472 GPS operations were performed on children between the age of 22 days and 5 years between 2009 and 2014, of which 43 were on an emergency basis and 105 were performed on patients aged less than 1 year. Three patients were admitted following day case surgery. Six patients were readmitted within 30 days. Complication rates for all procedures and the four most common procedures were similar to those found in published literature. Conclusions GPS for patients aged less than 5 years is comparatively safe in the DGH setting. The training opportunities available at DGHs are invaluable to surgical trainees and vital for sustaining the future provision of GPS by such hospitals. PMID:27269243

  6. [Restraint in paediatric care].

    PubMed

    Estrade, Marie; Tessier-Levêque, Mélanie; Wanquet-Thibault, Pascale

    2016-01-01

    Restraint in general, and particularly when giving paediatric care, is a sensitive subject. This practice continues to appear often as a solution when children are disorientated or struggle during care. However, it is generally traumatic for the different care agents: the child, the parent and the care-giver. Reflection on this subject has been carried out after exchanges with professionals about the use of restraint with children aged 2-4 during paediatric emergency care.

  7. A new tool for the paediatric HIV research: general data from the Cohort of the Spanish Paediatric HIV Network (CoRISpe)

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    There are approximately from 1,100 to 1,200 HIV-infected children in a follow-up in Spain. In 2008 an open, multicentral, retrospective and prospective Cohort of the Spanish Paediatric HIV Network (CoRISpe) was founded. The CoRISpe is divided into the node 1 and node 2 representing geographically almost the whole territory of Spain. Since 2008 seventy-five hospitals have been participating in the CoRISpe. All the retrospective data of the HIV-infected children have been kept in the CoRISpe since 1995 and prospective data since 2008. In this article we are going to present the notion of CoRISpe, its role, the structure, how the CoRISpe works and the process how a child is transferred from Paediatric to Adults Units. The main objective of the CoRISpe is to contribute to furthering scientific knowledge on paediatric HIV infection by providing demographic, sociopsychological, clinical and laboratory data from HIV-infected paediatric patients. Its aim is to enable high-quality research studies on HIV-infected children. PMID:23282073

  8. A new tool for the paediatric HIV research: general data from the Cohort of the Spanish Paediatric HIV Network (CoRISpe).

    PubMed

    de Jose, Ma Isabel; Jiménez de Ory, Santiago; Espiau, Maria; Fortuny, Claudia; Navarro, Ma Luisa; Soler-Palacín, Pere; Muñoz-Fernandez, Ma Angeles

    2013-01-02

    There are approximately from 1,100 to 1,200 HIV-infected children in a follow-up in Spain. In 2008 an open, multicentral, retrospective and prospective Cohort of the Spanish Paediatric HIV Network (CoRISpe) was founded. The CoRISpe is divided into the node 1 and node 2 representing geographically almost the whole territory of Spain. Since 2008 seventy-five hospitals have been participating in the CoRISpe. All the retrospective data of the HIV-infected children have been kept in the CoRISpe since 1995 and prospective data since 2008. In this article we are going to present the notion of CoRISpe, its role, the structure, how the CoRISpe works and the process how a child is transferred from Paediatric to Adults Units. The main objective of the CoRISpe is to contribute to furthering scientific knowledge on paediatric HIV infection by providing demographic, sociopsychological, clinical and laboratory data from HIV-infected paediatric patients. Its aim is to enable high-quality research studies on HIV-infected children.

  9. Social paediatrics.

    PubMed

    Spencer, Nick; Colomer, Concha; Alperstein, Garth; Bouvier, Paul; Colomer, Julia; Duperrex, Olivier; Gokcay, Gulbin; Julien, Gilles; Kohler, Lennart; Lindström, Bengt; Macfarlane, Aidan; Mercer, Raul; Panagiotopoulos, Takis; Schulpen, Tom

    2005-02-01

    Social paediatrics is an approach to child health that focuses on the child, in illness and in health, within the context of their society, environment, school, and family. The glossary clarifies the range of terms used to describe aspects of paediatric practice that overlap or are subsumed under social paediatrics and defines key social paediatric concepts. The glossary was compiled by a process of consultation and consensus building among the authors who are all members of the European Society for Social Paediatrics. Social paediatricians from outside Europe were included giving a more international perspective.

  10. Social paediatrics

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, N.; Colomer, C.; Alperstein, G.; Bouvier, P.; Colomer, J.; Duperrex, O.; Gokcay, G.; Julien, G.; Kohler, L.; Lindstrom, B.; Macfarlane, A.; Mercer, R.; Panagiotopoulos, T.; Schulpen, T.; on, b

    2005-01-01

    Social paediatrics is an approach to child health that focuses on the child, in illness and in health, within the context of their society, environment, school, and family. The glossary clarifies the range of terms used to describe aspects of paediatric practice that overlap or are subsumed under social paediatrics and defines key social paediatric concepts. The glossary was compiled by a process of consultation and consensus building among the authors who are all members of the European Society for Social Paediatrics. Social paediatricians from outside Europe were included giving a more international perspective. PMID:15650140

  11. Paediatrics in Amsterdam.

    PubMed

    Eber, Ernst; Aurora, Paul; Lødrup Carlsen, Karin C; Lindblad, Anders; Dankert-Roelse, Jeannette E; Ross-Russell, Robert I; Turner, Steve W; Midulla, Fabio; Hedlin, Gunilla

    2012-07-01

    The aim of this update is to describe the paediatric highlights from the 2011 European Respiratory Society (ERS) Annual Congress in Amsterdam, the Netherlands. Abstracts from all seven groups of the ERS Paediatric Assembly (Paediatric Respiratory Physiology, Paediatric Asthma and Allergy, Cystic Fibrosis, Paediatric Respiratory Infection and Immunology, Neonatology and Paediatric Intensive Care, Paediatric Respiratory Epidemiology, and Paediatric Bronchology) are presented in the context of current literature.

  12. Paediatric psychological problems.

    PubMed

    Pollack, Allan; Harrison, Christopher; Charles, Janice; Britt, Helena

    2014-04-01

    A 2011 BEACH-based study showed that over the past 40 years there has been increasing general practitioner (GP) involvement in the management of paediatric mental health in Australia. There has also been a changing mix of psychological conditions managed, including increased management of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and autism spectrum disorders (ASD).

  13. Evaluating a specialist nurse's role in a general paediatric surgical team.

    PubMed

    Quick, Julie

    2014-10-01

    A surgical care practitioner (SCP) is a registered nurse or allied health professional who, following specific education and competency training, carries out pre- and post-operative treatment and some surgical interventions under the supervision of a consultant surgeon, contributing to the maintenance of surgical services and the enhancement of patient care. With a cohesive approach, the SCP can do much to ensure continuity of care and mutual understanding and concordance between staff, child and family. Costs can be reduced and the surgical training of junior doctors supported. The results of this audit show that, with the inclusion of an SCP, higher quality general children's surgery can be provided at a medium-sized district general hospital, so that patients can be seen locally.

  14. Paediatric Interventional Uroradiology

    SciTech Connect

    Barnacle, Alex M.; Wilkinson, A. Graham; Roebuck, Derek J.

    2011-04-15

    Paediatric interventional uroradiology lies at the intersection of the disciplines of paediatric interventional radiology and paediatric endourology. Interdisciplinary collaboration has led to the development of new techniques and refinement of procedures adopted from adult practice. This article reviews the major procedures used in paediatric interventional uroradiology, with emphasis on nephrostomy, percutaneous nephrolithotomy, balloon-burst pyeloplasty, and antegrade ureteric stenting.

  15. Examining the Needs of Paediatric Nurses Caring for Children and Young People Presenting with Self-Harm/Suicidal Behaviour on General Paediatric Wards: Findings from a Small-Scale Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisher, Gemma; Foster, Celeste

    2016-01-01

    This article reports on the process and findings from a small-scale qualitative research study. The study intended to develop an evidence-based care plan/pathway for children and young people in paediatric inpatient settings presenting with self-harm/suicidal behaviour. The article includes a critical review of unanticipated challenges of…

  16. Interventional Radiology in Paediatrics.

    PubMed

    Chippington, Samantha J; Goodwin, Susie J

    2015-01-01

    As in adult practice, there is a growing role for paediatric interventional radiology expertise in the management of paediatric pathologies. This review is targeted for clinicians who may refer their patients to paediatric interventional radiology services, or who are responsible for patients who are undergoing paediatric interventional radiology procedures. The article includes a brief overview of the indications for intervention, techniques involved and the commonest complications. Although some of the procedures described are most commonly performed in a tertiary paediatric centre, many are performed in most Children's hospitals.

  17. A comparison of post-operative morbidity following outpatient dental care under general anaesthesia in paediatric patients with and without disabilities.

    PubMed

    Enever, G R; Nunn, J H; Sheehan, J K

    2000-06-01

    An investigation was undertaken of morbidity after outpatient general anaesthesia for comprehensive dental care in a group of paediatric patients over a 1-year period. Data were collated from the patient's hospital notes and from the response to a questionnaire sent to parents/carers. Clinical data were obtained for 55 cases (age range 3-17 years) for whom parents/carers had returned questionnaires. There were 27 intellectually and/or physically impaired patients, the other 28 being anxious or phobic. After discharge, 44% of all parents/carers reported symptoms post-operatively in their child, the prevalence being similar in both groups. The symptoms were nausea/vomiting (20%), unexpected drowsiness (13%) and the need for pain relief at home (13%). Dental procedures were routine restorations (42%), or a combination of restoration, extractions and preventive care for the remainder. Only four patients had extractions only. One teenager had to be admitted for persistent nausea and vomiting, despite prophylactic measures. In conclusion, post-operative morbidity appears to be low after outpatient general anaesthesia for dental procedures, and is no greater in patients with disabilities.

  18. Paediatrics: messages from Munich

    PubMed Central

    Midulla, Fabio; Lombardi, Enrico; Pijnenburg, Marielle; Balfour-Lynn, Ian M.; Grigg, Jonathan; Bohlin, Kajsa; Rusconi, Franca; Pohunek, Petr

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this article is to describe paediatric highlights from the 2014 European Respiratory Society (ERS) International Congress in Munich, Germany. Abstracts from the seven groups of the ERS Paediatric Assembly (Respiratory Physiology and Sleep, Asthma and Allergy, Cystic Fibrosis, Respiratory Infection and Immunology, Neonatology and Paediatric Intensive Care, Respiratory Epidemiology, and Bronchology) are presented in the context of the current literature. PMID:27730136

  19. Essentials of paediatric infection control

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Dorothy L

    2001-01-01

    Young children readily transmit and acquire nosocomial infections. Children are also vulnerable to endogenous infections as a result of the breakdown of their normal defences by disease, invasive procedures or therapy. The increasing acuity of illness in hospitalized children and therapeutic advances have resulted in a patient population that is increasingly at higher risk for nosocomial infections. Antibiotic resistance has emerged as a problem in some paediatric hospitals, usually in intensive care and oncology units. Infection rates are the highest in neonatal and paediatric intensive care units (where bloodstream infections are the most frequent), and are usually associated with intravascular devices. On general paediatric wards, respiratory and gastrointestinal infections predominate, reflecting the occurrence in the community. The surveillance of nosocomial infections identifies priorities for infection control activities and permits evaluation of interventions. The prevention of transmission between patients and to personnel requires that certain measures be taken with all patients, and that additional precautions be taken with some infections, based on the route of transmission. The prevention of transmission from personnel involves ensuring that personnel are appropriately immunized and counselled about working with infections. The prevention of nosocomial infection also involves control of visitors, appropriate management of invasive procedures and devices, sterilization and disinfection of equipment, provision of a clean environment and adequate staffing. Severely immunocompromised children require extra protection, including ventilation systems that reduce the risk of exposure to filamentous fungi. Infection control in paediatrics is an evolving field that must adapt to changes in the paediatric patient population and in health care technology. PMID:20084127

  20. Paediatric surgery in Uganda.

    PubMed

    Sekabira, John

    2015-02-01

    The Hugh Greenwood Lecture acknowledges the extremely generous support from Mr Greenwood that has enabled the BAPS to establish funds to advance paediatric surgical training in developing countries. In this Inaugural Lecture, Dr. Sekabira, the first Hugh Greenwood Fellow, describes the influence that this has had on his career and reviews the state of paediatric surgery in Uganda.

  1. Paediatrics in Berlin.

    PubMed

    Barbato, A; Bertuola, F; Kuehni, C; Korppi, M; Kotecha, S; Pijnenburg, M W; Ratjen, F; Seddon, P; Bush, A

    2009-08-01

    The aim of this report is to describe the highlights of the European Respiratory Society annual congress in Berlin, Germany. The best abstracts in asthma and allergy, cystic fibrosis, respiratory infection, paediatric and neonatal intensive care, paediatric investigative techniques (in particular respiratory physiology and bronchoscopy) and respiratory epidemiology are presented and set in the context of the current literature.

  2. Multi-detector CT in the paediatric urinary tract.

    PubMed

    Damasio, M B; Darge, K; Riccabona, M

    2013-07-01

    The use of paediatric multi-slice CT (MSCT) is rapidly increasing worldwide. As technology advances its application in paediatric care is constantly expanding with an increasing need for radiation dose control and appropriate utilization. Recommendations on how and when to use CT for assessment of the paediatric urinary tract appear to be an important issue. Therefore the European Society of Paediatric Radiology (ESPR) uroradiology task force and European Society of Urogenital Radiology (ESUR) paediatric working groups created a proposal for performing renal CT in children that has recently been published. The objective of this paper is to discuss paediatric urinary tract CT (uro-CT) in more detail and depth. The specific aim is not only to offer general recommendations on clinical indications and optimization processes of paediatric CT examination, but also to address various childhood characteristics and phenomena that facilitate understanding the different approach and use of uro-CT in children compared to adults. According to ALARA principles, paediatric uro-CT should only be considered for selected indications provided high-level comprehensive US is not conclusive and alternative non-ionizing techniques such as MR are not available or appropriate. Optimization of paediatric uro-CT protocols (considering lower age-adapted kV and mAs) is mandatory, and the number of phases and acquisition series should be kept as few as possible.

  3. Where should paediatric surgery be performed?

    PubMed

    Arul, G S; Spicer, R D

    1998-07-01

    We have tried to review the evidence for the organisation of paediatric surgical care. Difficulties arise because of the lack of published data from district general hospitals concerning paediatric surgical conditions. Hence much of the debate about the surgical management of children is based on anecdotal evidence. However, at a time when the provision of health care is being radically reorganised to an internal market based on a system of purchasers and providers it is more important than ever to understand the issues at stake. Two separate issues have been discussed: the role of the specialist paediatric centre and the provision of non-specialist paediatric surgery in district general hospitals. There are arguments for and against large regional specialist paediatric centres. The benefits of centralisation include concentration of expertise, more appropriate consultant on call commitment, development of support services, and junior doctor training. The disadvantages include children and their families having to travel long distances for care, and the loss of expertise at a local level. If specialist paediatric emergency transport is available the benefits of centralisation far outweigh the adverse effects of having to take children to a regional paediatric intensive care centre. Specialist paediatric centres are aware of the importance of treating children and their parents as a family unit as highlighted by the Platt committee; this is an important challenge and enormous improvements have occurred to provide proper accommodation for families while their children are treated in hospital. To keep these arguments of large distances and separation from the home in context, one paediatric intensive care unit in Victoria, Australia, providing a centralised service to a region larger in are than England and with a similar admission rate, has a lower mortality rate than the decentralised paediatric intensive care provided in the Trent region of the UK. There is clear

  4. [The latest in paediatric resuscitation recommendations].

    PubMed

    López-Herce, Jesús; Rodríguez, Antonio; Carrillo, Angel; de Lucas, Nieves; Calvo, Custodio; Civantos, Eva; Suárez, Eva; Pons, Sara; Manrique, Ignacio

    2017-04-01

    Cardiac arrest has a high mortality in children. To improve the performance of cardiopulmonary resuscitation, it is essential to disseminate the international recommendations and the training of health professionals and the general population in resuscitation. This article summarises the 2015 European Paediatric Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation recommendations, which are based on a review of the advances in cardiopulmonary resuscitation and consensus in the science and treatment by the International Council on Resuscitation. The Spanish Paediatric Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation recommendations, developed by the Spanish Group of Paediatric and Neonatal Resuscitation, are an adaptation of the European recommendations, and will be used for training health professionals and the general population in resuscitation. This article highlights the main changes from the previous 2010 recommendations on prevention of cardiac arrest, the diagnosis of cardiac arrest, basic life support, advanced life support and post-resuscitation care, as well as reviewing the algorithms of treatment of basic life support, obstruction of the airway and advanced life support.

  5. Paediatric Virology: A rapidly increasing educational challenge

    PubMed Central

    Mammas, Ioannis N.; Theodoridou, Maria; Kramvis, Anna; Thiagarajan, Prakash; Gardner, Sharryn; Papaioannou, Georgia; Melidou, Angeliki; Koutsaki, Maria; Kostagianni, Georgia; Achtsidis, Vassilis; Koutsaftiki, Chryssie; Calachanis, Marcos; Zaravinos, Apostolos; Greenough, Anne; Spandidos, Demetrios A.

    2017-01-01

    The ‘2nd Workshop on Paediatric Virology’, which took place on Saturday the 8th of October 2016 in Athens, Greece, provided an overview on recent views and advances on Paediatric Virology. Emphasis was given to HIV-1 management in Greece, a country under continuous financial crisis, hepatitis B vaccination in Africa, treatment options for hepatitis C virus in childhood, Zika virus in pregnancy and infancy, the burden of influenza on childhood, hand-foot-mouth disease and myocarditis associated with Coxsackie viruses. Other general topics covered included a critical evaluation of Paediatric Accident and Emergency viral infections, multimodality imaging of viral infections in children, surgical approaches of otolaryngologists to complex viral infections, new advances in the diagnosis and treatment of viral conjunctivitis and novel molecular diagnostic methods for HPV in childhood. A brief historical overview of the anti-vaccination movement was also provided, as well as presentations on the educational challenge of Paediatric Virology as a new subspecialty of Paediatrics. This review highlights selected lectures and discussions of the workshop. PMID:28352303

  6. [What's new in paediatric dermatology?].

    PubMed

    Plantin, P

    2014-12-01

    Regular analysis of the major journals in dermatology and paediatrics has been used to select forty articles which are representative of the past year in paediatric dermatology. This selection is not exhaustive but rather reflects the interests of the author and also the dominant topics in paediatric dermatology in 2013-2014.

  7. Paediatric musculoskeletal interventional radiology

    PubMed Central

    Paolantonio, Guglielmo; Fruhwirth, Rodolfo; Alvaro, Giuseppe; Parapatt, George K; Toma', Paolo; Rollo, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    Interventional radiology technique is now well established and widely used in the adult population. Through minimally invasive procedures, it increasingly replaces surgical interventions that involve higher percentages of invasiveness and, consequently, of morbidity and mortality. For these advantageous reasons, interventional radiology in recent years has spread to the paediatric age as well. The aim of this study was to review the literature on the development, use and perspectives of these procedures in the paediatric musculoskeletal field. Several topics are covered: osteomuscle neoplastic malignant and benign pathologies treated with invasive diagnostic and/or therapeutic procedures such as radiofrequency ablation in the osteoid osteoma; invasive and non-invasive procedures in vascular malformations; treatment of aneurysmal bone cysts; and role of interventional radiology in paediatric inflammatory and rheumatic inflammations. The positive results that have been generated with interventional radiology procedures in the paediatric field highly encourage both the development of new ad hoc materials, obviously adapted to young patients, as well as the improvement of such techniques, in consideration of the fact that childrens' pathologies do not always correspond to those of adults. In conclusion, as these interventional procedures have proven to be less invasive, with lower morbidity and mortality rates as well, they are becoming a viable and valid alternative to surgery in the paediatric population. PMID:26235144

  8. Key paediatric messages from Amsterdam

    PubMed Central

    Barben, Jürg; Bohlin, Kajsa; Everard, Mark L.; Hall, Graham; Pijnenburg, Mariëlle; Priftis, Kostas N.; Rusconi, Franca; Midulla, Fabio

    2016-01-01

    The Paediatric Assembly of the European Respiratory Society (ERS) maintained its high profile at the 2015 ERS International Congress in Amsterdam. There were symposia on preschool wheeze, respiratory sounds and cystic fibrosis; an educational skills workshop on paediatric respiratory resuscitation; a hot topic session on risk factors and early origins of respiratory diseases; a meet the expert session on paediatric lung function test reference values; and the annual paediatric grand round. In this report the Chairs of the Paediatric Assembly's Groups highlight the key messages from the abstracts presented at the Congress. PMID:27730186

  9. Making metadata usable in a multi-national research setting.

    PubMed

    Ellul, Claire; Foord, Joanna; Mooney, John

    2013-11-01

    SECOA (Solutions for Environmental Contrasts in Coastal Areas) is a multi-national research project examining the effects of human mobility on urban settlements in fragile coastal environments. This paper describes the setting up of a SECOA metadata repository for non-specialist researchers such as environmental scientists and tourism experts. Conflicting usability requirements of two groups - metadata creators and metadata users - are identified along with associated limitations of current metadata standards. A description is given of a configurable metadata system designed to grow as the project evolves. This work is of relevance for similar projects such as INSPIRE.

  10. [Why multi-national clinical trials now?--Industry perspective].

    PubMed

    Miki, Satoshi

    2007-02-01

    Clinical trial environment in Japan has issues such as high clinical development cost, resource-intensive and time-consuming preparation for clinical trial conduct in each clinical site, long "White Space" and slow speed in pt.recruitment. As a result of the Guideline revision in Nov., 2005, overseas' Phase III data is now usable as pivotal data for NDA submissions. Therefore, acceleration of "hollowing out of clinical trails for registration in Japan has been the significant concern. Under such circumstances, the possible solution would be to participate in the Multi-National Clinical Trials." While other Asian countries, EU and the US have rich precedents and experiences in conducting Multi-National Clinical Trials, Japan was left alone and other Asian countries do not need any collaboration with Japan. It is proposed that Japan take initiative to set up the network such as "Asian Clinical Trial Group" and collaborate with other Asian countries from the beginning of early stage development. Eventually, Asia should become the third region to create clinical evidence, same as to EU and the US.

  11. [Diagnosis of tuberculosis in paediatrics].

    PubMed

    Moreno-Pérez, D; Andrés Martín, A; Altet Gómez, N; Baquero-Artigao, F; Escribano Montaner, A; Gómez-Pastrana Durán, D; González Montero, R; Mellado Peña, M J; Rodrigo-Gonzalo-de-Liria, C; Ruiz Serrano, M J

    2010-04-01

    Tuberculosis is one of the most important health problems worldwide. There are an increasing number of cases, including children, due to different reasons in developed countries. The most likely determining cause is immigration from highly endemic areas. Measures to optimise early and appropriate diagnosis of the different forms of tuberculosis in children are a real priority. Two Societies of the Spanish Paediatric Association (Spanish Society of Paediatric Infectology and Spanish Society of Paediatric Pneumology) have agreed this Consensus Document in order to homogenise diagnostic criteria in paediatric patients.

  12. Paediatric pharmacokinetics: key considerations

    PubMed Central

    Batchelor, Hannah Katharine; Marriott, John Francis

    2015-01-01

    A number of anatomical and physiological factors determine the pharmacokinetic profile of a drug. Differences in physiology in paediatric populations compared with adults can influence the concentration of drug within the plasma or tissue. Healthcare professionals need to be aware of anatomical and physiological changes that affect pharmacokinetic profiles of drugs to understand consequences of dose adjustments in infants and children. Pharmacokinetic clinical trials in children are complicated owing to the limitations on blood sample volumes and perception of pain in children resulting from blood sampling. There are alternative sampling techniques that can minimize the invasive nature of such trials. Population based models can also limit the sampling required from each individual by increasing the overall sample size to generate robust pharmacokinetic data. This review details key considerations in the design and development of paediatric pharmacokinetic clinical trials. PMID:25855821

  13. Population approaches in paediatrics.

    PubMed

    Chatelut, Etienne

    2008-12-01

    Population pharmacokinetic (PK) approach is now often used to evaluate PK characteristics of a new compound during its clinical development. Recently, new legislation governing the development and authorization of medicines for use in children aged 0-17 years was introduced in the European Union. Among the strategies proposed in relation to clinical aspects, use of population PKs is stated. In this manuscript, comparison between standard PK and population PK methods will be briefly addressed to understand why the second is particularly adapted to perform PK studies in paediatrics. Then, specific patients' characteristics (covariates) in paediatrics will be presented. Examples of PK and PK-pharmacodynamic (PK-PD) studies will be finally given. The number of population PK studies published still exceeds largely those of PK-PD.

  14. Paediatric pharmacokinetics: key considerations.

    PubMed

    Batchelor, Hannah Katharine; Marriott, John Francis

    2015-03-01

    A number of anatomical and physiological factors determine the pharmacokinetic profile of a drug. Differences in physiology in paediatric populations compared with adults can influence the concentration of drug within the plasma or tissue. Healthcare professionals need to be aware of anatomical and physiological changes that affect pharmacokinetic profiles of drugs to understand consequences of dose adjustments in infants and children. Pharmacokinetic clinical trials in children are complicated owing to the limitations on blood sample volumes and perception of pain in children resulting from blood sampling. There are alternative sampling techniques that can minimize the invasive nature of such trials. Population based models can also limit the sampling required from each individual by increasing the overall sample size to generate robust pharmacokinetic data. This review details key considerations in the design and development of paediatric pharmacokinetic clinical trials.

  15. [New analgesics in paediatrics].

    PubMed

    Avez-Couturier, Justine; Wood, Chantal

    2016-01-01

    There are a number of different types of analgesics in paediatrics. They must be used in accordance with the situation, the type of pain and the characteristics of the child. In all cases, strict compliance with the posology and the instructions for use is essential to avoid any risk of error. Finally, pharmacological, physical and psychological treatments are employed in a complementary manner, for the biopsychosocial management of the child's care.

  16. The EU paediatric regulation: effects on paediatric psychopharmacology in Europe.

    PubMed

    Stoyanova-Beninska, Violeta V; Wohlfarth, Tamar; Isaac, Maria; Kalverdijk, Luuk J; van den Berg, Henk; Gispen-de Wied, Christine

    2011-08-01

    Child and adolescent psychiatry is a relatively young field and the recognition, classification, and treatment of disorders in children and adolescents lag behind those in adults. In recent years there is an increasing awareness of the differences between children and adults in psychopathology and pharmacology. Related to this new paediatric regulations have been introduced. This article reviews the regulatory and legislative measures that were adopted in the EU in 2007 and the subsequent impact of these measures on the field of paediatric psychopharmacology. The consequences of the paediatric regulation in the EU are reflected in several domains: regulatory, research aimed at drug development and clinical practices. In the regulatory domain, the consequences include: new paediatric indications, inclusion of special (class) warnings, specification of dose regimens, and information on safety specific to children and adolescents, and development of new medicinal formulations. The paediatric regulation leads to timely development of paediatric friendly formulations and better quality of the clinical evidence. In clinical practices, an increased awareness of the uniqueness of paediatric pharmacology is emerging among medical professionals, and subsequent improvement of medical care (i.e. correct doses, appropriate formulation, monitoring for expected adverse events). In addition, clinical guidelines will have to be revised more frequently in order to integrate the recently acquired knowledge. The new regulations stimulate transparency and discussions between academia, pharmaceutical industry, and regulators. The purpose is to optimize clinical research and obtain evidence for paediatric psychopharmacology, thereby providing adequate support for treatment.

  17. Interleukins for the paediatric pulmonologist.

    PubMed

    Rozycki, Henry J; Zhao, Wei

    2014-03-01

    Interleukins are critical immune modulators and since their first description in 1977, there has been a steady increase in the recognition of their roles in many paediatric respiratory diseases. This basic and clinical knowledge is now maturing into both approved and investigational therapies aimed at blocking or modifying the interleukin response. The purpose of this review is to bring up to date what is known about interleukin function in paediatric pulmonology, focusing on nine important lung conditions. This is followed by summaries about 18 interleukins which have been associated with these paediatric pulmonary conditions. Throughout, emphasis is placed on where interventions have been tested. Over the next several years, it is likely that many more treatments based on interleukin biology and function will become available and understanding the basis for these therapies will allow the practicing paediatric pulmonologist to take appropriate advantage of them.

  18. [Toxicology screening in paediatrics].

    PubMed

    Garcia-Algar, Óscar; Cuadrado González, Ainoha; Falcon, María

    2016-09-01

    The prevalence of acute or chronic exposure to substances of abuse in paediatric patients, from the neonatal period to adolescence, is not well established as most cases go unnoticed. Regardless of clinical cases of acute poisoning leading to visits to emergency room, the exposure is usually detected by a questionnaire to the parents or children. In the last few years, new validated analytical methodologies have been developed in order to detect parent drugs and their metabolites in different biological matrices. These biological matrices have different time windows for detection of the exposure: acute (i.e., urine, blood, oral fluid), and chronic (i.e., hair, meconium or teeth). The aim of this paper was to review the scenarios where the use of biological matrices is indicated for the detection of acute or chronic exposure to substances of abuse.

  19. Diagnostic paediatric imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, C.M.; Lingam, S.

    1986-01-01

    This book is a case study teaching manual presenting radiographs and examples of other imaging modalities from 100 paediatric patients. The material comes from the radiological teaching collection at the Hospital for Sick Children at Great Ormond Street in London and was compiled over a ten year period. With each case a short clinical history is given and a series of questions posed, similar to those encountered in postgraduate medical examinations. Sample answers with comments and more illustrations are presented on the following page. The last decade has seen a rapid expansion in the range and sophistication of diagnostic imaging modalities which are available to clinicians. Since it is impossible to achieve comprehensive coverage in a book of this size, the authors have selected examples of cases which illustrate the range of imaging modalities currently available and which may be encountered in both clinical practice and in examinations.

  20. Paediatric Blunt Torso Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Bhatti, Khalid M.; Taqi, Kadhim M.; Al-Harthy, Ahmed Z. S.; Hamid, Rana S.; Al-Balushi, Zainab N.; Sankhla, Dilip K.; Al-Qadhi, Hani A.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Trauma is the greatest cause of morbidity and mortality in paediatric/adolescent populations worldwide. This study aimed to describe trauma mechanisms, patterns and outcomes among children with blunt torso trauma admitted to the Sultan Qaboos University Hospital (SQUH) in Muscat, Oman. Methods: This retrospective single-centre study involved all children ≤12 years old with blunt torso trauma admitted for paediatric surgical care at SQUH between January 2009 and December 2013. Medical records were analysed to collect demographic and clinical data. Results: A total of 70 children were admitted with blunt torso trauma during the study period, including 39 (55.7%) male patients. The mean age was 5.19 ± 2.66 years. Of the cohort, 35 children (50.0%) received their injuries after having been hit by cars as pedestrians, while 19 (27.1%) were injured by falls, 12 (17.1%) during car accidents as passengers and four (5.7%) by falling heavy objects. According to computed tomography scans, thoracic injuries were most common (65.7%), followed by abdominal injuries (42.9%). The most commonly involved solid organs were the liver (15.7%) and spleen (11.4%). The majority of the patients were managed conservatively (92.9%) with a good outcome (74.3%). The mortality rate was 7.1%. Most deaths were due to multisystem involvement. Conclusion: Among children with blunt torso trauma admitted to SQUH, the main mechanism of injury was motor vehicle accidents. As a result, parental education and enforcement of infant car seat/child seat belt laws are recommended. Conservative management was the most successful approach. PMID:27226913

  1. Fifty years of paediatric ethics.

    PubMed

    Gillam, Lynn

    2015-01-01

    In 1965, when the first issue of Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health appeared, medical ethics was just becoming established as a discipline. The sub-speciality of paediatric ethics did not make an appearance until the late 1980s, with the first key texts appearing in the 1990s. Professional concern to practice ethically in paediatrics obviously goes much further back than that, even if not named as such. In clinical areas of paediatrics, the story of the last 50 years is essentially a story of progress - better understanding of disease, better diagnosis, more effective treatment, better outcomes. In paediatric ethics, the story of the last 50 years is a bit more complicated. In ethics, the idea of progress, rather than just change, is not so straightforward and is sometimes hotly contested. There has certainly been change, including some quite radical shifts in attitudes and practices, but on some issues, the ethical debate now looks remarkably similar to that of 40-50 years ago. This is the story of some things that have changed in paediatric ethics, some things that have stayed the same and the key ethical ideas lying beneath the surface.

  2. Advances in the medical management of paediatric IBD.

    PubMed

    Aloi, Marina; Nuti, Federica; Stronati, Laura; Cucchiara, Salvatore

    2014-02-01

    IBD includes two classic entities, Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis, and a third undetermined form (IBD-U), characterized by a chronic relapsing course resulting in a high rate of morbidity and impaired quality of life. Children with IBD are vulnerable in terms of growth failure, malnutrition and emotional effects. The aims of therapy have now transitioned from symptomatic control to the achievement of mucosal healing and deep remission. This type of therapy has been made possible by the advent of disease-modifying drugs, such as biologic agents, which are capable of interrupting the inflammatory cascade underlying IBD. Biologic agents are generally administered in patients who are refractory to conventional therapies. However, there is growing support that such agents could be used in the initial phases of the disease, typically in paediatric patients, to interrupt and cease the inflammatory process. Until several years ago, most therapeutic programmes in paediatric patients with IBD were borrowed from adult trials, whereas paediatric studies were often retrospective and uncontrolled. However, guidelines on therapeutic management of paediatric IBD and controlled, prospective, randomized trials including children with IBD have now been published. Here, the current knowledge concerning treatment options for children with IBD are reported. We also highlight the effectiveness and safety of new therapeutic advances in these paediatric patients.

  3. Influence of Food on Paediatric Gastrointestinal Drug Absorption Following Oral Administration: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Batchelor, Hannah K.

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this paper was to review existing information regarding food effects on drug absorption within paediatric populations. Mechanisms that underpin food–drug interactions were examined to consider potential differences between adult and paediatric populations, to provide insights into how this may alter the pharmacokinetic profile in a child. Relevant literature was searched to retrieve information on food–drug interaction studies undertaken on: (i) paediatric oral drug formulations; and (ii) within paediatric populations. The applicability of existing methodology to predict food effects in adult populations was evaluated with respect to paediatric populations where clinical data was available. Several differences in physiology, anatomy and the composition of food consumed within a paediatric population are likely to lead to food–drug interactions that cannot be predicted based on adult studies. Existing methods to predict food effects cannot be directly extrapolated to allow predictions within paediatric populations. Development of systematic methods and guidelines is needed to address the general lack of information on examining food–drug interactions within paediatric populations. PMID:27417362

  4. Influence of Food on Paediatric Gastrointestinal Drug Absorption Following Oral Administration: A Review.

    PubMed

    Batchelor, Hannah K

    2015-06-09

    The objective of this paper was to review existing information regarding food effects on drug absorption within paediatric populations. Mechanisms that underpin food-drug interactions were examined to consider potential differences between adult and paediatric populations, to provide insights into how this may alter the pharmacokinetic profile in a child. Relevant literature was searched to retrieve information on food-drug interaction studies undertaken on: (i) paediatric oral drug formulations; and (ii) within paediatric populations. The applicability of existing methodology to predict food effects in adult populations was evaluated with respect to paediatric populations where clinical data was available. Several differences in physiology, anatomy and the composition of food consumed within a paediatric population are likely to lead to food-drug interactions that cannot be predicted based on adult studies. Existing methods to predict food effects cannot be directly extrapolated to allow predictions within paediatric populations. Development of systematic methods and guidelines is needed to address the general lack of information on examining food-drug interactions within paediatric populations.

  5. Azithromycin use in paediatrics: A practical overview.

    PubMed

    Ovetchkine, Philippe; Rieder, Michael J

    2013-06-01

    Azithromycin is an antibiotic that is commonly prescribed for upper and lower respiratory tract infections in children. While it has proven benefits, some concerns regarding azithromycin use have arisen in recent years. This practice point considers azithromycin therapy for acute respiratory infections in otherwise healthy children. Pharmacokinetics, spectrum of activity, the problem of resistant bacteria and clinical aspects are considered, along with recommendations for use and contraindications. Azithromycin should be avoided in patients with a significant risk of bacteremia. It is associated with pneumococcal resistance and, with stated exceptions, is generally not recommended for the treatment of acute pharyngitis, acute otitis media or pneumococcal community-acquired pneumonia in the paediatric population.

  6. Paediatric Autoimmune Liver Disease.

    PubMed

    Liberal, Rodrigo; Vergani, Diego; Mieli-Vergani, Giorgina

    2015-01-01

    In paediatrics, there are 2 liver disorders in which liver damage most likely stems from an autoimmune attack: 'classical' autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) and the AIH/sclerosing cholangitis overlap syndrome (also known as autoimmune sclerosing cholangitis, ASC). The presentation of childhood autoimmune liver disease (AILD) is non-specific and can mimic most other liver disorders. AIH is exquisitely responsive to immunosuppressive treatment, which should be instituted promptly to prevent rapid deterioration and promote remission and long-term survival. Difficult-to-treat or non-responsive patients should be treated with mycophenolate mofetil; if this fails then calcineurin inhibitors can be tried. Persistent failure to respond or lack of adherence to treatment result in end-stage liver disease. These patients, and those with fulminant liver failure at diagnosis, will require liver transplantation. ASC responds to the same immunosuppressive treatment used for AIH when treatment is initiated early. Abnormal liver function tests often resolve within a few months of treatment, although medium- to long-term prognosis is worse than that of AIH because bile duct disease continues to progress despite treatment in approximately 50% of patients. Ursodeoxycholic acid is usually added to conventional treatment regimen in ASC, but whether this actually helps arrest the progression of bile duct disease remains to be established. The pathogenesis of paediatric-onset AILD is not fully understood, although there is mounting evidence that genetic susceptibility, molecular mimicry and impaired immunoregulatory networks contribute to the initiation and perpetuation of the autoimmune attack. Liver damage is thought to be mediated primarily by CD4pos T-cells. While Th1 effector cells are associated with hepatocyte damage in both AIH and ASC, Th17 immune responses predominate in the latter where they correlate with biochemical indices of cholestasis, indicating that IL-17 is involved in the

  7. Current management of paediatric urolithiasis.

    PubMed

    Gnessin, Ehud; Chertin, Leonid; Chertin, Boris

    2012-07-01

    We aimed to review a current management of paediatric nephrolithiasis. The current literature, including our own experience on the treatment of paediatric nephrolithiasis was reviewed by MEDLINE/PubMed search. We have used in our search following keywords: urolithiasis, nephrolithiasis, paediatrics, surgical treatment, conservative management, ESWL, ureteroscopy, and open renal surgery. The search was limited to the English language literature during the period of time from 1990 to 2011. All papers were reviewed independently by all co-authors and only the manuscripts directly related to the reviewed subjects were included into the current review. Due to the high incidence of predisposing factors for urolithiasis in children and high stone recurrence rates, every child with urinary stone should be given a complete metabolic evaluation. Most stones in children can be managed by ESWL and endoscopic techniques. Paediatric stone disease is an important clinical problem in paediatric urology practice. Because of its recurrent nature, every effort should be made to discover the underlying metabolic abnormality so that it can be treated appropriately. Obtaining a stone-free state with interventional management and close follow-up are of utmost importance.

  8. Bizarre paediatric facial burns.

    PubMed

    Ho, W S; Ying, S Y; Wong, T W

    2000-08-01

    Child abuse and neglect account for a significant number of paediatric burn injuries. It is of great importance because of the high mortality, high frequency of repeated abuse, as well as the physical, psychological and social sequelae that it causes. Burn abuse is often under-recognized and under-reported because it is difficult to define non-accidental injury. On the other hand, false accusation of burn abuse is extremely damaging to the family. Bizarre and unusual burn injuries can be caused by accident and should not automatically be assumed to be deliberate injury. Three boys of age 1-7 years with bizarre facial burns were admitted to the Burns Unit at the Prince of Wales Hospital between February 1995 and July 1999. One was burned by his baby-sitter with hot water steam and the other two were burned by their mothers with hot boiled eggs. The unusual causes of their burns raised the suspicion of child abuse and formal investigations were carried out by the Social Services Department. Detail assessment including a developmental history of the child and the psychosocial assessment of the family revealed that these three boys were burned because of poor medical advice and innocent cultural belief.

  9. The training paths and practice patterns of Canadian paediatric residency graduates, 2004–2010

    PubMed Central

    Hameed, Tahir; Lawrence, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The Paediatric Chairs of Canada have been proactive in workforce planning, anticipating paediatric job opportunities in academic centres. To complement this, it is important to characterize the practice profiles of paediatricians exiting training, including those working outside of tertiary care centres. OBJECTIVE: To describe the training paths and the practice patterns of Canadian paediatric residency graduates. METHODS: A survey was completed in 2010 to 2011 by Canadian program directors regarding residents completing core paediatrics training between 2004 and 2010. Data collection included training path after completing core paediatrics training and practice type after graduation. RESULTS: Of 699 residents completing their core training in paediatrics, training path data were available for 685 (98%). Overall, 430 (63%) residents completed subspecialty training while 255 (37%) completed general paediatrics training only. There was a significant increase in subspecialty training, from 59% in earlier graduates (2004 to 2007) to 67% in later graduates (2008 to 2010) (P=0.037). Practice pattern data after completion of training were available for 245 general paediatricians and 205 subspecialists. Sixty-nine percent of general paediatricians were community based while 85% of subspecialists were hospital based in tertiary or quaternary centres. Of all residents currently in practice, only 36 (8%) were working in rural, remote or underserviced areas. CONCLUSIONS: Almost two-thirds of recent Canadian paediatric graduates pursued subspecialty training. There was a significant increase in the frequency of subspecialty training among later-year graduates. Few graduates are practicing in rural or underserviced areas. Further studies are needed to determine whether these trends continue and their impact on the future paediatric workforce in Canada. PMID:27398047

  10. Aetiological factors in paediatric urolithiasis.

    PubMed

    van't Hoff, William G

    2004-01-01

    The aetiology of stones in children differs from that in adults. Young children, especially boys, are prone to infective stones, although this type of calculi is decreasing in frequency over time in prosperous countries. Two monogenic causes, cystinuria and hyperoxaluria, each account for 5-15% of paediatric stones. Increased factors for stone formation in children include prematurity, neurological problems, ketogenic diet and reconstructed or augmented bladders. Hypercalciuria is commonly found in paediatric stone formers, is usually idiopathic and is only rarely associated with hypercalcaemia. All children with stones should undergo a metabolic evaluation.

  11. More than 5 years of European Paediatric Regulation: statistics and industrial experience.

    PubMed

    Winzenburg, Gesine

    2014-08-05

    The aim of the European paediatric legislation is to ensure high quality paediatric clinical research, and subsequently increase availability of authorised medicines that are appropriate for children and produce better information on medicines. One of the main pillars of the regulation is the paediatric investigation plan (PIP), a new key document in the general drug development process. PIP submission and approval are now mandatory to ensure registration of a new drug in the EU. A short summary of the achievements from the introduction of the regulation in 2007 is given. In addition, PIP case studies are presented to illustrate the challenges associated when working within the framework of the new process.

  12. [General concepts of epigenetics: Projections in paediatrics].

    PubMed

    Krause, Bernardo J; Castro-Rodríguez, José A; Uauy, Ricardo; Casanello, Paola

    2016-01-01

    Current evidence supports the notion that alterations in intrauterine growth and during the first years of life have a substantial effect on the risk for the development of chronic disease, which in some cases is even higher than those due to genetic factors. The persistence and reproducibility of the phenotypes associated with altered early development suggest the participation of mechanisms that would record environmental cues, generating a cellular reprogramming (i.e., epigenetic mechanisms). This review is an introduction to a series of five articles focused on the participation of epigenetic mechanisms in the development of highly prevalent chronic diseases (i.e., cardiovascular, metabolic, asthma/allergies and cancer) and their origins in the foetal and neonatal period. This series of articles aims to show the state of the art in this research area and present the upcoming clues and challenges, in which paediatricians have a prominent role, developing strategies for the prevention, early detection and follow-up.

  13. Unmet needs in paediatric psychopharmacology: Present scenario and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Persico, Antonio M; Arango, Celso; Buitelaar, Jan K; Correll, Christoph U; Glennon, Jeffrey C; Hoekstra, Pieter J; Moreno, Carmen; Vitiello, Benedetto; Vorstman, Jacob; Zuddas, Alessandro

    2015-10-01

    Paediatric psychopharmacology holds great promise in two equally important areas of enormous biomedical and social impact, namely the treatment of behavioural abnormalities in children and adolescents, and the prevention of psychiatric disorders with adolescent- or adult-onset. Yet, in striking contrast, pharmacological treatment options presently available in child and adolescent psychiatry are dramatically limited. The most important currently unmet needs in paediatric psychopharmacology are: the frequent off-label prescription of medications to children and adolescents based exclusively on data from randomized controlled studies involving adult patients; the frequent lack of age-specific dose, long-term efficacy and tolerability/safety data; the lack of effective medications for many paediatric psychiatric disorders, most critically autism spectrum disorder; the scarcity and limitations of randomized placebo-controlled trials in paediatric psychopharmacology; the unexplored potential for the prevention of psychiatric disorders with adolescent- and adult-onset; the current lack of biomarkers to predict treatment response and severe adverse effects; the need for better preclinical data to foster the successful development of novel drug therapies; and the effective dissemination of evidence-based treatments to the general public, to better inform patients and families of the benefits and risks of pharmacological interventions during development. Priorities and strategies are proposed to overcome some of these limitations, including the European Child and Adolescent Clinical Psychopharmacology Network, as an overarching Pan-European infrastructure aimed at reliably carrying out much needed psychopharmacological trials in children and adolescents, in order to fill the identified gaps and improve overall outcomes.

  14. How readable are Australian paediatric oral health education materials?

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The objective of this study was to analyse the readability of paediatric oral health education leaflets available in Australia. Methods Forty paediatric oral health education materials were analysed for general readability according to the following parameters: Thoroughness; Textual framework; Terminology; and Readability (Flesch-Kincaid grade level (FKGL), Gunning Fog index (Fog) and Simplified Measure of Gobbledygook (SMOG)). Results Leaflets produced by the industry were among the hardest to read with an average readability at the 8th grade (8.4 ± 0.1). The readability of leaflets produced by the commercial sector was at the 7th grade (7.1 ± 1.7) and the government at the 6th grade (6.3 ± 1.9). The FKGL consistently yielded readabilities 2 grades below the Fog and SMOG indexes. In the content analyses, 14 essential paediatric oral health topics were noted and Early Childhood Caries (ECC) was identified as the most commonly used jargon term. Conclusion Paediatric oral health education materials are readily available, yet their quality and readability vary widely and may be difficult to read for disadvantaged populations in Australia. A redesign of these leaflets while taking literacy into consideration is suggested. PMID:25183234

  15. ESPR Uroradiology Task Force and ESUR Paediatric Working Group--Imaging recommendations in paediatric uroradiology, part V: childhood cystic kidney disease, childhood renal transplantation and contrast-enhanced ultrasonography in children.

    PubMed

    Riccabona, Michael; Avni, Fred Efraim; Damasio, Maria Beatrice; Ording-Müller, Lil-Sofie; Blickman, Johan G; Darge, Kassa; Lobo, Maria Luisa; Papadopoulou, Frederica; Vivier, Pierre-Hugues; Willi, Ullrich

    2012-10-01

    The ESPR Uroradiology Task Force and the ESUR Paediatric Working Group present two new recommendations on imaging in childhood cystic kidney disease and in childhood renal transplantation, and address the presently restricted availability of contrast-enhanced (ce) US in children. New insights into the genetics require an updated classification of paediatric cystic kidney disease along with a new concept of diagnostic imaging. Characteristic imaging features are key to the new classification. Available recommendations for imaging renal transplantation in children are not satisfactory. The following consensus-based algorithm proposes a more effective and more uniform imaging concept, reducing invasiveness, enhancing diagnostic accuracy, and facilitating future multicentre studies and meta-analysis. At present, ce-US in children can only be performed off-license, since the only approved US contrast agent (CA) for children has been taken off the market. Nevertheless, paediatric ce-US is practiced at multiple places using Sonovue (Bracco, Milan, Italy), a generally available agent in Europe. From a medical and scientific perspective, paediatric ce-US should be promoted, and efforts are undertaken to collect data on paediatric US-CA applications. Routine paediatric imaging depends on local expertise and availability of equipment. The imaging recommendations and supportive data are intended to ease the physicians' difficult task of dealing with the specific diagnostic demands of paediatric paediatric cystic kidney disease and transplantation.

  16. Teaching Presence: Co-Creating a Multi-National Online Learning Community in an Asynchronous Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dzubinski, Leanne M.

    2014-01-01

    The pace of globalization coupled with growing institutional pursuit of online education means that online classes are increasingly composed of a multi-national, multi-ethnic, and multi-cultural student body. Teaching presence, which is the ability to structure the class, create the social environment, give instruction, and assess student work, is…

  17. Inequality of Paediatric Workforce Distribution in China

    PubMed Central

    Song, Peige; Ren, Zhenghong; Chang, Xinlei; Liu, Xuebei; An, Lin

    2016-01-01

    Child health has been addressed as a priority at both global and national levels for many decades. In China, difficulty of accessing paediatricians has been of debate for a long time, however, there is limited evidence to assess the population- and geography-related inequality of paediatric workforce distribution. This study aimed to analyse the inequality of the distributions of the paediatric workforce (including paediatricians and paediatric nurses) in China by using Lorenz curve, Gini coefficient, and Theil L index, data were obtained from the national maternal and child health human resource sampling survey conducted in 2010. In this study, we found that the paediatric workforce was the most inequitable regarding the distribution of children <7 years, the geographic distribution of the paediatric workforce highlighted very severe inequality across the nation, except the Central region. For different professional types, we found that, except the Central region, the level of inequality of paediatric nurses was higher than that of the paediatricians regarding both the demographic and geographic distributions. The inner-regional inequalities were the main sources of the paediatric workforce distribution inequality. To conclude, this study revealed the inadequate distribution of the paediatric workforce in China for the first time, substantial inequality of paediatric workforce distribution still existed across the nation in 2010, more research is still needed to explore the in-depth sources of inequality, especially the urban-rural variance and the inner- and inter-provincial differences, and to guide national and local health policy-making and resource allocation. PMID:27420083

  18. Hypnosis in paediatric respiratory medicine.

    PubMed

    McBride, Joshua J; Vlieger, Arine M; Anbar, Ran D

    2014-03-01

    Hypnotherapy is an often misunderstood yet effective therapy. It has been reported to be useful within the field of paediatric respiratory medicine as both a primary and an adjunctive therapy. This article gives a brief overview of how hypnotherapy is performed followed by a review of its applications in paediatric patients with asthma, cystic fibrosis, dyspnea, habit cough, vocal cord dysfunction, and those requiring non-invasive positive pressure ventilation. As the available literature is comprised mostly of case series, retrospective studies, and only a single small randomized study, the field would be strengthened by additional randomized, controlled trials in order to better establish the effectiveness of hypnosis as a treatment, and to identify the processes leading to hypnosis-induced physiologic changes. As examples of the utility of hypnosis and how it can be taught to children with respiratory disease, the article includes videos that demonstrate its use for patients with cystic fibrosis.

  19. What's new in paediatric dentistry?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vitale, M. C.

    2016-03-01

    Since the early 80's, the use of laser has been introduced in the daily dental practice and the technological development has also provided over time to optimize its use. Various types of lasers with different wavelengths have been developed for use in a handy, easy and ergonomic manner. In daily paediatric dentistry, laser could be a very useful medical device which can completely replace the traditional high hand-piece and bur to realize a "micro-invasive" dentistry and a "clean" surgery, without bleeding and sutures. According to the international literature and in the light of recent researches, this work could give an overview on assisted laser therapy in paediatric dentistry, highlighting advantages and disadvantages of this new technology and pointing out the high compliance of the young patient.

  20. What Evidence Underlies Clinical Practice in Paediatric Surgery? A Systematic Review Assessing Choice of Study Design

    PubMed Central

    Allin, Benjamin; Knight, Marian

    2016-01-01

    Objective Identify every paediatric surgical article published in 1998 and every paediatric surgical article published in 2013, and determine which study designs were used and whether they were appropriate for robustly assessing interventions in surgical conditions. Methods A systematic review was conducted according to a pre-specified protocol (CRD42014007629), using EMBASE and Medline. Non-English language studies were excluded. Studies were included if meeting population criteria and either condition or intervention criteria. Population: Children under the age of 18, or adults who underwent intervention for a condition managed by paediatric surgeons when they were under 18 years of age. Condition: One managed by general paediatric surgeons. Intervention: Used for treatment of a condition managed by general paediatric surgeons. Main Outcome Measure Studies were classified according to whether the IDEAL collaboration recommended their design for assessing surgical interventions or not. Change in proportions between 1998 and 2013 was calculated. Results 1581 paediatric surgical articles were published in 1998, and 3453 in 2013. The most commonly used design, accounting for 45% of studies in 1998 and 46.8% in 2013, was the retrospective case series. Only 1.8% of studies were RCTs in 1998, and 1.9% in 2013. Overall, in 1998, 9.8% of studies used a recommended design. In 2013, 11.9% used a recommended design (proportion increase 2.3%, 95% confidence interval 0.5% increase to 4% increase, p = 0.017). Conclusions and Relevance A low proportion of published paediatric surgical manuscripts utilise a design that is recommended for assessing surgical interventions. RCTs represent fewer than 1 in 50 studies. In 2013, 88.1% of studies used a less robust design, suggesting the need for a new way of approaching paediatric surgical research. PMID:26959824

  1. Seroprevalence of occult hepatitis B among Egyptian paediatric hepatitis C cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Raouf, H E; Yassin, A S; Megahed, S A; Ashour, M S; Mansour, T M

    2015-02-01

    Occult hepatitis B infection is characterized by the presence of hepatitis B virus (HBV) DNA in the serum in the absence of hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg). Prevalence of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infections in Egypt is among the highest in the world. In this study, we aim at analysing the rates of occult HBV infections among HCV paediatric cancer patients in Egypt. The prevalence of occult HBV was assessed in two groups of paediatric cancer patients (HCV positive and HCV negative), in addition to a third group of paediatric noncancer patients, which was used as a general control. All groups were negative for HBsAg and positive for HCV antibody. HBV DNA was detected by nested PCR and real-time PCR. HCV was detected by real-time PCR. Sequencing was carried out in order to determine HBV genotypes to all HBV patients as well as to detect any mutation that might be responsible for the occult phenotype. Occult hepatitis B infection was observed in neither the non-HCV paediatric cancer patients nor the paediatric noncancer patients but was found in 31% of the HCV-positive paediatric cancer patients. All the detected HBV patients belonged to HBV genotype D, and mutations were found in the surface genome of HBV leading to occult HBV. Occult HBV infection seems to be relatively frequent in HCV-positive paediatric cancer patients, indicating that HBsAg negativity is not sufficient to completely exclude HBV infection. These findings emphasize the importance of considering occult HBV infection in HCV-positive paediatric cancer patients especially in endemic areas as Egypt.

  2. Paediatric short case examination.

    PubMed

    Isaacs, David

    2014-11-01

    The short case is a highly artificial scenario, in which the examination candidate is given little or no history and instructed to examine one system or one aspect of a patient and draw conclusions. Despite their artificiality, short cases test clinical skills which senior paediatricians value and consider essential qualities of a competent physician. This article presents some general suggestions on an approach to doing short case examinations.

  3. Arctic Collaborative Environment: A New Multi-National Partnership for Arctic Science and Decision Support

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laymon, Charles A,; Kress, Martin P.; McCracken, Jeff E.; Spehn, Stephen L.; Tanner, Steve

    2011-01-01

    The Arctic Collaborative Environment (ACE) project is a new international partnership for information sharing to meet the challenges of addressing Arctic. The goal of ACE is to create an open source, web-based, multi-national monitoring, analysis, and visualization decision-support system for Arctic environmental assessment, management, and sustainability. This paper will describe the concept, system architecture, and data products that are being developed and disseminated among partners and independent users through remote access.

  4. Information technology in paediatric rheumatology.

    PubMed

    Consolaro, Alessandro; Morgan, Esi M; Giancane, Gabriella; Rosina, Silvia; Lanni, Stefano; Ravelli, Angelo

    2016-01-01

    Information technology in paediatric rheumatology has seen several exciting developments in recent years. The new multidimensional questionnaires for juvenile idiopathic arthritis, juvenile dermatomyositis, and juvenile autoinflammatory diseases integrate all major parent- and child-reported outcomes (PCROs) used in these diseases into a single tool, and provide an effective guide to manage, document change in health, assess effectiveness of therapeutic interventions, and verify the parent and child satisfaction with illness outcome. The Pharmachild registry is aimed to gain information concerning the long-term effectiveness and safety of the medications currently used in juvenile idiopathic arthritis, particularly biologic agents, through collection of prospective data in a large, multinational sample of patients. Children and their parents are directly involved in the data collection by means of the regular completion of a digital version of a multidimensional questionnaire. The Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS) employs modern measurement science to advance assessment of PCROs, particularly HRQL, and offers multidimensional profile measures. The conceptual link of paediatric PROMIS with adult instruments facilitates harmonisation of assessments made in children and adolescents with those carried out in young adults in the process of transition of medical care. Development of electronic versions of questionnaires that permit their completion through smartphones or touch-screen devices will revolutionise information collection from parents and children, foster the regular collection of PCROs in routine care, and ultimately improve the quality of self-reported health data, and patient outcomes.

  5. Acute pancreatitis in the paediatric age group: a personal experience.

    PubMed

    Cosentini, A; Stranieri, G; Capillo, S; Notarangelo, L; Madonna, L; Iannini, S; Ferro, V; Defilippo, V; Defilippo, R G; Rubino, R

    2005-01-01

    Although relatively rare, acute pancreatitis is the most common disease complex involving the pancreas in the paediatric age group. The etiology of the disease is often unknown, and Italian epidemiological data on the paediatric population and, in particular, on the etiology of the disease are not available (except for studies of prevalence). Within the field of the most frequently encountered pancreatitis in the age range of our interest (i.e. 0-18 years), not only the commonly observed forms whose etiopathogenesis is ascribable to cholelithiasis must be mentioned but also those forms due to proteic-caloric malnutrition that are becoming increasingly common. The presenting clinical symptoms and signs may not be typical and the laboratory tests may not always be sensitive enough. In such age range chronic recurrent pancreatitis plays a very important epidemiologic role. Approximately 40% of children and teenagers admitted to the hospital with a diagnosis of pancreatitis report a previous episode of the disease. Irreversible changes in pancreatic parenchyma develop in those patients in whom the disease progresses, leading to pancreatic insufficiency. Such a morbid condition (chronic pancreatitis) is more often observed in adolescents, in whom the disease manifests itself with a vague repetitive dyspeptic symptomatology, after alternating remissions and recrudescences, not always clinically evident. In children, the clinical picture most commonly encountered is represented by recurrent abdominal pains, in view of the fact that the patients are frequently affected by thalassaemia. The pseudocystic evolution of the disease is the most common organic damage resulting from the chronic progression of the pancreatic impairment. A few differences have been found with respect to severity, etiology, and mortality of pancreatitis in the paediatric age group as compared with older age groups. Both the general practitioner with a paediatric practice and the paediatrician

  6. Paediatric exercise training in prevention and treatment.

    PubMed

    Pieles, Guido E; Horn, Richard; Williams, Craig A; Stuart, A Graham

    2014-04-01

    Exercise training is an underused intervention in paediatric healthcare. This is surprising, since initial evidence demonstrates its effectiveness and safety; furthermore it confers socioeconomic benefits for healthcare systems. Pilot studies have assessed and confirmed the feasibility of exercise training in many paediatric disease settings. However, more research is needed to understand the pathophysiology, quantify treatment effects and monitor outcomes. A concerted effort from researchers, health professionals and police makers will be necessary to make exercise training an evidence-based and cost-effective intervention in paediatric care.

  7. [The electrocardiogram in the paediatric age group].

    PubMed

    Sanches, M; Coelho, A; Oliveira, E; Lopes, A

    2014-09-01

    A properly interpreted electrocardiogram (ECG) provides important information and is an inexpensive and easy test to perform. It continues to be the method of choice for the diagnosis of arrhythmias. Although the principles of cardiac electrophysiology are the same, there are anatomical and physiological age-dependent changes which produce specific alterations in the paediatric ECG, and which may be misinterpreted as pathological. The intention of this article is to address in a systematic way the most relevant aspects of the paediatric ECG, to propose a possible reading scheme of the ECG and to review the electrocardiograph tracings most frequently found in the paediatric age group.

  8. Impact of the European paediatric legislation in paediatric rheumatology: past, present and future.

    PubMed

    Ruperto, Nicolino; Vesely, Richard; Saint-Raymond, Agnes; Martini, Alberto

    2013-12-01

    Conducting clinical trials in paediatric rheumatology has been difficult mainly because of the lack of funding for academic studies and the lack of interest by pharmaceutical companies in the small and non-rewarding paediatric market. The situation changed dramatically a few years ago with the introduction of the Best Pharmaceuticals for Children Act in the USA and of specific legislation for the development of paediatric medicines (Paediatric Regulation) in the European Union (EU). The EU Paediatric Regulation had a positive impact in paediatric rheumatology-in particular, on the development of new treatments for children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). Some problems remain, however, such as greater harmonisation of the regulatory aspects of medicines, how to handle me-too agents, how to conduct adequate pharmacokinetic studies and develop age-appropriate formulations, ethical problems in study review and implementation, and a change in the current JIA classification. The introduction of specific legislation, coupled with the existence of large international networks such as the Pediatric Rheumatology Collaborative Study Group (PRCSG at http://www.prcsg.org), covering North America, and the Paediatric Rheumatology International Trials Organisation (PRINTO at http://www.printo.it), covering more than 50 countries, has led to great advances in paediatric rheumatology. Future changes might increase the possibility of conducting trials with similar approaches in other paediatric rheumatological conditions and provide evidence-based treatments for children affected by rheumatic diseases.

  9. Evidence-based surgery: interventions in a regional paediatric surgical unit

    PubMed Central

    Kenny, S; Shankar, K; Rintala, R; Lamont, G; Lloyd, D

    1997-01-01

    Accepted 18 September 1996
 OBJECTIVES—To determine the proportion of paediatric surgical interventions that are evidence-based and to identify areas where randomised controlled trials (RCTs) or further research are required.
DESIGN—Prospective review of paediatric general surgical inpatients.
SETTING—A regional paediatric surgical unit.
SUBJECTS—All consecutive paediatric general surgical patients admitted in November, 1995.
MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES—Each patient on whom a diagnosis had been made was allocated a primary diagnosis and primary intervention (n=281). On the basis of expert knowledge, Plusnet Medline, and ISI Science Citation database searches, each intervention was categorised according to the level of supporting evidence: category 1, intervention based on RCT evidence; category 2, intervention with convincing non-experimental evidence such that an RCT would be unethical and unjustified; category 3, intervention without substantial supportive evidence.
RESULTS—Of 281 patient interventions, 31 (11%) were based on controlled trials and 185 (66%) on convincing non-experimental evidence. Only 23% of interventions were category 3.
CONCLUSIONS—In common with other medical specialties, the majority of paediatric surgical interventions are based on sound evidence. However, only 11% of interventions are based on RCT data, perhaps reflecting the nature of surgical practice. Further RCTs or research is indicated in a proportion of category 3interventions.

 PMID:9059162

  10. Sedation/anaesthesia in paediatric radiology

    PubMed Central

    Arlachov, Y; Ganatra, R H

    2012-01-01

    Objectives In this article we will give a comprehensive literature review on sedation/general anaesthesia (S/GA) and discuss the international variations in practice and options available for S/GA for imaging children. Methods The key articles were obtained primarily from PubMed, MEDLINE, ERIC, NHS Evidence and The Cochrane Library. Results Recently, paediatric radiology has seen a surge of diagnostic and therapeutic procedures, some of which require children to be still and compliant for up to 1 h. It is difficult and sometimes even impossible to obtain quick and high-quality images without employing sedating techniques in certain children. As with any medical procedure, S/GA in radiological practice is not without risks and can have potentially disastrous consequences if mismanaged. In order to reduce any complications and practice safety in radiological units, it is imperative to carry out pre-sedation assessments of children, obtain parental/guardian consent, monitor them closely before, during and after the procedure and have adequate equipment, a safe environment and a well-trained personnel. Conclusion Although the S/GA techniques, sedative drugs and personnel involved vary from country to country, the ultimate goal of S/GA in radiology remains the same; namely, to provide safety and comfort for the patients. Advances in knowledge Imaging children under general anaesthesia is becoming routine and preferred by operators because it ensures patient conformity and provides a more controlled environment. PMID:22898157

  11. Paediatric cardiac nursing education: a national collaboration.

    PubMed

    Cook, Kerry; Daniels, Amanda; Sheehan, Karen; Langton, Helen

    2006-02-01

    Educational courses for staff working in paediatric specialties may not be financially viable because of the small numbers involved and the difficulties that potential students have in getting released from their units. The UK Paediatric Cardiac Nurses Association worked with other groups to explore the feasibility of a national multi-professional paediatric cardiac education pathway. Three options were identified, including the continuation of local in-house provision with its associated variation in standards. The relative benefits and resource implications of each option were explored and approaches made to educational institutions for support in developing the pathway. A university with an established reputation for e-learning undertook this development and a post graduate certificate in Paediatric Cardiothoracic Practice will soon be available.

  12. Surgical strategies in paediatric inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Baillie, Colin T; Smith, Jennifer A

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) comprises two distinct but related chronic relapsing inflammatory conditions affecting different parts of the gastrointestinal tract. Crohn’s disease is characterised by a patchy transmural inflammation affecting both small and large bowel segments with several distinct phenotypic presentations. Ulcerative colitis classically presents as mucosal inflammation of the rectosigmoid (distal colitis), variably extending in a contiguous manner more proximally through the colon but not beyond the caecum (pancolitis). This article highlights aspects of the presentation, diagnosis, and management of IBD that have relevance for paediatric practice with particular emphasis on surgical considerations. Since 25% of IBD cases present in childhood or teenage years, the unique considerations and challenges of paediatric management should be widely appreciated. Conversely, we argue that the organizational separation of the paediatric and adult healthcare worlds has often resulted in late adoption of new approaches particularly in paediatric surgical practice. PMID:26034347

  13. Imaging in chronic cough in paediatrics.

    PubMed

    Brown, S; Davies, P

    2011-11-01

    Chronic cough is a common presentation in paediatrics. We describe a case which highlights the need for careful history taking and summarize the key clinical features which should prompt a clinician to perform a chest X-ray.

  14. Therapeutic clowning in paediatric practice.

    PubMed

    Finlay, Fiona; Baverstock, Anna; Lenton, Simon

    2014-10-01

    Over the past 30 years, there has been much research into the health benefits of humour and laughter. Although often viewed very positively, rigorous evaluation of the therapeutic effect of clowning is complex. Clowning is a multi-modal intervention, which may have an impact on medical conditions, procedures, family functioning and health care teams. Clowns help children to adapt to their hospital surroundings and can distract from, and demystify, painful or frightening procedures through 'doses of fun' to complement traditional clinical interventions. This paper provides a review of the paediatric literature and reveals studies looking at the effect of clown interventions on various practical procedures and individual medical conditions, and the effects of clowning within clinical teams.

  15. Steroid assays in paediatric endocrinology.

    PubMed

    Honour, John W

    2010-01-01

    Most steroid disorders of the adrenal cortex come to clinical attention in childhood and in order to investigate these problems, there are many challenges to the laboratory which need to be appreciated to a certain extent by clinicians. The analysis of sex steroids in biological fluids from neonates, over adrenarche and puberty present challenges of specificities and concentrations often in small sample sizes. Different reference ranges are also needed for interpretations. For around 40 years, quantitative assays for the steroids and their regulatory peptide hormones have been possible using immunoassay techniques. Problems are recognised and this review aims to summarise the benefits and failings of immunoassays and introduce where tandem mass spectrometry is anticipated to meet the clinical needs for steroid analysis in paediatric endocrine investigations. It is important to keep a dialogue between clinicians and the laboratory, especially when any laboratory result does not make sense in the clinical investigation.

  16. Steroid Assays in Paediatric Endocrinology

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Most steroid disorders of the adrenal cortex come to clinical attention in childhood and in order to investigate these problems, there are many challenges to the laboratory which need to be appreciated to a certain extent by clinicians. The analysis of sex steroids in biological fluids from neonates, over adrenarche and puberty present challenges of specificities and concentrations often in small sample sizes. Different reference ranges are also needed for interpretations. For around 40 years, quantitative assays for the steroids and their regulatory peptide hormones have been possible using immunoassay techniques. Problems are recognised and this review aims to summarise the benefits and failings of immunoassays and introduce where tandem mass spectrometry is anticipated to meet the clinical needs for steroid analysis in paediatric endocrine investigations. It is important to keep a dialogue between clinicians and the laboratory, especially when any laboratory result does not make sense in the clinical investigation. Conflict of interest:None declared. PMID:21274330

  17. Parental knowledge of paediatric vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Borràs, Eva; Domínguez, Àngela; Fuentes, Miriam; Batalla, Joan; Cardeñosa, Neus; Plasencia, Antoni

    2009-01-01

    Background Although routine vaccination is a major tool in the primary prevention of some infectious diseases, there is some reluctance in a proportion of the population. Negative parental perceptions of vaccination are an important barrier to paediatric vaccination. The aim of this study was to investigate parental knowledge of paediatric vaccines and vaccination in Catalonia. Methods A retrospective, cross-sectional study was carried out in children aged < 3 years recruited by random sampling from municipal districts of all health regions of Catalonia. The total sample was 630 children. Parents completed a standard questionnaire for each child, which included vaccination coverage and knowledge about vaccination. The level of knowledge of vaccination was scored according to parental answers. Results An association was observed between greater vaccination coverage of the 4:4:4:3:1 schedule (defined as: 4 DTPa/w doses, 4 Hib doses, 4 OPV doses, 3 MenC doses and 1 MMR dose) and maternal age >30 years (OR: 2.30; 95% CI: 1.20–4.43) and with a knowledge of vaccination score greater than the mean (OR: 0.45; 95% CI: 0.28–0.72). The score increased with maternal educational level and in parents of vaccinated children. A total of 20.47% of parents stated that vaccines could have undesirable consequences for their children. Of these, 23.26% had no specific information and 17.83% stated that vaccines can cause adverse reactions and the same percentage stated that vaccines cause allergies and asthma. Conclusion Higher vaccination coverage is associated with older maternal age and greater knowledge of vaccination. Vaccination coverage could be raised by improving information on vaccines and vaccination. PMID:19473498

  18. Harvesting organs for paediatric transplantation: medical features.

    PubMed

    Nivet, H

    1989-01-01

    The progress in organ transplantation has led to a rise in the demand for organs. Paediatric intensive care units are the main source for obtaining organs. Every "brain dead" patient should be regarded as a potential donor. General contraindications to organ donation are: systemic viral or bacterial infections and extra-cerebral malignancy. They are also organ-specific contraindications. The criteria for the diagnosis of "brain death" have been widely studied and defined. Care of brain dead donors consists of maintenance of cardiac, pulmonary and renal function. Monitoring requires control of central venous and arterial blood pressure, core temperature, urine flow, heart rate and biological data on both urine and blood. A 5% dextrose infusion is maintained with added potassium and sodium chloride according to the urine flow, detectable water loss, and blood and urine composition. Hypotension due to hypovolaemia requires immediate treatment with blood, colloid or albumin infusion. Persistent hypotension with cardiac pump failure is treated with inotropic agents: dopamine and/or dobutamine. Raised urine flow due to diabetes insipidus requires desmopressin (dDAVP). Progress in organ collection requires the consent of the parents and highly motivated medical teams.

  19. Networking in paediatrics: the example of the Paediatric Rheumatology International Trials Organisation (PRINTO).

    PubMed

    Ruperto, Nicolino; Martini, Alberto

    2011-06-01

    Networking is key to overcoming the logistical, methodological and ethical problems related to the implementation of paediatric studies. The adoption of legislation to encourage paediatric clinical trials by the American and European regulatory agencies has opened a new era in the assessment of drug safety and efficacy in children. Two very large international trial networks--the Pediatric Rheumatology Collaborative Study Group (PRCSG) and the Paediatric Rheumatology International Trials Organisation (PRINTO)--have played a critical role in the implementation of this legislation and have facilitated several successful controlled studies on the safety and the efficacy of new and old drugs in paediatric rheumatic diseases. The PRINTO and PRCSG networks can be seen as a model for international co-operation in other paediatric subspecialties.

  20. Paediatric continuing medical education needs and preferences of UNRWA physicians in Jordan.

    PubMed

    Nasir, A; Khader, A; Nasir, L; Abuzayed, I; Seita, A

    2016-04-19

    Most physicians who work in the United Nations Relief and Works Agency (UNRWA) infant and child health programme in Jordan are general practitioners with no postgraduate training in paediatrics. Furthermore, in resource-poor or remote settings, the ability to deliver live continuing medical education (CME) is often limited. A questionnaire exploring the resources available for accessing CME, preferences for types of CME, current sources of CME and topics of interest in the field of paediatric care was sent to all 92 physicians practising in UNRWA clinics in Jordan. Of the 89 respondents 80% had attended live medical lectures for CME and 70% CME meetings. Despite most physicians having access to the Internet only 52.8% were interested in Internet-based courses for accessing CME. There was a statistically significant relationship between year of graduation from medical school and preference for Internet-based CME. Implications for CME participation and paediatric CME topics are discussed.

  1. Abnormal bone marrow histopathology in paediatric mastocytosis.

    PubMed

    Carter, Melody C; Metcalfe, Dean D; Clark, Alicia S; Wayne, Alan S; Maric, Irina

    2015-03-01

    The diagnostic criteria for paediatric mastocytosis are largely based on adult studies and bone marrow findings are not well described in children. We evaluated use of the World Health Organization (WHO) criteria for the diagnosis of systemic disease in paediatric mastocytosis. In addition, we identified unique clinico-histopathological features within the biopsies. One hundred and thirteen children with paediatric mastocytosis were evaluated at the National Institutes of Health between 1986 and 2013. Complete bone marrow evaluations were performed in 50 cases. Seven children had repeat procedures. Bone marrows were analysed by histopathology, flow cytometry and for KIT D816V. Bone marrow biopsies displayed mild atypical haematopoietic maturation, increased haematogones and hypocellularity in a sub-set of patients with urticaria pigmentosa, diffuse cutaneous mastocytosis and indolent systemic mastocytosis. Hypocellularity was most pronounced in those with urticaria pigmentosa. Haematogones were highest, on average, in patients with diffuse cutaneous mastocytosis or mastocytomas. There was no evidence of peripheral blood cytopenias, myelodysplastic syndrome, myeloproliferative neoplasm or leukaemia within this cohort. The WHO criteria are applicable for the diagnosis of systemic mastocytosis in paediatrics. Although unsuspected bone marrow findings typically seen in myeloproliferative disorders are frequent in paediatric mastocytosis, patients within this study remained clinically stable without progression to a more aggressive variant.

  2. Outcome of paediatric intensive care survivors

    PubMed Central

    Grootenhuis, Martha A.; Bos, Albert P.

    2007-01-01

    The development of paediatric intensive care has contributed to the improved survival of critically ill children. Physical and psychological sequelae and consequences for quality of life (QoL) in survivors might be significant, as has been determined in adult intensive care unit (ICU) survivors. Awareness of sequelae due to the original illness and its treatment may result in changes in treatment and support during and after the acute phase. To determine the current knowledge on physical and psychological sequelae and the quality of life in survivors of paediatric intensive care, we undertook a computerised comprehensive search of online databases for studies reporting sequelae in survivors of paediatric intensive care. Studies reporting sequelae in paediatric survivors of cardiothoracic surgery and trauma were excluded, as were studies reporting only mortality. All other studies reporting aspects of physical and psychological sequelae were analysed. Twenty-seven studies consisting of 3,444 survivors met the selection criteria. Distinct physical and psychological sequelae in patients have been determined and seemed to interfere with quality of life. Psychological sequelae in parents seem to be common. Small numbers, methodological limitations and quantitative and qualitative heterogeneity hamper the interpretation of data. We conclude that paediatric intensive care survivors and their parents have physical and psychological sequelae affecting quality of life. Further well-designed prospective studies evaluating sequelae of the original illness and its treatment are warranted. PMID:17823815

  3. Causes, mechanisms and management of paediatric osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Mäkitie, Outi

    2013-08-01

    Osteoporosis, a skeletal disorder characterized by compromised bone strength and an increased risk of fractures, is an important paediatric disorder that involves almost all paediatric subspecialties. Osteogenesis imperfecta is the most common form of childhood-onset primary osteoporosis, but several other forms are also known. Secondary osteoporosis is caused by an underlying chronic illness or its treatment. The most common causes of secondary osteoporosis include chronic systemic inflammation, glucocorticoid use and neuromuscular disabilities. The skeletal sequelae can present in childhood as low-energy peripheral and vertebral fractures, or become evident in adulthood as low bone mass and an increased propensity to develop osteoporosis. Management should aim at prevention, as interventions to treat symptomatic osteoporosis in the paediatric age group are scarce. Bisphosphonates are the principal pharmacological agents that can be used in this setting, but data on their efficacy and safety in paediatric populations remain inadequate, especially in patients with secondary osteoporosis. Consequently, it is important to understand the potential skeletal effects of paediatric illnesses and their therapies in order to institute effective and timely prevention of skeletal complications.

  4. Vomiting and common paediatric surgery.

    PubMed

    Busoni, P; Crescioli, M; Agostino, R; Sestini, G

    2000-01-01

    Postoperative vomiting is a common and unpleasant complication. The purpose of the present study was to verify if dexamethasone reduces the incidence of vomiting when injected IV in children anaesthetized with halothane for common paediatric operations. We also studied the incidence of vomiting when sevoflurane was used instead. Five hundred and 69 boys, aged 2-12 years (ASA physical status I, II), scheduled for inguinal field surgery were randomly assigned to receive halothane, halothane and dexamethasone and sevoflurane in three groups: halothane (n=180), halothane and IV dexamethasone (n=188) and sevoflurane (n=201). Anaesthesia was induced by inhalation of halothane or sevoflurane in oxygen and nitrous oxide and was maintained at minimum alveolar concentration of each agent throughout the surgery. For intra- and postoperative pain control iliac crest block was used in all the boys. Vomiting was defined as any expulsion of liquid gastric contents. The incidence of postoperative vomiting was 23% in the halothane group, which was significantly greater than that in the other groups (halothane and dexamethasone group, 9%; sevoflurane group, 13%). In conclusion, dexamethasone reduces the incidence and frequency of multiple emetic episodes when administered intravenously after halothane anaesthesia; sevoflurane reduces the overall incidence of vomiting, but not multiple emetic episodes.

  5. Guidelines for paediatric life support. Paediatric Life Support Working Party of the European Resuscitation Council.

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    The paediatric life support working party of the European Resuscitation Council was set up in 1992 with the aim of producing guidelines for basic and advanced paediatric resuscitation that would be acceptable throughout Europe. The commonest cause of cardiac arrest in children is problems with the airway. The resulting difficulties in breathing and the associated hypoxia rapidly cause a severe bradycardia or asystole. In contrast, adults have primary cardiac events resulting in ventricular fibrillation. This important difference in the pathogenesis of paediatric and adult cardiac arrest is reflected in these European Resuscitation Council guidelines, which complement those already published for adults. PMID:8019227

  6. Diagnostic radiology in paediatric palliative care.

    PubMed

    Patel, Preena; Koh, Michelle; Carr, Lucinda; McHugh, Kieran

    2014-01-01

    Palliative care is an expanding specialty within paediatrics, which has attracted little attention in the paediatric radiological literature. Paediatric patients under a palliative care team will have numerous radiological tests which we traditionally categorise under organ systems rather than under the umbrella of palliative medicine. The prevalence of children with life-limiting illness is significant. It has been estimated to be one per thousand, and this may be an underestimate. In this review, we will focus on our experience at one institution, where radiology has proven to be an invaluable partner to palliative care. We will discuss examples of conditions commonly referred to our palliative care team and delineate the crucial role of diagnostic radiology in determining treatment options.

  7. How to handle multidisciplinary, multi-national and multi-sectoral projects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reitz, Anja; Wallmann, Klaus; Visbeck, Martin

    2016-04-01

    Collaborative research projects funded by the European Commission are by nature multi-national. Often they bring together different scientific communities as the questions raised in EU project calls can typically only be addressed through the convergence of these previously separated disciplines in one research consortium. Some work programmes even necessitate to team up as different disciplines as natural sciences, social science, legal science and economic science. Examples for such multi- national, -disciplinary and - sectoral projects are the EU projects ECO2 (FP7, concluded) and AtlantOS (H2020). Project managers of such projects need to develop skills beyond the common technical and management skills namely go into the domain of partners and stakeholders psychology and be able to maintain different perspectives on communication and interaction needs regarding cultural-, discipline- and sectoral background. Accordingly, the project manager has besides his technical role as manager at least three further roles: that of a communicator, that of a mediator and that of a person convincing partners of the necessary and selling the project products to the stakeholders. As the typical project manager has not too much power and authority by his position he has to use the power of smart communication and persuasion to overcome potential dissension between disciplines, national reservation or potential conflicts regarding different sectoral views. Accordingly, the project manager of such a complex project would try to arrange the ideal working environment by considering cultural feel, the cooperation of disciplines, information and the control of resources. The way he develops such ideal working environment is by reflection of past, present and future experiences/needs.

  8. Australian Paediatric Surveillance Unit annual report, 2013.

    PubMed

    Deverell, Marie; Zurynski, Yvonne A; Elliott, Elizabeth J

    2014-12-31

    This report provides an update on the surveillance conducted by the Australian Paediatric Surveillance Unit (APSU) during the period January to December 2013. The APSU facilitates national active surveillance of uncommon diseases of childhood including selected communicable diseases. This report includes data on the following conditions: acute flaccid paralysis (AFP), congenital cytomegalovirus (cCMV), congenital rubella, perinatal exposure to HIV and paediatric HIV infection, neonatal herpes simplex virus (HSV), congenital varicella, neonatal varicella, severe complications of varicella and juvenile onset recurrent respiratory papillomatosis (JoRRP). Surveillance of severe complications of influenza was undertaken during the influenza season (July to September 2013).

  9. Genetic testing for paediatric neurological disorders.

    PubMed

    Valente, Enza Maria; Ferraris, Alessandro; Dallapiccola, Bruno

    2008-12-01

    Paediatric neurological disorders encompass a large group of clinically heterogeneous diseases, of which some are known to have a genetic cause. Over the past few years, advances in nosological classifications and in strategies for molecular testing have substantially improved the diagnosis, genetic counselling, and clinical management of many patients, and have facilitated the possibility of prenatal diagnoses for future pregnancies. However, the increasing availability of genetic tests for paediatric neurological disorders is raising important questions with regard to the appropriateness, choice of protocols, interpretation of results, and ethical and social concerns of these services. In this Review, we discuss these topics and how these concerns affect genetic counselling.

  10. Changes in individual drug-independent system parameters during virtual paediatric pharmacokinetic trials: introducing time-varying physiology into a paediatric PBPK model.

    PubMed

    Abduljalil, Khaled; Jamei, Masoud; Rostami-Hodjegan, Amin; Johnson, Trevor N

    2014-05-01

    Although both POPPK and physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models can account for age and other covariates within a paediatric population, they generally do not account for real-time growth and maturation of the individuals through the time course of drug exposure; this may be significant in prolonged neonatal studies. The major objective of this study was to introduce age progression into a paediatric PBPK model, to allow for continuous updating of anatomical, physiological and biological processes in each individual subject over time. The Simcyp paediatric PBPK model simulator system parameters were reanalysed to assess the impact of re-defining the individual over the study period. A schedule for re-defining parameters within the Simcyp paediatric simulator, for each subject, over a prolonged study period, was devised to allow seamless prediction of pharmacokinetics (PK). The model was applied to predict concentration-time data from multiday studies on sildenafil and phenytoin performed in neonates. Among PBPK system parameters, CYP3A4 abundance was one of the fastest changing covariates and a 1-h re-sampling schedule was needed for babies below age 3.5 days in order to seamlessly predict PK (<5% change in abundance) with subject maturation. The re-sampling frequency decreased as age increased, reaching biweekly by 6 months of age. The PK of both sildenafil and phenytoin were predicted better at the end of a prolonged study period using the time varying vs fixed PBPK models. Paediatric PBPK models which account for time-varying system parameters during prolonged studies may provide more mechanistic PK predictions in neonates and infants.

  11. The paediatric story of human papillomavirus (Review)

    PubMed Central

    MAMMAS, IOANNIS N.; SOURVINOS, GEORGE; SPANDIDOS, DEMETRIOS A.

    2014-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is composed of a particularly heterogeneous family of DNA viruses, which has gained much attention in recent years due to the discoveries of Professor Harald zur Hausen, who first identified a connection between HPV and cervical cancer. Professor Harald zur Hausen, the ‘Father of HPV Virology’, was the recipient of the 2008 Nobel Prize. HPV can be transmitted through physical contact via autoinoculation or fomites, sexual contact, as well as vertically from the HPV-positive mother to her newborn, causing subclinical or clinical infections. In infancy and childhood, HPV-associated clinical infections include skin warts, genital warts and juvenile recurrent respiratory papillomatosis, while cervical squamous intraepithelial lesions have also been reported among adolescent girls. To date, several research teams, worldwide, have extensively investigated HPV from the paediatric point of view. This primitive effort has been performed before the recent great expansion of paediatric HPV research due to the vaccination programmes against HPV, which were introduced into clinical practice in 2006. In this review article, we present a brief overview of paediatric HPV research after the first report in 1978 involving children in the research of HPV until the time point of this great expansion. In the future, it is expected that further unresolved issues will be addressed and clarified, as the paediatric story of HPV remains a challenging research target. PMID:25013461

  12. [Paediatric palliative care, definition and regulations].

    PubMed

    Gioia, Martine

    2011-01-01

    The implementation of paediatric palliative care aims to fulfil objectives regarding the support provided for the child and his/her family in all aspects of care. It is guided by regulations and recommendations relating to pain relief, quality of life and support for families.

  13. Measuring the Expertise of Paediatric Rehabilitation Therapists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Gillian; Bartlett, Doreen J.; Currie, Melissa; Gilpin, Michelle; Baxter, Donna; Willoughby, Colleen; Tucker, Mary Ann; Strachan, Deborah

    2008-01-01

    This article describes the development of a classification system to measure the expertise levels of practicing paediatric rehabilitation therapists. Seventy-five therapists from five disciplines (physical, occupational, speech-language, behaviour, and recreational therapy) were involved, along with 170 peers, and 188 parents of children with…

  14. Paediatric human metapneumovirus infection: epidemiology, prevention and therapy.

    PubMed

    Principi, Nicola; Esposito, Susanna

    2014-03-01

    Since its discovery in 2001, human metapneumovirus (hMPV) has been identified as one of the most frequent causes of upper and lower respiratory tract infections. Although a considerable number of hMPV infections are diagnosed in adults and the elderly, the highest incidence of infection is among children as seropositivity for hMPV approaches 100% by 5-10 years of age. Most of the diseases due to hMPV are mild or moderate, tend to resolve spontaneously, and only require outpatient treatment. However, some may be severe enough to require hospitalisation or, albeit rarely, admission to a paediatric intensive care unit because of acute respiratory failure. Mortality is exceptional, but may occur. The most severe diseases generally affect younger patients, prematurely born children, and children who acquire nosocomial hMPV infection and those with a severe chronic underlying disease. Global hMPV infection has a major impact on national health systems, which is why various attempts have recently been made to introduce effective preventive and therapeutic measures; however, although some are already in the phase of development (including vaccines and monoclonal antibodies), there is currently no substantial possibility of prevention and, despite its limitations, ribavirin is still the only possible treatment. Given the risk of severe disease in various groups of high-risk children and the frequency of infection in the otherwise healthy paediatric population, there is an urgent need for further research aimed at developing effective preventive and therapeutic measures against hMPV.

  15. Non-invasive methods in paediatric exercise physiology.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, Neil; Fawkner, Samantha G

    2008-04-01

    Oded Bar-Or's hypothesis that children may be "metabolic non-specialists", even when engaging in specialized sports, has stimulated the study of paediatric exercise metabolism since the publication of his classic text Pediatric sports medicine for the practitioner in 1983. Evidence drawn from several methodologies indicates an interplay of anaerobic and aerobic exercise metabolism in which children have a relatively higher metabolic contribution from oxidative energy pathways than adolescents or adults, whereas there is a progressive increase in glycolytic support of exercise with age, at least into adolescence and possibly into young adulthood. The picture is generally consistent but incomplete, as research with young people has been limited by both ethical and methodological constraints. The recent rigorous introduction of non-invasive techniques such as breath-by-breath respiratory gas analysis and magnetic resonance spectroscopy into paediatric exercise physiology promises to open up new avenues of research and generate unique insights into the metabolism of the exercising muscle during growth and maturation. It therefore appears that we might have available the tools necessary to answer some of the elegant questions raised by Professor Bar-Or over 25 years ago.

  16. Guidelines on Vaccinations in Paediatric Haematology and Oncology Patients

    PubMed Central

    Cesaro, Simone; Giacchino, Mareva; Fioredda, Francesca; Barone, Angelica; Battisti, Laura; Bezzio, Stefania; Frenos, Stefano; De Santis, Raffaella; Livadiotti, Susanna; Marinello, Serena; Zanazzo, Andrea Giulio; Caselli, Désirée

    2014-01-01

    Objective. Vaccinations are the most important tool to prevent infectious diseases. Chemotherapy-induced immune depression may impact the efficacy of vaccinations in children. Patients and Methods. A panel of experts of the supportive care working group of the Italian Association Paediatric Haematology Oncology (AIEOP) addressed this issue by guidelines on vaccinations in paediatric cancer patients. The literature published between 1980 and 2013 was reviewed. Results and Conclusion. During intensive chemotherapy, vaccination turned out to be effective for hepatitis A and B, whilst vaccinations with toxoid, protein subunits, or bacterial antigens should be postponed to the less intensive phases, to achieve an adequate immune response. Apart from varicella, the administration of live-attenuated-virus vaccines is not recommended during this phase. Family members should remain on recommended vaccination schedules, including toxoid, inactivated vaccine (also poliomyelitis), and live-attenuated vaccines (varicella, measles, mumps, and rubella). By the time of completion of chemotherapy, insufficient serum antibody levels for vaccine-preventable diseases have been reported, while immunological memory appears to be preserved. Once immunological recovery is completed, usually after 6 months, response to booster or vaccination is generally good and allows patients to be protected and also to contribute to herd immunity. PMID:24868544

  17. Current views and advances on Paediatric Virology: An update for paediatric trainees.

    PubMed

    Mammas, Ioannis N; Greenough, Anne; Theodoridou, Maria; Kramvis, Anna; Christaki, Iliana; Koutsaftiki, Chryssie; Koutsaki, Maria; Portaliou, Dimitra M; Kostagianni, Georgia; Panagopoulou, Paraskevi; Sourvinos, George; Spandidos, Demetrios A

    2016-01-01

    Paediatric Virology is a bold new scientific field, which combines Paediatrics with Virology, Epidemiology, Molecular Medicine, Evidence-based Medicine, Clinical Governance, Quality Improvement, Pharmacology and Immunology. The Workshop on Paediatric Virology, which took place on Saturday October 10, 2015 in Athens, Greece, provided an overview of recent views and advances on viral infections occurring in neonates and children. It was included in the official programme of the 20th World Congress on Advances in Oncology and the 18th International Symposium on Molecular Medicine, which attracted over 500 delegates from the five continents. During the Workshop, the topics covered included the challenges of vaccine implementation against human papillomaviruses in countries under financial crisis, strategies for eradicating poliomyelitis and its 60th vaccine anniversary, as well as the debate on the association between autism and vaccination against measles, mumps and rubella. Among the non-vaccine related topics, emphasis was given to viral infections in prematurely born infants and their long-term outcomes, new paediatric intensive care management options for bronchiolitis related to respiratory syncytial virus, the clinical implications of hepatitis B virus and cytomegalovirus genotyping, the Ebola virus threat and preparedness in Paediatric Emergency Departments, oral, oropharynx, laryngeal, nasal and ocular viral infections and Merkel cell polyomavirus as a novel emerging virus of infancy and childhood. In this review, we provide selected presentations and reports discussed at the Workshop.

  18. Current views and advances on Paediatric Virology: An update for paediatric trainees

    PubMed Central

    MAMMAS, IOANNIS N.; GREENOUGH, ANNE; THEODORIDOU, MARIA; KRAMVIS, ANNA; CHRISTAKI, ILIANA; KOUTSAFTIKI, CHRYSSIE; KOUTSAKI, MARIA; PORTALIOU, DIMITRA M.; KOSTAGIANNI, GEORGIA; PANAGOPOULOU, PARASKEVI; SOURVINOS, GEORGE; SPANDIDOS, DEMETRIOS A.

    2016-01-01

    Paediatric Virology is a bold new scientific field, which combines Paediatrics with Virology, Epidemiology, Molecular Medicine, Evidence-based Medicine, Clinical Governance, Quality Improvement, Pharmacology and Immunology. The Workshop on Paediatric Virology, which took place on Saturday October 10, 2015 in Athens, Greece, provided an overview of recent views and advances on viral infections occurring in neonates and children. It was included in the official programme of the 20th World Congress on Advances in Oncology and the 18th International Symposium on Molecular Medicine, which attracted over 500 delegates from the five continents. During the Workshop, the topics covered included the challenges of vaccine implementation against human papillomaviruses in countries under financial crisis, strategies for eradicating poliomyelitis and its 60th vaccine anniversary, as well as the debate on the association between autism and vaccination against measles, mumps and rubella. Among the non-vaccine related topics, emphasis was given to viral infections in prematurely born infants and their long-term outcomes, new paediatric intensive care management options for bronchiolitis related to respiratory syncytial virus, the clinical implications of hepatitis B virus and cytomegalovirus genotyping, the Ebola virus threat and preparedness in Paediatric Emergency Departments, oral, oropharynx, laryngeal, nasal and ocular viral infections and Merkel cell polyomavirus as a novel emerging virus of infancy and childhood. In this review, we provide selected presentations and reports discussed at the Workshop. PMID:26889211

  19. Paediatric systemic lupus erythematosus: insights from translational research.

    PubMed

    Wright, Tracey B; Punaro, Marilynn

    2017-04-01

    Investigations in paediatric SLE contributed significantly to the discovery of the association of type I IFNs with lupus and underscored the potential application of this knowledge by informing the use of glucocorticoid therapy. Recent, promising research reveals biomarkers that may yield more focused clinical monitoring and assessment of response to treatment. This article reviews unique features of paediatric SLE and details important developments in paediatric lupus research.

  20. [Off-label use of drugs in paediatrics causes uncertainty].

    PubMed

    Hart, Dieter; Mühlbauer, Bernd

    2008-01-01

    The off-label use of drugs in paediatrics is a common practice casting doubts on the adequate safety of drug therapy. Regulatory initiatives of European and national legislators aim to address this paucity of clinical drug trials in paediatrics through clarifying regulations and incentives in pharmaceutical law, thereby promoting an increase in the approval of paediatric drugs, the improvement of drug and thus treatment safety. This paper describes the present situation in paediatrics and the legal status of off-label use in pharmaceutical law, medical malpractice law and statutory health insurance law.

  1. Paediatric Post-Traumatic Bladder Neck Distraction Injury: Case Series

    PubMed Central

    Sawant, Ajit S.; Kumar, Vikash; Pawar, Prakash; Tamhankar, Ashwin S.

    2017-01-01

    The bladder neck distraction is a rare posterior urethral injury in paediatric age group. It mostly occurs secondary to road traffic accidents. We report three cases of paediatric bladder neck distraction injury. Three paediatric patients aged between 4 to 7 years (mean 5 year), who presented with post traumatic bladder neck distraction injury but no other major injury, they were treated with early urethro-vesical anastomosis. Postoperatively all patients were continent and with good urine flow rates. In paediatric bladder neck distraction injury, immediate urethro-vesical anastomosis gives good results. PMID:28384935

  2. Fitting and flailing: recognition of paediatric antiphospholipid syndrome.

    PubMed

    Freeman, H; Patel, J; Fernandez, D; Sharples, P; Ramanan, A V

    2014-02-01

    Antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is a systemic autoimmune condition where the presence of antiphospholipid antibodies is thought to predispose to thrombotic events. It is uncommon in the paediatric population, but current diagnostic criteria are based on adult population studies, making assessment of its true paediatric prevalence difficult. We present two cases of paediatric APS, who presented with primary neurological events, and discuss approaches to diagnosis, interpretation of screening investigations, including antinuclear antibodies (ANA), anti-extractable nuclear antigen (ENA) antibodies and lupus anticoagulant. Possible approaches to the management of paediatric APS are discussed.

  3. Paediatric nephrology: the last 50 years.

    PubMed

    Kausman, Joshua Y; Powell, Harley R

    2015-01-01

    In 1965, the specialty of paediatric nephrology was in its infancy. Following the development of a landmark collaborative research study, the International Study of Kidney Disease in Childhood in the mid-1960s, the first specialist societies were formed: the European Society of Pediatric Nephrology in 1967 and the American Society of Pediatric Nephrology in 1969. The extraordinary improvements in care delivered to children with kidney disease over the past 50 years are too broad to cover in any one paper. They traverse the spectrum of diagnosis, classification, therapeutics, social well-being and transition to adult care. We have selected four case scenarios to highlight these changes in key areas of paediatric nephrology: post-streptococcal glomerulonephritis, nephrotic syndrome, haemolytic uraemic syndrome and neonatal dialysis and childhood transplantation.

  4. Improving quality in paediatric respiratory disease management.

    PubMed

    Harrop, Michele; Amegavie, Laweh

    2003-11-01

    Throughout the development, implementation and dissemination of the Paediatric Respiratory Newsletter, effective channels of communication between healthcare professionals have been established, highlighting the importance of collaboration. Promoting education, training, audit and research, the newsletter has nurtured both professional and practice development. The work begun during this project, and the outcomes it has achieved, have been developed into an ethos that recognises effective clinical practice and organisational development as central to the delivery of a quality service. This work informs and is informed by strategic developments, in particular, research and development, clinical audit, quality, practice development and clinical risk, all of which are observed to be the key elements of clinical governance. On a personal level, the project has provided me with an opportunity to consolidate information, forge links with the multidisciplinary team and establish a framework for the development of paediatric respiratory services. We hope it will continue to respond to, and be influenced by, changing health and social care demands.

  5. Alternative diagnoses at paediatric appendicitis MRI.

    PubMed

    Moore, M M; Kulaylat, A N; Brian, J M; Khaku, A; Hulse, M A; Engbrecht, B W; Methratta, S T; Boal, D K B

    2015-08-01

    As the utilization of MRI in the assessment for paediatric appendicitis increases in clinical practice, it is important to recognize alternative diagnoses as the cause of abdominal pain. The purpose of this review is to share our institution's experience using MRI in the evaluation of 510 paediatric patients presenting with suspected appendicitis over a 30 month interval (July 2011 to December 2013). An alternative diagnosis was documented in 98/510 (19.2%) patients; adnexal pathology (6.3%, n = 32), enteritis-colitis (6.3%, n = 32), and mesenteric adenitis (2.2%, n = 11) comprised the majority of cases. These common entities and other less frequent illustrative cases obtained during our overall institutional experience with MRI for suspected appendicitis are reviewed.

  6. Effects of anaesthesia on paediatric lung function.

    PubMed

    Trachsel, D; Svendsen, J; Erb, T O; von Ungern-Sternberg, B S

    2016-08-01

    Respiratory adverse events are one of the major causes of morbidity and mortality in paediatric anaesthesia. Aside from predisposing conditions associated with an increased risk of respiratory incidents in children such as concurrent infections and chronic airway irritation, there are adverse respiratory events directly attributable to the impact of anaesthesia on the respiratory system. Anaesthesia can negatively affect respiratory drive, ventilation/perfusion (V/Q) matching and tidal breathing, all resulting in potentially devastating hypoxaemia. Understanding paediatric respiratory physiology and its changes during anaesthesia will enable anaesthetists to anticipate, recognize and prevent deterioration that can lead to respiratory failure. This review aims to give a comprehensive overview of the effects of anaesthesia on respiration in children. It focuses on the impact of the different components of anaesthesia, patient positioning and procedure-related changes on respiratory physiology.

  7. Emergency department overcrowding – implications for paediatric emergency medicine

    PubMed Central

    Sinclair, Douglas

    2007-01-01

    Emergency department (ED) overcrowding has been an international phenomenon for more than 10 years. It is important to understand that ED overcrowding is a measure of health system efficiency and is not strictly related to ED volumes or capacity. ED overcrowding is defined as a situation in which the demand for emergency services exceeds the ability of physicians and nurses to provide quality care within a reasonable time. The major factor resulting in ED overcrowding is the presence of admitted patients in the ED for prolonged periods of time, not a high volume of low-acuity patients. While limited data are available for paediatric EDs, winter respiratory illnesses set the stage for ED overcrowding, which are epidemic in adult or general EDs. Prehospital-, ED- and hospital-related factors are described in the present article, and these may help prevent or manage this important patient safety problem. PMID:19030415

  8. Sleep · 8: Paediatric obstructive sleep apnoea

    PubMed Central

    Nixon, G; Brouillette, R

    2005-01-01

    In the past 25 years there has been increasing recognition of obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) as a common condition of childhood. Morbidity includes impairment of growth, cardiovascular complications, learning impairment, and behavioural problems. Diagnosis and treatment of this condition in children differs in many respects from that in adults. We review here the key features of paediatric OSA, highlighting differences from adult OSA, and suggest future directions for research. PMID:15923253

  9. Paediatric Iliopsoas abscess: A case report.

    PubMed

    Elliott, Carla

    2013-11-01

    Introduction: Iliopsoas abscess is an uncommon condition in the paediatric population. The clinical presentation is variable and may be confused with other conditions such as septic arthritis, osteomyelitis and appendicular abscess. A suspicion of iliopsoas abscess requires a prompt diagnosis so that rapid management and treatment can be undertaken. Discussion: This case describes the presence of an iliopsoas abscess in a paediatric patient presenting to the emergency department within a rural community. Due to the variability in clinical presentation imaging studies are necessary to distinguish an iliopsoas abscess from other inflammatory processes. Ultrasound is often the modality of choice. Imaging guided percutaneous drainage and/or aspiration and the administration of intravenous antibiotics are minimally invasive modern techniques providing a safe treatment options in the presence of an iliopsoas abscess. Conclusion: Iliopsoas abscess is an uncommon condition in the paediatric population. Due to the variability in clinical presentation, imaging, and in particular, ultrasound play a vital role in the diagnosis of cases with a high suspicion of abscess formation. Accurate diagnosis leads to a rapid treatment plan, avoiding further insult.

  10. Paediatric Virology in the Hippocratic Corpus

    PubMed Central

    Mammas, Ioannis N.; Spandidos, Demetrios A.

    2016-01-01

    Hippocrates (Island of Kos, 460 B.C.-Larissa, 370 B.C.) is the founder of the most famous Medical School of the classical antiquity. In acknowledgement of his pioneering contribution to the new scientific field of Paediatric Virology, this article provides a systematic analysis of the Hippocratic Corpus, with particular focus on viral infections predominating in neonates and children. A mumps epidemic, affecting the island of Thasos in the 5th century B.C., is described in detail. ‘Herpes’, a medical term derived from the ancient Greek word ‘ἕρπειν’, meaning ‘to creep’ or ‘crawl’, is used to describe the spreading of cutaneous lesions in both childhood and adulthood. Cases of children with exanthema ‘resembling mosquito bites’ are presented in reference to varicella or smallpox infection. A variety of upper and lower respiratory tract viral infections are described with impressive accuracy, including rhinitis, pharyngitis, tonsillitis, laryngitis, bronchiolitis and bronchitis. The ‘cough of Perinthos’ epidemic, an influenza-like outbreak in the 5th century B.C., is also recorded and several cases complicated with pneumonia or fatal outcomes are discussed. Hippocrates, moreover, describes conjunctivitis, otitis, lymphadenitis, meningoencephalitis, febrile convulsions, gastroenteritis, hepatitis, poliomyelitis and skin warts, along with proposed treatment directions. Almost 2,400 years later, Hippocrates' systematic approach and methodical innovations can inspire paediatric trainees and future Paediatric Virology subspecialists. PMID:27446241

  11. HACEK infective endocarditis: characteristics and outcomes from a large, multi-national cohort.

    PubMed

    Chambers, Stephen T; Murdoch, David; Morris, Arthur; Holland, David; Pappas, Paul; Almela, Manel; Fernández-Hidalgo, Nuria; Almirante, Benito; Bouza, Emilio; Forno, Davide; del Rio, Ana; Hannan, Margaret M; Harkness, John; Kanafani, Zeina A; Lalani, Tahaniyat; Lang, Selwyn; Raymond, Nigel; Read, Kerry; Vinogradova, Tatiana; Woods, Christopher W; Wray, Dannah; Corey, G Ralph; Chu, Vivian H

    2013-01-01

    The HACEK organisms (Haemophilus species, Aggregatibacter species, Cardiobacterium hominis, Eikenella corrodens, and Kingella species) are rare causes of infective endocarditis (IE). The objective of this study is to describe the clinical characteristics and outcomes of patients with HACEK endocarditis (HE) in a large multi-national cohort. Patients hospitalized with definite or possible infective endocarditis by the International Collaboration on Endocarditis Prospective Cohort Study in 64 hospitals from 28 countries were included and characteristics of HE patients compared with IE due to other pathogens. Of 5591 patients enrolled, 77 (1.4%) had HE. HE was associated with a younger age (47 vs. 61 years; p<0.001), a higher prevalence of immunologic/vascular manifestations (32% vs. 20%; p<0.008) and stroke (25% vs. 17% p = 0.05) but a lower prevalence of congestive heart failure (15% vs. 30%; p = 0.004), death in-hospital (4% vs. 18%; p = 0.001) or after 1 year follow-up (6% vs. 20%; p = 0.01) than IE due to other pathogens (n = 5514). On multivariable analysis, stroke was associated with mitral valve vegetations (OR 3.60; CI 1.34-9.65; p<0.01) and younger age (OR 0.62; CI 0.49-0.90; p<0.01). The overall outcome of HE was excellent with the in-hospital mortality (4%) significantly better than for non-HE (18%; p<0.001). Prosthetic valve endocarditis was more common in HE (35%) than non-HE (24%). The outcome of prosthetic valve and native valve HE was excellent whether treated medically or with surgery. Current treatment is very successful for the management of both native valve prosthetic valve HE but further studies are needed to determine why HE has a predilection for younger people and to cause stroke. The small number of patients and observational design limit inferences on treatment strategies. Self selection of study sites limits epidemiological inferences.

  12. Multi-National Collaborative Modeling of Water Dependent Resources in the Tigris-Euphrates River Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Passell, H.; Roach, J. D.; Reno, M. D.; Klise, G. T.; Tidwell, V. C.

    2010-12-01

    A team of scientists and engineers from the Iraq Ministry of Water Resources, the Iraq Transition Assistance Office of the U.S. Department of State, UNESCO, and Sandia National Laboratories collaborated to build a systems model of Iraqi water resources and related systems, including transboundary water systems, surface water and reservoirs, agriculture, salinity, municipal and industrial uses, and issues related to the restoration and maintenance of the southern Mesopotamian Marshes. The model is intended to assist scientists and planners in the government of Iraq in development of its long-term Strategy for Water and Land Resources. The model is a numerical simulation built in a system dynamics environment, is bounded spatially by the watershed of the Tigris-Euphrates river system, and operates on a monthly timestep from 1930-2047. Model results for the 78-year period from 1930-2007 are calibrated to historic data. The 40-year “scenario period” from 2008-2047 allows users to simulate various and competing future scenarios for water management, and management of related systems, in Iraq. The model shows the potential impact of development of reservoirs and agriculture in upstream countries Turkey, Syria and Iran, and the impact of changes in Iraq to reservoir operations, agricultural practices, municipal and industrial approaches, and marsh restoration efforts. The modeling project is part of Iraq’s long-term planning effort known as Strategy for Water and Land Resources in Iraq. Due to the political sensitivity of water issues in the Tigris and Euphrates River system, data used to drive this model, and specific model results are proprietary to the country of Iraq. As a result, this paper will not include quantitative results, but rather a qualitative description of the model building process, qualitative model results, and lessons learned from this multi-national and multi-cultural collaborative model building effort.

  13. Paediatric day-case neurosurgery in a resource challenged setting: Pattern and practice

    PubMed Central

    Owojuyigbe, Afolabi Muyiwa; Komolafe, Edward O.; Adenekan, Anthony T.; Dada, Muyiwa A.; Onyia, Chiazor U.; Ogunbameru, Ibironke O.; Owagbemi, Oluwafemi F.; Talabi, Ademola O.; Faponle, Fola A.

    2016-01-01

    Background: It has been generally observed that children achieve better convalescence in the home environment especially if discharged same day after surgery. This is probably due to the fact that children generally tend to feel more at ease in the home environment than in the hospital setting. Only few tertiary health institutions provide routine day-case surgery for paediatric neurosurgical patients in our sub-region. Objective: To review the pattern and practice of paediatric neurosurgical day-cases at our hospital. Patients and Methods: A prospective study of all paediatric day-case neurosurgeries carried out between June 2011 and June 2014. Results: A total of 53 patients (34 males and 19 females) with age ranging from 2 days to 14 years were seen. Majority of the patients (77.4%) presented with congenital lesions, and the most common procedure carried out was spina bifida repair (32%) followed by ventriculoperitoneal shunt insertion (26.4%) for hydrocephalus. Sixty-eight percentage belonged to the American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status class 2, whereas the rest (32%) belonged to class 1. General anaesthesia was employed in 83% of cases. Parenteral paracetamol was used for intra-operative analgesia for most of the patients. Two patients had post-operative nausea and vomiting and were successfully managed. There was no case of emergency re-operation, unplanned admission, cancellation or mortality. Conclusion: Paediatric day-case neurosurgery is feasible in our environment. With careful patient selection and adequate pre-operative preparation, good outcome can be achieved. PMID:27251657

  14. Use of Zoledronic Acid in Paediatric Craniofacial Fibrous Dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Rossin, Sara; Divisic, Antuan; De Gregorio, Alesandra; Agosto, Caterina; Catalano, Igor; Mazza, Alessandro; Sartori, Leonardo; Benini, Franca

    2016-01-01

    We describe a case of a paediatric patient affected by mandibular fibrous dysplasia (FD) with severe and chronic pain who was successfully treated with zoledronic acid (ZOL): a third-generation bisphosphonate. Further research is needed to assess its safety and efficacy as a treatment option for FD in the paediatric population. PMID:27747122

  15. Poverty and childhood undernutrition in developing countries: a multi-national cohort study.

    PubMed

    Petrou, Stavros; Kupek, Emil

    2010-10-01

    The importance of reducing childhood undernutrition has been enshrined in the United Nations' Millennium Development Goals. This study explores the relationship between alternative indicators of poverty and childhood undernutrition in developing countries within the context of a multi-national cohort study (Young Lives). Approximately 2000 children in each of four countries - Ethiopia, India (Andhra Pradesh), Peru and Vietnam - had their heights measured and were weighed when they were aged between 6 and 17 months (survey one) and again between 4.5 and 5.5 years (survey two). The anthropometric outcomes of stunted, underweight and wasted were calculated using World Health Organization 2006 reference standards. Maximum-likelihood probit estimation was employed to model the relationship within each country and survey between alternative measures of living standards (principally a wealth index developed using principal components analysis) and each anthropometric outcome. An extensive set of covariates was incorporated into the models to remove as much individual heterogeneity as possible. The fully adjusted models revealed a negative and statistically significant coefficient on wealth for all outcomes in all countries, with the exception of the outcome of wasted in India (Andhra Pradesh) and Vietnam (survey one) and the outcome of underweight in Vietnam (surveys one and two). In survey one, the partial effects of wealth on the probabilities of stunting, being underweight and wasting was to reduce them by between 1.4 and 5.1 percentage points, 1.0 and 6.4 percentage points, and 0.3 and 4.5 percentage points, respectively, with each unit (10%) increase in wealth. The partial effects of wealth on the probabilities of anthropometric outcomes were larger in the survey two models. In both surveys, children residing in the lowest wealth quintile households had significantly increased probabilities of being stunted in all four study countries and of being underweight in

  16. HACEK Infective Endocarditis: Characteristics and Outcomes from a Large, Multi-National Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Chambers, Stephen T.; Murdoch, David; Morris, Arthur; Holland, David; Pappas, Paul; Almela, Manel; Fernández-Hidalgo, Nuria; Almirante, Benito; Bouza, Emilio; Forno, Davide; del Rio, Ana; Hannan, Margaret M.; Harkness, John; Kanafani, Zeina A.; Lalani, Tahaniyat; Lang, Selwyn; Raymond, Nigel; Read, Kerry; Vinogradova, Tatiana; Woods, Christopher W.; Wray, Dannah; Corey, G. Ralph; Chu, Vivian H.

    2013-01-01

    The HACEK organisms (Haemophilus species, Aggregatibacter species, Cardiobacterium hominis, Eikenella corrodens, and Kingella species) are rare causes of infective endocarditis (IE). The objective of this study is to describe the clinical characteristics and outcomes of patients with HACEK endocarditis (HE) in a large multi-national cohort. Patients hospitalized with definite or possible infective endocarditis by the International Collaboration on Endocarditis Prospective Cohort Study in 64 hospitals from 28 countries were included and characteristics of HE patients compared with IE due to other pathogens. Of 5591 patients enrolled, 77 (1.4%) had HE. HE was associated with a younger age (47 vs. 61 years; p<0.001), a higher prevalence of immunologic/vascular manifestations (32% vs. 20%; p<0.008) and stroke (25% vs. 17% p = 0.05) but a lower prevalence of congestive heart failure (15% vs. 30%; p = 0.004), death in-hospital (4% vs. 18%; p = 0.001) or after 1 year follow-up (6% vs. 20%; p = 0.01) than IE due to other pathogens (n = 5514). On multivariable analysis, stroke was associated with mitral valve vegetations (OR 3.60; CI 1.34–9.65; p<0.01) and younger age (OR 0.62; CI 0.49–0.90; p<0.01). The overall outcome of HE was excellent with the in-hospital mortality (4%) significantly better than for non-HE (18%; p<0.001). Prosthetic valve endocarditis was more common in HE (35%) than non-HE (24%). The outcome of prosthetic valve and native valve HE was excellent whether treated medically or with surgery. Current treatment is very successful for the management of both native valve prosthetic valve HE but further studies are needed to determine why HE has a predilection for younger people and to cause stroke. The small number of patients and observational design limit inferences on treatment strategies. Self selection of study sites limits epidemiological inferences. PMID:23690995

  17. [Primary management and treatment of paediatric septic shock].

    PubMed

    Kneyber, Martin C J; van Heerde, Marc; Henneveld, Hetty Th

    2010-01-01

    Paediatric shock is common. Hypovolaemic and septic shock are the main forms. Early and rapid results-oriented therapy of paediatric septic shock has a favourable effect on survival. There is an international guideline for the primary management of paediatric shock during the first hour after presentation of the patient. The goal of treatment is to prevent oxygen debt and consequently organ failure. The main symptoms of paediatric shock are tachycardia and reduced consciousness. In a child in shock, the clinical picture should be recognized within 15 minutes and an attempt should be made to reverse the situation by rapid fluid infusion. If the shock persists after 15 minutes, vasoactive medication should be given and the child should be transferred to a local paediatric intensive care unit. Intubation and mechanical ventilation are then also required.

  18. The introduction of web-based video-consultation in a paediatric acute care setting.

    PubMed

    Jury, Susan C; Walker, Amanda M; Kornberg, Andrew J

    2013-10-01

    The Royal Children's Hospital (RCH) in Melbourne has been providing web-based video-consultations for a range of paediatric sub-specialties since 2011. There were 346 video-consultations in the first 16 months, from a total of 65 clinicians. Most teleconsultations were with the family at home. Generally, video-consultation was used for follow-up, after at least one face-to-face visit. A total of 132 users (specialist and regional clinicians, patients and families) responded to an online survey. The major reason for both clinicians and families participating in telehealth was the savings in families' travel time. Key factors for the successful implementation of telehealth at the RCH include: a clear organisational vision; simple web-based technology; clinician ownership; sustained support. The RCH experience suggests that telehealth is suitable for both simple and highly complex paediatric patients.

  19. Establishing an internet-based paediatric cancer registration and communication system for the Hungarian paediatric oncology network.

    PubMed

    Borgulya, Gábor; Jakab, Zsuzsanna; Schuler, Dezso; Garami, Miklós

    2004-01-01

    Cancer registration has developed in Europe over the last 50 years, and in the last decade intensive joint activities between the European Cancer Registries, in response to the need of pan-European harmonization of registration practices, have taken place. The Hungarian Paediatric Cancer Registry has been functioning as the database of the Hungarian Paediatric Oncology Network since 1971, aiming to follow the incidence and the treatment efficacy of malignant diseases. The goals of this globally unique open source information system are the following: 1) to raise the quality of the registration system to the European level by developing an Internet-based registration and communication system, modernizing the database, establishing automatic statistical analyses and adding an Internet website, 2) to support clinical epidemiological studies that we conduct with international collaborators on detailed analyses of the characteristics of patients and their diseases, evaluation of new diagnostic and therapeutic methods, prevention programs, and long-term quality of life and side effects. The benefits of the development of the Internet-based registration and communication system are as follows: a) introduction of an Internet-based case reporting system, b) modernization of the registry database according to international recommendations, c) automatic statistical summaries, encrypted mail systems, document repository, d) application of data security and privacy standards, e) establishment of a website and compilation of educational materials. The overall objective of this scientific project is to contribute towards the improvement of cancer prevention and cancer care for the benefit of the public in general and of cancer patients in particular.

  20. ICRP publication 121: radiological protection in paediatric diagnostic and interventional radiology.

    PubMed

    Khong, P-L; Ringertz, H; Donoghue, V; Frush, D; Rehani, M; Appelgate, K; Sanchez, R

    2013-04-01

    Paediatric patients have a higher average risk of developing cancer compared with adults receiving the same dose. The longer life expectancy in children allows more time for any harmful effects of radiation to manifest, and developing organs and tissues are more sensitive to the effects of radiation. This publication aims to provide guiding principles of radiological protection for referring clinicians and clinical staff performing diagnostic imaging and interventional procedures for paediatric patients. It begins with a brief description of the basic concepts of radiological protection, followed by the general aspects of radiological protection, including principles of justification and optimisation. Guidelines and suggestions for radiological protection in specific modalities - radiography and fluoroscopy, interventional radiology, and computed tomography - are subsequently covered in depth. The report concludes with a summary and recommendations. The importance of rigorous justification of radiological procedures is emphasised for every procedure involving ionising radiation, and the use of imaging modalities that are non-ionising should always be considered. The basic aim of optimisation of radiological protection is to adjust imaging parameters and institute protective measures such that the required image is obtained with the lowest possible dose of radiation, and that net benefit is maximised to maintain sufficient quality for diagnostic interpretation. Special consideration should be given to the availability of dose reduction measures when purchasing new imaging equipment for paediatric use. One of the unique aspects of paediatric imaging is with regards to the wide range in patient size (and weight), therefore requiring special attention to optimisation and modification of equipment, technique, and imaging parameters. Examples of good radiographic and fluoroscopic technique include attention to patient positioning, field size and adequate collimation, use

  1. Infection control in paediatric office settings

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Transmission of infection in the paediatric office is of increasing concern. The present document discusses routes of transmission of infection and the principles of current infection control measures. Prevention includes appropriate office design and administrative policies, triage, routine practices for the care of all patients (eg, hand hygiene; use of gloves, masks, eye protection and gowns for specific procedures; adequate cleaning, disinfection and sterilization of surfaces and equipment including toys, and aseptic technique for invasive procedures), and additional precautions for specific infections. Personnel should be adequately immunized, and those infected should follow work-restriction policies. PMID:19412374

  2. Paediatric idiopathic limbal stem cell deficiency.

    PubMed

    Vincent, Stephen J; Lee, Graham A

    2017-03-20

    Acquired limbal stem cell deficiency (LSCD) describes a condition in which the corneal limbal stem cells are altered or destroyed, typically due to ocular trauma, chronic allergy or inflammation. Idiopathic LSCD is a term used to describe limbal stem cell failure in the absence of any identifiable causative factor. While several cases of adult-onset LSCD have been identified previously, this case report describes a rare presentation of bilateral asymmetric idiopathic paediatric limbal stem cell deficiency in a sixteen-year-old male with an otherwise unremarkable ocular history.

  3. [Emergency medical aid in a paediatrics context].

    PubMed

    Branchard, Delphine; Tentillier, Éric; Gillet, Stéphane; Naud, Julien

    2016-01-01

    In France, the organisation of aid involves the intervention of the emergency medical services (Samu), which coordinate the medical regulation platforms for site 15 and the mobile emergency and intensive care services (Smur). Since they were created, the Samu have been tirelessly adapting their response to the various characteristics of pre-hospital assignments. Pre- and inter-hospital paediatrics has seen the development of specialised teams with the aim of providing effective aid which is adapted to the youngest and most vulnerable patients.

  4. Paediatric travel medicine: vaccines and medications

    PubMed Central

    Starr, Mike

    2013-01-01

    The paediatric aspects of travel medicine can be complex, and individual advice is often required. Nonetheless, children are much more likely to acquire common infections than exotic tropical diseases whilst travelling. Important exceptions are malaria and tuberculosis, which are more frequent and severe in children. Overall, travellers' diarrhoea is the most common illness affecting travellers. This review discusses vaccines and medications that may be indicated for children who are travelling overseas. It focuses on immunizations that are given as part of the routine schedule, as well as those that are more specific to travel. Malaria and travellers' diarrhoea are also discussed. PMID:23163285

  5. MIH: epidemiologic clinic study in paediatric patient

    PubMed Central

    CONDÒ, R.; PERUGIA, C.; MATURO, P.; DOCIMO, R.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY The Molar Incisor Hypomineralization (MIH) is a qualitative and quantitative defect of the enamel structure of the first permanent molars, which may vary from 1 to 4 with involvement of maxillary and jaw permanent incisors. Aim. Aim of this study is that to evaluate, among 1500 paediatric patients chosen at random aged between 0 and 14 years, afferent by the Paediatric Dentistry of the Azienda Ospedialiera Policlinico Tor Vergata of Rome from 1996 to 2011, the incidents and the prevalence of the MIH distribution, and furthermore to ascertain the possible relationship with the data described in the literature. Results and discussion. From the sample of 1500 paediatric patients, the number of those affections from MIH has turned out to be pairs to 110 (7.3%) aged between 4 and 15 years, and an average age equal to 9.7. The incidence of the hypoplastic defects is greater in the elements of the permanents series in which the functional class mainly interested is that of the first molars, with a percentage of 39.8%. Regarding the elements of the deciduous series affections from hypoplasia, they turn out to be in all in number of 20 represented in 80% of the cases from the seconds molars while in the remaining 20% of the cases the items involved are the central incisors. About the percentage of elements involved in the MIH: the molars, involved with a frequency of 56%, turn out to be more hit regarding incisors (44%). As reported in the literature, it can be asserted that the MIH can hit in equal measure both the male sex that feminine one. Conclusions. MIH represents a condition quite frequent in the paediatric population. In managing this anomaly takes an essential role in the early diagnosis and in the differential one. The study done underlined the importance of a correct application of the therapeutic protocol which, starting from a careful diagnosis and articulating themselves in the execution of preventive treatments and in severe cases restorative and

  6. Paediatric rectal prolapse in Rwanda.

    PubMed Central

    Chaloner, E J; Duckett, J; Lewin, J

    1996-01-01

    During the 1994 crisis in Rwanda, a high incidence of full-thickness rectal prolapse was noted among the refugee children in the south-west of the country. The prolapses arose as a result of acute diarrhoeal illness superimposed on malnutrition and worm infestation. We used a modification of the Thiersch wire technique in 40 of these cases during two months working in a refugee camp. A catgut pursestring was tied around the anal margin under local, regional or general anaesthesia. This was effective in achieving short-term control of full-thickness prolapse until the underlying illness was corrected. Under the circumstances, no formal follow-up could be arranged; however, no complications were reported and only one patient presented with recurrence. Images Figure 1 PMID:9014879

  7. Osteoporosis in paediatric patients with spina bifida

    PubMed Central

    Marreiros, Humberto Filipe; Loff, Clara; Calado, Eulalia

    2012-01-01

    The prevalence and morbidity associated with osteoporosis and fractures in patients with spina bifida (SB) highlight the importance of osteoporosis prevention and treatment in early childhood; however, the issue has received little attention. The method for the selection of appropriate patients for drug treatment has not been clarified. Objective To review the literature concerning fracture risks and low bone density in paediatric patients with SB. We looked for studies describing state-of-the-art treatments and for prevention of secondary osteoporosis. Methods Articles were identified through a search in the electronic database (PUBMED) supplemented with reviews of the reference lists of selected papers. The main outcome measures were incidence of fractures and risk factors for fracture, an association between bone mineral density (BMD) and occurrence of fracture, risk factors of low BMD, and effects of pharmacological and non-pharmacological treatments on BMD and on the incidence of fractures. We considered as a secondary outcome the occurrence of fractures in relation to the mechanism of injury. Results Results indicated that patients with SB are at increased risk for fractures and low BMD. Risk factors that may predispose patients to fractures include higher levels of neurological involvement, non-ambulatory status, physical inactivity, hypercalciuria, higher body fat levels, contractures, and a previous spontaneous fracture. Limitations were observed in the number and quality of studies concerning osteoporosis prevention and treatment in paediatric patients with SB. The safety and efficiency of drugs to treat osteoporosis in adults have not been evaluated satisfactorily in children with SB. PMID:22330186

  8. A paediatric X-ray exposure chart

    SciTech Connect

    Knight, Stephen P

    2014-09-15

    The aim of this review was to develop a radiographic optimisation strategy to make use of digital radiography (DR) and needle phosphor computerised radiography (CR) detectors, in order to lower radiation dose and improve image quality for paediatrics. This review was based on evidence-based practice, of which a component was a review of the relevant literature. The resulting exposure chart was developed with two distinct groups of exposure optimisation strategies – body exposures (for head, trunk, humerus, femur) and distal extremity exposures (elbow to finger, knee to toe). Exposure variables manipulated included kilovoltage peak (kVp), target detector exposure and milli-ampere-seconds (mAs), automatic exposure control (AEC), additional beam filtration, and use of antiscatter grid. Mean dose area product (DAP) reductions of up to 83% for anterior–posterior (AP)/posterior–anterior (PA) abdomen projections were recorded postoptimisation due to manipulation of multiple-exposure variables. For body exposures, the target EI and detector exposure, and thus the required mAs were typically 20% less postoptimisation. Image quality for some distal extremity exposures was improved by lowering kVp and increasing mAs around constant entrance skin dose. It is recommended that purchasing digital X-ray equipment with high detective quantum efficiency detectors, and then optimising the exposure chart for use with these detectors is of high importance for sites performing paediatric imaging. Multiple-exposure variables may need to be manipulated to achieve optimal outcomes.

  9. A paediatric X-ray exposure chart

    PubMed Central

    Knight, Stephen P

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this review was to develop a radiographic optimisation strategy to make use of digital radiography (DR) and needle phosphor computerised radiography (CR) detectors, in order to lower radiation dose and improve image quality for paediatrics. This review was based on evidence-based practice, of which a component was a review of the relevant literature. The resulting exposure chart was developed with two distinct groups of exposure optimisation strategies – body exposures (for head, trunk, humerus, femur) and distal extremity exposures (elbow to finger, knee to toe). Exposure variables manipulated included kilovoltage peak (kVp), target detector exposure and milli-ampere-seconds (mAs), automatic exposure control (AEC), additional beam filtration, and use of antiscatter grid. Mean dose area product (DAP) reductions of up to 83% for anterior–posterior (AP)/posterior–anterior (PA) abdomen projections were recorded postoptimisation due to manipulation of multiple-exposure variables. For body exposures, the target EI and detector exposure, and thus the required mAs were typically 20% less postoptimisation. Image quality for some distal extremity exposures was improved by lowering kVp and increasing mAs around constant entrance skin dose. It is recommended that purchasing digital X-ray equipment with high detective quantum efficiency detectors, and then optimising the exposure chart for use with these detectors is of high importance for sites performing paediatric imaging. Multiple-exposure variables may need to be manipulated to achieve optimal outcomes. PMID:26229655

  10. Transhepatic central venous catheter for long-term access in paediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Mortell, Alan; Said, Hanan; Doodnath, Reshma; Walsh, Kevin; Corbally, Martin

    2008-02-01

    Vascular access in paediatric patients with chronic and/or life-threatening illness is crucial to survival. Access is frequently lost in this group because of thrombosis, infection, or displacement, and vascular options can quickly be exhausted. The last resort access procedure is generally a direct atrial catheter inserted via a thoracotomy. A viable alternative is the percutaneous transhepatic Broviac catheter (Bard Access Systems, Salt Lake City, UT). We retrospectively reviewed the charts of 5 patients who underwent percutaneous transhepatic Broviac insertion for long-term access over a 4-year period in a single institution. Four of the patients (80%) had a significant cardiac abnormality, with 1 patient requiring long-term parenteral nutrition after complicated necrotizing enterocolitis. All patients had significant caval thrombosis, which precluded them having placement of a standard percutaneous or openly placed central catheter. Of the 5 patients, 2 (40%) died of cardiac-related illnesses. Of the 3 surviving patients, 2 had functioning catheters electively removed because they were no longer required. One catheter was removed at thoracotomy for right atrial perforation because of catheter erosion. Vascular access in paediatric patients with chronic and/or life-threatening illness is crucial to survival. Transhepatic central venous catheters are a feasible, reliable, and relatively easily placed form of central access in patients with multiple venous thromboses requiring long-term access. This route should be considered in paediatric patients requiring central access in preference to a thoracotomy.

  11. When to start paediatric testing of the adult HIV cure research agenda?

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Seema K

    2017-01-01

    Ethical guidelines recommend that experimental interventions should be tested in adults first before they are tested and approved in children. Some challenge this paradigm, however, and recommend initiating paediatric testing after preliminary safety testing in adults in certain cases. For instance, commentators have argued for accelerated testing of HIV vaccines in children. Additionally, HIV cure research on the use of very early therapy (VET) in infants, prompted in part by the Mississippi baby case, is one example of a strategy that is currently being tested in infants before it has been well tested in adults. Because infants’ immune systems are still developing, the timing of HIV transmission is easier to identify in infants than in adults, and infants who receive VET might never develop the viral reservoirs that make HIV so difficult to eradicate, infants may be uniquely situated to achieve HIV cure or sustained viral remission. Several commentators have now argued for earlier initiation of HIV cure interventions other than (or in addition to) VET in children. HIV cure research is therefore a good case for re-examining the important question of when to initiate paediatric research. I will argue that, despite the potential for HIV cure research to benefit children and the scientific value of involving children in this research, the HIV cure agenda should not accelerate the involvement of children for the following reasons: HIV cure research is highly speculative, risky, aimed at combination approaches and does not compare favourably with the available alternatives. I conclude by drawing general implications for the initiation of paediatric testing, including that interventions that have to be used in combination with others and cures for chronic diseases may not be valuable enough to justify early paediatric testing. PMID:27259546

  12. Paediatric biopharmaceutics classification system: current status and future decisions.

    PubMed

    Batchelor, Hannah

    2014-08-05

    Biopharmaceutical methods are routinely used in the design of medicines to predict in vivo absorption and hence guide the development of new products. Differences in anatomy and physiology of paediatric patients require adaptation of existing biopharmaceutical methods to ensure that in vivo predictions are relevant for this population. The biopharmaceutics classification system is a tool used in drug development to guide formulation selection and manufacture from early clinical studies through to product launch. The applicability of the biopharmaceutics system to paediatric product development has yet to be explored; this note brings together some key issues in direct extrapolation from adults into paediatric populations.

  13. Assessing the burden of paediatric influenza in Europe: the European Paediatric Influenza Analysis (EPIA) project.

    PubMed

    Paget, W John; Balderston, Catherine; Casas, Inmaculada; Donker, Gé; Edelman, Laurel; Fleming, Douglas; Larrauri, Amparo; Meijer, Adam; Puzelli, Simona; Rizzo, Caterina; Simonsen, Lone

    2010-08-01

    The European Paediatric Influenza Analysis (EPIA) project is a multi-country project that was created to collect, analyse and present data regarding the paediatric influenza burden in European countries, with the purpose of providing the necessary information to make evidence-based decisions regarding influenza immunisation recommendations for children. The initial approach taken is based on existing weekly virological and age-specific influenza-like illness (ILI) data from surveillance networks across Europe. We use a multiple regression model guided by longitudinal weekly patterns of influenza virus to attribute the weekly ILI consultation incidence pattern to each influenza (sub)type, while controlling for the effect of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) epidemics. Modelling the ILI consultation incidence during 2002/2003-2008 revealed that influenza infections that presented for medical attention as ILI affected between 0.3% and 9.8% of children aged 0-4 and 5-14 years in England, Italy, the Netherlands and Spain in an average season. With the exception of Spain, these rates were always higher in children aged 0-4 years. Across the six seasons analysed (five seasons were analysed from the Italian data), the model attributed 47-83% of the ILI burden in primary care to influenza virus infection in the various countries, with the A(H3N2) virus playing the most important role, followed by influenza viruses B and A(H1N1). National season averages from the four countries studied indicated that between 0.4% and 18% of children consulted a physician for ILI, with the percentage depending on the country and health care system. Influenza virus infections explained the majority of paediatric ILI consultations in all countries. The next step will be to apply the EPIA modelling approach to severe outcomes indicators (i.e. hospitalisations and mortality data) to generate a complete range of mild and severe influenza burden estimates needed for decision making concerning

  14. Nomenclature for congenital and paediatric cardiac disease: historical perspectives and The International Pediatric and Congenital Cardiac Code.

    PubMed

    Franklin, Rodney C G; Jacobs, Jeffrey Phillip; Krogmann, Otto N; Béland, Marie J; Aiello, Vera D; Colan, Steven D; Elliott, Martin J; William Gaynor, J; Kurosawa, Hiromi; Maruszewski, Bohdan; Stellin, Giovanni; Tchervenkov, Christo I; Walters Iii, Henry L; Weinberg, Paul; Anderson, Robert H

    2008-12-01

    Clinicians working in the field of congenital and paediatric cardiology have long felt the need for a common diagnostic and therapeutic nomenclature and coding system with which to classify patients of all ages with congenital and acquired cardiac disease. A cohesive and comprehensive system of nomenclature, suitable for setting a global standard for multicentric analysis of outcomes and stratification of risk, has only recently emerged, namely, The International Paediatric and Congenital Cardiac Code. This review, will give an historical perspective on the development of systems of nomenclature in general, and specifically with respect to the diagnosis and treatment of patients with paediatric and congenital cardiac disease. Finally, current and future efforts to merge such systems into the paperless environment of the electronic health or patient record on a global scale are briefly explored. On October 6, 2000, The International Nomenclature Committee for Pediatric and Congenital Heart Disease was established. In January, 2005, the International Nomenclature Committee was constituted in Canada as The International Society for Nomenclature of Paediatric and Congenital Heart Disease. This International Society now has three working groups. The Nomenclature Working Group developed The International Paediatric and Congenital Cardiac Code and will continue to maintain, expand, update, and preserve this International Code. It will also provide ready access to the International Code for the global paediatric and congenital cardiology and cardiac surgery communities, related disciplines, the healthcare industry, and governmental agencies, both electronically and in published form. The Definitions Working Group will write definitions for the terms in the International Paediatric and Congenital Cardiac Code, building on the previously published definitions from the Nomenclature Working Group. The Archiving Working Group, also known as The Congenital Heart Archiving

  15. A 3D digital medical photography system in paediatric medicine.

    PubMed

    Williams, Susanne K; Ellis, Lloyd A; Williams, Gigi

    2008-01-01

    In 2004, traditional clinical photography services at the Educational Resource Centre were extended using new technology. This paper describes the establishment of a 3D digital imaging system in a paediatric setting at the Royal Children's Hospital, Melbourne.

  16. Review article: Paediatric bone and joint infection.

    PubMed

    Stott, N Susan

    2001-06-01

    Paediatric musculoskeletal infection remains an important cause of morbidity. Methicillin sensitive Staphylococcus aureus is still the most common organism although the incidence of methicillin resistant S. aureus in the community is rising. Osteomyelitis and septic arthritis due to Haemophilus influenzae is decreasing in incidence secondary to immunisation and in some units has been replaced by infections with the gram negative bacillus, Kingella kingae. Recent prospective studies indicate that uncomplicated osteomyelitis can be treated by three to four weeks of antibiotics. However, there is still a small group of children who will have overwhelming disseminated infection. These children require aggressive surgical and medical intervention. Two recent reports have identified an increased incidence of septic arthritis in children who have hemophilia and are HIV positive.

  17. Adenoid bacterial colonization in a paediatric population.

    PubMed

    Subtil, João; Rodrigues, João Carlos; Reis, Lúcia; Freitas, Luís; Filipe, Joana; Santos, Alberto; Macor, Carlos; Duarte, Aida; Jordao, Luisa

    2017-04-01

    Adenoids play a key role in both respiratory and ear infection in children. It has also been shown that adenoidectomy improves these symptoms in this population. The main goal of the present study was to evaluate adenoid bacterial colonization and document a possible relation with infectious respiratory disease. A prospective observational study was designed to evaluate the proposed hypothesis in a paediatric population submitted to adenoidectomy by either infectious or non-infectious indications and compare these two cohorts. A total of 62 patients with ages ranging from 1 to 12 years old were enrolled in the study. Adenoid surface, adenoid core and middle meatus microbiota were compared. A close association between adenoid colonization and nasal infection was found, supporting that adenoids may function as bacterial reservoir for upper airway infection. The obtained results also contribute to explain the success of adenoidectomy in patients with infectious indications.

  18. Role of advanced paediatric nurse practitioners.

    PubMed

    Lisa, Egerton

    2012-07-01

    Children's attendance at emergency departments (EDs) is increasing every year, yet many children present with minor, self-limiting illnesses that could be managed at home. In light of Williams et al (2009) suggestion that healthcare professionals should improve the care available to patients at point of contact rather than try to change their health-seeking behaviours, this article describes how Tameside and Glossop Primary Care Trust has developed an advanced paediatric nurse practitioner (APNP) service in the ED to improve the care of children, and to reduce the number of admissions. The APNPs treat children in the ED then divert them to more appropriate services where support is given to the families to care for their children at home. The role contributes to meeting ED clinical quality indicators, frees up medical staff to deal with more seriously ill patients, and makes financial savings for the trust.

  19. Developmental paediatrics in primary care: what should we teach?

    PubMed Central

    Baird, G; Hall, D M

    1985-01-01

    There is little agreement about what constitutes good developmental paediatric practice at the level of primary care. Many of the available screening tests are intrinsically unsatisfactory or badly performed, but screening is only a small part of developmental paediatrics. Every primary care doctor should be familiar with the scientific basis of the subject even if a decision is made not to embark on a formal screening programme. PMID:2412629

  20. [Paediatric mobile emergency and intensive care services, objectives and missions].

    PubMed

    Julliand, Sébastien; Lodé, Noëlla

    2016-01-01

    The paediatric mobile emergency and intensive care service care teams have expertise in taking care of children in life-threatening circumstances. At the Robert-Debré Hospital in Paris, the paediatric Smur is multi-skilled, specialising particularly in transporting neonates and infants with severe cardiac or respiratory difficulties. The pathologies handled are very varied and include both neonatal pathologies and trauma pathologies in older children.

  1. Sixth Nerve Palsy in Paediatric Intracranial Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Reid, Julia E.; Reem, Rachel E.; Aylward, Shawn C.; Rogers, David L.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The purpose of this study was to report the incidence and describe the characteristics of sixth cranial nerve (CN VI) palsy in paediatric patients with intracranial hypertension (IH). A retrospective chart review of central Ohio children diagnosed with IH over the 3-year period from 2010 to 2013 was conducted. IH without identifiable cause was defined as idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH), whereas IH with identifiable pathologic aetiology was deemed secondary intracranial hypertension (SIH). A subset of patients with CN VI palsy was identified. Data collected included patient age, gender, past medical history, aetiology of SIH, ophthalmic examination, lumbar puncture results, neuroimaging results, and response to treatment. Seventy-eight children with intracranial hypertension were included in the study. Nine (11.5%) children (four males, five females; median age 14, range: 3–18) were found to have a unilateral (n = 2) or bilateral (n = 7) CN VI palsy. Five children had IIH; the remaining four had SIH from cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (n = 2) and infection (n = 2). The mean lumbar puncture opening pressure for the nine patients with CN VI palsy was 40 cm H2O (range: 21–65 cm H2O). Papilloedema was present in 8/9 (89%) patients. One patient required a lumboperitoneal shunt, and two others required optic nerve sheath fenestrations in addition to medical management. All cases of CN VI palsy resolved with treatment. In our primary service area, the incidence of CN VI palsy is approximately 12% among paediatric IH patients. The majority of cases with CN VI palsy presented with papilloedema and all cases resolved with treatment of intracranial hypertension. PMID:27928378

  2. Informed consent for paediatric clinical trials in Europe

    PubMed Central

    Lepola, Pirkko; Needham, Allison; Mendum, Jo; Sallabank, Peter; Neubauer, David; de Wildt, Saskia

    2016-01-01

    Objective Paediatric clinical trials are often conducted as multinational trials. Informed consent or assent is part of the ethics committee approval for clinical trials. The consent requirements vary between countries due to national laws and regulations, which are not harmonised in Europe. These discrepancies can present challenges for paediatric clinical trials. The aim of this study was to assemble these consent and assent requirements across the European Economic Area. The collated national requirements have not been publicly available before, despite a real need for this data. Methods National consent and assent requirements for paediatric clinical trials were analysed and collated for 25 European Union Member States and 2 European Free Trade Association countries until the end of 2014. The data were retrieved from existing databases and through communication with the competent authorities and selected ethics committees. Results from a literature search for international or national guidelines, declarations and conventions and academic societies' publications served as comparison material. Results Consent and assent requirements are heterogeneous across these countries. We compiled our findings in ‘The Informed Consent and Assent Tool Kit’, a table including 27 national consent and assent requirements listed by individual country. Conclusions Wide variation in paediatric consents and assents presents challenges for multinational paediatric trials in Europe. The toolkit is available for all those involved in paediatric clinical trials and ethics committees, providing a new platform for proactive feedback on informed consent requirements, and may finally lead to a needed harmonisation process, including uniform standards accepted across Europe. PMID:27226526

  3. A Retrospective Analysis of Spontaneous Adverse Drug Reactions Reports Relating to Paediatric Patients

    PubMed Central

    Rosli, Rosliana; Abd Aziz, Noorizan; Manan, Mohamed Mansor

    2016-01-01

    Background Spontaneous reporting on adverse drug reactions (ADR) has been established in Malaysia since 1987, and although these reports are monitored by the Malaysia drug monitoring authority, the National Pharmaceutical Control Bureau, information about ADRs in the paediatric patient population still remains unexplored. The aims of this study, therefore, were to characterize the ADRs reported in respect to the Malaysian paediatric population and to relate the data to specific paediatric age groups. Methods Data on all ADRs reported to the National Pharmaceutical Control Bureau between 2000 and 2013 for individuals aged from birth to 17 years old were analysed with respect to age and gender, type of reporter, suspected medicines (using the Anatomical Therapeutic Chemical classification), category of ADR (according to system organ class) as well as the severity of the ADR. Results In total, 11,523 ADR reports corresponding to 22,237 ADRs were analysed, with half of these reporting one ADR per report. Vaccines comprised 55.7% of the 11,523 ADR reports with the remaining being drug related ADRs. Overall, 63.9% of ADRs were reported for paediatric patients between 12 and 17 years of age, with the majority of ADRs reported in females (70.7%). The most common ADRs reported were from the following system organ classes: application site disorders (32.2%), skin and appendages disorders (20.6%), body as a whole general disorders (12.8%) and central and peripheral nervous system disorders (11.2%). Meanwhile, ADRs in respect to anti-infectives for systemic use (2194/5106; 43.0%) were the most frequently reported across all age groups, followed by drugs from the nervous system (1095/5106; 21.4%). Only 0.28% of the ADR cases were reported as fatal. A large proportion of the reports were received from healthcare providers in government health facilities. Discussion ADR reports concerning vaccines and anti-infectives were the most commonly reported in children, and are mainly

  4. Challenges in diagnosing paediatric malaria in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Malaria is a major cause of paediatric morbidity and mortality. As no clinical features clearly differentiate malaria from other febrile illnesses, and malaria diagnosis is challenged by often lacking laboratory equipment and expertise, overdiagnosis and overtreatment is common. Methods Children admitted with fever at the general paediatric wards at Muhimbili National Hospital (MNH), Dar es Salaam, Tanzania from January to June 2009 were recruited consecutively and prospectively. Demographic and clinical features were registered. Routine thick blood smear microscopy at MNH was compared to results of subsequent thin blood smear microscopy, and rapid diagnostics tests (RDTs). Genus-specific PCR of Plasmodium mitochondrial DNA was performed on DNA extracted from whole blood and species-specific PCR was done on positive samples. Results Among 304 included children, 62.6% had received anti-malarials during the last four weeks prior to admission and 65.1% during the hospital stay. Routine thick blood smears, research blood smears, PCR and RDT detected malaria in 13.2%, 6.6%, 25.0% and 13.5%, respectively. Positive routine microscopy was confirmed in only 43% (17/40), 45% (18/40) and 53% (21/40), by research microscopy, RDTs and PCR, respectively. Eighteen percent (56/304) had positive PCR but negative research microscopy. Reported low parasitaemia on routine microscopy was associated with negative research blood slide and PCR. RDT-positive cases were associated with signs of severe malaria. Palmar pallor, low haemoglobin and low platelet count were significantly associated with positive PCR, research microscopy and RDT. Conclusions The true morbidity attributable to malaria in the study population remains uncertain due to the discrepancies in results among the diagnostic methods. The current routine microscopy appears to result in overdiagnosis of malaria and, consequently, overuse of anti-malarials. Conversely, children with a false positive malaria diagnosis

  5. [Paediatric one-stop surgery: a series of 75 cases].

    PubMed

    López Alvarez-Buhilla, P; Astigarraga Aguirre, I; Torres Piedra, C; Azcona Zorrilla, M I; Olaizola Mendibil, A; Latorre Guisasola, M

    2009-01-01

    By one-stop surgery is meant the performing of both the pre-surgery assessment and the surgical procedure on the same day. We report our experience with a pilot study on one-stop surgery in the province of Bizkaia, with a population of 124,494 children aged 1 to 14 years old. Under the new scheme, the patient average of four visits to the hospital outpatient clinics was cut down to only one. Diagnosis and pre-surgery assessments were made by the children's Primary Care Paediatricians at their NHS clinics. Seventy-five children were treated over 10 months. They had abdominal wall, genital or soft tissue surgery. Only two developed minor complications. Families were generally satisfied with the quality of the medical care received as shown by a survey: 32.7% scored it as "excellent", 36.2% "very good", 24.1% "good" and 3.4% "medium". We think that one-stop surgery is a breakthrough in ambulatory surgery. Not only does it dramatically lower the number of visits to hospital outpatient clinics, but also the waiting time for surgery, the costs, and the surgeon's workload, and helps streamline the Public Health Services and the quality of the medical care as perceived by both patients and families. Ensuring a close relationship between Paediatric Surgeons and Primary Care Paediatricians is paramount.

  6. Clinical and experimental advances in congenital and paediatric cataracts

    PubMed Central

    Churchill, Amanda; Graw, Jochen

    2011-01-01

    Cataracts (opacities of the lens) are frequent in the elderly, but rare in paediatric practice. Congenital cataracts (in industrialized countries) are mainly caused by mutations affecting lens development. Much of our knowledge about the underlying mechanisms of cataractogenesis has come from the genetic analysis of affected families: there are contributions from genes coding for transcription factors (such as FoxE3, Maf, Pitx3) and structural proteins such as crystallins or connexins. In addition, there are contributions from enzymes affecting sugar pathways (particularly the galactose pathway) and from a quite unexpected area: axon guidance molecules like ephrins and their receptors. Cataractous mouse lenses can be identified easily by visual inspection, and a remarkable number of mutant lines have now been characterized. Generally, most of the mouse mutants show a similar phenotype to their human counterparts; however, there are some remarkable differences. It should be noted that many mutations affect genes that are expressed not only in the lens, but also in tissues and organs outside the eye. There is increasing evidence for pleiotropic effects of these genes, and increasing consideration that cataracts may act as early and readily detectable biomarkers for a number of systemic syndromes. PMID:21402583

  7. Paediatric cardiac intensive care unit: current setting and organization in 2010.

    PubMed

    Fraisse, Alain; Le Bel, Stéphane; Mas, Bertrand; Macrae, Duncan

    2010-10-01

    Over recent decades, specialized paediatric cardiac intensive care has emerged as a central component in the management of critically ill, neonatal, paediatric and adult patients with congenital and acquired heart disease. The majority of high-volume centres (dealing with over 300 surgical cases per year) have dedicated paediatric cardiac intensive care units, with the smallest programmes more likely to care for paediatric cardiac patients in mixed paediatric or adult intensive care units. Specialized nursing staff are also a crucial presence at the patient's bedside for quality of care. A paediatric cardiac intensive care programme should have patients (preoperative and postoperative) grouped together geographically, and should provide proximity to the operating theatre, catheterization laboratory and radiology department, as well as to the regular ward. Age-appropriate medical equipment must be provided. An optimal strategy for running a paediatric cardiac intensive care programme should include: multidisciplinary collaboration and involvement with paediatric cardiology, anaesthesia, cardiac surgery and many other subspecialties; a risk-stratification strategy for quantifying perioperative risk; a personalized patient approach; and anticipatory care. Finally, progressive withdrawal from heavy paediatric cardiac intensive care management should be institutionalized. Although the countries of the European Union do not share any common legislation on the structure and organization of paediatric intensive care or paediatric cardiac intensive care, any paediatric cardiac surgery programme in France that is agreed by the French Health Ministry must perform at least '150 major procedures per year in children' and must provide a 'specialized paediatric intensive care unit'.

  8. ESSOP--25 years: personal reflections from one who started the European Society for Social Paediatrics.

    PubMed

    Köhler, L

    2003-09-01

    ESSOP--the European Society for Social Paediatrics--was initiated in Lund, Sweden in 1977, and at the annual congress in Spetses, Greece, its 25th anniversary was celebrated. At the congress, Professor Lennart Köhler, who started the organization and for 10 years was its first Secretary General, presented his recollections from the life of ESSOP, its people, activities, strategies and ideologies, and the main lines of development over the years. This paper presents an edited version of his speech for the benefit of the readers of Child: Care, Health and Development.

  9. Attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder: recent advances in paediatric pharmacotherapy.

    PubMed

    May, Diane E; Kratochvil, Christopher J

    2010-01-01

    Throughout this decade, there has been significant research into pharmacotherapies for attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). This article considers the efficacy and safety of five of the more novel long-acting pharmacological treatments recently approved by the FDA for marketing in the US for paediatric ADHD, along with an alpha(2)-adrenoceptor agonist in preparation. Reviewed treatments include the non-stimulant atomoxetine, three novel extended-release (XR) stimulant preparations: dexmethylphenidate, lisdexamfetamine dimesylate and the methylphenidate transdermal system (TDS), and the recently approved XR alpha(2)-adrenoceptor agonist, guanfacine. Dexmethylphenidate XR is a stimulant treatment in a single isomer form, and has an efficacy and tolerability similar to two doses of immediate-release (IR) dexmethylphenidate when taken 4 hours apart, but is dosed at half of the usual d,l-methylphenidate dose. Dexmethylphenidate XR utilizes a beaded bimodal release, with 50% initially released and another 50% released 4 hours later to provide benefit lasting up to 10-12 hours. Lisdexamfetamine was the first stimulant treatment approved as a prodrug, whereby the single isomer d-amfetamine remains pharmacologically inactive until activated by cleaving the lysine. Its efficacy and tolerability are generally consistent with that of XR mixed amfetamine salts, with this activation method and more consistent absorption generally resulting in up to an 11- to 13-hour benefit. The methylphenidate TDS patch utilizes skin absorption to provide predictable and uniform delivery of methylphenidate when worn for 9 hours/day. The efficacy and tolerability of the methylphenidate TDS patch is generally consistent with that of osmotic-controlled release oral system (OROS) methylphenidate, providing benefit for about 11-12 hours. Because of their formulation, lisdexamfetamine and methylphenidate each have an onset of effect at about 2 hours after administration. An adjustable

  10. Clowning as a supportive measure in paediatrics - a survey of clowns, parents and nursing staff

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Hospital clowns, also known as clown doctors, can help paediatric patients with the stress of a hospitalization and to circumvent the accompanying feelings of fear, helplessness and sadness, thus supporting the healing process. The objectives of the present study were to clarify the structural and procedural conditions of paediatric clowning in Germany and to document the evaluations of hospital clowns, parents and hospital staff. Methods A nationwide online survey of hospital clowns currently active in paediatric departments and an accompanying field evaluation in Hamburg hospitals with surveys of parents and hospital staff were conducted. In addition to items developed specifically for the study regarding general conditions, procedures, assessments of effects and attitudes, the Work Satisfaction Scale was used. The sample included n = 87 hospital clowns, 37 parents and 43 hospital staff members. Results The online survey showed that the hospital clowns are well-trained, motivated and generally satisfied with their work. By their own estimate, they primarily boost morale and promote imagination in the patients. However, hospital clowns also desire better interdisciplinary collaboration and financial security as well as more recognition of their work. The Hamburg field study confirmed the positive results of the clown survey. According to the data, a clown intervention boosts morale and reduces stress in the patients. Moreover, there are practically no side effects. Both parents and hospital staff stated that the patients as well as they themselves benefited from the intervention. Conclusions The results match those of previous studies and give a very positive picture of hospital clowning, so that its routine use and expansion thereof can be recommended. Furthermore, the intervention should be subject to the rules of evidence-based medicine like other medical treatments. PMID:24112744

  11. A review of paediatric telehealth for pre- and post-operative surgical patients.

    PubMed

    Smith, Anthony C; Garner, Lisa; Caffery, Liam J; McBride, Craig A

    2014-10-01

    The Queensland Telepaediatric Service (QTS) was established in the year 2000 to deliver a broad range of paediatric specialist health services from the Royal Children's Hospital (RCH) in Brisbane, mainly via videoconference. During a 13-year study period, the QTS facilitated 18,949 video consultations, comprising Mental Health (42%), Medicine (30%), Surgery (21%) and Other (8%). We reviewed the surgical services provided through the QTS. There were 3880 video consultations with a paediatric surgeon. Most of these (91%) used fixed videoconferencing units, 8% were delivered via mobile units (robots) and 1% were delivered using Skype. Surgical consultations were provided by telehealth to 106 sites: 89% in Queensland and the rest to other states. The main surgical specialties were burns (50%), ear, nose and throat (19%), general surgery (21%), orthopaedics (9%) and vascular anomalies (2%). During a 12-month audit period, there were 224 teleconsultations in general surgery; the most common reason for referral was for undescended testes (17%). During the study period there was a significant growth in all surgical telehealth activity: linear regression showed an annual increase of 17 cases per year (P < 0.02). In the last four years of the study, there was a substantial growth in the general surgical component, although there was also a reduction in the burns component. Telehealth has potential for other specialist consultations which require periodic assessment and review.

  12. Management of bone tumours in paediatric oncology.

    PubMed

    Bölling, T; Hardes, J; Dirksen, U

    2013-01-01

    The management of bone tumours in paediatric oncology requires careful multidisciplinary planning due to the need for multimodal therapy approaches. The non-specific symptoms often lead to a delayed definitive diagnosis of a bone tumour. Imaging procedures are of major importance for an individualised and optimised treatment planning. They have to be carried out before any surgery, including biopsies. The introduction of multi-agent chemotherapy has led to a significant improvement in survival rates in patients suffering from Ewing's sarcomas and osteosarcomas. However, local therapy still remains indispensable in order to achieve long-term survival. For osteosarcoma, surgery remains the only adequate local therapy modality. Radiotherapy may be considered if surgery is not feasible. In these cases, high radiation doses need to be applied. The choice for local therapy modality is not as clear in patients with Ewing's sarcoma. Today, surgery is often preferred if a wide or at least marginal resection can be carried out. Additional radiotherapy is advised in patients with marginal/intralesional resection or poor histological response to induction chemotherapy. Definitive radiotherapy is recommended for inoperable lesions. In the future, new radiotherapy approaches, such as intensity-modulated radiotherapy or proton therapy, may yield better results with minor risks of late effects.

  13. Parental involvement in paediatric cancer treatment decisions.

    PubMed

    McKenna, K; Collier, J; Hewitt, M; Blake, H

    2010-09-01

    This study investigated parents' information needs and involvement in decision-making processes affecting the care of children diagnosed with cancer. Interviews and questionnaires were used to assess parental satisfaction in 50 mothers and 16 fathers responsible for 58 children in an English Paediatric Oncology Unit. Parents reported that doctors contributed almost twice as much to the decision-making process as they did, but parental satisfaction was positively correlated with the amount of information provided when giving informed consent. Satisfaction about their involvement in this process relied heavily upon the level of support received from others. Parents consenting to their child's involvement in non-randomised trials perceived themselves to be under greater pressure from others during the decision-making process while those whose children were further along the treatment trajectory were more uncertain about decisions previously made. Findings indicate that the accessibility, support, information and degree of control afforded to parents by healthcare professionals impacts upon their satisfaction with both the decision-making process and their confidence in the decisions thus made. Information and support tailored to parents' specific needs may therefore enhance satisfaction with clinical decision making and reassure parents about decisions made in the long-term interest of their child's health.

  14. Secondary surgery in paediatric facial paralysis reanimation.

    PubMed

    Terzis, Julia K; Olivares, Fatima S

    2010-11-01

    Ninety-two children, the entire series of paediatric facial reanimation by a single surgeon over thirty years, are presented. The objective is to analyse the incidence and value of secondary revisions for functional and aesthetic refinements following the two main stages of reanimation. The reconstructive strategy varied according to the denervation time, the aetiology, and whether the paralysis was uni- or bilateral, complete or partial. Irrespective of these variables, 89% of the patients required secondary surgery. Post-operative videos were available in seventy-two cases. Four independent observers graded patients' videos using a scale from poor to excellent. The effect of diverse secondary procedures was measured computing a mean-percent-gain score. Statistical differences between treatment groups means were tested by the t-test and one-way ANOVA. Two-thirds of the corrective and ancillary techniques utilized granted significantly higher mean-scores post-secondary surgery. A comparison of pre- and post-operative data found valuable improvements in all three facial zones after secondary surgery. In conclusion, inherent to dynamic procedures is the need for secondary revisions. Secondary surgery builds in the potential of reanimation surgery, effectively augmenting functional faculties and aesthesis.

  15. Paediatric AIDS: a new child abuse.

    PubMed

    Oletto, S; Giaquinto, C; Seefried, M; Ruga, E; Cozzani, S; Mazza, A; De Manzini, A; D'Elia, R; Zacchello, F

    1994-08-01

    In relation to youth rights, a new view has been created in recent decades that is included in the fundamental law of the child: the recognition of the right to education and the chance to develop a mature personality capable of creativity and liberty. Because of HIV infection it is very important to pay particular attention to the rights of the seropositive child and children born to seropositive mothers, which may be hampered not only in developing countries but also in the industrial world. HIV-affected children and their families are becoming abused and at high risk of becoming abused and this encroaches upon youth rights. As a consequence, in 1991 the Italian Society of Paediatrics issued a "Charter for the rights of seropositive children", which became an important document for all health care and social workers who deal with HIV-affected children. In this paper, we also consider the impact of HIV infection on the three main rights of children: the right to live, the rights of security and the rights of socialization.

  16. Amputation and prosthesis fitting in paediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Griffet, J

    2016-02-01

    Amputation of a limb is always perceived as a catastrophe. The principles underlying creation of a stump adapted to modern prosthetic fittings must be fully understood and the patient managed by a multidisciplinary team. In paediatric patients, preserving residual limb length is a crucial point that should be assessed according to the expected growth potential. Advances in prosthetic fittings have led to changes in the overall concept of socket design, which seeks to achieve three objectives: to maximise the weight-bearing surface area, to eliminate friction of the skin on the socket, and to eliminate lever-arm effects. The introduction on the market of new materials has contributed substantially to advances in prosthetic fittings. These advances require the use of new criteria for stump quality and optimisation, which exert a considerable influence on prosthesis function. Prosthetic fitting and specific management of psychological and social problems are provided during an inpatient stay in a physical medicine department, by a team of physicians, other healthcare professionals, social workers, and educators. Three-dimensional imaging and gait analysis provide valuable information.

  17. Paediatric dilated cardiomyopathy: clinical profile and outcome. The experience of a tertiary centre for paediatric cardiology.

    PubMed

    Miranda, Joana O; Costa, Liane; Rodrigues, Esmeralda; Teles, Elisa L; Baptista, Maria J; Areias, José C

    2015-02-01

    Dilated cardiomyopathy is the most common form of cardiomyopathy in the paediatric population and an important cause of heart transplantation in children. The clinical profile and course of dilated cardiomyopathy in children have been poorly characterised. A retrospective review of 61 patients (37 female; 24 male) diagnosed with dilated cardiomyopathy from January, 2005 to June, 2012 at a single institution was performed. The median age at diagnosis was 15 months. Heart failure was present in 83.6% of patients and 44.3% required intensive care. The most prevalent causes were idiopathic (47.5%), viral myocarditis (18.0%) and inherited metabolic diseases (11.5%). In viral myocarditis, Parvovirus B19 was the most common identified agent, in concurrence with the increasing incidence documented recently. Inherited metabolic diseases were responsible for 11.5% of dilated cardiomyopathy cases compared with the 4-6% described in the literature, which reinforces the importance of considering this aetiology in differential diagnosis of paediatric dilated cardiomyopathy. The overall mortality rate was 16.1% and five patients underwent heart transplantation. In our series, age at diagnosis and aetiology were the most important prognosis factors. We report no mortality in the five patients who underwent heart transplantation, after 2 years of follow-up.

  18. Training residents and fellows in paediatric cardiac anaesthesia.

    PubMed

    Andropoulos, Dean B

    2016-12-01

    The significant increase in complex anaesthetic care for infants, children, adolescents, and adults with CHD has given rise to specialized fellowship training programs. Specialized paediatric cardiac anaesthesia training for residents and fellows has advanced significantly since the 1970's, when there a handful of programs. With the advent of formal paediatric anaesthesia fellowship programs in the U.S., more specialized training became available in the 1990's and early 2000's. In the past decade, increasing numbers of second year advanced fellowships in paediatric cardiac anaesthesia have been organized; today in North America there are 18 programs with 25 positions. Standardized recommendations for case numbers and curriculum have been devised and are widely available via journal publications.

  19. Paediatric Pain Management: Using Complementary and Alternative Medicine.

    PubMed

    Evans, Subhadra; Tsao, Jennie C I; Zeltzer, Lonnie K

    2008-09-01

    Children undergo acute painful procedures and many also experience chronic pain.Due to their developing systems, infants and children may be at greater risk than adults for protracted pain sensitivity.There is a need to manage acute and chronic paediatric pain to reduce children's suffering and to prevent future pain problems.Consistent with a biopsychosocial perspective, complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) should be considered in management of acute and chronic paediatric pain.Although research is limited for paediatric pain, CAM interventions receiving the most empirical attention include hypnotherapy, acupuncture and music therapy. Evidence also exists for the therapeutic benefits of yoga, massage, humor therapy and the use of certain biological based therapies.

  20. Basics, principles, techniques and modern methods in paediatric ultrasonography.

    PubMed

    Riccabona, Michael

    2014-09-01

    Ultrasonography (US) is the mainstay of paediatric Radiology. This review aims at revisiting basic US principles, to list specific needs throughout childhood, and to discuss the application of new and modern US methods. The various sections elude to basic US physics, technical requisites and tips for handling, diagnostically valuable applications of modern techniques, and how to properly address hazards, risks and limitations. In conclusion, US holds vast potential throughout childhood in almost all body regions and many childhood specific queries - helping to reduce the need for or to optimize more invasive or irradiating imaging. Make the most of US and offerings a dedicated paediatric US service throughout the day, the week and the year thus is and will stay a major task of Paediatric Radiology.

  1. An overview of genetics of paediatric rheumatic diseases

    PubMed Central

    Woo, Patricia; Colbert, Robert A.

    2010-01-01

    The evidence so far suggests that the paediatric inflammatory diseases encountered in rheumatology practice may be largely genetic in origin, where common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in multiple genes contribute to risk, with real but variable environmental components. As far as genetic susceptibility to common paediatric rheumatic diseases is concerned, only juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) has been investigated in any substantial way so far. This article discusses susceptibility for different types of JIA, the different methods used and their advantages and disadvantages. The genetic code is also modifiable by epigenetic mechanisms and examples of these in immunity and rheumatoid arthritis are given to indicate another area of research in the elucidation of the genetics of paediatric rheumatic diseases. PMID:19853825

  2. Paediatric Drug Development and Formulation Design-a European Perspective.

    PubMed

    Van Riet-Nales, Diana A; Kozarewicz, Piotr; Aylward, Brian; de Vries, Rutger; Egberts, Toine C G; Rademaker, Carin M A; Schobben, Alfred F A M

    2017-02-01

    The availability of licensed paediatric drugs is lagging behind those for adults, and there is a lack of safe formulations in suitable doses that children are able and willing to take. As a consequence, children are commonly treated with off-label or unlicensed drugs. As off-label and unlicensed drug use are associated with a greater risk for harm than on-label drug use, a range of global initiatives have been developed to realize "better" medicines for children. This review describes the challenges and achievements of the European Union to realize this goal, with a focus on paediatric drug development and formulation design. In 2007, a European Paediatric Regulation was installed enforcing companies to consider children in the early development of drugs with a new drug substance, for a new indication or with a new route of administration. The Regulation, e.g. requires companies to develop a paediatric investigation plan discussing the proposed clinical trials in children of different ages and the formulations for future marketing. Since 2013, the pharmaceutical design of any newly marketed paediatric drug should comply with the "Guideline on the Pharmaceutical Development of Medicines for Paediatric Use." Companies should, e.g. justify the route of administration, dosage form, formulation characteristics, safety of excipients, dosing frequency, container closure system, administration device, patient acceptability and user information. In this review, the guideline's key aspects are discussed with a focus on novel formulations such as mini-tablets and orodispersible films, excipients with a potential risk for harm such as azo dyes and adequate user instructions.

  3. Oral Medicines for Children in the European Paediatric Investigation Plans

    PubMed Central

    van Riet – Nales, Diana A.; Römkens, Erwin G. A. W.; Saint-Raymond, Agnes; Kozarewicz, Piotr; Schobben, Alfred F. A. M.; Egberts, Toine C. G.; Rademaker, Carin M. A.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Pharmaceutical industry is no longer allowed to develop new medicines for use in adults only, as the 2007 Paediatric Regulation requires children to be considered also. The plans for such paediatric development called Paediatric Investigation Plans (PIPs) are subject to agreement by the European Medicines Agency (EMA) and its Paediatric Committee (PDCO). The aim of this study was to evaluate the key characteristics of oral paediatric medicines in the PIPs and the changes implemented as a result of the EMA/PDCO review. Methods All PIPs agreed by 31 December 2011 were identified through a proprietary EMA-database. PIPs were included if they contained an agreed proposal to develop an oral medicine for children 0 to 11 years. Information on the therapeutic area (EMA classification system); target age range (as defined by industry) and pharmaceutical characteristics (active substance, dosage form(s) as listed in the PIP, strength of each dosage form, excipients in each strength of each dosage form) was extracted from the EMA website or the EMA/PDCO assessment reports. Results A hundred and fifty PIPs were included corresponding to 16 therapeutic areas and 220 oral dosage forms in 431 strengths/compositions. Eighty-two PIPs (37%) included tablets, 44 (20%) liquids and 35 (16%) dosage forms with a specific composition/strength that were stored as a solid but swallowed as a liquid e.g. dispersible tablets. The EMA/PDCO review resulted in an increase of 13 (207 to 220) oral paediatric dosage forms and 44 (387 to 431) dosage forms with a specific composition/strength. For many PIPs, the target age range was widened and the excipient composition and usability aspects modified. Conclusion The EMA/PDCO review realized an increase in the number of requirements for the development of oral dosage forms and a larger increase in the number of dosage forms with a specific composition/strength, both targeting younger children. Changes to their pharmaceutical design were

  4. Neonatal circumcision revisited. Fetus and Newborn Committee, Canadian Paediatric Society.

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assist physicians in providing guidance to parents regarding neonatal circumcision. OPTIONS: Whether to recommend the routine circumcision of newborn male infants. OUTCOMES: Costs and complications of neonatal circumcision, the incidence of urinary tract infections, sexually transmitted diseases and cancer of the penis in circumcised and uncircumcised males, and of cervical cancer in their partners, and the costs of treating these diseases. EVIDENCE: The literature on circumcision was reviewed by the Fetus and Newborn Committee of the Canadian Paediatric Society. During extensive discussion at meetings of the committee over a 24-month period, the strength of the evidence was carefully weighed and the perspective of the committee developed. VALUES: The literature was assessed to determine whether neonatal circumcision improves the health of boys and men and is a cost-effective approach to preventing penile problems and associated urinary tract conditions. Religious and personal values were not included in the assessment. BENEFITS, HARMS AND COSTS: The effect of neonatal circumcision on the incidence of urinary tract infection, sexually transmitted diseases, cancer of the penis, cervical cancer and penile problems; the complications of circumcision; and estimates of the costs of neonatal circumcision and of the treatment of later penile conditions, urinary tract infections and complications of circumcision. RECOMMENDATION: Circumcision of newborns should not be routinely performed. VALIDATION: This recommendation is in keeping with previous statements on neonatal circumcision by the Canadian Paediatric Society and the American Academy of Pediatrics. The statement was reviewed by the Infectious Disease Committee of the Canadian Paediatric Society. The Board of Directors of the Canadian Paediatric Society has reviewed its content and approved it for publication. SPONSOR: This is an official statement of the Canadian Paediatric Society. No external

  5. Nurses in paediatric care--self-reported professional self and perceived research utilization.

    PubMed

    Andersson, Nina; Jylli, Leena; Kajermo, Kerstin Nilsson; Klang, Birgitta

    2007-12-01

    The aim was to describe how nurses in different professional levels evaluated their professional self and perceived barriers to research utilization in paediatric care. The sample consisted of three groups of nurses: control, trainee and specialists (n = 113) employed at two Paediatric University hospitals in Sweden. The control and trainee groups were nurses with a general education and the specialists had a specialist education in paediatric care. The nurses answered the two questionnaires: the Professional Self Description Form (PSDF) and the Barriers Scale. The results showed that the highest scores in the PSDF were found in sensitivity in all the three groups and consideration (in control and specialist group) and creativity (trainee group). The control group scored significantly higher in the item persistence. In the Barriers Scale, the three groups scored the greatest barriers in; 'there is insufficient time on the job to implement new ideas' and 'the nurses do not have time to read research'. The lowest barriers were found in; 'the nurse is unwilling to change/try new ideas' and 'the nurse is unaware of research'. The specialist nurses had significantly higher barriers in; 'the nurse is isolated from knowledgeable colleagues with whom to discuss the research', 'the nurse is unwilling to try new ideas' and 'administration will not allow implementation'. No correlations were found between the PSDF and the Barriers Scale. In conclusion, the self-evaluation of professional self and perceived research utilization showed few differences between the nurses. These findings indicate that the professional self is independent of educational level and work experiences while barriers to research utililization increases with competence and experience.

  6. The design of a multicentre Canadian surveillance study of sedation safety in the paediatric emergency department

    PubMed Central

    Bhatt, Maala; Roback, Mark G; Joubert, Gary; Farion, Ken J; Ali, Samina; Beno, Suzanne; McTimoney, C Michelle; Dixon, Andrew; Dubrovsky, Alexander Sasha; Barrowman, Nick; Johnson, David W

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Procedural sedation and analgesia have become standard practice in paediatric emergency departments worldwide. Although generally regarded as safe, serious adverse events such as bradycardia, asystole, pulmonary aspiration, permanent neurological injury and death have been reported, but their incidence is unknown due to the infrequency of their occurrence and lack of surveillance of sedation safety. To improve our understanding of the safety, comparative effectiveness and variation in care in paediatric procedural sedation, we are establishing a multicentre patient registry with the goal of conducting regular and ongoing surveillance for adverse events in procedural sedation. Methods This multicentre, prospective cohort study is enrolling patients under 18 years of age from six paediatric emergency departments across Canada. Data collection is fully integrated into clinical care and is performed electronically in real time by the healthcare professionals caring for the patient. The primary outcome is the proportion of patients who experience a serious adverse event as a result of their sedation. Secondary outcomes include the proportion of patients who experience an adverse event that could lead to a serious adverse event, proportion of patients who receive a significant intervention in response to an adverse event, proportion of patients who experience a successful sedation, and proportion of patients who experience a paradoxical reaction to sedation. There is no predetermined end date for data collection. Ethics and dissemination Ethics approval has been obtained from participating sites. Results will be disseminated using a multifaceted knowledge translation strategy by presenting at international conferences, publication in peer-reviewed journals, and through established networks. PMID:26024999

  7. Developing a paediatric drug formulary for the Netherlands.

    PubMed

    van der Zanden, Tjitske M; de Wildt, Saskia N; Liem, Yves; Offringa, Martin; de Hoog, Matthijs

    2017-04-01

    As many drugs in paediatrics are used off-label, prescribers face a lack of evidence-based dosing guidelines. A Dutch framework was developed to provide dosing guidelines based on best available evidence from registration data, investigator-initiated research, professional guidelines, clinical experience and consensus. This has clarified the scientific grounds of drug use for children and encouraged uniformity in prescribing habits in the Netherlands. The developed framework and the current content of the Dutch Paediatric Formulary could be used as basis for similar initiatives worldwide, preferably in a concerted effort to ultimately provide children with effective and safe drug therapy.

  8. A customer focus to paediatric health care: John Hunter Hospital.

    PubMed

    Keatinge, D

    1994-01-01

    The Department of Paediatrics at John Hunter Hospital, Newcastle, was invited to represent paediatric services in the New South Wales Department of Health's customer focus initiative. Six health care organisations were selected to be pathfinder centres in customer focus under this initiative. The aim of these pathfinder centres was to trial customer-oriented projects that would be applicable to other health care organisations. This article will discuss the process through which three customer-focused projects were identified and implemented, and discuss some of the outcomes of these projects.

  9. Dermatological Findings in Turkish Paediatric Haematology-Oncology Patients

    PubMed Central

    Uksal, Umit; Ozturk, Pinar; Colgecen, Emine; Taslidere, Nazan; Patiroglu, Turkan; Ozdemir, Mehmet Akif; Torun, Yasemin Altuner; Borlu, Murat

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Diagnoses of skin, mucosae, hair and nail manifestations in malignant diseases are often challenging because of life-threatening drug reactions, opportunistic infections or skin involvement of primary processes. Description of morphology, configuration and distribution of lesions is important in order to differentiate the self-healing eruptions from serious side effects of chemotherapy. There are case reports from Turkey including dermatological manifestations of malignancies and case series in adult patients but there are no published large group studies assessing all manifestations in children. The aim of this study was to evaluate the morphological features of dermatological findings in children with haemato-oncological diseases. Materials and Methods: The study was performed at the Erciyes University, Faculty of Medicine Pediatric Hematology-Oncology Clinic, Turkey. Three dermatologists daily consulted all patients admitted to the clinic during a one-year period. Results: The study group comprised of 157 children (79 female/78 male) aged 1–16 years (mean 7.19±4.63). Detailed dermatological examinations were performed, including oral-genital mucosae, hair and nails. Thorough skin examination revealed that 70% of the patients exhibited at least one dermatological finding. Generalized xerosis and hyperpigmentation were the most common findings among patients undergoing chemotherapy (24.19%). Multiple nevi on at least 10 covered areas were very frequent among patients undergoing long-term chemotherapy (18.47%). Three were identified as dysplastic nevus, but malignant transformation was not observed during the one-year study period. Conclusion: Regular dermatological consultation may help resolve the diagnostic and therapeutic problems in paediatric haemato-oncology clinics. PMID:27551173

  10. [Operational aspect of participation in the multi-national clinical trials from the foreign pharmaceutical company's standpoint].

    PubMed

    Namazu, Katsushi

    2007-02-01

    As a means to reduce the delay with the West, the enhanced use of multi-national clinical trials is expected. It is necessary to improve the presence of Japan as a development base by making the best use of the quality of the clinical trials and becoming more competitive in terms of the speed and the cost as compared with other Asian countries. The development team in Japan has to play an active role in the planning stage of the trial and support improvements in the IT environment of the medical institution for introducing clinical trial management systems such as EDC. I expect the medical institutions to simplify the procedures required for conducting clinical trials, to accept English documents, to secure doctor's time for the clinical trials and to increase the number of CRCs, etc. The elimination of the difference between the domestic and international regulations is expected of the regulator. Finally, the revision of medical institutions by the government would contribute improvements in the current situation where staff are too busy to conduct clinical trials.

  11. Report from The International Society for Nomenclature of Paediatric and Congenital Heart Disease: cardiovascular catheterisation for congenital and paediatric cardiac disease (Part 1 - Procedural nomenclature).

    PubMed

    Bergersen, Lisa; Everett, Allen Dale; Giroud, Jorge Manuel; Martin, Gerard R; Franklin, Rodney Cyril George; Béland, Marie Josée; Krogmann, Otto Nils; Aiello, Vera Demarchi; Colan, Steven D; Elliott, Martin J; Gaynor, J William; Kurosawa, Hiromi; Maruszewski, Bohdan; Stellin, Giovanni; Tchervenkov, Christo I; Walters, Henry Lane; Weinberg, Paul; Jacobs, Jeffrey Phillip

    2011-06-01

    Interventional cardiology for paediatric and congenital cardiac disease is a relatively young and rapidly evolving field. As the profession begins to establish multi-institutional databases, a universal system of nomenclature is necessary for the field of interventional cardiology for paediatric and congenital cardiac disease. The purpose of this paper is to present the results of the efforts of The International Society for Nomenclature of Paediatric and Congenital Heart Disease to establish a system of nomenclature for cardiovascular catheterisation for congenital and paediatric cardiac disease, focusing both on procedural nomenclature and on the nomenclature of complications associated with interventional cardiology. This system of nomenclature for cardiovascular catheterisation for congenital and paediatric cardiac disease is a component of The International Paediatric and Congenital Cardiac Code. This manuscript is the first part of a two-part series. Part 1 will cover the procedural nomenclature associated with interventional cardiology as treatment for paediatric and congenital cardiac disease. This procedural nomenclature of The International Paediatric and Congenital Cardiac Code will be used in the IMPACT Registry™ (IMproving Pediatric and Adult Congenital Treatment) of the National Cardiovascular Data Registry® of The American College of Cardiology. Part 2 will cover the nomenclature of complications associated with interventional cardiology as treatment for paediatric and congenital cardiac disease.

  12. European survey on ethical and legal framework of clinical trials in paediatrics: results and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Altavilla, Annagrazia; Giaquinto, Carlo; Ceci, Adriana

    2008-09-01

    This article constitutes a synthesis and analysis of the results of the "Survey on the ethical and legal frameworks existing in Europe for paediatric clinical trials" carried out by the European network TEDDY. TEDDY is a "Network of Excellence" funded by the Sixth EU Framework Programme (FP6). It began its activities in June 2005 and it is scheduled to run until 2010. It involves 19 partners in 11 countries. The overall goal of TEDDY is to promote the availability of safe and effective medicines to children in Europe by integrating existing expertise and the good practices. In the domain of ethics, the main aim of TEDDY is raise the awareness of the public and researchers concerning issues linked to biomedical research in paediatrics, by contributing to developing the debate on the ethical and legal stakes, as well as the potential deviations, in order to ensure the best possible protection of children participating in clinical trials. This study, with twenty-seven participating countries (23 EU Member States and 4 countries associated to the Fifth and Sixth EU Framework Programme), proposes to highlight the existing differences in the legislation of European countries concerning the procedure of consent, as well as the guarantee of the paediatric expertise within the Ethics Committees which are in charge of evaluating research protocols. The study shows that, even though the Directive 2001/20/EC has been transposed, the value attributed to the consent of minors who participate in clinical trials is different depending on the European state. Despite the general rule of having the written consent of the legal representative of the minor, over a certain age (different in relation to each state) and under certain conditions, to give the consent alone to participate in biomedical research. Furthermore, there is an Ethics Committee for minors in only four countries. In addition, we illustrate the lack of information and in-depth debate in Europe concerning the ethical

  13. Differences in absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion of xenobiotics between the paediatric and adult populations.

    PubMed

    Strolin Benedetti, M; Whomsley, R; Baltes, E L

    2005-10-01

    In children, the therapeutic benefits and potential risks associated with drug treatment may be different from those in adults and will depend on the exposure, receptor sensitivity and relationship between effect and exposure. In this paper, key factors undergoing maturational changes accounting for differences in drug metabolism and disposition in the paediatric population compared with adults are reviewed. Gastric and duodenal pH, gastric emptying time, intestinal transit time, secretion and activity of bile and pancreatic fluid, bacterial colonisation and transporters, such as P-glycoprotein (P-gp), are important factors for drug absorption, whereas key factors explaining differences in drug distribution between the paediatric population and adults are organ size, membrane permeability, plasma protein concentration and characteristics, endogenous substances in plasma, total body and extracellular water, fat content, regional blood flow and transporters such as P-gp, which is present not only in the gut, but also in liver, kidney, brain and other tissues. As far as drug metabolism is concerned, important differences have been found in the paediatric population compared with adults both for phase I enzymes (oxidative [e.g., cytochrome P450 (CYP)1A2, and CYP3A7 versus -3A4], reductive and hydrolytic enzymes) and phase II enzymes (e.g., N-methyltransferases and glucuronosyltransferases). Generally, the major enzyme differences observed in comparison with the adult age are in newborn infants, although for some enzymes (e.g., glucuronosyltransferases and other phase II enzymes) important differences still exist between infants and toddlers and adults. Finally, key factors undergoing maturational changes accounting for differences in renal excretion in the paediatric population compared with adults are glomerular filtration and tubular secretion. The ranking of the key factors varies according to the chemical structure and physicochemical properties of the drug

  14. [Osteoarticular infections: therapeutic proposals of the Paediatric Infectious Diseases Group of the French Society of Paediatrics (GPIP)].

    PubMed

    Grimprel, E; Lorrot, M; Haas, H; Pinquier, D; Parez, N; Ferroni, A; Cohen, R

    2008-10-01

    The empiric choice of initial antibiotherapy in osteoarticular infections in infants and children must take into consideration the actual epidemiology of principal pathogens, their respective antibiotic sensitivity profile, their pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties and the results of efficacy clinical studies. After a review of recent data concerning these four major points, the Paediatric Infectious Diseases Group of the French Society of Paediatrics (GPIP) has proposed guidelines for initial recommended schemes of antimicrobial therapy in acute and non complicated osteoarticular infections in infants and children.

  15. Surveillance biopsies after paediatric kidney transplantation: A review.

    PubMed

    Rose, Edward M; Kennedy, Sean E; Mackie, Fiona E

    2016-09-01

    Kidney transplantation is the most effective means of treating children with end-stage kidney disease, and yet, there continues to be a limited "life span" of transplanted kidneys in paediatric recipients. Early graft monitoring, using the surveillance biopsy, has the potential to extend renal allograft survival in paediatric recipients. The surveillance biopsy provides important and timely information about acute and chronic graft pathology, particularly SCR and calcineurin inhibitor-induced nephrotoxicity, which can subsequently guide management decisions and improve long-term graft survival. The ostensible value of the surveillance biopsy is furthered by the limitations of conventional renal functional studies. However, there is still much debate surrounding the surveillance biopsy in paediatric recipients, particularly in regard to its overall utility, safety and timing. This review discusses the current literature regarding the utility, safety, and potential predictive value of surveillance biopsies for guiding post-transplant management in paediatric renal allograft recipients, as well as the viability of other potentially newer non-invasive strategies for renal allograft monitoring.

  16. Aetiology of Intellectual Disability in Paediatric Outpatients in Northern India

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jauhari, Prashant; Boggula, Raju; Bhave, Anupama; Bhargava, Roli; Singh, Chandrakanta; Kohli, Neera; Yadav, Rajesh; Kumar, Rashmi

    2011-01-01

    Aim: To study the aetiology of intellectual disability in patients presenting to hospital and the diagnostic yield of a standardized examination. Method: Over a 1-year period, the first three children presenting to the paediatric outpatients department (OPD) on 2 selected weekdays with developmental delay, suspected intellectual disability, or…

  17. Cardiac Arrest after Local Anaesthetic Toxicity in a Paediatric Patient

    PubMed Central

    Figueroa, Diego Grimaldi; Simas, Ana Amélia Souza

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of a paediatric patient undergoing urological procedure in which a possible inadvertent intravascular or intraosseous injection of bupivacaine with adrenaline in usual doses caused subsequent cardiac arrest, completely reversed after administration of 20% intravenous lipid emulsion. Early diagnosis of local anaesthetics toxicity and adequate cardiovascular resuscitation manoeuvres contribute to the favourable outcome. PMID:27872765

  18. Optimizing treatment in paediatric rheumatology--lessons from oncology.

    PubMed

    Niehues, Tim

    2015-08-01

    Treatment of children with cancer, in particular with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL), has been highly successful in the past two decades owing to the implementation of treatment optimization studies. Study centres appointed by scientific societies design treatment optimization study protocols (TOSPs) that address an investigator-initiated research question and detail treatment procedures according to these aims. Nearly all children with malignant diseases are treated within TOSPs, whereas children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) and other common paediatric rheumatic diseases are mostly treated outside TOSPs and clinical trials. Despite the differences in natural course and prognosis between malignant and inflammatory diseases, aiming for the recruitment of all children with defined rheumatic diseases into TOSPs or similar protocols would enable the longitudinal collection of crucial clinical data and improve evidence-based approaches. Successful research networks already exist in paediatric rheumatology that could facilitate the implementation of this approach. Paediatric rheumatic diseases have a considerable impact on patients and their families; thus, I propose that research networks in paediatric rheumatology should recruit most--if not all--children with rheumatic diseases into study protocols with standardized treatment and outcome measures.

  19. IMMUNE ACTIVATION AND PAEDIATRIC HIV-1 DISEASE OUTCOME

    PubMed Central

    Roider, J; Muenchhoff, M; Goulder, PJR

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of review The paediatric HIV epidemic is changing. Over the past decade, new infections have substantially reduced whilst access to antiretroviral therapy (ART) has increased. Overall this success means that numbers of children living with HIV are climbing. In addition, the problems in adults of chronic inflammation resulting from persistent immune activation even following ART-mediated suppression of viral replication are magnified in children infected from birth. Recent findings Features of immune ontogeny favor low immune activation in early life, whilst specific aspects of paediatric HIV infection tend to increase it. A subset of ART-naïve non-progressing children exists in whom normal CD4 counts are maintained in the setting of persistent high viremia and yet in the context of low immune activation. This sooty mangabey-like phenotype contrasts with non-progressing adult infection characterized by the expression of protective HLA class I molecules and low viral load. The particular factors contributing to raised or lowered immune activation in paediatric infection, and that ultimately influence disease outcome, are discussed. Summary Novel strategies to circumvent the unwanted long-term consequences of HIV infection may be possible in children in whom natural immune ontogeny in early life militates against immune activation. Defining the mechanisms underlying low immune activation in natural HIV infection would have applications beyond paediatric HIV. PMID:26679413

  20. Benign paediatric mandibular tumours: experience in reconstruction using vascularised fibula.

    PubMed

    Rashid, Mamoon; Tamimy, Muhammad Sarmad; Ehtesham-Ul-Haq; Sarwar, Saad Ur Rahman; Rizvi, Syed Taokeer Ahmed

    2012-12-01

    The majority of the paediatric oral and maxillofacial tumours are benign and the mandible is involved in one-third of these cases. A review of the literature reveals only a handful of studies pertaining exclusively to benign paediatric mandibular tumours. The basis of this study was to fulfil the need to assess the suitability of major mandibular reconstructions using a vascularised fibular graft in cases of benign tumours in children. From April 1999 to April 2011 we have managed 18 cases of benign paediatric mandibular tumours. All the reconstructions were done using vascularised fibular graft. The age of these patients ranged from 8 to 16 years. The most common pathology seen in our series was Ameloblastoma, followed by Giant Cell Granuloma and vascular malformation. Other cases included fibrous dysplasia, aneurysmal bone cyst and odontogenic myxoma. Five of these were recurrent lesions. The mean length of the fibula harvested was 12 ± 2 cm. All the flaps in this series survived. Bone union occurred in all cases by 6 weeks. All the patients have maintained a satisfactory chin contour of the mandible during the follow-up period with minimal distortion occurring secondary to contralateral native mandibular growth in two cases. We conclude that, for benign paediatric mandibular tumours requiring major bone resection, the vascularised fibula is an excellent reconstructive option with the advantages of having a good bone stock, possibility for osteotomy, long pedicle length and potential for growth along with the possibility of dental rehabilitation.

  1. Pressure area care in infants and children: Nimbus Paediatric System.

    PubMed

    Jones, I; Tweed, C; Marron, M

    Survival rates in both critically and chronically ill infants and children have improved dramatically in recent years and new challenges exist in the nursing care given to these patients. Among these is the increased risk of pressure ulcer development. Children in intensive care environments are especially at risk. Prevention and management of pressure ulceration in the paediatric population requires clinical judgement and skill. The use of pressure ulcer risk assessment tools can assist in this process; however, to date, there is a lack of research evidence and further studies are needed. The pressure relief requirements of the paediatric patient are significantly different to those of the adult patient. In children under the age of 36 months, the ears and occiput are the areas most at risk of pressure injury as a result of the fact that this area is proportionately the largest and heaviest bony prominence. Despite the abundance of specialist pressure redistributing devices for adults, there is little available specifically for the paediatric patient. This article describes a review of the literature on these subject areas and follows with a short report of the evaluation of the new Paediatric Nimbus System undertaken at the Royal Hospital for Sick Children in Edinburgh.

  2. [The nurse consultation in a Swiss university paediatric emergency department].

    PubMed

    Yersin, Corinne; Hemme, Denis; Gehri, Mario; Pittet, Anne; Rey-Bellet Gasser, Céline

    2015-01-01

    In Switzerland, overcrowding in tertiary emergency departments is a frequent problem, resulting in lengthy waiting times, lower satisfaction on the part of families and a risk for patient's safety. The setting up of a nurse consultation in a university paediatric emergency centre has helped to improve the quality of care in this context.

  3. [Assessing and making safe the medicine use pathway in paediatrics].

    PubMed

    Didelot, Nicolas; Guerrier, Catherine; Didelot, Anne; Fritsch, Sandrine; Pelte, Jean-Pierre; Socha, Marie; Javelot, Hervé

    2016-01-01

    Based on an assessment of adverse events in a follow-up care and rehabilitation unit in paediatrics, audits were carried out of the medicine use pathway. The evaluation grid taken from this study today serves as a basis for the audits carried out on the medicine use pathway on a national level.

  4. The use of allografts in paediatric orthopaedic surgery.

    PubMed

    Docquier, Pierre-Louis; Paul, Laurent; Mousny, Maryline; Cornu, Olivier; Delloye, Christian

    2007-10-01

    Autograft harvesting in a growing child sometimes leads to disastrous consequences. Allograft can advantageously replace autograft in the majority of the cases. This overview presents the most frequently used allografts in paediatric orthopaedic surgery and discusses their benefits. Illustrative cases are presented to highlight specific indications.

  5. Standard concentration infusions in paediatric intensive care: the clinical approach.

    PubMed

    Perkins, Joanne; Aguado-Lorenzo, Virginia; Arenas-Lopez, Sara

    2016-08-14

    The use of standard concentrations of intravenous infusions has been advocated by international organisations to increase intravenous medication safety in paediatric and neonatal critical care. However, there is no guidance on how to identify and implement these infusions leading to great interunit variability.

  6. Liver transplantation in children using organs from young paediatric donors.

    PubMed

    Herden, Uta; Ganschow, Rainer; Briem-Richter, Andrea; Helmke, Knut; Nashan, Bjoern; Fischer, Lutz

    2011-06-01

    Nowadays, most paediatric liver transplant recipients receive a split or other technical variant graft from adult deceased or live donors, because of a lack of available age- and size matched paediatric donors. Few data are available, especially for liver grafts obtained from very young children (<6 years). We analysed all paediatric liver transplantations between 1989 and 2009. Recipients were divided into five groups (1-5) depending on donor age (<1, ≥1 to <6, ≥6 to <16, ≥16 to <45, ≥45 years). Overall, 413 paediatric liver transplantations from deceased donors were performed; 1- and 5-year graft survival rates were 75%, 80%, 78%, 81%, 74% and 75%, 64%, 70%, 67%, 46%, and 1- and 5-year patient survival rates were 88%, 91%, 90%, 89%, 78% and 88%, 84%, 84%, 83%, 63% for groups 1-5, respectively, without significant difference. Eight children received organs from donors younger than 1 year and 45 children received organs from donors between 1 and 6 years of age. Overall, vascular complications occurred in 13.2% of patients receiving organs from donors younger than 6 years. Analysis of our data revealed that the usage of liver grafts from donors younger than 6 years is a safe procedure. The outcome was comparable with grafts from older donors with excellent graft and patient survival, even for donors younger than 1 year.

  7. Epidemiology of paediatric renal stone disease in the UK

    PubMed Central

    Coward, R; Peters, C; Duffy, P; Corry, D; Kellett, M; Choong, S; van't, H

    2003-01-01

    Background: The previous epidemiological study of paediatric nephrolithiasis in Britain was conducted more than 30 years ago. Aims: To examine the presenting features, predisposing factors, and treatment strategies used in paediatric stones presenting to a British centre over the past five years. Methods: A total of 121 children presented with a urinary tract renal stone, to one adult and one paediatric centre, over a five year period (1997–2001). All children were reviewed in a dedicated stone clinic and had a full infective and metabolic stone investigative work up. Treatment was assessed by retrospective hospital note review. Results: A metabolic abnormality was found in 44% of children, 30% were classified as infective, and 26% idiopathic. Bilateral stones on presentation occurred in 26% of the metabolic group compared to 12% in the infective/idiopathic group (odds ratio 2.7, 95% CI 1.03 to 7.02). Coexisting urinary tract infection was common (49%) in the metabolic group. Surgically, minimally invasive techniques (lithotripsy, percutaneous nephrolithotomy, and endoscopy) were used in 68% of patients. Conclusions: There has been a shift in the epidemiology of paediatric renal stone disease in the UK over the past 30 years. Underlying metabolic causes are now the most common but can be masked by coexisting urinary tract infection. Treatment has progressed, especially surgically, with sophisticated minimally invasive techniques now employed. All children with renal stones should have a metabolic screen. PMID:14612355

  8. [Teamwork in a paediatric mobile emergency and intensive care service].

    PubMed

    Tison-Chambellan, Camille; Daussac, Élisabeth; Barnet, Lucile; Sirven, Sabine; Bambou, Dominique

    2016-01-01

    A paediatric mobile emergency and intensive care service team comprises several professionals with complementary skills. The cohesion of a team, as well as the listening and communication skills of each of its members, allow it to respond in the best possible way to emergency situations. Feedback sessions on practice and simulation exercises enhance teamwork.

  9. Indication-based national diagnostic reference levels for paediatric CT: a new approach with proposed values.

    PubMed

    Järvinen, H; Seuri, R; Kortesniemi, M; Lajunen, A; Hallinen, E; Savikurki-Heikkilä, P; Laarne, P; Perhomaa, M; Tyrväinen, E

    2015-07-01

    Indication-based national diagnostic reference levels (DRLs) for a few most common paediatric computed tomography (CT) examinations are proposed. Patient dose data (CTDI vol and dose length product) were collected for over 1000 patients in 4 university hospitals with best experiences in paediatric CT. Four indications for chest CT and two for abdomen (abdomen + pelvis), chest + abdomen and head CT were considered. The DRLs for the body examinations are proposed as exponential DRL-curves, where CTDI vol and dose length product are presented as a function of patient weight. The same DRL curve applies to all the indications studied. The basic 75 % level curve is supplemented by 50 % level curve to enable considerations on varying levels of technology. For head CT, DRLs are proposed for a few age groups (1, 1-5, 5-10 and 10-15 y), separately for routine CT and CT for ventricular size. The proposed DRLs are generally lower than the few published DRLs in other countries.

  10. Paediatric entrance doses from exposure index in computed radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vano, E.; Martinez, D.; Fernandez, J. M.; Ordiales, J. M.; Prieto, C.; Floriano, A.; Ten, J. I.

    2008-06-01

    Over the last two years we have evaluated paediatric patient doses in projection radiography derived from exposure level (EL) in computed radiography (CR) in a large university hospital. Entrance surface air kerma (ESAK) for 3501 paediatric examinations was calculated from the EL, which is a dose index parameter related to the light emitted by the phosphor-stimulable plate, archived in the Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) header of the images and automatically transferred to a database using custom-built dedicated software. Typical mean thicknesses for several age bands of paediatric patients was estimated to calculate ESAK from the EL values, using results of experimental measurements with phantoms for the typical x-ray beam qualities used in paediatric examinations. Mean/median ESAK values (in µGy) for the age bands of <1 year, 1-5 years, 6-10 years and 11-15 years have been obtained for chest without a bucky: 51/41, 57/34, 91/54 and 122/109; chest with a bucky (for only the last three age bands): 114/87, 129/105 and 219/170; abdomen: 119/91, 291/225, 756/600 and 1960/1508 and pelvis: 65/48, 455/314, 943/707 and 2261/1595. Sample sizes of clinical images used for the (indirect) measurements were 1724 for chest without a bucky, 799 for chest with a bucky, 337 for abdomen and 641 for pelvis. The methodology we describe could be applicable to other centres using CR as an imaging modality for paediatrics. Presently, this method is the only practical approach to automatically extract parameters contained in the DICOM header, for the calculation of patient dose values for the CR modality.

  11. Prenatal counselling and the role of the paediatric surgeon.

    PubMed

    Benachi, Alexandra; Sarnacki, Sabine

    2014-10-01

    With the development of prenatal ultrasound and of foetal medicine, the paediatric surgeon has extended his knowledge of the natural history of surgical malformations. He is a part of the prenatal team and parents should always be referred to him when a surgical malformation is suspected, even when termination of pregnancy is planned because of an expected poor prognosis. Direct contact between the prenatal medicine specialist and the paediatric surgeon is also highly recommended to ensure continuity in the messages delivered to the parents. Postnatal counselling does not compare with prenatal counselling, and the paediatric surgeon has learned from the obstetrician to modulate his talk by including other conditions that might affect the outcome of the foetus, especially genetically determined syndromes. When the foetal malformation is diagnosed very early, especially in the first trimester, it therefore seems important for the consultation with the paediatric surgeon to be scheduled when the complementary exams required by the anomalies diagnosed are done, in order to avoid later contradictory messages. Repeated consultations should be favoured as they allow provision of more precise information regarding changes in ultrasound and/or MRI images and so decrease parents׳ anxiety and help them to take their decision. Foetal surgery, which has reached various stages of development in different countries, requires paediatric surgeons and obstetricians to join forces to optimise procedures and evaluate their benefit/risk ratio. Since 2004, the National Rare Disease Plan in France has allowed the creation of Rare Disease Centres, which deal with congenital malformations and produce recommendations for the health care pathway of these patients by means of a multidisciplinary approach. This greatly enhances interdisciplinary communication and ensures that best care is provided to the parents-to-be and to their child.

  12. Drug development: EU paediatric legislation, the European Medicines Agency and its Paediatric Committee--adolescents' melanoma as a paradigm.

    PubMed

    Rose, Klaus; Senn, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    The European Medicines Agency (EMA) website lists all diseases that officially exist in adults only. The class waiver for juvenile melanoma was revoked in 2008 referring to US SEER statistics. This statistical justification is misleading. Melanoma in adolescents is much rarer than claimed by EMA/Paediatric Committee; < 1 ∕ 4 of adolescents with melanoma need systemic treatment; separate efficacy studies are neither medically justified nor feasible. The scarce adolescent patients should be allowed to participate in adult trials. To force companies to investigate them separately turns them into paediatric hostages, to adapt the term therapeutic orphans coined in 1968 by Shirkey. There are now five melanoma Paediatric Investigation Plans (PIPs). Probably none of the PIP-triggered clinical studies will ever be completed; we propose to call them ghost studies. An oncology research network considering a reasonable trial in melanoma, including adolescents, will compete for recruitment with the PIP-triggered trials designed by regulatory tunnel vision and sponsored by companies under EMA-imposed pressure. EMA/Paediatric Committee's territorial enthusiasm ("our patients") damages oncology research.

  13. The TRIAGE-ProADM Score for an Early Risk Stratification of Medical Patients in the Emergency Department - Development Based on a Multi-National, Prospective, Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Hausfater, Pierre; Amin, Devendra; Amin, Adina; Canavaggio, Pauline; Sauvin, Gabrielle; Bernard, Maguy; Conca, Antoinette; Haubitz, Sebastian; Struja, Tristan; Huber, Andreas; Mueller, Beat; Schuetz, Philipp

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The inflammatory biomarker pro-adrenomedullin (ProADM) provides additional prognostic information for the risk stratification of general medical emergency department (ED) patients. The aim of this analysis was to develop a triage algorithm for improved prognostication and later use in an interventional trial. Methods We used data from the multi-national, prospective, observational TRIAGE trial including consecutive medical ED patients from Switzerland, France and the United States. We investigated triage effects when adding ProADM at two established cut-offs to a five-level ED triage score with respect to adverse clinical outcome. Results Mortality in the 6586 ED patients showed a step-wise, 25-fold increase from 0.6% to 4.5% and 15.4%, respectively, at the two ProADM cut-offs (≤0.75nmol/L, >0.75–1.5nmol/L, >1.5nmol/L, p ANOVA <0.0001). Risk stratification by combining ProADM within cut-off groups and the triage score resulted in the identification of 1662 patients (25.2% of the population) at a very low risk of mortality (0.3%, n = 5) and 425 patients (6.5% of the population) at very high risk of mortality (19.3%, n = 82). Risk estimation by using ProADM and the triage score from a logistic regression model allowed for a more accurate risk estimation in the whole population with a classification of 3255 patients (49.4% of the population) in the low risk group (0.3% mortality, n = 9) and 1673 (25.4% of the population) in the high-risk group (15.1% mortality, n = 252). Conclusions Within this large international multicenter study, a combined triage score based on ProADM and established triage scores allowed a more accurate mortality risk discrimination. The TRIAGE-ProADM score improved identification of both patients at the highest risk of mortality who may benefit from early therapeutic interventions (rule in), and low risk patients where deferred treatment without negatively affecting outcome may be possible (rule out). PMID:28005916

  14. Psychophysical testing of visual prosthetic devices: a call to establish a multi-national joint task force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rizzo, Joseph F., III; Ayton, Lauren N.

    2014-04-01

    Recent advances in the field of visual prostheses, as showcased in this special feature of Journal of Neural Engineering , have led to promising results from clinical trials of a number of devices. However, as noted by these groups there are many challenges involved in assessing vision of people with profound vision loss. As such, it is important that there is consistency in the methodology and reporting standards for clinical trials of visual prostheses and, indeed, the broader vision restoration research field. Two visual prosthesis research groups, the Boston Retinal Implant Project (BRIP) and Bionic Vision Australia (BVA), have agreed to work cooperatively to establish a multi-national Joint Task Force. The aim of this Task Force will be to develop a consensus statement to guide the methods used to conduct and report psychophysical and clinical results of humans who receive visual prosthetic devices. The overarching goal is to ensure maximum benefit to the implant recipients, not only in the outcomes of the visual prosthesis itself, but also in enabling them to obtain accurate information about this research with ease. The aspiration to develop a Joint Task Force was first promulgated at the inaugural 'The Eye and the Chip' meeting in September 2000. This meeting was established to promote the development of the visual prosthetic field by applying the principles of inclusiveness, openness, and collegiality among the growing body of researchers in this field. These same principles underlie the intent of this Joint Task Force to enhance the quality of psychophysical research within our community. Despite prior efforts, a critical mass of interested parties could not congeal. Renewed interest for developing joint guidelines has developed recently because of a growing awareness of the challenges of obtaining reliable measurements of visual function in patients who are severely visually impaired (in whom testing is inherently noisy), and of the importance of

  15. Treatment of paediatric APL: how does the therapeutic approach differ from adults?

    PubMed

    Kutny, Matthew A; Gregory, John; Feusner, James H

    2014-03-01

    Acute promyelocytic leukaemia (APL) in children and adolescents shares many features with APL in adults. There are important distinctions, however, between these age groups in the presentation, complications and treatment outcomes. Paediatric patients are more likely to present with high risk features including elevated WBC count or microgranular variant (M3v). Yet the early death rate is lower in paediatric patients compared to adult patients. Overall outcomes such as CR, OS and EFS appear similar in paediatric and adult patients treated on similar regimens except that very young children may have a higher risk of relapse. While contemporary studies have clearly demonstrated improved survival in adults receiving ATO therapy, currently there is more limited data on the role of ATO in paediatric patients. Here we highlight the similarities and important distinctions between paediatric and adult APL while reviewing available data on treatment of paediatric APL.

  16. How small is small enough? Role of robotics in paediatric urology.

    PubMed

    Ganpule, Arvind P; Sripathi, Venkat

    2015-01-01

    The well-known advantages of robotic surgery include improved dexterity, three-dimensional operating view and an improved degree of freedom. Robotic surgery is performed for a wide range of surgeries in urology, which include radical prostatectomy, radical cystectomy, and ureteric reimplantation. Robotic paediatric urology is evolving. The major hindrance in the development of paediatric robotics is, first, the differences in practice patterns in paediatric urology compared with adult urology thereby making development of expertise difficult and secondly it is challenging to conduct proper studies in the paediatric population because of the paucity of cases. The difficulties in conducting these studies include difficulty in designing a proper randomised study, difficulties with blinding, and finally, the ethical issues involved, finally the instruments although in the phase of evolution require a lot of improvement. In this article, we review the relevant articles for paediatric robotic surgery. We emphasise on the technical aspects and results in contemporary paediatric robotic case series.

  17. Patient disclosure of medical errors in paediatrics: A systematic literature review

    PubMed Central

    Koller, Donna; Rummens, Anneke; Le Pouesard, Morgane; Espin, Sherry; Friedman, Jeremy; Coffey, Maitreya; Kenneally, Noah

    2016-01-01

    Medical errors are common within paediatrics; however, little research has examined the process of disclosing medical errors in paediatric settings. The present systematic review of current research and policy initiatives examined evidence regarding the disclosure of medical errors involving paediatric patients. Peer-reviewed research from a range of scientific journals from the past 10 years is presented, and an overview of Canadian and international policies regarding disclosure in paediatric settings are provided. The purpose of the present review was to scope the existing literature and policy, and to synthesize findings into an integrated and accessible report. Future research priorities and policy implications are then identified. PMID:27429578

  18. Patient disclosure of medical errors in paediatrics: A systematic literature review.

    PubMed

    Koller, Donna; Rummens, Anneke; Le Pouesard, Morgane; Espin, Sherry; Friedman, Jeremy; Coffey, Maitreya; Kenneally, Noah

    2016-05-01

    Medical errors are common within paediatrics; however, little research has examined the process of disclosing medical errors in paediatric settings. The present systematic review of current research and policy initiatives examined evidence regarding the disclosure of medical errors involving paediatric patients. Peer-reviewed research from a range of scientific journals from the past 10 years is presented, and an overview of Canadian and international policies regarding disclosure in paediatric settings are provided. The purpose of the present review was to scope the existing literature and policy, and to synthesize findings into an integrated and accessible report. Future research priorities and policy implications are then identified.

  19. Quality improvement of paediatric care in the Netherlands

    PubMed Central

    Schulpen, Tom W J; Lombarts, Kiki M J

    2007-01-01

    The development of the quality improvement programme of the Paediatric Association of the Netherlands is described within the setting of the national programme of the Dutch government. The programme is based on four pillars: site visits by peers (visitatie), continuous medical and professional education, development of clinical (evidence based) guidelines and patient safety with complication registration. The site visits by peers play a central role in assessing the quality improvement activities in hospital based paediatric care. The self assessment approach and the confidential character of the visits are well received by the surveyed specialists. Recent inclusion of quality criteria in the legally required 5 yearly medical specialist recertification process has boosted the care for quality, which could serve as example for other countries. PMID:17588977

  20. Advanced practice in paediatric intensive care: a review.

    PubMed

    Heward, Yvonne

    2009-02-01

    Advanced nursing roles are one way of encouraging experienced nurses to stay in clinical practice so they can provide expert care, develop practice and be role models for junior staff. A search for literature about advanced nurse practice in paediatric intensive care units in the UK identified just four articles, including one survey, but no reports of empirical research. There is some consensus on the nature and educational requirements for advanced practice but delays in agreeing a regulatory framework and failure to recognise the potential contribution of advanced roles mean that development is hindered. Although several UK units have developed or are developing the role, more insight and better evidence is needed on how nursing can be advanced in paediatric intensive care settings.

  1. Paediatric early warning scores on a children's ward: a quality improvement initiative.

    PubMed

    Ennis, Linda

    2014-09-01

    The aim of this quality improvement initiative was to incorporate a paediatric early warning score (PEWS) and track and trigger system in the routine care of children in an acute general children's ward at a regional hospital in the Republic of Ireland. In the absence of a nationally recommended specific PEWS strategy, a local plan was developed. The experience of structuring and implementing the PEWS and track and trigger system is presented in this article. Data from the first year of use were collected to evaluate the clinical utility and effectiveness of this system. In the busy acute children's service, the PEWS initiative was found to benefit processes of early detection, prompt referral and timely, appropriate management of children at potential risk of clinical deterioration. Nursing staff were empowered and supported to communicate concerns immediately and to seek rapid medical review, according to an agreed PEWS escalation plan. Outcomes were significantly improved.

  2. Varicella paediatric hospitalisations in Belgium: a 1-year national survey

    PubMed Central

    Blumental, Sophie; Sabbe, Martine; Lepage, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Background Varicella universal vaccination (UV) has been implemented in many countries for several years. Nevertheless, varicella UV remains debated in Europe and few data are available on the real burden of infection. We assessed the burden of varicella in Belgium through analysis of hospitalised cases during a 1-year period. Methods Data on children admitted to hospital with varicella were collected through a national network from November 2011 to October 2012. Inclusion criteria were either acute varicella or related complications up to 3 weeks after the rash. Results Participation of 101 hospitals was obtained, covering 97.7% of the total paediatric beds in Belgium. 552 children were included with a median age of 2.1 years. Incidence of paediatric varicella hospitalisations reached 29.5/105 person-years, with the highest impact among those 0–4 years old (global incidence and odds of hospitalisation: 79/105 person-years and 1.6/100 varicella cases, respectively). Only 14% (79/552) of the cohort had an underlying chronic condition. 65% (357/552) of children had ≥1 complication justifying their admission, 49% were bacterial superinfections and 10% neurological disorders. Only a quarter of children (141/552) received acyclovir. Incidence of complicated hospitalised cases was 19/105 person-years. Paediatric intensive care unit admission and surgery were required in 4% and 3% of hospitalised cases, respectively. Mortality among Belgian paediatric population was 0.5/106 and fatality ratio 0.2% among our cohort. Conclusions Varicella demonstrated a substantial burden of disease in Belgian children, especially among the youngest. Our thorough nationwide study, run in a country without varicella UV, offers data to support varicella UV in Belgium. PMID:26130380

  3. Therapeutic upper gastrointestinal tract endoscopy in Paediatric Gastroenterology

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, Imdadur; Patel, Praful; Boger, Philip; Rasheed, Shahnawaz; Thomson, Mike; Afzal, Nadeem Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    Since the first report of use of endoscopy in children in the 1970s, there has seen an exponential growth in published experience and innovation in the field. In this review article we focus on modern age therapeutic endoscopy practice, explaining use of traditional as well as new and innovative techniques, for diagnosis and treatment of diseases in the paediatric upper gastrointestinal tract. PMID:25789087

  4. Safety of Levetiracetam in Paediatrics: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Egunsola, Oluwaseun; Choonara, Imti; Sammons, Helen Mary

    2016-01-01

    Objective To identify adverse events (AEs) associated with Levetiracetam (LEV) in children. Methods Databases EMBASE (1974-February 2015) and Medline (1946-February 2015) were searched for articles in which paediatric patients (≤18 years) received LEV treatment for epilepsy. All studies with reports on safety were included. Studies involving adults, mixed age population (i.e. children and adults) in which the paediatric subpopulation was not sufficiently described, were excluded. A meta-analysis of the RCTs was carried out and association between the commonly reported AEs or treatment discontinuation and the type of regimen (polytherapy or monotherapy) was determined using Chi2 analysis. Results Sixty seven articles involving 3,174 paediatric patients were identified. A total of 1,913 AEs were reported across studies. The most common AEs were behavioural problems and somnolence, which accounted for 10.9% and 8.4% of all AEs in prospective studies. 21 prospective studies involving 1120 children stated the number of children experiencing AEs. 47% of these children experienced AEs. Significantly more children experienced AEs with polytherapy (64%) than monotherapy (22%) (p<0.001). Levetiracetam was discontinued in 4.5% of all children on polytherapy and 0.9% on monotherapy (p<0.001), the majority were due to behavioural problems. Conclusion Behavioural problems and somnolence were the most prevalent adverse events to LEV and the most common causes of treatment discontinuation. Children on polytherapy have a greater risk of adverse events than those receiving monotherapy. PMID:26930201

  5. Thyroid abnormalities in paediatric patients with vitiligo: retrospective study

    PubMed Central

    Borlu, Murat; Çınar, Salih Levent; Kesikoğlu, Ayten; Utaş, Serap

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The association between vitiligo and thyroid disease is not fully investigated especially in paediatric patients. Aim To determine the incidence of vitiligo and thyroid disorders in children. This is the first report from middle Anatolia and the second report from Turkey. Material and methods A retrospective chart review was performed to examine the presence of thyroid abnormalities in paediatric patients who had been admitted to the dermatology department with vitiligo. Results A total of 155 paediatric patients, including 80 (52%) male and 75 (48%) female patients were included. The mean age was 8.6 years. Non segmental vitiligo was the most common type of the disease in 140 (90%) reviewed patients, while segmental vitiligo appeared only in 15 (10%) patients. The mean onset of vitiligo was 5.6 ±0.9 years. A family history of vitiligo was found in 14 (9%) children. Thirty-four (22%) patients had thyroid function tests and/or thyroid autoantibody abnormality. All of these patients had non segmental vitiligo. It was statistically significant (p < 0.05) in types of vitiligo and thyroid disease parameters. Conclusions Our results show that it may be useful to screen thyroid in children with non segmental vitiligo. PMID:27512360

  6. Economics and ethics of paediatric respiratory extra corporeal life support.

    PubMed

    Callaghan, M; Doyle, Y; O'Hare, B; Healy, M; Nölke, L

    2013-09-01

    Extra corporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) is a form of life support, which facilitates gas exchange outside the body via an oxygenator and a centrifugal pumping system. A paediatric cardiac ECMO programme was established in 2005 at Our Lady's Children's Hospital, Crumlin (OLCHC) and to date 75 patients have received ECMO, the majority being post operative cardiac patients. The outcome data compares favourably with international figures. ECMO has been most successful in the treatment of newborn infants with life threatening respiratory failure from conditions such as meconium aspiration, respiratory distress syndrome and respiratory infections. There is no formal paediatric respiratory ECMO programme at OLCHC, or anywhere else in Ireland. Currently, neonates requiring respiratory ECMO are transferred to centres in Sweden or the UK at an average cost of 133,000 Euros/infant, funded by the Health Service Executive E112 treatment abroad scheme. There is considerable morbidity associated with the transfer of critically ill infants, as well as significant psycho-social impact on families. OLCHC is not funded to provide respiratory ECMO, although the equipment and expertise required are similar to cardiac ECMO and are currently in place. The average cost of an ECMO run at OLCHC is 65,000 Euros. There is now a strong argument for a fully funded single national cardiac and respiratory paediatric ECMO centre, similar to that for adult patients.

  7. Model-Driven Paediatric Cardiomyopathy Pathways - A Clinical Impact Assessment.

    PubMed

    Stroetmann, Karl A; Thiel, Rainer

    2017-01-01

    Intermediate results from an ongoing health technology assessment exercise of a simulation model of paediatric cardiomyopathy are reported. Comprehensive data on paediatric cardiomyopathy/heart failure, treatment options, incidence and prevalence, prognoses for different outcomes to be expected were collected. Based on this knowledge, a detailed clinical pathway model was developed and validated against the clinical workflow in a tertiary paediatric care hospital. It combines three disease stages and various treatment options with estimates of the probabilities of a child moving from one stage to another. To reflect the complexity of initial decision taking by clinicians, a three-stage Markov model was combined with a decision tree approach - a Markov decision process. A Markov Chain simulation tool was applied to compare estimates of transition probabilities and cost data of present standard of care treatment options for a cohort of children over ten years with expected improvements from using a clinical decision support tool based on the disease model under development. Early results indicate a slight increase of overall costs resulting from the extra cost of using such a tool in spite of some savings to be expected from improved care. However, the intangible benefits in life years saved of severely ill children and the improvement in QoL to be expected for moderately ill ones should more than compensate for this.

  8. Can paediatric early warning score be used as a triage tool in paediatric accident and emergency?

    PubMed

    Bradman, Kate; Maconochie, Ian

    2008-12-01

    The UK paediatric early warning score (PEWS) was developed for inpatients, looking at admission to the HDU and PICU and trying to produce a system which would recognize those children at risk of admission. Since the introduction of the '4-h wait', accident and emergency (A&E) departments have been under increasing strain to assess, treat and admit patients (if required) as quickly as possible. We designed this study with the view of identifying if the PEWS score could be used as a triage tool, to detect those patients who will need admission and therefore speed up the process of admitting children to the ward. All patients who visited A&E from 1st October-16th October 2006 were audited. The PEWS scores were collated after the study period. 774 children attended A&E during the study period. 316 patients were sent home from triage following nurse-led treatment or sent to another facility. Of the 458 patients remaining, 424 (93%) were included in the study - the only exclusion criterion was the failure of complete documentation of observations. The sensitivity [the probability of a child being admitted with a score of (n)] and the specificity (the probability of a patient not being admitted with a score of 0) were calculated. For all children aged 0-16 years, a PEWS score of >or=4 had a sensitivity of 24% and a specificity of 96%. A PEWS score of >or=2 had a sensitivity of 37% and a specificity of 88%. PEWS is of limited value in predicting admission (in a triage setting) in a population of undifferentiated disease. However, a low PEWS score has a high specificity, that is, a patient scoring <2 is unlikely to need admission.

  9. Malaria paediatric hospitalization between 1999 and 2008 across Kenya

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Intervention coverage and funding for the control of malaria in Africa has increased in recent years, however, there are few descriptions of changing disease burden and the few reports available are from isolated, single site observations or are of reports at country-level. Here we present a nationwide assessment of changes over 10 years in paediatric malaria hospitalization across Kenya. Methods Paediatric admission data on malaria and non-malaria diagnoses were assembled for the period 1999 to 2008 from in-patient registers at 17 district hospitals in Kenya and represented the diverse malaria ecology of the country. These data were then analysed using autoregressive moving average time series models with malaria and all-cause admissions as the main outcomes adjusted for rainfall, changes in service use and populations-at-risk within each hospital's catchment to establish whether there has been a statistically significant decline in paediatric malaria hospitalization during the observation period. Results Among the 17 hospital sites, adjusted paediatric malaria admissions had significantly declined at 10 hospitals over 10 years since 1999; had significantly increased at four hospitals, and remained unchanged in three hospitals. The overall estimated average reduction in malaria admission rates was 0.0063 cases per 1,000 children aged 0 to 14 years per month representing an average percentage reduction of 49% across the 10 hospitals registering a significant decline by the end of 2008. Paediatric admissions for all-causes had declined significantly with a reduction in admission rates of greater than 0.0050 cases per 1,000 children aged 0 to 14 years per month at 6 of 17 hospitals. Where malaria admissions had increased three of the four sites were located in Western Kenya close to Lake Victoria. Conversely there was an indication that areas with the largest declines in malaria admission rates were areas located along the Kenyan coast and some sites in

  10. Paediatric radiopharmaceutical administration: harmonization of the 2007 EANM paediatric dosage card (version 1.5.2008) and the 2010 North American consensus guidelines.

    PubMed

    Lassmann, Michael; Treves, S Ted

    2014-05-01

    In 2008 the EANM published their paediatric dosage card. In 2011 the North American consensus guidelines recommended a set of administered activities for paediatric nuclear medicine. During the EANM congress in 2012 a working group of the EANM and the SNMMI met to study the possibility of harmonizing these guidelines. The purpose of this work was to identify differences between these guidelines and suggest changes in both guidelines to achieve a level of harmonization. In addition, the new version of the EANM paediatric dosage card (version 01.02.2014) is provided.

  11. Evaluation of the health promotion activities of paediatric nurses: is the Ottawa Charter for Health Promotion a useful framework?

    PubMed

    Roden, Janet; Jarvis, Lynda

    2012-06-01

    Researchers were involved in an evaluative approach to examine the health promotion activities of paediatric nurses from a paediatric tertiary hospital centre (N = 83) and five paediatric non-tertiary hospital centres (N = 48) from Sydney, Australia. The aims of this study were to understand the nature of heath promotion in paediatric nursing practice by examining nurses' attitudes, investigating paediatric nurses' involvement in the five action area of the Ottawa Charter, and identifying barriers to the implementation of health promotion in practice. The researchers developed a health promotion survey based around the Ottawa Charter for Health Promotion (World Health Organisation, 1986a), and a literature review of nurses' involvement in health promotion. Results showed that tertiary paediatric nurses undertook more varied health promotion activities such as creating supportive environments (CSE), reorienting health services (RHS) and building healthy public policy (BHPP) than did non-tertiary paediatric nurses who were involved in only one action area of the Charter, that of developing personal skills (DPS). This research revealed that within paediatric nursing practice the action areas of the Ottawa Charter of BHPP and CSE were important; and that there is support for the advocacy role of paediatric nurses. There is also evidence that paediatric nurses may have health promotion knowledge deficits associated with the Ottawa Charter, and that the environment of multidisciplinary allied health professionals in a tertiary paediatric centre may positively influence senior paediatric nurses and their capacity to be involved in varied health promotion activities associated with the Ottawa Charter.

  12. Paediatric Low-Vision Assessment and Management in a Specialist Clinic in the UK

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lennon, Julie; Harper, Robert; Biswas, Sus; Lloyd, Chris

    2007-01-01

    This article presents a survey of the demographical, educational and visual functional characteristics of children attending a specialist paediatric low-vision assessment clinic at Manchester Royal Eye Hospital. Comprehensive data were collected retrospectively from children attending the paediatric low-vision clinic between January 2003 and…

  13. A Clinical Study of Phenomenology and Comorbidity of Paediatric Bipolar Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gupta, Pavan Kumar; T., Sivakumar; Agarwal, Vivek; Sitholey, Prabhat

    2012-01-01

    Background: Considerable controversy exists regarding clinical presentation, diagnosis, and comorbidities especially with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), in paediatric Bipolar Disorder (BPD). Aims and objectives: To describe phenomenology and comorbidities of paediatric BPD. Method: 78 Subjects (6-16 years) attending child and…

  14. Ultrasonographic Measurement of Subglottic Diameter for Paediatric Cuffed Endotracheal Tube Size Selection: Feasibility Report

    PubMed Central

    Altun, Demet; Sungur, Mukadder Orhan; Ali, Achmet; Bingül, Emre Sertaç; Seyhan, Tülay Özkan; Çamcı, Emre

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aim of this feasibility study was to investigate the first attempt success of ultrasonography (USG) in paediatric patients in predicting an appropriate cuffed endotracheal tube (ETT) size. Methods Fifty children who were 1–10 years of age and who received general anaesthesia with endotracheal intubation for adenoidectomy or adenotonsillectomy were enrolled in the study. In all participants, the transverse diameter of the subglottic airway was measured with USG at the cricoid level without ventilation. The outer diameter (OD) of the maximum allowable ETT was chosen according to the measured subglottic airway diameter. In the presence of resistance to passage of the tube into the trachea or in the absence of an audible leak at airway pressure of >25 cm H2O, the ETT was replaced with a tube whose internal diameter (ID) was 0.5 mm smaller. If a leak was audible at airway pressures of <10 cm H2O, if a seal could not be achieved with a cuff pressure of >25 cm H2O or if a peak airway pressure of >25 cm H2O was observed during ventilation, the tube was changed to a tube one size larger. The OD of the best-fit ETT was converted to the ID. The best-fit ID, the requirement for ETT replacement, the duration of airway diameter measurement by USG and the peak airway pressure were recorded. Results The success rate of the first attempt with USG was 86%; the ETT was replaced in five patients with a tube one size larger and in two patients with a tube one size smaller. Conclusion Our findings show the subglottic diameter measured by USG to be a reliable predictor in estimating the appropriate paediatric ETT size. PMID:28058141

  15. Control groups in paediatric epilepsy research: do first-degree cousins show familial effects?

    PubMed

    Hanson, Melissa; Morrison, Blaise; Jones, Jana E; Jackson, Daren C; Almane, Dace; Seidenberg, Michael; Zhao, Qianqian; Rathouz, Paul J; Hermann, Bruce P

    2017-03-01

    To determine whether first-degree cousins of children with idiopathic focal and genetic generalized epilepsies show any association across measures of cognition, behaviour, and brain structure. The presence/absence of associations addresses the question of whether and to what extent first-degree cousins may serve as unbiased controls in research addressing the cognitive, psychiatric, and neuroimaging features of paediatric epilepsies. Participants were children (aged 8-18) with epilepsy who had at least one first-degree cousin control enrolled in the study (n=37) and all enrolled cousin controls (n=100). Participants underwent neuropsychological assessment and brain imaging (cortical, subcortical, and cerebellar volumes), and parents completed the Child Behaviour Checklist (CBCL). Data (based on 42 outcome measures) from cousin controls were regressed on the corresponding epilepsy cognitive, behavioural, and imaging measures in a linear mixed model and case/control correlations were examined. Of the 42 uncorrected correlations involving cognitive, behavioural, and neuroimaging measures, only two were significant (p<0.05). The median correlation was 0.06. A test for whether the distribution of p values deviated from the null distribution under no association was not significant (p>0.25). Similar results held for the cognition/behaviour and brain imaging measures separately. Given the lack of association between cases and first-degree cousin performances on measures of cognition, behaviour, and neuroimaging, the results suggest a non-significant genetic influence on control group performance. First-degree cousins appear to be unbiased controls for cognitive, behavioural, and neuroimaging research in paediatric epilepsy.

  16. [Consensus document by the Spanish Society of Paediatric Infectious Diseases and the advisory committee on vaccines of the Spanish Paediatrics Association on vaccination in immunocompromised children].

    PubMed

    Mellado Peña, M J; Moreno-Pérez, D; Ruíz Contreras, J; Hernández-Sampelayo Matos, T; Navarro Gómez, M L

    2011-12-01

    Vaccination in immunocompromised infants, children and adolescents is a major aspect in the follow-up of this complex pathology in specific Paediatric Units. Vaccination is also an important prevention tool, as this can, to a certain extent, determine the morbidity and mortality in these patients. This consensus document was jointly prepared by Working Groups of the Spanish Society of Paediatric Infectious Diseases and the Advisory Committee on Vaccines of the Spanish Paediatric Association, who are usually involved in updating the management of vaccinations in immunocompromised children, and reflects their opinions. The consensus specifically summarises indications for vaccination in the following special paediatric populations: Solid organ and haematopoietic transplant-recipients; primary immunodeficiency; asplenic children; non-previously transplanted immunocompromised patients; chronically ill patients; HIV-infected children and also the vaccines recommended for immunodeficient children who travel.

  17. Patient doses in paediatric CT: feasibility of setting diagnostic reference levels.

    PubMed

    Järvinen, H; Merimaa, K; Seuri, R; Tyrväinen, E; Perhomaa, M; Savikurki-Heikkilä, P; Svedström, E; Ziliukas, J; Lintrop, M

    2011-09-01

    Despite the fact that doses to paediatric patients from computed tomography (CT) examinations are of special concern, only few data or studies for setting of paediatric diagnostic reference levels (DRLs) have been published. In this study, doses to children were estimated from chest and head CT, in order to study the feasibility of DRLs for these examinations. It is shown that for the DRLs, patient dose data from different CT scanners should be collected in age or weight groups, possibly for different indications. For practical reasons, the DRLs for paediatric chest CT should be given as a continuous DRL curve as a function of patient weight. For paediatric head CT, DRLs for a few age groups could be given. The users of the DRLs should be aware of the calibration phantom applied in the console calibration for different paediatric scanning protocols. The feasibility of DRLs should be re-evaluated every 2-3 y.

  18. Paediatric heart failure research: role of the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute.

    PubMed

    Burns, Kristin M

    2015-08-01

    The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, of the National Institutes of Health, is committed to supporting research in paediatric heart failure. The Institute's support of paediatric heart failure research includes both investigator-initiated grants and Institute initiatives. There were 107 funded grants in paediatric heart failure over the past 20 years in basic, translational and clinical research, technology development, and support of registries. Such research includes a broad diversity of scientific topics and approaches. The Institute also supports several initiatives for paediatric heart failure, including the Pediatric Circulatory Support Program, the Pumps for Kids, Infants, and Neonates (PumpKIN) Program, PediMACS, and the Pediatric Heart Network. This review article describes the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute's past, present, and future efforts to promote a better understanding of paediatric heart failure, with the ultimate goal of improving outcomes.

  19. Montelukast in the treatment of perennial allergic rhinitis in paediatric Japanese patients; an open-label clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Okubo, Kimihiro; Inoue, Yoichi; Numaguchi, Hirotaka; Tanaka, Kumi; Saito, Itori; Oshima, Nobuyuki; Matsumoto, Yuki; Prohn, Marita; Mehta, Anish; Nishida, Chisato; Philip, George

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: This study was conducted to evaluate the safety and tolerability, and population pharmacokinetics (PPK) of montelukast as well as efficacy in the treatment of perennial allergic rhinitis (PAR) in paediatric Japanese patients aged between 1 and 15 years. Methods: In this multi-centre, open-label trial, 87 paediatric Japanese patients with PAR received montelukast 4 mg oral granules (OG) for 4 weeks (1–5-year-olds, N = 15), 4 mg OG for 12 weeks (1–5-year-olds, N = 36), 5 mg chewable tablets (CT) for 12 weeks (6–9-year-olds, N = 18), or 5 mg CT for12 weeks (10–15-year-olds, N = 18). Clinical exams and laboratory assessments were conducted at study visits, and adverse events (AE) were monitored throughout the study up to 14 days after the last visit. Population pharmacokinetic approach was used to estimate AUC0–∞, Cmax, Tmax and apparent elimination half-life in each age group. Efficacy was assessed based on global evaluations by the subject’s caregiver. Results: There were no serious AEs and one discontinuation due to an AE. The most common AEs in any of the treatment groups were nasopharyngitis, pharyngitis, and acute sinusitis. Montelukast exposure (AUC0–∞) was similar in the 1–5-year-old group and the 6–9-year-old group, but 19% lower in the 10–15-year-old group. Among all patients, the total proportion of patients whose global evaluation was “very much better” was 5.7% (week 2), 11.5% (week 4), and 16.9% (week 12) reflecting improvement in symptoms over time. Conclusion: Montelukast was generally well tolerated in Japanese children with PAR. AUC0–∞was similar in 1–5 and 6–9-year-olds, while a lower exposure was observed in the 10–15-year-old group likely due to differences in bodyweight. The exposure in Japanese paediatric patients was generally consistent with that in non-Japanese paediatric and adult patients. As assessed by the patients’ caregivers, montelukast also

  20. Derivation of Australian diagnostic reference levels for paediatric multi detector computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Hayton, Anna; Wallace, Anthony

    2016-09-01

    Australian National Diagnostic Reference Levels for paediatric multi detector computed tomography were established for three protocols, Head, Chest and AbdoPelvis, across two age groups, Baby/Infant 0-4 years and Child 5-14 years by the Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Agency in 2012. The establishment of Australian paediatric DRLs is an important step towards lowering patient CT doses on a national scale. While Adult DRLs were calculated with data collected from the web based Australian National Diagnostic Reference Level Service, no paediatric data was submitted in the first year of service operation. Data from an independent Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists Quality Use of Diagnostic Imaging paediatric optimisation survey was used. The paediatric DRLs were defined for CTDIvol (mGy) and DLP (mGy·cm) values that referenced the 16 cm PMMA phantom for the Head protocol and the 32 cm PMMA phantom for body protocols for both paediatric age groups. The Australian paediatric DRLs for multi detector computed tomography are for the Head, Chest and AbdoPelvis protocols respectively, 470, 60 and 170 mGy·cm for the Baby/Infant age group, and 600, 110 and 390 mGy·cm for the Child age group. A comparison with published international paediatric DRLs for computed tomography reveal the Australian paediatric DRLs to be lower on average. However, the comparison is complicated by misalignment of defined age ranges. It is the intention of ARPANSA to review the paediatric DRLs in conjunction with a review of the adult DRLs, which should occur within 5 years of their publication.

  1. Migrant-friendly hospitals: a paediatric perspective - improving hospital care for migrant children

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The European Union (EU) Migrant-Friendly Hospital (MFH) Initiative, introduced in 2002, promotes the adoption of care approaches adapted to meet the service needs of migrants. However, for paediatric hospitals, no specific recommendations have been offered for MFH care for children. Using the Swiss MFH project as a case study, this paper aims to identify hospital-based care needs of paediatric migrants (PMs) and good service approaches. Methods Semi-structured interviews were conducted with principal project leaders of five paediatric hospitals participating in the Swiss MFH project. A review of the international literature on non-clinical hospital service needs and service responses of paediatric MFHs was conducted. Results Paediatric care can be complex, usually involving both the patient and the patient’s family. Key challenges include differing levels of acculturation between parents and children; language barriers; cultural differences between patient and provider; and time constraints. Current service and infrastructural responses include interpretation services for PMs and parents, translated information material, and special adaptations to ensure privacy, e.g., during breastfeeding. Clear standards for paediatric migrant-friendly hospitals (P-MFH) are lacking. Conclusions International research on hospital care for migrant children is scarce. The needs of paediatric migrants and their families may differ from guidance for adults. Paediatric migrant needs should be systematically identified and used to inform paediatric hospital care approaches. Hospital processes from admission to discharge should be revised to ensure implementation of migrant-sensitive approaches suitable for children. Staff should receive adequate support, such as training, easily available interpreters and sufficient consultation time, to be able to provide migrant-friendly paediatric services. The involvement of migrant groups may be helpful. Improving the quality of care

  2. Sweat testing for the detection of atomoxetine from paediatric patients with attention deficit/ hyperactivity disorder: application to clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Marchei, Emilia; Papaseit, Esther; Garcia-Algar, Oscar; Bilbao, Amaia; Farré, Magí; Pacifici, Roberta; Pichini, Simona

    2013-03-01

    Atomoxetine (ATX) is a selective norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor approved since 2002 for the treatment of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in children, adolescents, and adults as an alternative treatment to methylphenidate. Within the framework of a project evaluating the use of alternative biological matrices for therapeutic monitoring of psychoactive drugs in paediatric and non-paediatric individuals, the excretion of ATX and its principal metabolites has been recently studied in oral fluid and hair. The aim of this study was to describe the excretion profile of ATX and its metabolites 4-hydroxyatomoxetine (4-OH-ATX) and N-desmethylatomoxetine (N-des-ATX) in sweat following the administration of different dosage regimens (60, 40, 35, and 18 mg/day) of ATX to six paediatric patients. Sweat patches were applied to the back of each participant and removed at timed intervals. ATX and its metabolites were measured in patches using a previously validated liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometric (LC-MS/MS) method. Independently from the administered dose, ATX appeared in the sweat patches 1 h post administration and reached its maximum concentration generally at 24 h. Peak ATX concentrations ranged between 2.31 and 40.4 ng/patch and did not correlate with the administered drug dose, or with body surface area. Total ATX excreted in sweat ranged between 0.008 and 0.121 mg, corresponding to 0.02 and 0.3% of the administered drug. Neither 4-OH-ATX, nor N-des-ATX was detected in either of the collected sweat patches. Measuring ATX in sweat patches can provide information on cumulative drug use from patch application until removal.

  3. The outcomes of displaced paediatric distal radius fractures treated with percutaneous Kirschner wire fixation: a review of 248 cases.

    PubMed

    Ramoutar, D N; Shivji, F S; Rodrigues, J N; Hunter, J B

    2015-04-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the effect of manipulation under anaesthesia (MUA) and Kirschner wire (K-wire) fixation of displaced, paediatric distal radius fractures on residual radiological angulation, displacement, and shortening, as well as functional outcomes, including complication rates. A retrospective review was conducted of all paediatric patients undergoing MUA and K-wire fixation for an extra-articular distal radius fracture over a period of 5 years. A total of 248 patients were included in the study with a mean age of 9.9 years (3-15). Mean follow-up was 6.6 weeks (4-156). There was a statistically significant increase in median dorsal angulation (p<0.0001) between initial post-operative and follow-up radiographs at the time of K-wire removal. The number of K-wires used did not have a significant effect on dorsal angulation (p=0.9015) at time of K-wire removal, nor did the use of an above or below elbow cast (p=0.3883). Seventeen patients required a further general anaesthetic (5 revision operations, 12 removal of migrated K-wires). Eighty-seven percentage of (215 patients) of patients had normal function at follow-up post-K-wire removal. Angulation at time of K-wire removal of more than 15° was significantly associated with reduced functional outcome (p=0.0377). A total of 41 patients (17%) had complications associated with K-wire use. We conclude that though K-wire fixation is an effective technique, it does not prevent re-angulation of the fracture and is associated with a significant complication rate. Given the remodelling potential and tolerance to deformity in children, surgeons should give careful thought before utilising this technique for all displaced or angulated paediatric distal radius fractures. If used, 1 K-wire with immobilisation in a below elbow cast is sufficient in most cases.

  4. Development of research priorities in paediatric pain and palliative care

    PubMed Central

    Liossi, Christina; Anderson, Anna-Karenia; Howard, Richard F

    2016-01-01

    Priority setting for healthcare research is as important as conducting the research itself because rigorous and systematic processes of priority setting can make an important contribution to the quality of research. This project aimed to prioritise clinical therapeutic uncertainties in paediatric pain and palliative care in order to encourage and inform the future research agenda and raise the profile of paediatric pain and palliative care in the United Kingdom. Clinical therapeutic uncertainties were identified and transformed into patient, intervention, comparison and outcome (PICO) format and prioritised using a modified Nominal Group Technique. Members of the Clinical Studies Group in Pain and Palliative Care within National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) Clinical Research Network (CRN)-Children took part in the prioritisation exercise. There were 11 clinically active professionals spanning across a wide range of paediatric disciplines and one parent representative. The top three research priorities related to establishing the safety and efficacy of (1) gabapentin in the management of chronic pain with neuropathic characteristics, (2) intravenous non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in the management of post-operative pain in pre-schoolers and (3) different opioid formulations in the management of acute pain in children while at home. Questions about the long-term effect of psychological interventions in the management of chronic pain and various pharmacological interventions to improve pain and symptom management in palliative care were among the ‘top 10’ priorities. The results of prioritisation were included in the UK Database of Uncertainties about the Effects of Treatments (DUETS) database. Increased awareness of priorities and priority-setting processes should encourage clinicians and other stakeholders to engage in such exercises in the future. PMID:28386399

  5. Evaluating an outreach service for paediatric burns follow up.

    PubMed

    Cubitt, Jonathan J; Chesney, Amy; Brown, Liz; Nguyen, Dai Q

    2015-09-01

    Complications following paediatric burns are well documented and care needs to be taken to ensure the appropriate follow up of these patients. Historically this has meant follow up into adulthood however this is often not necessary. The centralisation of burns services in the UK means that patients and their parents may have to travel significant distances to receive this follow up care. To optimise our burns service we have introduced a burns outreach service to enable the patients to be treated closer to home. The aim of this study is to investigate the impact of the introduction of the burns outreach service and within this environment define the optimum length of time needed to follow up these patients. A retrospective analysis was carried out of 100 consecutive paediatric burns patients who underwent surgical management of their burn. During the follow up period there were 43 complications in 32 patients (32%). These included adverse scarring (either hypertrophic or keloid), delayed healing (taking >1 month to heal) and contractures (utilising either splinting or surgical correction). Fifty-nine percent of these complications occurred within 6 months of injury and all occurred within 18 months. Size of burn was directly correlated to the risk of developing a complication. The outreach service reduced the distance the patient needs to travel for follow up by more than 50%. There was also a significant financial benefit for the service as the follow up clinics were on average 50% cheaper with burns outreach than burns physician. Burns outreach is a feasible service that not only benefits the patients but also is cheaper for the burns service. The optimum length of follow up for paediatric burns in 18 months, after which if there have not been any complications they can be discharged.

  6. Paediatric cerebrovascular CT angiography—towards better image quality

    PubMed Central

    Thust, Stefanie C.; Chong, Wui Khean Kling; Gunny, Roxana; Mazumder, Asif; Poitelea, Marius; Welsh, Anna; Ederies, Ash

    2014-01-01

    Background Paediatric cerebrovascular CT angiography (CTA) can be challenging to perform due to variable cardiovascular physiology between different age groups and the risk of movement artefact. This analysis aimed to determine what proportion of CTA at our institution was of diagnostic quality and identify technical factors which could be improved. Materials and methods a retrospective analysis of 20 cases was performed at a national paediatric neurovascular centre assessing image quality with a subjective scoring system and Hounsfield Unit (HU) measurements. Demographic data, contrast dose, flow rate and triggering times were recorded for each patient. Results Using a qualitative scoring system, 75% of studies were found to be of diagnostic quality (n=9 ‘good’, n=6 ‘satisfactory’) and 25% (n=5) were ‘poor’. Those judged subjectively to be poor had arterial contrast density measured at less than 250 HU. Increased arterial opacification was achieved for cases performed with an increased flow rate (2.5-4 mL/s) and higher intravenous contrast dose (2 mL/kg). Triggering was found to be well timed in nine cases, early in four cases and late in seven cases. Of the scans triggered early, 75% were poor. Of the scans triggered late, less (29%) were poor. Conclusions High flow rates (>2.5 mL/s) were a key factor for achieving high quality paediatric cerebrovascular CTA imaging. However, appropriate triggering by starting the scan immediately on contrast opacification of the monitoring vessel plays an important role and could maintain image quality when flow rates were lower. Early triggering appeared more detrimental than late. PMID:25525579

  7. Cystic change in primary paediatric optic nerve sheath meningioma.

    PubMed

    Narayan, Daniel; Rajak, Saul; Patel, Sandy; Selva, Dinesh

    2016-08-01

    Primary optic nerve sheath meningiomas (PONSM) are rare in children. Cystic meningiomas are an uncommon subgroup of meningiomas. We report a case of paediatric PONSM managed using observation alone that underwent cystic change and radiological regression. A 5-year-old girl presented with visual impairment and proptosis. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging demonstrated a PONSM. The patient was left untreated and followed up with regular MR imaging. Repeat imaging at 16 years of age showed the tumour had started to develop cystic change. Repeat imaging at 21 years of age showed the tumour had decreased in size.

  8. Epigenetics: What does it mean for paediatric practice?

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Judith G

    2014-01-01

    ‘Epigenetics’ involves the study of gene expression and the environmental exposures that influence expression. In paediatrics, it is recognized that different physiological and developmental stages of the young individual are affected by both genetic control and environmental influence. It appears that changes in gene expression – not changes in the DNA itself – can be passed on from one generation to another. The importance for paediatricians is recognizing disorders involving epigenetics, recording events during childhood that could affect epigenetic control of gene expression, and being aware of new therapies as they become available. Paediatricians need to be able to recognize the relevant risk factors. PMID:24627653

  9. Transition of care from paediatric to adult rheumatology

    PubMed Central

    McDonagh, Janet E

    2007-01-01

    The origin of paediatric rheumatology in the UK mainly lies in adult rheumatology and this has proved invaluable in terms of transition provision, education and training, and collaborative research. The last 5 years have seen adolescent rheumatology gather momentum with the creation of an objective evidence base, a sound foundation for future work addressing the many unanswered questions and hypotheses in the area of transitional care. The aim of this paper is to review the evidence supporting the recent developments in transitional care within rheumatology. Acknowledging the non‐categorical nature of transition, the author will also refer to evidence from other chronic illnesses which has informed these developments. PMID:17715444

  10. [Paediatric emergency: creation of an independent nurse practitioner consultation].

    PubMed

    Rey-Bellet Gasser, C; Gehri, M; Yersin, C

    2015-01-14

    Consultations in the Paediatric Emergency Department (PED) continue to climb regularly. Emergency Nurse Practitioner consultations have long been created in the English speaking countries. Since January 2013, an indepen- dent nurse consultation, under delegated medical responsibility, exists in the multidisciplinary PED of the Children's Hospital of Lausanne. The mean consultation time is the same as the medical consultation and the overall waiting time hasn't decreased yet. But a well definite working frame, a systematic approach, as well as the continual medical supervision possibility, make it a safe, efficient and appreciated consultation, by both patients and professionals.

  11. Weaning from mechanical ventilation in paediatrics. State of the art.

    PubMed

    Valenzuela, Jorge; Araneda, Patricio; Cruces, Pablo

    2014-03-01

    Weaning from mechanical ventilation is one of the greatest volume and strength issues in evidence-based medicine in critically ill adults. In these patients, weaning protocols and daily interruption of sedation have been implemented, reducing the duration of mechanical ventilation and associated morbidity. In paediatrics, the information reported is less consistent, so that as yet there are no reliable criteria for weaning and extubation in this patient group. Several indices have been developed to predict the outcome of weaning. However, these have failed to replace clinical judgement, although some additional measurements could facilitate this decision.

  12. Transition of care from paediatric to adult rheumatology.

    PubMed

    McDonagh, Janet E

    2007-09-01

    The origin of paediatric rheumatology in the UK mainly lies in adult rheumatology and this has proved invaluable in terms of transition provision, education and training, and collaborative research. The last 5 years have seen adolescent rheumatology gather momentum with the creation of an objective evidence base, a sound foundation for future work addressing the many unanswered questions and hypotheses in the area of transitional care. The aim of this paper is to review the evidence supporting the recent developments in transitional care within rheumatology. Acknowledging the non-categorical nature of transition, the author will also refer to evidence from other chronic illnesses which has informed these developments.

  13. Diagnosis and management of paediatric concussion.

    PubMed

    Bressan, Silvia; Babl, Franz E

    2016-02-01

    Heightened recognition of concussions and concerns about their sequelae in children has become an increasing community and public health concern. Biomarkers and clinical tests are being explored, but the diagnosis of concussion in the emergency department continues to be based on clinical signs and symptoms. While the majority of children go on to recover from post-concussive symptoms within 2 weeks, it is unclear which patients with concussion will go on to develop short- or long-term sequelae. A number of more or less evidence-based guidelines have become available which seek to guide clinicians on how to manage children post-concussion. In general, care after the emergency department is focused on reducing the risk of re-injury and rest until cerebral recovery with a graduated return to school and then play.

  14. Paediatric Electrophysiologic Studies: How and What With?

    PubMed Central

    Sreeram, N; Emmel, M; Trieschmann, U; de Haan, E

    2008-01-01

    Catheter ablation of arrhythmias in children has become standard practice virtually worldwide. Successful and safe ablation has been made possible by a combination of factors. These include increased operator experience, a better understanding of the natural history of a wide variety of arrhythmias, advances in technology such as smaller catheters, the routine use of various three-dimensional mapping systems, and the development of alternative energy sources. It is also not uncommon to perform multiple catheter intervention procedures (ablation ± intravascular stent implantation ± device closure of residual shunts ± elective pacemaker or device implantation) during a single session. It is important to bear in mind that arrhythmia recurrence is commoner in children in general, and that this is particularly the case with postoperative (scar-related arrhythmias). Despite acute success, long-term follow-up is mandated for this subgroup of patients. PMID:18478065

  15. The HOPE (Helping to Outline Paediatric Eating Disorders) Project: development and debut of a paediatric clinical eating disorder registry

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The HOPE (Helping to Outline Paediatric Eating Disorders) Project is an ongoing registry study made up of a sequential cross-sectional sample prospectively recruited over 17 years, and is designed to answer empirical questions about paediatric eating disorders. This paper introduces the HOPE Project, describes the registry sample to-date, and discusses future directions and challenges and accomplishments. The project and clinical service were established in a tertiary academic hospital in Western Australia in 1996 with a service development grant. Research processes were inbuilt into the initial protocols and data collection was maintained in the following years. Recognisable progress with the research agenda accelerated only when dedicated research resources were obtained. The registry sample consists of consecutive children and adolescents assessed at the eating disorder program from 1996 onward. Standardised multidisciplinary data collected from family intake interview, parent and child clinical interviews, medical review, parent, child and teacher psychometric assessments, and inpatient admission records populate the HOPE Project database. Results The registry database to-date contains 941 assessments, of whom 685 met DSM-IV diagnostic criteria for an eating disorder at admission. The majority of the sample were females (91%) from metropolitan Perth (83%). The cases with eating disorders consist of eating disorders not otherwise specified (68%), anorexia nervosa (25%) and bulimia nervosa (7%). Among those with eating disorders, a history of weight loss since illness onset was almost universal (96%) with fear of weight gain (71%) common, and the median duration of illness was 8 months. Conclusions Over the next five years and more, we expect that the HOPE Project will make a strong scientific contribution to paediatric eating disorders research and will have important real-world applications to clinical practice and policy as the research unfolds

  16. The organisation of paediatric renal care in different European countries: results of the PAC project.

    PubMed

    Knoll, J; Demol, A; Elseviers, M; Harrington, M; De Vos, J Y; Zampieron, A; Ormandy, P; Kafkia, T

    2006-01-01

    The Paediatric Access Care (PAC) project, organised by the Research Board of EDTNA/ERCA, aimed to study the organisation of paediatric renal care in Europe and to investigate the practice of access care for both haemodialysis (HD) and peritoneal dialysis (PD) paediatric patients. This paper reports on the organisation of paediatric renal care. The majority of paediatric renal care units were located in specific paediatric units of university hospitals. Most of the centres had offered HD, PD and transplantation (Tx) for more than 20 years. Half of nursing staff had qualifications in paediatric and renal nursing. Most of the centres offered an extended multidisciplinary team approach with the family actively involved in the care of the patient. PD and HD were equally used. Automatic Peritoneal Dialysis (APD) was offered as the standard PD treatment in 2 out of 3 centres. The HD schedule mostly utilised was 3 x 4 hours a week. Half of the patients were on the Tx waiting list and one third of registered patients were transplanted in 2004.

  17. Paediatric dose reduction with the introduction of digital fluorography.

    PubMed

    Mooney, R B; McKinstry, J

    2001-01-01

    Fluoroscopy guided examinations in a paediatric X ray department were initially carried out on a unit that used a conventional screen-film combination for spot-films. A new fluoroscopy unit was installed with the facilities of digital fluorography and last image hold. Comparison of equipment performance showed that the dose per image for screen-film and digital fluorography was 3 microGy and 0.4 microGy, respectively. Although the screen-film had superior image quality, the department's radiologist confirmed that digital fluorography provided a diagnostic image. Patient dose measurements showed that introduction of the new unit caused doses to fall by an average of 70%, although fluoroscopy time had not changed significantly. The new unit produced 40% less air kerma during fluoroscopy. The remaining 30% reduction in dose was due to the introduction of digital fluorography and last image hold facilities. It is concluded that the use of digital fluorography can be an effective way of reducing paediatric dose.

  18. [Epidemiology and bacteriological diagnosis of paediatric acute osteoarticular infections].

    PubMed

    Ferroni, A

    2007-10-01

    Acute paediatric osteo-articular infections require a fast and sensitive diagnosis allowing a treatment directed to the causative pathogen. Many micro-organisms can be incriminated, but Staphylococcus aureus and Kingella kingae markedly prevail. K. kingae became the first bacterial species responsible for septic arthritis in children < 3 years. More rarely, (2)haemolytic Streptococci and Streptococcus pneumoniae are found. The incidence of community acquired S. aureus resistant to oxacillin in osteo-articular infections is still low in France. The microbiological diagnosis of septic arthritis relies upon analysis of articular fluid, which requires systematic inoculation of a blood culture vial to increase the recovery rate of K. kingae. If the culture is negative, it is recommended to carry out a universal PCR or a PCR targeted to the main germs responsible for septic arthritis. Indeed, PCR represents an undeniable benefice for the diagnosis of paediatric septic arthritis, particularly for the DNA detection of K. kingae. The diagnosis of acute osteomyelitis relies primarily upon blood cultures, since the bone puncture is not a systematic procedure in this setting. Their efficiency is low, and there is still a need to look for other arguments of diagnosis such as search of possible portals of entry or specific serologies.

  19. The Extent of Consumer Product Involvement in Paediatric Injuries.

    PubMed

    Catchpoole, Jesani; Walker, Sue; Vallmuur, Kirsten

    2016-07-07

    A challenge in utilising health sector injury data for Product Safety purposes is that clinically coded data have limited ability to inform regulators about product involvement in injury events, given data entry is bound by a predefined set of codes. Text narratives collected in emergency departments can potentially address this limitation by providing relevant product information with additional accompanying context. This study aims to identify and quantify consumer product involvement in paediatric injuries recorded in emergency department-based injury surveillance data. A total of 7743 paediatric injuries were randomly selected from Queensland Injury Surveillance Unit database and associated text narratives were manually reviewed to determine product involvement in the injury event. A Product Involvement Factor classification system was used to categorise these injury cases. Overall, 44% of all reviewed cases were associated with consumer products, with proximity factor (25%) being identified as the most common involvement of a product in an injury event. Only 6% were established as being directly due to the product. The study highlights the importance of utilising injury data to inform product safety initiatives where text narratives can be used to identify the type and involvement of products in injury cases.

  20. The Extent of Consumer Product Involvement in Paediatric Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Catchpoole, Jesani; Walker, Sue; Vallmuur, Kirsten

    2016-01-01

    A challenge in utilising health sector injury data for Product Safety purposes is that clinically coded data have limited ability to inform regulators about product involvement in injury events, given data entry is bound by a predefined set of codes. Text narratives collected in emergency departments can potentially address this limitation by providing relevant product information with additional accompanying context. This study aims to identify and quantify consumer product involvement in paediatric injuries recorded in emergency department-based injury surveillance data. A total of 7743 paediatric injuries were randomly selected from Queensland Injury Surveillance Unit database and associated text narratives were manually reviewed to determine product involvement in the injury event. A Product Involvement Factor classification system was used to categorise these injury cases. Overall, 44% of all reviewed cases were associated with consumer products, with proximity factor (25%) being identified as the most common involvement of a product in an injury event. Only 6% were established as being directly due to the product. The study highlights the importance of utilising injury data to inform product safety initiatives where text narratives can be used to identify the type and involvement of products in injury cases. PMID:27399744

  1. Dealing with paediatric cholesteatoma: how we changed our management.

    PubMed

    Sergi, B; Galli, J; Battista, M; De Corso, E; Paludetti, G

    2014-04-01

    We reviewed our series of surgeries for paediatric cholesteatoma to assess outcomes and functional results considering the extension of disease and surgical techniques. Between January 2003 and December 2009, 36 patients (range 6-14 years) were operated on for cholesteatoma. We considered the sites involved by the cholesteatoma (mastoid, antrum, attic, middle ear, Eustachian tube), surgical techniques used (intact canal wall, canal wall down) and how our habits changed over the years; moreover, we evaluated ossicular chain conditions and how we managed the ossiculoplasty. As outcomes, we considered the percentage of residual and recurrent cholesteatoma for each technique and hearing function (air bone gap closure, high frequencies bone conduction hearing loss) at follow-up. Intact canal wall was performed in 20 patients and canal wall down in 13 patients, in 9 as first surgery. In both groups, we observed improvement of the air bone gap; in the intact canal wall group, a residual cholesteatoma was observed in 6 patients whereas, during follow-up, 2 patients who underwent a canal wall down showed a recurrent cholesteatoma that was treated in an outpatient setting. Eradication of cholesteatoma and restoration of hearing function in paediatric patients present unique surgical challenges. Our experience shows an increased choice of intact canal wall over the years. Therefore, it is important for the surgeon to counsel parents about the probable need for multiple surgeries, especially if an intact canal wall mastoidectomy is performed.

  2. Paediatric echocardiography by telemedicine--nine years' experience.

    PubMed

    Finley, J P; Sharratt, G P; Nanton, M A; Chen, R P; Bryan, P; Wolstenholme, J; MacDonald, C

    1997-01-01

    In 1987 we established a realtime echocardiography service by telemedicine from the paediatric cardiology department of a tertiary-care hospital in Halifax. The service was initially provided to single regional hospital but was expanded to six regional hospitals in the three Canadian Maritime Provinces. The system used a dial-up broadband video-transmission service provided by the telephone companies. Records of all transmissions were kept prospectively and reviewed to January 1997. A total of 324 transmissions were made. During 1995-96 there were 135 studies: 69 (51%) were urgent examinations of newborn children and 30 (22%) were urgent examinations of older children; repeat studies and postoperative checks (usually for pericardial effusion) accounted for the other 36 studies (27%). The images were of broadcast quality except in five cases where problems with transmission or poor sedation occurred. A comparison of 26 transmitted studies with repeat, 'in person' studies showed no important discrepancies in diagnosis. During the two-year study period, the cost of the network (equipment leasing costs and telecommunications costs) was C$90,000. Use of the telemedicine network saved unnecessary patient transfer in 31 cases. The cost of the transportation avoided was C$100,000-C$118,000. This review confirms our preliminary findings that broadband echocardiography transmission provides a service comparable in availability and accuracy to that provided in our paediatric cardiology division.

  3. Tolvaptan use during hyperhydration in paediatric intracranial lymphoma with SIADH

    PubMed Central

    Delgado-Carballar, Violeta; Elleri, Daniela; Thankamony, Ajay; Burke, G A Amos; Nicholson, James C; Dunger, David B

    2016-01-01

    Summary An 11-year-old boy developed severe syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion (SIADH) after diagnosis of an intracranial B-cell lymphoma. His sodium levels dropped to 118–120 mmol/L despite 70% fluid restriction. For chemotherapy, he required hyperhydration, which posed a challenge because of severe hyponatraemia. Tolvaptan is an oral, highly selective arginine vasopressin V2-receptor antagonist, which has been licensed in adults for the management of SIADH and has been used in treating paediatric heart failure. Tolvaptan gradually increased sodium levels and allowed liberalisation of fluid intake and hyperhydration. Tolvaptan had profound effects on urinary output in our patient with increases up to 8 mL/kg/h and required close monitoring of fluid balance, frequent sodium measurements and adjustments to intake. After hyperhydration, tolvaptan was stopped, and the lymphoma went into remission with reversal of SIADH. We report one of the first uses of tolvaptan in a child with SIADH, and it was an effective and safe treatment to manage severe SIADH when fluid restriction was not possible or effective. However, meticulous monitoring of fluid balance and sodium levels and adjustments of fluid intake are required to prevent rapid sodium changes. Learning points: Tolvaptan can be used in paediatric patients with SIADH to allow hyperhydration during chemotherapy. Tolvaptan has profound effects on urinary output and meticulous monitoring of fluid balance and sodium 
levels is therefore warranted. Tolvaptan was well tolerated without significant side effects. PMID:27857840

  4. Evaluation of image-enhanced paediatric computed tomography brain examinations.

    PubMed

    Ledenius, K; Stålhammar, F; Wiklund, L M; Fredriksson, C; Forsberg, A; Thilander-Klang, A

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the possibility of reducing the radiation dose to paediatric patients undergoing computed tomography (CT) brain examination by using image-enhancing software. Artificial noise was added to the raw data collected from 20 patients aged between 1 and 10 y to simulate tube current reductions of 20, 40 and 60 mA. All images were created in duplicate; one set of images remained unprocessed whereas the other was processed with image-enhancing software. Three paediatric radiologists assessed the image quality based on their ability to visualise the high- and low-contrast structures and their overall impression of the diagnostic value of the image. For patients aged 6-10 y, it was found that dose reductions from 27 mGy (CTDI(vol)) to 23 mGy (15 %) in the upper brain and from 32 to 28 mGy (13 %) in the lower brain were possible for standard diagnostic CT examinations when using the image-enhancing filter. For patients 1-5 y, the results for standard diagnostics in the upper brain were inconclusive, for the lower brain no dose reductions were found possible.

  5. Attitudes towards fever amongst UK paediatric intensive care staff.

    PubMed

    Brick, Thomas; Agbeko, Rachel S; Davies, Patrick; Davis, Peter J; Deep, Akash; Fortune, Peter-Marc; Inwald, David P; Jones, Amy; Levin, Richard; Morris, Kevin P; Pappachan, John; Ray, Samiran; Tibby, Shane M; Tume, Lyvonne N; Peters, Mark J

    2017-03-01

    The role played by fever in the outcome of critical illness in children is unclear. This survey of medical and nursing staff in 35 paediatric intensive care units and transport teams in the United Kingdom and Ireland established attitudes towards the management of children with fever. Four hundred sixty-two medical and nursing staff responded to a web-based survey request. Respondents answered eight questions regarding thresholds for temperature control in usual clinical practice, indications for paracetamol use, and readiness to participate in a clinical trial of permissive temperature control. The median reported threshold for treating fever in clinical practice was 38 °C (IQR 38-38.5 °C). Paracetamol was reported to be used as an analgesic and antipyretic but also for non-specific comfort indications. There was a widespread support for a clinical trial of a permissive versus a conservative approach to fever in paediatric intensive care units. Within a trial, 58% of the respondents considered a temperature of 39 °C acceptable without treatment.

  6. Persistent disruption of ciliated epithelium following paediatric lung transplantation.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Biju; Aurora, Paul; Spencer, Helen; Elliott, Martin; Rutman, Andrew; Hirst, Robert A; O'Callaghan, Christopher

    2012-11-01

    It is unclear whether ciliary function following lung transplantation is normal or not. Our aim was to study the ciliary function and ultrastructure of epithelium above and below the airway anastomosis and the peripheral airway of children following lung transplantation. We studied the ciliary beat frequency (CBF) and beat pattern, using high speed digital video imaging and ultrastructure by transmission electron microscopy, of bronchial epithelium from above and below the airway anastomosis and the peripheral airway of 10 cystic fibrosis (CF) and 10 non-suppurative lung disease (NSLD) paediatric lung transplant recipients. Compared to epithelium below the anastomosis, the epithelium above the anastomosis in the CF group showed reduced CBF (median (interquartile range): 10.5 (9.0-11.4) Hz versus 7.4 (6.4-9.2) Hz; p<0.01) and increased dyskinesia (median (IQR): 16.5 (12.9-28.2)% versus 42.2 (32.6-56.4)%; p<0.01). In both CF and NSLD groups, compared with epithelium above the anastomosis, the epithelium below the anastomosis showed marked ultrastructural abnormalities (median duration post-transplant 7-12 months). Ciliary dysfunction is a feature of native airway epithelium in paediatric CF lung transplant recipients. The epithelium below the airway anastomosis shows profound ultrastructural abnormalities in both CF and NSLD lung transplant recipients, many months after transplantation.

  7. Nonoriginal Malappropriate Eponymous Nomenclature: examples relevant to paediatric orthopaedics.

    PubMed

    Aresti, Nick; Ramachandran, Manoj

    2012-11-01

    Eponyms are widely used in medicine and their use has been the subject of much debate recently. Advocates stress their historical significance, their ability to simplify complex terminology and their addition of character to science. Opponents cite the controversy among those eponyms and highlight the lack of both scientific and historical accuracy. The law of Nonoriginal Malappropriate Eponymous Nomenclature (NOMEN) suggests that no phenomenon is named after the individual(s) who originally described it. We aimed to determine whether this law is applicable to various clinical conditions and signs relevant to paediatric orthopaedics. We selected a series of 10 eponyms and performed a thorough literature review. In all cases, a description was identified preceding that from whom the disease received its eponymous name. We were also able to identify what we believe to be the earliest recorded description of each disease and sign. Our examples confirm the law of NOMEN in the field of paediatric orthopaedics. We suggest that irregularities in the descriptions and meanings of eponyms are identified and updated.

  8. Correlation of Clinicohaematological Parameters in Paediatric Dengue: A Retrospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Pai Jakribettu, Ramakrishna; Boloor, Rekha; Thaliath, Andrew; Yesudasan George, Sharanya; George, Thomas; Ponadka Rai, Manoj; Rafique Sheikh, Umran; Avabratha, Kadke Shreedhara; Baliga, Manjeshwar Shrinath

    2015-01-01

    Dengue is one of the arthropod-borne (arbo) viral diseases transmitted by female mosquito Aedes aegypti. Dengue fever has a wide spectrum of clinical presentation ranging from flu-like illness to severe complicated stage of dengue hemorrhagic fever leading to mortality. This was a retrospective study conducted in a tertiary care hospital in Coastal Karnataka, South India, to know the correlation between the clinical presentation and haematological parameters in the paediatric cases presented with dengue symptoms. A total of 163 paediatric cases who presented fever and dengue-like illness were included in the study. Of which, 69 were confirmed dengue patients. Critical analysis showed that there was a significant difference in the haematological parameters like total leucocyte count, percent differential leucocyte count, and platelets count, in the erythrocyte sedimentation rate (P < 0.05 to 0.0001). Additionally, when compared to nondengue patients, even the liver function and renal function parameters were significantly deranged (P < 0.05 to 0.0001). Stratification based on NS1, IgG, and IgM showed significant alterations in the haematological, hepatic, and renal parameters. With respect to the treatment a small percentage of patients, that is, 8% (4 patients), required platelet transfusion as their counts went below 20,000/μL. Two patients succumbed to their illness while three required ICU stay. PMID:26819620

  9. Bench performance of ventilators during simulated paediatric ventilation.

    PubMed

    Park, M A J; Freebairn, R C; Gomersall, C D

    2013-05-01

    This study compares the accuracy and capabilities of various ventilators using a paediatric acute respiratory distress syndrome lung model. Various compliance settings and respiratory rate settings were used. The study was done in three parts: tidal volume and FiO2 accuracy; pressure control accuracy and positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) accuracy. The parameters set on the ventilator were compared with either or both of the measured parameters by the test lung and the ventilator. The results revealed that none of the ventilators could consistently deliver tidal volumes within 1 ml/kg of the set tidal volume, and the discrepancy between the delivered volume and the volume measured by the ventilator varied greatly. The target tidal volume was 8 ml/kg, but delivered tidal volumes ranged from 3.6-11.4 ml/kg and the volumes measured by the ventilator ranged from 4.1-20.6 ml/kg. All the ventilators maintained pressure within 20% of the set pressure, except one ventilator which delivered pressures of up to 27% higher than the set pressure. Two ventilators maintained PEEP within 10% of the prescribed PEEP. The majority of the readings were also within 10%. However, three ventilators delivered, at times, PEEPs over 20% higher. In conclusion, as lung compliance decreases, especially in paediatric patients, some ventilators perform better than others. This study highlights situations where ventilators may not be able to deliver, nor adequately measure, set tidal volumes, pressure, PEEP or FiO2.

  10. Paediatric inpatient setting: an evaluation of parental perspectives.

    PubMed

    Elisabeth Williams, Geraint Williams Metin Nizamoglu And

    The Nursing and Midwifery Council (2008) define the standards of conduct, ethics and performance for nurses and midwives of nursing currently practicing in the UK. The Code places emphasis on the core nursing principles of kindness, respect, dignity and support for patients and relatives while under nursing care. A prospective study was conducted using a validated questionnaire to assess adherence to these core nursing principles on the basis of parental assessment in an orthopaedic paediatric inpatient unit at University Hospital Coventry and Warwickshire (UHCW). Core nursing standards were highest in respect to kindness' and 'respect' shown for patients (96% and 98% positive scores) and lowest for 'support' offered to their parents (89% positive scores). Lower 'support' scores possibly relate to information provision or emotional support. Improvement may be achieved via provision of additional time to identify parental concerns, which may be non-medical. The results demonstrate that parents perceive core nursing principles to be strongly adhered to on the orthopaedic paediatric unit at UHCW.

  11. Perspective on precision medicine in paediatric heart failure.

    PubMed

    Fridman, Michael D; Mital, Seema

    2017-03-01

    In 2015, President Obama launched the Precision Medicine Initiative (PMI), which introduced new funding to a method of research with the potential to study rare and complex diseases. Paediatric heart failure, a heterogeneous syndrome affecting approximately 1 in 100000 children, is one such condition in which precision medicine techniques may be applied with great benefit. Current heart failure therapies target downstream effects of heart failure rather than the underlying cause of heart failure. As such, they are often ineffective in paediatric heart failure, which is typically of primary (e.g. genetic) rather than secondary (e.g. acquired) aetiology. It is, therefore, important to develop therapies that can target the causes of heart failure in children with greater specificity thereby decreasing morbidity, mortality and burden of illness on both patients and their families. The benefits of co-ordinated research in genomics, proteomics, metabolomics, transcriptomics and phenomics along with dietary, lifestyle and social factors have led to novel therapeutic and prognostic applications in other fields such as oncology. Applying such co-ordinated research efforts to heart failure constitutes an important step in advancing care and improving the lives of those affected.

  12. Genetic differences between paediatric and adult Burkitt lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Havelange, Violaine; Pepermans, Xavier; Ameye, Geneviève; Théate, Ivan; Callet-Bauchu, Evelyne; Barin, Carole; Penther, Dominique; Lippert, Eric; Michaux, Lucienne; Mugneret, Francine; Dastugue, Nicole; Raphaël, Martine; Vikkula, Miikka; Poirel, Hélène A

    2016-04-01

    Dysregulation of MYC is the genetic hallmark of Burkitt lymphoma (BL) but it is encountered in other aggressive mature B-cell lymphomas. MYC dysregulation needs other cooperating events for BL development. We aimed to characterize these events and assess the differences between adult and paediatric BLs that may explain the different outcomes in these two populations. We analysed patterns of genetic aberrations in a series of 24 BLs: 11 adults and 13 children. We looked for genomic imbalances (copy number variations), copy-neutral loss of heterozygosity (CN-LOH) and mutations in TP53, CDKN2A, ID3 (exon 1), TCF3 (exon17) and CCND3 (exon 6). Young patients displayed more frequent 13q31.3q32.1 amplification, 7q32q36 gain and 5q23.3 CN-LOH, while 17p13 and 18q21.3 CN-LOH were only detected in adult BLs. ID3 mutations were present in all adult samples, but only in 42% of childhood cases. CCND3 and ID3 double-hit mutations, as well as 18q21 CN-LOH, seemed to be associated with poorer outcome. For the first time, we report different genetic anomalies between adult and paediatric BLs, suggesting age-related heterogeneity in Burkitt lymphomagenesis. This may explain the poorer prognosis of adult BLs. Additional studies are needed to confirm these results in the setting of clinical trials.

  13. The return of individual research findings in paediatric genetic research.

    PubMed

    Hens, Kristien; Nys, Herman; Cassiman, Jean-Jacques; Dierickx, Kris

    2011-03-01

    The combination of the issue of return of individual genetic results/incidental findings and paediatric biobanks is not much discussed in ethical literature. The traditional arguments pro and con return of such findings focus on principles such as respect for persons, autonomy and solidarity. Two dimensions have been distilled from the discussion on return of individual results in a genetic research context: the respect for a participant's autonomy and the duty of the researcher. Concepts such as autonomy and solidarity do not fit easily in the discussion when paediatric biobanks are concerned. Although parents may be allowed to enrol children in minimal risk genetic research on stored tissue samples, they should not be given the option to opt out of receiving important health information. Also, children have a right to an open future: parents do not have the right to access any genetic data that a biobank holds on their children. In this respect, the guidelines on genetic testing of minors are applicable. With regard to the duty of the researcher the question of whether researchers have a more stringent duty to return important health information when their research subjects are children is more difficult to answer. A researcher's primary duty is to perform useful research, a policy to return individual results must not hamper this task. The fact that vulnerable children are concerned, is an additional factor that should be considered when a policy of returning results is laid down for a specific collection or research project.

  14. Australian paediatric hyperbaric oxygen therapy 1998-2011.

    PubMed

    Frawley, G; Bennett, M; Thistlethwaite, K; Banham, N

    2013-01-01

    For a large number of ischaemic, infective, inflammatory or traumatic conditions, hyperbaric oxygen therapy is either the only treatment or an adjunct that significantly reduces morbidity and mortality. The primary aim of this review is to identify clinical conditions treated in a paediatric population referred to Australian hyperbaric units. Secondary aims are to describe outcomes of treatment and detail any complications occurring during treatment or during transfer between units. This was a retrospective cohort study (January 1998-December 2011) of children treated at four Australian hyperbaric medical units. A total of 112 children underwent 1099 hyperbaric treatments for 14 indications. Ages were not normally distributed with a median age of 14 years (interquartile range 11-16; range 0.25-16 years). Treatments were completed as planned in 81.5% of cases with 25 patients' treatment terminated at the request of physicians, parents or patients. Complications relating to hyperbaric oxygen therapy occurred in 58 treatments (5.3%). Central nervous system oxygen toxicity occurred in 1:366 treatments. Our findings indicate that provision of hyperbaric oxygen therapy to children is feasible in major regional hyperbaric units and is associated with low complication rates. Management of children in an adult hyperbaric facility, however, requires significant cooperation between paediatric, intensive care and hyperbaric consultants, as the need for transfer to another hospital and prolonged transports often impacts on optimal ongoing surgical and intensive care management.

  15. [The Appointment of Paediatric Professorships in the Soviet Occupation Zone and the early GDR. The Impact of the Political System Change after 1945].

    PubMed

    Hinz-Wessels, Annette

    2016-01-01

    This paper examines the impact of the political system change after 1945 on the appointment of paediatric professorships in the Soviet Occupation Zone and the GDR up until the time the Wall was built in 1961. It can be demonstrated that the political purge in the post-war period had only minor impact on the appointment of professorships and the National Socialist past no longer mattered after the conclusion of denazification. In 1957, the proportion of former NSDAP members among East German university professors of paediatrics was 100 per cent. When it came to new appointments, both members of the "bourgeois" academic non-professorial teaching staff from the GDR as well as paediatricians from West Germany, who had largely gained their scientifically qualifications under National Socialism, were in the running. A politically-controlled elite exchange did not take place until the construction of the Wall. State and party organs generally followed the personnel proposals of the universities since an insufficient number of qualified candidates was available for the systematic appointment of ,,progressive" paediatricians. Given the lack of staff, the SED personnel policy was aimed at the integration of previous elites, as long as they behaved loyally towards the new state. Since the East German faculties continued to make the questioning of the professionally competent professors in West Germany and East Germany the basis for their appointment lists, West German university paediatricians were able to exert considerable influence on the appointment of East German paediatric professorship until 1960s.

  16. Paediatric antibiotic prescriptions in primary care in the Alpes-Maritimes area of southeastern France between 2008 and 2013.

    PubMed

    Touboul-Lundgren, P; Bruno, P; Bailly, L; Dunais, B; Pradier, C

    2017-03-01

    France has remained among the top five European countries for ambulatory antibiotic consumption since such monitoring began in 1998. Young children are major antibiotic consumers, in spite of the viral origin of most infections in this population. Recommendations were updated in 2011 to limit prescriptions. In order to assess their impact, diagnoses and prescriptions were compared in a population of children attending daycare centres in southeastern France in 2008 and 2012. Trends in the reimbursement of paediatric antibiotic prescriptions by the national health insurance (NHI) for the whole area were also studied. Distribution of diagnoses accounting for antibiotic treatment and type of antibiotic prescribed over the previous 3 months to children below 4 years of age attending daycare centres in the Alpes-Maritimes area in southeastern France were compared between 2008 and 2012 prior to and following the availability of these new recommendations. Trends in reimbursed ambulatory antibiotic prescriptions by general practitioners and paediatricians in the area were studied for this age group from 2008 to 2012 and in 2013. The majority of recorded diagnoses concerned upper respiratory tract infections (URTI). Inappropriate antibiotic prescription persisted for colds and bronchitis in similar proportions during both surveys. Improvement in the choice of antibiotic with fewer prescriptions for third-generation cephalosporins was observed both in daycare centres and according to NHI data; however, this was mainly recorded among paediatricians. The management of paediatric URTI still needs improvement, pointing to the need to investigate and adequately address the reasons for inappropriate antibiotic prescription.

  17. Relapsing inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion in an anti-aquaporin-4 antibody positive paediatric patient.

    PubMed

    Kravljanac, Ruzica; Martinović, Vanja; Dujmović, Irena; Djurić, Milena; Kuzmanović, Miloš; Weinshenker, Brian G; Drulović, Jelena

    2014-09-01

    Paediatric patients with the syndrome of an inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion (SIADH), as a manifestation of inflammatory demyelinating disorders of the central nervous system, have been rarely described until now, in only a few cases of neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorders (NMOSDs). We present a case of relapsing SIADH associated with NMOSD, in an anti-aquaporin-4 antibody positive 14-year-old girl, who is, to our best knowledge, the first reported paediatric patient with relapsing SIADH and NMOSD. Additionally, our case further supports the notion that paediatric encephalomyelitis associated with SIADH should suggest the diagnosis of NMOSD.

  18. Music therapy as a non-pharmacological anxiolytic for paediatric radiotherapy patients.

    PubMed

    O'Callaghan, C; Sexton, M; Wheeler, G

    2007-04-01

    Outpatient radiotherapy treatment in the paediatric cancer patient can be a traumatic and an anxiety-provoking experience for both the patient and the family. Music therapy has been widely reported to have psychosocial, educational and physical benefits for the paediatric cancer patient. Using individual case reports, this paper shows the successful use of music therapy as a non-pharmacological anxiolytic in the paediatric radiotherapy, outpatient waiting room setting, by providing the patient and the family with a means of communication, self-expression and creativity.

  19. [Age-dependent visceral medicine: paediatric visceral medicine - visceral medical paediatrics - considerations on the short bowel syndrome in childhood].

    PubMed

    Krause, H; Heiduk, M; Wachowiak, R; Till, H

    2013-08-01

    There are several reasons for the possible development of a short bowel syndrome, which, however, occurs only rarely. The main causes consist of extended intestinal resections in cases of congenital anomalies (e.g., gastroschisis, intestinal atresia or dysplasia) or ischaemic lesions due to a volvulus. In addition, an intestinal stoma at a more upper segment of the GI tract can result in the functional manifestation of a short bowel syndrome. The differentiation between temporary and persisting types is essential for initiation of an adequate treatment. Loss or exclusion of organic resorption area at the inner surface of the (small) intestine can be associated with numerous pathological consequences requiring treatment. As a principle consideration from the paediatric point of view, the potential of intestinal adaptation needs to be assessed. Basic conservative treatment options are parenteral and enteral nutrition regimens, in particular, to prevent complications (such as D-lactate acidosis). The main surgical approaches are the procedures called LILT (longitudinal intestinal lengthening and tailoring) according to Bianchi and STEP (serial transverse enteroplasty). The technique to create intestinal segments of antiperistalsis has been abandoned. Because of the encouraging results of intestinal transplantation, this novel treatment option has gained greater attention over the past few years and is now also an option for paediatric patients. The limiting factor and thus major complication is the central venous catheter for long-term treatment. Catheter-related complications are still the main reason for a considerable mortality in these children.

  20. Creating a unique, multi-stakeholder Paediatric Oncology Platform to improve drug development for children and adolescents with cancer.

    PubMed

    Vassal, Gilles; Rousseau, Raphaël; Blanc, Patricia; Moreno, Lucas; Bode, Gerlind; Schwoch, Stefan; Schrappe, Martin; Skolnik, Jeffrey; Bergman, Lothar; Bradley-Garelik, Mary Brigid; Saha, Vaskar; Pearson, Andy; Zwierzina, Heinz

    2015-01-01

    Seven years after the launch of the European Paediatric Medicine Regulation, limited progress in paediatric oncology drug development remains a major concern amongst stakeholders - academics, industry, regulatory authorities, parents, patients and caregivers. Restricted increases in early phase paediatric oncology trials, legal requirements and regulatory pressure to propose early Paediatric Investigation Plans (PIPs), missed opportunities to explore new drugs potentially relevant for paediatric malignancies, lack of innovative trial designs and no new incentives to develop drugs against specific paediatric targets are some unmet needs. Better access to new anti-cancer drugs for paediatric clinical studies and improved collaboration between stakeholders are essential. The Cancer Drug Development Forum (CDDF), previously Biotherapy Development Association (BDA), with Innovative Therapy for Children with Cancer Consortium (ITCC), European Society for Paediatric Oncology (SIOPE) and European Network for Cancer Research in Children and Adolescents (ENCCA) has created a unique Paediatric Oncology Platform, involving multiple stakeholders and the European Union (EU) Commission, with an urgent remit to improve paediatric oncology drug development. The Paediatric Oncology Platform proposes to recommend immediate changes in the implementation of the Regulation and set the framework for its 2017 revision; initiatives to incentivise drug development against specific paediatric oncology targets, and repositioning of drugs not developed in adults. Underpinning these changes is a strategy for mechanism of action and biology driven selection and prioritisation of potential paediatric indications rather than the current process based on adult cancer indications. Pre-competitive research and drug prioritisation, early portfolio evaluation, cross-industry cooperation and multi-compound/sponsor trials are being explored, from which guidance for innovative trial designs will be

  1. Paediatric Urinary Tract Infection: A Hospital Based Experience

    PubMed Central

    Wani, Khursheed Ahmed; Bhat, Javaid Ahmed; Parry, Nazir Ahmed; Shaheen, Lubna; Bhat, Sartaj Ali

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Paediatric Urinary Tract Infection (UTI) is one of the commonly encountered entities by paediatricians. Studies have shown easy vulnerability of paediatric urinary tract in any acute febrile illness and a miss in diagnosis could have long term consequences like renal scaring with its adverse effects. Bearing these evidence based preludes in view we designed our study to know the prevalence of UTI in Kashmir province. Aim Aim of the present study was to know the prevalence of UTI in febrile children and to know the sensitivity of different imaging modalities like Renal and Urinary Bladder Ultrasonography (RUS), Voiding Cystourethrography (VCUG) and Dimercaptosuccinic Acid (DMSA) scan in diagnosing UTI. Materials and Methods A total of 304 patients, between 2 months to 10 years, with axillary temperature of ≥ 100.4oF (38oC), who did not have a definite source for their fever and who were not on antibiotics were included in the study. Detailed history and through clinical examination was done to rule out any potential or definite focus of infection as per the predesigned proforma. Routine urine examination with culture and sensitivity, followed by RUS and VCUG was done in all patients where routine urine examination was suggestive of UTI. DMSA was done in only culture proven cases after 6 months to document the renal scarring. Results Out of 304 children, 140 were males and 164 were females, UTI was present in 40 patients who had fever without any apparent cause giving a prevalence of 13.2%. Escherichia coli (E. coli) were the commonest isolated organism, followed by Klebsiella and Citrobacter species. Renal and Urinary Bladder Ultrasonography (RUS) detected Vesicoureteral Reflux (VUR) in 25% (10/40) while VCUG showed VUR in 55% (22/40) giving a RUS sensitivity of 45% for detecting VUR. DMSA done only after 6 months in UTI diagnosed patients showed a renal scarring in 25% (10/40) patients. Conclusion Missing a febrile paediatric UTI, can prove a future

  2. The relevance of the Goudge inquiry to the practice of child protection/forensic paediatrics.

    PubMed

    Skellern, Catherine; Donald, Terence

    2014-10-01

    In 2008 Ontario, Canada the Goudge Inquiry arose following increasing concerns about practices surrounding forensic pathology and the investigation of paediatric deaths. Some of the considerations and recommendations have relevance to child protection/forensic paediatricians, particularly in relation to their responsibilities in opinion formulation and as expert witnesses. By examining the Inquiry recommendations, this paper applies them in relation to child protection/forensic paediatrics by discussing forensic medicine and its legal context, how interpretation of published reports and data should be used in opinion formulation; issues of 'diagnosis' versus 'opinion'; issues specific to child protection paediatrics; quality control; aspects of report writing and terminological considerations. It concludes with an adaptation of key recommendations directly from those of Goudge, applied to the context of paediatric forensic medicine undertaken in child protection assessments.

  3. Key paediatric messages from the 2016 European Respiratory Society International Congress.

    PubMed

    Grigg, Jonathan; Balfour-Lynn, Ian M; Everard, Mark; Hall, Graham; Karadag, Bülent; Priftis, Kostas; Roehr, Charles Christoph; Rottier, Bart L; Midulla, Fabio

    2017-01-01

    In this article, the Group Chairs of the Paediatric Assembly of the European Respiratory Society (ERS) highlight some of the most interesting abstracts presented at the 2016 ERS International Congress, which was held in London.

  4. Key paediatric messages from the 2016 European Respiratory Society International Congress

    PubMed Central

    Balfour-Lynn, Ian M.; Everard, Mark; Hall, Graham; Karadag, Bülent; Priftis, Kostas; Roehr, Charles Christoph; Rottier, Bart L.; Midulla, Fabio

    2017-01-01

    In this article, the Group Chairs of the Paediatric Assembly of the European Respiratory Society (ERS) highlight some of the most interesting abstracts presented at the 2016 ERS International Congress, which was held in London. PMID:28154820

  5. Development and tests of a paediatric and neonatal immobilizer for ambulance transfers.

    PubMed

    Ballesteros, Tomás; Arana, Ignacio; Pérez Ezcurdia, Amaya; Alfaro, José Ramón

    2014-05-01

    There are many stretcher models able to adequately achieve the spinal immobilization of adult patients during emergency transports but do not work well with children. A paediatric and neonatal immobilizer has been designed, constructed and tested. It is simple, radio-transparent, able to be adequately fastened to an ambulance, adaptable to a wide range of paediatric patient's size, providing a correct spinal immobilization without an excessive immobilization of the rest of the body, without impairing the aperture of an aerial way or the cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and without reducing the accessibility of the medical personnel to the paediatric patient. It is able to be adapted to the size and injuries of the patient instead of adapting the position of the patient to the characteristics of the immobilizer. It can also be effectively fastened to the bed of an emergency helicopter, allowing the aerial transport of the paediatric patients.

  6. Medical thermography (digital infrared thermal imaging - DITI) in paediatric forearm fractures - A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Ćurković, S; Antabak, A; Halužan, D; Luetić, T; Prlić, I; Šiško, J

    2015-11-01

    Trauma is the most common cause of hospitalisation in children, and forearm fractures comprise 35% of all paediatric fractures. One-third of forearm fractures are distal forearm fractures, which are the most common fractures in the paediatric population. This type of fracture represents an everyday problem for the paediatric surgeon. The three phases of fracture healing in paediatric trauma are associated with skin temperature changes that can be measured and then compared with standard plain radiographs of visible callus formation, and eventually these methods can be used in everyday practice. Thermographic assessment of temperature distribution within the examined tissues enables a quick, non-contact, non-invasive measurement of their temperature. Medical thermography is used as a screening method in other parts of medicine, but the use of this method in traumatology has still not been researched.

  7. The influence of the European paediatric regulation on marketing authorisation of orphan drugs for children

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Drug development for rare diseases is challenging, especially when these orphan drugs (OD) are intended for children. In 2007 the EU Paediatric Drug Regulation was enacted to improve the development of high quality and ethically researched medicines for children through the establishment of Paediatric Investigation Plans (PIPs). The effect of the EU Paediatric Drug Regulation on the marketing authorisation (MA) of drugs for children with rare diseases was studied. Methods Data on all designated orphan drugs, their indication, MA, PIPs and indication group (adult or child) were obtained from the European Medicines Agency (EMA). The outcome and duration of the process from orphan drug designation (ODD) to MA, was compared, per indication, by age group. The effect of the Paediatric Drug Regulation, implemented in 2007, on the application process was assessed with survival analysis. Results Eighty-one orphan drugs obtained MA since 2000 and half are authorised for (a subgroup of) children; another 34 are currently undergoing further investigations in children through agreed PIPs. The Paediatric Drug Regulation did not significantly increase the number of ODDs with potential paediatric indications (58% before vs 64% after 2007 of ODDs, p = 0.1) and did not lead to more MAs for ODs with paediatric indications (60% vs 43%, p = 0.22). ODs authorised after 2007 had a longer time to MA than those authorised before 2007 (Hazard ratio (95% CI) 2.80 (1.84-4.28), p < 0.001); potential paediatric use did not influence the time to MA (Hazard ratio (95% CI) 1.14 (0.77-1.70), p = 0.52). Conclusions The EU Paediatric Drug Regulation had a minor impact on development and availability of ODs for children, was associated with a longer time to MA, but ensured the further paediatric development of drugs still off-label to children. The impact of the Paediatric Drug Regulation on research quantity and quality in children through PIPs is not yet clear. PMID

  8. PET/CT in paediatric malignancies - An update

    PubMed Central

    Padma, Subramanyam; Sundaram, Palaniswamy Shanmuga; Tewari, Anshu

    2016-01-01

    18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) is a well-established imaging modality in adult oncological practice. Its role in childhood malignancies needs to be discussed as paediatric malignancies differ from adults in tumor subtypes and they have different tumor biology and FDG uptake patterns. This is also compounded by smaller body mass, dosimetric restrictions, and physiological factors that can affect the FDG uptake. It calls for careful planning of the PET study, preparing the child, the parents, and expertise of nuclear physicians in reporting pediatric positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) studies. In a broad perspective, FDG-PET/CT has been used in staging, assessment of therapy response, identifying metastases and as a follow-up tool in a wide variety of pediatric malignancies. This review outlines the role of PET/CT in childhood malignancies other than hematological malignancies such as lymphoma and leukemia. PMID:27688605

  9. [Child health and international cooperation: A paediatric approach].

    PubMed

    Sobrino Toro, M; Riaño Galan, I; Bassat, Q; Perez-Lescure Picarzo, J; de Aranzabal Agudo, M; Krauel Vidal, X; Rivera Cuello, M

    2015-05-01

    The international development cooperation in child health arouses special interest in paediatric settings. In the last 10 10 years or so, new evidence has been presented on factors associated with morbidity and mortality in the first years of life in the least developed countries. This greater knowledge on the causes of health problems and possible responses in the form of interventions with impact, leads to the need to disseminate this information among concerned professional pediatricians. Serious efforts are needed to get a deeper insight into matters related to global child health and encourage pediatricians to be aware and participate in these processes. This article aims to provide a social pediatric approach towards international cooperation and child health-related matters.

  10. Prevention of measles spread on a paediatric ward.

    PubMed

    Tapisiz, A; Polat, M; Kara, S S; Tezer, H; Simsek, H; Aktas, F

    2015-03-01

    Since measles is a highly contagious respiratory infection with significant airborne transmission risk in hospitals, effective prevention measures are crucial. After a mother accompanying her child on a paediatric ward lacking a negative pressure room was diagnosed with measles, exposed persons without evidence of immunity (documentary evidence of receiving two doses of measles-mumps-rubella vaccine) were treated with vaccination or intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG). The interruption of transmission with these treatments was evaluated. There were 44 children and 101 adults exposed to the index patient. Twenty-five children and 88 adults were considered immune, providing evidence of immunity. Nineteen children and 13 adults were either given vaccination or IVIG for post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP). There were no additional cases of measles after 3 weeks follow-up. We conclude that measles is highly preventable by adequate PEP with vaccination or IVIG in a healthcare setting that lacks the benefit of a negative pressure room.

  11. Zinc in hair and urine of paediatric patients.

    PubMed

    van Wouwe, J P; de Wolff, F A; van Gelderen, H H

    1986-02-28

    Zinc concentrations in hair and urine were measured in groups of children varying in one condition - short stature, or after prolonged upper respiratory infection, or during non-infectious diarrhea, or while on chemotherapy for acute lymphatic leukaemia and in healthy controls. As compared with controls, hair zinc was significantly low after respiratory infection (p less than 0.0001) and high in short stature (p less than 0.01). Urinary zinc was increased during initial chemotherapy (p less than 0.001) and diarrhea (p less than 0.02). It is shown that zinc deficiency occurs in one of the common symptoms in paediatric medicine, namely upper respiratory tract infection. The high overlap (34-88%) proves hair and urine zinc to be of no use for reliable individual diagnostic statements.

  12. Does honey have a role in paediatric wound management?

    PubMed

    Bittmann, Stefan; Luchter, Elisabeth; Thiel, Michael; Kameda, Genn; Hanano, Ralph; Längler, Alfred

    Topical honey treatment has been shown to possess antimicrobial properties, promote autolytic debridement, stimulate growth of wound tissues to hasten healing, and to start the healing process in dormant wounds, stimulating anti-inflammatory activity that rapidly reduces pain, oedema and exudate production. This article provides an overview of the use of honey as a medicinal substance, particularly its use in wound treatment, and reviews the published data concerning honey as a form of complementary and alternative medicine in paediatric wound management. The literature reviewed was found by searching the PubMed, BIOSIS, and ISI Web of Science databases for the term honey. Exclusion criteria were articles where honey was used in a mixture with other therapeutic substances.

  13. Sideroblastic anaemia. A review of seven paediatric cases.

    PubMed

    Hamel, B C; Schretlen, E D

    1982-03-01

    Sideroblastic Anaemias are characterised by a) chronic hypochromic anemia, b) ringed sideroblasts in the bone marrow, c) an increase in total body iron, d) ineffective erythropoiesis and e) often abnormal concentrations of F.E.P. A classification of Sideroblastic Anaemia is given and the pathophysiology of Sideroblastic Anaemia is discussed. A series of seven paediatric cases with Sideroblastic Anaemia is presented and the results of studies of the iron, vitamin B6 and porphyrin metabolism are discussed. In two cases arguments for an ALA-synthetase deficiency are given. All five males were diagnosed as hereditary X-linked Sideroblastic Anaemia, one female as I.R.S.A. and the other female, who showed the features of the X-linked type, as congenital Sideroblastic Anaemia.

  14. Assessing quality of life in paediatric clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Morrow, Angela M; Quine, Susan; Heaton, Maria D; Craig, Jonathan C

    2010-06-01

    The rising prevalence of children with chronic conditions has made quality of life an increasingly important outcome measure in paediatric practice. The discrepancy between doctors' and patients' perceptions of quality of life makes formal assessment necessary. In this paper we use a case scenario to answer commonly asked questions. What is quality of life and who can assess it? Why assess quality of life in the clinical setting? Is it feasible to measure in routine clinical practice? How is quality of life formally assessed? We provide a basic outline of the language and methods of quality of life assessment and use the case scenario to discuss the process of choosing an appropriate instrument. We conclude that quality of life assessment in clinical practice is feasible and provides benefits for both patients and doctors. The benefits include better informed doctors, improved patient doctor communication and a means to effectively monitor quality of life as a treatment outcome.

  15. Normal perinatal and paediatric postmortem magnetic resonance imaging appearances.

    PubMed

    Arthurs, Owen J; Barber, Joy L; Taylor, Andrew M; Sebire, Neil J

    2015-04-01

    As postmortem imaging becomes more widely used following perinatal and paediatric deaths, the correct interpretation of images becomes imperative, particularly given the increased use of postmortem magnetic resonance imaging. Many pathological processes may have similar appearances in life and following death. A thorough knowledge of normal postmortem changes is therefore required within postmortem magnetic resonance imaging to ensure that these are not mistakenly interpreted as significant pathology. Similarly, some changes that are interpreted as pathological if they occur during life may be artefacts on postmortem magnetic resonance imaging that are of limited significance. This review serves to illustrate briefly those postmortem magnetic resonance imaging changes as part of the normal changes after death in fetuses and children, and highlight imaging findings that may confuse or mislead an observer to identifying pathology where none is present.

  16. Paediatric biepicondylar elbow fracture dislocation - a case report

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Paediatric elbow biepicondylar fracture dislocations are very rare injuries and have been only published in two independent case reviews. We report a case of 13 years old boy, who sustained this unusual injury after a fall on outstretched hand resulting in an unstable elbow fracture dislocation. Closed reduction was performed followed by delayed ORIF (Open Reduction and Internal Fixation) with K wires. Final follow-up at 14 weeks revealed a stable elbow and satisfactory function with full supination-pronation, range of motion from 0°-120° of flexion and normal muscle strength. This type of injury needs operative treatment and fixation to restore stability and return to normal or near normal elbow function. The method of fixation (screws or K wires) may depend on size and number of fracture fragments. PMID:20950437

  17. Paediatric and adolescent sport injury in the wilderness.

    PubMed

    Heggie, T W

    2010-01-01

    Participation in backcountry wilderness recreation has increased in recent years with children and adolescents making up an increasing number of participants visiting wilderness destinations. Engaging in wilderness activity involves the risk of injury, illness and even death. Unfortunately, there is very little research investigating the health challenges facing children and adolescents in the wilderness. With the intent of increasing awareness among the sports medicine community, this review examines reported paediatric and adolescent wilderness injuries reported in the state of Washington and in US National Parks, injuries reported during outdoor wilderness programmes and global youth expeditions, and health challenges in wilderness settings where the threat of acute mountain sickness is elevated. Future studies addressing the challenges of establishing numerator data linked to suitable denominator data and monitoring injured and non-injured children and adolescents in the wilderness are recommended.

  18. Evaluation and audit in a paediatric disability service.

    PubMed

    Cass, H D; Kugler, B T

    1993-03-01

    Parental and professional responses to questionnaires evaluating a paediatric disability service are reported and the viability of auditing structural, process, and outcome aspects of clinical practice are discussed. Expectations of waiting time to first appointment (met for only 52% of consumers) illustrate structural issues. Process issues are reflected in consumer reactions to outreach work (for example, 94% of parents and 84% of professionals found this supportive). Outcome measures such as consumer satisfaction with the service (76% of consumers reported being 'very satisfied' and 20% 'fairly satisfied') suggest that service aims are being met. Good concurrence of service aims with consumer needs is indicated by parental reasons for referral (for example, 75% for diagnostic help, 73% for a better understanding of the disorder, 88% for practical help), referrers' reasons (for example, 55% for a second diagnostic opinion, 45% due to lack of local expertise), and reports from most other professionals involved with the case that a similar service was not provided locally.

  19. Paediatric biepicondylar elbow fracture dislocation - a case report.

    PubMed

    Meta, Mahendrakumar; Miller, David

    2010-10-15

    Paediatric elbow biepicondylar fracture dislocations are very rare injuries and have been only published in two independent case reviews. We report a case of 13 years old boy, who sustained this unusual injury after a fall on outstretched hand resulting in an unstable elbow fracture dislocation. Closed reduction was performed followed by delayed ORIF (Open Reduction and Internal Fixation) with K wires. Final follow-up at 14 weeks revealed a stable elbow and satisfactory function with full supination-pronation, range of motion from 0°-120° of flexion and normal muscle strength. This type of injury needs operative treatment and fixation to restore stability and return to normal or near normal elbow function. The method of fixation (screws or K wires) may depend on size and number of fracture fragments.

  20. Unusual presentations of osteoarticular tuberculosis in two paediatric patients

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Jason Pui Yin; Ho, Kenneth Wai Yip; Lam, Ying Lee; Shek, Tony Wai Hung

    2012-01-01

    Tuberculosis is a universal mimicker and thus could be a differential diagnosis of any osteolytic lesion. Bone biopsy is crucial in these cases for culture and histological proof of tuberculous infection. This is a case report of two paediatric patients with unusual presentations of tuberculosis. One patient presented with knee pain and had imaged findings of an osteolytic lesion at the epiphysis. Interval scan showed spread of the lesion through the physis to the metaphyseal region. The second patient presented with hip pain and an osteolytic lesion of the acetabulum. He was subsequently found to have involvement of the brain and spine as well. Both patients were diagnosed with tuberculosis by bone biopsy for culture and pathological examination. They were treated successfully with antituberculous medications without chronic sequelae. These two patients showed that early recognition and prompt treatment are critical for management of tuberculosis to avoid chronic sequelae. PMID:23087272

  1. [The paediatric roots of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease].

    PubMed

    de Blic, J; Deschildre, A

    2011-02-01

    Early disturbances in pulmonary development seem to favour the occurrence of the functional impairments observed in COPD. In utero exposure to maternal smoking is the most commonly documented antenatal factor. Early life events such as the bronchopulmonary dysplasia are responsible for hypoalveolisation. The effects of passive smoking during childhood are prolonged into adulthood. The role of viral respiratory infections in early childhood remains a subject for debate. Finally the role of genes implied in pulmonary development both pre and post natally is beginning to be recognized. The decline of the respiratory function that occurs in adulthood leads then more rapidly to the functional criteria of COPD, particularly in the event of active smoking. There thus exist epidemiological and fundamental arguments, which support the idea that the COPD has at least, in part, a paediatric origin.

  2. Practical approach to catheter-related bloodstream infections in paediatrics

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Joan

    2005-01-01

    Catheter-related bloodstream infections (CRBIs) are a common problem in paediatrics. Sterile insertion and proper care of the catheter is likely more important than the type of catheter in determining the rate of CRBIs. The accuracy of the diagnosis of CRBIs can be improved by comparing the time to positivity or the concentration of organisms in blood drawn through the catheter with blood drawn from other sites, or by changing the catheter over a guidewire and culturing the removed catheter. When a CRBI is suspected, the catheter should be removed if it is no longer required, the child is hemodynamically unstable, there are metastatic foci of infection, the infecting organism is Candida or a mycobacterium, or there is a tunnel infection. The necessity for catheter removal is controversial if the infecting organism is Staphylococcus aureus or a Gram-negative organism. In most other situations, the catheter only needs to be removed if bacteremia persists despite appropriate antibiotic use. PMID:19668658

  3. Paediatric malaria: What do paediatricians need to know?

    PubMed Central

    Kuhn, Susan M; McCarthy, Anne E

    2006-01-01

    Although malaria is principally a disease of the tropical and subtropical regions of the world, it is an important disease to be familiar with for both local and global reasons. It remains to be one of the most important infectious diseases of the world, particularly in sub-Saharan Africa, killing more than one million people – mostly children – every year. In Canada, at least 350 to 1100 imported cases are reported annually, 25% of which are in the paediatric age group, as a result of both travel and migration. Because malaria is a potentially severe and sometimes fatal disease that is unfamiliar to many paediatricians in Canada, it is important that clinicians become familiar with its clinical presentation; understand when it should be suspected; and have an approach to prompt diagnosis, appropriate treatment and effective prevention methods. PMID:19030303

  4. [Use of inflammatory markers for monitoring paediatric asthma].

    PubMed

    Vidal G, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    The assessment of asthma control takes into account the symptoms, quality of life, lung function, and inflammatory markers. In the last few years, there has been a large increase in the number of publications related to the study of biomarkers in the management of paediatric asthma. Despite the large variety of inflammatory markers described in research studies, only a small group has shown to be useful in monitoring the disease. Induced sputum eosinophils offer the most solid evidence in assessing asthma control. Exhaled breath condensate and urinary leucotrienes could be useful in the future if there is standardisation in their procedures and interpretation of the results. Nitric oxide, basic eosinophil cationic protein, and bronchial biopsy with bronchoalveolar lavage, only appeared to be useful in a reduced group of patients.

  5. Iron's role in paediatric restless legs syndrome - a review.

    PubMed

    Dosman, Cara; Witmans, Manisha; Zwaigenbaum, Lonnie

    2012-04-01

    Paediatric restless legs syndrome (RLS) treatment is important because RLS's associated sleep disturbance causes significant developmental-behavioural morbidity and impacts family well-being. RLS is associated with brain iron insufficiency and dopaminergic dysfunction. Diagnosis requires fulfillment of diagnostic criteria, which for children are currently in evolution, and have limitations, especially in preschoolers. The community physician needs to recognize the possibility of RLS to refer to a sleep specialist for diagnostic confirmation and management recommendations, which include oral iron therapy, even though there is currently no definitive research evidence for iron efficacy in most children with RLS. A 3 mg to 6 mg elemental iron/kg/day dose for three months could be tried if the ferritin level is <50 ug/L. Sleep hygiene and behavioural strategies are also recommended. Iron supplementation should be safe in the absence of iron metabolism disorders, provided that transferrin saturation and ferritin levels are monitored pre-and post-treatment.

  6. Lack of Utility of Nasopharyngeal Swabs for Diagnosis of Burkholderia pseudomallei Pneumonia in Paediatric Patients

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Claudia; Suy, Kuong; Soeng, Sona; Day, Nicholas P. J.; Turner, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Diagnosis of Burkholderia pseudomallei pneumonia in children is challenging. We investigated the utility of nasopharyngeal swabs taken from 194 paediatric patients on admission with radiologically proven pneumonia. Melioidosis was proven in 0.5% of samples tested and only in a third of those known to be bacteraemic with B. pseudomallei. It appears unlikely that culture of nasopharyngeal secretions is helpful to confirm B. pseudomallei pneumonia in paediatric patients. PMID:26874977

  7. Evaluation of radiation dose to anthropomorphic paediatric models from positron-emitting labelled tracers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Tianwu; Zaidi, Habib

    2014-03-01

    PET uses specific molecules labelled with positron-emitting radionuclides to provide valuable biochemical and physiological information. However, the administration of radiotracers to patients exposes them to low-dose ionizing radiation, which is a concern in the paediatric population since children are at a higher cancer risk from radiation exposure than adults. Therefore, radiation dosimety calculations for commonly used positron-emitting radiotracers in the paediatric population are highly desired. We evaluate the absorbed dose and effective dose for 19 positron-emitting labelled radiotracers in anthropomorphic paediatric models including the newborn, 1-, 5-, 10- and 15-year-old male and female. This is achieved using pre-calculated S-values of positron-emitting radionuclides of UF-NCI paediatric phantoms and published biokinetic data for various radiotracers. The influence of the type of anthropomorphic model, tissue weight factors and direct human- versus mouse-derived biokinetic data on the effective dose for paediatric phantoms was also evaluated. In the case of 18F-FDG, dosimetry calculations of reference paediatric patients from various dose regimens were also calculated. Among the considered radiotracers, 18F-FBPA and 15O-water resulted in the highest and lowest effective dose in the paediatric phantoms, respectively. The ICRP 103 updated tissue-weighting factors decrease the effective dose in most cases. Substantial differences of radiation dose were observed between direct human- versus mouse-derived biokinetic data. Moreover, the effect of using voxel- versus MIRD-type models on the calculation of the effective dose was also studied. The generated database of absorbed organ dose and effective dose for various positron-emitting labelled radiotracers using new generation computational models and the new ICRP tissue-weighting factors can be used for the assessment of radiation risks to paediatric patients in clinical practice. This work also contributes

  8. [Paediatric Rehabilitation by the German Pension Insurance - Status Quo and Future Developments].

    PubMed

    Widera, T; Baumgarten, E; Druckenmüller, A; Niehues, C

    2017-04-01

    In Germany inpatient rehabilitation plays a major role for the treatment of children and adolescents with chronic health conditions. The German Pension Insurance carries out the rehabilitation of children and adolescents with high commitment. Paediatric rehabilitation enables children to go to kindergarten and school without interruption and participate in later professional life. The article specifies the basics of paediatric rehabilitation, describes the disease structure, defines the therapeutic care and explicates survey results.

  9. B cell depletion for autoimmune diseases in paediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Jansson, Annette F; Sengler, Claudia; Kuemmerle-Deschner, Jasmin; Gruhn, Bernd; Kranz, A Birgitta; Lehmann, Hartwig; Kleinert, Daniela; Pape, Lars; Girschick, Hermann J; Foeldvari, Ivan; Haffner, Dieter; Haas, Johannes P; Moebius, Dagmar; Foell, Dirk; Peitz, Joachim; Grote, Veit

    2011-01-01

    Data on B cell depletion therapy in severe autoimmune diseases in paediatric patients are very limited. We conducted a retrospective cohort study and recruited patients who were treated with rituximab (RTX) and followed up for at least 6 months through the German societies of paediatric rheumatology and nephrology. The aim was to describe the spectrum of autoimmune disorders for which RTX was used and to describe the applied therapeutic regimens, the observed efficacy, as well as potential immunological side effects. The need to develop standard treatment guidelines for future trials should be discussed. Sixty-five patients were included. Nineteen patients suffered from systemic lupus erythematosus, 13 from vasculitic disorders, 12 from hematological autoimmune diseases, 5 from mixed connective tissue disorders, 4 from juvenile idiopathic arthritis, and 9 had other autoimmune diseases. Adverse, infusion-related events were reported in 12/65 (18%) patients. Considering laboratory and clinical parameters, 13 patients (22%) were in complete remission, 31 (52%) were in partial remission, 6 (10%) were unchanged and 10 (17%) had progressed after 6 months. In 46% of the patients, the steroid dose could be more than halved. IgG, IgM and IgA decreased from normal levels prior to RTX therapy to below normal levels at 6 months in 2/22 (9%), 10/21 (48%), and 4/22 (18%) patients, respectively. Immunoglobulin deficiency or prolonged CD20 depletion was reported in eight patients after an observation period longer than 12 months. RTX therapy led to a perceivable reduction in disease activity. However, long-term immunological alterations may occur in more than 10% of the patients. Guidelines and protocols for off-label therapy are desirable to document reasonable follow-up data. Controlled prospective studies for RTX therapies in children with standardised therapeutic and diagnostic protocols are urgently needed.

  10. Efficacy of intranasal dexmedetomidine versus oral midazolam for paediatric premedication

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Lakshmi; Kumar, Ajay; Panikkaveetil, Ramkumar; Vasu, Bindu K; Rajan, Sunil; Nair, Suresh G

    2017-01-01

    Background and Aims: Premedication is an integral component of paediatric anaesthesia which, when optimal, allows comfortable separation of the child from the parent for induction and conduct of anaesthesia. Midazolam has been accepted as a safe and effective oral premedicant. Dexmedetomidine is a selective alpha-2 agonist with sedative and analgesic effects, which is effective through the transmucosal route. We compared the efficacy and safety of standard premedication with oral midazolam versus intranasal dexmedetomidine as premedication in children undergoing elective lower abdominal surgery. Methods: This was a prospective randomised double-blinded trial comparing the effects of premedication with 0.5 mg/kg oral midazolam versus 1 μg/kg intranasal dexmedetomidine in children between 2 and 12 years undergoing abdominal surgery. Sedation scores at separation and induction were the primary outcome measures. Behaviour scores and haemodynamic changes were secondary outcomes. Student's t-test and Chi-square were used for analysis of the variables. Results: Sedation scores were superior in Group B (dexmedetomidine) than Group A (midazolam) at separation and induction (P < 0.001). The behaviour scores at separation, induction and wake up scores at extubation were similar between the two groups. The heart rate and blood pressure showed significant differences at 15, 30 and 45 min in Group B but did not require pharmacological intervention for correction. Conclusion: Intranasal dexmedetomidine at a dose of 1 μg/kg produced superior sedation scores at separation and induction but normal behavioural scores in comparison to oral midazolam in paediatric patients. PMID:28250480

  11. Volunteer activity in specialist paediatric palliative care: a national survey

    PubMed Central

    Burbeck, Rachel; Low, Joe; Sampson, Elizabeth L; Scott, Rosalind; Bravery, Ruth; Candy, Bridget

    2015-01-01

    Objective To assess the involvement of volunteers with direct patient/family contact in UK palliative care services for children and young people. Method Cross-sectional survey using a web-based questionnaire. Setting UK specialist paediatric palliative care services. Participants Volunteer managers/coordinators from all UK hospice providers (n=37) and one National Health Service palliative care service involving volunteers (covering 53 services in total). Main outcomes Service characteristics, number of volunteers, extent of volunteer involvement in care services, use of volunteers’ professional skills and volunteer activities by setting. Results A total of 21 providers covering 31 hospices/palliative care services responded (30 evaluable responses). Referral age limit was 16–19 years in 23 services and 23–35 years in seven services; three services were Hospice at Home or home care only. Per service, there was a median of 25 volunteers with direct patient/family contact. Services providing only home care involved fewer volunteers than hospices with beds. Volunteers entirely ran some services, notably complementary therapy and pastoral/faith-based care. Complementary therapists, school teachers and spiritual care workers most commonly volunteered their professional skills. Volunteers undertook a wide range of activities including emotional support and recreational activities with children and siblings. Conclusions This is the most detailed national survey of volunteer activity in palliative care services for children and young people to date. It highlights the range and depth of volunteers’ contribution to specialist paediatric palliative care services and will help to provide a basis for future research, which could inform expansion of volunteers’ roles. PMID:24644170

  12. Radiation dose and image quality for paediatric interventional cardiology.

    PubMed

    Vano, E; Ubeda, C; Leyton, F; Miranda, P

    2008-08-07

    Radiation dose and image quality for paediatric protocols in a biplane x-ray system used for interventional cardiology have been evaluated. Entrance surface air kerma (ESAK) and image quality using a test object and polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) phantoms have been measured for the typical paediatric patient thicknesses (4-20 cm of PMMA). Images from fluoroscopy (low, medium and high) and cine modes have been archived in digital imaging and communications in medicine (DICOM) format. Signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), figure of merit (FOM), contrast (CO), contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and high contrast spatial resolution (HCSR) have been computed from the images. Data on dose transferred to the DICOM header have been used to test the values of the dosimetric display at the interventional reference point. ESAK for fluoroscopy modes ranges from 0.15 to 36.60 microGy/frame when moving from 4 to 20 cm PMMA. For cine, these values range from 2.80 to 161.10 microGy/frame. SNR, FOM, CO, CNR and HCSR are improved for high fluoroscopy and cine modes and maintained roughly constant for the different thicknesses. Cumulative dose at the interventional reference point resulted 25-45% higher than the skin dose for the vertical C-arm (depending of the phantom thickness). ESAK and numerical image quality parameters allow the verification of the proper setting of the x-ray system. Knowing the increases in dose per frame when increasing phantom thicknesses together with the image quality parameters will help cardiologists in the good management of patient dose and allow them to select the best imaging acquisition mode during clinical procedures.

  13. Radiation dose and image quality for paediatric interventional cardiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vano, E.; Ubeda, C.; Leyton, F.; Miranda, P.

    2008-08-01

    Radiation dose and image quality for paediatric protocols in a biplane x-ray system used for interventional cardiology have been evaluated. Entrance surface air kerma (ESAK) and image quality using a test object and polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) phantoms have been measured for the typical paediatric patient thicknesses (4-20 cm of PMMA). Images from fluoroscopy (low, medium and high) and cine modes have been archived in digital imaging and communications in medicine (DICOM) format. Signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), figure of merit (FOM), contrast (CO), contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and high contrast spatial resolution (HCSR) have been computed from the images. Data on dose transferred to the DICOM header have been used to test the values of the dosimetric display at the interventional reference point. ESAK for fluoroscopy modes ranges from 0.15 to 36.60 µGy/frame when moving from 4 to 20 cm PMMA. For cine, these values range from 2.80 to 161.10 µGy/frame. SNR, FOM, CO, CNR and HCSR are improved for high fluoroscopy and cine modes and maintained roughly constant for the different thicknesses. Cumulative dose at the interventional reference point resulted 25-45% higher than the skin dose for the vertical C-arm (depending of the phantom thickness). ESAK and numerical image quality parameters allow the verification of the proper setting of the x-ray system. Knowing the increases in dose per frame when increasing phantom thicknesses together with the image quality parameters will help cardiologists in the good management of patient dose and allow them to select the best imaging acquisition mode during clinical procedures.

  14. Treatment of paediatric pontine glioma with oral trophosphamide and etoposide

    PubMed Central

    Wolff, J E A; Westphal, S; Mölenkamp, G; Gnekow, A; Warmuth-Metz, M; Rating, D; Kuehl, J

    2002-01-01

    To evaluate the overall survival of paediatric patients with pontine gliomas treated with oral trophosphamide and etoposide. Patients between 3 and 17 years of age with either typical diffuse pontine glioma on MRI or histologically proven anaplastic astrocytoma/glioblastoma multiforme located in the pons, were eligible. Treatment consisted of oral trophosphamide 100 mg m−2 day−1 combined with oral etoposide at 25 mg m−2 day−1 starting simultaneously with conventional radiation. Twenty patients were enrolled (median age 6 years, male : female=9 : 11). Surgical procedures included: no surgery: five, open biopsy: three, stereotactic biopsy: six, partial resection: three, and sub-total resection: three. Histological diagnoses included pilocytic astrocytoma: one, astrocytoma with no other specification: three, anaplastic astrocytoma: three, glioblastoma multiforme: eight, no histology: five. The most frequent side effects were haematologic and gastrointestinal. There was no toxic death. The response to combined treatment in 12 evaluable patients was: complete response: 0, partial response: three, stable disease: four, and progressive disease: five. All tumours progressed locally and all patients died. The overall median survival was 8 months. The overall survival rates at 1 and 4 years were: 0.4 and 0.05 respectively. This was not different from a control group of patients documented in the same population. Oral trophosphamide in combination with etoposide did not improve survival of pontine glioma patients. The treatment was well tolerated and should be evaluated for more chemoresponsive paediatric malignancies. British Journal of Cancer (2002) 87, 945–949. doi:10.1038/sj.bjc.6600552 www.bjcancer.com © 2002 Cancer Research UK PMID:12434281

  15. Permeation studies through porcine small intestine of furosemide solutions for personalised paediatric administration.

    PubMed

    Provenza, N; Calpena, A C; Mallandrich, M; Sánchez, A; Egea, M A; Clares, B

    2014-11-20

    Personalized medicine is a challenging research area in paediatric drug design since no suitable pharmaceutical forms are currently available. Furosemide is an anthranilic acid derivative used in paediatric practice to treat cardiac and pulmonary disorders in premature infants and neonates. However, it is not commercialized in suitable dosage forms for paediatrics. Elaborating new paediatric formulations when no commercial forms are available is a common practice in pharmacy laboratories; amongst these, oral liquid formulations are the most common. We developed two extemporaneous paediatric oral solutions of furosemide (pure powder). The characterization and stability study were also performed. Parameters such as organoleptic characteristics, rheology, pH, content of active substance, and microbial stability were evaluated at three temperatures for two months. Evaluation of all these parameters showed that both solutions were stable for 60 days at 4 and 25 °C. Moreover, ex vivo studies were performed to evaluate the permeation behaviour of developed solutions through porcine small intestine to evaluate the potential paediatric biological parameters influencing the bioavailability and efficacy. A validated spectrofluorometric method was also used for this purpose. Our results guarantee a correct dosification, administration and potential efficacy of furosemide when is formulated in liquid oral forms for the treatment of cardiac and pulmonary disorders in children.

  16. UK National Clinical Guidelines in Paediatric Dentistry: stainless steel preformed crowns for primary molars.

    PubMed

    Kindelan, S A; Day, P; Nichol, R; Willmott, N; Fayle, S A

    2008-11-01

    This revised Clinical Guideline in Paediatric Dentistry replaces the previously published sixth guideline (Fayle SA. Int J Paediatr Dent 1999; 9: 311-314). The process of guideline production began in 1994, resulting in first publication in 1997. Each guideline has been circulated widely for consultation to all UK consultants in paediatric dentistry, council members of the British Society of Paediatric Dentistry (BSPD), and to people of related specialities recognized to have expertise in the subject. The final version of this guideline is produced from a combination of this input and thorough review of the published literature. The intention is to encourage improvement in clinical practice and to stimulate research and clinical audit in areas where scientific evidence is inadequate. Evidence underlying recommendations is scored according to the SIGN classification and guidelines should be read in this context. Further details regarding the process of paediatric dentistry guideline production in the UK is described in the Int J Paediatr Dent 1997; 7: 267-268.

  17. Paediatric endoscopy by adult gastroenterologists in Ile-Ife, Nigeria: A viable option to increase the access to paediatric endoscopy in low resource countries

    PubMed Central

    Alatise, Olusegun I.; Anyabolu, Henry Chineme; Sowande, Oludayo; Akinola, David

    2015-01-01

    Background: Paediatric endoscopy performed by adult gastroenterologists is a service delivery model that increases the access of children to endoscopy in countries where paediatric gastroenterologists with endoscopy skills are scarce. However, studies on the usefulness of this model in Nigeria and Sub-Saharan Africa are scarce. We aimed to evaluate the indications, procedures, diagnostic yield and safety of paediatric endoscopy performed by adult gastroenterologists in a Nigerian tertiary health facility. Materials and Methods: It was a retrospective study that evaluated the records of paediatric (≤18 years old) endoscopies carried out in the endoscopy suite of Obafemi Awolowo University Teaching Hospital Complex Ile-Ife, Nigeria from January 2007 to December 2014. Results: A total of 63 procedures were successfully completed in children of whom 4 were repeat procedures which were excluded. Thus, 59 endoscopies performed on children were analysed. Most (49; 83.1%) of these procedures on the children were diagnostic with oesophagogastroduodenoscopy being the commonest (43; 72.9%). Epigastric pain (22; 37.3%), haematemesis (17; 28.8%) and dysphagia (9; 15.3%) were the predominant indication for upper gastrointestinal (GI) endoscopy while haematochezia (9; 15.3%) and rectal protrusion (2; 3.4%) were the indications for colonoscopy. Injection sclerotherapy (3; 5.1%) and variceal banding (2; 3.4%) were the therapeutic upper GI endoscopic procedures conducted while polypectomies were performed during colonoscopy in 5 children (8.5%). Abnormal endoscopy findings were observed in 53 out of the 59 children making the positive diagnostic yield to be 89.8%. No complication, either from the procedure or anaesthesia was observed. Conclusion: Paediatric endoscopy performed by adult gastroenterologists is useful, feasible and safe. It is being encouraged as a viable option to fill the gap created by dearth of skilled paediatric gastroenterologists. PMID:26712292

  18. Paediatric home care in Tower Hamlets: a working partnership with parents.

    PubMed Central

    Tatman, M A; Woodroffe, C; Kelly, P J; Harris, R J

    1992-01-01

    OBJECTIVES--To describe the first two years of a paediatric home care service. DESIGN--Observational cross sectional study, 1989-91. SETTING--One inner London health district. PATIENTS--611 children referred to the service; 50 children selected from those referred during the first year, whose parents were interviewed and whose general practitioners were invited to complete a questionnaire. MAIN MEASURES--Description and costs of service; views of parents and general practitioners of selected sample of children. RESULTS--In its second year the team received 303 referrals and made 4004 visits at a salary cost of 98000 pounds, an average of 323 pounds/referral and 24 pounds/visit. This represented a referral rate of 3.2% (258/7939) of inpatient episodes from the main referring hospital between 1 December 1989 and 30 November 1990. Of all referrals to the service, 343(56%) came from hospital inpatient wards. The service was used by disadvantaged and ethnic minority families. The children's parents (in 28(61%) families) and the home care team did a wide range of nursing tasks in the home. Parents of 47(94%) children sampled agreed to be interviewed, and those of 43(91%) found the service useful; guidance and support were most commonly appreciated (33, 70%). Parents of 25(53%) children said that hospital stay or attendance had been reduced or avoided. Parents and general practitioners disagreed on clinical responsibility in 10 children, and communication was a problem for some general practitioners. CONCLUSIONS--The service enabled children to receive advanced nursing care at home. Clinical responsibility should be agreed between parents and professionals at referral. PMID:10136850

  19. A survey of paediatric HIV programmatic and clinical management practices in Asia and sub-Saharan Africa—the International epidemiologic Databases to Evaluate AIDS (IeDEA)

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction There are limited data on paediatric HIV care and treatment programmes in low-resource settings. Methods A standardized survey was completed by International epidemiologic Databases to Evaluate AIDS paediatric cohort sites in the regions of Asia-Pacific (AP), Central Africa (CA), East Africa (EA), Southern Africa (SA) and West Africa (WA) to understand operational resource availability and paediatric management practices. Data were collected through January 2010 using a secure, web-based software program (REDCap). Results A total of 64,552 children were under care at 63 clinics (AP, N=10; CA, N=4; EA, N=29; SA, N=10; WA, N=10). Most were in urban settings (N=41, 65%) and received funding from governments (N=51, 81%), PEPFAR (N=34, 54%), and/or the Global Fund (N=15, 24%). The majority were combined adult–paediatric clinics (N=36, 57%). Prevention of mother-to-child transmission was integrated at 35 (56%) sites; 89% (N=56) had access to DNA PCR for infant diagnosis. African (N=40/53) but not Asian sites recommended exclusive breastfeeding up until 4–6 months. Regular laboratory monitoring included CD4 (N=60, 95%), and viral load (N=24, 38%). Although 42 (67%) sites had the ability to conduct acid-fast bacilli (AFB) smears, 23 (37%) sites could conduct AFB cultures and 18 (29%) sites could conduct tuberculosis drug susceptibility testing. Loss to follow-up was defined as >3 months of lost contact for 25 (40%) sites, >6 months for 27 sites (43%) and >12 months for 6 sites (10%). Telephone calls (N=52, 83%) and outreach worker home visits to trace children lost to follow-up (N=45, 71%) were common. Conclusions In general, there was a high level of patient and laboratory monitoring within this multiregional paediatric cohort consortium that will facilitate detailed observational research studies. Practices will continue to be monitored as the WHO/UNAIDS Treatment 2.0 framework is implemented. PMID:23336728

  20. Effectiveness and Comparison of Various Audio Distraction Aids in Management of Anxious Dental Paediatric Patients

    PubMed Central

    Johri, Nikita; Khan, Suleman Abbas; Singh, Rahul Kumar; Chadha, Dheera; Navit, Pragati; Sharma, Anshul; Bahuguna, Rachana

    2015-01-01

    Background Dental anxiety is a widespread phenomenon and a concern for paediatric dentistry. The inability of children to deal with threatening dental stimuli often manifests as behaviour management problems. Nowadays, the use of non-aversive behaviour management techniques is more advocated, which are more acceptable to parents, patients and practitioners. Therefore, this present study was conducted to find out which audio aid was the most effective in the managing anxious children. Aims and Objectives The aim of the present study was to compare the efficacy of audio-distraction aids in reducing the anxiety of paediatric patients while undergoing various stressful and invasive dental procedures. The objectives were to ascertain whether audio distraction is an effective means of anxiety management and which type of audio aid is the most effective. Materials and Methods A total number of 150 children, aged between 6 to 12 years, randomly selected amongst the patients who came for their first dental check-up, were placed in five groups of 30 each. These groups were the control group, the instrumental music group, the musical nursery rhymes group, the movie songs group and the audio stories group. The control group was treated under normal set-up & audio group listened to various audio presentations during treatment. Each child had four visits. In each visit, after the procedures was completed, the anxiety levels of the children were measured by the Venham’s Picture Test (VPT), Venham’s Clinical Rating Scale (VCRS) and pulse rate measurement with the help of pulse oximeter. Results A significant difference was seen between all the groups for the mean pulse rate, with an increase in subsequent visit. However, no significant difference was seen in the VPT & VCRS scores between all the groups. Audio aids in general reduced anxiety in comparison to the control group, and the most significant reduction in anxiety level was observed in the audio stories group

  1. Paediatric and congenital cardiac surgery in emerging economies: surgical 'safari' versus educational programmes.

    PubMed

    Corno, Antonio F

    2016-07-01

    To attract the interest of all people potentially involved in humanitarian activities in the emerging economies, in particular giving attention to the basic requirements of the organization of paediatric cardiac surgery activities, the requirements for a successful partnership with the local existing organizations and the basic elements of a patient-centred multidisciplinary integrated approach. Unfortunately, for many years, the interventions in the low and middle income countries were largely limited to short-term medical missions, not inappropriately nicknamed 'surgical safari', because of negative general and specific characteristics. The negative aspects and the limits of the short-term medical missions can be overcome only by long-term educational programmes. The most suitable and consistent models of long-term educational programmes have been combined and implemented with the personal experience to offer a proposal for a long-term educational project, with the following steps: (i) site selection; (ii) demographic research; (iii) site assessment; (iv) organization of surgical educational teams; (v) regular frequency of surgical educational missions; (vi) programme evolution and maturation; (vii) educational outreach and interactive support. Potential limits of a long-term educational surgical programme are: (i) financial affordability; (ii) basic legal needs; (iii) legal support; (iv) non-profit indemnification. The success should not be measured by the number of successful operations of any given mission, but by the successful operations that our colleagues perform after we leave. Considering that the children in need outnumber by far the people able to provide care, in this humanitarian medicine there should be plenty of room for cooperation rather than competition. The main goal should be to provide teaching to local staff and implement methods and techniques to support the improvement of the care of the patients in the long run. This review focuses on the

  2. Systematic meta-analyses and field synopsis of genetic and epigenetic studies in paediatric inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xue; Song, Peige; Timofeeva, Maria; Meng, Xiangrui; Rudan, Igor; Little, Julian; Satsangi, Jack; Campbell, Harry; Theodoratou, Evropi

    2016-01-01

    We provide a comprehensive field synopsis of genetic and epigenetic associations for paediatric Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD). A systematic review was performed and included 84 genetic association studies reporting data for 183 polymorphisms in 71 genes. Meta-analyses were conducted for 20 SNPs in 10 genes of paediatric Crohn’s disease (CD) and for 8 SNPs in 5 genes of paediatric ulcerative colitis (UC). Five epigenetic studies were also included, but formal meta-analysis was not possible. Venice criteria and Bayesian false discovery probability test were applied to assess the credibility of associations. Nine SNPs in 4 genes were considered to have highly credible associations with paediatric CD, of which four variants (rs2066847, rs12521868, rs26313667, rs1800629) were not previously identified in paediatric GWAS. Differential DNA methylation in NOD2 and TNF-α, dysregulated expression in let-7 and miR-124 were associated with paediatric IBD, but not as yet replicated. Highly credible SNPs associated with paediatric IBD have also been implicated in adult IBD, with similar magnitudes of associations. Early onset and distinct phenotypic features of paediatric IBD might be due to distinct epigenetic changes, but these findings need to be replicated. Further progress identifying genetic and epigenetic susceptibility of paediatric IBD will require international collaboration, population diversity and harmonization of protocols. PMID:27670835

  3. Sequencing paediatric antiretroviral therapy in the context of a public health approach

    PubMed Central

    Boerma, Ragna S; Boender, T Sonia; van Hensbroek, Michael Boele; Rinke de Wit, Tobias F; Sigaloff, Kim CE

    2015-01-01

    Introduction As access to prevention of mother-to-child transmission (PMTCT) efforts has increased, the total number of children being born with HIV has significantly decreased. However, those children who do become infected after PMTCT failure are at particular risk of HIV drug resistance, selected by exposure to maternal or paediatric antiretroviral drugs used before, during or after birth. As a consequence, the response to antiretroviral therapy (ART) in these children may be compromised, particularly when non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs) are used as part of the first-line regimen. We review evidence guiding choices of first- and second-line ART. Discussion Children generally respond relatively well to ART. Clinical trials show the superiority of protease inhibitor (PI)- over NNRTI-based treatment in young children, but observational reports of NNRTI-containing regimens are usually favourable as well. This is reassuring as national guidelines often still recommend the use of NNRTI-based treatment for PMTCT-unexposed young children, due to the higher costs of PIs. After failure of NNRTI-based, first-line treatment, the rate of acquired drug resistance is high, but HIV may well be suppressed by PIs in second-line ART. By contrast, there are currently no adequate alternatives in resource-limited settings (RLS) for children failing either first- or second-line, PI-containing regimens. Conclusions Affordable salvage treatment options for children in RLS are urgently needed. PMID:26639116

  4. Secondary neutron doses received by paediatric patients during intracranial proton therapy treatments.

    PubMed

    Sayah, R; Farah, J; Donadille, L; Hérault, J; Delacroix, S; De Marzi, L; De Oliveira, A; Vabre, I; Stichelbaut, F; Lee, C; Bolch, W E; Clairand, I

    2014-06-01

    This paper's goal is to assess secondary neutron doses received by paediatric patients treated for intracranial tumours using a 178 MeV proton beam. The MCNPX Monte Carlo model of the proton therapy facility, previously validated through experimental measurements for both proton and neutron dosimetry, was used. First, absorbed dose was calculated for organs located outside the clinical target volume using a series of hybrid computational phantoms for different ages and considering a realistic treatment plan. In general, secondary neutron dose was found to decrease as the distance to the treatment field increases and as the patient age increases. In addition, secondary neutron doses were studied as a function of the beam incidence. Next, neutron equivalent dose was assessed using organ-specific energy-dependent radiation weighting factors determined from Monte Carlo simulations of neutron spectra at each organ. The equivalent dose was found to reach a maximum value of ∼155 mSv at the level of the breasts for a delivery of 49 proton Gy to an intracranial tumour of a one-year-old female patient. Finally, a thorough comparison of the calculation results with published data demonstrated the dependence of neutron dose on the treatment configuration and proved the need for facility-specific and treatment-dependent neutron dose calculations.

  5. We strongly support childhood immunisation-statement from the European Academy of Paediatrics (EAP).

    PubMed

    Dornbusch, Hans Juergen; Hadjipanayis, Adamos; Del Torso, Stefano; Mercier, Jean-Christophe; Wyder, Corinne; Schrier, Lenneke; Ross-Russell, Robert; Stiris, Tom; Ludvigsson, Jonas F

    2017-03-10

    The eradication of smallpox and the elimination of several other infectious diseases from much of the world has provided convincing evidence that vaccines are among the most effective interventions for promoting health. The current scepticism about immunisation among members of the new US administration carries a risk of decreasing immunisation rates also in Europe. While only a small minority of the population are strongly anti-vaccine, their public activities have significantly influenced an uncertainty among the general population about both the safety of and the necessity for vaccination. Therefore, the EAP calls for greater publically available, scientifically supported information on vaccination, particularly targeted at health care providers, for the further development of electronically based immunisation information systems (IIS). We further call on all European countries to work together both in legislative and public health arenas in order to increase vaccination coverage among the paediatric population. In the interest of children and their parents, the EAP expresses its strong support for childhood immunisation and recommended vaccination schedules. We are prepared to work with governments and media and share the extensive evidence demonstrating the effectiveness and safety of vaccines.

  6. Parental perceptions of giardiasis: a study in an outpatient paediatric hospital setting in havana, cuba.

    PubMed

    Almirall, Pedro; Escobedo, Angel A; Salazar, Yohana; Alfonso, Maydel; Avila, Ivonne; Cimerman, Sergio; Dawkins, Isabel V

    2013-01-01

    Background. Giardia lamblia is an important cause of diarrhoeal disease throughout the world. Giardiasis- a mild and self-limiting disease that this protozoan causes- is perceived as a harmful disease. Aim. To explore the general level of awareness about giardiasis, clinical features, mode of transmission, prevention, and consequences and describe the sources and channels of information caregivers would prefer using to be informed about this disease. Methods. A cross-sectional survey was conducted among caregivers attending to the outpatient paediatric hospital setting in Havana. Results. A total of 202 caregivers were interviewed. Nearly 73% considered giardiasis as a modern problem, and 39% considered that it could be a fatal disease. Although 76.7% were aware that small intestine is the organ affected, other localizations were cited. Abdominal pain and diarrhoea were recognized as the commonest symptoms. Around one-third could identify that giardiasis may spread through drinking unboiled water and unwashed vegetables other incorrect ways were mentioned; respondents with more than 12 years of formal education were more likely to have better knowledge. Discussion. Strategies to control giardiasis need to be through an integrated approach aiming at boosting caregivers' knowledge and encouraging healthcare workers to act as a readily available source for health information.

  7. The relationship between behavioural problems in preschool children and parental distress after a paediatric burn event.

    PubMed

    Bakker, Anne; van der Heijden, Peter G M; van Son, Maarten J M; van de Schoot, Rens; Vandermeulen, Els; Helsen, Ann; Van Loey, Nancy E E

    2014-09-01

    This study examines mother- and father-rated emotional and behaviour problems in and worries about 0- to 5-year-old children at 3 and 12 months after a burn event and the relation with parental distress. Mothers (n = 150) and fathers (n = 125) representing 155 children participated in this study. Child emotional and behaviour problems and parental worries about the child were assessed with the Child Behavior Checklist at both time points. Parents' level of acute subjective distress was assessed within the first month after the burn event with the Impact of Event Scale. Mothers and fathers held comparable views of their child's emotional and behaviour problems, which were generally within the normal limits. Parents' own acute stress reactions were significantly related to parent-rated child behaviour problems at 3 and 12 months postburn. A substantial part of mothers' and fathers' worries about the child concerned physical and emotional aspects of the burn trauma, and potential future social problems. Parents with high acute stress scores more often reported burn-related concerns about their child at 3 and 12 months postburn. Health-care professionals should be informed that parents' distress in the subacute phase of their child's burn event may be related to subsequent worries about their child and to (parent-observed) child emotional and behaviour problems. The authors recommend a family perspective, with particular attention for the interplay between parents' distress and parent-reported child behaviour problems and worries, in each phase of paediatric burn care.

  8. Parental quality of life in complex paediatric neurologic disorders of unknown aetiology.

    PubMed

    van Nimwegen, K J M; Kievit, W; van der Wilt, G J; Schieving, J H; Willemsen, M A A P; Donders, A R T; Verhaak, C M; Grutters, J P C

    2016-09-01

    Complex paediatric neurology (CPN) patients generally present with non-specific symptoms, such as developmental delay, impaired movement and epilepsy. The diagnostic trajectory in these disorders is usually complicated and long-lasting, and may be burdensome to the patients and their parents. Additionally, as caring for a chronically ill child can be stressful and demanding, parents of these patients may experience impaired health-related quality of life (HRQoL). This study aims to assess parental HRQoL and factors related to it in CPN. Physical and mental HRQoL of 120 parents was measured and compared to the general population using the SF-12 questionnaire. Parents also completed this questionnaire for the measurement of patient HRQoL. Additional questionnaires were used to measure parental uncertainty (Visual Analogue Scale) and worry phenomena (Penn State Worry Questionnaire), and to obtain socio-demographic data. A linear mixed model with random effect was used to investigate which of these variables were associated with parental HRQoL. As compared to the general population, HRQoL of these parents appeared diminished. Fathers showed both lowered physical (51.76, p < 0.05) and mental (49.41, p < 0.01) HRQoL, whereas mothers only showed diminished mental (46.46, p < 0.01) HRQoL. Patient HRQoL and parental worry phenomena were significantly correlated with overall and mental parental HRQoL. The reduction in parental mental HRQoL is alarming, also because children strongly rely on their parents and parental mental health is known to influence children's health. Awareness of these problems among clinicians, and supportive care if needed are important to prevent exacerbation of the problems.

  9. Introduction to "Diversity of Child Health Care in Europe: A Study of the European Paediatric Association/Union of National European Paediatric Societies and Associations".

    PubMed

    Ehrich, Jochen; Namazova-Baranova, Leyla; Pettoello-Mantovani, Massimo

    2016-10-01

    The field of pediatrics in Europe is characterized by the diversities, variations, and heterogeneities of child health care services provided in 53 European countries with more than 200 million children below 18 years of age. Managing the health care of infants, children, and adolescents in Europe requires balancing clinical aims, research findings, and socioeconomic goals within a typical environment characterized by cultural and economic complexity and large disparity in availability, affordability, and accessibility of pediatric care. Since its foundation in 1976, the European Paediatric Association-Union of National European Paediatric Societies and Associations has worked to improve both medical care of all children and cooperation of their caretakers in Europe. Such a report has been conceived in the strong belief that broadening of the intellectual basis of the European Paediatric Association-Union of National European Paediatric Societies and Associations and creating a multidisciplinary society will be necessary to reduce fragmentation of pediatrics and tackle the legal, economic, and organizational challenges of child health care in Europe.

  10. Psychosocial Predictors of Non-Adherence and Treatment Failure in a Large Scale Multi-National Trial of Antiretroviral Therapy for HIV: Data from the ACTG A5175/PEARLS Trial

    PubMed Central

    Safren, Steven A.; Biello, Katie B.; Smeaton, Laura; Mimiaga, Matthew J.; Walawander, Ann; Lama, Javier R.; Rana, Aadia; Nyirenda, Mulinda; Kayoyo, Virginia M.; Samaneka, Wadzanai; Joglekar, Anjali; Celentano, David; Martinez, Ana; Remmert, Jocelyn E.; Nair, Aspara; Lalloo, Umesh G.; Kumarasamy, Nagalingeswaran; Hakim, James; Campbell, Thomas B.

    2014-01-01

    Background PEARLS, a large scale trial of antiretroviral therapy (ART) for HIV (n = 1,571, 9 countries, 4 continents), found that a once-daily protease inhibitor (PI) based regimen (ATV+DDI+FTC), but not a once-daily non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor/nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI/NRTI) regimen (EFV+FTC/TDF), had inferior efficacy compared to a standard of care twice-daily NNRTI/NRTI regimen (EFV+3TC/ZDV). The present study examined non-adherence in PEARLS. Methods Outcomes: non-adherence assessed by pill count and by self-report, and time to treatment failure. Longitudinal predictors: regimen, quality of life (general health perceptions  =  QOL-health, mental health  =  QOL-mental health), social support, substance use, binge drinking, and sexual behaviors. “Life-Steps” adherence counseling was provided. Results In both pill-count and self-report multivariable models, both once-a-day regimens had lower levels of non-adherence than the twice-a-day standard of care regimen; although these associations attenuated with time in the self-report model. In both multivariable models, hard-drug use was associated with non-adherence, living in Africa and better QOL-health were associated with less non-adherence. According to pill-count, unprotected sex was associated with non-adherence. According to self-report, soft-drug use was associated with non-adherence and living in Asia was associated with less non-adherence. Both pill-count (HR = 1.55, 95% CI: 1.15, 2.09, p<.01) and self-report (HR = 1.13, 95% CI: 1.08, 1.13, p<.01) non-adherence were significant predictors of treatment failure over 72 weeks. In multivariable models (including pill-count or self-report nonadherence), worse QOL-health, age group (younger), and region were also significant predictors of treatment failure. Conclusion In the context of a large, multi-national, multi-continent, clinical trial there were variations in adherence over time, with more

  11. Report from The International Society for Nomenclature of Paediatric and Congenital Heart Disease: cardiovascular catheterisation for congenital and paediatric cardiac disease (Part 2 - Nomenclature of complications associated with interventional cardiology).

    PubMed

    Bergersen, Lisa; Giroud, Jorge Manuel; Jacobs, Jeffrey Phillip; Franklin, Rodney Cyril George; Béland, Marie Josée; Krogmann, Otto Nils; Aiello, Vera Demarchi; Colan, Steven D; Elliott, Martin J; Gaynor, J William; Kurosawa, Hiromi; Maruszewski, Bohdan; Stellin, Giovanni; Tchervenkov, Christo I; Walters, Henry Lane; Weinberg, Paul; Everett, Allen Dale

    2011-06-01

    Interventional cardiology for paediatric and congenital cardiac disease is a relatively young and rapidly evolving field. As the profession begins to establish multi-institutional databases, a universal system of nomenclature is necessary for the field of interventional cardiology for paediatric and congenital cardiac disease. The purpose of this paper is to present the results of the efforts of The International Society for Nomenclature of Paediatric and Congenital Heart Disease to establish a system of nomenclature for cardiovascular catheterisation for congenital and paediatric cardiac disease, focusing both on procedural nomenclature and the nomenclature of complications associated with interventional cardiology. This system of nomenclature for cardiovascular catheterisation for congenital and paediatric cardiac disease is a component of The International Paediatric and Congenital Cardiac Code. This manuscript is the second part of the two-part series. Part 1 covered the procedural nomenclature associated with interventional cardiology as treatment for paediatric and congenital cardiac disease. Part 2 will cover the nomenclature of complications associated with interventional cardiology as treatment for paediatric and congenital cardiac disease.

  12. The World Congress of Paediatric Cardiology and Cardiac Surgery: "The Olympics of our profession".

    PubMed

    Hugo-Hamman, Christopher; Jacobs, Jeffery Phillip

    2012-12-01

    The first World Congress of Paediatric Cardiology was held in London, United Kingdom, in 1980, organised by Dr. Jane Somerville and Prof. Fergus Macartney. The idea was that of Jane Somerville, who worked with enormous energy and enthusiasm to bring together paediatric cardiologists and surgeons from around the world. The 2nd World Congress of Paediatric Cardiology took place in New York in 1985, organised by Bill Rashkind, Mary Ellen Engle, and Eugene Doyle. The 3rd World Congress of Paediatric Cardiology was held in Bangkok, Thailand, in 1989, organised by Chompol Vongraprateep. Although cardiac surgeons were heavily involved in these early meetings, a separate World Congress of Paediatric Cardiac Surgery was held in Bergamo, Italy, in 1988, organised by Lucio Parenzan. Thereafter, it was recognised that surgeons and cardiologists working on the same problems and driven by a desire to help children should really rather meet together. A momentous decision was taken to initiate a Joint World Congress of Paediatric Cardiology and Cardiac Surgery. A steering committee was established with membership comprising the main organisers of the four separate previous Congresses, and additional members were recruited in an effort to achieve numerical equality of cardiologists and surgeons and a broad geographical representation. The historic 1st "World Congress of Paediatric Cardiology and Cardiac Surgery" took place in Paris in June, 1993, organised by Jean Kachaner. The next was to be held in Japan, but the catastrophic Kobe earthquake in 1995 forced relocation to Hawaii in 1997. Then followed Toronto, Canada (2001, organised by Bill Williams and Lee Benson), Buenos Aires, Argentina (2005, organised by Horatio Capelli and Guillermo Kreutzer), and most recently Cairns, Australia (2009, organised by Jim Wilkinson). Having visited Europe (1993), Asia-Pacific (1997), North America (2001), South America (2005), and Australia (2009), and reflecting the "African Renaissance", the

  13. Understanding decisions leading to nonurgent visits to the paediatric emergency department: caregivers’ perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Kua, Phek Hui Jade; Wu, Li; Ong, E-Lin Tessa; Lim, Zi Ying; Yiew, Jinmian Luther; Thia, Xing Hui Michelle; Sung, Sharon Cohan

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION A significant percentage of paediatric emergency department (ED) attendances worldwide are nonurgent, adversely affecting patient outcomes and healthcare systems. This study aimed to understand the reasons behind nonurgent ED visits, in order to develop targeted and effective preventive interventions. METHODS In-depth interviews were conducted with 49 caregivers to identify the decision-making factors related to taking children to the ED of KK Women’s and Children’s Hospital, Singapore. Interviews were carried out in the emergency room of the hospital after the children had been diagnosed with nonurgent conditions by the attending physician. Interview transcripts were analysed based on grounded theory principles. RESULTS The demographics of our study cohort were representative of the target population. The main reasons given by the caregivers for attending paediatric EDs included perceived severity of the child’s symptoms, availability of after-hours care, perceived advantage of a paediatric specialist hospital and mistrust of primary care physicians’ ability to manage paediatric conditions. Insurance or welfare was a contributing factor for only a small portion of caregivers. CONCLUSION The reasons provided by Singaporean caregivers for attending paediatric EDs were similar to those reported in studies conducted in Western countries. However, the former group had a unique understanding of the local healthcare system. The study’s findings may be used to develop interventions to change the knowledge, attitudes and behaviours of caregivers in Singapore. PMID:26805668

  14. Publishing ethics in paediatric research: a cross-cultural comparative review.

    PubMed

    Brännström, Inger

    2012-03-01

    The present article aims to scrutinize publishing ethics in the fields of paediatrics and paediatric nursing. Full-text readings of all original research articles in paediatrics from a high-income economy, i.e. Sweden, and from all low-income economies in Sub-Saharan Africa, were reviewed as they were indexed and stored in Web of Science for the search period from 1 January 2007 to 7 October 2009. The application of quantitative and qualitative content analysis revealed a marked discrepancy in publishing frequencies between the two contrasting economies. Authors from 16 low-income economies in Sub-Saharan Africa, with at least one article stored, were obviously closely linked to co-authorships and foreign funding sources, predominantly from Europe and the USA. Statements concerning conflicts of interest were frequently missing (both regions), even when multiple financial sources, including companies, were involved. It is necessary to be aware of possible systematic bias when using electronic databases to search for certain topics and regions. Further research regarding publishing ethics in paediatrics and paediatric nursing is emphasized.

  15. Comparative safety and efficacy of proton pump inhibitors in paediatric gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Kierkus, Jaroslaw; Oracz, Grzegorz; Korczowski, Bartosz; Szymanska, Edyta; Wiernicka, Anna; Woynarowski, Marek

    2014-05-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux is one of the most common reasons for referrals to paediatricians or paediatric gastroenterologists. Gastric acid-buffering agents, mucosal surface barriers and gastric anti-secretory agents are the main groups of medications currently used for treating gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) in children. Recently, the use of proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) for the treatment of GERD in children has increased considerably. Their effectiveness in healing erosive oesophagitis in paediatric subjects and in improving GERD symptoms has been established in many studies. However, the effectiveness in other clinical conditions and the long-term safety of PPIs for paediatric GERD have not been fully established yet and thus are still under debate. Therefore, the aim of this article is to provide a comparative review of the efficacy, safety and tolerability of PPIs in paediatric GERD. The available data suggest that short-term use of PPIs is well tolerated. Adverse events tend to be of a mild-to-moderate nature, with headache being the most frequently reported treatment-related adverse event. However, further well-designed trials and observational studies are still needed to clarify the efficacy and safety of PPIs in the paediatric population, especially in infants under the age of 12 months.

  16. Paediatric sleep-disordered breathing due to upper airway obstruction in the orthodontic setting: a review.

    PubMed

    Katyal, Vandana; Kennedy, Declan; Martin, James; Dreyer, Craig; Sampson, Wayne

    2013-11-01

    The essential feature of paediatric sleep-disordered breathing (SDB) is increased upper airway resistance during sleep presenting clinically as snoring. Paediatric SDB is a continuum ranging from primary snoring (PS), which is not associated with gas exchange abnormalities or significant sleep fragmentation, to obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) with complete upper airway obstruction, hypoxaemia, and obstructive hypoventilation. Adenotonsillar hypertrophy, obesity and craniofacial disharmonies are important predisposing factors in the development and progression of paediatric SDB. Clinical symptoms are significant and domains affected include behaviour, neurocognition, cardiovascular morbidity and quality of life. Overnight polysomnography is the current diagnostic gold standard method to assess SDB severity while adenotonsillectomy is the recommended first line of treatment. Other treatments for managing paediatric SDB include nasal continuous airway pressure, the administration of nasal steroids, dentofacial orthopaedic treatment and surgery. However, there are insufficient long-term efficacy data using dentofacial orthopaedics to treat paediatric SDB. Further studies are warranted to define the characteristics of patients who may benefit most from orthodontic treatment.

  17. A cost-effectiveness analysis of interactive paediatric telecardiology.

    PubMed

    Sicotte, Claude; Lehoux, Pascale; Van Doesburg, Nicolaas; Cardinal, Godefroy; Leblanc, Yves

    2004-01-01

    We analysed the cost-effectiveness of a teleconsultation service after five years of operation. The service provides diagnostic consultation at a distance for children suffering from cardiac pathologies. A retrospective study was performed with all 78 infants who had received a paediatric cardiology teleconsultation over a four-year period from January 1998. The cost-effectiveness of telecardiology was compared with that of the conventional means of providing services. Teleconsultation proved to be an effective and reliable method of enhancing access to tertiary care. The number of patient journeys (both emergency transfers and semi-urgent or elective visits to the tertiary care centre) was reduced by 42%. However, the cost analysis demonstrated that teleconsultation did not result in overall cost savings: the total cost of telecardiology was C dollars 272,327 and the total cost of conventional care would have been C dollars 157,212. There were direct savings for patients but not for the health-care system, because of the high cost of the equipment and telecommunication fees. Telemedicine therefore represented a supplementary cost of C dollars 1500 per patient. In summary, telemedicine added to cost but increased effectiveness. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of teleconsultation was estimated to C dollars 3488 per patient journey avoided.

  18. [Vaccination schedule of the Spanish association of paediatrics: recommendations 2010].

    PubMed

    Marès Bermúdez, J; van Esso Arbolave, D; Arístegui Fernández, J; Ruiz Contreras, J; González Hachero, J; Merino Moína, M; Barrio Corrales, F; Alvarez García, F J; Cilleruelo Ortega, M J; Ortigosa Del Castillo, L; Moreno Pérez, D

    2010-06-01

    The Vaccine Advisory Committee of the Spanish Association of Paediatrics updates annually, the immunization schedule, taking into account epidemiological data, as well as evidence of the effectiveness and efficiency of vaccines. This vaccination schedule includes grades of recommendation. The committee has graded as universal vaccines those that all children should receive, as recommended those with a profile of universal vaccination in childhood and which are desirable that all children receive, but that can be prioritized based on resources for its public funding and for risk groups those targeting groups of people in situations of epidemiological risk. The Committee considers as a priority to achieve a common immunization schedule. The Committee reaffirms the recommendation to include pneumococcal vaccination in the routine vaccination schedule. Vaccination against varicella in the second year of life is an effective strategy and therefore a desirable goal. Vaccination against rotavirus is recommended for all infants given the morbidity and high burden on the health care system. The Committee adheres to the recommendations of the Interterritorial Council of the National Health Care System in reference to routine vaccination against HPV for all girls aged 11 to 14 years and stresses the need to vaccinate against influenza and hepatitis A all patients with risk factors for these diseases. Finally, it stresses the need to update incomplete immunization schedules using accelerated immunization schedules.

  19. Adult and paediatric cough guidelines: Ready for an overhaul?

    PubMed

    Birring, Surinder S; Kavanagh, Joanne; Lai, Kefang; Chang, Anne B

    2015-12-01

    Cough is one of the most common reasons that patients seek medical attention. Cough guidelines from numerous countries and societies are available to assist the clinician to investigate and manage patients with cough. We review some of the recent progress in the field of cough that may lead to revision of these guidelines. In adults with chronic cough, new causes such as obstructive sleep apnoea have been identified. A new terminology, cough hypersensitivity syndrome (CHS), has been proposed for patients with chronic cough, which emphasises cough reflex hypersensitivity as a key feature. New therapeutic options are now available, particularly for patients with refractory or idiopathic chronic cough, which include gabapentin, speech pathology management and morphine. There has been great progress in the assessment of cough with the development of validated quality of life questionnaires and cough frequency monitoring tools. In children, common aetiologies differ from adults and those managed according to guidelines have better outcomes compared to usual care. New diagnostic entities such as protracted bacterial bronchitis have been described. Paediatric-specific cough assessment tools such as the Parent/Child Quality of Life Questionnaire will help improve the assessment of patients. Further research is necessary to improve the evidence base for future clinical guideline recommendations. Guidelines in future should also aim to reach a wider audience that includes primary care physicians, non-specialists and patients.

  20. Diabetes technology and treatments in the paediatric age group.

    PubMed

    Shalitin, S; Peter Chase, H

    2011-02-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is one of the most common chronic childhood diseases and its incidence has doubled during the last decade. The goals of intensive management of diabetes were established in 1993 by the Diabetes Control and Complications Trial (DCCT) (1). Children with T1D and their caregivers continue to face the challenge to maintain blood glucose levels in the near-normal range. It is important to prevent sustained hyperglycaemia which is associated with long-term microvascular and macrovascular complications and to avoid recurrent episodes of hypoglycaemia or hyperglycaemia, especially in young children, which may have adverse effects on cognitive function and impede efforts to achieve the recommended glycaemic targets. Advances in the use of technology that may help maintain the metabolic control goals for young people with T1D were centred on continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII) (2-4), continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) (5-7), and combining both technologies into a closed-loop system (8-10). The dilemma in paediatrics of patient selection for insulin pump therapy was found to be most successful in those with more frequent self-monitoring of blood glucose (SMBG) and younger age prior to pump initiation (2). Similarly, those who used a dual-wave bolus probably paid closer attention to their management and had lower HbA1c levels (3). The advantage of using a pre-meal bolus to improve postprandial glucose levels was shown to offer another potential method to improve glycaemic control (4). SMBG is an important component of therapy in patients with diabetes, especially in the paediatric age group. Standard use of glucose meters for SMBG provides only intermittent single blood glucose levels, without giving the 'whole picture' of glucose variability during the 24 h, and especially during the night, when blood glucose levels are seldom measured. Therefore, the use of a device such as real-time continuous glucose monitoring (RT-CGM) that provides

  1. Training fellows in paediatric cardiology: the Harvard experience.

    PubMed

    Brown, David W; Allan, Catherine K; Newburger, Jane W

    2016-12-01

    The Fellowship Program of the Department of Cardiology at Boston Children's Hospital seeks to train academically oriented leaders in clinical care and laboratory and clinical investigation of cardiovascular disease in the young. The core clinical fellowship involves 3 years in training, comprising 24 months of clinical rotations and 12 months of elective and research experience. Trainees have access to a vast array of research opportunities - clinical, basic, and translational. Clinical fellows interested in basic science may reverse the usual sequence and start their training in the laboratory, deferring clinical training for 1 or more years. An increasing number of clinical trainees apply to spend a fourth year as a senior fellow in one of the subspecialty areas of paediatric cardiology. From the founding of the Department to the present, we have maintained a fundamental and unwavering commitment to training and education in clinical care and research in basic science and clinical investigation, as well as to the training of outstanding young clinicians and investigators.

  2. Chronic paroxysmal hemicrania in paediatric age: report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Tarantino, Samuela; Vollono, Catello; Capuano, Alessandro; Vigevano, Federico; Valeriani, Massimiliano

    2011-04-01

    Chronic paroxysmal hemicrania (CPH) is a rare primary headache syndrome, which is classified along with hemicrania continua and short-lasting unilateral neuralgiform headache attacks with conjunctival injection and tearing (SUNCT) as trigeminal autonomic cephalalgia (TACs). CPH is characterised by short-lasting (2-30 min), severe and multiple (more than 5/day) pain attacks. Headache is unilateral, and fronto-orbital-temporal pain is combined with cranial autonomic symptoms. According to the International Classification of Headache Disorders, 2nd edition, the attacks are absolutely responsive to indomethacin. CPH has been only rarely and incompletely described in the developmental age. Here, we describe two cases concerning a 7-year-old boy and a 11-year-old boy with short-lasting, recurrent headache combined with cranial autonomic features. Pain was described as excruciating, and was non-responsive to most traditional analgesic drugs. The clinical features of our children's headache and the positive response to indomethacin led us to propose the diagnosis of CPH. Therefore, our children can be included amongst the very few cases of this trigeminal autonomic cephalgia described in the paediatric age.

  3. Nosocomial hepatitis A infection in a paediatric intensive care unit.

    PubMed Central

    Drusin, L M; Sohmer, M; Groshen, S L; Spiritos, M D; Senterfit, L B; Christenson, W N

    1987-01-01

    Seven members of staff in a paediatric intensive care unit and two of their relatives developed hepatitis A over a period of five days. A 13 year old boy who was incontinent of faeces prior to his death, was presumed to be the source of infection. Two hundred and sixty seven other members of staff underwent serological testing and were given prophylactic pooled gamma globulin. Twenty three per cent were immune before exposure. Of people born in the United States, those at highest risk of developing the disease are physicians, dentists, nurses and those under the age of 40. Of those born outside the United States, being white and under the age of 30 are the two main risk factors. Data from a questionnaire sent to 19 nurses at risk (six cases, 13 controls) suggested that sharing food with patients or their families, drinking coffee, sharing cigarettes and eating in the nurses' office in the intensive care unit were associated with an increased incidence of hepatitis. Nurses with three or four of these habits were at particular risk. The costs of screening and prophylaxis were US $64.72 per employee, while prophylaxis alone would have cost US $8.42 per employee. Assessing risk factors on the one hand and costs of prophylaxis on the other are important elements in the control of nosocomial infections. PMID:3632014

  4. Malarial acute kidney injury in a paediatric intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Kapoor, Kapil; Gupta, Shalu

    2012-10-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a serious complication of malaria which has a very high mortality rate. A retrospective analysis of medical record data of children treated for malarial AKI in a paediatric intensive care unit (PICU) was performed in order to evaluate the incidence, poor prognostic factors and outcome of AKI with malaria. Eighteen (48.6%) malarial patients had AKI (11 Plasmodium vivax positive, six P. falciparum positive and one mixed infection) with a male-to-female ratio of 1:2. The mean age was 75 ± 32 months (range, 1 month to 10 years). Oliguria was present in 61.1% and 55.5% required renal replacement therapy. Mortality was noted in 33.3% of patients and full recovery was achieved in 50% of patients. Oliguria, shock, central nervous system involvement, jaundice, disseminated intravascular coagulopathy and acute respiratory distress syndrome emerged as bad prognostic factors in simple univariate analysis. Malaria patients with and without AKI differ significantly in terms of shock, ventilator requirement, mortality and length of PICU stay.

  5. Pharmaceutical development and optimization of azithromycin suppository for paediatric use.

    PubMed

    Kauss, Tina; Gaubert, Alexandra; Boyer, Chantal; Ba, Boubakar B; Manse, Muriel; Massip, Stephane; Léger, Jean-Michel; Fawaz, Fawaz; Lembege, Martine; Boiron, Jean-Michel; Lafarge, Xavier; Lindegardh, Niklas; White, Nicholas J; Olliaro, Piero; Millet, Pascal; Gaudin, Karen

    2013-01-30

    Pharmaceutical development and manufacturing process optimization work was undertaken in order to propose a potential paediatric rectal formulation of azithromycin as an alternative to existing oral or injectable formulations. The target product profile was to be easy-to-use, cheap and stable in tropical conditions, with bioavailability comparable to oral forms, rapidly achieving and maintaining bactericidal concentrations. PEG solid solution suppositories were characterized in vitro using visual, HPLC, DSC, FTIR and XRD analyses. In vitro drug release and in vivo bioavailability were assessed; a study in rabbits compared the bioavailability of the optimized solid solution suppository to rectal solution and intra-venous product (as reference) and to the previous, non-optimized formulation (suspended azithromycin suppository). The bioavailability of azithromycin administered as solid solution suppositories relative to intra-venous was 43%, which compared well to the target of 38% (oral product in humans). The results of 3-month preliminary stability and feasibility studies were consistent with industrial production scale-up. This product has potential both as a classical antibiotic and as a product for use in severely ill children in rural areas. Industrial partners for further development are being sought.

  6. Migraine management: How do the adult and paediatric migraines differ?

    PubMed Central

    Sonal Sekhar, M.; Sasidharan, Shalini; Joseph, Siby; Kumar, Anand

    2011-01-01

    Migraine is one of the common causes of severe and recurring headache. It may be difficult to manage in primary care settings, where it is under diagnosed and medically treated. Migraine can occur in children as well as in adults and it is three times more common in women than in men. Migraine in children is different from adults in various ways. Migraine management depends on the various factors like duration and severity of pain, associated symptoms, degree of disability, and initial response to treatment. The therapy of children and adolescents with migraines includes treatment modalities for acute attacks, prophylactic medications when the attacks are frequent, and biobehavioural modes of treatment to aid long-term management of the disorder. The long lasting outcome of childhood headaches and progression into adult headaches remains largely unknown. However, it has been suggested that adult migraine may represent a progressive disorder. In children, the progressive nature is uncertain and further investigations into longitudinal outcome and phenotypic changes in childhood headaches have yet to be recognized. Even though paediatric and adult migraines seem to be slightly different from one another, but not enough to categorize either as sole. PMID:23960771

  7. Health-e-Child: a grid platform for european paediatrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skaburskas, K.; Estrella, F.; Shade, J.; Manset, D.; Revillard, J.; Rios, A.; Anjum, A.; Branson, A.; Bloodsworth, P.; Hauer, T.; McClatchey, R.; Rogulin, D.

    2008-07-01

    The Health-e-Child (HeC) project [1], [2] is an EC Framework Programme 6 Integrated Project that aims to develop a grid-based integrated healthcare platform for paediatrics. Using this platform biomedical informaticians will integrate heterogeneous data and perform epidemiological studies across Europe. The resulting Grid enabled biomedical information platform will be supported by robust search, optimization and matching techniques for information collected in hospitals across Europe. In particular, paediatricians will be provided with decision support, knowledge discovery and disease modelling applications that will access data in hospitals in the UK, Italy and France, integrated via the Grid. For economy of scale, reusability, extensibility, and maintainability, HeC is being developed on top of an EGEE/gLite [3] based infrastructure that provides all the common data and computation management services required by the applications. This paper discusses some of the major challenges in bio-medical data integration and indicates how these will be resolved in the HeC system. HeC is presented as an example of how computer science (and, in particular Grid infrastructures) originating from high energy physics can be adapted for use by biomedical informaticians to deliver tangible real-world benefits.

  8. Pharmaceutical development and optimization of azithromycin suppository for paediatric use

    PubMed Central

    Kauss, Tina; Gaubert, Alexandra; Boyer, Chantal; Ba, Boubakar B.; Manse, Muriel; Massip, Stephane; Léger, Jean-Michel; Fawaz, Fawaz; Lembege, Martine; Boiron, Jean-Michel; Lafarge, Xavier; Lindegardh, Niklas; White, Nicholas J.; Olliaro, Piero; Millet, Pascal; Gaudin, Karen

    2013-01-01

    Pharmaceutical development and manufacturing process optimization work was undertaken in order to propose a potential paediatric rectal formulation of azithromycin as an alternative to existing oral or injectable formulations. The target product profile was to be easy-to-use, cheap and stable in tropical conditions, with bioavailability comparable to oral forms, rapidly achieving and maintaining bactericidal concentrations. PEG solid solution suppositories were characterized in vitro using visual, HPLC, DSC, FTIR and XRD analyses. In vitro drug release and in vivo bioavailability were assessed; a study in rabbits compared the bioavailability of the optimized solid solution suppository to rectal solution and intra-venous product (as reference) and to the previous, non-optimized formulation (suspended azithromycin suppository). The bioavailability of azithromycin administered as solid solution suppositories relative to intra-venous was 43%, which compared well to the target of 38% (oral product in humans). The results of 3-month preliminary stability and feasibility studies were consistent with industrial production scale-up. This product has potential both as a classical antibiotic and as a product for use in severely ill children in rural areas. Industrial partners for further development are being sought. PMID:23220079

  9. Association of Neisseria cinerea with ocular infections in paediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Dolter, J; Wong, J; Janda, J M

    1998-01-01

    Twenty-two strains of Neisseria cinerea were recovered from paediatric patients over a 7-year period and forwarded to the Microbial Diseases Laboratory for biochemical identification and/or confirmation. Eighteen of these 22 strains (82%) were recovered from the eyes of very young children (< or = 1 year), > 50% occurring during the neonatal period. The majority of eye isolates were involved in a variety of ocular infections including orbital cellulitis, conjunctivitis, and eye discharge (most common); in four of the 13 instances (31%) where laboratory data was available, Neisseria cinerea was recovered in pure culture. Neisseria cinerea isolates were often submitted to the Microbial Diseases Laboratory as possible 'N. gonorrhoeae' or 'Neisseria species' due to problems resulting from the use of commercial assays or unfamiliarity with the organism. These observations indicate that N. cinerea can produce eye infections in very young children, who presumably acquire this organism vertically from the mother during birth. Accurate identification of N. cinerea in such infants can preclude the social trauma and possible legal ramifications which can initially result from its misidentification as N. gonorrhoeae.

  10. Oral health perceptions of paediatric palliative care nursing staff.

    PubMed

    Couch, Elizabeth; Mead, Jean Marie; Walsh, Margaret M

    2013-01-01

    Systematic oral care reduces oral complications among children in paediatric palliative care (PPC), yet little is known about the oral health perceptions of PPC nursing staff. This qualitative cross-sectional study used semi-structured interviews based on phenomenography to explore PPC nursing staff's perceptions of oral health and the relationship of oral care to comfort and quality of life. A purposive sample of nine nursing staff employed at a California PPC facility participated. Five themes emerged from the analysis of the interviews: signs of oral health, reasons for oral care, adaptation of oral care on a case-by-case basis, barriers to providing oral care, and facilitators of improving oral care. The perceived importance of oral health was the underlining similarity between the themes. A need for further research in the area of oral PPC is indicated. Collaboration with dental professionals may be needed to create oral PPC guidelines that fit the complex needs of children with life-limiting illnesses.

  11. Combinations of common chronic paediatric diseases deviate the immune response in diverging directions

    PubMed Central

    Nilsson, L; Kivling, A; Jalmelid, M; Magnusson, K Fälth; Faresjö, M

    2006-01-01

    The cytokine pattern of T lymphocytes has not been characterized in children with combinations of paediatric immunological disorders. We describe cytokine secretion in children with type 1 diabetes, coeliac disease and allergy and combinations of two of these diseases after stimulation with ‘disease-specific’ antigens. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were collected from 68 children with type 1 diabetes, allergy or coeliac disease, two of these diseases in combination or none of these diseases. Using the enzyme-linked immunospot (ELISPOT) technique, interferon (IFN)-γ and interleukin (IL)-4 were analysed from fresh PBMC spontaneously and after in vitro stimulation with antigens associated with one or more of these diseases (insulin, gluten, birch and cat extract, β-lactoglobulin, ovalbumin and phytohaemagglutinin) in order to divide T helper (Th)1- from Th2-like lymphocytes. Stimulation with birch and cat extract caused increased IL-4 secretion in allergic children. A low IFN-γ response to insulin was found in type 1 diabetic children, whereas allergic children responded to insulin by increased IL-4 secretion. Children suffering from both type 1 diabetes (Th1-prone) and allergy (Th2-prone) reacted distinctly to general mitogen stimulation. Children suffering from two Th1-dominated diseases (type 1 diabetes and coeliac disease) showed hardly any response to either food or inhalation allergens. Our results indicate an important interplay between common immunological diseases in children. The combination of two Th1-deviated diseases is associated with a suppressed immune response, whereas a combination of Th1- and Th2-dominated diseases appears to increase the general immune response. PMID:17100762

  12. Comparison of oral dexmedetomidine versus oral midazolam as premedication to prevent emergence agitation after sevoflurane anaesthesia in paediatric patients

    PubMed Central

    Prabhu, M Kavya; Mehandale, Sripada G

    2017-01-01

    Background and Aims: Sevoflurane is the most often used inhalational agent in paediatric anaesthesia, but emergence agitation (EA) remains a major concern. Oral midazolam and parenteral dexmedetomidine are known to be effective in controlling EA. We attempted to elucidate whether oral dexmedetomidine is better than midazolam in controlling EA. Methods: Prospective double-blinded study involving ninety patients aged 1–10 years, undergoing elective surgeries of <2 h of expected duration under sevoflurane general anaesthesia, randomised to receive either midazolam (Group A) or dexmedetomidine (Group B) as oral premedication was carried out to record level of sedation before induction, haemodynamic parameters and recovery time. Incidence and severity of EA, post-operative pain and requirement of rescue analgesic were assessed at 0, 5, 15, 30 and 60 min postoperatively. Results: Data were analysed applying Student's t-test and Chi-square test using SPSS software. Mask acceptance was better in Group B (97.8% vs. 73.4%, P < 0.001). Mean arterial pressure was lower in Group B (P < 0.001) though clinically not significant. More rescue analgesic was required in Group A (5.6% vs. 0%). There was no significant difference in adverse effects. Although there was a higher incidence of EA in Group A (Aono's score 3 and 4; 40% vs. 4.4%), none of them required intervention (paediatric anaesthesia emergence delirium score >10; 0 vs. 0). Conclusion: Premedication with oral dexmedetomidine provides smooth induction and recovery, reduces the EA and provides better analgesia and sedation as compared to oral midazolam. PMID:28250481

  13. PET/CT-guided treatment planning for paediatric cancer patients: a simulation study of proton and conventional photon therapy

    PubMed Central

    Brodin, N P; Björk-Eriksson, T; Birk Christensen, C; Kiil-Berthelsen, A; Aznar, M C; Hollensen, C; Markova, E; Munck af Rosenschöld, P

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the impact of including fluorine-18 fludeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) scanning in the planning of paediatric radiotherapy (RT). Methods: Target volumes were first delineated without and subsequently re-delineated with access to 18F-FDG PET scan information, on duplicate CT sets. RT plans were generated for three-dimensional conformal photon RT (3DCRT) and intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT). The results were evaluated by comparison of target volumes, target dose coverage parameters, normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) and estimated risk of secondary cancer (SC). Results: Considerable deviations between CT- and PET/CT-guided target volumes were seen in 3 out of the 11 patients studied. However, averaging over the whole cohort, CT or PET/CT guidance introduced no significant difference in the shape or size of the target volumes, target dose coverage, irradiated volumes, estimated NTCP or SC risk, neither for IMPT nor 3DCRT. Conclusion: Our results imply that the inclusion of PET/CT scans in the RT planning process could have considerable impact for individual patients. There were no general trends of increasing or decreasing irradiated volumes, suggesting that the long-term morbidity of RT in childhood would on average remain largely unaffected. Advances in knowledge: 18F-FDG PET-based RT planning does not systematically change NTCP or SC risk for paediatric cancer patients compared with CT only. 3 out of 11 patients had a distinct change of target volumes when PET-guided planning was introduced. Dice and mismatch metrics are not sufficient to assess the consequences of target volume differences in the context of RT. PMID:25494657

  14. Prevalence and outcome of severe malnutrition in children less than five-year-old in Omdurman Paediatric Hospital, Sudan.

    PubMed

    Kanan, Shaza O H; Swar, Mohammed Osman

    2016-01-01

    This is a retrospective observational hospital-based study aimed to determine the prevalence and outcome of severe acute malnutrition in children less than five years admitted to Omdurman Paediatric Hospital during the period January 2014 to December 2014. Data was collected from patient's hospital records during the study period. Ethical approval and permission to access patients' record were obtained. A total of 593 children with severe malnutrition were identified; 305 of cases were male (51.4%) with a male: female ratio of 1:0.9. The mean age these children was 22.3 months. Children 36-59 months were least affected. 35.4% were classified as low socioeconomic class, 22.9% classified as an average class and there were no sufficient data to classify the remaining. The overall prevalence of severe malnutrition was 6.5%, and the general mortality rate was 2.4% while mortality rate among children with severe malnutrition was 9.3%. Among the 593 admitted children with malnutrition, 407 (68.6%) had marasmus, 141 (23.8%) had kwashiorkor and 45 (7.6%) had marasmic-kwashiorkor. The highest prevalence and mortality rate occurred in September. The most common clinical presentations were gastroenteritis, malaria, urinary tract infections, giardiasis, tuberculosis and AIDS. Only 10.8% of the admitted children were exclusively breast fed for the first three months. 33% were fully vaccinated. Overall 75.7% improved and discharged, 15% discharged against medical advice and 9.3% died. We concluded that prevalence and mortality among children with acute severe malnutrition at Omdurman paediatrics hospital were high, and the current management strategies require review to identify the causes. We recommended adopting policies to manage malnutrition in the community and hospitals.

  15. Prevalence and outcome of severe malnutrition in children less than five-year-old in Omdurman Paediatric Hospital, Sudan

    PubMed Central

    Swar, Mohammed Osman

    2016-01-01

    This is a retrospective observational hospital-based study aimed to determine the prevalence and outcome of severe acute malnutrition in children less than five years admitted to Omdurman Paediatric Hospital during the period January 2014 to December 2014. Data was collected from patient’s hospital records during the study period. Ethical approval and permission to access patients’ record were obtained. A total of 593 children with severe malnutrition were identified; 305 of cases were male (51.4%) with a male: female ratio of 1:0.9. The mean age these children was 22.3 months. Children 36–59 months were least affected. 35.4% were classified as low socioeconomic class, 22.9% classified as an average class and there were no sufficient data to classify the remaining. The overall prevalence of severe malnutrition was 6.5%, and the general mortality rate was 2.4% while mortality rate among children with severe malnutrition was 9.3%. Among the 593 admitted children with malnutrition, 407 (68.6%) had marasmus, 141 (23.8%) had kwashiorkor and 45 (7.6%) had marasmic-kwashiorkor. The highest prevalence and mortality rate occurred in September. The most common clinical presentations were gastroenteritis, malaria, urinary tract infections, giardiasis, tuberculosis and AIDS. Only 10.8% of the admitted children were exclusively breast fed for the first three months. 33% were fully vaccinated. Overall 75.7% improved and discharged, 15% discharged against medical advice and 9.3% died. We concluded that prevalence and mortality among children with acute severe malnutrition at Omdurman paediatrics hospital were high, and the current management strategies require review to identify the causes. We recommended adopting policies to manage malnutrition in the community and hospitals. PMID:27651550

  16. Electronic medical file exchange between on-duty care providers and the attending paediatrician: a Belgian paediatric pilot project.

    PubMed

    Deneyer, M; Hachimi-Idrissi, S; Michel, L; Nyssen, M; De Moor, G; Vandenplas, Y

    2012-01-01

    The authors propose the introduction of a pilot project: "paediatric core file exchange in emergencies" (PCF-EXEM) which enables the exchange of medical data between the attending paediatrician (AP), holder of the medical record, and on-duty medical units (i.e. general practitioners, paediatricians, surgeons, emergency physicians,...). This project is based on two pillars: a protected server (PCF-server) containing paediatric core files (PCF), with important clinical data that should be available for the physician in order to quickly get a clear insight into the relevant clinical medical history of the child, and secondly, the possibility to provide feedback to the attending physician about the findings recorded during the on-call duty. The permanent availability of health data on the PCF-server and the possibility to provide feedback represent together the PCF-EXEM-project. This project meets the demand of the care providers to have relevant medical information permanently available in order to guarantee high quality care in emergency situations. The frail balance between the right to informative privacy and professional confidentiality on the one hand and the right to quality health care on the other hand has been taken into account. The technical and practical feasibility of this project is described. The objectives and vision of the PCF-EXEM project are conform to Belgian legislation concerning the processing of medical data and are in line with the still under consideration European projects which are focusing on interoperability and the development of a common access control to databanks containing health data for care providers. PCF-EXEM could therefore be a model for other EU countries as well.

  17. Coregistration of multimodal imaging is associated with favourable two-year seizure outcome after paediatric epilepsy surgery.

    PubMed

    Perry, Michael Scott; Bailey, Laurie; Freedman, Daniel; Donahue, David; Malik, Saleem; Head, Hayden; Keator, Cynthia; Hernandez, Angel

    2017-03-01

    Multimodal coregistration uses multiple image datasets coregistered to an anatomical reference (i.e. MRI), allowing multiple studies to be viewed together. Commonly used in intractable epilepsy evaluation and generally accepted to improve localization of the epileptogenic zone, data showing that coregistration improves outcome is lacking. We compared seizure freedom following epilepsy surgery in paediatric patients, evaluated before and after the use of coregistration protocols at our centre, to determine whether this correlated with a change in outcome. We included paediatric epilepsy surgery patients with at least one anatomical and one functional neuroimaging study as part of their presurgical evaluation. Preoperatively designated palliative procedures and repeat surgeries were excluded. Multiple pre-, peri-, and postoperative variables were compared between groups with the primary outcome of seizure freedom. In total, 115 were included with an average age of 10.63 years (0.12-20.7). All evaluations included video-EEG (VEEG) and MRI. Seven (6%) had subtraction single-photon emission CT (SPECT), 46 (40%) had positron emission tomography (PET), and 62 (54%) had both as part of their evaluation. Sixty (52%) had extratemporal epilepsy and 25 (22%) were MRI-negative. Sixty-eight (59%) had coregistration. Coregistered patients were less likely to undergo invasive EEG monitoring (p=0.045) and were more likely to have seizure freedom at one (p=0.034) and two years (p<0.001) post-operatively. A logistic regression accounting for multiple covariates supported an association between the use of coregistration and favourable post-surgical outcome. Coregistered imaging contributes to favourable postoperative seizure reduction compared to visual analysis of individual modalities. Imaging coregistration is associated with improved outcome, independent of other variables after surgery. Coregistered imaging may reduce the need for invasive EEG monitoring, likely due to improved

  18. Smoke inhalation increases intensive care requirements and morbidity in paediatric burns.

    PubMed

    Tan, Alethea; Smailes, Sarah; Friebel, Thessa; Magdum, Ashish; Frew, Quentin; El-Muttardi, Naguib; Dziewulski, Peter

    2016-08-01

    Burn survival has improved with advancements in fluid resuscitation, surgical wound management, wound dressings, access to antibiotics and nutritional support for burn patients. Despite these advancements, the presence of smoke inhalation injury in addition to a cutaneous burn still significantly increases morbidity and mortality. The pathophysiology of smoke inhalation has been well studied in animal models. Translation of this knowledge into effectiveness of clinical management and correlation with patient outcomes including the paediatric population, is still limited. We retrospectively reviewed our experience of 13 years of paediatric burns admitted to a regional burn's intensive care unit. We compared critical care requirements and patient outcomes between those with cutaneous burns only and those with concurrent smoke inhalation injury. Smoke inhalation increases critical care requirements and mortality in the paediatric burn population. Therefore, early critical care input in the management of these patients is advised.

  19. Off-label drug use in paediatrics: a world-wide problem.

    PubMed

    Lenk, Christian

    2012-06-01

    Since more than 35 years, the international medical scientific community tries to solve the problem of the off-label use of paediatric drugs. The aim is simple, but ambitious: to supply children and adolescents with effective drugs, as safe as possible, with known and well-documented side effects, and with accurate and up-to-date information on dosage and administration form. However, despite the significant efforts of paediatricians, researchers and international health politics, a number of severe obstacles for the optimal supply of children and adolescents with safe drugs remain. The detailed analysis of the problem shows not only a still remaining lack of medical knowledge, but also persistent weaknesses in the ethical, legal, medical, pharmacological, and political practices that surround the phenomenon of off-label use in paediatrics. The article gives an overview about the remaining difficulties in the field of paediatric off-label medication with special consideration to ethical and regulatory questions.

  20. Accelerated oral nanomedicine discovery from miniaturized screening to clinical production exemplified by paediatric HIV nanotherapies

    PubMed Central

    Giardiello, Marco; Liptrott, Neill J.; McDonald, Tom O.; Moss, Darren; Siccardi, Marco; Martin, Phil; Smith, Darren; Gurjar, Rohan; Rannard, Steve P.; Owen, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Considerable scope exists to vary the physical and chemical properties of nanoparticles, with subsequent impact on biological interactions; however, no accelerated process to access large nanoparticle material space is currently available, hampering the development of new nanomedicines. In particular, no clinically available nanotherapies exist for HIV populations and conventional paediatric HIV medicines are poorly available; one current paediatric formulation utilizes high ethanol concentrations to solubilize lopinavir, a poorly soluble antiretroviral. Here we apply accelerated nanomedicine discovery to generate a potential aqueous paediatric HIV nanotherapy, with clinical translation and regulatory approval for human evaluation. Our rapid small-scale screening approach yields large libraries of solid drug nanoparticles (160 individual components) targeting oral dose. Screening uses 1 mg of drug compound per library member and iterative pharmacological and chemical evaluation establishes potential candidates for progression through to clinical manufacture. The wide applicability of our strategy has implications for multiple therapy development programmes. PMID:27767027

  1. Management of adults with paediatric-onset chronic liver disease: strategic issues for transition care.

    PubMed

    Vajro, Pietro; Ferrante, Lorenza; Lenta, Selvaggia; Mandato, Claudia; Persico, Marcello

    2014-04-01

    Advances in the management of children with chronic liver disease have enabled many to survive into adulthood with or without their native livers, so that the most common of these conditions are becoming increasingly common in adult hepatology practice. Because the aetiologies of chronic liver disease in children may vary significantly from those in adulthood, adults with paediatric-onset chronic liver disease may often present with clinical manifestations unfamiliar to their adulthood physician. Transition of medical care to adult practice requires that the adulthood medical staff (primary physicians and subspecialists) have a comprehensive knowledge of childhood liver disease and their implications, and of the differences in caring for these patients. Pending still unavailable Scientific Society guidelines, this article examines causes, presentation modes, evaluation, management, and complications of the main paediatric-onset chronic liver diseases, and discusses key issues to aid in planning a program of transition from paediatric to adult patients.

  2. Accelerated oral nanomedicine discovery from miniaturized screening to clinical production exemplified by paediatric HIV nanotherapies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giardiello, Marco; Liptrott, Neill J.; McDonald, Tom O.; Moss, Darren; Siccardi, Marco; Martin, Phil; Smith, Darren; Gurjar, Rohan; Rannard, Steve P.; Owen, Andrew

    2016-10-01

    Considerable scope exists to vary the physical and chemical properties of nanoparticles, with subsequent impact on biological interactions; however, no accelerated process to access large nanoparticle material space is currently available, hampering the development of new nanomedicines. In particular, no clinically available nanotherapies exist for HIV populations and conventional paediatric HIV medicines are poorly available; one current paediatric formulation utilizes high ethanol concentrations to solubilize lopinavir, a poorly soluble antiretroviral. Here we apply accelerated nanomedicine discovery to generate a potential aqueous paediatric HIV nanotherapy, with clinical translation and regulatory approval for human evaluation. Our rapid small-scale screening approach yields large libraries of solid drug nanoparticles (160 individual components) targeting oral dose. Screening uses 1 mg of drug compound per library member and iterative pharmacological and chemical evaluation establishes potential candidates for progression through to clinical manufacture. The wide applicability of our strategy has implications for multiple therapy development programmes.

  3. Safe paediatric intensive care. Part 1: Does more medical care lead to improved outcome?

    PubMed

    Frey, Bernhard; Argent, Andrew

    2004-06-01

    Neonatal and paediatric intensive care has improved the prognosis for seriously sick infants and children. This has happened because of a pragmatic approach focused on stabilisation of vital functions and immense technological advances in diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. However, the belief that more medical care must inevitably lead to improved health is increasingly being questioned. This issue is especially relevant in developing countries where the introduction of highly specialised paediatric intensive care may not lead to an overall fall in child mortality. Even in developed countries, the complexity and availability of therapeutics and invasive procedures may put seriously ill children at additional risk. In both developing and industrialised countries the use of safe and simple procedures for appropriate periods, particular attention to drug prescription patterns and selection of appropriate aims and modes of therapy, including non-invasive methods, may minimise the risks of paediatric intensive care.

  4. Management of paediatric tuberculosis in provincial and district hospitals in Afghanistan.

    PubMed

    Delawer, F M; Isono, M; Ueki, H; Zhuben, M; Zafari, M; Seddiq, M K; Habib, H; Ayoubi, M K

    2013-08-01

    Case detection, diagnosis and treatment of tuberculosis 1 B) in children are challenging issues vorldwide. This study in Afghanistan aimed to evaluate paediatric TB case management, including contact investigation, at health facilities where all diagnostic processes were available. In 7 out of 8 regions of the country 1 province was selected. Documents used for management of paediatric TB cases were reviewed in 15 distinct hospitals and 8 provincial hospitals in the selected provinces. The key issues which emerged were: a low suspect rate among total outpatients (0.4%) and a very low suspect rate among children aged < 5 years; low performance of suspect management (68.5% suspects received further examinations); low utilization of other diagnostic methods; a high early defaulter rate (14.0%); and insufficient coverage of contact management (74.0%). This survey indicated that the Afghanistan national TB programme needs to develop plans to improve the quality of diagnosis, suspect management and contact management in paediatric TB cases.

  5. The paediatric flat foot and general anthropometry in 140 Australian school children aged 7 - 10 years

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Many studies have found a positive relationship between increased body weight and flat foot posture in children. Methods From a study population of 140 children aged seven to 10 years, a sample of 31 children with flat feet was identified by screening with the FPI-6. Basic anthropometric measures were compared between subjects with and without flat feet as designated. Results The results of this study, in contrast to many others, question the association of flat feet and heavy children. A significant relationship between foot posture and weight (FPI (L) r = -0.186 (p < 0.05), FPI(R) r = -0.194 (p < 0.05), waist girth (FPI (L) r = -0.213 (p < 0.05), FPI(R) r = -0.228 (p < 0.01) and BMI (FPI (L) r = -0.243 (p < 0.01), FPI(R) r = -0.263 (p < 0.01) was identified, but was both weak and inverse. Conclusions This study presents results which conflict with those of many previous investigations addressing the relationship between children's weight and foot posture. In contrast to previous studies, the implication of these results is that heavy children have less flat feet. Further investigation is warranted using a standardized approach to assessment and a larger sample of children to test this apparent contradiction. PMID:21513507

  6. Distinctive intrahepatic characteristics of paediatric and adult pathogenesis of chronic hepatitis C infection.

    PubMed

    Valva, P; Gismondi, M I; Casciato, P C; Galoppo, M; Lezama, C; Galdame, O; Gadano, A; Galoppo, M C; Mullen, E; De Matteo, E N; Preciado, M V

    2014-12-01

    Mechanisms leading to liver damage in chronic hepatitis C (CHC) are being discussed, but both the immune system and the virus are involved. The aim of this study was to evaluate intrahepatic viral infection, apoptosis and portal and periportal/interface infiltrate in paediatric and adult patients to elucidate the pathogenesis of chronic hepatitis C. HCV-infected, activated caspase-3(+) and TUNEL(+) hepatocytes, as well as total, CD4(+), CD8(+), Foxp3(+) and CD20(+) lymphocytes infiltrating portal and periportal/interface tracts were evaluated in 27 paediatric and 32 adult liver samples by immunohistochemistry or immunofluorescence. The number of infected hepatocytes was higher in paediatric than in adult samples (p 0.0078). In children, they correlated with apoptotic hepatocytes (activated caspase-3(+) r = 0.74, p < 0.0001; TUNEL(+) r = 0.606, p 0.0017). Also, infected (p = 0.026) and apoptotic hepatocytes (p = 0.03) were associated with the severity of fibrosis. In adults, activated caspase-3(+) cell count was increased in severe hepatitis (p = 0.009). Total, CD4(+), CD8(+) and Foxp3(+) lymphocyte count was higher in adult samples (p < 0.05). Paediatric CD8(+) cells correlated with infected (r = 0.495, p 0.04) and TUNEL(+) hepatocytes (r = 0.474, p = 0.047), while adult ones correlated with activated caspase-3(+) hepatocytes (r = 0.387, p 0.04). In adults, CD8(+) was associated with hepatitis severity (p < 0.0001) and correlated with inflammatory activity (CD8(+) r = 0.639, p 0.0003). HCV, apoptosis and immune response proved to be involved in CHC pathogenesis of both paediatric and adult patients. However, liver injury in paediatric CHC would be largely associated with a viral cytopathic effect mediated by apoptosis, while in adults it would be mainly associated with an exacerbated immune response.

  7. Delivery of paediatric rheumatology care in the UK--the projected shortfall.

    PubMed

    Foster, Helen E; Harrison, Mark J; Pain, Clare E; Symmons, Deborah P M; Baildam, Eileen M

    2011-05-01

    Adult rheumatologists in the UK have historically provided a significant contribution to clinical care for children with rheumatic disease. However, changes in postgraduate training have resulted in adult rheumatology trainees no longer being trained in paediatric rheumatology (PRh), and accordingly, they will be ill-equipped to manage children when incumbent adult rheumatology specialists retire. The objectives of this work were to ascertain the number of UK adult rheumatologists currently involved in PRh care and to inform future workforce planning. As part of the British Society for Rheumatology annual consultant workforce survey, additional questions relating to PRh were included. A questionnaire was sent to 584 adult rheumatologists, of whom 403 (69%) responded to questions about PRh; of these, 75 of 403 (19%) reported seeing children and many will retire in the next 5 and 10 years (13/75 (18%) and 35/75 (48%), respectively). The majority (58/75, 78%) reported having separate clinics for children, often alongside other health care professionals (mostly consultant paediatrician, paediatric rheumatologist, or allied health professional). Notably, 4 of 75 (5%) adult rheumatologists had clinical sessions seeing children without any paediatric input. The median (IQR) number of paediatric consultations by adult rheumatologists per month was 10 (6, 15), equating to a total 931 paediatric consultations per average month. Many UK adult rheumatologists are involved in managing paediatric rheumatic disease and many will retire over the next 10 years. This will result in a shortfall in clinical provision as their replacements in adult rheumatology will not have had appropriate PRh training. This projected shortfall needs to be addressed in future workforce planning.

  8. Interaction of Crohn's Disease Susceptibility Genes in an Australian Paediatric Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Josef; Sim, Winnie H.; Ellis, Justine A.; Ong, Eng K.; Catto-Smith, Anthony G.; Cameron, Donald J. S.; Bishop, Ruth F.; Kirkwood, Carl D.

    2010-01-01

    Genetic susceptibility is an important contributor to the pathogenesis of Crohn's disease (CD). We investigated multiple CD susceptibility genes in an Australian paediatric onset CD cohort. Newly diagnosed paediatric onset CD patients (n = 72) and controls (n = 98) were genotyped for 34 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 18 genetic loci. Gene-gene interaction analysis, gene-disease phenotype analysis and genetic risk profiling were performed for all SNPs and all genes. Of the 34 SNPs analysed, four polymorphisms on three genes (NOD2, IL23R, and region 3p21) were significantly associated with CD status (p<0.05). All three CD specific paediatric polymorphisms on PSMG1 and TNFRSF6B showed a trend of association with p<0.1. An additive gene-gene interaction involving TLR4, PSMG1, TNFRSF6B and IRGM was identified with CD. Genes involved in microbial processing (TLR4, PSMG1, NOD2) were significantly associated either at the individual level or in gene-gene interactive roles. Colonic disease was significantly associated with disease SNP rs7517847 (IL23R) (p<0.05) and colonic and ileal/colonic disease was significantly associated with disease SNP rs125221868 (IBD5) and SLC22A4 & SLC22A4/5 variants (p<0.05). We were able to demonstrate genetic association of several genes to CD in a paediatric onset cohort. Several of the observed associations have not been reported previously in association with paediatric CD patients. Our findings demonstrate that CD genetic susceptibility in paediatric patients presents as a complex interaction between numerous genes. PMID:21079743

  9. Assessment of Diet and Physical Activity in Paediatric Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease Patients: A United Kingdom Case Control Study.

    PubMed

    Gibson, Philippa S; Lang, Sarah; Gilbert, Marianne; Kamat, Deepa; Bansal, Sanjay; Ford-Adams, Martha E; Desai, Ashish P; Dhawan, Anil; Fitzpatrick, Emer; Moore, J Bernadette; Hart, Kathryn H

    2015-11-26

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common cause of chronic liver disease in children, with prevalence rising alongside childhood obesity rates. This study aimed to characterise the habitual diet and activity behaviours of children with NAFLD compared to obese children without liver disease in the United Kingdom (UK). Twenty-four biopsy-proven paediatric NAFLD cases and eight obese controls without biochemical or radiological evidence of NAFLD completed a 24-h dietary recall, a Physical Activity Questionnaire (PAQ), a Dutch Eating Behavior Questionnaire (DEBQ) and a 7-day food and activity diary (FAD), in conjunction with wearing a pedometer. Groups were well matched for age and gender. Obese children had higher BMI z-scores (p = 0.006) and BMI centiles (p = 0.002) than participants with NAFLD. After adjusting for multiple hypotheses testing and controlling for differences in BMI, no differences in macro- or micronutrient intake were observed as assessed using either 24-h recall or 7-day FAD (p > 0.001). Under-reporting was prevalent (NAFLD 75%, Obese Control 87%: p = 0.15). Restrained eating behaviours were significantly higher in the NAFLD group (p = 0.005), who also recorded more steps per day than the obese controls (p = 0.01). In conclusion, this is the first study to assess dietary and activity patterns in a UK paediatric NAFLD population. Only a minority of cases and controls were meeting current dietary and physical activity recommendations. Our findings do not support development of specific dietary/ physical activity guidelines for children with NAFLD; promoting adherence with current general paediatric recommendations for health should remain the focus of clinical management.

  10. Paediatric cardiovascular clinical trials: an analysis of ClinicalTrials.gov and the Food and Drug Administration Pediatric Drug Labeling Database.

    PubMed

    Hill, Kevin D; Henderson, Heather T; Hornik, Christoph P; Li, Jennifer S

    2015-08-01

    Recent regulatory initiatives in the United States of America and Europe have transformed the paediatric clinical trials landscape by significantly increasing capital investment and paediatric trial volume. The purpose of this manuscript was to review the impact of these initiatives on the paediatric cardiovascular trials landscape when compared with other paediatric sub-specialties. We also evaluate factors that may have contributed to the success or failure of recent major paediatric cardiovascular trials so as to inform the optimal design and conduct of future trials in the field.

  11. Good practice guidelines for clinical psychologists working in paediatric cochlear implant teams.

    PubMed

    Bathgate, Fionna; Bennett, Emily; Cropper, Jenny; Edwards, Lindsey; Emond, Alice; Gamble, Caroline; Kentish, Rosie; Samuel, Victoria

    2013-11-01

    There are relatively few clinical psychologists working in paediatric cochlear implant centres in the UK and in this respect we lag behind other countries such as the USA and The Netherlands. In an effort to promote the added value our profession can offer teams, the clinical psychologists working in paediatric CI centres have put together good practice guidelines. This article outlines the rationale for putting together the guidelines, highlights the unique contribution clinical psychologists can offer, outlines the evidence base for psychological input in this clinical population, and offers a fictional case study for illustration.

  12. Beyond counting cases: public health impacts of national Paediatric Surveillance Units

    PubMed Central

    Grenier, D; Elliott, E J; Zurynski, Y; Pereira, R Rodrigues; Preece, M; Lynn, R; von Kries, R; Zimmermann, H; Dickson, N P; Virella, D

    2007-01-01

    Paediatric Surveillance Units (PSUs) have been established in 14 countries and facilitate national, prospective, active surveillance for a range of conditions, with monthly reporting by child health specialists. The International Network of Paediatric Surveillance Units (INoPSU) was established in 1998 and facilitates international collaboration among member PSUs and allows for sharing of resources, simultaneous data collection and hence comparison of data from different geographical regions. The impact of data collected by PSUs, both individually and collectively as members of INoPSU, on public health outcomes, clinical care and research is described. PMID:17158859

  13. Progress review of the European Paediatric Regulatory Framework after six years of implementation.

    PubMed

    Mentzer, Dirk

    2014-08-05

    The EU regulation (EU 1901/2006 Paediatric Regulation) that entered into force in 2007 has changed the field of medicinal drug development for children in the EU. Five years after its implementation a large number changes due to this regulation have been incorporated by Pharmaceutical Industry considering the development of new candidate drug. This report is a review of changes already implemented and the aspects of paediatric drug development, which still needs to be addressed in future working in the fields to provide better medicines for children.

  14. Off-label use of maraviroc in HIV-1-infected paediatric patients in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Palladino, Claudia; Gómez, María Luisa Navarro; Soler-Palacín, Pere; González-Tomé, María Isabel; De Ory, Santiago J; Espiau, María; Hoyos, Santiago Pérez; León-Leal, Juan Antonio; Méndez, María; Moreno-Pérez, David; Guasch, Claudia Fortuny; Sierra, Antoni Mur; Guruceta, Itziar Pocheville; Guillén, Santiago Moreno; Briz, Verónica

    2015-10-23

    Maraviroc (MVC) is not approved for HIV-1-infected paediatric patients. This is the first assessment of the use of MVC-based salvage therapy in vertically HIV-1-infected paediatric patients in clinical settings. The results suggest that MVC-based salvage therapy is useful in children and adolescents with extensive resistance profile leading to maintained virological suppression in up to 88% of the patients with CCR5-tropic virus. The likelihood of treatment success might increase when MVC is combined with other active drugs.

  15. Immunization of high-risk paediatric populations: Central European Vaccination Awareness Group recommendations.

    PubMed

    Richter, Darko; Anca, Ioana; André, Francis E; Bakir, Mustafa; Chlibek, Roman; Čižman, Milan; Mangarov, Atanas; Mészner, Zsófia; Pokorn, Marko; Prymula, Roman; Salman, Nuran; Simurka, Pavol; Tamm, Eda; Tešović, Goran; Urbančíková, Ingrid; Usonis, Vytautas; Wysocki, Jacek; Zavadska, Dace; Central European Vaccination Awareness Group

    2014-06-01

    Over the last decade, childhood immunization has substantially reduced morbidity and mortality from vaccine-preventable diseases. However, particular paediatric risk groups, such as those with comorbidities, may not be adequately vaccinated despite being more susceptible to complications and death from certain infectious diseases. This may be due to lack of immunization recommendations, lack of awareness, or incomplete adherence to existing guidelines. Furthermore, recommendations for immunization can be inconsistent across Europe. An expanded initiative from the Central European Vaccination Awareness Group aims to raise awareness of the different high-risk paediatric groups, differentiate them according to their specific risk, and formalise a guidance statement for the immunization of each population.

  16. [Vaccination schedule of the Spanish Association of Paediatrics: recommendations 2011].

    PubMed

    Marès Bermúdez, J; van Esso Arbolave, D; Moreno-Pérez, D; Merino Moína, M; Alvarez García, F J; Cilleruelo Ortega, M J; Arístegui Fernández, J; Ortigosa del Castillo, L; Ruiz-Contreras, J; Barrio Corrales, F; González-Hachero, J

    2011-02-01

    The Advisory Committee on Vaccines of the Spanish Paediatric Association updates annually the immunization schedule, taking into account epidemiological data as well as evidence of the effectiveness and efficiency of vaccines. This vaccination schedule includes grades of recommendation. The committee has graded as universal vaccines those that all children should receive, as recommended, those with a profile of universal vaccines of childhood and as are desirable those that all children may receive, but that can be prioritized based on public funding resources and for risk groups, targeting those groups of people in epidemiological situations of risk. The Committee considers as a priority to achieve a common immunization schedule for Spain. The Committee reaffirms the recommendation to include pneumococcal vaccination in the routine vaccination schedule. Vaccination against varicella in the second year of life is an effective strategy and therefore a desirable goal. Given the morbidity and high burden on the health care system, vaccination against rotavirus is recommended for all infants. Due to the current problems of availability of both vaccines, associated with the recent finding of circovirus, the committee urges that rotavirus vaccination is restarted as soon as possible as it is considered a desirable health benefit for all children in our country. The Committee adheres to the recommendations of the National Health Coordination Council in reference to routine vaccination against HPV for all girls aged 11 to 14 years and stresses the need to vaccinate all patients with risk factors for these diseases against influenza and hepatitis A. Finally, it stresses the need to update incomplete immunizations using accelerated immunization schedules.

  17. Plasma Cell-Free DNA in Paediatric Lymphomas

    PubMed Central

    Mussolin, Lara; Burnelli, Roberta; Pillon, Marta; Carraro, Elisa; Farruggia, Piero; Todesco, Alessandra; Mascarin, Maurizio; Rosolen, Angelo

    2013-01-01

    Background: Extracellular circulating DNA (cfDNA) can be found in small amounts in plasma of healthy individuals. Increased levels of cfDNA have been reported in patients with cancer of breast, cervix, colon, liver and it was shown that cfDNA can originate from both tumour and non-tumour cells. Objectives: Levels of cfDNA of a large series of children with lymphoma were evaluated and analyzed in relation with clinical characteristics. Methods: plasma cfDNA levels obtained at diagnosis in 201 paediatric lymphoma patients [43 Hodgkin lymphomas (HL), 45 anaplastic large cell lymphomas (ALCL), 88 Burkitt lymphomas (BL), 17 lymphoblastic (LBL), 8 diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL)] and 15 healthy individuals were determined using a quantitative PCR assay for POLR2 gene and, in addition, for NPM-ALK fusion gene in ALCL patients. Wilcoxon rank sum test was used to compare plasma levels among different patient subgroups and controls and to analyze relationship between levels of cfDNA and clinical characteristics. Results: Levels of cfDNA in lymphoma patients were significantly higher compared with controls (p<0.0001). CfDNA was associated with median age (p=0.01) in HL, and with stage in ALCL (p=0.01). In HL patients high cfDNA levels were correlated with poor prognosis (p=0.03). In ALCL we found that most of the cfDNA (77%) was non-tumor DNA. Conclusion: level of plasma cfDNA might constitute an important non-invasive tool at diagnosis in lymphoma patients' management; in particular in patients with HL, cfDNA seems to be a promising prognostic biomarker. PMID:23678368

  18. Evidence in immunotherapy for paediatric respiratory allergy: Advances and recommendations.

    PubMed

    Tortajada-Girbés, M; Mesa Del Castillo, M; Larramona, H; Lucas, J M; Álvaro, M; Tabar, A I; Jerez, M J; Martínez-Cañavate, A

    2016-11-01

    Allergic respiratory diseases are major health problems in paediatric population due their high level of prevalence and chronicity, and to their relevance in the costs and quality of life. One of the most important risk factors for the development of airway diseases in children and adolescents is atopy. The mainstays for the treatment of these diseases are avoiding allergens, controlling symptoms, and preventing them through sustained desensitization by allergen immunotherapy (AIT). AIT is a treatment option that consists in the administration of increasing amounts of allergens to modify the biological response to them, inducing long-term tolerance even after treatment has ended. This treatment approach has shown to decrease symptoms and improve quality of life, becoming cost effective for a large number of patients. In addition, it is considered the only treatment that can influence the natural course of the disease by targeting the cause of the allergic inflammatory response. The aim of this publication is to reflect the advances of AIT in the diagnosis and treatment of allergic respiratory diseases in children and adolescents reviewing articles published since 2000, establishing evidence categories to support the strength of the recommendations based on evidence. The first part of the article covers the prerequisite issues to understand how AIT is effective, such as the correct etiologic and clinical diagnosis of allergic respiratory diseases. Following this, the article outlines the advancements in understanding the mechanisms by which AIT achieve immune tolerance to allergens. Administration routes, treatment regimens, dose and duration, efficacy, safety, and factors associated with adherence are also reviewed. Finally, the article reviews future advances in the research of AIT.

  19. Predicting mortality for paediatric inpatients where malaria is uncommon

    PubMed Central

    Clifton, Dana C; Ramadhani, Habib O; Msuya, Levina J; Njau, Boniface N; Kinabo, Grace D; Buchanan, Ann M; Crump, John A

    2012-01-01

    Objective As the proportion of children living low malaria transmission areas in sub-Saharan Africa increases, approaches for identifying non-malarial severe illness need to be evaluated to improve child outcomes. Design As a prospective cohort study, we identified febrile paediatric inpatients, recorded data using Integrated Management of Childhood Illness (IMCI) criteria, and collected diagnostic specimens. Setting Tertiary referral centre, northern Tanzania. Results Of 466 participants with known outcome, median age was 1.4 years (range 2 months–13.0 years), 200 (42.9%) were female, 11 (2.4%) had malaria and 34 (7.3%) died. Inpatient death was associated with: Capillary refill >3 s (OR 9.0, 95% CI 3.0 to 26.7), inability to breastfeed or drink (OR 8.9, 95% CI 4.0 to 19.6), stiff neck (OR 7.0, 95% CI 2.8 to 17.6), lethargy (OR 5.2, 95% CI 2.5 to 10.6), skin pinch >2 s (OR 4.8, 95% CI 1.9 to 12.3), respiratory difficulty (OR 4.0, 95% CI 1.9 to 8.2), generalised lymphadenopathy (OR 3.6, 95% CI 1.6 to 8.3) and oral candidiasis (OR 3.4, 95% CI 1.4 to 8.3). BCS <5 (OR 27.2, p<0.001) and severe wasting (OR 6.9, p<0.001) were independently associated with inpatient death. Conclusions In a low malaria transmission setting, IMCI criteria performed well for predicting inpatient death from non-malarial illness. Laboratory results were not as useful in predicting death, underscoring the importance of clinical examination in assessing prognosis. Healthcare workers should consider local malaria epidemiology as malaria over-diagnosis in children may delay potentially life-saving interventions in areas where malaria is uncommon. PMID:22872067

  20. New developments in paediatric cardiac functional ultrasound imaging.

    PubMed

    de Korte, Chris L; Nillesen, Maartje M; Saris, Anne E C M; Lopata, Richard G P; Thijssen, Johan M; Kapusta, Livia

    2014-07-01

    Ultrasound imaging can be used to estimate the morphology as well as the motion and deformation of tissues. If the interrogated tissue is actively deforming, this deformation is directly related to its function and quantification of this deformation is normally referred as 'strain imaging'. Tissue can also be deformed by applying an internal or external force and the resulting, induced deformation is a function of the mechanical tissue characteristics. In combination with the load applied, these strain maps can be used to estimate or reconstruct the mechanical properties of tissue. This technique was named 'elastography' by Ophir et al. in 1991. Elastography can be used for atherosclerotic plaque characterisation, while the contractility of the heart or skeletal muscles can be assessed with strain imaging. Rather than using the conventional video format (DICOM) image information, radio frequency (RF)-based ultrasound methods enable estimation of the deformation at higher resolution and with higher precision than commercial methods using Doppler (tissue Doppler imaging) or video image data (2D speckle tracking methods). However, the improvement in accuracy is mainly achieved when measuring strain along the ultrasound beam direction, so it has to be considered a 1D technique. Recently, this method has been extended to multiple directions and precision further improved by using spatial compounding of data acquired at multiple beam steered angles. Using similar techniques, the blood velocity and flow can be determined. RF-based techniques are also beneficial for automated segmentation of the ventricular cavities. In this paper, new developments in different techniques of quantifying cardiac function by strain imaging, automated segmentation, and methods of performing blood flow imaging are reviewed and their application in paediatric cardiology is discussed.

  1. [Immunisation schedule of the Spanish Association of Paediatrics: 2016 recommendations].

    PubMed

    Moreno-Pérez, D; Álvarez García, F J; Arístegui Fernández, J; Cilleruelo Ortega, M J; Corretger Rauet, J M; García Sánchez, N; Hernández Merino, A; Hernández-Sampelayo Matos, T; Merino Moína, M; Ortigosa del Castillo, L; Ruiz-Contreras, J

    2016-01-01

    The Advisory Committee on Vaccines of the Spanish Association of Paediatrics (CAV-AEP) annually publishes the immunisation schedule which, in our opinion, estimates optimal for children resident in Spain, considering available evidence on current vaccines. We acknowledge the effort of the Ministry of Health during the last year in order to optimize the funded unified Spanish vaccination schedule, with the recent inclusion of pneumococcal and varicella vaccination in early infancy. Regarding the funded vaccines included in the official unified immunization schedule, taking into account available data, CAV-AEP recommends 2+1 strategy (2, 4 and 12 months) with hexavalent (DTPa-IPV-Hib-HB) vaccines and 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine. Administration of Tdap and poliomyelitis booster dose at the age of 6 is recommended, as well as Tdap vaccine for adolescents and pregnant women, between 27-36 weeks gestation. The two-dose scheme should be used for MMR (12 months and 2-4 years) and varicella (15 months and 2-4 years). Coverage of human papillomavirus vaccination in girls aged 11-12 with a two dose scheme (0, 6 months) should be improved. Information for male adolescents about potential beneficial effects of this immunisation should be provided as well. Regarding recommended unfunded immunisations, CAV-AEP recommends the administration of meningococcal B vaccine, due to the current availability in Spanish communitary pharmacies, with a 3+1 scheme (3, 5, 7 and 13-15 months). CAV-AEP requests the incorporation of this vaccine in the funded unified schedule. Vaccination against rotavirus is recommended in all infants. Annual influenza immunisation and vaccination against hepatitis A are indicated in population groups considered at risk.

  2. [Immunisation schedule of the Spanish Association of Paediatrics: 2015 recommendations].

    PubMed

    Moreno-Pérez, D; Álvarez García, F J; Arístegui Fernández, J; Cilleruelo Ortega, M J; Corretger Rauet, J M; García Sánchez, N; Hernández Merino, A; Hernández-Sampelayo Matos, T; Merino Moína, M; Ortigosa Del Castillo, L; Ruiz-Contreras, J

    2015-01-01

    The Advisory Committee on Vaccines of the Spanish Association of Paediatrics updates the immunisation schedule every year, taking into account epidemiological data as well as evidence on the safety, effectiveness and efficiency of current vaccines, including levels of recommendation. In our opinion, this is the optimal vaccination calendar for all children resident in Spain. Regarding the vaccines included in the official unified immunization schedule, the Committee emphasizes the administration of the first dose of hepatitis B either at birth or at 2 months of life; the recommendation of the first dose of MMR and varicella vaccine at the age of 12 months, with the second dose at the age of 2-3 years; DTaP or Tdap vaccine at the age of 6 years, followed by another Tdap booster dose at 11-12 years old; Tdap strategies for pregnant women and household contacts of the newborn, and immunization against human papillomavirus in girls aged 11-12 years old with a 2 dose scheme (0, 6 months). The Committee reasserts its recommendation to include vaccination against pneumococcal disease in the routine immunisation schedule, the same as it is being conducted in Western European countries. The recently authorised meningococcal B vaccine, currently blocked in Spain, exhibits the profile of a universal vaccine. The Committe insists on the need of having the vaccine available in communitary pharmacies. It has also proposed the free availability of varicella vaccines. Their efectiveness and safety have been confirmed when they are administred from the second year of life. Vaccination against rotavirus is recommended in all infants. The Committee stresses the need to vaccinate population groups considered at risk against influenza and hepatitis A.

  3. [Immunisation schedule of the Spanish Association of Paediatrics: 2017 recommendations].

    PubMed

    Moreno-Pérez, David; Álvarez García, Francisco José; Arístegui Fernández, Javier; Cilleruelo Ortega, María José; Corretger Rauet, José María; García Sánchez, Nuria; Hernández Merino, Ángel; Hernández-Sampelayo Matos, Teresa; Merino Moína, Manuel; Ortigosa Del Castillo, Luis; Ruiz-Contreras, Jesús

    2017-02-01

    The Advisory Committee on Vaccines of the Spanish Association of Paediatrics (CAV- AEP) annually publishes the immunisation schedule which, in our opinion, is considered optimal for children resident in Spain, taking into account the evidence available on current vaccines. Pneumococcal and varicella immunisation in early childhood is already included in all funded vaccines present in the regional immunisation programmes. Furthermore, this committee establishes recommendations on vaccines not included in official calendars (non-funded immunisations), such as rotavirus, meningococcal B, and meningococcal ACWY. As regards funded immunisations, 2+1 strategy (2, 4, 11-12 months) with hexavalent (DTaP-IPV-Hib-HB) and 13-valent pneumococcal vaccines is recommended. Administration of the 6-year booster dose with DTaP is recommended, as well as a poliomyelitis dose for children who had received the 2+1 scheme, with the Tdap vaccine for adolescents and pregnant women between 27 and 32 weeks gestation. The two-dose scheme should be used for MMR (12 months and 2-4 years) and varicella (15 months and 2-4 years). Coverage of human papillomavirus vaccination in girls aged 12 with a two-dose scheme (0, 6 months) should be improved. Information and recommendations for male adolescents about potential beneficial effects of the tetravalent HPV vaccine should also be provided. ACWY meningococcal vaccine is the optimal choice in adolescents. For recommended unfunded immunisations, the CAV-AEP recommends the administration of meningococcal B vaccine, due to the current availability in Spanish community pharmacies, with a 3+1 scheme. CAV-AEP requests the incorporation of this vaccine in the funded unified schedule. Vaccination against rotavirus is recommended in all infants.

  4. Modelling seasonal variations in presentations at a paediatric emergency department.

    PubMed

    Takase, Miyuki; Carlin, John

    2012-09-01

    Overcrowding is a phenomenon commonly observed at emergency departments (EDs) in many hospitals, and negatively impacts patients, healthcare professionals and organisations. Health care organisations are expected to act proactively to cope with a high patient volume by understanding and predicting the patterns of ED presentations. The aim of this study was, therefore, to identify the patterns of patient flow at a paediatric ED in order to assist the management of EDs. Data for ED presentations were collected from the Royal Children's Hospital in Melbourne, Australia, with the time-frame of July 2003 to June 2008. A linear regression analysis with trigonometric functions was used to identify the pattern of patient flow at the ED. The results showed that a logarithm of the daily average ED presentations was increasing exponentially (as explained by 0.004t + 0.00005t2 with t representing time, p<0.001). The model also indicated that there was a yearly oscillation in the frequency of ED presentations, in which lower frequencies were observed in summer and higher frequencies during winter (as explained by -0.046 sin(2(pi)t/12)-0.083 cos(2(pi)t/12), p<0.001). In addition, the variation of the oscillations was increasing over time (as explained by -0.002t*sin(2(pi)t/12)-0.001t*cos(2(pi)t/12), p<0.05). The identified regression model explained a total of 96% of the variance in the pattern of ED presentations. This model can be used to understand the trend of the current patient flow as well as to predict the future flow at the ED. Such an understanding will assist health care managers to prepare resources and environment more effectively to cope with overcrowding.

  5. Implementation of smart pump technology in a paediatric intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Manrique-Rodríguez, Silvia; Sánchez-Galindo, Amelia C; de Lorenzo-Pinto, Ana; González-Vives, Leticia; López-Herce, Jesús; Carrillo-Álvarez, Ángel; Sanjurjo-Sáez, María; Fernández-Llamazares, Cecilia M

    2015-09-01

    Patient safety is a matter of major concern that involves every health professional. Nowadays, emerging technologies such as smart pumps can diminish medication errors as well as standardise and improve clinical practice with the subsequent benefits for patients. The aim of this paper was to describe the smart pump implementation process in a paediatric intensive care unit (PICU) and to present the most relevant infusion-related programming errors that were prevented. This was a comparative study between CareFusion Alaris Guardrails(®) and Hospira MedNet(®) systems, as well as a prospective and intervention study with analytical components carried out in the PICU of Gregorio Marañón General and Teaching Hospital. All intravenous infusions programmed with a pump in the eleven beds of the unit were analyzed. A drug library was developed and subsequently loaded into CareFusion and Hospira pumps that were used during a three month period each. The most suitable system for implementation was selected according to their differences in features and users' acceptance. Data stored in the pumps were analyzed to assess user compliance with the technology, health care setting and type of errors intercepted. The implementation process was carried out with CareFusion systems. Compliance with the technology was 92% and user acceptance was high. Vacation substitution and drug administration periods were significantly associated with a greater number of infusion-related programming errors. High risk drugs were involved in 48% of intercepted errors. Based on these results we can conclude that implementation of smart pumps proved effective in intercepting infusion-related programming errors from reaching patients. User awareness of the importance of programming infusions with the drug library is the key to succeed in the implementation process.

  6. Community paediatric respiratory infection surveillance study protocol: a feasibility, prospective inception cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Emma C; Ingle, Suzanne Marie; Muir, Peter; Beck, Charles; Finn, Adam; Leeming, John Peter; Cabral, Christie; Kesten, Joanna May; Hay, Alastair D

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Paediatric respiratory tract infections (RTIs) are common reasons for primary care consultations and antibiotic prescribing. Locally relevant syndromic and microbiological surveillance information has the potential to improve the care of children with RTIs by normalising illness (parents) and reducing uncertainty (clinicians). Currently, most RTI studies are conducted at the point of healthcare service consultation, leaving the community burden, microbiology, symptom duration and proportion consulting largely unknown. This study seeks to establish the feasibility of (mainly online) participant recruitment and retention, and the acceptability/comparability of parent versus nurse-collected microbiological sampling, to inform the design of a future surveillance intervention study. Evidence regarding consultation rates and symptom duration is also sought. Methods and analysis A community-based, feasibility prospective inception cohort study, recruiting children aged ≥3 months and <16 years and their parents via general practitioner surgery invitation letter, aiming to collect data on 300 incident RTIs by July 2016. Following informed consent, parents provide baseline (demographic) data online, and respond to weekly emails to confirm the absence/presence of new RTI symptoms. Once symptomatic, parents provide daily data online (RTI symptoms, school/day-care attendance, time off work, health service use, medication), and a research nurse visits to collect clinical examination data and microbiological (nasal and saliva) swabs. Parents are invited to provide symptomatic (at nurse visit, but without nurse assistance) and asymptomatic (alone) swabs on recovery. A review of primary care medical notes will gather medical history, health service utilisation, referral and antibiotic prescribing rates. Feasibility will be assessed using recruitment and retention rates, data completeness; and acceptability by quantitative survey and qualitative interviews

  7. Antimicrobial use in paediatric patients in a teaching hospital in Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Kebede, Hafte Kahsay; Gesesew, Hailay Abrha; Woldehaimanot, Tewodros Eyob; Goro, Kabaye Kumela

    2017-01-01

    Background Antibiotics use in in children are different from adults due to a lack of data on pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, efficacy and safety of drugs, different physiological spectrum, pediatrics populations being vulnerable to the majority of the illnesses, and the adverse effect of their irrational use is more serious. However, antibiotic use is not explored much in a paediatric population. The current study focused on antibiotic use among pediatric population using data from a tertiary hospital in Ethiopia. Methods A retrospective cross-sectional study collated data from 614 pediatrics patients admitted in pediatrics ward at Jimma University Teaching Hospital, Southwest Ethiopia. Descriptive analyses were performed to describe the type and pattern of antibiotics. The number of prescriptions per a patient was also compared with the WHO standard. Data analysis was carried out using SPSS version 20 for mackintosh. Results Antimicrobials were prescribed for 407(86.4%) patients of which 85.9% were in the form of injectables. A total of 1241 (90%) medicines were administered parenterally followed by oral 110 (8%). The maximum number of medicines per prescription was eight for all types of drugs in general, and five for antimicrobials in particular. All antimicrobials were prescribed empirically without any microbiological evidence. Pneumonia, sepsis and meningitis were the main reasons for antimicrobial use in the ward. Out of the total of 812 antibiotics prescribed; Penicillin G crystalline was the most (20%) frequently prescribed, followed by gentamicin (19%) and ampicillin (16). Conclusions Majority of the prescribed antibiotics were antimicrobials, and was in the form of injectables. Antimicrobials were over prescribed and the number of drugs per prescription was also far from WHO recommendation. Strict prescribing standard guidelines and treatment habits should be developed in the country, to prevent antimicrobial resistance. PMID:28264021

  8. Review of calls to NHS Direct related to attendance in the paediatric emergency department

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, B; Fairhurst, R; Markland, J; Marzouk, O

    2006-01-01

    Objective To examine the outcomes of calls to NHS Direct (NHS‐D) in relation to attendance at the accident and emergency (A&E) department. Design A prospective collection of data about consecutive calls to NHS‐D North West Coast was matched with attendances at the A&E department over a period of 3 months. Setting NHS‐D Regional Trust and a large urban paediatric A&E department. Patients Children and young adults aged <16 years living in local postal code areas. Main outcome measures To examine (1) whether advice given by NHS‐D was followed and (2) the differences in disease severity and necessity of attendance of patients referred by NHS‐D and those referred by general practitioners and self‐presenters. Results The relationship between the advice given and subsequent action is complex. Only 70% of calls advised to attend the A&E department did so. A further 1% (176) were advised not to attend the A&E department did in fact attend the department. Patients referred by NHS‐D represented only 3.2% of department attendances. There was little difference in the triage categories of the presenting groups, but there were significantly less admissions (p<0.01) in the NHS‐D group. Conclusions Delivering telephone advice about illness severity in children is difficult as visual clues are so important. More collaborative prospective studies are needed, including with primary care, to understand families' choices, and to refine and assess NHS‐D's ability to discriminate those requiring further clinical assessment. PMID:17130596

  9. Regional anaesthesia to improve pain outcomes in paediatric surgical patients: a qualitative systematic review of randomized controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Suresh, S; Schaldenbrand, K; Wallis, B; De Oliveira, G S

    2014-09-01

    Summary The development of analgesic interventions in paediatric surgical patients is often limited by the inherent difficulties of conducting large randomized clinical trials to test interventions in those patients. Regional anaesthesia is a valid strategy to improve postoperative pain in the adult surgical population, but the effects of regional anaesthesia on postoperative pain outcomes in paediatric patients are currently not well defined. The main objective of the current review was to systematically evaluate the use of regional anaesthesia techniques to minimize postoperative pain in paediatric patients. A systematic search was performed to identify randomized controlled trials that evaluated the effects of the regional anaesthesia techniques on postoperative pain outcomes in paediatric surgical patients' procedures. Seventy-three studies on 5125 paediatric patients were evaluated. Only few surgical procedures had more than one small randomized controlled trial favouring the use of regional anaesthesia to minimize postoperative pain (ophthalmological surgery, cleft lip repair, inguinal hernia, and urological procedures). Additional evidence is required to support the use of specific regional anaesthesia techniques to improve postoperative pain for several surgical procedures (craniectomy, adenotonsillectomy, appendectomy, cardiac surgery, umbilical hernia repair, upper and lower extremity) in paediatric patients. Currently, only a very limited number of regional anaesthesia techniques have demonstrated significant improvement on postoperative pain outcomes for a restricted number of surgical procedures. More studies are needed in order to establish regional anaesthesia as a valid strategy to improve analgesia in the paediatric surgical population.

  10. Childhood Fever Management Program for Korean Paediatric Nurses: A Comparison between Blended and Face-to-Face Learning Method.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Yong Sun; Kim, Jin Sun

    2014-11-28

    Abstract Background: A blended learning can be a useful learning strategy to improve the quality of fever and fever management education for paediatric nurses. Aim: This study compared the effects of a blended and face-to-face learning program on paediatric nurses' childhood fever management, using Theory of Planned Behavior. Methods/Design: A nonequivalent control group pretest-posttest design was used. A fevermanagement education program using blended learning (combining face-to-face and online learning components) was offered to 30 paediatric nurses, and 29 paediatric nurses received face-to-face training. Results/Findings: Learning outcomes did not significantly differ between the two groups. However, learners' satisfaction was higher for the blended learning program than the face-toface learning program. Conclusion: A blended-learning paediatric fever management program was as effective as a traditional face-to-face learning program. Therefore, a blended-learning paediatric fever management-learning program could be a useful and flexible learning method for paediatric nurses.

  11. Identification of an autosomal recessive mode of inheritance in paediatric Behçet's families by segregation analysis.

    PubMed

    Molinari, N; Koné Paut, I; Manna, R; Demaille, J; Daures, J P; Touitou, I

    2003-10-01

    We have conducted a segregation analysis in order to characterise the transmission of Behçet Disease (BD), a multifactorial condition with a strong genetic component. Complete information about BD status and pedigree was obtained on 104 probands from our database. We used the criteria of the International Study Group for BD (ISBD) to delineate the clinical status of the sibs: possible BD (patients meeting two criteria), or ascertained BD (patients meeting at least three criteria). A proband was defined as "paediatric" when he/she completed ISBD criteria before/by the age of 16 years. Families were distinguished as paediatric (n = 67) (ascertained through a paediatric proband), and non-paediatric (n = 37) ones. An Expectation Maximization (EM) algorithm was used to estimate the Mendelian segregation ratio P in nuclear families (two parents and their offspring). The maximum likelihood estimate: Pcirc; = 0.248, calculated in the paediatric data set, was consistent with the theoretical value of P = (1/4) for autosomal recessive inheritance, whereas the Pcirc; value was 0.08 when using the non-paediatric data set. Our work provides the first evidence of genetic heterogeneity in BD, and of the existence of a Mendelian entity in the paediatric BD subgroup. Previous studies failed to show any simple mode of inheritance in BD, probably because they were performed on the whole BD population.

  12. From pharmacovigilance to therapy amelioration in paediatric patients: the role of the clinical pharmacologists and family paediatricians. Part of a series on Paediatric Pharmacology, guest edited by Gianvincenzo Zuccotti, Emilio Clementi, and Massimo Molteni.

    PubMed

    Napoleone, Ettore; Radice, Sonia

    2012-02-01

    An active pharmacovigilance approach is advisable in paediatric pharmacotherapy as it contributes to generate knowledge promptly and to enhance the estimation of true risk in clinical practice. Reports and studies from the scientific community and regulatory agencies have shown that effective methods for early detection of adverse drug reaction and pharmacoepidemiological studies are a primary need since they increase drug safety in the paediatric population. In this perspective article we describe how pharmacologists and paediatricians may actively synergise to optimise drug therapies and their management in paediatric patients.

  13. Inequalities in the Provision of Paediatric Speech and Language Therapy Services across London Boroughs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pring, Tim

    2016-01-01

    Background: The inverse-care law suggests that fewer healthcare resources are available in deprived areas where health needs are greatest. Aims: To examine the provision of paediatric speech and language services across London boroughs and to relate provision to the level of deprivation of the boroughs. Methods & Procedures: Information on the…

  14. Filtration to reduce paediatric dose for a linear slot-scanning digital X-ray machine.

    PubMed

    Perks, T D; Dendere, R; Irving, B; Hartley, T; Scholtz, P; Lawson, A; Trauernicht, C; Steiner, S; Douglas, T S

    2015-12-01

    This paper describes modelling, application and validation of a filtration technique for a linear slot-scanning digital X-ray system to reduce radiation dose to paediatric patients while preserving diagnostic image quality. A dose prediction model was implemented, which calculates patient entrance doses using variable input parameters. Effective dose is calculated using a Monte Carlo simulation. An added filter of 1.8-mm aluminium was predicted to lower the radiation dose significantly. An objective image quality study was conducted using detective quantum efficiency (DQE). The PTW Normi 4FLU test phantom was used for quantitative assessment, showing that image contrast and spatial resolution were maintained with the proposed filter. A paediatric cadaver full-body imaging trial assessed the diagnostic quality of the images and measured the dose reduction using a 1.8-mm aluminium filter. Assessment by radiologists indicated that diagnostic quality was maintained with the added filtration, despite a reduction in DQE. A new filtration technique for full-body paediatric scanning on the Lodox Statscan has been validated, reducing entrance dose for paediatric patients by 36 % on average and effective dose by 27 % on average, while maintaining image quality.

  15. European Paediatric Formulation Initiative (EuPFI)-Formulating Ideas for Better Medicines for Children.

    PubMed

    Salunke, Smita; Liu, Fang; Batchelor, Hannah; Walsh, Jenny; Turner, Roy; Ju, Tzuchi Rob; Tuleu, Catherine

    2017-02-01

    The European Paediatric Formulation Initiative (EuPFI), founded in 2007, aims to promote and facilitate the preparation of better and safe medicines for children through linking research and information dissemination. It brings together the capabilities of the industry, academics, hospitals, and regulators within a common platform in order to scope the solid understanding of the major issues, which will underpin the progress towards the future of paediatric medicines we want.The EuPFI was formed in parallel to the adoption of regulations within the EU and USA and has served as a community that drives research and dissemination through publications and the organisation of annual conferences. The membership and reach of this group have grown since its inception in 2007 and continue to develop and evolve to meet the continuing needs and ambitions of research into and development of age appropriate medicines. Five diverse workstreams (age-appropriate medicines, Biopharmaceutics, Administration Devices, Excipients and Taste Assessment & Taste Masking (TATM)) direct specific workpackages on behalf of the EuPFI. Furthermore, EuPFI interacts with multiple diverse professional groups across the globe to ensure efficient working in the area of paediatric medicines. Strong commitment and active involvement of all EuPFI stakeholders have proved to be vital to effectively address knowledge gaps related to paediatric medicines, discuss potential areas for further research and identify issues that need more attention and analysis in the future.

  16. Bilateral facial palsy: a form of neuroborreliosis presentation in paediatric age

    PubMed Central

    Francisco, Telma; Marques, Marília; Vieira, José Pedro; Brito, Maria João

    2013-01-01

    Bilateral facial palsy (BFP) is a very uncommon entity, particularly in the paediatric age group. Despite its several aetiologies, neuroborreliosis should be suspected, especially in children from endemic areas presenting with acute neurological disease of unknown cause. We present two cases of BFPs as the presenting forms of neuroborreliosis. PMID:23396928

  17. Movie making as a cognitive distraction for paediatric patients receiving radiotherapy treatment: qualitative interview study

    PubMed Central

    Shrimpton, Bradley J M; Willis, David J; Tongs, Cáthal D; Rolfo, Aldo G

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To establish the outcomes achieved by using an innovative movie-making programme designed to reduce fear of radiotherapy among paediatric patients. Design Qualitative descriptive evaluation based on semistructured, qualitative interviews with purposeful sampling and thematic analysis. Setting Tertiary Cancer Centre. Participants 20 parents of paediatric patients who had produced a movie of their radiation therapy experience and were in a follow-up phase of cancer management. Results Participants attributed a broad range of outcomes to the movie-making program. These included that the programme had helped reduce anxiety and distress exhibited by paediatric patients and contributed to a willingness to receive treatment. Other outcomes were that the completed movies had been used in school reintegration and for maintaining social connections. Conclusions Allowing children to create a video of their experience of radiotherapy provided a range of benefits to paediatric patients that varied according to their needs. For some patients, movie-making offered a valuable medium for overcoming fear of the unknown as well as increasing understanding of treatment processes. For others, the development of a personalised video offered an important cognitive/attentional distraction through engaging with an age-appropriate activity. Together these outcomes helped children maintain self-control and a positive outlook. PMID:23328308

  18. Hereditary ataxias and paediatric neurology: new movers and shakers enter the field.

    PubMed

    Morrison, Patrick J

    2003-01-01

    Over 25 autosomal dominant and autosomal recessive spinocerebellar ataxias have been isolated over the last decade. The recognition of paediatric ataxia phenotypes and, in addition, other movement disorders including hereditary choreiform and parkinsonian syndromes, has improved our knowledge of these diseases. Advances in molecular genetics has allowed fuller delineation and better recognition of these diseases.

  19. Proteomics-based discovery of biomarkers for paediatric acute lymphoblastic leukaemia: challenges and opportunities

    PubMed Central

    López Villar, Elena; Wu, Duojiao; Cho, William C; Madero, Luis; Wang, Xiangdong

    2014-01-01

    There are important breakthroughs in the treatment of paediatric acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) since 1950, by which the prognosis of the child majority suffered from ALL has been improved. However, there are urgent needs to have disease-specific biomarkers to monitor the therapeutic efficacy and predict the patient prognosis. The present study overviewed proteomics-based research on paediatric ALL to discuss important advances to combat cancer cells and search novel and real protein biomarkers of resistance or sensitivity to drugs which target the signalling networks. We highlighted the importance and significance of a proper phospho-quantitative design and strategy for paediatric ALL between relapse and remission, when human body fluids from cerebrospinal, peripheral blood, or bone-marrow were applied. The present article also assessed the schedule for the analysis of body fluids from patients at different states, importance of proteomics-based tools to discover ALL-specific and sensitive biomarkers, to stimulate paediatric ALL research via proteomics to ‘build’ the reference map of the signalling networks from leukemic cells at relapse, and to monitor significant clinical therapies for ALL-relapse. PMID:24912534

  20. Paediatric necrotizing fasciitis complicating third molar extraction: report of a case.

    PubMed

    Ricalde, P; Engroff, S L; Jansisyanont, P; Ord, R A

    2004-06-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis is an uncommon but well-described entity. In the paediatric population compromising risk factors are frequently absent. We describe the successful treatment of a case of cervicofacial necrotizing fasciitis in a healthy 14-year-old male following routine extraction of an uninfected wisdom tooth for orthodontic purposes.

  1. Safety and effectiveness of total splenic vessel ligations in paediatric patients with splenomegaly

    PubMed Central

    Zhen, Chen; Lishuang, Ma; Jinshan, Zhang; Guoliang, Qiao; Wangchen; Zhen, Zhang; Shuili, Liu; Jun, Zhang; Kaoping, Guan; Long, Li

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUNDS: Splenomegaly may contribute to hypersplenism and can result in thrombocytopenia. Many approaches are used to treat splenomegaly; however, the current management of splenomegaly has intrinsic limitations or disadvantages. Now, we initiate a new approach, that of total splenic vessel (artery and vein) ligations (TSVLs) in paediatric patients with splenomegaly. The purpose of our study is to evaluate the results obtained with TVSLs procedure for paediatric patients. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Seventeen paediatric patients with splenomegaly were screened for enrolment into this retrospective analysis. PROCEDURE: We identified and dissociated the splenic vessel. Next, we ligated the splenic artery and we used clips to ligate the vein distally and proximally. RESULT: The mean [standard deviation (SD)] splenic infarction rate of a total of 17 patients was 77.5 (5.1)% in 6 months after operation. After TSVL, the mean count of platelet (PLT) and white blood cell (WBC) increased significantly and reached a steady state in the third month. Both the PLT and WBC had a significance higher than pre-TSVL in a 1-year follow-up. CONCLUSION: Based on the evidence, we make cautious conclusions that TSVLs are a safe and effective method in the treatment of paediatric patients with splenomegaly, achieving a satisfactory long-term haematological response and benefit. PMID:27609328

  2. Ischemic stroke in paediatrics - narrative review of the literature and two cases.

    PubMed

    Klucka, Jozef; Stourac, Petr; Stoudek, Roman; Toukalkova, Michaela; Harazim, Hana; Kosinova, Martina; Stouracova, Alena; Mrlian, Andrej; Suk, Petr; Malaska, Jan

    2017-03-01

    Stroke is a rare condition in childhood with an estimated incidence of between 1.3-13/100.000 patients. Clinical manifestation and risk factors for paediatric stroke are different from those of adults. The uncommon incidence, age-associated difference and plethora of clinical symptoms make the diagnosis of such strokes extremely difficult and often delayed. The history and clinical examination should point to diseases or predisposing factors. Neuroimaging (DWI MR) is the golden standard for diagnosis of paediatric stroke and other investigations can be considered according to the clinical condition. Despite advances in paediatric stroke research and clinical care, questions remain unanswered regarding acute treatment, secondary prevention and rehabilitation. The treatment recommendations are mainly extrapolated from studies on adult populations. In the review authors summarized the clinical characteristics and diagnostic steps for stroke in children/adolescents based on the most recent international guidelines and practical directions for recognising and managing the child/adolescent with stroke in paediatric emergency. In the two case reports, we describe the clinical course in both stroke patients.

  3. Systemic exposure to menthol following administration of peppermint oil to paediatric patients

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Peppermint oil (PMO) has been used to treat abdominal ailments dating to ancient Egypt, Greece and Rome. Despite its increasing paediatric use, as in irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) treatment, the pharmacokinetics (PK) of menthol in children given PMO has not been explored. Single-site, exploratory p...

  4. An Overview of a UK Paediatric Visual Impaired Population and Low Vision Aid Provision

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Theodorou, Nana; Shipman, Tracey

    2013-01-01

    A retrospective study was carried out to evaluate the paediatric visual impaired population attending the Low Vision Clinic at Sheffield Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, over a period of 14 years. Data were collected and analysed for children less than 17 years for prevalence, demographics, registration status, aetiologies, and types of…

  5. The Self-Directed Learning Experience of Mothers Whose Child Has Had a Paediatric Stroke

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grover, Kenda S.

    2014-01-01

    This study employed qualitative research methodology to explore the experiences of mothers who self-directed their learning following their child's stroke diagnosis. Paediatric stroke, although rare, is among the top 10 causes of death in children in the USA, but information about the cause, treatment and long-term impact are difficult to…

  6. Early clinical experience with a new preloaded one-piece intraocular lens in paediatric cataract surgery.

    PubMed

    Gosling, D B; Chan, T K J

    2016-09-01

    PurposeTo report the clinical experience of using the Tecnis PCB00 (Abbott Medical Optics, Santa Ana, CA, USA) preloaded one-piece intraocular lens (IOL) in the setting of a tertiary referral centre for paediatric cataract.MethodsA retrospective case note review of all paediatric cataract surgeries using the Tecnis PCB00 IOL, at a single UK paediatric ophthalmology department.ResultsNine eyes in seven patients received the IOL between December 2014 and January 2016. All patients underwent lens aspiration and insertion of the IOL 'in the bag.' The indications for surgery included developmental cataract (8/9) and traumatic cataract (1/9). Mean age at the time of surgery was 7 years (range 2-14). The median improvement in logMAR best-corrected visual acuity was 0.475 (range 0.250-1.500). The mean follow-up duration was 5 months (range 1-13). No operative or post-operative complications occurred as a result of using the device.ConclusionThe Tecnis PCB00 preloaded IOL appears to be a safe and effective device in treating paediatric cataract.

  7. Reduced N400 Semantic Priming Effects in Adult Survivors of Paediatric and Adolescent Traumatic Brain Injury

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knuepffer, C.; Murdoch, B. E.; Lloyd, D.; Lewis, F. M.; Hinchliffe, F. J.

    2012-01-01

    The immediate and long-term neural correlates of linguistic processing deficits reported following paediatric and adolescent traumatic brain injury (TBI) are poorly understood. Therefore, the current research investigated event-related potentials (ERPs) elicited during a semantic picture-word priming experiment in two groups of highly functioning…

  8. Proteomics-based discovery of biomarkers for paediatric acute lymphoblastic leukaemia: challenges and opportunities.

    PubMed

    López Villar, Elena; Wu, Duojiao; Cho, William C; Madero, Luis; Wang, Xiangdong

    2014-07-01

    There are important breakthroughs in the treatment of paediatric acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) since 1950, by which the prognosis of the child majority suffered from ALL has been improved. However, there are urgent needs to have disease-specific biomarkers to monitor the therapeutic efficacy and predict the patient prognosis. The present study overviewed proteomics-based research on paediatric ALL to discuss important advances to combat cancer cells and search novel and real protein biomarkers of resistance or sensitivity to drugs which target the signalling networks. We highlighted the importance and significance of a proper phospho-quantitative design and strategy for paediatric ALL between relapse and remission, when human body fluids from cerebrospinal, peripheral blood, or bone-marrow were applied. The present article also assessed the schedule for the analysis of body fluids from patients at different states, importance of proteomics-based tools to discover ALL-specific and sensitive biomarkers, to stimulate paediatric ALL research via proteomics to 'build' the reference map of the signalling networks from leukemic cells at relapse, and to monitor significant clinical therapies for ALL-relapse.

  9. Paediatric respiratory nursing posts in secondary care reduce asthma morbidity, but provision is variable.

    PubMed

    McKean, M; Furness, J

    2009-08-01

    British guidelines on asthma recommend nurse delivered structured discharges for all children with asthma. This study carried out a postal and telephone survey to investigate the provision of this service. Twenty out of 34 (59%) hospitals in the Northern and Yorkshire regions do not have a recognised paediatric respiratory nurse post to facilitate this aspect of care.

  10. Identifying futility in a paediatric critical care setting: a prospective observational study

    PubMed Central

    Goh, A; Mok, Q

    2001-01-01

    AIMS—To determine the extent of futile care provided to critically ill children admitted to a paediatric intensive care setting.
METHODS—Prospective evaluation of consecutive admissions to a 20 bedded multidisciplinary paediatric intensive care unit of a North London teaching hospital over a nine month period. Three previously defined criteria for futility were used: (1) imminent demise futility (those with a mortality risk greater than 90% using the Paediatric Risk of Mortality (PRISM II) score); (2) lethal condition futility (those with conditions incompatible with long term survival); and (3) qualitative futility (those with unacceptable quality of life and high morbidity).
RESULTS—A total of 662 children accounting for 3409 patient bed days were studied. Thirty four patients fulfilled at least one of the criteria for futility, and used a total of 104 bed days (3%). Only 33 (0.9%) bed days were used by patients with mortality risk greater than 90%, 60 (1.8%) by patients with poor long term prognosis, and 16 (0.5%) by those with poor quality of life. Nineteen of 34 patients died; withdrawal of treatment was the mode of death in 15 (79%).
CONCLUSIONS—Cost containment initiatives focusing on futility in the paediatric intensive care unit setting are unlikely to be successful as only relatively small amounts of resources were used in providing futile care. Paediatricians are recognising futility early and may have taken ethically appropriate measures to limit care that is futile.

 PMID:11207181

  11. The prioritisation of paediatrics and palliative care in cancer control plans in Africa

    PubMed Central

    Weaver, M S; Yao, A J J; Renner, L A; Harif, M; Lam, C G

    2015-01-01

    Background: Given the burden of childhood cancer and palliative care need in Africa, this paper investigated the paediatric and palliative care elements in cancer control plans. Methods: We conducted a comparative content analysis of accessible national cancer control plans in Africa, using a health systems perspective attentive to context, development, scope, and monitoring/evaluation. Burden estimates were derived from World Bank, World Health Organisation, and Worldwide Palliative Care Alliance. Results: Eighteen national plans and one Africa-wide plan (10 English, 9 French) were accessible, representing 9 low-, 4 lower-middle-, and 5 upper-middle-income settings. Ten plans discussed cancer control in the context of noncommunicable diseases. Paediatric cancer was mentioned in 7 national plans, representing 5127 children, or 13% of the estimated continental burden for children aged 0–14 years. Palliative care needs were recognised in 11 national plans, representing 157 490 children, or 24% of the estimated Africa-wide burden for children aged 0–14 years; four plans specified paediatric palliative needs. Palliative care was itemised in four budgets. Sample indicators and equity measures were identified, including those highlighting contextual needs for treatment access and completion. Conclusions: Recognising explicit strategies and funding for paediatric and palliative services may guide prioritised cancer control efforts in resource-limited settings. PMID:26042935

  12. Paediatric CT optimisation utilising Catphan® 600 and age-specific anthropomorphic phantoms.

    PubMed

    Santos, Joana; Batista, Maria do Carmo; Foley, Shane; Paulo, Graciano; McEntee, Mark F; Rainford, Louise

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of the study is to perform phantom-based optimisation of paediatric computed tomography (CT) protocols and quantify the impact upon radiation dose and image noise levels. The study involved three Portuguese paediatric centres. Currently employed scanning protocols for head and chest examinations and combinations of exposure parameters were applied to a Catphan(®)600 phantom to review the CT dose impact. Contrast-noise ratio (CNR) was quantified using Radia Diagnostic(®) tool. Imaging parameters, returning similar CNRs (<1) and dose savings were applied to three paediatric anthropomorphic phantoms. OsiriX software based on standard deviation pixel values facilitated image noise analysis. Currently employed protocols and age categorisation varied between centres. Manipulation of exposure parameters facilitated mean dose reductions of 33 and 28 % for paediatric head and chest CT examinations, respectively. The majority of the optimised CT examinations resulted in image noise similar to currently employed protocols. Dose reductions of up to 33 % were achieved with image quality maintained.

  13. Personalized medicine in the paediatric population: the balance between pharmacogenetics progress and bioethics.

    PubMed

    Schiavone, Stefania; Neri, Margherita; Pomara, Cristoforo; Riezzo, Irene; Trabace, Luigia; Turillazzi, Emanuela

    2017-02-07

    Personalized medicine (PM) is becoming increasingly important in contemporary clinical and research scenarios. In the context of PM, pharmacogenomics and pharmacogenetics are aimed at the genetic personalization of drug response. Extrinsic and intrinsic factors may explain inter-individual variability in drug response. Among such factors, age seems to specifically intervene to modulate drug response since normal developmental changes may influence the exposure-response relation. Consequently, the potential benefit of pharmacogenomics (PGx) in the paediatric population is considerable. However, many challenges still exist in incorporating PGx into clinical practice. In fact, drug prescribing in the paediatric population is often based on extrapolation from clinical trials conducted on adults as there is often a lack of paediatric data. Children are not just 'small adults', as they have their own pharmacological characteristics in terms of drug metabolism and efficacy, adverse drug reactions and toxicity. Although children might potentially benefit from such research, many ethical concerns arise at the intersection of the spheres of drug development and genetic testing. Children require particular attention because of their vulnerability both in research and the clinical applications of PGx; furthermore, children range from preterm newborns and neonates to infants and toddlers and to adolescents, thus forming a further heterogeneous target group. In this paper, we focus on some ethically relevant concerns (i.e., informed consent, stigmatization, ancillary information) that might arise as a result of the possible application of PGx tests in both paediatric practice and research.

  14. Hippocratic views on Paediatric Dentistry and Ancient Greek origins of Orthodontics.

    PubMed

    Tsoucalas, G; Kousoulis, A A; Karamanou, M; Marineli, F; Tsoucalas, I; Androutsos, G

    2012-12-01

    Hippocrates, the father of medicine, expressed some very interesting ideas on dentistry. His remarks on paediatric dentistry and orthodontics are quite impressive and influenced its practice in ancient Greece. Here we examine his writings in order to find the most important dental references.

  15. Professional and organizational commitment in paediatric occupational therapists: the influence of practice setting.

    PubMed

    Seruya, Francine M; Hinojosa, Jim

    2010-09-01

    The professional and organizational commitment of paediatric occupational therapists working in two distinct practice settings, schools and medically based settings, was investigated. A web-based survey program was used to administer a questionnaire to occupational therapists employed in New York, New Jersey and Connecticut. The study employed social identity theory as a guiding perspective in understanding therapists' professional and organizational commitment. One hundred and fifty-seven paediatric therapists responded to the Professional Commitment Questionnaire and the Organizational Commitment Questionnaire to gauge their commitment to both the profession and their employing organizations. Results indicated that paediatric therapists, regardless of employment setting, have high professional commitment. Paediatric occupational therapists employed in medically based settings indicated statistically significant higher organizational commitment than their school-based counterparts. For therapists that work in school settings, the presence of a professional cohort did not influence professional commitment scores. As the study employed a web-based survey methodology, only individuals who were members of associations and had access to a computer and the Internet were able to participate. Further study might include widening the participant pool as well as adding additional instruments to explore both professional and organizational commitment on a more national scale.

  16. Education and training in the paediatric senior house officer grade: analysis of RCPCH hospital/child health visits reports, 1997–2001

    PubMed Central

    Smith, C; Anderson, J

    2003-01-01

    Methods: Retrospective audit of visits reports (1997–2001) against the RCPCH criteria for general professional training. Hospital and/or community child health departments who were responsible for training paediatric senior house officers were visited to assess whether RCPCH criteria of education were being met. Follow up visits were undertaken where limited education and training approval was given. Reports were received from 214 of 242 (88%) hospital and/or community based departments in England, Wales, and Northern Ireland. Results: Satisfactory achievement of the 12 training criteria by departments varied widely: 39–95% (median 66%) achieved. Follow up visits reported significant improvements in most departments. Criteria which departments struggled to achieve reasonable standards were: (1) ensuring SHOs were performing educationally appropriate duties (39% achieved); and (2) satisfactory outpatient experience (41% achieved). Twenty four per cent of hospital based departments did not have a paediatrician with 12 months or more experience of paediatrics resident on call. Conclusions: The visiting process highlighted areas of good practice, encouraged change to meet the criteria, and recommended increased resources and staffing where necessary to improve training and hence the service. The need for continuing approval for education and training in these departments encouraged significant efforts on the part of trainers and managers to meet the requirements, and consequently the quality of service to children has been enhanced. PMID:12716724

  17. Chiropractic care for paediatric and adolescent Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Psychostimulants are first line of therapy for paediatric and adolescent AD/HD. The evidence suggests that up to 30% of those prescribed stimulant medications do not show clinically significant outcomes. In addition, many children and adolescents experience side-effects from these medications. As a result, parents are seeking alternate interventions for their children. Complementary and alternative medicine therapies for behavioural disorders such as AD/HD are increasing with as many as 68% of parents having sought help from alternative practitioners, including chiropractors. Objective The review seeks to answer the question of whether chiropractic care can reduce symptoms of inattention, impulsivity and hyperactivity for paediatric and adolescent AD/HD. Methods Electronic databases (Cochrane CENTRAL register of Controlled Trials, Cochrane Database of Systematic reviews, MEDLINE, PsycINFO, CINAHL, Scopus, ISI Web of Science, Index to Chiropractic Literature) were searched from inception until July 2009 for English language studies for chiropractic care and AD/HD. Inclusion and exclusion criteria were applied to select studies. All randomised controlled trials were evaluated using the Jadad score and a checklist developed from the CONSORT (Consolidated Standards of Reporting Trials) guidelines. Results The search yielded 58 citations of which 22 were intervention studies. Of these, only three studies were identified for paediatric and adolescent AD/HD cohorts. The methodological quality was poor and none of the studies qualified using inclusion criteria. Conclusions To date there is insufficient evidence to evaluate the efficacy of chiropractic care for paediatric and adolescent AD/HD. The claim that chiropractic care improves paediatric and adolescent AD/HD, is only supported by low levels of scientific evidence. In the interest of paediatric and adolescent health, if chiropractic care for AD/HD is to continue, more rigorous scientific research needs to

  18. Effect of reducing the paediatric stavudine dose by half: a physiologically-based pharmacokinetic model

    PubMed Central

    Sy, Sherwin K.B.; Malmberg, Ruben; Matsushima, Aoi; Asin-Prieto, Eduardo; Rosenkranz, Bernd; Cotton, Mark F.; Derendorf, Hartmut; Innes, Steve

    2016-01-01

    Owing to significant dose-related toxicity, the adult stavudine dose was reduced in 2007. The paediatric dose, however, has not been reduced. Although the intended paediatric dose is 1 mg/kg twice daily (b.i.d.), the current weight-band dosing approach results in a mean actual dose of 1.23 ± 0.47 mg/kg. Both efficacy and mitochondrial toxicity depend on the concentration of the intracellular metabolite stavudine triphosphate (d4T-TP). We simulated the effect of reducing the paediatric dose to 0.5 mg/kg. A physiologically-based pharmacokinetic model consisting of 13 tissue compartments plus a full ADAM model was used to describe the elimination of stavudine. The volume of distribution at steady-state and apparent oral clearance were simulated and the resulting AUC profile was compared with literature data in adult and paediatric populations. A biochemical reaction model was utilised to simulate intracellular d4T-TP levels for both the standard and proposed reduced paediatric doses. Simulated and observed exposure after oral dosing showed adequate agreement. Mean steady-state d4T-TP for 1.23 mg/kg b.i.d. was 27.9 (90% CI 27.0–28.9) fmol/106 cells, 25% higher than that achieved by the 40 mg adult dose. The 0.5 mg/kg dose resulted in d4T-TP of 13.2 (12.7–13.7) fmol/106 cells, slightly higher than the adult dose of 20 mg b.i.d. [11.5 (11.2–11.9) fmol/106 cells], which has excellent antiviral efficacy and substantially less toxicity. Current paediatric dosing may result in even higher d4T-TP than the original 40 mg adult dose. Halving the paediatric dose would significantly reduce the risk of mitochondrial toxicity without compromising antiviral efficacy. PMID:25697412

  19. Stenotrophomonas maltophilia: An Emerging Pathogen in Paediatric Population

    PubMed Central

    Nayyar, Charu; Thakur, Preeti; Saigal, Karnika

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Stenotrophomonas maltophilia (formerly Pseudomonas maltophilia/Xanthomonas maltophilia), a Gram- negative, non-fermenting bacillus, is being increasingly recognized as a threatening nosocomial pathogen, associated with significant mortality. Aim To determine the prevalence of infection, antimicrobial susceptibility pattern and clinical outcome of S. maltophilia in a paediatric population. Materials and Methods This was a retrospective study conducted over a period of eight months, i.e., October 2015 to May 2016. All clinical samples received in the microbiology laboratory during the study period were processed using standard microbiological procedures. S. maltophilia isolates were selected. Antibiotic susceptibility was performed for levofloxacin and trimethoprim-sulphamethoxazole by Vitek 2C system (Biomerieux, France). Average length of stay and mortality caused by S. maltophilia infection was compared with age and sex matched controls without S. maltophilia infection. Results A total of 16,234 clinical specimens were received in the microbiology laboratory in the study period, with 2,734 pathogenic bacteria isolated. A total of 1,339 (1.7% of total isolates) Gram-negative bacteria were isolated, out of which 414 were non-fermenters. Among the non-fermenters, 23 (5.5%) were S. maltophilia. Out of the 23 isolates, 15 (65.2%) were isolated from blood, 4 (17.3%) were isolated from urine and tracheal aspirate each. A total of 91.3% of strains were susceptible and 8.6% were resistant to trimethoprim-sulphamethoxazole. Total 80% of strains were sensitive and 20% had intermediate susceptibility for levofloxacin. None of the strains were resistant to levofloxacin. Average length of stay of patients with S. maltophilia infection was found out to be 23.3 days as compared to 44.8 days in controls. The average mortality of patients with S. maltophilia infection was found to be same as that of controls (35.2%). Conclusion S. maltophilia is becoming an important

  20. [Immunisation schedule of the Spanish Association of Paediatrics: 2014 recommendations].

    PubMed

    Moreno-Pérez, D; Alvarez García, F J; Arístegui Fernández, J; Cilleruelo Ortega, M J; Corretger Rauet, J M; García Sánchez, N; Hernández Merino, A; Hernández-Sampelayo Matos, T; Merino Moína, M; Ortigosa Del Castillo, L; Ruiz-Contreras, J

    2014-01-01

    The Advisory Committee on Vaccines of the Spanish Association of Paediatrics (CAV-AEP) updates the immunisation schedule every year, taking into account epidemiological data as well as evidence on safety, effectiveness and efficiency of vaccines. The present schedule includes levels of recommendation. We have graded, as routine vaccinations, those that the CAV-AEP consider all children should receive; as recommended those that fit the profile for universal childhood immunisation and would ideally be given to all children, but that can be prioritised according to the resources available for their public funding; and as risk group vaccinations those that specifically target individuals in special situations. Immunisation schedules tend to be dynamic and adaptable to ongoing epidemiological changes. Based on the latest epidemiological trends, CAV-AEP recommends the administration of the first dose of MMR and varicella vaccines at age 12 months, with the second dose at age 2-3 years; the administration of DTaP or Tdap vaccine at age 4-6 years, always followed by another Tdap dose at 11-12 years; and the three meningococcal C scheme at 2 months, 12 months and 12 years of age. It reasserts its recommendation to include vaccination against pneumococcal disease in the routine immunisation schedule. The CAV-AEP believes that the coverage of vaccination against human papillomavirus in girls aged 11-12 years must be increased. Universal vaccination against varicella in the second year of life is an effective strategy, and the immediate public availability of the vaccine is requested in order to guarantee the right of healthy children to be vaccinated. Vaccination against rotavirus is recommended in all infants due to the morbidity and elevated healthcare burden of the virus. The Committee stresses the need to vaccinate population groups considered at risk against influenza and hepatitis A. The recently authorised meningococcal B vaccine has opened a chapter of hope in the

  1. [Immunisation schedule of the Spanish Association of Paediatrics: 2013 recommendations].

    PubMed

    Moreno-Pérez, D; Álvarez García, F J; Arístegui Fernández, J; Barrio Corrales, F; Cilleruelo Ortega, M J; Corretger Rauet, J M; González-Hachero, J; Hernández-Sampelayo Matos, T; Merino Moína, M; Ortigosa Del Castillo, L; Ruiz-Contreras, J

    2013-01-01

    The Advisory Committee on Vaccines of the Spanish Association of Paediatrics (CAV-AEP) updates the immunisation schedule every year, taking into account epidemiological data as well as evidence on the safety, effectiveness and efficiency of vaccines. The present schedule includes levels of recommendation. We have graded as routine vaccinations those that the CAV-AEP consider all children should receive; as recommended those that fit the profile for universal childhood immunisation and would ideally be given to all children, but that can be prioritised according to the resources available for their public funding; and as risk group vaccinations those that specifically target individuals in situations of risk. Immunisation schedules tend to be dynamic and adaptable to ongoing epidemiological changes. Nevertheless, the achievement of a unified immunisation schedule in all regions of Spain is a top priority for the CAV-AEP. Based on the latest epidemiological trends, CAV-AEP follows the innovations proposed in the last year's schedule, such as the administration of the first dose of the MMR and the varicella vaccines at age 12 months and the second dose at age 2-3 years, as well as the administration of the Tdap vaccine at age 4-6 years, always followed by another dose at 11-14 years of age, preferably at 11-12 years. The CAV-AEP believes that the coverage of vaccination against human papillomavirus in girls aged 11-14 years, preferably at 11-12 years, must increase. It reasserts its recommendation to include vaccination against pneumococcal disease in the routine immunisation schedule. Universal vaccination against varicella in the second year of life is an effective strategy and therefore a desirable objective. Vaccination against rotavirus is recommended in all infants due to the morbidity and elevated healthcare burden of the virus. The Committee stresses the need to vaccinate population groups considered at risk against influenza and hepatitis A. Finally, it

  2. The UK Paediatric Familial Hypercholesterolaemia Register: preliminary data

    PubMed Central

    Ramaswami, Uma; Cooper, Jackie; Humphries, Steve E

    2017-01-01

    Background The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence 2008 guidelines on the treatment and management of familial hypercholesterolaemia (FH) recommend that children with FH should be considered for statin treatment by the age of 10 years. The Paediatric FH Register was established in 2012 to collect baseline and long-term follow-up data on all children with FH in the UK. Methods Paediatricians and adult lipidologists have been invited to enter baseline data on any child with a clinical diagnosis of FH using an electronic capture record. Results Baseline data is on 232 children (50% boys, 80% Caucasian), with an untreated mean (SD) total cholesterol of 7.61 (1.48) mmol/L and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) of 5.67 (1.46) mmol/L. Overall 111/232 (47.8%) of the children were on statins. Children over the age of 10 years at the most recent follow-up were twice as likely to be on statin treatment than those under 10 years (57.6% (102/177) vs 23.1% (9/39), p=0.00009). In both age groups, those subsequently on statin treatment had significantly higher diagnostic total and LDL-C (overall 6.01 (1.46) mmol/L vs 5.31 (1.37) mmol/L, p=0.00007), and had stronger evidence of a family history of early coronary heart disease (CHD) in parent or first-degree relative (overall 28.4% vs 19.0%, p=0.09). In statin-treated children LDL-C level was reduced by 35% (2.07 (1.38) mmol/L) compared with a reduction of 5.5% (0.29 (0.87) mmol/L), p=0.0001 in those not treated. None of those on statin had measured plasma levels of creatine kinase, alanine aminotransferase and AST indicative of statin toxicity (ie, >2.5 times the upper limit of the normal range). Conclusions The data indicates that treatment decisions in children with FH are appropriately based on a stronger family history of CHD and higher LDL-C. PMID:26948823

  3. Paediatric Prescription Analysis in a Primary Health Care Institution

    PubMed Central

    Devassykutty, Denny

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Paediatric prescription analysis was done by vari-ous studies in tertiary care centers but not much published data, at primary care level. The Medical Council of India introduced new prescription format and also antibiotic stewardship program was launched by Government of Kerala in the year 2015. So in these contexts this study was conducted. Aim To analyse the patterns of prescriptions and drug dis-pensing in pediatric patients using WHO core drug use indicators and parameters in the prescription format prescribed by Medical Council of India. Materials and Methods Prospective study was done at a community health center, for a period of four months where parents of children attending the outpatient department were interviewed and the prescriptions and medicines that is with them was examined and analysed for any prescription errors or dispensing errors. For statistical analysis, quantitative variables were expressed in mean and standard deviation and qualitative variables in percentages. Results The mean age of the patients was 6.1 (SD±3.4) years. The average number of drugs prescribed was 2.29 (SD±35.91), 98.4% drugs were prescribed by generic name. Majority of drugs prescribed were in the form of syrups (62.73%), use of antibiotics was frequent (73.18%), but injection use was very minimal (0.006%). Weight of the patient was recorded in 58.33% of the prescriptions. Only 30 prescriptions (5.43%) were written in capital letters. A 100% of the prescriptions contain the details of the child along with provisional diagnosis and signature of the doctor. A 98.44% of the drugs prescribed were from the essential drug list. Copy of the essential drug list is available at the institution. The availability of key drugs was 100%. 98.73% knew the correct dosages and 100% of the drugs were adequately labeled. Conclusion The prescription pattern is in accordance with the standard guidelines of WHO. Interventions are needed to rectify over prescription of

  4. Promoting a combination approach to paediatric HIV psychosocial support.

    PubMed

    Amzel, Anouk; Toska, Elona; Lovich, Ronnie; Widyono, Monique; Patel, Tejal; Foti, Carrie; Dziuban, Eric J; Phelps, B Ryan; Sugandhi, Nandita; Mark, Daniella; Altschuler, Jenny

    2013-11-01

    Ninety percent of the 3.4 million HIV-infected children live in sub-Saharan Africa. Their psychosocial well being is fundamental to establishing and maintaining successful treatment outcomes and overall quality of life. With the increased roll-out of antiretroviral treatment, HIV infection is shifting from a life-threatening to a chronic disease. However, even for paediatric patients enrolled in care and treatment, HIV can still be devastating due to the interaction of complex factors, particularly in the context of other household illness and overextended healthcare systems in sub-Saharan Africa.This article explores the negative effect of several interrelated HIV-specific factors on the psychosocial well being of HIV-infected children: disclosure, stigma and discrimination, and bereavement. However, drawing on clinical studies of resilience, it stresses the need to move beyond a focus on the individual as a full response to the needs of a sick child requires support for the individual child, caregiver-child dyads, extended families, communities, and institutions. This means providing early and progressive age appropriate interventions aimed at increasing the self-reliance and self-acceptance in children and their caregivers and promoting timely health-seeking behaviours. Critical barriers that cause poorer biomedical and psychosocial outcomes among children and caregiver must also be addressed as should the causes and consequences of stigma and associated gender and social norms.This article reviews interventions at different levels of the ecological model: individual-centred programs, family-centred interventions, programs that support or train healthcare providers, community interventions for HIV-infected children, and initiatives that improve the capacity of schools to provide more supportive environments for HIV-infected children. Although experience is increasing in approaches that address the psychosocial needs of vulnerable and HIV-infected children, there

  5. An evaluation of Medline published paediatric audits from 1966 to 1999

    PubMed Central

    O'Gorman, Clodagh Sheila; Ziedan, Yasir; O'Neill, Michael Brendan

    2007-01-01

    Aim To evaluate the quality of paediatric audits from 1966 to 1999. Methods A Medline search was performed using the MeSH terms audit, child, paediatric (and pediatric). Predefined core elements of audit were used as inclusion criteria for entry of an article into this study. These criteria were as follows: (1) an article deals with a healthcare topic; (2) a standard is predefined; (3) actual practice is evaluated; (4) actual practice is compared with the standard. The fifth criterion of audit, dissemination of information and reaudit, was not an inclusion criterion, as it was not used in the early years covered by this study. Empirical grading of standards was used. Results The search yielded 442 articles, of which 303 (100%) were related to paediatric healthcare and were reviewed. Standards were defined in 115 (38%) articles. Audit against the standard was performed in 92 (30.4%) articles, of which 42 (45.6%) were published before, and 50 (54.3%) after, 1990. 18 (5.9%) articles were re‐audited: 6 (14.3%) were published before, and 12 (24%) after, 1990. Of the 188 paediatric studies rejected, 119 (63.3%) described practice observations. Conclusion Many articles in paediatrics are published as “audits”, but they do not contain the core elements of audit. Although audit is a potentially valuable tool in clinical medicine, the publication of poor‐quality audits may lead to the decline of the audit concept. Suggestions on ways to improve the quality of published audits are made. PMID:16738000

  6. Adrenal Disorders and the Paediatric Brain: Pathophysiological Considerations and Clinical Implications

    PubMed Central

    Polizzi, Agata; Di Rosa, Gabriella; Romeo, Anna Claudia; Dipasquale, Valeria; Chirico, Valeria; Arrigo, Teresa; Ruggieri, Martino

    2014-01-01

    Various neurological and psychiatric manifestations have been recorded in children with adrenal disorders. Based on literature review and on personal case-studies and case-series we focused on the pathophysiological and clinical implications of glucocorticoid-related, mineralcorticoid-related, and catecholamine-related paediatric nervous system involvement. Childhood Cushing syndrome can be associated with long-lasting cognitive deficits and abnormal behaviour, even after resolution of the hypercortisolism. Exposure to excessive replacement of exogenous glucocorticoids in the paediatric age group (e.g., during treatments for adrenal insufficiency) has been reported with neurological and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) abnormalities (e.g., delayed myelination and brain atrophy) due to potential corticosteroid-related myelin damage in the developing brain and the possible impairment of limbic system ontogenesis. Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH), a disorder of unclear pathophysiology characterised by increased cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) pressure, has been described in children with hypercortisolism, adrenal insufficiency, and hyperaldosteronism, reflecting the potential underlying involvement of the adrenal-brain axis in the regulation of CSF pressure homeostasis. Arterial hypertension caused by paediatric adenomas or tumours of the adrenal cortex or medulla has been associated with various hypertension-related neurological manifestations. The development and maturation of the central nervous system (CNS) through childhood is tightly regulated by intrinsic, paracrine, endocrine, and external modulators, and perturbations in any of these factors, including those related to adrenal hormone imbalance, could result in consequences that affect the structure and function of the paediatric brain. Animal experiments and clinical studies demonstrated that the developing (i.e., paediatric) CNS seems to be particularly vulnerable to alterations induced by adrenal

  7. Paediatric admissions to the British military hospital at Camp Bastion, Afghanistan

    PubMed Central

    Arul, GS; Reynolds, J; DiRusso, S; Scott, A; Bree, S; Templeton, P; Midwinter, MJ

    2012-01-01

    INTRODUCTION International humanitarian law requires emergency medical support for both military personnel and civilians, including children. Here we present a detailed review of paediatric admissions with the pattern of injury and the resources they consume. METHODS All paediatric admissions to the hospital at Camp Bastion between 1 January and 29 April 2011 were analysed prospectively. Data collected included time and date of admission, patient age and weight, mechanism of injury, extent of wounding, treatment, length of hospital stay and discharge destination. RESULTS Eighty-five children (65 boys and 17 girls, median age: 8 years, median weight: 20kg) were admitted. In 63% of cases the indication for admission was battle related trauma and in 31% non-battle trauma. Of the blast injuries, 51% were due to improvised explosive devices. Non-battle emergencies were mainly due to domestic burns (46%) and road traffic accidents (29%). The most affected anatomical area was the extremities (44% of injuries). Over 30% of patients had critical injuries. Operative intervention was required in 74% of cases. The median time to theatre for all patients was 52 minutes; 3 patients with critical injuries went straight to theatre in a median of 7 minutes. A blood transfusion was required in 27 patients; 6 patients needed a massive transfusion. Computed tomography was performed on 62% of all trauma admissions and 40% of patients went to the intensive care unit. The mean length of stay was 2 days (range: 1–26 days) and there were 7 deaths. CONCLUSIONS Paediatric admissions make up a small but significant part of admissions to the hospital at Camp Bastion. The proportion of serious injuries is very high in comparison with admissions to a UK paediatric emergency department. The concentration of major injuries means that lessons learnt in terms of teamwork, the speed of transfer to theatre and massive transfusion protocols could be applied to UK paediatric practice. PMID:22524930

  8. Paediatric Parenting Stress in Inflammatory Bowel Disease: Application of the Pediatric Inventory for Parents

    PubMed Central

    Guilfoyle, Shanna M.; Denson, Lee A.; Baldassano, Robert N.; Hommel, Kevin A.

    2010-01-01

    Background The psychosocial functioning of caregivers of adolescents managing inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) has been understudied; yet, poor caregiver functioning can place youth at risk for compromised disease management. The current study addressed this limitation by examining a sample of caregivers of adolescents with IBD. Study aims included: 1) document rates of paediatric parenting stress, 2) identify associated sociodemographic predictors of parenting stress, and 3) compare previously published rates of parenting stress to those within other paediatric chronic conditions, including cancer, type 1 diabetes, obesity, sickle cell disease, bladder exstrophy. Methods Caregivers of adolescents with an IBD diagnosis (Mage = 15.4±1.4, 44.4% female, 88.7% Caucasian) and receiving tertiary care within a gastroenterology clinic (N = 62) completed the Pediatric Inventory for Parents (PIP) as a measure of paediatric parenting stress with Frequency and Difficulty as PIP subscales. Paediatric gastroenterologists provided disease severity assessments. Results Adolescents with IBD were experiencing relatively mild disease activity. Bivariate correlations revealed that PIP-Difficulty was positively associated with Crohn’s disease severity (r = 0.38, p < 0.01). Caregiver age was negatively associated with the frequency of parenting stress total (r = −.25, p = .05) and communication scores (r = −.25, p <.05). The frequency and difficulty of parenting stressors within the IBD sample were similar to rates within type 1 diabetes, but were significantly lower to rates identified in other paediatric chronic conditions. Conclusions Caregivers of adolescents with IBD seem to experience low rates of parenting stress when their adolescents are receiving outpatient care and during phases of IBD relative inactivity. The sociodemographic characteristics of IBD families (i.e., primarily Caucasian, well-educated, and higher socioeconomic status) likely encourage greater access to

  9. Adrenal disorders and the paediatric brain: pathophysiological considerations and clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Salpietro, Vincenzo; Polizzi, Agata; Di Rosa, Gabriella; Romeo, Anna Claudia; Dipasquale, Valeria; Morabito, Paolo; Chirico, Valeria; Arrigo, Teresa; Ruggieri, Martino

    2014-01-01

    Various neurological and psychiatric manifestations have been recorded in children with adrenal disorders. Based on literature review and on personal case-studies and case-series we focused on the pathophysiological and clinical implications of glucocorticoid-related, mineralcorticoid-related, and catecholamine-related paediatric nervous system involvement. Childhood Cushing syndrome can be associated with long-lasting cognitive deficits and abnormal behaviour, even after resolution of the hypercortisolism. Exposure to excessive replacement of exogenous glucocorticoids in the paediatric age group (e.g., during treatments for adrenal insufficiency) has been reported with neurological and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) abnormalities (e.g., delayed myelination and brain atrophy) due to potential corticosteroid-related myelin damage in the developing brain and the possible impairment of limbic system ontogenesis. Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH), a disorder of unclear pathophysiology characterised by increased cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) pressure, has been described in children with hypercortisolism, adrenal insufficiency, and hyperaldosteronism, reflecting the potential underlying involvement of the adrenal-brain axis in the regulation of CSF pressure homeostasis. Arterial hypertension caused by paediatric adenomas or tumours of the adrenal cortex or medulla has been associated with various hypertension-related neurological manifestations. The development and maturation of the central nervous system (CNS) through childhood is tightly regulated by intrinsic, paracrine, endocrine, and external modulators, and perturbations in any of these factors, including those related to adrenal hormone imbalance, could result in consequences that affect the structure and function of the paediatric brain. Animal experiments and clinical studies demonstrated that the developing (i.e., paediatric) CNS seems to be particularly vulnerable to alterations induced by adrenal

  10. Similar outcome of upfront-unrelated and matched sibling stem cell transplantation in idiopathic paediatric aplastic anaemia. A study on behalf of the UK Paediatric BMT Working Party, Paediatric Diseases Working Party and Severe Aplastic Anaemia Working Party of EBMT.

    PubMed

    Dufour, Carlo; Veys, Paul; Carraro, Elisa; Bhatnagar, Neha; Pillon, Marta; Wynn, Rob; Gibson, Brenda; Vora, Ajay J; Steward, Colin G; Ewins, Anna M; Hough, Rachael E; de la Fuente, Josu; Velangi, Mark; Amrolia, Persis J; Skinner, Roderick; Bacigalupo, Andrea; Risitano, Antonio M; Socie, Gerard; Peffault de Latour, Regis; Passweg, Jakob; Rovo, Alicia; Tichelli, André; Schrezenmeier, Hubert; Hochsmann, Britta; Bader, Peter; van Biezen, Anja; Aljurf, Mahmoud D; Kulasekararaj, Austin; Marsh, Judith C; Samarasinghe, Sujith

    2015-11-01

    We explored the feasibility of unrelated donor haematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) upfront without prior immunosuppressive therapy (IST) in paediatric idiopathic severe aplastic anaemia (SAA). This cohort was then compared to matched historical controls who had undergone first-line therapy with a matched sibling/family donor (MSD) HSCT (n = 87) or IST with horse antithymocyte globulin and ciclosporin (n = 58) or second-line therapy with unrelated donor HSCT post-failed IST (n = 24). The 2-year overall survival in the upfront cohort was 96 ± 4% compared to 91 ± 3% in the MSD controls (P = 0·30) and 94 ± 3% in the IST controls (P = 0·68) and 74 ± 9% in the unrelated donor HSCT post-IST failure controls (P = 0·02).The 2-year event-free survival in the upfront cohort was 92 ± 5% compared to 87 ± 4% in MSD controls (P = 0·37), 40 ± 7% in IST controls (P = 0·0001) and 74 ± 9% in the unrelated donor HSCT post-IST failure controls (n = 24) (P = 0·02). Outcomes for upfront-unrelated donor HSCT in paediatric idiopathic SAA were similar to MSD HSCT and superior to IST and unrelated donor HSCT post-IST failure. Front-line therapy with matched unrelated donor HSCT is a novel treatment approach and could be considered as first-line therapy in selected paediatric patients who lack a MSD.

  11. Summary Report: 62nd Annual Congress - British Association of Paediatric Surgeons Cardiff, Wales, UK, July 22nd- 24th, 2015.

    PubMed

    Davenport, Mark

    2016-02-01

    The 62nd British Association of Paediatric Surgeons (BAPS) Annual Conference was held July 22-24, 2015, in Cardiff, Wales. This congress issue contains papers presented during the open sessions and transcripts based on invited lectures.

  12. Negotiating identity at the intersection of paediatric and genetic medicine: the parent as facilitator, narrator and patient.

    PubMed

    Dimond, Rebecca

    2014-01-01

    This article identifies a significant transformation in the role and identity of parents accompanying their child to clinic. This shift is a product of the intersection between paediatric and genetic medicine, where parents play a critical role in providing information about their child, family and ultimately, about themselves. To provide a context for this matrix, two broad areas of sociological inquiry are highlighted. The first is explanations of the role a parent plays in paediatric medicine and the second is the diagnostic process in paediatric genetics and the implications for parent and child identities. Drawing from an ethnographic study of clinical consultations, attention is paid to the changing role of parenthood and the extended role of patienthood in paediatric genetic medicine.

  13. Simultaneous, Bilateral Ophthalmoplegia as the Presenting Sign of Paediatric Multiple Sclerosis: Case Report and Discussion of the Differential Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Adam, Murtaza K.; Krespan, Kelly; Moster, Mark L.; Sergott, Robert C.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract An 11-year-old female developed bilateral oculomotor nerve palsies without pupillary involvement and bilateral optic neuropathy as the presenting signs of paediatric multiple sclerosis (MS). Although ocular mono-neuropathies have been reported, this is the first bilateral mono-neuropathy reported in a paediatric patient due to MS. The differential diagnosis and evaluation for bilateral ophthalmoplegia are discussed in detail. PMID:27928305

  14. White matter changes in paediatric multiple sclerosis and monophasic demyelinating disorders.

    PubMed

    Longoni, Giulia; Brown, Robert A; MomayyezSiahkal, Parya; Elliott, Colm; Narayanan, Sridar; Bar-Or, Amit; Ann Marrie, Ruth; Ann Yeh, E; Filippi, Massimo; Banwell, Brenda; Arnold, Douglas L

    2017-03-14

    Most children who experience an acquired demyelinating syndrome of the central nervous system will have a monophasic disease course, with no further clinical or radiological symptoms. A subset will be diagnosed with multiple sclerosis, a life-long disorder. Using linear mixed effects models we examined longitudinal diffusion properties of normal-appearing white matter in 505 serial scans of 132 paediatric participants with acquired demyelinating syndromes followed for a median of 4.4 years, many from first clinical presentation, and 106 scans of 80 healthy paediatric participants. Fifty-three participants with demyelinating syndromes eventually received a diagnosis of paediatric-onset multiple sclerosis. Diffusion tensor imaging measures properties of water diffusion through tissue, which normally becomes increasingly restricted and anisotropic in the brain during childhood and adolescence, as fibre bundles develop and myelinate. In the healthy paediatric participants, our data demonstrate the expected trajectory of more restricted and anisotropic white matter diffusivity with increasing age. However, in participants with multiple sclerosis, fractional anisotropy decreased and mean diffusivity of non-lesional, normal-appearing white matter progressively increased after clinical presentation, suggesting not only a failure of age-expected white matter development but also a progressive loss of tissue integrity. Surprisingly, patients with monophasic disease failed to show age-expected changes in diffusion parameters in normal-appearing white matter, although they did not show progressive loss of integrity over time. Further analysis demonstrated that participants with monophasic disease experienced different post-onset trajectories in normal-appearing white matter depending on their presenting phenotype: those with acute disseminated encephalomyelitis demonstrated abnormal trajectories of diffusion parameters compared to healthy paediatric participants, as did

  15. Fine needle biopsy with cytology in paediatrics: the importance of a multidisciplinary approach and the role of ancillary techniques.

    PubMed

    Barroca, H; Bom-Sucesso, M

    2014-02-01

    Fine needle biopsy (FNB) with cytology has long been regarded as an excellent technique as the first choice for diagnosing adult tumours. Being an inexpensive minimally invasive technique with high accuracy and diagnostic immediacy through rapid on-site evaluation, it is also ideal for implementation in the paediatric setting, particularly in developing countries. Furthermore, it allows complementary and advanced procedures such as flow cytometry, polymerase chain reaction (PCR) or fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), among others, which enhances the diagnostic capacity of this technique and gives it a key role in risk stratification and therapeutic decision-making for several tumours. The advantages of FNB are optimized in the setting of a multidisciplinary team where cytologist, clinician and radiologist play leading roles. Paediatric tumours are rare and most ancillary techniques are cost-effective but complex to be implemented in small centres with limited experience in paediatric pathology. Therefore reference centres are essential, in order to establish teams with extensive experience and expertise. Hence, any child with a suspected malignancy should be directly referred to a paediatric oncology unit. Focusing on a practical approach to the assessment of paediatric lymphadenopathies and non-central nervous system solid tumours we review the effectiveness of FNB as applied concurrently with ancillary techniques in a multidisciplinary approach to the diagnosis, prognosis and therapeutic decisions of paediatric tumours and tumour-like lesions.

  16. Rapid paediatric fluid resuscitation: a randomised controlled trial comparing the efficiency of two provider-endorsed manual paediatric fluid resuscitation techniques in a simulated setting

    PubMed Central

    Cole, Evan T; Harvey, Greg; Urbanski, Sara; Foster, Gary; Thabane, Lehana; Parker, Melissa J

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Manual techniques of intravascular fluid administration are commonly used during paediatric resuscitation, although it is unclear which technique is most efficient in the hands of typical healthcare providers. We compared the rate of fluid administration achieved with the disconnect–reconnect and push–pull manual syringe techniques for paediatric fluid resuscitation in a simulated setting. Methods This study utilised a randomised crossover trial design and enrolled 16 consenting healthcare provider participants from a Canadian paediatric tertiary care centre. The study was conducted in a non-clinical setting using a model simulating a 15 kg child in decompensated shock. Participants administered 900 mL (60 mL/kg) of normal saline to the simulated patient using each of the two techniques under study. The primary outcome was the rate of fluid administration, as determined by two blinded independent video reviewers. We also collected participant demographic data and evaluated other secondary outcomes including total volume administered, number of catheter dislodgements, number of technical errors, and subjective and objective measures of provider fatigue. Results All 16 participants completed the trial. The mean (SD) rate of fluid administration (mL/s) was greater for the disconnect–reconnect technique at 1.77 (0.145) than it was for the push–pull technique at 1.62 (0.226), with a mean difference of 0.15 (95% CI 0.055 to 0.251; p=0.005). There was no difference in mean volume administered (p=0.778) or participant self-reported fatigue (p=0.736) between techniques. No catheter dislodgement events occurred. Conclusions The disconnect–reconnect technique allowed for the fastest rate of fluid administration, suggesting that use of this technique may be preferable in situations requiring rapid resuscitation. These findings may help to inform future iterations of paediatric resuscitation guidelines. Trial registration number This trial was

  17. Patterns of paediatric facial fractures in a hospital of São Paulo, Brazil: a retrospective study of 3 years.

    PubMed

    Nardis, Amanda da Costa; Costa, Sabrina Araújo Pinho; da Silva, Rogério Almeida; Kaba, Shajadi Carlos Pardo

    2013-04-01

    The objective of this study is to analyze patterns of facial fractures in children treated at the Service of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery of the Vila Penteado General Hospital (HGVP), in São Paulo, Brazil, in a period of 3 years. Between May 2008 and April 2011 the authors reviewed 110 records of patients under 12 years old with facial fractures. The following parameters were evaluated: age and sex distribution, aetiology of trauma, incidence and type of fractures, monthly distribution and treatment modality. Male-to-female ratio was 1.8:1, and the mean age was 8.13. The majority of the involved patients were aged between 6 and 12 years. The most prevalent cause was fall (58%) and nasal fractures were the most common type of fracture (69%). Monthly distribution was similar in all seasons. Of 110 patients, 69 (62%) were treated conservatively. The incidence of facial fractures in the area of study is high. The high incidence of nasal fractures should be a warning to maxillofacial surgeons, so that they are not overlooked. Safety programs should be installed in Brazil to increase public awareness and to decrease morbidity resulting from paediatric trauma.

  18. Gynaecological laparoscopic surgery: eight years experience in the Yaoundé Gynaeco-Obstetric and Paediatric Hospital, Cameroon.

    PubMed

    Mboudou, Emile; Morfaw, Frederick L I; Foumane, Pascal; Sama, Julius Dohbit; Mbatsogo, Bernard Armand Enama; Minkande, Jacqueline Ze

    2014-04-01

    This is a retrospective analysis of eight years of gynaecological laparoscopic surgery in a resource-limited setting. All gynaecological patients managed by laparoscopy at the Yaoundé Gynaeco-Obstetric and Paediatric Hospital from 1 January 2004 to 30 November 2011 were included. Amongst the 9194 gynaecological surgeries performed during the study period, 6.9% (633) were done by laparoscopy. Most of the women underwent an operative laparoscopy (568/592; 95.9%). The most common indication was infertility (415/592; 70.1%). Diagnostic laparoscopies were mostly indicated for chronic pelvic pain (18/24; 75%). The most common surgical finding was tubo-peritoneal adhesions (412/592; 69.6%). A total of 35 patients (35/592; 5.9%) had at least one complication. The mean duration of hospitalization was 3.4 ±1.8 days. The general uptake of gynaecological laparoscopic surgery is low in our setting. The laparoscopic complication rate of 5.9% is encouraging.

  19. Progressivity and participation: children’s management of parental assistance in paediatric chronic pain encounters

    PubMed Central

    Clemente, Ignasi

    2010-01-01

    This article examines how older paediatric patients (10–18 years) initiate different actions, including the solicitation of parental assistance, to accomplish the task of answering clinicians’ symptom questions in three paediatric tertiary care clinics. Using the qualitative method of conversation analysis to examine children’s symptom accounts in 69 video-recorded outpatient intake visits, I describe four child-initiated strategies that preclude, solicit and limit parental assistance in the interactional environment of having difficulties in providing an answer. These strategies are: children’s own answer searches, children’s solicitations of corroboration, children’s solicitations of an answer, and children’s answer completions. Supported by the clinicians’ strong commitment to child-centredness, children manage to solicit parental assistance without losing the opportunity to present their own symptom accounts. PMID:19856490

  20. Use of clinical guidelines: perspectives from clinicians in paediatric and maternity hospitals in Kabul, Afghanistan.

    PubMed

    Graham, H; Tokhi, M; Edward, A; Salehi, A S; Turkmani, S; Duke, T; Bartlett, L

    2015-04-02

    This study explored the perceived value, role and reported use of clinical guidelines by clinicians in urban paediatric and maternity hospital settings, and the effect of current implementation strategies on clinician attitudes, knowledge and behaviour. A total of 63 clinicians from 7 paediatric and maternity hospitals in Kabul, Afghanistan participated in structured focus groups; content analysis methodology was used for identification and analysis of key themes. Seven sets of guidelines, protocols or standards were identified (including 5 WHO-endorsed guidelines). However, most are failing to achieve high levels of use. Factors associated with guideline use included: clinician involvement in guideline development; multidisciplinary training; demonstrable results; and positive clinician perceptions regarding guideline quality and contextual appropriateness. Implementation activities should fulfil 3 major objectives: promote guideline awareness and access; stimulate motivation among clinical guideline users; and actively facilitate adherence to guidelines.

  1. Iatrogenic illness in the paediatric intensive care unit at Gharian teaching hospital, Libya.

    PubMed

    Ismail, A M; Shedeed, S A

    2012-02-01

    The aim of this prospective follow-up study wasto determine the incidence and risk factors of iatrogenic illness and the outcome among cases admitted to the paediatric intensive care unit in ateaching hospital in Libya. The incidence of iatrogenic complications was 22.9% among 423 cases admitted over a 1-year period. Human error (18.4%) followed by machine defects (4.5%) were the most common causes of complications. The overall mortality rate was 7.6% and was significantly higher in iatrogenic cases than others (13.4% versus 5.8%). Paediatric risk of mortality (PRISM) score was a good predictor of risk of iatrogenic illness. Both mortality and occurrence of iatrogenic illness were significantly associated with: higher PRISM score, use of mechanical ventilation, higher bed occupancy rate in the unit, presence of respiratory and neurological diseases, prolonged duration of stay in the intensive care unit and younger age of the child.

  2. Child health in low-resource settings: pathways through UK paediatric training.

    PubMed

    Goenka, Anu; Magnus, Dan; Rehman, Tanya; Williams, Bhanu; Long, Andrew; Allen, Steve J

    2013-11-01

    UK doctors training in paediatrics benefit from experience of child health in low-resource settings. Institutions in low-resource settings reciprocally benefit from hosting UK trainees. A wide variety of opportunities exist for trainees working in low-resource settings including clinical work, research and the development of transferable skills in management, education and training. This article explores a range of pathways for UK trainees to develop experience in low-resource settings. It is important for trainees to start planning a robust rationale early for global child health activities via established pathways, in the interests of their own professional development as well as UK service provision. In the future, run-through paediatric training may include core elements of global child health, as well as designated 'tracks' for those wishing to develop their career in global child health further. Hands-on experience in low-resource settings is a critical component of these training initiatives.

  3. Paediatric CT protocol optimisation: a design of experiments to support the modelling and optimisation process.

    PubMed

    Rani, K; Jahnen, A; Noel, A; Wolf, D

    2015-07-01

    In the last decade, several studies have emphasised the need to understand and optimise the computed tomography (CT) procedures in order to reduce the radiation dose applied to paediatric patients. To evaluate the influence of the technical parameters on the radiation dose and the image quality, a statistical model has been developed using the design of experiments (DOE) method that has been successfully used in various fields (industry, biology and finance) applied to CT procedures for the abdomen of paediatric patients. A Box-Behnken DOE was used in this study. Three mathematical models (contrast-to-noise ratio, noise and CTDI vol) depending on three factors (tube current, tube voltage and level of iterative reconstruction) were developed and validated. They will serve as a basis for the development of a CT protocol optimisation model.

  4. The World Congress of Paediatric Cardiology and Cardiac Surgery: a short factual history by Jane Somerville.

    PubMed

    Somerville, Jane

    2012-12-01

    The World Congress of Paediatric Cardiology and Cardiac Surgery has survived with minimal assets and simple organisation. Each congress is special, taking on the humour, flavour, and culture of the organising country. It is hard work for a few organisers and money is hard to raise. The steering committee works closely, fairly, and successfully, and even though accused of being secretive and effete that does not matter. It is efficient and produces successful, happy world congresses, where all involved with the speciality are welcome. With so many "grown-ups" with congenital heart disease, it is no longer just a paediatric problem - maybe the name of this congress must change again. Regardless, the flag must fly on.

  5. Haemophilus influenzae type a as a cause of paediatric septic arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Ulanova, Marina

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Incidence rates of invasive Haemophilus influenzae serotype b disease have decreased significantly since the introduction of the Hib vaccine; however, the rates in indigenous populations remain disproportionately high, specifically in the paediatric population. Additionally, with the decline of type b invasive infections, there has been a rebound in the incidence of invasive infections caused by other strains of H. influenzae, particularly serotype a. Case presentation: We present a paediatric case of septic arthritis caused by H. influenzae type a in a toddler that was fully resolved following antibiotic therapy. This report adds to other reports of septic arthritis in indigenous populations as shown through a review of recently documented H. influenzae type a septic arthritis cases. Conclusion: Socio-economic risk factors for invasive H. influenzae type a disease, such as poverty, poor housing conditions, overcrowding, smoking and substance abuse during pregnancy, as well as the need for H. influenzae type a immunization of vulnerable populations, are discussed. PMID:28348786

  6. Paediatric biobanking: Dutch experts reflecting on appropriate legal standards for practice.

    PubMed

    Kranendonk, Elcke J; Hennekam, Raoul C; Ploem, M Corrette

    2017-01-01

    Large sets of data and human specimens, such as blood, tumour tissue and DNA, are deposited in biobanks for research purposes, preferably for long periods of time and with broadly defined research aims. Our research focuses on the retention of data and biological materials obtained from children. However important such paediatric biobanks may be, the privacy interests of the children involved and the related risks may not be ignored. The privacy issues arising from paediatric biobanks are the central focus of this article. We first review the international regulations that apply to biobanks and then summarise viewpoints expressed by experts in a round-table discussion. We confine ourselves here to two normative questions: (1) How much control should children's parents or legal representatives, and later the children themselves, have over the stored materials and data? (2) What should be done if research findings emerge that have serious implications for a child's health?

  7. The development and implementation of a hospital based paediatric orthopaedic nursing transition program.

    PubMed

    Griffiths, Nadine; Houghton, Kerry

    2013-01-01

    Within Australia and the rest of the world paediatric orthopaedic nursing as a subspeciality nursing workforce faces challenges due to a lack of formal education programs that support the development of knowledge. Despite these challenges the need to ensure the availability of competent and knowledgeable nursing staff to positively contribute to health care outcomes remains unchanged. Thus a need has arisen to develop locally implemented education programs. A multi-tiered paediatric orthopaedic nursing transition program which incorporates work based learning processes combined, with formal assessment components, has been designed utilising Benner's "theory of novice to expert" to facilitate the growth of experts in the clinical setting driven by the requirements of individual clinical settings. The implementation of this program has led to increased confidence in the clinical setting for nursing staff which has positively influenced the care of children and their families in the orthopaedic service.

  8. Report of two paediatric cases of central line infections caused by species of the genus Kocuria

    PubMed Central

    Hamula, Camille L.; Dingle, Tanis C.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Species of the genus Kocuria are Gram-positive cocci of the family Micrococcacceae that are ubiquitous in the environment and part of the normal skin and oral flora in humans. A paucity of cases have been reported of Kocuria as human pathogens and there are currently no evidence-based guidelines for managing these uncommon infections. Case presentation: We present two paediatric cases of central line infections with species of the genus Kocuria that required line removal despite antimicrobial therapy. Conclusion: Species of the genus Kocuria are uncommon human pathogens that have rarely been reported to cause opportunistic infections in both adult and paediatric populations. The cases presented here add to the growing body of literature documenting the pathogenicity of these organisms and the possible need for line removal to achieve clinical cure in central line-associated bacteraemia caused by species of the genus Kocuria. PMID:28348760

  9. Dosimetry and Image Quality in Control Studies in Computerised Tomography Realized to Paediatric Patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández, M. R.; Dies, P.; Gamboa-deBuen, I.; Rickards, J.; Ruiz, C.

    2008-08-01

    Computerised tomography (CT) is a favourite method of medical diagnosis. Its use has thus increased rapidly throughout the world, particularly in studies relating to children. However to avoid administering unnecessarily high doses of radiation to paediatric patients it is important to have correct dose reference levels to minimize risk. The research is being developed within the public health sector at the Hospital Infantil de México "Dr. Federico Gómez." We measured the entrance surface air kerma (KP) in paediatric patients, during the radiological studies of control in CT (studies of head, thorax and abdomen). Phantom was used to evaluate image quality as the tomograph requires a high resolution image in order to operate at its optimum level.

  10. Congenital insensitivity to pain in a child attending a paediatric fracture clinic.

    PubMed

    Abdulla, Mohamed; Khaled, Sari S; Khaled, Yazan S; Kapoor, Harish

    2014-09-01

    Congenital insensitivity to pain is a rare condition that is often undiagnosed until patients present with a variety of musculoskeletal problems. A major sequel of these orthopaedic manifestations is the development of heterotopic ossification and callus formation following fractures, eventually leading to the development of a Charcot's joint. This case reports on a 7-year-old child who was diagnosed with congenital insensitivity to pain type V, after he presented in our clinic with fractures of the metatarsals in his left foot while continuing to weight bear, without any discomfort. The patient failed to attend the follow-up in paediatric neurology clinic despite multiple invitations. This case highlights the importance of establishing an early diagnosis and keeping a close eye on this rare entity, which can present for the first time in a paediatric fracture clinic.

  11. Herbal medicinal products in the paediatric population--status quo and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Wegener, Tankred

    2013-02-01

    The limited extent of data available for herbal medicinal products (HMPs) in the paediatric population is related to missing documentation of their use in practice and in literature. Therefore, information for properly evaluating indications, posology, length of treatment and safety in children is often lacking. Frequently, these documentation gaps are reflected in the product information of HMPs as final result of regulatory decisions. On the other hand, there is long-term experience of HMPs as well established and traditionally used medicinal products, which also covers the use in the paediatric population, as applied by parents themselves, and the recommendations of physicians, other health practitioners and pharmacists. The methodology of pharmaco-epidemiologic studies is a valuable tool to evaluate data of the practical use of HMPs in children. The documentation gap may be closed by such methodologies, and HMPs may be applied prospectively on the basis of well-documented empirical knowledge.

  12. Clinical value of stool culture in paediatric oncology patients: hospital evaluation and UK survey of practice.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, O; Cooke, R P D; Cunliffe, N A; Pizer, B

    2017-01-01

    Diarrhoea is a frequently occurring symptom in paediatric oncology patients. The role of routine testing for enteric bacteria in hospitalized patients with diarrhoea is considered limited, but the diagnostic value of testing in children with oncological conditions has not been reported. Therefore, we conducted a five-year retrospective service evaluation in our tertiary paediatric oncology unit together with a national survey of 21 centres to estimate the utility of stool cultures in oncology patients with diarrhoea and the national approach to testing. Our local survey demonstrated very low diagnostic yield using routine enteric stool cultures with only one sample out of 842 (0.1%) testing positive. The national survey demonstrated considerable variation in practice. There is little evidence to support the use of conventional stool culture for enteric bacteria in children with cancer in our centre. These findings should inform national testing policies.

  13. Dosimetry and Image Quality in Control Studies in Computerised Tomography Realized to Paediatric Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Hernandez, M. R.; Gamboa-deBuen, I.; Dies, P.; Rickards, J.; Ruiz, C.

    2008-08-11

    Computerised tomography (CT) is a favourite method of medical diagnosis. Its use has thus increased rapidly throughout the world, particularly in studies relating to children. However to avoid administering unnecessarily high doses of radiation to paediatric patients it is important to have correct dose reference levels to minimize risk. The research is being developed within the public health sector at the Hospital Infantil de Mexico 'Dr. Federico Gomez.' We measured the entrance surface air kerma (K{sub P}) in paediatric patients, during the radiological studies of control in CT (studies of head, thorax and abdomen). Phantom was used to evaluate image quality as the tomograph requires a high resolution image in order to operate at its optimum level.

  14. Lumbar Disc Herniation Causing Cauda Equina Syndrome in a Paediatric Patient. A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Irshad, Mohamad; Ahmad, Khurshid; Malla, Hilal Ahmad

    2016-08-30

    Lumbar disc disease occurs mainly in the adult population. A disc prolapse in the paediatric population is very rare. Cauda equine syndrome resulting from compression of the cauda equina is a rare syndrome and is one of the few spinal surgical emergencies. Here we present a 13-year-old boy with pain in the lumbar region radiating bilaterally to the lower limbs, with asymmetrical weakness of lower the limbs, perianal hypoaesthesia and urinary retention. MRI of lumbar spine confirmed disc protrusion at the L3-L4 level with severe spinal canal stenosis. Patient was treated with microdiscectomy at the L3-L4 level. Postoperatively, his neurological deficit disappeared gradually. Although very rare, lumbar disc prolapse in the paediatric age group can lead to cauda equina syndrome. Early diagnosis and treatment can prevent life-long disability.

  15. Harmonising Adult and Paediatric Reference Intervals in Australia and New Zealand: An Evidence-Based Approach for Establishing a First Panel of Chemistry Analytes

    PubMed Central

    Tate, Jillian R; Sikaris, Ken A; Jones, Graham RD; Yen, Tina; Koerbin, Gus; Ryan, Julie; Reed, Maxine; Gill, Janice; Koumantakis, George; Hickman, Peter; Graham, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Scientific evidence supports the use of common reference intervals (RIs) for many general chemistry analytes, in particular those with sound calibration and traceability in place. Already the Nordic countries and United Kingdom have largely achieved harmonised RIs. Following a series of workshops organised by the Australasian Association of Clinical Biochemists (AACB) between 2012 and 2014 at which an evidence-based approach for determination of common intervals was developed, pathology organisations in Australia and New Zealand have reached a scientific consensus on what adult and paediatric intervals we should use across Australasia. The aim of this report is to describe the processes that the AACB and the Royal College of Pathologists of Australasia have taken towards recommending the implementation of a first panel of common RIs for use in Australasia. PMID:25678727

  16. Paediatric surgery and anaesthesia in south-western Uganda: a cross-sectional survey

    PubMed Central

    Obua, Apunyo D; Mouton, Falan; Ttendo, Steven; Wilson, Iain H

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Objective To study paediatric surgery rates in south-western Uganda, compare them to rates in England, and determine if existing surgical facilities and workforce meet World Health Organization (WHO) standards. Methods To obtain information on surgical facilities and workforce, we conducted a cross-sectional survey of all hospitals performing major surgery in 14 districts of south-western Uganda in 2007–2008. Using theatre logbook data, we determined the surgical rates, types of surgery performed and in-theatre surgical outcomes. Findings Of 72 hospitals surveyed, 29 were performing major surgery. None met WHO standards for essential surgery. There were 0.7 accredited surgeons per 100 000 population and no paediatric surgeons. Most anaesthetists were not physicians (accredited anaesthetist per 100 000 population: 1.1). The annual surgical rate for children aged ≤ 14 years was 180 operations per 100 000 population; most were emergency procedures. The annual surgical rate for patients of all ages was 652 operations per 100 000 population, with a median of 422 per operating theatre (range: 60–3497) and of 226 per surgeon (range: 60–1748). Mission or nongovernmental organization (NGO) hospitals, which had 44% of the hospital beds in the region, performed 3039 (55%) of the paediatric operations. Externally funded surgeons performed 80% of the 140 cleft lip and palate operations. Four in-theatre deaths occurred in children ≤ 14 years old (in-theatre mortality: 7.7 deaths per 10 000 operations). Conclusion Access to all surgery, including paediatric surgery, is poor in south-western Uganda and investment in basic health-care facilities and surgical workforce and training is urgently needed. Mission and NGO hospitals make a valuable contribution to elective surgery, and externally funded surgeons make an important contribution to specialist surgery. In-theatre mortality was lower than reported for similar settings. PMID:21124714

  17. Use of Scrambler Therapy in Acute Paediatric Pain: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Spadini, Silvia; De Tommasi, Valentina; Benini, Franca

    2016-01-01

    We report our clinical experience on the effect of Scrambler Therapy (ST) for a child with acute mixed pain refractory to pharmacological treatment. ST, recently proposed as an alternative treatment for chronic neuropathic pain in adults, is a noninvasive approach to relieve pain, by changing pain perception at brain level. It is safe and has no side effects. Further research is needed to assess its efficacy for acute pain and for paediatric population. PMID:26977329

  18. Alternative technique in atypical spinal decompression: the use of the ultrasonic scalpel in paediatric achondroplasia.

    PubMed

    Woodacre, Timothy; Sewell, Matthew; Clarke, Andrew J; Hutton, Mike

    2016-06-10

    Spinal stenosis can be a very disabling condition. Surgical decompression carries a risk of dural tear and neural injury, which is increased in patients with severe stenosis or an atypical anatomy. We present an unusual case of symptomatic stenosis secondary to achondroplasia presenting in a paediatric patient, and highlight a new surgical technique used to minimise the risk of dural and neural injury during decompression.

  19. Stress echocardiography in paediatrics: implications for the evaluation of anomalous aortic origin of the coronary arteries.

    PubMed

    Thompson, W Reid

    2015-12-01

    Stress echocardiography in paediatrics is used to evaluate pre- and post-operative coronary artery conditions, as well as to gain haemodynamic information for a variety of diagnoses, although evidence regarding sensitivity, specificity, and predictive value is lacking. This review will consider the available literature with a focus on anomalous aortic origin of the coronary arteries and discuss a practical approach to test selection and use.

  20. Paediatric early warning systems for detecting and responding to clinical deterioration in children: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Lambert, Veronica; Matthews, Anne; MacDonell, Rachel; Fitzsimons, John

    2017-01-01

    Objective To systematically review the available evidence on paediatric early warning systems (PEWS) for use in acute paediatric healthcare settings for the detection of, and timely response to, clinical deterioration in children. Method The electronic databases PubMed, MEDLINE, CINAHL, EMBASE and Cochrane were searched systematically from inception up to August 2016. Eligible studies had to refer to PEWS, inclusive of rapid response systems and teams. Outcomes had to be specific to the identification of and/or response to clinical deterioration in children (including neonates) in paediatric hospital settings (including emergency departments). 2 review authors independently completed the screening and selection process, the quality appraisal of the retrieved evidence and data extraction; with a third reviewer resolving any discrepancies, as required. Results were narratively synthesised. Results From a total screening of 2742 papers, 90 papers, of varied designs, were identified as eligible for inclusion in the review. Findings revealed that PEWS are extensively used internationally in paediatric inpatient hospital settings. However, robust empirical evidence on which PEWS is most effective was limited. The studies examined did however highlight some evidence of positive directional trends in improving clinical and process-based outcomes for clinically deteriorating children. Favourable outcomes were also identified for enhanced multidisciplinary team work, communication and confidence in recognising, reporting and making decisions about child clinical deterioration. Conclusions Despite many studies reporting on the complexity and multifaceted nature of PEWS, no evidence was sourced which examined PEWS as a complex healthcare intervention. Future research needs to investigate PEWS as a complex multifaceted sociotechnical system that is embedded in a wider safety culture influenced by many organisational and human factors. PEWS should be embraced as a part of a

  1. Decision making concerning life-sustaining treatment in paediatric nephrology: professionals' experiences and values

    PubMed Central

    Fauriel, Isabelle; Moutel, Grégoire; Duchange, Nathalie; Montuclard, Luc; Moutard, Marie-Laure; Cochat, Pierre; Hervé, Christian

    2005-01-01

    Background In a previous paper, we studied decisions to withhold or withdraw life-sustaining treatment (LST) taken between 1995 and 2001 in 31 French-speaking paediatric nephrology centres. Files were available for 18 of the 31 centres. A grid was used to analyse the criteria on which decisions were based, and the results were enriched by an analysis of interviews with the doctors in at these centres (31 interviews with doctors from the 18 centres). The goal was to describe in detail and to specify the criteria on which decisions to withhold or withdraw LST were based, extracted from the files. The second paper deals exclusively with the interviews with doctors and analyses their lifetime’s experience and perception Methods We carried out semi-directed interviews with nephrologists from all the paediatric nephrology centres in France and the French-speaking regions of Switzerland and Belgium. Results We interviewed 46 paediatric nephrologists. Most were aware that decisions relating to LST are necessary and based on the assessment of the child’s quality of life. According to them, decisions are not based on scientific criteria, but on the capacity to accept handicap, the family’s past experiences and the doctor’s own projections. They report that their task is particularly difficult when their action may contribute to death (withdrawal of treatment, acceleration of the process). They feel that their duty is to help the families in the acceptation of the doctors’ decision rather than to encourage their participation in the decision-making process. Conclusions This paper shows that paediatric nephrologists differ in their opinions, mostly due to their own ethical convictions. This observation highlights the need to establish common rules taking into account the views held by doctors. This is the only way to establish an ethical code shared by professionals. PMID:16204280

  2. A prospective surveillance of paediatric head injuries in Singapore: a dual-centre study

    PubMed Central

    Chong, Shu-Ling; Chew, Su Yah; Feng, Jasmine Xun Yi; Teo, Penny Yun Lin; Chin, Sock Teng; Liu, Nan; Ong, Marcus Eng Hock

    2016-01-01

    Objective To study the causes of head injuries among the paediatric population in Singapore, and the association between causes and mortality, as well as the need for airway or neurosurgical intervention. Design This is a prospective observational study utilising data from the trauma surveillance system from January 2011 to March 2015. Setting Paediatric emergency departments (EDs) of KK Women's and Children's Hospital and the National University Health System. Participants We included children aged <16 years presenting to the paediatric EDs with head injuries who required a CT scan, admission for monitoring of persistent symptoms, or who died from the head injury. We excluded children who presented with minor mechanisms and those whose symptoms had spontaneously resolved. Primary and secondary outcome measures Primary composite outcome was defined as death or the need for intubation or neurosurgical intervention. Secondary outcomes included length of hospital stay and type of neurosurgical intervention. Results We analysed 1049 children who met the inclusion criteria. The mean age was 6.7 (SD 5.2) years. 260 (24.8%) had a positive finding on CT. 17 (1.6%) children died, 52 (5.0%) required emergency intubation in the ED and 58 (5.5%) underwent neurosurgery. The main causes associated with severe outcomes were motor vehicle crashes (OR 7.2, 95% CI 4.3 to 12.0) and non-accidental trauma (OR 5.8, 95% CI 1.8 to 18.6). This remained statistically significant when we stratified to children aged <2 years and performed a multivariable analysis adjusting for age and location of injury. For motor vehicle crashes, less than half of the children were using restraints. Conclusions Motor vehicle crashes and non-accidental trauma causes are particularly associated with poor outcomes among children with paediatric head injury. Continued vigilance and compliance with injury prevention initiatives and legislature are vital. PMID:26908533

  3. Upper-lip laser frenectomy without infiltrated anaesthesia in a paediatric patient: a case report.

    PubMed

    Kafas, Panagiotis; Stavrianos, Christos; Jerjes, Waseem; Upile, Tahwinder; Vourvachis, Michael; Theodoridis, Marios; Stavrianou, Irene

    2009-05-20

    Labial frenectomy is a common surgical procedure in the field of oral surgery. Labial frenectomy is a procedure usually done for orthodontic reasons. The role of laser surgery in the oral cavity is well established. The use of diode laser frenectomy without infiltrated anaesthesia is currently under investigation. Needle-less oral surgery, without infiltrated anaesthesia, is a novel situation in paediatrics with paramount importance.

  4. Tinea capitis outbreak among paediatric refugee population, an evolving healthcare challenge.

    PubMed

    Mashiah, Jacob; Kutz, Ana; Ben Ami, Ronen; Savion, Mihal; Goldberg, Ilan; Gan Or, Tamar; Zidan, Omri; Sprecher, Eli; Harel, Avikam

    2016-09-01

    Outbreaks of tinea capitis (TC) represent a major medical and economic burden. Population migrations have become a phenomenon of increasing relevance for medical conditions management. Given the recent massive arrival of immigrants, we sought to determine epidemiologic trends for TC among paediatric populations at the Tel Aviv Medical Center. We conducted a retrospective study of all TC cases diagnosed between 2010 and 2014 in a paediatric dermatology unit of a tertiary medical centre, serving as a referral centre for the paediatric refugee population from the great Tel Aviv area. Epidemiologic, clinical and treatment data including effectiveness and safety were reviewed. In all, 145 children met the inclusion criteria. Trend analyses showed increases in TC rates over the study period. Incidence rates were higher in boys than in girls. Children of African origin had the highest TC incidence rates as compared with other ethnic groups. Trichophyton violaceum and Microsporum audouinii were the predominant causative organisms. Treatment with griseofulvin was satisfactory in all cases. There was a significant increase in TC incidence rates in the Tel Aviv area over the study period. TV and MA were the predominant organisms. These trends may be a result of poor living conditions and crowded school premises.

  5. Social media in paediatric heart disease: professional use and opportunities to improve cardiac care.

    PubMed

    Schumacher, Kurt R; Lee, Joyce M; Pasquali, Sara K

    2015-12-01

    Social media is any type of communication utilising electronic technology that follows two guiding principles: free publishing or sharing of content and ideas and group collaboration and inter-connectedness. Over the last 10 years, social media technology has made tremendous inroads into all facets of communication. Modalities such as Facebook, YouTube, and Twitter are no longer viewed as new communication technologies. Owing to their tremendous usage, they are now common ways to conduct a dialogue with individuals and groups. Greater than 91% of teenagers and 89% of young adults routinely use social media. Further, 24% of teenagers reported being online "almost constantly". These forms of communication are readily used by individuals cared for in the field of paediatric cardiology; thus, they should carry significant interest for cardiology care providers; however, social media's influence on medicine extends beyond use by patients. It directly affects all medical providers, both users and non-users. Further, social media has the ability to improve care for patients with paediatric heart disease. This article details social media's current influence on paediatric cardiology, including considerations for professional use of social media and potential opportunities to improve cardiac care.

  6. Detection of intestinal protozoa in paediatric patients with gastrointestinal symptoms by multiplex real-time PCR.

    PubMed

    Maas, L; Dorigo-Zetsma, J W; de Groot, C J; Bouter, S; Plötz, F B; van Ewijk, B E

    2014-06-01

    The performance of a multiplex real-time PCR for the detection of Blastocystis, Dientamoeba fragilis, Giardia lamblia, Cryptosporidium species and Entamoeba species in faecal samples was evaluated in an observational prospective study. Paediatric patients (0-18 years) presenting with gastrointestinal symptoms and suspected of having enteroparasitic disease were included. A questionnaire on gastrointestinal symptoms and the chosen treatment was completed at the start of the study and after 6 weeks. Of 163 paediatric patients (mean age, 7.8 years), 114 (70%) had a PCR-positive faecal sample. D. fragilis was detected most frequently, in 101 patients, followed by Blastocystis in 49. In faecal samples of 47 patients, more than one protozoan was detected, mainly the combination of D. fragilis and Blastocystis. Reported gastrointestinal symptoms were abdominal pain (78%), nausea (30%), and altered bowel habits (28%). Eighty-nine of the PCR-positive patients were treated with antibiotics. A significant reduction in abdominal pain was observed both in treated and in untreated patients. This study demonstrated that multiplex real-time PCR detects a high percentage of intestinal protozoa in paediatric patients with gastrointestinal symptoms. However, interpretation and determination of the clinical relevance of a positive PCR result in this population are still difficult.

  7. Validation of the reporting bases of the orthopaedic and paediatric surveillance schemes.

    PubMed Central

    Godward, S; Dezateux, C

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Nationally representative estimates of treatment rates for congenital dislocation of the hip were required to inform a review of the current United Kingdom screening policy. Cases were ascertained through an active reporting scheme involving orthopaedic surgeons and the existing British Paediatric Association Surveillance Unit (BPASU) scheme. OBJECTIVE: To report the methods used to establish, maintain, and validate the orthopaedic and BPASU schemes. METHODS: Multiple sources were used to develop the orthopaedic reporting base. Surgeons treating children were identified by postal questionnaire. The orthopaedic and paediatric reporting bases were compared to the 1992 manpower census surveys of surgeons and paediatricians. RESULTS: A single source of respondent ascertainment would have missed 12% of the 517 surgeons who treated children. Comparison with the manpower census data suggests the orthopaedic and paediatric reporting bases were 97% and 92% complete. CONCLUSIONS: Multiple sources should be used to establish and maintain a reporting base. Targeting respondents avoids unnecessary contact, saves resources, and may improve compliance. Manpower census data can be used for regular validation of the reporting base. PMID:8976664

  8. Characterization of Th17 and FoxP3(+) Treg Cells in Paediatric Psoriasis Patients.

    PubMed

    Zhang, L; Li, Y; Yang, X; Wei, J; Zhou, S; Zhao, Z; Cheng, J; Duan, H; Jia, T; Lei, Q; Huang, J; Feng, C

    2016-03-01

    Psoriasis is one of the most common inflammatory skin conditions affecting both children and adults. Growing evidence indicates that T-helper 17 (Th17) cells and CD4(+) CD25(+) regulatory T (Treg) cells play an important role in the pathogenesis of psoriasis. However, the relationship between Th17 and Treg cells and their dynamic variations in paediatric psoriasis remain unclear. In this study, we found that both Th17 and FoxP3(+) Treg cells and the ratio of Th17 to Treg cell frequency in the peripheral circulation were increased in patients with paediatric psoriasis and were positively correlated with the disease severity. The function of Treg to suppress CD4(+) CD25(-) T cell proliferation and IFN-γ secretion was impaired during the onset of psoriasis. After disease remission, both the Th17 and Treg cell frequencies were decreased, and the suppressive function of the Treg cells was obviously restored. However, neither Treg cells from the disease onset nor those after remission can regulate IL-17 secretion by CD4(+) T cells. These findings will further our understanding of the associations between Th17 and Treg cells in paediatric psoriasis and their influence on disease severity.

  9. Development of age-specific Japanese head phantoms for dose evaluation in paediatric head CT examinations.

    PubMed

    Yamauchi-Kawaura, C; Fujii, K; Akahane, K; Yamauchi, M; Narai, K; Aoyama, T; Katsu, T; Obara, S; Imai, K; Ikeda, M

    2015-02-01

    In this study, the authors developed age-specific physical head phantoms simulating the physique of Japanese children for dose evaluation in paediatric head computed tomography (CT) examinations. Anatomical structures at 99 places in 0-, 0.5-, 1- and 3-y-old Japanese patients were measured using DICOM viewer software from CT images, and the head phantom of each age was designed. For trial manufacture, a 3-y-old head phantom consisting of acrylic resin and gypsum was produced by machine processing. Radiation doses for the head phantom were measured with radiophotoluminescence glass dosemeters and Si-pin photodiode dosemeters. To investigate whether the phantom shape was suitable for dose evaluation, organ doses in the same scan protocol were compared between the 3-y-old head and commercially available anthropomorphic phantoms having approximately the same head size. The doses of organs in both phantoms were equivalent. The authors' designed paediatric head phantom will be useful for dose evaluation in paediatric head CT examinations.

  10. Daptomycin in paediatrics: current knowledge and the need for future research.

    PubMed

    Principi, Nicola; Caironi, Michela; Venturini, Francesca; Pani, Luca; Esposito, Susanna

    2015-03-01

    To overcome the problems stemming from antimicrobial resistance, there have been several attempts to develop new antimicrobials in recent years. Of the highly potent drugs targeting resistant Gram-positive bacteria, daptomycin has a number of attractive characteristics that suggest its possible use in the treatment of serious infections due to these organisms. Although several pharmacokinetic and clinical studies in adults have provided data to determine how this drug should be prescribed to obtain the maximal clinical efficacy without significant risks of severe adverse events, we have not yet solved all of the problems related to the use of this antibiotic in paediatric patients. In this paper, the resolved and lingering problems of daptomycin treatment in newborns and children are reviewed and discussed. Studies have indicated that daptomycin is a promising therapeutic option for the treatment of paediatric diseases caused by MDR Gram-positive bacilli. However, before daptomycin can be licensed for use in newborns and children, further studies are needed to establish the appropriate dosages for paediatric patients of different ages. The data collected in adults can only be transferred to children older than 12 years, and the information available is not sufficient to determine the dosage that will assure the highest antimicrobial efficacy with only marginal risks of adverse events in younger patients. Thus, studies in neonates and younger infants are urgently needed to permit the use of daptomycin in the first months of life, a period in which infections due to MDR Gram-positive pathogens are increasing.

  11. Paediatric nurses' experience with death: the effect of empathic tendency on their anxiety levels.

    PubMed

    Polat, Sevinç; Alemdar, Dilek Küçük; Gürol, Ayşe

    2013-02-01

    The purpose of this descriptive and analytic study is to investigate the effect on anxiety levels of nurses' empathic tendency after experiencing death of patients in the paediatric intensive care unit. No sampling method was used in this study, and all 58 nurses working in the paediatric intensive care unit that agreed to participate in the study were included. The score mean of Empathic Tendency Scale for nurses was 77.43 ± 4.55, their score mean of trait anxiety inventory was 39.82 ± 5.53 and their score mean of state anxiety inventory was 48.03 ± 6.80. This study concluded that nurses had a mild trait anxiety level under normal conditions and experienced moderate anxiety levels when faced with death. This study concluded that the empathic tendency of nurses working in the paediatric intensive care unit had no effect on their anxiety levels when faced with death; however, the anxiety level of nurses decreased as their empathic trends increased.

  12. Validation of a paediatric thyroid phantom using different multidetector computed tomography models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alsabbagh, M.; Ng, L. Y.; Tajuddin, A. A.; Manap, M. A.; Zainon, R.

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the attenuation values of a fabricated paediatric thyroid phantom material using different MDCT models. A paediatric thyroid phantom was designed to mimic the shape and size of a paediatric patient with an age of 9 years using high- density Polyethylene as the phantom material. The fabricated phantom was scanned using two different multidetector CT scanners (16- and 128-row detectors). The CT numbers were evaluated and the mass attenuation coefficients (μ/ρ) of the phantom material were obtained at each applied energy from each scanner. The results were compared with the tables of the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). The CTs of 16- and 128-row detectors showed that the obtained attenuation values are very similar to the NIST's values. However, the CT of the 128-row detectors showed a slightly much closer match to the NIST's values. This refers to the type and quality of the electronic connections between the detectors. Furthermore, the type and number of detectors (16- and 128-detectors) could affect the details and quality of the output images. The results show that different multidetector CTs can be used to validate the phantom and determine the mass attenuation coefficients of its material.

  13. The role of Clostridium difficile in the paediatric and neonatal gut - a narrative review.

    PubMed

    Lees, E A; Miyajima, F; Pirmohamed, M; Carrol, E D

    2016-07-01

    Clostridium difficile is an important nosocomial pathogen in adults. Its significance in children is less well defined, but cases of C. difficile infection (CDI) appear to be increasingly prevalent in paediatric patients. This review aims to summarize reported Clostridium difficile carriage rates across children of different age groups, appraise the relationship between CDI and factors such as method of delivery, type of infant feed, antibiotic use, and co-morbidities, and review factors affecting the gut microbiome in children and the host immune response to C. difficile. Searches of PubMed and Google Scholar using the terms 'Clostridium difficile neonates' and 'Clostridium difficile children' were completed, and reference lists of retrieved publications screened for further papers. In total, 88 papers containing relevant data were included. There was large inter-study variation in reported C. difficile carriage rates. There was an association between CDI and recent antibiotic use, and co-morbidities such as immunosuppression and inflammatory bowel disease. C. difficile was also found in stools of children with diarrhoea attributed to other pathogens (e.g. rotavirus). The role of C. difficile in the paediatric gut remains unclear; is it an innocent bystander in diarrhoeal disease caused by other organisms, or a pathogen causing subclinical to severe symptoms? Further investigation of the development of serological and local host response to C. difficile carriage may shed new light on disease mechanisms. Work is underway on defining a framework for diagnosis and management of paediatric CDI.

  14. Epidemiology of paediatric surgical admissions to a government referral hospital in the Gambia.

    PubMed Central

    Bickler, S. W.; Sanno-Duanda, B.

    2000-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: There is a paucity of published data on the type of conditions that require surgery among children in sub-Saharan Africa. Such information is necessary for assessing the impact of such conditions on child health and for setting priorities to improve paediatric surgical care. METHODS: Described in the article is a 29-month prospective study of all children aged < 15 years who were admitted to a government referral hospital in the Gambia from January 1996 to May 1998. RESULTS: A total of 1726 children were admitted with surgical problems. Surgical patients accounted for 11.3% of paediatric admissions and 34,625 total inpatient days. The most common admission diagnoses were injuries (46.9%), congenital anomalies (24.3%), and infections requiring surgery (14.5%). The diagnoses that accounted for the greatest number of inpatient days were burns (18.8%), osteomyelitis (15.4%), fractures (12.7%), soft tissue injuries (3.9%), and head injuries (3.4%). Gambian children were rarely admitted for appendicitis and never admitted for hypertrophic pyloric stenosis. The leading causes of surgical deaths were burns, congenital anomalies, and injuries other than burns. DISCUSSION: Prevention of childhood injuries and better trauma management, especially at the primary and secondary health care levels, should be the priorities for improving paediatric surgical care in sub-Saharan Africa. Surgical care of children should be considered an essential component of child health programmes in developing countries. PMID:11143193

  15. Patient and staff doses in paediatric interventional cardiology derived from experimental measurements with phantoms.

    PubMed

    Ubeda, Carlos; Vano, Eliseo; Miranda, Patricia; Aguirre, Daniel; Riquelme, Nemorino; Dalmazzo, Dandaro; Galaz, Sergio

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this paper was to determine experimentally the entrance surface air kerma (ESAK) and kerma-area product (KAP) levels to patients and scatter doses at the cardiologist's eyes during paediatric interventional cardiology (IC) procedures for Chile, on the basis of measurements taken from X-ray systems characterization for different thicknesses of polymethyl methacrylate, together with the average values of fluoroscopy time and number of cine frames for ten paediatric IC procedures. The range of cumulative ESAK values when the different clinical procedures were simulated was from 2 to 1100 mGy. KAP values ranged from 0.30 to 150 Gy cm(2). Scatter doses at cardiologist's eyes for the simulated procedures ranged from 0.20 to 116 µSv per procedure. Large differences between the X-ray systems were found in our study. Standardized guidelines in terms of X-ray system setting and protocols should be developed for hospitals that perform paediatric IC procedures in Chile.

  16. Paediatric radiology seen from Africa. Part I: providing diagnostic imaging to a young population.

    PubMed

    Andronikou, Savvas; McHugh, Kieran; Abdurahman, Nuraan; Khoury, Bryan; Mngomezulu, Victor; Brant, William E; Cowan, Ian; McCulloch, Mignon; Ford, Nathan

    2011-07-01

    Paediatric radiology requires dedicated equipment, specific precautions related to ionising radiation, and specialist knowledge. Developing countries face difficulties in providing adequate imaging services for children. In many African countries, children represent an increasing proportion of the population, and additional challenges follow from extreme living conditions, poverty, lack of parental care, and exposure to tuberculosis, HIV, pneumonia, diarrhoea and violent trauma. Imaging plays a critical role in the treatment of these children, but is expensive and difficult to provide. The World Health Organisation initiatives, of which the World Health Imaging System for Radiography (WHIS-RAD) unit is one result, needs to expand into other areas such as the provision of maintenance servicing. New initiatives by groups such as Rotary and the World Health Imaging Alliance to install WHIS-RAD units in developing countries and provide digital solutions, need support. Paediatric radiologists are needed to offer their services for reporting, consultation and quality assurance for free by way of teleradiology. Societies for paediatric radiology are needed to focus on providing a volunteer teleradiology reporting group, information on child safety for basic imaging, guidelines for investigations specific to the disease spectrum, and solutions for optimising imaging in children.

  17. The STEP (Safety and Toxicity of Excipients for Paediatrics) database: part 2 - the pilot version.

    PubMed

    Salunke, Smita; Brandys, Barbara; Giacoia, George; Tuleu, Catherine

    2013-11-30

    The screening and careful selection of excipients is a critical step in paediatric formulation development as certain excipients acceptable in adult formulations, may not be appropriate for paediatric use. While there is extensive toxicity data that could help in better understanding and highlighting the gaps in toxicity studies, the data are often scattered around the information sources and saddled with incompatible data types and formats. This paper is the second in a series that presents the update on the Safety and Toxicity of Excipients for Paediatrics ("STEP") database being developed by Eu-US PFIs, and describes the architecture data fields and functions of the database. The STEP database is a user designed resource that compiles the safety and toxicity data of excipients that is scattered over various sources and presents it in one freely accessible source. Currently, in the pilot database data from over 2000 references/10 excipients presenting preclinical, clinical, regulatory information and toxicological reviews, with references and source links. The STEP database allows searching "FOR" excipients and "BY" excipients. This dual nature of the STEP database, in which toxicity and safety information can be searched in both directions, makes it unique from existing sources. If the pilot is successful, the aim is to increase the number of excipients in the existing database so that a database large enough to be of practical research use will be available. It is anticipated that this source will prove to be a useful platform for data management and data exchange of excipient safety information.

  18. Nontraumatic Lesions of the Clavicle in a Paediatric Population: Incidence and Management

    PubMed Central

    Clement, N. D.; Nicol, G.; Porter, D. E.

    2014-01-01

    Background. The incidence of paediatric nontraumatic clavicle lesions is unknown and there is limited literature regarding the management of such patients. Methods. A review of a prospectively complied radiological database held at the study was conducted for a defined 10-year period. The study centre is the only paediatric service available for a defined catchment population. The case notes of all patients with nontraumatic lesions were reviewed, and the mode of presentation, the diagnostic dilemmas, and the management were recorded. Results. A total of 2133 clavicle radiographs were performed during the study period, with only five having a nontraumatic history. The overall incidence of paediatric nontraumatic clavicle lesions was 0.38 per 100,000 per year. Three patients were diagnosed with chronic recurrent osteomyelitis, one with chronic bifocal osteomyelitis, and one with Langerhans cell histiocytosis. All patients with osteomyelitis demonstrated a typical natural history of a chronic relapsing remitting infection. Three underwent bone biopsy; however, no organism was identified. Conclusion. This study demonstrated that the incidence of nontraumatic clavicle lesions is small, and those patients presenting with osteomyelitis should not routinely undergo a bone biopsy and close observation with the appropriate antibiotic therapy is advised. PMID:27355009

  19. How and when to refer a child for specialist paediatric palliative care.

    PubMed

    Harrop, Emily; Edwards, Clare

    2013-12-01

    Specialist paediatric palliative care is a relatively new area of paediatrics, and the interface with other disciplines can occasionally pose challenges for referrers due to lack of information about the diverse services available. Although services vary on a regional basis, there are common principles which may be used to guide and support referrals. Children may be referred to palliative care services via a number of routes from community-based primary care to regional tertiary centres. Identifying those most likely to benefit from the finite resources available can be a challenge, and healthcare professional's negative attitudes to palliative care have been further identified as a potentially modifiable barrier. This article aims to clarify the role of specialist paediatric palliative care, identify who should be eligible for such care, describe the services available (including those from children's hospices) and provide a tool for assessing some of the most challenging referrals. Many of the documents referenced can be downloaded from the Together for Short Lives website, and in many cases, there is no charge.

  20. Principles of a paediatric palliative care consultation can be achieved with home telemedicine.

    PubMed

    Bradford, Natalie K; Armfield, Nigel R; Young, Jeanine; Herbert, Anthony; Mott, Christine; Smith, Anthony C

    2014-10-01

    We compared the records of paediatric palliative consultations undertaken face-to-face, with telemedicine consultations undertaken in patients' homes. A convenience sample of consecutive paediatric palliative care patients was identified from the hospital's palliative care database. A total of 100 consultations was reviewed (50 telemedicine consultations during home visits and 50 face-to-face consultations) according to 14 established principles and components of a paediatric palliative care consultation. In the telemedicine group there was a higher proportion of patients in a stable condition (58% vs 7%), and a lower proportion of patients in terminal phase (2% vs 17%). Discussion about pain and anorexia were significantly more common in the telemedicine group. Discussion about follow up was significantly more common in the telemedicine group (86% vs 56%), whilst resuscitation planning was more common in deteriorating patients receiving inpatient care. All other components and principles of a palliative care consultation were documented equally regardless of method of consultation. The findings confirm that palliative consultations via telemedicine are just as effective as face-to-face consultations in terms of the documented components of the consultation.

  1. Towards culturally competent paediatric oncology care. A qualitative study from the perspective of care providers.

    PubMed

    Suurmond, J; Lieveld, A; van de Wetering, M; Schouten-van Meeteren, A Y N

    2017-03-28

    In order to gain more insight on the influence of ethnic diversity in paediatric cancer care, the perspectives of care providers were explored. Semi-structured interviews were conducted among 12 paediatric oncologists and 13 nurses of two different paediatric oncology wards and were analysed using a framework method. We found that care providers described the contact with Turkish and Moroccan parents as more difficult. They offered two reasons for this: (1) language barriers between care provider and parents hindered the exchange of information; (2) cultural barriers between care provider and parents about sharing the diagnosis and palliative perspective hindered communication. Care providers reported different solutions to deal with these barriers, such as using an interpreter and improving their cultural knowledge about their patients. They, however, were not using interpreters sufficiently and were unaware of the importance of eliciting parents' perspectives. Communication techniques to overcome dilemmas between parents and care providers were not used and care providers were unaware of stereotypes and prejudice. Care providers should be offered insight in cultural barriers they are unaware of. Training in cultural competence might be a possibility to overcome manifest barriers.

  2. Scatter and staff dose levels in paediatric interventional cardiology: a multicentre study.

    PubMed

    Ubeda, Carlos; Vano, Eliseo; Gonzalez, Luciano; Miranda, Patricia; Valenzuela, Edith; Leyton, Fernando; Oyarzun, Carlos

    2010-06-01

    Interventional cardiology procedures usually imply high doses to the staff, as paediatric cardiologists need to stay closer to the patient than during adult procedures. Also, biplane systems are used that imply an additional source of staff doses. The objective of this paper is to measure scatter doses in four X-ray systems, using polymethyl methacrylate phantoms with thicknesses ranging from 4 to 16 cm to simulate paediatric patients, for the different acquisition modes. Scatter dose rates measured at the position of cardiologist's eyes ranged from 0.8 to 12 mSv h(-1), and about twice the above values at lower extremities, as a linear function of the surface air kerma at the phantom, keeping the irradiated area constant. Therefore, the respective personal dose equivalent for the lens of the eyes may be around 0.5 and 1 mSv throughout the procedure, if additional protection is not used. Simultaneous cine acquisition in biplane systems yielded scatter doses to cardiologists, increased by factors from 5 to 21, compared with a single C-arm acquisition case and depending on geometry. Knowledge of scatter doses for different operation modes, patient thicknesses and the biplane operation should help paediatric cardiologists to adopt conservative attitudes in respect of their occupational radiation risks.

  3. Safe paediatric intensive care. Part 2: workplace organisation, critical incident monitoring and guidelines.

    PubMed

    Frey, Bernhard; Argent, Andrew

    2004-07-01

    In order to optimise safety within the paediatric intensive care unit (PICU), it is essential to optimise organisation, identify problem areas and implement standards and guidelines for safe practice (with appropriate monitoring). Organisational issues have a major impact on safety: the introduction and-recently-centralisation of paediatric intensive care, the appointment of dedicated paediatric intensivists, nursing staffing, handovers, rounds, the number of work hours and night shifts with the associated problems of disturbed circadian rhythms. The technique of voluntary, anonymous, non-punitive critical incident reporting has the potential to identify incidents and latent errors before they become self-evident through a major incident. This systems approach focuses on organisational and communication problems. Standards and guidelines may help in weighing up the benefits and risks of invasive procedures, and interventional studies have shown that implementation of standards and guidelines can improve outcome. Mortality prediction models enable us to monitor quality of care and, thus, to investigate the best ways of organising intensive care and monitoring the effects of changes in practice.

  4. Radiation assessment to paediatric with F-18-FDG undergo whole-body PET/CT examination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhalisa, H.; Mohamad, A. S.; Rafidah, Z.

    2016-01-01

    This study was carried out on wholebody radiation dose assessment to paediatrics patient who undergo PET/CT scanner at Institut Kanser Negara. Consist of 68 patients with varies of malignancies and epilepsy disease case covering age between 2 years to 12 years old. This is a retrospective study from 2010-2014. The use of PET/CT scanner as an advanced tool has been proven to give an extra radiation dose to the patient. It is because of the radiation exposure from the combination of both CT and PET scans rather than a single CT or PET scan. Furthermore, a study on radiation dose to paediatric patient undergoing PET/CT is rare in Malaysia. So, the aim of this study is to estimate the wholebody effective dose to paediatric patient in Malaysia. Effective dose from PET scan was calculated based on the activity of F18 FDG and dose coefficient reported in International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) Publication 106. Effective dose from CT was determined using k coefficient as reported in ICRP publication 102 and Dose Length Product (DLP) value. The average effective dose from PET and CT were found to be 7.05mSv and 5.77mSv respectively. The mean wholebody effective dose received by a patient with combined PETCT examination was 12.78mSv. These results could be used as reference for dosimetry of a patient undergoing PETCT examination in Malaysia.

  5. Radiation assessment to paediatric with F-18-FDG undergo whole-body PET/CT examination

    SciTech Connect

    Dhalisa, H. Rafidah, Z.; Mohamad, A. S.

    2016-01-22

    This study was carried out on wholebody radiation dose assessment to paediatrics patient who undergo PET/CT scanner at Institut Kanser Negara. Consist of 68 patients with varies of malignancies and epilepsy disease case covering age between 2 years to 12 years old. This is a retrospective study from 2010-2014. The use of PET/CT scanner as an advanced tool has been proven to give an extra radiation dose to the patient. It is because of the radiation exposure from the combination of both CT and PET scans rather than a single CT or PET scan. Furthermore, a study on radiation dose to paediatric patient undergoing PET/CT is rare in Malaysia. So, the aim of this study is to estimate the wholebody effective dose to paediatric patient in Malaysia. Effective dose from PET scan was calculated based on the activity of F18 FDG and dose coefficient reported in International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) Publication 106. Effective dose from CT was determined using k coefficient as reported in ICRP publication 102 and Dose Length Product (DLP) value. The average effective dose from PET and CT were found to be 7.05mSv and 5.77mSv respectively. The mean wholebody effective dose received by a patient with combined PETCT examination was 12.78mSv. These results could be used as reference for dosimetry of a patient undergoing PETCT examination in Malaysia.

  6. Dental Awareness among Parents and Oral Health of Paediatric Cancer Patients Receiving Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Marwaha, Mohita; Bansal, Kalpana; Sachdeva, Anupam; Gupta, Ajay

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Dental care is often overlooked by the parents of children receiving treatment for cancer including chemotherapy who are in a phase of severe immunosuppression. Aim (i) To study dental attitudes of parents of children receiving chemotherapy towards importance of dental care. (ii) To evaluate oral hygiene status and compare it with healthy controls. Materials and Methods A questionnaire assessing the awareness towards dental care was given to the parents of 47 paediatric patients suffering from cancer receiving chemotherapy and to parents of 47 paediatric patients reporting to outpatient Department of Pedodontics at SGT Dental College. Oral examination was also carried out for both the groups and DMFT/dmft, plaque and gingival index were noted. Results Parents had a varying opinion regarding dental health of their child. The caries status of children in the control group was greater than children in the study group. The mean plaque index of children in the control group (1.40) was greater than children in the study group (1.34) which was statistically significant according to Mann-Whitney U test. The gingival health of children in the study group was better than children in the control group which was also not statistically significant. Conclusion This study highlights need for a periodic referral of the child cancer patients to the paediatric dental clinic in hospitals for the timely dental care. PMID:27437369

  7. Summary of the 2015 International Paediatric Heart Failure Summit of Johns Hopkins All Children's Heart Institute.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Jeffrey P; Quintessenza, James A; Karl, Tom R; Asante-Korang, Alfred; Everett, Allen D; Collins, Susan B; Ramirez-Correa, Genaro A; Burns, Kristin M; Cohen, Mitchell; Colan, Steven D; Costello, John M; Daly, Kevin P; Franklin, Rodney C G; Fraser, Charles D; Hill, Kevin D; Huhta, James C; Kaushal, Sunjay; Law, Yuk M; Lipshultz, Steven E; Murphy, Anne M; Pasquali, Sara K; Payne, Mark R; Rossano, Joseph; Shirali, Girish; Ware, Stephanie M; Xu, Mingguo; Jacobs, Marshall L

    2015-08-01

    In the United States alone, ∼14,000 children are hospitalised annually with acute heart failure. The science and art of caring for these patients continues to evolve. The International Pediatric Heart Failure Summit of Johns Hopkins All Children's Heart Institute was held on February 4 and 5, 2015. The 2015 International Pediatric Heart Failure Summit of Johns Hopkins All Children's Heart Institute was funded through the Andrews/Daicoff Cardiovascular Program Endowment, a philanthropic collaboration between All Children's Hospital and the Morsani College of Medicine at the University of South Florida (USF). Sponsored by All Children's Hospital Andrews/Daicoff Cardiovascular Program, the International Pediatric Heart Failure Summit assembled leaders in clinical and scientific disciplines related to paediatric heart failure and created a multi-disciplinary "think-tank". The purpose of this manuscript is to summarise the lessons from the 2015 International Pediatric Heart Failure Summit of Johns Hopkins All Children's Heart Institute, to describe the "state of the art" of the treatment of paediatric cardiac failure, and to discuss future directions for research in the domain of paediatric cardiac failure.

  8. The aetiology and impact of malnutrition in paediatric inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Gerasimidis, K; McGrogan, P; Edwards, C A

    2011-08-01

    Disease-associated undernutrition of all types is very common in paediatric inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Recent weight loss remains one of the triad of clinical manifestations and a cornerstone for the diagnosis of Crohn's disease (CD), although significantly fewer patients now present as being underweight. Recent evidence suggests that the introduction of medical treatment will quickly restore body weight, although this does not reflect concomitant changes in body composition. CD children present with features of nutritional cachexia with normal fat stores but depleted lean mass. Poor bone health, delayed puberty and growth failure are additional features that further complicate clinical management. Suboptimal nutritional intake is a main determinant of undernutrition, although activation of the immune system and secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines exert additional independent effects. Biochemically low concentrations of plasma micronutrients are commonly reported in IBD patients, although their interpretation is difficult in the presence of an acute phase response and other indices of body stores adequacy are needed. Anaemia is a common extraintestinal manifestation of the IBD child. Iron-deficient anaemia is the predominant type, with anaemia of chronic disease second. Decreased dietary intake, as a result of decreased appetite and food aversion, is the major cause of undernutrition in paediatric IBD. Altered energy and nutrient requirements, malabsorption and increased gastrointestinal losses are additional factors, although their contribution to undernutrition in paediatric CD needs to be studied further.

  9. Paracetamol versus ibuprofen: a randomized controlled trial of outpatient analgesia efficacy for paediatric acute limb fractures.

    PubMed

    Shepherd, Michael; Aickin, Richard

    2009-12-01

    Paediatric limb fracture is a common injury that presents frequently to the ED. The primary objective of the present study was to determine whether ibuprofen provides better analgesia than paracetamol for paediatric patients discharged with acute limb fractures. A prospective, randomized controlled study was conducted in a children's ED. Children aged 5-14 years with an acute limb fracture were randomized to be prescribed paracetamol 15 mg/kg/dose every 4 h or ibuprofen 10 mg/kg/dose every 8 h. Objective (child-reported) pain scores using the 'Faces' pain scale were measured over a 48 h period. Child-reported pain did not differ significantly between the paracetamol and ibuprofen groups (mean pain score paracetamol 2.8 [95% CI 2.4-3.4] vs 2.7 [95% CI 2.1-3.3], P = 0.73). Parent-reported sleep quality did not differ between the two groups (P = 0.78). Child-reported pain score decreased over the 48 h of measurement (P < 0.0001). There were no significant differences in side-effects detected between the two groups. The present study shows that in the outpatient paediatric population, ibuprofen does not provide better analgesia than paracetamol. Pain from an acute fracture can be managed by regular simple oral analgesia and immobilization.

  10. Diagnostic reference levels for thorax X-ray examinations of paediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Kiljunen, T; Järvinen, H; Savolainen, S

    2007-06-01

    Based on the Medical Exposure Directive of the European Commission, 97/43/Euratom, The Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority (STUK) in Finland has the responsibility for setting national diagnostic reference levels (DRLs) for the most common radiological examinations. Paediatric patients deserve special attention because of the higher radiation risk compared with adults. The purpose of this paper is to present a method that takes into account patient size when setting DRLs in paediatric patients. The overall data consisted of patient doses collected from six hospitals during the years 1994-2001, and new measurements in two hospitals in 2004. In total, there were 700 chest examinations. The method established by the National Radiological Protection Board (UK) for setting DRLs was not considered feasible in Finnish practice. Patient doses correlated exponentially with the projection thickness, which was measured directly for each patient. Since 1 January 2006, paediatric DRLs for conventional chest examinations have been specified in Finland as a DRL curve by using both dose quantities (entrance surface doses (ESD) and dose-area product (DAP)) as a function of patient projection thickness.

  11. Assessment of the Absorbed Dose in the Kidney of Nuclear Nephrology Paediatric Patients using ICRP Biokinetic Data and Monte Carlo Simulations with Mass-Scaled Paediatric Voxel Phantoms.

    PubMed

    Teles, P; Mendes, M; Zankl, M; de Sousa, V; Santos, A I; Vaz, P

    2016-04-21

    The aim of this work is to use Monte Carlo simulations and VOXEL phantoms to estimate the absorbed dose in paediatric patients (aged from 2 weeks to 16 y), with normal renal function, to whom technetium-99m-dimercaptosuccinic acid ((99m)Tc-DMSA) was administered, for diagnostic renal scintigraphy purposes; and compare them with values obtained using the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) methodology. In the ICRP methodology, the cumulated absorbed dose in the kidneys is estimated by multiplying the administered activity with the corresponding given dose coefficients. The other methods were based on Monte Carlo simulations performed on two paediatric voxel phantoms ( ITALIC! CHILDand ITALIC! BABY), and another three phantoms, which were modified to suit the mass of the patients' kidneys, and other anatomical factors. Different ITALIC! S-values were estimated using this methodology, which together with solving the ICRP biokinetic model to determine the cumulated activities, allowed for the estimation of absorbed doses different from those obtained with the ICRP method, together with new dose coefficients. The obtained values were then compared. The deviations suggest that the ITALIC! S-values are strongly dependent on the patient's total body weight, which could be in contrast with the ICRP data, which is provided by age, regardless of other anatomical parameters.

  12. Ethical principles and operational guidelines for good clinical practice in paediatric research. Recommendations of the Ethics Working Group of the Confederation of European Specialists in Paediatrics (CESP).

    PubMed

    Gill, Denis

    2004-02-01

    A child has the full right of protection of his/her life by provision of optional medical care. There is a need in paediatrics for better evidence based practice founded on quality research into efficacy and safety of children's medications. To protect the best interests of the child one must balance the ethical demand to do clinical studies with the necessity to avoid doing harm. To achieve this end good clinical practice in paediatric research demands that studies comply with the Declaration of Helsinki, ICH topic E11, EU Directives and other relevant international guidelines. Evident differences in physiology, pharmacology, pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics between children of differing ages and between children and adults demand properly constructed and conducted studies that respect the special somatic, emotional and mental needs of children. To justify any research project one must balance the benefit/risk ratio, provide experienced, competent personnel and infracture, obtain adequate informed consent/assent, and have the study evaluated and approved by an ethics committee containing expertise on the rights and needs of children.

  13. Paediatric ED BiPAP continuous quality improvement programme with patient analysis: 2005–2013

    PubMed Central

    Abramo, Thomas; Williams, Abby; Mushtaq, Samaiya; Meredith, Mark; Sepaule, Rawle; Crossman, Kristen; Burney Jones, Cheryl; Godbold, Suzanne; Hu, Zhuopei; Nick, Todd

    2017-01-01

    Objective In paediatric moderate-to-severe asthmatics, there is significant bronchospasm, airway obstruction, air trapping causing severe hyperinflation with more positive intraplural pressure preventing passive air movement. These effects cause an increased respiratory rate (RR), less airflow and shortened inspiratory breath time. In certain asthmatics, aerosols are ineffective due to their inadequate ventilation. Bilevel positive airway pressure (BiPAP) in acute paediatric asthmatics can be an effective treatment. BiPAP works by unloading fatigued inspiratory muscles, a direct bronchodilation effect, offsetting intrinsic PEEP and recruiting collapsed alveoli that reduces the patient's work of breathing and achieves their total lung capacity quicker. Unfortunately, paediatric emergency department (PED) BiPAP is underused and quality analysis is non-existent. A PED BiPAP Continuous Quality Improvement Program (CQIP) from 2005 to 2013 was evaluated using descriptive analytics for the primary outcomes of usage, safety, BiPAP settings, therapeutics and patient disposition. Interventions PED BiPAP CQIP descriptive analytics. Setting Academic PED. Participants 1157 patients. Interventions A PED BiPAP CQIP from 2005 to 2013 for the usage, safety, BiPAP settings, therapeutic response parameters and patient disposition was evaluated using descriptive analytics. Primary and secondary outcomes Safety, usage, compliance, therapeutic response parameters, BiPAP settings and patient disposition. Results 1157 patients had excellent compliance without complications. Only 6 (0.5%) BiPAP patients were intubated. BiPAP median settings: IPAP 18 (16,20) cm H2O range 12–28; EPAP 8 cmH2O (8,8) range 6–10; inspiratory-to-expiratory time (I:E) ratio 1.75 (1.5,1.75). Pediatric Asthma Severity score and RR decreased (p<0.001) while tidal volume increased (p<0.001). Patient disposition: 325 paediatric intensive care units (PICU), 832 wards, with 52 of these PED ward patients were

  14. Meteorological factors and El Nino Southern Oscillation are associated with paediatric varicella infections in Hong Kong, 2004-2010.

    PubMed

    Chan, J Y C; Lin, H L; Tian, L W

    2014-07-01

    Varicella accounts for substantial morbidities and remains a public health issue worldwide, especially in children. Little is known about the effect of meteorological variables on varicella infection risk for children. This study described the epidemiology of paediatric varicella notifications in Hong Kong from 2004 to 2010, and explored the association between paediatric varicella notifications in children aged <18 years and various meteorological factors using a time-stratified case-crossover model, with adjustment of potential confounding factors. The analysis found that daily mean temperature, atmospheric pressure and Southern Oscillation Index (SOI) were positively associated with paediatric varicella notifications. We found that an interquartile range (IQR) increase in temperature (8·38°C) at lag 1 day, a 9·50 hPa increase in atmospheric pressure for the current day, and a 21·91 unit increase in SOI for the current day may lead to an increase in daily cases of 5·19% [95% confidence interval (CI) 1·90-8·58], 5·77% (95% CI 3·01-8·61), and 4·32% (95% CI 2·98-5·68), respectively. An IQR increase in daily relative humidity (by 11·96%) was associated with a decrease in daily paediatric varicella (-2·79%, 95% CI -3·84 to -1·73). These findings suggest that meteorological factors might be important predictors of paediatric varicella infection in Hong Kong.

  15. Information Seeking Behaviour of Parents of Paediatric Patients for Clinical Decision Making: The Central Role of Information Literacy in a Participatory Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kostagiolas, Petros; Martzoukou, Konstantina; Georgantzi, Georgia; Niakas, Dimitris

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: This study investigated the information seeking behaviour and needs of parents of paediatric patients and their motives for seeking Internet-based information. Method: A questionnaire survey of 121 parents was conducted in a paediatric clinic of a Greek university hospital. Analysis: The data were analysed using SPSS; descriptive…

  16. Inter-rater reliability between nurses for a new paediatric triage system based primarily on vital parameters: the Paediatric Triage Instrument (PETI)

    PubMed Central

    Karjala, Jaana; Eriksson, Staffan

    2017-01-01

    Introduction The major paediatric triage systems are primarily based on flow charts involving signs and symptoms for orientation and subjective estimates of the patient's condition. In contrast, the 4-level Paediatric Triage Instrument (PETI) is primarily based on vital parameters and was developed exclusively for paediatric triage in patients with medical symptoms. The aim of this study was to assess the inter-rater reliability of this triage system in children when used by nurses. Methods A design was employed in which triage was performed simultaneously and independently by a research nurse and an emergency department (ED) nurse using the PETI. All patients aged ≤12 years who presented at the ED with a medical symptom were considered eligible for participation. Results The 89 participants exhibited a median age of 2 years and were triaged by 28 different nurses. The inter-rater reliability between nurses calculated with the quadratic-weighted κ was 0.78 (95% CI 0.67 to 0.89); the linear-weighted κ was 0.67 (95% CI 0.56 to 0.80) and the unweighted κ was 0.59 (95% CI 0.44 to 0.73). For the patients aged <1, 1–3 and >3 years, the quadratic-weighted κ values were 0.67 (95% CI 0.39 to 0.94), 0.86 (95% CI 0.75 to 0.97) and 0.73 (95% CI 0.49 to 0.97), respectively. The median triage duration was 6 min. Conclusions The PETI exhibited substantial reliability when used in children aged ≤12 years and almost perfect reliability among children aged 1–3 years. Moreover, rapid application of the PETI was demonstrated. This study has some limitations, including sample size and generalisability, but the PETI exhibited promise regarding reliability, and the next step could be either a larger reliability study or a validation study. PMID:28235966

  17. An mHealth system for toxicity monitoring of paediatric oncological patients using Near Field Communication technology.

    PubMed

    Duregger, Katharina; Hayn, Dieter; Morak, Jürgen; Ladenstein, Ruth; Schreier, Gunter

    2015-01-01

    Home-based monitoring might be useful to reduce the burden of long-lasting oncological treatment for children. Current telemonitoring applications focus on chronic diseases or elderly people. Based on the workflow for different stakeholders and the identification of parameters important in paediatric oncology, we developed a prototype of a smartphone-based telehealth system using Near Field Communication technology for monitoring paediatric neuroblastoma patients at home. The parameters blood pressure, heart rate, temperature, body weight, C-reactive protein, white blood cell count, wellbeing, pain level, nausea level and skin alterations could be monitored using a smartphone, a designated app, point-of-care measurement devices and a smart-poster containing RFID tags. The system has been designed to increase the quality of life for paediatric cancer patients. As a future step, a clinical trial is currently being planned to evaluate the system in clinical setting.

  18. Is autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) an adequate treatment option for repair of cartilage defects in paediatric patients?

    PubMed

    Kaszkin-Bettag, Marietta

    2013-08-01

    Cartilage lesions in the knee of juvenile patients require an effective repair to regain life-long functional activity of the joint. Autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) is discussed to be advantageous over other methods for cartilage repair regarding long-term outcome. ACI has successfully been applied in juvenile patients, although currently recommended for patients ≥18 years of age. Only few controlled clinical trials present evidence of efficacy and safety of ACI in adolescent patients. ACI products have to undergo the process of a marketing authorisation application, including the submission of a paediatric investigation plan (PIP). Data from prospective clinical studies or retrospective collection of long-term data in paediatric patients should be submitted for risk-benefit evaluation by the Paediatric Committee (PDCO).

  19. Paediatric drug use with focus on off-label prescriptions in Lombardy and implications for therapeutic approaches.

    PubMed

    Carnovale, Carla; Conti, Valentino; Perrone, Valentina; Antoniazzi, Stefania; Pozzi, Marco; Merlino, Luca; Venegoni, Mauro; Clementi, Emilio; Radice, Sonia

    2013-12-01

    The persistent lack of information on the paediatric use of most medicinal products is a major hindrance towards an optimal treatment of paediatric patients. Several studies have documented the high prevalence of off-label use in paediatric population. No comprehensive studies, however, exist that analyse in full all prescriptions for all dispensed drugs, especially in view of the recent intervention by the European Medicine Agency to tackle this issue. We have assessed the drug prescription pattern in the paediatric outpatient population of Lombardy, which has a reliable record of such prescriptions focusing on off-label drug use. We analysed all dispensed outpatient prescriptions to children aged 0-18 years and the proportion of off-label drug use in 2011, using data from the regional administrative prescriptions database. A total of 4,027,119 prescriptions were dispensed, of which 133,619 (3.3 %) were off-label. The anatomical therapeutic chemical classes most involved in off-label prescriptions were antibiotics for systemic use (33,629), alimentary tract and metabolism (31,739) and respiratory tract (31,458). The highest rate (8 %) of off-label drug prescriptions was observed in the age range 0-1. The study revealed also an inappropriate prescription pattern for fluoroquinolones and drugs targeting the cardiovascular and musculoskeletal systems. We identified inappropriate prescriptions for specific drug classes, highlighting the need of increasing pharmacological studies in the paediatric patients and specific critical drugs/drug classes in which such studies are particularly urgent. Depending on the region, inappropriate paediatric drug prescriptions may affect different drug classes, indicating the need of tailoring specific programmes of information.

  20. Prospective survey of acute osteoarticular infections in a French paediatric orthopedic surgery unit.

    PubMed

    Ferroni, A; Al Khoury, H; Dana, C; Quesne, G; Berche, P; Glorion, C; Péjin, Z

    2013-09-01

    The epidemiology of acute paediatric osteoarticular infections (OAI) has recently evolved, mainly due to the improvement of microbiological diagnosis. We conducted a prospective study to analyse the recent epidemiology and the clinical evolution of paediatric OAI in order to validate the adequacy of our probabilistic first-line antibiotic treatment (intraveinous cefamandole + gentamicin). All children suspected of community acquired OAI were included and followed-up for 3 years. The etiologic diagnosis was based on blood cultures, joint aspirations and bone punctures. All osteoarticular (OA) samples were systematically inoculated into blood culture bottles. Real-time universal 16S rRNA and PCR targeted on Staphylococcus aureus, Kingella kingae, Streptococcus pneumoniae and Streptococcus pyogenes were performed twice a week. From 17 March 2007 to 26 February 2009, 98 septic arthritis, 70 osteomyelitis, 23 osteoarthritis and six spondylodiscitis were analysed. A portal of entry was suspected in 44% of cases, including 55% of otorhinolaryngological infections. C reactive protein was the most sensitive inflammatory marker. PCR increased by 54% the performance of bacteriological diagnosis. Among the patients completely investigated (blood culture and OAI samples), there were 63% documented OAI. The main pathogens found were K. kingae (52%), S. aureus (28%), S. pyogenes (7%), S. pneumoniae (3%) and Streptococcus agalactiae (2%). All isolated bacteria were sensitive to the probabilist treatment and outcome was favorable. PCR has significantly improved the performance and the delay of IOA diagnosis in children, for which K. kingae turned out to be the first causative agent. The probabilistic treatment was active against the main bacteria responsible for paediatric OAI.

  1. Antiparasitic drugs for paediatrics: systematic review, formulations, pharmacokinetics, safety, efficacy and implications for control.

    PubMed

    Keiser, Jennifer; Ingram, Katrin; Utzinger, Jürg

    2011-10-01

    Drug development for paediatric applications entails a number of challenges, such as the wide age spectrum covered - from birth to adolescence - and developmental changes in physiology during biological maturation that influence the efficacy and toxicity of drugs. Safe and efficacious antiparasitic drugs for children are of pivotal importance given the large proportion of burden attributable to parasitic diseases in this age group, and growing efforts to administer, as widely as possible, antiparasitic drugs to at-risk populations, such as infants and school-aged children, often without prior diagnosis. The purpose of this review is to investigate whether antiparasitic drugs have been adequately studied for use in paediatrics. We approached this issue through a systematic review using PubMed and the Cochrane Central Register of Trials covering a period of 10 years and 8 months until the end of August 2010 to identify trials that investigated efficacy, safety and pharmacokinetic (PK) parameters of antiparasitic drugs for paediatrics. Overall, 269 clinical drug trials and 17 PK studies met our inclusion criteria. Antimalarial drugs were the most commonly studied medicines (82·6%). Most trials were carried out in Africa and children aged 2-11 years were the age group most often investigated. Additionally, we critically examined available drug formulations for anthelminthics and identified a number of shortcomings that are discussed. Finally, we shed new light on current proposals to expand 'preventive chemotherapy' to preschool-aged children and emphasise that new research, including risk-benefit analyses, are needed before such a strategy can be adopted more widely.

  2. Medication consumption in the Spanish paediatric population: related factors and time trend, 1993–2003

    PubMed Central

    Carrasco-Garrido, Pilar; Jiménez-García, Rodrigo; Barrera, Valentín Hernández; de Andrés, Ana López; de Miguel, Ángel Gil

    2009-01-01

    AIMS To ascertain the prevalence of consumption of medications in the Spanish paediatric population and to identify the factors associated with such consumption. METHODS This was a descriptive, cross-sectional study covering the Spanish adult population, using data drawn from the 1993 and 2003 Spanish National Health Surveys (SNHS). The 1993 and 2003 SNHS include data on 5280 and 6463 children, respectively, age range 0–15 years. The independent variables were sociodemographic and health-related, and the dependent variable was medications use. Using logistic multivariate regression models, we analysed the temporal evolution of medication consumption between 1993 and 2003. RESULTS The 1993 SNHS data revealed that 36.81% of the paediatric population had consumed some type of medication, whereas in 2003 this figure had dropped to 34%. Over the decade of study, there was a significant decrease in use of medications for catarrh, influenza, throat (P < 0.05), and an increase in consumption of pain-relieving drugs and/or fever-lowering, antibiotics and anti-allergy remedies. Multivariate analysis highlighted the association between medication consumption, negative perception of the child's health [odds ratio (OR) 2.84, 95% confidence interval (CI) 2.16, 3.72 in 1993, and OR 3.54, 95% CI 2.74, 4.56 in 2003] and medical visits to the physician across the 2 years (OR 12.09, 95% CI 10.13, 14.42 in 1993, and OR 7.17, 95% CI 6.06, 8.47 in 2003). CONCLUSIONS Although there was a significant decline in overall drug consumption in the Spanish paediatric population from 1993 to 2003, the prevalence of consumption of certain groups, such as analgesics, antipyretics and antibiotics, has risen. PMID:19740404

  3. Paediatric models in motion: requirements for model-based decision support at the bedside

    PubMed Central

    Barrett, Jeffrey S

    2015-01-01

    Optimal paediatric pharmacotherapy is reliant on a detailed understanding of the individual patient including their developmental status and disease state as well as the pharmaceutical agents he/she is receiving for treatment or management of side effects. Our appreciation for size and maturation effects on the pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) phenomenon has improved to the point that we can develop predictive models that permit us to individualize therapy, especially in the situation where we are monitoring drug effects or therapeutic concentrations. The growth of efforts to guide paediatric pharmacotherapy via model-based decision support necessitates a coordinated and systematic approach to ensuring reliable and robust output to caregivers that represents the current standard of care and adheres to governance imposed by the host institution or coalition responsible. Model-based systems which guide caregivers on dosing paediatric patients in a more comprehensive manner are in development at several institutions. Care must be taken that these systems provide robust guidance with the current best practice. These systems must evolve as new information becomes available and ultimately are best constructed from diverse data representing global input on demographics, ethnic / racial diversity, diet and other lifestyle factors. Multidisciplinary involvement at the project team level is key to the ultimate clinical valuation. Likewise, early engagement of clinical champions is also critical for the success of model-based tools. Adherence to regulatory requirements as well as best practices with respect to software development and testing are essential if these tools are to be used as part of the routine standard of care. PMID:24251868

  4. Role of E-selectin for diagnosing myocardial injury in paediatric patients with mycoplasma pneumoniae pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Deng, Ming-Hong; Lin, Chun-Wang; Sun, Yan-Na; Zeng, Xiang-Lin; Wen, Fang

    2017-01-01

    Backgrounds Effects of myocardial injury on E-selectin remain unclear. Thus, we investigated the diagnostic value of E-selectin for myocardial injury in paediatric patients with mycoplasma pneumoniae pneumonia. Methods In this prospective and blinded clinical study, plasma E-selectin, cardiac troponin I, creatine kinase isoenzyme MB, interleukin-6 and tumor necrosis factor alpha concentrations were measured in paediatric patients with mycoplasma pneumoniae pneumonia (MPP group, n = 138). The control group comprised 120 healthy children. The definition of cardiac injury was based on cardiac troponin I or CK-MB (with or possibly without abnormal electrocardiogram evidence). Diagnostic value of E-selectin for myocardial injury was determined by analysing receiver operating characteristic curves. Results Among the 138 mycoplasma pneumoniae pneumonia patients, 40 patients were identified with myocardial injury, while 98 patients were identified without myocardial injury. Plasma E-selectin concentrations were: 40.22 ± 4.80 ng/mL, in patients with myocardial injury; 18.55 ± 2.16 ng/mL, in patients without myocardial injury and 12.39 ± 3.27 ng/mL, in healthy children. For the 40 patients identified with myocardial injury, area under the receiver operating characteristic curve value for plasma E-selectin concentrations was 0.945 (95% CI: 0.899-0.991), and optimal diagnostic cut-off value was 29.93 ng/mL (positive likelihood ratio = 72.5). Conclusion E-selectin was shown to be an effective index for myocardial injury in paediatric patients with mycoplasma pneumoniae pneumonia, and its role in other causes of myocardial injury warrants further investigation.

  5. Visceral leishmaniasis in Malta—an 18 year paediatric, population based study

    PubMed Central

    Grech, V.; Mizzi, J.; Mangion, M.; Vella, C.

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Visceral leishmaniasis (VL) is a chronic parasitic infection that infects approximately 400 000 individuals annually, with a predilection towards early childhood.
AIMS—To study the epidemiology of VL in childhood.
METHODS—VL is endemic in Malta, a small archipelago of islands in the centre of the Mediterranean with a total population approaching half a million. Notification of human cases of leishmaniasis is compulsory. Case records of all 81 paediatric patients with VL between 1980 and 1998 were analysed.
RESULTS—The annual incidence of VL declined for all cases of VL, and declined significantly for paediatric cases (p = 0.01). For 1994to 1998, the overall incidence of VL was 0.9 per 100 000 total population and the paediatric incidence was 2.5 per 100 000 population. Median age at presentation was 34 months. Common features at presentation were splenomegaly, hepatomegaly, fever, and pancytopenia with high lymphocyte and monocyte counts. The diagnostic sensitivity of isolated immunofluorescent antibody testing was equivalent to bone marrow aspiration (95%). Blood transfusions for anaemia were required in 93% of patients. Eleven per cent had intercurrent infections. All patients were cured, and were initially treated with intravenous sodium stibogluconate. Defervescence occurred after a median of six days of treatment, and patients continued to be treated on a day case basis. Nine relapsers were retreated with sodium stibogluconate, achieving a cure rate of 94%, but five patients required additional drug therapy. There were no permanent sequelae associated with VL or its treatment.
CONCLUSIONS—The decreased incidence is attributed to the eradication of stray dogs which are the disease reservoir.

 PMID:10799428

  6. High-sensitivity C-reactive protein in paediatric inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Sidoroff, Marianne; Karikoski, Riitta; Raivio, Taneli; Savilahti, Erkki; Kolho, Kaija-Leena

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To study whether high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) measurement can aid the assessment of disease activity and glucocorticoid treatment in paediatric inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). METHODS: CRP levels were measured in 39 children with IBD undergoing colonoscopy [median age 12.8 years, Crohn’s disease (CD) n = 20], in 22 other children with IBD followed for acute response to glucocorticoids, and in 33 paediatric non-IBD patients. When standard CRP level was below detection limit (< 5 mg/L), hs-CRP was analyzed. RESULTS: Sixty-four percent (25/39) of the children with IBD undergoing colonoscopy displayed undetectable (< 5 mg/L) standard CRP levels. Of these, the hs-CRP measurement could not differentiate between active (median, 0.2 mg/L, range, 0.007-1.37, n = 17) or quiescent (0.1 mg/L, 0.01-1.89, n = 8, P = NS) disease. Patients with ileocolonic CD had higher CRP levels (14 mg/L, 0.06-45, n = 13) than patients with no ileal involvement (0.18 mg/L, 0.01-9, n = 7, P < 0.01) or ulcerative colitis (UC) (0.13 mg/L, 0.007-23, P < 0.05). In children with active IBD treated with systemic glucocorticoids, the standard CRP was undetectable in 59% of the patients. The hs-CRP levels did not differ between patients that responded to steroid therapy and in non-responders. CONCLUSION: The measurement of hs-CRP did not prove useful in the assessment of disease activity or glucocorticoid treatment in paediatric IBD patients that had undetectable standard CRP. PMID:20556836

  7. Paediatric Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder and Depressive Symptoms: Clinical Correlates and CBT Treatment Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Brown, H M; Lester, K J; Jassi, A; Heyman, I; Krebs, G

    2015-07-01

    Depression frequently co-occurs with paediatric obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), yet the clinical correlates and impact of depression on CBT outcomes remain unclear. The prevalence and clinical correlates of depression were examined in a paediatric specialist OCD-clinic sample (N = 295; Mean = 15 [7 - 18] years, 42 % female), using both dimensional (Beck Depression Inventory-youth; n = 261) and diagnostic (Development and Wellbeing Assessment; n = 127) measures of depression. The impact of depressive symptoms and suspected disorders on post-treatment OCD severity was examined in a sub-sample who received CBT, with or without SSRI medication (N = 100). Fifty-one per-cent of patients reported moderately or extremely elevated depressive symptoms and 26 % (95 % CI: 18 - 34) met criteria for a suspected depressive disorder. Depressive symptoms and depressive disorders were associated with worse OCD symptom severity and global functioning prior to CBT. Individuals with depression were more likely to be female, have had a psychiatric inpatient admission and less likely to be attending school (ps < 0.01). OCD and depressive symptom severity significantly decreased after CBT. Depressive symptoms and depressive disorders predicted worse post-treatment OCD severity (βs = 0.19 and 0.26, ps < 0.05) but became non-significant when controlling for pre-treatment OCD severity (βs = 0.05 and 0.13, ns). Depression is common in paediatric OCD and is associated with more severe OCD and poorer functioning. However, depression severity decreases over the course of CBT for OCD and is not independently associated with worse outcomes, supporting the recommendation for treatment as usual in the presence of depressive symptoms.

  8. Barriers to education of overseas doctors in paediatrics: a qualitative study in South Yorkshire

    PubMed Central

    Mahajan, J; Stark, P

    2007-01-01

    Objective To explore the factors that may influence the progress of doctors who come from the Indian subcontinent to train in paediatrics in the UK. Methods Overseas doctors training in paediatrics in Rotherham, Sheffield and Doncaster participated in the study. Focus groups were used to collect data; two focus groups, each with 4–5 participants, were conducted at 6‐week intervals. Semistructured, one‐to‐one interviews were conducted to add more understanding and depth to issues highlighted in the focus groups. The focus groups and interviews were audiotaped; the tapes were transcribed and data were analysed using the Grounded Theory; open codes were formed and concepts identified using microanalysis, and initial theories were built. Results Lack of information about the National Health Service (NHS)/Royal Colleges, inappropriate communication skills, difficulties in team working, difficulties in preparing for Royal College examinations, visa and job hunting, and social and cultural isolation were identified as major barriers. Problems arose not only from difficulties with language but also from use of local and colloquial words, different accents and difficulty in communicating sensitive issues. Lack of understanding of role in teams and difficulties in working in multiprofessional setting all contributed to the problems. Cultural differences inside and outside the workplace, and social isolation were also highlighted. Induction programmes, mentoring, awareness of the issues within the teams, and courses in communication specifically directed at overseas doctors were identified as means to overcome these barriers. Conclusions Several intercultural factors were identified that could act as barriers to the progress of overseas doctors training in paediatrics in the UK. Increased awareness of these factors within the teams would be the first step in resolving some of the issues. PMID:16935914

  9. Flexible intramedullary nailing in paediatric femoral fractures. A report of 73 cases

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Flexible intramedullary nailing has emerged as an accepted procedure for paediatric femoral fractures. Present indications include all patients with femoral shaft fractures and open physis. Despite its excellent reported results, orthopaedic surgeons remain divided in opinion regarding its usefulness and the best material used for nails. We thus undertook a retrospective study of paediatric femoral fractures treated with titanium or stainless steel flexible nails at our institute with a minimum of 5 years follow up. Material and methods We included 73 femoral shaft fractures in 69 patients treated with retrograde flexible intramedullary nailing with a minimum follow up of 5 years. Final limb length discrepancy and any angular or rotational deformities were determined. Results Mean age at final follow up was 15.5 years (10-21 years). Mean follow up was 7.16 years (5.0-8.6 years). Titanium and stainless steel nails were used in 43 and 30 cases respectively. There were 51 midshaft, 17 proximal, and 5 distal fractures. All fractures united at an average of 11 weeks but asymptomatic malalignment and LLD were seen in 19% and 58% fractures respectively. LLD ranged from -3 cm to 1.5 cm. Other complications included superficial infection(2), proximal migration of nail(3), irritation at nail insertion site(5) and penetration of femoral neck with nail tip(1). There were 59 excellent, 10 satisfactory and 4 poor results. Conclusion Flexible intramedullary nailing is reliable and safe for treating paediatric femoral shaft fractures. It is relatively free of serious complications despite asymptomatic malalignment and LLD in significant percentage of fractures. PMID:22192682

  10. Changes in cerebral oxygen saturation and haemoglobin concentration during paediatric cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Suemori, T; Horton, S B; Bottrell, S; Skowno, J J; Davidson, A

    2017-03-01

    Although near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) enables bedside assessment of cerebral oxygenation, it provides little information on the cause of deoxygenation. The authors aimed to investigate the changes in cerebral oxygenation and haemoglobin concentration and their associations during paediatric cardiac surgery in order to elucidate the physiology underlying cerebral deoxygenation. An observational retrospective study on 399 patients who underwent paediatric cardiac surgery was conducted. With use of NIRS, cerebral oxygen saturation as expressed by tissue oxygen index (TOI) before and after surgery, concentration changes in oxygenated haemoglobin (Δ[HbO2]) and deoxygenated haemoglobin (Δ[HHb]) after surgery were studied as were the associations between these values and clinical variables. TOI decreased after surgery (preoperative versus postoperative value, 66.0% [56.9, 71.3] versus 63.2% [54.3, 69.4], median [25th, 75th percentile], P <0.001) and the decrease was greater in higher category groups in the Risk Adjusted Classification for Congenital Heart Surgery (RACHS-1). [HHb] increased from its baseline (+1.74 μmol/l [-1.57, +5.84], P <0.001) and the increase was greater in higher risk category groups. On the contrary, there was no evidence for a change in [HbO2] (+0.45 μmol/l [-4.76, +5.30], P=0.42). Cerebral oxygen saturation decreased after paediatric cardiac surgery and the decrease was greater in patients of higher risk groups. The increase in [HHb] was considered to play a predominant role in the cerebral deoxygenation noted, in particular in higher RACHS-1 category groups.

  11. Types of anaemic crises in paediatric patients with sickle cell anaemia seen in Enugu, Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Juwah, A; Nlemadim, E; Kaine, W

    2004-01-01

    Background: Anaemic crises in paediatric patients with sickle cell anaemia are major causes of morbidity and mortality. Some children admitted to hospitals' emergency rooms or paediatric wards of the hospitals with severe anaemia die before blood transfusion. Aims and Methods: A total of 108 episodes of anaemic crises were prospectively evaluated in 108 patients with sickle cell anaemia attending the paediatric sickle cell clinic of the University of Nigeria Teaching Hospital, Enugu, Nigeria. Results: Hyper-haemolytic crises were the commonest types of anaemic crises in the patients studied. The mean haemoglobin concentration of 44.66 (SD 6.42) g/l in crises was significantly lower than the mean steady state level of 78.69 (SD 8.50) g/l. Reticulocytes, unconjugated serum bilirubin concentrations, and the presence of nucleated red blood cells were also increased. About 4.6% of patients were not jaundiced at presentation even though they were profoundly anaemic. Their haematological indices gradually returned to normal without marked changes in their serum bilirubin concentrations. These patients were probably in the early recovery phase of aplastic crises. The classical presentation of acute splenic sequestration crisis with a rapidly enlarging spleen and hypotension was not observed. This was probably because of its precipitate nature and accompanying circulatory collapse, which carried a high mortality rate. Minor forms of sequestration crises may have occurred in the liver and spleen. Conclusions: Malaria appeared to have played a role in precipitating some of the hyper-haemolytic episodes. Further studies to elucidate this role are required so that appropriate recommendations regarding malaria prophylaxis can be made in patients with sickle cell anaemia. PMID:15155406

  12. Autism Disorder (AD): An Updated Review for Paediatric Dentists

    PubMed Central

    J., Udhya; M.M, Varadharaja; J., Parthiban; Srinivasan, Ila

    2014-01-01

    Over the past two decades, there has been an explosion of interest in Autism Disorder (AD). Knowledge and awareness on the condition has grown exponentially at all levels among the general public, parents, health professionals, the research community and more recently, at parliamentary level. The world has begun to recognize the scope of this problem and act internationally and locally to improve the lives of the growing number of individuals and families affected by this devastating disorder. This article reviews the dental literature since 1969 and it summarizes characteristics of patients with AD, oral health status and dental management of patients with AD. PMID:24701555

  13. Highlights of Children with Cancer UK’s Workshop on Drug Delivery in Paediatric Brain Tumours

    PubMed Central

    Nailor, Audrey; Walker, David A; Jacques, Thomas S; Warren, Kathy E; Brem, Henry; Kearns, Pamela R; Greenwood, John; Penny, Jeffrey I; Pilkington, Geoffrey J; Carcaboso, Angel M; Fleischhack, Gudrun; Macarthur, Donald; Slavc, Irene; Meijer, Lisethe; Gill, Steven; Lowis, Stephen; van Vuurden, Dannis G; Pearl, Monica S; Clifford, Steven C; Morrissy, Sorana; Ivanov, Delyan P; Beccaria, Kévin; Gilbertson, Richard J; Straathof, Karin; Green, Jordan J; Smith, Stuart; Rahman, Ruman; Kilday, John-Paul

    2016-01-01

    The first Workshop on Drug Delivery in Paediatric Brain Tumours was hosted in London by the charity Children with Cancer UK. The goals of the workshop were to break down the barriers to treating central nervous system (CNS) tumours in children, leading to new collaborations and further innovations in this under-represented and emotive field. These barriers include the physical delivery challenges presented by the blood–brain barrier, the underpinning reasons for the intractability of CNS cancers, and the practical difficulties of delivering cancer treatment to the brains of children. Novel techniques for overcoming these problems were discussed, new models brought forth, and experiences compared. PMID:27110286

  14. Impacted Sharp Oesophageal Foreign Bodies—A Novel Technique of Removal with the Paediatric Bronchoscope

    PubMed Central

    Bajpai, Minu

    2016-01-01

    Sharp foreign bodies in the oesophagus may present as an entirely asymptomatic child with only radiological evidence but require emergent surgical management. Safety pins, razor blades and needles are a few of the commonly ingested sharp objects in developing countries. The open safety pin is a particularly interesting clinical problem, as the management depends on its location and orientation. Many methods and instruments have been used over the years to remove them from the upper digestive tract. We present a novel method using the rigid paediatric bronchoscope and alligator forceps for the extraction of this unusual foreign body from the oesophagus of a 6 year old girl. PMID:26851436

  15. Kingella kingae infections in paediatric patients: 5 cases of septic arthritis, osteomyelitis and bacteraemia.

    PubMed

    Birgisson, H; Steingrimsson, O; Gudnason, T

    1997-01-01

    Kingella kingae is a Gram-negative rod most oft