Science.gov

Sample records for multi-party numerical computation

  1. Multi-party Semi-quantum Key Agreement with Delegating Quantum Computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wen-Jie; Chen, Zhen-Yu; Ji, Sai; Wang, Hai-Bin; Zhang, Jun

    2017-10-01

    A multi-party semi-quantum key agreement (SQKA) protocol based on delegating quantum computation (DQC) model is proposed by taking Bell states as quantum resources. In the proposed protocol, the participants only need the ability of accessing quantum channel and preparing single photons {|0〉, |1〉, |+〉, |-〉}, while the complicated quantum operations, such as the unitary operations and Bell measurement, will be delegated to the remote quantum center. Compared with previous quantum key agreement protocols, this client-server model is more feasible in the early days of the emergence of quantum computers. In order to prevent the attacks from outside eavesdroppers, inner participants and quantum center, two single photon sequences are randomly inserted into Bell states: the first sequence is used to perform the quantum channel detection, while the second is applied to disorder the positions of message qubits, which guarantees the security of the protocol.

  2. Multi-party Semi-quantum Key Agreement with Delegating Quantum Computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wen-Jie; Chen, Zhen-Yu; Ji, Sai; Wang, Hai-Bin; Zhang, Jun

    2017-07-01

    A multi-party semi-quantum key agreement (SQKA) protocol based on delegating quantum computation (DQC) model is proposed by taking Bell states as quantum resources. In the proposed protocol, the participants only need the ability of accessing quantum channel and preparing single photons {|0〉, |1〉, |+〉, |-〉}, while the complicated quantum operations, such as the unitary operations and Bell measurement, will be delegated to the remote quantum center. Compared with previous quantum key agreement protocols, this client-server model is more feasible in the early days of the emergence of quantum computers. In order to prevent the attacks from outside eavesdroppers, inner participants and quantum center, two single photon sequences are randomly inserted into Bell states: the first sequence is used to perform the quantum channel detection, while the second is applied to disorder the positions of message qubits, which guarantees the security of the protocol.

  3. Secure Multi-party Computation Protocol for Defense Applications in Military Operations Using Virtual Cryptography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pathak, Rohit; Joshi, Satyadhar

    With the advent into the 20th century whole world has been facing the common dilemma of Terrorism. The suicide attacks on US twin towers 11 Sept. 2001, Train bombings in Madrid Spain 11 Mar. 2004, London bombings 7 Jul. 2005 and Mumbai attack 26 Nov. 2008 were some of the most disturbing, destructive and evil acts by terrorists in the last decade which has clearly shown their evil intent that they can go to any extent to accomplish their goals. Many terrorist organizations such as al Quaida, Harakat ul-Mujahidin, Hezbollah, Jaish-e-Mohammed, Lashkar-e-Toiba, etc. are carrying out training camps and terrorist operations which are accompanied with latest technology and high tech arsenal. To counter such terrorism our military is in need of advanced defense technology. One of the major issues of concern is secure communication. It has to be made sure that communication between different military forces is secure so that critical information is not leaked to the adversary. Military forces need secure communication to shield their confidential data from terrorist forces. Leakage of concerned data can prove hazardous, thus preservation and security is of prime importance. There may be a need to perform computations that require data from many military forces, but in some cases the associated forces would not want to reveal their data to other forces. In such situations Secure Multi-party Computations find their application. In this paper, we propose a new highly scalable Secure Multi-party Computation (SMC) protocol and algorithm for Defense applications which can be used to perform computation on encrypted data. Every party encrypts their data in accordance with a particular scheme. This encrypted data is distributed among some created virtual parties. These Virtual parties send their data to the TTP through an Anonymizer layer. TTP performs computation on encrypted data and announces the result. As the data sent was encrypted its actual value can’t be known by TTP

  4. Experimental realization of an entanglement access network and secure multi-party computation

    PubMed Central

    Chang, X.-Y.; Deng, D.-L.; Yuan, X.-X.; Hou, P.-Y.; Huang, Y.-Y.; Duan, L.-M.

    2016-01-01

    To construct a quantum network with many end users, it is critical to have a cost-efficient way to distribute entanglement over different network ends. We demonstrate an entanglement access network, where the expensive resource, the entangled photon source at the telecom wavelength and the core communication channel, is shared by many end users. Using this cost-efficient entanglement access network, we report experimental demonstration of a secure multiparty computation protocol, the privacy-preserving secure sum problem, based on the network quantum cryptography. PMID:27404561

  5. Experimental realization of an entanglement access network and secure multi-party computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, X.-Y.; Deng, D.-L.; Yuan, X.-X.; Hou, P.-Y.; Huang, Y.-Y.; Duan, L.-M.

    2016-07-01

    To construct a quantum network with many end users, it is critical to have a cost-efficient way to distribute entanglement over different network ends. We demonstrate an entanglement access network, where the expensive resource, the entangled photon source at the telecom wavelength and the core communication channel, is shared by many end users. Using this cost-efficient entanglement access network, we report experimental demonstration of a secure multiparty computation protocol, the privacy-preserving secure sum problem, based on the network quantum cryptography.

  6. Multi-Party Quantum Steganography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mihara, Takashi

    2016-11-01

    Steganography has been proposed as a data hiding technique. As a derivation, quantum steganography based on quantum physics has also been proposed. In this paper, we extend the results in presented (Mihara, Phys. Lett. 379, 952 2015) and propose a multi-party quantum steganography technique that combines quantum error-correcting codes with entanglement. The proposed protocol shares an entangled state among n +1 parties and sends n secret messages, corresponding to the n parties, to the other party. With no knowledge of the other secret messages, the n parties can construct a stego message by cooperating with each other. Finally, we propose a protocol for sending qubits using the same technique.

  7. Multi-Party Quantum Steganography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mihara, Takashi

    2017-02-01

    Steganography has been proposed as a data hiding technique. As a derivation, quantum steganography based on quantum physics has also been proposed. In this paper, we extend the results in presented (Mihara, Phys. Lett. 379, 952 2015) and propose a multi-party quantum steganography technique that combines quantum error-correcting codes with entanglement. The proposed protocol shares an entangled state among n +1 parties and sends n secret messages, corresponding to the n parties, to the other party. With no knowledge of the other secret messages, the n parties can construct a stego message by cooperating with each other. Finally, we propose a protocol for sending qubits using the same technique.

  8. Understanding the Dynamics of Collaborative Multi-Party Discourse

    SciTech Connect

    Cowell, Andrew J.; Gregory, Michelle L.; Bruce, Joseph R.; Haack, Jereme N.; Love, Douglas V.; Rose, Stuart J.; Andrew, Adrienne H.

    2006-12-01

    In this manuscript, we discuss the efforts underway at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory in understanding the dynamics of multi-party discourse across a number of communication mo-dalities, such as email, instant messaging traffic and meeting data. Two prototype systems are dis-cussed. The Conversation Analysis Tool (ChAT) is an experimental test-bed for the development of computational linguistic components, and provides users with the ability to easily identify top-ics or persons of interest within multi-party conversations, including who talked to whom, when, entities that were discussed, etc. The Retrospective Analysis of Communication Events (RACE) prototype, leveraging many of the ChAT components, is an application built specifically for knowledge workers and focuses on merging different types of communications data so that the underlying message can be discovered in an efficient, timely fashion.

  9. Multi-party quantum summation without a trusted third party based on single particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Cai; Situ, Haozhen; Huang, Qiong; Yang, Pingle

    We propose multi-party quantum summation protocols based on single particles, in which participants are allowed to compute the summation of their inputs without the help of a trusted third party and preserve the privacy of their inputs. Only one participant who generates the source particles needs to perform unitary operations and only single particles are needed in the beginning of the protocols.

  10. W-state Analyzer and Multi-party Measurement-device-independent Quantum Key Distribution

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Changhua; Xu, Feihu; Pei, Changxing

    2015-01-01

    W-state is an important resource for many quantum information processing tasks. In this paper, we for the first time propose a multi-party measurement-device-independent quantum key distribution (MDI-QKD) protocol based on W-state. With linear optics, we design a W-state analyzer in order to distinguish the four-qubit W-state. This analyzer constructs the measurement device for four-party MDI-QKD. Moreover, we derived a complete security proof of the four-party MDI-QKD, and performed a numerical simulation to study its performance. The results show that four-party MDI-QKD is feasible over 150 km standard telecom fiber with off-the-shelf single photon detectors. This work takes an important step towards multi-party quantum communication and a quantum network. PMID:26644289

  11. W-state Analyzer and Multi-party Measurement-device-independent Quantum Key Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Changhua; Xu, Feihu; Pei, Changxing

    2015-12-01

    W-state is an important resource for many quantum information processing tasks. In this paper, we for the first time propose a multi-party measurement-device-independent quantum key distribution (MDI-QKD) protocol based on W-state. With linear optics, we design a W-state analyzer in order to distinguish the four-qubit W-state. This analyzer constructs the measurement device for four-party MDI-QKD. Moreover, we derived a complete security proof of the four-party MDI-QKD, and performed a numerical simulation to study its performance. The results show that four-party MDI-QKD is feasible over 150 km standard telecom fiber with off-the-shelf single photon detectors. This work takes an important step towards multi-party quantum communication and a quantum network.

  12. W-state Analyzer and Multi-party Measurement-device-independent Quantum Key Distribution.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Changhua; Xu, Feihu; Pei, Changxing

    2015-12-08

    W-state is an important resource for many quantum information processing tasks. In this paper, we for the first time propose a multi-party measurement-device-independent quantum key distribution (MDI-QKD) protocol based on W-state. With linear optics, we design a W-state analyzer in order to distinguish the four-qubit W-state. This analyzer constructs the measurement device for four-party MDI-QKD. Moreover, we derived a complete security proof of the four-party MDI-QKD, and performed a numerical simulation to study its performance. The results show that four-party MDI-QKD is feasible over 150 km standard telecom fiber with off-the-shelf single photon detectors. This work takes an important step towards multi-party quantum communication and a quantum network.

  13. Retrospective Analysis of Communication Events - Understanding the Dynamics of Collaborative Multi-Party Discourse

    SciTech Connect

    Cowell, Andrew J.; Haack, Jereme N.; McColgin, Dave W.

    2006-06-08

    This research is aimed at understanding the dynamics of collaborative multi-party discourse across multiple communication modalities. Before we can truly make sig-nificant strides in devising collaborative communication systems, there is a need to understand how typical users utilize com-putationally supported communications mechanisms such as email, instant mes-saging, video conferencing, chat rooms, etc., both singularly and in conjunction with traditional means of communication such as face-to-face meetings, telephone calls and postal mail. Attempting to un-derstand an individual’s communications profile with access to only a single modal-ity is challenging at best and often futile. Here, we discuss the development of RACE – Retrospective Analysis of Com-munications Events – a test-bed prototype to investigate issues relating to multi-modal multi-party discourse.

  14. Multi-Party, Whole-Body Interactions in Mathematical Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ma, Jasmine Y.

    2017-01-01

    This study interrogates the contributions of multi-party, whole-body interactions to students' collaboration and negotiation of mathematics ideas in a task setting called walking scale geometry, where bodies in interaction became complex resources for students' emerging goals in problem solving. Whole bodies took up overlapping roles representing…

  15. Quantum Steganography for Multi-party Covert Communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Lin; Tang, Guang-Ming; Sun, Yi-Feng; Yan, Shu-Fan

    2016-01-01

    A novel multi-party quantum steganography protocol based on quantum secret sharing is proposed in this paper. Hidden channels are built in HBB and improved HBB quantum secret sharing protocols for secret messages transmitting, via the entanglement swapping of GHZ states and Bell measurement. Compared with the original protocol, there are only a few different GHZ sates transmitted in the proposed protocol, making the hidden channel with good imperceptibility. Moreover, the secret messages keep secure even when the hidden channel is under the attack from the dishonest participators, for the sub-secretmessages distributed randomly to different participators. With good imperceptibility and security, the capacity of proposed protocol is higher than previous multi-party quantum steganography protocol.

  16. Multi-party semi-quantum key distribution-convertible multi-party semi-quantum secret sharing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Kun-Fei; Gu, Jun; Hwang, Tzonelih; Gope, Prosanta

    2017-08-01

    This paper proposes a multi-party semi-quantum secret sharing (MSQSS) protocol which allows a quantum party (manager) to share a secret among several classical parties (agents) based on GHZ-like states. By utilizing the special properties of GHZ-like states, the proposed scheme can easily detect outside eavesdropping attacks and has the highest qubit efficiency among the existing MSQSS protocols. Then, we illustrate an efficient way to convert the proposed MSQSS protocol into a multi-party semi-quantum key distribution (MSQKD) protocol. The proposed approach is even useful to convert all the existing measure-resend type of semi-quantum secret sharing protocols into semi-quantum key distribution protocols.

  17. Multi-party quantum key agreement with teleportation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Binbin; Guo, Gongde; Lin, Song

    2017-04-01

    Based on the technique of quantum teleportation, a new multi-party quantum key agreement protocol is proposed. In this protocol, all users first share EPR pairs via public quantum channels. Afterwards, the states of signal particles can be transferred between two adjacent users by quantum teleportation. With the help of four unitary encoding operations, all users can encode their separate secret key into the traveling quantum states. In the end, all users can derive the final shared key synchronously. The security analysis shows that the presented protocol is secure against some common attacks and completely loss tolerant.

  18. Numerical Optimization Using Computer Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trosset, Michael W.; Torczon, Virginia

    1997-01-01

    Engineering design optimization often gives rise to problems in which expensive objective functions are minimized by derivative-free methods. We propose a method for solving such problems that synthesizes ideas from the numerical optimization and computer experiment literatures. Our approach relies on kriging known function values to construct a sequence of surrogate models of the objective function that are used to guide a grid search for a minimizer. Results from numerical experiments on a standard test problem are presented.

  19. In Praise of Numerical Computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yap, Chee K.

    Theoretical Computer Science has developed an almost exclusively discrete/algebraic persona. We have effectively shut ourselves off from half of the world of computing: a host of problems in Computational Science & Engineering (CS&E) are defined on the continuum, and, for them, the discrete viewpoint is inadequate. The computational techniques in such problems are well-known to numerical analysis and applied mathematics, but are rarely discussed in theoretical algorithms: iteration, subdivision and approximation. By various case studies, I will indicate how our discrete/algebraic view of computing has many shortcomings in CS&E. We want embrace the continuous/analytic view, but in a new synthesis with the discrete/algebraic view. I will suggest a pathway, by way of an exact numerical model of computation, that allows us to incorporate iteration and approximation into our algorithms’ design. Some recent results give a peek into how this view of algorithmic development might look like, and its distinctive form suggests the name “numerical computational geometry” for such activities.

  20. Strong polygamy of quantum correlations in multi-party quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jeong San

    2014-10-01

    We propose a new type of polygamy inequality for multi-party quantum entanglement. We first consider the possible amount of bipartite entanglement distributed between a fixed party and any subset of the rest parties in a multi-party quantum system. By using the summation of these distributed entanglements, we provide an upper bound of the distributed entanglement between a party and the rest in multi-party quantum systems. We then show that this upper bound also plays as a lower bound of the usual polygamy inequality, therefore the strong polygamy of multi-party quantum entanglement. For the case of multi-party pure states, we further show that the strong polygamy of entanglement implies the strong polygamy of quantum discord.

  1. Numerical computation of Pop plot

    SciTech Connect

    Menikoff, Ralph

    2015-03-23

    The Pop plot — distance-of-run to detonation versus initial shock pressure — is a key characterization of shock initiation in a heterogeneous explosive. Reactive burn models for high explosives (HE) must reproduce the experimental Pop plot to have any chance of accurately predicting shock initiation phenomena. This report describes a methodology for automating the computation of a Pop plot for a specific explosive with a given HE model. Illustrative examples of the computation are shown for PBX 9502 with three burn models (SURF, WSD and Forest Fire) utilizing the xRage code, which is the Eulerian ASC hydrocode at LANL. Comparison of the numerical and experimental Pop plot can be the basis for a validation test or as an aid in calibrating the burn rate of an HE model. Issues with calibration are discussed.

  2. An Novel Protocol for the Quantum Secure Multi-Party Summation Based on Two-Particle Bell States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wen; Wang, Yong-Bin; Fan, Wen-Qin

    2017-09-01

    A protocol for the quantum secure multi-party summation based on two-particle Bell states is proposed. In this protocol, two-particle Bell states are used as private information carriers. Without using the entangled character of Bell states, we also use Pauli matrices operations to encode information and Hadamard matrix to extract information. The proposed protocol can also resist various attacks and overcomes the problem of information leakage with acceptable efficiency. In theory, our protocol can be used to build complex secure protocols for other multiparty computations and also lots of other important applications in distributed networks.

  3. Multi-party quantum private comparison with an almost-dishonest third party

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Sheng-Liang; Hwang, Tzonelih; Gope, Prosanta

    2015-11-01

    This article proposes the first multi-party quantum private comparison protocol with an almost-dishonest third party, where many participants can compare their secrets in either ascending or descending order without revealing any secret information to anyone. In order to do that, the participants need not to pre-share any secret key between them. As a consequence, the proposed scheme can be enforced in several environments such as multi-party ranking and multi-data ranking protocol.

  4. Numerical Package in Computer Supported Numeric Analysis Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tezer, Murat

    2007-01-01

    At universities in the faculties of Engineering, Sciences, Business and Economics together with higher education in Computing, it is stated that because of the difficulty, calculators and computers can be used in Numerical Analysis (NA). In this study, the learning computer supported NA will be discussed together with important usage of the…

  5. A History of Computer Numerical Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haggen, Gilbert L.

    Computer numerical control (CNC) has evolved from the first significant counting method--the abacus. Babbage had perhaps the greatest impact on the development of modern day computers with his analytical engine. Hollerith's functioning machine with punched cards was used in tabulating the 1890 U.S. Census. In order for computers to become a…

  6. A History of Computer Numerical Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haggen, Gilbert L.

    Computer numerical control (CNC) has evolved from the first significant counting method--the abacus. Babbage had perhaps the greatest impact on the development of modern day computers with his analytical engine. Hollerith's functioning machine with punched cards was used in tabulating the 1890 U.S. Census. In order for computers to become a…

  7. Interpreters' Involvement in Multi-Party Interactions: The Nature of Participation as Listener and Speaker

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Takimoto, Masato

    2012-01-01

    This paper investigates two naturally occurring business interpreting situations where there are a number of participants. Unlike dialogue interpreting situations where there are only two primary interlocutors, the overall interaction shows more complexity in these multi-party situations. This, in turn, means that the interpreters' functions and…

  8. Numerical quadratures for approximate computation of ERBS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanaty, Peter

    2013-12-01

    In the ground-laying paper [3] on expo-rational B-splines (ERBS), the default numerical method for approximate computation of the integral with C∞-smooth integrand in the definition of ERBS is Romberg integration. In the present work, a variety of alternative numerical quadrature methods for computation of ERBS and other integrals with smooth integrands are studied, and their performance is compared on several benchmark examples.

  9. Numerical recipes, The art of scientific computing

    SciTech Connect

    Press, W.H.; Flannery, B.P.; Teukolsky, S.; Vetterling, W.T.

    1986-01-01

    Seventeen chapter are divided into 130 sections provide a self-contained treatment that derives, critically discusses, and actually implements over 200 of the most important numerical algorithms for scientific work. Each algorithm is presented both in FORTRAN and Pascal, with the source programs printed in the book itself. The scope of Numerical Recipes ranges from standard areas of numerical analysis (linear algebra, differential equations, roots) through subjects useful to signal processing (Fourier methods, filtering), data analysis (least squares, robust fitting, statistical functions), simulation (random deviates and Monte Carlo). The routines themselves are available for a wide variety of different computers, from personal computers to mainframes, and are largely portable among different machines.

  10. Probabilistic numerics and uncertainty in computations

    PubMed Central

    Hennig, Philipp; Osborne, Michael A.; Girolami, Mark

    2015-01-01

    We deliver a call to arms for probabilistic numerical methods: algorithms for numerical tasks, including linear algebra, integration, optimization and solving differential equations, that return uncertainties in their calculations. Such uncertainties, arising from the loss of precision induced by numerical calculation with limited time or hardware, are important for much contemporary science and industry. Within applications such as climate science and astrophysics, the need to make decisions on the basis of computations with large and complex data have led to a renewed focus on the management of numerical uncertainty. We describe how several seminal classic numerical methods can be interpreted naturally as probabilistic inference. We then show that the probabilistic view suggests new algorithms that can flexibly be adapted to suit application specifics, while delivering improved empirical performance. We provide concrete illustrations of the benefits of probabilistic numeric algorithms on real scientific problems from astrometry and astronomical imaging, while highlighting open problems with these new algorithms. Finally, we describe how probabilistic numerical methods provide a coherent framework for identifying the uncertainty in calculations performed with a combination of numerical algorithms (e.g. both numerical optimizers and differential equation solvers), potentially allowing the diagnosis (and control) of error sources in computations. PMID:26346321

  11. Probabilistic numerics and uncertainty in computations.

    PubMed

    Hennig, Philipp; Osborne, Michael A; Girolami, Mark

    2015-07-08

    We deliver a call to arms for probabilistic numerical methods: algorithms for numerical tasks, including linear algebra, integration, optimization and solving differential equations, that return uncertainties in their calculations. Such uncertainties, arising from the loss of precision induced by numerical calculation with limited time or hardware, are important for much contemporary science and industry. Within applications such as climate science and astrophysics, the need to make decisions on the basis of computations with large and complex data have led to a renewed focus on the management of numerical uncertainty. We describe how several seminal classic numerical methods can be interpreted naturally as probabilistic inference. We then show that the probabilistic view suggests new algorithms that can flexibly be adapted to suit application specifics, while delivering improved empirical performance. We provide concrete illustrations of the benefits of probabilistic numeric algorithms on real scientific problems from astrometry and astronomical imaging, while highlighting open problems with these new algorithms. Finally, we describe how probabilistic numerical methods provide a coherent framework for identifying the uncertainty in calculations performed with a combination of numerical algorithms (e.g. both numerical optimizers and differential equation solvers), potentially allowing the diagnosis (and control) of error sources in computations.

  12. Secure multi-party communication with quantum key distribution managed by trusted authority

    DOEpatents

    Hughes, Richard John; Nordholt, Jane Elizabeth; Peterson, Charles Glen

    2015-01-06

    Techniques and tools for implementing protocols for secure multi-party communication after quantum key distribution ("QKD") are described herein. In example implementations, a trusted authority facilitates secure communication between multiple user devices. The trusted authority distributes different quantum keys by QKD under trust relationships with different users. The trusted authority determines combination keys using the quantum keys and makes the combination keys available for distribution (e.g., for non-secret distribution over a public channel). The combination keys facilitate secure communication between two user devices even in the absence of QKD between the two user devices. With the protocols, benefits of QKD are extended to multi-party communication scenarios. In addition, the protocols can retain benefit of QKD even when a trusted authority is offline or a large group seeks to establish secure communication within the group.

  13. Secure multi-party communication with quantum key distribution managed by trusted authority

    DOEpatents

    Nordholt, Jane Elizabeth; Hughes, Richard John; Peterson, Charles Glen

    2013-07-09

    Techniques and tools for implementing protocols for secure multi-party communication after quantum key distribution ("QKD") are described herein. In example implementations, a trusted authority facilitates secure communication between multiple user devices. The trusted authority distributes different quantum keys by QKD under trust relationships with different users. The trusted authority determines combination keys using the quantum keys and makes the combination keys available for distribution (e.g., for non-secret distribution over a public channel). The combination keys facilitate secure communication between two user devices even in the absence of QKD between the two user devices. With the protocols, benefits of QKD are extended to multi-party communication scenarios. In addition, the protocols can retain benefit of QKD even when a trusted authority is offline or a large group seeks to establish secure communication within the group.

  14. Secure multi-party communication with quantum key distribution managed by trusted authority

    DOEpatents

    Hughes, Richard John; Nordholt, Jane Elizabeth; Peterson, Charles Glen

    2017-06-14

    Techniques and tools for implementing protocols for secure multi-party communication after quantum key distribution ("QKD") are described herein. In example implementations, a trusted authority facilitates secure communication between multiple user devices. The trusted authority distributes different quantum keys by QKD under trust relationships with different users. The trusted authority determines combination keys using the quantum keys and makes the combination keys available for distribution (e.g., for non-secret distribution over a public channel). The combination keys facilitate secure communication between two user devices even in the absence of QKD between the two user devices. With the protocols, benefits of QKD are extended to multi-party communication scenarios. In addition, the protocols can retain benefit of QKD even when a trusted authority is offline or a large group seeks to establish secure communication within the group.

  15. Multi-party quantum key agreement protocol secure against collusion attacks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ping; Sun, Zhiwei; Sun, Xiaoqiang

    2017-07-01

    The fairness of a secure multi-party quantum key agreement (MQKA) protocol requires that all involved parties are entirely peer entities and can equally influence the outcome of the protocol to establish a shared key wherein no one can decide the shared key alone. However, it is found that parts of the existing MQKA protocols are sensitive to collusion attacks, i.e., some of the dishonest participants can collaborate to predetermine the final key without being detected. In this paper, a multi-party QKA protocol resisting collusion attacks is proposed. Different from previous QKA protocol resisting N-1 coconspirators or resisting 1 coconspirators, we investigate the general circle-type MQKA protocol which can be secure against t dishonest participants' cooperation. Here, t < N. We hope the results of the presented paper will be helpful for further research on fair MQKA protocols.

  16. Numerical Computation of Diffusion on a Surface

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, Peter; Adalsteinsson, David; Colella, Phillip; Arkin, Adam Paul; Onsum, Matthew

    2005-02-24

    We present a numerical method for computing diffusive transport on a surface derived from image data. Our underlying discretization method uses a Cartesian grid embedded boundary method for computing the volume transport in region consisting of all points a small distance from the surface. We obtain a representation of this region from image data using a front propagation computation based on level set methods for solving the Hamilton-Jacobi and eikonal equations. We demonstrate that the method is second-order accurate in space and time, and is capable of computing solutions on complex surface geometries obtained from image data of cells.

  17. Universality in numerical computations with random data.

    PubMed

    Deift, Percy A; Menon, Govind; Olver, Sheehan; Trogdon, Thomas

    2014-10-21

    The authors present evidence for universality in numerical computations with random data. Given a (possibly stochastic) numerical algorithm with random input data, the time (or number of iterations) to convergence (within a given tolerance) is a random variable, called the halting time. Two-component universality is observed for the fluctuations of the halting time--i.e., the histogram for the halting times, centered by the sample average and scaled by the sample variance, collapses to a universal curve, independent of the input data distribution, as the dimension increases. Thus, up to two components--the sample average and the sample variance--the statistics for the halting time are universally prescribed. The case studies include six standard numerical algorithms as well as a model of neural computation and decision-making. A link to relevant software is provided for readers who would like to do computations of their own.

  18. Multiaxis Computer Numerical Control Internship Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rouse, Sharon M.

    2012-01-01

    (Purpose) The purpose of this paper was to examine the issues associated with bringing new technology into the classroom, in particular, the vocational/technical classroom. (Methodology) A new Haas 5 axis vertical Computer Numerical Control machining center was purchased to update the CNC machining curriculum at a community college and the process…

  19. Fusing Symbolic and Numerical Diagnostic Computations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, Mark

    2007-01-01

    X-2000 Anomaly Detection Language denotes a developmental computing language, and the software that establishes and utilizes the language, for fusing two diagnostic computer programs, one implementing a numerical analysis method, the other implementing a symbolic analysis method into a unified event-based decision analysis software system for realtime detection of events (e.g., failures) in a spacecraft, aircraft, or other complex engineering system. The numerical analysis method is performed by beacon-based exception analysis for multi-missions (BEAMs), which has been discussed in several previous NASA Tech Briefs articles. The symbolic analysis method is, more specifically, an artificial-intelligence method of the knowledge-based, inference engine type, and its implementation is exemplified by the Spacecraft Health Inference Engine (SHINE) software. The goal in developing the capability to fuse numerical and symbolic diagnostic components is to increase the depth of analysis beyond that previously attainable, thereby increasing the degree of confidence in the computed results. In practical terms, the sought improvement is to enable detection of all or most events, with no or few false alarms.

  20. Multi-party quantum private comparison protocol with n -level entangled states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qing-Le; Sun, Hong-Xiang; Huang, Wei

    2014-06-01

    In this paper, two multi-party quantum private comparison (MQPC) protocols are proposed in distributed mode and traveling mode, respectively. Compared with the first MQPC protocol, which pays attention to compare between arbitrary two participants, our protocols focus on the comparison of equality for n participants with a more reasonable assumption of the third party. Through executing our protocols once, it is easy to get if n participants' secrets are same or not. In addition, our protocols are proved to be secure against the attacks from both outside attackers and dishonest participants.

  1. Numerical uncertainty in computational engineering and physics

    SciTech Connect

    Hemez, Francois M

    2009-01-01

    Obtaining a solution that approximates ordinary or partial differential equations on a computational mesh or grid does not necessarily mean that the solution is accurate or even 'correct'. Unfortunately assessing the quality of discrete solutions by questioning the role played by spatial and temporal discretizations generally comes as a distant third to test-analysis comparison and model calibration. This publication is contributed to raise awareness of the fact that discrete solutions introduce numerical uncertainty. This uncertainty may, in some cases, overwhelm in complexity and magnitude other sources of uncertainty that include experimental variability, parametric uncertainty and modeling assumptions. The concepts of consistency, convergence and truncation error are overviewed to explain the articulation between the exact solution of continuous equations, the solution of modified equations and discrete solutions computed by a code. The current state-of-the-practice of code and solution verification activities is discussed. An example in the discipline of hydro-dynamics illustrates the significant effect that meshing can have on the quality of code predictions. A simple method is proposed to derive bounds of solution uncertainty in cases where the exact solution of the continuous equations, or its modified equations, is unknown. It is argued that numerical uncertainty originating from mesh discretization should always be quantified and accounted for in the overall uncertainty 'budget' that supports decision-making for applications in computational physics and engineering.

  2. Numerical methods for problems in computational aeroacoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mead, Jodi Lorraine

    1998-12-01

    A goal of computational aeroacoustics is the accurate calculation of noise from a jet in the far field. This work concerns the numerical aspects of accurately calculating acoustic waves over large distances and long time. More specifically, the stability, efficiency, accuracy, dispersion and dissipation in spatial discretizations, time stepping schemes, and absorbing boundaries for the direct solution of wave propagation problems are determined. Efficient finite difference methods developed by Tam and Webb, which minimize dispersion and dissipation, are commonly used for the spatial and temporal discretization. Alternatively, high order pseudospectral methods can be made more efficient by using the grid transformation introduced by Kosloff and Tal-Ezer. Work in this dissertation confirms that the grid transformation introduced by Kosloff and Tal-Ezer is not spectrally accurate because, in the limit, the grid transformation forces zero derivatives at the boundaries. If a small number of grid points are used, it is shown that approximations with the Chebyshev pseudospectral method with the Kosloff and Tal-Ezer grid transformation are as accurate as with the Chebyshev pseudospectral method. This result is based on the analysis of the phase and amplitude errors of these methods, and their use for the solution of a benchmark problem in computational aeroacoustics. For the grid transformed Chebyshev method with a small number of grid points it is, however, more appropriate to compare its accuracy with that of high- order finite difference methods. This comparison, for an order of accuracy 10-3 for a benchmark problem in computational aeroacoustics, is performed for the grid transformed Chebyshev method and the fourth order finite difference method of Tam. Solutions with the finite difference method are as accurate. and the finite difference method is more efficient than, the Chebyshev pseudospectral method with the grid transformation. The efficiency of the Chebyshev

  3. Numerical Simulation for Generalized Aurora Computed Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Y.; Aso, T.; Gustavsson, B.; Tanabe, K.; Kadokura, A.; Ogawa, Y.

    2007-12-01

    The conventional method of aurora tomographic inversion is extended to a more generalized aurora computed tomography (CT). The generalized aurora CT is the method to reconstruct energy distribution of auroral precipitating electrons from multimodal data, such as electron density enhancement from the EISCAT radar and cosmic noise absorption (CNA) from imaging riometer, as well as auroral images. In this study, we evaluate the feasibility of the generalized aurora CT by numerical simulation. The forward problem is based on model calculation of auroral emission and electron density enhancement for incident electrons and the mapping of the results to the instruments. Assuming the energy and spatial distributions of the incident electrons, the three-dimensional (3D) distributions of volume emission rate and electron density are calculated. The data observed with the ALIS (Auroral Large Imaging System) cameras, the EISCAT radar, and the imaging riometer are obtained by mapping the volume emission rate and electron density to each instrument. We attempt to retrieve the initial distribution of precipitating electrons from the simulated observational data. The inversion analysis is based on the Bayesian inference, in which the problem is formulated as the maximization problem of posterior probability. The results are compared between the reconstruction from only auroral images and that from multimodal data.

  4. Integrating Numerical Computation into the Modeling Instruction Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caballero, Marcos D.; Burk, John B.; Aiken, John M.; Thoms, Brian D.; Douglas, Scott S.; Scanlon, Erin M.; Schatz, Michael F.

    2014-01-01

    Numerical computation (the use of a computer to solve, simulate, or visualize a physical problem) has fundamentally changed the way scientific research is done. Systems that are too difficult to solve in closed form are probed using computation. Experiments that are impossible to perform in the laboratory are studied numerically. Consequently, in…

  5. Integrating Numerical Computation into the Modeling Instruction Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caballero, Marcos D.; Burk, John B.; Aiken, John M.; Thoms, Brian D.; Douglas, Scott S.; Scanlon, Erin M.; Schatz, Michael F.

    2014-01-01

    Numerical computation (the use of a computer to solve, simulate, or visualize a physical problem) has fundamentally changed the way scientific research is done. Systems that are too difficult to solve in closed form are probed using computation. Experiments that are impossible to perform in the laboratory are studied numerically. Consequently, in…

  6. Evaluating economic strategies for multi-party application of performance contracting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Haiyan

    2007-12-01

    Scope and method of study. This subject matter is focused on the economic justification for energy management projects which involve both an energy client and an energy service company (ESCO) (and possibly other parties) in an Energy Savings Performance Contracting (ESPC) project. In this research, an analysis model is developed which includes multi-party involvement in justifying energy management projects that require expertise and capital beyond that found in the energy client. Examples include energy generation from waste heat, solar applications, and so on. The model is built on a system level and expands risk analysis beyond the simple party views. It is a multi-party model which seeks to find "win-win" solutions for all parties (or to expose shortcomings of projects where all parties cannot "win"). Such model application will help in justifying projects that might otherwise be discarded as too complex and too risky, or expose projects that will not produce demanded economic performance. Findings and conclusions. The inputs of the model are referred to as being probabilistic and deterministic. The outputs of the model are the Net Present Values (NPV) of the client and the ESCO, respectively. The probabilistic inputs are either probability-distributed or simulated with the correlation coefficients from historical data. The deterministic inputs are referred to as either discrete arrays or single values. Multiple scenarios are generated in accordance with the number of the discrete arrays and the number of the values in each array. In each scenario, all probabilistic inputs are simulated, combined with the values randomly picked from the discrete arrays, and entered into the model. The output analysis is based on simulated NPVs for the primary parties (client and ESCO). The major contributions of the research include: (1) develop an analysis protocol for the parties involved in an ESPC project depending on the inputs and outputs of the proposed energy system, (2

  7. Numerical considerations in computing invariant subspaces

    SciTech Connect

    Dongarra, J.J. . Dept. of Computer Science Oak Ridge National Lab., TN ); Hammarling, S. ); Wilkinson, J.H. )

    1990-11-01

    This paper describes two methods for computing the invariant subspace of a matrix. The first involves using transformations to interchange the eigenvalues; the second involves direct computation of the vectors. 10 refs.

  8. Multi-Party Quantum Private Comparison Protocol Based on Entanglement Swapping of Bell Entangled States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Tian-Yu

    2016-09-01

    Recently, Liu et al. proposed a two-party quantum private comparison (QPC) protocol using entanglement swapping of Bell entangled state (Commun. Theor. Phys. 57 (2012) 583). Subsequently Liu et al. pointed out that in Liu et al.'s protocol, the TP can extract the two users' secret inputs without being detected by launching the Bell-basis measurement attack, and suggested the corresponding improvement to mend this loophole (Commun. Theor. Phys. 62 (2014) 210). In this paper, we first point out the information leakage problem toward TP existing in both of the above two protocols, and then suggest the corresponding improvement by using the one-way hash function to encrypt the two users' secret inputs. We further put forward the three-party QPC protocol also based on entanglement swapping of Bell entangled state, and then validate its output correctness and its security in detail. Finally, we generalize the three-party QPC protocol into the multi-party case, which can accomplish arbitrary pair's comparison of equality among K users within one execution. Supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant No. 61402407

  9. Research in applied mathematics, numerical analysis, and computer science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    Research conducted at the Institute for Computer Applications in Science and Engineering (ICASE) in applied mathematics, numerical analysis, and computer science is summarized and abstracts of published reports are presented. The major categories of the ICASE research program are: (1) numerical methods, with particular emphasis on the development and analysis of basic numerical algorithms; (2) control and parameter identification; (3) computational problems in engineering and the physical sciences, particularly fluid dynamics, acoustics, and structural analysis; and (4) computer systems and software, especially vector and parallel computers.

  10. Numerical computations of swirling recirculating flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srinivasan, R.; Mongia, H. C.

    1980-01-01

    Swirling, recirculating, nonreacting flows were computed using a 2D elliptic program consisting of three tasks. The computations in Task 1 and 2 were made using an independent analysis for the two coaxial swirling flows. The Task 2 computations were made using the measured profiles of the mixing region. In Task 3, a modified 2D elliptic program was employed to include the effects of interaction between the inner and outer streams.

  11. Advances in Numerical Boundary Conditions for Computational Aeroacoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tam, Christopher K. W.

    1997-01-01

    Advances in Computational Aeroacoustics (CAA) depend critically on the availability of accurate, nondispersive, least dissipative computation algorithm as well as high quality numerical boundary treatments. This paper focuses on the recent developments of numerical boundary conditions. In a typical CAA problem, one often encounters two types of boundaries. Because a finite computation domain is used, there are external boundaries. On the external boundaries, boundary conditions simulating the solution outside the computation domain are to be imposed. Inside the computation domain, there may be internal boundaries. On these internal boundaries, boundary conditions simulating the presence of an object or surface with specific acoustic characteristics are to be applied. Numerical boundary conditions, both external or internal, developed for simple model problems are reviewed and examined. Numerical boundary conditions for real aeroacoustic problems are also discussed through specific examples. The paper concludes with a description of some much needed research in numerical boundary conditions for CAA.

  12. Numerical Computation of Homogeneous Slope Stability

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Shuangshuang; Li, Kemin; Ding, Xiaohua; Liu, Tong

    2015-01-01

    To simplify the computational process of homogeneous slope stability, improve computational accuracy, and find multiple potential slip surfaces of a complex geometric slope, this study utilized the limit equilibrium method to derive expression equations of overall and partial factors of safety. This study transformed the solution of the minimum factor of safety (FOS) to solving of a constrained nonlinear programming problem and applied an exhaustive method (EM) and particle swarm optimization algorithm (PSO) to this problem. In simple slope examples, the computational results using an EM and PSO were close to those obtained using other methods. Compared to the EM, the PSO had a small computation error and a significantly shorter computation time. As a result, the PSO could precisely calculate the slope FOS with high efficiency. The example of the multistage slope analysis indicated that this slope had two potential slip surfaces. The factors of safety were 1.1182 and 1.1560, respectively. The differences between these and the minimum FOS (1.0759) were small, but the positions of the slip surfaces were completely different than the critical slip surface (CSS). PMID:25784927

  13. Numerical characteristics of quantum computer simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernyavskiy, A.; Khamitov, K.; Teplov, A.; Voevodin, V.; Voevodin, Vl.

    2016-12-01

    The simulation of quantum circuits is significantly important for the implementation of quantum information technologies. The main difficulty of such modeling is the exponential growth of dimensionality, thus the usage of modern high-performance parallel computations is relevant. As it is well known, arbitrary quantum computation in circuit model can be done by only single- and two-qubit gates, and we analyze the computational structure and properties of the simulation of such gates. We investigate the fact that the unique properties of quantum nature lead to the computational properties of the considered algorithms: the quantum parallelism make the simulation of quantum gates highly parallel, and on the other hand, quantum entanglement leads to the problem of computational locality during simulation. We use the methodology of the AlgoWiki project (algowiki-project.org) to analyze the algorithm. This methodology consists of theoretical (sequential and parallel complexity, macro structure, and visual informational graph) and experimental (locality and memory access, scalability and more specific dynamic characteristics) parts. Experimental part was made by using the petascale Lomonosov supercomputer (Moscow State University, Russia). We show that the simulation of quantum gates is a good base for the research and testing of the development methods for data intense parallel software, and considered methodology of the analysis can be successfully used for the improvement of the algorithms in quantum information science.

  14. Computing abstraction hierarchies by numerical simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Bundy, A.; Giunchiglia, F.; Sebastiani, R.; Walsh, T.

    1996-12-31

    We present a novel method for building ABSTRIPS-style abstraction hierarchies in planning. The aim of this method is to minimize the amount of backtracking between abstraction levels. Previous approaches have determined the criticality of operator preconditions by reasoning about plans directly. Here, we adopt a simpler and faster approach where we use numerical simulation of the planning process. We demonstrate the theoretical advantages of our approach by identifying some simple properties lacking in previous approaches but possessed by our method. We demonstrate the empirical advantages of our approach by a set of four benchmark experiments using the ABTWEAK system. We compare the quality of the abstraction hierarchies generated with those built by the ALPINE and HIGHPOINT algorithms.

  15. Numerical computation for teaching quantum statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, Tyson; Swendsen, Robert H.

    2013-11-01

    The study of ideal quantum gases reveals surprising quantum effects that can be observed in macroscopic systems. The properties of bosons are particularly unusual because a macroscopic number of particles can occupy a single quantum state. We describe a computational approach that supplements the usual analytic derivations applicable in the thermodynamic limit. The approach involves directly summing over the quantum states for finite systems and avoids the need for doing difficult integrals. The results display the unusual behavior of quantum gases even for relatively small systems.

  16. Numerical Computation of Sensitivities and the Adjoint Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, Robert Michael

    1997-01-01

    We discuss the numerical computation of sensitivities via the adjoint approach in optimization problems governed by differential equations. We focus on the adjoint problem in its weak form. We show how one can avoid some of the problems with the adjoint approach, such as deriving suitable boundary conditions for the adjoint equation. We discuss the convergence of numerical approximations of the costate computed via the weak form of the adjoint problem and show the significance for the discrete adjoint problem.

  17. Dynamics of Numerics & Spurious Behaviors in CFD Computations. Revised

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yee, Helen C.; Sweby, Peter K.

    1997-01-01

    The global nonlinear behavior of finite discretizations for constant time steps and fixed or adaptive grid spacings is studied using tools from dynamical systems theory. Detailed analysis of commonly used temporal and spatial discretizations for simple model problems is presented. The role of dynamics in the understanding of long time behavior of numerical integration and the nonlinear stability, convergence, and reliability of using time-marching approaches for obtaining steady-state numerical solutions in computational fluid dynamics (CFD) is explored. The study is complemented with examples of spurious behavior observed in steady and unsteady CFD computations. The CFD examples were chosen to illustrate non-apparent spurious behavior that was difficult to detect without extensive grid and temporal refinement studies and some knowledge from dynamical systems theory. Studies revealed the various possible dangers of misinterpreting numerical simulation of realistic complex flows that are constrained by available computing power. In large scale computations where the physics of the problem under study is not well understood and numerical simulations are the only viable means of solution, extreme care must be taken in both computation and interpretation of the numerical data. The goal of this paper is to explore the important role that dynamical systems theory can play in the understanding of the global nonlinear behavior of numerical algorithms and to aid the identification of the sources of numerical uncertainties in CFD.

  18. Numerical computations of turbulence amplification in shock wave interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zang, T. A.; Hussaini, M. Y.; Bushnell, D. M.

    1983-01-01

    Numerical computations are presented which illustrate and test various effects pertinent to the amplification and generation of turbulence in shock wave turbulent boundary layer interactions. Several fundamental physical mechanisms are identified. Idealizations of these processes are examined by nonlinear numerical calculations. The results enable some limits to be placed on the range of validity of existing linear theories.

  19. Technical Note: Computing numerator relationships between any pair of animals

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A simple method is described to compute the numerator relationship between any or all pairs of animals in the numerator relationship matrix. The method depends on output of the MTDFNRM program from the MTDFREML set of programs. An option of the MTDFNRM program creates a file including the inbreeding...

  20. An efficient numerical method for orbit computations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palacios, M.; Abad, A.; Elipe, A.

    1992-08-01

    A nonstandard formulation of perturbed Keplerian motion is set forth based on the analysis by Deprit (1975) and incorporating quaternions to integrate the equations of motion. The properties of quaternions are discussed and applied to the portion of the equations of motion describing the rotations between the space frame and the departure frame. Angular momentum is assumed to be constant, and a redundant set of variables is introduced to test the equations of motion for different step sizes. The method is analyzed for the cases of artificial satellites in Keplerian circular orbits, Keplerian elliptical orbits, and zonal harmonics. The present formulation is shown to adequately represent the dynamical behavior while avoiding small inclinations. The rotations described by quaternions require less arithmetic operations and therefore save computation time, and the accuracy of the solutions are improved by at least two significant digits.

  1. Computational methods for aerodynamic design using numerical optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peeters, M. F.

    1983-01-01

    Five methods to increase the computational efficiency of aerodynamic design using numerical optimization, by reducing the computer time required to perform gradient calculations, are examined. The most promising method consists of drastically reducing the size of the computational domain on which aerodynamic calculations are made during gradient calculations. Since a gradient calculation requires the solution of the flow about an airfoil whose geometry was slightly perturbed from a base airfoil, the flow about the base airfoil is used to determine boundary conditions on the reduced computational domain. This method worked well in subcritical flow.

  2. Numerical treatment of shocks in unsteady potential flow computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schippers, H.

    1985-04-01

    For moving shocks in unsteady transonic potential flow, an implicit fully-conservative finite-difference algorithm is presented. It is based on time-linearization and mass-flux splitting. For the one-dimensional problem of a traveling shock-wave, this algorithm is compared with the method of Goorjian and Shankar. The algorithm was implemented in the computer program TULIPS for the computation of transonic unsteady flow about airfoils. Numerical results for a pitching ONERA M6 airfoil are presented.

  3. Computer numerical control grinding of spiral bevel gears

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, H. Wayne

    1991-01-01

    The development of Computer Numerical Control (CNC) spiral bevel gear grinding has paved the way for major improvement in the production of precision spiral bevel gears. The object of the program was to decrease the setup, maintenance of setup, and pattern development time by 50 percent of the time required on conventional spiral bevel gear grinders. Details of the process are explained.

  4. Computer used to program numerically controlled milling machine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, T. C.

    1967-01-01

    Computer program automatically directs a numerically controlled milling machine through a series of cutting and trimming actions. It accepts engineering data points, passes smooth curve segments through the points, breaks the resulting curves into a series of closely spaced points, and transforms these points into the form required by the mechanism.

  5. Computer-Numerical-Control and the EMCO Compact 5 Lathe.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mullen, Frank M.

    This laboratory manual is intended for use in teaching computer-numerical-control (CNC) programming using the Emco Maier Compact 5 Lathe. Developed for use at the postsecondary level, this material contains a short introduction to CNC machine tools. This section covers CNC programs, CNC machine axes, and CNC coordinate systems. The following…

  6. Numerical methods for solving ODEs on the infinity computer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazzia, F.; Sergeyev, Ya. D.; Iavernaro, F.; Amodio, P.; Mukhametzhanov, M. S.

    2016-10-01

    New algorithms for the numerical solution of Ordinary Differential Equations (ODEs) with initial conditions are proposed. They are designed for working on a new kind of a supercomputer - the Infinity Computer - that is able to deal numerically with finite, infinite and infinitesimal numbers. Due to this fact, the Infinity Computer allows one to calculate the exact derivatives of functions using infinitesimal values of the stepsize. As a consequence, the new methods are able to work with the exact values of the derivatives, instead of their approximations. Within this context, variants of one-step multi-point methods closely related to the classical Taylor formulae and to the Obrechkoff methods are considered. To get numerical evidence of the theoretical results, test problems are solved by means of the new methods and the results compared with the performance of classical methods.

  7. Grid computing for the numerical reconstruction of digital holograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nebrensky, J. J.; Hobson, P. R.; Fryer, P. C.

    2005-02-01

    Digital holography has the potential to greatly extend holography's applications and move it from the lab into the field: a single CCD or other solid-state sensor can capture any number of holograms while numerical reconstruction within a computer eliminates the need for chemical processing and readily allows further processing and visualization of the holographic image. The steady increase in sensor pixel count and resolution leads to the possibilities of larger sample volumes and of higher spatial resolution sampling, enabling the practical use of digital off-axis holography. However, this increase in pixel count also drives a corresponding expansion of the computational effort needed to numerically reconstruct such holograms to an extent where the reconstruction process for a single depth slice takes significantly longer than the capture process for each single hologram. Grid computing -- a recent innovation in large-scale distributed processing -- provides a convenient means of harnessing significant computing resources in ad-hoc fashion that might match the field deployment of a holographic instrument. In this paper we consider the computational needs of digital holography and discuss the deployment of numerical reconstruction software over an existing Grid testbed. The analysis of marine organisms is used as an exemplar for work flow and job execution of in-line digital holography.

  8. Numerical computation of gravitational field for general axisymmetric objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukushima, Toshio

    2016-10-01

    We developed a numerical method to compute the gravitational field of a general axisymmetric object. The method (i) numerically evaluates a double integral of the ring potential by the split quadrature method using the double exponential rules, and (ii) derives the acceleration vector by numerically differentiating the numerically integrated potential by Ridder's algorithm. Numerical comparison with the analytical solutions for a finite uniform spheroid and an infinitely extended object of the Miyamoto-Nagai density distribution confirmed the 13- and 11-digit accuracy of the potential and the acceleration vector computed by the method, respectively. By using the method, we present the gravitational potential contour map and/or the rotation curve of various axisymmetric objects: (i) finite uniform objects covering rhombic spindles and circular toroids, (ii) infinitely extended spheroids including Sérsic and Navarro-Frenk-White spheroids, and (iii) other axisymmetric objects such as an X/peanut-shaped object like NGC 128, a power-law disc with a central hole like the protoplanetary disc of TW Hya, and a tear-drop-shaped toroid like an axisymmetric equilibrium solution of plasma charge distribution in an International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor-like tokamak. The method is directly applicable to the electrostatic field and will be easily extended for the magnetostatic field. The FORTRAN 90 programs of the new method and some test results are electronically available.

  9. Dynamical Approach Study of Spurious Numerics in Nonlinear Computations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yee, H. C.; Mansour, Nagi (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The last two decades have been an era when computation is ahead of analysis and when very large scale practical computations are increasingly used in poorly understood multiscale complex nonlinear physical problems and non-traditional fields. Ensuring a higher level of confidence in the predictability and reliability (PAR) of these numerical simulations could play a major role in furthering the design, understanding, affordability and safety of our next generation air and space transportation systems, and systems for planetary and atmospheric sciences, and in understanding the evolution and origin of life. The need to guarantee PAR becomes acute when computations offer the ONLY way of solving these types of data limited problems. Employing theory from nonlinear dynamical systems, some building blocks to ensure a higher level of confidence in PAR of numerical simulations have been revealed by the author and world expert collaborators in relevant fields. Five building blocks with supporting numerical examples were discussed. The next step is to utilize knowledge gained by including nonlinear dynamics, bifurcation and chaos theories as an integral part of the numerical process. The third step is to design integrated criteria for reliable and accurate algorithms that cater to the different multiscale nonlinear physics. This includes but is not limited to the construction of appropriate adaptive spatial and temporal discretizations that are suitable for the underlying governing equations. In addition, a multiresolution wavelets approach for adaptive numerical dissipation/filter controls for high speed turbulence, acoustics and combustion simulations will be sought. These steps are corner stones for guarding against spurious numerical solutions that are solutions of the discretized counterparts but are not solutions of the underlying governing equations.

  10. Dynamical Approach Study of Spurious Numerics in Nonlinear Computations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yee, H. C.; Mansour, Nagi (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The last two decades have been an era when computation is ahead of analysis and when very large scale practical computations are increasingly used in poorly understood multiscale complex nonlinear physical problems and non-traditional fields. Ensuring a higher level of confidence in the predictability and reliability (PAR) of these numerical simulations could play a major role in furthering the design, understanding, affordability and safety of our next generation air and space transportation systems, and systems for planetary and atmospheric sciences, and in understanding the evolution and origin of life. The need to guarantee PAR becomes acute when computations offer the ONLY way of solving these types of data limited problems. Employing theory from nonlinear dynamical systems, some building blocks to ensure a higher level of confidence in PAR of numerical simulations have been revealed by the author and world expert collaborators in relevant fields. Five building blocks with supporting numerical examples were discussed. The next step is to utilize knowledge gained by including nonlinear dynamics, bifurcation and chaos theories as an integral part of the numerical process. The third step is to design integrated criteria for reliable and accurate algorithms that cater to the different multiscale nonlinear physics. This includes but is not limited to the construction of appropriate adaptive spatial and temporal discretizations that are suitable for the underlying governing equations. In addition, a multiresolution wavelets approach for adaptive numerical dissipation/filter controls for high speed turbulence, acoustics and combustion simulations will be sought. These steps are corner stones for guarding against spurious numerical solutions that are solutions of the discretized counterparts but are not solutions of the underlying governing equations.

  11. Numerical computations of faceted pattern formation in snow crystal growth.

    PubMed

    Barrett, John W; Garcke, Harald; Nürnberg, Robert

    2012-07-01

    Faceted growth of snow crystals leads to a rich diversity of forms with remarkable sixfold symmetry. Snow crystal structures result from diffusion-limited crystal growth in the presence of anisotropic surface energy and anisotropic attachment kinetics. It is by now well understood that the morphological stability of ice crystals strongly depends on supersaturation, crystal size, and temperature. Until very recently it was very difficult to perform numerical simulations of this highly anisotropic crystal growth. In particular, obtaining facet growth in combination with dendritic branching is a challenging task. We present numerical simulations of snow crystal growth in two and three spacial dimensions using a computational method recently introduced by the present authors. We present both qualitative and quantitative computations. In particular, a linear relationship between tip velocity and supersaturation is observed. In our computations, surface energy effects, although small, have a pronounced effect on crystal growth. We compute solid plates, solid prisms, hollow columns, needles, dendrites, capped columns, and scrolls on plates. Although all these forms appear in nature, it is a significant challenge to reproduce them with the help of numerical simulations for a continuum model.

  12. Numerical methods and computers used in elastohydrodynamic lubrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamrock, B. J.; Tripp, J. H.

    1982-01-01

    Some of the methods of obtaining approximate numerical solutions to boundary value problems that arise in elastohydrodynamic lubrication are reviewed. The highlights of four general approaches (direct, inverse, quasi-inverse, and Newton-Raphson) are sketched. Advantages and disadvantages of these approaches are presented along with a flow chart showing some of the details of each. The basic question of numerical stability of the elastohydrodynamic lubrication solutions, especially in the pressure spike region, is considered. Computers used to solve this important class of lubrication problems are briefly described, with emphasis on supercomputers.

  13. Numerical Computation of Dynamical Schwingerlike Pair Production in Graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fillion-Gourdeau, F.; Blain, P.; Gagnon, D.; Lefebvre, C.; Maclean, S.

    2017-03-01

    The density of electron-hole pairs produced in a graphene sample immersed in a homogeneous time-dependent electric field is evaluated. Because low energy charge carriers in graphene are described by relativistic quantum mechanics, the calculation is performed within the strong field quantum electrodynamics formalism, requiring a solution of the Dirac equation in momentum space. The equation is solved using a split-operator numerical scheme on parallel computers, allowing for the investigation of several field configurations. The strength of the method is illustrated by computing the electron momentum density generated from a realistic laser pulse model. We observe quantum interference patterns reminiscent of Landau-Zener-Stückelberg interferometry.

  14. Digital Optics for Numerical Computing: The Residue Number System for Numerical Optical Computing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-10-01

    rlI u -13 - -r"M-MO MEsI UE- NJIaMEt SVSTreM * SELECT N PAZRWISE RELATIVELY PRIME INTEGER MODULI in 1 9m=r, .. I., AS SYSTEM BASE * INTEGER X IS...EMERGENCE OF THE ELECTRONIC COMPUTER - EMPLOYS LIGHT BEAM AND PHOTO-CELLS TO SENSE OPENINGS AND CLOSINGS OF MECHANICAL SIEVE - 3U GEARS, ONE FOR EACH PRIME ...TO 113 - USED TO FACTOR NUMBERS, SUCH AS THE MERSENNE NUMBER - SIFTED 28,UUUSU8 NUMBERS PER HOUR ANALOG REPRESENTATION * A. HUANS, 1975 - FIRST TO

  15. The development and evaluation of numerical algorithms for MIMD computers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voigt, Robert G.

    1990-01-01

    Two activities were pursued under this grant. The first was a visitor program to conduct research on numerical algorithms for MIMD computers. The program is summarized in the following attachments. Attachment A - List of Researchers Supported; Attachment B - List of Reports Completed; and Attachment C - Reports. The second activity was a workshop on the Control of fluid Dynamic Systems held on March 28 to 29, 1989. The workshop is summarized in attachments. Attachment D - Workshop Summary; and Attachment E - List of Workshop Participants.

  16. On the Numerical Computation of the LMM's Coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aceto, Lidia; Sestini, Alessandra

    2007-09-01

    In this work some remarks on the numerical computation of the coefficients of some families of LMMs, used with boundary conditions and on general meshes, are introduced. Three formulations of the order conditions, which are the tools used for determining such coefficients, are considered. In particular, the attention is focused on the Generalized BDF (GBDF) for which some experiments performed in MATLAB are also presented.

  17. Numerical computation of aeroacoustic transfer functions for realistic airfoils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miotto, Renato Fuzaro; Wolf, William Roberto; de Santana, Leandro Dantas

    2017-10-01

    Based on Amiet's theory formalism, we propose a numerical framework to compute the aeroacoustic transfer function of realistic airfoil geometries. The aeroacoustic transfer function relates the amplitude and phase of an incoming periodic gust to the respective unsteady lift response permitting, therefore, the application of Curle's analogy to compute the radiated noise. The methodology is focused on the airfoil leading-edge noise problem being able to also consider the trailing-edge back-scattering and, consequently, airfoil compactness effects. The approach is valid for compressible subsonic flows and the airfoil blade is assumed of large aspect ratio subjected to three-dimensional periodic gusts with supersonic velocity trace at the airfoil leading edge (i.e. supercritical gusts). This work proposes the iterative application of the boundary element method to numerically solve the boundary value problem prescribed by the linearized airfoil theory. Details of the numerical implementation are discussed and include the application of boundary conditions in different steps of the iterative procedure, treatment of derivatives in the implementation of the Kutta condition and accurate representation of singularities present at the leading- and trailing-edges. This study validates the numerical approach by comparing results with Amiet's theory obtained analytically. Subsequently, effects of realistic airfoil geometries on the leading-edge airfoil radiated noise are presented.

  18. Numerical computations of Orbiter flow fields and heating rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodrich, W. D.; Li, C. P.; Houston, C. K.; Chiu, P.; Olmedo, L.

    1976-01-01

    Numerical computations of flow fields around an analytical description of the Space Shuttle Orbiter windward surface, including the root of the wing leading edge, are presented to illustrate the sensitivity of these calculations to several flow field modeling assumptions. Results of parametric flow field and boundary layer computations using the axisymmetric analogue concept to obtain three-dimensional heating rates, in conjunction with exact three-dimensional inviscid floe field solutions and two-dimensional boundary layer analysis - show the sensitivity of boundary layer edge conditions and heating rates to considerations of the inviscid flow field entropy layer, equilibrium air versus chemically and vibrationally frozen flow, and nonsimilar terms in the boundary layer computations. A cursory comparison between flow field predictions obtained from these methods and current Orbiter design methods has established a benchmark for selecting and adjusting these and future design methodologies.

  19. Four-stage computational technology with adaptive numerical methods for computational aerodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaydurov, V.; Liu, T.; Zheng, Z.

    2012-10-01

    Computational aerodynamics is a key technology in aircraft design which is ahead of physical experiment and complements it. Of course all three components of computational modeling are actively developed: mathematical models of real aerodynamic processes, numerical algorithms, and high-performance computing. The most impressive progress has been made in the field of computing, though with a considerable complication of computer architecture. Numerical algorithms are developed more conservative. More precisely, they are offered and theoretically justified for more simple mathematical problems. Nevertheless, computational mathematics now has amassed a whole palette of numerical algorithms that can provide acceptable accuracy and interface between modern mathematical models in aerodynamics and high-performance computers. A significant step in this direction was the European Project ADIGMA whose positive experience will be used in International Project TRISTAM for further movement in the field of computational technologies for aerodynamics. This paper gives a general overview of objectives and approaches intended to use and a description of the recommended four-stage computer technology.

  20. Validation of Numerical Codes to Compute Tsunami Runup And Inundation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velioğlu, Deniz; Cevdet Yalçıner, Ahmet; Kian, Rozita; Zaytsev, Andrey

    2015-04-01

    FLOW 3D and NAMI DANCE are two numerical codes which can be applied to analysis of flow and motion of long waves. Flow 3D simulates linear and nonlinear propagating surface waves as well as irregular waves including long waves. NAMI DANCE uses finite difference computational method to solve nonlinear shallow water equations (NSWE) in long wave problems, specifically tsunamis. Both codes can be applied to tsunami simulations and visualization of long waves. Both codes are capable of solving flooding problems. However, FLOW 3D is designed mainly to solve flooding problem from land and NAMI DANCE is designed to solve flooding problem from the sea. These numerical codes are applied to some benchmark problems for validation and verification. One useful benchmark problem is the runup of solitary waves which is investigated analytically and experimentally by Synolakis (1987). Since 1970s, solitary waves have commonly been used to model tsunamis especially in experimental and numerical studies. In this respect, a benchmark problem on runup of solitary waves is a relevant choice to assess the capability and validity of the numerical codes on amplification of tsunamis. In this study both codes have been tested, compared and validated by applying to the analytical benchmark problem of solitary wave runup on a sloping beach. Comparison of the results showed that both codes are in good agreement with the analytical and experimental results and thus can be proposed to be used in inundation of long waves and tsunami hazard analysis.

  1. A Polynomial Subset-Based Efficient Multi-Party Key Management System for Lightweight Device Networks.

    PubMed

    Mahmood, Zahid; Ning, Huansheng; Ghafoor, AtaUllah

    2017-03-24

    Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs) consist of lightweight devices to measure sensitive data that are highly vulnerable to security attacks due to their constrained resources. In a similar manner, the internet-based lightweight devices used in the Internet of Things (IoT) are facing severe security and privacy issues because of the direct accessibility of devices due to their connection to the internet. Complex and resource-intensive security schemes are infeasible and reduce the network lifetime. In this regard, we have explored the polynomial distribution-based key establishment schemes and identified an issue that the resultant polynomial value is either storage intensive or infeasible when large values are multiplied. It becomes more costly when these polynomials are regenerated dynamically after each node join or leave operation and whenever key is refreshed. To reduce the computation, we have proposed an Efficient Key Management (EKM) scheme for multiparty communication-based scenarios. The proposed session key management protocol is established by applying a symmetric polynomial for group members, and the group head acts as a responsible node. The polynomial generation method uses security credentials and secure hash function. Symmetric cryptographic parameters are efficient in computation, communication, and the storage required. The security justification of the proposed scheme has been completed by using Rubin logic, which guarantees that the protocol attains mutual validation and session key agreement property strongly among the participating entities. Simulation scenarios are performed using NS 2.35 to validate the results for storage, communication, latency, energy, and polynomial calculation costs during authentication, session key generation, node migration, secure joining, and leaving phases. EKM is efficient regarding storage, computation, and communication overhead and can protect WSN-based IoT infrastructure.

  2. A Polynomial Subset-Based Efficient Multi-Party Key Management System for Lightweight Device Networks

    PubMed Central

    Mahmood, Zahid; Ning, Huansheng; Ghafoor, AtaUllah

    2017-01-01

    Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs) consist of lightweight devices to measure sensitive data that are highly vulnerable to security attacks due to their constrained resources. In a similar manner, the internet-based lightweight devices used in the Internet of Things (IoT) are facing severe security and privacy issues because of the direct accessibility of devices due to their connection to the internet. Complex and resource-intensive security schemes are infeasible and reduce the network lifetime. In this regard, we have explored the polynomial distribution-based key establishment schemes and identified an issue that the resultant polynomial value is either storage intensive or infeasible when large values are multiplied. It becomes more costly when these polynomials are regenerated dynamically after each node join or leave operation and whenever key is refreshed. To reduce the computation, we have proposed an Efficient Key Management (EKM) scheme for multiparty communication-based scenarios. The proposed session key management protocol is established by applying a symmetric polynomial for group members, and the group head acts as a responsible node. The polynomial generation method uses security credentials and secure hash function. Symmetric cryptographic parameters are efficient in computation, communication, and the storage required. The security justification of the proposed scheme has been completed by using Rubin logic, which guarantees that the protocol attains mutual validation and session key agreement property strongly among the participating entities. Simulation scenarios are performed using NS 2.35 to validate the results for storage, communication, latency, energy, and polynomial calculation costs during authentication, session key generation, node migration, secure joining, and leaving phases. EKM is efficient regarding storage, computation, and communication overhead and can protect WSN-based IoT infrastructure. PMID:28338632

  3. Numerical Technology for Large-Scale Computational Electromagnetics

    SciTech Connect

    Sharpe, R; Champagne, N; White, D; Stowell, M; Adams, R

    2003-01-30

    The key bottleneck of implicit computational electromagnetics tools for large complex geometries is the solution of the resulting linear system of equations. The goal of this effort was to research and develop critical numerical technology that alleviates this bottleneck for large-scale computational electromagnetics (CEM). The mathematical operators and numerical formulations used in this arena of CEM yield linear equations that are complex valued, unstructured, and indefinite. Also, simultaneously applying multiple mathematical modeling formulations to different portions of a complex problem (hybrid formulations) results in a mixed structure linear system, further increasing the computational difficulty. Typically, these hybrid linear systems are solved using a direct solution method, which was acceptable for Cray-class machines but does not scale adequately for ASCI-class machines. Additionally, LLNL's previously existing linear solvers were not well suited for the linear systems that are created by hybrid implicit CEM codes. Hence, a new approach was required to make effective use of ASCI-class computing platforms and to enable the next generation design capabilities. Multiple approaches were investigated, including the latest sparse-direct methods developed by our ASCI collaborators. In addition, approaches that combine domain decomposition (or matrix partitioning) with general-purpose iterative methods and special purpose pre-conditioners were investigated. Special-purpose pre-conditioners that take advantage of the structure of the matrix were adapted and developed based on intimate knowledge of the matrix properties. Finally, new operator formulations were developed that radically improve the conditioning of the resulting linear systems thus greatly reducing solution time. The goal was to enable the solution of CEM problems that are 10 to 100 times larger than our previous capability.

  4. DarkSUSY: Computing Supersymmetric Dark Matter Properties Numerically

    SciTech Connect

    Gondolo, P.

    2004-07-16

    The question of the nature of the dark matter in the Universe remains one of the most outstanding unsolved problems in basic science. One of the best motivated particle physics candidates is the lightest supersymmetric particle, assumed to be the lightest neutralino - a linear combination of the supersymmetric partners of the photon, the Z boson and neutral scalar Higgs particles. Here we describe DarkSUSY, a publicly-available advanced numerical package for neutralino dark matter calculations. In DarkSUSY one can compute the neutralino density in the Universe today using precision methods which include resonances, pair production thresholds and coannihilations. Masses and mixings of supersymmetric particles can be computed within DarkSUSY or with the help of external programs such as FeynHiggs, ISASUGRA and SUSPECT. Accelerator bounds can be checked to identify viable dark matter candidates. DarkSUSY also computes a large variety of astrophysical signals from neutralino dark matter, such as direct detection in low-background counting experiments and indirect detection through antiprotons, antideuterons, gamma-rays and positrons from the Galactic halo or high-energy neutrinos from the center of the Earth or of the Sun. Here we describe the physics behind the package. A detailed manual will be provided with the computer package.

  5. Numerical computation of modulated factor in measuring D*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Xiangrong; Zhang, Yan; Zhang, Yani; Tang, Hengjing

    2009-07-01

    The "direct current" radiation is turned to periodic "alternating current" radiation by the modulate tray, then, the periodic "alternating current" radiation is received by photoelectric detector in one constant frequency during measuring D*. The ratio is called modulated factor, which the ratio is the fundamental virtual factor of "alternating current" radiant power to "direct current" radiant power. The modulated factor is an important parameter in measuring D*. The modulated factor could be gained by analytic method or numerical computation method. In this paper, by the method of numerical computation and Matlab program, the authors give out modulated factor of a light-spot modulated by a fan-shaped modulate tray. The modulated factor is different from r, R, n. Some conclusions that we are using in measuring D* are testified. When the light-spot and the detector are at the same axis and L>=10 √Ab (Ab is the area of the light-spot), the diameter of the light-spot is 0.87 of the width of fan-shaped modulate tray dentition, the modulated factor is 0.3536.

  6. Numerical computation of travelling breathers in Klein Gordon chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sire, Yannick; James, Guillaume

    2005-05-01

    We numerically study the existence of travelling breathers in Klein-Gordon chains, which consist of one-dimensional networks of nonlinear oscillators in an anharmonic on-site potential, linearly coupled to their nearest neighbors. Travelling breathers are spatially localized solutions having the property of being exactly translated by p sites along the chain after a fixed propagation time T (these solutions generalize the concept of solitary waves for which p=1). In the case of even on-site potentials, the existence of small amplitude travelling breathers superposed on a small oscillatory tail has been proved recently [G. James, Y. Sire, Travelling breathers with exponentially small tails in a chain of nonlinear oscillators, Commun. Math. Phys., 2005, in press (available online at http://www.springerlink.com)], the tail being exponentially small with respect to the central oscillation size. In this paper, we compute these solutions numerically and continue them into the large amplitude regime for different types of even potentials. We find that Klein-Gordon chains can support highly localized travelling breather solutions superposed on an oscillatory tail. We provide examples where the tail can be made very small and is difficult to detect at the scale of central oscillations. In addition, we numerically observe the existence of these solutions in the case of non-even potentials.

  7. Numerical Methods of Computational Electromagnetics for Complex Inhomogeneous Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, Wei

    2014-05-15

    Understanding electromagnetic phenomena is the key in many scientific investigation and engineering designs such as solar cell designs, studying biological ion channels for diseases, and creating clean fusion energies, among other things. The objectives of the project are to develop high order numerical methods to simulate evanescent electromagnetic waves occurring in plasmon solar cells and biological ion-channels, where local field enhancement within random media in the former and long range electrostatic interactions in the latter are of major challenges for accurate and efficient numerical computations. We have accomplished these objectives by developing high order numerical methods for solving Maxwell equations such as high order finite element basis for discontinuous Galerkin methods, well-conditioned Nedelec edge element method, divergence free finite element basis for MHD, and fast integral equation methods for layered media. These methods can be used to model the complex local field enhancement in plasmon solar cells. On the other hand, to treat long range electrostatic interaction in ion channels, we have developed image charge based method for a hybrid model in combining atomistic electrostatics and continuum Poisson-Boltzmann electrostatics. Such a hybrid model will speed up the molecular dynamics simulation of transport in biological ion-channels.

  8. Computer Numerical Control: Instructional Manual. The North Dakota High Technology Mobile Laboratory Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sinn, John W.

    This instructional manual contains five learning activity packets for use in a workshop on computer numerical control for computer-aided manufacturing. The lessons cover the following topics: introduction to computer-aided manufacturing, understanding the lathe, using the computer, computer numerically controlled part programming, and executing a…

  9. Computer Numerical Control: Instructional Manual. The North Dakota High Technology Mobile Laboratory Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sinn, John W.

    This instructional manual contains five learning activity packets for use in a workshop on computer numerical control for computer-aided manufacturing. The lessons cover the following topics: introduction to computer-aided manufacturing, understanding the lathe, using the computer, computer numerically controlled part programming, and executing a…

  10. Numerical simulation of NQR/NMR: Applications in quantum computing.

    PubMed

    Possa, Denimar; Gaudio, Anderson C; Freitas, Jair C C

    2011-04-01

    A numerical simulation program able to simulate nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) as well as nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments is presented, written using the Mathematica package, aiming especially applications in quantum computing. The program makes use of the interaction picture to compute the effect of the relevant nuclear spin interactions, without any assumption about the relative size of each interaction. This makes the program flexible and versatile, being useful in a wide range of experimental situations, going from NQR (at zero or under small applied magnetic field) to high-field NMR experiments. Some conditions specifically required for quantum computing applications are implemented in the program, such as the possibility of use of elliptically polarized radiofrequency and the inclusion of first- and second-order terms in the average Hamiltonian expansion. A number of examples dealing with simple NQR and quadrupole-perturbed NMR experiments are presented, along with the proposal of experiments to create quantum pseudopure states and logic gates using NQR. The program and the various application examples are freely available through the link http://www.profanderson.net/files/nmr_nqr.php.

  11. Numerical computation of steady-state acoustic disturbances in flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, W. R.; Myers, M. K.

    1992-01-01

    Two time domain methods for computing two dimensional steady-state acoustic disturbances propagating through internal subsonic viscous flow fields in the presence of variable area are investigated. The first method solves the Navier-Stokes equations for the combined steady and acoustic field together and subtracts the steady flow to obtain the acoustic field. The second method solves a system of perturbation equations to obtain the acoustic disturbances, making use of a separate steady flow computation as input to the system. In each case the periodic steady-state acoustic fluctuations are obtained numerically on a supercomputer using a second order unsplit explicit MacCormack predictor-corrector method. Results show that the first method is not very effective for computing acoustic disturbances of even moderate amplitude. It appears that more accurate steady flow algorithms are required for this method to succeed. On the other hand, linear and nonlinear acoustic disturbances extracted from the perturbation approach are shown to exhibit expected behavior for the problems considered. It is also found that inflow boundary conditions for an equivalent uniform duct can be successfully applied to a nonuniform duct to obtain steady-state acoustic disturbances.

  12. Numerical computation of viscous flow about unconventional airfoil shapes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahmed, S.; Tannehill, J. C.

    1990-01-01

    A new two-dimensional computer code was developed to analyze the viscous flow around unconventional airfoils at various Mach numbers and angles of attack. The Navier-Stokes equations are solved using an implicit, upwind, finite-volume scheme. Both laminar and turbulent flows can be computed. A new nonequilibrium turbulence closure model was developed for computing turbulent flows. This two-layer eddy viscosity model was motivated by the success of the Johnson-King model in separated flow regions. The influence of history effects are described by an ordinary differential equation developed from the turbulent kinetic energy equation. The performance of the present code was evaluated by solving the flow around three airfoils using the Reynolds time-averaged Navier-Stokes equations. Excellent results were obtained for both attached and separated flows about the NACA 0012 airfoil, the RAE 2822 airfoil, and the Integrated Technology A 153W airfoil. Based on the comparison of the numerical solutions with the available experimental data, it is concluded that the present code in conjunction with the new nonequilibrium turbulence model gives excellent results.

  13. Numerical computations of turbulent flows; LES/SAS comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilie, Marcel; Smith, Stefan Llewellyn

    2010-11-01

    In aerodynamics, the unsteady fluctuations of the flow field can have a significant influence on stalled flow characteristics, or on the forces acting on different parts of the aircraft. In non-aerodynamic flows, there is a multitude of mixing problems such as piston engines or turbine blade cooling where steady Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) solutions are not adequate. On the other hand the unsteady Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (URANS) has proven to be insufficient. This is due to the highly dissipative nature of standard URANS. The use of Large Eddy Simulation (LES) methods is often not practical, due to the requirement of very fine grid resolution near walls. Direct Numerical Simulations (DNS) compute the flow field without further simplifications. However, due to a wide range of length and time scales present in turbulent flows, the use of DNS is still limited to low-Reynolds-number flows and relatively simple geometries. To combine the advantages of a URANS with the higher resolution of a LES, hybrid methods such as Detached Eddy Simulation (DES) or Scale Adaptive Simulation (SAS) are preferred. The present research concerns the suitability of SAS for the computation of highly separated flows. The results show that SAS is a promising approach for the computation of massively separated flows.

  14. Numerical computation of steady-state acoustic disturbances in flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, W. R.; Myers, M. K.

    1992-01-01

    Two time domain methods for computing two dimensional steady-state acoustic disturbances propagating through internal subsonic viscous flow fields in the presence of variable area are investigated. The first method solves the Navier-Stokes equations for the combined steady and acoustic field together and subtracts the steady flow to obtain the acoustic field. The second method solves a system of perturbation equations to obtain the acoustic disturbances, making use of a separate steady flow computation as input to the system. In each case the periodic steady-state acoustic fluctuations are obtained numerically on a supercomputer using a second order unsplit explicit MacCormack predictor-corrector method. Results show that the first method is not very effective for computing acoustic disturbances of even moderate amplitude. It appears that more accurate steady flow algorithms are required for this method to succeed. On the other hand, linear and nonlinear acoustic disturbances extracted from the perturbation approach are shown to exhibit expected behavior for the problems considered. It is also found that inflow boundary conditions for an equivalent uniform duct can be successfully applied to a nonuniform duct to obtain steady-state acoustic disturbances.

  15. Summary of research in applied mathematics, numerical analysis, and computer sciences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    The major categories of current ICASE research programs addressed include: numerical methods, with particular emphasis on the development and analysis of basic numerical algorithms; control and parameter identification problems, with emphasis on effective numerical methods; computational problems in engineering and physical sciences, particularly fluid dynamics, acoustics, and structural analysis; and computer systems and software, especially vector and parallel computers.

  16. Numerical computational of fluid flow through a detached retina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiann, Lim Yeou; Ismail, Zuhaila; Shafie, Sharidan; Fitt, Alistair

    2015-02-01

    In this paper, a phenomenon of fluid flow through a detached retina is studied. Rhegmatogeneous retinal detachment happens when vitreous humour flow through a detached retina. The exact mechanism of Rhegmatogeneous retinal detachment is complex and remains incomplete. To understand the fluid flow, a paradigm mathematical model is developed and is approximated by the lubrication theory. The numerical results of the velocity profile and pressure distribution are computed by using Finite Element Method. The effects of fluid mechanical on the retinal detachment is discussed and analyzed. Based on the analysis, it is found that the retinal detachment deformation affects the pressure distribution. It is important to comprehend the development of the retinal detachment so that a new treatment method can be developed.

  17. Computer numeric control subaperture aspheric surface polishing-microroughness evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prochaska, Frantisek; Polak, Jaroslav; Matousek, Ondrej; Tomka, David

    2014-09-01

    The aim of this work was an investigation of surface microroughness and shape accuracy achieved on an aspheric lens by subaperture computer numeric control (CNC) polishing. Different optical substrates were polished (OHARA S-LAH 58, SF4, ZERODUR) using a POLITEX™ polishing pad, synthetic pitch, and the natural optical pitch. Surface roughness was measured by light interferometer. The best results were achieved on the S-LAH58 glass and the ZERODUR™ using the natural optical pitch. In the case of SF4 glass, the natural optical pitch showed a tendency to scratch the surface. Experiments also indicated a problem in surface form deterioration when using the natural optical pitch, regardless of the type of optical material.

  18. Symbolic coding for noninvertible systems: uniform approximation and numerical computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beyn, Wolf-Jürgen; Hüls, Thorsten; Schenke, Andre

    2016-11-01

    It is well known that the homoclinic theorem, which conjugates a map near a transversal homoclinic orbit to a Bernoulli subshift, extends from invertible to specific noninvertible dynamical systems. In this paper, we provide a unifying approach that combines such a result with a fully discrete analog of the conjugacy for finite but sufficiently long orbit segments. The underlying idea is to solve appropriate discrete boundary value problems in both cases, and to use the theory of exponential dichotomies to control the errors. This leads to a numerical approach that allows us to compute the conjugacy to any prescribed accuracy. The method is demonstrated for several examples where invertibility of the map fails in different ways.

  19. Sequential incoherence in a multi-party synchronous computer mediated communication for an introductory Health Informatics course.

    PubMed

    Herskovic, Jorge R; Goodwin, J Caleb; Bozzo Silva, Pamela A; Willcockson, Irmgard; Franklin, Amy

    2010-11-13

    Online courses will play a key role in the high-volume Informatics education required to train the personnel that will be necessary to fulfill the health IT needs of the country. Online courses can cause feelings of isolation in students. A common way to address these feelings is to hold synchronous online "chats" for students. Conventional chats, however, can be confusing and impose a high extrinsic cognitive load on their participants that hinders the learning process. In this paper we present a qualitative analysis that shows the causes of this high cognitive load and our solution through the use of a moderated chat system.

  20. Sequential incoherence in a multi-party synchronous computer mediated communication for an introductory Health Informatics course

    PubMed Central

    Herskovic, Jorge R.; Goodwin, J. Caleb; Bozzo Silva, Pamela A.; Willcockson, Irmgard; Franklin, Amy

    2010-01-01

    Online courses will play a key role in the high-volume Informatics education required to train the personnel that will be necessary to fulfill the health IT needs of the country. Online courses can cause feelings of isolation in students. A common way to address these feelings is to hold synchronous online “chats” for students. Conventional chats, however, can be confusing and impose a high extrinsic cognitive load on their participants that hinders the learning process. In this paper we present a qualitative analysis that shows the causes of this high cognitive load and our solution through the use of a moderated chat system. PMID:21346988

  1. Numerical simulation of landfill aeration using computational fluid dynamics.

    PubMed

    Fytanidis, Dimitrios K; Voudrias, Evangelos A

    2014-04-01

    The present study is an application of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) to the numerical simulation of landfill aeration systems. Specifically, the CFD algorithms provided by the commercial solver ANSYS Fluent 14.0, combined with an in-house source code developed to modify the main solver, were used. The unsaturated multiphase flow of air and liquid phases and the biochemical processes for aerobic biodegradation of the organic fraction of municipal solid waste were simulated taking into consideration their temporal and spatial evolution, as well as complex effects, such as oxygen mass transfer across phases, unsaturated flow effects (capillary suction and unsaturated hydraulic conductivity), temperature variations due to biochemical processes and environmental correction factors for the applied kinetics (Monod and 1st order kinetics). The developed model results were compared with literature experimental data. Also, pilot scale simulations and sensitivity analysis were implemented. Moreover, simulation results of a hypothetical single aeration well were shown, while its zone of influence was estimated using both the pressure and oxygen distribution. Finally, a case study was simulated for a hypothetical landfill aeration system. Both a static (steadily positive or negative relative pressure with time) and a hybrid (following a square wave pattern of positive and negative values of relative pressure with time) scenarios for the aeration wells were examined. The results showed that the present model is capable of simulating landfill aeration and the obtained results were in good agreement with corresponding previous experimental and numerical investigations.

  2. Numerical computations of the dynamics of fluidic membranes and vesicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrett, John W.; Garcke, Harald; Nürnberg, Robert

    2015-11-01

    Vesicles and many biological membranes are made of two monolayers of lipid molecules and form closed lipid bilayers. The dynamical behavior of vesicles is very complex and a variety of forms and shapes appear. Lipid bilayers can be considered as a surface fluid and hence the governing equations for the evolution include the surface (Navier-)Stokes equations, which in particular take the membrane viscosity into account. The evolution is driven by forces stemming from the curvature elasticity of the membrane. In addition, the surface fluid equations are coupled to bulk (Navier-)Stokes equations. We introduce a parametric finite-element method to solve this complex free boundary problem and present the first three-dimensional numerical computations based on the full (Navier-)Stokes system for several different scenarios. For example, the effects of the membrane viscosity, spontaneous curvature, and area difference elasticity (ADE) are studied. In particular, it turns out, that even in the case of no viscosity contrast between the bulk fluids, the tank treading to tumbling transition can be obtained by increasing the membrane viscosity. Besides the classical tank treading and tumbling motions, another mode (called the transition mode in this paper, but originally called the vacillating-breathing mode and subsequently also called trembling, transition, and swinging mode) separating these classical modes appears and is studied by us numerically. We also study how features of equilibrium shapes in the ADE and spontaneous curvature models, like budding behavior or starfish forms, behave in a shear flow.

  3. CDIAC catalog of numeric data packages and computer model packages

    SciTech Connect

    Boden, T.A.; O`Hara, F.M. Jr.; Stoss, F.W.

    1993-05-01

    The Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center acquires, quality-assures, and distributes to the scientific community numeric data packages (NDPs) and computer model packages (CMPs) dealing with topics related to atmospheric trace-gas concentrations and global climate change. These packages include data on historic and present atmospheric CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 4} concentrations, historic and present oceanic CO{sub 2} concentrations, historic weather and climate around the world, sea-level rise, storm occurrences, volcanic dust in the atmosphere, sources of atmospheric CO{sub 2}, plants` response to elevated CO{sub 2} levels, sunspot occurrences, and many other indicators of, contributors to, or components of climate change. This catalog describes the packages presently offered by CDIAC, reviews the processes used by CDIAC to assure the quality of the data contained in these packages, notes the media on which each package is available, describes the documentation that accompanies each package, and provides ordering information. Numeric data are available in the printed NDPs and CMPs, in CD-ROM format, and from an anonymous FTP area via Internet. All CDIAC information products are available at no cost.

  4. A Computational Model for the Numerical Simulation of FSW Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agelet de Saracibar, C.; Chiumenti, M.; Santiago, D.; Cervera, M.; Dialami, N.; Lombera, G.

    2010-06-01

    In this paper a computational model for the numerical simulation of Friction Stir Welding (FSW) processes is presented. FSW is a new method of welding in solid state in which a shouldered tool with a profile probe is rotated and slowly plunged into the joint line between two pieces of sheet or plate material which are butted together. Once the probe has been completely inserted, it is moved with a small tilt angle in the welding direction. Here a quasi-static, thermal transient, mixed multiscale stabilized Eulerian formulation is used. Norton-Hoff and Sheppard-Wright rigid thermo-viscoplastic material models have been considered. A staggered solution algorithm is defined such that for any time step, the mechanical problem is solved at constant temperature and then the thermal problem is solved keeping constant the mechanical variables. A pressure multiscale stabilized mixed linear velocity/linear pressure finite element interpolation formulation is used to solve the mechanical problem and a convection multiscale stabilized linear temperature interpolation formulation is used to solve the thermal problem. The model has been implemented into the in-house developed FE code COMET. Results obtained in the simulation of FSW process are compared to other numerical results or experimental results, when available.

  5. Numerical computation on massively parallel hypercubes. [Connection machine

    SciTech Connect

    McBryan, O.A.

    1986-01-01

    We describe numerical computations on the Connection Machine, a massively parallel hypercube architecture with 65,536 single-bit processors and 32 Mbytes of memory. A parallel extension of COMMON LISP, provides access to the processors and network. The rich software environment is further enhanced by a powerful virtual processor capability, which extends the degree of fine-grained parallelism beyond 1,000,000. We briefly describe the hardware and indicate the principal features of the parallel programming environment. We then present implementations of SOR, multigrid and pre-conditioned conjugate gradient algorithms for solving partial differential equations on the Connection Machine. Despite the lack of floating point hardware, computation rates above 100 megaflops have been achieved in PDE solution. Virtual processors prove to be a real advantage, easing the effort of software development while improving system performance significantly. The software development effort is also facilitated by the fact that hypercube communications prove to be fast and essentially independent of distance. 29 refs., 4 figs.

  6. Numerical Computations of Hypersonic Boundary-Layer over Surface Irregularities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Chau-Lyan; Choudhari, Meelan M.; Li, Fei

    2010-01-01

    Surface irregularities such as protuberances inside a hypersonic boundary layer may lead to premature transition on the vehicle surface. Early transition in turn causes large localized surface heating that could damage the thermal protection system. Experimental measurements as well as numerical computations aimed at building a knowledge base for transition Reynolds numbers with respect to different protuberance sizes and locations have been actively pursued in recent years. This paper computationally investigates the unsteady wake development behind large isolated cylindrical roughness elements and the scaled wind-tunnel model of the trip used in a recent flight measurement during the reentry of space shuttle Discovery. An unstructured mesh, compressible flow solver based on the space-time conservation element, solution element (CESE) method is used to perform time-accurate Navier-Stokes calculations for the flow past a roughness element under several wind-tunnel conditions. For a cylindrical roughness element with a height to the boundary-layer thickness ratio from 0.8 to 2.5, the wake flow is characterized by a mushroom-shaped centerline streak and horse-shoe vortices. While time-accurate solutions converged to a steady-state for a ratio of 0.8, strong flow unsteadiness is present for a ratio of 1.3 and 2.5. Instability waves marked by distinct disturbance frequencies were found in the latter two cases. Both the centerline streak and the horse-shoe vortices become unstable downstream. The oscillatory vortices eventually reach an early breakdown stage for the largest roughness element. Spectral analyses in conjunction with the computed root mean square variations suggest that the source of the unsteadiness and instability waves in the wake region may be traced back to possible absolute instability in the front-side separation region.

  7. Numerical observer for atherosclerotic plaque classification in spectral computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Lorsakul, Auranuch; Fakhri, Georges El; Worstell, William; Ouyang, Jinsong; Rakvongthai, Yothin; Laine, Andrew F; Li, Quanzheng

    2016-07-01

    Spectral computed tomography (SCT) generates better image quality than conventional computed tomography (CT). It has overcome several limitations for imaging atherosclerotic plaque. However, the literature evaluating the performance of SCT based on objective image assessment is very limited for the task of discriminating plaques. We developed a numerical-observer method and used it to assess performance on discrimination vulnerable-plaque features and compared the performance among multienergy CT (MECT), dual-energy CT (DECT), and conventional CT methods. Our numerical observer was designed to incorporate all spectral information and comprised two-processing stages. First, each energy-window domain was preprocessed by a set of localized channelized Hotelling observers (CHO). In this step, the spectral image in each energy bin was decorrelated using localized prewhitening and matched filtering with a set of Laguerre-Gaussian channel functions. Second, the series of the intermediate scores computed from all the CHOs were integrated by a Hotelling observer with an additional prewhitening and matched filter. The overall signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) were obtained, yielding an overall discrimination performance metric. The performance of our new observer was evaluated for the particular binary classification task of differentiating between alternative plaque characterizations in carotid arteries. A clinically realistic model of signal variability was also included in our simulation of the discrimination tasks. The inclusion of signal variation is a key to applying the proposed observer method to spectral CT data. Hence, the task-based approaches based on the signal-known-exactly/background-known-exactly (SKE/BKE) framework and the clinical-relevant signal-known-statistically/background-known-exactly (SKS/BKE) framework were applied for analytical computation of figures of merit (FOM). Simulated data of a

  8. BOOK REVIEW: Numerical Relativity: Solving Einstein's Equations on the Computer Numerical Relativity: Solving Einstein's Equations on the Computer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gourgoulhon, Eric

    2011-04-01

    clearly the research work of one of the authors, but it is also an opportunity to discuss the Cosmic Censorship conjecture and the Hoop conjecture. Chapter 11 presents the basics of hyperbolic systems and focuses on the famous BSSN formalism employed in most numerical codes. The electromagnetism analogy introduced in chapter 2 is developed, providing some very useful insight. The remainder of the book is devoted to the collapse of rotating stars (chapter 14) and to the coalescence of binary systems of compact objects, either neutron stars or black holes (chapters 12, 13, 15, 16 and 17). This is a unique introduction and review of results about the expected main sources of gravitational radiation. It includes a detailed presentation of the major triumph of numerical relativity: the successful computation of binary black hole merger. I think that Baumgarte and Shapiro have accomplished a genuine tour de force by writing such a comprehensive and self-contained textbook on a highly evolving subject. The primary value of the book is to be extremely pedagogical. The style is definitively at the textbook level and not that of a review article. One may point out the use of boxes to recap important results and the very instructive aspect of many figures, some of them in colour. There are also numerous exercises in the main text, to encourage the reader to find some useful results by himself. The pedagogical trend is manifest up to the book cover, with the subtitle explaining what the title means! Another great value of the book is indisputably its encyclopedic aspect, making it a very good starting point for research on many topics of modern relativity. I have no doubt that Baumgarte and Shapiro's monograph will quicken considerably the learning phase of any master or PhD student beginning numerical relativity. It will also prove to be very valuable for all researchers of the field and should become a major reference. Beyond numerical relativity, the richness and variety of

  9. Research conducted at the Institute for Computer Applications in Science and Engineering in applied mathematics, numerical analysis and computer science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    Research conducted at the Institute for Computer Applications in Science and Engineering in applied mathematics, numerical analysis, and computer science during the period April, 1986 through September 30, 1986 is summarized.

  10. Research conducted at the Institute for Computer Applications in Science and Engineering in applied mathematics, numerical analysis and computer science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    Research conducted at the Institute for Computer Applications in Science and Engineering in applied mathematics, numerical analysis, and computer science during the period October 1, 1986 through March 31, 1987 is summarized.

  11. Research conducted at the Institute for Computer Applications in Science and Engineering in applied mathematics, numerical analysis and computer science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    This report summarizes research conducted at the Institute for Computer Applications in Science and Engineering in applied mathematics, numerical analysis, and computer science during the period April l, 1988 through September 30, 1988.

  12. Multiscale modeling in the numerical computation of isothermal nonwetting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Marc K.

    2005-11-01

    A state of permanent, isothermal nonwetting of a solid surface by a normally wetting liquid may be achieved by having the surface move tangential to a liquid drop being pressed against it. Surrounding gas is swept into the space between the liquid and solid, creating a lubricating film that prevents wetting. The length scales of the drop and the film are typically three or more orders of magnitude different, making numerical simulation difficult from a resolution standpoint. A hybrid computational approach employing lubrication theory for the thinnest portions of the gas film and a finite element simulation for the liquid and outer gas phases is presented. The model problem is a steady, two-dimensional flow between parallel solid surfaces with the drop attached to the upper surface. Results are presented for a silicone oil drop with air as the surrounding gas. The drop shape, flow field, and forces on the drop are determined as functions of the Reynolds number, the flow rate through the system, and the solid surface separation distance. As the drop approaches the lower surface, both leftward-leaning and rightward-leaning drop shapes are possible, but there is a range of flow rates where steady solutions are not found. When the separation distance is less than the radius of the undisturbed hemispherical drop, only left-leaning drop shapes are found. The reasons for this behavior are explained in terms of the lubrication pressure field beneath the drop.

  13. Numerical Computation of the Radar Cross Section of Rockets and Artillery Rounds

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-01

    ARL-TR-7468 ● SEP 2015 US Army Research Laboratory Numerical Computation of the Radar Cross Section of Rockets and Artillery...Numerical Computation of the Radar Cross Section of Rockets and Artillery Rounds by Christopher Kenyon and Traian Dogaru Sensors and Electron...2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Numerical Computation of the Radar Cross Section of Rockets and Artillery Rounds 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER

  14. Reliable numerical computation in an optimal output-feedback design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vansteenwyk, Brett; Ly, Uy-Loi

    1991-01-01

    A reliable algorithm is presented for the evaluation of a quadratic performance index and its gradients with respect to the controller design parameters. The algorithm is a part of a design algorithm for optimal linear dynamic output-feedback controller that minimizes a finite-time quadratic performance index. The numerical scheme is particularly robust when it is applied to the control-law synthesis for systems with densely packed modes and where there is a high likelihood of encountering degeneracies in the closed-loop eigensystem. This approach through the use of an accurate Pade series approximation does not require the closed-loop system matrix to be diagonalizable. The algorithm was included in a control design package for optimal robust low-order controllers. Usefulness of the proposed numerical algorithm was demonstrated using numerous practical design cases where degeneracies occur frequently in the closed-loop system under an arbitrary controller design initialization and during the numerical search.

  15. Numerical analysis, scientific computing and fundamental studies of fluid mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1989-08-01

    This paper briefly discusses the following topics: vortex dynamics, vortical flow and separated flow; free surface flows at low Reynolds number; concurrent linear algebra routines; concurrent continuation and invariant manifolds; concurrent multigrid continuation methods; AUTO-software; Taylor-vortex flows; boundary conditions for infinite domains; numerical and analytical studies of evolutionary systems; numerical methods for stiff differential equations; vortex reconnection; and a study of finite amplitude bifurcations in plane Poiseuille flow.

  16. Base Numeration Systems and Introduction to Computer Programming.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, K. Ed.; And Others

    This teaching guide is for the instructor of an introductory course in computer programming using FORTRAN language. Five FORTRAN programs are incorporated in this guide, which has been used as a FORTRAN IV SELF TEACHER. The base eight, base four, and base two concepts are integrated with FORTRAN computer programs, geoblock activities, and related…

  17. Numerical computation of nonlinear normal modes in mechanical engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renson, L.; Kerschen, G.; Cochelin, B.

    2016-03-01

    This paper reviews the recent advances in computational methods for nonlinear normal modes (NNMs). Different algorithms for the computation of undamped and damped NNMs are presented, and their respective advantages and limitations are discussed. The methods are illustrated using various applications ranging from low-dimensional weakly nonlinear systems to strongly nonlinear industrial structures.

  18. Condition and Error Estimates in Numerical Matrix Computations

    SciTech Connect

    Konstantinov, M. M.; Petkov, P. H.

    2008-10-30

    This tutorial paper deals with sensitivity and error estimates in matrix computational processes. The main factors determining the accuracy of the result computed in floating--point machine arithmetics are considered. Special attention is paid to the perturbation analysis of matrix algebraic equations and unitary matrix decompositions.

  19. Numerical computation of space shuttle orbiter flow field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tannehill, John C.

    1988-01-01

    A new parabolized Navier-Stokes (PNS) code has been developed to compute the hypersonic, viscous chemically reacting flow fields around 3-D bodies. The flow medium is assumed to be a multicomponent mixture of thermally perfect but calorically imperfect gases. The new PNS code solves the gas dynamic and species conservation equations in a coupled manner using a noniterative, implicit, approximately factored, finite difference algorithm. The space-marching method is made well-posed by special treatment of the streamwise pressure gradient term. The code has been used to compute hypersonic laminar flow of chemically reacting air over cones at angle of attack. The results of the computations are compared with the results of reacting boundary-layer computations and show excellent agreement.

  20. Computational Fluid Dynamics. [numerical methods and algorithm development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    This collection of papers was presented at the Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) Conference held at Ames Research Center in California on March 12 through 14, 1991. It is an overview of CFD activities at NASA Lewis Research Center. The main thrust of computational work at Lewis is aimed at propulsion systems. Specific issues related to propulsion CFD and associated modeling will also be presented. Examples of results obtained with the most recent algorithm development will also be presented.

  1. On the numerical computation of the Mittag-Leffler function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valério, Duarte; Tenreiro Machado, José

    2014-10-01

    Recently simple limiting functions establishing upper and lower bounds on the Mittag-Leffler function were found. This paper follows those expressions to design an efficient algorithm for the approximate calculation of expressions usual in fractional-order control systems. The numerical experiments demonstrate the superior efficiency of the proposed method.

  2. Laser beam scintillation beyond the turbulent atmosphere A numerical computation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bufton, J. L.; Taylor, L. S.

    1976-01-01

    The extended Huygens-Fresnel formulation for propagation through turbulence is used to examine scintillation of a finite laser beam. The method is demonstrated analytically for propagation beyond a weak Gaussian phase screen. A numerical integration technique is used to extend the results to a more realistic turbulence model. Results are compared with existing Gaussian beam propagation theory.

  3. Review of numerical procedures for computational surface thermochemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milos, Frank S.; Rasky, Daniel J.

    1994-01-01

    Models and equations for surface thermochemistry and near-surface thermophysics of aerodynamically heated thermal protection materials are reviewed, with particular emphasis on computational boundary conditions for surface mass and energy transfer. The surface energy and mass balances, coupled with an appropriate ablation or surface catalysis model, provide complete thermochemical boundary conditions for a true multidisciplinary solution of the fully coupled fluid-dynamics/solid mechanics problem. Practical approximate solutions can be obtained by using a detailed model with full thermophysics for either the solid or fluid phase and a semianalytic method for the other half of the problem. A significant increase in the state-of-the-art in aerothermal computational fluid dynamics is possible by uniting computational fluid dynamic (CFD) methodology with surface thermochemistry boundary conditions and the heat-balance-integral method.

  4. On DNA numerical representations for genomic similarity computation.

    PubMed

    Mendizabal-Ruiz, Gerardo; Román-Godínez, Israel; Torres-Ramos, Sulema; Salido-Ruiz, Ricardo A; Morales, J Alejandro

    2017-01-01

    Genomic signal processing (GSP) refers to the use of signal processing for the analysis of genomic data. GSP methods require the transformation or mapping of the genomic data to a numeric representation. To date, several DNA numeric representations (DNR) have been proposed; however, it is not clear what the properties of each DNR are and how the selection of one will affect the results when using a signal processing technique to analyze them. In this paper, we present an experimental study of the characteristics of nine of the most frequently-used DNR. The objective of this paper is to evaluate the behavior of each representation when used to measure the similarity of a given pair of DNA sequences.

  5. On DNA numerical representations for genomic similarity computation

    PubMed Central

    Mendizabal-Ruiz, Gerardo; Román-Godínez, Israel; Torres-Ramos, Sulema; Salido-Ruiz, Ricardo A.; Morales, J. Alejandro

    2017-01-01

    Genomic signal processing (GSP) refers to the use of signal processing for the analysis of genomic data. GSP methods require the transformation or mapping of the genomic data to a numeric representation. To date, several DNA numeric representations (DNR) have been proposed; however, it is not clear what the properties of each DNR are and how the selection of one will affect the results when using a signal processing technique to analyze them. In this paper, we present an experimental study of the characteristics of nine of the most frequently-used DNR. The objective of this paper is to evaluate the behavior of each representation when used to measure the similarity of a given pair of DNA sequences. PMID:28323839

  6. Mathematical modeling and numerical computation of narrow escape problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheviakov, Alexei F.; Reimer, Ashton S.; Ward, Michael J.

    2012-02-01

    The narrow escape problem refers to the problem of calculating the mean first passage time (MFPT) needed for an average Brownian particle to leave a domain with an insulating boundary containing N small well-separated absorbing windows, or traps. This mean first passage time satisfies the Poisson partial differential equation subject to a mixed Dirichlet-Neumann boundary condition on the domain boundary, with the Dirichlet condition corresponding to absorbing traps. In the limit of small total trap size, a common asymptotic theory is presented to calculate the MFPT in two-dimensional domains and in the unit sphere. The asymptotic MFPT formulas depend on mutual trap locations, allowing for global optimization of trap locations. Although the asymptotic theory for the MFPT was developed in the limit of asymptotically small trap radii, and under the assumption that the traps are well-separated, a comprehensive study involving comparison with full numerical simulations shows that the full numerical and asymptotic results for the MFPT are within 1% accuracy even when total trap size is only moderately small, and for traps that may be rather close together. This close agreement between asymptotic and numerical results at finite, and not necessarily asymptotically small, values of the trap size clearly illustrates one of the key side benefits of a theory based on a systematic asymptotic analysis. In addition, for the unit sphere, numerical results are given for the optimal configuration of a collection of traps on the surface of a sphere that minimizes the average MFPT. The case of N identical traps and a pattern of traps with two different sizes are considered. The effect of trap fragmentation on the average MFPT is also discussed.

  7. The Numerical Computation of Three-Dimensional Turbulent Boundary Layers.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-04-01

    begin by saying what an honour and a pleasure it is for me t," this review lecture. To some extent my pleasure is enhanced by a sense of deja vu as...A.J. Baker Finite element solution theory tor three-dimensional boundary flows. Computer Methods in Applied Mechanics and Engineering, Vol.4, pp.367-386

  8. Computer-based numerical simulations of adsorption in nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khashimova, Diana

    2014-08-01

    Zeolites are crystalline oxides with uniform, molecular-pore diameters of 3-14Å. Significant developments since 1950 made production of synthetic zeolites with high purity and controlled chemical composition possible. In powder-form, zeolites are major role-players in high-tech, industrial catalysis, adsorption, and ion exchange applications. Understanding properties of thin-film zeolites has been a focus of recent research. The ability to fine-tune desired macroscopic properties by controlled alteration at the molecular level is paramount. The relationships between macroscopic and molecular-level properties are established by experimental research. Because generating macroscopic, experimental data in a controlled laboratory can be prohibitively costly and time-consuming, reliable numerical simulations, which remove such difficulties, are an attractive alternative. Using a Configurational Biased Monte Carlo (CBMC) approach in grand canonical ensemble, numerical models for pure component and multicomponent adsorption processes were developed. Theoretical models such as ideal (IAST) and real adsorbed solution theory (RAST) to predict mixture adsorption in nanopores were used for comparison. Activity coefficients used in RAST calculations were determined from the Wilson, spreading pressure and COSMO-RS models. Investigative testing of the method on known materials, represented by all-silica zeolites such as MFI (channel type) and DDR (cage type), proved successful in replicating experimental data on adsorption of light hydrocarbons - alkanes, such as methane, ethane, propane and butane. Additionally, adsorption of binary and ternary mixtures was simulated. The given numerical approach developed can be a powerful, cost and time saving tool to predict process characteristics for different molecular-structure configurations. The approach used here for simulating adsorption properties of nanopore materials including process characteristics, may have great potential for

  9. Multi-party quantum private comparison based on the entanglement swapping of d-level cat states and d-level Bell states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao-Xu, Ji; Tian-Yu, Ye

    2017-07-01

    In this paper, a novel multi-party quantum private comparison protocol with a semi-honest third party (TP) is proposed based on the entanglement swapping of d-level cat states and d-level Bell states. Here, TP is allowed to misbehave on his own, but will not conspire with any party. In our protocol, n parties employ unitary operations to encode their private secrets and can compare the equality of their private secrets within one time execution of the protocol. Our protocol can withstand both the outside attacks and the participant attacks on the condition that none of the QKD methods is adopted to generate keys for security. One party cannot obtain other parties' secrets except for the case that their secrets are identical. The semi-honest TP cannot learn any information about these parties' secrets except the end comparison result on whether all private secrets from n parties are equal.

  10. Numerical Methods for Computing Turbulence-Induced Noise

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-12-16

    consider the finite dimensional subspace Vhl C Vh . Let vhi -= phlu be the optimal representation of u in Vhl and phi : V+_+ Vhl be the appropriate...mapping. We consider the following numerical method which is obtained by replacing h with hi in (2.4). Find uhl E Vhi , such that B(whi, uhl) + M(whUhl, f...the same functional form of the model that leads to the optimal solution on Vh, also leads to the optimal solution on Vhi . Thus, requiring uhl = vh

  11. Coordinate Systems, Numerical Objects and Algorithmic Operations of Computational Experiment in Fluid Mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degtyarev, Alexander; Khramushin, Vasily

    2016-02-01

    The paper deals with the computer implementation of direct computational experiments in fluid mechanics, constructed on the basis of the approach developed by the authors. The proposed approach allows the use of explicit numerical scheme, which is an important condition for increasing the effciency of the algorithms developed by numerical procedures with natural parallelism. The paper examines the main objects and operations that let you manage computational experiments and monitor the status of the computation process. Special attention is given to a) realization of tensor representations of numerical schemes for direct simulation; b) realization of representation of large particles of a continuous medium motion in two coordinate systems (global and mobile); c) computing operations in the projections of coordinate systems, direct and inverse transformation in these systems. Particular attention is paid to the use of hardware and software of modern computer systems.

  12. Numerical procedures for three-dimensional computational surface thermochemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milos, Frank S.; Rasky, Daniel J.

    1992-01-01

    Models and equations for surface thermochemistry and near-surface thermophysics of aerodynamically-heated thermal protection materials are reviewed, with particular emphasis on computational boundary conditions for surface mass and energy transfer. The surface energy and mass balances, coupled with an appropriate ablation or surface catalysis model, provide complete thermochemical boundary conditions for a true multidisciplinary solution of the fully coupled fluid-dynamics/solid mechanics problem. Practical approximate solutions can be obtained by using a detailed model with full thermophysics for either the solid or fluid phase amd a semianalytic method for the other half of the problem. A significant increase in the state-of-the-art in aerothermal computational fluid dynamics is possible by uniting CFD methodology with surface thermochemistry boundary conditions and the heat-balance-integral method.

  13. Comparison of Numerical Models for Computing Underwater Light Fields

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-04-01

    L is an analytic process, and thus there are body. Depth integration of the Riccati equations (by no Monte Carlo fluctuations in the computed radi - a...1)gj(T) C. Model MCI [ Monte Carlo (Gordon)] i=m This model simulates radiative transfer in both the ( M - i)! ocean and the atmosphere, as coupled...Kattawar and C. Adams, " Radiative transfer in spherical (1974). shell atmospheres. II. asymmetric phase functions ," Icarus 38. R. Stavn and A

  14. Computing Finite-Difference Approximations to Derivatives for Numerical Optimization.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-05-01

    representable number I n the form 1= "W. (4) where P is the machine base Is the exponent and i s a Mantissa comprising r digits. Al floating - point numbers ane...In floating - point arithmetic, see "Z Wilkrinson (1963). Throughout this paper, it will be important to distinguish uezact from *computed* quantities...as the error resulting from any other floating - point operation, and is not of any special * significance. As an example, consider the subtraction of

  15. On the accurate numerical computation of highly eccentric orbits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrandiz, J. M.; Sansaturio, M. E.; Vigo, J.

    In this paper we analyze the features of different systems of equations of motion in connection with the numerical integration of highly eccentric orbits of Earth satellites. To this end we have chosen some highly reputed sets such as: Battin's variational equations, Cartesian coordinates with the intermediate anomaly as independent variable, and the KS coordinates, with or without their usual time element. We have also considered the basic focal (BF) variables, whose efficiency is reinforced by using a time element. Likewise, we test a new set of the focal type for which the time element appears as a canonical variable. The numerical results are analyzed in detail with the purpose of isolating, as far possible, the deep reasons accounting for the good and bad observed behaviors in order to favor future developments. Special attention is paid to the oblateness perturbation, in which case the BF set with time element comes out as the best option, due to its accuracy and efficiency. Afterwards, we study the effect of perturbations caused by tesseral harmonics or by a third body, which give rise to a richer and complex casuistry.

  16. The application of generalized, cyclic, and modified numerical integration algorithms to problems of satellite orbit computation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chesler, L.; Pierce, S.

    1971-01-01

    Generalized, cyclic, and modified multistep numerical integration methods are developed and evaluated for application to problems of satellite orbit computation. Generalized methods are compared with the presently utilized Cowell methods; new cyclic methods are developed for special second-order differential equations; and several modified methods are developed and applied to orbit computation problems. Special computer programs were written to generate coefficients for these methods, and subroutines were written which allow use of these methods with NASA's GEOSTAR computer program.

  17. Research in progress in applied mathematics, numerical analysis, fluid mechanics, and computer science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    This report summarizes research conducted at the Institute for Computer Applications in Science and Engineering in applied mathematics, fluid mechanics, and computer science during the period October 1, 1993 through March 31, 1994. The major categories of the current ICASE research program are: (1) applied and numerical mathematics, including numerical analysis and algorithm development; (2) theoretical and computational research in fluid mechanics in selected areas of interest to LaRC, including acoustics and combustion; (3) experimental research in transition and turbulence and aerodynamics involving LaRC facilities and scientists; and (4) computer science.

  18. Modeling extracellular electrical stimulation: II. Computational validation and numerical results.

    PubMed

    Tahayori, Bahman; Meffin, Hamish; Dokos, Socrates; Burkitt, Anthony N; Grayden, David B

    2012-12-01

    The validity of approximate equations describing the membrane potential under extracellular electrical stimulation (Meffin et al 2012 J. Neural Eng. 9 065005) is investigated through finite element analysis in this paper. To this end, the finite element method is used to simulate a cylindrical neurite under extracellular stimulation. Laplace's equations with appropriate boundary conditions are solved numerically in three dimensions and the results are compared to the approximate analytic solutions. Simulation results are in agreement with the approximate analytic expressions for longitudinal and transverse modes of stimulation. The range of validity of the equations describing the membrane potential for different values of stimulation and neurite parameters are presented as well. The results indicate that the analytic approach can be used to model extracellular electrical stimulation for realistic physiological parameters with a high level of accuracy.

  19. Improved methods for computing masses from numerical simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Kronfeld, A.S.

    1989-11-22

    An important advance in the computation of hadron and glueball masses has been the introduction of non-local operators. This talk summarizes the critical signal-to-noise ratio of glueball correlation functions in the continuum limit, and discusses the case of (q{bar q} and qqq) hadrons in the chiral limit. A new strategy for extracting the masses of excited states is outlined and tested. The lessons learned here suggest that gauge-fixed momentum-space operators might be a suitable choice of interpolating operators. 15 refs., 2 tabs.

  20. COSMIC REIONIZATION ON COMPUTERS: NUMERICAL AND PHYSICAL CONVERGENCE

    SciTech Connect

    Gnedin, Nickolay Y.

    2016-04-10

    In this paper I show that simulations of reionization performed under the Cosmic Reionization On Computers project do converge in space and mass, albeit rather slowly. A fully converged solution (for a given star formation and feedback model) can be determined at a level of precision of about 20%, but such a solution is useless in practice, since achieving it in production-grade simulations would require a large set of runs at various mass and spatial resolutions, and computational resources for such an undertaking are not yet readily available. In order to make progress in the interim, I introduce a weak convergence correction factor in the star formation recipe, which allows one to approximate the fully converged solution with finite-resolution simulations. The accuracy of weakly converged simulations approaches a comparable, ∼20% level of precision for star formation histories of individual galactic halos and other galactic properties that are directly related to star formation rates, such as stellar masses and metallicities. Yet other properties of model galaxies, for example, their H i masses, are recovered in the weakly converged runs only within a factor of 2.

  1. Cosmic Reionization On Computers: Numerical and Physical Convergence

    SciTech Connect

    Gnedin, Nickolay Y.

    2016-04-01

    In this paper I show that simulations of reionization performed under the Cosmic Reionization On Computers (CROC) project do converge in space and mass, albeit rather slowly. A fully converged solution (for a given star formation and feedback model) can be determined at a level of precision of about 20%, but such a solution is useless in practice, since achieving it in production-grade simulations would require a large set of runs at various mass and spatial resolutions, and computational resources for such an undertaking are not yet readily available. In order to make progress in the interim, I introduce a weak convergence correction factor in the star formation recipe, which allows one to approximate the fully converged solution with finite resolution simulations. The accuracy of weakly converged simulations approaches a comparable, ~20% level of precision for star formation histories of individual galactic halos and other galactic properties that are directly related to star formation rates, like stellar masses and metallicities. Yet other properties of model galaxies, for example, their HI masses, are recovered in the weakly converged runs only within a factor of two.

  2. Cosmic Reionization On Computers: Numerical and Physical Convergence

    DOE PAGES

    Gnedin, Nickolay Y.

    2016-04-01

    In this paper I show that simulations of reionization performed under the Cosmic Reionization On Computers (CROC) project do converge in space and mass, albeit rather slowly. A fully converged solution (for a given star formation and feedback model) can be determined at a level of precision of about 20%, but such a solution is useless in practice, since achieving it in production-grade simulations would require a large set of runs at various mass and spatial resolutions, and computational resources for such an undertaking are not yet readily available. In order to make progress in the interim, I introduce amore » weak convergence correction factor in the star formation recipe, which allows one to approximate the fully converged solution with finite resolution simulations. The accuracy of weakly converged simulations approaches a comparable, ~20% level of precision for star formation histories of individual galactic halos and other galactic properties that are directly related to star formation rates, like stellar masses and metallicities. Yet other properties of model galaxies, for example, their HI masses, are recovered in the weakly converged runs only within a factor of two.« less

  3. Cosmic Reionization on Computers: Numerical and Physical Convergence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gnedin, Nickolay Y.

    2016-04-01

    In this paper I show that simulations of reionization performed under the Cosmic Reionization On Computers project do converge in space and mass, albeit rather slowly. A fully converged solution (for a given star formation and feedback model) can be determined at a level of precision of about 20%, but such a solution is useless in practice, since achieving it in production-grade simulations would require a large set of runs at various mass and spatial resolutions, and computational resources for such an undertaking are not yet readily available. In order to make progress in the interim, I introduce a weak convergence correction factor in the star formation recipe, which allows one to approximate the fully converged solution with finite-resolution simulations. The accuracy of weakly converged simulations approaches a comparable, ~20% level of precision for star formation histories of individual galactic halos and other galactic properties that are directly related to star formation rates, such as stellar masses and metallicities. Yet other properties of model galaxies, for example, their H i masses, are recovered in the weakly converged runs only within a factor of 2.

  4. Numerical solutions of acoustic wave propagation problems using Euler computations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hariharan, S. I.

    1984-01-01

    This paper reports solution procedures for problems arising from the study of engine inlet wave propagation. The first problem is the study of sound waves radiated from cylindrical inlets. The second one is a quasi-one-dimensional problem to study the effect of nonlinearities and the third one is the study of nonlinearities in two dimensions. In all three problems Euler computations are done with a fourth-order explicit scheme. For the first problem results are shown in agreement with experimental data and for the second problem comparisons are made with an existing asymptotic theory. The third problem is part of an ongoing work and preliminary results are presented for this case.

  5. Scientific visualization for solar concentrating systems: Computer simulation program for visual and numerical analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Baum, I.V.

    1996-11-01

    The Computer Simulation Program for Visual and Numerical Analysis of Solar Concentrators (VNASC) and specified scientific visualization methods for computer modeling of solar concentrating systems are described. The program has two code versions (FORTRAN and C++). It visualizes a concentrating process and takes into account geometrical factors and errors, including Gauss errors of reflecting surfaces, facets` alignment errors, and suntracking errors.

  6. Study of Some Numerical Phenomena Intervening in the Computer Simulations of Some Physical Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iordache, D. A.; Delsanto, P. P.; Iordache, V.

    2007-04-01

    The mechanisms of the computing schemes leading to the main numerical phenomena: instabilities, divergence or pseudo-convergence, distortions, as well as of the stability and convergence radii, and of the optimization possibilities of the computer simulations of some physical processes were studied by this work.

  7. Application of a numerical differencing analyzer computer program to a Modular Integrated Utility System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brandli, A. E.; Donham, C. F.

    1974-01-01

    This paper describes the application of a numerical differencing analyzer computer program to the thermal analyzation of a MIUS model. The MIUS model which was evaluated is one which would be required to support a 648-unit Garden Apartment Complex. This computer program was capable of predicting the thermal performance of this MIUS from the impressed electrical, heating, and cooling loads.

  8. An efficient numerical algorithm for computing densely distributed positive interior transmission eigenvalues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Tiexiang; Huang, Tsung-Ming; Lin, Wen-Wei; Wang, Jenn-Nan

    2017-03-01

    We propose an efficient eigensolver for computing densely distributed spectra of the two-dimensional transmission eigenvalue problem (TEP), which is derived from Maxwell’s equations with Tellegen media and the transverse magnetic mode. The governing equations, when discretized by the standard piecewise linear finite element method, give rise to a large-scale quadratic eigenvalue problem (QEP). Our numerical simulation shows that half of the positive eigenvalues of the QEP are densely distributed in some interval near the origin. The quadratic Jacobi-Davidson method with a so-called non-equivalence deflation technique is proposed to compute the dense spectrum of the QEP. Extensive numerical simulations show that our proposed method processes the convergence efficiently, even when it needs to compute more than 5000 desired eigenpairs. Numerical results also illustrate that the computed eigenvalue curves can be approximated by nonlinear functions, which can be applied to estimate the denseness of the eigenvalues for the TEP.

  9. Numerical computation of the sensitivity kernel for monitoring weak changes with multiply scattered acoustic waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanu, Chinaemerem; Snieder, Roel

    2015-12-01

    Monitoring of weak localized changes within a medium using coda waves, we can either use the decorrelation and/or the phase shift of the coda waves. The formulation for both the decorrelation and the phase shift of the coda waves due to weak changes contain a common sensitivity kernel that is needed to image the weak localized changes. We provide a novel approach to compute the sensitivity kernel which uses finite difference modelling of the wavefields from the source and the receiver with an a priori scattering model. These wavefields give the intensities needed to compute the sensitivity kernels. This approach unlike methods that computes the sensitivity kernel with analytical approximations of the scattered intensity computes the numerical solution of the scattered intensity with a prior scattering model. The numerical solution of the sensitivity kernel allows us to use an arbitrary earth model that includes a free surface without simplifying the property of the scattering model. We demonstrate the computation of the numerical sensitivity kernel within statistically heterogeneous models and models with irregular topography. The statistically heterogeneous models we explore include a simple model for vertically fractured and horizontally layered shale reservoirs. We compare the impact of either the horizontal or the vertical source-receiver configuration on the characteristics of the sensitivity kernel. All computations of the numerical kernel we present in this study use 2-D heterogeneous scattering models, however, the kernel computation is easily extended to 3-D scattering models.

  10. La Granja: A Beowulf type Computer for Numerical Simulations in Stellar and Galactic Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velázquez, H.; Aguilar, L. A.

    We present a Beowulf type computer built using off-the-shelf hardware and freely available software. Its performance in raw computational power and parallel efficiency is compared with an SGI Origin-2000 computer using two different N-body codes. The impact of this technology in opening up the possibility of making routine N ~ 10^6 particle simulations with a ``home made'' computer is discussed. The effect of higher numerical resolution is shown with simulations of a cold dissipationless collapse and of the vertical heating of the disk component of a spiral galaxy evolving in isolation.

  11. Computational experiment on the numerical solution of some inverse problems of mathematical physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasil'ev, V. I.; Kardashevsky, A. M.; Sivtsev, PV

    2016-11-01

    In this article the computational experiment on the numerical solution of the most popular linear inverse problems for equations of mathematical physics are presented. The discretization of retrospective inverse problem for parabolic equation is performed using difference scheme with non-positive weight multiplier. Similar difference scheme is also used for the numerical solution of Cauchy problem for two-dimensional Laplace equation. The results of computational experiment, performed on model problems with exact solution, including ones with randomly perturbed input data are presented and discussed.

  12. Vectorization on the star computer of several numerical methods for a fluid flow problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lambiotte, J. J., Jr.; Howser, L. M.

    1974-01-01

    A reexamination of some numerical methods is considered in light of the new class of computers which use vector streaming to achieve high computation rates. A study has been made of the effect on the relative efficiency of several numerical methods applied to a particular fluid flow problem when they are implemented on a vector computer. The method of Brailovskaya, the alternating direction implicit method, a fully implicit method, and a new method called partial implicitization have been applied to the problem of determining the steady state solution of the two-dimensional flow of a viscous imcompressible fluid in a square cavity driven by a sliding wall. Results are obtained for three mesh sizes and a comparison is made of the methods for serial computation.

  13. Some remarks on the numerical computation of integrals on an unbounded interval

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capobianco, M.; Criscuolo, G.

    2007-08-01

    An account of the error and the convergence theory is given for Gauss?Laguerre and Gauss?Radau?Laguerre quadrature formulae. We develop also truncated models of the original Gauss rules to compute integrals extended over the positive real axis. Numerical examples confirming the theoretical results are given comparing these rules among themselves and with different quadrature formulae proposed by other authors (Evans, Int. J. Comput. Math. 82:721?730, 2005; Gautschi, BIT 31:438?446, 1991).

  14. Technology and Jobs: Computer-Aided Design. Numerical-Control Machine-Tool Operators. Office Automation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stanton, Michael; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Three reports on the effects of high technology on the nature of work include (1) Stanton on applications and implications of computer-aided design for engineers, drafters, and architects; (2) Nardone on the outlook and training of numerical-control machine tool operators; and (3) Austin and Drake on the future of clerical occupations in automated…

  15. CINDA-3G: Improved Numerical Differencing Analyzer Program for Third-Generation Computers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaski, J. D.; Lewis, D. R.; Thompson, L. R.

    1970-01-01

    The goal of this work was to develop a new and versatile program to supplement or replace the original Chrysler Improved Numerical Differencing Analyzer (CINDA) thermal analyzer program in order to take advantage of the improved systems software and machine speeds of the third-generation computers.

  16. The Improvement of Efficiency in the Numerical Computation of Orbit Trajectories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dyer, J.; Danchick, R.; Pierce, S.; Haney, R.

    1972-01-01

    An analysis, system design, programming, and evaluation of results are described for numerical computation of orbit trajectories. Evaluation of generalized methods, interaction of different formulations for satellite motion, transformation of equations of motion and integrator loads, and development of efficient integrators are also considered.

  17. Research in progress in applied mathematics, numerical analysis, and computer science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Research conducted at the Institute in Science and Engineering in applied mathematics, numerical analysis, and computer science is summarized. The Institute conducts unclassified basic research in applied mathematics in order to extend and improve problem solving capabilities in science and engineering, particularly in aeronautics and space.

  18. Technology and Jobs: Computer-Aided Design. Numerical-Control Machine-Tool Operators. Office Automation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stanton, Michael; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Three reports on the effects of high technology on the nature of work include (1) Stanton on applications and implications of computer-aided design for engineers, drafters, and architects; (2) Nardone on the outlook and training of numerical-control machine tool operators; and (3) Austin and Drake on the future of clerical occupations in automated…

  19. CNC Turning Center Advanced Operations. Computer Numerical Control Operator/Programmer. 444-332.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skowronski, Steven D.; Tatum, Kenneth

    This student guide provides materials for a course designed to introduce the student to the operations and functions of a two-axis computer numerical control (CNC) turning center. The course consists of seven units. Unit 1 presents course expectations and syllabus, covers safety precautions, and describes the CNC turning center components, CNC…

  20. CNC Turning Center Advanced Operations. Computer Numerical Control Operator/Programmer. 444-332.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skowronski, Steven D.; Tatum, Kenneth

    This student guide provides materials for a course designed to introduce the student to the operations and functions of a two-axis computer numerical control (CNC) turning center. The course consists of seven units. Unit 1 presents course expectations and syllabus, covers safety precautions, and describes the CNC turning center components, CNC…

  1. CNC Turning Center Operations and Prove Out. Computer Numerical Control Operator/Programmer. 444-334.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skowronski, Steven D.

    This student guide provides materials for a course designed to instruct the student in the recommended procedures used when setting up tooling and verifying part programs for a two-axis computer numerical control (CNC) turning center. The course consists of seven units. Unit 1 discusses course content and reviews and demonstrates set-up procedures…

  2. CNC Turning Center Operations and Prove Out. Computer Numerical Control Operator/Programmer. 444-334.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skowronski, Steven D.

    This student guide provides materials for a course designed to instruct the student in the recommended procedures used when setting up tooling and verifying part programs for a two-axis computer numerical control (CNC) turning center. The course consists of seven units. Unit 1 discusses course content and reviews and demonstrates set-up procedures…

  3. Verifying the error bound of numerical computation implemented in computer systems

    DOEpatents

    Sawada, Jun

    2013-03-12

    A verification tool receives a finite precision definition for an approximation of an infinite precision numerical function implemented in a processor in the form of a polynomial of bounded functions. The verification tool receives a domain for verifying outputs of segments associated with the infinite precision numerical function. The verification tool splits the domain into at least two segments, wherein each segment is non-overlapping with any other segment and converts, for each segment, a polynomial of bounded functions for the segment to a simplified formula comprising a polynomial, an inequality, and a constant for a selected segment. The verification tool calculates upper bounds of the polynomial for the at least two segments, beginning with the selected segment and reports the segments that violate a bounding condition.

  4. Decoupled time-marching schemes in computational cardiac electrophysiology and ECG numerical simulation.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Miguel A; Zemzemi, Nejib

    2010-07-01

    This work considers the approximation of the cardiac bidomain equations, either isolated or coupled with the torso, via first order semi-implicit time-marching schemes involving a fully decoupled computation of the unknown fields (ionic state, transmembrane potential, extracellular and torso potentials). For the isolated bidomain system, we show that the Gauss-Seidel and Jacobi like splittings do not compromise energy stability; they simply alter the energy norm. Within the framework of the numerical simulation of electrocardiograms (ECG), these bidomain splittings are combined with an explicit Robin-Robin treatment of the heart-torso coupling conditions. We show that the resulting schemes allow a fully decoupled (energy) stable computation of the heart and torso fields, under an additional hyperbolic-CFL like condition. The accuracy and convergence rate of the considered schemes are investigated numerically with a series of numerical experiments.

  5. Numerical Computation of Mass Transport in Low Reynolds Number Flows and the Concentration Boundary Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Licata, Nicholas A.; Fuller, Nathaniel J.

    Understanding the physical mechanisms by which an individual cell interacts with its environment often requires detailed information about the fluid in which the cell is immersed. Mass transport between the interior of the cell and the external environment is influenced by the flow of the extracellular fluid and the molecular diffusivity. Analytical calculations of the flow field are challenging in simple geometries, and not generally available in more realistic cases with irregular domain boundaries. Motivated by these problems, we discuss the numerical solution of Stokes equation by implementing a Gauss-Seidel algorithm on a staggered computational grid. The computed velocity profile is used as input to numerically solve the advection-diffusion equation for mass transport. Special attention is paid to the case of two-dimensional flows at large Péclet number. The numerical results are compared with a perturbative analytical treatment of the concentration boundary layer.

  6. A Numerical Scheme for Computing Stable and Unstable Manifolds in Nonautonomous Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balasuriya, Sanjeeva

    2016-12-01

    There are many methods for computing stable and unstable manifolds in autonomous flows. When the flow is nonautonomous, however, difficulties arise since the hyperbolic trajectory to which these manifolds are anchored, and the local manifold emanation directions, are changing with time. This article utilizes recent results which approximate the time-variation of both these quantities to design a numerical algorithm which can obtain high resolution in global nonautonomous stable and unstable manifolds. In particular, good numerical approximation is possible locally near the anchor trajectory. Nonautonomous manifolds are computed for two examples: a Rossby wave situation which is highly chaotic, and a nonautonomus (time-aperiodic) Duffing oscillator model in which the manifold emanation directions are rapidly changing. The numerical method is validated and analyzed in these cases using finite-time Lyapunov exponent fields and exactly known nonautonomous manifolds.

  7. Review of The SIAM 100-Digit Challenge: A Study in High-Accuracy Numerical Computing

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, David

    2005-01-25

    In the January 2002 edition of SIAM News, Nick Trefethen announced the '$100, 100-Digit Challenge'. In this note he presented ten easy-to-state but hard-to-solve problems of numerical analysis, and challenged readers to find each answer to ten-digit accuracy. Trefethen closed with the enticing comment: 'Hint: They're hard! If anyone gets 50 digits in total, I will be impressed.' This challenge obviously struck a chord in hundreds of numerical mathematicians worldwide, as 94 teams from 25 nations later submitted entries. Many of these submissions exceeded the target of 50 correct digits; in fact, 20 teams achieved a perfect score of 100 correct digits. Trefethen had offered $100 for the best submission. Given the overwhelming response, a generous donor (William Browning, founder of Applied Mathematics, Inc.) provided additional funds to provide a $100 award to each of the 20 winning teams. Soon after the results were out, four participants, each from a winning team, got together and agreed to write a book about the problems and their solutions. The team is truly international: Bornemann is from Germany, Laurie is from South Africa, Wagon is from the USA, and Waldvogel is from Switzerland. This book provides some mathematical background for each problem, and then shows in detail how each of them can be solved. In fact, multiple solution techniques are mentioned in each case. The book describes how to extend these solutions to much larger problems and much higher numeric precision (hundreds or thousands of digit accuracy). The authors also show how to compute error bounds for the results, so that one can say with confidence that one's results are accurate to the level stated. Numerous numerical software tools are demonstrated in the process, including the commercial products Mathematica, Maple and Matlab. Computer programs that perform many of the algorithms mentioned in the book are provided, both in an appendix to the book and on a website. In the process, the

  8. Summary of research conducted at the Institute for Computer Applications in Science and Engineering in applied mathematics, numerical analysis and computer science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    Research conducted at the Institute for Computer Applications in Science and Engineering in applied mathematics, numerical analysis, and computer science during the period October 1, 1988 through March 31, 1989 is summarized.

  9. Summary of research in applied mathematics, numerical analysis and computer science at the Institute for Computer Applications in Science and Engineering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    Research conducted at the Institute for Computer Applications in Science and Engineering in applied mathematics, numerical analysis and computer science during the period October 1, 1983 through March 31, 1984 is summarized.

  10. Current research activities: Applied and numerical mathematics, fluid mechanics, experiments in transition and turbulence and aerodynamics, and computer science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    Research conducted at the Institute for Computer Applications in Science and Engineering in applied mathematics, numerical analysis, fluid mechanics including fluid dynamics, acoustics, and combustion, aerodynamics, and computer science during the period 1 Apr. 1992 - 30 Sep. 1992 is summarized.

  11. A comparison of digital computer programs for the numerical solution of ordinary differential equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ingram, H. L.

    1973-01-01

    Recently the determination of the best technique for numerically solving systems of ordinary differential equations on a digital computer has received much attention. The use of these formulas in conjunction with a stepsize control developed is explained, and one of the formulas is chosen for comparison with other integration techniques. This comparison of one of the best of Fehlberg's formulas with the different numerical techniques described in previous studies on a variety of test problems clearly shows the superiority of Fehlberg's formula. That is, on each of the test problems, the chosen Fehlberg formula is able to achieve a given accuracy in less computer time than any of the other techniques tested. Also, the computer program for the chosen Fehlberg formula is less complex and easier to use than the computer programs for most of the other techniques. To illustrate the use of the chosen Fehlberg formula, a computer listing of its application to several example problems is included along with a sample of the computer output from these applications.

  12. Development of simulation tools for numerical investigation and computer-aided design (CAD) of gyrotrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damyanova, M.; Sabchevski, S.; Zhelyazkov, I.; Vasileva, E.; Balabanova, E.; Dankov, P.; Malinov, P.

    2016-10-01

    As the most powerful CW sources of coherent radiation in the sub-terahertz to terahertz frequency range the gyrotrons have demonstrated a remarkable potential for numerous novel and prospective applications in the fundamental physical research and the technologies. Among them are powerful gyrotrons for electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH) and current drive (ECCD) of magnetically confined plasma in various reactors for controlled thermonuclear fusion (e.g., tokamaks and most notably ITER), high-frequency gyrotrons for sub-terahertz spectroscopy (for example NMR-DNP, XDMR, study of the hyperfine structure of positronium, etc.), gyrotrons for thermal processing and so on. Modelling and simulation are indispensable tools for numerical studies, computer-aided design (CAD) and optimization of such sophisticated vacuum tubes (fast-wave devices) operating on a physical principle known as electron cyclotron resonance maser (ECRM) instability. During the recent years, our research team has been involved in the development of physical models and problem-oriented software packages for numerical analysis and CAD of different gyrotrons in the framework of a broad international collaboration. In this paper we present the current status of our simulation tools (GYROSIM and GYREOSS packages) and illustrate their functionality by results of numerical experiments carried out recently. Finally, we provide an outlook on the envisaged further development of the computer codes and the computational modules belonging to these packages and specialized to different subsystems of the gyrotrons.

  13. Re-Computation of Numerical Results Contained in NACA Report No. 496

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perry, Boyd, III

    2015-01-01

    An extensive examination of NACA Report No. 496 (NACA 496), "General Theory of Aerodynamic Instability and the Mechanism of Flutter," by Theodore Theodorsen, is described. The examination included checking equations and solution methods and re-computing interim quantities and all numerical examples in NACA 496. The checks revealed that NACA 496 contains computational shortcuts (time- and effort-saving devices for engineers of the time) and clever artifices (employed in its solution methods), but, unfortunately, also contains numerous tripping points (aspects of NACA 496 that have the potential to cause confusion) and some errors. The re-computations were performed employing the methods and procedures described in NACA 496, but using modern computational tools. With some exceptions, the magnitudes and trends of the original results were in fair-to-very-good agreement with the re-computed results. The exceptions included what are speculated to be computational errors in the original in some instances and transcription errors in the original in others. Independent flutter calculations were performed and, in all cases, including those where the original and re-computed results differed significantly, were in excellent agreement with the re-computed results. Appendix A contains NACA 496; Appendix B contains a Matlab(Reistered) program that performs the re-computation of results; Appendix C presents three alternate solution methods, with examples, for the two-degree-of-freedom solution method of NACA 496; Appendix D contains the three-degree-of-freedom solution method (outlined in NACA 496 but never implemented), with examples.

  14. Numerical simulation of free shear flows: Towards a predictive computational aeroacoustics capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soh, W. Y.

    1993-01-01

    Implicit and explicit spatial differencing techniques with fourth order accuracy have been developed. The implicit technique is based on the Pade compact scheme. A Dispersion Relation Preserving concept has been incorporated into both of the numerical schemes. Two dimensional Euler computation of a spatially-developing free shear flow, with and without external excitation, has been performed to demonstrate the capability of numerical schemes developed. Results are in good agreement with theory and experimental observation regarding the growth rate of fluctuating velocity, the convective velocity, and the vortex-pairing process.

  15. Numerical characterization of nonlinear dynamical systems using parallel computing: The role of GPUS approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fazanaro, Filipe I.; Soriano, Diogo C.; Suyama, Ricardo; Madrid, Marconi K.; Oliveira, José Raimundo de; Muñoz, Ignacio Bravo; Attux, Romis

    2016-08-01

    The characterization of nonlinear dynamical systems and their attractors in terms of invariant measures, basins of attractions and the structure of their vector fields usually outlines a task strongly related to the underlying computational cost. In this work, the practical aspects related to the use of parallel computing - specially the use of Graphics Processing Units (GPUS) and of the Compute Unified Device Architecture (CUDA) - are reviewed and discussed in the context of nonlinear dynamical systems characterization. In this work such characterization is performed by obtaining both local and global Lyapunov exponents for the classical forced Duffing oscillator. The local divergence measure was employed by the computation of the Lagrangian Coherent Structures (LCSS), revealing the general organization of the flow according to the obtained separatrices, while the global Lyapunov exponents were used to characterize the attractors obtained under one or more bifurcation parameters. These simulation sets also illustrate the required computation time and speedup gains provided by different parallel computing strategies, justifying the employment and the relevance of GPUS and CUDA in such extensive numerical approach. Finally, more than simply providing an overview supported by a representative set of simulations, this work also aims to be a unified introduction to the use of the mentioned parallel computing tools in the context of nonlinear dynamical systems, providing codes and examples to be executed in MATLAB and using the CUDA environment, something that is usually fragmented in different scientific communities and restricted to specialists on parallel computing strategies.

  16. Numerical computations of supersonic base flow with special emphasis on turbulence modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahu, Jubaraj

    1994-07-01

    One of the important parameters in the design of shells is the total aerodynamic drag. The base drag component is a large part and can be as high as 50% or more of the total drag. Therefore, it is necessary to predict the base pressure as accurately as possible. The ability to compute the base region flowfield for projectiles using Navier-Stokes computational techniques has been developed. The basic configuration used in this study is a cylindrical afterbody. Numerical flowfield computations have been performed at M(sub infinity) = 2.46 and at 0-deg angle of attack. Various turbulence models (two algebraic models and a two-equation model) are used in the base flow region. Details of the flowfield such as the Mach number contours and base pressure distributions are presented. Computed base pressure distributions are compared with available experimental data for the same conditions and the same configuration.

  17. Computational flow development for unsteady viscous flows: Foundation of the numerical method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bratanow, T.; Spehert, T.

    1978-01-01

    A procedure is presented for effective consideration of viscous effects in computational development of high Reynolds number flows. The procedure is based on the interpretation of the Navier-Stokes equations as vorticity transport equations. The physics of the flow was represented in a form suitable for numerical analysis. Lighthill's concept for flow development for computational purposes was adapted. The vorticity transport equations were cast in a form convenient for computation. A statement for these equations was written using the method of weighted residuals and applying the Galerkin criterion. An integral representation of the induced velocity was applied on the basis of the Biot-Savart law. Distribution of new vorticity, produced at wing surfaces over small computational time intervals, was assumed to be confined to a thin region around the wing surfaces.

  18. An efficient approach for computing the geometrical optics field reflected from a numerically specified surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mittra, R.; Rushdi, A.

    1979-01-01

    An approach for computing the geometrical optic fields reflected from a numerically specified surface is presented. The approach includes the step of deriving a specular point and begins with computing the reflected rays off the surface at the points where their coordinates, as well as the partial derivatives (or equivalently, the direction of the normal), are numerically specified. Then, a cluster of three adjacent rays are chosen to define a 'mean ray' and the divergence factor associated with this mean ray. Finally, the ampilitude, phase, and vector direction of the reflected field at a given observation point are derived by associating this point with the nearest mean ray and determining its position relative to such a ray.

  19. Problem-Oriented Simulation Packages and Computational Infrastructure for Numerical Studies of Powerful Gyrotrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damyanova, M.; Sabchevski, S.; Zhelyazkov, I.; Vasileva, E.; Balabanova, E.; Dankov, P.; Malinov, P.

    2016-05-01

    Powerful gyrotrons are necessary as sources of strong microwaves for electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH) and electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD) of magnetically confined plasmas in various reactors (most notably ITER) for controlled thermonuclear fusion. Adequate physical models and efficient problem-oriented software packages are essential tools for numerical studies, analysis, optimization and computer-aided design (CAD) of such high-performance gyrotrons operating in a CW mode and delivering output power of the order of 1-2 MW. In this report we present the current status of our simulation tools (physical models, numerical codes, pre- and post-processing programs, etc.) as well as the computational infrastructure on which they are being developed, maintained and executed.

  20. Multiresolution Wavelet Based Adaptive Numerical Dissipation Control for Shock-Turbulence Computations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sjoegreen, B.; Yee, H. C.

    2001-01-01

    The recently developed essentially fourth-order or higher low dissipative shock-capturing scheme of Yee, Sandham and Djomehri (1999) aimed at minimizing nu- merical dissipations for high speed compressible viscous flows containing shocks, shears and turbulence. To detect non smooth behavior and control the amount of numerical dissipation to be added, Yee et al. employed an artificial compression method (ACM) of Harten (1978) but utilize it in an entirely different context than Harten originally intended. The ACM sensor consists of two tuning parameters and is highly physical problem dependent. To minimize the tuning of parameters and physical problem dependence, new sensors with improved detection properties are proposed. The new sensors are derived from utilizing appropriate non-orthogonal wavelet basis functions and they can be used to completely switch to the extra numerical dissipation outside shock layers. The non-dissipative spatial base scheme of arbitrarily high order of accuracy can be maintained without compromising its stability at all parts of the domain where the solution is smooth. Two types of redundant non-orthogonal wavelet basis functions are considered. One is the B-spline wavelet (Mallat & Zhong 1992) used by Gerritsen and Olsson (1996) in an adaptive mesh refinement method, to determine regions where re nement should be done. The other is the modification of the multiresolution method of Harten (1995) by converting it to a new, redundant, non-orthogonal wavelet. The wavelet sensor is then obtained by computing the estimated Lipschitz exponent of a chosen physical quantity (or vector) to be sensed on a chosen wavelet basis function. Both wavelet sensors can be viewed as dual purpose adaptive methods leading to dynamic numerical dissipation control and improved grid adaptation indicators. Consequently, they are useful not only for shock-turbulence computations but also for computational aeroacoustics and numerical combustion. In addition, these

  1. Numerical Computation of the Matrix Riccati Equation for Heat Propagation during Space Shuttle Reentry.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-12-01

    to have the opportunity to study numerical analysis and computer systems. This thesis gave me a chance to apply that know- ledge to an important...scaling and squaring the Taylor series. OVERALL EVALUATION OF THE METHODS A large segment of the available project time was dedicated to studying the...previous section, MEXP2 calculated the Schur transformation UTUT . MEXP2 was reprogrammed several different ways over a period of two weeks, without

  2. Computational fluid dynamics at NASA Ames and the numerical aerodynamic simulation program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, V. L.

    1985-01-01

    Computers are playing an increasingly important role in the field of aerodynamics such as that they now serve as a major complement to wind tunnels in aerospace research and development. Factors pacing advances in computational aerodynamics are identified, including the amount of computational power required to take the next major step in the discipline. The four main areas of computational aerodynamics research at NASA Ames Research Center which are directed toward extending the state of the art are identified and discussed. Example results obtained from approximate forms of the governing equations are presented and discussed, both in the context of levels of computer power required and the degree to which they either further the frontiers of research or apply to programs of practical importance. Finally, the Numerical Aerodynamic Simulation Program--with its 1988 target of achieving a sustained computational rate of 1 billion floating-point operations per second--is discussed in terms of its goals, status, and its projected effect on the future of computational aerodynamics.

  3. Numerical simulation of the convective heat transfer on high-performance computing systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepanov, S. P.; Vasilyeva, M. V.; Vasilyev, V. I.

    2016-10-01

    In this work, we consider a coupled system of equations for the convective heat transfer and flow problems, which describes the processes of the natural or forced convection in some bounded area. Mathematical model include the Navier-Stokes equation for flow and the heat transfer equation for the heat transfer. Numerical implementation is based on the finite element method, which allows to take into account the complex geometry of the modeled objects. For numerical stabilization of the convective heat transfer equation for high Peclet numbers, we use streamline upwinding Petrov-Galerkin (SUPG) method. The results of the numerical simulations are presented for the 2D formulation. As the test problems, we consider the flow and heat transfer problems in technical construction under the conditions of heat sources and influence of air temperature. We couple this formulation with heat transfer problem in the surrounding grounds and investigate the influence of the technical construction to the ground in condition of the permafrost and the influence of the grounds to the temperature distribution in the construction. Numerical computation are performed on the computational cluster of the North-Eastern Federal University.

  4. Computationally Efficient Numerical Model for the Evolution of Directional Ocean Surface Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malej, M.; Choi, W.; Goullet, A.

    2011-12-01

    The main focus of this work has been the asymptotic and numerical modeling of weakly nonlinear ocean surface wave fields. In particular, a development of an efficient numerical model for the evolution of nonlinear ocean waves, including extreme waves known as Rogue/Freak waves, is of direct interest. Due to their elusive and destructive nature, the media often portrays Rogue waves as unimaginatively huge and unpredictable monsters of the sea. To address some of these concerns, derivations of reduced phase-resolving numerical models, based on the small wave steepness assumption, are presented and their corresponding numerical simulations via Fourier pseudo-spectral methods are discussed. The simulations are initialized with a well-known JONSWAP wave spectrum and different angular distributions are employed. Both deterministic and Monte-Carlo ensemble average simulations were carried out. Furthermore, this work concerns the development of a new computationally efficient numerical model for the short term prediction of evolving weakly nonlinear ocean surface waves. The derivations are originally based on the work of West et al. (1987) and since the waves in the ocean tend to travel primarily in one direction, the aforementioned new numerical model is derived with an additional assumption of a weak transverse dependence. In turn, comparisons of the ensemble averaged randomly initialized spectra, as well as deterministic surface-to-surface correlations are presented. The new model is shown to behave well in various directional wave fields and can potentially be a candidate for computationally efficient prediction and propagation of extreme ocean surface waves - Rogue/Freak waves.

  5. Computational model for supporting SHM systems design: Damage identification via numerical analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sartorato, Murilo; de Medeiros, Ricardo; Vandepitte, Dirk; Tita, Volnei

    2017-02-01

    This work presents a computational model to simulate thin structures monitored by piezoelectric sensors in order to support the design of SHM systems, which use vibration based methods. Thus, a new shell finite element model was proposed and implemented via a User ELement subroutine (UEL) into the commercial package ABAQUS™. This model was based on a modified First Order Shear Theory (FOST) for piezoelectric composite laminates. After that, damaged cantilever beams with two piezoelectric sensors in different positions were investigated by using experimental analyses and the proposed computational model. A maximum difference in the magnitude of the FRFs between numerical and experimental analyses of 7.45% was found near the resonance regions. For damage identification, different levels of damage severity were evaluated by seven damage metrics, including one proposed by the present authors. Numerical and experimental damage metrics values were compared, showing a good correlation in terms of tendency. Finally, based on comparisons of numerical and experimental results, it is shown a discussion about the potentials and limitations of the proposed computational model to be used for supporting SHM systems design.

  6. Numerical Computation of a Continuous-thrust State Transition Matrix Incorporating Accurate Hardware and Ephemeris Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellison, Donald; Conway, Bruce; Englander, Jacob

    2015-01-01

    A significant body of work exists showing that providing a nonlinear programming (NLP) solver with expressions for the problem constraint gradient substantially increases the speed of program execution and can also improve the robustness of convergence, especially for local optimizers. Calculation of these derivatives is often accomplished through the computation of spacecraft's state transition matrix (STM). If the two-body gravitational model is employed as is often done in the context of preliminary design, closed form expressions for these derivatives may be provided. If a high fidelity dynamics model, that might include perturbing forces such as the gravitational effect from multiple third bodies and solar radiation pressure is used then these STM's must be computed numerically. We present a method for the power hardward model and a full ephemeris model. An adaptive-step embedded eight order Dormand-Prince numerical integrator is discussed and a method for the computation of the time of flight derivatives in this framework is presented. The use of these numerically calculated derivatieves offer a substantial improvement over finite differencing in the context of a global optimizer. Specifically the inclusion of these STM's into the low thrust missiondesign tool chain in use at NASA Goddard Spaceflight Center allows for an increased preliminary mission design cadence.

  7. Virtual photons in imaginary time: Computing exact Casimir forces via standard numerical electromagnetism techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez, Alejandro; Ibanescu, Mihai; Joannopoulos, J. D.; Johnson, Steven G.; Iannuzzi, Davide

    2007-09-15

    We describe a numerical method to compute Casimir forces in arbitrary geometries, for arbitrary dielectric and metallic materials, with arbitrary accuracy (given sufficient computational resources). Our approach, based on well-established integration of the mean stress tensor evaluated via the fluctuation-dissipation theorem, is designed to directly exploit fast methods developed for classical computational electromagnetism, since it only involves repeated evaluation of the Green's function for imaginary frequencies (equivalently, real frequencies in imaginary time). We develop the approach by systematically examining various formulations of Casimir forces from the previous decades and evaluating them according to their suitability for numerical computation. We illustrate our approach with a simple finite-difference frequency-domain implementation, test it for known geometries such as a cylinder and a plate, and apply it to new geometries. In particular, we show that a pistonlike geometry of two squares sliding between metal walls, in both two and three dimensions with both perfect and realistic metallic materials, exhibits a surprising nonmonotonic ''lateral'' force from the walls.

  8. Numerical approach for solving kinetic equations in two-dimensional case on hybrid computational clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malkov, Ewgenij A.; Poleshkin, Sergey O.; Kudryavtsev, Alexey N.; Shershnev, Anton A.

    2016-10-01

    The paper presents the software implementation of the Boltzmann equation solver based on the deterministic finite-difference method. The solver allows one to carry out parallel computations of rarefied flows on a hybrid computational cluster with arbitrary number of central processor units (CPU) and graphical processor units (GPU). Employment of GPUs leads to a significant acceleration of the computations, which enables us to simulate two-dimensional flows with high resolution in a reasonable time. The developed numerical code was validated by comparing the obtained solutions with the Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) data. For this purpose the supersonic flow past a flat plate at zero angle of attack is used as a test case.

  9. International Symposium on Computational Electronics—Physical Modeling, Mathematical Theory, and Numerical Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yiming

    2007-12-01

    This symposium is an open forum for discussion on the current trends and future directions of physical modeling, mathematical theory, and numerical algorithm in electrical and electronic engineering. The goal is for computational scientists and engineers, computer scientists, applied mathematicians, physicists, and researchers to present their recent advances and exchange experience. We welcome contributions from researchers of academia and industry. All papers to be presented in this symposium have carefully been reviewed and selected. They include semiconductor devices, circuit theory, statistical signal processing, design optimization, network design, intelligent transportation system, and wireless communication. Welcome to this interdisciplinary symposium in International Conference of Computational Methods in Sciences and Engineering (ICCMSE 2007). Look forward to seeing you in Corfu, Greece!

  10. Numerical Simulation of Slinger Combustor Using 2-D Axisymmetric Computational Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Semin; Park, Soo Hyung; Lee, Donghun

    2010-06-01

    Small-size turbojet engines have difficulties in maintaining the chemical reaction due to the limitation of chamber size. The combustion chamber is generally designed to improve the reaction efficiency by the generation of vortices in the chamber and to enhance air-fuel mixing characteristics. In the initial stage of designing the combustor, analysis of the 3-D full configuration is not practical due to the huge time consuming computation and grid generation followed by modifications of the geometry. In the present paper, an axisymmetric model maintaining geometric similarity and flow characteristic of 3-D configuration is developed. Based on numerical results from the full 3-D configuration, model reduction is achieved toward 2-D axisymmetric configuration. In the modeling process, the area and location of each hole in 3-D full configuration are considered reasonably and replaced to the 2-D axisymmetric model. By using the 2-D axisymmetric model, the factor that can affect the performance is investigated with the assumption that the flow is non-reacting and turbulent. Numerical results from the present model show a good agreement with numerical results from 3-D full configuration model such as existence of vortex pair in forward region and total pressure loss. By simplifying the complex 3-D model, computing time can be remarkably reduced and it makes easy to find effects of geometry modification.

  11. Computation of optimal unstable structures for a numerical weather prediction model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buizza, R.; Tribbia, J.; Molteni, F.; Palmer, T.

    1993-10-01

    Numerical experiments have been performed to compute the fastest growing perturbations in a finite time interval for a complex numerical weather prediction model. The models used are the tangent forward and adjoint versions of the adiabatic primitive-equation model of the Integrated Forecasting System developed at the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts and Météo France. These have been run with a horizontal truncation T21, with 19 vertical levels. The fastest growing perturbations are the singular vectors of the propagator of the forward tangent model with the largest singular values. An iterative Lanczos algorithm has been used for the numerical computation of the perturbations. Sensitivity of the calculations to different time intervals and to the norm used in the definition of the adjoint model have been analysed. The impact of normal mode initialization has also been studied. Two classes of fastest growing perturbations have been found; one is characterized by a maximum amplitude in the middle troposphere, while the other is confined to model layers close to the surface. It is shown that the latter is damped by the boundary layer physics in the full model. The linear evolution of the perturbations has been compared to the non-linear evolution when the perturbations are superimposed on a basic state in the T63, 19-level version of the ECMWF model.

  12. Numerically Exact Computer Simulations of Light Scattering by Densely Packed, Random Particulate Media

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dlugach, Janna M.; Mishchenko, Michael I.; Liu, Li; Mackowski, Daniel W.

    2011-01-01

    Direct computer simulations of electromagnetic scattering by discrete random media have become an active area of research. In this progress review, we summarize and analyze our main results obtained by means of numerically exact computer solutions of the macroscopic Maxwell equations. We consider finite scattering volumes with size parameters in the range, composed of varying numbers of randomly distributed particles with different refractive indices. The main objective of our analysis is to examine whether all backscattering effects predicted by the low-density theory of coherent backscattering (CB) also take place in the case of densely packed media. Based on our extensive numerical data we arrive at the following conclusions: (i) all backscattering effects predicted by the asymptotic theory of CB can also take place in the case of densely packed media; (ii) in the case of very large particle packing density, scattering characteristics of discrete random media can exhibit behavior not predicted by the low-density theories of CB and radiative transfer; (iii) increasing the absorptivity of the constituent particles can either enhance or suppress typical manifestations of CB depending on the particle packing density and the real part of the refractive index. Our numerical data strongly suggest that spectacular backscattering effects identified in laboratory experiments and observed for a class of high-albedo Solar System objects are caused by CB.

  13. What numerical models can and cannot tell us: Limitations on inferences in computational geomorphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van De Wiel, Marco

    2016-04-01

    Computer simulations and numerical experiments have become an increasingly important part of geomorphological investigation in the last decades. Process-based numerical models attempt to simulate real-world processes in a virtual environment which can be easily manipulated and studied. Conceptually, the experimental design of these simulation studies broadly falls in one of three categories: predictive modelling, explanatory modelling, and exploratory modelling. However, the epistemologies of these three modes of modelling are as of yet incomplete and not fully understood. Not only do the three modes of modelling have different underlying assumptions, they also have different criteria to establish validity and different limitations on the interpretations and inferences that can be made. These differences are usually only implicitly recognized, if at all, in computational geomorphology studies. This presentation provides an explicit, though not necessarily exhaustive, overview of the epistemological differences between the three modes of computational modelling, and of the limitations this imposes on what can and cannot be learned from simulation experiments.

  14. Numerical computation of the effective-one-body potential q using self-force results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akcay, Sarp; van de Meent, Maarten

    2016-03-01

    The effective-one-body theory (EOB) describes the conservative dynamics of compact binary systems in terms of an effective Hamiltonian approach. The Hamiltonian for moderately eccentric motion of two nonspinning compact objects in the extreme mass-ratio limit is given in terms of three potentials: a (v ) , d ¯ (v ) , q (v ) . By generalizing the first law of mechanics for (nonspinning) black hole binaries to eccentric orbits, [A. Le Tiec, Phys. Rev. D 92, 084021 (2015).] recently obtained new expressions for d ¯(v ) and q (v ) in terms of quantities that can be readily computed using the gravitational self-force approach. Using these expressions we present a new computation of the EOB potential q (v ) by combining results from two independent numerical self-force codes. We determine q (v ) for inverse binary separations in the range 1 /1200 ≤v ≲1 /6 . Our computation thus provides the first-ever strong-field results for q (v ) . We also obtain d ¯ (v ) in our entire domain to a fractional accuracy of ≳10-8 . We find that our results are compatible with the known post-Newtonian expansions for d ¯(v ) and q (v ) in the weak field, and agree with previous (less accurate) numerical results for d ¯(v ) in the strong field.

  15. Optimizing numerical weather forecasting models for the CRAY-1 and cyber 205 computers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickinson, A.

    1982-06-01

    The Meteorological Office has recently acquired a Cyber 205 computer system which will be used to run large numerical models of the atmosphere and weather forecasting models. In particular a new operational forecast model has been developed for this computer and this is being coded to take full advantage of the vector capabilities of this machine. Development versions of this model have also been run on a Cray-1 at the European Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecasts. This has presented the opportunity to compare some of the features of these two computers. It is shown that in general numerical weather prediction models can be split into two sections, the dynamical and physical processes. In the dynamical processes the same operations are applied at every point in the integration domain and so these processes are readily vectorizable. However, the physical processes are conditional and intermittent in nature and use must be made of the mask/merge, compress/expand and gather/scatter class of instructions in order to vectorize these processes.

  16. Numerical computation of the EOB potential q using self-force results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akcay, Sarp; van de Meent, Maarten

    2015-12-01

    The effective-one-body theory (EOB) describes the conservative dynamics of compact binary systems in terms of an effective Hamiltonian approach. The Hamiltonian for moderately eccentric motion of two non-spinning compact objects in the extreme mass-ratio limit is given in terms of three potentials: $a(v), \\bar{d}(v), q(v)$. By generalizing the first law of mechanics for (non-spinning) black hole binaries to eccentric orbits, [\\prd{\\bf92}, 084021 (2015)] recently obtained new expressions for $\\bar{d}(v)$ and $q(v)$ in terms of quantities that can be readily computed using the gravitational self-force approach. Using these expressions we present a new computation of the EOB potential $q(v)$ by combining results from two independent numerical self-force codes. We determine $q(v)$ for inverse binary separations in the range $1/1200 \\le v \\lesssim 1/6$. Our computation thus provides the first-ever strong-field results for $q(v)$. We also obtain $\\bar{d}(v)$ in our entire domain to a fractional accuracy of $\\gtrsim 10^{-8}$. We find to our results are compatible with the known post-Newtonian expansions for $\\bar{d}(v)$ and $q(v)$ in the weak field, and agree with previous (less accurate) numerical results for $\\bar{d}(v)$ in the strong field.

  17. Numerical computation of three-dimensional blunt body flow fields with an impinging shock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holst, T. L.; Tannehill, J. C.

    1975-01-01

    A time-marching finite-difference method was used to solve the compressible Navier-Stokes equations for the three-dimensional wing-leading-edge shock impingement problem. The bow shock was treated as a discontinuity across which the exact shock jump conditions were applied. All interior shock layer detail such as shear layers, shock waves, jets, and the wall boundary layer were automatically captured in the solution. The impinging shock was introduced by discontinuously changing the freestream conditions across the intersection line at the bow shock. A special storage-saving procedure for sweeping through the finite-difference mesh was developed which reduces the required amount of computer storage by at least a factor of two without sacrificing the execution time. Numerical results are presented for infinite cylinder blunt body cases as well as the three-dimensional shock impingement case. The numerical results are compared with existing experimental and theoretical results.

  18. On the numerical computation of nonlinear force-free magnetic fields. [from solar photosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, S. T.; Sun, M. T.; Chang, H. M.; Hagyard, M. J.; Gary, G. A.

    1990-01-01

    An algorithm has been developed to extrapolate nonlinear force-free magnetic fields from the photosphere, given the proper boundary conditions. This paper presents the results of this work, describing the mathematical formalism that was developed, the numerical techniques employed, and comments on the stability criteria and accuracy developed for these numerical schemes. An analytical solution is used for a benchmark test; the results show that the computational accuracy for the case of a nonlinear force-free magnetic field was on the order of a few percent (less than 5 percent). This newly developed scheme was applied to analyze a solar vector magnetogram, and the results were compared with the results deduced from the classical potential field method. The comparison shows that additional physical features of the vector magnetogram were revealed in the nonlinear force-free case.

  19. SIVEH: Numerical Computing Simulation of Wireless Energy-Harvesting Sensor Nodes

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez, Antonio; Blanc, Sara; Climent, Salvador; Yuste, Pedro; Ors, Rafael

    2013-01-01

    The paper presents a numerical energy harvesting model for sensor nodes, SIVEH (Simulator I–V for EH), based on I–V hardware tracking. I–V tracking is demonstrated to be more accurate than traditional energy modeling techniques when some of the components present different power dissipation at either different operating voltages or drawn currents. SIVEH numerical computing allows fast simulation of long periods of time—days, weeks, months or years—using real solar radiation curves. Moreover, SIVEH modeling has been enhanced with sleep time rate dynamic adjustment, while seeking energy-neutral operation. This paper presents the model description, a functional verification and a critical comparison with the classic energy approach. PMID:24008287

  20. Numerical methods for the analysis of sampled-data systems and for the computation of system zeros

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodel, A. Scottedward

    1991-01-01

    MARSYAS is a computer aided control system design package for the simulation and analysis of open loop and closed loop dynamic systems. Outlined here is the numerical and theoretical basis of the MARSYAS functions developed during the summer of 1991. In particular, the numerical computation of the matrix exponential e(exp A) = I + A + A(exp 2)/2! + A(exp 3)/3! + ... and the numerical computation of the finite system zeros of a dynamic system (continuous time or discrete time) are presented.

  1. Interactive Graphics Utility for Army NEC (Numerical Electromagnetics Code) Automation (IGUANA). Computer Program Package.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-09-01

    STANDARDS-1963-A 4 . 1 1 1 1 ’ 1 ’I l 1 4r AD-A160 652 Contractor Report 307 September 1985 INTERACTIVE GRAPHICS UTILITY FOR ARMY NEC AUTOMATION ( IGUANA ...20363-5100 62543N NO8CM41 88509 I1I TITLE (owkide Securft Ci,,zifteaninV 191, INTERACTIVE GRAPHICS UTILITY FOR ARMY NFC AUTOMATION ( IGUANA , Computer...GROUP Sue-GROUP Numerical Electromagnetics Code (NEC) Subdecks .1’* The Interactive Graphics Utility for Army NEC Automation ( IGUANA ) is a system

  2. New Bifurcation Routes to Chaos of a Driven Current Filament in Semiconductors Simulated by Numerical Computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoki, K.; Mugibayashi, N.; Yamamoto, K.

    1986-01-01

    Bifurcation routes to chaos of a driven current filament in semiconductors have been investigated by numerical computation. Ths S-shaped current-voltage (J-E) characteristic is described by the modified Crandall's model. The catastrophic J-E curve induced by impact ionization of neutral donors is driven by an alternating electric field superimposed on d.c. bias E0. As a function of E0, the prototype of period-doubling bifurcation (Feigenbaum scenario) and intermittency are simulated. However, under the influences of joule heating and slow response of space charge, breakdown of the Feigenbaum scenario is found.

  3. Numerical ray-tracing approach with laser intensity distribution for LIDAR signal power function computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Guangyuan; Li, Song; Huang, Ke; Li, Zile; Zheng, Guoxing

    2016-10-01

    We have developed a new numerical ray-tracing approach for LIDAR signal power function computation, in which the light round-trip propagation is analyzed by geometrical optics and a simple experiment is employed to acquire the laser intensity distribution. It is relatively more accurate and flexible than previous methods. We emphatically discuss the relationship between the inclined angle and the dynamic range of detector output signal in biaxial LIDAR system. Results indicate that an appropriate negative angle can compress the signal dynamic range. This technique has been successfully proved by comparison with real measurements.

  4. Efficient numerical method for computation of thermohydrodynamics of laminar lubricating films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elrod, Harold G.

    1989-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe an accurate, yet economical, method for computing temperature effects in laminar lubricating films in two dimensions. The procedure presented here is a sequel to one presented in Leeds in 1986 that was carried out for the one-dimensional case. Because of the marked dependence of lubricant viscosity on temperature, the effect of viscosity variation both across and along a lubricating film can dwarf other deviations from ideal constant-property lubrication. In practice, a thermohydrodynamics program will involve simultaneous solution of the film lubrication problem, together with heat conduction in a solid, complex structure. The extent of computation required makes economy in numerical processing of utmost importance. In pursuit of such economy, we here use techniques similar to those for Gaussian quadrature. We show that, for many purposes, the use of just two properly positioned temperatures (Lobatto points) characterizes well the transverse temperature distribution.

  5. Non-numeric computation for high eccentricity orbits. [Earth satellite orbit perturbation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sridharan, R.; Renard, M. L.

    1975-01-01

    Geocentric orbits of large eccentricity (e = 0.9 to 0.95) are significantly perturbed in cislunar space by the sun and moon. The time-history of the height of perigee, subsequent to launch, is particularly critical. The determination of 'launch windows' is mostly concerned with preventing the height of perigee from falling below its low initial value before the mission lifetime has elapsed. Between the extremes of high accuracy digital integration of the equations of motion and of using an approximate, but very fast, stability criteria method, this paper is concerned with the developement of a method of intermediate complexity using non-numeric computation. The computer is used as the theory generator to generalize Lidov's theory using six osculating elements. Symbolic integration is completely automatized and the output is a set of condensed formulae well suited for repeated applications in launch window analysis. Examples of applications are given.

  6. Overview of the numerical and computational developments performed in the frame of the CATHARE 2 code

    SciTech Connect

    Barre, F.; Sun, C.; Dor, I.

    1995-12-31

    A new version of the French thermal-hydraulics safety code CATHARE 2 has been developed. It is a fast running version, able to take into account vector and parallel computing. It will be used as the thermal-hydraulics kernel of the new generation of full scope simulators and study simulators. One of the objectives is also to provide an advanced three-dimensional module with a high CPU-time performance. An effort has been performed to develop a three-step numerical method with a maximum level of implicitness. In the field of thermalhydraulics, new needs have been defined, especially for containment calculations. Second order schemes and turbulence models for two-phase flow are under development. Its last objective is to develop a code easy to couple with large system codes which deal, for example, with severe accident field. The structure of the new codes developed in the CEA allows to use parallel computing to manage this coupling.

  7. On the potential of computational methods and numerical simulation in ice mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergan, Pål G.; Cammaert, Gus; Skeie, Geir; Tharigopula, Venkatapathi

    2010-06-01

    This paper deals with the challenge of developing better methods and tools for analysing interaction between sea ice and structures and, in particular, to be able to calculate ice loads on these structures. Ice loads have traditionally been estimated using empirical data and "engineering judgment". However, it is believed that computational mechanics and advanced computer simulations of ice-structure interaction can play an important role in developing safer and more efficient structures, especially for irregular structural configurations. The paper explains the complexity of ice as a material in computational mechanics terms. Some key words here are large displacements and deformations, multi-body contact mechanics, instabilities, multi-phase materials, inelasticity, time dependency and creep, thermal effects, fracture and crushing, and multi-scale effects. The paper points towards the use of advanced methods like ALE formulations, mesh-less methods, particle methods, XFEM, and multi-domain formulations in order to deal with these challenges. Some examples involving numerical simulation of interaction and loads between level sea ice and offshore structures are presented. It is concluded that computational mechanics may prove to become a very useful tool for analysing structures in ice; however, much research is still needed to achieve satisfactory reliability and versatility of these methods.

  8. Computational time analysis of the numerical solution of 3D electrostatic Poisson's equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamboh, Shakeel Ahmed; Labadin, Jane; Rigit, Andrew Ragai Henri; Ling, Tech Chaw; Amur, Khuda Bux; Chaudhary, Muhammad Tayyab

    2015-05-01

    3D Poisson's equation is solved numerically to simulate the electric potential in a prototype design of electrohydrodynamic (EHD) ion-drag micropump. Finite difference method (FDM) is employed to discretize the governing equation. The system of linear equations resulting from FDM is solved iteratively by using the sequential Jacobi (SJ) and sequential Gauss-Seidel (SGS) methods, simulation results are also compared to examine the difference between the results. The main objective was to analyze the computational time required by both the methods with respect to different grid sizes and parallelize the Jacobi method to reduce the computational time. In common, the SGS method is faster than the SJ method but the data parallelism of Jacobi method may produce good speedup over SGS method. In this study, the feasibility of using parallel Jacobi (PJ) method is attempted in relation to SGS method. MATLAB Parallel/Distributed computing environment is used and a parallel code for SJ method is implemented. It was found that for small grid size the SGS method remains dominant over SJ method and PJ method while for large grid size both the sequential methods may take nearly too much processing time to converge. Yet, the PJ method reduces computational time to some extent for large grid sizes.

  9. Study on the reliable computation time of the numerical model using the sliding temporal correlation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yong; Wang, Pengfei; Huang, Gang

    2015-02-01

    A simple and useful method, the sliding temporal correlation (STC) analysis, is employed in the present work to investigate the predictable time (PT) of two typical chaotic numerical models (Lorenz system and Chen chaotic system) and reliable computing times (RCT) of an atmospheric general circulation model (ECHAM5). Through kinds of numerical experiments, results indicate that the maximal prediction time of Lorenz system (and Chen chaotic system) detected by STC method is coherent well with that by classical error limitation method, suggesting the effective role of the STC method. Then, taking the geopotential height for example, the RCT of ECHAM5 and potential impact factors such as the integration time step, initial condition, and model's resolution are explored. Results reveal that (1) the high-value areas of the RCT are mainly situated in the tropics, and the global mean RCT (GMRCT) decreases from with the time step increasing; (2) the ocean forcing can enlarge the difference of the RCT between that averaged over the Southern Hemisphere (SH) and Northern Hemisphere (NH), which implies the RCT in the NH may be more sensitive to the computation error than that in the SH; (3) the model's RCT also displays significant seasonality having longer (about 1-2 days) GMRCT in the experiment integrating from winter than that from summer; (4) the RCT of the high-resolution (T106) ECHAM5 shows similar spatial feature to that of low-resolution (T63) ECHAM5, but the GMRCT and hemispheric difference decreases.

  10. A numerical procedure to compute the stabilising solution of game theoretic Riccati equations of stochastic control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dragan, Vasile; Ivanov, Ivan

    2011-04-01

    In this article, the problem of the numerical computation of the stabilising solution of the game theoretic algebraic Riccati equation is investigated. The Riccati equation under consideration occurs in connection with the solution of the H ∞ control problem for a class of stochastic systems affected by state-dependent and control-dependent white noise and subjected to Markovian jumping. The stabilising solution of the considered game theoretic Riccati equation is obtained as a limit of a sequence of approximations constructed based on stabilising solutions of a sequence of algebraic Riccati equations of stochastic control with definite sign of the quadratic part. The proposed algorithm extends to this general framework the method proposed in Lanzon, Feng, Anderson, and Rotkowitz (Lanzon, A., Feng, Y., Anderson, B.D.O., and Rotkowitz, M. (2008), 'Computing the Positive Stabilizing Solution to Algebraic Riccati Equations with an Indefinite Quadratic Term Viaa Recursive Method,' IEEE Transactions on Automatic Control, 53, pp. 2280-2291). In the proof of the convergence of the proposed algorithm different concepts associated the generalised Lyapunov operators as stability, stabilisability and detectability are widely involved. The efficiency of the proposed algorithm is demonstrated by several numerical experiments.

  11. WATERLOPP V2/64: A highly parallel machine for numerical computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostlund, Neil S.

    1985-07-01

    Current technological trends suggest that the high performance scientific machines of the future are very likely to consist of a large number (greater than 1024) of processors connected and communicating with each other in some as yet undetermined manner. Such an assembly of processors should behave as a single machine in obtaining numerical solutions to scientific problems. However, the appropriate way of organizing both the hardware and software of such an assembly of processors is an unsolved and active area of research. It is particularly important to minimize the organizational overhead of interprocessor comunication, global synchronization, and contention for shared resources if the performance of a large number ( n) of processors is to be anything like the desirable n times the performance of a single processor. In many situations, adding a processor actually decreases the performance of the overall system since the extra organizational overhead is larger than the extra processing power added. The systolic loop architecture is a new multiple processor architecture which attemps at a solution to the problem of how to organize a large number of asynchronous processors into an effective computational system while minimizing the organizational overhead. This paper gives a brief overview of the basic systolic loop architecture, systolic loop algorithms for numerical computation, and a 64-processor implementation of the architecture, WATERLOOP V2/64, that is being used as a testbed for exploring the hardware, software, and algorithmic aspects of the architecture.

  12. Numerical methods for computing the ground state of spin-1 Bose-Einstein condensates in a uniform magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Lim, Fong Yin; Bao, Weizhu

    2008-12-01

    We propose efficient and accurate numerical methods for computing the ground-state solution of spin-1 Bose-Einstein condensates subjected to a uniform magnetic field. The key idea in designing the numerical method is based on the normalized gradient flow with the introduction of a third normalization condition, together with two physical constraints on the conservation of total mass and conservation of total magnetization. Different treatments of the Zeeman energy terms are found to yield different numerical accuracies and stabilities. Numerical comparison between different numerical schemes is made, and the best scheme is identified. The numerical scheme is then applied to compute the condensate ground state in a harmonic plus optical lattice potential, and the effect of the periodic potential, in particular to the relative population of each hyperfine component, is investigated through comparison to the condensate ground state in a pure harmonic trap.

  13. Numerical Study of Boundary Layer Interaction with Shocks: Method Improvement and Test Computation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, N. A.

    1995-01-01

    The objective is the development of a high-order and high-resolution method for the direct numerical simulation of shock turbulent-boundary-layer interaction. Details concerning the spatial discretization of the convective terms can be found in Adams and Shariff (1995). The computer code based on this method as introduced in Adams (1994) was formulated in Cartesian coordinates and thus has been limited to simple rectangular domains. For more general two-dimensional geometries, as a compression corner, an extension to generalized coordinates is necessary. To keep the requirements or limitations for grid generation low, the extended formulation should allow for non-orthogonal grids. Still, for simplicity and cost efficiency, periodicity can be assumed in one cross-flow direction. For easy vectorization, the compact-ENO coupling algorithm as used in Adams (1994) treated whole planes normal to the derivative direction with the ENO scheme whenever at least one point of this plane satisfied the detection criterion. This is apparently too restrictive for more general geometries and more complex shock patterns. Here we introduce a localized compact-ENO coupling algorithm, which is efficient as long as the overall number of grid points treated by the ENO scheme is small compared to the total number of grid points. Validation and test computations with the final code are performed to assess the efficiency and suitability of the computer code for the problems of interest. We define a set of parameters where a direct numerical simulation of a turbulent boundary layer along a compression corner with reasonably fine resolution is affordable.

  14. BOOK REVIEW: Advanced Topics in Computational Partial Differential Equations: Numerical Methods and Diffpack Programming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katsaounis, T. D.

    2005-02-01

    equations in Diffpack can be used to derive fully implicit solvers for systems. The proposed techniques are illustrated in terms of two applications, namely a system of PDEs modelling pipeflow and a two-phase porous media flow. Stochastic PDEs is the topic of chapter 7. The first part of the chapter is a simple introduction to stochastic PDEs; basic analytical properties are presented for simple models like transport phenomena and viscous drag forces. The second part considers the numerical solution of stochastic PDEs. Two basic techniques are presented, namely Monte Carlo and perturbation methods. The last part explains how to implement and incorporate these solvers into Diffpack. Chapter 8 describes how to operate Diffpack from Python scripts. The main goal here is to provide all the programming and technical details in order to glue the programming environment of Diffpack with visualization packages through Python and in general take advantage of the Python interfaces. Chapter 9 attempts to show how to use numerical experiments to measure the performance of various PDE solvers. The authors gathered a rather impressive list, a total of 14 PDE solvers. Solvers for problems like Poisson, Navier--Stokes, elasticity, two-phase flows and methods such as finite difference, finite element, multigrid, and gradient type methods are presented. The authors provide a series of numerical results combining various solvers with various methods in order to gain insight into their computational performance and efficiency. In Chapter 10 the authors consider a computationally challenging problem, namely the computation of the electrical activity of the human heart. After a brief introduction on the biology of the problem the authors present the mathematical models involved and a numerical method for solving them within the framework of Diffpack. Chapter 11 and 12 are closely related; actually they could have been combined in a single chapter. Chapter 11 introduces several mathematical

  15. Exact numerical computation of a kinetic energy operator in curvilinear coordinates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lauvergnat, David; Nauts, André

    2002-05-01

    The conformation and dynamical behavior of molecular systems is very often advantageously described in terms of physically well-adapted curvilinear coordinates. It is rather easy to show that the numerous analytical expressions of the kinetic energy operator of a molecular system described in terms of n curvilinear coordinates can all be transformed into the following more usable expression: T̂=∑ijf2ij(q)∂2/∂qi∂qj+∑if1i(q)∂/∂qi+ν(q), where f2ij(q), f1i(q), and ν(q) are functions of the curvilinear coordinates q=(…,qi,…). If the advantages of curvilinear coordinates are unquestionable, they do have a major drawback: the sometimes awful complexity of the analytical expression of the kinetic operator T̂ for molecular systems with more than five atoms. Therefore, we develop an algorithm for computing T̂ for a given value of the n curvilinear coordinates q. The calculation of the functions f2ij(q), f1i(q), and ν(q) only requires the knowledge of the Cartesian coordinates and their derivatives in terms of the n curvilinear coordinates. This coordinate transformation (curvilinear→Cartesian) is very easy to perform and is widely used in quantum chemistry codes resorting to a Z-matrix to define the curvilinear coordinates. Thus, the functions f2ij(q), f1i(q), and ν(q) can be evaluated numerically and exactly for a given value of q, which makes it possible to propagate wavepackets or to simulate the spectra of rather complex systems (constrained Hamiltonian). The accuracy of this numerical procedure is tested by comparing two calculations of the bending spectrum of HCN: the first one, performed by using the present numerical kinetic operator procedure, the second one, obtained in previous studies, by using an analytical kinetic operator. Finally, the ab initio computation of the internal rotation spectrum and wave functions of 2-methylpropanal by means of dimensionality reduction, is given as an original application.

  16. Interactive numerals

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Although Arabic numerals (like ‘2016’ and ‘3.14’) are ubiquitous, we show that in interactive computer applications they are often misleading and surprisingly unreliable. We introduce interactive numerals as a new concept and show, like Roman numerals and Arabic numerals, interactive numerals introduce another way of using and thinking about numbers. Properly understanding interactive numerals is essential for all computer applications that involve numerical data entered by users, including finance, medicine, aviation and science. PMID:28484609

  17. Using Linear Algebra to Introduce Computer Algebra, Numerical Analysis, Data Structures and Algorithms (and To Teach Linear Algebra, Too).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gonzalez-Vega, Laureano

    1999-01-01

    Using a Computer Algebra System (CAS) to help with the teaching of an elementary course in linear algebra can be one way to introduce computer algebra, numerical analysis, data structures, and algorithms. Highlights the advantages and disadvantages of this approach to the teaching of linear algebra. (Author/MM)

  18. Using Linear Algebra to Introduce Computer Algebra, Numerical Analysis, Data Structures and Algorithms (and To Teach Linear Algebra, Too).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gonzalez-Vega, Laureano

    1999-01-01

    Using a Computer Algebra System (CAS) to help with the teaching of an elementary course in linear algebra can be one way to introduce computer algebra, numerical analysis, data structures, and algorithms. Highlights the advantages and disadvantages of this approach to the teaching of linear algebra. (Author/MM)

  19. A one dimensional numerical approach for computing the eigenmodes of elastic waves in buried pipelines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Wenbo; Kirby, Ray; Mudge, Peter; Gan, Tat-Hean

    2016-12-01

    Ultrasonic guided waves are often used in the detection of defects in oil and gas pipelines. It is common for these pipelines to be buried underground and this may restrict the length of the pipe that can be successfully tested. This is because acoustic energy travelling along the pipe walls may radiate out into the surrounding medium. Accordingly, it is important to develop a better understanding of the way in which elastic waves propagate along the walls of buried pipes, and so in this article a numerical model is developed that is suitable for computing the eigenmodes for uncoated and coated buried pipes. This is achieved by combining a one dimensional eigensolution based on the semi-analytic finite element (SAFE) method, with a perfectly matched layer (PML) for the infinite medium surrounding the pipe. This article also explores an alternative exponential complex coordinate stretching function for the PML in order to improve solution convergence. It is shown for buried pipelines that accurate solutions may be obtained over the entire frequency range typically used in long range ultrasonic testing (LRUT) using a PML layer with a thickness equal to the pipe wall thickness. This delivers a fast and computationally efficient method and it is shown for pipes buried in sand or soil that relevant eigenmodes can be computed and sorted in less than one second using relatively modest computer hardware. The method is also used to find eigenmodes for a buried pipe coated with the viscoelastic material bitumen. It was recently observed in the literature that a viscoelastic coating may effectively isolate particular eigenmodes so that energy does not radiate from these modes into the surrounding [elastic] medium. A similar effect is also observed in this article and it is shown that this occurs even for a relatively thin layer of bitumen, and when the shear impedance of the coating material is larger than that of the surrounding medium.

  20. High Performance Parallel Processing Project: Industrial computing initiative. Progress reports for fiscal year 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Koniges, A.

    1996-02-09

    This project is a package of 11 individual CRADA`s plus hardware. This innovative project established a three-year multi-party collaboration that is significantly accelerating the availability of commercial massively parallel processing computing software technology to U.S. government, academic, and industrial end-users. This report contains individual presentations from nine principal investigators along with overall program information.

  1. Numerical method for computing Maass cusp forms on triply punctured two-sphere

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, K. T.; Kamari, H. M.; Zainuddin, H.

    2014-03-05

    A quantum mechanical system on a punctured surface modeled on hyperbolic space has always been an important subject of research in mathematics and physics. This corresponding quantum system is governed by the Schrödinger equation whose solutions are the Maass waveforms. Spectral studies on these Maass waveforms are known to contain both continuous and discrete eigenvalues. The discrete eigenfunctions are usually called the Maass Cusp Forms (MCF) where their discrete eigenvalues are not known analytically. We introduce a numerical method based on Hejhal and Then algorithm using GridMathematica for computing MCF on a punctured surface with three cusps namely the triply punctured two-sphere. We also report on a pullback algorithm for the punctured surface and a point locater algorithm to facilitate the complete pullback which are essential parts of the main algorithm.

  2. Computing the numerical solution to functional differential equations: some recent progresses towards E. Hopf's 1952 dream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venturi, Daniele

    2016-11-01

    The fundamental importance of functional differential equations has been recognized in many areas of mathematical physics, such as fluid dynamics, quantum field theory and statistical physics. For example, in the context of fluid dynamics, the Hopf characteristic functional equation was deemed by Monin and Yaglom to be "the most compact formulation of the turbulence problem", which is the problem of determining the statistical properties of the velocity and pressure fields of Navier-Stokes equations given statistical information on the initial state. However, no effective numerical method has yet been developed to compute the solution to functional differential equations. In this talk I will provide a new perspective on this general problem, and discuss recent progresses in approximation theory for nonlinear functionals and functional equations. The proposed methods will be demonstrated through various examples.

  3. Development of a computational testbed for numerical simulation of combustion instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grenda, Jeffrey; Venkateswaran, Sankaran; Merkle, Charles L.

    1993-01-01

    A synergistic hierarchy of analytical and computational fluid dynamic techniques is used to analyze three-dimensional combustion instabilities in liquid rocket engines. A mixed finite difference/spectral procedure is employed to study the effects of a distributed vaporization zone on standing and spinning instability modes within the chamber. Droplet atomization and vaporization are treated by a variety of classical models found in the literature. A multi-zone, linearized analytical solution is used to validate the accuracy of the numerical simulations at small amplitudes for a distributed vaporization region. This comparison indicates excellent amplitude and phase agreement under both stable and unstable operating conditions when amplitudes are small and proper grid resolution is used. As amplitudes get larger, expected nonlinearities are observed. The effect of liquid droplet temperature fluctuations was found to be of critical importance in driving the instabilities of the combustion chamber.

  4. Numerical method to compute acoustic scattering effect of a moving source.

    PubMed

    Song, Hao; Yi, Mingxu; Huang, Jun; Pan, Yalin; Liu, Dawei

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, the aerodynamic characteristic of a ducted tail rotor in hover has been numerically studied using CFD method. An analytical time domain formulation based on Ffowcs Williams-Hawkings (FW-H) equation is derived for the prediction of the acoustic velocity field and used as Neumann boundary condition on a rigid scattering surface. In order to predict the aerodynamic noise, a hybrid method combing computational aeroacoustics with an acoustic thin-body boundary element method has been proposed. The aerodynamic results and the calculated sound pressure levels (SPLs) are compared with the known method for validation. Simulation results show that the duct can change the value of SPLs and the sound directivity. Compared with the isolate tail rotor, the SPLs of the ducted tail rotor are smaller at certain azimuth.

  5. A numerical method for computing unsteady 2-D boundary layer flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krainer, Andreas

    1988-01-01

    A numerical method for computing unsteady two-dimensional boundary layers in incompressible laminar and turbulent flows is described and applied to a single airfoil changing its incidence angle in time. The solution procedure adopts a first order panel method with a simple wake model to solve for the inviscid part of the flow, and an implicit finite difference method for the viscous part of the flow. Both procedures integrate in time in a step-by-step fashion, in the course of which each step involves the solution of the elliptic Laplace equation and the solution of the parabolic boundary layer equations. The Reynolds shear stress term of the boundary layer equations is modeled by an algebraic eddy viscosity closure. The location of transition is predicted by an empirical data correlation originating from Michel. Since transition and turbulence modeling are key factors in the prediction of viscous flows, their accuracy will be of dominant influence to the overall results.

  6. SAR Computation inside Fetus by RF Coil during MR Imaging Employing Realistic Numerical Pregnant Woman Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kikuchi, Satoru; Saito, Kazuyuki; Takahashi, Masaharu; Ito, Koichi; Ikehira, Hiroo

    This paper presents the computational electromagnetic dosimetry inside an anatomically based pregnant woman models exposed to electromagnetic wave during magnetic resonance imaging. The two types of pregnant woman models corresponding to early gestation and 26 weeks gestation were used for this study. The specific absorption rate (SAR) in and around a fetus were calculated by radiated electromagnetic wave from highpass and lowpass birdcage coil. Numerical calculation results showed that high SAR region is observed at the body in the vicinity of gaps of the coil, and is related to concentrated electric field in the gaps of human body such as armpit and thigh. Moreover, it has confirmed that the SAR in the fetus is less than International Electrotechnical Commission limit of 10W/kg, when whole-body average SARs are 2W/kg and 4W/kg, which are the normal operating mode and first level controlled operating mode, respectively.

  7. NUMERICAL COMPUTATIONS OF CO-EXISTING SUPER-CRITICAL AND SUB-CRITICAL FLOWS BASED UPON CRD SCHEMES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horie, Katsuya; Okamura, Seiji; Kobayashi, Yusuke; Hyodo, Makoto; Hida, Yoshihisa; Nishimoto, Naoshi; Mori, Akio

    Stream flows in steep gradient bed form complicating flow configurations, where co-exist super-critical and sub-critical flows. Computing numerically such flows are the key to successful river management. This study applied CRD schemes to 1D and 2D stream flow computations and proposed genuine ways to eliminate expansion shock waves. Through various cases of computing stream flows conducted, CRD schemes showed that i) conservativeness of discharge and accuracy of four significant figures are ensured, ii) artificial viscosity is not explicitly used for computational stabilization, and thus iii) 1D and 2D computations based upon CRD schemes are applicable to evaluating complicating stream flows for river management.

  8. A methodology to compute GPS slant total delays in a numerical weather model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zus, Florian; Bender, Michael; Deng, Zhiguo; Dick, Galina; Heise, Stefan; Shang-Guan, Ming; Wickert, Jens

    2012-04-01

    A numerical algorithm based on Fermat's Principle was developed to simulate the propagation of Global Positioning System (GPS) radio signals in the refractivity field of a numerical weather model. The unique in the proposed algorithm is that the ray-trajectory automatically involves the location of the ground-based receiver and the satellite, i.e. the posed two-point boundary value problem is solved by an implicit finite difference scheme. This feature of the algorithm allows the fast and accurate computation of the signal travel-time delay, referred to as Slant Total Delay (STD), between a satellite and a ground-based receiver. We provide a technical description of the algorithm and estimate the uncertainty of STDs due to simplifying assumptions in the algorithm and due to the uncertainty of the refractivity field. In a first application, we compare STDs retrieved from GPS phase-observations at the German Research Centre for Geosciences Potsdam (GFZ STDs) with STDs derived from the European Center for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts analyses (ECMWF STDs). The statistical comparison for one month (August 2007) for a large and continuously operating network of ground-based receivers in Germany indicates good agreement between GFZ STDs and ECMWF STDs; the standard deviation is 0.5% and the mean deviation is 0.1%.

  9. Numerical computation of exponential matrices using the Cayley-Hamilton theorem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walden, H.; Roelof, E. C.

    1982-01-01

    A method for computing exponential matrices, which often arise naturally in the solution of systems of linear differential equations, is developed. An exponential matrix is generated as a linear combination of a finite number (equal to the matrix order) of matrices, the coefficients of which are scalar infinite sums. The method can be generalized to apply to any formal power series of matrices. Attention is focused upon the exponential function, and the matrix exponent is assumed tri-diagonal in form. In such cases, the terms in the coefficient infinite sums can be extracted, as recursion relations, from the characteristic polynomial of the matrix exponent. Two numerical examples are presented in some detail: (1) the three dimensional infinitesimal rotation rate matrix, which is skew symmetric, and (2) an N-dimensional tri-diagonal and symmetric finite difference matrix which arises in the numerical solution of the heat conduction partial differential equation. In the second example, the known eigenvalues and eigenvectors of the finite difference matrix permit an analytical solution for the exponential matrix, through the theory of diagonalization and similarity transformations, which is used for independent verification. The convergence properties of the scalar infinite summations are investigated for finite difference matrices of various orders up to ten, and it is found that the number of terms required for convergence increases slowly with the order of the matrix.

  10. Numerical algorithms for computations of feedback laws arising in control of flexible systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lasiecka, Irena

    1989-01-01

    Several continuous models will be examined, which describe flexible structures with boundary or point control/observation. Issues related to the computation of feedback laws are examined (particularly stabilizing feedbacks) with sensors and actuators located either on the boundary or at specific point locations of the structure. One of the main difficulties is due to the great sensitivity of the system (hyperbolic systems with unbounded control actions), with respect to perturbations caused either by uncertainty of the model or by the errors introduced in implementing numerical algorithms. Thus, special care must be taken in the choice of the appropriate numerical schemes which eventually lead to implementable finite dimensional solutions. Finite dimensional algorithms are constructed on a basis of a priority analysis of the properties of the original, continuous (infinite diversional) systems with the following criteria in mind: (1) convergence and stability of the algorithms and (2) robustness (reasonable insensitivity with respect to the unknown parameters of the systems). Examples with mixed finite element methods and spectral methods are provided.

  11. Numerical algorithms for computations of feedback laws arising in control of flexible systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lasiecka, Irena

    1989-01-01

    Several continuous models will be examined, which describe flexible structures with boundary or point control/observation. Issues related to the computation of feedback laws are examined (particularly stabilizing feedbacks) with sensors and actuators located either on the boundary or at specific point locations of the structure. One of the main difficulties is due to the great sensitivity of the system (hyperbolic systems with unbounded control actions), with respect to perturbations caused either by uncertainty of the model or by the errors introduced in implementing numerical algorithms. Thus, special care must be taken in the choice of the appropriate numerical schemes which eventually lead to implementable finite dimensional solutions. Finite dimensional algorithms are constructed on a basis of a priority analysis of the properties of the original, continuous (infinite diversional) systems with the following criteria in mind: (1) convergence and stability of the algorithms and (2) robustness (reasonable insensitivity with respect to the unknown parameters of the systems). Examples with mixed finite element methods and spectral methods are provided.

  12. Numerical modelling of vehicular pollution dispersion: The application of computational fluid dynamics techniques, a case study

    SciTech Connect

    Vanderheyden, M.D.; Dajka, S.C.; Sinclair, R.; Yeung, D.

    1997-12-31

    Numerical modelling of vehicular emissions using the United States Environmental Protection Agency`s CALINE4 and CAL3QHC dispersion models to predict air quality impacts in the vicinity of roadways is a widely accepted means of evaluating vehicular emissions impacts. The numerical models account for atmospheric dispersion in both open or suburban terrains. When assessing roadways in urban areas with numerous large buildings, however, the models are unable to account for the complex airflows and therefore do not provide satisfactory estimates of pollutant concentrations. Either Wind Tunnel Modelling or Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) techniques can be used to assess the impact of vehicle emissions in an urban core. This paper presents a case study where CFD is used to predict worst-case air quality impacts for two development configurations: an existing roadway configuration and a proposed configuration with an elevated pedestrian walkway. In assessing these configurations, worst-case meteorology and traffic conditions are modeled to allow for the prediction of pollutant concentrations due to vehicular emissions on two major streets in Hong Kong. The CFD modelling domain is divided up into thousands of control volumes. Each of these control volumes has a central point called a node where velocities, pollutant concentration and other auxiliary variables are calculated. The region of interest, the pedestrian link and its immediate surroundings, has a denser distribution of nodes in order to give a better resolution of local flow details. Separate CFD modelling runs were undertaken for each development configuration for wind direction increments of 15 degrees. For comparison of the development scenarios, pollutant concentrations (carbon monoxide, nitrogen dioxide and particulate matter) are predicted at up to 99 receptor nodes representing sensitive locations.

  13. Infragravity wave generation and dynamics over a mild slope beach : Experiments and numerical computations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cienfuegos, R.; Duarte, L.; Hernandez, E.

    2008-12-01

    Charasteristic frequencies of gravity waves generated by wind and propagating towards the coast are usually comprised between 0.05Hz and 1Hz. Nevertheless, lower frequecy waves, in the range of 0.001Hz and 0.05Hz, have been observed in the nearshore zone. Those long waves, termed as infragravity waves, are generated by complex nonlinear mechanisms affecting the propagation of irregular waves up to the coast. The groupiness of an incident random wave field may be responsible for producing a slow modulation of the mean water surface thus generating bound long waves travelling at the group speed. Similarly, a quasi- periodic oscillation of the break-point location, will be accompained by a slow modulation of set-up/set-down in the surf zone and generation and release of long waves. If the primary structure of the carrying incident gravity waves is destroyed (e.g. by breaking), forced long waves can be freely released and even reflected at the coast. Infragravity waves can affect port operation through resonating conditions, or strongly affect sediment transport and beach morphodynamics. In the present study we investigate infragravity wave generation mechanisms both, from experiments and numerical computations. Measurements were conducted at the 70-meter long wave tank, located at the Instituto Nacional de Hidraulica (Chile), prepared with a beach of very mild slope of 1/80 in order to produce large surf zone extensions. A random JONSWAP type wave field (h0=0.52m, fp=0.25Hz, Hmo=0.17m) was generated by a piston wave-maker and measurements of the free surface displacements were performed all over its length at high spatial resolution (0.2m to 1m). Velocity profiles were also measured at four verticals inside the surf zone using an ADV. Correlation maps of wave group envelopes and infragravity waves are computed in order to identify long wave generation and dynamics in the experimental set-up. It appears that both mechanisms (groupiness and break-point oscillation) are

  14. Worldline approach for numerical computation of electromagnetic Casimir energies: Scalar field coupled to magnetodielectric media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackrory, Jonathan B.; Bhattacharya, Tanmoy; Steck, Daniel A.

    2016-10-01

    We present a worldline method for the calculation of Casimir energies for scalar fields coupled to magnetodielectric media. The scalar model we consider may be applied in arbitrary geometries, and it corresponds exactly to one polarization of the electromagnetic field in planar layered media. Starting from the field theory for electromagnetism, we work with the two decoupled polarizations in planar media and develop worldline path integrals, which represent the two polarizations separately, for computing both Casimir and Casimir-Polder potentials. We then show analytically that the path integrals for the transverse-electric polarization coupled to a dielectric medium converge to the proper solutions in certain special cases, including the Casimir-Polder potential of an atom near a planar interface, and the Casimir energy due to two planar interfaces. We also evaluate the path integrals numerically via Monte Carlo path-averaging for these cases, studying the convergence and performance of the resulting computational techniques. While these scalar methods are only exact in particular geometries, they may serve as an approximation for Casimir energies for the vector electromagnetic field in other geometries.

  15. Numerical study of premixed HCCI engine combustion and its sensitivity to computational mesh and model uncertainties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Song-Charng; Reitz, Rolf D.

    2003-06-01

    This study used a numerical model to investigate the combustion process in a premixed iso-octane homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) engine. The engine was a supercharged Cummins C engine operated under HCCI conditions. The CHEMKIN code was implemented into an updated KIVA-3V code so that the combustion could be modelled using detailed chemistry in the context of engine CFD simulations. The model was able to accurately simulate the ignition timing and combustion phasing for various engine conditions. The unburned hydrocarbon emissions were also well predicted while the carbon monoxide emissions were under predicted. Model results showed that the majority of unburned hydrocarbon is located in the piston-ring crevice region and the carbon monoxide resides in the vicinity of the cylinder walls. A sensitivity study of the computational grid resolution indicated that the combustion predictions were relatively insensitive to the grid density. However, the piston-ring crevice region needed to be simulated with high resolution to obtain accurate emissions predictions. The model results also indicated that HCCI combustion and emissions are very sensitive to the initial mixture temperature. The computations also show that the carbon monoxide emissions prediction can be significantly improved by modifying a key oxidation reaction rate constant.

  16. High numerical aperture diffractive optical elements for neutral atom quantum computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, A. L.; Kemme, S. A.; Wendt, J. R.; Carter, T. R.; Samora, S.

    2013-03-01

    The viability of neutral atom based quantum computers is dependent upon scalability to large numbers of qubits. Diffractive optical elements (DOEs) offer the possibility to scale up to many qubit systems by enabling the manipulation of light to collect signal or deliver a tailored spatial trapping pattern. DOEs have an advantage over refractive microoptics since they do not have measurable surface sag, making significantly larger numerical apertures (NA) accessible with a smaller optical component. The smaller physical size of a DOE allows the micro-lenses to be placed in vacuum with the atoms, reducing aberration effects that would otherwise be introduced by the cell walls of the vacuum chamber. The larger collection angle accessible with DOEs enable faster quantum computation speeds. We have designed a set of DOEs for collecting the 852 nm fluorescence from the D2 transition in trapped cesium atoms, and compare these DOEs to several commercially available refractive micro-lenses. The largest DOE is able to collect over 20% of the atom's radiating sphere whereas the refractive micro-optic is able to collect just 8% of the atom's radiating sphere.

  17. Good manufacturing practices--grade preformed ossicular prostheses from banked bone via computer numerically controlled micromilling.

    PubMed

    Berrettini, Stefano; Bruschini, Luca; Stefanini, Cesare; D'Alessandro, Delfo; D'Acunto, Mario; Danti, Serena

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was the fabrication of ossicular replacement prostheses (ORPs) from decellularized banked cortical bone via computer numerically controlled (CNC) ultraprecision micromilling, in order to obtain preformed clinical-grade tissue products, reproducing shape, size, and details perfectly comparable to those of synthetic devices. Banked femoral compact bone was used to fabricate partial and total ORPs via CNC micromilling according to Good Manufacturing Practices procedures. Drawings of ORPs with different shapes and sizes were uploaded to the computer interface, and different surface-finish parameters were tested. The obtained products underwent dimensional, weight, and surface characterizations. A histologic analysis was pursued to compare the bone matrix compactness of the produced ORPs to that of the ear ossicles. Banked-bone ORPs were produced with high dimensional accuracy. Partial ORP weights averaged (+/- SD) 31.2 +/- 0.6 mg, and total ORP weights averaged 69.3 +/- 0.7 mg. The best-finish mode allowed microscale or nanoscale roughness free from machinery textures to be obtained. Finally, the histologic analysis confirmed that the extracellular matrix compactness of the produced ORPs was suitable for ossicular chain replacement. This study assesses the fabrication feasibility of novel banked-bone ORPs of extremely high dimensional accuracy. Such devices are aimed at combining the most favorable aspects of both synthetic (reproducibility, convenience, and biosafety) and biological replacements (total biocompatibility).

  18. Numerical Difficulties Computing Electrostatic Potentials Near Interfaces with the Poisson-Boltzmann Equation.

    PubMed

    Harris, Robert C; Boschitsch, Alexander H; Fenley, Marcia O

    2017-08-08

    Many researchers compute surface maps of the electrostatic potential (φ) with the Poisson-Boltzmann (PB) equation to relate the structural information obtained from X-ray and NMR experiments to biomolecular functions. Here we demonstrate that the usual method of obtaining these surface maps of φ, by interpolating from neighboring grid points on the solution grid generated by a PB solver, generates large errors because of the large discontinuity in the dielectric constant (and thus in the normal derivative of φ) at the surface. The Cartesian Poisson-Boltzmann solver contains several features that reduce the numerical noise in surface maps of φ: First, CPB introduces additional mesh points at the Cartesian grid/surface intersections where the PB equation is solved. This procedure ensures that the solution for interior mesh points only references nodes on the interior or on the surfaces; similarly for exterior points. Second, for added points on the surface, a second order least-squares reconstruction (LSR) is implemented that analytically incorporates the discontinuities at the surface. LSR is used both during the solution phase to compute φ at the surface and during postprocessing to obtain φ, induced charges, and ionic pressures. Third, it uses an adaptive grid where the finest grid cells are located near the molecular surface.

  19. Computationally robust and noise resistant numerical detector for the detection of atmospheric infrasound.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dong-Chang; Olson, John V; Szuberla, Curt A L

    2013-07-01

    This work reports on a performance study of two numerical detectors that are particularly useful for infrasound arrays operating under windy conditions. The sum of squares of variance ratios (SSVR1)-proposed for detecting signals with frequency ranging from 1 to 10 Hz-is computed by taking the ratio of the squared sum of eigenvalues to the square of largest eigenvalue of the covariance matrix of the power spectrum. For signals with lower frequency between 0.015 and 0.1 Hz, SSVR2 is developed to reduce the detector's sensitivity to noise. The detectors' performances are graphically compared against the current method, the mean of cross correlation maxima (MCCM), using the receiver operating characteristics curves and three types of atmospheric infrasound, corrupted by Gaussian and Pink noise. The MCCM and SSVR2 detectors were also used to detect microbaroms from the 24 h-long infrasound data. It was found that the two detectors outperform the MCCM detector in both sensitivity and computational efficiency. For mine blasts corrupted by Pink noise (signal-to-noise ratio = -7 dB), the MCCM and SSVR1 detectors yield 62 and 88 % true positives when accepting 20% false positives. For an eight-sensor array, the speed gain is approximately eleven-fold for a 50 s long signal.

  20. Numerical simulation of separating flows using computational models based on the vorticity confinement method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lesong

    The objective of the present research is to investigate the recent development of the vorticity confinement method. First, a new formulation of the vorticity confinement term is studied. Advantages of the new formulation over the original one include the ability to conserve the momentum, and the ability to preserve the centroid motion of some flow properties such as the vorticity magnitude. Next, new difference schemes, which are simpler and more efficient than the old schemes, are discussed. At last, two computational models based on the vorticity confinement method are investigated. One of the models is devised to simulate inviscid flows over bodies with surfaces not aligned with the grid. The other is a surface boundary layer model, which is intended for efficiently simulating viscous flows with separations from the body surfaces. To validate the computational models, numerical simulations of three-dimensional flows over a 6:1 ellipsoid at incidence are performed. Comparisons have been made with exact solutions for inviscid simulations or experimental data for viscous simulations, and data obtained with conventional CFD methods. It is observed that both the inviscid and the viscous solutions with the new models exhibit good agreement with the exact solutions or the experiment data. The new models can have much higher efficiency than conventional CFD methods, and are able to obtain solutions with comparable accuracy.

  1. Energy conserving numerical methods for the computation of complex vortical flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allaneau, Yves

    One of the original goals of this thesis was to develop numerical tools to help with the design of micro air vehicles. Micro Air Vehicles (MAVs) are small flying devices of only a few inches in wing span. Some people consider that as their size becomes smaller and smaller, it would be increasingly more difficult to keep all the classical control surfaces such as the rudders, the ailerons and the usual propellers. Over the years, scientists took inspiration from nature. Birds, by flapping and deforming their wings, are capable of accurate attitude control and are able to generate propulsion. However, the biomimicry design has its own limitations and it is difficult to place a hummingbird in a wind tunnel to study precisely the motion of its wings. Our approach was to use numerical methods to tackle this challenging problem. In order to precisely evaluate the lift and drag generated by the wings, one needs to be able to capture with high fidelity the extremely complex vortical flow produced in the wake. This requires a numerical method that is stable yet not too dissipative, so that the vortices do not get diffused in an unphysical way. We solved this problem by developing a new Discontinuous Galerkin scheme that, in addition to conserving mass, momentum and total energy locally, also preserves kinetic energy globally. This property greatly improves the stability of the simulations, especially in the special case p=0 when the approximation polynomials are taken to be piecewise constant (we recover a finite volume scheme). In addition to needing an adequate numerical scheme, a high fidelity solution requires many degrees of freedom in the computations to represent the flow field. The size of the smallest eddies in the flow is given by the Kolmogoroff scale. Capturing these eddies requires a mesh counting in the order of Re³ cells, where Re is the Reynolds number of the flow. We show that under-resolving the system, to a certain extent, is acceptable. However our

  2. Initial analysis of SAR from a cell phone inside a vehicle by numerical computation.

    PubMed

    Anzaldi, Gabriel; Silva, Ferran; Fernández, Mireya; Quílez, Marcos; Riu, Pere J

    2007-05-01

    The purpose of this paper is to analyze the influence of the metallic structures of a realistic car body frame on the specific absorption rate (SAR) produced by a cell phone when a complete human body model is placed at different locations inside the vehicle, and to identify the relevant parameters responsible for these changes. The modeling and analysis of the whole system was conducted by means of computer simulations based on the full wave finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) numerical method. The excitation considered was an 835 MHz lambda/2 dipole located as a hands-free communication device or as a hand-held portable system. We compared the SAR at different planes on the human model, placed inside the vehicle with respect to the free space situation. The presence of the car body frame significantly changes the SAR distributions, especially when the dipole is far from the body. Although the results are not conclusive on this point, this change in SAR distribution is not likely to produce an increase above the limits in current guidelines for partial body exposure, but may be significant for whole-body exposure. The most relevant change found was the change in the impedance of the dipole, affecting the radiated power. A complementary result from the electromagnetic computations performed is the change in the electromagnetic field distribution inside a vehicle when human bodies are present. The whole vehicle model has been optimized to provide accurate results for sources placed inside the vehicle, while keeping low requirements for computer storage and simulation time.

  3. Fast numerical generation and encryption of computer-generated Fresnel holograms.

    PubMed

    Tsang, P W M; Poon, T-C; Cheung, K W K

    2011-03-01

    In the past two decades, generation and encryption of holographic images have been identified as two important areas of investigation in digital holography. The integration of these two technologies has enabled images to be encrypted with more dimensions of freedom on top of simply employing the encryption keys. Despite the moderate success attained to date, and the rapid advancement of computing technology in recent years, the heavy computation load involved in these two processes remains a major bottleneck in the evolution of the digital holography technology. To alleviate this problem, we have proposed a fast and economical solution which is capable of generating, and at the same time encrypting, holograms with numerical means. In our method, the hologram formation mechanism is decomposed into a pair of one-dimensional (1D) processes. In the first stage, a given three-dimensional (3D) scene is partitioned into a stack of uniformed spaced horizontal planes and converted into a set of hologram sublines. Next, the sublines are expanded to a hologram by convolving it with a 1D reference signal. To encrypt the hologram, the reference signal is first convolved with a key function in the form of a maximum length sequence (also known as MLS, or M-sequence). The use of a MLS has two advantages. First, an MLS is spectrally flat so that it will not jeopardize the frequency spectrum of the hologram. Second, the autocorrelation function of an MLS is close to a train of Kronecker delta function. As a result, the encrypted hologram can be decoded by correlating it with the same key that is adopted in the encoding process. Experimental results reveal that the proposed method can be applied to generate and encrypt holograms with a small number of computations. In addition, the encrypted hologram can be decoded and reconstructed to the original 3D scene with good fidelity. © 2010 Optical Society of America

  4. Contracted basis Lanczos methods for computing numerically exact rovibrational levels of methane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiao-Gang; Carrington, Tucker

    2004-08-01

    We present a numerically exact calculation of rovibrational levels of a five-atom molecule. Two contracted basis Lanczos strategies are proposed. The first and preferred strategy is a two-stage contraction. Products of eigenfunctions of a four-dimensional (4D) stretch problem and eigenfunctions of 5D bend-rotation problems, one for each K, are used as basis functions for computing eigenfunctions and eigenvalues (for each K) of the Hamiltonian without the Coriolis coupling term, denoted H0. Finally, energy levels of the full Hamiltonian are calculated in a basis of the eigenfunctions of H0. The second strategy is a one-stage contraction in which energy levels of the full Hamiltonian are computed in the product contracted basis (without first computing eigenfunctions of H0). The two-stage contraction strategy, albeit more complicated, has the crucial advantage that it is trivial to parallelize the calculation so that the CPU and memory costs are independent of J. For the one-stage contraction strategy the CPU and memory costs of the difficult part of the calculation scale linearly with J. We use the polar coordinates associated with orthogonal Radau vectors and spherical harmonic type rovibrational basis functions. A parity-adapted rovibrational basis suitable for a five-atom molecule is proposed and employed to obtain bend-rotation eigenfunctions in the first step of both contraction methods. The effectiveness of the two methods is demonstrated by calculating a large number of converged J=1 rovibrational levels of methane using a global potential energy surface.

  5. Contracted basis Lanczos methods for computing numerically exact rovibrational levels of methane.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao-Gang; Carrington, Tucker

    2004-08-15

    We present a numerically exact calculation of rovibrational levels of a five-atom molecule. Two contracted basis Lanczos strategies are proposed. The first and preferred strategy is a two-stage contraction. Products of eigenfunctions of a four-dimensional (4D) stretch problem and eigenfunctions of 5D bend-rotation problems, one for each K, are used as basis functions for computing eigenfunctions and eigenvalues (for each K) of the Hamiltonian without the Coriolis coupling term, denoted H0. Finally, energy levels of the full Hamiltonian are calculated in a basis of the eigenfunctions of H0. The second strategy is a one-stage contraction in which energy levels of the full Hamiltonian are computed in the product contracted basis (without first computing eigenfunctions of H0). The two-stage contraction strategy, albeit more complicated, has the crucial advantage that it is trivial to parallelize the calculation so that the CPU and memory costs are independent of J. For the one-stage contraction strategy the CPU and memory costs of the difficult part of the calculation scale linearly with J. We use the polar coordinates associated with orthogonal Radau vectors and spherical harmonic type rovibrational basis functions. A parity-adapted rovibrational basis suitable for a five-atom molecule is proposed and employed to obtain bend-rotation eigenfunctions in the first step of both contraction methods. The effectiveness of the two methods is demonstrated by calculating a large number of converged J = 1 rovibrational levels of methane using a global potential energy surface.

  6. Numerical simulation of normal nasal cavity airflow in Chinese adult: a computational flow dynamics model.

    PubMed

    Tan, Jie; Han, Demin; Wang, Jie; Liu, Ting; Wang, Tong; Zang, Hongrui; Li, Yunchuan; Wang, Xiangdong

    2012-03-01

    Our purpose is to simulate the airflow inside the healthy Chinese nose with normal nasal structure and function by computational fluid dynamics (CFD) method and to analyze the relationship between the airflow and physiological function. In this study, we used the software MIMICS 13.0 to construct 20 3-dimensional (3-D) models based on the computer tomography scans of Chinese adults' nose with normal nasal structure and function. Thereafter, numerical simulations were carried out using the software FLUENT 6.3. Then the characteristics of airflow inside the airway and sinuses were demonstrated qualitatively and quantitatively in steady state. We found that during the inhalation phase, the vortices and turbulences were located at anterior part and bottom of the nasal cavity. But there is no vortex in the whole nasal cavity during the expiratory phase. The distributions of pressure and wall shear stress are different in two phases. The maximum airflow velocity occurs around the plane of palatine velum during both inspiratory and expiratory phases. After the airflow passed the nasal valve, the peak velocity of inhaled airflow decreases and it increases again at the postnaris. Vice versa, the exhaled airflow decelerates after it passed the postnaris and it accelerates again at nasal valve. The data collected in this presentation validates the effectiveness of CFD simulation in the study of airflow in the nasal cavity. Nasal airflow is closely related to the structure and physiological functions of the nasal cavity. CFD may thus also be used to study nasal airflow changes resulting from abnormal nasal structure and nasal diseases.

  7. Numerical computation of the Green's function for two-dimensional finite-size photonic crystals of infinite length.

    PubMed

    Seydou, F; Ramahi, Omar M; Duraiswami, Ramani; Seppänen, T

    2006-11-13

    We develop a numerical algorithm that computes the Green's function of Maxwell equation for a 2D finite-size photonic crystal, composed of rods of arbitrary shape. The method is based on the boundary integral equation, and a Nyström discretization is used for the numerical solution. To provide an exact solution that validates our code we derive multipole expansions for circular cylinders using our integral equation approach. The numerical method performs very well on the test case. We then apply it to crystals of arbitrary shape and discuss the convergence.

  8. Effects of the computational time step on numerical solutions for turbulent flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Haecheon; Moin, Parviz

    1994-01-01

    Effects of large computational time steps on the computed turbulence were investigated using a fully implicit method. In turbulent channel flow computations the largest computational time step in wall units which led to accurate prediction of turbulence statistics was determined. Turbulence fluctuations could not be sustained if the computational time step was near or larger than the Kolmogorov time scale.

  9. The Design of a Templated C++ Small Vector Class for Numerical Computing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moran, Patrick J.

    2000-01-01

    We describe the design and implementation of a templated C++ class for vectors. The vector class is templated both for vector length and vector component type; the vector length is fixed at template instantiation time. The vector implementation is such that for a vector of N components of type T, the total number of bytes required by the vector is equal to N * size of (T), where size of is the built-in C operator. The property of having a size no bigger than that required by the components themselves is key in many numerical computing applications, where one may allocate very large arrays of small, fixed-length vectors. In addition to the design trade-offs motivating our fixed-length vector design choice, we review some of the C++ template features essential to an efficient, succinct implementation. In particular, we highlight some of the standard C++ features, such as partial template specialization, that are not supported by all compilers currently. This report provides an inventory listing the relevant support currently provided by some key compilers, as well as test code one can use to verify compiler capabilities.

  10. Alternative numerical computation of one-sided Lévy and Mittag-Leffler distributions.

    PubMed

    Saa, Alberto; Venegeroles, Roberto

    2011-08-01

    We consider here the recently proposed closed-form formula in terms of the Meijer G functions for the probability density functions g(α)(x) of one-sided Lévy stable distributions with rational index α=l/k, with 0<α<1. Since one-sided Lévy and Mittag-Leffler distributions are known to be related, this formula could also be useful for calculating the probability density functions ρ(α)(x) of the latter. We show, however, that the formula is computationally inviable for fractions with large denominators, being unpractical even for some modest values of l and k. We present a fast and accurate numerical scheme, based on an early integral representation due to Mikusinski, for the evaluation of g(α)(x) and ρ(α)(x), their cumulative distribution function, and their derivatives for any real index α∈(0,1). As an application, we explore some properties of these probability density functions. In particular, we determine the location and value of their maxima as functions of the index α. We show that α≈0.567 and 0.605 correspond, respectively, to the one-sided Lévy and Mittag-Leffler distributions with shortest maxima. We close by discussing how our results can elucidate some recently described dynamical behavior of intermittent systems.

  11. Comparative analysis of numerical integration schemes of density equation for a computational model of bone remodelling.

    PubMed

    Garzón-Alvarado, D A; Linero, D

    2012-01-01

    In this study, a computational model of bone remodelling problem as proposed by Weinans et al. (1992) is described and solved by other temporal integration techniques different from the Euler scheme. This model considers three types of numerical integration schemes of the evolution of the material density during the remodelling: Euler, Heun and Runge-Kutta methods. Also the strain and the density field are obtained inside each element, at Gauss points or at the nodes of the mesh. A square plate with 1.00 m of side subjected to non-uniform pressure is simulated with two meshes of quadrilateral element with size [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text] m. Two increments time size: [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text] days are used. The results show that Euler, Heun and Runge-Kutta's methods correctly approached the problem of bone remodelling and that there were no appreciable differences in the patterns obtained by the mesh and time step used. In contrast, using an element-based approach and node-based approach, substantial differences were produced in bone remodelling density pattern. 'Chess board' type discontinuities were found in the element approach near the applied pressure area, as were well-defined columns away from this. The node-based approach showed continuity in density distribution. These patterns were well represented by the methods for resolving the density equation. This study concluded that any method of time integration could be used for these meshes and time steps size.

  12. [Numerical finite element modeling of custom car seat using computer aided design].

    PubMed

    Huang, Xuqi; Singare, Sekou

    2014-02-01

    A good cushion can not only provide the sitter with a high comfort, but also control the distribution of the hip pressure to reduce the incidence of diseases. The purpose of this study is to introduce a computer-aided design (CAD) modeling method of the buttocks-cushion using numerical finite element (FE) simulation to predict the pressure distribution on the buttocks-cushion interface. The buttock and the cushion model geometrics were acquired from a laser scanner, and the CAD software was used to create the solid model. The FE model of a true seated individual was developed using ANSYS software (ANSYS Inc, Canonsburg, PA). The model is divided into two parts, i.e. the cushion model made of foam and the buttock model represented by the pelvis covered with a soft tissue layer. Loading simulations consisted of imposing a vertical force of 520N on the pelvis, corresponding to the weight of the user upper extremity, and then solving iteratively the system.

  13. HONEI: A collection of libraries for numerical computations targeting multiple processor architectures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Dyk, Danny; Geveler, Markus; Mallach, Sven; Ribbrock, Dirk; Göddeke, Dominik; Gutwenger, Carsten

    2009-12-01

    We present HONEI, an open-source collection of libraries offering a hardware oriented approach to numerical calculations. HONEI abstracts the hardware, and applications written on top of HONEI can be executed on a wide range of computer architectures such as CPUs, GPUs and the Cell processor. We demonstrate the flexibility and performance of our approach with two test applications, a Finite Element multigrid solver for the Poisson problem and a robust and fast simulation of shallow water waves. By linking against HONEI's libraries, we achieve a two-fold speedup over straight forward C++ code using HONEI's SSE backend, and additional 3-4 and 4-16 times faster execution on the Cell and a GPU. A second important aspect of our approach is that the full performance capabilities of the hardware under consideration can be exploited by adding optimised application-specific operations to the HONEI libraries. HONEI provides all necessary infrastructure for development and evaluation of such kernels, significantly simplifying their development. Program summaryProgram title: HONEI Catalogue identifier: AEDW_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEDW_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: GPLv2 No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 216 180 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 1 270 140 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: C++ Computer: x86, x86_64, NVIDIA CUDA GPUs, Cell blades and PlayStation 3 Operating system: Linux RAM: at least 500 MB free Classification: 4.8, 4.3, 6.1 External routines: SSE: none; [1] for GPU, [2] for Cell backend Nature of problem: Computational science in general and numerical simulation in particular have reached a turning point. The revolution developers are facing is not primarily driven by a change in (problem-specific) methodology, but rather by the fundamental paradigm shift of the

  14. Large Eddy Simulations (LES) and Direct Numerical Simulations (DNS) for the computational analyses of high speed reacting flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Givi, Peyman; Madnia, Cyrus K.; Steinberger, C. J.; Frankel, S. H.

    1992-01-01

    The principal objective is to extend the boundaries within which large eddy simulations (LES) and direct numerical simulations (DNS) can be applied in computational analyses of high speed reacting flows. A summary of work accomplished during the last six months is presented.

  15. Curriculums in Industrial Technology. Plastics Technology. Industrial Maintenance. Computer Numerical Control. Teacher's Manuals and Student Learning Guides.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    El Paso Community Coll., TX.

    Curriculum guides are provided for plastics technology, industrial maintenance, and computer numerical control. Each curriculum is divided into a number of courses. For each course these instructor materials are presented in the official course outline: course description, course objectives, unit titles, texts and materials, instructor resources,…

  16. Curriculums in Industrial Technology. Plastics Technology. Industrial Maintenance. Computer Numerical Control. Teacher's Manuals and Student Learning Guides.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    El Paso Community Coll., TX.

    Curriculum guides are provided for plastics technology, industrial maintenance, and computer numerical control. Each curriculum is divided into a number of courses. For each course these instructor materials are presented in the official course outline: course description, course objectives, unit titles, texts and materials, instructor resources,…

  17. GIM code user's manual for the STAR-100 computer. [for generating numerical analogs of the conversion laws

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spradley, L.; Pearson, M.

    1979-01-01

    The General Interpolants Method (GIM), a three dimensional, time dependent, hybrid procedure for generating numerical analogs of the conversion laws, is described. The Navier-Stokes equations written for an Eulerian system are considered. The conversion of the GIM code to the STAR-100 computer, and the implementation of 'GIM-ON-STAR' is discussed.

  18. Analysis of fracture aperture and roughness using multi-scale computed tomography and numerical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ketcham, R. A.; Thompson, C.; Slottke, D. T.; Cardenas, M. B.; Sharp, J. M.

    2009-05-01

    Open and connected fractures, when present, dominate both fluid flow and solute transport in rock bodies. The transport properties of fracture networks are controlled by the aperture and roughness of the individual fractures. Precise measurement and meaningful characterization of these features is typically problematic, particularly in tandem. Furthermore, the empirical equations used to characterize the effect of surface roughness on fluid flow are derived from artificial configurations, and may not be suitable for natural systems. We have undertaken a multi-tiered study utilizing X-ray computed tomography combined with laboratory experiments and numerical modeling to characterize natural fractures and their flow properties from the dm to the µm scale. We have created and continue to enhance a series of calibrations and procedures to evaluate and maximize our ability to determine, in three dimensions, surface location and aperture in randomly- orientated fractures in heterogeneous natural materials such as granites. Our methods are geared to explicitly take account of the innate blurring of CT data through measurement and deconvolution of a point-spread function. These methods developed for fracture characterization apply to any measurement problem in which the feature being analyzed is small relative to the resolution of the scan data. Our experimental program encompasses both exposed fracture surfaces (skins) and paired surfaces within solid samples which are then subjected to flow testing. High-energy (420-450 kV) X-rays are required to image the larger specimens (>10 cm diameter) that are necessary to maintain a measurable hydraulic head gradient during flow testing. Nominal resolution is approximately 250 µm, but accuracy in locating air-rock interfaces is in the 25-50 µm range. Extracted ~2 cm sections of fracture skins were studied with 225 kV microfocal CT, with nominal resolution of 25 µm and surface-location accuracy of 5-10 µm. Finally, ~5 mm

  19. Utilizing spectral analysis of coastal discharge computed by a numerical model to determine boundary influence

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Swain, E.D.; Langevin, C.D.; Wang, J.D.

    2008-01-01

    In the present study, a spectral analysis was applied to field data and a numerical model of southeastern Everglades and northeastern Florida Bay that involved computing and comparing the power spectrum of simulated and measured flows at the primary coastal outflow creek. Four dominant power frequencies, corresponding to the S1, S2, M2, and 01 tidal periods, were apparent in the measured outflows. The model seemed to reproduce the magnitudes of the S1 and S2 components better than those of the M2 and 01 components. To determine the cause of the relatively poor representation of the M2 and 01 components, we created a steady-base version of the model by setting the time-varying forcing functions - rainfall, evapotranspiration, wind, and inland and tidal boundary conditions - to averaged values. The steady-base model was then modified to produce multiple simulations with only one time-varying forcing function for each model run. These experimental simulations approximated the individual effects of each forcing function on the system. The spectral analysis of the experimental simulations indicated that temporal fluctuations in rainfall, evapotranspiration, and inland water level and discharge boundaries have negligible effects on coastal creek flow fluctuations with periods of less than 48 hours. The tidal boundary seems to be the only forcing function inducing the M2 and 01 frequency flow fluctuations in the creek. An analytical formulation was developed, relating the errors induced by the tidal water-level gauge resolution to the errors in the simulated discharge fluctuations at the coastal creek. This formulation yielded a discharge-fluctuation error similar in magnitude to the errors observed when comparing the spectrum of the simulated and measured discharge. The dominant source of error in the simulation of discharge fluctuation magnitude is most likely the resolution of the water-level gauges used to create the model boundary.

  20. Development of a numerical computer code and circuit element models for simulation of firing systems

    SciTech Connect

    Carpenter, K.H. . Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering)

    1990-07-02

    Numerical simulation of firing systems requires both the appropriate circuit analysis framework and the special element models required by the application. We have modified the SPICE circuit analysis code (version 2G.6), developed originally at the Electronic Research Laboratory of the University of California, Berkeley, to allow it to be used on MSDOS-based, personal computers and to give it two additional circuit elements needed by firing systems--fuses and saturating inductances. An interactive editor and a batch driver have been written to ease the use of the SPICE program by system designers, and the interactive graphical post processor, NUTMEG, supplied by U. C. Berkeley with SPICE version 3B1, has been interfaced to the output from the modified SPICE. Documentation and installation aids have been provided to make the total software system accessible to PC users. Sample problems show that the resulting code is in agreement with the FIRESET code on which the fuse model was based (with some modifications to the dynamics of scaling fuse parameters). In order to allow for more complex simulations of firing systems, studies have been made of additional special circuit elements--switches and ferrite cored inductances. A simple switch model has been investigated which promises to give at least a first approximation to the physical effects of a non ideal switch, and which can be added to the existing SPICE circuits without changing the SPICE code itself. The effect of fast rise time pulses on ferrites has been studied experimentally in order to provide a base for future modeling and incorporation of the dynamic effects of changes in core magnetization into the SPICE code. This report contains detailed accounts of the work on these topics performed during the period it covers, and has appendices listing all source code written documentation produced.

  1. Mechanical Behavior of Salt Caverns: Closed-Form Solutions vs Numerical Computations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Linlin; Bérest, Pierre; Brouard, Benoît

    2015-11-01

    Creep closure and structural stability of a cylindrical elongated cavern leached out from a salt formation are discussed. The Norton-Hoff creep law, or "power law", is used to capture the main features of salt rheological behavior. Two failure criteria are considered: (1) shear stresses must not be larger than a certain fraction of the mean stress (dilation criterion); and (2) the effective stress at the cavern wall (actual stress plus cavern fluid pressure) must not be tensile. The case of a brine-filled cavern whose pressure is kept constant is discussed first. It is proved that creep closure reaches a steady state such that stresses in the rock mass remain constant. However, decades are needed to reach such a state. During the transient phase that results from the slow redistribution of stresses in the rock mass, deviatoric stresses decrease at the vicinity of the cavern wall, and onset of dilation is less and less likely. At this point, the case of a rapid brine pressure increase, typical of a tightness test, is considered. It is proved that during such a swift pressure increase, cavern behavior is almost perfectly elastic; there is no risk of dilation onset. However, even when cavern pressure remains significantly smaller than geostatic, the effective stress at cavern wall can become tensile. These results, obtained through numerical computations, are confirmed by closed-form solutions obtained in the case of an idealized perfectly cylindrical cavern; these solutions provide a better insight into the main structural features of the behavior of the cavern.

  2. Modelling LARES temperature distribution and thermal drag II: Numerical computation of current-epoch thermal forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brooks, Jason W.; Matzner, Richard

    2016-07-01

    The LARES satellite is a laser-ranged space experiment to contribute to geophysics observation, and to measure the general relativistic Lense-Thirring effect. LARES consists of a solid tungsten alloy sphere, into which 92 fused-silica Cube Corner Reflectors (CCRs) are set in colatitude circles ("rows"). During its first four months in orbit it was observed to undergo an anomalous along-track orbital acceleration of approximately -0.4 pm/s2 (pm: = picometer). The first paper in this series (Eur. Phys. J. Plus 130, 206 (2015) - Paper I) computed the thermally induced along-track "thermal drag" on the LARES satellite during the first 126 days after launch. The results there suggest that the IR absorbance α and emissivity ɛ of the CCRs equal 0.60, a possible value for silica with slight surface contamination subjected to the space environment. Paper I computed an average thermal drag acceleration of -0.36 pm/s2 for a 120-day period starting with the 7th day after launch. The heating and the resultant along-track acceleration depend on the plane of the orbit, the sun position, and in particular on the occurrence of eclipses, all of which are functions of time. Thus we compute the thermal drag for specific days. The satellite is heated from two sources: sunlight and Earth's infrared (IR) radiation. Paper I worked in the fast-spin regime, where CCRs with the same colatitude can be taken to have the same temperature. Further, since all temperature variations (temporal or spatial) were small in this regime, Paper I linearized the Stefan-Boltzmann law and performed a Fourier series analysis. However, the spin rate of the satellite is expected currently ( ≈ day 1500) to be slow, of order ≈ 5 /orbit, so the "fast-spin equal-temperatures in a row" assumption is suspect. In this paper, which considers epochs up to 1580 days after launch, we do not linearize and we use direct numerical integration instead of Fourier methods. In addition to the along-track drag, this code

  3. Comment on "Study on the reliable computation time of the numerical model using the sliding temporal correlation method"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Algaba, Antonio; Fernández-Sánchez, Fernando; Merino, Manuel; Rodríguez-Luis, Alejandro J.

    2016-11-01

    The paper, "Study on the reliable computation time of the numerical model using the sliding temporal correlation method," was published in Theoretical and Applied Climatology. In that work, the sliding temporal correlation analysis is employed to investigate the predictable time of two typical chaotic numerical models, namely the Lorenz system and the Chen chaotic system. However, it has been recently shown by us when using a linear scaling in time and state variables that generically, the Chen system is only a particular case of the Lorenz system, with time reversion if the parameter c is positive. Consequently, to study the Chen chaotic system is simply to consider the Lorenz system integrated backwards.

  4. Numerical computation of viscous flow around bodies and wings moving at supersonic speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tannehill, J. C.

    1984-01-01

    Research in aerodynamics is discussed. The development of equilibrium air curve fits; computation of hypersonic rarefield leading edge flows; computation of 2-D and 3-D blunt body laminar flows with an impinging shock; development of a two-dimensional or axisymmetric real gas blunt body code; a study of an over-relaxation procedure forthe MacCormack finite-difference scheme; computation of 2-D blunt body turbulent flows with an impinging shock; computation of supersonic viscous flow over delta wings at high angles of attack; and computation of the Space Shuttle Orbiter flowfield are discussed.

  5. Transport Loss Estimation of Fine Particulate Matter in Sampling Tube Based on Numerical Computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, L.; Cheng, Z.

    2016-12-01

    In-situ measurement of PM2.5 physical and chemical properties is one substantial approach for the mechanism investigation of PM2.5 pollution. Minimizing PM2.5 transport loss in sampling tube is essential for ensuring the accuracy of the measurement result. In order to estimate the integrated PM2.5 transport efficiency in sampling tube and optimize tube designs, the effects of different tube factors (length, bore size and bend number) on the PM2.5 transport were analyzed based on the numerical computation. The results shows that PM2.5 mass concentration transport efficiency of vertical tube with flowrate at 20.0 L·min-1, bore size at 4 mm, length at 1.0 m was 89.6%. However, the transport efficiency will increase to 98.3% when the bore size is increased to 14 mm. PM2.5 mass concentration transport efficiency of horizontal tube with flowrate at 1.0 L·min-1, bore size at 4mm, length at 10.0 m is 86.7%, increased to 99.2% with length at 0.5 m. Low transport efficiency of 85.2% for PM2.5 mass concentration is estimated in bend with flowrate at 20.0 L·min-1, bore size at 4mm, curvature angle at 90o. Laminar flow of air in tube through keeping the ratio of flowrate (L·min-1) and bore size (mm) less than 1.4 is beneficial to decrease the PM2.5 transport loss. For the target of PM2.5 transport efficiency higher than 97%, it is advised to use vertical sampling tubes with length less than 6.0 m for the flowrates of 2.5, 5.0, 10.0 L·min-1 and bore size larger than 12 mm for the flowrates of 16.7 or 20.0 L·min-1. For horizontal sampling tubes, tube length is decided by the ratio of flowrate and bore size. Meanwhile, it is suggested to decrease the amount of the bends in tube of turbulent flow.

  6. Computer numerically controlled (CNC) aspheric shaping with toroidal Wheels (Abstract Only)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ketelsen, D.; Kittrell, W. C.; Kuhn, W. M.; Parks, R. E.; Lamb, George L.; Baker, Lynn

    1987-01-01

    Contouring with computer numerically controlled (CNC) machines can be accomplished with several different tool geometries and coordinated machine axes. To minimize the number of coordinated axes for nonsymmetric work to three, it is common practice to use a spherically shaped tool such as a ball-end mill. However, to minimize grooving due to the feed and ball radius, it is desirable to use a long ball radius, but there is clearly a practical limit to ball diameter with the spherical tool. We have found that the use of commercially available toroidal wheels permits long effective cutting radii, which in turn improve finish and minimize grooving for a set feed. In addition, toroidal wheels are easier than spherical wheels to center accurately. Cutting parameters are also easier to control because the feed rate past the tool does not change as the slope of the work changes. The drawback to the toroidal wheel is the more complex calculation of the tool path. Of course, once the algorithm is worked out, the tool path is as easily calculated as for a spherical tool. We have performed two experiments with the Large Optical Generator (LOG) that were ideally suited to three-axis contouring--surfaces that have no axis of rotational symmetry. By oscillating the cutting head horizontally or vertically (in addition to the motions required to generate the power of the surface) , and carefully coordinating those motions with table rotation, the mostly astigmatic departure for these surfaces is produced. The first experiment was a pair of reflector molds that together correct the spherical aberration of the Arecibo radio telescope. The larger of these was 5 m in diameter and had a 12 cm departure from the best-fit sphere. The second experiment was the generation of a purely astigmatic surface to demonstrate the feasibility of producing axially symmetric asphe.rics while mounted and rotated about any off-axis point. Measurements of the latter (the first experiment had relatively

  7. Neural computing for numeric-to-symbolic conversion in control systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Passino, Kevin M.; Sartori, Michael A.; Antsaklis, Panos J.

    1989-01-01

    A type of neural network, the multilayer perceptron, is used to classify numeric data and assign appropriate symbols to various classes. This numeric-to-symbolic conversion results in a type of information extraction, which is similar to what is called data reduction in pattern recognition. The use of the neural network as a numeric-to-symbolic converter is introduced, its application in autonomous control is discussed, and several applications are studied. The perceptron is used as a numeric-to-symbolic converter for a discrete-event system controller supervising a continuous variable dynamic system. It is also shown how the perceptron can implement fault trees, which provide useful information (alarms) in a biological system and information for failure diagnosis and control purposes in an aircraft example.

  8. Neural computing for numeric-to-symbolic conversion in control systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Passino, Kevin M.; Sartori, Michael A.; Antsaklis, Panos J.

    1989-01-01

    A type of neural network, the multilayer perceptron, is used to classify numeric data and assign appropriate symbols to various classes. This numeric-to-symbolic conversion results in a type of information extraction, which is similar to what is called data reduction in pattern recognition. The use of the neural network as a numeric-to-symbolic converter is introduced, its application in autonomous control is discussed, and several applications are studied. The perceptron is used as a numeric-to-symbolic converter for a discrete-event system controller supervising a continuous variable dynamic system. It is also shown how the perceptron can implement fault trees, which provide useful information (alarms) in a biological system and information for failure diagnosis and control purposes in an aircraft example.

  9. Nature inspired computational technique for the numerical solution of nonlinear singular boundary value problems arising in physiology.

    PubMed

    Malik, Suheel Abdullah; Qureshi, Ijaz Mansoor; Amir, Muhammad; Haq, Ihsanul

    2014-01-01

    We present a hybrid heuristic computing method for the numerical solution of nonlinear singular boundary value problems arising in physiology. The approximate solution is deduced as a linear combination of some log sigmoid basis functions. A fitness function representing the sum of the mean square error of the given nonlinear ordinary differential equation (ODE) and its boundary conditions is formulated. The optimization of the unknown adjustable parameters contained in the fitness function is performed by the hybrid heuristic computation algorithm based on genetic algorithm (GA), interior point algorithm (IPA), and active set algorithm (ASA). The efficiency and the viability of the proposed method are confirmed by solving three examples from physiology. The obtained approximate solutions are found in excellent agreement with the exact solutions as well as some conventional numerical solutions.

  10. First-principles computation of random-pinning glass transition, glass cooperative length scales, and numerical comparisons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cammarota, Chiara; Seoane, Beatriz

    2016-11-01

    As a guideline for experimental tests of the ideal glass transition (random-pinning glass transition, RPGT) that shall be induced in a system by randomly pinning particles, we performed first-principle computations within the hypernetted chain approximation and numerical simulations of a hard-sphere model of a glass former. We obtain confirmation of the expected enhancement of glassy behavior under the procedure of random pinning. We present the analytical phase diagram as a function of c and of the packing fraction ϕ , showing a line of RPGT ending in a critical point. We also obtain microscopic results on cooperative length scales characterizing medium-range amorphous order in hard-sphere glasses and indirect quantitative information on a key thermodynamic quantity defined in proximity to ideal glass transitions, the amorphous surface tension. Finally, we present numerical results of pair correlation functions able to differentiate the liquid and the glass phases, as predicted by the analytic computations.

  11. Nature Inspired Computational Technique for the Numerical Solution of Nonlinear Singular Boundary Value Problems Arising in Physiology

    PubMed Central

    Malik, Suheel Abdullah; Qureshi, Ijaz Mansoor; Haq, Ihsanul

    2014-01-01

    We present a hybrid heuristic computing method for the numerical solution of nonlinear singular boundary value problems arising in physiology. The approximate solution is deduced as a linear combination of some log sigmoid basis functions. A fitness function representing the sum of the mean square error of the given nonlinear ordinary differential equation (ODE) and its boundary conditions is formulated. The optimization of the unknown adjustable parameters contained in the fitness function is performed by the hybrid heuristic computation algorithm based on genetic algorithm (GA), interior point algorithm (IPA), and active set algorithm (ASA). The efficiency and the viability of the proposed method are confirmed by solving three examples from physiology. The obtained approximate solutions are found in excellent agreement with the exact solutions as well as some conventional numerical solutions. PMID:24672381

  12. Numerical Scheme for Viability Computation Using Randomized Technique with Linear Programming

    SciTech Connect

    Djeridane, Badis

    2008-06-12

    We deal with the problem of computing viability sets for nonlinear continuous or hybrid systems. Our main objective is to beat the curse of dimensionality, that is, we want to avoid the exponential growth of required computational resource with respect to the dimension of the system. We propose a randomized approach for viability computation: we avoid griding the state-space, use random extraction of points instead, and the computation of viable set test is formulated as a classical feasibility problem. This algorithm was implemented successfully to linear and nonlinear examples. We provide comparison of our results with results of other method.

  13. Fast computation of synthetic seismograms within a medium containing remote localized perturbations: A numerical solution to the scattering problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masson, Yder; Romanowicz, Barbara

    2016-11-01

    We derive a fast discrete solution to the scattering problem. This solution allows us to compute accurate synthetic seismograms or waveforms for arbitrary locations of sources and receivers within a medium containing localized perturbations. The key to efficiency is that wave propagation modeling does not need to be carried out in the entire volume that encompasses the sources and the receivers but only within the sub-volume containing the perturbations or scatterers. The proposed solution has important applications, for example, it permits the imaging of remote targets located in regions where no sources or receivers are present. Our solution relies on domain decomposition: within a small volume that contains the scatterers, wave propagation is modeled numerically, while in the surrounding volume, where the medium isn't perturbed, the response is obtained through wavefield extrapolation. The originality of this work is the derivation of discrete formulas for representation theorems and Kirchhoff-Helmholtz integrals that naturally adapt to the numerical scheme employed for modeling wave propagation. Our solution applies, for example, to finite difference methods or finite/spectral elements methods. The synthetic seismograms obtained with our solution can be considered "exact" as the total numerical error is comparable to that of the method employed for modeling wave propagation. We detail a basic implementation of our solution in the acoustic case using the finite difference method and present numerical examples that demonstrate the accuracy of the method. We show that ignoring some terms accounting for higher order scattering effects in our solution has a limited effect on the computed seismograms and significantly reduces the computational effort. Finally, we show that our solution can be used to compute localised sensitivity kernels and we discuss applications to target oriented imaging. Extension to the elastic case is straightforward and summarised in a

  14. Anisotropic Shear Velocity Models of the North American Upper Mantle Based on Waveform Inversion and Numerical Wavefield Computations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierre, C.

    2015-12-01

    The Earthscope TA deployment across the continental United-State (US) has reached its eastern part, providing the opportunity for high-resolution 3D seismic velocity imaging of both lithosphere and asthenosphere across the entire north-American continent (NA). Previously (Yuan et al., 2014), we presented a 3D radially anisotropic shear wave (Vs) model of North America (NA) lithospheric mantle based on full waveform tomography, combining teleseismic and regional distance data sampling the NA. Regional wavefield computations were performed numerically, using a regional Spectral Element code (RegSEM, Cupillard et al., 2012), while teleseismic computations were performed approximately, using non-linear asymptotic coupling theory (NACT, Li and Romanowicz, 1995). For both datasets, the inversion was performed iteratively, using a Gauss-Newton scheme, with kernels computed using either NACT or the surface wave, path average approximation (PAVA), depending on the source-station distance. We here present a new radially anisotropic lithospheric/asthenospheric model of Vs for NA based entirely on SEM-based numerical waveforms from an augmented dataset of 155 regional events and 70 teleseismic events. The forward wavefield computations are performed using RegSEM down to 40s, starting from our most recent whole mantle 3D radially anisotropic Vs model (SEMUCB-wm1, French and Romanowicz, 2014). To model teleseismic wavefields within our regional computational domain, we developed a new modeling technique which allows us to replace a distant source by virtual sources at the boundary of the computational domain (Masson et al., 2014). Computing virtual sources requires one global simulation per teleseismic events.We then compare two models obtained: one using NACT/PAVA kernels as in our previous work, and another using hybrid kernels, where the Hessian is computed using NACT/PAVA, but the gradient is computed numerically from the adjoint wavefield, providing more accurate kernels

  15. A numerical model for the computation of radiance distributions in natural waters with wind-roughened surfaces. Part 2: User's guide and code listing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mobley, Curtis D.

    1988-07-01

    This report is a users' guide for and listing of the FORTRAN V computer code that implements a numerical procedure for computing radiance distributions in natural waters. The mathematical details of the numerical radiance model are described in a companion report (A Numerical Model for the Computation of Radiance Distributions in Natural Waters with Wind-Roughened Surfaces, by Curtis D. Mobley and Rudolph W. Preisendorfer, NOAA Technical Memorandum ERL PMEL-75). The present report describes how to run the computer model and therefore addresses questions such as which routines perform which calculations, what input is required by the various programs, and what is the file structure of the overall program.

  16. Numerical computation of the optimal vector field: Exemplified by a fishery model

    PubMed Central

    Grass, D.

    2012-01-01

    Numerous optimal control models analyzed in economics are formulated as discounted infinite time horizon problems, where the defining functions are nonlinear as well in the states as in the controls. As a consequence solutions can often only be found numerically. Moreover, the long run optimal solutions are mostly limit sets like equilibria or limit cycles. Using these specific solutions a BVP approach together with a continuation technique is used to calculate the parameter dependent dynamic structure of the optimal vector field. We use a one dimensional optimal control model of a fishery to exemplify the numerical techniques. But these methods are applicable to a much wider class of optimal control problems with a moderate number of state and control variables. PMID:25505805

  17. Numerical computation of transonic flow governed by the full-potential equation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holst, T. L.

    1983-01-01

    Numerical solution techniques for solving transonic flow fields governed by the full potential equation are discussed. In a general sense relaxation schemes suitable for the numerical solution of elliptic partial differential equations are presented and discussed with emphasis on transonic flow applications. The presentation can be divided into two general categories: An introductory treatment of the basic concepts associated with the numerical solution of elliptic partial differential equations and a more advanced treatment of current procedures used to solve the full potential equation for transonic flow fields. The introductory material is presented for completeness and includes a brief introduction (Chapter 1), governing equations (Chapter 2), classical relaxation schemes (Chapter 3), and early concepts regarding transonic full potential equation algorithms (Chapter 4).

  18. Numerical modeling of inelastic structures at loading of steady state rolling. Thermo-mechanical asphalt pavement computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wollny, Ines; Hartung, Felix; Kaliske, Michael

    2016-05-01

    In order to gain a deeper knowledge of the interactions in the coupled tire-pavement-system, e.g. for the future design of durable pavement structures, the paper presents recent results of research in the field of theoretical-numerical asphalt pavement modeling at material and structural level, whereby the focus is on a realistic and numerically efficient computation of pavements under rolling tire load by using the finite element method based on an Arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian (ALE) formulation. Inelastic material descriptions are included into the ALE frame efficiently by a recently developed unsplit history update procedure. New is also the implementation of a viscoelastic cohesive zone model into the ALE pavement formulation to describe the interaction of the single pavement layers. The viscoelastic cohesive zone model is further extended to account for the normal pressure dependent shear behavior of the bonding layer. Another novelty is that thermo-mechanical effects are taken into account by a coupling of the mechanical ALE pavement computation to a transient thermal computation of the pavement cross-section to obtain the varying temperature distributions of the pavement due to climatic impact. Then, each ALE pavement simulation considers the temperature dependent asphalt material model that includes elastic, viscous and plastic behavior at finite strains and the temperature dependent viscoelastic cohesive zone formulation. The temperature dependent material parameters of the asphalt layers and the interfacial layers are fitted to experimental data. Results of coupled tire-pavement computations are presented to demonstrate potential fields of application.

  19. An analytically based numerical method for computing view factors in real urban environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Doo-Il; Woo, Ju-Wan; Lee, Sang-Hyun

    2016-11-01

    A view factor is an important morphological parameter used in parameterizing in-canyon radiative energy exchange process as well as in characterizing local climate over urban environments. For realistic representation of the in-canyon radiative processes, a complete set of view factors at the horizontal and vertical surfaces of urban facets is required. Various analytical and numerical methods have been suggested to determine the view factors for urban environments, but most of the methods provide only sky-view factor at the ground level of a specific location or assume simplified morphology of complex urban environments. In this study, a numerical method that can determine the sky-view factors (ψ ga and ψ wa ) and wall-view factors (ψ gw and ψ ww ) at the horizontal and vertical surfaces is presented for application to real urban morphology, which are derived from an analytical formulation of the view factor between two blackbody surfaces of arbitrary geometry. The established numerical method is validated against the analytical sky-view factor estimation for ideal street canyon geometries, showing a consolidate confidence in accuracy with errors of less than 0.2 %. Using a three-dimensional building database, the numerical method is also demonstrated to be applicable in determining the sky-view factors at the horizontal (roofs and roads) and vertical (walls) surfaces in real urban environments. The results suggest that the analytically based numerical method can be used for the radiative process parameterization of urban numerical models as well as for the characterization of local urban climate.

  20. Influence of numerical schemes on statistical properties of computed charged particle trajectories in turbulent electromagnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Lalescu, C.C.; Teaca, B.; Carati, D.

    2013-05-15

    A class of numerical schemes is developed for the study of charged particle transport in complex stationary electromagnetic fields and tested for fields obtained from a numerical solution of the magneto-hydrodynamic equation. The performances of these schemes are evaluated by analyzing the conservation of energy and the statistical properties of the trajectories. Energy conservation is affected by the interpolation technique used to estimate the field value at the particle position. However, the particle transport properties are more robust, except in the limit of low energy when a significant fraction of the particles are trapped.

  1. Conical : An extended module for computing a numerically satisfactory pair of solutions of the differential equation for conical functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunster, T. M.; Gil, A.; Segura, J.; Temme, N. M.

    2017-08-01

    Conical functions appear in a large number of applications in physics and engineering. In this paper we describe an extension of our module Conical (Gil et al., 2012) for the computation of conical functions. Specifically, the module includes now a routine for computing the function R-1/2+ iτ m (x) , a real-valued numerically satisfactory companion of the function P-1/2+ iτ m (x) for x > 1. In this way, a natural basis for solving Dirichlet problems bounded by conical domains is provided. The module also improves the performance of our previous algorithm for the conical function P-1/2+ iτ m (x) and it includes now the computation of the first order derivative of the function. This is also considered for the function R-1/2+ iτ m (x) in the extended algorithm.

  2. Automatic computation of electrode trajectories for Deep Brain Stimulation: a hybrid symbolic and numerical approach.

    PubMed

    Essert, Caroline; Haegelen, Claire; Lalys, Florent; Abadie, Alexandre; Jannin, Pierre

    2012-07-01

    The optimal electrode trajectory is needed to assist surgeons in planning Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS). A method for image-based trajectory planning was developed and tested. Rules governing the DBS surgical procedure were defined with geometric constraints. A formal geometric solver using multimodal brain images and a template built from 15 brain MRI scans were used to identify a space of possible solutions and select the optimal one. For validation, a retrospective study of 30 DBS electrode implantations from 18 patients was performed. A trajectory was computed in each case and compared with the trajectories of the electrodes that were actually implanted. Computed trajectories had an average difference of 6.45° compared with reference trajectories and achieved a better overall score based on satisfaction of geometric constraints. Trajectories were computed in 2 min for each case. A rule-based solver using pre-operative MR brain images can automatically compute relevant and accurate patient-specific DBS electrode trajectories.

  3. Investigation of the Numerical Method of Moments for Digital Computer Determination of Differential Equations.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-12-01

    DIGITAL COMPUTER DET -.(U) AIR FORCE INST OF TECH NRXGHT-PflTTERSON RFB OH SCHOOL OF ENGI. D E OYLER UNLSIIDDEC 84 RFIT/GEP/PH/84D-7 F/G 12/1i N...Average Er or vi dumber of Interior Nodes for g(x,Y) - x I+ y ........................ ......... 41 13 Computer Rua Times vs Number of Interior Modes

  4. Equilibrium gas flow computations. II - An analysis of numerical formulations of conservation laws

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vinokur, Marcel; Liu, Yen

    1988-01-01

    Modern numerical techniques employing properties of flux Jacobian matrices are extended to general, equilibrium gas laws. Generalizations of the Beam-Warming scheme, Steger-Warming and van Leer flux-vector splittings, and Roe's approximate Riemann solver are presented for three-dimensional, time-varying grids. The approximations inherent in previous generalizations are discussed.

  5. A Computer-Based Content Analysis of Interview Texts: Numeric Description and Multivariate Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bierschenk, B.

    1977-01-01

    A method is described by which cognitive structures in verbal data can be identified and categorized through numerical analysis and quantitative description. Transcriptions of interviews (in this case, the verbal statements of 40 researchers) are manually coded and subjected to analysis following the AaO (Agent action Object) paradigm. The texts…

  6. Equilibrium gas flow computations. II - An analysis of numerical formulations of conservation laws

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vinokur, Marcel; Liu, Yen

    1988-01-01

    Modern numerical techniques employing properties of flux Jacobian matrices are extended to general, equilibrium gas laws. Generalizations of the Beam-Warming scheme, Steger-Warming and van Leer flux-vector splittings, and Roe's approximate Riemann solver are presented for three-dimensional, time-varying grids. The approximations inherent in previous generalizations are discussed.

  7. A Computer-Based Content Analysis of Interview Texts: Numeric Description and Multivariate Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bierschenk, B.

    1977-01-01

    A method is described by which cognitive structures in verbal data can be identified and categorized through numerical analysis and quantitative description. Transcriptions of interviews (in this case, the verbal statements of 40 researchers) are manually coded and subjected to analysis following the AaO (Agent action Object) paradigm. The texts…

  8. Interactive Computing With a Programmable Calculator; Student Experimentations in Numerical Methods.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gerald, Curtis F.

    Programable desk calculators can provide students with personal experience in the use of numerical methods. Courses at California Polytechnic State University at San Luis Obispo use the Compucorp Model 025 Educator Experiences with it as a teaching device for solving non-linear equations and differential equations show that students can by-pass…

  9. Numerical errors in the computation of subfilter scalar variance in large eddy simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaul, C. M.; Raman, V.; Balarac, G.; Pitsch, H.

    2009-05-01

    Subfilter scalar variance is a key quantity for scalar mixing at the small scales of a turbulent flow and thus plays a crucial role in large eddy simulation of combustion. While prior studies have mainly focused on the physical aspects of modeling subfilter variance, the current work discusses variance models in conjunction with the numerical errors due to their implementation using finite-difference methods. A priori tests on data from direct numerical simulation of homogeneous turbulence are performed to evaluate the numerical implications of specific model forms. Like other subfilter quantities, such as kinetic energy, subfilter variance can be modeled according to one of two general methodologies. In the first of these, an algebraic equation relating the variance to gradients of the filtered scalar field is coupled with a dynamic procedure for coefficient estimation. Although finite-difference methods substantially underpredict the gradient of the filtered scalar field, the dynamic method is shown to mitigate this error through overestimation of the model coefficient. The second group of models utilizes a transport equation for the subfilter variance itself or for the second moment of the scalar. Here, it is shown that the model formulation based on the variance transport equation is consistently biased toward underprediction of the subfilter variance. The numerical issues in the variance transport equation stem from discrete approximations to chain-rule manipulations used to derive convection, diffusion, and production terms associated with the square of the filtered scalar. These approximations can be avoided by solving the equation for the second moment of the scalar, suggesting that model's numerical superiority.

  10. Numerical Computation of Time-Fractional Fokker-Planck Equation Arising in Solid State Physics and Circuit Theory Numerical Computation of Time-Fractional Fokker-Planck Equation Arising in Solid State Physics and Circuit Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Sunil

    2013-12-01

    The main aim of the present work is to propose a new and simple algorithm to obtain a quick and accurate analytical solution of the time fractional Fokker-Plank equation which arises in various fields in natural science, including solid-state physics, quantum optics, chemical physics, theoretical biology, and circuit theory. This new and simple algorithm is an innovative adjustment in Laplace transform algorithm which makes the calculations much simpler and applicable to several practical problems in science and engineering. The proposed scheme finds the solutions without any discretization or restrictive assumptions and is free from round-off errors and therefore reduces the numerical computations to a great extent. Furthermore, several numerical examples are presented to illustrate the accuracy and the stability of the method.

  11. Source Stacking for Numerical Wavefield Computations - Application to Global Scale Seismic Mantle Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacLean, L. S.; Romanowicz, B. A.; French, S.

    2015-12-01

    Seismic wavefield computations using the Spectral Element Method are now regularly used to recover tomographic images of the upper mantle and crust at the local, regional, and global scales (e.g. Fichtner et al., GJI, 2009; Tape et al., Science 2010; Lekic and Romanowicz, GJI, 2011; French and Romanowicz, GJI, 2014). However, the heaviness of the computations remains a challenge, and contributes to limiting the resolution of the produced images. Using source stacking, as suggested by Capdeville et al. (GJI,2005), can considerably speed up the process by reducing the wavefield computations to only one per each set of N sources. This method was demonstrated through synthetic tests on low frequency datasets, and therefore should work for global mantle tomography. However, the large amplitudes of surface waves dominates the stacked seismograms and these cases can no longer be separated by windowing in the time domain. We have developed a processing approach that helps address this issue and demonstrate its usefulness through a series of synthetic tests performed at long periods (T >60 s) on toy upper mantle models. The summed synthetics are computed using the CSEM code (Capdeville et al., 2002). As for the inverse part of the procedure, we use a quasi-Newton method, computing Frechet derivatives and Hessian using normal mode perturbation theory.

  12. A two-parameter continuation method for computing numerical solutions of spin-1 Bose-Einstein condensates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y.-S.; Chien, C.-S.

    2014-01-01

    We describe a novel two-parameter continuation method combined with a spectral-collocation method (SCM) for computing the ground state and excited-state solutions of spin-1 Bose-Einstein condensates (BEC), where the second kind Chebyshev polynomials are used as the basis functions for the trial function space. To compute the ground state solution of spin-1 BEC, we implement the single parameter continuation algorithm with the chemical potential μ as the continuation parameter, and trace the first solution branch of the Gross-Pitaevskii equations (GPEs). When the curve-tracing is close enough to the target point, where the normalization condition of the wave function is going to be satisfied, we add the magnetic potential λ as the second continuation parameter with the magnetization M as the additional constraint condition. Then we implement the two-parameter continuation algorithm until the target point is reached, and the ground state solution of the GPEs is obtained. The excited state solutions of the GPEs can be treated in a similar way. Some numerical experiments on Na23 and Rb87 are reported. The numerical results on the spin-1 BEC are the same as those reported in [10]. Further numerical experiments on excited-state solutions of spin-1 BEC suffice to show the robustness and efficiency of the proposed two-parameter continuation algorithm.

  13. Numerical stabilization of entanglement computation in auxiliary-field quantum Monte Carlo simulations of interacting many-fermion systems.

    PubMed

    Broecker, Peter; Trebst, Simon

    2016-12-01

    In the absence of a fermion sign problem, auxiliary-field (or determinantal) quantum Monte Carlo (DQMC) approaches have long been the numerical method of choice for unbiased, large-scale simulations of interacting many-fermion systems. More recently, the conceptual scope of this approach has been expanded by introducing ingenious schemes to compute entanglement entropies within its framework. On a practical level, these approaches, however, suffer from a variety of numerical instabilities that have largely impeded their applicability. Here we report on a number of algorithmic advances to overcome many of these numerical instabilities and significantly improve the calculation of entanglement measures in the zero-temperature projective DQMC approach, ultimately allowing us to reach similar system sizes as for the computation of conventional observables. We demonstrate the applicability of this improved DQMC approach by providing an entanglement perspective on the quantum phase transition from a magnetically ordered Mott insulator to a band insulator in the bilayer square lattice Hubbard model at half filling.

  14. 3-D parallel program for numerical calculation of gas dynamics problems with heat conductivity on distributed memory computational systems (CS)

    SciTech Connect

    Sofronov, I.D.; Voronin, B.L.; Butnev, O.I.

    1997-12-31

    The aim of the work performed is to develop a 3D parallel program for numerical calculation of gas dynamics problem with heat conductivity on distributed memory computational systems (CS), satisfying the condition of numerical result independence from the number of processors involved. Two basically different approaches to the structure of massive parallel computations have been developed. The first approach uses the 3D data matrix decomposition reconstructed at temporal cycle and is a development of parallelization algorithms for multiprocessor CS with shareable memory. The second approach is based on using a 3D data matrix decomposition not reconstructed during a temporal cycle. The program was developed on 8-processor CS MP-3 made in VNIIEF and was adapted to a massive parallel CS Meiko-2 in LLNL by joint efforts of VNIIEF and LLNL staffs. A large number of numerical experiments has been carried out with different number of processors up to 256 and the efficiency of parallelization has been evaluated in dependence on processor number and their parameters.

  15. Numerical stabilization of entanglement computation in auxiliary-field quantum Monte Carlo simulations of interacting many-fermion systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broecker, Peter; Trebst, Simon

    2016-12-01

    In the absence of a fermion sign problem, auxiliary-field (or determinantal) quantum Monte Carlo (DQMC) approaches have long been the numerical method of choice for unbiased, large-scale simulations of interacting many-fermion systems. More recently, the conceptual scope of this approach has been expanded by introducing ingenious schemes to compute entanglement entropies within its framework. On a practical level, these approaches, however, suffer from a variety of numerical instabilities that have largely impeded their applicability. Here we report on a number of algorithmic advances to overcome many of these numerical instabilities and significantly improve the calculation of entanglement measures in the zero-temperature projective DQMC approach, ultimately allowing us to reach similar system sizes as for the computation of conventional observables. We demonstrate the applicability of this improved DQMC approach by providing an entanglement perspective on the quantum phase transition from a magnetically ordered Mott insulator to a band insulator in the bilayer square lattice Hubbard model at half filling.

  16. Computation of Quasi-Periodic Normally Hyperbolic Invariant Tori: Algorithms, Numerical Explorations and Mechanisms of Breakdown

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canadell, Marta; Haro, Àlex

    2017-05-01

    We present several algorithms for computing normally hyperbolic invariant tori carrying quasi-periodic motion of a fixed frequency in families of dynamical systems. The algorithms are based on a KAM scheme presented in Canadell and Haro (J Nonlinear Sci, 2016. doi: 10.1007/s00332-017-9389-y), to find the parameterization of the torus with prescribed dynamics by detuning parameters of the model. The algorithms use different hyperbolicity and reducibility properties and, in particular, compute also the invariant bundles and Floquet transformations. We implement these methods in several 2-parameter families of dynamical systems, to compute quasi-periodic arcs, that is, the parameters for which 1D normally hyperbolic invariant tori with a given fixed frequency do exist. The implementation lets us to perform the continuations up to the tip of the quasi-periodic arcs, for which the invariant curves break down. Three different mechanisms of breakdown are analyzed, using several observables, leading to several conjectures.

  17. The numerical computation of the preionization phase of a toroidal pinch discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindemuth, I. R.; Pettibone, J. S.; Stevens, J. C.; Kraybill, D. M.; Suter, J. L.; Harding, R. C.

    1980-03-01

    Using the two-dimensional MHD computer code ANIMAL the plasma dynamics of the preionization phase of a toroidal pinch is computed. The physical model includes electron and ion thermal conduction, electron-ion resistivity, electron-neutral resistivity, ionization, dissociation, and line radiation, all based on local thermodynamic equilibrium. The code uses ADI finite difference equations with improved boundary conditions which enable the code to follow the oscillatory motion of the plasma. A coupled electrical circuit calculation is performed. The physical model requires the specification of a minimum ionization fraction to set an upper bound on the resistivity. By suitably choosing this fraction, many of the features of the preionization discharge are reproduced. These calculations have suggested a new electrical diagnostic, the measurement of intervals between zero-crossings of current and flux, which is used to help normalize the computations.

  18. Numerical computation of two dimensional viscous blunt body flows with an impinging shock, part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holst, T. L.; Tannehill, J. C.

    1974-01-01

    Two-dimensional viscous blunt body flows with an impinging shock have been computed using a time-dependent finite-difference method which solves the complete set of Navier-Stokes equations for a compressible flow. For low Reynolds number flows, the entire flow field, including the bow shock and impinging shock, has been captured in the computation. For higher Reynolds number flows, the bow shock is treated as a discontinuity across which the Rankine-Hugoniot equations are applied, while the boundary layer and interaction regions are captured as before. Using this latter shock-fitting approach, a Type III shock interaction flow field has been computed with flow conditions corresponding to the space shuttle orbiter freestream conditions at 61 km (200,000 ft).

  19. Adaptive computer program for determination of absorption profiles by numerical deconvolution: application to amoxicillin absorption.

    PubMed

    Deslandes, A; Westphal, J F; Trouvin, J H; Farinotti, R

    1992-08-01

    We have developed a specific numerical deconvolution program for the Apple Macintosh microcomputer. After comparison with other methods, we used the program to evaluate the influence of nifedipine on the absorption and bioavailability of amoxicillin. The technique provided a model-independent approach. This study shows that the simultaneous administration of nifedipine with amoxicillin leads to a significant increase in both the total quantity of amoxicillin absorbed (+22%) and the rate of absorption. Parameters of clearance, volume of distribution, and elimination were unaffected. Numerical deconvolution analysis showed that nifedipine did not modify the absorption kinetics of amoxicillin, which are characterized by a lag time followed by a constant rate of absorption, suggesting zero-order kinetics with first-order kinetics at the end of the process. The results suggest the existence of a specialized, saturable transport molecule for this antibiotic.

  20. Nonequilibrium flow computations. I - An analysis of numerical formulations of conservation laws

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Yen; Vinokur, Marcel

    1989-01-01

    Modern numerical techniques employing properties of flux Jacobian matrices are extended to general, nonequilibrium flows. Generalizations of the Beam-Warming scheme, Steger-Warming and van Leer Flux-vector splittings, and Roe's approximate Riemann solver are presented for 3-D, time-varying grids. The analysis is based on a thermodynamic model that includes the most general thermal and chemical nonequilibrium flow of an arbitrary gas. Various special cases are also discussed.

  1. Nonequilibrium flow computations. 1: An analysis of numerical formulations of conservation laws

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Yen; Vinokur, Marcel

    1988-01-01

    Modern numerical techniques employing properties of flux Jacobian matrices are extended to general, nonequilibrium flows. Generalizations of the Beam-Warming scheme, Steger-Warming and van Leer Flux-vector splittings, and Roe's approximate Riemann solver are presented for 3-D, time-varying grids. The analysis is based on a thermodynamic model that includes the most general thermal and chemical nonequilibrium flow of an arbitrary gas. Various special cases are also discussed.

  2. Advanced Numerical Methods for Computing Statistical Quantities of Interest from Solutions of SPDES

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-19

    and related optimization problems; developing numerical methods for option pricing problems in the presence of random arbitrage return. 1. Novel...equations (BSDEs) are connected to nonlinear partial differen- tial equations and non-linear semigroups, to the theory of hedging and pricing of contingent...the presence of random arbitrage return [3] We consider option pricing problems when we relax the condition of no arbitrage in the Black- Scholes

  3. Numerical Solution of the Problem of the Computational Time Reversal in the Quadrant

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-09-21

    condition with a finite support in a hyperboilc equation, given the Cauchy data at the lateral surface. A stability estimate for this ill-posed problem...implies refocusing of the time reversed wave field. Two such two-dimensional inverse problems are solved numerically in the case when the domain is a ...inverse problem for a hyperbolic equation with the Cauchy data at a lateral surface. Consider the standard Cauchy problem for the hyperbolic equation utt

  4. The implementation of the graphics of program EAGLE: A numerical grid generation code on NASA Langley SNS computer system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houston, Johnny L.

    1989-01-01

    Program EAGLE (Eglin Arbitrary Geometry Implicit Euler) Numerical Grid Generation System is a composite (multi-block) algebraic or elliptic grid generation system designed to discretize the domain in and/or around any arbitrarily shaped three dimensional regions. This system combines a boundary conforming surface generation scheme and includes plotting routines designed to take full advantage of the DISSPLA Graphics Package (Version 9.0). Program EAGLE is written to compile and execute efficiently on any Cray machine with or without solid state disk (SSD) devices. Also, the code uses namelist inputs which are supported by all Cray machines using the FORTRAN compiler CFT77. The namelist inputs makes it easier for the user to understand the inputs and operation of Program EAGLE. EAGLE's numerical grid generator is constructed in the following form: main program, EGG (executive routine); subroutine SURFAC (surface generation routine); subroutine GRID (grid generation routine); and subroutine GRDPLOT (grid plotting routines). The EAGLE code was modified to use on the NASA-LaRC SNS computer (Cray 2S) system. During the modification a conversion program was developed for the output data of EAGLE's subroutine GRID to permit the data to be graphically displayed by IRIS workstations, using Plot3D. The code of program EAGLE was modified to make operational subroutine GRDPLOT (using DI-3000 Graphics Software Packages) on the NASA-LaRC SNS Computer System. How to implement graphically, the output data of subroutine GRID was determined on any NASA-LaRC graphics terminal that has access to the SNS Computer System DI-300 Graphics Software Packages. A Quick Reference User Guide was developed for the use of program EAGLE on the NASA-LaRC SNS Computer System. One or more application program(s) was illustrated using program EAGLE on the NASA LaRC SNS Computer System, with emphasis on graphics illustrations.

  5. Development and application of a complex numerical model and software for the computation of dose conversion factors for radon progenies.

    PubMed

    Farkas, Árpád; Balásházy, Imre

    2015-04-01

    A more exact determination of dose conversion factors associated with radon progeny inhalation was possible due to the advancements in epidemiological health risk estimates in the last years. The enhancement of computational power and the development of numerical techniques allow computing dose conversion factors with increasing reliability. The objective of this study was to develop an integrated model and software based on a self-developed airway deposition code, an own bronchial dosimetry model and the computational methods accepted by International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) to calculate dose conversion coefficients for different exposure conditions. The model was tested by its application for exposure and breathing conditions characteristic of mines and homes. The dose conversion factors were 8 and 16 mSv WLM(-1) for homes and mines when applying a stochastic deposition model combined with the ICRP dosimetry model (named PM-A model), and 9 and 17 mSv WLM(-1) when applying the same deposition model combined with authors' bronchial dosimetry model and the ICRP bronchiolar and alveolar-interstitial dosimetry model (called PM-B model). User friendly software for the computation of dose conversion factors has also been developed. The software allows one to compute conversion factors for a large range of exposure and breathing parameters and to perform sensitivity analyses.

  6. Current and planned numerical development for improving computing performance for long duration and/or low pressure transients

    SciTech Connect

    Faydide, B.

    1997-07-01

    This paper presents the current and planned numerical development for improving computing performance in case of Cathare applications needing real time, like simulator applications. Cathare is a thermalhydraulic code developed by CEA (DRN), IPSN, EDF and FRAMATOME for PWR safety analysis. First, the general characteristics of the code are presented, dealing with physical models, numerical topics, and validation strategy. Then, the current and planned applications of Cathare in the field of simulators are discussed. Some of these applications were made in the past, using a simplified and fast-running version of Cathare (Cathare-Simu); the status of the numerical improvements obtained with Cathare-Simu is presented. The planned developments concern mainly the Simulator Cathare Release (SCAR) project which deals with the use of the most recent version of Cathare inside simulators. In this frame, the numerical developments are related with the speed up of the calculation process, using parallel processing and improvement of code reliability on a large set of NPP transients.

  7. Chrysler improved numerical differencing analyzer for third generation computers CINDA-3G

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaski, J. D.; Lewis, D. R.; Thompson, L. R.

    1972-01-01

    New and versatile method has been developed to supplement or replace use of original CINDA thermal analyzer program in order to take advantage of improved systems software and machine speeds of third generation computers. CINDA-3G program options offer variety of methods for solution of thermal analog models presented in network format.

  8. Programmer's guide for the GNAT computer program (numerical analysis of stratification in supercritical oxygen)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heinmiller, J. P.

    1971-01-01

    This document is the programmer's guide for the GNAT computer program developed under MSC/TRW Task 705-2, Apollo cryogenic storage system analysis, subtask 2, is reported. Detailed logic flow charts and compiled program listings are provided for all program elements.

  9. Numerical evaluation of shift multiplexing using a spherical wave in a holographic memory based on a computer-generated hologram

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nobukawa, Teruyoshi; Nomura, Takanori

    2016-09-01

    Shift multiplexing method using a spherical wave is proposed for a holographic memory system based on a computer-generated hologram (CGH). In the proposed method, a propagated signal beam along an optical axis is generated by a CGH. The zero order beam of the CGH is obtained as a point source in the Fourier plane. This point source becomes a spherical reference beam on a recording medium by displacing a Fourier transform lens. The use of the spherical reference beam allows us to implement shift multiplexing in the holographic memory based on a CGH. Shift selectivity of the proposed method is numerically evaluated. In addition, shift multiplexing with the proposed method is numerically demonstrated.

  10. OpenGeoSys: Performance-Oriented Computational Methods for Numerical Modeling of Flow in Large Hydrogeological Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naumov, D.; Fischer, T.; Böttcher, N.; Watanabe, N.; Walther, M.; Rink, K.; Bilke, L.; Shao, H.; Kolditz, O.

    2014-12-01

    OpenGeoSys (OGS) is a scientific open source code for numerical simulation of thermo-hydro-mechanical-chemical processes in porous and fractured media. Its basic concept is to provide a flexible numerical framework for solving multi-field problems for applications in geoscience and hydrology as e.g. for CO2 storage applications, geothermal power plant forecast simulation, salt water intrusion, water resources management, etc. Advances in computational mathematics have revolutionized the variety and nature of the problems that can be addressed by environmental scientists and engineers nowadays and an intensive code development in the last years enables in the meantime the solutions of much larger numerical problems and applications. However, solving environmental processes along the water cycle at large scales, like for complete catchment or reservoirs, stays computationally still a challenging task. Therefore, we started a new OGS code development with focus on execution speed and parallelization. In the new version, a local data structure concept improves the instruction and data cache performance by a tight bundling of data with an element-wise numerical integration loop. Dedicated analysis methods enable the investigation of memory-access patterns in the local and global assembler routines, which leads to further data structure optimization for an additional performance gain. The concept is presented together with a technical code analysis of the recent development and a large case study including transient flow simulation in the unsaturated / saturated zone of the Thuringian Syncline, Germany. The analysis is performed on a high-resolution mesh (up to 50M elements) with embedded fault structures.

  11. Numerical Computation of Flame Spread over a Thin Solid in Forced Concurrent Flow with Gas-phase Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jiang, Ching-Biau; T'ien, James S.

    1994-01-01

    Excerpts from a paper describing the numerical examination of concurrent-flow flame spread over a thin solid in purely forced flow with gas-phase radiation are presented. The computational model solves the two-dimensional, elliptic, steady, and laminar conservation equations for mass, momentum, energy, and chemical species. Gas-phase combustion is modeled via a one-step, second order finite rate Arrhenius reaction. Gas-phase radiation considering gray non-scattering medium is solved by a S-N discrete ordinates method. A simplified solid phase treatment assumes a zeroth order pyrolysis relation and includes radiative interaction between the surface and the gas phase.

  12. Description of a computer program and numerical techniques for developing linear perturbation models from nonlinear systems simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dieudonne, J. E.

    1978-01-01

    A numerical technique was developed which generates linear perturbation models from nonlinear aircraft vehicle simulations. The technique is very general and can be applied to simulations of any system that is described by nonlinear differential equations. The computer program used to generate these models is discussed, with emphasis placed on generation of the Jacobian matrices, calculation of the coefficients needed for solving the perturbation model, and generation of the solution of the linear differential equations. An example application of the technique to a nonlinear model of the NASA terminal configured vehicle is included.

  13. HyCFS, a high-resolution shock capturing code for numerical simulation on hybrid computational clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shershnev, Anton A.; Kudryavtsev, Alexey N.; Kashkovsky, Alexander V.; Khotyanovsky, Dmitry V.

    2016-10-01

    The present paper describes HyCFS code, developed for numerical simulation of compressible high-speed flows on hybrid CPU/GPU (Central Processing Unit / Graphical Processing Unit) computational clusters on the basis of full unsteady Navier-Stokes equations, using modern shock capturing high-order TVD (Total Variation Diminishing) and WENO (Weighted Essentially Non-Oscillatory) schemes on general curvilinear structured grids. We discuss the specific features of hybrid architecture and details of program implementation and present the results of code verification.

  14. Shape Optimization for Navier-Stokes Equations with Algebraic Turbulence Model: Numerical Analysis and Computation

    SciTech Connect

    Haslinger, Jaroslav; Stebel, Jan

    2011-04-15

    We study the shape optimization problem for the paper machine headbox which distributes a mixture of water and wood fibers in the paper making process. The aim is to find a shape which a priori ensures the given velocity profile on the outlet part. The mathematical formulation leads to the optimal control problem in which the control variable is the shape of the domain representing the header, the state problem is represented by the generalized Navier-Stokes system with nontrivial boundary conditions. This paper deals with numerical aspects of the problem.

  15. Numerical Solution of the 3-D Navier-Stokes Equations on the CRAY-1 Computer.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-01-01

    for scientific computa- - ’ " ...... , z Cordinates in Cartesian tions; the CRAY-I, STAR 100 and ILLIAC IV Frame., , Transformed Coordinate Syst among...one fraccional time step. 1n2m n 4 2 (16) Each difference operator contains a-predictor and corrector. During a specific numerical sweep, the flux...82171979. WUr nthe (RAY-’I, " Report #134, Systems 31 . unin, P G. ,"Prelmdmr RfMinvrIng ILboratory, University of11. ~~. AUrning a.n, i l~1iaAhiigan

  16. Computation of Nonlinear Backscattering Using a High-Order Numerical Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fibich, G.; Ilan, B.; Tsynkov, S.

    2001-01-01

    The nonlinear Schrodinger equation (NLS) is the standard model for propagation of intense laser beams in Kerr media. The NLS is derived from the nonlinear Helmholtz equation (NLH) by employing the paraxial approximation and neglecting the backscattered waves. In this study we use a fourth-order finite-difference method supplemented by special two-way artificial boundary conditions (ABCs) to solve the NLH as a boundary value problem. Our numerical methodology allows for a direct comparison of the NLH and NLS models and for an accurate quantitative assessment of the backscattered signal.

  17. Design and evaluation of the computer-based training program Calcularis for enhancing numerical cognition

    PubMed Central

    Käser, Tanja; Baschera, Gian-Marco; Kohn, Juliane; Kucian, Karin; Richtmann, Verena; Grond, Ursina; Gross, Markus; von Aster, Michael

    2013-01-01

    This article presents the design and a first pilot evaluation of the computer-based training program Calcularis for children with developmental dyscalculia (DD) or difficulties in learning mathematics. The program has been designed according to insights on the typical and atypical development of mathematical abilities. The learning process is supported through multimodal cues, which encode different properties of numbers. To offer optimal learning conditions, a user model completes the program and allows flexible adaptation to a child's individual learning and knowledge profile. Thirty-two children with difficulties in learning mathematics completed the 6–12-weeks computer training. The children played the game for 20 min per day for 5 days a week. The training effects were evaluated using neuropsychological tests. Generally, children benefited significantly from the training regarding number representation and arithmetic operations. Furthermore, children liked to play with the program and reported that the training improved their mathematical abilities. PMID:23935586

  18. Numerical solution of singular ODE eigenvalue problems in electronic structure computations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammerling, Robert; Koch, Othmar; Simon, Christa; Weinmüller, Ewa B.

    2010-09-01

    We put forward a new method for the solution of eigenvalue problems for (systems of) ordinary differential equations, where our main focus is on eigenvalue problems for singular Schrödinger equations arising for example in electronic structure computations. In most established standard methods, the generation of the starting values for the computation of eigenvalues of higher index is a critical issue. Our approach comprises two stages: First we generate rough approximations by a matrix method, which yields several eigenvalues and associated eigenfunctions simultaneously, albeit with moderate accuracy. In a second stage, these approximations are used as starting values for a collocation method which yields approximations of high accuracy efficiently due to an adaptive mesh selection strategy, and additionally provides reliable error estimates. We successfully apply our method to the solution of the quantum mechanical Kepler, Yukawa and the coupled ODE Stark problems.

  19. A numerical method for parameterization of atmospheric chemistry - Computation of tropospheric OH

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spivakovsky, C. M.; Wofsy, S. C.; Prather, M. J.

    1990-01-01

    An efficient and stable computational scheme for parameterization of atmospheric chemistry is described. The 24-hour-average concentration of OH is represented as a set of high-order polynomials in variables such as temperature, densities of H2O, CO, O3, and NO(t) (defined as NO + NO2 + NO3 + 2N2O5 + HNO2 + HNO4) as well as variables determining solar irradiance: cloud cover, density of the overhead ozone column, surface albedo, latitude, and solar declination. This parameterization of OH chemistry was used in the three-dimensional study of global distribution of CH3CCl3. The proposed computational scheme can be used for parameterization of rates of chemical production and loss or of any other output of a full chemical model.

  20. Efficient numerical method for computation of the thermohydrodynamics of laminar lubricating films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elrod, H. G.

    1991-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe an accurate, yet economical, method for computing temperature effects in laminar lubricating films in two dimensions. Because of the marked dependence of lubricant viscosity on temperature, the effect of viscosity variation both across and along a lubricating film can dwarf other deviations from ideal constant-property lubrication. In practice, a thermohydrodynamics program will involve simultaneous solution of the film lubrication problem, together with heat conduction in a solid, complex structure. In pursuit of computational economy, techniques similar to those for Gaussian quadrature are used; it is shown that, for many purposes, the use of just two properly positioned temperatures (Lobatto points) characterizes the transverse temperature distribution.

  1. Numerical Computation of Diffusion Properties in Molecular Systems on a Topology-Conforming Grid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teo, Ivan; Schulten, Klaus

    2012-02-01

    Multiscale problems involving diffusion in molecular systems are a mainstay of computational biophysics. Given a molecular system, the local diffusion coefficient D(r) as well as the equilibrium distribution function P(r) that characterizes the local free energy are computed to describe the kinetics of diffusing particles at each point in space through the Smoluchowski equation (SE). An irregular grid of space-varying fineness conforming to P(r) is generated via the method of topology-representing networks and a subsequent Voronoi tessellation. The discretized SE produces a rate matrix which describes the probabilities of particles hopping from point to point on the grid. We demonstrate the calculation of the rate matrix for ions diffusing through the balloon-like structure of the mechanosensitive channel of small conductance (MscS) and thence the determination of mean first-passage times that characterize conduction of ions through balloon and channel.

  2. Numerical Simulation of Hypersonic Aerodynamics and the Computational Needs for the Design of an Aerospace Plane

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-01-01

    amounts of energy, Convenience: Computational results are immediately obtainable but experimental results are difficult to measure , calibrate, and...mean-square RNS = reduced Navier Stokes R x = mass diffusion term such as in a species equation R i = Richardson number, a measure of vertical dynamic...the basic orthogonally transformed equations are, if we define Jacobian of the coordinate transformation, where g = g11 22 g+ [+ [19]2 which measures

  3. Numerical studies on the electromagnetic properties of the nonlinear Lorentz Computational model for the dielectric media

    SciTech Connect

    Abe, H.; Okuda, H.

    1994-06-01

    We study linear and nonlinear properties of a new computer simulation model developed to study the propagation of electromagnetic waves in a dielectric medium in the linear and nonlinear regimes. The model is constructed by combining a microscopic model used in the semi-classical approximation for the dielectric media and the particle model developed for the plasma simulations. It is shown that the model may be useful for studying linear and nonlinear wave propagation in the dielectric media.

  4. Software Aspects of IEEE Floating-Point Computations for Numerical Applications in High Energy Physics

    SciTech Connect

    2010-05-11

    Floating-point computations are at the heart of much of the computing done in high energy physics. The correctness, speed and accuracy of these computations are of paramount importance. The lack of any of these characteristics can mean the difference between new, exciting physics and an embarrassing correction. This talk will examine practical aspects of IEEE 754-2008 floating-point arithmetic as encountered in HEP applications. After describing the basic features of IEEE floating-point arithmetic, the presentation will cover: common hardware implementations (SSE, x87) techniques for improving the accuracy of summation, multiplication and data interchange compiler options for gcc and icc affecting floating-point operations hazards to be avoided About the speaker Jeffrey M Arnold is a Senior Software Engineer in the Intel Compiler and Languages group at Intel Corporation. He has been part of the Digital->Compaq->Intel compiler organization for nearly 20 years; part of that time, he worked on both low- and high-level math libraries. Prior to that, he was in the VMS Engineering organization at Digital Equipment Corporation. In the late 1980s, Jeff spent 2½ years at CERN as part of the CERN/Digital Joint Project. In 2008, he returned to CERN to spent 10 weeks working with CERN/openlab. Since that time, he has returned to CERN multiple times to teach at openlab workshops and consult with various LHC experiments. Jeff received his Ph.D. in physics from Case Western Reserve University.

  5. A numerical study of different projection-based model reduction techniques applied to computational homogenisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soldner, Dominic; Brands, Benjamin; Zabihyan, Reza; Steinmann, Paul; Mergheim, Julia

    2017-06-01

    Computing the macroscopic material response of a continuum body commonly involves the formulation of a phenomenological constitutive model. However, the response is mainly influenced by the heterogeneous microstructure. Computational homogenisation can be used to determine the constitutive behaviour on the macro-scale by solving a boundary value problem at the micro-scale for every so-called macroscopic material point within a nested solution scheme. Hence, this procedure requires the repeated solution of similar microscopic boundary value problems. To reduce the computational cost, model order reduction techniques can be applied. An important aspect thereby is the robustness of the obtained reduced model. Within this study reduced-order modelling (ROM) for the geometrically nonlinear case using hyperelastic materials is applied for the boundary value problem on the micro-scale. This involves the Proper Orthogonal Decomposition (POD) for the primary unknown and hyper-reduction methods for the arising nonlinearity. Therein three methods for hyper-reduction, differing in how the nonlinearity is approximated and the subsequent projection, are compared in terms of accuracy and robustness. Introducing interpolation or Gappy-POD based approximations may not preserve the symmetry of the system tangent, rendering the widely used Galerkin projection sub-optimal. Hence, a different projection related to a Gauss-Newton scheme (Gauss-Newton with Approximated Tensors- GNAT) is favoured to obtain an optimal projection and a robust reduced model.

  6. Software Aspects of IEEE Floating-Point Computations for Numerical Applications in High Energy Physics

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    Floating-point computations are at the heart of much of the computing done in high energy physics. The correctness, speed and accuracy of these computations are of paramount importance. The lack of any of these characteristics can mean the difference between new, exciting physics and an embarrassing correction. This talk will examine practical aspects of IEEE 754-2008 floating-point arithmetic as encountered in HEP applications. After describing the basic features of IEEE floating-point arithmetic, the presentation will cover: common hardware implementations (SSE, x87) techniques for improving the accuracy of summation, multiplication and data interchange compiler options for gcc and icc affecting floating-point operations hazards to be avoided About the speaker Jeffrey M Arnold is a Senior Software Engineer in the Intel Compiler and Languages group at Intel Corporation. He has been part of the Digital->Compaq->Intel compiler organization for nearly 20 years; part of that time, he worked on both low- and high-level math libraries. Prior to that, he was in the VMS Engineering organization at Digital Equipment Corporation. In the late 1980s, Jeff spent 2½ years at CERN as part of the CERN/Digital Joint Project. In 2008, he returned to CERN to spent 10 weeks working with CERN/openlab. Since that time, he has returned to CERN multiple times to teach at openlab workshops and consult with various LHC experiments. Jeff received his Ph.D. in physics from Case Western Reserve University.

  7. Numerical simulation of biofilm growth in flow channels using a cellular automaton approach coupled with a macro flow computation.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Takehiro; Ueda, Shuya

    2013-01-01

    Biofilm is a slime-like complex aggregate of microorganisms and their products, extracellular polymer substances, that grows on a solid surface. The growth phenomenon of biofilm is relevant to the corrosion and clogging of water pipes, the chemical processes in a bioreactor, and bioremediation. In these phenomena, the behavior of the biofilm under flow has an important role. Therefore, controlling the biofilm behavior in each process is important. To provide a computational tool for analyzing biofilm growth, the present study proposes a computational model for the simulation of biofilm growth in flows. This model accounts for the growth, decay, detachment and adhesion of biofilms. The proposed model couples the computation of the surrounding fluid flow, using the finite volume method, with the simulation of biofilm growth, using the cellular automaton approach, a relatively low-computational-cost method. Furthermore, a stochastic approach for considering the adhesion process is proposed. Numerical simulations for the biofilm growth on a planar wall and that in an L-shaped rectangular channel were carried out. A variety of biofilm structures were observed depending on the strength of the flow. Moreover, the importance of the detachment and adhesion processes was confirmed.

  8. Numerical Investigation of Different Radial Inlet Forms for Centrifugal Compressor and Influence of the Deflectors Number by Means of Computational Fluid Dynamics Methods with Computational Model Validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozhukhov, Y. V.; Yun, V. K.; Reshetnikova, L. V.; Prokopovich, M. V.

    2015-08-01

    The goal of this work is numerical experiments for five different types of the centrifugal compressor's inlet chambers with the help of CFD-methods and comparison of the computational results with the results of the real experiment which was held in the Nevskiy Lenin Plant in Saint-Petersburg. In the context of one of the chambers the influence of deflectors on its characteristics was investigated. The objects of investigation are 5 inlet chambers of different types which differ from each other by deflectors’ existence and by its number. The comparative analyze of the results of numerical and real experiments was held by means of comparison of relative velocity and static pressure coefficient distribution on hub and shroud region, and also by means of loss coefficient values change for all five chambers. As a result of the numerical calculation the quantitative and qualitative departure of CFD- calculations results and real experiment were found out. The investigation of the influence of the number of deflectors on flow parameters was carried out. The results of the study prove that the presence of the deflectors on flow path significantly increases the probability of the flow separations and reversed flows appearance on them. At the same time, the complete absence of the deflectors in the chamber significantly increases circumferential distortion of the flow; however the loss coefficient decreases anyway, the high values of which are caused by the shock flow existence. Thus, the profiling of the deflectors of the inlet chamber should be given a special attention.

  9. Six degree of freedom simulation of fluid payload projectiles using numerically computed fluid moments

    SciTech Connect

    Vaughn, H.R.; Wolfe, W.P.; Oberkampf, W.L.

    1985-07-01

    A flight trajectory simulation method has been developed for calculating the six degree of freedom motion of fluid filled projectiles. Numerically calculated internal fluid moments and experimentally known aerodynamic forces and moments are coupled to the projectile motion. Comparisons of predicted results with flight test data of an M483 155mm artillery projectile with a highly viscous payload confirm the accuracy of the simulation. This simulation clearly shows that the flight instability is due to the growth of the nutation component of angular motion caused by the viscous effects of the fluid payload. This simulation procedure, when used in conjunction with the previously developed method for calculating internal fluid moments, allows the designer to examine the effects of various liquid payloads and container geometries on the dynamic behavior of flight vehicles.

  10. The combination of symbolic and numerical computation for three-dimensional modeling of RNA.

    PubMed

    Major, F; Turcotte, M; Gautheret, D; Lapalme, G; Fillion, E; Cedergren, R

    1991-09-13

    Three-dimensional (3-D) structural models of RNA are essential for understanding of the cellular roles played by RNA. Such models have been obtained by a technique based on a constraint satisfaction algorithm that allows for the facile incorporation of secondary and other structural information. The program generates 3-D structures of RNA with atomic-level resolution that can be refined by numerical techniques such as energy minimization. The precision of this technique was evaluated by comparing predicted transfer RNA loop and RNA pseudoknot structures with known or consensus structures. The root-mean-square deviation (2.0 to 3.0 angstroms before minimization) between predicted and control structures reveal this system to be an effective method in modeling RNA.

  11. Desirable floating-point arithmetic and elementary functions for numerical computation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hull, T. E.

    1978-01-01

    The topics considered are: (1) the base of the number system, (2) precision control, (3) number representation, (4) arithmetic operations, (5) other basic operations, (6) elementary functions, and (7) exception handling. The possibility of doing without fixed-point arithmetic is also mentioned. The specifications are intended to be entirely at the level of a programming language such as FORTRAN. The emphasis is on convenience and simplicity from the user's point of view. Conforming to such specifications would have obvious beneficial implications for the portability of numerical software, and for proving programs correct, as well as attempting to provide facilities which are most suitable for the user. The specifications are not complete in every detail, but it is intended that they be complete in spirit - some further details, especially syntatic details, would have to be provided, but the proposals are otherwise relatively complete.

  12. Desirable floating-point arithmetic and elementary functions for numerical computation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hull, T. E.

    1978-01-01

    The topics considered are: (1) the base of the number system, (2) precision control, (3) number representation, (4) arithmetic operations, (5) other basic operations, (6) elementary functions, and (7) exception handling. The possibility of doing without fixed-point arithmetic is also mentioned. The specifications are intended to be entirely at the level of a programming language such as FORTRAN. The emphasis is on convenience and simplicity from the user's point of view. Conforming to such specifications would have obvious beneficial implications for the portability of numerical software, and for proving programs correct, as well as attempting to provide facilities which are most suitable for the user. The specifications are not complete in every detail, but it is intended that they be complete in spirit - some further details, especially syntatic details, would have to be provided, but the proposals are otherwise relatively complete.

  13. Assessment of three numerical methods for the computation of a low-density plume flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Penko, Paul F.; Riley, Ben R.; Boyd, Iain D.

    1993-01-01

    Results from three numerical methods including one based on the Navier-Stokes equations, one based on kinetic theory using the DSMC method, and one based on the Boltzmann equation with a Krook-type collision term are compared to each other and to experimental data for a model problem of heated nitrogen flow in a conical nozzle expanding into a vacuum. The problem simulates flow in a resistojet, a low-thrust, electrothermal rocket. The continuum method is applied to both the internal flow and near-field plume. The DSMC and Boltzmann methods are applied primarily to the plume. Experimental measurements of Pitot pressure and flow angle, taken with an apparatus that duplicates the model nozzle flow, are used in the comparisons.

  14. Velocity Fields of Axisymmetric Hydrogen-Air Counterflow Diffusion Flames from LDV, PIV, and Numerical Computation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pellett, Gerald L.; Wilson, Lloyd G.; Humphreys, William M., Jr.; Bartram, Scott M.; Gartrell, Luther R.; Isaac, K. M.

    1995-01-01

    Laminar fuel-air counterflow diffusion flames (CFDFs) were studied using axisymmetric convergent-nozzle and straight-tube opposed jet burners (OJBs). The subject diagnostics were used to probe a systematic set of H2/N2-air CFDFs over wide ranges of fuel input (22 to 100% Ha), and input axial strain rate (130 to 1700 Us) just upstream of the airside edge, for both plug-flow and parabolic input velocity profiles. Laser Doppler Velocimetry (LDV) was applied along the centerline of seeded air flows from a convergent nozzle OJB (7.2 mm i.d.), and Particle Imaging Velocimetry (PIV) was applied on the entire airside of both nozzle and tube OJBs (7 and 5 mm i.d.) to characterize global velocity structure. Data are compared to numerical results from a one-dimensional (1-D) CFDF code based on a stream function solution for a potential flow input boundary condition. Axial strain rate inputs at the airside edge of nozzle-OJB flows, using LDV and PIV, were consistent with 1-D impingement theory, and supported earlier diagnostic studies. The LDV results also characterized a heat-release hump. Radial strain rates in the flame substantially exceeded 1-D numerical predictions. Whereas the 1-D model closely predicted the max I min axial velocity ratio in the hot layer, it overpredicted its thickness. The results also support previously measured effects of plug-flow and parabolic input strain rates on CFDF extinction limits. Finally, the submillimeter-scale LDV and PIV diagnostics were tested under severe conditions, which reinforced their use with subcentimeter OJB tools to assess effects of aerodynamic strain, and fueVair composition, on laminar CFDF properties, including extinction.

  15. Modeling and Numerical Challenges in Eulerian-Lagrangian Computations of Shock-driven Multiphase Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diggs, Angela; Balachandar, Sivaramakrishnan

    2015-06-01

    The present work addresses the numerical methods required for particle-gas and particle-particle interactions in Eulerian-Lagrangian simulations of multiphase flow. Local volume fraction as seen by each particle is the quantity of foremost importance in modeling and evaluating such interactions. We consider a general multiphase flow with a distribution of particles inside a fluid flow discretized on an Eulerian grid. Particle volume fraction is needed both as a Lagrangian quantity associated with each particle and also as an Eulerian quantity associated with the flow. In Eulerian Projection (EP) methods, the volume fraction is first obtained within each cell as an Eulerian quantity and then interpolated to each particle. In Lagrangian Projection (LP) methods, the particle volume fraction is obtained at each particle and then projected onto the Eulerian grid. Traditionally, EP methods are used in multiphase flow, but sub-grid resolution can be obtained through use of LP methods. By evaluating the total error and its components we compare the performance of EP and LP methods. The standard von Neumann error analysis technique has been adapted for rigorous evaluation of rate of convergence. The methods presented can be extended to obtain accurate field representations of other Lagrangian quantities. Most importantly, we will show that such careful attention to numerical methodologies is needed in order to capture complex shock interaction with a bed of particles. Supported by U.S. Department of Defense SMART Program and the U.S. Department of Energy PSAAP-II program under Contract No. DE-NA0002378.

  16. Numerical computation of pyramidal quantum dots with band non-parabolicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Liang; Shu, Yong-chun; Xu, Jing-jun; Wang, Zhan-guo

    2013-09-01

    This paper presents an effective and feasible eigen-energy scanning method to solve polynomial matrix eigenvalues introduced by 3D quantum dots problem with band non-parabolicity. The pyramid-shaped quantum dot is placed in a computational box with uniform mesh in Cartesian coordinates. Its corresponding Schrödinger equation is discretized by the finite difference method. The interface conditions are incorporated into the discretization scheme without explicitly enforcing them. By comparing the eigenvalues from isolated quantum dots and a vertically aligned regular array of them, we investigate the coupling effect for variable distances between the quantum dots and different size.

  17. Interpolation Method Needed for Numerical Uncertainty Analysis of Computational Fluid Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groves, Curtis; Ilie, Marcel; Schallhorn, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) to predict a flow field is an approximation to the exact problem and uncertainties exist. There is a method to approximate the errors in CFD via Richardson's Extrapolation. This method is based off of progressive grid refinement. To estimate the errors in an unstructured grid, the analyst must interpolate between at least three grids. This paper describes a study to find an appropriate interpolation scheme that can be used in Richardson's extrapolation or other uncertainty method to approximate errors. Nomenclature

  18. Comparison of Numerical Schemes for a Realistic Computational Aeroacoustics Benchmark Problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hixon, R.; Wu, J.; Nallasamy, M.; Sawyer, S.; Dyson, R.

    2004-01-01

    In this work, a nonlinear structured-multiblock CAA solver, the NASA GRC BASS code, will be tested on a realistic CAA benchmark problem. The purpose of this test is to ascertain what effect the high-accuracy solution methods used in CAA have on a realistic test problem, where both the mean flow and the unsteady waves are simultaneously computed on a fully curvilinear grid from a commercial grid generator. The proposed test will compare the solutions obtained using several finite-difference methods on identical grids to determine whether high-accuracy schemes have advantages for this benchmark problem.

  19. Comprehensive analysis of neutrino events in the Super-Kamiokande type detector from the view point of the Computer Numerical Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konoshi, E.; Takahashi, N.; Galkin, V. I.; Misaki, A.

    2008-07-01

    Comparisons are made on the direction of the incident neutrino, zenith angle distribution of neutrino events produced both inside and outside the detector between the Super-Kamiokande Experiment and our Computer Numerical Experiment.

  20. Comparison of FDTD numerical computations and analytical multipole expansion method for plasmonics-active nanosphere dimers.

    PubMed

    Dhawan, Anuj; Norton, Stephen J; Gerhold, Michael D; Vo-Dinh, Tuan

    2009-06-08

    This paper describes a comparative study of finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) and analytical evaluations of electromagnetic fields in the vicinity of dimers of metallic nanospheres of plasmonics-active metals. The results of these two computational methods, to determine electromagnetic field enhancement in the region often referred to as "hot spots" between the two nanospheres forming the dimer, were compared and a strong correlation observed for gold dimers. The analytical evaluation involved the use of the spherical-harmonic addition theorem to relate the multipole expansion coefficients between the two nanospheres. In these evaluations, the spacing between two nanospheres forming the dimer was varied to obtain the effect of nanoparticle spacing on the electromagnetic fields in the regions between the nanostructures. Gold and silver were the metals investigated in our work as they exhibit substantial plasmon resonance properties in the ultraviolet, visible, and near-infrared spectral regimes. The results indicate excellent correlation between the two computational methods, especially for gold nanosphere dimers with only a 5-10% difference between the two methods. The effect of varying the diameters of the nanospheres forming the dimer, on the electromagnetic field enhancement, was also studied.

  1. Computer-assisted numerical analysis for oxygen and carbon dioxide mass transfer in blood oxygenators.

    PubMed

    Turri, Fabio; Yanagihara, Jurandir Itizo

    2011-06-01

    A two-dimensional numeric simulator is developed to predict the nonlinear, convective-reactive, oxygen mass exchange in a cross-flow hollow fiber blood oxygenator. The numeric simulator also calculates the carbon dioxide mass exchange, as hemoglobin affinity to oxygen is affected by the local pH value, which depends mostly on the local carbon dioxide content in blood. Blood pH calculation inside the oxygenator is made by the simultaneous solution of an equation that takes into account the blood buffering capacity and the classical Henderson-Hasselbach equation. The modeling of the mass transfer conductance in the blood comprises a global factor, which is a function of the Reynolds number, and a local factor, which takes into account the amount of oxygen reacted to hemoglobin. The simulator is calibrated against experimental data for an in-line fiber bundle. The results are: (i) the calibration process allows the precise determination of the mass transfer conductance for both oxygen and carbon dioxide; (ii) very alkaline pH values occur in the blood path at the gas inlet side of the fiber bundle; (iii) the parametric analysis of the effect of the blood base excess (BE) shows that (.)V(CO₂) is similar in the case of blood metabolic alkalosis, metabolic acidosis, or normal BE, for a similar blood inlet P(CO₂), although the condition of metabolic alkalosis is the worst case, as the pH in the vicinity of the gas inlet is the most alkaline; (iv) the parametric analysis of the effect of the gas flow to blood flow ratio (QG/QB) shows that (.)V(CO₂) variation with the gas flow is almost linear up to QG/QB = 2.0. (.)V(O₂) is not affected by the gas flow as it was observed that by increasing the gas flow up to eight times, the (.)V(O₂) grows only 1%. The mass exchange of carbon dioxide uses the full length of the hollow-fiber only if Q(G) /Q(B)> 2.0, as it was observed that only in this condition does the local variation of pH and blood P(CO₂) comprise the whole

  2. Numerical computation of the linear stability of the diffusion model for crystal growth simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, C.; Sorensen, D.C.; Meiron, D.I.; Wedeman, B.

    1996-12-31

    We consider a computational scheme for determining the linear stability of a diffusion model arising from the simulation of crystal growth. The process of a needle crystal solidifying into some undercooled liquid can be described by the dual diffusion equations with appropriate initial and boundary conditions. Here U{sub t} and U{sub a} denote the temperature of the liquid and solid respectively, and {alpha} represents the thermal diffusivity. At the solid-liquid interface, the motion of the interface denoted by r and the temperature field are related by the conservation relation where n is the unit outward pointing normal to the interface. A basic stationary solution to this free boundary problem can be obtained by writing the equations of motion in a moving frame and transforming the problem to parabolic coordinates. This is known as the Ivantsov parabola solution. Linear stability theory applied to this stationary solution gives rise to an eigenvalue problem of the form.

  3. Numerical computation of multishocked, three-dimensional supersonic flow fields with real gas effects.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kutler, P.; Reinhardt, W. A.; Warming, R. F.

    1972-01-01

    A computational procedure is presented which is capable of determining the supersonic flow field surrounding three-dimensional wing-body configurations such as a delta-wing space shuttle. The governing equations in conservation-law form are solved by a finite difference method using a second-order noncentered algorithm between the body and the outermost shock wave, which is treated as a sharp discontinuity. Secondary shocks which form between these boundaries are captured automatically, and the intersection of these shocks with the bow shock posed no difficulty. Resulting flow fields about typical blunt nose shuttle-like configurations at angle of attack are presented. The differences between perfect and real gas effects for high Mach number flows are shown.

  4. The rapid and precise computation of GPS slant total delays and mapping factors utilizing a numerical weather model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zus, Florian; Dick, Galina; Douša, Jan; Heise, Stefan; Wickert, Jens

    2014-03-01

    In a previous study we developed an elegant technique to compute the signal travel time delay due to the neutral atmosphere, also known as slant total delay (STD), between a Global Positioning System (GPS) satellite and a ground-based receiver utilizing data from a numerical weather model (NWM). Currently, we make use of NWM data from the Global Forecast System (GFS) because short-range forecasts are easily accessible. In this study we introduce some modifications which double the speed of our algorithm without altering its precision; on an ordinary PC (using a single core) we compute about 2000 STDs per second with a precision of about 1 mm. The data throughput and precision are independent of the vacuum elevation (azimuth) angle of the receiver satellite link. Hence, the algorithm allows the computation of STDs in a mesobeta-scale NWM with an unprecedented speed and precision. A practical by-product of the algorithm is introduced as well; the Potsdam Mapping Factors (PMFs), which are generated by fast direct mapping utilizing short-range GFS forecasts. In fact, it appears that the PMFs make the application of parameterized mapping in GPS processing obsolete.

  5. Computational efficiency of numerical approximations of tangent moduli for finite element implementation of a fiber-reinforced hyperelastic material model.

    PubMed

    Liu, Haofei; Sun, Wei

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we evaluated computational efficiency of finite element (FE) simulations when a numerical approximation method was used to obtain the tangent moduli. A fiber-reinforced hyperelastic material model for nearly incompressible soft tissues was implemented for 3D solid elements using both the approximation method and the closed-form analytical method, and validated by comparing the components of the tangent modulus tensor (also referred to as the material Jacobian) between the two methods. The computational efficiency of the approximation method was evaluated with different perturbation parameters and approximation schemes, and quantified by the number of iteration steps and CPU time required to complete these simulations. From the simulation results, it can be seen that the overall accuracy of the approximation method is improved by adopting the central difference approximation scheme compared to the forward Euler approximation scheme. For small-scale simulations with about 10,000 DOFs, the approximation schemes could reduce the CPU time substantially compared to the closed-form solution, due to the fact that fewer calculation steps are needed at each integration point. However, for a large-scale simulation with about 300,000 DOFs, the advantages of the approximation schemes diminish because the factorization of the stiffness matrix will dominate the solution time. Overall, as it is material model independent, the approximation method simplifies the FE implementation of a complex constitutive model with comparable accuracy and computational efficiency to the closed-form solution, which makes it attractive in FE simulations with complex material models.

  6. Influence of numerical dissipation in computing supersonic vortex-dominated flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kandil, O. A.; Chuang, A.

    1986-01-01

    Steady supersonic vortex-dominated flows are solved using the unsteady Euler equations for conical and three-dimensional flows around sharp- and round-edged delta wings. The computational method is a finite-volume scheme which uses a four-stage Runge-Kutta time stepping with explicit second- and fourth-order dissipation terms. The grid is generated by a modified Joukowski transformation. The steady flow solution is obtained through time-stepping with initial conditions corresponding to the freestream conditions, and the bow shock is captured as a part of the solution. The scheme is applied to flat-plate and elliptic-section wings with a leading edge sweep of 70 deg at an angle of attack of 10 deg and a freestream Mach number of 2.0. Three grid sizes of 29 x 39, 65 x 65 and 100 x 100 have been used. The results for sharp-edged wings show that they are consistent with all grid sizes and variation of the artificial viscosity coefficients. The results for round-edged wings show that separated and attached flow solutions can be obtained by varying the artificial viscosity coefficients. They also show that the solutions are independent of the way time stepping is done. Local time-stepping and global minimum time-steeping produce same solutions.

  7. Numerical computation of gravitational field of general extended body and its application to rotation curve study of galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukushima, Toshio

    2017-06-01

    Reviewed are recently developed methods of the numerical integration of the gravitational field of general two- or three-dimensional bodies with arbitrary shape and mass density distribution: (i) an axisymmetric infinitely-thin disc (Fukushima 2016a, MNRAS, 456, 3702), (ii) a general infinitely-thin plate (Fukushima 2016b, MNRAS, 459, 3825), (iii) a plane-symmetric and axisymmetric ring-like object (Fukushima 2016c, AJ, 152, 35), (iv) an axisymmetric thick disc (Fukushima 2016d, MNRAS, 462, 2138), and (v) a general three-dimensional body (Fukushima 2016e, MNRAS, 463, 1500). The key techniques employed are (a) the split quadrature method using the double exponential rule (Takahashi and Mori, 1973, Numer. Math., 21, 206), (b) the precise and fast computation of complete elliptic integrals (Fukushima 2015, J. Comp. Appl. Math., 282, 71), (c) Ridder's algorithm of numerical differentiaion (Ridder 1982, Adv. Eng. Softw., 4, 75), (d) the recursive computation of the zonal toroidal harmonics, and (e) the integration variable transformation to the local spherical polar coordinates. These devices succesfully regularize the Newton kernel in the integrands so as to provide accurate integral values. For example, the general 3D potential is regularly integrated as Φ (\\vec{x}) = - G \\int_0^∞ ( \\int_{-1}^1 ( \\int_0^{2π} ρ (\\vec{x}+\\vec{q}) dψ ) dγ ) q dq, where \\vec{q} = q (√{1-γ^2} cos ψ, √{1-γ^2} sin ψ, γ), is the relative position vector referred to \\vec{x}, the position vector at which the potential is evaluated. As a result, the new methods can compute the potential and acceleration vector very accurately. In fact, the axisymmetric integration reproduces the Miyamoto-Nagai potential with 14 correct digits. The developed methods are applied to the gravitational field study of galaxies and protoplanetary discs. Among them, the investigation on the rotation curve of M33 supports a disc-like structure of the dark matter with a double-power-law surface

  8. An efficient algorithm for numerical computations of continuous densities of states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langfeld, K.; Lucini, B.; Pellegrini, R.; Rago, A.

    2016-06-01

    In Wang-Landau type algorithms, Monte-Carlo updates are performed with respect to the density of states, which is iteratively refined during simulations. The partition function and thermodynamic observables are then obtained by standard integration. In this work, our recently introduced method in this class (the LLR approach) is analysed and further developed. Our approach is a histogram free method particularly suited for systems with continuous degrees of freedom giving rise to a continuum density of states, as it is commonly found in lattice gauge theories and in some statistical mechanics systems. We show that the method possesses an exponential error suppression that allows us to estimate the density of states over several orders of magnitude with nearly constant relative precision. We explain how ergodicity issues can be avoided and how expectation values of arbitrary observables can be obtained within this framework. We then demonstrate the method using compact U(1) lattice gauge theory as a show case. A thorough study of the algorithm parameter dependence of the results is performed and compared with the analytically expected behaviour. We obtain high precision values for the critical coupling for the phase transition and for the peak value of the specific heat for lattice sizes ranging from 8^4 to 20^4. Our results perfectly agree with the reference values reported in the literature, which covers lattice sizes up to 18^4. Robust results for the 20^4 volume are obtained for the first time. This latter investigation, which, due to strong metastabilities developed at the pseudo-critical coupling of the system, so far has been out of reach even on supercomputers with importance sampling approaches, has been performed to high accuracy with modest computational resources. This shows the potential of the method for studies of first order phase transitions. Other situations where the method is expected to be superior to importance sampling techniques are pointed

  9. High-immersion three-dimensional display of the numerical computer model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, Shujun; Yu, Xunbo; Zhao, Tianqi; Cai, Yuanfa; Chen, Duo; Chen, Zhidong; Sang, Xinzhu

    2013-08-01

    High-immersion three-dimensional (3D) displays making them valuable tools for many applications, such as designing and constructing desired building houses, industrial architecture design, aeronautics, scientific research, entertainment, media advertisement, military areas and so on. However, most technologies provide 3D display in the front of screens which are in parallel with the walls, and the sense of immersion is decreased. To get the right multi-view stereo ground image, cameras' photosensitive surface should be parallax to the public focus plane and the cameras' optical axes should be offset to the center of public focus plane both atvertical direction and horizontal direction. It is very common to use virtual cameras, which is an ideal pinhole camera to display 3D model in computer system. We can use virtual cameras to simulate the shooting method of multi-view ground based stereo image. Here, two virtual shooting methods for ground based high-immersion 3D display are presented. The position of virtual camera is determined by the people's eye position in the real world. When the observer stand in the circumcircle of 3D ground display, offset perspective projection virtual cameras is used. If the observer stands out the circumcircle of 3D ground display, offset perspective projection virtual cameras and the orthogonal projection virtual cameras are adopted. In this paper, we mainly discussed the parameter setting of virtual cameras. The Near Clip Plane parameter setting is the main point in the first method, while the rotation angle of virtual cameras is the main point in the second method. In order to validate the results, we use the D3D and OpenGL to render scenes of different viewpoints and generate a stereoscopic image. A realistic visualization system for 3D models is constructed and demonstrated for viewing horizontally, which provides high-immersion 3D visualization. The displayed 3D scenes are compared with the real objects in the real world.

  10. Computational Numerical Electromagnetics for the Solution of Guided-Wave and Radiating Problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkins, Gregory M.

    2002-12-01

    Electronic packaging encompasses several different scientific and engineering disciplines. These range from applied physics, which may address the stress analysis of the materials within the package, to thermal engineering, which probes the heat transfer between individual components. In the current research we are interested in the electrical aspects since our concern is to focus attention on the design of the components and the corresponding electromagnetic field behavior within the component, and to investigate the factors which may limit the performance of very-large-scale-integrated (VLSI) circuits. Much work is being done in the area of electromagnetic modeling, particularly in the higher frequencies of operation such as those involved in the use of microwave and millimeter wave integrated circuits (MIC, MMIC, respectively) for electromagnetic systems. Although we need to observe the electromagnetic effects on the individual circuit elements themselves, we must also take into account the effects due to materials and other parameters which support and connect these elements to one another. It is of great importance that we do not neglect the interconnections, and their environments, and that we incorporate this type of information into our design procedure. Failure to do so may greatly affect the outcome of our electronic device design. The current study focuses on applications of several computational electromagnetics methodologies to electromagnetic systems. The following are examples of examples to current technology: 1. Adaptive mesh refinement is essential in the study of small discontinuities such as an iris or a thin slot. To adequately model the behavior in these regions, the discretization must be on the order of the size of the discontinuity; 2. An alternative to adaptive mesh refinement may be the use of non-standard mesh element configurations. In thin-layer regions with high field activity, standard discretization configurations such as triangle

  11. Direct Numerical Simulation of Boiling Multiphase Flows: State-of-the-Art, Modeling, Algorithmic and Computer Needs

    SciTech Connect

    Nourgaliev R.; Knoll D.; Mousseau V.; Berry R.

    2007-04-01

    The state-of-the-art for Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) of boiling multiphase flows is reviewed, focussing on potential of available computational techniques, the level of current success for their applications to model several basic flow regimes (film, pool-nucleate and wall-nucleate boiling -- FB, PNB and WNB, respectively). Then, we discuss multiphysics and multiscale nature of practical boiling flows in LWR reactors, requiring high-fidelity treatment of interfacial dynamics, phase-change, hydrodynamics, compressibility, heat transfer, and non-equilibrium thermodynamics and chemistry of liquid/vapor and fluid/solid-wall interfaces. Finally, we outline the framework for the {\\sf Fervent} code, being developed at INL for DNS of reactor-relevant boiling multiphase flows, with the purpose of gaining insight into the physics of multiphase flow regimes, and generating a basis for effective-field modeling in terms of its formulation and closure laws.

  12. Numerical computation and validation of two-phase flow downstream of a gas turbine combustor dome swirl cup

    SciTech Connect

    Tolpadi, A.K.; Burrus, D.L.; Lawson, R.J.

    1995-10-01

    The two-phase axisymmetric flow field downstream of the swirl cup of an advanced gas turbine combustor is studied numerically and validated against experimental Phase-Doppler Particle Analyzer (PDPA) data. The swirl cup analyzed is that of a single annular GE/SNECMA CFM56 turbofan engine that is comprised of a pair of coaxial counterswirling air streams together with a fuel atomizer. The atomized fuel mixes with the swirling air stream, resulting in the establishment of a complex two-phase flow field within the swirl chamber. The analysis procedure involves the solution of the gas phase equations in an Eulerian frame of reference using the code CONCERT. CONCERT has been developed and used extensively in the past and represents a fully elliptic body-fitted computational fluid dynamics code to predict flow fields in practical full-scale combustors. The flow in this study is assumed to be nonreacting and isothermal. The liquid phase is simulated by using a droplet spray model and by treating the motion of the fuel droplets in a Lagrangian frame of reference. Extensive PDPA data for the CFM56 engine swirl cup have been obtained at atmospheric pressure by using water as the fuel (Wang et al., 1992a). The PDPA system makes pointwise measurements that are fundamentally Eulerian. Measurements have been made of the continuous gas phase velocity together with discrete phase attributes such as droplet size, droplet number count, and droplet velocity distribution at various axial stations downstream of the injector. Numerical calculations were performed under the exact inlet and boundary conditions as the experimental measurements. The computed gas phase velocity field showed good agreement with the test data.

  13. Interfacial kinematics and governing mechanisms under the influence of high strain rate impact conditions: Numerical computations of experimental observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raoelison, R. N.; Sapanathan, T.; Padayodi, E.; Buiron, N.; Rachik, M.

    2016-11-01

    This paper investigates the complex interfacial kinematics and governing mechanisms during high speed impact conditions. A robust numerical modelling technique using Eulerian simulations are used to explain the material response of the interface subjected to a high strain rate collision during a magnetic pulse welding. The capability of this model is demonstrated using the predictions of interfacial kinematics and revealing the governing mechanical behaviours. Numerical predictions of wave formation resulted with the upward or downward jetting and complex interfacial mixing governed by wake and vortex instabilities corroborate the experimental observations. Moreover, the prediction of the material ejection during the simulation explains the experimentally observed deposited particles outside the welded region. Formations of internal cavities along the interface is also closely resemble the resulted confined heating at the vicinity of the interface appeared from those wake and vortex instabilities. These results are key features of this simulation that also explains the potential mechanisms in the defects formation at the interface. These results indicate that the Eulerian computation not only has the advantage of predicting the governing mechanisms, but also it offers a non-destructive approach to identify the interfacial defects in an impact welded joint.

  14. Computer programs of information processing of nuclear physical methods as a demonstration material in studying nuclear physics and numerical methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bateev, A. B.; Filippov, V. P.

    2017-01-01

    The principle possibility of using computer program Univem MS for Mössbauer spectra fitting as a demonstration material at studying such disciplines as atomic and nuclear physics and numerical methods by students is shown in the article. This program is associated with nuclear-physical parameters such as isomer (or chemical) shift of nuclear energy level, interaction of nuclear quadrupole moment with electric field and of magnetic moment with surrounded magnetic field. The basic processing algorithm in such programs is the Least Square Method. The deviation of values of experimental points on spectra from the value of theoretical dependence is defined on concrete examples. This value is characterized in numerical methods as mean square deviation. The shape of theoretical lines in the program is defined by Gaussian and Lorentzian distributions. The visualization of the studied material on atomic and nuclear physics can be improved by similar programs of the Mössbauer spectroscopy, X-ray Fluorescence Analyzer or X-ray diffraction analysis.

  15. Development of problem-oriented software packages for numerical studies and computer-aided design (CAD) of gyrotrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damyanova, M.; Sabchevski, S.; Zhelyazkov, I.; Vasileva, E.; Balabanova, E.; Dankov, P.; Malinov, P.

    2016-03-01

    Gyrotrons are the most powerful sources of coherent CW (continuous wave) radiation in the frequency range situated between the long-wavelength edge of the infrared light (far-infrared region) and the microwaves, i.e., in the region of the electromagnetic spectrum which is usually called the THz-gap (or T-gap), since the output power of other devices (e.g., solid-state oscillators) operating in this interval is by several orders of magnitude lower. In the recent years, the unique capabilities of the sub-THz and THz gyrotrons have opened the road to many novel and future prospective applications in various physical studies and advanced high-power terahertz technologies. In this paper, we present the current status and functionality of the problem-oriented software packages (most notably GYROSIM and GYREOSS) used for numerical studies, computer-aided design (CAD) and optimization of gyrotrons for diverse applications. They consist of a hierarchy of codes specialized to modelling and simulation of different subsystems of the gyrotrons (EOS, resonant cavity, etc.) and are based on adequate physical models, efficient numerical methods and algorithms.

  16. Numerical simulation of airflow fields in two typical nasal structures of empty nose syndrome: a computational fluid dynamics study.

    PubMed

    Di, Meng-Yang; Jiang, Zhe; Gao, Zhi-Qiang; Li, Zhi; An, Yi-Ran; Lv, Wei

    2013-01-01

    The pathogenesis of empty nose syndrome (ENS) has not been elucidated so far. Though postulated, there remains a lack of experimental evidence about the roles of nasal aerodynamics on the development of ENS. To investigate the nasal aerodynamic features of ENS andto explore the role of aerodynamic changes on the pathogenesis of ENS. Seven sinonasal models were numerically constructed, based on the high resolution computed tomography images of seven healthy male adults. Bilateral radical inferior/middle turbinectomy were numerically performed to mimic the typical nasal structures of ENS-inferior turbinate (ENS-IT) and ENS-middle turbinate (ENS-MT). A steady laminar model was applied in calculation. Velocity, pressure, streamlines, air flux and wall shear stress were numerically investigated. Each parameter of normal structures was compared with those of the corresponding pathological models of ENS-IT and ENS-MT, respectively. ENS-MT: Streamlines, air flux distribution, and wall shear stress distribution were generally similar to those of the normal structures; nasal resistances decreased. Velocities decreased locally, while increased around the sphenopalatine ganglion by 0.20 ± 0.17 m/s and 0.22 ± 0.10 m/s during inspiration and expiration, respectively. ENS-IT: Streamlines were less organized with new vortexes shown near the bottom wall. The airflow rates passing through the nasal olfactory area decreased by 26.27% ± 8.68% and 13.18% ± 7.59% during inspiration and expiration, respectively. Wall shear stresses, nasal resistances and local velocities all decreased. Our CFD simulation study suggests that the changes in nasal aerodynamics may play an essential role in the pathogenesis of ENS. An increased velocity around the sphenopalatine ganglion in the ENS-MT models could be responsible for headache in patients with ENS-MT. However, these results need to be validated in further studies with a larger sample size and more complicated calculating models.

  17. Numerical Simulation of Airflow Fields in Two Typical Nasal Structures of Empty Nose Syndrome: A Computational Fluid Dynamics Study

    PubMed Central

    Di, Meng-Yang; Jiang, Zhe; Gao, Zhi-Qiang; Li, Zhi; An, Yi-Ran; Lv, Wei

    2013-01-01

    Background The pathogenesis of empty nose syndrome (ENS) has not been elucidated so far. Though postulated, there remains a lack of experimental evidence about the roles of nasal aerodynamics on the development of ENS. Objective To investigate the nasal aerodynamic features of ENS andto explore the role of aerodynamic changes on the pathogenesis of ENS. Methods Seven sinonasal models were numerically constructed, based on the high resolution computed tomography images of seven healthy male adults. Bilateral radical inferior/middle turbinectomy were numerically performed to mimic the typical nasal structures of ENS-inferior turbinate (ENS-IT) and ENS-middle turbinate (ENS-MT). A steady laminar model was applied in calculation. Velocity, pressure, streamlines, air flux and wall shear stress were numerically investigated. Each parameter of normal structures was compared with those of the corresponding pathological models of ENS-IT and ENS-MT, respectively. Results ENS-MT: Streamlines, air flux distribution, and wall shear stress distribution were generally similar to those of the normal structures; nasal resistances decreased. Velocities decreased locally, while increased around the sphenopalatine ganglion by 0.20±0.17m/s and 0.22±0.10m/s during inspiration and expiration, respectively. ENS-IT: Streamlines were less organized with new vortexes shown near the bottom wall. The airflow rates passing through the nasal olfactory area decreased by 26.27%±8.68% and 13.18%±7.59% during inspiration and expiration, respectively. Wall shear stresses, nasal resistances and local velocities all decreased. Conclusion Our CFD simulation study suggests that the changes in nasal aerodynamics may play an essential role in the pathogenesis of ENS. An increased velocity around the sphenopalatine ganglion in the ENS-MT models could be responsible for headache in patients with ENS-MT. However, these results need to be validated in further studies with a larger sample size and more

  18. Contrast-enhanced microwave imaging of breast tumors: a computational study using 3D realistic numerical phantoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shea, J. D.; Kosmas, P.; Van Veen, B. D.; Hagness, S. C.

    2010-07-01

    The detection of early-stage tumors in the breast by microwave imaging is challenged by both the moderate endogenous dielectric contrast between healthy and malignant glandular tissues and the spatial resolution available from illumination at microwave frequencies. The high endogenous dielectric contrast between adipose and fibroglandular tissue structures increases the difficulty of tumor detection due to the high dynamic range of the contrast function to be imaged and the low level of signal scattered from a tumor relative to the clutter scattered by normal tissue structures. Microwave inverse scattering techniques, used to estimate the complete spatial profile of the dielectric properties within the breast, have the potential to reconstruct both normal and cancerous tissue structures. However, the ill-posedness of the associated inverse problem often limits the frequency of microwave illumination to the UHF band within which early-stage cancers have sub-wavelength dimensions. In this computational study, we examine the reconstruction of small, compact tumors in three-dimensional numerical breast phantoms by a multiple-frequency inverse scattering solution. Computer models are also employed to investigate the use of exogenous contrast agents for enhancing tumor detection. Simulated array measurements are acquired before and after the introduction of the assumed contrast effects for two specific agents currently under consideration for breast imaging: microbubbles and carbon nanotubes. Differential images of the applied contrast demonstrate the potential of the approach for detecting the preferential uptake of contrast agents by malignant tissues.

  19. Physical and numerical sources of computational inefficiency in integration of chemical kinetic rate equations: Etiology, treatment and prognosis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pratt, D. T.; Radhakrishnan, K.

    1986-01-01

    The design of a very fast, automatic black-box code for homogeneous, gas-phase chemical kinetics problems requires an understanding of the physical and numerical sources of computational inefficiency. Some major sources reviewed in this report are stiffness of the governing ordinary differential equations (ODE's) and its detection, choice of appropriate method (i.e., integration algorithm plus step-size control strategy), nonphysical initial conditions, and too frequent evaluation of thermochemical and kinetic properties. Specific techniques are recommended (and some advised against) for improving or overcoming the identified problem areas. It is argued that, because reactive species increase exponentially with time during induction, and all species exhibit asymptotic, exponential decay with time during equilibration, exponential-fitted integration algorithms are inherently more accurate for kinetics modeling than classical, polynomial-interpolant methods for the same computational work. But current codes using the exponential-fitted method lack the sophisticated stepsize-control logic of existing black-box ODE solver codes, such as EPISODE and LSODE. The ultimate chemical kinetics code does not exist yet, but the general characteristics of such a code are becoming apparent.

  20. Can a numerically stable subgrid-scale model for turbulent flow computation be ideally accurate?: a preliminary theoretical study for the Gaussian filtered Navier-Stokes equations.

    PubMed

    Ida, Masato; Taniguchi, Nobuyuki

    2003-09-01

    This paper introduces a candidate for the origin of the numerical instabilities in large eddy simulation repeatedly observed in academic and practical industrial flow computations. Without resorting to any subgrid-scale modeling, but based on a simple assumption regarding the streamwise component of flow velocity, it is shown theoretically that in a channel-flow computation, the application of the Gaussian filtering to the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations yields a numerically unstable term, a cross-derivative term, which is similar to one appearing in the Gaussian filtered Vlasov equation derived by Klimas [J. Comput. Phys. 68, 202 (1987)] and also to one derived recently by Kobayashi and Shimomura [Phys. Fluids 15, L29 (2003)] from the tensor-diffusivity subgrid-scale term in a dynamic mixed model. The present result predicts that not only the numerical methods and the subgrid-scale models employed but also only the applied filtering process can be a seed of this numerical instability. An investigation concerning the relationship between the turbulent energy scattering and the unstable term shows that the instability of the term does not necessarily represent the backscatter of kinetic energy which has been considered a possible origin of numerical instabilities in large eddy simulation. The present findings raise the question whether a numerically stable subgrid-scale model can be ideally accurate.

  1. Computer numerical control (CNC) lithography: light-motion synchronized UV-LED lithography for 3D microfabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jungkwun; Yoon, Yong-Kyu; Allen, Mark G.

    2016-03-01

    This paper presents a computer-numerical-controlled ultraviolet light-emitting diode (CNC UV-LED) lithography scheme for three-dimensional (3D) microfabrication. The CNC lithography scheme utilizes sequential multi-angled UV light exposures along with a synchronized switchable UV light source to create arbitrary 3D light traces, which are transferred into the photosensitive resist. The system comprises a switchable, movable UV-LED array as a light source, a motorized tilt-rotational sample holder, and a computer-control unit. System operation is such that the tilt-rotational sample holder moves in a pre-programmed routine, and the UV-LED is illuminated only at desired positions of the sample holder during the desired time period, enabling the formation of complex 3D microstructures. This facilitates easy fabrication of complex 3D structures, which otherwise would have required multiple manual exposure steps as in the previous multidirectional 3D UV lithography approach. Since it is batch processed, processing time is far less than that of the 3D printing approach at the expense of some reduction in the degree of achievable 3D structure complexity. In order to produce uniform light intensity from the arrayed LED light source, the UV-LED array stage has been kept rotating during exposure. UV-LED 3D fabrication capability was demonstrated through a plurality of complex structures such as V-shaped micropillars, micropanels, a micro-‘hi’ structure, a micro-‘cat’s claw,’ a micro-‘horn,’ a micro-‘calla lily,’ a micro-‘cowboy’s hat,’ and a micro-‘table napkin’ array.

  2. An Analysis of the Muon-Like Events as the Fully Contained Events in the Super-Kamiokande through the Computer Numerical Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konishi, E.; Minorikawa, Y.; Galkin, V.I.; Ishiwata, M.; Nakamura, I.; Takahashi, N.; Kato, M.; Misaki, A.

    We analyze the muon-like Events(single ring image ) in the Super-Kamiokande (SK) by the Computer Numerical Experiment. Assuming the parameters of the neutrino oscillation obtained by the SK which characterize the type of the neutrino oscillation, we reproduce the zenith angle distribution of the muon-like events and compare it with the real distribution obtained by the SK . Also, we carry out the L/E analysis of the muon-like events by the Computer Numerical Experiment and compare it with that by the SK.

  3. Assessing the influence of the rhizosphere on soil hydraulic properties using X-ray computed tomography and numerical modelling

    PubMed Central

    Daly, Keith R.; Mooney, Sacha J.; Bennett, Malcolm J.; Crout, Neil M. J.; Roose, Tiina; Tracy, Saoirse R.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the dynamics of water distribution in soil is crucial for enhancing our knowledge of managing soil and water resources. The application of X-ray computed tomography (CT) to the plant and soil sciences is now well established. However, few studies have utilized the technique for visualizing water in soil pore spaces. Here this method is utilized to visualize the water in soil in situ and in three-dimensions at successive reductive matric potentials in bulk and rhizosphere soil. The measurements are combined with numerical modelling to determine the unsaturated hydraulic conductivity, providing a complete picture of the hydraulic properties of the soil. The technique was performed on soil cores that were sampled adjacent to established roots (rhizosphere soil) and from soil that had not been influenced by roots (bulk soil). A water release curve was obtained for the different soil types using measurements of their pore geometries derived from CT imaging and verified using conventional methods, such as pressure plates. The water, soil, and air phases from the images were segmented and quantified using image analysis. The water release characteristics obtained for the contrasting soils showed clear differences in hydraulic properties between rhizosphere and bulk soil, especially in clay soil. The data suggest that soils influenced by roots (rhizosphere soil) are less porous due to increased aggregation when compared with bulk soil. The information and insights obtained on the hydraulic properties of rhizosphere and bulk soil will enhance our understanding of rhizosphere biophysics and improve current water uptake models. PMID:25740922

  4. The Impact of Numerical Control Technology and Computer Aided Manufacturing on Curriculum Development in Industrial Education and Technology. A Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bauch, Klaus Dieter

    The study was designed to investigate the effects of Numerical Control Technology and Computer-Aided Manufacturing (NC/CAM) in American industry on industrial education and engineering technology education. The specific purpose was to identify a data base and rationale for curriculum development in NC/CAM through a comparison of views by…

  5. Assessing the influence of the rhizosphere on soil hydraulic properties using X-ray computed tomography and numerical modelling.

    PubMed

    Daly, Keith R; Mooney, Sacha J; Bennett, Malcolm J; Crout, Neil M J; Roose, Tiina; Tracy, Saoirse R

    2015-04-01

    Understanding the dynamics of water distribution in soil is crucial for enhancing our knowledge of managing soil and water resources. The application of X-ray computed tomography (CT) to the plant and soil sciences is now well established. However, few studies have utilized the technique for visualizing water in soil pore spaces. Here this method is utilized to visualize the water in soil in situ and in three-dimensions at successive reductive matric potentials in bulk and rhizosphere soil. The measurements are combined with numerical modelling to determine the unsaturated hydraulic conductivity, providing a complete picture of the hydraulic properties of the soil. The technique was performed on soil cores that were sampled adjacent to established roots (rhizosphere soil) and from soil that had not been influenced by roots (bulk soil). A water release curve was obtained for the different soil types using measurements of their pore geometries derived from CT imaging and verified using conventional methods, such as pressure plates. The water, soil, and air phases from the images were segmented and quantified using image analysis. The water release characteristics obtained for the contrasting soils showed clear differences in hydraulic properties between rhizosphere and bulk soil, especially in clay soil. The data suggest that soils influenced by roots (rhizosphere soil) are less porous due to increased aggregation when compared with bulk soil. The information and insights obtained on the hydraulic properties of rhizosphere and bulk soil will enhance our understanding of rhizosphere biophysics and improve current water uptake models. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  6. LiPISC: A Lightweight and Flexible Method for Privacy-Aware Intersection Set Computation

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Shiyong; Ren, Yi; Choo, Kim-Kwang Raymond

    2016-01-01

    Privacy-aware intersection set computation (PISC) can be modeled as secure multi-party computation. The basic idea is to compute the intersection of input sets without leaking privacy. Furthermore, PISC should be sufficiently flexible to recommend approximate intersection items. In this paper, we reveal two previously unpublished attacks against PISC, which can be used to reveal and link one input set to another input set, resulting in privacy leakage. We coin these as Set Linkage Attack and Set Reveal Attack. We then present a lightweight and flexible PISC scheme (LiPISC) and prove its security (including against Set Linkage Attack and Set Reveal Attack). PMID:27326763

  7. The Computation of Global Viscoelastic Co- and Post-seismic Displacement in a Realistic Earth Model by Straightforward Numerical Inverse Laplace Integration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, H.; Sun, W.

    2016-12-01

    The theoretical computation of dislocation theory in a given earth model is necessary in the explanation of observations of the co- and post-seismic deformation of earthquakes. For this purpose, computation theories based on layered or pure half space [Okada, 1985; Okubo, 1992; Wang et al., 2006] and on spherically symmetric earth [Piersanti et al., 1995; Pollitz, 1997; Sabadini & Vermeersen, 1997; Wang, 1999] have been proposed. It is indicated that the compressibility, curvature and the continuous variation of the radial structure of Earth should be simultaneously taken into account for modern high precision displacement-based observations like GPS. Therefore, Tanaka et al. [2006; 2007] computed global displacement and gravity variation by combining the reciprocity theorem (RPT) [Okubo, 1993] and numerical inverse Laplace integration (NIL) instead of the normal mode method [Peltier, 1974]. Without using RPT, we follow the straightforward numerical integration of co-seismic deformation given by Sun et al. [1996] to present a straightforward numerical inverse Laplace integration method (SNIL). This method is used to compute the co- and post-seismic displacement of point dislocations buried in a spherically symmetric, self-gravitating viscoelastic and multilayered earth model and is easy to extended to the application of geoid and gravity. Comparing with pre-existing method, this method is relatively more straightforward and time-saving, mainly because we sum associated Legendre polynomials and dislocation love numbers before using Riemann-Merlin formula to implement SNIL.

  8. Numerical Uncertainty Analysis for Computational Fluid Dynamics using Student T Distribution -- Application of CFD Uncertainty Analysis Compared to Exact Analytical Solution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groves, Curtis E.; Ilie, marcel; Shallhorn, Paul A.

    2014-01-01

    Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) is the standard numerical tool used by Fluid Dynamists to estimate solutions to many problems in academia, government, and industry. CFD is known to have errors and uncertainties and there is no universally adopted method to estimate such quantities. This paper describes an approach to estimate CFD uncertainties strictly numerically using inputs and the Student-T distribution. The approach is compared to an exact analytical solution of fully developed, laminar flow between infinite, stationary plates. It is shown that treating all CFD input parameters as oscillatory uncertainty terms coupled with the Student-T distribution can encompass the exact solution.

  9. Numerical methods for matrix computations using arrays of processors. Final report, 15 August 1983-15 October 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Golub, G.H.

    1987-04-30

    The basic objective of this project was to consider a large class of matrix computations with particular emphasis on algorithms that can be implemented on arrays of processors. In particular, methods useful for sparse matrix computations were investigated. These computations arise in a variety of applications such as the solution of partial differential equations by multigrid methods and in the fitting of geodetic data. Some of the methods developed have already found their use on some of the newly developed architectures.

  10. Q-S (lag or anticipated) synchronization backstepping scheme in a class of continuous-time hyperchaotic systems--a symbolic-numeric computation approach.

    PubMed

    Yan, Zhenya

    2005-06-01

    First, a Q-S (lag or anticipated) synchronization of continuous-time dynamical systems is defined. Second, based on a backstepping design with one controller, a systematic, concrete, and automatic scheme is developed to investigate the Q-S (lag or anticipated) synchronization between the drive system and response system with a strict-feedback form. Two identical hyperchaotic Tamasevicius-Namajunas-Cenys(TNC) systems as well as the hyperchaotic TNC system and hyperchaotic Rossler system are chosen to illustrate the proposed scheme. Numerical simulations are used to verify the effectiveness of the proposed scheme. The scheme can also be extended to study Q-S (lag or anticipated) synchronization between other dynamical systems with strict-feedback forms. With the aid of symbolic-numeric computation, the scheme can be performed to yield automatically the scalar controller in computer.

  11. A Workshop on the Integration of Numerical and Symbolic Computing Methods Held in Saratoga Springs, New York on July 9-11, 1990

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-04-01

    SUMMARY OF COMPLETED PROJECT (for public use) The summary (about 200 words) must be self-contained and intellegible to a scientifically literate reader...dialogue among re- searchers in symbolic methods and numerical computation, and their appli- cations in certain disciplines of artificial intelligence...Lozano-Perez Purdue University Artificial Intelligence Laboratory West Lafayette, IN 47907 Massachusetts Institute of Technology (317) 494-6181 545

  12. A robust and efficient numerical method to compute the dynamics of the rotating two-component dipolar Bose-Einstein condensates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Qinglin; Zhang, Yong; Mauser, Norbert J.

    2017-10-01

    We present a robust and efficient numerical method to compute the dynamics of the rotating two-component dipolar Bose-Einstein condensates (BEC). Using the rotating Lagrangian coordinates transform (Bao et al., 2013), we reformulate the original coupled Gross-Pitaevskii equations (CGPE) into new equations where the rotating term vanishes and the potential becomes time-dependent. A time-splitting Fourier pseudospectral method is proposed to numerically solve the new equations where the nonlocal Dipole-Dipole Interactions (DDI) are computed by a newly-developed Gaussian-sum (GauSum) solver (Exl et al., 2016) which helps achieve spectral accuracy in space within O(N log N) operations (N is the total number of grid points). The new method is spectrally accurate in space and second order accurate in time - these accuracies are confirmed numerically. Dynamical properties of some physical quantities, including the total mass, energy, center of mass and angular momentum expectation, are presented and confirmed numerically. Interesting dynamical phenomena that are peculiar to the rotating two-component dipolar BECs, such as dynamics of center of mass, quantized vortex lattices dynamics and the collapse dynamics in 3D, are presented.

  13. Optimal computation of guided wave propagation and scattering in pipeworks comprising elbows: Numerical and experimental validations and parametric studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Bakkali, M.; Lhémery, A.; Chapuis, B.; Berthelot, F.; Grondel, S.

    2015-03-01

    Simulation tools of guided wave (GW) examination are developed at CEA to help inspection design and results interpretation. In a previous paper [M. El Bakkali, A. Lhémery, V. Baronian and F. Berthelot, (AIP Conf. Proc. 1581), pp. 332-9 (2014)], a model was developed to deal with GW propagation in elbows, GW scattering at the junction of a straight and a curved guides and GW multiple-scattering by an elbow joined to two straight pipes. The method is computationally optimal: many results are obtained by fast post-processing. Modes in the straight and curved guides are computed once by the semi-analytic finite element method; this implies solving two systems of equations over their shared cross-section meshed by FE. Scattering at a junction of straight and curved pipes requires computing surface integrals over the same section for applying the mode-matching method. For varying elbow angle, computing scattering coefficients of the straight-curved-straight double junction requires multiplying scattering matrices local to one junction with analytic propagation matrices in the curved guide that are angle-dependent. The aim here is twofold. First, the model is validated by comparison of its predictions with results computed by the finite element method and with measurements. Second, the model is used for parametric studies made easy by its computing efficiency.

  14. A computationally efficient and accurate numerical representation of thermodynamic properties of steam and water for computations of non-equilibrium condensing steam flow in steam turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hrubý, Jan

    2012-04-01

    Mathematical modeling of the non-equilibrium condensing transonic steam flow in the complex 3D geometry of a steam turbine is a demanding problem both concerning the physical concepts and the required computational power. Available accurate formulations of steam properties IAPWS-95 and IAPWS-IF97 require much computation time. For this reason, the modelers often accept the unrealistic ideal-gas behavior. Here we present a computation scheme based on a piecewise, thermodynamically consistent representation of the IAPWS-95 formulation. Density and internal energy are chosen as independent variables to avoid variable transformations and iterations. On the contrary to the previous Tabular Taylor Series Expansion Method, the pressure and temperature are continuous functions of the independent variables, which is a desirable property for the solution of the differential equations of the mass, energy, and momentum conservation for both phases.

  15. Numerical computation of spherical harmonics of arbitrary degree and order by extending exponent of floating point numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukushima, Toshio

    2012-04-01

    By extending the exponent of floating point numbers with an additional integer as the power index of a large radix, we compute fully normalized associated Legendre functions (ALF) by recursion without underflow problem. The new method enables us to evaluate ALFs of extremely high degree as 232 = 4,294,967,296, which corresponds to around 1 cm resolution on the Earth's surface. By limiting the application of exponent extension to a few working variables in the recursion, choosing a suitable large power of 2 as the radix, and embedding the contents of the basic arithmetic procedure of floating point numbers with the exponent extension directly in the program computing the recurrence formulas, we achieve the evaluation of ALFs in the double-precision environment at the cost of around 10% increase in computational time per single ALF. This formulation realizes meaningful execution of the spherical harmonic synthesis and/or analysis of arbitrary degree and order.

  16. An improved numerical procedure for the parametric optimization of three dimensional scramjet nozzles. [supersonic combustion ramjet engines - computer programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dash, S.; Delguidice, P. D.

    1975-01-01

    A parametric numerical procedure permitting the rapid determination of the performance of a class of scramjet nozzle configurations is presented. The geometric complexity of these configurations ruled out attempts to employ conventional nozzle design procedures. The numerical program developed permitted the parametric variation of cowl length, turning angles on the cowl and vehicle undersurface and lateral expansion, and was subject to fixed constraints such as the vehicle length and nozzle exit height. The program required uniform initial conditions at the burner exit station and yielded the location of all predominant wave zones, accounting for lateral expansion effects. In addition, the program yielded the detailed pressure distribution on the cowl, vehicle undersurface and fences, if any, and calculated the nozzle thrust, lift and pitching moments.

  17. Numerical simulation of unsteady vortex structures in near wake of poorly streamlined bodies on multiprocessor computer system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babakov, A. V.; Novikov, P. A.

    2011-02-01

    On the basis of the conservative difference method, spatially unsteady flows near complexly shaped objects are studied. The mathematical model is based on the inviscid gas model. For subsonic, transonic, and supersonic regimes, the nonstationary aerodynamics of various aerospace objects is examined. The three-dimensional structure of the unsteady vortex near wake and its influence on the basic aerodynamic characteristics of aerial vehicles are visualized. The numerical simulation is performed using parallel algorithms on supercomputers of cluster architecture.

  18. Numerical methods for the analysis of sampled-data systems and for the computation of system zeros

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodel, A. Scottedward

    1992-01-01

    MARSYAS is a computer-aided control system design package for the simulation and analysis of dynamic systems. In the summer of 1991 MARSYAS was updated to allow for the analysis of sampled-data systems in terms of frequency response, stability, etc. This update was continued during the summer of 1992 in order to extend further MARSYAS commands to the study of sampled-data systems. Further work was done to examine the computation of OPENAT transfer functions, root-locii and w-plane frequency response plots.

  19. Turbulent structures in wall-bounded shear flows observed via three-dimensional numerical simulators. [using the Illiac 4 computer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leonard, A.

    1980-01-01

    Three recent simulations of tubulent shear flow bounded by a wall using the Illiac computer are reported. These are: (1) vibrating-ribbon experiments; (2) study of the evolution of a spot-like disturbance in a laminar boundary layer; and (3) investigation of turbulent channel flow. A number of persistent flow structures were observed, including streamwise and vertical vorticity distributions near the wall, low-speed and high-speed streaks, and local regions of intense vertical velocity. The role of these structures in, for example, the growth or maintenance of turbulence is discussed. The problem of representing the large range of turbulent scales in a computer simulation is also discussed.

  20. Numerical nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rijkhorst, Erik-Jan

    2005-12-01

    The late stages of evolution of stars like our Sun are dominated by several episodes of violent mass loss. Space based observations of the resulting objects, known as Planetary Nebulae, show a bewildering array of highly symmetric shapes. The interplay between gasdynamics and radiative processes determines the morphological outcome of these objects, and numerical models for astrophysical gasdynamics have to incorporate these effects. This thesis presents new numerical techniques for carrying out high-resolution three-dimensional radiation hydrodynamical simulations. Such calculations require parallelization of computer codes, and the use of state-of-the-art supercomputer technology. Numerical models in the context of the shaping of Planetary Nebulae are presented, providing insight into their origin and fate.

  1. An improved numerical method to compute neutron/gamma deexcitation cascades starting from a high spin state

    DOE PAGES

    Regnier, D.; Litaize, O.; Serot, O.

    2015-12-23

    Numerous nuclear processes involve the deexcitation of a compound nucleus through the emission of several neutrons, gamma-rays and/or conversion electrons. The characteristics of such a deexcitation are commonly derived from a total statistical framework often called “Hauser–Feshbach” method. In this work, we highlight a numerical limitation of this kind of method in the case of the deexcitation of a high spin initial state. To circumvent this issue, an improved technique called the Fluctuating Structure Properties (FSP) method is presented. Two FSP algorithms are derived and benchmarked on the calculation of the total radiative width for a thermal neutron capture onmore » 238U. We compare the standard method with these FSP algorithms for the prediction of particle multiplicities in the deexcitation of a high spin level of 143Ba. The gamma multiplicity turns out to be very sensitive to the numerical method. The bias between the two techniques can reach 1.5 γγ/cascade. Lastly, the uncertainty of these calculations coming from the lack of knowledge on nuclear structure is estimated via the FSP method.« less

  2. An improved numerical method to compute neutron/gamma deexcitation cascades starting from a high spin state

    SciTech Connect

    Regnier, D.; Litaize, O.; Serot, O.

    2015-12-23

    Numerous nuclear processes involve the deexcitation of a compound nucleus through the emission of several neutrons, gamma-rays and/or conversion electrons. The characteristics of such a deexcitation are commonly derived from a total statistical framework often called “Hauser–Feshbach” method. In this work, we highlight a numerical limitation of this kind of method in the case of the deexcitation of a high spin initial state. To circumvent this issue, an improved technique called the Fluctuating Structure Properties (FSP) method is presented. Two FSP algorithms are derived and benchmarked on the calculation of the total radiative width for a thermal neutron capture on 238U. We compare the standard method with these FSP algorithms for the prediction of particle multiplicities in the deexcitation of a high spin level of 143Ba. The gamma multiplicity turns out to be very sensitive to the numerical method. The bias between the two techniques can reach 1.5 γγ/cascade. Lastly, the uncertainty of these calculations coming from the lack of knowledge on nuclear structure is estimated via the FSP method.

  3. Proposed Use of the NASA Ames Nebula Cloud Computing Platform for Numerical Weather Prediction and the Distribution of High Resolution Satellite Imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Limaye, Ashutosh S.; Molthan, Andrew L.; Srikishen, Jayanthi

    2010-01-01

    The development of the Nebula Cloud Computing Platform at NASA Ames Research Center provides an open-source solution for the deployment of scalable computing and storage capabilities relevant to the execution of real-time weather forecasts and the distribution of high resolution satellite data to the operational weather community. Two projects at Marshall Space Flight Center may benefit from use of the Nebula system. The NASA Short-term Prediction Research and Transition (SPoRT) Center facilitates the use of unique NASA satellite data and research capabilities in the operational weather community by providing datasets relevant to numerical weather prediction, and satellite data sets useful in weather analysis. SERVIR provides satellite data products for decision support, emphasizing environmental threats such as wildfires, floods, landslides, and other hazards, with interests in numerical weather prediction in support of disaster response. The Weather Research and Forecast (WRF) model Environmental Modeling System (WRF-EMS) has been configured for Nebula cloud computing use via the creation of a disk image and deployment of repeated instances. Given the available infrastructure within Nebula and the "infrastructure as a service" concept, the system appears well-suited for the rapid deployment of additional forecast models over different domains, in response to real-time research applications or disaster response. Future investigations into Nebula capabilities will focus on the development of a web mapping server and load balancing configuration to support the distribution of high resolution satellite data sets to users within the National Weather Service and international partners of SERVIR.

  4. Computer code for scattering from impedance bodies of revolution. Part 3: Surface impedance with s and phi variation. Analytical and numerical results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Uslenghi, Piergiorgio L. E.; Laxpati, Sharad R.; Kawalko, Stephen F.

    1993-01-01

    The third phase of the development of the computer codes for scattering by coated bodies that has been part of an ongoing effort in the Electromagnetics Laboratory of the Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Department at the University of Illinois at Chicago is described. The work reported discusses the analytical and numerical results for the scattering of an obliquely incident plane wave by impedance bodies of revolution with phi variation of the surface impedance. Integral equation formulation of the problem is considered. All three types of integral equations, electric field, magnetic field, and combined field, are considered. These equations are solved numerically via the method of moments with parametric elements. Both TE and TM polarization of the incident plane wave are considered. The surface impedance is allowed to vary along both the profile of the scatterer and in the phi direction. Computer code developed for this purpose determines the electric surface current as well as the bistatic radar cross section. The results obtained with this code were validated by comparing the results with available results for specific scatterers such as the perfectly conducting sphere. Results for the cone-sphere and cone-cylinder-sphere for the case of an axially incident plane were validated by comparing the results with the results with those obtained in the first phase of this project. Results for body of revolution scatterers with an abrupt change in the surface impedance along both the profile of the scatterer and the phi direction are presented.

  5. Three-Dimensional Imaging and Numerical Reconstruction of Graphite/Epoxy Composite Microstructure Based on Ultra-High Resolution X-Ray Computed Tomography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Czabaj, M. W.; Riccio, M. L.; Whitacre, W. W.

    2014-01-01

    A combined experimental and computational study aimed at high-resolution 3D imaging, visualization, and numerical reconstruction of fiber-reinforced polymer microstructures at the fiber length scale is presented. To this end, a sample of graphite/epoxy composite was imaged at sub-micron resolution using a 3D X-ray computed tomography microscope. Next, a novel segmentation algorithm was developed, based on concepts adopted from computer vision and multi-target tracking, to detect and estimate, with high accuracy, the position of individual fibers in a volume of the imaged composite. In the current implementation, the segmentation algorithm was based on Global Nearest Neighbor data-association architecture, a Kalman filter estimator, and several novel algorithms for virtualfiber stitching, smoothing, and overlap removal. The segmentation algorithm was used on a sub-volume of the imaged composite, detecting 508 individual fibers. The segmentation data were qualitatively compared to the tomographic data, demonstrating high accuracy of the numerical reconstruction. Moreover, the data were used to quantify a) the relative distribution of individual-fiber cross sections within the imaged sub-volume, and b) the local fiber misorientation relative to the global fiber axis. Finally, the segmentation data were converted using commercially available finite element (FE) software to generate a detailed FE mesh of the composite volume. The methodology described herein demonstrates the feasibility of realizing an FE-based, virtual-testing framework for graphite/fiber composites at the constituent level.

  6. Numerical Analysis of Organ Doses Delivered During Computed Tomography Examinations Using Japanese Adult Phantoms with the WAZA-ARI Dosimetry System.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Fumiaki; Sato, Kaoru; Endo, Akira; Ono, Koji; Ban, Nobuhiko; Hasegawa, Takayuki; Katsunuma, Yasushi; Yoshitake, Takayasu; Kai, Michiaki

    2015-08-01

    A dosimetry system for computed tomography (CT) examinations, named WAZA-ARI, is being developed to accurately assess radiation doses to patients in Japan. For dose calculations in WAZA-ARI, organ doses were numerically analyzed using average adult Japanese male (JM) and female (JF) phantoms with the Particle and Heavy Ion Transport code System (PHITS). Experimental studies clarified the photon energy distribution of emitted photons and dose profiles on the table for some multi-detector row CT (MDCT) devices. Numerical analyses using a source model in PHITS could specifically take into account emissions of x rays from the tube to the table with attenuation of photons through a beam-shaping filter for each MDCT device based on the experiment results. The source model was validated by measuring the CT dose index (CTDI). Numerical analyses with PHITS revealed a concordance of organ doses with body sizes of the JM and JF phantoms. The organ doses in the JM phantoms were compared with data obtained using previously developed systems. In addition, the dose calculations in WAZA-ARI were verified with previously reported results by realistic NUBAS phantoms and radiation dose measurement using a physical Japanese model (THRA1 phantom). The results imply that numerical analyses using the Japanese phantoms and specified source models can give reasonable estimates of dose for MDCT devices for typical Japanese adults.

  7. Self Learning of Negative Number Concepts by Lower Division Elementary Students through Solving Computer-Provided Numerical Problems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hativa, Nira; Cohen, Dorit

    1995-01-01

    Two fourth-grade classes served in a study that employed computers for promoting autonomous learning processes through solving challenging problems adapted to students' aptitudes using the number line as an intuitive model. Findings showed that students have preinstructional intuitions and informal knowledge of negative numbers. (24 references)…

  8. Saturation-free numerical scheme for computing the flow past a lattice of airfoils and the determination of separation points in a viscous fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrov, A. G.

    2011-07-01

    A numerical method for computing the potential flow past a lattice of airfoils is described. The problem is reduced to a linear integrodifferential equation on the lattice contour, which is then approximated by a linear system of equations with the help of specially derived quadrature formulas. The quadrature formulas exhibit exponential convergence in the number of points on an airfoil and have a simple analytical form. Due to its fast convergence and high accuracy, the method can be used to directly optimize the airfoils as based on any given integral characteristics. The shear stress distribution and the separation points are determined from the velocity distribution at the airfoil boundary calculated by solving the boundary layer equations. The method proposed is free of laborious grid generation procedures and does not involve difficulties associated with numerical viscosity at high Reynolds numbers.

  9. The inverse Numerical Computer Program FLUX-BOT for estimating Vertical Water Fluxes from Temperature Time-Series.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trauth, N.; Schmidt, C.; Munz, M.

    2016-12-01

    Heat as a natural tracer to quantify water fluxes between groundwater and surface water has evolved to a standard hydrological method. Typically, time series of temperatures in the surface water and in the sediment are observed and are subsequently evaluated by a vertical 1D representation of heat transport by advection and dispersion. Several analytical solutions as well as their implementation into user-friendly software exist in order to estimate water fluxes from the observed temperatures. Analytical solutions can be easily implemented but assumptions on the boundary conditions have to be made a priori, e.g. sinusoidal upper temperature boundary. Numerical models offer more flexibility and can handle temperature data which is characterized by irregular variations such as storm-event induced temperature changes and thus cannot readily be incorporated in analytical solutions. This also reduced the effort of data preprocessing such as the extraction of the diurnal temperature variation. We developed a software to estimate water FLUXes Based On Temperatures- FLUX-BOT. FLUX-BOT is a numerical code written in MATLAB which is intended to calculate vertical water fluxes in saturated sediments, based on the inversion of measured temperature time series observed at multiple depths. It applies a cell-centered Crank-Nicolson implicit finite difference scheme to solve the one-dimensional heat advection-conduction equation. Besides its core inverse numerical routines, FLUX-BOT includes functions visualizing the results and functions for performing uncertainty analysis. We provide applications of FLUX-BOT to generic as well as to measured temperature data to demonstrate its performance.

  10. On the use of co-ordinate stretching in the numeral computation of high frequency scattering. [of jet engine noise by fuselage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bayliss, A.

    1978-01-01

    The scattering of the sound of a jet engine by an airplane fuselage is modeled by solving the axially symmetric Helmholtz equation exterior to a long thin ellipsoid. The integral equation method based on the single layer potential formulation is used. A family of coordinate systems on the body is introduced and an algorithm is presented to determine the optimal coordinate system. Numerical results verify that the optimal choice enables the solution to be computed with a grid that is coarse relative to the wavelength.

  11. Validation of two 3-D numerical computation codes for the flows in an annular cascade of high turning angle turbine blades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wensheng, Wang; Fengxian, Zhang; Yanji, Xu; Naixing, Chen

    This paper describes and validates two improved three-dimensional numerical methods employed for calculating the flows in an annular cascade of high turning angle turbine blades tested by the authors in the annular cascade wind tunnel of the Institute of Engineering Thermophysics. Comparisons between the predictions and measurements were made on the static pressure contours of blade pressure and suction surfaces, and the spanwise distributions of pitchwise area-averaged static pressure coefficient and flow angle in the downstream of the cascade. The agreement between the calculated results and experimental data shows good and validates the reliability and applicability of the computation codes.

  12. A field programmable gate array-based reconfigurable smart-sensor network for wireless monitoring of new generation computer numerically controlled machines.

    PubMed

    Moreno-Tapia, Sandra Veronica; Vera-Salas, Luis Alberto; Osornio-Rios, Roque Alfredo; Dominguez-Gonzalez, Aurelio; Stiharu, Ion; Romero-Troncoso, Rene de Jesus

    2010-01-01

    Computer numerically controlled (CNC) machines have evolved to adapt to increasing technological and industrial requirements. To cover these needs, new generation machines have to perform monitoring strategies by incorporating multiple sensors. Since in most of applications the online Processing of the variables is essential, the use of smart sensors is necessary. The contribution of this work is the development of a wireless network platform of reconfigurable smart sensors for CNC machine applications complying with the measurement requirements of new generation CNC machines. Four different smart sensors are put under test in the network and their corresponding signal processing techniques are implemented in a Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA)-based sensor node.

  13. Direct Numerical Simulation of Liquid Nozzle Spray with Comparison to Shadowgraphy and X-Ray Computed Tomography Experimental Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Poppel, Bret; Owkes, Mark; Nelson, Thomas; Lee, Zachary; Sowell, Tyler; Benson, Michael; Vasquez Guzman, Pablo; Fahrig, Rebecca; Eaton, John; Kurman, Matthew; Kweon, Chol-Bum; Bravo, Luis

    2014-11-01

    In this work, we present high-fidelity Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) results of liquid fuel injection from a pressure-swirl atomizer and compare the simulations to experimental results obtained using both shadowgraphy and phase-averaged X-ray computed tomography (CT) scans. The CFD and experimental results focus on the dense near-nozzle region to identify the dominant mechanisms of breakup during primary atomization. Simulations are performed using the NGA code of Desjardins et al (JCP 227 (2008)) and employ the volume of fluid (VOF) method proposed by Owkes and Desjardins (JCP 270 (2013)), a second order accurate, un-split, conservative, three-dimensional VOF scheme providing second order density fluxes and capable of robust and accurate high density ratio simulations. Qualitative features and quantitative statistics are assessed and compared for the simulation and experimental results, including the onset of atomization, spray cone angle, and drop size and distribution.

  14. Numerical optimization techniques for bound circulation distribution for minimum induced drag of Nonplanar wings: Computer program documentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuhlman, J. M.; Ku, T. J.

    1981-01-01

    A two dimensional advanced panel far-field potential flow model of the undistorted, interacting wakes of multiple lifting surfaces was developed which allows the determination of the spanwise bound circulation distribution required for minimum induced drag. This model was implemented in a FORTRAN computer program, the use of which is documented in this report. The nonplanar wakes are broken up into variable sized, flat panels, as chosen by the user. The wake vortex sheet strength is assumed to vary linearly over each of these panels, resulting in a quadratic variation of bound circulation. Panels are infinite in the streamwise direction. The theory is briefly summarized herein; sample results are given for multiple, nonplanar, lifting surfaces, and the use of the computer program is detailed in the appendixes.

  15. Numerical study for the calculation of computer-generated hologram in color holographic 3D projection enabled by modified wavefront recording plane method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Chenliang; Qi, Yijun; Wu, Jun; Yuan, Caojin; Nie, Shouping; Xia, Jun

    2017-03-01

    A method of calculating computer-generated hologram (CGH) for color holographic 3D projection is proposed. A color 3D object is decomposed into red, green and blue components. For each color component, a virtual wavefront recording plane (WRP) is established which is nonuniformly sampled according to the depth map of the 3D object. The hologram of each color component is calculated from the nonuniform sampled WRP using the shifted Fresnel diffraction algorithm. Finally three holograms of RGB components are encoded into one single CGH based on the multiplexing encoding method. The computational cost of CGH generation is reduced by converting diffraction calculation from huge 3D voxels to three 2D planar images. Numerical experimental results show that the CGH generated by our method is capable to project zoomable color 3D object with clear quality.

  16. A numerical approach for the direct computation of flows including fluid-solid interaction: Modeling contact angle, film rupture, and dewetting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahady, K.; Afkhami, S.; Kondic, L.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we present a computationally efficient method for including fluid-solid interactions into direct numerical simulations of the Navier-Stokes equations. This method is found to be as powerful as our earlier formulation [K. Mahady et al., "A volume of fluid method for simulating fluid/fluid interfaces in contact with solid boundaries," J. Comput. Phys. 294, 243 (2015)], while outperforming the earlier method in terms of computational efficiency. The performance and efficacy of the presented method are demonstrated by computing contact angles of droplets at equilibrium. Furthermore, we study the instability of films due to destabilizing fluid-solid interactions, and discuss the influence of contact angle and inertial effects on film breakup. In particular, direct simulation results show an increase in the final characteristic length scales when compared to the predictions of a linear stability analysis, suggesting significant influence of nonlinear effects. Our results also show that emerging length scales differ, depending on a number of physical dimensions considered.

  17. A numerical theory of lattice gas and lattice Boltzmann methods in the computation of solutions to nonlinear advective-diffusive systems

    SciTech Connect

    Elton, A.B.H.

    1990-09-24

    A numerical theory for the massively parallel lattice gas and lattice Boltzmann methods for computing solutions to nonlinear advective-diffusive systems is introduced. The convergence theory is based on consistency and stability arguments that are supported by the discrete Chapman-Enskog expansion (for consistency) and conditions of monotonicity (in establishing stability). The theory is applied to four lattice methods: Two of the methods are for some two-dimensional nonlinear diffusion equations. One of the methods is for the one-dimensional lattice method for the one-dimensional viscous Burgers equation. And one of the methods is for a two-dimensional nonlinear advection-diffusion equation. Convergence is formally proven in the L{sub 1}-norm for the first three methods, revealing that they are second-order, conservative, conditionally monotone finite difference methods. Computational results which support the theory for lattice methods are presented. In addition, a domain decomposition strategy using mesh refinement techniques is presented for lattice gas and lattice Boltzmann methods. The strategy allows concentration of computational resources on regions of high activity. Computational evidence is reported for the strategy applied to the lattice gas method for the one-dimensional viscous Burgers equation. 72 refs., 19 figs., 28 tabs.

  18. Influence of numerical model decisions on the flow-induced vibration of a computational vocal fold model

    PubMed Central

    Shurtz, Timothy E.; Thomson, Scott L.

    2012-01-01

    Computational vocal fold models are often used to study the physics of voice production. In this paper the sensitivity of predicted vocal fold flow-induced vibration and resulting airflow patterns to several modeling selections is explored. The location of contact lines used to prevent mesh collapse and assumptions of symmetry were found to influence airflow patterns. However, these variables had relatively little effect on the vibratory response of the vocal fold model itself. Model motion was very sensitive to Poisson’s ratio. The importance of these parameter sensitivities in the context of vocal fold modeling is discussed. PMID:23794762

  19. Numerical computation of lightning transfer functions for layered, anisotropically conducting shielding structures by the method of moments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Happ, Fabian; Brüns, Heinz-D.; Mavraj, Gazmend; Gronwald, Frank

    2016-09-01

    A formalism for the computation of lightning transfer functions by the method of moments, which involves shielding structures that may consist of layered, anisotropically conducting composite materials, is presented in this contribution. The composite materials, being of a type that is widely used in space- and aircraft design, are electrically characterized by an equivalent conductivity. As basis for the quantitative analysis the method of moments is used where shielding surfaces can be treated by a thin layer technique which utilizes analytical solutions inside the layer. Also the effect of an extended lightning channel can be taken into account. The method is applied to geometries that resemble an actual airplane fuselage.

  20. Q-S (complete or anticipated) synchronization backstepping scheme in a class of discrete-time chaotic (hyperchaotic) systems: a symbolic-numeric computation approach.

    PubMed

    Yan, Zhenya

    2006-03-01

    First, a type of Q-S (complete or anticipated) synchronization is defined in discrete-time dynamical systems. Second, based on backstepping design with a scalar controller, a systematic, concrete and automatic scheme is presented to investigate Q-S (complete or anticipated) synchronization between the discrete-time drive system and response system with strict-feedback form. Finally, the proposed scheme is used to illustrate Q-S (complete or anticipated) synchronization between the two-dimensional discrete-time Lorenz system and Fold system, as well as the three-dimensional hyperchaotic discrete-time Rossler system and generalized discrete-time Rossler system. Moreover numerical simulations are used to verify the effectiveness of the proposed scheme. Our scheme can be also extended to investigate Q-S (complete or anticipated) synchronization between other discrete-time dynamical systems with strict-feedback forms. With the aid of symbolic-numeric computation, the scheme can be performed to yield automatically the scalar controller and to verify its effectiveness in computer.

  1. Integrated analysis of numerical weather prediction and computational fluid dynamics for estimating cross-ventilation effects on inhaled air quality inside a factory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murga, Alicia; Sano, Yusuke; Kawamoto, Yoichi; Ito, Kazuhide

    2017-10-01

    Mechanical and passive ventilation strategies directly impact indoor air quality. Passive ventilation has recently become widespread owing to its ability to reduce energy demand in buildings, such as the case of natural or cross ventilation. To understand the effect of natural ventilation on indoor environmental quality, outdoor-indoor flow paths need to be analyzed as functions of urban atmospheric conditions, topology of the built environment, and indoor conditions. Wind-driven natural ventilation (e.g., cross ventilation) can be calculated through the wind pressure coefficient distributions of outdoor wall surfaces and openings of a building, allowing the study of indoor air parameters and airborne contaminant concentrations. Variations in outside parameters will directly impact indoor air quality and residents' health. Numerical modeling can contribute to comprehend these various parameters because it allows full control of boundary conditions and sampling points. In this study, numerical weather prediction modeling was used to calculate wind profiles/distributions at the atmospheric scale, and computational fluid dynamics was used to model detailed urban and indoor flows, which were then integrated into a dynamic downscaling analysis to predict specific urban wind parameters from the atmospheric to built-environment scale. Wind velocity and contaminant concentration distributions inside a factory building were analyzed to assess the quality of the human working environment by using a computer simulated person. The impact of cross ventilation flows and its variations on local average contaminant concentration around a factory worker, and inhaled contaminant dose, were then discussed.

  2. Performance of heterogeneous computing with graphics processing unit and many integrated core for hartree potential calculations on a numerical grid.

    PubMed

    Choi, Sunghwan; Kwon, Oh-Kyoung; Kim, Jaewook; Kim, Woo Youn

    2016-09-15

    We investigated the performance of heterogeneous computing with graphics processing units (GPUs) and many integrated core (MIC) with 20 CPU cores (20×CPU). As a practical example toward large scale electronic structure calculations using grid-based methods, we evaluated the Hartree potentials of silver nanoparticles with various sizes (3.1, 3.7, 4.9, 6.1, and 6.9 nm) via a direct integral method supported by the sinc basis set. The so-called work stealing scheduler was used for efficient heterogeneous computing via the balanced dynamic distribution of workloads between all processors on a given architecture without any prior information on their individual performances. 20×CPU + 1GPU was up to ∼1.5 and ∼3.1 times faster than 1GPU and 20×CPU, respectively. 20×CPU + 2GPU was ∼4.3 times faster than 20×CPU. The performance enhancement by CPU + MIC was considerably lower than expected because of the large initialization overhead of MIC, although its theoretical performance is similar with that of CPU + GPU. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Features in simulation of crystal growth using the hyperbolic PFC equation and the dependence of the numerical solution on the parameters of the computational grid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starodumov, Ilya; Kropotin, Nikolai

    2016-08-01

    We investigate the three-dimensional mathematical model of crystal growth called PFC (Phase Field Crystal) in a hyperbolic modification. This model is also called the modified model PFC (originally PFC model is formulated in parabolic form) and allows to describe both slow and rapid crystallization processes on atomic length scales and on diffusive time scales. Modified PFC model is described by the differential equation in partial derivatives of the sixth order in space and second order in time. The solution of this equation is possible only by numerical methods. Previously, authors created the software package for the solution of the Phase Field Crystal problem, based on the method of isogeometric analysis (IGA) and PetIGA program library. During further investigation it was found that the quality of the solution can strongly depends on the discretization parameters of a numerical method. In this report, we show the features that should be taken into account during constructing the computational grid for the numerical simulation.

  4. Features in simulation of crystal growth using the hyperbolic PFC equation and the dependence of the numerical solution on the parameters of the computational grid

    SciTech Connect

    Starodumov, Ilya; Kropotin, Nikolai

    2016-08-10

    We investigate the three-dimensional mathematical model of crystal growth called PFC (Phase Field Crystal) in a hyperbolic modification. This model is also called the modified model PFC (originally PFC model is formulated in parabolic form) and allows to describe both slow and rapid crystallization processes on atomic length scales and on diffusive time scales. Modified PFC model is described by the differential equation in partial derivatives of the sixth order in space and second order in time. The solution of this equation is possible only by numerical methods. Previously, authors created the software package for the solution of the Phase Field Crystal problem, based on the method of isogeometric analysis (IGA) and PetIGA program library. During further investigation it was found that the quality of the solution can strongly depends on the discretization parameters of a numerical method. In this report, we show the features that should be taken into account during constructing the computational grid for the numerical simulation.

  5. Proposed Use of the NASA Ames Nebula Cloud Computing Platform for Numerical Weather Prediction and the Distribution of High Resolution Satellite Imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Limaye, A.; Molthan, A.

    2010-12-01

    The development of the Nebula Cloud Computing Platform at NASA Ames Research Center provides an open-source solution for the deployment of scalable computing and storage capabilities relevant to the execution of real-time weather forecasts and the distribution of high resolution satellite data to the operational weather community. Two projects at Marshall Space Flight Center may benefit from use of the Nebula system. The NASA Short-term Prediction Research and Transition (SPoRT) Center facilitates the use of unique NASA satellite data and research capabilities in the operational weather community by providing datasets relevant to numerical weather prediction, and satellite data sets useful in weather analysis. SERVIR provides satellite data products for decision support, emphasizing environmental threats such as wildfires, floods, landslides, and other hazards, with interests in numerical weather prediction in support of disaster response. The Weather Research and Forecast (WRF) model Environmental Modeling System (WRF-EMS) has been configured for Nebula cloud computing use via the creation of a disk image and deployment of repeated instances. Given the available infrastructure within Nebula and the “infrastructure as a service” concept, the system appears well-suited for the rapid deployment of additional forecast models over different domains, in response to real-time research applications or disaster response. Future investigations into Nebula capabilities will focus on the development of a web mapping server and load balancing configuration to support the distribution of high resolution satellite data sets to users within the National Weather Service and international partners of SERVIR.

  6. Computational modeling and relevance of numerical convergence for the investigation of thermal expansion behavior for aluminium hybrid composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishna, S. A. Mohan; Shridhar, T. N.; Krishnamurthy, L.

    2016-06-01

    The thermal characterization and analysis of composite materials has been increasingly important in a wide range of applications. The coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) is one of the most important properties of metal matrix composites (MMCs). Since nearly all MMCs are used in various temperature ranges, measurement of CTE as a function of temperature is necessary in order to know the behavior of the material. In this research paper, the evaluation of CTE or thermal expansivity has been accomplished for Al 6061, silicon carbide and graphite hybrid MMCs from room temperature to 300∘C. Aluminium-based composites reinforced with silicon carbide and graphite particles have been prepared by stir casting technique. The thermal expansivity behavior of hybrid composites with different percentage compositions of reinforcements has been investigated. The results have indicated that the thermal expansivity of different compositions of hybrid MMCs decrease by the addition of graphite with silicon carbide and Al 6061. Empirical models have been validated for the evaluation of thermal expansivity of composites. Numerical convergence test has been accomplished to investigate the thermal expansion behavior of composites.

  7. Numerical Solution to Generalized Burgers'-Fisher Equation Using Exp-Function Method Hybridized with Heuristic Computation

    PubMed Central

    Malik, Suheel Abdullah; Qureshi, Ijaz Mansoor; Amir, Muhammad; Malik, Aqdas Naveed; Haq, Ihsanul

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, a new heuristic scheme for the approximate solution of the generalized Burgers'-Fisher equation is proposed. The scheme is based on the hybridization of Exp-function method with nature inspired algorithm. The given nonlinear partial differential equation (NPDE) through substitution is converted into a nonlinear ordinary differential equation (NODE). The travelling wave solution is approximated by the Exp-function method with unknown parameters. The unknown parameters are estimated by transforming the NODE into an equivalent global error minimization problem by using a fitness function. The popular genetic algorithm (GA) is used to solve the minimization problem, and to achieve the unknown parameters. The proposed scheme is successfully implemented to solve the generalized Burgers'-Fisher equation. The comparison of numerical results with the exact solutions, and the solutions obtained using some traditional methods, including adomian decomposition method (ADM), homotopy perturbation method (HPM), and optimal homotopy asymptotic method (OHAM), show that the suggested scheme is fairly accurate and viable for solving such problems. PMID:25811858

  8. Numerical Computation of Electric Field and Potential Along Silicone Rubber Insulators Under Contaminated and Dry Band Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arshad; Nekahi, A.; McMeekin, S. G.; Farzaneh, M.

    2016-09-01

    Electrical field distribution along the insulator surface is considered one of the important parameters for the performance evaluation of outdoor insulators. In this paper numerical simulations were carried out to investigate the electric field and potential distribution along silicone rubber insulators under various polluted and dry band conditions. Simulations were performed using commercially available simulation package Comsol Multiphysics based on the finite element method. Various pollution severity levels were simulated by changing the conductivity of pollution layer. Dry bands of 2 cm width were inserted at the high voltage end, ground end, middle part, shed, sheath, and at the junction of shed and sheath to investigate the effect of dry band location and width on electric field and potential distribution. Partial pollution conditions were simulated by applying pollution layer on the top and bottom surface respectively. It was observed from the simulation results that electric field intensity was higher at the metal electrode ends and at the junction of dry bands. Simulation results showed that potential distribution is nonlinear in the case of clean and partially polluted insulator and linear for uniform pollution layer. Dry band formation effect both potential and electric field distribution. Power dissipated along the insulator surface and the resultant heat generation was also studied. The results of this study could be useful in the selection of polymeric insulators for contaminated environments.

  9. Horizontal heat fluxes over complex terrain computed using a simple mixed-layer model and a numerical model

    SciTech Connect

    Kimura, Fujio; Kuwagata, Tuneo

    1995-02-01

    The thermally induced local circulation over a periodic valley is simulated by a two-dimensional numerical model that does-not include condensational processes. During the daytime of a clear, calm day, heat is transported from the mountainous region to the valley area by anabatic wind and its return flow. The specific humidity is, however, transported in an inverse manner. The horizontal exchange rate of sensible heat has a horizontal scale similarity, as long as the horizontal scale is less than a critical width of about 100 km. The sensible heat accumulated in an atmospheric column over an arbitrary point can be estimated by a simple model termed the uniform mixed-layer model (UML). The model assumes that the potential temperature is both vertically and horizontally uniform in the mixed layer, even over the complex terrain. The UML model is valid only when the horizontal scale of the topography is less than the critical width and the maximum difference in the elevation of the topography is less than about 1500 m. Latent heat is accumulated over the mountainous region while the atmosphere becomes dry over the valley area. When the horizontal scale is close to the critical width, the largest amount of humidity is accumulated during the late afternoon over the mountainous region. 18 refs., 15 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Numerical solution to generalized Burgers'-Fisher equation using Exp-function method hybridized with heuristic computation.

    PubMed

    Malik, Suheel Abdullah; Qureshi, Ijaz Mansoor; Amir, Muhammad; Malik, Aqdas Naveed; Haq, Ihsanul

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, a new heuristic scheme for the approximate solution of the generalized Burgers'-Fisher equation is proposed. The scheme is based on the hybridization of Exp-function method with nature inspired algorithm. The given nonlinear partial differential equation (NPDE) through substitution is converted into a nonlinear ordinary differential equation (NODE). The travelling wave solution is approximated by the Exp-function method with unknown parameters. The unknown parameters are estimated by transforming the NODE into an equivalent global error minimization problem by using a fitness function. The popular genetic algorithm (GA) is used to solve the minimization problem, and to achieve the unknown parameters. The proposed scheme is successfully implemented to solve the generalized Burgers'-Fisher equation. The comparison of numerical results with the exact solutions, and the solutions obtained using some traditional methods, including adomian decomposition method (ADM), homotopy perturbation method (HPM), and optimal homotopy asymptotic method (OHAM), show that the suggested scheme is fairly accurate and viable for solving such problems.

  11. Numerical Aerodynamic Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    An overview of historical and current numerical aerodynamic simulation (NAS) is given. The capabilities and goals of the Numerical Aerodynamic Simulation Facility are outlined. Emphasis is given to numerical flow visualization and its applications to structural analysis of aircraft and spacecraft bodies. The uses of NAS in computational chemistry, engine design, and galactic evolution are mentioned.

  12. Computer simulation of two-dimensional unsteady flows in estuaries and embayments by the method of characteristics : basic theory and the formulation of the numerical method

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lai, Chintu

    1977-01-01

    Two-dimensional unsteady flows of homogeneous density in estuaries and embayments can be described by hyperbolic, quasi-linear partial differential equations involving three dependent and three independent variables. A linear combination of these equations leads to a parametric equation of characteristic form, which consists of two parts: total differentiation along the bicharacteristics and partial differentiation in space. For its numerical solution, the specified-time-interval scheme has been used. The unknown, partial space-derivative terms can be eliminated first by suitable combinations of difference equations, converted from the corresponding differential forms and written along four selected bicharacteristics and a streamline. Other unknowns are thus made solvable from the known variables on the current time plane. The computation is carried to the second-order accuracy by using trapezoidal rule of integration. Means to handle complex boundary conditions are developed for practical application. Computer programs have been written and a mathematical model has been constructed for flow simulation. The favorable computer outputs suggest further exploration and development of model worthwhile. (Woodard-USGS)

  13. Numerical Computation of Optical Properties of Internally Mixed Soot in Biomass Burning Constrained by Field and Laboratory Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    China, S.; Scarnato, B. V.; Gorkowski, K.; Aiken, A. C.; Liu, S.; Dubey, M. K.; Mazzoleni, C.

    2014-12-01

    Carbonaceous aerosol emitted from biomass burning (BB) contributes significantly to atmospheric aerosol loadings regionally and globally. Direct radiative forcing of BB aerosol is highly uncertain due to its complex composition, morphology and mixing state. Soot particles are the strongest light absorbing aerosols in BB smoke. In BB smoke, soot particles are normally internally mixed with other material and the mixing state can affect their optical properties. In this study we investigated morphology and mixing state of soot particles emitted from BB smoke from field and laboratory measurements. Smoke particles were collected 1) during the Las Conchas wildfire in New Mexico (June, 2011) and 2) at the U.S. Forest Service's Fire Science Laboratory in 2012, during the fourth Fire Laboratory at Missoula Experiment (FLAME-4). Single particles were analyzed with electron microscopy, and were categorized and characterized by their morphology, and mixing state. We found that soot particles were mostly heavily coated. Based on the characterization on field and laboratory samples, synthetic soot particles with various morphologies and mixing states were generated and their optical properties were numerically calculated using the discrete dipole approximation. We used organic material as a coating agent and investigated the spectral dependency of scattering and absorption for internally mixed soot particles. We found enhancement in scattering and absorption when most of the soot particle was embedded within the organic coating. The aim of this study is to improve our understanding of the effect of morphology and mixing on light scattering and absorption by soot particles and ultimately their effects on the direct radiative forcing.

  14. Fingering convection induced by atomic diffusion in stars: 3D numerical computations and applications to stellar models

    SciTech Connect

    Zemskova, Varvara; Garaud, Pascale; Deal, Morgan; Vauclair, Sylvie

    2014-11-10

    Iron-rich layers are known to form in the stellar subsurface through a combination of gravitational settling and radiative levitation. Their presence, nature, and detailed structure can affect the excitation process of various stellar pulsation modes and must therefore be modeled carefully in order to better interpret Kepler asteroseismic data. In this paper, we study the interplay between atomic diffusion and fingering convection in A-type stars, as well as its role in the establishment and evolution of iron accumulation layers. To do so, we use a combination of three-dimensional idealized numerical simulations of fingering convection (which neglect radiative transfer and complex opacity effects) and one-dimensional realistic stellar models. Using the three-dimensional simulations, we first validate the mixing prescription for fingering convection recently proposed by Brown et al. (within the scope of the aforementioned approximation) and identify what system parameters (total mass of iron, iron diffusivity, thermal diffusivity, etc.) play a role in the overall evolution of the layer. We then implement the Brown et al. prescription in the Toulouse-Geneva Evolution Code to study the evolution of the iron abundance profile beneath the stellar surface. We find, as first discussed by Théado et al., that when the concurrent settling of helium is ignored, this accumulation rapidly causes an inversion in the mean molecular weight profile, which then drives fingering convection. The latter mixes iron with the surrounding material very efficiently, and the resulting iron layer is very weak. However, taking helium settling into account partially stabilizes the iron profile against fingering convection, and a large iron overabundance can accumulate. The opacity also increases significantly as a result, and in some cases it ultimately triggers dynamical convection. The direct effects of radiative acceleration on the dynamics of fingering convection (especially in the

  15. Numerical research on the anisotropic transport of thermal neutron in heterogeneous porous media with micron X-ray computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yong; Yue, Wenzheng; Zhang, Mo

    2016-01-01

    The anisotropic transport of thermal neutron in heterogeneous porous media is of great research interests in many fields. In this paper, it is the first time that a new model based on micron X-ray computed tomography (CT) has been proposed to simultaneously consider both the separation of matrix and pore and the distribution of mineral components. We apply the Monte Carlo method to simulate thermal neutrons transporting through the model along different directions, and meanwhile detect those unreacted thermal neutrons by an array detector on the other side of the model. Therefore, the anisotropy of pore structure can be imaged by the amount of received thermal neutrons, due to the difference of rock matrix and pore-filling fluids in the macroscopic reaction cross section (MRCS). The new model has been verified by the consistent between the simulated data and the pore distribution from X-ray CT. The results show that the evaluation of porosity can be affected by the anisotropy of media. Based on the research, a new formula is developed to describe the correlation between the resolution of array detectors and the quality of imaging. The formula can be further used to analyze the critical resolution and the suitable number of thermal neutrons emitted in each simulation. Unconventionally, we find that a higher resolution cannot always lead to a better image. PMID:27271330

  16. Numerical research on the anisotropic transport of thermal neutron in heterogeneous porous media with micron X-ray computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yong; Yue, Wenzheng; Zhang, Mo

    2016-06-01

    The anisotropic transport of thermal neutron in heterogeneous porous media is of great research interests in many fields. In this paper, it is the first time that a new model based on micron X-ray computed tomography (CT) has been proposed to simultaneously consider both the separation of matrix and pore and the distribution of mineral components. We apply the Monte Carlo method to simulate thermal neutrons transporting through the model along different directions, and meanwhile detect those unreacted thermal neutrons by an array detector on the other side of the model. Therefore, the anisotropy of pore structure can be imaged by the amount of received thermal neutrons, due to the difference of rock matrix and pore-filling fluids in the macroscopic reaction cross section (MRCS). The new model has been verified by the consistent between the simulated data and the pore distribution from X-ray CT. The results show that the evaluation of porosity can be affected by the anisotropy of media. Based on the research, a new formula is developed to describe the correlation between the resolution of array detectors and the quality of imaging. The formula can be further used to analyze the critical resolution and the suitable number of thermal neutrons emitted in each simulation. Unconventionally, we find that a higher resolution cannot always lead to a better image.

  17. Numerical research on the anisotropic transport of thermal neutron in heterogeneous porous media with micron X-ray computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yong; Yue, Wenzheng; Zhang, Mo

    2016-06-08

    The anisotropic transport of thermal neutron in heterogeneous porous media is of great research interests in many fields. In this paper, it is the first time that a new model based on micron X-ray computed tomography (CT) has been proposed to simultaneously consider both the separation of matrix and pore and the distribution of mineral components. We apply the Monte Carlo method to simulate thermal neutrons transporting through the model along different directions, and meanwhile detect those unreacted thermal neutrons by an array detector on the other side of the model. Therefore, the anisotropy of pore structure can be imaged by the amount of received thermal neutrons, due to the difference of rock matrix and pore-filling fluids in the macroscopic reaction cross section (MRCS). The new model has been verified by the consistent between the simulated data and the pore distribution from X-ray CT. The results show that the evaluation of porosity can be affected by the anisotropy of media. Based on the research, a new formula is developed to describe the correlation between the resolution of array detectors and the quality of imaging. The formula can be further used to analyze the critical resolution and the suitable number of thermal neutrons emitted in each simulation. Unconventionally, we find that a higher resolution cannot always lead to a better image.

  18. Recent advances in PC-Linux systems for electronic structure computations by optimized compilers and numerical libraries.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jen-Shiang K; Yu, Chin-Hui

    2002-01-01

    One of the most frequently used packages for electronic structure research, GAUSSIAN 98, is compiled on Linux systems with various hardware configurations, including AMD Athlon (with the "Thunderbird" core), AthlonMP, and AthlonXP (with the "Palomino" core) systems as well as the Intel Pentium 4 (with the "Willamette" core) machines. The default PGI FORTRAN compiler (pgf77) and the Intel FORTRAN compiler (ifc) are respectively employed with different architectural optimization options to compile GAUSSIAN 98 and test the performance improvement. In addition to the BLAS library included in revision A.11 of this package, the Automatically Tuned Linear Algebra Software (ATLAS) library is linked against the binary executables to improve the performance. Various Hartree-Fock, density-functional theories, and the MP2 calculations are done for benchmarking purposes. It is found that the combination of ifc with ATLAS library gives the best performance for GAUSSIAN 98 on all of these PC-Linux computers, including AMD and Intel CPUs. Even on AMD systems, the Intel FORTRAN compiler invariably produces binaries with better performance than pgf77. The enhancement provided by the ATLAS library is more significant for post-Hartree-Fock calculations. The performance on one single CPU is potentially as good as that on an Alpha 21264A workstation or an SGI supercomputer. The floating-point marks by SpecFP2000 have similar trends to the results of GAUSSIAN 98 package.

  19. Numerical methods and a computer program for subsonic and supersonic aerodynamic design and analysis of wings with attainable thrust considerations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, H. W.; Walkley, K. B.

    1984-01-01

    This paper describes methodology and an associated computer program for the design of wing lifting surfaces with attainable thrust taken into consideration. The approach is based on the determination of an optimum combination of a series of candidate surfaces rather than the more commonly used candidate loadings. Special leading-edge surfaces are selected to provide distributed leading-edge thrust forces which compensate for any failure to achieve the full theoretical leading-edge thrust, and a second series of general candidate surfaces is selected to minimize drag subject to constraints on the lift coefficient and, if desired, on the pitching moment coefficient. A primary purpose of the design approach is the introduction of attainable leading-edge thrust considerations so that relatively mild camber surfaces may be employed in the achievement of aerodynamic efficiencies comparable to those attainable if full theoretical leading-edge thrust could be achieved. The program provides an analysis as well as a design capability and is applicable to both subsonic and supersonic flow.

  20. A Numerical Computation Model for Low-Density Lipoprotein (LDL) Aggregation and Deposition in the Human Artery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yongli; Cai, Shaobiao; Ratner, Albert

    2009-11-01

    Cholesterol caused cardiovascular events are commonly seen in human lives. These events are primarily believed to be caused by the built up of particles like low-density lipoprotein (LDL). When a large number of LDL circulates in the blood, it can gradually build up in the inner walls of the arteries. A thick, hard deposit plaque can be formed together with other substances. This type of plaque may clog those arteries and cause vascular problems. Clinical evidences suggest that LDL is related to cardiovascular events and the progression of coronary heart disease is due to its aggregation and deposition. This study presents an investigation of LDL aggregation and deposition based on particulate flow. A soft-sphere based particulate computational flow model is developed to represent LDL suspending in plasma. The transport, collision and adhesion phenomena of LDL particles are simulated to examine the physics involved in aggregation and deposition. A multiple-time step discrete-element approach is presented for efficiently simulating large number of LDL particles and their interactions. The roles the quality and quantity the LDL playing in the process of aggregation and deposition are determined. The study provides a new perspective for improving the understanding of the fundamentals as related to these particle-caused cardiovascular events.

  1. ARMP-02 documentation: Part 2, Chapter 7, MICBURN-E computer code manual: Volume 1, Theory and numerics manual

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, D.B.

    1986-12-01

    MICBURN-E is a multigroup pin cell lattice physics computer code designed for the burnup analysis of light water reactor fuel rods. It was specifically developed to handle fuel rods containing an initially homogeneous mixture of fuel (UO/sub 2/) and burnable absorber (Gd/sub 2/O/sub 3/) compositions. MICBURN-E features a fine mesh geometry model which makes it particularly suitable for the analysis of fuel rods which burn according to the phenomenon for ''onion-skin'' depletion effects. MICBURN-E employs integral transport theory based upon the method of collision probabilities to calculate neutron flux distributions and eigenvalues for cylindrical geometries. The primary application of MICBURN-E is to generate a burnable absorber data file containing effective microscopic absorption cross sections as a function of burnup for a pseudo nuclide. This file is then supplied as input to various assembly lattice physics codes including CPM-2, EPRI-CPM and CASMO-1. MICBURN-E is written entirely in FORTRAN and is supplied with a Nuclear Data Library which contains basic microscopic cross sections and burnup parameters for several nuclides.

  2. Mechanical disruption of mammalian cells in a microfluidic system and its numerical analysis based on computational fluid dynamics.

    PubMed

    Wurm, Matthias; Zeng, An-Ping

    2012-03-21

    The lysis of mammalian cells is an essential part of different lab-on-a-chip sample preparation methods, which aim at the release, separation, and subsequent analysis of DNA, proteins, or metabolites. Particularly for the analysis of compartmented in vivo metabolism of mammalian cells, such a method must be very fast compared to the metabolic turnover-rates, it should not affect the native metabolite concentrations, and should ideally leave cell organelles undamaged. So far, no such a method is available. We have developed a microfluidic system for the effective rapid mechanical cell disruption and established a mathematical model to describe the efficiency of the system. Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells were disrupted with high efficiency by passing through two consecutive micronozzle arrays. Simultaneous cell compression and shearing led to a disruption rate of ≥90% at a sample flow rate of Q = 120 μL min(-1) per nozzle passage, which corresponds to a mean fluid velocity of 13.3 m s(-1) and a mean Reynolds number of 22.6 in the nozzle gap. We discussed the problem of channel clogging by cellular debris and the resulting flow instability at the micronozzle arrays. The experimental results were compared to predictions from Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations and the critical energy dissipation rate for the disruption of the CHO cell population with known size distribution was determined to be 4.7 × 10(8) W m(-3). Our model for the calculation of cell disruption on the basis of CFD-data could be applied to other microgeometries to predict intended disruption or undesired cell damage.

  3. Active Control of Fan Noise: Feasibility Study. Volume 5; Numerical Computation of Acoustic Mode Reflection Coefficients for an Unflanged Cylindrical Duct

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kraft, R. E.

    1996-01-01

    A computational method to predict modal reflection coefficients in cylindrical ducts has been developed based on the work of Homicz, Lordi, and Rehm, which uses the Wiener-Hopf method to account for the boundary conditions at the termination of a thin cylindrical pipe. The purpose of this study is to develop a computational routine to predict the reflection coefficients of higher order acoustic modes impinging on the unflanged termination of a cylindrical duct. This effort was conducted wider Task Order 5 of the NASA Lewis LET Program, Active Noise Control of aircraft Engines: Feasibility Study, and will be used as part of the development of an integrated source noise, acoustic propagation, ANC actuator coupling, and control system algorithm simulation. The reflection coefficient prediction will be incorporated into an existing cylindrical duct modal analysis to account for the reflection of modes from the duct termination. This will provide a more accurate, rapid computation design tool for evaluating the effect of reflected waves on active noise control systems mounted in the duct, as well as providing a tool for the design of acoustic treatment in inlet ducts. As an active noise control system design tool, the method can be used preliminary to more accurate but more numerically intensive acoustic propagation models such as finite element methods. The resulting computer program has been shown to give reasonable results, some examples of which are presented. Reliable data to use for comparison is scarce, so complete checkout is difficult, and further checkout is needed over a wider range of system parameters. In future efforts the method will be adapted as a subroutine to the GEAE segmented cylindrical duct modal analysis program.

  4. The History of Earthquake Engineering at the University of California at Berkeley and Recent Developments of Numerical Methods and Computer Programs at CSI Berkeley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, E. L.

    The purpose of this paper is to summarize, from a personal viewpoint, some research in structural dynamics within the Department of Civil Engineering at the University of California at Berkeley during the period of 1950 to 1990. The second part of the paper is to present a few recently developed numerical algorithms for dynamic analysis that are required in the design of wind, wave and earthquake resistant structures. These algorithms have been incorporated into the SAP 2000 programs (developed by Computers and Structures, Inc. in Berkeley) and have been used in the analysis of hundreds of large structural systems. This most recent research and development work was conducted since the author's retirement in 1991 from teaching at the University.

  5. A Field Programmable Gate Array-Based Reconfigurable Smart-Sensor Network for Wireless Monitoring of New Generation Computer Numerically Controlled Machines

    PubMed Central

    Moreno-Tapia, Sandra Veronica; Vera-Salas, Luis Alberto; Osornio-Rios, Roque Alfredo; Dominguez-Gonzalez, Aurelio; Stiharu, Ion; de Jesus Romero-Troncoso, Rene

    2010-01-01

    Computer numerically controlled (CNC) machines have evolved to adapt to increasing technological and industrial requirements. To cover these needs, new generation machines have to perform monitoring strategies by incorporating multiple sensors. Since in most of applications the online Processing of the variables is essential, the use of smart sensors is necessary. The contribution of this work is the development of a wireless network platform of reconfigurable smart sensors for CNC machine applications complying with the measurement requirements of new generation CNC machines. Four different smart sensors are put under test in the network and their corresponding signal processing techniques are implemented in a Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA)-based sensor node. PMID:22163602

  6. Run-up of nonlinear long waves in bays of finite length: 1-D analytical theory and 2-D numerical computations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelinovsky, Efim; Harris, Matthew; Garayshin, Viacheslav; Nicolsky, Dmitry; Pender, John; Rybkin, Alexei

    2016-04-01

    Run-up of long waves in sloping bays is studied analytically in the framework of the 1-D nonlinear shallow-water theory. By assuming that the wave flow is uniform along the cross-section, the 2-D nonlinear shallow-water equations are reduced to a linear semi-axis variable-coefficient 1-D wave equation via the generalized Carrier-Greenspan transformation (Rybkin et al., JFM 2014). A spectral solution is developed by solving the linear semi-axis variable-coefficient 1-D equation via separation of variables and then applying the inverse Carrier-Greenspan transform. The shoreline dynamics in U-shaped and V-shaped bays are computed via a double integral through standard integration techniques. To compute the run-up of a given long wave a numerical method is developed to find the eigenfunction decomposition required for the spectral solution in the linearized system. The run-up of a long wave in a bathymetry characteristic of a narrow canyon is then examined.

  7. What can we learn from in-soil imaging of a live plant: X-ray Computed Tomography and 3D numerical simulation of root-soil system

    DOE PAGES

    Yang, Xiaofan; Varga, Tamas; Liu, Chongxuan; ...

    2017-05-04

    Plant roots play a critical role in plant-soil-microbe interactions that occur in the rhizosphere. X-ray Computed Tomography (XCT) has been proven to be an effective tool for non-invasive root imaging and analysis. A combination of XCT, open-source software, and in-house developed code was used to non-invasively image a prairie dropseed (Sporobolus heterolepis) specimen, segment the root data to obtain a 3D image of the root structure, and extract quantitative information from the 3D data, respectively. Based on the explicitly-resolved root structure, pore-scale computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations were applied to numerically investigate the root-soil-groundwater system. The plant root conductivity, soilmore » hydraulic conductivity and transpiration rate were shown to control the groundwater distribution. Furthermore, the coupled imaging-modeling approach demonstrates a realistic platform to investigate rhizosphere flow processes and would be feasible to provide useful information linked to upscaled models.« less

  8. COMMIX-PPC: A three-dimensional transient multicomponent computer program for analyzing performance of power plant condensers. Volume 1, Equations and numerics

    SciTech Connect

    Chien, T.H.; Domanus, H.M.; Sha, W.T.

    1993-02-01

    The COMMIX-PPC computer pregrain is an extended and improved version of earlier COMMIX codes and is specifically designed for evaluating the thermal performance of power plant condensers. The COMMIX codes are general-purpose computer programs for the analysis of fluid flow and heat transfer in complex Industrial systems. In COMMIX-PPC, two major features have been added to previously published COMMIX codes. One feature is the incorporation of one-dimensional equations of conservation of mass, momentum, and energy on the tube stile and the proper accounting for the thermal interaction between shell and tube side through the porous-medium approach. The other added feature is the extension of the three-dimensional conservation equations for shell-side flow to treat the flow of a multicomponent medium. COMMIX-PPC is designed to perform steady-state and transient. Three-dimensional analysis of fluid flow with heat transfer tn a power plant condenser. However, the code is designed in a generalized fashion so that, with some modification, it can be used to analyze processes in any heat exchanger or other single-phase engineering applications. Volume I (Equations and Numerics) of this report describes in detail the basic equations, formulation, solution procedures, and models for a phenomena. Volume II (User`s Guide and Manual) contains the input instruction, flow charts, sample problems, and descriptions of available options and boundary conditions.

  9. The 1887 earthquake and tsunami in the Ligurian Sea: analysis of coastal effects studied by numerical modeling and prototype for real-time computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monnier, Angélique; Gailler, Audrey; Loevenbruck, Anne; Heinrich, Philippe; Hébert, Hélène

    2017-04-01

    The February 1887 earthquake in Italy (Imperia) triggered a tsunami well observed on the French and Italian coastlines. Tsunami waves were recorded on a tide gauge in the Genoa harbour with a small, recently reappraised maximum amplitude of about 10-12 cm (crest-to-trough). The magnitude of the earthquake is still debated in the recent literature, and discussed according to available macroseismic, tectonic and tsunami data. While the tsunami waveform observed in the Genoa harbour may be well explained with a magnitude smaller than 6.5 (Hébert et al., EGU 2015), we investigate in this study whether such source models are consistent with the tsunami effects reported elsewhere along the coastline. The idea is to take the opportunity of the fine bathymetric data recently synthetized for the French Tsunami Warning Center (CENALT) to test the 1887 source parameters using refined, nested grid tsunami numerical modeling down to the harbour scale. Several source parameters are investigated to provide a series of models accounting for various magnitudes and mechanisms. This allows us to compute the tsunami effects for several coastal sites in France (Nice, Villefranche, Antibes, Mandelieu, Cannes) and to compare with observations. Meanwhile we also check the computing time of the chosen scenarios to study whether running nested grids simulation in real time can be suitable in operational context in term of computational cost for these Ligurian scenarios. This work is supported by the FP7 ASTARTE project (Assessment Strategy and Risk Reduction for Tsunamis in Europe, grant 603839 FP7) and by the French PIA TANDEM (Tsunamis in the Atlantic and English ChaNnel: Definition of the Effects through Modeling) project (grant ANR-11-RSNR-00023).

  10. ProtDCal: A program to compute general-purpose-numerical descriptors for sequences and 3D-structures of proteins.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Blanco, Yasser B; Paz, Waldo; Green, James; Marrero-Ponce, Yovani

    2015-05-16

    The exponential growth of protein structural and sequence databases is enabling multifaceted approaches to understanding the long sought sequence-structure-function relationship. Advances in computation now make it possible to apply well-established data mining and pattern recognition techniques to these data to learn models that effectively relate structure and function. However, extracting meaningful numerical descriptors of protein sequence and structure is a key issue that requires an efficient and widely available solution. We here introduce ProtDCal, a new computational software suite capable of generating tens of thousands of features considering both sequence-based and 3D-structural descriptors. We demonstrate, by means of principle component analysis and Shannon entropy tests, how ProtDCal's sequence-based descriptors provide new and more relevant information not encoded by currently available servers for sequence-based protein feature generation. The wide diversity of the 3D-structure-based features generated by ProtDCal is shown to provide additional complementary information and effectively completes its general protein encoding capability. As demonstration of the utility of ProtDCal's features, prediction models of N-linked glycosylation sites are trained and evaluated. Classification performance compares favourably with that of contemporary predictors of N-linked glycosylation sites, in spite of not using domain-specific features as input information. ProtDCal provides a friendly and cross-platform graphical user interface, developed in the Java programming language and is freely available at: http://bioinf.sce.carleton.ca/ProtDCal/ . ProtDCal introduces local and group-based encoding which enhances the diversity of the information captured by the computed features. Furthermore, we have shown that adding structure-based descriptors contributes non-redundant additional information to the features-based characterization of polypeptide systems. This

  11. Numerical Optimization Using Desktop Computers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-09-11

    points, the cubic will accurately predict the minimum of the penalized objective function. Himmelblau in [Ref. 2] states that the Golden Section search...REFERENCES 1. Kuester, J. L., and Mize, J. H., Optimization Techniques, PP. 73-74, 344-345, McGraw-Hill, 1973. 2. Himmelblau , D. M., Applied Nonlinear

  12. Modeling pure methane hydrate dissociation using a numerical simulator from a novel combination of X-ray computed tomography and macroscopic data

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, A.; Moridis, G.J.; Kneafsey, T.J.; Sloan, Jr., E.D.

    2009-08-15

    The numerical simulator TOUGH+HYDRATE (T+H) was used to predict the transient pure methane hydrate (no sediment) dissociation data. X-ray computed tomography (CT) was used to visualize the methane hydrate formation and dissociation processes. A methane hydrate sample was formed from granular ice in a cylindrical vessel, and slow depressurization combined with thermal stimulation was applied to dissociate the hydrate sample. CT images showed that the water produced from the hydrate dissociation accumulated at the bottom of the vessel and increased the hydrate dissociation rate there. CT images were obtained during hydrate dissociation to confirm the radial dissociation of the hydrate sample. This radial dissociation process has implications for dissociation of hydrates in pipelines, suggesting lower dissociation times than for longitudinal dissociation. These observations were also confirmed by the numerical simulator predictions, which were in good agreement with the measured thermal data during hydrate dissociation. System pressure and sample temperature measured at the sample center followed the CH{sub 4} hydrate L{sub w}+H+V equilibrium line during hydrate dissociation. The predicted cumulative methane gas production was within 5% of the measured data. Thus, this study validated our simulation approach and assumptions, which include stationary pure methane hydrate-skeleton, equilibrium hydrate-dissociation and heat- and mass-transfer in predicting hydrate dissociation in the absence of sediments. It should be noted that the application of T+H for the pure methane hydrate system (no sediment) is outside the general applicability limits of T+H.

  13. Dynamical approach study of spurious steady-state numerical solutions of nonlinear differential equations. I - The dynamics of time discretization and its implications for algorithm development in computational fluid dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yee, H. C.; Sweby, P. K.; Griffiths, D. F.

    1991-01-01

    Spurious stable as well as unstable steady state numerical solutions, spurious asymptotic numerical solutions of higher period, and even stable chaotic behavior can occur when finite difference methods are used to solve nonlinear differential equations (DE) numerically. The occurrence of spurious asymptotes is independent of whether the DE possesses a unique steady state or has additional periodic solutions and/or exhibits chaotic phenomena. The form of the nonlinear DEs and the type of numerical schemes are the determining factor. In addition, the occurrence of spurious steady states is not restricted to the time steps that are beyond the linearized stability limit of the scheme. In many instances, it can occur below the linearized stability limit. Therefore, it is essential for practitioners in computational sciences to be knowledgeable about the dynamical behavior of finite difference methods for nonlinear scalar DEs before the actual application of these methods to practical computations. It is also important to change the traditional way of thinking and practices when dealing with genuinely nonlinear problems. In the past, spurious asymptotes were observed in numerical computations but tended to be ignored because they all were assumed to lie beyond the linearized stability limits of the time step parameter delta t. As can be seen from the study, bifurcations to and from spurious asymptotic solutions and transitions to computational instability not only are highly scheme dependent and problem dependent, but also initial data and boundary condition dependent, and not limited to time steps that are beyond the linearized stability limit.

  14. Dynamical approach study of spurious steady-state numerical solutions of nonlinear differential equations. I - The dynamics of time discretization and its implications for algorithm development in computational fluid dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yee, H. C.; Sweby, P. K.; Griffiths, D. F.

    1991-01-01

    Spurious stable as well as unstable steady state numerical solutions, spurious asymptotic numerical solutions of higher period, and even stable chaotic behavior can occur when finite difference methods are used to solve nonlinear differential equations (DE) numerically. The occurrence of spurious asymptotes is independent of whether the DE possesses a unique steady state or has additional periodic solutions and/or exhibits chaotic phenomena. The form of the nonlinear DEs and the type of numerical schemes are the determining factor. In addition, the occurrence of spurious steady states is not restricted to the time steps that are beyond the linearized stability limit of the scheme. In many instances, it can occur below the linearized stability limit. Therefore, it is essential for practitioners in computational sciences to be knowledgeable about the dynamical behavior of finite difference methods for nonlinear scalar DEs before the actual application of these methods to practical computations. It is also important to change the traditional way of thinking and practices when dealing with genuinely nonlinear problems. In the past, spurious asymptotes were observed in numerical computations but tended to be ignored because they all were assumed to lie beyond the linearized stability limits of the time step parameter delta t. As can be seen from the study, bifurcations to and from spurious asymptotic solutions and transitions to computational instability not only are highly scheme dependent and problem dependent, but also initial data and boundary condition dependent, and not limited to time steps that are beyond the linearized stability limit.

  15. Dynamical approach study of spurious steady-state numerical solutions of nonlinear differential equations. Part 1: The ODE connection and its implications for algorithm development in computational fluid dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yee, H. C.; Sweby, P. K.; Griffiths, D. F.

    1990-01-01

    Spurious stable as well as unstable steady state numerical solutions, spurious asymptotic numerical solutions of higher period, and even stable chaotic behavior can occur when finite difference methods are used to solve nonlinear differential equations (DE) numerically. The occurrence of spurious asymptotes is independent of whether the DE possesses a unique steady state or has additional periodic solutions and/or exhibits chaotic phenomena. The form of the nonlinear DEs and the type of numerical schemes are the determining factor. In addition, the occurrence of spurious steady states is not restricted to the time steps that are beyond the linearized stability limit of the scheme. In many instances, it can occur below the linearized stability limit. Therefore, it is essential for practitioners in computational sciences to be knowledgeable about the dynamical behavior of finite difference methods for nonlinear scalar DEs before the actual application of these methods to practical computations. It is also important to change the traditional way of thinking and practices when dealing with genuinely nonlinear problems. In the past, spurious asymptotes were observed in numerical computations but tended to be ignored because they all were assumed to lie beyond the linearized stability limits of the time step parameter delta t. As can be seen from the study, bifurcations to and from spurious asymptotic solutions and transitions to computational instability not only are highly scheme dependent and problem dependent, but also initial data and boundary condition dependent, and not limited to time steps that are beyond the linearized stability limit.

  16. Numerical Simulation of Permeability Change in Wellbore Cement Fractures after Geomechanical Stress and Geochemical Reactions Using X-ray Computed Tomography Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Kabilan, Senthil; Jung, Hun Bok; Kuprat, Andrew P.; Beck, Anthon N.; Varga, Tamas; Fernandez, Carlos A.; Um, Wooyong

    2016-06-21

    X-ray microtomography (XMT) imaging combined with a three-dimensional (3D) computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling technique was used to study the effect of geochemical and geomechanical processes on fracture properties in composite Portland cement–basalt caprock core samples. The effect of fluid properties and flow conditions on fracture permeability was numerically studied by using fluids with varying physical properties and simulating different pressure conditions. CFD revealed that the application of geomechanical stress led to increased fluid flow, which resulted in increased fracture permeability. After CO2-reaction, XMT images displayed preferential precipitation of calcium carbonate within the fractures in the cement matrix and less precipitation in fractures located at the cement–basalt interface. CFD predicted changes in flow characteristics and differences in absolute values of flow properties due to different pressure gradients. CFD was able to highlight the profound effect of fluid properties on flow characteristics and hydraulic properties of fractures. This study demonstrates the applicability of XMT imaging and CFD as powerful tools for characterizing the hydraulic properties of fractures in a number of applications like geologic carbon sequestration and storage, hydraulic fracturing for shale gas production, and enhanced geothermal systems.

  17. Numerical Simulation of Permeability Change in Wellbore Cement Fractures after Geomechanical Stress and Geochemical Reactions Using X-ray Computed Tomography Imaging.

    PubMed

    Kabilan, Senthil; Jung, Hun Bok; Kuprat, Andrew P; Beck, Anthon N; Varga, Tamas; Fernandez, Carlos A; Um, Wooyong

    2016-06-21

    X-ray microtomography (XMT) imaging combined with three-dimensional (3D) computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling technique was used to study the effect of geochemical and geomechanical processes on fracture permeability in composite Portland cement-basalt caprock core samples. The effect of fluid density and viscosity and two different pressure gradient conditions on fracture permeability was numerically studied by using fluids with varying density and viscosity and simulating two different pressure gradient conditions. After the application of geomechanical stress but before CO2-reaction, CFD revealed fluid flow increase, which resulted in increased fracture permeability. After CO2-reaction, XMT images displayed preferential precipitation of calcium carbonate within the fractures in the cement matrix and less precipitation in fractures located at the cement-basalt interface. CFD estimated changes in flow profile and differences in absolute values of flow velocity due to different pressure gradients. CFD was able to highlight the profound effect of fluid viscosity on velocity profile and fracture permeability. This study demonstrates the applicability of XMT imaging and CFD as powerful tools for characterizing the hydraulic properties of fractures in a number of applications like geologic carbon sequestration and storage, hydraulic fracturing for shale gas production, and enhanced geothermal systems.

  18. Efficient numerical methods for the random-field Ising model: Finite-size scaling, reweighting extrapolation, and computation of response functions.

    PubMed

    Fytas, Nikolaos G; Martín-Mayor, Víctor

    2016-06-01

    It was recently shown [Phys. Rev. Lett. 110, 227201 (2013)PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.110.227201] that the critical behavior of the random-field Ising model in three dimensions is ruled by a single universality class. This conclusion was reached only after a proper taming of the large scaling corrections of the model by applying a combined approach of various techniques, coming from the zero- and positive-temperature toolboxes of statistical physics. In the present contribution we provide a detailed description of this combined scheme, explaining in detail the zero-temperature numerical scheme and developing the generalized fluctuation-dissipation formula that allowed us to compute connected and disconnected correlation functions of the model. We discuss the error evolution of our method and we illustrate the infinite limit-size extrapolation of several observables within phenomenological renormalization. We present an extension of the quotients method that allows us to obtain estimates of the critical exponent α of the specific heat of the model via the scaling of the bond energy and we discuss the self-averaging properties of the system and the algorithmic aspects of the maximum-flow algorithm used.

  19. Multi-party Quantum Key Agreement without Entanglement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Bin-Bin; Guo, Gong-De; Lin, Song

    2017-04-01

    A new efficient quantum key agreement protocol without entanglement is proposed. In this protocol, each user encodes his secret key into the traveling particles by performing one of four rotation operations that one cannot perfectly distinguish. In the end, all users can simultaneously obtain the final shared key. The security of the presented protocol against some common attacks is discussed. It is shown that this protocol can effectively protect the privacy of each user and satisfy the requirement of fairness in theory. Moreover, the quantum carriers and the encoding operations used in the protocol can be achieved in realistic physical devices. Therefore, the presented protocol is feasible with current technology.

  20. Multi-party Quantum Key Agreement without Entanglement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Bin-Bin; Guo, Gong-De; Lin, Song

    2016-12-01

    A new efficient quantum key agreement protocol without entanglement is proposed. In this protocol, each user encodes his secret key into the traveling particles by performing one of four rotation operations that one cannot perfectly distinguish. In the end, all users can simultaneously obtain the final shared key. The security of the presented protocol against some common attacks is discussed. It is shown that this protocol can effectively protect the privacy of each user and satisfy the requirement of fairness in theory. Moreover, the quantum carriers and the encoding operations used in the protocol can be achieved in realistic physical devices. Therefore, the presented protocol is feasible with current technology.

  1. K-Anonymous Multi-party Secret Handshakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Shouhuai; Yung, Moti

    Anonymity-protection techniques are crucial for various commercial and financial transactions, where participants are worried about their privacy. On the other hand, authentication methods are also crucial for such interactions. Secret handshake is a relatively recent mechanism that facilitates privacy-preserving mutual authentication between communicating peers. In recent years, researchers have proposed a set of secret handshake schemes based on different assumptions about the credentials used: from one-time credentials to the more general PKI-like credentials. In this paper, we concentrate on k-anonymous secret handshake schemes based on PKI-like infrastructures. More specifically, we deal with the k-anonymous m-party (m > 2) secret handshake problem, which is significantly more involved than its two-party counterpart due to the following: When an honest user hand-shakes with m - 1 parties, it must be assured that these parties are distinct; otherwise, under the mask of anonymity a dishonest participant may clone itself in a single handshake session (i.e., assuming multiple personalities).

  2. Cooling Computers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Birken, Marvin N.

    1967-01-01

    Numerous decisions must be made in the design of computer air conditioning, each determined by a combination of economics, physical, and esthetic characteristics, and computer requirements. Several computer air conditioning systems are analyzed--(1) underfloor supply and overhead return, (2) underfloor plenum and overhead supply with computer unit…

  3. Cooling Computers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Birken, Marvin N.

    1967-01-01

    Numerous decisions must be made in the design of computer air conditioning, each determined by a combination of economics, physical, and esthetic characteristics, and computer requirements. Several computer air conditioning systems are analyzed--(1) underfloor supply and overhead return, (2) underfloor plenum and overhead supply with computer unit…

  4. A Comparison of the CHILD and Landlab Computational Landscape Evolution Models and Examples of Best Practices in Numerical Modeling of Surface Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gasparini, N. M.; Hobley, D. E. J.; Tucker, G. E.; Istanbulluoglu, E.; Adams, J. M.; Nudurupati, S. S.; Hutton, E. W. H.

    2014-12-01

    Computational models are important tools that can be used to quantitatively understand the evolution of real landscapes. Commonalities exist among most landscape evolution models, although they are also idiosyncratic, in that they are coded in different languages, require different input values, and are designed to tackle a unique set of questions. These differences can make applying a landscape evolution model challenging, especially for novice programmers. In this study, we compare and contrast two landscape evolution models that are designed to tackle similar questions, but the actual model designs are quite different. The first model, CHILD, is over a decade-old and is relatively well-tested, well-developed and well-used. It is coded in C++, operates on an irregular grid and was designed more with function rather than user-experience in mind. In contrast, the second model, Landlab, is relatively new and was designed to be accessible to a wide range of scientists, including those who have not previously used or developed a numerical model. Landlab is coded in Python, a relatively easy language for the non-proficient programmer, and has the ability to model landscapes described on both regular and irregular grids. We present landscape simulations from both modeling platforms. Our goal is to illustrate best practices for implementing a new process module in a landscape evolution model, and therefore the simulations are applicable regardless of the modeling platform. We contrast differences and highlight similarities between the use of the two models, including setting-up the model and input file for different evolutionary scenarios, computational time, and model output. Whenever possible, we compare model output with analytical solutions and illustrate the effects, or lack thereof, of a uniform vs. non-uniform grid. Our simulations focus on implementing a single process, including detachment-limited or transport-limited fluvial bedrock incision and linear or non

  5. Are computer numerical control (CNC)-manufactured patient-specific metal templates available for posterior thoracic pedicle screw insertion? Feasibility and accuracy evaluation.

    PubMed

    Kong, Xiangxue; Tang, Lei; Ye, Qiang; Huang, Wenhua; Li, Jianyi

    2017-07-17

    Accurate and safe posterior thoracic pedicle insertion (PTPI) remains a challenge. Patient-specific drill templates (PDTs) created by rapid prototyping (RP) can assist in posterior thoracic pedicle insertion, but pose biocompatibility risks. The aims of this study were to develop alternative PDTs with computer numerical control (CNC) and assess their feasibility and accuracy in assisting PTPI. Preoperative CT images of 31 cadaveric thoracic vertebras were obtained and then the optimal pedicle screw trajectories were planned. The PDTs with optimal screw trajectories were randomly assigned to be designed and manufactured by CNC or RP in each vertebra. With the guide of the CNC- or RP-manufactured PDTs, the appropriate screws were inserted into the pedicles. Postoperative CT scans were performed to analyze any deviations at entry point and midpoint of the pedicles. The CNC group was found to be significant manufacture-time-shortening, and cost-decreasing, when compared with the RP group (P < 0.01). The PDTs fitted the vertebral laminates well while all screws were being inserted into the pedicles. There were no significant differences in absolute deviations at entry point and midpoint of the pedicle on either axial or sagittal planes (P > 0.05). The screw positions were grade 0 in 90.3% and grade 1 in 9.7% of the cases in the CNC group and grade 0 in 93.5% and grade 1 in 6.5% of the cases in the RP group (P = 0.641). CNC-manufactured PDTs are viable for assisting in PTPI with good feasibility and accuracy.

  6. From Numerical Problem Solving to Model-Based Experimentation Incorporating Computer-Based Tools of Various Scales into the ChE Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shacham, Mordechai; Cutlip, Michael B.; Brauner, Neima

    2009-01-01

    A continuing challenge to the undergraduate chemical engineering curriculum is the time-effective incorporation and use of computer-based tools throughout the educational program. Computing skills in academia and industry require some proficiency in programming and effective use of software packages for solving 1) single-model, single-algorithm…

  7. Evaluating Definite Integrals on a Computer Theory and Practice. Applications of Numerical Analysis. Modules and Monographs in Undergraduate Mathematics and Its Applications Project. UMAP Unit 432.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wagon, Stanley

    This document explores two methods of obtaining numbers that are approximations of certain definite integrals. The methods covered are the Trapezoidal Rule and Romberg's method. Since the formulas used involve considerable calculation, a computer is normally used. Some of the problems and pitfalls of computer implementation, such as roundoff…

  8. Proceedings of the 1978 Army Numerical Analysis and Computers Conference held at U.S. Army Missile Research and Development Command, Redstone Arsenal, Alabama. 1 - 2 March 1978.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-10-01

    Machining; The CEMA Ryad Computer Family; Some Algorithms for the Analysis of Computer Programs; Solving Differential Equations on a Hand Held Programmable ... Calculator ; The Mechanical Train Analog: A Proposed software Evaluation Tool; A Comparison of Nastran Code and Exact Solution to an Elastic-Plastic

  9. From Numerical Problem Solving to Model-Based Experimentation Incorporating Computer-Based Tools of Various Scales into the ChE Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shacham, Mordechai; Cutlip, Michael B.; Brauner, Neima

    2009-01-01

    A continuing challenge to the undergraduate chemical engineering curriculum is the time-effective incorporation and use of computer-based tools throughout the educational program. Computing skills in academia and industry require some proficiency in programming and effective use of software packages for solving 1) single-model, single-algorithm…

  10. Elementary Techniques of Numerical Integration and Their Computer Implementation. Applications of Elementary Calculus to Computer Science. Modules and Monographs in Undergraduate Mathematics and Its Applications Project. UMAP Unit 379.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Motter, Wendell L.

    It is noted that there are some integrals which cannot be evaluated by determining an antiderivative, and these integrals must be subjected to other techniques. Numerical integration is one such method; it provides a sum that is an approximate value for some integral types. This module's purpose is to introduce methods of numerical integration and…

  11. Hindi Numerals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bright, William

    In most languages encountered by linguists, the numerals, considered as a paradigmatic set, constitute a morpho-syntactic problem of only moderate complexity. The Indo-Aryan language family of North India, however, presents a curious contrast. The relatively regular numeral system of Sanskrit, as it has developed historically into the modern…

  12. Numerical Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siegler, Robert S.; Braithwaite, David W.

    2016-01-01

    In this review, we attempt to integrate two crucial aspects of numerical development: learning the magnitudes of individual numbers and learning arithmetic. Numerical magnitude development involves gaining increasingly precise knowledge of increasing ranges and types of numbers: from non-symbolic to small symbolic numbers, from smaller to larger…

  13. Numerical Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siegler, Robert S.; Braithwaite, David W.

    2016-01-01

    In this review, we attempt to integrate two crucial aspects of numerical development: learning the magnitudes of individual numbers and learning arithmetic. Numerical magnitude development involves gaining increasingly precise knowledge of increasing ranges and types of numbers: from non-symbolic to small symbolic numbers, from smaller to larger…

  14. Numerical nonlinear inelastic analysis of stiffened shells of revolution. Volume 3: Engineer's program manual for STARS-2P digital computer program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Svalbonas, V.; Levine, H.; Ogilvie, P.

    1975-01-01

    Engineering programming information is presented for the STARS-2P (shell theory automated for rotational structures-2P (plasticity)) digital computer program, and FORTRAN 4 was used in writing the various subroutines. The execution of this program requires the use of thirteen temporary storage units. The program was initially written and debugged on the IBM 370-165 computer and converted to the UNIVAC 1108 computer, where it utilizes approximately 60,000 words of core. Only basic FORTRAN library routines are required by the program: sine, cosine, absolute value, and square root.

  15. Proceedings of The 1980 Army Numerical Analysis and Computers Conference (17th) Held at Moffett Field, California on 20-21 February 1980.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-08-01

    137 APPROXIMATIONS FOR Z [G(s) F(s)] Richard E. Dickson ........ ...................... ... 147 RADIX 65/39, A ROOT...APPROXIMATIONS FOR Z (G(s) F(s)) Dr. Richard E. Dickson, US Army Missile Command, Redstone Arsenal, Alabama RADIX 65/39, A ROOT SEARCHING ALGORITHM FOR...III CHAIRPERSON - Dr. Billy Z . Jenkins, US Army Missile Command, Redstone Arsenal, Alabama COMPUTATIONAL TRANSONICS ON A VECTOR COMPUTER Messrs. Jerry S

  16. Computational modeling technique for numerical simulation of immiscible two-phase flow problems involving flow and transport phenomena in porous media with hysteresis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abreu, Eduardo; Lambert, Wanderson

    2012-05-01

    Numerical methods are necessary, and are extremely important, in developing an understanding of the dynamics of multiphase flow of fluids in porous media applications to maximize hydrocarbon recovery as well as to simulate contaminant transport of soluble or insoluble species in groundwater contamination problems. This work deals with a problem very common in water-flooding process in petroleum reservoir to motivate the proposed modeling: the flow of two immiscible and incompressible fluid phases. The system of equations which describe this type of flow is a coupled, highly nonlinear system of time-dependent partial differential equations. The equation for the invading fluid (e.g., water phase) is a convection-dominated, degenerate parabolic partial differential equation whose solutions typically exhibit sharp moving fronts (e.g., moving internal layers with strong gradients) and it is very difficult to approximate numerically. We propose a two-stage numerical method to describe the injection problem for a model of two-phase (water-oil) flow in a porous rock, taking into account both gravity and hysteresis effects for solving transport flow problems in porous media. Indeed, we also investigate the Riemann problem for the one-dimensional, purely hyperbolic system, associated to the full differential model problem at hand. Thus, the use of accurate numerical methods in conjunction with one-dimensional semi-analytical Riemann solutions might provide valuable insight into the qualitative solution behavior of the full nonlinear governing flow system.

  17. Quasi-Periodic Oscillations and Frequencies in AN Accretion Disk and Comparison with the Numerical Results from Non-Rotating Black Hole Computed by the Grh Code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donmez, Orhan

    The shocked wave created on the accretion disk after different physical phenomena (accretion flows with pressure gradients, star-disk interaction etc.) may be responsible observed Quasi Periodic Oscillations (QPOs) in X-ray binaries. We present the set of characteristics frequencies associated with accretion disk around the rotating and non-rotating black holes for one particle case. These persistent frequencies are results of the rotating pattern in an accretion disk. We compare the frequency's from two different numerical results for fluid flow around the non-rotating black hole with one particle case. The numerical results are taken from Refs. 1 and 2 using fully general relativistic hydrodynamical code with non-selfgravitating disk. While the first numerical result has a relativistic tori around the black hole, the second one includes one-armed spiral shock wave produced from star-disk interaction. Some physical modes presented in the QPOs can be excited in numerical simulation of relativistic tori and spiral waves on the accretion disk. The results of these different dynamical structures on the accretion disk responsible for QPOs are discussed in detail.

  18. Numerical-Optimization Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanderplaats, Garret N.

    1991-01-01

    Automated Design Synthesis (ADS) computer program is general-purpose numerical-optimization program for design engineering. Provides wide range of options for solution of constrained and unconstrained function minimization problems. Suitable for such applications as minimum-weight design. Written in FORTRAN 77.

  19. "Recognizing Numerical Constants"

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, David H.; Craw, James M. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    The advent of inexpensive, high performance computer and new efficient algorithms have made possible the automatic recognition of numerically computed constants. In other words, techniques now exist for determining, within certain limits, whether a computed real or complex number can be written as a simple expression involving the classical constants of mathematics. In this presentation, some of the recently discovered techniques for constant recognition, notably integer relation detection algorithms, will be presented. As an application of these methods, the author's recent work in recognizing "Euler sums" will be described in some detail.

  20. Numerical Development.

    PubMed

    Siegler, Robert S; Braithwaite, David W

    2017-01-03

    In this review, we attempt to integrate two crucial aspects of numerical development: learning the magnitudes of individual numbers and learning arithmetic. Numerical magnitude development involves gaining increasingly precise knowledge of increasing ranges and types of numbers: from nonsymbolic to small symbolic numbers, from smaller to larger whole numbers, and from whole to rational numbers. One reason why this development is important is that precision of numerical magnitude knowledge is correlated with, predictive of, and causally related to both whole and rational number arithmetic. Rational number arithmetic, however, also poses challenges beyond understanding the magnitudes of the individual numbers. Some of these challenges are inherent; they are present for all learners. Other challenges are culturally contingent; they vary from country to country and classroom to classroom. Generating theories and data that help children surmount the challenges of rational number arithmetic is a promising and important goal for future numerical development research.

  1. Present-day thermal signatures of different heat transport mechanisms within the Northeast German basin and their sensitivity to the resolution of the computational mesh - results from coupled 3D numerical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaiser, B. O.; Scheck-Wenderoth, M.; Cacace, M.; Przybycin, A.; Lewerenz, B.

    2012-04-01

    Sedimentary basins provide a significant portion of geothermal energy. Making geothermal heat an effective source for sustainable energy supply requires a quantitative reserve assessment. Numerical (mathematical) models of sedimentary basins are useful tools for first-order approximations of the geothermal potential on a regional scale. The challenge for numerical investigations within complex geological sedimentary basins is that the thermal field contains superposed signals originating from several heat transport processes, different in nature but physically coupled. An additional difficulty arising from numerical simulations is the error introduced by discretizing a continuous physical system into its numerical counterpart. Different mesh resolutions may lead to different and sometimes contrasting computational findings, thus making the reliability of coupled numerical simulations at least questionable. By means of 3D numerical simulations we discriminate conductive, forced convective and free thermal convective heat transport within a complex geological setting, the Northeast German Basin. As a second step we explore the sensitivity of each heat transport process with regard to the spatial discretization. The internal geological structure of the NEGB is characterized by the presence of a highly structured Zechstein salt sequence piercing the sedimentary overburden locally. Moreover, the Zechstein salt is impervious to fluid flow and has a relative high thermal conductivity compared to the surrounding clastic sediments. Computational results show that these hydrogeological conditions exerts primary constraints on the internal hydrothermal setting of the basin. The impervious nature of the Zechstein salt inhibits groundwater flow to be effective. Accordingly, conduction is the main heat transport mechanism within the salt. In contrast, forced convective heat transport triggerd by topographic gradients affects mainly the temperature distribution within the post

  2. Numerical analysis of stiffened shells of revolution. Volume 2: Users' manual for STAR-02S - shell theory automated for rotational structures - 2 (statics), digital computer program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Svalbonas, V.

    1973-01-01

    A procedure for the structural analysis of stiffened shells of revolution is presented. A digital computer program based on the Love-Reissner first order shell theory was developed. The computer program can analyze orthotropic thin shells of revolution, subjected to unsymmetric distributed loading or concentrated line loads, as well as thermal strains. The geometrical shapes of the shells which may be analyzed are described. The shell wall cross section can be a sheet, sandwich, or reinforced sheet or sandwich. General stiffness input options are also available.

  3. Numerical analysis and FORTRAN program for the computation of the turbulent wakes of turbomachinery rotor blades, isolated airfoils and cascade of airfoils. Final Report - Ph.D. Thesis Mar. 1980

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hah, C.; Lakshminarayana, B.

    1982-01-01

    Turbulent wakes of turbomachinery rotor blades, isolated airfoils, and a cascade of airfoils were investigated both numerically and experimentally. Low subsonic and incompressible wake flows were examined. A finite difference procedure was employed in the numerical analysis utilizing the continuity, momentum, and turbulence closure equations in the rotating, curvilinear, and nonorthogonal coordinate system. A nonorthogonal curvilinear coordinate system was developed to improve the accuracy and efficiency of the numerical calculation. Three turbulence models were employed to obtain closure of the governing equations. The first model was comprised to transport equations for the turbulent kinetic energy and the rate of energy dissipation, and the second and third models were comprised of equations for the rate of turbulent kinetic energy dissipation and Reynolds stresses, respectively. The second model handles the convection and diffusion terms in the Reynolds stress transport equation collectively, while the third model handles them individually. The numerical results demonstrate that the second and third models provide accurate predictions, but the computer time and memory storage can be considerably saved with the second model.

  4. Proceedings of the 1981 Army Numerical Analysis and Computers Conference, held U. S. Army Missile Command, Redstone Arsenal, Alabama, 26-27 February 1981

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-08-01

    and so the storage penalty is 3xILxJL, compared to ILxJL for the single-region solution by the basic GEM. The theo - retical operation count given in...6, June 1967. R.H. Jansen , "High speed computation of single and coupled microstrip parameters including dispersions, high-order nodes, loss, and

  5. Numerical simulation of dynamics of brushless dc motors for aerospace and other applications. Volume 2: User's guide to computer EMA model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demerdash, N. A. O.; Nehl, T. W.

    1979-01-01

    A description and user's guide of the computer program developed to simulate the dynamics of an electromechanical actuator for aerospace applications are presented. The effects of the stator phase currents on the permanent magnets of the rotor are examined. The voltage and current waveforms present in the power conditioner network during the motoring, regenerative braking, and plugging modes of operation are presented and discussed.

  6. ADVANCED COMPUTATIONAL METHODS IN DOSE MODELING: APPLICATION OF COMPUTATIONAL BIOPHYSICAL TRANSPORT, COMPUTATIONAL CHEMISTRY, AND COMPUTATIONAL BIOLOGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Computational toxicology (CompTox) leverages the significant gains in computing power and computational techniques (e.g., numerical approaches, structure-activity relationships, bioinformatics) realized over the last few years, thereby reducing costs and increasing efficiency i...

  7. ADVANCED COMPUTATIONAL METHODS IN DOSE MODELING: APPLICATION OF COMPUTATIONAL BIOPHYSICAL TRANSPORT, COMPUTATIONAL CHEMISTRY, AND COMPUTATIONAL BIOLOGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Computational toxicology (CompTox) leverages the significant gains in computing power and computational techniques (e.g., numerical approaches, structure-activity relationships, bioinformatics) realized over the last few years, thereby reducing costs and increasing efficiency i...

  8. Numerical investigation of the vortex core precession in a model hydro turbine with the aid of hybrid methods for computation of turbulent flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sentyabov, A. V.; Gavrilov, A. A.; Dekterev, A. A.; Minakov, A. V.

    2014-12-01

    Numerical modeling of the unsteady flow in the draft tube of the test bench hydro turbine is conducted. The hybrid RANS-LES methods for modeling turbulent flows are compared. The intensity and frequency of pressure fluctuations, which are induced by the vortex core precession under the runner, and the integral characteristics are considered. An analysis of the synchronous and asynchronous parts of pressure fluctuations is done; the generating and influence of the synchronous component of fluctuations are considered. The vortex core interaction with the draft tube elbow is considered.

  9. Improved curve fits for the thermodynamic properties of equilibrium air suitable for numerical computation using time-dependent or shock-capturing methods, part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tannehill, J. C.; Mugge, P. H.

    1974-01-01

    Simplified curve fits for the thermodynamic properties of equilibrium air were devised for use in either the time-dependent or shock-capturing computational methods. For the time-dependent method, curve fits were developed for p = p(e, rho), a = a(e, rho), and T = T(e, rho). For the shock-capturing method, curve fits were developed for h = h(p, rho) and T = T(p, rho). The ranges of validity for these curves fits were for temperatures up to 25,000 K and densities from 10 to the minus 7th power to 10 to the 3d power amagats. These approximate curve fits are considered particularly useful when employed on advanced computers such as the Burroughs ILLIAC 4 or the CDC STAR.

  10. Computational modes and the Machenauer N.L.N.M.I. of the GLAS 4th order model. [NonLinear Normal Mode Initialization in numerical weather forecasting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Navon, I. M.; Bloom, S.; Takacs, L. L.

    1985-01-01

    An attempt was made to use the GLAS global 4th order shallow water equations to perform a Machenhauer nonlinear normal mode initialization (NLNMI) for the external vertical mode. A new algorithm was defined for identifying and filtering out computational modes which affect the convergence of the Machenhauer iterative procedure. The computational modes and zonal waves were linearly initialized and gravitational modes were nonlinearly initialized. The Machenhauer NLNMI was insensitive to the absence of high zonal wave numbers. The effects of the Machenhauer scheme were evaluated by performing 24 hr integrations with nondissipative and dissipative explicit time integration models. The NLNMI was found to be inferior to the Rasch (1984) pseudo-secant technique for obtaining convergence when the time scales of nonlinear forcing were much smaller than the time scales expected from the natural frequency of the mode.

  11. Forebody and base region real-gas flow in severe planetary entry by a factored implicit numerical method. I - Computational fluid dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lombard, C. K.; Davy, W. C.; Green, M. J.

    1980-01-01

    A new code for the simulation of full (forebody and base region) flowfields about bluff bodies in the hypersonic regime of severe planetary entry is described. The present 'maximally conservative, maximally differenced' formulation of the unsteady compressible Navier-Stokes equations for 2-D axisymmetric 3-D flow is contrasted for stability with previous formulations of Viviand, Kutler, et al, and Thomas and Lombard. Discrete metric relations peculiar to the axisymmetric finite volume formulation are presented along with a general discussion of their relations to and consequences of failure to close computational cells. A computational mesh of curvilinear coordinate topology singular in the flow regime is presented that permits aligned capturing of the major physical features of the complex flowfield.

  12. Forebody and base region real-gas flow in severe planetary entry by a factored implicit numerical method. I - Computational fluid dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lombard, C. K.; Davy, W. C.; Green, M. J.

    1980-01-01

    A new code for the simulation of full (forebody and base region) flowfields about bluff bodies in the hypersonic regime of severe planetary entry is described. The present 'maximally conservative, maximally differenced' formulation of the unsteady compressible Navier-Stokes equations for 2-D axisymmetric 3-D flow is contrasted for stability with previous formulations of Viviand, Kutler, et al, and Thomas and Lombard. Discrete metric relations peculiar to the axisymmetric finite volume formulation are presented along with a general discussion of their relations to and consequences of failure to close computational cells. A computational mesh of curvilinear coordinate topology singular in the flow regime is presented that permits aligned capturing of the major physical features of the complex flowfield.

  13. Computational modes and the Machenauer N.L.N.M.I. of the GLAS 4th order model. [NonLinear Normal Mode Initialization in numerical weather forecasting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Navon, I. M.; Bloom, S.; Takacs, L. L.

    1985-01-01

    An attempt was made to use the GLAS global 4th order shallow water equations to perform a Machenhauer nonlinear normal mode initialization (NLNMI) for the external vertical mode. A new algorithm was defined for identifying and filtering out computational modes which affect the convergence of the Machenhauer iterative procedure. The computational modes and zonal waves were linearly initialized and gravitational modes were nonlinearly initialized. The Machenhauer NLNMI was insensitive to the absence of high zonal wave numbers. The effects of the Machenhauer scheme were evaluated by performing 24 hr integrations with nondissipative and dissipative explicit time integration models. The NLNMI was found to be inferior to the Rasch (1984) pseudo-secant technique for obtaining convergence when the time scales of nonlinear forcing were much smaller than the time scales expected from the natural frequency of the mode.

  14. Downward continuation of the free-air gravity anomalies to the ellipsoid using the gradient solution and terrain correction: An attempt of global numerical computations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Y. M.

    1989-01-01

    The formulas for the determination of the coefficients of the spherical harmonic expansion of the disturbing potential of the earth are defined for data given on a sphere. In order to determine the spherical harmonic coefficients, the gravity anomalies have to be analytically downward continued from the earth's surface to a sphere-at least to the ellipsoid. The goal is to continue the gravity anomalies from the earth's surface downward to the ellipsoid using recent elevation models. The basic method for the downward continuation is the gradient solution (the g sub 1 term). The terrain correction was also computed because of the role it can play as a correction term when calculating harmonic coefficients from surface gravity data. The fast Fourier transformation was applied to the computations.

  15. Numerical analysis of stiffened shells of revolution. Volume 4: Engineer's program manual for STARS-2S shell theory automated for rotational structures - 2 (statics) digital computer program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Svalbonas, V.; Ogilvie, P.

    1973-01-01

    The engineering programming information for the digital computer program for analyzing shell structures is presented. The program is designed to permit small changes such as altering the geometry or a table size to fit the specific requirements. Each major subroutine is discussed and the following subjects are included: (1) subroutine description, (2) pertinent engineering symbols and the FORTRAN coded counterparts, (3) subroutine flow chart, and (4) subroutine FORTRAN listing.

  16. Numerical computation of spherical harmonics of arbitrary degree and order by extending exponent of floating point numbers: II first-, second-, and third-order derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukushima, Toshio

    2012-11-01

    We confirm that the first-, second-, and third-order derivatives of fully-normalized Legendre polynomial (LP) and associated Legendre function (ALF) of arbitrary degree and order can be correctly evaluated by means of non-singular fixed-degree formulas (Bosch in Phys Chem Earth 25:655-659, 2000) in the ordinary IEEE754 arithmetic when the values of fully-normalized LP and ALF are obtained without underflow problems, for e.g., using the extended range arithmetic we recently developed (Fukushima in J Geod 86:271-285, 2012). Also, we notice the same correctness for the popular but singular fixed-order formulas unless (1) the order of differentiation is greater than the order of harmonics and (2) the point of evaluation is close to the poles. The new formulation using the fixed-order formulas runs at a negligible extra computational time, i.e., 3-5 % increase in computational time per single ALF when compared with the standard algorithm without the exponent extension. This enables a practical computation of low-order derivatives of spherical harmonics of arbitrary degree and order.

  17. Numerical modeling of preburner flowfield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chow, A. S.; Mo, J. D.; Jin, K. R.

    1993-06-01

    This work is intended to numerically predict the flowfields inside the preburner of the Space Shuttle Main Engine. The computer code (FDNS) based on pressure correction method is modified and adapted with an elliptic grid generator. The original configuration of the preburner in conjunction with downstream gas turbines has been simplified geometrically and numerically modeled at its full power in this work. The computational results are presented and qualitatively discussed with test data collected in NASA/MSFC.

  18. Introduction to Numerical Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Schoonover, Joseph A.

    2016-06-14

    These are slides for a lecture for the Parallel Computing Summer Research Internship at the National Security Education Center. This gives an introduction to numerical methods. Repetitive algorithms are used to obtain approximate solutions to mathematical problems, using sorting, searching, root finding, optimization, interpolation, extrapolation, least squares regresion, Eigenvalue problems, ordinary differential equations, and partial differential equations. Many equations are shown. Discretizations allow us to approximate solutions to mathematical models of physical systems using a repetitive algorithm and introduce errors that can lead to numerical instabilities if we are not careful.

  19. Computerized Numerical Control Curriculum Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reneau, Fred; And Others

    This guide is intended for use in a course in programming and operating a computerized numerical control system. Addressed in the course are various aspects of programming and planning, setting up, and operating machines with computerized numerical control, including selecting manual or computer-assigned programs and matching them with…

  20. Numerical Integration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sozio, Gerry

    2009-01-01

    Senior secondary students cover numerical integration techniques in their mathematics courses. In particular, students would be familiar with the "midpoint rule," the elementary "trapezoidal rule" and "Simpson's rule." This article derives these techniques by methods which secondary students may not be familiar with and an approach that…

  1. Numerical Relativity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, John G.

    2009-01-01

    Recent advances in numerical relativity have fueled an explosion of progress in understanding the predictions of Einstein's theory of gravity, General Relativity, for the strong field dynamics, the gravitational radiation wave forms, and consequently the state of the remnant produced from the merger of compact binary objects. I will review recent results from the field, focusing on mergers of two black holes.

  2. Numerical Relativity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, John G.

    2009-01-01

    Recent advances in numerical relativity have fueled an explosion of progress in understanding the predictions of Einstein's theory of gravity, General Relativity, for the strong field dynamics, the gravitational radiation wave forms, and consequently the state of the remnant produced from the merger of compact binary objects. I will review recent results from the field, focusing on mergers of two black holes.

  3. Numerical computation of aerodynamics and heat transfer in a turbine cascade and a turn-around duct using advanced turbulence models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lakshminarayana, B.; Luo, J.

    1993-01-01

    The objective of this research is to develop turbulence models to predict the flow and heat transfer fields dominated by the curvature effect such as those encountered in turbine cascades and turn-around ducts. A Navier-Stokes code has been developed using an explicit Runge-Kutta method with a two layer k-epsilon/ARSM (Algebraic Reynolds Stress Model), Chien's Low Reynolds Number (LRN) k-epsilon model and Coakley's LRN q-omega model. The near wall pressure strain correlation term was included in the ARSM. The formulation is applied to Favre-averaged N-S equations and no thin-layer approximations are made in either the mean flow or turbulence transport equations. Anisotropic scaling of artificial dissipation terms was used. Locally variable timestep was also used to improve convergence. Detailed comparisons were made between computations and data measured in a turbine cascade by Arts et al. at Von Karman Institute. The surface pressure distributions and wake profiles were predicted well by all the models. The blade heat transfer is predicted well by k-epsilon/ARSM model, as well as the k-epsilon model. It's found that the onset of boundary layer transition on both surfaces is highly dependent upon the level of local freestream turbulence intensity, which is strongly influenced by the streamline curvature. Detailed computation of the flow in the turn around duct has been carried out and validated against the data by Monson as well as Sandborn. The computed results at various streamwise locations both on the concave and convex sides are compared with flow and turbulence data including the separation zone on the inner well. The k-epsilon/ARSM model yielded relatively better results than the two-equation turbulence models. A detailed assessment of the turbulence models has been made with regard to their applicability to curved flows.

  4. Frontiers in Numerical Relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Charles R.; Finn, Lee S.; Hobill, David W.

    2011-06-01

    Preface; Participants; Introduction; 1. Supercomputing and numerical relativity: a look at the past, present and future David W. Hobill and Larry L. Smarr; 2. Computational relativity in two and three dimensions Stuart L. Shapiro and Saul A. Teukolsky; 3. Slowly moving maximally charged black holes Robert C. Ferrell and Douglas M. Eardley; 4. Kepler's third law in general relativity Steven Detweiler; 5. Black hole spacetimes: testing numerical relativity David H. Bernstein, David W. Hobill and Larry L. Smarr; 6. Three dimensional initial data of numerical relativity Ken-ichi Oohara and Takashi Nakamura; 7. Initial data for collisions of black holes and other gravitational miscellany James W. York, Jr.; 8. Analytic-numerical matching for gravitational waveform extraction Andrew M. Abrahams; 9. Supernovae, gravitational radiation and the quadrupole formula L. S. Finn; 10. Gravitational radiation from perturbations of stellar core collapse models Edward Seidel and Thomas Moore; 11. General relativistic implicit radiation hydrodynamics in polar sliced space-time Paul J. Schinder; 12. General relativistic radiation hydrodynamics in spherically symmetric spacetimes A. Mezzacappa and R. A. Matzner; 13. Constraint preserving transport for magnetohydrodynamics John F. Hawley and Charles R. Evans; 14. Enforcing the momentum constraints during axisymmetric spacelike simulations Charles R. Evans; 15. Experiences with an adaptive mesh refinement algorithm in numerical relativity Matthew W. Choptuik; 16. The multigrid technique Gregory B. Cook; 17. Finite element methods in numerical relativity P. J. Mann; 18. Pseudo-spectral methods applied to gravitational collapse Silvano Bonazzola and Jean-Alain Marck; 19. Methods in 3D numerical relativity Takashi Nakamura and Ken-ichi Oohara; 20. Nonaxisymmetric rotating gravitational collapse and gravitational radiation Richard F. Stark; 21. Nonaxisymmetric neutron star collisions: initial results using smooth particle hydrodynamics

  5. Transpiration and film cooling boundary layer computer program. Volume 1: Numerical solutions of the turbulent boundary layer equations with equilibrium chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, J. N.

    1971-01-01

    A finite difference turbulent boundary layer computer program has been developed. The program is primarily oriented towards the calculation of boundary layer performance losses in rocket engines; however, the solution is general, and has much broader applicability. The effects of transpiration and film cooling as well as the effect of equilibrium chemical reactions (currently restricted to the H2-O2 system) can be calculated. The turbulent transport terms are evaluated using the phenomenological mixing length - eddy viscosity concept. The equations of motion are solved using the Crank-Nicolson implicit finite difference technique. The analysis and computer program have been checked out by solving a series of both laminar and turbulent test cases and comparing the results to data or other solutions. These comparisons have shown that the program is capable of producing very satisfactory results for a wide range of flows. Further refinements to the analysis and program, especially as applied to film cooling solutions, would be aided by the acquisition of a firm data base.

  6. Toward Scientific Numerical Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleb, Bil

    2007-01-01

    Ultimately, scientific numerical models need quantified output uncertainties so that modeling can evolve to better match reality. Documenting model input uncertainties and verifying that numerical models are translated into code correctly, however, are necessary first steps toward that goal. Without known input parameter uncertainties, model sensitivities are all one can determine, and without code verification, output uncertainties are simply not reliable. To address these two shortcomings, two proposals are offered: (1) an unobtrusive mechanism to document input parameter uncertainties in situ and (2) an adaptation of the Scientific Method to numerical model development and deployment. Because these two steps require changes in the computational simulation community to bear fruit, they are presented in terms of the Beckhard-Harris-Gleicher change model.

  7. Toward Scientific Numerical Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleb, Bil

    2007-01-01

    Ultimately, scientific numerical models need quantified output uncertainties so that modeling can evolve to better match reality. Documenting model input uncertainties and verifying that numerical models are translated into code correctly, however, are necessary first steps toward that goal. Without known input parameter uncertainties, model sensitivities are all one can determine, and without code verification, output uncertainties are simply not reliable. To address these two shortcomings, two proposals are offered: (1) an unobtrusive mechanism to document input parameter uncertainties in situ and (2) an adaptation of the Scientific Method to numerical model development and deployment. Because these two steps require changes in the computational simulation community to bear fruit, they are presented in terms of the Beckhard-Harris-Gleicher change model.

  8. Numerical Modeling of Airblast.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-06-01

    REPORT SAIC 87/1701 June 1987 Dr.. Submitted to: cp Dr. Jay Boris Laboratory for Computational Physics Accet F4,r Naval Research Laboratory I...boundary layer physical assumptions provides an unsteady prediction of the mass flux emerging from the ground. This model was first proposed by Mirels...the physics modeled will be explained. High explosive dust cloud simulation provides a research path when combined with numerical calculations can lead

  9. Computation of the time-varying flow rate from an artesian well in central Dade County, Florida, by analytical and numerical simulation methods

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Merritt, Michael L.

    1995-01-01

    To construct a digital simulation of a plume of brackish water in the surficial Biscayne aquifer of central Dade County, Florida, that originated from a flowing artesian well, it was necessary to quantify the rate of spillage and the consequent point-source loading of the aquifer. However, a flow-rate measurement (2,350 gallons per minute) made 2 months after drilling of the well in 1944 was inconsistent with later measurements (1,170 gallons per minute) in 1964, 1965, and 1969. Possible explanations were the: (1) drawdown of the aquifer over time; (2) raising of the altitude at which the water was discharged; (3) installation of 80 feet of 8-inch liner; (4) an increase in the density of the flowing water; and (5) gradual deterioration of the well casing. The first approach to reconciling the measured flow rates was to apply a form of the equation for constant-drawdown analysis often used to estimate aquifer transmissivity. Next, a numerical simulation analysis was made that pro- vided the means to account for friction loss in the well and recharge across vertically adjacent con- fining layers and from lateral boundaries. The numerical analysis required the construction of a generalized model of the subsurface from the surficial Biscayne aquifer to the cavernous, dolomitic Boulder Zone at a depth of 3,000 feet. Calibration of the generalized flow model required that the moddle confining unit of the Floridan aquifer system separating the artesian flow zone in the Upper Floridan aquifer from the Lower Floridan aquifer (the Boulder Zone) have a vertical hydraulic conductivity of at least 1 foot per day. The intermediate confining unit separating the flow zone from the surficial Biscayne aquifer was assigned a much lower hydraulic conductivity (0.01 foot per day or less). The model indicated that the observed mounding of Upper Floridan aquifer heads along the axis of the Florida Peninsula was related to the variable depth of the freshwater and brackish-water zone

  10. Numerical simulation of a novel all-optical flip-flop based on a chirped nonlinear distributed feedback semiconductor laser structure using GPGPU computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zoweil, H.

    2015-05-01

    A novel all-optical flip-flop based on a chirped nonlinear distributed feedback laser structure is proposed. The flip-flop does not require a holding beam. The optical gain is provided by a current injection into an active layer. The nonlinear wave-guiding layer consists of a chirped phase shifted grating accompanied with a negative nonlinear refractive index coefficient that increases in magnitude along the wave-guide. In the 'OFF' state, the chirped grating does not provide the required optical feedback to start lasing. An optical pulse switches the device 'ON' by reducing the chirp due to the negative nonlinear refractive index coefficient. The reduced chirp grating provides enough feedback to sustain a laser mode. The device is switched 'OFF' by cross gain modulation. GPGPU computing allows for long simulation time of multiple SET-RESET operations. The 'ON/OFF' transitions delays are in nanoseconds time scale.

  11. A Numerical Model for the Computation of Radiance Distributions in Natural Waters with Wind-Roughened Surfaces, Part 2: User’s Guide and Code Listing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-07-01

    AAM) AT ALL Y LEVELS WRITE(NOUT) (AAM(I).I=1, NRAMP ) 00 150 J=1.NV 150 WRITE(NUOUT) (AYM(I .J) ,I11, NRAMP ) IF(IDBLJG2.NE.0) THIEN WRITEC6. 1038) CALL...COMPUTATIONS C C SAVE THE COMPuILO AMP’ ITubES C WRITE(NUOUT) (WERK(I) ,I I, NRAMP ) WRITE(NUOUT) (AAM) I), I1 , NRAMP ) WRITE (NUOUT) (AAP (I) .I=1. NRAMP ) DO...450 J=1,NY 450 wRITE(NuOUT) (A\\’M(I ,.),Iz.1, NRAMP ) 00 451 j=l.Ny 451 vyRITE NjOUT) (AYPL(I .j),I 1,NkAMP) ENDFILE NUOUT IF(IDBUG2.NE.(ni T,-EN WRITE

  12. Haemodynamic imaging of thoracic stent-grafts by computational fluid dynamics (CFD): presentation of a patient-specific method combining magnetic resonance imaging and numerical simulations.

    PubMed

    Midulla, Marco; Moreno, Ramiro; Baali, Adil; Chau, Ming; Negre-Salvayre, Anne; Nicoud, Franck; Pruvo, Jean-Pierre; Haulon, Stephan; Rousseau, Hervé

    2012-10-01

    In the last decade, there was been increasing interest in finding imaging techniques able to provide a functional vascular imaging of the thoracic aorta. The purpose of this paper is to present an imaging method combining magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) to obtain a patient-specific haemodynamic analysis of patients treated by thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR). MRI was used to obtain boundary conditions. MR angiography (MRA) was followed by cardiac-gated cine sequences which covered the whole thoracic aorta. Phase contrast imaging provided the inlet and outlet profiles. A CFD mesh generator was used to model the arterial morphology, and wall movements were imposed according to the cine imaging. CFD runs were processed using the finite volume (FV) method assuming blood as a homogeneous Newtonian fluid. Twenty patients (14 men; mean age 62.2 years) with different aortic lesions were evaluated. Four-dimensional mapping of velocity and wall shear stress were obtained, depicting different patterns of flow (laminar, turbulent, stenosis-like) and local alterations of parietal stress in-stent and along the native aorta. A computational method using a combined approach with MRI appears feasible and seems promising to provide detailed functional analysis of thoracic aorta after stent-graft implantation. • Functional vascular imaging of the thoracic aorta offers new diagnostic opportunities • CFD can model vascular haemodynamics for clinical aortic problems • Combining CFD with MRI offers patient specific method of aortic analysis • Haemodynamic analysis of stent-grafts could improve clinical management and follow-up.

  13. Computation of maximum gust loads in nonlinear aircraft using a new method based on the matched filter approach and numerical optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pototzky, Anthony S.; Heeg, Jennifer; Perry, Boyd, III

    1990-01-01

    Time-correlated gust loads are time histories of two or more load quantities due to the same disturbance time history. Time correlation provides knowledge of the value (magnitude and sign) of one load when another is maximum. At least two analysis methods have been identified that are capable of computing maximized time-correlated gust loads for linear aircraft. Both methods solve for the unit-energy gust profile (gust velocity as a function of time) that produces the maximum load at a given location on a linear airplane. Time-correlated gust loads are obtained by re-applying this gust profile to the airplane and computing multiple simultaneous load responses. Such time histories are physically realizable and may be applied to aircraft structures. Within the past several years there has been much interest in obtaining a practical analysis method which is capable of solving the analogous problem for nonlinear aircraft. Such an analysis method has been the focus of an international committee of gust loads specialists formed by the U.S. Federal Aviation Administration and was the topic of a panel discussion at the Gust and Buffet Loads session at the 1989 SDM Conference in Mobile, Alabama. The kinds of nonlinearities common on modern transport aircraft are indicated. The Statical Discrete Gust method is capable of being, but so far has not been, applied to nonlinear aircraft. To make the method practical for nonlinear applications, a search procedure is essential. Another method is based on Matched Filter Theory and, in its current form, is applicable to linear systems only. The purpose here is to present the status of an attempt to extend the matched filter approach to nonlinear systems. The extension uses Matched Filter Theory as a starting point and then employs a constrained optimization algorithm to attack the nonlinear problem.

  14. Three-dimensional Numerical Modeling and Computational Fluid Dynamics Simulations to Analyze and Improve Oxygen Availability in the AMC Bioartificial Liver

    PubMed Central

    Poyck, Paul P. C.; Eloot, Sunny; Chamuleau, Robert A. F. M.; Verdonck, Pascal R.

    2006-01-01

    A numerical model to investigate fluid flow and oxygen (O2) transport and consumption in the AMC-Bioartificial Liver (AMC-BAL) was developed and applied to two representative micro models of the AMC-BAL with two different gas capillary patterns, each combined with two proposed hepatocyte distributions. Parameter studies were performed on each configuration to gain insight in fluid flow, shear stress distribution and oxygen availability in the AMC-BAL. We assessed the function of the internal oxygenator, the effect of changes in hepatocyte oxygen consumption parameters in time and the effect of the change from an experimental to a clinical setting. In addition, different methodologies were studied to improve cellular oxygen availability, i.e. external oxygenation of culture medium, culture medium flow rate, culture gas oxygen content (pO2) and the number of oxygenation capillaries. Standard operating conditions did not adequately provide all hepatocytes in the AMC-BAL with sufficient oxygen to maintain O2 consumption at minimally 90% of maximal uptake rate. Cellular oxygen availability was optimized by increasing the number of gas capillaries and pO2 of the oxygenation gas by a factor two. Pressure drop over the AMC-BAL and maximal shear stresses were low and not considered to be harmful. This information can be used to increase cellular efficiency and may ultimately lead to a more productive AMC-BAL. PMID:17031599

  15. Numerical investigation of liver radioembolization via computational particle-hemodynamics: The role of the microcatheter distal direction and microsphere injection point and velocity.

    PubMed

    Aramburu, Jorge; Antón, Raúl; Rivas, Alejandro; Ramos, Juan Carlos; Sangro, Bruno; Bilbao, José Ignacio

    2016-11-07

    Liver radioembolization is a treatment option for patients with primary and secondary liver cancer. The procedure consists of injecting radiation-emitting microspheres via an intra-arterially placed microcatheter, enabling the deposition of the microspheres in the tumoral bed. The microcatheter location and the particle injection rate are determined during a pretreatment work-up. The purpose of this study was to numerically study the effects of the injection characteristics during the first stage of microsphere travel through the bloodstream in a patient-specific hepatic artery (i.e., the near-tip particle-hemodynamics and the segment-to-segment particle distribution). Specifically, the influence of the distal direction of an end-hole microcatheter and particle injection point and velocity were analyzed. Results showed that the procedure targeted the right lobe when injecting from two of the three injection points under study and the remaining injection point primarily targeted the left lobe. Changes in microcatheter direction and injection velocity resulted in an absolute difference in exiting particle percentage for a given liver segment of up to 20% and 30%, respectively. It can be concluded that even though microcatheter placement is presumably reproduced in the treatment session relative to the pretreatment angiography, the treatment may result in undesired segment-to-segment particle distribution and therefore undesired treatment outcomes due to modifications of any of the parameters studied, i.e., microcatheter direction and particle injection point and velocity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Development of Numerical Computational Model for Metallic Wire Particles’ Behavior in GIS for the Estimation of the Partial Discharge-free Allowable Maximum Flight Height

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Natsuume, Daisuke; Inami, Kiyoshi; Hama, Hiroyuki; Oda, Shinji; Yoshimura, Manabu; Miyamoto, Toshio; Hanaoka, Ryoichi; Fukami, Tadashi

    It has been widely accepted that Gas Insulated Switchgear (GIS) has proven to be reliable, compact and has high availability. However, metallic particles forced to fly and kept in motion in high electric field, can cause partial discharges which lead to a flashover of GIS. Authors have formulated time vs vertical motion equation for a metallic particle on the basis of the statistical analysis of the time-resolved and digitized motion data obtained by a high speed framing video camera, introducing charging-suppress factor η for the coated electrode. Numerical solution of the time-motion equation gives the incidence/departure velocity upon the grounded electrode. Fairly well-agreements have been confirmed between the measured and simulated behavior of the particle’s motion, including its maximum flight height. A metallic wire particle was fixed at various height on a Teflon (PTFE) string tighten radially across the coaxial electrodes. The radius of light emission generated by the partial discharge on both ends of the metallic particle have been observed by an Image-Intesifier. The partial discharge-free allowable maximum flight height and the insulation reliability of GIS have been deduced for various size of the particle as a function of electric field and coating condition, on the grounded electrode combining the simulated particle behavior and observed radius for streamer criteria.

  17. A numerical method to compute derivatives of functions of large complex matrices and its application to the overlap Dirac operator at finite chemical potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puhr, Matthias; Buividovich, Pavel

    2016-11-01

    We present a method for the numerical calculation of derivatives of functions of general complex matrices. The method can be used in combination with any algorithm that evaluates or approximates the desired matrix function, in particular with implicit Krylov-Ritz-type approximations. An important use case for the method is the evaluation of the overlap Dirac operator in lattice Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD) at finite chemical potential, which requires the application of the sign function of a non-Hermitian matrix to some source vector. While the sign function of non-Hermitian matrices in practice cannot be efficiently approximated with source-independent polynomials or rational functions, sufficiently good approximating polynomials can still be constructed for each particular source vector. Our method allows for an efficient calculation of the derivatives of such implicit approximations with respect to the gauge field or other external parameters, which is necessary for the calculation of conserved lattice currents or the fermionic force in Hybrid Monte-Carlo or Langevin simulations. We also give an explicit deflation prescription for the case when one knows several eigenvalues and eigenvectors of the matrix being the argument of the differentiated function. We test the method for the two-sided Lanczos approximation of the finite-density overlap Dirac operator on realistic SU(3) gauge field configurations on lattices with sizes as large as 14 ×143 and 6 ×183.

  18. Numerical relativity and spectral methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grandclement, P.

    2016-12-01

    The term numerical relativity denotes the various techniques that aim at solving Einstein's equations using computers. Those computations can be divided into two families: temporal evolutions on the one hand and stationary or periodic solutions on the other one. After a brief presentation of those two classes of problems, I will introduce a numerical tool designed to solve Einstein's equations: the KADATH library. It is based on the the use of spectral methods that can reach high accuracy with moderate computational resources. I will present some applications about quasicircular orbits of black holes and boson star configurations.

  19. Creative computing with Landlab: an open-source toolkit for building, coupling, and exploring two-dimensional numerical models of Earth-surface dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hobley, Daniel E. J.; Adams, Jordan M.; Nudurupati, Sai Siddhartha; Hutton, Eric W. H.; Gasparini, Nicole M.; Istanbulluoglu, Erkan; Tucker, Gregory E.

    2017-01-01

    The ability to model surface processes and to couple them to both subsurface and atmospheric regimes has proven invaluable to research in the Earth and planetary sciences. However, creating a new model typically demands a very large investment of time, and modifying an existing model to address a new problem typically means the new work is constrained to its detriment by model adaptations for a different problem. Landlab is an open-source software framework explicitly designed to accelerate the development of new process models by providing (1) a set of tools and existing grid structures - including both regular and irregular grids - to make it faster and easier to develop new process components, or numerical implementations of physical processes; (2) a suite of stable, modular, and interoperable process components that can be combined to create an integrated model; and (3) a set of tools for data input, output, manipulation, and visualization. A set of example models built with these components is also provided. Landlab's structure makes it ideal not only for fully developed modelling applications but also for model prototyping and classroom use. Because of its modular nature, it can also act as a platform for model intercomparison and epistemic uncertainty and sensitivity analyses. Landlab exposes a standardized model interoperability interface, and is able to couple to third-party models and software. Landlab also offers tools to allow the creation of cellular automata, and allows native coupling of such models to more traditional continuous differential equation-based modules. We illustrate the principles of component coupling in Landlab using a model of landform evolution, a cellular ecohydrologic model, and a flood-wave routing model.

  20. Numerical Calculation of Permeability and Electrical Formation Factor from AN Oil Reservoir Rock Using Geometry Obtained from Synchrotron X-Ray Computed Microtomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butler, S. L.; Bird, M.; Hawkes, C.; Kotzer, T.

    2013-12-01

    Advanced imaging techniques and computational modeling are being used increasingly to investigate the transport characteristics of porous rocks. In this contribution, we describe modeling of fluid and electrical flow through the interstices of two rock samples from the Weyburn oilfield in Southwestern Saskatchewan, Canada, using commercially available software. Samples of Marley Dolostone and Vuggy Limestone were imaged at resolutions of 0.78 μm and 7.45 μm, respectively, using synchrotron X-ray tomography. The porosity, permeability and electrical formation factor of similar samples were measured in the laboratory. The connected pore space of the rock sample was extracted and converted to a standard CAD file representation using commercial software. This CAD file was then imported into a commercial finite-element modeling software package where the pore space was meshed and the Navier-Stokes equations and Laplace's equation describing fluid and electrical flows were solved with appropriate boundary conditions. An example solution of the fluid flow field is shown in figure 1. Streamlines follow the direction of fluid flow while colors indicate the magnitude of the velocity. Calculation of the fluxes in post-processing allowed us to determine the permeability and electrical formation factors which were similar to those found experimentally and fell on the same porosity-permeability and Archie's Law trends. Fluid flow through a 50 micron per side cubic sub-sample of a Marley Dolostone. The pressure gradient is applied vertically. Streamlines indicate the direction of fluid flow. Colors indicate the magnitude of flow velocity.