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Sample records for multi-purpose disinfecting solution

  1. A multicenter investigation of OPTI-FREE® RepleniSH® multi-purpose disinfecting solution impact on soft contact lens patient comfort

    PubMed Central

    Corbin, Glenn S; Bennett, Linda; Espejo, Louis; Carducci, Suzanne; Sacco, Andrew; Hannigan, Robert; Schatz, Stuart

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Demonstrate that successful soft contact lens wearers using competitive multipurpose solutions report improvement in comfort with OPTI-FREE® RepleniSH® Multi-Purpose Disinfecting Solution (MPDS). Methods: This 30-day, multicentered, open-label study enrolled 109 eligible soft contact lens wearers using COMPLETE® Multi-Purpose Solution (MPS) Easy Rub® or ReNu MultiPlus® MPS. The test solution (OPTI-FREE® RepleniSH® MPDS) was dispensed for use in place of habitual care solutions. Subjects assessed their experience with their habitual solution (baseline) and the test solution (Day 30) using Likert-style questions. Contact lens acuity and biomicroscopy findings were recorded at each visit. Results: The test solution was associated with a statistically significant improvement in instillation comfort (P = 0.02), end of day comfort (P < 0.0001), clear vision (P < 0.0001) and overall satisfaction (P < 0.001). Subjects reported the test solution enhanced their overall lens-wearing experience more effectively than their previous solution (P < 0.0001) and that they would continue test solution use after the study (P < 0.0001). Conclusions: The test solution was effective at improving comfort and overall contact lens experience compared to COMPLETE® MPS Easy Rub® or ReNu MultiPlus® MPS in successful contact lens wearers. These results indicate that changing contact lens care solutions, even in successful lens wearers, may improve comfort and overall lens-wearing experience. PMID:20169049

  2. Multi-Purpose Tests: A Solution to Test Proliferation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holmes, Susan E.

    This research, conducted for California State Department of Education, is one component of a feasibility study focusing on ways to make the testing process more efficient by application of multi-purpose tests (MPT). MPT are designed, administered and scored to serve more than one purpose and to consolidate and unify testing programs as a partial…

  3. Comparative evaluation of multi-purpose solutions in the stabilization of tear lysozyme.

    PubMed

    Barniak, Vicki L; Burke, Susan E; Venkatesh, Srini

    2010-12-01

    The range and extent of tear proteins removed by various multi-purpose solutions has been investigated, but there is little information in the literature about their ability to prevent denaturation of tear proteins, particularly lysozyme. The purpose of this study was to determine the ability of Bausch+Lomb Biotrue™ multi-purpose solution and other care solutions to affect denaturation of lysozyme using a lysozyme activity assay. The test solutions used were: Biotrue multi-purpose solution, Bausch+Lomb renu(®) fresh™, formerly ReNu MultiPlus(®), Alcon OPTI-FREE RepleniSH, Alcon OPTI-FREE EXPRESS, CIBA VISION AQuify, and AMO COMPLETE Multi-Purpose Solution Easy Rub Formula. A phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) solution served as a control. The test and control solutions containing lysozyme were exposed to sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), a known denaturant of the enzyme. The assay was based on digestion of the cell wall of Micrococcus luteus in a suspension, a substrate sensitive to active lysozyme. Enzymatic activity against M. luteus was used to assess activity of lysozyme. The decrease in the turbidity of the cell wall suspension, a measure of relative enzyme activity, was determined by following the decrease in absorbance (at 450nm) over time using a spectrophotometer. Statistically significant greater stabilization of lysozyme was observed with Biotrue multi-purpose solution and renu fresh than with OPTI-FREE RepleniSH, OPTI-FREE EXPRESS, AQuify, COMPLETE Multi-Purpose Solution Easy Rub Formula, and a PBS control. The lysozyme activity assay revealed that Biotrue multi-purpose solution and renu fresh have the ability to stabilize lysozyme under conditions that typically denature the protein.

  4. Nonclinical safety evaluation of boric acid and a novel borate-buffered contact lens multi-purpose solution, Biotrue™ multi-purpose solution.

    PubMed

    Lehmann, David M; Cavet, Megan E; Richardson, Mary E

    2010-12-01

    Multipurpose solutions (MPS) often contain low concentrations of boric acid as a buffering agent. Limited published literature has suggested that boric acid and borate-buffered MPS may alter the corneal epithelium; an effect attributed to cytotoxicity induced by boric acid. However, this claim has not been substantiated. We investigated the effect of treating cells with relevant concentrations of boric acid using two cytotoxicity assays, and also assessed the impact of boric acid on corneal epithelial barrier function by measuring TEER and immunostaining for tight junction protein ZO-1 in human corneal epithelial cells. Boric acid was also assessed in an in vivo ocular model when administered for 28 days. Additionally, we evaluated Biotrue multi-purpose solution, a novel borate-buffered MPS, alone and with contact lenses for ocular compatibility in vitro and in vivo. Boric acid passed both cytotoxicity assays and did not alter ZO-1 distribution or corneal TEER. Furthermore, boric acid was well-tolerated on-eye following repeated administration in a rabbit model. Finally, Biotrue multi-purpose solution demonstrated good ocular biocompatibility both in vitro and in vivo. This MPS was not cytotoxic and was compatible with the eye when administered alone and when evaluated with contact lenses. We demonstrate that boric acid and a borate-buffered MPS is compatible with the ocular environment. Our findings provide evidence that ocular effects reported for some borate-buffered MPS may be incorrectly attributed to boric acid and are more likely a function of the unique combination of ingredients in the MPS formulation tested.

  5. The role of multi-purpose solutions in prevention and removal of lipid depositions on contact lenses.

    PubMed

    Tam, Ngai Keung; Pitt, William G; Perez, Krystian X; Handly, Erika; Glenn, Andrew A; Hickey, John W; Larsen, Brian G

    2014-12-01

    The sorption and desorption of radiolabeled dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) and cholesterol (CH) were measured on 5 types of commercial contact lenses. The lenses were soaked in vitro in an artificial tear fluid for 16h. The effects of borate buffered saline and two commercial multi-purpose lens-care solutions (MPSs) on reducing the lipid (DPPC and CH) sorption and increasing the lipid removal were examined. The results showed that silicone hydrogel (SiHy) lenses accumulated the most lipids, sorbing over an order of magnitude more than polymacon, a conventional hydrogel lens. Pre-soaking the SiHy lenses for 16h in MPSs reduced the DPPC sorption by up to 13% and the CH sorption by up to 11%, compared to controls that were not pre-soaked. However neither these reductions nor those on polymacon were statistically significant (p>0.05). In sorption experiments without presoaking, subsequent exposure to the MPSs removed some DPPC from the lenses (0-3.1% for SiHy lenses and 14-55% for polymacon), but CH removal was 0.0-0.8% for SiHy lenses and 0.6-28% for polymacon lenses. Some of these removals were statistically significant (p<0.05).

  6. Evaluating the potential of multi-purpose nature based solutions in peri-urban landscapes - a preliminary assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geris, Josie; Wilkinson, Mark; Stutter, Marc; Guenther, Daniel; Soulsby, Chris

    2016-04-01

    Many communities across the world face the increasing challenge of balancing water quantity and quality protection and improvement with accommodating new growth and urban development. Urbanisation is typically associated with detrimental changes in water quality, sediment delivery, and effects on water storage and flow pathways (e.g. increases in flooding). Current mitigation solutions are typically based on isolated design strategies used at specific small scale sites and for storm water only. More holistic catchment scale approaches are urgently required to effectively manage the amount of water flows and protect the raw water quality in peri-urban landscapes. This project aims to provide a better understanding of the connectivity between natural and managed flow pathways, storage, and biogeochemical processes in the peri-urban landscape to eventually aid a more integrated water quantity and quality control design. For an actively urbanising catchment in NE Scotland we seek to understand the spatio-temporal character of the natural flow pathways and associated water quality, and how these may be used to support the design of nature based solutions during urbanisation. We present preliminary findings from a dense and multiscale monitoring network that includes hydrometric, tracer (stable water isotopes) and water quality (turbidity (sediment), nitrate, phosphate) data during a range of contrasting hydroclimatological conditions and at different stages of the development of urban infrastructure. These demonstrate a highly variable nature, both temporally and spatially, with water quality dynamics out of sync with storm responses and depending on management practices. This highlights potential difficulties for managing water quantity and quality simultaneously at the catchment scale, and suggests that a treatment train approach may be required. Well-designed nature based solutions that tackle both water quantity and quality issues will require adaptability and a

  7. Belford proactive flood solutions: scientific evidence to influence local and national policy by multi-purpose runoff management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkinson, M.; Quinn, P. F.; Jonczyk, J.

    2010-12-01

    The increased risk from flooding continues to be of concern to governments all around the world and flood protection is becoming more of a challenge. In the UK, climate change projections indicate more extremes within the weather systems. In addition, there is an increased demand for using land in urban areas beside channels. These developments both put pressure on our flood defences and there is a need for new solutions to managing flood risk. There is currently support within the England and Wales Environment Agency for sustainable flood management solutions such as storage ponds, wetlands, beaver dams and willow riparian features (referred to here as Runoff Attenuation Features, or RAFs). However the effectiveness of RAFs are not known at the catchment scale since they have only really been trailed at the plot scale. These types of mitigation measure can offer benefits to water quality and create ecological habitats. The village of Belford, situated in the Belford Burn catchment (6km2), northern England, has suffered from numerous flood events. In addition, the catchment suffers from water quality issues within the channel and high sediment loads are having an impact on the ecology of the nearby estuary. There was a desire by the Local Environment Agency Flood Levy team to deliver an alternative catchment-based solution to the problem. With funding from the Northumbria Regional Flood Defence Committee, the Environment Agency North East Local Levy team and Newcastle University have created a partnership to address the flood problem trailing soft engineered RAF’s at the catchment scale. The partnership project, “Belford proactive flood solutions” is testing novel techniques in reducing flood risk in small sub-catchments for the Environment Agency. The project provides the information needed to understand whether the multi-functional mitigation measures are working at the sub-catchment scale. Data suggest that the mitigation measures present have delayed the

  8. Antiviral efficacy of disinfectant solution MRI-1.

    PubMed

    Skinner, G R; Billstrom, M; Randall, S; Buchan, A; Davies, J; Ahmad, A

    1998-01-01

    Disinfectant MRI-1 was prepared by dissolution of non-ionic and ionic detergent in ethanol. The disinfectant inactivated extracellular and intracellular enveloped and non-enveloped viruses including herpes viruses, influenza A and human immunodeficiency disease virus in suspension or on surfaces by pre-exposure or post-exposure to the disinfectant; in addition, cells were disabled as potential hosts for viral infection using concentrations of MRI-1 which were 50-fold less than the operative concentration for disinfection. There was no evidence of in vitro mutagenicity using Salmonella typhimurium or sensitization or other adverse effect in a guinea pig model or in human subjects.

  9. Use of buffered hypochlorite solution for disinfecting fibrescopes.

    PubMed

    Coates, D; Death, J E

    1982-03-01

    The possible use of sodium hypochlorite solution buffered to pH 7.6 and containing 100 ppm available chlorine (avCl) for disinfecting fibrescopes was investigated. A flexible fibrescope experimentally contaminated with Pseudomonas putida, Mycobacterium fortuitum, or Bacillus subtilis spores was effectively disinfected within 10 m in repeatedly and without any observable adverse effect on the instrument. The corrosive nature of buffered hypochlorite was investigated by immersing various fibrescope components and metal wires in solutions of different strength for long periods and examining them for damage. Stainless steel, platinum, glass, Teflon, polythene and epoxy resin were apparently unaffected whereas polyurethane, rubber and other metals tested were damaged to different extents. Buffered hypochlorite solutions may have many applications pertaining to the disinfection of items which are either thermolabile or require rapid effective disinfection.

  10. Hydrophobic polycationic coatings disinfect poliovirus and rotavirus solutions.

    PubMed

    Larson, Alyssa M; Hsu, Bryan B; Rautaray, Debabrata; Haldar, Jayanta; Chen, Jianzhu; Klibanov, Alexander M

    2011-03-01

    Coating surfaces with N-alkylated polyethylenimines (PEIs), namely branched N,N-hexyl,methyl-PEI via covalent attachment to glass or linear N,N-dodecyl,methyl-PEI by physical deposition ("painting") onto polyethylene, enables the resultant materials to quickly and efficiently disinfect aqueous solutions of (non-enveloped) poliovirus and rotavirus.

  11. Armored Multi Purpose Vehicle (AMPV)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-12-01

    Selected Acquisition Report (SAR) RCS: DD-A&T(Q&A)823-471 Armored Multi-Purpose Vehicle (AMPV) As of FY 2017 President’s Budget Defense Acquisition...RDT&E - Research, Development, Test, and Evaluation SAR - Selected Acquisition Report SCP - Service Cost Position TBD - To Be Determined TY - Then...RDT&E funding by $4M assigned to Program Management Growth. While this decrement will cause a slight re-prioritization of selected efforts in FY 2016

  12. [Antimicrobial and sporicidal efficacy of various disinfectant solutions].

    PubMed

    Gismondo, M R; Drago, L; Lombardi, A; Fassina, M C; Mombelli, B

    1995-01-01

    The often indiscriminate use of antimicrobial agents has led to increased bacterial resistance over the past years. This phenomenon is above all evident in nosocomial environments but also at a community level. It is therefore important that, in addition to the rational use of antibiotics, an accurate prophylaxis is performed which includes the correct use of disinfectants. This study examines the antimicrobial activity of various commercially available disinfectant solutions consisting of one or more active ingredients. An analysis of the results reveals that products consisting of an association of individual components (quaternary ammonium chloride with o-phenylphenol and/or isopropyl alcohol; chlorhexidine with benzalkonium chloride or with diazolidinylurea and isopropanol) demonstrate a greater efficacy in terms of microbicidal concentration and contact times.

  13. Disinfection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gould, J. P.; Haas, C. N.

    1978-01-01

    Presents a literature review of wastewater disinfection for 1978. This review covers areas such as: (1) mechanisms of inactivation of negative microorganisms by chlorine and ozone; and (2) the effects of various treatment on over-all water quality. A list of 61 references is also presented. (HM)

  14. Disinfection of preexisting contamination of bacillus cereus on stainless steel when using glycoconjugate solution

    SciTech Connect

    Pavan, Casey; Tarasenko, Olga

    2011-06-10

    Stainless steel is ubiquitous in our modern world, however it can become contaminated. This can endanger our health. The aim of our study is to disinfect stainless steel using Bacillus cereus as a model organism. Bacillus cereus is a microbe that is ubiquitous in nature, specifically soil. B. cereus is known to cause illness in humans. To prevent this, we propose to use a glycoconjugate solution (GS) for disinfection of stainless steel after it is contamination by B. cereus spores. In this study, two GS (9, 10) were tested for disinfection effectiveness on B. cereus spores on the surface of stainless steel foil (AISI-Series 200/300/400, THERMA-FOIL, Dayville, CT 0241). The disinfection rate of each GS was assessed by exposing the steel surface to B. cereus spores first and allowing them to settle for 24 hours. GS was used to treat the contaminated surface. The steel is washed and the resulting solution is plated on tryptic soy agar (TSA) plates. The GS with the fewest colony forming unit (CFU) formed on TSA is determined to be the most efficient during disinfection. Results show that both GS demonstrate a strong ability to disinfect B. cereus spores. Between the two, GS 9 shows the highest disinfection efficacy by killing approximately 99.5% of spores. This is a drastic improvement over the 0-20% disinfection of the control. Based on this we find that studied GS do have the capacity to act as a disinfectant on stainless steel.

  15. Disinfection of Preexisting Contamination of BACILLUS CEREUS on Stainless Steel when Using Glycoconjugate Solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavan, Casey; Tarasenko, Olga

    2011-06-01

    Stainless steel is ubiquitous in our modern world, however it can become contaminated. This can endanger our health. The aim of our study is to disinfect stainless steel using Bacillus cereus as a model organism. Bacillus cereus is a microbe that is ubiquitous in nature, specifically soil. B. cereus is known to cause illness in humans. To prevent this, we propose to use a glycoconjugate solution (GS) for disinfection of stainless steel after it is contamination by B. cereus spores. In this study, two GS (9, 10) were tested for disinfection effectiveness on B. cereus spores on the surface of stainless steel foil (AISI-Series 200/300/400, THERMA-FOIL, Dayville, CT 0241). The disinfection rate of each GS was assessed by exposing the steel surface to B. cereus spores first and allowing them to settle for 24 hours. GS was used to treat the contaminated surface. The steel is washed and the resulting solution is plated on tryptic soy agar (TSA) plates. The GS with the fewest colony forming unit (CFU) formed on TSA is determined to be the most efficient during disinfection. Results show that both GS demonstrate a strong ability to disinfect B. cereus spores. Between the two, GS 9 shows the highest disinfection efficacy by killing approximately 99.5% of spores. This is a drastic improvement over the 0-20% disinfection of the control. Based on this we find that studied GS do have the capacity to act as a disinfectant on stainless steel.

  16. [Aqueous iodine solutions as disinfectants: composition, stability, comparison with chlorine and bromine solution (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Gottardi, W

    1978-09-01

    The equilibrium concentrations of aqueous iodine solutions in dependence of the total concentration and the pH-value have been calculated with and without regard of the iodate formation. The values obtained by the latter methode enabled by application of the known rate law to calculate the initial rate of the iodate formation and to draw from this conclusions concerning the stability of iodine solutions. On the grounds of these calculations to aqueous iodine solutions in the concentration and pH-range which is relevant for disinfection (greater than 10(-5) M/l, pH 6--9) one can attribute a stability sufficient for the use in practice and - unlike chlorine and bromine solutions - a content of bactericidal "free halogene" which is higher and independent of the pH-value. The disinfecting action of the iodine cation (H2O+J) which is supposed to be very powerful can be neglected because of its low concentration (10(-3)--10(-6%) of the total concentration). Hypoiodic acid which has already been converted into iodate by disproportionation is as good as lost for the disinfection because of the extremely slow reverse reaction.

  17. Configurable Multi-Purpose Processor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valencia, J. Emilio; Forney, Chirstopher; Morrison, Robert; Birr, Richard

    2010-01-01

    Advancements in technology have allowed the miniaturization of systems used in aerospace vehicles. This technology is driven by the need for next-generation systems that provide reliable, responsive, and cost-effective range operations while providing increased capabilities such as simultaneous mission support, increased launch trajectories, improved launch, and landing opportunities, etc. Leveraging the newest technologies, the command and telemetry processor (CTP) concept provides for a compact, flexible, and integrated solution for flight command and telemetry systems and range systems. The CTP is a relatively small circuit board that serves as a processing platform for high dynamic, high vibration environments. The CTP can be reconfigured and reprogrammed, allowing it to be adapted for many different applications. The design is centered around a configurable field-programmable gate array (FPGA) device that contains numerous logic cells that can be used to implement traditional integrated circuits. The FPGA contains two PowerPC processors running the Vx-Works real-time operating system and are used to execute software programs specific to each application. The CTP was designed and developed specifically to provide telemetry functions; namely, the command processing, telemetry processing, and GPS metric tracking of a flight vehicle. However, it can be used as a general-purpose processor board to perform numerous functions implemented in either hardware or software using the FPGA s processors and/or logic cells. Functionally, the CTP was designed for range safety applications where it would ultimately become part of a vehicle s flight termination system. Consequently, the major functions of the CTP are to perform the forward link command processing, GPS metric tracking, return link telemetry data processing, error detection and correction, data encryption/ decryption, and initiate flight termination action commands. Also, the CTP had to be designed to survive and

  18. Effect of disinfecting solutions on accuracy of alginate and elastomeric impressions.

    PubMed

    Peutzfeldt, A; Asmussen, E

    1989-10-01

    The effect of immersion in six disinfecting solutions on the accuracy of 10 impression materials was investigated. Impressions were taken of a truncated steel cone. After setting, the impressions were either stored at room temperature for 24 h, for control, or immediately immersed in a disinfecting agent for 60 min (in one case 10 min), and after 24 h poured with gypsum. A steel ring fitting the steel cone was placed on the resulting dies, and the discrepancy between the top surface of the ring and the die was measured. From these measurements the deviation between the base diameter of the die and of the impression was calculated to express the inaccuracy. All impressions except some in Blueprint exhibited a net shrinkage, giving rise to too large die stones and incomplete seating of the steel ring. Blueprint impressions, however, occasionally swelled and resulted in too small die stones and "overseating" of the steel ring. The disinfecting solutions had no significant impact on two impression materials. For the remaining eight materials the accuracy was decreased, increased, or unaffected by the immersion. Generally, the accuracy of the alginates investigated were more affected by the disinfecting solutions than were the elastomeric impression materials. The accuracy of the three alginates was drastically impaired by immersion in 70% ethanol, whereas the remaining five disinfecting solutions had a smaller, though sometimes statistically significant, effect on the accuracy. For the elastomeric materials only a few specific combinations of impression material and disinfecting solution reduced the accuracy.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  19. Effect of disinfecting solutions on surface texture of alginate and elastomeric impressions.

    PubMed

    Peutzfeldt, A; Asmussen, E

    1990-02-01

    The effect of immersion in six disinfecting solutions on the surface texture of 10 impression materials was investigated. Assessment of the surface texture was based on measurement of the ability to reproduce fine detail. Impressions were taken of a roughness standard, i.e. a steel block with known roughness. After setting, the impressions were either stored at room temperature for 24 h, for control, or immediately immersed in a disinfecting agent for 60 min (in one case 10 min), and after 24 h poured with gypsum. After another 24 h, the roughness of the dies was recorded with a profilometer. Three addition-curing silicones were left unaltered by disinfection. For the remaining seven materials, the ability of detail reproduction was changed for some of the combinations of impression material and disinfecting solution. In general, this meant a reduction of detail reproduction, but occasionally an improvement of the surface texture resulted from disinfection. Changes in surface texture were most often brought about by a solution of chlorinated trisodium phosphate. It was concluded that elastomeric impression materials reproduced fine detail better than did alginates and that both types of impression material may be immersed in specific disinfecting solutions for as long as 1 h without the surface texture being impaired.

  20. Multi-Purpose Logistics Module Briefing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    Silvanna Rabbi, MPLM Program Manager, Italian Space Agency, gives an overview of the Multi-Purpose Logistics Module (MPLM) in a prelaunch press conference. She describes the objectives, construction, specifications, and purpose of the three Italian-built modules, Leonardo, Rafaello, and Donatello. Ms. Rabbi then answers questions from the press.

  1. 9 CFR 96.14 - Uncertified casings; disinfection with saturated brine solution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Uncertified casings; disinfection with saturated brine solution. 96.14 Section 96.14 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE EXPORTATION AND IMPORTATION OF ANIMALS (INCLUDING POULTRY) AND...

  2. 9 CFR 96.14 - Uncertified casings; disinfection with saturated brine solution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Uncertified casings; disinfection with saturated brine solution. 96.14 Section 96.14 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE EXPORTATION AND IMPORTATION OF ANIMALS (INCLUDING POULTRY) AND...

  3. Electronic multi-purpose material level sensor

    DOEpatents

    McEwan, Thomas E.

    1997-01-01

    The present electronic multi-purpose material level sensor is based on time domain reflectometry (TDR) of very short electrical pulses. Pulses are propagated along a transmission line that is partially immersed in a liquid, powder, or other substance such as grain in a silo. The time difference of the reflections at the start of the transmission line and the air/liquid interface are used to determine levels to better than 0.01 inch. The sensor is essentially independent of circuit element and temperature variations, and can be mass produced at an extremely low price. The transmission line may be a Goubau line, microstrip, coaxial cable, twin lead, CPS or CPW, and may typically be a strip placed along the inside wall of a tank. The reflected pulses also contain information about strata within the liquid such as sludge-build-up at the bottom of an oil tank.

  4. Electronic multi-purpose material level sensor

    DOEpatents

    McEwan, T.E.

    1997-03-11

    The present electronic multi-purpose material level sensor is based on time domain reflectometry (TDR) of very short electrical pulses. Pulses are propagated along a transmission line that is partially immersed in a liquid, powder, or other substance such as grain in a silo. The time difference of the reflections at the start of the transmission line and the air/liquid interface are used to determine levels to better than 0.01 inch. The sensor is essentially independent of circuit element and temperature variations, and can be mass produced at an extremely low price. The transmission line may be a Goubau line, microstrip, coaxial cable, twin lead, CPS or CPW, and may typically be a strip placed along the inside wall of a tank. The reflected pulses also contain information about strata within the liquid such as sludge-build-up at the bottom of an oil tank. 9 figs.

  5. Efficacy of Korean Multipurpose Contact Lens Disinfecting Solutions against Acanthamoeba castellanii

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Eun-Kyung; Park, Hye-Ryun; Quan, Fu-Shi; Kong, Hyun-Hee

    2016-01-01

    Acanthamoeba keratitis has been increasing in recent years. Main risk factors are contact lens wear and their cleaning solutions. Most contact lens wearers use multipurpose disinfecting solutions (MPDS) for cleansing and disinfecting microorganisms because of its convenience. We determined amoebicidal effects of MPDS made in Korea and their cytotoxicity on human corneal epithelium cells. Fifteen commercial MPDS (A to O) were tested for their amoebicidal effects on Acanthamoeba castellanii trophozoites and cysts by using a most probable number (MPN) technique. Among them, 7 kinds of MPDS showed little or no amoebicidal effects for 24 hr exposure. Solutions A, B, G, H, L, and O showed positive amoebicidal effects, and solutions M and N killed almost all trophozoites and cysts after 24 hr exposure. However, 50%-N solution showed 56% cytotoxicity on human corneal epithelial cells within 4 hr exposure, and 50%-O solution also showed 62% cytotoxicity on human cells within 4 hr exposure. Solution A did not show any cytotoxicity on human cells. These results revealed that most MPDS made in Korea were ineffective to kill Acanthamoeba. The solutions having amoebicidal activity also showed high levels of cytotoxicity on human corneal epithelial cells. New formulations for improved MPDS that are amoebicidal but safe for host cells are needed to prevent Acanthamoeba keratitis. PMID:28095653

  6. Disinfection of E. coli by nonthermal microplasma electrolysis in normal saline solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakiyama, Yukinori; Tomai, Takaaki; Miyano, Masaru; Graves, David B.

    2009-04-01

    We present a unique method to inactivate microorganisms in 0.9% NaCl solution (normal saline solution) by means of microplasmas. The device consists of a thin titanium wire covered by a glass tube for insulation except the tip and a ground electrode. Application of an asymmetric high-frequency, high voltage results in the formation of microbubbles at both electrodes. Repetitive light emission is observed in the vicinity of the powered electrode. We employed E. coli bacteria to investigate the disinfection efficiency of the device. More than 99.5% of E. coli were deactivated in 180 s. The survival curve showed biphasic behavior.

  7. Surface detail reproduction and dimensional accuracy of stone models: influence of disinfectant solutions and alginate impression materials.

    PubMed

    Guiraldo, Ricardo Danil; Borsato, Thaís Teixeira; Berger, Sandrine Bittencourt; Lopes, Murilo Baena; Gonini-Jr, Alcides; Sinhoreti, Mário Alexandre Coelho

    2012-01-01

    This study compared the surface detail reproduction and dimensional accuracy of stone models obtained from molds disinfected with 2% sodium hypochlorite, 2% chlorhexidine digluconate or 0.2% peracetic acid to models produced using molds which were not disinfected, with 3 alginate materials (Cavex ColorChange, Hydrogum 5 and Jeltrate Plus). The molds were prepared over matrix containing 20-, 50-, and 75-µm lines, performed under pressure with perforated metal tray. The molds were removed following gelation and either disinfected (using one of the solutions by spraying followed by storage in closed jars for 15 min) or not disinfected. The samples were divided into 12 groups (n=5). Molds were filled with dental gypsum Durone IV and 1 h after the start of the stone mixing the models were separated from the tray. Surface detail reproduction and dimensional accuracy were evaluated using optical microscopy on the 50-µm line with 25 mm in length, in accordance with the ISO 1563 standard. The dimensional accuracy results (%) were subjected to ANOVA. The 50 µm-line was completely reproduced by all alginate impression materials regardless of the disinfection procedure. There was no statistically significant difference in the mean values of dimensional accuracy in combinations between disinfectant procedure and alginate impression material (p=0.2130) or for independent factors. The disinfectant solutions and alginate materials used in this study are no factors of choice regarding the surface detail reproduction and dimensional accuracy of stone models.

  8. Resistance of Acanthamoeba cysts to disinfection in multiple contact lens solutions.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Stephanie P; Sriram, Rama; Qvarnstrom, Yvonne; Roy, Sharon; Verani, Jennifer; Yoder, Jonathan; Lorick, Suchita; Roberts, Jacquelin; Beach, Michael J; Visvesvara, Govinda

    2009-07-01

    Acanthamoebae are free-living amoebae found in the environment, including soil, freshwater, brackish water, seawater, hot tubs, and Jacuzzis. Acanthamoeba species can cause keratitis, a painful vision-threatening infection of the cornea, and fatal granulomatous encephalitis in humans. More than 20 species of Acanthamoeba belonging to morphological groups I, II, and III distributed in 15 genotypes have been described. Among these, Acanthamoeba castellanii, A. polyphaga, and A. hatchetti are frequently identified as causing Acanthamoeba keratitis (AK). Improper contact lens care and contact with nonsterile water while wearing contact lenses are known risk factors for AK. During a recent multistate outbreak, AK was found to be associated with the use of Advanced Medical Optics Complete MoisturePlus multipurpose contact lens solution, which was hypothesized to have had insufficient anti-Acanthamoeba activity. As part of the investigation of that outbreak, we compared the efficacies of 11 different contact lens solutions against cysts of A. castellanii, A. polyphaga, and A. hatchetti (the isolates of all species were genotype T4), which were isolated in 2007 from specimens obtained during the outbreak investigation. The data, generated with A. castellanii, A. polyphaga, and A. hatchetti cysts, suggest that the two contact lens solutions containing hydrogen peroxide were the only solutions that showed any disinfection ability, with 0% and 66% growth, respectively, being detected with A. castellanii and 0% and 33% growth, respectively, being detected with A. polyphaga. There was no statistically significant difference in disinfection efficacy between the 11 solutions for A. hatchetti.

  9. Comparison of Hydrogen Peroxide Contact Lens Disinfection Systems and Solutions against Acanthamoeba polyphaga

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Reanne; Kilvington, Simon

    2001-01-01

    Acanthamoeba is a free-living amoeba causing a potentially blinding infection of the cornea. Contact lens wearers are most at risk and account for some 95% of cases. Hydrogen peroxide is used for contact lens disinfection due to its broad antimicrobial activity. Lenses must be neutralized before use to avoid pronounced stinging and possible corneal damage. Neutralization is achieved by adding a catalyst during the disinfection process (one-step) or afterwards (two-step). Here, the activities of commercial peroxide systems and individual solutions against trophozoites and cysts of Acanthamoeba polyphaga were compared. All disinfection systems were active against trophozoites, giving a ≥3-log (99.9%) kill within 1 h. Of the four one-step systems, only one showed some cysticidal activity, giving a 1.28 ± 0.41-log reduction. Both two-step systems were cysticidal, giving a ≥3-log kill at 4 h. All system peroxide solutions were cysticidal, giving a ≥3-log kill by 4 to 6 h. Variation in the cysticidal rate was observed with two solutions that gave a 1.8- to 2.1-log kill at 4 h compared with 3.0 to 4.0 for the rest (P < 0.05). No cysticidal activity was found with the peroxigen sodium perborate or the contact lens protein remover subtilisin A. Two-step systems are cysticidal providing contact times of at least 4 h are employed. Variation in cyst killing occurs between peroxide solutions, possibly due to formulation differences. One-step systems are less effective against Acanthamoeba cysts due to rapid peroxide neutralization. The cysticidal activity of one-step systems could be improved if neutralization rates were retarded. PMID:11408220

  10. Fresh-cut product sanitation and wash water disinfection: problems and solutions.

    PubMed

    Gil, Maria I; Selma, Maria V; López-Gálvez, Francisco; Allende, Ana

    2009-08-31

    It is well known that fresh-cut processors usually rely on wash water sanitizers to reduce microbial counts in order to maintain quality and extend shelf-life of the end product. Water is a useful tool for reducing potential contamination but it can also transfer pathogenic microorganisms. Washing with sanitizers is important in fresh-cut produce hygiene, particularly removing soil and debris, but especially in water disinfection to avoid cross-contamination between clean and contaminated product. Most of the sanitizing solutions induce higher microbial reduction after washing when compared to water washing, but after storage, epiphytic microorganisms grow rapidly, reaching similar levels. In fact, despite the general idea that sanitizers are used to reduce the microbial population on the produce, their main effect is maintaining the microbial quality of the water. The use of potable water instead of water containing chemical disinfection agents for washing fresh-cut vegetables is being advocated in some European countries. However, the problems of using an inadequate sanitizer or even none are considered in this manuscript. The need for a standardized approach to evaluate and compare the efficiency of sanitizing agents is also presented. Most new alternative techniques accentuate the problems with chlorine suggesting that the industry should move away from this traditional disinfection agent. However, the use of chlorine based sanitizers are presented as belonging to the most effective and efficient sanitizers when adequate doses are used. In this review improvements in water disinfection and sanitation strategies, including a shower pre-washing step and a final rinse of the produce, are suggested.

  11. New formaldehyde base disinfectants.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trujillo, R.; Lindell, K. F.

    1973-01-01

    Preparations of formaldehyde in various organic liquids - ethylene glycol, glycerol, and propylene glycol - serve as effective disinfectants towards microbial vegetative cells and spores. This disinfection is a temperature-dependent process and is manifest when these formaldehyde base disinfectants are dissolved in water. The irritating vapors associated with formaldehyde disinfection are not present in either of these new formaldehyde base disinfectants or in aqueous solutions of them.

  12. Multi-Purpose Logistics Module (MPLM) Cargo Heat Exchanger

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zampiceni, John J.; Harper, Lon T.

    2002-01-01

    This paper describes the New Shuttle Orbiter's Multi- Purpose Logistics Modulo (MPLM) Cargo Heat Exchanger (HX) and associated MPLM cooling system. This paper presents Heat Exchanger (HX) design and performance characteristics of the system.

  13. Human resources for maternal health: multi-purpose or specialists?

    PubMed

    Fauveau, Vincent; Sherratt, Della R; de Bernis, Luc

    2008-09-30

    A crucial question in the aim to attain MDG5 is whether it can be achieved faster with the scaling up of multi-purpose health workers operating in the community or with the scaling up of professional skilled birth attendants working in health facilities. Most advisers concerned with maternal mortality reduction concur to promote births in facilities with professional attendants as the ultimate strategy. The evidence, however, is scarce on what it takes to progress in this path, and on the 'interim solutions' for situations where the majority of women still deliver at home. These questions are particularly relevant as we have reached the twentieth anniversary of the safe motherhood initiative without much progress made. In this paper we review the current situation of human resources for maternal health as well as the problems that they face. We propose seven key areas of work that must be addressed when planning for scaling up human resources for maternal health in light of MDG5, and finally we indicate some advances recently made in selected countries and the lessons learned from these experiences. Whilst the focus of this paper is on maternal health, it is acknowledged that the interventions to reduce maternal mortality will also contribute to significantly reducing newborn mortality. Addressing each of the seven key areas of work--recommended by the first International Forum on 'Midwifery in the Community', Tunis, December 2006--is essential for the success of any MDG5 programme. We hypothesize that a great deal of the stagnation of maternal health programmes has been the result of confusion and careless choices in scaling up between a limited number of truly skilled birth attendants and large quantities of multi-purpose workers with short training, fewer skills, limited authority and no career pathways. We conclude from the lessons learnt that no significant progress in maternal mortality reduction can be achieved without a strong political decision to empower

  14. Human resources for maternal health: multi-purpose or specialists?

    PubMed Central

    Fauveau, Vincent; Sherratt, Della R; de Bernis, Luc

    2008-01-01

    A crucial question in the aim to attain MDG5 is whether it can be achieved faster with the scaling up of multi-purpose health workers operating in the community or with the scaling up of professional skilled birth attendants working in health facilities. Most advisers concerned with maternal mortality reduction concur to promote births in facilities with professional attendants as the ultimate strategy. The evidence, however, is scarce on what it takes to progress in this path, and on the 'interim solutions' for situations where the majority of women still deliver at home. These questions are particularly relevant as we have reached the twentieth anniversary of the safe motherhood initiative without much progress made. In this paper we review the current situation of human resources for maternal health as well as the problems that they face. We propose seven key areas of work that must be addressed when planning for scaling up human resources for maternal health in light of MDG5, and finally we indicate some advances recently made in selected countries and the lessons learned from these experiences. Whilst the focus of this paper is on maternal health, it is acknowledged that the interventions to reduce maternal mortality will also contribute to significantly reducing newborn mortality. Addressing each of the seven key areas of work – recommended by the first International Forum on 'Midwifery in the Community', Tunis, December 2006 – is essential for the success of any MDG5 programme. We hypothesize that a great deal of the stagnation of maternal health programmes has been the result of confusion and careless choices in scaling up between a limited number of truly skilled birth attendants and large quantities of multi-purpose workers with short training, fewer skills, limited authority and no career pathways. We conclude from the lessons learnt that no significant progress in maternal mortality reduction can be achieved without a strong political decision to

  15. Evaluation of povidone-iodine as a disinfectant solution for contact lenses: antimicrobial activity and cytotoxicity for corneal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Yanai, Ryoji; Yamada, Naoyuki; Ueda, Kiichi; Tajiri, Motoharu; Matsumoto, Toru; Kido, Keiji; Nakamura, Shigeru; Saito, Fumio; Nishida, Teruo

    2006-05-01

    Povidone-iodine (PVP-I) possesses broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity and is used clinically as a disinfectant. We evaluated the disinfectant properties and safety of PVP-I for use as a contact lens solution. The concentrations of PVP-I required to reduce the number of Staphylococcus aureus or Candida albicans by 3 log units were lower than were those of hydrogen peroxide, polyhexamethylene biguanide (PHMB), and benzalkonium chloride (BAK). The cytotoxicity of PVP-I for cultured human corneal epithelial (HCE) cells was less than that of the other three agents. The safety margin for PVP-I was thus greatest among the tested compounds. PVP-I appears suited for use as a contact lens disinfectant.

  16. OCRWM Bulletin: Westinghouse begins designing multi-purpose canister

    SciTech Connect

    1995-09-01

    This publication consists of two parts: OCRWM (Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management) Bulletin; and Of Mountains & Science which has articles on the Yucca Mountain project. The OCRWM provides information about OCRWM activities and in this issue has articles on multi-purpose canister design, and transportation cask trailer.

  17. [Disinfection efficacy of hand hygiene based on chlorhexidine gluconate content and usage of alcohol-based hand-rubbing solution].

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Ippei; Watanabe, Kiyoshi; Nakaminami, Hidemasa; Azuma, Chihiro; Noguchi, Norihisa

    2014-01-01

    Recently, the procedure for surgical hand hygiene has been switching to a two-stage method and hand-rubbing method from the traditional hand-scrubbing method. Both the two-stage and hand-rubbing methods use alcohol-based hand-rubbing after hand washing. The former requires 5 min of antiseptic hand washing, and the latter 1 min of nonantiseptic hand washing. For a prolonged bactericidal effect in terms of surgical hand hygiene, chlorhexidine gluconate (CHG) has been noted due to its residual activity. However, no detailed study comparing the disinfection efficacy and prolonged effects according to different contents of CHG and the usage of alcohol-based hand-rubbing has been conducted. The glove juice method is able to evaluate disinfection efficacy and prolonged effects of the disinfectants more accurately because it can collect not only transitory bacteria but also normal inhabitants on hands. In the present study, we examined the disinfection efficacy and prolonged effects on alcohol-based hand-rubbing containing CHG by six hand-rubbing methods and three two-stage methods using the glove juice method. In both methods, 3 mL (one pump dispenser push volume) alcohol-based hand-rubbing solution containing 1% (w/v) CHG showed the highest disinfection efficacy and prolonged effects, and no significant difference was found between the hand-rubbing and two-stage methods. In the two methods of hand hygiene, the hand-rubbing method was able to save time and cost. Therefore, the data strongly suggest that the hand-rubbing method using a one pump dispenser push volume of alcohol-based hand-rubbing solution containing 1% (w/v) CHG is suitable for surgical hand hygiene.

  18. Evaluation of safety and efficacy of a new multipurpose disinfecting solution on silicone hydrogel contact lenses☆

    PubMed Central

    Pinto-Fraga, José; Blázquez Arauzo, Francisco; Urbano Rodríguez, Rubén; González-García, María J.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the safety and efficacy of a new multipurpose disinfecting solution (MPDS) with a formulation that includes aloe vera on its composition. Methods This is a prospective, randomized, double-masked clinical trial with a crossover design that included seven examinations. Two different MPDSs, Avizor Alvera® (study solution) and All Clean Soft® (control solution), each were used for 1 month. Comfilcon A silicone hydrogel contact lenses were used during the trial. The main outcome variables were corneal staining and deposits on the surfaces of the contact lenses. Other parameters including ocular surface response, contact lens wettability, user satisfaction, and adverse events, were analyzed according to the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) 11980:2010 guidance for clinical investigation. Results Twenty subjects (10 women, 10 men) (mean age, 27.7 ± 5.6 years; range, 20–41) were included. No differences between both MPDSs were found in the percentage of subjects with corneal staining >0 at day 30 (study: 35%, control: 50%; p = 0.46); neither in the percentage of subjects with deposits on the surface of the contact lens >0 at day 30 (study: 26.32%, control: 52.63%; p = 0.18). The study MPDS received higher rates in comfort (study: 8.14 ± 1.09, control: 7.94 ± 0.92; p = 0.56) and satisfaction at day 30 (study: 8.63 ± 0.91, control: 8.29 ± 0.80; p = 0.19), however the scores were not significantly different with the control MPDS. Conclusions The clinical trial showed that the study MPDS is safe, efficient, and has acceptable physiologic tolerance, according to the ISO 11980:2010 guidance for clinical investigation. PMID:25649640

  19. Influence on the generation of disinfection byproducts in a tannic acid solution by aluminum ions.

    PubMed

    Shen, Hong; Chen, Xin; Chen, Hongbin

    2016-08-17

    Aluminum (Al) commonly exists in natural waters, and its salts are often used as coagulants in drinking water treatment. Therefore, associated with the security of drinking water, functions of Al ions (Al(3+)) on generation of disinfection byproducts (DBPs) should not be ignored. This study focuses on DBPs and the carcinogenic factor of chlorinated water samples after the addition of Al(3+) with different Al(3+)/initial tannic acid molar ratios. The results imply that Al(3+) acts as a promoter of haloacetic acids (HAAs) and an inhibitor of trihalomethanes (THMs) when tannic acid is selected as model compound of natural organic matter during chlorination. Depending on the results of size exclusion chromatography and ultraviolet spectrophotometer, an equilibrium system can be assumed between hydrolysis and flocculation in tannic acid solution with Al(3+). Furthermore, influences on the equilibrium system for Al(3+) addition may result in various effects on generation and distribution ratios of THMs and HAAs during chlorination. Finally, according to the analyses of a fluorescence spectrophotometer, it is demonstrated that the presence of Al(3+) helps to increase precursors of DBPs (humic acid-like organics) and then improve the generation of DBPs.

  20. The Multi-Purpose Detector (MPD) of the collider experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golovatyuk, V.; Kekelidze, V.; Kolesnikov, V.; Rogachevsky, O.; Sorin, A.

    2016-08-01

    The project NICA (Nuclotron-based Ion Collider fAcility) is aimed to study dense baryonic matter in heavy-ion collisions in the energy range up to √{s_{NN}} = 11 GeV with average luminosity of L = 1027 cm-2s-1 (for 197Au79). The experimental program at the NICA collider will be performed with the Multi-Purpose Detector (MPD). We report on the main physics objectives of the NICA heavy-ion program and present the main detector components.

  1. System Engineering Strategy for Distributed Multi-Purpose Simulation Architectures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhula, Dlilpkumar; Kurt, Cindy Marie; Luty, Roger

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes the system engineering approach used to develop distributed multi-purpose simulations. The multi-purpose simulation architecture focuses on user needs, operations, flexibility, cost and maintenance. This approach was used to develop an International Space Station (ISS) simulator, which is called the International Space Station Integrated Simulation (ISIS)1. The ISIS runs unmodified ISS flight software, system models, and the astronaut command and control interface in an open system design that allows for rapid integration of multiple ISS models. The initial intent of ISIS was to provide a distributed system that allows access to ISS flight software and models for the creation, test, and validation of crew and ground controller procedures. This capability reduces the cost and scheduling issues associated with utilizing standalone simulators in fixed locations, and facilitates discovering unknowns and errors earlier in the development lifecycle. Since its inception, the flexible architecture of the ISIS has allowed its purpose to evolve to include ground operator system and display training, flight software modification testing, and as a realistic test bed for Exploration automation technology research and development.

  2. Multi-purpose canister system evaluation: A systems engineering approach

    SciTech Connect

    1994-09-01

    This report summarizes Department of Energy (DOE) efforts to investigate various container systems for handling, transporting, storing, and disposing of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) assemblies in the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System (CRWMS). The primary goal of DOE`s investigations was to select a container technology that could handle the vast majority of commercial SNF at a reasonable cost, while ensuring the safety of the public and protecting the environment. Several alternative cask and canister concepts were evaluated for SNF assembly packaging to determine the most suitable concept. Of these alternatives, the multi-purpose canister (MPC) system was determined to be the most suitable. Based on the results of these evaluations, the decision was made to proceed with design and certification of the MPC system. A decision to fabricate and deploy MPCs will be made after further studies and preparation of an environmental impact statement.

  3. Viability of Acanthamoeba after exposure to a multipurpose disinfecting contact lens solution and two hydrogen peroxide systems

    PubMed Central

    Hiti, K; Walochnik, J; Haller-Schober, E M; Faschinger, C; Aspöck, H

    2002-01-01

    Background/aim: Contact lens cases contaminated with Acanthamoeba are a major risk factor for an infection of the eye. In this study the anti-Acanthamoeba activity of three different contact lens storage solutions was tested. Methods: A new multipurpose contact lens storage solution (Meni Care Plus) and a two step (Titmus H2O2) and one step (Oxysept Comfort) hydrogen peroxide system were tested for their effects on trophozoites and cysts of three different Acanthamoeba species: A castellanii, A hatchetti, and A lenticulata. Results: After a soaking time of 8 hours (overnight soaking of contact lenses) the Titmus H2O2 0.6% solution showed very good amoebicidal effects, while Oxysept Comfort 3% H2O2 could not effectively destroy the cysts of any of the three tested species. Viable cysts of the species A lenticulata and A hatchetti were still present after exposure to Meni Care Plus (0.0005% PHMB) for 8 hours. Conclusion: Not all of the three tested contact lens storage solutions have sufficient amoebicidal effects. The two step peroxide system Titmus H2O2 is a very effective disinfectant contact lens solution in order to avoid a possible Acanthamoeba infection of the eye. PMID:11815336

  4. STS-102 Onboard Photograph-Multi-Purpose Logistics Module, Leonardo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    A crewmember of Expedition One, cosmonaut Yuri P. Gidzenko, is dwarfed by transient hardware aboard Leonardo, the Italian Space Agency-built Multi-Purpose Logistics Module (MPLM), a primary cargo of the STS-102 mission. The Leonardo MPLM is the first of three such pressurized modules that will serve as the International Space Station's (ISS's) moving vans, carrying laboratory racks filled with equipment, experiments and supplies to and from the Space Station aboard the Space Shuttle. The cylindrical module is approximately 21-feet long and 15- feet in diameter, weighing almost 4.5 tons. It can carry up to 10 tons of cargo into 16 standard Space Station equipment racks. Of the 16 racks the module can carry, 5 can be furnished with power, data, and fluid to support refrigerators or freezers. In order to function as an attached station module as well as a cargo transport, the logistics module also includes components that provide life support, fire detection and suppression, electrical distribution, and computer functions. The eighth Shuttle mission to visit the ISS, the STS-102 mission served as a crew rotation flight. It delivered the Expedition Two crew to the Station and returned the Expedition One crew back to Earth.

  5. Multi-purpose hydrogen isotopes separation plant design

    SciTech Connect

    Boniface, H.A.; Gnanapragasam, N.V.; Ryland, D.K.; Suppiah, S.; Castillo, I.

    2015-03-15

    There is a potential interest at AECL's Chalk River Laboratories to remove tritium from moderately tritiated light water and to reclaim tritiated, downgraded heavy water. With only a few limitations, a single CECE (Combined Electrolysis and Catalytic Exchange) process configuration can be designed to remove tritium from heavy water or light water and upgrade heavy water. Such a design would have some restrictions on the nature of the feed-stock and tritium product, but could produce essentially tritium-free light or heavy water that is chemically pure. The extracted tritium is produced as a small quantity of tritiated heavy water. The overall plant capacity is fixed by the total amount of electrolysis and volume of catalyst. In this proposal, with 60 kA of electrolysis a throughput of 15 kg*h{sup -1} light water for detritiation, about 4 kg*h{sup -1} of heavy water for detritiation and about 27 kg*h{sup -1} of 98% heavy water for upgrading can be processed. Such a plant requires about 1,000 liters of AECL isotope exchange catalyst. The general design features and details of this multi-purpose CECE process are described in this paper, based on some practical choices of design criteria. In addition, we outline the small differences that must be accommodated and some compromises that must be made to make the plant capable of such flexible operation. (authors)

  6. Effect of immersion disinfection of alginate impressions in sodium hypochlorite solution on the dimensional changes of stone models.

    PubMed

    Hiraguchi, Hisako; Kaketani, Masahiro; Hirose, Hideharu; Yoneyama, Takayuki

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of the immersion of alginate impressions in 0.5% sodium hypochlorite solution for 15 min on the dimensional changes of stone models designed to simulate a sectional form of a residual ridge. Five brands of alginate impression materials, which underwent various dimensional changes in water, were used. A stone model made with an impression that had not been immersed was prepared as a control. The immersion of two brands of alginate impressions that underwent small dimensional changes in water did not lead to serious deformation of the stone models, and the differences in the dimensional changes between the stone models produced with disinfected impressions and those of the control were less than 15 µm. In contrast, the immersions of three brands of alginate impressions that underwent comparatively large dimensional changes in water caused deformation of the stone models.

  7. Contamination of toothbrush at different time intervals and effectiveness of various disinfecting solutions in reducing the contamination of toothbrush.

    PubMed

    Sogi, Suma H P; Subbareddy, V V; Kiran, Shashi N D

    2002-09-01

    The common devices used for oral hygiene measures are toothbrush, dentifrice and oral rinses. Present study was carried out to know the level of contamination of toothbrush after brushing and at the same time, to know the efficacy of various disinfecting solution in reducing their contamination. Thirty two children in the age group of 12-14, residing in Government Hostel were selected. They were divided into four groups of 8 each, and were supplied with toothbrushes. Toothbrushes were cultured to assess the contamination at different time intervals. Control group had shown the highest percentage of contamination. It was concluded that cleaning of the oral cavity is not the only procedure in maintaining the oral hygiene, the oral hygiene devices should also be kept clean.

  8. Safety Assessment of Multi Purpose Small Payload Rack(MSPR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizutani, Yoshinobu; Takada, Satomi; Murata, Kosei; Ozawa, Daisaku; Kobayashi, Ryoji; Nakamura, Yasuhiro

    2010-09-01

    We are reporting summary of preliminary safety assessment for Multi Purpose Small Payload Rack(MSPR), which is one of the micro gravity experiment facilities that are being developed for the 2nd phase JEM utilization(JEM: Japanese Experiment Module) that will be launched on H-II Transfer Vehicle(HTV) 2nd flight in 2011. MSPR is used for multi-purpose micro-g experiment providing experimental spaces and work stations. MSPR has three experimental spaces; first, there is a space called Work Volume(WV) with capacity volume of approximately 350 litters, in which multiple resources including electricity, communication, and moving image functions can be used. Within this space, installation of devices can be done by simple, prompt attachment by Velcro and pins with high degree of flexibility. Second, there is Small Experiment Area(SEA), with capacity volume of approximately 70 litters, in which electricity, communication, and moving image functions can also be used in the same way as WV. These spaces protect experiment devices and specimens from contingent loads by the crewmembers. Third, there is Work Bench with area of 0.5 square meters, on which can be used for maintenance, inspection and data operations of installed devices, etc. This bench can be stored in the rack during contingency. Chamber for Combustion Experiment(CCE) that is planned to be installed in WV is a pressure-resistant experimental container that can be used to seal hazardous materials from combustion experiments. This CCE has double sealing design in chamber itself, which resist gas leakage under normal the temperature and pressure. Electricity, communication, moving image function can be used in the same way as WV. JAXA Phase 2 Safety Review Panel(SRP) has been held in April, 2010. For safety analysis of MSPR, hazards were identified based on Fault Tree Analysis methodology and then these hazards were classified into either eight ISS standard-type hazards or eight unique-type hazards that requires

  9. 16 CFR 1212.3 - Requirements for multi-purpose lighters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Requirements for multi-purpose lighters. 1212.3 Section 1212.3 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY ACT REGULATIONS SAFETY STANDARD FOR MULTI-PURPOSE LIGHTERS Requirements for Child-Resistance §...

  10. 16 CFR 1212.3 - Requirements for multi-purpose lighters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Requirements for multi-purpose lighters. 1212.3 Section 1212.3 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY ACT REGULATIONS SAFETY STANDARD FOR MULTI-PURPOSE LIGHTERS Requirements for Child-Resistance §...

  11. 16 CFR 1212.3 - Requirements for multi-purpose lighters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Requirements for multi-purpose lighters. 1212.3 Section 1212.3 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY ACT REGULATIONS SAFETY STANDARD FOR MULTI-PURPOSE LIGHTERS Requirements for Child-Resistance §...

  12. 16 CFR 1212.3 - Requirements for multi-purpose lighters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Requirements for multi-purpose lighters. 1212.3 Section 1212.3 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY ACT REGULATIONS SAFETY STANDARD FOR MULTI-PURPOSE LIGHTERS Requirements for Child-Resistance §...

  13. 16 CFR 1212.3 - Requirements for multi-purpose lighters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Requirements for multi-purpose lighters. 1212.3 Section 1212.3 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY ACT REGULATIONS SAFETY STANDARD FOR MULTI-PURPOSE LIGHTERS Requirements for Child-Resistance §...

  14. [The role of bacterial contamination of milking utensils and disinfecting solutions as a possible cause of clinical mastitis in dairy cows].

    PubMed

    Hässig, M; Sigrist, S M; Corti, S; Giezendanner, N; Stephan, R

    2011-06-01

    Various instruments and utensils used during milking as well as teat dip solutions were examined for contamination with coagulase-negative staphylococci (CNS). The goal of this study was to investigate the relationship between contaminated fomites and udder infection in dairy cows. A total of 344 cows from ten dairy farms with the highest rate of clinical mastitis among the farms serviced by the Ambulatory Clinic of the University of Zurich were included in the study. Each farm was visited five times. All lactating cows, with the exception of those undergoing antibiotic treatment, were examined immediately before milking using the California Mastitis Test (CMT). A milk sample was collected from positive quarters. Items used to clean the udder, which included wood wool, paper towels and disinfecting towels as well as the milker's hands and the teat dip cup were swabbed for bacteriological examination. Water samples, samples of teat dip and cleaning solutions were also collected and cultured. Our results demonstrate that cleaning and disinfecting solutions have the potential to transmit udder pathogens and cause clinical mastitis. The most common CNS isolated from quarter samples were S. saprophyticus, S. sciuri and S. chromogenes, and the most common CNS isolated from utensils, cleaning and disinfecting solutions were S. fleuretii, S. vitulus, S. equorum, S. sciuri, S. haemolyticus, S. succinus and S. saprophyticus.

  15. 9 CFR 96.14 - Uncertified casings; disinfection with saturated brine solution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... solution must be recorded on a one-hour dial of a recording thermometer and filed in the local APHIS office... thermometer should be located at a point which would be approximately at the bottom of the volume of...

  16. 9 CFR 96.14 - Uncertified casings; disinfection with saturated brine solution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... solution must be recorded on a one-hour dial of a recording thermometer and filed in the local APHIS office... thermometer should be located at a point which would be approximately at the bottom of the volume of...

  17. 9 CFR 96.14 - Uncertified casings; disinfection with saturated brine solution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... solution must be recorded on a one-hour dial of a recording thermometer and filed in the local APHIS office... thermometer should be located at a point which would be approximately at the bottom of the volume of...

  18. A new NASA LaRC Multi-Purpose Prepregging Unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkinson, S. P.; Marchello, J. M.; Dixon, D.; Johnston, N. J.

    1993-01-01

    A multi-purpose prepregging machine has been designed and built for NASA Langley Research Center. The machine has numerous advantages over existing units due to its various modular components. Each of these can be used individually or simultaneously depending on the required prepregging method. A reverse roll coater provides the ability to prepare thin films from typical hot-melt thermoset formulations. Also, if necessary, the design allows direct fiber impregnation within the reverse roll coater gap. Included in the impregnation module is a solution dip tank allowing the fabrication of thermoplastic prepregs from solution. The proceeding modules within the unit consist of four nip stations, two hot-plates, a hot-sled option and a high temperature oven. This paper describes the advantages of such a modular construction and discusses the various processing combinations available to the prepregger. A variety of high performance prepreg material systems were produced on IM7 (Hercules) carbon fiber. These included LaRC RP46, a PMR-type resin processed from methanol and two polyamide acids, LaRC IA and LaRC ITPI, prpregged from N-methyl pyrrolidinone (NMP). Parameters involved in the production of these prepreg materials are presented as are the mechanical properties of the resulting good quality laminates. A brief introduction into the existing prepregging science is presented. Topics relating to solution prepregging are identified with a focus on the current research effort and its future development.

  19. Stability of antimicrobial activity of peracetic acid solutions used in the final disinfection process.

    PubMed

    Costa, Solange Alves da Silva; Paula, Olívia Ferreira Pereira de; Silva, Célia Regina Gonçalves E; Leão, Mariella Vieira Pereira; Santos, Silvana Soléo Ferreira dos

    2015-01-01

    The instruments and materials used in health establishments are frequently exposed to microorganism contamination, and chemical products are used before sterilization to reduce occupational infection. We evaluated the antimicrobial effectiveness, physical stability, and corrosiveness of two commercial formulations of peracetic acid on experimentally contaminated specimens. Stainless steel specimens were contaminated with Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Candida albicans, blood, and saliva and then immersed in a ready peracetic acid solution: 2% Sekusept Aktiv (SA) or 0.25% Proxitane Alpha (PA), for different times. Then, washes of these instruments were plated in culture medium and colony-forming units counted. This procedure was repeated six times per day over 24 non-consecutive days. The corrosion capacity was assessed with the mass loss test, and the concentration of peracetic acid and pH of the solutions were measured with indicator tapes. Both SA and PA significantly eliminated microorganisms; however, the SA solution was stable for only 4 days, whereas PA remained stable throughout the experiment. The concentration of peracetic acid in the SA solutions decreased over time until the chemical was undetectable, although the pH remained at 5. The PA solution had a concentration of 500-400 mg/L and a pH of 2-3. Neither formulation induced corrosion and both reduced the number of microorganisms (p = 0.0001). However, the differences observed in the performance of each product highlight the necessity of establishing a protocol for optimizing the use of each one.

  20. [The microorganism count on impressions after their disinfection by submersion in sodium hypochlorite solutions].

    PubMed

    Koshmanova, T N; Panteleeva, L G

    1998-01-01

    The virucidal, bactericidal, and fungicidal activity of sodium hypochlorite is studied with silicone imprints. Poliomyelitis virus (type I vaccine strain Sabin LSc 2 ab with titer 10(7.36) TCD50/ml), bacteriophage f52 with titer 2.10(7) PFU/ml, Staphylococcus aureus strain 906, and Candida albicans in concentrations 10(7) corpuscles/ml in the presence of protein die completely in 20 min when submerged in 0.5% sodium hypochlorite solution. Imprints from alginate materials are destroyed if submerged in this solution.

  1. Multi-criteria objective based climate change impact assessment for multi-purpose multi-reservoir systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Ruben; Schütze, Niels

    2014-05-01

    Water resources systems with reservoirs are expected to be sensitive to climate change. Assessment studies that analyze the impact of climate change on the performance of reservoirs can be divided in two groups: (1) Studies that simulate the operation under projected inflows with the current set of operational rules. Due to non adapted operational rules the future performance of these reservoirs can be underestimated and the impact overestimated. (2) Studies that optimize the operational rules for best adaption of the system to the projected conditions before the assessment of the impact. The latter allows for estimating more realistically future performance and adaption strategies based on new operation rules are available if required. Multi-purpose reservoirs serve various, often conflicting functions. If all functions cannot be served simultaneously at a maximum level, an effective compromise between multiple objectives of the reservoir operation has to be provided. Yet under climate change the historically preferenced compromise may no longer be the most suitable compromise in the future. Therefore a multi-objective based climate change impact assessment approach for multi-purpose multi-reservoir systems is proposed in the study. Projected inflows are provided in a first step using a physically based rainfall-runoff model. In a second step, a time series model is applied to generate long-term inflow time series. Finally, the long-term inflow series are used as driving variables for a simulation-based multi-objective optimization of the reservoir system in order to derive optimal operation rules. As a result, the adapted Pareto-optimal set of diverse best compromise solutions can be presented to the decision maker in order to assist him in assessing climate change adaption measures with respect to the future performance of the multi-purpose reservoir system. The approach is tested on a multi-purpose multi-reservoir system in a mountainous catchment in Germany. A

  2. Silver deposition on stainless steel container surfaces in contact with disinfectant silver aqueous solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petala, M.; Tsiridis, V.; Mintsouli, I.; Pliatsikas, N.; Spanos, Th.; Rebeyre, P.; Darakas, E.; Patsalas, P.; Vourlias, G.; Kostoglou, M.; Sotiropoulos, S.; Karapantsios, Th.

    2017-02-01

    Silver is the preservative used on the Russian segment of the International Space Station (ISS) to prevent microbial proliferation within potable water supplies. Yet, in the frame of the European Automated Transfer Vehicle (ATV) missions to ISS, silver depletion from water has been detected during ground transportation of this water to launch site, thereby indicating a degradation of water quality. This study investigates the silver loss from water when in contact with stainless steel surfaces. Experiments are conducted with several types of stainless steel surfaces being exposed to water containing 10 or 0.5 mg/L silver ions. Results show that silver deposits on stainless steel surfaces even when a passivation layer protects the metallic surface. The highest protection to silver deposition is offered by acid passivated and electropolished SS 316L. SEM and XPS experiments were carried out at several locations of the sample area that was in contact with the Ag solution and found similar morphological (SEM) and compositional (sputter-etch XPS) results. The results reveal that silver deposits uniformly across the wetted surface to a thickness larger than 3 nm. Moreover, evidence is provided that silver deposits in its metallic form on all stainless steel surfaces, in line with a galvanic deposition mechanism. Combination of ICP-MS and XPS results suggests a mechanism for Ag deposition/reduction with simultaneous substrate oxidation resulting in oxide growth at the exposed stainless steel surface.

  3. Whole body vibration: unsupervised training or combined with a supervised multi-purpose exercise for fitness?

    PubMed

    Emerenziani, Gian Pietro; Meucci, Marco; Gallotta, Maria Chiara; Buzzachera, Cosme Franklim; Guidetti, Laura; Baldari, Carlo

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the study was to compare the effect of an unsupervised whole body vibration (WBV) training and two different supervised multi-purpose exercise programmes, with and without WBV, on body composition, functional fitness and self-reported well-being in middle-aged adults. Fifty-four healthy participants (age 48.6 ± 6.7 years) were randomly assigned to a vibration group (VG), a multi-purpose exercise group (MG) and a multi-purpose exercise with vibration group (VMG) and trained 3 days a week for 4 months. VG performed a standardised unsupervised WBV protocol, MG a supervised multi-purpose exercise and VMG a multi-purpose exercise including vibration. After training, drop out was significantly higher in VG group (P = 0.016) when compared to VMG group. In both MG and VMG, body composition, sit-up, push-up, sit and reach, agility test, hopping test and self-reported general health significantly improved (P < 0.05). No additive effects were generated by the vibration stimulus. Percentage of body fat and agility test in VG had a significant opposite trend compared to VMG group (P < 0.05). In summary, an unsupervised WBV training should not be chosen for training protocol. However, positive effects on physical fitness and the best results in adherence could be achieved integrating WBV practice into a multi-purpose exercise training.

  4. The effect of a surface disinfectant on a dental cast.

    PubMed

    Bass, R A; Plummer, K D; Anderson, E F

    1992-05-01

    This study determined the effect of a disinfectant solution on dental casts. Stone samples were immersed in a disinfectant solution and in control solutions. The results indicate that a saturated calcium sulfate (clear slurry) solution with 0.525% sodium hypochlorite was an effective disinfectant and acted without damage to the dental cast.

  5. Earthscape, a Multi-Purpose Interactive 3d Globe Viewer for Hybrid Data Visualization and Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarthou, A.; Mas, S.; Jacquin, M.; Moreno, N.; Salamon, A.

    2015-08-01

    The hybrid visualization and interaction tool EarthScape is presented here. The software is able to display simultaneously LiDAR point clouds, draped videos with moving footprint, volume scientific data (using volume rendering, isosurface and slice plane), raster data such as still satellite images, vector data and 3D models such as buildings or vehicles. The application runs on touch screen devices such as tablets. The software is based on open source libraries, such as OpenSceneGraph, osgEarth and OpenCV, and shader programming is used to implement volume rendering of scientific data. The next goal of EarthScape is to perform data analysis using ENVI Services Engine, a cloud data analysis solution. EarthScape is also designed to be a client of Jagwire which provides multisource geo-referenced video fluxes. When all these components will be included, EarthScape will be a multi-purpose platform that will provide at the same time data analysis, hybrid visualization and complex interactions. The software is available on demand for free at france@exelisvis.com.

  6. Disinfection of contaminated equipment: evaluation of benzalkonium chloride exposure time and solution age and the ability of air-drying to eliminate Flavobacterium psychrophilum.

    PubMed

    Oplinger, Randall W; Wagner, Eric

    2010-12-01

    Disinfection of equipment that comes in contact with fish can help to minimize the spread of Flavobacterium psychrophilum (the etiological agent of bacterial coldwater disease) within and among fish culture facilities. We present the results of three studies that evaluated the potential use of benzalkonium chloride and air-drying to kill surface-attached F. psychrophilum. In the first study, we established a vat with a 600-mg/L benzalkonium chloride solution and sampled this solution 0, 14, 35, 56, 70, and 84 d after creation. The solution was kept outdoors and subjected to typical hatchery use. Plastic test strips were dipped in a solution containing F. psychrophilum and were then immersed in benzalkonium chloride for 0, 1, 10, 30, or 60 min. The strips were then rinsed with sterile water and streaked across a plate containing tryptone yeast extract salts (TYES) medium. No culturable bacteria were detected from any strips immersed for 10, 30, or 60 min. Bacteria were detected on 17% of the strips that were immersed for 1 min. The age of the benzalkonium chloride solution had no effect on disinfection ability. In the second study, plastic strips were immersed in a solution containing F. psychrophilum and then were dipped in a 600-mg/L benzalkonium chloride solution for 10 s. The strips were then air-dried for 1 h and were streaked onto TYES medium. No bacterial growth was observed from any strips in the second experiment. The third study determined whether air-drying alone was sufficient to kill F. psychrophilum. Plastic strips were dipped in a solution containing F. psychrophilum; were allowed to dry at room temperature for 0, 24, 48, or 96 h; and were then streaked across TYES medium. Bacteria were cultured from strips representing each drying interval, indicating that air-drying times of 96 h or less are insufficient to kill F. psychrophilum.

  7. A membrane filter technique for testing disinfectants.

    PubMed Central

    Prince, J; Deverill, C E; Ayliffe, G A

    1975-01-01

    A membrane filter was used for assessing the surface disinfecting activity of phenolic disinfectants and a chloroxylenol disinfectant. The influence of the type of organism, inoculum size, and hardness of water was investigated. Pseudomonas aeruginosa was chosen for the standardized test. Disinfectant solutions were prepared in water of 300 ppm hardness and applied for two and a half minutes and eight minutes to the bacteria deposited from filtration of 1 ml of a suspension containing 10-6 bacteria. The membrane filter test has certain advantages over many tests, eg, all organisms surviving after treatment can be counted and residual disinfectant is easily removed. PMID:804497

  8. A membrane filter technique for testing disinfectants.

    PubMed

    Prince, J; Deverill, C E; Ayliffe, G A

    1975-01-01

    A membrane filter was used for assessing the surface disinfecting activity of phenolic disinfectants and a chloroxylenol disinfectant. The influence of the type of organism, inoculum size, and hardness of water was investigated. Pseudomonas aeruginosa was chosen for the standardized test. Disinfectant solutions were prepared in water of 300 ppm hardness and applied for two and a half minutes and eight minutes to the bacteria deposited from filtration of 1 ml of a suspension containing 10-6 bacteria. The membrane filter test has certain advantages over many tests, eg, all organisms surviving after treatment can be counted and residual disinfectant is easily removed.

  9. SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL NUMBER DENSITIES FOR MULTI-PURPOSE CANISTER CRITICALITY CALCULATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    D. A. Thomas

    1996-01-12

    The purpose of this analysis is to calculate the number densities for spent nuclear fuel (SNF) to be used in criticality evaluations of the Multi-Purpose Canister (MPC) waste packages. The objective of this analysis is to provide material number density information which will be referenced by future MPC criticality design analyses, such as for those supporting the Conceptual Design Report.

  10. Engineering a Multi-Purpose Test Collection for Web Retrieval Experiments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bailey, Peter; Craswell, Nick; Hawking, David

    2003-01-01

    Describes a test collection that was developed as a multi-purpose testbed for experiments on the Web in distributed information retrieval, hyperlink algorithms, and conventional ad hoc retrieval. Discusses inter-server connectivity, integrity of server holdings, inclusion of documents related to a wide spread of likely queries, and distribution of…

  11. Performance test on PELICAN - a multi-purpose time of flight cold neutron spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Dehong; Mole, Richard. A.; Kearley, Gordon J.

    2015-01-01

    Pelican, a direct geometry multi-purpose cold neutron spectrometer has recently been commissioned at the Bragg Institute, ANSTO. The energy resolution and flux at the sample position as a function of neutron wavelength has been evaluated and time focusing at selected energy transfers has also been demonstrated. Several test experiments of quasi-elastic and inelastic neutron scatterings have been performed and these have indicated the realisation of the design specifications and performance of the instrument.

  12. The International Space Station's Multi-Purpose Logistics Module, Thermal Performance of the First Five Flights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holladay, Jon; Cho, Frank

    2003-01-01

    The Multi-Purpose Logistics Module is the primary carrier for transport of pressurized payload to the International Space Station. Performing five missions within a thirteen month span provided a unique opportunity to gather a great deal of information toward understanding and verifying the orbital performance of the vehicle. This paper will provide a brief overview of the hardware history and design capabilities followed by a summary of the missions flown, resource requirements and possibilities for the future.

  13. Multi-Purpose, Application-Centric, Scalable I/O Proxy Application

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, M. C.

    2015-06-15

    MACSio is a Multi-purpose, Application-Centric, Scalable I/O proxy application. It is designed to support a number of goals with respect to parallel I/O performance testing and benchmarking including the ability to test and compare various I/O libraries and I/O paradigms, to predict scalable performance of real applications and to help identify where improvements in I/O performance can be made within the HPC I/O software stack.

  14. The Army’s Armored Multi-Purpose Vehicle (AMPV): Background and Issues for Congress

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-24

    purpose vehicles, mortar carriers, and medical treatment and evacuation vehicles. An estimated 3,000 of these M-113 variants are currently in...transportable, armored multi-purpose vehicle family intended to provide a lightweight , amphibious armored personnel carrier for armor and mechanized infantry...a number of different variations of the M-113 were produced to fulfill such roles as a command and control vehicle, mortar carrier, and armored

  15. Explosive Ordnance Disposal Proficiency Range and Multi-Purpose Contingency Training Area

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-04-01

    measures, including but not limited to installation of safety fencing, straw bales , silt fence, seeding (temporary and permanent), planting native grasses...point. All combustible materials would be cleared from a 200-foot radius inner circle surrounding the destruction point. • Multi-Purpose Contingency...Chapter 2 April 2007 2-5 entrances, would ring the destruction point. All combustible materials would be cleared from a 200-foot radius inner

  16. MODELING DISINFECTANT RESIDUALS IN DRINKING-WATER STORAGE TANKS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The factors leading to the loss of disinfectant residual in well-mixed drinking-water storage tanks are studied. Equations relating disinfectant residual to the disinfectant's reation rate, the tank volume, and the fill and drain rates are presented. An analytical solution for ...

  17. Restoring Natural Streamflow Variability by Modifying Multi-purpose Reservoir Operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiau, J.

    2010-12-01

    Multi-purpose reservoirs typically provide benefits of water supply, hydroelectric power, and flood mitigation. Hydroelectric power generations generally do not consume water. However, temporal distribution of downstream flows is highly changed due to hydro-peaking effects. Associated with offstream diversion of water supplies for municipal, industrial, and agricultural requirements, natural streamflow characteristics of magnitude, duration, frequency, timing, and rate of change is significantly altered by multi-purpose reservoir operation. Natural flow regime has long been recognized a master factor for ecosystem health and biodiversity. Restoration of altered flow regime caused by multi-purpose reservoir operation is the main objective of this study. This study presents an optimization framework that modifying reservoir operation to seeking balance between human and environmental needs. The methodology presented in this study is applied to the Feitsui Reservoir, located in northern Taiwan, with main purpose of providing stable water-supply and auxiliary purpose of electricity generation and flood-peak attenuation. Reservoir releases are dominated by two decision variables, i.e., duration of water releases for each day and percentage of daily required releases within the duration. The current releasing policy of the Feitsui Reservoir releases water for water-supply and hydropower purposes during 8:00 am to 16:00 pm each day and no environmental flows releases. Although greater power generation is obtained by 100% releases distributed within 8-hour period, severe temporal alteration of streamflow is observed downstream of the reservoir. Modifying reservoir operation by relaxing these two variables and reserve certain ratio of streamflow as environmental flow to maintain downstream natural variability. The optimal reservoir releasing policy is searched by the multi-criterion decision making technique for considering reservoir performance in terms of shortage ratio

  18. Programmable Thermostat Module Upgrade for the Multi-Purpose Logistics Module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, Dallas; Glasgow, Shaun; Reagan, Shawn; Presson, Keith; Howard, David; Smith, Dennis

    2007-01-01

    The STS-121/ULF1.1 mission was the maiden flight of the Programmable Thermostat Module (PTM) system used to control the 28 V shell heaters on the Multi-Purpose Logistics Module (MPLM). These PTMs, in conjunction with a Data Recorder Module (DRM), provide continuous closed loop temperature control and data recording of MPLM on-orbit heater operations. This paper will discuss the hardware design, development, test and verification (DDT&V) activities performed at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) as well as the operational implementation and mission performance.

  19. A multi-purpose SAIL demonstrator design and its principle experimental verification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yu; Yan, Aimin; Xu, Nan; Wang, Lijuan; Luan, Zhu; Sun, Jianfeng; Liu, Liren

    2009-08-01

    A fully 2-D synthetic aperture imaging ladar (SAIL) demonstrator is designed and being fabricated to experimentally investigate and theoretically analyze the beam diffraction properties, antenna function, imaging resolution and signal processing algorithm of SAIL. The design details of the multi-purpose SAIL demonstrator are given and, as the first phase, a laboratory-scaled SAIL system based on bulk optical elements has been built to verify the principle of design, which is similar in construction to the demonstrator but without the major antenna telescope. The system has the aperture diameter of about 1mm and the target distance of 3.2m.

  20. The Multi-Purpose Detector for NICA heavy-Ion Collider at JINR

    SciTech Connect

    Rogachevsky, O. V.

    2012-05-15

    The Multi-Purpose Detector (MPD) is designed to study heavy-ion collisions at the Nuclotron-based heavy Ion Collider fAcility (NICA) at JINR, Dubna. Its main components located inside a superconducting solenoid are a tracking system composed of a silicon microstrip vertex detector followed by a large volume time-projection chamber, a time-of-flight system for particle identification and a barrel electromagnetic calorimeter. A zero degree hadron calorimeter is designed specifically to measure the energy of spectators. In this paper, all parts of the apparatus are described and their tracking and particle identification parameters are discussed in some detail.

  1. Multi-Purpose Low Voltage Dual Output DC-DC Converter For 100V Power Bus Telecom Platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galiana, D.; Mollard, J. M.

    2011-10-01

    The decreasing supply voltages of digital electronic and high speed ADC (Analog to Digital Converter) and DAC (Digital to Analog Converter) require flexible and high current secondary power distribution system. In the frame of the Inmarsat I-XL program, a 12 kW geomobile SatCom satellite, with 100 V regulated power bus, a multi purpose dual output converter was developed for the payload processor as a building block. After a short introduction on the main performance requirements, the baseline architecture is presented. The main drivers of the architecture are reliability, adjustability, radiation tolerant and single event free, volume and mass. The combination of all these constraints highlights the need of significant breakthrough in various domains. Many research results related to packaging and power electronic topics are brought up. These results directly drive the adopted solution presented in the next step followed by a description of the integration of the defined building block in the Inmarsat I-XL payload IP (Integrated Processor). Finally, the main electrical performances such as output ripple and spikes, load step transient and stability are summarized.

  2. Dimensional changes in stone models simulating full crown preparations with adjacent teeth resulting from long-term immersion of medium-viscosity addition-type silicone rubber impressions in disinfectant solutions.

    PubMed

    Hiraguchi, Hisako; Iwasaki, Yukiko; Iwasaki, Eriko; Kikuchi, Hisaji; Hirose, Hideharu; Yoneyama, Takayuki

    2015-01-01

    If impression materials could be immersed in disinfectant solutions for a longer period, then this form of disinfection would be easier to incorporate into dental preparation procedures. This study investigated the dimensional changes in stone models resulting from immersion of medium-viscosity hydrophilic addition-type silicone rubber impression material in disinfectant solutions for 30 min and 24 h. Impressions of a master die designed to simulate a full crown preparation with adjacent teeth were immersed in 2% glutaraldehyde and 0.55% ortho-phthalaldehyde solutions. The dimensional changes in the mesiodistal and buccolingual dimensions in the stone models were then measured using a three-dimensional coordinate system. It was found that the dimensional changes in the stone models caused by immersion of the impression materials were less than 15 μm. Immersion in 2% glutaraldehyde or 0.55% ortho-phthalaldehyde for 24 h was as clinically acceptable for medium-viscosity hydrophilic addition-type silicone rubber impressions as immersion for 30 min.

  3. NASA AND ESA Partnership on the Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle Service Module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Free, James M.; Schubert, Kathleen; Grantier, Julie

    2012-01-01

    In March 2011, NASA and ESA made a decision to partially offset the European obligations deriving from the extension of the ISS Program until the end of 2020 with different means than ATVs, following the ATV-5 mission foreseen in mid-2014. NASA and ESA considered a number of barter options, and concluded that the provision by ESA of the Service Module and Spacecraft Adaptor for the NASA Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle (MPCV) was the barter element with the most interest. A joint ESA - NASA working group was established to assess the feasibility of Europe developing this Module based on ATV heritage. The working group was supported by European and US industry namely Astrium, TAS-I and Lockheed-Martin. This paper gives an overview of the results of the on-going study as well as its projected utilization for the global space exploration endeavour.

  4. Descent and Landing Triggers for the Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle Exploration Flight Test-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bihari, Brian D.; Semrau, Jeffrey D.; Duke, Charity J.

    2013-01-01

    The Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle (MPCV) will perform a flight test known as Exploration Flight Test-1 (EFT-1) currently scheduled for 2014. One of the primary functions of this test is to exercise all of the important Guidance, Navigation, Control (GN&C), and Propulsion systems, along with the flight software for future flights. The Descent and Landing segment of the flight is governed by the requirements levied on the GN&C system by the Landing and Recovery System (LRS). The LRS is a complex system of parachutes and flight control modes that ensure that the Orion MPCV safely lands at its designated target in the Pacific Ocean. The Descent and Landing segment begins with the jettisoning of the Forward Bay Cover and concludes with sensing touchdown. This paper discusses the requirements, design, testing, analysis and performance of the current EFT-1 Descent and Landing Triggers flight software.

  5. Raffaello Multi-Purpose Logistics Module (MPLM) in Discovery Cargo Bay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    Launched on July 26, 2005 from the Kennedy Space Center in Florida, STS-114 was classified as Logistics Flight 1. Among the Station-related activities of the mission were the delivery of new supplies and the replacement of one of the orbital outpost's Control Moment Gyroscopes (CMGs). STS-114 also carried the Raffaello Multi-Purpose Logistics Module (MPLM) and the External Stowage Platform-2. Back dropped by popcorn-like clouds, the MPLM can be seen in the cargo bay as Discovery undergoes rendezvous and docking operations. Cosmonaut Sergei K. Kriklev, Expedition 11 Commander, and John L. Phillips, NASA Space Station officer and flight engineer photographed the spacecraft from the International Space Station (ISS).

  6. Raffaello Multi-Purpose Logistics Module (MPLM) in Discovery Cargo Bay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    Launched on July 26 2005 from the Kennedy Space Center in Florida, STS-114 was classified as Logistics Flight 1. Among the Station-related activities of the mission were the delivery of new supplies and the replacement of one of the orbital outpost's Control Moment Gyroscopes (CMGs). STS-114 also carried the Raffaello Multi-Purpose Logistics Module (MPLM) and the External Stowage Platform-2. Back dropped by popcorn-like clouds, the MPLM can be seen in the cargo bay as Discovery undergoes rendezvous and docking operations. Cosmonaut Sergei K. Kriklev, Expedition 11 Commander, and John L. Phillips, NASA Space Station officer and flight engineer photographed the spacecraft from the International Space Station (ISS).

  7. The Raffaello, a Multi-Purpose Logistics Module, arrives at KSC aboard a Beluga super transporter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    An Airbus Industrie A300-600ST 'Beluga' Super Transporter is reflected in the rain puddles as it comes to a stop at the Shuttle Landing Facility. The Beluga is carrying the Raffaello, the second Multi-Purpose Logistics Module (MPLM) for the International Space Station (ISS). One of Italy's major contributions to the ISS program, the MPLM is a reusable logistics carrier and the primary delivery system used to resupply and return station cargo requiring a pressurized environment. Weighing nearly 4.5 tons, the module measures 21 feet long and 15 feet in diameter. Raffaello will join Leonardo, the first Italian-built MPLM, in the Space Station Processing Facility for testing. NASA, Boeing, the Italian Space Agency and Alenia Aerospazio will provide engineering support.

  8. Multi Purpose Crew Vehicle Active Thermal Control and Environmental Control and Life Support Development Status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, John F.; Barido, Richard A.; Boehm, Paul; Cross, Cynthia D.; Rains, George Edward

    2014-01-01

    The Orion Multi Purpose Crew Vehicle (MPCV) is the first crew transport vehicle to be developed by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) in the last thirty years. Orion is currently being developed to transport the crew safely beyond Earth orbit. This year, the vehicle focused on building the Exploration Flight Test 1 (EFT1) vehicle to be launched in September of 2014. The development of the Orion Active Thermal Control (ATCS) and Environmental Control and Life Support (ECLS) System, focused on the integrating the components into the EFT1 vehicle and preparing them for launch. Work also has started on preliminary design reviews for the manned vehicle. Additional development work is underway to keep the remaining component progressing towards implementation on the flight tests of EM1 in 2017 and of EM2 in 2020. This paper covers the Orion ECLS development from April 2013 to April 2014

  9. Multi Purpose Crew Vehicle Environmental Control and Life Support Development Status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, John F.; Barido, Richard A.; Cross, Cynthia D.; Rains, George Edward

    2012-01-01

    The Orion Multi Purpose Crew Vehicle (MPCV) is the first crew transport vehicle to be developed by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) in the last thirty years. Orion is currently being developed to transport the crew safely beyond Earth orbit. This year, the vehicle focused on building the Exploration Flight Test 1 (EFT1) vehicle to be launched in 2014. The development of the Orion Environmental Control and Life Support (ECLS) System, focused on the completing the components which are on EFT1. Additional development work has been done to keep the remaining component progressing towards implementation for a flight tests in of EM1 in 2017 and in and EM2 in 2020. This paper covers the Orion ECLS development from April 2012 to April 2013.

  10. The Raffaello, a Multi-Purpose Logistics Module, arrives at KSC aboard a Beluga super transporter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    An Airbus Industrie A300-600ST 'Beluga' Super Transporter is reflected in the rain puddles as it taxis toward the mate/demate tower at the Shuttle Landing Facility. The Beluga is carrying the Raffaello, the second Multi-Purpose Logistics Module (MPLM) for the International Space Station (ISS). One of Italy's major contributions to the ISS program, the MPLM is a reusable logistics carrier and the primary delivery system used to resupply and return station cargo requiring a pressurized environment. Weighing nearly 4.5 tons, the module measures 21 feet long and 15 feet in diameter. Raffaello will join Leonardo, the first Italian-built MPLM, in the Space Station Processing Facility for testing. NASA, Boeing, the Italian Space Agency and Alenia Aerospazio will provide engineering support.

  11. The Raffaello, a Multi-Purpose Logistics Module, arrives at KSC aboard a Beluga super transporter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    An Airbus Industrie A300-600ST 'Beluga' Super Transporter lands in the rain at the Shuttle Landing Facility to deliver its cargo, the second Multi-Purpose Logistics Module (MPLM) for the International Space Station (ISS). One of Italy's major contributions to the ISS program, the MPLM, named Raffaello, is a reusable logistics carrier and the primary delivery system used to resupply and return station cargo requiring a pressurized environment. Weighing nearly 4.5 tons, the module measures 21 feet long and 15 feet in diameter. Raffaello will join Leonardo, the first Italian-built MPLM, in the Space Station Processing Facility for testing. NASA, Boeing, the Italian Space Agency and Alenia Aerospazio will provide engineering support.

  12. The Raffaello, a Multi-Purpose Logistics Module, arrives at KSC aboard a Beluga super transporter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    An Airbus Industrie A300-600ST 'Beluga' Super Transporter touches down at the Shuttle Landing Facility to deliver its cargo, the second Multi-Purpose Logistics Module (MPLM) for the International Space Station (ISS). One of Italy's major contributions to the ISS program, the MPLM, named Raffaello, is a reusable logistics carrier and the primary delivery system used to resupply and return station cargo requiring a pressurized environment. Weighing nearly 4.5 tons, the module measures 21 feet long and 15 feet in diameter. Raffaello will join Leonardo, the first Italian-built MPLM, in the Space Station Processing Facility for testing. NASA, Boeing, the Italian Space Agency and Alenia Aerospazio will provide engineering support.

  13. Multi Purpose Crew Vehicle Environmental Control and Life Support Development Status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, John F.; Barido, Richard A.; Cross, Cynthia D.; Carrasquillo, Robyn; Rains, George Edward

    2011-01-01

    The Orion Multi Purpose Crew Vehicle (MPCV) is the first crew transport vehicle to be developed by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) in the last thirty years. Orion is currently being developed to transport the crew safely from the Earth beyond Earth orbit. This year, the vehicle focused on building the Orion Flight Test 1 (OFT1) vehicle to be launched in 2013. The development of the Orion Environmental Control and Life Support (ECLS) System, focused on the components which are on OFT1 which includes pressure control and active thermal control systems, is progressing through the design stage into manufacturing. Additional development work was done to keep the remaining component progressing towards implementation for a flight test in 2017. This paper covers the Orion ECLS development from April 2011 to April 2012.

  14. Orion Multi Purpose Crew Vehicle Environmental Control and Life Support Development Status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, John F.; Barido, Richard A.; Cross, Cynthia D.; Carrasquillo, Robyn; Rains, George Edward

    2012-01-01

    The Orion Multi Purpose Crew Vehicle (MPCV) is the first crew transport vehicle to be developed by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) in the last thirty years. Orion is currently being developed to transport the crew safely from the Earth beyond Earth orbit. This year, the vehicle focused on building the Exploration Flight Test 1 (EFT1) vehicle to be launched in 2014. The development of the Orion Environmental Control and Life Support (ECLS) System, focused on the components which are on EFT1 which includes pressure control and active thermal control systems, is progressing through the design stage into manufacturing. Additional development work was done to keep the remaining component progressing towards implementation for a flight tests in 2017 and in 2020. This paper covers the Orion ECLS development from April 2011 to April 2012.

  15. Colonic mucosal pseudolipomatosis: disinfectant colitis?

    PubMed

    Kim, Su Jin; Baek, Il Hyun

    2012-01-01

    Colonic pseudolipomatosis is rare and its pathogenesis is still unclear. A number of mechanisms, including mechanical injury during an endoscopic procedure or chemical injury by disinfectant, seem to contribute to its pathogenesis. In our endoscopy unit, pseudolipomatosis occurred in an epidemic pattern after changing the endoscopic disinfectant from 2% glutaraldehyde to peracetic acid compound to decrease the length of endoscope reprocessing time. We assumed that pseudolipomatosis could be a type of chemical colitis produced by the residual disinfectant solution that remained on the surface or in a channel of the endoscope after reprocessing. The aim of this report was to highlight a series of 12 cases of colonic pseudolipomatosis in order to describe the endoscopic and pathological features and discuss the harmful effect of disinfectants as a possible cause of pseudolipomatosis. To identify the cause of the lesions, we systematically reviewed each patient history and the endoscopic and histological features. From March 2004 to February 2005, 1276 colonoscopies were performed and 12 cases (0.94%) of colonic pseudolipomatosis were diagnosed at the Kangnam Sacred Heart Hospital of Hallym University. The pathogenesis of colonic pseudolipomatosis is not well-known, but our experience indicates the endoscopic disinfectant as the probable cause of pseudolipomatosis rather than either mechanical traumatic injury or intraluminal air pressure-related injury.

  16. Zonal management of multi-purposes groundwater utilization based on water quality and impact on the aquifer.

    PubMed

    Liang, Ching-Ping; Jang, Cheng-Shin; Chen, Ching-Fang; Chen, Jui-Sheng

    2016-07-01

    Groundwater is widely used for drinking, irrigation, and aquaculture in the Pingtung Plain, Southwestern Taiwan. The overexploitation and poor quality of groundwater in some areas of the Pingtung Plain pose great challenges for the safe use and sustainable management of groundwater resources. Thus, establishing an effective management plan for multi-purpose groundwater utilization in the Pingtung Plain is imperative. Considerations of the quality of the groundwater and potential impact on the aquifer of groundwater exploitation are paramount to multi-purpose groundwater utilization management. This study proposes a zonal management plan for the multi-purpose use of groundwater in the Pingtung Plain. The zonal management plan is developed by considering the spatial variability of the groundwater quality and the impact on the aquifer, which is defined as the ratio of the actual groundwater extraction rate to transmissivity. A geostatistical Kriging approach is used to spatially delineate the safe zones based on the water quality standards applied in the three groundwater utilization sectors. Suitable zones for the impact on the aquifer are then spatially determined. The evaluation results showing the safe water quality zones for the three types of utilization demands and suitable zones for the impact on aquifer are integrated to create a zonal management map for multi-purpose groundwater utilization which can help government administrators to establish a water resource management strategy for safe and sustainable use of groundwater to meet multi-purpose groundwater utilization requirements in the Pingtung Plain.

  17. Comparison of susceptibility of cystic-fibrosis-related and non-cystic-fibrosis-related Pseudomonas aeruginosa to chlorine-based disinfecting solutions: implications for infection prevention and ward disinfection.

    PubMed

    Moore, John E; Rendall, Jacqueline C

    2014-09-01

    Multidrug-resistant (MDR) Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from cystic fibrosis (CF) sputum was shown to be more tolerant to the most commonly used chlorine-based disinfecting agent in the UK, with approximately 7 out of 10 isolates surviving a residual free chlorine (RFC) concentration of 500 p.p.m., when compared with antibiotic-sensitive invasive P. aeruginosa from a non-CF blood culture source, where 8 out of 10 isolates were killed at a RFC concentration of 100 p.p.m. All CF isolates were killed at 1000 p.p.m. chlorine. Additional studies were performed to examine factors that influenced the concentration of RFC from chlorine-based (sodium dichloroisocyanurate) disinfecting agents in contact with CF sputum and their components (bacterial cells, glycocalyx) to assess the reduction of the bactericidal activity of such disinfecting agents. Pseudomonas glycocalyx had a greater inhibitory effect of chlorine deactivation than bacterial cells. Calibration curves demonstrated the relative deactivating capacity on RFC from clinical soils, in the order pus>CF sputum>wound discharge fluid/synovial fluid>ascites fluid>bile, where quantitatively each 1 % (w/v) CF sputum reduced the RFC by 43 p.p.m. Sublethal stressing of P. aeruginosa with chlorine resulted in lowered susceptibility to colistin (P = 0.0326) but not to meropenem, tobramycin or ciprofloxacin. In conclusion, heavy contamination of healthcare fomites with CF sputum containing MDR P. aeruginosa may result in exhaustion of RFC, and this, combined with an increased resistance to chlorine with such strains, may lead to their survival and increased antibiotic resistance in such environments. CF infection prevention strategies in such scenarios should therefore target interventions with increased concentrations of chlorine to ensure the eradication of MDR P. aeruginosa from the CF healthcare environment.

  18. WATER DISINFECTION PRACTICE

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The current review of canteen water disinfection proceeded along three general lines. A summary has been prepared of the information available from...the literature on canteen water disinfection. The current opinions of two outstanding investigators in the field of disinfection have been solicited in

  19. NASA and ESA Partnership on the Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle Service Module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schubert, Kathleen E.; Grantier, Julie A.

    2012-01-01

    (1) ESA decided in its Council Meeting in March 2011 to partially offset the European ISS obligations after 2015 with different means than ATVs; (2) The envisioned approach is based on a barter element(s) that would generate cost avoidance on the NASA side; (3) NASA and ESA considered a number of Barter options, NASA concluded that the provision by ESA of the Service Module for the NASA Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle (MPCV) was the barter with the most interest;. (4) A joint ESA - NASA working group was established in May 2011 to assess the feasibility of Europe developing this Module based on ATV heritage; (5)The working group was supported by European and US industry namely Astrium, TAS-I and Lockheed-Martin; and (6) The project is currently in phase B1 with the objective to prepare a technical and programmatic proposal for an ESA MPCV-SM development. This proposal will be one element of the package that ESA plans submit to go forward for approval by European Ministers in November 2012.

  20. REBOUND: an open-source multi-purpose N-body code for collisional dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rein, H.; Liu, S.-F.

    2012-01-01

    REBOUND is a new multi-purpose N-body code which is freely available under an open-source license. It was designed for collisional dynamics such as planetary rings but can also solve the classical N-body problem. It is highly modular and can be customized easily to work on a wide variety of different problems in astrophysics and beyond. REBOUND comes with three symplectic integrators: leap-frog, the symplectic epicycle integrator (SEI) and a Wisdom-Holman mapping (WH). It supports open, periodic and shearing-sheet boundary conditions. REBOUND can use a Barnes-Hut tree to calculate both self-gravity and collisions. These modules are fully parallelized with MPI as well as OpenMP. The former makes use of a static domain decomposition and a distributed essential tree. Two new collision detection modules based on a plane-sweep algorithm are also implemented. The performance of the plane-sweep algorithm is superior to a tree code for simulations in which one dimension is much longer than the other two and in simulations which are quasi-two dimensional with less than one million particles. In this work, we discuss the different algorithms implemented in REBOUND, the philosophy behind the code's structure as well as implementation specific details of the different modules. We present results of accuracy and scaling tests which show that the code can run efficiently on both desktop machines and large computing clusters.

  1. REBOUND: Multi-purpose N-body code for collisional dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rein, Hanno; Liu, Shang-Fei

    2011-10-01

    REBOUND is a multi-purpose N-body code which is freely available under an open-source license. It was designed for collisional dynamics such as planetary rings but can also solve the classical N-body problem. It is highly modular and can be customized easily to work on a wide variety of different problems in astrophysics and beyond. REBOUND comes with three symplectic integrators: leap-frog, the symplectic epicycle integrator (SEI) and a Wisdom-Holman mapping (WH). It supports open, periodic and shearing-sheet boundary conditions. REBOUND can use a Barnes-Hut tree to calculate both self-gravity and collisions. These modules are fully parallelized with MPI as well as OpenMP. The former makes use of a static domain decomposition and a distributed essential tree. Two new collision detection modules based on a plane-sweep algorithm are also implemented. The performance of the plane-sweep algorithm is superior to a tree code for simulations in which one dimension is much longer than the other two and in simulations which are quasi-two dimensional with less than one million particles.

  2. Evaluation of Life Sciences Glovebox (LSG) and Multi-Purpose Crew Restraint Concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitmore, Mihriban

    2005-01-01

    Within the scope of the Multi-purpose Crew Restraints for Long Duration Spaceflights project, funded by Code U, it was proposed to conduct a series of evaluations on the ground and on the KC-135 to investigate the human factors issues concerning confined/unique workstations, such as the design of crew restraints. The usability of multiple crew restraints was evaluated for use with the Life Sciences Glovebox (LSG) and for performing general purpose tasks. The purpose of the KC-135 microgravity evaluation was to: (1) to investigate the usability and effectiveness of the concepts developed, (2) to gather recommendations for further development of the concepts, and (3) to verify the validity of the existing requirements. Some designs had already been tested during a March KC-135 evaluation, and testing revealed the need for modifications/enhancements. This flight was designed to test the new iterations, as well as some new concepts. This flight also involved higher fidelity tasks in the LSG, and the addition of load cells on the gloveports.

  3. MATISSE: Multi-purpose Advanced Tool for Instruments for the Solar System Exploration .

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zinzi, A.; Capria, M. T.; Antonelli, L. A.

    In planetary sciences, design, assemble and launch onboard instruments are only preliminary steps toward the final aim of converting data into scientific knowledge, as the real challenge is the data analysis and interpretation. Up to now data have been generally stored in "old style" archives, i.e. common ftp servers where the user can manually search for data browsing directories organized in a time order manner. However, as datasets to be stored and searched become particularly large, this latter task absorbs a great part of the time, subtracting time to the real scientific work. In order to reduce the time spent to search and analyze data MATISSE (Multi-purpose Advanced Tool for Instruments for the Solar System Exploration), a new set of software tools developed together with the scientific teams of the instruments involved, is under development at ASDC (ASI Science Data Center), whose experience in space missions data management is well known (e.g., \\citealt{verrecchia07,pittori09,giommi09,massaro11}) and its features and aims will be presented here.

  4. Software-programmable continuous-flow multi-purpose lab-on-a-chip

    PubMed Central

    Amin, Ahmed M.; Thakur, Raviraj; Madren, Seth; Chuang, Han-Sheng; Thottethodi, Mithuna; Vijaykumar, T. N.; Wereley, Steven T.; Jacobson, Stephen C.

    2013-01-01

    Current lab-on-a-chip (LoC) devices are assay-specific and are custom-built for each single experiment. Performing an experiment requires scientists or engineers to go through the time-consuming process of designing, fabricating, and testing a chip before conducting the actual experiment. This prolonged cycle can take months to complete, increasing effort and cost and reducing productivity. Similarly, minor modifications to an assay protocol re-incur the overheads of the design cycle. In this paper, we develop a multi-purpose, software-programmableLab-on-a-Chip (SPLoC), where the user simply writes or downloads a program for each experiment. We describe the components necessary to realize the SPLoC, which include a high-level programming language, an abstract instruction set, a runtime and control system, and a microfluidic device. We describe two key features of our high-level language compiler, and describe a novel variable-volume variable-ratio mixer. Finally, we demonstrate our SPLoC on four diverse, real-world assays. PMID:24436691

  5. A multi-purpose open-source triggering platform for magnetic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruytenberg, T.; Webb, A. G.; Beenakker, J. W. M.

    2014-10-01

    Many MR scans need to be synchronised with external events such as the cardiac or respiratory cycles. For common physiological functions commercial trigger equipment exists, but for more experimental inputs these are not available. This paper describes the design of a multi-purpose open-source trigger platform for MR systems. The heart of the system is an open-source Arduino Due microcontroller. This microcontroller samples an analogue input and digitally processes these data to determine the trigger. The output of the microcontroller is programmed to mimic a physiological signal which is fed into the electrocardiogram (ECG) or pulse oximeter port of MR scanner. The microcontroller is connected to a Bluetooth dongle that allows wireless monitoring and control outside the scanner room. This device can be programmed to generate a trigger based on various types of input. As one example, this paper describes how it can be used as an acoustic cardiac triggering unit. For this, a plastic stethoscope is connected to a microphone which is used as an input for the system. This test setup was used to acquire retrospectively-triggered cardiac scans in ten volunteers. Analysis showed that this platform produces a reliable trigger (>99% triggers are correct) with a small average 8 ms variation between the exact trigger points.

  6. Honeycomblike large area LaB6 plasma source for Multi-Purpose Plasma facility.

    PubMed

    Woo, Hyun-Jong; Chung, Kyu-Sun; You, Hyun-Jong; Lee, Myoung-Jae; Lho, Taihyeop; Choh, Kwon Kook; Yoon, Jung-Sik; Jung, Yong Ho; Lee, Bongju; Yoo, Suk Jae; Kwon, Myeon

    2007-10-01

    A Multi-Purpose Plasma (MP(2)) facility has been renovated from Hanbit mirror device [Kwon et al., Nucl. Fusion 43, 686 (2003)] by adopting the same philosophy of diversified plasma simulator (DiPS) [Chung et al., Contrib. Plasma Phys. 46, 354 (2006)] by installing two plasma sources: LaB(6) (dc) and helicon (rf) plasma sources; and making three distinct simulators: divertor plasma simulator, space propulsion simulator, and astrophysics simulator. During the first renovation stage, a honeycomblike large area LaB(6) (HLA-LaB(6)) cathode was developed for the divertor plasma simulator to improve the resistance against the thermal shock fragility for large and high density plasma generation. A HLA-LaB(6) cathode is composed of the one inner cathode with 4 in. diameter and the six outer cathodes with 2 in. diameter along with separate graphite heaters. The first plasma is generated with Ar gas and its properties are measured by the electric probes with various discharge currents and magnetic field configurations. Plasma density at the middle of central cell reaches up to 2.6 x 10(12) cm(-3), while the electron temperature remains around 3-3.5 eV at the low discharge current of less than 45 A, and the magnetic field intensity of 870 G. Unique features of electric property of heaters, plasma density profiles, is explained comparing with those of single LaB(6) cathode with 4 in. diameter in DiPS.

  7. A case study: Transforming a vaudeville theatre into a 21st century multi-purpose hall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talaske, Richard H.; Hoffman, Ian B.; Laney, Jonathan P.

    2002-05-01

    Originally constructed in 1927 as an atmospheric, vaudeville theatre, the Coronado enjoyed 50 years as host to a true variety of events. In the 1970s, functional and space limitations became a catalyst for touring events to avoid the Coronado, and the theatre fell into disrepair. In the mid-1990s, a renovation was planned (completed January 2001) to restore the glory of the original theatre and upgrade it to be a viable multi-purpose hall for the 21st century. By annexing two neighboring buildings, many of the space limitations could be overcome in both the front- and back-of-house. The scope included a significantly enlarged stage and stagehouse, performer support spaces, expanded lobby spaces, quiet ventilation systems, and a new music rehearsal room. Acoustically, a primary goal was to upgrade the hall for both reinforced music/theatre performances and unreinforced, orchestral performances. However, historical regulations prevented modification to the room shape and configuration. In order to make the room suitable for unreinforced music, two primary acoustic features were instituted-a semi-custom concert enclosure for the stage and an acoustic enhancement system for the audience chamber. For theatrical and popular music events, a new performance audio system was designed and integrated into the hall.

  8. Software-programmable continuous-flow multi-purpose lab-on-a-chip.

    PubMed

    Amin, Ahmed M; Thakur, Raviraj; Madren, Seth; Chuang, Han-Sheng; Thottethodi, Mithuna; Vijaykumar, T N; Wereley, Steven T; Jacobson, Stephen C

    2013-11-01

    Current lab-on-a-chip (LoC) devices are assay-specific and are custom-built for each single experiment. Performing an experiment requires scientists or engineers to go through the time-consuming process of designing, fabricating, and testing a chip before conducting the actual experiment. This prolonged cycle can take months to complete, increasing effort and cost and reducing productivity. Similarly, minor modifications to an assay protocol re-incur the overheads of the design cycle. In this paper, we develop a multi-purpose, software-programmableLab-on-a-Chip (SPLoC), where the user simply writes or downloads a program for each experiment. We describe the components necessary to realize the SPLoC, which include a high-level programming language, an abstract instruction set, a runtime and control system, and a microfluidic device. We describe two key features of our high-level language compiler, and describe a novel variable-volume variable-ratio mixer. Finally, we demonstrate our SPLoC on four diverse, real-world assays.

  9. A multi-purpose open-source triggering platform for magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Ruytenberg, T; Webb, A G; Beenakker, J W M

    2014-10-01

    Many MR scans need to be synchronised with external events such as the cardiac or respiratory cycles. For common physiological functions commercial trigger equipment exists, but for more experimental inputs these are not available. This paper describes the design of a multi-purpose open-source trigger platform for MR systems. The heart of the system is an open-source Arduino Due microcontroller. This microcontroller samples an analogue input and digitally processes these data to determine the trigger. The output of the microcontroller is programmed to mimic a physiological signal which is fed into the electrocardiogram (ECG) or pulse oximeter port of MR scanner. The microcontroller is connected to a Bluetooth dongle that allows wireless monitoring and control outside the scanner room. This device can be programmed to generate a trigger based on various types of input. As one example, this paper describes how it can be used as an acoustic cardiac triggering unit. For this, a plastic stethoscope is connected to a microphone which is used as an input for the system. This test setup was used to acquire retrospectively-triggered cardiac scans in ten volunteers. Analysis showed that this platform produces a reliable trigger (>99% triggers are correct) with a small average 8 ms variation between the exact trigger points.

  10. Solar water disinfection

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, R.; Collier, R.

    1996-11-01

    Non-potable drinking water is a major problem for much of the world`s population. It has been estimated that from 15 to 20 million children under the age of 5 die from diarrheal conditions brought on by infected drinking water every year. This is equivalent to a fully-loaded DC-10 crashing every ten minutes of every day, 365 days a year. Heat is one of the most effective methods of disinfecting drinking water. Using conventional means of heating water (heating on an open-flamed stove) results in an extremely energy-intensive process. The main obstacle is that for areas of the world where potable water is a problem, fuel supplies are either too expensive, not available, or the source of devastating environmental problems (deforestation). The apparatus described is a solar-powered water disinfection device that can overcome most if not all of the barriers that presently limit technological solutions to drinking water problems. It uses a parabolic trough solar concentrator with a receiver tube that is also a counterflow heat exchanger. The system is totally self-contained utilizing a photovoltaic-powered water pump, and a standard automotive thermostat for water flow control. The system is designed for simplicity, reliability and the incorporation of technology readily accessible in most areas of the world. Experiments at the Florida Solar Energy Center have demonstrated up to 2,500 liters of safe drinking water per day with 28 square meters of solar concentrator.

  11. 77 FR 38582 - Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; Domestic Client Life-Cycle Multi-Purpose Forms

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-28

    ... International Trade Administration Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; Domestic Client Life-Cycle... information collection will cover all aspects of a U.S. organization's life-cycle with CS. CS is mandated by... services and trade events to U.S. organizations. The Domestic Client Life-cycle Multi-Purpose...

  12. 16 CFR 1145.17 - Multi-purpose lighters that can be operated by children; risks of death or injury.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... by children; risks of death or injury. 1145.17 Section 1145.17 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT... UNDER THE CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY ACT § 1145.17 Multi-purpose lighters that can be operated by children; risks of death or injury. (a) The Commission finds that it is in the public interest to regulate...

  13. 16 CFR 1145.17 - Multi-purpose lighters that can be operated by children; risks of death or injury.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... by children; risks of death or injury. 1145.17 Section 1145.17 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT... UNDER THE CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY ACT § 1145.17 Multi-purpose lighters that can be operated by children; risks of death or injury. (a) The Commission finds that it is in the public interest to regulate...

  14. 16 CFR 1145.17 - Multi-purpose lighters that can be operated by children; risks of death or injury.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... by children; risks of death or injury. 1145.17 Section 1145.17 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT... UNDER THE CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY ACT § 1145.17 Multi-purpose lighters that can be operated by children; risks of death or injury. (a) The Commission finds that it is in the public interest to regulate...

  15. 16 CFR 1145.17 - Multi-purpose lighters that can be operated by children; risks of death or injury.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... by children; risks of death or injury. 1145.17 Section 1145.17 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT... UNDER THE CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY ACT § 1145.17 Multi-purpose lighters that can be operated by children; risks of death or injury. (a) The Commission finds that it is in the public interest to regulate...

  16. 16 CFR 1145.17 - Multi-purpose lighters that can be operated by children; risks of death or injury.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... by children; risks of death or injury. 1145.17 Section 1145.17 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT... UNDER THE CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY ACT § 1145.17 Multi-purpose lighters that can be operated by children; risks of death or injury. (a) The Commission finds that it is in the public interest to regulate...

  17. Forward Bay Cover Separation Modeling and Testing for the Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ali, Yasmin; Radke, Tara; Chuhta, Jesse; Hughes, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Spacecraft multi-body separation events during atmospheric descent require complex testing and analysis to validate the flight separation dynamics model and to verify no recontact. NASA Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle (MPCV) teams examined key model parameters and risk areas to develop a robust but affordable test campaign in order to validate and verify the Forward Bay Cover (FBC) separation event for Exploration Flight Test-1 (EFT-1). The FBC jettison simulation model is highly complex, consisting of dozens of parameters varied simultaneously, with numerous multi-parameter interactions (coupling and feedback) among the various model elements, and encompassing distinct near-field, mid-field, and far-field regimes. The test campaign was composed of component-level testing (for example gas-piston thrusters and parachute mortars), ground FBC jettison tests, and FBC jettison air-drop tests that were accomplished by a highly multi-disciplinary team. Three ground jettison tests isolated the testing of mechanisms and structures to anchor the simulation models excluding aerodynamic effects. Subsequently, two air-drop tests added aerodynamic and parachute parameters, and served as integrated system demonstrations, which had been preliminarily explored during the Orion Pad Abort-1 (PA-1) flight test in May 2010. Both ground and drop tests provided extensive data to validate analytical models and to verify the FBC jettison event for EFT-1, but more testing is required to support human certification, for which NASA and Lockheed Martin are applying knowledge from Apollo and EFT-1 testing and modeling to develop a robust but affordable human spacecraft capability.

  18. Forward Bay Cover Separation Modeling and Testing for the Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ali, Yasmin; Chuhta, Jesse D.; Hughes, Michael P.; Radke, Tara S.

    2015-01-01

    Spacecraft multi-body separation events during atmospheric descent require complex testing and analysis to validate the flight separation dynamics models used to verify no re-contact. The NASA Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle (MPCV) architecture includes a highly-integrated Forward Bay Cover (FBC) jettison assembly design that combines parachutes and piston thrusters to separate the FBC from the Crew Module (CM) and avoid re-contact. A multi-disciplinary team across numerous organizations examined key model parameters and risk areas to develop a robust but affordable test campaign in order to validate and verify the FBC separation event for Exploration Flight Test-1 (EFT-1). The FBC jettison simulation model is highly complex, consisting of dozens of parameters varied simultaneously, with numerous multi-parameter interactions (coupling and feedback) among the various model elements, and encompassing distinct near-field, mid-field, and far-field regimes. The test campaign was composed of component-level testing (for example gas-piston thrusters and parachute mortars), ground FBC jettison tests, and FBC jettison air-drop tests that were accomplished by a highly multi-disciplinary team. Three ground jettison tests isolated the testing of mechanisms and structures to anchor the simulation models excluding aerodynamic effects. Subsequently, two air-drop tests added aerodynamic and parachute elements, and served as integrated system demonstrations, which had been preliminarily explored during the Orion Pad Abort-1 (PA-1) flight test in May 2010. Both ground and drop tests provided extensive data to validate analytical models and to verify the FBC jettison event for EFT-1. Additional testing will be required to support human certification of this separation event, for which NASA and Lockheed Martin are applying knowledge from Apollo and EFT-1 testing and modeling to develop a robust human-rated FBC separation event.

  19. HyBIS - a low cost, multi-purpose, modular vehicle for detailed ocean mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huehnerbach, V.; Murton, B.; Berndt, C.; Garrard, J.; Wollatz-Vogt, M.; Wetzel, G.; Matthiessen, T.

    2013-12-01

    HyBIS is a low-cost, multi-purpose, highly maneuverable, fibre-optic controlled survey and sampling robotic underwater vehicle (RUV) capable of diving to 6000m. Built in the UK by Hydro-Lek Ltd. in collaboration with the National Oceanography Centre, Southampton, it has proven itself during recent discoveries of the deepest hydrothermal vents in the world, at 5100m deep in the Cayman Trough in the Caribbean and habitat mapping of seamounts in the Atlantic and Indian oceans . The vehicle has a modular design, with the top module being a command and power system that comprises power management, cameras, lights, hydraulics, thrusters and telemetry. The lower module can alternatively be a clam-shell sampling grab, a manipulator-arm and tool sled, a winch for instrument recovery, or an ocean bottom seismometer deployment module. Unlike a conventional ROV, HyBIS does not have any floatation, rather it is suspended by its umbilical cable directly from the ship. The advantage of direct suspension is that HyBIS can recover or deploy a payload of up to 700kg, although this comes at the price of reduced maneuverability compared to a 'normal' ROV. During its four years of service, HyBIS has, so far, accumulated an impressive list of achievements: recording over 450 hours of HD video footage, thousands of HD still images, collected geological, biological samples, as well as fluids and gas from over 40 different sites. It has also recovered two different seabed landers containing scientific equipment worth over £300k, and placed Ocean Bottom Seismometers onto the seafloor.

  20. Operation and maintenance of a new hazardous waste multi-purpose rotary kiln incinerator (system) in compliance with the Environmental Protection Agency and Louisiana (US) regulations

    SciTech Connect

    Fontenot, M.M. Jr.

    1997-12-31

    The proper management of hazardous and non-hazardous waste generated by modern society will continue to be a challenge for the world. Waste minimization and recycling practices will play a significant role in reducing the amount of waste to be managed. Total elimination of all waste in present day society is unlikely to occur in the future. Therefore, generators must take a proactive and responsible care approach to manage their wastes. An effective treatment operation to manage combustible waste is incineration. Properly designed, high efficiency waste incineration systems are very effective treatment solutions for waste management, particularly when compared to land disposal alternatives. High temperature incineration provides a permanent solution for destroying combustible waste and eliminate harmful or toxic organic constituents in the waste. The Novartis Crop Protection, Inc., St. Gabriel Facility, top environmental priority in the management of waste is to minimize waste at the source. The remaining wastes are recycled, detoxified, and/or incinerated. Land disposal of waste is the last resort for waste management. To achieve the St. Gabriel Facility waste management priorities, a new multi-purpose rotary kiln incinerator was constructed in 1992--93. The incinerator is the first of its kind constructed and permitted in the State of Louisiana since the promulgation of RCRA. The final operating conditions under RCRA were obtained from the regulatory agencies in 1996. This paper will discuss the operating and maintenance programs that were implemented for the new multi-purpose rotary kiln incinerator system to meet the RCRA permit conditions. A review of the preventative maintenance programs (i.e., equipment, monitors, analyzers), computer control, waste analysis, tracking of key parameters, operational cost and equipment reliability of the incinerator system will be presented.

  1. NASA Planning for Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle Ground Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Letchworth, Gary; Schlierf, Roland

    2011-01-01

    tools included Kaizen/Lean events, mockups and human factors analysis. The majority of products developed by this team are applicable as KSC prepares 21st Century Ground Systems for the Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle and Space Launch System.

  2. Friction Stir Weld Application and Tooling Design for the Multi-purpose Crew Vehicle Stage Adapter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alcorn, John

    2013-01-01

    The Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle (MPCV), commonly known as the Orion capsule, is planned to be the United States' next manned spacecraft for missions beyond low earth orbit. Following the cancellation of the Constellation program and creation of SLS (Space Launch System), the need arose for the MPCV to utilize the Delta IV Heavy rocket for a test launch scheduled for 2014 instead of the previously planned Ares I rocket. As a result, an adapter (MSA) must be used in conjunction with the MPCV to account for the variation in diameter of the launch vehicles; 5.5 meters down to 5.0 meters. Prior to ight article fabrication, a path nder (test article) will be fabricated to ne tune the associated manufacturing processes. The adapter will be comprised of an aluminum frustum (partial cone) that employs isogrid technology and circumferential rings on each end. The frustum will be fabricated by friction stir welding (FSW) three individual panels together on a Vertical Weld Tool (VWT) at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center. Subsequently, each circumferential ring will be friction stir welded to the frustum using a Robotic Weld Tool (RWT). The irregular geometry and large mass of the MSA require that extensive tooling preparation be put into support structures for the friction stir weld. The tooling on the VWT will be comprised of a set of conveyors mounted on pre-existing stanchions so that the MSA will have the ability to be rotated after each of the three friction stir welds. The tooling requirements to friction stir weld the rings with the RWT are somewhat more demanding. To support the mass of the MSA and resist the load of the weld tool, a system of mandrels will be mounted to stanchions and assembled in a circle. The goal of the paper will be to explain the design, fabrication, and assembly of the tooling, to explain the use of friction stir welding on the MSA path nder, and also to discuss the lessons learned and modi cations made in preparation for ight article fabrication

  3. A Multi-Purpose Data Dissemination Infrastructure for the Marine-Earth Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanafusa, Y.; Saito, H.; Kayo, M.; Suzuki, H.

    2015-12-01

    To open the data from a variety of observations, the Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology (JAMSTEC) has developed a multi-purpose data dissemination infrastructure. Although many observations have been made in the earth science, all the data are not opened completely. We think data centers may provide researchers with a universal data dissemination service which can handle various kinds of observation data with little effort. For this purpose JAMSTEC Data Management Office has developed the "Information Catalog Infrastructure System (Catalog System)". This is a kind of catalog management system which can create, renew and delete catalogs (= databases) and has following features, - The Catalog System does not depend on data types or granularity of data records. - By registering a new metadata schema to the system, a new database can be created on the same system without sytem modification. - As web pages are defined by the cascading style sheets, databases have different look and feel, and operability. - The Catalog System provides databases with basic search tools; search by text, selection from a category tree, and selection from a time line chart. - For domestic users it creates the Japanese and English pages at the same time and has dictionary to control terminology and proper noun. As of August 2015 JAMSTEC operates 7 databases on the Catalog System. We expect to transfer existing databases to this system, or create new databases on it. In comparison with a dedicated database developed for the specific dataset, the Catalog System is suitable for the dissemination of small datasets, with minimum cost. Metadata held in the catalogs may be transfered to other metadata schema to exchange global databases or portals. Examples: JAMSTEC Data Catalog: http://www.godac.jamstec.go.jp/catalog/data_catalog/metadataList?lang=enJAMSTEC Document Catalog: http://www.godac.jamstec.go.jp/catalog/doc_catalog/metadataList?lang=en&tab=categoryResearch Information

  4. Disinfection. [Wastewater treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Haas, C.N.; McCreary, J.J.

    1982-06-01

    Methods of disinfection of wastewater including chlorination, ultraviolet radiation, ozone, and quaternary compounds are reviewed. Various analytical methods to detect residues of the disinfectants are described. The production of inorganic and nonvolatile organic compounds in conventional water treatment processes is reviewed. (KRM)

  5. [Spanish disinfectants for the 21st century].

    PubMed

    Herruzo Cabrera, R

    2000-01-01

    There are two chemical disinfectants patents from Spain that permit to obtain advantageous products on other disinfectants: Nduopropenide (two iodures of quaternary ammonium) and "Peroxidine" (hydrogen peroxide that active to lactic acid and a surfactant mixture). The first product is used as an antiseptic or disinfectant, but the second, only act as disinfectant. DISINFECTION: It is studied (by germ-carrier methods), the microbicide effect on different microorganisms (Gram positive cocci, Gram negative bacilli, fungus, Mycobacteria and B subtilis spores), comparing these two products with different disinfectants as 2% glutaraldehyde, 1/8 phenate-glutaraldehyde, peracetic acid compounds, 11% oxygen peroxide and 2% sodium hypoclorite. It is obtained that 1/4 Peroxidine in 5 minutes or 1/6 Peroxidine in 10 minutes, are the most effective disinfectant on all microorganisms used (includes the most resistant) since it produces destruction of 4 log-10 of spores and 5 log-10 of Mycobacteria. Moreover, it can destroy, completely, the inoculum of commercial spores, routinely used for sterilization process evaluation, in 20 minutes, when 2% glutaraldehyd needs 3-10 hours. ANTISEPSIE: It is studied the "hygienization" and surgical handwashing with Nduopropenide solution, in comparison with classical washing methods (neutral soap in routinely handwashing and 5% chlorhexidine or 10% iodine-povidone in surgical washing): 1) Nduopropenide and alcohol solution is more effective that routinely handwashing. 2) This product is more effective and persistent, after surgical washing that chlorhexidine or iodine-povidone. Moreover, it does not must be applied with brush. 3) The mixture Nduopropenide and chlorhexidine makes a synergy, then it can be used in hand or skin washing, on heath personnel or patient people, being advantageous on the other products.

  6. Effectiveness of Four Disinfectants against Ebola Virus on Different Materials.

    PubMed

    Smither, Sophie; Phelps, Amanda; Eastaugh, Lin; Ngugi, Sarah; O'Brien, Lyn; Dutch, Andrew; Lever, Mark Stephen

    2016-07-07

    The West Africa Ebola virus (EBOV) outbreak has highlighted the need for effective disinfectants capable of reducing viral load in a range of sample types, equipment and settings. Although chlorine-based products are widely used, they can also be damaging to equipment or apparatus that needs continuous use such as aircraft use for transportation of infected people. Two aircraft cleaning solutions were assessed alongside two common laboratory disinfectants in a contact kill assay with EBOV on two aircraft relevant materials representative of a porous and non-porous surface. A decimal log reduction of viral titre of 4 is required for a disinfectant to be deemed effective and two of the disinfectants fulfilled this criteria under the conditions tested. One product, Ardrox 6092, was found to perform similarly to sodium hypochlorite, but as it does not have the corrosive properties of sodium hypochlorite, it could be an alternative disinfectant solution to be used for decontamination of EBOV on sensitive apparatus.

  7. Effectiveness of Four Disinfectants against Ebola Virus on Different Materials

    PubMed Central

    Smither, Sophie; Phelps, Amanda; Eastaugh, Lin; Ngugi, Sarah; O’Brien, Lyn; Dutch, Andrew; Lever, Mark Stephen

    2016-01-01

    The West Africa Ebola virus (EBOV) outbreak has highlighted the need for effective disinfectants capable of reducing viral load in a range of sample types, equipment and settings. Although chlorine-based products are widely used, they can also be damaging to equipment or apparatus that needs continuous use such as aircraft use for transportation of infected people. Two aircraft cleaning solutions were assessed alongside two common laboratory disinfectants in a contact kill assay with EBOV on two aircraft relevant materials representative of a porous and non-porous surface. A decimal log reduction of viral titre of 4 is required for a disinfectant to be deemed effective and two of the disinfectants fulfilled this criteria under the conditions tested. One product, Ardrox 6092, was found to perform similarly to sodium hypochlorite, but as it does not have the corrosive properties of sodium hypochlorite, it could be an alternative disinfectant solution to be used for decontamination of EBOV on sensitive apparatus. PMID:27399759

  8. Managing runoff and flow pathways in a small rural catchment to reduce flood risk with other multi-purpose benefits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkinson, Mark; Welton, Phil; Kerr, Peter; Quinn, Paul; Jonczyk, Jennine

    2010-05-01

    Belford only two houses were flooded. Data from the catchment and mitigation features showed that the defence measures resulted in an increase in travel time of the peak and attenuated high flows which would have usually travelled quickly down the channel to the village. For example, the pilot feature appears to have increased the travel time of a flood peak at the top of the catchment from 20 minutes to 35 minutes over a 1 km stretch of channel. There are currently ten active mitigation features present in the catchment. More features are planned for construction this year. Early data from the catchment indicates that the runoff attenuation features are having an impact on reducing flood flows in the channel and also slowing down the flood peak. At the same time the multi-purpose aspects of the features are apparent.

  9. Disinfection of laryngoscopes: A survey of practice

    PubMed Central

    Chaskar, Vaishali Prabhakar; Dave, Nandini Malay; Dias, Raylene; Karnik, Priyanka

    2017-01-01

    Background and Aims: The laryngoscope is a common piece of equipment used by anaesthesiologists. It has been identified as a potential source of cross infection. Although guidelines exist regarding appropriate disinfection practices, recent reviews suggest ineffectiveness of current methods of disinfection and poor compliance with the established protocols. We conducted a questionnaire-based survey to study the current disinfection practices being followed by a cross section of anaesthesiologists. Methods: A simple questionnaire containing 13 questions was distributed amongst anaesthesiologists in an anaesthesia conference. Data were analysed with percentage analysis. Results: Out of 250 delegates who attended the conference, 150 submitted the completed questionnaires. Residents constituted 41% and 46% were consultants. Eighteen (12%) used only tap water for cleaning and 132 (88%) used a chemical agent after rinsing with water. Out of 132, 76 (51%) used detergent/soap solution, 29 (19%) would wash and then soak in disinfectant or germicidal agents (glutaraldehyde, povidone iodine and chlorhexidine) and 18 (12%) would wipe the blade with an alcohol swab. With respect to disinfection of laryngoscope handles, 70% respondents said they used an alcohol swab, 18% did not use any method, 9% were not aware of the method being used, while 3% did not respond. Conclusion: Our results indicate wide variation in methods of decontamination of laryngoscopes. Awareness regarding laryngoscope as a potential source of infection was high. We need to standardise and implement guidelines on a national level and make available resources which will help to improve patient safety.

  10. A target field design of open multi-purpose RF coil for musculoskeletal MR imaging at 3T.

    PubMed

    Gao, Fei; Zhang, Rui; Zhou, Diange; Wang, Xiaoying; Huang, Kefu; Zhang, Jue

    2016-10-01

    Musculoskeletal MR imaging under multi-angle situations plays an increasingly important role in assessing joint and muscle tissues system. However, there are still limitations due to the closed structures of most conventional RF coils. In this study, a time-harmonic target-field method was employed to design open multi-purpose coil (OMC) for multi-angle musculoskeletal MR imaging. The phantom imaging results suggested that the proposed OMC could achieve homogeneously distributed magnetic field and high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of 239.04±0.83 in the region of interest (ROI). The maximum temperature in the heating hazard test was 16°C lower than the standard regulation, which indicated the security of the designed OMC. Furthermore, to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed OMC for musculoskeletal MR imaging, especially for multi-angle imaging, a healthy volunteer was examined for MR imaging of elbow, ankle and knee using OMC. The in vivo imaging results showed that the proposed OMC is effective for MR imaging of musculoskeletal tissues at different body parts, with satisfied B1 field homogeneity and SNR. Moreover, the open structure of the OMC could provide a large joint movement region. The proposed open multi-purpose coil is feasible for musculoskeletal MR imaging, and potentially, it is more suitable for the evaluation of musculoskeletal tissues under multi-angle conditions.

  11. A multi-purpose system for water purification and sea-water softening.

    PubMed

    Barsky, L; Rubinstein, J; Barsky, S; Kirzhner, F; Bodul, O

    1998-01-01

    A novel technique that can be used for reacting toxic carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions from power plants and other combustion wastes with sea water is described. A chemical interaction between CO2 and the cations in sea water, with the pH electrolytically regulated, can precipitate almost all the calcium and magnesium ions, as well as some sodium and potassium ions, as carbonates and bicarbonates. The carbonates and bicarbonates thus prepared can then be mixed with ash to yield a building material. Sulfur ions will be neutralized with calcium and magnesium, and the remaining ions can be removed using reverse osmosis or some other method. The technology and equipment for purification are based on modules that can be used for industrial waste-water, sea water, solutions, and otherwise. The module for separation of sand and suspended coarse substances consists of a tank for flocculation, coagulation, and precipitation of solid particles; and a low-pressure hydrocyclone. The module for purification from oil and fine suspensions is based on column flotation, flotation with a special ejector, and adhesion flotation. The module for ions and colloids consists of an absorbing filter with zeolite, fly ash, and other absorbing materials. Using a laboratory model consisting of a special mini-plant, we processed 10 L of factory-waste water containing more than 20 g/L organic content (compare with the upper limit of 0.02 g/L allowed by the Ministry of Environmental Protection in Israel). After the experimental solution was treated and evaporated to a small bulk, the water obtained was almost clear. On the basis of the results in the model, we present a scaled-up process for the design, development, and production of equipment for and the assembly of a large installation for drainage and water purification.

  12. The effect of a range of disinfectants on the dimensional accuracy of some impression materials.

    PubMed

    Jagger, D C; Al Jabra, O; Harrison, A; Vowles, R W; McNally, L

    2004-12-01

    In this study the dimensional accuracy of two model materials; dental stone and plaster of Paris, reproduced from three commonly used impression materials; alginate, polyether and addition-cured silicone, retained by their adhesives in acrylic resin trays and exposed to four disinfectant solutions was evaluated. Ninety casts were used to investigate the effect of the four disinfectants on the dimensional accuracy of alginate, polyether and addition-cured silicone impression material. For each impression material 30 impressions were taken, half were poured in dental stone and half in plaster of Paris. The disinfectants used were Dimenol, Perform-ID, MD-520, and Haz-tabs. Measurements were carried out using a High Precision Reflex Microscope. For the alginate impressions only those disinfected by 5-minute immersion in Haz-tabs solution and in full-strength MD 520 were not adversely affected by the disinfection treatment. All polyether impressions subjected to immersion disinfection exhibited a clinically acceptable expansion. Disinfected addition-cured silicone impressions produced very accurate stone casts. Those disinfected by spraying with fill-strength Dimenol produced casts that were very similar to those left as controls, but those treated by immersion disinfection exhibited negligible and clinically acceptable expansion. The results of the studied demonstrated that the various disinfection treatments had different effects on the impression materials. It is important that an appropriate disinfectant is used for each type of impression material.

  13. Multi-purpose HealthCare Telemedicine Systems with mobile communication link support

    PubMed Central

    Kyriacou, E; Pavlopoulos, S; Berler, A; Neophytou, M; Bourka, A; Georgoulas, A; Anagnostaki, A; Karayiannis, D; Schizas, C; Pattichis, C; Andreou, A; Koutsouris, D

    2003-01-01

    The provision of effective emergency telemedicine and home monitoring solutions are the major fields of interest discussed in this study. Ambulances, Rural Health Centers (RHC) or other remote health location such as Ships navigating in wide seas are common examples of possible emergency sites, while critical care telemetry and telemedicine home follow-ups are important issues of telemonitoring. In order to support the above different growing application fields we created a combined real-time and store and forward facility that consists of a base unit and a telemedicine (mobile) unit. This integrated system: can be used when handling emergency cases in ambulances, RHC or ships by using a mobile telemedicine unit at the emergency site and a base unit at the hospital-expert's site, enhances intensive health care provision by giving a mobile base unit to the ICU doctor while the telemedicine unit remains at the ICU patient site and enables home telemonitoring, by installing the telemedicine unit at the patient's home while the base unit remains at the physician's office or hospital. The system allows the transmission of vital biosignals (3–12 lead ECG, SPO2, NIBP, IBP, Temp) and still images of the patient. The transmission is performed through GSM mobile telecommunication network, through satellite links (where GSM is not available) or through Plain Old Telephony Systems (POTS) where available. Using this device a specialist doctor can telematically "move" to the patient's site and instruct unspecialized personnel when handling an emergency or telemonitoring case. Due to the need of storing and archiving of all data interchanged during the telemedicine sessions, we have equipped the consultation site with a multimedia database able to store and manage the data collected by the system. The performance of the system has been technically tested over several telecommunication means; in addition the system has been clinically validated in three different countries using

  14. Microbial contamination and disinfection methods of pacifiers

    PubMed Central

    NELSON, Paulo; LOUVAIN, Márcia Costa; MACARI, Soraia; LUCISANO, Marília Pacífico; da SILVA, Raquel Assed Bezerra; de QUEIROZ, Alexandra Mussolino; GATON-HERNÁNDEZ, Patrícia; da SILVA, Léa Assed Bezerra

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the microbial contamination of pacifiers by Mutans Streptococci (MS) and the efficacy of different methods for their disinfection. Methods Twenty-eight children were assigned to a 4-stage changeover system with a 1-week interval. In each stage, children received a new pacifier and the parents were instructed to maintain their normal habits for 1 week. After this time, the pacifiers were subjected to the following 4 disinfection methods: spraying with 0.12% chlorhexidine solution, Brushtox® or sterile tap water, and immersion in boiling tap water for 15 minutes. Microbiological culture for MS and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) were performed. The results were analyzed statistically by Friedman’s non-parametric test (a=0.05). Results The 0.12% chlorhexidine spray was statistically similar to the boiling water (p>0.05) and more effective than the Brushtox® spray and control (p<0.05). The analysis of SEM showed the formation of a cariogenic biofilm in all groups with positive culture. Conclusions Pacifiers become contaminated by MS after their use by children and should be disinfected routinely. Spraying with a 0.12% chlorhexidine solution and immersion in boiling water promoted better disinfection of the pacifiers compared with a commercial antiseptic toothbrush cleanser (Brushtox®). PMID:26537723

  15. Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle Active Thermal Control and Environmental Control and Life Support Development Status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, John F.; Barido, Richard A.; Cross, Cynthia D.; Rains, George Edward

    2013-01-01

    The Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle (MPCV) is the first crew transport vehicle to be developed by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) in the last thirty years. Orion is currently being developed to transport the crew safely beyond Earth orbit. This year, the vehicle focused on building the Exploration Flight Test 1 (EFT1) vehicle to be launched in 2014. The development of the Orion Environmental Control and Life Support (ECLS) System, focused on the completing the components which are on EFT1. Additional development work has been done to keep the remaining component progressing towards implementation for a flight tests in of EM1 in 2017 and in and EM2 in 2020. This paper covers the Orion ECLS development from April 2012 to April 2013.

  16. Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle Active Thermal Control and Environmental Control and Life Support Development Status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, John F.; Barido, Richard A.; Boehm, Paul; Cross, Cynthia D.; Rains, George Edward

    2014-01-01

    The Orion Multi Purpose Crew Vehicle (MPCV) is the first crew transport vehicle to be developed by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) in the last thirty years. Orion is currently being developed to transport the crew safely beyond Earth orbit. This year, the vehicle focused on building the Exploration Flight Test 1 (EFT1) vehicle to be launched in September of 2014. The development of the Orion Active Thermal Control (ATCS) and Environmental Control and Life Support (ECLS) System, focused on the integrating the components into the EFT1 vehicle and preparing them for launch. Work also has started on preliminary design reviews for the manned vehicle. Additional development work is underway to keep the remaining component progressing towards implementation on the flight tests of EM1 in 2017 and of EM2 in 2020. This paper covers the Orion ECLS development from April 2013 to April 2014.

  17. Low cost multi-purpose balloon-borne platform for wide-field imaging and video observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ocaña, Francisco; Sánchez de Miguel, Alejandro; Conde, Aitor

    2016-07-01

    Atmosphere layers, especially the troposphere, hinder the astronomical observation. For more than 100 years astronomers have tried observing from balloons to avoid turbulence and extinction. New developments in cardsize computers, RF equipment and satellite navigation have democratised the access to the stratosphere. As a result of a ProAm collaboration with the Daedalus Team we have developed a low-cost multi-purpose platform with stratospheric balloons carrying up to 3 kg of scientific payload. The Daedalus Team is an amateur group that has been launching sounding probes since 2010. Since then the first two authors have provided scienti fic payloads for nighttime flights with the purpose of technology demonstration for astronomical observation. We have successfully observed meteor showers (Geminids 2012, Camelopardalis 2014, Quadrantids 2016 and Lyrids 2016) and city light pollution emission with image and video sensors covering the 400-1000nm range.

  18. Development and applications of a multi-purpose digital controller with a System-on-Chip FPGA for accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurimoto, Yoshinori; Nakamura, Keigo

    2016-12-01

    J-PARC Main Ring (MR) is a high intensity proton synchrotron which accelerates protons from 3 GeV to 30 GeV. It has operated at a beam intensity of 390 kW and an upgrade toward the megawatt rating is scheduled. For higher beam intensity, some of the accelerator components require more intelligent and complicated functions. To consolidate such functions among various components, we developed multi-purpose digital boards using a System-on-Chip Field-Programmable Gated Array (SoC FPGA). In this paper, we describe the details of our developed boards as well as their possible applications. As an application of the boards, we have successfully performed the measurement of the betatron amplitude function during beam acceleration in J-PARC MR. The experimental setup and results of the measurement are also described in detail.

  19. Liftoff and Time Equivalent Duration Data Evaluation of Exploration Flight Test 1 Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houston, Janice

    2016-01-01

    The liftoff phase induces high acoustic loading over a broad frequency range for a launch vehicle. These external acoustic environments are used in the prediction of the internal vibration responses of the vehicle and components. There arises the question about time equivalent (Teq) duration of the liftoff phase and similarity to other launch vehicles. Vibroacoustic engineers require the fatigue-weighted time duration values for qualification testing inputs. In order to determine the Teq for the Space Launch System, NASA's newest launch vehicle, the external microphone data from the Exploration Flight Test 1 (EFT-1) flight of the Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle (MPCV) was evaluated. During that evaluation, a trend was observed in the data and the origin of that trend is discussed in this paper. Finally, the Teq values for the EFT-1 Orion MPCV are presented.

  20. Environmental assessment for the reuse of TNX as a multi-purpose pilot plant campus at the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect

    1998-07-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) prepared this environmental assessment (EA) to analyze the potential environmental and safety impacts of DOE planning to allow asset reuse of the TNX Area at the Savannah River Site (SRS) located near Aiken, South Carolina. The proposed action would include providing for a location for the Centers of Excellence at or adjacent to SRS and entering into a cooperative agreement with a non-profit management and operations (management firm) contractor to operate and market the TNX facilities and equipment. The area (formerly TNX) would be called a Multi-Purpose Pilot Plant Campus (MPPC) and would be used: (1) as location for technology research, development, demonstration, and commercial operations; (2) to establish partnerships with industry to develop applied technologies for commercialization; and (3) serve as administrative headquarters for Centers of Excellence in the program areas of soil remediation, radioecology, groundwater contamination, and municipal solid waste minimization.

  1. K/FAST - The U.S. Army's NDI multi-purpose Ku-band fly-away Satcom terminal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, Alexander J.; Bernard, Robert A.; Stevens, Peter E.; D'Alessandro, Maryann

    1992-03-01

    Attention is given to K/FAST, a NDI multi-purpose Ku-band fly-away Satcom terminal, and the ways in which it epitomizes current trends in military C3I. K/FAST is a state-of-the-art, all solid-state Ku-band terminal providing medium data rate (less than T1) capability. It is designed to accept a GFE bulk encryptor, and includes a multiplexer subsystem with plug-in jacks for secure or nonsecure phones. The multiplexer is reconfigurable, in the field, and permits a mix of compressed voice, data, facsimile, and compressed video. It is demonstrated that off-the-shelf state-of-the-art NDI hardware can be integrated to meet military mission requirements while bypassing the typical multiyear DOD research-and-development cycle.

  2. Urban photogrammetric data base for multi-purpose cadastral-based information systems: the Riyadh city case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-garni, Abdullah M.

    Urban information systems are economic resources that can benefit decision makers in the planning, development, and management of urban projects and resources. In this research, a conceptual model-based prototype Urban Geographic Information System (UGIS) is developed. The base maps used in developing the system and acquiring visual attributes are obtained from aerial photographs. The system is a multi-purpose parcel-based one that can serve many urban applications such as public utilities, health centres, schools, population estimation, road engineering and maintenance, and many others. A modern region in the capital city of Saudi Arabia is used for the study. The developed model is operational for one urban application (population estimation) and is tested for that particular application. The results showed that the system has a satisfactory accuracy and that it may well be promising for other similar urban applications in countries with similar demographic and social characteristics.

  3. Effective reprocessing of reusable dispensers for surface disinfection tissues – the devil is in the details

    PubMed Central

    Kampf, Günter; Degenhardt, Stina; Lackner, Sibylle; Ostermeyer, Christiane

    2014-01-01

    Background: It has recently been reported that reusable dispensers for surface disinfection tissues may be contaminated, especially with adapted Achromobacter species 3, when products based on surface-active ingredients are used. Fresh solution may quickly become recontaminated if dispensers are not processed adequately. Methods: We evaluated the abilities of six manual and three automatic processes for processing contaminated dispensers to prevent recolonisation of a freshly-prepared disinfectant solution (Mikrobac forte 0.5%). Dispensers were left at room temperature for 28 days. Samples of the disinfectant solution were taken every 7 days and assessed quantitatively for bacterial contamination. Results: All automatic procedures prevented recolonisation of the disinfectant solution when a temperature of 60–70°C was ensured for at least 5 min, with or without the addition of chemical cleaning agents. Manual procedures prevented recontamination of the disinfectant solution when rinsing with hot water or a thorough cleaning step was performed before treating all surfaces with an alcohol-based disinfectant or an oxygen-releaser. Other cleaning and disinfection procedures, including the use of an alcohol-based disinfectant, did not prevent recolonisation. Conclusions: These results indicate that not all processes are effective for processing reusable dispensers for surface-disinfectant tissues, and that a high temperature during the cleaning step or use of a biofilm-active cleaning agent are essential. PMID:24653973

  4. Recent advances in drinking water disinfection: successes and challenges.

    PubMed

    Ngwenya, Nonhlanhla; Ncube, Esper J; Parsons, James

    2013-01-01

    , it is recommended that water disinfection should never be compromised by attempting to control DBPs. The reason for this is that the risks of human illness and death from pathogens in drinking water are much greater than the risks from exposure to disinfectants and disinfection by-products. Nevertheless, if DBP levels exceed regulatory limits, strategies should focus on eliminating organic impurities that foster their formation, without compromising disinfection. As alternatives to chlorine, disinfectants such as chloramines, ozone, chlorine dioxide, and UV disinfection are gaining popularity. Chlorine and each of these disinfectants have individual advantage and disadvantage in terms of cost, efficacy-stability, ease of application, and nature of disinfectant by-products (DBPs). Based on efficiency, ozone is the most efficient disinfectant for inactivating bacteria, viruses, and protozoa. In contrast, chloramines are the least efficient and are not recommended for use as primary disinfectants. Chloramines are favored for secondary water disinfection, because they react more slowly than chlorine and are more persistent in distribution systems. In addition, chloramines produce lower DBP levels than does chlorine, although microbial activity in the distribution system may produce nitrate from monochloramine, when it is used as a residual disinfectant, Achieving the required levels of water quality, particularly microbial inactivation levels, while minimizing DBP formation requires the application of proper risk and disinfection management protocols. In addition, the failure of conventional treatment processes to eliminate critical waterborne pathogens in drinking water demand that improved and/or new disinfection technologies be developed. Recent research has disclosed that nanotechnology may offer solutions in this area, through the use of nanosorbents, nanocatalysts, bioactive nanoparticles, nanostructured catalytic membranes, and nanoparticle-enhanced filtration.

  5. Poorly processed reusable surface disinfection tissue dispensers may be a source of infection

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Reusable surface disinfectant tissue dispensers are used in hospitals in many countries because they allow immediate access to pre-soaked tissues for targeted surface decontamination. On the other hand disinfectant solutions with some active ingredients may get contaminated and cause outbreaks. We determined the frequency of contaminated surface disinfectant solutions in reusable dispensers and the ability of isolates to multiply in different formulations. Methods Reusable tissue dispensers with different surface disinfectants were randomly collected from healthcare facilities. Solutions were investigated for bacterial contamination. The efficacy of two surface disinfectants was determined in suspension tests against two isolated species directly from a contaminated solution or after 5 passages without selection pressure in triplicate. Freshly prepared use solutions were contaminated to determine survival of isolates. Results 66 dispensers containing disinfectant solutions with surface-active ingredients were collected in 15 healthcare facilities. 28 dispensers from nine healthcare facilities were contaminated with approximately 107 cells per mL of Achromobacter species 3 (9 hospitals), Achromobacter xylosoxidans or Serratia marcescens (1 hospital each). In none of the hospitals dispenser processing had been adequately performed. Isolates regained susceptibility to the disinfectants after five passages without selection pressure but were still able to multiply in different formulations from different manufacturers at room temperature within 7 days. Conclusions Neglecting adequate processing of surface disinfectant dispensers has contributed to frequent and heavy contamination of use-solutions based on surface active ingredients. Tissue dispenser processing should be taken seriously in clinical practice. PMID:24447780

  6. [Optimizing surgical hand disinfection].

    PubMed

    Kampf, G; Kramer, A; Rotter, M; Widmer, A

    2006-08-01

    For more than 110 years hands of surgeons have been treated before a surgical procedure in order to reduce the bacterial density. The kind and duration of treatment, however, has changed significantly over time. Recent scientific evidence suggests a few changes with the aim to optimize both the efficacy and the dermal tolerance. Aim of this article is the presentation and discussion of new insights in surgical hand disinfection. A hand wash should be performed before the first disinfection of a day, ideally at least 10 min before the beginning of the disinfection as it has been shown that a 1 min hand wash significantly increases skin hydration for up to 10 min. The application time may be as short as 1.5 min depending on the type of hand rub. Hands and forearms should be kept wet with the hand rub for the recommended application time in any case. A specific rub-in procedure according to EN 12791 has been found to be suitable in order to avoid untreated skin areas. The alcohol-based hand rub should have a proven excellent dermal tolerance in order to ensure appropriate compliance. Considering these elements in clinical practice can have a significant impact to optimize the high quality of surgical hand disinfection for prevention of surgical site infections.

  7. CHLORINE DISINFECTION OF AEROMONAS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The bacterial genus Aeromonas is currently listed on the USEPA's Candidate Contaminant List (CCL). Resistance to chemical disinfection is an essential aspect regarding all microbial groups listed on the CCL. This study was designed to determine the inactivation kinetics of Aeromo...

  8. In vitro study on the disinfectability of two split-septum needle-free connection devices using different disinfection procedures

    PubMed Central

    Engelhart, Steffen; Exner, Martin; Simon, Arne

    2015-01-01

    This in vitro study investigated the external disinfection of two needle-free connection devices (NFC) using Octeniderm® (spraying and wiping technique) vs. Descoderm® pads (wiping technique). The split-septum membrane of the NFC was contaminated with >105 CFU K. pneumoniae or S. epidermidis. The efficacy of the disinfection at 30 sec. exposure time was controlled by taking a swab sample and by flushing the NFC with sterile 0.9% sodium chloride solution. Disinfection with octenidine dihydrochloride 0.1 g, 1-Propanol 30.0 g, and 2-Propanol 45.0 g in 100 g solution was highly effective (CFU reduction ≥4 log) against both microorganisms, whereas the use of 63.1 g 2-Propanol in 100 ml solution led to residual contamination with S. epidermidis. Our investigation underlines that (i) in clinical practice disinfection of NFCs before use is mandatory, and that (ii) details of disinfection technique are of utmost importance regarding their efficacy. Our investigation revealed no significant differences between both split-septum NFC types. Clinical studies are needed to confirm a possible superiority of disinfectants with long-lasting residual antimicrobial activity. PMID:26693394

  9. Multi-purpose silastic dual-lumen central venous catheters for both collection and transplantation of hematopoietic progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Lazarus, H M; Trehan, S; Miller, R; Fox, R M; Creger, R J; Raaf, J H

    2000-04-01

    Autologous peripheral blood progenitor cell (PBPC) transplantation frequently requires sequential placement and use of two separate central venous catheters: (1) a short-term, large-bore, stiff device inserted for leukapheresis, and after removal of that device, (2) a long-term, multi-lumen, flexible, Silastic catheter for administration of high-dose chemotherapy, re-infusion of hematopoietic cells, and intensive supportive care. We reviewed our recent experience with two dual-lumen, large-bore, Silastic multi-purpose ('hybrid') catheters, each of which can be used as a single device for both leukapheresis and long-term supportive care throughout the transplant process. Quinton-Raaf PermCath and Bard-Hickman hemodialysis/apheresis dual-lumen catheters were used as the sole venous access device in 112 consecutive patients who underwent autologous PBPC collection and transplantation. The catheter exit site was monitored three times a week, and lumen patency was assessed using clinical and radiologic techniques. Catheters were removed prematurely for persistent thrombus, positive blood cultures despite appropriate antibiotics, or mechanical dysfunction. There were no intra-operative or immediate post-operative complications relating to insertion. Thirty-two patients experienced catheter occlusion necessitating urokinase instillation. Persistent occlusive problems were noted in 16 patients, and in 10 patients the catheter had to be removed. Two exit site infections and 17 bacteremias occurred. Catheters had to be removed for persistent infection in two subjects and for mechanical problems in five others. Cost analysis comparing the hybrid catheters alone vs conventional devices revealed a charge of $4230 in patients with hybrid catheters vs. $7530 in those requiring a temporary non-Silastic dialysis catheter in addition to a flexible, long-term Silastic catheter. Hybrid, Silastic, dual-lumen, large-bore central venous catheters are safe, cost-effective and convenient

  10. Use of Hydrogen Peroxide to Disinfect Hydroponic Plant Growth Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barta, Daniel J.; Henderson, Keith

    2000-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide was studied as an alternative to conventional bleach and rinsing methods to disinfect hydroponic plant growth systems. A concentration of 0.5% hydrogen peroxide was found to be effective. Residual hydrogen peroxide can be removed from the system by repeated rinsing or by flowing the solution through a platinum on aluminum catalyst. Microbial populations were reduced to near zero immediately after treatment but returned to pre-disinfection levels 2 days after treatment. Treating nutrient solution with hydrogen peroxide and planting directly into trays being watered with the nutrient solution without replenishment, was found to be detrimental to lettuce germination and growth.

  11. Effects of disinfectants in renal dialysis patients

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, E.

    1986-11-01

    Patients receiving hemodialysis therapy risk exposure to both disinfectants and sterilants. Dialysis equipment is disinfected periodically with strong solutions of hypochlorite or formaldehyde. Gross hemolysis resulting from accidental hypochlorite infusion has led to cardiac arrest, probably as a result of hyperkalemia. Formaldehyde is commonly used in 4% solutions to sterilize the fluid paths of dialysis controllers and to sterilize dialyzers before reuse. It can react with red cell antigenic surfaces leading to the formation of anti-N antibodies. The major exposure risk is the low concentration of disinfectant found in municipal water used to prepare 450 L dialysate weekly. With thrice-weekly treatment schedules, the quality requirements for water used to make this solution must be met rigorously. Standards for water used in the preparation of dialysate have recently been proposed but not all patients are treated with dialysate meeting such standards. The introduction of sterilants via tap water is insidious and has let to more pervasive consequences. Both chlorine and chloramines, at concentrations found in potable water, are strong oxidants that cause extensive protein denaturation and hemolysis. Oxidation of the Fe/sup 2 +/ in hemoglobin to Fe/sup 3 +/ forms methemoglobin, which is incapable of carrying either O/sub 2/ or CO/sub 2/. Chloramine can form not only methemoglobin, but can also denature proteins within the red cell, thus forming aggregates (Heinz bodies). Chloramines also inhibit hexose monophosphate shunt activity, a mechanism that makes the red cell even more susceptible to oxidant damage.

  12. Genetic algorithms optimization of hedging rules for operation of the multi-purpose Ubonratana Reservoir in Thailand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiamsathit, C.; Adeloye, A. J.; Soudharajan, B.

    2014-09-01

    This study has developed optimal hedging policies for the multi-purpose Ubonratana Reservoir in northeastern Thailand based on its existing rule curves. The hedging policy was applied whenever the reservoir storage falls below a critical level for each month of the year. The decision variables, i.e. the set of monthly storages defining the critical rule curve that triggers rationing and the rationing ratio, were optimized by genetic algorithm (GA). Both single stage (i.e. with one critical rule curve and one rationing ratio) and two-stage (with two critical rule curves and ratios) of the hedging policy were considered in the optimization. To test the effect of the optimized hedging policies on reservoir performance, simulations were carried out, forced alternatively with the existing rule curves (i.e. without hedging) and the two optimized hedging policies. Performance was summarized in terms of reliability (time- and volume-based) and vulnerability. The results showed that the vulnerability was significantly reduced by using the optimized hedging rules. However, the number of water shortages increased with the optimized rules, causing the time-based reliability to worsen significantly. This should not be of concern since, although the number of shortages increased, the associated shortage quantities on most of these additional occasions were small, leaving the volumetric reliability largely unchanged.

  13. Iodine Tagging Velocimetry and Mechanism in the Hypersonic Near Wake of a MultiPurpose Crew Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balla, R. Jeffrey

    2013-01-01

    This study demonstrates a new molecular tagging velocimetry (MTV) method for velocity measurements of high speed flow. It demonstrates offbody Iodine Tagging Velocimetry (ITV) in the hypersonic near wake of a MultiPurpose Crew Vehicle (MPCV) model. Experiments are performed in the NASA-Langley 31-inch Mach 10 air wind tunnel. A 0.5% I2 / N2 mixture is seeded on the leeward backshell of the model using a pressure tap. I2 laser-induced fluorescence is excited along a 5.5 mm line using an ArF excimer laser near 193 nm. Results indicate I2 absorbs at least 2 photons to produce iodine ions and electrons. These recombine as the tagged region is displaced downstream to produce I (2P3/2) whose emission is monitored at 206 nm. Results at P0 = 2.41 MPa (350 psi), T0 = 990K, and 10 micro-sec transit times produce velocities from 630-820 m/sec across the I2 seeded jet at a distance of 38.2 mm (25.5 jet diameters) downstream from the jet orifice. Maximum wake jet velocities near the shear layer are 59% of freestream velocity.

  14. Resistance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolates to Hydrogel Contact Lens Disinfection Correlates with Cytotoxic Activity

    PubMed Central

    Lakkis, Carol; Fleiszig, Suzanne M. J.

    2001-01-01

    One of the most common pathogens in infection of hydrogel contact lens wearers is Pseudomonas aeruginosa, which can gain access to the eye via contamination of the lens, lens case, and lens care solutions. Only one strain per species is used in current regulatory testing for the marketing of chemical contact lens disinfectants. The aim of this study was to determine whether P. aeruginosa strains vary in their susceptibility to hydrogel contact lens disinfectants. A method for rapidly screening bacterial susceptibility to contact lens disinfectants was developed, based on measurement of the MIC. The susceptibility of 35 P. aeruginosa isolates to two chemical disinfectants was found to vary among strains. MICs ranged from 6.25 to 100% for both disinfectants at 37°C, and a number of strains were not inhibited by a 100% disinfectant concentration in the lens case environment at room temperature (22°C). Resistance to disinfection appeared to be an inherent rather than acquired trait, since some resistant strains had been isolated prior to the introduction of the disinfectants and some susceptible P. aeruginosa strains could not be made more resistant by repeated disinfectant exposure. A number of P. aeruginosa strains which were comparatively more resistant to short-term disinfectant exposure also demonstrated the ability to grow to levels above the initial inoculum in one chemical disinfectant after long-term (24 to 48 h) disinfectant exposure. Resistance was correlated with acute cytotoxic activity toward corneal epithelial cells and with exsA, which encodes a protein that regulates cytotoxicity via a complex type III secretion system. These results suggest that chemical disinfection solutions may select for contamination with cytotoxic strains. Further investigation of the mechanisms and factors responsible for resistance may also lead to strategies for reducing adverse responses to contact lens wear. PMID:11283074

  15. In vitro-in vivo sequence studies as a method of selecting the most efficacious alcohol-based solution for hygienic hand disinfection.

    PubMed

    Herruzo, R; Vizcaino, M J; Herruzo, I

    2010-05-01

    The use of alcohol-based hand rubs serves to reduce hospital-acquired infections. Many products of this type are now on offer and it is essential to know how to rank their efficacy. A sequence of tests is proposed here to compare any given new alcohol-based solution against the reference solution (60% 2-isopropyl-alcohol) with 30 s of contact time: (i) in vitro (with pig skin as carrier) testing of >30 species of microorganism; (ii) in vitro assessment of residual efficacy (after 30 min of drying); (iii) in vivo study of transient microbiota (modification of the EN 1500 standard procedure) using four ATCC strains; (iv) in vivo study of resident hand microbiota. After performing the in vitro evaluation of seven alcohol-based hand rubs, the two most efficacious (chlorhexidine-quac-alcohol and mecetronium- alcohol) were chosen and studied, comparatively with the reference solution (60% isopropyl alcohol), in vitro (for chemical sustainability on the skin) and in vivo (against transient and resident microbiota). Chlorhexidine-quac-alcohol proved to be significantly superior to mecetronium-alcohol or the reference solution in all tests, except against resident microbiota for which the improvement was not statistically significant.

  16. Commercial Disinfectants During Disinfection Process Validation: More Failures than Success

    PubMed Central

    Chumber, Sushil Kumar; Khanduri, Uma

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Disinfection process validation is mandatory before introduction of a new disinfectant in hospital services. Commercial disinfection brands often question existing hospital policy claiming greater efficacy and lack of toxicity of their products. Inadvertent inadequate disinfection leads to morbidity, patient’s economic burden, and the risk of mortality. Aim To evaluate commercial disinfectants for high, intermediate and low-level disinfection so as to identify utility for our routine situations. Materials and Methods This laboratory based experiment was conducted at St Stephen Hospital, Delhi during July-September 2013. Twelve commercial disinfectants: Sanidex®, Sanocid®, Cidex®, SekuSept Aktiv®, BIB Forte®, Alprojet W®, Desnet®, Sanihygiene®, Incidin®, D125®, Lonzagard®, and Glutishield® were tested. Time-kill assay (suspension test) was performed against six indicator bacteria (Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Salmonella Typhi, Bacillus cereus, and Mycobacterium fortuitum). Low and high inoculum (final concentrations 1.5X106 and 9X106 cfu/ml) of the first five bacteria while only low level of M. fortuitum was tested. Results Cidex® (2.4% Glutaraldehyde) performed best as high level disinfectant while newer quarternary ammonium compounds (QACs) (Incidin®, D125®, and Lonzagard®) were good at low level disinfection. Sanidex® (0.55% Ortho-pthalaldehyde) though mycobactericidal took 10 minutes for sporicidal activity. Older QAC containing BIB Forte® and Desnet® took 20 minutes to fully inhibit P. aeruginosa. All disinfectants effectively reduced S. Typhi to zero counts within 5 minutes. Conclusion Cidex® is a good high-level disinfectant while newer QACs (Incidin®, D125®, and Lonzagard®) were capable low-level disinfectants. PMID:27656441

  17. The higher disinfectant resistance of nosocomial isolates of Klebsiella oxytoca: how reliable are indicator organisms in disinfectant testing?

    PubMed

    Gebel, J; Sonntag, H-G; Werner, H-P; Vacata, V; Exner, M; Kistemann, T

    2002-04-01

    The Children's Clinic in Giessen, Germany recently reported several severe infections with Klebsiella oxytoca resulting in deaths of two neonates. The putative source of the infections was a contaminated infusion solution. The resistance to disinfectant of the K. oxytoca isolates was investigated in three independent laboratories and was indeed found to be significantly increased. Comparative tests with standard strains of K. oxytoca and other recommended bacterial surrogates showed the disinfection procedures used were fully effective. The higher resistance of the nosocomial isolates may have developed due to improper handling and storage of the cleaning utensils. This report describes the events and draws conclusions concerning the use of disinfectants, the treatment of cleaning utensils, the reliability of procedures for testing disinfectants, and suggests additional measures.

  18. Multi-time scale Climate Informed Stochastic Hybrid Simulation-Optimization Model (McISH model) for Multi-Purpose Reservoir System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, M.; Lall, U.

    2013-12-01

    In order to mitigate the impacts of climate change, proactive management strategies to operate reservoirs and dams are needed. A multi-time scale climate informed stochastic model is developed to optimize the operations for a multi-purpose single reservoir by simulating decadal, interannual, seasonal and sub-seasonal variability. We apply the model to a setting motivated by the largest multi-purpose dam in N. India, the Bhakhra reservoir on the Sutlej River, a tributary of the Indus. This leads to a focus on timing and amplitude of the flows for the monsoon and snowmelt periods. The flow simulations are constrained by multiple sources of historical data and GCM future projections, that are being developed through a NSF funded project titled 'Decadal Prediction and Stochastic Simulation of Hydroclimate Over Monsoon Asia'. The model presented is a multilevel, nonlinear programming model that aims to optimize the reservoir operating policy on a decadal horizon and the operation strategy on an updated annual basis. The model is hierarchical, in terms of having a structure that two optimization models designated for different time scales are nested as a matryoshka doll. The two optimization models have similar mathematical formulations with some modifications to meet the constraints within that time frame. The first level of the model is designated to provide optimization solution for policy makers to determine contracted annual releases to different uses with a prescribed reliability; the second level is a within-the-period (e.g., year) operation optimization scheme that allocates the contracted annual releases on a subperiod (e.g. monthly) basis, with additional benefit for extra release and penalty for failure. The model maximizes the net benefit of irrigation, hydropower generation and flood control in each of the periods. The model design thus facilitates the consistent application of weather and climate forecasts to improve operations of reservoir systems. The

  19. The effect of immersion disinfection procedures on dimensional stability of two elastomeric impression materials.

    PubMed

    Melilli, Dario; Rallo, Antonio; Cassaro, Angelo; Pizzo, Giuseppe

    2008-12-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effect of immersion disinfection procedures on the dimensional stability of two elastomeric impression materials. Impressions of a stainless steel die were made with polyether (PE) and with addition-polymerized silicone rubber (PVS). The test specimens underwent disinfection treatment by immersion in two commercially available solutions containing quaternary ammonium compounds (Sterigum Powder, SP) and glutaraldehyde plus an amino derivative (MD520, MD), respectively. The impressions were measured at 4 different time points: before any disinfection treatment (T0); after the first disinfection (T1); 6 hours after the first disinfection (T2); after the second disinfection, carried out 6 hours after the first one (T3). Impressions which were not disinfected served as controls. When both impression materials were disinfected with SP, significant differences were detected among all measurements (P < 0.0001), with the exception of T2 vs T3 (P > 0.05). On the other hand, when MD was used, significant differences were found when T0 measurement was compared to T1, T2 and T3 measurements (P = 0.0043 for PE, and P = 0.0014 for PVS). The dimensional change of all material/disinfectant combinations was always disinfection on the dimension of elastomers in SP or MD are not clinically relevant.

  20. Impact of virus aggregation on inactivation by peracetic acid and implications for other disinfectants.

    PubMed

    Mattle, Michael J; Crouzy, Benoit; Brennecke, Moritz; Wigginton, Krista R; Perona, Paolo; Kohn, Tamar

    2011-09-15

    Viruses in wastewater and natural environments are often present as aggregates. The disinfectant dose required for their inactivation, however, is typically determined with dispersed viruses. This study investigates how aggregation affects virus inactivation by chemical disinfectants. Bacteriophage MS2 was aggregated by lowering the solution pH, and aggregates were inactivated by peracetic acid (PAA). Aggregates were redispersed before enumeration to obtain the residual number of individual infectious viruses. In contrast to enumerating whole aggregates, this approach allowed an assessment of disinfection efficiency which remains applicable even if the aggregates disperse in post-treatment environments. Inactivation kinetics were determined as a function of aggregate size (dispersed, 0.55 and 0.90 μm radius) and PAA concentration (5-103 mg/L). Aggregation reduced the apparent inactivation rate constants 2-6 fold. The larger the aggregate and the higher the PAA concentration, the more pronounced the inhibitory effect of aggregation on disinfection. A reaction-diffusion based model was developed to interpret the experimental results, and to predict inactivation rates for additional aggregate sizes and disinfectants. The model showed that the inhibitory effect of aggregation arises from consumption of the disinfectant within the aggregate, but that diffusion of the disinfectant into the aggregates is not a rate-limiting factor. Aggregation therefore has a large inhibitory effect if highly reactive disinfectants are used, whereas inactivation by mild disinfectants is less affected. Our results suggest that mild disinfectants should be used for the treatment of water containing viral aggregates.

  1. Monte Carlo simulations of gamma-ray space telescopes: a BoGEMMS multi-purpose application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fioretti, Valentina; Bulgarelli, Andrea; Tavani, Marco; Marisaldi, Martino; Sabatini, Sabina; Malaguti, Giuseppe; Trifoglio, Massimo; Gianotti, Fulvio

    2014-07-01

    After the development of a BoGEMMS (Bologna Geant4 Multi-Mission Simulator) template for the background study of X-ray telescopes, a new extension is built for the simulation of a Gamma-ray space mission (e.g. AGILE, Fermi), conceived to work as a common, multi-purpose framework for the present and future electron tracking gamma-ray space telescopes. The Gamma-ray extension involves the Geant4 mass model, the physics list and, more important, the production and treatment of the simulation output. From the user point of view, the simulation set-up follows a tree structure, with the main level being the selection of the simulation framework (the general, X-ray or gamma-ray application) and the secondary levels being the detailed configuration of the geometry and the output format. The BoGEMMS application to Gamma-ray missions has been used to evaluate the instrument performances of a new generation of Gamma-ray telescopes (e.g. Gamma-Light), and a full simulation of the AGILE mission is currently under construction, to scientifically validate and calibrate the simulator with real in-space data sets. A complete description of the BoGEMMS Gamma-ray framework is presented here, with an overview of the achieved results for the potential application to present and future experiments (e.g., GAMMA-400 and Gamma-Light). The evaluation of the photon conversion efficiency to beta particle pairs and the comparison to tabulated data allows the preliminary physical validation of the overall architecture. The Gamma-ray module application for the study of the Gamma-Light instrument performances is reported as reference test case.

  2. Mechanisms of actions of sodium hypochlorite in cleaning and disinfection processes.

    PubMed

    Fukuzaki, Satoshi

    2006-12-01

    Sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) is the most widely used disinfectant in the food industry despite the increasing availability of other disinfectants. Sodium hypochlorite fulfills many requirements as the ideal disinfectant and furthermore it has an excellent cleaning action. The effectiveness of sodium hypochlorite in the cleaning and disinfection processes depends on the concentration of available chlorine and the pH of the solution. Hypochlorous acid (HOCl) is a weak acid and dissociates to the hypochlorite ion (-OCl) and proton (H+) depending on the solution pH. It is generally believed that HOCl is the active species in the germicidal action, whereas the concentration of -OCl is a key factor determining the cleaning efficiency. This implies that the optimal pH region of the germicidal activity of sodium hypochlorite differs from that of its cleaning activity. This paper describes the theory and practice of the cleaning and disinfecting operations based on the use of sodium hypochlorite solution.

  3. 9 CFR 91.18 - Cleaning and disinfection of transport carriers for export.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Cleaning and disinfection of transport....18 Cleaning and disinfection of transport carriers for export. All fittings, utensils and equipment... prepared solution of: (a) Sodium carbonate (4 percent) in the proportion of 1 pound to 3 gallons of...

  4. 9 CFR 91.18 - Cleaning and disinfection of transport carriers for export.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Cleaning and disinfection of transport....18 Cleaning and disinfection of transport carriers for export. All fittings, utensils and equipment... prepared solution of: (a) Sodium carbonate (4 percent) in the proportion of 1 pound to 3 gallons of...

  5. Effect of well disinfection on arsenic in ground water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gotkowitz, M.; Ellickson, K.; Clary, A.; Bowman, G.; Standridge, J.; Sonzogni, W.

    2008-01-01

    Domestic water wells are routinely subjected to in situ chemical disinfection treatments to control nuisance or pathogenic bacteria. Most treatments are chlorine based and presumably cause strongly oxidizing conditions in the wellbore. Water resource managers in Wisconsin were concerned that such treatments might facilitate release of arsenic from sulfide minerals disseminated within a confined sandstone aquifer. To test this hypothesis, a well was subjected to four disinfection treatments over 9 months time. The first treatment consisted of routine pumping of the well without chemical disinfection; three subsequent treatments included chlorine disinfection and pumping. Pretreatment arsenic concentrations in well water ranged from 7.4 to 18 ??g/L. Elevated arsenic concentrations up to 57 ??g/L in the chemical treatment solutions purged from the well are attributed to the disintegration or dissolution of biofilms or scale. Following each of the four treatments, arsenic concentrations decreased to less than 10 ??g/L during a period of pumping. Arsenic concentrations generally returned to pretreatment levels under stagnant, nonpumping conditions imposed following each treatment. Populations of iron-oxidizing, heterotrophic, and sulfate-reducing bacteria decreased following chemical treatments but were never fully eradicated from the well. Strongly oxidizing conditions were induced by the chlorine-based disinfections, but the treatments did not result in sustained increases in well water arsenic. Results suggest that disruption of biofilm and mineral deposits in the well and the water distribution system in tandem with chlorine disinfection can improve water quality in this setting. ?? 2008 The Author(s).

  6. Effects of Disinfectants on Larval Development of Ascaris suum Eggs.

    PubMed

    Oh, Ki-Seok; Kim, Geon-Tae; Ahn, Kyu-Sung; Shin, Sung-Shik

    2016-02-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of several different commercial disinfectants on the embryogenic development of Ascaris suum eggs. A 1-ml aliquot of each disinfectant was mixed with approximately 40,000 decorticated or intact A. suum eggs in sterile tubes. After each treatment time (at 0.5, 1, 5, 10, 30, and 60 min), disinfectants were washed away, and egg suspensions were incubated at 25˚C in distilled water for development of larvae inside. At 3 weeks of incubation after exposure, ethanol, methanol, and chlorohexidin treatments did not affect the larval development of A. suum eggs, regardless of their concentration and treatment time. Among disinfectants tested in this study, 3% cresol, 0.2% sodium hypochlorite and 0.02% sodium hypochlorite delayed but not inactivated the embryonation of decorticated eggs at 3 weeks of incubation, because at 6 weeks of incubation, undeveloped eggs completed embryonation regardless of exposure time, except for 10% povidone iodine. When the albumin layer of A. suum eggs remained intact, however, even the 10% povidone iodine solution took at least 5 min to reasonably inactivate most eggs, but never completely kill them with even 60 min of exposure. This study demonstrated that the treatment of A. suum eggs with many commercially available disinfectants does not affect the embryonation. Although some disinfectants may delay or stop the embryonation of A. suum eggs, they can hardly kill them completely.

  7. Effects of Disinfectants on Larval Development of Ascaris suum Eggs

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Ki-Seok; Kim, Geon-Tae; Ahn, Kyu-Sung; Shin, Sung-Shik

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of several different commercial disinfectants on the embryogenic development of Ascaris suum eggs. A 1-ml aliquot of each disinfectant was mixed with approximately 40,000 decorticated or intact A. suum eggs in sterile tubes. After each treatment time (at 0.5, 1, 5, 10, 30, and 60 min), disinfectants were washed away, and egg suspensions were incubated at 25˚C in distilled water for development of larvae inside. At 3 weeks of incubation after exposure, ethanol, methanol, and chlorohexidin treatments did not affect the larval development of A. suum eggs, regardless of their concentration and treatment time. Among disinfectants tested in this study, 3% cresol, 0.2% sodium hypochlorite and 0.02% sodium hypochlorite delayed but not inactivated the embryonation of decorticated eggs at 3 weeks of incubation, because at 6 weeks of incubation, undeveloped eggs completed embryonation regardless of exposure time, except for 10% povidone iodine. When the albumin layer of A. suum eggs remained intact, however, even the 10% povidone iodine solution took at least 5 min to reasonably inactivate most eggs, but never completely kill them with even 60 min of exposure. This study demonstrated that the treatment of A. suum eggs with many commercially available disinfectants does not affect the embryonation. Although some disinfectants may delay or stop the embryonation of A. suum eggs, they can hardly kill them completely. PMID:26951988

  8. Sanitizers and Disinfectants Guide. Revised

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Healthy Schools Network, Inc., 2012

    2012-01-01

    Sanitizers and disinfectants can play an important role in protecting public health. They are designed to kill "pests," including infectious germs and other microorganisms such as bacteria, viruses, and fungi. Unfortunately, sanitizers and disinfectants also contain chemicals that are "pesticides." Exposure to persistent toxic…

  9. New Disinfection Agents for Water.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-03-01

    with HTH being the better disinfectant. In similar experiments involving Entamoeba invadens and Giardia Lamblia Compound I was more effective than...different and dependent upon the nature of the organism. Keywords: Water disinfections; N-Chloramines; HTH; Bacteria; Viruses; Protozoa; Giardia lamblia ; Stability in water; 3-Chloro-4,4-dimethy1-2-oxazolidinone; Calcium hypochlorite.

  10. DISINFECTION BYPRODUCTS: THE NEXT GENERATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Disinfection of drinking water is rightly hailed as a major public health triumph of the 20th Century. Before widespread disinfection of drinking water in the U.S. and Europe, millions of people died from infectious waterborne diseases, such as typhoid and cholera. The microbia...

  11. In-vitro analysis of the microbicidal activity of 6 contact lens care solutions

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Contact lens-related infections are often associated with inadequate contact lens hygiene, and therefore, contact lens care products should be able to sufficiently minimise the amount of pathogens that are responsible for these infections. In 2001, the EN ISO 14729 was introduced to ensure adequate disinfection efficacy of contact lens care solutions, but this norm has recently been criticised. Methods In this study, six frequently used contact lens care solutions were retested according to the Stand Alone Test of the EN ISO 14729 (2001). The Stand Alone Test is a quantitative suspension test. In addition, the products were tested in a modified setting adding an organic load. The load was a mixture of human blood serum, lysozyme, and mucine, which resembles tear fluid. Results The criteria of the Stand Alone Test recommended in EN ISO 14729 were only met by Aosept Plus. This 3% hydrogen-peroxide-based contact lens care solution attained a reduction factor of > 5 log units for bacteria and > 4 for fungi in all cases. Two further contact lens care solutions, Blue Vision and Optifree Replenish, met the criteria of a reduction factor of > 3 log units for bacteria and > 1 log unit for fungi, but only in the presence of artificial tear fluid. The three remaining products did not exhibit adequate disinfecting efficacy, at least against one of the tested microorganisms. Conclusions Through the observation that the artificial tear fluid used in this study influences the disinfecting efficacy of contact lens care solutions, especially that of multi-purpose solutions, in a different way than does albumin, mucine, or even the organic load suggested in EN ISO 14729, it becomes obvious that the test conditions in the EN ISO 14729 should be revised in order to create more realistic conditions, e.g., by using a more realistic artificial tear fluid. Furthermore, we suggest adapting the EN ISO 14729 to the European test hierarchy for chemical disinfectants and antiseptics

  12. Disinfection of pumice.

    PubMed

    Setz, J; Heeg, P

    1996-10-01

    Pumice is a potential source of infection for the dental technician and of cross-contamination between different dentures and patients. In this study, the number of microorganisms in two different combinations of pumice and disinfectant was compared with a conventional mixture of pumice and water. The results revealed that under practical conditions the mix of Steribim (pumice containing benzoic acid added by the manufacturer) with water reduced the number of bacteria by 99% compared with a mix of a conventional pumice and water. The addition of an antiseptic product that contained octenidine as active agent to conventional pumice reduced the number of microorganisms by 99.999%.

  13. Occurrence and exposures to disinfectants and disinfection by-products

    SciTech Connect

    Cumming, R.B.; Jolley, R.L.

    1992-01-01

    Disinfection by-products are associated with all chemical disinfectants. The concentration and toxic nature of the disinfection byproducts (DBPs) is a direct function of the chemical nature of the disinfectant itself and/or of the chemical reactions of the disinfectant with reaction substrates in the water, especially organic constituents. A principal advantage of biological and physical water treatment processes, such as filtration, is the lack of chemical reactions producing disinfectant-related DBPs. The use of the highest quality source water available is important for minimization of DBP formation. In lieu of such high quality water, improvement of water quality by removal of DBP precursors through filtration or other means before application of chemical disinfectants is important. Most, if not all, water treatment experts are aware of these simplistic axioms. In view of the increasing knowledge being developed concerning DBPs including the identification of new'' DBPs, prudence dictates minimization of DBP formation. Wholesome drinking water is perhaps the biggest economic bargain available to consumers. The cost-effectiveness of water quality improvement should be evaluated with that in mind.

  14. Occurrence and exposures to disinfectants and disinfection by-products

    SciTech Connect

    Cumming, R.B.; Jolley, R.L.

    1992-12-31

    Disinfection by-products are associated with all chemical disinfectants. The concentration and toxic nature of the disinfection byproducts (DBPs) is a direct function of the chemical nature of the disinfectant itself and/or of the chemical reactions of the disinfectant with reaction substrates in the water, especially organic constituents. A principal advantage of biological and physical water treatment processes, such as filtration, is the lack of chemical reactions producing disinfectant-related DBPs. The use of the highest quality source water available is important for minimization of DBP formation. In lieu of such high quality water, improvement of water quality by removal of DBP precursors through filtration or other means before application of chemical disinfectants is important. Most, if not all, water treatment experts are aware of these simplistic axioms. In view of the increasing knowledge being developed concerning DBPs including the identification of ``new`` DBPs, prudence dictates minimization of DBP formation. Wholesome drinking water is perhaps the biggest economic bargain available to consumers. The cost-effectiveness of water quality improvement should be evaluated with that in mind.

  15. Multi-destination and multi-purpose trip effects in the analysis of the demand for trips to a remote recreational site.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Espiñeira, Roberto; Amoako-Tuffour, Joe

    2009-06-01

    One of the basic assumptions of the travel cost method for recreational demand analysis is that the travel cost is always incurred for a single purpose recreational trip. Several studies have skirted around the issue with simplifying assumptions and dropping observations considered as nonconventional holiday-makers or as nontraditional visitors from the sample. The effect of such simplifications on the benefit estimates remains conjectural. Given the remoteness of notable recreational parks, multi-destination or multi-purpose trips are not uncommon. This article examines the consequences of allocating travel costs to a recreational site when some trips were taken for purposes other than recreation and/or included visits to other recreational sites. Using a multi-purpose weighting approach on data from Gros Morne National Park, Canada, we conclude that a proper correction for multi-destination or multi-purpose trip is more of what is needed to avoid potential biases in the estimated effects of the price (travel-cost) variable and of the income variable in the trip generation equation.

  16. Dental unit waterlines disinfection using hypochlorous acid-based disinfectant

    PubMed Central

    Shajahan, Irfana Fathima; Kandaswamy, D; Srikanth, Padma; Narayana, L Lakshmi; Selvarajan, R

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of the study was to investigate the efficacy of a new disinfectant to disinfect the dental unit waterlines. Materials and Methods: New dental unit waterlines were installed in 13 dental chairs, and biofilm was allowed to grow for 10 days. Disinfection treatment procedure was carried out in the 12 units, and one unit was left untreated. The dental unit waterlines were removed and analyzed using the scanning electron microscope (SEM) (TESCAN VEGA3 SBU). Result: On examination, SEM images showed that there was no slime layer or bacterial cells seen in any of the 12 cut sections obtained from the treated dental waterlines which mean that there was no evident of biofilm formation. Untreated dental unit waterlines showed a microbial colonization with continuous filamentous organic matrix. There was significant biofilm formation in the control tube relative to the samples. Conclusion: The tested disinfectant was found to be effective in the removal of biofilm from the dental unit waterlines. PMID:27563184

  17. Evaluation of the antimicrobial activity and dimensional alterations of alginate impression disinfectants.

    PubMed

    Semensato, Ana Paula Nocentini; Crosariol, Sonia Khouri; Marchini, Leonardo

    2009-09-01

    This paper offers a quantitative evaluation of the antimicrobial efficacy of eight different disinfection procedures for irreversible hydrocolloid impressions and the dimensional changes induced by them. Samples were collected immediately after impressions, after the disinfection procedures and over casts and analyzed for bacterial growth. Control, enzyme solutions, acetic acid and ultraviolet irradiation samples showed bacterial growth. Chlorhexidine and 1% sodium hypochlorite presented adequate antimicrobial activity, while 2% sodium hypochlorite solution showed the best results. Dimensional changes were similar to those of the controls in all the tested agents. The results indicated 2% hypochlorite was the most appropriate disinfectant tested.

  18. [Use of corrosion inhibitors during the sterilization and disinfection of medical instruments].

    PubMed

    Talalina, A S; Kochanova, L G; Anan'eva, A I; Romanova, A A

    1984-01-01

    The search of corrosion inhibitors reducing the corrosive action of the sterilizing and disinfecting media has been performed in order to protect instruments made of metals against corrosion during these processes. The program of the investigations includes potentiodynamic and potentiostatic measurements and full-scale tests. The infection of the sodium benzoate or potassium gluconate into the disinfecting chloramine solution and sterilizing hydrogene peroxide solution has been shown to improve the resistance to the corrosion for medical instruments made of carbon steel.

  19. Emergency Disinfection of Drinking Water

    MedlinePlus

    ... water service has been interrupted – like a hurricane, flood, or water pipe breakage – local authorities may recommend ... disinfect and test the well water after the flood. Contact your state or local health department for ...

  20. [Microbiological assesssment of efficiency chemothermal disinfection of blood contaminated hospital textiles].

    PubMed

    Röhm-Rodowald, Ewa; Jakimiak, Bozenna; Podgórska, Marta; Chojecka, Agnieszka

    2010-01-01

    Thermal disinfection should be applied to laundering procedures of hospital textiles contaminated with blood. Currently, there is an increasing number of hospital textiles composed of cotton-polyester blends that cannot endure high temperatures of thermal disinfection. Besides, decreasing the temperature of chemothermal disinfection enhances the possibility of micro-organisms to survive the laundering procedure. The aim of this study was to prepare a new method for the microbiological evaluation of disinfecting laundering procedures for hospital textiles contaminated with blood. The bactericidal activity of chemical disinfectants for chemothermal disinfection was determined by simulating a laundering procedure for hospital textiles in the laboratory according to procedure of National Institute of Hygiene - DF/05/03. Bioindicators cotton carriers inoculated with Enterococcus faecium were used for determinating the antibacterial effects for hospital textiles contaminated with blood. High concentrations of bovine albumin and/or sheep erythrocytes were used as substrate for simulating human blood. The results showed that the bactericidal activity of chemical disinfectants for chemothermal disinfection hospital textiles in the event of massive organic contamination--heavily soiled with blood, shall be evaluated using carrier test in following conditions: test organism- Enterococcus faecium, interfering substances--6 g/l bovine albumin solution added to preparation.

  1. Evaluation of commonly-used farm disinfectants in wet and dry models of Salmonella farm contamination.

    PubMed

    McLaren, Ian; Wales, Andrew; Breslin, Mark; Davies, Robert

    2011-02-01

    Two experimental models of Salmonella contamination were used in an attempt to mimic the conditions of disinfectant use on farms. A wet model, for conditions such as boot dips, used disinfectant application to a slurry of poultry faeces inoculated with Salmonella Enteritidis or Salmonella Typhimurium. A dry model, for disinfectant application to surfaces and equipment with adherent or residual organic material, used Salmonella-inoculated poultry faeces that were air-dried onto wooden dowels, immersed in disinfectant solution then left in air at room temperature overnight. All samples were subjected to a disinfectant neutralization step and resuscitation in broth, followed by Salmonella culture on semi-solid then indicator media. Disinfectants were tested at 0.5x, 1x and 2x the concentrations specified for the general control of bacterial pathogens on livestock premises in the UK (Defra General Orders rates). Chlorocresol-based disinfectants provided consistently high rates of Salmonella killing in both wet and dry tests. Formaldehyde-containing disinfectants showed very high efficacy in the dry test but were less effective in the shorter wet test, whereas the efficacy of glutaraldehyde without formaldehyde was variable between products. Other chemical classes tested (quaternary ammonium compounds, amphoteric surfactants, iodine preparations, peroxygens and a substituted phenol blend) were only moderately effective. They often required concentrations above General Orders rates to eliminate the test salmonellas, and frequently elimination was not achieved even under maximal conditions of concentration and exposure.

  2. Evaluation of properties of irreversible hydrocolloid impression materials mixed with disinfectant liquids

    PubMed Central

    Amalan, Arul; Ginjupalli, Kishore; Upadhya, Nagaraja

    2013-01-01

    Background: Addition of disinfectant to irreversible hydrocolloid impression materials can eliminate the disinfection step to avoid dimensional changes associated with it. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of various disinfectant mixing liquids on the properties of commercially available irreversible hydrocolloid impression materials. Materials and Methods: Four commercially available irreversible hydrocolloid impression materials (Zelgan, Vignette, Tropicalgin, and Algitex) were mixed with disinfectant liquid containing chlorhexidine (0.1 and 0.2%) and sodium hypochlorite (0.1 and 0.5%). After mixing with disinfectant liquids, materials were evaluated for pH changes during gelation, gelation time, flow, gel strength, permanent deformation and detail reproduction. Results: Significant changes in gelation time were observed in irreversible hydrocolloid impression materials upon mixing with disinfectant liquids. In general, chlorhexidine increased the gelation time, whereas sodium hypochlorite reduced it. However, no significant changes in the flow were observed both with chlorhexidine and sodium hypochlorite. Gel strength was found to decrease when mixed with chlorhexidine, whereas an increase in gel strength was observed upon mixing with sodium hypochlorite. Permanent deformation of the most irreversible hydrocolloid impression materials was below the specification limit even after mixing with disinfectant liquids. Sodium hypochlorite significantly reduced the surface detail reproduction, whereas no change in detail reproduction was observed with chlorhexidine. Conclusion: Chlorhexidine solution can be used to mix irreversible hydrocolloid impression materials in regular dental practice as it did not significantly alter the properties. This may ensure effective disinfection of impressions. PMID:23878566

  3. Toxicology of household cleaning products and disinfectants.

    PubMed

    Kore, A M; Kiesche-Nesselrodt, A

    1990-03-01

    Hundreds of different household cleaning products are available in homes, presenting potential hazards to pets. These products are complex mixtures of chemicals that vary widely in their toxic potential. Prevention of toxicoses in companion animals follows the same guidelines as those recommended for children: Keep cleaning products out of the reach of pets, do not leave open containers or solutions of cleaning products unattended where animals may get into them, make sure containers of cleaning products are tightly sealed and properly labeled, and dispose of any cleaning solutions promptly after use. If a companion animal has ingested or spilled a cleaning product or disinfectant on itself, it is very important to assess the potential hazard to the animal promptly. Many products contain warnings regarding the corrosive or irritation potential of the product and instructions on the label for preliminary action in the case of accidental oral, dermal, or ocular exposures in humans. These instructions can generally be followed initially until further information on the product can be obtained, although the recommendations on some product labels may be outdated. In general, the clinical management for toxicoses caused by cleaning products and disinfectants involves the prevention of further contact with the concentrated product through either dilution or bathing; emergency stabilization of the patient if clinical signs are present; instituting specific therapies, if available; and use of general supportive care.

  4. The Role of Combination Techniques in Maximizing the Utility of Precipitation Estimates from Several Multi-Purpose Remote-Sensing Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huffman, George J.; Adler, Robert F.; Bolvin, David T.; Curtis, Scott; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Multi-purpose remote-sensing products from various satellites have proved crucial in developing global estimates of precipitation. Examples of these products include low-earth-orbit and geosynchronous-orbit infrared (leo- and geo-IR), Outgoing Longwave Radiation (OLR), Television Infrared Operational Satellite (TIROS) Operational Vertical Sounder (TOVS) data, and passive microwave data such as that from the Special Sensor Microwave/ Imager (SSM/I). Each of these datasets has served as the basis for at least one useful quasi-global precipitation estimation algorithm; however, the quality of estimates varies tremendously among the algorithms for the different climatic regions around the globe.

  5. Spin Forming of an Aluminum 2219-T6 Aft Bulkhead for the Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle: Phase II Supplemental Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piascik, Robert S.; Squire, Michael D.; Domack, Marcia S.; Hoffman, Eric K.

    2015-01-01

    The principal focus of this project was to assist the Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle (MPCV) Program in developing a spin forming fabrication process for manufacture of the aft bulkhead of the pressure vessel. The spin forming process will enable a single piece aluminum (Al) 2219 aft bulkhead which will eliminate the current multiple piece welded construction, simplify fabrication, and lead to an enhanced design that will reduce vehicle weight by eliminating welds. Phase I of this assessment explored spin forming the single-piece forward pressure vessel bulkhead from aluminum-lithium 2195.

  6. Effect of different disinfecting procedures on the hardness and color stability of two maxillofacial elastomers over time

    PubMed Central

    ELENI, Panagiota N.; KROKIDA, Magdalini K.; POLYZOIS, Gregory L.; GETTLEMAN, Lawrence

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Disinfection procedures often cause deterioration in a maxillofacial prosthesis. Color and hardness alterations could lead to a replacement of the prosthesis. Material and Methods: An experimental chlorinated polyethylene (CPE) and a commercial polydimethyl siloxane (PDMS) sample were treated with four different disinfection procedures for a period which simulates 1 year of clinical service. The applied disinfection procedures included microwave exposure and immersion in three solutions, sodium hypochlorite, neutral soap and a commercial disinfecting soap. Shore A hardness (ΔΗ) and color differences (ΔΕ) were determined before and after each procedure. All data were analyzed by Two Way Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) and Tukey's post hoc tests at a level of α=0.05. Results: The samples presented significant alterations in color and hardness after the different disinfection treatments. The color differences (ΔΕ) were at least eye detectable in all cases and clinically unacceptable in most of the cases, with values ranging from 1.51 to 4.15 and from 1.54 to 5.92 for the PDMS and CPE material, respectively. Hardness was decreased after all the disinfection procedures in the PDMS, while for the CPE, a decrement was observed after disinfection with sodium hypochlorite and neutral soap and an increment after microwave exposure and the disinfection with a commercial antimicrobial agent. The PDMS samples presented greater alterations in color and hardness after disinfection with sodium hypochlorite solution, while the microwave exposure caused negligible effects. The CPE samples were affected most after disinfection when treated with neutral soap, and more slightly when disinfected with sodium hypochlorite solution. Conclusions: The disinfection procedures caused alterations in color and hardness of the examined materials. The most suitable disinfection procedure for the PDMS material is microwave exposure, while disinfection with sodium hypochlorite

  7. Health effects of drinking water disinfectants and disinfection by-products

    SciTech Connect

    Condie, L.W.; Bercz, J.P.

    1986-01-01

    This paper summarizes toxicological studies conducted with drinking water disinfectants. Toxicological effects, which are associated with the disinfectants themselves as well as with the by-products formed when disinfectants react with organic material present in water, are considered. The health impact of chemical reactions occurring between residual disinfectants and nutrients in the gastrointestinal tract is also discussed. 40 references, 5 tables.

  8. On the cause of the tailing phenomenon during virus disinfection by chlorine dioxide.

    PubMed

    Sigstam, Thérèse; Rohatschek, Andreas; Zhong, Qingxia; Brennecke, Moritz; Kohn, Tamar

    2014-01-01

    This study investigates the mechanisms underlying the deviation from Chick-Watson kinetics, namely a tailing curve, during the disinfection of viruses by chlorine dioxide (ClO2). Tailing has been previously reported, but is typically attributed to the decay in disinfectant concentration. Herein, it is shown that tailing occurs even at constant ClO2 concentrations. Four working hypothesis to explain the cause of tailing were tested, specifically changes in the solution's disinfecting capacity, aggregation of viruses, resistant virus subpopulations, and changes in the virus properties during disinfection. In experiments using MS2 as a model virus, it was possible to rule out the solution's disinfecting capacity, virus aggregation and the resistant subpopulation as reasons for tailing. Instead, the cause for tailing is the deposition of an adduct onto the virus capsid over the course of the experiment, which protects the viruses. This adduct could easily be removed by washing, which restored the susceptibility of the viruses to ClO2. This finding highlights an important shortcoming of ClO2, namely its self-limiting effect on virus disinfection. It is important to take this effect into account in treatment applications to ensure that the water is sufficiently disinfected before human consumption.

  9. Generation of ozone foam and its application for disinfection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiragaki, Keisuke; Ishimaru, Tomiya; Nakanishi, Masaru; Muraki, Ryouji; Nieda, Masanori; Yamabe, Chobei

    2015-07-01

    Generated ozone foam was applied to the disinfection of Pseudomonas fluorescens. The effect of disinfection has been confirmed experimentally and new equipment for the disinfection of hands using this ozone foam has been put on the market for the practical use. The ozone foam was produced in the foam generator after mixing the water including surfactant (30 mL/min) and air including ozone (1000 ppm = 2.14 g/m3 ~ 1600 ppm = 3.4 g/m3, 300 mL/min). The liquid-to-gas ratio is 100 L/m3. The concentration of dissolved ozone in the thin liquid films of the bubbles was about 3 mg/L which was measured by the chemical method of the KI absorption and titration of sodium thiosulfate solution. The disinfection test samples were prepared using the PET disk on which Pseudomonas fluorescens of its number of more than 108 were attached. Test sample was inserted into ozone foam set on the glass plate for one to 6 min. The survival rate log (N/N0 decreased with time and its value of about-2.6 (i.e., ~1/400) was obtained at 6 min (2 min × 3 times repeated). It was also confirmed that the ozone foam was useful for the disinfection of hands. For more effective disinfection (in case of taking a long time for foam melting), the ozone foam was broken by force and changed into ozone water by which the survival rate decreased ×4 (i.e., N/N0 = 1/10 000) at 4 ~ 6 min. Contribution to the topical issue "The 14th International Symposium on High Pressure Low Temperature Plasma Chemistry (HAKONE XIV)", edited by Nicolas Gherardi, Ronny Brandenburg and Lars Stollenwark

  10. The influence of storing alginate impressions sprayed with disinfectant on dimensional accuracy and deformation of maxillary edentulous stone models.

    PubMed

    Hiraguchi, Hisako; Kaketani, Masahiro; Hirose, Hideharu; Yoneyama, Takayuki

    2010-05-01

    This study investigated the effects of storing impressions for 3 hours after spraying them with a disinfectant solution on dimensional change and deformation of maxillary edentulous stone models. Three brands of alginate impression materials, characterized by a small degree of contraction in 100% relative humidity, were used. The spray disinfectants used were 1% sodium hypochlorite solution and 2% glutaraldehyde solution. A stone model taken from an impression that had not been sprayed or stored was prepared as a control. The results indicated that the differences in dimensional change between the control and disinfected stone models were less than 24 mum, and that no deformation was observed in the stone models.

  11. Preliminary SEM Observations on the Surface of Elastomeric Impression Materials after Immersion or Ozone Disinfection

    PubMed Central

    Prombonas, Anthony; Yannikakis, Stavros; Karampotsos, Thanasis; Katsarou, Martha-Spyridoula; Drakoulis, Nikolaos

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Surface integrity of dental elastomeric impression materials that are subjected to disinfection is of major importance for the quality of the final prosthetic restorations. Aim The aim of this qualitative Scanning Electronic Microscopy (SEM) study was to reveal the effects of immersion or ozone disinfection on the surface of four dental elastomeric impression materials. Materials and Methods Four dental elastomeric impression material brands were used (two vinyl polysiloxane silicones, one polyether, and one vinyl polyether silicone). Total of 32 specimens were fabricated, eight from each impression material. Specimens were immersion (0.525% sodium hypochlorite solution or 0.3% benzalkonium chloride solution) or ozone disinfected or served as controls and examined with SEM. Results Surface degradation was observed on several speci-mens disinfected with 0.525% sodium hypochlorite solution. Similar wavy-wrinkling surface structures were observed in almost all specimens, when treated either with 0.3% benzalkonium chloride solution or ozone. Conclusion The SEM images obtained from this study revealed that both immersion disinfectants and ozone show similar impression material surface alterations. Ozone seems to be non-inferior as compared to immersion disinfectants, but superior as to environmental protection. PMID:28208993

  12. Disinfection of Human Teeth for Educational Purposes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tate, William H.; White, Robert S.

    1991-01-01

    A study investigated the efficacy of glutaraldehyde and several other disinfectants for disinfecting teeth to be used for teaching and research, as an alternative to autoclaving for teeth with amalgam restorations. Results indicate that formalin was the only disinfectant that penetrated tooth pulp chambers in effective antimicrobial…

  13. [Drinking water decontamination with isolative sorbent disinfectants].

    PubMed

    Krasnov, M S

    2004-01-01

    Drinking water can be decontaminated with the use of isolative sorbent disinfectants. Consideration of the effectiveness of water disinfectants and the sorptive power of porous materials against bacteria and viruses attested to the favour of iodine and silver-containing disinfectants and their compositions on porous aggressive carriers to be employed in extreme conditions such as on board crewed space vehicles.

  14. Review of water disinfection techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colombo, Gerald V.; Sauer, Richard L.

    1987-01-01

    Throughout the history of manned space flight the supply of potable water to the astronauts has presented unique problems. Of particular concern has been the microbiological quality of the potable water. This has required the development of both preflight water system servicing procedures to disinfect the systems and inflight disinfectant addition and monitoring devices to ensure continuing microbiological control. The disinfectants successfully used to date have been aqueous chlorine or iodine. Because of special system limitations the use of iodine has been the most successful for inflight use and promises to be the agent most likely to be used in the future. Future spacecraft potable, hygiene, and experiment water systems will utilize recycled water. This will present special problems for water quality control. NASA is currently conducting research and development to solve these problems.

  15. Characterization of ozone disinfection of murine norovirus.

    PubMed

    Lim, Mi Young; Kim, Ju-Mi; Lee, Jung Eun; Ko, GwangPyo

    2010-02-01

    Despite the importance of human noroviruses (NoVs) in public health, little information concerning the effectiveness of ozone against NoVs is available. We determined the efficacy of ozone disinfection using murine norovirus (MNV) as a surrogate of human NoV. MNV in ozone demand-free buffer was exposed to a predetermined dose of ozone at two different pHs and temperatures. The virus remaining in the solution was analyzed by plaque assay, real-time TaqMan reverse transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR) (short template), and long-template conventional RT-PCR. Under all conditions, more than 99% of the MNV was inactivated by ozone at 1 mg/liter within 2 min. Both RT-PCR assays significantly underestimated the inactivation of MNV, compared with that measured by plaque assay. Our results indicate that NoV may be more resistant to ozone than has been previously reported. Nevertheless, proper ozone disinfection practices can be used to easily control its transmission in water.

  16. EPIDEMIOLOGIC STUDIES OF DISINFECTANTS AND DISINFECTANT BY-PRODUCTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This article provides a review of the epidemiologic evidence for human health effects that may be associated with the disinfection of drinking water. An epidemiologic study attempts to link human health effects with exposure to a specific agent (e.g., DBCM), agents (e.g., THMs or...

  17. [Disinfection of caliciviruses at 20 and 10 degrees C].

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, A; Kaleta, E F

    2003-07-01

    Five disinfectants, Venno FF super, Venno Vet 1 super, Venno Oxygen, M&Enno-Veterinär B neu und Neopredisan 135-1, were tested to evaluate their efficacy against caliciviruses at 20 and 10 degrees C. As model test virus served feline calicivirus type F9 (FCV F9). All disinfectants were tested according to Guidelines of the German Veterinary Association (DVG). The investigations were performed in suspension tests and germ carrier tests. The suspension tests were carried out without and with protein load. As protein was used foetal calf serum at the concentration of 40%. Venno FF super showed less protein dependence, however a considerable temperature dependence. This matter can be corrected by increase of concentration on 2%. Venno Vet 1 super was without protein especially effective. The losses on the effectiveness through low temperature and protein load can be annulled also here by increase of concentration. Venno Oxygen was more effective in the comparison to that here named both preparations. The effects of temperature can be corrected by extension of reaction time. The most effective preparation was M&Enno Veterinär B neu. The disinfection occurred at 20 degrees C with 0.5% solution within 120 min and at 10 degrees C with 1.0% solution within 60 min. The fifth disinfectant Neopredisan was in suspension tests without protein load and carrier tests with gauze at 20 and 10 degrees C relative convincing but in germ carrier tests with poplar wood, no complete disinfection could be achieved within tested concentrations and reaction times.

  18. Effect of mixing techniques on bacterial attachment and disinfection time of polyether impression material

    PubMed Central

    Guler, Umut; Budak, Yasemin; Ruh, Emrah; Ocal, Yesim; Canay, Senay; Akyon, Yakut

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was 2-fold. The first aim was to evaluate the effects of mixing technique (hand-mixing or auto-mixing) on bacterial attachment to polyether impression materials. The second aim was to determine whether bacterial attachment to these materials was affected by length of exposure to disinfection solutions. Materials and Methods: Polyether impression material samples (n = 144) were prepared by hand-mixing or auto-mixing. Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa were used in testing. After incubation, the bacterial colonies were counted and then disinfectant solution was applied. The effect of disinfection solution was evaluated just after the polymerization of impression material and 30 min after polymerization. Differences in adherence of bacteria to the samples prepared by hand-mixing and to those prepared by auto-mixing were assessed by Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U-tests. For evaluating the efficiency of the disinfectant, Kruskal-Wallis multiple comparisons test was used. Results: E. coli counts were higher in hand-mixed materials (P < 0.05); no other statistically significant differences were found between hand- and auto-mixed materials. According to the Kruskal-Wallis test, significant differences were found between the disinfection procedures (Z > 2.394). Conclusion: The methods used for mixing polyether impression material did not affect bacterial attachment to impression surfaces. In contrast, the disinfection procedure greatly affects decontamination of the impression surface. PMID:24966729

  19. Assessment of peracetic acid disinfected effluents by microbiotests.

    PubMed

    Antonelli, M; Mezzanotte, V; Panouillères, M

    2009-09-01

    Bioassays were performed by commercially available kits on peracetic acid (PAA) solutions, at different concentrations, and on secondary effluents (from two different wastewater treatment plants) after disinfection at bench-scale, considering both samples containing residual active PAA and the same samples where residual PAA was quenched. Four indicator organisms were used: Vibrio fischeri, Thamnocephalus platyurus, Daphnia magna, and Selenastrum capricornutum. The experiments lead to conclude that Thamnocephalus platyurus is a very sensitive organism, probably not adequate to perform a reliable toxicity assessment of effluents for monitoring purposes. The presence of specific organic compounds deriving from human metabolism and urban pollution, even at very low concentrations, can affect the results of bioassays, especially those performed on Vibrio fischeri. PAA is toxic for bacteria and crustaceans even at concentrations lower than the ones commonly used in wastewater disinfection (2-5 mg/L), while its effect on algae is smaller. The toxic effect on bacteria was expected, as PAA is used for disinfection, but its possible influence on biological processes in the receiving aquatic environment should be considered. Toxicity on crustaceans would confirm the fact that discharging disinfected effluents could raise some environmental problems.

  20. Recycled Water Poses Disinfectant Problem

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chemical and Engineering News, 1973

    1973-01-01

    Discusses the possible health hazards resulting from released nucleic acid of inactivated viruses, chlorinated nonliving organic molecules, and overestimated reliability of waste treatment standards. Suggests the recycle system use a dual disinfectant such as chlorine and ozone in water treatment. (CC)

  1. Postoutbreak disinfection of mobile equipment.

    PubMed

    Alphin, R L; Ciaverelli, C D; Hougentogler, D P; Johnson, K J; Rankin, M K; Benson, E R

    2010-03-01

    Current control strategies for avian influenza virus, exotic Newcastle disease, and other highly contagious poultry diseases include surveillance, quarantine, depopulation, disposal, and decontamination. Skid steer loaders and other mobile equipment are extensively used during depopulation and disposal. Movement of contaminated equipment has been implicated in the spread of disease in previous outbreaks. One approach to equipment decontamination is to power wash the equipment, treat with a liquid disinfectant, change any removable filters, and let it sit idle for several days. In this project, multiple disinfectant strategies were individually evaluated for their effectiveness at inactivating Newcastle disease virus (NDV) on mechanical equipment seeded with the virus. A small gasoline engine was used to simulate typical mechanical equipment. A high titer of LaSota strain, NDV was applied and dried onto a series of metal coupons. The coupons were then placed on both interior and exterior surfaces of the engine. Liquid disinfectants that had been effective in the laboratory were not as effective at disinfecting the engine under field conditions. Indirect thermal fog showed a decrease in overall virus titer or strength. Direct thermal fog was more effective than liquid spray application or indirect thermal fog application.

  2. Implications of changing water cycle for the performance and yield characteristics of the multi-purpose Beas Reservoir in India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adeloye, A. J.; Ojha, C. S.; Soundharajan, B.; Remesan, R.

    2013-12-01

    There is considerable change in both the spatial and temporal patterns of monsoon rainfall in India, with implications for water resources availability and security. 'Mitigating the Impacts of Climate Change on India Agriculture' (MICCI) is one of five on-going scientific efforts being sponsored as part of the UK-NERC/India-MOES Changing Water Cycle (South Asia) initiative to further the understanding of the problem and proffer solutions that are robust and effective. This paper focuses on assessing the implications of projected climate change on the yield and performance characteristics of the Pong Reservoir on the Beas River, Himachal Pradesh, India. The Pong serves both hydropower and irrigation needs and is therefore strategic for the socio-economic well-being of the region as well as sustaining the livelihoods of millions of farmers that rely on it for irrigation. Simulated baseline and climate-change perturbed hydro-climate scenarios developed as part of a companion Work Package of MICCI formed the basis of the analysis. For both of these scenarios, reservoir analyses were carried out using the Sequent Peak Algorithm (SPA) and Pong's existing level of releases to derive rule curves for the reservoir. These rule curves then formed the basis of further reservoir behaviour simulations in WEAP and the resulting performance of the reservoir was summarised in terms of reliability, resilience, vulnerability and sustainability. The whole exercise was implemented within a Monte Carlo framework for the benefit of characterising the variability in the assessments. The results show that the rule curves developed using future hydro-climate are significantly changed from the baseline in that higher storages will be required to be maintained in the Pong in the future to achieve reliable performance. As far as the overall performance of the reservoir is concerned, future reliability (both time-based and volume-based) is not significantly different from the baseline, provided

  3. Shear bond strength of composite resin to dentin after application of cavity disinfectants – SEM study

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Vivek; Rampal, Poonam; Kumar, Sukesh

    2011-01-01

    Aim: The aim was to evaluate the effect of different cavity disinfectants on dentin bond strengths of composite resin applied with two different adhesive systems. Materials and Methods: Two-hundred mandibular molars were sectioned parallel to the occlusal surface to expose dentin in the midcoronal one-third. The dentinal surfaces were polished with waterproof-polishing papers. The specimens were randomly divided into five groups of 40 teeth each as follows: group 1(control) -- specimens were not treated with any cavity disinfectants. Groups 2--5 (experimental groups) -- dentin surfaces were treated with the following cavity disinfectants, respectively; 2% chlorhexidine solution, 0.1% benzalkonium chloride-based disinfectant, 1% chlorhexidine gel, and an iodine potassium iodide/copper sulfate-based disinfectant. The specimens were then randomly divided into two subgroups including 20 teeth each to evaluate the effect of different bonding systems. Dentin bonding systems were applied to the dentin surfaces and the composite buildups were done. After the specimens were stored in an incubator for 24 hours, the shear bond strength was measured at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. The specimens were then statistically analyzed. Statistical Analysis Used: One way analysis of variance and Tukey-HSD tests were used. Results: There was no significant difference between chlorhexidine gel and control groups regardless of the type of the bonding agent used (P>0.05). On the other hand, pretreatment with benzalkonium chloride-based, iodine potassium iodide/copper sulfate-based disinfectants or chlorhexidine solutions had a negative effect on the shear bond strength of self-etching bonding systems. Conclusions: The findings of this study suggest that when benzalkonium chloride-based, iodine potassium iodide/copper sulfate-based disinfectants or chlorhexidine solutions are used as a cavity disinfectant, an etch-and-rinse bonding system should be preferred. PMID:22090756

  4. SU-E-J-47: Development of a High-Precision, Image-Guided Radiotherapy, Multi- Purpose Radiation Isocenter Quality-Assurance Calibration and Checking System

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, C; Yan, G; Helmig, R; Lebron, S; Kahler, D

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To develop a system that can define the radiation isocenter and correlate this information with couch coordinates, laser alignment, optical distance indicator (ODI) settings, optical tracking system (OTS) calibrations, and mechanical isocenter walkout. Methods: Our team developed a multi-adapter, multi-purpose quality assurance (QA) and calibration device that uses an electronic portal imaging device (EPID) and in-house image-processing software to define the radiation isocenter, thereby allowing linear accelerator (Linac) components to be verified and calibrated. Motivated by the concept that each Linac component related to patient setup for image-guided radiotherapy based on cone-beam CT should be calibrated with respect to the radiation isocenter, we designed multiple concentric adapters of various materials and shapes to meet the needs of MV and KV radiation isocenter definition, laser alignment, and OTS calibration. The phantom's ability to accurately define the radiation isocenter was validated on 4 Elekta Linacs using a commercial ball bearing (BB) phantom as a reference. Radiation isocenter walkout and the accuracy of couch coordinates, ODI, and OTS were then quantified with the device. Results: The device was able to define the radiation isocenter within 0.3 mm. Radiation isocenter walkout was within ±1 mm at 4 cardinal angles. By switching adapters, we identified that the accuracy of the couch position digital readout, ODI, OTS, and mechanical isocenter walkout was within sub-mm. Conclusion: This multi-adapter, multi-purpose isocenter phantom can be used to accurately define the radiation isocenter and represents a potential paradigm shift in Linac QA. Moreover, multiple concentric adapters allowed for sub-mm accuracy for the other relevant components. This intuitive and user-friendly design is currently patent pending.

  5. Effect of iodine disinfectant source and water quality parameters on soluble iodine speciation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silverstein, Joann; Hurst, Charles; Barkley, Robert; Dunham, Andrew

    1993-01-01

    Investigations of iodine species distribution of various aqueous solutions of iodine disinfectants and water from equilibrated suspensions of triodide and pentaiodide resins were done at the University of Colorado for the Center for Space Environmental Health during 1992 and 1993. Direct measurements of three individual iodine species: I(-), I2 and I3(-), were made. In addition three measures of total titratable iodine species were used. It has been found that I2 and I3(-) solutions produce a significant fraction of the non-disinfecting species iodine I(-), ranging from 50 to 80% of added iodine, respectively, at pH values of approximately 5. Correspondingly, I2 solutions produce more than twice the concentration of disinfecting iodine species per mass iodine dose than I3(-) solutions. Both I(-) and I2 species were found in aqeuous extracts of pentaiodide resin, although no soluble species were detected with triiodide resin.

  6. Factors in the Selection of Surface Disinfectants for Use in a Laboratory Animal Setting.

    PubMed

    Campagna, Michael V; Faure-Kumar, Emmanuelle; Treger, Janet A; Cushman, Jesse D; Grogan, Tristan R; Kasahara, Noriyuki; Lawson, Gregory W

    2016-03-01

    Because surface disinfectants are an important means of pathogen control within laboratory animal facilities, these products must have an appropriate spectrum of antimicrobial activity. However, many other factors must also be considered, including effects on human health, environmental safety, and animal behavior. Aqueous solutions of sodium hypochlorite often are considered to be the 'gold standard' for surface disinfection, but these products can be corrosive, caustic, and aversive in odor. This study was designed to identify disinfectants that are as effective as hypochlorite solutions but more acceptable for use in a laboratory animal setting. An antiviral disinfectant-efficacy assay was developed by using viral vectors that expressed green fluorescence protein as surrogates for wild-type viruses of concern in laboratory animals. Efficacy testing revealed that most of the products were highly effective when used against viral vectors in suspension. However, when the disinfectants were challenged by buffering virus in protein or drying virus on nonporous surfaces, the hypochlorite and peroxymonosulfate products performed the best. Review of safety data sheets for the agents indicated that a peroxide-based product was considerably safer than the other products tested and that the pH of most products was not conducive to disposal down a drain. Behavioral testing of Swiss Webster, C57Bl/6, and BALB/c mice showed that the hypochlorite- and peroxide-based products were clearly aversive, given that the mice consistently avoided these products. All of these factors must be considered when choosing the appropriate disinfectant.

  7. Factors in the Selection of Surface Disinfectants for Use in a Laboratory Animal Setting

    PubMed Central

    Campagna, Michael V; Faure-Kumar, Emmanuelle; Treger, Janet A; Cushman, Jesse D; Grogan, Tristan R; Kasahara, Noriyuki; Lawson, Gregory W

    2016-01-01

    Because surface disinfectants are an important means of pathogen control within laboratory animal facilities, these products must have an appropriate spectrum of antimicrobial activity. However, many other factors must also be considered, including effects on human health, environmental safety, and animal behavior. Aqueous solutions of sodium hypochlorite often are considered to be the ‘gold standard’ for surface disinfection, but these products can be corrosive, caustic, and aversive in odor. This study was designed to identify disinfectants that are as effective as hypochlorite solutions but more acceptable for use in a laboratory animal setting. An antiviral disinfectant-efficacy assay was developed by using viral vectors that expressed green fluorescence protein as surrogates for wild-type viruses of concern in laboratory animals. Efficacy testing revealed that most of the products were highly effective when used against viral vectors in suspension. However, when the disinfectants were challenged by buffering virus in protein or drying virus on nonporous surfaces, the hypochlorite and peroxymonosulfate products performed the best. Review of safety data sheets for the agents indicated that a peroxide-based product was considerably safer than the other products tested and that the pH of most products was not conducive to disposal down a drain. Behavioral testing of Swiss Webster, C57Bl/6, and BALB/c mice showed that the hypochlorite- and peroxide-based products were clearly aversive, given that the mice consistently avoided these products. All of these factors must be considered when choosing the appropriate disinfectant. PMID:27025810

  8. Comparison of disinfection byproduct formation from chlorine and alternative disinfectants.

    PubMed

    Hua, Guanghui; Reckhow, David A

    2007-04-01

    Seven diverse natural waters were collected and treated in the laboratory under five oxidation scenarios (chlorine, chloramine, both with and without preozonation, and chlorine dioxide). The impact of these disinfectants on the formation of disinfection byproducts was investigated. Results showed that preozonation decreased the formation of trihalomethanes (THMs), haloacetic acids (HAAs) and total organic halogen (TOX) for most waters during postchlorination. A net increase in THMs, HAAs and TOX was observed for a water of low humic content. Either decreases or increases were observed in dihaloacetic acids and unknown TOX (UTOX) as a result of preozonation when used with chloramination. Chloramines and chlorine dioxide produced a higher percentage of UTOX than free chlorine. They also formed more iodoform and total organic iodine (TOI) than free chlorine in the presence of iodide. Free chlorine produced a much higher level of total organic chlorine (TOCl) and bromine (TOBr) than chloramines and chlorine dioxide in the presence of bromide.

  9. DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCT FORMATION BY ALTERNATIVE DISINFECTANTS AND REMOVAL BY GRANULAR ACTIVATED CARBON

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effects of the use of the alternative disinfectants on the formation of halogenated disinfection by–products (DBPs) including total organic halide, trihalomethanes, haloacetic acids, haloacetonitriles, haloketones, chloral hydrate, and chloropicrin, were examined along ...

  10. The role and fate of inorganic nitrogen species during UVA/TiO₂ disinfection.

    PubMed

    Zuo, XiaoJun; Hu, Jiangyong; Chen, MinDong

    2015-09-01

    Inorganic nitrogen species have three states including ammonia nitrogen (NH4(+)/NH3), nitrite (NO2(-)) and nitrate (NO3(-)) and are often found in the disinfection system. However, no available literature could be found on their role and fate in photocatalytic disinfection systems. In this study, batch experiments were conducted to investigate bacteria inactivation, H2O2 generated and inorganic nitrogen variation to understand the role and fate of inorganic nitrogen species during UVA/TiO2 disinfection and evaluate effects of initial pH and bacteria levels on the role and fate. NH4(+)/NH3 and NO2(-) inhibited the photocatalytic disinfection process obviously. It could be confirmed through that H2O2 yield used for pathogen inactivation was dependent on NH4(+)/NH3 and NO2(-) levels. The NH4(+)/NH3 remaining, NH4(+) remaining and NO3(-) yields in only NH4(+)/NH3 photocatalytic oxidation experiments were obviously different from the corresponding values in the photocatalytic disinfection experiments with NH4(+)/NH3, which confirmed that photocatalytic disinfection had an obvious effect on the fate of NH4(+)/NH3. However, photocatalytic disinfection had slight effects on the fate of NO2(-) and NO3(-). Escherischia coli inactivation rate was the highest in neutral solutions (Initial pH 7) while the lowest in alkaline solutions (Initial pH 8.5). The decrease of NH4(+)/NH3 in alkaline solutions was the most significant. In turn, the photocatalysis of NO2(-) was more evident in acidic solutions. E. coli inactivation was reduced with the increase of initial E. coli concentrations. The initial bacteria concentrations significantly influenced the increase of NH4(+)/NH3, NH4(+) and NO3(-), but slightly impacted the decrease of NO2(-).

  11. The Multi-Purpose Astrolabe.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neie, Van E.

    1979-01-01

    Directions are given for construction of an astrolabe capable of yielding two celestial coordinates: altitude and azimuth. Potential uses are included for both young and older children. Quantitative measurement activities related to celestial motion and position are given. (SA)

  12. Evaluation of disinfection techniques for, and their effects on, rectal thermocouple catheters.

    PubMed

    MAHER, J T; ROGERS, M R; PETERSON, D W

    1961-07-01

    The antibacterial activities of an iodophor (Wescodyne G), a quaternary ammonium compound (Roccal), and an iodine tincture as agents for the cold disinfection of rectal catheters contaminated in vitro were determined. Following thorough cleaning with an alcoholic solution of soft soap, each of the three disinfectants tested showed satisfactory results (100% kill) in 5 min against the enteric test bacteria (Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhosa) as well as a test species of the genus Pseudomonas, among the bacteria most resistant to surface-active agents. An aqueous solution of Wescodyne G containing 75 ppm available iodine was used both as a wiping solution and for subsequent disinfection of rectal catheters contaminated in vivo. Total bacterial destruction was found to follow a 60-min soak preceded by the wiping procedure. Rectal catheters subjected to prolonged immersion in each of the test disinfectants were found to be essentially unaffected, retaining their initial calibrations within a permissible tolerance. Neither Roccal nor Wescodyne G solutions were found to measurably attack bare thermocouples. Alcoholic iodine 0.5% did, however, exert a deteriorating effect on bare thermocouples in a short time, as measured by change in resistance characteristics. The results of this study have led to the recommendation that Wescodyne G containing 75 ppm available iodine be used in standing operating procedures for the initial cleaning and subsequent disinfection of rectal thermocouple catheters.

  13. DRINKING WATER DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS: WHAT IS KNOWN

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chlorine, ozone, chlorine dioxide, and chloramine are currently the major disinfectants being used to disinfect drinking water. Although the alternative disinfectants (ozone, chlorine dioxide, and chloramine) are increasing in popularity in the United States, chlorine is still us...

  14. Disinfecting Filters For Recirculated Air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pilichi, Carmine A.

    1992-01-01

    Simple treatment disinfects air filters by killing bacteria, algae, fungi, mycobacteria, viruses, spores, and any other micro-organisms filters might harbor. Concept applied to reusable stainless-steel wire mesh filters and disposable air filters. Treatment used on filters in air-circulation systems in spacecraft, airplanes, other vehicles, and buildings to help prevent spread of colds, sore throats, and more-serious illnesses.

  15. Micropollutants produced by disinfection of wastewater effluents

    SciTech Connect

    Jolley, R.L.; Cumming, R.B.; Lee, N.E.; Thompson, J.E.; Lewis, L.R.

    1981-01-01

    Recent research conducted with the objective of determining some of the chemical mutagenic characteristics of nonvolatile micropollutants in treated wastewater effluents is summarized. The effluents from nine wastewater plants were examined relative to the chemical effects of the disinfectants chlorine, ozone, and uv light on nonvolatile organic constituents and the formation of mutagenic constituents during disinfection. Results indicate that disinfection by chlorine or ozone can lead to an increase in the number of mutagenic materials in the effluents. (JGB)

  16. Influence of disinfection with peracetic acid and hypochlorite in dimensional alterations of casts obtained from addition silicone and polyether impressions.

    PubMed

    Queiroz, Daher Antonio; Peçanha, Marcelo Massaroni; Neves, Ana Christina Claro; Frizzera, Fausto; Tonetto, Mateus Rodrigues; Silva-Concílio, Laís Regiane

    2013-11-01

    Dental impressions disinfection is important to reduce the risk of cross contamination but this process may produce dimensional distortions. Peracetic acid is a disinfectant agent with several favorable characteristics yet underutilized in Dentistry. The aim of this paper is to compare the dimensional stability of casts obtained from addition silicone and polyether impressions that were immersed for 10 minutes in a solution of 0.2% peracetic acid or 1% sodium hypochlorite. Sixty samples in type IV gypsum were produced after a master cast that simulated a full crown preparation of a maxillary premolar. Samples were divided in 6 groups (n = 10) according to the impression material and disinfection agent: Group AC--addition silicone control (without disinfectant); Group APA--addition silicone + 0.2% peracetic acid; Group AH--addition silicone + 1% sodium hypochlorite; Group PC--polyether control (without disinfectant); Group PPA--polyether + 0.2% peracetic acid; Group PH--polyether + 1% sodium hypochlorite. Cast height, base and top diameter were measured and a mean value was obtained for each sample and group all data was statistically analyzed (ANOVA, p < 0.05). There was not a significant statistical difference between addition silicone and polyether impressions regardless of the disinfectant materials. It can be concluded that disinfection with the proposed agents did not produce significant alterations of the impressions and the peracetic acid could be considered a reliable material to disinfect dental molds.

  17. Decontamination formulations for disinfection and sterilization

    DOEpatents

    Tucker, Mark D.; Engler, Daniel E.

    2007-09-18

    Aqueous decontamination formulations that neutralize biological pathogens for disinfection and sterilization applications. Examples of suitable applications include disinfection of food processing equipment, disinfection of areas containing livestock, mold remediation, sterilization of medical instruments and direct disinfection of food surfaces, such as beef carcasses. The formulations include at least one reactive compound, bleaching activator, inorganic base, and water. The formulations can be packaged as a two-part kit system, and can have a pH value in the range of 7-8.

  18. Detection of regulated disinfection by-products in cheeses.

    PubMed

    Cardador, Maria Jose; Gallego, Mercedes; Cabezas, Lourdes; Fernández-Salguero, Jose

    2016-08-01

    Cheese can contain regulated disinfection by-products (DBPs), mainly through contact with brine solutions prepared in disinfected water or sanitisers used to clean all contact surfaces, such as processing equipment and tanks. This study has focused on the possible presence of up to 10 trihalomethanes (THMs) and 13 haloacetic acids (HAAs) in a wide range of European cheeses. The study shows that 2 THMs, (in particular trichloromethane) and 3 HAAs (in particular dichloroacetic acid) can be found at μg/kg levels in the 56 cheeses analysed. Of the two types of DBPs, HAAs were generally present at higher concentrations, due to their hydrophilic and non-volatile nature. Despite their different nature (THMs are lipophilic), both of them have an affinity for fatty cheeses, increasing their concentrations as the percentage of water decreased because the DBPs were concentrated in the aqueous phase of the cheeses.

  19. Disinfecting endoscopes: how not to transmit Mycobacterium tuberculosis by bronchoscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Leers, W D

    1980-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis was cultured from the bronchial washings of two patients who underwent bronchoscopy consecutively with the same bronchoscope. Active pulmonary tuberculosis was later confirmed in the first patient, whereas the second patient had clinical and serologic evidence of infection with respiratory syncytial virus. The bronchoscope had been cleaned with an iodophor disinfectant, which had not destroyed the tubercle bacilli. The agent recommended for chemical disinfection of fibreoptic bronchoscopes is 2% glutaraldehyde solution; the instrument should be immersed in it for 10 to 30 minutes. Five hours' exposure to ethylene oxide is recommended for sterilization of instruments. These procedures must be preceded by adequate mechanical cleaning. Then transmission of pathogenic organisms during endoscopy, which can result in nosocomial disease, misdiagnosis or inappropriate treatment, will be avoided. Images FIG. 1 FIG. 2 FIG. 3 PMID:6790150

  20. 9 CFR 166.14 - Cleaning and disinfecting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ..., fencing, troughs, chutes, floors, walls, and all other parts of the facilities, with a disinfectant..., including all doors, endgates, portable chutes, and similar equipment with a disinfectant prescribed...

  1. 9 CFR 166.14 - Cleaning and disinfecting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ..., fencing, troughs, chutes, floors, walls, and all other parts of the facilities, with a disinfectant..., including all doors, endgates, portable chutes, and similar equipment with a disinfectant prescribed...

  2. Multi-purpose droop controllers incorporating a passivity-based stabilizer for unified control of electronically interfaced distributed generators including primary source dynamics.

    PubMed

    Azimi, Seyed Mohammad; Afsharnia, Saeed

    2016-07-01

    This paper presents multi-purpose droop controllers for electronically-interfaced distributed generators (EI-DGs). These controllers allow the micro-grids to operate in grid-connected mode, islanded mode and mode transition transients with a unique control configuration. The active and reactive-power sharing among EI-DGs are satisfied by the proposed droop controllers in islanded mode. On the other hand, in the grid-connected mode, the droop controllers adjust the output active and reactive-powers of EI-DGs at the pre-programmed constant levels. The provision of sufficient damping capability and maintenance of the transient stability in all operational modes of EI-DGs are warranted by the suggested stabilizer. This stabilizer, which is designed using the passivity-based control (PBC) approach, is incorporated in the droop controllers to dampen power-angle, frequency and voltage deviations during large transients using solely local information. The primary source dynamics of EI-DGs are also considered. It is analytically proven that the presence of the primary source dynamics leads to attenuation of the damping capability of EI-DGs in transients. To compensate the adverse effect of the primary source dynamics during transients a novel compensator is inserted in the frequency-droop loop. Finally, time-domain simulations are performed on a multi-resources MG to verify the analytical results compared to those obtained, based on a recently-developed strategy.

  3. The Source, Spatial Distribution and Risk Assessment of Heavy Metals in Soil from the Pearl River Delta Based on the National Multi-Purpose Regional Geochemical Survey.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lingyan; Guo, Shuhai; Wu, Bo

    2015-01-01

    The data on the heavy metal content at different soil depths derived from a multi-purpose regional geochemical survey in the Pearl River Delta (PRD) were analyzed using ArcGIS 10.0. By comparing their spatial distributions and areas, the sources of heavy metals (Cd, Hg, As and Pb) were quantitatively identified and explored. Netted measuring points at 25 ×25 km were set over the entire PRD according to the geochemical maps. Based on the calculation data obtained from different soil depths, the concentrations of As and Cd in a large area of the PRD exceeded the National Second-class Standard. The spatial disparity of the geometric centers in the surface soil and deep soil showed that As in the surface soil mainly came from parent materials, while Cd had high consistency in different soil profiles because of deposition in the soil forming process. The migration of Cd also resulted in a considerable ecological risk to the Beijiang and Xijiang River watershed. The potential ecological risk index followed the order Cd ≥ Hg > Pb > As. According to the sources, the distribution trends and the characteristics of heavy metals in the soil from the perspective of the whole area, the Cd pollution should be repaired, especially in the upper reaches of the Xijiang and Beijiang watershed to prevent risk explosion while the pollution of Hg and Pb should be controlled in areas with intense human activity, and supervision during production should be strengthened to maintain the ecological balance of As.

  4. A new analysis method using Bragg curve spectroscopy for a Multi-purpose Active-target Particle Telescope for radiation monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Losekamm, M. J.; Milde, M.; Pöschl, T.; Greenwald, D.; Paul, S.

    2017-02-01

    Traditional radiation detectors can either measure the total radiation dose omnidirectionally (dosimeters), or determine the incoming particles characteristics within a narrow field of view (spectrometers). Instantaneous measurements of anisotropic fluxes thus require several detectors, resulting in bulky setups. The Multi-purpose Active-target Particle Telescope (MAPT), employing a new detection principle, is designed to measure particle fluxes omnidirectionally and be simultaneously a dosimeter and spectrometer. It consists of an active core of scintillating fibers whose light output is measured by silicon photomultipliers, and fits into a cube with an edge length of 10 cm. It identifies particles using extended Bragg curve spectroscopy, with sensitivity to charged particles with kinetic energies above 25 MeV. MAPT's unique layout results in a geometrical acceptance of approximately 800 cm2 sr and an angular resolution of less than 6°, which can be improved by track-fitting procedures. In a beam test of a simplified prototype, the energy resolution was found to be less than 1 MeV for protons with energies between 30 and 70 MeV. Possible applications of MAPT include the monitoring of radiation environments in spacecraft and beam monitoring in medical facilities.

  5. The Source, Spatial Distribution and Risk Assessment of Heavy Metals in Soil from the Pearl River Delta Based on the National Multi-Purpose Regional Geochemical Survey

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lingyan; Guo, Shuhai; Wu, Bo

    2015-01-01

    The data on the heavy metal content at different soil depths derived from a multi-purpose regional geochemical survey in the Pearl River Delta (PRD) were analyzed using ArcGIS 10.0. By comparing their spatial distributions and areas, the sources of heavy metals (Cd, Hg, As and Pb) were quantitatively identified and explored. Netted measuring points at 25 ×25 km were set over the entire PRD according to the geochemical maps. Based on the calculation data obtained from different soil depths, the concentrations of As and Cd in a large area of the PRD exceeded the National Second-class Standard. The spatial disparity of the geometric centers in the surface soil and deep soil showed that As in the surface soil mainly came from parent materials, while Cd had high consistency in different soil profiles because of deposition in the soil forming process. The migration of Cd also resulted in a considerable ecological risk to the Beijiang and Xijiang River watershed. The potential ecological risk index followed the order Cd ≥ Hg > Pb > As. According to the sources, the distribution trends and the characteristics of heavy metals in the soil from the perspective of the whole area, the Cd pollution should be repaired, especially in the upper reaches of the Xijiang and Beijiang watershed to prevent risk explosion while the pollution of Hg and Pb should be controlled in areas with intense human activity, and supervision during production should be strengthened to maintain the ecological balance of As. PMID:26230506

  6. Effects of species and season on chemical composition and ruminal crude protein and organic matter degradability of some multi-purpose tree species by West African dwarf rams.

    PubMed

    Arigbede, O M; Anele, U Y; Südekum, K-H; Hummel, J; Oni, A O; Olanite, J A; Isah, A O

    2012-04-01

    Seasonal chemical composition and ruminal organic matter (OM) and crude protein (CP) degradabilities were determined in four tropical multi-purpose tree species (MPTS) namely; Pterocarpus santalinoides, Grewia pubescens, Enterolobium cyclocarpum and Leucaena leucocephala. Three West African dwarf (WAD) rams fitted with permanent rumen cannula were used for the degradability trials. Foliage samples were collected four times to represent seasonal variations as follows: January--mid dry; April--late dry; July--mid rainy and October--late rainy seasons. Leaf samples were randomly collected from the trees for estimation of dry matter (DM) and chemical composition. Ruminal in sacco OM and CP degradabilities were estimated from residues in nylon bags. All samples had high CP (161-259 g/kg DM) and moderate fibre concentrations [neutral detergent fibre (without residual ash], 300-501 g/kg DM; acid detergent fibre (without residual ash), 225-409 g/kg DM and acid detergent lignin, 87-179 g/kg DM across seasons. Interaction effects of species and season on chemical composition were highly significant (p = 0.001) except for trypsin inhibitor (p = 0.614). The MPTS recorded more than 60% OM and CP degradability at 24 h, which implied that they were all highly degradable in the rumen. Their incorporation into ruminant feeding systems as dry season forage supplements is therefore recommended.

  7. [Evaluation of household chemical disinfectants for Vibrio cholerae EL TOR (non toxigenic strain)].

    PubMed

    Timenetsky, J; Yanaguita, R M; Silva, L A

    1992-10-01

    The methodology of microbiological evaluation of disinfectants in permanently being questioned because the laboratorial protocols do not correspond to the real conditions under which these products are used. In 1985 the Use-Dilution method of AOAC was adopted in Brazil for microbiological qualification of chemical disinfectants for commercial purposes. Domestic disinfectants are tested in this way against Salmonella choleraesuis and Staphylococcus aureus ATCC strains, was chosen for this evaluation Vibrio cholerae in view of its current importance in Brazil, in terms of Public Health associated with the study of the disinfectant's antimicrobial activities. Nineteen disinfectant products for domestic use for available to the public were evaluated microbiologically by means of simplified Use-Dilution test with 10 carriers. The active compounds of the products included formaldehyde, phenols, cresols, quaternary ammonium compounds, chlorine and ethanol. Seven were mixtures of these. According to the recommendations for their use, sixteen products should be used undiluted. Under these conditions, 9 disinfectants were vibriocides and 7 did not demonstrate this antibacterial activity. Four products in dilutions not clearly specified were also ineffective. The vibriocide products which must used without dilution were tested again, diluted at 1:2. These solutions did not inactivate V. cholerae showing that, microbiologically, their active compounds are used in limited concentrations. Commercial alcohol (95.5 degrees GL) at 1:3, chlorine 2.8% Agua sanitária at 1:200 and Lysoform at 1:20 came up to the standards required by the test.

  8. Disinfection of Dental Unit Water Line Using Aloe Vera: In Vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Pareek, Sonia; Nagaraj, Anup; Sharma, Prateek; Walia, Satinder; Naidu, Shravani; Yousuf, Asif

    2013-01-01

    Context. Dental unit waterlines may be heavily contaminated with microorganisms and are a potential source of infection for both practicing staff and immunocompromised patients particularly. Contamination of dental unit water lines could be inhibited with the use of disinfectants. The present study investigates the effect of aloe-vera-based disinfectant in reducing the microbial growth in dental unit water lines (DUWLs). Aims. To compare the efficacy of aloe vera, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), and 5% sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) in controlling microbial contamination of DUWLs. Materials and Methods. After obtaining baseline water samples, the dental unit waterlines were treated with aloe vera, 10% hydrogen peroxide, and 5% sodium hypochlorite. Each of the three disinfectants was used in increasing concentrations and their inhibiting effect was compared. Water samples were analyzed for microbiological quality by the total viable count (TVC) method. Statistical Analysis Used. SPSS 16. Results. There was significant reduction in mean CFU/ml when treated with disinfectants each for a period of one week. Aloe-vera solution was found to be the most effective in reducing the microbial colonies. Conclusions. Improving the water quality from dental unit water lines is of considerable importance; chemical-based disinfectants can be replaced with herbal disinfectants for treating microbial contamination in dental unit waterlines. PMID:24089615

  9. Disinfection of dental unit water line using aloe vera: in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Pareek, Sonia; Nagaraj, Anup; Sharma, Prateek; Atri, Mansi; Walia, Satinder; Naidu, Shravani; Yousuf, Asif

    2013-01-01

    Context. Dental unit waterlines may be heavily contaminated with microorganisms and are a potential source of infection for both practicing staff and immunocompromised patients particularly. Contamination of dental unit water lines could be inhibited with the use of disinfectants. The present study investigates the effect of aloe-vera-based disinfectant in reducing the microbial growth in dental unit water lines (DUWLs). Aims. To compare the efficacy of aloe vera, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), and 5% sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) in controlling microbial contamination of DUWLs. Materials and Methods. After obtaining baseline water samples, the dental unit waterlines were treated with aloe vera, 10% hydrogen peroxide, and 5% sodium hypochlorite. Each of the three disinfectants was used in increasing concentrations and their inhibiting effect was compared. Water samples were analyzed for microbiological quality by the total viable count (TVC) method. Statistical Analysis Used. SPSS 16. Results. There was significant reduction in mean CFU/ml when treated with disinfectants each for a period of one week. Aloe-vera solution was found to be the most effective in reducing the microbial colonies. Conclusions. Improving the water quality from dental unit water lines is of considerable importance; chemical-based disinfectants can be replaced with herbal disinfectants for treating microbial contamination in dental unit waterlines.

  10. Chlorate as an inorganic disinfection by product in swimming pools.

    PubMed

    Erdinger, L; Kirsch, F; Sonntag, H G

    1999-06-01

    Chlorate and chlorite concentrations were determined in water samples taken from 33 swimming pools. In the pools under investigation, disinfection of the water is carried out either by gaseous chlorine (n = 14) or hypochlorite solution in conjunction with flocculation and sand filtration. A number of the pools also use ozone treatment to augment the disinfection process. Chlorite was not detectable in any of the samples (detection limit 1 mg/l). High concentrations of chlorate were detected in samples from a number of the pools; in one case as high as 40 mg/l. Higher chlorate concentrations were found to be associated with those pools using hypochlorite solution as a disinfecting agent. In contrast, relatively low chlorate concentrations were found in pools treated with gaseous chlorine. In order to elucidate any relationship between the chlorate content of pool water and that of the respective hypochlorite stock solution, chlorate and bromate concentrations were determined in the hypochlorite stock solutions of nine pools. Bromate concentration in the stock solutions were not found to exceed 1.2 g/l, chlorate was measured in concentrations of up to 44.5 g/l. The additional use of ozone as part of the water purification process appears to have no significant influence on chlorate concentration. Chlorate has no bactericidal properties and does not interfere with the measurement of certain parameters relevant to hygiene in swimming pools such as free and combined chlorine, pH or redox potential. At present, the effects of high chlorate concentrations in swimming pool water are unclear. Our initial investigations indicate that chlorate has no cytotoxic (Neutral-Red assay) or irritating properties (HET-CAM assay). However, both chlorate and chlorite are known to interfere with the haematopoetic system. In Germany, the MCL for chlorite in drinking water is 0.2 mg/l. It is therefore strongly recommended that measures should be taken to reduce chlorate concentrations in

  11. Microbial contamination of disinfectants used for intermittent self-catheterization.

    PubMed

    Hakuno, Harumasa; Yamamoto, Mitutaka; Oie, Shigeharu; Kamiya, Akira

    2010-07-01

    We investigated the microbial contamination of 0.02% benzalkonium chloride solution used in catheter kits for intermittent self-catheterization. Of 20 samples examined, 12 (60.0%) were contaminated with 8.8 x 10(2)-3.1 x 10(6) colony-forming units (cfu)/mL. The contaminants were Pseudomonas fluorescens, Burkholderia cepacia, and Aeromonas spp. These results showed that 0.02% benzalkonium chloride solution used for the lubrication/disinfection of catheters for self-catheterization is susceptible to contamination. Therefore, the lubricant/disinfectant for catheters for self-catheterization was changed from 0.02% benzalkonium chloride solution to 84-87% glycerin containing 0.02% benzalkonium chloride, and microbial contamination of the latter in catheter kits for self-catheterization was reinvestigated. Of 42 samples, 5 (11.9%) were contaminated with 20-2.0 x 10(4) cfu/mL. However, the rate of contamination of 84-87% glycerin containing 0.02% benzalkonium chloride was significantly lower than that of 0.02% benzalkonium chloride solution (P<0.0001). The contaminant of 84-87% glycerin containing 0.02% benzalkonium chloride was Bacillus spp. in all contaminated samples. In this survey, neither contaminants of 0.02% benzalkonium chloride solution nor the contaminant of 84-87% glycerin containing 0.02% benzalkonium chloride were the causative microbial species of urinary tract infection.

  12. Ultraviolet (UV) Disinfection for Drinking Water Systems

    EPA Science Inventory

    UV disinfection is an effective process for inactivating many microbial pathogens in water with potential to serve as stand-alone treatment or in combination with other disinfectants. USEPA provided guidance on the validation of UV reactors nearly a decade ago. Since then, lesson...

  13. 40 CFR 141.72 - Disinfection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... for Giardia lamblia cysts and viruses. If a system uses a disinfectant other than chlorine, the system...) The residual disinfectant concentration in the distribution system, measured as total chlorine, combined chlorine, or chlorine dioxide, as specified in § 141.74 (a)(2) and (b)(6), cannot be...

  14. 40 CFR 141.72 - Disinfection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... for Giardia lamblia cysts and viruses. If a system uses a disinfectant other than chlorine, the system...) The residual disinfectant concentration in the distribution system, measured as total chlorine, combined chlorine, or chlorine dioxide, as specified in § 141.74 (a)(2) and (b)(6), cannot be...

  15. 40 CFR 141.72 - Disinfection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... for Giardia lamblia cysts and viruses. If a system uses a disinfectant other than chlorine, the system...) The residual disinfectant concentration in the distribution system, measured as total chlorine, combined chlorine, or chlorine dioxide, as specified in § 141.74 (a)(2) and (b)(6), cannot be...

  16. 40 CFR 141.72 - Disinfection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... for Giardia lamblia cysts and viruses. If a system uses a disinfectant other than chlorine, the system...) The residual disinfectant concentration in the distribution system, measured as total chlorine, combined chlorine, or chlorine dioxide, as specified in § 141.74 (a)(2) and (b)(6), cannot be...

  17. 9 CFR 71.10 - Permitted disinfectants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... § 71.10 Permitted disinfectants. (a) Disinfectants permitted for use on cars, boats, and other vehicles... least 4 fluid ounces to 1 gallon of water. (2) Liquefied phenol (U.S.P. strength 87 percent phenol) in the proportion of at least 6 fluid ounces to 1 gallon of water. (3) Chlorinated lime (U.S.P....

  18. 9 CFR 71.10 - Permitted disinfectants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... § 71.10 Permitted disinfectants. (a) Disinfectants permitted for use on cars, boats, and other vehicles... least 4 fluid ounces to 1 gallon of water. (2) Liquefied phenol (U.S.P. strength 87 percent phenol) in the proportion of at least 6 fluid ounces to 1 gallon of water. (3) Chlorinated lime (U.S.P....

  19. Silver disinfection in water distribution systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silvestry Rodriguez, Nadia

    Silver was evaluated as disinfectant to maintain water quality in water distribution system. It was used to inhibit growth of two opportunistic bacteria in planktonik form and in biofilm formation in Robbins devices with stainless steel and PVC surfaces. The results of this work show that silver is a potential secondary disinfectant to be used in water distribution systems.

  20. 40 CFR 141.72 - Disinfection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... PRIMARY DRINKING WATER REGULATIONS Filtration and Disinfection § 141.72 Disinfection. A public water system that uses a surface water source and does not provide filtration treatment must provide the... determines that filtration is required in writing pursuant to § 1412 (b)(7)(C)(iii). A public water...

  1. ULTRAVIOLET DISINFECTION STUDIES WITH CCL LISTED MICROORGANISMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Resistance to ultraviolet (UV) disinfection is an essential aspect regarding all microbial groups listed on the CCL. The U.S. drinking water industry is interested in including UV light treatment as an amendment to conventional treatment for disinfecting water supplies. UV disi...

  2. MUTAGENICITY OF DRINKING WATER FOLLOWING DISINFECTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Many drinking water utilities in the USA are considering alternatives to chlorine for disinfection in order to comply with federal regulations regarding disinfection by-products. An evaluation is thus needed of the potential risks associated with the use of alternative disinfecta...

  3. [Electrochemical disinfection using the gas diffusion electrode system].

    PubMed

    Xu, Wen-Ying; Li, Ping; Dong, Bin

    2010-01-01

    Study on the electrochemical disinfection with the H2O2 produced at the gas diffusion electrode (GDE) prepared from active carbon/ poly-tetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) was performed in the non-membrane cell. The effects of PTFE mass fraction W(PTFE) and content of the pore-forming agent in GDE m(NH4CO3), operating conditions such as pH value and oxygen flow rate Q(o2)) on disinfection were investigated, respectively. The experimental results showed that H2 O2 reached peak production at W(PTFE) of 0.5 in GDE. Addition of the pore-forming agent in the appropriate amount improved the disinfection, and this phenomenon was more obvious at neutral pH than at acidic pH. BET specific area analysis indicated that the average pore size in the membrane electrode first decreased significantly with the increasing amount of pore-forming agent, and then increased moderately. This helped the mass transfer of oxygen at the GDE. Adsorption made little or no progress to kill the bacteria during the electrolysis. Drop of pH value resulted in a rapid rise of the germicidal efficacy. This system had a broad pH coverage: when total bacterial count in raw water was 10(6) CFU x mL(-1), pH 3-10,the germicidal efficacy was greater than 80% after 30 min electrolysis using the GDE with W(Pt) of 3 per thousand as cathode. Increase of the oxygen flow rate Q(o2) within limits had little influence on the production of H2 O2 and the succeeding disinfection. On one hand, resistance of the solution and energy consumption on the disinfection increased at high oxygen flow rate, which gave rise to an increase in the operating cost of disinfection with the GDE system; on the other hand, treatment time could be reduced reasonably at high oxygen flow rate, which leads to reduction of equipment investment. Killing mechanism study showed that the direct oxidation and formation of the free radicals at the anode played a greater role in the beginning, and then the oxidative indirect effect of the generated H2 O2 at

  4. Kinetics and influence of water composition on photocatalytic disinfection and photocatalytic oxidation of pollutants.

    PubMed

    Marugán, Javier; van Grieken, Rafael; Pablos, Cristina

    2010-12-01

    This work is focused on the comparison between the photocatalytic inactivation of Escherichia coli and the photocatalytic oxidation of methylene blue, regarding the reaction kinetics and the influence of water composition. Disinfection profiles show an initial delay, in contrast with the exponential decay shown by the decolorization of methylene blue solutions. A serial-event mechanism is proposed for both disinfection and mineralization processes, the number of intermediate species being the main difference between them. Concerning the influence of water composition, inactivation of bacteria is more sensitive to the presence of inorganic ions and/or organic matter in the solution. In some cases opposite behaviours are observed, such as in the presence of chloride ions, which enhance the disinfection rate but decrease degradation activity for methylene blue. Consequently, the results obtained in the evaluation of photocatalytic processes for the degradation of chemical pollutants cannot be always extrapolated to the inactivation of microorganisms.

  5. An EPR study on wastewater disinfection by peracetic acid, hydrogen peroxide and UV irradiation.

    PubMed

    Bianchini, Roberto; Calucci, Lucia; Caretti, Cecilia; Lubello, Claudio; Pinzino, Calogero; Piscicelli, Michela

    2002-09-01

    EPR spectroscopy was applied to obtain qualitative and quantitative information on the radicals produced in disinfection processes of wastewater for agricultural reuse. The DEPMPO spin trap was employed to detect hydroxyl and carbon-centered short living radicals in two different peracetic acid solutions and a hydrogen peroxide solution used for water disinfection either in the absence or in the presence of UV-C irradiation. Moreover, three different kinds of water (wastewater, demineralized water, distilled water) were analysed in order to assess the contribution of Fenton reactions to the radical production. The spectroscopic results were discussed in relation to the efficiency of the different oxidizing agents and UV irradiation in wastewater disinfection evaluated as Escherichia Coli, Faecal and Total Coliforms inactivation.

  6. Hazards with disinfecting agents in renal units!

    PubMed

    Stragier, A

    1992-02-01

    As already described in the April 1991 issue of EDTNA/ERCA Journal (Volume XVII, No. 2), the specific characteristics of various disinfecting agents delineate their respective application areas. Obviously, in a renal unit one needs a large range of disinfecting agents as they are being used for cleaning and disinfection of: water treatment devices; water tanks and distribution systems; single patient units; patient vascular access sites; dialysis connection procedure; dialyser reuse; instruments; floors, etc.... We have been taught never to mix different disinfecting agents as this might reduce their efficiency. However, it had never been hitherto reported that this might be dangerous or even cause an explosion! In this paper, we describe in detail how we were confronted with such an explosion. We further report that similar hazards occurred in other units and present an overview of possible hazards with the most common disinfecting agents. Finally, we emphasize some preventive guidelines to be put forth in renal units.

  7. Sepsis, parenteral vaccination and skin disinfection

    PubMed Central

    Cook, Ian F.

    2016-01-01

    ASBSTRACT Disinfection should be required for all skin penetrative procedures including parenteral administration of vaccines. This review analyses medically attended infectious events following parenteral vaccination in terms of their microbiological aetiology and pathogenesis. Like ‘clean’ surgical site infections, the major pathogens responsible for these events were Staphylococcal species, implicating endogenous con-tamination as a significant source of infection. As 70% isopropyl alcohol swabbing has been shown to effectively disinfect the skin, it would be medico-legally difficult to defend a case of sepsis with the omission of skin disinfection unless the very low risk of this event was adequately explained to the patient and documented prior to vaccination. There was a significant cost-benefit for skin disinfection and cellulitis. Skin disinfection in the context of parenteral vaccination represents a new paradigm of medical practice; the use of a low cost intervention to prevent an event of very low prevalence but of significant cost. PMID:27295449

  8. Susceptibility of Vaccinia Virus to Chemical Disinfectants

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira, Tércia Moreira Ludolfo; Rehfeld, Izabelle Silva; Coelho Guedes, Maria Isabel Maldonado; Ferreira, Jaqueline Maria Siqueira; Kroon, Erna Geessien; Lobato, Zélia Inês Portela

    2011-01-01

    Vaccinia virus (VACV) is the cause of bovine vaccinia (BV), an emerging zoonotic disease that affects dairy cows and milkers. Some chemical disinfectants have been used on farms affected by BV to disinfect cow teats and milkers' hands. To date, there is no information about the efficacy of disinfectants against VACV. Therefore, this study aimed to assess the virucidal activity of some active disinfectants commonly used in the field. Sodium hypochlorite, quaternary ammonium combined with chlorhexidine, and quaternary ammonium combined with glutaraldehyde were effective in inactivating the virus at all concentrations tested. Iodine and quaternary ammonium as the only active component were partially effective. The presence of bovine feces as organic matter and light decreased the effectiveness of sodium hypochlorite. These results show that an appropriated disinfection and asepsis of teats and hands may be helpful in the control and prevention of BV and other infections with VACV. PMID:21734141

  9. Surface disinfection: should we do it?

    PubMed

    Rutala, W A; Weber, D J

    2001-08-01

    The effective use of disinfectants constitutes an important factor in preventing hospital-acquired infections. Surfaces are considered non-critical items as they come in contact with intact skin. Use of non-critical items or contact with non-critical surfaces carries little risk of transmitting a pathogen to patients. Thus, the routine use of disinfectants to disinfect hospital floors and other non-critical items is controversial. However, surfaces may potentially contribute to cross-transmission by acquisition of transient hand carriage by health care personnel due to contact with a contaminated surface or by patient contact with contaminated surfaces or medical equipment. This paper reviews the epidemiological and microbiological data regarding the use of disinfectants on non-critical surfaces. It concludes that while non-critical surfaces are uncommonly associated with transmission of infections to patients, one should clean and disinfect surfaces on a regularly scheduled basis.

  10. Variability of Burkholderia pseudomallei strain sensitivities to chlorine disinfection.

    PubMed

    O'Connell, Heather A; Rose, Laura J; Shams, Alicia; Bradley, Meranda; Arduino, Matthew J; Rice, Eugene W

    2009-08-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei is a select agent and the causative agent of melioidosis. Variations in previously reported chlorine and monochloramine concentration time (Ct) values for disinfection of this organism make decisions regarding the appropriate levels of chlorine in water treatment systems difficult. This study identified the variation in Ct values for 2-, 3-, and 4-log(10) reductions of eight environmental and clinical isolates of B. pseudomallei in phosphate-buffered water. The greatest calculated Ct values for a 4-log(10) inactivation were 7.8 mg.min/liter for free available chlorine (FAC) at pH 8 and 5 degrees C and 550 mg.min/liter for monochloramine at pH 8 and 5 degrees C. Ionic strength of test solutions, culture hold times in water, and cell washing were ruled out as sources of the differences in prior observations. Tolerance to FAC was correlated with the relative amount of extracellular material produced by each isolate. Solid-phase cytometry analysis using an esterase-cleaved fluorochrome assay detected a 2-log(10)-higher level of organisms based upon metabolic activity than did culture, which in some cases increased Ct values by fivefold. Despite strain-to-strain variations in Ct values of 17-fold for FAC and 2.5-fold for monochloramine, standard FAC disinfection practices utilized in the United States should disinfect planktonic populations of these B. pseudomallei strains by 4 orders of magnitude in less than 10 min at the tested temperatures and pH levels.

  11. TH-A-19A-08: Intel Xeon Phi Implementation of a Fast Multi-Purpose Monte Carlo Simulation for Proton Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Souris, K; Lee, J; Sterpin, E

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Recent studies have demonstrated the capability of graphics processing units (GPUs) to compute dose distributions using Monte Carlo (MC) methods within clinical time constraints. However, GPUs have a rigid vectorial architecture that favors the implementation of simplified particle transport algorithms, adapted to specific tasks. Our new, fast, and multipurpose MC code, named MCsquare, runs on Intel Xeon Phi coprocessors. This technology offers 60 independent cores, and therefore more flexibility to implement fast and yet generic MC functionalities, such as prompt gamma simulations. Methods: MCsquare implements several models and hence allows users to make their own tradeoff between speed and accuracy. A 200 MeV proton beam is simulated in a heterogeneous phantom using Geant4 and two configurations of MCsquare. The first one is the most conservative and accurate. The method of fictitious interactions handles the interfaces and secondary charged particles emitted in nuclear interactions are fully simulated. The second, faster configuration simplifies interface crossings and simulates only secondary protons after nuclear interaction events. Integral depth-dose and transversal profiles are compared to those of Geant4. Moreover, the production profile of prompt gammas is compared to PENH results. Results: Integral depth dose and transversal profiles computed by MCsquare and Geant4 are within 3%. The production of secondaries from nuclear interactions is slightly inaccurate at interfaces for the fastest configuration of MCsquare but this is unlikely to have any clinical impact. The computation time varies between 90 seconds for the most conservative settings to merely 59 seconds in the fastest configuration. Finally prompt gamma profiles are also in very good agreement with PENH results. Conclusion: Our new, fast, and multi-purpose Monte Carlo code simulates prompt gammas and calculates dose distributions in less than a minute, which complies with clinical time

  12. Development of a new single-bottle multi-purpose primer for bonding to dental porcelain, alumina, zirconia, and dental gold alloy.

    PubMed

    Ikemura, Kunio; Tanaka, Hisaki; Fujii, Toshihide; Deguchi, Mikito; Endo, Takeshi; Kadoma, Yoshinori

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the bonding efficacy of a combined primer application which comprised a silane coupling agent, an acidic adhesive monomer, and a dithiooctanoate monomer, as well as the influence of shelf life on bonding. Five experimental primers (coded as Si-P-SS-1 to Si-P-SS-4, and Si-SS as the control) were prepared using 20.0-40.0 wt% 3-methacryloyloxypropyltriethoxysilane (3-MPTES), 0-7.44 wt% 6-methacryloyloxyhexyl phosphonoacetate (6-MHPA), and 0.50 wt% 10-methacryloyloxydecyl 6,8-dithiooctanoate (10-MDDT). After 24-hour storage at 23°C (Initial) and 2-month storage at 50°C (Aged), tensile bond strengths (TBSs) of a resin cement (ResiCem, Shofu Inc., Kyoto, Japan) to primer-treated porcelain, alumina, zirconia, and Au alloy were measured. With the Initial and Aged primers of Si-P-SS-1 to Si-P-SS-3, there were no statistically significant differences in the mean TBSs (MPa) [porcelain: 21.7-29.2; alumina: 21.4-25.3; zirconia: 20.3-24.5; and Au alloy: 23.4-27.6] among these three primers (p>0.05), but they were significantly higher than that of the control primer (p<0.05). The experimental primers Si-P-SS-1 to Si-P-SS-3 demonstrated good potential as multi-purpose primers: they had good shelf lives as single-bottle primer systems and were thus able to exhibit good bond strength to all the adherends tested after 2-month storage under accelerated aging conditions.

  13. Liquid Methane Conditioning Capabilities Developed at the NASA Glenn Research Center's Small Multi- Purpose Research Facility (SMiRF) for Accelerated Lunar Surface Storage Thermal Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bamberger, Helmut H.; Robinson, R. Craig; Jurns, John M.; Grasl, Steven J.

    2011-01-01

    Glenn Research Center s Creek Road Cryogenic Complex, Small Multi-Purpose Research Facility (SMiRF) recently completed validation / checkout testing of a new liquid methane delivery system and liquid methane (LCH4) conditioning system. Facility checkout validation was conducted in preparation for a series of passive thermal control technology tests planned at SMiRF in FY10 using a flight-like propellant tank at simulated thermal environments from 140 to 350K. These tests will validate models and provide high quality data to support consideration of LCH4/LO2 propellant combination option for a lunar or planetary ascent stage.An infrastructure has been put in place which will support testing of large amounts of liquid methane at SMiRF. Extensive modifications were made to the test facility s existing liquid hydrogen system for compatibility with liquid methane. Also, a new liquid methane fluid conditioning system will enable liquid methane to be quickly densified (sub-cooled below normal boiling point) and to be quickly reheated to saturation conditions between 92 and 140 K. Fluid temperatures can be quickly adjusted to compress the overall test duration. A detailed trade study was conducted to determine an appropriate technique to liquid conditioning with regard to the SMiRF facility s existing infrastructure. In addition, a completely new roadable dewar has been procured for transportation and temporary storage of liquid methane. A new spherical, flight-representative tank has also been fabricated for integration into the vacuum chamber at SMiRF. The addition of this system to SMiRF marks the first time a large-scale liquid methane propellant test capability has been realized at Glenn.This work supports the Cryogenic Fluid Management Project being conducted under the auspices of the Exploration Technology Development Program, providing focused cryogenic fluid management technology efforts to support NASA s future robotic or human exploration missions.

  14. Root canal disinfection of immature dog teeth with apical periodontitis: Comparison of three different protocols

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Benítez, Soledad; Stambolsky Guelfand, Carlos; Martín-Jiménez, Milagros

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: The present in vivo study was designed to assess the efficacy of 3 root canal disinfection protocols in immature dog teeth with apical periodontitis (AP). Material and Methods: Forty immature premolars with pulp necrosis and AP of five Beagle dogs were used. Three experimental disinfection protocols were established. After irrigation with 40 ml 5.25% sodium hypochlorite using the Endovac system, in Group 1 canals were flushed with QMix solution; in Group 2, canals were flushed with QMix solution and 2% chlorhexidine gel dressing was placed for two weeks; and in Group 3, triantibiotic paste dressing was placed for two weeks. Canals were sampled after periapical lesions were radiographically visible (S1), after the first disinfection session (S2) and, in groups 2 and 3, after dressing (S3). Results: After the first session of the disinfection protocol (S2), there was significant (p < 0.05) bacterial reduction in the three experimental groups. Microorganisms were absent in 100% of S2 samples in groups 1 and 2, and in 75% of group 3 (p > 0.05). After dressing, 87.5% of the S3 samples showed increased bacterial count: in group 2, CFU counts (median = 891) were significantly higher than in group 3 (median = 18) (p = 0.03). Conclusions: In immature dog teeth with AP, root canal irrigation using QMix solution, with or without chlorhexidine gel dressing, or a triantibiotic paste dressing, provides the same level of disinfection than irrigation with 5.25% sodium hypochlorite alone in only one session. Key words:Apical periodontitis, chlorhexidine, Endovac, immature teeth, QMix solution, root canal disinfection, triantibiotic paste. PMID:25593656

  15. 40 CFR 141.172 - Disinfection profiling and benchmarking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... appropriate, through the entire treatment plant. This system must begin this monitoring not later than April 1...) The temperature of the disinfected water must be measured once per day at each residual disinfectant... disinfected water must be measured once per day at each chlorine residual disinfectant concentration...

  16. 40 CFR 141.172 - Disinfection profiling and benchmarking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... appropriate, through the entire treatment plant. This system must begin this monitoring not later than April 1...) The temperature of the disinfected water must be measured once per day at each residual disinfectant... disinfected water must be measured once per day at each chlorine residual disinfectant concentration...

  17. 40 CFR 141.172 - Disinfection profiling and benchmarking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... appropriate, through the entire treatment plant. This system must begin this monitoring not later than April 1...) The temperature of the disinfected water must be measured once per day at each residual disinfectant... disinfected water must be measured once per day at each chlorine residual disinfectant concentration...

  18. 40 CFR 141.172 - Disinfection profiling and benchmarking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... appropriate, through the entire treatment plant. This system must begin this monitoring not later than April 1...) The temperature of the disinfected water must be measured once per day at each residual disinfectant... disinfected water must be measured once per day at each chlorine residual disinfectant concentration...

  19. 40 CFR 141.172 - Disinfection profiling and benchmarking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... appropriate, through the entire treatment plant. This system must begin this monitoring not later than April 1...) The temperature of the disinfected water must be measured once per day at each residual disinfectant... disinfected water must be measured once per day at each chlorine residual disinfectant concentration...

  20. Microbial resistance to disinfectants: mechanisms and significance

    SciTech Connect

    Hoff, J.C.; Akin, E.W.

    1986-11-01

    Drinking water disinfection provides the final barrier to transmission of a wide variety of potentially waterborne infectious agents including pathogenic bacteria, viruses, and protozoa. These agents differ greatly in their innate resistance to inactivation by disinfectants, ranging from extremely sensitive bacteria to highly resistant protozoan cysts. The close similarity between microorganism inactivation rates and the kinetics of chemical reactions has long been recognized. Ideally, under carefully controlled conditions, microorganism inactivation rates simulate first-order chemical reaction rates, making it possible to predict the effectiveness of disinfection under specific conditions. In practice, changes in relative resistance and deviations from first-order kinetics are caused by a number of factors, including microbial growth conditions, aggregation, and association with particulate materials. The net effect of all these factors is a reduction in the effectiveness and predictability of disinfection processes. To ensure effective pathogen control, disinfectant concentrations and contact times greater than experimentally determined values may be required. Of the factors causing enhanced disinfection resistance, protection by association with particulate matter is the most significant. Therefore, removal of particulate matter is an important step in increasing the effectiveness of disinfection processes.

  1. Cleanliness of portable medical equipment disinfected by nursing staff.

    PubMed

    Havill, Nancy L; Havill, Heather L; Mangione, Elise; Dumigan, Diane G; Boyce, John M

    2011-09-01

    Increased attention has been focused on disinfection by housekeepers, but few data are available on disinfection of equipment by nurses. We used adenosine triphosphate bioluminescence assays and aerobic cultures to assess the cleanliness of portable medical equipment disinfected by nurses between each patient use. We found that the equipment was not being disinfected as per protocol and that education and feedback to nursing are warranted to improve disinfection of medical equipment.

  2. [Hygiene and methods of decontamination, disinfection and sterilization in dental offices in Yaounde].

    PubMed

    Onana, J; Ngongang, A

    2002-03-01

    Hygiene and asepsis of the dental office depend on medical ethics and legal obligation. The survey done with the participation of 33 practitioners over the 42 practicing in Yaounde allows apprehending the reality of the daily hygiene. The ways of cleaning, decontamination, disinfection or of sterilization of the premises, the dental equipment and instruments, hand-washing, disposable materials and the vaccination protection of the practitioners were analyzed. The cleaning of the floor and door mats is daily (100%); disinfection is done daily in 83% of the departments in all of the centers. The cleaning and disinfection of the dental chair is daily and is done using soap (23%) and/or bleaching-water (56%). Cleaning or disinfection of the suction machine is done with soap (24%) or with bleaching-water (47%). The hand-pieces and the turbines are cleaned and/or disinfected after each usage in (94%) with alcohol (17%) or with bleaching-water (32%) and sterilized with a heat sterilizer (45%), an autoclave(40%) or cold disinfected(15%). The frequency of the treatment of the instruments is well-respected (83%). Nevertheless the products used are very varied and are not always used in the prescribed order. Hand-washing is systematic after each patient; 50% of the practitioners use soap bars or powered soap and 50% use an antiseptic or a disinfectant solutions. With the regard to the vaccination, only 3 practitioners were properly vaccinated against hepatitis B, tetanus, diphtheria, poliomyelitis and tuberculosis. With regard to the protection of the practitioners, 72% do not wear caps, 56% do not wear eyeglasses, 40% do not wear masks, 95% do not use rubber dams, 56% do not disinfect the radiographic films and 37% do not disinfect the impressions; the habitual attire consists of a smock worn over street clothes (78%) and street shoes (90%). The debris is burnt in 35% of the centers. Better knowledge of the different stages (cleaning, decontamination, disinfection or

  3. 9 CFR 96.10 - Uncertified casings; transportation for disinfection; original shipping containers; disposition...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... sodium hydroxide of not less than 95 percent purity to 6 gallons of water, or one 131/2-ounce can to 5 gallons of water. 2 2 Due to the extreme caustic nature of sodium hydroxide solution, and of sodium... least thirty minutes to accomplish disinfection. The containers should then be washed with water...

  4. 9 CFR 96.10 - Uncertified casings; transportation for disinfection; original shipping containers; disposition...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... sodium hydroxide of not less than 95 percent purity to 6 gallons of water, or one 131/2-ounce can to 5 gallons of water. 2 2 Due to the extreme caustic nature of sodium hydroxide solution, and of sodium... least thirty minutes to accomplish disinfection. The containers should then be washed with water...

  5. 9 CFR 96.10 - Uncertified casings; transportation for disinfection; original shipping containers; disposition...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... sodium hydroxide of not less than 95 percent purity to 6 gallons of water, or one 131/2-ounce can to 5 gallons of water. 2 2 Due to the extreme caustic nature of sodium hydroxide solution, and of sodium... least thirty minutes to accomplish disinfection. The containers should then be washed with water...

  6. 9 CFR 96.10 - Uncertified casings; transportation for disinfection; original shipping containers; disposition...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... sodium hydroxide of not less than 95 percent purity to 6 gallons of water, or one 131/2-ounce can to 5 gallons of water. 2 2 Due to the extreme caustic nature of sodium hydroxide solution, and of sodium... least thirty minutes to accomplish disinfection. The containers should then be washed with water...

  7. 9 CFR 96.10 - Uncertified casings; transportation for disinfection; original shipping containers; disposition...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... sodium hydroxide of not less than 95 percent purity to 6 gallons of water, or one 131/2-ounce can to 5 gallons of water. 2 2 Due to the extreme caustic nature of sodium hydroxide solution, and of sodium... least thirty minutes to accomplish disinfection. The containers should then be washed with water...

  8. Use of Clinical UV Chamber to Disinfect Dental Impressions: A Comparative Study

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Sakshi; Kumar, Varun; Gupta, Neelu

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Dental impressions are potential source of infection in a prosthodontic practice. Risk of transmission of infection through saliva, blood etc is considered as hazard for both dentist as well as dental auxiliary staff. A number of methods are currently employed for disinfecting the impressions which are technique sensitive and time consuming. This study focuses on disinfecting impression using dental UV chamber which is commonly employed for storing sterilized instruments. Aim The aim of this invitro study was to evaluate the use of clinical UV chamber to disinfect various impression materials at different time intervals and its comparison with 2% glutaraldehyde using standard immersion technique. Materials and Methods Total sample size of 180 specimens was taken from three different impression materials. The impressions were made from 30 dentulous subjects. A total of ten impressions were made for each impression material i.e. alginate, addition silicone and polyether impression material. Six punch samples were taken from each impression. Out of 6 punch sample, one was kept as control, second was disinfected by immersing in freshly prepared 2% glutaraldehyde solution for 10 minutes and remaining four were exposed to UV rays for 3 minutes, 6 minutes, 10 minutes and 15 minutes using dental UV chamber. Amount of disinfection achieved was evaluated by counting the colonies over the culture plates with the help of digital colony. Results The results showed that the mean CFUs for alginate were found to be i.e. 11797.40 ± 5989.73 (mean ± SD). The mean CFUs for addition silicone impression material was found 7095.40 with a standard deviation of 4268.83 and the mean CFUs for polyether impression material was found to be 2168.92 ± 1676 (mean ± SD). Conclusion For alginate and addition silicone impression material, disinfection was achieved on exposure to UV rays for a period of 10 minutes. However, for polyether impression material 3 minutes of exposure to

  9. Disinfection methods used in decontamination of bottles used for feeding powdered infant formula.

    PubMed

    Redmond, Elizabeth; Griffith, Christopher J

    2009-01-01

    Infant susceptibility and the risks posed by infections associated with bottle-fed powdered infant formula (PIF) have received increased attention in recent years. Intrinsic contamination of PIF with pathogens has been reported and extrinsic contamination can be introduced from the handler or the environment during reconstitution. Recommended disinfection advice and bottle decontamination have changed in recent years and the aim of this study was to validate the efficacy of four current disinfection methods using bottles that had contained reconstituted PIF spiked with either a representative mixed bacterial culture or specific pathogens. Initially, bottles (n = 6) of reconstituted formula were spiked with 10(5) cfu/ml representative mixed culture. For subsequent experiments, reconstituted formula was spiked with either 10(2) and 10(4) cfu/ml of Enterobacter sakazakii (Cronobacter), Bacillus cereus and Staphylococcus aureus. Before disinfection, bottles were cleaned according to recommended guidelines. Disinfection procedures tested included a hypochlorite-based chemical solution and three heat-based methods. Bottles were sampled in four sites. Before cleaning and disinfection, the inner screw cap and inner-teat were the most heavily contaminated sites with 1.6-7.4 x 10(3) cfu/per-area-sampled; the bottle interior was more contaminated overall with 1.2 x 10(4) cfu/per-area-sampled. After disinfection, adherence to recommended procedures (combined with good hygiene) enabled effective decontamination to be achieved using all methods. Small differences in disinfection ability were not significant (p > 0.05). Cumulatively, 800 sites were sampled and no B. cereus or E. sakazakii were isolated. S. aureus was isolated from 0.1% of sites with one site exceeding 1 cfu/ml. Findings indicate the potential for bottle contamination and that strict adherence to four currently used methods allowed effective decontamination. This highlights the importance of effective consumer

  10. [Disinfection by-products reduction of combined disinfection by chlorine and monochloramines in distribution system].

    PubMed

    Liu, Jing; Chen, Chao; Zhang, Xiao-Jian

    2009-09-15

    Halogen disinfection by-products of four chlorined disinfection processes with long contact time in distribution system was compared in the work. These four disinfection processes are free chlorine, monochloramines, free chlorine disinfection in clearwelles while chloramines in distribution system, sequential chlorination disinfection with short-term free chlorine plus chloramines. According to the research, free chlorine generates most trihalomethanes (THMs) and haloacetic acids (HAAs) both in clearwells and distribution system, while monochloramines barely yield halogen DBPs. Free chlorine disinfection in clearwelles while chloramines in distribution system could reduce 9.6% of THMs and 42% of HAAs in 24 h contact time of distribution system compared with free chlorine. But free chlorine has contacted with water for 2 h in this process, halogen DBPs have been yielded substantially. Process of sequential chlorination disinfection could control DBPs more effectively due to keeping a short contact time of free chlorine and water. 48% of THMs and 72% of HAAs are reduced in 24h compared with free chlorine. In conclusion, sequential chlorination disinfection is a more effective disinfection process for controlling DBPs and water safety.

  11. [Virucidal activity of disinfectants. Influence of the serum protein upon the virucidal activity of disinfectants].

    PubMed

    Noda, M; Matsuda, S; Kobayashi, M

    2000-08-01

    Five disinfectants were tested for virucidal activity on three DNA viruses and three RNA viruses in the presence or absence of serum protein. Disinfectants of the aldehyde and halogen groups had a virucidal activity on human herpes virus, bovine rhabdo virus, human immunodeficiency virus, human adeno virus, porcine parvo virus, and polio virus. Disinfectants of the invert and amphoteric soap groups, and biganide group had a destructive effect on RNA and DNA viruses possessing an envelope. The presence of serum protein exerted great influence upon the virucidal activity of disinfectants of the invert and amphoteric soap groups.

  12. Formation of organic chloramines during water disinfection: chlorination versus chloramination.

    PubMed

    Lee, Wontae; Westerhoff, Paul

    2009-05-01

    Many of the available studies on formation of organic chloramines during chlorination or chloramination have involved model organic nitrogen compounds (e.g., amino acids), but not naturally occurring organic nitrogen in water. This study assessed organic chloramine formation during chlorination and chloramination of 16 natural organic matter (NOM) solutions and 16 surface waters which contained dissolved organic nitrogen (DON). Chlorination rapidly formed organic chloramines within 10 min, whereas chloramination formed organic chloramination much more slowly, reaching the maximum concentration between 2 and 120 h after the addition of monochloramine into the solutions containing DON. The average organic chloramine formation upon addition of free chlorine and monochloramine into the NOM solutions were 0.78 mg-Cl(2)/mg-DON at 10 min and 0.16 mg-Cl(2)/mg-DON at 24h, respectively. Organic chloramine formation upon chlorination and chloramination increased as the dissolved organic carbon/dissolved organic nitrogen (DOC/DON) ratio decreased (i.e., DON contents increased). Chlorination of molecular weight (10,000 Da) fractionated water showed that molecular weight of DON would not impact the amount of organic chloramines produced. Comparison of three different disinfection schemes at water treatment plants (free chlorine, preformed monochloramine, and chlorine/ammonia additions) indicated organic chloramine formation could lead to a possible overestimation of disinfection capacity in many chloraminated water systems that add chlorine followed by an ammonia addition to form monochloramine.

  13. Disinfection efficacy of organic chloramines.

    PubMed

    Donnermair, Martina M; Blatchley, Ernest R

    2003-04-01

    The disinfection efficacies of model organic chloramines were investigated. Twenty amino acids and two nucleic acid bases were chlorinated separately with sodium hypochlorite at a Cl:N molar ratio of 0.4:1, and were then used to treat an E. coli suspension for 60 min. DPD/FAS titration was carried out to obtain the concentration of the chlorinated nitrogenous organic compounds as a function of time. In addition, membrane introduction mass spectrometry (MIMS) was used to quantify inorganic chloramines (mono-, di-, and trichloramine). The results of these experiments showed that the organic chloramines examined in this research had little or no effect on the viability of E. coli. MIMS analyses demonstrated that there was no quantifiable formation of inorganic chloramines when the organic nitrogen compounds were chlorinated.

  14. Residual structure of Streptococcus mutans biofilm following complete disinfection favors secondary bacterial adhesion and biofilm re-development.

    PubMed

    Ohsumi, Tatsuya; Takenaka, Shoji; Wakamatsu, Rika; Sakaue, Yuuki; Narisawa, Naoki; Senpuku, Hidenobu; Ohshima, Hayato; Terao, Yutaka; Okiji, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    Chemical disinfection of oral biofilms often leaves biofilm structures intact. This study aimed to examine whether the residual structure promotes secondary bacterial adhesion. Streptococcus mutans biofilms generated on resin-composite disks in a rotating disc reactor were disinfected completely with 70% isopropyl alcohol, and were again cultured in the same reactor after resupplying with the same bacterial solution. Specimens were subjected to fluorescence confocal laser scanning microscopy, viable cell counts and PCR-Invader assay in order to observe and quantify secondarily adhered cells. Fluorescence microscopic analysis, particularly after longitudinal cryosectioning, demonstrated stratified patterns of viable cells on the disinfected biofilm structure. Viable cell counts of test specimens were significantly higher than those of controls, and increased according to the amount of residual structure and culture period. Linear regression analysis exhibited a high correlation between viable and total cell counts. It was concluded that disinfected biofilm structures favored secondary bacterial adhesion.

  15. Pilot Study for UVA-LED Disinfection of Escherichia coli in Water for Space and Earth Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ragolta, Carolina

    2010-01-01

    To test the efficacy of UVA-LED disinfection, a solution of Escherichia coli was pumped through a modified drip flow reactor at a flow rate of 1 ml/min. The experiment was conducted in a controlled environment chamber to ensure that temperature did not cause disinfection. The reactor featured three wells with different treatments: UVA-LED irradiation, UVA-LEDs with Ti02, and UVA-LEDs with nanosilver. Samples from each well were taken throughout a 340 hour period, inactivated, assayed, and analyzed for E. coli disinfection. Results of the duplicate experiments indicated longer exposure times are needed for UVA-LED disinfection of E. coli in water. Further research would consider a longer sampling period and different test conditions, such as increased contact area and various flow rates.

  16. 9 CFR 71.10 - Permitted disinfectants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... AGRICULTURE INTERSTATE TRANSPORTATION OF ANIMALS (INCLUDING POULTRY) AND ANIMAL PRODUCTS GENERAL PROVISIONS..., Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act (7 U.S.C. 135 et seq.), with tuberculocidal claims, as disinfectants...

  17. Wastewater Disinfectants: Many Called--Few Chosen

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, James W.

    1978-01-01

    Gives a comparative study of disinfectants used to rid wastewater of pathogens. Concentrates on the effects of chlorine and ozone, with some mention of ultra-violet irradiation, bromine chloride, and chlorine dioxide. (MA)

  18. A simple device for disinfecting endoscopes.

    PubMed

    Wagenvoort, J H; van Blankenstein, M; Kooyman-Op de Hoek, G; Boks, A L; van Oudenaarde, P H

    1986-01-01

    A method for disinfecting fibreoptic endoscopes with povidone-iodine and a simple cleaning device, consisting of a curved glass pipe and a peristaltic pump is described. If properly employed the system produces satisfactory results.

  19. Disinfection of Burkholderia pseudomallei in potable water.

    PubMed

    Howard, Kay; Inglis, Timothy J J

    2005-03-01

    The effect of chlorine, monochloramine and UV disinfection on the water-borne pathogen Burkholderia pseudomallei was assessed. Persistence of B. pseudomallei was verified by MPN involving a one-step recovery procedure. Chlorine proved the most effective disinfectant with a 99.99% reduction of a 10(6) CFU/mL pure bacterial culture followed by 99.9% reduction by monochloramine and 99% reduction by UV. Co-culture of B. pseudomallei with Acanthamoeba astronyxis was found to greatly enhance survival of B. pseudomallei in the presence of all disinfecting agents tested. For example, when amoebae were present 100 times more monochloramine was required to maintain the disinfectant efficacy. Given the results obtained from these co-culture experiments, more research is needed to investigate the role of amoeba and biofilms in survival of B. pseudomallei in potable water.

  20. ALTERNATIVE DISINFECTION FOR DRINKING WATER TREATMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    During a one-yr study at Jefferson Parish, La., the chemical, microbiological, and mutagenic effects os using the major drinkgin water disinfectants (chlorine, chlorine dioxide, chloramine, ozone) were evaluated. Tests were performed on samples collected from various treatment s...

  1. ALTERNATIVE DISINFECTANTS FOR DRINKING WATER TREATMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    During a one-year study at Jefferson Parish, Louisiana the chemical, microbiological, and mutagenic effects of using the major drinking water disinfectants (chlorine, chlorine dioxide, chloramine, ozone) were evaluated. ests were performed on samples collected from various treatm...

  2. Disinfection, sterilization, and antisepsis: An overview.

    PubMed

    Rutala, William A; Weber, David J

    2016-05-02

    All invasive procedures involve contact by a medical device or surgical instrument with a patient's sterile tissue or mucous membranes. The level of disinfection or sterilization is dependent on the intended use of the object: critical (items that contact sterile tissue such as surgical instruments), semicritical (items that contact mucous membrane such as endoscopes), and noncritical (devices that contact only intact skin such as stethoscopes) items require sterilization, high-level disinfection and low-level disinfection, respectively. Cleaning must always precede high-level disinfection and sterilization. Antiseptics are essential to infection prevention as part of a hand hygiene program as well as several other uses such as surgical hand antisepsis and pre-operative skin preparation.

  3. Environmental Cleaning and Disinfecting for MRSA

    MedlinePlus

    ... difference between cleaners, sanitizers, and disinfectants? Cleaners or detergents are products that are used to remove soil, ... germs (like bacteria, viruses, and fungi). Cleaners or detergents work by washing the surface to lift dirt ...

  4. Performic acid (PFA): tests on an advanced primary effluent show promising disinfection performance.

    PubMed

    Gehr, R; Chen, D; Moreau, M

    2009-01-01

    Performic acid, or PFA (CH(2)O(3)), is a well-known oxidizing agent and disinfectant in the medical field and food industry. It has recently become available on a commercial scale for potential use in wastewater disinfection. This study investigated its application to an advanced primary effluent which is recalcitrant to disinfection by UV and peracetic acid (PAA). Methods were developed for determining PFA concentrations in stock solutions as well as in residual concentrations in the wastewater. Batch and continuous-flow pilot studies showed a correlation between log fecal coliform removals and PFA doses. A PFA dose of approximately 3.4 mg/L and a contact time of 45 minutes could achieve 3-logs removal, and almost total disinfection could be achieved using a dose of 6 mg/L. The by-products of PFA addition are hydrogen peroxide and formic acid (CHOOH), neither of which is considered to be toxic to aquatic fauna at the doses required for disinfection.

  5. New developments in disinfection and sterilization.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Craig A

    2016-05-02

    A review of regulatory clearances for selected new sterilization and disinfection products for the period January 2012-June 2015 indicates continued leverage of established technologies for steam and low-temperature sterilization, and high-level disinfection. New products in these areas were typically modified and improved versions of existing products, with the exception of a new combination hydrogen peroxide/ozone sterilizer. Development of new low-temperature sterilization technologies to address continued evolution of complex medical devices is expected to continue.

  6. [Elimination of microscopic filamentous fungi with disinfectants].

    PubMed

    Laciaková, A; Laciak, V

    1994-01-01

    The antifungal effectivity of three single-component (Persteril, Septonex, Glutaraldehyd) and of three combined (Persteril+Septonex, Pesteril+Glutaraldehyd, Glutaraldehyd+Septonex) commercially available disinfectants was monitored by the diffuse method on five fen of the microscopic filamentous fungi Aspergillus alternata, Aspergillus niger, Mucor fragillis, Fusarium moniliforme, Penicillium glabrum. The highest antifungal activity was observed in 2% Persteril while 2% Persteril + 1% Septonex were the most effective among the combined disinfectants. M. fragilis was the most resistant strain.

  7. Impact of chlorinated disinfection on copper corrosion in hot water systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montes, J. Castillo; Hamdani, F.; Creus, J.; Touzain, S.; Correc, O.

    2014-09-01

    In France, hot water quality control inside buildings is occasionally ensured by disinfection treatments using temperature increases or addition of sodium hypochlorite (between 0.5 ppm and 1 ppm residual free chlorine). This disinfectant is a strong oxidiser and it could interact with metallic pipes usually used in hot water systems. This work deals with the study of the impact of these treatments on the durability of copper pipes. The objective of this work was to investigate the influence of sodium hypochlorite concentration and temperature on the copper corrosion mechanism. Copper samples were tested under dynamic and static conditions of ageing with sodium hypochlorite solutions ranging from 0 to 100 ppm with temperature at 50 °C and 70 °C. The efficiency of a corrosion inhibitor was investigated in dynamic conditions. Visual observations and analytical analyses of the internal surface of samples was studied at different ageing duration. Corrosion products were characterised by X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy. Temperature and disinfectant were found to considerably affect the copper corrosion mechanism. Surprisingly, the corrosiveness of the solution was higher at lower temperatures. The temperature influences the nature of corrosion products. The protection efficiency is then strongly depend on the nature of the corrosion products formed at the surface of copper samples exposed to the aggressive solutions containing different concentration of disinfectant.

  8. Analysis of the sporicidal activity of chlorine dioxide disinfectant against Bacillus anthracis (Sterne strain)

    PubMed Central

    Chatuev, B.A.; Peterson, J.W.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Routine surface decontamination is an essential hospital and laboratory procedure, but the list of effective, noncorrosive disinfectants that kill spores is limited. We investigated the sporicidal potential of an aqueous chlorine dioxide solution and encountered some unanticipated problems. Quantitative bacteriological culture methods were used to determine the log10 reduction of Bacillus anthracis (Sterne strain) spores following 3 min exposure to various concentrations of aqueous chlorine dioxide solutions at room temperature in sealed tubes, as well as spraying onto plastic and stainless steel surfaces in a biological safety cabinet. Serial 10-fold dilutions of the treated spores were then plated on 5% sheep blood agar plates, and the survivor colonies were enumerated. Disinfection of spore suspensions with aqueous chlorine dioxide solution in sealed microfuge tubes was highly effective, reducing the viable spore counts by 8 log10 in only 3 min. By contrast, the process of spraying or spreading the disinfectant onto surfaces resulted in only a 1 log10 kill because the chlorine dioxide gas was rapidly vaporised from the solutions. Full potency of the sprayed aqueous chlorine dioxide solution was restored by preparing the chlorine dioxide solution in 5% bleach (0.3% sodium hypochlorite). The volatility of chlorine dioxide can cause treatment failures that constitute a serious hazard for unsuspecting users. Supplementation of the chlorine dioxide solution with 5% bleach (0.3% sodium hypochlorite) restored full potency and increased stability for one week. PMID:20061062

  9. Analysis of the sporicidal activity of chlorine dioxide disinfectant against Bacillus anthracis (Sterne strain).

    PubMed

    Chatuev, B M; Peterson, J W

    2010-02-01

    Routine surface decontamination is an essential hospital and laboratory procedure, but the list of effective, noncorrosive disinfectants that kill spores is limited. We investigated the sporicidal potential of an aqueous chlorine dioxide solution and encountered some unanticipated problems. Quantitative bacteriological culture methods were used to determine the log(10) reduction of Bacillus anthracis (Sterne strain) spores following 3min exposure to various concentrations of aqueous chlorine dioxide solutions at room temperature in sealed tubes, as well as spraying onto plastic and stainless steel surfaces in a biological safety cabinet. Serial 10-fold dilutions of the treated spores were then plated on 5% sheep blood agar plates, and the survivor colonies were enumerated. Disinfection of spore suspensions with aqueous chlorine dioxide solution in sealed microfuge tubes was highly effective, reducing the viable spore counts by 8log(10) in only 3min. By contrast, the process of spraying or spreading the disinfectant onto surfaces resulted in only a 1log(10) kill because the chlorine dioxide gas was rapidly vaporised from the solutions. Full potency of the sprayed aqueous chlorine dioxide solution was restored by preparing the chlorine dioxide solution in 5% bleach (0.3% sodium hypochlorite). The volatility of chlorine dioxide can cause treatment failures that constitute a serious hazard for unsuspecting users. Supplementation of the chlorine dioxide solution with 5% bleach (0.3% sodium hypochlorite) restored full potency and increased stability for one week.

  10. Optimization of fixed titanium dioxide film on PET bottles and visual indicator for water disinfection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heredia-Munoz, Manuel Antonio

    Water is perhaps the most important resource that sustains human life. According to the World Health Organization (WHO), almost two billion people do not have access to the required water that is needed to satisfy their daily needs and one billion do not have access to clean sources of water for consumption, most of them living in isolated and poor areas around the globe. Poor quality water increases the risk of cholera, typhoid fever and dysentery, and other water-borne illness making this problem a real crisis that humankind is facing. Several water disinfection technologies have been proposed as solutions for this problem. Solar water disinfection using TiO2 coated PET bottles was the alternative that is studied in this work. This technology does not only inactivate bacteria but also disintegrates organic chemicals that can be present in water. The objectives of this work address the optimization of the TiO 2 coated PET bottles technologies. The improvement on the bottle coating process, using two coats of 10% W/V of TiO2 in a solution of vinegar and sodium bicarbonate to form the TiO2 film, the use of a different indigo carmine (1.25 X 10-1mg/pill) concentration in the pill indicator of contamination, the increase of the disinfection rate through shaking the bottles, degradation under intermittent UV radiation and the effect of bottle size on photocatalytic water disinfection were among the most important findings. A new mathematical model that describes better photocatalytic water disinfection in TiO2 coated bottles and simulates water disinfection under different working conditions was another important achievement. These results can now be used to design a strategy for disseminating this technology in areas where it is required and, in that way, generate the greatest positive impact on the people needing safe drinking water.

  11. Experience in Remote Demolition of the Activated Biological Shielding of the Multi Purpose Research Reactor (MZFR) on the German Karlsruhe Site - 12208

    SciTech Connect

    Eisenmann, Beata; Fleisch, Joachim; Prechtl, Erwin; Suessdorf, Werner; Urban, Manfred

    2012-07-01

    In 2009, WAK Decommissioning and Waste Management GmbH (WAK) became owner and operator of the waste treatment facilities of Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) as well as of the prototype reactors, the Compact Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactor (KNK) and Multi-Purpose Reactor (MZFR), both being in an advanced stage of dismantling. Together with the dismantling and decontamination activities of the former WAK reprocessing facility since 1990, the envisaged demolishing of the R and D reactor FR2 and a hot cell facility, all governmentally funded nuclear decommissioning projects on the Karlsruhe site are concentrated under the WAK management. The small space typical of prototype research reactors represented a challenge also during the last phase of activated dismantling, dismantling of the activated biological shield of the MZFR. Successful demolition of the biological shield required detailed planning and extensive testing in the years before. In view of the limited space and the ambient dose rate that was too high for manual work, it was required to find a tool carrier system to take up and control various demolition and dismantling tools in a remote manner. The strategy formulated in the concept of dismantling the biological shield by means of a modified electro-hydraulic demolition excavator in an adaptable working scaffolding turned out to be feasible. The following boundary conditions were essential: - Remote exchange of the dismantling and removal tools in smallest space. - Positioning of various supply facilities on the working platform. - Avoiding of interfering edges. - Optimization of mass flow (removal of the dismantled mass from the working area). - Maintenance in the surroundings of the dismantling area (in the controlled area). - Testing and qualification of the facilities and training of the staff. Both the dismantling technique chosen and the proceeding selected proved to be successful. Using various designs of universal cutters developed on the basis of

  12. Reproductive effects of alternative disinfectants

    SciTech Connect

    Carlton, B.D.; Barlett, P.; Basaran, A.; Colling, K.; Osis, I.; Smith, M.K.

    1986-11-01

    Organohalides formed through the reaction of chlorine and organic compounds in natural and waste waters pose potential health hazards. For this reason, alternative water disinfectants that do not form organohalides are being investigated with great interest. In this laboratory, the authors have examined the reproductive effects of chloramine and chlorine administered by gavage in Long-Evans rats. Animals were treated for a total of 66 to 76 days. Males were treated for 56 days and females for 14 days prior to breeding and throughout the 10-day breeding period. Females were treated throughout gestation and lactation. Following breeding, the males were necropsied and evaluated for sperm parameters and reproductive tract histopathology. Adult females and some pups were necropsied at weaning on postnatal day 21. Other pups were treated postweaning until 28 or 40 days of age. These pups were evaluated for the day of vaginal patency and thyroid hormone levels. No differences were observed between control rats and those rats exposed to up to 5 mg/kg/day chlorine or 10 mg/kg/day chloramine when fertility, viability, litter size, day of eye opening, or day of vaginal patency were evaluated. No alterations in sperm count, sperm direct progressive movement percent motility, or sperm morphology were observed among adult male rats. In addition, male and female reproductive organ weights were comparable to their respective control groups, and no significant histopathologic changes were observed among chlorine- or chloramine-treated male and female rats.

  13. Potential application of high pressure carbon dioxide in treated wastewater and water disinfection: Recent overview and further trends.

    PubMed

    Vo, Huy Thanh; Imai, Tsuyoshi; Ho, Truc Thanh; Dang, Thanh-Loc Thi; Hoang, Son Anh

    2015-10-01

    Recently emerging disadvantages in conventional disinfection have heightened the need for finding a new solution. Developments in the use of high pressure carbon dioxide for food preservation and sterilization have led to a renewed interest in its applicability in wastewater treatment and water disinfection. Pressurized CO2 is one of the most investigated methods of antibacterial treatment and has been used extensively for decades to inhibit pathogens in dried food and liquid products. This study reviews the literature concerning the utility of CO2 as a disinfecting agent, and the pathogen inactivation mechanism of CO2 treatment is evaluated based on all available research. In this paper, it will be argued that the successful application and high effectiveness of CO2 treatment in liquid foods open a potential opportunity for its use in wastewater treatment and water disinfection. The findings from models with different operating conditions (pressure, temperature, microorganism, water content, media …) suggest that most microorganisms are successfully inhibited under CO2 treatment. It will also be shown that the bacterial deaths under CO2 treatment can be explained by many different mechanisms. Moreover, the findings in this study can help to address the recently emerging problems in water disinfection, such as disinfection by-products (resulting from chlorination or ozone treatment).

  14. Reduction of Acid-Fast and Non-Acid-Fast Bacteria by Point of Use Coagulation-Flocculation-Disinfection

    PubMed Central

    Casanova, Lisa M.; Sobsey, Mark D.

    2015-01-01

    Point of use (POU) household water treatment is increasingly being adopted as a solution for access to safe water. Non-tuberculous Mycobacteria (NTM) are found in water, but there is little research on whether NTM survive POU treatment. Mycobacteria may be removed by multi-barrier treatment systems that combine processes such as coagulation, settling and disinfection. This work evaluated removal of a non-tuberculous Mycobacterium (Mycobaterium terrae) and a Gram-negative non-acid-fast environmental bacterium (Aeromonas hydrophila) by combined coagulation-flocculation disinfection POU treatment. Aeromonas hydrophila showed 7.7 log10 reduction in demand free buffer, 6.8 log10 in natural surface water, and 4 log10 reduction in fecally contaminated surface water. Turbidity after treatment was <1 NTU. There was almost no reduction in levels of viable M. terrae by coagulant-flocculant-disinfectant in natural water after 30 minutes. The lack of Mycobacteria reduction was similar for both combined coagulant-flocculant-disinfectant and hypochlorite alone. A POU coagulant-flocculant-disinfectant treatment effectively reduced A. hydrophila from natural surface waters but not Mycobacteria. These results reinforce previous findings that POU coagulation-flocculation-disinfection is effective against gram-negative enteric bacteria. POU treatment and safe storage interventions may need to take into account risks from viable NTM in treated stored water and consider alternative treatment processes to achieve NTM reductions. PMID:26580632

  15. [Comparison of the quality and toxicity of wastewater after chlorine and chlorine dioxide disinfections].

    PubMed

    Wang, Li-sha; Zhang, Tong; Hu, Hong-ying

    2005-11-01

    The effects of chlorine and chlorine dioxide disinfections on quality and toxicity of wastewater were compared. The experiment results showed that chlorine disinfection had no obvious effect on wastewater color, while chlorine dioxide disinfection decreased wastewater color observably. The DOC of wastewater did not change much after chlorine and chlorine dioxide disinfections. Chlorine disinfection significantly increased UV230 of wastewater and chlorine dioxide disinfection slightly decreased UV230 of wastewater. When the disinfectants dosage was 30 mg/L, UV230 increased about 0.7 cm(-1) after chlorine disinfection and decreased about 0.05 cm(-1) after chlorine dioxide disinfection. The acute toxicity of wastewater increased with increasing disinfectants dosage for both chlorine and chlorine dioxide disinfections and the acute toxicity after chlorine disinfection is much stronger than that after chlorine dioxide disinfection. The genotoxicity of wastewater increased slightly after chlorine disinfection and decreased slightly after chlorine dioxide disinfection.

  16. Development of a Cavity Disinfectant Containing Antibacterial Monomer MDPB.

    PubMed

    Hirose, N; Kitagawa, R; Kitagawa, H; Maezono, H; Mine, A; Hayashi, M; Haapasalo, M; Imazato, S

    2016-12-01

    An experimental cavity disinfectant (ACC) that is intended to be used for various direct and indirect restorations was prepared by adding an antibacterial monomer 12-methacryloyloxydodecylpyridinum bromide (MDPB) at 5% into 80% ethanol. The antibacterial effectiveness of ACC and its influences on the bonding abilities of resin cements were investigated. To examine the antibacterial activity of unpolymerized MDPB, the minimum inhibitory and bactericidal concentrations (MIC and MBC) were determined for Streptococcus mutans, Lactobacillus casei, Actinomyces naeslundii, Parvimonas micra, Enterococcus faecalis, Fusobacterium nucleatum, and Porphyromonas gingivalis Antibacterial activities of ACC and the commercial cavity disinfectant containing 2% chlorhexidine and ethanol (CPS) were evaluated by agar disk diffusion tests through 7 bacterial species and by MIC and MBC measurement for S. mutans The effects of ACC and CPS to kill bacteria in dentinal tubules were compared with an S. mutans-infected dentin model. Shear bond strength tests were used to examine the influences of ACC on the dentin-bonding abilities of a self-adhesive resin cement and a dual-cure resin cement used with a primer. Unpolymerized MDPB showed strong antibacterial activity against 7 oral bacteria. ACC produced inhibition zones against all bacterial species similar to CPS. For ACC and CPS, the MIC value for S. mutans was identical, and the MBC was similar with only a 1-step dilution difference (1:2). Treatment of infected dentin with ACC resulted in significantly greater bactericidal effects than CPS (P < 0.05, analysis of variance and Tukey's honest significant difference test). ACC showed no negative influences on the bonding abilities to dentin for both resin cements, while CPS reduced the bond strength of the self-adhesive resin cement (P < 0.05). This study clarified that the experimental cavity disinfectant containing 5% MDPB is more effective in vitro than the commercially available

  17. New non-alcoholic formulation for hand disinfection.

    PubMed

    Biagi, Marco; Giachetti, Daniela; Miraldi, Elisabetta; Figura, Natale

    2014-04-01

    Hand washing is considered as the single most important strategy to prevent infections. World health organization (WHO) defines hand hygiene as a primary issue of personal care with particular reference to hospital personnel and health facility workers. In this work, we investigated a new combination for hand disinfection as an alternative to alcohol-based and chlorhexidine products. The new combination of 5-pyrrolidone-2-carboxylic acid (PCA) and copper sulphate pentahydrate (CS) was tested upon different bacterial species that normally colonize hands, including Staphylococcus aureus, methicillin resistant S. aureus (MR S. aureus), Staphylococcus epidermidis, multidrug resistant S. epidermidis (MDR S. epidermidis), Streptococcus pyogenes, Streptococcus agalactiae, Escherichia coli, Candida albicans and three clinical isolates: MR S. aureus, MDR S. epidermidis, and an E. coli strain. Minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs), Minimal bactericidal concentrations (MBCs), fractional inhibitory concentration (FIC) indices, and fractional bactericidal concentration (FBC) indices were evaluated. Ethanol 70% V/V, isopropanol 60% V/V, and 4% w/V chlorhexidine solution were used as reference hand disinfectants. Copper sulphate pentahydrate was very effective against all tested microorganisms: The MIC and MBC for CS ranged from 781 mg/l against S. pyogenes to 12500 mg/l against E. coli strains and C. albicans. In addition, PCA exhibited a good antimicrobial activity, in particular, against S. pyogenes and S. agalactiae. The combination of CS and PCA showed a strong synergistic effect and all FIC indices were ≤0·500. The combination of CS and PCA were more effective than ethanol 70% V/V and isopropanol 60% V/V. In addition to antimicrobial activity, the new formulation possesses peculiar features such as residual activity and moisturizing effect. This work identifies a new strategy for hand disinfection.

  18. EFFICACY OF NOVEL WATER DISINFECTION TECHNIQUES IN HORTICULTURAL NUTRIENT RECYCLING.

    PubMed

    Heungens, K; Clierinck, M; Inghelbrecht, S; Vissers, M

    2015-01-01

    Hydroponic systems used for growing potted ornamentals in greenhouses are commonly ebb-and-flow irrigation systems. The drainage water is usually recycled to save water and nutrients. To avoid the spread of pathogens in these closed irrigation systems, disinfection of the recycled water is standard practice. Growers can use slow sand filtration or UV-radiation techniques, but these methods are often either not sulted for specific problems or they require an excessively large investment. The objective of this study was to test less expensive but effective alternative disinfection systems. The efficacy of five disinfection systems against fungi and oomycetes was determined: Aqua-Hort (based on Cu-ions), Reciclean (performic acid), D1-OX Forte (CIO2), ECA (electrochemically activated water = anodic oxidation: hypochlorite and free radicals) and Newtec (also anodic oxidation). These five systems and a no-sterilization control were integrated in small closed ebb-and-flow circuits with nutrient solution reservoirs of 400 L each. Activity against Fusarium was excellent with ECA, good with Newtec and DI-OX Forte, moderate with high doses of Reciclean (250 ppm H2O2 and poor with the Aqua-Hort. There was no Pythium in the ECA and Newtec systems, while still so in the Aqua-Hort system, even at high doses (up to 7 ppm Cu++). Although the Reciclean (up to 100 ppm H2O2) and Aqua-Hort systems did not perform well against the pathogens, they did very well against algae; especially Reciclean was also useful against duckweed in water and liverwort on soil substrates. Concentrations of total Cl were elevated in water, substrate and plants after treatments with ECA and Newtec; other accumulations were Cu (Aqua-Hort), Na and SO4 (DI-OX Forte). However, only on a limited number of plant species these accumulations produced phytotoxic effects.

  19. Effectiveness of different chemical agents for disinfection of gutta-percha cones.

    PubMed

    Nabeshima, Cleber K; Machado, Manoel Eduardo de Lima; Britto, Maria Leticia Borges; Pallotta, Raul Capp

    2011-12-01

    This aim of this study was to evaluate and compare the efficacy of different chemical methods to disinfect gutta-percha cones (GP). Eighty-six size 80 GP cones were used. The cones were contaminated by immersion in saliva and Enterococcus faecalis. Four chemical agents were used: 1% sodium hypochlorite (G1), 2% chlorhexidine gluconate (G2), 10% povidone iodine (G3) and 0.9% saline solution (G4). GP cones were immersed in the solutions for periods of 1 and 10 min. After the disinfection procedure, the cones were incubated in blood heart infusion and the presence of bacterial growth was analysed by turbidity of the medium. In G4, bacterial growth was observed in all specimens; G3 showed growth after immersion for 1 min when contaminated with E. faecalis; G1 showed diverse results after the immersion for 1 min. Meanwhile, G1 and G3 after 10 min, and G2 at both times evaluated did not show bacterial growth. The immersion of GP cones in 2% chlorhexidine gluconate for 1 min was an effective method for GP disinfection, while 10% povidone iodine and 1% sodium hypochlorite needed 10 min of immersion to disinfect the GP.

  20. The History And Future Directions Of Biosolids Disinfection

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper reviews the history of disinfection practices, emphasizing their application to human fecal material and the residuals from wastewater treatment. It discusses development of the current US sewage sludge disinfection regulations and their associated practices; discusse...

  1. The History And Future Directions Of Biosolids Disinfection (Presentation)

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper reviews the history of disinfection practices, emphasizing their application to human fecal material and the residuals from wastewater treatment. It discusses development of the current US sewage sludge disinfection regulations and their associated practices; discusse...

  2. Formation and Occurrence of Disinfection By-Products

    EPA Science Inventory

    Disinfection by-products (DBPs) are formed when disinfectants such as chlorine, ozone, chlorine dioxide, or chloramines react with naturally occurring organic matter, anthropogenic contaminants, bromide, and iodide during the production of drinking water. There is concern about D...

  3. Basic Information about Chloramines and Drinking Water Disinfection

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Chloramines are disinfectants used to treat drinking water. Chloramines are most commonly formed when ammonia is added to chlorine to treat drinking water. Chloramines provide longer-lasting disinfection as the water moves through pipes to consumers.

  4. MULTISPECTRAL IDENTIFICATION OF CHLORINE DIOXIDE DISINFECTION BYPRODUCTS IN DRINKING WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper discusses the identification of organic disinfection byproducts (DBPs) at a pilot plant in Evansville, IN, which uses chlorine dioxide as a primary disinfectant. Unconventional multispectral identification techniques (gas chromatography combined with high- and low reso...

  5. DISINFECTION PROCESSES AND STABILITY REFINEMENTS TO BIOSOLIDS TREATMENT TECHNOLOGIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper reviews the current US sewage sludge disinfection regulations and their associated practices; discusses the limitations of the practices; discusses the criteria employed in evaluating a new (innovative or alternative) disinfection process and both notes some processes ...

  6. PARTICLE ASSOCIATION EFFECTS ON MICROBIAL INDICATOR CONCENTRATIONS AND CSO DISINFECTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Combined sewer overflow (CSO) and wastewater disinfection effectiveness are evaluated by measuring microbial indicator concentrations before and after disinfection. The standard techniques for quantifying indicators are membrane filtration and multiple-tube fermentation/most pro...

  7. Acetic Acid, the Active Component of Vinegar, Is an Effective Tuberculocidal Disinfectant

    PubMed Central

    Cortesia, Claudia; Vilchèze, Catherine; Bernut, Audrey; Contreras, Whendy; Gómez, Keyla; de Waard, Jacobus; Jacobs, William R.; Kremer, Laurent; Takiff, Howard

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Effective and economical mycobactericidal disinfectants are needed to kill both Mycobacterium tuberculosis and non-M. tuberculosis mycobacteria. We found that acetic acid (vinegar) efficiently kills M. tuberculosis after 30 min of exposure to a 6% acetic acid solution. The activity is not due to pH alone, and propionic acid also appears to be bactericidal. M. bolletii and M. massiliense nontuberculous mycobacteria were more resistant, although a 30-min exposure to 10% acetic acid resulted in at least a 6-log10 reduction of viable bacteria. Acetic acid (vinegar) is an effective mycobactericidal disinfectant that should also be active against most other bacteria. These findings are consistent with and extend the results of studies performed in the early and mid-20th century on the disinfectant capacity of organic acids. IMPORTANCE  Mycobacteria are best known for causing tuberculosis and leprosy, but infections with nontuberculous mycobacteria are an increasing problem after surgical or cosmetic procedures or in the lungs of cystic fibrosis and immunosuppressed patients. Killing mycobacteria is important because Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains can be multidrug resistant and therefore potentially fatal biohazards, and environmental mycobacteria must be thoroughly eliminated from surgical implements and respiratory equipment. Currently used mycobactericidal disinfectants can be toxic, unstable, and expensive. We fortuitously found that acetic acid kills mycobacteria and then showed that it is an effective mycobactericidal agent, even against the very resistant, clinically important Mycobacterium abscessus complex. Vinegar has been used for thousands of years as a common disinfectant, and if it can kill mycobacteria, the most disinfectant-resistant bacteria, it may prove to be a broadly effective, economical biocide with potential usefulness in health care settings and laboratories, especially in resource-poor countries. PMID:24570366

  8. The influence of mixing methods and disinfectant on the physical properties of alginate impression materials.

    PubMed

    Dreesen, Karoline; Kellens, Annelies; Wevers, Martine; Thilakarathne, Pushpike J; Willems, Guy

    2013-06-01

    The aims of this in vitro study were to quantify the effect of manual versus automatic mixing and of using a disinfectant on mechanical properties of three different alginate impression materials. Two of the three alginates tested were especially developed for orthodontic use: Orthotrace® and Orthofine® while the third was a conventional alginate CA37FS®. Alginates were mixed by hand or automatically using a Cavex alginate mixer II®. Mixing was performed at room temperature using tap water. The material was allowed to set in a water bath at 35°C (±1°C), simulating intra-oral setting conditions, and half of the samples were disinfected before testing. For each tested material, 10 standardized samples were used. The disinfectant used was the CavexImpreSafe® that has a bactericide, virucide, and fungicide function. The specimens were exposed for 3 minutes in a 3% solution and were then tested according to the ISO 1563: 1990 (E) standard specifications. Descriptive statistics and three-way analysis of variance were performed, and a 5% significance level was used for statistical analysis. Evaluation of tensile strength and elastic recovery of different alginate samples, hand versus automatical mixing or disinfected versus not disinfected, resulted in significant differences for all materials except for Orthofine®. Considering detail reproduction, all three alginates evaluated reproduced the 50-μm line successfully without interruption. The mixing method can significantly affect the elastic recovery and tensile strength of the alginates tested while the effect of using a disinfectant is less explicit.

  9. How clean is your scope? A completed audit cycle of the disinfection of nasendoscopes

    PubMed Central

    Lakhani, Raj; Smithard, Abigail; Bleach, Nigel

    2010-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Correct disinfection of nasendoscopes is essential to address both the potential iatrogenic transmission of infection and to avoid injury from the chemicals used. MATERIALS AND METHODS Standards-based audit of the disinfection of nasendoscopes against the ENT UK guidelines, ervention: instructional poster and staff training session. The disinfection process was re-audited one month later. RESULTS A total of 10 sessions and 31 cleaning episodes were audited in the first cycle (C1). A total of 12 sessions and 36 cleaning episodes were re-audited in the second cycle (C2). Clinic set-up results: there was a marked improvement in the checking of the expiry date (C1 = 5/10; C2 = 10/12; P ≤ 0.001) and recording the date for the solution to be discarded (C1 = 0/10; C2 = 10/12; P ≤ 0.048). Each cleaning episode results: an improvement in transportation in a ‘dirty bag’ (C1 = 0/31; C2 = 19/36; P ≤ 0.001), washing of the scope (C1 = 0/31; C2 = 36/36; P ≤ 0.001), adequate disinfection time (C1 = 16/31; C2 = 33/36; P≤ 0.001), rinsing and drying with alcohol swab (C1 = 0/31; C2 = 35/36; P ≤ 0.001) and placing of the scope in a ‘clean bag’ for storage (C1 = 0/31; C2 = 35/36; P ≤ 0.001) was seen after the intervention. CONCLUSIONS The introduction of a poster and training in the disinfection of nasendoscopes proved successful in improving compliance with the published guidelines. These simple measures were simple, cheap and effective to institute. The benefit of improving the disinfection of nasendoscopes to patients, doctors and the organisations that they work in is clear. PMID:20883605

  10. Evaluation of Vinegar as a Disinfectant for Extracted Human Teeth - An in-Vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Ganipineni, Kiranmai; Babburi, Suresh; Venigalla, Aparna; Pinnisetti, Soujanya; Kotti, Ajay Benarji; Kalapala, Lavanya

    2016-01-01

    Introduction In dentistry, extracted human teeth are routinely used to learn technical and preclinical skills. Since human teeth harbour many pathogens these should be disinfected before use to minimize the risk of infections. Some commonly used disinfectants in laboratories are 10% formalin, 3% hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), 5.25% Sodium Hypochlorite (NaOCl), 70% alcohol and normal saline which have their own disadvantages like carcinogenicity, toxicity, cost effectiveness etc. Many studies have been conducted using these solutions but there is no evidence to suggest a suitable alternative for disinfecting extracted teeth. Vinegar is a sour liquid comprised mainly of acetic acid. It is cheap and commercially available shown to be effective in the prevention and control of microbial contamination. Aim The present study was conducted for evaluation of vinegar as a disinfectant for extracted teeth. Materials and Methods In this study a total of 40 (n=40) extracted non carious teeth were taken which were disinfected with various physical methods such as sterilization, autoclaving and chemical methods by using Vinegar, 70% Alcohol, 10% Formalin, 3% Hydrogen peroxide and 5.25% NaOCL. Later, teeth from each group were placed individually in separate test tubes containing 10ml of brain heart infusion broth at 37°C for 48 hrs to observe the evidence of growth of microorganisms. Results Results were analyzed using Kruskal-Wallis test. Vinegar, 10% Formalin and 3% Hydrogen peroxide were effective. The results were statistically significant with Kruskal-Wallis test value 28.053 and p-value was <0.001. Conclusion Vinegar can be used as an effective disinfectant for extracted human teeth. PMID:27630953

  11. Acetic Acid, the active component of vinegar, is an effective tuberculocidal disinfectant.

    PubMed

    Cortesia, Claudia; Vilchèze, Catherine; Bernut, Audrey; Contreras, Whendy; Gómez, Keyla; de Waard, Jacobus; Jacobs, William R; Kremer, Laurent; Takiff, Howard

    2014-02-25

    Effective and economical mycobactericidal disinfectants are needed to kill both Mycobacterium tuberculosis and non-M. tuberculosis mycobacteria. We found that acetic acid (vinegar) efficiently kills M. tuberculosis after 30 min of exposure to a 6% acetic acid solution. The activity is not due to pH alone, and propionic acid also appears to be bactericidal. M. bolletii and M. massiliense nontuberculous mycobacteria were more resistant, although a 30-min exposure to 10% acetic acid resulted in at least a 6-log10 reduction of viable bacteria. Acetic acid (vinegar) is an effective mycobactericidal disinfectant that should also be active against most other bacteria. These findings are consistent with and extend the results of studies performed in the early and mid-20th century on the disinfectant capacity of organic acids. IMPORTANCE Mycobacteria are best known for causing tuberculosis and leprosy, but infections with nontuberculous mycobacteria are an increasing problem after surgical or cosmetic procedures or in the lungs of cystic fibrosis and immunosuppressed patients. Killing mycobacteria is important because Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains can be multidrug resistant and therefore potentially fatal biohazards, and environmental mycobacteria must be thoroughly eliminated from surgical implements and respiratory equipment. Currently used mycobactericidal disinfectants can be toxic, unstable, and expensive. We fortuitously found that acetic acid kills mycobacteria and then showed that it is an effective mycobactericidal agent, even against the very resistant, clinically important Mycobacterium abscessus complex. Vinegar has been used for thousands of years as a common disinfectant, and if it can kill mycobacteria, the most disinfectant-resistant bacteria, it may prove to be a broadly effective, economical biocide with potential usefulness in health care settings and laboratories, especially in resource-poor countries.

  12. Mutagenicity and disinfection by-products in surface drinking water disinfected with peracetic acid.

    PubMed

    Monarca, Silvano; Richardson, Susan D; Feretti, Donatella; Grottolo, Mario; Thruston, Alfred D; Zani, Claudia; Navazio, Giancarlo; Ragazzo, Patrizia; Zerbini, Ilaria; Alberti, Adriana

    2002-02-01

    The aims of this research were to study the influence of peracetic acid (PAA) on the formation of mutagens in surface waters used for human consumption and to assess its potential application for the disinfection of drinking water. The results obtained using PAA were compared to those found with sodium hypochlorite (NaClO) and chlorine dioxide (ClO2). The Ames test, root anaphase aberration assay, and root/micronuclei assay in Allium cepa and Tradescantia/micronuclei test were used to evaluate the mutagenicity of disinfected samples. Microbiological tests were also performed, and disinfection by-products (DBPs) were identified using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). A slight bacterial mutagenicity was found in raw lake and river water, and similar activity was detected in disinfected samples. A plant test revealed genotoxicity in raw river water, and microbiological analysis showed that PAA has bactericidal activity but lower than that of the other disinfectants. The DBPs produced by PAA were mainly carboxylic acids, which are not recognized as mutagenic, whereas the waters treated with the other disinfectants showed the presence of mutagenic/carcinogenic halogenated DBPs. However, additional experiments should be performed with higher concentrations of PAA and using water with higher organic carbon content to better evaluate this disinfectant.

  13. DETECTION OF INFECTIOUS ADENOVIRUS IN TERTIARY TREATED AND UV DISINFECTED WASTEWATER DURING A UV DISINFECTION PILOT STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    An infectious enteric adenovirus was isolated from urban wastewater receiving tertiary treatment and ultraviolet (UV) disinfection. A pilot study was undertaken to investigate the efficacy of UV disinfection (low pressure, high intensity radiation) of total and fecal coliform bac...

  14. Integrated Disinfection By-Products Mixtures Research: Disinfection of Drinking Waters by Chlorination and Ozonation/Postchlorination Treatment Scenarios

    EPA Science Inventory

    This article describes disinfection of the same source water by two commonly used disinfection treatment scenarios for purposes of subsequent concentration, chemical analysis, and toxicological evaluation. Accompanying articles in this issue of the Journal of Toxicology and Envir...

  15. Proteomic adaptations to starvation prepare Escherichia coli for disinfection tolerance.

    PubMed

    Du, Zhe; Nandakumar, Renu; Nickerson, Kenneth W; Li, Xu

    2015-02-01

    Despite the low nutrient level and constant presence of secondary disinfectants, bacterial re-growth still occurs in drinking water distribution systems. The molecular mechanisms that starved bacteria use to survive low-level chlorine-based disinfectants are not well understood. The objective of this study is to investigate these molecular mechanisms at the protein level that prepare starved cells for disinfection tolerance. Two commonly used secondary disinfectants chlorine and monochloramine, both at 1 mg/L, were used in this study. The proteomes of normal and starved Escherichia coli (K12 MG1655) cells were studied using quantitative proteomics. Over 60-min disinfection, starved cells showed significantly higher disinfection tolerance than normal cells based on the inactivation curves for both chlorine and monochloramine. Proteomic analyses suggest that starvation may prepare cells for the oxidative stress that chlorine-based disinfection will cause by affecting glutathione metabolism. In addition, proteins involved in stress regulation and stress responses were among the ones up-regulated under both starvation and chlorine/monochloramine disinfection. By comparing the fold changes under different conditions, it is suggested that starvation prepares E. coli for disinfection tolerance by increasing the expression of enzymes that can help cells survive chlorine/monochloramine disinfection. Protein co-expression analyses show that proteins in glycolysis and pentose phosphate pathway that were up-regulated under starvation are also involved in disinfection tolerance. Finally, the production and detoxification of methylglyoxal may be involved in the chlorine-based disinfection and cell defense mechanisms.

  16. Environmental health perspectives. Volume 46. Drinking water disinfectants - December 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Lucier, G.W.; Hook, G.E.R.

    1982-01-01

    Among subjects considered are chlorine dioxide, N-chloramines, mutagenic activity by disinfectant reaction products, trihalomethane and behavioral toxicity, and carcinogenic risk estimation. There are 27 papers on these and related topics. The volume stems from a symposium on drinking water disinfectants and disinfectant by-products.

  17. Survival of Viral Biowarfare Agents in Disinfected Waters

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-07-01

    disinfection at small systems AWWA water quality division disinfection systems committee,” Journal of the American Water Works Association, vol. 92...no. 5, pp. 24–31, 2000. [2] G. F. Connell, J. C. Routt, B. Macler et al., “Committee report: disinfection at large and medium-size systems AWWA water

  18. Proteomic Adaptations to Starvation Prepare Escherichia coli for Disinfection Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Du, Zhe; Nandakumar, Renu; Nickerson, Kenneth; Li, Xu

    2015-01-01

    Despite the low nutrient level and constant presence of secondary disinfectants, bacterial re-growth still occurs in drinking water distribution systems. The molecular mechanisms that starved bacteria use to survive low-level chlorine-based disinfectants are not well understood. The objective of this study is to investigate these molecular mechanisms at the protein level that prepare starved cells for disinfection tolerance. Two commonly used secondary disinfectants chlorine and monochloramine, both at 1 mg/L, were used in this study. The proteomes of normal and starved Escherichia coli (K12 MG1655) cells were studied using quantitative proteomics. Over 60-min disinfection, starved cells showed significantly higher disinfection tolerance than normal cells based on the inactivation curves for both chlorine and monochloramine. Proteomic analyses suggest that starvation may prepare cells for the oxidative stress that chlorine-based disinfection will cause by affecting glutathione metabolism. In addition, proteins involved in stress regulation and stress responses were among the ones up-regulated under both starvation and chlorine/monochloramine disinfection. By comparing the fold changes under different conditions, it is suggested that starvation prepares E. coli for disinfection tolerance by increasing the expression of enzymes that can help cells survive chlorine/monochloramine disinfection. Protein co-expression analyses show that proteins in glycolysis and pentose phosphate pathway that were up-regulated under starvation are also involved in disinfection tolerance. Finally, the production and detoxification of methylglyoxal may be involved in the chlorine-based disinfection and cell defense mechanisms. PMID:25463932

  19. OPTIMAL SCHEDULING OF BOOSTER DISINFECTION IN WATER DISTRIBUTION SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Booster disinfection is the addition of disinfectant at locations distributed throughout a water distribution system. Such a strategy can reduce the mass of disinfectant required to maintain a detectable residual at points of consumption in the distribution system, which may lea...

  20. Evaluation of a new hydrogen peroxide wipe disinfectant.

    PubMed

    Boyce, John M; Havill, Nancy L

    2013-05-01

    A new activated hydrogen peroxide wipe disinfectant was used to disinfect 10 high-touch surfaces in 72 patient rooms. After cleaning, 99% of surfaces yielded less than 2.5 colony-forming units/cm(2), 75% yielded no growth, and 70% yielded adenosine triphosphate counts of less than 250 relative light units. The new disinfectant was highly effective.

  1. Studies on Disinfection By-Products and Drinking Water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rostad, Colleen E.

    2007-01-01

    Drinking water is disinfected with chemicals to remove pathogens, such as Giardia and Cryptosproridium, and prevent waterborne diseases such as cholera and typhoid. During disinfection, by-products are formed at trace concentrations. Because some of these by-products are suspected carcinogens, drinking water utilities must maintain the effectiveness of the disinfection process while minimizing the formation of by-products.

  2. THE TOXICOLOGY OF COMPLEX MIXTURES OF DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chemical disinfection of water is a major public health advance that has decreased dramatically water-borne disease. Chemical disinfectants react with naturally occurring organic and inorganic matter in water to produce a wide variety of disinfection byproducts (DBPs). DBP num...

  3. A Toxicological Perspective on Disinfection ByProducts

    EPA Science Inventory

    Disinfection of water is essential for reduction of microbes harmful to human health and chemical disinfection is considered one of the major public health triumphs of the 20th Century. An unintended consequence of disinfection with oxidizing chemicals is formation of disinfectio...

  4. 9 CFR 91.41 - Cleaning and disinfecting of aircraft.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Cleaning and disinfecting of aircraft... INSPECTION AND HANDLING OF LIVESTOCK FOR EXPORTATION Cleaning and Disinfecting of Aircraft § 91.41 Cleaning and disinfecting of aircraft. Prior to loading of animals, the stowage area of aircraft to be used...

  5. 9 CFR 91.41 - Cleaning and disinfecting of aircraft.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Cleaning and disinfecting of aircraft... INSPECTION AND HANDLING OF LIVESTOCK FOR EXPORTATION Cleaning and Disinfecting of Aircraft § 91.41 Cleaning and disinfecting of aircraft. Prior to loading of animals, the stowage area of aircraft to be used...

  6. 9 CFR 91.41 - Cleaning and disinfecting of aircraft.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Cleaning and disinfecting of aircraft... INSPECTION AND HANDLING OF LIVESTOCK FOR EXPORTATION Cleaning and Disinfecting of Aircraft § 91.41 Cleaning and disinfecting of aircraft. Prior to loading of animals, the stowage area of aircraft to be used...

  7. Intracellular mechanisms of solar water disinfection

    PubMed Central

    Castro-Alférez, María; Polo-López, María Inmaculada; Fernández-Ibáñez, Pilar

    2016-01-01

    Solar water disinfection (SODIS) is a zero-cost intervention measure to disinfect drinking water in areas of poor access to improved water sources, used by more than 6 million people in the world. The bactericidal action of solar radiation in water has been widely proven, nevertheless the causes for this remain still unclear. Scientific literature points out that generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) inside microorganisms promoted by solar light absorption is the main reason. For the first time, this work reports on the experimental measurement of accumulated intracellular ROS in E. coli during solar irradiation. For this experimental achievement, a modified protocol based on the fluorescent probe dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate (DCFH-DA), widely used for oxidative stress in eukaryotic cells, has been tested and validated for E. coli. Our results demonstrate that ROS and their accumulated oxidative damages at intracellular level are key in solar water disinfection. PMID:27909341

  8. Antiseptics and Disinfectants: Activity, Action, and Resistance

    PubMed Central

    McDonnell, Gerald; Russell, A. Denver

    1999-01-01

    Antiseptics and disinfectants are extensively used in hospitals and other health care settings for a variety of topical and hard-surface applications. A wide variety of active chemical agents (biocides) are found in these products, many of which have been used for hundreds of years, including alcohols, phenols, iodine, and chlorine. Most of these active agents demonstrate broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity; however, little is known about the mode of action of these agents in comparison to antibiotics. This review considers what is known about the mode of action and spectrum of activity of antiseptics and disinfectants. The widespread use of these products has prompted some speculation on the development of microbial resistance, in particular whether antibiotic resistance is induced by antiseptics or disinfectants. Known mechanisms of microbial resistance (both intrinsic and acquired) to biocides are reviewed, with emphasis on the clinical implications of these reports. PMID:9880479

  9. Intracellular mechanisms of solar water disinfection.

    PubMed

    Castro-Alférez, María; Polo-López, María Inmaculada; Fernández-Ibáñez, Pilar

    2016-12-02

    Solar water disinfection (SODIS) is a zero-cost intervention measure to disinfect drinking water in areas of poor access to improved water sources, used by more than 6 million people in the world. The bactericidal action of solar radiation in water has been widely proven, nevertheless the causes for this remain still unclear. Scientific literature points out that generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) inside microorganisms promoted by solar light absorption is the main reason. For the first time, this work reports on the experimental measurement of accumulated intracellular ROS in E. coli during solar irradiation. For this experimental achievement, a modified protocol based on the fluorescent probe dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate (DCFH-DA), widely used for oxidative stress in eukaryotic cells, has been tested and validated for E. coli. Our results demonstrate that ROS and their accumulated oxidative damages at intracellular level are key in solar water disinfection.

  10. Intracellular mechanisms of solar water disinfection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro-Alférez, María; Polo-López, María Inmaculada; Fernández-Ibáñez, Pilar

    2016-12-01

    Solar water disinfection (SODIS) is a zero-cost intervention measure to disinfect drinking water in areas of poor access to improved water sources, used by more than 6 million people in the world. The bactericidal action of solar radiation in water has been widely proven, nevertheless the causes for this remain still unclear. Scientific literature points out that generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) inside microorganisms promoted by solar light absorption is the main reason. For the first time, this work reports on the experimental measurement of accumulated intracellular ROS in E. coli during solar irradiation. For this experimental achievement, a modified protocol based on the fluorescent probe dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate (DCFH-DA), widely used for oxidative stress in eukaryotic cells, has been tested and validated for E. coli. Our results demonstrate that ROS and their accumulated oxidative damages at intracellular level are key in solar water disinfection.

  11. Hand disinfection in hospitals - benefits and risks.

    PubMed

    Kampf, Günter; Löffler, Harald

    2010-12-01

    The WHO regards hand hygiene as an essential tool for the prevention of noso-comial infections. The hygienic hand disinfection has a superior antimicrobial efficacy compared to hand washing and should be performed as the treatment of choice before and after a variety of activities at the point of patient care. Washing hands should be preferred when the hands are visibly soiled. Skin irritation is quite common among healthcare workers and is mainly caused by water, soap and long lasting occlusion. Compliance with hand disinfection in clinical practice is often low. Measures to improve compliance include training, provision of hand rubs where they are needed, and the responsibility of doctors to set a good example. Improved compliance in hand hygiene and targeted use of alcohol-based hand rubs can reduce the nosocomial infection rate by up to 40 %. The benefit of hand disinfection is therefore much larger than possible risks.

  12. Reproductive effects of alternative disinfectants.

    PubMed

    Carlton, B D; Barlett, P; Basaran, A; Colling, K; Osis, I; Smith, M K

    1986-11-01

    Organohalides formed through the reaction of chlorine and organic compounds in natural and waste waters pose potential health hazards. For this reason, alternative water disinfectants that do not form organohalides are being investigated with great interest. Limited data are available on the health effects, in particular reproductive toxicity effects, of these compounds. In our laboratory, we have examined the reproductive effects of chloramine and chlorine administered by gavage in Long-Evans rats. Animals were treated for a total of 66 to 76 days. Males were treated for 56 days and females for 14 days prior to breeding and throughout the 10-day breeding period. Females were treated throughout gestation and lactation. Following breeding, the males were necropsied and evaluated for sperm parameters and reproductive tract histopathology. Adult females and some pups were necropsied at weaning on postnatal day 21. Other pups were treated postweaning until 28 or 40 days of age. These pups were evaluated for the day of vaginal patency and thyroid hormone levels. No differences were observed between control rats and those rats exposed to up to 5 mg/kg/day chlorine or 10 mg/kg/day chloramine when fertility, viability, litter size, day of eye opening, or day of vaginal patency were evaluated. No alterations in sperm count, sperm direct progressive movement (micron/sec), percent motility, or sperm morphology were observed among adult male rats. In addition, male and female reproductive organ weights were comparable to their respective control groups, and no significant histopathologic changes were observed among chlorine- or chloramine-treated male and female rats.

  13. Synergistic disinfection and removal of biofilms by a sequential two-step treatment with ozone followed by hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    Tachikawa, Mariko; Yamanaka, Kenzo

    2014-11-01

    Synergistic disinfection and removal of biofilms by ozone (O3) water in combination with hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) solution was studied by determining disinfection rates and observing changes of the biofilm structure in situ by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) using an established biofilm of Pseudomonas fluorescence. The sequential treatment with O3, 1.0-1.7 mg/L, followed by H2O2, 0.8-1.1%, showed synergistic disinfection effects, while the reversed treatment, first H2O2 followed by O3, showed only an additive effect. The decrease of synergistic disinfection effect by addition of methanol (CH3OH), a scavenger of hydroxyl radical (OH), into the H2O2 solution suggested generation of hydroxyl radicals on or in the biofilm by the sequential treatment with O3 followed by H2O2. The primary treatment with O3 increased disinfection rates of H2O2 in the secondary treatment, and the increase of O3 concentration enhanced the rates. The cold temperature of O3 water (14 °C and 8 °C) increased the synergistic effect, suggesting the increase of O3 adsorption and hydroxyl radical generation in the biofilm. CLSM observation showed that the sequential treatment, first with O3 followed by H2O2, loosened the cell connections and thinned the extracellular polysaccharides (EPS) in the biofilm. The hydroxyl radical generation in the biofilm may affect the EPS and biofilm structure and may induce effective disinfection with H2O2. This sequential treatment method may suggest a new practical procedure for disinfection and removal of biofilms by inorganic oxidants such as O3 and H2O2.

  14. Exploring the potential of magnetic antimicrobial agents for water disinfection.

    PubMed

    Pina, Ana S; Batalha, Iris L; Fernandes, Cláudia S M; Aoki, Matheus A; Roque, Ana C A

    2014-12-01

    Industrial and urban activities yield large amounts of contaminated groundwater, which present a major health issue worldwide. Infectious diseases are the most common health risk associated with drinking-water and wastewater remediation is a major concern of our modern society. The field of wastewater treatment is being revolutionized by new nano-scale water disinfection devices which outperform most currently available technologies. In particular, iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) have been widely used in environmental applications due to their unique physical-chemical properties. In this work, poly(ethylene) glycol (PEG)-coated MNPs have been functionalized with (RW)3, an antimicrobial peptide, to yield a novel magnetic-responsive support with antimicrobial activity against Escherichia coli K-12 DSM498 and Bacillus subtilis 168. The magnetic-responsive antimicrobial device showed to be able to successfully disinfect the surrounding solution. Using a rapid high-throughput screening platform, the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) was determined to be 500 μM for both strains with a visible bactericidal effect.

  15. [Survey of methods of cleaning, decontamination, disinfection and sterilization in dental health services in tropical areas].

    PubMed

    Clapeau, G; Decroix, B; Bakayoko-Ly, R; Varenne, B; Dosso-Hien, D; Decroix, M O

    1997-01-01

    The International Aid for Ontology (IAO) carried out this survey of hygiene in the dental health services of 5 French-speaking African countries in 1994, in association with the Faculty of Pharmaceutical and Biological Sciences of Paris. This study received support from the World Health Organization (WHO), the French Ministry for Cooperation and the European Community and the Ivory Coast Oral and Dental Hygiene and Health Committee (CIHSBD). Twenty-nine dental services from Benin (3), Burkina Faso (6), Ivory Coast (12), Mali (5), Niger (3) participated in this survey which gives an insight into the daily hygiene routines of these services. The cleaning, decontamination, disinfection and sterilization procedures for premises, dental equipment, instruments, hands and disposable items were investigated. No individual protocols are reported. Bench tops were cleaned or disinfected daily in 73% of centers and floors were cleaned or disinfected daily in 59% of centers. Walls were cleaned once per week in 44% of the centers. Hands were always washed between patients, with 68% of dental surgeons using only solid or liquid cleansing soaps and the others using antiseptic or disinfectant solutions. The dentist's chair was cleaned or disinfected daily in 68% of centers, mostly with soap (43%) or diluted bleach (23%). Vacuum equipment was cleaned with soap (50%) or diluted bleach (57%), with some surgeries using a combination of the two. Hand pieces and turbines were cleaned and disinfected after each use with alcohol (35%) or diluted bleach (26%) and were sterilized in 9% of centers. Instruments were sterilized with a Poupinel (63%), unspecified sterilizer (26%), autoclave (7%) or low temperature disinfection procedure (4%). Instruments were regularly sterilized in all centers. Single-use disposable items were often reused: 88% of centers reused gloves, 64% anesthetic cartridges and 32% disposable needles. This survey demonstrates that dentists do attempt to achieve appropriate

  16. Disinfection of Contaminated Canals by Different Laser Wavelengths, while Performing Root Canal Therapy.

    PubMed

    Asnaashari, Mohammad; Safavi, Nassimeh

    2013-01-01

    Removal of smear layer and disinfection of canals are important objectives of teeth root canal cleaning. In order to achieve this purpose, rinsing substances, intra canal drugs as well as ultrasound are used. Today, use of laser to remove smear layer and to disinfect root canals has increasingly attracted the attentions. Till now different lasers such as CO2, Nd:YAG, Er:YAG, Er,Cr:YSGG have been used for debris and smear removal from the canals. Numerous studies have shown that Er:YAG is the most appropriate laser for intra canal debris and smear removal. In addition different laser wavelengths have been used directly or as an adjunctive to disinfect canals. Laser light can penetrate areas of canals where irrigating and disinfecting solutions cannot reach, like secondary canals and deep dentinal tubules and also can eliminate microorganisms. Different studies have confirmed the penetration of Nd:YAG laser in deep dentin and reduction of microorganisms penetration. But studies on comparison of antibacterial effects of Nd:YAG laser with sodium hypochlorite showed effectiveness of both, with a better effect for sodium hypochlorite. Studies performed in relation with anti-microbial effects of Diode laser with various parameters show that this laser can be effective in reducing intra canal bacterial count and penetration in the depth of 500 microns in dentin. In studies performed on Diode laser in combination with canal irrigating solutions such as sodium hypochlorite and oxygenated water better results were obtained. Although studies on disinfection by the Erbium laser family show that use of this laser alone can be effective in disinfecting canals, studies evaluating the disinfecting effects of this laser and different concentrations of sodium hypochlorite show that the latter alone is more effective in disinfecting canals. And better results were obtained when Erbium laser was used in combination with sodium hypochlorite irrigating solution in canals. Results of the

  17. Efficacy of Various Chemical Disinfectants on Biofilms Formed in Spacecraft Potable Water System Component

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wong, Willy; Garcia, Veronica; Castro, Victoria; Ott, Mark; Duane

    2009-01-01

    As the provision of potable water is critical for successful habitation of the International Space Station (ISS), life support systems were installed in December 2008 to recycle both humidity from the atmosphere and urine to conserve available water in the vehicle. Pre-consumption testing from the dispensing needle at the Potable Water Dispenser (PWD) indicated that bacterial concentrations exceeded the current ISS specifications of 50 colony forming units (CFU) per ml. Subsequent investigations revealed that a corrugated stainless steel flex hose upstream of the dispensing needle in the PWD was filled with non-sterile water and left at room temperature for over one month before launch. To simulate biofilm formation that was suspected in the flight system, sterile flex hoses were seeded with a consortium of bacterial isolates previously recovered from other ISS water systems, which included Ralstonia pickettii, Burkholderia multivorans, Caulobacter vibrioides., and Cupriavidus pauculus. After 5 days of incubation, these hoses were challenged with various chemical disinfectants including hydrogen peroxide, colloidal silver, and buffered pH solutions to determine the ability of the disinfectants to decrease and maintain bacterial concentrations below ISS specifications. Disinfection efficacy over time was measured by collecting daily heterotrophic plate counts following exposure to the disinfectants. A single flush with either 6% hydrogen peroxide solution or a mixture of 3% hydrogen peroxide and 400 ppb colloidal silver effectively reduced the bacterial concentrations to less than 1 CFU/ml for a period of up to 2 months. Testing results indicated that hydrogen peroxide and mixtures of hydrogen peroxide and colloidal silver have tremendous potential as alternative disinfectants for ISS water systems.

  18. Tolerance of Clostridium perfringens biofilms to disinfectants commonly used in the food industry.

    PubMed

    Charlebois, Audrey; Jacques, Mario; Boulianne, Martine; Archambault, Marie

    2017-04-01

    Clostridium perfringens is an opportunistic pathogen that can cause food poisoning in humans and various enterotoxemia in animal species. Recently, it was shown to form mono-species biofilms, a structured community of bacterial cells enclosed in a self-produced extracellular matrix. Biofilms have been associated with tolerance to antibiotics, disinfectants, and physical and environmental stresses. Very little is known about the tolerance of C. perfringens biofilm toward disinfectants. In the present study, susceptibilities of C. perfringens biofilms to five types of commonly used disinfectants on farms and in food processing environments were analysed. In this paper, we show that C. perfringens mono-species biofilms can protect the bacterial cells from the action of potassium monopersulfate, quaternary ammonium chloride, hydrogen peroxide and glutaraldehyde solutions. However, sodium hypochlorite solution was shown to be effective on C. perfringens biofilms. Our investigation of dual-species biofilms of C. perfringens with the addition of Staphylococcus aureus or Escherichia coli demonstrated that overall, the mono-species biofilm of C. perfringens was more tolerant to all disinfectants than the dual-species biofilms. For the anaerobic grown biofilms, the mono-species biofilm of C. perfringens was more tolerant to sodium hypochlorite and quaternary ammonium chloride than the dual-species biofilms of C. perfringens with S. aureus or E. coli. This study demonstrates that C. perfringens biofilm is an effective protection mechanism to disinfectants commonly used on farms and in food processing environments.

  19. Effect of Different Energy Levels of Microwave on Disinfection of Dental Stone Casts

    PubMed Central

    Robati Anaraki, Mahmood; Lotfipour, Farzaneh; Moslehifard, Elnaz; Momtaheni, Ali; Sigari, Pooyan

    2013-01-01

    Background and aims Current chemical methods may not efficiently disinfect dental stone casts. The aim of this study was to investigate if microwave irradiation is effective for disinfection of stone casts. Materials and methods In this laboratory study, three groups (n = 162) of prepared spherical stone beads as carriers with a diameter of 10 mm were inoculated by separately soaking in three broth culture media, each containing a study microorganism—Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus or Candida albicans. Six inoculated carriers were used for every test, including irradiation in a household microwave oven at 300, 450, 600 or 900 W energy level, or soaking in 0.03%, 0.06%, 0.12%, 0.25% or 0.50% concentration of sodium hypochlorite solution, at 1, 2, or 3-minute test times. Positive and negative control groups were considered for each test. All treated carriers were then individually transferred to nutrient broth culture medium and one milliliter from each tube was cultured in nutrient agar media over night. Colony forming unit per milliliter (CFU/mL) was counted, and multi-factor ANOVA was used to analyze data (α = 0.05). Results Microwave irradiation at 600 W resulted in high-level disinfection in 3 minutes. Immersion of the stone casts in hypochlorite solution at 0.06% concentration resulted in disinfection after 2 minutes. Conclusion According to the results, high level disinfection of the stone casts can be achieved by microwave irradiation at 600 W in 3 minutes, similar to a validated chemical method. PMID:24082984

  20. Evaluating efficacy of field-generated electrochemical oxidants on disinfection of fomites using bacteriophage MS2 and mouse norovirus MNV-1 as pathogenic virus surrogates.

    PubMed

    Julian, Timothy R; Trumble, John M; Schwab, Kellogg J

    2014-06-01

    Surface disinfection, as part of environmental hygiene practices, is an efficient barrier to gastroenteritis transmission. However, surface disinfectants may be difficult to obtain in remote, resource-limited, or disaster relief settings. Electrochemical oxidants (ECO) are chlorine-based disinfectants that can be generated using battery power to electrolyze brine (NaCl) solutions. Electrolysis generates a mixed-oxidant solution that contains both chlorine (HOCl, OCl(-)) and reactive oxygen species (e.g., ·OH, O3, H2O2, and ·O2-) capable of inactivating pathogens. One onsite generator of ECO is the Smart Electrochlorinator 200 (SE-200, Cascade Designs, Inc.). In a laboratory study, we assessed ECO surface disinfection efficacy for two gastrointestinal virus surrogates: bacteriophage MS2 and murine norovirus MNV-1. We quantified both infectivity and nucleic acid inactivation using culture-dependent and independent assays. At free available chlorine concentrations of 2,500 ppm and a contact time of 30 s, ECO inactivation of infective MS2 bacteriophage exceeded 7 log10 compared to MNV-1 disinfection of approximately 2 log10. Genomic RNA inactivation was less than infective virus inactivation: MS2 RNA inactivation was approximately 5 log10 compared to MNV-1 RNA inactivation of approximately 1.5 log10. The results are similar to inactivation efficacy of household bleach when used at similar free available chlorine concentrations. Our work demonstrates the potential of ECO solutions, generated onsite, to be used for surface disinfection.

  1. Disinfecting efficacy of three chemical disinfectants on contaminated diagnostic instruments: A randomized trial

    PubMed Central

    Ganavadiya, Rahul; Chandra Shekar, B.R.; Saxena, Vrinda; Tomar, Poonam; Gupta, Ruchika; Khandelwal, Garima

    2014-01-01

    Context: Cross infection remains one of the major challenges in the dental profession, especially in field settings. Transmission of hepatitis B, hepatitis C, and human immunodeficiency virus have raised a major concern for patients and dental staff. These risks can be eliminated by effective sterilization and disinfection techniques. Aim: The aim was to compare the disinfecting efficacy of three chemical disinfectants on contaminated diagnostic instruments. Settings and Design: This was a randomized, cross over trial conducted among three participants selected from a research laboratory, Bhopal, Madhya Pradesh, India. Materials and Methods: The study participants were examined 4 times on different days. Each time, the coded mouth mirrors of different make were used, and the disinfection was accomplished using coded disinfectants. The reduction in total viable count was compared between the three groups (2% glutaraldehyde, 6% hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and 99.9% ethyl alcohol) with distilled water as negative control and autoclaving as a positive control. Furthermore, the predisinfection count was compared between the instruments of different make. Statistical Analysis Used: Statistical analysis was performed using paired t-test and One-way ANOVA. The statistical significance was fixed at 0.05. Results: Autoclaved instruments resulted in complete elimination of viable micro-organisms. Maximum reduction in microbial load was observed after disinfection with H2O2 followed by glutaraldehyde, ethyl alcohol and distilled water in descending order. Furthermore, maximum microbial contamination was recorded on locally manufactured mirrors, while standard plain mirrors showed least contamination. Conclusions: Although, a significant reduction in total viable count was observed with all the disinfectants evaluated in the present study, none of the disinfectants was successful in completely eliminating the viable micro-organisms. PMID:25316989

  2. Efficacy of three surface disinfectants for dental radiographic films and gloves.

    PubMed

    Coogan, M M; Patel, M; Mladenova, D

    2004-07-01

    Contaminated radiographic films and gloves may transmit infectious diseases. Objective. To determine whether Pre Sept (NaDC), a sodium dichloroisocyanurate based disinfectant; Bronocide SP (AIP) an alcohol-phenol-iodine disinfectant and polyvinyl pyrrolidine iodine (PVPI) can be used to disinfect radiographic films and gloves. Study design. Radiographic films were contaminated with Candida albicans, Streptococcus mutans, Lactobacilli or saliva and placed in either 0.1, 0.25 or 0.5 NaDC for 1, 2 or 5 min; PVPI for 5 min or sprayed with AIP. Gloves contaminated with C. albicans, S. mutans or Lactobacilli were sprayed with AIP. After treatment the films and gloves were tested for viable microorganisms. Results. A 0.5% solution of NaDC killed all microorganisms after one-minute exposure. PVPI killed 99.8% and AIP spray between 95.8 and 99% of microorganisms. Conclusions. NaDC was the most successful disinfectant in the laboratory and clinical setting followed by PVPI and AIP.

  3. [Degradation Kinetics and Formation of Disinfection By-products During Linuron Chlorination in Drinking Water].

    PubMed

    Ling, Xiao; Hu, Chen-yan; Cheng, Ming; Gu, Jian

    2015-05-01

    Chlorination degradation of linuron was studied using the common disinfectant sodium hypochlorite, the effects of chlorine dosage, pH value, bromine ion concentrationand temperature were systematically investigated, and the formation characteristics of disinfection by-products (DBPs) during the chlorination reaction was analyzed. The results showed that the chlorination degradation kinetics of linuron by sodium hypochlorite could be well described by the second-order kinetic model. Moreover, pH values had a great impact on the degradation reaction, and the rate constant reached the maximum level at pH 7, and the base elementary reaction rate constants of HOCl and OCl- with linuron were 4.84 x 10(2) L · (mol · h)(-1) and 3.80 x 10(2) L · (mol · h)(-1), respectively. The reaction rate decreased with the addition of bromide ion and increased with increasing temperature. Furthermore, many kinds of disinfection by- products were produced during the chlorination degradation of linuron, including CF, DCAN, TCNM and halogen acetone. Under conditions of different solution pH and different bromide ion concentrations, there would be significant difference in the types and concentrations of disinfection by-products.

  4. Hollow fiber membrane decorated with Ag/MWNTs: toward effective water disinfection and biofouling control.

    PubMed

    Gunawan, Poernomo; Guan, Cong; Song, Xianghua; Zhang, Quanyuan; Leong, Susanna Su Jan; Tang, Chuyang; Chen, Yuan; Chan-Park, Mary B; Chang, Matthew Wook; Wang, Kean; Xu, Rong

    2011-12-27

    The currently applied disinfection methods during water treatment provide effective solutions to kill pathogens, but also generate harmful byproducts, which are required to be treated with additional efforts. In this work, an alternative and safer water disinfection system consisting of silver nanoparticle/multiwalled carbon nanotubes (Ag/MWNTs) coated on a polyacrylonitrile (PAN) hollow fiber membrane, Ag/MWNTs/PAN, has been developed. Silver nanoparticles of controlled sizes were coated on polyethylene glycol-grafted MWNTs. Ag/MWNTs were then covalently coated on the external surface of a chemically modified PAN hollow fiber membrane to act as a disinfection barrier. A continuous filtration test using E. coli containing feedwater was conducted for the pristine PAN and Ag/MWNTs/PAN composite membranes. The Ag/MWNT coating significantly enhanced the antimicrobial activities and antifouling properties of the membrane against E. coli. Under the continuous filtration mode using E. coli feedwater, the relative flux drop over Ag/MWNTs/PAN was 6%, which was significantly lower than that over the pristine PAN (55%) at 20 h of filtration. The presence of the Ag/MWNT disinfection layer effectively inhibited the growth of bacteria in the filtration module and prevented the formation of biofilm on the surface of the membrane. Such distinctive antimicrobial properties of the composite membrane is attributed to the proper dispersion of silver nanoparticles on the external surface of the membrane, leading to direct contact with bacterium cells.

  5. [Endodontics in motion: new concepts, materials and techniques 4. Root canal disinfection in 2015].

    PubMed

    van der Waal, S V; de Soet, J J

    2015-12-01

    Apical periodontitis is an inflammatory response around the root tip of a tooth to microbial infection of the root canal system. Therefore, disinfection of the root canal system is the most important aim of root canal treatment. There are various mechanical and chemical ways to clean and disinfect. Most methods, however, cannot be relied upon to fully decontaminate in all cases. There are problems, for example, with the proper concentrations of disinfectant agents, like sodium hypochlorite. But the more recent agents, like ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid, calcium hydroxide or antibiotic pastes also have disadvantages, which are mostly a result of poor access of the irrigant to the biofilm bacteria in the affected root canals. Currently, a new strategy with a modified salt solution is under investigation that offers the prospect of being used as a root canal irrigant. At this moment the preferred treatment still seems to be to remove infected tissue as much as possible and to create access for irrigation procedures. The best results are achieved with 1-2% sodium hypochlorite as a disinfectant, possibly alternating with ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid as a cleansing agent. There is no scientific evidence for the successful use of calcium hydroxide.

  6. Improvement of Ultrasonic Disinfection Power Using TiO2 Photocatalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dadjour, Mahmoud Farshbaf; Ogino, Chiaki; Matsumura, Susumu; Nakamura, Shinichi; Shimizu, Nobuaki

    2005-03-01

    The disinfection power of an ultrasonic system was enhanced using TiO2-photocatalyst in the irradiating solutions. Cultures of Legionella were used in the irradiation system with and without TiO2. A significant decrease in the concentration of viable cells was observed during irradiation in the presence of TiO2. The rate of cell killing was higher in the presence of TiO2 than it was with Al2O3, and was proportional to the amount of TiO2 used in the irradiating samples. There was no significant effect of cell concentration on the rate of cell killing in the range of 103 to 107 CFU/ml. Addition of OH radical scavengers such as glutathione, ascorbic acid and histidine to the irradiating solutions reduced the rate of disinfection, thus indicating the primary role of OH radicals in this process.

  7. New technology for sterilization and disinfection.

    PubMed

    Nyström, B

    1991-09-16

    Sterilization with low temperature steam and formaldehyde is a well-known process in many European countries, but little known in the United States. It sterilizes reliably and reproducibly at temperatures greater than or equal to 65 degrees C. With a well-designed cycle, it leaves residues of formaldehyde on sterilized items below 5 micrograms/cm2, measured on a standard filter paper. Formaldehyde levels in air near the autoclave are well below official exposure limits, if at all measurable. Occurrence of late growers in bioindicators, and penetration of the sterilizing media into long narrow lumina, should be validated for new processes. Automated cleaning and disinfection in closed washer-disinfectors and flushing disinfectors are likewise processes relatively little known in the United States. Disinfection is achieved by a final rinse with hot water or steam. Washer-disinfectors are used for surgical instruments, nondisposable anesthesia and other equipment, flushing disinfectors for nondisposable bedpans, wash-bowls, urinals, and similar equipment. They clean well, washer-disinfectors excellently so, and disinfect reliably. With the use of such equipment in wards, surgical departments, and other areas, reliance on chemical germicides can be dramatically reduced and disposables can be replaced by disinfectable nondisposables.

  8. Evaluation of Alternative Methods for Wastewater Disinfection

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-09-01

    sodium metabisulfite, and sodium bisulfite are used for dechlorinating chlorinated effluents, but sulfur dioxide is the favored candidate for...metabisulfite and sodium bisulfite are safe substitutes for sulfur dioxide and are used in most small facilities. These solid dechlorination materials are...induced toxicity to aquatic life? (TRC limits. ChlorinatedNO compounds) No Yes Evalue alternate disinfection , technologies: Dechlorination techniques

  9. Effective household disinfection methods of kitchen sponges

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Several household disinfecting treatments to kill bacteria, yeasts and molds on kitchen sponges were evaluated. Sponges were soaked in 10 percent bleach for 3 min, lemon juice (pH 2.9) or deionized water for 1 min; placed in a microwave oven for 1 min; or placed in a dishwasher operating with a dryi...

  10. SMALL DRINKING WATER SYSTEMS HANDBOOK A GUIDE TO "PACKAGED" FILTRATION AND DISINFECTION TECHNOLOGIES WITH REMOTE MONITORING AND CONTROL TOOLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The intent of this handbook is to highlight information appropriate to small systems with an emphasis on filtration and disinfection technologies and how they can be "packaged" with remote monitoring and control technologies to provide a healthy and affordable solution for small ...

  11. Efficacy of various disinfectants against SARS coronavirus.

    PubMed

    Rabenau, H F; Kampf, G; Cinatl, J; Doerr, H W

    2005-10-01

    The recent severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) epidemic in Asia and Northern America led to broad use of various types of disinfectant in order to control the public spread of the highly contagious virus. However, only limited data were available to demonstrate their efficacy against SARS coronavirus (SARS-CoV). We therefore investigated eight disinfectants for their activity against SARS-CoV according to prEN 14476. Four hand rubs were tested at 30s (Sterillium, based on 45% iso-propanol, 30% n-propanol and 0.2% mecetronium etilsulphate; Sterillium Rub, based on 80% ethanol; Sterillium Gel, based on 85% ethanol; Sterillium Virugard, based on 95% ethanol). Three surface disinfectants were investigated at 0.5% for 30 min and 60 min (Mikrobac forte, based on benzalkonium chloride and laurylamine; Kohrsolin FF, based on benzalkonium chloride, glutaraldehyde and didecyldimonium chloride; Dismozon pur, based on magnesium monoperphthalate), and one instrument disinfectant was investigated at 4% for 15 min, 3% for 30 min and 2% for 60 min [Korsolex basic, based on glutaraldehyde and (ethylenedioxy)dimethanol]. Three types of organic load were used: 0.3% albumin, 10% fetal calf serum, and 0.3% albumin with 0.3% sheep erythrocytes. Virus titres were determined by a quantitative test (endpoint titration) in 96-well microtitre plates. With all tested preparations, SARS-CoV was inactivated to below the limit of detection (reduction factor mostly > or =4), regardless of the type of organic load. In summary, SARS-CoV can be inactivated quite easily with many commonly used disinfectants.

  12. Two in-vivo protocols for testing virucidal efficacy of handwashing and hand disinfection.

    PubMed

    Steinmann, J; Nehrkorn, R; Meyer, A; Becker, K

    1995-01-01

    Whole-hands and fingerpads of seven volunteers were contaminated with poliovirus type 1 Sabin strain in order to evaluate virucidal efficacy of different forms of handwashing and handrub with alcohols and alcohol-based disinfectants. In the whole-hand protocol, handwashing with unmedicated soap for 5 min and handrubbing with 80% ethanol yielded a log reduction factor (RF) of > 2, whereas the log RF by 96.8% ethanol exceeded 3.2. With the fingerpad model ethanol produced a greater log RF than iso- or n-propanol. Comparing five commercial hand disinfectants and a chlorine solution (1.0% chloramine T-solution) for handrub, Desderman and Promanum, both composed of ethanol, yielded log RFs of 2.47 and 2.26 respectively after an application time of 60 s, similar to 1.0% chloramine T-solution (log RF of 2.28). Autosept, Mucasept, and Sterillium, based on n-propanol and/or isopropanol, were found to be significantly less effective (log RFs of 1.16, 1.06 and 1.52 respectively). A comparison of a modified whole-hand and the fingerpad protocol with Promanum showed similar results with the two systems suggesting both models are suitable for testing the in-vivo efficacy of handwashing agents and hand disinfectants which are used without any water.

  13. Assessment of an innovative antimicrobial surface disinfectant in the operating room environment using adenosine triphosphate bioluminescence assay.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Brian D; Spencer, Maureen; Rossi, Peter J; Lee, Cheong J; Brown, Kellie R; Malinowski, Michael; Seabrook, Gary R; Edmiston, Charles E

    2015-03-01

    Terminal cleaning in the operating room is a critical step in preventing the transmission of health care-associated pathogens. The persistent disinfectant activity of a novel isopropyl alcohol/organofunctional silane solution (ISO) was evaluated in 4 operating rooms after terminal cleaning. Adenosine triphosphate bioluminescence documented a significant difference (P < .048) in surface bioburden on IOS-treated surfaces versus controls. RODAC plate cultures revealed a significant (P < .001) reduction in microbial contamination on IOS-treated surfaces compared with controls. Further studies are warranted to validate the persistent disinfectant activity of ISO within selective health care settings.

  14. Peracetic acid for secondary effluent disinfection: a comprehensive performance assessment.

    PubMed

    Antonelli, M; Turolla, A; Mezzanotte, V; Nurizzo, C

    2013-01-01

    The paper is a review of previous research on secondary effluent disinfection by peracetic acid (PAA) integrated with new data about the effect of a preliminary flash-mixing step. The process was studied at bench and pilot scale to assess its performance for discharge in surface water and agricultural reuse (target microorganisms: Escherichia coli and faecal coliform bacteria). The purposes of the research were: (1) determining PAA decay and disinfection kinetics as a function of operating parameters, (2) evaluating PAA suitability as a disinfectant, (3) assessing long-term disinfection efficiency, (4) investigating disinfected effluent biological toxicity on some aquatic indicator organisms (Vibrio fischeri, Daphnia magna and Selenastrum capricornutum), (5) comparing PAA with conventional disinfectants (sodium hypochlorite, UV irradiation). PAA disinfection was capable of complying with Italian regulations on reuse (10 CFU/100 mL for E. coli) and was competitive with benchmarks. No regrowth phenomena were observed, as long as needed for agricultural reuse (29 h after disinfection), even at negligible concentrations of residual disinfectant. The toxic effect of PAA on the aquatic environment was due to the residual disinfectant in the water, rather than to chemical modification of the effluent.

  15. Comparison of UVB and UVC irradiation disinfection efficacies on Pseudomonas Aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) biofilm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Argyraki, A.; Markvart, M.; Nielsen, Anne; Bjarnsholt, T.; Bjørndal, L.; Petersen, P. M.

    2016-04-01

    Disinfection routines are important in all clinical applications. The uprising problem of antibiotic resistance has driven major research efforts towards alternative disinfection approaches, involving light-based solutions. Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) is a common bacterium that can cause skin, soft tissue, lungs, kidney and urinary tract infections. Moreover, it can be found on and in medical equipment causing often cross infections in hospitals. The objective of this study was to test the efficiency, of two different light-based disinfection treatments, namely UVB and UVC irradiation, on P. aeruginosa biofilms at different growth stages. In our experiments a new type of UV light emitting diodes (LEDs) were used to deliver UV irradiation on the biofilms, in the UVB (296nm) and UVC (266nm) region. The killing rate was studied as a function of dose for 24h grown biofilms. The dose was ramped from 72J/m2 to 10000J/m2. It was shown that UVB irradiation was more effective than UVC irradiation in inactivating P. aeruginosa biofilms. No colony forming units (CFU) were observed for the UVB treated biofilms when the dose was 10000 J/m2 (CFU in control sample: 7.5 x 104). UVB irradiation at a dose of 20000J/m2 on mature biofilms (72h grown) resulted in a 3.9 log killing efficacy. The fact that the wavelength of 296nm exists in daylight and has such disinfection ability on biofilms gives new perspectives for applications within disinfection at hospitals.

  16. Effect of magnetic ion exchange and ozonation on disinfection by-product formation.

    PubMed

    Kingsbury, Ryan S; Singer, Philip C

    2013-03-01

    The purpose of this research was to investigate the performance of treatment with magnetic ion exchange (MIEX) resin followed by ozonation in achieving disinfection goals while controlling bromate and chlorinated disinfection by-product (DBP) formation. Three water samples were collected from raw water supplies impacted by the San Francisco Bay Delta to represent the varying levels of bromide and total organic carbon (TOC) that occur throughout the year. A fourth water was prepared by spiking bromide into a portion of one of the samples. Samples of each water were pre-treated with alum or virgin MIEX resin, and the raw and treated waters were subsequently ozonated under semi-batch conditions to assess the impact of treatment on ozone demand, ozone exposure for disinfection ("CT"), and bromate formation. Finally, aliquots of raw, coagulated, resin-treated, and ozonated waters were chlorinated in order to measure trihalomethane formation potential (THMFP). In the waters studied, MIEX resin removed 41-68% of raw water TOC, compared to 12-44% for alum. MIEX resin also reduced the bromide concentration by 20-50%. The removal of TOC by alum and MIEX resin significantly reduced the ozone demand of all waters studied, resulting in higher dissolved ozone concentrations and CT values for a given amount of ozone transferred into solution. For a given level of disinfection (CT), the amount of bromate produced by ozonation of MIEX-treated waters was similar to or slightly less than that of raw water and significantly less than that of alum-treated water. MIEX resin removed 39-85% of THMFP compared to 16-56% removal by alum. Ozonation reduced THMFP by 35-45% in all cases. This work indicates that in bromide-rich waters in which ozone disinfection is used, MIEX resin is a more appropriate treatment than alum for the removal of organic carbon, as it achieves superior TOC and THM precursor removal and decreases the production of bromate from ozone.

  17. Comparison of the efficacy of natural-based and synthetic biocides to disinfect silicone and stainless steel surfaces.

    PubMed

    Gomes, I B; Malheiro, J; Mergulhão, F; Maillard, J-Y; Simões, M

    2016-06-01

    New biocidal solutions are needed to combat effectively the evolution of microbes developing antibiotic resistance while having a low or no environmental toxicity impact. This work aims to assess the efficacy of commonly used biocides and natural-based compounds on the disinfection of silicone and stainless steel (SS) surfaces seeded with differentStaphylococcus aureusstrains. Minimum inhibitory concentration was determined for synthetic (benzalkonium chloride-BAC, glutaraldehyde-GTA,ortho-phthalaldehyde-OPA and peracetic acid-PAA) and natural-based (cuminaldehyde-CUM), eugenol-EUG and indole-3-carbinol-I3C) biocides by the microdilution method. The efficacy of selected biocides at MIC, 10 × MIC and 5500 mg/L (representative in-use concentration) on the disinfection of sessileS. aureuson silicone and SS was assessed by viable counting. Silicone surfaces were harder to disinfect than SS. GTA, OPA and PAA yielded complete CFU reduction of sessile cells for all test concentrations as well as BAC at 10 × MIC and 5500 mg/L. CUM was the least efficient compound. EUG was efficient for SS disinfection, regardless of strains and concentrations tested. I3C at 10 × MIC and 5500 mg/L was able to cause total CFU reduction of silicone and SS deposited bacteria. Although not so efficient as synthetic compounds, the natural-based biocides are promising to be used in disinfectant formulations, particularly I3C and EUG.

  18. Effectiveness of 2% peracetic acid for the disinfection of gutta-percha cones.

    PubMed

    Salvia, Ana Carolina Rodrigues Danzi; Teodoro, Guilherme Rodrigues; Balducci, Ivan; Koga-Ito, Cristiane Yumi; Oliveira, Simone Helena Gonçalves de

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of 2% peracetic acid for the disinfection of gutta-percha cones contaminated in vitro with Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus mutans, Candida albicans and Bacillus subtilus (in spore form). Two hundred and twenty-five gutta-percha cones were contaminated with standardized suspensions of each microorganism and incubated at 37°C for 24 h. The cones were divided into 10 experimental groups (n = 15), according to the microorganism tested and disinfection testing times. The disinfection procedure consisted of immersing each cone in a plastic tube containing the substance. The specimens remained in contact with the substance for 1 or 2.5 minutes. Afterwards, each cone was transferred to a 10% sodium thiosulphate solution (Na(2)S(2)O(3)) to neutralize the disinfectant. Microbial biofilms adhering to the cones were dispersed by agitation. Aliquots of 0.1 ml of the suspensions obtained were plated on Sabouraud dextrose agar, or brain and heart infusion agar, and incubated at 37°C for 24 h. The results were expressed in colony forming units (CFU/ml) and the data were submitted to the Wilcoxon Signed Rank Test (level of significance at 0.05). A significant reduction was observed, after 1 minute of exposure, in the test solution for C. albicans (p = 0.0190), S. aureus (p = 0.0001), S. mutans (p = 0.0001), B. subtilis (p = 0.0001), and E. coli (p = 0.0001). After 2.5 minutes of exposure, 100% of the microbial inocula were eliminated. It was concluded that the 2% peracetic acid solution was effective against the biofilms of the tested microorganisms on gutta-percha cones at 1 minute of exposure.

  19. Evaluation and Comparison of High-Level Microwave Oven Disinfection with Chemical Disinfection of Dental Gypsum Casts

    PubMed Central

    Meghashri, K; Kumar, Prasanna; Prasad, D Krishna; Hegde, Rakshit

    2014-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to evaluate and compare microwave disinfection with chemical disinfection of dental gypsum casts. Materials and Methods: A total of 120 casts were prepared from a silicone mold using Type III dental stone. Of the 120 casts, 60 casts were contaminated with 1 ml suspension of Staphylococcus aureus and 60 casts were contaminated with 1 ml suspension of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Then, the casts were disinfected with microwave irradiation and chemical disinfection using the microwave oven and 0.5% sodium hypochlorite. Bacteriologic procedures were performed; the cfu/ml for each cast was calculated as a weighted mean. The results were analyzed using Kruskal-Wallis test and Mann-Whitney test. Results: The untreated casts showed Brain heart infusion broth counts of 106 log cfu/ml compared to irradiated and chemically disinfected casts, in which 105 log reduction of cfu/ml was seen. These results satisfied the requirements of current infection control guidelines for the dental laboratory. The results obtained for chemical disinfection were in equivalence with microwave disinfection. Conclusions: Within the limitation of this in vitro study, it was found that microwave disinfection of casts for 5 min at 900 W gives high-level disinfection that complies with the current infection control guidelines for the dental laboratory and microwave disinfection method is an effective and validated method as chemical disinfection. How to cite the article: Meghashri K, Kumar P, Prasad DK, Hegde R. Evaluation and comparison of high-level microwave oven disinfection with chemical disinfection of dental gypsum casts. J Int Oral Health 2014;6(3):56-60 . PMID:25083033

  20. Suppression of Eimeria tenella sporulation by disinfectants.

    PubMed

    You, Myung-Jo

    2014-08-01

    The disinfectant effects (DEs) of 10 types of chemicals, defined by their ability to destroy or inhibit oocysts and consequently prevent sporulation of Eimeria tenella field isolate, were evaluated in vitro. Correct species assignments and sample purities were confirmed by the singular internal transcribed spacer (ITS)-PCR analysis. A total of 18 treatments were performed, and the disinfection suppression levels were 75.9% for 39% benzene + 22% xylene (1:10 dilution), 85.5% for 30% cresol soup (1:1 dilution), and 91.7% for 99.9% acetic acid (1:2 dilution) group. The results indicate that acetic acid, cresol soup, and benzene+xylene are good candidates for suppression of E. tenella oocyst sporulation.

  1. Lighting the way to improved disinfection

    SciTech Connect

    Valenti, M.

    1997-07-01

    Ultraviolet light has a proven track record of killing bacteria and viruses found in municipal wastewater. In addition, environmental concerns over the use of chemical disinfectants, coupled with improvements in ultraviolet-lighting technology, have led to the development of UV systems that treat spent metalworking fluids in the industrialized world; disinfect drinking water in developing countries; and clean aquaculture water, ballast water, and hospital air everywhere. A large-scale pilot plant capable of treating less than 1 million gallons per day was built on-site by Los Angeles-based Montgomery Watson and CCCSD in 1992. It demonstrated that UV was just as effective as chlorination in killing bacteria and slightly more effective in destroying viruses found in the Martinez plant`s wastewater. It also showed the lamps would need to be cleaned of fouling every two to four weeks. The paper discusses this plant and the use of UV light in the above-mentioned water treatment processes.

  2. Disinfection of nitrous oxide inhalation equipment.

    PubMed

    Yagiela, J A; Hunt, L M; Hunt, D E

    1979-02-01

    Cross-infection by contaminated equipment is a potential hazard associated with conscious sedation with nitrous oxide and oxygen . Nosocomial infections have occasionally been linked wih the use of unsterile inhalation devices; microbial contamination of sterile nasal hoods routinely occurs during administration of nitrous oxide; and in vitro experiments indicate that subsequent use of contaminated nasal masks may lead to aspiration of microorganisms. Although the incidence of respiratory disease after such contamination is unknown, it is clear that disinfection of the nitrous oxide apparatus between patients is desirable. A simple cleaning method involving alkaline glutaraldehyde is described that provides adequate disinfection of the rubber goods used in the administration of gas. Superiority of this technique over previously recommended cleaning methods is shown.

  3. Disinfectants for spacecraft applications - An overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koenig, David W.; Mallary, Laura L.; Pierson, Duane L.

    1991-01-01

    The review of disinfectants for use on manned missions emphasizes the need for contamination control to prevent the detrimental effects of bacteria growth on crew health. Microbial control is possible by means of biocides, but the selected product has to meet stringent toxicity requirements for the small environments in spacecraft. The testing and evaluation is described of four biocide candidates: hydrogen peroxide, quaternary ammonium compounds, iodine, and glutaraldehyde. The effectiveness of the disinfectants are analyzed in terms of the ability to treat typical microbial counts from Skylab missions in a closed environment. It is shown that many biocide candidates are not compatible with the ECLSS, water-recovery management, and air-revitalization subsystems of the Space Station Freedom. The use of hydrogen peroxide is proposed with a secondary stronger agent for microbial spills from biological experiments.

  4. THE UPTAKE OF WATER DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS INTO FOODS DURING HOME PROCESSING

    EPA Science Inventory

    A variety of organic compounds in tap water are produced as a result of disinfection process. Use of chlorine-containing chemicals for disinfection produces many disinfection by-products (DBPs) including trihalomethanes, haloacetonitriles and haloacetic acid. Ozonation with secon...

  5. Research Issues Underlying the Four-Lab Study: Integrated Disinfection Byproducts Mixtures Research

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chemical disinfection of drinking water is a major public health triumph of the 20th century, resulting in significant decreases in morbidity and mortality from waterborne diseases. Disinfection byproducts (DBPs) are chemicals formed by the reaction of oxidizing disinfectants wi...

  6. 40 CFR 141.709 - Developing the disinfection profile and benchmark.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL PRIMARY DRINKING WATER REGULATIONS Enhanced Treatment for... water must be measured at each residual disinfectant concentration sampling point during peak hourly... disinfected water must be measured at each chlorine residual disinfectant concentration sampling point...

  7. 40 CFR 141.709 - Developing the disinfection profile and benchmark.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL PRIMARY DRINKING WATER REGULATIONS Enhanced Treatment for... water must be measured at each residual disinfectant concentration sampling point during peak hourly... disinfected water must be measured at each chlorine residual disinfectant concentration sampling point...

  8. 40 CFR 141.709 - Developing the disinfection profile and benchmark.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL PRIMARY DRINKING WATER REGULATIONS Enhanced Treatment for... water must be measured at each residual disinfectant concentration sampling point during peak hourly... disinfected water must be measured at each chlorine residual disinfectant concentration sampling point...

  9. 40 CFR 141.709 - Developing the disinfection profile and benchmark.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL PRIMARY DRINKING WATER REGULATIONS Enhanced Treatment for... water must be measured at each residual disinfectant concentration sampling point during peak hourly... disinfected water must be measured at each chlorine residual disinfectant concentration sampling point...

  10. 40 CFR 141.709 - Developing the disinfection profile and benchmark.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL PRIMARY DRINKING WATER REGULATIONS Enhanced Treatment for... water must be measured at each residual disinfectant concentration sampling point during peak hourly... disinfected water must be measured at each chlorine residual disinfectant concentration sampling point...

  11. Silver-based Antibacterial Surfaces for Drinking Water Disinfection - An overview

    EPA Science Inventory

    Risks associated with current disinfection techniques, including the formation of disinfection by-products and multi-drug resistant bacterial species, have prompted the exploration of advanced disinfection methods. One such technique employs silver nanoparticles incorporation on ...

  12. Disinfection of secondary effluents by infiltration percolation.

    PubMed

    Makni, H

    2001-01-01

    Among the most attractive applications of reclaimed wastewater are: irrigation of public parks, sports fields, golf courses and market gardening. These uses require advanced wastewater treatment including disinfection. According to WHO guidelines (1989) and current rules and regulations in Tunisia, faecal coliform levels have to be reduced to < 10(3) or 10(2) CFU/100 mL. In Tunisia, most wastewater plants are only secondary treatment and, in order to meet health related regulations, the effluents need to be disinfected. However, it is usual for secondary effluents to need filtration prior to disinfection. Effectiveness of conventional disinfection processes, such as chlorination and UV radiation, are dependent upon the oxidation level and the levels of suspended solids of the treated water. Ozonation is relatively expensive and energy consuming. The consideration of the advantages and disadvantages of conventional techniques, their reliability, investment needs and operational costs will lead to the use of less sophisticated alternative techniques for certain facilities. Among alternative techniques, soil aquifer treatment and infiltration percolation through sand beds have been studied in Arizona, Israel, France, Spain and Morocco. Infiltration percolation plants have been intermittently fed with secondary or high quality primary effluents which percolated through 1.5-2 m unsaturated coarse sand and were recovered by under-drains. In such infiltration percolation facilities, microorganisms were eliminated through numerous physical, physicochemical and biological inter-related processes (mechanical filtration, adsorption and microbial degradation respectively). Efficiency of faecal coliform removal was dependent upon the water detention times in the filtering medium and on the oxidation of the filtered water. Effluents of Sfax town aerated ponds were infiltrated through 1.5 m deep sand columns in order to determine the performance of infiltration percolation in the

  13. Regenerable Iodine Water-Disinfection System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sauer, Richard L.; Colombo, Gerald V.; Jolly, Clifford D.

    1994-01-01

    Iodinated resin bed for disinfecting water regenerated to extend useful life. Water flows through regeneration bed of crystalline iodine during regeneration. At other times, flow diverted around regeneration bed. Although regeneration cycle manually controlled readily automated to start and stop according to signals from concentration sensors. Further benefit of regeneration is bed provides highly concentrated biocide source when needed. Concentrated biocide used to superiodinate system after contamination from routine maintenance or unexpected introduction of large concentration of microbes.

  14. Small Scale Water Disinfection for Military Purposes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-01-01

    AD-A268 654 Small scale water disinfection for military purposes. Gary Thomson DSTO DoGC Materials Research Laboratory ELECTE P.O. Box 147 m...Scottsdale AUG 2 4 •9 3 1. SUMTasmania 7260 E When a military force is in the field, it is impossible to apply at all times the normal practices of water ...purification such as coagulation, flocculation, sedimentation, filtration and chlorination used for a municipal water supply. For personnel who are

  15. Iodine Disinfection in the Use of Individual Water Purification Devices

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-03-01

    affect the triiodide’s disinfection capability of viruses. Heavy organic matter loading could reduce the disinfection capability of an iodine resin...reference 20). However, a 10-fold reduction in organic matter (0.6 mg/ml or 600 mg/L) did not TIP #31-005-0306 9 appear to affect the triiodide...Provide additional contact time and/or increase iodine dose in more turbid waters. Affects disinfection capability. Heavy organic matter loading

  16. Influence of ultrasound enhancement on chlorine dioxide consumption and disinfection by-products formation for secondary effluents disinfection.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiaoqin; Zhao, Junyuan; Li, Zifu; Lan, Juanru; Li, Yajie; Yang, Xin; Wang, Dongling

    2016-01-01

    Chlorine dioxide (ClO2) has been promoted as an alternative disinfectant because of its high disinfection efficiency and less formation of organic disinfection by-products (DBPs). However, particle-associated microorganisms could be protected during the disinfection process, which decreases the disinfection efficiency or increases the required dosage. Besides, the formation of inorganic disinfection by-products is a significant concern in environment health. Ultrasound (US)-combined disinfection methods are becoming increasingly attractive because they are efficient and environmentally friendly. In this study, US was introduced as an enhancement method to identify its influence on ClO2 demand reduction and to minimize the production of potential DBPs for secondary effluents disinfection. Fecal coliform was used as an indicator, and DBPs, including trichloromethane (TCM), dichloroacetic acid (DCAA), trichloroacetic acid (TCAA), chlorite (ClO2(-)), and chlorate (ClO3(-)), were analyzed to observe the potential DBPs formation. Results show that US pretreatment could reduce half of ClO2 dosage compared with ClO2 disinfection alone for the same disinfection efficiency, and that an input power density of 2.64 kJ/L pretreatment with the 1.5mg/L ClO2 was enough to meet the discharge requirement in China (i.e., fecal coliform below 1000 CFU/L for Class 1A) for secondary effluent disinfection, and the ClO2(-) concentration in the disinfection effluent was only 1.37 mg/L at the same time. Furthermore, the different effects of US on the two processes (US as pretreatment and simultaneous US/ClO2 disinfection) were also analyzed, including deagglomerating, cell damage, and synergistic disinfection as well as degasing/sonolysis. It was proved that the production of TCM, DCAA, and TCAA was insignificantly influenced with the introduction of US, but US pretreatment did reduce the production of ClO2(-) and ClO3(-) effectually. In general, US pretreatment could be a better option for

  17. [Principles of antisepsis, disinfection and sterilization].

    PubMed

    Hernández-Navarrete, María-Jesús; Celorrio-Pascual, José-Miguel; Lapresta Moros, Carlos; Solano Bernad, Victor-Manuel

    2014-12-01

    This article aims to provide a brief review of the main concepts on which the prevention and control of infection are based. Antisepsis comprises a set of techniques aimed at the total sterilization, or at most, disinfection, removing germs that contaminate an environment. Both procedures must be preceded by an environmental cleanup in the location in which they intend to be applied. The disinfection is carried out using biocides or germicides. Antimicrobial chemicals, that have mechanisms of action and resistances very similar to antibiotics, are generating concern due to the possibility of crossing genetic information that aggravates the problem of bacterial resistance. Most biocides can act as antiseptics, and applied to skin tissue, or disinfectants on inanimate materials. The spectrum of action of germicides depends on the product itself and external controllable factors: temperature, concentration, exposure time, etc. Sterilization techniques are primarily physical, by exposing the material to steam, or sterilizing gas, using autoclaves. Major advances are the use of low temperatures with shorter exposure times, in parallel with technological advances in instrumentation in order to avoid high temperatures and high use rotations due to workload.

  18. New Technologies to Improve Root Canal Disinfection.

    PubMed

    Plotino, Gianluca; Cortese, Teresa; Grande, Nicola M; Leonardi, Denise P; Di Giorgio, Gianni; Testarelli, Luca; Gambarini, Gianluca

    2016-01-01

    Effective irrigant delivery and agitation are prerequisites to promote root canal disinfection and debris removal and improve successful endodontic treatment. This paper presents an overview of the currently available technologies to improve the cleaning of the endodontic space and their debridement efficacy. A PubMed electronic search was conducted with appropriate key words to identify the relevant literature on this topic. After retrieving the full-text articles, all the articles were reviewed and the most appropriate were included in this review. Several different systems of mechanical activation of irrigants to improve endodontic disinfection were analysed: manual agitation with gutta-percha cones, endodontic instruments or special brushes, vibrating systems activated by low-speed hand-pieces or by sonic or subsonic energy, use of ultrasonic or laser energy to mechanically activate the irrigants and apical negative pressure irrigation systems. Furthermore, this review aims to describe systems designed to improve the intracanal bacterial decontamination by a specific chemical action, such as ozone, direct laser action or light-activated disinfection. The ultrasonic activation of root canal irrigants and of sodium hypochlorite in particular still remains the gold standard to which all other systems of mechanical agitation analyzed in this article were compared. From this overview, it is evident that the use of different irrigation systems can provide several advantages in the clinical endodontic outcome and that integration of new technologies, coupled with enhanced techniques and materials, may help everyday clinical practice.

  19. A Modern Approach to Disinfection, as Old as the Evolution of Vertebrates

    PubMed Central

    Migliarina, Franco; Ferro, Sergio

    2014-01-01

    The immune system of vertebrates “naturally” produces hypochlorous acid (HOCl) to fight against bacteria and pathogens. A patented electrochemical technology mirrors the above defense system, allowing the synthesis of HOCl solutions through the electrolysis of water enriched in salts, at the level of a few grams per liter. The system allows for the careful control of the pH of produced solutions, with consequent optimization of their activity. Once the HOCl is introduced into the water system; it is able to remove the biofilm from pipe network; significantly decreasing the level of Legionella colonization; within 8–10 weeks from the beginning of the disinfection approach. The technology has been applied in a variety of healthcare facilities, both in Italy and in neighboring European countries. In the present paper, two successful case studies are briefly presented: Data were obtained from experiences in two different healthcare facilities, one in Italy and the other in Germany. Destruction of biofilm was indirectly testified by an increase of total organic carbon content of water; as a consequence, and because of the dosing of the disinfecting agent, some μg/L of total halomethanes were also formed. However, both compositional features were only observed during the initial stages of the disinfection treatment. PMID:27429291

  20. A Modern Approach to Disinfection, as Old as the Evolution of Vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Migliarina, Franco; Ferro, Sergio

    2014-12-19

    The immune system of vertebrates "naturally" produces hypochlorous acid (HOCl) to fight against bacteria and pathogens. A patented electrochemical technology mirrors the above defense system, allowing the synthesis of HOCl solutions through the electrolysis of water enriched in salts, at the level of a few grams per liter. The system allows for the careful control of the pH of produced solutions, with consequent optimization of their activity. Once the HOCl is introduced into the water system; it is able to remove the biofilm from pipe network; significantly decreasing the level of Legionella colonization; within 8-10 weeks from the beginning of the disinfection approach. The technology has been applied in a variety of healthcare facilities, both in Italy and in neighboring European countries. In the present paper, two successful case studies are briefly presented: Data were obtained from experiences in two different healthcare facilities, one in Italy and the other in Germany. Destruction of biofilm was indirectly testified by an increase of total organic carbon content of water; as a consequence, and because of the dosing of the disinfecting agent, some μg/L of total halomethanes were also formed. However, both compositional features were only observed during the initial stages of the disinfection treatment.

  1. Hydrogen Peroxide as an Effective Disinfectant for Pasteurella multocida

    PubMed Central

    Jung, In-Soo; Kim, Hyun-Jung; Jung, Won-Yong

    2014-01-01

    Pasteurella multocida (P. multocida) infections vary widely, from local infections resulting from animal bites and scratches to general infections. As of yet, no vaccine against P. multocida has been developed, and the most effective way to prevent pathogenic transmission is to clean the host environment using disinfectants. In this study, we identified which disinfectants most effectively inhibited environmental isolates of P. multocida. Three readily available disinfectants were compared: 3% hydrogen peroxide (HP), 70% isopropyl alcohol, and synthetic phenol. In suspension tests and zone inhibition tests, 3% HP was the most promising disinfectant against P. multocida. PMID:24954350

  2. Resistance to chemical disinfection under conditions of microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchin, George L.

    1998-01-01

    In unit gravity, bacteria and disinfecting resin beads co-sediment to the septum in a fluid processing apparatus (FPA) resulting in effective chemical disinfection. In microgravity bacteria in suspension have access to a larger volume of the FPA because of a lack of sedimentation. Further, when disinfecting resin beads are added to the FPA they also remain in suspension reducing their effective concentration. Typically, therefore, disinfection experiments in microgravity return larger numbers of viable bacteria than ground-based controls. Preliminary experiments aboard the MIR Space Station with Pseudomonas aeruginosa additionally suggest that the longer bacteria are retained in microgravity the more resistant they become to chemical disinfection. This phenomenon is probably due to additional time to develop resistant biofilms on the interior of the FPA. To partially solve these problems we have developed additional disinfecting materials to use in conjunction with polyiodide containing resin beads. One of these materials carbon beads coated with 3-trimethoxy silylpropyl dimethyloctadecyl ammonium chloride (Dow-Corning 5700®), acts synergistically with polyiodide resin disinfectants. Carbon beads so treated are still able to remove aqueous iodine from the water stream while providing an additional level of chemical disinfection. This additional capability prevents contamination of the carbon beads with heterotrophic bacteria and insures that bacteria surviving iodine disinfection are efficiently devitalized.

  3. Control of microorganisms in flowing nutrient solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, R. D.

    1994-11-01

    Controlling microorganisms in flowing nutrient solutions involves different techniques when targeting the nutrient solution, hardware surfaces in contact with the solution, or the active root zone. This review presents basic principles and applications of a number of treatment techniques, including disinfection by chemicals, ultrafiltration, ultrasonics, and heat treatment, with emphasis on UV irradiation and ozone treatment. Procedures for control of specific pathogens by nutrient solution conditioning also are reviewed.

  4. Control of microorganisms in flowing nutrient solutions.

    PubMed

    Evans, R D

    1994-11-01

    Controlling microorganisms in flowing nutrient solutions involves different techniques when targeting the nutrient solution, hardware surfaces in contact with the solution, or the active root zone. This review presents basic principles and applications of a number of treatment techniques, including disinfection by chemicals, ultrafiltration, ultrasonics, and heat treatment, with emphasis on UV irradiation and ozone treatment. Procedures for control of specific pathogens by nutrient solution conditioning also are reviewed.

  5. Digital imaging for the education of proper surgical hand disinfection.

    PubMed

    Haidegger, Tamás; Nagy, Melinda; Lehotsky, Akos; Szilágyi, László

    2011-01-01

    Nosocomial infections are the undesirable result of a treatment in a hospital, or a health care service unit, not related to the patient's original condition. Despite the evolution of medicine, fundamental problems with hand hygiene remain existent, leading to the spread of nosocomial infections. Our group has been working on a generic solution to provide a method and apparatus to teach and verify proper hand disinfection. The general idea is to mark the skin surfaces that were sufficiently treated with alcoholic hand rub. Digital image processing is employed to determine the location of these areas and overlay it on the segmented hand, visualizing the results in an intuitive form. A non-disruptive ultraviolet marker is mixed to a commercially available hand rub, therefore leaving the original hand washing workflow intact. Digital images are taken in an enclosed device we developed for this purpose. First, robust hand contour segmentation is performed, then a histogram-based formulation of the fuzzy c-means algorithm is employed for the classification of clean versus dirty regions, minimizing the processing time of the images. The method and device have been tested in 3 hospitals in Hungary, Romania and Singapore, on surgeons, residents, medical students and nurses. A health care professional verified the results of the segmentation, since no gold standard is available for the recorded human cases. We were able to identify the hand boundaries correctly in 99.2% of the cases. The device can give objective feedback to medical students and staff to develop and maintain proper hand disinfection practice.

  6. Production of various disinfection byproducts in indoor swimming pool waters treated with different disinfection methods.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jin; Jun, Myung-Jin; Lee, Man-Ho; Lee, Min-Hwan; Eom, Seog-Won; Zoh, Kyung-Duk

    2010-11-01

    In this study, the concentrations of disinfection byproducts (DBPs), including trihalomethanes (THMs; chloroform, bromodichloromethane, dibromochloromethane, and bromoform), haloacetic acids (HAAs; dichloroacetic acid and trichloroacetic acid), haloacetonitriles (HANs; dichloroacetonitrile, trichloroacetonitrile, bromochloroacetonitrile, and dibromoacetonitrile), and chloral hydrate (CH) were measured in 86 indoor swimming pools in Seoul, Korea, treated using different disinfection methods, such as chlorine, ozone and chlorine, and a technique that uses electrochemically generated mixed oxidants (EGMOs). The correlations between DBPs and other environmental factors such as with total organic carbon (TOC), KMnO(4) consumption, free residual chlorine, pH, and nitrate (NO(3)(-)) in the pools were examined. The geometric mean concentrations of total DBPs in swimming pool waters were 183.1±2.5μg/L, 32.6±2.1μg/L, and 139.9±2.4μg/L in pools disinfected with chlorine, ozone/chlorine, and EGMO, respectively. The mean concentrations of total THMs (TTHMs), total HAAs (THAAs), total HANs (THANs), and CH differed significantly depending on the disinfection method used (P<0.01). Interestingly, THAAs concentrations were the highest, followed by TTHMs, CH, and THANs in all swimming pools regardless of disinfection method. TOC showed a good correlation with the concentrations of DBPs in all swimming pools (chlorine; r=0.82, P<0.01; ozone/chlorine; r=0.52, P<0.01, EGMO; r=0.39, P<0.05). In addition, nitrate was positively correlated with the concentrations of total DBPs in swimming pools disinfected with chlorine and ozone/chlorine (chlorine; r=0.58; ozone/chlorine; r=0.60, P<0.01), whereas was negative correlated with the concentrations of total DBPs (r=-0.53, P<0.01) in the EGMO-treated pools.

  7. Chlorination and chloramination of tetracycline antibiotics: disinfection by-products formation and influential factors.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Shiqing; Shao, Yisheng; Gao, Naiyun; Zhu, Shumin; Ma, Yan; Deng, Jing

    2014-09-01

    Formation of disinfection by-products (DBPs) from chlorination and chloramination of tetracycline antibiotics (TCs) was comprehensively investigated. It was demonstrated that a connection existed between the transformation of TCs and the formation of chloroform (CHCl3), carbon tetrachloride (CCl4), dichloroacetonitrile (DCAN) and dichloroacetone (DCAce). Factors evaluated included chlorine (Cl2) and chloramine(NH2Cl) dosage, reaction time, solution pH and disinfection modes. Increased Cl2/NH2Cl dosage and reaction time improved the formation of CHCl3 and DCAce. Formation of DCAN followed an increasing and then decreasing pattern with increasing Cl2 dosage and prolonged reaction time. pH affected DBPs formation differently, with CHCl3 and DCAN decreasing in chlorination, and having maximum concentrations at pH 7 in chloramination. The total concentrations of DBPs obeyed the following order: chlorination>chloramination>pre-chlorination (0.5h)>pre-chlorination (1h)>pre-chlorination (2h).

  8. Effect of microwave disinfection on mechanical properties of denture base acrylic resin.

    PubMed

    Hamouda, Ibrahim M; Ahmed, Sabry A

    2010-10-01

    The microwave oven was used for sterilizing dentures contaminated with Candida albicans and other communicable diseases instead of disinfectant solutions. This study was carried out to evaluate the flexural properties, toughness, and impact strength of heat-cured acrylic resin sterilized by microwave oven either immersed in water or non-immersed for 5 and 15 min at full power. The results indicated that the microwave oven sterilization technique resulted in reduction of the load necessary to fracture the specimens, deformation at fracture, transverse strength, modulus of elasticity except disinfection at 5 min dry condition, toughness, and impact strength. This study concluded that the microwave oven is not acceptable for sterilization of dentures because of its weakening effects on the dentures that prone for fracture during clinical use. This method of sterilization increased the brittleness of acrylic resin specimens.

  9. Chlorhexidine or povidone-iodine: Which solution is more effective on skin colonization in neonates?

    PubMed Central

    Majidipour, Narges; Abdeyazdan, Zahra; Zargham-Boroujeni, Ali

    2013-01-01

    Background: Infection control should be an integrated part of patient care, especially to ensure safety and survival in hospitalized neonates. Although povidone-iodine (PVP-I) solution has been used as the most common antiseptic in hospitals of Iran, chlorhexidine is currently used in some wards for skin disinfection. However, there is no evidence about the superiority of either antiseptic solution over the other one. This clinical trial carried out in two university hospitals affiliated to Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan, Iran, aimed to compare the effects of chlorhexidine and PVP-I solutions on skin bacterial colonization in hospitalized neonates. Materials and Methods: The participants were 98 hospitalized infants. In each infant, one area on the skin was disinfected by chlorhexidine while the contralateral site was disinfected by PVP-I. Skin cultures were taken before and after disinfection. Microorganisms were determined and colony count was performed based on a standard method. The collected data were analyzed using descriptive and inferential statistical methods in SPSS v. 14. Results: The mean of microorganism colony count before and after disinfection by either solution was statistically different (P < 0.001). There was no significant difference between the two groups in terms of mean microorganism colony count before disinfection. However, a significant difference was observed after disinfection. Conclusions: PVP-I is more efficacious than chlorhexidine for skin disinfection. Consequently, it seems better to use PVP-I for skin preparation before invasive procedures. PMID:23983729

  10. The effect of disinfectants on 2024-T3 aluminum in the air medical helicopter.

    PubMed

    Austin, E N; Austin, H C; McKechnie, T N

    1993-03-01

    A principle structural component of helicopters is 2024-T3 aluminum alloy. This alloy has been designed for use in areas requiring high strength-to-weight ratios, but it is susceptible to corrosion damage. The air medical helicopter is frequently exposed to bloodborne pathogens, dirt, intravenous solutions and a variety of other contaminants. The amount of damage to the helicopter that can be caused by the use of cleaners and disinfectants has been raised as an area of concern for the safety of the helicopter, crew and patients. In a controlled study, 2024-T3 alclad aluminum strips were placed in 120-ml glass jars that were filled with 60 ml of solution and then sealed. The solutions used were disinfectants, cleaners and water (both tap and distilled). The strips in solution were placed in a controlled oven at 140 F for 100 hours to simulate long-term damage from immersion, vapors and heat. On examination, many strips were discolored and corroded. Only one solution caused no apparent damage, and only one caused slight vapor damage. As a result of the study, one of the solutions has been designated for use. The results have been used as examples for flight team members on the costly damage that can result from inappropriate use of these substances. A cleaning policy and procedure has been developed to ensure adequate protection from chemical exposure while protecting all team members from the dangers of bloodborne pathogens.

  11. An evaluation of drinking water samples treated with alternative disinfectants

    SciTech Connect

    Patterson, K.S.; Lykins, B.W. Jr.; Garner, L.M.

    1995-10-01

    Due to concern over potential human health risks associated with the use of chlorine (Cl{sub 2}) for disinfection of drinking water, many utilities are considering alternative disinfectants. An evaluation is thus needed of the potential risks associated with the use of alternative disinfectants relative to those posed by Cl{sub 2}. At a pilot-scale drinking water plant in Jefferson Parish, LA., two studies were conducted in which clarified and sand filtered Mississippi River water was treated with either ozone (O{sub 3}), monochloramine (NH{sub 2}Cl), Cl{sub 2} or was not disinfected. Ozonated water was also post-disinfected with either NH{sub 2}Cl or Cl{sub 2}, to provide a disinfectant residual. For each treatment stream total organic carbon (TOC), total organic halide (TOX) and microbiological contaminants were determined. XAD resin concentrates were also prepared for mutagenicity testing in the Ames Salmonella assay. Water samples disinfected with O{sub 3} alone had low levels of mutagenic activity, the same as the non-disinfected water. The level of mutagenicity observed following chlorination was approximately twice that observed following treatment with NH{sub 2}Cl. Disinfection with O{sub 3} prior to treatment with either Cl{sub 2} or NH{sub 2}Cl resulted in a significantly lower level of mutagenicity than when either disinfectant was used alone. The concentrations of TOX present in the water samples showed a pattern similar to that of the mutagenicity data. The levels of TOC, by contrast, were similar for all the treatment streams. No significant baterial contamination was observed in water samples treated with either Cl{sub 2} or NH{sub 2}Cl alone or in combination with O{sub 3}, as determined by heterotrophic plate counts. However, O{sub 3} alone did not insure an acceptable level of disinfection at the end of the treatment stream.

  12. Aquaculture fouling: Efficacy of potassium monopersulphonate triple salt based disinfectant (Virkon® Aquatic) against Ciona intestinalis.

    PubMed

    Paetzold, S Christine; Davidson, Jeff

    2011-07-01

    With the increasing spread of invasive marine species and their detrimental effects on aquaculture operations globally, mitigation strategies need to be optimized to mitigate economic impacts. The efficacy of a potassium monopersulphonate triple salt based disinfectant used in the aquaculture industry (Virkon® Aquatic at 0.5-5%) was evaluated against the solitary tunicate Ciona intestinalis, as well as the susceptibility of three different age groups of C. intestinalis to the treatment and the effect of the disinfectant on mussel mortality. Younger C. intestinalis were most affected by all treatments, and almost all immersion applications significantly decreased the biomass of C. intestinalis compared to untreated plates. Disinfectant solutions of ≥ 1% reduced biomass below pre-treatment levels. Mussel mortality was low, especially for solutions <3%. C. intestinalis should be treated 4 weeks post-settlement to maximize antifouling treatment effects. Immersion in 3% disinfectant for 30 s reduced the biomass of C. intestinalis by up to 89% and would be feasible in field applications using existing treatment equipment.

  13. 9 CFR 71.11 - Cresylic disinfectant as permitted disinfectant; specifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... disinfectant; specifications. 71.11 Section 71.11 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH... than the equivalent of 0.5 percent of sodium hydroxide, and not less than 21 percent of soap exclusive... glyceride, fat acid, or resin acid may be used in preparing the soap, but not all are suitable nor are...

  14. 9 CFR 71.11 - Cresylic disinfectant as permitted disinfectant; specifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... disinfectant; specifications. 71.11 Section 71.11 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH... than the equivalent of 0.5 percent of sodium hydroxide, and not less than 21 percent of soap exclusive... glyceride, fat acid, or resin acid may be used in preparing the soap, but not all are suitable nor are...

  15. 9 CFR 71.11 - Cresylic disinfectant as permitted disinfectant; specifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... disinfectant; specifications. 71.11 Section 71.11 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH... than the equivalent of 0.5 percent of sodium hydroxide, and not less than 21 percent of soap exclusive... glyceride, fat acid, or resin acid may be used in preparing the soap, but not all are suitable nor are...

  16. 9 CFR 71.11 - Cresylic disinfectant as permitted disinfectant; specifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... disinfectant; specifications. 71.11 Section 71.11 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH... than the equivalent of 0.5 percent of sodium hydroxide, and not less than 21 percent of soap exclusive... glyceride, fat acid, or resin acid may be used in preparing the soap, but not all are suitable nor are...

  17. 9 CFR 71.11 - Cresylic disinfectant as permitted disinfectant; specifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... disinfectant; specifications. 71.11 Section 71.11 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH... than the equivalent of 0.5 percent of sodium hydroxide, and not less than 21 percent of soap exclusive... glyceride, fat acid, or resin acid may be used in preparing the soap, but not all are suitable nor are...

  18. A method to evaluate the cleaning and disinfectant action of surface disinfectants.

    PubMed

    Walder, M; Myrbäck, K E; Nilsson, B

    1989-02-01

    Surface disinfection tests, used to evaluate new disinfectants, do not take into account the effects of detergents or of the mechanical cleaning process. We describe methods which evaluate both the disinfection and cleaning effect of disinfectants on organic matter. When testing alcohols at high concentrations (greater than or equal to 70%) on blood spots contaminated with Staphylococcus aureus, we found that the organisms were trapped and fixed to the test surface, probably due to denaturation of the blood. This gave a low inactivating factor (IF), as well as a poor subjective cleaning effect (SC). If serum was used instead of blood, we observed less pronounced trapping, resulting in a high IF although the SC was still poor. When broth was used, both IF and SC were satisfactory. With alcohols at a concentration of 42%, trapping was markedly reduced which improved the SC in blood contamination, with serum or broth contamination trapping did not occur. However, 42% ethanol lost its killing effect (i.e. low IF), whereas 42% isopropanol still demonstrated a high IF.

  19. TRIBROMOPYRROLE, BROMINATED ACIDS, AND OTHER DISINFECTION BYPRODUCTS PRODUCED BY DISINFECTION OF DRINKING WATER RICH IN BROMIDE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS), we investigated the formation of disinfection byproducts (DBPs) from high bromide waters (2 mg/L) treated with chlorine or chlorine dioxide used in combination with chlorine and chloramines. This study represents the first comp...

  20. Comparing irradiation parameters on disinfecting enterrecoccus faecalis in root canal disinfection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarp, Ayşe. S.; Gülsoy, Murat

    2016-02-01

    Although conventional method carries all the debris, studies on persisting infections in root canals show bacteria and their toxins spread from the root canal and contaminate the apical region. Thus developes apical periodontitis or symptoms, and loss of tooth. Even if the treatment has adequate success, anatomy of root canal system can be very complexwith accessory canals. The disinfecting effect of laser radiation has only recently been used in dentistry. Laser irradiation has a bactericidal effect. Each wavelength has its own advantages and limitations according to their different absorption characteristics, depending on their 'absorption coefficient'. The sterilizing efficiency of two types of wavelengths, a new fiber laser 1940- nm Thulium fiber Laser and an 2940 nm Er:YAG Laser were compared in this study. Irradiation with a power of 0.50 W with 1940- nm Thulium fiber Laser disinfected 95,15% of bacteria, however irradiation with same laser power with Er:YAG Laser caused a reduction of 96,48 %. But there was no significant difference in the disinfection effect of two different laser groups ( p < 0.05, Mann- U-Whitney Test). In addition to this, Er :YAG Laser caused three times more reduction from its own positive control group where 1940- nm Thulium fiber Laser caused 2,5 times effective disinfection.

  1. MUTAGENICITY AND DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS IN SURFACE DRINKING WATER DISINFECTED WITH PERACETIC ACID

    EPA Science Inventory

    The aims of this research were to study the influence of peracetic acid (PAA) on the formation of mutagens in surface waters used for human consumption and to assess its potential application for the disinfection of drinking water. The results obtained using PAA were compared to ...

  2. [Genotoxicity of drinking water during chlorine and chloramine disinfection and the influence of disinfection conditions using the umu-test].

    PubMed

    Liu, Qing; Zhang, Li-Ping; Liu, Wen-Jun; Nie, Xue-Biao; Zhang, Su-Xia; Zhang, Shun

    2010-01-01

    In this study, the effects of disinfectant dosage, reaction time and the ratio of Cl2 to N of disinfectant on genotoxicity of effluent of ozone-biological activated carbon (O3-BAC) during chlorine or chloramine disinfection were investigated using umu-test. It was found that, the genotoxicity of effluent of O3-BAC before disinfection ranged from 20-70 ng/L, and it increased after disinfection by chlorine or chloramines. With the same reaction time(24 h), genotoxicity after chlorination (40-95 ng/L) was higher than that after chloramination (20-40 ng/L) under same initial dosage. For chlorination, with initial dosage increasing from 0 mg/L to 10 mg/L, genotoxicity increased firstly, and got the maximum value at about 0.5-1 mg/L dosage, then decreased and got the minimum value at about 3-5 mg/L dosage, and finally increased again. For chloramination, genotoxicity didn't change that much. With the dosage of 3 mg/L and reaction time increasing from 0 h to 72 h, no matter for chlorine or chloramines disinfection, genotoxicity of effluent of O3-BAC both increased firstly, and got the maximum value at about 2 h, then decreased and got the minimum value at about 18 h, and finally increased again, and genotoxicity after chlorine disinfection (83-120 ng/L) was higher than that after chloramines disinfection (20-62 ng/L) under same reaction time. Further more, effects of the different ratios of Cl2 to N of disinfectant on genotoxicity of effluent of O3-BAC were also studied. Results of this study demonstrate that under test conditions, chloramine disinfection is safer than chlorine disinfection in the aspect of genotoxicity for drinking water, and the changes of genotoxicity are different from those of total HAAs.

  3. Inactivation of dairy bacteriophages by commercial sanitizers and disinfectants.

    PubMed

    Campagna, Céline; Villion, Manuela; Labrie, Simon J; Duchaine, Caroline; Moineau, Sylvain

    2014-02-03

    Many commercial sanitizers and disinfectants have been used over the years to control microbial contamination but their efficacy on phages is often unknown. Here, 23 commercial chemical products, including 21 food-grade sanitizers were tested against virulent dairy phages. These food-grade chemicals included oxidizing agents, halogenated agents, alcohols, quaternary ammonium compounds, anionic acids, iodine-based acids, and an amphoteric chemical. Phage P008 was first exposed to each sanitizer for 2 and 15min at room temperature and at two different concentrations, namely the lowest and highest no-rinse sanitizing concentrations. Organic matter (whey or milk) was also added to the testing solutions. At the end of the exposure period, the test solution was neutralized and the number of infectious phages was determined by plaque assays. The five most efficient sanitizers against phage P008 (<4 log of inactivation) were then tested against virulent lactococcal phages P008, CB13, AF6, P1532 of the 936 group, P001 (c2), Q54, and 1358 as well as Lactobacillus plantarum phage B1 and Streptococcus thermophilus phage 2972 using the same protocol. The oxidizing agents and the quaternary ammonium compounds were the most efficient against all phages although phages CB13 and P1532 were less sensitive to these chemicals than the other phages. This study may help in the selection of appropriate chemicals for controlling phage contamination in industrial factories and research laboratories.

  4. ULTRAVIOLET LIGHT DISINFECTION OF COMBINED SEWER OVERFLOW (NEW ORLEANS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective of this state-of-the-art review is to examine the performance and effectiveness of ultraviolet (UV) light disinfection for combined sewer overflow (CSO) applications. Topics presented include the use of UV light as a disinfecting agent, its practical applications, d...

  5. 9 CFR 51.31 - Disinfecting premises, conveyances, and materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... ANIMALS DESTROYED BECAUSE OF BRUCELLOSIS Indemnity for Sheep, Goats, and Horses § 51.31 Disinfecting... brucellosis, must be properly cleaned and disinfected in accordance with recommendations of the APHIS or State... the Veterinarian in Charge determines that an extension will not adversely affect the...

  6. Products identified at an alternative disinfection pilot plant.

    PubMed

    Lykins, B W; Koffskey, W

    1986-11-01

    Many drinking water utilities have recently changed or are seriously considering changing their disinfection practice from chlorine to some alternative treatment process. However, most of these utilities are changing their disinfectants without evaluating chemical impacts. Therefore, a research cooperative agreement was developed with Jefferson Parish, LA, to evaluate four parallel streams treated with four different disinfectants (chlorine, monochloramine, chlorine dioxide, and ozone.) These streams, along with a fifth parallel stream, which was not treated with a disinfectant (control), were passed through both sand and granular activated carbon (GAC). Ozonation reduced the total organic carbon (TOC) and total organic halide (TOX) concentration by 0.3 mg/L and 10 micrograms/L, respectively. The average concentration of TOC for the other disinfectants was comparable to that associated with the nondisinfected stream (3.3 mg/L). The average instantaneous TOX concentration for chlorine dioxide, chloramine, and chlorine disinfection after 30 min contact time increased by 60, 92, and 238 micrograms/L, respectively, from a nondisinfected concentration of 25 micrograms/L. The volatile organics most affected by disinfection (chlorination) were the trihalomethanes. No significant change in concentration was noted after disinfection for the other volatile organics evaluated, such as 1,2-dichlorethane, dichloromethane, trichloroethylene, 1,1,2-trichloroethane, and carbon tetrachloride. Ozonation produced an average concentration reduction of 11 to 84% for most of the nonvolatiles evaluated. Conversely, a concentration increase of 43 to 100% was noted, after chlorination, for some of the nonvolatile organics.

  7. Peracetic Acid as a Green Disinfectant for Combined Sewer Overflows

    EPA Science Inventory

    This cooperative research and development agreement between U.S. EPA, Solvay, MSDGC, and CB&I is evaluating the potential of PAA for disinfection of Muddy Creek CSO wastewater and comparing that with sodium hypochlorite disinfection. This presentation will document the effectiven...

  8. Genotoxicity of Disinfection By-products: Comparison to Carcinogenicity

    EPA Science Inventory

    Disinfection by-products (DBPs) can be formed when water is disinfected by various agents such as chlorine, ozone, or chloramines. Among the >600 DBPs identified in drinking water, 11 are regulated by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, and another ~70 DBPs that occur at s...

  9. Disinfection of water in recirculating aquaculture systems with peracetic acid

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Peracetic acid (PAA) has become a favoured alternative to chlorination in the disinfection of municipal waste water in recent years. It is also commonly used in the food industry as a disinfectant. Based on PAA concentration, the disulfide linkage in enzymes and proteins of microorganisms can be bro...

  10. Products identified at an alternative disinfection pilot plant.

    PubMed Central

    Lykins, B W; Koffskey, W

    1986-01-01

    Many drinking water utilities have recently changed or are seriously considering changing their disinfection practice from chlorine to some alternative treatment process. However, most of these utilities are changing their disinfectants without evaluating chemical impacts. Therefore, a research cooperative agreement was developed with Jefferson Parish, LA, to evaluate four parallel streams treated with four different disinfectants (chlorine, monochloramine, chlorine dioxide, and ozone.) These streams, along with a fifth parallel stream, which was not treated with a disinfectant (control), were passed through both sand and granular activated carbon (GAC). Ozonation reduced the total organic carbon (TOC) and total organic halide (TOX) concentration by 0.3 mg/L and 10 micrograms/L, respectively. The average concentration of TOC for the other disinfectants was comparable to that associated with the nondisinfected stream (3.3 mg/L). The average instantaneous TOX concentration for chlorine dioxide, chloramine, and chlorine disinfection after 30 min contact time increased by 60, 92, and 238 micrograms/L, respectively, from a nondisinfected concentration of 25 micrograms/L. The volatile organics most affected by disinfection (chlorination) were the trihalomethanes. No significant change in concentration was noted after disinfection for the other volatile organics evaluated, such as 1,2-dichlorethane, dichloromethane, trichloroethylene, 1,1,2-trichloroethane, and carbon tetrachloride. Ozonation produced an average concentration reduction of 11 to 84% for most of the nonvolatiles evaluated. Conversely, a concentration increase of 43 to 100% was noted, after chlorination, for some of the nonvolatile organics. PMID:3816717

  11. Inactivation of lymphadenopathy associated virus by chemical disinfectants.

    PubMed

    Spire, B; Barré-Sinoussi, F; Montagnier, L; Chermann, J C

    1984-10-20

    Reverse transcriptase activity of lymphadenopathy associated virus was assayed after exposure to various standard chemical disinfectants. 25% ethanol or 1% glutaraldehyde should prove sufficient to disinfect medical instruments, and 0.2% sodium hypochlorite for cleaning floors and benches. 0.1% formalin is too slow to be recommended.

  12. The alternative methods for disinfection of E. coli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yetim, Tuba; Görmez, Arzu; Gürkök, Sümeyra

    2016-04-01

    Recently, advanced oxidation processes have gained significant interest for bacterial inactivation. In the present study, the efficacy of sonolysis, photocatalysis and sonophotocatalysis was evaluated for disinfection of Escherichia coli O157:H7 strain. Sonophotocatalysis proved to be the most effective disinfection methods by generating greater amount of •OHradical.

  13. PERFORMANCE OF OZONE AS A DISINFECTANT FOR COMBINED SEWER OVERFLOW

    EPA Science Inventory

    Disinfection of combined sewer overflow (CSO) minimizes the amount of disease-causing microorganisms (pathogens) released into receiving waters. Currently, the primary disinfecting agent used in the US for wastewater treatment is chlorine (Cl2); however, Cl2 produces problems in ...

  14. The Next Generation of Disinfection By-Products

    EPA Science Inventory

    The disinfection of drinking water has been rightly hailed as a public health triumph of the 20th century. Millions of people worldwide receive quality drinking water every day from their public water systems. However, chemical disinfection has also produced an unintended health ...

  15. The Next Generation of Drinking Water Disinfection By-Products

    EPA Science Inventory

    The disinfection of drinking water has been rightly hailed as a public health triumph of the 20th century. Millions of people worldwide receive quality drinking water every day from their public water systems. However, chemical disinfection has also produced an unintended healt...

  16. Guidelines for ultraviolet disinfection of drinking water: considerations for Ontario.

    PubMed

    Hofmann, Ron; Andrews, Bob; Lachmaniuk, Pat

    The Ontario Ministry of the Environment is actively investigating protocols for approving the installation of ultraviolet (UV) disinfection systems for drinking water disinfection. This paper discusses issues that may be considered for selecting the appropriate UV dose, validating UV reactor performance, and monitoring the performance of the reactor once installed.

  17. Drowning in Disinfection Byproducts? Swimming Pool Water Quality

    EPA Science Inventory

    Disinfection is mandatory for swimming pools, because transmission of disease by bacteria, virus and protozoa is the most significant health issue. However another issue arises, and care should be taken to minimize the risks from disinfection by-products (DBPs). Public pools are ...

  18. [Scanning electron microscope study of chemically disinfected endodontic files].

    PubMed

    Navarro, G; Mateos, M; Navarro, J L; Canalda, C

    1991-01-01

    Forty stainless steel endodontic files were observed at scanning electron microscopy after being subjected to ten disinfection cycles of 10 minutes each one, immersed in different chemical disinfectants. Corrosion was not observed on the surface of the files in circumstances that this study was made.

  19. 9 CFR 51.31 - Disinfecting premises, conveyances, and materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Disinfecting premises, conveyances, and materials. 51.31 Section 51.31 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION... representative. Cleaning and disinfecting must be completed within 15 days from the date the animals were...

  20. 9 CFR 51.31 - Disinfecting premises, conveyances, and materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Disinfecting premises, conveyances, and materials. 51.31 Section 51.31 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION... representative. Cleaning and disinfecting must be completed within 15 days from the date the animals were...

  1. Disinfection By-Products: Formation and Occurrence in Drinking Water

    EPA Science Inventory

    The disinfection of drinking water has been rightly hailed as a public health triumph of the twentieth century. Millions of people worldwide receive quality drinking water every day from their public water systems. However, chemical disinfection has also produced an unintended he...

  2. Products identified at an alternative disinfection pilot plant

    SciTech Connect

    Lykins, B.W. Jr.; Koffskey, W.

    1986-11-01

    Many drinking water utilities have recently changed or are seriously considering changing their disinfection practice from chlorine to some alternative treatment process. However, most of these utilities are changing their disinfectants without evaluating chemical impacts. Therefore, a research cooperative agreement was developed with Jefferson Parish, LA, to evaluate four parallel streams treated with four different disinfectants (chlorine, monochloramine, chlorine dioxide, and ozone.) These streams, along with a fifth parallel stream, which was not treated with a disinfectant (control), were passed through both sand and granular activated carbon (GAC). Ozonation reduced the total organic carbon (TOC) and total organic halide (TOX) concentration by 0.3 mg/L and 10 micrograms/L, respectively. The average concentration of TOC for the other disinfectants was comparable to that associated with the nondisinfected stream (3.3 mg/L). The average instantaneous TOX concentration for chlorine dioxide, chloramine, and chlorine disinfection after 30 min contact time increased by 60, 92, and 238 micrograms/L, respectively, from a nondisinfected concentration of 25 micrograms/L. The volatile organics most affected by disinfection (chlorination) were the trihalomethanes. No significant change in concentration was noted after disinfection for the other volatile organics evaluated, such as 1,2-dichlorethane, dichloromethane, trichloroethylene, 1,1,2-trichloroethane, and carbon tetrachloride. Ozonation produced an average concentration reduction of 11 to 84% for most of the nonvolatiles evaluated. Conversely, a concentration increase of 43 to 100% was noted, after chlorination, for some of the nonvolatile organics.

  3. NEW SLUDGE DISINFECTION TECHNOLOGIES IN THE LITERATURE AND PEC APPLICATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Since it's creation in 1985, the Pathogen Equivalency Committee (PEC), has been reviewing novel sludge disinfection technologies and their abilities to protect human health and the environment. In the past several years many new disinfection technologies have surfaced not only in...

  4. Zero-G Condensing Heat Exchanger with Integral Disinfection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burke, Kenneth A. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    The system that operates in a zero gravity environment and has an integral ozone generating capability is disclosed. The system contributes to the control of metabolic water vapors in the air, and also provided disinfection of any resulting condensate within the system, as well as disinfection of the air stream that flows throughout the disclosed system.

  5. HIGH-RATE DISINFECTION TECHNIQUES FOR COMBIND SEWER OVERFLOW

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper presents high-rate disinfection technologies for combined sewer overflow (CSO). The high-rate disinfection technologies of interest are: chlorination/dechlorination, ultraviolet light irradiation (UV), chlorine dioxide (ClO2 ), ozone (O3), peracetic acid (CH3COOOH )...

  6. Nanomaterial Case Study: Nanoscale Silver in Disinfectant Spray (Final Report)

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA announced the release of the final report, Nanomaterial Case Study: Nanoscale Silver in Disinfectant Spray. This report represents a case study of engineered nanoscale silver (nano-Ag), focusing on the specific example of nano-Ag as possibly used in disinfectant spr...

  7. A multi-purpose computing center: FNAL

    SciTech Connect

    Wolbers, Stephen; /Fermilab

    2009-01-01

    The Fermilab Computing Center is described with a special emphasis given to the scientific computing systems and the data storage and archiving systems. The scope and focus of this paper is the Fermilab scientific computing facility. It does not cover, or does not cover very well, related issues such as data Grids, cloud computing and storage, commercial storage, data integrity, authorization, access rates, and novel storage technologies. These are all important considerations in discussing data centers and should be kept in mind when one explores issues related to computing centers and long-term data storage.

  8. Dual-Channel Multi-Purpose Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, Joseph M.; Content, David

    2009-01-01

    A dual-channel telescope allows for a wide-field telescope design wit h a good, narrow field channel of fewer surfaces for shorter-wavelen gth or planet-finding applications. The design starts with a Korsch three-mirror-anastigmat (TMA) telescope that meets the mission criter ia for image quality over a wide field of view. The internal image a t the Cassegrain focus is typically blurry due to the aberration bala ncing among the three mirrors. The Cassegrain focus is then re-optim ized on the axis of the system where the narrow field channel instru ment is picked off by bending the primary mirror.

  9. Multi-purpose neutron radiography system

    SciTech Connect

    Barton, J.P.; Bryant, L.E.; Berry, P.

    1996-07-01

    A conceptual design is given for a low cost, multipurpose radiography system suited for the needs of the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The proposed neutron source is californium-252. One purpose is to provide an in-house capability for occasional, reactor quality, neutron radiography thus replacing the recently closed Omega-West Reactor. A second purpose is to provide a highly reliable standby transportable neutron radiography system. A third purpose is to provide for transportable neutron probe gamma spectroscopy techniques. The cost is minimized by shared use of an existing x-ray facility, and by use of an existing transport cask. The achievable neutron radiography and radioscopy performance characteristics have been verified. The demonstrated image qualities range from high resolution gadolinium - SR film, with L:D = 100:1, to radioscopy using a LIXI image with L:D = 30:1 and neutron fluence 3.4 x 10{sup 5} n/cm{sup 2}.

  10. Quarkonia as a multi-purpose tool

    SciTech Connect

    Vogt, R

    2010-12-21

    Quarkonia can be a very useful tool for understanding the medium in which they are produced and pass through. However, their usefulness as a tool depends on how well certain aspects of their behavior in cold matter are understood.

  11. Mutagenic activity of disinfection by-products.

    PubMed Central

    Cognet, L; Courtois, Y; Mallevialle, J

    1986-01-01

    Data on raw water quality, disinfection treatment practices, and the resulting mutagenic properties of the treated water were compiled from pilot- and full-scale treatment experiments to evaluate that parameter which might produce variability in the results of a mutagenic study. Analysis of the data and comparison of treatment practices indicated that the measured mutagenic activity is strongly related to the characteristics of the organic matter in the raw water, the methodology used to sample and detect mutagens, the scale of the study both in terms of treatment flow and period of study, and the point at which and the conditions under which oxidants are added during treatment. Conclusions regarding disinfection systems in full-scale water treatment plants include the following: When raw water is pretreated and high concentrations of organics are present in the raw water, both ozonation and chlorination increased mutagenic activity. However, no significant difference in mutagenicity was found between the two oxidants. Both in the case of a nitrified groundwater and a clarified surface water, the mutagenic activity of the water after ozonation was related to its mutagenic activity before ozonation. With ozonation, mutagenic activity decreased after granular activated carbon (GAC) filtration. Thus, when GAC filtration follows ozone disinfection, early addition of oxidants may not be deleterious to the finished water quality. When chlorine or chlorine dioxide is added after GAC filtration, chlorine dioxide was found to produce a less mutagenic water than chlorine. Although these conclusions suggest means of controlling mutagenic activity during treatment, it must be stressed that the measurement of mutagenicity is a presumptive index of contamination level. PMID:3816721

  12. Mutagenic activity of disinfection by-products

    SciTech Connect

    Cognet, L.; Courtois, Y.; Mallevialle, J.

    1986-11-01

    Data on raw water quality, disinfection treatment practices, and the resulting mutagenic properties of the treated water were compiled from pilot- and full-scale treatment experiments to evaluate that parameter which might produce variability in the results of a mutagenic study. Analysis of the data and comparison of treatment practices indicated that the measured mutagenic activity is strongly related to the characteristics of the organic matter in the raw water, the methodology used to sample and detect mutagens, the scale of the study both in terms of treatment flow and period of study, and the point at which and the conditions under which oxidants are added during treatment. Conclusions regarding disinfection systems in full-scale water treatment plants include the following: When raw water is pretreated and high concentrations of organics are present in the raw water, both ozonation and chlorination increased mutagenic activity. However, no significant difference in mutagenicity was found between the two oxidants. Both in the case of a nitrified groundwater and a clarified surface water, the mutagenic activity of the water after ozonation was related to its mutagenic activity before ozonation. With ozonation, mutagenic activity decreased after granular activated carbon (GAC) filtration. Thus, when GAC filtration follows ozone disinfection, early addition of oxidants may not be deleterious to the finished water quality. When chlorine or chlorine dioxide is added after GAC filtration, chlorine dioxide was found to produce a less mutagenic water than chlorine. Although these conclusions suggest means of controlling mutagenic activity during treatment, it must be stressed that the measurement of mutagenicity is a presumptive index of contamination level.

  13. Impact of disinfection on drinking water biofilm bacterial community.

    PubMed

    Mi, Zilong; Dai, Yu; Xie, Shuguang; Chen, Chao; Zhang, Xiaojian

    2015-11-01

    Disinfectants are commonly applied to control the growth of microorganisms in drinking water distribution systems. However, the effect of disinfection on drinking water microbial community remains poorly understood. The present study investigated the impacts of different disinfectants (chlorine and chloramine) and dosages on biofilm bacterial community in bench-scale pipe section reactors. Illumina MiSeq sequencing illustrated that disinfection strategy could affect both bacterial diversity and community structure of drinking water biofilm. Proteobacteria tended to predominate in chloraminated drinking water biofilms, while Firmicutes in chlorinated and unchlorinated biofilms. The major proteobacterial groups were influenced by both disinfectant type and dosage. In addition, chloramination had a more profound impact on bacterial community than chlorination.

  14. Antimicrobial nanomaterials as water disinfectant: applications, limitations and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Hossain, Fahim; Perales-Perez, Oscar J; Hwang, Sangchul; Román, Félix

    2014-01-01

    Nanotechnology and its application is one of the rapidly developing sciences. As demand of fresh drinking water is increasing, nanotechnology can contribute noticeable development and improvement to water treatment process. Disinfection process is the last and most important step in water and wastewater treatment process. Some nanomaterials can be used as disinfectants due to their antimicrobial properties and reduce the possibility of harmful disinfection by-products (DBPs) formation during traditional disinfection process. A significant number of research efforts is done or going on to understand the mechanisms and enhance the efficiency of nanomaterials as antimicrobial agents, although it will take more time to understand the full potential of nanomaterials in this field. This review paper focuses on inactivation pathways of benign nanomaterials, their possible and probable application and limitations as disinfectants and future opportunities for their application in water cleaning processes.

  15. Disinfection of contaminated water by using solar irradiation.

    PubMed

    Caslake, Laurie F; Connolly, Daniel J; Menon, Vilas; Duncanson, Catriona M; Rojas, Ricardo; Tavakoli, Javad

    2004-02-01

    Contaminated water causes an estimated 6 to 60 billion cases of gastrointestinal illness annually. The majority of these cases occur in rural areas of developing nations where the water supply remains polluted and adequate sanitation is unavailable. A portable, low-cost, and low-maintenance solar unit to disinfect unpotable water has been designed and tested. The solar disinfection unit was tested with both river water and partially processed water from two wastewater treatment plants. In less than 30 min in midday sunlight, the unit eradicated more than 4 log10 U (99.99%) of bacteria contained in highly contaminated water samples. The solar disinfection unit has been field tested by Centro Panamericano de Ingenieria Sanitaria y Ciencias del Ambiente in Lima, Peru. At moderate light intensity, the solar disinfection unit was capable of reducing the bacterial load in a controlled contaminated water sample by 4 log10 U and disinfected approximately 1 liter of water in 30 min.

  16. Cleaning and disinfection practice in the meat industries of Europe.

    PubMed

    Salvat, G; Colin, P

    1995-06-01

    The application and efficacy of cleaning and disinfection methods are reviewed, together with the relevant European and French legislation. European Commission Hygiene Directive 93/43/EEC of 14 June 1993 proposes the adoption of hazard analysis and critical control points (HACCP) for the meat industry, and this includes cleaning and disinfection. It is necessary to organise a team for washing, cleaning, rinsing, disinfection and final rinsing; three different types of organisation are compared. Application of HACCP and its contribution to the shelf life of products and their contamination with Listeria monocytogenes is discussed in the light of practical experience with poultry meat and cured pork products. Various means of verifying the efficacy of cleaning and disinfection (turbidimetry, adenosine triphosphate assay and macroscopic observation) are compared with the techniques of conventional microbiology. The authors conclude that cleaning and disinfection are essential for application of HACCP to the meat industry.

  17. UV disinfection pilot plant study at the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect

    Huffines, R.L.; Beavers, B.A.

    1993-05-01

    An ultraviolet light disinfection system pilot plant was operated at the Savannah River Site Central Shops sanitary wastewater treatment package plant July 14, 1992 through August 13, 1992. The purpose was to determine the effectiveness of ultraviolet light disinfection on the effluent from the small package-type wastewater treatment plants currently used on-site. This pilot plant consisted of a rack of UV lights suspended in a stainless steel channel through which a sidestream of effluent from the treatment plant clarifier was pumped. Fecal coliform analyses were performed on the influent to and effluent from the pilot unit to verify the disinfection process. UV disinfection was highly effective in reducing fecal coliform colonies within NPDES permit limitations even under process upset conditions. The average fecal coliform reduction exceeded 99.7% using ultraviolet light disinfection under normal operating conditions at the package treatment plants.

  18. UV disinfection pilot plant study at the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect

    Huffines, R.L.; Beavers, B.A.

    1993-01-01

    An ultraviolet light disinfection system pilot plant was operated at the Savannah River Site Central Shops sanitary wastewater treatment package plant July 14, 1992 through August 13, 1992. The purpose was to determine the effectiveness of ultraviolet light disinfection on the effluent from the small package-type wastewater treatment plants currently used on-site. This pilot plant consisted of a rack of UV lights suspended in a stainless steel channel through which a sidestream of effluent from the treatment plant clarifier was pumped. Fecal coliform analyses were performed on the influent to and effluent from the pilot unit to verify the disinfection process. UV disinfection was highly effective in reducing fecal coliform colonies within NPDES permit limitations even under process upset conditions. The average fecal coliform reduction exceeded 99.7% using ultraviolet light disinfection under normal operating conditions at the package treatment plants.

  19. Exposure to common quaternary ammonium disinfectants decreases fertility in mice

    PubMed Central

    Melin, Vanessa E.; Potineni, Haritha; Hunt, Patricia; Griswold, Jodi; Siems, Bill; Werre, Stephen R.; Hrubec, Terry C.

    2014-01-01

    Quaternary ammonium compounds (QACs) are antimicrobial disinfectants commonly used in commercial and household settings. Extensive use of QACs results in ubiquitous human exposure, yet reproductive toxicity has not been evaluated. Decreased reproductive performance in laboratory mice coincided with the introduction of a disinfectant containing both alkyl dimethyl benzyl ammonium chloride (ADBAC) and didecyl dimethyl ammonium chloride (DDAC). QACs were detected in caging material over a period of several months following cessation of disinfectant use. Breeding pairs exposed for six months to a QAC disinfectant exhibited decreases in fertility and fecundity: increased time to first litter, longer pregnancy intervals, fewer pups per litter and fewer pregnancies. Significant morbidity in near term dams was also observed. In summary, exposure to a common QAC disinfectant mixture significantly impaired reproductive health in mice. This study illustrates the importance of assessing mixture toxicity of commonly used products whose components have only been evaluated individually. PMID:25483128

  20. A Review of Current Disinfectants for Gastrointestinal Endoscopic Reprocessing

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sanghoon; Koo, Ja Seol; Park, Jeong Bae; Lim, Yun Jeong; Hong, Su Jin; Kim, Sang-Woo; Chun, Hoon Jai

    2013-01-01

    Gastrointestinal endoscopy is gaining popularity for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. However, concerns over endoscope-related nosocomial infections are increasing, together with interest by the general public in safe and efficient endoscopy. For this reason, reprocessing the gastrointestinal endoscope is an important step for effective performance of endoscopy. Disinfectants are essential to the endoscope reprocessing procedure. Before selecting an appropriate disinfectant, their characteristics, limitations and means of use must be fully understood. Herein, we review the characteristics of several currently available disinfectants, including their uses, potency, advantages, and disadvantages. Most disinfectants can be used to reprocess gastrointestinal endoscopes if the manufacturer's guidelines are followed. The selection and use of a suitable disinfectant depends on the individual circumstances of each endoscopy suite. PMID:23964330

  1. Bactericidal efficacy of electrochemically activated solutions and of commercially available hypochlorite.

    PubMed

    Helme, A J; Ismail, M N; Scarano, F J; Yang, C L

    2010-01-01

    Electrochemical activation (ECA) has been developed as a quick and efficient method of hypochlorite production, and many claim increased efficacy when compared to conventional disinfectant solutions. Numerous potential applications, including hospital disinfection, waste-water treatment, routine drinking water disinfection and biological decontamination have been suggested. In this study, three solutions were produced by electrochemical activation of 0.5% NaCl and compared to commercially available NaOCl. The NaOCl concentration and pH of each solution was measured, and the minimum bactericidal concentration of each was determined using seven common microbial pathogens. All solutions were effective, the most significant of which was the ECA anolyte solution. This is notable due to its neutral pH and antimicrobial efficacy that is four times that of commercially available NaOCl. This process may lead to production of a highly effective yet non-caustic disinfectant that would have countless scientific, medical, military and public health applications.

  2. Disinfection of Viruses in Water by Ozone.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-12-01

    A0-A092 252 HEBREW UNIV JERUSALEM (ISRAEL) ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH LAB F/6 6/5 DISINFECTION OF VIRUSES IN WATER BY OZONE.(U) DEC 79 H I SHUVAL, E... resulted in the inactivation of only 50-90% of the viruses. No clear dose response relationship was found. C. Mass Transfer and Reaction Kinetics in...one minute for an ozone dose of less than 0.4 mg/liter. E. Mechanism of Virus Inactivation by Ozone Results have shown that only those amino acids

  3. Regenerable Iodine Water-Disinfection System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sauer, Richard L.; Colombo, Gerald V.; Jolly, Clifford D.

    1994-01-01

    Iodinated resin bed for disinfecting water regenerated to extend its useful life. Water flows through regeneration bed of crystalline iodine during regeneration. At other times, flow diverted around regeneration bed. Although regeneration cycle was manually controlled in demonstration, readily automated to start and stop according to signals and stop according to signals from concentration sensors. Further benefit of regeneration is that regeneration bed provides highly concentrated biocide source (200 mg/L) when needed. Concentrated biocide used to superiodinate system after contamination from routine maintenance or unexpected introduction of large concentration of microbes.

  4. The role of surface disinfection in infection prevention

    PubMed Central

    Gebel, Jürgen; Exner, Martin; French, Gary; Chartier, Yves; Christiansen, Bärbel; Gemein, Stefanie; Goroncy-Bermes, Peter; Hartemann, Philippe; Heudorf, Ursel; Kramer, Axel; Maillard, Jean-Yves; Oltmanns, Peter; Rotter, Manfred; Sonntag, Hans-Günther

    2013-01-01

    Background: The Rudolf Schuelke Foundation addresses topics related to hygiene, infection prevention and public health. In this context a panel of scientists from various European countries discussed “The Role of Surface Disinfection in Infection Prevention”. The most important findings and conclusions of this meeting are summarised in the present consensus paper. Aim: Although the relevance of surface disinfection is increasingly being accepted, there are still a number of issues which remain controversial. In particular, the following topics were addressed: Transferral of microbes from surface to patients as a cause of infection, requirements for surface disinfectants, biocidal resistance and toxicity, future challenges. Methods and findings: After discussion and review of current scientific literature the authors agreed that contaminated surfaces contribute to the transmission of pathogens and may thus pose an infection hazard. Targeted surface disinfection based on a risk profile is seen as an indispensable constituent in a multibarrier approach of universal infection control precautions. Resistance and cross-resistance depend on the disinfectant agent as well as on the microbial species. Prudent implementation of surface disinfection regimens tested to be effective can prevent or minimize adverse effects. Conclusions: Disinfection must be viewed as a holistic process. There is a need for defining standard principles for cleaning and disinfection, for ensuring compliance with these principles by measures such as written standard operating procedures, adequate training and suitable audit systems. Also, test procedures must be set up in order to demonstrate the efficacy of disinfectants including new application methods such as pre-soaked wipes for surface disinfection. PMID:23967396

  5. Solar optics-based active panel for solar energy storage and disinfection of greywater.

    PubMed

    Lee, W; Song, J; Son, J H; Gutierrez, M P; Kang, T; Kim, D; Lee, L P

    2016-09-01

    Smart city and innovative building strategies are becoming increasingly more necessary because advancing a sustainable building system is regarded as a promising solution to overcome the depleting water and energy. However, current sustainable building systems mainly focus on energy saving and miss a holistic integration of water regeneration and energy generation. Here, we present a theoretical study of a solar optics-based active panel (SOAP) that enables both solar energy storage and photothermal disinfection of greywater simultaneously. Solar collector efficiency of energy storage and disinfection rate of greywater have been investigated. Due to the light focusing by microlens, the solar collector efficiency is enhanced from 25% to 65%, compared to that without the microlens. The simulation of greywater sterilization shows that 100% disinfection can be accomplished by our SOAP for different types of bacteria including Escherichia coli. Numerical simulation reveals that our SOAP as a lab-on-a-wall system can resolve the water and energy problem in future sustainable building systems.

  6. Oxidation of diclofenac by aqueous chlorine dioxide: identification of major disinfection byproducts and toxicity evaluation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yingling; Liu, Haijin; Liu, Guoguang; Xie, Youhai

    2014-03-01

    Diclofenac (DCF), a synthetic non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug, is one of the most frequently detected pharmaceuticals in the aquatic environment. In this work, the mechanism and toxicity of DCF degradation by ClO2 under simulated water disinfection conditions were investigated. Experimental results indicate that rapid and significant oxidation of DCF occurred within the first few minutes; however, its mineralization process was longer than its degradation process. UPLC-MS and (1)H NMR spectroscopy were performed to identify major disinfection byproducts that were generated in three tentative degradation routes. The two main routes were based on initial decarboxylation of DCF on the aliphatic chain and hydroxylation of the phenylacetic acid moiety at the C-4 position. Subsequently, the formed aldehyde intermediates were the starting point for further multistep degradation involving decarboxylation, hydroxylation, and oxidation reactions of CN bond cleavage. The third route was based on transient preservation of chlorinated derivatives resulting from electrophilic attack by chlorine on the aromatic ring, which similarly underwent CN bond cleavage. Microtox bioassay was employed to evaluate the cytotoxicity of solutions treated by ClO2. The formation of more toxic mid-byproducts during the ClO2 disinfection process poses a potential risk to consumers.

  7. Reducing the chlorine dioxide demand in final disinfection of drinking water treatment plants using activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Sorlini, Sabrina; Biasibetti, Michela; Collivignarelli, Maria Cristina; Crotti, Barbara Marianna

    2015-01-01

    Chlorine dioxide is one of the most widely employed chemicals in the disinfection process of a drinking water treatment plant (DWTP). The aim of this work was to evaluate the influence of the adsorption process with granular activated carbon (GAC) on the chlorine dioxide consumption in final oxidation/disinfection. A first series of tests was performed at the laboratory scale employing water samples collected at the outlet of the DWTP sand filter of Cremona (Italy). The adsorption process in batch conditions with seven different types of GAC was studied. A second series of tests was performed on water samples collected at the outlet of four GAC columns installed at the outlet of the DWTP sand filter. The results showed that the best chlorine dioxide demand (ClO2-D) reduction yields are equal to 60-80% and are achieved in the first 30 min after ClO2 addition, during the first 16 days of the column operation using a mineral, coal-based, mesoporous GAC. Therefore, this carbon removes organic compounds that are more rapidly reactive with ClO2. Moreover, a good correlation was found between the ClO2-D and UV absorbance at wavelength 254 nm using mineral carbons; therefore, the use of a mineral mesoporous GAC is an effective solution to control the high ClO2-D in the disinfection stage of a DWTP.

  8. Adsorption of MS2 on oxide nanoparticles affects chlorine disinfection and solar inactivation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wen; Zhang, Xuezhi

    2015-02-01

    Adsorption on colloidal particles is one of the environmental processes affecting fate, transport, viability or reproducibility of viruses. This work studied colloidal interactions (adsorption kinetics and isotherms) between different oxide nanoparticles (NPs) (i.e., TiO2, NiO, ZnO, SiO2, and Al2O3) and bacteriophage, MS2. The results shows that that all oxide NPs exhibited strong adsorption capacity for MS2, except SiO2 NPs, which is supported by the extended Derjaguin and Landau, Verwey and Overbeek (EDLVO) theory. Moreover, the implication of such colloidal interactions on water disinfection is manifested by the observations that the presence of TiO2 and ZnO NPs could enhance MS2 inactivation under solar irradiation, whereas NiO and SiO2 decreased MS2 inactivation. By contrast, all of these oxide NPs were found to mitigate chlorine disinfection against MS2 to different extent, and the shielding effect was probably caused by reduced free chlorine and free MS2 in the solution due to sorption onto NPs. Clearly, there is a pressing need to further understand colloidal interactions between engineered NPs and viruses in water to better improve the current water treatment processes and to develop novel nanomaterials for water disinfection.

  9. Comparative efficacies of commonly used disinfectants and antifungal pharmaceutical spray preparations against dermatophytic fungi.

    PubMed

    Gupta, A K; Ahmad, I; Summerbell, R C

    2001-08-01

    Arthroconidia from five fungal strains belonging to three Trichophyton species, Trichophyton mentagrophytes, T. raubitschekii and T. tonsurans, were tested against commercial chemical disinfectants and pharmaceutical antifungal agents. The chemical disinfectants included chlorine, phenol, sodium dodecyl sulphate and several quaternary ammonium salts, while the two pharmaceutical preparations contained bifonazole and terbinafine as active agents. Arthroconidia were exposed to the antifungal agent either in a suspension solution for a given period of time and assayed for kill rate, or on a sprayed agar plate and monitored for surviving colonies over a period of 14 days. Chlorine (1%) and terbinafine (0.01%) were found to be high level disinfectants bringing about a rapid inactivation of conidia in all five strains. Phenol was equally effective against T. raubitschekii and T. tonsurans; however, T. mentagrophytes cells were able to survive for up to 1 h in 5% phenol. Quaternary ammonium compounds were less rapid in their action against dermatophytes and were needed at a level of about 0.5% to be completely fungicidal. Three commercial spray formulations with a range of 0.1 to 0.3% quaternary ammonium salts were fungistatic against T. mentagrophytes strains. Bifonazole (1%) was also fungistatic in its action against T. mentagrophytes. Sodium dodecyl sulphate (0.5%) was largely ineffective against Trichophyton arthroconidia.

  10. Comparative evaluation of tensile strength of Gutta-percha cones with a herbal disinfectant

    PubMed Central

    Mahali, Raghunandhan Raju; Dola, Binoy; Tanikonda, Rambabu; Peddireddi, Suresh

    2015-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate and compare the tensile strength values and influence of taper on the tensile strength of Gutta-percha (GP) cones after disinfection with sodium hypochlorite (SH) and Aloe vera gel (AV). Materials and Methods: Sixty GP cones of size 110, 2% taper, 60 GP cones F3 ProTaper, and 60 GP of size 30, 6% taper were obtained from sealed packs as three different groups. Experimental groups were disinfected with 5.25% SH and 90% AV gel except the control group. Tensile strengths of GP were measured using the universal testing machine. Results: The mean tensile strength values for Group IA, IIA and IIIA are 11.8 MPa, 8.69 MPa, and 9.24 MPa, respectively. Results were subjected to statistical analysis one-way analysis of variance test and Tukey post-hoc test. 5.25% SH solutions decreased the tensile strength of GP cones whereas with 90% AV gel it was not significantly altered. Conclusion: Ninety percent Aloe vera gel as a disinfectant does not alter the tensile strength of GP cones PMID:26752842

  11. Evaluating the Efficiency of Lettuce Disinfection According to the Official Protocol in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Yarahmadi, M; Yunesian, M; Pourmand, MR; Shahsavani, A; Mubedi, I; Nomanpour, B; Naddafi, K

    2012-01-01

    Background The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of Sanitization of Lettuce according to the protocols set forth by Iranian Ministry of Health and Medical Education for reducing populations of total coliform, fecal coliform, and helminth eggs present on lettuce. Methods: In the present study, we determined the load of total coliform, fecal coliform, and parasites of lettuce. The lettuce was sanitized by protocol of Iranian Ministry of Health and Medical Education. The protocol consists of 3 levels to disinfect the fruits and vegetables. The procedure was as follows: first washing stage. The leaves of leafy vegetables washed with tap water, second stage, separation of helminth eggs by 3 to 5 droplets of detergent per liter for 5 min; third stage, disinfection of vegetables by calcium hypochlorite solution (with 200 mg/l free chlorine) for 5 min; and finally the disinfected vegetables were washed with tap water. Results: The average initial levels of total coliform and fecal coliform in the samples were 3.36 log10 cfu/g and 2.31 log10 cfu/g, respectively. Helminth eggs were not detected in any of the samples tested. The efficiency of total coliform and fecal coliform removal were 78.1% (0.75 log10cfu/g) and 79.6% (0.67 log10cfu/g), respectively, after washing. This increased up to 94.8(1.44 log10cfu/g) and 98.5% (1.90 log10cfu/g) after the use of detergent. Chlorine disinfection rose these amounts up to 98.3% (2.18 log10cfu/g) and 100% (2.31 log10cfu/g), respectively. Conclusion: By applying the protocol large parts of microorganisms existing on lettuce have indeed been removed. PMID:23113153

  12. Corrosion control and disinfection studies in spacecraft water systems. [considering Saturn 5 orbital workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shea, T. G.

    1974-01-01

    Disinfection and corrosion control in the water systems of the Saturn 5 Orbital Workshop Program are considered. Within this framework, the problem areas of concern are classified into four general areas: disinfection; corrosion; membrane-associated problems of disinfectant uptake and diffusion; and taste and odor problems arising from membrane-disinfectant interaction.

  13. Adsorption of active ingredients of surface disinfectants depends on the type of fabric used for surface treatment.

    PubMed

    Bloss, R; Meyer, S; Kampf, G

    2010-05-01

    The disinfection of surfaces in the immediate surrounding of a hospitalised patient is considered to be an important element for prevention of nosocomial infection. The type of fabric in a mop, however, has to our knowledge never been regarded as relevant for an effective disinfection of surfaces. We have therefore studied the adsorption of benzalkonium chloride (BAC), glutardialdehyde and propan-1-ol from working solutions of three surface disinfectants to four different types of fabric (A: white pulp and polyester; B: viscose rayon; C: polyester; D: mixture of viscose, cellulose and polyester). The working solutions of each disinfectant were exposed to each fabric for up to 24h. Before and after exposure, tissues were removed and squeezed in a standardised way. The eluate was used for determination of the concentration of the active ingredient in quadruplicate. The analysis of glutardialdehyde and BAC was performed using high performance liquid chromatography; the analysis of propan-1-ol was done using gas chromatography. BAC was strongly adsorbed to the tissues based on white pulp (up to 61% after 30 min), followed by the viscose rayon tissues (up to 70% after 30 min) and the mixed tissues (up to 54% after 7h). The polyester fibre tissue adsorbed the smallest amounts of BAC with up to 17% after 15 min. Only with the polyester fibre tissue were BAC concentrations found in the range of the calculated BAC concentrations. Glutardialdehyde and propan-1-ol did not adsorb to any of the fibres. Effective surface disinfection also includes selection of an appropriate fabric.

  14. Translational science in disinfection for regenerative endodontics.

    PubMed

    Diogenes, Anibal R; Ruparel, Nikita B; Teixeira, Fabricio B; Hargreaves, Kenneth M

    2014-04-01

    The endodontic management of permanent immature teeth is fraught with challenges. Although treatment modalities for vital pulp therapy in these teeth provide long-term favorable outcome, the outcomes from the treatment of pulp necrosis and apical periodontitis are significantly less predictable. Immature teeth diagnosed with pulp necrosis have been traditionally treated with apexification or apexogenesis approaches. Unfortunately, these treatments provide little to no benefit in promoting continued root development. Regenerative endodontic procedures have emerged as an important alternative in treating teeth with otherwise questionable long-term prognosis because of thin, fragile dentinal walls and a lack of immunocompetency. These procedures rely heavily on root canal chemical disinfection of the root canal system. Traditionally, irrigants and medicaments have been chosen for their maximum antimicrobial effect without consideration for their effects on stem cells and the dentinal microenvironment. Translational research has been crucial to provide evidence for treatment modifications that aim to increase favorable outcome while steering away from common pitfalls in the currently used protocols. In this review, recent advances learned from translational research related to disinfection in regenerative endodontics are presented and discussed.

  15. Nanomaterial Case Study: Nanoscale Silver in Disinfectant ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA announced the release of the final report, Nanomaterial Case Study: Nanoscale Silver in Disinfectant Spray. This report represents a case study of engineered nanoscale silver (nano-Ag), focusing on the specific example of nano-Ag as possibly used in disinfectant sprays. This case study is organized around the comprehensive environmental assessment (CEA) framework, which structures available information pertaining to the product life cycle, environmental transport and fate, exposure-dose in receptors (i.e., humans, ecological populations, and the environment), and potential impacts in these receptors. The document does not draw conclusions about potential risks. Instead, it is intended to be used as part of a process to identify what is known and unknown about nano-Ag in a selected application. In turn, the external review draft of the document provided a starting point to identify and prioritize possible research directions to support future assessments of nanomaterials. The information presented in the case study and the questions raised in this document are a foundation for a process to determine priorities among various research topics and directions. After that process has been completed, a final chapter will be added to this document to summarize highlights from preceding chapters and the major research issues that have emerged.

  16. Anaerobic effluent disinfection using ozone: byproducts formation.

    PubMed

    Silva, G H R; Daniel, L A; Bruning, H; Rulkens, W H

    2010-09-01

    This research was aimed at studying oxidation processes, coliform inactivation effectiveness and disinfection byproducts (DBPs) associated with the disinfection of anaerobic sanitary wastewater effluent with ozone applied at doses of 5.0, 8.0 and 10.0mg O(3)L(-1) for contact times of 5, 10 and 15 min. The wastewater used in this research was generated by the wastewater treatment plant (WWTP), University of São Paulo - Brazil. The total coliform inactivation range was 2.00-4.06 log(10), and the inactivation range for Escherichia coli was 2.41-4.65 log(10). Mean chemical oxygen demand (COD) reductions were 37.6%, 48.8% and 42.4% for doses of 5.0, 8.0 and 10.0mg O(3)L(-1), respectively. Aldehyde formation varied with dosage only when the ozone dose was increased from 5.0 to 8.0mg O(3)L(-1) for acetaldehyde and from 5.0 to 8.0 and from 8.0 to 10.0mg O(3)L(-1) for glyoxal.

  17. Virus Sensitivity Index of UV disinfection.

    PubMed

    Tang, Walter Z; Sillanpää, Mika

    2015-01-01

    A new concept of Virus Sensitivity Index (VSI) is defined as the ratio between the first-order inactivation rate constant of a virus, ki, and that of MS2-phage during UV disinfection, kr. MS2-phage is chosen as the reference virus because it is recommended as a virus indicator during UV reactor design and validation by the US Environmental Protection Agency. VSI has wide applications in research, design, and validation of UV disinfection systems. For example, it can be used to rank the UV disinfection sensitivity of viruses in reference to MS2-phage. There are four major steps in deriving the equation between Hi/Hr and 1/VSI. First, the first-order inactivation rate constants are determined by regression analysis between Log I and fluence required. Second, the inactivation rate constants of MS2-phage are statistically analysed at 3, 4, 5, and 6 Log I levels. Third, different VSI values are obtained from the ki of different viruses dividing by the kr of MS2-phage. Fourth, correlation between Hi/Hr and 1/VSI is analysed by using linear, quadratic, and cubic models. As expected from the theoretical analysis, a linear relationship adequately correlates Hi/Hr and 1/VSI without an intercept. VSI is used to quantitatively predict the UV fluence required for any virus at any log inactivation (Log I). Four equations were developed at 3, 4, 5, and 6 Log I. These equations have been validated using external data which are not used for the virus development. At Log I less than 3, the equation tends to under-predict the required fluence at both low Log I such as 1 and 2 Log I. At Log I greater than 3 Log I, the equation tends to over-predict the fluence required. The reasons for these may very likely be due to the shoulder at the beginning and the tailing at the end of the collimated beam test experiments. At 3 Log I, the error percentage is less than 6%. The VSI is also used to predict inactivation rate constants under two different UV disinfection

  18. Effects of a newly designed HEMA-free, multi-purpose, single-bottle, self-etching adhesive on bonding to dental hard tissues, zirconia-based ceramics, and gold alloy.

    PubMed

    Ikemura, Kunio; Jogetsu, Yoshiyuki; Shinno, Kazuya; Nakatsuka, Toshiyuki; Endo, Takeshi; Kadoma, Yoshinori

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the bonding effectiveness of newly designed self-etching adhesives to four types of adherends--enamel, dentin, zirconia, and gold (Au) alloy. Five experimental adhesives were prepared, which contained 3.0-5.0 wt% 6-methacryloyloxyhexyl phosphonoacetate (6-MHPA) or 6-methacryloyloxyhexyl 3-phosphonopropionate (6-MHPP), 3.0 wt% 4-acryloyloxyethoxycarbonylphthalic acid (4-AET) or 17.0 wt% 4-methacryloyloxyethoxycarbonylphthalic acid (4-MET), 0-0.5 wt% 6-methacryloyloxyhexyl 6,8-dithiooctanoate (6-MHDT) or 10-methacryloyloxydecyl 6,8-dithiooctanoate (10-MDDT), and varying contents of Bis-GMA, dimethacrylate monomers, water, acetone, and a photoinitiator system. After 2,000 times of thermal cycling, shear bond strengths (SBSs) between a resin composite (Beautifil II, Shofu Inc., Japan) and the four adherends, bonded using the experimental adhesives, were measured at 1.0 mm/min. No statistically significant differences in SBS for bonding to ground enamel, dentin, sandblasted zirconia and Au alloy (p>0.05) were found between experimental adhesives which contained 6-MHPA and/or 6-MHPP, 4-MET or 4-AET, 6-MHDT and/or 10-MDDT, Bis-GMA, and dimethacrylates. An adhesive layer of less than 5.0 µm thickness, by scanning electron microscopy observation, revealed strong adhesion to the four adherends. Therefore, the newly designed multi-purpose, self-etching adhesive strongly adhered to all the four adherend materials tested.

  19. Design of a new, multi-purpose, light-curing adhesive comprising a silane coupling agent, acidic adhesive monomers and dithiooctanoate monomers for bonding to varied metal and dental ceramic materials.

    PubMed

    Ikemura, Kunio; Tanaka, Hisaki; Fujii, Toshihide; Deguchi, Mikito; Negoro, Noriyuki; Endo, Takeshi; Kadoma, Yoshinori

    2011-01-01

    A newly designed, light-curing adhesive was investigated for its bonding effectiveness to porcelain, alumina, zirconia, Au, Au alloy, Ag alloy, Au-Ag-Pd alloy, and Ni-Cr alloy. Four experimental adhesives were prepared using varying contents of the following: a silane coupling agent [3-methacryloyloxypropyltriethoxysilane (3-MPTES)], acidic adhesive monomers [6-methacryloyloxyhexyl phosphonoacetate(6-MHPA),6-methacryloyloxyhexyl3-phosphonopropionate(6-MHPP)and 4-methacryloyloxyethoxycarbonylphthalic acid (4-MET)], and dithiooctanoate monomers [6-methacryloyloxyhexyl 6,8-dithiooctanoate (6-MHDT) and 10-methacryloyloxydecyl 6,8-dithiooctanoate (10-MDDT)]. After all adherend surfaces were sandblasted and applied with an experimental adhesive, shear bond strengths (SBSs) of a light-curing resin composite (Beautifil II, Shofu Inc., Kyoto, Japan) to the adherend materials after 2,000 times of thermal cycling were measured. For the experimental adhesive which contained 3-MPTES (30.0 wt%), 6-MHPA (1.0 wt%), 6-MHPP (1.0 wt%), 4-MET (1.0 wt%), 6-MHDT (0.5 wt%) and 10-MDDT (0.5 wt%), it consistently yielded the highest SBS for all adherend surfaces in the range of 20.8 (4.8)-30.3 (7.9) MPa, with no significant differences among all the adherend materials (p>0.05). Therefore, the newly designed, multi-purpose, light-curing adhesive was able to deliver high SBS to all the adherend materials tested.

  20. Effects of primary sludge particulate (PSP) entrapment on ultrasonic (20 kHz) disinfection of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Cui, Xiaofei; Talley, Jeffrey W; Liu, Guojing; Larson, Steve L

    2011-05-01

    The role of primary sludge particulates (PSPs) in ultrasonic disinfection of Escherichia coli (E. coli) was investigated. Entrapment of E. coli by PSP was directly observed through scanning electron microscope (SEM) after E. coli and PSP were incubated together in water for 24 h at 35 °C. Entrapment coefficient was proposed for the first time to reflect the ability of PSP to entrap E. coli and was estimated as 1.4 × 10(3) CFU/mg PSP under our experimental conditions. Ultrasonication (20 kHz) of different E. coli-PSPs solutions showed that the entrapped E. coli cells were protected by PSP from ultrasonication and the unentrapped cells were not. However, the protection of entrapped E. coli cells gradually decreased as ultrasonication proceeded, suggesting the ability of power ultrasonication to deprotect the entrapped E. coli cells. SEM studies suggested a two-step mechanism for ultrasonic (20 kHz) disinfection of entrapped E. coli: breakdown of the protective PSP refugia and disinfection of the exposed E. coli cells. This research will enable more informed decisions about disinfection of aqueous samples where porous PSP are present.

  1. Effects of different disinfectants on decontamination of laryngoscopes.

    PubMed

    Tekin, I; Arican, I; Akcali, S; Sanlidag, T; Ozbakkaloglu, B

    2003-10-01

    Guidelines for controlling possible contamination of laryngoscopes should be formulated with the benefit of relevant experimental data. In this study, the effects of five different disinfectants commonly used for the disinfection of laryngoscopes are evaluated. We formed 14 groups, with 10 blades in each. The first 7 groups were contaminated with hospital related meticillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), and the remaining 7 groups with hospital related multiple resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA). For the first group of blades, no disinfection procedure was carried out and, were assumed as a control group. Blades in remaining groups were rested for 10 minutes in containers containing 70% alcohol (II), 1/100 dilution of cetrimide (III), 1/100 dilution of chlorhexidine (IV), 1/10 dilution of chlorhexidine (V), 1/10 dilution of povidone iodine (VI), and 1/100 dilution of ammonium chloride (VII). Disinfectant used in a group was considered effective when growth was seen in 5 or less than 5 plates representing that group. All disenfectants tested were found effective on decontamination of laryngoscopes. Five different moderate level disinfectants, which are commonly used for the disinfection of laryngoscopes, have been found effective even on resistant hospital microorganisms like MRSA and P. aeruginosa. They may be the choices of the disinfectants, especially 1/10 dilution of chlorhexidine gluconate and 1/100 dilution of ammonium chloride.

  2. Occurrence of bromate, chlorite and chlorate in drinking waters disinfected with hypochlorite reagents. Tracing their origins.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Villanova, Rafael J; Oliveira Dantas Leite, M Vilani; Hernández Hierro, J Miguel; de Castro Alfageme, Santiago; García Hernández, Cristina

    2010-05-15

    Bromate was first reported as a disinfection by-product from ozonated waters, but more recently it has been reported also as a result of treatment using hypochlorite solutions worldwide. The aim of this study was to study the scope of this phenomenon in the drinking waters (n=509) of Castilla y León, Spain, and in the hypochlorite disinfectant reagents. Two thirds of the treated waters monitored were found to have bromate concentrations higher than 1 microg/l, and of them a median value of 8 microg/l and a maximum of 49 microg/l. These concentrations are higher than those reported so far, however, a great variability can be found. Median values for chlorite were of 5 microg/l, and of 119 microg/l for chlorate. Only 7 out of 40 hypochlorite feedstock solutions were negative for bromate, the rest showing a median of 1022 mg/l; and 4 out of 14 calcium hypochlorite pellets were also negative, the rest with a median of 240 mg/kg. Although bromate is cited as potentially added to water from calcium hypochlorite pellets, no reference is found in scientific literature regarding its real content. Chlorite (median 2646 mg/l) and chlorate (median 20,462 mg/l) and chlorite (median 695 mg/kg) and chlorate (median 9516 mg/kg) were also monitored, respectively, in sodium hypochlorite solutions and calcium hypochlorite pellets. The levels of chlorite and chlorate in water are considered satisfactory, but not those of bromate, undoubtedly owing to the high content of bromide in the raw brines employed by the chlor-alkali manufacturers. Depending on the manufacturer, the bromate concentrations in the treated waters may be very heterogeneous owing to the lack of specification for this contaminant in the disinfectant reagents -the European Norms EN 900 and 901 do not mention it.

  3. Surface Charge and Hydrophobicity of Endospores of Bacillus anthracis and Related Species in Aqueous Solution

    EPA Science Inventory

    The surface properties of microorganisms play an important role in attachment and detachment in the environment. The change in surface charge can effect coagulation, disinfection, adhesion to surfaces, uptake of chemicals, and environmental transport. In aqueous solution, cell s...

  4. Role of disinfection in the Infection Prevention Multibarrier System.

    PubMed

    Kramer, Axel

    2007-09-13

    The role of disinfection in infection prevention has been analyzed over the past 50 years both in the form of benefit-risk evaluations as well as in an epidemiological sense. This has served as the basis for not only national and international guidelines and recommendations, but has also created the legal and normative framework for regulation of infection control (and hence of disinfection) in numerous and acts and ordinances. Likewise, today the efficacy of disinfection measures, user safety and environmental compatibility in line with the state of the art are assured. Compliance as regards the conductance of disinfection measures has increased accordingly. The user is able to select and correctly employ the disinfectant most suited to the intended disinfection procedure. The quality of the apparatus used has vastly improved since the coming into force of the German Medical Devices Act (MPG). And finally the preconditions for conductance of disinfection have become so matter of fact that it is easy to forget just what progress has been made here. This applies e.g. to the facilities now available for hand hygiene, for decontamination of instruments, laundry and bedpans with washer-disinfectors as well as for surface disinfection and drinking water disinfection. But it is the human being who continues to pose the greatest risk. Risk awareness does not always result in proper action being taken: it is hard to really grasp something that one cannot experience. As such, hand disinfection is often dispensed with, and without any sense of having done something wrong, the debate about the evidence of the usefulness of floor disinfection continues, and often medical practitioners fail to resort to exclusive automated decontamination of medical devices because of the costs incurred. Hospitals, nursing homes and rehabilitation establishments are obliged to set up a quality management system, and to continue developing this. This calls for a quality assurance system

  5. Current GI endoscope disinfection and QA practices.

    PubMed

    Moses, Frank M; Lee, Jennifer S

    2004-01-01

    High-level disinfection (HLD) of GI endoscopes is readily achieved when published guidelines are observed. Contamination is linked to breakdowns in accepted procedure. However, there is no recognized method of verifying adequacy of endoscope reprocessing in routine practice and no data regarding current quality assurance (QA) practice. Prior reports have demonstrated a wide variation in routine clinical practice of GI endoscopy HLD. The goal of this study was to determine current practice at regional endoscopy centers with regard to endoscope cleaning and HLD, maintenance, and QA practice. An anonymous multiple-choice questionnaire was mailed to 367 SGNA members in Pennsylvania, Delaware, Virginia, Maryland, and District of Columbia and completed by 230 (63%). The majority of responders were hospital-based and 59% of the units performed over 3000 procedures per year. After use the endoscope was hand-carried or transported in a dry container (97%) to a separate cleaning room (85%) for HLD by technicians (40%). Wide variations existed in manual step procedures including use of disposable (50%) brushes and number of times channel brushed: once (21%), twice (35%), or three to five times (37%). Soaking duration in disinfectant (70% gluteraldehyde) was for <10 min (8%), 10-20 min (35%), 20-30 min (38%), 30-40 min (7%), and >40 min (3%). Sixty-seven percent had an active unit infection control (IC) service and 98% had a QA program. Monitoring of cleaning effectiveness was by visual inspection (50%) and culturing endoscopes (17%). Culture was done weekly (1%) and

  6. The action of three antiseptics/disinfectants against enveloped and non-enveloped viruses.

    PubMed

    Wood, A; Payne, D

    1998-04-01

    The antiviral action of chloroxylenol, benzalkonium chloride and cetrimide/chlorhexidine was assessed against a range of enveloped and non-enveloped human viruses using a suspension test method. Viral suspensions of 10(6)-10(7) pfu/TCID50 or sfu were prepared in each of the antiseptic/disinfectant solutions in the presence of a bovine serum/yeast extract mixture to simulate 'dirty conditions'. During incubation, aliquots were removed at predetermined timepoints up to 10 min to assess the kinetics of inactivation. Results indicate that all products were effective in inactivating the enveloped viruses herpes simplex virus type 1 and human immunodeficiency virus type 1, whilst being ineffective in inactivating human coronavirus, also enveloped, and the non-enveloped viruses. The exception to this was the benzalkonium chloride-based product (Dettol Hospital Concentrate) which was active against the non-enveloped human coxsackie virus. Four antiseptic/disinfectant solutions with chloroxylenol, benzalkonium chloride, cetrimide/chlorhexidine and povidone-iodine were also assessed for antiviral effect against human immunodeficiency virus in the presence of whole human blood. All four solutions proved to be effective within 1 min despite the cytotoxic nature of the compounds to the detection system.

  7. Antimicrobial-Coated Granules for Disinfecting Water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akse, James R.; Holtsnider, John T.; Kliestik, Helen

    2011-01-01

    Methods of preparing antimicrobialcoated granules for disinfecting flowing potable water have been developed. Like the methods reported in the immediately preceding article, these methods involve chemical preparation of substrate surfaces (in this case, the surfaces of granules) to enable attachment of antimicrobial molecules to the surfaces via covalent bonds. A variety of granular materials have been coated with a variety of antimicrobial agents that include antibiotics, bacteriocins, enzymes, bactericides, and fungicides. When employed in packed beds in flowing water, these antimicrobial-coated granules have been proven effective against gram-positive bacteria, gram-negative bacteria, fungi, and viruses. Composite beds, consisting of multiple layers containing different granular antimicrobial media, have proven particularly effective against a broad spectrum of microorganisms. These media have also proven effective in enhancing or potentiating the biocidal effects of in-line iodinated resins and of very low levels of dissolved elemental iodine.

  8. Treatment of disinfection by-product precursors.

    PubMed

    Bond, T; Goslan, E H; Parsons, S A; Jefferson, B

    2011-01-01

    Formation of harmful disinfection by-products (DBPs), of which trihalomethanes (THMs) and haloacetic acids (HAAs) are the major groups, can be controlled by removal of natural organic matter (NOM) before disinfection. In the literature, removal of precursors is variable, even with the same treatment. The treatment of DBP precursors and NOM was examined with the intention of outlining precursor removal strategies for various water types. Freundlich adsorption parameters and hydroxyl rate constants were collated from the literature to link treatability by activated carbon and advanced oxidation processes (AOPs), respectively, to physico-chemical properties. Whereas hydroxyl rate constants did not correlate meaningfully with any property, a moderate correlation was found between Freundlich parameters and log K(ow), indicating activated carbon will preferentially adsorb hydrophobic NOM. Humic components of NOM are effectively removed by coagulation, and, where they are the principal precursor source, coagulation may be sufficient to control DBPs. Where humic species remaining post-coagulation retain significant DBP formation potential (DBPFP), activated carbon is deemed a suitable process selection. Anion exchange is an effective treatment for transphilic species, known for high carboxylic acid functionality, and consequently is recommended for carboxylic acid precursors. Amino acids have been linked to HAA formation and are important constituents of algal organic matter. Amino acids are predicted to be effectively removed by biotreatment and nanofiltration. Carbohydrates have been found to reach 50% of NOM in river waters. If the carbohydrates were to pose a barrier to successful DBP control, additional treatment stages such as nanofiltration are likely to be required to reduce their occurrence.

  9. Uncertainty in prediction of disinfection performance.

    PubMed

    Neumann, Marc B; von Gunten, Urs; Gujer, Willi

    2007-06-01

    Predicting the disinfection performance of a full-scale reactor in drinking water treatment is associated with considerable uncertainty. In view of quantitative risk analysis, this study assesses the uncertainty involved in predicting inactivation of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts for an ozone reactor treating lake water. A micromodel is suggested which quantifies inactivation by stochastic sampling from density distributions of ozone exposure and lethal ozone dose. The ozone exposure distribution is computed with a tank in series model that is derived from tracer data and measurements of flow, ozone concentration and ozone decay. The distribution of lethal ozone doses is computed with a delayed Chick-Watson model which was calibrated by Sivaganesan and Marinas [2005. Development of a Ct equation taking into consideration the effect of Lot variability on the inactivation of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts with ozone. Water Res. 39(11), 2429-2437] utilizing a large number of inactivation studies. Parameter uncertainty is propagated with Monte Carlo simulation and the probability of attaining given inactivation levels is assessed. Regional sensitivity analysis based on variance decomposition ranks the influence of parameters in determining the variance of the model result. The lethal dose model turns out to be responsible for over 90% of the output variance. The entire analysis is re-run for three exemplary scenarios to assess the robustness of the results in view of changing inputs, differing operational parameters or revised assumptions about the appropriate model. We argue that the suggested micromodel is a versatile approach for characterization of disinfection reactors. The scheme developed for uncertainty assessment is optimal for model diagnostics and effectively supports the management of uncertainty.

  10. US EPA Research on Monochloramine Disinfection Kinetics of Nitrosomonas europaea

    EPA Science Inventory

    Based on utility surveys, 30 to 63% of utilities practicing chloramination for secondary disinfection experience nitrification episodes (American Water Works Association 2006). Nitrification in drinking water distribution systems is undesirable and may result in water quality deg...

  11. USEPA Research on Monochloramine Disinfection Kinetics of Nitrosomonas Europaea

    EPA Science Inventory

    Based on utility surveys, 30 to 63% of utilities practicing chloramination for secondary disinfection experience nitrification episodes (American Water Works Association 2006). Nitrification in drinking water distribution systems is undesirable and may result in water quality deg...

  12. IDENTIFICATION OF TI02/UV DISINFECTION BYPRODUCTS IN DRINKING WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Due to concern over the presence of trihalomethanes (THMs) and other chlorinated byproducts in chlorinated drinking water, alternative disinfection methods are being explored. One of the alternative treatment methods currently being evaluated for potential use with small systems ...

  13. IDENTIFICATION OF NEW DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS IN DRINKING WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Due to concern over the potential adverse health effects of trihalomethanes (THMs) and other chlorinated by-products in chlorinated drinking water, alternative disinfectants are being explored. Ozone, chlorine dioxide, and chloramine are popular alternatives, as they produce low...

  14. U.S. EPA's Ultraviolet Disinfection Technologies Demonstration Study

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation will give a background on USEPA's Disinfection Technologies Demonstration Study. This will include regulatory background, science background, goals of the project, and ultimate expected outcome of the project. This presentation will preceed a panel discussion ...

  15. [Research development on disinfection technology for viruses in drinking water].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yun; Zhang, Qiang; Liu, Yan; Dai, Ruihua; Liu, Xiang

    2010-09-01

    With the deterioration of water source pollution, the quality requirements for drinking water of countries will become stricter and stricter, and the microbe index has been one of the important aspects. The introduction of the virus index and the development of disinfection technology focusing on virus have significant importance for the improvement of the drinking water standards and for the protection of people health in every country. To be familiar with the domestic and abroad research development of the disinfection control technology focusing on virus provides certain theory guidance and technological support for continuously improving drinking water standard in our country and for establishing safer drinking water processing technologies. So, this article will comprehensively describes 4 aspects: resistance comparison of virus over every disinfection technology, influential factors of disinfection, research development of new technology, and the mechanisms.

  16. [Effectiveness of alcoholic hand disinfectants against methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus].

    PubMed

    Kampf, G; Jarosch, R; Rüden, H

    1997-03-01

    In order to determine the efficacy of hand disinfectants based on alcohol against three MRSA strains and 3 methicillin-susceptible S. aureus strains (MSSA), 1-propanol (60%) as well as Sterillium and Spitaderm were investigated in the quantitative suspension test at various dilutions and reactions times (15, 30 and 60s). All undiluted disinfectants revealed reduction factors > 6 against MRSA and MSSA after 30s. Diluted disinfectants (50%) were significantly less effective against MRSA at short reaction times (15 s) (p < 0.05). Sterillium in a dilution of 50% did not reach 5 reduction factors against either MRSA or MSSA after 30 s. The impact of an appropriate use of hand disinfectants in order to break chains of infections with MRSA is obvious.

  17. Effects of wastewater disinfection on waterborne bacteria and viruses

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blatchley, E. R.; Gong, W.-L.; Alleman, J.E.; Rose, J.B.; Huffman, D.E.; Otaki, M.; Lisle, J.T.

    2007-01-01

    Wastewater disinfection is practiced with the goal of reducing risks of human exposure to pathogenic microorganisms. In most circumstances, the efficacy of a wastewater disinfection process is regulated and monitored based on measurements of the responses of indicator bacteria. However, inactivation of indicator bacteria does not guarantee an acceptable degree of inactivation among other waterborne microorganisms (e.g., microbial pathogens). Undisinfected effluent samples from several municipal wastewater treatment facilities were collected for analysis. Facilities were selected to provide a broad spectrum of effluent quality, particularly as related to nitrogenous compounds. Samples were subjected to bench-scale chlorination and dechlorination and UV irradiation under conditions that allowed compliance with relevant discharge regulations and such that disinfectant exposures could be accurately quantified. Disinfected samples were subjected to a battery of assays to assess the immediate and long-term effects of wastewater disinfection on waterborne bacteria and viruses. In general, (viable) bacterial populations showed an immediate decline as a result of disinfectant exposure; however, incubation of disinfected samples under conditions that were designed to mimic the conditions in a receiving stream resulted in substantial recovery of the total bacterial community. The bacterial groups that are commonly used as indicators do not provide an accurate representation of the response of the bacterial community to disinfectant exposure and subsequent recovery in the environment. UV irradiation and chlorination/dechlorination both accomplished measurable inactivation of indigenous phage; however, the extent of inactivation was fairly modest under the conditions of disinfection used in this study. UV irradiation was consistently more effective as a virucide than chlorination/dechlorination under the conditions of application, based on measurements of virus (phage

  18. In-office microwave disinfection of soft contact lenses

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, M.G.; Rechberger, J.; Grant, T.; Holden, B.A. )

    1990-02-01

    We evaluated the effectiveness of an in-office microwave disinfection procedure which allowed for the disinfection of up to 40 soft contact lenses at one time. Ciba AOSept cases filled with sterile unpreserved saline were contaminated with one of six FDA test challenge microorganisms at a concentration of approximately 10(3) colony forming units per milliliter (CFU/ml). Twenty cases were placed on the rotating plate of a standard 2450 MHz 650 W microwave oven in a 10-cm diameter circle. The cases were exposed to high intensity microwave irradiation for periods of 0 to 15 min. None of the 6 microorganisms evaluated survived 2 min or longer of microwave exposure. Our findings indicated that microwave irradiation can be a convenient, rapid, and effective method of disinfecting a number of soft contact lenses at one time and thus adaptable as an in-office soft contact lens disinfection procedure.

  19. Deposition and disinfection of Escherichia coli O157:H7 on naturally occurring photoactive materials in a parallel plate chamber†

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Alicia A.; Chowdhury, Indranil; Gong, Amy S.; Cwiertny, David M.; Walker, Sharon L.

    2014-01-01

    Dissolved organic matter in combination with iron oxides has been shown to facilitate photochemical disinfection through the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) under UV and visible light. However, due to the extremely short lifetime of these radicals, the disinfection effciency is limited by the successful transport of ROS to bacterial surfaces. This study was designed to quantitatively investigate three collector surfaces with various potentials to produce ROS [bare quartz, hematite (α-Fe2O3) coated quartz, and Suwannee River humic acid (SRHA)] and the effects of extracellular polymeric substance (EPS) (full or partial coating) and solution chemistry (ionic strength, IS) on the interactions between bacteria and the ROS-producing substrates. With few exceptions, bacterial deposition studies in a parallel plate (PP) flow chamber have revealed increasing cell adhesion with IS. Furthermore, interactions between collector surfaces and cells can be explained by electrostatic forces, with negatively charged SRHA reducing and positively charged α-Fe2O3 enhancing bacterial deposition significantly. Increased deposition was also observed with full EPS content, indicating the ability of EPS to facilitate interaction between cells and surfaces in the aquatic environment. In complementary disinfection studies conducted with simulated light, viability loss was observed for cells fully coated with EPS when attached to α-Fe2O3 under all IS conditions. Based upon our prior study in which EPS was found to not inhibit hydroxyl radical activity toward bacteria, we proposed that EPS might therefore promote disinfection by facilitating cell attachment to ROS-producing surfaces where higher concentrations of ROS are expected at closer proximities to reactive substrates (e.g., SRHA and α-Fe2O3). Our findings on the mechanism and controlling factors of cell interactions with photoactive substrates provide insight as to the role of ionic strength in photochemical disinfection

  20. An in-use microbiological comparison of two surgical hand disinfection techniques in cardiothoracic surgery: hand rubbing versus hand scrubbing.

    PubMed

    Carro, C; Camilleri, L; Traore, O; Badrikian, L; Legault, B; Azarnoush, K; Dualé, C; De Riberolles, C

    2007-09-01

    Surgical site infection after heart surgery increases morbidity and mortality. The method of presurgical hand disinfection could influence the infection risk. From February to April 2003, we compared the microbiological efficacy of hand-rubbing (R) and hand-scrubbing (S) procedures. The surgical team alternately used hand-scrubbing or hand-rubbing techniques every two weeks. Fingertip impressions were taken before and immediately after hand disinfection, every 2h and at the end of the operation. Acceptability of hand rubbing was assessed by a questionnaire. Mean durations of surgical procedures were 259+/-68 and 244+/-69min for groups S and R respectively (P=0.43). Bacterial counts immediately after hand disinfection were comparable with the two techniques, but significantly lower in group R at the end of surgery. No differences were observed between the percentages of negative samples taken after 2h, 4h and at the end of surgery between the two groups. Bacterial skin flora reduction immediately after hand disinfection, after 2h and 4h of operating time and at the end of surgery was better in group R, but the difference was not statistically significant. Before surgery, the hand-rubbing method with alcohol solution preceded by hand washing with mild neutral soap is as effective as hand scrubbing to reduce bacterial counts on hands. It decreased the bacterial counts both immediately after hand disinfection and at the end of long cardiothoracic surgical procedures. The acceptability of hand rubbing was excellent and it can be considered to be a valid alternative to the conventional hand-scrubbing protocol.

  1. Efficient Photocatalytic Disinfection of Escherichia coli O157:H7 using C70-TiO2 Hybrid under Visible Light Irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouyang, Kai; Dai, Ke; Walker, Sharon L.; Huang, Qiaoyun; Yin, Xixiang; Cai, Peng

    2016-05-01

    Efficient photocatalytic disinfection of Escherichia coli O157:H7 was achieved by using a C70 modified TiO2 (C70-TiO2) hybrid as a photocatalyst under visible light (λ > 420 nm) irradiation. Disinfection experiments showed that 73% of E. coli O157:H7 died within 2 h with a disinfection rate constant of k = 0.01 min‑1, which is three times that measured for TiO2. The mechanism of cell death was investigated by using several scavengers combined with a partition system. The results revealed that diffusing hydroxyl radicals play an important role in the photocatalytically initiated bacterial death, and direct contact between C70-TiO2 hybrid and bacteria is not indispensable in the photocatalytic disinfection process. Extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) of bacteria have little effect on the disinfection efficiency. Analyses of the inhibitory effect of C70-TiO2 thin films on E. coli O157:H7 showed a decrease of the bacterial concentration from 3 × 108 to 38 cfu mL‑1 in the solution with C70-TiO2 thin film in the first 2 h of irradiation and a complete inhibition of the growth of E. coli O157:H7 in the later 24 h irradiation.

  2. Efficient Photocatalytic Disinfection of Escherichia coli O157:H7 using C70-TiO2 Hybrid under Visible Light Irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Ouyang, Kai; Dai, Ke; Walker, Sharon L.; Huang, Qiaoyun; Yin, Xixiang; Cai, Peng

    2016-01-01

    Efficient photocatalytic disinfection of Escherichia coli O157:H7 was achieved by using a C70 modified TiO2 (C70-TiO2) hybrid as a photocatalyst under visible light (λ > 420 nm) irradiation. Disinfection experiments showed that 73% of E. coli O157:H7 died within 2 h with a disinfection rate constant of k = 0.01 min−1, which is three times that measured for TiO2. The mechanism of cell death was investigated by using several scavengers combined with a partition system. The results revealed that diffusing hydroxyl radicals play an important role in the photocatalytically initiated bacterial death, and direct contact between C70-TiO2 hybrid and bacteria is not indispensable in the photocatalytic disinfection process. Extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) of bacteria have little effect on the disinfection efficiency. Analyses of the inhibitory effect of C70-TiO2 thin films on E. coli O157:H7 showed a decrease of the bacterial concentration from 3 × 108 to 38 cfu mL−1 in the solution with C70-TiO2 thin film in the first 2 h of irradiation and a complete inhibition of the growth of E. coli O157:H7 in the later 24 h irradiation. PMID:27161821

  3. Equivalency testing of ultraviolet disinfection for wastewater reclamation

    SciTech Connect

    Oppenheimer, J.A.; Jacangelo, J.G.; Laine, J.M.

    1996-11-01

    UV light disinfection was shown to continuously provide microbial inactivation equivalent to chlorine while reducing the formation of known carcinogenic disinfection by-products and the formation of chronic whole effluent toxicity. This was the first study to demonstrate UV`s performance relative to chlorination over an extended timeframe at a full-scale facility treating to meet the most stringent California reclamation standards.

  4. Evaluation of otoscope cone cleaning and disinfection procedures commonly used in veterinary medical practices: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Newton, Heide M; Rosenkrantz, Wayne S; Muse, Russell; Griffin, Craig E

    2006-04-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the relative efficacy of otoscope cone cleaning and disinfection methods commonly used in veterinary practices. Using sterile technique, 60 new gas-sterilized 4-mm otoscope cones were inoculated with a broth culture of 1.5 billion Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteria per mL then allowed to dry for 10 min. Six study groups of 10 cones each were created. Group 1 served as positive control and received no cleaning or disinfection. Group 2 cones were wiped with sterile cotton-tipped applicators and gauze then rinsed with water. Group 3 cones were wiped with 70% isopropyl alcohol. Group 4 cones were scrubbed in a speculum cleaner with Cetylcide II solution (Cetylite Industries, Inc., Pennsauken, NJ). Groups 5 and 6 cones were soaked for 20 min in Cetylcide II and chlorhexidine gluconate 2% solutions, respectively. Using sterile technique and after 10-15 min drying time, the cones were swabbed in a consistent pattern, and samples were submitted for quantitative culture. Culture results showed no growth from cones soaked in Cetylcide II or chlorhexidine solutions. Two of the 10 cones wiped with alcohol, 3/10 cones wiped then rinsed with water, and 3/10 cones scrubbed with the speculum cleaner showed growth of P. aeruginosa. All (10/10) cones in the control group showed heavy growth of P. aeruginosa. These results show that P. aeruginosa can survive on otoscope cones cleaned and disinfected by several commonly used methods. Further study is needed to determine practical and optimal cleaning and disinfection methods for otoscope cones.

  5. Characterization of the microbial flora in disinfecting footbaths with hypochlorite.

    PubMed

    Langsrud, Solveig; Seifert, Linn; Møretrø, Trond

    2006-09-01

    Change or disinfection of footwear are measures to prevent cross contamination between areas with low and high hygienic levels in the food industry. The efficacy of disinfecting footwear is not well documented. Samples of used disinfectant and from swabbing of corners after draining were taken from disinfecting footbaths containing chlorine in four Norwegian cheese factories. Bacteria were present in 9 of 12 footbaths and more positive samples were found from swab samples than from used disinfectant. The microbial flora in footbaths varied between the dairies. In two dairies, the flora was dominated by Pseudomonas spp. and Acinetobacter spp., respectively. In the third dairy, both Bacillus spp. and Staphylococcus spp. were present and in the fourth dairy, the flora was diverse (Acinetobacter sp., Enterococcus faecalis, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and Bacillus sp.). The strains were not resistant to the recommended user concentration of chlorine in bactericidal suspension or surface tests. The degree of attachment to plastic varied between strains and species and bacteria attached to surfaces were in general more resistant than suspended bacteria. The results of the survey indicated that disinfecting footbaths containing chlorine may act as contamination sources in food factories and should not be used without regular hygienic monitoring.

  6. Disinfectants in health care: finding an alternative to chlorine dioxide.

    PubMed

    Keward, Josephine

    Cleanliness of the clinical environment has a direct impact on healthcare-associated infection (HCAI) incidence and there is increasing evidence of its importance with regard to infection prevention and control. While traditional high-level disinfectants have excellent antimicrobial properties, these are typically offset against issues such as corrosiveness, toxicity, cost and user acceptance. Recent years have seen several user-friendly sporicidal disinfectants emerge onto the market. Antimicrobial profile and user acceptance determine the clinical success of any disinfectant. Therefore, product adoption is often a two-stage process with a tabletop evaluation of the appropriate technical data, including efficacy claims, followed by an in-use product evaluation. The first part of this article demonstrates the importance of the clinical environment with respect to HCAI and examines some of the issues around disinfectants used in health care and considerations when selecting a new disinfectant for use. The second part reports the experiences of the Infection Prevention and Control team at Alder Hey Children's Hospital in their assessment and subsequent adoption of a new user-friendly sporicidal disinfectant into clinical practice.

  7. Disinfection of Needleless Connector Hubs: Clinical Evidence Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Moureau, Nancy L.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Needleless connectors (NC) are used on virtually all intravascular devices, providing an easy access point for infusion connection. Colonization of NC is considered the cause of 50% of postinsertion catheter-related infections. Breaks in aseptic technique, from failure to disinfect, result in contamination and subsequent biofilm formation within NC and catheters increasing the potential for infection of central and peripheral catheters. Methods. This systematic review evaluated 140 studies and 34 abstracts on NC disinfection practices, the impact of hub contamination on infection, and measures of education and compliance. Results. The greatest risk for contamination of the catheter after insertion is the NC with 33–45% contaminated, and compliance with disinfection as low as 10%. The optimal technique or disinfection time has not been identified, although scrubbing with 70% alcohol for 5–60 seconds is recommended. Studies have reported statistically significant results in infection reduction when passive alcohol disinfection caps are used (48–86% reduction). Clinical Implications. It is critical for healthcare facilities and clinicians to take responsibility for compliance with basic principles of asepsis compliance, to involve frontline staff in strategies, to facilitate education that promotes understanding of the consequences of failure, and to comply with the standard of care for hub disinfection. PMID:26075093

  8. Nanosilver as a disinfectant in dental unit waterlines ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Dental unit water lines (DUWL) are susceptible to biofilm development and bacterial growth leading to water contamination, causing health and ecological effects. This study monitors the interactions between a commonly used nanosilver disinfectant (ASAP-AGX-32, an antimicrobial cleaner for dental units, 0.0032% Ag) and biofilm development in DUWL. To simulate the disinfection scenario, an in-house DUWL model was assembled and biofilm accumulation was allowed. Subsequent to biofilm development, the disinfection process was performed according to the manufacturer's instructions. The pristine nanosilver particles in the cleaner measured between 3 and 5 nm in diameter and were surrounded by a stabilizing polymer. However, the polymeric stabilizing agent diminished over the disinfection process, initiating partial AgNPs aggregation. Furthermore, surface speciation of the pristine AgNPs were identified as primarily AgO, and after the disinfection process, transformations to AgCl were observed. The physicochemical characteristics of AgNPs are known to govern their fate, and transport and environmental implications. Hence, knowledge of the AgNPs characteristics after the disinfection process (usage scenario) is of significance. This study demonstrates the adsorption of AgNPs onto biofilm surfaces and, therefore, will assist in illustration of the toxicity mechanisms of AgNPs to bacteria and biofilms. This work can be an initial step in better understanding how

  9. Stability and effectiveness of chlorine disinfectants in water distribution systems.

    PubMed

    Olivieri, V P; Snead, M C; Krusé, C W; Kawata, K

    1986-11-01

    A test system for water distribution was used to evaluate the stability and effectiveness of three residual disinfectants--free chlorine, combined chlorine, and chlorine dioxide--when challenged with a sewage contaminant. The test distribution system consisted of the street main and internal plumbing for two barracks at Fort George G. Meade, MD. To the existing pipe network, 152 m (500 ft) of 13-mm (0.5 in.) copper pipe were added for sampling, and 60 m (200 ft) of 2.54-cm (1.0 in.) plastic pipe were added for circulation. The levels of residual disinfectants tested were 0.2 mg/L and 1.0 mg/L as available chlorine. In the absence of a disinfectant residual, microorganisms in the sewage contaminant were consistently recovered at high levels. The presence of any disinfectant residual reduced the microorganism level and frequency of occurrence at the consumer's tap. Free chlorine was the most effective residual disinfectant and may serve as a marker or flag in the distribution network. Free chlorine and chlorine dioxide were the least stable in the pipe network. The loss of disinfectant in the pipe network followed first-order kinetics. The half-life determined in static tests for free chlorine, chlorine dioxide, and combined chlorine was 140, 93, and 1680 min.

  10. Stability and effectiveness of chlorine disinfectants in water distribution systems

    SciTech Connect

    Olivieri, V.P.; Snead, M.C.; Kruse, C.W.; Kawata, K.

    1986-11-01

    A test system for water distribution was used to evaluate the stability and effectiveness of three residual disinfectants - free chlorine, combined chlorine, and chlorine dioxide - when challenged with a sewage contaminant. The test distribution system consisted of the street main and internal plumbing for two barracks at Fort George G. Meade, MD. To the existing pipe network, 152 m (500 ft) of 13-mm (0.5 in.) copper pipe were added for sampling, and 60 m (200 ft) of 2.54-cm (1.0 in.) plastic pipe were added for circulation. The levels of residual disinfectants tested were 0.2 mg/L and 1.0 mg/L as available chlorine. In the absence of a disinfectant residual, microorganisms in the sewage contaminant were consistently recovered at high levels. The presence of any disinfectant residual reduced the microorganism level and frequency of occurrence at the consumer's tap. Free chlorine was the most effective residual disinfectant and may serve as a marker or flag in the distribution network. Free chlorine and chlorine dioxide were the least stable in the pipe network. The loss of disinfectant in the pipe network followed first-order kinetics. The half-life determined in static tests for free chlorine, chlorine dioxide, and combined chlorine was 140, 93, and 1680 min.

  11. A MULTIPLE-PURPOSE DESIGN APPROACH TO THE EVALUATION OF RISKS FROM COMPLEX MIXTURES OF DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Drinking water disinfection has effectively eliminated much of the morbidity and mortality associated with waterborne infectious diseases in the United States. Various disinfection processes, however, produce certain types and amounts of disinfection by-products (DBPs), including...

  12. Novel Electrokinetic Microfluidic Detector for Evaluating Effectiveness of Microalgae Disinfection in Ship Ballast Water

    PubMed Central

    Maw, Myint Myint; Wang, Junsheng; Li, Fabo; Jiang, Jinhu; Song, Younan; Pan, Xinxiang

    2015-01-01

    Ship ballast water treatment methods face many technical challenges. The effectiveness of every treatment method usually is evaluated by using large scale equipment and a large volume of samples, which involves time-consuming, laborious, and complex operations. This paper reports the development of a novel, simple and fast platform of methodology in evaluating the efficiency and the best parameters for ballast water treatment systems, particularly in chemical disinfection. In this study, a microfluidic chip with six sample wells and a waste well was designed, where sample transportation was controlled by electrokinetic flow. The performance of this microfluidic platform was evaluated by detecting the disinfection of Dunaliella salina (D. salina) algae in ballast water treated by sodium hypochlorite (NaClO) solution. Light-induced chlorophyll fluorescence (LICF) intensity was used to determine the viability of microalgae cells in the system, which can be operated automatically with the dimension of the detector as small as 50 mm × 24 mm × 5 mm. The 40 µL volume of sample solution was used for each treatment condition test and the validity of detection can be accomplished within about five min. The results show that the viability of microalgae cells under different treatment conditions can be determined accurately and further optimal treatment conditions including concentrations of NaClO and treatment time can also be obtained. These results can provide accurate evaluation and optimal parameters for ballast water treatment methods. PMID:26516836

  13. [Specific antisepsis and environmental disinfection in preventing "Clostridium difficile associated diarrhea"].

    PubMed

    Agolini, G; Protano, C; Puro, V; Raitano, A; Ferraro, F; Vitali, M

    2009-01-01

    In the last years, Clostridium difficile acquired great interest for public health because of constant increase of Clostridium difficile associated diarrhea (CDAD), especially in nosocomial field and as a consequences of its pathogenicity and virulence. Oro-faecal transmission and great environmental persistence of Clostridium difficile indicate hand hygiene of health care workers and environmental disinfection practices as key interventions for prevention and control of nosocomial CDAD. The current indications relative to the hand hygiene suggest the use of soap and water for hand washing and, to achieve a better compliance of health care workers to this treatment, the alternative use of sodium dichloroisocyanurate or alcohol-based solution or gel waterless. Regard to environmental disinfection, to avoid high concentrations of sodium hypochlorite (in the magnitude of 5.000-6.000 ppm), necessary to reduce microbic load of dirty environment, the most appropriate treatment should consist of 2 phases: preliminary cleaning with water and detergents or polyphenol, followed by treatment with solution containing 1.000 ppm available chlorine, obtained from sodium hypochlorite or sodium dichloroisocyanurate.

  14. [A new device for the disinfection of handpieces and turbines].

    PubMed

    Simonetti D'Arca, A S; Petti, S; Tomassini, E; Polimeni, A

    1995-01-01

    Dental handpieces are often difficult to disinfect. This is one of the main reasons for the considerable risk of cross-infections in dental offices. The aim of the present study was the evaluation of the disinfectant property of a recent, commercially available, automatic instrument, described as capable to clean, disinfect and lubricate dental handpieces. The following experimental evaluations were made: 1) antimicrobial activity of the disinfectant (glyoxalaldehyde) used. The method described by the European Committee for Standardization was followed. Test microorganisms were Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus. 2) disinfection of dental handpieces (69 contra-angles and 97 turbines of different marks). They were naturally infected using them on patients for 30 minutes at least. 3) disinfection of dental handpieces infected with bacterial suspensions of Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pyogenes (beta-haemolyticus, group A), Candida albicans and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The results of the first experiment showed a strong bactericidal power of the disinfectant with both the tested strains, after a contact time of only 1 minute. A great proportion of the dental handpieces tested during the second experiment were found disinfected: from 84% through 89% out of the various models of turbine handpieces; from 89% through 100% out of the models of contra-angle handpieces. Even though bacterial contamination level was low (about 10(3) microorganisms per handpiece), a satisfactory disinfectant ability in natural conditions was found. The results of the third experiment were unclear. The tested instrument reduced 10(5)-10(8) times the original bacterial count when the gram positive microorganisms (Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pyogenes) were used. On the other hand, when Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Candida albicans were used, the results were different: the bacterial count was reduced 10(6)-10(7) times in some cases, and only 10(2) times in other cases

  15. Disinfection of Vegetative Cells of Bacillus anthracis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-03-01

    glassware, stirrers, and solutions were made to be CDF. A 0.05 M potassium phosphate buffer was prepared at pH 7. Sodium hypochlorite was first diluted...by 1:200 and used the same day. Free chlorine solution (2 mg/L) was prepared by appropriate dilutions of 1:200 diluted sodium hypochlorite solution...all the dilutions. First, a solution of 1000 mg chlorine solution was prepared in two steps. Sodium hypochlorite solution was diluted 1:5, and then 1

  16. Determination of decimal reduction time (D value) of chemical agents used in hospitals for disinfection purposes

    PubMed Central

    Mazzola, Priscila Gava; Penna, Thereza Christina Vessoni; da S Martins, Alzira M

    2003-01-01

    Background Prior to the selection of disinfectants for low, intermediate and high (sterilizing) levels, the decimal reduction time, D-value, for the most common and persistent bacteria identified at a health care facility should be determined. Methods The D-value was determined by inoculating 100 mL of disinfecting solution with 1 mL of a bacterial suspension (104 – 105 CFU/mL for vegetative and spore forms). At regular intervals, 1 mL aliquots of this mixture were transferred to 8 mL of growth media containing a neutralizing agent, and incubated at optimal conditions for the microorganism. Results The highest D-values for various bacteria were determined for the following solutions: (i) 0.1% sodium dichloroisocyanurate (pH 7.0) – E. coli and A. calcoaceticus (D = 5.9 min); (ii) sodium hypochlorite (pH 7.0) at 0.025% for B. stearothermophilus (D = 24 min), E. coli and E. cloacae (D = 7.5 min); at 0.05% for B. stearothermophilus (D = 9.4 min) and E. coli (D = 6.1 min) and 0.1% for B. stearothermophilus (D = 3.5 min) and B. subtilis (D = 3.2 min); (iii) 2.0% glutaraldehyde (pH 7.4) – B. stearothermophilus, B. subtilis (D = 25 min) and E. coli (D = 7.1 min); (iv) 0.5% formaldehyde (pH 6.5) – B. subtilis (D = 11.8 min), B. stearothermophilus (D = 10.9 min) and A. calcoaceticus (D = 5.2 min); (v) 2.0% chlorhexidine (pH 6.2) – B. stearothermophilus (D = 9.1 min), and at 0.4% for E. cloacae (D = 8.3 min); (vi) 1.0% Minncare® (peracetic acid and hydrogen peroxide, pH 2.3) – B. stearothermophilus (D = 9.1 min) and E. coli (D = 6.7 min). Conclusions The suspension studies were an indication of the disinfectant efficacy on a surface. The data in this study reflect the formulations used and may vary from product to product. The expected effectiveness from the studied formulations showed that the tested agents can be recommended for surface disinfection as stated in present guidelines and emphasizes the importance and need to develop routine and novel programs to

  17. Electrochemical disinfection of toilet wastewater using wastewater electrolysis cell.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xiao; Qu, Yan; Cid, Clément A; Finke, Cody; Hoffmann, Michael R; Lim, Keahying; Jiang, Sunny C

    2016-04-01

    The paucity of proper sanitation facilities has contributed to the spread of waterborne diseases in many developing countries. The primary goal of this study was to demonstrate the feasibility of using a wastewater electrolysis cell (WEC) for toilet wastewater disinfection. The treated wastewater was designed to reuse for toilet flushing and agricultural irrigation. Laboratory-scale electrochemical (EC) disinfection experiments were performed to investigate the disinfection efficiency of the WEC with four seeded microorganisms (Escherichia coli, Enterococcus, recombinant adenovirus serotype 5, and bacteriophage MS2). In addition, the formation of organic disinfection byproducts (DBPs) trihalomethanes (THMs) and haloacetic acids (HAA5) at the end of the EC treatment was also investigated. The results showed that at an applied cell voltage of +4 V, the WEC achieved 5-log10 reductions of all four seeded microorganisms in real toilet wastewater within 60 min. In contrast, chemical chlorination (CC) disinfection using hypochlorite [NaClO] was only effective for the inactivation of bacteria. Due to the rapid formation of chloramines, less than 0.5-log10 reduction of MS2 was observed in toilet wastewater even at the highest [NaClO] dosage (36 mg/L, as Cl2) over a 1 h reaction. Experiments using laboratory model waters showed that free reactive chlorine generated in situ during EC disinfection process was the main disinfectant responsible for the inactivation of microorganisms. However, the production of hydroxyl radicals [OH], and other reactive oxygen species by the active bismuth-doped TiO2 anode were negligible under the same electrolytic conditions. The formation of THMs and HAA5 were found to increase with higher applied cell voltage. Based on the energy consumption estimates, the WEC system can be operated using solar energy stored in a DC battery as the sole power source.

  18. Electrochemical disinfection of toilet wastewater using wastewater electrolysis cell

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Xiao; Qu, Yan; Cid, Clément A.; Finke, Cody; Hoffmann, Michael R.; Lim, Keahying; Jiang, Sunny C.

    2016-01-01

    The paucity of proper sanitation facilities has contributed to the spread of waterborne diseases in many developing countries. The primary goal of this study was to demonstrate the feasibility of using a wastewater electrolysis cell (WEC) for toilet wastewater disinfection. The treated wastewater was designed to reuse for toilet flushing and agricultural irrigation. Laboratory-scale electrochemical (EC) disinfection experiments were performed to investigate the disinfection efficiency of the WEC with four seeded microorganisms (Escherichia coli, Enterococcus, recombinant adenovirus serotype 5, and bacteriophage MS2). In addition, the formation of organic disinfection byproducts (DBPs) trihalomethanes (THMs) and haloacetic acids (HAA5) at the end of the EC treatment was also investigated. The results showed that at an applied cell voltage of +4 V, the WEC achieved 5-log10 reductions of all four seeded microorganisms in real toilet wastewater within 60 min. In contrast, chemical chlorination (CC) disinfection using hypochlorite [NaClO] was only effective for the inactivation of bacteria. Due to the rapid formation of chloramines, less than 0.5-log10 reduction of MS2 was observed in toilet wastewater even at the highest [NaClO] dosage (36 mg/L, as Cl2) over a 1 h reaction. Experiments using laboratory model waters showed that free reactive chlorine generated in situ during EC disinfection process was the main disinfectant responsible for the inactivation of microorganisms. However, the production of hydroxyl radicals [•OH], and other reactive oxygen species by the active bismuth-doped TiO2 anode were negligible under the same electrolytic conditions. The formation of THMs and HAA5 were found to increase with higher applied cell voltage. Based on the energy consumption estimates, the WEC system can be operated using solar energy stored in a DC battery as the sole power source. PMID:26854604

  19. Designing plasmas for chronic wound disinfection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nosenko, T.; Shimizu, T.; Morfill, G. E.

    2009-11-01

    Irradiation with low-temperature atmospheric-pressure plasma provides a promising method for chronic wound disinfection. To be efficient for this purpose, plasma should meet the following criteria: it should significantly reduce bacterial density in the wounded area, cause a long-term post-irradiation inhibition of bacterial growth, yet without causing any negative effect on human cells. In order to design plasmas that would satisfy these requirements, we assessed the relative contribution of different components with respect to bactericidal properties due to irradiation with argon plasma. We demonstrate that plasma-generated UV radiation is the main short-term sterilizing factor of argon plasma. On the other hand, plasma-generated reactive nitrogen species (RNS) and reactive oxygen species (ROS) cause a long-term 'after-irradiation' inhibition of bacterial growth and, therefore, are important for preventing wound recolonization with bacteria between two treatments. We also demonstrate that at certain concentrations plasma-generated RNS and ROS cause significant reduction of bacterial density, but have no adverse effect on human skin cells. Possible mechanisms of the different effects of plasma-generated reactive species on bacteria and human cells are discussed. The results of this study suggest that argon plasma for therapeutic purposes should be optimized in the direction of reducing the intensity of plasma-generated UV radiation and increasing the density of non-UV plasma products.

  20. Water disinfection through photoactive modified titania.

    PubMed

    Sethi, Diptipriya; Pal, Ajoy; Sakthivel, Ramasamy; Pandey, Sony; Dash, Tapan; Das, Trupti; Kumar, Rohit

    2014-01-05

    TiO(2), N-TiO(2) and S-TiO(2) samples have been prepared by various chemical methods. These samples were characterized by X-ray diffractometer (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Laser Raman spectrometer, UV-Visible spectrophotometer, field emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM) and transmission electron microscope (TEM). X-ray powder diffraction study reveals that all three samples are single anatase phase of titania and the crystallinity of titania decreases with sulphur doping whereas nitrogen doping does not affect it. UV-Visible (diffuse) reflectance spectra shows that doping of titania with nitrogen and sulphur shift the absorption edge of titania from ultraviolet to visible region. XPS study confirms that both nitrogen and sulphur are well doped in the titania lattice. It is observed that nitrogen occupies at both substitutional and interstitial position in the lattice of titania. FE-SEM and TEM studies demonstrate that the particles are below 50nm range. It is found that S and N doping of titania increased its water disinfection property in the order TiO(2)