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Sample records for multi-target antisense approach

  1. Multi-target drug design approaches for multifactorial diseases: from neurodegenerative to cardiovascular applications.

    PubMed

    Katselou, M G; Matralis, A N; Kourounakis, A P

    2014-01-01

    In multi-target drug design (MTD) medicinal chemistry aims to integrate multiple pharmacophores into a single drug molecule in order to make it active on several molecular biological mechanisms simultaneously. Given the fact that most diseases are multifactorial in nature, MTD is being pursued with increasing intensity, which has resulted in improved outcomes in disease models and several compounds have entered clinical trials. In a wide range of examples we illustrate how various functionalities have been combined within single structures and how this has affected their (pre)clinical outcome. This review describes the successful application of MTD for disorders such as neurodegenerative, cardiovascular, diabetes, metabolic and inflammatory diseases, especially focusing on the field of atherosclerosis where multi-target strategies are a promising alternative to the classical "one target-one drug" design approach.

  2. Multi-target pharmacology: possibilities and limitations of the "skeleton key approach" from a medicinal chemist perspective.

    PubMed

    Talevi, Alan

    2015-01-01

    Multi-target drugs have raised considerable interest in the last decade owing to their advantages in the treatment of complex diseases and health conditions linked to drug resistance issues. Prospective drug repositioning to treat comorbid conditions is an additional, overlooked application of multi-target ligands. While medicinal chemists usually rely on some version of the lock and key paradigm to design novel therapeutics, modern pharmacology recognizes that the mid- and long-term effects of a given drug on a biological system may depend not only on the specific ligand-target recognition events but also on the influence of the repeated administration of a drug on the cell gene signature. The design of multi-target agents usually imposes challenging restrictions on the topology or flexibility of the candidate drugs, which are briefly discussed in the present article. Finally, computational strategies to approach the identification of novel multi-target agents are overviewed.

  3. PMHT Approach for Multi-Target Multi-Sensor Sonar Tracking in Clutter.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaohua; Li, Yaan; Yu, Jing; Chen, Xiao; Dai, Miao

    2015-11-06

    Multi-sensor sonar tracking has many advantages, such as the potential to reduce the overall measurement uncertainty and the possibility to hide the receiver. However, the use of multi-target multi-sensor sonar tracking is challenging because of the complexity of the underwater environment, especially the low target detection probability and extremely large number of false alarms caused by reverberation. In this work, to solve the problem of multi-target multi-sensor sonar tracking in the presence of clutter, a novel probabilistic multi-hypothesis tracker (PMHT) approach based on the extended Kalman filter (EKF) and unscented Kalman filter (UKF) is proposed. The PMHT can efficiently handle the unknown measurements-to-targets and measurements-to-transmitters data association ambiguity. The EKF and UKF are used to deal with the high degree of nonlinearity in the measurement model. The simulation results show that the proposed algorithm can improve the target tracking performance in a cluttered environment greatly, and its computational load is low.

  4. Systems biology approaches and tools for analysis of interactomes and multi-target drugs.

    PubMed

    Schrattenholz, André; Groebe, Karlfried; Soskic, Vukic

    2010-01-01

    diseases" remains a most pressing medical need. Currently, a change of paradigm can be observed with regard to a new interest in agents that modulate multiple targets simultaneously, essentially "dirty drugs." Targeting cellular function as a system rather than on the level of the single target, significantly increases the size of the drugable proteome and is expected to introduce novel classes of multi-target drugs with fewer adverse effects and toxicity. Multiple target approaches have recently been used to design medications against atherosclerosis, cancer, depression, psychosis and neurodegenerative diseases. A focussed approach towards "systemic" drugs will certainly require the development of novel computational and mathematical concepts for appropriate modelling of complex data. But the key is the extraction of relevant molecular information from biological systems by implementing rigid statistical procedures to differential proteomic analytics.

  5. Dual-action Hybrid Compounds - A New Dawn in the Discovery of Multi-target Drugs: Lead Generation Approaches.

    PubMed

    Abdolmalekia, Azizeh; Ghasemi, Jahan B

    2016-09-27

    Finding high quality beginning compounds is a critical job at the start of the lead generation stage for multi-target drug discovery (MTDD). Designing hybrid compounds as a selective multi-target chemical entity is a challenge, opportunity, and new idea to better act against specific multiple targets. One hybrid molecule is formed by two (or more) pharmacophore group's participation. So, these new compounds often exhibit two or more activities going about as multi-target drugs (mt-drugs) and may have superior safety or efficacy. Application of integrating a range of information and sophisticated new in silico, bioinformatics, structural biology, pharmacogenomics methods may be useful to discover/design, and synthesis of the new hybrid molecules. In this regard, many rational and screening approaches have followed by medicinal chemists for the lead generation in MTDD. Here, we review some popular lead generation approaches that have been used for designing multiple ligands (DMLs). This paper focuses on dual- acting chemical entities that incorporate a part of two drugs or bioactive compounds to compose hybrid molecules. Also, it presents some of key concepts and limitations/strengths of lead generation methods by comparing combination framework method with screening approaches. Besides, a number of examples to represent applications of hybrid molecules in the drug discovery are included.

  6. Improved genome-scale multi-target virtual screening via a novel collaborative filtering approach to cold-start problem

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Hansaim; Gray, Paul; Xie, Lei; Poleksic, Aleksandar

    2016-01-01

    Conventional one-drug-one-gene approach has been of limited success in modern drug discovery. Polypharmacology, which focuses on searching for multi-targeted drugs to perturb disease-causing networks instead of designing selective ligands to target individual proteins, has emerged as a new drug discovery paradigm. Although many methods for single-target virtual screening have been developed to improve the efficiency of drug discovery, few of these algorithms are designed for polypharmacology. Here, we present a novel theoretical framework and a corresponding algorithm for genome-scale multi-target virtual screening based on the one-class collaborative filtering technique. Our method overcomes the sparseness of the protein-chemical interaction data by means of interaction matrix weighting and dual regularization from both chemicals and proteins. While the statistical foundation behind our method is general enough to encompass genome-wide drug off-target prediction, the program is specifically tailored to find protein targets for new chemicals with little to no available interaction data. We extensively evaluate our method using a number of the most widely accepted gene-specific and cross-gene family benchmarks and demonstrate that our method outperforms other state-of-the-art algorithms for predicting the interaction of new chemicals with multiple proteins. Thus, the proposed algorithm may provide a powerful tool for multi-target drug design. PMID:27958331

  7. Improved genome-scale multi-target virtual screening via a novel collaborative filtering approach to cold-start problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Hansaim; Gray, Paul; Xie, Lei; Poleksic, Aleksandar

    2016-12-01

    Conventional one-drug-one-gene approach has been of limited success in modern drug discovery. Polypharmacology, which focuses on searching for multi-targeted drugs to perturb disease-causing networks instead of designing selective ligands to target individual proteins, has emerged as a new drug discovery paradigm. Although many methods for single-target virtual screening have been developed to improve the efficiency of drug discovery, few of these algorithms are designed for polypharmacology. Here, we present a novel theoretical framework and a corresponding algorithm for genome-scale multi-target virtual screening based on the one-class collaborative filtering technique. Our method overcomes the sparseness of the protein-chemical interaction data by means of interaction matrix weighting and dual regularization from both chemicals and proteins. While the statistical foundation behind our method is general enough to encompass genome-wide drug off-target prediction, the program is specifically tailored to find protein targets for new chemicals with little to no available interaction data. We extensively evaluate our method using a number of the most widely accepted gene-specific and cross-gene family benchmarks and demonstrate that our method outperforms other state-of-the-art algorithms for predicting the interaction of new chemicals with multiple proteins. Thus, the proposed algorithm may provide a powerful tool for multi-target drug design.

  8. Ultrasound in systemic sclerosis. A multi-target approach from joint to lung.

    PubMed

    Gutierrez, Marwin; Pineda, Carlos; Cazenave, Tomas; Piras, Marco; Erre, Gian Luca; Draghessi, Antonella; De Angelis, Rossella; Grassi, Walter

    2014-08-01

    Ultrasound (US) is a cost-effective, noninvasive, accessible imaging modality that clinicians use at the point of care to assess disease activity and therapeutic efficacy in different rheumatic conditions. However, its utility has been prevalently demonstrated in the field of chronic arthritides. Only in the last few years there was an interest to explore the potential of US beyond the musculoskeletal area. In this way, preliminary US data about the assessment of the different targets involved in systemic sclerosis such as joints, tendons, skin, vessels, and lung have been provided. The main purpose of this US review is to provide an overview of the potential role of US in the multi-target assessment of SSc and to discuss the current evidence supporting its relevance and applications in daily clinical practice.

  9. Tiny molecule, big power: Multi-target approach for curcumin in diabetic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Karuppagounder, Vengadeshprabhu; Arumugam, Somasundaram; Giridharan, Vijayasree V; Sreedhar, Remya; Bose, Rajendran J C; Vanama, Jyothi; Palaniyandi, Suresh S; Konishi, Tetsuya; Watanabe, Kenichi; Thandavarayan, Rajarajan A

    2017-02-01

    Diabetic cardiomyopathy (DCM) is described as impaired cardiac diastolic and systolic functions. Diabetes mellitus (DM), a related cardiovascular disease, has become one of the major causes of death in DM patients. Mortality in these diseases is 2 to 3 times higher than in non-DM patients with cardiovascular disease. The progression of DCM and the cellular and molecular perturbations associated with the pathogenesis are complex and multifactorial. Although considerable progress has been achieved, the molecular etiologies of DCM remain poorly understood. There is an expanding need for natural antidiabetic medicines that do not cause the side effects of modern drugs. Curcumin, a pleiotropic molecule, from Curcuma longa, is known to possess numerous impacts such as scavenging free radical, antioxidant, antitumor, and antiinflammatory activities. The reports from preclinical and clinical findings revealed that curcumin can reverse insulin resistance, hyperglycemia, obesity, and obesity-related metabolic diseases. The current review provides an updated overview of the possible molecular mechanism of DCM and multitarget approach of curcumin in alleviating DCM and diabetic complication. Additionally, we mentioned the approaches that are currently being implemented to improve the bioavailability of this promising natural product in diabetes therapeutics.

  10. A Multi-targeted Approach to Suppress Tumor-Promoting Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Samadi, Abbas K.; Georgakilas, Alexandros G.; Amedei, Amedeo; Amin, Amr; Bishayee, Anupam; Lokeshwar, Bal L.; Grue, Brendan; Panis, Carolina; Boosani, Chandra S.; Poudyal, Deepak; Stafforini, Diana M.; Bhakta, Dipita; Niccolai, Elena; Guha, Gunjan; Rupasinghe, H.P. Vasantha; Fujii, Hiromasa; Honoki, Kanya; Mehta, Kapil; Aquilano, Katia; Lowe, Leroy; Hofseth, Lorne J.; Ricciardiello, Luigi; Ciriolo, Maria Rosa; Singh, Neetu; Whelan, Richard L.; Chaturvedi, Rupesh; Ashraf, S. Salman; Kumara, HMC Shantha; Nowsheen, Somaira; Mohammed, Sulma I.; Helferich, William G.; Yang, Xujuan

    2015-01-01

    Cancers harbor significant genetic heterogeneity and patterns of relapse following many therapies are due to evolved resistance to treatment. While efforts have been made to combine targeted therapies, significant levels of toxicity have stymied efforts to effectively treat cancer with multi-drug combinations using currently approved therapeutics. We discuss the relationship between tumor-promoting inflammation and cancer as part of a larger effort to develop a broad-spectrum therapeutic approach aimed at a wide range of targets to address this heterogeneity. Specifically, macrophage migration inhibitory factor, cyclooxygenase-2, transcription factor nuclear factor-kappaB, tumor necrosis factor alpha, inducible nitric oxide synthase, protein kinase B, and CXC chemokines are reviewed as important antiinflammatory targets while curcumin, resveratrol, epigallocatechin gallate, genistein, lycopene, and anthocyanins are reviewed as low-cost, low toxicity means by which these targets might all be reached simultaneously. Future translational work will need to assess the resulting synergies of rationally designed antiinflammatory mixtures (employing low-toxicity constituents), and then combine this with similar approaches targeting the most important pathways across the range of cancer hallmark phenotypes. PMID:25951989

  11. Epigenetic-based therapy: From single- to multi-target approaches.

    PubMed

    Benedetti, Rosaria; Conte, Mariarosaria; Iside, Concetta; Altucci, Lucia

    2015-12-01

    The treatment of cancer has traditionally been based on the identification of a single molecule and/or enzymatic function (target) responsible for a particular phenotype, and therefore on the ability to stimulate, attenuate or inhibit its activity through the use of selective compounds. However, cancer is no longer considered a disease caused by a single factor, but is now recognized as a multi-factorial disorder. Genetic, epigenetic and metabolic factors all contribute to neoplasia, causing significant changes in molecular networks that govern cell growth, development, death and specialization. Consequently, many antitumor therapies are no longer directed against a single target but the biological system as a whole, in which functions determining the onset and maintenance of a physio-pathological state are modulated. The field of epi-drug discovery is currently in a transitional phase where the search for putative anticancer drugs is shifting from single-target-oriented molecules to network-active compounds and to epi-drugs used in combination with other epi-agents and with traditional chemotherapeutics. This review illustrates the pros and cons of each therapeutic option, providing examples in support of single-target and multi (network)-target epi-drug approaches.

  12. Ilizarov treatment of congenital pseudarthrosis of the tibia: a multi-targeted approach using the Ilizarov technique.

    PubMed

    Choi, In Ho; Cho, Tae-Joon; Moon, Hyuk Ju

    2011-03-01

    Congenital pseudarthrosis of the tibia (CPT) is one of the most challenging problems in pediatric orthopaedics. The treatment goals are osteosynthesis, stabilization of the ankle mortise by fibular stabilization, and lower limb-length equalization. Each of these goals is difficult to accomplish but regardless of the surgical options, the basic biological considerations are the same: pseudarthrosis resection, biological bone bridging of the defect by stable fixation, and the correction of any angular deformity. The Ilizarov method is certainly valuable for the treatment of CPT because it can address not only pseudarthrosis but also all complex deformities associated with this condition. Leg-length discrepancy can be managed by proximal tibial lengthening using distraction osteogenesis combined with or without contralateral epiphysiodesis. However, treatment of CPT is fraught with complications due to the complex nature of the disease, and failure is common. Residual challenges, such as refracture, growth disturbance, and poor foot and ankle function with stiffness, are frequent and perplexing. Refracture is the most common and serious complication after primary healing and might result in the re-establishment of pseudarthrosis. Therefore, an effective, safe and practical treatment method that minimizes the residual challenges after healing and accomplishes the multiple goals of treatment is needed. This review describes a multi-targeted approach for tackling these challenges, which utilizes the Ilizarov technique in atrophic-type CPT.

  13. Multi-Target Approaches in Colon Cancer Chemoprevention Based on Systems Biology of Tumor Cell-Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Guruswamy, Suresh; Rao, Chinthalapally V.

    2008-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is the leading cause of cancer related deaths in the United States. Although it is preventable, thousands of lives are lost each year in the U.S. to colorectal cancer than to breast cancer and AIDS combined. In colon cancer, the formation and progression of precancerous lesions like aberrant crypt foci and polyps is associated with the up-regulation of cycloxygenase-2 (COX-2), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and hydroxy methyl glutaryl CoA reductase (HMG-CoA reductase). The current review will focus on the signaling pathway involving COX-2 and HMG-CoA reductase enzymes and their downstream effectors in signaling mechanism. Cancer cells need huge pools of both cholesterol and isoprenoids to sustain their unlimited growth potential. Cholesterol by modulating caveolae formation regulates several signaling molecules like AKT, IGFR, EGFR and Rho which are involved in cell growth and survival. Cholesterol is also essential for lipid body formation which serves as storage sites for COX-2, eicosanoids and caveolin-1. Experimental studies have identified important mechanisms showing that COX-2, caveolin-1, lipid bodies and prenylated proteins is involved in carcinogenesis. Therefore multi-target, multi-drug approach is the ideal choice for effective colon cancer chemoprevention. This review will give an overview of the two pathways, their signaling networks, and the interactions between the components of the two networks in the activation and regulation of cell signaling involving growth/survival and explain the rationale for colon cancer chemoprevention using COX-2 inhibitors and statins. PMID:19763245

  14. Overview on the current status of virtual high-throughput screening and combinatorial chemistry approaches in multi-target anticancer drug discovery; Part I.

    PubMed

    Geromichalos, George D; Alifieris, Constantinos E; Geromichalou, Elena G; Trafalis, Dimitrios T

    2016-01-01

    Conventional drug design embraces the "one gene, one drug, one disease" philosophy. Nowadays, new generation of anti- cancer drugs, able to inhibit more than one pathway, is believed to play a major role in contemporary anticancer drug research. In this way, polypharmacology, focusing on multi-target drugs, has emerged as a new paradigm in drug discovery. A number of recent successful drugs have in part or in whole emerged from a structure-based research approach. Many advances including crystallography and informatics are behind these successes. Increasing insight into the genetics and molecular biology of cancer has resulted in the identification of an increasing number of potential molecular targets, for anticancer drug discovery and development. These targets can be approached through exploitation of emerging structural biology, "rational" drug design, screening of chemical libraries, or a combination of these methods. The result is the rapid discovery of new anticancer drugs. In this article we discuss the application of molecular modeling, molecular docking and virtual high-throughput screening to multi-targeted anticancer drug discovery. Efforts have been made to employ in silico methods for facilitating the search and design of selective multi-target agents. These computer aided molecular design methods have shown promising potential in facilitating drug discovery directed at selective multiple targets and is expected to contribute to intelligent lead anticancer drugs.

  15. Combinatorial support vector machines approach for virtual screening of selective multi-target serotonin reuptake inhibitors from large compound libraries.

    PubMed

    Shi, Z; Ma, X H; Qin, C; Jia, J; Jiang, Y Y; Tan, C Y; Chen, Y Z

    2012-02-01

    Selective multi-target serotonin reuptake inhibitors enhance antidepressant efficacy. Their discovery can be facilitated by multiple methods, including in silico ones. In this study, we developed and tested an in silico method, combinatorial support vector machines (COMBI-SVMs), for virtual screening (VS) multi-target serotonin reuptake inhibitors of seven target pairs (serotonin transporter paired with noradrenaline transporter, H(3) receptor, 5-HT(1A) receptor, 5-HT(1B) receptor, 5-HT(2C) receptor, melanocortin 4 receptor and neurokinin 1 receptor respectively) from large compound libraries. COMBI-SVMs trained with 917-1951 individual target inhibitors correctly identified 22-83.3% (majority >31.1%) of the 6-216 dual inhibitors collected from literature as independent testing sets. COMBI-SVMs showed moderate to good target selectivity in misclassifying as dual inhibitors 2.2-29.8% (majority <15.4%) of the individual target inhibitors of the same target pair and 0.58-7.1% of the other 6 targets outside the target pair. COMBI-SVMs showed low dual inhibitor false hit rates (0.006-0.056%, 0.042-0.21%, 0.2-4%) in screening 17 million PubChem compounds, 168,000 MDDR compounds, and 7-8181 MDDR compounds similar to the dual inhibitors. Compared with similarity searching, k-NN and PNN methods, COMBI-SVM produced comparable dual inhibitor yields, similar target selectivity, and lower false hit rate in screening 168,000 MDDR compounds. The annotated classes of many COMBI-SVMs identified MDDR virtual hits correlate with the reported effects of their predicted targets. COMBI-SVM is potentially useful for searching selective multi-target agents without explicit knowledge of these agents.

  16. A Network-Based Data Integration Approach to Support Drug Repurposing and Multi-Target Therapies in Triple Negative Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Laurie D.; Demartini, Andrea; Amato, Angela; Eterno, Vincenzo; Zambelli, Alberto; Bellazzi, Riccardo

    2016-01-01

    The integration of data and knowledge from heterogeneous sources can be a key success factor in drug design, drug repurposing and multi-target therapies. In this context, biological networks provide a useful instrument to highlight the relationships and to model the phenomena underlying therapeutic action in cancer. In our work, we applied network-based modeling within a novel bioinformatics pipeline to identify promising multi-target drugs. Given a certain tumor type/subtype, we derive a disease-specific Protein-Protein Interaction (PPI) network by combining different data-bases and knowledge repositories. Next, the application of suitable graph-based algorithms allows selecting a set of potentially interesting combinations of drug targets. A list of drug candidates is then extracted by applying a recent data fusion approach based on matrix tri-factorization. Available knowledge about selected drugs mechanisms of action is finally exploited to identify the most promising candidates for planning in vitro studies. We applied this approach to the case of Triple Negative Breast Cancer (TNBC), a subtype of breast cancer whose biology is poorly understood and that lacks of specific molecular targets. Our “in-silico” findings have been confirmed by a number of in vitro experiments, whose results demonstrated the ability of the method to select candidates for drug repurposing. PMID:27632168

  17. Multi-target Parallel Processing Approach for Gene-to-structure Determination of the Influenza Polymerase PB2 Subunit

    PubMed Central

    Moen, Spencer O.; Smith, Eric; Raymond, Amy C.; Fairman, James W.; Stewart, Lance J.; Staker, Bart L.; Begley, Darren W.; Edwards, Thomas E.; Lorimer, Donald D.

    2013-01-01

    Pandemic outbreaks of highly virulent influenza strains can cause widespread morbidity and mortality in human populations worldwide. In the United States alone, an average of 41,400 deaths and 1.86 million hospitalizations are caused by influenza virus infection each year 1. Point mutations in the polymerase basic protein 2 subunit (PB2) have been linked to the adaptation of the viral infection in humans 2. Findings from such studies have revealed the biological significance of PB2 as a virulence factor, thus highlighting its potential as an antiviral drug target. The structural genomics program put forth by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Disease (NIAID) provides funding to Emerald Bio and three other Pacific Northwest institutions that together make up the Seattle Structural Genomics Center for Infectious Disease (SSGCID). The SSGCID is dedicated to providing the scientific community with three-dimensional protein structures of NIAID category A-C pathogens. Making such structural information available to the scientific community serves to accelerate structure-based drug design. Structure-based drug design plays an important role in drug development. Pursuing multiple targets in parallel greatly increases the chance of success for new lead discovery by targeting a pathway or an entire protein family. Emerald Bio has developed a high-throughput, multi-target parallel processing pipeline (MTPP) for gene-to-structure determination to support the consortium. Here we describe the protocols used to determine the structure of the PB2 subunit from four different influenza A strains. PMID:23851357

  18. Multi-target parallel processing approach for gene-to-structure determination of the influenza polymerase PB2 subunit.

    PubMed

    Armour, Brianna L; Barnes, Steve R; Moen, Spencer O; Smith, Eric; Raymond, Amy C; Fairman, James W; Stewart, Lance J; Staker, Bart L; Begley, Darren W; Edwards, Thomas E; Lorimer, Donald D

    2013-06-28

    Pandemic outbreaks of highly virulent influenza strains can cause widespread morbidity and mortality in human populations worldwide. In the United States alone, an average of 41,400 deaths and 1.86 million hospitalizations are caused by influenza virus infection each year (1). Point mutations in the polymerase basic protein 2 subunit (PB2) have been linked to the adaptation of the viral infection in humans (2). Findings from such studies have revealed the biological significance of PB2 as a virulence factor, thus highlighting its potential as an antiviral drug target. The structural genomics program put forth by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Disease (NIAID) provides funding to Emerald Bio and three other Pacific Northwest institutions that together make up the Seattle Structural Genomics Center for Infectious Disease (SSGCID). The SSGCID is dedicated to providing the scientific community with three-dimensional protein structures of NIAID category A-C pathogens. Making such structural information available to the scientific community serves to accelerate structure-based drug design. Structure-based drug design plays an important role in drug development. Pursuing multiple targets in parallel greatly increases the chance of success for new lead discovery by targeting a pathway or an entire protein family. Emerald Bio has developed a high-throughput, multi-target parallel processing pipeline (MTPP) for gene-to-structure determination to support the consortium. Here we describe the protocols used to determine the structure of the PB2 subunit from four different influenza A strains.

  19. Overview on the current status on virtual high-throughput screening and combinatorial chemistry approaches in multi-target anticancer drug discovery; Part II.

    PubMed

    Geromichalos, George D; Alifieris, Constantinos E; Geromichalou, Elena G; Trafalis, Dimitrios T

    2016-01-01

    Conventional drug design embraces the "one gene, one drug, one disease" philosophy. Nowadays, new generation of anticancer drugs, able to inhibit more than one pathway, is believed to play a major role in contemporary anticancer drug research. In this way, polypharmacology, focusing on multi-target drugs, has emerged as a new paradigm in drug discovery. A number of recent successful drugs have in part or in whole emerged from a structure-based research approach. Many advances including crystallography and informatics are behind these successes. In this part II we will review the role and methodology of ligand-, structure- and fragment-based computer-aided drug design computer aided drug desing (CADD), virtual high throughput screening (vHTS), de novo drug design, fragment-based design and structure-based molecular docking, homology modeling, combinatorial chemistry and library design, pharmacophore model chemistry and informatics in modern drug discovery.

  20. A High Performance Computing Study of a Scalable FISST-Based Approach to Multi-Target, Multi-Sensor Tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussein, I.; Wilkins, M.; Roscoe, C.; Faber, W.; Chakravorty, S.; Schumacher, P.

    2016-09-01

    Finite Set Statistics (FISST) is a rigorous Bayesian multi-hypothesis management tool for the joint detection, classification and tracking of multi-sensor, multi-object systems. Implicit within the approach are solutions to the data association and target label-tracking problems. The full FISST filtering equations, however, are intractable. While FISST-based methods such as the PHD and CPHD filters are tractable, they require heavy moment approximations to the full FISST equations that result in a significant loss of information contained in the collected data. In this paper, we review Smart Sampling Markov Chain Monte Carlo (SSMCMC) that enables FISST to be tractable while avoiding moment approximations. We study the effect of tuning key SSMCMC parameters on tracking quality and computation time. The study is performed on a representative space object catalog with varying numbers of RSOs. The solution is implemented in the Scala computing language at the Maui High Performance Computing Center (MHPCC) facility.

  1. High-throughput screening for various classes of doping agents using a new 'dilute-and-shoot' liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry multi-target approach.

    PubMed

    Guddat, S; Solymos, E; Orlovius, A; Thomas, A; Sigmund, G; Geyer, H; Thevis, M; Schänzer, W

    2011-01-01

    A new multi-target approach based on liquid chromatography--electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (LC-(ESI)-MS/MS) is presented to screen for various classes of prohibited substances using direct injection of urine specimens. With a highly sensitive new generation hybrid mass spectrometer classic groups of drugs--for example, diuretics, beta2-agonists--stimulants and narcotics are detectable at concentration levels far below the required limits. Additionally, more challenging and various new target compounds could be implemented. Model compounds of stimulant conjugates were studied to investigate a possible screening without complex sample preparation. As a main achievement, the integration of the plasma volume expanders dextran and hydroxyethyl starch (HES), commonly analyzed in time-consuming, stand-alone procedures, is accomplished. To screen for relatively new prohibited compounds, a common metabolite of the selective androgen receptor modulator (SARMs) andarine, a metabolite of growth hormone releasing peptide (GHRP-2), and 5-amino-4-imidazolecarboxyamide ribonucleoside (AICAR) are analyzed. Following a completely new approach, conjugates of di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) metabolites are monitored to detect abnormally high levels of plasticizers indicating for illicit blood transfusion. The assay was fully validated for qualitative purposes considering the parameters specificity, intra- (3.2-16.6%) and inter-day precision (0.4-19.9%) at low, medium and high concentration, robustness, limit of detection (1-70 ng/ml, dextran: 30 µg/ml, HES: 10 µg/ml) and ion suppression/enhancement effects. The analyses of post-administration and routine doping control samples demonstrates the applicability of the method for sports drug testing. This straightforward and reliable approach accomplishes the combination of different screening procedures resulting in a high-throughput method that increases the efficiency of the labs daily work.

  2. Cis-Antisense Transcription Gives Rise to Tunable Genetic Switch Behavior: A Mathematical Modeling Approach.

    PubMed

    Bordoy, Antoni E; Chatterjee, Anushree

    2015-01-01

    Antisense transcription has been extensively recognized as a regulatory mechanism for gene expression across all kingdoms of life. Despite the broad importance and extensive experimental determination of cis-antisense transcription, relatively little is known about its role in controlling cellular switching responses. Growing evidence suggests the presence of non-coding cis-antisense RNAs that regulate gene expression via antisense interaction. Recent studies also indicate the role of transcriptional interference in regulating expression of neighboring genes due to traffic of RNA polymerases from adjacent promoter regions. Previous models investigate these mechanisms independently, however, little is understood about how cells utilize coupling of these mechanisms in advantageous ways that could also be used to design novel synthetic genetic devices. Here, we present a mathematical modeling framework for antisense transcription that combines the effects of both transcriptional interference and cis-antisense regulation. We demonstrate the tunability of transcriptional interference through various parameters, and that coupling of transcriptional interference with cis-antisense RNA interaction gives rise to hypersensitive switches in expression of both antisense genes. When implementing additional positive and negative feed-back loops from proteins encoded by these genes, the system response acquires a bistable behavior. Our model shows that combining these multiple-levels of regulation allows fine-tuning of system parameters to give rise to a highly tunable output, ranging from a simple-first order response to biologically complex higher-order response such as tunable bistable switch. We identify important parameters affecting the cellular switch response in order to provide the design principles for tunable gene expression using antisense transcription. This presents an important insight into functional role of antisense transcription and its importance towards

  3. AChE Inhibition-based Multi-target-directed Ligands, a Novel Pharmacological Approach for the Symptomatic and Disease-modifying Therapy of Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yu; Wang, Hao; Chen, Hong-zhuan

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia in elder people, characterised by a progressive decline in memory as a result of an impairment of cholinergic neurotransmission. To date acetylcholinesterase inhibitors (AChEIs) have become the most prescribed drugs for the symptomatic treatment of mild to moderate AD. However, the traditional “one molecule-one target” paradigm is not sufficient and appropriate to yield the desired therapeutic efficacy since multiple factors, such as amyloid-β (Aβ) deposits, neuroinflammation, oxidative stress, and decreased levels of acetylcholine (ACh) have been thought to play significant roles in the AD pathogenesis. New generation of multi-target drugs is earnestly demanded not only for ameliorating symptoms but also for modifying the disease. Herein, we delineated the catalytic and non-catalytic functions of AChE, and summarized the works of our group and others in research and development of novel AChEI-based multi-target-directed ligands (MTDLs), such as dual binding site AChEIs and multi-target AChEIs inhibiting Aβ aggregation, regulating Aβ procession, antagonizing platelet-activating factor (PAF) receptor, scavenging oxygen radical, chelating metal ions, inhibiting monoamine oxidase B (MAO-B), blocking N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptor and others. PMID:26786145

  4. Insights into immediate-early gene function in hippocampal memory consolidation using antisense oligonucleotide and fluorescent imaging approaches.

    PubMed

    Guzowski, John F

    2002-01-01

    In the 14 years since it was discovered that specific genes could be dynamically regulated in the brain by neural activity, there has been a substantial research focus attempting to understand the role immediate-early genes (IEGs) play in various brain functions. This article examines the involvement of IEGs in hippocampal synaptic plasticity and in memory consolidation processes performed by the hippocampus. Studies employing conventional IEG detection methodologies and a novel gene-imaging approach that provides temporal and cellular resolution (cellular compartment analysis of emporal activity by fluorescence in situ hybridization or catFISH) provide evidence supporting the assertion that IEG expression reflects the integration of information processed by hippocampal neurons. However, IEG expression is not merely correlated with neural activity, but also plays a pivotal role in stabilizing recent changes in synaptic efficacy. As such, localized disruption of IEGs Arc or c-fos by intrahippocampal administration of antisense oligonucleotides or germline disruption of the IEGs c-fos, tissue plasminogen activator, or zif268 impairs consolidation of long-term memory formation, without affecting learning or short-term memory. Further investigation into the expression and function of IEGs using catFISH and antisense approaches will likely increase understanding of the molecular and cellular bases of information processing involving the hippocampus.

  5. Cubature Information SMC-PHD for Multi-Target Tracking.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhe; Wang, Zulin; Xu, Mai

    2016-05-09

    In multi-target tracking, the key problem lies in estimating the number and states of individual targets, in which the challenge is the time-varying multi-target numbers and states. Recently, several multi-target tracking approaches, based on the sequential Monte Carlo probability hypothesis density (SMC-PHD) filter, have been presented to solve such a problem. However, most of these approaches select the transition density as the importance sampling (IS) function, which is inefficient in a nonlinear scenario. To enhance the performance of the conventional SMC-PHD filter, we propose in this paper two approaches using the cubature information filter (CIF) for multi-target tracking. More specifically, we first apply the posterior intensity as the IS function. Then, we propose to utilize the CIF algorithm with a gating method to calculate the IS function, namely CISMC-PHD approach. Meanwhile, a fast implementation of the CISMC-PHD approach is proposed, which clusters the particles into several groups according to the Gaussian mixture components. With the constructed components, the IS function is approximated instead of particles. As a result, the computational complexity of the CISMC-PHD approach can be significantly reduced. The simulation results demonstrate the effectiveness of our approaches.

  6. Multi-Target Directed Drugs: A Modern Approach for Design of New Drugs for the treatment of Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Dias, Kris Simone Tranches; Viegas, Jr, Claudio

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is a complex neurodegenerative disorder with a multi-faceted pathogenesis. So far, the therapeutic paradigm “one-compound-one-target” has failed and despite enormous efforts to elucidate the pathophysiology of AD, the disease is still incurable. The multiple factors involved in AD include amyloid aggregation to form insoluble neurotoxic plaques of Aβ, hyperphosphorylation of tau protein, oxidative stress, calcium imbalance, mitochondrial dysfunction and deterioration of synaptic transmission. These factors together, accentuate changes in the CNS homeostasis, starting a complex process of interconnected physiological damage, leading to cognitive and memory impairment and neuronal death. A recent approach for the rational design of new drug candidates, also called multitarget-directed ligand (MTDL) approach, has gained increasing attention by many research groups, which have developed a variety of hybrid compounds acting simultaneously on diverse biological targets. This review aims to show some recent advances and examples of the exploitation of MTDL approach in the rational design of novel drug candidate prototypes for the treatment of AD. PMID:24851088

  7. An in vivo and in silico approach to study cis-antisense: a short cut to higher order response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Courtney, Colleen; Varanasi, Usha; Chatterjee, Anushree

    2014-03-01

    Antisense interactions are present in all domains of life. Typically sense, antisense RNA pairs originate from overlapping genes with convergent face to face promoters, and are speculated to be involved in gene regulation. Recent studies indicate the role of transcriptional interference (TI) in regulating expression of genes in convergent orientation. Modeling antisense, TI gene regulation mechanisms allows us to understand how organisms control gene expression. We present a modeling and experimental framework to understand convergent transcription that combines the effects of transcriptional interference and cis-antisense regulation. Our model shows that combining transcriptional interference and antisense RNA interaction adds multiple-levels of regulation which affords a highly tunable biological output, ranging from first order response to complex higher-order response. To study this system we created a library of experimental constructs with engineered TI and antisense interaction by using face-to-face inducible promoters separated by carefully tailored overlapping DNA sequences to control expression of a set of fluorescent reporter proteins. Studying this gene expression mechanism allows for an understanding of higher order behavior of gene expression networks.

  8. Sequential measurement-driven multi-target Bayesian filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zong-xiang; Li, Li-juan; Xie, Wei-xin; Li, Liang-qun

    2015-12-01

    Bayesian filter is an efficient approach for multi-target tracking in the presence of clutter. Recently, considerable attention has been focused on probability hypothesis density (PHD) filter, which is an intensity approximation of the multi-target Bayesian filter. However, PHD filter is inapplicable to cases in which target detection probability is low. The use of this filter may result in a delay in data processing because it handles received measurements periodically, once every sampling period. To track multiple targets in the case of low detection probability and to handle received measurements in real time, we propose a sequential measurement-driven Bayesian filter. The proposed filter jointly propagates the marginal distributions and existence probabilities of each target in the filter recursion. We also present an implementation of the proposed filter for linear Gaussian models. Simulation results demonstrate that the proposed filter can more accurately track multiple targets than the Gaussian mixture PHD filter or cardinalized PHD filter.

  9. Targeting Cancer with Antisense Oligomers

    SciTech Connect

    Hnatowich, DJ

    2008-10-28

    With financial assistance from the Department of Energy, we have shown definitively that radiolabeled antisense DNAs and other oligomers will accumulate in target cancer cells in vitro and in vivo by an antisense mechanism. We have also shown that the number of mRNA targets for our antisense oligomers in the cancer cell types that we have investigated so far is sufficient to provide and antisense image and/or radiotherapy of cancer in mice. These studies have been reported in about 10 publications. However our observation over the past several years has shown that radiolabeled antisense oligomers administered intravenously in their native and naked form will accumulate and be retained in target xenografts by an antisense mechanism but will also accumulate at high levels in normal organs such as liver, spleen and kidneys. We have investigated unsuccessfully several commercially available vectors. Thus the use of radiolabeled antisense oligomers for the imaging of cancer must await novel approaches to delivery. This laboratory has therefore pursued two new paths, optical imaging of tumor and Auger radiotherapy. We are developing a novel method of optical imaging tumor using antisense oligomers with a fluorophore is administered while hybridized with a shorter complementary oligomer with an inhibitor. In culture and in tumored mice that the duplex remains intact and thus nonfluorescent until it encounters its target mRNA at which time it dissociates and the antisense oligomer binds along with its fluorophore to the target. Simultaneous with the above, we have also observed, as have others, that antisense oligomers migrate rapidly and quantitatively to the nucleus upon crossing cell membranes. The Auger electron radiotherapy path results from this observation since the nuclear migration properties could be used effectively to bring and to retain in the nucleus an Auger emitting radionuclide such as 111In or 125I bound to the antisense oligomer. Since the object becomes

  10. The Antisense RNA Approach: a New Application for In Vivo Investigation of the Stress Response of Oenococcus oeni, a Wine-Associated Lactic Acid Bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Darsonval, Maud; Msadek, Tarek; Alexandre, Hervé

    2015-01-01

    Oenococcus oeni is a wine-associated lactic acid bacterium mostly responsible for malolactic fermentation in wine. In wine, O. oeni grows in an environment hostile to bacterial growth (low pH, low temperature, and ethanol) that induces stress response mechanisms. To survive, O. oeni is known to set up transitional stress response mechanisms through the synthesis of heat stress proteins (HSPs) encoded by the hsp genes, notably a unique small HSP named Lo18. Despite the availability of the genome sequence, characterization of O. oeni genes is limited, and little is known about the in vivo role of Lo18. Due to the lack of genetic tools for O. oeni, an efficient expression vector in O. oeni is still lacking, and deletion or inactivation of the hsp18 gene is not presently practicable. As an alternative approach, with the goal of understanding the biological function of the O. oeni hsp18 gene in vivo, we have developed an expression vector to produce antisense RNA targeting of hsp18 mRNA. Recombinant strains were exposed to multiple stresses inducing hsp18 gene expression: heat shock and acid shock. We showed that antisense attenuation of hsp18 affects O. oeni survival under stress conditions. These results confirm the involvement of Lo18 in heat and acid tolerance of O. oeni. Results of anisotropy experiments also confirm a membrane-protective role for Lo18, as previous observations had already suggested. This study describes a new, efficient tool to demonstrate the use of antisense technology for modulating gene expression in O. oeni. PMID:26452552

  11. Mid-course multi-target tracking using continuous representation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zak, Michail; Toomarian, Nikzad

    1991-01-01

    The thrust of this paper is to present a new approach to multi-target tracking for the mid-course stage of the Strategic Defense Initiative (SDI). This approach is based upon a continuum representation of a cluster of flying objects. We assume that the velocities of the flying objects can be embedded into a smooth velocity field. This assumption is based upon the impossibility of encounters in a high density cluster between the flying objects. Therefore, the problem is reduced to an identification of a moving continuum based upon consecutive time frame observations. In contradistinction to the previous approaches, here each target is considered as a center of a small continuous neighborhood subjected to a local-affine transformation, and therefore, the target trajectories do not mix. Obviously, their mixture in plane of sensor view is apparent. The approach is illustrated by an example.

  12. Temporal clustering in the multi-target tracking environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelso, Thomas S.

    1988-08-01

    In multi-target tracking problems such as those found in high-energy particle physics, fluid mechanics, and ballistic missile defense, the common objective is to separate the data into observations associated with individual targets and to use this data to estimate the targets' trajectories. In defense related applications, it is necessary to have algorithms which are computationally efficient, robust, and minimize data storage requirements. Recently developed approaches in the field of multi-target tracking, however, have been shown to have significant computational disadvantages. In this study, non-hierarchical clustering methods are combined with computationally efficient algorithms such as those used to solve assignment and quadratic programming problems to provide an integrated procedure which is computationally efficient, minimizes data storage requirements, and gives a reasonable estimate of the number of targets. Combined with a sequential estimation filter such as the extended Kalman filter, the procedure can provide estimates of a target's state and state covariance after three observations and continuously maintain updated target state estimates in real time. Empirical results based on 100 targets in ballistic trajectories have demonstrated this method's effectiveness by properly clustering data with four measurement attributes (range, range rate, azimuth, and elevation) in over 98 percent of the cases.

  13. Upping the Antisense Ante.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weiss, Rick

    1991-01-01

    Discussed is a designer-drug technology called antisense which blocks messenger RNA's ability to carry information to protein producing sites in the cell. The applications of this drug to AIDS research, cancer therapy, and other diseases are discussed. (KR)

  14. Antisense oligonucleotides as therapeutics for malignant diseases.

    PubMed

    Ho, P T; Parkinson, D R

    1997-04-01

    The continued progress in our understanding of the biology of neoplasia and in the identification, cloning, and sequencing of genes critical to tumor cell function permits the exploitation of this information to develop specific agents that may directly modulate the function of these genes or their protein products. Antisense oligonucleotides are being investigated as a potential therapeutic modality that takes direct advantage of molecular sequencing. The antisense approach uses short oligonucleotides designed to hybridize to a target mRNA transcript through Watson-Crick base pairing. The formation of this oligonucleotide: RNA heteroduplex results in mRNA inactivation and consequent inhibition of synthesis of the protein product. A fundamental attraction of the antisense approach is that this method potentially may be applied to any gene product, in theory, for the treatment of malignant and non-malignant diseases. However, this simple and attractive model has proven to be much more complex in practice. A number of important challenges in the preclinical development of antisense oligonucleotides have been identified, including stability, sequence length, cellular uptake, target sequence selection, appropriate negative controls, oligonucleotide: protein interactions, and cost of manufacture. Although the biological activity of an oligonucleotide against its molecular target is theoretically sequence-dependent, the animal pharmacokinetics and toxicology of phosphorothioate analogues directed against vastly disparate gene products appear relatively non-sequence-specific. In oncology, a number of clinical trials have been initiated with antisense oligonucleotides directed against molecular targets including: p53; bcl-2; raf kinase; protein kinase C-alpha; c-myb. The experience gained from these early clinical trials will be applicable to the next generation of antisense agents in development. These may include molecules with novel backbones or other structural

  15. Cellular Delivery and Photochemical Activation of Antisense Agents through a Nucleobase Caging Strategy

    PubMed Central

    Govan, Jeane M.; Uprety, Rajendra; Thomas, Meryl; Lusic, Hrvoje; Lively, Mark O.; Deiters, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    Antisense oligonucleotides are powerful tools to regulate gene expression in cells and model organisms. However, a transfection or microinjection is needed for efficient delivery of the antisense agent. We report the conjugation of multiple HIV TAT peptides to a hairpin-protected antisense agent through a light-cleavable nucleobase caging group. This conjugation allows for the facile delivery of the antisense agent without a transfection reagent and photochemical activation offers precise control over gene expression. The developed approach is highly modular, as demonstrated by the conjugation of folic acid to the caged antisense agent. This enabled targeted cell delivery through cell-surface folate receptors followed by photochemical triggering of antisense activity. Importantly, the presented strategy delivers native oligonucleotides after light-activation, devoid of any delivery functionalities or modifications that could otherwise impair their antisense activity. PMID:23915424

  16. Multi-target therapeutics for neuropsychiatric and neurodegenerative disorders.

    PubMed

    Bawa, Priya; Pradeep, Priyamvada; Kumar, Pradeep; Choonara, Yahya E; Modi, Girish; Pillay, Viness

    2016-12-01

    Historically, neuropsychiatric and neurodegenerative disease treatments focused on the 'magic bullet' concept; however multi-targeted strategies are increasingly attractive gauging from the escalating research in this area. Because these diseases are typically co-morbid, multi-targeted drugs capable of interacting with multiple targets will expand treatment to the co-morbid disease condition. Despite their theoretical efficacy, there are significant impediments to clinical success (e.g., difficulty titrating individual aspects of the drug and inconclusive pathophysiological mechanisms). The new and revised diagnostic frameworks along with studies detailing the endophenotypic characteristics of the diseases promise to provide the foundation for the circumvention of these impediments. This review serves to evaluate the various marketed and nonmarketed multi-targeted drugs with particular emphasis on their design strategy.

  17. Tacrine-resveratrol fused hybrids as multi-target-directed ligands against Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Jeřábek, Jakub; Uliassi, Elisa; Guidotti, Laura; Korábečný, Jan; Soukup, Ondřej; Sepsova, Vendula; Hrabinova, Martina; Kuča, Kamil; Bartolini, Manuela; Peña-Altamira, Luis Emiliano; Petralla, Sabrina; Monti, Barbara; Roberti, Marinella; Bolognesi, Maria Laura

    2017-02-15

    Multi-target drug discovery is one of the most followed approaches in the active central nervous system (CNS) therapeutic area, especially in the search for new drugs against Alzheimer's disease (AD). This is because innovative multi-target-directed ligands (MTDLs) could more adequately address the complexity of this pathological condition. In a continuation of our efforts aimed at a new series of anti-AD MTDLs, we combined the structural features of the cholinesterase inhibitor drug tacrine with that of resveratrol, which is known for its purported antioxidant and anti-neuroinflammatory activities. The most interesting hybrid compounds (5, 8, 9 and 12) inhibited human acetylcholinesterase at micromolar concentrations and effectively modulated Aβ self-aggregation in vitro. In addition, 12 showed intriguing anti-inflammatory and immuno-modulatory properties in neuronal and glial AD cell models. Importantly, the MTDL profile is accompanied by high-predicted blood-brain barrier permeability, and low cytotoxicity on primary neurons.

  18. Multi-Target Tracking by Discrete-Continuous Energy Minimization.

    PubMed

    Milan, Anton; Schindler, Konrad; Roth, Stefan

    2016-10-01

    The task of tracking multiple targets is often addressed with the so-called tracking-by-detection paradigm, where the first step is to obtain a set of target hypotheses for each frame independently. Tracking can then be regarded as solving two separate, but tightly coupled problems. The first is to carry out data association, i.e., to determine the origin of each of the available observations. The second problem is to reconstruct the actual trajectories that describe the spatio-temporal motion pattern of each individual target. The former is inherently a discrete problem, while the latter should intuitively be modeled in continuous space. Having to deal with an unknown number of targets, complex dependencies, and physical constraints, both are challenging tasks on their own and thus most previous work focuses on one of these subproblems. Here, we present a multi-target tracking approach that explicitly models both tasks as minimization of a unified discrete-continuous energy function. Trajectory properties are captured through global label costs, a recent concept from multi-model fitting, which we introduce to tracking. Specifically, label costs describe physical properties of individual tracks, e.g., linear and angular dynamics, or entry and exit points. We further introduce pairwise label costs to describe mutual interactions between targets in order to avoid collisions. By choosing appropriate forms for the individual energy components, powerful discrete optimization techniques can be leveraged to address data association, while the shapes of individual trajectories are updated by gradient-based continuous energy minimization. The proposed method achieves state-of-the-art results on diverse benchmark sequences.

  19. Antisense targeting of 3' end elements involved in DUX4 mRNA processing is an efficient therapeutic strategy for facioscapulohumeral dystrophy: a new gene-silencing approach.

    PubMed

    Marsollier, Anne-Charlotte; Ciszewski, Lukasz; Mariot, Virginie; Popplewell, Linda; Voit, Thomas; Dickson, George; Dumonceaux, Julie

    2016-04-15

    Defects in mRNA 3'end formation have been described to alter transcription termination, transport of the mRNA from the nucleus to the cytoplasm, stability of the mRNA and translation efficiency. Therefore, inhibition of polyadenylation may lead to gene silencing. Here, we choose facioscapulohumeral dystrophy (FSHD) as a model to determine whether or not targeting key 3' end elements involved in mRNA processing using antisense oligonucleotide drugs can be used as a strategy for gene silencing within a potentially therapeutic context. FSHD is a gain-of-function disease characterized by the aberrant expression of the Double homeobox 4 (DUX4) transcription factor leading to altered pathogenic deregulation of multiple genes in muscles. Here, we demonstrate that targeting either the mRNA polyadenylation signal and/or cleavage site is an efficient strategy to down-regulate DUX4 expression and to decrease the abnormally high-pathological expression of genes downstream of DUX4. We conclude that targeting key functional 3' end elements involved in pre-mRNA to mRNA maturation with antisense drugs can lead to efficient gene silencing and is thus a potentially effective therapeutic strategy for at least FSHD. Moreover, polyadenylation is a crucial step in the maturation of almost all eukaryotic mRNAs, and thus all mRNAs are virtually eligible for this antisense-mediated knockdown strategy.

  20. The Human Kinome Targeted by FDA Approved Multi-Target Drugs and Combination Products: A Comparative Study from the Drug-Target Interaction Network Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Chun Yan; Yang, Hong; Zhou, Jin; Xue, Wei Wei; Tan, Jun; Zhu, Feng

    2016-01-01

    The human kinome is one of the most productive classes of drug target, and there is emerging necessity for treating complex diseases by means of polypharmacology (multi-target drugs and combination products). However, the advantages of the multi-target drugs and the combination products are still under debate. A comparative analysis between FDA approved multi-target drugs and combination products, targeting the human kinome, was conducted by mapping targets onto the phylogenetic tree of the human kinome. The approach of network medicine illustrating the drug-target interactions was applied to identify popular targets of multi-target drugs and combination products. As identified, the multi-target drugs tended to inhibit target pairs in the human kinome, especially the receptor tyrosine kinase family, while the combination products were able to against targets of distant homology relationship. This finding asked for choosing the combination products as a better solution for designing drugs aiming at targets of distant homology relationship. Moreover, sub-networks of drug-target interactions in specific disease were generated, and mechanisms shared by multi-target drugs and combination products were identified. In conclusion, this study performed an analysis between approved multi-target drugs and combination products against the human kinome, which could assist the discovery of next generation polypharmacology. PMID:27828998

  1. Antisense oligonucleotides in therapy for neurodegenerative disorders.

    PubMed

    Evers, Melvin M; Toonen, Lodewijk J A; van Roon-Mom, Willeke M C

    2015-06-29

    Antisense oligonucleotides are synthetic single stranded strings of nucleic acids that bind to RNA and thereby alter or reduce expression of the target RNA. They can not only reduce expression of mutant proteins by breakdown of the targeted transcript, but also restore protein expression or modify proteins through interference with pre-mRNA splicing. There has been a recent revival of interest in the use of antisense oligonucleotides to treat several neurodegenerative disorders using different approaches to prevent disease onset or halt disease progression and the first clinical trials for spinal muscular atrophy and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis showing promising results. For these trials, intrathecal delivery is being used but direct infusion into the brain ventricles and several methods of passing the blood brain barrier after peripheral administration are also under investigation.

  2. A Finite Point Process Approach to Multi-Target Localization

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-01

    fully parameterized by the intensity function: λ(t) = N∑ i=1 pD(t) δ(t− Ti), (3) where δ(·) is the Dirac delta function, and pD(·) represents the...central node over a communication network. At the central node , the individual sensor solutions are fused along with the GPS positions to yield a highly...over 25 m front to back. In figure 8, the shooter position is marked by a red human figure, and the shot line is marked by a translucent red line . The

  3. Overlapping Antisense Transcription in the Human Genome

    PubMed Central

    Fahey, M. E.; Moore, T. F.

    2002-01-01

    Accumulating evidence indicates an important role for non-coding RNA molecules in eukaryotic cell regulation. A small number of coding and non-coding overlapping antisense transcripts (OATs) in eukaryotes have been reported, some of which regulate expression of the corresponding sense transcript. The prevalence of this phenomenon is unknown, but there may be an enrichment of such transcripts at imprinted gene loci. Taking a bioinformatics approach, we systematically searched a human mRNA database (RefSeq) for complementary regions that might facilitate pairing with other transcripts. We report 56 pairs of overlapping transcripts, in which each member of the pair is transcribed from the same locus. This allows us to make an estimate of 1000 for the minimum number of such transcript pairs in the entire human genome. This is a surprisingly large number of overlapping gene pairs and, clearly, some of the overlaps may not be functionally significant. Nonetheless, this may indicate an important general role for overlapping antisense control in gene regulation. EST databases were also investigated in order to address the prevalence of cases of imprinted genes with associated non-coding overlapping, antisense transcripts. However, EST databases were found to be completely inappropriate for this purpose. PMID:18628857

  4. The Role of Structural Elements of the 5'-Terminal Region of p53 mRNA in Translation under Stress Conditions Assayed by the Antisense Oligonucleotide Approach.

    PubMed

    Swiatkowska, Agata; Zydowicz, Paulina; Gorska, Agnieszka; Suchacka, Julia; Dutkiewicz, Mariola; Ciesiołka, Jerzy

    2015-01-01

    The p53 protein is one of the major factors responsible for cell cycle regulation and stress response. In the 5'-terminal region of p53 mRNA, an IRES element has been found which takes part in the translational regulation of p53 expression. Two characteristic hairpin motifs are present in this mRNA region: G56-C169, with the first AUG codon, and U180-A218, which interacts with the Hdm2 protein (human homolog of mouse double minute 2 protein). 2'-OMe modified antisense oligomers hybridizing to the 5'-terminal region of p53 mRNA were applied to assess the role of these structural elements in translation initiation under conditions of cellular stress. Structural changes in the RNA target occurring upon oligomers' binding were monitored by the Pb2+-induced cleavage method. The impact of antisense oligomers on the synthesis of two proteins, the full-length p53 and its isoform Δ40p53, was analysed in HT-29, MCF-7 and HepG2 cells, under normal conditions and under stress, as well as in vitro conditions. The results revealed that the hairpin U180-A218 and adjacent single-stranded region A219-A228 were predominantly responsible for high efficacy of IRES-mediated translation in the presence of stress factors. These motifs play a role of cis-acting elements which are able to modulate IRES activity, likely via interactions with protein factors.

  5. Designing Multi-Targeted Therapeutics for the Treatment of Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Orhan, Ilkay Erdogan; Senol, F Sezer

    2016-01-01

    Due to multi-faceted pathology of AD; no drug can seize the progress of the disease, whereas only the symptomatic treatment is available at the moment. Several drug classes to treat AD are available in clinical use, AChEIs being the most prescribed. In addition to AChEIs, secretase enzymes and iron chelators have turned out to be the focus of research and the popular targets in drug discovery against AD. The latest approaches such as immunotherapy, multi-targeted drug ligand design, AChE inhibitors, antioxidants, metal chelators, monoamine oxidase (MAO) inhibitors, antiinflammatory drugs, and N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) inhibitors are currently in use to cure this disease to some extent. But, there is a certain need to develop new drugs to fight with AD, particularly acting on multi-targets or with dual mechanisms of action. In this review, a particular emphasis will be focused on multitargets aiming at AD to design new drug molecules with respect to treatment strategies and preventive measures. Since the underlying pathogenesis of AD is complicated and still under investigation, the attempts to design highly selective and potent agents to treat AD are quite intensively continuing. In this respect, designing novel drugs with dual/multi-acting mechanisms seems to be more rational.

  6. Antisense Oligonucleotides Used to Target the DUX4 mRNA as Therapeutic Approaches in FaciosScapuloHumeral Muscular Dystrophy (FSHD)

    PubMed Central

    Ansseau, Eugénie; Vanderplanck, Céline; Wauters, Armelle; Harper, Scott Q.; Coppée, Frédérique; Belayew, Alexandra

    2017-01-01

    FacioScapuloHumeral muscular Dystrophy (FSHD) is one of the most prevalent hereditary myopathies and is generally characterized by progressive muscle atrophy affecting the face, scapular fixators; upper arms and distal lower legs. The FSHD locus maps to a macrosatellite D4Z4 repeat array on chromosome 4q35. Each D4Z4 unit contains a DUX4 gene; the most distal of which is flanked by a polyadenylation site on FSHD-permissive alleles, which allows for production of stable DUX4 mRNAs. In addition, an open chromatin structure is required for DUX4 gene transcription. FSHD thus results from a gain of function of the toxic DUX4 protein that normally is only expressed in germ line and stem cells. Therapeutic strategies are emerging that aim to decrease DUX4 expression or toxicity in FSHD muscle cells. We review here the heterogeneity of DUX4 mRNAs observed in muscle and stem cells; and the use of antisense oligonucleotides (AOs) targeting the DUX4 mRNA to interfere either with transcript cleavage/polyadenylation or intron splicing. We show in primary cultures that DUX4-targeted AOs suppress the atrophic FSHD myotube phenotype; but do not improve the disorganized FSHD myotube phenotype which could be caused by DUX4c over-expression. Thus; DUX4c might constitute another therapeutic target in FSHD. PMID:28273791

  7. Antisense Oligonucleotides Used to Target the DUX4 mRNA as Therapeutic Approaches in FaciosScapuloHumeral Muscular Dystrophy (FSHD).

    PubMed

    Ansseau, Eugénie; Vanderplanck, Céline; Wauters, Armelle; Harper, Scott Q; Coppée, Frédérique; Belayew, Alexandra

    2017-03-03

    FacioScapuloHumeral muscular Dystrophy (FSHD) is one of the most prevalent hereditary myopathies and is generally characterized by progressive muscle atrophy affecting the face, scapular fixators; upper arms and distal lower legs. The FSHD locus maps to a macrosatellite D4Z4 repeat array on chromosome 4q35. Each D4Z4 unit contains a DUX4 gene; the most distal of which is flanked by a polyadenylation site on FSHD-permissive alleles, which allows for production of stable DUX4 mRNAs. In addition, an open chromatin structure is required for DUX4 gene transcription. FSHD thus results from a gain of function of the toxic DUX4 protein that normally is only expressed in germ line and stem cells. Therapeutic strategies are emerging that aim to decrease DUX4 expression or toxicity in FSHD muscle cells. We review here the heterogeneity of DUX4 mRNAs observed in muscle and stem cells; and the use of antisense oligonucleotides (AOs) targeting the DUX4 mRNA to interfere either with transcript cleavage/polyadenylation or intron splicing. We show in primary cultures that DUX4-targeted AOs suppress the atrophic FSHD myotube phenotype; but do not improve the disorganized FSHD myotube phenotype which could be caused by DUX4c over-expression. Thus; DUX4c might constitute another therapeutic target in FSHD.

  8. Antibacterial Drug Leads: DNA and Enzyme Multi-Targeting

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Wei; Wang, Yang; Li, Kai; Gao, Jian; Huang, Chun-Hsiang; Chen, Chun-Chi; Ko, Tzu-Ping; Zhang, Yonghui; Guo, Rey-Ting; Oldfield, Eric

    2015-01-01

    We report the results of an investigation of the activity of a series of amidine and bisamidine compounds against Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli. The most active compounds bound to an AT-rich DNA dodecamer (CGCGAATTCGCG)2, and using DSC were found to increase the melting transition by up to 24 °C. Several compounds also inhibited undecaprenyl diphosphate synthase (UPPS) with IC50 values of 100–500 nM and we found good correlations (R2 = 0.89, S. aureus; R2 = 0.79, E. coli)) between experimental and predicted cell growth inhibition by using DNA ΔTm and UPPS IC50 experimental results together with 1 computed descriptor. We also solved the structures of three bisamidines binding to DNA as well as three UPPS structures. Overall, the results are of general interest in the context of the development of resistance-resistant antibiotics that involve multi-targeting. PMID:25574764

  9. Deterministic optimal maneuver strategy for multi-target missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dwivedi, N. P.

    1975-01-01

    This paper presents an optimal strategy for making impulsive correction to a multi-target trajectory by a single maneuver. The concept of an optimal maneuver time is introduced. The choice of suitable weighting functions is explored to enable one to properly translate the subjective desire of mission success into an objective cost function whose minimization yields the optimal strategy. It is shown that a number of strategies previously formulated are derivable from one general expression. A number of other interesting properties of the optimal strategy are described. Numerical results are presented for a typical two-target mission. It is shown that the strategy formulated is optimal. For some perturbations, there exists an optimal maneuver time different from the time of initiation of the perturbation. That is, the physical properties of the trajectory can be exploited to select the optimal time of making a corrective maneuver.

  10. Multi-Robot, Multi-Target Particle Swarm Optimization Search in Noisy Wireless Environments

    SciTech Connect

    Kurt Derr; Milos Manic

    2009-05-01

    Multiple small robots (swarms) can work together using Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO) to perform tasks that are difficult or impossible for a single robot to accomplish. The problem considered in this paper is exploration of an unknown environment with the goal of finding a target(s) at an unknown location(s) using multiple small mobile robots. This work demonstrates the use of a distributed PSO algorithm with a novel adaptive RSS weighting factor to guide robots for locating target(s) in high risk environments. The approach was developed and analyzed on multiple robot single and multiple target search. The approach was further enhanced by the multi-robot-multi-target search in noisy environments. The experimental results demonstrated how the availability of radio frequency signal can significantly affect robot search time to reach a target.

  11. Real-Time Multi-Target Localization from Unmanned Aerial Vehicles

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xuan; Liu, Jinghong; Zhou, Qianfei

    2016-01-01

    In order to improve the reconnaissance efficiency of unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) electro-optical stabilized imaging systems, a real-time multi-target localization scheme based on an UAV electro-optical stabilized imaging system is proposed. First, a target location model is studied. Then, the geodetic coordinates of multi-targets are calculated using the homogeneous coordinate transformation. On the basis of this, two methods which can improve the accuracy of the multi-target localization are proposed: (1) the real-time zoom lens distortion correction method; (2) a recursive least squares (RLS) filtering method based on UAV dead reckoning. The multi-target localization error model is established using Monte Carlo theory. In an actual flight, the UAV flight altitude is 1140 m. The multi-target localization results are within the range of allowable error. After we use a lens distortion correction method in a single image, the circular error probability (CEP) of the multi-target localization is reduced by 7%, and 50 targets can be located at the same time. The RLS algorithm can adaptively estimate the location data based on multiple images. Compared with multi-target localization based on a single image, CEP of the multi-target localization using RLS is reduced by 25%. The proposed method can be implemented on a small circuit board to operate in real time. This research is expected to significantly benefit small UAVs which need multi-target geo-location functions. PMID:28029145

  12. Real-Time Multi-Target Localization from Unmanned Aerial Vehicles.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xuan; Liu, Jinghong; Zhou, Qianfei

    2016-12-25

    In order to improve the reconnaissance efficiency of unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) electro-optical stabilized imaging systems, a real-time multi-target localization scheme based on an UAV electro-optical stabilized imaging system is proposed. First, a target location model is studied. Then, the geodetic coordinates of multi-targets are calculated using the homogeneous coordinate transformation. On the basis of this, two methods which can improve the accuracy of the multi-target localization are proposed: (1) the real-time zoom lens distortion correction method; (2) a recursive least squares (RLS) filtering method based on UAV dead reckoning. The multi-target localization error model is established using Monte Carlo theory. In an actual flight, the UAV flight altitude is 1140 m. The multi-target localization results are within the range of allowable error. After we use a lens distortion correction method in a single image, the circular error probability (CEP) of the multi-target localization is reduced by 7%, and 50 targets can be located at the same time. The RLS algorithm can adaptively estimate the location data based on multiple images. Compared with multi-target localization based on a single image, CEP of the multi-target localization using RLS is reduced by 25%. The proposed method can be implemented on a small circuit board to operate in real time. This research is expected to significantly benefit small UAVs which need multi-target geo-location functions.

  13. Antisense Treatments for Biothreat Agents

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-08-01

    oligomers (ASOs) represent a promising technology to treat viral and bacterial infections, and have already been shown to be successful against a...viral and bacterial agents have a history of state- sponsored ’weaponization’, including Marburg, Ebola, Junin, Machupo, yellow fever viruses and...14. ABSTRACT Antisense oligomers (ASOs) represent a promising technology to treat viral and bacterial infections, and have already been shown to be

  14. Multi-target pursuit formation of multi-agent systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Jing; Guan, Xin-Ping; Luo, Xiao-Yuan

    2011-01-01

    The main goal of this paper is to design a team of agents that can accomplish multi-target pursuit formation using a developed leader—follower strategy. It is supposed that every target can accept a certain number of agents. First, each agent can automatically choose its target based on the distance from the agent to the target and the number of agents accepted by the target. In view of the fact that all agents are randomly dispersed in the workplace at the initial time, we present a numbering strategy for them. During the movement of agents, not every agent can always obtain pertinent state information about the targets. So, a developed leader—follower strategy and a pursuit formation algorithm are proposed. Under the proposed method, agents with the same target can maintain a circle formation. Furthermore, it turns out that the pursuit formation algorithm for agents to the desired formation is convergent. Simulation studies are provided to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  15. Pharmaceutical prerequisites for a multi-target therapy.

    PubMed

    Kroll, U; Cordes, C

    2006-01-01

    The quality of a phytomedicine is defined by the quality of the herbal drug, the manufacturing of the drug preparations and the properties of the finished product, taking into account the special requirements of the individual herbal species in accordance with Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP) standards [2003. Medicinal Products for Human and Veterinary Use. Eudralex, vol. 4 (2003/94/EC)]. The quality control of the complete process is based on pharmacognostic methods, characteristic fingerprint chromatograms, defined amounts of marker substances, physicochemical characteristics and microbiological monitoring. For a herbal multi-component preparation used in multi-target therapy, these pharmaceutical prerequisites have to be ensured for all components and for their combination, as is exemplified by Iberogast((R)) (STW 5) a fixed combination of hydroethanolic extracts of bitter candytuft (Iberis amara), angelica root (Angelicae radix), milk thistle fruit (Silybi mariani fructus), celandine herb (Chelidonii herba), caraway fruit (Carvi fructus), liquorice root (Liquiritiae radix), peppermint herb (Menthae piperitae folium), balm leaf (Melissae folium) and chamomile flower (Matricariae flos) using in the therapy of gastrointestinal complaints (Rösch et al., 2006). The prerequisites for the quality of each of its components according to actual standards are at first the cultivation of the plant material according to the Guidelines for Good Agricultural Practice (GAP) conditions of Medicinal and Aromatic Plants [1998. Z. Arzn. Gew. Pfl. 3, 166-178] to yield a defined raw material of high quality. Characteristic compounds of the extracts had to be identified and different analytical methods such as HPLC, with low coefficients of variation had to be developed to analyze each of the standardized ethanolic extracts and the finished product. At the example of the extract of I. amara these necessary investigations are described. The variability of the plant material in its

  16. Spt4 selectively regulates the expression of C9orf72 sense and antisense mutant transcripts.

    PubMed

    Kramer, Nicholas J; Carlomagno, Yari; Zhang, Yong-Jie; Almeida, Sandra; Cook, Casey N; Gendron, Tania F; Prudencio, Mercedes; Van Blitterswijk, Marka; Belzil, Veronique; Couthouis, Julien; Paul, Joseph West; Goodman, Lindsey D; Daughrity, Lillian; Chew, Jeannie; Garrett, Aliesha; Pregent, Luc; Jansen-West, Karen; Tabassian, Lilia J; Rademakers, Rosa; Boylan, Kevin; Graff-Radford, Neill R; Josephs, Keith A; Parisi, Joseph E; Knopman, David S; Petersen, Ronald C; Boeve, Bradley F; Deng, Ning; Feng, Yanan; Cheng, Tzu-Hao; Dickson, Dennis W; Cohen, Stanley N; Bonini, Nancy M; Link, Christopher D; Gao, Fen-Biao; Petrucelli, Leonard; Gitler, Aaron D

    2016-08-12

    An expanded hexanucleotide repeat in C9orf72 causes amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and frontotemporal dementia (c9FTD/ALS). Therapeutics are being developed to target RNAs containing the expanded repeat sequence (GGGGCC); however, this approach is complicated by the presence of antisense strand transcription of expanded GGCCCC repeats. We found that targeting the transcription elongation factor Spt4 selectively decreased production of both sense and antisense expanded transcripts, as well as their translated dipeptide repeat (DPR) products, and also mitigated degeneration in animal models. Knockdown of SUPT4H1, the human Spt4 ortholog, similarly decreased production of sense and antisense RNA foci, as well as DPR proteins, in patient cells. Therapeutic targeting of a single factor to eliminate c9FTD/ALS pathological features offers advantages over approaches that require targeting sense and antisense repeats separately.

  17. Multi-target siRNA: Therapeutic Strategy for Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Li, Tiejun; Xue, Yuwen; Wang, Guilan; Gu, Tingting; Li, Yunlong; Zhu, York Yuanyuan; Chen, Li

    2016-01-01

    Multiple targets RNAi strategy is a preferred way to treat multigenic diseases, especially cancers. In the study, multi-target siRNAs were designed to inhibit NET-1, EMS1 and VEGF genes in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells. And multi-target siRNAs showed better silencing effects on NET-1, EMS1 and VEGF, compared with single target siRNA. Moreover, multi-target siRNA showed greater suppression effects on proliferation, migration, invasion, angiogenesis and induced apoptosis in HCC cells. The results suggested that multi-target siRNA might be a preferred strategy for cancer therapy and NET-1, EMS1 and VEGF could be effective targets for HCC treatments. PMID:27390607

  18. Computer Aided Drug Design for Multi-Target Drug Design: SAR /QSAR, Molecular Docking and Pharmacophore Methods.

    PubMed

    Abdolmaleki, Azizeh; Ghasemi, Jahan B; Ghasemi, Fatemeh

    2017-01-01

    Multi-target drugs against particular multiple targets get better protection, resistance profiles and curative influence by cooperative rules of a key beneficial target with resistance behavior and compensatory elements. Computational techniques can assist us in the efforts to design novel drugs (ligands) with a preferred bioactivity outline and alternative bioactive molecules at an early stage. A number of in silico methods have been explored extensively in order to facilitate the investigation of individual target agents and to propose a selective drug. A different, progressively more significant field which is used to predict the bioactivity of chemical compounds is the data mining method. Some of the previously mentioned methods have been investigated for multi-target drug design (MTDD) to find drug leads interact simultaneously with multiple targets. Several cheminformatics methods and structure-based approaches try to extract information from units working cooperatively in a biomolecular system to fulfill their task. To dominate the difficulties of the experimental specification of ligand-target structures, rational methods, namely molecular docking, SAR and QSAR are vital substitutes to obtain knowledge for each structure in atomic insight. These procedures are logically successful for the prediction of binding affinity and have shown promising potential in facilitating MTDD. Here, we review some of the important features of the multi-target therapeutics discoveries using the computational approach, highlighting the SAR, QSAR, docking and pharmacophore methods to discover interactions between drug-target that could be leveraged for curative benefits. A summary of each, followed by examples of its applications in drug design has been provided. Computational efficiency of each method has been represented according to its main strengths and limitations.

  19. The role of multi-target policy instruments in agri-environmental policy mixes.

    PubMed

    Schader, Christian; Lampkin, Nicholas; Muller, Adrian; Stolze, Matthias

    2014-12-01

    The Tinbergen Rule has been used to criticise multi-target policy instruments for being inefficient. The aim of this paper is to clarify the role of multi-target policy instruments using the case of agri-environmental policy. Employing an analytical linear optimisation model, this paper demonstrates that there is no general contradiction between multi-target policy instruments and the Tinbergen Rule, if multi-target policy instruments are embedded in a policy-mix with a sufficient number of targeted instruments. We show that the relation between cost-effectiveness of the instruments, related to all policy targets, is the key determinant for an economically sound choice of policy instruments. If economies of scope with respect to achieving policy targets are realised, a higher cost-effectiveness of multi-target policy instruments can be achieved. Using the example of organic farming support policy, we discuss several reasons why economies of scope could be realised by multi-target agri-environmental policy instruments.

  20. Functionalization of an Antisense Small RNA.

    PubMed

    Rodrigo, Guillermo; Prakash, Satya; Cordero, Teresa; Kushwaha, Manish; Jaramillo, Alfonso

    2016-02-27

    In order to explore the possibility of adding new functions to preexisting genes, we considered a framework of riboregulation. We created a new riboregulator consisting of the reverse complement of a known riboregulator. Using computational design, we engineered a cis-repressing 5' untranslated region that can be activated by this new riboregulator. As a result, both RNAs can orthogonally trans-activate translation of their cognate, independent targets. The two riboregulators can also repress each other by antisense interaction, although not symmetrically. Our work highlights that antisense small RNAs can work as regulatory agents beyond the antisense paradigm and that, hence, they could be interfaced with other circuits used in synthetic biology.

  1. Antisense oligodeoxynucleotide to the cystic fibrosis gene inhibits anion transport in normal cultured sweat duct cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sorscher, E.J.; Kirk, K.L.; Weaver, M.L.; Jilling, T.; Blalock, J.E.; LeBoeuf, R.D. )

    1991-09-01

    The authors have tested the hypothesis that the cystic fibrosis (CF) gene product, called the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), mediates anion transport in normal human sweat duct cells. Sweat duct cells in primary culture were treated with oligodeoxynucleotides that were antisense to the CFTR gene transcript in order to block the expression of the wild-type CFTR. Anion transport in CFTR transcript antisense-treated cells was then assessed with a halide-specific dye, 6-methoxy-N-(3-sulfopropryl)quinolinium, and fluorescent digital imaging microscopy to monitor halide influx and efflux from single sweat duct cells. Antisense oligodeoxynucleotide treatment for 24 hr virtually abolished Cl{sup {minus}} transport in sweat duct cells compared with untreated cells or control cells treated with sense oligodeoxynucleotides. Br{sup {minus}} uptake into sweat duct cells was also blocked after a 24-hr CFTR transcript antisense treatments, but not after treatments for only 4 hr. Lower concentrations of antisense oligodeoxynucleotides were less effective at inhibiting Cl{sup {minus}} transport. These results indicate that oligodeoxynucleotides that are antisense to CFTR transcript inhibit sweat duct Cl{sup {minus}} permeability in both a time-dependent and dose-dependent manner. This approach provides evidence that inhibition of the expression of the wild-type CFTR gene in a normal, untransfected epithelial cell results in an inhibition of Cl{sup {minus}} permeability.

  2. Dantrolene enhances antisense-mediated exon skipping in human and mouse models of Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Kendall, Genevieve C; Mokhonova, Ekaterina I; Moran, Miriana; Sejbuk, Natalia E; Wang, Derek W; Silva, Oscar; Wang, Richard T; Martinez, Leonel; Lu, Qi L; Damoiseaux, Robert; Spencer, Melissa J; Nelson, Stanley F; Miceli, M Carrie

    2012-12-12

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) causes profound and progressive muscle weakness and loss, resulting in early death. DMD is usually caused by frameshifting deletions in the gene DMD, which leads to absence of dystrophin protein. Dystrophin binds to F-actin and components of the dystrophin-associated glycoprotein complex and protects the sarcolemma from contraction-induced injury. Antisense oligonucleotide-mediated exon skipping is a promising therapeutic approach aimed at restoring the DMD reading frame and allowing expression of an intact dystrophin glycoprotein complex. To date, low levels of dystrophin protein have been produced in humans by this method. We performed a small-molecule screen to identify existing drugs that enhance antisense-directed exon skipping. We found that dantrolene, currently used to treat malignant hyperthermia, potentiates antisense oligomer-guided exon skipping to increase exon skipping to restore the mRNA reading frame, the sarcolemmal dystrophin protein, and the dystrophin glycoprotein complex in skeletal muscles of mdx mice when delivered intramuscularly or intravenously. Further, dantrolene synergized with multiple weekly injections of antisense to increase muscle strength and reduce serum creatine kinase in mdx mice. Dantrolene similarly promoted antisense-mediated exon skipping in reprogrammed myotubes from DMD patients. Ryanodine and Rycal S107, which, like dantrolene, targets the ryanodine receptor, also promoted antisense-driven exon skipping, implicating the ryanodine receptor as the critical molecular target.

  3. Shock waves: a novel method for cytoplasmic delivery of antisense oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Tschoep, K; Hartmann, G; Jox, R; Thompson, S; Eigler, A; Krug, A; Erhardt, S; Adams, G; Endres, S; Delius, M

    2001-06-01

    Intracytoplasmic delivery of oligonucleotides (ODN) can improve ODN-based strategies such as the antisense approach and the use of immunostimulatory CpG dinucleotide containing ODN. Shock waves are established for the treatment of nephrolithiasis and other diseases. Here we describe the use of shock waves as a new physical method for the direct transport of antisense ODN into the cytoplasm and the nucleus of cells. Human peripheral blood mononuclear cells together with antisense ODN were exposed to shock waves generated by an electrohydraulic lithotripter. ODN uptake was examined by flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy. By optimization of physical parameters we achieved the transfer of high amounts of ODN which were detected within less than 5 min after shock wave exposure, with viability of cells higher than 95%. Transfection of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells with an antisense ODN directed against tumor necrosis factor (TNF) alpha resulted in a reduction in lipopolysaccharide-induced TNF production by 62% (n=5, P=0.006). Specificity of TNF suppression was confirmed with a four-mismatch oligonucleotide. Positive atmospheric pressure abolished antisense-mediated inhibition of TNF synthesis by blocking shock wave-induced cavitation and formation of oscillating air bubbles. Electroporation was less effective. The use of shock waves is thus an efficient physical tool for ODN delivery to cells. Shock waves may allow the evaluation of target proteins in cell types difficult to transfect with other methods and thus may improve the antisense technique for the analysis of unknown genes.

  4. Extending multi-tenant architectures: a database model for a multi-target support in SaaS applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rico, Antonio; Noguera, Manuel; Garrido, José Luis; Benghazi, Kawtar; Barjis, Joseph

    2016-05-01

    Multi-tenant architectures (MTAs) are considered a cornerstone in the success of Software as a Service as a new application distribution formula. Multi-tenancy allows multiple customers (i.e. tenants) to be consolidated into the same operational system. This way, tenants run and share the same application instance as well as costs, which are significantly reduced. Functional needs vary from one tenant to another; either companies from different sectors run different types of applications or, although deploying the same functionality, they do differ in the extent of their complexity. In any case, MTA leaves one major concern regarding the companies' data, their privacy and security, which requires special attention to the data layer. In this article, we propose an extended data model that enhances traditional MTAs in respect of this concern. This extension - called multi-target - allows MT applications to host, manage and serve multiple functionalities within the same multi-tenant (MT) environment. The practical deployment of this approach will allow SaaS vendors to target multiple markets or address different levels of functional complexity and yet commercialise just one single MT application. The applicability of the approach is demonstrated via a case study of a real multi-tenancy multi-target (MT2) implementation, called Globalgest.

  5. Powerful inner/outer controlled multi-target magnetic nanoparticle drug carrier prepared by liquid photo-immobilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, Yan-Qing; Zheng, Zhe; Huang, Zheng; Li, Zhibin; Niu, Shuiqin; Liu, Jun-Ming

    2014-05-01

    Nanomagnetic materials offer exciting avenues for advancing cancer therapies. Most researches have focused on efficient delivery of drugs in the body by incorporating various drug molecules onto the surface of nanomagnetic particles. The challenge is how to synthesize low toxic nanocarriers with multi-target drug loading. The cancer cell death mechanisms associated with those nanocarriers remain unclear either. Following the cell biology mechanisms, we develop a liquid photo-immobilization approach to attach doxorubicin, folic acid, tumor necrosis factor-α, and interferon-γ onto the oleic acid molecules coated Fe3O4 magnetic nanoparticles to prepare a kind of novel inner/outer controlled multi-target magnetic nanoparticle drug carrier. In this work, this approach is demonstrated by a variety of structural and biomedical characterizations, addressing the anti-cancer effects in vivo and in vitro on the HeLa, and it is highly efficient and powerful in treating cancer cells in a valuable programmed cell death mechanism for overcoming drug resistance.

  6. Powerful inner/outer controlled multi-target magnetic nanoparticle drug carrier prepared by liquid photo-immobilization

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Yan-Qing; Zheng, Zhe; Huang, Zheng; Li, Zhibin; Niu, Shuiqin; Liu, Jun-Ming

    2014-01-01

    Nanomagnetic materials offer exciting avenues for advancing cancer therapies. Most researches have focused on efficient delivery of drugs in the body by incorporating various drug molecules onto the surface of nanomagnetic particles. The challenge is how to synthesize low toxic nanocarriers with multi-target drug loading. The cancer cell death mechanisms associated with those nanocarriers remain unclear either. Following the cell biology mechanisms, we develop a liquid photo-immobilization approach to attach doxorubicin, folic acid, tumor necrosis factor-α, and interferon-γ onto the oleic acid molecules coated Fe3O4 magnetic nanoparticles to prepare a kind of novel inner/outer controlled multi-target magnetic nanoparticle drug carrier. In this work, this approach is demonstrated by a variety of structural and biomedical characterizations, addressing the anti-cancer effects in vivo and in vitro on the HeLa, and it is highly efficient and powerful in treating cancer cells in a valuable programmed cell death mechanism for overcoming drug resistance. PMID:24845203

  7. Antisense oligonucleotide therapeutics for human leukemia.

    PubMed

    Gewirtz, A M

    1998-01-01

    The development of reliable gene disruption strategies, and their application in living cells, has proven to be an extraordinary important advance for cell and molecular biologists. Using the various available approaches, the specific functions of any given gene may now be investigated directly in the relevant cell type. Application of similar experimental tools in a clinical setting might prove to be equally valuable and could well form the basis of a monumental advance in the practice of clinical medicine. This seems particularly true at the present time because much progress has been made in understanding the molecular pathogenesis of many diseases, including cancer. For these reasons a tremendous amount of interest has been generated in the use of oligodeoxynucleotides to modify gene expression. However, in spite of some notable successes which are detailed in this review, oligonucleotides have generated controversy in regard to their mechanism of action, reliability, and ultimate therapeutic utility. Nevertheless, the potential power of the "antisense" approach remains undisputed, and its ultimate therapeutic utility is far reaching. Accordingly, the problems associated with the use of these compounds are clearly worth solving. It remains the hope of many laboratories that the day will soon come when these techniques will make an important contribution to the management of chronic myelogenous leukemia and other neoplastic disorders.

  8. Antisense oligonucleotide therapeutics for human leukemia.

    PubMed

    Gewirtz, A M

    1997-01-01

    The development of reliable gene disruption strategies, and their application in living cells, has proven to be an extraordinarily important advance for cell and molecular biologists. Using the various available approaches, the specific functions of any given gene may now be investigated directly in the relevant cell type. Application of similar experimental tools in a clinical setting might prove to be equally valuable and could well form the basis of a monumental advance in the practice of clinical medicine. This seems particularly true at the present time since much progress has been made in understanding the molecular pathogenesis of many diseases, including cancer. For these reasons a tremendous amount of interest has been generated in the use of oligodeoxynucleotides to modify gene expression. However, in spite of some notable successes which are detailed in this review, oligonucleotides have generated controversy in regards to their mechanism of action, reliability, and ultimate therapeutic utility. Nevertheless, the potential power of the "antisense" approach remains undisputed, and its ultimate therapeutic utility is far reaching. Accordingly, the problems associated with the use of these compounds are clearly worth solving. It remains the hope of many laboratories that the day will soon come when these techniques will make an important contribution to the management of CML and other neoplastic disorders.

  9. Antisense Oligonucleotide Therapy for Inherited Retinal Dystrophies.

    PubMed

    Gerard, Xavier; Garanto, Alejandro; Rozet, Jean-Michel; Collin, Rob W J

    2016-01-01

    Inherited retinal dystrophies (IRDs) are an extremely heterogeneous group of genetic diseases for which currently no effective treatment strategies exist. Over the last decade, significant progress has been made utilizing gene augmentation therapy for a few genetic subtypes of IRD, although several technical challenges so far prevent a broad clinical application of this approach for other forms of IRD. Many of the mutations leading to these retinal diseases affect pre-mRNA splicing of the mutated genes . Antisense oligonucleotide (AON)-mediated splice modulation appears to be a powerful approach to correct the consequences of such mutations at the pre-mRNA level , as demonstrated by promising results in clinical trials for several inherited disorders like Duchenne muscular dystrophy, hypercholesterolemia and various types of cancer. In this mini-review, we summarize ongoing pre-clinical research on AON-based therapy for a few genetic subtypes of IRD , speculate on other potential therapeutic targets, and discuss the opportunities and challenges that lie ahead to translate splice modulation therapy for retinal disorders to the clinic.

  10. Monoaminergic Mechanisms in Epilepsy May Offer Innovative Therapeutic Opportunity for Monoaminergic Multi-Target Drugs.

    PubMed

    Svob Strac, Dubravka; Pivac, Nela; Smolders, Ilse J; Fogel, Wieslawa A; De Deurwaerdere, Philippe; Di Giovanni, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    A large body of experimental and clinical evidence has strongly suggested that monoamines play an important role in regulating epileptogenesis, seizure susceptibility, convulsions, and comorbid psychiatric disorders commonly seen in people with epilepsy (PWE). However, neither the relative significance of individual monoamines nor their interaction has yet been fully clarified due to the complexity of these neurotransmitter systems. In addition, epilepsy is diverse, with many different seizure types and epilepsy syndromes, and the role played by monoamines may vary from one condition to another. In this review, we will focus on the role of serotonin, dopamine, noradrenaline, histamine, and melatonin in epilepsy. Recent experimental, clinical, and genetic evidence will be reviewed in consideration of the mutual relationship of monoamines with the other putative neurotransmitters. The complexity of epileptic pathogenesis may explain why the currently available drugs, developed according to the classic drug discovery paradigm of "one-molecule-one-target," have turned out to be effective only in a percentage of PWE. Although, no antiepileptic drugs currently target specifically monoaminergic systems, multi-target directed ligands acting on different monoaminergic proteins, present on both neurons and glia cells, may represent a new approach in the management of seizures, and their generation as well as comorbid neuropsychiatric disorders.

  11. Monoaminergic Mechanisms in Epilepsy May Offer Innovative Therapeutic Opportunity for Monoaminergic Multi-Target Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Svob Strac, Dubravka; Pivac, Nela; Smolders, Ilse J.; Fogel, Wieslawa A.; De Deurwaerdere, Philippe; Di Giovanni, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    A large body of experimental and clinical evidence has strongly suggested that monoamines play an important role in regulating epileptogenesis, seizure susceptibility, convulsions, and comorbid psychiatric disorders commonly seen in people with epilepsy (PWE). However, neither the relative significance of individual monoamines nor their interaction has yet been fully clarified due to the complexity of these neurotransmitter systems. In addition, epilepsy is diverse, with many different seizure types and epilepsy syndromes, and the role played by monoamines may vary from one condition to another. In this review, we will focus on the role of serotonin, dopamine, noradrenaline, histamine, and melatonin in epilepsy. Recent experimental, clinical, and genetic evidence will be reviewed in consideration of the mutual relationship of monoamines with the other putative neurotransmitters. The complexity of epileptic pathogenesis may explain why the currently available drugs, developed according to the classic drug discovery paradigm of “one-molecule-one-target,” have turned out to be effective only in a percentage of PWE. Although, no antiepileptic drugs currently target specifically monoaminergic systems, multi-target directed ligands acting on different monoaminergic proteins, present on both neurons and glia cells, may represent a new approach in the management of seizures, and their generation as well as comorbid neuropsychiatric disorders. PMID:27891070

  12. Curcumin: A multi-target disease-modifying agent for late-stage transthyretin amyloidosis

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Nelson; Gonçalves, Nádia P.; Saraiva, Maria J.; Almeida, Maria R.

    2016-01-01

    Transthyretin amyloidoses encompass a variety of acquired and hereditary diseases triggered by systemic extracellular accumulation of toxic transthyretin aggregates and fibrils, particularly in the peripheral nervous system. Since transthyretin amyloidoses are typically complex progressive disorders, therapeutic approaches aiming multiple molecular targets simultaneously, might improve therapy efficacy and treatment outcome. In this study, we evaluate the protective effect of physiologically achievable doses of curcumin on the cytotoxicity induced by transthyretin oligomers in vitro by showing reduction of caspase-3 activity and the levels of endoplasmic reticulum-resident chaperone binding immunoglobulin protein. When given to an aged Familial Amyloidotic Polyneuropathy mouse model, curcumin not only reduced transthyretin aggregates deposition and toxicity in both gastrointestinal tract and dorsal root ganglia but also remodeled congophilic amyloid material in tissues. In addition, curcumin enhanced internalization, intracellular transport and degradation of transthyretin oligomers by primary macrophages from aged Familial Amyloidotic Polyneuropathy transgenic mice, suggesting an impaired activation of naïve phagocytic cells exposed to transthyretin toxic intermediate species. Overall, our results clearly support curcumin or optimized derivatives as promising multi-target disease-modifying agent for late-stage transthyretin amyloidosis. PMID:27197872

  13. Viral Vector-Mediated Antisense Therapy for Genetic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Imbert, Marine; Dias-Florencio, Gabriella; Goyenvalle, Aurélie

    2017-01-01

    RNA plays complex roles in normal health and disease and is becoming an important target for therapeutic intervention; accordingly, therapeutic strategies that modulate RNA function have gained great interest over the past decade. Antisense oligonucleotides (AOs) are perhaps the most promising strategy to modulate RNA expression through a variety of post binding events such as gene silencing through degradative or non-degradative mechanisms, or splicing modulation which has recently demonstrated promising results. However, AO technology still faces issues like poor cellular-uptake, low efficacy in target tissues and relatively rapid clearance from the circulation which means repeated injections are essential to complete therapeutic efficacy. To overcome these limitations, viral vectors encoding small nuclear RNAs have been engineered to shuttle antisense sequences into cells, allowing appropriate subcellular localization with pre-mRNAs and permanent correction. In this review, we outline the different strategies for antisense therapy mediated by viral vectors and provide examples of each approach. We also address the advantages and limitations of viral vector use, with an emphasis on their clinical application. PMID:28134780

  14. Development of Antisense Drugs for Dyslipidemia

    PubMed Central

    Wada, Fumito; Harada-Shiba, Mariko

    2016-01-01

    Abnormal elevation of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) and triglyceride-rich lipoproteins in plasma as well as dysfunction of anti-atherogenic high-density lipoprotein (HDL) have both been recognized as essential components of the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis and are classified as dyslipidemia. This review describes the arc of development of antisense oligonucleotides for the treatment of dyslipidemia. Chemically-armed antisense candidates can act on various kinds of transcripts, including mRNA and miRNA, via several different endogenous antisense mechanisms, and have exhibited potent systemic anti-dyslipidemic effects. Here, we present specific cutting-edge technologies have recently been brought into antisense strategies, and describe how they have improved the potency of antisense drugs in regard to pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics. In addition, we discuss perspectives for the use of armed antisense oligonucleotides as new clinical options for dyslipidemia, in the light of outcomes of recent clinical trials and safety concerns indicated by several clinical and preclinical studies. PMID:27466159

  15. Multi-target strategy to address Alzheimer's disease: design, synthesis and biological evaluation of new tacrine-based dimers.

    PubMed

    Rizzo, Stefano; Bisi, Alessandra; Bartolini, Manuela; Mancini, Francesca; Belluti, Federica; Gobbi, Silvia; Andrisano, Vincenza; Rampa, Angela

    2011-09-01

    The multifactorial nature of Alzheimer's disease (AD) offers us a textbook example where parental compounds, mostly marketed, are modified with the aim of improving and/or conferring two or even more biological activities to contrast or less frequently revert the disease's symptoms. This is the case of tacrine and its dimeric derivative bis(7)-tacrine which, for instance, paved the way for the development of a broad collection of very interesting homo- and heterodimeric structures, conceived in light of the emerging multi-target approach for AD-related drug discovery. As a contribution to the topic, we report here the design, synthesis and biological evaluation of 12 compounds referable to bis(7)-tacrine. In addition to the cholinesterase activity, some of the selected compounds (7-9 and 12) were capable of inhibiting the non-enzymatic function of AChE and/or showed a remarkable activity against BACE1. Thus, the present study outlines a series of newly synthesized molecules, structurally related to bis(7)-tacrine, endowed with extended biological profile in agreement with the emerging multi-target paradigm.

  16. Plasmid Replication Control by Antisense RNAs.

    PubMed

    Brantl, Sabine

    2014-08-01

    Plasmids are selfish genetic elements that normally constitute a burden for the bacterial host cell. This burden is expected to favor plasmid loss. Therefore, plasmids have evolved mechanisms to control their replication and ensure their stable maintenance. Replication control can be either mediated by iterons or by antisense RNAs. Antisense RNAs work through a negative control circuit. They are constitutively synthesized and metabolically unstable. They act both as a measuring device and a regulator, and regulation occurs by inhibition. Increased plasmid copy numbers lead to increasing antisense-RNA concentrations, which, in turn, result in the inhibition of a function essential for replication. On the other hand, decreased plasmid copy numbers entail decreasing concentrations of the inhibiting antisense RNA, thereby increasing the replication frequency. Inhibition is achieved by a variety of mechanisms, which are discussed in detail. The most trivial case is the inhibition of translation of an essential replication initiator protein (Rep) by blockage of the rep-ribosome binding site. Alternatively, ribosome binding to a leader peptide mRNA whose translation is required for efficient Rep translation can be prevented by antisense-RNA binding. In 2004, translational attenuation was discovered. Antisense-RNA-mediated transcriptional attenuation is another mechanism that has, so far, only been detected in plasmids of Gram-positive bacteria. ColE1, a plasmid that does not need a plasmid-encoded replication initiator protein, uses the inhibition of primer formation. In other cases, antisense RNAs inhibit the formation of an activator pseudoknot that is required for efficient Rep translation.

  17. Cooperative motion control for multi-target observation

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, L.E.

    1997-08-01

    An important issue that arises in the automation of many security, surveillance, and reconnaissance tasks is that of monitoring (or observing) the movements of targets navigating in a bounded area of interest. A key research issue in these problems is that of sensor placement--determining where sensors should be located to maintain the targets in view. In complex applications involving limited-range sensors, the use of multiple sensors dynamically moving over time is required. In this paper, the author investigates the use of a cooperative team of autonomous sensor-based robots for the observation of multiple moving targets. The focus is primarily on developing the distributed control strategies that allow the robot team to attempt to minimize the total time in which targets escape observation by some robot team member in the area of interest. This paper first formalizes the problem and discusses related work. The author then presents a distributed approximate approach to solving this problem that combines low-level multi-robot control with higher-level reasoning control based on the ALLIANCE formalism. The effectiveness of the approach is analyzed by comparing it to three other feasible algorithms for cooperative control, showing the superiority of the approach for a large class of problems.

  18. Antisense therapeutics in oncology: current status

    PubMed Central

    Farooqi, Ammad Ahmad; Rehman, Zia ur; Muntane, Jordi

    2014-01-01

    There is increasing progress in translational oncology and tremendous breakthroughs have been made as evidenced by preclinical and clinical trials. Data obtained from high-throughput technologies are deepening our understanding about the molecular and gene network in cancer cells and rapidly emerging in vitro and in vivo evidence is highlighting the role of antisense agents as specific inhibitors of the expression of target genes, thus modulating the response of cancer cells to different therapeutic strategies. Much information is continuously being added into various facets of molecular oncology and it is now understood that overexpression of antiapoptotic proteins, oncogenes, oncogenic microRNAs (miRNA), and fusion proteins make cancer cells difficult to target. Delivery of antisense oligonucleotides has remained a challenge and technological developments have helped in overcoming hurdles by improving the ability to penetrate cells, effective and targeted binding to gene sequences, and downregulation of target gene function. Different delivery systems, including stable nucleic acid lipid particles, have shown potential in enhancing the delivery of cargo to the target site. In this review, we attempt to summarize the current progress in the development of antisense therapeutics and their potential in medical research. We partition this multicomponent review into introductory aspects about recent breakthroughs in antisense therapeutics. We also discuss how antisense therapeutics have shown potential in resensitizing resistant cancer cells to apoptosis by targeted inhibition of antiapoptotic proteins, oncogenic miRNAs, and BCR-ABL. PMID:25395862

  19. Chemical Modification of the Multi-Target Neuroprotective Compound Fisetin

    PubMed Central

    Chiruta, Chandramouli; Schubert, David; Dargusch, Richard; Maher, Pamela

    2012-01-01

    Many factors are implicated in age-related CNS disorders making it unlikely that modulating only a single factor will provide effective treatment. Perhaps a better approach is to identify small molecules that have multiple biological activities relevant to the maintenance of brain function. Recently, we identified an orally active, neuroprotective and cognition-enhancing molecule, the flavonoid fisetin, that is effective in several animal models of CNS disorders. Fisetin has direct antioxidant activity and can also increase the intracellular levels of glutathione (GSH), the major endogenous antioxidant. In addition, fisetin has both neurotrophic and anti-inflammatory activity. However, its relatively high EC50 in cell based assays, low lipophilicity, high tPSA and poor bioavailability suggest that there is room for medicinal chemical improvement. Here we describe a multi-tiered approach to screening that has allowed us to identify fisetin derivatives with significantly enhanced activity in an in vitro neuroprotection model while at the same time maintaining other key activities. PMID:22192055

  20. Systemic administration of antisense p75(NTR) oligodeoxynucleotides rescues axotomised spinal motor neurons.

    PubMed

    Lowry, K S; Murray, S S; Coulson, E J; Epa, R; Bartlett, P F; Barrett, G; Cheema, S S

    2001-04-01

    The 75 kD low-affinity neurotrophin receptor (p75(NTR)) is expressed in developing and axotomised spinal motor neurons. There is now convincing evidence that p75(NTR) can, under some circumstances, become cytotoxic and promote neuronal cell death. We report here that a single application of antisense p75(NTR) oligodeoxynucleotides to the proximal nerve stumps of neonatal rats significantly reduces the loss of axotomised motor neurons compared to controls treated with nonsense oligodeoxynucleotides or phosphate-buffered saline. Our investigations also show that daily systemic intraperitoneal injections of antisense p75(NTR) oligodeoxynucleotides for 14 days significantly reduce the loss of axotomised motor neurons compared to controls. Furthermore, we found that systemic delivery over a similar period continues to be effective following axotomy when intraperitoneal injections were 1) administered after a delay of 24 hr, 2) limited to the first 7 days, or 3) administered every third day. In addition, p75(NTR) protein levels were reduced in spinal motor neurons following treatment with antisense p75(NTR) oligodeoxynucleotides. There were also no obvious side effects associated with antisense p75(NTR) oligodeoxynucleotide treatments as determined by behavioural observations and postnatal weight gain. Our findings indicate that antisense-based strategies could be a novel approach for the prevention of motor neuron degeneration associated with injuries or disease.

  1. Expression of XIST sense and antisense in bovine fetal organs and cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Farazmand, Ali; Basrur, Parvathi K; Stranzinger, Gerald; Graphodatskaya, Daria; Reyes, Ed R; King, W Allan

    2004-01-01

    Untranslated RNAs transcribed from sense and antisense strands of a gene referred to as X-inactive specific transcript (XIST) play crucial roles in the genetic inactivation and condensation of one of the two X chromosomes in the somatic cells of female mammals. X inactivation is also thought to occur in mammalian male germ cells mainly based on the formation of a condensed structure referred to as a sex body or XY-body, during spermatogenesis. Molecular identity of the sex body, the roles of sense and antisense XIST RNAs in its formation, and the relevance of the sex body to spermatogenesis are not known. Here we report the results of our strand-specific RT-PCR approach to identify the amplicon detected in fetal bovine testes previously referred to as XIST and to test for sense/antisense expression in male and female organs and cell cultures of different sex chromosome constitution. Our results showed that the transcript detected consistently in male gonads and variably in somatic organs represents XIST antisense RNA and that XIST sense and antisense RNAs are co-expressed in female somatic tissues and cultured cells including cells of sex chromosome aneuploids (XXY and XXX). Our results, which differ from those of other investigators in this area, are discussed in the light of the recently reported differences in the expression pattern of murine Xist/Tsix loci and their structural and functional differences in different mammalian species.

  2. Key Targets for Multi-Target Ligands Designed to Combat Neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Ramsay, Rona R.; Majekova, Magdalena; Medina, Milagros; Valoti, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    HIGHLIGHTS Compounds that interact with multiple targets but minimally with the cytochrome P450 system (CYP) address the many factors leading to neurodegeneration.Acetyl- and Butyryl-cholineEsterases (AChE, BChE) and Monoamine Oxidases A/B (MAO A, MAO B) are targets for Multi-Target Designed Ligands (MTDL).ASS234 is an irreversible inhibitor of MAO A >MAO B and has micromolar potency against the cholinesterases.ASS234 is a poor CYP substrate in human liver, yielding the depropargylated metabolite.SMe1EC2, a stobadine derivative, showed high radical scavenging property, in vitro and in vivo giving protection in head trauma and diabetic damage of endothelium.Control of mitochondrial function and morphology by manipulating fission and fusion is emerging as a target area for therapeutic strategies to decrease the pathological outcome of neurodegenerative diseases. Growing evidence supports the view that neurodegenerative diseases have multiple and common mechanisms in their aetiologies. These multifactorial aspects have changed the broadly common assumption that selective drugs are superior to “dirty drugs” for use in therapy. This drives the research in studies of novel compounds that might have multiple action mechanisms. In neurodegeneration, loss of neuronal signaling is a major cause of the symptoms, so preservation of neurotransmitters by inhibiting the breakdown enzymes is a first approach. Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitors are the drugs preferentially used in AD and that one of these, rivastigmine, is licensed also for PD. Several studies have shown that monoamine oxidase (MAO) B, located mainly in glial cells, increases with age and is elevated in Alzheimer (AD) and Parkinson's Disease's (PD). Deprenyl, a MAO B inhibitor, significantly delays the initiation of levodopa treatment in PD patients. These indications underline that AChE and MAO are considered a necessary part of multi-target designed ligands (MTDL). However, both of these targets are

  3. Promise of Neurorestoration and Mitochondrial Biogenesis in Parkinson's Disease with Multi Target Drugs: An Alternative to Stem Cell Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Young J.

    2013-01-01

    There is an unmet need in progressive neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases. The present therapeutics for these diseases at best is symptomatic and is not able to delay disease or possess disease modifying activity. Thus an approach to drug design should be made to slow or halt progressive course of a neurological disorder by interfering with a disease-specific pathogenetic process. This would entail the ability of the drug to protect neurons by blocking the common pathway for neuronal injury and cell death and the ability to promote regeneration of neurons and restoration of neuronal function. We have now developed a number of multi target drugs which possess neuroprotective, and neurorestorative activity as well as being able to active PGC-1α (peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator-1α), SIRT1 (NAD-dependent deacetylase protein) and NTF (mitochondrial transcription factor) that are intimately associated with mitochondrial biogenesis. PMID:24167412

  4. Delivery is key: lessons learnt from developing splice-switching antisense therapies.

    PubMed

    Godfrey, Caroline; Desviat, Lourdes R; Smedsrød, Bård; Piétri-Rouxel, France; Denti, Michela A; Disterer, Petra; Lorain, Stéphanie; Nogales-Gadea, Gisela; Sardone, Valentina; Anwar, Rayan; El Andaloussi, Samir; Lehto, Taavi; Khoo, Bernard; Brolin, Camilla; van Roon-Mom, Willeke Mc; Goyenvalle, Aurélie; Aartsma-Rus, Annemieke; Arechavala-Gomeza, Virginia

    2017-03-13

    The use of splice-switching antisense therapy is highly promising, with a wealth of pre-clinical data and numerous clinical trials ongoing. Nevertheless, its potential to treat a variety of disorders has yet to be realized. The main obstacle impeding the clinical translation of this approach is the relatively poor delivery of antisense oligonucleotides to target tissues after systemic delivery. We are a group of researchers closely involved in the development of these therapies and would like to communicate our discussions concerning the validity of standard methodologies currently used in their pre-clinical development, the gaps in current knowledge and the pertinent challenges facing the field. We therefore make recommendations in order to focus future research efforts and facilitate a wider application of therapeutic antisense oligonucleotides.

  5. Repair of Thalassemic Human β -globin mRNA in Mammalian Cells by Antisense Oligonucleotides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sierakowska, Halina; Sambade, Maria J.; Agrawal, Sudhir; Kole, Ryszard

    1996-11-01

    In one form of β -thalassemia, a genetic blood disorder, a mutation in intron 2 of the β -globin gene (IVS2-654) causes aberrant splicing of β -globin pre-mRNA and, consequently, β -globin deficiency. Treatment of mammalian cells stably expressing the IVS2-654 human β -globin gene with antisense oligonucleotides targeted at the aberrant splice sites restored correct splicing in a dose-dependent fashion, generating correct human β -globin mRNA and polypeptide. Both products persisted for up to 72 hr posttreatment. The oligonucleotides modified splicing by a true antisense mechanism without overt unspecific effects on cell growth and splicing of other pre-mRNAs. This novel approach in which antisense oligonucleotides are used to restore rather than to down-regulate the activity of the target gene is applicable to other splicing mutants and is of potential clinical interest.

  6. Antisense RNA suppression of peroxidase gene expression

    SciTech Connect

    Lagrimini, L.M.; Bradford, S.; De Leon, F.D. )

    1989-04-01

    The 5{prime} half the anionic peroxidase cDNA of tobacco was inserted into a CaMV 35S promoter/terminator expression cassette in the antisense configuration. This was inserted into the Agrobacterium-mediated plant transformation vector pCIBIO which includes kanamycin selection, transformed into two species of tobacco (N. tabacum and M. sylvestris), and plants were subsequently regenerated on kanamycin. Transgenic plants were analyzed for peroxidase expression and found to have 3-5 fold lower levels of peroxidase than wild-type plants. Isoelectric focusing demonstrated that the antisense RNA only suppressed the anionic peroxidase. Wound-induced peroxidase expression was found not to be affected by the antisense RNA. Northern blots show a greater than 5 fold suppression of anionic peroxidase mRNA in leaf tissue, and the antisense RNA was expressed at a level 2 fold over the endogenous mRNA. Plants were self-pollinated and F1 plants showed normal segregation. N. sylvestris transgenic plants with the lowest level of peroxidase are epinastic, and preliminary results indicate elevated auxin levels. Excised pith tissue from both species of transgenic plants rapidly collapse when exposed to air, while pith tissue from wild-type plants showed little change when exposed to air. Further characterization of these phenotypes is currently being made.

  7. Strand-specific community RNA-seq reveals prevalent and dynamic antisense transcription in human gut microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Guanhui; Wang, Mingjie; Doak, Thomas G.; Ye, Yuzhen

    2015-01-01

    Metagenomics and other meta-omics approaches (including metatranscriptomics) provide insights into the composition and function of microbial communities living in different environments or animal hosts. Metatranscriptomics research provides an unprecedented opportunity to examine gene regulation for many microbial species simultaneously, and more importantly, for the majority that are unculturable microbial species, in their natural environments (or hosts). Current analyses of metatranscriptomic datasets focus on the detection of gene expression levels and the study of the relationship between changes of gene expression and changes of environment. As a demonstration of utilizing metatranscriptomics beyond these common analyses, we developed a computational and statistical procedure to analyze the antisense transcripts in strand-specific metatranscriptomic datasets. Antisense RNAs encoded on the DNA strand opposite a gene’s CDS have the potential to form extensive base-pairing interactions with the corresponding sense RNA, and can have important regulatory functions. Most studies of antisense RNAs in bacteria are rather recent, are mostly based on transcriptome analysis, and have been applied mainly to single bacterial species. Application of our approaches to human gut-associated metatranscriptomic datasets allowed us to survey antisense transcription for a large number of bacterial species associated with human beings. The ratio of protein coding genes with antisense transcription ranges from 0 to 35.8% (median = 10.0%) among 47 species. Our results show that antisense transcription is dynamic, varying between human individuals. Functional enrichment analysis revealed a preference of certain gene functions for antisense transcription, and transposase genes are among the most prominent ones (but we also observed antisense transcription in bacterial house-keeping genes). PMID:26388849

  8. Strand-specific community RNA-seq reveals prevalent and dynamic antisense transcription in human gut microbiota.

    PubMed

    Bao, Guanhui; Wang, Mingjie; Doak, Thomas G; Ye, Yuzhen

    2015-01-01

    Metagenomics and other meta-omics approaches (including metatranscriptomics) provide insights into the composition and function of microbial communities living in different environments or animal hosts. Metatranscriptomics research provides an unprecedented opportunity to examine gene regulation for many microbial species simultaneously, and more importantly, for the majority that are unculturable microbial species, in their natural environments (or hosts). Current analyses of metatranscriptomic datasets focus on the detection of gene expression levels and the study of the relationship between changes of gene expression and changes of environment. As a demonstration of utilizing metatranscriptomics beyond these common analyses, we developed a computational and statistical procedure to analyze the antisense transcripts in strand-specific metatranscriptomic datasets. Antisense RNAs encoded on the DNA strand opposite a gene's CDS have the potential to form extensive base-pairing interactions with the corresponding sense RNA, and can have important regulatory functions. Most studies of antisense RNAs in bacteria are rather recent, are mostly based on transcriptome analysis, and have been applied mainly to single bacterial species. Application of our approaches to human gut-associated metatranscriptomic datasets allowed us to survey antisense transcription for a large number of bacterial species associated with human beings. The ratio of protein coding genes with antisense transcription ranges from 0 to 35.8% (median = 10.0%) among 47 species. Our results show that antisense transcription is dynamic, varying between human individuals. Functional enrichment analysis revealed a preference of certain gene functions for antisense transcription, and transposase genes are among the most prominent ones (but we also observed antisense transcription in bacterial house-keeping genes).

  9. Antisense-mediated exon skipping to reframe transcripts.

    PubMed

    Turczynski, Sandrina; Titeux, Matthias; Pironon, Nathalie; Hovnanian, Alain

    2012-01-01

    Numerous genetic disorders are caused by loss-of-function mutations that disrupt the open reading frame of the gene either by nonsense or by frameshift (insertion, deletion, indel, or splicing) mutations. Most of the time, the result is the absence of functional protein synthesis due to mRNA degradation by nonsense-mediated mRNA decay, or rapid degradation of a truncated protein. Antisense-based splicing modulation is a powerful tool that has the potential to treat genetic disorders by restoring the open reading frame through selective removal of the mutated exon, or by restoring correct splicing.We have developed this approach for a severe genetic skin disorder, recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa, caused by mutations in the COL7A1 gene encoding type VII collagen. This gene is particularly suited for exon-skipping approaches due to its unique genomic structure. It is composed of 118 exons, 83 of which are in frame. Moreover, these exons encode a single repetitive collagenous domain.Using this gene as an example, we describe general methods that demonstrate the feasibility and efficacy of the antisense-mediated exon-skipping strategy to reframe transcripts.

  10. Cardinality Balanced Multi-Target Multi-Bernoulli Filter with Error Compensation

    PubMed Central

    He, Xiangyu; Liu, Guixi

    2016-01-01

    The cardinality balanced multi-target multi-Bernoulli (CBMeMBer) filter developed recently has been proved an effective multi-target tracking (MTT) algorithm based on the random finite set (RFS) theory, and it can jointly estimate the number of targets and their states from a sequence of sensor measurement sets. However, because of the existence of systematic errors in sensor measurements, the CBMeMBer filter can easily produce different levels of performance degradation. In this paper, an extended CBMeMBer filter, in which the joint probability density function of target state and systematic error is recursively estimated, is proposed to address the MTT problem based on the sensor measurements with systematic errors. In addition, an analytic implementation of the extended CBMeMBer filter is also presented for linear Gaussian models. Simulation results confirm that the proposed algorithm can track multiple targets with better performance. PMID:27589764

  11. Development of RNA interference-based therapeutics and application of multi-target small interfering RNAs.

    PubMed

    Li, Tiejun; Wu, Meihua; Zhu, York Yuanyuan; Chen, Jianxin; Chen, Li

    2014-08-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) has been proven in recent years to be a newly advanced and powerful tool for development of therapeutic agents toward various unmet medical needs such as cancer, in particular, a great attention has been paid to the development of antineoplastic agents. Recent success in clinical trials related to RNAi-based therapeutics on cancer and ocular disease has validated that small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) constitute a new promising class of therapeutics. Currently, a great wealth of multi-target based siRNA structural modifications is available for promoting siRNA-mediated gene silencing with low side effects. Here, the latest developments in RNAi-based therapeutics and novel structural modifications described for siRNAs--in particular multi-target siRNAs--are reviewed.

  12. Systematic mining of analog series with related core structures in multi-target activity space.

    PubMed

    Gupta-Ostermann, Disha; Hu, Ye; Bajorath, Jürgen

    2013-08-01

    We have aimed to systematically extract analog series with related core structures from multi-target activity space to explore target promiscuity of closely related analogous. Therefore, a previously introduced SAR matrix structure was adapted and further extended for large-scale data mining. These matrices organize analog series with related yet distinct core structures in a consistent manner. High-confidence compound activity data yielded more than 2,300 non-redundant matrices capturing 5,821 analog series that included 4,288 series with multi-target and 735 series with multi-family activities. Many matrices captured more than three analog series with activity against more than five targets. The matrices revealed a variety of promiscuity patterns. Compound series matrices also contain virtual compounds, which provide suggestions for compound design focusing on desired activity profiles.

  13. Zebrafish behavioral profiling identifies multi-target antipsychotic-like compounds

    PubMed Central

    Bruni, Giancarlo; Rennekamp, Andrew J.; Velenich, Andrea; McCarroll, Matthew; Gendelev, Leo; Fertsch, Ethan; Taylor, Jack; Lakhani, Parth; Lensen, Dennis; Evron, Tama; Lorello, Paul J.; Huang, Xi-Ping; Kolczewski, Sabine; Carey, Galen; Caldarone, Barbara J.; Prinssen, Eric; Roth, Bryan L.; Keiser, Michael J.; Peterson, Randall T.; Kokel, David

    2016-01-01

    Many psychiatric drugs act on multiple targets and therefore require screening assays that encompass a wide target space. With sufficiently rich phenotyping, and a large sampling of compounds, it should be possible to identify compounds with desired mechanisms of action based on their behavioral profiles alone. Although zebrafish (Danio rerio) behaviors have been used to rapidly identify neuroactive compounds, it remains unclear exactly what kind of behavioral assays might be necessary to identify multi-target compounds such as antipsychotics. Here, we developed a battery of behavioral assays in larval zebrafish to determine if behavioral profiles could provide sufficient phenotypic resolution to identify and classify psychiatric drugs. Using the antipsychotic drug haloperidol as a test case, we found that behavioral profiles of haloperidol-treated animals could be used to identify previously uncharacterized compounds with desired antipsychotic-like activities and multi-target mechanisms of action. PMID:27239787

  14. Coexistence of sense and anti-sense mRNAs of variant surface protein in Giardia lamblia trophozoites.

    PubMed

    Guo, Junli; Zheng, Wenyu; Wang, Yuehua; Li, Yao; Lu, Siqi; Feng, Xianmin

    2014-02-14

    A strategy of the parasitic protozoan Giardia lamblia to evade attack from the host immune system is periodic changes of its surface antigen, a member of the variant surface protein (VSP) family. A post-transcriptional gene silencing mechanism has been proposed to explain the presence of only one among many possible VSPs at any time. To investigate this phenomenon further, we extracted total RNA from cultured trophozoites of the G. lamblia C2 isolate, and cDNA was reverse-transcribed from the RNA. Sense and anti-sense VSPs were amplified from the total cDNA using nested PCR with primers designed from the 3'-conserved region and the known 5' or 3' end of the cDNA library. Sequence analyses of the amplified products revealed more than 34 full-length antisense VSPs and a smear of sense VSPs. Sequence alignments and comparisons revealed that these VSPs contained variable N-termini and conserved C-termini, and could be classified into 5 clades based on the sizes and variations of the N-terminal sequence. All antisense VSPs existed in the sense forms, but no corresponding antisense VSP existed for sense RNA (snsRNA) 16. The coexistence of sense and antisense VSP mRNAs in cultured G. lamblia supports the post-transcriptional regulation of VSP expression. We propose that VSPs transcribed simultaneously in the sense and antisense forms form double-stranded RNAs (dsRNAs) which are degraded by the Dicer endonuclease, while a VSP without an antisense transcription (e.g., snsRNA16) will be expressed on the surface of Giardia. In addition, in the course of this investigation VSPs were identified that were previously not known. PCR-based amplification of specific sense and antisense VSP cDNAs can be used to identify the specific VSP on G. lamblia trophozoites, which is easier than using specific monoclonal antibody approaches.

  15. Skipping multiple exons of dystrophin transcripts using cocktail antisense oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Echigoya, Yusuke; Yokota, Toshifumi

    2014-02-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is one of the most common and lethal genetic disorders, with 20,000 children per year born with DMD globally. DMD is caused by mutations in the dystrophin (DMD) gene. Antisense-mediated exon skipping therapy is a promising therapeutic approach that uses short DNA-like molecules called antisense oligonucleotides (AOs) to skip over/splice out the mutated part of the gene to produce a shortened but functional dystrophin protein. One major challenge has been its limited applicability. Multiple exon skipping has recently emerged as a potential solution. Indeed, many DMD patients need exon skipping of multiple exons in order to restore the reading frame, depending on how many base pairs the mutated exon(s) and adjacent exons have. Theoretically, multiple exon skipping could be used to treat approximately 90%, 80%, and 98% of DMD patients with deletion, duplication, and nonsense mutations, respectively. In addition, multiple exon skipping could be used to select deletions that optimize the functionality of the truncated dystrophin protein. The proof of concept of systemic multiple exon skipping using a cocktail of AOs has been demonstrated in dystrophic dog and mouse models. Remaining challenges include the insufficient efficacy of systemic treatment, especially for therapies that target the heart, and limited long-term safety data. Here we review recent preclinical developments in AO-mediated multiple exon skipping and discuss the remaining challenges.

  16. Antisense Oligodeoxynucleotide Inhibition of HIV Gene Expression

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-03-20

    of HtL -60 cells. Hence, the effects of antisense oligomers on cellular differentiation were examined and compared with Me2 SO. Differentiation of HL-60...reticulocyte eIF4B binds specifically to AUG (36). Both eIF4F, which includes eIF4A, eIF4E, and a 220 kD subunit, and eIF4B may be crosslinked to the

  17. Using both strands: The fundamental nature of antisense transcription.

    PubMed

    Murray, Struan C; Mellor, Jane

    2016-01-01

    Non-coding transcription across the antisense strands of genes is an abundant, pervasive process in eukaryotes from yeast to humans, however its biological function remains elusive. Here, we provide commentary on a recent study of ours, which demonstrates a genome-wide role for antisense transcription: establishing a unique, dynamic chromatin architecture over genes. Antisense transcription increases the level of nucleosome occupancy and histone acetylation at the promoter and body of genes, without necessarily modulating the level of protein-coding sense transcription. It is also associated with high levels of histone turnover. By allowing genes to sample a wider range of chromatin configurations, antisense transcription could serve to make genes more sensitive to changing signals, priming them for responses to developmental programs or stressful cellular environments. Given the abundance of antisense transcription and the breadth of these chromatin changes, we propose that antisense transcription represents a fundamental, canonical feature of eukaryotic genes.

  18. A good antisense molecule is hard to find.

    PubMed

    Branch, A D

    1998-02-01

    Antisense molecules and ribozymes capture the imagination with their promise of rational drug design and exquisite specificity. However, they are far more difficult to produce than was originally anticipated, and their ability to eliminate the function of a single gene has never been proven. Furthermore, a wide variety of unexpected non-antisense effects have come to light. Although some of these side effects will almost certainly have clinical value, they make it hard to produce drugs that act primarily through true antisense mechanisms and complicate the use of antisense compounds as research reagents. To minimize unwanted non-antisense effects, investigators are searching for antisense compounds and ribozymes whose target sites are particularly vulnerable to attack. This is a challenging quest.

  19. Network pharmacology of cancer: From understanding of complex interactomes to the design of multi-target specific therapeutics from nature.

    PubMed

    Poornima, Paramasivan; Kumar, Jothi Dinesh; Zhao, Qiaoli; Blunder, Martina; Efferth, Thomas

    2016-09-01

    Despite massive investments in drug research and development, the significant decline in the number of new drugs approved or translated to clinical use raises the question, whether single targeted drug discovery is the right approach. To combat complex systemic diseases that harbour robust biological networks such as cancer, single target intervention is proved to be ineffective. In such cases, network pharmacology approaches are highly useful, because they differ from conventional drug discovery by addressing the ability of drugs to target numerous proteins or networks involved in a disease. Pleiotropic natural products are one of the promising strategies due to their multi-targeting and due to lower side effects. In this review, we discuss the application of network pharmacology for cancer drug discovery. We provide an overview of the current state of knowledge on network pharmacology, focus on different technical approaches and implications for cancer therapy (e.g. polypharmacology and synthetic lethality), and illustrate the therapeutic potential with selected examples green tea polyphenolics, Eleutherococcus senticosus, Rhodiola rosea, and Schisandra chinensis). Finally, we present future perspectives on their plausible applications for diagnosis and therapy of cancer.

  20. Adaptive Collaborative Gaussian Mixture Probability Hypothesis Density Filter for Multi-Target Tracking.

    PubMed

    Yang, Feng; Wang, Yongqi; Chen, Hao; Zhang, Pengyan; Liang, Yan

    2016-10-11

    In this paper, an adaptive collaborative Gaussian Mixture Probability Hypothesis Density (ACo-GMPHD) filter is proposed for multi-target tracking with automatic track extraction. Based on the evolutionary difference between the persistent targets and the birth targets, the measurements are adaptively partitioned into two parts, persistent and birth measurement sets, for updating the persistent and birth target Probability Hypothesis Density, respectively. Furthermore, the collaboration mechanism of multiple probability hypothesis density (PHDs) is established, where tracks can be automatically extracted. Simulation results reveal that the proposed filter yields considerable computational savings in processing requirements and significant improvement in tracking accuracy.

  1. Expression of RNA-Interference/Antisense Transgenes by the Cognate Promoters of Target Genes Is a Better Gene-Silencing Strategy to Study Gene Functions in Rice

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Hai; Li, Feng; Yang, Jiawei; Hong, Laifa; Fu, Xiao; Li, Zhibin; Liu, Zhenlan; Li, Jianming; Zhuang, Chuxiong

    2011-01-01

    Antisense and RNA interference (RNAi)-mediated gene silencing systems are powerful reverse genetic methods for studying gene function. Most RNAi and antisense experiments used constitutive promoters to drive the expression of RNAi/antisense transgenes; however, several reports showed that constitutive promoters were not expressed in all cell types in cereal plants, suggesting that the constitutive promoter systems are not effective for silencing gene expression in certain tissues/organs. To develop an alternative method that complements the constitutive promoter systems, we constructed RNAi and/or antisense transgenes for four rice genes using a constitutive promoter or a cognate promoter of a selected rice target gene and generated many independent transgenic lines. Genetic, molecular, and phenotypic analyses of these RNAi/antisense transgenic rice plants, in comparison to previously-reported transgenic lines that silenced similar genes, revealed that expression of the cognate promoter-driven RNAi/antisense transgenes resulted in novel growth/developmental defects that were not observed in transgenic lines expressing constitutive promoter-driven gene-silencing transgenes of the same target genes. Our results strongly suggested that expression of RNAi/antisense transgenes by cognate promoters of target genes is a better gene-silencing approach to discovery gene function in rice. PMID:21408609

  2. Expression of RNA-interference/antisense transgenes by the cognate promoters of target genes is a better gene-silencing strategy to study gene functions in rice.

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Jiang, Dagang; Zhou, Hai; Li, Feng; Yang, Jiawei; Hong, Laifa; Fu, Xiao; Li, Zhibin; Liu, Zhenlan; Li, Jianming; Zhuang, Chuxiong

    2011-03-03

    Antisense and RNA interference (RNAi)-mediated gene silencing systems are powerful reverse genetic methods for studying gene function. Most RNAi and antisense experiments used constitutive promoters to drive the expression of RNAi/antisense transgenes; however, several reports showed that constitutive promoters were not expressed in all cell types in cereal plants, suggesting that the constitutive promoter systems are not effective for silencing gene expression in certain tissues/organs. To develop an alternative method that complements the constitutive promoter systems, we constructed RNAi and/or antisense transgenes for four rice genes using a constitutive promoter or a cognate promoter of a selected rice target gene and generated many independent transgenic lines. Genetic, molecular, and phenotypic analyses of these RNAi/antisense transgenic rice plants, in comparison to previously-reported transgenic lines that silenced similar genes, revealed that expression of the cognate promoter-driven RNAi/antisense transgenes resulted in novel growth/developmental defects that were not observed in transgenic lines expressing constitutive promoter-driven gene-silencing transgenes of the same target genes. Our results strongly suggested that expression of RNAi/antisense transgenes by cognate promoters of target genes is a better gene-silencing approach to discovery gene function in rice.

  3. Multi-target-qubit unconventional geometric phase gate in a multi-cavity system

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Tong; Cao, Xiao-Zhi; Su, Qi-Ping; Xiong, Shao-Jie; Yang, Chui-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Cavity-based large scale quantum information processing (QIP) may involve multiple cavities and require performing various quantum logic operations on qubits distributed in different cavities. Geometric-phase-based quantum computing has drawn much attention recently, which offers advantages against inaccuracies and local fluctuations. In addition, multiqubit gates are particularly appealing and play important roles in QIP. We here present a simple and efficient scheme for realizing a multi-target-qubit unconventional geometric phase gate in a multi-cavity system. This multiqubit phase gate has a common control qubit but different target qubits distributed in different cavities, which can be achieved using a single-step operation. The gate operation time is independent of the number of qubits and only two levels for each qubit are needed. This multiqubit gate is generic, e.g., by performing single-qubit operations, it can be converted into two types of significant multi-target-qubit phase gates useful in QIP. The proposal is quite general, which can be used to accomplish the same task for a general type of qubits such as atoms, NV centers, quantum dots, and superconducting qubits. PMID:26898176

  4. ASS234, As a New Multi-Target Directed Propargylamine for Alzheimer's Disease Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Marco-Contelles, José; Unzeta, Mercedes; Bolea, Irene; Esteban, Gerard; Ramsay, Rona R.; Romero, Alejandro; Martínez-Murillo, Ricard; Carreiras, M. Carmo; Ismaili, Lhassane

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: ASS2324 is a hybrid compound resulting from the juxtaposition of donepezil and the propargylamine PF9601NASS2324 is a multi-target directed propargylamine able to bind to all the AChE/BuChE and MAO A/B enzymesASS2324 shows antioxidant, neuroprotective and suitable permeability propertiesASS2324 restores the scopolamine-induced cognitive impairment to the same extent as donepezil, and is less toxicASS2324 prevents β-amyloid induced aggregation in the cortex of double transgenic miceASS2324 is the most advanced anti-Alzheimer agent for pre-clinical studies that we have identified in our laboratories The complex nature of Alzheimer's disease (AD) has prompted the design of Multi-Target-Directed Ligands (MTDL) able to bind to diverse biochemical targets involved in the progress and development of the disease. In this context, we have designed a number of MTD propargylamines (MTDP) showing antioxidant, anti-beta-amyloid, anti-inflammatory, as well as cholinesterase and monoamine oxidase (MAO) inhibition capacities. Here, we describe these properties in the MTDL ASS234, our lead-compound ready to enter in pre-clinical studies for AD, as a new multipotent, permeable cholinesterase/monoamine oxidase inhibitor, able to inhibit Aβ-aggregation, and possessing antioxidant and neuroprotective properties. PMID:27445665

  5. In silico search for multi-target anti-inflammatories in Chinese herbs and formulas.

    PubMed

    Ehrman, Thomas M; Barlow, David J; Hylands, Peter J

    2010-03-15

    Chinese herbs were screened for compounds which may be active against four targets involved in inflammation, using pharmacophore-assisted docking. Multiple LigandScout (LS) pharmacophores built from ligand-receptor complexes in the protein databank (PDB) were first employed to select compounds. These compounds were then docked using LS-derived templates and ranked according to docking score. The targets comprised cyclo-oxygenases 1 & 2 (COX), p38 MAP kinase (p38), c-Jun terminal-NH(2) kinase (JNK) and type 4 cAMP-specific phosphodiesterase (PDE4). The results revealed that multi-target inhibitors are likely to be relatively common in Chinese herbs. Details of their distribution are given, in addition to experimental evidence supporting these results. Examples of compounds predicted to be active against at least three targets are presented, and their features outlined. The distribution of herbs containing predicted inhibitors was also analysed in relation to 192 Chinese formulas from over 50 herbal categories. Among those found to contain a high proportion of these herbs were formulas traditionally used to treat fever, headache, rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory bowel disorders, skin disease, cancer, and traumatic injury. Relationships between multi-target drug discovery and Chinese medicine are discussed.

  6. Antisense transcription as a tool to tune gene expression.

    PubMed

    Brophy, Jennifer A N; Voigt, Christopher A

    2016-01-14

    A surprise that has emerged from transcriptomics is the prevalence of genomic antisense transcription, which occurs counter to gene orientation. While frequent, the roles of antisense transcription in regulation are poorly understood. We built a synthetic system in Escherichia coli to study how antisense transcription can change the expression of a gene and tune the response characteristics of a regulatory circuit. We developed a new genetic part that consists of a unidirectional terminator followed by a constitutive antisense promoter and demonstrate that this part represses gene expression proportionally to the antisense promoter strength. Chip-based oligo synthesis was applied to build a large library of 5,668 terminator-promoter combinations that was used to control the expression of three repressors (PhlF, SrpR, and TarA) in a simple genetic circuit (NOT gate). Using the library, we demonstrate that antisense promoters can be used to tune the threshold of a regulatory circuit without impacting other properties of its response function. Finally, we determined the relative contributions of antisense RNA and transcriptional interference to repressing gene expression and introduce a biophysical model to capture the impact of RNA polymerase collisions on gene repression. This work quantifies the role of antisense transcription in regulatory networks and introduces a new mode to control gene expression that has been previously overlooked in genetic engineering.

  7. Natural antisense and noncoding RNA transcripts as potential drug targets.

    PubMed

    Wahlestedt, Claes

    2006-06-01

    Information on the complexity of mammalian RNA transcription has increased greatly in the past few years. Notably, thousands of sense transcripts (conventional protein-coding genes) have antisense transcript partners, most of which are noncoding. Interestingly, a number of antisense transcripts regulate the expression of their sense partners, either in a discordant (antisense knockdown results in sense-transcript elevation) or concordant (antisense knockdown results in concomitant sense-transcript reduction) manner. Two new pharmacological strategies based on the knockdown of antisense RNA transcripts by siRNA (or another RNA targeting principle) are proposed in this review. In the case of discordant regulation, knockdown of antisense transcript elevates the expression of the conventional (sense) gene, thereby conceivably mimicking agonist-activator action. In the case of concordant regulation, knockdown of antisense transcript, or concomitant knockdown of antisense and sense transcripts, results in an additive or even synergistic reduction of the conventional gene expression. Although both strategies have been demonstrated to be valid in cell culture, it remains to be seen whether they provide advantages in other contexts.

  8. Voltage-gated calcium channel and antisense oligonucleotides thereto

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hruska, Keith A. (Inventor); Friedman, Peter A. (Inventor); Barry, Elizabeth L. R. (Inventor); Duncan, Randall L. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    An antisense oligonucleotide of 10 to 35 nucleotides in length that can hybridize with a region of the .alpha..sub.1 subunit of the SA-Cat channel gene DNA or mRNA is provided, together with pharmaceutical compositions containing and methods utilizing such antisense oligonucleotide.

  9. Antisense oligodeoxynucleotide inhibition as a potent diagnostic tool for gene function in plant biology

    SciTech Connect

    Jansson, Christer; Sun, Chuanxin; Ghebramedhin, Haile; Hoglund, Anna-Stina; Jansson, Christer

    2008-01-15

    Antisense oligodeoxynucleotide (ODN) inhibition emerges as an effective means for probing gene function in plant cells. Employing this method we have established the importance of the SUSIBA2 transcription factor for regulation of starch synthesis in barley endosperm, and arrived at a model for the role of the SUSIBAs in sugar signaling and source-sink commutation during cereal endosperm development. In this addendum we provide additional data demonstrating the suitability of the antisense ODN technology in studies on starch branching enzyme activities in barley leaves. We also comment on the mechanism for ODN uptake in plant cells. Antisense ODNs are short (12-25 nt-long) stretches of single-stranded ODNs that hybridize to the cognate mRNA in a sequence-specific manner, thereby inhibiting gene expression. They are naturally occurring in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes where they partake in gene regulation and defense against viral infection. The mechanisms for antisense ODN inhibition are not fully understood but it is generally considered that the ODN either sterically interferes with translation or promotes transcript degradation by RNase H activation. The earliest indication of the usefulness of antisense ODN technology for the purposes of molecular biology and medical therapy was the demonstration in 1978 that synthetic ODNs complementary to Raos sarcoma virus could inhibit virus replication in tissue cultures of chick embryo fibroblasts. Since then the antisense ODN technology has been widely used in animal sciences and as an important emerging therapeutic approach in clinical medicine. However, antisense ODN inhibition has been an under-exploited strategy for plant tissues, although the prospects for plant cells in suspension cultures to take up single-stranded ODNs was reported over a decade ago. In 2001, two reports from Malho and coworker demonstrated the use of cationic-complexed antisense ODNs to suppress expression of genes encoding pollen

  10. Multi-Target Directed Indole Based Hybrid Molecules in Cancer Therapy: An Up-To-Date Evidence-Based Review.

    PubMed

    Sunil, Dhanya; Kamath, Pooja R

    2016-09-27

    Cancer is a multifactorial disease and most of its types still remain incurable, in spite of enormous efforts to explicate various tumor pathophysiology. The anti-cancer drug discovery paradigm "one-compound-one-target" has failed and subsequently shifted to two-drug cocktail and recently the "multi-target approach" in order to design and develop agents able to act simultaneously on multiple intracellular constituents and signaling pathways. Novel hybrid compounds are now designed by incorporating two covalently linked independently acting pharmacores, each efficient at combating cancer. They can deliver synergistic effects from the dual action of both independently acting moieties by interacting with multiple targets. These composite molecules are also less prone to drug resistance, leading to an improved pharmacological potency than each individual moiety. As indole nucleus is a central component of many natural and synthetic molecules with extensive biological activity, this review incorporates a variety of such hybrid compounds with indole moiety as one of the active units, where better therapeutic effect has been successfully achieved, by either simultaneous or sequential action of individual functional pharmacore. The current limitations and challenges encountered in the development of these hybrid agents are also discussed.

  11. The Cellular Processing Capacity Limits the Amounts of Chimeric U7 snRNA Available for Antisense Delivery.

    PubMed

    Eckenfelder, Agathe; Tordo, Julie; Babbs, Arran; Davies, Kay E; Goyenvalle, Aurélie; Danos, Olivier

    2012-06-26

    Many genetic diseases are induced by mutations disturbing the maturation of pre-mRNAs, often affecting splicing. Antisense oligoribonucleotides (AONs) have been used to modulate splicing thereby circumventing the deleterious effects of mutations. Stable delivery of antisense sequences is achieved by linking them to small nuclear RNA (snRNAs) delivered by viral vectors, as illustrated by studies where therapeutic exon skipping was obtained in animal models of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). Yet, clinical translation of these approaches is limited by the amounts of vector to be administered. In this respect, maximizing the amount of snRNA antisense shuttle delivered by the vector is essential. Here, we have used a muscle- and heart-specific enhancer (MHCK) to drive the expression of U7 snRNA shuttles carrying antisense sequences against the human or murine DMD pre-mRNAs. Although antisense delivery and subsequent exon skipping were improved both in tissue culture and in vivo, we observed the formation of additional U7 snRNA by-products following gene transfer. These included aberrantly 3' processed as well as unprocessed species that may arise because of the saturation of the cellular processing capacity. Future efforts to increase the amounts of functional U7 shuttles delivered into a cell will have to take this limitation into account.

  12. The Cellular Processing Capacity Limits the Amounts of Chimeric U7 snRNA Available for Antisense Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Eckenfelder, Agathe; Tordo, Julie; Babbs, Arran; Davies, Kay E; Goyenvalle, Aurélie; Danos, Olivier

    2012-01-01

    Many genetic diseases are induced by mutations disturbing the maturation of pre-mRNAs, often affecting splicing. Antisense oligoribonucleotides (AONs) have been used to modulate splicing thereby circumventing the deleterious effects of mutations. Stable delivery of antisense sequences is achieved by linking them to small nuclear RNA (snRNAs) delivered by viral vectors, as illustrated by studies where therapeutic exon skipping was obtained in animal models of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). Yet, clinical translation of these approaches is limited by the amounts of vector to be administered. In this respect, maximizing the amount of snRNA antisense shuttle delivered by the vector is essential. Here, we have used a muscle- and heart-specific enhancer (MHCK) to drive the expression of U7 snRNA shuttles carrying antisense sequences against the human or murine DMD pre-mRNAs. Although antisense delivery and subsequent exon skipping were improved both in tissue culture and in vivo, we observed the formation of additional U7 snRNA by-products following gene transfer. These included aberrantly 3′ processed as well as unprocessed species that may arise because of the saturation of the cellular processing capacity. Future efforts to increase the amounts of functional U7 shuttles delivered into a cell will have to take this limitation into account. PMID:23344083

  13. Antisense oligonucleotide-based therapy in human erythropoietic protoporphyria.

    PubMed

    Oustric, Vincent; Manceau, Hana; Ducamp, Sarah; Soaid, Rima; Karim, Zoubida; Schmitt, Caroline; Mirmiran, Arienne; Peoc'h, Katell; Grandchamp, Bernard; Beaumont, Carole; Lyoumi, Said; Moreau-Gaudry, François; Guyonnet-Dupérat, Véronique; de Verneuil, Hubert; Marie, Joëlle; Puy, Herve; Deybach, Jean-Charles; Gouya, Laurent

    2014-04-03

    In 90% of people with erythropoietic protoporphyria (EPP), the disease results from the inheritance of a common hypomorphic FECH allele, encoding ferrochelatase, in trans to a private deleterious FECH mutation. The activity of the resulting FECH enzyme falls below the critical threshold of 35%, leading to the accumulation of free protoporphyrin IX (PPIX) in bone marrow erythroblasts and in red cells. The mechanism of low expression involves a biallelic polymorphism (c.315-48T>C) localized in intron 3. The 315-48C allele increases usage of the 3' cryptic splice site between exons 3 and 4, resulting in the transcription of an unstable mRNA with a premature stop codon, reducing the abundance of wild-type FECH mRNA, and finally reducing FECH activity. Through a candidate-sequence approach and an antisense-oligonucleotide-tiling method, we identified a sequence that, when targeted by an antisense oligonucleotide (ASO-V1), prevented usage of the cryptic splice site. In lymphoblastoid cell lines derived from symptomatic EPP subjects, transfection of ASO-V1 reduced the usage of the cryptic splice site and efficiently redirected the splicing of intron 3 toward the physiological acceptor site, thereby increasing the amount of functional FECH mRNA. Moreover, the administration of ASO-V1 into developing human erythroblasts from an overtly EPP subject markedly increased the production of WT FECH mRNA and reduced the accumulation of PPIX to a level similar to that measured in asymptomatic EPP subjects. Thus, EPP is a paradigmatic Mendelian disease in which the in vivo correction of a common single splicing defect would improve the condition of most affected individuals.

  14. Antisense Oligonucleotide-Based Therapy in Human Erythropoietic Protoporphyria

    PubMed Central

    Oustric, Vincent; Manceau, Hana; Ducamp, Sarah; Soaid, Rima; Karim, Zoubida; Schmitt, Caroline; Mirmiran, Arienne; Peoc’h, Katell; Grandchamp, Bernard; Beaumont, Carole; Lyoumi, Said; Moreau-Gaudry, François; Guyonnet-Dupérat, Véronique; de Verneuil, Hubert; Marie, Joëlle; Puy, Herve; Deybach, Jean-Charles; Gouya, Laurent

    2014-01-01

    In 90% of people with erythropoietic protoporphyria (EPP), the disease results from the inheritance of a common hypomorphic FECH allele, encoding ferrochelatase, in trans to a private deleterious FECH mutation. The activity of the resulting FECH enzyme falls below the critical threshold of 35%, leading to the accumulation of free protoporphyrin IX (PPIX) in bone marrow erythroblasts and in red cells. The mechanism of low expression involves a biallelic polymorphism (c.315−48T>C) localized in intron 3. The 315−48C allele increases usage of the 3′ cryptic splice site between exons 3 and 4, resulting in the transcription of an unstable mRNA with a premature stop codon, reducing the abundance of wild-type FECH mRNA, and finally reducing FECH activity. Through a candidate-sequence approach and an antisense-oligonucleotide-tiling method, we identified a sequence that, when targeted by an antisense oligonucleotide (ASO-V1), prevented usage of the cryptic splice site. In lymphoblastoid cell lines derived from symptomatic EPP subjects, transfection of ASO-V1 reduced the usage of the cryptic splice site and efficiently redirected the splicing of intron 3 toward the physiological acceptor site, thereby increasing the amount of functional FECH mRNA. Moreover, the administration of ASO-V1 into developing human erythroblasts from an overtly EPP subject markedly increased the production of WT FECH mRNA and reduced the accumulation of PPIX to a level similar to that measured in asymptomatic EPP subjects. Thus, EPP is a paradigmatic Mendelian disease in which the in vivo correction of a common single splicing defect would improve the condition of most affected individuals. PMID:24680888

  15. Discovery of multi-target receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors as novel anti-angiogenesis agents

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jinfeng; Zhang, Lin; Pan, Xiaoyan; Dai, Bingling; Sun, Ying; Li, Chuansheng; Zhang, Jie

    2017-01-01

    Recently, we have identified a biphenyl-aryl urea incorporated with salicylaldoxime (BPS-7) as an anti-angiogenesis agent. Herein, we disclosed a series of novel anti-angiogenesis agents with BPS-7 as lead compound through combining diarylureas with N-pyridin-2-ylcyclopropane carboxamide. Several title compounds exhibited simultaneous inhibition effects against three pro-angiogenic RTKs (VEGFR-2, TIE-2 and EphB4). Some of them displayed potent anti-proliferative activity against human vascular endothelial cell (EA.hy926). In particular, two potent compounds (CDAU-1 and CDAU-2) could be considered as promising anti-angiogenesis agents with triplet inhibition profile. The biological evaluation and molecular docking results indicate that N-pyridin-2-ylcyclopropane carboxamide could serve as a hinge-binding group (HBG) for the discovery of multi-target anti-angiogenesis agents. CDAU-2 also exhibited promising anti-angiogenic potency in a tissue model for angiogenesis. PMID:28332573

  16. Multi-Target Detection from Full-Waveform Airborne Laser Scanner Using Phd Filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuse, T.; Hiramatsu, D.; Nakanishi, W.

    2016-06-01

    We propose a new technique to detect multiple targets from full-waveform airborne laser scanner. We introduce probability hypothesis density (PHD) filter, a type of Bayesian filtering, by which we can estimate the number of targets and their positions simultaneously. PHD filter overcomes some limitations of conventional Gaussian decomposition method; PHD filter doesn't require a priori knowledge on the number of targets, assumption of parametric form of the intensity distribution. In addition, it can take a similarity between successive irradiations into account by modelling relative positions of the same targets spatially. Firstly we explain PHD filter and particle filter implementation to it. Secondly we formulate the multi-target detection problem on PHD filter by modelling components and parameters within it. At last we conducted the experiment on real data of forest and vegetation, and confirmed its ability and accuracy.

  17. [Controlling arachidonic acid metabolic network: from single- to multi-target inhibitors of key enzymes].

    PubMed

    Liu, Ying; Chen, Zheng; Shang, Er-chang; Yang, Kun; Wei, Deng-guo; Zhou, Lu; Jiang, Xiao-lu; He, Chong; Lai, Lu-hua

    2009-03-01

    Inflammatory diseases are common medical conditions seen in disorders of human immune system. There is a great demand for anti-inflammatory drugs. There are major inflammatory mediators in arachidonic acid metabolic network. Several enzymes in this network have been used as key targets for the development of anti-inflammatory drugs. However, specific single-target inhibitors can not sufficiently control the network balance and may cause side effects at the same time. Most inflammation induced diseases come from the complicated coupling of inflammatory cascades involving multiple targets. In order to treat these complicated diseases, drugs that can intervene multi-targets at the same time attracted much attention. The goal of this review is mainly focused on the key enzymes in arachidonic acid metabolic network, such as phospholipase A2, cyclooxygenase, 5-lipoxygenase and eukotriene A4 hydrolase. Advance in single target and multi-targe inhibitors is summarized.

  18. Image-Based Multi-Target Tracking through Multi-Bernoulli Filtering with Interactive Likelihoods

    PubMed Central

    Hoak, Anthony; Medeiros, Henry; Povinelli, Richard J.

    2017-01-01

    We develop an interactive likelihood (ILH) for sequential Monte Carlo (SMC) methods for image-based multiple target tracking applications. The purpose of the ILH is to improve tracking accuracy by reducing the need for data association. In addition, we integrate a recently developed deep neural network for pedestrian detection along with the ILH with a multi-Bernoulli filter. We evaluate the performance of the multi-Bernoulli filter with the ILH and the pedestrian detector in a number of publicly available datasets (2003 PETS INMOVE, Australian Rules Football League (AFL) and TUD-Stadtmitte) using standard, well-known multi-target tracking metrics (optimal sub-pattern assignment (OSPA) and classification of events, activities and relationships for multi-object trackers (CLEAR MOT)). In all datasets, the ILH term increases the tracking accuracy of the multi-Bernoulli filter. PMID:28273796

  19. Discovery of multi-target receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors as novel anti-angiogenesis agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jinfeng; Zhang, Lin; Pan, Xiaoyan; Dai, Bingling; Sun, Ying; Li, Chuansheng; Zhang, Jie

    2017-03-01

    Recently, we have identified a biphenyl-aryl urea incorporated with salicylaldoxime (BPS-7) as an anti-angiogenesis agent. Herein, we disclosed a series of novel anti-angiogenesis agents with BPS-7 as lead compound through combining diarylureas with N-pyridin-2-ylcyclopropane carboxamide. Several title compounds exhibited simultaneous inhibition effects against three pro-angiogenic RTKs (VEGFR-2, TIE-2 and EphB4). Some of them displayed potent anti-proliferative activity against human vascular endothelial cell (EA.hy926). In particular, two potent compounds (CDAU-1 and CDAU-2) could be considered as promising anti-angiogenesis agents with triplet inhibition profile. The biological evaluation and molecular docking results indicate that N-pyridin-2-ylcyclopropane carboxamide could serve as a hinge-binding group (HBG) for the discovery of multi-target anti-angiogenesis agents. CDAU-2 also exhibited promising anti-angiogenic potency in a tissue model for angiogenesis.

  20. Improved Bearings-Only Multi-Target Tracking with GM-PHD Filtering

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qian; Song, Taek Lyul

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, an improved nonlinear Gaussian mixture probability hypothesis density (GM-PHD) filter is proposed to address bearings-only measurements in multi-target tracking. The proposed method, called the Gaussian mixture measurements-probability hypothesis density (GMM-PHD) filter, not only approximates the posterior intensity using a Gaussian mixture, but also models the likelihood function with a Gaussian mixture instead of a single Gaussian distribution. Besides, the target birth model of the GMM-PHD filter is assumed to be partially uniform instead of a Gaussian mixture. Simulation results show that the proposed filter outperforms the GM-PHD filter embedded with the extended Kalman filter (EKF) and the unscented Kalman filter (UKF). PMID:27626423

  1. Improved Bearings-Only Multi-Target Tracking with GM-PHD Filtering.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qian; Song, Taek Lyul

    2016-09-10

    In this paper, an improved nonlinear Gaussian mixture probability hypothesis density (GM-PHD) filter is proposed to address bearings-only measurements in multi-target tracking. The proposed method, called the Gaussian mixture measurements-probability hypothesis density (GMM-PHD) filter, not only approximates the posterior intensity using a Gaussian mixture, but also models the likelihood function with a Gaussian mixture instead of a single Gaussian distribution. Besides, the target birth model of the GMM-PHD filter is assumed to be partially uniform instead of a Gaussian mixture. Simulation results show that the proposed filter outperforms the GM-PHD filter embedded with the extended Kalman filter (EKF) and the unscented Kalman filter (UKF).

  2. AVN-101: A Multi-Target Drug Candidate for the Treatment of CNS Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Ivachtchenko, Alexandre V.; Lavrovsky, Yan; Okun, Ilya

    2016-01-01

    Lack of efficacy of many new highly selective and specific drug candidates in treating diseases with poorly understood or complex etiology, as are many of central nervous system (CNS) diseases, encouraged an idea of developing multi-modal (multi-targeted) drugs. In this manuscript, we describe molecular pharmacology, in vitro ADME, pharmacokinetics in animals and humans (part of the Phase I clinical studies), bio-distribution, bioavailability, in vivo efficacy, and safety profile of the multimodal drug candidate, AVN-101. We have carried out development of a next generation drug candidate with a multi-targeted mechanism of action, to treat CNS disorders. AVN-101 is a very potent 5-HT7 receptor antagonist (Ki = 153 pM), with slightly lesser potency toward 5-HT6, 5-HT2A, and 5HT-2C receptors (Ki = 1.2–2.0 nM). AVN-101 also exhibits a rather high affinity toward histamine H1 (Ki = 0.58 nM) and adrenergic α2A, α2B, and α2C (Ki = 0.41–3.6 nM) receptors. AVN-101 shows a good oral bioavailability and facilitated brain-blood barrier permeability, low toxicity, and reasonable efficacy in animal models of CNS diseases. The Phase I clinical study indicates the AVN-101 to be well tolerated when taken orally at doses of up to 20 mg daily. It does not dramatically influence plasma and urine biochemistry, nor does it prolong QT ECG interval, thus indicating low safety concerns. The primary therapeutic area for AVN-101 to be tested in clinical trials would be Alzheimer’s disease. However, due to its anxiolytic and anti-depressive activities, there is a strong rational for it to also be studied in such diseases as general anxiety disorders, depression, schizophrenia, and multiple sclerosis. PMID:27232215

  3. [Development of multi-target multi-spectral high-speed pyrometer].

    PubMed

    Xiao, Peng; Dai, Jing-Min; Wang, Qing-Wei

    2008-11-01

    The plume temperature of a solid propellant rocket engine (SPRE) is a fundamental parameter in denoting combustion status. It is necessary to measure the temperature along both the axis and the radius of the engine. In order to measure the plume temperature distribution of a solid propellant rocket engine, the multi-spectral thermometry has been approved. Previously the pyrometer was developed in the Harbin Institute of Technology of China in 1999, which completed the measurement of SPRE plume temperature and its distribution with multi-spectral technique in aerospace model development for the first time. Following this experience, a new type of multi-target multi-spectral high-speed pyrometer used in the ground experiments of SPRE plume temperature measurement was developed. The main features of the instrument include the use of a dispersing prism and a photo-diode array to cover the entire spectral band of 0.4 to 1.1 microm. The optic fibers are used in order to collect and transmit the thermal radiation fluxes. The instrument can measure simultaneously the temperature and emissivity of eight spectra for six uniformly distributed points on the target surface, which are well defined by the hole on the field stop lens. A specially designed S/H (Sample/Hold) circuit, with 48 sample and hold units that were triggered with a signal, measures the multi-spectral and multi-target outputs. It can sample 48 signals with a less than 10ns time difference which is most important for the temperature calculation.

  4. Gene Isoform Specificity through Enhancer-Associated Antisense Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Onodera, Courtney S.; Underwood, Jason G.; Katzman, Sol; Jacobs, Frank; Greenberg, David; Salama, Sofie R.; Haussler, David

    2012-01-01

    Enhancers and antisense RNAs play key roles in transcriptional regulation through differing mechanisms. Recent studies have demonstrated that enhancers are often associated with non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs), yet the functional role of these enhancer:ncRNA associations is unclear. Using RNA-Sequencing to interrogate the transcriptomes of undifferentiated mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs) and their derived neural precursor cells (NPs), we identified two novel enhancer-associated antisense transcripts that appear to control isoform-specific expression of their overlapping protein-coding genes. In each case, an enhancer internal to a protein-coding gene drives an antisense RNA in mESCs but not in NPs. Expression of the antisense RNA is correlated with expression of a shorter isoform of the associated sense gene that is not present when the antisense RNA is not expressed. We demonstrate that expression of the antisense transcripts as well as expression of the short sense isoforms correlates with enhancer activity at these two loci. Further, overexpression and knockdown experiments suggest the antisense transcripts regulate expression of their associated sense genes via cis-acting mechanisms. Interestingly, the protein-coding genes involved in these two examples, Zmynd8 and Brd1, share many functional domains, yet their antisense ncRNAs show no homology to each other and are not present in non-murine mammalian lineages, such as the primate lineage. The lack of homology in the antisense ncRNAs indicates they have evolved independently of each other and suggests that this mode of lineage-specific transcriptional regulation may be more widespread in other cell types and organisms. Our findings present a new view of enhancer action wherein enhancers may direct isoform-specific expression of genes through ncRNA intermediates. PMID:22937057

  5. Ribonucleases, antisense RNAs and the control of bacterial plasmids.

    PubMed

    Saramago, Margarida; Bárria, Cátia; Arraiano, Cecília M; Domingues, Susana

    2015-03-01

    In the last decade regulatory RNAs have emerged as powerful tools to regulate the expression of genes both in prokaryotes and in eukaryotes. RNases, by degrading these RNA molecules, control the right amount of regulatory RNAs, which is fundamental for an accurate regulation of gene expression in the cell. Remarkably the first antisense RNAs identified were plasmid-encoded and their detailed study was crucial for the understanding of prokaryotic antisense RNAs. In this review we highlight the role of RNases in the precise modulation of antisense RNAs that control plasmid replication, maintenance and transfer.

  6. On primordial sense-antisense coding.

    PubMed

    Rodin, Andrei S; Rodin, Sergei N; Carter, Charles W

    2009-11-01

    The genetic code is implemented by aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (aaRS). These 20 enzymes are divided into two classes that, despite performing same functions, have nothing common in structure. The mystery of this striking partition of aaRSs might have been concealed in their sterically complementary modes of tRNA recognition that, as we have found recently, protect the tRNAs with complementary anticodons from confusion in translation. This finding implies that, in the beginning, life increased its coding repertoire by the pairs of complementary codons (rather than one-by-one) and used both complementary strands of genes as templates for translation. The class I and class II aaRSs may represent one of the most important examples of such primordial sense-antisense (SAS) coding (Rodin and Ohno, Orig Life Evol Biosph 25:565-589, 1995). In this report, we address the issue of SAS coding in a wider scope. We suggest a variety of advantages that such coding would have had in exploring a wider sequence space before translation became highly specific. In particular, we confirm that in Achlya klebsiana a single gene might have originally coded for an HSP70 chaperonin (class II aaRS homolog) and an NAD-specific GDH-like enzyme (class I aaRS homolog) via its sense and antisense strands. Thus, in contrast to the conclusions in Williams et al. (Mol Biol Evol 26:445-450, 2009), this could indeed be a "Rosetta stone" gene (Carter and Duax, Mol Cell 10:705-708, 2002) (eroded somewhat, though) for the SAS origin of the two aaRS classes.

  7. Natural antisense transcripts of Alzheimer's disease associated genes.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jin-Hu; Cheng, Hai-Peng; Yu, Long; Zhao, Shouyuan

    2006-04-01

    Natural antisense transcripts (NATs), also named endogenous antisense transcripts, are a class of genes whose role in controlling gene expression is becoming more and more relevant. NATs might play important roles in gene expression and translation regulation. Present work investigated the presence of NATs of Alzheimer's disease associated genes including PRESENILIN1, PRESENILIN2, BACE1, BACE2, APP, APOE, TAU (MAPT), PRION, alpha-SYNUCLEIN (SNCA), NICASTRIN, PEN2, APH1A, APH1B as well as CD147 (BASIGIN), and the results revealed that APP, BACE2, APH1A, TAU, CD147 and alpha-SYNUCLEIN contain natural antisense transcripts. These NATs were characterized according to the sense-antisense overlapping information and potential functional mechanisms were proposed. Present findings provide preliminary but important information about transcription regulation of AD associated genes, which would further our understanding of the gene expression regulation of AD, and also suggest a novel potential strategy for the therapy of AD.

  8. Design, synthesis and evaluation of seleno-dihydropyrimidinones as potential multi-targeted therapeutics for Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Canto, Rômulo F S; Barbosa, Flavio A R; Nascimento, Vanessa; de Oliveira, Aldo S; Brighente, Inês M C; Braga, Antonio Luiz

    2014-06-07

    In this paper we report the design, synthesis and evaluation of a series of seleno-dihydropyrimidinones as potential multi-targeted therapeutics for Alzheimer's disease. The compounds show excellent results as acetylcholinesterase inhibitors, being as active as the standard drug. All these compounds also show very good antioxidant activity through different mechanisms of action.

  9. Antisense oligonucleotide treatment ameliorates alpha-1 antitrypsin–related liver disease in mice

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Shuling; Booten, Sheri L.; Aghajan, Mariam; Hung, Gene; Zhao, Chenguang; Blomenkamp, Keith; Gattis, Danielle; Watt, Andrew; Freier, Susan M.; Teckman, Jeffery H.; McCaleb, Michael L.; Monia, Brett P.

    2013-01-01

    Alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency (AATD) is a rare genetic disease that results from mutations in the alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT) gene. The mutant AAT protein aggregates and accumulates in the liver leading to AATD liver disease, which is only treatable by liver transplant. The PiZ transgenic mouse strain expresses a human AAT (hAAT) transgene that contains the AATD-associated Glu342Lys mutation. PiZ mice exhibit many AATD symptoms, including AAT protein aggregates, increased hepatocyte death, and liver fibrosis. In the present study, we systemically treated PiZ mice with an antisense oligonucleotide targeted against hAAT (AAT-ASO) and found reductions in circulating levels of AAT and both soluble and aggregated AAT protein in the liver. Furthermore, AAT-ASO administration in these animals stopped liver disease progression after short-term treatment, reversed liver disease after long-term treatment, and prevented liver disease in young animals. Additionally, antisense oligonucleotide treatment markedly decreased liver fibrosis in this mouse model. Administration of AAT-ASO in nonhuman primates led to an approximately 80% reduction in levels of circulating normal AAT, demonstrating potential for this approach in higher species. Antisense oligonucleotides thus represent a promising therapy for AATD liver disease. PMID:24355919

  10. Layer-by-Layer Assembled Antisense DNA Microsponge Particles for Efficient Delivery of Cancer Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Antisense oligonucleotides can be employed as a potential approach to effectively treat cancer. However, the inherent instability and inefficient systemic delivery methods for antisense therapeutics remain major challenges to their clinical application. Here, we present a polymerized oligonucleotides (ODNs) that self-assemble during their formation through an enzymatic elongation method (rolling circle replication) to generate a composite nucleic acid/magnesium pyrophosphate sponge-like microstructure, or DNA microsponge, yielding high molecular weight nucleic acid product. In addition, this densely packed ODN microsponge structure can be further condensed to generate polyelectrolyte complexes with a favorable size for cellular uptake by displacing magnesium pyrophosphate crystals from the microsponge structure. Additional layers are applied to generate a blood-stable and multifunctional nanoparticle via the layer-by-layer (LbL) assembly technique. By taking advantage of DNA nanotechnology and LbL assembly, functionalized DNA nanostructures were utilized to provide extremely high numbers of repeated ODN copies for efficient antisense therapy. Moreover, we show that this formulation significantly improves nucleic acid drug/carrier stability during in vivo biodistribution. These polymeric ODN systems can be designed to serve as a potent means of delivering stable and large quantities of ODN therapeutics systemically for cancer treatment to tumor cells at significantly lower toxicity than traditional synthetic vectors, thus enabling a therapeutic window suitable for clinical translation. PMID:25198246

  11. Antisense repression of sucrose phosphate synthase in transgenic muskmelon alters plant growth and fruit development

    SciTech Connect

    Tian, Hongmei; Ma, Leyuan; Zhao, Cong; Hao, Hui; Gong, Biao; Yu, Xiyan; Wang, Xiufeng

    2010-03-12

    To unravel the roles of sucrose phosphate synthase (SPS) in muskmelon (Cucumis melo L.), we reduced its activity in transgenic muskmelon plants by an antisense approach. For this purpose, an 830 bp cDNA fragment of muskmelon sucrose phosphate synthase was expressed in antisense orientation behind the 35S promoter of the cauliflower mosaic virus. The phenotype of the antisense plants clearly differed from that of control plants. The transgenic plant leaves were markedly smaller, and the plant height and stem diameter were obviously shorter and thinner. Transmission electron microscope observation revealed that the membrane degradation of chloroplast happened in transgenic leaves and the numbers of grana and grana lamella in the chloroplast were significantly less, suggesting that the slow growth and weaker phenotype of transgenic plants may be due to the damage of the chloroplast ultrastructure, which in turn results in the decrease of the net photosynthetic rate. The sucrose concentration and levels of sucrose phosphate synthase decreased in transgenic mature fruit, and the fruit size was smaller than the control fruit. Together, our results suggest that sucrose phosphate synthase may play an important role in regulating the muskmelon plant growth and fruit development.

  12. Re-sensitizing drug-resistant bacteria to antibiotics by designing Antisense Therapeutics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Courtney, Colleen; Chatterjee, Anushree

    2014-03-01

    ``Super-bugs'' or ``multi-drug resistant organisms'' are a serious international health problem, with devastating consequences to patient health care. The Center for Disease Control has identified antibiotic resistance as one of the world's most pressing public health problems as a significant fraction of bacterial infections contracted are drug resistant. Typically, antibiotic resistance is encoded by ``resistance-genes'' which express proteins that carryout the resistance causing functions inside the bacterium. We present a RNA based therapeutic strategy for designing antimicrobials capable of re-sensitizing resistant bacteria to antibiotics by targeting labile regions of messenger RNAs encoding for resistance-causing proteins. We perform in silico RNA secondary structure modeling to identify labile target regions in an mRNA of interest. A synthetic biology approach is then used to administer antisense nucleic acids to our model system of ampicillin resistant Escherichia coli. Our results show a prolonged lag phase and decrease in viability of drug-resistant E. colitreated with antisense molecules. The antisense strategy can be applied to alter expression of other genes in antibiotic resistance pathways or other pathways of interest.

  13. Antisense oligonucleotide treatment ameliorates alpha-1 antitrypsin-related liver disease in mice.

    PubMed

    Guo, Shuling; Booten, Sheri L; Aghajan, Mariam; Hung, Gene; Zhao, Chenguang; Blomenkamp, Keith; Gattis, Danielle; Watt, Andrew; Freier, Susan M; Teckman, Jeffery H; McCaleb, Michael L; Monia, Brett P

    2014-01-01

    Alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency (AATD) is a rare genetic disease that results from mutations in the alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT) gene. The mutant AAT protein aggregates and accumulates in the liver leading to AATD liver disease, which is only treatable by liver transplant. The PiZ transgenic mouse strain expresses a human AAT (hAAT) transgene that contains the AATD-associated Glu342Lys mutation. PiZ mice exhibit many AATD symptoms, including AAT protein aggregates, increased hepatocyte death, and liver fibrosis. In the present study, we systemically treated PiZ mice with an antisense oligonucleotide targeted against hAAT (AAT-ASO) and found reductions in circulating levels of AAT and both soluble and aggregated AAT protein in the liver. Furthermore, AAT-ASO administration in these animals stopped liver disease progression after short-term treatment, reversed liver disease after long-term treatment, and prevented liver disease in young animals. Additionally, antisense oligonucleotide treatment markedly decreased liver fibrosis in this mouse model. Administration of AAT-ASO in nonhuman primates led to an approximately 80% reduction in levels of circulating normal AAT, demonstrating potential for this approach in higher species. Antisense oligonucleotides thus represent a promising therapy for AATD liver disease.

  14. Targeted skipping of human dystrophin exons in transgenic mouse model systemically for antisense drug development.

    PubMed

    Wu, Bo; Benrashid, Ehsan; Lu, Peijuan; Cloer, Caryn; Zillmer, Allen; Shaban, Mona; Lu, Qi Long

    2011-01-01

    Antisense therapy has recently been demonstrated with great potential for targeted exon skipping and restoration of dystrophin production in cultured muscle cells and in muscles of Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD) patients. Therapeutic values of exon skipping critically depend on efficacy of the drugs, antisense oligomers (AOs). However, no animal model has been established to test AO targeting human dystrophin exon in vivo systemically. In this study, we applied Vivo-Morpholino to the hDMD mouse, a transgenic model carrying the full-length human dystrophin gene, and achieved for the first time more than 70% efficiency of targeted human dystrophin exon skipping in vivo systemically. We also established a GFP-reporter myoblast culture to screen AOs targeting human dystrophin exon 50. Antisense efficiency for most AOs is consistent between the reporter cells, human myoblasts and in the hDMD mice in vivo. However, variation in efficiency was also clearly observed. A combination of in vitro cell culture and a Vivo-Morpholino based evaluation in vivo systemically in the hDMD mice therefore may represent a prudent approach for selecting AO drug and to meet the regulatory requirement.

  15. ESAM: Endocrine inspired Sensor Activation Mechanism for multi-target tracking in WSNs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adil Mahdi, Omar; Wahab, Ainuddin Wahid Abdul; Idris, Mohd Yamani Idna; Znaid, Ammar Abu; Khan, Suleman; Al-Mayouf, Yusor Rafid Bahar

    2016-10-01

    Target tracking is a significant application of wireless sensor networks (WSNs) in which deployment of self-organizing and energy efficient algorithms is required. The tracking accuracy increases as more sensor nodes are activated around the target but more energy is consumed. Thus, in this study, we focus on limiting the number of sensors by forming an ad-hoc network that operates autonomously. This will reduce the energy consumption and prolong the sensor network lifetime. In this paper, we propose a fully distributed algorithm, an Endocrine inspired Sensor Activation Mechanism for multi target-tracking (ESAM) which reflecting the properties of real life sensor activation system based on the information circulating principle in the endocrine system of the human body. Sensor nodes in our network are secreting different hormones according to certain rules. The hormone level enables the nodes to regulate an efficient sleep and wake up cycle of nodes to reduce the energy consumption. It is evident from the simulation results that the proposed ESAM in autonomous sensor network exhibits a stable performance without the need of commands from a central controller. Moreover, the proposed ESAM generates more efficient and persistent results as compared to other algorithms for tracking an invading object.

  16. Vasculoprotection as a Convergent, Multi-Targeted Mechanism of Anti-AD Therapeutics and Interventions.

    PubMed

    Bhat, Narayan R

    2015-01-01

    Using a variety of animal models of Alzheimer's disease (AD), there have been a number of recent studies reporting varying degrees of success with anti-AD therapeutics. The efficacies are often discussed in terms of the modulatory effects of the compounds tested on identified or assumed targets among the known (or proposed) pathogenic and neuroprotective mechanisms, largely within the context of the dominant amyloid cascade hypothesis. However, it is clear that several of the relatively more efficacious treatments tend to be multifunctional and target multiple pathological processes associated with AD including most commonly, oxidative and metabolic stress and neuroinflammation. Increasing evidence suggests that vascular and neurodegenerative pathologies often co-exist and that neurovascular dysfunction plays a critical role in the development or progression of AD. In this review, we will discuss the significance of vasculoprotection or neurovascular unit integrity as a common, multi-targeted mechanism underlying the reported efficacy of a majority of anti-AD therapeutics--amyloid-targeted or otherwise--while providing a strong support for future neurovascular-based treatment strategies and interventions.

  17. Crawling and walking infants encounter objects differently in a multi-target environment.

    PubMed

    Dosso, Jill A; Boudreau, J Paul

    2014-10-01

    From birth, infants move their bodies in order to obtain information and stimulation from their environment. Exploratory movements are important for the development of an infant's understanding of the world and are well established as being key to cognitive advances. Newly acquired motor skills increase the potential actions available to the infant. However, the way that infants employ potential actions in environments with multiple potential targets is undescribed. The current work investigated the target object selections of infants across a range of self-produced locomotor experience (11- to 14-month-old crawlers and walkers). Infants repeatedly accessed objects among pairs of objects differing in both distance and preference status, some requiring locomotion. Overall, their object actions were found to be sensitive to object preference status; however, the role of object distance in shaping object encounters was moderated by movement status. Crawlers' actions appeared opportunistic and were biased towards nearby objects while walkers' actions appeared intentional and were independent of object position. Moreover, walkers' movements favoured preferred objects more strongly for children with higher levels of self-produced locomotion experience. The multi-target experimental situation used in this work parallels conditions faced by foraging organisms, and infants' behaviours were discussed with respect to optimal foraging theory. There is a complex interplay between infants' agency, locomotor experience, and environment in shaping their motor actions. Infants' movements, in turn, determine the information and experiences offered to infants by their micro-environment.

  18. Antenna allocation in MIMO radar with widely separated antennas for multi-target detection.

    PubMed

    Gao, Hao; Wang, Jian; Jiang, Chunxiao; Zhang, Xudong

    2014-10-27

    In this paper, we explore a new resource called multi-target diversity to optimize the performance of multiple input multiple output (MIMO) radar with widely separated antennas for detecting multiple targets. In particular, we allocate antennas of the MIMO radar to probe different targets simultaneously in a flexible manner based on the performance metric of relative entropy. Two antenna allocation schemes are proposed. In the first scheme, each antenna is allocated to illuminate a proper target over the entire illumination time, so that the detection performance of each target is guaranteed. The problem is formulated as a minimum makespan scheduling problem in the combinatorial optimization framework. Antenna allocation is implemented through a branch-and-bound algorithm and an enhanced factor 2 algorithm. In the second scheme, called antenna-time allocation, each antenna is allocated to illuminate different targets with different illumination time. Both antenna allocation and time allocation are optimized based on illumination probabilities. Over a large range of transmitted power, target fluctuations and target numbers, both of the proposed antenna allocation schemes outperform the scheme without antenna allocation. Moreover, the antenna-time allocation scheme achieves a more robust detection performance than branch-and-bound algorithm and the enhanced factor 2 algorithm when the target number changes.

  19. Multi-Target Tracking Using an Improved Gaussian Mixture CPHD Filter

    PubMed Central

    Si, Weijian; Wang, Liwei; Qu, Zhiyu

    2016-01-01

    The cardinalized probability hypothesis density (CPHD) filter is an alternative approximation to the full multi-target Bayesian filter for tracking multiple targets. However, although the joint propagation of the posterior intensity and cardinality distribution in its recursion allows more reliable estimates of the target number than the PHD filter, the CPHD filter suffers from the spooky effect where there exists arbitrary PHD mass shifting in the presence of missed detections. To address this issue in the Gaussian mixture (GM) implementation of the CPHD filter, this paper presents an improved GM-CPHD filter, which incorporates a weight redistribution scheme into the filtering process to modify the updated weights of the Gaussian components when missed detections occur. In addition, an efficient gating strategy that can adaptively adjust the gate sizes according to the number of missed detections of each Gaussian component is also presented to further improve the computational efficiency of the proposed filter. Simulation results demonstrate that the proposed method offers favorable performance in terms of both estimation accuracy and robustness to clutter and detection uncertainty over the existing methods. PMID:27886106

  20. [STW 5/Iberogast: multi-target-action for treatment of functional dyspepsia and irritable bowel syndrome].

    PubMed

    Allescher, Hans-Dieter; Wagner, Hildebert

    2007-01-01

    Functional gastro-intestinal diseases such as functional dyspepsia and irritable bowel syndrome are a therapeutic challenge, as they are not only characterized by a multitude of symptoms, some of them with severe consequences for affected patients, but are also caused by a multitude of factors. The clinical efficacy of the therapeutics STW 5/Iberogast in these diseases has been proven in a number of randomized prospective clinical studies. Several preclinical studies suggest that its efficacy could be due to its complex composition of nine standardized herbal extracts, which act differently on multiple sites. This principle, which is quite popular in clinical medicine, was introduced as a multi-target therapy for functional bowel disorders. Components of STW 5/Iberogast reduce gastro-intestinal hypersensitivity and act spasmolytic on spastic, tonicising on atonic gastro-intestinal muscle. In addition a stimulating effect on reduced mucus-secretion, an inhibitory effect on enhanced gastric acid secretion and an anti-inflammatory effect have been shown. These effects could explain the clinical efficacy of STW5/Iberogast in a large range of symptoms.

  1. Multi-target camera tracking, hand-off and display LDRD 158819 final report

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Robert J.

    2014-10-01

    Modern security control rooms gather video and sensor feeds from tens to hundreds of cameras. Advanced camera analytics can detect motion from individual video streams and convert unexpected motion into alarms, but the interpretation of these alarms depends heavily upon human operators. Unfortunately, these operators can be overwhelmed when a large number of events happen simultaneously, or lulled into complacency due to frequent false alarms. This LDRD project has focused on improving video surveillance-based security systems by changing the fundamental focus from the cameras to the targets being tracked. If properly integrated, more cameras shouldn't lead to more alarms, more monitors, more operators, and increased response latency but instead should lead to better information and more rapid response times. For the course of the LDRD we have been developing algorithms that take live video imagery from multiple video cameras, identifies individual moving targets from the background imagery, and then displays the results in a single 3D interactive video. In this document we summarize the work in developing this multi-camera, multi-target system, including lessons learned, tools developed, technologies explored, and a description of current capability.

  2. Multi-Target Camera Tracking, Hand-off and Display LDRD 158819 Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Robert J.

    2014-10-01

    Modern security control rooms gather video and sensor feeds from tens to hundreds of cameras. Advanced camera analytics can detect motion from individual video streams and convert unexpected motion into alarms, but the interpretation of these alarms depends heavily upon human operators. Unfortunately, these operators can be overwhelmed when a large number of events happen simultaneously, or lulled into complacency due to frequent false alarms. This LDRD project has focused on improving video surveillance-based security systems by changing the fundamental focus from the cameras to the targets being tracked. If properly integrated, more cameras shouldn’t lead to more alarms, more monitors, more operators, and increased response latency but instead should lead to better information and more rapid response times. For the course of the LDRD we have been developing algorithms that take live video imagery from multiple video cameras, identify individual moving targets from the background imagery, and then display the results in a single 3D interactive video. In this document we summarize the work in developing this multi-camera, multi-target system, including lessons learned, tools developed, technologies explored, and a description of current capability.

  3. Topology of classical molecular optimal control landscapes for multi-target objectives

    SciTech Connect

    Joe-Wong, Carlee; Ho, Tak-San; Rabitz, Herschel; Wu, Rebing

    2015-04-21

    This paper considers laser-driven optimal control of an ensemble of non-interacting molecules whose dynamics lie in classical phase space. The molecules evolve independently under control to distinct final states. We consider a control landscape defined in terms of multi-target (MT) molecular states and analyze the landscape as a functional of the control field. The topology of the MT control landscape is assessed through its gradient and Hessian with respect to the control. Under particular assumptions, the MT control landscape is found to be free of traps that could hinder reaching the objective. The Hessian associated with an optimal control field is shown to have finite rank, indicating an inherent degree of robustness to control noise. Both the absence of traps and rank of the Hessian are shown to be analogous to the situation of specifying multiple targets for an ensemble of quantum states. Numerical simulations are presented to illustrate the classical landscape principles and further characterize the system behavior as the control field is optimized.

  4. In Vitro and In Vivo Activity of Multi-Target Inhibitors Against Trypanosoma brucei

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Gyongseon; Zhu, Wei; Wang, Yang; Huang, Guozhong; Byun, Sooyoung; Choi, Gahee; Li, Kai; Huang, Zhuoli; Docampo, Roberto; Oldfield, Eric; No, Joo Hwan

    2015-01-01

    We tested a series of amidine and related compounds against Trypanosoma brucei. The most active compound was a biphenyldiamidine which had an EC50 of 7.7 nM against bloodstream form parasites. There was little toxicity against two human cell lines with CC50 > 100 μM. There was also good in vivo activity in a mouse model of infection with 100% survival at 3 mg/kg i.p. The most potent lead blocked replication of kinetoplast DNA (k-DNA), but not nuclear DNA, in the parasite. Some compounds also inhibited the enzyme farnesyl diphosphate synthase (FPPS) and some were uncouplers of oxidative phosphorylation. We developed a computational model for T. brucei cell growth inhibition (R2 = 0.76) using DNA ΔTm values for inhibitor binding, combined with T. brucei FPPS IC50 values. Overall, the results suggest that it may be possible to develop multi-target drug leads against T. brucei that act by inhibiting both k-DNA replication and isoprenoid biosynthesis. PMID:26295062

  5. A sequential multi-target Mps1 phosphorylation cascade promotes spindle checkpoint signaling

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Zhejian; Gao, Haishan; Jia, Luying; Li, Bing; Yu, Hongtao

    2017-01-01

    The master spindle checkpoint kinase Mps1 senses kinetochore-microtubule attachment and promotes checkpoint signaling to ensure accurate chromosome segregation. The kinetochore scaffold Knl1, when phosphorylated by Mps1, recruits checkpoint complexes Bub1–Bub3 and BubR1–Bub3 to unattached kinetochores. Active checkpoint signaling ultimately enhances the assembly of the mitotic checkpoint complex (MCC) consisting of BubR1–Bub3, Mad2, and Cdc20, which inhibits the anaphase-promoting complex or cyclosome bound to Cdc20 (APC/CCdc20) to delay anaphase onset. Using in vitro reconstitution, we show that Mps1 promotes APC/C inhibition by MCC components through phosphorylating Bub1 and Mad1. Phosphorylated Bub1 binds to Mad1–Mad2. Phosphorylated Mad1 directly interacts with Cdc20. Mutations of Mps1 phosphorylation sites in Bub1 or Mad1 abrogate the spindle checkpoint in human cells. Therefore, Mps1 promotes checkpoint activation through sequentially phosphorylating Knl1, Bub1, and Mad1. This sequential multi-target phosphorylation cascade makes the checkpoint highly responsive to Mps1 and to kinetochore-microtubule attachment. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.22513.001 PMID:28072388

  6. ATP as a multi-target danger signal in the brain

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Ricardo J.; Tomé, Angelo R.; Cunha, Rodrigo A.

    2015-01-01

    ATP is released in an activity-dependent manner from different cell types in the brain, fulfilling different roles as a neurotransmitter, neuromodulator, in astrocyte-to-neuron communication, propagating astrocytic responses and formatting microglia responses. This involves the activation of different ATP P2 receptors (P2R) as well as adenosine receptors upon extracellular ATP catabolism by ecto-nucleotidases. Notably, brain noxious stimuli trigger a sustained increase of extracellular ATP, which plays a key role as danger signal in the brain. This involves a combined action of extracellular ATP in different cell types, namely increasing the susceptibility of neurons to damage, promoting astrogliosis and recruiting and formatting microglia to mount neuroinflammatory responses. Such actions involve the activation of different receptors, as heralded by neuroprotective effects resulting from blockade mainly of P2X7R, P2Y1R and adenosine A2A receptors (A2AR), which hierarchy, cooperation and/or redundancy is still not resolved. These pleiotropic functions of ATP as a danger signal in brain damage prompt a therapeutic interest to multi-target different purinergic receptors to provide maximal opportunities for neuroprotection. PMID:25972780

  7. Collaborative multi-target tracking using networked micro-robotic vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswas, Subir; Gupta, Sonny; Yu, Fan; Wu, Tao

    2007-04-01

    This paper presents a collaborative target tracking framework, in which distributed mechanisms are developed for tracking multiple mobile targets using a team of networked micro robotic vehicles. Applications of such a framework would include detection of multi-agent intrusion, network-assisted attack localization, and other collaborative search scenarios. The key idea of the developed framework is to design distributed algorithms that can be executed by tracking entities using a mobile ad hoc network. The paper comprises the following components. First, the software and hardware architectural detail of a Swarm Capable Autonomous Vehicle (SCAV) system that is used as the mobile platform in our target tracking application is presented. Second, the details of an indoor self-localization and Kalman filter based navigation system for the SCAV are presented. Third, a formal definition of the collaborative multi-target tracking problem and a heuristic based networked solution are developed. Finally, the performance of the proposed tracking framework is evaluated on a laboratory test-bed of a fleet of SCAV vehicles. A detailed system characterization in terms localization, navigation, and collaborative tracking performance is performed on the SCAV test-bed. In addition to valuable implementation insights about the localization, navigation, filtering, and ad hoc networking processes, a number of interesting conclusions about the overall tracking system are presented.

  8. A novel multi-target regression framework for time-series prediction of drug efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Li, Haiqing; Zhang, Wei; Chen, Ying; Guo, Yumeng; Li, Guo-Zheng; Zhu, Xiaoxin

    2017-01-01

    Excavating from small samples is a challenging pharmacokinetic problem, where statistical methods can be applied. Pharmacokinetic data is special due to the small samples of high dimensionality, which makes it difficult to adopt conventional methods to predict the efficacy of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) prescription. The main purpose of our study is to obtain some knowledge of the correlation in TCM prescription. Here, a novel method named Multi-target Regression Framework to deal with the problem of efficacy prediction is proposed. We employ the correlation between the values of different time sequences and add predictive targets of previous time as features to predict the value of current time. Several experiments are conducted to test the validity of our method and the results of leave-one-out cross-validation clearly manifest the competitiveness of our framework. Compared with linear regression, artificial neural networks, and partial least squares, support vector regression combined with our framework demonstrates the best performance, and appears to be more suitable for this task. PMID:28098186

  9. Simulation Research Framework with Embedded Intelligent Algorithms for Analysis of Multi-Target, Multi-Sensor, High-Cluttered Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanlon, Nicholas P.

    nearly identical performance metrics at orders of magnitude faster in execution. Second, a fuzzy inference system is presented that alleviates air traffic controllers from information overload by utilizing flight plan data and radar/GPS correlation values to highlight aircraft that deviate from their intended routes. Third, a genetic algorithm optimizes sensor placement that is robust and capable of handling unexpected routes in the environment. Fourth, a fuzzy CUSUM algorithm more accurately detects and corrects aircraft mode changes. Finally, all the work is packaged in a holistic simulation research framework that provides evaluation and analysis of various multi-sensor, multi-target scenarios.

  10. Splice-switching antisense oligonucleotides as therapeutic drugs

    PubMed Central

    Havens, Mallory A.; Hastings, Michelle L.

    2016-01-01

    Splice-switching oligonucleotides (SSOs) are short, synthetic, antisense, modified nucleic acids that base-pair with a pre-mRNA and disrupt the normal splicing repertoire of the transcript by blocking the RNA–RNA base-pairing or protein–RNA binding interactions that occur between components of the splicing machinery and the pre-mRNA. Splicing of pre-mRNA is required for the proper expression of the vast majority of protein-coding genes, and thus, targeting the process offers a means to manipulate protein production from a gene. Splicing modulation is particularly valuable in cases of disease caused by mutations that lead to disruption of normal splicing or when interfering with the normal splicing process of a gene transcript may be therapeutic. SSOs offer an effective and specific way to target and alter splicing in a therapeutic manner. Here, we discuss the different approaches used to target and alter pre-mRNA splicing with SSOs. We detail the modifications to the nucleic acids that make them promising therapeutics and discuss the challenges to creating effective SSO drugs. We highlight the development of SSOs designed to treat Duchenne muscular dystrophy and spinal muscular atrophy, which are currently being tested in clinical trials. PMID:27288447

  11. The Multi-Target Drug M30 Shows Pro-Cognitive and Anti-Inflammatory Effects in a Rat Model of Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Pimentel, Luisa S; Allard, Simon; Do Carmo, Sonia; Weinreb, Orly; Danik, Marc; Hanzel, Cecilia E; Youdim, Moussa B; Cuello, A Claudio

    2015-01-01

    Current therapies for Alzheimer's disease (AD) offer partial symptomatic relief and do not modify disease progression. There is substantial evidence indicating a disease onset years before clinical diagnosis, at which point no effective therapy has been found. In this study, we investigated the efficacy of a new multi-target drug, M30, at relatively early stages of the AD-like amyloid pathology in a robust rat transgenic model. McGill-R-Thy1-APP transgenic rats develop the full AD-like amyloid pathology in a progressive fashion, and have a minimal genetic burden. McGill rats were given 5 mg/kg M30 or vehicle per os, every 2 days for 4 months, starting at a stage where the transgenic animals suffer detectable cognitive impairments. At the completion of the treatment, cognitive functions were assessed with Novel Object Location and Novel Object Recognition tests. The brains were then analyzed to assess amyloid-β (Aβ) burden and the levels of key inflammatory markers. Long-term treatment with M30 was associated with both the prevention and the reversal of transgene-related cognitive decline. The effects on cognition were accompanied by a shift of the Aβ-immunoreactive material toward an amyloid plaque aggregated molecular form, diminished molecular signs of CNS inflammation and a change in microglia morphology toward a surveying phenotype. This study is the first to demonstrate the therapeutic potential of M30 in a rat model of the AD amyloid pathology. It provides a rationale for further investigations with M30 and with potential multi-target approaches to delay, prevent or reverse the progression the AD pathology at early disease-stages.

  12. Harnessing the fruits of nature for the development of multi-targeted cancer therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Fazlul H; Li, Yiwei

    2009-11-01

    Cancer cells exhibit deregulation in multiple cellular signaling pathways. Therefore, treatments using specific agents that target only one pathway usually fail in cancer therapy. The combination treatments using chemotherapeutic agents with distinct molecular mechanisms are considered more promising for higher efficacy; however, using multiple agents contributes to added toxicity. Emerging evidence has shown that some "natural products" such as isoflavones, indole-3-carbinol (I3C) and its in vivo dimeric product 3,3'-diindolylmethane (DIM), and curcumin among many others, have growth inhibitory and apoptosis inducing effects on human and animal cancer cells mediated by targeting multiple cellular signaling pathways in vitro without causing unwanted toxicity in normal cells. Therefore, these non-toxic "natural products" from natural resources could be useful in combination with conventional chemotherapeutic agents for the treatment of human malignancies with lower toxicity and higher efficacy. In fact, recently increasing evidence from pre-clinical in vivo studies and clinical trials have shown some success in support of the use of rational design of multi-targeted therapies for the treatment of cancers using conventional chemotherapeutic agents in combination with "natural products". These studies have provided promising results and further opened-up newer avenues for cancer therapy. In this review article, we have succinctly summarized the known effects of "natural products" especially by focusing on isoflavones, indole-3-carbinol (I3C) and its in vivo dimeric product 3,3'-diindolylmethane (DIM), and curcumin, and provided a comprehensive view on the molecular mechanisms underlying the principle of cancer therapy using combination of "natural products" with conventional therapeutics.

  13. Olive Oil Phenols as Promising Multi-targeting Agents Against Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Rigacci, Stefania

    2015-01-01

    Amyloid diseases are characterized by the deposition of typically aggregated proteins/peptides in tissues, associated with degeneration and progressive functional impairment. Alzheimer's disease is one of the most studied neurodegenerative amyloid diseases and, in Western countries, a significant cause of dementia in the elderly. The so-called "Mediterranean diet" has been considered for long as the healthier dietary regimen, characterised by a great abundance in vegetables and fruits, extra virgin olive oil as the main source of fat, a moderate consumption of red wine and a reduced intake of proteins from red meat. Recent epidemiological studies support the efficacy of the Mediterranean diet not only against cardiovascular and cancer diseases (as previously demonstrated) but also against the cognitive decline associated with ageing, and several data are highlighting the role played by natural phenols, of which red wine and extra virgin olive oil are rich, in such context. In the meantime, studies conducted both in vivo and in vitro have started to reveal the great potential of the phenolic component of extra virgin olive oil (mainly oleuropein aglycone and oleocanthal) in counteracting amyloid aggregation and toxicity, with a particular emphasis on the pathways involved in the onset and progression of Alzheimer's disease: amyloid precursor protein processing, amyloid-beta (Aβ) peptide and tau aggregation, autophagy impairment, neuroinflammation. The aim of this review is to summarize the results of such research efforts, showing how the action of these phenols goes far beyond their renowned antioxidant activity and revealing their potential as multi-targeting agents against Alzheimer's disease.

  14. CYP17 inhibitors--abiraterone, C17,20-lyase inhibitors and multi-targeting agents.

    PubMed

    Yin, Lina; Hu, Qingzhong

    2014-01-01

    As the first in class steroid 17α-hydroxylase/C17,20-lyase (CYP17) inhibitor, abiraterone acetate (of which the active metabolite is abiraterone) has been shown to improve overall survival in patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC)--in those who are chemotherapy-naive and those previously treated with docetaxel. Furthermore, the clinical success of abiraterone demonstrated that CRPC, which has previously been regarded as an androgen-independent disease, is still driven, at least in part, by androgens. More importantly, abiraterone is a 'promiscuous' drug that interacts with a number of targets, which dictate its clinical benefits and adverse effects profile. Besides CYP17 inhibition, abiraterone acts as an antagonist to the androgen receptor and inhibits 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase--two effects that potentially contribute to its antitumour effects. However, the inhibition of the 17α-hydroxylase activity of CYP17, CYP11B1 and a panel of hepatic CYP enzymes leads to adverse effects and toxicities that include secondary mineralocorticoid excess. Abiraterone is also associated with increased incidence of cardiac disorders. Under such circumstances, development of new CYP17 inhibitors as an additional line of defence is urgently needed. To achieve enhanced clinical benefits, new strategies are being explored that include selective inhibition of the C17,20-lyase activity of CYP17 and multi-targeting strategies that affect androgen synthesis and signalling at different points. Some of these strategies-including the drugs orteronel, VT-464 and galeterone--are supported by preclinical data and are being explored in the clinic.

  15. Experimental demonstration of a multi-target detection technique using an X-band optically steered phased array radar.

    PubMed

    Shi, Nuannuan; Li, Ming; Deng, Ye; Zhang, Lihong; Sun, Shuqian; Tang, Jian; Li, Wei; Zhu, Ninghua

    2016-06-27

    An X-band optically-steered phased array radar is developed to demonstrate high resolution multi-target detection. The beam forming is implemented based on wavelength-swept true time delay (TTD) technique. The beam forming system has a wide direction tuning range of ± 54 degree, low magnitude ripple of ± 0.5 dB and small delay error of 0.13 ps/nm. To further verify performance of the proposed optically-steered phased array radar, three experiments are then carried out to implement the single and multiple target detection. A linearly chirped X-band microwave signal is used as radar signal which is finally compressed at the receiver to improve the detection accuracy. The ranging resolution for multi-target detection is up to 2 cm within the measuring distance over 4 m and the azimuth angle error is less than 4 degree.

  16. Synthesis and evaluation of dihydropyrimidinone-derived selenoesters as multi-targeted directed compounds against Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Barbosa, Flavio A R; Canto, Rômulo F S; Saba, Sumbal; Rafique, Jamal; Braga, Antonio L

    2016-11-15

    This paper describes the synthesis and evaluation of new dihydropyrimidinone (DHPM)-derived selenoesters as potential multi-targeted agents for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease. A series of DHPM-derived selenoesters were obtained with high structural diversity through a short and modular synthetic route. The antioxidant activity was evaluated by TBARS and iron chelation assays. These compounds were also evaluated as acetylcholinesterase inhibitors (AChEi). The compounds demonstrated good antioxidant activity, since they presented excellent lipid peroxidation inhibition and good iron chelation activity. In addition, they showed acetylcholinesterase inhibition activity and some of them presented activity superior to that of the standard drug galantamine. The in silico predictions showed that the compound 1h may present a good pharmacokinetic profile. Therefore, the series of DHPM-derived selenoesters described herein displayed good potential for the development of antioxidant and anticholinesterasic agents in the search for new multi-targeted therapeutics for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease.

  17. Antisense-Mediated RNA Targeting: Versatile and Expedient Genetic Manipulation in the Brain

    PubMed Central

    Zalachoras, Ioannis; Evers, Melvin M.; van Roon-Mom, Willeke M. C.; Aartsma-Rus, Annemieke M.; Meijer, Onno C.

    2011-01-01

    A limiting factor in brain research still is the difficulty to evaluate in vivo the role of the increasing number of proteins implicated in neuronal processes. We discuss here the potential of antisense-mediated RNA targeting approaches. We mainly focus on those that manipulate splicing (exon skipping and exon inclusion), but will also briefly discuss mRNA targeting. Classic knockdown of expression by mRNA targeting is only one possible application of antisense oligonucleotides (AON) in the control of gene function. Exon skipping and inclusion are based on the interference of AONs with splicing of pre-mRNAs. These are powerful, specific and particularly versatile techniques, which can be used to circumvent pathogenic mutations, shift splice variant expression, knock down proteins, or to create molecular models using in-frame deletions. Pre-mRNA targeting is currently used both as a research tool, e.g., in models for motor neuron disease, and in clinical trials for Duchenne muscular dystrophy and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. AONs are particularly promising in relation to brain research, as the modified AONs are taken up extremely fast in neurons and glial cells with a long residence, and without the need for viral vectors or other delivery tools, once inside the blood brain barrier. In this review we cover (1). The principles of antisense-mediated techniques, chemistry, and efficacy. (2) The pros and cons of AON approaches in the brain compared to other techniques of interfering with gene function, such as transgenesis and short hairpin RNAs, in terms of specificity of the manipulation, spatial, and temporal control over gene expression, toxicity, and delivery issues. (3) The potential applications for Neuroscience. We conclude that there is good evidence from animal studies that the central nervous system can be successfully targeted, but the potential of the diverse AON-based approaches appears to be under-recognized. PMID:21811437

  18. Semi-Autonomous Collaborative Control of Multi-Robotic Systems for Multi-Task Multi-Target Pairing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-11-01

    this paper proposes a control method for a single- master multi-slave ( SMMS ) teleoperator to cooperatively con- trol a team of mobile robots for a multi... SMMS ) teleoperator to cooperatively control a team of mobile robots for a multi-target mission. The major components of the proposed control method...required human resources and amplifying the human effort, the single-master multi-slave ( SMMS ) teleoperation has been con- sidered in this paper. Fong et

  19. Antisense RNA modulation of alkyl hydroperoxide reductase levels in Helicobacter pylori correlates with organic peroxide toxicity but not infectivity.

    PubMed

    Croxen, Matthew A; Ernst, Peter B; Hoffman, Paul S

    2007-05-01

    Much of the gene content of the human gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori ( approximately 1.7-Mb genome) is considered essential. This view is based on the completeness of metabolic pathways, infrequency of nutritional auxotrophies, and paucity of pathway redundancies typically found in bacteria with larger genomes. Thus, genetic analysis of gene function is often hampered by lethality. In the absence of controllable promoters, often used to titrate gene function, we investigated the feasibility of an antisense RNA interference strategy. To test the antisense approach, we targeted alkyl hydroperoxide reductase (AhpC), one of the most abundant proteins expressed by H. pylori and one whose function is essential for both in vitro growth and gastric colonization. Here, we show that antisense ahpC (as-ahpC) RNA expression from shuttle vector pDH37::as-ahpC achieved an approximately 72% knockdown of AhpC protein levels, which correlated with increased susceptibilities to hydrogen peroxide, cumene, and tert-butyl hydroperoxides but not with growth efficiency. Compensatory increases in catalase levels were not observed in the knockdowns. Expression of single-copy antisense constructs (expressed under the urease promoter and containing an fd phage terminator) from the rdxA locus of mouse-colonizing strain X47 achieved a 32% knockdown of AhpC protein levels (relative to wild-type X47 levels), which correlated with increased susceptibility to organic peroxides but not with mouse colonization efficiency. Our studies indicate that high levels of AhpC are not required for in vitro growth or for primary gastric colonization. Perhaps AhpC, like catalase, assumes a greater role in combating exogenous peroxides arising from lifelong chronic inflammation. These studies also demonstrate the utility of antisense RNA interference in the evaluation of gene function in H. pylori.

  20. Lipid-based delivery of combinations of antisense oligodeoxynucleotides for the in vitro inhibition of HIV-1 replication.

    PubMed

    Lavigne, C; Yelle, J; Sauvé, G; Thierry, A G

    2001-01-01

    We evaluated a new approach to AIDS therapy by using combinations of oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs), delivered with a lipid-based carrier system, that target different HIV viral genome sites. We identified some of the factors that seem to influence the effectiveness of a combination strategy in cell cultures including ODN concentrations, type of infection (acute vs chronic), backbone modification of the ODN, and the number of sequences. When delivered by the DLS carrier system, some advantages of using a combination of ODNs over treatment with only one ODN could be observed in acute infection assays but not in the chronic infection model. These results suggest that in the acute infection model, the 3 different antisense ODNs in the "cocktail" might block an early step of virus replication by combined inhibitory effects. Various combinations of phosphorothioate-modified (PS) and unmodified oligonucleotides delivered by the DLS system were compared for their antiviral activity in a long-term acute assay using HIV-1 (IIIB strain)-infected MOLT-3 cells. The most effective combination had 3 phosphorothioate antisense ODNs: Srev, SDIS, and SPac (>99% inhibition at 100 pM). However, the additive effect determined when using ODN combinations was rather low, revealing the high level of nonsequence specificity in HIV-1 cell culture models. Data illustrated the high sequence nonspecific activity of ODNs, especially when comparing activity of antisense ODNs with activity of random control sequence ODNs. The latter exhibited an inhibitory effect similar to that of antisense ODNs under our experimental conditions. Nevertheless, we demonstrated that it is possible to achieve high anti-HIV activity by using, in combination, picomolar range concentrations of antisense oligonucleotides complexed to a lipid-based carrier system such as the DLS system, without increasing cell toxicity.

  1. Selective amplification of glucocorticoid anti-inflammatory activity through synergistic multi-target action of a combination drug

    PubMed Central

    Zimmermann, Grant R; Avery, William; Finelli, Alyce L; Farwell, Melissa; Fraser, Christopher C; Borisy, Alexis A

    2009-01-01

    observed in the cellular network of corticotroph AtT-20/D16v-F2 cells in vitro, as measured by pro-opiomelanocortin expression and adrenocorticotropic hormone secretion. Conclusions These data suggest that the multi-target mechanism of low-dose prednisolone and dipyridamole creates a dissociated activity profile with an increased therapeutic window through cellular network selective amplification of glucocorticoid-mediated anti-inflammatory signaling. PMID:19171052

  2. Inhibition of human immunodeficiency virus replication by antisense oligodeoxynucleotides.

    PubMed Central

    Goodchild, J; Agrawal, S; Civeira, M P; Sarin, P S; Sun, D; Zamecnik, P C

    1988-01-01

    Twenty different target sites within human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) RNA were selected for studies of inhibition of HIV replication by antisense oligonucleotides. Target sites were selected based on their potential capacity to block recognition functions during viral replication. Antisense oligomers complementary to sites within or near the sequence repeated at the ends of retrovirus RNA (R region) and to certain splice sites were most effective. The effect of antisense oligomer length on inhibiting virus replication was also investigated, and preliminary toxicity studies in mice show that these compounds are toxic only at high levels. The results indicate potential usefulness for these oligomers in the treatment of patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) and AIDS-related complex either alone or in combination with other drugs. PMID:3041414

  3. Inhibition of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Replication by Antisense Oligodeoxynucleotides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodchild, John; Agrawal, Sudhir; Civeira, Maria P.; Sarin, Prem S.; Sun, Daisy; Zamecnik, Paul C.

    1988-08-01

    Twenty different target sites within human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) RNA were selected for studies of inhibition of HIV replication by antisense oligonucleotides. Target sites were selected based on their potential capacity to block recognition functions during viral replication. Antisense oligomers complementary to sites within or near the sequence repeated at the ends of retrovirus RNA (R region) and to certain splice sites were most effective. The effect of antisense oligomer length on inhibiting virus replication was also investigated, and preliminary toxicity studies in mice show that these compounds are toxic only at high levels. The results indicate potential usefulness for these oligomers in the treatment of patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) and AIDS-related complex either alone or in combination with other drugs.

  4. Antisense downregulation of polyphenol oxidase results in enhanced disease susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Thipyapong, Piyada; Hunt, Michelle D; Steffens, John C

    2004-11-01

    Polyphenol oxidases (PPOs; EC 1.14.18.1 or EC 1.10.3.2) catalyze the oxidation of phenolics to quinones, highly reactive intermediates whose secondary reactions are responsible for much of the oxidative browning that accompanies plant senescence, wounding, and responses to pathogens. To assess the impact of PPO expression on resistance to Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato we introduced a chimeric antisense potato PPO cDNA into tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum L.). Oxidation of caffeic acid, the dominant o-diphenolic aglycone of tomato foliage, was decreased ca. 40-fold by antisense expression of PPO. All members of the PPO gene family were downregulated: neither immunoreactive PPO nor PPO-specific mRNA were detectable in the transgenic plants. In addition, the antisense PPO construct suppressed inducible increases in PPO activity. Downregulation of PPO in antisense plants did not affect growth, development, or reproduction of greenhouse-grown plants. However, antisense PPO expression dramatically increased susceptibility to P. syringae expressing the avirulence gene avrPto in both Pto and pto backgrounds. In a compatible (pto) interaction, plants constitutively expressing an antisense PPO construct exhibited a 55-fold increase in bacterial growth, three times larger lesion area, and ten times more lesions cm(-2) than nontransformed plants. In an incompatible (Pto) interaction, antisense PPO plants exhibited 100-fold increases in bacterial growth and ten times more lesions cm(-2) than nontransformed plants. Although it is not clear whether hypersusceptibility of antisense plants is due to low constitutive PPO levels or failure to induce PPO upon infection, these findings suggest a critical role for PPO-catalyzed phenolic oxidation in limiting disease development. As a preliminary effort to understand the role of induced PPO in limiting disease development, we also examined the response of PPO promoter::beta-glucuronidase constructs when plants are challenged with P

  5. Downstream Antisense Transcription Predicts Genomic Features That Define the Specific Chromatin Environment at Mammalian Promoters

    PubMed Central

    Lavender, Christopher A.; Hoffman, Jackson A.; Trotter, Kevin W.; Gilchrist, Daniel A.; Bennett, Brian D.; Burkholder, Adam B.; Fargo, David C.; Archer, Trevor K.

    2016-01-01

    Antisense transcription is a prevalent feature at mammalian promoters. Previous studies have primarily focused on antisense transcription initiating upstream of genes. Here, we characterize promoter-proximal antisense transcription downstream of gene transcription starts sites in human breast cancer cells, investigating the genomic context of downstream antisense transcription. We find extensive correlations between antisense transcription and features associated with the chromatin environment at gene promoters. Antisense transcription downstream of promoters is widespread, with antisense transcription initiation observed within 2 kb of 28% of gene transcription start sites. Antisense transcription initiates between nucleosomes regularly positioned downstream of these promoters. The nucleosomes between gene and downstream antisense transcription start sites carry histone modifications associated with active promoters, such as H3K4me3 and H3K27ac. This region is bound by chromatin remodeling and histone modifying complexes including SWI/SNF subunits and HDACs, suggesting that antisense transcription or resulting RNA transcripts contribute to the creation and maintenance of a promoter-associated chromatin environment. Downstream antisense transcription overlays additional regulatory features, such as transcription factor binding, DNA accessibility, and the downstream edge of promoter-associated CpG islands. These features suggest an important role for antisense transcription in the regulation of gene expression and the maintenance of a promoter-associated chromatin environment. PMID:27487356

  6. Correction of a Cystic Fibrosis Splicing Mutation by Antisense Oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Igreja, Susana; Clarke, Luka A; Botelho, Hugo M; Marques, Luís; Amaral, Margarida D

    2016-02-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF), the most common life-threatening genetic disease in Caucasians, is caused by ∼2,000 different mutations in the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene. A significant fraction of these (∼13%) affect pre-mRNA splicing for which novel therapies have been somewhat neglected. We have previously described the effect of the CFTR splicing mutation c.2657+5G>A in IVS16, showing that it originates transcripts lacking exon 16 as well as wild-type transcripts. Here, we tested an RNA-based antisense oligonucleotide (AON) strategy to correct the aberrant splicing caused by this mutation. Two AONs (AON1/2) complementary to the pre-mRNA IVS16 mutant region were designed and their effect on splicing was assessed at the RNA and protein levels, on intracellular protein localization and function. To this end, we used the 2657+5G>A mutant CFTR minigene stably expressed in HEK293 Flp-In cells that express a single copy of the transgene. RNA data from AON1-treated mutant cells show that exon 16 inclusion was almost completely restored (to 95%), also resulting in increased levels of correctly localized CFTR protein at the plasma membrane (PM) and with increased function. A novel two-color CFTR splicing reporter minigene developed here allowed the quantitative monitoring of splicing by automated microscopy localization of CFTR at the PM. The AON strategy is thus a promising therapeutic approach for the specific correction of alternative splicing.

  7. Natural antisense transcripts associated with salinity response in alfalfa

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Natural antisense transcripts (NATs) are long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) complimentary to the messenger (sense) RNA (Wang et al. 2014). Many of them are involved in regulation of their own sense transcripts thus playing pivotal biological roles in all processes of organismal development and responses...

  8. Neighboring gene regulation by antisense long non-coding RNAs.

    PubMed

    Villegas, Victoria E; Zaphiropoulos, Peter G

    2015-02-03

    Antisense transcription, considered until recently as transcriptional noise, is a very common phenomenon in human and eukaryotic transcriptomes, operating in two ways based on whether the antisense RNA acts in cis or in trans. This process can generate long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs), one of the most diverse classes of cellular transcripts, which have demonstrated multifunctional roles in fundamental biological processes, including embryonic pluripotency, differentiation and development. Antisense lncRNAs have been shown to control nearly every level of gene regulation--pretranscriptional, transcriptional and posttranscriptional--through DNA-RNA, RNA-RNA or protein-RNA interactions. This review is centered on functional studies of antisense lncRNA-mediated regulation of neighboring gene expression. Specifically, it addresses how these transcripts interact with other biological molecules, nucleic acids and proteins, to regulate gene expression through chromatin remodeling at the pretranscriptional level and modulation of transcriptional and post-transcriptional processes by altering the sense mRNA structure or the cellular compartmental distribution, either in the nucleus or the cytoplasm.

  9. Reduction of polygalacturonase activity in tomato fruit by antisense RNA.

    PubMed

    Sheehy, R E; Kramer, M; Hiatt, W R

    1988-12-01

    Polygalacturonase [PG; poly(1,4-alpha-D-galacturonide) glycanhydrolase; EC 3.2.1.15] is expressed in tomato only during the ripening stage of fruit development. PG becomes abundant during ripening and has a major role in cell wall degradation and fruit softening. Tomato plants were transformed to produce antisense RNA from a gene construct containing the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter and a full-length PG cDNA in reverse orientation. The construct was integrated into the tomato genome by Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. The constitutive synthesis of PG antisense RNA in transgenic plants resulted in a substantial reduction in the levels of PG mRNA and enzymatic activity in ripening fruit. The steady-state levels of PG antisense RNA in green fruit of transgenic plants were lower than the levels of PG mRNA normally attained during ripening. However, analysis of transcription in isolated nuclei demonstrated that the antisense RNA construct was transcribed at a higher rate than the tomato PG gene(s). Analysis of fruit from transgenic plants demonstrated a reduction in PG mRNA and enzymatic activity of 70-90%. The reduction in PG activity did not prevent the accumulation of the red pigment lycopene.

  10. Multi-Target Directed Donepezil-Like Ligands for Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Unzeta, Mercedes; Esteban, Gerard; Bolea, Irene; Fogel, Wieslawa A.; Ramsay, Rona R.; Youdim, Moussa B. H.; Tipton, Keith F.; Marco-Contelles, José

    2016-01-01

    HIGHLIGHTS ASS234 is a MTDL compound containing a moiety from Donepezil and the propargyl group from the PF 9601N, a potent and selective MAO B inhibitor. This compound is the most advanced anti-Alzheimer agent for preclinical studies identified in our laboratory.Derived from ASS234 both multipotent donepezil-indolyl (MTDL-1) and donepezil-pyridyl hybrids (MTDL-2) were designed and evaluated as inhibitors of AChE/BuChE and both MAO isoforms. MTDL-2 showed more high affinity toward the four enzymes than MTDL-1.MTDL-3 and MTDL-4, were designed containing the N-benzylpiperidinium moiety from Donepezil, a metal- chelating 8-hydroxyquinoline group and linked to a N-propargyl core and they were pharmacologically evaluated.The presence of the cyano group in MTDL-3, enhanced binding to AChE, BuChE and MAO A. It showed antioxidant behavior and it was able to strongly complex Cu(II), Zn(II) and Fe(III).MTDL-4 showed higher affinity toward AChE, BuChE.MTDL-3 exhibited good brain penetration capacity (ADMET) and less toxicity than Donepezil. Memory deficits in scopolamine-lesioned animals were restored by MTDL-3.MTDL-3 particularly emerged as a ligand showing remarkable potential benefits for its use in AD therapy. Alzheimer's disease (AD), the most common form of adult onset dementia, is an age-related neurodegenerative disorder characterized by progressive memory loss, decline in language skills, and other cognitive impairments. Although its etiology is not completely known, several factors including deficits of acetylcholine, β-amyloid deposits, τ-protein phosphorylation, oxidative stress, and neuroinflammation are considered to play significant roles in the pathophysiology of this disease. For a long time, AD patients have been treated with acetylcholinesterase inhibitors such as donepezil (Aricept®) but with limited therapeutic success. This might be due to the complex multifactorial nature of AD, a fact that has prompted the design of new Multi-Target-Directed Ligands

  11. The ICAM-1 antisense oligonucleotide ISIS-3082 prevents the development of postoperative ileus in mice.

    PubMed

    The, Frans O; de Jonge, Wouter J; Bennink, Roel J; van den Wijngaard, Rene M; Boeckxstaens, Guy E

    2005-09-01

    Intestinal manipulation (IM) during abdominal surgery triggers the influx of inflammatory cells, leading to postoperative ileus. Prevention of this local muscle inflammation, using intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and leukocyte function-associated antigen-1-specific antibodies, has been shown to shorten postoperative ileus. However, the therapeutic use of antibodies has considerable disadvantages. The aim of the current study was to evaluate the effect of ISIS-3082, a mouse-specific ICAM-1 antisense oligonucleotide, on postoperative ileus in mice. Mice underwent a laparotomy or a laparotomy combined with IM after treatment with ICAM-1 antibodies, 0.1-10 mg kg(-1) ISIS-3082, saline or ISIS-8997 (scrambled control antisense oligonucleotides, 1 and 3 mg kg(-1)). At 24 h after surgery, gastric emptying of a 99mTC labelled semi-liquid meal was determined using scintigraphy. Intestinal inflammation was assessed by myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity in ileal muscle whole mounts. IM significantly reduced gastric emptying compared to laparotomy. Pretreatment with ISIS-3082 (0.1-1 mg kg(-1)) as well as ICAM-1 antibodies (10 mg kg(-1)), but not ISIS-8997 or saline, improved gastric emptying in a dose-dependent manner. This effect diminished with higher doses of ISIS-3082 (3-10 mg kg(-1)). Similarly, ISIS-3082 (0.1-1 mg kg(-1)) and ICAM-1 antibodies, but not ISIS-8997 or higher doses of ISIS-3082 (3-10 mg kg(-1)), reduced manipulation-induced inflammation. Immunohistochemistry showed reduction of ICAM-1 expression with ISIS-3082 only. ISIS-3082 pretreatment prevents postoperative ileus in mice by reduction of manipulation-induced local intestinal muscle inflammation. Our data suggest that targeting ICAM-1 using antisense oligonucleotides may represent a new therapeutic approach to the prevention of postoperative ileus.

  12. Polarized expression of the membrane ASP protein derived from HIV-1 antisense transcription in T cells

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Retroviral gene expression generally depends on a full-length transcript that initiates in the 5' LTR, which is either left unspliced or alternatively spliced. We and others have demonstrated the existence of antisense transcription initiating in the 3' LTR in human lymphotropic retroviruses, including HTLV-1, HTLV-2, and HIV-1. Such transcripts have been postulated to encode antisense proteins important for the establishment of viral infections. The antisense strand of the HIV-1 proviral DNA contains an ORF termed asp, coding for a highly hydrophobic protein. However, although anti-ASP antibodies have been described to be present in HIV-1-infected patients, its in vivo expression requires further support. The objective of this present study was to clearly demonstrate that ASP is effectively expressed in infected T cells and to provide a better characterization of its subcellular localization. Results We first investigated the subcellular localization of ASP by transfecting Jurkat T cells with vectors expressing ASP tagged with the Flag epitope to its N-terminus. Using immunofluorescence microscopy, we found that ASP localized to the plasma membrane in transfected Jurkat T cells, but with different staining patterns. In addition to an entire distribution to the plasma membrane, ASP showed an asymmetric localization and could also be detected in membrane connections between two cells. We then infected Jurkat T cells with NL4.3 virus coding for ASP tagged with the Flag epitope at its C-terminal end. By this approach, we were capable of showing that ASP is effectively expressed from the HIV-1 3' LTR in infected T cells, with an asymmetric localization of the viral protein at the plasma membrane. Conclusion These results demonstrate for the first time that ASP can be detected when expressed from full-length HIV-1 proviral DNA and that its localization is consistent with Jurkat T cells overexpressing ASP. PMID:21929758

  13. Multi-exon Skipping Using Cocktail Antisense Oligonucleotides in the Canine X-linked Muscular Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Kuraoka, Mutsuki; Lee, Joshua J.A.; Takeda, Shin'ichi; Yokota, Toshifumi

    2016-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is one of the most common lethal genetic diseases worldwide, caused by mutations in the dystrophin (DMD) gene. Exon skipping employs short DNA/RNA-like molecules called antisense oligonucleotides (AONs) that restore the reading frame and produce shorter but functional proteins. However, exon skipping therapy faces two major hurdles: limited applicability (up to only 13% of patients can be treated with a single AON drug), and uncertain function of truncated proteins. These issues were addressed with a cocktail AON approach. While approximately 70% of DMD patients can be treated by single exon skipping (all exons combined), one could potentially treat more than 90% of DMD patients if multiple exon skipping using cocktail antisense drugs can be realized. The canine X-linked muscular dystrophy (CXMD) dog model, whose phenotype is more similar to human DMD patients, was used to test the systemic efficacy and safety of multi-exon skipping of exons 6 and 8. The CXMD dog model harbors a splice site mutation in intron 6, leading to a lack of exon 7 in dystrophin mRNA. To restore the reading frame in CXMD requires multi-exon skipping of exons 6 and 8; therefore, CXMD is a good middle-sized animal model for testing the efficacy and safety of multi-exon skipping. In the current study, a cocktail of antisense morpholinos targeting exon 6 and exon 8 was designed and it restored dystrophin expression in body-wide skeletal muscles. Methods for transfection/injection of cocktail oligos and evaluation of the efficacy and safety of multi-exon skipping in the CXMD dog model are presented. PMID:27285612

  14. Proteomic analysis of mature barley grains from C-hordein antisense lines.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Daiana; Gaziola, Salete Aparecida; Boaretto, Luis Felipe; Azevedo, Ricardo Antunes

    2016-05-01

    Hordeins are the major storage proteins in barley grains and are responsible for their low nutritional quality. Previously, antisense C-hordein barley lines were generated and were shown to contain a more balanced amino acid composition and an altered storage protein profile. In the present study, a proteomic approach that combined two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) and mass spectrometry was used to (1) identify the changes in the protein profile of non-storage proteins (salt soluble fraction) in antisense C-hordein barley lines (L1, L2 and L3) and (2) map the differentially expressed proteins compared to the non-transgenic control line (Hordeum vulgare cv. Golden Promise). Moreover, the changes in the proteins were correlated with the more balanced amino acid composition of these lines, with special attention to the lysine content. The results showed that suppression of C-hordein expression does not exclusively affect hordein synthesis and accumulation. The more balanced amino acid composition observed in the transgenic lines L1, L2 and L3 was an indirect result of the profound alterations in the patterns of the non-storage proteins. The observed changes included up-regulated expression of the proteins involved in stress and detoxification (L1), defence (L2 and L3), and storage globulins (L1, L2 and L3). To a lesser extent, the proteins involved in grain metabolism were also changed. Thus, the increased essential amino acids content results from changes in distinct protein sources among the three antisense C-hordein lines analyzed, although the up-regulated expression of lysine-rich proteins was consistently observed in all lines.

  15. Antisense-Based Progerin Downregulation in HGPS-Like Patients' Cells.

    PubMed

    Harhouri, Karim; Navarro, Claire; Baquerre, Camille; Da Silva, Nathalie; Bartoli, Catherine; Casey, Frank; Mawuse, Guedenon Koffi; Doubaj, Yassamine; Lévy, Nicolas; De Sandre-Giovannoli, Annachiara

    2016-07-11

    Progeroid laminopathies, including Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria Syndrome (HGPS, OMIM #176670), are premature and accelerated aging diseases caused by defects in nuclear A-type Lamins. Most HGPS patients carry a de novo point mutation within exon 11 of the LMNA gene encoding A-type Lamins. This mutation activates a cryptic splice site leading to the deletion of 50 amino acids at its carboxy-terminal domain, resulting in a truncated and permanently farnesylated Prelamin A called Prelamin A Δ50 or Progerin. Some patients carry other LMNA mutations affecting exon 11 splicing and are named "HGPS-like" patients. They also produce Progerin and/or other truncated Prelamin A isoforms (Δ35 and Δ90) at the transcriptional and/or protein level. The results we present show that morpholino antisense oligonucleotides (AON) prevent pathogenic LMNA splicing, markedly reducing the accumulation of Progerin and/or other truncated Prelamin A isoforms (Prelamin A Δ35, Prelamin A Δ90) in HGPS-like patients' cells. Finally, a patient affected with Mandibuloacral Dysplasia type B (MAD-B, carrying a homozygous mutation in ZMPSTE24, encoding an enzyme involved in Prelamin A maturation, leading to accumulation of wild type farnesylated Prelamin A), was also included in this study. These results provide preclinical proof of principle for the use of a personalized antisense approach in HGPS-like and MAD-B patients, who may therefore be eligible for inclusion in a therapeutic trial based on this approach, together with classical HGPS patients.

  16. Altered activity profile of a tertiary silanol analog of multi-targeting nuclear receptor modulator T0901317.

    PubMed

    Toyama, Hirozumi; Sato, Shoko; Shirakawa, Hitoshi; Komai, Michio; Hashimoto, Yuichi; Fujii, Shinya

    2016-04-01

    We report the design, synthesis, and physicochemical/biological evaluation of novel silanol derivative 6 (sila-T) as a silanol analog of multi-target nuclear receptor modulator T0901317 (5). Compound 6 showed intermediate hydrophobicity between the corresponding alcohol 13 and perfluoroalcohol 5. While 5 exhibited potent activities toward liver X receptor α and β, farnesoid X receptor, pregnane X receptor (PXR) and retinoic acid receptor-related orphan receptor (ROR)γ, silanol 6 exhibited activity only toward PXR and RORs. Incorporation of silanol instead of perfluoroalcohol is a promising option for developing novel target-selective, biologically active compounds.

  17. Upregulation of functional Kv11.1 isoform expression by inhibition of intronic polyadenylation with antisense morpholino oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Gong, Qiuming; Stump, Matthew R; Zhou, Zhengfeng

    2014-11-01

    The KCNH2 gene encodes the Kv11.1 potassium channel that conducts the rapidly activating delayed rectifier current in the heart. KCNH2 pre-mRNA undergoes alternative processing; intron 9 splicing leads to the formation of a functional, full-length Kv11.1a isoform, while polyadenylation within intron 9 generates a non-functional, C-terminally truncated Kv11.1a-USO isoform. The relative expression of Kv11.1 isoforms plays an important role in the regulation of Kv11.1 channel function and the pathogenesis of long QT syndrome. In this study, we identified cis-acting elements that are required for KCNH2 intron 9 poly(A) signal activity. Mutation of these elements decreased Kv11.1a-USO expression and increased the expression of Kv11.1a mRNA, protein and channel current. More importantly, blocking these elements by antisense morpholino oligonucleotides shifted the alternative processing of KCNH2 intron 9 from the polyadenylation to the splicing pathway, leading to the predominant production of Kv11.1a and a significant increase in Kv11.1 current. Our findings indicate that the expression of the Kv11.1a isoform can be upregulated by an antisense approach. Antisense inhibition of KCNH2 intronic polyadenylation represents a novel approach to increase Kv11.1 channel function.

  18. Hybridization of different antisense oligonucleotides on the surface of gold nanoparticles to silence zinc metalloproteinase gene after uptake by Leishmania major.

    PubMed

    Jebali, Ali; Anvari-Tafti, Mohammad Hosssein

    2015-05-01

    The use of antisense oligonucleotides is a novel strategy to treat infectious diseases. In this approach, vital mRNAs are targeted by antisense oligonucleotides. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of gold nanoparticles hybridized with different antisense oligonucleotides on Leishmania (L) major. In this project, gold nanoparticles were first synthesized, and then conjugated with primary oligonucleotides, 3'-AAA-5'. Next, conjugated gold nanoparticles (NP1) were separately hybridized with three types of antisense oligonucleotide from coding reign of GP63 gene (NP2), non-coding reign of GP63 gene (NP3), and both coding and non-coding reigns of GP63 (NP4). Then, 1mL of L. major suspension was separately added to 1mL of different hybridized gold nanoparticles at serial concentrations (1-200μg/mL), and incubated for 24, 48, and 72h at 37°C. Next, the uptake of each nanoparticle was separately measured by atomic absorption spectroscopy. After incubation, the cell viability was separately evaluated by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl-tetrazolium bromide assay. Also, the expression of GP63 gene was read out by quantitative-real-time PCR. This study showed that NP2 and NP3 had higher (5-fold) uptake than NP1 and NP4. Moreover, NP2 and NP3 led to less cell viability and gene expression, compared with NP1 and NP4. It could be concluded that both sequence and size of antisense oligonucleotide were important for transfection of L. major. Importantly, these antisense oligonucleotides can be obtained from both coding and non-coding reign of GP63 gene. Moreover, hybridized gold nanoparticles not only could silence GP63 gene, but also could kill L. major.

  19. Development and application of a multi-targeting reference plasmid as calibrator for analysis of five genetically modified soybean events.

    PubMed

    Pi, Liqun; Li, Xiang; Cao, Yiwei; Wang, Canhua; Pan, Liangwen; Yang, Litao

    2015-04-01

    Reference materials are important in accurate analysis of genetically modified organism (GMO) contents in food/feeds, and development of novel reference plasmid is a new trend in the research of GMO reference materials. Herein, we constructed a novel multi-targeting plasmid, pSOY, which contained seven event-specific sequences of five GM soybeans (MON89788-5', A2704-12-3', A5547-127-3', DP356043-5', DP305423-3', A2704-12-5', and A5547-127-5') and sequence of soybean endogenous reference gene Lectin. We evaluated the specificity, limit of detection and quantification, and applicability of pSOY in both qualitative and quantitative PCR analyses. The limit of detection (LOD) was as low as 20 copies in qualitative PCR, and the limit of quantification (LOQ) in quantitative PCR was 10 copies. In quantitative real-time PCR analysis, the PCR efficiencies of all event-specific and Lectin assays were higher than 90%, and the squared regression coefficients (R(2)) were more than 0.999. The quantification bias varied from 0.21% to 19.29%, and the relative standard deviations were from 1.08% to 9.84% in simulated samples analysis. All the results demonstrated that the developed multi-targeting plasmid, pSOY, was a credible substitute of matrix reference materials, and could be used as a reliable reference calibrator in the identification and quantification of multiple GM soybean events.

  20. In Vivo Characterization of ARN14140, a Memantine/Galantamine-Based Multi-Target Compound for Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Reggiani, Angelo M.; Simoni, Elena; Caporaso, Roberta; Meunier, Johann; Keller, Emeline; Maurice, Tangui; Minarini, Anna; Rosini, Michela; Cavalli, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is a chronic pathological condition that leads to neurodegeneration, loss of intellectual abilities, including cognition and memory, and ultimately to death. It is widely recognized that AD is a multifactorial disease, where different pathological cascades (mainly amyloid and tau) contribute to neural death and to the clinical outcome related to the disease. The currently available drugs for AD were developed according to the one-target, one-drug paradigm. In recent times, multi-target strategies have begun to play an increasingly central role in the discovery of more efficacious candidates for complex neurological conditions, including AD. In this study, we report on the in vivo pharmacological characterization of ARN14140, a new chemical entity, which was obtained through a multi-target structure-activity relationship campaign, and which showed a balanced inhibiting profile against the acetylcholinesterase enzyme and the NMDA receptor. Based on the initial promising biochemical data, ARN14140 is here studied in mice treated with the amyloidogenic fragment 25–35 of the amyloid-β peptide, a consolidated non-transgenic AD model. Sub-chronically treating animals with ARN14140 leads to a prevention of the cognitive impairment and of biomarker levels connected to neurodegeneration, demonstrating its neuroprotective potential as new AD agent. PMID:27609215

  1. In vitro characterization of two novel biodegradable vectors for the delivery of radiolabeled antisense oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    von Guggenberg, Elisabeth; Shahhosseini, Soraya; Koslowsky, Ingrid; Lavasanifar, Afsaneh; Murray, David; Mercer, John

    2010-12-01

    The development of antisense oligonucleotides suitable for tumor targeting applications is hindered by low stability and bioavailability of oligonucleotides in vivo and by the absence of efficient and safe vectors for oligonucleotide delivery. Stabilization in vivo has been achieved through chemical modification of oligonucleotides by various means, but effective approaches to enhance their intracellular delivery are lacking. This study reports on the characterization in vitro of a fully phosphorothioated 20-mer oligonucleotide, complementary to p21 mRNA, radiolabeled with fluorine-18 using a thiol reactive prosthetic group. The potential of two novel synthetic block copolymers containing grafted polyamines on their hydrophobic blocks for vector-assisted cell delivery was studied in vitro. Extensive cellular uptake studies were performed in human colon carcinoma cell lines with enhanced or deficient p21 expression to evaluate and compare the uptake mechanism of naked and vectorized radiolabeled formulations. Uptake studies with the two novel biodegradable vectors showed a moderate increase in cell uptake of the radiofluorinated antisense oligonucleotide. The two vectors show, however, promising advantages over conventional lipidic vectors regarding their biocompatibility and subcellular distribution.

  2. Treatment of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis with antisense oligonucleotides against the low affinity neurotrophin receptor.

    PubMed

    Soilu-Hänninen, M; Epa, R; Shipham, K; Butzkueven, H; Bucci, T; Barrett, G; Bartlett, P F; Kilpatrick, T J

    2000-03-15

    Upregulated expression of the low-affinity neurotrophin receptor (p75) in the central nervous system (CNS) during experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) has recently been demonstrated. To investigate whether p75 plays a role in disease pathogenesis, we adopted a gene therapy approach, utilizing antisense oligonucleotides to downregulate p75 expression during EAE. Phosphorothioate antisense oligonucleotides (AS), nonsense oligonucleotides (NS) or phosphate buffered saline (PBS) were injected daily for 18 days after immunization of SJL/J (H-2s)-mice with myelin proteolipid protein (PLP) peptide 139-151. In the AS group, there was a statistically significant reduction in both the mean maximal disease score (1.85 in the AS, 2.94 in the NS and 2.75 in the PBS-groups, respectively, P < 0.025) and in the cumulative disease incidence ( approximately 60% in the AS group and approximately 90% in the control groups). Histological and immunohistochemical analysis showed reduced inflammation and demyelination, as well as reduced p75 expression at the blood-brain barrier (BBB) in the AS-treated mice in comparison with both control groups. There was no difference, however, in p75 expression on neural cells within the CNS between the three groups of mice. We conclude that p75 could play a proactive role in the pathogenesis of EAE and may exert its effect at the level of the BBB.

  3. Antisense Mediated Splicing Modulation For Inherited Metabolic Diseases: Challenges for Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Pérez, Belen; Vilageliu, Lluisa; Grinberg, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    In the past few years, research in targeted mutation therapies has experienced significant advances, especially in the field of rare diseases. In particular, the efficacy of antisense therapy for suppression of normal, pathogenic, or cryptic splice sites has been demonstrated in cellular and animal models and has already reached the clinical trials phase for Duchenne muscular dystrophy. In different inherited metabolic diseases, splice switching oligonucleotides (SSOs) have been used with success in patients' cells to force pseudoexon skipping or to block cryptic splice sites, in both cases recovering normal transcript and protein and correcting the enzyme deficiency. However, future in vivo studies require individual approaches for delivery depending on the gene defect involved, given the different patterns of tissue and organ expression. Herein we review the state of the art of antisense therapy targeting RNA splicing in metabolic diseases, grouped according to their expression patterns—multisystemic, hepatic, or in central nervous system (CNS)—and summarize the recent progress achieved in the field of in vivo delivery of oligonucleotides to each organ or system. Successful body-wide distribution of SSOs and preferential distribution in the liver after systemic administration have been reported in murine models for different diseases, while for CNS limited data are available, although promising results with intratechal injections have been achieved. PMID:24506780

  4. From the dual function lead AP2238 to AP2469, a multi-target-directed ligand for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Tarozzi, Andrea; Bartolini, Manuela; Piazzi, Lorna; Valgimigli, Luca; Amorati, Riccardo; Bolondi, Cecilia; Djemil, Alice; Mancini, Francesca; Andrisano, Vincenza; Rampa, Angela

    2014-01-01

    The development of drugs with different pharmacological properties appears to be an innovative therapeutic approach for Alzheimer's disease. In this article, we describe a simple structural modification of AP2238, a first dual function lead, in particular the introduction of the catechol moiety performed in order to search for multi-target ligands. The new compound AP2469 retains anti-acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and beta-site amyloid precursor protein cleaving enzyme (BACE)1 activities compared to the reference, and is also able to inhibit Aβ42 self-aggregation, Aβ42 oligomer-binding to cell membrane and subsequently reactive oxygen species formation in both neuronal and microglial cells. The ability of AP2469 to interfere with Aβ42 oligomer-binding to neuron and microglial cell membrane gives this molecule both neuroprotective and anti-inflammatory properties. These findings, together with its strong chain-breaking antioxidant performance, make AP2469 a potential drug able to modify the course of the disease. PMID:25505579

  5. Analytic performance prediction of track-to-track association with biased data in multi-sensor multi-target tracking scenarios.

    PubMed

    Tian, Wei; Wang, Yue; Shan, Xiuming; Yang, Jian

    2013-09-12

    An analytic method for predicting the performance of track-to-track association (TTTA) with biased data in multi-sensor multi-target tracking scenarios is proposed in this paper. The proposed method extends the existing results of the bias-free situation by accounting for the impact of sensor biases. Since little insight of the intrinsic relationship between scenario parameters and the performance of TTTA can be obtained by numerical simulations, the proposed analytic approach is a potential substitute for the costly Monte Carlo simulation method. Analytic expressions are developed for the global nearest neighbor (GNN) association algorithm in terms of correct association probability. The translational biases of sensors are incorporated in the expressions, which provide good insight into how the TTTA performance is affected by sensor biases, as well as other scenario parameters, including the target spatial density, the extraneous track density and the average association uncertainty error. To show the validity of the analytic predictions, we compare them with the simulation results, and the analytic predictions agree reasonably well with the simulations in a large range of normally anticipated scenario parameters.

  6. From the dual function lead AP2238 to AP2469, a multi-target-directed ligand for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Tarozzi, Andrea; Bartolini, Manuela; Piazzi, Lorna; Valgimigli, Luca; Amorati, Riccardo; Bolondi, Cecilia; Djemil, Alice; Mancini, Francesca; Andrisano, Vincenza; Rampa, Angela

    2014-04-01

    The development of drugs with different pharmacological properties appears to be an innovative therapeutic approach for Alzheimer's disease. In this article, we describe a simple structural modification of AP2238, a first dual function lead, in particular the introduction of the catechol moiety performed in order to search for multi-target ligands. The new compound AP2469 retains anti-acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and beta-site amyloid precursor protein cleaving enzyme (BACE)1 activities compared to the reference, and is also able to inhibit Aβ 42 self-aggregation, Aβ 42 oligomer-binding to cell membrane and subsequently reactive oxygen species formation in both neuronal and microglial cells. The ability of AP2469 to interfere with Aβ 42 oligomer-binding to neuron and microglial cell membrane gives this molecule both neuroprotective and anti-inflammatory properties. These findings, together with its strong chain-breaking antioxidant performance, make AP2469 a potential drug able to modify the course of the disease.

  7. Analytic Performance Prediction of Track-to-Track Association with Biased Data in Multi-Sensor Multi-Target Tracking Scenarios

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Wei; Wang, Yue; Shan, Xiuming; Yang, Jian

    2013-01-01

    An analytic method for predicting the performance of track-to-track association (TTTA) with biased data in multi-sensor multi-target tracking scenarios is proposed in this paper. The proposed method extends the existing results of the bias-free situation by accounting for the impact of sensor biases. Since little insight of the intrinsic relationship between scenario parameters and the performance of TTTA can be obtained by numerical simulations, the proposed analytic approach is a potential substitute for the costly Monte Carlo simulation method. Analytic expressions are developed for the global nearest neighbor (GNN) association algorithm in terms of correct association probability. The translational biases of sensors are incorporated in the expressions, which provide good insight into how the TTTA performance is affected by sensor biases, as well as other scenario parameters, including the target spatial density, the extraneous track density and the average association uncertainty error. To show the validity of the analytic predictions, we compare them with the simulation results, and the analytic predictions agree reasonably well with the simulations in a large range of normally anticipated scenario parameters. PMID:24036583

  8. Dovitinib (TKI258), a multi-target angiokinase inhibitor, is effective regardless of KRAS or BRAF mutation status in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Choong-Kun; Lee, Myung Eun; Lee, Won Suk; Kim, Jeong Min; Park, Kyu Hyun; Kim, Tae Soo; Lee, Kang Young; Ahn, Joong Bae; Chung, Hyun Cheol; Rha, Sun Young

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: We aimed to determine whether KRAS and BRAF mutant colorectal cancer (CRC) cells exhibit distinct sensitivities to the multi-target angiokinase inhibitor, TKI258 (dovitinib). Materials and methods: We screened 10 CRC cell lines by using receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) array to identify activated RTKs. MTT assays, anchorage-independent colony-formation assays, and immunoblotting assays were performed to evaluate the in vitro anti-tumor effects of TKI258. In vivo efficacy study followed by pharmacodynamic evaluation was done. Results: Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor 1 (FGFR1) and FGFR3 were among the most highly activated RTKs in CRC cell lines. In in vitro assays, the BRAF mutant HT-29 cells were more resistant to the TKI258 than the KRAS mutant LoVo cells. However, in xenograft assays, TKI258 equally delayed the growth of tumors induced by both cell lines. TUNEL assays showed that the apoptotic index was unchanged following TKI258 treatment, but staining for Ki-67 and CD31 was substantially reduced in both xenografts, implying an anti-angiogenic effect of the drug. TKI258 treatment was effective in delaying CRC tumor growth in vivo regardless of the KRAS and BRAF mutation status. Conclusions: Our results identify FGFRs as potential targets in CRC treatment and suggest that combined targeting of multiple RTKs with TKI258 might serve as a novel approach to improve outcome of patients with CRC. PMID:25628921

  9. Targeting antisense mitochondrial ncRNAs inhibits murine melanoma tumor growth and metastasis through reduction in survival and invasion factors.

    PubMed

    Lobos-González, Lorena; Silva, Verónica; Araya, Mariela; Restovic, Franko; Echenique, Javiera; Oliveira-Cruz, Luciana; Fitzpatrick, Christopher; Briones, Macarena; Villegas, Jaime; Villota, Claudio; Vidaurre, Soledad; Borgna, Vincenzo; Socias, Miguel; Valenzuela, Sebastián; Lopez, Constanza; Socias, Teresa; Varas, Manuel; Díaz, Jorge; Burzio, Luis O; Burzio, Verónica A

    2016-09-06

    We reported that knockdown of the antisense noncoding mitochondrial RNAs (ASncmtRNAs) induces apoptotic death of several human tumor cell lines, but not normal cells, suggesting this approach for selective therapy against different types of cancer. In order to translate these results to a preclinical scenario, we characterized the murine noncoding mitochondrial RNAs (ncmtRNAs) and performed in vivo knockdown in syngeneic murine melanoma models. Mouse ncmtRNAs display structures similar to the human counterparts, including long double-stranded regions arising from the presence of inverted repeats. Knockdown of ASncmtRNAs with specific antisense oligonucleotides (ASO) reduces murine melanoma B16F10 cell proliferation and induces apoptosis in vitro through downregulation of pro-survival and metastasis markers, particularly survivin. For in vivo studies, subcutaneous B16F10 melanoma tumors in C57BL/6 mice were treated systemically with specific and control antisense oligonucleotides (ASO). For metastasis studies, tumors were resected, followed by systemic administration of ASOs and the presence of metastatic nodules in lungs and liver was assessed. Treatment with specific ASO inhibited tumor growth and metastasis after primary tumor resection. In a metastasis-only assay, mice inoculated intravenously with cells and treated with the same ASO displayed reduced number and size of melanoma nodules in the lungs, compared to controls. Our results suggest that ASncmtRNAs could be potent targets for melanoma therapy. To our knowledge, the ASncmtRNAs are the first potential non-nuclear targets for melanoma therapy.

  10. Targeting antisense mitochondrial ncRNAs inhibits murine melanoma tumor growth and metastasis through reduction in survival and invasion factors

    PubMed Central

    Lobos-González, Lorena; Silva, Verónica; Araya, Mariela; Restovic, Franko; Echenique, Javiera; Oliveira-Cruz, Luciana; Fitzpatrick, Christopher; Briones, Macarena; Villegas, Jaime; Villota, Claudio; Vidaurre, Soledad; Borgna, Vincenzo; Socias, Miguel; Valenzuela, Sebastián; Lopez, Constanza; Socias, Teresa; Varas, Manuel; Díaz, Jorge; Burzio, Luis O.; Burzio, Verónica A.

    2016-01-01

    We reported that knockdown of the antisense noncoding mitochondrial RNAs (ASncmtRNAs) induces apoptotic death of several human tumor cell lines, but not normal cells, suggesting this approach for selective therapy against different types of cancer. In order to translate these results to a preclinical scenario, we characterized the murine noncoding mitochondrial RNAs (ncmtRNAs) and performed in vivo knockdown in syngeneic murine melanoma models. Mouse ncmtRNAs display structures similar to the human counterparts, including long double-stranded regions arising from the presence of inverted repeats. Knockdown of ASncmtRNAs with specific antisense oligonucleotides (ASO) reduces murine melanoma B16F10 cell proliferation and induces apoptosis in vitro through downregulation of pro-survival and metastasis markers, particularly survivin. For in vivo studies, subcutaneous B16F10 melanoma tumors in C57BL/6 mice were treated systemically with specific and control antisense oligonucleotides (ASO). For metastasis studies, tumors were resected, followed by systemic administration of ASOs and the presence of metastatic nodules in lungs and liver was assessed. Treatment with specific ASO inhibited tumor growth and metastasis after primary tumor resection. In a metastasis-only assay, mice inoculated intravenously with cells and treated with the same ASO displayed reduced number and size of melanoma nodules in the lungs, compared to controls. Our results suggest that ASncmtRNAs could be potent targets for melanoma therapy. To our knowledge, the ASncmtRNAs are the first potential non-nuclear targets for melanoma therapy. PMID:27507060

  11. Bacterial antisense RNAs are mainly the product of transcriptional noise

    PubMed Central

    Lloréns-Rico, Verónica; Cano, Jaime; Kamminga, Tjerko; Gil, Rosario; Latorre, Amparo; Chen, Wei-Hua; Bork, Peer; Glass, John I.; Serrano, Luis; Lluch-Senar, Maria

    2016-01-01

    cis-Encoded antisense RNAs (asRNAs) are widespread along bacterial transcriptomes. However, the role of most of these RNAs remains unknown, and there is an ongoing discussion as to what extent these transcripts are the result of transcriptional noise. We show, by comparative transcriptomics of 20 bacterial species and one chloroplast, that the number of asRNAs is exponentially dependent on the genomic AT content and that expression of asRNA at low levels exerts little impact in terms of energy consumption. A transcription model simulating mRNA and asRNA production indicates that the asRNA regulatory effect is only observed above certain expression thresholds, substantially higher than physiological transcript levels. These predictions were verified experimentally by overexpressing nine different asRNAs in Mycoplasma pneumoniae. Our results suggest that most of the antisense transcripts found in bacteria are the consequence of transcriptional noise, arising at spurious promoters throughout the genome. PMID:26973873

  12. Induction of Radiosensitization by Antisense Oligonucleotide Gene Therapy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-07-01

    Miraglia L and Strobl JS: Sensitization of breast cancer cells to ionizing radiation by protein kinase C inhibition. Proc. of the 9 0 ,h American Assoc...sensitizes human tumor cells to ionizing radiation . Radiat Res 129:345-350. O’Brian C, Vogel VG, Singletary SE and Ward NE (1989) Elevated protein...Antisense Oligonucleotides, Ionizing Radiation , Breast Cancer, Abbreviations: IR, ionizing radiation ; PKC, protein kinase C; MCF-7, Michigan Cancer

  13. Intravesical NGF Antisense Therapy using Lipid Nanoparticle for Interstitial Cystitis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    disease of the urinary bladder . The goal of this project is to advance key preclinical experiments towards the development of a new drug. Specific...factor (NGF) bladder drug delivery system targeting Interstitial Cystitis/Painful Bladder Syndrome (IC/PBS), IC/PBS is a chronic, severely debilitating...interstitial cystitis, painful bladder syndrome, liposome, nerve growth factor, afferent hyper-excitability, antisense 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF

  14. Intravesical NGF Antisense Therapy Using Lipid Nanoparticle for Interstitial Cystitis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    cystitis” evaluates the feasibility of an anti-nerve growth factor (NGF) bladder drug delivery as a treatment for Interstitial Cystitis/Painful Bladder...the project include early stage development, initial manufacture, and animal testing of an experimental liposome NGF-antisense formulations for...a novel diseased animal model. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Interstitial cystitis/painful bladder syndrome, Liposome, Peer Reviewed Medical Research Program

  15. Antisense Oligonucleotides: Rising Stars in Eliminating RNA Toxicity in Myotonic Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Zhihua

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Myotonic dystrophy (DM) is a dominantly inherited, multisystemic disease caused by expanded CTG (type 1, DM1) or CCTG (type 2, DM2) repeats in untranslated regions of the mutated genes. Pathogenesis results from expression of RNAs from the mutated alleles that are toxic because of the expanded CUG or CCUG repeats. Increased understanding of the repeat-containing RNA (C/CUGexp RNA)-induced toxicity has led to the development of multiple strategies targeting the toxic RNA. Among these approaches, antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) have demonstrated high potency in reversing the RNA toxicity in both cultured DM1 cells and DM1 animal models, thus offering great promise for the potential treatment of DM1. ASO targeting approaches will also provide avenues for the treatment of other repeat RNA-mediated diseases. PMID:23252746

  16. Tracking the Turn Maneuvering Target Using the Multi-Target Bayes Filter with an Adaptive Estimation of Turn Rate.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zong-Xiang; Wu, De-Hui; Xie, Wei-Xin; Li, Liang-Qun

    2017-02-15

    Tracking the target that maneuvers at a variable turn rate is a challenging problem. The traditional solution for this problem is the use of the switching multiple models technique, which includes several dynamic models with different turn rates for matching the motion mode of the target at each point in time. However, the actual motion mode of a target at any time may be different from all of the dynamic models, because these models are usually limited. To address this problem, we establish a formula for estimating the turn rate of a maneuvering target. By applying the estimation method of the turn rate to the multi-target Bayes (MB) filter, we develop a MB filter with an adaptive estimation of the turn rate, in order to track multiple maneuvering targets. Simulation results indicate that the MB filter with an adaptive estimation of the turn rate, is better than the existing filter at tracking the target that maneuvers at a variable turn rate.

  17. The synthesis of Zr-Nb-N nanocomposite coating prepared by multi-target magnetron co-sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, S.; Wang, N.; Li, D. J.; Dong, L.; Gu, H. Q.; Wan, R. X.; Sun, X.

    2013-07-01

    Growth, structure, and mechanical properties of the nanocomposite Zr-Nb-N coatings deposited on Si(1 0 0) at different substrate bias voltages and substrate temperatures were performed by multi-target magnetron co-sputtering system. Extensive measurements were taken to investigate the influences of substrate bias voltage and deposition temperature on microstructure, hardness, elastic modulus, residual stress, critical fracture load. The maximum hardness and elastic modulus was up to 36 GPa and 425 GPa, respectively. The hardest coating also showed the lowest residual stress and the highest critical load. These enhancement effects should be related to nanocrystalline solid-solution microstructure formation and smaller grain size. These Zr-Nb-N coatings appeared to be a promising composite coating system suitable for engineering applications.

  18. Multi-target screening mines hesperidin as a multi-potent inhibitor: Implication in Alzheimer's disease therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Sandipan; Bandyopadhyay, Jaya; Chakraborty, Sourav; Basu, Soumalee

    2016-10-04

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most frequent form of neurodegenerative disorder in elderly people. Involvement of several pathogenic events and their interconnections make this disease a complex disorder. Therefore, designing compounds that can inhibit multiple toxic pathways is the most attractive therapeutic strategy in complex disorders like AD. Here, we have designed a multi-tier screening protocol combining ensemble docking to mine BACE1 inhibitor, as well as 2-D QSAR models for anti-amyloidogenic and antioxidant activities. An in house developed phytochemical library of 200 phytochemicals has been screened through this multi-target procedure which mine hesperidin, a flavanone glycoside commonly found in citrus food items, as a multi-potent phytochemical in AD therapeutics. Steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy reveal that binding of hesperidin to the active site of BACE1 induces a conformational transition of the protein from open to closed form. Hesperidin docks close to the catalytic aspartate residues and orients itself in a way that blocks the cavity opening thereby precluding substrate binding. Hesperidin is a high affinity BACE1 inhibitor and only 500 nM of the compound shows complete inhibition of the enzyme activity. Furthermore, ANS and Thioflavin-T binding assay show that hesperidin completely inhibits the amyloid fibril formation which is further supported by atomic force microscopy. Hesperidin exhibits moderate ABTS(+) radical scavenging assay but strong hydroxyl radical scavenging ability, as evident from DNA nicking assay. Present study demonstrates the applicability of a novel multi-target screening procedure to mine multi-potent agents from natural origin for AD therapeutics.

  19. Thiolated carboxymethyl dextran as a nanocarrier for colon delivery of hSET1 antisense: In vitro stability and efficiency study.

    PubMed

    Kiani, Melika; Mirzazadeh Tekie, Farnaz Sadat; Dinarvand, Meshkat; Soleimani, Masoud; Dinarvand, Rassoul; Atyabi, Fatemeh

    2016-05-01

    Gene therapy is an optimistic approach in cancer treatment. However, for efficient delivery of gene materials, designing an appropriate vector is necessary. Polyelectrolyte complexes (PECs) of chitosan and dextran could be considered a proper nanoparticulate carrier for sensitive biomaterials. In this study, PECs of chitosan and thiolated dextran were used as either an injectable or oral gene delivery system. hSET1 antisense was loaded into the PECs to suppress proliferation of colon cancer cell line. The prepared nanoparticles have ~115nm diameter size and positive zeta potential with high mucoadhesion properties. They are able to protect antisense from degradation in serum and biorelevant fluids (FaSSIF and FaSSGF). Furthermore, prepared nanoparticles demonstrated superior cellular penetration and inhibitory effect on SW480 colon cancer cell proliferation. All nanoparticles significantly down regulated hSET1 in comparison with naked antisense. It can be concluded that thiolated PECs have potential use for injectable or oral delivery of nucleic acids such as antisense.

  20. 1,3,4-Thiadiazoles: a potent multi targeted pharmacological scaffold.

    PubMed

    Haider, Saqlain; Alam, Mohammad Sarwar; Hamid, Hinna

    2015-03-06

    Despite a significant work on thiadiazoles, continuous efforts are still being made to identify novel heterocyclic compounds with potent biological activities. This review may help the medicinal chemists to develop new leads possessing 1,3,4-thiadiazole nucleus with higher efficacy and reduced side effects. This review throws light on the detailed synthetic approaches which have been used for the synthesis of thiadiazoles. This has been followed by the in depth analysis of the thiadiazoles with respect to their medicinal significance.

  1. Multi-Target/Multi-Sensor Tracking using Only Range and Doppler Measurements

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-04-01

    targets and sensors, whereas combinatorial approaches such as MHT scale exponentially. Thus, trackers based upon the EM formulation would, in principle ...of the weights Ekm is given by (35), which can be rewritten asX j,n p0(wjmn)P (I)(k j jmn) 1 E(I+1)km ¡ J = 0: (44) 608 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON...55. [5] Bar-Shalom, Y., and Li, X. R. Multitarget-Multisensor Tracking: Principles and Techniques. Storrs, CT: YBS Publishing, 1995. [6] Li, X., Wong

  2. Diagnostic potential of multi-targeted LAMP (loop-mediated isothermal amplification) for osteoarticular tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Kusum; Sharma, Megha; Batra, Nitya; Sharma, Aman; Dhillon, Mandeep Singh

    2017-02-01

    Delay in diagnosing osteoarticular tuberculosis (OATB) contributes significantly to morbidity by causing disfiguration and neurological sequelae. The delay caused by conventional culture and the expertise and expense involved in other nucleic acid based tests, make LAMP (loop-mediated isothermal amplification) assay a favorable middle path. We evaluated LAMP assay using IS6110 and MPB64 for rapid diagnosis of OATB by comparing with IS6110 PCR and culture. LAMP assay was performed on 140 synovial fluid and pus samples (10 culture-positive proven cases, 80 culture-negative probable cases, and 50 negative controls) using three set of primer pairs each for IS6110 and MPB64. LAMP assay, using two-target approach, had an overall sensitivity and specificity of 90% and 100% in detecting OATB. Sensitivity of IS6110 PCR, IS6110 LAMP, and MPB64 LAMP was 80%, 100%, and 100%, respectively, for confirmed cases and 72.5%, 81.75%, and 86.25%, respectively, for probable cases. Six additional cases were picked using two-target approach. LAMP assay utilizing IS6110 and MPB64 is a cost-effective technique for an early and reliable diagnosis of OATB. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 35:361-365, 2017.

  3. Antisense-Based Progerin Downregulation in HGPS-Like Patients’ Cells

    PubMed Central

    Harhouri, Karim; Navarro, Claire; Baquerre, Camille; Da Silva, Nathalie; Bartoli, Catherine; Casey, Frank; Mawuse, Guedenon Koffi; Doubaj, Yassamine; Lévy, Nicolas; De Sandre-Giovannoli, Annachiara

    2016-01-01

    Progeroid laminopathies, including Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria Syndrome (HGPS, OMIM #176670), are premature and accelerated aging diseases caused by defects in nuclear A-type Lamins. Most HGPS patients carry a de novo point mutation within exon 11 of the LMNA gene encoding A-type Lamins. This mutation activates a cryptic splice site leading to the deletion of 50 amino acids at its carboxy-terminal domain, resulting in a truncated and permanently farnesylated Prelamin A called Prelamin A Δ50 or Progerin. Some patients carry other LMNA mutations affecting exon 11 splicing and are named “HGPS-like” patients. They also produce Progerin and/or other truncated Prelamin A isoforms (Δ35 and Δ90) at the transcriptional and/or protein level. The results we present show that morpholino antisense oligonucleotides (AON) prevent pathogenic LMNA splicing, markedly reducing the accumulation of Progerin and/or other truncated Prelamin A isoforms (Prelamin A Δ35, Prelamin A Δ90) in HGPS-like patients’ cells. Finally, a patient affected with Mandibuloacral Dysplasia type B (MAD-B, carrying a homozygous mutation in ZMPSTE24, encoding an enzyme involved in Prelamin A maturation, leading to accumulation of wild type farnesylated Prelamin A), was also included in this study. These results provide preclinical proof of principle for the use of a personalized antisense approach in HGPS-like and MAD-B patients, who may therefore be eligible for inclusion in a therapeutic trial based on this approach, together with classical HGPS patients. PMID:27409638

  4. Bodywide skipping of exons 45-55 in dystrophic mdx52 mice by systemic antisense delivery.

    PubMed

    Aoki, Yoshitsugu; Yokota, Toshifumi; Nagata, Tetsuya; Nakamura, Akinori; Tanihata, Jun; Saito, Takashi; Duguez, Stephanie M R; Nagaraju, Kanneboyina; Hoffman, Eric P; Partridge, Terence; Takeda, Shin'ichi

    2012-08-21

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), the commonest form of muscular dystrophy, is caused by lack of dystrophin. One of the most promising therapeutic approaches is antisense-mediated elimination of frame-disrupting mutations by exon skipping. However, this approach faces two major hurdles: limited applicability of each individual target exon and uncertain function and stability of each resulting truncated dystrophin. Skipping of exons 45-55 at the mutation hotspot of the DMD gene would address both issues. Theoretically it could rescue more than 60% of patients with deletion mutations. Moreover, spontaneous deletions of this specific region are associated with asymptomatic or exceptionally mild phenotypes. However, such multiple exon skipping of exons 45-55 has proved technically challenging. We have therefore designed antisense oligo (AO) morpholino mixtures to minimize self- or heteroduplex formation. These were tested as conjugates with cell-penetrating moieties (vivo-morpholinos). We have tested the feasibility of skipping exons 45-55 in H2K-mdx52 myotubes and in mdx52 mice, which lack exon 52. Encouragingly, with mixtures of 10 AOs, we demonstrated skipping of all 10 exons in vitro, in H2K-mdx52 myotubes and on intramuscular injection into mdx52 mice. Moreover, in mdx52 mice in vivo, systemic injections of 10 AOs induced extensive dystrophin expression at the subsarcolemma in skeletal muscles throughout the body, producing up to 15% of wild-type dystrophin protein levels, accompanied by improved muscle strength and histopathology without any detectable toxicity. This is a unique successful demonstration of effective rescue by exon 45-55 skipping in a dystrophin-deficient animal model.

  5. A novel multi-target RNAi adenovirus inhibits hepatoma cell proliferation, migration, and induction of angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Tingting; Cheng, Ya; Ren, Weihua; Jia, Weidong; Ma, Jinliang; Xu, Geliang

    2016-01-01

    The pathogenesis of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a multi-step process involving many genes. Consequently, single gene targeting therapy has limited efficacy, making combination therapy targeting multiple genes a necessity. Based on our previous findings, we constructed a single vector mediating simultaneous expression of multiple short hairpin RNAs (shRNAs) against human vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2), chemokine C-C motif receptor 1 (CCR1), and epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM), three genes closely related to HCC progression that act through separate pathways. The shRNA vector efficiently downregulated the mRNA and protein of all three molecules in Huh7 hepatoma cells. The vector also inhibited cell proliferation and migration and reduced angiogenesis. Furthermore, this shRNA vector can be recombined into adenovirus, a gene therapy vector, for better in vivo application. It thus offers a potentially effective future gene therapy approach to treating human liver cancer. PMID:27221035

  6. Behavior-based cooperative robotics applied to multi-target observation

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, L.E.

    1996-12-31

    An important issue that arises in the automation of many security, surveillance, and reconnaissance tasks is that of monitoring (or observing) the movements of targets navigating in a bounded area of interest. A key research issue in these problems is that of sensor placement - determining where sensors should be located to maintain the targets in view. In complex applications involving limited-range sensors, the use of multiple sensors dynamically moving over time is required. In this paper, the author investigates the use of a cooperative team of autonomous sensor-based robots for the observation of multiple moving targets. The author focuses primarily on developing the distributed control strategies that allow the robot team to attempt to minimize the total time in which targets escape observation by some robot team member in the area of interest. The initial efforts on this problem address the aspects of distributed control in homogeneous robot teams with equivalent sensing and movement capabilities working in an uncluttered, bounded area. This paper first formalizes the problem, discusses related work, and then shows that this problem is NP-hard. The author then presents a distributed approximate approach to solving this problem that combines low-level multi-robot control with higher-level control. The low-level control is described in terms of force fields emanating from the targets and the robots. The higher level control is presented in the ALLIANCE formalism, which provides mechanisms for fault tolerant cooperative control, and allows robot team members to adjust their low-level actions based upon the actions of their teammates. The author then presents the results of the ongoing implementation of this approach, both in simulation and on physical robots. To the authors knowledge, this is the first paper addressing this research problem that has been implemented on physical robot teams.

  7. Design, assembly, and activity of antisense DNA nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Keum, Jung-Won; Ahn, Jin-Ho; Bermudez, Harry

    2011-12-16

    Discrete DNA nanostructures allow simultaneous features not possible with traditional DNA forms: encapsulation of cargo, display of multiple ligands, and resistance to enzymatic digestion. These properties suggested using DNA nanostructures as a delivery platform. Here, DNA pyramids displaying antisense motifs are shown to be able to specifically degrade mRNA and inhibit protein expression in vitro, and they show improved cell uptake and gene silencing when compared to linear DNA. Furthermore, the activity of these pyramids can be regulated by the introduction of an appropriate complementary strand. These results highlight the versatility of DNA nanostructures as functional devices.

  8. In silico search for multi-target therapies for osteoarthritis based on 10 common Huoxue Huayu herbs and potential applications to other diseases.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Chun-Song; Zhuang, Zhi-Qiang; Xu, Xiao-Jie; Ye, Jin-Xia; Ye, Hong-Zhi; Li, Xi-Hai; Wu, Guang-Wen; Xu, Hui-Feng; Liu, Xian-Xiang

    2014-03-01

    Huoxue Huayu (HXHY) has been widely used in traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) as a key therapeutic principle for osteoarthritis (OA), and related herbs have been widely prescribed to treat OA in the clinic. The aims of the present study were to explore a multi-target therapy for OA using 10 common HXHY herbs and to investigate their potential applications for treatment of other diseases. A novel computational simulation approach that integrates chemical structure, ligand clusters, chemical space and drug‑likeness evaluations, as well as docking and network analysis, was used to investigate the properties and effects of the herbs. The compounds contained in the studied HXHY herbs were divided into 10 clusters. Comparison of the chemical properties of these compounds to those of other compounds described in the DrugBank database indicated that the properties of the former are more diverse than those of the latter and that most of the HXHY-derived compounds do not violate the 'Lipinski's rule of five'. Docking analysis allowed for the identification of 39 potential bioactive compounds from HXHY herbs and 11 potential targets for these compounds. The identified targets were closely associated with 49 diseases, including neoplasms, musculoskeletal, nervous system and cardiovascular diseases. Ligand‑target (L‑T) and ligand‑target‑disease (L‑T‑D) networks were constructed in order to further elucidate the pharmacological effects of the herbs. Our findings suggest that a number of compounds from HXHY herbs are promising candidates for mult‑target therapeutic application in OA and may exert diverse pharmacological effects, affecting additional diseases besides OA.

  9. Berberine Ameliorates Nonbacterial Prostatitis via Multi-Target Metabolic Network Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Hui; Wang, Huiyu; Zhang, Aihua; Yan, Guangli; Zhang, Yue; An, Na

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Metabolomics has been increasingly applied to discovering biomarkers and identifying perturbed pathways. Berberine has been shown to exhibit anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, and anticancer properties, but its mechanisms for treating nonbacterial prostatitis (NBP) remain unclear completely. We developed the untargeted metabolomics approach based on UPLC-Q-TOF-HDMS to profile the metabolite changes in urine samples in order to discover novel potential biomarkers to clarify mechanisms of berberine in treating a rat model of capsaicin-induced nonbacterial prostatitis (NBP). The changes in metabolic profiling were restored to their base-line values after berberine treatment according to the principal component analysis (PCA) score plots. Fourteen different potential biomarkers and five acutely perturbed metabolic pathways contributing to the treatment of NBP were discovered and identified. Specifically, the berberine-treated rats are located closer to the normal group, indicating that the NBP-induced disturbances to the metabolic profile were partially reversed by berberine treatment. After treatment with berberine, the relative contents of 12 potential biomarkers were effectively regulated, which suggested that the therapeutic effects of berberine on NBP may involve regulating disturbances to the metabolism. Our results show that the protective effect of berberine occurs in part through a reversal of the NBP-caused disturbances. PMID:25588034

  10. Multi-targeted mechanisms underlying the endothelial protective effects of the diabetic-safe sweetener erythritol.

    PubMed

    Boesten, Daniëlle M P H J; Berger, Alvin; de Cock, Peter; Dong, Hua; Hammock, Bruce D; den Hartog, Gertjan J M; Bast, Aalt

    2013-01-01

    Diabetes is characterized by hyperglycemia and development of vascular pathology. Endothelial cell dysfunction is a starting point for pathogenesis of vascular complications in diabetes. We previously showed the polyol erythritol to be a hydroxyl radical scavenger preventing endothelial cell dysfunction onset in diabetic rats. To unravel mechanisms, other than scavenging of radicals, by which erythritol mediates this protective effect, we evaluated effects of erythritol in endothelial cells exposed to normal (7 mM) and high glucose (30 mM) or diabetic stressors (e.g. SIN-1) using targeted and transcriptomic approaches. This study demonstrates that erythritol (i.e. under non-diabetic conditions) has minimal effects on endothelial cells. However, under hyperglycemic conditions erythritol protected endothelial cells against cell death induced by diabetic stressors (i.e. high glucose and peroxynitrite). Also a number of harmful effects caused by high glucose, e.g. increased nitric oxide release, are reversed. Additionally, total transcriptome analysis indicated that biological processes which are differentially regulated due to high glucose are corrected by erythritol. We conclude that erythritol protects endothelial cells during high glucose conditions via effects on multiple targets. Overall, these data indicate a therapeutically important endothelial protective effect of erythritol under hyperglycemic conditions.

  11. Molecular mechanisms of the neuroprotective/neurorescue action of multi-target green tea polyphenols.

    PubMed

    Mandel, Silvia A; Weinreb, Orly; Amit, Tamar; Youdim, Moussa B H

    2012-01-01

    Mounting evidence suggests that lifestyle factors, especially nutrition are essential factor for healthy ageing. However, as a result of the increase in life expectance, neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer's and Parkinson's (AD and PD, respectively) are becoming an increasing burden, as aging is their main risk factor. Brain aging and neurodegenerative diseases of the elderly are characterized by oxidative damage, dysregulation of redox metals homeostasis and inflammation. Thus, it is not surprising that a large amount of drugs/agents in therapeutic use for these conditions are antioxidants/metal complexing, bioenergetic and anti-inflammatory agents. Natural plant polyphenols (flavonoids and non-flavonoids) are the most abundant antioxidants in the diet and as such, are ideal nutraceuticals for neutralizing stress-induced free radicals and inflammation. Human epidemiological and new animal data suggest that green and black flavonoids named catechins, may help protecting the aging brain and reduce the incidence of dementia, AD and PD. This review will present salient features of the beneficial multi-pharmacological actions of black and green tea polyphenols in aging and neurodegeneration, and speculate on their potential in drug combination to target distinct pathologies as a therapeutic disease modification approach.

  12. Berberine ameliorates nonbacterial prostatitis via multi-target metabolic network regulation.

    PubMed

    Sun, Hui; Wang, Huiyu; Zhang, Aihua; Yan, Guangli; Zhang, Yue; An, Na; Wang, Xijun

    2015-03-01

    Metabolomics has been increasingly applied to discovering biomarkers and identifying perturbed pathways. Berberine has been shown to exhibit anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, and anticancer properties, but its mechanisms for treating nonbacterial prostatitis (NBP) remain unclear completely. We developed the untargeted metabolomics approach based on UPLC-Q-TOF-HDMS to profile the metabolite changes in urine samples in order to discover novel potential biomarkers to clarify mechanisms of berberine in treating a rat model of capsaicin-induced nonbacterial prostatitis (NBP). The changes in metabolic profiling were restored to their base-line values after berberine treatment according to the principal component analysis (PCA) score plots. Fourteen different potential biomarkers and five acutely perturbed metabolic pathways contributing to the treatment of NBP were discovered and identified. Specifically, the berberine-treated rats are located closer to the normal group, indicating that the NBP-induced disturbances to the metabolic profile were partially reversed by berberine treatment. After treatment with berberine, the relative contents of 12 potential biomarkers were effectively regulated, which suggested that the therapeutic effects of berberine on NBP may involve regulating disturbances to the metabolism. Our results show that the protective effect of berberine occurs in part through a reversal of the NBP-caused disturbances.

  13. Multi-target detection and estimation with the use of massive independent, identical sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Tiancheng; Corchado, Juan M.; Bajo, Javier; Chen, Genshe

    2015-05-01

    This paper investigates the problem of using a large number of independent, identical sensors jointly for multi-object detection and estimation (MODE), namely massive sensor MODE. This is significantly different to the general target tracking using few sensors. The massive sensor data allows very accurate estimation in theory (but may instead go conversely in fact) but will also cause a heavy computational burden for the traditional filter-based tracker. Instead, we propose a clustering method to fuse massive sensor data in the same state space, which is shown to be able to filter clutter and to estimate states of the targets without the use of any traditional filter. This non-Bayesian solution as referred to massive sensor observation-only (O2) inference needs neither to assume the target/clutter model nor to know the system noises. Therefore it can handle challenging scenarios with few prior information and do so very fast computationally. Simulations with the use of massive homogeneous (independent identical distributed) sensors have demonstrated the validity and superiority of the proposed approach.

  14. Intra-Amygdala Injections of CREB Antisense Impair Inhibitory Avoidance Memory: Role of Norepinephrine and Acetylcholine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Canal, Clinton E.; Chang, Qing; Gold, Paul E.

    2008-01-01

    Infusions of CREB antisense into the amygdala prior to training impair memory for aversive tasks, suggesting that the antisense may interfere with CRE-mediated gene transcription and protein synthesis important for the formation of new memories within the amygdala. However, the amygdala also appears to modulate memory formation in distributed…

  15. Hybrid-based multi-target ligands for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Rampa, Angela; Belluti, Federica; Gobbi, Silvia; Bisi, Alessandra

    2011-11-01

    Progresses in medicinal chemistry over the last few years have focused on the design and synthesis of hybrid compounds, molecules encompassing in a single scaffold two pharmacophores from known entities endowed with well established biological activities. The interest in this topic is related to the increasing emphasis on the identification of the different factors involved in a number of disorders, such as the complex multifactorial Alzheimer's disease (AD), and hybrid- based strategy has become a focal point in this medicinal chemistry field since it could lead to derivatives with an improved biological profile. Using this strategy, acetylcholinesterase inhibitors (AChEIs) have been extensively coupled with properly selected bioactive molecules to obtain homo- and heterodimers endowed with increased potency together with supplementary actions. In the past decade the inhibition of the AChE induced aggregation of the -amyloid peptide into the senile plaques, which is a key event in the neurotoxic cascade of AD, has been considered a relevant approach leading to several dual binding site inhibitors, able to contact both the peripheral anionic site of AChE and the active site. In recent years, pioneering efforts have been performed to obtain novel AChEIs that, beyond the capability to inhibit AChE, were able to hit a number of specific AD targets. In particular, these compounds proved to possess antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, or neuroprotective activities, useful to block or revert the progression of the disease. This review summarizes the progresses that have been made in the design of hybrid molecules for the treatment of AD.

  16. Biodegradable polymer nanocarriers for therapeutic antisense microRNA delivery in living animals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paulmurugan, Ramasamy; Sekar, Narayana M.; Sekar, Thillai V.

    2012-03-01

    MicroRNAs are endogenous regulators of gene expression, deregulated in several cellular diseases including cancer. Altering the cellular microenvironment by modulating the microRNAs functions can regulate different genes involved in major cellular processes, and this approach is now being investigated as a promising new generation of molecularly targeted anti-cancer therapies. AntagomiRs (Antisense-miRNAs) are a novel class of chemically modified stable oligonucleotides used for blocking the functions of endogenous microRNAs, which are overexpressed. A key challenge in achieving effective microRNAbased therapeutics lies in the development of an efficient delivery system capable of specifically delivering antisense oligonucleotides and target cancer cells in living animals. We are now developing an effective delivery system designed to selectively deliver antagomiR- 21 and antagomiR-10b to triple negative breast cancer cells, and to revert tumor cell metastasis and invasiveness. The FDA-approved biodegradable PLGA-nanoparticles were selected as a carrier for antagomiRs delivery. Chemically modified antagomiRs (antagomiR-21 and antagomiR-10b) were co-encapsulated in PEGylated-PLGA-nanoparticles by using the double-emulsification (W/O/W) solvent evaporation method, and the resulting average particle size of 150-200nm was used for different in vitro and in vivo experiments. The antagomiR encapsulated PLGA-nanoparticles were evaluated for their in vitro antagomiRs delivery, intracellular release profile, and antagomiRs functional effects, by measuring the endogenous cellular targets, and the cell growth and metastasis. The xenografts of tumor cells in living mice were used for evaluating the anti-metastatic and anti-invasive properties of cells. The results showed that the use of PLGA for antagomiR delivery is not only efficient in crossing cell membrane, but can also maintain functional intracellular antagomiRs level for a extended period of time and achieve

  17. Does Active Learning through an Antisense Jigsaw Make Sense?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seetharaman, Mahadevan; Musier-Forsyth, Karin

    2003-12-01

    Three journal articles on nucleic acid antisense modification strategies were assigned to 12 students as part of an active learning "jigsaw" exercise for a graduate-level chemistry course on nucleic acids. Each student was required to read one of the three articles. This assignment was preceded by an hour-long lecture on the basic concepts in antisense antigene technology. On the day of the jigsaw, the students with the same article (three groups of four students) discussed their article briefly, and then formed four new groups where no one had read the same article. Each student spent about five minutes teaching his or her article to the other group members, using specific questions provided to guide the discussion. This exercise laid the foundation for bringing the discussion to the entire class, where most of the students actively participated. To test the students' comprehension of the reading materials, a problem set was designed that required not only an understanding of the three articles, but also application of the concepts learned. The effectiveness of this active learning strategy and its applicability to other topics are discussed in this article.

  18. Lysine metabolism in antisense C-hordein barley grains.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Daiana; Rizzi, Vanessa; Gaziola, Salete A; Medici, Leonardo O; Vincze, Eva; Kozak, Marcin; Lea, Peter J; Azevedo, Ricardo A

    2015-02-01

    The grain proteins of barley are deficient in lysine and threonine due to their low concentrations in the major storage protein class, the hordeins, especially in the C-hordein subgroup. Previously produced antisense C-hordein transgenic barley lines have an improved amino acid composition, with increased lysine, methionine and threonine contents. The objective of the study was to investigate the possible changes in the regulation of key enzymes of the aspartate metabolic pathway and the contents of aspartate-derived amino acids in the nontransgenic line (Hordeum vulgare L. cv. Golden Promise) and five antisense C-hordein transgenic barley lines. Considering the amounts of soluble and protein-bound aspartate-derived amino acids together with the analysis of key enzymes of aspartate metabolic pathway, we suggest that the C-hordein suppression did not only alter the metabolism of at least one aspartate-derived amino acid (threonine), but major changes were also detected in the metabolism of lysine and methionine. Modifications in the activities and regulation of aspartate kinase, dihydrodipicolinate synthase and homoserine dehydrogenase were observed in most transgenic lines. Furthermore the activities of lysine α-ketoglutarate reductase and saccharopine dehydrogenase were also altered, although the extent varied among the transgenic lines.

  19. Antisense therapeutics for tumor treatment: the TGF-beta2 inhibitor AP 12009 in clinical development against malignant tumors.

    PubMed

    Schlingensiepen, K H; Fischer-Blass, B; Schmaus, S; Ludwig, S

    2008-01-01

    Overexpression of the cytokine transforming growth factor-beta 2 (TGF-beta2) is a hallmark of various malignant tumors including pancreatic carcinoma, malignant glioma, metastasizing melanoma, and metastatic colorectal carcinoma. This is due to the pivotal role of TGF-beta2 as it regulates key mechanisms of tumor development, namely immunosuppression, metastasis, angiogenesis, and proliferation. The antisense technology is an innovative technique offering a targeted approach for the treatment of different highly aggressive tumors and other diseases. Antisense oligonucleotides are being developed to inhibit the production of disease-causing proteins at the molecular level. The immunotherapeutic approach with the phosphorothioate oligodeoxynucleotide AP 12009 for the treatment of malignant tumors is based on the specific inhibition of TGF-beta2. After providing preclinical proof of concept, the safety and efficacy of AP 12009 were assessed in clinical phase I/II open-label dose-escalation studies in recurrent or refractory high-grade glioma patients. Median survival time after recurrence exceeded the current literature data for chemotherapy. Currently, phase I/II study in advanced pancreatic carcinoma, metastatic melanoma, and metastatic colorectal carcinoma and a phase IIb study in recurrent or refractory high-grade glioma are ongoing. The preclinical as well as the clinical results implicate targeted TGF-beta2 suppression as a promising therapeutic approach for malignant tumor therapy.

  20. TargetNet: a web service for predicting potential drug-target interaction profiling via multi-target SAR models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Zhi-Jiang; Dong, Jie; Che, Yu-Jing; Zhu, Min-Feng; Wen, Ming; Wang, Ning-Ning; Wang, Shan; Lu, Ai-Ping; Cao, Dong-Sheng

    2016-05-01

    Drug-target interactions (DTIs) are central to current drug discovery processes and public health fields. Analyzing the DTI profiling of the drugs helps to infer drug indications, adverse drug reactions, drug-drug interactions, and drug mode of actions. Therefore, it is of high importance to reliably and fast predict DTI profiling of the drugs on a genome-scale level. Here, we develop the TargetNet server, which can make real-time DTI predictions based only on molecular structures, following the spirit of multi-target SAR methodology. Naïve Bayes models together with various molecular fingerprints were employed to construct prediction models. Ensemble learning from these fingerprints was also provided to improve the prediction ability. When the user submits a molecule, the server will predict the activity of the user's molecule across 623 human proteins by the established high quality SAR model, thus generating a DTI profiling that can be used as a feature vector of chemicals for wide applications. The 623 SAR models related to 623 human proteins were strictly evaluated and validated by several model validation strategies, resulting in the AUC scores of 75-100 %. We applied the generated DTI profiling to successfully predict potential targets, toxicity classification, drug-drug interactions, and drug mode of action, which sufficiently demonstrated the wide application value of the potential DTI profiling. The TargetNet webserver is designed based on the Django framework in Python, and is freely accessible at http://targetnet.scbdd.com.

  1. Multi-Target-Directed Ligands and other Therapeutic Strategies in the Search of a Real Solution for Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Agis-Torres, Angel; Sölhuber, Monica; Fernandez, Maria; Sanchez-Montero, J.M.

    2014-01-01

    The lack of an adequate therapy for Alzheimer's Disease (AD) contributes greatly to the continuous growing amount of papers and reviews, reflecting the important efforts made by scientists in this field. It is well known that AD is the most common cause of dementia, and up-to-date there is no prevention therapy and no cure for the disease, which contrasts with the enormous efforts put on the task. On the other hand many aspects of AD are currently debated or even unknown. This review offers a view of the current state of knowledge about AD which includes more relevant findings and processes that take part in the disease; it also shows more relevant past, present and future research on therapeutic drugs taking into account the new paradigm “Multi-Target-Directed Ligands” (MTDLs). In our opinion, this paradigm will lead from now on the research toward the discovery of better therapeutic solutions, not only in the case of AD but also in other complex diseases. This review highlights the strategies followed by now, and focuses other emerging targets that should be taken into account for the future development of new MTDLs. Thus, the path followed in this review goes from the pathology and the processes involved in AD to the strategies to consider in on-going and future researches. PMID:24533013

  2. Sample Preparation Strategies for the Effective Quantitation of Hydrophilic Metabolites in Serum by Multi-Targeted HILIC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Tsakelidou, Elisavet; Virgiliou, Christina; Valianou, Lemonia; Gika, Helen G; Raikos, Nikolaos; Theodoridis, Georgios

    2017-03-30

    The effect of endogenous interferences of serum in multi-targeted metabolite profiling HILIC-MS/MS analysis was investigated by studying different sample preparation procedures. A modified QuEChERS dispersive SPE protocol, a HybridSPE protocol, and a combination of liquid extraction with protein precipitation were compared to a simple protein precipitation. Evaluation of extraction efficiency and sample clean-up was performed for all methods. SPE sorbent materials tested were found to retain hydrophilic analytes together with endogenous interferences, thus additional elution steps were needed. Liquid extraction was not shown to minimise matrix effects. In general, it was observed that a balance should be reached in terms of recovery, efficient clean-up, and sample treatment time when a wide range of metabolites are analysed. A quick step for removing phospholipids prior to the determination of hydrophilic endogenous metabolites is required, however, based on the results from the applied methods, further studies are needed to achieve high recoveries for all metabolites.

  3. Multi-Target Joint Detection and Estimation Error Bound for the Sensor with Clutter and Missed Detection

    PubMed Central

    Lian, Feng; Zhang, Guang-Hua; Duan, Zhan-Sheng; Han, Chong-Zhao

    2016-01-01

    The error bound is a typical measure of the limiting performance of all filters for the given sensor measurement setting. This is of practical importance in guiding the design and management of sensors to improve target tracking performance. Within the random finite set (RFS) framework, an error bound for joint detection and estimation (JDE) of multiple targets using a single sensor with clutter and missed detection is developed by using multi-Bernoulli or Poisson approximation to multi-target Bayes recursion. Here, JDE refers to jointly estimating the number and states of targets from a sequence of sensor measurements. In order to obtain the results of this paper, all detectors and estimators are restricted to maximum a posteriori (MAP) detectors and unbiased estimators, and the second-order optimal sub-pattern assignment (OSPA) distance is used to measure the error metric between the true and estimated state sets. The simulation results show that clutter density and detection probability have significant impact on the error bound, and the effectiveness of the proposed bound is verified by indicating the performance limitations of the single-sensor probability hypothesis density (PHD) and cardinalized PHD (CPHD) filters for various clutter densities and detection probabilities. PMID:26828499

  4. Tracking the Turn Maneuvering Target Using the Multi-Target Bayes Filter with an Adaptive Estimation of Turn Rate

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zong-xiang; Wu, De-hui; Xie, Wei-xin; Li, Liang-qun

    2017-01-01

    Tracking the target that maneuvers at a variable turn rate is a challenging problem. The traditional solution for this problem is the use of the switching multiple models technique, which includes several dynamic models with different turn rates for matching the motion mode of the target at each point in time. However, the actual motion mode of a target at any time may be different from all of the dynamic models, because these models are usually limited. To address this problem, we establish a formula for estimating the turn rate of a maneuvering target. By applying the estimation method of the turn rate to the multi-target Bayes (MB) filter, we develop a MB filter with an adaptive estimation of the turn rate, in order to track multiple maneuvering targets. Simulation results indicate that the MB filter with an adaptive estimation of the turn rate, is better than the existing filter at tracking the target that maneuvers at a variable turn rate. PMID:28212291

  5. A multi-target real-time PCR assay for rapid identification of meningitis-associated microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Favaro, Marco; Savini, Vincenzo; Favalli, Cartesio; Fontana, Carla

    2013-01-01

    A central nervous system (CNS) infection, such as meningitis, is a serious and life-threatening condition. Bacterial meningitis can be severe and may result in brain damage, disability or even death. Rapid diagnosis of CNS infections and identification of the pathogenic microorganisms are needed to improve the patient outcome. Bacterial culture of a patient's cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is currently considered the "gold standard" for diagnosing bacterial meningitis. From the CSF cultures researchers can assess the in vitro susceptibility of the causative microorganism to determine the best antibiotic treatment. However, many of the culture assays, such as microscopy and the latex agglutination test are not sensitive. To enhance pathogen detection in CSF samples we developed a multi-target real-time PCR assay that can rapidly identify six different microorganisms: Streptococcus pneumoniae, Neisseria meningitidis, Haemophilus influenzae, Streptococcus agalactiae, Listeria monocytogenes and Cryptococcus neoformans. In this study we applied this PCR analysis to 296 CSF samples from patients who were suspected of having meningitis. Of the 296 samples that were examined, 59 samples were positive according to the CSF culture and/or molecular assays. Forty-six CSF samples were positive for both the CSF culture and our real-time PCR assay, while 13 samples were positive for the real-time PCR but negative for the traditional assays. This discrepancy may have been caused by the fact that these samples were collected from 23 patients who were treated with antimicrobials before CSF sampling.

  6. Functional analysis of polyphenol oxidases by antisense/sense technology.

    PubMed

    Thipyapong, Piyada; Stout, Michael J; Attajarusit, Jutharat

    2007-07-27

    Polyphenol oxidases (PPOs) catalyze the oxidation of phenolics to quinones, the secondary reactions of which lead to oxidative browning and postharvest losses of many fruits and vegetables. PPOs are ubiquitous in angiosperms, are inducible by both biotic and abiotic stresses, and have been implicated in several physiological processes including plant defense against pathogens and insects, the Mehler reaction, photoreduction of molecular oxygen by PSI, regulation of plastidic oxygen levels, aurone biosynthesis and the phenylpropanoid pathway. Here we review experiments in which the roles of PPO in disease and insect resistance as well as in the Mehler reaction were investigated using transgenic tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) plants with modified PPO expression levels (suppressed PPO and overexpressing PPO). These transgenic plants showed normal growth, development and reproduction under laboratory, growth chamber and greenhouse conditions. Antisense PPO expression dramatically increased susceptibility while PPO overexpression increased resistance of tomato plants to Pseudomonas syringae. Similarly, PPO-overexpressing transgenic plants showed an increase in resistance to various insects, including common cutworm (Spodoptera litura (F.)), cotton bollworm (Helicoverpa armigera (Hübner)) and beet army worm (Spodoptera exigua (Hübner)), whereas larvae feeding on plants with suppressed PPO activity had higher larval growth rates and consumed more foliage. Similar increases in weight gain, foliage consumption, and survival were also observed with Colorado potato beetles (Leptinotarsa decemlineata (Say)) feeding on antisense PPO transgenic tomatoes. The putative defensive mechanisms conferred by PPO and its interaction with other defense proteins are discussed. In addition, transgenic plants with suppressed PPO exhibited more favorable water relations and decreased photoinhibition compared to nontransformed controls and transgenic plants overexpressing PPO, suggesting

  7. Peripheral reduction of FGFR4 with antisense oligonucleotides increases metabolic rate and lowers adiposity in diet-induced obese mice.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xing Xian; Watts, Lynnetta M; Manchem, Vara Prasad; Chakravarty, Kaushik; Monia, Brett P; McCaleb, Michael L; Bhanot, Sanjay

    2013-01-01

    Obesity is a primary risk factor for multiple metabolic disorders. Many drugs for the treatment of obesity, which mainly act through CNS as appetite suppressants, have failed during development or been removed from the market due to unacceptable adverse effects. Thus, there are very few efficacious drugs available and remains a great unmet medical need for anti-obesity drugs that increase energy expenditure by acting on peripheral tissues without severe side effects. Here, we report a novel approach involving antisense inhibition of fibroblast growth factor receptor 4 (FGFR4) in peripheral tissues. Treatment of diet-induce obese (DIO) mice with FGFR4 antisense oligonucleotides (ASO) specifically reduced liver FGFR4 expression that not only resulted in decrease in body weight (BW) and adiposity in free-feeding conditions, but also lowered BW and adiposity under caloric restriction. In addition, combination treatment with FGFR4 ASO and rimonabant showed additive reduction in BW and adiposity. FGFR4 ASO treatment increased basal metabolic rate during free-feeding conditions and, more importantly, prevented adaptive decreases of metabolic rate induced by caloric restriction. The treatment increased fatty acid oxidation while decreased lipogenesis in both liver and fat. Mechanistic studies indicated that anti-obesity effect of FGFR4 ASO was mediated at least in part through an induction of plasma FGF15 level resulted from reduction of hepatic FGFR4 expression. The anti-obesity effect was accompanied by improvement in plasma glycemia, whole body insulin sensitivity, plasma lipid levels and liver steatosis. Therefore, FGFR4 could be a potential novel target and antisense reduction of hepatic FGFR4 expression could be an efficacious therapy as an adjunct to diet restriction or to an appetite suppressant for the treatment of obesity and related metabolic disorders.

  8. Modulation of splicing of the preceding intron by antisense oligonucleotide complementary to intra-exon sequence deleted in dystrophin Kobe

    SciTech Connect

    Takeshima, Y.; Matuso, M.; Sakamoto, H.; Nishio, H.

    1994-09-01

    Molecular analysis of dystrophin Kobe showed that exon 19 of the dystrophin gene bearing a 52 bp deletion was skipped during splicing, although the known consensus sequences at the 5{prime} and 3{prime} splice site of exon 19 were maintained. These data suggest that the deleted sequence of exon 19 may function as a cis-acting factor for exact splicing for the upstream intron. To investigate this potential role, an in vitro splicing system using dystrophin precursors was established. A two-exon precursor containing exon 18, truncated intron 18, and exon 19 was accurately spliced. However, splicing of intron 18 was dramatically inhibited when wild exon 19 was replaced with mutated exon 19. Even though the length of exon 19 was restored to normal by replacing the deleted sequence with other sequence, splicing of intron 18 was not fully reactivated. Characteristically, splicing of intron 18 was inactivated more markedly when the replaced sequence contained less polypurine stretches. These data suggested that modification of the exon sequence would result in a splicing abnormality. Antisense 31 mer 2`-O-methyl ribonucleotide was targeted against 5{prime} end of deleted region of exon 19 to modulate splicing of the mRNA precursor. Splicing of intron 18 was inhibited in a dose- and time-dependent manner. This is the first in vitro evidence to show splicing of dystrophin pre-mRNA can be managed by antisense oligonucleotides. These experiments represent an approach in which antisense oligonucleotides are used to restore the function of a defective dystrophin gene in Duchenne muscular dystrophy by inducing skipping of certain exons during splicing.

  9. Anticubilin antisense RNA ameliorates adriamycin-induced tubulointerstitial injury in experimental rats.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jun; Li, Kailong; He, Yani; Zhang, Jianguo; Wang, Huiming; Yang, Jurong; Zhan, Jun; Liang, Haijun

    2011-12-01

    This study was designed to determine the effects of in vivo anticubilin antisense RNA on the uptake of albumin in tubules and on the tubulointerstitial injury in adriamycin-induced proteinuric rats. Adriamycin-treated rats were subjected to intrarenal delivery of adenoviral vectors encoding empty plasmid, cubilin sense RNA expression vector pAd-CUB or anticubilin antisense RNA expression vector pAd-ACUB on day 3. On days 14 and 28, half of the rats in each group were randomly selected to be killed, and blood samples, kidney tissues and 24-hour urine were collected. The diseased rats treated with pAdEasy-ACUB showed a 60% decrease in serum creatinine and glomerular filtration rate. Interestingly, the anticubilin antisense treatment led to a marked increase in albuminuria. Antisense treatment attenuated the histologic changes on both day 14 and day 28. The antisense treatment induced more than 60% recovery of adriamycin-induced injury, accompanied with 85% knockdown in the expression of cubilin protein and markedly decreased albumin deposition. Adriamycin induced an increase in the expression of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, transforming growth factor-β and regulated on activation in normal T-cell expressed and secreted and the number of infiltrating cells, which was reversed by the antisense treatment. Anticubilin antisense RNA delivered by an adenoviral vector ameliorates albuminuria-induced glomerulosclerosis and tubulointerstitial damage in adriamycin nephrotic rats, indicating that cubilin could be a potential therapeutic target in proteinuric nephropathy.

  10. rasiRNA pathway controls antisense expression of Drosophila telomeric retrotransposons in the nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Shpiz, Sergey; Kwon, Dmitry; Rozovsky, Yakov; Kalmykova, Alla

    2009-01-01

    Telomeres in Drosophila are maintained by the specialized telomeric retrotransposons HeT-A, TART and TAHRE. Sense transcripts of telomeric retroelements were shown to be the targets of a specialized RNA-interference mechanism, a repeat-associated short interfering (rasi)RNA-mediated system. Antisense rasiRNAs play a key role in this mechanism, highlighting the importance of antisense expression in retrotransposon silencing. Previously, bidirectional transcription was reported for the telomeric element TART. Here, we show that HeT-A is also bidirectionally transcribed, and HeT-A antisense transcription in ovaries is regulated by a promoter localized within its 3′ untranslated region. A remarkable feature of noncoding HeT-A antisense transcripts is the presence of multiple introns. We demonstrate that sense and antisense HeT-A-specific rasiRNAs are present in the same tissue, indicating that transcripts of both directions may be considered as natural targets of the rasiRNA pathway. We found that the expression of antisense transcripts of telomeric elements is regulated by the RNA silencing machinery, suggesting rasiRNA-mediated interplay between sense and antisense transcripts in the cell. Finally, this regulation occurs in the nucleus since disruption of the rasiRNA pathway leads to an accumulation of TART and HeT-A transcripts in germ cell nuclei. PMID:19036789

  11. Protection of shrimp Penaeus monodon from WSSV infection using antisense constructs.

    PubMed

    Ahanger, Sajad; Sandaka, Supriyanka; Ananad, Deepika; Mani, Madhu K; Kondadhasula, Ravinder; Reddy, Chandra Sekhar; Marappan, Makesh; Valappil, Rajendran K; Majumdar, Kshitish C; Mishra, Rakesh K

    2014-02-01

    White spot syndrome caused by white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) is one of the most threatening diseases of shrimp culture industry. Previous studies have successfully demonstrated the use of DNA- and RNA-based vaccines to protect WSSV infection in shrimp. In the present study, we have explored the protective efficacy of antisense constructs directed against WSSV proteins, VP24, and VP28, thymidylate synthase (TS), and ribonucleotide reductase-2 (RR2) under the control of endogenous shrimp histone-3 (H3) or penaedin (Pn) promoter. Several antisense constructs were generated by inserting VP24 (pH3-VP24, pPn-VP24), VP28 (pH3-VP28, pPn-VP28), TS (pH3-TS, pPn-TS), and RR2 (pH3-RR2) in antisense orientation. These constructs were tested for their protective potential in WSSV infected cell cultures, and their effect on reduction of the viral load was assessed. A robust reduction in WSSV copy number was observed upon transfection of antisense constructs in hemocyte cultures derived from Penaeus monodon and Scylla serrata. When tested in vivo, antisense constructs offered a strong protection in WSSV challenged P. monodon. Constructs expressing antisense VP24 and VP28 provided the best protection (up to 90 % survivability) with a corresponding decrease in the viral load. Our work demonstrates that shrimp treated with antisense constructs present an efficient control strategy for combating WSSV infection in shrimp aquaculture.

  12. Identification of differentially expressed sense and antisense transcript pairs in breast epithelial tissues

    PubMed Central

    Grigoriadis, Anita; Oliver, Gavin R; Tanney, Austin; Kendrick, Howard; Smalley, Matt J; Jat, Parmjit; Neville, A Munro

    2009-01-01

    Background More than 20% of human transcripts have naturally occurring antisense products (or natural antisense transcripts – NATs), some of which may play a key role in a range of human diseases. To date, several databases of in silico defined human sense-antisense (SAS) pairs have appeared, however no study has focused on differential expression of SAS pairs in breast tissue. We therefore investigated the expression levels of sense and antisense transcripts in normal and malignant human breast epithelia using the Affymetrix HG-U133 Plus 2.0 and Almac Diagnostics Breast Cancer DSA microarray technologies as well as massively parallel signature sequencing (MPSS) data. Results The expression of more than 2500 antisense transcripts were detected in normal breast duct luminal cells and in primary breast tumors substantially enriched for their epithelial cell content by DSA microarray. Expression of 431 NATs were confirmed by either of the other two technologies. A corresponding sense transcript could be identified on DSA for 257 antisense transcripts. Of these SAS pairs, 163 have not been previously reported. A positive correlation of differential expression between normal and malignant breast samples was observed for most SAS pairs. Orientation specific RT-QPCR of selected SAS pairs validated their expression in several breast cancer cell lines and solid breast tumours. Conclusion Disease-focused and antisense enriched microarray platforms (such as Breast Cancer DSA) confirm the assumption that antisense transcription in the human breast is more prevalent than previously anticipated. Expression of a proportion of these NATs has already been confirmed by other technologies while the true existence of the remaining ones has to be validated. Nevertheless, future studies will reveal whether the relative abundances of antisense and sense transcripts have regulatory influences on the translation of these mRNAs. PMID:19615061

  13. Safety of antisense oligonucleotide and siRNA-based therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Chi, Xuan; Gatti, Philip; Papoian, Thomas

    2017-01-31

    Oligonucleotide-based therapy is an active area of drug development designed to treat a variety of gene-specific diseases. Two of the more promising platforms are the antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) and short interfering RNAs (siRNAs), both of which are often directed against similar targets. In light of recent reports on clinical trials of severe thrombocytopenia with two different ASO drugs and increased peripheral neuropathy with an siRNA drug, we compared and contrasted the specific safety characteristics of these two classes of oligonucleotide therapeutic. The objectives were to assess factors that could contribute to the specific toxicities observed with these two classes of promising drugs, and get a better understanding of the potential mechanism(s) responsible for these rare, but serious, adverse events.

  14. Dual inhibitors of β-amyloid aggregation and acetylcholinesterase as multi-target anti-Alzheimer drug candidates.

    PubMed

    Viayna, Elisabet; Sabate, Raimon; Muñoz-Torrero, Diego

    2013-01-01

    Notwithstanding the functional role that the aggregates of some amyloidogenic proteins can play in different organisms, protein aggregation plays a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of a large number of human diseases. One of such diseases is Alzheimer's disease (AD), where the overproduction and aggregation of the β-amyloid peptide (Aβ) are regarded as early critical factors. Another protein that seems to occupy a prominent position within the complex pathological network of AD is the enzyme acetylcholinesterase (AChE), with classical and non-classical activities involved at the late (cholinergic deficit) and early (Aβ aggregation) phases of the disease. Dual inhibitors of Aβ aggregation and AChE are thus emerging as promising multi-target agents with potential to efficiently modify the natural course of AD. In the initial phases of the drug discovery process of such compounds, in vitro evaluation of the inhibition of Aβ aggregation is rather troublesome, as it is very sensitive to experimental assay conditions, and requires expensive synthetic Aβ peptides, which makes cost-prohibitive the screening of large compound libraries. Herein, we review recently developed multitarget anti-Alzheimer compounds that exhibit both Aβ aggregation and AChE inhibitory activities, and, in some cases also additional valuable activities such as BACE-1 inhibition or antioxidant properties. We also discuss the development of simplified in vivo methods for the rapid, simple, reliable, unexpensive, and high-throughput amenable screening of Aβ aggregation inhibitors that rely on the overexpression of Aβ42 alone or fused with reporter proteins in Escherichia coli.

  15. A Universal Positive-Negative Selection System for Gene Targeting in Plants Combining an Antibiotic Resistance Gene and Its Antisense RNA.

    PubMed

    Nishizawa-Yokoi, Ayako; Nonaka, Satoko; Osakabe, Keishi; Saika, Hiroaki; Toki, Seiichi

    2015-09-01

    Gene targeting (GT) is a useful technology for accurate genome engineering in plants. A reproducible approach based on a positive-negative selection system using hygromycin resistance and the diphtheria toxin A subunit gene as positive and negative selection markers, respectively, is now available. However, to date, this selection system has been applied exclusively in rice (Oryza sativa). To establish a universally applicable positive-negative GT system in plants, we designed a selection system using a combination of neomycin phosphotransferaseII (nptII) and an antisense nptII construct. The concomitant transcription of both sense and antisense nptII suppresses significantly the level of expression of the sense nptII gene, and transgenic calli and plants become sensitive to the antibiotic geneticin. In addition, we were able to utilize the sense nptII gene as a positive selection marker and the antisense nptII construct as a negative selection marker for knockout of the endogenous rice genes Waxy and 33-kD globulin through GT, although negative selection with this system is relatively less efficient compared with diphtheria toxin A subunit. The approach developed here, with some additional improvements, could be applied as a universal selection system for the enrichment of GT cells in several plant species.

  16. Mutually exclusive sense–antisense transcription at FLC facilitates environmentally induced gene repression

    PubMed Central

    Rosa, Stefanie; Duncan, Susan; Dean, Caroline

    2016-01-01

    Antisense transcription through genic regions is pervasive in most genomes; however, its functional significance is still unclear. We are studying the role of antisense transcripts (COOLAIR) in the cold-induced, epigenetic silencing of Arabidopsis FLOWERING LOCUS C (FLC), a regulator of the transition to reproduction. Here we use single-molecule RNA FISH to address the mechanistic relationship of FLC and COOLAIR transcription at the cellular level. We demonstrate that while sense and antisense transcripts can co-occur in the same cell they are mutually exclusive at individual loci. Cold strongly upregulates COOLAIR transcription in an increased number of cells and through the mutually exclusive relationship facilitates shutdown of sense FLC transcription in cis. COOLAIR transcripts form dense clouds at each locus, acting to influence FLC transcription through changed H3K36me3 dynamics. These results may have general implications for other loci showing both sense and antisense transcription. PMID:27713408

  17. Identification and analysis of antisense RNA target regions of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1.

    PubMed Central

    Rittner, K; Sczakiel, G

    1991-01-01

    Antisense RNA, transcribed intracellularly from constitutive expression cassettes, inhibits the replication of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) as demonstrated by a quantitative microinjection assay in human SW480 cells. Infectious proviral HIV-1 DNA was co-microinjected together with a fivefold molar excess of plasmids expressing antisense RNA complementary to a set of ten different HIV-1 target regions. The most inhibitory antisense RNA expression plasmids were targeted against a 1 kb region within the gag open reading frame and against a 562 base region containing the coding sequences for the regulatory viral proteins tat and rev. Experimental evidence is presented that the antisense principle is the inhibitory mechanism in this assay system. PMID:2027749

  18. Crucial role of antisense transcription across the Xist promoter in Tsix-mediated Xist chromatin modification.

    PubMed

    Ohhata, Tatsuya; Hoki, Yuko; Sasaki, Hiroyuki; Sado, Takashi

    2008-01-01

    Expression of Xist, which triggers X inactivation, is negatively regulated in cis by an antisense gene, Tsix, transcribed along the entire Xist gene. We recently demonstrated that Tsix silences Xist through modification of the chromatin structure in the Xist promoter region. This finding prompted us to investigate the role of antisense transcription across the Xist promoter in Tsix-mediated silencing. Here, we prematurely terminated Tsix transcription before the Xist promoter and addressed its effect on Xist silencing in mouse embryos. We found that although 93% of the region encoding Tsix was transcribed, truncation of Tsix abolished the antisense regulation of Xist. This resulted in a failure to establish the repressive chromatin configuration at the Xist promoter on the mutated X, including DNA methylation and repressive histone modifications, especially in extraembryonic tissues. These results suggest a crucial role for antisense transcription across the Xist promoter in Xist silencing.

  19. Combination Antisense Treatment for Destructive Exon Skipping of Myostatin and Open Reading Frame Rescue of Dystrophin in Neonatal mdx Mice

    PubMed Central

    Lu-Nguyen, Ngoc B; Jarmin, Susan A; Saleh, Amer F; Popplewell, Linda; Gait, Michael J; Dickson, George

    2015-01-01

    The fatal X-linked Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), characterized by progressive muscle wasting and muscle weakness, is caused by mutations within the DMD gene. The use of antisense oligonucleotides (AOs) modulating pre-mRNA splicing to restore the disrupted dystrophin reading frame, subsequently generating a shortened but functional protein has emerged as a potential strategy in DMD treatment. AO therapy has recently been applied to induce out-of-frame exon skipping of myostatin pre-mRNA, knocking-down expression of myostatin protein, and such an approach is suggested to enhance muscle hypertrophy/hyperplasia and to reduce muscle necrosis. Within this study, we investigated dual exon skipping of dystrophin and myostatin pre-mRNAs using phosphorodiamidate morpholino oligomers conjugated with an arginine-rich peptide (B-PMOs). Intraperitoneal administration of B-PMOs was performed in neonatal mdx males on the day of birth, and at weeks 3 and 6. At week 9, we observed in treated mice (as compared to age-matched, saline-injected controls) normalization of muscle mass, a recovery in dystrophin expression, and a decrease in muscle necrosis, particularly in the diaphragm. Our data provide a proof of concept for antisense therapy combining dystrophin restoration and myostatin inhibition for the treatment of DMD. PMID:25959011

  20. Bolaamphiphile-based nanocomplex delivery of phosphorothioate gapmer antisense oligonucleotides as a treatment for Clostridium difficile

    PubMed Central

    Hegarty, John P; Krzeminski, Jacek; Sharma, Arun K; Guzman-Villanueva, Diana; Weissig, Volkmar; Stewart, David B

    2016-01-01

    Despite being a conceptually appealing alternative to conventional antibiotics, a major challenge toward the successful implementation of antisense treatments for bacterial infections is the development of efficient oligonucleotide delivery systems. Cationic vesicles (bolasomes) composed of dequalinium chloride (“DQAsomes”) have been used to deliver plasmid DNA across the cardiolipin-rich inner membrane of mitochondria. As cardiolipin is also a component of many bacterial membranes, we investigated the application of cationic bolasomes to bacteria as an oligonucleotide delivery system. Antisense sequences designed in silico to target the expression of essential genes of the bacterial pathogen, Clostridium difficile, were synthesized as 2′-O-methyl phosphorothioate gapmer antisense oligonucleotides (ASO). These antisense gapmers were quantitatively assessed for their ability to block mRNA translation using luciferase reporter and C. difficile protein expression plasmid constructs in a coupled transcription–translation system. Cationic bolaamphiphile compounds (dequalinium derivatives) of varying alkyl chain length were synthesized and bolasomes were prepared via probe sonication of an aqueous suspension. Bolasomes were characterized by particle size distribution, zeta potential, and binding capacities for anionic oligonucleotide. Bolasomes and antisense gapmers were combined to form antisense nanocomplexes. Anaerobic C. difficile log phase cultures were treated with serial doses of gapmer nanocomplexes or equivalent amounts of empty bolasomes for 24 hours. Antisense gapmers for four gene targets achieved nanomolar minimum inhibitory concentrations for C. difficile, with the lowest values observed for oligonucleotides targeting polymerase genes rpoB and dnaE. No inhibition of bacterial growth was observed from treatments at matched dosages of scrambled gapmer nanocomplexes or plain, oligonucleotide-free bolasomes compared to untreated control cultures. We

  1. Natural Antisense Transcripts and Long Non-Coding RNA in Neurospora crassa

    PubMed Central

    Arthanari, Yamini; Heintzen, Christian; Griffiths-Jones, Sam; Crosthwaite, Susan K.

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence of long non-coding RNAs (lncRNA) and natural antisense transcripts (NATs) has been reported in a variety of organisms. While a consensus has yet to be reached on their global importance, an increasing number of examples have been shown to be functional, regulating gene expression at the transcriptional and post-transcriptional level. Here, we use RNA sequencing data from the ABI SOLiD platform to identify lncRNA and NATs obtained from samples of the filamentous fungus Neurospora crassa grown under different light and temperature conditions. We identify 939 novel lncRNAs, of which 477 are antisense to annotated genes. Across the whole dataset, the extent of overlap between sense and antisense transcripts is large: 371 sense/antisense transcripts are complementary over 500 nts or more and 236 overlap by more than 1000 nts. Most prevalent are 3′ end overlaps between convergently transcribed sense/antisense pairs, but examples of divergently transcribed pairs and nested transcripts are also present. We confirm the expression of a subset of sense/antisense transcript pairs by qPCR. We examine the size, types of overlap and expression levels under the different environmental stimuli of light and temperature, and identify 11 lncRNAs that are up-regulated in response to light. We also find differences in transcript length and the position of introns between protein-coding transcripts that have antisense expression and transcripts with no antisense expression. These results demonstrate the ability of N. crassa lncRNAs and NATs to be regulated by different environmental stimuli and provide the scope for further investigation into the function of NATs. PMID:24621812

  2. Advanced In vivo Use of CRISPR/Cas9 and Anti-sense DNA Inhibition for Gene Manipulation in the Brain

    PubMed Central

    Walters, Brandon J.; Azam, Amber B.; Gillon, Colleen J.; Josselyn, Sheena A.; Zovkic, Iva B.

    2016-01-01

    Gene editing tools are essential for uncovering how genes mediate normal brain–behavior relationships and contribute to neurodegenerative and neuropsychiatric disorders. Recent progress in gene editing technology now allows neuroscientists unprecedented access to edit the genome efficiently. Although many important tools have been developed, here we focus on approaches that allow for rapid gene editing in the adult nervous system, particularly CRISPR/Cas9 and anti-sense nucleotide-based techniques. CRISPR/Cas9 is a flexible gene editing tool, allowing the genome to be manipulated in diverse ways. For instance, CRISPR/Cas9 has been successfully used to knockout genes, knock-in mutations, overexpress or inhibit gene activity, and provide scaffolding for recruiting specific epigenetic regulators to individual genes and gene regions. Moreover, the CRISPR/Cas9 system may be modified to target multiple genes at one time, affording simultaneous inhibition and overexpression of distinct genetic targets. Although many of the more advanced applications of CRISPR/Cas9 have not been applied to the nervous system, the toolbox is widely accessible, such that it is poised to help advance neuroscience. Anti-sense nucleotide-based technologies can be used to rapidly knockdown genes in the brain. The main advantage of anti-sense based tools is their simplicity, allowing for rapid gene delivery with minimal technical expertise. Here, we describe the main applications and functions of each of these systems with an emphasis on their many potential applications in neuroscience laboratories. PMID:26793235

  3. Reversal of the malignant phenotype of cervical cancer CaSki cells through adeno-associated virus-mediated delivery of HPV16 E7 antisense RNA.

    PubMed

    Wu, Sufang; Meng, Li; Wang, Shixuan; Wang, Wei; Xi, Ling; Tian, Xun; Chen, Gang; Wu, Ying; Zhou, Jianfeng; Xu, Gang; Lu, Yunping; Ma, Ding

    2006-04-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is the most important risk factor for the development of cervical cancer. The oncogene E7 from high-risk HPV strains has the ability to immortalize epithelial cells and increase cellular transformation in culture. In this study, we explored the possibility of preventing cervical cancer growth by inhibiting HPV16 E7 expression through gene transfer of an antisense construct. A recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) vector was chosen for the transfer, based on its transfection efficiency, in vivo stability, and lack of detectable pathology. In vitro transfer of an rAAV vector expressing antisense HPV16 E7 (AAV-HPV16E7AS) inhibited cell proliferation, induced apoptosis, reduced cell migration, and restrained in vivo proliferation of HPV16/HPV18-positive cervical cancer CaSki cells. These results indicate that down-regulation of HPV16 E7 with antisense RNA is beneficial in reducing the tumorigenicity of CaSki cells, and rAAV vectors ought to be a new efficient approach for delivering the expression of therapeutic genes.

  4. Programmed fluctuations in sense/antisense transcript ratios drive sexual differentiation in S. pombe

    PubMed Central

    Bitton, Danny A; Grallert, Agnes; Scutt, Paul J; Yates, Tim; Li, Yaoyong; Bradford, James R; Hey, Yvonne; Pepper, Stuart D; Hagan, Iain M; Miller, Crispin J

    2011-01-01

    Strand-specific RNA sequencing of S. pombe revealed a highly structured programme of ncRNA expression at over 600 loci. Waves of antisense transcription accompanied sexual differentiation. A substantial proportion of ncRNA arose from mechanisms previously considered to be largely artefactual, including improper 3′ termination and bidirectional transcription. Constitutive induction of the entire spk1+, spo4+, dis1+ and spo6+ antisense transcripts from an integrated, ectopic, locus disrupted their respective meiotic functions. This ability of antisense transcripts to disrupt gene function when expressed in trans suggests that cis production at native loci during sexual differentiation may also control gene function. Consistently, insertion of a marker gene adjacent to the dis1+ antisense start site mimicked ectopic antisense expression in reducing the levels of this microtubule regulator and abolishing the microtubule-dependent ‘horsetail' stage of meiosis. Antisense production had no impact at any of these loci when the RNA interference (RNAi) machinery was removed. Thus, far from being simply ‘genome chatter', this extensive ncRNA landscape constitutes a fundamental component in the controls that drive the complex programme of sexual differentiation in S. pombe. PMID:22186733

  5. [Exon skipping therapy for Duchenne muscular dystrophy by using antisense Morpholino].

    PubMed

    Takeda, Shin'ichi

    2009-11-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is caused by the lack of dystrophin protein at the sarcolemma. Exon skipping by antisense oligonucleotides is a novel method to restore the reading frame of the mutated DMD gene, and rescue dystrophin production. We recently reported that systemic delivery of Morpholino antisense oligonucleotides targeting exon 6 and 8 of the canine DMD gene, efficiently recovered functional dystrophin proteins at the sarcolamma of dystrophic dogs, and improved performance of affected dogs without serious side effects (Yokota et al., Ann Neurol. 65 (6): 667-676, 2009). To optimize therapeutic antisense Morpholinos for more frequent mutations of the DMD gene, we designed antisense Morpholinos targeting exon 51 of the mouse DMD gene, and injected them separately or in combination into the muscles of mdx52 mice, in which exon 52 has been deleted by a gene targeting technique (Araki et al., 1997). We also tried systemic delivery of antisense Morpholino to skip exon 51 in mdx52 mice. It is important to verify the effectiveness and side effects of antisense Morpholino in experimental animal models such as dystrophic dogs or mdx52 mice, before clinical trials in DMD patients.

  6. Periostin antisense oligonucleotide prevents adhesion formation after surgery in mice.

    PubMed

    Takai, Shinji; Yoshino, Masafumi; Takao, Kazumasa; Yoshikawa, Kazunori; Jin, Denan

    2017-02-09

    To study the role of periostin in adhesion formation, the effect of periostin antisense oligonucleotide (PAO) on adhesion formation was evaluated in mice. Under anesthesia, the serous membrane of the cecum was abraded, and the adhesion score and mRNA levels of periostin and its related factors were determined after surgery. Saline, 40 mg/kg of negative sense oligonucleotide (NSO), or 40 mg/kg of PAO were injected into the abdomen after surgery, and the adhesion score and mRNA levels were evaluated 14 days later. Filmy adhesion formation was observed 1 day after surgery, and the adhesion score increased gradually to 14 days. The mRNA levels of periostin, transforming growth factor (TGF)-β, and collagen I increased gradually from 3 days to 14 days. The adhesion score of PAO was significantly lower than of saline or NSO 14 days after surgery. The mRNA levels of periostin, TGF-β, and collagen I were also significantly attenuated by treatment with PAO compared with saline or NSO. Thus, these results demonstrated that the periostin mRNA level increased in the abraded cecum, and PAO prevented adhesion formation along with attenuation of the periostin mRNA level.

  7. Conserved pattern of antisense overlapping transcription in the homologous human ERCC-1 and yeast RAD10 DNA repair gene regions.

    PubMed Central

    van Duin, M; van Den Tol, J; Hoeijmakers, J H; Bootsma, D; Rupp, I P; Reynolds, P; Prakash, L; Prakash, S

    1989-01-01

    We report that the genes for the homologous Saccharomyces cerevisiae RAD10 and human ERCC-1 DNA excision repair proteins harbor overlapping antisense transcription units in their 3' regions. Since naturally occurring antisense transcription is rare in S. cerevisiae and humans (this is the first example in human cells), our findings indicate that antisense transcription in the ERCC-1-RAD10 gene regions represents an evolutionarily conserved feature. Images PMID:2471070

  8. Defining Synphenotype Groups in Xenopus tropicalis by Use of Antisense Morpholino Oligonucleotides

    PubMed Central

    Rana, Amer Ahmed; Collart, Clara; Gilchrist, Michael J; Smith, J. C

    2006-01-01

    To identify novel genes involved in early development, and as proof-of-principle of a large-scale reverse genetics approach in a vertebrate embryo, we have carried out an antisense morpholino oligonucleotide (MO) screen in Xenopus tropicalis, in the course of which we have targeted 202 genes expressed during gastrula stages. MOs were designed to complement sequence between −80 and +25 bases of the initiating AUG codons of the target mRNAs, and the specificities of many were tested by (i) designing different non-overlapping MOs directed against the same mRNA, (ii) injecting MOs differing in five bases, and (iii) performing “rescue” experiments. About 65% of the MOs caused X. tropicalis embryos to develop abnormally (59% of those targeted against novel genes), and we have divided the genes into “synphenotype groups,” members of which cause similar loss-of-function phenotypes and that may function in the same developmental pathways. Analysis of the expression patterns of the 202 genes indicates that members of a synphenotype group are not necessarily members of the same synexpression group. This screen provides new insights into early vertebrate development and paves the way for a more comprehensive MO-based analysis of gene function in X. tropicalis. PMID:17112317

  9. Antisense oligonucleotides delivered to the amniotic cavity in utero modulate gene expression in the postnatal mouse

    PubMed Central

    Depreux, Frederic F.; Wang, Lingyan; Jiang, Han; Jodelka, Francine M.; Rosencrans, Robert F.; Rigo, Frank; Lentz, Jennifer J.; Brigande, John V.; Hastings, Michelle L.

    2016-01-01

    Congenital diseases account for a large portion of pediatric illness. Prenatal screening and diagnosis permit early detection of many genetic diseases. Fetal therapeutic strategies to manage disease processes in utero represent a powerful new approach for clinical care. A safe and effective fetal pharmacotherapy designed to modulate gene expression ideally would avoid direct mechanical engagement of the fetus and present an external reservoir of drug. The amniotic cavity surrounding the fetus could serve as an ideal drug reservoir. Antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) are an established tool for the therapeutic modulation of gene expression. We hypothesize that ASOs administered to the amniotic cavity will gain entry to the fetus and modulate gene expression. Here, we show that an ASO targeting MALAT1 RNA, delivered by transuterine microinjection into the mouse amniotic cavity at embryonic day 13-13.5, reduces target RNA expression for up to 4 weeks after birth. A similarly delivered ASO targeting a causal splice site mutation for Usher syndrome corrects gene expression in the inner ear, a therapeutically relevant target tissue. We conclude that intra-amniotic delivery of ASOs is well tolerated and produces a sustained effect on postnatal gene expression. Transuterine delivery of ASOs is an innovative platform for developing fetal therapeutics to efficaciously treat congenital disease. PMID:27683224

  10. In vivo correction of a Menkes disease model using antisense oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Madsen, Erik C; Morcos, Paul A; Mendelsohn, Bryce A; Gitlin, Jonathan D

    2008-03-11

    Although the molecular basis of many inherited metabolic diseases has been defined, the availability of effective therapies in such disorders remains problematic. Menkes disease is a fatal neurodegenerative disorder due to loss-of-function mutations in the ATP7A gene encoding a copper-transporting P-type Atpase. To develop therapeutic approaches in affected patients, we have identified a zebrafish model of Menkes disease termed calamity that results from splicing defects in the zebrafish orthologue of the ATP7A gene. Embryonic-recessive lethal mutants have impaired copper homeostasis that results in absent melanin pigmentation, impaired notochord formation, and hindbrain neurodegeneration. In this current study, we have attempted to rescue these striking phenotypic alterations by using a series of antisense morpholino oligonucleotides directed against the splice-site junctions of two mutant calamity alleles. Our findings reveal a robust and complete correction of the copper-deficient defects of calamity in association with the generation of the WT Menkes protein in all rescued mutants. Interestingly, a quantitative analysis of atp7a-specific transcripts suggests that competitive translational regulation may account for the synthesis of WT protein in these embryos. This in vivo correction of Menkes disease through the rescue of aberrant splicing may provide therapeutic options in this fatal disease and illustrates the potential for zebrafish models of human genetic disease in the development of treatments based on the principles of interactions of synthetic oligonucleotide analogues with mRNA.

  11. Antisense Oligonucleotides Targeting Influenza A Segment 8 Genomic RNA Inhibit Viral Replication

    PubMed Central

    Lenartowicz, Elzbieta; Nogales, Aitor; Kierzek, Elzbieta; Kierzek, Ryszard; Martínez-Sobrido, Luis

    2016-01-01

    Influenza A virus (IAV) affects 5%–10% of the world's population every year. Through genome changes, many IAV strains develop resistance to currently available anti-influenza therapeutics. Therefore, there is an urgent need to find new targets for therapeutics against this important human respiratory pathogen. In this study, 2′-O-methyl and locked nucleic acid antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) were designed to target internal regions of influenza A/California/04/2009 (H1N1) genomic viral RNA segment 8 (vRNA8) based on a base-pairing model of vRNA8. Ten of 14 tested ASOs showed inhibition of viral replication in Madin-Darby canine kidney cells. The best five ASOs were 11–15 nucleotides long and showed inhibition ranging from 5- to 25-fold. In a cell viability assay they showed no cytotoxicity. The same five ASOs also showed no inhibition of influenza B/Brisbane/60/2008 (Victoria lineage), indicating that they are sequence specific for IAV. Moreover, combinations of ASOs slightly improved anti-influenza activity. These studies establish the accessibility of IAV vRNA for ASOs in regions other than the panhandle formed between the 5′ and 3′ ends. Thus, these regions can provide targets for the development of novel IAV antiviral approaches. PMID:27463680

  12. Differential modification of flavonoid and isoflavonoid biosynthesis with an antisense chalcone synthase construct in transgenic Lotus corniculatus.

    PubMed

    Colliver, S P; Morris, P; Robbins, M P

    1997-11-01

    Three clonal genotypes of Lotus corniculatus L. (bird's foot trefoil) were transformed with an antisense chalcone synthase (CHS) gene construct made using a stress induced CHS17 cDNA from Phaseolus vulgaris under the control of the constitutive CaMV 35S promoter and Nos terminator via Agrobacterium rhizogenes. After initial screening, ten antisense and five control co-transformation events from each recipient clonal genotype were analysed. After elicitation with glutathione, the level of tannin accumulation was found to be increased in a number of antisense root cultures derived from the low (S33) and moderate (S50) tannin recipient genotypes. Six antisense and four control transformed lines from genotype S50 were selected for more detailed study. The antisense CHS construct was found to be integrated into the genome, with a copy number ranging from 1 to 5 and antisense orientation was confirmed by PCR. In transformed root cultures, increased CHS transcript levels were noted in a number of antisense lines. Biochemical analyses of glutathione-elicited-root cultures indicated a significant increase in tannin accumulation in antisense CHS lines and mean vestitol levels were reduced. These results show that the introduction of a heterologous antisense chalcone synthase construct into L. corniculatus resulted in an unpredicted molecular and biochemical phenotype. Such findings are discussed in relation to manipulation of this complex multigene family.

  13. PLGA-PEG-PLGA microspheres as a delivery vehicle for antisense oligonucleotides to CTGF: Implications on post-surgical peritoneal adhesion prevention

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azeke, John Imuetinyan-Jesu, Jr.

    , while both cytokines are over-expressed within the first day following injury, CTGF protein levels could not be correlated with observed adhesion development. In addition, we synthesized linear triblock copolymers of polyethylene glycol (PEG) and poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA), two of the most widely studied biodegradable polymers in use today. Bulk gels and microparticles of the copolymers were then evaluated for gelling behavior, temperature stability, and drug loading and release kinetics in order assess their suitability as potential carriers of antisense therapeutics. A novel approach to affecting the antisense oligonucleotide release kinetics by varying the relative concentrations of co-encapsulated cationic lipid transfection agents was also presented.

  14. Administration of antisense DNA for hepatocyte growth factor causes an depressive and anxiogenic response in rats.

    PubMed

    Wakatsuki, Masatoshi; Akiyoshi, Jotaro; Ichioka, Shugo; Tanaka, Yoshihiro; Tsuru, Jusen; Matsushita, Hirotaka; Hanada, Hiroaki; Isogawa, Koichi

    2007-12-01

    Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) is induced in neurons during ischemia and is neuroprotective against post-ischemic delayed neuronal death in the hippocampus. HGF might play an important role in the maturation and functioning of these neurons in the hippocampus. Our aim was to determine what effect HGF antisense has on depression and anxiety in rats. HGF antisense was infused at a constant rate into cerebral lateral ventricles and its effect on anxiety in rats was monitored. In forced swimming test, rats that received antisense DNA increased the length of time that they were immobile in the water. In the elevated plus maze test, the black and white box test and conditioned fear test, HGF antisense administration caused all indicators of anxiety to increase. Number of HGF-positive cells in C1 of hippocampus was significantly decreased in the HGF antisense-infused group compared to the vehicle- and scrambled oligonucleotide-treated group. No significant effect on general locomotor activity was seen. These results indicate that inhibition of HGF induces an increase in depression and anxiety-related behaviors suggesting a depressive and anxiogenic-like effect.

  15. Characterization of Antisense Transformed Plants Deficient in the Tobacco Anionic Peroxidase.

    PubMed Central

    Lagrimini, L. M.; Gingas, V.; Finger, F.; Rothstein, S.; Liu, TTY.

    1997-01-01

    On the basis of the biological compounds that they metabolize, plant peroxidases have long been implicated in plant growth, cell wall biogenesis, lignification, and host defenses. Transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.) plants that underexpress anionic peroxidase were generated using antisense RNA. The antisense RNA was found to be specific for the anionic isoenzyme and highly effective, reducing endogenous transcript levels and total peroxidase activity by as much as 1600-fold. Antisense-transformed plants appeared normal at initial observation; however, growth studies showed that plants with reduced peroxidase activity grow taller and flower sooner than control plants. In contrast, previously transformed plants overproducing anionic peroxidase were shorter and flowered later than controls. Axillary buds were more developed in antisense-transformed plants and less developed in plants overproducing this enzyme. It was found that the lignin content in leaf, stem, and root was unchanged in antisense-transformed plants, which does not support a role for anionic peroxidase in the lignification of secondary xylem vessels. However, studies of wounded tissue show some reduction in wound-induced deposition of lignin-like polymers. The data support a possible role for tobacco anionic peroxidase in host defenses but not without a reduction in growth potential. PMID:12223765

  16. The conditional inhibition of gene expression in cultured Drosophila cells by antisense RNA.

    PubMed Central

    Bunch, T A; Goldstein, L S

    1989-01-01

    Genes producing antisense RNA are becoming important tools for the selective inhibition of gene expression. Experiments in different biological systems, targeting different mRNAs have yielded diverse results with respect to the success of the technique and its mechanism of action. We have examined the potential of three antisense genes, whose transcription is driven by a Drosophila metallothionein promoter, to inhibit the expression of alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) or a microtubule associated protein (205K MAP) in cultured Drosophila cells. Expression of ADH was significantly reduced upon induction of the anti-ADH genes. The ADH mRNA does not appear to be destabilized by the presence of antisense RNA but rather exists at similar levels in hybrid form. Hybrids are detected with both spliced and unspliced ADH RNA. In contrast to these results, antisense genes producing antisense RNA in great excess to 205K MAP mRNA, which is itself far less abundant than the ADH mRNA, failed to show any inhibition of 205K MAP expression. Images PMID:2481266

  17. Genome-wide antisense transcription drives mRNA processing in bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Lasa, Iñigo; Toledo-Arana, Alejandro; Dobin, Alexander; Villanueva, Maite; de los Mozos, Igor Ruiz; Vergara-Irigaray, Marta; Segura, Víctor; Fagegaltier, Delphine; Penadés, José R.; Valle, Jaione; Solano, Cristina; Gingeras, Thomas R.

    2011-01-01

    RNA deep sequencing technologies are revealing unexpected levels of complexity in bacterial transcriptomes with the discovery of abundant noncoding RNAs, antisense RNAs, long 5′ and 3′ untranslated regions, and alternative operon structures. Here, by applying deep RNA sequencing to both the long and short RNA fractions (<50 nucleotides) obtained from the major human pathogen Staphylococcus aureus, we have detected a collection of short RNAs that is generated genome-wide through the digestion of overlapping sense/antisense transcripts by RNase III endoribonuclease. At least 75% of sense RNAs from annotated genes are subject to this mechanism of antisense processing. Removal of RNase III activity reduces the amount of short RNAs and is accompanied by the accumulation of discrete antisense transcripts. These results suggest the production of pervasive but hidden antisense transcription used to process sense transcripts by means of creating double-stranded substrates. This process of RNase III-mediated digestion of overlapping transcripts can be observed in several evolutionarily diverse Gram-positive bacteria and is capable of providing a unique genome-wide posttranscriptional mechanism to adjust mRNA levels. PMID:22123973

  18. The production of an inducible antisense alternative oxidase (Aox1a) plant.

    PubMed

    Potter, F J; Wiskich, J T; Dry, I B

    2001-01-01

    Plant mitochondria contain an alternative oxidase (AOX) acting as a terminal electron acceptor of the alternative pathway in the electron transport chain. Here we describe the production of inducible antisense Aox1a plants of Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh. and the procedures used to determine the resulting alternative pathway activity. The Arabidopsis Aox1a cDNA sequence was cloned behind a copper-inducible promoter system in the antisense orientation. Arabidopsis thaliana (Columbia) plants were transformed by in-planta vacuum infiltration with Agrobacterium containing the antisense construct. Whole-leaf ethanol production was used as a measure to investigate alternative pathway activity in the presence of antimycin A. After 24 h, leaves from the copper-induced, antisense line F1.1 produced up to 8.8 times more ethanol (via aerobic fermentation) than the non-induced and wild-type leaves, indicating effective cytochrome pathway inhibition by antimycin A and a decreased alternative pathway activity in induced F1.1 leaves. Transgene expression studies also revealed no expression in non-induced leaves and up until 24 h post-induction. Copper-induced transgenic leaves were less susceptible to alternative pathway inhibition than non-induced transgenic leaves, as seen via tissue-slice respiratory studies, and mitochondrial respiration, using F1.1 cell cultures, also supported this. These results demonstrate the successful production of a transgenic line of Arabidopsis in which the alternative pathway activity can be genetically manipulated with an inducible antisense system.

  19. The use of antisense mRNA to inhibit the tonoplast H+ ATPase in carrot.

    PubMed Central

    Gogarten, J P; Fichmann, J; Braun, Y; Morgan, L; Styles, P; Taiz, S L; DeLapp, K; Taiz, L

    1992-01-01

    Carrot root cells were transformed with the coding or 5' noncoding regions of the carrot vacuolar H+ ATPase A subunit cDNA cloned in the antisense orientation behind the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter. Bafilomycin-sensitive ATPase, H(+)-pumping, and 14C-O-methyl-glucose uptake activities were specifically inhibited in the tonoplast fractions of mutant cell lines. Protein gel blotting confirmed that the expression of the A subunit was inhibited in the tonoplast fraction, but not in the Golgi fraction. Two-dimensional protein gel blots of total microsomes of wild-type and control transformant cell lines revealed two major immunoreactive polypeptides in the acidic pI range. In contrast, highly purified tonoplast membranes contained only the less acidic polypeptide. Because the less acidic polypeptide was preferentially diminished in the two antisense cell lines, we infer that the antisense constructs specifically blocked expression of a tonoplast-specific isoform of the V-ATPase A subunit in carrot. Regenerated plants containing the antisense constructs exhibited altered leaf morphologies and reduced cell expansion. The altered phenotype was correlated with the presence of the antisense construct. PMID:1392599

  20. SupraMolecular BioVectors (SMBV) improve antisense inhibition of erbB-2 expression.

    PubMed Central

    Allal, C.; Sixou, S.; Kravtzoff, R.; Soulet, N.; Soula, G.; Favre, G.

    1998-01-01

    New therapeutic strategies are now being developed against adenocarcinoma associated with erbB-2 amplification, particularly by inhibiting p185erbB-2 expression. Antisense oligodeoxynucleotides seem promising for this purpose as long as they are efficiently protected against degradation and targeted into the cells. We present antisense oligonucleotide carriers, the supramolecular biovectors (SMBVs), for which we have already demonstrated the ability to improve both cellular uptake and protection of oligodeoxynucleotide. The present work demonstrates that SMBVs elicit a specific and non-toxic action of antisense compounds in a cell model, irrespective of their sensitivity to nucleases. This is a major point, considering the specificity problems associated with the use of nuclease-resistant phosphorothioate oligodeoxynucleotide. SMBVs improve antisense efficiency of oligodeoxynucleotide designed against p185erbB-2, with a complete growth arrest of SK-Br-3, human adenocarcinoma mammary cells that overexpress p185erbB-2 and no effect on MCF-7 cells that normally express p185erbB-2. The comparison of SMBVs with DOTAP reveals the statistically higher efficiency of SMBVs, which allows the antisense inhibition of p185erbB-2 expression in 65-75% of SK-Br-3 cells (P < 0.05). The efficiency and controlled synthesis of SMBVs underline their potentialities as oligodeoxynucleotide carriers for in vivo experiments. PMID:9652760

  1. Antisense oligonucleotides targeted to the p53 gene modulate liver regeneration in vivo.

    PubMed

    Arora, V; Iversen, P L

    2000-02-01

    The rapidly proliferating cells of the regenerating liver after partial hepatectomy (PH) present a reproducible in vivo model to study the functional role of the tumor suppressor gene p53. The present study uses the rat 70% PH model along with systemic administration of three different structural types of antisense oligonucleotides (ODNs) designed to suppress p53 expression. We tested the hypothesis that antisense ODNs can inhibit the expression of p53, resulting in the loss of the G(1)-S cell cycle checkpoint and an altered pattern of liver regeneration. Intraperitoneal administration of 5 mg/kg/day antisense phosphorothioate ODN after 70% PH resulted in reduced expression of the p53 protein in the regenerating liver. There were concomitant increases in weight gain of remnant-regenerating liver and expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen and p21(waf-1) compared with either saline or 5 mg/kg/day mispaired phosphorothioate ODN treatment. Flow cytometric analysis of DNA content of isolated hepatocytes revealed a reduction in the G(0)/G(1) cell population and accumulation of cells with more than 4n DNA in antisense-treated rats. The regenerating livers had significantly diminished cytochrome P-450 (CYP) enzyme activities. Rats treated with p53 antisense ODNs, but not saline or mispair ODN controls, had significantly elevated CYP activities. These observations functionally link the expression of p53 with diminished expression of several CYP isoforms in the liver regeneration model.

  2. Prediction of Multi-Target Networks of Neuroprotective Compounds with Entropy Indices and Synthesis, Assay, and Theoretical Study of New Asymmetric 1,2-Rasagiline Carbamates

    PubMed Central

    Romero Durán, Francisco J.; Alonso, Nerea; Caamaño, Olga; García-Mera, Xerardo; Yañez, Matilde; Prado-Prado, Francisco J.; González-Díaz, Humberto

    2014-01-01

    In a multi-target complex network, the links (Lij) represent the interactions between the drug (di) and the target (tj), characterized by different experimental measures (Ki, Km, IC50, etc.) obtained in pharmacological assays under diverse boundary conditions (cj). In this work, we handle Shannon entropy measures for developing a model encompassing a multi-target network of neuroprotective/neurotoxic compounds reported in the CHEMBL database. The model predicts correctly >8300 experimental outcomes with Accuracy, Specificity, and Sensitivity above 80%–90% on training and external validation series. Indeed, the model can calculate different outcomes for >30 experimental measures in >400 different experimental protocolsin relation with >150 molecular and cellular targets on 11 different organisms (including human). Hereafter, we reported by the first time the synthesis, characterization, and experimental assays of a new series of chiral 1,2-rasagiline carbamate derivatives not reported in previous works. The experimental tests included: (1) assay in absence of neurotoxic agents; (2) in the presence of glutamate; and (3) in the presence of H2O2. Lastly, we used the new Assessing Links with Moving Averages (ALMA)-entropy model to predict possible outcomes for the new compounds in a high number of pharmacological tests not carried out experimentally. PMID:25255029

  3. Single base discrimination for ribonuclease H-dependent antisense effects within intact human leukaemia cells.

    PubMed Central

    Giles, R V; Ruddell, C J; Spiller, D G; Green, J A; Tidd, D M

    1995-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated, in vitro, that phosphodiester and phosphorothioate antisense oligodeoxynucleotides could direct ribonuclease H to cleave non-target RNA sites and that chimeric methylphosphonodiester/phosphodiester analogue structures were substantially more specific. In this report we show that such chimeric molecules can promote point mutation-specific scission of target mRNA by both Escherichia coli and human RNases H in vitro. Intact human leukaemia cells 'biochemically microinjected' with antisense effectors demonstrated efficient suppression of target mRNA expression. It was noted that the chimeric methylphosphonodiester/phosphodiester structures showed single base discrimination, whereas neither the phosphodiester nor phosphorothioate compounds were as stringent. Finally, we show that the antisense effects obtained in intact cells were due to endogenous RNase H activity. Images PMID:7731809

  4. The Role of Transcription Factors at Antisense-Expressing Gene Pairs in Yeast.

    PubMed

    Mostovoy, Yulia; Thiemicke, Alexander; Hsu, Tiffany Y; Brem, Rachel B

    2016-06-27

    Genes encoded close to one another on the chromosome are often coexpressed, by a mechanism and regulatory logic that remain poorly understood. We surveyed the yeast genome for tandem gene pairs oriented tail-to-head at which expression antisense to the upstream gene was conserved across species. The intergenic region at most such tandem pairs is a bidirectional promoter, shared by the downstream gene mRNA and the upstream antisense transcript. Genomic analyses of these intergenic loci revealed distinctive patterns of transcription factor regulation. Mutation of a given transcription factor verified its role as a regulator in trans of tandem gene pair loci, including the proximally initiating upstream antisense transcript and downstream mRNA and the distally initiating upstream mRNA. To investigate cis-regulatory activity at such a locus, we focused on the stress-induced NAD(P)H dehydratase YKL151C and its downstream neighbor, the metabolic enzyme GPM1 Previous work has implicated the region between these genes in regulation of GPM1 expression; our mutation experiments established its function in rich medium as a repressor in cis of the distally initiating YKL151C sense RNA, and an activator of the proximally initiating YKL151C antisense RNA. Wild-type expression of all three transcripts required the transcription factor Gcr2. Thus, at this locus, the intergenic region serves as a focal point of regulatory input, driving antisense expression and mediating the coordinated regulation of YKL151C and GPM1 Together, our findings implicate transcription factors in the joint control of neighboring genes specialized to opposing conditions and the antisense transcripts expressed between them.

  5. The Role of Transcription Factors at Antisense-Expressing Gene Pairs in Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Mostovoy, Yulia; Thiemicke, Alexander; Hsu, Tiffany Y.; Brem, Rachel B.

    2016-01-01

    Genes encoded close to one another on the chromosome are often coexpressed, by a mechanism and regulatory logic that remain poorly understood. We surveyed the yeast genome for tandem gene pairs oriented tail-to-head at which expression antisense to the upstream gene was conserved across species. The intergenic region at most such tandem pairs is a bidirectional promoter, shared by the downstream gene mRNA and the upstream antisense transcript. Genomic analyses of these intergenic loci revealed distinctive patterns of transcription factor regulation. Mutation of a given transcription factor verified its role as a regulator in trans of tandem gene pair loci, including the proximally initiating upstream antisense transcript and downstream mRNA and the distally initiating upstream mRNA. To investigate cis-regulatory activity at such a locus, we focused on the stress-induced NAD(P)H dehydratase YKL151C and its downstream neighbor, the metabolic enzyme GPM1. Previous work has implicated the region between these genes in regulation of GPM1 expression; our mutation experiments established its function in rich medium as a repressor in cis of the distally initiating YKL151C sense RNA, and an activator of the proximally initiating YKL151C antisense RNA. Wild-type expression of all three transcripts required the transcription factor Gcr2. Thus, at this locus, the intergenic region serves as a focal point of regulatory input, driving antisense expression and mediating the coordinated regulation of YKL151C and GPM1. Together, our findings implicate transcription factors in the joint control of neighboring genes specialized to opposing conditions and the antisense transcripts expressed between them. PMID:27190003

  6. Use of an Antisense RNA Strategy To Investigate the Functional Significance of Mn-Catalase in the Extreme Thermophile Thermus thermophilus

    PubMed Central

    Moreno, Renata; Hidalgo, Aurelio; Cava, Felipe; Fernández-Lafuente, Roberto; Guisán, José Manuel; Berenguer, José

    2004-01-01

    The expression of an antisense RNA revealed that an Mn-catalase was required in Thermus thermophilus for aerobic but not for anaerobic growth. The antisense system is based on the constitutive expression of a “bicistronic” transcript consisting of the kanamycin resistance gene mRNA followed by the antisense RNA against the selected target. PMID:15516595

  7. The zebrafish progranulin gene family and antisense transcripts

    PubMed Central

    Cadieux, Benoît; Chitramuthu, Babykumari P; Baranowski, David; Bennett, Hugh PJ

    2005-01-01

    Background Progranulin is an epithelial tissue growth factor (also known as proepithelin, acrogranin and PC-cell-derived growth factor) that has been implicated in development, wound healing and in the progression of many cancers. The single mammalian progranulin gene encodes a glycoprotein precursor consisting of seven and one half tandemly repeated non-identical copies of the cystine-rich granulin motif. A genome-wide duplication event hypothesized to have occurred at the base of the teleost radiation predicts that mammalian progranulin may be represented by two co-orthologues in zebrafish. Results The cDNAs encoding two zebrafish granulin precursors, progranulins-A and -B, were characterized and found to contain 10 and 9 copies of the granulin motif respectively. The cDNAs and genes encoding the two forms of granulin, progranulins-1 and -2, were also cloned and sequenced. Both latter peptides were found to be encoded by precursors with a simplified architecture consisting of one and one half copies of the granulin motif. A cDNA encoding a chimeric progranulin which likely arises through the mechanism of trans-splicing between grn1 and grn2 was also characterized. A non-coding RNA gene with antisense complementarity to both grn1 and grn2 was identified which may have functional implications with respect to gene dosage, as well as in restricting the formation of the chimeric form of progranulin. Chromosomal localization of the four progranulin (grn) genes reveals syntenic conservation for grna only, suggesting that it is the true orthologue of mammalian grn. RT-PCR and whole-mount in situ hybridization analysis of zebrafish grns during development reveals that combined expression of grna and grnb, but not grn1 and grn2, recapitulate many of the expression patterns observed for the murine counterpart. This includes maternal deposition, widespread central nervous system distribution and specific localization within the epithelial compartments of various organs

  8. Avian Leukosis Virus Activation of an Antisense RNA Upstream of TERT in B-Cell Lymphomas

    PubMed Central

    Nehyba, Jiri; Malhotra, Sanandan; Winans, Shelby; O'Hare, Thomas H.; Justice, James

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Avian leukosis virus (ALV) induces tumors by integrating its proviral DNA into the chicken genome and altering the expression of nearby genes via strong promoter and enhancer elements. Viral integration sites that contribute to oncogenesis are selected in tumor cells. Deep-sequencing analysis of B-cell lymphoma DNA confirmed that the telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) gene promoter is a common ALV integration target. Twenty-six unique proviral integration sites were mapped between 46 and 3,552 nucleotides (nt) upstream of the TERT transcription start site, predominantly in the opposite transcriptional orientation to TERT. Transcriptome-sequencing (RNA-seq) analysis of normal bursa revealed a transcribed region upstream of TERT in the opposite orientation, suggesting the TERT promoter is bidirectional. This transcript appears to be an uncharacterized antisense RNA. We have previously shown that TERT expression is upregulated in tumors with integrations in the TERT promoter region. We now report that the viral promoter drives the expression of a chimeric transcript containing viral sequences spliced to exons 4 through 7 of this antisense RNA. Clonal expansion of cells with ALV integrations driving overexpression of the TERT antisense RNA suggest it may have a role in tumorigenesis. IMPORTANCE The data suggest that ALV integrations in the TERT promoter region drive the overexpression of a novel antisense RNA and contribute to the development of lymphomas. PMID:27512065

  9. Antisense Inhibition of the Photosynthetic Antenna Proteins CP29 and CP26

    PubMed Central

    Andersson, Jenny; Walters, Robin G.; Horton, Peter; Jansson, Stefan

    2001-01-01

    The specific roles of the chlorophyll a/b binding proteins CP29 and CP26 in light harvesting and energy dissipation within the photosynthetic apparatus have been investigated. Arabidopsis was transformed with antisense constructs against the genes encoding the CP29 or CP26 apoprotein, which gave rise to several transgenic lines with remarkably low amounts of the antisense target proteins. The decrease in the level of CP24 protein in the CP29 antisense lines indicates a physical interaction between these complexes. Analysis of chlorophyll fluorescence showed that removal of the proteins affected photosystem II function, probably as a result of changes in the organization of the light-harvesting antenna. However, whole plant measurements showed that overall photosynthetic rates were similar to those in the wild type. Both antisense lines were capable of the qE type of nonphotochemical fluorescence quenching, although there were minor changes in the capacity for quenching and in its induction kinetics. High-light-induced violaxanthin deepoxidation to zeaxanthin was not affected, although the pool size of these pigments was decreased slightly. We conclude that CP29 and CP26 are unlikely to be sites for nonphotochemical quenching. PMID:11340191

  10. Drug evaluation: ISIS-301012, an antisense oligonucleotide for the treatment of hypercholesterolemia.

    PubMed

    Burnett, John R

    2006-10-01

    ISIS-301012 is an antisense oligonucleotide inhibitor of apolipoprotein B-100, which is being developed by Isis Pharmaceuticals Inc for the potential treatment of hypercholesterolemia. A subcutaneous injectable formulation is currently undergoing phase 11 clinical trials, while phase I trials are underway with an oral formulation of the drug.

  11. Efficient hammerhead ribozyme and antisense RNA targeting in a slow ribosome Escherichia coli mutant.

    PubMed

    Chen, H; Ferbeyre, G; Cedergren, R

    1997-05-01

    We have evaluated inhibition of the plasmid-born chloramphenicol acetyl transferase gene (CAT) by the hammerhead ribozyme and antisense RNA in Escherichia coli where the translation and transcription rates have been modified. Whereas neither antisense nor the hammerhead had an inhibitory effect on CAT activity in wild-type E. coli, both reduced the level of the messenger RNA and the activity of the CAT gene by almost 60% in a slow ribosome mutant. Streptomycin, which increases the speed of translation in this mutant strain, restored full CAT activity. The level of CAT activity expressed from a T7 RNA polymerase promoter was not affected by the presence of either antisense RNA or the hammerhead ribozyme. When the target gene was expressed from a chromosomal locus in wild-type E. coli, both antisense RNA and the hammerhead ribozyme showed some inhibitory activity, but the level of inhibition was significantly increased in the slow ribosome strain. This bacterial system offers a unique entry to the study of cellular factors which mediate the activity of ribozymes in vivo.

  12. In vivo potentialities of EWS-Fli-1 targeted antisense oligonucleotides-nanospheres complexes.

    PubMed

    Maksimenko, Andrei; Polard, Valerie; Villemeur, Marie; Elhamess, Hind; Couvreur, Patrick; Bertrand, Jean-Remi; Aboubakar, Malam; Gottikh, Marina; Malvy, Claude

    2005-11-01

    The EWS/FLI-1 fusion gene, resulting from a t(11;22) translocation, plays a key role in the pathogenesis of Ewing sarcoma. Previously, we have shown that antisense oligonucleotides designed against EWS-Fli-1 inhibited tumor growth in nude mice provided they were delivered intratumorally by nanocapsules or by CTAB-coated nanospheres. In this study, we have used two types of nanospheres (designated as type 1 and type 2 nanospheres) stabilized with chitosan for both intratumoral and systemic administration of oligonucleotides. Inhibition of the tumor growth in vivo was found to be dependent on the carrier type as well as on antisense oligonucleotide modification. Indeed, whereas both types of nanospheres were efficient in reducing tumor growth after intratumoral injection, we have obtained only with type 2 nanospheres an antitumoral effect after intravenous injection in a preliminary experiment. Additionally, the anticancer efficacy of a localized modification of the EWS-Fli-1 phosphodiester/phosphorothioate chimeric antisense oligonucleotide was demonstrated. In cell culture the oligonucleotides inhibit cell growth by their antisense activity. Further investigations are needed in vivo to learn the mechanism of action of the complexes.

  13. Antisense long noncoding RNAs regulate var gene activation in the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum.

    PubMed

    Amit-Avraham, Inbar; Pozner, Guy; Eshar, Shiri; Fastman, Yair; Kolevzon, Netanel; Yavin, Eylon; Dzikowski, Ron

    2015-03-03

    The virulence of Plasmodium falciparum, the causative agent of the deadliest form of human malaria, is attributed to its ability to evade human immunity through antigenic variation. These parasites alternate between expression of variable antigens, encoded by members of a multicopy gene family named var. Immune evasion through antigenic variation depends on tight regulation of var gene expression, ensuring that only a single var gene is expressed at a time while the rest of the family is maintained transcriptionally silent. Understanding how a single gene is chosen for activation is critical for understanding mutually exclusive expression but remains a mystery. Here, we show that antisense long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) initiating from var introns are associated with the single active var gene at the time in the cell cycle when the single var upstream promoter is active. We demonstrate that these antisense transcripts are incorporated into chromatin, and that expression of these antisense lncRNAs in trans triggers activation of a silent var gene in a sequence- and dose-dependent manner. On the other hand, interference with these lncRNAs using complement peptide nucleic acid molecules down-regulated the active var gene, erased the epigenetic memory, and induced expression switching. Altogether, our data provide evidence that these antisense lncRNAs play a key role in regulating var gene activation and mutually exclusive expression.

  14. The association between H3K4me3 and antisense transcription.

    PubMed

    Cui, Peng; Liu, Wanfei; Zhao, Yuhui; Lin, Qiang; Ding, Feng; Xin, Chengqi; Geng, Jianing; Song, Shuhui; Sun, Fanglin; Hu, Songnian; Yu, Jun

    2012-04-01

    Histone H3 lysine 4 trimethylation (H3K4me3) is well known to occur in the promoter region of genes for transcription activation. However, when investigating the H3K4me3 profiles in the mouse cerebrum and testis, we discovered that H3K4me3 also has a significant enrichment at the 3' end of actively transcribed (sense) genes, named as 3'-H3K4me3. 3'-H3K4me3 is associated with ~15% of protein-coding genes in both tissues. In addition, we examined the transcriptional initiation signals including RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) binding sites and 5'-CAGE-tag that marks transcriptional start sites. Interestingly, we found that 3'-H3K4me3 is associated with the initiation of antisense transcription. Furthermore, 3'-H3K4me3 modification levels correlate positively with the antisense expression levels of the associated sense genes, implying that 3'-H3K4me3 is involved in the activation of antisense transcription. Taken together, our findings suggest that H3K4me3 may be involved in the regulation of antisense transcription that initiates from the 3' end of sense genes. In addition, a positive correlation was also observed between the expression of antisense and the associated sense genes with 3'-H3K4me3 modification. More importantly, we observed the 3'-H3K4me3 enrichment among genes in human, fruitfly and Arabidopsis, and found that the sequences of 3'-H3K4me3-marked regions are highly conserved and essentially indistinguishable from known promoters in vertebrate. Therefore, we speculate that these 3'-H3K4me3-marked regions may serve as potential promoters for antisense transcription and 3'-H3K4me3 appear to be a universal epigenetic feature in eukaryotes. Our results provide a novel insight into the epigenetic roles of H3K4me3 and the regulatory mechanism of antisense transcription.

  15. Antisense precision polymer micelles require less poly(ethylenimine) for efficient gene knockdown

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fakhoury, Johans J.; Edwardson, Thomas G.; Conway, Justin W.; Trinh, Tuan; Khan, Farhad; Barłóg, Maciej; Bazzi, Hassan S.; Sleiman, Hanadi F.

    2015-12-01

    Therapeutic nucleic acids are powerful molecules for shutting down protein expression. However, their cellular uptake is poor and requires transport vectors, such as cationic polymers. Of these, poly(ethylenimine) (PEI) has been shown to be an efficient vehicle for nucleic acid transport into cells. However, cytotoxicity has been a major hurdle in the development of PEI-DNA complexes as clinically viable therapeutics. We have synthesized antisense-polymer conjugates, where the polymeric block is completely monodisperse and sequence-controlled. Depending on the polymer sequence, these can self-assemble to produce micelles of very low polydispersity. The introduction of linear poly(ethylenimine) to these micelles leads to aggregation into size-defined PEI-mediated superstructures. Subsequently, both cellular uptake and gene silencing are greatly enhanced over extended periods compared to antisense alone, while at the same time cellular cytotoxicity remains very low. In contrast, gene silencing is not enhanced with antisense polymer conjugates that are not able to self-assemble into micelles. Thus, using antisense precision micelles, we are able to achieve significant transfection and knockdown with minimal cytotoxicity at much lower concentrations of linear PEI then previously reported. Consequently, a conceptual solution to the problem of antisense or siRNA delivery is to self-assemble these molecules into `gene-like' micelles with high local charge and increased stability, thus reducing the amount of transfection agent needed for effective gene silencing.Therapeutic nucleic acids are powerful molecules for shutting down protein expression. However, their cellular uptake is poor and requires transport vectors, such as cationic polymers. Of these, poly(ethylenimine) (PEI) has been shown to be an efficient vehicle for nucleic acid transport into cells. However, cytotoxicity has been a major hurdle in the development of PEI-DNA complexes as clinically viable

  16. Conditional gene silencing of multiple genes with antisense RNAs and generation of a mutator strain of Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Nakashima, Nobutaka; Tamura, Tomohiro

    2009-01-01

    In this study, we describe a method of simultaneous conditional gene silencing of up to four genes in Escherichia coli by using antisense RNAs. We used antisense RNAs with paired termini, which carried flanking inverted repeats to create paired double-stranded RNA termini; these RNAs have been proven to have high silencing efficacy. To express antisense RNAs, we constructed four IPTG-inducible vectors carrying different but compatible replication origins. When the lacZ antisense RNA was expressed using these vectors, lacZ expression was successfully silenced by all the vectors, but the expression level of the antisense RNA and silencing efficacy differed depending on the used vectors. All the vectors were co-transformable; the antisense RNAs against lacZ, ackA, pta and pepN were co-expressed, and silencing of all the target genes was confirmed. Furthermore, when antisense RNAs were targeted to the mutator genes mutS, mutD (dnaQ) and ndk, which are involved in DNA replication or DNA mismatch repair, spontaneous mutation frequencies increased over 2000-fold. The resulting mutator strain is useful for random mutagenesis of plasmids. The method provides a robust tool for investigating functional relationships between multiple genes or altering cell phenotypes for biotechnological and industrial applications. PMID:19515932

  17. Decreased glucocorticoid receptor activity following glucocorticoid receptor antisense RNA gene fragment transfection.

    PubMed Central

    Pepin, M C; Barden, N

    1991-01-01

    Depression is often characterized by increased cortisol secretion caused by hyperactivity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and by nonsuppression of cortisol secretion following dexamethasone administration. This hyperactivity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis could result from a reduced glucocorticoid receptor (GR) activity in neurons involved in its control. To investigate the effect of reduced neuronal GR levels, we have blocked cellular GR mRNA processing and/or translation by introduction of a complementary GR antisense RNA strand. Two cell lines were transfected with a reporter plasmid carrying the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) gene under control of the mouse mammary tumor virus long terminal repeat (a glucocorticoid-inducible promoter). This gene construction permitted assay of the sensitivity of the cells to glucocorticoid hormones. Cells were also cotransfected with a plasmid containing 1,815 bp of GR cDNA inserted in the reverse orientation downstream from either a neurofilament gene promoter element or the Rous sarcoma virus promoter element. Northern (RNA) blot analysis demonstrated formation of GR antisense RNA strands. Measurement of the sensitivity of CAT activity to exogeneous dexamethasone showed that although dexamethasone increased CAT activity by as much as 13-fold in control incubations, expression of GR antisense RNA caused a 2- to 4-fold decrease in the CAT response to dexamethasone. Stable transfectants bearing the GR antisense gene fragment construction demonstrated a 50 to 70% decrease of functional GR levels compared with normal cells, as evidenced by a ligand-binding assay with the type II glucocorticoid receptor-specific ligand [3H]RU 28362. These results validate the use of antisense RNA to GR to decrease cellular response to glucocorticoids. Images PMID:1996114

  18. Antisense oligodeoxynucleotide inhibition of a swelling-activated cation channel in osteoblast-like osteosarcoma cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duncan, R. L.; Kizer, N.; Barry, E. L.; Friedman, P. A.; Hruska, K. A.

    1996-01-01

    By patch-clamp analysis, we have shown that chronic, intermittent mechanical strain (CMS) increases the activity of stretch-activated cation channels of osteoblast-like UMR-106.01 cells. CMS also produces a swelling-activated whole-cell conductance (Gm) regulated by varying strain levels. We questioned whether the swelling-activated conductance was produced by stretch-activated cation channel activity. We have identified a gene involved in the increase in conductance by using antisense oligodeoxynucleotides (ODN) derived from the alpha 1-subunit genes of calcium channels found in UMR-106.01 cells (alpha1S, alpha1C, and alpha1D). We demonstrate that alpha 1C antisense ODNs abolish the increase in Gm in response to hypotonic swelling following CMS. Antisense ODNs to alpha1S and alpha1D, sense ODNs to alpha1C, and sham permeabilization had no effect on the conductance increase. In addition, during cell-attached patch-clamp studies, antisense ODNs to alpha1c completely blocked the swelling-activated and stretch-activated nonselective cation channel response to strain. Antisense ODNs to alpha1S treatment produced no effect on either swelling-activated or stretch-activated cation channel activity. There were differences in the stretch-activated and swelling-activated cation channel activity, but whether they represent different channels could not be determined from our data. Our data indicate that the alpha1C gene product is involved in the Gm and the activation of the swelling-activated cation channels induced by CMS. The possibility that swelling-activated cation channel genes are members of the calcium channel superfamily exists, but if alpha1c is not the swelling-activated cation channel itself, then its expression is required for induction of swelling-activated cation channel activity by CMS.

  19. Transcriptome analysis of antigenic variation in Plasmodium falciparum - var silencing is not dependent on antisense RNA

    PubMed Central

    Ralph, Stuart A; Bischoff, Emmanuel; Mattei, Denise; Sismeiro, Odile; Dillies, Marie-Agnès; Guigon, Ghislaine; Coppee, Jean-Yves; David, Peter H; Scherf, Artur

    2005-01-01

    Background Plasmodium falciparum, the causative agent of the most severe form of malaria, undergoes antigenic variation through successive presentation of a family of antigens on the surface of parasitized erythrocytes. These antigens, known as Plasmodium falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 (PfEMP1) proteins, are subject to a mutually exclusive expression system, and are encoded by the multigene var family. The mechanism whereby inactive var genes are silenced is poorly understood. To investigate transcriptional features of this mechanism, we conducted a microarray analysis of parasites that were selected to express different var genes by adhesion to chondroitin sulfate A (CSA) or CD36. Results In addition to oligonucleotides for all predicted protein-coding genes, oligonucleotide probes specific to each known var gene of the FCR3 background were designed and added to the microarray, as well as tiled sense and antisense probes for a subset of var genes. In parasites selected for adhesion to CSA, one full-length var gene (var2csa) was strongly upregulated, as were sense RNA molecules emanating from the 3' end of a limited subset of other var genes. No global relationship between sense and antisense production of var genes was observed, but notably, some var genes had coincident high levels of both antisense and sense transcript. Conclusion Mutually exclusive expression of PfEMP1 proteins results from transcriptional silencing of non-expressed var genes. The distribution of steady-state sense and antisense RNA at var loci are not consistent with a silencing mechanism based on antisense silencing of inactive var genes. Silencing of var loci is also associated with altered regulation of genes distal to var loci. PMID:16277748

  20. Antisense antibiotics: a brief review of novel target discovery and delivery.

    PubMed

    Bai, Hui; Xue, Xiaoyan; Hou, Zheng; Zhou, Ying; Meng, Jingru; Luo, Xiaoxing

    2010-06-01

    The nightmare of multi-drug resistant bacteria will still haunt if no panacea is ever found. Efforts on seeking desirable natural products with bactericidal property and screening chemically modified derivatives of traditional antibiotics have lagged behind the emergence of new multi-drug resistant bacteria. The concept of using antisense antibiotics, now as revolutionary as is on threshold has experienced ups and downs in the past decade. In the past five years, however, significant technology advances in the fields of microbial genomics, structural modification of oligonucleotides and efficient delivery system have led to fundamental progress in the research and in vivo application of this paradigm. The wealthy information provided in the microbial genomics era has allowed the identification and/or validation of a number of essential genes that may serve as possible targets for antisense inhibition; antisense oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs) based on the 3rd generation of modified structures, e.g., peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) and phosphorodiamidate morpholino oligomers (PMOs) have shown great potency in gene expression inhibition in a sequence-specific and dosedependent manner at low micromolar concentrations; and cell penetrating peptide mediated delivery system has enabled the effective display of intracellular antisense inhibition of targeted genes both in vitro and in vivo. The new methods show promise in the discovery of novel gene-specific antisense antibiotics that will be useful in the future battle against drug-resistant bacterial infections. This review describes this promising paradigm, the targets that have been identified and the recent technologies on which it is delivered.

  1. "Dilute-and-inject" multi-target screening assay for highly polar doping agents using hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography high resolution/high accuracy mass spectrometry for sports drug testing.

    PubMed

    Görgens, Christian; Guddat, Sven; Orlovius, Anne-Katrin; Sigmund, Gerd; Thomas, Andreas; Thevis, Mario; Schänzer, Wilhelm

    2015-07-01

    In the field of LC-MS, reversed phase liquid chromatography is the predominant method of choice for the separation of prohibited substances from various classes in sports drug testing. However, highly polar and charged compounds still represent a challenging task in liquid chromatography due to their difficult chromatographic behavior using reversed phase materials. A very promising approach for the separation of hydrophilic compounds is hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC). Despite its great potential and versatile advantages for the separation of highly polar compounds, HILIC is up to now not very common in doping analysis, although most manufacturers offer a variety of HILIC columns in their portfolio. In this study, a novel multi-target approach based on HILIC high resolution/high accuracy mass spectrometry is presented to screen for various polar stimulants, stimulant sulfo-conjugates, glycerol, AICAR, ethyl glucuronide, morphine-3-glucuronide, and myo-inositol trispyrophosphate after direct injection of diluted urine specimens. The usage of an effective online sample cleanup and a zwitterionic HILIC analytical column in combination with a new generation Hybrid Quadrupol-Orbitrap® mass spectrometer enabled the detection of highly polar analytes without any time-consuming hydrolysis or further purification steps, far below the required detection limits. The methodology was fully validated for qualitative and quantitative (AICAR, glycerol) purposes considering the parameters specificity; robustness (rRT < 2.0%); linearity (R > 0.99); intra- and inter-day precision at low, medium, and high concentration levels (CV < 20%); limit of detection (stimulants and stimulant sulfo-conjugates < 10 ng/mL; norfenefrine; octopamine < 30 ng/mL; AICAR < 10 ng/mL; glycerol 100 μg/mL; ETG < 100 ng/mL); accuracy (AICAR 103.8-105.5%, glycerol 85.1-98.3% at three concentration levels) and ion suppression/enhancement effects.

  2. Cis-encoded non-coding antisense RNAs in streptococci and other low GC Gram (+) bacterial pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Kyu Hong; Kim, Jeong-Ho

    2015-01-01

    Due to recent advances of bioinformatics and high throughput sequencing technology, discovery of regulatory non-coding RNAs in bacteria has been increased to a great extent. Based on this bandwagon, many studies searching for trans-acting small non-coding RNAs in streptococci have been performed intensively, especially in the important human pathogen, group A and B streptococci. However, studies for cis-encoded non-coding antisense RNAs in streptococci have been scarce. A recent study shows antisense RNAs are involved in virulence gene regulation in group B streptococcus, S. agalactiae. This suggests antisense RNAs could have important roles in the pathogenesis of streptococcal pathogens. In this review, we describe recent discoveries of chromosomal cis-encoded antisense RNAs in streptococcal pathogens and other low GC Gram (+) bacteria to provide a guide for future studies. PMID:25859258

  3. Functional consequences of anti-sense RNA-mediated inhibition of CD8 surface expression in a human T cell clone

    PubMed Central

    1988-01-01

    An experimental approach for defining the function of CD8 has been developed by linking anti-sense RNA mutagenesis and T cell cloning technologies. We have transfected an anti-sense CD8 episomal expression vector into a CD8+ nontransformed human T cell clone that is specific for the human class I alloantigen HLA-B35. Expression of CD8 on this T cell clone, JH.ARL.1, was selectively and efficiently inhibited. Stimulation of this CD8- variant with specific alloantigen resulted in a marked loss of a number of functional responses, including cytotoxicity, proliferation, IL-2 secretion, and IL-2-R expression. However, these same functional responses could be elicited with stimuli that do not require antigen recognition to activate the T cell (anti- CD3 mAbs, PHA). The results of our study support the hypothesis that CD8 is required for recognition of class I MHC alloantigens that results in activation of T cell functional responses. PMID:2459296

  4. Modulation of intrahepatic cholesterol trafficking: evidence by in vivo antisense treatment for the involvement of sterol carrier protein-2 in newly synthesized cholesterol transport into rat bile.

    PubMed Central

    Puglielli, L; Rigotti, A; Amigo, L; Nuñez, L; Greco, A V; Santos, M J; Nervi, F

    1996-01-01

    Biliary cholesterol represents one of the two major excretory pathways for sterol elimination from the body and plays a central role in cholesterol gallstone formation. Biliary cholesterol originates from a precursor pool of preformed and newly synthesized free cholesterol. Although it has been suggested that newly synthesized and preformed biliary cholesterol are secreted by independent pathways, the specific cellular and molecular mechanisms are unknown. We used male Wistar rats to study the time-course of the appearance of newly synthesized cholesterol, phosphatidylcholine and protein into bile. The specific role of sterol carrier protein-2 (SCP-2) in the transport of newly synthesized biliary cholesterol was evaluated by an in vivo antisense oligonucleotide approach. In contrast to [14C]phosphatidylcholine and [35S]proteins, the time-course of [14C]cholesterol appearance into bile was rapid, and microtubule- and Golgi-independent. In vivo SCP-2 antisense treatment reduced and delayed the appearance of biliary [14C]cholesterol. Furthermore, hepatic SCP-2 expression increased more than 3-fold over control values in rats that had been treated with diosgenin to increase biliary secretion of newly synthesized cholesterol. These results suggest that SCP-2 is necessary for the rapid transport of newly synthesized cholesterol into bile and that hepatocytes can induce SCP-2 expression according to the rate of biliary secretion of newly synthesized cholesterol. PMID:8760350

  5. Restoration of Full-Length SMN Promoted by Adenoviral Vectors Expressing RNA Antisense Oligonucleotides Embedded in U7 snRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Geib, Till; Hertel, Klemens J.

    2009-01-01

    Background Spinal Muscular Atrophy (SMA) is an autosomal recessive disease that leads to specific loss of motor neurons. It is caused by deletions or mutations of the survival of motor neuron 1 gene (SMN1). The remaining copy of the gene, SMN2, generates only low levels of the SMN protein due to a mutation in SMN2 exon 7 that leads to exon skipping. Methodology/Principal Findings To correct SMN2 splicing, we use Adenovirus type 5–derived vectors to express SMN2-antisense U7 snRNA oligonucleotides targeting the SMN intron 7/exon 8 junction. Infection of SMA type I–derived patient fibroblasts with these vectors resulted in increased levels of exon 7 inclusion, upregulating the expression of SMN to similar levels as in non–SMA control cells. Conclusions/Significance These results show that Adenovirus type 5–derived vectors delivering U7 antisense oligonucleotides can efficiently restore full-length SMN protein and suggest that the viral vector-mediated oligonucleotide application may be a suitable therapeutic approach to counteract SMA. PMID:19997596

  6. Unified QSAR approach to antimicrobials. 4. Multi-target QSAR modeling and comparative multi-distance study of the giant components of antiviral drug-drug complex networks.

    PubMed

    Prado-Prado, Francisco J; Martinez de la Vega, Octavio; Uriarte, Eugenio; Ubeira, Florencio M; Chou, Kuo-Chen; González-Díaz, Humberto

    2009-01-15

    One limitation of almost all antiviral Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationships (QSAR) models is that they predict the biological activity of drugs against only one species of virus. Consequently, the development of multi-tasking QSAR models (mt-QSAR) to predict drugs activity against different species of virus is of the major vitally important. These mt-QSARs offer also a good opportunity to construct drug-drug Complex Networks (CNs) that can be used to explore large and complex drug-viral species databases. It is known that in very large CNs we can use the Giant Component (GC) as a representative sub-set of nodes (drugs) and but the drug-drug similarity function selected may strongly determines the final network obtained. In the three previous works of the present series we reported mt-QSAR models to predict the antimicrobial activity against different fungi [Gonzalez-Diaz, H.; Prado-Prado, F. J.; Santana, L.; Uriarte, E. Bioorg.Med.Chem.2006, 14, 5973], bacteria [Prado-Prado, F. J.; Gonzalez-Diaz, H.; Santana, L.; Uriarte E. Bioorg.Med.Chem.2007, 15, 897] or parasite species [Prado-Prado, F.J.; González-Díaz, H.; Martinez de la Vega, O.; Ubeira, F.M.; Chou K.C. Bioorg.Med.Chem.2008, 16, 5871]. However, including these works, we do not found any report of mt-QSAR models for antivirals drug, or a comparative study of the different GC extracted from drug-drug CNs based on different similarity functions. In this work, we used Linear Discriminant Analysis (LDA) to fit a mt-QSAR model that classify 600 drugs as active or non-active against the 41 different tested species of virus. The model correctly classifies 143 of 169 active compounds (specificity=84.62%) and 119 of 139 non-active compounds (sensitivity=85.61%) and presents overall training accuracy of 85.1% (262 of 308 cases). Validation of the model was carried out by means of external predicting series, classifying the model 466 of 514, 90.7% of compounds. In order to illustrate the performance of the model in practice, we develop a virtual screening recognizing the model as active 92.7%, 102 of 110 antivirus compounds. These compounds were never use in training or predicting series. Next, we obtained and compared the topology of the CNs and their respective GCs based on Euclidean, Manhattan, Chebychey, Pearson and other similarity measures. The GC of the Manhattan network showed the more interesting features for drug-drug similarity search. We also give the procedure for the construction of Back-Projection Maps for the contribution of each drug sub-structure to the antiviral activity against different species.

  7. A multi-target approach for pain treatment: dual inhibition of fatty acid amide hydrolase and TRPV1 in a rat model of osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Malek, Natalia; Mrugala, Monika; Makuch, Wioletta; Kolosowska, Natalia; Przewlocka, Barbara; Binkowski, Marcin; Czaja, Martyna; Morera, Enrico; Di Marzo, Vincenzo; Starowicz, Katarzyna

    2015-05-01

    The pharmacological inhibition of anandamide (AEA) hydrolysis by fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) attenuates pain in animal models of osteoarthritis (OA) but has failed in clinical trials. This may have occurred because AEA also activates transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1), which contributes to pain development. Therefore, we investigated the effectiveness of the dual FAAH-TRPV1 blocker OMDM-198 in an MIA-model of osteoarthritic pain. We first investigated the MIA-induced model of OA by (1) characterizing the pain phenotype and degenerative changes within the joint using X-ray microtomography and (2) evaluating nerve injury and inflammation marker (ATF-3 and IL-6) expression in the lumbar dorsal root ganglia of osteoarthritic rats and differences in gene and protein expression of the cannabinoid CB1 receptors FAAH and TRPV1. Furthermore, we compared OMDM-198 with compounds acting exclusively on FAAH or TRPV1. Osteoarthritis was accompanied by the fragmentation of bone microstructure and destroyed cartilage. An increase of the mRNA levels of ATF3 and IL-6 and an upregulation of AEA receptors and FAAH in the dorsal root ganglia were observed. OMDM-198 showed antihyperalgesic effects in the OA model, which were comparable with those of a selective TRPV1 antagonist, SB-366,791, and a selective FAAH inhibitor, URB-597. The effect of OMDM-198 was attenuated by the CB1 receptor antagonist, AM-251, and by the nonpungent TRPV1 agonist, olvanil, suggesting its action as an "indirect" CB1 agonist and TRPV1 antagonist. These results suggest an innovative strategy for the treatment of OA, which may yield more satisfactory results than those obtained so far with selective FAAH inhibitors in human OA.

  8. Chimeric snRNA molecules carrying antisense sequences against the splice junctions of exon 51 of the dystrophin pre-mRNA induce exon skipping and restoration of a dystrophin synthesis in Δ48-50 DMD cells

    PubMed Central

    De Angelis, Fernanda Gabriella; Sthandier, Olga; Berarducci, Barbara; Toso, Silvia; Galluzzi, Giuliana; Ricci, Enzo; Cossu, Giulio; Bozzoni, Irene

    2002-01-01

    Deletions and point mutations in the dystrophin gene cause either the severe progressive myopathy Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) or the milder Becker muscular dystrophy, depending on whether the translational reading frame is lost or maintained. Because internal in-frame deletions in the protein produce only mild myopathic symptoms, it should be possible, by preventing the inclusion of specific mutated exon(s) in the mature dystrophin mRNA, to restore a partially corrected phenotype. Such control has been previously accomplished by the use of synthetic oligonucleotides; nevertheless, a significant drawback to this approach is caused by the fact that oligonucleotides would require periodic administrations. To circumvent this problem, we have produced several constructs able to express in vivo, in a stable fashion, large amounts of chimeric RNAs containing antisense sequences. In this paper we show that antisense molecules against exon 51 splice junctions are able to direct skipping of this exon in the human DMD deletion 48–50 and to rescue dystrophin synthesis. We also show that the highest skipping activity was found when antisense constructs against the 5′ and 3′ splice sites are coexpressed in the same cell. PMID:12077324

  9. Chromatin remodelling and antisense-mediated up-regulation of the developmental switch gene eud-1 control predatory feeding plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Serobyan, Vahan; Xiao, Hua; Namdeo, Suryesh; Rödelsperger, Christian; Sieriebriennikov, Bogdan; Witte, Hanh; Röseler, Waltraud; Sommer, Ralf J.

    2016-01-01

    Phenotypic plasticity has been suggested to act through developmental switches, but little is known about associated molecular mechanisms. In the nematode Pristionchus pacificus, the sulfatase eud-1 was identified as part of a developmental switch controlling mouth-form plasticity governing a predatory versus bacteriovorous mouth-form decision. Here we show that mutations in the conserved histone-acetyltransferase Ppa-lsy-12 and the methyl-binding-protein Ppa-mbd-2 mimic the eud-1 phenotype, resulting in the absence of one mouth-form. Mutations in both genes cause histone modification defects and reduced eud-1 expression. Surprisingly, Ppa-lsy-12 mutants also result in the down-regulation of an antisense-eud-1 RNA. eud-1 and antisense-eud-1 are co-expressed and further experiments suggest that antisense-eud-1 acts through eud-1 itself. Indeed, overexpression of the antisense-eud-1 RNA increases the eud-1-sensitive mouth-form and extends eud-1 expression. In contrast, this effect is absent in eud-1 mutants indicating that antisense-eud-1 positively regulates eud-1. Thus, chromatin remodelling and antisense-mediated up-regulation of eud-1 control feeding plasticity in Pristionchus. PMID:27487725

  10. A potential suppressive effect of natural antisense IL-1β RNA on lipopolysaccharide-induced IL-1β expression

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Jiawei; Wu, Xiurong; Hong, Mao; Tobias, Peter; Han, Jiahuai

    2013-01-01

    Although more than half of genomic loci are believed to have antisense transcription, whether antisense transcription is involved in cytokine expression has not been studied. Here we show that some loci of innate immunity related genes do have antisense transcripts. We investigated the effect of several antisense RNAs, including anti-4-1BBL, anti-p100 and anti-IL-1β, on their cognate sense gene’s expression in macrophages. We found that overexpression of antisense IL-1β transcript suppressed IL-1β expression. Anti-IL-1β is complementary to the sequence in the 5′ upstream region of the IL-1β promoter. Its mediated inhibition of IL-1β production occurred at the transcriptional level. Anti-IL-1β did not alter the methylation status of the IL-1β promoter. However, chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays revealed that the anti-IL-1β transcript can change the chromatin structure of the IL-1β promoter by decreasing H3K4 trimethylation on the promoter, which is at least part of the mechanism underlying the reduced binding of RNA polymerase II to the IL-1β promoter upon anti-IL-1β expression. Our data suggest that some antisense-transcripts of innate immunity related genes play a role by regulating cytokine expression. PMID:23677478

  11. Downregulation of brain mineralocorticoid and glucocorticoid receptor by antisense oligodeoxynucleotide treatment fails to alter spatial navigation in rats.

    PubMed

    Engelmann, M; Landgraf, R; Lörscher, P; Conzelmann, C; Probst, J C; Holsboer, F; Reul, J M

    1998-11-13

    Adult male Brown Norway rats were long-term intracerebroventricularly (i.c.v.) infused with antisense oligodeoxynucleotides (18-mer, double endcapped phosphorothioate protected) targeting either mineralocorticoid or glucocorticoid receptor mRNA, or received the respective mixed bases sequence or vehicle. Mineralocorticoid receptor-mixed bases and glucocorticoid receptor-mixed bases oligodeoxynucleotide infusion (1 microg/0.5 microl/h) over a time period of seven days did not alter hippocampal mineralocorticoid receptor and glucocorticoid receptor binding when compared to vehicle treatment. In contrast, i.c.v. administration of mineralocorticoid receptor, as well as glucocorticoid receptor-antisense over the same time period resulted in a significantly reduced binding of mineralocorticoid receptor and glucocorticoid receptor in the hippocampus [mineralocorticoid receptor-antisense group approx. 72% of mineralocorticoid receptor-mixed bases and vehicle groups (100%); glucocorticoid receptor antisense group approx. 77% of glucocorticoid receptor-mixed bases and vehicle]. The specificity of these antisense effects is indicated by the finding that rats treated with mineralocorticoid receptor-antisense did not show any changes in glucocorticoid receptor and vice versa. Animals treated according to this infusion protocol and tested in the Morris water maze for their spatial navigation abilities failed to show significant differences among the groups. These data indicate that a reduction of hippocampal mineralocorticoid receptor or glucocorticoid receptor binding capacity by 20-30% does not interfere with spatial navigation.

  12. Dermal/transdermal delivery of small interfering RNA and antisense oligonucleotides- advances and hurdles.

    PubMed

    Ita, Kevin

    2017-03-01

    A diverse array of nucleic acids has been studied by several researchers for the management of several diseases. Among these compounds, small interfering RNA and antisense oligonucleotides have attracted considerable attention. Antisense oligonucleotides are synthetic single stranded strings of nucleic acids that bind to RNA and thereby alter or reduce expression of the target RNA while siRNAs, on the other hand, are double-stranded RNA molecules which can hybridize with a specific mRNA sequence and block the translation of numerous genes. One of the main obstacles in the dermal or transdermal delivery of these compounds is their low skin permeability. In this review, various techniques used to enhance the delivery of these molecules into or across the skin are described and in some cases, the correlation between enhanced dermal/transdermal delivery and therapeutic efficacy is highlighted.

  13. Reversal of phenotypes in MECP2 duplication mice using genetic rescue or antisense oligos

    PubMed Central

    Sztainberg, Yehezkel; Chen, Hong-mei; Swann, John W.; Hao, Shuang; Tang, Bin; Wu, Zhenyu; Tang, Jianrong; Wan, Ying-Wooi; Liu, Zhandong; Rigo, Frank; Zoghbi, Huda Y.

    2015-01-01

    Copy number variations have been frequently associated with developmental delay, intellectual disability, and autism spectrum disorders1. MECP2 duplication syndrome is one of the most common genomic rearrangements in males2 and is characterized by autism, intellectual disability, motor dysfunction, anxiety, epilepsy, recurrent respiratory tract infections, and early death3–5. The broad range of deficits caused by methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MeCP2) overexpression poses a daunting challenge to traditional biochemical pathway-based therapeutic approaches. Accordingly, we sought strategies that directly target MeCP2 and are amenable to translation into clinical therapy. The first question, however, was whether the neurological dysfunction is reversible after symptoms set in. Reversal of phenotypes in adult symptomatic mice has been demonstrated in some models of monogenic loss-of-function neurological disorders6–8, including loss of MeCP2 in Rett syndrome9, indicating that, at least in some cases, the neuroanatomy may remain sufficiently intact so that correction of the molecular dysfunction underlying these disorders can restore healthy physiology. Given the absence of neurodegeneration in MECP2 duplication syndrome, we hypothesized that restoration of normal MeCP2 levels in MECP2 duplication adult mice would rescue their phenotype. Therefore, we first generated and characterized a conditional Mecp2-overexpressing mouse model and showed that correction of MeCP2 levels largely reversed the behavioral, molecular, and electrophysiological deficits. Next, we sought a translational strategy to reduce MeCP2 and turned to antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs). ASOs are small modified nucleic acids that can selectively hybridize with mRNA transcribed from a target gene and silence it10,11, and have been successfully used to correct deficits in different mouse models12–18. We found that ASO treatment induced a broad phenotypic rescue in adult symptomatic transgenic MECP2

  14. Mining SAGE data allows large-scale, sensitive screening of antisense transcript expression.

    PubMed

    Quéré, Ronan; Manchon, Laurent; Lejeune, Mireille; Clément, Oliver; Pierrat, Fabien; Bonafoux, Béatrice; Commes, Thérèse; Piquemal, David; Marti, Jacques

    2004-11-23

    As a growing number of complementary transcripts, susceptible to exert various regulatory functions, are being found in eukaryotes, high throughput analytical methods are needed to investigate their expression in multiple biological samples. Serial Analysis of Gene Expression (SAGE), based on the enumeration of directionally reliable short cDNA sequences (tags), is capable of revealing antisense transcripts. We initially detected them by observing tags that mapped on to the reverse complement of known mRNAs. The presence of such tags in individual SAGE libraries suggested that SAGE datasets contain latent information on antisense transcripts. We raised a collection of virtual tags for mining these data. Tag pairs were assembled by searching for complementarities between 24-nt long sequences centered on the potential SAGE-anchoring sites of well-annotated human expressed sequences. An analysis of their presence in a large collection of published SAGE libraries revealed transcripts expressed at high levels from both strands of two adjacent, oppositely oriented, transcription units. In other cases, the respective transcripts of such cis-oriented genes displayed a mutually exclusive expression pattern or were co-expressed in a small number of libraries. Other tag pairs revealed overlapping transcripts of trans-encoded unique genes. Finally, we isolated a group of tags shared by multiple transcripts. Most of them mapped on to retroelements, essentially represented in humans by Alu sequences inserted in opposite orientations in the 3'UTR of otherwise different mRNAs. Registering these tags in separate files makes possible computational searches focused on unique sense-antisense pairs. The method developed in the present work shows that SAGE datasets constitute a major resource of rapidly investigating with high sensitivity the expression of antisense transcripts, so that a single tag may be detected in one library when screening a large number of biological samples.

  15. Antisense-RNA mediated control of plasmid replication - pIP501 revisited.

    PubMed

    Brantl, Sabine

    2015-03-01

    Over the past decade, a wealth of small noncoding RNAs (sRNAs) have been discovered in the genomes of almost all bacterial species, where they constitute the most abundant class of posttranscriptional regulators. These sRNAs are key-players in prokaryotic metabolism, stress response and virulence. However, the first bona-fide antisense RNAs had been found already in 1981 in plasmids, where they regulate replication or maintenance. Antisense RNAs involved in plasmid replication control - meanwhile investigated in depth for almost 35 years - employ a variety of mechanisms of action: They regulate primer maturation, inhibit translation of essential replication initiator proteins (Rep proteins) as well as leader peptides or the formation of activator pseudoknots required for efficient rep translation. Alternatively they attenuate transcription or translation of rep mRNAs. Some antisense RNAs collaborate with transcriptional repressors to ensure proper copy-number control. Here, I summarize our knowledge on replication control of the broad-host range plasmid pIP501 that was originally isolated from Streptococcus agalactiae. Plasmid pIP501 uses two copy number-control elements, RNAIII, a cis-encoded antisense RNA, and transcriptional repressor CopR. RNA III mediates transcription attenuation, a rather widespread concept that found its culmination in the recent discovery of riboswitches. A peculiarity of pIP501 is the unusual stability of RNA III, which requires a second function of CopR: CopR does not only repress transcription from the essential repR promoter, but also prevents convergent transcription between rep mRNA and RNAIII, thereby indirectly increasing the amount of RNAIII. The concerted action of these two control elements is necessary to prevent plasmid loss at dangerously low copy numbers.

  16. Natural antisense transcripts in Plasmodium falciparum isolates from patients with complicated malaria.

    PubMed

    Subudhi, Amit Kumar; Boopathi, P A; Garg, Shilpi; Middha, Sheetal; Acharya, Jyoti; Pakalapati, Deepak; Saxena, Vishal; Aiyaz, Mohammed; Orekondy, Harsha B; Mugasimangalam, Raja C; Sirohi, Paramendra; Kochar, Sanjay K; Kochar, Dhanpat K; Das, Ashis

    2014-06-01

    Mechanisms regulating gene expression in malaria parasites are not well understood. Little is known about how the parasite regulates its gene expression during transition from one developmental stage to another and in response to various environmental conditions. Parasites in a diseased host face environments which differ from the static, well adapted in vitro conditions. Parasites thus need to adapt quickly and effectively to these conditions by establishing transcriptional states which are best suited for better survival. With the discovery of natural antisense transcripts (NATs) in this parasite and considering the various proposed mechanisms by which NATs might regulate gene expression, it has been speculated that these might be playing a critical role in gene regulation. We report here the diversity of NATs in this parasite, using isolates taken directly from patients with differing clinical symptoms caused by malaria infection. Using a custom designed strand specific whole genome microarray, a total of 797 NATs targeted against annotated loci have been detected. Out of these, 545 NATs are unique to this study. The majority of NATs were positively correlated with the expression pattern of the sense transcript. However, 96 genes showed a change in sense/antisense ratio on comparison between uncomplicated and complicated disease conditions. The antisense transcripts map to a broad range of biochemical/metabolic pathways, especially pathways pertaining to the central carbon metabolism and stress related pathways. Our data strongly suggests that a large group of NATs detected here are unannotated transcription units antisense to annotated gene models. The results reveal a previously unknown set of NATs that prevails in this parasite, their differential regulation in disease conditions and mapping to functionally well annotated genes. The results detailed here call for studies to deduce the possible mechanism of action of NATs, which would further help in

  17. Naturally occurring antisense RNA of histone H2a in mouse cultured cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Nishida, Hiromi; Tomaru, Yasuhiro; Oho, Yuko; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide

    2005-01-01

    Background An antisense transcript of histone H2a that has no significant protein-coding region has been cloned from a mouse full-length cDNA library. In the present study, we evaluated this transcript by using RT-PCR and compared the expression patterns of the sense and antisense transcripts by using quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR). Results This antisense RNA was expressed in three mouse cell lines. We call it ASH2a. ASH2a includes not only the complementary sequence of the transcript of Hist2h2aa2 (a replication-dependent histone H2a gene), but also that of the promoter of Hist2h2aa2. The upstream genomic sequence of the transcription start site of the ASH2a-coding gene (ASH2a) lacks both CCAAT and TATA boxes. This absence suggests that the regulation of ASH2a is different from that of the replication-dependent histone H2a genes. Findings from qRT-PCR indicated that the expression pattern of ASH2a was different from that of Hist2h2aa2. Expression of Hist2h2aa2 peaked at 2 to 4 h during S-phase, but that of ASH2a peaked at 1 h. Conclusion We showed the existence of ASH2a, a histone H2a antisense RNA, in mouse cultured cells. The expression pattern of ASH2a is different from that of the sense RNA. PMID:15892893

  18. Bulged-out nucleotides protect an antisense RNA from RNase III cleavage.

    PubMed Central

    Hjalt, T A; Wagner, E G

    1995-01-01

    Bulged-out nucleotides or internal loops are present in the stem-loop structures of several antisense RNAs. We have used the antisense/target RNA system (CopA/CopT) that controls the copy number of plasmid R1 to examine the possible biological function of bulged-out nucleotides. Two regions within the major stem-loop of the antisense RNA, CopA, carry bulged-out nucleotides. Base pairing in either one or both of these regions of the stem was restored by site-specific mutagenesis and in one case a new internal loop was introduced. The set of mutant and wild-type CopA variants was characterized structurally in vitro. The results reported here indicate a possible function of the bulges: their presence protects CopA RNA from being a substrate for the double-strand-specific enzyme RNase III. In vitro cleavage rates were drastically increased when either the lower or both bulges were absent. This is paralleled by a similar, but not identical, effect of the bulges on metabolic stability of the CopA RNAs in vivo. The degradation pathways of wild-type and mutant CopA in various strain backgrounds are discussed. In the accompanying paper, we address the significance of bulges in CopA for binding to the target RNA in vitro and for its inhibitory efficiency in vivo. Images PMID:7534906

  19. Regulation of apoptosis by fau revealed by functional expression cloning and antisense expression.

    PubMed

    Mourtada-Maarabouni, Mirna; Kirkham, Lucy; Farzaneh, Farzin; Williams, Gwyn T

    2004-12-16

    Functional expression cloning is a powerful strategy for identifying critical steps in biological pathways independently of prior assumptions. It is particularly suitable for the identification of molecules crucial to the control of apoptosis. Our screen for sequences suppressing T-cell apoptosis isolated a sequence antisense to fau (Finkel-Biskis-Reilly murine sarcoma virus (FBR-MuSV)-associated ubiquitously expressed gene). The fox gene in FBR murine osteosarcoma virus is also antisense to fau and several reports have indicated that fau displays tumour suppressor and oncogenic properties in different contexts. Our observations indicate that the fau antisense sequence suppresses expression of endogenous fau mRNA and produces resistance to apoptosis induced both by the glucocorticoid analogue dexamethasone' by ultraviolet radiation, and by the anticancer drug cisplatin. In all cases, colony-forming ability is protected, indicating that fau affects the critical events prior to commitment to cell death. Overexpression of fau in the sense orientation induces cell death, which is inhibited both by Bcl-2 and by inhibition of caspases, in line with its proposed role in apoptosis.

  20. Antisense-mediated depletion of tomato GDP-L-galactose phosphorylase increases susceptibility to chilling stress.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li-Yan; Li, Dong; Deng, Yong-Sheng; Lv, Wei; Meng, Qing-Wei

    2013-02-15

    The GDP-L-galactose phosphorylase (GGP), which converts GDP-l-galactose to l-Gal-1-phosphate, is generally considered to be a key enzyme of the major ascorbate biosynthesis pathways in higher plants, but experimental evidence for its role in tomato is lacking. In the present study, the GGP gene was isolated from tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) and transient expression of SlGGP-GFP (green fluorescent protein) fusion protein in onion cells revealed the cytoplasmic and nucleus localization of the protein. Antisense transgenic tomato lines with only 50-75% ascorbate level of the wild type (WT) were obtained. Chilling treatment induced lower increase in AsA levels and redox ratio of ascorbate in antisense transgenic plants compared with WT plants. Under chilling stress, transgenic plants accumulated more malendialdehyde (MDA) and more O(2)(·-), leaked more electrolytes and showed lower maximal photochemical efficiency of PSII (Fv/Fm), net photosynthetic rate (Pn), and oxidizable P700 compared with WT plants. Furthermore, the antisense transgenic plants exhibited significantly higher H(2)O(2) level and lower ascorbate peroxidase (APX) activity. Our results suggested that GGP plays an important role in protecting plants against chilling stress by maintaining ascorbate pool and ascorbate redox state.

  1. A noncoding RNA antisense to moesin at 5p14.1 in autism.

    PubMed

    Kerin, Tara; Ramanathan, Anita; Rivas, Kasey; Grepo, Nicole; Coetzee, Gerhard A; Campbell, Daniel B

    2012-04-04

    People with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) are characterized by deficits in social interaction, language, and behavioral flexibility. Rare mutations and copy number variations have been identified in individuals with ASD, but in most patients, the causal variants remain unknown. A genome-wide association study (GWAS), designed to identify genes and pathways that contribute to ASD, indicated a genome-wide significant association of ASD with the single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs4307059 (P = 10⁻¹⁰), which is located in a gene-poor region of chromosome 5p14.1. We describe here a 3.9-kb noncoding RNA that is transcribed from the region of the chromosome 5p14.1 ASD GWAS association SNP. The noncoding RNA was encoded by the opposite (antisense) strand of moesin pseudogene 1 (MSNP1), and we therefore designated it as MSNP1AS (moesin pseudogene 1, antisense). Chromosome 5p14.1 MSNP1AS was 94% identical and antisense to the X chromosome transcript of MSN, which encodes a protein (moesin) that regulates neuronal architecture. Individuals who carry the ASD-associated rs4307059 T allele showed increased expression of MSNP1AS. The MSNP1AS noncoding RNA bound to MSN, was highly overexpressed (12.7-fold) in postmortem cerebral cortex of individuals with ASD, and could regulate levels of moesin protein in human cell lines. These data reveal a biologically functional element that may contribute to ASD risk.

  2. α-fur, an antisense RNA gene to fur in the extreme acidophile Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans.

    PubMed

    Lefimil, C; Jedlicki, E; Holmes, D S

    2014-03-01

    A large non-coding RNA, termed α-Fur, of ~1000 nt has been detected in the extreme acidophile Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans encoded on the antisense strand to the iron-responsive master regulator fur (ferric uptake regulator) gene. A promoter for α-fur was predicted bioinformatically and validated using gene fusion experiments. The promoter is situated within the coding region and in the same sense as proB, potentially encoding a glutamate 5-kinase. The 3' termination site of the α-fur transcript was determined by 3' rapid amplification of cDNA ends to lie 7 nt downstream of the start of transcription of fur. Thus, α-fur is antisense to the complete coding region of fur, including its predicted ribosome-binding site. The genetic context of α-fur is conserved in several members of the genus Acidithiobacillus but not in all acidophiles, indicating that it is monophyletic but not niche specific. It is hypothesized that α-Fur regulates the cellular level of Fur. This is the fourth example of an antisense RNA to fur, although it is the first in an extreme acidophile, and underscores the growing importance of cis-encoded non-coding RNAs as potential regulators involved in the microbial iron-responsive stimulon.

  3. Antisense oligonucleotide therapy for the treatment of C9ORF72 ALS/FTD diseases.

    PubMed

    Riboldi, Giulietta; Zanetta, Chiara; Ranieri, Michela; Nizzardo, Monica; Simone, Chiara; Magri, Francesca; Bresolin, Nereo; Comi, Giacomo P; Corti, Stefania

    2014-12-01

    Motor neuron disorders, and particularly amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), are fatal diseases that are due to the loss of motor neurons in the brain and spinal cord, with progressive paralysis and premature death. It has been recently shown that the most frequent genetic cause of ALS, frontotemporal dementia (FTD), and other neurological diseases is the expansion of a hexanucleotide repeat (GGGGCC) in the non-coding region of the C9ORF72 gene. The pathogenic mechanisms that produce cell death in the presence of this expansion are still unclear. One of the most likely hypotheses seems to be the gain-of-function that is achieved through the production of toxic RNA (able to sequester RNA-binding protein) and/or toxic proteins. In recent works, different authors have reported that antisense oligonucleotides complementary to the C9ORF72 RNA transcript sequence were able to significantly reduce RNA foci generated by the expanded RNA, in affected cells. Here, we summarize the recent findings that support the idea that the buildup of "toxic" RNA containing the GGGGCC repeat contributes to the death of motor neurons in ALS and also suggest that the use of antisense oligonucleotides targeting this transcript is a promising strategy for treating ALS/frontotemporal lobe dementia (FTLD) patients with the C9ORF72 repeat expansion. These data are particularly important, given the state of the art antisense technology, and they allow researchers to believe that a clinical application of these discoveries will be possible soon.

  4. ASBEL, an ANA/BTG3 antisense transcript required for tumorigenicity of ovarian carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Yanagida, Satoshi; Taniue, Kenzui; Sugimasa, Hironobu; Nasu, Emiko; Takeda, Yasuko; Kobayashi, Mana; Yamamoto, Tadashi; Okamoto, Aikou; Akiyama, Tetsu

    2013-01-01

    Mammalian genomes encode numerous antisense non-coding RNAs, which are assumed to be involved in the regulation of the sense gene expression. However, the mechanisms of their action and involvement in the development of diseases have not been well elucidated. The ANA/BTG3 protein is an antiproliferative protein whose expression is downregulated in prostate and lung cancers. Here we show that an antisense transcript of the ANA/BTG3 gene, termed ASBEL, negatively regulates the levels of ANA/BTG3 protein, but not of ANA/BTG3 mRNA and is required for proliferation and tumorigenicity of ovarian clear cell carcinoma. We further show that knockdown of ANA/BTG3 rescues growth inhibition caused by ASBEL knockdown. Moreover, we demonstrate that ASBEL forms duplexes with ANA/BTG3 mRNA in the nucleus and suppresses its cytoplasmic transportation. Our findings illustrate a novel function for an antisense transcript that critically promotes tumorigenesis by suppressing translation of the sense gene by inhibiting its cytoplasmic transportation.

  5. Antisense-mediated FLC transcriptional repression requires the P-TEFb transcription elongation factor

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhi-Wei; Wu, Zhe; Raitskin, Oleg; Sun, Qianwen; Dean, Caroline

    2014-01-01

    The functional significance of noncoding transcripts is currently a major question in biology. We have been studying the function of a set of antisense transcripts called COOLAIR that encompass the whole transcription unit of the Arabidopsis floral repressor FLOWERING LOCUS C (FLC). Alternative polyadenylation of COOLAIR transcripts correlates with different FLC sense expression states. Suppressor mutagenesis aimed at understanding the importance of this sense–antisense transcriptional circuitry has identified a role for Arabidopsis cyclin-dependent kinase C (CDKC;2) in FLC repression. CDKC;2 functions in an Arabidopsis positive transcription elongation factor b (P-TEFb) complex and influences global RNA polymerase II (Pol II) Ser2 phosphorylation levels. CDKC;2 activity directly promotes COOLAIR transcription but does not affect an FLC transgene missing the COOLAIR promoter. In the endogenous gene context, however, the reduction of COOLAIR transcription by cdkc;2 disrupts a COOLAIR-mediated repression mechanism that increases FLC expression. This disruption then feeds back to indirectly increase COOLAIR expression. This tight interconnection between sense and antisense transcription, together with differential promoter sensitivity to P-TEFb, is central to quantitative regulation of this important floral repressor gene. PMID:24799695

  6. Intrathecal PLC(β3) oligodeoxynucleotides antisense potentiates acute morphine efficacy and attenuates chronic morphine tolerance.

    PubMed

    Quanhong, Zhou; Ying, Xue; Moxi, Chen; Tao, Xu; Jing, Wang; Xin, Zhang; Li, Wang; Derong, Cui; Xiaoli, Zhang; Wei, Jiang

    2012-09-07

    Morphine is a mainstay for chronic pain treatment, but its efficacy has been hampered by physical tolerance. The underlying mechanism for chronic morphine induced tolerance is complicated and not well understood. PLC(β3) is regarded as an important factor in the morphine tolerance signal pathway. In this study, we determined intrathecal (i.t.) administration of an antisense oligodeoxynucleotide (ODN) of PLC(β3) could quicken the on-set antinociceptive efficacy of acute morphine treatment and prolong the maximum effect up to 4h. The antisense could also attenuate the development of morphine-induced tolerance and left shift the ED50 after 7 day of coadministration with morphine. These results probably were contributed by the PLC(β3) antisense ODN as they successfully knocked down protein expression levels and reduced activity of PLC(β3) in spinal cord in rats. The mismatch group had no such effects. The results confirmed the important involvement of PLC(β3) in both acute morphine efficacy and chronic morphine tolerance at spinal level in rats. This study may provide an idea for producing a novel adjuvant for morphine treatment.

  7. Bioinformatic analyses of sense and antisense expression from terminal inverted repeat transposons in Drosophila somatic cells.

    PubMed

    Harrington, Andrew W; Steiniger, Mindy

    2016-01-02

    Understanding regulation of transposon movement in somatic cells is important as mobile elements can cause detrimental genomic rearrangements. Generally, transposons move via one of 2 mechanisms; retrotransposons utilize an RNA intermediate, therefore copying themselves and amplifying throughout the genome, while terminal inverted repeat transposons (TIR Tns) excise DNA sequences from the genome and integrate into a new location. Our recently published work indicates that retrotransposons in Drosophila tissue culture cells are actively transcribed in the antisense direction. Our data support a model in which convergent transcription of retrotransposons from intra element transcription start sites results in complementary RNAs that hybridize to form substrates for Dicer-2, the endogenous small interfering (esi)RNA generating enzyme. Here, we extend our previous analysis to TIR Tns. In contrast to retrotransposons, our data show that antisense TIR Tn RNAs result from transcription of intronic TIR Tns oriented antisense to their host genes. Also, disproportionately less esiRNAs are generated from TIR transcripts than from retrotransposons and transcription of very few individual TIR Tns could be confirmed. Collectively, these data support a model in which TIR Tns are regulated at the level of Transposase production while retrotransposons are regulated with esiRNA post-transcriptional mechanisms in Drosophila somatic cells.

  8. Antisense Transcription of Retrotransposons in Drosophila: An Origin of Endogenous Small Interfering RNA Precursors

    PubMed Central

    Russo, Joseph; Harrington, Andrew W.; Steiniger, Mindy

    2016-01-01

    Movement of transposons causes insertions, deletions, and chromosomal rearrangements potentially leading to premature lethality in Drosophila melanogaster. To repress these elements and combat genomic instability, eukaryotes have evolved several small RNA-mediated defense mechanisms. Specifically, in Drosophila somatic cells, endogenous small interfering (esi)RNAs suppress retrotransposon mobility. EsiRNAs are produced by Dicer-2 processing of double-stranded RNA precursors, yet the origins of these precursors are unknown. We show that most transposon families are transcribed in both the sense (S) and antisense (AS) direction in Dmel-2 cells. LTR retrotransposons Dm297, mdg1, and blood, and non-LTR retrotransposons juan and jockey transcripts, are generated from intraelement transcription start sites with canonical RNA polymerase II promoters. We also determined that retrotransposon antisense transcripts are less polyadenylated than sense. RNA-seq and small RNA-seq revealed that Dicer-2 RNA interference (RNAi) depletion causes a decrease in the number of esiRNAs mapping to retrotransposons and an increase in expression of both S and AS retrotransposon transcripts. These data support a model in which double-stranded RNA precursors are derived from convergent transcription and processed by Dicer-2 into esiRNAs that silence both sense and antisense retrotransposon transcripts. Reduction of sense retrotransposon transcripts potentially lowers element-specific protein levels to prevent transposition. This mechanism preserves genomic integrity and is especially important for Drosophila fitness because mobile genetic elements are highly active. PMID:26534950

  9. Cationic derivatives of biocompatible hyaluronic acids for delivery of siRNA and antisense oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Han, Su-Eun; Kang, Hyungu; Shim, Ga Yong; Kim, Sun Jae; Choi, Han-Gon; Kim, Jiseok; Hahn, Sei Kwang; Oh, Yu-Kyoung

    2009-02-01

    In this study, we tested the use of cationic polymer derivatives of biocompatible hyaluronic acid (HA) as a delivery system of siRNA and antisense oligonucleotides. HA was modified with cationic polymer polyethylenimine (PEI). When compared with PEI alone, cationic PEI derivatives of HA (HA-PEI) provided increased cellular delivery of Small interfering RNA (siRNA) in B16F1, A549, HeLa, and Hep3B tumor cells. Indeed, more than 95% of the cells were positive for siRNA following its delivery with HA-PEI. A survivin-specific siRNA that was delivered using HA-PEI potently reduced the mRNA expression levels of the target gene in all of the cell lines. By contrast, survivin-specific siRNA delivered by PEI alone did not induce a significant reduction in mRNA levels. In green fluorescent protein (GFP)-expressing 293 T cells, a loss of GFP expression was evident in the cells that had been treated with GFP-specific siRNA and HA-PEI complex. The inhibition of target gene expression by antisense oligonucleotide G3139 was also enhanced after delivery with HA-PEI. Moreover, HA-PEI displayed lower cytotoxicity than PEI alone. These results suggest that HA-PEI could be further developed as biocompatible delivery systems of siRNA and antisense oligonucleotides for enhanced cellular uptake and inhibition of target gene expression.

  10. Multi-targeting exploration of new 2-aminothiazolyl quinolones: Synthesis, antimicrobial evaluation, interaction with DNA, combination with topoisomerase IV and penetrability into cells.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yu; Avula, Srinivasa Rao; Gao, Wei-Wei; Addla, Dinesh; Tangadanchu, Vijai Kumar Reddy; Zhang, Ling; Lin, Jian-Mei; Zhou, Cheng-He

    2016-11-29

    A series of new potentially multi-targeting antimicrobial 2-aminothiazolyl quinolones were designed, synthesized and characterized by (1)H NMR, (13)C NMR, IR, MS and HRMS spectra. Bioactive assay manifested that some of the prepared compounds showed moderate to good antibacterial and antifungal activities. Noticeably, compound 10f could effectively inhibit the growth of B. typhi and MRSA with MIC values of 1 and 8 μg/mL, respectively. Experimental results revealed that compound 10f was membrane-active and had the ability to rapidly kill the tested strains and effectively prevent the development of bacterial resistance. Moreover, this compound also exhibited low toxicity against L929 cells. Molecular docking indicated that compound 10f could bind with topoisomerase IV-DNA complexes through hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic interactions. Quantum chemical studies were also performed on 10f to understand the structural features essential for activity. The preliminary mechanism research suggested that compound 10f could intercalate into calf thymus DNA to form a steady supramolecular complex which might block DNA replication to exert the powerful bioactivities.

  11. TIMMA-R: an R package for predicting synergistic multi-targeted drug combinations in cancer cell lines or patient-derived samples

    PubMed Central

    He, Liye; Wennerberg, Krister; Aittokallio, Tero; Tang, Jing

    2015-01-01

    Summary: Network pharmacology-based prediction of multi-targeted drug combinations is becoming a promising strategy to improve anticancer efficacy and safety. We developed a logic-based network algorithm, called Target Inhibition Interaction using Maximization and Minimization Averaging (TIMMA), which predicts the effects of drug combinations based on their binary drug-target interactions and single-drug sensitivity profiles in a given cancer sample. Here, we report the R implementation of the algorithm (TIMMA-R), which is much faster than the original MATLAB code. The major extensions include modeling of multiclass drug-target profiles and network visualization. We also show that the TIMMA-R predictions are robust to the intrinsic noise in the experimental data, thus making it a promising high-throughput tool to prioritize drug combinations in various cancer types for follow-up experimentation or clinical applications. Availability and implementation: TIMMA-R source code is freely available at http://cran.r-project.org/web/packages/timma/. Contact: jing.tang@helsinki.fi Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:25638808

  12. Using combination therapy to override stromal-mediated chemoresistance in mutant FLT3-positive AML: Synergism between FLT3 inhibitors, dasatinib/multi-targeted inhibitors, and JAK inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Weisberg, Ellen; Liu, Qingsong; Nelson, Erik; Kung, Andrew L.; Christie, Amanda L.; Bronson, Rod; Sattler, Martin; Sanda, Takaomi; Zhao, Zheng; Hur, Wooyoung; Mitsiades, Constantine; Smith, Robert; Daley, John F.; Stone, Richard; Galinsky, Ilene; Griffin, James D.; Gray, Nathanael

    2014-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) progenitors are frequently characterized by activating mutations in the receptor tyrosine kinase FLT3. Protein tyrosine kinases are integral components of signaling cascades that play a role in both FLT3-mediated transformation as well as viability pathways that are advantageous to leukemic cell survival. The bone marrow microenvironment can diminish AML sensitivity to tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs). We hypothesized that inhibition of protein kinases in addition to FLT3 may be effective in overriding drug resistance in AML. We used a cell-based model mimicking stromal protection as part of an unbiased high-throughput chemical screen to identify kinase inhibitors with the potential to override microenvironment-mediated drug resistance in mutant FLT3-positive AML. Several related multi-targeted kinase inhibitors, including dasatinib, with the capability of reversing microenvironment-induced resistance to FLT3 inhibition were identified and validated. We validated synergy in vitro and demonstrated effective combination potential in vivo. In particular Janus kinase (JAK) inhibitors were effective in overriding stromal protection and potentiating FLT3 inhibition in primary AML and cell lines. These results hint at a novel concept of using combination therapy to override drug resistance in mutant FLT3-positive AML in the bone marrow niche and suppress or eradicate residual disease. PMID:22469781

  13. Multi-target determination of organic ultraviolet absorbents in organism tissues by ultrasonic assisted extraction and ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Peng, Xianzhi; Jin, Jiabin; Wang, Chunwei; Ou, Weihui; Tang, Caiming

    2015-03-06

    A sensitive and reliable method was developed for multi-target determination of 13 most widely used organic ultraviolet (UV) absorbents (including UV filters and UV stabilizers) in aquatic organism tissues. The organic UV absorbents were extracted using ultrasonic-assisted extraction, purified via gel permeation chromatography coupled with silica gel column chromatography, and determined by ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Recoveries of the UV absorbents from organism tissues mostly ranged from 70% to 120% from fish filet with satisfactory reproducibility. Method quantification limits were 0.003-1.0ngg(-1) dry weight (dw) except for 2-ethylhexyl 4-methoxycinnamate. This method has been applied to analysis of the UV absorbents in wild and farmed aquatic organisms collected from the Pearl River Estuary, South China. 2-Hydroxy-4-methoxybenzophenone and UV-P were frequently detected in both wild and farmed marine organisms at low ngg(-1)dw. 3-(4-Methylbenzylidene)camphor and most of the benzotriazole UV stabilizers were also frequently detected in maricultured fish. Octocrylene and 2-ethylhexyl 4-methoxycinnamate were not detected in any sample. This work lays basis for in-depth study about bioaccumulation and biomagnification of the UV absorbents in marine environment.

  14. Self-assembled phenylalanine-α,β-dehydrophenylalanine nanotubes for sustained intravitreal delivery of a multi-targeted tyrosine kinase inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Panda, Jiban J; Yandrapu, Sarath; Kadam, Rajendra S; Chauhan, Virander S; Kompella, Uday B

    2013-12-28

    Current standard of care for sustained back of the eye drug delivery is surgical placement or injection of large, slow release implants using a relatively large 22 gauge needle. We designed novel dipeptide (phenylalanine-α,β-dehydrophenylalanine; Phe-∆Phe) based nanotubes with a diameter of ~15-30 nm and a length of ~1500 nm that could be injected with a 33 gauge needle for sustained intravitreal delivery of pazopanib, a multi-targeted tyrosine kinase inhibitor. The drug could be loaded during nanotube assembly or post-loaded after nanotube formation, with the former being more efficient at 25% w/w pazopanib loading and ~55% loading efficiency. Plain and peptide loaded nanotube were non-cytotoxic to retinal pigment epithelial cells even at a concentration of 200 μg/ml. Following intravitreal injection of fluorescently labeled nanotubes using a 33 gauge needle in a rat model, the nanotube persistence and drug delivery were monitored using noninvasive fluorophotometry, electron microscopy and mass spectrometry analysis. Nanotubes persisted in the vitreous humor during the 15 days study and pazopanib levels in the vitreous humor, retina, and choroid-RPE at the end of the study were 4.5, 5, and 2.5-folds higher, respectively, compared to the plain drug. Thus, Phe-∆Phe nanotubes allow intravitreal injections with a small gauge needle and sustain drug delivery.

  15. Involvement of Bcl-2 and Bax in photodynamic therapy-mediated apoptosis. Antisense Bcl-2 oligonucleotide sensitizes RIF 1 cells to photodynamic therapy apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, M; Ahmad, N; Gupta, S; Mukhtar, H

    2001-05-04

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT), a promising treatment modality, is an oxidative stress that induces apoptosis in many cancer cells in vitro and tumors in vivo. Understanding the mechanism(s) involved in PDT-mediated apoptosis may improve its therapeutic efficacy. Although studies suggest the involvement of multiple pathways, the triggering event(s) responsible for PDT-mediated apoptotic response is(are) not clear. To investigate the role of Bcl-2 in PDT-mediated apoptosis, we employed Bcl-2-antisense and -overexpression approaches in two cell types differing in their responses toward PDT apoptosis. In the first approach, we treated radiation-induced fibrosarcoma (RIF 1) cells, which are resistant to silicon phthalocyanine (Pc 4)-PDT apoptosis, with Bcl-2-antisense oligonucleotide. This treatment resulted in sensitization of RIF 1 cells to PDT-mediated apoptosis as demonstrated by i) cleavage of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase, ii) DNA ladder formation, iii) terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL)-positive cells, and iv) DEVDase activity. This treatment also resulted in oligonucleotide concentration-dependent decrease in cell viability and down-regulation of Bcl-2 protein with a concomitant increase in apoptosis. However, the level of Bax, a pro-apoptotic member of Bcl-2 family, remained unaltered. In the second approach, an overexpression of Bcl-2 in PDT apoptosis-sensitive human epidermoid carcinoma (A431) cells resulted in enhanced apoptosis and up-regulation of Bax following PDT. In both the approaches, the increased Bax/Bcl-2 ratio was associated with an increased apoptotic response of PDT. Our data also demonstrated that PDT results in modulation of other Bcl-2 family members in a way that the overall ratio of pro-apoptotic and anti-apoptotic member proteins favors apoptosis.

  16. Apolipoprotein E-deficient mice created by systemic administration of antisense oligodeoxynucleotides: a new model for lipoprotein metabolism studies.

    PubMed

    Morishita, R; Gibbons, G H; Kaneda, Y; Zhang, L; Ogihara, T; Dzau, V J

    2002-11-01

    Atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease results from complex interactions among multiple genetic and environmental factors. Thus, it is important to elucidate the influence of each factor on cholesterol metabolism. For this purpose, transgenic/gene-targeting technology is a powerful tool for studying gene functions. However, this technology has several disadvantages such as being time consuming and expensive. Accordingly, we established new animal models using in vivo gene transfer technology. In this study, we examined the feasibility of the creation of a new animal model for the study of atherosclerosis. We hypothesized that apolipoprotein (apo) E-deficient mice can be created by systemic administration of antisense apo E oligodeoxynucleotides (ODN) coupled to the HVJ-liposome complex. Initially, we examined the localization and cellular fate of FITC-labeled antisense ODN administered intravenously. FITC-labeled ODN transfection by the HVJ-liposome method resulted in fluorescence in the liver, spleen and kidney, but not in other organs such as brain. Moreover, fluorescence with the HVJ-liposome method was sustained for up to 2 weeks after transfection, which resulted in a striking difference from transfection of ODN alone or ODN in liposomes without HVJ, which showed rapid disappearance of fluorescence (within 1 day). Given these unique characteristics of the HVJ-liposome method, we next examined transfection of antisense apo E ODN by intravenous administration. Transfection of antisense apo E ODN resulted in a marked reduction of apo E mRNA levels in the liver, but no change in apo B and beta-actin mRNA levels. In mice fed a normal diet, a transient increase in cholesterol and triglyceride levels was observed in the antisense apo E-treated group, but they returned to normal levels by 6 days after transfection. Similar findings were also found in mice fed a high cholesterol diet. Neither scrambled nor mismatched ODN resulted in any increase in cholesterol. To make

  17. Analysis of wheat SAGE tags reveals evidence for widespread antisense transcription

    PubMed Central

    Poole, Rebecca L; Barker, Gary LA; Werner, Kay; Biggi, Gaia F; Coghill, Jane; Gibbings, J George; Berry, Simon; Dunwell, Jim M; Edwards, Keith J

    2008-01-01

    Background Serial Analysis of Gene Expression (SAGE) is a powerful tool for genome-wide transcription studies. Unlike microarrays, it has the ability to detect novel forms of RNA such as alternatively spliced and antisense transcripts, without the need for prior knowledge of their existence. One limitation of using SAGE on an organism with a complex genome and lacking detailed sequence information, such as the hexaploid bread wheat Triticum aestivum, is accurate annotation of the tags generated. Without accurate annotation it is impossible to fully understand the dynamic processes involved in such complex polyploid organisms. Hence we have developed and utilised novel procedures to characterise, in detail, SAGE tags generated from the whole grain transcriptome of hexaploid wheat. Results Examination of 71,930 Long SAGE tags generated from six libraries derived from two wheat genotypes grown under two different conditions suggested that SAGE is a reliable and reproducible technique for use in studying the hexaploid wheat transcriptome. However, our results also showed that in poorly annotated and/or poorly sequenced genomes, such as hexaploid wheat, considerably more information can be extracted from SAGE data by carrying out a systematic analysis of both perfect and "fuzzy" (partially matched) tags. This detailed analysis of the SAGE data shows first that while there is evidence of alternative polyadenylation this appears to occur exclusively within the 3' untranslated regions. Secondly, we found no strong evidence for widespread alternative splicing in the developing wheat grain transcriptome. However, analysis of our SAGE data shows that antisense transcripts are probably widespread within the transcriptome and appear to be derived from numerous locations within the genome. Examination of antisense transcripts showing sequence similarity to the Puroindoline a and Puroindoline b genes suggests that such antisense transcripts might have a role in the regulation of

  18. Antisense Transcript and RNA Processing Alterations Suppress Instability of Polyadenylated mRNA in Chlamydomonas Chloroplasts

    PubMed Central

    Nishimura, Yoshiki; Kikis, Elise A.; Zimmer, Sara L.; Komine, Yutaka; Stern, David B.

    2004-01-01

    In chloroplasts, the control of mRNA stability is of critical importance for proper regulation of gene expression. The Chlamydomonas reinhardtii strain Δ26pAtE is engineered such that the atpB mRNA terminates with an mRNA destabilizing polyadenylate tract, resulting in this strain being unable to conduct photosynthesis. A collection of photosynthetic revertants was obtained from Δ26pAtE, and gel blot hybridizations revealed RNA processing alterations in the majority of these suppressor of polyadenylation (spa) strains, resulting in a failure to expose the atpB mRNA 3′ poly(A) tail. Two exceptions were spa19 and spa23, which maintained unusual heteroplasmic chloroplast genomes. One genome type, termed PS+, conferred photosynthetic competence by contributing to the stability of atpB mRNA; the other, termed PS−, was required for viability but could not produce stable atpB transcripts. Based on strand-specific RT-PCR, S1 nuclease protection, and RNA gel blots, evidence was obtained that the PS+ genome stabilizes atpB mRNA by generating an atpB antisense transcript, which attenuates the degradation of the polyadenylated form. The accumulation of double-stranded RNA was confirmed by insensitivity of atpB mRNA from PS+ genome-containing cells to S1 nuclease digestion. To obtain additional evidence for antisense RNA function in chloroplasts, we used strain Δ26, in which atpB mRNA is unstable because of the lack of a 3′ stem-loop structure. In this context, when a 121-nucleotide segment of atpB antisense RNA was expressed from an ectopic site, an elevated accumulation of atpB mRNA resulted. Finally, when spa19 was placed in a genetic background in which expression of the chloroplast exoribonuclease polynucleotide phosphorylase was diminished, the PS+ genome and the antisense transcript were no longer required for photosynthesis. Taken together, our results suggest that antisense RNA in chloroplasts can protect otherwise unstable transcripts from 3′→5

  19. Knockdown of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signalling in the midgut of Anopheles stephensi mosquitoes using antisense morpholinos.

    PubMed

    Pietri, J E; Cheung, K W; Luckhart, S

    2014-10-01

    Arthropod-borne infectious diseases are responsible for nearly 1.5 million deaths annually across the globe, with malaria responsible for >50% of these deaths. Recent efforts to enhance malaria control have focused on developing genetically modified Anopheles mosquitoes that are resistant to malaria parasite infection by manipulating proteins that are essential to the immune response. Although this approach has shown promise, the lack of efficient genetic tools in the mosquito makes it difficult to investigate innate immunity using reverse genetics. Current gene knockdown strategies based on small interfering RNA are typically labourious, inefficient, and require extensive training. In the present study, we describe the use of morpholino antisense oligomers to knockdown MEK-ERK signalling in the midgut of Anopheles stephensi through a simple feeding protocol. Anti-MEK morpholino provided in a saline meal was readily ingested by female mosquitoes with minimal toxicity and resulted in knockdown of total MEK protein levels 3-4 days after morpholino feeding. Further, anti-MEK morpholino feeding attenuated inducible phosphorylation of the downstream kinase ERK and, as predicted by previous work, reduced parasite burden in mosquitoes infected with Plasmodium falciparum. To our knowledge, this is the first example of morpholino use for target protein knockdown via feeding in an insect vector. Our results suggest this method is not only efficient for studies of individual proteins, but also for studies of phenotypic control by complex cell signalling networks. As such, our protocol is an effective alternative to current methods for gene knockdown in arthropods.

  20. Genetic modification of condensed tannin biosynthesis in Lotus corniculatus. 1. Heterologous antisense dihydroflavonol reductase down-regulates tannin accumulation in "hairy root" cultures.

    PubMed

    Carron, T R; Robbins, M P; Morris, P

    1994-03-01

    An antisense dihydroflavonol reductase (DFR) gene-construct made using the cDNA for DFR from Antirrhinum majus was introduced into the genome of a series of clonal genotypes of Lotus corniculatus via Agrobacterium rhizogenes. After initial screening, 17 antisense and 11 control transformation events were analysed and tannin levels found to be reduced in antisense root cultures. The effect of this antisense construct, (pMAJ2), which consisted of the 5' half of the DFR cDNA sequence, was compared in three different recipient Lotus genotypes. This construct effectively down-regulated tannin biosynthesis in two of the recepient genotypes (s33 and s50); however, this construct was relatively ineffective in a third genotype (s41) which accumulated high levels of condensed tannins in derived transgenic root cultures. Four pMAJ2 antisense and three control lines derived from clonal genotypes s33 and s50 were selected and studied in greater detail. The antisense DFR construct was found to be integrated into the genome of the antisense "hairy root" cultures, and the antisense RNA was shown to be expressed. Tannin levels were much lower in antisense roots compared to the controls and this reduction in tannin levels was accompanied by a change in condensed tannin subunit composition.

  1. Water-absorbent polymer as a carrier for a discrete deposit of antisense oligodeoxynucleotides in the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Bannai, M; Ichikawa, M; Nishimura, F; Nishihara, M; Takahashi, M

    1998-09-01

    One of the problems of introducing antisense oligodeoxynucleotides (ODN) into the central nervous system (CNS) is their rapid disappearance from the target site due to their dispersion and diffusion, which results in poor uptake and/or retention in cells (M. Morris, A.B. Lucion, Antisense oligonucleotides in the study of neuroendocrine systems, J. Neuroendocrinol. 7 (1995) 493-500; S. Ogawa, H.E. Brown, H.J. Okano, D.W. Pfaff, Cellular uptake of intracerebrally administrated oligodeoxynucleotides in mouse brain, Regul. Pept. 59 (1995) 143-149) [2,5]. Recently, we adapted a new method using water-absorbent polymer (WAP; internally cross-linked starch-grafted-polyacrylates) as a carrier for antisense ODN. The polymer forms a hydro-gel after absorbing water which is chemically and biologically inert. In these studies, the polymer (powder-form) is fully swollen by physiological saline containing antisense ODN (0.2 micromol/ml) to make 80-fold volume gel. Hydro-gel (1 microliter) is injected into the target site, and water solutes are assumed to be diffused stoichiometrically into CNS from the surface of the gel. Histological studies indicate that 24 h after the injection, antisense ODN (5'biotinylated-S-oligos of 15 mer) are distributed to within 800 micrometer from the edge of the area where the gel is located and then gradually disappear from this area within days, but still remain within 300-micrometer distance 7 days later. Antisense ODN are effectively incorporated by all the cell types examined, i.e., neurons, astrocytes and microglias, and suppress the synthesis of the target protein. This method can be adapted to slow delivery of antisense ODN and other water soluble substances into the CNS.

  2. Anti-myeloma activity of a multi targeted kinase inhibitor, AT9283, via potent Aurora Kinase and STAT3 inhibition either alone or in combination with lenalidomide

    PubMed Central

    Santo, Loredana; Hideshima, Teru; Cirstea, Diana; Bandi, Madhavi; Nelson, Erik A.; Gorgun, Gullu; Rodig, Scott; Vallet, Sonia; Pozzi, Samantha; Patel, Kishan; Unitt, Christine; Squires, Matt; Hu, Yiguo; Chauhan, Dharminder; Mahindra, Anuj; Munshi, Nikhil C.; Anderson, Kenneth C.; Raje, Noopur

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Aurora Kinases, whose expression is linked to genetic instability and cellular proliferation, are under investigation as novel therapeutic targets in multiple myeloma (MM). Here, we investigated the preclinical activity of a small molecule–multi-targeted kinase inhibitor, AT9283, with potent activity against Aurora kinase A (AURKA), Aurora kinase B (AURKB) and Janus Kinase 2/3. Experimental design We evaluated the in vitro anti myeloma activity of AT9283 alone and in combination with lenalidomide and the in vivo efficacy by using a Xenograft mouse model of human MM. Results Our data demonstrated AT9283 induced cell growth inhibition and apoptosis in MM. Studying the apoptosis mechanism of AT9283 in MM, we observed features consistent with both AURKA and AURKB inhibition, e.g increase of cells with polyploid DNA content, decrease in phospho-Histone H3, and decrease of phospho-Aurora A. Importantly, AT9283 also inhibited STAT3 tyrosine phosphorylation in MM cells. Genetic depletion of STAT3, AURKA or AURKB showed growth inhibition of MM cells, suggesting a role of AT9283-induced inhibition of these molecules in the underlying mechanism of MM cell death. In vivo studies demonstrated decreased MM cell growth and prolonged survival in AT9283-treated mice compared to controls. Importantly, combination studies of AT9283 with lenalidomide showed significant synergistic cytotoxicity in MM cells, even in the presence of bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs). Enhanced cytotoxicity was associated with increased inhibition of pSTAT3 and pERK. Conclusions Demonstration of in vitro and in vivo anti-MM activity of AT9283 provides the rationale for the clinical evaluation of AT9283 as monotherapy and in combination in patients with MM. PMID:21430070

  3. Novel multi-target-directed ligands for Alzheimer's disease: Combining cholinesterase inhibitors and 5-HT6 receptor antagonists. Design, synthesis and biological evaluation.

    PubMed

    Więckowska, Anna; Kołaczkowski, Marcin; Bucki, Adam; Godyń, Justyna; Marcinkowska, Monika; Więckowski, Krzysztof; Zaręba, Paula; Siwek, Agata; Kazek, Grzegorz; Głuch-Lutwin, Monika; Mierzejewski, Paweł; Bienkowski, Przemysław; Sienkiewicz-Jarosz, Halina; Knez, Damijan; Wichur, Tomasz; Gobec, Stanislav; Malawska, Barbara

    2016-11-29

    As currently postulated, a complex treatment may be key to an effective therapy for Alzheimer's disease (AD). Recent clinical trials in patients with moderate AD have shown a superior effect of the combination therapy of donepezil (a selective acetylcholinesterase inhibitor) with idalopirdine (a 5-HT6 receptor antagonist) over monotherapy with donepezil. Here, we present the first report on the design, synthesis and biological evaluation of a novel class of multifunctional ligands that combines a 5-HT6 receptor antagonist with a cholinesterase inhibitor. Novel multi-target-directed ligands (MTDLs) were designed by combining pharmacophores directed against the 5-HT6 receptor (1-(phenylsulfonyl)-4-(piperazin-1-yl)-1H-indole) and cholinesterases (tacrine or N-benzylpiperidine analogues). In vitro evaluation led to the identification of tacrine derivative 12 with well-balanced potencies against the 5-HT6 receptor (Kb = 27 nM), acetylcholinesterase and butyrylcholinesterase (IC50hAChE = 12 nM, IC50hBuChE = 29 nM). The compound also showed good in vitro blood-brain-barrier permeability (PAMPA-BBB assay), which was confirmed in vivo (open field study). Central cholinomimetic activity was confirmed in vivo in rats using a scopolamine-induced hyperlocomotion model. A novel class of multifunctional ligands with compound 12 as the best derivative in a series represents an excellent starting point for the further development of an effective treatment for AD.

  4. [Multi-Target Recognition of Internal and External Defects of Potato by Semi-Transmission Hyperspectral Imaging and Manifold Learning Algorithm].

    PubMed

    Huang, Tao; Li, Xiao-yu; Jin, Rui; Ku, Jing; Xu, Sen-miao; Xu, Meng-ling; Wu, Zhen-zhong; Kong, De-guo

    2015-04-01

    The present paper put forward a non-destructive detection method which combines semi-transmission hyperspectral imaging technology with manifold learning dimension reduction algorithm and least squares support vector machine (LSSVM) to recognize internal and external defects in potatoes simultaneously. Three hundred fifteen potatoes were bought in farmers market as research object, and semi-transmission hyperspectral image acquisition system was constructed to acquire the hyperspectral images of normal external defects (bud and green rind) and internal defect (hollow heart) potatoes. In order to conform to the actual production, defect part is randomly put right, side and back to the acquisition probe when the hyperspectral images of external defects potatoes are acquired. The average spectrums (390-1,040 nm) were extracted from the region of interests for spectral preprocessing. Then three kinds of manifold learning algorithm were respectively utilized to reduce the dimension of spectrum data, including supervised locally linear embedding (SLLE), locally linear embedding (LLE) and isometric mapping (ISOMAP), the low-dimensional data gotten by manifold learning algorithms is used as model input, Error Correcting Output Code (ECOC) and LSSVM were combined to develop the multi-target classification model. By comparing and analyzing results of the three models, we concluded that SLLE is the optimal manifold learning dimension reduction algorithm, and the SLLE-LSSVM model is determined to get the best recognition rate for recognizing internal and external defects potatoes. For test set data, the single recognition rate of normal, bud, green rind and hollow heart potato reached 96.83%, 86.96%, 86.96% and 95% respectively, and he hybrid recognition rate was 93.02%. The results indicate that combining the semi-transmission hyperspectral imaging technology with SLLE-LSSVM is a feasible qualitative analytical method which can simultaneously recognize the internal and

  5. Improvement of corrosion protection property of Mg-alloy by DLC and Si-DLC coatings with PBII technique and multi-target DC-RF magnetron sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masami, Ikeyama; Setsuo, Nakao; Tsutomu, Sonoda; Junho, Choi

    2009-05-01

    Magnesium alloys have been considered as one of the most promising light weight materials with potential applications for automobile and aircraft components. Their poor corrosion resistance, however, has to date prevented wider usage. Diamond-like carbon (DLC) and silicon-incorporated DLC (Si-DLC) coatings are known to provide a high degree of corrosion protection, and hold accordingly promise for enhancing the corrosion resistance of the magnesium alloys. In this work we have studied the effect of coating conditions of DLC coatings as well as Si incorporation into coating on corrosion resistance, deposited onto AZ91 magnesium alloy substrates by plasma based ion implantation (PBII). The influences of a Ti interlayer beneath the DLC, Si-DLC and Ti incorporated DLC (Ti-DLC) coatings fabricated by multi-target direct-current radio-frequency (DC-RF) magnetron sputtering were also examined on both the adhesion strength and corrosion resistance of the materials. We have also examined the effect of the Si content in the Si-DLC coatings made by magnetron sputtering on the alloys' corrosion resistance. The results of potentiodynamic polarization measurements demonstrate that Si-DLC coating deposited by PBII exhibits the highest corrosion resistance in an aqueous 0.05 M NaCl solution. Although Ti layer is helpful in increasing adhesion between DLC coating and AZ91 substrate, it also influences adversely corrosion protection. The ozone treatment of the magnesium alloy's surface before the formation of coatings has been found to improve both adhesion strength and corrosion resistance.

  6. New insights into pharmacological profile of LASSBio-579, a multi-target N-phenylpiperazine derivative active on animal models of schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Neves, Gilda; Antonio, Camila B; Betti, Andresa H; Pranke, Mariana A; Fraga, Carlos A M; Barreiro, Eliezer J; Noël, François; Rates, Stela M K

    2013-01-15

    Previous behavioral and receptor binding studies on N-phenylpiperazine derivatives by our group indicated that LASSBio-579, LASSBio-580 and LASSBio-581 could be potential antipsychotic lead compounds. The present study identified LASSBio-579 as the most promising among the three compounds, since it was the only one that inhibited apomorphine-induced climbing (5 mg/kg p.o.) and apomorphine-induced hypothermia (15 mg/kg p.o.). Furthermore, LASSBio-579 (0.5 mg/kg p.o.) was effective in the ketamine-induced hyperlocomotion test and prevented the prepulse inhibition deficits induced by apomorphine, DOI and ketamine with different potencies (1 mg/kg, 0.5 mg/kg and 5 mg/kg p.o., respectively). LASSBio-579 also induced a motor impairment, catalepsy and a mild sedative effect but only at doses 3-120 times higher than those with antipsychotic-like effects. In addition, LASSBio-579 (0.5 and 1 mg/kg p.o.) reversed the catalepsy induced by WAY 100,635, corroborating its action on both dopaminergic and serotonergic neurotransmission and pointing to the contribution of 5-HT(1A) receptor activation to its pharmacological profile. Moreover, co-administration of sub-effective doses of LASSBio-579 with sub-effective doses of clozapine or haloperidol prevented the apomorphine-induced climbing without induction of catalepsy. In summary, our results characterize LASSBio-579 as a multi-target ligand active in pharmacological animal models of schizophrenia, confirming that this compound could be included in development programs aiming at a new drug for treating schizophrenia.

  7. Antisense Down-Regulation of Metallothionein: A Therapeutic Approach for Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-08-01

    buffer containing dATP and 3 U of T4 DNA ligase in 50 i.l final volume at 160C overnight. The reaction was stopped by heating at 75°C for 10 min. The...for 10 min. Blunt end ligation was carried out as shown above in presence of 6 U of T4 DNA ligase overnight. Reaction was stopped and samples were...initially ligated to the shuttle plasmid pSV-ICEU I using 1X ligation buffer, 3 U of T4 DNA ligase , 0.25 .tg of shuttle plasmid with three-fold molar excess

  8. Long antisense non-coding RNAs function to direct epigenetic complexes that regulate transcription in human cells

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Kevin V.

    2009-01-01

    Epigenetic silencing of tumor suppressor gene promoters is one of the most common observations found in cancer. Despite the plethora of observed epigenetically silenced cancer related genes little is known about what is guiding the silencing to these particular loci. Two recent articles suggest that long antisense non-coding RNAs function as epigenetic regulators of transcription in human cells. These reports, along with previous observations that small antisense non-coding RNAs can epigenetically regulate transcription, imply that long antisense non-coding RNAs function as endogenous transcriptional regulatory RNAs in humans. Mechanistically, these long antisense non-coding RNAs may be involved in maintaining balanced transcription at bidirectionally transcribed loci as a method to modulate gene expression according to the selective pressures placed on the cell. The loss of this intricate bidirectional RNA based regulatory network can result in overt epigenetic silencing of gene expression. In the case of tumor suppressor genes, this silencing can lead to the loss of cellular regulation and be a contributing factor in cancer. This perspective will highlight the endogenous effector RNAs and mechanism of action whereby long antisense non-coding RNAs transcriptionally regulate gene expression in human cells. PMID:19633414

  9. Revealing natural antisense transcripts from Plasmodium vivax isolates: evidence of genome regulation in complicated malaria.

    PubMed

    Boopathi, P A; Subudhi, Amit Kumar; Garg, Shilpi; Middha, Sheetal; Acharya, Jyoti; Pakalapati, Deepak; Saxena, Vishal; Aiyaz, Mohammed; Chand, Bipin; Mugasimangalam, Raja C; Kochar, Sanjay K; Sirohi, Parmendra; Kochar, Dhanpat K; Das, Ashis

    2013-12-01

    Plasmodium vivax is the most geographically widespread human malaria parasite causing approximately 130-435 million infections annually. It is an economic burden in many parts of the world and poses a public health challenge along with the other Plasmodium sp. The biology of this parasite is less studied and poorly understood, in spite of these facts. Emerging evidence of severe complications due to infections by this parasite provides an impetus to focus research on the same. Investigating the parasite directly from infected patients is the best way to study its biology and pathogenic mechanisms. Gene expression studies of this parasite directly obtained from the patients has provided evidence of gene regulation resulting in varying amount of transcript levels in the different blood stages. The mechanisms regulating gene expression in malaria parasites are not well understood. Discovery of Natural Antisense Transcripts (NATs) in Plasmodium falciparum has suggested that these might play an important role in regulating gene expression. We report here the genome-wide occurrence of NATs in P. vivax parasites from patients with differing clinical symptoms. A total of 1348 NATs against annotated gene loci have been detected using a custom designed microarray with strand specific probes. Majority of NATs identified from this study shows positive correlation with the expression pattern of the sense (S) transcript. Our data also shows condition specific expression patterns of varying S and antisense (AS) transcript levels. Genes with AS transcripts enrich to various biological processes. To our knowledge this is the first report on the presence of NATs from P. vivax obtained from infected patients with different disease complications. The data suggests differential regulation of gene expression in diverse clinical conditions, as shown by differing sense/antisense ratios and would lead to future detailed investigations of gene regulation.

  10. Measurement of phosphorothioate oligodeoxynucleotide antisense transport across the blood-brain barrier.

    PubMed

    Banks, William A

    2011-01-01

    Phosphorothioate oligodeoxynucleotides (PODNs) can act as antisense molecules, knocking down proteins. Many PODNs have the unusual characteristic of being transported across the blood-brain barrier by a saturable system. This means that PODNs injected intravenously can accumulate in the central nervous system in quantities sufficient to knock down proteins in brain and the blood-brain barrier. A critical step in the development of PODNs that can be administered peripherally and knockdown proteins in the central nervous system is to determine the relation to the blood-brain barrier, specifically, does the PODN cross the blood-brain barrier and, if so, how fast and to what degree.

  11. Welcome to the splice age: antisense oligonucleotide–mediated exon skipping gains wider applicability

    PubMed Central

    McNally, Elizabeth M.; Wyatt, Eugene J.

    2016-01-01

    Exon skipping uses antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) to alter transcript splicing for the purpose of rescuing or modulating protein expression. In this issue of the JCI, Lee and colleagues developed and evaluated an ASO-dependent method for treating certain molecularly defined diseases associated with alterations in lamin A/C (LMNA) splicing. Exon skipping by ASOs is gaining traction as a therapeutic strategy, and the use of ASOs is now being applied to bypass mutations and generate modified but functional proteins for an array of genetic disorders. PMID:26999602

  12. Development of Cotton leaf curl virus resistant transgenic cotton using antisense ßC1 gene.

    PubMed

    Sohrab, Sayed Sartaj; Kamal, Mohammad A; Ilah, Abdul; Husen, Azamal; Bhattacharya, P S; Rana, D

    2016-05-01

    Cotton leaf curl virus (CLCuV) is a serious pathogen causing leaf curl disease and affecting the cotton production in major growing areas. The transgenic cotton (Gossypium hirsutum cv. Coker 310) plants were developed by using βC1 gene in antisense orientation gene driven by Cauliflower mosaic virus-35S promoter and nos (nopaline synthase) terminator and mediated by Agrobacterium tumefaciens transformation and somatic embryogenesis system. Molecular confirmation of the transformants was carried out by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and Southern blot hybridization. The developed transgenic and inoculated plants remained symptomless till their growth period. In conclusion, the plants were observed as resistant to CLCuV.

  13. Synthesis of antisense oligonucleotides containing acyclic alkynyl nucleoside analogs and their biophysical and biological properties.

    PubMed

    Ogata, Aya; Maeda, Yusuke; Ueno, Yoshihito

    2017-04-01

    The synthesis of oligonucleotide (ON) analogs, which can be used as antisense molecules, has recently gained much attention. Here, we report the synthesis and properties of an ON analog containing acyclic thymidine and cytidine analogs with a 4-pentyl-1,2-diol instead of the d-ribofuranose moiety. The incorporation of these analogs into the ON improved its nuclease resistance to 3'-exonucleases. Furthermore, it was found that the incorporation of the acyclic thymidine analog into a DNA/RNA duplex accelerates the RNA cleavage of a DNA/RNA duplex by Escherichia coli RNase H.

  14. Administration of antisense DNA for GPR39-1b causes anxiolytic-like responses and appetite loss in rats.

    PubMed

    Ishitobi, Yoshinobu; Akiyoshi, Jotaro; Honda, Shuhei; Ninomiya, Taiga; Kanehisa, Masayuki; Tanaka, Yoshihiro; Tsuru, Jusen; Isogawa, Koichi; Kitamura, Hirokazu; Fujikura, Yoshihisa

    2012-03-01

    The G protein-coupled receptor 39-b (GPR39-1b) is a splice variant of which is expressed in the central nervous and gastrointestinal systems. Previously, GPR39-1b was proposed to be the receptor for obestatin, but current evidence does not support this hypothesis. The purpose of the present work was to identify the role of GPR39-1b in anxiety and eating behaviors. Antisense oligonucleotides were infused at a constant rate into the cerebral lateral ventricles of rats and their effect on anxiety-like behavior and food intake was monitored. GPR39-1b antisense oligonucleotides produced anxiolytic-like effects in the elevated-plus maze test and in the black and white box test. Antisense oligonucleotides also decreased food intake. These results indicate that inhibition of GPR39-1b induces a decrease in anxiety-related behaviors and disturbs appetite.

  15. Upregulation of long noncoding RNA zinc finger antisense 1 enhances epithelial-mesenchymal transition in vitro and predicts poor prognosis in glioma.

    PubMed

    Lv, Qiao-Li; Chen, Shu-Hui; Zhang, Xue; Sun, Bao; Hu, Lei; Qu, Qiang; Huang, Yuan-Tao; Wang, Gui-Hua; Liu, Yan-Ling; Zhang, Ying-Ying; Zhou, Hong-Hao

    2017-03-01

    Increasing evidence indicates that long noncoding RNAs play important roles in development and progression of various cancers. Zinc finger antisense 1 is a novel long noncoding RNA whose clinical significance, biological function, and underlying mechanism are still undetermined in glioma. In this study, we reported that zinc finger antisense 1 expression was markedly upregulated in glioma and tightly correlated with clinical stage. Moreover, patients with high zinc finger antisense 1 expression had shorter survival. Multivariate Cox regression analysis provided a clue that, probably, zinc finger antisense 1 level could serve as an independent prognostic factor for glioma. Functionally, zinc finger antisense 1 acted as an oncogene in glioma because its knockdown could promote apoptosis and significantly inhibit cell proliferation, migration, and invasion. Furthermore, zinc finger antisense 1 silencing could result in cell cycle arrest at the G0/G1 phase and correspondingly decrease the percentage of S phase cells in both U87 and U251 cell lines. Moreover, it was found that silenced zinc finger antisense 1 could impair migration and invasion by inhibiting the epithelial-mesenchymal transition through reducing the expression of MMP2, MMP9, N-cadherin, Integrin β1, ZEB1, Twist, and Snail as well as increasing E-cadherin level in glioma. Taken together, our data identified that zinc finger antisense 1 might act as a valuable prognostic biomarker and potential therapeutic target for glioma.

  16. Cocaine and amphetamine elicit differential effects in rats with a unilateral injection of dopamine transporter antisense oligodeoxynucleotides.

    PubMed

    Silvia, C P; Jaber, M; King, G R; Ellinwood, E H; Caron, M G

    1997-02-01

    We have developed an antisense oligodeoxynucleotide to the dopamine transporter and used it to discriminate the behavioral properties of amphetamine and cocaine. In SK-N-MC cells permanently transfected with the dopamine transporter complementary DNA, treatment with 5 mM antisense oligodeoxynucleotide reduced dopamine uptake by 25% when compared to sense control. Unilateral intranigral administration of dopamine transporter antisense (50 microM) twice daily in freely moving rats for 2.5 days was sufficient to reduce dopamine transporter messenger RNA by 70% as measured by in situ hybridization, but not protein levels as measured by [3H]mazindol binding. However, intranigral treatment via implanted osmotic minipump over a period of seven days produced reductions in both dopamine transporter messenger RNA and protein levels (32%) at a dose of 500 pmol/day. These results indicate a longer half-life for the dopamine transporter than expected. Potassium chloride depolarization of ipsilateral striatal slices showed a greater than 200% increase in dopamine overflow on the antisense-treated side compared to the control side. Since imbalance of dopamine tone is known to induce rotational activity, we tested this behavioral paradigm in rats treated with various oligodeoxynucleotides at different doses and time-points. We have found that antisense-treated animals did not rotate spontaneously under any experimental conditions. Using various psychostimulants that target the dopamine transporter and increase dopamine levels, we found that the antisense-treated animals consistently rotated contralaterally in response to amphetamine (2 mg/kg), but not to cocaine (10 mg/kg) or nomifensine (10 mg/kg). These results bring in vivo evidence for a different mode of action of amphetamine and cocaine on the dopamine transporter and lend direct support to the view that amphetamine acts as a dopamine releaser, whereas cocaine acts by blocking dopamine transport.

  17. Engineering of gibberellin levels in citrus by sense and antisense overexpression of a GA 20-oxidase gene modifies plant architecture.

    PubMed

    Fagoaga, Carmen; Tadeo, Francisco R; Iglesias, Domingo J; Huerta, Laura; Lliso, Ignacio; Vidal, Ana M; Talon, Manuel; Navarro, Luís; García-Martínez, José L; Peña, Leandro

    2007-01-01

    Carrizo citrange (Citrus sinensisxPoncirus trifoliata) is a citrus hybrid widely used as a rootstock, whose genetic manipulation to improve different growth characteristics is of high agronomic interest. In this work, transgenic Carrizo citrange plants have been produced overexpressing sense and antisense CcGA20ox1 (a key enzyme of GA biosynthesis) under control of the 35S promoter to modify plant architecture. As expected, taller (sense) and shorter (antisense) phenotypes correlated with higher and lower levels, respectively, of active GA1 in growing shoots. In contrast, other phenotypic characteristics seemed to be specific to citrus, or different from those described for similar transgenics in other species. For instance, thorns, typical organs of citrus at juvenile stages, were much longer in sense and shorter in antisense plants, and xylem tissue was reduced in leaf and internode of sense plants. Antisense plants presented a bushy phenotype, suggesting a possible effect of GAs on auxin biosynthesis and/or transport. The main foliole of sense plants was longer, although total leaf area was reduced. Leaf thickness was smaller in sense and larger in antisense plants due to changes in the spongy parenchyma. Internode cell length was not altered in transgenic plants, indicating that, in citrus, GAs regulate cell division rather than cell elongation. Interestingly, the phenotypes described were not apparent when transgenic plants were grafted on non-transgenic rootstock. This suggests that roots contribute to the GA economy of aerial parts in citrus and opens the possibility of using the antisense plants as dwarfing rootstocks.

  18. SU-E-T-453: Image-Guided Patient-Specific Quality Assurance for Multi-Target Single Isocenter Intracranial VMAT Radiosurgery

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, M; Brezovich, I; Duan, J; Wu, X; Shen, S; Cardan, R.; Fiveash, J; Popple, R

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To demonstrate a patient specific, image-guided quality assurance method that tests both dosimetric and geometric accuracy for single-isocenter multiple-target VMAT radiosurgery (SIMT-VMAT-SRS) Method: We used a new film type, EBT-XD (optimal range 0.4–40Gy), and an in-house PMMA phantom having a coronal plane for film and a 0.125 cm3 ionization chamber (IC). The phantom contained fiducial features for kV image guided setup and for accurate film marking. Five patient plans with multiple targets sizes ranging from 3 to 21mm in diameter and prescribed doses from 14 to 18 Gy were selected. Two verification plans were generated for each case with the film plane passing through the center of the largest and smallest targets. For the four largest targets we obtained an IC measurement. For each case, a calibration film was irradiated using a custom designed step pattern. The films were scanned using a flatbed color scanner and converted to dose using the calibration film and the three channel calibration method. Image registration was performed between film and treatment planning system calculations to evaluate the geometric accuracy. Results: The mean registration vector had an average magnitude of 0.47 mm (range from 0.13mm to 0.64 mm). For the four largest targets, the mean ratio of the IC and film measurement to expected dose was 0.990 (range 0.968 to 1.009) and 1.032 (1.021 to 1.046), respectively. The fraction of pixels having gamma index < 1 for criteria of 3%/3mm, 3%/2mm, 3%/1mm was 98.8%, 97.5% and 87.2% before geometric registration and 99.1%, 98.3% and 94.8% after registration. Conclusion: We have demonstrated an image-guided QA method can assess both geometric and dosimetric accuracy. The phantom was positioned with sub-millimeter accuracy. Absolute film dosimetry using EBT-XD film was sufficiently accurate for assessment of dose to multi-targets too small for IC measurement in SRS VMAT plans.

  19. Statistical Evaluation of the Rodin–Ohno Hypothesis: Sense/Antisense Coding of Ancestral Class I and II Aminoacyl-tRNA Synthetases

    PubMed Central

    Chandrasekaran, Srinivas Niranj; Yardimci, Galip Gürkan; Erdogan, Ozgün; Roach, Jeffrey; Carter, Charles W.

    2013-01-01

    We tested the idea that ancestral class I and II aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases arose on opposite strands of the same gene. We assembled excerpted 94-residue Urgenes for class I tryptophanyl-tRNA synthetase (TrpRS) and class II Histidyl-tRNA synthetase (HisRS) from a diverse group of species, by identifying and catenating three blocks coding for secondary structures that position the most highly conserved, active-site residues. The codon middle-base pairing frequency was 0.35 ± 0.0002 in all-by-all sense/antisense alignments for 211 TrpRS and 207 HisRS sequences, compared with frequencies between 0.22 ± 0.0009 and 0.27 ± 0.0005 for eight different representations of the null hypothesis. Clustering algorithms demonstrate further that profiles of middle-base pairing in the synthetase antisense alignments are correlated along the sequences from one species-pair to another, whereas this is not the case for similar operations on sets representing the null hypothesis. Most probable reconstructed sequences for ancestral nodes of maximum likelihood trees show that middle-base pairing frequency increases to approximately 0.42 ± 0.002 as bacterial trees approach their roots; ancestral nodes from trees including archaeal sequences show a less pronounced increase. Thus, contemporary and reconstructed sequences all validate important bioinformatic predictions based on descent from opposite strands of the same ancestral gene. They further provide novel evidence for the hypothesis that bacteria lie closer than archaea to the origin of translation. Moreover, the inverse polarity of genetic coding, together with a priori α-helix propensities suggest that in-frame coding on opposite strands leads to similar secondary structures with opposite polarity, as observed in TrpRS and HisRS crystal structures. PMID:23576570

  20. Antisense expression of peach mildew resistance locus O (PpMlo1) gene confers cross-species resistance to powdery mildew in Fragaria x ananassa.

    PubMed

    Jiwan, Derick; Roalson, Eric H; Main, Dorrie; Dhingra, Amit

    2013-12-01

    Powdery mildew (PM) is one of the major plant pathogens. The conventional method of PM control includes frequent use of sulfur-based fungicides adding to production costs and potential harm to the environment. PM remains a major scourge for Rosaceae crops where breeding approaches mainly resort to gene-for-gene resistance. We have tested an alternate source of PM resistance in Rosaceae. Mildew resistance locus O (MLO) has been well studied in barley due to its role in imparting broad spectrum resistance to PM. We identified PpMlo1 (Prunus persica Mlo) in peach and characterized it further to test if a similar mechanism of resistance is conserved in Rosaceae. Due to its recalcitrance in tissue culture, reverse genetic studies involving PpMloI were not feasible in peach. Therefore, Fragaria x ananassa LF9 line, a taxonomic surrogate, was used for functional analysis of PpMlo1. Agrobacterium-mediated transformation yielded transgenic strawberry plants expressing PpMlo1 in sense and antisense orientation. Antisense expression of PpMlo1 in transgenic strawberry plants conferred resistance to Fragaria-specific powdery mildew, Podosphaera macularis. Phylogenetic analysis of 208 putative Mlo gene copies from 35 plant species suggests a large number of duplications of this gene family prior to the divergence of monocots and eudicots, early in eudicot diversification. Our results indicate that the Mlo-based resistance mechanism is functional in Rosaceae, and that Fragaria can be used as a host to test mechanistic function of genes derived from related tree species. To the best of our knowledge, this work is one of the first attempts at testing the potential of using a Mlo-based resistance strategy to combat powdery mildew in Rosaceae.

  1. Inhibition of human telomerase reverse transcriptase in vivo and in vitro for retroviral vector-based antisense oligonucleotide therapy in ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Qi, Z; Mi, R

    2016-01-01

    Human telomerase is absent in most normal tissues, but is abnormally activated in all major cancer cells. Telomerase enables tumor cells to maintain telomere length, allowing indefinite replicative capacity. Albeit not sufficient in itself to induce neoplasia, telomerase is believed to be necessary for cancer cells to grow without limit. Studies using an antisense oligonucleotide (ASODN) to the RNA component of telomerase or human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) demonstrate that telomerase in human tumor lines can be blocked in vivo. Inhibition of hTERT led to telomere shortening and cancer cell death, validating telomerase as a target for anticancer genetic therapy. Varieties of approaches for hTERT inhibition have been investigated. The aim of this study was to analyze the biological activity of ASODN to the hTERT mediated by retrovirus vector, which was used as therapy for ovarian tumor. We constructed and characterized a recombinant retrovirus vector with full-length hTERT antisense complementary DNA. The vector was introduced into ES-2 by lipofectamine-mediated gene transfection. The cellular proliferation and telomerase activity of the transformant cells were retarded. The hTERT gene expression and the telomerase activity of the transformant cells were both decreased. The transformant cells show partial reversion of the malignant phenotype. PT67 cells were also transfected with the recombinant vector and virus-producer cells were generated. The retrovirus-containing supernatant effectively inhibited the growth of human ovarian tumor xenografts in mouse models (subcutaneous tumor model), and enhanced the mouse survival time.

  2. Interleukin-6 antisense oligonucleotides inhibit the growth of human myeloma cell lines.

    PubMed Central

    Levy, Y; Tsapis, A; Brouet, J C

    1991-01-01

    IL-6 has been shown to be a plasmacytoma growth factor in mice and is believed to play a key role in the development of human multiple myeloma. We investigated the IL-6 requirements for the growth of two human myeloma cell lines, U 266 and RPMI 8226. These cell lines secreted minute amounts of IL-6 (20 U/ml) and featured IL-6 mRNA. IL-6 receptors were detectable at the surface of malignant cells by immunofluorescence. Antibodies to IL-6 did not alter the proliferation of these myeloma cells. There was a dose-dependent decrease, however, in [3H]-thymidine uptake in the presence of IL-6 antisense (and not sense) oligodeoxynucleotides; in the presence of 20 microM IL-6 antisense, an 80 and 95% inhibition of the proliferation of U 266 and RPMI 8226 cells was observed, respectively. These results provide strong evidence for an IL-6 autocrine proliferation of myeloma cells which may occur via internal interaction between IL-6 and the IL-6 receptor. Images PMID:1864979

  3. Evidence for a major role of antisense RNAs in cyanobacterial gene regulation

    PubMed Central

    Georg, Jens; Voß, Björn; Scholz, Ingeborg; Mitschke, Jan; Wilde, Annegret; Hess, Wolfgang R

    2009-01-01

    Information on the numbers and functions of naturally occurring antisense RNAs (asRNAs) in eubacteria has thus far remained incomplete. Here, we screened the model cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 for asRNAs using four different methods. In the final data set, the number of known noncoding RNAs rose from 6 earlier identified to 60 and of asRNAs from 1 to 73 (28 were verified using at least three methods). Among these, there are many asRNAs to housekeeping, regulatory or metabolic genes, as well as to genes encoding electron transport proteins. Transferring cultures to high light, carbon-limited conditions or darkness influenced the expression levels of several asRNAs, suggesting their functional relevance. Examples include the asRNA to rpl1, which accumulates in a light-dependent manner and may be required for processing the L11 r-operon and the SyR7 noncoding RNA, which is antisense to the murF 5′ UTR, possibly modulating murein biosynthesis. Extrapolated to the whole genome, ∼10% of all genes in Synechocystis are influenced by asRNAs. Thus, chromosomally encoded asRNAs may have an important function in eubacterial regulatory networks. PMID:19756044

  4. Small regulatory RNAs in lambdoid bacteriophages and phage-derived plasmids: Not only antisense.

    PubMed

    Nejman-Faleńczyk, Bożena; Bloch, Sylwia; Licznerska, Katarzyna; Felczykowska, Agnieszka; Dydecka, Aleksandra; Węgrzyn, Alicja; Węgrzyn, Grzegorz

    2015-03-01

    Until recently, only two small regulatory RNAs encoded by lambdoid bacteriophages were known. These transcripts are derived from paQ and pO promoters. The former one is supposed to act as an antisense RNA for expression of the Q gene, encoding a transcription antitermination protein. The latter transcript, called oop RNA, was initially proposed to have a double role, in establishing expression of the cI gene and in providing a primer for DNA replication. Although the initially proposed mechanisms by which oop RNA could influence the choice between two alternative developmental pathways of the phage and the initiation of phage DNA replication were found not true, the pO promoter has been demonstrated to be important for both regulation of phage development and control of DNA replication. Namely, the pO-derived transcript is an antisense RNA for expression of the cII gene, and pO is a part of a dual promoter system responsible for regulation of initiation of DNA synthesis from the oriλ region. Very recent studies identified a battery of small RNAs encoded by lambdoid bacteriophages existing as prophages in chromosomes of enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli strains. Some of them have very interesting functions, like anti-small RNAs.

  5. Antisense suppression of donor splice site mutations in the dystrophin gene transcript

    PubMed Central

    Fletcher, Sue; Meloni, Penny L; Johnsen, Russell D; Wong, Brenda L; Muntoni, Francesco; Wilton, Stephen D

    2013-01-01

    We describe two donor splice site mutations, affecting dystrophin exons 16 and 45 that led to Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), through catastrophic inactivation of the mRNA. These gene lesions unexpectedly resulted in the retention of the downstream introns, thereby increasing the length of the dystrophin mRNA by 20.2 and 36 kb, respectively. Splice-switching antisense oligomers targeted to exon 16 excised this in-frame exon and the following intron from the patient dystrophin transcript very efficiently in vitro, thereby restoring the reading frame and allowing synthesis of near-normal levels of a putatively functional dystrophin isoform. In contrast, targeting splice-switching oligomers to exon 45 in patient cells promoted only modest levels of an out-of-frame dystrophin transcript after transfection at high oligomer concentrations, whereas dual targeting of exons 44 and 45 or 45 and 46 resulted in more efficient exon skipping, with concomitant removal of intron 45. The splice site mutations reported here appear highly amenable to antisense oligomer intervention. We suggest that other splice site mutations may need to be evaluated for oligomer interventions on a case-by-case basis. PMID:24498612

  6. Concomitant emergence of the antisense protein gene of HIV-1 and of the pandemic.

    PubMed

    Cassan, Elodie; Arigon-Chifolleau, Anne-Muriel; Mesnard, Jean-Michel; Gross, Antoine; Gascuel, Olivier

    2016-10-11

    Recent experiments provide sound arguments in favor of the in vivo expression of the AntiSense Protein (ASP) of HIV-1. This putative protein is encoded on the antisense strand of the provirus genome and entirely overlapped by the env gene with reading frame -2. The existence of ASP was suggested in 1988, but is still controversial, and its function has yet to be determined. We used a large dataset of ∼23,000 HIV-1 and SIV sequences to study the origin, evolution, and conservation of the asp gene. We found that the ASP ORF is specific to group M of HIV-1, which is responsible for the human pandemic. Moreover, the correlation between the presence of asp and the prevalence of HIV-1 groups and M subtypes appeared to be statistically significant. We then looked for evidence of selection pressure acting on asp Using computer simulations, we showed that the conservation of the ASP ORF in the group M could not be due to chance. Standard methods were ineffective in disentangling the two selection pressures imposed by both the Env and ASP proteins-an expected outcome with overlaps in frame -2. We thus developed a method based on careful evolutionary analysis of the presence/absence of stop codons, revealing that ASP does impose significant selection pressure. All of these results support the idea that asp is the 10th gene of HIV-1 group M and indicate a correlation with the spread of the pandemic.

  7. Concomitant emergence of the antisense protein gene of HIV-1 and of the pandemic

    PubMed Central

    Cassan, Elodie; Arigon-Chifolleau, Anne-Muriel; Mesnard, Jean-Michel; Gross, Antoine; Gascuel, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    Recent experiments provide sound arguments in favor of the in vivo expression of the AntiSense Protein (ASP) of HIV-1. This putative protein is encoded on the antisense strand of the provirus genome and entirely overlapped by the env gene with reading frame −2. The existence of ASP was suggested in 1988, but is still controversial, and its function has yet to be determined. We used a large dataset of ∼23,000 HIV-1 and SIV sequences to study the origin, evolution, and conservation of the asp gene. We found that the ASP ORF is specific to group M of HIV-1, which is responsible for the human pandemic. Moreover, the correlation between the presence of asp and the prevalence of HIV-1 groups and M subtypes appeared to be statistically significant. We then looked for evidence of selection pressure acting on asp. Using computer simulations, we showed that the conservation of the ASP ORF in the group M could not be due to chance. Standard methods were ineffective in disentangling the two selection pressures imposed by both the Env and ASP proteins—an expected outcome with overlaps in frame −2. We thus developed a method based on careful evolutionary analysis of the presence/absence of stop codons, revealing that ASP does impose significant selection pressure. All of these results support the idea that asp is the 10th gene of HIV-1 group M and indicate a correlation with the spread of the pandemic. PMID:27681623

  8. Chicken GHR natural antisense transcript regulates GHR mRNA in LMH cells

    PubMed Central

    An, Lilong; Ma, Jinge; Qiu, Fengfang; Jia, Rumin; Nie, Qinghua; Zhang, Dexiang; Luo, Qingbin; Li, Ting; Wang, Zhang; Zhang, Xiquan

    2016-01-01

    Growth hormone receptor (GHR) played key roles in human and animal growth. Both human laron type dwarfism and sex linked dwarf chicken were caused by the mutation of GHR gene. In this study, we identified an endogenously expressed long non-coding natural antisense transcript, GHR-AS, which overlapped with the GHR mRNA (GHR-S) in a tail to tail manner. Spatial and temporal expression analyses indicated that GHR-AS were highly expressed in chicken liver and displayed ascending with the development of chicken from E10 to 3 w of age. Interfering GHR-AS caused GHR-S decreasing, accompanied with increasing of the inactive gene indicator, H3K9me2, in the GHR-S promoter regions in LMH cells. RNase A experiment exhibited that GHR-AS and GHR-S can form double strand RNAs at the last exon of GHR gene in vivo and in vitro, which hinted they could act on each other via the region. In addition, the levels of GHR-S and GHR-AS can be affected by DNA methylation. Compared the normal chicken with the dwarfs, the negative correlation trends were showed between the GHR-S promoter methylation status and the GHR-AS levels. This is the first report of that GHR gene possessed natural antisense transcript and the results presented here further highlight the fine and complicated regulating mechanism of GHR gene in chicken development. PMID:27713155

  9. Antisense Morpholino Oligonucleotides Reduce Neurofilament Synthesis and Inhibit Axon Regeneration in Lamprey Reticulospinal Neurons.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guixin; Jin, Li-qing; Hu, Jianli; Rodemer, William; Selzer, Michael E

    2015-01-01

    The sea lamprey has been used as a model for the study of axonal regeneration after spinal cord injury. Previous studies have suggested that, unlike developing axons in mammal, the tips of regenerating axons in lamprey spinal cord are simple in shape, packed with neurofilaments (NFs), and contain very little F-actin. Thus it has been proposed that regeneration of axons in the central nervous system of mature vertebrates is not based on the canonical actin-dependent pulling mechanism of growth cones, but involves an internal protrusive force, perhaps generated by the transport or assembly of NFs in the distal axon. In order to assess this hypothesis, expression of NFs was manipulated by antisense morpholino oligonucleotides (MO). A standard, company-supplied MO was used as control. Axon retraction and regeneration were assessed at 2, 4 and 9 weeks after MOs were applied to a spinal cord transection (TX) site. Antisense MO inhibited NF180 expression compared to control MO. The effect of inhibiting NF expression on axon retraction and regeneration was studied by measuring the distance of axon tips from the TX site at 2 and 4 weeks post-TX, and counting the number of reticulospinal neurons (RNs) retrogradely labeled by fluorescently-tagged dextran injected caudal to the injury at 9 weeks post-TX. There was no statistically significant effect of MO on axon retraction at 2 weeks post-TX. However, at both 4 and 9 weeks post-TX, inhibition of NF expression inhibited axon regeneration.

  10. In vivo generation of highly abundant sequence-specific oligonucleotides for antisense and triplex gene regulation.

    PubMed Central

    Noonberg, S B; Scott, G K; Garovoy, M R; Benz, C C; Hunt, C A

    1994-01-01

    Antisense and triplex oligonucleotides continue to demonstrate potential as mediators of gene-specific repression of protein synthesis. However, inefficient and heterogeneous cellular uptake, intracellular sequestration, and rapid intracellular and extracellular degradation represent obstacles to their eventual clinical utility. Efficient cellular delivery of targeted ribozymes can present similar problems. In this report we describe a system for circumventing these obstacles and producing large quantities of short, sequence-specific RNA oligonucleotides for use in these gene regulation strategies. The oligonucleotides are generated from a vector containing promoter, capping, and termination sequences from the human small nuclear U6 gene, surrounding a synthetic sequence incorporating the oligonucleotide of interest. In vivo, these oligonucleotides are produced constitutively and without cell type specificity in levels up to 5 x 10(6) copies per cell, reach steady-state levels of expression within 9 hours post-transfection, and are still readily detectable 7 days post-transfection. In addition, these oligonucleotides are retained in the nucleus, obtain a 5' gamma-monomethyl phosphate cap, and have an intracellular half-life of approximately one hour. This expression vector provides a novel and efficient method of intracellular delivery of antisense or triplex RNA oligonucleotides (and/or ribozymes) for gene regulation, as well as a cost-effective means of comparing the biological activity arising from a variety of different potential oligonucleotide sequences. Images PMID:8052538

  11. Delivery of antisense oligodeoxyribonucleotide lipopolyplex nanoparticles assembled by microfluidic hydrodynamic focusing.

    PubMed

    Koh, Chee Guan; Zhang, Xulang; Liu, Shujun; Golan, Sharon; Yu, Bo; Yang, Xiaojuan; Guan, Jingjiao; Jin, Yan; Talmon, Yeshayahu; Muthusamy, Natarajan; Chan, Kenneth K; Byrd, John C; Lee, Robert J; Marcucci, Guido; Lee, L James

    2010-01-04

    A multi-inlet microfluidic hydrodynamic focusing (MF) system to prepare lipopolyplex (LP) containing Bcl-2 antisense deoxyoligonucleotide (ODN) was developed and evaluated. The lipopolyplex nanoparticles consist of ODN:protamine:lipids (1:0.3:12.5wt/wt ratio) and the lipids included DC-Chol:egg PC:PEG-DSPE (40:58:2mol/mol%). Using K562 human erythroleukemia cells, which contain an abundance of Bcl-2 and overexpression of transferrin receptors (TfR), and G3139 (oblimerson sodium or Genasense(TM)) as a model cell line and drug, respectively, the Bcl-2 down-regulation at the mRNA and protein levels as well as cellular uptake and apoptosis was compared between the conventional bulk mixing (BM) method and the MF method. The lipopolyplex size and surface charge were characterized by dynamic light scattering (DLS) and zeta potential (zeta) measurement, respectively, while the ODN encapsulation efficiency was determined by gel electrophoresis. Cryogenic transmission electron microscopy (Cryo-TEM) was used to determine the morphology of LPs. Our results demonstrated that MF produced LP nanoparticles had similar structures but smaller size and size distribution compared to BM LP nanoparticles. MF LP nanoparticles had higher level of Bcl-2 antisense uptake and showed more efficient down-regulation of Bcl-2 protein level than BM LP nanoparticles.

  12. No rosetta stone for a sense-antisense origin of aminoacyl tRNA synthetase classes.

    PubMed

    Williams, Tom A; Wolfe, Kenneth H; Fares, Mario A

    2009-02-01

    Aminoacyl tRNA synthetases (aaRS) are crucial enzymes that join amino acids to their cognate tRNAs, thereby implementing the genetic code. These enzymes fall into two unrelated structural classes whose evolution has not been explained. The leading hypothesis, proposed by Rodin and Ohno, is that the two classes originated as a pair of sense-antisense genes encoded on opposite strands of a single DNA molecule. This unusual idea obtained its main support from reports of a "Rosetta stone": a locus where genes for heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) and an Nicotinamide adenine dinulecotide-specific glutamate dehydrogenase (NAD-GDH), which are structurally homologous to the two classes of aaRS, overlap extensively on complementary DNA strands. This remarkable locus was first characterized in the oomycete Achlya klebsiana and has since been reported in many other species. Here we present evidence that the open reading frames on the antisense strand of HSP70 genes are spurious, and we identify a more probable candidate for the gene encoding the oomycete NAD-GDH enzyme. These results cast extensive doubt on the Rosetta Stone argument.

  13. Natural antisense RNAs are involved in the regulation of CD45 expression in autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Rong, J; Yin, J; Su, Z

    2015-03-01

    CD45 is a transmembrane protein tyrosine phosphatase that is specifically expressed in hematopoietic cells and can initiate signal transduction via the dephosphorylation of tyrosine. Alternatively spliced transcript variants of this gene encode distinct isoforms, which indicate different functional states of CD45. Among these variants, CD45RO, which contains neither exon 4, 5, or 6, is over-expressed in lymphocytes in autoimmune diseases, including systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis, multiple sclerosis, and type I diabetes. The CD45 RO serves as a marker of the immune response activity and lymphocyte development. Previous studies have indicated that exon splicing is generally correlated with local hypermethylated DNA and acetylated histone modification, while autoimmune diseases are commonly associated with global hypomethylation and histone deacetylation in lymphocytes. Thus, the question arises of how exons 4, 5, and 6 of CD45RO are excluded under the status of global DNA hypomethylation and histone deacetylation in these autoimmune diseases. On the basis of the analyses of the context sequence of CD45 and its natural antisense RNA in GenBank, we proposed that the long noncoding RNA encoded by the natural antisense gene of CD45 contributes to the expressional regulation of the CD45RO splicing variant via recruitment of DNA methyltransferase and histone modification modulators specific to the sense gene CD45; thus, it is associated with the over-expression of CD45RO and the functional regulation of lymphocytes in the pathogenic development of autoimmune diseases.

  14. Antisense-mediated silencing of a gene encoding a major ryegrass pollen allergen.

    PubMed

    Bhalla, P L; Swoboda, I; Singh, M B

    1999-09-28

    Type 1 allergic reactions, such as hay fever and allergic asthma, triggered by grass pollen allergens are a global health problem that affects approximately 20% of the population in cool, temperate climates. Ryegrass is the dominant source of allergens because of its prodigious production of airborne pollen. Lol p 5 is the major allergenic protein of ryegrass pollen, judging from the fact that almost all of the individuals allergic to grass pollen show presence of serum IgE antibodies against this protein. Moreover, nearly two-thirds of the IgE reactivity of ryegrass pollen has been attributed to this protein. Therefore, it can be expected that down-regulation of Lol p 5 production can significantly reduce the allergic potential of ryegrass pollen. Here, we report down-regulation of Lol p 5 with an antisense construct targeted to the Lol p 5 gene in ryegrass. The expression of antisense RNA was regulated by a pollen-specific promoter. Immunoblot analysis of proteins with allergen-specific antibodies did not detect Lol p 5 in the transgenic pollen. The transgenic pollen showed remarkably reduced allergenicity as reflected by low IgE-binding capacity of pollen extract as compared with that of control pollen. The transgenic ryegrass plants in which Lol p 5 gene expression is perturbed showed normal fertile pollen development, indicating that genetic engineering of hypoallergenic grass plants is possible.

  15. Selective suppression of antisense transcription by Set2-mediated H3K36 methylation

    PubMed Central

    Venkatesh, Swaminathan; Li, Hua; Gogol, Madelaine M.; Workman, Jerry L.

    2016-01-01

    Maintenance of a regular chromatin structure over the coding regions of genes occurs co-transcriptionally via the ‘chromatin resetting' pathway. One of the central players in this pathway is the histone methyltransferase Set2. Here we show that the loss of Set2 in yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, results in transcription initiation of antisense RNAs embedded within body of protein-coding genes. These RNAs are distinct from the previously identified non-coding RNAs and cover 11% of the yeast genome. These RNA species have been named Set2-repressed antisense transcripts (SRATs) since the co-transcriptional addition of the H3K36 methyl mark by Set2 over their start sites results in their suppression. Interestingly, loss of chromatin resetting factor Set2 or the subsequent production of SRATs does not affect the abundance of the sense transcripts. This difference in transcriptional outcomes of overlapping transcripts due to a strand-independent addition of H3K36 methylation is a key regulatory feature of interleaved transcriptomes. PMID:27892455

  16. RNA sequencing uncovers antisense RNAs and novel small RNAs in Streptococcus pyogenes

    PubMed Central

    Le Rhun, Anaïs; Beer, Yan Yan; Reimegård, Johan; Chylinski, Krzysztof; Charpentier, Emmanuelle

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Streptococcus pyogenes is a human pathogen responsible for a wide spectrum of diseases ranging from mild to life-threatening infections. During the infectious process, the temporal and spatial expression of pathogenicity factors is tightly controlled by a complex network of protein and RNA regulators acting in response to various environmental signals. Here, we focus on the class of small RNA regulators (sRNAs) and present the first complete analysis of sRNA sequencing data in S. pyogenes. In the SF370 clinical isolate (M1 serotype), we identified 197 and 428 putative regulatory RNAs by visual inspection and bioinformatics screening of the sequencing data, respectively. Only 35 from the 197 candidates identified by visual screening were assigned a predicted function (T-boxes, ribosomal protein leaders, characterized riboswitches or sRNAs), indicating how little is known about sRNA regulation in S. pyogenes. By comparing our list of predicted sRNAs with previous S. pyogenes sRNA screens using bioinformatics or microarrays, 92 novel sRNAs were revealed, including antisense RNAs that are for the first time shown to be expressed in this pathogen. We experimentally validated the expression of 30 novel sRNAs and antisense RNAs. We show that the expression profile of 9 sRNAs including 2 predicted regulatory elements is affected by the endoribonucleases RNase III and/or RNase Y, highlighting the critical role of these enzymes in sRNA regulation. PMID:26580233

  17. Ustilago maydis natural antisense transcript expression alters mRNA stability and pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Donaldson, Michael E; Saville, Barry J

    2013-01-01

    Ustilago maydis infection of Zea mays leads to the production of thick-walled diploid teliospores that are the dispersal agent for this pathogen. Transcriptome analyses of this model biotrophic basidiomycete fungus identified natural antisense transcripts (NATs) complementary to 247 open reading frames. The U. maydis NAT cDNAs were fully sequenced and annotated. Strand-specific RT-PCR screens confirmed expression and identified NATs preferentially expressed in the teliospore. Targeted screens revealed four U. maydis NATs that are conserved in a related fungus. Expression of NATs in haploid cells, where they are not naturally occurring, resulted in increased steady-state levels of some complementary mRNAs. The expression of one NAT, as-um02151, in haploid cells resulted in a twofold increase in complementary mRNA levels, the formation of sense–antisense double-stranded RNAs, and unchanged Um02151 protein levels. This led to a model for NAT function in the maintenance and expression of stored teliospore mRNAs. In testing this model by deletion of the regulatory region, it was determined that alteration in NAT expression resulted in decreased pathogenesis in both cob and seedling infections. This annotation and functional analysis supports multiple roles for U. maydis NATs in controlling gene expression and influencing pathogenesis. PMID:23650872

  18. Antisense Inhibition of Threonine Synthase Leads to High Methionine Content in Transgenic Potato Plants1

    PubMed Central

    Zeh, Michaela; Casazza, Anna Paola; Kreft, Oliver; Roessner, Ute; Bieberich, Katrin; Willmitzer, Lothar; Hoefgen, Rainer; Hesse, Holger

    2001-01-01

    Methionine (Met) and threonine (Thr) are members of the aspartate family of amino acids. In plants, their biosynthetic pathways diverge at the level of O-phosphohomo-serine (Ser). The enzymes cystathionine gamma-synthase and Thr synthase (TS) compete for the common substrate O-phosphohomo-Ser with the notable feature that plant TS is activated through S-adenosyl-Met, a metabolite derived from Met. To investigate the regulation of this branch point, we engineered TS antisense potato (Solanum tuberosum cv Désirée) plants using the constitutive cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter. In leaf tissues, these transgenics exhibit a reduction of TS activity down to 6% of wild-type levels. Thr levels are reduced to 45% wild-type controls, whereas Met levels increase up to 239-fold depending on the transgenic line and environmental conditions. Increased levels of homo-Ser and homo-cysteine indicate increased carbon allocation into the aspartate pathway. In contrast to findings in Arabidopsis, increased Met content has no detectable effect on mRNA or protein levels or on the enzymatic activity of cystathionine gamma-synthase in potato. Tubers of TS antisense potato plants contain a Met level increased by a factor of 30 and no reduction in Thr. These plants offer a major biotechnological advance toward the development of crop plants with improved nutritional quality. PMID:11706163

  19. Retroposition as a source of antisense long non-coding RNAs with possible regulatory functions.

    PubMed

    Bryzghalov, Oleksii; Szcześniak, Michał Wojciech; Makałowska, Izabela

    2016-01-01

    Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are a class of intensely studied, yet enigmatic molecules that make up a substantial portion of the human transcriptome. In this work, we link the origins and functions of some lncRNAs to retroposition, a process resulting in the creation of intronless copies (retrocopies) of the so-called parental genes. We found 35 human retrocopies transcribed in antisense and giving rise to 58 lncRNA transcripts. These lncRNAs share sequence similarity with the corresponding parental genes but in the sense/antisense orientation, meaning they have the potential to interact with each other and to form RNA:RNA duplexes. We took a closer look at these duplexes and found that 10 of the lncRNAs might regulate parental gene expression and processing at the pre-mRNA and mRNA levels. Further analysis of the co-expression and expression correlation provided support for the existence of functional coupling between lncRNAs and their mate parental gene transcripts.

  20. PAAn-1b and PAAn-E: two phosphorothioate antisense oligodeoxynucleotides inhibit human aromatase gene expression.

    PubMed

    Auvray, P; Sourdaine, P; Séralini, G E

    1998-12-09

    Estrogen-dependent diseases, especially breast cancers, are frequently treated with aromatase inhibitors. Another more recent strategy is the antisense technology. In this study, after predicting aromatase mRNA secondary structure, we describe the design, the efficiency, and the toxicity of two antisense phosphorothioate oligodeoxynucleotides (PAAn-1b and PAAn-E) directed toward aromatase mRNA. Indeed, 2 microM PAAn-1b and PAAn-E encapsulated with 54 microM polyethylenimine inhibit aromatase activity by 71 and 79%, respectively, in transfected 293 cells, with IC50 values of 0.2 and 0.6 microM. The mechanism of inhibition appears to be specific after using sense and scramble oligodeoxynucleotides as controls and largely decreases aromatase mRNA and protein amounts. Moreover, PAAn-1b and PAAn-E are not cytotoxic for 293 cells. This study finally provides a new strategy for aromatase inhibition. It offers new tools for studying aromatase gene expression and its role in cancer for instance, and this could be of help for the therapy of estrogen-dependent diseases.

  1. Selective suppression of antisense transcription by Set2-mediated H3K36 methylation.

    PubMed

    Venkatesh, Swaminathan; Li, Hua; Gogol, Madelaine M; Workman, Jerry L

    2016-11-28

    Maintenance of a regular chromatin structure over the coding regions of genes occurs co-transcriptionally via the 'chromatin resetting' pathway. One of the central players in this pathway is the histone methyltransferase Set2. Here we show that the loss of Set2 in yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, results in transcription initiation of antisense RNAs embedded within body of protein-coding genes. These RNAs are distinct from the previously identified non-coding RNAs and cover 11% of the yeast genome. These RNA species have been named Set2-repressed antisense transcripts (SRATs) since the co-transcriptional addition of the H3K36 methyl mark by Set2 over their start sites results in their suppression. Interestingly, loss of chromatin resetting factor Set2 or the subsequent production of SRATs does not affect the abundance of the sense transcripts. This difference in transcriptional outcomes of overlapping transcripts due to a strand-independent addition of H3K36 methylation is a key regulatory feature of interleaved transcriptomes.

  2. Fabrication of a microarray using a combination of the large circular sense and antisense DNA.

    PubMed

    Doh, Kyung-Oh; Lee, Yun-Han; Han, Kil-Hwan; Uhm, Seok-Yong; Kim, Jong-Pil; Bae, Yun-Ui; Park, Jeong-Hoh; Moon, Ik-Jae; Park, Jong-Gu

    2010-01-01

    In the present study, single-stranded large circular (LC)-sense molecules were utilized as probes for DNA microarrays and showed stronger binding signals than those of PCR-amplified cDNA probes. A microarray experiment using 284 LC-sense DNA probes found 6 upregulated and 7 downregulated genes in A549 cells as compared to WI38VA13 cells. Repeated experiments showed largely consistent results, and microarray data strongly correlated with data acquired from quantitative real-time RT-PCR. A large array comprising 5,079 LC-sense DNA was prepared, and analysis of the mean differential expression from dye-swap experiments revealed 332 upregulated and 509 downregulated genes in A549 cells compared to WI38VA13 cells. Subsequent functional analysis using an LC-antisense library of overexpressed genes identified 28 genes involved in A549 cell growth. These experiments demonstrated the proper features of LC-sense molecules as probe DNA for microarray and the potential utility of the combination of LC-sense and -antisense libraries for an effective functional validation of genes.

  3. Expression of the Antisense-to-Latency Transcript Long Noncoding RNA in Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus.

    PubMed

    Schifano, Jason M; Corcoran, Kathleen; Kelkar, Hemant; Dittmer, Dirk P

    2017-02-15

    The regulation of latency is central to herpesvirus biology. Recent transcriptome-wide surveys have uncovered evidence for promiscuous transcription across the entirety of the Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) genome and postulated the existence of multiple viral long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs). Next-generation sequencing studies are highly dependent on the specific experimental approach and particular algorithms of analysis and therefore benefit from independent confirmation of the results. The antisense-to-latency transcript (ALT) lncRNA was discovered by genome-tiling microarray (Chandriani et al., J Virol 86:7934-7942, 2010, https://doi.org/10.1128/JVI.00645-10). To characterize ALT in detail, we physically isolated this lncRNA by a strand-specific hybrid capture assay and then employed transcriptome sequencing and novel reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) assays to distinguish all RNA species in the KSHV latency region. These methods confirm that ALT initiates at positions 120739/121012 and encodes a single splice site, which is shared with the 3'-coterminal K14-vGPCR/ORF74 mRNA, terminating at 130873 (GenBank accession number GQ994935), resulting in an ∼10,000-nucleotide transcript. No shorter ALT isoforms were identified. This study also identified a novel intron within the LANA 5' untranslated region using a splice acceptor at 127888. In summary, ALT joins PAN/nut1/T1.1 as a bona fide lncRNA of KSHV with potentially important roles in viral gene regulation and pathogenesis.

  4. A Prospective Study in the Rational Design of Efficient Antisense Oligonucleotides for Exon Skipping in the DMD Gene

    PubMed Central

    Wee, Keng Boon; Wang, Jian Li; Chen, Yi Jun; Xiong, Qian Bin; Lai, Poh San; Yee, Woon Chee

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Antisense oligonucleotide (AON)-mediated exon skipping to restore dystrophin expression in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) therapy shown promise in a number of human clinical trials. Current AON design methods are semi-empirical, involving either trial-and-error and/or preliminary experimentations. Therefore, a rational approach to design efficient AONs to address the wide spectrum of patients' mutations is desirable. Retrospective studies have extracted many AON design variables, but they were not tested prospectively to design AONs for skipping DMD exons. Not only did the variables differ among the various studies, no numerical cutoff for each variable was inferred, which makes their use in AON design difficult. The challenge is to thus select a minimal set of key independent variables that can consistently design efficient AONs. In this prospective study, a novel set of design variables with respective cutoff values was used to design 23 novel AONs, each to skip one of nine DMD exons. Nineteen AONs were found to be efficacious in inducing specific exon skipping (83% of total), of which 14 were considered efficient (61% of total), i.e., they induced exon skipping in >25% of total transcripts. Notably, the satisfactory success rates were achieved by using only three design variables; namely, co-transcriptional binding accessibility of target site, presence of exonic splicing enhancers, and target length. Retrospective analyses revealed that the most efficient AON in every exon targeted has the lowest average cumulative position (ACP) score. Taking the prospective and retrospective studies together, we propose that design guidelines recommend using the ACP score to select the most efficient AON for each exon. PMID:22486275

  5. Loop structures in the 5' untranslated region and antisense RNA mediate pilE gene expression in Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    PubMed

    Masters, Thao L; Wachter, Jenny; Hill, Stuart A

    2016-11-01

    Regulation of the Neisseria gonorrhoeae pilE gene is ill-defined. In this study, post-transcriptional effects on expression were assessed. In silico analysis predicts the formation of three putative stable stem-loop structures with favourable free energies within the 5' untranslated region of the pilE message. Using quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR analyses, we show that each loop structure forms, with introduced destabilizing stem-loop mutations diminishing loop stability. Utilizing a series of pilE translational fusions, deletion of either loop 1 or loop 2 caused a significant reduction of pilE mRNA resulting in reduced expression of the reporter gene. Consequently, the formation of the loops apparently protects the pilE transcript from degradation. Putative loop 3 contains the pilE ribosomal binding site. Consequently, its formation may influence translation. Analysis of a small RNA transcriptome revealed an antisense RNA being produced upstream of the pilE promoter that is predicted to hybridize across the 5' untranslated region loops. Insertional mutants were created where the antisense RNA is not transcribed. In these mutants, pilE transcript levels are greatly diminished, with any residual message apparently not being translated. Complementation of these insertion mutants in trans with the antisense RNA gene facilitates pilE translation yielding a pilus + phenotype. Overall, this study demonstrates a complex relationship between loop-dependent transcript protection and antisense RNA in modulating pilE expression levels.

  6. Genome-wide analysis of expression modes and DNA methylation status at sense-antisense transcript loci in mouse.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Yutaka; Numata, Koji; Murata, Shinya; Osada, Yuko; Saito, Rintaro; Nakaoka, Hajime; Yamamoto, Naoyuki; Watanabe, Kazufumi; Kato, Hidemasa; Abe, Kuniya; Kiyosawa, Hidenori

    2010-12-01

    The functionality of sense-antisense transcripts (SATs), although widespread throughout the mammalian genome, is largely unknown. Here, we analyzed the SATs expression and its associated promoter DNA methylation status by surveying 12 tissues of mice to gain insights into the relationship between expression and DNA methylation of SATs. We have found that sense and antisense expression positively correlate in most tissues. However, in some SATs with tissue-specific expression, the expression level of a transcript from a CpG island-bearing promoter is low when the promoter DNA methylation is present. In these circumstances, the expression level of its opposite-strand transcript, especially when it is poly(A)-negative was coincidentally higher. These observations suggest that, albeit the general tendency of sense-antisense simultaneous expression, some antisense transcripts have coordinated expression with its counterpart sense gene promoter methylation. This cross-strand relationship is not a privilege of imprinted genes but seems to occur widely in SATs.

  7. Organic-inorganic nano-composite films for photonic applications made by multi-beam multi-target pulsed laser deposition with remote control of the plume directions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darwish, Abdalla M.; Moore, Shaelynn; Mohammed, Aziz; Alexander, Deonte'; Bastian, Tyler; Dorlus, Wydglif; Sarkisov, Sergey S.; Patel, Darayas N.; Mele, Paolo; Koplitz, Brent

    2016-09-01

    the components of different nature, organic polymers and inorganic dopants, in the same target at a certain proportion and exposing them to the same laser beam not necessarily brings good quality nano-composite films. The laser pulse energy and wavelength cannot be optimized for each component individually. Also, the mixing proportion in the composite film is dictated by the initial proportion of the target and thus cannot be changed in the process. These limitations were removed in the recently proposed method of multi-beam and multi-target deposition (in its doublebeam/ dual-target variation) using a MAPLE polymer target and one inorganic target, each being concurrently exposed to laser beams of different wavelengths.5-14 Using the method, nano-composite films of polymer poly(methyl methacrylate) known as PMMA doped with a rare earth (RE) inorganic upconversion phosphor compounds were prepared. Also, a nano-composite film of thermoelectric film of inorganic aluminum-doped ZnO known as AZO was impregnated with PMMA nano-fillers with the purpose of improving electrical conductivity and thermoelectric performance.10, 14 The polymer target was a frozen (to a temperature of liquid nitrogen) PMMA solution in chlorobenzene exposed to a 1064- nm laser beam from a Q-switched Nd:YAG pulsed laser. The inorganic targets were the pellets made of the compressed micro-powders of highly efficient RE-doped NaYF4 or the sintered powder of AZO concurrently ablated with the

  8. [Connection of magnetic antisense probe with SK-Br-3 oncocyte mRNA nucleotide detected by high resolution atomic force microscope].

    PubMed

    Tan, Shude; Ouyang, Yu; Li, Xinyou; Wen, Ming; Li, Shaolin

    2011-06-01

    The present paper is aimed to detect superparamagnetic iron oxide labeled c-erbB2 oncogene antisense oligonucleotide probe (magnetic antisense probe) connected with SK-Br-3 oncocyte mRNA nucleotide by high resolution atomic force microscope (AFM). We transfected SK-Br-3 oncocyte with magnetic antisense probe, then observed the cells by AFM with high resolution and detected protein expression and magnetic resonance imagine (MRI). The high resolution AFM clearly showed the connection of the oligonucleotide remote end of magnetic antisense probe with the mRNA nucleotide of oncocyte. The expression of e-erbB2 protein in SK-Br3 cells were highly inhibited by using magnetic antisense probe. We then obtained the lowest signal to noise ratio (SNR) of SK-Br-3 oncocyte transfected with magnetic antisense probe by MRI (P<0.05). These experiments demonstrated that the high resolution AFM could be used to show the binding of magnetic antisense probe and SK-Br-3 mRNA of tumor cell nuclear.

  9. BC047440 antisense eukaryotic expression vectors inhibited HepG2 cell proliferation and suppressed xenograft tumorigenicity.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Lu; Liang, Ping; Zhou, JianBo; Huang, XiaoBing; Wen, Yu; Wang, Zheng; Li, Jing

    2012-02-01

    The biological functions of the BC047440 gene highly expressed by hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) are unknown. The objective of this study was to reconstruct antisense eukaryotic expression vectors of the gene for inhibiting HepG(2) cell proliferation and suppressing their xenograft tumorigenicity. The full-length BC047440 cDNA was cloned from human primary HCC by RT-PCR. BC047440 gene fragments were ligated with pMD18-T simple vectors and subsequent pcDNA3.1(+) plasmids to construct the recombinant antisense eukaryotic vector pcDNA3.1(+)BC047440AS. The endogenous BC047440 mRNA abundance in target gene-transfected, vector-transfected and naive HepG(2) cells was semiquantitatively analyzed by RT-PCR and cell proliferation was measured by the MTT assay. Cell cycle distribution and apoptosis were profiled by flow cytometry. The in vivo xenograft experiment was performed on nude mice to examine the effects of antisense vector on tumorigenicity. BC047440 cDNA fragments were reversely inserted into pcDNA3.1(+) plasmids. The antisense vector significantly reduced the endogenous BC047440 mRNA abundance by 41% in HepG(2) cells and inhibited their proliferation in vitro (P < 0.01). More cells were arrested by the antisense vector at the G(1) phase in an apoptosis-independent manner (P = 0.014). Additionally, transfection with pcDNA3.1(+)BC047440AS significantly reduced the xenograft tumorigenicity in nude mice. As a novel cell cycle regulator associated with HCC, the BC047440 gene was involved in cell proliferation in vitro and xenograft tumorigenicity in vivo through apoptosis-independent mechanisms.

  10. Topical gene silencing by iontophoretic delivery of an antisense oligonucleotide-dendrimer nanocomplex: the proof of concept in a skin cancer mouse model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venuganti, , Venkata Vamsi K.; Saraswathy, Manju; Dwivedi, Chandradhar; Kaushik, Radhey S.; Perumal, Omathanu P.

    2015-02-01

    The study was aimed at investigating the feasibility of using a poly (amidoamine) (PAMAM) dendrimer as a carrier for topical iontophoretic delivery of an antisense oligonucleotide (ASO). Bcl-2, an anti-apoptotic protein implicated in skin cancer, was used as the model target protein to demonstrate the topical gene silencing approach. Confocal laser scanning microscopy studies demonstrated that the iontophoretically delivered ASO-dendrimer complex can reach the viable epidermis in porcine skin. In contrast, passively delivered free or dendrimer complexed ASO was mainly localized to the stratum corneum. The cell uptake of ASO was significantly enhanced by the dendrimer complex and the complex suppressed Bcl-2 levels in the cell. In the skin cancer mouse model, the iontophoretically delivered ASO-dendrimer complex reduced the tumor volume by 45% and was consistent with the reduction in Bcl-2 protein levels. The iontophoretically delivered ASO-dendrimer complex caused significant apoptosis in skin tumor. Overall, the findings from this study demonstrate that dendrimers are promising nanocarriers for developing topical gene silencing approaches for skin diseases.The study was aimed at investigating the feasibility of using a poly (amidoamine) (PAMAM) dendrimer as a carrier for topical iontophoretic delivery of an antisense oligonucleotide (ASO). Bcl-2, an anti-apoptotic protein implicated in skin cancer, was used as the model target protein to demonstrate the topical gene silencing approach. Confocal laser scanning microscopy studies demonstrated that the iontophoretically delivered ASO-dendrimer complex can reach the viable epidermis in porcine skin. In contrast, passively delivered free or dendrimer complexed ASO was mainly localized to the stratum corneum. The cell uptake of ASO was significantly enhanced by the dendrimer complex and the complex suppressed Bcl-2 levels in the cell. In the skin cancer mouse model, the iontophoretically delivered ASO-dendrimer complex

  11. Surface Plasmon Resonance Assay of Binding Properties of Antisense Oligonucleotides to Serum Albumins and Lipoproteins.

    PubMed

    Onishi, Reina; Watanabe, Ayahisa; Nakajima, Mado; Sekiguchi, Mitsuaki; Kugimiya, Akira; Kinouchi, Hiroki; Nihashi, Yoichiro; Kamimori, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, we developed an assay to evaluate the kinetic binding properties of the unconjugated antisense oligonucleotide (ASO) and lipophilic and hydrophilic ligands conjugated ASOs to mouse and human serum albumin, and lipoproteins using surface plasmon resonance (SPR). The lipophilic ligands conjugated ASOs showed clear affinity to the albumins and lipoproteins, while the unconjugated and hydrophilic ligand conjugated ASOs showed no interaction. The SPR method showed reproducible immobilization of albumins and lipoproteins as ligands on the sensor chip, and reproducible affinity kinetic parameters of interaction of ASOs conjugated with the ligands could be obtained. The kinetic binding data of these ASOs to albumin and lipoproteins by SPR were related with the distributions in the whole liver in mice after administration of these conjugated ASOs. The results demonstrated that our SPR method could be a valuable tool for predicting the mechanism of the properties of delivery of conjugated ASOs to the organs.

  12. Cell-penetrating peptides-based strategies for the delivery of splice redirecting antisense oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    El Andaloussi, Samir; Said Hassane, Fatouma; Boisguerin, Prisca; Sillard, Rannar; Langel, Ulo; Lebleu, Bernard

    2011-01-01

    Progress in our understanding of the molecular pathogenesis of human malignancies has provided therapeutic targets amenable to oligonucleotide (ON)-based strategies. Antisense ON-mediated splicing regulation in particular offers promising prospects since the majority of human genes undergo alternative splicing and since splicing defects have been found in many diseases. However, their implementation has been hampered so far by the poor bioavailability of nucleic acids-based drugs. Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) now appear as promising non-viral delivery vector for non-permeant biomolecules. We describe here new CPPs allowing the delivery of splice redirecting steric-block ON using either chemical conjugation or non-covalent complexation. We also describe a convenient and robust splice redirecting assay which allows the quantitative assessment of ON nuclear delivery.

  13. Assessment of biofilm formation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa by antisense mazE-PNA.

    PubMed

    Valadbeigi, Hassan; Sadeghifard, Nourkhoda; Salehi, Majid Baseri

    2017-03-01

    The hallmark patogenicity in Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) is biofilm formation that is not easy to eradicate, because it has variety mechanisms for antibiotic resistance. In addition, toxin-antitoxin (TA) system may play role in biofilm formation. The current study aimed to evaluate the role of TA loci in biofilm formation. Therefore, 18 P. aeruginosa clinical isolates were collected and evaluated for specific biofilm and TA genes. The analysis by RT-qPCR demonstrated that expression of mazE antitoxin in biofilm formation was increase. On the other hand, mazE antitoxin TA system was used as target for antisense PNA. mazE-PNA was able to influence in biofilm formation and was inhibit at 5,10 and 15 μM concentrations biofilm formation in P. aeruginosa. Therefore, it could be highlighted target for anti-biofilm target to eradicate P. aeruginosa biofilm producer.

  14. Engineering Resistance Against Mungbean yellow mosaic India virus Using Antisense RNA.

    PubMed

    Haq, Q M I; Ali, Arif; Malathi, V G

    2010-06-01

    Yellow mosaic disease of cultivated legumes in South-East Asia, is caused by Mungbean yellow mosaic India virus (MYMIV) and Mungbean yellow mosaic virus (MYMV) belonging to the genus Begomovirus of the family Geminiviridae. Efforts to engineer resistance against the genus Begomovirus are focused mainly on silencing of complementary-sense virus genes involved in virus replication. Here we have targeted a complementary-sense gene (ACI) encoding Replication initiation Protein (Rep) to develop resistance against soybean isolate of Mungbean yellow mosaic India virus-[India:New Delhi:Soybean 2:1999], a bipartite begomovirus prevalent throughout the Indian subcontinent. We show that the legume host plants co-agroinoculated with infectious constructs of soybean isolate of Mungbean yellow mosaic India virus [India:New Delhi:Soybean 2:1999] along with this antisense Rep gene construct show resistance to the virus.

  15. Discovery and antibacterial activity of glabramycin A-C from Neosartorya glabra by an antisense strategy.

    PubMed

    Jayasuriya, Hiranthi; Zink, Deborah; Basilio, Angela; Vicente, Francisca; Collado, Javier; Bills, Gerald; Goldman, Mary Lee; Motyl, Mary; Huber, Joann; Dezeny, Gabe; Byrne, Kevin; Singh, Sheo B

    2009-05-01

    Treatment of drug-resistant bacteria is a significant unmet medical need. This challenge can be met only by the discovery and development of new antibiotics. Antisense technology is one of the newest discovery tools that provides enhanced sensitivity for detection of antibacterials, and has led to the discovery of a number of interesting new antibacterial natural products. Continued utilization of this technology led to the discovery of three new bicyclic lactones, glabramycins A-C, from a Neosartorya glabra strain. Glabramycin C showed strong antibiotic activity against Streptococcus pneumoniae (MIC 2 microg ml(-1)) and modest antibiotic activity against Staphylococcus aureus (MIC 16 microg ml(-1)). The isolation, structure, relative configuration and antibacterial activity, and plausible biogenesis of these compounds have been discussed.

  16. Targeting Long Noncoding RNA with Antisense Oligonucleotide Technology as Cancer Therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Tianyuan; Kim, Youngsoo; MacLeod, A Robert

    2016-01-01

    Recent annotation of the human transcriptome revealed that only 2 % of the genome encodes proteins while the majority of human genome is transcribed into noncoding RNAs. Although we are just beginning to understand the diverse roles long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) play in molecular and cellular processes, they have potentially important roles in human development and pathophysiology. However, targeting of RNA by traditional structure-based design of small molecule inhibitors has been difficult, due to a lack of understanding of the dynamic tertiary structures most RNA molecules adopt. Antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) are capable of targeting specific genes or transcripts directly through Watson-Crick base pairing and thus can be designed based on sequence information alone. These agents have made possible specific targeting of "non-druggable targets" including RNA molecules. Here we describe how ASOs can be applied in preclinical studies to reduce levels of lncRNAs of interest.

  17. Antisense and chemical suppression of the nonmevalonate pathway affects ent-kaurene biosynthesis in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Okada, Kazunori; Kawaide, Hiroshi; Kuzuyama, Tomohisa; Seto, Haruo; Curtis, Ian S; Kamiya, Yuji

    2002-06-01

    Transgenic plants of Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh. (ecotype Columbia) expressing the antisense AtMECT gene, encoding 2- C-methyl- D-erythritol 4-phosphate cytidylyltransferase, were generated to elucidate the physiological role of the nonmevalonate pathway for production of ent-kaurene, the latter being the plastidic precursor of gibberellins. In transformed plants pigmentation and accumulation of ent-kaurene were reduced compared to wild-type plants. Fosmidomycin, an inhibitor of 1-deoxy- D-xylulose 5-phosphate reductoisomerase (DXR), caused a similar depletion of these compounds in transgenic plants. These observations suggest that both AtMECT and DXR are important in the synthesis of isopentenyl diphosphate and dimethylallyl diphosphate and that ent-kaurene is mainly produced through the nonmevalonate pathway in the plastid.

  18. Circadian rhythms of sense and antisense transcription in sugarcane, a highly polyploid crop.

    PubMed

    Hotta, Carlos Takeshi; Nishiyama, Milton Yutaka; Souza, Glaucia Mendes

    2013-01-01

    Commercial sugarcane (Saccharum hybrid) is a highly polyploid and aneuploid grass that stores large amounts of sucrose in its stem. We have measured circadian rhythms of sense and antisense transcription in a commercial cultivar (RB855453) using a custom oligoarray with 14,521 probes that hybridize to sense transcripts (SS) and 7,380 probes that hybridize to antisense transcripts (AS).We estimated that 32% of SS probes and 22% AS probes were rhythmic. This is a higher proportion of rhythmic probes than the usually found in similar experiments in other plant species. Orthologs and inparalogs of Arabidopsis thaliana, sugarcane, rice, maize and sorghum were grouped in ortholog clusters. When ortholog clusters were used to compare probes among different datasets, sugarcane also showed a higher proportion of rhythmic elements than the other species. Thus, it is possible that a higher proportion of transcripts are regulated by the sugarcane circadian clock. Thirty-six percent of the identified AS/SS pairs had significant correlated time courses and 64% had uncorrelated expression patterns. The clustering of transcripts with similar function, the anticipation of daily environmental changes and the temporal compartmentation of metabolic processes were some properties identified in the circadian sugarcane transcriptome. During the day, there was a dominance of transcripts associated with photosynthesis and carbohydrate metabolism, including sucrose and starch synthesis. During the night, there was dominance of transcripts associated with genetic processing, such as histone regulation and RNA polymerase, ribosome and protein synthesis. Finally, the circadian clock also regulated hormone signalling pathways: a large proportion of auxin and ABA signalling components were regulated by the circadian clock in an unusual biphasic distribution.

  19. Effect of Terminal Groups of Dendrimers in the Complexation with Antisense Oligonucleotides and Cell Uptake.

    PubMed

    Márquez-Miranda, Valeria; Peñaloza, Juan Pablo; Araya-Durán, Ingrid; Reyes, Rodrigo; Vidaurre, Soledad; Romero, Valentina; Fuentes, Juan; Céric, Francisco; Velásquez, Luis; González-Nilo, Fernando D; Otero, Carolina

    2016-12-01

    Poly(amidoamine) dendrimers are the most recognized class of dendrimer. Amino-terminated (PAMAM-NH2) and hydroxyl-terminated (PAMAM-OH) dendrimers of generation 4 are widely used, since they are commercially available. Both have different properties, mainly based on their different overall charges at physiological pH. Currently, an important function of dendrimers as carriers of short single-stranded DNA has been applied. These molecules, known as antisense oligonucleotides (asODNs), are able to inhibit the expression of a target mRNA. Whereas PAMAM-NH2 dendrimers have shown to be able to transfect plasmid DNA, PAMAM-OH dendrimers have not shown the same successful results. However, little is known about their interaction with shorter and more flexible molecules such as asODNs. Due to several initiatives, the use of these neutral dendrimers as a scaffold to introduce other functional groups has been proposed. Because of its low cytotoxicity, it is relevant to understand the molecular phenomena involving these types of dendrimers. In this work, we studied the behavior of an antisense oligonucleotide in presence of both types of dendrimers using molecular dynamics simulations, in order to elucidate if they are able to form stable complexes. In this manner, we demonstrated at atomic level that PAMAM-NH2, unlike PAMAM-OH, could form a well-compacted complex with asODN, albeit PAMAM-OH can also establish stable interactions with the oligonucleotide. The biological activity of asODN in complex with PAMAM-NH2 dendrimer was also shown. Finally, we revealed that in contact with PAMAM-OH, asODN remains outside the cells as TIRF microscopy results showed, due to its poor interaction with this dendrimer and cell membranes.

  20. Inhibition of keratin 17 expression with antisense and RNAi strategies: exploring novel therapy for psoriasis.

    PubMed

    Chang, Ting; Sun, Linchao; Wang, Yan; Wang, Datai; Li, Wei; Li, Chunying; Gao, Tianwen; Liu, Yufeng; Wang, Gang

    2011-07-01

    Psoriasis is now considered to be a chronic, immune-mediated and inflammatory skin disease. As the precise cause of psoriasis remains unknown, its treatment is challenging for dermatologists. Keratin 17 (K17), an intermediate filament protein, is highly expressed in psoriatic lesions, while not normally expressed in healthy epidermis. Studies have suggested that K17 plays a role in the pathogenesis of psoriasis. However, no study has been performed to determine the potential application of K17 down-regulation as a treatment option for psoriatic lesions. We hypothesized that anti-K17 interference may suppress the development and progression of psoriasis and potentially serve as a novel strategy for the treatment of psoriasis. Therefore, we down-regulated and silenced K17 gene expression in keratinocytes (KCs) using antisense and RNA interference (RNAi) techniques. We found that K17-specific antisense oligonucleotides (ASODN) or siRNAs inhibited proliferation and induced apoptosis in KCs as well as down-regulated K17 expression at both mRNA and protein levels. For our in vivo study, we constructed the SCID-hu xenogeneic transplantation psoriasis mouse model by grafting psoriatic lesions onto SCID mice and topically applied K17-specific ASODN and liposome-encapsulated siRNA to the grafts. We observed morphological and histological improvement in the treated psoriatic grafts. As a result, K17 mRNA and protein expression was significantly decreased in the grafts of the mouse model. Taken together, we conclude that anti-K17 therapy is an effective treatment option for psoriasis, and the K17 molecule, as a new target, may hold tremendous potential for the treatment of psoriasis in the future.

  1. Therapeutic potentialities of EWS-Fli-1 mRNA-targeted vectorized antisense oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Maksimenko, A; Lambert, G; Bertrand, J R; Fattal, E; Couvreur, P; Malvy, C

    2003-12-01

    We have used structured antisense oligonucleotides (AON), which are protected against extra and intracellular degradation by their internal structure. We have shown that if correctly designed this structure does not prevent them from hybridizing to the mRNA target. This concept allows reducing the number of thioate groups in the oligonucleotide and therefore the potential toxicity. Junction oncogenes are found in cancers such as certain leukemias, Ewing sarcoma, and thyroid papillary carcinomas. Ewing sarcoma is a cancer of children and young adults with bone metastasis. It is caused by a chromosomic translocation t(11;22) (q24;q12) creating a fusion gene between the genes EWS and Fli-1 giving rise to a chimeric protein which is an unnatural transcription factor. Immortalized NIH/3T3 cells transfected by the EWS-Fli-1 cDNA under the control of the LTR retroviral promoter--which do not undergo apoptosis and which became tumoral--were used for this study. As a model of Ewing sarcoma in nude mice, we have used permanently expressing human EWS-Fli-1 cells grafted to nude mice. The nanospheres or nanocapsules have been used to deliver two different AON: a phosphorothioate, and a structured chimeric AON, both targeted toward the junction area of EWS-Fli-1. Both types of AON-loaded nanoparticles inhibited the growth of the xenografted tumor after intratumoral injections into nude mice, whereas similar nanoparticles with control oligonucleotides had no effect. With AON in nanospheres, we have shown after 24 hours that the mRNA of EWS-Fli-1 was specifically down-regulated, confirming the antisense activity of the targeted AON.

  2. Circadian Rhythms of Sense and Antisense Transcription in Sugarcane, a Highly Polyploid Crop

    PubMed Central

    Hotta, Carlos Takeshi; Nishiyama, Milton Yutaka; Souza, Glaucia Mendes

    2013-01-01

    Commercial sugarcane (Saccharum hybrid) is a highly polyploid and aneuploid grass that stores large amounts of sucrose in its stem. We have measured circadian rhythms of sense and antisense transcription in a commercial cultivar (RB855453) using a custom oligoarray with 14,521 probes that hybridize to sense transcripts (SS) and 7,380 probes that hybridize to antisense transcripts (AS).We estimated that 32% of SS probes and 22% AS probes were rhythmic. This is a higher proportion of rhythmic probes than the usually found in similar experiments in other plant species. Orthologs and inparalogs of Arabidopsis thaliana, sugarcane, rice, maize and sorghum were grouped in ortholog clusters. When ortholog clusters were used to compare probes among different datasets, sugarcane also showed a higher proportion of rhythmic elements than the other species. Thus, it is possible that a higher proportion of transcripts are regulated by the sugarcane circadian clock. Thirty-six percent of the identified AS/SS pairs had significant correlated time courses and 64% had uncorrelated expression patterns. The clustering of transcripts with similar function, the anticipation of daily environmental changes and the temporal compartmentation of metabolic processes were some properties identified in the circadian sugarcane transcriptome. During the day, there was a dominance of transcripts associated with photosynthesis and carbohydrate metabolism, including sucrose and starch synthesis. During the night, there was dominance of transcripts associated with genetic processing, such as histone regulation and RNA polymerase, ribosome and protein synthesis. Finally, the circadian clock also regulated hormone signalling pathways: a large proportion of auxin and ABA signalling components were regulated by the circadian clock in an unusual biphasic distribution. PMID:23936527

  3. Antisense inhibition of mitochondrial pyruvate dehydrogenase E1alpha subunit in anther tapetum causes male sterility.

    PubMed

    Yui, Rika; Iketani, Satoru; Mikami, Tetsuo; Kubo, Tomohiko

    2003-04-01

    We hypothesized that cytoplasmic male sterility (CMS) in sugar beet may be the consequence of mitochondrial dysfunctions affecting normal anther development. To test the hypothesis, we attempted to mimic the sugar beet CMS phenotype by inhibiting the expression of mitochondrial pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH), which is essential for the operation of the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle. Screening with a cDNA library of sugar beet flower buds allowed the identification of two PDH E1alpha subunit genes (bvPDH_E1alpha-1 and bvPDH_E1alpha-2). bvPDH_E1alpha-1 was found to be highly expressed in tap roots, whereas bvPDH_E1alpha-2 was expressed most abundantly in flower buds. Green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusion of bvPDH_E1alpha revealed mitochondrial targeting properties. A 300-bp bvPDH_E1alpha-1 cDNA sequence (from +620 to +926) was connected to a tapetum-specific promoter in the antisense orientation and then introduced into tobacco. Antisense expression of bvPDH_E1alpha-1 resulted in conspicuously decreased endogenous bvPDH_E1alpha-1 transcripts and male sterility. The tapetum in the male-sterile anthers showed swelling or abnormal vacuolation. It is also worth noting that in the sterile anthers, cell organelles, such as elaioplasts, tapetosomes and orbicules were poorly formed and microspores exhibited aberrant exine development. These features are shared by sugar beet CMS. The results thus clearly indicate that inhibition of PDH activity in anther tapetum is sufficient to cause male sterility, a phenocopy of the sugar beet CMS.

  4. Sense and antisense transcripts of the developmentally regulated murine hsp70.2 gene are expressed in distinct and only partially overlapping areas in the adult brain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murashov, A. K.; Wolgemuth, D. J.

    1996-01-01

    We have examined the spatial pattern of expression of a member of the hsp70 gene family, hsp70.2, in the mouse central nervous system. Surprisingly, RNA blot analysis and in situ hybridization revealed abundant expression of an 'antisense' hsp70.2 transcript in several areas of adult mouse brain. Two different transcripts recognized by sense and antisense riboprobes for the hsp70.2 gene were expressed in distinct and only partially overlapping neuronal populations. RNA blot analysis revealed low levels of the 2.7 kb transcript of hsp70.2 in several areas of the brain, with highest signal in the hippocampus. Abundant expression of a slightly larger (approximately 2.8 kb) 'antisense' transcript was detected in several brain regions, notably in the brainstem, cerebellum, mesencephalic tectum, thalamus, cortex, and hippocampus. In situ hybridization revealed that the sense and antisense transcripts were both predominantly neuronal and localized to the same cell types in the granular layer of the cerebellum, trapezoid nucleus of the superior olivary complex, locus coeruleus and hippocampus. The hsp70.2 antisense transcripts were particularly abundant in the frontal cortex, dentate gyrus, subthalamic nucleus, zona incerta, superior and inferior colliculi, central gray, brainstem, and cerebellar Purkinje cells. Our findings have revealed a distinct cellular and spatial localization of both sense and antisense transcripts, demonstrating a new level of complexity in the function of the heat shock genes.

  5. Down-regulation of protein kinase Ceta by antisense oligonucleotides sensitises A549 lung cancer cells to vincristine and paclitaxel.

    PubMed

    Sonnemann, Jürgen; Gekeler, Volker; Ahlbrecht, Katrin; Brischwein, Klaus; Liu, Chao; Bader, Peter; Müller, Cornelia; Niethammer, Dietrich; Beck, James F

    2004-06-25

    Previous studies point to protein kinase C (PKC) isozyme eta as a resistance factor in cancer cells. Therefore, we investigated whether down-regulation of PKCeta with second generation antisense oligonucleotides (ODNs) would sensitise A549 human lung carcinoma cells to cytostatics. The effects were compared to the outcome of Bcl-xL down-regulation. Upon treatment with antisense ODNs, PKCeta and Bcl-xL were both significantly reduced on mRNA and protein level. Down-regulation of either PKCeta or Bcl-xL in combination with vincristine or paclitaxel resulted in a significant increase in caspase-3 activity compared to that in the control oligonucleotide treated cells. In addition, PKCeta down-regulation augmented vincristine-induced dissipation of mitochondrial transmembrane potential. In conclusion, these results confirm that PKCeta might represent a considerable resistance factor and an interesting target to improve anticancer chemotherapy.

  6. Analysis of 14-3-3 Family Member Function in Xenopus Embryos by Microinjection of Antisense Morpholino Oligos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lau, Jeffrey M. C.; Muslin, Anthony J.

    The 14-3-3 intracellular phosphoserine/threonine-binding proteins are adapter molecules that regulate signal transduction, cell cycle, nutrient sensing, apoptotic, and cytoskeletal pathways. There are seven 14-3-3 family members, encoded by separate genes, in vertebrate organisms. To evaluate the role of individual 14-3-3 proteins in vertebrate embryonic development, we utilized an antisense morpholino oligo microinjection technique in Xenopus laevis embryos. By use of this method, we showed that embryos lacking specific 14-3-3 proteins displayed unique phenotypic abnormalities. Specifically, embryos lacking 14-3-3 τ exhibited gastrulation and axial patterning defects, but embryos lacking 14-3-3 γ exhibited eye defects without other abnormalities, and embryos lacking 14-3-3 ζ appeared completely normal. These and other results demonstrate the power and specificity of the morpholino antisense oligo microinjection technique.

  7. Expression of antisense or sense RNA of an ankyrin repeat-containing gene blocks chloroplast differentiation in arabidopsis.

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, H; Scheirer, D C; Fowle, W H; Goodman, H M

    1992-01-01

    The Arabidopsis AKR gene that encodes a protein with four ankyrin repeats (a 33-amino acid motif that appears in the 89K domain of the human protein ankyrin) was isolated and characterized. A short sequence outside the ankyrin repeats is similar to that of the protein of the Drosophila muscle segment homeobox (msh) gene. The expression of the AKR gene is light dependent, and transgenic Arabidopsis plants with two or more copies of an antisense or sense AKR construct became chlorotic in a developmentally regulated manner. The chlorotic phenotype was genetically transmitted to the next generation, although most chlorotic plants produced much less seed. Reduced presence of thylakoid membranes and loss of grana are found in the plastids of chlorotic leaves, indicating that antisense or sense AKR has blocked chloroplast differentiation. This study indicates the importance of ankyrin repeat-containing proteins, not only in yeast and animals, but in plants as well. PMID:1281700

  8. [The creation of transgenic tobacco plants expressing fragments of the ARGOS and NtEXPA4 genes in antisense orientation].

    PubMed

    Kuluev, B R; Kniazev, A V; Postrigan', B N; Chemeris, A V

    2014-01-01

    Transgenic tobacco plants expressing the fragments of the ARGOS and NtEXPA4 genes in antisense orientation have been created. Eleven lines of transgenic plants were investigated and five of them were characterized by a decrease in the sizes of the leaves and flowers as compared to control. Stalk sizes decreased when only the NtEXPA4 gene fragment was used. The organ size of the experimental plants decreased because of a reduction in the level of both cell division and cell expansion. Two lines of transgenic tobacco plants expressing the part of the ARGOS gene in antisense orientation were characterized by a reduction in the level of the NtEXPA1 and NtEXPA4 gene expression.

  9. Inhibitory effects of antisense oligodeoxynucleotides targeting c-myc mRNA on smooth muscle cell proliferation and migration.

    PubMed Central

    Biro, S; Fu, Y M; Yu, Z X; Epstein, S E

    1993-01-01

    Smooth muscle cell (SMC) proliferation and migration play pivotal roles in restenosis following angioplasty. c-myc is an immediate early response gene induced by various mitogens, and several lines of evidence derived from experiments using transformed or hematopoietic cell lines, or transgenic mice, suggest its protein product plays a role in numerous signaling transduction pathways, including those modulating cell division. We therefore reasoned that a strategy employing oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs) complementary to c-myc mRNA (antisense ODNs) might be potent inhibitors of SMC proliferation and, perhaps, of SMC migration. To evaluate this concept, we tested several antisense ODNs targeted to c-myc mRNA (15- or 18-mer ODNs complementary to different c-myc mRNA sequences) by introducing them individually into the medium of cultured rat aortic SMCs. Phosphoroamidate-modified ODNs were employed to retard degradation. Antisense ODNs inhibited, in a concentration-dependent manner, SMC proliferation and SMC migration. Maximal inhibitory effect was 50% for proliferation and > 90% for migration. These effects were associated with decreased SMC expression of c-myc-encoded protein by Western immunoblotting and immunocytochemical staining. ODNs with the same nucleotides but a scrambled sequence caused no effect. These results indicate that the c-myc gene product is involved in the signal transduction pathways mediating SMC proliferation and migration in the in vitro model we employed. The results also suggest a potential role of antisense strategies designed to inhibit c-myc expression for the prevention of coronary restenosis. Images PMID:8421701

  10. Antisense bcl-2 treatment increases programmed cell death in non-small cell lung cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Koty, P P; Zhang, H; Levitt, M L

    1999-02-01

    Programmed cell death (PCD) is a genetically regulated pathway that is altered in many cancers. This process is, in part, regulated by the ratio of PCD inducers (Bax) or inhibitors (Bcl-2). An abnormally high ratio of Bcl-2 to Bax prevents PCD, thus contributing to resistance to chemotherapeutic agents, many of which are capable of inducing PCD. Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells demonstrate resistance to these PCD-inducing agents. If Bcl-2 prevents NSCLC cells from entering the PCD pathway, then reducing the amount of endogenous Bcl-2 product may allow these cells to spontaneously enter the PCD pathway. Our purpose was to determine the effects of bcl-2 antisense treatment on the levels of programmed cell death in NSCLC cells. First, we determined whether bcl-2 and bax mRNA were expressed in three morphologically distinct NSCLC cell lines: NCI-H226 (squamous), NCI-H358 (adenocarcinoma), and NCI-H596 (adenosquamous). Cells were then exposed to synthetic antisense bcl-2 oligonucleotide treatment, after which programmed cell death was determined, as evidenced by DNA fragmentation. Bcl-2 protein expression was detected immunohistochemically. All three NSCLC cell lines expressed both bcl-2 and bax mRNA and had functional PCD pathways. Synthetic antisense bcl-2 oligonucleotide treatment resulted in decreased Bcl-2 levels, reduced cell proliferation, decreased cell viability, and increased levels of spontaneous PCD. This represents the first evidence that decreasing Bcl-2 in three morphologically distinct NSCLC cell lines allows the cells to spontaneously enter a PCD pathway. It also indicates the potential therapeutic use of antisense bcl-2 in the treatment of NSCLC.

  11. Construction of a directed hammerhead ribozyme library: towards the identification of optimal target sites for antisense-mediated gene inhibition.

    PubMed Central

    Pierce, M L; Ruffner, D E

    1998-01-01

    Antisense-mediated gene inhibition uses short complementary DNA or RNA oligonucleotides to block expression of any mRNA of interest. A key parameter in the success or failure of an antisense therapy is the identification of a suitable target site on the chosen mRNA. Ultimately, the accessibility of the target to the antisense agent determines target suitability. Since accessibility is a function of many complex factors, it is currently beyond our ability to predict. Consequently, identification of the most effective target(s) requires examination of every site. Towards this goal, we describe a method to construct directed ribozyme libraries against any chosen mRNA. The library contains nearly equal amounts of ribozymes targeting every site on the chosen transcript and the library only contains ribozymes capable of binding to that transcript. Expression of the ribozyme library in cultured cells should allow identification of optimal target sites under natural conditions, subject to the complexities of a fully functional cell. Optimal target sites identified in this manner should be the most effective sites for therapeutic intervention. PMID:9801305

  12. Effects of variations in length of hammerhead ribozyme antisense arms upon the cleavage of longer RNA substrates.

    PubMed Central

    Sioud, M

    1997-01-01

    The efficacy of intracellular binding of hammerhead ribozyme to its cleavage site in target RNA is a major requirement for its use as a therapeutic agent. Such efficacy can be influenced by several factors, such as the length of the ribozyme antisense arms and mRNA secondary structures. Analysis of various IL-2 hammerhead ribozymes having different antisense arms but directed to the same site predicts that the hammerhead ribozyme target site is present within a double-stranded region that is flanked by single-stranded loops. Extension of the low cleaving hammerhead ribozyme antisense arms by nucleotides that base pair with the single-stranded regions facilitated the hammerhead ribozyme binding to longer RNA substrates (e.g. mRNA). In addition, a correlation between the in vitro and intracellular results was also found. Thus, the present study would facilitate the design of hammerhead ribozymes directed against higher order structured sites. Further, it emphasises the importance of detailed structural investigations of hammerhead ribozyme full-length target RNAs. PMID:9016562

  13. Antisense Oligonucleotides Modulating Activation of a Nonsense-Mediated RNA Decay Switch Exon in the ATM Gene

    PubMed Central

    Kralovicova, Jana; Moreno, Pedro M.D.; Cross, Nicholas C.P.; Pêgo, Ana Paula

    2016-01-01

    ATM (ataxia-telangiectasia, mutated) is an important cancer susceptibility gene that encodes a key apical kinase in the DNA damage response pathway. ATM mutations in the germ line result in ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T), a rare genetic syndrome associated with hypersensitivity to double-strand DNA breaks and predisposition to lymphoid malignancies. ATM expression is limited by a tightly regulated nonsense-mediated RNA decay (NMD) switch exon (termed NSE) located in intron 28. In this study, we identify antisense oligonucleotides that modulate NSE inclusion in mature transcripts by systematically targeting the entire 3.1-kb-long intron. Their identification was assisted by a segmental deletion analysis of transposed elements, revealing NSE repression upon removal of a distant antisense Alu and NSE activation upon elimination of a long terminal repeat transposon MER51A. Efficient NSE repression was achieved by delivering optimized splice-switching oligonucleotides to embryonic and lymphoblastoid cells using chitosan-based nanoparticles. Together, these results provide a basis for possible sequence-specific radiosensitization of cancer cells, highlight the power of intronic antisense oligonucleotides to modify gene expression, and demonstrate transposon-mediated regulation of NSEs. PMID:27658045

  14. Rapid blockade of telomerase activity and tumor cell growth by the DPL lipofection of ribbon antisense to hTR.

    PubMed

    Bajpai, Arun K; Park, Jeong-Hoh; Moon, Ik-Jae; Kang, Hyungu; Lee, Yun-Han; Doh, Kyung-Oh; Suh, Seong-Il; Chang, Byeong-Churl; Park, Jong-Gu

    2005-09-29

    Ribbon antisense (RiAS) to the hTR RNA, a component of the telomerase complex, was employed to inhibit telomerase activity and cancer cell growth. The antisense molecule, hTR-RiAS, combined with enhanced cellular uptake was shown to effectively inhibit telomerase activity and cause rapid cell death in various cancer cell lines. When cancer cells were treated with hTR-RiAS, the level of hTR RNA was reduced by more than 90% accompanied with reduction in telomerase activity. When checked for cancer cell viability, cancer cell lines treated with hTR-RiAS using DNA+Peptide+Lipid complex showed 70-80% growth inhibition in 3 days. The reduced cell viability was due to apoptosis as the percentage of cells exhibiting the sub-G0 arrest and DNA fragmentation increased after antisense treatment. Further, when subcutaneous tumors of a colon cancer cell line (SW480) were treated intratumorally with hTR-RiAS, tumor growth was markedly suppressed with almost total ablation of hTR RNA in the tumor tissue. Cells in the tumor tissue were also found to undergo apoptosis after hTR-RiAS treatment. These results suggest that hTR-RiAS is an effective anticancer reagent, with a potential for broad efficacy to diverse malignant tumors.

  15. Novel antisense therapeutics delivery systems: In vitro and in vivo studies of liposomes targeted with anti-CD20 antibody.

    PubMed

    Meissner, Justyna M; Toporkiewicz, Monika; Czogalla, Aleksander; Matusewicz, Lucyna; Kuliczkowski, Kazimierz; Sikorski, Aleksander F

    2015-12-28

    Antisense gene therapy using molecules such as antisense oligodeoxynucleotides, siRNA or miRNA is a very promising strategy for the treatment of neoplastic diseases. It can be combined with other treatment strategies to enhance therapeutic effect. In acute leukemias, overexpression of the antiapoptotic gene BCL2 is observed in more than 70% of cases. Therefore, reduction of the Bcl-2 protein level could, in itself, prevent the development of cancer or could possibly help sensitize cancer cells to apoptosis inducers. The main objective of our work is to develop therapeutic liposome formulations characterized by high transfection efficiency, stability in the presence of serum, as well as specificity and toxicity for target (leukemic) cells. Each of our liposomal formulations consists of a core composed of antisense oligonucleotides complexed by either cationic lipid, DOTAP, or a synthetic polycation, polyethyleneimine, encapsulated within liposomes modified with polyethylenoglycol. In addition, the liposomal shells are enriched with covalently-bound antibodies recognizing a well characterized bio-marker, CD20, exposed on the surface of leukemia cells. The resulting immunoliposomes selectively and effectively reduced the expression of BCL2 in target cells. Model animal experiments carried out on mice-engrafted tumors expressing the specific marker showed high efficiency of the liposome formulations against specific tumor development. In conclusion, we show that lipid formulations based on a polyplex or lipoplex backbone additionally equipped with antibodies are promising non-viral vectors for specific oligonucleotide transfer into human tumor cells.

  16. Nanoparticle delivery of antisense oligonucleotides and their application in the exon skipping strategy for Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Falzarano, Maria Sofia; Passarelli, Chiara; Ferlini, Alessandra

    2014-02-01

    Antisense therapy is a powerful tool for inducing post-transcriptional modifications and thereby regulating target genes associated with disease. There are several classes of antisense oligonucleotides (AONs) with therapeutic use, such as double-stranded RNAs (interfering RNAs, utilized for gene silencing, and single-stranded AONs with various chemistries, which are useful for antisense targeting of micro-RNAs and mRNAs. In particular, the use of AONs for exon skipping, by targeting pre-mRNA, is proving to be a highly promising therapy for some genetic disorders like Duchenne muscular dystrophy and spinal muscular atrophy. However, AONs are unable to cross the plasma membrane unaided, and several other obstacles still remain to be overcome, in particular their instability due to their nuclease sensitivity and their lack of tissue specificity. Various drug delivery systems have been explored to improve the bioavailability of nucleic acids, and nanoparticles (NPs) have been suggested as potential vectors for DNA/RNA. This review describes the recent progress in AON conjugation with natural and synthetic delivery systems, and provides an overview of the efficacy of NP-AON complexes as an exon-skipping treatment for Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

  17. Hormone-dependent expression of a steroidogenic acute regulatory protein natural antisense transcript in MA-10 mouse tumor Leydig cells.

    PubMed

    Castillo, Ana Fernanda; Fan, Jinjiang; Papadopoulos, Vassilios; Podestá, Ernesto J

    2011-01-01

    Cholesterol transport is essential for many physiological processes, including steroidogenesis. In steroidogenic cells hormone-induced cholesterol transport is controlled by a protein complex that includes steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR). Star is expressed as 3.5-, 2.8-, and 1.6-kb transcripts that differ only in their 3'-untranslated regions. Because these transcripts share the same promoter, mRNA stability may be involved in their differential regulation and expression. Recently, the identification of natural antisense transcripts (NATs) has added another level of regulation to eukaryotic gene expression. Here we identified a new NAT that is complementary to the spliced Star mRNA sequence. Using 5' and 3' RACE, strand-specific RT-PCR, and ribonuclease protection assays, we demonstrated that Star NAT is expressed in MA-10 Leydig cells and steroidogenic murine tissues. Furthermore, we established that human chorionic gonadotropin stimulates Star NAT expression via cAMP. Our results show that sense-antisense Star RNAs may be coordinately regulated since they are co-expressed in MA-10 cells. Overexpression of Star NAT had a differential effect on the expression of the different Star sense transcripts following cAMP stimulation. Meanwhile, the levels of StAR protein and progesterone production were downregulated in the presence of Star NAT. Our data identify antisense transcription as an additional mechanism involved in the regulation of steroid biosynthesis.

  18. Antisense Morpholino-Oligomers Directed against the 5′ End of the Genome Inhibit Coronavirus Proliferation and Growth†

    PubMed Central

    Neuman, Benjamin W.; Stein, David A.; Kroeker, Andrew D.; Paulino, Amy D.; Moulton, Hong M.; Iversen, Patrick L.; Buchmeier, Michael J.

    2004-01-01

    Conjugation of a peptide related to the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 Tat represents a novel method for delivery of antisense morpholino-oligomers. Conjugated and unconjugated oligomers were tested to determine sequence-specific antiviral efficacy against a member of the Coronaviridae, Mouse hepatitis virus (MHV). Specific antisense activity designed to block translation of the viral replicase polyprotein was first confirmed by reduction of luciferase expression from a target sequence-containing reporter construct in both cell-free and transfected cell culture assays. Peptide-conjugated morpholino-oligomers exhibited low toxicity in DBT astrocytoma cells used for culturing MHV. Oligomer administered at micromolar concentrations was delivered to >80% of cells and inhibited virus titers 10- to 100-fold in a sequence-specific and dose-responsive manner. In addition, targeted viral protein synthesis, plaque diameter, and cytopathic effect were significantly reduced. Inhibition of virus infectivity by peptide-conjugated morpholino was comparable to the antiviral activity of the aminoglycoside hygromycin B used at a concentration fivefold higher than the oligomer. These results suggest that this composition of antisense compound has therapeutic potential for control of coronavirus infection. PMID:15140987

  19. Hormone-Dependent Expression of a Steroidogenic Acute Regulatory Protein Natural Antisense Transcript in MA-10 Mouse Tumor Leydig Cells

    PubMed Central

    Castillo, Ana Fernanda; Fan, Jinjiang; Papadopoulos, Vassilios; Podestá, Ernesto J.

    2011-01-01

    Cholesterol transport is essential for many physiological processes, including steroidogenesis. In steroidogenic cells hormone-induced cholesterol transport is controlled by a protein complex that includes steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR). Star is expressed as 3.5-, 2.8-, and 1.6-kb transcripts that differ only in their 3′-untranslated regions. Because these transcripts share the same promoter, mRNA stability may be involved in their differential regulation and expression. Recently, the identification of natural antisense transcripts (NATs) has added another level of regulation to eukaryotic gene expression. Here we identified a new NAT that is complementary to the spliced Star mRNA sequence. Using 5′ and 3′ RACE, strand-specific RT-PCR, and ribonuclease protection assays, we demonstrated that Star NAT is expressed in MA-10 Leydig cells and steroidogenic murine tissues. Furthermore, we established that human chorionic gonadotropin stimulates Star NAT expression via cAMP. Our results show that sense-antisense Star RNAs may be coordinately regulated since they are co-expressed in MA-10 cells. Overexpression of Star NAT had a differential effect on the expression of the different Star sense transcripts following cAMP stimulation. Meanwhile, the levels of StAR protein and progesterone production were downregulated in the presence of Star NAT. Our data identify antisense transcription as an additional mechanism involved in the regulation of steroid biosynthesis. PMID:21829656

  20. siRNA-mediated heterochromatin establishment requires HP1 and is associated with antisense transcription

    PubMed Central

    Iida, Tetsushi; Nakayama, Jun-ichi; Moazed, Danesh

    2008-01-01

    Summary Heterochromatic gene silencing at the pericentromeric DNA repeats in fission yeast requires the RNA interference (RNAi) machinery. The RNA-Induced Transcriptional Silencing (RITS) complex mediates histone H3 lysine 9 (H3K9) methylation and recruits the RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase Complex (RDRC) to promote double-strand RNA (dsRNA) synthesis and siRNA generation. Here we show that ectopic expression of a long hairpin RNA bypasses the requirement for chromatin-dependent steps in siRNA generation. The ability of hairpin-produced siRNAs to silence homologous sequences in trans is subject to local chromatin structure, requires HP1, and correlates with antisense transcription at the target locus. Furthermore, although hairpin siRNAs can be produced in the absence of RDRC, trans-silencing of reporter genes by hairpin-produced siRNAs is completely dependent on the dsRNA synthesis activity of RDRC. These results provide new insights into the regulation of siRNA action and reveal roles for cis-dsRNA synthesis and HP1 in siRNA-mediated heterochromatin assembly. PMID:18657501

  1. Antisense Oligonucleotide Mediated Splice Correction of a Deep Intronic Mutation in OPA1

    PubMed Central

    Bonifert, Tobias; Gonzalez Menendez, Irene; Battke, Florian; Theurer, Yvonne; Synofzik, Matthis; Schöls, Ludger; Wissinger, Bernd

    2016-01-01

    Inherited optic neuropathies (ION) present an important cause of blindness in the European working-age population. Recently we reported the discovery of four independent families with deep intronic mutations in the main inherited optic neuropathies gene OPA1. These deep intronic mutations cause mis-splicing of the OPA1 pre-messenger-RNA transcripts by creating cryptic acceptor splice sites. As a rescue strategy we sought to prevent mis-splicing of the mutant pre-messenger-RNA by applying 2′O-methyl-antisense oligonucleotides (AONs) with a full-length phosphorothioate backbone that target the cryptic acceptor splice sites and the predicted novel branch point created by the deep intronic mutations, respectively. Transfection of patient-derived primary fibroblasts with these AONs induced correct splicing of the mutant pre-messenger-RNA in a time and concentration dependent mode of action, as detected by pyrosequencing of informative heterozygous variants. The treatment showed strong rescue effects (~55%) using the cryptic acceptor splice sites targeting AON and moderate rescue (~16%) using the branch point targeting AON. The highest efficacy of Splice correction could be observed 4 days after treatment however, significant effects were still seen 14 days post-transfection. Western blot analysis revealed increased amounts of OPA1 protein with maximum amounts at ~3 days post-treatment. In summary, we provide the first mutation-specific in vitro rescue strategy for OPA1 deficiency using synthetic AONs. PMID:27874857

  2. Small antisense oligonucleotides against G-quadruplexes: specific mRNA translational switches

    PubMed Central

    Rouleau, Samuel G.; Beaudoin, Jean-Denis; Bisaillon, Martin; Perreault, Jean-Pierre

    2015-01-01

    G-quadruplexes (G4) are intricate RNA structures found throughout the transcriptome. Because they are associated with a variety of biological cellular mechanisms, these fascinating structural motifs are seen as potential therapeutic targets against many diseases. While screening of chemical compounds specific to G4 motifs has yielded interesting results, no single compound successfully discriminates between G4 motifs based on nucleotide sequences alone. This level of specificity is best attained using antisense oligonucleotides (ASO). Indeed, oligonucleotide-based strategies are already used to modulate DNA G4 folding in vitro. Here, we report that, in human cells, the use of short ASO to promote and inhibit RNA G4 folding affects the translation of specific mRNAs, including one from the 5′UTR of the H2AFY gene, a histone variant associated with cellular differentiation and cancer. These results suggest that the relatively high specificity of ASO-based strategies holds significant potential for applications aimed at modulating G4-motif folding. PMID:25510493

  3. Ribonuclease H1-dependent hepatotoxicity caused by locked nucleic acid-modified gapmer antisense oligonucleotides

    PubMed Central

    Kasuya, Takeshi; Hori, Shin-ichiro; Watanabe, Ayahisa; Nakajima, Mado; Gahara, Yoshinari; Rokushima, Masatomo; Yanagimoto, Toru; Kugimiya, Akira

    2016-01-01

    Gapmer antisense oligonucleotides cleave target RNA effectively in vivo, and is considered as promising therapeutics. Especially, gapmers modified with locked nucleic acid (LNA) shows potent knockdown activity; however, they also cause hepatotoxic side effects. For developing safe and effective gapmer drugs, a deeper understanding of the mechanisms of hepatotoxicity is required. Here, we investigated the cause of hepatotoxicity derived from LNA-modified gapmers. Chemical modification of gapmer’s gap region completely suppressed both knockdown activity and hepatotoxicity, indicating that the root cause of hepatotoxicity is related to intracellular gapmer activity. Gene silencing of hepatic ribonuclease H1 (RNaseH1), which catalyses gapmer-mediated RNA knockdown, strongly supressed hepatotoxic effects. Small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated knockdown of a target mRNA did not result in any hepatotoxic effects, while the gapmer targeting the same position on mRNA as does the siRNA showed acute toxicity. Microarray analysis revealed that several pre-mRNAs containing a sequence similar to the gapmer target were also knocked down. These results suggest that hepatotoxicity of LNA gapmer is caused by RNAseH1 activity, presumably because of off-target cleavage of RNAs inside nuclei. PMID:27461380

  4. Identification of three novel antisense RNAs in the fur locus from unicellular cyanobacteria.

    PubMed

    Sevilla, Emma; Martín-Luna, Beatriz; González, Andrés; Gonzalo-Asensio, Jesús A; Peleato, María Luisa; Fillat, María F

    2011-12-01

    The interplay between Fur (ferric uptake regulator) proteins and small, non-coding RNAs has been described as a key regulatory loop in several bacteria. In the filamentous cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. PCC 7120, a large dicistronic transcript encoding the putative membrane protein Alr1690 and an α-furA RNA is involved in the modulation of the global regulator FurA. In this work we report the existence of three novel antisense RNAs in cyanobacteria and show that a cis α-furA RNA is conserved in very different genomic contexts, namely in the unicellular cyanobacteria Microcystis aeruginosa PCC 7806 and Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. Syα-fur RNA covers only part of the coding sequence of the fur orthologue sll0567, whose flanking genes encode two hypothetical proteins. Transcriptional analysis of fur and its adjacent genes in Microcystis unravels a highly compact organization of this locus involving overlapping transcripts. Maα-fur RNA spans the whole Mafur CDS and part of the flanking dnaJ and sufE sequences. In addition, Mafur seems to be part of a dicistronic operon encoding this regulator and an α-sufE RNA. These results allow new insights into the transcriptomes of two unicellular cyanobacteria and suggest that in M. aeruginosa PCC 7806, the α-fur and α-sufE RNAs might participate in a regulatory connection between the genes of the dnaJ-fur-sufE locus.

  5. Antisense oligonucleotide-mediated exon skipping as a strategy to reduce proteolytic cleavage of ataxin-3

    PubMed Central

    Toonen, Lodewijk J. A.; Schmidt, Iris; Luijsterburg, Martijn S.; van Attikum, Haico; van Roon-Mom, Willeke M. C.

    2016-01-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type-3 (SCA3) is a neurodegenerative disorder caused by a polyglutamine repeat expansion in the ataxin-3 protein. Cleavage of mutant ataxin-3 by proteolytic enzymes yields ataxin-3 fragments containing the polyglutamine stretch. These shorter ataxin-3 fragments are thought to be involved in SCA3 pathogenesis due to their increased cellular toxicity and their involvement in formation of the characteristic neuronal aggregates. As a strategy to prevent formation of toxic cleavage fragments, we investigated an antisense oligonucleotide-mediated modification of the ataxin-3 pre-mRNA through exon skipping of exon 8 and 9, resulting in the removal of a central 88 amino acid region of the ataxin-3 protein. This removed protein region contains several predicted cleavage sites and two ubiquitin-interacting motifs. In contrast to unmodified mutant ataxin-3, the internally truncated ataxin-3 protein did not give rise to potentially toxic cleavage fragments when incubated with caspases. In vitro experiments did not show cellular toxicity of the modified ataxin-3 protein. However, the modified protein was incapable of binding poly-ubiquitin chains, which may interfere with its normal deubiquitinating function. Low exon skipping efficiencies combined with reduction in important ataxin-3 protein functions suggest that skipping of exon 8 and 9 is not a viable therapeutic option for SCA3. PMID:27731380

  6. Tuning growth cycles of Brassica crops via natural antisense transcripts of BrFLC.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaorong; Zhang, Shaofeng; Bai, Jinjuan; He, Yuke

    2016-03-01

    Several oilseed and vegetable crops of Brassica are biennials that require a prolonged winter cold for flowering, a process called vernalization. FLOWERING LOCUS C (FLC) is a central repressor of flowering. Here, we report that the overexpression of natural antisense transcripts (NATs) of Brassica rapa FLC (BrFLC) greatly shortens plant growth cycles. In rapid-, medium- and slow-cycling crop types, there are four copies of the BrFLC genes, which show extensive variation in sequences and expression levels. In Bre, a biennial crop type that requires vernalization, five NATs derived from the BrFLC2 locus are rapidly induced under cold conditions, while all four BrFLC genes are gradually down-regulated. The transgenic Bre lines overexpressing a long NAT of BrFLC2 do not require vernalization, resulting in a gradient of shortened growth cycles. Among them, a subset of lines both flower and set seeds as early as Yellow sarson, an annual crop type in which all four BrFLC genes have non-sense mutations and are nonfunctional in flowering repression. Our results demonstrate that the growth cycles of biennial crops of Brassica can be altered by changing the expression levels of BrFLC2 NATs. Thus, BrFLC2 NATs and their transgenic lines are useful for the genetic manipulation of crop growth cycles.

  7. Short antisense-locked nucleic acids (all-LNAs) correct alternative splicing abnormalities in myotonic dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Wojtkowiak-Szlachcic, Agnieszka; Taylor, Katarzyna; Stepniak-Konieczna, Ewa; Sznajder, Lukasz J; Mykowska, Agnieszka; Sroka, Joanna; Thornton, Charles A; Sobczak, Krzysztof

    2015-03-31

    Myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) is an autosomal dominant multisystemic disorder caused by expansion of CTG triplet repeats in 3'-untranslated region of DMPK gene. The pathomechanism of DM1 is driven by accumulation of toxic transcripts containing expanded CUG repeats (CUG(exp)) in nuclear foci which sequester several factors regulating RNA metabolism, such as Muscleblind-like proteins (MBNLs). In this work, we utilized very short chemically modified antisense oligonucleotides composed exclusively of locked nucleic acids (all-LNAs) complementary to CUG repeats, as potential therapeutic agents against DM1. Our in vitro data demonstrated that very short, 8- or 10-unit all-LNAs effectively bound the CUG repeat RNA and prevented the formation of CUG(exp)/MBNL complexes. In proliferating DM1 cells as well as in skeletal muscles of DM1 mouse model the all-LNAs induced the reduction of the number and size of CUG(exp) foci and corrected MBNL-sensitive alternative splicing defects with high efficacy and specificity. The all-LNAs had low impact on the cellular level of CUG(exp)-containing transcripts and did not affect the expression of other transcripts with short CUG repeats. Our data strongly indicate that short all-LNAs complementary to CUG repeats are a promising therapeutic tool against DM1.

  8. Trans-splicing improvement by the combined application of antisense strategies.

    PubMed

    Koller, Ulrich; Hainzl, Stefan; Kocher, Thomas; Hüttner, Clemens; Klausegger, Alfred; Gruber, Christina; Mayr, Elisabeth; Wally, Verena; Bauer, Johann W; Murauer, Eva M

    2015-01-06

    Spliceosome-mediated RNA trans-splicing has become an emergent tool for the repair of mutated pre-mRNAs in the treatment of genetic diseases. RNA trans-splicing molecules (RTMs) are designed to induce a specific trans-splicing reaction via a binding domain for a respective target pre-mRNA region. A previously established reporter-based screening system allows us to analyze the impact of various factors on the RTM trans-splicing efficiency in vitro. Using this system, we are further able to investigate the potential of antisense RNAs (AS RNAs), presuming to improve the trans-splicing efficiency of a selected RTM, specific for intron 102 of COL7A1. Mutations in the COL7A1 gene underlie the dystrophic subtype of the skin blistering disease epidermolysis bullosa (DEB). We have shown that co-transfections of the RTM and a selected AS RNA, interfering with competitive splicing elements on a COL7A1-minigene (COL7A1-MG), lead to a significant increase of the RNA trans-splicing efficiency. Thereby, accurate trans-splicing between the RTM and the COL7A1-MG is represented by the restoration of full-length green fluorescent protein GFP on mRNA and protein level. This mechanism can be crucial for the improvement of an RTM-mediated correction, especially in cases where a high trans-splicing efficiency is required.

  9. Antisense oligonucleotide–mediated MDM4 exon 6 skipping impairs tumor growth

    PubMed Central

    Dewaele, Michael; Tabaglio, Tommaso; Willekens, Karen; Bezzi, Marco; Teo, Shun Xie; Low, Diana H.P.; Koh, Cheryl M.; Rambow, Florian; Fiers, Mark; Rogiers, Aljosja; Radaelli, Enrico; Al-Haddawi, Muthafar; Tan, Soo Yong; Hermans, Els; Amant, Frederic; Yan, Hualong; Lakshmanan, Manikandan; Koumar, Ratnacaram Chandrahas; Lim, Soon Thye; Derheimer, Frederick A.; Campbell, Robert M.; Bonday, Zahid; Tergaonkar, Vinay; Shackleton, Mark; Blattner, Christine; Marine, Jean-Christophe; Guccione, Ernesto

    2015-01-01

    MDM4 is a promising target for cancer therapy, as it is undetectable in most normal adult tissues but often upregulated in cancer cells to dampen p53 tumor-suppressor function. The mechanisms that underlie MDM4 upregulation in cancer cells are largely unknown. Here, we have shown that this key oncogenic event mainly depends on a specific alternative splicing switch. We determined that while a nonsense-mediated, decay-targeted isoform of MDM4 (MDM4-S) is produced in normal adult tissues as a result of exon 6 skipping, enhanced exon 6 inclusion leads to expression of full-length MDM4 in a large number of human cancers. Although this alternative splicing event is likely regulated by multiple splicing factors, we identified the SRSF3 oncoprotein as a key enhancer of exon 6 inclusion. In multiple human melanoma cell lines and in melanoma patient–derived xenograft (PDX) mouse models, antisense oligonucleotide–mediated (ASO-mediated) skipping of exon 6 decreased MDM4 abundance, inhibited melanoma growth, and enhanced sensitivity to MAPK-targeting therapeutics. Additionally, ASO-based MDM4 targeting reduced diffuse large B cell lymphoma PDX growth. As full-length MDM4 is enhanced in multiple human tumors, our data indicate that this strategy is applicable to a wide range of tumor types. We conclude that enhanced MDM4 exon 6 inclusion is a common oncogenic event and has potential as a clinically compatible therapeutic target. PMID:26595814

  10. Thiolated polycarbophil as an adjuvant for permeation enhancement in nasal delivery of antisense oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Vetter, A; Martien, R; Bernkop-Schnürch, A

    2010-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of thiolated polycarbophil as an adjuvant to enhance the permeation and improve the stability of a phosphorothioate antisense oligonucleotide (PTO-ODN) on the nasal mucosa. Polycarbophil-cysteine (PCP-Cys) was synthesized by the covalent attachment of L-cysteine to the polymeric backbone. Cytotoxicity tests were examined on human nasal epithelial cells from surgery of nasal polyps confirmed by histological studies. Deoxyribonuclease I activity in respiratory region of the porcine nasal cavity was analyzed by an enzymatic assay. The enzymatic degradation of PTO-ODNs on freshly excised porcine nasal mucosa was analyzed and protection of PCP-cysteine toward DNase I degradation was evaluated. Permeation studies were performed in Ussing-type diffusion chambers. PCP-Cys/GSH did not arise a remarkable mortal effect. Porcine respiratory mucosa was shown to possess nuclease activity corresponding to 0.69 Kunitz units/mL. PTO-ODNs were degraded by incubation with nasal mucosa. In the presence of 0.45% thiolated polycarbophil and 0.5% glutathione (GSH), this degradation process could be lowered. In the presence of thiolated polycarbophil and GSH the uptake of PTO-ODNs from the nasal mucosa was 1.7-fold improved. According to these results thiolated polycarbophil/GSH might be a promising excipient for nasal administration of PTO-ODNs.

  11. Proteome changes in tomato lines transformed with phytoene synthase-1 in the sense and antisense orientations.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Francesca P; Koistinen, P Kaisa; Gerrish, Christopher; Halket, John M; Patel, Raj K P; Fraser, Paul D; Bramley, Peter M

    2012-10-01

    The commercial cultivation of genetically engineered (GE) crops in Europe has met with considerable consumer resistance, which has led to vigorous safety assessments including the measurement of substantial equivalence between the GE and parent lines. This necessitates the identification and quantification of significant changes to the metabolome and proteome in the GE crop. In this study, the quantitative proteomic analysis of tomato fruit from lines that have been transformed with the carotenogenic gene phytoene synthase-1 (Psy-1), in the sense and antisense orientations, in comparison with a non-transformed, parental line is described. Multidimensional protein identification technology (MudPIT), with tandem mass spectrometry, has been used to identify proteins, while quantification has been carried out with isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQ). Fruit from the GE plants showed significant alterations to their proteomes compared with the parental line, especially those from the Psy-1 sense transformants. These results demonstrate that MudPIT and iTRAQ are suitable techniques for the verification of substantial equivalence of the proteome in GE crops.

  12. Rescue of hearing and vestibular function by antisense oligonucleotides in a mouse model of human deafness.

    PubMed

    Lentz, Jennifer J; Jodelka, Francine M; Hinrich, Anthony J; McCaffrey, Kate E; Farris, Hamilton E; Spalitta, Matthew J; Bazan, Nicolas G; Duelli, Dominik M; Rigo, Frank; Hastings, Michelle L

    2013-03-01

    Hearing impairment is the most common sensory disorder, with congenital hearing impairment present in approximately 1 in 1,000 newborns. Hereditary deafness is often mediated by the improper development or degeneration of cochlear hair cells. Until now, it was not known whether such congenital failures could be mitigated by therapeutic intervention. Here we show that hearing and vestibular function can be rescued in a mouse model of human hereditary deafness. An antisense oligonucleotide (ASO) was used to correct defective pre-mRNA splicing of transcripts from the USH1C gene with the c.216G>A mutation, which causes human Usher syndrome, the leading genetic cause of combined deafness and blindness. Treatment of neonatal mice with a single systemic dose of ASO partially corrects Ush1c c.216G>A splicing, increases protein expression, improves stereocilia organization in the cochlea, and rescues cochlear hair cells, vestibular function and low-frequency hearing in mice. These effects were sustained for several months, providing evidence that congenital deafness can be effectively overcome by treatment early in development to correct gene expression and demonstrating the therapeutic potential of ASOs in the treatment of deafness.

  13. Morpholino antisense oligonucleotides targeting intronic repressor Element1 improve phenotype in SMA mouse models.

    PubMed

    Osman, Erkan Y; Miller, Madeline R; Robbins, Kate L; Lombardi, Abby M; Atkinson, Arleigh K; Brehm, Amanda J; Lorson, Christian L

    2014-09-15

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a neurodegenerative disease caused by the loss of Survival Motor Neuron-1 (SMN1). In all SMA patients, a nearly identical copy gene called SMN2 is present, which produces low levels of functional protein owing to an alternative splicing event. To prevent exon-skipping, we have targeted an intronic repressor, Element1 (E1), located upstream of SMN2 exon 7 using Morpholino-based antisense oligonucleotides (E1(MO)-ASOs). A single intracerebroventricular injection in the relatively severe mouse model of SMA (SMNΔ7 mouse model) elicited a robust induction of SMN protein, and mean life span was extended from an average survival of 13 to 54 days following a single dose, consistent with large weight gains and a correction of the neuronal pathology. Additionally, E1(MO)-ASO treatment in an intermediate SMA mouse (SMN(RT) mouse model) significantly extended life span by ∼700% and weight gain was comparable with the unaffected animals. While a number of experimental therapeutics have targeted the ISS-N1 element of SMN2 pre-mRNA, the development of E1 ASOs provides a new molecular target for SMA therapeutics that dramatically extends survival in two important pre-clinical models of disease.

  14. Antisense oligonucleotide-mediated exon skipping as a strategy to reduce proteolytic cleavage of ataxin-3.

    PubMed

    Toonen, Lodewijk J A; Schmidt, Iris; Luijsterburg, Martijn S; van Attikum, Haico; van Roon-Mom, Willeke M C

    2016-10-12

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type-3 (SCA3) is a neurodegenerative disorder caused by a polyglutamine repeat expansion in the ataxin-3 protein. Cleavage of mutant ataxin-3 by proteolytic enzymes yields ataxin-3 fragments containing the polyglutamine stretch. These shorter ataxin-3 fragments are thought to be involved in SCA3 pathogenesis due to their increased cellular toxicity and their involvement in formation of the characteristic neuronal aggregates. As a strategy to prevent formation of toxic cleavage fragments, we investigated an antisense oligonucleotide-mediated modification of the ataxin-3 pre-mRNA through exon skipping of exon 8 and 9, resulting in the removal of a central 88 amino acid region of the ataxin-3 protein. This removed protein region contains several predicted cleavage sites and two ubiquitin-interacting motifs. In contrast to unmodified mutant ataxin-3, the internally truncated ataxin-3 protein did not give rise to potentially toxic cleavage fragments when incubated with caspases. In vitro experiments did not show cellular toxicity of the modified ataxin-3 protein. However, the modified protein was incapable of binding poly-ubiquitin chains, which may interfere with its normal deubiquitinating function. Low exon skipping efficiencies combined with reduction in important ataxin-3 protein functions suggest that skipping of exon 8 and 9 is not a viable therapeutic option for SCA3.

  15. PlantNATsDB: a comprehensive database of plant natural antisense transcripts

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Dijun; Yuan, Chunhui; Zhang, Jian; Zhang, Zhao; Bai, Lin; Meng, Yijun; Chen, Ling-Ling; Chen, Ming

    2012-01-01

    Natural antisense transcripts (NATs), as one type of regulatory RNAs, occur prevalently in plant genomes and play significant roles in physiological and pathological processes. Although their important biological functions have been reported widely, a comprehensive database is lacking up to now. Consequently, we constructed a plant NAT database (PlantNATsDB) involving approximately 2 million NAT pairs in 69 plant species. GO annotation and high-throughput small RNA sequencing data currently available were integrated to investigate the biological function of NATs. PlantNATsDB provides various user-friendly web interfaces to facilitate the presentation of NATs and an integrated, graphical network browser to display the complex networks formed by different NATs. Moreover, a ‘Gene Set Analysis’ module based on GO annotation was designed to dig out the statistical significantly overrepresented GO categories from the specific NAT network. PlantNATsDB is currently the most comprehensive resource of NATs in the plant kingdom, which can serve as a reference database to investigate the regulatory function of NATs. The PlantNATsDB is freely available at http://bis.zju.edu.cn/pnatdb/. PMID:22058132

  16. Ultra Deep Sequencing of Listeria monocytogenes sRNA Transcriptome Revealed New Antisense RNAs

    PubMed Central

    Behrens, Sebastian; Widder, Stefanie; Mannala, Gopala Krishna; Qing, Xiaoxing; Madhugiri, Ramakanth; Kefer, Nathalie; Mraheil, Mobarak Abu; Rattei, Thomas; Hain, Torsten

    2014-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes, a gram-positive pathogen, and causative agent of listeriosis, has become a widely used model organism for intracellular infections. Recent studies have identified small non-coding RNAs (sRNAs) as important factors for regulating gene expression and pathogenicity of L. monocytogenes. Increased speed and reduced costs of high throughput sequencing (HTS) techniques have made RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) the state-of-the-art method to study bacterial transcriptomes. We created a large transcriptome dataset of L. monocytogenes containing a total of 21 million reads, using the SOLiD sequencing technology. The dataset contained cDNA sequences generated from L. monocytogenes RNA collected under intracellular and extracellular condition and additionally was size fractioned into three different size ranges from <40 nt, 40–150 nt and >150 nt. We report here, the identification of nine new sRNAs candidates of L. monocytogenes and a reevaluation of known sRNAs of L. monocytogenes EGD-e. Automatic comparison to known sRNAs revealed a high recovery rate of 55%, which was increased to 90% by manual revision of the data. Moreover, thorough classification of known sRNAs shed further light on their possible biological functions. Interestingly among the newly identified sRNA candidates are antisense RNAs (asRNAs) associated to the housekeeping genes purA, fumC and pgi and potentially their regulation, emphasizing the significance of sRNAs for metabolic adaptation in L. monocytogenes. PMID:24498259

  17. Antisense inhibition of hyaluronan synthase-2 in human osteosarcoma cells inhibits hyaluronan retention and tumorigenicity

    SciTech Connect

    Nishida, Yoshihiro . E-mail: ynishida@med.nagoya-u.ac.jp; Knudson, Warren; Knudson, Cheryl B.; Ishiguro, Naoki

    2005-07-01

    Osteosarcoma is a common malignant bone tumor associated with childhood and adolescence. The results of numerous studies have suggested that hyaluronan plays an important role in regulating the aggressive behavior of various types of cancer cells. However, no studies have addressed hyaluronan with respect to osteosarcomas. In this investigation, the mRNA expression copy number of three mammalian hyaluronan synthases (HAS) was determined using competitive RT-PCR in the osteoblastic osteosarcoma cell line, MG-63. MG-63 are highly malignant osteosarcoma cells with an abundant hyaluronan-rich matrix. The results demonstrated that HAS-2 is the predominant HAS in MG-63. Accumulation of intracellular hyaluronan increased in association with the proliferative phase of these cells. The selective inhibition of HAS-2 mRNA in MG-63 cells by antisense phosphorothioate oligonucleotides resulted in reduced hyaluronan accumulation by these cells. As expected, the reduction in hyaluronan disrupted the assembly of cell-associated matrices. However, of most interest, coincident with the reduction in hyaluronan, there was a substantial decrease in cell proliferation, a decrease in cell motility and a decrease in cell invasiveness. These data suggest that hyaluronan synthesized by HAS-2 in MG-63 plays a crucial role in osteosarcoma cell proliferation, motility, and invasion.

  18. Antisense COOLAIR mediates the coordinated switching of chromatin states at FLC during vernalization

    PubMed Central

    Csorba, Tibor; Questa, Julia I.; Sun, Qianwen; Dean, Caroline

    2014-01-01

    Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) have been proposed to play important roles in gene regulation. However, their importance in epigenetic silencing and how specificity is determined remain controversial. We have investigated the cold-induced epigenetic switching mechanism involved in the silencing of Arabidopsis thaliana FLOWERING LOCUS C (FLC), which occurs during vernalization. Antisense transcripts, collectively named COOLAIR, are induced by prolonged cold before the major accumulation of histone 3 lysine 27 trimethylation (H3K27me3), characteristic of Polycomb silencing. We have found that COOLAIR is physically associated with the FLC locus and accelerates transcriptional shutdown of FLC during cold exposure. Removal of COOLAIR disrupted the synchronized replacement of H3K36 methylation with H3K27me3 at the intragenic FLC nucleation site during the cold. Consistently, genetic analysis showed COOLAIR and Polycomb complexes work independently in the cold-dependent silencing of FLC. Our data reveal a role for lncRNA in the coordinated switching of chromatin states that occurs during epigenetic regulation. PMID:25349421

  19. The Effects of Aerosolized STAT1 Antisense Oligodeoxynucleotides on Rat Pulmonary Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wenjun; Liao, Bin; Zeng, Ming; Zhu, Chen; Fan, Xianming

    2009-01-01

    Previous study showed that aerosolized signal transducer and activator of transcription-1 (STAT1) antisense oligodeoxynucleotide (ASON) inhibited the expression of STAT1 and ICAM-1 mRNA and protein in alveolar macrophages (AMs) and decreased the concentrations of TGF-β, PDGF and TNF-α in bronchioalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) in bleomycin (BLM)-induced rat pulmonary fibrosis. Administration of STAT1 ASON ameliorated alveolitis in rat pulmonary fibrosis. However, further investigations are needed to determine whether there is an effect from administration of STAT1 ASON on fibrosis. This study investigated the effect of aerosolized STAT1 ASON on the expressions of inflammatory mediators, hydroxyproline and type I and type III collagen mRNA in BLM-induced rat pulmonary fibrosis. The results showed that STAT1 ASON applied by aerosolization could ameliorate alveolitis and fibrosis, inhibit the expressions of inflammatory mediators, decrease the content of hydroxyproline, and suppress the expressions of type I and type III collagen mRNA in lung tissue in BLM-induced rat pulmonary fibrosis. These results suggest that aerosolized STAT1 ASON might be considered as a promising new strategy in the treatment of pulmonary fibrosis. PMID:19254480

  20. Programmable control of bacterial gene expression with the combined CRISPR and antisense RNA system.

    PubMed

    Lee, Young Je; Hoynes-O'Connor, Allison; Leong, Matthew C; Moon, Tae Seok

    2016-03-18

    A central goal of synthetic biology is to implement diverse cellular functions by predictably controlling gene expression. Though research has focused more on protein regulators than RNA regulators, recent advances in our understanding of RNA folding and functions have motivated the use of RNA regulators. RNA regulators provide an advantage because they are easier to design and engineer than protein regulators, potentially have a lower burden on the cell and are highly orthogonal. Here, we combine the CRISPR system from Streptococcus pyogenes and synthetic antisense RNAs (asRNAs) in Escherichia coli strains to repress or derepress a target gene in a programmable manner. Specifically, we demonstrate for the first time that the gene target repressed by the CRISPR system can be derepressed by expressing an asRNA that sequesters a small guide RNA (sgRNA). Furthermore, we demonstrate that tunable levels of derepression can be achieved (up to 95%) by designing asRNAs that target different regions of a sgRNA and by altering the hybridization free energy of the sgRNA-asRNA complex. This new system, which we call the combined CRISPR and asRNA system, can be used to reversibly repress or derepress multiple target genes simultaneously, allowing for rational reprogramming of cellular functions.

  1. Factors that affect the efficiency of antisense oligodeoxyribonucleotide transfection by insonated gas-filled lipid microbubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Ying-Zheng; Lu, Cui-Tao

    2008-03-01

    Objective: To investigate the factors that affect the efficiency of antisense oligodeoxyribonucleotide(AS-ODNs) transfection by insonated gas-filled lipid microbubbles. Methods: Lipid microbubbles filled with two types of gases-air and C3F8, were prepared respectively. An AS-ODNs sequence HA824 and a breast cancer cell line SK-BR-3 were used to define the various operating variables determining the transfection efficiency of insonated microbubbles. Two mixing methods, three levels of mixing speed, different mixing durations and various ultrasound initiation time after mixing were examined respectively. Transfection efficiency was detected by fluorescence microscopy. Results: C3F8 microbubbles gave higher levels of AS-ODNs transfection efficiency than air microbubbles in all test conditions. Transfection efficiency resulted from mixing method A (incubation of HA824 and microbubbles before mixing cells) did not show significant difference with that of mixing method B (without incubation of HA824 and microbubbles before mixing cells). Mixing speed, duration of mixing and ultrasound initiation time after mixing were central to determining HA824 transfection efficiency in vitro. The optimum parameters for SK-BR-3 cells were found at a mixing speed of 40-50 rpm for 30-60 s with less than 60 s delay before ultrasound. Conclusion: Ultrasound-mediated AS-ODNs transfection enhanced by C3F8-filled lipid microbubbles represents an effective avenue for AS-ODNs transfer.

  2. Antisense-induced exon skipping restores dystrophin expression in DMD patient derived muscle cells.

    PubMed

    van Deutekom, J C; Bremmer-Bout, M; Janson, A A; Ginjaar, I B; Baas, F; den Dunnen, J T; van Ommen, G J

    2001-07-15

    Due to frame-shifting mutations in the DMD gene that cause dystrophin deficiency, Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) patients suffer from lethal muscle degeneration. In contrast, mutations in the allelic Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD) do not disrupt the translational reading frame, resulting in a less severe phenotype. In this study, we explored a genetic therapy aimed at restoring the reading frame in muscle cells from DMD patients through targeted modulation of dystrophin pre-mRNA splicing. Considering that exon 45 is the single most frequently deleted exon in DMD, whereas exon (45+46) deletions cause only a mild form of BMD, we set up an antisense-based system to induce exon 46 skipping from the transcript in cultured myotubes of both mouse and human origin. In myotube cultures from two unrelated DMD patients carrying an exon 45 deletion, the induced skipping of exon 46 in only approximately 15% of the mRNA led to normal amounts of properly localized dystrophin in at least 75% of myotubes. Our results provide first evidence of highly effective restoration of dystrophin expression from the endogenous gene in DMD patient-derived muscle cells. This strategy may be applicable to not only >65% of DMD mutations, but also many other genetic diseases.

  3. Antisense-mediated exon skipping: a therapeutic strategy for titin-based dilated cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Gramlich, Michael; Pane, Luna Simona; Zhou, Qifeng; Chen, Zhifen; Murgia, Marta; Schötterl, Sonja; Goedel, Alexander; Metzger, Katja; Brade, Thomas; Parrotta, Elvira; Schaller, Martin; Gerull, Brenda; Thierfelder, Ludwig; Aartsma-Rus, Annemieke; Labeit, Siegfried; Atherton, John J; McGaughran, Julie; Harvey, Richard P; Sinnecker, Daniel; Mann, Matthias; Laugwitz, Karl-Ludwig; Gawaz, Meinrad Paul; Moretti, Alessandra

    2015-01-01

    Frameshift mutations in the TTN gene encoding titin are a major cause for inherited forms of dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM), a heart disease characterized by ventricular dilatation, systolic dysfunction, and progressive heart failure. To date, there are no specific treatment options for DCM patients but heart transplantation. Here, we show the beneficial potential of reframing titin transcripts by antisense oligonucleotide (AON)-mediated exon skipping in human and murine models of DCM carrying a previously identified autosomal-dominant frameshift mutation in titin exon 326. Correction of TTN reading frame in patient-specific cardiomyocytes derived from induced pluripotent stem cells rescued defective myofibril assembly and stability and normalized the sarcomeric protein expression. AON treatment in Ttn knock-in mice improved sarcomere formation and contractile performance in homozygous embryos and prevented the development of the DCM phenotype in heterozygous animals. These results demonstrate that disruption of the titin reading frame due to a truncating DCM mutation can be restored by exon skipping in both patient cardiomyocytes in vitro and mouse heart in vivo, indicating RNA-based strategies as a potential treatment option for DCM. PMID:25759365

  4. A lignin-specific peroxidase in tobacco whose antisense suppression leads to vascular tissue modification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blee, Kristopher A.; Choi, Joon W.; O'Connell, Ann P.; Schuch, Wolfgang; Lewis, Norman G.; Bolwell, G. Paul

    2003-01-01

    A tobacco peroxidase isoenzyme (TP60) was down-regulated in tobacco using an antisense strategy, this affording transformants with lignin reductions of up to 40-50% of wild type (control) plants. Significantly, both guaiacyl and syringyl levels decreased in essentially a linear manner with the reductions in lignin amounts, as determined by both thioacidolysis and nitrobenzene oxidative analyses. These data provisionally suggest that a feedback mechanism is operative in lignifying cells, which prevents build-up of monolignols should oxidative capacity for their subsequent metabolism be reduced. Prior to this study, the only known rate-limiting processes in the monolignol/lignin pathways involved that of Phe supply and the relative activities of cinnamate-4-hydroxylase/p-coumarate-3-hydroxylase, respectively. These transformants thus provide an additional experimental means in which to further dissect and delineate the factors involved in monolignol targeting to precise regions in the cell wall, and of subsequent lignin assembly. Interestingly, the lignin down-regulated tobacco phenotypes displayed no readily observable differences in overall growth and development profiles, although the vascular apparatus was modified.

  5. Antisense oligodeoxynucleotide-conjugated hyaluronic acid/protamine nanocomplexes for intracellular gene inhibition.

    PubMed

    Mok, Hyejung; Park, Ji Won; Park, Tae Gwan

    2007-01-01

    Green fluorescent protein (GFP) antisense oligodeoxynucleotide (ODN) was covalently conjugated to hyaluronic acid (HA) via a reducible disulfide linkage, and the HA-ODN conjugate was complexed with protamine to increase the extent of cellular uptake and enhance the gene inhibition efficiency of GFP expression. The HA-ODN conjugate formed more stable polyelectrolyte complexes with protamine as compared to naked ODN, probably because of its increased charge density. The higher cellular uptake of protamine/HA-ODN complexes than that of protamine/naked ODN complexes was attributed to the formation of more compact nanosized complexes (approximately 200 nm in diameter) in aqueous solution. Protamine/HA-ODN complexes also showed a comparable level of GFP gene inhibition to that of cytotoxic polyethylenimine (PEI)/ODN complexes. Since both HA and protamine are naturally occurring biocompatible materials, the current formulation based on a cleavable conjugation strategy of ODN to HA could be potentially applied as safe and effective nonviral carriers for ODN and siRNA nucleic acid therapeutics.

  6. Transcription termination within the iron transport-biosynthesis operon of Vibrio anguillarum requires an antisense RNA.

    PubMed

    Stork, Michiel; Di Lorenzo, Manuela; Welch, Timothy J; Crosa, Jorge H

    2007-05-01

    The iron transport-biosynthesis (ITB) operon in Vibrio anguillarum includes four genes for ferric siderophore transport, fatD, -C, -B, and -A, and two genes for siderophore biosynthesis, angR and angT. This cluster plays an important role in the virulence mechanisms of this bacterium. Despite being part of the same polycistronic mRNA, the relative levels of transcription for the fat portion and for the whole ITB message differ profoundly, the levels of the fat transcript being about 17-fold higher. Using S1 nuclease mapping, lacZ transcriptional fusions, and in vitro studies, we were able to show that the differential gene expression within the ITB operon is due to termination of transcription between the fatA and angR genes, although a few transcripts proceeded beyond the termination site to the end of this operon. This termination process requires a 427-nucleotide antisense RNA that spans the intergenic region and acts as a novel transcriptional terminator.

  7. Predictive Dose-Based Estimation of Systemic Exposure Multiples in Mouse and Monkey Relative to Human for Antisense Oligonucleotides With 2′-O-(2-Methoxyethyl) Modifications

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Rosie Z; Grundy, John S; Henry, Scott P; Kim, Tae-Won; Norris, Daniel A; Burkey, Jennifer; Wang, Yanfeng; Vick, Andrew; Geary, Richard S

    2015-01-01

    Evaluation of species differences and systemic exposure multiples (or ratios) in toxicological animal species versus human is an ongoing exercise during the course of drug development. The systemic exposure ratios are best estimated by directly comparing area under the plasma concentration-time curves (AUCs), and sometimes by comparing the dose administered, with the dose being adjusted either by body surface area (BSA) or body weight (BW). In this study, the association between AUC ratio and the administered dose ratio from animals to human were studied using a retrospective data-driven approach. The dataset included nine antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) with 2′-O-(2-methoxyethyl) modifications, evaluated in two animal species (mouse and monkey) following single and repeated parenteral administrations. We found that plasma AUCs were similar between ASOs within the same species, and are predictable to human exposure using a single animal species, either mouse or monkey. Between monkey and human, the plasma exposure ratio can be predicted directly based on BW-adjusted dose ratios, whereas between mouse and human, the exposure ratio would be nearly fivefold lower in mouse compared to human based on BW-adjusted dose values. Thus, multiplying a factor of 5 for the mouse BW-adjusted dose would likely provide a reasonable AUC exposure estimate in human at steady-state. PMID:25602582

  8. Targeted Knockdown of Hepatic SOAT2 with Antisense Oligonucleotides Stabilizes Atherosclerotic Plaque in ApoB100-only LDLr−/− Mice

    PubMed Central

    Melchior, John T.; Olson, John D.; Kelley, Kathryn L.; Wilson, Martha D.; Sawyer, Janet K.; Link, Kerry M.; Rudel, Lawrence L.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To test the hypothesis that the attenuation of CO packaging into apoB-containing lipoproteins will arrest progression of pre-existing atherosclerotic lesions. Approach and Results Atherosclerosis was induced in apoB-100 only, LDLr−/− mice by feeding a diet enriched in cis-monounsaturated fatty acids (cis-MUFAs) for 24 weeks. A subset of mice was then sacrificed to quantify the extent of atherosclerosis. The remaining mice were continued on the same diet (controls) or assigned to the following treatments for 16 weeks: (1) a diet enriched in n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, (2) the cis-MUFA diet plus bi-weekly injections of an antisense oligonucleotide (ASO) specific to hepatic SOAT2; or (3) the cis-MUFA diet and bi-weekly injections of a non-targeting hepatic ASO. Extent of atherosclerotic lesions in the aorta was monitored morphometrically in vivo with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and ex vivo histologically and immunochemically. Hepatic knockdown of SOAT2 via ASO treatment arrested lesion growth and stabilized lesions. Conclusions Hepatic knockdown of SOAT2 in apoB100-only, LDLr−/− mice resulted in remodeling of aortic atherosclerotic lesions into a stable phenotype, suggesting SOAT2 is a viable target for treatment of atherosclerosis. PMID:26229140

  9. Inhibition of flower formation by antisense repression of mitochondrial citrate synthase in transgenic potato plants leads to a specific disintegration of the ovary tissues of flowers.

    PubMed Central

    Landschütze, V; Willmitzer, L; Müller-Röber, B

    1995-01-01

    The tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle constitutes a major component of the mitochondrial metabolism of eucaryotes, including higher plants. To analyze the importance of this pathway, we down-regulated mitochondrial citrate synthase (mCS; EC 4.1.3.7), the first enzyme of the TCA cycle, in transgenic potato plants using an antisense RNA approach. Several transformants were identified with reduced citrate synthase activity (down to approximately 6% of wild-type activity). These plants were indistinguishable from wild-type plants in the greenhouse during vegetative growth. A major change, however, was seen upon initiation of the generative phase (flower formation). In the case of transgenic plants with a strong reduction in citrate synthase activity (< 30% of wild-type levels), flower buds formed > 2 weeks later as compared with wild-type plants. Furthermore, flower buds from these plants did not develop into mature flowers but rather were aborted at an early stage of development. Microscopic analysis showed that in these cases ovaries disintegrated during flower development. We conclude that the TCA cycle is of major importance during the transition from the vegetative to the generative phase. Images PMID:7882969

  10. Antisense inhibition of sorbitol synthesis leads to up-regulation of starch synthesis without altering CO2 assimilation in apple leaves.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Lailiang; Zhou, Rui; Reidel, Edwin J; Sharkey, Thomas D; Dandekar, Abhaya M

    2005-03-01

    Sorbitol is a primary end-product of photosynthesis in apple (Malus domestica Borkh.) and many other tree fruit species of the Rosaceae family. Sorbitol synthesis shares a common hexose phosphate pool with sucrose synthesis in the cytosol. In this study, 'Greensleeves' apple was transformed with a cDNA encoding aldose 6-phosphate reductase (A6PR, EC 1.1.1.200) in the antisense orientation. Antisense expression of A6PR decreased A6PR activity in mature leaves to approximately 15-30% of the untransformed control. The antisense plants had lower concentrations of sorbitol but higher concentrations of sucrose and starch in mature leaves at both dusk and predawn. (14)CO(2) pulse-chase labeling at ambient CO(2) demonstrated that partitioning of the newly fixed carbon to starch was significantly increased, whereas that to sucrose remained unchanged in the antisense lines with decreased sorbitol synthesis. Total activities of ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (EC 4.1.1.39), sucrose-phosphate synthase (EC 2.4.1.14), and ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase (EC 2.7.7.27) were not significantly altered in the antisense lines, whereas both stromal and cytosolic fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase (EC 3.1.3.11) activities were higher in the antisense lines with 15% of the control A6PR activity. Concentrations of glucose 6-phosphate and fructose 6-phosphate (F6P) were higher in the antisense plants than in the control, but the 3-phosphoglycerate concentration was lower in the antisense plants with 15% of the control A6PR activity. Fructose 2, 6-bisphosphate concentration increased in the antisense plants, but not to the extent expected from the increase in F6P, comparing sucrose-synthesizing species. There was no significant difference in CO(2) assimilation in response to photon flux density or intercellular CO(2) concentration. We concluded that cytosolic FBPase activity in vivo was down-regulated and starch synthesis was up-regulated in response to decreased sorbitol synthesis

  11. Functional tissue engineering for ligament healing: potential of antisense gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Woo, Savio L Y; Jia, Fengyan; Zou, Li; Gabriel, Mary T

    2004-03-01

    histomorphological properties of ligaments have been investigated in recent years. These therapeutic strategies include growth factor stimulation (Conti, N. A., and L. E. Dahners. Presented at Orthopaedic Research Society, San Francisco, CA; Deie, M., T. Marui, C. R. Allen, K. A. Hildebrand, H. I. Georgescu, et al. Mech. Ageing Dev. 97:121-130, 1997), cell therapy (Menetrey, J., C. Kasemkijwattana, C. S. Day, P. Bosch, F. H. Fu, et al. Tissue Eng. 5:435-442, 1999; Watanabe, N., S. L-Y. Woo, C. Papageorgiou, C. Celechovsky, and S. Takai. Microsc. Res. Tech. 58:39-44, 2002), as well as gene stherapy (Nakamura N., D. A. Hart, R. S. Boorman, Y. Kaneda, N. G. Shrive, et al. J. Orthop. Res. 18:517-523, 2000; Shimomura, T., F. Jia, C. Niyibizi, and S. L-Y. Woo. Connect. Tissue Res.:2003). The knowledge gained by studying these therapeutic strategies could potentially be applied to other ligaments and tendons. In this article, antisense gene therapy to alter gene expression by using antisense oligonucleotides will be examined as a possible solution.

  12. Inhibition of bone resorption in vitro by antisense RNA and DNA molecules targeted against carbonic anhydrase II or two subunits of vacuolar H(+)-ATPase.

    PubMed Central

    Laitala, T; Väänänen, H K

    1994-01-01

    The bone resorbing cells, osteoclasts, express high levels of carbonic anhydrase II (CA II) and vacuolar H(+)-ATPase (V-ATPase) during bone resorption. We have used antisense RNA and DNA molecules targeted against CA II, and against 16- and 60-kD subunits of vacuolar H(+)-ATPase (V-ATPase), to block the expression of these proteins in vitro. Osteoclastic bone resorption was studied in two in vitro culture systems: release of 45Calcium from prelabeled newborn mouse calvaria cultures, and resorption pit assays performed with rat osteoclasts cultured on bovine bone slices. Both antisense RNA and DNA against CA II and the V-ATPase were used to compare their specificities as regards inhibiting bone resorption in vitro. The antisense molecules inhibited the synthesis of these proteins by decreasing the amounts of mRNA in the cells in a highly specific manner. In osteoclast cultures treated with the 16-kD V-ATPase antisense RNA, acidification of an unknown population of intracellular vesicles was highly stimulated. The acidification of these vesicles was not sensitive to amiloride or bafilomycin A1. This suggests the existence of a back-up system for acidification of intracellular vesicles, when the expression of the V-ATPase is blocked. Our results further indicate that blocking the expression of CA II and V-ATPase with antisense RNA or DNA leads to decreased bone resorption. Images PMID:8200964

  13. Medial prefrontal cortical injections of c-fos antisense oligonucleotides transiently lower c-Fos protein and mimic amphetamine withdrawal behaviours.

    PubMed

    Persico, A M; Schindler, C W; Davis, S C; Ambrosio, E; Uhl, G R

    1998-02-01

    Prefrontal cerebral cortical areas display decreased expression of several transcription factor/immediate-early genes, including c-fos, during amphetamine withdrawal. Antisense strategies can help to test possible roles for this prefrontal c-fos down-regulation in the behavioural correlates of amphetamine withdrawal. Medial prefrontal cortical injections delivering 1.7 nmoles of anti c-fos oligonucleotides revealed an approximately 3 h half-life for phosphothioate and a 15 min half-life for phosphodiester oligonucleotides. Antisense phosphothioates complementary to the c-fos translational start site reduced levels of c-Fos protein, while exerting modest and variable effects on c-fos messenger RNA levels. Neither missense phosphorothioate nor antisense phosphodiester oligonucleotides significantly reduced levels of either c-fos messenger RNA or protein. Animals injected with anti c-fos phosphothioate oligonucleotides into the medial prefrontal cortex displayed marked reductions in linear locomotor activity and repetitive movements measured in a novel environment, effects not seen when missense oligonucleotides were used or when animals were accustomed to the activity monitor prior to antisense oligonucleotide injection. Behavioural changes produced by prefrontal cortical injections of c-fos antisense oligonucleotides closely mimic alterations recorded during amphetamine withdrawal. Prefrontal c-fos could thus conceivably play roles in the neurobiological underpinnings of psychostimulant withdrawal and of responses to stressors such as exposure to novel environments.

  14. The Multi-target Effects of CNI-1493: Convergence of Antiamylodogenic and Antiinflammatory Properties in Animal Models of Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sankowski, Roman; Herring, Arne; Keyvani, Kathy; Frenzel, Kathrin; Wu, Jinyu; Röskam, Stephan; Noelker, Carmen; Bacher, Michael; Al-Abed, Yousef

    2016-01-01

    After several decades of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) research and failed clinical trials, one can speculate that targeting a single pathway is not sufficient. However, a cocktail of novel therapeutics will constitute a challenging clinical trial. A more plausible approach will capitalize on a drug that has relevant and synergistic multiple-target effects in AD. We have previously demonstrated the efficacy of CNI-1493 in the CRND8 transgenic AD mouse model. Similar to many antiinflammatory drugs that were tested in preclinical models of AD, it was speculated that the significant effect of CNI-1493 is due to its established antiinflammatory properties in rodents and humans. In the present study, we set out to elucidate the protective mechanism of CNI-1493 as a drug simultaneously targeting several aspects of AD pathology. Using C1213, a highly similar analogue of CNI-1493 that lacks antiinflammatory properties, we show that both compounds directly interact with soluble and insoluble amyloid β (Aβ) aggregates and attenuate Aβ cytotoxicity in vitro. Additionally, CNI-1493 and C1213 ameliorates Aβ-induced behavioral deficits in nematodes. Finally, C1213 reduces Aβ plaque burden and cognitive deficits in transgenic CRND8 mice to a similar extent as previously shown with CNI-1493. Taken together, our findings suggest antiamyloidogenic activity as a relevant component of the in vivo efficacy of CNI-1493 and its analogue C1213. Thus, CNI-1493, a drug with proven safety in humans, is a viable candidate for novel multitarget therapeutic approaches to AD. PMID:27847962

  15. Selective Neuromuscular Denervation in Taiwanese Severe SMA Mouse Can Be Reversed by Morpholino Antisense Oligonucleotides

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Te-Lin; Chen, Tai-Heng; Hsu, Ya-Yun; Cheng, Yu-Hua; Juang, Bi-Tzen; Jong, Yuh-Jyh

    2016-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is an autosomal recessive motor neuron disease caused by deficiency of the survival of motor neuron (SMN) protein, which leads to synaptic defects and spinal motor neuron death. Neuromuscular junction (NMJ) abnormalities have been found to be involved in SMA pathogenesis in the SMNΔ7 SMA mouse model. However, whether similar NMJ pathological findings present in another commonly used mouse model, the Taiwanese SMA mouse, has not been fully investigated. To examine the NMJs of the Taiwanese severe SMA mouse model (Smn-/-; SMN2tg/0), which is characterized by severe phenotype and death before postnatal day (P) 9, we investigated 25 axial and appendicular muscles from P1 to P9. We labelled the muscles with anti-neurofilament and anti-synaptophysin antibodies for nerve terminals and α-bungarotoxin for acetylcholine receptors (AChRs). We found that severe NMJ denervation (<50% fully innervated endplates) selectively occurred in the flexor digitorum brevis 2 and 3 (FDB-2/3) muscles from P5, and an increased percentage of fully denervated endplates correlated with SMA progression. Furthermore, synaptophysin signals were absent at the endplate compared to control littermate mice, suggesting that vesicle transport might only be affected at the end stage. Subsequently, we treated the Taiwanese severe SMA mice with morpholino (MO) antisense oligonucleotides (80 μg/g) via subcutaneous injection at P0. We found that MO significantly reversed the NMJ denervation in FDB-2/3 muscles and extended the survival of Taiwanese severe SMA mice. We conclude that early NMJ denervation in the FDB-2/3 muscles of Taiwanese severe SMA mice can be reversed by MO treatment. The FDB-2/3 muscles of Taiwanese severe SMA mice provide a very sensitive platform for assessing the effectiveness of drug treatments in SMA preclinical studies. PMID:27124114

  16. Survivin Antisense Oligonucleotides Effectively Radiosensitize Colorectal Cancer Cells in Both Tissue Culture and Murine Xenograft Models

    SciTech Connect

    Roedel, Franz; Capalbo, Gianni; Weiss, Christian; Roedel, Claus

    2008-05-01

    Purpose: Survivin shows a radiation resistance factor in colorectal cancer. In the present study, we determined whether survivin messenger RNA levels in patients with rectal cancer predict tumor response after neoadjuvant radiochemotherapy and whether inhibition of survivin by the use of antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) enhances radiation responses. Methods and Materials: SW480 colorectal carcinoma cells were transfected with survivin ASO (LY2181308) and irradiated with doses ranging from 0-8 Gy. Survivin expression, cell-cycle distribution, {gamma}H2AX fluorescence, and induction of apoptosis were monitored by means of immunoblotting, flow cytometry, and caspase 3/7 activity. Clonogenic survival was determined by using a colony-forming assay. An SW480 xenograft model was used to investigate the effect of survivin attenuation and irradiation on tumor growth. Furthermore, survivin messenger RNA levels were studied in patient biopsy specimens by using Affymetrix microarray analysis. Results: In the translational study of 20 patients with rectal cancer, increased survivin levels were associated with significantly greater risk of local tumor recurrence (p = 0.009). Treatment of SW480 cells with survivin ASOs and irradiation resulted in an increased percentage of apoptotic cells, caspase 3/7 activity, fraction of cells in the G{sub 2}/M phase, and H2AX phosphorylation. Clonogenic survival decreased compared with control-treated cells. Furthermore, treatment of SW480 xenografts with survivin ASOs and irradiation resulted in a significant delay in tumor growth. Conclusion: Survivin appears to be a molecular biomarker in patients with rectal cancer. Furthermore, in vitro and in vivo data suggest a potential role of survivin as a molecular target to improve treatment response to radiotherapy in patients with rectal cancer.

  17. Sense-antisense gene pairs: sequence, transcription, and structure are not conserved between human and mouse

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Emily J.; Chin-Inmanu, Kwanrutai; Jia, Hui; Lipovich, Leonard

    2013-01-01

    Previous efforts to characterize conservation between the human and mouse genomes focused largely on sequence comparisons. These studies are inherently limited because they don't account for gene structure differences, which may exist despite genomic sequence conservation. Recent high-throughput transcriptome studies have revealed widespread and extensive overlaps between genes, and transcripts, encoded on both strands of the genomic sequence. This overlapping gene organization, which produces sense-antisense (SAS) gene pairs, is capable of effecting regulatory cascades through established mechanisms. We present an evolutionary conservation assessment of SAS pairs, on three levels: genomic, transcriptomic, and structural. From a genome-wide dataset of human SAS pairs, we first identified orthologous loci in the mouse genome, then assessed their transcription in the mouse, and finally compared the genomic structures of SAS pairs expressed in both species. We found that approximately half of human SAS loci have single orthologous locations in the mouse genome; however, only half of those orthologous locations have SAS transcriptional activity in the mouse. This suggests that high human-mouse gene conservation overlooks widespread distinctions in SAS pair incidence and expression. We compared gene structures at orthologous SAS loci, finding frequent differences in gene structure between human and orthologous mouse SAS pair members. Our categorization of human SAS pairs with respect to mouse conservation of expression as well as structure points to limitations of mouse models. Gene structure differences, including at SAS loci, may account for some of the phenotypic distinctions between primates and rodents. Genes in non-conserved SAS pairs may contribute to evolutionary lineage-specific regulatory outcomes. PMID:24133500

  18. Manipulation of Strawberry Fruit Softening by Antisense Expression of a Pectate Lyase Gene1

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez-Bermúdez, Silvia; Redondo-Nevado, José; Muñoz-Blanco, Juan; Caballero, José L.; López-Aranda, José M.; Valpuesta, Victoriano; Pliego-Alfaro, Fernando; Quesada, Miguel A.; Mercado, José A.

    2002-01-01

    Strawberry (Fragaria × ananassa, Duch., cv Chandler) is a soft fruit with a short postharvest life, mainly due to a rapid lost of firm texture. To control the strawberry fruit softening, we obtained transgenic plants that incorporate an antisense sequence of a strawberry pectate lyase gene under the control of the 35S promoter. Forty-one independent transgenic lines (Apel lines) were obtained, propagated in the greenhouse for agronomical analysis, and compared with control plants, non-transformed plants, and transgenic lines transformed with the pGUSINT plasmid. Total yield was significantly reduced in 33 of the 41 Apel lines. At the stage of full ripen, no differences in color, size, shape, and weight were observed between Apel and control fruit. However, in most of the Apel lines, ripened fruits were significantly firmer than controls. Six Apel lines were selected for further analysis. In all these lines, the pectate lyase gene expression in ripened fruit was 30% lower than in control, being totally suppressed in three of them. Cell wall material isolated from ripened Apel fruit showed a lower degree of in vitro swelling and a lower amount of ionically bound pectins than control fruit. An analysis of firmness at three different stages of fruit development (green, white, and red) showed that the highest reduction of softening in Apel fruit occurred during the transition from the white to the red stage. The postharvest softening of Apel fruit was also diminished. Our results indicate that pectate lyase gene is an excellent candidate for biotechnological improvement of fruit softening in strawberry. PMID:11842178

  19. Selective Neuromuscular Denervation in Taiwanese Severe SMA Mouse Can Be Reversed by Morpholino Antisense Oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Lin, Te-Lin; Chen, Tai-Heng; Hsu, Ya-Yun; Cheng, Yu-Hua; Juang, Bi-Tzen; Jong, Yuh-Jyh

    2016-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is an autosomal recessive motor neuron disease caused by deficiency of the survival of motor neuron (SMN) protein, which leads to synaptic defects and spinal motor neuron death. Neuromuscular junction (NMJ) abnormalities have been found to be involved in SMA pathogenesis in the SMNΔ7 SMA mouse model. However, whether similar NMJ pathological findings present in another commonly used mouse model, the Taiwanese SMA mouse, has not been fully investigated. To examine the NMJs of the Taiwanese severe SMA mouse model (Smn-/-; SMN2tg/0), which is characterized by severe phenotype and death before postnatal day (P) 9, we investigated 25 axial and appendicular muscles from P1 to P9. We labelled the muscles with anti-neurofilament and anti-synaptophysin antibodies for nerve terminals and α-bungarotoxin for acetylcholine receptors (AChRs). We found that severe NMJ denervation (<50% fully innervated endplates) selectively occurred in the flexor digitorum brevis 2 and 3 (FDB-2/3) muscles from P5, and an increased percentage of fully denervated endplates correlated with SMA progression. Furthermore, synaptophysin signals were absent at the endplate compared to control littermate mice, suggesting that vesicle transport might only be affected at the end stage. Subsequently, we treated the Taiwanese severe SMA mice with morpholino (MO) antisense oligonucleotides (80 μg/g) via subcutaneous injection at P0. We found that MO significantly reversed the NMJ denervation in FDB-2/3 muscles and extended the survival of Taiwanese severe SMA mice. We conclude that early NMJ denervation in the FDB-2/3 muscles of Taiwanese severe SMA mice can be reversed by MO treatment. The FDB-2/3 muscles of Taiwanese severe SMA mice provide a very sensitive platform for assessing the effectiveness of drug treatments in SMA preclinical studies.

  20. Antisense inhibition of cyclin D1 expression is equivalent to flavopiridol for radiosensitization of zebrafish embryos

    SciTech Connect

    McAleer, Mary Frances; Duffy, Kevin T.; Davidson, William R.; Kari, Gabor; Dicker, Adam P.; Rodeck, Ulrich; Wickstrom, Eric . E-mail: eric@tesla.jci.tju.edu

    2006-10-01

    Purpose: Flavopiridol, a small molecule pan-cyclin inhibitor, has been shown to enhance Radiation response of tumor cells both in vitro and in vivo. The clinical utility of flavopiridol, however, is limited by toxicity, previously attributed to pleiotropic inhibitory effects on several targets affecting multiple signal transduction pathways. Here we used zebrafish embryos to investigate radiosensitizing effects of flavopiridol in normal tissues. Methods and Materials: Zebrafish embryos at the 1- to 4-cell stage were treated with 500 nM flavopiridol or injected with 0.5 pmol antisense hydroxylprolyl-phosphono nucleic acid oligomers to reduce cyclin D1 expression, then subjected to ionizing radiation (IR) or no radiation. Results: Flavopiridol-treated embryos demonstrated a twofold increase in mortality after exposure to 40 Gy by 96 hpf and developed distinct radiation-induced defects in midline development (designated as the 'curly up' phenotype) at higher rates when compared with embryos receiving IR only. Cyclin D1-deficient embryos had virtually identical IR sensitivity profiles when compared with embryos treated with flavopiridol. This was particularly evident for the IR-induced curly up phenotype, which was greatly exacerbated by both flavopriridol and cyclin D1 downregulation. Conclusions: Treatment of zebrafish embryos with flavopiridol enhanced radiation sensitivity of zebrafish embryos to a degree that was very similar to that associated with downregulation of cyclin D1 expression. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that inhibition of cyclin D1 is sufficient to account for the radiosensitizing action of flavopiridol in the zebrafish embryo vertebrate model.

  1. Elucidation of the Biotransformation Pathways of a Galnac3-conjugated Antisense Oligonucleotide in Rats and Monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Shemesh, Colby S; Yu, Rosie Z; Gaus, Hans J; Greenlee, Sarah; Post, Noah; Schmidt, Karsten; Migawa, Michael T; Seth, Punit P; Zanardi, Thomas A; Prakash, Thazha P; Swayze, Eric E; Henry, Scott P; Wang, Yanfeng

    2016-01-01

    Triantennary N-acetyl galactosamine (GalNAc3) is a high-affinity ligand for hepatocyte-specific asialoglycoprotein receptors. Conjugation with GalNAc3 via a trishexylamino (THA)-C6 cluster significantly enhances antisense oligonucleotide (ASO) potency. Herein, the biotransformation, disposition, and elimination of the THA cluster of ION-681257, a GalNAc3-conjugated ASO currently in clinical development, are investigated in rats and monkey. Rats were administered a single subcutaneous dose of 3H-radiolabeled (3H placed in THA) or nonradiolabeled ION-681257. Mass balance included radiometric profiling and metabolite fractionation with characterization by mass spectrometry. GalNAc3-conjugated ASOs were extensively distributed into liver. The THA-C6 triantenerrary GalNAc3 conjugate at the 5′-end of the ASO was rapidly metabolized and excreted with 25.67 ± 1.635% and 71.66 ± 4.17% of radioactivity recovered in urine and feces within 48 hours postdose. Unchanged drug, short-mer ASOs, and linker metabolites were detected in urine. Collectively, 14 novel linker associated metabolites were discovered including oxidation at each branching arm, initially by monooxidation at the β-position followed by dioxidation at the α-arm, and lastly, tri and tetra oxidations on the two remaining β-arms. Metabolites in bile and feces were identical to urine except for oxidized linear and cyclic linker metabolites. Enzymatic reaction phenotyping confirmed involvement of N-acetyl-β-glucosaminidase, deoxyribonuclease II, alkaline phosphatase, and alcohol + aldehyde dehydrogenases on the complex metabolism pathway for THA supplementing in vivo findings. Lastly, excreta from monkeys treated with ION-681257 revealed the identical series as observed in rat. In summary, our findings provide an improved understanding of GalNAc3-conjugated-ASO metabolism pathways which facilitate similar development programs. PMID:27164023

  2. Long antisense non-coding RNAs and the epigenetic regulation of gene expression.

    PubMed

    Vadaie, Nadia; Morris, Kevin V

    2013-08-01

    Shortly after the completion of the human genome project in 2003, the Encode project was launched. The project was set out to identify the functional elements in the human genome, and unexpectedly it was found that >80% of the genome is transcribed. The Encode project identified those transcribed regions of the genome to be encoded by non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs). With only 2% of the genome carrying gene-encoding proteins, the conundrum was then, what is the function, if any, of these non-coding regions of the genome? These ncRNAs included both short and long RNAs. The focus of this review will be on antisense long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs), as these transcripts have been observed to play a role in gene expression of protein-coding genes. Some lncRNAs have been found to regulate protein-coding gene transcription at the epigenetic level, whereby they suppress transcription through the recruitment of protein complexes to target loci in the genome. Conversely, there are lncRNAs that have a positive role in gene expression with less known about mechanism, and some lncRNAs have been shown to be involved in post-transcriptional processes. Additionally, lncRNAs have been observed to regulate their own expression in a positive feedback loop by functioning as a decoy. The biological significance of lncRNAs is only just now becoming evident, with many lncRNAs found to play a significant role in several human diseases.

  3. Hsp90 protein interacts with phosphorothioate oligonucleotides containing hydrophobic 2'-modifications and enhances antisense activity.

    PubMed

    Liang, Xue-Hai; Shen, Wen; Sun, Hong; Kinberger, Garth A; Prakash, Thazha P; Nichols, Joshua G; Crooke, Stanley T

    2016-05-05

    RNase H1-dependent antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) are chemically modified to enhance pharmacological properties. Major modifications include phosphorothioate (PS) backbone and different 2'-modifications in 2-5 nucleotides at each end (wing) of an ASO. Chemical modifications can affect protein binding and understanding ASO-protein interactions is important for better drug design. Recently we identified many intracellular ASO-binding proteins and found that protein binding could affect ASO potency. Here, we analyzed the structure-activity-relationships of ASO-protein interactions and found 2'-modifications significantly affected protein binding, including La, P54nrb and NPM. PS-ASOs containing more hydrophobic 2'-modifications exhibit higher affinity for proteins in general, although certain proteins, e.g. Ku70/Ku80 and TCP1, are less affected by 2'-modifications. We found that Hsp90 protein binds PS-ASOs containing locked-nucleic-acid (LNA) or constrained-ethyl-bicyclic-nucleic-acid ((S)-cEt) modifications much more avidly than 2'-O-methoxyethyl (MOE). ASOs bind the mid-domain of Hsp90 protein. Hsp90 interacts with more hydrophobic 2' modifications, e.g. (S)-cEt or LNA, in the 5'-wing of the ASO. Reduction of Hsp90 protein decreased activity of PS-ASOs with 5'-LNA or 5'-cEt wings, but not with 5'-MOE wing. Together, our results indicate Hsp90 protein enhances the activity of PS/LNA or PS/(S)-cEt ASOs, and imply that altering protein binding of ASOs using different chemical modifications can improve therapeutic performance of PS-ASOs.

  4. Distinct Expression Patterns of Natural Antisense Transcripts in Arabidopsis1[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Henz, Stefan R.; Cumbie, Jason S.; Kasschau, Kristin D.; Lohmann, Jan U.; Carrington, James C.; Weigel, Detlef; Schmid, Markus

    2007-01-01

    It has been shown that overlapping cis-natural antisense transcripts (cis-NATs) can form a regulatory circuit in which small RNAs derived from one transcript regulate stability of the other transcript, which manifests itself as anticorrelated expression. However, little is known about how widespread antagonistic expression of cis-NATs is. We have determined how frequently cis-NAT pairs, which make up 7.4% of annotated transcription units in the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) genome, show anticorrelated expression patterns. Indeed, global expression profiles of pairs of cis-NATs on average have significantly lower pairwise Pearson correlation coefficients than other pairs of neighboring genes whose transcripts do not overlap. However, anticorrelated expression that is greater than expected by chance is found in only a small number of cis-NAT pairs. The degree of anticorrelation does not depend on the length of the overlap or on the distance of the 5′ ends of the transcripts. Consistent with earlier findings, cis-NATs do not exhibit an increased likelihood to give rise to small RNAs, as determined from available small RNA sequences and massively parallel signature sequencing tags. However, the overlapping regions of cis-NATs appeared to be enriched for small RNA loci compared to nonoverlapping regions. Furthermore, expression of cis-NATs was not disproportionately affected in various RNA-silencing mutants. Our results demonstrate that there is a trend toward anticorrelated expression of cis-NAT pairs in Arabidopsis, but currently available data do not produce a strong signature of small RNA-mediated silencing for this process. PMID:17496106

  5. Antisense suppression of potassium channel expression demonstrates its role in maturation of the action potential.

    PubMed

    Vincent, A; Lautermilch, N J; Spitzer, N C

    2000-08-15

    A developmental increase in delayed rectifier potassium current (I(Kv)) in embryonic Xenopus spinal neurons is critical for the maturation of excitability and action potential waveform. Identifying potassium channel genes that generate I(Kv) is essential to understanding the mechanisms by which they are controlled. Several Kv genes are upregulated during embryogenesis in parallel with increases in I(Kv) and produce delayed rectifier current when heterologously expressed, indicating that they could encode channels underlying this current. We used antisense (AS) cRNA to test the contribution of xKv3.1 to the maturation of I(Kv), because xKv3.1 AS appears to suppress specifically heterologous expression of potassium current by xKv3.1 mRNA. The injection of xKv3.1 AS into embryos reduces endogenous levels of xKv3.1 mRNA in the developing spinal cord and reduces the amplitude and rate of activation of I(Kv) in 40% of cultured neurons, similar to the percentage of neurons in which endogenous xKv3.1 transcripts are detected. The current in these mature neurons resembles that at an earlier stage of differentiation before the appearance of xKv3.1 mRNA. Furthermore, AS expression increases the duration of the action potential in 40% of the neurons. No change in voltage-dependent calcium current is observed, suggesting that the decrease in I(Kv) is sufficient to account for lengthening of the action potential. Computer-simulated action potentials incorporating observed reductions in amplitude and rate of activation of I(Kv) exhibit an increase in duration similar to that observed experimentally. Thus xKv3.1 contributes to the maturation of I(Kv) in a substantial percentage of these developing spinal neurons.

  6. Antisense inhibition of apolipoprotein (a) to lower plasma lipoprotein (a) levels in humans

    PubMed Central

    Graham, Mark J.; Viney, Nick; Crooke, Rosanne M.; Tsimikas, Sotirios

    2016-01-01

    Epidemiological, genetic association, and Mendelian randomization studies have provided strong evidence that lipoprotein (a) [Lp(a)] is an independent causal risk factor for CVD, including myocardial infarction, stroke, peripheral arterial disease, and calcific aortic valve stenosis. Lp(a) levels >50 mg/dl are highly prevalent (20% of the general population) and are overrepresented in patients with CVD and aortic stenosis. These data support the notion that Lp(a) should be a target of therapy for CVD event reduction and to reduce progression of aortic stenosis. However, effective therapies to specifically reduce plasma Lp(a) levels are lacking. Recent animal and human studies have shown that Lp(a) can be specifically targeted with second generation antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) that inhibit apo(a) mRNA translation. In apo(a) transgenic mice, an apo(a) ASO reduced plasma apo(a)/Lp(a) levels and their associated oxidized phospholipid (OxPL) levels by 86 and 93%, respectively. In cynomolgus monkeys, a second generation apo(a) ASO, ISIS-APO(a)Rx, significantly reduced hepatic apo(a) mRNA expression and plasma Lp(a) levels by >80%. Finally, in a phase I study in normal volunteers, ISIS-APO(a)Rx ASO reduced Lp(a) levels and their associated OxPL levels up to 89 and 93%, respectively, with minimal effects on other lipoproteins. ISIS-APO(a)Rx represents the first specific and potent drug in clinical development to lower Lp(a) levels and may be beneficial in reducing CVD events and progression of calcific aortic valve stenosis. PMID:26538546

  7. Sense-antisense gene-pairs in breast cancer and associated pathological pathways

    PubMed Central

    Grinchuk, Oleg V.; Motakis, Efthymios; Yenamandra, Surya Pavan; Ow, Ghim Siong; Jenjaroenpun, Piroon; Tang, Zhiqun; Yarmishyn, Aliaksandr A.; Ivshina, Anna V.; Kuznetsov, Vladimir A.

    2015-01-01

    More than 30% of human protein-coding genes form hereditary complex genome architectures composed of sense-antisense (SA) gene pairs (SAGPs) transcribing their RNAs from both strands of a given locus. Such architectures represent important novel components of genome complexity contributing to gene expression deregulation in cancer cells. Therefore, the architectures might be involved in cancer pathways and, in turn, be used for novel drug targets discovery. However, the global roles of SAGPs in cancer pathways has not been studied. Here we investigated SAGPs associated with breast cancer (BC)-related pathways using systems biology, prognostic survival and experimental methods. Gene expression analysis identified 73 BC-relevant SAGPs that are highly correlated in BC. Survival modelling and metadata analysis of the 1161 BC patients allowed us to develop a novel patient prognostic grouping method selecting the 12 survival-significant SAGPs. The qRT-PCR-validated 12-SAGP prognostic signature reproducibly stratified BC patients into low- and high-risk prognostic subgroups. The 1381 SAGP-defined differentially expressed genes common across three studied cohorts were identified. The functional enrichment analysis of these genes revealed the GABPA gene network, including BC-relevant SAGPs, specific gene sets involved in cell cycle, spliceosomal and proteasomal pathways. The co-regulatory function of GABPA in BC cells was supported using siRNA knockdown studies. Thus, we demonstrated SAGPs as the synergistically functional genome architectures interconnected with cancer-related pathways and associated with BC patient clinical outcomes. Taken together, SAGPs represent an important component of genome complexity which can be used to identify novel aspects of coordinated pathological gene networks in cancers. PMID:26517092

  8. Hfq restructures RNA-IN and RNA-OUT and facilitates antisense pairing in the Tn10/IS10 system.

    PubMed

    Ross, Joseph A; Ellis, Michael J; Hossain, Shahan; Haniford, David B

    2013-05-01

    Hfq functions in post-transcriptional gene regulation in a wide range of bacteria, usually by promoting base-pairing of mRNAs and trans-encoded sRNAs that share partial sequence complementarity. It is less clear if Hfq is required for pairing of cis-encoded RNAs (i.e., antisense RNAs) with their target mRNAs. In the current work, we have characterized the interactions between Escherichia coli Hfq and the components of the Tn10/IS10 antisense system, RNA-IN and RNA-OUT. We show that Hfq interacts with RNA-OUT through its proximal RNA-binding surface, as is typical for Hfq and trans-encoded sRNAs. In contrast, RNA-IN binds both proximal and distal RNA-binding surfaces in Hfq with a higher affinity for the latter, as is typical for mRNA interactions in canonical sRNA-mRNA pairs. Importantly, an amino acid substitution in Hfq that interferes with RNA binding to the proximal site negatively impacts RNA-IN:OUT pairing in vitro and suppresses the ability of Hfq to negatively regulate IS10 transposition in vivo. We also show that Hfq binding to RNA-IN and RNA-OUT alters secondary structure elements in both of these RNAs and speculate that this could be important in how Hfq facilitates RNA-IN:OUT pairing. Based on the results presented here, we suggest that Hfq could be involved in regulating RNA pairing in other antisense systems, including systems encoded by other transposable elements.

  9. Modulation of γ2-MSH hepatoprotection by antisense peptides and melanocortin subtype 3 and 4 receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Turcic, Petra; Stambuk, Nikola; Konjevoda, Pasko; Kelava, Tomislav; Gabricevic, Mario; Stojkovic, Ranko; Aralica, Gorana

    2015-01-01

    Melanocortins, i.e., melanocyte stimulating hormones (MSH) are peptides with strong antiinflammatory effects. The most investigated aspects of γ2-MSH are related to cardiovascular effects and natriuresis, with limited research available about its anti-inflammatory and cytoprotective effects. The aims of this study were: 1) to examine the effects of γ2-MSH and its derivative [D-Trp(8)]-γ2-MSH on the acetaminophen model of liver damage in CBA mice; 2) to evaluate the modulation of γ2-MSH hepatoprotection by melanocortin subtypes 3 and 4 receptor antagonists SHU 9119 and HS 024; 3) to define the importance of central MSH pharmacophore region (HFRW) by using antisense peptides LVKAT and VKAT. In this study, specific antagonists and antisense peptides were used to target central pharmacophore region of γ2-MSH and [D-Trp(8)]-γ2-MSH, enabling the evaluation of hepatoprotection from the standpoint of the receptor and pharmacophore blockade. The criteria for monitoring the effects of the hormones on the liver damage were alanine transaminase, aspartate transaminase activities (U/L), and pathohistological scoring of liver necrosis (scale 0-5). γ2-MSH (0.24 mg/kg) indicated hepatoprotective effects in comparison to control (p < 0.001). In contrast, [D-Trp(8)]-γ2-MSH did not show any hepatoprotective effects. Application of antagonists SHU 9119 and HS 024, and antisense peptides LVKAT and VKAT, also did not show any hepatoprotective effects. In fact, when combined with γ2-MSH, it annulled its hepatoprotective effect. The results provide evidence for hepatoprotective and antiinflammatory effects of the γ2-MSH in the liver.

  10. Putative mitochondrial polypeptides coded by expanded quadruplet codons, decoded by antisense tRNAs with unusual anticodons.

    PubMed

    Seligmann, Hervé

    2012-11-01

    Weak triplet codon-anticodon interactions render ribosome-free translation unlikely. Some modern tRNAs read quadruplet codons (tetracodons), suggesting vestigial ribosome-free translation. Here, mitochondrial genomes are explored for tetracoded overlapping protein coding (tetra)genes. Occasional single tetracodons within regular mitochondrial genes coevolve positively/negatively with antisense tRNAs with predicted reduced/expanded anticodons (depending on taxon), suggesting complex tetra-decoding mechanisms. Transcripts of antisense tRNAs with unusual anticodons are more abundant than of homologues with regular anticodons. Assuming overlapping tetracoding with silent 4th tetracodon position, BLAST aligns 10 putative tetragenes spanning 17% of regular human mitochondrial protein coding tricodons with 14 GenBank proteins. Various tests including predicted peptide secondary structures, 3rd codon position (of the regular main frame of the protein coding gene) conservation against replicational deamination mutation gradients, and circular code usage (overlapping genes avoid using circular code codons) confirm tetracoding in these overlapping tetragenes with silent 4th position, but not for BLAST-predicted tetragenes assuming silent 2nd or 3rd positions. This converges with tetradecoding mechanisms that are more compatible with silent 4th, than at other, tetracodon positions. Tetracoding increases with (a) GC-contents, perhaps conserved or switched on in high temperature conditions; (b) usage of theoretically predicted 'tessera' tetracodons; (c) 12s rRNA stability; and d) antisense tRNA numbers with predicted expanded anticodons. Most detected tetragenes are not evolutionarily conserved, apparently reflect specific, transient adaptations. Tetracoding increases with mammal longevity.

  11. Down-regulation of specific members of the glutamine synthetase gene family in alfalfa by antisense RNA technology.

    PubMed

    Temple, S J; Bagga, S; Sengupta-Gopalan, C

    1998-06-01

    Glutamine synthetase (GS) catalyzes the ATP-dependent condensation of NH3 with glutamate to produce glutamine. In plants GS is an octameric enzyme and is located either in the cytoplasm (GS1) or in the chloroplast (GS2). Two distinct classes of GS1 genes with unique 3'-untranslated region (3'UTR) have been identified in alfalfa. We have demonstrated that the two classes exhibit differential expression pattern in the different plant organs suggesting different functional roles for the different isozymes. To determine the functional significance of the two classes of GS1 genes in alfalfa, we have utilized antisense gene constructs aimed specifically at the 3'UTR of the two GS1 genes and introduced them individually into alfalfa. Our data show that the gene constructs are effective in lowering the corresponding transcript level very effectively though there were organ-specific differences in the level of reduction. No transcript corresponding to the antisense gene construct was detected in any of the alfalfa transformants though they accumulated to significant levels in transgenic tobacco containing the same construct. This suggests that the antisense transcript was not stable in the presence of the homologous target sequence. Transgenic alfalfa with up to 80% reduction in the transcript level corresponding to each gene class, however, showed no reduction in GS activity or GS1 polypeptide level. The results suggest that GS1 mRNA levels are not rate-limiting for GS1 polypeptide synthesis and that GS levels are controlled both at the transcriptional and translational/post-translational level.

  12. Magnetic force microscopy analysis of apoptosis of HL-60 cells induced by complex of antisense oligonucleotides and magnetic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Shen, He-bai; Long, De-hong; Zhu, Long-zhang; Li, Xing-Yu; Dong, Ya-ming; Jia, Neng-qin; Zhou, Hai-qing; Xin, Xi; Sun, Yang

    2006-06-20

    Magnetic force microscopy (MFM) has been employed to observe antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs)-coupled silica-coated magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SMNPs) internalized into human leukemia (HL-60) cells. The experiment demonstrated that the ASOs-coupled SMNPs delivery into the cells really occurred. The nanoparticles were internalized into the cells and the apoptotic topography can be directly visualized simultaneously with MFM technology. These present observations offer direct morphology evidence on studying the apoptosis of tumor cells and provide useful information for better design of new diagnostic and therapeutic tools in tumor treatment.

  13. Antisense long non-coding RNA PCNA-AS1 promotes tumor growth by regulating proliferating cell nuclear antigen in hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Sheng-Xian; Tao, Qi-Fei; Wang, Jie; Yang, Fu; Liu, Lei; Wang, Li-Li; Zhang, Jin; Yang, Yuan; Liu, Hui; Wang, Fang; Sun, Shu-Han; Zhou, Wei-Ping

    2014-07-10

    About 61-72% of transcribed regions possess long noncoding RNAs in antisense orientation (Antisense long noncoding RNAs, aslncRNAs). However, the function of aslncRNAs in HCC remains unclear. We found numerous aslncRNAs were deregulated and might be involved in regulatory gene-net of HCC. The PCNA-AS1, antisense to PCNA, is significantly up-regulated in HCC and could promote tumor growth in vitro and in vivo. The effects of PCNA-AS1 rely on regulation of PCNA via forming RNA hybridization to increase PCNA mRNA stability. We concluded that aslncRNAs might act as upstream regulators in HCC and PCNA-AS1 could serve as a novel therapeutic target.

  14. Design of multi-target compounds as AChE, BACE1, and amyloid-β(1-42) oligomerization inhibitors: in silico and in vitro studies.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Rodríguez, Maricarmen; Correa-Basurto, José; Martínez-Ramos, Federico; Padilla-Martínez, Itzia Irene; Benítez-Cardoza, Claudia G; Mera-Jiménez, Elvia; Rosales-Hernández, Martha Cecilia

    2014-01-01

    Despite great efforts to develop new therapeutic strategies against Alzheimer's disease (AD), the acetylcholinesterase inhibitors (AChEIs): donepezil, rivastigmine, and galantamine, have been used only as a palliative therapeutic approach. However, the pathogenesis of AD includes several factors such as cholinergic hypothesis, amyloid-β (Aβ) aggregation, and oxidative stress. For this reason, the design of compounds that target the genesis and progression of AD could offer a therapeutic benefit. We have designed a set of compounds (M-1 to M-5) with pharmacophore moieties to inhibit the release, aggregation, or toxicity of Aβ, act as AChEIs and have antioxidant properties. Once the compounds were designed, we analyzed their physicochemical parameters and performed docking studies to determine their affinity values for AChE, β-site amyloid-protein precursor cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1), and the Aβ monomer. The best ligands, M-1 and M-4, were then synthesized, chemically characterized, and evaluated in vitro. The in vitro studies showed that these compounds inhibit AChE (M-1 Ki = 0.12 and M-4 Ki = 0.17 μM) and BACE1 (M-1 IC50 = 15.1 and M-4 IC50 = 15.4 nM). They also inhibit Aβ oligomerization and exhibit antioxidant activity. In addition, these compounds showed low cytotoxicity in microglial cells. For these reasons, they are promising for future use as drugs in AD mice transgenic models.

  15. Ginger components as new leads for the design and development of novel multi-targeted anti-Alzheimer’s drugs: a computational investigation

    PubMed Central

    Azam, Faizul; Amer, Abdualrahman M; Abulifa, Abdullah R; Elzwawi, Mustafa M

    2014-01-01

    Ginger (Zingiber officinale), despite being a common dietary adjunct that contributes to the taste and flavor of foods, is well known to contain a number of potentially bioactive phytochemicals having valuable medicinal properties. Although recent studies have emphasized their benefits in Alzheimer’s disease, limited information is available on the possible mechanism by which it renders anti-Alzheimer activity. Therefore, the present study seeks to employ molecular docking studies to investigate the binding interactions between active ginger components and various anti-Alzheimer drug targets. Lamarckian genetic algorithm methodology was employed for docking of 12 ligands with 13 different target proteins using AutoDock 4.2 program. Docking protocol was validated by re-docking of all native co-crystallized ligands into their original binding cavities exhibiting a strong correlation coefficient value (r2=0.931) between experimentally reported and docking predicted activities. This value suggests that the approach could be a promising computational tool to aid optimization of lead compounds obtained from ginger. Analysis of binding energy, predicted inhibition constant, and hydrophobic/hydrophilic interactions of ligands with target receptors revealed acetylcholinesterase as most promising, while c-Jun N-terminal kinase was recognized as the least favorable anti-Alzheimer’s drug target. Common structural requirements include hydrogen bond donor/acceptor area, hydrophobic domain, carbon spacer, and distal hydrophobic domain flanked by hydrogen bond donor/acceptor moieties. In addition, drug-likeness score and molecular properties responsible for a good pharmacokinetic profile were calculated by Osiris property explorer and Molinspiration online toolkit, respectively. None of the compounds violated Lipinski’s rule of five, making them potentially promising drug candidates for the treatment of Alzheimer’s disease. PMID:25364231

  16. Ginger components as new leads for the design and development of novel multi-targeted anti-Alzheimer's drugs: a computational investigation.

    PubMed

    Azam, Faizul; Amer, Abdualrahman M; Abulifa, Abdullah R; Elzwawi, Mustafa M

    2014-01-01

    Ginger (Zingiber officinale), despite being a common dietary adjunct that contributes to the taste and flavor of foods, is well known to contain a number of potentially bioactive phytochemicals having valuable medicinal properties. Although recent studies have emphasized their benefits in Alzheimer's disease, limited information is available on the possible mechanism by which it renders anti-Alzheimer activity. Therefore, the present study seeks to employ molecular docking studies to investigate the binding interactions between active ginger components and various anti-Alzheimer drug targets. Lamarckian genetic algorithm methodology was employed for docking of 12 ligands with 13 different target proteins using AutoDock 4.2 program. Docking protocol was validated by re-docking of all native co-crystallized ligands into their original binding cavities exhibiting a strong correlation coefficient value (r (2)=0.931) between experimentally reported and docking predicted activities. This value suggests that the approach could be a promising computational tool to aid optimization of lead compounds obtained from ginger. Analysis of binding energy, predicted inhibition constant, and hydrophobic/hydrophilic interactions of ligands with target receptors revealed acetylcholinesterase as most promising, while c-Jun N-terminal kinase was recognized as the least favorable anti-Alzheimer's drug target. Common structural requirements include hydrogen bond donor/acceptor area, hydrophobic domain, carbon spacer, and distal hydrophobic domain flanked by hydrogen bond donor/acceptor moieties. In addition, drug-likeness score and molecular properties responsible for a good pharmacokinetic profile were calculated by Osiris property explorer and Molinspiration online toolkit, respectively. None of the compounds violated Lipinski's rule of five, making them potentially promising drug candidates for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease.

  17. A c-myc antisense oligonucleotide inhibits human retinal pigment epithelial cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Capeáns, C; Piñeiro, A; Domínguez, F; Loidi, L; Buceta, M; Carneiro, C; Garcia-Caballero, T; Sanchez-Salorio, M

    1998-05-01

    The purpose of this work was to investigate if MYC-dependent intracellular mitogenic pathway is active in cultures of human retinal pigment epithelial (hRPE) cells and whether myc antisense phosphorotioate oligonucleotides (c-myc-AS-ODN) are useful tools for inhibiting the proliferation of hRPE cells. Cultures of hRPE cells were established from adult human corneal donors. These cells were positively stained for cytokeratins and vimentin. Myc mRNA expression was determined by Northern blot analysis and it was determined by means of immunofluorescence if MYC was expressed. C-myc-AS-ODN effect on cell proliferation was estimated by evaluating the incorporation of 5-bromo-2'-deoxy-uridine into cellular DNA. Cell number was estimated by using a tetrazolium bromide based colorimetric method. Human RPE cells in culture expressed MYC and myc mRNA as well as prothymosin alpha mRNA--a gene whose transcription is under MYC control--indicating that MYC-dependent intracellular mitogenic pathway is active in these cells. In accordance with this, we found that blocking the expression of myc by the addition of c-myc-AS-ODN to the culture medium inhibited hRPE cell proliferation. The effect of the c-myc-AS-ODN was found to be sequence specific (the use of a control oligonucleotide with the same sequence but in an opposite direction had no effect) and dose-dependent (4 microM was the lowest effective dose tested). By using RT-PCR we found that the c-myc-AS-ODN inhibition of cell proliferation was related to a diminution in c-myc mRNA expression, and by immunofluorescence we detected a diminution in c-MYC protein staining in RPE cells after 48 hr of treatment with c-myc-AS-ODN. Furthermore, growth inhibition remained for at least 5 days after addition of a single dose of the c-myc-AS-ODN to the culture. We conclude that hRPE cell proliferation is under MYC control. Blocking the expression of myc by c-myc-AS-ODN inhibited hRPE cell proliferation. These findings establish a rationale

  18. [Anionic long circulation liposomes mediated antisense scintigraphy in tumor-bearing rats].

    PubMed

    Ma, Chao; Kuang, Anren; Huang, Rui; Tang, Gongshun

    2011-04-01

    This paper was aimed to investigate the biodistribution and ability of free 131-bcl-2/bcl-xl ASON (FA) and anionic long circulation liposomes encapsulated with 131I-bcl-2/bcl-xlASON (NA), in tumor-bearing rats, to image breast cancer. We investigated the tissue distribution of NA in virgin female Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats with n-methyl nitrosourea (MNU)-induced breast cancers in situ. The percentage of the injected dose per gram (%ID/g) was calculated, with the maximum ratios of tumor to blood and tumor to muscle, after injections of NA and FA for 0.5 h, 1 h, 2 h, 3 h, 4 h, 6 h, 12 h and 24 h, respectively. The ability of NA to image breast cancer in tumor-bearing rats was determined using emission computed tomography (ECT). Seventy percent (90/130) SD rats in the study developed mammary tumors after MNU injection with the average latency (NA) (96 +/- 1.2)days. The %ID/g of NA in breast cancer tissue, tumor bearing rats in liver and spleen tumor tissues after 10 hours were (6.23 +/- 0.23) %ID/g, (12.00 +/- 0.26) %ID/g and (18.25 +/- 1.33)% ID/g, respectively. The ratios of tumor to blood 6.29 +/- 0.76 and tumor to muscle 10.55 +/- 0.68 in tumor bearing rats slowly maximized at 10 h post injection of NA, most probably due to the enhanced permeability and retention effect. Hence in radionuclide antisense scintigraphy, the breast cancer in rat was clearly displayed at 10h after iv administration of NA-D. However, tumors were not visualized in rats with the iv injection of NS and NN even at the delayed time. Due to the inhibition of rapid uptake of NA by the reticulo-endothelial system, NA displays valuable pharmacologic properties characterized by the enhanced accumulation in tumor.

  19. Unravelling the Secrets of Mycobacterial Cidality through the Lens of Antisense.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Parvinder; Datta, Santanu; Shandil, Radha Krishan; Kumar, Naveen; Robert, Nanduri; Sokhi, Upneet K; Guptha, Supreeth; Narayanan, Shridhar; Anbarasu, Anand; Ramaiah, Sudha

    2016-01-01

    One of the major impediments in anti-tubercular drug discovery is the lack of a robust grammar that governs the in-vitro to the in-vivo translation of efficacy. Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) is capable of growing both extracellular as well as intracellular; encountering various hostile conditions like acidic milieu, free radicals, starvation, oxygen deprivation, and immune effector mechanisms. Unique survival strategies of Mtb have prompted researchers to develop in-vitro equivalents to simulate in-vivo physiologies and exploited to find efficacious inhibitors against various phenotypes. Conventionally, the inhibitors are screened on Mtb under the conditions that are unrelated to the in-vivo disease environments. The present study was aimed to (1). Investigate cidality of Mtb targets using a non-chemical inhibitor antisense-RNA (AS-RNA) under in-vivo simulated in-vitro conditions.(2). Confirm the cidality of the targets under in-vivo in experimental tuberculosis. (3). Correlate in-vitro vs. in-vivo cidality data to identify the in-vitro condition that best predicts in-vivo cidality potential of the targets. Using cidality as a metric for efficacy, and AS-RNA as a target-specific inhibitor, we delineated the cidality potential of five target genes under six different physiological conditions (replicating, hypoxia, low pH, nutrient starvation, nitrogen depletion, and nitric oxide).In-vitro cidality confirmed in experimental tuberculosis in BALB/c mice using the AS-RNA allowed us to identify cidal targets in the rank order of rpoB>aroK>ppk>rpoC>ilvB. RpoB was used as the cidality control. In-vitro and in-vivo studies feature aroK (encoding shikimate kinase) as an in-vivo mycobactericidal target suitable for anti-TB drug discovery. In-vitro to in-vivo cidality correlations suggested the low pH (R = 0.9856) in-vitro model as best predictor of in-vivo cidality; however, similar correlation studies in pathologically relevant (Kramnik) mice are warranted. In the acute

  20. Unravelling the Secrets of Mycobacterial Cidality through the Lens of Antisense

    PubMed Central

    Datta, Santanu; Shandil, Radha Krishan; Kumar, Naveen; Robert, Nanduri; Sokhi, Upneet K.; Guptha, Supreeth; Narayanan, Shridhar; Anbarasu, Anand; Ramaiah, Sudha

    2016-01-01

    One of the major impediments in anti-tubercular drug discovery is the lack of a robust grammar that governs the in-vitro to the in-vivo translation of efficacy. Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) is capable of growing both extracellular as well as intracellular; encountering various hostile conditions like acidic milieu, free radicals, starvation, oxygen deprivation, and immune effector mechanisms. Unique survival strategies of Mtb have prompted researchers to develop in-vitro equivalents to simulate in-vivo physiologies and exploited to find efficacious inhibitors against various phenotypes. Conventionally, the inhibitors are screened on Mtb under the conditions that are unrelated to the in-vivo disease environments. The present study was aimed to (1). Investigate cidality of Mtb targets using a non-chemical inhibitor antisense-RNA (AS-RNA) under in-vivo simulated in-vitro conditions.(2). Confirm the cidality of the targets under in-vivo in experimental tuberculosis. (3). Correlate in-vitro vs. in-vivo cidality data to identify the in-vitro condition that best predicts in-vivo cidality potential of the targets. Using cidality as a metric for efficacy, and AS-RNA as a target-specific inhibitor, we delineated the cidality potential of five target genes under six different physiological conditions (replicating, hypoxia, low pH, nutrient starvation, nitrogen depletion, and nitric oxide).In-vitro cidality confirmed in experimental tuberculosis in BALB/c mice using the AS-RNA allowed us to identify cidal targets in the rank order of rpoB>aroK>ppk>rpoC>ilvB. RpoB was used as the cidality control. In-vitro and in-vivo studies feature aroK (encoding shikimate kinase) as an in-vivo mycobactericidal target suitable for anti-TB drug discovery. In-vitro to in-vivo cidality correlations suggested the low pH (R = 0.9856) in-vitro model as best predictor of in-vivo cidality; however, similar correlation studies in pathologically relevant (Kramnik) mice are warranted. In the acute

  1. Inhibition of human immunodeficiency virus in early infected and chronically infected cells by antisense oligodeoxynucleotides and their phosphorothioate analogues.

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, S; Ikeuchi, T; Sun, D; Sarin, P S; Konopka, A; Maizel, J; Zamecnik, P C

    1989-01-01

    Antisense oligodeoxynucleotides, both the phosphorothioate analogues and unmodified oligomers of the same sequence, inhibit replication and expression of human immunodeficiency virus already growing in tissue cultures of MOLT-3 cells with much greater efficacy than do mismatched ("random") oligomers and homooligomers of the same length and with the same internucleotide modification. This preferential inhibitory effect is elicited in as short a time as 4-24 hr postinfection. Likewise, antisense oligomers exhibit greater inhibitory effects on human immunodeficiency virus in chronically infected cells than do mismatched oligomers and homooligomers. Phosphorothioate antisene oligomers are up to 100 times more potent than unmodified oligomers of the same sequence in these inhibitory assays. These results, in major respects, confirm and extend those recently published by Matsukura et al. [Matsukura, M., Zon, G., Shinozuka, K., Robert-Guroff, M., Shimada, T., Stein, C. A., Mitsuza, H., Wong-Staal, F., Cohen, J. S. & Broder, S. (1989) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 86, 4244-4248]. They also point out the importance of computer analysis of sequences though to be random but that in reality contain significant areas of likely hybridization, either to the viral genome or to the complementary DNA strand synthesized from it. They thus reinforce the concept that specific base pairing is a crucial feature of oligonucleotide inhibition of human immunodeficiency virus. PMID:2682627

  2. Regulation of Nav1.7: A Conserved SCN9A Natural Antisense Transcript Expressed in Dorsal Root Ganglia.

    PubMed

    Koenig, Jennifer; Werdehausen, Robert; Linley, John E; Habib, Abdella M; Vernon, Jeffrey; Lolignier, Stephane; Eijkelkamp, Niels; Zhao, Jing; Okorokov, Andrei L; Woods, C Geoffrey; Wood, John N; Cox, James J

    2015-01-01

    The Nav1.7 voltage-gated sodium channel, encoded by SCN9A, is critical for human pain perception yet the transcriptional and post-transcriptional mechanisms that regulate this gene are still incompletely understood. Here, we describe a novel natural antisense transcript (NAT) for SCN9A that is conserved in humans and mice. The NAT has a similar tissue expression pattern to the sense gene and is alternatively spliced within dorsal root ganglia. The human and mouse NATs exist in cis with the sense gene in a tail-to-tail orientation and both share sequences that are complementary to the terminal exon of SCN9A/Scn9a. Overexpression analyses of the human NAT in human embryonic kidney (HEK293A) and human neuroblastoma (SH-SY5Y) cell lines show that it can function to downregulate Nav1.7 mRNA, protein levels and currents. The NAT may play an important role in regulating human pain thresholds and is a potential candidate gene for individuals with chronic pain disorders that map to the SCN9A locus, such as Inherited Primary Erythromelalgia, Paroxysmal Extreme Pain Disorder and Painful Small Fibre Neuropathy, but who do not contain mutations in the sense gene. Our results strongly suggest the SCN9A NAT as a prime candidate for new therapies based upon augmentation of existing antisense RNAs in the treatment of chronic pain conditions in man.

  3. Inhibition of EGF Uptake by Nephrotoxic Antisense Drugs In Vitro and Implications for Preclinical Safety Profiling.

    PubMed

    Moisan, Annie; Gubler, Marcel; Zhang, Jitao David; Tessier, Yann; Dumong Erichsen, Kamille; Sewing, Sabine; Gérard, Régine; Avignon, Blandine; Huber, Sylwia; Benmansour, Fethallah; Chen, Xing; Villaseñor, Roberto; Braendli-Baiocco, Annamaria; Festag, Matthias; Maunz, Andreas; Singer, Thomas; Schuler, Franz; Roth, Adrian B

    2017-03-17

    Antisense oligonucleotide (AON) therapeutics offer new avenues to pursue clinically relevant targets inaccessible with other technologies. Advances in improving AON affinity and stability by incorporation of high affinity nucleotides, such as locked nucleic acids (LNA), have sometimes been stifled by safety liabilities related to their accumulation in the kidney tubule. In an attempt to predict and understand the mechanisms of LNA-AON-induced renal tubular toxicity, we established human cell models that recapitulate in vivo behavior of pre-clinically and clinically unfavorable LNA-AON drug candidates. We identified elevation of extracellular epidermal growth factor (EGF) as a robust and sensitive in vitro biomarker of LNA-AON-induced cytotoxicity in human kidney tubule epithelial cells. We report the time-dependent negative regulation of EGF uptake and EGF receptor (EGFR) signaling by toxic but not innocuous LNA-AONs and revealed the importance of EGFR signaling in LNA-AON-mediated decrease in cellular activity. The robust EGF-based in vitro safety profiling of LNA-AON drug candidates presented here, together with a better understanding of the underlying molecular mechanisms, constitutes a significant step toward developing safer antisense therapeutics.

  4. Antisense Oligonucleotides Targeting Parasite Inositol 1,4,5-Trisphosphate Receptor Inhibits Mammalian Host Cell Invasion by Trypanosoma cruzi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashimoto, Muneaki; Nara, Takeshi; Hirawake, Hiroko; Morales, Jorge; Enomoto, Masahiro; Mikoshiba, Katsuhiko

    2014-02-01

    Chagas disease is caused by an intracellular parasitic protist, Trypanosoma cruzi. As there are no highly effective drugs against this agent that also demonstrate low toxicity, there is an urgent need for development of new drugs to treat Chagas disease. We have previously demonstrated that the parasite inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor (TcIP3R) is crucial for invasion of the mammalian host cell by T. cruzi. Here, we report that TcIP3R is a short-lived protein and that its expression is significantly suppressed in trypomastigotes. Treatment of trypomastigotes, an infective stage of T. cruzi, with antisense oligonucleotides specific to TcIP3R deceased TcIP3R protein levels and impaired trypomastigote invasion of host cells. Due to the resulting instability and very low expression level of TcIP3R in trypomastigotes indicates that TcIP3R is a promising target for antisense therapy in Chagas disease.

  5. Control of enzymatic browning in potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) by sense and antisense RNA from tomato polyphenol oxidase.

    PubMed

    Coetzer, C; Corsini, D; Love, S; Pavek, J; Tumer, N

    2001-02-01

    Polyphenol oxidase (PPO) activity of Russet Burbank potato was inhibited by sense and antisense PPO RNAs expressed from a tomato PPO cDNA under the control of the 35S promoter from the cauliflower mosaic virus. Transgenic Russet Burbank potato plants from 37 different lines were grown in the field. PPO activity and the level of enzymatic browning were measured in the tubers harvested from the field. Of the tubers from 28 transgenic lines that were sampled, tubers from 5 lines exhibited reduced browning. The level of PPO activity correlated with the reduction in enzymatic browning in these lines. These results indicate that expression of tomato PPO RNA in sense or antisense orientation inhibits PPO activity and enzymatic browning in the major commercial potato cultivar. Expression of tomato PPO RNA in sense orientation led to the greatest decrease in PPO activity and enzymatic browning, possibly due to cosuppression. These results suggest that expression of closely related heterologous genes can be used to prevent enzymatic browning in a wide variety of food crops without the application of various food additives.

  6. Enhancement of infectivity and persistence in vivo by HBZ, a natural antisense coded protein of HTLV-1.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Joshua; Yamamoto, Brenda; Li, Min; Phipps, Andrew J; Younis, Ihab; Lairmore, Michael D; Green, Patrick L

    2006-05-15

    Natural antisense viral transcripts have been recognized in retroviruses, including human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1), HIV-1, and feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV), and have been postulated to encode proteins important for the infection cycle and/or pathogenesis of the virus. The antisense strand of the HTLV-1 genome encodes HBZ, a novel nuclear basic region leucine zipper (b-ZIP) protein that in overexpression assays down-regulates Tax oncoprotein-induced viral transcription. Herein, we investigated the contribution of HBZ to HTLV-1-mediated immortalization of primary T lymphocytes in vitro and HTLV-1 infection in a rabbit animal model. HTLV-1 HBZ mutant viruses were generated and evaluated for viral gene expression, protein production, and immortalization capacity. Biologic properties of HBZ mutant viruses in vitro were indistinguishable from wild-type HTLV-1, providing the first direct evidence that HBZ is dispensable for viral replication and cellular immortalization. Rabbits inoculated with irradiated cells expressing HTLV-1 HBZ mutant viruses became persistently infected. However, these rabbits displayed a decreased antibody response to viral gene products and reduced proviral copies in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) as compared with wild-type HTLV-1-infected animals. Our findings indicated that HBZ was not required for in vitro cellular immortalization, but enhanced infectivity and persistence in inoculated rabbits. This study demonstrates that retroviruses use negative-strand-encoded proteins in the establishment of chronic viral infections.