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Sample records for multi-target antisense approach

  1. Multi-target drug design approaches for multifactorial diseases: from neurodegenerative to cardiovascular applications.

    PubMed

    Katselou, M G; Matralis, A N; Kourounakis, A P

    2014-01-01

    In multi-target drug design (MTD) medicinal chemistry aims to integrate multiple pharmacophores into a single drug molecule in order to make it active on several molecular biological mechanisms simultaneously. Given the fact that most diseases are multifactorial in nature, MTD is being pursued with increasing intensity, which has resulted in improved outcomes in disease models and several compounds have entered clinical trials. In a wide range of examples we illustrate how various functionalities have been combined within single structures and how this has affected their (pre)clinical outcome. This review describes the successful application of MTD for disorders such as neurodegenerative, cardiovascular, diabetes, metabolic and inflammatory diseases, especially focusing on the field of atherosclerosis where multi-target strategies are a promising alternative to the classical "one target-one drug" design approach.

  2. Multi-target pharmacology: possibilities and limitations of the "skeleton key approach" from a medicinal chemist perspective.

    PubMed

    Talevi, Alan

    2015-01-01

    Multi-target drugs have raised considerable interest in the last decade owing to their advantages in the treatment of complex diseases and health conditions linked to drug resistance issues. Prospective drug repositioning to treat comorbid conditions is an additional, overlooked application of multi-target ligands. While medicinal chemists usually rely on some version of the lock and key paradigm to design novel therapeutics, modern pharmacology recognizes that the mid- and long-term effects of a given drug on a biological system may depend not only on the specific ligand-target recognition events but also on the influence of the repeated administration of a drug on the cell gene signature. The design of multi-target agents usually imposes challenging restrictions on the topology or flexibility of the candidate drugs, which are briefly discussed in the present article. Finally, computational strategies to approach the identification of novel multi-target agents are overviewed.

  3. PMHT Approach for Multi-Target Multi-Sensor Sonar Tracking in Clutter.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaohua; Li, Yaan; Yu, Jing; Chen, Xiao; Dai, Miao

    2015-11-06

    Multi-sensor sonar tracking has many advantages, such as the potential to reduce the overall measurement uncertainty and the possibility to hide the receiver. However, the use of multi-target multi-sensor sonar tracking is challenging because of the complexity of the underwater environment, especially the low target detection probability and extremely large number of false alarms caused by reverberation. In this work, to solve the problem of multi-target multi-sensor sonar tracking in the presence of clutter, a novel probabilistic multi-hypothesis tracker (PMHT) approach based on the extended Kalman filter (EKF) and unscented Kalman filter (UKF) is proposed. The PMHT can efficiently handle the unknown measurements-to-targets and measurements-to-transmitters data association ambiguity. The EKF and UKF are used to deal with the high degree of nonlinearity in the measurement model. The simulation results show that the proposed algorithm can improve the target tracking performance in a cluttered environment greatly, and its computational load is low.

  4. Combined analgesics in (headache) pain therapy: shotgun approach or precise multi-target therapeutics?

    PubMed

    Straube, Andreas; Aicher, Bernhard; Fiebich, Bernd L; Haag, Gunther

    2011-03-31

    Pain in general and headache in particular are characterized by a change in activity in brain areas involved in pain processing. The therapeutic challenge is to identify drugs with molecular targets that restore the healthy state, resulting in meaningful pain relief or even freedom from pain. Different aspects of pain perception, i.e. sensory and affective components, also explain why there is not just one single target structure for therapeutic approaches to pain. A network of brain areas ("pain matrix") are involved in pain perception and pain control. This diversification of the pain system explains why a wide range of molecularly different substances can be used in the treatment of different pain states and why in recent years more and more studies have described a superior efficacy of a precise multi-target combination therapy compared to therapy with monotherapeutics. In this article, we discuss the available literature on the effects of several fixed-dose combinations in the treatment of headaches and discuss the evidence in support of the role of combination therapy in the pharmacotherapy of pain, particularly of headaches. The scientific rationale behind multi-target combinations is the therapeutic benefit that could not be achieved by the individual constituents and that the single substances of the combinations act together additively or even multiplicatively and cooperate to achieve a completeness of the desired therapeutic effect.As an example the fixed-dose combination of acetylsalicylic acid (ASA), paracetamol (acetaminophen) and caffeine is reviewed in detail. The major advantage of using such a fixed combination is that the active ingredients act on different but distinct molecular targets and thus are able to act on more signalling cascades involved in pain than most single analgesics without adding more side effects to the therapy. Multitarget therapeutics like combined analgesics broaden the array of therapeutic options, enable the completeness

  5. Combined analgesics in (headache) pain therapy: shotgun approach or precise multi-target therapeutics?

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Pain in general and headache in particular are characterized by a change in activity in brain areas involved in pain processing. The therapeutic challenge is to identify drugs with molecular targets that restore the healthy state, resulting in meaningful pain relief or even freedom from pain. Different aspects of pain perception, i.e. sensory and affective components, also explain why there is not just one single target structure for therapeutic approaches to pain. A network of brain areas ("pain matrix") are involved in pain perception and pain control. This diversification of the pain system explains why a wide range of molecularly different substances can be used in the treatment of different pain states and why in recent years more and more studies have described a superior efficacy of a precise multi-target combination therapy compared to therapy with monotherapeutics. Discussion In this article, we discuss the available literature on the effects of several fixed-dose combinations in the treatment of headaches and discuss the evidence in support of the role of combination therapy in the pharmacotherapy of pain, particularly of headaches. The scientific rationale behind multi-target combinations is the therapeutic benefit that could not be achieved by the individual constituents and that the single substances of the combinations act together additively or even multiplicatively and cooperate to achieve a completeness of the desired therapeutic effect. As an example the fixesd-dose combination of acetylsalicylic acid (ASA), paracetamol (acetaminophen) and caffeine is reviewed in detail. The major advantage of using such a fixed combination is that the active ingredients act on different but distinct molecular targets and thus are able to act on more signalling cascades involved in pain than most single analgesics without adding more side effects to the therapy. Summary Multitarget therapeutics like combined analgesics broaden the array of therapeutic

  6. Systems biology approaches and tools for analysis of interactomes and multi-target drugs.

    PubMed

    Schrattenholz, André; Groebe, Karlfried; Soskic, Vukic

    2010-01-01

    diseases" remains a most pressing medical need. Currently, a change of paradigm can be observed with regard to a new interest in agents that modulate multiple targets simultaneously, essentially "dirty drugs." Targeting cellular function as a system rather than on the level of the single target, significantly increases the size of the drugable proteome and is expected to introduce novel classes of multi-target drugs with fewer adverse effects and toxicity. Multiple target approaches have recently been used to design medications against atherosclerosis, cancer, depression, psychosis and neurodegenerative diseases. A focussed approach towards "systemic" drugs will certainly require the development of novel computational and mathematical concepts for appropriate modelling of complex data. But the key is the extraction of relevant molecular information from biological systems by implementing rigid statistical procedures to differential proteomic analytics.

  7. Dual-action Hybrid Compounds - A New Dawn in the Discovery of Multi-target Drugs: Lead Generation Approaches.

    PubMed

    Abdolmalekia, Azizeh; Ghasemi, Jahan B

    2016-09-27

    Finding high quality beginning compounds is a critical job at the start of the lead generation stage for multi-target drug discovery (MTDD). Designing hybrid compounds as a selective multi-target chemical entity is a challenge, opportunity, and new idea to better act against specific multiple targets. One hybrid molecule is formed by two (or more) pharmacophore group's participation. So, these new compounds often exhibit two or more activities going about as multi-target drugs (mt-drugs) and may have superior safety or efficacy. Application of integrating a range of information and sophisticated new in silico, bioinformatics, structural biology, pharmacogenomics methods may be useful to discover/design, and synthesis of the new hybrid molecules. In this regard, many rational and screening approaches have followed by medicinal chemists for the lead generation in MTDD. Here, we review some popular lead generation approaches that have been used for designing multiple ligands (DMLs). This paper focuses on dual- acting chemical entities that incorporate a part of two drugs or bioactive compounds to compose hybrid molecules. Also, it presents some of key concepts and limitations/strengths of lead generation methods by comparing combination framework method with screening approaches. Besides, a number of examples to represent applications of hybrid molecules in the drug discovery are included.

  8. Improved genome-scale multi-target virtual screening via a novel collaborative filtering approach to cold-start problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Hansaim; Gray, Paul; Xie, Lei; Poleksic, Aleksandar

    2016-12-01

    Conventional one-drug-one-gene approach has been of limited success in modern drug discovery. Polypharmacology, which focuses on searching for multi-targeted drugs to perturb disease-causing networks instead of designing selective ligands to target individual proteins, has emerged as a new drug discovery paradigm. Although many methods for single-target virtual screening have been developed to improve the efficiency of drug discovery, few of these algorithms are designed for polypharmacology. Here, we present a novel theoretical framework and a corresponding algorithm for genome-scale multi-target virtual screening based on the one-class collaborative filtering technique. Our method overcomes the sparseness of the protein-chemical interaction data by means of interaction matrix weighting and dual regularization from both chemicals and proteins. While the statistical foundation behind our method is general enough to encompass genome-wide drug off-target prediction, the program is specifically tailored to find protein targets for new chemicals with little to no available interaction data. We extensively evaluate our method using a number of the most widely accepted gene-specific and cross-gene family benchmarks and demonstrate that our method outperforms other state-of-the-art algorithms for predicting the interaction of new chemicals with multiple proteins. Thus, the proposed algorithm may provide a powerful tool for multi-target drug design.

  9. Improved genome-scale multi-target virtual screening via a novel collaborative filtering approach to cold-start problem

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Hansaim; Gray, Paul; Xie, Lei; Poleksic, Aleksandar

    2016-01-01

    Conventional one-drug-one-gene approach has been of limited success in modern drug discovery. Polypharmacology, which focuses on searching for multi-targeted drugs to perturb disease-causing networks instead of designing selective ligands to target individual proteins, has emerged as a new drug discovery paradigm. Although many methods for single-target virtual screening have been developed to improve the efficiency of drug discovery, few of these algorithms are designed for polypharmacology. Here, we present a novel theoretical framework and a corresponding algorithm for genome-scale multi-target virtual screening based on the one-class collaborative filtering technique. Our method overcomes the sparseness of the protein-chemical interaction data by means of interaction matrix weighting and dual regularization from both chemicals and proteins. While the statistical foundation behind our method is general enough to encompass genome-wide drug off-target prediction, the program is specifically tailored to find protein targets for new chemicals with little to no available interaction data. We extensively evaluate our method using a number of the most widely accepted gene-specific and cross-gene family benchmarks and demonstrate that our method outperforms other state-of-the-art algorithms for predicting the interaction of new chemicals with multiple proteins. Thus, the proposed algorithm may provide a powerful tool for multi-target drug design. PMID:27958331

  10. Ultrasound in systemic sclerosis. A multi-target approach from joint to lung.

    PubMed

    Gutierrez, Marwin; Pineda, Carlos; Cazenave, Tomas; Piras, Marco; Erre, Gian Luca; Draghessi, Antonella; De Angelis, Rossella; Grassi, Walter

    2014-08-01

    Ultrasound (US) is a cost-effective, noninvasive, accessible imaging modality that clinicians use at the point of care to assess disease activity and therapeutic efficacy in different rheumatic conditions. However, its utility has been prevalently demonstrated in the field of chronic arthritides. Only in the last few years there was an interest to explore the potential of US beyond the musculoskeletal area. In this way, preliminary US data about the assessment of the different targets involved in systemic sclerosis such as joints, tendons, skin, vessels, and lung have been provided. The main purpose of this US review is to provide an overview of the potential role of US in the multi-target assessment of SSc and to discuss the current evidence supporting its relevance and applications in daily clinical practice.

  11. Tiny molecule, big power: Multi-target approach for curcumin in diabetic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Karuppagounder, Vengadeshprabhu; Arumugam, Somasundaram; Giridharan, Vijayasree V; Sreedhar, Remya; Bose, Rajendran J C; Vanama, Jyothi; Palaniyandi, Suresh S; Konishi, Tetsuya; Watanabe, Kenichi; Thandavarayan, Rajarajan A

    2017-02-01

    Diabetic cardiomyopathy (DCM) is described as impaired cardiac diastolic and systolic functions. Diabetes mellitus (DM), a related cardiovascular disease, has become one of the major causes of death in DM patients. Mortality in these diseases is 2 to 3 times higher than in non-DM patients with cardiovascular disease. The progression of DCM and the cellular and molecular perturbations associated with the pathogenesis are complex and multifactorial. Although considerable progress has been achieved, the molecular etiologies of DCM remain poorly understood. There is an expanding need for natural antidiabetic medicines that do not cause the side effects of modern drugs. Curcumin, a pleiotropic molecule, from Curcuma longa, is known to possess numerous impacts such as scavenging free radical, antioxidant, antitumor, and antiinflammatory activities. The reports from preclinical and clinical findings revealed that curcumin can reverse insulin resistance, hyperglycemia, obesity, and obesity-related metabolic diseases. The current review provides an updated overview of the possible molecular mechanism of DCM and multitarget approach of curcumin in alleviating DCM and diabetic complication. Additionally, we mentioned the approaches that are currently being implemented to improve the bioavailability of this promising natural product in diabetes therapeutics. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. A Multi-targeted Approach to Suppress Tumor-Promoting Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Samadi, Abbas K.; Georgakilas, Alexandros G.; Amedei, Amedeo; Amin, Amr; Bishayee, Anupam; Lokeshwar, Bal L.; Grue, Brendan; Panis, Carolina; Boosani, Chandra S.; Poudyal, Deepak; Stafforini, Diana M.; Bhakta, Dipita; Niccolai, Elena; Guha, Gunjan; Rupasinghe, H.P. Vasantha; Fujii, Hiromasa; Honoki, Kanya; Mehta, Kapil; Aquilano, Katia; Lowe, Leroy; Hofseth, Lorne J.; Ricciardiello, Luigi; Ciriolo, Maria Rosa; Singh, Neetu; Whelan, Richard L.; Chaturvedi, Rupesh; Ashraf, S. Salman; Kumara, HMC Shantha; Nowsheen, Somaira; Mohammed, Sulma I.; Helferich, William G.; Yang, Xujuan

    2015-01-01

    Cancers harbor significant genetic heterogeneity and patterns of relapse following many therapies are due to evolved resistance to treatment. While efforts have been made to combine targeted therapies, significant levels of toxicity have stymied efforts to effectively treat cancer with multi-drug combinations using currently approved therapeutics. We discuss the relationship between tumor-promoting inflammation and cancer as part of a larger effort to develop a broad-spectrum therapeutic approach aimed at a wide range of targets to address this heterogeneity. Specifically, macrophage migration inhibitory factor, cyclooxygenase-2, transcription factor nuclear factor-kappaB, tumor necrosis factor alpha, inducible nitric oxide synthase, protein kinase B, and CXC chemokines are reviewed as important antiinflammatory targets while curcumin, resveratrol, epigallocatechin gallate, genistein, lycopene, and anthocyanins are reviewed as low-cost, low toxicity means by which these targets might all be reached simultaneously. Future translational work will need to assess the resulting synergies of rationally designed antiinflammatory mixtures (employing low-toxicity constituents), and then combine this with similar approaches targeting the most important pathways across the range of cancer hallmark phenotypes. PMID:25951989

  13. Epigenetic-based therapy: From single- to multi-target approaches.

    PubMed

    Benedetti, Rosaria; Conte, Mariarosaria; Iside, Concetta; Altucci, Lucia

    2015-12-01

    The treatment of cancer has traditionally been based on the identification of a single molecule and/or enzymatic function (target) responsible for a particular phenotype, and therefore on the ability to stimulate, attenuate or inhibit its activity through the use of selective compounds. However, cancer is no longer considered a disease caused by a single factor, but is now recognized as a multi-factorial disorder. Genetic, epigenetic and metabolic factors all contribute to neoplasia, causing significant changes in molecular networks that govern cell growth, development, death and specialization. Consequently, many antitumor therapies are no longer directed against a single target but the biological system as a whole, in which functions determining the onset and maintenance of a physio-pathological state are modulated. The field of epi-drug discovery is currently in a transitional phase where the search for putative anticancer drugs is shifting from single-target-oriented molecules to network-active compounds and to epi-drugs used in combination with other epi-agents and with traditional chemotherapeutics. This review illustrates the pros and cons of each therapeutic option, providing examples in support of single-target and multi (network)-target epi-drug approaches.

  14. Multi-Targeted Molecular Effects of Hibiscus sabdariffa Polyphenols: An Opportunity for a Global Approach to Obesity.

    PubMed

    Herranz-López, María; Olivares-Vicente, Mariló; Encinar, José Antonio; Barrajón-Catalán, Enrique; Segura-Carretero, Antonio; Joven, Jorge; Micol, Vicente

    2017-08-20

    Improper diet can alter gene expression by breaking the energy balance equation and changing metabolic and oxidative stress biomarkers, which can result in the development of obesity-related metabolic disorders. The pleiotropic effects of dietary plant polyphenols are capable of counteracting by modulating different key molecular targets at the cell, as well as through epigenetic modifications. Hibiscus sabdariffa (HS)-derived polyphenols are known to ameliorate various obesity-related conditions. Recent evidence leads to propose the complex nature of the underlying mechanism of action. This multi-targeted mechanism includes the regulation of energy metabolism, oxidative stress and inflammatory pathways, transcription factors, hormones and peptides, digestive enzymes, as well as epigenetic modifications. This article reviews the accumulated evidence on the multiple anti-obesity effects of HS polyphenols in cell and animal models, as well as in humans, and its putative molecular targets. In silico studies reveal the capacity of several HS polyphenols to act as putative ligands for different digestive and metabolic enzymes, which may also deserve further attention. Therefore, a global approach including integrated and networked omics techniques, virtual screening and epigenetic analysis is necessary to fully understand the molecular mechanisms of HS polyphenols and metabolites involved, as well as their possible implications in the design of safe and effective polyphenolic formulations for obesity.

  15. Ilizarov treatment of congenital pseudarthrosis of the tibia: a multi-targeted approach using the Ilizarov technique.

    PubMed

    Choi, In Ho; Cho, Tae-Joon; Moon, Hyuk Ju

    2011-03-01

    Congenital pseudarthrosis of the tibia (CPT) is one of the most challenging problems in pediatric orthopaedics. The treatment goals are osteosynthesis, stabilization of the ankle mortise by fibular stabilization, and lower limb-length equalization. Each of these goals is difficult to accomplish but regardless of the surgical options, the basic biological considerations are the same: pseudarthrosis resection, biological bone bridging of the defect by stable fixation, and the correction of any angular deformity. The Ilizarov method is certainly valuable for the treatment of CPT because it can address not only pseudarthrosis but also all complex deformities associated with this condition. Leg-length discrepancy can be managed by proximal tibial lengthening using distraction osteogenesis combined with or without contralateral epiphysiodesis. However, treatment of CPT is fraught with complications due to the complex nature of the disease, and failure is common. Residual challenges, such as refracture, growth disturbance, and poor foot and ankle function with stiffness, are frequent and perplexing. Refracture is the most common and serious complication after primary healing and might result in the re-establishment of pseudarthrosis. Therefore, an effective, safe and practical treatment method that minimizes the residual challenges after healing and accomplishes the multiple goals of treatment is needed. This review describes a multi-targeted approach for tackling these challenges, which utilizes the Ilizarov technique in atrophic-type CPT.

  16. Multi-Targeted Molecular Effects of Hibiscus sabdariffa Polyphenols: An Opportunity for a Global Approach to Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Herranz-López, María; Olivares-Vicente, Mariló; Barrajón-Catalán, Enrique; Segura-Carretero, Antonio; Joven, Jorge; Micol, Vicente

    2017-01-01

    Improper diet can alter gene expression by breaking the energy balance equation and changing metabolic and oxidative stress biomarkers, which can result in the development of obesity-related metabolic disorders. The pleiotropic effects of dietary plant polyphenols are capable of counteracting by modulating different key molecular targets at the cell, as well as through epigenetic modifications. Hibiscus sabdariffa (HS)-derived polyphenols are known to ameliorate various obesity-related conditions. Recent evidence leads to propose the complex nature of the underlying mechanism of action. This multi-targeted mechanism includes the regulation of energy metabolism, oxidative stress and inflammatory pathways, transcription factors, hormones and peptides, digestive enzymes, as well as epigenetic modifications. This article reviews the accumulated evidence on the multiple anti-obesity effects of HS polyphenols in cell and animal models, as well as in humans, and its putative molecular targets. In silico studies reveal the capacity of several HS polyphenols to act as putative ligands for different digestive and metabolic enzymes, which may also deserve further attention. Therefore, a global approach including integrated and networked omics techniques, virtual screening and epigenetic analysis is necessary to fully understand the molecular mechanisms of HS polyphenols and metabolites involved, as well as their possible implications in the design of safe and effective polyphenolic formulations for obesity. PMID:28825642

  17. Multi-Target Approaches in Colon Cancer Chemoprevention Based on Systems Biology of Tumor Cell-Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Guruswamy, Suresh; Rao, Chinthalapally V.

    2008-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is the leading cause of cancer related deaths in the United States. Although it is preventable, thousands of lives are lost each year in the U.S. to colorectal cancer than to breast cancer and AIDS combined. In colon cancer, the formation and progression of precancerous lesions like aberrant crypt foci and polyps is associated with the up-regulation of cycloxygenase-2 (COX-2), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and hydroxy methyl glutaryl CoA reductase (HMG-CoA reductase). The current review will focus on the signaling pathway involving COX-2 and HMG-CoA reductase enzymes and their downstream effectors in signaling mechanism. Cancer cells need huge pools of both cholesterol and isoprenoids to sustain their unlimited growth potential. Cholesterol by modulating caveolae formation regulates several signaling molecules like AKT, IGFR, EGFR and Rho which are involved in cell growth and survival. Cholesterol is also essential for lipid body formation which serves as storage sites for COX-2, eicosanoids and caveolin-1. Experimental studies have identified important mechanisms showing that COX-2, caveolin-1, lipid bodies and prenylated proteins is involved in carcinogenesis. Therefore multi-target, multi-drug approach is the ideal choice for effective colon cancer chemoprevention. This review will give an overview of the two pathways, their signaling networks, and the interactions between the components of the two networks in the activation and regulation of cell signaling involving growth/survival and explain the rationale for colon cancer chemoprevention using COX-2 inhibitors and statins. PMID:19763245

  18. Overview on the current status of virtual high-throughput screening and combinatorial chemistry approaches in multi-target anticancer drug discovery; Part I.

    PubMed

    Geromichalos, George D; Alifieris, Constantinos E; Geromichalou, Elena G; Trafalis, Dimitrios T

    2016-01-01

    Conventional drug design embraces the "one gene, one drug, one disease" philosophy. Nowadays, new generation of anti- cancer drugs, able to inhibit more than one pathway, is believed to play a major role in contemporary anticancer drug research. In this way, polypharmacology, focusing on multi-target drugs, has emerged as a new paradigm in drug discovery. A number of recent successful drugs have in part or in whole emerged from a structure-based research approach. Many advances including crystallography and informatics are behind these successes. Increasing insight into the genetics and molecular biology of cancer has resulted in the identification of an increasing number of potential molecular targets, for anticancer drug discovery and development. These targets can be approached through exploitation of emerging structural biology, "rational" drug design, screening of chemical libraries, or a combination of these methods. The result is the rapid discovery of new anticancer drugs. In this article we discuss the application of molecular modeling, molecular docking and virtual high-throughput screening to multi-targeted anticancer drug discovery. Efforts have been made to employ in silico methods for facilitating the search and design of selective multi-target agents. These computer aided molecular design methods have shown promising potential in facilitating drug discovery directed at selective multiple targets and is expected to contribute to intelligent lead anticancer drugs.

  19. Combinatorial support vector machines approach for virtual screening of selective multi-target serotonin reuptake inhibitors from large compound libraries.

    PubMed

    Shi, Z; Ma, X H; Qin, C; Jia, J; Jiang, Y Y; Tan, C Y; Chen, Y Z

    2012-02-01

    Selective multi-target serotonin reuptake inhibitors enhance antidepressant efficacy. Their discovery can be facilitated by multiple methods, including in silico ones. In this study, we developed and tested an in silico method, combinatorial support vector machines (COMBI-SVMs), for virtual screening (VS) multi-target serotonin reuptake inhibitors of seven target pairs (serotonin transporter paired with noradrenaline transporter, H(3) receptor, 5-HT(1A) receptor, 5-HT(1B) receptor, 5-HT(2C) receptor, melanocortin 4 receptor and neurokinin 1 receptor respectively) from large compound libraries. COMBI-SVMs trained with 917-1951 individual target inhibitors correctly identified 22-83.3% (majority >31.1%) of the 6-216 dual inhibitors collected from literature as independent testing sets. COMBI-SVMs showed moderate to good target selectivity in misclassifying as dual inhibitors 2.2-29.8% (majority <15.4%) of the individual target inhibitors of the same target pair and 0.58-7.1% of the other 6 targets outside the target pair. COMBI-SVMs showed low dual inhibitor false hit rates (0.006-0.056%, 0.042-0.21%, 0.2-4%) in screening 17 million PubChem compounds, 168,000 MDDR compounds, and 7-8181 MDDR compounds similar to the dual inhibitors. Compared with similarity searching, k-NN and PNN methods, COMBI-SVM produced comparable dual inhibitor yields, similar target selectivity, and lower false hit rate in screening 168,000 MDDR compounds. The annotated classes of many COMBI-SVMs identified MDDR virtual hits correlate with the reported effects of their predicted targets. COMBI-SVM is potentially useful for searching selective multi-target agents without explicit knowledge of these agents.

  20. A Network-Based Data Integration Approach to Support Drug Repurposing and Multi-Target Therapies in Triple Negative Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Laurie D.; Demartini, Andrea; Amato, Angela; Eterno, Vincenzo; Zambelli, Alberto; Bellazzi, Riccardo

    2016-01-01

    The integration of data and knowledge from heterogeneous sources can be a key success factor in drug design, drug repurposing and multi-target therapies. In this context, biological networks provide a useful instrument to highlight the relationships and to model the phenomena underlying therapeutic action in cancer. In our work, we applied network-based modeling within a novel bioinformatics pipeline to identify promising multi-target drugs. Given a certain tumor type/subtype, we derive a disease-specific Protein-Protein Interaction (PPI) network by combining different data-bases and knowledge repositories. Next, the application of suitable graph-based algorithms allows selecting a set of potentially interesting combinations of drug targets. A list of drug candidates is then extracted by applying a recent data fusion approach based on matrix tri-factorization. Available knowledge about selected drugs mechanisms of action is finally exploited to identify the most promising candidates for planning in vitro studies. We applied this approach to the case of Triple Negative Breast Cancer (TNBC), a subtype of breast cancer whose biology is poorly understood and that lacks of specific molecular targets. Our “in-silico” findings have been confirmed by a number of in vitro experiments, whose results demonstrated the ability of the method to select candidates for drug repurposing. PMID:27632168

  1. Multi-target Parallel Processing Approach for Gene-to-structure Determination of the Influenza Polymerase PB2 Subunit

    PubMed Central

    Moen, Spencer O.; Smith, Eric; Raymond, Amy C.; Fairman, James W.; Stewart, Lance J.; Staker, Bart L.; Begley, Darren W.; Edwards, Thomas E.; Lorimer, Donald D.

    2013-01-01

    Pandemic outbreaks of highly virulent influenza strains can cause widespread morbidity and mortality in human populations worldwide. In the United States alone, an average of 41,400 deaths and 1.86 million hospitalizations are caused by influenza virus infection each year 1. Point mutations in the polymerase basic protein 2 subunit (PB2) have been linked to the adaptation of the viral infection in humans 2. Findings from such studies have revealed the biological significance of PB2 as a virulence factor, thus highlighting its potential as an antiviral drug target. The structural genomics program put forth by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Disease (NIAID) provides funding to Emerald Bio and three other Pacific Northwest institutions that together make up the Seattle Structural Genomics Center for Infectious Disease (SSGCID). The SSGCID is dedicated to providing the scientific community with three-dimensional protein structures of NIAID category A-C pathogens. Making such structural information available to the scientific community serves to accelerate structure-based drug design. Structure-based drug design plays an important role in drug development. Pursuing multiple targets in parallel greatly increases the chance of success for new lead discovery by targeting a pathway or an entire protein family. Emerald Bio has developed a high-throughput, multi-target parallel processing pipeline (MTPP) for gene-to-structure determination to support the consortium. Here we describe the protocols used to determine the structure of the PB2 subunit from four different influenza A strains. PMID:23851357

  2. Multi-target parallel processing approach for gene-to-structure determination of the influenza polymerase PB2 subunit.

    PubMed

    Armour, Brianna L; Barnes, Steve R; Moen, Spencer O; Smith, Eric; Raymond, Amy C; Fairman, James W; Stewart, Lance J; Staker, Bart L; Begley, Darren W; Edwards, Thomas E; Lorimer, Donald D

    2013-06-28

    Pandemic outbreaks of highly virulent influenza strains can cause widespread morbidity and mortality in human populations worldwide. In the United States alone, an average of 41,400 deaths and 1.86 million hospitalizations are caused by influenza virus infection each year (1). Point mutations in the polymerase basic protein 2 subunit (PB2) have been linked to the adaptation of the viral infection in humans (2). Findings from such studies have revealed the biological significance of PB2 as a virulence factor, thus highlighting its potential as an antiviral drug target. The structural genomics program put forth by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Disease (NIAID) provides funding to Emerald Bio and three other Pacific Northwest institutions that together make up the Seattle Structural Genomics Center for Infectious Disease (SSGCID). The SSGCID is dedicated to providing the scientific community with three-dimensional protein structures of NIAID category A-C pathogens. Making such structural information available to the scientific community serves to accelerate structure-based drug design. Structure-based drug design plays an important role in drug development. Pursuing multiple targets in parallel greatly increases the chance of success for new lead discovery by targeting a pathway or an entire protein family. Emerald Bio has developed a high-throughput, multi-target parallel processing pipeline (MTPP) for gene-to-structure determination to support the consortium. Here we describe the protocols used to determine the structure of the PB2 subunit from four different influenza A strains.

  3. Overview on the current status on virtual high-throughput screening and combinatorial chemistry approaches in multi-target anticancer drug discovery; Part II.

    PubMed

    Geromichalos, George D; Alifieris, Constantinos E; Geromichalou, Elena G; Trafalis, Dimitrios T

    2016-01-01

    Conventional drug design embraces the "one gene, one drug, one disease" philosophy. Nowadays, new generation of anticancer drugs, able to inhibit more than one pathway, is believed to play a major role in contemporary anticancer drug research. In this way, polypharmacology, focusing on multi-target drugs, has emerged as a new paradigm in drug discovery. A number of recent successful drugs have in part or in whole emerged from a structure-based research approach. Many advances including crystallography and informatics are behind these successes. In this part II we will review the role and methodology of ligand-, structure- and fragment-based computer-aided drug design computer aided drug desing (CADD), virtual high throughput screening (vHTS), de novo drug design, fragment-based design and structure-based molecular docking, homology modeling, combinatorial chemistry and library design, pharmacophore model chemistry and informatics in modern drug discovery.

  4. A High Performance Computing Study of a Scalable FISST-Based Approach to Multi-Target, Multi-Sensor Tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussein, I.; Wilkins, M.; Roscoe, C.; Faber, W.; Chakravorty, S.; Schumacher, P.

    2016-09-01

    Finite Set Statistics (FISST) is a rigorous Bayesian multi-hypothesis management tool for the joint detection, classification and tracking of multi-sensor, multi-object systems. Implicit within the approach are solutions to the data association and target label-tracking problems. The full FISST filtering equations, however, are intractable. While FISST-based methods such as the PHD and CPHD filters are tractable, they require heavy moment approximations to the full FISST equations that result in a significant loss of information contained in the collected data. In this paper, we review Smart Sampling Markov Chain Monte Carlo (SSMCMC) that enables FISST to be tractable while avoiding moment approximations. We study the effect of tuning key SSMCMC parameters on tracking quality and computation time. The study is performed on a representative space object catalog with varying numbers of RSOs. The solution is implemented in the Scala computing language at the Maui High Performance Computing Center (MHPCC) facility.

  5. High-throughput screening for various classes of doping agents using a new 'dilute-and-shoot' liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry multi-target approach.

    PubMed

    Guddat, S; Solymos, E; Orlovius, A; Thomas, A; Sigmund, G; Geyer, H; Thevis, M; Schänzer, W

    2011-01-01

    A new multi-target approach based on liquid chromatography--electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (LC-(ESI)-MS/MS) is presented to screen for various classes of prohibited substances using direct injection of urine specimens. With a highly sensitive new generation hybrid mass spectrometer classic groups of drugs--for example, diuretics, beta2-agonists--stimulants and narcotics are detectable at concentration levels far below the required limits. Additionally, more challenging and various new target compounds could be implemented. Model compounds of stimulant conjugates were studied to investigate a possible screening without complex sample preparation. As a main achievement, the integration of the plasma volume expanders dextran and hydroxyethyl starch (HES), commonly analyzed in time-consuming, stand-alone procedures, is accomplished. To screen for relatively new prohibited compounds, a common metabolite of the selective androgen receptor modulator (SARMs) andarine, a metabolite of growth hormone releasing peptide (GHRP-2), and 5-amino-4-imidazolecarboxyamide ribonucleoside (AICAR) are analyzed. Following a completely new approach, conjugates of di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) metabolites are monitored to detect abnormally high levels of plasticizers indicating for illicit blood transfusion. The assay was fully validated for qualitative purposes considering the parameters specificity, intra- (3.2-16.6%) and inter-day precision (0.4-19.9%) at low, medium and high concentration, robustness, limit of detection (1-70 ng/ml, dextran: 30 µg/ml, HES: 10 µg/ml) and ion suppression/enhancement effects. The analyses of post-administration and routine doping control samples demonstrates the applicability of the method for sports drug testing. This straightforward and reliable approach accomplishes the combination of different screening procedures resulting in a high-throughput method that increases the efficiency of the labs daily work.

  6. Antisense Therapy in Neurology

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Joshua J.A.; Yokota, Toshifumi

    2013-01-01

    Antisense therapy is an approach to fighting diseases using short DNA-like molecules called antisense oligonucleotides. Recently, antisense therapy has emerged as an exciting and promising strategy for the treatment of various neurodegenerative and neuromuscular disorders. Previous and ongoing pre-clinical and clinical trials have provided encouraging early results. Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA), Huntington’s disease (HD), amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), Fukuyama congenital muscular dystrophy (FCMD), dysferlinopathy (including limb-girdle muscular dystrophy 2B; LGMD2B, Miyoshi myopathy; MM, and distal myopathy with anterior tibial onset; DMAT), and myotonic dystrophy (DM) are all reported to be promising targets for antisense therapy. This paper focuses on the current progress of antisense therapies in neurology. PMID:25562650

  7. Cis-Antisense Transcription Gives Rise to Tunable Genetic Switch Behavior: A Mathematical Modeling Approach.

    PubMed

    Bordoy, Antoni E; Chatterjee, Anushree

    2015-01-01

    Antisense transcription has been extensively recognized as a regulatory mechanism for gene expression across all kingdoms of life. Despite the broad importance and extensive experimental determination of cis-antisense transcription, relatively little is known about its role in controlling cellular switching responses. Growing evidence suggests the presence of non-coding cis-antisense RNAs that regulate gene expression via antisense interaction. Recent studies also indicate the role of transcriptional interference in regulating expression of neighboring genes due to traffic of RNA polymerases from adjacent promoter regions. Previous models investigate these mechanisms independently, however, little is understood about how cells utilize coupling of these mechanisms in advantageous ways that could also be used to design novel synthetic genetic devices. Here, we present a mathematical modeling framework for antisense transcription that combines the effects of both transcriptional interference and cis-antisense regulation. We demonstrate the tunability of transcriptional interference through various parameters, and that coupling of transcriptional interference with cis-antisense RNA interaction gives rise to hypersensitive switches in expression of both antisense genes. When implementing additional positive and negative feed-back loops from proteins encoded by these genes, the system response acquires a bistable behavior. Our model shows that combining these multiple-levels of regulation allows fine-tuning of system parameters to give rise to a highly tunable output, ranging from a simple-first order response to biologically complex higher-order response such as tunable bistable switch. We identify important parameters affecting the cellular switch response in order to provide the design principles for tunable gene expression using antisense transcription. This presents an important insight into functional role of antisense transcription and its importance towards

  8. AChE Inhibition-based Multi-target-directed Ligands, a Novel Pharmacological Approach for the Symptomatic and Disease-modifying Therapy of Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yu; Wang, Hao; Chen, Hong-zhuan

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia in elder people, characterised by a progressive decline in memory as a result of an impairment of cholinergic neurotransmission. To date acetylcholinesterase inhibitors (AChEIs) have become the most prescribed drugs for the symptomatic treatment of mild to moderate AD. However, the traditional “one molecule-one target” paradigm is not sufficient and appropriate to yield the desired therapeutic efficacy since multiple factors, such as amyloid-β (Aβ) deposits, neuroinflammation, oxidative stress, and decreased levels of acetylcholine (ACh) have been thought to play significant roles in the AD pathogenesis. New generation of multi-target drugs is earnestly demanded not only for ameliorating symptoms but also for modifying the disease. Herein, we delineated the catalytic and non-catalytic functions of AChE, and summarized the works of our group and others in research and development of novel AChEI-based multi-target-directed ligands (MTDLs), such as dual binding site AChEIs and multi-target AChEIs inhibiting Aβ aggregation, regulating Aβ procession, antagonizing platelet-activating factor (PAF) receptor, scavenging oxygen radical, chelating metal ions, inhibiting monoamine oxidase B (MAO-B), blocking N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptor and others. PMID:26786145

  9. Cubature Information SMC-PHD for Multi-Target Tracking.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhe; Wang, Zulin; Xu, Mai

    2016-05-09

    In multi-target tracking, the key problem lies in estimating the number and states of individual targets, in which the challenge is the time-varying multi-target numbers and states. Recently, several multi-target tracking approaches, based on the sequential Monte Carlo probability hypothesis density (SMC-PHD) filter, have been presented to solve such a problem. However, most of these approaches select the transition density as the importance sampling (IS) function, which is inefficient in a nonlinear scenario. To enhance the performance of the conventional SMC-PHD filter, we propose in this paper two approaches using the cubature information filter (CIF) for multi-target tracking. More specifically, we first apply the posterior intensity as the IS function. Then, we propose to utilize the CIF algorithm with a gating method to calculate the IS function, namely CISMC-PHD approach. Meanwhile, a fast implementation of the CISMC-PHD approach is proposed, which clusters the particles into several groups according to the Gaussian mixture components. With the constructed components, the IS function is approximated instead of particles. As a result, the computational complexity of the CISMC-PHD approach can be significantly reduced. The simulation results demonstrate the effectiveness of our approaches.

  10. Insights into immediate-early gene function in hippocampal memory consolidation using antisense oligonucleotide and fluorescent imaging approaches.

    PubMed

    Guzowski, John F

    2002-01-01

    In the 14 years since it was discovered that specific genes could be dynamically regulated in the brain by neural activity, there has been a substantial research focus attempting to understand the role immediate-early genes (IEGs) play in various brain functions. This article examines the involvement of IEGs in hippocampal synaptic plasticity and in memory consolidation processes performed by the hippocampus. Studies employing conventional IEG detection methodologies and a novel gene-imaging approach that provides temporal and cellular resolution (cellular compartment analysis of emporal activity by fluorescence in situ hybridization or catFISH) provide evidence supporting the assertion that IEG expression reflects the integration of information processed by hippocampal neurons. However, IEG expression is not merely correlated with neural activity, but also plays a pivotal role in stabilizing recent changes in synaptic efficacy. As such, localized disruption of IEGs Arc or c-fos by intrahippocampal administration of antisense oligonucleotides or germline disruption of the IEGs c-fos, tissue plasminogen activator, or zif268 impairs consolidation of long-term memory formation, without affecting learning or short-term memory. Further investigation into the expression and function of IEGs using catFISH and antisense approaches will likely increase understanding of the molecular and cellular bases of information processing involving the hippocampus.

  11. Multi-Target Directed Drugs: A Modern Approach for Design of New Drugs for the treatment of Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Dias, Kris Simone Tranches; Viegas, Jr, Claudio

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is a complex neurodegenerative disorder with a multi-faceted pathogenesis. So far, the therapeutic paradigm “one-compound-one-target” has failed and despite enormous efforts to elucidate the pathophysiology of AD, the disease is still incurable. The multiple factors involved in AD include amyloid aggregation to form insoluble neurotoxic plaques of Aβ, hyperphosphorylation of tau protein, oxidative stress, calcium imbalance, mitochondrial dysfunction and deterioration of synaptic transmission. These factors together, accentuate changes in the CNS homeostasis, starting a complex process of interconnected physiological damage, leading to cognitive and memory impairment and neuronal death. A recent approach for the rational design of new drug candidates, also called multitarget-directed ligand (MTDL) approach, has gained increasing attention by many research groups, which have developed a variety of hybrid compounds acting simultaneously on diverse biological targets. This review aims to show some recent advances and examples of the exploitation of MTDL approach in the rational design of novel drug candidate prototypes for the treatment of AD. PMID:24851088

  12. Modelling ligand selectivity of serine proteases using integrative proteochemometric approaches improves model performance and allows the multi-target dependent interpretation of features.

    PubMed

    Ain, Qurrat U; Méndez-Lucio, Oscar; Ciriano, Isidro Cortés; Malliavin, Thérèse; van Westen, Gerard J P; Bender, Andreas

    2014-11-01

    Serine proteases, implicated in important physiological functions, have a high intra-family similarity, which leads to unwanted off-target effects of inhibitors with insufficient selectivity. However, the availability of sequence and structure data has now made it possible to develop approaches to design pharmacological agents that can discriminate successfully between their related binding sites. In this study, we have quantified the relationship between 12,625 distinct protease inhibitors and their bioactivity against 67 targets of the serine protease family (20,213 data points) in an integrative manner, using proteochemometric modelling (PCM). The benchmarking of 21 different target descriptors motivated the usage of specific binding pocket amino acid descriptors, which helped in the identification of active site residues and selective compound chemotypes affecting compound affinity and selectivity. PCM models performed better than alternative approaches (models trained using exclusively compound descriptors on all available data, QSAR) employed for comparison with R(2)/RMSE values of 0.64 ± 0.23/0.66 ± 0.20 vs. 0.35 ± 0.27/1.05 ± 0.27 log units, respectively. Moreover, the interpretation of the PCM model singled out various chemical substructures responsible for bioactivity and selectivity towards particular proteases (thrombin, trypsin and coagulation factor 10) in agreement with the literature. For instance, absence of a tertiary sulphonamide was identified to be responsible for decreased selective activity (by on average 0.27 ± 0.65 pChEMBL units) on FA10. Among the binding pocket residues, the amino acids (arginine, leucine and tyrosine) at positions 35, 39, 60, 93, 140 and 207 were observed as key contributing residues for selective affinity on these three targets.

  13. An in vivo and in silico approach to study cis-antisense: a short cut to higher order response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Courtney, Colleen; Varanasi, Usha; Chatterjee, Anushree

    2014-03-01

    Antisense interactions are present in all domains of life. Typically sense, antisense RNA pairs originate from overlapping genes with convergent face to face promoters, and are speculated to be involved in gene regulation. Recent studies indicate the role of transcriptional interference (TI) in regulating expression of genes in convergent orientation. Modeling antisense, TI gene regulation mechanisms allows us to understand how organisms control gene expression. We present a modeling and experimental framework to understand convergent transcription that combines the effects of transcriptional interference and cis-antisense regulation. Our model shows that combining transcriptional interference and antisense RNA interaction adds multiple-levels of regulation which affords a highly tunable biological output, ranging from first order response to complex higher-order response. To study this system we created a library of experimental constructs with engineered TI and antisense interaction by using face-to-face inducible promoters separated by carefully tailored overlapping DNA sequences to control expression of a set of fluorescent reporter proteins. Studying this gene expression mechanism allows for an understanding of higher order behavior of gene expression networks.

  14. Sequential measurement-driven multi-target Bayesian filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zong-xiang; Li, Li-juan; Xie, Wei-xin; Li, Liang-qun

    2015-12-01

    Bayesian filter is an efficient approach for multi-target tracking in the presence of clutter. Recently, considerable attention has been focused on probability hypothesis density (PHD) filter, which is an intensity approximation of the multi-target Bayesian filter. However, PHD filter is inapplicable to cases in which target detection probability is low. The use of this filter may result in a delay in data processing because it handles received measurements periodically, once every sampling period. To track multiple targets in the case of low detection probability and to handle received measurements in real time, we propose a sequential measurement-driven Bayesian filter. The proposed filter jointly propagates the marginal distributions and existence probabilities of each target in the filter recursion. We also present an implementation of the proposed filter for linear Gaussian models. Simulation results demonstrate that the proposed filter can more accurately track multiple targets than the Gaussian mixture PHD filter or cardinalized PHD filter.

  15. Applications of Multi-Target Computer-Aided Methodologies in Molecular Design of CNS Drugs.

    PubMed

    Raevsky, Oleg A; Mukhametov, Azat; Grigorev, Veniamin Y; Ustyugov, Alexey; Tsay, Shwu-Chen; Jih-Ru Hwu, Reuben; Yarla, Nagendra Sastry; Barreto, George E; Aliev, Gjumrakch; Bachurin, Sergey O

    2017-09-20

    : Discovery of drugs for diseases of the central nervous system (CNS) faces high attrition rates in clinical trials. Neural diseases are extremely complex in nature and typically associated with multiple drug targets. A conception of multi-target directed ligands (MTDL), widely applied to discovery of cancer pharmaceuticals, may be a perspective solution for CNS diseases. Special bio-informatics approaches have been developed which can assist the medicinal chemists in identification and structural optimization of MTDL. In this review, we analyze the current status of development of multi-target approaches in quantitative structure-activity relationships (mt-QSAR) for CNS drug discovery; and describe applications of multi-target approaches in molecular modelling (which can be called mt-MM) as well as perspectives for multi-target approaches in bio-informatics in relation to Alzheimer&apos's disease. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  16. Targeting Cancer with Antisense Oligomers

    SciTech Connect

    Hnatowich, DJ

    2008-10-28

    With financial assistance from the Department of Energy, we have shown definitively that radiolabeled antisense DNAs and other oligomers will accumulate in target cancer cells in vitro and in vivo by an antisense mechanism. We have also shown that the number of mRNA targets for our antisense oligomers in the cancer cell types that we have investigated so far is sufficient to provide and antisense image and/or radiotherapy of cancer in mice. These studies have been reported in about 10 publications. However our observation over the past several years has shown that radiolabeled antisense oligomers administered intravenously in their native and naked form will accumulate and be retained in target xenografts by an antisense mechanism but will also accumulate at high levels in normal organs such as liver, spleen and kidneys. We have investigated unsuccessfully several commercially available vectors. Thus the use of radiolabeled antisense oligomers for the imaging of cancer must await novel approaches to delivery. This laboratory has therefore pursued two new paths, optical imaging of tumor and Auger radiotherapy. We are developing a novel method of optical imaging tumor using antisense oligomers with a fluorophore is administered while hybridized with a shorter complementary oligomer with an inhibitor. In culture and in tumored mice that the duplex remains intact and thus nonfluorescent until it encounters its target mRNA at which time it dissociates and the antisense oligomer binds along with its fluorophore to the target. Simultaneous with the above, we have also observed, as have others, that antisense oligomers migrate rapidly and quantitatively to the nucleus upon crossing cell membranes. The Auger electron radiotherapy path results from this observation since the nuclear migration properties could be used effectively to bring and to retain in the nucleus an Auger emitting radionuclide such as 111In or 125I bound to the antisense oligomer. Since the object becomes

  17. Multi-Target Drugs for Neglected Diseases.

    PubMed

    Scotti, Luciana; Filho, Francisco J B M; de Moura, Ricardo O; Ribeiro, Frederico F; Ishiki, Hamilton; da Silva, Marcelo S; Filho, José M B; Scotti, Marcus T

    2016-05-30

    Diseases perceived as neglected tropical infections are generally caused by parasites which reach poor, underserved populations (primarily infrastructure), cause serious damage to health, and many deaths. AIDS and tuberculosis, (although not classified as neglected by WHO), are discriminated against infections which cause great social damage. The drugs currently used to treat these diseases do not have the desired effectiveness, enable the emergence of resistant strains, and in most cases are difficult to obtain. Few pharmaceutical companies are investing in new drug research for neglected diseases, for lack of financial return. This review reports the major neglected diseases, AIDS, tuberculosis, their targets, and research on multi-target drugs. The studies for new drugs against these infections involve in silico methods, synthesis, structural determinations, analytical analysis and other experimental assays. A new single compound, forecasting possible pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic interactions becomes a simpler process; it is also believed that these drugs are safer and more efficient, since they act with synergism on different targets. It occurs but the emergence of new resistant strains and side effects. Multi-target drugs represent a new alternative to find new lead compounds. A ligand that targets two or more receivers may be seen as a potential drug, combating infection by different routes.

  18. Mid-course multi-target tracking using continuous representation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zak, Michail; Toomarian, Nikzad

    1991-01-01

    The thrust of this paper is to present a new approach to multi-target tracking for the mid-course stage of the Strategic Defense Initiative (SDI). This approach is based upon a continuum representation of a cluster of flying objects. We assume that the velocities of the flying objects can be embedded into a smooth velocity field. This assumption is based upon the impossibility of encounters in a high density cluster between the flying objects. Therefore, the problem is reduced to an identification of a moving continuum based upon consecutive time frame observations. In contradistinction to the previous approaches, here each target is considered as a center of a small continuous neighborhood subjected to a local-affine transformation, and therefore, the target trajectories do not mix. Obviously, their mixture in plane of sensor view is apparent. The approach is illustrated by an example.

  19. Mid-course multi-target tracking using continuous representation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zak, Michail; Toomarian, Nikzad

    1991-01-01

    The thrust of this paper is to present a new approach to multi-target tracking for the mid-course stage of the Strategic Defense Initiative (SDI). This approach is based upon a continuum representation of a cluster of flying objects. We assume that the velocities of the flying objects can be embedded into a smooth velocity field. This assumption is based upon the impossibility of encounters in a high density cluster between the flying objects. Therefore, the problem is reduced to an identification of a moving continuum based upon consecutive time frame observations. In contradistinction to the previous approaches, here each target is considered as a center of a small continuous neighborhood subjected to a local-affine transformation, and therefore, the target trajectories do not mix. Obviously, their mixture in plane of sensor view is apparent. The approach is illustrated by an example.

  20. Mid-course multi-target tracking using continuous representation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zak, Michail; Toomarian, Nikzad

    1991-08-01

    The thrust of this paper is to present a new approach to multi-target tracking for the mid-course stage of the Strategic Defense Initiative (SDI). This approach is based upon a continuum representation of a cluster of flying objects. We assume that the velocities of the flying objects can be embedded into a smooth velocity field. This assumption is based upon the impossibility of encounters in a high density cluster between the flying objects. Therefore, the problem is reduced to an identification of a moving continuum based upon consecutive time frame observations. In contradistinction to the previous approaches, here each target is considered as a center of a small continuous neighborhood subjected to a local-affine transformation, and therefore, the target trajectories do not mix. Obviously, their mixture in plane of sensor view is apparent. The approach is illustrated by an example.

  1. The Antisense RNA Approach: a New Application for In Vivo Investigation of the Stress Response of Oenococcus oeni, a Wine-Associated Lactic Acid Bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Darsonval, Maud; Msadek, Tarek; Alexandre, Hervé

    2015-01-01

    Oenococcus oeni is a wine-associated lactic acid bacterium mostly responsible for malolactic fermentation in wine. In wine, O. oeni grows in an environment hostile to bacterial growth (low pH, low temperature, and ethanol) that induces stress response mechanisms. To survive, O. oeni is known to set up transitional stress response mechanisms through the synthesis of heat stress proteins (HSPs) encoded by the hsp genes, notably a unique small HSP named Lo18. Despite the availability of the genome sequence, characterization of O. oeni genes is limited, and little is known about the in vivo role of Lo18. Due to the lack of genetic tools for O. oeni, an efficient expression vector in O. oeni is still lacking, and deletion or inactivation of the hsp18 gene is not presently practicable. As an alternative approach, with the goal of understanding the biological function of the O. oeni hsp18 gene in vivo, we have developed an expression vector to produce antisense RNA targeting of hsp18 mRNA. Recombinant strains were exposed to multiple stresses inducing hsp18 gene expression: heat shock and acid shock. We showed that antisense attenuation of hsp18 affects O. oeni survival under stress conditions. These results confirm the involvement of Lo18 in heat and acid tolerance of O. oeni. Results of anisotropy experiments also confirm a membrane-protective role for Lo18, as previous observations had already suggested. This study describes a new, efficient tool to demonstrate the use of antisense technology for modulating gene expression in O. oeni. PMID:26452552

  2. Molecular Mechanisms of Antisense Oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Crooke, Stanley T

    2017-04-01

    In 1987, when I became interested in the notion of antisense technology, I returned to my roots in RNA biochemistry and began work to understand how oligonucleotides behave in biological systems. Since 1989, my research has focused primarily on this topic, although I have been involved in most areas of research in antisense technology. I believe that the art of excellent science is to frame large important questions that are perhaps not immediately answerable with existing knowledge and methods, and then conceive a long-term (multiyear) research strategy that begins by answering the most pressing answerable questions on the path to the long-term goals. Then, a step-by-step research pathway that will address the strategic questions posed must be implemented, adjusting the plan as new things are learned. This is the approach we have taken at Ionis. Obviously, to create antisense technology, we have had to address a wide array of strategic questions, for example, the medicinal chemistry of oligonucleotides, manufacturing and analytical methods, pharmacokinetics and toxicology, as well as questions about the molecular pharmacology of antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs). Each of these endeavors has consumed nearly three decades of scientific effort, is still very much a work-in-progress, and has resulted in hundreds of publications. As a recipient of the Lifetime Achievement Award 2016 granted by the Oligonucleotide Therapeutic Society, in this note, my goal is to summarize the contributions of my group to the efforts to understand the molecular mechanisms of ASOs.

  3. Molecular Mechanisms of Antisense Oligonucleotides

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    In 1987, when I became interested in the notion of antisense technology, I returned to my roots in RNA biochemistry and began work to understand how oligonucleotides behave in biological systems. Since 1989, my research has focused primarily on this topic, although I have been involved in most areas of research in antisense technology. I believe that the art of excellent science is to frame large important questions that are perhaps not immediately answerable with existing knowledge and methods, and then conceive a long-term (multiyear) research strategy that begins by answering the most pressing answerable questions on the path to the long-term goals. Then, a step-by-step research pathway that will address the strategic questions posed must be implemented, adjusting the plan as new things are learned. This is the approach we have taken at Ionis. Obviously, to create antisense technology, we have had to address a wide array of strategic questions, for example, the medicinal chemistry of oligonucleotides, manufacturing and analytical methods, pharmacokinetics and toxicology, as well as questions about the molecular pharmacology of antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs). Each of these endeavors has consumed nearly three decades of scientific effort, is still very much a work-in-progress, and has resulted in hundreds of publications. As a recipient of the Lifetime Achievement Award 2016 granted by the Oligonucleotide Therapeutic Society, in this note, my goal is to summarize the contributions of my group to the efforts to understand the molecular mechanisms of ASOs. PMID:28080221

  4. Temporal clustering in the multi-target tracking environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelso, Thomas S.

    1988-08-01

    In multi-target tracking problems such as those found in high-energy particle physics, fluid mechanics, and ballistic missile defense, the common objective is to separate the data into observations associated with individual targets and to use this data to estimate the targets' trajectories. In defense related applications, it is necessary to have algorithms which are computationally efficient, robust, and minimize data storage requirements. Recently developed approaches in the field of multi-target tracking, however, have been shown to have significant computational disadvantages. In this study, non-hierarchical clustering methods are combined with computationally efficient algorithms such as those used to solve assignment and quadratic programming problems to provide an integrated procedure which is computationally efficient, minimizes data storage requirements, and gives a reasonable estimate of the number of targets. Combined with a sequential estimation filter such as the extended Kalman filter, the procedure can provide estimates of a target's state and state covariance after three observations and continuously maintain updated target state estimates in real time. Empirical results based on 100 targets in ballistic trajectories have demonstrated this method's effectiveness by properly clustering data with four measurement attributes (range, range rate, azimuth, and elevation) in over 98 percent of the cases.

  5. SMC-PHD-based multi-target tracking with reduced peak extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunne, Darcy; Tharmarasa, Ratnasingham; Lang, Thomas; Kirubarajan, T.

    2009-08-01

    The Probability Hypothesis Density (PHD) filter is a powerful new tool in the field of multitarget tracking. Unlike classical multi-target tracking approaches, such as Multiple Hypothesis Tracking (MHT), in each scan it provides a complete solution to multi-target state estimation without the necessity for explicit measurement-to-track data association. The PHD filter recursively propagates the first order moment of the multi-target posterior. This allows us to determine the expected number of targets as well as their state estimates at each scan. However, there is no implicit connection between the target state estimates in consecutive scans. In this paper, a new cluster-based approach is proposed for track labeling in the Sequential Monte Carlo (SMC i.e. particle filter based) PHD filter. The method associates a likelihood vector to each particle in the SMC estimate. This vector indicates the likelihood that the particle estimate belongs to each of the established target tracks. This likelihood vector is propagated along with the PHD moment and updated with the PHD function. By maintaining a set of associations from scan to scan, the new method provides a complete PHD solution for a multi-target tracking application over time. The method is tested on both clean and noisy multi-target tracking scenarios and the results are compared to some previously published methods.

  6. An antisense-based functional genomics approach for identification of genes critical for growth of Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    De Backer, M D; Nelissen, B; Logghe, M; Viaene, J; Loonen, I; Vandoninck, S; de Hoogt, R; Dewaele, S; Simons, F A; Verhasselt, P; Vanhoof, G; Contreras, R; Luyten, W H

    2001-03-01

    Converting the complete genome sequence of Candida albicans into meaningful biological information will require comprehensive screens for identifying functional classes of genes. Most systems described so far are not applicable to C. albicans because of its difficulty with mating, its diploid nature, and the lack of functional random insertional mutagenesis methods. We examined artificial gene suppression as a means to identify gene products critical for growth of this pathogen; these represent new antifungal drug targets. To achieve gene suppression we combined antisense RNA inhibition and promoter interference. After cloning antisense complementary DNA (cDNA) fragments under control of an inducible GAL1 promoter, we transferred the resulting libraries to C. albicans. Over 2,000 transformant colonies were screened for a promoter-induced diminished-growth phenotype. After recovery of the plasmids, sequence determination of their inserts revealed the messenger RNA (mRNA) they inhibited or the gene they disrupted. Eighty-six genes critical for growth were identified, 45 with unknown function. When used in high-throughput screening for antifungals, the crippled C. albicans strains generated in this study showed enhanced sensitivity to specific drugs.

  7. Pharmacology of Antisense Drugs.

    PubMed

    Bennett, C Frank; Baker, Brenda F; Pham, Nguyen; Swayze, Eric; Geary, Richard S

    2017-01-06

    Recent studies have led to a greater appreciation of the diverse roles RNAs play in maintaining normal cellular function and how they contribute to disease pathology, broadening the number of potential therapeutic targets. Antisense oligonucleotides are the most direct means to target RNA in a selective manner and have become an established platform technology for drug discovery. There are multiple molecular mechanisms by which antisense oligonucleotides can be used to modulate RNAs in cells, including promoting the degradation of the targeted RNA or modulating RNA function without degradation. Antisense drugs utilizing various antisense mechanisms are demonstrating therapeutic potential for the treatment of a broad variety of diseases. This review focuses on some of the advances that have taken place in translating antisense technology from the bench to the clinic.

  8. Increased cell survival by inhibition of BRCA1 using an antisense approach in an estrogen responsive ovarian carcinoma cell line

    PubMed Central

    Annab, Lois A; Hawkins, Rebecca E; Solomon, Greg; Barrett, J Carl; Afshari, Cynthia A

    2000-01-01

    tumorigenicity by injection of cells (106 cells in 0.1cm2 50% matrigel; Collaborative Biomedical Products, Bedford, MA, USA) into subcutaneous sites in 6-week-old athymic Ncr-nude mice (NCI Animal Program, Bethesda, MD, USA) that were ovariectomized at approximately 4 weeks of age. Half of the ovariectomized mice received an implanted 0.18mg estrogen 60-day pellet (Innovative Research of America, Sarasota, FL, USA). Results: Antisense technology was effective in decreasing both RNA and protein levels of BRCA1 in the BG-1 human ovarian adenocarcinoma cells. BRCA1 antisense-infected populations contained significantly less BRCA1 message than control LXSN-infected pools and selected clones contained varying reduced levels of BRCA1 protein compared with control clones (Figs 1a and 1b). Three independent BRCA1 antisense-infected cultures demonstrated a resistance to cell death induced by withdrawal from estrogen over a 6- to 20-day period (Fig. 2a). The BRCA1 antisense population also exhibited a threefold to sixfold increase in cell growth compared with control cells in the presence of estrogen treatment. BG-1 BRCA1 antisense clones demonstrated a similar response to pooled population studies, enhanced growth with estrogen, and failure to die upon estrogen depletion (Fig. 2b). The BRCA1 antisense clones were further examined for other associated tumorigenic properties. All of the antisense clones were able to form colonies in soft agar (2-23 colonies per 104 cells plated; data not shown), whereas control clones were deficient in their ability to form colonies (0-0.8 colonies per 104 cells plated). Table 1 shows, in the presence of estrogen, the clone with the lowest levels of BRCA1 (AS-4) produced significantly more colonies (133 ± 17.9 colonies per 104 cells plated) than the control clone (NEO; 6 ± 3.1 colonies per 104 cells plated). Clones AS-4 and NEO were also injected with matrigel subcutaneously into ovariectomized athymic mice. Almost twice as many sites were positive for

  9. Upping the Antisense Ante.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weiss, Rick

    1991-01-01

    Discussed is a designer-drug technology called antisense which blocks messenger RNA's ability to carry information to protein producing sites in the cell. The applications of this drug to AIDS research, cancer therapy, and other diseases are discussed. (KR)

  10. Upping the Antisense Ante.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weiss, Rick

    1991-01-01

    Discussed is a designer-drug technology called antisense which blocks messenger RNA's ability to carry information to protein producing sites in the cell. The applications of this drug to AIDS research, cancer therapy, and other diseases are discussed. (KR)

  11. Antisense oligonucleotides as therapeutics for malignant diseases.

    PubMed

    Ho, P T; Parkinson, D R

    1997-04-01

    The continued progress in our understanding of the biology of neoplasia and in the identification, cloning, and sequencing of genes critical to tumor cell function permits the exploitation of this information to develop specific agents that may directly modulate the function of these genes or their protein products. Antisense oligonucleotides are being investigated as a potential therapeutic modality that takes direct advantage of molecular sequencing. The antisense approach uses short oligonucleotides designed to hybridize to a target mRNA transcript through Watson-Crick base pairing. The formation of this oligonucleotide: RNA heteroduplex results in mRNA inactivation and consequent inhibition of synthesis of the protein product. A fundamental attraction of the antisense approach is that this method potentially may be applied to any gene product, in theory, for the treatment of malignant and non-malignant diseases. However, this simple and attractive model has proven to be much more complex in practice. A number of important challenges in the preclinical development of antisense oligonucleotides have been identified, including stability, sequence length, cellular uptake, target sequence selection, appropriate negative controls, oligonucleotide: protein interactions, and cost of manufacture. Although the biological activity of an oligonucleotide against its molecular target is theoretically sequence-dependent, the animal pharmacokinetics and toxicology of phosphorothioate analogues directed against vastly disparate gene products appear relatively non-sequence-specific. In oncology, a number of clinical trials have been initiated with antisense oligonucleotides directed against molecular targets including: p53; bcl-2; raf kinase; protein kinase C-alpha; c-myb. The experience gained from these early clinical trials will be applicable to the next generation of antisense agents in development. These may include molecules with novel backbones or other structural

  12. Making sense of antisense

    SciTech Connect

    Moffat, A.S.

    1991-08-02

    Out in the San Joaquin Valley of California grows a field of tomato plants that look like ordinary tomato plants. But these tomatoes are special - one of the first fruits of a new technology that may revolutionize not just commercial plant development but human medicine as well. The new technology uses novel RNAs, called antisense RNAs, to block the activity of specific genes. At first, researchers were mainly interested in antisense RNA as a tool for probing gene function. In the late 1970s, when the technology was first developed, molecular biologists didn't have a good way of mutating genes in the cells of higher organisms so that they could see what happens when the gene activity is lost. Antisense technology, in effect, provided a way of doing that. But the biotechnology industry soon recognized the immense practical potential of a technique that could be used to knock out the activity of bad genes. To make the tomato plants, for example, plant scientists used antisense RNAs to shut off the expression of the gene encoding an enzyme that makes tomatoes mushy, thereby yielding a product that may travel better and last longer on grocery shelves. Recent work by various labs suggests that it may be possible to design antisense compounds that inhibit the activity of viral genes or of the oncogenes thought to contribute to cancer development, without affecting normal cellular genes. That raises the possibility that the technology might aid in producing better, more selective drugs to treat viral diseases, including AIDS, and cancer.

  13. Multi-target therapeutics for neuropsychiatric and neurodegenerative disorders.

    PubMed

    Bawa, Priya; Pradeep, Priyamvada; Kumar, Pradeep; Choonara, Yahya E; Modi, Girish; Pillay, Viness

    2016-12-01

    Historically, neuropsychiatric and neurodegenerative disease treatments focused on the 'magic bullet' concept; however multi-targeted strategies are increasingly attractive gauging from the escalating research in this area. Because these diseases are typically co-morbid, multi-targeted drugs capable of interacting with multiple targets will expand treatment to the co-morbid disease condition. Despite their theoretical efficacy, there are significant impediments to clinical success (e.g., difficulty titrating individual aspects of the drug and inconclusive pathophysiological mechanisms). The new and revised diagnostic frameworks along with studies detailing the endophenotypic characteristics of the diseases promise to provide the foundation for the circumvention of these impediments. This review serves to evaluate the various marketed and nonmarketed multi-targeted drugs with particular emphasis on their design strategy.

  14. Symmetrizing measurement equations for association-free multi-target tracking via point set distances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanebeck, Uwe D.; Baum, Marcus; Willett, Peter

    2017-05-01

    We are tracking multiple targets based on noisy measurements. The targets are labeled, the measurements are unlabeled, and the association of measurements to targets is unknown. Our goal is association-free tracking, so the associations will never be determined as this is costly and impractical in many scenarios. By employing a permutation-invariant and differentiable point set distance measure, we derive a modified association-free multi-target measurement equation. It maintains the target identities but is invariant to permutations in the unlabeled measurements. Based on this measurement equation, we derive an efficient sample-based association-free multi-target Kalman filter. The proposed new approach is straightforward to implement and scalable.

  15. Tacrine-resveratrol fused hybrids as multi-target-directed ligands against Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Jeřábek, Jakub; Uliassi, Elisa; Guidotti, Laura; Korábečný, Jan; Soukup, Ondřej; Sepsova, Vendula; Hrabinova, Martina; Kuča, Kamil; Bartolini, Manuela; Peña-Altamira, Luis Emiliano; Petralla, Sabrina; Monti, Barbara; Roberti, Marinella; Bolognesi, Maria Laura

    2017-02-15

    Multi-target drug discovery is one of the most followed approaches in the active central nervous system (CNS) therapeutic area, especially in the search for new drugs against Alzheimer's disease (AD). This is because innovative multi-target-directed ligands (MTDLs) could more adequately address the complexity of this pathological condition. In a continuation of our efforts aimed at a new series of anti-AD MTDLs, we combined the structural features of the cholinesterase inhibitor drug tacrine with that of resveratrol, which is known for its purported antioxidant and anti-neuroinflammatory activities. The most interesting hybrid compounds (5, 8, 9 and 12) inhibited human acetylcholinesterase at micromolar concentrations and effectively modulated Aβ self-aggregation in vitro. In addition, 12 showed intriguing anti-inflammatory and immuno-modulatory properties in neuronal and glial AD cell models. Importantly, the MTDL profile is accompanied by high-predicted blood-brain barrier permeability, and low cytotoxicity on primary neurons.

  16. Multi-Target Tracking by Discrete-Continuous Energy Minimization.

    PubMed

    Milan, Anton; Schindler, Konrad; Roth, Stefan

    2016-10-01

    The task of tracking multiple targets is often addressed with the so-called tracking-by-detection paradigm, where the first step is to obtain a set of target hypotheses for each frame independently. Tracking can then be regarded as solving two separate, but tightly coupled problems. The first is to carry out data association, i.e., to determine the origin of each of the available observations. The second problem is to reconstruct the actual trajectories that describe the spatio-temporal motion pattern of each individual target. The former is inherently a discrete problem, while the latter should intuitively be modeled in continuous space. Having to deal with an unknown number of targets, complex dependencies, and physical constraints, both are challenging tasks on their own and thus most previous work focuses on one of these subproblems. Here, we present a multi-target tracking approach that explicitly models both tasks as minimization of a unified discrete-continuous energy function. Trajectory properties are captured through global label costs, a recent concept from multi-model fitting, which we introduce to tracking. Specifically, label costs describe physical properties of individual tracks, e.g., linear and angular dynamics, or entry and exit points. We further introduce pairwise label costs to describe mutual interactions between targets in order to avoid collisions. By choosing appropriate forms for the individual energy components, powerful discrete optimization techniques can be leveraged to address data association, while the shapes of individual trajectories are updated by gradient-based continuous energy minimization. The proposed method achieves state-of-the-art results on diverse benchmark sequences.

  17. Radiolabeled oligonucleotides for antisense imaging

    PubMed Central

    Iyer, Arun K; He, Jiang

    2011-01-01

    Oligonucleotides radiolabeled with isotopes emitting γ-rays (for SPECT imaging) or positrons (for PET imaging) can be useful for targeting messenger RNA (mRNA) thereby serving as non-invasive imaging tools for detection of gene expression in vivo (antisense imaging). Radiolabeled oligonucleotides may also be used for monitoring their in vivo fate, thereby helping us better understand the barriers to its delivery for antisense targeting. These developments have led to a new area of molecular imaging and targeting, utilizing radiolabeled antisense oligonucleotides. However, the success of antisense imaging relies heavily on overcoming the barriers for its targeted delivery in vivo. Furthermore, the low ability of the radiolabeled antisense oligonucleotide to subsequently internalize into the cell and hybridize with its target mRNA poses additional challenges in realizing its potentials. This review covers the advances in the antisense imaging probe development for PET and SPECT, with an emphasis on radiolabeling strategies, stability, delivery and in vivo targeting. PMID:21822406

  18. Cellular Delivery and Photochemical Activation of Antisense Agents through a Nucleobase Caging Strategy

    PubMed Central

    Govan, Jeane M.; Uprety, Rajendra; Thomas, Meryl; Lusic, Hrvoje; Lively, Mark O.; Deiters, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    Antisense oligonucleotides are powerful tools to regulate gene expression in cells and model organisms. However, a transfection or microinjection is needed for efficient delivery of the antisense agent. We report the conjugation of multiple HIV TAT peptides to a hairpin-protected antisense agent through a light-cleavable nucleobase caging group. This conjugation allows for the facile delivery of the antisense agent without a transfection reagent and photochemical activation offers precise control over gene expression. The developed approach is highly modular, as demonstrated by the conjugation of folic acid to the caged antisense agent. This enabled targeted cell delivery through cell-surface folate receptors followed by photochemical triggering of antisense activity. Importantly, the presented strategy delivers native oligonucleotides after light-activation, devoid of any delivery functionalities or modifications that could otherwise impair their antisense activity. PMID:23915424

  19. Designing multi-targeted agents: An emerging anticancer drug discovery paradigm.

    PubMed

    Fu, Rong-Geng; Sun, Yuan; Sheng, Wen-Bing; Liao, Duan-Fang

    2017-08-18

    The dominant paradigm in drug discovery is to design ligands with maximum selectivity to act on individual drug targets. With the target-based approach, many new chemical entities have been discovered, developed, and further approved as drugs. However, there are a large number of complex diseases such as cancer that cannot be effectively treated or cured only with one medicine to modulate the biological function of a single target. As simultaneous intervention of two (or multiple) cancer progression relevant targets has shown improved therapeutic efficacy, the innovation of multi-targeted drugs has become a promising and prevailing research topic and numerous multi-targeted anticancer agents are currently at various developmental stages. However, most multi-pharmacophore scaffolds are usually discovered by serendipity or screening, while rational design by combining existing pharmacophore scaffolds remains an enormous challenge. In this review, four types of multi-pharmacophore modes are discussed, and the examples from literature will be used to introduce attractive lead compounds with the capability of simultaneously interfering with different enzyme or signaling pathway of cancer progression, which will reveal the trends and insights to help the design of the next generation multi-targeted anticancer agents. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. The Human Kinome Targeted by FDA Approved Multi-Target Drugs and Combination Products: A Comparative Study from the Drug-Target Interaction Network Perspective.

    PubMed

    Li, Ying Hong; Wang, Pan Pan; Li, Xiao Xu; Yu, Chun Yan; Yang, Hong; Zhou, Jin; Xue, Wei Wei; Tan, Jun; Zhu, Feng

    2016-01-01

    The human kinome is one of the most productive classes of drug target, and there is emerging necessity for treating complex diseases by means of polypharmacology (multi-target drugs and combination products). However, the advantages of the multi-target drugs and the combination products are still under debate. A comparative analysis between FDA approved multi-target drugs and combination products, targeting the human kinome, was conducted by mapping targets onto the phylogenetic tree of the human kinome. The approach of network medicine illustrating the drug-target interactions was applied to identify popular targets of multi-target drugs and combination products. As identified, the multi-target drugs tended to inhibit target pairs in the human kinome, especially the receptor tyrosine kinase family, while the combination products were able to against targets of distant homology relationship. This finding asked for choosing the combination products as a better solution for designing drugs aiming at targets of distant homology relationship. Moreover, sub-networks of drug-target interactions in specific disease were generated, and mechanisms shared by multi-target drugs and combination products were identified. In conclusion, this study performed an analysis between approved multi-target drugs and combination products against the human kinome, which could assist the discovery of next generation polypharmacology.

  1. The Human Kinome Targeted by FDA Approved Multi-Target Drugs and Combination Products: A Comparative Study from the Drug-Target Interaction Network Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Chun Yan; Yang, Hong; Zhou, Jin; Xue, Wei Wei; Tan, Jun; Zhu, Feng

    2016-01-01

    The human kinome is one of the most productive classes of drug target, and there is emerging necessity for treating complex diseases by means of polypharmacology (multi-target drugs and combination products). However, the advantages of the multi-target drugs and the combination products are still under debate. A comparative analysis between FDA approved multi-target drugs and combination products, targeting the human kinome, was conducted by mapping targets onto the phylogenetic tree of the human kinome. The approach of network medicine illustrating the drug-target interactions was applied to identify popular targets of multi-target drugs and combination products. As identified, the multi-target drugs tended to inhibit target pairs in the human kinome, especially the receptor tyrosine kinase family, while the combination products were able to against targets of distant homology relationship. This finding asked for choosing the combination products as a better solution for designing drugs aiming at targets of distant homology relationship. Moreover, sub-networks of drug-target interactions in specific disease were generated, and mechanisms shared by multi-target drugs and combination products were identified. In conclusion, this study performed an analysis between approved multi-target drugs and combination products against the human kinome, which could assist the discovery of next generation polypharmacology. PMID:27828998

  2. A Finite Point Process Approach to Multi-Target Localization

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-01

    82) Thus Q ( T |T(n) ) = N∑ i=1 Qi ( Ti |T (n) ) + Qcl ( T(n) ) (83) where Qi ( Ti |T (n) ) = s∑ ℓ=1 [ mℓ∑ j=1 log pD(Ti)N ( z (ℓ) j |h(Ti, Sℓ), Σw...pD(T (n) i )N ( z (ℓ) j |h(T (n) i , Sℓ), Σw ) ν(ℓ) ( z (ℓ) j |T (n) ) − ∫ T pD(Ti)N (z|h (Ti, Sℓ ) ,Σw) dz ] (84) and Qcl ( T(n) ) = s∑ ℓ=1

  3. Antisense targeting of 3' end elements involved in DUX4 mRNA processing is an efficient therapeutic strategy for facioscapulohumeral dystrophy: a new gene-silencing approach.

    PubMed

    Marsollier, Anne-Charlotte; Ciszewski, Lukasz; Mariot, Virginie; Popplewell, Linda; Voit, Thomas; Dickson, George; Dumonceaux, Julie

    2016-04-15

    Defects in mRNA 3'end formation have been described to alter transcription termination, transport of the mRNA from the nucleus to the cytoplasm, stability of the mRNA and translation efficiency. Therefore, inhibition of polyadenylation may lead to gene silencing. Here, we choose facioscapulohumeral dystrophy (FSHD) as a model to determine whether or not targeting key 3' end elements involved in mRNA processing using antisense oligonucleotide drugs can be used as a strategy for gene silencing within a potentially therapeutic context. FSHD is a gain-of-function disease characterized by the aberrant expression of the Double homeobox 4 (DUX4) transcription factor leading to altered pathogenic deregulation of multiple genes in muscles. Here, we demonstrate that targeting either the mRNA polyadenylation signal and/or cleavage site is an efficient strategy to down-regulate DUX4 expression and to decrease the abnormally high-pathological expression of genes downstream of DUX4. We conclude that targeting key functional 3' end elements involved in pre-mRNA to mRNA maturation with antisense drugs can lead to efficient gene silencing and is thus a potentially effective therapeutic strategy for at least FSHD. Moreover, polyadenylation is a crucial step in the maturation of almost all eukaryotic mRNAs, and thus all mRNAs are virtually eligible for this antisense-mediated knockdown strategy.

  4. Volatility in mRNA secondary structure as a design principle for antisense.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Erik; Srivastava, Ranjan

    2013-02-01

    Designing effective antisense sequences is a formidable problem. A method for predicting efficacious antisense holds the potential to provide fundamental insight into this biophysical process. More practically, such an understanding increases the chance of successful antisense design as well as saving considerable time, money and labor. The secondary structure of an mRNA molecule is believed to be in a constant state of flux, sampling several different suboptimal states. We hypothesized that particularly volatile regions might provide better accessibility for antisense targeting. A computational framework, GenAVERT was developed to evaluate this hypothesis. GenAVERT used UNAFold and RNAforester to generate and compare the predicted suboptimal structures of mRNA sequences. Subsequent analysis revealed regions that were particularly volatile in terms of intramolecular hydrogen bonding, and thus potentially superior antisense targets due to their high accessibility. Several mRNA sequences with known natural antisense target sites as well as artificial antisense target sites were evaluated. Upon comparison, antisense sequences predicted based upon the volatility hypothesis closely matched those of the naturally occurring antisense, as well as those artificial target sites that provided efficient down-regulation. These results suggest that this strategy may provide a powerful new approach to antisense design.

  5. Antisense oligonucleotides in therapy for neurodegenerative disorders.

    PubMed

    Evers, Melvin M; Toonen, Lodewijk J A; van Roon-Mom, Willeke M C

    2015-06-29

    Antisense oligonucleotides are synthetic single stranded strings of nucleic acids that bind to RNA and thereby alter or reduce expression of the target RNA. They can not only reduce expression of mutant proteins by breakdown of the targeted transcript, but also restore protein expression or modify proteins through interference with pre-mRNA splicing. There has been a recent revival of interest in the use of antisense oligonucleotides to treat several neurodegenerative disorders using different approaches to prevent disease onset or halt disease progression and the first clinical trials for spinal muscular atrophy and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis showing promising results. For these trials, intrathecal delivery is being used but direct infusion into the brain ventricles and several methods of passing the blood brain barrier after peripheral administration are also under investigation.

  6. Inferring multi-target QSAR models with taxonomy-based multi-task learning.

    PubMed

    Rosenbaum, Lars; Dörr, Alexander; Bauer, Matthias R; Boeckler, Frank M; Zell, Andreas

    2013-07-11

    A plethora of studies indicate that the development of multi-target drugs is beneficial for complex diseases like cancer. Accurate QSAR models for each of the desired targets assist the optimization of a lead candidate by the prediction of affinity profiles. Often, the targets of a multi-target drug are sufficiently similar such that, in principle, knowledge can be transferred between the QSAR models to improve the model accuracy. In this study, we present two different multi-task algorithms from the field of transfer learning that can exploit the similarity between several targets to transfer knowledge between the target specific QSAR models. We evaluated the two methods on simulated data and a data set of 112 human kinases assembled from the public database ChEMBL. The relatedness between the kinase targets was derived from the taxonomy of the humane kinome. The experiments show that multi-task learning increases the performance compared to training separate models on both types of data given a sufficient similarity between the tasks. On the kinase data, the best multi-task approach improved the mean squared error of the QSAR models of 58 kinase targets. Multi-task learning is a valuable approach for inferring multi-target QSAR models for lead optimization. The application of multi-task learning is most beneficial if knowledge can be transferred from a similar task with a lot of in-domain knowledge to a task with little in-domain knowledge. Furthermore, the benefit increases with a decreasing overlap between the chemical space spanned by the tasks.

  7. Antisense activity detection by inhibition of fluorescence resonance energy transfer.

    PubMed

    Benítez-Hess, M L; DiPaolo, J A; Alvarez-Salas, L M

    2004-01-01

    Use of antisense nucleic acids to modulate expression of particular genes is a promising approach to the therapy of human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV-16)-associated cervical cancer. Understandably, evaluation of the in vivo performance of synthetic antisense oligodeoxynucleotides (AS-ODNs) or ribozymes is of ultimate importance to development of effective antisense tools. Here we report the use of a bacterial reporter system based on the inhibition of fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) to measure the interaction of AS-ODNs with HPV-16 target nt 410-445, using variants of the green fluorescent protein (GFP). An optimal FRET-producing pair was selected with GFP as the donor and yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) as the acceptor molecule. Hybridization of AS-ODNs with a chimaeric mRNA containing the antisense target site flanked by GFP variants resulted in the inhibition of the FRET effect. Use of different linkers suggested that the amino acid content of the linker has no significant effect on FRET effect. Antisense accessibility, tested by RNaseH assays with phosphorothioated target-specific and mutant AS-ODNs, suggested a specific effect on the chimaeric mRNA. FRET inhibition measurements correlated with the presence of truncated proteins confirming true antisense activity over the target. Therefore, FRET inhibition may be used for the direct measurement of AS-ODNs activity in vivo. Copyright 2004 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Overlapping Antisense Transcription in the Human Genome

    PubMed Central

    Fahey, M. E.; Moore, T. F.

    2002-01-01

    Accumulating evidence indicates an important role for non-coding RNA molecules in eukaryotic cell regulation. A small number of coding and non-coding overlapping antisense transcripts (OATs) in eukaryotes have been reported, some of which regulate expression of the corresponding sense transcript. The prevalence of this phenomenon is unknown, but there may be an enrichment of such transcripts at imprinted gene loci. Taking a bioinformatics approach, we systematically searched a human mRNA database (RefSeq) for complementary regions that might facilitate pairing with other transcripts. We report 56 pairs of overlapping transcripts, in which each member of the pair is transcribed from the same locus. This allows us to make an estimate of 1000 for the minimum number of such transcript pairs in the entire human genome. This is a surprisingly large number of overlapping gene pairs and, clearly, some of the overlaps may not be functionally significant. Nonetheless, this may indicate an important general role for overlapping antisense control in gene regulation. EST databases were also investigated in order to address the prevalence of cases of imprinted genes with associated non-coding overlapping, antisense transcripts. However, EST databases were found to be completely inappropriate for this purpose. PMID:18628857

  9. The Role of Structural Elements of the 5'-Terminal Region of p53 mRNA in Translation under Stress Conditions Assayed by the Antisense Oligonucleotide Approach.

    PubMed

    Swiatkowska, Agata; Zydowicz, Paulina; Gorska, Agnieszka; Suchacka, Julia; Dutkiewicz, Mariola; Ciesiołka, Jerzy

    2015-01-01

    The p53 protein is one of the major factors responsible for cell cycle regulation and stress response. In the 5'-terminal region of p53 mRNA, an IRES element has been found which takes part in the translational regulation of p53 expression. Two characteristic hairpin motifs are present in this mRNA region: G56-C169, with the first AUG codon, and U180-A218, which interacts with the Hdm2 protein (human homolog of mouse double minute 2 protein). 2'-OMe modified antisense oligomers hybridizing to the 5'-terminal region of p53 mRNA were applied to assess the role of these structural elements in translation initiation under conditions of cellular stress. Structural changes in the RNA target occurring upon oligomers' binding were monitored by the Pb2+-induced cleavage method. The impact of antisense oligomers on the synthesis of two proteins, the full-length p53 and its isoform Δ40p53, was analysed in HT-29, MCF-7 and HepG2 cells, under normal conditions and under stress, as well as in vitro conditions. The results revealed that the hairpin U180-A218 and adjacent single-stranded region A219-A228 were predominantly responsible for high efficacy of IRES-mediated translation in the presence of stress factors. These motifs play a role of cis-acting elements which are able to modulate IRES activity, likely via interactions with protein factors.

  10. Network Pharmacology Strategies Toward Multi-Target Anticancer Therapies: From Computational Models to Experimental Design Principles

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Jing; Aittokallio, Tero

    2014-01-01

    Polypharmacology has emerged as novel means in drug discovery for improving treatment response in clinical use. However, to really capitalize on the polypharmacological effects of drugs, there is a critical need to better model and understand how the complex interactions between drugs and their cellular targets contribute to drug efficacy and possible side effects. Network graphs provide a convenient modeling framework for dealing with the fact that most drugs act on cellular systems through targeting multiple proteins both through on-target and off-target binding. Network pharmacology models aim at addressing questions such as how and where in the disease network should one target to inhibit disease phenotypes, such as cancer growth, ideally leading to therapies that are less vulnerable to drug resistance and side effects by means of attacking the disease network at the systems level through synergistic and synthetic lethal interactions. Since the exponentially increasing number of potential drug target combinations makes pure experimental approach quickly unfeasible, this review depicts a number of computational models and algorithms that can effectively reduce the search space for determining the most promising combinations for experimental evaluation. Such computational-experimental strategies are geared toward realizing the full potential of multi-target treatments in different disease phenotypes. Our specific focus is on system-level network approaches to polypharmacology designs in anticancer drug discovery, where we give representative examples of how network-centric modeling may offer systematic strategies toward better understanding and even predicting the phenotypic responses to multi-target therapies.

  11. Role of moving average analysis for development of multi-target (Q)SAR models.

    PubMed

    Khatri, N; Dutt, R; Madan, A K

    2015-01-01

    In modern drug discovery era, multi target- quantitative structure activity relationship [mt- (Q)SAR] approaches have emerged as novel and powerful alternatives in the field of in-silico drug design so as to facilitate the discovery of new chemical entities with multiple biological activities. Amongst various machine learning approaches, moving average analysis (MAA) has frequently exhibited high accuracy of prediction of diverse biological activities against different biological targets and experimental conditions. Role of MAA in developing (Q)SAR models for prediction of single/dual or multi target activity has been briefly reviewed in the present article. Subsequently, MAA was successfully utilized for developing mt-(Q)SAR models for simultaneous prediction of anti-Plasmodium falciparum and anti-Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense activities of benzyl phenyl ether derivatives. The statistical significance of models was assessed through intercorrelation analysis, sensitivity, specificity and Matthew's correlation coefficient. Proposed MAA based models were also validated using test set. High predictability of the order of 80% to 95% amalgamated with safety (indicated by high value of selectivity index) of proposed mt-(Q)SAR models justifies use of MAA in developing models in order to obtain more realistic and accurate results for prediction of anti-protozal activity against multiple targets. Active ranges of the proposed models can play a significant role in the development of novel, potent, versatile and safe anti-protozoal drugs with improved profile in terms of both anti-Plasmodium falciparum and anti-Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense activities.

  12. Designing Multi-Targeted Therapeutics for the Treatment of Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Orhan, Ilkay Erdogan; Senol, F Sezer

    2016-01-01

    Due to multi-faceted pathology of AD; no drug can seize the progress of the disease, whereas only the symptomatic treatment is available at the moment. Several drug classes to treat AD are available in clinical use, AChEIs being the most prescribed. In addition to AChEIs, secretase enzymes and iron chelators have turned out to be the focus of research and the popular targets in drug discovery against AD. The latest approaches such as immunotherapy, multi-targeted drug ligand design, AChE inhibitors, antioxidants, metal chelators, monoamine oxidase (MAO) inhibitors, antiinflammatory drugs, and N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) inhibitors are currently in use to cure this disease to some extent. But, there is a certain need to develop new drugs to fight with AD, particularly acting on multi-targets or with dual mechanisms of action. In this review, a particular emphasis will be focused on multitargets aiming at AD to design new drug molecules with respect to treatment strategies and preventive measures. Since the underlying pathogenesis of AD is complicated and still under investigation, the attempts to design highly selective and potent agents to treat AD are quite intensively continuing. In this respect, designing novel drugs with dual/multi-acting mechanisms seems to be more rational.

  13. A Parallel Finite Set Statistical Simulator for Multi-Target Detection and Tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussein, I.; MacMillan, R.

    2014-09-01

    Finite Set Statistics (FISST) is a powerful Bayesian inference tool for the joint detection, classification and tracking of multi-target environments. FISST is capable of handling phenomena such as clutter, misdetections, and target birth and decay. Implicit within the approach are solutions to the data association and target label-tracking problems. Finally, FISST provides generalized information measures that can be used for sensor allocation across different types of tasks such as: searching for new targets, and classification and tracking of known targets. These FISST capabilities have been demonstrated on several small-scale illustrative examples. However, for implementation in a large-scale system as in the Space Situational Awareness problem, these capabilities require a lot of computational power. In this paper, we implement FISST in a parallel environment for the joint detection and tracking of multi-target systems. In this implementation, false alarms and misdetections will be modeled. Target birth and decay will not be modeled in the present paper. We will demonstrate the success of the method for as many targets as we possibly can in a desktop parallel environment. Performance measures will include: number of targets in the simulation, certainty of detected target tracks, computational time as a function of clutter returns and number of targets, among other factors.

  14. Antibacterial Drug Leads: DNA and Enzyme Multi-Targeting

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Wei; Wang, Yang; Li, Kai; Gao, Jian; Huang, Chun-Hsiang; Chen, Chun-Chi; Ko, Tzu-Ping; Zhang, Yonghui; Guo, Rey-Ting; Oldfield, Eric

    2015-01-01

    We report the results of an investigation of the activity of a series of amidine and bisamidine compounds against Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli. The most active compounds bound to an AT-rich DNA dodecamer (CGCGAATTCGCG)2, and using DSC were found to increase the melting transition by up to 24 °C. Several compounds also inhibited undecaprenyl diphosphate synthase (UPPS) with IC50 values of 100–500 nM and we found good correlations (R2 = 0.89, S. aureus; R2 = 0.79, E. coli)) between experimental and predicted cell growth inhibition by using DNA ΔTm and UPPS IC50 experimental results together with 1 computed descriptor. We also solved the structures of three bisamidines binding to DNA as well as three UPPS structures. Overall, the results are of general interest in the context of the development of resistance-resistant antibiotics that involve multi-targeting. PMID:25574764

  15. Deterministic optimal maneuver strategy for multi-target missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dwivedi, N. P.

    1975-01-01

    This paper presents an optimal strategy for making impulsive correction to a multi-target trajectory by a single maneuver. The concept of an optimal maneuver time is introduced. The choice of suitable weighting functions is explored to enable one to properly translate the subjective desire of mission success into an objective cost function whose minimization yields the optimal strategy. It is shown that a number of strategies previously formulated are derivable from one general expression. A number of other interesting properties of the optimal strategy are described. Numerical results are presented for a typical two-target mission. It is shown that the strategy formulated is optimal. For some perturbations, there exists an optimal maneuver time different from the time of initiation of the perturbation. That is, the physical properties of the trajectory can be exploited to select the optimal time of making a corrective maneuver.

  16. Multi-Robot, Multi-Target Particle Swarm Optimization Search in Noisy Wireless Environments

    SciTech Connect

    Kurt Derr; Milos Manic

    2009-05-01

    Multiple small robots (swarms) can work together using Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO) to perform tasks that are difficult or impossible for a single robot to accomplish. The problem considered in this paper is exploration of an unknown environment with the goal of finding a target(s) at an unknown location(s) using multiple small mobile robots. This work demonstrates the use of a distributed PSO algorithm with a novel adaptive RSS weighting factor to guide robots for locating target(s) in high risk environments. The approach was developed and analyzed on multiple robot single and multiple target search. The approach was further enhanced by the multi-robot-multi-target search in noisy environments. The experimental results demonstrated how the availability of radio frequency signal can significantly affect robot search time to reach a target.

  17. Real-Time Multi-Target Localization from Unmanned Aerial Vehicles.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xuan; Liu, Jinghong; Zhou, Qianfei

    2016-12-25

    In order to improve the reconnaissance efficiency of unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) electro-optical stabilized imaging systems, a real-time multi-target localization scheme based on an UAV electro-optical stabilized imaging system is proposed. First, a target location model is studied. Then, the geodetic coordinates of multi-targets are calculated using the homogeneous coordinate transformation. On the basis of this, two methods which can improve the accuracy of the multi-target localization are proposed: (1) the real-time zoom lens distortion correction method; (2) a recursive least squares (RLS) filtering method based on UAV dead reckoning. The multi-target localization error model is established using Monte Carlo theory. In an actual flight, the UAV flight altitude is 1140 m. The multi-target localization results are within the range of allowable error. After we use a lens distortion correction method in a single image, the circular error probability (CEP) of the multi-target localization is reduced by 7%, and 50 targets can be located at the same time. The RLS algorithm can adaptively estimate the location data based on multiple images. Compared with multi-target localization based on a single image, CEP of the multi-target localization using RLS is reduced by 25%. The proposed method can be implemented on a small circuit board to operate in real time. This research is expected to significantly benefit small UAVs which need multi-target geo-location functions.

  18. Real-Time Multi-Target Localization from Unmanned Aerial Vehicles

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xuan; Liu, Jinghong; Zhou, Qianfei

    2016-01-01

    In order to improve the reconnaissance efficiency of unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) electro-optical stabilized imaging systems, a real-time multi-target localization scheme based on an UAV electro-optical stabilized imaging system is proposed. First, a target location model is studied. Then, the geodetic coordinates of multi-targets are calculated using the homogeneous coordinate transformation. On the basis of this, two methods which can improve the accuracy of the multi-target localization are proposed: (1) the real-time zoom lens distortion correction method; (2) a recursive least squares (RLS) filtering method based on UAV dead reckoning. The multi-target localization error model is established using Monte Carlo theory. In an actual flight, the UAV flight altitude is 1140 m. The multi-target localization results are within the range of allowable error. After we use a lens distortion correction method in a single image, the circular error probability (CEP) of the multi-target localization is reduced by 7%, and 50 targets can be located at the same time. The RLS algorithm can adaptively estimate the location data based on multiple images. Compared with multi-target localization based on a single image, CEP of the multi-target localization using RLS is reduced by 25%. The proposed method can be implemented on a small circuit board to operate in real time. This research is expected to significantly benefit small UAVs which need multi-target geo-location functions. PMID:28029145

  19. Antisense Oligonucleotides Used to Target the DUX4 mRNA as Therapeutic Approaches in FaciosScapuloHumeral Muscular Dystrophy (FSHD).

    PubMed

    Ansseau, Eugénie; Vanderplanck, Céline; Wauters, Armelle; Harper, Scott Q; Coppée, Frédérique; Belayew, Alexandra

    2017-03-03

    FacioScapuloHumeral muscular Dystrophy (FSHD) is one of the most prevalent hereditary myopathies and is generally characterized by progressive muscle atrophy affecting the face, scapular fixators; upper arms and distal lower legs. The FSHD locus maps to a macrosatellite D4Z4 repeat array on chromosome 4q35. Each D4Z4 unit contains a DUX4 gene; the most distal of which is flanked by a polyadenylation site on FSHD-permissive alleles, which allows for production of stable DUX4 mRNAs. In addition, an open chromatin structure is required for DUX4 gene transcription. FSHD thus results from a gain of function of the toxic DUX4 protein that normally is only expressed in germ line and stem cells. Therapeutic strategies are emerging that aim to decrease DUX4 expression or toxicity in FSHD muscle cells. We review here the heterogeneity of DUX4 mRNAs observed in muscle and stem cells; and the use of antisense oligonucleotides (AOs) targeting the DUX4 mRNA to interfere either with transcript cleavage/polyadenylation or intron splicing. We show in primary cultures that DUX4-targeted AOs suppress the atrophic FSHD myotube phenotype; but do not improve the disorganized FSHD myotube phenotype which could be caused by DUX4c over-expression. Thus; DUX4c might constitute another therapeutic target in FSHD.

  20. Antisense Oligonucleotides Used to Target the DUX4 mRNA as Therapeutic Approaches in FaciosScapuloHumeral Muscular Dystrophy (FSHD)

    PubMed Central

    Ansseau, Eugénie; Vanderplanck, Céline; Wauters, Armelle; Harper, Scott Q.; Coppée, Frédérique; Belayew, Alexandra

    2017-01-01

    FacioScapuloHumeral muscular Dystrophy (FSHD) is one of the most prevalent hereditary myopathies and is generally characterized by progressive muscle atrophy affecting the face, scapular fixators; upper arms and distal lower legs. The FSHD locus maps to a macrosatellite D4Z4 repeat array on chromosome 4q35. Each D4Z4 unit contains a DUX4 gene; the most distal of which is flanked by a polyadenylation site on FSHD-permissive alleles, which allows for production of stable DUX4 mRNAs. In addition, an open chromatin structure is required for DUX4 gene transcription. FSHD thus results from a gain of function of the toxic DUX4 protein that normally is only expressed in germ line and stem cells. Therapeutic strategies are emerging that aim to decrease DUX4 expression or toxicity in FSHD muscle cells. We review here the heterogeneity of DUX4 mRNAs observed in muscle and stem cells; and the use of antisense oligonucleotides (AOs) targeting the DUX4 mRNA to interfere either with transcript cleavage/polyadenylation or intron splicing. We show in primary cultures that DUX4-targeted AOs suppress the atrophic FSHD myotube phenotype; but do not improve the disorganized FSHD myotube phenotype which could be caused by DUX4c over-expression. Thus; DUX4c might constitute another therapeutic target in FSHD. PMID:28273791

  1. MULTI-TARGETED THERAPY OF CANCER BY GENISTEIN

    PubMed Central

    BANERJEE, SANJEEV; LI, YIWEI; WANG, ZHIWEI; SARKAR, FAZLUL H.

    2008-01-01

    Soy isoflavones have been identified as dietary components having an important role in reducing the incidence of breast and prostate cancers in Asian countries. Genistein, the predominant isoflavone found in soy products, has been shown to inhibit the carcinogenesis in animal models. There is a growing body of experimental evidence showing that the inhibition of human cancer cell growth by genisteinis mediated via the modulation of genes that are related to the control of cell cycle and apoptosis. It has been shown that genistein inhibits the activation of NF-κB and Akt signaling pathways, both of which are known to maintain a homeostatic balance between cell survival and apoptosis. Moreover, genistein antagonizes estrogen- and androgen-mediated signaling pathways in the processes of carcinogenesis. Furthermore, genistein has been found to have antioxidant properties, and shown to be a potent inhibitor of angiogenesis and metastasis. Taken together, both in vivo and in vitro studies have clearly shown that genistein, one of the major soy isoflavones, is a promising agent for cancer chemoprevention and further suggest that it could be an adjunct to cancer therapy by virtue of its effects on reversing radioresistance and chemoresistance. In this review, we attempt to provide evidence for these preventive and therapeutic effects of genistein in a succinct manner highlighting comprehensive state-of-the-art knowledge regarding its multi-targeted biological and molecular effects in cancer cells. PMID:18492603

  2. Multi-target pursuit formation of multi-agent systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Jing; Guan, Xin-Ping; Luo, Xiao-Yuan

    2011-01-01

    The main goal of this paper is to design a team of agents that can accomplish multi-target pursuit formation using a developed leader—follower strategy. It is supposed that every target can accept a certain number of agents. First, each agent can automatically choose its target based on the distance from the agent to the target and the number of agents accepted by the target. In view of the fact that all agents are randomly dispersed in the workplace at the initial time, we present a numbering strategy for them. During the movement of agents, not every agent can always obtain pertinent state information about the targets. So, a developed leader—follower strategy and a pursuit formation algorithm are proposed. Under the proposed method, agents with the same target can maintain a circle formation. Furthermore, it turns out that the pursuit formation algorithm for agents to the desired formation is convergent. Simulation studies are provided to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  3. A network-based multi-target computational estimation scheme for anticoagulant activities of compounds.

    PubMed

    Li, Qian; Li, Xudong; Li, Canghai; Chen, Lirong; Song, Jun; Tang, Yalin; Xu, Xiaojie

    2011-03-22

    Traditional virtual screening method pays more attention on predicted binding affinity between drug molecule and target related to a certain disease instead of phenotypic data of drug molecule against disease system, as is often less effective on discovery of the drug which is used to treat many types of complex diseases. Virtual screening against a complex disease by general network estimation has become feasible with the development of network biology and system biology. More effective methods of computational estimation for the whole efficacy of a compound in a complex disease system are needed, given the distinct weightiness of the different target in a biological process and the standpoint that partial inhibition of several targets can be more efficient than the complete inhibition of a single target. We developed a novel approach by integrating the affinity predictions from multi-target docking studies with biological network efficiency analysis to estimate the anticoagulant activities of compounds. From results of network efficiency calculation for human clotting cascade, factor Xa and thrombin were identified as the two most fragile enzymes, while the catalytic reaction mediated by complex IXa:VIIIa and the formation of the complex VIIIa:IXa were recognized as the two most fragile biological matter in the human clotting cascade system. Furthermore, the method which combined network efficiency with molecular docking scores was applied to estimate the anticoagulant activities of a serial of argatroban intermediates and eight natural products respectively. The better correlation (r = 0.671) between the experimental data and the decrease of the network deficiency suggests that the approach could be a promising computational systems biology tool to aid identification of anticoagulant activities of compounds in drug discovery. This article proposes a network-based multi-target computational estimation method for anticoagulant activities of compounds by

  4. Pharmaceutical prerequisites for a multi-target therapy.

    PubMed

    Kroll, U; Cordes, C

    2006-01-01

    The quality of a phytomedicine is defined by the quality of the herbal drug, the manufacturing of the drug preparations and the properties of the finished product, taking into account the special requirements of the individual herbal species in accordance with Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP) standards [2003. Medicinal Products for Human and Veterinary Use. Eudralex, vol. 4 (2003/94/EC)]. The quality control of the complete process is based on pharmacognostic methods, characteristic fingerprint chromatograms, defined amounts of marker substances, physicochemical characteristics and microbiological monitoring. For a herbal multi-component preparation used in multi-target therapy, these pharmaceutical prerequisites have to be ensured for all components and for their combination, as is exemplified by Iberogast((R)) (STW 5) a fixed combination of hydroethanolic extracts of bitter candytuft (Iberis amara), angelica root (Angelicae radix), milk thistle fruit (Silybi mariani fructus), celandine herb (Chelidonii herba), caraway fruit (Carvi fructus), liquorice root (Liquiritiae radix), peppermint herb (Menthae piperitae folium), balm leaf (Melissae folium) and chamomile flower (Matricariae flos) using in the therapy of gastrointestinal complaints (Rösch et al., 2006). The prerequisites for the quality of each of its components according to actual standards are at first the cultivation of the plant material according to the Guidelines for Good Agricultural Practice (GAP) conditions of Medicinal and Aromatic Plants [1998. Z. Arzn. Gew. Pfl. 3, 166-178] to yield a defined raw material of high quality. Characteristic compounds of the extracts had to be identified and different analytical methods such as HPLC, with low coefficients of variation had to be developed to analyze each of the standardized ethanolic extracts and the finished product. At the example of the extract of I. amara these necessary investigations are described. The variability of the plant material in its

  5. Antisense Oligonucleotide Therapy in Diabetic Retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Hnik, Peter; Boyer, David S.; Grillone, Lisa R.; Clement, John G.; Henry, Scott P.; Green, Ellen A.

    2009-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy is one of the leading causes of blindness in the United States and other parts of the world. Historically, laser photocoagulation and vitrectomy surgery have been used for the treatment of diabetic retinopathy, including diabetic macular edema. Both procedures have proven to be useful under certain conditions but have their limitations. New pathways and processes that promote diabetic retinopathy have been identified, and several new therapeutic approaches are under investigation. These new therapies may be beneficial in the treatment of diabetic retinopathy and include antivascular endothelial growth factor agents, corticosteroids, and therapies that may potentially target a number of additional diabetic retinopathy-related factors and processes, including antisense oligonucleotides. Second-generation antisense oligonucleotides, such as iCo-007, may offer a significant advantage in the treatment of diabetic retinopathy by downregulating the signal pathways of multiple growth factors that seem to play a critical role in the process of ocular angiogenesis and vascular leakage. Benefits of such molecules are expected to include the specificity of the kinase target and an extended half-life, resulting in less frequent intravitreal drug administration, resistance to molecule degradation, and a good safety profile. PMID:20144342

  6. Antisense Treatments for Biothreat Agents

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-08-01

    oligomers (ASOs) represent a promising technology to treat viral and bacterial infections, and have already been shown to be successful against a...viral and bacterial agents have a history of state- sponsored ’weaponization’, including Marburg, Ebola, Junin, Machupo, yellow fever viruses and...14. ABSTRACT Antisense oligomers (ASOs) represent a promising technology to treat viral and bacterial infections, and have already been shown to be

  7. Antisense Reduction of Mutant COMP Reduces Growth Plate Chondrocyte Pathology.

    PubMed

    Posey, Karen L; Coustry, Francoise; Veerisetty, Alka C; Hossain, Mohammad; Gattis, Danielle; Booten, Sheri; Alcorn, Joseph L; Seth, Punit P; Hecht, Jacqueline T

    2017-03-01

    Mutations in cartilage oligomeric matrix protein cause pseudoachondroplasia, a severe disproportionate short stature disorder. Mutant cartilage oligomeric matrix protein produces massive intracellular retention of cartilage oligomeric matrix protein, stimulating ER and oxidative stresses and inflammation, culminating in post-natal loss of growth plate chondrocytes, which compromises linear bone growth. Treatments for pseudoachondroplasia are limited because cartilage is relatively avascular and considered inaccessible. Here we report successful delivery and treatment using antisense oligonucleotide technology in our transgenic pseudoachondroplasia mouse model. We demonstrate delivery of human cartilage oligomeric matrix protein-specific antisense oligonucleotides to cartilage and reduction of cartilage oligomeric matrix protein expression, which largely alleviates pseudoachondroplasia growth plate chondrocyte pathology. One antisense oligonucleotide reduced steady-state levels of cartilage oligomeric matrix protein mRNA and dampened intracellular retention of mutant cartilage oligomeric matrix protein, leading to a reduction of inflammatory markers and cell death and partial restoration of proliferation. This novel and exciting work demonstrates that antisense-based therapy is a viable approach for treating pseudoachondroplasia and other human cartilage disorders. Copyright © 2017 The American Society of Gene and Cell Therapy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Spt4 selectively regulates the expression of C9orf72 sense and antisense mutant transcripts.

    PubMed

    Kramer, Nicholas J; Carlomagno, Yari; Zhang, Yong-Jie; Almeida, Sandra; Cook, Casey N; Gendron, Tania F; Prudencio, Mercedes; Van Blitterswijk, Marka; Belzil, Veronique; Couthouis, Julien; Paul, Joseph West; Goodman, Lindsey D; Daughrity, Lillian; Chew, Jeannie; Garrett, Aliesha; Pregent, Luc; Jansen-West, Karen; Tabassian, Lilia J; Rademakers, Rosa; Boylan, Kevin; Graff-Radford, Neill R; Josephs, Keith A; Parisi, Joseph E; Knopman, David S; Petersen, Ronald C; Boeve, Bradley F; Deng, Ning; Feng, Yanan; Cheng, Tzu-Hao; Dickson, Dennis W; Cohen, Stanley N; Bonini, Nancy M; Link, Christopher D; Gao, Fen-Biao; Petrucelli, Leonard; Gitler, Aaron D

    2016-08-12

    An expanded hexanucleotide repeat in C9orf72 causes amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and frontotemporal dementia (c9FTD/ALS). Therapeutics are being developed to target RNAs containing the expanded repeat sequence (GGGGCC); however, this approach is complicated by the presence of antisense strand transcription of expanded GGCCCC repeats. We found that targeting the transcription elongation factor Spt4 selectively decreased production of both sense and antisense expanded transcripts, as well as their translated dipeptide repeat (DPR) products, and also mitigated degeneration in animal models. Knockdown of SUPT4H1, the human Spt4 ortholog, similarly decreased production of sense and antisense RNA foci, as well as DPR proteins, in patient cells. Therapeutic targeting of a single factor to eliminate c9FTD/ALS pathological features offers advantages over approaches that require targeting sense and antisense repeats separately.

  9. Multi-target siRNA: Therapeutic Strategy for Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Li, Tiejun; Xue, Yuwen; Wang, Guilan; Gu, Tingting; Li, Yunlong; Zhu, York Yuanyuan; Chen, Li

    2016-01-01

    Multiple targets RNAi strategy is a preferred way to treat multigenic diseases, especially cancers. In the study, multi-target siRNAs were designed to inhibit NET-1, EMS1 and VEGF genes in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells. And multi-target siRNAs showed better silencing effects on NET-1, EMS1 and VEGF, compared with single target siRNA. Moreover, multi-target siRNA showed greater suppression effects on proliferation, migration, invasion, angiogenesis and induced apoptosis in HCC cells. The results suggested that multi-target siRNA might be a preferred strategy for cancer therapy and NET-1, EMS1 and VEGF could be effective targets for HCC treatments. PMID:27390607

  10. Computer Aided Drug Design for Multi-Target Drug Design: SAR /QSAR, Molecular Docking and Pharmacophore Methods.

    PubMed

    Abdolmaleki, Azizeh; Ghasemi, Jahan B; Ghasemi, Fatemeh

    2017-01-01

    Multi-target drugs against particular multiple targets get better protection, resistance profiles and curative influence by cooperative rules of a key beneficial target with resistance behavior and compensatory elements. Computational techniques can assist us in the efforts to design novel drugs (ligands) with a preferred bioactivity outline and alternative bioactive molecules at an early stage. A number of in silico methods have been explored extensively in order to facilitate the investigation of individual target agents and to propose a selective drug. A different, progressively more significant field which is used to predict the bioactivity of chemical compounds is the data mining method. Some of the previously mentioned methods have been investigated for multi-target drug design (MTDD) to find drug leads interact simultaneously with multiple targets. Several cheminformatics methods and structure-based approaches try to extract information from units working cooperatively in a biomolecular system to fulfill their task. To dominate the difficulties of the experimental specification of ligand-target structures, rational methods, namely molecular docking, SAR and QSAR are vital substitutes to obtain knowledge for each structure in atomic insight. These procedures are logically successful for the prediction of binding affinity and have shown promising potential in facilitating MTDD. Here, we review some of the important features of the multi-target therapeutics discoveries using the computational approach, highlighting the SAR, QSAR, docking and pharmacophore methods to discover interactions between drug-target that could be leveraged for curative benefits. A summary of each, followed by examples of its applications in drug design has been provided. Computational efficiency of each method has been represented according to its main strengths and limitations. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  11. The role of multi-target policy instruments in agri-environmental policy mixes.

    PubMed

    Schader, Christian; Lampkin, Nicholas; Muller, Adrian; Stolze, Matthias

    2014-12-01

    The Tinbergen Rule has been used to criticise multi-target policy instruments for being inefficient. The aim of this paper is to clarify the role of multi-target policy instruments using the case of agri-environmental policy. Employing an analytical linear optimisation model, this paper demonstrates that there is no general contradiction between multi-target policy instruments and the Tinbergen Rule, if multi-target policy instruments are embedded in a policy-mix with a sufficient number of targeted instruments. We show that the relation between cost-effectiveness of the instruments, related to all policy targets, is the key determinant for an economically sound choice of policy instruments. If economies of scope with respect to achieving policy targets are realised, a higher cost-effectiveness of multi-target policy instruments can be achieved. Using the example of organic farming support policy, we discuss several reasons why economies of scope could be realised by multi-target agri-environmental policy instruments. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Monoamino oxidase a: an interesting pharmacological target for the development of multi-target QSAR.

    PubMed

    Molina, Enrique; Sobarzo-Sanchez, Eduardo; Speck-Planche, Alejandro; Matos, Maria Joao; Uriarte, Eugenio; Santana, Lourdes; Yanez, Matilde; Orallo, Francisco

    2012-09-01

    With the significant increase of life expectancy of populations in societies today, the importance of the discovery of drugs associated with neurodegenerative diseases has emerged. Therefore, neurodegenerative diseases are an important topic in Medicinal Chemistry. Although drug discovery is considered a complex and slow process, new approaches and methods have been developed with the intention of finding new chemical entities in more efficient ways. This work provides a review of virtual methodologies applied in drug discovery and especially a new model for the prediction of MAO-A inhibitors using a multi-target QSAR methodology. This model involves a mixed approach containing simple descriptors based on atom-centered fragments and functional groups (DRAGON) and topological substructural molecular design descriptors (MODESLAB). This unified multi-species QSAR model was validated through a virtual screening of a new series of oxoisoaporphine derivatives, taking into account the information in the calculated fragmental contributions. Therefore, this method represents a useful tool for the in silico screening of MAO-A inhibitors.

  13. Powerful inner/outer controlled multi-target magnetic nanoparticle drug carrier prepared by liquid photo-immobilization

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Yan-Qing; Zheng, Zhe; Huang, Zheng; Li, Zhibin; Niu, Shuiqin; Liu, Jun-Ming

    2014-01-01

    Nanomagnetic materials offer exciting avenues for advancing cancer therapies. Most researches have focused on efficient delivery of drugs in the body by incorporating various drug molecules onto the surface of nanomagnetic particles. The challenge is how to synthesize low toxic nanocarriers with multi-target drug loading. The cancer cell death mechanisms associated with those nanocarriers remain unclear either. Following the cell biology mechanisms, we develop a liquid photo-immobilization approach to attach doxorubicin, folic acid, tumor necrosis factor-α, and interferon-γ onto the oleic acid molecules coated Fe3O4 magnetic nanoparticles to prepare a kind of novel inner/outer controlled multi-target magnetic nanoparticle drug carrier. In this work, this approach is demonstrated by a variety of structural and biomedical characterizations, addressing the anti-cancer effects in vivo and in vitro on the HeLa, and it is highly efficient and powerful in treating cancer cells in a valuable programmed cell death mechanism for overcoming drug resistance. PMID:24845203

  14. Extending multi-tenant architectures: a database model for a multi-target support in SaaS applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rico, Antonio; Noguera, Manuel; Garrido, José Luis; Benghazi, Kawtar; Barjis, Joseph

    2016-05-01

    Multi-tenant architectures (MTAs) are considered a cornerstone in the success of Software as a Service as a new application distribution formula. Multi-tenancy allows multiple customers (i.e. tenants) to be consolidated into the same operational system. This way, tenants run and share the same application instance as well as costs, which are significantly reduced. Functional needs vary from one tenant to another; either companies from different sectors run different types of applications or, although deploying the same functionality, they do differ in the extent of their complexity. In any case, MTA leaves one major concern regarding the companies' data, their privacy and security, which requires special attention to the data layer. In this article, we propose an extended data model that enhances traditional MTAs in respect of this concern. This extension - called multi-target - allows MT applications to host, manage and serve multiple functionalities within the same multi-tenant (MT) environment. The practical deployment of this approach will allow SaaS vendors to target multiple markets or address different levels of functional complexity and yet commercialise just one single MT application. The applicability of the approach is demonstrated via a case study of a real multi-tenancy multi-target (MT2) implementation, called Globalgest.

  15. Powerful inner/outer controlled multi-target magnetic nanoparticle drug carrier prepared by liquid photo-immobilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, Yan-Qing; Zheng, Zhe; Huang, Zheng; Li, Zhibin; Niu, Shuiqin; Liu, Jun-Ming

    2014-05-01

    Nanomagnetic materials offer exciting avenues for advancing cancer therapies. Most researches have focused on efficient delivery of drugs in the body by incorporating various drug molecules onto the surface of nanomagnetic particles. The challenge is how to synthesize low toxic nanocarriers with multi-target drug loading. The cancer cell death mechanisms associated with those nanocarriers remain unclear either. Following the cell biology mechanisms, we develop a liquid photo-immobilization approach to attach doxorubicin, folic acid, tumor necrosis factor-α, and interferon-γ onto the oleic acid molecules coated Fe3O4 magnetic nanoparticles to prepare a kind of novel inner/outer controlled multi-target magnetic nanoparticle drug carrier. In this work, this approach is demonstrated by a variety of structural and biomedical characterizations, addressing the anti-cancer effects in vivo and in vitro on the HeLa, and it is highly efficient and powerful in treating cancer cells in a valuable programmed cell death mechanism for overcoming drug resistance.

  16. Monoaminergic Mechanisms in Epilepsy May Offer Innovative Therapeutic Opportunity for Monoaminergic Multi-Target Drugs.

    PubMed

    Svob Strac, Dubravka; Pivac, Nela; Smolders, Ilse J; Fogel, Wieslawa A; De Deurwaerdere, Philippe; Di Giovanni, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    A large body of experimental and clinical evidence has strongly suggested that monoamines play an important role in regulating epileptogenesis, seizure susceptibility, convulsions, and comorbid psychiatric disorders commonly seen in people with epilepsy (PWE). However, neither the relative significance of individual monoamines nor their interaction has yet been fully clarified due to the complexity of these neurotransmitter systems. In addition, epilepsy is diverse, with many different seizure types and epilepsy syndromes, and the role played by monoamines may vary from one condition to another. In this review, we will focus on the role of serotonin, dopamine, noradrenaline, histamine, and melatonin in epilepsy. Recent experimental, clinical, and genetic evidence will be reviewed in consideration of the mutual relationship of monoamines with the other putative neurotransmitters. The complexity of epileptic pathogenesis may explain why the currently available drugs, developed according to the classic drug discovery paradigm of "one-molecule-one-target," have turned out to be effective only in a percentage of PWE. Although, no antiepileptic drugs currently target specifically monoaminergic systems, multi-target directed ligands acting on different monoaminergic proteins, present on both neurons and glia cells, may represent a new approach in the management of seizures, and their generation as well as comorbid neuropsychiatric disorders.

  17. Monoaminergic Mechanisms in Epilepsy May Offer Innovative Therapeutic Opportunity for Monoaminergic Multi-Target Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Svob Strac, Dubravka; Pivac, Nela; Smolders, Ilse J.; Fogel, Wieslawa A.; De Deurwaerdere, Philippe; Di Giovanni, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    A large body of experimental and clinical evidence has strongly suggested that monoamines play an important role in regulating epileptogenesis, seizure susceptibility, convulsions, and comorbid psychiatric disorders commonly seen in people with epilepsy (PWE). However, neither the relative significance of individual monoamines nor their interaction has yet been fully clarified due to the complexity of these neurotransmitter systems. In addition, epilepsy is diverse, with many different seizure types and epilepsy syndromes, and the role played by monoamines may vary from one condition to another. In this review, we will focus on the role of serotonin, dopamine, noradrenaline, histamine, and melatonin in epilepsy. Recent experimental, clinical, and genetic evidence will be reviewed in consideration of the mutual relationship of monoamines with the other putative neurotransmitters. The complexity of epileptic pathogenesis may explain why the currently available drugs, developed according to the classic drug discovery paradigm of “one-molecule-one-target,” have turned out to be effective only in a percentage of PWE. Although, no antiepileptic drugs currently target specifically monoaminergic systems, multi-target directed ligands acting on different monoaminergic proteins, present on both neurons and glia cells, may represent a new approach in the management of seizures, and their generation as well as comorbid neuropsychiatric disorders. PMID:27891070

  18. Curcumin: A multi-target disease-modifying agent for late-stage transthyretin amyloidosis

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Nelson; Gonçalves, Nádia P.; Saraiva, Maria J.; Almeida, Maria R.

    2016-01-01

    Transthyretin amyloidoses encompass a variety of acquired and hereditary diseases triggered by systemic extracellular accumulation of toxic transthyretin aggregates and fibrils, particularly in the peripheral nervous system. Since transthyretin amyloidoses are typically complex progressive disorders, therapeutic approaches aiming multiple molecular targets simultaneously, might improve therapy efficacy and treatment outcome. In this study, we evaluate the protective effect of physiologically achievable doses of curcumin on the cytotoxicity induced by transthyretin oligomers in vitro by showing reduction of caspase-3 activity and the levels of endoplasmic reticulum-resident chaperone binding immunoglobulin protein. When given to an aged Familial Amyloidotic Polyneuropathy mouse model, curcumin not only reduced transthyretin aggregates deposition and toxicity in both gastrointestinal tract and dorsal root ganglia but also remodeled congophilic amyloid material in tissues. In addition, curcumin enhanced internalization, intracellular transport and degradation of transthyretin oligomers by primary macrophages from aged Familial Amyloidotic Polyneuropathy transgenic mice, suggesting an impaired activation of naïve phagocytic cells exposed to transthyretin toxic intermediate species. Overall, our results clearly support curcumin or optimized derivatives as promising multi-target disease-modifying agent for late-stage transthyretin amyloidosis. PMID:27197872

  19. Functionalization of an Antisense Small RNA.

    PubMed

    Rodrigo, Guillermo; Prakash, Satya; Cordero, Teresa; Kushwaha, Manish; Jaramillo, Alfonso

    2016-02-27

    In order to explore the possibility of adding new functions to preexisting genes, we considered a framework of riboregulation. We created a new riboregulator consisting of the reverse complement of a known riboregulator. Using computational design, we engineered a cis-repressing 5' untranslated region that can be activated by this new riboregulator. As a result, both RNAs can orthogonally trans-activate translation of their cognate, independent targets. The two riboregulators can also repress each other by antisense interaction, although not symmetrically. Our work highlights that antisense small RNAs can work as regulatory agents beyond the antisense paradigm and that, hence, they could be interfaced with other circuits used in synthetic biology.

  20. Multi-target strategy to address Alzheimer's disease: design, synthesis and biological evaluation of new tacrine-based dimers.

    PubMed

    Rizzo, Stefano; Bisi, Alessandra; Bartolini, Manuela; Mancini, Francesca; Belluti, Federica; Gobbi, Silvia; Andrisano, Vincenza; Rampa, Angela

    2011-09-01

    The multifactorial nature of Alzheimer's disease (AD) offers us a textbook example where parental compounds, mostly marketed, are modified with the aim of improving and/or conferring two or even more biological activities to contrast or less frequently revert the disease's symptoms. This is the case of tacrine and its dimeric derivative bis(7)-tacrine which, for instance, paved the way for the development of a broad collection of very interesting homo- and heterodimeric structures, conceived in light of the emerging multi-target approach for AD-related drug discovery. As a contribution to the topic, we report here the design, synthesis and biological evaluation of 12 compounds referable to bis(7)-tacrine. In addition to the cholinesterase activity, some of the selected compounds (7-9 and 12) were capable of inhibiting the non-enzymatic function of AChE and/or showed a remarkable activity against BACE1. Thus, the present study outlines a series of newly synthesized molecules, structurally related to bis(7)-tacrine, endowed with extended biological profile in agreement with the emerging multi-target paradigm.

  1. Antisense oligodeoxynucleotide to the cystic fibrosis gene inhibits anion transport in normal cultured sweat duct cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sorscher, E.J.; Kirk, K.L.; Weaver, M.L.; Jilling, T.; Blalock, J.E.; LeBoeuf, R.D. )

    1991-09-01

    The authors have tested the hypothesis that the cystic fibrosis (CF) gene product, called the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), mediates anion transport in normal human sweat duct cells. Sweat duct cells in primary culture were treated with oligodeoxynucleotides that were antisense to the CFTR gene transcript in order to block the expression of the wild-type CFTR. Anion transport in CFTR transcript antisense-treated cells was then assessed with a halide-specific dye, 6-methoxy-N-(3-sulfopropryl)quinolinium, and fluorescent digital imaging microscopy to monitor halide influx and efflux from single sweat duct cells. Antisense oligodeoxynucleotide treatment for 24 hr virtually abolished Cl{sup {minus}} transport in sweat duct cells compared with untreated cells or control cells treated with sense oligodeoxynucleotides. Br{sup {minus}} uptake into sweat duct cells was also blocked after a 24-hr CFTR transcript antisense treatments, but not after treatments for only 4 hr. Lower concentrations of antisense oligodeoxynucleotides were less effective at inhibiting Cl{sup {minus}} transport. These results indicate that oligodeoxynucleotides that are antisense to CFTR transcript inhibit sweat duct Cl{sup {minus}} permeability in both a time-dependent and dose-dependent manner. This approach provides evidence that inhibition of the expression of the wild-type CFTR gene in a normal, untransfected epithelial cell results in an inhibition of Cl{sup {minus}} permeability.

  2. Shock waves: a novel method for cytoplasmic delivery of antisense oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Tschoep, K; Hartmann, G; Jox, R; Thompson, S; Eigler, A; Krug, A; Erhardt, S; Adams, G; Endres, S; Delius, M

    2001-06-01

    Intracytoplasmic delivery of oligonucleotides (ODN) can improve ODN-based strategies such as the antisense approach and the use of immunostimulatory CpG dinucleotide containing ODN. Shock waves are established for the treatment of nephrolithiasis and other diseases. Here we describe the use of shock waves as a new physical method for the direct transport of antisense ODN into the cytoplasm and the nucleus of cells. Human peripheral blood mononuclear cells together with antisense ODN were exposed to shock waves generated by an electrohydraulic lithotripter. ODN uptake was examined by flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy. By optimization of physical parameters we achieved the transfer of high amounts of ODN which were detected within less than 5 min after shock wave exposure, with viability of cells higher than 95%. Transfection of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells with an antisense ODN directed against tumor necrosis factor (TNF) alpha resulted in a reduction in lipopolysaccharide-induced TNF production by 62% (n=5, P=0.006). Specificity of TNF suppression was confirmed with a four-mismatch oligonucleotide. Positive atmospheric pressure abolished antisense-mediated inhibition of TNF synthesis by blocking shock wave-induced cavitation and formation of oscillating air bubbles. Electroporation was less effective. The use of shock waves is thus an efficient physical tool for ODN delivery to cells. Shock waves may allow the evaluation of target proteins in cell types difficult to transfect with other methods and thus may improve the antisense technique for the analysis of unknown genes.

  3. Dantrolene enhances antisense-mediated exon skipping in human and mouse models of Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Kendall, Genevieve C; Mokhonova, Ekaterina I; Moran, Miriana; Sejbuk, Natalia E; Wang, Derek W; Silva, Oscar; Wang, Richard T; Martinez, Leonel; Lu, Qi L; Damoiseaux, Robert; Spencer, Melissa J; Nelson, Stanley F; Miceli, M Carrie

    2012-12-12

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) causes profound and progressive muscle weakness and loss, resulting in early death. DMD is usually caused by frameshifting deletions in the gene DMD, which leads to absence of dystrophin protein. Dystrophin binds to F-actin and components of the dystrophin-associated glycoprotein complex and protects the sarcolemma from contraction-induced injury. Antisense oligonucleotide-mediated exon skipping is a promising therapeutic approach aimed at restoring the DMD reading frame and allowing expression of an intact dystrophin glycoprotein complex. To date, low levels of dystrophin protein have been produced in humans by this method. We performed a small-molecule screen to identify existing drugs that enhance antisense-directed exon skipping. We found that dantrolene, currently used to treat malignant hyperthermia, potentiates antisense oligomer-guided exon skipping to increase exon skipping to restore the mRNA reading frame, the sarcolemmal dystrophin protein, and the dystrophin glycoprotein complex in skeletal muscles of mdx mice when delivered intramuscularly or intravenously. Further, dantrolene synergized with multiple weekly injections of antisense to increase muscle strength and reduce serum creatine kinase in mdx mice. Dantrolene similarly promoted antisense-mediated exon skipping in reprogrammed myotubes from DMD patients. Ryanodine and Rycal S107, which, like dantrolene, targets the ryanodine receptor, also promoted antisense-driven exon skipping, implicating the ryanodine receptor as the critical molecular target.

  4. Cooperative motion control for multi-target observation

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, L.E.

    1997-08-01

    An important issue that arises in the automation of many security, surveillance, and reconnaissance tasks is that of monitoring (or observing) the movements of targets navigating in a bounded area of interest. A key research issue in these problems is that of sensor placement--determining where sensors should be located to maintain the targets in view. In complex applications involving limited-range sensors, the use of multiple sensors dynamically moving over time is required. In this paper, the author investigates the use of a cooperative team of autonomous sensor-based robots for the observation of multiple moving targets. The focus is primarily on developing the distributed control strategies that allow the robot team to attempt to minimize the total time in which targets escape observation by some robot team member in the area of interest. This paper first formalizes the problem and discusses related work. The author then presents a distributed approximate approach to solving this problem that combines low-level multi-robot control with higher-level reasoning control based on the ALLIANCE formalism. The effectiveness of the approach is analyzed by comparing it to three other feasible algorithms for cooperative control, showing the superiority of the approach for a large class of problems.

  5. Antisense technologies targeting fatty acid synthetic enzymes.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jinshun; Liu, Feng; Jiang, Yuyang

    2012-05-01

    Fatty acid synthesis is a coordinated process involving multiple enzymes. Overexpression of some of these enzymes plays important roles in tumor growth and development. Therefore, these enzymes are attractive targets for cancer therapies. Antisense agents provide highly specific inhibition of the expression of target genes and thus have served as powerful tools for gene functional studies and potential therapeutic agents for cancers. This article reviews different types of antisense agents and their applications in the modulation of fatty acid synthesis. Patents of antisense agents targeting fatty acid synthetic enzymes are introduced. In addition, miR-122 has been shown to regulate the expression of fatty acid synthetic enzymes, and thus antisense agent patents that inhibit miR-122 expression are also discussed.

  6. Antisense oligonucleotide therapeutics for human leukemia.

    PubMed

    Gewirtz, A M

    1998-01-01

    The development of reliable gene disruption strategies, and their application in living cells, has proven to be an extraordinary important advance for cell and molecular biologists. Using the various available approaches, the specific functions of any given gene may now be investigated directly in the relevant cell type. Application of similar experimental tools in a clinical setting might prove to be equally valuable and could well form the basis of a monumental advance in the practice of clinical medicine. This seems particularly true at the present time because much progress has been made in understanding the molecular pathogenesis of many diseases, including cancer. For these reasons a tremendous amount of interest has been generated in the use of oligodeoxynucleotides to modify gene expression. However, in spite of some notable successes which are detailed in this review, oligonucleotides have generated controversy in regard to their mechanism of action, reliability, and ultimate therapeutic utility. Nevertheless, the potential power of the "antisense" approach remains undisputed, and its ultimate therapeutic utility is far reaching. Accordingly, the problems associated with the use of these compounds are clearly worth solving. It remains the hope of many laboratories that the day will soon come when these techniques will make an important contribution to the management of chronic myelogenous leukemia and other neoplastic disorders.

  7. Antisense oligonucleotide therapeutics for human leukemia.

    PubMed

    Gewirtz, A M

    1997-01-01

    The development of reliable gene disruption strategies, and their application in living cells, has proven to be an extraordinarily important advance for cell and molecular biologists. Using the various available approaches, the specific functions of any given gene may now be investigated directly in the relevant cell type. Application of similar experimental tools in a clinical setting might prove to be equally valuable and could well form the basis of a monumental advance in the practice of clinical medicine. This seems particularly true at the present time since much progress has been made in understanding the molecular pathogenesis of many diseases, including cancer. For these reasons a tremendous amount of interest has been generated in the use of oligodeoxynucleotides to modify gene expression. However, in spite of some notable successes which are detailed in this review, oligonucleotides have generated controversy in regards to their mechanism of action, reliability, and ultimate therapeutic utility. Nevertheless, the potential power of the "antisense" approach remains undisputed, and its ultimate therapeutic utility is far reaching. Accordingly, the problems associated with the use of these compounds are clearly worth solving. It remains the hope of many laboratories that the day will soon come when these techniques will make an important contribution to the management of CML and other neoplastic disorders.

  8. Antisense Oligonucleotide Therapy for Inherited Retinal Dystrophies.

    PubMed

    Gerard, Xavier; Garanto, Alejandro; Rozet, Jean-Michel; Collin, Rob W J

    2016-01-01

    Inherited retinal dystrophies (IRDs) are an extremely heterogeneous group of genetic diseases for which currently no effective treatment strategies exist. Over the last decade, significant progress has been made utilizing gene augmentation therapy for a few genetic subtypes of IRD, although several technical challenges so far prevent a broad clinical application of this approach for other forms of IRD. Many of the mutations leading to these retinal diseases affect pre-mRNA splicing of the mutated genes . Antisense oligonucleotide (AON)-mediated splice modulation appears to be a powerful approach to correct the consequences of such mutations at the pre-mRNA level , as demonstrated by promising results in clinical trials for several inherited disorders like Duchenne muscular dystrophy, hypercholesterolemia and various types of cancer. In this mini-review, we summarize ongoing pre-clinical research on AON-based therapy for a few genetic subtypes of IRD , speculate on other potential therapeutic targets, and discuss the opportunities and challenges that lie ahead to translate splice modulation therapy for retinal disorders to the clinic.

  9. Viral Vector-Mediated Antisense Therapy for Genetic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Imbert, Marine; Dias-Florencio, Gabriella; Goyenvalle, Aurélie

    2017-01-01

    RNA plays complex roles in normal health and disease and is becoming an important target for therapeutic intervention; accordingly, therapeutic strategies that modulate RNA function have gained great interest over the past decade. Antisense oligonucleotides (AOs) are perhaps the most promising strategy to modulate RNA expression through a variety of post binding events such as gene silencing through degradative or non-degradative mechanisms, or splicing modulation which has recently demonstrated promising results. However, AO technology still faces issues like poor cellular-uptake, low efficacy in target tissues and relatively rapid clearance from the circulation which means repeated injections are essential to complete therapeutic efficacy. To overcome these limitations, viral vectors encoding small nuclear RNAs have been engineered to shuttle antisense sequences into cells, allowing appropriate subcellular localization with pre-mRNAs and permanent correction. In this review, we outline the different strategies for antisense therapy mediated by viral vectors and provide examples of each approach. We also address the advantages and limitations of viral vector use, with an emphasis on their clinical application. PMID:28134780

  10. Chemical Modification of the Multi-Target Neuroprotective Compound Fisetin

    PubMed Central

    Chiruta, Chandramouli; Schubert, David; Dargusch, Richard; Maher, Pamela

    2012-01-01

    Many factors are implicated in age-related CNS disorders making it unlikely that modulating only a single factor will provide effective treatment. Perhaps a better approach is to identify small molecules that have multiple biological activities relevant to the maintenance of brain function. Recently, we identified an orally active, neuroprotective and cognition-enhancing molecule, the flavonoid fisetin, that is effective in several animal models of CNS disorders. Fisetin has direct antioxidant activity and can also increase the intracellular levels of glutathione (GSH), the major endogenous antioxidant. In addition, fisetin has both neurotrophic and anti-inflammatory activity. However, its relatively high EC50 in cell based assays, low lipophilicity, high tPSA and poor bioavailability suggest that there is room for medicinal chemical improvement. Here we describe a multi-tiered approach to screening that has allowed us to identify fisetin derivatives with significantly enhanced activity in an in vitro neuroprotection model while at the same time maintaining other key activities. PMID:22192055

  11. Development of Antisense Drugs for Dyslipidemia

    PubMed Central

    Wada, Fumito; Harada-Shiba, Mariko

    2016-01-01

    Abnormal elevation of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) and triglyceride-rich lipoproteins in plasma as well as dysfunction of anti-atherogenic high-density lipoprotein (HDL) have both been recognized as essential components of the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis and are classified as dyslipidemia. This review describes the arc of development of antisense oligonucleotides for the treatment of dyslipidemia. Chemically-armed antisense candidates can act on various kinds of transcripts, including mRNA and miRNA, via several different endogenous antisense mechanisms, and have exhibited potent systemic anti-dyslipidemic effects. Here, we present specific cutting-edge technologies have recently been brought into antisense strategies, and describe how they have improved the potency of antisense drugs in regard to pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics. In addition, we discuss perspectives for the use of armed antisense oligonucleotides as new clinical options for dyslipidemia, in the light of outcomes of recent clinical trials and safety concerns indicated by several clinical and preclinical studies. PMID:27466159

  12. Multi-targeted hybrids based on HDAC inhibitors for anti-cancer drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Seo, Seung-Yong

    2012-02-01

    Multi-targeted hybrids combine two drugs in a single molecule to have greater medicinal effects than its individual components. Recently, a number of anti-cancer drug candidates such as CUDC-101 (Curis) have been designed based on linking properly two selected pharmacophores endowed with activity against different therapeutic targets.

  13. Plasmid Replication Control by Antisense RNAs.

    PubMed

    Brantl, Sabine

    2014-08-01

    Plasmids are selfish genetic elements that normally constitute a burden for the bacterial host cell. This burden is expected to favor plasmid loss. Therefore, plasmids have evolved mechanisms to control their replication and ensure their stable maintenance. Replication control can be either mediated by iterons or by antisense RNAs. Antisense RNAs work through a negative control circuit. They are constitutively synthesized and metabolically unstable. They act both as a measuring device and a regulator, and regulation occurs by inhibition. Increased plasmid copy numbers lead to increasing antisense-RNA concentrations, which, in turn, result in the inhibition of a function essential for replication. On the other hand, decreased plasmid copy numbers entail decreasing concentrations of the inhibiting antisense RNA, thereby increasing the replication frequency. Inhibition is achieved by a variety of mechanisms, which are discussed in detail. The most trivial case is the inhibition of translation of an essential replication initiator protein (Rep) by blockage of the rep-ribosome binding site. Alternatively, ribosome binding to a leader peptide mRNA whose translation is required for efficient Rep translation can be prevented by antisense-RNA binding. In 2004, translational attenuation was discovered. Antisense-RNA-mediated transcriptional attenuation is another mechanism that has, so far, only been detected in plasmids of Gram-positive bacteria. ColE1, a plasmid that does not need a plasmid-encoded replication initiator protein, uses the inhibition of primer formation. In other cases, antisense RNAs inhibit the formation of an activator pseudoknot that is required for efficient Rep translation.

  14. Key Targets for Multi-Target Ligands Designed to Combat Neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Ramsay, Rona R.; Majekova, Magdalena; Medina, Milagros; Valoti, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    HIGHLIGHTS Compounds that interact with multiple targets but minimally with the cytochrome P450 system (CYP) address the many factors leading to neurodegeneration.Acetyl- and Butyryl-cholineEsterases (AChE, BChE) and Monoamine Oxidases A/B (MAO A, MAO B) are targets for Multi-Target Designed Ligands (MTDL).ASS234 is an irreversible inhibitor of MAO A >MAO B and has micromolar potency against the cholinesterases.ASS234 is a poor CYP substrate in human liver, yielding the depropargylated metabolite.SMe1EC2, a stobadine derivative, showed high radical scavenging property, in vitro and in vivo giving protection in head trauma and diabetic damage of endothelium.Control of mitochondrial function and morphology by manipulating fission and fusion is emerging as a target area for therapeutic strategies to decrease the pathological outcome of neurodegenerative diseases. Growing evidence supports the view that neurodegenerative diseases have multiple and common mechanisms in their aetiologies. These multifactorial aspects have changed the broadly common assumption that selective drugs are superior to “dirty drugs” for use in therapy. This drives the research in studies of novel compounds that might have multiple action mechanisms. In neurodegeneration, loss of neuronal signaling is a major cause of the symptoms, so preservation of neurotransmitters by inhibiting the breakdown enzymes is a first approach. Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitors are the drugs preferentially used in AD and that one of these, rivastigmine, is licensed also for PD. Several studies have shown that monoamine oxidase (MAO) B, located mainly in glial cells, increases with age and is elevated in Alzheimer (AD) and Parkinson's Disease's (PD). Deprenyl, a MAO B inhibitor, significantly delays the initiation of levodopa treatment in PD patients. These indications underline that AChE and MAO are considered a necessary part of multi-target designed ligands (MTDL). However, both of these targets are

  15. Promise of Neurorestoration and Mitochondrial Biogenesis in Parkinson's Disease with Multi Target Drugs: An Alternative to Stem Cell Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Young J.

    2013-01-01

    There is an unmet need in progressive neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases. The present therapeutics for these diseases at best is symptomatic and is not able to delay disease or possess disease modifying activity. Thus an approach to drug design should be made to slow or halt progressive course of a neurological disorder by interfering with a disease-specific pathogenetic process. This would entail the ability of the drug to protect neurons by blocking the common pathway for neuronal injury and cell death and the ability to promote regeneration of neurons and restoration of neuronal function. We have now developed a number of multi target drugs which possess neuroprotective, and neurorestorative activity as well as being able to active PGC-1α (peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator-1α), SIRT1 (NAD-dependent deacetylase protein) and NTF (mitochondrial transcription factor) that are intimately associated with mitochondrial biogenesis. PMID:24167412

  16. Intracellular distribution of microinjected antisense oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Leonetti, J P; Mechti, N; Degols, G; Gagnor, C; Lebleu, B

    1991-04-01

    Antisense oligomers constitute an attractive class of specific tools for genetic analysis and for potential therapeutic applications. Targets with different cellular locations have been described, such as mRNA translation initiation sites, pre-mRNA splicing sites, or the genes themselves. However the mechanism(s) of action and the intracellular distribution of antisense oligomers remain poorly understood. Antisense oligomers conjugated with various fluorochromes or with BrdUrd were microinjected into the cytoplasm of somatic cells, and their cellular distribution was monitored by fluorescence microscopy in fixed and nonfixed cells. A fast translocation in the nuclei and a concentration on nuclear structures were observed whatever probe was used. Nuclear transport occurs by diffusion since it is not affected by depletion of the intracellular ATP pool, temperature, or excess unlabeled oligomer. Accumulation of the oligomers in the nuclei essentially takes place on a set of proteins preferentially extracted between 0.2 M and 0.4 M NaCl as revealed by crosslinking of photosensitive oligomers. The relationship between nuclear location of antisense oligomers and their mechanism of action remains to be ascertained and could be of major interest in the design of more efficient antisense molecules.

  17. Intracellular distribution of microinjected antisense oligonucleotides.

    PubMed Central

    Leonetti, J P; Mechti, N; Degols, G; Gagnor, C; Lebleu, B

    1991-01-01

    Antisense oligomers constitute an attractive class of specific tools for genetic analysis and for potential therapeutic applications. Targets with different cellular locations have been described, such as mRNA translation initiation sites, pre-mRNA splicing sites, or the genes themselves. However the mechanism(s) of action and the intracellular distribution of antisense oligomers remain poorly understood. Antisense oligomers conjugated with various fluorochromes or with BrdUrd were microinjected into the cytoplasm of somatic cells, and their cellular distribution was monitored by fluorescence microscopy in fixed and nonfixed cells. A fast translocation in the nuclei and a concentration on nuclear structures were observed whatever probe was used. Nuclear transport occurs by diffusion since it is not affected by depletion of the intracellular ATP pool, temperature, or excess unlabeled oligomer. Accumulation of the oligomers in the nuclei essentially takes place on a set of proteins preferentially extracted between 0.2 M and 0.4 M NaCl as revealed by crosslinking of photosensitive oligomers. The relationship between nuclear location of antisense oligomers and their mechanism of action remains to be ascertained and could be of major interest in the design of more efficient antisense molecules. Images PMID:1849273

  18. Antisense therapeutics in oncology: current status

    PubMed Central

    Farooqi, Ammad Ahmad; Rehman, Zia ur; Muntane, Jordi

    2014-01-01

    There is increasing progress in translational oncology and tremendous breakthroughs have been made as evidenced by preclinical and clinical trials. Data obtained from high-throughput technologies are deepening our understanding about the molecular and gene network in cancer cells and rapidly emerging in vitro and in vivo evidence is highlighting the role of antisense agents as specific inhibitors of the expression of target genes, thus modulating the response of cancer cells to different therapeutic strategies. Much information is continuously being added into various facets of molecular oncology and it is now understood that overexpression of antiapoptotic proteins, oncogenes, oncogenic microRNAs (miRNA), and fusion proteins make cancer cells difficult to target. Delivery of antisense oligonucleotides has remained a challenge and technological developments have helped in overcoming hurdles by improving the ability to penetrate cells, effective and targeted binding to gene sequences, and downregulation of target gene function. Different delivery systems, including stable nucleic acid lipid particles, have shown potential in enhancing the delivery of cargo to the target site. In this review, we attempt to summarize the current progress in the development of antisense therapeutics and their potential in medical research. We partition this multicomponent review into introductory aspects about recent breakthroughs in antisense therapeutics. We also discuss how antisense therapeutics have shown potential in resensitizing resistant cancer cells to apoptosis by targeted inhibition of antiapoptotic proteins, oncogenic miRNAs, and BCR-ABL. PMID:25395862

  19. Expression of XIST sense and antisense in bovine fetal organs and cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Farazmand, Ali; Basrur, Parvathi K; Stranzinger, Gerald; Graphodatskaya, Daria; Reyes, Ed R; King, W Allan

    2004-01-01

    Untranslated RNAs transcribed from sense and antisense strands of a gene referred to as X-inactive specific transcript (XIST) play crucial roles in the genetic inactivation and condensation of one of the two X chromosomes in the somatic cells of female mammals. X inactivation is also thought to occur in mammalian male germ cells mainly based on the formation of a condensed structure referred to as a sex body or XY-body, during spermatogenesis. Molecular identity of the sex body, the roles of sense and antisense XIST RNAs in its formation, and the relevance of the sex body to spermatogenesis are not known. Here we report the results of our strand-specific RT-PCR approach to identify the amplicon detected in fetal bovine testes previously referred to as XIST and to test for sense/antisense expression in male and female organs and cell cultures of different sex chromosome constitution. Our results showed that the transcript detected consistently in male gonads and variably in somatic organs represents XIST antisense RNA and that XIST sense and antisense RNAs are co-expressed in female somatic tissues and cultured cells including cells of sex chromosome aneuploids (XXY and XXX). Our results, which differ from those of other investigators in this area, are discussed in the light of the recently reported differences in the expression pattern of murine Xist/Tsix loci and their structural and functional differences in different mammalian species.

  20. Systemic administration of antisense p75(NTR) oligodeoxynucleotides rescues axotomised spinal motor neurons.

    PubMed

    Lowry, K S; Murray, S S; Coulson, E J; Epa, R; Bartlett, P F; Barrett, G; Cheema, S S

    2001-04-01

    The 75 kD low-affinity neurotrophin receptor (p75(NTR)) is expressed in developing and axotomised spinal motor neurons. There is now convincing evidence that p75(NTR) can, under some circumstances, become cytotoxic and promote neuronal cell death. We report here that a single application of antisense p75(NTR) oligodeoxynucleotides to the proximal nerve stumps of neonatal rats significantly reduces the loss of axotomised motor neurons compared to controls treated with nonsense oligodeoxynucleotides or phosphate-buffered saline. Our investigations also show that daily systemic intraperitoneal injections of antisense p75(NTR) oligodeoxynucleotides for 14 days significantly reduce the loss of axotomised motor neurons compared to controls. Furthermore, we found that systemic delivery over a similar period continues to be effective following axotomy when intraperitoneal injections were 1) administered after a delay of 24 hr, 2) limited to the first 7 days, or 3) administered every third day. In addition, p75(NTR) protein levels were reduced in spinal motor neurons following treatment with antisense p75(NTR) oligodeoxynucleotides. There were also no obvious side effects associated with antisense p75(NTR) oligodeoxynucleotide treatments as determined by behavioural observations and postnatal weight gain. Our findings indicate that antisense-based strategies could be a novel approach for the prevention of motor neuron degeneration associated with injuries or disease.

  1. Development of RNA interference-based therapeutics and application of multi-target small interfering RNAs.

    PubMed

    Li, Tiejun; Wu, Meihua; Zhu, York Yuanyuan; Chen, Jianxin; Chen, Li

    2014-08-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) has been proven in recent years to be a newly advanced and powerful tool for development of therapeutic agents toward various unmet medical needs such as cancer, in particular, a great attention has been paid to the development of antineoplastic agents. Recent success in clinical trials related to RNAi-based therapeutics on cancer and ocular disease has validated that small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) constitute a new promising class of therapeutics. Currently, a great wealth of multi-target based siRNA structural modifications is available for promoting siRNA-mediated gene silencing with low side effects. Here, the latest developments in RNAi-based therapeutics and novel structural modifications described for siRNAs--in particular multi-target siRNAs--are reviewed.

  2. Cardinality Balanced Multi-Target Multi-Bernoulli Filter with Error Compensation

    PubMed Central

    He, Xiangyu; Liu, Guixi

    2016-01-01

    The cardinality balanced multi-target multi-Bernoulli (CBMeMBer) filter developed recently has been proved an effective multi-target tracking (MTT) algorithm based on the random finite set (RFS) theory, and it can jointly estimate the number of targets and their states from a sequence of sensor measurement sets. However, because of the existence of systematic errors in sensor measurements, the CBMeMBer filter can easily produce different levels of performance degradation. In this paper, an extended CBMeMBer filter, in which the joint probability density function of target state and systematic error is recursively estimated, is proposed to address the MTT problem based on the sensor measurements with systematic errors. In addition, an analytic implementation of the extended CBMeMBer filter is also presented for linear Gaussian models. Simulation results confirm that the proposed algorithm can track multiple targets with better performance. PMID:27589764

  3. Systematic mining of analog series with related core structures in multi-target activity space.

    PubMed

    Gupta-Ostermann, Disha; Hu, Ye; Bajorath, Jürgen

    2013-08-01

    We have aimed to systematically extract analog series with related core structures from multi-target activity space to explore target promiscuity of closely related analogous. Therefore, a previously introduced SAR matrix structure was adapted and further extended for large-scale data mining. These matrices organize analog series with related yet distinct core structures in a consistent manner. High-confidence compound activity data yielded more than 2,300 non-redundant matrices capturing 5,821 analog series that included 4,288 series with multi-target and 735 series with multi-family activities. Many matrices captured more than three analog series with activity against more than five targets. The matrices revealed a variety of promiscuity patterns. Compound series matrices also contain virtual compounds, which provide suggestions for compound design focusing on desired activity profiles.

  4. Zebrafish behavioral profiling identifies multi-target antipsychotic-like compounds

    PubMed Central

    Bruni, Giancarlo; Rennekamp, Andrew J.; Velenich, Andrea; McCarroll, Matthew; Gendelev, Leo; Fertsch, Ethan; Taylor, Jack; Lakhani, Parth; Lensen, Dennis; Evron, Tama; Lorello, Paul J.; Huang, Xi-Ping; Kolczewski, Sabine; Carey, Galen; Caldarone, Barbara J.; Prinssen, Eric; Roth, Bryan L.; Keiser, Michael J.; Peterson, Randall T.; Kokel, David

    2016-01-01

    Many psychiatric drugs act on multiple targets and therefore require screening assays that encompass a wide target space. With sufficiently rich phenotyping, and a large sampling of compounds, it should be possible to identify compounds with desired mechanisms of action based on their behavioral profiles alone. Although zebrafish (Danio rerio) behaviors have been used to rapidly identify neuroactive compounds, it remains unclear exactly what kind of behavioral assays might be necessary to identify multi-target compounds such as antipsychotics. Here, we developed a battery of behavioral assays in larval zebrafish to determine if behavioral profiles could provide sufficient phenotypic resolution to identify and classify psychiatric drugs. Using the antipsychotic drug haloperidol as a test case, we found that behavioral profiles of haloperidol-treated animals could be used to identify previously uncharacterized compounds with desired antipsychotic-like activities and multi-target mechanisms of action. PMID:27239787

  5. Multi-Target Screening and Experimental Validation of Natural Products from Selaginella Plants against Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Deng, Yin-Hua; Wang, Ning-Ning; Zou, Zhen-Xing; Zhang, Lin; Xu, Kang-Ping; Chen, Alex F; Cao, Dong-Sheng; Tan, Gui-Shan

    2017-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive and irreversible neurodegenerative disorder which is considered to be the most common cause of dementia. It has a greater impact not only on the learning and memory disturbances but also on social and economy. Currently, there are mainly single-target drugs for AD treatment but the complexity and multiple etiologies of AD make them difficult to obtain desirable therapeutic effects. Therefore, the choice of multi-target drugs will be a potential effective strategy inAD treatment. To find multi-target active ingredients for AD treatment from Selaginella plants, we firstly explored the behaviors effects on AD mice of total extracts (TE) from Selaginella doederleinii on by Morris water maze test and found that TE has a remarkable improvement on learning and memory function for AD mice. And then, multi-target SAR models associated with AD-related proteins were built based on Random Forest (RF) and different descriptors to preliminarily screen potential active ingredients from Selaginella. Considering the prediction outputs and the quantity of existing compounds in our laboratory, 13 compounds were chosen to carry out the in vitro enzyme inhibitory experiments and 4 compounds with BACE1/MAO-B dual inhibitory activity were determined. Finally, the molecular docking was applied to verify the prediction results and enzyme inhibitory experiments. Based on these study and validation processes, we explored a new strategy to improve the efficiency of active ingredients screening based on trace amount of natural product and numbers of targets and found some multi-target compounds with biological activity for the development of novel drugs for AD treatment.

  6. Delivery is key: lessons learnt from developing splice-switching antisense therapies.

    PubMed

    Godfrey, Caroline; Desviat, Lourdes R; Smedsrød, Bård; Piétri-Rouxel, France; Denti, Michela A; Disterer, Petra; Lorain, Stéphanie; Nogales-Gadea, Gisela; Sardone, Valentina; Anwar, Rayan; El Andaloussi, Samir; Lehto, Taavi; Khoo, Bernard; Brolin, Camilla; van Roon-Mom, Willeke Mc; Goyenvalle, Aurélie; Aartsma-Rus, Annemieke; Arechavala-Gomeza, Virginia

    2017-03-13

    The use of splice-switching antisense therapy is highly promising, with a wealth of pre-clinical data and numerous clinical trials ongoing. Nevertheless, its potential to treat a variety of disorders has yet to be realized. The main obstacle impeding the clinical translation of this approach is the relatively poor delivery of antisense oligonucleotides to target tissues after systemic delivery. We are a group of researchers closely involved in the development of these therapies and would like to communicate our discussions concerning the validity of standard methodologies currently used in their pre-clinical development, the gaps in current knowledge and the pertinent challenges facing the field. We therefore make recommendations in order to focus future research efforts and facilitate a wider application of therapeutic antisense oligonucleotides.

  7. Repair of Thalassemic Human β -globin mRNA in Mammalian Cells by Antisense Oligonucleotides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sierakowska, Halina; Sambade, Maria J.; Agrawal, Sudhir; Kole, Ryszard

    1996-11-01

    In one form of β -thalassemia, a genetic blood disorder, a mutation in intron 2 of the β -globin gene (IVS2-654) causes aberrant splicing of β -globin pre-mRNA and, consequently, β -globin deficiency. Treatment of mammalian cells stably expressing the IVS2-654 human β -globin gene with antisense oligonucleotides targeted at the aberrant splice sites restored correct splicing in a dose-dependent fashion, generating correct human β -globin mRNA and polypeptide. Both products persisted for up to 72 hr posttreatment. The oligonucleotides modified splicing by a true antisense mechanism without overt unspecific effects on cell growth and splicing of other pre-mRNAs. This novel approach in which antisense oligonucleotides are used to restore rather than to down-regulate the activity of the target gene is applicable to other splicing mutants and is of potential clinical interest.

  8. Antisense RNA suppression of peroxidase gene expression

    SciTech Connect

    Lagrimini, L.M.; Bradford, S.; De Leon, F.D. )

    1989-04-01

    The 5{prime} half the anionic peroxidase cDNA of tobacco was inserted into a CaMV 35S promoter/terminator expression cassette in the antisense configuration. This was inserted into the Agrobacterium-mediated plant transformation vector pCIBIO which includes kanamycin selection, transformed into two species of tobacco (N. tabacum and M. sylvestris), and plants were subsequently regenerated on kanamycin. Transgenic plants were analyzed for peroxidase expression and found to have 3-5 fold lower levels of peroxidase than wild-type plants. Isoelectric focusing demonstrated that the antisense RNA only suppressed the anionic peroxidase. Wound-induced peroxidase expression was found not to be affected by the antisense RNA. Northern blots show a greater than 5 fold suppression of anionic peroxidase mRNA in leaf tissue, and the antisense RNA was expressed at a level 2 fold over the endogenous mRNA. Plants were self-pollinated and F1 plants showed normal segregation. N. sylvestris transgenic plants with the lowest level of peroxidase are epinastic, and preliminary results indicate elevated auxin levels. Excised pith tissue from both species of transgenic plants rapidly collapse when exposed to air, while pith tissue from wild-type plants showed little change when exposed to air. Further characterization of these phenotypes is currently being made.

  9. Widespread Antisense Transcription in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Dornenburg, James E.; DeVita, Anne M.; Palumbo, Michael J.; Wade, Joseph T.

    2010-01-01

    ABSTRACT The vast majority of annotated transcripts in bacteria are mRNAs. Here we identify ~1,000 antisense transcripts in the model bacterium Escherichia coli. We propose that these transcripts are generated by promiscuous transcription initiation within genes and that many of them regulate expression of the overlapping gene. PMID:20689751

  10. Strand-specific community RNA-seq reveals prevalent and dynamic antisense transcription in human gut microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Guanhui; Wang, Mingjie; Doak, Thomas G.; Ye, Yuzhen

    2015-01-01

    Metagenomics and other meta-omics approaches (including metatranscriptomics) provide insights into the composition and function of microbial communities living in different environments or animal hosts. Metatranscriptomics research provides an unprecedented opportunity to examine gene regulation for many microbial species simultaneously, and more importantly, for the majority that are unculturable microbial species, in their natural environments (or hosts). Current analyses of metatranscriptomic datasets focus on the detection of gene expression levels and the study of the relationship between changes of gene expression and changes of environment. As a demonstration of utilizing metatranscriptomics beyond these common analyses, we developed a computational and statistical procedure to analyze the antisense transcripts in strand-specific metatranscriptomic datasets. Antisense RNAs encoded on the DNA strand opposite a gene’s CDS have the potential to form extensive base-pairing interactions with the corresponding sense RNA, and can have important regulatory functions. Most studies of antisense RNAs in bacteria are rather recent, are mostly based on transcriptome analysis, and have been applied mainly to single bacterial species. Application of our approaches to human gut-associated metatranscriptomic datasets allowed us to survey antisense transcription for a large number of bacterial species associated with human beings. The ratio of protein coding genes with antisense transcription ranges from 0 to 35.8% (median = 10.0%) among 47 species. Our results show that antisense transcription is dynamic, varying between human individuals. Functional enrichment analysis revealed a preference of certain gene functions for antisense transcription, and transposase genes are among the most prominent ones (but we also observed antisense transcription in bacterial house-keeping genes). PMID:26388849

  11. Strand-specific community RNA-seq reveals prevalent and dynamic antisense transcription in human gut microbiota.

    PubMed

    Bao, Guanhui; Wang, Mingjie; Doak, Thomas G; Ye, Yuzhen

    2015-01-01

    Metagenomics and other meta-omics approaches (including metatranscriptomics) provide insights into the composition and function of microbial communities living in different environments or animal hosts. Metatranscriptomics research provides an unprecedented opportunity to examine gene regulation for many microbial species simultaneously, and more importantly, for the majority that are unculturable microbial species, in their natural environments (or hosts). Current analyses of metatranscriptomic datasets focus on the detection of gene expression levels and the study of the relationship between changes of gene expression and changes of environment. As a demonstration of utilizing metatranscriptomics beyond these common analyses, we developed a computational and statistical procedure to analyze the antisense transcripts in strand-specific metatranscriptomic datasets. Antisense RNAs encoded on the DNA strand opposite a gene's CDS have the potential to form extensive base-pairing interactions with the corresponding sense RNA, and can have important regulatory functions. Most studies of antisense RNAs in bacteria are rather recent, are mostly based on transcriptome analysis, and have been applied mainly to single bacterial species. Application of our approaches to human gut-associated metatranscriptomic datasets allowed us to survey antisense transcription for a large number of bacterial species associated with human beings. The ratio of protein coding genes with antisense transcription ranges from 0 to 35.8% (median = 10.0%) among 47 species. Our results show that antisense transcription is dynamic, varying between human individuals. Functional enrichment analysis revealed a preference of certain gene functions for antisense transcription, and transposase genes are among the most prominent ones (but we also observed antisense transcription in bacterial house-keeping genes).

  12. Antisense-mediated exon skipping to reframe transcripts.

    PubMed

    Turczynski, Sandrina; Titeux, Matthias; Pironon, Nathalie; Hovnanian, Alain

    2012-01-01

    Numerous genetic disorders are caused by loss-of-function mutations that disrupt the open reading frame of the gene either by nonsense or by frameshift (insertion, deletion, indel, or splicing) mutations. Most of the time, the result is the absence of functional protein synthesis due to mRNA degradation by nonsense-mediated mRNA decay, or rapid degradation of a truncated protein. Antisense-based splicing modulation is a powerful tool that has the potential to treat genetic disorders by restoring the open reading frame through selective removal of the mutated exon, or by restoring correct splicing.We have developed this approach for a severe genetic skin disorder, recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa, caused by mutations in the COL7A1 gene encoding type VII collagen. This gene is particularly suited for exon-skipping approaches due to its unique genomic structure. It is composed of 118 exons, 83 of which are in frame. Moreover, these exons encode a single repetitive collagenous domain.Using this gene as an example, we describe general methods that demonstrate the feasibility and efficacy of the antisense-mediated exon-skipping strategy to reframe transcripts.

  13. Network pharmacology of cancer: From understanding of complex interactomes to the design of multi-target specific therapeutics from nature.

    PubMed

    Poornima, Paramasivan; Kumar, Jothi Dinesh; Zhao, Qiaoli; Blunder, Martina; Efferth, Thomas

    2016-09-01

    Despite massive investments in drug research and development, the significant decline in the number of new drugs approved or translated to clinical use raises the question, whether single targeted drug discovery is the right approach. To combat complex systemic diseases that harbour robust biological networks such as cancer, single target intervention is proved to be ineffective. In such cases, network pharmacology approaches are highly useful, because they differ from conventional drug discovery by addressing the ability of drugs to target numerous proteins or networks involved in a disease. Pleiotropic natural products are one of the promising strategies due to their multi-targeting and due to lower side effects. In this review, we discuss the application of network pharmacology for cancer drug discovery. We provide an overview of the current state of knowledge on network pharmacology, focus on different technical approaches and implications for cancer therapy (e.g. polypharmacology and synthetic lethality), and illustrate the therapeutic potential with selected examples green tea polyphenolics, Eleutherococcus senticosus, Rhodiola rosea, and Schisandra chinensis). Finally, we present future perspectives on their plausible applications for diagnosis and therapy of cancer. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Coexistence of sense and anti-sense mRNAs of variant surface protein in Giardia lamblia trophozoites.

    PubMed

    Guo, Junli; Zheng, Wenyu; Wang, Yuehua; Li, Yao; Lu, Siqi; Feng, Xianmin

    2014-02-14

    A strategy of the parasitic protozoan Giardia lamblia to evade attack from the host immune system is periodic changes of its surface antigen, a member of the variant surface protein (VSP) family. A post-transcriptional gene silencing mechanism has been proposed to explain the presence of only one among many possible VSPs at any time. To investigate this phenomenon further, we extracted total RNA from cultured trophozoites of the G. lamblia C2 isolate, and cDNA was reverse-transcribed from the RNA. Sense and anti-sense VSPs were amplified from the total cDNA using nested PCR with primers designed from the 3'-conserved region and the known 5' or 3' end of the cDNA library. Sequence analyses of the amplified products revealed more than 34 full-length antisense VSPs and a smear of sense VSPs. Sequence alignments and comparisons revealed that these VSPs contained variable N-termini and conserved C-termini, and could be classified into 5 clades based on the sizes and variations of the N-terminal sequence. All antisense VSPs existed in the sense forms, but no corresponding antisense VSP existed for sense RNA (snsRNA) 16. The coexistence of sense and antisense VSP mRNAs in cultured G. lamblia supports the post-transcriptional regulation of VSP expression. We propose that VSPs transcribed simultaneously in the sense and antisense forms form double-stranded RNAs (dsRNAs) which are degraded by the Dicer endonuclease, while a VSP without an antisense transcription (e.g., snsRNA16) will be expressed on the surface of Giardia. In addition, in the course of this investigation VSPs were identified that were previously not known. PCR-based amplification of specific sense and antisense VSP cDNAs can be used to identify the specific VSP on G. lamblia trophozoites, which is easier than using specific monoclonal antibody approaches. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  15. Skipping multiple exons of dystrophin transcripts using cocktail antisense oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Echigoya, Yusuke; Yokota, Toshifumi

    2014-02-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is one of the most common and lethal genetic disorders, with 20,000 children per year born with DMD globally. DMD is caused by mutations in the dystrophin (DMD) gene. Antisense-mediated exon skipping therapy is a promising therapeutic approach that uses short DNA-like molecules called antisense oligonucleotides (AOs) to skip over/splice out the mutated part of the gene to produce a shortened but functional dystrophin protein. One major challenge has been its limited applicability. Multiple exon skipping has recently emerged as a potential solution. Indeed, many DMD patients need exon skipping of multiple exons in order to restore the reading frame, depending on how many base pairs the mutated exon(s) and adjacent exons have. Theoretically, multiple exon skipping could be used to treat approximately 90%, 80%, and 98% of DMD patients with deletion, duplication, and nonsense mutations, respectively. In addition, multiple exon skipping could be used to select deletions that optimize the functionality of the truncated dystrophin protein. The proof of concept of systemic multiple exon skipping using a cocktail of AOs has been demonstrated in dystrophic dog and mouse models. Remaining challenges include the insufficient efficacy of systemic treatment, especially for therapies that target the heart, and limited long-term safety data. Here we review recent preclinical developments in AO-mediated multiple exon skipping and discuss the remaining challenges.

  16. Multi-Targeted Agents in Cancer Cell Chemosensitization: What We Learnt from Curcumin Thus Far.

    PubMed

    Bordoloi, Devivasha; Roy, Nand K; Monisha, Javadi; Padmavathi, Ganesan; Kunnumakkara, Ajaikumar B

    2016-01-01

    Research over the past several years has developed many mono-targeted therapies for the prevention and treatment of cancer, but it still remains one of the fatal diseases in the world killing 8.2 million people annually. It has been well-established that development of chemoresistance in cancer cells against mono-targeted chemotherapeutic agents by modulation of multiple survival pathways is the major cause of failure of cancer chemotherapy. Therefore, inhibition of these pathways by non-toxic multi-targeted agents may have profoundly high potential in preventing drug resistance and sensitizing cancer cells to chemotherapeutic agents. To study the potential of curcumin, a multi-targeted natural compound, obtained from the plant Turmeric (Curcuma longa) in combination with standard chemotherapeutic agents to inhibit drug resistance and sensitize cancer cells to these agents based on available literature and patents. An extensive literature survey was performed in PubMed and Google for the chemosensitizing potential of curcumin in different cancers published so far and the patents published during 2014-2015. Our search resulted in many in vitro, in vivo and clinical reports signifying the chemosensitizing potential of curcumin in diverse cancers. There were 160 in vitro studies, 62 in vivo studies and 5 clinical studies. Moreover, 11 studies reported on hybrid curcumin: the next generation of curcumin based therapeutics. Also, 34 patents on curcumin's biological activity have been retrieved. Altogether, the present study reveals the enormous potential of curcumin, a natural, non-toxic, multi-targeted agent in overcoming drug resistance in cancer cells and sensitizing them to chemotherapeutic drugs.

  17. Adaptive Collaborative Gaussian Mixture Probability Hypothesis Density Filter for Multi-Target Tracking.

    PubMed

    Yang, Feng; Wang, Yongqi; Chen, Hao; Zhang, Pengyan; Liang, Yan

    2016-10-11

    In this paper, an adaptive collaborative Gaussian Mixture Probability Hypothesis Density (ACo-GMPHD) filter is proposed for multi-target tracking with automatic track extraction. Based on the evolutionary difference between the persistent targets and the birth targets, the measurements are adaptively partitioned into two parts, persistent and birth measurement sets, for updating the persistent and birth target Probability Hypothesis Density, respectively. Furthermore, the collaboration mechanism of multiple probability hypothesis density (PHDs) is established, where tracks can be automatically extracted. Simulation results reveal that the proposed filter yields considerable computational savings in processing requirements and significant improvement in tracking accuracy.

  18. Sustained Release of Cx43 Antisense Oligodeoxynucleotides from Coated Collagen Scaffolds Promotes Wound Healing.

    PubMed

    Gilmartin, Daniel J; Soon, Allyson; Thrasivoulou, Christopher; Phillips, Anthony R J; Jayasinghe, Suwan N; Becker, David L

    2016-07-01

    Antisense oligodeoxynucleotides targeting the mRNA of the gap junction protein Cx43 promote tissue repair in a variety of different wounds. Delivery of the antisense drug has most often been achieved by a thermoreversible hydrogel, Pluronic F-127, which is very effective in the short term but does not allow for sustained delivery over several days. For chronic wounds that take a long time to heal, repeated dosing with the drug may be desirable but is not always compatible with conventional treatments such as the weekly changing of compression bandages on venous leg ulcers. Here the coating of collagen scaffolds with antisense oligonucleotides is investigated and a way to provide protection of the oligodeoxynucleotide drug is found in conjunction with sustained release over a 7 d period. This approach significantly reduces the normal foreign body reaction to the scaffold, which induces an increase of Cx43 protein and an inhibition of healing. As a result of the antisense integration into the scaffold, inflammation is reduced with the rate of wound healing and contracture is significantly improved. This coated scaffold approach may be very useful for treating venous leg ulcers and also for providing a sustained release of any other types of oligonucleotide drugs that are being developed. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. A good antisense molecule is hard to find.

    PubMed

    Branch, A D

    1998-02-01

    Antisense molecules and ribozymes capture the imagination with their promise of rational drug design and exquisite specificity. However, they are far more difficult to produce than was originally anticipated, and their ability to eliminate the function of a single gene has never been proven. Furthermore, a wide variety of unexpected non-antisense effects have come to light. Although some of these side effects will almost certainly have clinical value, they make it hard to produce drugs that act primarily through true antisense mechanisms and complicate the use of antisense compounds as research reagents. To minimize unwanted non-antisense effects, investigators are searching for antisense compounds and ribozymes whose target sites are particularly vulnerable to attack. This is a challenging quest.

  20. Using both strands: The fundamental nature of antisense transcription.

    PubMed

    Murray, Struan C; Mellor, Jane

    2016-01-01

    Non-coding transcription across the antisense strands of genes is an abundant, pervasive process in eukaryotes from yeast to humans, however its biological function remains elusive. Here, we provide commentary on a recent study of ours, which demonstrates a genome-wide role for antisense transcription: establishing a unique, dynamic chromatin architecture over genes. Antisense transcription increases the level of nucleosome occupancy and histone acetylation at the promoter and body of genes, without necessarily modulating the level of protein-coding sense transcription. It is also associated with high levels of histone turnover. By allowing genes to sample a wider range of chromatin configurations, antisense transcription could serve to make genes more sensitive to changing signals, priming them for responses to developmental programs or stressful cellular environments. Given the abundance of antisense transcription and the breadth of these chromatin changes, we propose that antisense transcription represents a fundamental, canonical feature of eukaryotic genes.

  1. In silico search for multi-target anti-inflammatories in Chinese herbs and formulas.

    PubMed

    Ehrman, Thomas M; Barlow, David J; Hylands, Peter J

    2010-03-15

    Chinese herbs were screened for compounds which may be active against four targets involved in inflammation, using pharmacophore-assisted docking. Multiple LigandScout (LS) pharmacophores built from ligand-receptor complexes in the protein databank (PDB) were first employed to select compounds. These compounds were then docked using LS-derived templates and ranked according to docking score. The targets comprised cyclo-oxygenases 1 & 2 (COX), p38 MAP kinase (p38), c-Jun terminal-NH(2) kinase (JNK) and type 4 cAMP-specific phosphodiesterase (PDE4). The results revealed that multi-target inhibitors are likely to be relatively common in Chinese herbs. Details of their distribution are given, in addition to experimental evidence supporting these results. Examples of compounds predicted to be active against at least three targets are presented, and their features outlined. The distribution of herbs containing predicted inhibitors was also analysed in relation to 192 Chinese formulas from over 50 herbal categories. Among those found to contain a high proportion of these herbs were formulas traditionally used to treat fever, headache, rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory bowel disorders, skin disease, cancer, and traumatic injury. Relationships between multi-target drug discovery and Chinese medicine are discussed.

  2. Multi-target-qubit unconventional geometric phase gate in a multi-cavity system.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tong; Cao, Xiao-Zhi; Su, Qi-Ping; Xiong, Shao-Jie; Yang, Chui-Ping

    2016-02-22

    Cavity-based large scale quantum information processing (QIP) may involve multiple cavities and require performing various quantum logic operations on qubits distributed in different cavities. Geometric-phase-based quantum computing has drawn much attention recently, which offers advantages against inaccuracies and local fluctuations. In addition, multiqubit gates are particularly appealing and play important roles in QIP. We here present a simple and efficient scheme for realizing a multi-target-qubit unconventional geometric phase gate in a multi-cavity system. This multiqubit phase gate has a common control qubit but different target qubits distributed in different cavities, which can be achieved using a single-step operation. The gate operation time is independent of the number of qubits and only two levels for each qubit are needed. This multiqubit gate is generic, e.g., by performing single-qubit operations, it can be converted into two types of significant multi-target-qubit phase gates useful in QIP. The proposal is quite general, which can be used to accomplish the same task for a general type of qubits such as atoms, NV centers, quantum dots, and superconducting qubits.

  3. Multi-target-qubit unconventional geometric phase gate in a multi-cavity system

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Tong; Cao, Xiao-Zhi; Su, Qi-Ping; Xiong, Shao-Jie; Yang, Chui-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Cavity-based large scale quantum information processing (QIP) may involve multiple cavities and require performing various quantum logic operations on qubits distributed in different cavities. Geometric-phase-based quantum computing has drawn much attention recently, which offers advantages against inaccuracies and local fluctuations. In addition, multiqubit gates are particularly appealing and play important roles in QIP. We here present a simple and efficient scheme for realizing a multi-target-qubit unconventional geometric phase gate in a multi-cavity system. This multiqubit phase gate has a common control qubit but different target qubits distributed in different cavities, which can be achieved using a single-step operation. The gate operation time is independent of the number of qubits and only two levels for each qubit are needed. This multiqubit gate is generic, e.g., by performing single-qubit operations, it can be converted into two types of significant multi-target-qubit phase gates useful in QIP. The proposal is quite general, which can be used to accomplish the same task for a general type of qubits such as atoms, NV centers, quantum dots, and superconducting qubits. PMID:26898176

  4. Co-targeting cancer drug escape pathways confers clinical advantage for multi-target anticancer drugs.

    PubMed

    Tao, Lin; Zhu, Feng; Xu, Feng; Chen, Zhe; Jiang, Yu Yang; Chen, Yu Zong

    2015-12-01

    Recent investigations have suggested that anticancer therapeutics may be enhanced by co-targeting the primary anticancer target and the corresponding drug escape pathways. Whether this strategy confers statistically significant clinical advantage has not been systematically investigated. This question was probed by the evaluation of the clinical status and the multiple targets of 23 approved and 136 clinical trial multi-target anticancer drugs with particular focus on those co-targeting EGFR, HER2, Abl, VEGFR2, mTOR, PI3K, Alk, MEK, KIT, and DNA topoisomerase, and some of the 14, 7, 13, 20, 6, 5, 7, 2, 4 and 10 cancer drug escape pathways respectively. Most of the approved (73.9%) and phase III (75.0%), the majority of the Phase II (62.8%) and I (53.6%), and the minority of the discontinued (35.3%) multi-target drugs were found to co-target cancer drug escape pathways. This suggests that co-targeting anticancer targets and drug escape pathways confer significant clinical advantage and such strategy can be more extensively explored. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Multi-Targeted Antithrombotic Therapy for Total Artificial Heart Device Patients.

    PubMed

    Ramirez, Angeleah; Riley, Jeffrey B; Joyce, Lyle D

    2016-03-01

    To prevent thrombotic or bleeding events in patients receiving a total artificial heart (TAH), agents have been used to avoid adverse events. The purpose of this article is to outline the adoption and results of a multi-targeted antithrombotic clinical procedure guideline (CPG) for TAH patients. Based on literature review of TAH anticoagulation and multiple case series, a CPG was designed to prescribe the use of multiple pharmacological agents. Total blood loss, Thromboelastograph(®) (TEG), and platelet light-transmission aggregometry (LTA) measurements were conducted on 13 TAH patients during the first 2 weeks of support in our institution. Target values and actual medians for postimplant days 1, 3, 7, and 14 were calculated for kaolinheparinase TEG, kaolin TEG, LTA, and estimated blood loss. Protocol guidelines were followed and anticoagulation management reduced bleeding and prevented thrombus formation as well as thromboembolic events in TAH patients postimplantation. The patients in this study were susceptible to a variety of possible complications such as mechanical device issues, thrombotic events, infection, and bleeding. Among them all it was clear that patients were at most risk for bleeding, particularly on postoperative days 1 through 3. However, bleeding was reduced into postoperative days 3 and 7, indicating that acceptable hemostasis was achieved with the anticoagulation protocol. The multidisciplinary, multi-targeted anticoagulation clinical procedure guideline was successful to maintain adequate antithrombotic therapy for TAH patients.

  6. ASS234, As a New Multi-Target Directed Propargylamine for Alzheimer's Disease Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Marco-Contelles, José; Unzeta, Mercedes; Bolea, Irene; Esteban, Gerard; Ramsay, Rona R.; Romero, Alejandro; Martínez-Murillo, Ricard; Carreiras, M. Carmo; Ismaili, Lhassane

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: ASS2324 is a hybrid compound resulting from the juxtaposition of donepezil and the propargylamine PF9601NASS2324 is a multi-target directed propargylamine able to bind to all the AChE/BuChE and MAO A/B enzymesASS2324 shows antioxidant, neuroprotective and suitable permeability propertiesASS2324 restores the scopolamine-induced cognitive impairment to the same extent as donepezil, and is less toxicASS2324 prevents β-amyloid induced aggregation in the cortex of double transgenic miceASS2324 is the most advanced anti-Alzheimer agent for pre-clinical studies that we have identified in our laboratories The complex nature of Alzheimer's disease (AD) has prompted the design of Multi-Target-Directed Ligands (MTDL) able to bind to diverse biochemical targets involved in the progress and development of the disease. In this context, we have designed a number of MTD propargylamines (MTDP) showing antioxidant, anti-beta-amyloid, anti-inflammatory, as well as cholinesterase and monoamine oxidase (MAO) inhibition capacities. Here, we describe these properties in the MTDL ASS234, our lead-compound ready to enter in pre-clinical studies for AD, as a new multipotent, permeable cholinesterase/monoamine oxidase inhibitor, able to inhibit Aβ-aggregation, and possessing antioxidant and neuroprotective properties. PMID:27445665

  7. An Ab Initio Method for Designing Multi-Target Specific Pharmacophores using Complementary Interaction Field of Aspartic Proteases.

    PubMed

    Kaalia, Rama; Kumar, Amit; Srinivasan, Ashwin; Ghosh, Indira

    2015-06-01

    For past few decades, key objectives of rational drug discovery have been the designing of specific and selective ligands for target proteins. Infectious diseases like malaria are continuously becoming resistant to traditional medicines, which inculcates need for new approaches to design inhibitors for antimalarial targets. A novel method for ab initio designing of multi target specific pharmacophores using the interaction field maps of active sites of multiple proteins has been developed to design 'specificity' pharmacophores for aspartic proteases. The molecular interaction field grid maps of active sites of aspartic proteases (plasmepsin II & IV from Plasmodium falciparum, plasmepsin from Plasmodium vivax, pepsin & cathepsin D from human) are calculated and common pharmacophoric features for favourable binding spots in active sites are extracted in the form of cliques of graphs using inductive logic programming (ILP). The two pharmacophore ensembles are constructed from largest common cliques by imposing size of receptor active site (L) and domain-specific receptor-ligand information (S). The overlap of chemical space between two ensembles and the results of virtual screening of inhibitor database with known activities show that this method can design efficient pharmacophores with no prior ligand information. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Multi-Target Directed Indole Based Hybrid Molecules in Cancer Therapy : An Up-To-Date Evidence-Based Review.

    PubMed

    Sunil, Dhanya; Kamath, Pooja R

    2017-01-01

    Cancer is a multifactorial disease and most of its types still remain incurable, in spite of enormous efforts to explicate various tumor pathophysiology. The anti-cancer drug discovery paradigm "one-compound-one-target" has failed and subsequently shifted to two-drug cocktail and recently the "multi-target approach" in order to design and develop agents able to act simultaneously on multiple intracellular constituents and signaling pathways. Novel hybrid compounds are now designed by incorporating two covalently linked independently acting pharmacores, each efficient at combating cancer. They can deliver synergistic effects from the dual action of both independently acting moieties by interacting with multiple targets. These composite molecules are also less prone to drug resistance, leading to an improved pharmacological potency than each individual moiety. As indole nucleus is a central component of many natural and synthetic molecules with extensive biological activity, this review incorporates a variety of such hybrid compounds with indole moiety as one of the active units, where better therapeutic effect has been successfully achieved, by either simultaneous or sequential action of individual functional pharmacore. The current limitations and challenges encountered in the development of these hybrid agents are also discussed.

  9. Antisense Oligonucleotide-Mediated Removal of the Polyglutamine Repeat in Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 3 Mice.

    PubMed

    Toonen, Lodewijk J A; Rigo, Frank; van Attikum, Haico; van Roon-Mom, Willeke M C

    2017-09-15

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 (SCA3) is a currently incurable neurodegenerative disorder caused by a CAG triplet expansion in exon 10 of the ATXN3 gene. The resultant expanded polyglutamine stretch in the mutant ataxin-3 protein causes a gain of toxic function, which eventually leads to neurodegeneration. One important function of ataxin-3 is its involvement in the proteasomal protein degradation pathway, and long-term downregulation of the protein may therefore not be desirable. In the current study, we made use of antisense oligonucleotides to mask predicted exonic splicing signals, resulting in exon 10 skipping from ATXN3 pre-mRNA. This led to formation of a truncated ataxin-3 protein lacking the toxic polyglutamine expansion, but retaining its ubiquitin binding and cleavage function. Repeated intracerebroventricular injections of the antisense oligonucleotides in a SCA3 mouse model led to exon skipping and formation of the modified ataxin-3 protein throughout the mouse brain. Exon skipping was long lasting, with the modified protein being detectable for at least 2.5 months after antisense oligonucleotide injection. A reduction in insoluble ataxin-3 and nuclear accumulation was observed following antisense oligonucleotide treatment, indicating a beneficial effect on pathogenicity. Together, these data suggest that exon 10 skipping is a promising therapeutic approach for SCA3. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Expression of RNA-interference/antisense transgenes by the cognate promoters of target genes is a better gene-silencing strategy to study gene functions in rice.

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Jiang, Dagang; Zhou, Hai; Li, Feng; Yang, Jiawei; Hong, Laifa; Fu, Xiao; Li, Zhibin; Liu, Zhenlan; Li, Jianming; Zhuang, Chuxiong

    2011-03-03

    Antisense and RNA interference (RNAi)-mediated gene silencing systems are powerful reverse genetic methods for studying gene function. Most RNAi and antisense experiments used constitutive promoters to drive the expression of RNAi/antisense transgenes; however, several reports showed that constitutive promoters were not expressed in all cell types in cereal plants, suggesting that the constitutive promoter systems are not effective for silencing gene expression in certain tissues/organs. To develop an alternative method that complements the constitutive promoter systems, we constructed RNAi and/or antisense transgenes for four rice genes using a constitutive promoter or a cognate promoter of a selected rice target gene and generated many independent transgenic lines. Genetic, molecular, and phenotypic analyses of these RNAi/antisense transgenic rice plants, in comparison to previously-reported transgenic lines that silenced similar genes, revealed that expression of the cognate promoter-driven RNAi/antisense transgenes resulted in novel growth/developmental defects that were not observed in transgenic lines expressing constitutive promoter-driven gene-silencing transgenes of the same target genes. Our results strongly suggested that expression of RNAi/antisense transgenes by cognate promoters of target genes is a better gene-silencing approach to discovery gene function in rice.

  11. Expression of RNA-Interference/Antisense Transgenes by the Cognate Promoters of Target Genes Is a Better Gene-Silencing Strategy to Study Gene Functions in Rice

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Hai; Li, Feng; Yang, Jiawei; Hong, Laifa; Fu, Xiao; Li, Zhibin; Liu, Zhenlan; Li, Jianming; Zhuang, Chuxiong

    2011-01-01

    Antisense and RNA interference (RNAi)-mediated gene silencing systems are powerful reverse genetic methods for studying gene function. Most RNAi and antisense experiments used constitutive promoters to drive the expression of RNAi/antisense transgenes; however, several reports showed that constitutive promoters were not expressed in all cell types in cereal plants, suggesting that the constitutive promoter systems are not effective for silencing gene expression in certain tissues/organs. To develop an alternative method that complements the constitutive promoter systems, we constructed RNAi and/or antisense transgenes for four rice genes using a constitutive promoter or a cognate promoter of a selected rice target gene and generated many independent transgenic lines. Genetic, molecular, and phenotypic analyses of these RNAi/antisense transgenic rice plants, in comparison to previously-reported transgenic lines that silenced similar genes, revealed that expression of the cognate promoter-driven RNAi/antisense transgenes resulted in novel growth/developmental defects that were not observed in transgenic lines expressing constitutive promoter-driven gene-silencing transgenes of the same target genes. Our results strongly suggested that expression of RNAi/antisense transgenes by cognate promoters of target genes is a better gene-silencing approach to discovery gene function in rice. PMID:21408609

  12. Antisense PMO Found in Dystrophic Dog Model Was Effective in Cells from Exon 7-Deleted DMD Patient

    PubMed Central

    Saito, Takashi; Nakamura, Akinori; Aoki, Yoshitsugu; Yokota, Toshifumi; Okada, Takashi; Osawa, Makiko; Takeda, Shin'ichi

    2010-01-01

    Background Antisense oligonucleotide-induced exon skipping is a promising approach for treatment of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). We have systemically administered an antisense phosphorodiamidate morpholino oligomer (PMO) targeting dystrophin exons 6 and 8 to a dog with canine X-linked muscular dystrophy in Japan (CXMDJ) lacking exon 7 and achieved recovery of dystrophin in skeletal muscle. To date, however, antisense chemical compounds used in DMD animal models have not been directly applied to a DMD patient having the same type of exon deletion. We recently identified a DMD patient with an exon 7 deletion and tried direct translation of the antisense PMO used in dog models to the DMD patient's cells. Methodology/Principal Findings We converted fibroblasts of CXMDJ and the DMD patient to myotubes by FACS-aided MyoD transduction. Antisense PMOs targeting identical regions of dog and human dystrophin exons 6 and 8 were designed. These antisense PMOs were mixed and administered as a cocktail to either dog or human cells in vitro. In the CXMDJ and human DMD cells, we observed a similar efficacy of skipping of exons 6 and 8 and a similar extent of dystrophin protein recovery. The accompanying skipping of exon 9, which did not alter the reading frame, was different between cells of these two species. Conclusion/Significance Antisense PMOs, the effectiveness of which has been demonstrated in a dog model, achieved multi-exon skipping of dystrophin gene on the FACS-aided MyoD-transduced fibroblasts from an exon 7-deleted DMD patient, suggesting the feasibility of systemic multi-exon skipping in humans. PMID:20805873

  13. Antisense PMO found in dystrophic dog model was effective in cells from exon 7-deleted DMD patient.

    PubMed

    Saito, Takashi; Nakamura, Akinori; Aoki, Yoshitsugu; Yokota, Toshifumi; Okada, Takashi; Osawa, Makiko; Takeda, Shin'ichi

    2010-08-18

    Antisense oligonucleotide-induced exon skipping is a promising approach for treatment of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). We have systemically administered an antisense phosphorodiamidate morpholino oligomer (PMO) targeting dystrophin exons 6 and 8 to a dog with canine X-linked muscular dystrophy in Japan (CXMD(J)) lacking exon 7 and achieved recovery of dystrophin in skeletal muscle. To date, however, antisense chemical compounds used in DMD animal models have not been directly applied to a DMD patient having the same type of exon deletion. We recently identified a DMD patient with an exon 7 deletion and tried direct translation of the antisense PMO used in dog models to the DMD patient's cells. We converted fibroblasts of CXMD(J) and the DMD patient to myotubes by FACS-aided MyoD transduction. Antisense PMOs targeting identical regions of dog and human dystrophin exons 6 and 8 were designed. These antisense PMOs were mixed and administered as a cocktail to either dog or human cells in vitro. In the CXMD(J) and human DMD cells, we observed a similar efficacy of skipping of exons 6 and 8 and a similar extent of dystrophin protein recovery. The accompanying skipping of exon 9, which did not alter the reading frame, was different between cells of these two species. Antisense PMOs, the effectiveness of which has been demonstrated in a dog model, achieved multi-exon skipping of dystrophin gene on the FACS-aided MyoD-transduced fibroblasts from an exon 7-deleted DMD patient, suggesting the feasibility of systemic multi-exon skipping in humans.

  14. Improved Bearings-Only Multi-Target Tracking with GM-PHD Filtering

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qian; Song, Taek Lyul

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, an improved nonlinear Gaussian mixture probability hypothesis density (GM-PHD) filter is proposed to address bearings-only measurements in multi-target tracking. The proposed method, called the Gaussian mixture measurements-probability hypothesis density (GMM-PHD) filter, not only approximates the posterior intensity using a Gaussian mixture, but also models the likelihood function with a Gaussian mixture instead of a single Gaussian distribution. Besides, the target birth model of the GMM-PHD filter is assumed to be partially uniform instead of a Gaussian mixture. Simulation results show that the proposed filter outperforms the GM-PHD filter embedded with the extended Kalman filter (EKF) and the unscented Kalman filter (UKF). PMID:27626423

  15. Discovery of multi-target receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors as novel anti-angiogenesis agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jinfeng; Zhang, Lin; Pan, Xiaoyan; Dai, Bingling; Sun, Ying; Li, Chuansheng; Zhang, Jie

    2017-03-01

    Recently, we have identified a biphenyl-aryl urea incorporated with salicylaldoxime (BPS-7) as an anti-angiogenesis agent. Herein, we disclosed a series of novel anti-angiogenesis agents with BPS-7 as lead compound through combining diarylureas with N-pyridin-2-ylcyclopropane carboxamide. Several title compounds exhibited simultaneous inhibition effects against three pro-angiogenic RTKs (VEGFR-2, TIE-2 and EphB4). Some of them displayed potent anti-proliferative activity against human vascular endothelial cell (EA.hy926). In particular, two potent compounds (CDAU-1 and CDAU-2) could be considered as promising anti-angiogenesis agents with triplet inhibition profile. The biological evaluation and molecular docking results indicate that N-pyridin-2-ylcyclopropane carboxamide could serve as a hinge-binding group (HBG) for the discovery of multi-target anti-angiogenesis agents. CDAU-2 also exhibited promising anti-angiogenic potency in a tissue model for angiogenesis.

  16. Image-Based Multi-Target Tracking through Multi-Bernoulli Filtering with Interactive Likelihoods

    PubMed Central

    Hoak, Anthony; Medeiros, Henry; Povinelli, Richard J.

    2017-01-01

    We develop an interactive likelihood (ILH) for sequential Monte Carlo (SMC) methods for image-based multiple target tracking applications. The purpose of the ILH is to improve tracking accuracy by reducing the need for data association. In addition, we integrate a recently developed deep neural network for pedestrian detection along with the ILH with a multi-Bernoulli filter. We evaluate the performance of the multi-Bernoulli filter with the ILH and the pedestrian detector in a number of publicly available datasets (2003 PETS INMOVE, Australian Rules Football League (AFL) and TUD-Stadtmitte) using standard, well-known multi-target tracking metrics (optimal sub-pattern assignment (OSPA) and classification of events, activities and relationships for multi-object trackers (CLEAR MOT)). In all datasets, the ILH term increases the tracking accuracy of the multi-Bernoulli filter. PMID:28273796

  17. Discovery of multi-target receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors as novel anti-angiogenesis agents

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jinfeng; Zhang, Lin; Pan, Xiaoyan; Dai, Bingling; Sun, Ying; Li, Chuansheng; Zhang, Jie

    2017-01-01

    Recently, we have identified a biphenyl-aryl urea incorporated with salicylaldoxime (BPS-7) as an anti-angiogenesis agent. Herein, we disclosed a series of novel anti-angiogenesis agents with BPS-7 as lead compound through combining diarylureas with N-pyridin-2-ylcyclopropane carboxamide. Several title compounds exhibited simultaneous inhibition effects against three pro-angiogenic RTKs (VEGFR-2, TIE-2 and EphB4). Some of them displayed potent anti-proliferative activity against human vascular endothelial cell (EA.hy926). In particular, two potent compounds (CDAU-1 and CDAU-2) could be considered as promising anti-angiogenesis agents with triplet inhibition profile. The biological evaluation and molecular docking results indicate that N-pyridin-2-ylcyclopropane carboxamide could serve as a hinge-binding group (HBG) for the discovery of multi-target anti-angiogenesis agents. CDAU-2 also exhibited promising anti-angiogenic potency in a tissue model for angiogenesis. PMID:28332573

  18. [Controlling arachidonic acid metabolic network: from single- to multi-target inhibitors of key enzymes].

    PubMed

    Liu, Ying; Chen, Zheng; Shang, Er-chang; Yang, Kun; Wei, Deng-guo; Zhou, Lu; Jiang, Xiao-lu; He, Chong; Lai, Lu-hua

    2009-03-01

    Inflammatory diseases are common medical conditions seen in disorders of human immune system. There is a great demand for anti-inflammatory drugs. There are major inflammatory mediators in arachidonic acid metabolic network. Several enzymes in this network have been used as key targets for the development of anti-inflammatory drugs. However, specific single-target inhibitors can not sufficiently control the network balance and may cause side effects at the same time. Most inflammation induced diseases come from the complicated coupling of inflammatory cascades involving multiple targets. In order to treat these complicated diseases, drugs that can intervene multi-targets at the same time attracted much attention. The goal of this review is mainly focused on the key enzymes in arachidonic acid metabolic network, such as phospholipase A2, cyclooxygenase, 5-lipoxygenase and eukotriene A4 hydrolase. Advance in single target and multi-targe inhibitors is summarized.

  19. Multi-Target Detection from Full-Waveform Airborne Laser Scanner Using Phd Filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuse, T.; Hiramatsu, D.; Nakanishi, W.

    2016-06-01

    We propose a new technique to detect multiple targets from full-waveform airborne laser scanner. We introduce probability hypothesis density (PHD) filter, a type of Bayesian filtering, by which we can estimate the number of targets and their positions simultaneously. PHD filter overcomes some limitations of conventional Gaussian decomposition method; PHD filter doesn't require a priori knowledge on the number of targets, assumption of parametric form of the intensity distribution. In addition, it can take a similarity between successive irradiations into account by modelling relative positions of the same targets spatially. Firstly we explain PHD filter and particle filter implementation to it. Secondly we formulate the multi-target detection problem on PHD filter by modelling components and parameters within it. At last we conducted the experiment on real data of forest and vegetation, and confirmed its ability and accuracy.

  20. Improved Bearings-Only Multi-Target Tracking with GM-PHD Filtering.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qian; Song, Taek Lyul

    2016-09-10

    In this paper, an improved nonlinear Gaussian mixture probability hypothesis density (GM-PHD) filter is proposed to address bearings-only measurements in multi-target tracking. The proposed method, called the Gaussian mixture measurements-probability hypothesis density (GMM-PHD) filter, not only approximates the posterior intensity using a Gaussian mixture, but also models the likelihood function with a Gaussian mixture instead of a single Gaussian distribution. Besides, the target birth model of the GMM-PHD filter is assumed to be partially uniform instead of a Gaussian mixture. Simulation results show that the proposed filter outperforms the GM-PHD filter embedded with the extended Kalman filter (EKF) and the unscented Kalman filter (UKF).

  1. Image-Based Multi-Target Tracking through Multi-Bernoulli Filtering with Interactive Likelihoods.

    PubMed

    Hoak, Anthony; Medeiros, Henry; Povinelli, Richard J

    2017-03-03

    We develop an interactive likelihood (ILH) for sequential Monte Carlo (SMC) methods for image-based multiple target tracking applications. The purpose of the ILH is to improve tracking accuracy by reducing the need for data association. In addition, we integrate a recently developed deep neural network for pedestrian detection along with the ILH with a multi-Bernoulli filter. We evaluate the performance of the multi-Bernoulli filter with the ILH and the pedestrian detector in a number of publicly available datasets (2003 PETS INMOVE, Australian Rules Football League (AFL) and TUD-Stadtmitte) using standard, well-known multi-target tracking metrics (optimal sub-pattern assignment (OSPA) and classification of events, activities and relationships for multi-object trackers (CLEAR MOT)). In all datasets, the ILH term increases the tracking accuracy of the multi-Bernoulli filter.

  2. [Development of multi-target multi-spectral high-speed pyrometer].

    PubMed

    Xiao, Peng; Dai, Jing-Min; Wang, Qing-Wei

    2008-11-01

    The plume temperature of a solid propellant rocket engine (SPRE) is a fundamental parameter in denoting combustion status. It is necessary to measure the temperature along both the axis and the radius of the engine. In order to measure the plume temperature distribution of a solid propellant rocket engine, the multi-spectral thermometry has been approved. Previously the pyrometer was developed in the Harbin Institute of Technology of China in 1999, which completed the measurement of SPRE plume temperature and its distribution with multi-spectral technique in aerospace model development for the first time. Following this experience, a new type of multi-target multi-spectral high-speed pyrometer used in the ground experiments of SPRE plume temperature measurement was developed. The main features of the instrument include the use of a dispersing prism and a photo-diode array to cover the entire spectral band of 0.4 to 1.1 microm. The optic fibers are used in order to collect and transmit the thermal radiation fluxes. The instrument can measure simultaneously the temperature and emissivity of eight spectra for six uniformly distributed points on the target surface, which are well defined by the hole on the field stop lens. A specially designed S/H (Sample/Hold) circuit, with 48 sample and hold units that were triggered with a signal, measures the multi-spectral and multi-target outputs. It can sample 48 signals with a less than 10ns time difference which is most important for the temperature calculation.

  3. AVN-101: A Multi-Target Drug Candidate for the Treatment of CNS Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Ivachtchenko, Alexandre V.; Lavrovsky, Yan; Okun, Ilya

    2016-01-01

    Lack of efficacy of many new highly selective and specific drug candidates in treating diseases with poorly understood or complex etiology, as are many of central nervous system (CNS) diseases, encouraged an idea of developing multi-modal (multi-targeted) drugs. In this manuscript, we describe molecular pharmacology, in vitro ADME, pharmacokinetics in animals and humans (part of the Phase I clinical studies), bio-distribution, bioavailability, in vivo efficacy, and safety profile of the multimodal drug candidate, AVN-101. We have carried out development of a next generation drug candidate with a multi-targeted mechanism of action, to treat CNS disorders. AVN-101 is a very potent 5-HT7 receptor antagonist (Ki = 153 pM), with slightly lesser potency toward 5-HT6, 5-HT2A, and 5HT-2C receptors (Ki = 1.2–2.0 nM). AVN-101 also exhibits a rather high affinity toward histamine H1 (Ki = 0.58 nM) and adrenergic α2A, α2B, and α2C (Ki = 0.41–3.6 nM) receptors. AVN-101 shows a good oral bioavailability and facilitated brain-blood barrier permeability, low toxicity, and reasonable efficacy in animal models of CNS diseases. The Phase I clinical study indicates the AVN-101 to be well tolerated when taken orally at doses of up to 20 mg daily. It does not dramatically influence plasma and urine biochemistry, nor does it prolong QT ECG interval, thus indicating low safety concerns. The primary therapeutic area for AVN-101 to be tested in clinical trials would be Alzheimer’s disease. However, due to its anxiolytic and anti-depressive activities, there is a strong rational for it to also be studied in such diseases as general anxiety disorders, depression, schizophrenia, and multiple sclerosis. PMID:27232215

  4. Antisense delivery using protamine–oligonucleotide particles

    PubMed Central

    Junghans, Monika; Kreuter, Jörg; Zimmer, Andreas

    2000-01-01

    Protamine, a polycationic peptide (mol. wt 4000–4500), was evaluated as a potential penetration enhancer for phosphodiester antisense oligonucleotides (ODNs). Unique complexes in the form of nanoparticles were spontaneously formed, which we call ‘proticles’. The stability of the particles and the ODNs bound into the proticles was examined in foetal calf serum and cell culture medium. FITC-labelled ODNs bound to protamine showed an increased cellular uptake into human histiocytic lymphoma U 937 cells compared to free ODNs. Proticles significantly decreased cellular growth in a cell proliferation assay using ODNs against the c-myc proto-oncogene. PMID:10773093

  5. Voltage-gated calcium channel and antisense oligonucleotides thereto

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hruska, Keith A. (Inventor); Friedman, Peter A. (Inventor); Barry, Elizabeth L. R. (Inventor); Duncan, Randall L. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    An antisense oligonucleotide of 10 to 35 nucleotides in length that can hybridize with a region of the .alpha..sub.1 subunit of the SA-Cat channel gene DNA or mRNA is provided, together with pharmaceutical compositions containing and methods utilizing such antisense oligonucleotide.

  6. Natural antisense and noncoding RNA transcripts as potential drug targets.

    PubMed

    Wahlestedt, Claes

    2006-06-01

    Information on the complexity of mammalian RNA transcription has increased greatly in the past few years. Notably, thousands of sense transcripts (conventional protein-coding genes) have antisense transcript partners, most of which are noncoding. Interestingly, a number of antisense transcripts regulate the expression of their sense partners, either in a discordant (antisense knockdown results in sense-transcript elevation) or concordant (antisense knockdown results in concomitant sense-transcript reduction) manner. Two new pharmacological strategies based on the knockdown of antisense RNA transcripts by siRNA (or another RNA targeting principle) are proposed in this review. In the case of discordant regulation, knockdown of antisense transcript elevates the expression of the conventional (sense) gene, thereby conceivably mimicking agonist-activator action. In the case of concordant regulation, knockdown of antisense transcript, or concomitant knockdown of antisense and sense transcripts, results in an additive or even synergistic reduction of the conventional gene expression. Although both strategies have been demonstrated to be valid in cell culture, it remains to be seen whether they provide advantages in other contexts.

  7. Antisense transcription as a tool to tune gene expression.

    PubMed

    Brophy, Jennifer A N; Voigt, Christopher A

    2016-01-14

    A surprise that has emerged from transcriptomics is the prevalence of genomic antisense transcription, which occurs counter to gene orientation. While frequent, the roles of antisense transcription in regulation are poorly understood. We built a synthetic system in Escherichia coli to study how antisense transcription can change the expression of a gene and tune the response characteristics of a regulatory circuit. We developed a new genetic part that consists of a unidirectional terminator followed by a constitutive antisense promoter and demonstrate that this part represses gene expression proportionally to the antisense promoter strength. Chip-based oligo synthesis was applied to build a large library of 5,668 terminator-promoter combinations that was used to control the expression of three repressors (PhlF, SrpR, and TarA) in a simple genetic circuit (NOT gate). Using the library, we demonstrate that antisense promoters can be used to tune the threshold of a regulatory circuit without impacting other properties of its response function. Finally, we determined the relative contributions of antisense RNA and transcriptional interference to repressing gene expression and introduce a biophysical model to capture the impact of RNA polymerase collisions on gene repression. This work quantifies the role of antisense transcription in regulatory networks and introduces a new mode to control gene expression that has been previously overlooked in genetic engineering.

  8. Antisense oligodeoxynucleotide inhibition as a potent diagnostic tool for gene function in plant biology

    SciTech Connect

    Jansson, Christer; Sun, Chuanxin; Ghebramedhin, Haile; Hoglund, Anna-Stina; Jansson, Christer

    2008-01-15

    Antisense oligodeoxynucleotide (ODN) inhibition emerges as an effective means for probing gene function in plant cells. Employing this method we have established the importance of the SUSIBA2 transcription factor for regulation of starch synthesis in barley endosperm, and arrived at a model for the role of the SUSIBAs in sugar signaling and source-sink commutation during cereal endosperm development. In this addendum we provide additional data demonstrating the suitability of the antisense ODN technology in studies on starch branching enzyme activities in barley leaves. We also comment on the mechanism for ODN uptake in plant cells. Antisense ODNs are short (12-25 nt-long) stretches of single-stranded ODNs that hybridize to the cognate mRNA in a sequence-specific manner, thereby inhibiting gene expression. They are naturally occurring in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes where they partake in gene regulation and defense against viral infection. The mechanisms for antisense ODN inhibition are not fully understood but it is generally considered that the ODN either sterically interferes with translation or promotes transcript degradation by RNase H activation. The earliest indication of the usefulness of antisense ODN technology for the purposes of molecular biology and medical therapy was the demonstration in 1978 that synthetic ODNs complementary to Raos sarcoma virus could inhibit virus replication in tissue cultures of chick embryo fibroblasts. Since then the antisense ODN technology has been widely used in animal sciences and as an important emerging therapeutic approach in clinical medicine. However, antisense ODN inhibition has been an under-exploited strategy for plant tissues, although the prospects for plant cells in suspension cultures to take up single-stranded ODNs was reported over a decade ago. In 2001, two reports from Malho and coworker demonstrated the use of cationic-complexed antisense ODNs to suppress expression of genes encoding pollen

  9. Study on the degeneracy of antisense peptides using affinity chromatography.

    PubMed

    Zhao, R; Yu, X; Liu, H; Zhai, L; Xiong, S; Su, T; Liu, G

    2001-04-13

    The degeneracy of antisense peptides was studied by high-performance affinity chromatography. A model sense peptide (AAAA) and its antisense peptides (CGGG, GGGG, RGGG, SGGG) were designed and synthesized according to the degeneracy of genetic codes. An affinity column with AAAA as the ligand was prepared. The affinity chromatographic behaviors of antisense peptides on the column were evaluated. The results indicated that model antisense peptides have clear retention on the immobilized AAAA affinity column. RGGG showed the strongest affinity interaction. Similar result was obtained from another experiment that Arg-substituted antisense peptide of fusion peptide (1-11) of influenza virus A was also shown the highest affinity binding to immobilized fusion peptide.

  10. The Cellular Processing Capacity Limits the Amounts of Chimeric U7 snRNA Available for Antisense Delivery.

    PubMed

    Eckenfelder, Agathe; Tordo, Julie; Babbs, Arran; Davies, Kay E; Goyenvalle, Aurélie; Danos, Olivier

    2012-06-26

    Many genetic diseases are induced by mutations disturbing the maturation of pre-mRNAs, often affecting splicing. Antisense oligoribonucleotides (AONs) have been used to modulate splicing thereby circumventing the deleterious effects of mutations. Stable delivery of antisense sequences is achieved by linking them to small nuclear RNA (snRNAs) delivered by viral vectors, as illustrated by studies where therapeutic exon skipping was obtained in animal models of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). Yet, clinical translation of these approaches is limited by the amounts of vector to be administered. In this respect, maximizing the amount of snRNA antisense shuttle delivered by the vector is essential. Here, we have used a muscle- and heart-specific enhancer (MHCK) to drive the expression of U7 snRNA shuttles carrying antisense sequences against the human or murine DMD pre-mRNAs. Although antisense delivery and subsequent exon skipping were improved both in tissue culture and in vivo, we observed the formation of additional U7 snRNA by-products following gene transfer. These included aberrantly 3' processed as well as unprocessed species that may arise because of the saturation of the cellular processing capacity. Future efforts to increase the amounts of functional U7 shuttles delivered into a cell will have to take this limitation into account.

  11. The Cellular Processing Capacity Limits the Amounts of Chimeric U7 snRNA Available for Antisense Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Eckenfelder, Agathe; Tordo, Julie; Babbs, Arran; Davies, Kay E; Goyenvalle, Aurélie; Danos, Olivier

    2012-01-01

    Many genetic diseases are induced by mutations disturbing the maturation of pre-mRNAs, often affecting splicing. Antisense oligoribonucleotides (AONs) have been used to modulate splicing thereby circumventing the deleterious effects of mutations. Stable delivery of antisense sequences is achieved by linking them to small nuclear RNA (snRNAs) delivered by viral vectors, as illustrated by studies where therapeutic exon skipping was obtained in animal models of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). Yet, clinical translation of these approaches is limited by the amounts of vector to be administered. In this respect, maximizing the amount of snRNA antisense shuttle delivered by the vector is essential. Here, we have used a muscle- and heart-specific enhancer (MHCK) to drive the expression of U7 snRNA shuttles carrying antisense sequences against the human or murine DMD pre-mRNAs. Although antisense delivery and subsequent exon skipping were improved both in tissue culture and in vivo, we observed the formation of additional U7 snRNA by-products following gene transfer. These included aberrantly 3′ processed as well as unprocessed species that may arise because of the saturation of the cellular processing capacity. Future efforts to increase the amounts of functional U7 shuttles delivered into a cell will have to take this limitation into account. PMID:23344083

  12. Antisense oligonucleotide-based therapy in human erythropoietic protoporphyria.

    PubMed

    Oustric, Vincent; Manceau, Hana; Ducamp, Sarah; Soaid, Rima; Karim, Zoubida; Schmitt, Caroline; Mirmiran, Arienne; Peoc'h, Katell; Grandchamp, Bernard; Beaumont, Carole; Lyoumi, Said; Moreau-Gaudry, François; Guyonnet-Dupérat, Véronique; de Verneuil, Hubert; Marie, Joëlle; Puy, Herve; Deybach, Jean-Charles; Gouya, Laurent

    2014-04-03

    In 90% of people with erythropoietic protoporphyria (EPP), the disease results from the inheritance of a common hypomorphic FECH allele, encoding ferrochelatase, in trans to a private deleterious FECH mutation. The activity of the resulting FECH enzyme falls below the critical threshold of 35%, leading to the accumulation of free protoporphyrin IX (PPIX) in bone marrow erythroblasts and in red cells. The mechanism of low expression involves a biallelic polymorphism (c.315-48T>C) localized in intron 3. The 315-48C allele increases usage of the 3' cryptic splice site between exons 3 and 4, resulting in the transcription of an unstable mRNA with a premature stop codon, reducing the abundance of wild-type FECH mRNA, and finally reducing FECH activity. Through a candidate-sequence approach and an antisense-oligonucleotide-tiling method, we identified a sequence that, when targeted by an antisense oligonucleotide (ASO-V1), prevented usage of the cryptic splice site. In lymphoblastoid cell lines derived from symptomatic EPP subjects, transfection of ASO-V1 reduced the usage of the cryptic splice site and efficiently redirected the splicing of intron 3 toward the physiological acceptor site, thereby increasing the amount of functional FECH mRNA. Moreover, the administration of ASO-V1 into developing human erythroblasts from an overtly EPP subject markedly increased the production of WT FECH mRNA and reduced the accumulation of PPIX to a level similar to that measured in asymptomatic EPP subjects. Thus, EPP is a paradigmatic Mendelian disease in which the in vivo correction of a common single splicing defect would improve the condition of most affected individuals.

  13. Antisense Oligonucleotide-Based Therapy in Human Erythropoietic Protoporphyria

    PubMed Central

    Oustric, Vincent; Manceau, Hana; Ducamp, Sarah; Soaid, Rima; Karim, Zoubida; Schmitt, Caroline; Mirmiran, Arienne; Peoc’h, Katell; Grandchamp, Bernard; Beaumont, Carole; Lyoumi, Said; Moreau-Gaudry, François; Guyonnet-Dupérat, Véronique; de Verneuil, Hubert; Marie, Joëlle; Puy, Herve; Deybach, Jean-Charles; Gouya, Laurent

    2014-01-01

    In 90% of people with erythropoietic protoporphyria (EPP), the disease results from the inheritance of a common hypomorphic FECH allele, encoding ferrochelatase, in trans to a private deleterious FECH mutation. The activity of the resulting FECH enzyme falls below the critical threshold of 35%, leading to the accumulation of free protoporphyrin IX (PPIX) in bone marrow erythroblasts and in red cells. The mechanism of low expression involves a biallelic polymorphism (c.315−48T>C) localized in intron 3. The 315−48C allele increases usage of the 3′ cryptic splice site between exons 3 and 4, resulting in the transcription of an unstable mRNA with a premature stop codon, reducing the abundance of wild-type FECH mRNA, and finally reducing FECH activity. Through a candidate-sequence approach and an antisense-oligonucleotide-tiling method, we identified a sequence that, when targeted by an antisense oligonucleotide (ASO-V1), prevented usage of the cryptic splice site. In lymphoblastoid cell lines derived from symptomatic EPP subjects, transfection of ASO-V1 reduced the usage of the cryptic splice site and efficiently redirected the splicing of intron 3 toward the physiological acceptor site, thereby increasing the amount of functional FECH mRNA. Moreover, the administration of ASO-V1 into developing human erythroblasts from an overtly EPP subject markedly increased the production of WT FECH mRNA and reduced the accumulation of PPIX to a level similar to that measured in asymptomatic EPP subjects. Thus, EPP is a paradigmatic Mendelian disease in which the in vivo correction of a common single splicing defect would improve the condition of most affected individuals. PMID:24680888

  14. Design, synthesis and evaluation of seleno-dihydropyrimidinones as potential multi-targeted therapeutics for Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Canto, Rômulo F S; Barbosa, Flavio A R; Nascimento, Vanessa; de Oliveira, Aldo S; Brighente, Inês M C; Braga, Antonio Luiz

    2014-06-07

    In this paper we report the design, synthesis and evaluation of a series of seleno-dihydropyrimidinones as potential multi-targeted therapeutics for Alzheimer's disease. The compounds show excellent results as acetylcholinesterase inhibitors, being as active as the standard drug. All these compounds also show very good antioxidant activity through different mechanisms of action.

  15. Gene Isoform Specificity through Enhancer-Associated Antisense Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Onodera, Courtney S.; Underwood, Jason G.; Katzman, Sol; Jacobs, Frank; Greenberg, David; Salama, Sofie R.; Haussler, David

    2012-01-01

    Enhancers and antisense RNAs play key roles in transcriptional regulation through differing mechanisms. Recent studies have demonstrated that enhancers are often associated with non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs), yet the functional role of these enhancer:ncRNA associations is unclear. Using RNA-Sequencing to interrogate the transcriptomes of undifferentiated mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs) and their derived neural precursor cells (NPs), we identified two novel enhancer-associated antisense transcripts that appear to control isoform-specific expression of their overlapping protein-coding genes. In each case, an enhancer internal to a protein-coding gene drives an antisense RNA in mESCs but not in NPs. Expression of the antisense RNA is correlated with expression of a shorter isoform of the associated sense gene that is not present when the antisense RNA is not expressed. We demonstrate that expression of the antisense transcripts as well as expression of the short sense isoforms correlates with enhancer activity at these two loci. Further, overexpression and knockdown experiments suggest the antisense transcripts regulate expression of their associated sense genes via cis-acting mechanisms. Interestingly, the protein-coding genes involved in these two examples, Zmynd8 and Brd1, share many functional domains, yet their antisense ncRNAs show no homology to each other and are not present in non-murine mammalian lineages, such as the primate lineage. The lack of homology in the antisense ncRNAs indicates they have evolved independently of each other and suggests that this mode of lineage-specific transcriptional regulation may be more widespread in other cell types and organisms. Our findings present a new view of enhancer action wherein enhancers may direct isoform-specific expression of genes through ncRNA intermediates. PMID:22937057

  16. The role of antisense oligonucleotide therapy in patients with familial hypercholesterolemia: risks, benefits, and management recommendations.

    PubMed

    Agarwala, Anandita; Jones, Peter; Nambi, Vijay

    2015-01-01

    Antisense oligonucleotide therapy is a promising approach for the treatment of a broad variety of medical conditions. It functions at the cellular level by interfering with RNA function, often leading to degradation of specifically targeted abnormal gene products implicated in the disease process. Mipomersen is a novel antisense oligonucleotide directed at apolipoprotein (apoB)-100, the primary apolipoprotein associated with low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), which has recently been approved for the treatment of familial hypercholesterolemia. A number of clinical studies have demonstrated its efficacy in lowering LDL-C and apoB levels in patients with elevated LDL-C despite maximal medical therapy using conventional lipid-lowering agents. This review outlines the risks and benefits of therapy and provides recommendations on the use of mipomersen.

  17. Cellular uptake and trafficking of antisense oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Crooke, Stanley T; Wang, Shiyu; Vickers, Timothy A; Shen, Wen; Liang, Xue-Hai

    2017-03-01

    Antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) modified with phosphorothioate (PS) linkages and different 2' modifications can be used either as drugs (e.g., to treat homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia and spinal muscular atrophy) or as research tools to alter gene expression. PS-ASOs can enter cells without additional modification or formulation and can be designed to mediate sequence-specific cleavage of different types of RNA (including mRNA and non-coding RNA) targeted by endogenous RNase H1. Although PS-ASOs function in both the cytoplasm and nucleus, localization to different subcellular regions can affect their therapeutic potency. Cellular uptake and intracellular distribution of PS ASOs are mediated by protein interactions. The main proteins involved in these processes have been identified, and intracellular sites in which PS ASOs are active, or inactive, cataloged.

  18. Antisense Oligonucleotides: Treatment Strategies and Cellular Internalization

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Colton M.; Harris, Edward N.

    2016-01-01

    The clinical applicaton of antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) is becoming more of a reality as several drugs have been approved for the treatment of human disorders and many others are in various phases in development and clinical trials. ASOs are short DNA/RNA oligos which are heavily modified to increase their stability in biological fluids and retain the properties of creating RNA-RNA and DNA-RNA duplexes that knock-down or correct genetic expression. This review outlines several strategies that ASOs utilize for the treatment of various congenital diseases and syndromes that develop with aging. In addition, we discuss some of the mechanisms for specific non-targeted ASO internalization within cells. PMID:28374018

  19. Antenna allocation in MIMO radar with widely separated antennas for multi-target detection.

    PubMed

    Gao, Hao; Wang, Jian; Jiang, Chunxiao; Zhang, Xudong

    2014-10-27

    In this paper, we explore a new resource called multi-target diversity to optimize the performance of multiple input multiple output (MIMO) radar with widely separated antennas for detecting multiple targets. In particular, we allocate antennas of the MIMO radar to probe different targets simultaneously in a flexible manner based on the performance metric of relative entropy. Two antenna allocation schemes are proposed. In the first scheme, each antenna is allocated to illuminate a proper target over the entire illumination time, so that the detection performance of each target is guaranteed. The problem is formulated as a minimum makespan scheduling problem in the combinatorial optimization framework. Antenna allocation is implemented through a branch-and-bound algorithm and an enhanced factor 2 algorithm. In the second scheme, called antenna-time allocation, each antenna is allocated to illuminate different targets with different illumination time. Both antenna allocation and time allocation are optimized based on illumination probabilities. Over a large range of transmitted power, target fluctuations and target numbers, both of the proposed antenna allocation schemes outperform the scheme without antenna allocation. Moreover, the antenna-time allocation scheme achieves a more robust detection performance than branch-and-bound algorithm and the enhanced factor 2 algorithm when the target number changes.

  20. A sequential multi-target Mps1 phosphorylation cascade promotes spindle checkpoint signaling

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Zhejian; Gao, Haishan; Jia, Luying; Li, Bing; Yu, Hongtao

    2017-01-01

    The master spindle checkpoint kinase Mps1 senses kinetochore-microtubule attachment and promotes checkpoint signaling to ensure accurate chromosome segregation. The kinetochore scaffold Knl1, when phosphorylated by Mps1, recruits checkpoint complexes Bub1–Bub3 and BubR1–Bub3 to unattached kinetochores. Active checkpoint signaling ultimately enhances the assembly of the mitotic checkpoint complex (MCC) consisting of BubR1–Bub3, Mad2, and Cdc20, which inhibits the anaphase-promoting complex or cyclosome bound to Cdc20 (APC/CCdc20) to delay anaphase onset. Using in vitro reconstitution, we show that Mps1 promotes APC/C inhibition by MCC components through phosphorylating Bub1 and Mad1. Phosphorylated Bub1 binds to Mad1–Mad2. Phosphorylated Mad1 directly interacts with Cdc20. Mutations of Mps1 phosphorylation sites in Bub1 or Mad1 abrogate the spindle checkpoint in human cells. Therefore, Mps1 promotes checkpoint activation through sequentially phosphorylating Knl1, Bub1, and Mad1. This sequential multi-target phosphorylation cascade makes the checkpoint highly responsive to Mps1 and to kinetochore-microtubule attachment. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.22513.001 PMID:28072388

  1. ESAM: Endocrine inspired Sensor Activation Mechanism for multi-target tracking in WSNs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adil Mahdi, Omar; Wahab, Ainuddin Wahid Abdul; Idris, Mohd Yamani Idna; Znaid, Ammar Abu; Khan, Suleman; Al-Mayouf, Yusor Rafid Bahar

    2016-10-01

    Target tracking is a significant application of wireless sensor networks (WSNs) in which deployment of self-organizing and energy efficient algorithms is required. The tracking accuracy increases as more sensor nodes are activated around the target but more energy is consumed. Thus, in this study, we focus on limiting the number of sensors by forming an ad-hoc network that operates autonomously. This will reduce the energy consumption and prolong the sensor network lifetime. In this paper, we propose a fully distributed algorithm, an Endocrine inspired Sensor Activation Mechanism for multi target-tracking (ESAM) which reflecting the properties of real life sensor activation system based on the information circulating principle in the endocrine system of the human body. Sensor nodes in our network are secreting different hormones according to certain rules. The hormone level enables the nodes to regulate an efficient sleep and wake up cycle of nodes to reduce the energy consumption. It is evident from the simulation results that the proposed ESAM in autonomous sensor network exhibits a stable performance without the need of commands from a central controller. Moreover, the proposed ESAM generates more efficient and persistent results as compared to other algorithms for tracking an invading object.

  2. Topology of classical molecular optimal control landscapes for multi-target objectives

    SciTech Connect

    Joe-Wong, Carlee; Ho, Tak-San; Rabitz, Herschel; Wu, Rebing

    2015-04-21

    This paper considers laser-driven optimal control of an ensemble of non-interacting molecules whose dynamics lie in classical phase space. The molecules evolve independently under control to distinct final states. We consider a control landscape defined in terms of multi-target (MT) molecular states and analyze the landscape as a functional of the control field. The topology of the MT control landscape is assessed through its gradient and Hessian with respect to the control. Under particular assumptions, the MT control landscape is found to be free of traps that could hinder reaching the objective. The Hessian associated with an optimal control field is shown to have finite rank, indicating an inherent degree of robustness to control noise. Both the absence of traps and rank of the Hessian are shown to be analogous to the situation of specifying multiple targets for an ensemble of quantum states. Numerical simulations are presented to illustrate the classical landscape principles and further characterize the system behavior as the control field is optimized.

  3. Collaborative multi-target tracking using networked micro-robotic vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswas, Subir; Gupta, Sonny; Yu, Fan; Wu, Tao

    2007-04-01

    This paper presents a collaborative target tracking framework, in which distributed mechanisms are developed for tracking multiple mobile targets using a team of networked micro robotic vehicles. Applications of such a framework would include detection of multi-agent intrusion, network-assisted attack localization, and other collaborative search scenarios. The key idea of the developed framework is to design distributed algorithms that can be executed by tracking entities using a mobile ad hoc network. The paper comprises the following components. First, the software and hardware architectural detail of a Swarm Capable Autonomous Vehicle (SCAV) system that is used as the mobile platform in our target tracking application is presented. Second, the details of an indoor self-localization and Kalman filter based navigation system for the SCAV are presented. Third, a formal definition of the collaborative multi-target tracking problem and a heuristic based networked solution are developed. Finally, the performance of the proposed tracking framework is evaluated on a laboratory test-bed of a fleet of SCAV vehicles. A detailed system characterization in terms localization, navigation, and collaborative tracking performance is performed on the SCAV test-bed. In addition to valuable implementation insights about the localization, navigation, filtering, and ad hoc networking processes, a number of interesting conclusions about the overall tracking system are presented.

  4. [STW 5/Iberogast: multi-target-action for treatment of functional dyspepsia and irritable bowel syndrome].

    PubMed

    Allescher, Hans-Dieter; Wagner, Hildebert

    2007-01-01

    Functional gastro-intestinal diseases such as functional dyspepsia and irritable bowel syndrome are a therapeutic challenge, as they are not only characterized by a multitude of symptoms, some of them with severe consequences for affected patients, but are also caused by a multitude of factors. The clinical efficacy of the therapeutics STW 5/Iberogast in these diseases has been proven in a number of randomized prospective clinical studies. Several preclinical studies suggest that its efficacy could be due to its complex composition of nine standardized herbal extracts, which act differently on multiple sites. This principle, which is quite popular in clinical medicine, was introduced as a multi-target therapy for functional bowel disorders. Components of STW 5/Iberogast reduce gastro-intestinal hypersensitivity and act spasmolytic on spastic, tonicising on atonic gastro-intestinal muscle. In addition a stimulating effect on reduced mucus-secretion, an inhibitory effect on enhanced gastric acid secretion and an anti-inflammatory effect have been shown. These effects could explain the clinical efficacy of STW5/Iberogast in a large range of symptoms.

  5. Crawling and walking infants encounter objects differently in a multi-target environment.

    PubMed

    Dosso, Jill A; Boudreau, J Paul

    2014-10-01

    From birth, infants move their bodies in order to obtain information and stimulation from their environment. Exploratory movements are important for the development of an infant's understanding of the world and are well established as being key to cognitive advances. Newly acquired motor skills increase the potential actions available to the infant. However, the way that infants employ potential actions in environments with multiple potential targets is undescribed. The current work investigated the target object selections of infants across a range of self-produced locomotor experience (11- to 14-month-old crawlers and walkers). Infants repeatedly accessed objects among pairs of objects differing in both distance and preference status, some requiring locomotion. Overall, their object actions were found to be sensitive to object preference status; however, the role of object distance in shaping object encounters was moderated by movement status. Crawlers' actions appeared opportunistic and were biased towards nearby objects while walkers' actions appeared intentional and were independent of object position. Moreover, walkers' movements favoured preferred objects more strongly for children with higher levels of self-produced locomotion experience. The multi-target experimental situation used in this work parallels conditions faced by foraging organisms, and infants' behaviours were discussed with respect to optimal foraging theory. There is a complex interplay between infants' agency, locomotor experience, and environment in shaping their motor actions. Infants' movements, in turn, determine the information and experiences offered to infants by their micro-environment.

  6. ATP as a multi-target danger signal in the brain

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Ricardo J.; Tomé, Angelo R.; Cunha, Rodrigo A.

    2015-01-01

    ATP is released in an activity-dependent manner from different cell types in the brain, fulfilling different roles as a neurotransmitter, neuromodulator, in astrocyte-to-neuron communication, propagating astrocytic responses and formatting microglia responses. This involves the activation of different ATP P2 receptors (P2R) as well as adenosine receptors upon extracellular ATP catabolism by ecto-nucleotidases. Notably, brain noxious stimuli trigger a sustained increase of extracellular ATP, which plays a key role as danger signal in the brain. This involves a combined action of extracellular ATP in different cell types, namely increasing the susceptibility of neurons to damage, promoting astrogliosis and recruiting and formatting microglia to mount neuroinflammatory responses. Such actions involve the activation of different receptors, as heralded by neuroprotective effects resulting from blockade mainly of P2X7R, P2Y1R and adenosine A2A receptors (A2AR), which hierarchy, cooperation and/or redundancy is still not resolved. These pleiotropic functions of ATP as a danger signal in brain damage prompt a therapeutic interest to multi-target different purinergic receptors to provide maximal opportunities for neuroprotection. PMID:25972780

  7. Multi-Target Tracking Using an Improved Gaussian Mixture CPHD Filter

    PubMed Central

    Si, Weijian; Wang, Liwei; Qu, Zhiyu

    2016-01-01

    The cardinalized probability hypothesis density (CPHD) filter is an alternative approximation to the full multi-target Bayesian filter for tracking multiple targets. However, although the joint propagation of the posterior intensity and cardinality distribution in its recursion allows more reliable estimates of the target number than the PHD filter, the CPHD filter suffers from the spooky effect where there exists arbitrary PHD mass shifting in the presence of missed detections. To address this issue in the Gaussian mixture (GM) implementation of the CPHD filter, this paper presents an improved GM-CPHD filter, which incorporates a weight redistribution scheme into the filtering process to modify the updated weights of the Gaussian components when missed detections occur. In addition, an efficient gating strategy that can adaptively adjust the gate sizes according to the number of missed detections of each Gaussian component is also presented to further improve the computational efficiency of the proposed filter. Simulation results demonstrate that the proposed method offers favorable performance in terms of both estimation accuracy and robustness to clutter and detection uncertainty over the existing methods. PMID:27886106

  8. Vasculoprotection as a Convergent, Multi-Targeted Mechanism of Anti-AD Therapeutics and Interventions.

    PubMed

    Bhat, Narayan R

    2015-01-01

    Using a variety of animal models of Alzheimer's disease (AD), there have been a number of recent studies reporting varying degrees of success with anti-AD therapeutics. The efficacies are often discussed in terms of the modulatory effects of the compounds tested on identified or assumed targets among the known (or proposed) pathogenic and neuroprotective mechanisms, largely within the context of the dominant amyloid cascade hypothesis. However, it is clear that several of the relatively more efficacious treatments tend to be multifunctional and target multiple pathological processes associated with AD including most commonly, oxidative and metabolic stress and neuroinflammation. Increasing evidence suggests that vascular and neurodegenerative pathologies often co-exist and that neurovascular dysfunction plays a critical role in the development or progression of AD. In this review, we will discuss the significance of vasculoprotection or neurovascular unit integrity as a common, multi-targeted mechanism underlying the reported efficacy of a majority of anti-AD therapeutics--amyloid-targeted or otherwise--while providing a strong support for future neurovascular-based treatment strategies and interventions.

  9. Antenna Allocation in MIMO Radar with Widely Separated Antennas for Multi-Target Detection

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Hao; Wang, Jian; Jiang, Chunxiao; Zhang, Xudong

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we explore a new resource called multi-target diversity to optimize the performance of multiple input multiple output (MIMO) radar with widely separated antennas for detecting multiple targets. In particular, we allocate antennas of the MIMO radar to probe different targets simultaneously in a flexible manner based on the performance metric of relative entropy. Two antenna allocation schemes are proposed. In the first scheme, each antenna is allocated to illuminate a proper target over the entire illumination time, so that the detection performance of each target is guaranteed. The problem is formulated as a minimum makespan scheduling problem in the combinatorial optimization framework. Antenna allocation is implemented through a branch-and-bound algorithm and an enhanced factor 2 algorithm. In the second scheme, called antenna-time allocation, each antenna is allocated to illuminate different targets with different illumination time. Both antenna allocation and time allocation are optimized based on illumination probabilities. Over a large range of transmitted power, target fluctuations and target numbers, both of the proposed antenna allocation schemes outperform the scheme without antenna allocation. Moreover, the antenna-time allocation scheme achieves a more robust detection performance than branch-and-bound algorithm and the enhanced factor 2 algorithm when the target number changes. PMID:25350505

  10. Calibration Method for IATS and Application in Multi-Target Monitoring Using Coded Targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yueyin; Wagner, Andreas; Wunderlich, Thomas; Wasmeier, Peter

    2017-06-01

    The technique of Image Assisted Total Stations (IATS) has been studied for over ten years and is composed of two major parts: one is the calibration procedure which combines the relationship between the camera system and the theodolite system; the other is the automatic target detection on the image by various methods of photogrammetry or computer vision. Several calibration methods have been developed, mostly using prototypes with an add-on camera rigidly mounted on the total station. However, these prototypes are not commercially available. This paper proposes a calibration method based on Leica MS50 which has two built-in cameras each with a resolution of 2560 × 1920 px: an overview camera and a telescope (on-axis) camera. Our work in this paper is based on the on-axis camera which uses the 30-times magnification of the telescope. The calibration consists of 7 parameters to estimate. We use coded targets, which are common tools in photogrammetry for orientation, to detect different targets in IATS images instead of prisms and traditional ATR functions. We test and verify the efficiency and stability of this monitoring method with multi-target.

  11. Multi-Target Camera Tracking, Hand-off and Display LDRD 158819 Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Robert J.

    2014-10-01

    Modern security control rooms gather video and sensor feeds from tens to hundreds of cameras. Advanced camera analytics can detect motion from individual video streams and convert unexpected motion into alarms, but the interpretation of these alarms depends heavily upon human operators. Unfortunately, these operators can be overwhelmed when a large number of events happen simultaneously, or lulled into complacency due to frequent false alarms. This LDRD project has focused on improving video surveillance-based security systems by changing the fundamental focus from the cameras to the targets being tracked. If properly integrated, more cameras shouldn’t lead to more alarms, more monitors, more operators, and increased response latency but instead should lead to better information and more rapid response times. For the course of the LDRD we have been developing algorithms that take live video imagery from multiple video cameras, identify individual moving targets from the background imagery, and then display the results in a single 3D interactive video. In this document we summarize the work in developing this multi-camera, multi-target system, including lessons learned, tools developed, technologies explored, and a description of current capability.

  12. Multi-target camera tracking, hand-off and display LDRD 158819 final report

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Robert J.

    2014-10-01

    Modern security control rooms gather video and sensor feeds from tens to hundreds of cameras. Advanced camera analytics can detect motion from individual video streams and convert unexpected motion into alarms, but the interpretation of these alarms depends heavily upon human operators. Unfortunately, these operators can be overwhelmed when a large number of events happen simultaneously, or lulled into complacency due to frequent false alarms. This LDRD project has focused on improving video surveillance-based security systems by changing the fundamental focus from the cameras to the targets being tracked. If properly integrated, more cameras shouldn't lead to more alarms, more monitors, more operators, and increased response latency but instead should lead to better information and more rapid response times. For the course of the LDRD we have been developing algorithms that take live video imagery from multiple video cameras, identifies individual moving targets from the background imagery, and then displays the results in a single 3D interactive video. In this document we summarize the work in developing this multi-camera, multi-target system, including lessons learned, tools developed, technologies explored, and a description of current capability.

  13. A novel multi-target regression framework for time-series prediction of drug efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Li, Haiqing; Zhang, Wei; Chen, Ying; Guo, Yumeng; Li, Guo-Zheng; Zhu, Xiaoxin

    2017-01-01

    Excavating from small samples is a challenging pharmacokinetic problem, where statistical methods can be applied. Pharmacokinetic data is special due to the small samples of high dimensionality, which makes it difficult to adopt conventional methods to predict the efficacy of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) prescription. The main purpose of our study is to obtain some knowledge of the correlation in TCM prescription. Here, a novel method named Multi-target Regression Framework to deal with the problem of efficacy prediction is proposed. We employ the correlation between the values of different time sequences and add predictive targets of previous time as features to predict the value of current time. Several experiments are conducted to test the validity of our method and the results of leave-one-out cross-validation clearly manifest the competitiveness of our framework. Compared with linear regression, artificial neural networks, and partial least squares, support vector regression combined with our framework demonstrates the best performance, and appears to be more suitable for this task. PMID:28098186

  14. Ribonucleases, antisense RNAs and the control of bacterial plasmids.

    PubMed

    Saramago, Margarida; Bárria, Cátia; Arraiano, Cecília M; Domingues, Susana

    2015-03-01

    In the last decade regulatory RNAs have emerged as powerful tools to regulate the expression of genes both in prokaryotes and in eukaryotes. RNases, by degrading these RNA molecules, control the right amount of regulatory RNAs, which is fundamental for an accurate regulation of gene expression in the cell. Remarkably the first antisense RNAs identified were plasmid-encoded and their detailed study was crucial for the understanding of prokaryotic antisense RNAs. In this review we highlight the role of RNases in the precise modulation of antisense RNAs that control plasmid replication, maintenance and transfer.

  15. Simulation Research Framework with Embedded Intelligent Algorithms for Analysis of Multi-Target, Multi-Sensor, High-Cluttered Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanlon, Nicholas P.

    nearly identical performance metrics at orders of magnitude faster in execution. Second, a fuzzy inference system is presented that alleviates air traffic controllers from information overload by utilizing flight plan data and radar/GPS correlation values to highlight aircraft that deviate from their intended routes. Third, a genetic algorithm optimizes sensor placement that is robust and capable of handling unexpected routes in the environment. Fourth, a fuzzy CUSUM algorithm more accurately detects and corrects aircraft mode changes. Finally, all the work is packaged in a holistic simulation research framework that provides evaluation and analysis of various multi-sensor, multi-target scenarios.

  16. Natural antisense transcripts of Alzheimer's disease associated genes.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jin-Hu; Cheng, Hai-Peng; Yu, Long; Zhao, Shouyuan

    2006-04-01

    Natural antisense transcripts (NATs), also named endogenous antisense transcripts, are a class of genes whose role in controlling gene expression is becoming more and more relevant. NATs might play important roles in gene expression and translation regulation. Present work investigated the presence of NATs of Alzheimer's disease associated genes including PRESENILIN1, PRESENILIN2, BACE1, BACE2, APP, APOE, TAU (MAPT), PRION, alpha-SYNUCLEIN (SNCA), NICASTRIN, PEN2, APH1A, APH1B as well as CD147 (BASIGIN), and the results revealed that APP, BACE2, APH1A, TAU, CD147 and alpha-SYNUCLEIN contain natural antisense transcripts. These NATs were characterized according to the sense-antisense overlapping information and potential functional mechanisms were proposed. Present findings provide preliminary but important information about transcription regulation of AD associated genes, which would further our understanding of the gene expression regulation of AD, and also suggest a novel potential strategy for the therapy of AD.

  17. Harnessing the fruits of nature for the development of multi-targeted cancer therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Fazlul H; Li, Yiwei

    2009-11-01

    Cancer cells exhibit deregulation in multiple cellular signaling pathways. Therefore, treatments using specific agents that target only one pathway usually fail in cancer therapy. The combination treatments using chemotherapeutic agents with distinct molecular mechanisms are considered more promising for higher efficacy; however, using multiple agents contributes to added toxicity. Emerging evidence has shown that some "natural products" such as isoflavones, indole-3-carbinol (I3C) and its in vivo dimeric product 3,3'-diindolylmethane (DIM), and curcumin among many others, have growth inhibitory and apoptosis inducing effects on human and animal cancer cells mediated by targeting multiple cellular signaling pathways in vitro without causing unwanted toxicity in normal cells. Therefore, these non-toxic "natural products" from natural resources could be useful in combination with conventional chemotherapeutic agents for the treatment of human malignancies with lower toxicity and higher efficacy. In fact, recently increasing evidence from pre-clinical in vivo studies and clinical trials have shown some success in support of the use of rational design of multi-targeted therapies for the treatment of cancers using conventional chemotherapeutic agents in combination with "natural products". These studies have provided promising results and further opened-up newer avenues for cancer therapy. In this review article, we have succinctly summarized the known effects of "natural products" especially by focusing on isoflavones, indole-3-carbinol (I3C) and its in vivo dimeric product 3,3'-diindolylmethane (DIM), and curcumin, and provided a comprehensive view on the molecular mechanisms underlying the principle of cancer therapy using combination of "natural products" with conventional therapeutics.

  18. Olive Oil Phenols as Promising Multi-targeting Agents Against Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Rigacci, Stefania

    2015-01-01

    Amyloid diseases are characterized by the deposition of typically aggregated proteins/peptides in tissues, associated with degeneration and progressive functional impairment. Alzheimer's disease is one of the most studied neurodegenerative amyloid diseases and, in Western countries, a significant cause of dementia in the elderly. The so-called "Mediterranean diet" has been considered for long as the healthier dietary regimen, characterised by a great abundance in vegetables and fruits, extra virgin olive oil as the main source of fat, a moderate consumption of red wine and a reduced intake of proteins from red meat. Recent epidemiological studies support the efficacy of the Mediterranean diet not only against cardiovascular and cancer diseases (as previously demonstrated) but also against the cognitive decline associated with ageing, and several data are highlighting the role played by natural phenols, of which red wine and extra virgin olive oil are rich, in such context. In the meantime, studies conducted both in vivo and in vitro have started to reveal the great potential of the phenolic component of extra virgin olive oil (mainly oleuropein aglycone and oleocanthal) in counteracting amyloid aggregation and toxicity, with a particular emphasis on the pathways involved in the onset and progression of Alzheimer's disease: amyloid precursor protein processing, amyloid-beta (Aβ) peptide and tau aggregation, autophagy impairment, neuroinflammation. The aim of this review is to summarize the results of such research efforts, showing how the action of these phenols goes far beyond their renowned antioxidant activity and revealing their potential as multi-targeting agents against Alzheimer's disease.

  19. Piezo-microfluidic transport system for multi-targets biochip detections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chia-Chin; Wang, Pei-Wen; Lee, Chih-Kung

    2016-03-01

    Detecting minute trace of interferon-gamma and various bio-markers by using a single biochip was adopted as a platform to examine the technology advancements presented. As bio-detection faces the restriction that only very small quantity of specimen is available, ways to make the best use of the sample available are a must. Since samples concentration will affect the binding rate of an immunoassay, the testing order will become an influencing factor if multiple biomarkers testing situation are needed by using only a single trace of sample. More specifically, if we test disease A first and then detect disease B using the sample just been measured by testing disease A, we most likely will get different results if we reverse the testing order. With an attempt to examine and maybe resolve the issues mentioned above, a micro-fluid control system was developed. The design requirements not only ask for microfluidic control but also demand the system developed has the potential to be integrated within the biochip once its performance is verified. A piezo-vibrating system that can generate traveling waves for microfluidic control was chosen due to its versatility and large force to volume ratio. A simulation software COMSOL was adopted first to predict the microfluidic behavior of the two-mode excited piezo-microfluidic transport system. Secondly, fluorescent particles was used to analyze the microfluidic behavior of system fabricated based on the simulation. Finally, Electrochemistry Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) was implemented to verify the performance and extendibility of this newly developed system for multi-target detections.

  20. CYP17 inhibitors--abiraterone, C17,20-lyase inhibitors and multi-targeting agents.

    PubMed

    Yin, Lina; Hu, Qingzhong

    2014-01-01

    As the first in class steroid 17α-hydroxylase/C17,20-lyase (CYP17) inhibitor, abiraterone acetate (of which the active metabolite is abiraterone) has been shown to improve overall survival in patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC)--in those who are chemotherapy-naive and those previously treated with docetaxel. Furthermore, the clinical success of abiraterone demonstrated that CRPC, which has previously been regarded as an androgen-independent disease, is still driven, at least in part, by androgens. More importantly, abiraterone is a 'promiscuous' drug that interacts with a number of targets, which dictate its clinical benefits and adverse effects profile. Besides CYP17 inhibition, abiraterone acts as an antagonist to the androgen receptor and inhibits 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase--two effects that potentially contribute to its antitumour effects. However, the inhibition of the 17α-hydroxylase activity of CYP17, CYP11B1 and a panel of hepatic CYP enzymes leads to adverse effects and toxicities that include secondary mineralocorticoid excess. Abiraterone is also associated with increased incidence of cardiac disorders. Under such circumstances, development of new CYP17 inhibitors as an additional line of defence is urgently needed. To achieve enhanced clinical benefits, new strategies are being explored that include selective inhibition of the C17,20-lyase activity of CYP17 and multi-targeting strategies that affect androgen synthesis and signalling at different points. Some of these strategies-including the drugs orteronel, VT-464 and galeterone--are supported by preclinical data and are being explored in the clinic.

  1. Qingfei Xiaoyan Wan alleviates asthma through multi-target network regulation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Qingfei Xiaoyan Wan (QFXY), a traditional Chinese formula, is widely used for relieving cough, asthma, upper respiratory tract infection, bronchitis, pneumonia, and etc. in clinic. Comparing with other anti-asthma drugs, it is characterised with moderate and persistent efficacy as well as few side effects, however, the underlying action mechanism still remains elusive. This study aimed to identify QFXY multi-target network regulation as an asthma controller. Methods This study established asthma model induced by histamine phosphate and acetylcholine chloride (His&Ach) in guinea pigs, which then were administered orally with QFXY. Hematoxylin-Eosin staining sections were applied for evaluating QFXY effect. In both Model and QFXY groups, customized microarrays and 2D electrophoresis were adopted to detect differentially expressed genes (diff genes) and proteins (diff proteins) respectively, and some diff proteins were identified with MALDI-TOF/MS. The checked diff genes and proteins underwent Cluster, GO and KEGG analysis. Based on GAD and HPRD databases, QFXY-asthma target regulation network was constructed. Results His&Ach-induced asthma model of guinea pigs was established. HE sections presented anti-inflammation and anti-remodelling effects of QFXY. Comparing with the Model group, 55 diff genes and 6 diff proteins were identified in QFXY group. Validation by qPCR and Western blot showed the microarray and 2D data reliable. Furthermore, QFXY-asthma target regulation network was achieved. Conclusions A primarily combined genomic and proteomic screening of QFXY targets displayed a series of candidate genes and proteins, which indicated that the effect of QFXY relied on the combined mechanism, anti-inflammation and anti-remodelling, as well as influencing signal transduction in vivo. PMID:23919426

  2. The Multi-Target Drug M30 Shows Pro-Cognitive and Anti-Inflammatory Effects in a Rat Model of Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Pimentel, Luisa S; Allard, Simon; Do Carmo, Sonia; Weinreb, Orly; Danik, Marc; Hanzel, Cecilia E; Youdim, Moussa B; Cuello, A Claudio

    2015-01-01

    Current therapies for Alzheimer's disease (AD) offer partial symptomatic relief and do not modify disease progression. There is substantial evidence indicating a disease onset years before clinical diagnosis, at which point no effective therapy has been found. In this study, we investigated the efficacy of a new multi-target drug, M30, at relatively early stages of the AD-like amyloid pathology in a robust rat transgenic model. McGill-R-Thy1-APP transgenic rats develop the full AD-like amyloid pathology in a progressive fashion, and have a minimal genetic burden. McGill rats were given 5 mg/kg M30 or vehicle per os, every 2 days for 4 months, starting at a stage where the transgenic animals suffer detectable cognitive impairments. At the completion of the treatment, cognitive functions were assessed with Novel Object Location and Novel Object Recognition tests. The brains were then analyzed to assess amyloid-β (Aβ) burden and the levels of key inflammatory markers. Long-term treatment with M30 was associated with both the prevention and the reversal of transgene-related cognitive decline. The effects on cognition were accompanied by a shift of the Aβ-immunoreactive material toward an amyloid plaque aggregated molecular form, diminished molecular signs of CNS inflammation and a change in microglia morphology toward a surveying phenotype. This study is the first to demonstrate the therapeutic potential of M30 in a rat model of the AD amyloid pathology. It provides a rationale for further investigations with M30 and with potential multi-target approaches to delay, prevent or reverse the progression the AD pathology at early disease-stages.

  3. Targeted skipping of human dystrophin exons in transgenic mouse model systemically for antisense drug development.

    PubMed

    Wu, Bo; Benrashid, Ehsan; Lu, Peijuan; Cloer, Caryn; Zillmer, Allen; Shaban, Mona; Lu, Qi Long

    2011-01-01

    Antisense therapy has recently been demonstrated with great potential for targeted exon skipping and restoration of dystrophin production in cultured muscle cells and in muscles of Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD) patients. Therapeutic values of exon skipping critically depend on efficacy of the drugs, antisense oligomers (AOs). However, no animal model has been established to test AO targeting human dystrophin exon in vivo systemically. In this study, we applied Vivo-Morpholino to the hDMD mouse, a transgenic model carrying the full-length human dystrophin gene, and achieved for the first time more than 70% efficiency of targeted human dystrophin exon skipping in vivo systemically. We also established a GFP-reporter myoblast culture to screen AOs targeting human dystrophin exon 50. Antisense efficiency for most AOs is consistent between the reporter cells, human myoblasts and in the hDMD mice in vivo. However, variation in efficiency was also clearly observed. A combination of in vitro cell culture and a Vivo-Morpholino based evaluation in vivo systemically in the hDMD mice therefore may represent a prudent approach for selecting AO drug and to meet the regulatory requirement.

  4. PNA-based artificial nucleases as antisense and anti-miRNA oligonucleotide agents.

    PubMed

    Gaglione, M; Milano, G; Chambery, A; Moggio, L; Romanelli, A; Messere, A

    2011-08-01

    Because of its interesting chemical, physical and biological properties, Peptide Nucleic Acid (PNA) has attracted major attention in molecular biology, for diagnostics purposes and development of biosensors. PNAs have become candidates for gene therapeutic drugs in ANTISENSE (AO) strategy with favorable in vivo biochemical properties. Recently, antisense PNA oligonucleotides have been described in anti-miRNA approach (AMO). We propose PNA-based nucleases as AO and AMO agents. We report the design, synthesis and characterization of two kinds of artificial nucleases composed of a PEG-PNA-PEG domain conjugated to HGG·Cu (A) and DETA (B) as well known cleavage sites. Qualitative (MALDI-TOF) and quantitative (HTS) assays were planned to study nuclease activity of constructs A and B on RNA-3'-FAM target sequence. The results have highlighted the best performance of nuclease B and the relevance of the PEG spacer, in particular for conjugate A, in terms of efficiency of the cleavage, suggesting that conjugates A and B also act as potential antisense and anti-miRNA agents.

  5. Re-sensitizing drug-resistant bacteria to antibiotics by designing Antisense Therapeutics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Courtney, Colleen; Chatterjee, Anushree

    2014-03-01

    ``Super-bugs'' or ``multi-drug resistant organisms'' are a serious international health problem, with devastating consequences to patient health care. The Center for Disease Control has identified antibiotic resistance as one of the world's most pressing public health problems as a significant fraction of bacterial infections contracted are drug resistant. Typically, antibiotic resistance is encoded by ``resistance-genes'' which express proteins that carryout the resistance causing functions inside the bacterium. We present a RNA based therapeutic strategy for designing antimicrobials capable of re-sensitizing resistant bacteria to antibiotics by targeting labile regions of messenger RNAs encoding for resistance-causing proteins. We perform in silico RNA secondary structure modeling to identify labile target regions in an mRNA of interest. A synthetic biology approach is then used to administer antisense nucleic acids to our model system of ampicillin resistant Escherichia coli. Our results show a prolonged lag phase and decrease in viability of drug-resistant E. colitreated with antisense molecules. The antisense strategy can be applied to alter expression of other genes in antibiotic resistance pathways or other pathways of interest.

  6. Targeted Skipping of Human Dystrophin Exons in Transgenic Mouse Model Systemically for Antisense Drug Development

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Peijuan; Cloer, Caryn; Zillmer, Allen; Shaban, Mona; Lu, Qi Long

    2011-01-01

    Antisense therapy has recently been demonstrated with great potential for targeted exon skipping and restoration of dystrophin production in cultured muscle cells and in muscles of Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD) patients. Therapeutic values of exon skipping critically depend on efficacy of the drugs, antisense oligomers (AOs). However, no animal model has been established to test AO targeting human dystrophin exon in vivo systemically. In this study, we applied Vivo-Morpholino to the hDMD/mdx mouse, a transgenic model carrying the full-length human dystrophin gene with mdx background, and achieved for the first time more than 70% efficiency of targeted human dystrophin exon skipping in vivo systemically. We also established a GFP-reporter myoblast culture to screen AOs targeting human dystrophin exon 50. Antisense efficiency for most AOs is consistent between the reporter cells, human myoblasts and in the hDMD/mdx mice in vivo. However, variation in efficiency was also clearly observed. A combination of in vitro cell culture and a Vivo-Morpholino based evaluation in vivo systemically in the hDMD/mdx mice therefore may represent a prudent approach for selecting AO drug and to meet the regulatory requirement. PMID:21611204

  7. Antisense repression of sucrose phosphate synthase in transgenic muskmelon alters plant growth and fruit development

    SciTech Connect

    Tian, Hongmei; Ma, Leyuan; Zhao, Cong; Hao, Hui; Gong, Biao; Yu, Xiyan; Wang, Xiufeng

    2010-03-12

    To unravel the roles of sucrose phosphate synthase (SPS) in muskmelon (Cucumis melo L.), we reduced its activity in transgenic muskmelon plants by an antisense approach. For this purpose, an 830 bp cDNA fragment of muskmelon sucrose phosphate synthase was expressed in antisense orientation behind the 35S promoter of the cauliflower mosaic virus. The phenotype of the antisense plants clearly differed from that of control plants. The transgenic plant leaves were markedly smaller, and the plant height and stem diameter were obviously shorter and thinner. Transmission electron microscope observation revealed that the membrane degradation of chloroplast happened in transgenic leaves and the numbers of grana and grana lamella in the chloroplast were significantly less, suggesting that the slow growth and weaker phenotype of transgenic plants may be due to the damage of the chloroplast ultrastructure, which in turn results in the decrease of the net photosynthetic rate. The sucrose concentration and levels of sucrose phosphate synthase decreased in transgenic mature fruit, and the fruit size was smaller than the control fruit. Together, our results suggest that sucrose phosphate synthase may play an important role in regulating the muskmelon plant growth and fruit development.

  8. Layer-by-Layer Assembled Antisense DNA Microsponge Particles for Efficient Delivery of Cancer Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Antisense oligonucleotides can be employed as a potential approach to effectively treat cancer. However, the inherent instability and inefficient systemic delivery methods for antisense therapeutics remain major challenges to their clinical application. Here, we present a polymerized oligonucleotides (ODNs) that self-assemble during their formation through an enzymatic elongation method (rolling circle replication) to generate a composite nucleic acid/magnesium pyrophosphate sponge-like microstructure, or DNA microsponge, yielding high molecular weight nucleic acid product. In addition, this densely packed ODN microsponge structure can be further condensed to generate polyelectrolyte complexes with a favorable size for cellular uptake by displacing magnesium pyrophosphate crystals from the microsponge structure. Additional layers are applied to generate a blood-stable and multifunctional nanoparticle via the layer-by-layer (LbL) assembly technique. By taking advantage of DNA nanotechnology and LbL assembly, functionalized DNA nanostructures were utilized to provide extremely high numbers of repeated ODN copies for efficient antisense therapy. Moreover, we show that this formulation significantly improves nucleic acid drug/carrier stability during in vivo biodistribution. These polymeric ODN systems can be designed to serve as a potent means of delivering stable and large quantities of ODN therapeutics systemically for cancer treatment to tumor cells at significantly lower toxicity than traditional synthetic vectors, thus enabling a therapeutic window suitable for clinical translation. PMID:25198246

  9. Antisense oligonucleotide treatment ameliorates alpha-1 antitrypsin-related liver disease in mice.

    PubMed

    Guo, Shuling; Booten, Sheri L; Aghajan, Mariam; Hung, Gene; Zhao, Chenguang; Blomenkamp, Keith; Gattis, Danielle; Watt, Andrew; Freier, Susan M; Teckman, Jeffery H; McCaleb, Michael L; Monia, Brett P

    2014-01-01

    Alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency (AATD) is a rare genetic disease that results from mutations in the alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT) gene. The mutant AAT protein aggregates and accumulates in the liver leading to AATD liver disease, which is only treatable by liver transplant. The PiZ transgenic mouse strain expresses a human AAT (hAAT) transgene that contains the AATD-associated Glu342Lys mutation. PiZ mice exhibit many AATD symptoms, including AAT protein aggregates, increased hepatocyte death, and liver fibrosis. In the present study, we systemically treated PiZ mice with an antisense oligonucleotide targeted against hAAT (AAT-ASO) and found reductions in circulating levels of AAT and both soluble and aggregated AAT protein in the liver. Furthermore, AAT-ASO administration in these animals stopped liver disease progression after short-term treatment, reversed liver disease after long-term treatment, and prevented liver disease in young animals. Additionally, antisense oligonucleotide treatment markedly decreased liver fibrosis in this mouse model. Administration of AAT-ASO in nonhuman primates led to an approximately 80% reduction in levels of circulating normal AAT, demonstrating potential for this approach in higher species. Antisense oligonucleotides thus represent a promising therapy for AATD liver disease.

  10. Experimental demonstration of a multi-target detection technique using an X-band optically steered phased array radar.

    PubMed

    Shi, Nuannuan; Li, Ming; Deng, Ye; Zhang, Lihong; Sun, Shuqian; Tang, Jian; Li, Wei; Zhu, Ninghua

    2016-06-27

    An X-band optically-steered phased array radar is developed to demonstrate high resolution multi-target detection. The beam forming is implemented based on wavelength-swept true time delay (TTD) technique. The beam forming system has a wide direction tuning range of ± 54 degree, low magnitude ripple of ± 0.5 dB and small delay error of 0.13 ps/nm. To further verify performance of the proposed optically-steered phased array radar, three experiments are then carried out to implement the single and multiple target detection. A linearly chirped X-band microwave signal is used as radar signal which is finally compressed at the receiver to improve the detection accuracy. The ranging resolution for multi-target detection is up to 2 cm within the measuring distance over 4 m and the azimuth angle error is less than 4 degree.

  11. Semi-Autonomous Collaborative Control of Multi-Robotic Systems for Multi-Task Multi-Target Pairing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-11-01

    this paper proposes a control method for a single- master multi-slave ( SMMS ) teleoperator to cooperatively con- trol a team of mobile robots for a multi... SMMS ) teleoperator to cooperatively control a team of mobile robots for a multi-target mission. The major components of the proposed control method...required human resources and amplifying the human effort, the single-master multi-slave ( SMMS ) teleoperation has been con- sidered in this paper. Fong et

  12. H2A.Z marks antisense promoters and has positive effects on antisense transcript levels in budding yeast.

    PubMed

    Gu, Muxin; Naiyachit, Yanin; Wood, Thomas J; Millar, Catherine B

    2015-02-19

    The histone variant H2A.Z, which has been reported to have both activating and repressive effects on gene expression, is known to occupy nucleosomes at the 5' ends of protein-coding genes. We now find that H2A.Z is also significantly enriched in gene coding regions and at the 3' ends of genes in budding yeast, where it co-localises with histone marks associated with active promoters. By comparing H2A.Z binding to global gene expression in budding yeast strains engineered so that normally unstable transcripts are abundant, we show that H2A.Z is required for normal levels of antisense transcripts as well as sense ones. High levels of H2A.Z at antisense promoters are associated with decreased antisense transcript levels when H2A.Z is deleted, indicating that H2A.Z has an activating effect on antisense transcripts. Decreases in antisense transcripts affected by H2A.Z are accompanied by increased levels of paired sense transcripts. The effect of H2A.Z on protein coding gene expression is a reflection of its importance for normal levels of both sense and antisense transcripts.

  13. Selective amplification of glucocorticoid anti-inflammatory activity through synergistic multi-target action of a combination drug

    PubMed Central

    Zimmermann, Grant R; Avery, William; Finelli, Alyce L; Farwell, Melissa; Fraser, Christopher C; Borisy, Alexis A

    2009-01-01

    observed in the cellular network of corticotroph AtT-20/D16v-F2 cells in vitro, as measured by pro-opiomelanocortin expression and adrenocorticotropic hormone secretion. Conclusions These data suggest that the multi-target mechanism of low-dose prednisolone and dipyridamole creates a dissociated activity profile with an increased therapeutic window through cellular network selective amplification of glucocorticoid-mediated anti-inflammatory signaling. PMID:19171052

  14. A novel multi-target inhibitor harboring selectivity of inhibiting EGFR T790M sparing wild-type EGFR

    PubMed Central

    Song, Xiaoping; Qi, Xin; Wang, Qiang; Zhu, Weiming; Li, Jing

    2017-01-01

    Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC) is driven by a variety of deregulated kinases and the development of multi-target inhibitor for multiple signaling pathways or multiple steps is required. Here, we reported that ZWM026, an indolocarbazoles analogue, derived from mangrove in coastal marine wetland, exhibited selectivity and reversibility against T790M mutant over wild-type EGFR in naturally occurring NSCLC cells and constructed NIH-3T3 cells. It simultaneously inhibited activities of HER2, HER3, HER4 and RET but was different from current multi-target kinase inhibitors. There was no activity in protein kinase C (PKC) family which is generally recognized as molecule target of indolocarbazoles. ZWM026 had more potent activities against gefitinib sensitizing, non-sensitizing and rare EGFR mutant NSCLC cells and constructed NIH-3T3 cells. ZWM026 induced apoptosis and exerted a synergistic effect by combining with cisplatin in NCI-H1975 cells. In summary, we identified a novel reversible multi-target inhibitor which could serve as a promising lead compound of drug development for NSCLC. PMID:28979811

  15. A novel multi-target inhibitor harboring selectivity of inhibiting EGFR T790M sparing wild-type EGFR.

    PubMed

    Song, Xiaoping; Qi, Xin; Wang, Qiang; Zhu, Weiming; Li, Jing

    2017-01-01

    Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC) is driven by a variety of deregulated kinases and the development of multi-target inhibitor for multiple signaling pathways or multiple steps is required. Here, we reported that ZWM026, an indolocarbazoles analogue, derived from mangrove in coastal marine wetland, exhibited selectivity and reversibility against T790M mutant over wild-type EGFR in naturally occurring NSCLC cells and constructed NIH-3T3 cells. It simultaneously inhibited activities of HER2, HER3, HER4 and RET but was different from current multi-target kinase inhibitors. There was no activity in protein kinase C (PKC) family which is generally recognized as molecule target of indolocarbazoles. ZWM026 had more potent activities against gefitinib sensitizing, non-sensitizing and rare EGFR mutant NSCLC cells and constructed NIH-3T3 cells. ZWM026 induced apoptosis and exerted a synergistic effect by combining with cisplatin in NCI-H1975 cells. In summary, we identified a novel reversible multi-target inhibitor which could serve as a promising lead compound of drug development for NSCLC.

  16. Strategies to identify natural antisense transcripts.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yulong; Li, Dijie; Zhang, Ru; Peng, Shang; Zhang, Ge; Yang, Tuanmin; Qian, Airong

    2017-01-01

    Natural antisense transcripts, originally considered as transcriptional noises arising from so-called "junk DNA″, are recently recognized as important modulators for gene regulation. They are prevalent in nearly all realms of life and have been found to modulate gene expression positively or negatively. By affecting almost all stages of gene expression range from pre-transcriptional, transcriptional and post-transcriptional to translation, NATs are fundamentally involved in various biological processes. However, compared to increasing huge data from transcriptional analysis especially high-throughput sequencing technologies (such as RNA-seq), limited functional NATs (around 70) are so far reported, which hinder our advanced comprehensive understanding for this field. Hence, efficient strategies for identifying NATs are urgently desired. In this review, we discussed the current strategies for identifying NATs, with a focus on the advantages, disadvantages, and applications of methods isolating functional NATs. Moreover, publicly available databases for NATs were also discussed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. and Société Française de Biochimie et Biologie Moléculaire (SFBBM). All rights reserved.

  17. Splice-switching antisense oligonucleotides as therapeutic drugs

    PubMed Central

    Havens, Mallory A.; Hastings, Michelle L.

    2016-01-01

    Splice-switching oligonucleotides (SSOs) are short, synthetic, antisense, modified nucleic acids that base-pair with a pre-mRNA and disrupt the normal splicing repertoire of the transcript by blocking the RNA–RNA base-pairing or protein–RNA binding interactions that occur between components of the splicing machinery and the pre-mRNA. Splicing of pre-mRNA is required for the proper expression of the vast majority of protein-coding genes, and thus, targeting the process offers a means to manipulate protein production from a gene. Splicing modulation is particularly valuable in cases of disease caused by mutations that lead to disruption of normal splicing or when interfering with the normal splicing process of a gene transcript may be therapeutic. SSOs offer an effective and specific way to target and alter splicing in a therapeutic manner. Here, we discuss the different approaches used to target and alter pre-mRNA splicing with SSOs. We detail the modifications to the nucleic acids that make them promising therapeutics and discuss the challenges to creating effective SSO drugs. We highlight the development of SSOs designed to treat Duchenne muscular dystrophy and spinal muscular atrophy, which are currently being tested in clinical trials. PMID:27288447

  18. RNA therapeutics: RNAi and antisense mechanisms and clinical applications

    PubMed Central

    Chery, Jessica

    2016-01-01

    RNA therapeutics refers to the use of oligonucleotides to target primarily ribonucleic acids (RNA) for therapeutic efforts or in research studies to elucidate functions of genes. Oligonucleotides are distinct from other pharmacological modalities, such as small molecules and antibodies that target mainly proteins, due to their mechanisms of action and chemical properties. Nucleic acids come in two forms: deoxyribonucleic acids (DNA) and ribonucleic acids (RNA). Although DNA is more stable, RNA offers more structural variety ranging from messenger RNA (mRNA) that codes for protein to non-coding RNAs, microRNA (miRNA), transfer RNA (tRNA), short interfering RNAs (siRNAs), ribosomal RNA (rRNA), and long-noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs). As our understanding of the wide variety of RNAs deepens, researchers have sought to target RNA since >80% of the genome is estimated to be transcribed. These transcripts include non-coding RNAs such as miRNAs and siRNAs that function in gene regulation by playing key roles in the transfer of genetic information from DNA to protein, the final product of the central dogma in biology1. Currently there are two main approaches used to target RNA: double stranded RNA-mediated interference (RNAi) and antisense oligonucleotides (ASO). Both approaches are currently in clinical trials for targeting of RNAs involved in various diseases, such as cancer and neurodegeneration. In fact, ASOs targeting spinal muscular atrophy and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis have shown positive results in clinical trials2. Advantages of ASOs include higher affinity due to the development of chemical modifications that increase affinity, selectivity while decreasing toxicity due to off-target effects. This review will highlight the major therapeutic approaches of RNA medicine currently being applied with a focus on RNAi and ASOs. PMID:27570789

  19. Antisense-Mediated RNA Targeting: Versatile and Expedient Genetic Manipulation in the Brain

    PubMed Central

    Zalachoras, Ioannis; Evers, Melvin M.; van Roon-Mom, Willeke M. C.; Aartsma-Rus, Annemieke M.; Meijer, Onno C.

    2011-01-01

    A limiting factor in brain research still is the difficulty to evaluate in vivo the role of the increasing number of proteins implicated in neuronal processes. We discuss here the potential of antisense-mediated RNA targeting approaches. We mainly focus on those that manipulate splicing (exon skipping and exon inclusion), but will also briefly discuss mRNA targeting. Classic knockdown of expression by mRNA targeting is only one possible application of antisense oligonucleotides (AON) in the control of gene function. Exon skipping and inclusion are based on the interference of AONs with splicing of pre-mRNAs. These are powerful, specific and particularly versatile techniques, which can be used to circumvent pathogenic mutations, shift splice variant expression, knock down proteins, or to create molecular models using in-frame deletions. Pre-mRNA targeting is currently used both as a research tool, e.g., in models for motor neuron disease, and in clinical trials for Duchenne muscular dystrophy and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. AONs are particularly promising in relation to brain research, as the modified AONs are taken up extremely fast in neurons and glial cells with a long residence, and without the need for viral vectors or other delivery tools, once inside the blood brain barrier. In this review we cover (1). The principles of antisense-mediated techniques, chemistry, and efficacy. (2) The pros and cons of AON approaches in the brain compared to other techniques of interfering with gene function, such as transgenesis and short hairpin RNAs, in terms of specificity of the manipulation, spatial, and temporal control over gene expression, toxicity, and delivery issues. (3) The potential applications for Neuroscience. We conclude that there is good evidence from animal studies that the central nervous system can be successfully targeted, but the potential of the diverse AON-based approaches appears to be under-recognized. PMID:21811437

  20. Multi-Target Directed Donepezil-Like Ligands for Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Unzeta, Mercedes; Esteban, Gerard; Bolea, Irene; Fogel, Wieslawa A.; Ramsay, Rona R.; Youdim, Moussa B. H.; Tipton, Keith F.; Marco-Contelles, José

    2016-01-01

    HIGHLIGHTS ASS234 is a MTDL compound containing a moiety from Donepezil and the propargyl group from the PF 9601N, a potent and selective MAO B inhibitor. This compound is the most advanced anti-Alzheimer agent for preclinical studies identified in our laboratory.Derived from ASS234 both multipotent donepezil-indolyl (MTDL-1) and donepezil-pyridyl hybrids (MTDL-2) were designed and evaluated as inhibitors of AChE/BuChE and both MAO isoforms. MTDL-2 showed more high affinity toward the four enzymes than MTDL-1.MTDL-3 and MTDL-4, were designed containing the N-benzylpiperidinium moiety from Donepezil, a metal- chelating 8-hydroxyquinoline group and linked to a N-propargyl core and they were pharmacologically evaluated.The presence of the cyano group in MTDL-3, enhanced binding to AChE, BuChE and MAO A. It showed antioxidant behavior and it was able to strongly complex Cu(II), Zn(II) and Fe(III).MTDL-4 showed higher affinity toward AChE, BuChE.MTDL-3 exhibited good brain penetration capacity (ADMET) and less toxicity than Donepezil. Memory deficits in scopolamine-lesioned animals were restored by MTDL-3.MTDL-3 particularly emerged as a ligand showing remarkable potential benefits for its use in AD therapy. Alzheimer's disease (AD), the most common form of adult onset dementia, is an age-related neurodegenerative disorder characterized by progressive memory loss, decline in language skills, and other cognitive impairments. Although its etiology is not completely known, several factors including deficits of acetylcholine, β-amyloid deposits, τ-protein phosphorylation, oxidative stress, and neuroinflammation are considered to play significant roles in the pathophysiology of this disease. For a long time, AD patients have been treated with acetylcholinesterase inhibitors such as donepezil (Aricept®) but with limited therapeutic success. This might be due to the complex multifactorial nature of AD, a fact that has prompted the design of new Multi-Target-Directed Ligands

  1. Antisense RNA Modulation of Alkyl Hydroperoxide Reductase Levels in Helicobacter pylori Correlates with Organic Peroxide Toxicity but Not Infectivity▿

    PubMed Central

    Croxen, Matthew A.; Ernst, Peter B.; Hoffman, Paul S.

    2007-01-01

    Much of the gene content of the human gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori (∼1.7-Mb genome) is considered essential. This view is based on the completeness of metabolic pathways, infrequency of nutritional auxotrophies, and paucity of pathway redundancies typically found in bacteria with larger genomes. Thus, genetic analysis of gene function is often hampered by lethality. In the absence of controllable promoters, often used to titrate gene function, we investigated the feasibility of an antisense RNA interference strategy. To test the antisense approach, we targeted alkyl hydroperoxide reductase (AhpC), one of the most abundant proteins expressed by H. pylori and one whose function is essential for both in vitro growth and gastric colonization. Here, we show that antisense ahpC (as-ahpC) RNA expression from shuttle vector pDH37::as-ahpC achieved an ∼72% knockdown of AhpC protein levels, which correlated with increased susceptibilities to hydrogen peroxide, cumene, and tert-butyl hydroperoxides but not with growth efficiency. Compensatory increases in catalase levels were not observed in the knockdowns. Expression of single-copy antisense constructs (expressed under the urease promoter and containing an fd phage terminator) from the rdxA locus of mouse-colonizing strain X47 achieved a 32% knockdown of AhpC protein levels (relative to wild-type X47 levels), which correlated with increased susceptibility to organic peroxides but not with mouse colonization efficiency. Our studies indicate that high levels of AhpC are not required for in vitro growth or for primary gastric colonization. Perhaps AhpC, like catalase, assumes a greater role in combating exogenous peroxides arising from lifelong chronic inflammation. These studies also demonstrate the utility of antisense RNA interference in the evaluation of gene function in H. pylori. PMID:17337572

  2. Antisense RNA modulation of alkyl hydroperoxide reductase levels in Helicobacter pylori correlates with organic peroxide toxicity but not infectivity.

    PubMed

    Croxen, Matthew A; Ernst, Peter B; Hoffman, Paul S

    2007-05-01

    Much of the gene content of the human gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori ( approximately 1.7-Mb genome) is considered essential. This view is based on the completeness of metabolic pathways, infrequency of nutritional auxotrophies, and paucity of pathway redundancies typically found in bacteria with larger genomes. Thus, genetic analysis of gene function is often hampered by lethality. In the absence of controllable promoters, often used to titrate gene function, we investigated the feasibility of an antisense RNA interference strategy. To test the antisense approach, we targeted alkyl hydroperoxide reductase (AhpC), one of the most abundant proteins expressed by H. pylori and one whose function is essential for both in vitro growth and gastric colonization. Here, we show that antisense ahpC (as-ahpC) RNA expression from shuttle vector pDH37::as-ahpC achieved an approximately 72% knockdown of AhpC protein levels, which correlated with increased susceptibilities to hydrogen peroxide, cumene, and tert-butyl hydroperoxides but not with growth efficiency. Compensatory increases in catalase levels were not observed in the knockdowns. Expression of single-copy antisense constructs (expressed under the urease promoter and containing an fd phage terminator) from the rdxA locus of mouse-colonizing strain X47 achieved a 32% knockdown of AhpC protein levels (relative to wild-type X47 levels), which correlated with increased susceptibility to organic peroxides but not with mouse colonization efficiency. Our studies indicate that high levels of AhpC are not required for in vitro growth or for primary gastric colonization. Perhaps AhpC, like catalase, assumes a greater role in combating exogenous peroxides arising from lifelong chronic inflammation. These studies also demonstrate the utility of antisense RNA interference in the evaluation of gene function in H. pylori.

  3. Lipid-based delivery of combinations of antisense oligodeoxynucleotides for the in vitro inhibition of HIV-1 replication.

    PubMed

    Lavigne, C; Yelle, J; Sauvé, G; Thierry, A G

    2001-01-01

    We evaluated a new approach to AIDS therapy by using combinations of oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs), delivered with a lipid-based carrier system, that target different HIV viral genome sites. We identified some of the factors that seem to influence the effectiveness of a combination strategy in cell cultures including ODN concentrations, type of infection (acute vs chronic), backbone modification of the ODN, and the number of sequences. When delivered by the DLS carrier system, some advantages of using a combination of ODNs over treatment with only one ODN could be observed in acute infection assays but not in the chronic infection model. These results suggest that in the acute infection model, the 3 different antisense ODNs in the "cocktail" might block an early step of virus replication by combined inhibitory effects. Various combinations of phosphorothioate-modified (PS) and unmodified oligonucleotides delivered by the DLS system were compared for their antiviral activity in a long-term acute assay using HIV-1 (IIIB strain)-infected MOLT-3 cells. The most effective combination had 3 phosphorothioate antisense ODNs: Srev, SDIS, and SPac (>99% inhibition at 100 pM). However, the additive effect determined when using ODN combinations was rather low, revealing the high level of nonsequence specificity in HIV-1 cell culture models. Data illustrated the high sequence nonspecific activity of ODNs, especially when comparing activity of antisense ODNs with activity of random control sequence ODNs. The latter exhibited an inhibitory effect similar to that of antisense ODNs under our experimental conditions. Nevertheless, we demonstrated that it is possible to achieve high anti-HIV activity by using, in combination, picomolar range concentrations of antisense oligonucleotides complexed to a lipid-based carrier system such as the DLS system, without increasing cell toxicity.

  4. Inhibition of human immunodeficiency virus replication by antisense oligodeoxynucleotides.

    PubMed Central

    Goodchild, J; Agrawal, S; Civeira, M P; Sarin, P S; Sun, D; Zamecnik, P C

    1988-01-01

    Twenty different target sites within human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) RNA were selected for studies of inhibition of HIV replication by antisense oligonucleotides. Target sites were selected based on their potential capacity to block recognition functions during viral replication. Antisense oligomers complementary to sites within or near the sequence repeated at the ends of retrovirus RNA (R region) and to certain splice sites were most effective. The effect of antisense oligomer length on inhibiting virus replication was also investigated, and preliminary toxicity studies in mice show that these compounds are toxic only at high levels. The results indicate potential usefulness for these oligomers in the treatment of patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) and AIDS-related complex either alone or in combination with other drugs. PMID:3041414

  5. Altered antisense-to-sense transcript ratios in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Maruyama, Reo; Shipitsin, Michail; Choudhury, Sibgat; Wu, Zhenhua; Protopopov, Alexei; Yao, Jun; Lo, Pang-Kuo; Bessarabova, Marina; Ishkin, Alex; Nikolsky, Yuri; Liu, X Shirley; Sukumar, Saraswati; Polyak, Kornelia

    2012-02-21

    Transcriptome profiling studies suggest that a large fraction of the genome is transcribed and many transcripts function independent of their protein coding potential. The relevance of noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs) in normal physiological processes and in tumorigenesis is increasingly recognized. Here, we describe consistent and significant differences in the distribution of sense and antisense transcripts between normal and neoplastic breast tissues. Many of the differentially expressed antisense transcripts likely represent long ncRNAs. A subset of genes that mainly generate antisense transcripts in normal but not cancer cells is involved in essential metabolic processes. These findings suggest fundamental differences in global RNA regulation between normal and cancer cells that might play a role in tumorigenesis.

  6. Inhibition of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Replication by Antisense Oligodeoxynucleotides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodchild, John; Agrawal, Sudhir; Civeira, Maria P.; Sarin, Prem S.; Sun, Daisy; Zamecnik, Paul C.

    1988-08-01

    Twenty different target sites within human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) RNA were selected for studies of inhibition of HIV replication by antisense oligonucleotides. Target sites were selected based on their potential capacity to block recognition functions during viral replication. Antisense oligomers complementary to sites within or near the sequence repeated at the ends of retrovirus RNA (R region) and to certain splice sites were most effective. The effect of antisense oligomer length on inhibiting virus replication was also investigated, and preliminary toxicity studies in mice show that these compounds are toxic only at high levels. The results indicate potential usefulness for these oligomers in the treatment of patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) and AIDS-related complex either alone or in combination with other drugs.

  7. Inhibition of microRNA with antisense oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Esau, Christine C

    2008-01-01

    Antisense inhibition of microRNA (miRNA) function has been an important tool for uncovering miRNA biology. Chemical modification of anti-miRNA oligonucleotides (AMOs) is necessary to improve affinity for target miRNA, stabilize the AMO to nuclease degradation, and to promote tissue uptake for in vivo delivery. Here I summarize the work done to evaluate the effectiveness of various chemically modified AMOs for use in cultured cells and rodent models, and outline important issues to consider when inhibiting miRNAs with antisense oligonucleotides.

  8. Antisense downregulation of polyphenol oxidase results in enhanced disease susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Thipyapong, Piyada; Hunt, Michelle D; Steffens, John C

    2004-11-01

    Polyphenol oxidases (PPOs; EC 1.14.18.1 or EC 1.10.3.2) catalyze the oxidation of phenolics to quinones, highly reactive intermediates whose secondary reactions are responsible for much of the oxidative browning that accompanies plant senescence, wounding, and responses to pathogens. To assess the impact of PPO expression on resistance to Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato we introduced a chimeric antisense potato PPO cDNA into tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum L.). Oxidation of caffeic acid, the dominant o-diphenolic aglycone of tomato foliage, was decreased ca. 40-fold by antisense expression of PPO. All members of the PPO gene family were downregulated: neither immunoreactive PPO nor PPO-specific mRNA were detectable in the transgenic plants. In addition, the antisense PPO construct suppressed inducible increases in PPO activity. Downregulation of PPO in antisense plants did not affect growth, development, or reproduction of greenhouse-grown plants. However, antisense PPO expression dramatically increased susceptibility to P. syringae expressing the avirulence gene avrPto in both Pto and pto backgrounds. In a compatible (pto) interaction, plants constitutively expressing an antisense PPO construct exhibited a 55-fold increase in bacterial growth, three times larger lesion area, and ten times more lesions cm(-2) than nontransformed plants. In an incompatible (Pto) interaction, antisense PPO plants exhibited 100-fold increases in bacterial growth and ten times more lesions cm(-2) than nontransformed plants. Although it is not clear whether hypersusceptibility of antisense plants is due to low constitutive PPO levels or failure to induce PPO upon infection, these findings suggest a critical role for PPO-catalyzed phenolic oxidation in limiting disease development. As a preliminary effort to understand the role of induced PPO in limiting disease development, we also examined the response of PPO promoter::beta-glucuronidase constructs when plants are challenged with P

  9. Altered activity profile of a tertiary silanol analog of multi-targeting nuclear receptor modulator T0901317.

    PubMed

    Toyama, Hirozumi; Sato, Shoko; Shirakawa, Hitoshi; Komai, Michio; Hashimoto, Yuichi; Fujii, Shinya

    2016-04-01

    We report the design, synthesis, and physicochemical/biological evaluation of novel silanol derivative 6 (sila-T) as a silanol analog of multi-target nuclear receptor modulator T0901317 (5). Compound 6 showed intermediate hydrophobicity between the corresponding alcohol 13 and perfluoroalcohol 5. While 5 exhibited potent activities toward liver X receptor α and β, farnesoid X receptor, pregnane X receptor (PXR) and retinoic acid receptor-related orphan receptor (ROR)γ, silanol 6 exhibited activity only toward PXR and RORs. Incorporation of silanol instead of perfluoroalcohol is a promising option for developing novel target-selective, biologically active compounds. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Potent inhibition of respiratory syncytial virus replication using a 2-5A-antisense chimera targeted to signals within the virus genomic RNA

    PubMed Central

    Player, Mark R.; Barnard, Dale L.; Torrence, Paul F.

    1998-01-01

    The 2-5A system is a recognized mechanistic component of the antiviral action of interferon. Interferon-induced 2-5A synthetase generates 2-5A, which, in turn, activates the latent constitutive RNase L that degrades viral RNA. Chemical conjugation of 2-5A to an antisense oligonucleotide can target the 2-5A-dependent RNase L to the antisense-specified RNA and effect its selective destruction. Such a 2-5A-antisense chimera (NIH351) has been developed that targets a consensus sequence within the respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) genomic RNA. NIH351 was 50- to 90-fold more potent against RSV strain A2 than was ribavirin, the presently approved drug for clinical management of RSV infection. It was similarly active against a variety of RSV strains of both A and B subgroups and possessed a cell culture selectivity index comparable to ribavirin. In addition, the anti-RSV activity of NIH351 was shown to be virus-specific and a result of a true antisense effect, because a scrambled nucleotide sequence in the antisense domain of NIH351 caused a significant decrease in antiviral activity. The 2-5A system’s RNase L was implicated in the mechanism of action of NIH351 because a congener with a disabled 2-5A moiety was of greatly reduced anti-RSV effectiveness. These findings represent an innovative approach to the control of RSV replication. PMID:9671772

  11. Downstream Antisense Transcription Predicts Genomic Features That Define the Specific Chromatin Environment at Mammalian Promoters

    PubMed Central

    Lavender, Christopher A.; Hoffman, Jackson A.; Trotter, Kevin W.; Gilchrist, Daniel A.; Bennett, Brian D.; Burkholder, Adam B.; Fargo, David C.; Archer, Trevor K.

    2016-01-01

    Antisense transcription is a prevalent feature at mammalian promoters. Previous studies have primarily focused on antisense transcription initiating upstream of genes. Here, we characterize promoter-proximal antisense transcription downstream of gene transcription starts sites in human breast cancer cells, investigating the genomic context of downstream antisense transcription. We find extensive correlations between antisense transcription and features associated with the chromatin environment at gene promoters. Antisense transcription downstream of promoters is widespread, with antisense transcription initiation observed within 2 kb of 28% of gene transcription start sites. Antisense transcription initiates between nucleosomes regularly positioned downstream of these promoters. The nucleosomes between gene and downstream antisense transcription start sites carry histone modifications associated with active promoters, such as H3K4me3 and H3K27ac. This region is bound by chromatin remodeling and histone modifying complexes including SWI/SNF subunits and HDACs, suggesting that antisense transcription or resulting RNA transcripts contribute to the creation and maintenance of a promoter-associated chromatin environment. Downstream antisense transcription overlays additional regulatory features, such as transcription factor binding, DNA accessibility, and the downstream edge of promoter-associated CpG islands. These features suggest an important role for antisense transcription in the regulation of gene expression and the maintenance of a promoter-associated chromatin environment. PMID:27487356

  12. Antisense oligonucleotide therapy for spinocerebellar ataxia type 2.

    PubMed

    Scoles, Daniel R; Meera, Pratap; Schneider, Matthew D; Paul, Sharan; Dansithong, Warunee; Figueroa, Karla P; Hung, Gene; Rigo, Frank; Bennett, C Frank; Otis, Thomas S; Pulst, Stefan M

    2017-04-20

    There are no disease-modifying treatments for adult human neurodegenerative diseases. Here we test RNA-targeted therapies in two mouse models of spinocerebellar ataxia type 2 (SCA2), an autosomal dominant polyglutamine disease. Both models recreate the progressive adult-onset dysfunction and degeneration of a neuronal network that are seen in patients, including decreased firing frequency of cerebellar Purkinje cells and a decline in motor function. We developed a potential therapy directed at the ATXN2 gene by screening 152 antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs). The most promising oligonucleotide, ASO7, downregulated ATXN2 mRNA and protein, which resulted in delayed onset of the SCA2 phenotype. After delivery by intracerebroventricular injection to ATXN2-Q127 mice, ASO7 localized to Purkinje cells, reduced cerebellar ATXN2 expression below 75% for more than 10 weeks without microglial activation, and reduced the levels of cerebellar ATXN2. Treatment of symptomatic mice with ASO7 improved motor function compared to saline-treated mice. ASO7 had a similar effect in the BAC-Q72 SCA2 mouse model, and in both mouse models it normalized protein levels of several SCA2-related proteins expressed in Purkinje cells, including Rgs8, Pcp2, Pcp4, Homer3, Cep76 and Fam107b. Notably, the firing frequency of Purkinje cells returned to normal even when treatment was initiated more than 12 weeks after the onset of the motor phenotype in BAC-Q72 mice. These findings support ASOs as a promising approach for treating some human neurodegenerative diseases.

  13. Correction of a Cystic Fibrosis Splicing Mutation by Antisense Oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Igreja, Susana; Clarke, Luka A; Botelho, Hugo M; Marques, Luís; Amaral, Margarida D

    2016-02-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF), the most common life-threatening genetic disease in Caucasians, is caused by ∼2,000 different mutations in the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene. A significant fraction of these (∼13%) affect pre-mRNA splicing for which novel therapies have been somewhat neglected. We have previously described the effect of the CFTR splicing mutation c.2657+5G>A in IVS16, showing that it originates transcripts lacking exon 16 as well as wild-type transcripts. Here, we tested an RNA-based antisense oligonucleotide (AON) strategy to correct the aberrant splicing caused by this mutation. Two AONs (AON1/2) complementary to the pre-mRNA IVS16 mutant region were designed and their effect on splicing was assessed at the RNA and protein levels, on intracellular protein localization and function. To this end, we used the 2657+5G>A mutant CFTR minigene stably expressed in HEK293 Flp-In cells that express a single copy of the transgene. RNA data from AON1-treated mutant cells show that exon 16 inclusion was almost completely restored (to 95%), also resulting in increased levels of correctly localized CFTR protein at the plasma membrane (PM) and with increased function. A novel two-color CFTR splicing reporter minigene developed here allowed the quantitative monitoring of splicing by automated microscopy localization of CFTR at the PM. The AON strategy is thus a promising therapeutic approach for the specific correction of alternative splicing.

  14. Development and application of a multi-targeting reference plasmid as calibrator for analysis of five genetically modified soybean events.

    PubMed

    Pi, Liqun; Li, Xiang; Cao, Yiwei; Wang, Canhua; Pan, Liangwen; Yang, Litao

    2015-04-01

    Reference materials are important in accurate analysis of genetically modified organism (GMO) contents in food/feeds, and development of novel reference plasmid is a new trend in the research of GMO reference materials. Herein, we constructed a novel multi-targeting plasmid, pSOY, which contained seven event-specific sequences of five GM soybeans (MON89788-5', A2704-12-3', A5547-127-3', DP356043-5', DP305423-3', A2704-12-5', and A5547-127-5') and sequence of soybean endogenous reference gene Lectin. We evaluated the specificity, limit of detection and quantification, and applicability of pSOY in both qualitative and quantitative PCR analyses. The limit of detection (LOD) was as low as 20 copies in qualitative PCR, and the limit of quantification (LOQ) in quantitative PCR was 10 copies. In quantitative real-time PCR analysis, the PCR efficiencies of all event-specific and Lectin assays were higher than 90%, and the squared regression coefficients (R(2)) were more than 0.999. The quantification bias varied from 0.21% to 19.29%, and the relative standard deviations were from 1.08% to 9.84% in simulated samples analysis. All the results demonstrated that the developed multi-targeting plasmid, pSOY, was a credible substitute of matrix reference materials, and could be used as a reliable reference calibrator in the identification and quantification of multiple GM soybean events.

  15. Near-infrared reflection from Al-doped ZnO films prepared by multi-target reactive sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okuhara, Y.; Matsubara, H.; Takata, M.

    2011-10-01

    Thin films of aluminium-doped zinc oxide (ZnO:Al) as heat reflective coatings were prepared by multi-target reactive sputtering using metallic Zn and Al targets. An optimization of Al content and a reduction in oxygen partial pressure were crucial in increasing the carrier concentration Ne and the Hall mobility μ. The ZnO:Al film with the highest Ne achieved the shortest plasma wavelength λp of 1375 nm, which shifted the near-infrared reflectance spectrum closer to the visible region. The high μ reduced the optical absorption and enhanced the reflectance. Moreover, the multi-target system enabled intermittent doping of Al, which was applied to stack multilayers consisting of non-doped and Al-doped ZnO layers. A drop in the refractive indices n above λp for the ZnO:Al layers formed the periodic distribution of n in the thickness direction, which provided a high reflectance zone from 1000 to 1400 nm in wavelength.

  16. Synthesis and evaluation of dihydropyrimidinone-derived selenoesters as multi-targeted directed compounds against Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Barbosa, Flavio A R; Canto, Rômulo F S; Saba, Sumbal; Rafique, Jamal; Braga, Antonio L

    2016-11-15

    This paper describes the synthesis and evaluation of new dihydropyrimidinone (DHPM)-derived selenoesters as potential multi-targeted agents for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease. A series of DHPM-derived selenoesters were obtained with high structural diversity through a short and modular synthetic route. The antioxidant activity was evaluated by TBARS and iron chelation assays. These compounds were also evaluated as acetylcholinesterase inhibitors (AChEi). The compounds demonstrated good antioxidant activity, since they presented excellent lipid peroxidation inhibition and good iron chelation activity. In addition, they showed acetylcholinesterase inhibition activity and some of them presented activity superior to that of the standard drug galantamine. The in silico predictions showed that the compound 1h may present a good pharmacokinetic profile. Therefore, the series of DHPM-derived selenoesters described herein displayed good potential for the development of antioxidant and anticholinesterasic agents in the search for new multi-targeted therapeutics for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. In Vivo Characterization of ARN14140, a Memantine/Galantamine-Based Multi-Target Compound for Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Reggiani, Angelo M.; Simoni, Elena; Caporaso, Roberta; Meunier, Johann; Keller, Emeline; Maurice, Tangui; Minarini, Anna; Rosini, Michela; Cavalli, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is a chronic pathological condition that leads to neurodegeneration, loss of intellectual abilities, including cognition and memory, and ultimately to death. It is widely recognized that AD is a multifactorial disease, where different pathological cascades (mainly amyloid and tau) contribute to neural death and to the clinical outcome related to the disease. The currently available drugs for AD were developed according to the one-target, one-drug paradigm. In recent times, multi-target strategies have begun to play an increasingly central role in the discovery of more efficacious candidates for complex neurological conditions, including AD. In this study, we report on the in vivo pharmacological characterization of ARN14140, a new chemical entity, which was obtained through a multi-target structure-activity relationship campaign, and which showed a balanced inhibiting profile against the acetylcholinesterase enzyme and the NMDA receptor. Based on the initial promising biochemical data, ARN14140 is here studied in mice treated with the amyloidogenic fragment 25–35 of the amyloid-β peptide, a consolidated non-transgenic AD model. Sub-chronically treating animals with ARN14140 leads to a prevention of the cognitive impairment and of biomarker levels connected to neurodegeneration, demonstrating its neuroprotective potential as new AD agent. PMID:27609215

  18. One-Compound-Multi-Target: Combination Prospect of Natural Compounds with Thrombolytic Therapy in Acute Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Han-Sen; Qi, Su-Hua; Shen, Jian-Gang

    2017-01-01

    Abstract: Tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA) is the only FDA-approved drug for acute ischemic stroke treatment, but its clinical use is limited due to the narrow therapeutic time window and severe adverse effects, including hemorrhagic transformation (HT) and neurotoxicity. One of the potential resolutions is to use adjunct therapies to reduce the side effects and extend t-PA's therapeutic time window. However, therapies modulating single target seem not to be satisfied, and a multi-target strategy is warranted to resolve such complex disease. Recently, large amount of efforts have been made to explore the active compounds from herbal supplements to treat ischemic stroke. Some natural compounds revealed both neuro- and blood-brain-barrier (BBB)-protective effects by concurrently targeting multiple cellular signaling pathways in cerebral ischemia-reperfusion injury. Thus, those compounds are potential to be one-drug-multi-target agents as combined therapy with t-PA for ischemic stroke. In this review article, we summarize current progress about molecular targets involving in t-PA-mediated HT and neurotoxicity in ischemic brain injury. Based on these targets, we select 23 promising compounds from currently available literature with the bioactivities simultaneously targeting several important molecular targets. We propose that those compounds merit further investigation as combined therapy with t-PA. Finally, we discuss the potential drawbacks of the natural compounds' studies and raise several important issues to be addressed in the future for the development of natural compound as an adjunct therapy. PMID:27334020

  19. Natural antisense transcripts associated with salinity response in alfalfa

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Natural antisense transcripts (NATs) are long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) complimentary to the messenger (sense) RNA (Wang et al. 2014). Many of them are involved in regulation of their own sense transcripts thus playing pivotal biological roles in all processes of organismal development and responses...

  20. Neighboring gene regulation by antisense long non-coding RNAs.

    PubMed

    Villegas, Victoria E; Zaphiropoulos, Peter G

    2015-02-03

    Antisense transcription, considered until recently as transcriptional noise, is a very common phenomenon in human and eukaryotic transcriptomes, operating in two ways based on whether the antisense RNA acts in cis or in trans. This process can generate long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs), one of the most diverse classes of cellular transcripts, which have demonstrated multifunctional roles in fundamental biological processes, including embryonic pluripotency, differentiation and development. Antisense lncRNAs have been shown to control nearly every level of gene regulation--pretranscriptional, transcriptional and posttranscriptional--through DNA-RNA, RNA-RNA or protein-RNA interactions. This review is centered on functional studies of antisense lncRNA-mediated regulation of neighboring gene expression. Specifically, it addresses how these transcripts interact with other biological molecules, nucleic acids and proteins, to regulate gene expression through chromatin remodeling at the pretranscriptional level and modulation of transcriptional and post-transcriptional processes by altering the sense mRNA structure or the cellular compartmental distribution, either in the nucleus or the cytoplasm.

  1. [Antisense transcription within the hns locus of Escherichia coli].

    PubMed

    Tututkina, M N; Shavkunov, K S; Masulis, I S; Ozolin', O N

    2010-01-01

    Scanning the entire genome of E. coli by means of pattern-recognition software PlatProm spotted out more than a thousand of potential start points for antisense transcription. Taking into account possible role of antisense RNAs in the cell regulatory networks, our top-priority interest was focused on the promoter-like sites found within genes of transcription regulators. One of them (hns) encodes a major nucleoid protein affecting expression pattern of many genomic loci. Several potential start points for antisense transcription were found within its coding sequence. Gel-retardation assays, potassium permanganate and DNAse I foot-printings confirmed the ability of the intragenic promoter located approximately 280 bp downstream of ATG to bind RNA polymerase. Primer extension revealed the cDNA of the expected size while Northern blot hybridization assumes the presence of aRNA among cellular RNAs. Relative abundance of antisense RNA and hns-mRNA in vivo exhibited dependence on growth conditions thus assuming existence of regulatory pathways keeping cellular concentration of these two transcripts at the optimal level.

  2. Antisense transcription licenses nascent transcripts to mediate transcriptional gene silencing

    PubMed Central

    Dang, Yunkun; Cheng, Jiasen; Sun, Xianyun; Zhou, Zhipeng; Liu, Yi

    2016-01-01

    In eukaryotes, antisense transcription can regulate sense transcription by induction of epigenetic modifications. We showed previously that antisense transcription triggers Dicer-independent siRNA (disiRNA) production and disiRNA locus DNA methylation (DLDM) in Neurospora crassa. Here we show that the conserved exonuclease ERI-1 (enhanced RNAi-1) is a critical component in this process. Antisense transcription and ERI-1 binding to target RNAs are necessary and sufficient to trigger DLDM. Convergent transcription causes stalling of RNA polymerase II during transcription, which permits ERI-1 to bind nascent RNAs in the nucleus and recruit a histone methyltransferase complex that catalyzes chromatin modifications. Furthermore, we show that, in the cytoplasm, ERI-1 targets hundreds of transcripts from loci without antisense transcription to regulate RNA stability. Together, our results demonstrate a critical role for transcription kinetics in long noncoding RNA-mediated epigenetic modifications and identify ERI-1 as an important regulator of cotranscriptional gene silencing and post-transcriptional RNA metabolism. PMID:27856616

  3. Thermodynamic criteria for high hit rate antisense oligonucleotide design

    PubMed Central

    Matveeva, O. V.; Mathews, D. H.; Tsodikov, A. D.; Shabalina, S. A.; Gesteland, R. F.; Atkins, J. F.; Freier, S. M.

    2003-01-01

    Antisense oligonucleotides are used for therapeutic applications and in functional genomic studies. In practice, however, many of the oligonucleotides complementary to an mRNA have little or no antisense activity. Theoretical strategies to improve the ‘hit rate’ in antisense screens will reduce the cost of discovery and may lead to identification of antisense oligonucleotides with increased potency. Statistical analysis performed on data collected from more than 1000 experiments with phosphorothioate-modified oligonucleotides revealed that the oligo-probes, which form stable duplexes with RNA (ΔGo37 ≤ –30 kcal/mol) and have small self-interaction potential, are more frequently efficient than molecules that form less stable oligonucleotide–RNA hybrids or more stable self-structures. To achieve optimal statistical preference, the values for self-interaction should be (ΔGo37) ≥ –8 kcal/mol for inter-oligonucleotide pairing and (ΔGo37) ≥ –1.1 kcal/mol for intra-molecular pairing. Selection of oligonucleotides with these thermodynamic values in the analyzed experiments would have increased the ‘hit rate’ by as much as 6-fold. PMID:12930948

  4. Reduction of polygalacturonase activity in tomato fruit by antisense RNA.

    PubMed

    Sheehy, R E; Kramer, M; Hiatt, W R

    1988-12-01

    Polygalacturonase [PG; poly(1,4-alpha-D-galacturonide) glycanhydrolase; EC 3.2.1.15] is expressed in tomato only during the ripening stage of fruit development. PG becomes abundant during ripening and has a major role in cell wall degradation and fruit softening. Tomato plants were transformed to produce antisense RNA from a gene construct containing the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter and a full-length PG cDNA in reverse orientation. The construct was integrated into the tomato genome by Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. The constitutive synthesis of PG antisense RNA in transgenic plants resulted in a substantial reduction in the levels of PG mRNA and enzymatic activity in ripening fruit. The steady-state levels of PG antisense RNA in green fruit of transgenic plants were lower than the levels of PG mRNA normally attained during ripening. However, analysis of transcription in isolated nuclei demonstrated that the antisense RNA construct was transcribed at a higher rate than the tomato PG gene(s). Analysis of fruit from transgenic plants demonstrated a reduction in PG mRNA and enzymatic activity of 70-90%. The reduction in PG activity did not prevent the accumulation of the red pigment lycopene.

  5. Analytic Performance Prediction of Track-to-Track Association with Biased Data in Multi-Sensor Multi-Target Tracking Scenarios

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Wei; Wang, Yue; Shan, Xiuming; Yang, Jian

    2013-01-01

    An analytic method for predicting the performance of track-to-track association (TTTA) with biased data in multi-sensor multi-target tracking scenarios is proposed in this paper. The proposed method extends the existing results of the bias-free situation by accounting for the impact of sensor biases. Since little insight of the intrinsic relationship between scenario parameters and the performance of TTTA can be obtained by numerical simulations, the proposed analytic approach is a potential substitute for the costly Monte Carlo simulation method. Analytic expressions are developed for the global nearest neighbor (GNN) association algorithm in terms of correct association probability. The translational biases of sensors are incorporated in the expressions, which provide good insight into how the TTTA performance is affected by sensor biases, as well as other scenario parameters, including the target spatial density, the extraneous track density and the average association uncertainty error. To show the validity of the analytic predictions, we compare them with the simulation results, and the analytic predictions agree reasonably well with the simulations in a large range of normally anticipated scenario parameters. PMID:24036583

  6. Prolonged-acting, Multi-targeting Gallium Nanoparticles Potently Inhibit Growth of Both HIV and Mycobacteria in Co-Infected Human Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Narayanasamy, Prabagaran; Switzer, Barbara L.; Britigan, Bradley E.

    2015-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and Mycobacterium tuberculosis (TB) are responsible for two of the major global human infectious diseases that result in significant morbidity, mortality and socioeconomic impact. Furthermore, severity and disease prevention of both infections is enhanced by co-infection. Parallel limitations also exist in access to effective drug therapy and the emergence of resistance. Furthermore, drug-drug interactions have proven problematic during treatment of co-incident HIV and TB infections. Thus, improvements in drug access and simplified treatment regimens are needed immediately. One of the key host cells infected by both HIV and TB is the mononuclear phagocyte (MP; monocyte, macrophage and dendritic cell). Therefore, we hypothesized that one way this can be achieved is through drug-targeting by a nanoformulated drug that ideally would be active against both HIV and TB. Accordingly, we validated macrophage targeted long acting (sustained drug release) gallium (Ga) nanoformulation against HIV-mycobacterium co-infection. The multi-targeted Ga nanoparticle agent inhibited growth of both HIV and TB in the macrophage. The Ga nanoparticles reduced the growth of mycobacterium and HIV for up to 15 days following single drug loading. These results provide a potential new approach to treat HIV-TB co-infection that could eventually lead to improved clinical outcomes. PMID:25744727

  7. Analytic performance prediction of track-to-track association with biased data in multi-sensor multi-target tracking scenarios.

    PubMed

    Tian, Wei; Wang, Yue; Shan, Xiuming; Yang, Jian

    2013-09-12

    An analytic method for predicting the performance of track-to-track association (TTTA) with biased data in multi-sensor multi-target tracking scenarios is proposed in this paper. The proposed method extends the existing results of the bias-free situation by accounting for the impact of sensor biases. Since little insight of the intrinsic relationship between scenario parameters and the performance of TTTA can be obtained by numerical simulations, the proposed analytic approach is a potential substitute for the costly Monte Carlo simulation method. Analytic expressions are developed for the global nearest neighbor (GNN) association algorithm in terms of correct association probability. The translational biases of sensors are incorporated in the expressions, which provide good insight into how the TTTA performance is affected by sensor biases, as well as other scenario parameters, including the target spatial density, the extraneous track density and the average association uncertainty error. To show the validity of the analytic predictions, we compare them with the simulation results, and the analytic predictions agree reasonably well with the simulations in a large range of normally anticipated scenario parameters.

  8. From the dual function lead AP2238 to AP2469, a multi-target-directed ligand for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Tarozzi, Andrea; Bartolini, Manuela; Piazzi, Lorna; Valgimigli, Luca; Amorati, Riccardo; Bolondi, Cecilia; Djemil, Alice; Mancini, Francesca; Andrisano, Vincenza; Rampa, Angela

    2014-04-01

    The development of drugs with different pharmacological properties appears to be an innovative therapeutic approach for Alzheimer's disease. In this article, we describe a simple structural modification of AP2238, a first dual function lead, in particular the introduction of the catechol moiety performed in order to search for multi-target ligands. The new compound AP2469 retains anti-acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and beta-site amyloid precursor protein cleaving enzyme (BACE)1 activities compared to the reference, and is also able to inhibit Aβ 42 self-aggregation, Aβ 42 oligomer-binding to cell membrane and subsequently reactive oxygen species formation in both neuronal and microglial cells. The ability of AP2469 to interfere with Aβ 42 oligomer-binding to neuron and microglial cell membrane gives this molecule both neuroprotective and anti-inflammatory properties. These findings, together with its strong chain-breaking antioxidant performance, make AP2469 a potential drug able to modify the course of the disease.

  9. From the dual function lead AP2238 to AP2469, a multi-target-directed ligand for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Tarozzi, Andrea; Bartolini, Manuela; Piazzi, Lorna; Valgimigli, Luca; Amorati, Riccardo; Bolondi, Cecilia; Djemil, Alice; Mancini, Francesca; Andrisano, Vincenza; Rampa, Angela

    2014-01-01

    The development of drugs with different pharmacological properties appears to be an innovative therapeutic approach for Alzheimer's disease. In this article, we describe a simple structural modification of AP2238, a first dual function lead, in particular the introduction of the catechol moiety performed in order to search for multi-target ligands. The new compound AP2469 retains anti-acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and beta-site amyloid precursor protein cleaving enzyme (BACE)1 activities compared to the reference, and is also able to inhibit Aβ42 self-aggregation, Aβ42 oligomer-binding to cell membrane and subsequently reactive oxygen species formation in both neuronal and microglial cells. The ability of AP2469 to interfere with Aβ42 oligomer-binding to neuron and microglial cell membrane gives this molecule both neuroprotective and anti-inflammatory properties. These findings, together with its strong chain-breaking antioxidant performance, make AP2469 a potential drug able to modify the course of the disease. PMID:25505579

  10. Multi-target drugs to address multiple checkpoints in complex inflammatory pathologies: evolutionary cues for novel "first-in-class" anti-inflammatory drug candidates: a reviewer's perspective.

    PubMed

    Mathew, Geetha; Unnikrishnan, M K

    2015-10-01

    Inflammation is a complex, metabolically expensive process involving multiple signaling pathways and regulatory mechanisms which have evolved over evolutionary timescale. Addressing multiple targets of inflammation holistically, in moderation, is probably a more evolutionarily viable strategy, as compared to current therapy which addresses drug targets in isolation. Polypharmacology, addressing multiple targets, is commonly used in complex ailments, suggesting the superior safety and efficacy profile of multi-target (MT) drugs. Phenotypic drug discovery, which generated successful MT and first-in-class drugs in the past, is now re-emerging. A multi-pronged approach, which modulates the evolutionarily conserved, robust and pervasive cellular mechanisms of tissue repair, with AMPK at the helm, regulating the complex metabolic/immune/redox pathways underlying inflammation, is perhaps a more viable strategy than addressing single targets in isolation. Molecules that modulate multiple molecular mechanisms of inflammation in moderation (modulating TH cells toward the anti-inflammatory phenotype, activating AMPK, stimulating Nrf2 and inhibiting NFκB) might serve as a model for a novel Darwinian "first-in-class" therapeutic category that holistically addresses immune, redox and metabolic processes associated with inflammatory repair. Such a multimodal biological activity is supported by the fact that several non-calorific pleiotropic natural products with anti-inflammatory action have been incorporated into diet (chiefly guided by the adaptive development of olfacto-gustatory preferences over evolutionary timescales) rendering such molecules, endowed with evolutionarily privileged molecular scaffolds, naturally oriented toward multiple targets.

  11. Dovitinib (TKI258), a multi-target angiokinase inhibitor, is effective regardless of KRAS or BRAF mutation status in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Choong-Kun; Lee, Myung Eun; Lee, Won Suk; Kim, Jeong Min; Park, Kyu Hyun; Kim, Tae Soo; Lee, Kang Young; Ahn, Joong Bae; Chung, Hyun Cheol; Rha, Sun Young

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: We aimed to determine whether KRAS and BRAF mutant colorectal cancer (CRC) cells exhibit distinct sensitivities to the multi-target angiokinase inhibitor, TKI258 (dovitinib). Materials and methods: We screened 10 CRC cell lines by using receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) array to identify activated RTKs. MTT assays, anchorage-independent colony-formation assays, and immunoblotting assays were performed to evaluate the in vitro anti-tumor effects of TKI258. In vivo efficacy study followed by pharmacodynamic evaluation was done. Results: Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor 1 (FGFR1) and FGFR3 were among the most highly activated RTKs in CRC cell lines. In in vitro assays, the BRAF mutant HT-29 cells were more resistant to the TKI258 than the KRAS mutant LoVo cells. However, in xenograft assays, TKI258 equally delayed the growth of tumors induced by both cell lines. TUNEL assays showed that the apoptotic index was unchanged following TKI258 treatment, but staining for Ki-67 and CD31 was substantially reduced in both xenografts, implying an anti-angiogenic effect of the drug. TKI258 treatment was effective in delaying CRC tumor growth in vivo regardless of the KRAS and BRAF mutation status. Conclusions: Our results identify FGFRs as potential targets in CRC treatment and suggest that combined targeting of multiple RTKs with TKI258 might serve as a novel approach to improve outcome of patients with CRC. PMID:25628921

  12. The ICAM-1 antisense oligonucleotide ISIS-3082 prevents the development of postoperative ileus in mice.

    PubMed

    The, Frans O; de Jonge, Wouter J; Bennink, Roel J; van den Wijngaard, Rene M; Boeckxstaens, Guy E

    2005-09-01

    Intestinal manipulation (IM) during abdominal surgery triggers the influx of inflammatory cells, leading to postoperative ileus. Prevention of this local muscle inflammation, using intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and leukocyte function-associated antigen-1-specific antibodies, has been shown to shorten postoperative ileus. However, the therapeutic use of antibodies has considerable disadvantages. The aim of the current study was to evaluate the effect of ISIS-3082, a mouse-specific ICAM-1 antisense oligonucleotide, on postoperative ileus in mice. Mice underwent a laparotomy or a laparotomy combined with IM after treatment with ICAM-1 antibodies, 0.1-10 mg kg(-1) ISIS-3082, saline or ISIS-8997 (scrambled control antisense oligonucleotides, 1 and 3 mg kg(-1)). At 24 h after surgery, gastric emptying of a 99mTC labelled semi-liquid meal was determined using scintigraphy. Intestinal inflammation was assessed by myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity in ileal muscle whole mounts. IM significantly reduced gastric emptying compared to laparotomy. Pretreatment with ISIS-3082 (0.1-1 mg kg(-1)) as well as ICAM-1 antibodies (10 mg kg(-1)), but not ISIS-8997 or saline, improved gastric emptying in a dose-dependent manner. This effect diminished with higher doses of ISIS-3082 (3-10 mg kg(-1)). Similarly, ISIS-3082 (0.1-1 mg kg(-1)) and ICAM-1 antibodies, but not ISIS-8997 or higher doses of ISIS-3082 (3-10 mg kg(-1)), reduced manipulation-induced inflammation. Immunohistochemistry showed reduction of ICAM-1 expression with ISIS-3082 only. ISIS-3082 pretreatment prevents postoperative ileus in mice by reduction of manipulation-induced local intestinal muscle inflammation. Our data suggest that targeting ICAM-1 using antisense oligonucleotides may represent a new therapeutic approach to the prevention of postoperative ileus.

  13. Proteomic analysis of mature barley grains from C-hordein antisense lines.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Daiana; Gaziola, Salete Aparecida; Boaretto, Luis Felipe; Azevedo, Ricardo Antunes

    2016-05-01

    Hordeins are the major storage proteins in barley grains and are responsible for their low nutritional quality. Previously, antisense C-hordein barley lines were generated and were shown to contain a more balanced amino acid composition and an altered storage protein profile. In the present study, a proteomic approach that combined two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) and mass spectrometry was used to (1) identify the changes in the protein profile of non-storage proteins (salt soluble fraction) in antisense C-hordein barley lines (L1, L2 and L3) and (2) map the differentially expressed proteins compared to the non-transgenic control line (Hordeum vulgare cv. Golden Promise). Moreover, the changes in the proteins were correlated with the more balanced amino acid composition of these lines, with special attention to the lysine content. The results showed that suppression of C-hordein expression does not exclusively affect hordein synthesis and accumulation. The more balanced amino acid composition observed in the transgenic lines L1, L2 and L3 was an indirect result of the profound alterations in the patterns of the non-storage proteins. The observed changes included up-regulated expression of the proteins involved in stress and detoxification (L1), defence (L2 and L3), and storage globulins (L1, L2 and L3). To a lesser extent, the proteins involved in grain metabolism were also changed. Thus, the increased essential amino acids content results from changes in distinct protein sources among the three antisense C-hordein lines analyzed, although the up-regulated expression of lysine-rich proteins was consistently observed in all lines. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Multi-exon Skipping Using Cocktail Antisense Oligonucleotides in the Canine X-linked Muscular Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Kuraoka, Mutsuki; Lee, Joshua J.A.; Takeda, Shin'ichi; Yokota, Toshifumi

    2016-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is one of the most common lethal genetic diseases worldwide, caused by mutations in the dystrophin (DMD) gene. Exon skipping employs short DNA/RNA-like molecules called antisense oligonucleotides (AONs) that restore the reading frame and produce shorter but functional proteins. However, exon skipping therapy faces two major hurdles: limited applicability (up to only 13% of patients can be treated with a single AON drug), and uncertain function of truncated proteins. These issues were addressed with a cocktail AON approach. While approximately 70% of DMD patients can be treated by single exon skipping (all exons combined), one could potentially treat more than 90% of DMD patients if multiple exon skipping using cocktail antisense drugs can be realized. The canine X-linked muscular dystrophy (CXMD) dog model, whose phenotype is more similar to human DMD patients, was used to test the systemic efficacy and safety of multi-exon skipping of exons 6 and 8. The CXMD dog model harbors a splice site mutation in intron 6, leading to a lack of exon 7 in dystrophin mRNA. To restore the reading frame in CXMD requires multi-exon skipping of exons 6 and 8; therefore, CXMD is a good middle-sized animal model for testing the efficacy and safety of multi-exon skipping. In the current study, a cocktail of antisense morpholinos targeting exon 6 and exon 8 was designed and it restored dystrophin expression in body-wide skeletal muscles. Methods for transfection/injection of cocktail oligos and evaluation of the efficacy and safety of multi-exon skipping in the CXMD dog model are presented. PMID:27285612

  15. Polarized expression of the membrane ASP protein derived from HIV-1 antisense transcription in T cells

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Retroviral gene expression generally depends on a full-length transcript that initiates in the 5' LTR, which is either left unspliced or alternatively spliced. We and others have demonstrated the existence of antisense transcription initiating in the 3' LTR in human lymphotropic retroviruses, including HTLV-1, HTLV-2, and HIV-1. Such transcripts have been postulated to encode antisense proteins important for the establishment of viral infections. The antisense strand of the HIV-1 proviral DNA contains an ORF termed asp, coding for a highly hydrophobic protein. However, although anti-ASP antibodies have been described to be present in HIV-1-infected patients, its in vivo expression requires further support. The objective of this present study was to clearly demonstrate that ASP is effectively expressed in infected T cells and to provide a better characterization of its subcellular localization. Results We first investigated the subcellular localization of ASP by transfecting Jurkat T cells with vectors expressing ASP tagged with the Flag epitope to its N-terminus. Using immunofluorescence microscopy, we found that ASP localized to the plasma membrane in transfected Jurkat T cells, but with different staining patterns. In addition to an entire distribution to the plasma membrane, ASP showed an asymmetric localization and could also be detected in membrane connections between two cells. We then infected Jurkat T cells with NL4.3 virus coding for ASP tagged with the Flag epitope at its C-terminal end. By this approach, we were capable of showing that ASP is effectively expressed from the HIV-1 3' LTR in infected T cells, with an asymmetric localization of the viral protein at the plasma membrane. Conclusion These results demonstrate for the first time that ASP can be detected when expressed from full-length HIV-1 proviral DNA and that its localization is consistent with Jurkat T cells overexpressing ASP. PMID:21929758

  16. Polarized expression of the membrane ASP protein derived from HIV-1 antisense transcription in T cells.

    PubMed

    Clerc, Isabelle; Laverdure, Sylvain; Torresilla, Cynthia; Landry, Sébastien; Borel, Sophie; Vargas, Amandine; Arpin-André, Charlotte; Gay, Bernard; Briant, Laurence; Gross, Antoine; Barbeau, Benoît; Mesnard, Jean-Michel

    2011-09-19

    Retroviral gene expression generally depends on a full-length transcript that initiates in the 5' LTR, which is either left unspliced or alternatively spliced. We and others have demonstrated the existence of antisense transcription initiating in the 3' LTR in human lymphotropic retroviruses, including HTLV-1, HTLV-2, and HIV-1. Such transcripts have been postulated to encode antisense proteins important for the establishment of viral infections. The antisense strand of the HIV-1 proviral DNA contains an ORF termed asp, coding for a highly hydrophobic protein. However, although anti-ASP antibodies have been described to be present in HIV-1-infected patients, its in vivo expression requires further support. The objective of this present study was to clearly demonstrate that ASP is effectively expressed in infected T cells and to provide a better characterization of its subcellular localization. We first investigated the subcellular localization of ASP by transfecting Jurkat T cells with vectors expressing ASP tagged with the Flag epitope to its N-terminus. Using immunofluorescence microscopy, we found that ASP localized to the plasma membrane in transfected Jurkat T cells, but with different staining patterns. In addition to an entire distribution to the plasma membrane, ASP showed an asymmetric localization and could also be detected in membrane connections between two cells. We then infected Jurkat T cells with NL4.3 virus coding for ASP tagged with the Flag epitope at its C-terminal end. By this approach, we were capable of showing that ASP is effectively expressed from the HIV-1 3' LTR in infected T cells, with an asymmetric localization of the viral protein at the plasma membrane. These results demonstrate for the first time that ASP can be detected when expressed from full-length HIV-1 proviral DNA and that its localization is consistent with Jurkat T cells overexpressing ASP.

  17. Inhaled ENaC antisense oligonucleotide ameliorates cystic fibrosis-like lung disease in mice.

    PubMed

    Crosby, Jeff R; Zhao, Chenguang; Jiang, Chong; Bai, Dong; Katz, Melanie; Greenlee, Sarah; Kawabe, Hiroshi; McCaleb, Michael; Rotin, Daniela; Guo, Shuling; Monia, Brett P

    2017-05-20

    Epithelial sodium channel (ENaC, Scnn1) hyperactivity in the lung leads to airway surface dehydration and mucus accumulation in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients and in mice with CF-like lung disease. We identified several potent ENaC specific antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) and tested them by inhalation in mouse models of CF-like lung disease. The inhaled ASOs distributed into lung airway epithelial cells and decreased ENaC expression by inducing RNase H1-dependent degradation of the targeted Scnn1a mRNA. Aerosol delivered ENaC ASO down-regulated mucus marker expression and ameliorated goblet cell metaplasia, inflammation, and airway hyper-responsiveness. Lack of systemic activity of ASOs delivered via the aerosol route ensures the safety of this approach. Our results demonstrate that antisense inhibition of ENaC in airway epithelial cells could be an effective and safe approach for the prevention and reversal of lung symptoms in CF and potentially other inflammatory diseases of the lung. Copyright © 2017 European Cystic Fibrosis Society. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Antisense-Based Progerin Downregulation in HGPS-Like Patients' Cells.

    PubMed

    Harhouri, Karim; Navarro, Claire; Baquerre, Camille; Da Silva, Nathalie; Bartoli, Catherine; Casey, Frank; Mawuse, Guedenon Koffi; Doubaj, Yassamine; Lévy, Nicolas; De Sandre-Giovannoli, Annachiara

    2016-07-11

    Progeroid laminopathies, including Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria Syndrome (HGPS, OMIM #176670), are premature and accelerated aging diseases caused by defects in nuclear A-type Lamins. Most HGPS patients carry a de novo point mutation within exon 11 of the LMNA gene encoding A-type Lamins. This mutation activates a cryptic splice site leading to the deletion of 50 amino acids at its carboxy-terminal domain, resulting in a truncated and permanently farnesylated Prelamin A called Prelamin A Δ50 or Progerin. Some patients carry other LMNA mutations affecting exon 11 splicing and are named "HGPS-like" patients. They also produce Progerin and/or other truncated Prelamin A isoforms (Δ35 and Δ90) at the transcriptional and/or protein level. The results we present show that morpholino antisense oligonucleotides (AON) prevent pathogenic LMNA splicing, markedly reducing the accumulation of Progerin and/or other truncated Prelamin A isoforms (Prelamin A Δ35, Prelamin A Δ90) in HGPS-like patients' cells. Finally, a patient affected with Mandibuloacral Dysplasia type B (MAD-B, carrying a homozygous mutation in ZMPSTE24, encoding an enzyme involved in Prelamin A maturation, leading to accumulation of wild type farnesylated Prelamin A), was also included in this study. These results provide preclinical proof of principle for the use of a personalized antisense approach in HGPS-like and MAD-B patients, who may therefore be eligible for inclusion in a therapeutic trial based on this approach, together with classical HGPS patients.

  19. Antisense-mediated exon skipping: A versatile tool with therapeutic and research applications

    PubMed Central

    Aartsma-Rus, Annemieke; van Ommen, Gert-Jan B.

    2007-01-01

    Antisense-mediated modulation of splicing is one of the few fields where antisense oligonucleotides (AONs) have been able to live up to their expectations. In this approach, AONs are implemented to restore cryptic splicing, to change levels of alternatively spliced genes, or, in case of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), to skip an exon in order to restore a disrupted reading frame. The latter allows the generation of internally deleted, but largely functional, dystrophin proteins and would convert a severe DMD into a milder Becker muscular dystrophy phenotype. In fact, exon skipping is currently one of the most promising therapeutic tools for DMD, and a successful first-in-man trial has recently been completed. In this review the applicability of exon skipping for DMD and other diseases is described. For DMD AONs have been designed for numerous exons, which has given us insight into their mode of action, splicing in general, and splicing of the DMD gene in particular. In addition, retrospective analysis resulted in guidelines for AON design for DMD and most likely other genes as well. This knowledge allows us to optimize therapeutic exon skipping, but also opens up a range of other applications for the exon skipping approach. PMID:17684229

  20. Upregulation of functional Kv11.1 isoform expression by inhibition of intronic polyadenylation with antisense morpholino oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Gong, Qiuming; Stump, Matthew R; Zhou, Zhengfeng

    2014-11-01

    The KCNH2 gene encodes the Kv11.1 potassium channel that conducts the rapidly activating delayed rectifier current in the heart. KCNH2 pre-mRNA undergoes alternative processing; intron 9 splicing leads to the formation of a functional, full-length Kv11.1a isoform, while polyadenylation within intron 9 generates a non-functional, C-terminally truncated Kv11.1a-USO isoform. The relative expression of Kv11.1 isoforms plays an important role in the regulation of Kv11.1 channel function and the pathogenesis of long QT syndrome. In this study, we identified cis-acting elements that are required for KCNH2 intron 9 poly(A) signal activity. Mutation of these elements decreased Kv11.1a-USO expression and increased the expression of Kv11.1a mRNA, protein and channel current. More importantly, blocking these elements by antisense morpholino oligonucleotides shifted the alternative processing of KCNH2 intron 9 from the polyadenylation to the splicing pathway, leading to the predominant production of Kv11.1a and a significant increase in Kv11.1 current. Our findings indicate that the expression of the Kv11.1a isoform can be upregulated by an antisense approach. Antisense inhibition of KCNH2 intronic polyadenylation represents a novel approach to increase Kv11.1 channel function.

  1. Hybridization of different antisense oligonucleotides on the surface of gold nanoparticles to silence zinc metalloproteinase gene after uptake by Leishmania major.

    PubMed

    Jebali, Ali; Anvari-Tafti, Mohammad Hosssein

    2015-05-01

    The use of antisense oligonucleotides is a novel strategy to treat infectious diseases. In this approach, vital mRNAs are targeted by antisense oligonucleotides. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of gold nanoparticles hybridized with different antisense oligonucleotides on Leishmania (L) major. In this project, gold nanoparticles were first synthesized, and then conjugated with primary oligonucleotides, 3'-AAA-5'. Next, conjugated gold nanoparticles (NP1) were separately hybridized with three types of antisense oligonucleotide from coding reign of GP63 gene (NP2), non-coding reign of GP63 gene (NP3), and both coding and non-coding reigns of GP63 (NP4). Then, 1mL of L. major suspension was separately added to 1mL of different hybridized gold nanoparticles at serial concentrations (1-200μg/mL), and incubated for 24, 48, and 72h at 37°C. Next, the uptake of each nanoparticle was separately measured by atomic absorption spectroscopy. After incubation, the cell viability was separately evaluated by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl-tetrazolium bromide assay. Also, the expression of GP63 gene was read out by quantitative-real-time PCR. This study showed that NP2 and NP3 had higher (5-fold) uptake than NP1 and NP4. Moreover, NP2 and NP3 led to less cell viability and gene expression, compared with NP1 and NP4. It could be concluded that both sequence and size of antisense oligonucleotide were important for transfection of L. major. Importantly, these antisense oligonucleotides can be obtained from both coding and non-coding reign of GP63 gene. Moreover, hybridized gold nanoparticles not only could silence GP63 gene, but also could kill L. major.

  2. Nucleus-localized antisense small RNAs with 5'-polyphosphate termini regulate long term transcriptional gene silencing in Entamoeba histolytica G3 strain.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hanbang; Alramini, Hussein; Tran, Vy; Singh, Upinder

    2011-12-30

    In the deep-branching eukaryotic parasite Entamoeba histolytica, transcriptional gene silencing (TGS) of the Amoebapore A gene (ap-a) in the G3 strain has been reported with subsequent development of this parasite strain for gene silencing. However, the mechanisms underlying this gene silencing approach are poorly understood. Here we report that antisense small RNAs (sRNAs) specific to the silenced ap-a gene can be identified in G3 parasites. Furthermore, when additional genes are silenced in the G3 strain, antisense sRNAs to the newly silenced genes can also be detected. Characterization of these sRNAs demonstrates that they are ~27 nucleotides in size, have 5'-polyphosphate termini, and persist even after removal of the silencing plasmid. Immunofluorescence analysis (IFA) and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) show that both the Argonaute protein EhAGO2-2 and antisense sRNAs to the silenced genes are localized to the parasite nucleus. Furthermore, α-EhAGO2-2 immunoprecipitation confirmed the direct association of the antisense sRNAs with EhAGO2-2. Finally, chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays demonstrate that the loci of the silenced genes are enriched for histone H3 and EhAGO2-2, indicating that both chromatin modification and the RNA-induced transcriptional silencing complex are involved in permanent gene silencing in G3 parasites. In conclusion, our data demonstrate that G3-based gene silencing in E. histolytica is mediated by an siRNA pathway, which utilizes antisense 5'-polyphosphate sRNAs. To our knowledge, this is the first study to show that 5'- polyphosphate antisense sRNAs can mediate TGS, and it is the first example of RNAi-mediated TGS in protozoan parasites.

  3. Tracking the Turn Maneuvering Target Using the Multi-Target Bayes Filter with an Adaptive Estimation of Turn Rate.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zong-Xiang; Wu, De-Hui; Xie, Wei-Xin; Li, Liang-Qun

    2017-02-15

    Tracking the target that maneuvers at a variable turn rate is a challenging problem. The traditional solution for this problem is the use of the switching multiple models technique, which includes several dynamic models with different turn rates for matching the motion mode of the target at each point in time. However, the actual motion mode of a target at any time may be different from all of the dynamic models, because these models are usually limited. To address this problem, we establish a formula for estimating the turn rate of a maneuvering target. By applying the estimation method of the turn rate to the multi-target Bayes (MB) filter, we develop a MB filter with an adaptive estimation of the turn rate, in order to track multiple maneuvering targets. Simulation results indicate that the MB filter with an adaptive estimation of the turn rate, is better than the existing filter at tracking the target that maneuvers at a variable turn rate.

  4. The synthesis of Zr-Nb-N nanocomposite coating prepared by multi-target magnetron co-sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, S.; Wang, N.; Li, D. J.; Dong, L.; Gu, H. Q.; Wan, R. X.; Sun, X.

    2013-07-01

    Growth, structure, and mechanical properties of the nanocomposite Zr-Nb-N coatings deposited on Si(1 0 0) at different substrate bias voltages and substrate temperatures were performed by multi-target magnetron co-sputtering system. Extensive measurements were taken to investigate the influences of substrate bias voltage and deposition temperature on microstructure, hardness, elastic modulus, residual stress, critical fracture load. The maximum hardness and elastic modulus was up to 36 GPa and 425 GPa, respectively. The hardest coating also showed the lowest residual stress and the highest critical load. These enhancement effects should be related to nanocrystalline solid-solution microstructure formation and smaller grain size. These Zr-Nb-N coatings appeared to be a promising composite coating system suitable for engineering applications.

  5. Multi-targeted inhibition of tumor growth and lung metastasis by redox-sensitive shell crosslinked micelles loading disulfiram

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Xiaopin; Xiao, Jisheng; Yin, Qi; Zhang, Zhiwen; Yu, Haijun; Mao, Shirui; Li, Yaping

    2014-03-01

    Metastasis, the main cause of cancer related deaths, remains the greatest challenge in cancer treatment. Disulfiram (DSF), which has multi-targeted anti-tumor activity, was encapsulated into redox-sensitive shell crosslinked micelles to achieve intracellular targeted delivery and finally inhibit tumor growth and metastasis. The crosslinked micelles demonstrated good stability in circulation and specifically released DSF under a reductive environment that mimicked the intracellular conditions of tumor cells. As a result, the DSF-loaded redox-sensitive shell crosslinked micelles (DCMs) dramatically inhibited cell proliferation, induced cell apoptosis and suppressed cell invasion, as well as impairing tube formation of HMEC-1 cells. In addition, the DCMs could accumulate in tumor tissue and stay there for a long time, thereby causing significant inhibition of 4T1 tumor growth and marked prevention in lung metastasis of 4T1 tumors. These results suggested that DCMs could be a promising delivery system in inhibiting the growth and metastasis of breast cancer.

  6. SOMCL-085, a novel multi-targeted FGFR inhibitor, displays potent anticancer activity in FGFR-addicted human cancer models.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xi-Fei; Dai, Yang; Peng, Xia; Shen, Yan-Yan; Su, Yi; Wei, Man-Man; Liu, Wei-Ren; Ding, Zhen-Bin; Zhang, Ao; Shi, Ying-Hong; Ai, Jing

    2017-09-14

    Aberrant fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR) activation is found across a diverse spectrum of malignancies, especially those lacking effective treatments. SOMCL-085 is a novel FGFR-dominant multi-target kinase inhibitor. Here, we explored the FGFR-targeting anticancer activity of SOMCL-085 both in vitro and in vivo. Among a panel of 20 tyrosine kinases screened, SOMCL-085 potently inhibited FGFR1, FGFR2 and FGFR3 kinase activity, with IC50 values of 1.8, 1.9 and 6.9 nmol/L, respectively. This compound simultaneously inhibited the angiogenesis kinases VEGFR and PDGFR, but without obvious inhibitory effect on other 12 tyrosine kinases. In 3 representative human cancer cell lines with different mechanisms of FGFR activation tested, SOMCL-085 (20-500 nmol/L) dose-dependently inhibited FGFR1-3 phosphorylation and the phosphorylation of their key downstream effectors PLCγ and Erk. In 7 FGFR aberrant human cancer cell lines, regardless of the mechanistic complexity of FGFR over-activation, SOMCL-085 potently inhibited FGFR-driven cell proliferation by arresting cells at the G1/S phase. In the FGFR1-amplified lung cancer cell line H1581 xenograft mice and FGFR2-amplified gastric cancer cell line SNU16 xenograft mice, oral administration of SOMCL-085 (25, 50 mg·kg(-1)·d(-1)) for 21 days substantially suppressed tumor growth without affecting their body-weight. These results suggest that SOMCL-085 is a potent multi-target FGFR inhibitor that inhibits the FGFR-dependent neoplastic phenotypes of human cancer cells in vitro and in vivo.

  7. Multi-target screening mines hesperidin as a multi-potent inhibitor: Implication in Alzheimer's disease therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Sandipan; Bandyopadhyay, Jaya; Chakraborty, Sourav; Basu, Soumalee

    2016-10-04

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most frequent form of neurodegenerative disorder in elderly people. Involvement of several pathogenic events and their interconnections make this disease a complex disorder. Therefore, designing compounds that can inhibit multiple toxic pathways is the most attractive therapeutic strategy in complex disorders like AD. Here, we have designed a multi-tier screening protocol combining ensemble docking to mine BACE1 inhibitor, as well as 2-D QSAR models for anti-amyloidogenic and antioxidant activities. An in house developed phytochemical library of 200 phytochemicals has been screened through this multi-target procedure which mine hesperidin, a flavanone glycoside commonly found in citrus food items, as a multi-potent phytochemical in AD therapeutics. Steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy reveal that binding of hesperidin to the active site of BACE1 induces a conformational transition of the protein from open to closed form. Hesperidin docks close to the catalytic aspartate residues and orients itself in a way that blocks the cavity opening thereby precluding substrate binding. Hesperidin is a high affinity BACE1 inhibitor and only 500 nM of the compound shows complete inhibition of the enzyme activity. Furthermore, ANS and Thioflavin-T binding assay show that hesperidin completely inhibits the amyloid fibril formation which is further supported by atomic force microscopy. Hesperidin exhibits moderate ABTS(+) radical scavenging assay but strong hydroxyl radical scavenging ability, as evident from DNA nicking assay. Present study demonstrates the applicability of a novel multi-target screening procedure to mine multi-potent agents from natural origin for AD therapeutics.

  8. Antisense Mediated Splicing Modulation For Inherited Metabolic Diseases: Challenges for Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Pérez, Belen; Vilageliu, Lluisa; Grinberg, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    In the past few years, research in targeted mutation therapies has experienced significant advances, especially in the field of rare diseases. In particular, the efficacy of antisense therapy for suppression of normal, pathogenic, or cryptic splice sites has been demonstrated in cellular and animal models and has already reached the clinical trials phase for Duchenne muscular dystrophy. In different inherited metabolic diseases, splice switching oligonucleotides (SSOs) have been used with success in patients' cells to force pseudoexon skipping or to block cryptic splice sites, in both cases recovering normal transcript and protein and correcting the enzyme deficiency. However, future in vivo studies require individual approaches for delivery depending on the gene defect involved, given the different patterns of tissue and organ expression. Herein we review the state of the art of antisense therapy targeting RNA splicing in metabolic diseases, grouped according to their expression patterns—multisystemic, hepatic, or in central nervous system (CNS)—and summarize the recent progress achieved in the field of in vivo delivery of oligonucleotides to each organ or system. Successful body-wide distribution of SSOs and preferential distribution in the liver after systemic administration have been reported in murine models for different diseases, while for CNS limited data are available, although promising results with intratechal injections have been achieved. PMID:24506780

  9. In vitro characterization of two novel biodegradable vectors for the delivery of radiolabeled antisense oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    von Guggenberg, Elisabeth; Shahhosseini, Soraya; Koslowsky, Ingrid; Lavasanifar, Afsaneh; Murray, David; Mercer, John

    2010-12-01

    The development of antisense oligonucleotides suitable for tumor targeting applications is hindered by low stability and bioavailability of oligonucleotides in vivo and by the absence of efficient and safe vectors for oligonucleotide delivery. Stabilization in vivo has been achieved through chemical modification of oligonucleotides by various means, but effective approaches to enhance their intracellular delivery are lacking. This study reports on the characterization in vitro of a fully phosphorothioated 20-mer oligonucleotide, complementary to p21 mRNA, radiolabeled with fluorine-18 using a thiol reactive prosthetic group. The potential of two novel synthetic block copolymers containing grafted polyamines on their hydrophobic blocks for vector-assisted cell delivery was studied in vitro. Extensive cellular uptake studies were performed in human colon carcinoma cell lines with enhanced or deficient p21 expression to evaluate and compare the uptake mechanism of naked and vectorized radiolabeled formulations. Uptake studies with the two novel biodegradable vectors showed a moderate increase in cell uptake of the radiofluorinated antisense oligonucleotide. The two vectors show, however, promising advantages over conventional lipidic vectors regarding their biocompatibility and subcellular distribution.

  10. Computational discovery of sense-antisense transcription in the human and mouse genomes

    PubMed Central

    Shendure, Jay; Church, George M

    2002-01-01

    Background Overlapping but oppositely oriented transcripts have the potential to form sense-antisense perfect double-stranded (ds) RNA duplexes. Over recent years, the number and variety of examples of mammalian gene-regulatory phenomena in which endogenous dsRNA duplexes have been proposed or demonstrated to participate has greatly increased. These include genomic imprinting, RNA interference, translational regulation, alternative splicing, X-inactivation and RNA editing. We computationally mined public mouse and human expressed sequence tag (EST) databases to search for additional examples of bidirectionally transcribed genomic regions. Results Our bioinformatics approach identified over 217 candidate overlapping transcriptional units, almost all of which are novel. From experimental validation of a subset of our predictions by orientation-specific RT-PCR, we estimate that our methodology has a specificity of 84% or greater. In many cases, regions of sense-antisense overlap within the 5'- or 3'-untranslated regions of a given transcript correlate with genomic patterns of mouse-human conservation. Conclusions Our results, in conjunction with the literature, bring the total number of predicted and validated examples of overlapping but oppositely oriented transcripts to over 300. Several of these cases support the hypothesis that a subset of the instances of substantial mouse-human conservation in the 5' and 3' UTRs of transcripts might be explained in part by functionality of an overlapping transcriptional unit. PMID:12225583

  11. Treatment of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis with antisense oligonucleotides against the low affinity neurotrophin receptor.

    PubMed

    Soilu-Hänninen, M; Epa, R; Shipham, K; Butzkueven, H; Bucci, T; Barrett, G; Bartlett, P F; Kilpatrick, T J

    2000-03-15

    Upregulated expression of the low-affinity neurotrophin receptor (p75) in the central nervous system (CNS) during experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) has recently been demonstrated. To investigate whether p75 plays a role in disease pathogenesis, we adopted a gene therapy approach, utilizing antisense oligonucleotides to downregulate p75 expression during EAE. Phosphorothioate antisense oligonucleotides (AS), nonsense oligonucleotides (NS) or phosphate buffered saline (PBS) were injected daily for 18 days after immunization of SJL/J (H-2s)-mice with myelin proteolipid protein (PLP) peptide 139-151. In the AS group, there was a statistically significant reduction in both the mean maximal disease score (1.85 in the AS, 2.94 in the NS and 2.75 in the PBS-groups, respectively, P < 0.025) and in the cumulative disease incidence ( approximately 60% in the AS group and approximately 90% in the control groups). Histological and immunohistochemical analysis showed reduced inflammation and demyelination, as well as reduced p75 expression at the blood-brain barrier (BBB) in the AS-treated mice in comparison with both control groups. There was no difference, however, in p75 expression on neural cells within the CNS between the three groups of mice. We conclude that p75 could play a proactive role in the pathogenesis of EAE and may exert its effect at the level of the BBB.

  12. 1,3,4-Thiadiazoles: a potent multi targeted pharmacological scaffold.

    PubMed

    Haider, Saqlain; Alam, Mohammad Sarwar; Hamid, Hinna

    2015-03-06

    Despite a significant work on thiadiazoles, continuous efforts are still being made to identify novel heterocyclic compounds with potent biological activities. This review may help the medicinal chemists to develop new leads possessing 1,3,4-thiadiazole nucleus with higher efficacy and reduced side effects. This review throws light on the detailed synthetic approaches which have been used for the synthesis of thiadiazoles. This has been followed by the in depth analysis of the thiadiazoles with respect to their medicinal significance.

  13. Targeting antisense mitochondrial ncRNAs inhibits murine melanoma tumor growth and metastasis through reduction in survival and invasion factors

    PubMed Central

    Lobos-González, Lorena; Silva, Verónica; Araya, Mariela; Restovic, Franko; Echenique, Javiera; Oliveira-Cruz, Luciana; Fitzpatrick, Christopher; Briones, Macarena; Villegas, Jaime; Villota, Claudio; Vidaurre, Soledad; Borgna, Vincenzo; Socias, Miguel; Valenzuela, Sebastián; Lopez, Constanza; Socias, Teresa; Varas, Manuel; Díaz, Jorge; Burzio, Luis O.; Burzio, Verónica A.

    2016-01-01

    We reported that knockdown of the antisense noncoding mitochondrial RNAs (ASncmtRNAs) induces apoptotic death of several human tumor cell lines, but not normal cells, suggesting this approach for selective therapy against different types of cancer. In order to translate these results to a preclinical scenario, we characterized the murine noncoding mitochondrial RNAs (ncmtRNAs) and performed in vivo knockdown in syngeneic murine melanoma models. Mouse ncmtRNAs display structures similar to the human counterparts, including long double-stranded regions arising from the presence of inverted repeats. Knockdown of ASncmtRNAs with specific antisense oligonucleotides (ASO) reduces murine melanoma B16F10 cell proliferation and induces apoptosis in vitro through downregulation of pro-survival and metastasis markers, particularly survivin. For in vivo studies, subcutaneous B16F10 melanoma tumors in C57BL/6 mice were treated systemically with specific and control antisense oligonucleotides (ASO). For metastasis studies, tumors were resected, followed by systemic administration of ASOs and the presence of metastatic nodules in lungs and liver was assessed. Treatment with specific ASO inhibited tumor growth and metastasis after primary tumor resection. In a metastasis-only assay, mice inoculated intravenously with cells and treated with the same ASO displayed reduced number and size of melanoma nodules in the lungs, compared to controls. Our results suggest that ASncmtRNAs could be potent targets for melanoma therapy. To our knowledge, the ASncmtRNAs are the first potential non-nuclear targets for melanoma therapy. PMID:27507060

  14. Targeting antisense mitochondrial ncRNAs inhibits murine melanoma tumor growth and metastasis through reduction in survival and invasion factors.

    PubMed

    Lobos-González, Lorena; Silva, Verónica; Araya, Mariela; Restovic, Franko; Echenique, Javiera; Oliveira-Cruz, Luciana; Fitzpatrick, Christopher; Briones, Macarena; Villegas, Jaime; Villota, Claudio; Vidaurre, Soledad; Borgna, Vincenzo; Socias, Miguel; Valenzuela, Sebastián; Lopez, Constanza; Socias, Teresa; Varas, Manuel; Díaz, Jorge; Burzio, Luis O; Burzio, Verónica A

    2016-09-06

    We reported that knockdown of the antisense noncoding mitochondrial RNAs (ASncmtRNAs) induces apoptotic death of several human tumor cell lines, but not normal cells, suggesting this approach for selective therapy against different types of cancer. In order to translate these results to a preclinical scenario, we characterized the murine noncoding mitochondrial RNAs (ncmtRNAs) and performed in vivo knockdown in syngeneic murine melanoma models. Mouse ncmtRNAs display structures similar to the human counterparts, including long double-stranded regions arising from the presence of inverted repeats. Knockdown of ASncmtRNAs with specific antisense oligonucleotides (ASO) reduces murine melanoma B16F10 cell proliferation and induces apoptosis in vitro through downregulation of pro-survival and metastasis markers, particularly survivin. For in vivo studies, subcutaneous B16F10 melanoma tumors in C57BL/6 mice were treated systemically with specific and control antisense oligonucleotides (ASO). For metastasis studies, tumors were resected, followed by systemic administration of ASOs and the presence of metastatic nodules in lungs and liver was assessed. Treatment with specific ASO inhibited tumor growth and metastasis after primary tumor resection. In a metastasis-only assay, mice inoculated intravenously with cells and treated with the same ASO displayed reduced number and size of melanoma nodules in the lungs, compared to controls. Our results suggest that ASncmtRNAs could be potent targets for melanoma therapy. To our knowledge, the ASncmtRNAs are the first potential non-nuclear targets for melanoma therapy.

  15. Bacterial antisense RNAs are mainly the product of transcriptional noise

    PubMed Central

    Lloréns-Rico, Verónica; Cano, Jaime; Kamminga, Tjerko; Gil, Rosario; Latorre, Amparo; Chen, Wei-Hua; Bork, Peer; Glass, John I.; Serrano, Luis; Lluch-Senar, Maria

    2016-01-01

    cis-Encoded antisense RNAs (asRNAs) are widespread along bacterial transcriptomes. However, the role of most of these RNAs remains unknown, and there is an ongoing discussion as to what extent these transcripts are the result of transcriptional noise. We show, by comparative transcriptomics of 20 bacterial species and one chloroplast, that the number of asRNAs is exponentially dependent on the genomic AT content and that expression of asRNA at low levels exerts little impact in terms of energy consumption. A transcription model simulating mRNA and asRNA production indicates that the asRNA regulatory effect is only observed above certain expression thresholds, substantially higher than physiological transcript levels. These predictions were verified experimentally by overexpressing nine different asRNAs in Mycoplasma pneumoniae. Our results suggest that most of the antisense transcripts found in bacteria are the consequence of transcriptional noise, arising at spurious promoters throughout the genome. PMID:26973873

  16. Antisense Oligonucleotides: Rising Stars in Eliminating RNA Toxicity in Myotonic Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Zhihua

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Myotonic dystrophy (DM) is a dominantly inherited, multisystemic disease caused by expanded CTG (type 1, DM1) or CCTG (type 2, DM2) repeats in untranslated regions of the mutated genes. Pathogenesis results from expression of RNAs from the mutated alleles that are toxic because of the expanded CUG or CCUG repeats. Increased understanding of the repeat-containing RNA (C/CUGexp RNA)-induced toxicity has led to the development of multiple strategies targeting the toxic RNA. Among these approaches, antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) have demonstrated high potency in reversing the RNA toxicity in both cultured DM1 cells and DM1 animal models, thus offering great promise for the potential treatment of DM1. ASO targeting approaches will also provide avenues for the treatment of other repeat RNA-mediated diseases. PMID:23252746

  17. Intravesical NGF Antisense Therapy using Lipid Nanoparticle for Interstitial Cystitis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    disease of the urinary bladder . The goal of this project is to advance key preclinical experiments towards the development of a new drug. Specific...factor (NGF) bladder drug delivery system targeting Interstitial Cystitis/Painful Bladder Syndrome (IC/PBS), IC/PBS is a chronic, severely debilitating...interstitial cystitis, painful bladder syndrome, liposome, nerve growth factor, afferent hyper-excitability, antisense 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF

  18. Intravesical NGF Antisense Therapy Using Lipid Nanoparticle for Interstitial Cystitis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-12-01

    INVESTIGATOR: Michael Chancellor CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: Lipella Pharmaceuticals , Inc. Pittsburgh, PA 15208 REPORT DATE: December 2016 TYPE OF REPORT...Contact E-Mail: David.chancellor@lipella.com 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) Lipella Pharmaceuticals , Inc...local NGF antisense therapies for the IC/BPS indication. Lipella Pharmaceuticals Inc collaborated with investigators located at the University Of

  19. ISIS 301012 gene therapy for hypercholesterolemia: sense, antisense, or nonsense?

    PubMed

    Ito, Matthew K

    2007-10-01

    To present an overview of antisense technology and to review and assess available literature on the chemistry, pharmacology, pharmacokinetics, drug interactions, preclinical and clinical studies, dosing, and adverse events of ISIS 301012 in the treatment of hyperlipidemia. PubMed database searches were conducted from 1966 to May 2007 using the search terms ISIS 301012, antisense, oligonucleotide, hypercholesterolemia, hyperlipidemia, and apolipoprotein B. Bibliographies of relevant review articles and information from the manufacturer were reviewed for additional references. Available English-language literature, including abstracts, preclinical, and clinical trials, review articles, and scientific presentations were examined. Apolipoprotein B is an important structural protein on the surface of atherogenic lipoproteins such as remnant very-low-density lipoprotein and low-density lipoprotein and facilitates the clearance of these particles from the circulation by binding to the low-density lipoprotein receptor. Overproduction of apolipoprotein B or reduced receptor-mediated clearance of lipoproteins leads to elevated serum cholesterol levels and premature atherosclerosis. ISIS 301012 is an antisense oligonucleotide that inhibits apolipoprotein B production by binding directly to and reducing the expression of apolipoprotein B messenger RNA. In a clinical trial, ISIS 301012 50-400 mg administered weekly via subcutaneous injection for 4 weeks reduced apolipoprotein B by 14.3-47.4% and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol by 5.9-40% at 55 days. The most frequent adverse event was injection-site erythema that resolved spontaneously. Studies are ongoing to further define the safety, efficacy, and pharmacokinetics of ISIS 301012 as add-on therapy in patients with heterozygous and homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia. No pharmacokinetic interactions have been demonstrated with ezetimibe and simvastatin. ISIS 301012 is the first agent to enter clinical trials utilizing

  20. Diagnostic potential of multi-targeted LAMP (loop-mediated isothermal amplification) for osteoarticular tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Kusum; Sharma, Megha; Batra, Nitya; Sharma, Aman; Dhillon, Mandeep Singh

    2017-02-01

    Delay in diagnosing osteoarticular tuberculosis (OATB) contributes significantly to morbidity by causing disfiguration and neurological sequelae. The delay caused by conventional culture and the expertise and expense involved in other nucleic acid based tests, make LAMP (loop-mediated isothermal amplification) assay a favorable middle path. We evaluated LAMP assay using IS6110 and MPB64 for rapid diagnosis of OATB by comparing with IS6110 PCR and culture. LAMP assay was performed on 140 synovial fluid and pus samples (10 culture-positive proven cases, 80 culture-negative probable cases, and 50 negative controls) using three set of primer pairs each for IS6110 and MPB64. LAMP assay, using two-target approach, had an overall sensitivity and specificity of 90% and 100% in detecting OATB. Sensitivity of IS6110 PCR, IS6110 LAMP, and MPB64 LAMP was 80%, 100%, and 100%, respectively, for confirmed cases and 72.5%, 81.75%, and 86.25%, respectively, for probable cases. Six additional cases were picked using two-target approach. LAMP assay utilizing IS6110 and MPB64 is a cost-effective technique for an early and reliable diagnosis of OATB. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 35:361-365, 2017.

  1. A novel multi-target RNAi adenovirus inhibits hepatoma cell proliferation, migration, and induction of angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Tingting; Cheng, Ya; Ren, Weihua; Jia, Weidong; Ma, Jinliang; Xu, Geliang

    2016-01-01

    The pathogenesis of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a multi-step process involving many genes. Consequently, single gene targeting therapy has limited efficacy, making combination therapy targeting multiple genes a necessity. Based on our previous findings, we constructed a single vector mediating simultaneous expression of multiple short hairpin RNAs (shRNAs) against human vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2), chemokine C-C motif receptor 1 (CCR1), and epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM), three genes closely related to HCC progression that act through separate pathways. The shRNA vector efficiently downregulated the mRNA and protein of all three molecules in Huh7 hepatoma cells. The vector also inhibited cell proliferation and migration and reduced angiogenesis. Furthermore, this shRNA vector can be recombined into adenovirus, a gene therapy vector, for better in vivo application. It thus offers a potentially effective future gene therapy approach to treating human liver cancer. PMID:27221035

  2. Behavior-based cooperative robotics applied to multi-target observation

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, L.E.

    1996-12-31

    An important issue that arises in the automation of many security, surveillance, and reconnaissance tasks is that of monitoring (or observing) the movements of targets navigating in a bounded area of interest. A key research issue in these problems is that of sensor placement - determining where sensors should be located to maintain the targets in view. In complex applications involving limited-range sensors, the use of multiple sensors dynamically moving over time is required. In this paper, the author investigates the use of a cooperative team of autonomous sensor-based robots for the observation of multiple moving targets. The author focuses primarily on developing the distributed control strategies that allow the robot team to attempt to minimize the total time in which targets escape observation by some robot team member in the area of interest. The initial efforts on this problem address the aspects of distributed control in homogeneous robot teams with equivalent sensing and movement capabilities working in an uncluttered, bounded area. This paper first formalizes the problem, discusses related work, and then shows that this problem is NP-hard. The author then presents a distributed approximate approach to solving this problem that combines low-level multi-robot control with higher-level control. The low-level control is described in terms of force fields emanating from the targets and the robots. The higher level control is presented in the ALLIANCE formalism, which provides mechanisms for fault tolerant cooperative control, and allows robot team members to adjust their low-level actions based upon the actions of their teammates. The author then presents the results of the ongoing implementation of this approach, both in simulation and on physical robots. To the authors knowledge, this is the first paper addressing this research problem that has been implemented on physical robot teams.

  3. Regulation of naturally occurring antisense RNA of myosin heavy chain (MyHC) in neonatal cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Luther, H P; Bartsch, H; Morano, I; Podlowski, S; Baumann, G

    2005-03-01

    Naturally occurring antisense RNA has been detected for a range of eukaryotic genes. Its abundance compared to levels of its complementary sense mRNA appears to be a factor indicating its possible regulatory function. In previous studies, we detected appreciable levels of antisense RNA against the two isoforms (alpha and beta) of the heavy myosin-chain (MyHC) in the myocardium of rats. If this is to play a significant role in gene expression antisense levels should vary in response to external and internal cellular influences. Recently, a bidirectional promoter located in the alpha/beta MyHC intergenic region was described, which was proposed to regulate coordinated transcription of alpha-MyHC sense and beta-MyHC antisense. To study MyHC antisense regulation in neonatal heart, we investigated cultivated myocytes stimulated with either trijodthyronin (T3) as an inductor of alpha-MyHC or phenylephrine with stimulation of beta-MyHC. RNA-quantification of sense and antisense transcripts of both isoforms was performed by real-time RT-PCR. Stimulation by T3 led to an induction of both sense and antisense of alpha-MyHC and to a decrease of beta-MyHC sense and antisense. Phenylephrine increased sense and antisense beta-MyHC but reduced antisense alpha-MyHC. The sense/antisense of alpha- and beta-MyHC ratio was unchanged compared to control. Results indicate a coregulation of sense and antisense MyHC RNA under stimulation of T3 and phenylephrine in neonatal cardiomyocytes.

  4. Synthesis and properties of double-stranded antisense oligonucleotides connected with a pentaerythritol linker.

    PubMed

    Shibata, Aya; Ueno, Yoshihito; Matsuda, Akira; Kitade, Yukio

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes the synthesis and properties of double-stranded antisense oligonucleotides connected with a pentaerythritol linker. We found that double-stranded antisense oligonucleotides with aminomethyl residues have high affinity for single-stranded DNA or RNA in buffer solutions both with and without MgCl(2). Thus, these oligonucleotides would be useful as antisense oligonucleotides for targeting single-stranded RNA through triplex formation.

  5. Multi-target detection and estimation with the use of massive independent, identical sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Tiancheng; Corchado, Juan M.; Bajo, Javier; Chen, Genshe

    2015-05-01

    This paper investigates the problem of using a large number of independent, identical sensors jointly for multi-object detection and estimation (MODE), namely massive sensor MODE. This is significantly different to the general target tracking using few sensors. The massive sensor data allows very accurate estimation in theory (but may instead go conversely in fact) but will also cause a heavy computational burden for the traditional filter-based tracker. Instead, we propose a clustering method to fuse massive sensor data in the same state space, which is shown to be able to filter clutter and to estimate states of the targets without the use of any traditional filter. This non-Bayesian solution as referred to massive sensor observation-only (O2) inference needs neither to assume the target/clutter model nor to know the system noises. Therefore it can handle challenging scenarios with few prior information and do so very fast computationally. Simulations with the use of massive homogeneous (independent identical distributed) sensors have demonstrated the validity and superiority of the proposed approach.

  6. Berberine ameliorates nonbacterial prostatitis via multi-target metabolic network regulation.

    PubMed

    Sun, Hui; Wang, Huiyu; Zhang, Aihua; Yan, Guangli; Zhang, Yue; An, Na; Wang, Xijun

    2015-03-01

    Metabolomics has been increasingly applied to discovering biomarkers and identifying perturbed pathways. Berberine has been shown to exhibit anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, and anticancer properties, but its mechanisms for treating nonbacterial prostatitis (NBP) remain unclear completely. We developed the untargeted metabolomics approach based on UPLC-Q-TOF-HDMS to profile the metabolite changes in urine samples in order to discover novel potential biomarkers to clarify mechanisms of berberine in treating a rat model of capsaicin-induced nonbacterial prostatitis (NBP). The changes in metabolic profiling were restored to their base-line values after berberine treatment according to the principal component analysis (PCA) score plots. Fourteen different potential biomarkers and five acutely perturbed metabolic pathways contributing to the treatment of NBP were discovered and identified. Specifically, the berberine-treated rats are located closer to the normal group, indicating that the NBP-induced disturbances to the metabolic profile were partially reversed by berberine treatment. After treatment with berberine, the relative contents of 12 potential biomarkers were effectively regulated, which suggested that the therapeutic effects of berberine on NBP may involve regulating disturbances to the metabolism. Our results show that the protective effect of berberine occurs in part through a reversal of the NBP-caused disturbances.

  7. Structural evidence of quercetin multi-target bioactivity: A reverse virtual screening strategy.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Diego; Paulino, Margot; Polticelli, Fabio; Arredondo, Florencia; Williams, Robert J; Abin-Carriquiry, Juan A

    2017-08-30

    The ubiquitous flavonoid quercetin is broadly recognized for showing diverse biological and health-promoting effects, such as anti-cancer, anti-inflammatory and cytoprotective activities. The therapeutic potential of quercetin and similar compounds for preventing such diverse oxidative stress-related pathologies has been generally attributed to their direct antioxidant properties. Nevertheless, accumulated evidence indicates that quercetin is also able to interact with multiple cellular targets influencing the activity of diverse signaling pathways. Even though there are a number of well-established protein targets such as phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase and xanthine oxidase, there remains a lack of a comprehensive knowledge of the potential mechanisms of action of quercetin and its target space. In the present work we adopted a reverse screening strategy based on ligand similarity (SHAFTS) and target structure (idTarget, LIBRA) resulting in a set of predicted protein target candidates. Furthermore, using this method we corroborated a broad array of previously experimentally tested candidates among the predicted targets, supporting the suitability of this screening approach. Notably, all of the predicted target candidates belonged to two main protein families, protein kinases and poly [ADP-ribose] polymerases. They also included key proteins involved at different points within the same signaling pathways or within interconnected signaling pathways, supporting a pleiotropic, multilevel and potentially synergistic mechanism of action of quercetin. In this context we highlight the value of quercetin's broad target profile for its therapeutic potential in diseases like inflammation, neurodegeneration and cancer. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Multi-Targeted Mechanisms Underlying the Endothelial Protective Effects of the Diabetic-Safe Sweetener Erythritol

    PubMed Central

    de Cock, Peter; Dong, Hua; Hammock, Bruce D.; den Hartog, Gertjan J. M.; Bast, Aalt

    2013-01-01

    Diabetes is characterized by hyperglycemia and development of vascular pathology. Endothelial cell dysfunction is a starting point for pathogenesis of vascular complications in diabetes. We previously showed the polyol erythritol to be a hydroxyl radical scavenger preventing endothelial cell dysfunction onset in diabetic rats. To unravel mechanisms, other than scavenging of radicals, by which erythritol mediates this protective effect, we evaluated effects of erythritol in endothelial cells exposed to normal (7 mM) and high glucose (30 mM) or diabetic stressors (e.g. SIN-1) using targeted and transcriptomic approaches. This study demonstrates that erythritol (i.e. under non-diabetic conditions) has minimal effects on endothelial cells. However, under hyperglycemic conditions erythritol protected endothelial cells against cell death induced by diabetic stressors (i.e. high glucose and peroxynitrite). Also a number of harmful effects caused by high glucose, e.g. increased nitric oxide release, are reversed. Additionally, total transcriptome analysis indicated that biological processes which are differentially regulated due to high glucose are corrected by erythritol. We conclude that erythritol protects endothelial cells during high glucose conditions via effects on multiple targets. Overall, these data indicate a therapeutically important endothelial protective effect of erythritol under hyperglycemic conditions. PMID:23755276

  9. Multi-targeted mechanisms underlying the endothelial protective effects of the diabetic-safe sweetener erythritol.

    PubMed

    Boesten, Daniëlle M P H J; Berger, Alvin; de Cock, Peter; Dong, Hua; Hammock, Bruce D; den Hartog, Gertjan J M; Bast, Aalt

    2013-01-01

    Diabetes is characterized by hyperglycemia and development of vascular pathology. Endothelial cell dysfunction is a starting point for pathogenesis of vascular complications in diabetes. We previously showed the polyol erythritol to be a hydroxyl radical scavenger preventing endothelial cell dysfunction onset in diabetic rats. To unravel mechanisms, other than scavenging of radicals, by which erythritol mediates this protective effect, we evaluated effects of erythritol in endothelial cells exposed to normal (7 mM) and high glucose (30 mM) or diabetic stressors (e.g. SIN-1) using targeted and transcriptomic approaches. This study demonstrates that erythritol (i.e. under non-diabetic conditions) has minimal effects on endothelial cells. However, under hyperglycemic conditions erythritol protected endothelial cells against cell death induced by diabetic stressors (i.e. high glucose and peroxynitrite). Also a number of harmful effects caused by high glucose, e.g. increased nitric oxide release, are reversed. Additionally, total transcriptome analysis indicated that biological processes which are differentially regulated due to high glucose are corrected by erythritol. We conclude that erythritol protects endothelial cells during high glucose conditions via effects on multiple targets. Overall, these data indicate a therapeutically important endothelial protective effect of erythritol under hyperglycemic conditions.

  10. Molecular mechanisms of the neuroprotective/neurorescue action of multi-target green tea polyphenols.

    PubMed

    Mandel, Silvia A; Weinreb, Orly; Amit, Tamar; Youdim, Moussa B H

    2012-01-01

    Mounting evidence suggests that lifestyle factors, especially nutrition are essential factor for healthy ageing. However, as a result of the increase in life expectance, neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer's and Parkinson's (AD and PD, respectively) are becoming an increasing burden, as aging is their main risk factor. Brain aging and neurodegenerative diseases of the elderly are characterized by oxidative damage, dysregulation of redox metals homeostasis and inflammation. Thus, it is not surprising that a large amount of drugs/agents in therapeutic use for these conditions are antioxidants/metal complexing, bioenergetic and anti-inflammatory agents. Natural plant polyphenols (flavonoids and non-flavonoids) are the most abundant antioxidants in the diet and as such, are ideal nutraceuticals for neutralizing stress-induced free radicals and inflammation. Human epidemiological and new animal data suggest that green and black flavonoids named catechins, may help protecting the aging brain and reduce the incidence of dementia, AD and PD. This review will present salient features of the beneficial multi-pharmacological actions of black and green tea polyphenols in aging and neurodegeneration, and speculate on their potential in drug combination to target distinct pathologies as a therapeutic disease modification approach.

  11. Phytochemicals as multi-target inhibitors of the inflammatory pathway- A modeling and experimental study.

    PubMed

    Devi, Nisha S; Ramanan, Meera; Paragi-Vedanthi, Padmapriya; Doble, Mukesh

    2017-03-11

    The arachidonic acid pathway consists of several enzymes and targeting them is favored for developing anti-inflammatory drugs. However, till date the current drugs are generally active against a single target, leading to undesirable side-effects. Phytochemicals are known to inhibit multiple targets simultaneously and hence, an attempt is made here to investigate their suitability. A pharmacophore based study is performed with three sets of reported phytochemicals namely, dual 5-LOX/mPGES1, alkaloids and FLAP inhibitors. The analysis indicated that phenylpropanoids (including ferulic acid) and benzoic acids derivatives, and berberine mapped onto these pharmacophores with three hydrophobic centroids and an acceptor feature. 2,4,5-trimethoxy (7) and 3,4-dimethoxy cinnamic acids (8) mapped onto all the three pharmacophores. Experimental studies indicated that berberine inhibited 5-LOX (100 μM) and PGE2 (50 μM) production by 72.2 and 72.0% and ferulic acid by 74.3 and 54.4% respectively. This approach offers a promising theoretical combined with experimental strategy for designing novel molecules against inflammatory enzymes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Berberine Ameliorates Nonbacterial Prostatitis via Multi-Target Metabolic Network Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Hui; Wang, Huiyu; Zhang, Aihua; Yan, Guangli; Zhang, Yue; An, Na

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Metabolomics has been increasingly applied to discovering biomarkers and identifying perturbed pathways. Berberine has been shown to exhibit anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, and anticancer properties, but its mechanisms for treating nonbacterial prostatitis (NBP) remain unclear completely. We developed the untargeted metabolomics approach based on UPLC-Q-TOF-HDMS to profile the metabolite changes in urine samples in order to discover novel potential biomarkers to clarify mechanisms of berberine in treating a rat model of capsaicin-induced nonbacterial prostatitis (NBP). The changes in metabolic profiling were restored to their base-line values after berberine treatment according to the principal component analysis (PCA) score plots. Fourteen different potential biomarkers and five acutely perturbed metabolic pathways contributing to the treatment of NBP were discovered and identified. Specifically, the berberine-treated rats are located closer to the normal group, indicating that the NBP-induced disturbances to the metabolic profile were partially reversed by berberine treatment. After treatment with berberine, the relative contents of 12 potential biomarkers were effectively regulated, which suggested that the therapeutic effects of berberine on NBP may involve regulating disturbances to the metabolism. Our results show that the protective effect of berberine occurs in part through a reversal of the NBP-caused disturbances. PMID:25588034

  13. A modeling study for structure features of β-N-acetyl-D-hexosaminidase from Ostrinia furnacalis and its novel inhibitor allosamidin: species selectivity and multi-target characteristics.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yanli; Liu, Tian; Yang, Qing; Li, Zhong; Qian, Xuhong

    2012-04-01

    Insect β-N-acetyl-D-hexosaminidase, a chitin degrading enzyme, is physiologically important during the unique life cycle of the insect. OfHex1, a β-N-acetyl-D-hexosaminidase from the insect, Ostrinia furna, which was obtained by our laboratory (Gen Bank No.: ABI81756.1), was studied by molecular modeling as well as by molecular docking with its inhibitor, allosamidin. 3D model of OfHex1 was built through the ligand-supported homology modeling approach. The binding modes of its substrate and inhibitor were proposed through docking and cluster analysis. The pocket's size and shape of OfHex1 differ from that of human β-N-acetyl-D-hexosaminidase, which determined that allosamidin can selectively inhibit OfHex1 instead of human β-N-acetyl-D-hexosaminidase. Moreover, the multi-target characteristics of allosamidin that inhibit enzymes from different families, OfHex1 (EC 3.2.1.52; GH20) and chitinase (EC 3.2.1.14; GH18), were compared. The common -1/+1 sugar-binding site of chitinase and OfHex1, and the -2/-3 sugar-binding site in chitinase contribute to the binding of allosamidin. This work, at molecular level, proved that OfHex1 could be a potential species-specific target for novel green pesticide design and also provide the possibility to develop allosamidin or its derivatives as a new type of insecticide to 'hit two birds with one stone', which maybe become a novel strategy in pest control. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  14. In silico search for multi-target therapies for osteoarthritis based on 10 common Huoxue Huayu herbs and potential applications to other diseases.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Chun-Song; Zhuang, Zhi-Qiang; Xu, Xiao-Jie; Ye, Jin-Xia; Ye, Hong-Zhi; Li, Xi-Hai; Wu, Guang-Wen; Xu, Hui-Feng; Liu, Xian-Xiang

    2014-03-01

    Huoxue Huayu (HXHY) has been widely used in traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) as a key therapeutic principle for osteoarthritis (OA), and related herbs have been widely prescribed to treat OA in the clinic. The aims of the present study were to explore a multi-target therapy for OA using 10 common HXHY herbs and to investigate their potential applications for treatment of other diseases. A novel computational simulation approach that integrates chemical structure, ligand clusters, chemical space and drug‑likeness evaluations, as well as docking and network analysis, was used to investigate the properties and effects of the herbs. The compounds contained in the studied HXHY herbs were divided into 10 clusters. Comparison of the chemical properties of these compounds to those of other compounds described in the DrugBank database indicated that the properties of the former are more diverse than those of the latter and that most of the HXHY-derived compounds do not violate the 'Lipinski's rule of five'. Docking analysis allowed for the identification of 39 potential bioactive compounds from HXHY herbs and 11 potential targets for these compounds. The identified targets were closely associated with 49 diseases, including neoplasms, musculoskeletal, nervous system and cardiovascular diseases. Ligand‑target (L‑T) and ligand‑target‑disease (L‑T‑D) networks were constructed in order to further elucidate the pharmacological effects of the herbs. Our findings suggest that a number of compounds from HXHY herbs are promising candidates for mult‑target therapeutic application in OA and may exert diverse pharmacological effects, affecting additional diseases besides OA.

  15. Hybrid-based multi-target ligands for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Rampa, Angela; Belluti, Federica; Gobbi, Silvia; Bisi, Alessandra

    2011-11-01

    Progresses in medicinal chemistry over the last few years have focused on the design and synthesis of hybrid compounds, molecules encompassing in a single scaffold two pharmacophores from known entities endowed with well established biological activities. The interest in this topic is related to the increasing emphasis on the identification of the different factors involved in a number of disorders, such as the complex multifactorial Alzheimer's disease (AD), and hybrid- based strategy has become a focal point in this medicinal chemistry field since it could lead to derivatives with an improved biological profile. Using this strategy, acetylcholinesterase inhibitors (AChEIs) have been extensively coupled with properly selected bioactive molecules to obtain homo- and heterodimers endowed with increased potency together with supplementary actions. In the past decade the inhibition of the AChE induced aggregation of the -amyloid peptide into the senile plaques, which is a key event in the neurotoxic cascade of AD, has been considered a relevant approach leading to several dual binding site inhibitors, able to contact both the peripheral anionic site of AChE and the active site. In recent years, pioneering efforts have been performed to obtain novel AChEIs that, beyond the capability to inhibit AChE, were able to hit a number of specific AD targets. In particular, these compounds proved to possess antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, or neuroprotective activities, useful to block or revert the progression of the disease. This review summarizes the progresses that have been made in the design of hybrid molecules for the treatment of AD.

  16. Chemotography for multi-target SAR analysis in the context of biological pathways.

    PubMed

    Lounkine, Eugen; Kutchukian, Peter; Petrone, Paula; Davies, John W; Glick, Meir

    2012-09-15

    The increasing amount of chemogenomics data, that is, activity measurements of many compounds across a variety of biological targets, allows for better understanding of pharmacology in a broad biological context. Rather than assessing activity at individual biological targets, today understanding of compound interaction with complex biological systems and molecular pathways is often sought in phenotypic screens. This perspective poses novel challenges to structure-activity relationship (SAR) assessment. Today, the bottleneck of drug discovery lies in the understanding of SAR of rich datasets that go beyond single targets in the context of biological pathways, potential off-targets, and complex selectivity profiles. To aid in the understanding and interpretation of such complex SAR, we introduce Chemotography (chemotype chromatography), which encodes chemical space using a color spectrum by combining clustering and multidimensional scaling. Rich biological data in our approach were visualized using spatial dimensions traditionally reserved for chemical space. This allowed us to analyze SAR in the context of target hierarchies and phylogenetic trees, two-target activity scatter plots, and biological pathways. Chemotography, in combination with the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG), also allowed us to extract pathway-relevant SAR from the ChEMBL database. We identified chemotypes showing polypharmacology and selectivity-conferring scaffolds, even in cases where individual compounds have not been tested against all relevant targets. In addition, we analyzed SAR in ChEMBL across the entire Kinome, going beyond individual compounds. Our method combines the strengths of chemical space visualization for SAR analysis and graphical representation of complex biological data. Chemotography is a new paradigm for chemogenomic data visualization and its versatile applications presented here may allow for improved assessment of SAR in biological context, such as

  17. Arginine-rich cell-penetrating peptides facilitate delivery of antisense oligomers into murine leukocytes and alter pre-mRNA splicing.

    PubMed

    Marshall, N B; Oda, S K; London, C A; Moulton, H M; Iversen, P L; Kerkvliet, N I; Mourich, D V

    2007-08-31

    Phosphorodiamidate morpholino oligomers (PMO) are synthetic antisense molecules that interfere with translation, pre-mRNA splicing and RNA synthesis. Like other gene-silencing technologies, PMO are poorly taken up by primary leukocytes without the use of physical or chemical delivery techniques. We sought an alternative delivery mechanism of PMO into immune cells that eliminates the need for such manipulations. Here we demonstrate the first use of arginine-rich cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) to deliver PMO (P-PMO) directly into primary murine leukocytes for inhibition of gene expression and promotion of altered pre-mRNA splicing. We compared the P-PMO delivery efficacy of four arginine-rich CPPs including HIV Tat and penetratin, and one histidine rich CPP, and found that the (RXR)(4) peptide was the most efficacious for PMO delivery and targeted antisense effect. The delivery and antisense effects of P-PMO are time- and dose-dependent and influenced by the activation and maturation states of T cells and dendritic cells, respectively. Targeted expression of several genes using P-PMO is shown including surface signaling proteins (CD45 and OX-40), a cytokine (interleukin-2), and a nuclear transcription factor (Foxp3). Considering the abundance of naturally occurring alternatively spliced gene products involved in immune regulation, P-PMO offer an effective method for modulating gene activity for immunological research and applications beyond traditional antisense approaches.

  18. Thiolated carboxymethyl dextran as a nanocarrier for colon delivery of hSET1 antisense: In vitro stability and efficiency study.

    PubMed

    Kiani, Melika; Mirzazadeh Tekie, Farnaz Sadat; Dinarvand, Meshkat; Soleimani, Masoud; Dinarvand, Rassoul; Atyabi, Fatemeh

    2016-05-01

    Gene therapy is an optimistic approach in cancer treatment. However, for efficient delivery of gene materials, designing an appropriate vector is necessary. Polyelectrolyte complexes (PECs) of chitosan and dextran could be considered a proper nanoparticulate carrier for sensitive biomaterials. In this study, PECs of chitosan and thiolated dextran were used as either an injectable or oral gene delivery system. hSET1 antisense was loaded into the PECs to suppress proliferation of colon cancer cell line. The prepared nanoparticles have ~115nm diameter size and positive zeta potential with high mucoadhesion properties. They are able to protect antisense from degradation in serum and biorelevant fluids (FaSSIF and FaSSGF). Furthermore, prepared nanoparticles demonstrated superior cellular penetration and inhibitory effect on SW480 colon cancer cell proliferation. All nanoparticles significantly down regulated hSET1 in comparison with naked antisense. It can be concluded that thiolated PECs have potential use for injectable or oral delivery of nucleic acids such as antisense.

  19. Mechanisms of Antisense Transcription Initiation from the 3′ End of the GAL10 Coding Sequence In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Malik, Shivani; Durairaj, Geetha

    2013-01-01

    In spite of the important regulatory functions of antisense transcripts in gene expression, it remains unknown how antisense transcription is initiated. Recent studies implicated RNA polymerase II in initiation of antisense transcription. However, how RNA polymerase II is targeted to initiate antisense transcription has not been elucidated. Here, we have analyzed the association of RNA polymerase II with the antisense initiation site at the 3′ end of the GAL10 coding sequence in dextrose-containing growth medium that induces antisense transcription. We find that RNA polymerase II is targeted to the antisense initiation site at GAL10 by Reb1p activator as well as general transcription factors (e.g., TFIID, TFIIB, and Mediator) for antisense transcription initiation. Intriguingly, while GAL10 antisense transcription is dependent on TFIID, its sense transcription does not require TFIID. Further, the Gal4p activator that promotes GAL10 sense transcription is dispensable for antisense transcription. Moreover, the proteasome that facilitates GAL10 sense transcription does not control its antisense transcription. Taken together, our results reveal that GAL10 sense and antisense transcriptions are regulated differently and shed much light on the mechanisms of antisense transcription initiation. PMID:23836882

  20. Antisense suppression of type 1 diacylglycerol acyltransferase adversely affects plant development in Brassica napus.

    PubMed

    Lock, Yee-Ying; Snyder, Crystal L; Zhu, Weiming; Siloto, Rodrigo M P; Weselake, Randall J; Shah, Saleh

    2009-09-01

    Diacylglycerol acyltransferase (DGAT) catalyzes the acyl-coenzyme A (CoA) dependent acylation of sn-1,2-diacylglycerol to form triacylglycerol in the terminal step of seed oil formation. Previous work has suggested that the level of DGAT activity may have a substantial effect on the flow of carbon into triacylglycerol, implying that the enzyme may represent a promising target for seed oil modification through biotechnological approaches. In the current study, Brassica napus DH12075 was transformed with an antisense type 1 DGAT construct, resulting in a reduction in DGAT1 gene expression, total DGAT activity and seed oil content. In addition, reduced seed yield and germination rates were observed along with severe developmental abnormalities. These data suggest that in addition to its critical role in seed oil formation, DGAT1 enzyme may also be important for normal seed development in B. napus, although the underlying mechanism(s) remain to be determined. Copyright © Physiologia Plantarum 2009.

  1. Aptamer and Antisense-Mediated Two-Dimensional Isolation of Specific Cancer Cell Subpopulations.

    PubMed

    Labib, Mahmoud; Green, Brenda; Mohamadi, Reza M; Mepham, Adam; Ahmed, Sharif U; Mahmoudian, Laili; Chang, I-Hsin; Sargent, Edward H; Kelley, Shana O

    2016-03-02

    Cancer cells, and in particular those found circulating in blood, can have widely varying phenotypes and molecular profiles despite a common origin. New methods are needed that can deconvolute the heterogeneity of cancer cells and sort small numbers of cells to aid in the characterization of cancer cell subpopulations. Here, we describe a new molecular approach to capturing cancer cells that isolates subpopulations using two-dimensional sorting. Using aptamer-mediated capture and antisense-triggered release, the new strategy sorts cells according to levels of two different markers and thereby separates them into their corresponding subpopulations. Using a phenotypic assay, we demonstrate that the subpopulations isolated have markedly different properties. This system provides an important new tool for identifying circulating tumor cell subtypes.

  2. TargetNet: a web service for predicting potential drug-target interaction profiling via multi-target SAR models.

    PubMed

    Yao, Zhi-Jiang; Dong, Jie; Che, Yu-Jing; Zhu, Min-Feng; Wen, Ming; Wang, Ning-Ning; Wang, Shan; Lu, Ai-Ping; Cao, Dong-Sheng

    2016-05-01

    Drug-target interactions (DTIs) are central to current drug discovery processes and public health fields. Analyzing the DTI profiling of the drugs helps to infer drug indications, adverse drug reactions, drug-drug interactions, and drug mode of actions. Therefore, it is of high importance to reliably and fast predict DTI profiling of the drugs on a genome-scale level. Here, we develop the TargetNet server, which can make real-time DTI predictions based only on molecular structures, following the spirit of multi-target SAR methodology. Naïve Bayes models together with various molecular fingerprints were employed to construct prediction models. Ensemble learning from these fingerprints was also provided to improve the prediction ability. When the user submits a molecule, the server will predict the activity of the user's molecule across 623 human proteins by the established high quality SAR model, thus generating a DTI profiling that can be used as a feature vector of chemicals for wide applications. The 623 SAR models related to 623 human proteins were strictly evaluated and validated by several model validation strategies, resulting in the AUC scores of 75-100 %. We applied the generated DTI profiling to successfully predict potential targets, toxicity classification, drug-drug interactions, and drug mode of action, which sufficiently demonstrated the wide application value of the potential DTI profiling. The TargetNet webserver is designed based on the Django framework in Python, and is freely accessible at http://targetnet.scbdd.com .

  3. Multi-Target Joint Detection and Estimation Error Bound for the Sensor with Clutter and Missed Detection

    PubMed Central

    Lian, Feng; Zhang, Guang-Hua; Duan, Zhan-Sheng; Han, Chong-Zhao

    2016-01-01

    The error bound is a typical measure of the limiting performance of all filters for the given sensor measurement setting. This is of practical importance in guiding the design and management of sensors to improve target tracking performance. Within the random finite set (RFS) framework, an error bound for joint detection and estimation (JDE) of multiple targets using a single sensor with clutter and missed detection is developed by using multi-Bernoulli or Poisson approximation to multi-target Bayes recursion. Here, JDE refers to jointly estimating the number and states of targets from a sequence of sensor measurements. In order to obtain the results of this paper, all detectors and estimators are restricted to maximum a posteriori (MAP) detectors and unbiased estimators, and the second-order optimal sub-pattern assignment (OSPA) distance is used to measure the error metric between the true and estimated state sets. The simulation results show that clutter density and detection probability have significant impact on the error bound, and the effectiveness of the proposed bound is verified by indicating the performance limitations of the single-sensor probability hypothesis density (PHD) and cardinalized PHD (CPHD) filters for various clutter densities and detection probabilities. PMID:26828499

  4. Synthesis and evaluation of multi-target-directed ligands against Alzheimer's disease based on the fusion of donepezil and ebselen.

    PubMed

    Luo, Zonghua; Sheng, Jianfei; Sun, Yang; Lu, Chuanjun; Yan, Jun; Liu, Anqiu; Luo, Hai-Bin; Huang, Ling; Li, Xingshu

    2013-11-27

    A novel series of compounds obtained by fusing the cholinesterase inhibitor donepezil and the antioxidant ebselen were designed as multi-target-directed ligands against Alzheimer's disease. An in vitro assay showed that some of these molecules did not exhibit highly potent cholinesterase inhibitory activity but did have various other ebselen-related pharmacological effects. Among the molecules, compound 7d, one of the most potent acetylcholinesterase inhibitors (IC50 values of 0.042 μM for Electrophorus electricus acetylcholinesterase and 0.097 μM for human acetylcholinesterase), was found to be a strong butyrylcholinesterase inhibitor (IC50 = 1.586 μM), to possess rapid H2O2 and peroxynitrite scavenging activity and glutathione peroxidase-like activity (ν0 = 123.5 μM min(-1)), and to be a substrate of mammalian TrxR. A toxicity test in mice showed no acute toxicity at doses of up to 2000 mg/kg. According to an in vitro blood-brain barrier model, 7d is able to penetrate the central nervous system.

  5. Multi-target interphase fluorescence in situ hybridization assay increases sensitivity of sputum cytology as a predictor of lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Varella-Garcia, Marileila; Kittelson, John; Schulte, Aline P; Vu, Kieu O; Wolf, Holly J; Zeng, Chan; Hirsch, Fred R; Byers, Tim; Kennedy, Tim; Miller, York E; Keith, Robert L; Franklin, Wilbur A

    2004-01-01

    Survival rates for lung cancer are low because patients have disseminated disease at diagnosis; therefore tests for early diagnosis are highly desirable. This pilot study investigated occurrence of chromosomal aneusomy in sputum from a 33 case-control cohort matched on age, gender, and date of sample collection. Subjects had chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and > or = 30 pack-years of tobacco use, and aneusomy was tested using a multi-target DNA FISH assay (LAVysion, Abbott/Vysis). In specimens collected within 12 months of lung cancer diagnosis, abnormality was more frequent among the 18 cases (41%) than the 17 controls (6%; P = 0.04). Aneusomy had no significant association with cytologic atypia, which might indicate that molecular and morphological changes could be independent markers of tumorigenesis. Combining both tests, abnormality was found in 83% of the cases and 20% of the controls (P = 0.0004) suggesting that FISH may improve the sensitivity of cytologic atypia as a predictor of lung cancer.

  6. Multi-Target Joint Detection and Estimation Error Bound for the Sensor with Clutter and Missed Detection.

    PubMed

    Lian, Feng; Zhang, Guang-Hua; Duan, Zhan-Sheng; Han, Chong-Zhao

    2016-01-28

    The error bound is a typical measure of the limiting performance of all filters for the given sensor measurement setting. This is of practical importance in guiding the design and management of sensors to improve target tracking performance. Within the random finite set (RFS) framework, an error bound for joint detection and estimation (JDE) of multiple targets using a single sensor with clutter and missed detection is developed by using multi-Bernoulli or Poisson approximation to multi-target Bayes recursion. Here, JDE refers to jointly estimating the number and states of targets from a sequence of sensor measurements. In order to obtain the results of this paper, all detectors and estimators are restricted to maximum a posteriori (MAP) detectors and unbiased estimators, and the second-order optimal sub-pattern assignment (OSPA) distance is used to measure the error metric between the true and estimated state sets. The simulation results show that clutter density and detection probability have significant impact on the error bound, and the effectiveness of the proposed bound is verified by indicating the performance limitations of the single-sensor probability hypothesis density (PHD) and cardinalized PHD (CPHD) filters for various clutter densities and detection probabilities.

  7. Sample Preparation Strategies for the Effective Quantitation of Hydrophilic Metabolites in Serum by Multi-Targeted HILIC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Tsakelidou, Elisavet; Virgiliou, Christina; Valianou, Lemonia; Gika, Helen G; Raikos, Nikolaos; Theodoridis, Georgios

    2017-03-30

    The effect of endogenous interferences of serum in multi-targeted metabolite profiling HILIC-MS/MS analysis was investigated by studying different sample preparation procedures. A modified QuEChERS dispersive SPE protocol, a HybridSPE protocol, and a combination of liquid extraction with protein precipitation were compared to a simple protein precipitation. Evaluation of extraction efficiency and sample clean-up was performed for all methods. SPE sorbent materials tested were found to retain hydrophilic analytes together with endogenous interferences, thus additional elution steps were needed. Liquid extraction was not shown to minimise matrix effects. In general, it was observed that a balance should be reached in terms of recovery, efficient clean-up, and sample treatment time when a wide range of metabolites are analysed. A quick step for removing phospholipids prior to the determination of hydrophilic endogenous metabolites is required, however, based on the results from the applied methods, further studies are needed to achieve high recoveries for all metabolites.

  8. TargetNet: a web service for predicting potential drug-target interaction profiling via multi-target SAR models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Zhi-Jiang; Dong, Jie; Che, Yu-Jing; Zhu, Min-Feng; Wen, Ming; Wang, Ning-Ning; Wang, Shan; Lu, Ai-Ping; Cao, Dong-Sheng

    2016-05-01

    Drug-target interactions (DTIs) are central to current drug discovery processes and public health fields. Analyzing the DTI profiling of the drugs helps to infer drug indications, adverse drug reactions, drug-drug interactions, and drug mode of actions. Therefore, it is of high importance to reliably and fast predict DTI profiling of the drugs on a genome-scale level. Here, we develop the TargetNet server, which can make real-time DTI predictions based only on molecular structures, following the spirit of multi-target SAR methodology. Naïve Bayes models together with various molecular fingerprints were employed to construct prediction models. Ensemble learning from these fingerprints was also provided to improve the prediction ability. When the user submits a molecule, the server will predict the activity of the user's molecule across 623 human proteins by the established high quality SAR model, thus generating a DTI profiling that can be used as a feature vector of chemicals for wide applications. The 623 SAR models related to 623 human proteins were strictly evaluated and validated by several model validation strategies, resulting in the AUC scores of 75-100 %. We applied the generated DTI profiling to successfully predict potential targets, toxicity classification, drug-drug interactions, and drug mode of action, which sufficiently demonstrated the wide application value of the potential DTI profiling. The TargetNet webserver is designed based on the Django framework in Python, and is freely accessible at http://targetnet.scbdd.com.

  9. Multi-target QPDR classification model for human breast and colon cancer-related proteins using star graph topological indices.

    PubMed

    Munteanu, Cristian Robert; Magalhães, Alexandre L; Uriarte, Eugenio; González-Díaz, Humberto

    2009-03-21

    The cancer diagnostic is a complex process and, sometimes, the specific markers can interfere or produce negative results. Thus, new simple and fast theoretical models are required. One option is the complex network graphs theory that permits us to describe any real system, from the small molecules to the complex genetic, neural or social networks by transforming real properties in topological indices. This work converts the protein primary structure data in specific Randic's star networks topological indices using the new sequence to star networks (S2SNet) application. A set of 1054 proteins were selected from previous works and contains proteins related or not with two types of cancer, human breast cancer (HBC) and human colon cancer (HCC). The general discriminant analysis method generates an input-coded multi-target classification model with the training/predicting set accuracies of 90.0% for the forward stepwise model type. In addition, a protein subset was modified by single amino acid mutations with higher log-odds PAM250 values and tested with the new classification if can be related with HBC or HCC. In conclusion, we shown that, using simple input data such is the primary protein sequence and the simples linear analysis, it is possible to obtain accurate classification models that can predict if a new protein related with two types of cancer. These results promote the use of the S2SNet in clinical proteomics.

  10. Comprehensive insight into the binding of sunitinib, a multi-targeted anticancer drug to human serum albumin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kabir, Md. Zahirul; Tee, Wei-Ven; Mohamad, Saharuddin B.; Alias, Zazali; Tayyab, Saad

    2017-06-01

    Binding studies between a multi-targeted anticancer drug, sunitinib (SU) and human serum albumin (HSA) were made using fluorescence, UV-vis absorption, circular dichroism (CD) and molecular docking analysis. Both fluorescence quenching data and UV-vis absorption results suggested formation of SU-HSA complex. Moderate binding affinity between SU and HSA was evident from the value of the binding constant (3.04 × 104 M-1), obtained at 298 K. Involvement of hydrophobic interactions and hydrogen bonds as the leading intermolecular forces in the formation of SU-HSA complex was predicted from the thermodynamic data of the binding reaction. These results were in good agreement with the molecular docking analysis. Microenvironmental perturbations around Tyr and Trp residues as well as secondary and tertiary structural changes in HSA upon SU binding were evident from the three-dimensional fluorescence and circular dichroism results. SU binding to HSA also improved the thermal stability of the protein. Competitive displacement results and molecular docking analysis revealed the binding locus of SU to HSA in subdomain IIA (Sudlow's site I). The influence of a few common ions on the binding constant of SU-HSA complex was also noticed.

  11. Tracking the Turn Maneuvering Target Using the Multi-Target Bayes Filter with an Adaptive Estimation of Turn Rate

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zong-xiang; Wu, De-hui; Xie, Wei-xin; Li, Liang-qun

    2017-01-01

    Tracking the target that maneuvers at a variable turn rate is a challenging problem. The traditional solution for this problem is the use of the switching multiple models technique, which includes several dynamic models with different turn rates for matching the motion mode of the target at each point in time. However, the actual motion mode of a target at any time may be different from all of the dynamic models, because these models are usually limited. To address this problem, we establish a formula for estimating the turn rate of a maneuvering target. By applying the estimation method of the turn rate to the multi-target Bayes (MB) filter, we develop a MB filter with an adaptive estimation of the turn rate, in order to track multiple maneuvering targets. Simulation results indicate that the MB filter with an adaptive estimation of the turn rate, is better than the existing filter at tracking the target that maneuvers at a variable turn rate. PMID:28212291

  12. A multi-target real-time PCR assay for rapid identification of meningitis-associated microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Favaro, Marco; Savini, Vincenzo; Favalli, Cartesio; Fontana, Carla

    2013-01-01

    A central nervous system (CNS) infection, such as meningitis, is a serious and life-threatening condition. Bacterial meningitis can be severe and may result in brain damage, disability or even death. Rapid diagnosis of CNS infections and identification of the pathogenic microorganisms are needed to improve the patient outcome. Bacterial culture of a patient's cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is currently considered the "gold standard" for diagnosing bacterial meningitis. From the CSF cultures researchers can assess the in vitro susceptibility of the causative microorganism to determine the best antibiotic treatment. However, many of the culture assays, such as microscopy and the latex agglutination test are not sensitive. To enhance pathogen detection in CSF samples we developed a multi-target real-time PCR assay that can rapidly identify six different microorganisms: Streptococcus pneumoniae, Neisseria meningitidis, Haemophilus influenzae, Streptococcus agalactiae, Listeria monocytogenes and Cryptococcus neoformans. In this study we applied this PCR analysis to 296 CSF samples from patients who were suspected of having meningitis. Of the 296 samples that were examined, 59 samples were positive according to the CSF culture and/or molecular assays. Forty-six CSF samples were positive for both the CSF culture and our real-time PCR assay, while 13 samples were positive for the real-time PCR but negative for the traditional assays. This discrepancy may have been caused by the fact that these samples were collected from 23 patients who were treated with antimicrobials before CSF sampling.

  13. Multi-Target-Directed Ligands and other Therapeutic Strategies in the Search of a Real Solution for Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Agis-Torres, Angel; Sölhuber, Monica; Fernandez, Maria; Sanchez-Montero, J.M.

    2014-01-01

    The lack of an adequate therapy for Alzheimer's Disease (AD) contributes greatly to the continuous growing amount of papers and reviews, reflecting the important efforts made by scientists in this field. It is well known that AD is the most common cause of dementia, and up-to-date there is no prevention therapy and no cure for the disease, which contrasts with the enormous efforts put on the task. On the other hand many aspects of AD are currently debated or even unknown. This review offers a view of the current state of knowledge about AD which includes more relevant findings and processes that take part in the disease; it also shows more relevant past, present and future research on therapeutic drugs taking into account the new paradigm “Multi-Target-Directed Ligands” (MTDLs). In our opinion, this paradigm will lead from now on the research toward the discovery of better therapeutic solutions, not only in the case of AD but also in other complex diseases. This review highlights the strategies followed by now, and focuses other emerging targets that should be taken into account for the future development of new MTDLs. Thus, the path followed in this review goes from the pathology and the processes involved in AD to the strategies to consider in on-going and future researches. PMID:24533013

  14. One-Compound-Multi-Target: Combination Prospect of Natural Compounds with Thrombolytic Therapy in Acute Ischemic Stroke.

    PubMed

    Chen, Han-Sen; Qi, Su-Hua; Shen, Jian-Gang

    2017-01-01

    Tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA) is the only FDA-approved drug for acute ischemic stroke treatment, but its clinical use is limited due to the narrow therapeutic time window and severe adverse effects, including hemorrhagic transformation (HT) and neurotoxicity. One of the potential resolutions is to use adjunct therapies to reduce the side effects and extend t-PA&#039;s therapeutic time window. However, therapies modulating single target seem not to be satisfied, and a multitarget strategy is warranted to resolve such complex disease. Recently, large amount of efforts have been made to explore the active compounds from herbal supplements to treat ischemic stroke. Some natural compounds revealed both neuro- and bloodbrain- barrier (BBB)-protective effects by concurrently targeting multiple cellular signaling pathways in cerebral ischemia-reperfusion injury. Thus, those compounds are potential to be one-drug-multi-target agents as combined therapy with t-PA for ischemic stroke. In this review article, we summarize current progress about molecular targets involving in t-PA-mediated HT and neurotoxicity in ischemic brain injury. Based on these targets, we select 23 promising compounds from currently available literature with the bioactivities simultaneously targeting several important molecular targets. We propose that those compounds merit further investigation as combined therapy with t-PA. Finally, we discuss the potential drawbacks of the natural compounds&#039; studies and raise several important issues to be addressed in the future for the development of natural compound as an adjunct therapy.

  15. Genome-wide characterization of human L1 antisense promoter-driven transcripts.

    PubMed

    Criscione, Steven W; Theodosakis, Nicholas; Micevic, Goran; Cornish, Toby C; Burns, Kathleen H; Neretti, Nicola; Rodić, Nemanja

    2016-06-14

    Long INterspersed Element-1 (LINE-1 or L1) is the only autonomously active, transposable element in the human genome. L1 sequences comprise approximately 17 % of the human genome, but only the evolutionarily recent, human-specific subfamily is retrotransposition competent. The L1 promoter has a bidirectional orientation containing a sense promoter that drives the transcription of two proteins required for retrotransposition and an antisense promoter. The L1 antisense promoter can drive transcription of chimeric transcripts: 5' L1 antisense sequences spliced to the exons of neighboring genes. The impact of L1 antisense promoter activity on cellular transcriptomes is poorly understood. To investigate this, we analyzed GenBank ESTs for messenger RNAs that initiate in the L1 antisense promoter. We identified 988 putative L1 antisense chimeric transcripts, 911 of which have not been previously reported. These appear to be alternative genic transcripts, sense-oriented with respect to gene and initiating near, but typically downstream of, the gene transcriptional start site. In multiple cell lines, L1 antisense promoters display enrichment for YY1 transcription factor and histone modifications associated with active promoters. Global run-on sequencing data support the activity of the L1 antisense promoter. We independently detected 124 L1 antisense chimeric transcripts using long read Pacific Biosciences RNA-seq data. Furthermore, we validated four chimeric transcripts by quantitative RT-PCR and Sanger sequencing and demonstrated that they are readily detectable in many normal human tissues. We present a comprehensive characterization of human L1 antisense promoter-driven transcripts and provide substantial evidence that they are transcribed in a variety of human cell-types. Our findings reveal a new wide-reaching aspect of L1 biology by identifying antisense transcripts affecting as many as 4 % of all human genes.

  16. Bodywide skipping of exons 45-55 in dystrophic mdx52 mice by systemic antisense delivery.

    PubMed

    Aoki, Yoshitsugu; Yokota, Toshifumi; Nagata, Tetsuya; Nakamura, Akinori; Tanihata, Jun; Saito, Takashi; Duguez, Stephanie M R; Nagaraju, Kanneboyina; Hoffman, Eric P; Partridge, Terence; Takeda, Shin'ichi

    2012-08-21

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), the commonest form of muscular dystrophy, is caused by lack of dystrophin. One of the most promising therapeutic approaches is antisense-mediated elimination of frame-disrupting mutations by exon skipping. However, this approach faces two major hurdles: limited applicability of each individual target exon and uncertain function and stability of each resulting truncated dystrophin. Skipping of exons 45-55 at the mutation hotspot of the DMD gene would address both issues. Theoretically it could rescue more than 60% of patients with deletion mutations. Moreover, spontaneous deletions of this specific region are associated with asymptomatic or exceptionally mild phenotypes. However, such multiple exon skipping of exons 45-55 has proved technically challenging. We have therefore designed antisense oligo (AO) morpholino mixtures to minimize self- or heteroduplex formation. These were tested as conjugates with cell-penetrating moieties (vivo-morpholinos). We have tested the feasibility of skipping exons 45-55 in H2K-mdx52 myotubes and in mdx52 mice, which lack exon 52. Encouragingly, with mixtures of 10 AOs, we demonstrated skipping of all 10 exons in vitro, in H2K-mdx52 myotubes and on intramuscular injection into mdx52 mice. Moreover, in mdx52 mice in vivo, systemic injections of 10 AOs induced extensive dystrophin expression at the subsarcolemma in skeletal muscles throughout the body, producing up to 15% of wild-type dystrophin protein levels, accompanied by improved muscle strength and histopathology without any detectable toxicity. This is a unique successful demonstration of effective rescue by exon 45-55 skipping in a dystrophin-deficient animal model.

  17. Antisense-Based Progerin Downregulation in HGPS-Like Patients’ Cells

    PubMed Central

    Harhouri, Karim; Navarro, Claire; Baquerre, Camille; Da Silva, Nathalie; Bartoli, Catherine; Casey, Frank; Mawuse, Guedenon Koffi; Doubaj, Yassamine; Lévy, Nicolas; De Sandre-Giovannoli, Annachiara

    2016-01-01

    Progeroid laminopathies, including Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria Syndrome (HGPS, OMIM #176670), are premature and accelerated aging diseases caused by defects in nuclear A-type Lamins. Most HGPS patients carry a de novo point mutation within exon 11 of the LMNA gene encoding A-type Lamins. This mutation activates a cryptic splice site leading to the deletion of 50 amino acids at its carboxy-terminal domain, resulting in a truncated and permanently farnesylated Prelamin A called Prelamin A Δ50 or Progerin. Some patients carry other LMNA mutations affecting exon 11 splicing and are named “HGPS-like” patients. They also produce Progerin and/or other truncated Prelamin A isoforms (Δ35 and Δ90) at the transcriptional and/or protein level. The results we present show that morpholino antisense oligonucleotides (AON) prevent pathogenic LMNA splicing, markedly reducing the accumulation of Progerin and/or other truncated Prelamin A isoforms (Prelamin A Δ35, Prelamin A Δ90) in HGPS-like patients’ cells. Finally, a patient affected with Mandibuloacral Dysplasia type B (MAD-B, carrying a homozygous mutation in ZMPSTE24, encoding an enzyme involved in Prelamin A maturation, leading to accumulation of wild type farnesylated Prelamin A), was also included in this study. These results provide preclinical proof of principle for the use of a personalized antisense approach in HGPS-like and MAD-B patients, who may therefore be eligible for inclusion in a therapeutic trial based on this approach, together with classical HGPS patients. PMID:27409638

  18. Pseudogenes as an alternative source of natural antisense transcripts

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Naturally occurring antisense transcripts (NATs) are non-coding RNAs that may regulate the activity of sense transcripts to which they bind because of complementarity. NATs that are not located in the gene they regulate (trans-NATs) have better chances to evolve than cis-NATs, which is evident when the sense strand of the cis-NAT is part of a protein coding gene. However, the generation of a trans-NAT requires the formation of a relatively large region of complementarity to the gene it regulates. Results Pseudogene formation may be one evolutionary mechanism that generates trans-NATs to the parental gene. For example, this could occur if the parental gene is regulated by a cis-NAT that is copied as a trans-NAT in the pseudogene. To support this we identified human pseudogenes with a trans-NAT to the parental gene in their antisense strand by analysis of the database of expressed sequence tags (ESTs). We found that the mutations that appeared in these trans-NATs after the pseudogene formation do not show the flat distribution that would be expected in a non functional transcript. Instead, we found higher similarity to the parental gene in a region nearby the 3' end of the trans-NATs. Conclusions Our results do not imply a functional relation of the trans-NAT arising from pseudogenes over their respective parental genes but add evidence for it and stress the importance of duplication mechanisms of genetic material in the generation of non-coding RNAs. We also provide a plausible explanation for the large transcripts that can be found in the antisense strand of some pseudogenes. PMID:21047404

  19. Pseudogenes as an alternative source of natural antisense transcripts.

    PubMed

    Muro, Enrique M; Andrade-Navarro, Miguel A

    2010-11-03

    Naturally occurring antisense transcripts (NATs) are non-coding RNAs that may regulate the activity of sense transcripts to which they bind because of complementarity. NATs that are not located in the gene they regulate (trans-NATs) have better chances to evolve than cis-NATs, which is evident when the sense strand of the cis-NAT is part of a protein coding gene. However, the generation of a trans-NAT requires the formation of a relatively large region of complementarity to the gene it regulates. Pseudogene formation may be one evolutionary mechanism that generates trans-NATs to the parental gene. For example, this could occur if the parental gene is regulated by a cis-NAT that is copied as a trans-NAT in the pseudogene. To support this we identified human pseudogenes with a trans-NAT to the parental gene in their antisense strand by analysis of the database of expressed sequence tags (ESTs). We found that the mutations that appeared in these trans-NATs after the pseudogene formation do not show the flat distribution that would be expected in a non functional transcript. Instead, we found higher similarity to the parental gene in a region nearby the 3' end of the trans-NATs. Our results do not imply a functional relation of the trans-NAT arising from pseudogenes over their respective parental genes but add evidence for it and stress the importance of duplication mechanisms of genetic material in the generation of non-coding RNAs. We also provide a plausible explanation for the large transcripts that can be found in the antisense strand of some pseudogenes.

  20. Oxacillin sensitization of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus pseudintermedius by antisense peptide nucleic acids in vitro.

    PubMed

    Goh, Shan; Loeffler, Anette; Lloyd, David H; Nair, Sean P; Good, Liam

    2015-11-11

    Antibiotic resistance genes can be targeted by antisense agents, which can reduce their expression and thus restore cellular susceptibility to existing antibiotics. Antisense inhibitors can be gene and pathogen specific, or designed to inhibit a group of bacteria having conserved sequences within resistance genes. Here, we aimed to develop antisense peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) that could be used to effectively restore susceptibility to β-lactams in methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus pseudintermedius (MRSP). Antisense PNAs specific for conserved regions of the mobilisable gene mecA, and the growth essential gene, ftsZ, were designed. Clinical MRSA and MRSP strains of high oxacillin resistance were treated with PNAs and assayed for reduction in colony forming units on oxacillin plates, reduction in target gene mRNA levels, and cell size. Anti-mecA PNA at 7.5 and 2.5 μM reduced mecA mRNA in MRSA and MRSP (p < 0.05). At these PNA concentrations, 66 % of MRSA and 92 % of MRSP cells were killed by oxacillin (p < 0.01). Anti-ftsZ PNA at 7.5 and 2.5 μM reduced ftsZ mRNA in MRSA and MRSP, respectively (p ≤ 0.05). At these PNA concentrations, 86 % of MRSA cells and 95 % of MRSP cells were killed by oxacillin (p < 0.05). Anti-ftsZ PNAs resulted in swelling of bacterial cells. Scrambled PNA controls did not affect MRSA but sensitized MRSP moderately to oxacillin without affecting mRNA levels. The antisense PNAs effects observed provide in vitro proof of concept that this approach can be used to reverse β-lactam resistance in staphylococci. Further studies are warranted as clinical treatment alternatives are needed.

  1. Design, assembly, and activity of antisense DNA nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Keum, Jung-Won; Ahn, Jin-Ho; Bermudez, Harry

    2011-12-16

    Discrete DNA nanostructures allow simultaneous features not possible with traditional DNA forms: encapsulation of cargo, display of multiple ligands, and resistance to enzymatic digestion. These properties suggested using DNA nanostructures as a delivery platform. Here, DNA pyramids displaying antisense motifs are shown to be able to specifically degrade mRNA and inhibit protein expression in vitro, and they show improved cell uptake and gene silencing when compared to linear DNA. Furthermore, the activity of these pyramids can be regulated by the introduction of an appropriate complementary strand. These results highlight the versatility of DNA nanostructures as functional devices.

  2. Intra-Amygdala Injections of CREB Antisense Impair Inhibitory Avoidance Memory: Role of Norepinephrine and Acetylcholine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Canal, Clinton E.; Chang, Qing; Gold, Paul E.

    2008-01-01

    Infusions of CREB antisense into the amygdala prior to training impair memory for aversive tasks, suggesting that the antisense may interfere with CRE-mediated gene transcription and protein synthesis important for the formation of new memories within the amygdala. However, the amygdala also appears to modulate memory formation in distributed…

  3. [Computer aid design of antisense oligonucleotide in gene therapy--review].

    PubMed

    Wu, Qi-Wei; Wu, Jia-Jin

    2004-06-01

    In this paper, the situation on antisense oligonucleotide as a means of gene therapy was outlined, and the main factors impeding its progress at present was summarized. The one of main factors is the efficiency of antisense oligonucleotide as a drug and the other is the side-effect in clinical use. At the level of cell and gene, these influential factors were analyzed in detail. The main factor that makes side-effect in using antisense oligonucleotide is the difficulty to distinguish effectively homologous-gene from target gene. The another factor is the secondary structure and three-dimensional structure of target gene that seriously affect antisense oligonucleotide to arrive at target position. The third problem is what can affect antisense oligonucleotide transmission and quick annealing. How use computer technique to analyze fully the target gene of antisense oligonucleotide including the secondary structure and homology of target gene, and to design effective antisense oligonucleotide, in order to reduce its side-effect in clinical use of antisense oligonucleotide as a drug of gene therapy, and the computer-aid design method were described.

  4. Intra-Amygdala Injections of CREB Antisense Impair Inhibitory Avoidance Memory: Role of Norepinephrine and Acetylcholine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Canal, Clinton E.; Chang, Qing; Gold, Paul E.

    2008-01-01

    Infusions of CREB antisense into the amygdala prior to training impair memory for aversive tasks, suggesting that the antisense may interfere with CRE-mediated gene transcription and protein synthesis important for the formation of new memories within the amygdala. However, the amygdala also appears to modulate memory formation in distributed…

  5. XAX: A multi-ton, multi-target detection system for dark matter, double beta decay and pp solar neutrinos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arisaka, K.; Wang, H.; Smith, P. F.; Cline, D.; Teymourian, A.; Brown, E.; Ooi, W.; Aharoni, D.; Lam, C. W.; Lung, K.; Davies, S.; Price, M.

    2009-03-01

    A multi-target detection system XAX, comprising concentric 10 ton targets of 136Xe and 129/131Xe, together with a geometrically similar or larger target of liquid Ar, is described. Each is configured as a two-phase scintillation/ionization TPC detector, enhanced by a full 4π array of ultra-low radioactivity quartz photon intensifying detectors (QUPIDs) replacing the conventional photomultipliers for detection of scintillation light. It is shown that background levels in XAX can be reduced to the level required for dark matter particle (WIMP) mass measurement at a 10-10 pb WIMP-nucleon cross-section, with single-event sensitivity below 10-11 pb. The use of multiple target elements allows for confirmation of the A2 dependence of a coherent cross-section, and the different Xe isotopes provide information on the spin-dependence of the dark matter interaction. The event rates observed by Xe and Ar would modulate annually with opposite phases from each other for WIMP mass >˜100 GeV/c2. The large target mass of 136Xe and high degree of background reduction allow neutrinoless double beta decay to be observed with lifetimes of 1027 1028 years, corresponding to the Majorana neutrino mass range 0.01 0.1 eV, the most likely range from observed neutrino mass differences. The use of a 136Xe-depleted 129/131Xe target will also allow measurement of the pp solar neutrino spectrum to a precision of 1 2%.

  6. An overview on natural cholinesterase inhibitors--a multi-targeted drug class--and their mass production.

    PubMed

    Orhan, I Erdogan; Orhan, G; Gurkas, E

    2011-09-01

    Cholinesterase enzyme family consisting of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and butrylcholinesterase (BChE) is important in pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD), explained by "cholinergic hypothesis". Accordingly, deficiency of the neuromediator called "acetylcholine" excessive amount of BChE has been well-described in the brains of AD patients. Consequently, cholinesterase inhibition has become one of the most-prescribed treatment strategies for AD. In fact, cholinesterase inhibitors have been also reported for their effectiveness in some other diseases including glaucoma, myasthenia gravies, as well as Down syndrome, lately. They play a role in the action of mechanism of insecticidal drugs such as carbamate derivatives as well as nerve gases such as malathion and parathion. All these utilizations can make them a multi-targeted drug class putting a special emphasis on AD therapy in the first place. Several inhibitors of cholinesterases with synthetic and natural origins are available in drug market; however, the reasons including side effects, relatively low bioavailability, etc. limit their uses in medicine and there is still a great demand to discover new cholinesterase inhibitors. Galanthamine, an alkaloid derivative isolated from snowdrop (Galanthus nivalis L.), is the latest anticholinesterase drug used against AD. Huperzine A, isolated from Huperzia serrata (Thunb.) Trev. is the most-promising drug candidate with potent anticholinesterase effect and it is a licensed anti-AD drug in China. In this review, a short introduction will be given on known cholinesterase inhibitors and, then, galanthamine and huperzine A will be covered in regard with their cholinesterase inhibitory potentials and mass productions by organic synthesis and in vitro culture techniques.

  7. Dual inhibitors of β-amyloid aggregation and acetylcholinesterase as multi-target anti-Alzheimer drug candidates.

    PubMed

    Viayna, Elisabet; Sabate, Raimon; Muñoz-Torrero, Diego

    2013-01-01

    Notwithstanding the functional role that the aggregates of some amyloidogenic proteins can play in different organisms, protein aggregation plays a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of a large number of human diseases. One of such diseases is Alzheimer's disease (AD), where the overproduction and aggregation of the β-amyloid peptide (Aβ) are regarded as early critical factors. Another protein that seems to occupy a prominent position within the complex pathological network of AD is the enzyme acetylcholinesterase (AChE), with classical and non-classical activities involved at the late (cholinergic deficit) and early (Aβ aggregation) phases of the disease. Dual inhibitors of Aβ aggregation and AChE are thus emerging as promising multi-target agents with potential to efficiently modify the natural course of AD. In the initial phases of the drug discovery process of such compounds, in vitro evaluation of the inhibition of Aβ aggregation is rather troublesome, as it is very sensitive to experimental assay conditions, and requires expensive synthetic Aβ peptides, which makes cost-prohibitive the screening of large compound libraries. Herein, we review recently developed multitarget anti-Alzheimer compounds that exhibit both Aβ aggregation and AChE inhibitory activities, and, in some cases also additional valuable activities such as BACE-1 inhibition or antioxidant properties. We also discuss the development of simplified in vivo methods for the rapid, simple, reliable, unexpensive, and high-throughput amenable screening of Aβ aggregation inhibitors that rely on the overexpression of Aβ42 alone or fused with reporter proteins in Escherichia coli.

  8. Biodegradable polymer nanocarriers for therapeutic antisense microRNA delivery in living animals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paulmurugan, Ramasamy; Sekar, Narayana M.; Sekar, Thillai V.

    2012-03-01

    MicroRNAs are endogenous regulators of gene expression, deregulated in several cellular diseases including cancer. Altering the cellular microenvironment by modulating the microRNAs functions can regulate different genes involved in major cellular processes, and this approach is now being investigated as a promising new generation of molecularly targeted anti-cancer therapies. AntagomiRs (Antisense-miRNAs) are a novel class of chemically modified stable oligonucleotides used for blocking the functions of endogenous microRNAs, which are overexpressed. A key challenge in achieving effective microRNAbased therapeutics lies in the development of an efficient delivery system capable of specifically delivering antisense oligonucleotides and target cancer cells in living animals. We are now developing an effective delivery system designed to selectively deliver antagomiR- 21 and antagomiR-10b to triple negative breast cancer cells, and to revert tumor cell metastasis and invasiveness. The FDA-approved biodegradable PLGA-nanoparticles were selected as a carrier for antagomiRs delivery. Chemically modified antagomiRs (antagomiR-21 and antagomiR-10b) were co-encapsulated in PEGylated-PLGA-nanoparticles by using the double-emulsification (W/O/W) solvent evaporation method, and the resulting average particle size of 150-200nm was used for different in vitro and in vivo experiments. The antagomiR encapsulated PLGA-nanoparticles were evaluated for their in vitro antagomiRs delivery, intracellular release profile, and antagomiRs functional effects, by measuring the endogenous cellular targets, and the cell growth and metastasis. The xenografts of tumor cells in living mice were used for evaluating the anti-metastatic and anti-invasive properties of cells. The results showed that the use of PLGA for antagomiR delivery is not only efficient in crossing cell membrane, but can also maintain functional intracellular antagomiRs level for a extended period of time and achieve

  9. Lysine metabolism in antisense C-hordein barley grains.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Daiana; Rizzi, Vanessa; Gaziola, Salete A; Medici, Leonardo O; Vincze, Eva; Kozak, Marcin; Lea, Peter J; Azevedo, Ricardo A

    2015-02-01

    The grain proteins of barley are deficient in lysine and threonine due to their low concentrations in the major storage protein class, the hordeins, especially in the C-hordein subgroup. Previously produced antisense C-hordein transgenic barley lines have an improved amino acid composition, with increased lysine, methionine and threonine contents. The objective of the study was to investigate the possible changes in the regulation of key enzymes of the aspartate metabolic pathway and the contents of aspartate-derived amino acids in the nontransgenic line (Hordeum vulgare L. cv. Golden Promise) and five antisense C-hordein transgenic barley lines. Considering the amounts of soluble and protein-bound aspartate-derived amino acids together with the analysis of key enzymes of aspartate metabolic pathway, we suggest that the C-hordein suppression did not only alter the metabolism of at least one aspartate-derived amino acid (threonine), but major changes were also detected in the metabolism of lysine and methionine. Modifications in the activities and regulation of aspartate kinase, dihydrodipicolinate synthase and homoserine dehydrogenase were observed in most transgenic lines. Furthermore the activities of lysine α-ketoglutarate reductase and saccharopine dehydrogenase were also altered, although the extent varied among the transgenic lines.

  10. Does Active Learning through an Antisense Jigsaw Make Sense?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seetharaman, Mahadevan; Musier-Forsyth, Karin

    2003-12-01

    Three journal articles on nucleic acid antisense modification strategies were assigned to 12 students as part of an active learning "jigsaw" exercise for a graduate-level chemistry course on nucleic acids. Each student was required to read one of the three articles. This assignment was preceded by an hour-long lecture on the basic concepts in antisense antigene technology. On the day of the jigsaw, the students with the same article (three groups of four students) discussed their article briefly, and then formed four new groups where no one had read the same article. Each student spent about five minutes teaching his or her article to the other group members, using specific questions provided to guide the discussion. This exercise laid the foundation for bringing the discussion to the entire class, where most of the students actively participated. To test the students' comprehension of the reading materials, a problem set was designed that required not only an understanding of the three articles, but also application of the concepts learned. The effectiveness of this active learning strategy and its applicability to other topics are discussed in this article.

  11. Antisense Reduction of Tau in Adult Mice Protects against Seizures

    PubMed Central

    DeVos, Sarah L.; Goncharoff, Dustin K.; Chen, Guo; Kebodeaux, Carey S.; Yamada, Kaoru; Stewart, Floy R.; Schuler, Dorothy R.; Maloney, Susan E.; Wozniak, David F.; Rigo, Frank; Bennett, C. Frank; Cirrito, John R.; Holtzman, David M.

    2013-01-01

    Tau, a microtubule-associated protein, is implicated in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's Disease (AD) in regard to both neurofibrillary tangle formation and neuronal network hyperexcitability. The genetic ablation of tau substantially reduces hyperexcitability in AD mouse lines, induced seizure models, and genetic in vivo models of epilepsy. These data demonstrate that tau is an important regulator of network excitability. However, developmental compensation in the genetic tau knock-out line may account for the protective effect against seizures. To test the efficacy of a tau reducing therapy for disorders with a detrimental hyperexcitability profile in adult animals, we identified antisense oligonucleotides that selectively decrease endogenous tau expression throughout the entire mouse CNS—brain and spinal cord tissue, interstitial fluid, and CSF—while having no effect on baseline motor or cognitive behavior. In two chemically induced seizure models, mice with reduced tau protein had less severe seizures than control mice. Total tau protein levels and seizure severity were highly correlated, such that those mice with the most severe seizures also had the highest levels of tau. Our results demonstrate that endogenous tau is integral for regulating neuronal hyperexcitability in adult animals and suggest that an antisense oligonucleotide reduction of tau could benefit those with epilepsy and perhaps other disorders associated with tau-mediated neuronal hyperexcitability. PMID:23904623

  12. Sense-antisense pairs in mammals: functional and evolutionary considerations.

    PubMed

    Galante, Pedro A F; Vidal, Daniel O; de Souza, Jorge E; Camargo, Anamaria A; de Souza, Sandro J

    2007-01-01

    A significant number of genes in mammalian genomes are being found to have natural antisense transcripts (NATs). These sense-antisense (S-AS) pairs are believed to be involved in several cellular phenomena. Here, we generated a catalog of S-AS pairs occurring in the human and mouse genomes by analyzing different sources of expressed sequences available in the public domain plus 122 massively parallel signature sequencing (MPSS) libraries from a variety of human and mouse tissues. Using this dataset of almost 20,000 S-AS pairs in both genomes we investigated, in a computational and experimental way, several putative roles that have been assigned to NATs, including gene expression regulation. Furthermore, these global analyses allowed us to better dissect and propose new roles for NATs. Surprisingly, we found that a significant fraction of NATs are artifacts produced by genomic priming during cDNA library construction. We propose an evolutionary and functional model in which alternative polyadenylation and retroposition account for the origin of a significant number of functional S-AS pairs in mammalian genomes.

  13. Antisense therapeutics for tumor treatment: the TGF-beta2 inhibitor AP 12009 in clinical development against malignant tumors.

    PubMed

    Schlingensiepen, K H; Fischer-Blass, B; Schmaus, S; Ludwig, S

    2008-01-01

    Overexpression of the cytokine transforming growth factor-beta 2 (TGF-beta2) is a hallmark of various malignant tumors including pancreatic carcinoma, malignant glioma, metastasizing melanoma, and metastatic colorectal carcinoma. This is due to the pivotal role of TGF-beta2 as it regulates key mechanisms of tumor development, namely immunosuppression, metastasis, angiogenesis, and proliferation. The antisense technology is an innovative technique offering a targeted approach for the treatment of different highly aggressive tumors and other diseases. Antisense oligonucleotides are being developed to inhibit the production of disease-causing proteins at the molecular level. The immunotherapeutic approach with the phosphorothioate oligodeoxynucleotide AP 12009 for the treatment of malignant tumors is based on the specific inhibition of TGF-beta2. After providing preclinical proof of concept, the safety and efficacy of AP 12009 were assessed in clinical phase I/II open-label dose-escalation studies in recurrent or refractory high-grade glioma patients. Median survival time after recurrence exceeded the current literature data for chemotherapy. Currently, phase I/II study in advanced pancreatic carcinoma, metastatic melanoma, and metastatic colorectal carcinoma and a phase IIb study in recurrent or refractory high-grade glioma are ongoing. The preclinical as well as the clinical results implicate targeted TGF-beta2 suppression as a promising therapeutic approach for malignant tumor therapy.

  14. Modulation of splicing of the preceding intron by antisense oligonucleotide complementary to intra-exon sequence deleted in dystrophin Kobe

    SciTech Connect

    Takeshima, Y.; Matuso, M.; Sakamoto, H.; Nishio, H.

    1994-09-01

    Molecular analysis of dystrophin Kobe showed that exon 19 of the dystrophin gene bearing a 52 bp deletion was skipped during splicing, although the known consensus sequences at the 5{prime} and 3{prime} splice site of exon 19 were maintained. These data suggest that the deleted sequence of exon 19 may function as a cis-acting factor for exact splicing for the upstream intron. To investigate this potential role, an in vitro splicing system using dystrophin precursors was established. A two-exon precursor containing exon 18, truncated intron 18, and exon 19 was accurately spliced. However, splicing of intron 18 was dramatically inhibited when wild exon 19 was replaced with mutated exon 19. Even though the length of exon 19 was restored to normal by replacing the deleted sequence with other sequence, splicing of intron 18 was not fully reactivated. Characteristically, splicing of intron 18 was inactivated more markedly when the replaced sequence contained less polypurine stretches. These data suggested that modification of the exon sequence would result in a splicing abnormality. Antisense 31 mer 2`-O-methyl ribonucleotide was targeted against 5{prime} end of deleted region of exon 19 to modulate splicing of the mRNA precursor. Splicing of intron 18 was inhibited in a dose- and time-dependent manner. This is the first in vitro evidence to show splicing of dystrophin pre-mRNA can be managed by antisense oligonucleotides. These experiments represent an approach in which antisense oligonucleotides are used to restore the function of a defective dystrophin gene in Duchenne muscular dystrophy by inducing skipping of certain exons during splicing.

  15. Peripheral reduction of FGFR4 with antisense oligonucleotides increases metabolic rate and lowers adiposity in diet-induced obese mice.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xing Xian; Watts, Lynnetta M; Manchem, Vara Prasad; Chakravarty, Kaushik; Monia, Brett P; McCaleb, Michael L; Bhanot, Sanjay

    2013-01-01

    Obesity is a primary risk factor for multiple metabolic disorders. Many drugs for the treatment of obesity, which mainly act through CNS as appetite suppressants, have failed during development or been removed from the market due to unacceptable adverse effects. Thus, there are very few efficacious drugs available and remains a great unmet medical need for anti-obesity drugs that increase energy expenditure by acting on peripheral tissues without severe side effects. Here, we report a novel approach involving antisense inhibition of fibroblast growth factor receptor 4 (FGFR4) in peripheral tissues. Treatment of diet-induce obese (DIO) mice with FGFR4 antisense oligonucleotides (ASO) specifically reduced liver FGFR4 expression that not only resulted in decrease in body weight (BW) and adiposity in free-feeding conditions, but also lowered BW and adiposity under caloric restriction. In addition, combination treatment with FGFR4 ASO and rimonabant showed additive reduction in BW and adiposity. FGFR4 ASO treatment increased basal metabolic rate during free-feeding conditions and, more importantly, prevented adaptive decreases of metabolic rate induced by caloric restriction. The treatment increased fatty acid oxidation while decreased lipogenesis in both liver and fat. Mechanistic studies indicated that anti-obesity effect of FGFR4 ASO was mediated at least in part through an induction of plasma FGF15 level resulted from reduction of hepatic FGFR4 expression. The anti-obesity effect was accompanied by improvement in plasma glycemia, whole body insulin sensitivity, plasma lipid levels and liver steatosis. Therefore, FGFR4 could be a potential novel target and antisense reduction of hepatic FGFR4 expression could be an efficacious therapy as an adjunct to diet restriction or to an appetite suppressant for the treatment of obesity and related metabolic disorders.

  16. Gene Silencing by Gold Nanoshell-Mediated Delivery and Laser-Triggered Release of Antisense Oligonucleotide and siRNA

    PubMed Central

    Huschka, Ryan; Barhoumi, Aoune; Liu, Qing; Roth, Jack A.; Ji, Lin; Halas, Naomi J.

    2013-01-01

    The approach of RNA interference (RNAi)- using antisense DNA or RNA oligonucleotides to silence activity of a specific pathogenic gene transcript and reduce expression of the encoded protein- is very useful in dissecting genetic function and holds significant promise as a molecular therapeutic. A major obstacle in achieving gene silencing with RNAi technology is the systemic delivery of therapeutic oligonucleotides. Here we demonstrate an engineered gold nanoshell (NS)-based therapeutic oligonucleotide delivery vehicle, designed to release its cargo on demand upon illumination with a near-infrared (NIR) laser. A poly(L)lysine peptide (PLL) epilayer covalently attached to the NS surface (NS-PLL) is used to capture intact, single-stranded antisense DNA oligonucleotides, or alternatively, double-stranded short-interfering RNA (siRNA) molecules. Controlled release of the captured therapeutic oligonucleotides in each case is accomplished by continuous wave NIR laser irradiation at 800 nm, near the resonance wavelength of the nanoshell. Fluorescently tagged oligonucleotides were used to monitor the time-dependent release process and light-triggered endosomal release. A green fluorescent protein (GFP)-expressing human lung cancer H1299 cell line was used to determine cellular uptake and gene silencing mediated by the NS-PLL carrying GFP gene-specific single-stranded DNA antisense oligonucleotide (AON-GFP), or a double-stranded siRNA (siRNA-GFP), in vitro. Light-triggered delivery resulted in ∼ 47% and ∼49% downregulation of the targeted GFP expression by AON-GFP and siRNA-GFP, respectively. Cytotoxicity induced by both the NS-PLL delivery vector and by laser irradiation is minimal, as demonstrated by a XTT cell proliferation assay. PMID:22862291

  17. Cardiovascular and Metabolic Effects of ANGPTL3 Antisense Oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Graham, Mark J; Lee, Richard G; Brandt, Teresa A; Tai, Li-Jung; Fu, Wuxia; Peralta, Raechel; Yu, Rosie; Hurh, Eunju; Paz, Erika; McEvoy, Bradley W; Baker, Brenda F; Pham, Nguyen C; Digenio, Andres; Hughes, Steven G; Geary, Richard S; Witztum, Joseph L; Crooke, Rosanne M; Tsimikas, Sotirios

    2017-07-20

    Epidemiologic and genomewide association studies have linked loss-of-function variants in ANGPTL3, encoding angiopoietin-like 3, with low levels of plasma lipoproteins. We evaluated antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) targeting Angptl3 messenger RNA (mRNA) for effects on plasma lipid levels, triglyceride clearance, liver triglyceride content, insulin sensitivity, and atherosclerosis in mice. Subsequently, 44 human participants (with triglyceride levels of either 90 to 150 mg per deciliter [1.0 to 1.7 mmol per liter] or >150 mg per deciliter, depending on the dose group) were randomly assigned to receive subcutaneous injections of placebo or an antisense oligonucleotide targeting ANGPTL3 mRNA in a single dose (20, 40, or 80 mg) or multiple doses (10, 20, 40, or 60 mg per week for 6 weeks). The main end points were safety, side-effect profile, pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic measures, and changes in levels of lipids and lipoproteins. The treated mice had dose-dependent reductions in levels of hepatic Angptl3 mRNA, Angptl3 protein, triglycerides, and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, as well as reductions in liver triglyceride content and atherosclerosis progression and increases in insulin sensitivity. After 6 weeks of treatment, persons in the multiple-dose groups had reductions in levels of ANGPTL3 protein (reductions of 46.6 to 84.5% from baseline, P<0.01 for all doses vs. placebo) and in levels of triglycerides (reductions of 33.2 to 63.1%), LDL cholesterol (1.3 to 32.9%), very-low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (27.9 to 60.0%), non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (10.0 to 36.6%), apolipoprotein B (3.4 to 25.7%), and apolipoprotein C-III (18.9 to 58.8%). Three participants who received the antisense oligonucleotide and three who received placebo reported dizziness or headache. There were no serious adverse events. Oligonucleotides targeting mouse Angptl3 retarded the progression of atherosclerosis and reduced levels of atherogenic lipoproteins in

  18. Functional analysis of polyphenol oxidases by antisense/sense technology.

    PubMed

    Thipyapong, Piyada; Stout, Michael J; Attajarusit, Jutharat

    2007-07-27

    Polyphenol oxidases (PPOs) catalyze the oxidation of phenolics to quinones, the secondary reactions of which lead to oxidative browning and postharvest losses of many fruits and vegetables. PPOs are ubiquitous in angiosperms, are inducible by both biotic and abiotic stresses, and have been implicated in several physiological processes including plant defense against pathogens and insects, the Mehler reaction, photoreduction of molecular oxygen by PSI, regulation of plastidic oxygen levels, aurone biosynthesis and the phenylpropanoid pathway. Here we review experiments in which the roles of PPO in disease and insect resistance as well as in the Mehler reaction were investigated using transgenic tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) plants with modified PPO expression levels (suppressed PPO and overexpressing PPO). These transgenic plants showed normal growth, development and reproduction under laboratory, growth chamber and greenhouse conditions. Antisense PPO expression dramatically increased susceptibility while PPO overexpression increased resistance of tomato plants to Pseudomonas syringae. Similarly, PPO-overexpressing transgenic plants showed an increase in resistance to various insects, including common cutworm (Spodoptera litura (F.)), cotton bollworm (Helicoverpa armigera (Hübner)) and beet army worm (Spodoptera exigua (Hübner)), whereas larvae feeding on plants with suppressed PPO activity had higher larval growth rates and consumed more foliage. Similar increases in weight gain, foliage consumption, and survival were also observed with Colorado potato beetles (Leptinotarsa decemlineata (Say)) feeding on antisense PPO transgenic tomatoes. The putative defensive mechanisms conferred by PPO and its interaction with other defense proteins are discussed. In addition, transgenic plants with suppressed PPO exhibited more favorable water relations and decreased photoinhibition compared to nontransformed controls and transgenic plants overexpressing PPO, suggesting

  19. Analysis of sense and naturally occurring antisense transcripts of myosin heavy chain in the human myocardium.

    PubMed

    Luther, H P; Podlowski, S; Hetzer, R; Baumann, G

    2001-01-01

    Naturally occurring antisense RNA has the potential to form a duplex with its complementary sense mRNA, thereby regulating protein expression. Previously, we demonstrated considerable amounts of endogenous antisense RNA for both alpha- and beta-myosin heavy chain (MHC) in rat heart suggesting a role in posttranscriptional MHC-regulation (Luther et al. [1997] J Mol Cell Cardiol 29(1):27-35). To evaluate whether antisense RNA is also involved in MHC regulation in human heart we analyzed ventricular myocardium transcripts in nonfailing hearts (n=3) and hearts from patients undergoing heart transplantation (n=5). Investigation of RNA by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) detected an antisense RNA transcript for beta-MHC but none for alpha-MHC. Northern blot analysis of normal and failing hearts detected sense mRNA for beta-MHC, but not alpha-MHC suggesting no functionally relevant levels of alpha-MHC mRNA exist in the human ventricle. The results describe-for the first time-the existence of endogenous polyadenylated MHC antisense transcripts in the human heart. The potential effect of attenuating translation was shown in an in vitro translation assay using a synthetic antisense-oligonucleotide derived from the sequence of the naturally occurring antisense RNA. Copyright 2001 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  20. Photosynthetic Performance and Fertility Are Repressed in GmAOX2b Antisense Soybean1[OA

    PubMed Central

    Chai, Tsun-Thai; Simmonds, Daina; Day, David A.; Colmer, Timothy D.; Finnegan, Patrick M.

    2010-01-01

    The alternative oxidase (AOX) is a cyanide-resistant oxidase that provides an alternative outlet for electrons from the respiratory electron transport chain embedded in the inner membrane of plant mitochondria. Examination of soybean (Glycine max) plants carrying a GmAOX2b antisense gene showed AOX to have a central role in reproductive development and fecundity. In three independently transformed antisense lines, seed set was reduced by 16% to 43%, whereas ovule abortion increased by 1.2- to 1.7-fold when compared with nontransgenic transformation control plants. Reduced fecundity was associated with reductions in whole leaf cyanide-resistant, salicylhydroxamic acid-sensitive respiration and net photosynthesis, but there was no change in total respiration in the dark. The frequency of potential fertilization events was reduced by at least one-third in the antisense plants as a likely consequence of prefertilization defects. Pistils of the antisense plants contained a higher proportion of immature-sized, nonfertile embryo sacs compared with nontransgenic control plants. Increased rates of pollen abortion in vivo and reduced rates of pollen germination in vitro suggested that the antisense gene compromised pollen development and function. Reciprocal crosses between antisense and nontransgenic plants revealed that pollen produced by antisense plants was less active in fertilization. Taken together, the results presented here indicate that AOX expression has an important role in determining normal gametophyte development and function. PMID:20097793

  1. Anticubilin antisense RNA ameliorates adriamycin-induced tubulointerstitial injury in experimental rats.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jun; Li, Kailong; He, Yani; Zhang, Jianguo; Wang, Huiming; Yang, Jurong; Zhan, Jun; Liang, Haijun

    2011-12-01

    This study was designed to determine the effects of in vivo anticubilin antisense RNA on the uptake of albumin in tubules and on the tubulointerstitial injury in adriamycin-induced proteinuric rats. Adriamycin-treated rats were subjected to intrarenal delivery of adenoviral vectors encoding empty plasmid, cubilin sense RNA expression vector pAd-CUB or anticubilin antisense RNA expression vector pAd-ACUB on day 3. On days 14 and 28, half of the rats in each group were randomly selected to be killed, and blood samples, kidney tissues and 24-hour urine were collected. The diseased rats treated with pAdEasy-ACUB showed a 60% decrease in serum creatinine and glomerular filtration rate. Interestingly, the anticubilin antisense treatment led to a marked increase in albuminuria. Antisense treatment attenuated the histologic changes on both day 14 and day 28. The antisense treatment induced more than 60% recovery of adriamycin-induced injury, accompanied with 85% knockdown in the expression of cubilin protein and markedly decreased albumin deposition. Adriamycin induced an increase in the expression of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, transforming growth factor-β and regulated on activation in normal T-cell expressed and secreted and the number of infiltrating cells, which was reversed by the antisense treatment. Anticubilin antisense RNA delivered by an adenoviral vector ameliorates albuminuria-induced glomerulosclerosis and tubulointerstitial damage in adriamycin nephrotic rats, indicating that cubilin could be a potential therapeutic target in proteinuric nephropathy.

  2. rasiRNA pathway controls antisense expression of Drosophila telomeric retrotransposons in the nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Shpiz, Sergey; Kwon, Dmitry; Rozovsky, Yakov; Kalmykova, Alla

    2009-01-01

    Telomeres in Drosophila are maintained by the specialized telomeric retrotransposons HeT-A, TART and TAHRE. Sense transcripts of telomeric retroelements were shown to be the targets of a specialized RNA-interference mechanism, a repeat-associated short interfering (rasi)RNA-mediated system. Antisense rasiRNAs play a key role in this mechanism, highlighting the importance of antisense expression in retrotransposon silencing. Previously, bidirectional transcription was reported for the telomeric element TART. Here, we show that HeT-A is also bidirectionally transcribed, and HeT-A antisense transcription in ovaries is regulated by a promoter localized within its 3′ untranslated region. A remarkable feature of noncoding HeT-A antisense transcripts is the presence of multiple introns. We demonstrate that sense and antisense HeT-A-specific rasiRNAs are present in the same tissue, indicating that transcripts of both directions may be considered as natural targets of the rasiRNA pathway. We found that the expression of antisense transcripts of telomeric elements is regulated by the RNA silencing machinery, suggesting rasiRNA-mediated interplay between sense and antisense transcripts in the cell. Finally, this regulation occurs in the nucleus since disruption of the rasiRNA pathway leads to an accumulation of TART and HeT-A transcripts in germ cell nuclei. PMID:19036789

  3. Safety of antisense oligonucleotide and siRNA-based therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Chi, Xuan; Gatti, Philip; Papoian, Thomas

    2017-01-31

    Oligonucleotide-based therapy is an active area of drug development designed to treat a variety of gene-specific diseases. Two of the more promising platforms are the antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) and short interfering RNAs (siRNAs), both of which are often directed against similar targets. In light of recent reports on clinical trials of severe thrombocytopenia with two different ASO drugs and increased peripheral neuropathy with an siRNA drug, we compared and contrasted the specific safety characteristics of these two classes of oligonucleotide therapeutic. The objectives were to assess factors that could contribute to the specific toxicities observed with these two classes of promising drugs, and get a better understanding of the potential mechanism(s) responsible for these rare, but serious, adverse events.

  4. Intracerebral Infusion of Antisense Oligonucleotides Into Prion-infected Mice

    PubMed Central

    Nazor Friberg, Karah; Hung, Gene; Wancewicz, Ed; Giles, Kurt; Black, Chris; Freier, Sue; Bennett, Frank; DeArmond, Stephen J; Freyman, Yevgeniy; Lessard, Pierre; Ghaemmaghami, Sina; Prusiner, Stanley B

    2012-01-01

    Mice deficient for the cellular prion protein (PrPC) do not develop prion disease; accordingly, gene-based strategies to diminish PrPC expression are of interest. We synthesized a series of chemically modified antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) targeted against mouse Prnp messenger RNA (mRNA) and identified those that were most effective in decreasing PrPC expression. Those ASOs were also evaluated in scrapie-infected cultured cells (ScN2a) for their efficacy in diminishing the levels of the disease-causing prion protein (PrPSc). When the optimal ASO was infused intracerebrally into FVB mice over a 14-day period beginning 1 day after infection with the Rocky Mountain Laboratory (RML) strain of mouse prions, a prolongation of the incubation period of almost 2 months was observed. Whether ASOs can be used to develop an effective therapy for patients dying of Creutzfeldt–Jakob disease remains to be established. PMID:23344724

  5. Antisense oligonucleotide for tissue factor inhibits hepatic ischemic reperfusion injury.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Kenji; Kadotani, Yayoi; Ushigome, Hidetaka; Akioka, Kiyokazu; Okamoto, Masahiko; Ohmori, Yoshihiro; Yaoi, Takeshi; Fushiki, Shinji; Yoshimura, Rikio; Yoshimura, Norio

    2002-09-27

    Tissue factor (TF) is an initiation factor for blood coagulation and its expression is induced on endothelial cells during inflammatory or immune responses. We designed an antisense oligodeoxynucleotide (AS-1/TF) for rat TF and studied its effect on hepatic ischemic reperfusion injury. AS-1/TF was delivered intravenously to Lewis rats. After 10 h, hepatic artery and portal vein were partially clamped. Livers were reperfused after 180 min and harvested. TF expression was studied using immunohistochemical staining. One of 10 rats survived in a 5-day survival rate and TF was strongly stained on endothelial cells in non-treatment group. However, by treatment with AS-1/TF, six of seven survived and TF staining was significantly reduced. Furthermore, we observed that fluorescein-labeled AS-1/TF was absorbed into endothelial cells. These results suggest that AS-1/TF can strongly suppress the expression of TF and thereby inhibit ischemic reperfusion injury to the rat liver.

  6. Antisense oligonucleotide targeting midkine suppresses in vivo angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Dai, Li-Cheng; Wang, Xiang; Yao, Xing; Lu, Yong-Liang; Ping, Jin-Liang; He, Jian-Fang

    2007-02-28

    To evaluate the effect of antisense oligonucleotide targeting midkine (MK-AS) on angiogenesis in chick chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) and in situ human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). An in situ human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) model and CAM assay were used in this experiment. The effect of MK-AS on angiogenesis was evaluated by cell proliferation assay and hematoxylin-eosin (HE) staining. MK-AS significantly inhibited human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) and in situ human HCC growth. At the same time, MK-AS suppressed the angiogenesis both in human hepatocellular carcinoma cell line (HEPG2)-induced CAM and in situ human HCC tissues. MK-AS is an effective antiangiogenesis agent in vivo.

  7. Antisense oligonucleotide targeting midkine suppresses in vivo angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Li-Cheng; Wang, Xiang; Yao, Xing; Lu, Yong-Liang; Ping, Jin-Liang; He, Jian-Fang

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the effect of antisense oligonucleotide targeting midkine (MK-AS) on angiogenesis in chick chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) and in situ human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). METHODS: An in situ human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) model and CAM assay were used in this experiment. The effect of MK-AS on angiogenesis was evaluated by cell proliferation assay and hematoxylin-eosin (HE) staining. RESULTS: MK-AS significantly inhibited human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) and in situ human HCC growth. At the same time, MK-AS suppressed the angiogenesis both in human hepatocellular carcinoma cell line (HEPG2)-induced CAM and in situ human HCC tissues. CONCLUSION: MK-AS is an effective antiangiogenesis agent in vivo. PMID:17451201

  8. A Universal Positive-Negative Selection System for Gene Targeting in Plants Combining an Antibiotic Resistance Gene and Its Antisense RNA.

    PubMed

    Nishizawa-Yokoi, Ayako; Nonaka, Satoko; Osakabe, Keishi; Saika, Hiroaki; Toki, Seiichi

    2015-09-01

    Gene targeting (GT) is a useful technology for accurate genome engineering in plants. A reproducible approach based on a positive-negative selection system using hygromycin resistance and the diphtheria toxin A subunit gene as positive and negative selection markers, respectively, is now available. However, to date, this selection system has been applied exclusively in rice (Oryza sativa). To establish a universally applicable positive-negative GT system in plants, we designed a selection system using a combination of neomycin phosphotransferaseII (nptII) and an antisense nptII construct. The concomitant transcription of both sense and antisense nptII suppresses significantly the level of expression of the sense nptII gene, and transgenic calli and plants become sensitive to the antibiotic geneticin. In addition, we were able to utilize the sense nptII gene as a positive selection marker and the antisense nptII construct as a negative selection marker for knockout of the endogenous rice genes Waxy and 33-kD globulin through GT, although negative selection with this system is relatively less efficient compared with diphtheria toxin A subunit. The approach developed here, with some additional improvements, could be applied as a universal selection system for the enrichment of GT cells in several plant species.

  9. Expression of ACC oxidase antisense gene inhibits ripening of cantaloupe melon fruits.

    PubMed

    Ayub, R; Guis, M; Ben Amor, M; Gillot, L; Roustan, J P; Latché, A; Bouzayen, M; Pech, J C

    1996-07-01

    The plant hormone ethylene plays a major role in the ripening of climacteric fruit. We have generated transgenic cantaloupe Charentais melons expressing an antisense ACC oxidase gene; ACC oxidase catalyzes the last step of ethylene biosynthesis. Ethylene production of transgenic fruit was < 1% of control untransformed fruit, and the ripening process was blocked both on and off the vine. The antisense phenotype could be reversed by exogenous ethylene treatment. Analysis of antisense ACC oxidase melons indicated that the ripening process includes ethylene-dependent and ethylene-independent pathways. Because the transgenic line we generated displays extended storage life and improved quality, it has a promising potential for commercial development.

  10. An imprinted antisense transcript at the human GNAS1 locus.

    PubMed

    Hayward, B E; Bonthron, D T

    2000-03-22

    Recent studies of the GNAS1 gene have shown a highly complex imprinted expression pattern, with paternally, maternally and biallelically derived protein products, raising questions regarding how such transcriptional complexity is established and maintained. GNAS1 was originally identified as the gene encoding an important and widely expressed signal transduction protein, the alpha subunit of the stimulatory G protein G(s). Partial G(s)alpha deficiency results in the hormone resistance syndrome, pseudohypoparathyroidism type 1a. G(s)alpha is encoded by exons 1-13 of GNAS1 and, in most tissues at least, expression of this transcript is biallelic. Two large upstream exons, however, have monoallelic expression patterns, and in each case their transcripts splice onto GNAS1 exon 2. The most 5' of these is maternally expressed, and encodes neuroendocrine secretory protein 55 (NESP55), whose coding region does not overlap with that of G(s)alpha. The other exon, 14 kb further 3', is paternally expressed, and encodes XL(alpha)s (extra large alphas-like protein), translated in-frame with G(s)alpha exons 2-13. This close proximity of two oppositely imprinted promoters suggested the likelihood of important regulatory interactions between them, and to investigate this possibility we have performed a search for other transcripts in the region. Here we show that the maternally methylated region upstream of the XL(alpha)s exon gives rise to a spliced polyadenylated antisense transcript, which spans the upstream NESP55 region. This antisense transcript is imprinted, and expressed only from the paternal allele, suggesting that it may have a specific role in suppressing in cis the activity of the paternal NESP55 allele.

  11. Antisense-mediated reduction in ADC activity causes minor alterations in the alkaloid profile of cultured hairy roots and regenerated transgenic plants of Nicotiana tabacum.

    PubMed

    Chintapakorn, Yupyn; Hamill, John D

    2007-10-01

    In species of the genus Nicotiana, as in most plants, the important polyamine precursor putrescine can be derived from the amino acids ornithine and/or arginine via the activity of ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) and/or arginine decarboxylase (ADC), respectively. Nicotiana species also utilize putrescine to provide the pyrollidine ring of the defensive alkaloid nicotine and its derivatives. Previous biochemical studies, involving callus tissues cultured in vitro, suggested that the ADC-mediated route to putrescine is used preferentially to provide the putrescine that is utilized for nicotine synthesis in N. tabacum. To ascertain if this is the case in N. tabacum plants, where nicotine synthesis takes place exclusively in roots, we used an antisense approach to diminish ADC activity in transformed roots which were cultured in vitro. Several independent lines were recovered possessing markedly reduced levels of ADC transcript and ADC activity compared to controls. Transcript levels of other genes in this general area of metabolism, including ODC, were not altered as a result of the antisense-mediated downregulation of ADC. Concentrations of nicotine were comparable in antisense-ADC and control hairy root lines throughout most of their respective culture cycles, except at the latter stages of growth when the nicotine content of antisense-ADC hairy root lines was observed to be approximately 20% lower than in controls. Levels of anatabine, the second most abundant alkaloid typically found in N. tabacum, which is not derived from putrescine, were slightly elevated in two antisense-ADC hairy root lines at the latter stages of their culture cycles compared to controls. Comparison of alkaloid levels in leaves of transgenic plants that were regenerated from separate antisense-ADC and control transformed root lines indicated that the former possessed slightly elevated levels of anatabine but did not contain average levels of leaf nicotine that were different from that of

  12. Antisense-mediated down-regulation of putrescine N-methyltransferase activity in transgenic Nicotiana tabacum L. can lead to elevated levels of anatabine at the expense of nicotine.

    PubMed

    Chintapakorn, Yupynn; Hamill, John D

    2003-09-01

    Nicotiana tabacum L. produces a number of pyridine alkaloids, with nicotine representing the major component and anatabine comprising most of the remainder of the alkaloid fraction. An antisense approach was used here to down-regulate activity of the important enzyme putrescine N-methyltransferase (PMT) in transformed roots of this species to determine effects upon alkaloid metabolism. Transformed root lines were produced that contained markedly reduced PMT activity, with a concomitant reduction in nicotine content compared to controls. No negative effects upon growth were observed. Several antisense-PMT transformed root lines, and also leaf tissues of regenerated transformed plants, showed a substantial increase in anatabine content relative to controls. Northern hybridization experiments indicated that the antisense-PMT manipulation had little or no effect upon the transcript levels of other genes encoding enzymes involved in alkaloid metabolism, including quinolinate acid phosphoribosyltransferase (QPT). The latter enzyme plays a key role in regulating the synthesis of nicotinic acid which supplies the pyridine ring necessary for both nicotine and anatabine synthesis. We suggest that elevated anatabine levels in antisense-PMT lines are a direct consequence of a relative oversupply of nicotinic acid which, in the absence of adequate levels of 1-methyl-delta(1)-pyrrolinium cation (the ultimate product of PMT activity), is used to synthesise anatabine directly. As is discussed, no naturally occurring species or varieties of Nicotiana are known that typically produce high levels of anatabine in root or leaf tissues, meaning that the antisense PMT transgenics produced in this study have no natural counterpart. These experiments thus represent an example of metabolic engineering of plant pyridine metabolism, via antisense down-regulation of gene expression in a contributing pathway leading to secondary metabolite biosynthesis.

  13. Amelioration of Danhong injection on the lipopolysaccharide-stimulated systemic acute inflammatory reaction via multi-target strategy.

    PubMed

    Gao, Li-Na; Cui, Yuan-Lu; Wang, Qiang-Song; Wang, Shao-Xia

    2013-10-07

    coincidence with the result of Proteome profile array. Meanwhile, the mRNA expressions of iNOS, IL-6, IL-1β, MCP-1 in mice liver and kidney were significantly reduced by DHI. Experiments performed in vitro further revealed that the productions of NO, PGE2 and the mRNA expressions of iNOS, COX-2 were notably inhibited by DHI. Cell-based ELISA revealed that the COX-2 protein expression was diminished by DHI. The results of ELISA demonstrated that DHI significantly down-regulated the protein productions of IL-6 and MCP-1. Furthermore, the mRNA expressions of iNOS, COX-2, TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6 and MCP-1 analyzed by real-time RT-PCR were suppressed by DHI. These results demonstrate that DHI exerts the protective effect through inhibiting the expressions of iNOS, COX-2, IL-1β, IL-6, MCP-1 and TNF-α, which elucidate that DHI may be a strongly multi-target Chinese medicine injection on improving the inflammatory diseases. © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Crucial role of antisense transcription across the Xist promoter in Tsix-mediated Xist chromatin modification.

    PubMed

    Ohhata, Tatsuya; Hoki, Yuko; Sasaki, Hiroyuki; Sado, Takashi

    2008-01-01

    Expression of Xist, which triggers X inactivation, is negatively regulated in cis by an antisense gene, Tsix, transcribed along the entire Xist gene. We recently demonstrated that Tsix silences Xist through modification of the chromatin structure in the Xist promoter region. This finding prompted us to investigate the role of antisense transcription across the Xist promoter in Tsix-mediated silencing. Here, we prematurely terminated Tsix transcription before the Xist promoter and addressed its effect on Xist silencing in mouse embryos. We found that although 93% of the region encoding Tsix was transcribed, truncation of Tsix abolished the antisense regulation of Xist. This resulted in a failure to establish the repressive chromatin configuration at the Xist promoter on the mutated X, including DNA methylation and repressive histone modifications, especially in extraembryonic tissues. These results suggest a crucial role for antisense transcription across the Xist promoter in Xist silencing.

  15. Identification and analysis of antisense RNA target regions of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1.

    PubMed Central

    Rittner, K; Sczakiel, G

    1991-01-01

    Antisense RNA, transcribed intracellularly from constitutive expression cassettes, inhibits the replication of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) as demonstrated by a quantitative microinjection assay in human SW480 cells. Infectious proviral HIV-1 DNA was co-microinjected together with a fivefold molar excess of plasmids expressing antisense RNA complementary to a set of ten different HIV-1 target regions. The most inhibitory antisense RNA expression plasmids were targeted against a 1 kb region within the gag open reading frame and against a 562 base region containing the coding sequences for the regulatory viral proteins tat and rev. Experimental evidence is presented that the antisense principle is the inhibitory mechanism in this assay system. PMID:2027749

  16. Mutually exclusive sense–antisense transcription at FLC facilitates environmentally induced gene repression

    PubMed Central

    Rosa, Stefanie; Duncan, Susan; Dean, Caroline

    2016-01-01

    Antisense transcription through genic regions is pervasive in most genomes; however, its functional significance is still unclear. We are studying the role of antisense transcripts (COOLAIR) in the cold-induced, epigenetic silencing of Arabidopsis FLOWERING LOCUS C (FLC), a regulator of the transition to reproduction. Here we use single-molecule RNA FISH to address the mechanistic relationship of FLC and COOLAIR transcription at the cellular level. We demonstrate that while sense and antisense transcripts can co-occur in the same cell they are mutually exclusive at individual loci. Cold strongly upregulates COOLAIR transcription in an increased number of cells and through the mutually exclusive relationship facilitates shutdown of sense FLC transcription in cis. COOLAIR transcripts form dense clouds at each locus, acting to influence FLC transcription through changed H3K36me3 dynamics. These results may have general implications for other loci showing both sense and antisense transcription. PMID:27713408

  17. Combination Antisense Treatment for Destructive Exon Skipping of Myostatin and Open Reading Frame Rescue of Dystrophin in Neonatal mdx Mice

    PubMed Central

    Lu-Nguyen, Ngoc B; Jarmin, Susan A; Saleh, Amer F; Popplewell, Linda; Gait, Michael J; Dickson, George

    2015-01-01

    The fatal X-linked Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), characterized by progressive muscle wasting and muscle weakness, is caused by mutations within the DMD gene. The use of antisense oligonucleotides (AOs) modulating pre-mRNA splicing to restore the disrupted dystrophin reading frame, subsequently generating a shortened but functional protein has emerged as a potential strategy in DMD treatment. AO therapy has recently been applied to induce out-of-frame exon skipping of myostatin pre-mRNA, knocking-down expression of myostatin protein, and such an approach is suggested to enhance muscle hypertrophy/hyperplasia and to reduce muscle necrosis. Within this study, we investigated dual exon skipping of dystrophin and myostatin pre-mRNAs using phosphorodiamidate morpholino oligomers conjugated with an arginine-rich peptide (B-PMOs). Intraperitoneal administration of B-PMOs was performed in neonatal mdx males on the day of birth, and at weeks 3 and 6. At week 9, we observed in treated mice (as compared to age-matched, saline-injected controls) normalization of muscle mass, a recovery in dystrophin expression, and a decrease in muscle necrosis, particularly in the diaphragm. Our data provide a proof of concept for antisense therapy combining dystrophin restoration and myostatin inhibition for the treatment of DMD. PMID:25959011

  18. H19 Antisense RNA Can Up-Regulate Igf2 Transcription by Activation of a Novel Promoter in Mouse Myoblasts

    PubMed Central

    Duputié, Anne; Antoine, Etienne; Aptel, Nathalie; Milligan, Laura; Carbonell, Françoise; Lelay-Taha, Marie-Noëlle; Piette, Jacques; Weber, Michaël; Montarras, Didier; Pinset, Christian; Dandolo, Luisa; Forné, Thierry; Cathala, Guy

    2012-01-01

    It was recently shown that a long non-coding RNA (lncRNA), that we named the 91H RNA (i.e. antisense H19 transcript), is overexpressed in human breast tumours and contributes in trans to the expression of the Insulin-like Growth Factor 2 (IGF2) gene on the paternal chromosome. Our preliminary experiments suggested that an H19 antisense transcript having a similar function may also be conserved in the mouse. In the present work, we further characterise the mouse 91H RNA and, using a genetic complementation approach in H19 KO myoblast cells, we show that ectopic expression of the mouse 91H RNA can up-regulate Igf2 expression in trans despite almost complete unmethylation of the Imprinting-Control Region (ICR). We then demonstrate that this activation occurs at the transcriptional level by activation of a previously unknown Igf2 promoter which displays, in mouse tissues, a preferential mesodermic expression (Pm promoter). Finally, our experiments indicate that a large excess of the H19 transcript can counteract 91H-mediated Igf2 activation. Our work contributes, in conjunction with other recent findings, to open new horizons to our understanding of Igf2 gene regulation and functions of the 91H/H19 RNAs in normal and pathological conditions. PMID:22662250

  19. Combined sense-antisense Alu elements activate the EGFP reporter gene when stable transfection.

    PubMed

    Ma, Zhihong; Kong, Xianglong; Liu, Shufeng; Yin, Shuxian; Zhao, Yuehua; Liu, Chao; Lv, Zhanjun; Wang, Xiufang

    2017-08-01

    Alu elements in the human genome are present in more than one million copies, accounting for 10% of the genome. However, the biological functions of most Alu repeats are unknown. In this present study, we detected the effects of Alu elements on EGFP gene expression using a plasmid system to find the roles of Alu elements in human genome. We inserted 5'-4TMI-Alus-CMV promoter-4TMI-Alus (or antisense Alus)-3' sequences into the pEGFP-C1 vector to construct expression vectors. We altered the copy number of Alus, the orientation of the Alus, and the presence of an enhancer (4TMI) in the inserted 5'-4TMI-Alus-CMV promoter-4TMI-Alus (or antisense Alus)-3' sequences. These expression vectors were stably transfected into HeLa cells, and EGFP reporter gene expression was determined. Our results showed that combined sense-antisense Alu elements activated the EGFP reporter gene in the presence of enhancers and stable transfection. The combined sense-antisense Alu vectors carrying four copies of Alus downstream of inserted CMV induced much stronger EGFP gene expression than two copies. Alus downstream of inserted CMV were replaced to AluJBs (having 76% homology with Alu) to construct expression vectors. We found that combined sense-antisense Alu (or antisense AluJB) vectors induced strong EGFP gene expression after stable transfection and heat shock. To further explore combined sense-antisense Alus activating EGFP gene expression, we constructed Tet-on system vectors, mini-C1-Alu-sense-sense and mini-C1-Alu-sense-antisense (EGFP gene was driven by mini-CMV). We found that combined sense-antisense Alus activated EGFP gene in the presence of reverse tetracycline repressor (rTetR) and doxycycline (Dox). Clone experiments showed that Mini-C1-Alu-sense-antisense vector had more positive cells than that of Mini-C1-Alu-sense-sense vector. The results in this paper proved that Alu repetitive sequences inhibited gene expression and combined sense-antisense Alus activated EGFP reporter

  20. Antisense oligonucleotides targeting translation inhibitory elements in 5' UTRs can selectively increase protein levels.

    PubMed

    Liang, Xue-Hai; Sun, Hong; Shen, Wen; Wang, Shiyu; Yao, Joyee; Migawa, Michael T; Bui, Huynh-Hoa; Damle, Sagar S; Riney, Stan; Graham, Mark J; Crooke, Rosanne M; Crooke, Stanley T

    2017-09-19

    A variety of diseases are caused by deficiencies in amounts or activity of key proteins. An approach that increases the amount of a specific protein might be of therapeutic benefit. We reasoned that translation could be specifically enhanced using trans-acting agents that counter the function of negative regulatory elements present in the 5' UTRs of some mRNAs. We recently showed that translation can be enhanced by antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) that target upstream open reading frames. Here we report the amount of a protein can also be selectively increased using ASOs designed to hybridize to other translation inhibitory elements in 5' UTRs. Levels of human RNASEH1, LDLR, and ACP1 and of mouse ACP1 and ARF1 were increased up to 2.7-fold in different cell types and species upon treatment with chemically modified ASOs targeting 5' UTR inhibitory regions in the mRNAs encoding these proteins. The activities of ASOs in enhancing translation were sequence and position dependent and required helicase activity. The ASOs appear to improve the recruitment of translation initiation factors to the target mRNA. Importantly, ASOs targeting ACP1 mRNA significantly increased the level of ACP1 protein in mice, suggesting that this approach has therapeutic and research potentials. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  1. Development of Multiexon Skipping Antisense Oligonucleotide Therapy for Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Yokota, Toshifumi; Wood, Matthew J. A.

    2013-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is an incurable, X-linked progressive muscle degenerative disorder that results from the absence of dystrophin protein and leads to premature death in affected individuals due to respiratory and/or cardiac failure typically by age of 30. Very recently the exciting prospect of an effective oligonucleotide therapy has emerged which restores dystrophin protein expression to affected tissues in DMD patients with highly promising data from a series of clinical trials. This therapeutic approach is highly mutation specific and thus is personalised. Therefore DMD has emerged as a model genetic disorder for understanding and overcoming of the challenges of developing personalised genetic medicines. One of the greatest weaknesses of the current oligonucleotide approach is that it is a mutation-specific therapy. To address this limitation, we have recently demonstrated that exons 45–55 skipping therapy has the potential to treat clusters of mutations that cause DMD, which could significantly reduce the number of compounds that would need to be developed in order to successfully treat all DMD patients. Here we discuss and review the latest preclinical work in this area as well as a variety of accompanying issues, including efficacy and potential toxicity of antisense oligonucleotides, prior to human clinical trials. PMID:23984357

  2. TSUNAMI: an antisense method to phenocopy splicing-associated diseases in animals

    PubMed Central

    Sahashi, Kentaro; Hua, Yimin; Ling, Karen K.Y.; Hung, Gene; Rigo, Frank; Horev, Guy; Katsuno, Masahisa; Sobue, Gen; Ko, Chien-Ping; Bennett, C. Frank; Krainer, Adrian R.

    2012-01-01

    Antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) are versatile molecules that can be designed to specifically alter splicing patterns of target pre-mRNAs. Here we exploit this feature to phenocopy a genetic disease. Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a motor neuron disease caused by loss-of-function mutations in the SMN1 gene. The related SMN2 gene expresses suboptimal levels of functional SMN protein due to alternative splicing that skips exon 7; correcting this defect—e.g., with ASOs—is a promising therapeutic approach. We describe the use of ASOs that exacerbate SMN2 missplicing and phenocopy SMA in a dose-dependent manner when administered to transgenic Smn−/− mice. Intracerebroventricular ASO injection in neonatal mice recapitulates SMA-like progressive motor dysfunction, growth impairment, and shortened life span, with α-motor neuron loss and abnormal neuromuscular junctions. These SMA-like phenotypes are prevented by a therapeutic ASO that restores correct SMN2 splicing. We uncovered starvation-induced splicing changes, particularly in SMN2, which likely accelerate disease progression. These results constitute proof of principle that ASOs designed to cause sustained splicing defects can be used to induce pathogenesis and rapidly and accurately model splicing-associated diseases in animals. This approach allows the dissection of pathogenesis mechanisms, including spatial and temporal features of disease onset and progression, as well as testing of candidate therapeutics. PMID:22895255

  3. TSUNAMI: an antisense method to phenocopy splicing-associated diseases in animals.

    PubMed

    Sahashi, Kentaro; Hua, Yimin; Ling, Karen K Y; Hung, Gene; Rigo, Frank; Horev, Guy; Katsuno, Masahisa; Sobue, Gen; Ko, Chien-Ping; Bennett, C Frank; Krainer, Adrian R

    2012-08-15

    Antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) are versatile molecules that can be designed to specifically alter splicing patterns of target pre-mRNAs. Here we exploit this feature to phenocopy a genetic disease. Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a motor neuron disease caused by loss-of-function mutations in the SMN1 gene. The related SMN2 gene expresses suboptimal levels of functional SMN protein due to alternative splicing that skips exon 7; correcting this defect-e.g., with ASOs-is a promising therapeutic approach. We describe the use of ASOs that exacerbate SMN2 missplicing and phenocopy SMA in a dose-dependent manner when administered to transgenic Smn(-/-) mice. Intracerebroventricular ASO injection in neonatal mice recapitulates SMA-like progressive motor dysfunction, growth impairment, and shortened life span, with α-motor neuron loss and abnormal neuromuscular junctions. These SMA-like phenotypes are prevented by a therapeutic ASO that restores correct SMN2 splicing. We uncovered starvation-induced splicing changes, particularly in SMN2, which likely accelerate disease progression. These results constitute proof of principle that ASOs designed to cause sustained splicing defects can be used to induce pathogenesis and rapidly and accurately model splicing-associated diseases in animals. This approach allows the dissection of pathogenesis mechanisms, including spatial and temporal features of disease onset and progression, as well as testing of candidate therapeutics.

  4. Natural Antisense Transcripts and Long Non-Coding RNA in Neurospora crassa

    PubMed Central

    Arthanari, Yamini; Heintzen, Christian; Griffiths-Jones, Sam; Crosthwaite, Susan K.

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence of long non-coding RNAs (lncRNA) and natural antisense transcripts (NATs) has been reported in a variety of organisms. While a consensus has yet to be reached on their global importance, an increasing number of examples have been shown to be functional, regulating gene expression at the transcriptional and post-transcriptional level. Here, we use RNA sequencing data from the ABI SOLiD platform to identify lncRNA and NATs obtained from samples of the filamentous fungus Neurospora crassa grown under different light and temperature conditions. We identify 939 novel lncRNAs, of which 477 are antisense to annotated genes. Across the whole dataset, the extent of overlap between sense and antisense transcripts is large: 371 sense/antisense transcripts are complementary over 500 nts or more and 236 overlap by more than 1000 nts. Most prevalent are 3′ end overlaps between convergently transcribed sense/antisense pairs, but examples of divergently transcribed pairs and nested transcripts are also present. We confirm the expression of a subset of sense/antisense transcript pairs by qPCR. We examine the size, types of overlap and expression levels under the different environmental stimuli of light and temperature, and identify 11 lncRNAs that are up-regulated in response to light. We also find differences in transcript length and the position of introns between protein-coding transcripts that have antisense expression and transcripts with no antisense expression. These results demonstrate the ability of N. crassa lncRNAs and NATs to be regulated by different environmental stimuli and provide the scope for further investigation into the function of NATs. PMID:24621812

  5. Bolaamphiphile-based nanocomplex delivery of phosphorothioate gapmer antisense oligonucleotides as a treatment for Clostridium difficile

    PubMed Central

    Hegarty, John P; Krzeminski, Jacek; Sharma, Arun K; Guzman-Villanueva, Diana; Weissig, Volkmar; Stewart, David B

    2016-01-01

    Despite being a conceptually appealing alternative to conventional antibiotics, a major challenge toward the successful implementation of antisense treatments for bacterial infections is the development of efficient oligonucleotide delivery systems. Cationic vesicles (bolasomes) composed of dequalinium chloride (“DQAsomes”) have been used to deliver plasmid DNA across the cardiolipin-rich inner membrane of mitochondria. As cardiolipin is also a component of many bacterial membranes, we investigated the application of cationic bolasomes to bacteria as an oligonucleotide delivery system. Antisense sequences designed in silico to target the expression of essential genes of the bacterial pathogen, Clostridium difficile, were synthesized as 2′-O-methyl phosphorothioate gapmer antisense oligonucleotides (ASO). These antisense gapmers were quantitatively assessed for their ability to block mRNA translation using luciferase reporter and C. difficile protein expression plasmid constructs in a coupled transcription–translation system. Cationic bolaamphiphile compounds (dequalinium derivatives) of varying alkyl chain length were synthesized and bolasomes were prepared via probe sonication of an aqueous suspension. Bolasomes were characterized by particle size distribution, zeta potential, and binding capacities for anionic oligonucleotide. Bolasomes and antisense gapmers were combined to form antisense nanocomplexes. Anaerobic C. difficile log phase cultures were treated with serial doses of gapmer nanocomplexes or equivalent amounts of empty bolasomes for 24 hours. Antisense gapmers for four gene targets achieved nanomolar minimum inhibitory concentrations for C. difficile, with the lowest values observed for oligonucleotides targeting polymerase genes rpoB and dnaE. No inhibition of bacterial growth was observed from treatments at matched dosages of scrambled gapmer nanocomplexes or plain, oligonucleotide-free bolasomes compared to untreated control cultures. We

  6. Advanced In vivo Use of CRISPR/Cas9 and Anti-sense DNA Inhibition for Gene Manipulation in the Brain

    PubMed Central

    Walters, Brandon J.; Azam, Amber B.; Gillon, Colleen J.; Josselyn, Sheena A.; Zovkic, Iva B.

    2016-01-01

    Gene editing tools are essential for uncovering how genes mediate normal brain–behavior relationships and contribute to neurodegenerative and neuropsychiatric disorders. Recent progress in gene editing technology now allows neuroscientists unprecedented access to edit the genome efficiently. Although many important tools have been developed, here we focus on approaches that allow for rapid gene editing in the adult nervous system, particularly CRISPR/Cas9 and anti-sense nucleotide-based techniques. CRISPR/Cas9 is a flexible gene editing tool, allowing the genome to be manipulated in diverse ways. For instance, CRISPR/Cas9 has been successfully used to knockout genes, knock-in mutations, overexpress or inhibit gene activity, and provide scaffolding for recruiting specific epigenetic regulators to individual genes and gene regions. Moreover, the CRISPR/Cas9 system may be modified to target multiple genes at one time, affording simultaneous inhibition and overexpression of distinct genetic targets. Although many of the more advanced applications of CRISPR/Cas9 have not been applied to the nervous system, the toolbox is widely accessible, such that it is poised to help advance neuroscience. Anti-sense nucleotide-based technologies can be used to rapidly knockdown genes in the brain. The main advantage of anti-sense based tools is their simplicity, allowing for rapid gene delivery with minimal technical expertise. Here, we describe the main applications and functions of each of these systems with an emphasis on their many potential applications in neuroscience laboratories. PMID:26793235

  7. Cytomegalovirus-mediated induction of antisense mRNA expression to UL44 inhibits virus replication in an astrocytoma cell line: identification of an essential gene.

    PubMed Central

    Ripalti, A; Boccuni, M C; Campanini, F; Landini, M P

    1995-01-01

    We have used an antisense RNA approach in the analysis of gene function in human cytomegalovirus (HCMV). An astrocytoma cell line (U373-MG) that is permissive for virus replication was permanently transfected with a construct bearing sequence from HCMV UL44 (coding for the major late DNA-binding protein, ppUL44, also known as pp52 or ICP36) in an antisense orientation and under the control of the immediate-early enhancer-promoter element. Upon HCMV infection at a high multiplicity, we found a marked reduction in UL44 protein products (the ICP36 family of proteins) in established cell transfectants and a strong inhibition of virus yield in infected-cell supernatants at two weeks postinfection, while herpes simplex virus replication was not affected. In infected cells, viral DNA replication was strongly inhibited. While gene products such as pUS22 and pUL32 were also inhibited, pUL123 and pUL82 accumulated in the infected cells over time. Our data suggest an essential role for the UL44 family of proteins in HCMV replication and represent a model of virus inhibition by virus-induced antisense RNA synthesis in genetically modified cells. PMID:7884850

  8. Reversal of the malignant phenotype of cervical cancer CaSki cells through adeno-associated virus-mediated delivery of HPV16 E7 antisense RNA.

    PubMed

    Wu, Sufang; Meng, Li; Wang, Shixuan; Wang, Wei; Xi, Ling; Tian, Xun; Chen, Gang; Wu, Ying; Zhou, Jianfeng; Xu, Gang; Lu, Yunping; Ma, Ding

    2006-04-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is the most important risk factor for the development of cervical cancer. The oncogene E7 from high-risk HPV strains has the ability to immortalize epithelial cells and increase cellular transformation in culture. In this study, we explored the possibility of preventing cervical cancer growth by inhibiting HPV16 E7 expression through gene transfer of an antisense construct. A recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) vector was chosen for the transfer, based on its transfection efficiency, in vivo stability, and lack of detectable pathology. In vitro transfer of an rAAV vector expressing antisense HPV16 E7 (AAV-HPV16E7AS) inhibited cell proliferation, induced apoptosis, reduced cell migration, and restrained in vivo proliferation of HPV16/HPV18-positive cervical cancer CaSki cells. These results indicate that down-regulation of HPV16 E7 with antisense RNA is beneficial in reducing the tumorigenicity of CaSki cells, and rAAV vectors ought to be a new efficient approach for delivering the expression of therapeutic genes.

  9. Effects of different target sites on antisense RNA-mediated regulation of gene expression.

    PubMed

    Park, Hongmarn; Yoon, Yeongseong; Suk, Shinae; Lee, Ji Young; Lee, Younghoon

    2014-11-01

    Antisense RNA is a type of noncoding RNA (ncRNA) that binds to complementary mRNA sequences and induces gene repression by inhibiting translation or degrading mRNA. Recently, several small ncRNAs (sRNAs) have been identified in Escherichia coli that act as antisense RNA mainly via base pairing with mRNA. The base pairing predominantly leads to gene repression, and in some cases, gene activation. In the current study, we examined how the location of target sites affects sRNA-mediated gene regulation. An efficient antisense RNA expression system was developed, and the effects of antisense RNAs on various target sites in a model mRNA were examined. The target sites of antisense RNAs suppressing gene expression were identified, not only in the translation initiation region (TIR) of mRNA, but also at the junction between the coding region and 3' untranslated region. Surprisingly, an antisense RNA recognizing the upstream region of TIR enhanced gene expression through increasing mRNA stability.

  10. [Exon skipping therapy for Duchenne muscular dystrophy by using antisense Morpholino].

    PubMed

    Takeda, Shin'ichi

    2009-11-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is caused by the lack of dystrophin protein at the sarcolemma. Exon skipping by antisense oligonucleotides is a novel method to restore the reading frame of the mutated DMD gene, and rescue dystrophin production. We recently reported that systemic delivery of Morpholino antisense oligonucleotides targeting exon 6 and 8 of the canine DMD gene, efficiently recovered functional dystrophin proteins at the sarcolamma of dystrophic dogs, and improved performance of affected dogs without serious side effects (Yokota et al., Ann Neurol. 65 (6): 667-676, 2009). To optimize therapeutic antisense Morpholinos for more frequent mutations of the DMD gene, we designed antisense Morpholinos targeting exon 51 of the mouse DMD gene, and injected them separately or in combination into the muscles of mdx52 mice, in which exon 52 has been deleted by a gene targeting technique (Araki et al., 1997). We also tried systemic delivery of antisense Morpholino to skip exon 51 in mdx52 mice. It is important to verify the effectiveness and side effects of antisense Morpholino in experimental animal models such as dystrophic dogs or mdx52 mice, before clinical trials in DMD patients.

  11. Upstream Anti-sense Promoters are Hubs of Transcription Factor Binding and Active Histone Modifications

    PubMed Central

    Scruggs, Benjamin S.; Gilchrist, Daniel A.; Nechaev, Sergei; Muse, Ginger W.; Burkholder, Adam; Fargo, David C.; Adelman, Karen

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Anti-sense transcription originating upstream of mammalian protein-coding genes is a well-documented phenomenon, but remarkably little is known about the regulation or function of anti-sense promoters and the non-coding RNAs they generate. Here we define at nucleotide resolution the divergent transcription start sites (TSSs) near mouse mRNA genes. We find that coupled sense and anti-sense TSSs precisely define the boundaries of a nucleosome-depleted region (NDR) that is highly enriched in transcription factor (TF) motifs. Notably, as the distance between sense and anti-sense TSSs increases, so does the size of the NDR, the level of signal-dependent TF binding and gene activation. We further discover a group of anti-sense TSSs in macrophages with an enhancer-like chromatin signature. Interestingly, this signature identifies divergent promoters that are activated during immune challenge. We propose that anti-sense promoters serve as platforms for TF binding and establishment of active chromatin to further regulate or enhance sense-strand mRNA expression. PMID:26028540

  12. Transcriptional interference by antisense RNA is required for circadian clock function

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Zhihong; Ye, Qiaohong; Anson, Simon R; Yang, Jichen; Xiao, Guanghua; Kowbel, David; Glass, N. Louise; Crosthwaite, Susan K.; Liu, Yi

    2014-01-01

    Eukaryotic circadian oscillators consist of negative feedback loops that generate endogenous rhythmicities1. Natural antisense RNAs are found in a wide range of eukaryotic organisms2-5. Nevertheless, the physiological importance and mode of action of most antisense RNAs is not clear6-9. frequency (frq) encodes a component of the Neurospora core circadian negative feedback loop which was thought to generate sustained rhythmicity10. Transcription of qrf, the long non-coding frq antisense RNA, is light induced, and its level oscillates in antiphase to frq sense RNA3. Here we show that qrf transcription is regulated by both light-dependent and -independent mechanisms. Light-dependent qrf transcription represses frq expression and regulates clock resetting. qrf expression in the dark, on the other hand, is required for circadian rhythmicity. frq transcription also inhibits qrf expression and surprisingly, drives the antiphasic rhythm of qrf transcripts. The mutual inhibition of frq and qrf transcription thus forms a double negative feedback loop that is interlocked with the core feedback loop. Genetic and mathematical modeling analyses indicate that such an arrangement is required for robust and sustained circadian rhythmicity. Moreover, our results suggest that antisense transcription inhibits sense expression by mediating chromatin modifications and premature transcription termination. Together, our results established antisense transcription as an essential feature in a circadian system and shed light on the importance and mechanism of antisense action. PMID:25132551

  13. CEA and AFP expression in human hepatoma cells transfected with antisense IGF-I gene

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Li; Li, Shu-Nong; Wang, Xiao-Ning

    1998-01-01

    AIM: To determine whether antisense insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) gene can modulate CEA and AFP expression in human hepatoma cells (HepG2). METHODS: Transfection of HepG2 cells was accomplished using Lipofectin reagent. Northern blot analysis confirmed the antisense IGF-I RNA of the transfected cells. CEA and AFP levels were measured using radioimmunoassay. RESULTS: Human hepatoma cell lines (HepG2) were transfected with antisense IGF-I gene. Northern blot analysis confirmed that antisense IGF-I RNA was expressed in the transfected cells. The effect of antisense IGF-I gene on CEA and AFP expression was demonstrated by the fact that the CEA and AFP levels in the supernatant of transfected cell culture were significantly lower as compared with the parent cells, [CEA 7.0 μg/L ± 0.76 μg/L and 3.29 μg/L ± 1.80 μg/L (P < 0.05) and AFP 53.63 μg/L ± 6.02 μg/L and 9.0 μg/L ± 5.26 μg/L (P < 0.01), respectively]. CONCLUSION: The malignant potentiality of the transfected cells was partially suppressed.Antisense IGF-I gene can modulate the expression of CEA and AFP in human hepatoma cell lines (HepG2) PMID:11819225

  14. Rho and NusG suppress pervasive antisense transcription in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Peters, Jason M.; Mooney, Rachel A.; Grass, Jeffrey A.; Jessen, Erik D.; Tran, Frances; Landick, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Despite the prevalence of antisense transcripts in bacterial transcriptomes, little is known about how their synthesis is controlled. We report that a major function of the Escherichia coli termination factor Rho and its cofactor, NusG, is suppression of ubiquitous antisense transcription genome-wide. Rho binds C-rich unstructured nascent RNA (high C/G ratio) prior to its ATP-dependent dissociation of transcription complexes. NusG is required for efficient termination at minority subsets (∼20%) of both antisense and sense Rho-dependent terminators with lower C/G ratio sequences. In contrast, a widely studied nusA deletion proposed to compromise Rho-dependent termination had no effect on antisense or sense Rho-dependent terminators in vivo. Global colocalization of the histone-like nucleoid-structuring protein (H-NS) with Rho-dependent terminators and genetic interactions between hns and rho suggest that H-NS aids Rho in suppression of antisense transcription. The combined actions of Rho, NusG, and H-NS appear to be analogous to the Sen1–Nrd1–Nab3 and nucleosome systems that suppress antisense transcription in eukaryotes. PMID:23207917

  15. Identification of antisense long noncoding RNAs that function as SINEUPs in human cells.

    PubMed

    Schein, Aleks; Zucchelli, Silvia; Kauppinen, Sakari; Gustincich, Stefano; Carninci, Piero

    2016-09-20

    Mammalian genomes encode numerous natural antisense long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) that regulate gene expression. Recently, an antisense lncRNA to mouse Ubiquitin carboxyl-terminal hydrolase L1 (Uchl1) was reported to increase UCHL1 protein synthesis, representing a new functional class of lncRNAs, designated as SINEUPs, for SINE element-containing translation UP-regulators. Here, we show that an antisense lncRNA to the human protein phosphatase 1 regulatory subunit 12A (PPP1R12A), named as R12A-AS1, which overlaps with the 5' UTR and first coding exon of the PPP1R12A mRNA, functions as a SINEUP, increasing PPP1R12A protein translation in human cells. The SINEUP activity depends on the aforementioned sense-antisense interaction and a free right Alu monomer repeat element at the 3' end of R12A-AS1. In addition, we identify another human antisense lncRNA with SINEUP activity. Our results demonstrate for the first time that human natural antisense lncRNAs can up-regulate protein translation, suggesting that endogenous SINEUPs may be widespread and present in many mammalian species.

  16. Identification of sense and antisense transcripts regulated by drought in sugarcane.

    PubMed

    Lembke, Carolina Gimiliani; Nishiyama, Milton Yutaka; Sato, Paloma Mieko; de Andrade, Rodrigo Fandiño; Souza, Glaucia Mendes

    2012-07-01

    Sugarcane is an important sugar and energy crop that can be used efficiently for biofuels production. The development of sugarcane cultivars tolerant to drought could allow for the expansion of plantations to sub-prime regions. Knowledge on the mechanisms underlying drought responses and its relationship with carbon partition would greatly help to define routes to increase yield. In this work we studied sugarcane responses to drought using a custom designed oligonucleotide array with 21,901 different probes. The oligoarrays were designed to contain probes that detect transcription in both sense and antisense orientation. We validated the results obtained using quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR). A total of 987 genes were differentially expressed in at least one sample of sugarcane plants submitted to drought for 24, 72 and 120 h. Among them, 928 were sense transcripts and 59 were antisense transcripts. Genes related to Carbohydrate Metabolism, RNA Metabolism and Signal Transduction were selected for gene expression validation by qPCR that indicated a validation percentage of 90%. From the probes presented on the array, 75% of the sense probes and 11.9% of the antisense probes have signal above background and can be classified as expressed sequences. Our custom sugarcane oligonucleotide array provides sensitivity and good coverage of sugarcane transcripts for the identification of a representative proportion of natural antisense transcripts (NATs) and sense-antisense transcript pairs (SATs). The antisense transcriptome showed, in most cases, co-expression with respective sense transcripts.

  17. Programmed fluctuations in sense/antisense transcript ratios drive sexual differentiation in S. pombe

    PubMed Central

    Bitton, Danny A; Grallert, Agnes; Scutt, Paul J; Yates, Tim; Li, Yaoyong; Bradford, James R; Hey, Yvonne; Pepper, Stuart D; Hagan, Iain M; Miller, Crispin J

    2011-01-01

    Strand-specific RNA sequencing of S. pombe revealed a highly structured programme of ncRNA expression at over 600 loci. Waves of antisense transcription accompanied sexual differentiation. A substantial proportion of ncRNA arose from mechanisms previously considered to be largely artefactual, including improper 3′ termination and bidirectional transcription. Constitutive induction of the entire spk1+, spo4+, dis1+ and spo6+ antisense transcripts from an integrated, ectopic, locus disrupted their respective meiotic functions. This ability of antisense transcripts to disrupt gene function when expressed in trans suggests that cis production at native loci during sexual differentiation may also control gene function. Consistently, insertion of a marker gene adjacent to the dis1+ antisense start site mimicked ectopic antisense expression in reducing the levels of this microtubule regulator and abolishing the microtubule-dependent ‘horsetail' stage of meiosis. Antisense production had no impact at any of these loci when the RNA interference (RNAi) machinery was removed. Thus, far from being simply ‘genome chatter', this extensive ncRNA landscape constitutes a fundamental component in the controls that drive the complex programme of sexual differentiation in S. pombe. PMID:22186733

  18. In vitro inhibition of promyelocytic leukemia/retinoic acid receptor-alpha (PML/RARalpha) expression and leukemogenic activity by DNA/LNA chimeric antisense oligos.

    PubMed

    Caprodossi, Sara; Galluzzi, Luca; Biagetti, Simona; Della Chiara, Giulia; Pelicci, Pier Giuseppe; Magnani, Mauro; Fanelli, Mirco

    2005-01-01

    Acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) is a subtype of myeloid leukemia characterized by the chromosomal translocation t(15:17) that leads to the expression of promyelocytic leukemia/retinoic acid receptor-alpha (PML/ RARalpha) oncofusion protein. The block of differentiation at the promyelocytic stage of the blasts and their increased survival induced by PML/RARalpha are the principal biological features of the disease. Therapies based on pharmacological doses of retinoic acid (RA, 10(-6) M) are able to restore APL cell differentiation in most cases, but not to achieve complete hematological remission because retinoic acid resistance occurs in many patients. In order to elaborate alternative therapeutic approaches, we focused our attention on the use of antisense oligonucleotides as gene-specific drug directed to PML/RARalpha mRNA target. We used antisense molecules containing multiple locked nucleic acid (LNA) modifications. The LNAs are nucleotide analogues that are able to form duplexes with complementary DNA or RNA sequences with highly increased thermal stability and are resistant to 3'-exonuclease degradation in vitro. The DNA/LNA chimeric molecules were designed on the fusion sequence of PML and RARalpha genes to specifically target the oncofusion protein. Cell-free and in vitro experiments using U937-PR9-inducible cell line showed that DNA/LNA oligonucleotides were able to interfere with PML/RARalpha expression more efficiently than the corresponding unmodified DNA oligo. Moreover, the treatment of U937-PR9 cells with these chimeric antisense molecules was able to abrogate the block of differentiation induced by PML/RARalpha oncoprotein. These data suggest a possible application of oligonucleotides containing LNA in an antisense therapeutic strategy for APL.

  19. Bax expression remains unchanged following antisense treatment directed against BCL-2.

    PubMed

    Rubenstein, Marvin; Hollowell, Courtney M P; Guinan, Patrick

    2011-09-01

    Antisense oligonucleotides (oligos) have been evaluated in both in vivo and in vitro prostate cancer models. Although most contain a single mRNA binding site, our laboratory has also evaluated bispecific types directed toward two proteins. This study evaluates the inhibition of in vitro propagating LNCaP cells employing mono- and bispecific oligos directed against bcl-2 [the second binding site was directed against the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)]. Employing RT-PCR, the expression of two apoptosis regulating proteins, bcl-2 and non-targeted bax, was then evaluated. LNCaP prostate tumor cells were initially incubated for 24 h in the presence of oligos (6.25 μM) directed against bcl-2 and compared to lipofectin containing controls. Comparable and significant growth inhibition was produced by both mono- and bispecific forms. Employing RT-PCR to determine the expression of bcl-2, we found that the greatest amount of mRNA suppression approached 100% for each oligo type: monospecific MR4 (directed only against bcl-2), 100%; and bispecifics MR24 and MR42, 86 and 100%, respectively. We conclude, based upon both inhibition of in vitro growth and bcl-2 expression, that bispecific antisense oligos directed against EGFR and bcl-2 mRNAs are at least as effective as a monospecific directed solely toward bcl-2. In an effort to determine a compensatory response by cells evading apoptosis in the presence of bcl-2 suppression, the levels of mRNA encoding the non-targeted apoptosis activating protein bax were evaluated. Non-targeted protein suppression by these bispecifics has previously been demonstrated against prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA). However, in contrast to effects against bcl-2 and PSMA, no significant alteration in bax expression was produced by either oligo type. In LNCaP cells, bcl-2 suppression does not influence bax expression and, at least for this protein, there is no compensatory change in bax expression regulating apoptosis at this level

  20. Antisense DNA parameters derived from next-nearest-neighbor analysis of experimental data

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The enumeration of tetrameric and other sequence motifs that are positively or negatively correlated with in vivo antisense DNA effects has been a useful addition to the arsenal of information needed to predict effective targets for antisense DNA control of gene expression. Such retrospective information derived from in vivo cellular experiments characterizes aspects of the sequence dependence of antisense inhibition that are not predicted by nearest-neighbor (NN) thermodynamic parameters derived from in vitro experiments. However, quantitation of the antisense contributions of motifs is problematic, since individual motifs are not isolated from the effects of neighboring nucleotides, and motifs may be overlapping. These problems are circumvented by a next-nearest-neighbor (NNN) analysis of antisense DNA effects in which the overlapping nature of nearest-neighbors is taken into account. Results Next-nearest-neighbor triplet combinations of nucleotides are the simplest that include overlapping sequence effects and therefore can encompass interactions beyond those of nearest neighbors. We used singular value decomposition (SVD) to fit experimental data from our laboratory in which phosphorothioate-modified antisense DNAs (S-DNAs) 20 nucleotides long were used to inhibit cellular protein expression in 112 experiments involving four gene targets and two cell lines. Data were fitted using a NNN model, neglecting end effects, to derive NNN inhibition parameters that could be combined to give parameters for a set of 49 sequences that represents the inhibitory effects of all possible overlapping triplet interactions in the cellular targets of these antisense S-DNAs. We also show that parameters to describe subsets of the data, such as the mRNAs being targeted and the cell lines used, can be included in such a derivation. While NNN triplet parameters provided an adequate model to fit our data, NN doublet parameters did not. Conclusions The methodology presented

  1. Conserved pattern of antisense overlapping transcription in the homologous human ERCC-1 and yeast RAD10 DNA repair gene regions.

    PubMed Central

    van Duin, M; van Den Tol, J; Hoeijmakers, J H; Bootsma, D; Rupp, I P; Reynolds, P; Prakash, L; Prakash, S

    1989-01-01

    We report that the genes for the homologous Saccharomyces cerevisiae RAD10 and human ERCC-1 DNA excision repair proteins harbor overlapping antisense transcription units in their 3' regions. Since naturally occurring antisense transcription is rare in S. cerevisiae and humans (this is the first example in human cells), our findings indicate that antisense transcription in the ERCC-1-RAD10 gene regions represents an evolutionarily conserved feature. Images PMID:2471070

  2. Periostin antisense oligonucleotide prevents adhesion formation after surgery in mice.

    PubMed

    Takai, Shinji; Yoshino, Masafumi; Takao, Kazumasa; Yoshikawa, Kazunori; Jin, Denan

    2017-02-01

    To study the role of periostin in adhesion formation, the effect of periostin antisense oligonucleotide (PAO) on adhesion formation was evaluated in mice. Under anesthesia, the serous membrane of the cecum was abraded, and the adhesion score and mRNA levels of periostin and its related factors were determined after surgery. Saline, 40 mg/kg of negative sense oligonucleotide (NSO), or 40 mg/kg of PAO were injected into the abdomen after surgery, and the adhesion score and mRNA levels were evaluated 14 days later. Filmy adhesion formation was observed 1 day after surgery, and the adhesion score increased gradually to 14 days. The mRNA levels of periostin, transforming growth factor (TGF)-β, and collagen I increased gradually from 3 days to 14 days. The adhesion score of PAO was significantly lower than of saline or NSO 14 days after surgery. The mRNA levels of periostin, TGF-β, and collagen I were also significantly attenuated by treatment with PAO compared with saline or NSO. Thus, these results demonstrated that the periostin mRNA level increased in the abraded cecum, and PAO prevented adhesion formation along with attenuation of the periostin mRNA level. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Annexin A2 facilitates endocytic trafficking of antisense oligonucleotides

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shiyu; Sun, Hong; Tanowitz, Michael; Liang, Xue-hai; Crooke, Stanley T.

    2016-01-01

    Chemically modified antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) designed to mediate site-specific cleavage of RNA by RNase H1 are used as research tools and as therapeutics. ASOs modified with phosphorothioate (PS) linkages enter cells via endocytotic pathways. The mechanisms by which PS-ASOs are released from membrane-enclosed endocytotic organelles to reach target RNAs remain largely unknown. We recently found that annexin A2 (ANXA2) co-localizes with PS-ASOs in late endosomes (LEs) and enhances ASO activity. Here, we show that co-localization of ANXA2 with PS-ASO is not dependent on their direct interactions or mediated by ANXA2 partner protein S100A10. Instead, ANXA2 accompanies the transport of PS-ASOs to LEs, as ANXA2/PS-ASO co-localization was observed inside LEs. Although ANXA2 appears not to affect levels of PS-ASO internalization, ANXA2 reduction caused significant accumulation of ASOs in early endosomes (EEs) and reduced localization in LEs and decreased PS-ASO activity. Importantly, the kinetics of PS-ASO activity upon free uptake show that target mRNA reduction occurs at least 4 hrs after PS-ASOs exit from EEs and is coincident with release from LEs. Taken together, our results indicate that ANXA2 facilitates PS-ASO trafficking from early to late endosomes where it may also contribute to PS-ASO release. PMID:27378781

  4. Improved targeting of miRNA with antisense oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Davis, Scott; Lollo, Bridget; Freier, Susan; Esau, Christine

    2006-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of 20-24 nt noncoding RNAs that regulate target mRNAs post-transcriptionally by binding with imperfect complementarity in the 3'-untranslated region (3'-UTR) and inhibiting translation or RNA stability. Current understanding of miRNA biology is limited, and antisense oligonucleotide (ASO) inhibition is a powerful technique for miRNA functionalization in vitro and in vivo, and for therapeutic targeting of miRNAs. Identification of optimal ASO chemistries for targeting miRNAs is therefore of great interest. We evaluated a number of 2'-sugar and backbone ASO modifications for their ability to inhibit miR-21 activity on a luciferase reporter mRNA. ASO modifications that improved target affinity improved miRNA ASO activity, yet the positioning of high-affinity modifications also had dramatically different effects on miRNA activity, suggesting that more than affinity determined the effectiveness of the miRNA ASOs. We present data in which the activity of a modified miRNA ASO was inversely correlated to its tolerability as an siRNA passenger strand, suggesting that a similar mechanism could be involved in the dissociation of miRNA ASOs and siRNA passenger strands. These studies begin to define the factors important for designing improved miRNA ASOs, enabling more effective miRNA functionalization and therapeutic targeting.

  5. Improved targeting of miRNA with antisense oligonucleotides

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Scott; Lollo, Bridget; Freier, Susan; Esau, Christine

    2006-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of 20–24 nt noncoding RNAs that regulate target mRNAs post-transcriptionally by binding with imperfect complementarity in the 3′-untranslated region (3′-UTR) and inhibiting translation or RNA stability. Current understanding of miRNA biology is limited, and antisense oligonucleotide (ASO) inhibition is a powerful technique for miRNA functionalization in vitro and in vivo, and for therapeutic targeting of miRNAs. Identification of optimal ASO chemistries for targeting miRNAs is therefore of great interest. We evaluated a number of 2′-sugar and backbone ASO modifications for their ability to inhibit miR-21 activity on a luciferase reporter mRNA. ASO modifications that improved target affinity improved miRNA ASO activity, yet the positioning of high-affinity modifications also had dramatically different effects on miRNA activity, suggesting that more than affinity determined the effectiveness of the miRNA ASOs. We present data in which the activity of a modified miRNA ASO was inversely correlated to its tolerability as an siRNA passenger strand, suggesting that a similar mechanism could be involved in the dissociation of miRNA ASOs and siRNA passenger strands. These studies begin to define the factors important for designing improved miRNA ASOs, enabling more effective miRNA functionalization and therapeutic targeting. PMID:16690972

  6. Antitumor Activity of a Novel Antisense Oligonucleotide Against Akt1

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Heejeong; Kim, Deog Joong; Ahn, Eun Hyun; Gellert, Ginelle C.; Shay, Jerry W.; Ahn, Chang-Ho; Lee, Young Bok

    2010-01-01

    The AKT pathway is an important therapeutic target for cancer drug discovery as it functions as a main point for transducing extracellular and intracellular oncogenic signals. Moreover, alternations of the AKT pathway have been found in a wide range of cancers. In the present study, we found that an Akt1 antisense oligonucleotide (Akt1 AO) significantly downregulated the expression of AKT1 at both the mRNA and protein levels and inhibited cellular growth at nanomolar concentrations in various types of human cancer cells. Combined treatment of Akt1 AO with several cytotoxic drugs resulted in an additive growth inhibition of Caki-1 cells. The in vivo effectiveness of Akt1 AO was determined using two different xenograft nude mouse models. Akt1 AO (30 mg/kg, i.v. every 48 h) significantly inhibited the tumor growth of nude mouse subcutaneously implanted with U251 human glioblastoma cells after 27 days treatment. Akt1 AO (30 mg/kg, i.p continuously via osmotic pump) also significantly inhibited the tumor formation in nude mice implanted with luciferase-expressing MIA human pancreatic cancer cells (MIA-Luc) after 14 days of treatment. The luciferase signals from MIA-Luc cells were reduced or completely abolished after 2 weeks of treatment and the implanted tumors were barely detectable. Our findings suggest that Akt1 AO alone or in combination with other clinically approved anticancer agents should be further explored and progressed into clinical studies as a potential novel therapeutic agent. PMID:19693774

  7. Chimeric Antisense Oligonucleotide Conjugated to α-Tocopherol

    PubMed Central

    Nishina, Tomoko; Numata, Junna; Nishina, Kazutaka; Yoshida-Tanaka, Kie; Nitta, Keiko; Piao, Wenying; Iwata, Rintaro; Ito, Shingo; Kuwahara, Hiroya; Wada, Takeshi; Mizusawa, Hidehiro; Yokota, Takanori

    2015-01-01

    We developed an efficient system for delivering short interfering RNA (siRNA) to the liver by using α-tocopherol conjugation. The α-tocopherol–conjugated siRNA was effective and safe for RNA interference–mediated gene silencing in vivo. In contrast, when the 13-mer LNA (locked nucleic acid)-DNA gapmer antisense oligonucleotide (ASO) was directly conjugated with α-tocopherol it showed markedly reduced silencing activity in mouse liver. Here, therefore, we tried to extend the 5′-end of the ASO sequence by using 5′-α-tocopherol–conjugated 4- to 7-mers of unlocked nucleic acid (UNA) as a “second wing.” Intravenous injection of mice with this α-tocopherol–conjugated chimeric ASO achieved more potent silencing than ASO alone in the liver, suggesting increased delivery of the ASO to the liver. Within the cells, the UNA wing was cleaved or degraded and α-tocopherol was released from the 13-mer gapmer ASO, resulting in activation of the gapmer. The α-tocopherol–conjugated chimeric ASO showed high efficacy, with hepatic tropism, and was effective and safe for gene silencing in vivo. We have thus identified a new, effective LNA-DNA gapmer structure in which drug delivery system (DDS) molecules are bound to ASO with UNA sequences. PMID:25584900

  8. Specific RNP capture with antisense LNA/DNA mixmers

    PubMed Central

    Rogell, Birgit; Fischer, Bernd; Rettel, Mandy; Krijgsveld, Jeroen; Castello, Alfredo; Hentze, Matthias W.

    2017-01-01

    RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) play essential roles in RNA biology, responding to cellular and environmental stimuli to regulate gene expression. Important advances have helped to determine the (near) complete repertoires of cellular RBPs. However, identification of RBPs associated with specific transcripts remains a challenge. Here, we describe “specific ribonucleoprotein (RNP) capture,” a versatile method for the determination of the proteins bound to specific transcripts in vitro and in cellular systems. Specific RNP capture uses UV irradiation to covalently stabilize protein–RNA interactions taking place at “zero distance.” Proteins bound to the target RNA are captured by hybridization with antisense locked nucleic acid (LNA)/DNA oligonucleotides covalently coupled to a magnetic resin. After stringent washing, interacting proteins are identified by quantitative mass spectrometry. Applied to in vitro extracts, specific RNP capture identifies the RBPs bound to a reporter mRNA containing the Sex-lethal (Sxl) binding motifs, revealing that the Sxl homolog sister of Sex lethal (Ssx) displays similar binding preferences. This method also revealed the repertoire of RBPs binding to 18S or 28S rRNAs in HeLa cells, including previously unknown rRNA-binding proteins. PMID:28476952

  9. Prediction of Multi-Target Networks of Neuroprotective Compounds with Entropy Indices and Synthesis, Assay, and Theoretical Study of New Asymmetric 1,2-Rasagiline Carbamates

    PubMed Central

    Romero Durán, Francisco J.; Alonso, Nerea; Caamaño, Olga; García-Mera, Xerardo; Yañez, Matilde; Prado-Prado, Francisco J.; González-Díaz, Humberto

    2014-01-01

    In a multi-target complex network, the links (Lij) represent the interactions between the drug (di) and the target (tj), characterized by different experimental measures (Ki, Km, IC50, etc.) obtained in pharmacological assays under diverse boundary conditions (cj). In this work, we handle Shannon entropy measures for developing a model encompassing a multi-target network of neuroprotective/neurotoxic compounds reported in the CHEMBL database. The model predicts correctly >8300 experimental outcomes with Accuracy, Specificity, and Sensitivity above 80%–90% on training and external validation series. Indeed, the model can calculate different outcomes for >30 experimental measures in >400 different experimental protocolsin relation with >150 molecular and cellular targets on 11 different organisms (including human). Hereafter, we reported by the first time the synthesis, characterization, and experimental assays of a new series of chiral 1,2-rasagiline carbamate derivatives not reported in previous works. The experimental tests included: (1) assay in absence of neurotoxic agents; (2) in the presence of glutamate; and (3) in the presence of H2O2. Lastly, we used the new Assessing Links with Moving Averages (ALMA)-entropy model to predict possible outcomes for the new compounds in a high number of pharmacological tests not carried out experimentally. PMID:25255029

  10. A Novel, Multi-Target Natural Drug Candidate, Matrine, Improves Cognitive Deficits in Alzheimer's Disease Transgenic Mice by Inhibiting Aβ Aggregation and Blocking the RAGE/Aβ Axis.

    PubMed

    Cui, Lili; Cai, Yujie; Cheng, Wanwen; Liu, Gen; Zhao, Jianghao; Cao, Hao; Tao, Hua; Wang, Yan; Yin, Mingkang; Liu, Tingting; Liu, Yu; Huang, Pengru; Liu, Zhou; Li, Keshen; Zhao, Bin

    2017-04-01

    The treatment of AD is a topic that has puzzled researchers for many years. Current mainstream theories still consider Aβ to be the most important target for the cure of AD. In this study, we attempted to explore multiple targets for AD treatments with the aim of identifying a qualified compound that could both inhibit the aggregation of Aβ and block the RAGE/Aβ axis. We believed that a compound that targets both Aβ and RAGE may be a feasible strategy for AD treatment. A novel and small natural compound, Matrine (Mat), was identified by high-throughput screening of the main components of traditional Chinese herbs used to treat dementia. Various experimental techniques were used to evaluate the effect of Mat on these two targets both in vitro and in AD mouse model. Mat could inhibit Aβ42-induced cytotoxicity and suppress the Aβ/RAGE signaling pathway in vitro. Additionally, the results of in vivo evaluations of the effects of Mat on the two targets were consistent with the results of our in vitro studies. Furthermore, Mat reduced proinflammatory cytokines and Aβ deposition and attenuated the memory deficits of AD transgenic mice. We believe that this novel, multi-target strategy to inhibit both Aβ and RAGE, is worthy of further exploration. Therefore, our future studies will focus on identifying even more effective multi-target compounds for the treatment of AD based on the molecular structure of Mat.

  11. Defining Synphenotype Groups in Xenopus tropicalis by Use of Antisense Morpholino Oligonucleotides

    PubMed Central

    Rana, Amer Ahmed; Collart, Clara; Gilchrist, Michael J; Smith, J. C

    2006-01-01

    To identify novel genes involved in early development, and as proof-of-principle of a large-scale reverse genetics approach in a vertebrate embryo, we have carried out an antisense morpholino oligonucleotide (MO) screen in Xenopus tropicalis, in the course of which we have targeted 202 genes expressed during gastrula stages. MOs were designed to complement sequence between −80 and +25 bases of the initiating AUG codons of the target mRNAs, and the specificities of many were tested by (i) designing different non-overlapping MOs directed against the same mRNA, (ii) injecting MOs differing in five bases, and (iii) performing “rescue” experiments. About 65% of the MOs caused X. tropicalis embryos to develop abnormally (59% of those targeted against novel genes), and we have divided the genes into “synphenotype groups,” members of which cause similar loss-of-function phenotypes and that may function in the same developmental pathways. Analysis of the expression patterns of the 202 genes indicates that members of a synphenotype group are not necessarily members of the same synexpression group. This screen provides new insights into early vertebrate development and paves the way for a more comprehensive MO-based analysis of gene function in X. tropicalis. PMID:17112317

  12. Antisense Oligonucleotides Targeting Influenza A Segment 8 Genomic RNA Inhibit Viral Replication

    PubMed Central

    Lenartowicz, Elzbieta; Nogales, Aitor; Kierzek, Elzbieta; Kierzek, Ryszard; Martínez-Sobrido, Luis

    2016-01-01

    Influenza A virus (IAV) affects 5%–10% of the world's population every year. Through genome changes, many IAV strains develop resistance to currently available anti-influenza therapeutics. Therefore, there is an urgent need to find new targets for therapeutics against this important human respiratory pathogen. In this study, 2′-O-methyl and locked nucleic acid antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) were designed to target internal regions of influenza A/California/04/2009 (H1N1) genomic viral RNA segment 8 (vRNA8) based on a base-pairing model of vRNA8. Ten of 14 tested ASOs showed inhibition of viral replication in Madin-Darby canine kidney cells. The best five ASOs were 11–15 nucleotides long and showed inhibition ranging from 5- to 25-fold. In a cell viability assay they showed no cytotoxicity. The same five ASOs also showed no inhibition of influenza B/Brisbane/60/2008 (Victoria lineage), indicating that they are sequence specific for IAV. Moreover, combinations of ASOs slightly improved anti-influenza activity. These studies establish the accessibility of IAV vRNA for ASOs in regions other than the panhandle formed between the 5′ and 3′ ends. Thus, these regions can provide targets for the development of novel IAV antiviral approaches. PMID:27463680

  13. Effects of antisense misexpression of CFC on downstream flectin protein expression during heart looping.

    PubMed

    Linask, Kersti K; Han, Ming-Da; Linask, Kaari L; Schlange, Thomas; Brand, Thomas

    2003-10-01

    Dextral looping of the heart is regulated on multiple levels. In humans, mutations of the genes CFC and Pitx2/RIEG result in laterality-associated cardiac anomalies. In animal models, a common read-out after the misexpression of laterality genes is heart looping direction. Missing in these studies is how laterality genes impact on downstream morphogenetic processes to coordinate heart looping. Previously, we showed that Pitx2 indirectly regulates flectin protein by regulating the timing of flectin expression in one heart field versus the other (Linask et al. [2002] Dev. Biol. 246:407-417). To address this question further we used a reported loss-of-function approach to interfere with chick CFC expression (Schlange et al. [2001] Dev. Biol. 234:376-389) and assaying for flectin expression during looping. Antisense CFC treatment results in abnormal heart looping or no looping. Our results show that regardless of the sidedness of downstream Pitx2 expression, it is the sidedness of predominant flectin protein expression in the extracellular matrix of the dorsal mesocardial folds and splanchnic mesoderm apposed to the foregut wall that is associated directly with looping direction. Thus, Pitx2 can be experimentally uncoupled from heart looping. The flectin asymmetry continues to be maintained in the secondary heart field during looping. Copyright 2003 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  14. Evaluation of Antisense Oligonucleotides Targeting ATXN3 in SCA3 Mouse Models.

    PubMed

    Moore, Lauren R; Rajpal, Gautam; Dillingham, Ian T; Qutob, Maya; Blumenstein, Kate G; Gattis, Danielle; Hung, Gene; Kordasiewicz, Holly B; Paulson, Henry L; McLoughlin, Hayley S

    2017-06-16

    The most common dominantly inherited ataxia, spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 (SCA3), is an incurable neurodegenerative disorder caused by a CAG repeat expansion in the ATXN3 gene that encodes an abnormally long polyglutamine tract in the disease protein, ATXN3. Mice lacking ATXN3 are phenotypically normal; hence, disease gene suppression offers a compelling approach to slow the neurodegenerative cascade in SCA3. Here we tested antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) that target human ATXN3 in two complementary mouse models of SCA3: yeast artificial chromosome (YAC) MJD-Q84.2 (Q84) mice expressing the full-length human ATXN3 gene and cytomegalovirus (CMV) MJD-Q135 (Q135) mice expressing a human ATXN3 cDNA. Intracerebroventricular injection of ASOs resulted in widespread delivery to the most vulnerable brain regions in SCA3. In treated Q84 mice, three of five tested ASOs reduced disease protein levels by >50% in the diencephalon, cerebellum, and cervical spinal cord. Two ASOs also significantly reduced mutant ATXN3 in the mouse forebrain and resulted in no signs of astrogliosis or microgliosis. In Q135 mice expressing a single ATXN3 isoform via a cDNA transgene, ASOs did not result in similar robust ATXN3 silencing. Our results indicate that ASOs targeting full-length human ATXN3 would likely be well tolerated and could lead to a preventative therapy for SCA3. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Antisense oligonucleotides delivered to the amniotic cavity in utero modulate gene expression in the postnatal mouse

    PubMed Central

    Depreux, Frederic F.; Wang, Lingyan; Jiang, Han; Jodelka, Francine M.; Rosencrans, Robert F.; Rigo, Frank; Lentz, Jennifer J.; Brigande, John V.; Hastings, Michelle L.

    2016-01-01

    Congenital diseases account for a large portion of pediatric illness. Prenatal screening and diagnosis permit early detection of many genetic diseases. Fetal therapeutic strategies to manage disease processes in utero represent a powerful new approach for clinical care. A safe and effective fetal pharmacotherapy designed to modulate gene expression ideally would avoid direct mechanical engagement of the fetus and present an external reservoir of drug. The amniotic cavity surrounding the fetus could serve as an ideal drug reservoir. Antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) are an established tool for the therapeutic modulation of gene expression. We hypothesize that ASOs administered to the amniotic cavity will gain entry to the fetus and modulate gene expression. Here, we show that an ASO targeting MALAT1 RNA, delivered by transuterine microinjection into the mouse amniotic cavity at embryonic day 13-13.5, reduces target RNA expression for up to 4 weeks after birth. A similarly delivered ASO targeting a causal splice site mutation for Usher syndrome corrects gene expression in the inner ear, a therapeutically relevant target tissue. We conclude that intra-amniotic delivery of ASOs is well tolerated and produces a sustained effect on postnatal gene expression. Transuterine delivery of ASOs is an innovative platform for developing fetal therapeutics to efficaciously treat congenital disease. PMID:27683224

  16. Dmpk gene deletion or antisense knockdown does not compromise cardiac or skeletal muscle function in mice

    PubMed Central

    Carrell, Samuel T.; Carrell, Ellie M.; Auerbach, David; Pandey, Sanjay K.; Bennett, C. Frank; Dirksen, Robert T.; Thornton, Charles A.

    2016-01-01

    Myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) is a genetic disorder in which dominant-active DM protein kinase (DMPK) transcripts accumulate in nuclear foci, leading to abnormal regulation of RNA processing. A leading approach to treat DM1 uses DMPK-targeting antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) to reduce levels of toxic RNA. However, basal levels of DMPK protein are reduced by half in DM1 patients. This raises concern that intolerance for further DMPK loss may limit ASO therapy, especially since mice with Dmpk gene deletion reportedly show cardiac defects and skeletal myopathy. We re-examined cardiac and muscle function in mice with Dmpk gene deletion, and studied post-maturity knockdown using Dmpk-targeting ASOs in mice with heterozygous deletion. Contrary to previous reports, we found no effect of Dmpk gene deletion on cardiac or muscle function, when studied on two genetic backgrounds. In heterozygous knockouts, the administration of ASOs reduced Dmpk expression in cardiac and skeletal muscle by > 90%, yet survival, electrocardiogram intervals, cardiac ejection fraction and muscle strength remained normal. The imposition of cardiac stress by pressure overload, or muscle stress by myotonia, did not unmask a requirement for DMPK. Our results support the feasibility and safety of using ASOs for post-transcriptional silencing of DMPK in muscle and heart. PMID:27522499

  17. In vivo correction of a Menkes disease model using antisense oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Madsen, Erik C; Morcos, Paul A; Mendelsohn, Bryce A; Gitlin, Jonathan D

    2008-03-11

    Although the molecular basis of many inherited metabolic diseases has been defined, the availability of effective therapies in such disorders remains problematic. Menkes disease is a fatal neurodegenerative disorder due to loss-of-function mutations in the ATP7A gene encoding a copper-transporting P-type Atpase. To develop therapeutic approaches in affected patients, we have identified a zebrafish model of Menkes disease termed calamity that results from splicing defects in the zebrafish orthologue of the ATP7A gene. Embryonic-recessive lethal mutants have impaired copper homeostasis that results in absent melanin pigmentation, impaired notochord formation, and hindbrain neurodegeneration. In this current study, we have attempted to rescue these striking phenotypic alterations by using a series of antisense morpholino oligonucleotides directed against the splice-site junctions of two mutant calamity alleles. Our findings reveal a robust and complete correction of the copper-deficient defects of calamity in association with the generation of the WT Menkes protein in all rescued mutants. Interestingly, a quantitative analysis of atp7a-specific transcripts suggests that competitive translational regulation may account for the synthesis of WT protein in these embryos. This in vivo correction of Menkes disease through the rescue of aberrant splicing may provide therapeutic options in this fatal disease and illustrates the potential for zebrafish models of human genetic disease in the development of treatments based on the principles of interactions of synthetic oligonucleotide analogues with mRNA.

  18. Robust gene silencing mediated by antisense small RNAs in the pathogenic protist Entamoeba histolytica

    PubMed Central

    Morf, Laura; Pearson, Richard J.; Wang, Angelia S.; Singh, Upinder

    2013-01-01

    RNA interference uses small RNAs (sRNA), which target genes for sequence-specific silencing. The parasite Entamoeba histolytica contains an abundant repertoire of 27 nt antisense (AS) sRNA with 5′-polyphosphate termini, but their roles in regulating gene expression have not been well established. We demonstrate that a gene-coding region to which large numbers of AS sRNAs map can serve as a ‘trigger’ and silence the gene fused to it. Silencing is mediated by generation of AS sRNAs with 5′-polyphosphate termini that have sequence specificity to the fused gene. The mechanism of silencing is independent of the placement of the trigger relative to the silenced gene but is dependent on the sRNA concentration to the trigger. Silencing requires transcription of the trigger-gene fusion and is maintained despite loss of the trigger plasmid. We used this approach to silence multiple amebic genes, including an E. histolytica Myb gene, which is upregulated during oxidative stress response. Silencing of the EhMyb gene decreased parasite viability under oxidative stress conditions. Thus, we have developed a new tool for genetic manipulation in E. histolytica with many advantages over currently available technologies. Additionally, these data shed mechanistic insights into a eukaryotic RNA interference pathway with many novel aspects. PMID:23935116

  19. Strategies for In Vivo Screening and Mitigation of Hepatotoxicity Associated with Antisense Drugs.

    PubMed

    Kamola, Piotr J; Maratou, Klio; Wilson, Paul A; Rush, Kay; Mullaney, Tanya; McKevitt, Tom; Evans, Paula; Ridings, Jim; Chowdhury, Probash; Roulois, Aude; Fairchild, Ann; McCawley, Sean; Cartwright, Karen; Gooderham, Nigel J; Gant, Timothy W; Moores, Kitty; Hughes, Stephen A; Edbrooke, Mark R; Clark, Kenneth; Parry, Joel D

    2017-09-15

    Antisense oligonucleotide (ASO) gapmers downregulate gene expression by inducing enzyme-dependent degradation of targeted RNA and represent a promising therapeutic platform for addressing previously undruggable genes. Unfortunately, their therapeutic application, particularly that of the more potent chemistries (e.g., locked-nucleic-acid-containing gapmers), has been hampered by their frequent hepatoxicity, which could be driven by hybridization-mediated interactions. An early de-risking of this liability is a crucial component of developing safe, ASO-based drugs. To rank ASOs based on their effect on the liver, we have developed an acute screen in the mouse that can be applied early in the drug development cycle. A single-dose (3-day) screen with streamlined endpoints (i.e., plasma transaminase levels and liver weights) was observed to be predictive of ASO hepatotoxicity ranking established based on a repeat-dose (15 day) study. Furthermore, to study the underlying mechanisms of liver toxicity, we applied transcriptome profiling and pathway analyses and show that adverse in vivo liver phenotypes correlate with the number of potent, hybridization-mediated off-target effects (OTEs). We propose that a combination of in silico OTE predictions, streamlined in vivo hepatotoxicity screening, and a transcriptome-wide selectivity screen is a valid approach to identifying and progressing safer compounds. Copyright © 2017 GSK R&D. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Antisense Oligonucleotides Delivered to the Mouse CNS Ameliorate Symptoms of Severe Spinal Muscular Atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Passini, Marco A.; Bu, Jie; Richards, Amy M.; Kinnecom, Cathrine; Sardi, S. Pablo; Stanek, Lisa M.; Hua, Yimin; Rigo, Frank; Matson, John; Hung, Gene; Kaye, Edward M.; Shihabuddin, Lamya S.; Krainer, Adrian R.; Bennett, C. Frank; Cheng, Seng H.

    2011-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is an autosomal recessive neuromuscular disorder caused by mutations in the SMN1 gene that result in a deficiency of SMN protein. One approach to treat SMA is to use antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) to redirect the splicing of a paralogous gene, SMN2, to boost production of functional SMN. Injection of a 2′-O-2-methoxyethyl–modified ASO (ASO-10-27) into the cerebral lateral ventricles of mice with a severe form of SMA resulted in splice-mediated increases in SMN protein and in the number of motor neurons in the spinal cord, which led to improvements in muscle physiology, motor function and survival. Intrathecal infusion of ASO-10-27 into cynomolgus monkeys delivered putative therapeutic levels of the oligonucleotide to all regions of the spinal cord. These data demonstrate that central nervous system–directed ASO therapy is efficacious and that intrathecal infusion may represent a practical route for delivering this therapeutic in the clinic. PMID:21368223

  1. Artemis splice defects cause atypical SCID and can be restored in vitro by an antisense oligonucleotide.

    PubMed

    Ijspeert, H; Lankester, A C; van den Berg, J M; Wiegant, W; van Zelm, M C; Weemaes, C M R; Warris, A; Pan-Hammarström, Q; Pastink, A; van Tol, M J D; van Dongen, J J M; van Gent, D C; van der Burg, M

    2011-09-01

    Artemis deficiency is known to result in classical T-B- severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) in case of Artemis null mutations, or Omenn's syndrome in case of hypomorphic mutations in the Artemis gene. We describe two unrelated patients with a relatively mild clinical T-B- SCID phenotype, caused by different homozygous Artemis splice-site mutations. The splice-site mutations concern either dysfunction of a 5' splice-site or an intronic point mutation creating a novel 3' splice-site, resulting in mutated Artemis protein with residual activity or low levels of wild type (WT) Artemis transcripts. During the first 10 years of life, the patients suffered from recurrent infections necessitating antibiotic prophylaxis and intravenous immunoglobulins. Both mutations resulted in increased ionizing radiation sensitivity and insufficient variable, diversity and joining (V(D)J) recombination, causing B-lymphopenia and exhaustion of the naive T-cell compartment. The patient with the novel 3' splice-site had progressive granulomatous skin lesions, which disappeared after stem cell transplantation (SCT). We showed that an alternative approach to SCT can, in principle, be used in this case; an antisense oligonucleotide (AON) covering the intronic mutation restored WT Artemis transcript levels and non-homologous end-joining pathway activity in the patient fibroblasts.

  2. Differential modification of flavonoid and isoflavonoid biosynthesis with an antisense chalcone synthase construct in transgenic Lotus corniculatus.

    PubMed

    Colliver, S P; Morris, P; Robbins, M P

    1997-11-01

    Three clonal genotypes of Lotus corniculatus L. (bird's foot trefoil) were transformed with an antisense chalcone synthase (CHS) gene construct made using a stress induced CHS17 cDNA from Phaseolus vulgaris under the control of the constitutive CaMV 35S promoter and Nos terminator via Agrobacterium rhizogenes. After initial screening, ten antisense and five control co-transformation events from each recipient clonal genotype were analysed. After elicitation with glutathione, the level of tannin accumulation was found to be increased in a number of antisense root cultures derived from the low (S33) and moderate (S50) tannin recipient genotypes. Six antisense and four control transformed lines from genotype S50 were selected for more detailed study. The antisense CHS construct was found to be integrated into the genome, with a copy number ranging from 1 to 5 and antisense orientation was confirmed by PCR. In transformed root cultures, increased CHS transcript levels were noted in a number of antisense lines. Biochemical analyses of glutathione-elicited-root cultures indicated a significant increase in tannin accumulation in antisense CHS lines and mean vestitol levels were reduced. These results show that the introduction of a heterologous antisense chalcone synthase construct into L. corniculatus resulted in an unpredicted molecular and biochemical phenotype. Such findings are discussed in relation to manipulation of this complex multigene family.

  3. Antisense RNA transcripts in the blood may be novel diagnostic markers for colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Kurokawa, Tomohiro; Kohno, Keisuke; Nagai, Kentaro; Chiba, Mitsuru; Pak, Sugiru; Murata, Soichiro; Fukunaga, Kiyoshi; Yasue, Hiroshi; Ohkohchi, Nobuhiro

    2017-09-01

    Numerous genetic studies have been conducted regarding the occurrence of colorectal cancer (CRC) and the prognosis using microarrays. However, adequate investigations into the diagnostic application of microarrays have yet to be performed. The simplicity and accuracy of diagnosis and prognosis tracking are important requirements for its processes, and the use of blood cells for diagnosis is considered to be suitable to meet these requirements. The patients involved in the study were 28 preoperative patients with CRC and 6 healthy individuals who served as controls. RNA was extracted from the blood cells of the patients and analyzed using a sense/antisense RNA custom microarray. In the patients with CRC, the expression levels of 20 sense RNA and 20 antisense RNA species were identified as being significantly altered compared with that of the healthy volunteers (P<0.05; fold-change, >2.0). Cluster analysis of these RNA species revealed that the top 10 antisense RNAs significantly clustered patients with cancer and healthy individuals separately. Patients with stage I or II CRC exhibited significant changes in the expression levels of 33 sense and 39 antisense RNA species, as compared with healthy volunteers (P<0.01; fold-change >2.0). Cluster analysis demonstrated that patients with stage I or II CRC and healthy volunteers formed separate clusters only among the top 20 antisense RNA species. A tracking study of expression levels of haloacid dehalogenase-like hydrolase domain-containing 1 (HDHD1) antisense RNA was performed and a significant difference was identified between the CRC and healthy groups revealing that the levels at one week and three months following surgical removal of the cancerous tissue, decreased to almost same levels of the healthy individuals. The results of the current study indicate that HDHD1 antisense RNA may serve as a potential biomarker for the prognosis of CRC.

  4. Superior Silencing by 2',4'-BNA(NC)-Based Short Antisense Oligonucleotides Compared to 2',4'-BNA/LNA-Based Apolipoprotein B Antisense Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Tsuyoshi; Yasuhara, Hidenori; Wada, Fumito; Harada-Shiba, Mariko; Imanishi, Takeshi; Obika, Satoshi

    2012-01-01

    The duplex stability with target mRNA and the gene silencing potential of a novel bridged nucleic acid analogue are described. The analogue, 2',4'-BNA(NC) antisense oligonucleotides (AONs) ranging from 10- to 20-nt-long, targeted apolipoprotein B. 2',4'-BNA(NC) was directly compared to its conventional bridged (or locked) nucleic acid (2',4'-BNA/LNA)-based counterparts. Melting temperatures of duplexes formed between 2',4'-BNA(NC)-based antisense oligonucleotides and the target mRNA surpassed those of 2',4'-BNA/LNA-based counterparts at all lengths. An in vitro transfection study revealed that when compared to the identical length 2',4'-BNA/LNA-based counterpart, the corresponding 2',4'-BNA(NC)-based antisense oligonucleotide showed significantly stronger inhibitory activity. This inhibitory activity was more pronounced in shorter (13-, 14-, and 16-mer) oligonucleotides. On the other hand, the 2',4'-BNA(NC)-based 20-mer AON exhibited the highest affinity but the worst IC(50) value, indicating that very high affinity may undermine antisense potency. These results suggest that the potency of AONs requires a balance between reward term and penalty term. Balance of these two parameters would depend on affinity, length, and the specific chemistry of the AON, and fine-tuning of this balance could lead to improved potency. We demonstrate that 2',4'-BNA(NC) may be a better alternative to conventional 2',4'-BNA/LNA, even for "short" antisense oligonucleotides, which are attractive in terms of drug-likeness and cost-effective bulk production.

  5. PLGA-PEG-PLGA microspheres as a delivery vehicle for antisense oligonucleotides to CTGF: Implications on post-surgical peritoneal adhesion prevention

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azeke, John Imuetinyan-Jesu, Jr.

    , while both cytokines are over-expressed within the first day following injury, CTGF protein levels could not be correlated with observed adhesion development. In addition, we synthesized linear triblock copolymers of polyethylene glycol (PEG) and poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA), two of the most widely studied biodegradable polymers in use today. Bulk gels and microparticles of the copolymers were then evaluated for gelling behavior, temperature stability, and drug loading and release kinetics in order assess their suitability as potential carriers of antisense therapeutics. A novel approach to affecting the antisense oligonucleotide release kinetics by varying the relative concentrations of co-encapsulated cationic lipid transfection agents was also presented.

  6. Characterization of Antisense Transformed Plants Deficient in the Tobacco Anionic Peroxidase.

    PubMed Central

    Lagrimini, L. M.; Gingas, V.; Finger, F.; Rothstein, S.; Liu, TTY.

    1997-01-01

    On the basis of the biological compounds that they metabolize, plant peroxidases have long been implicated in plant growth, cell wall biogenesis, lignification, and host defenses. Transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.) plants that underexpress anionic peroxidase were generated using antisense RNA. The antisense RNA was found to be specific for the anionic isoenzyme and highly effective, reducing endogenous transcript levels and total peroxidase activity by as much as 1600-fold. Antisense-transformed plants appeared normal at initial observation; however, growth studies showed that plants with reduced peroxidase activity grow taller and flower sooner than control plants. In contrast, previously transformed plants overproducing anionic peroxidase were shorter and flowered later than controls. Axillary buds were more developed in antisense-transformed plants and less developed in plants overproducing this enzyme. It was found that the lignin content in leaf, stem, and root was unchanged in antisense-transformed plants, which does not support a role for anionic peroxidase in the lignification of secondary xylem vessels. However, studies of wounded tissue show some reduction in wound-induced deposition of lignin-like polymers. The data support a possible role for tobacco anionic peroxidase in host defenses but not without a reduction in growth potential. PMID:12223765

  7. The use of antisense mRNA to inhibit the tonoplast H+ ATPase in carrot.

    PubMed Central

    Gogarten, J P; Fichmann, J; Braun, Y; Morgan, L; Styles, P; Taiz, S L; DeLapp, K; Taiz, L

    1992-01-01

    Carrot root cells were transformed with the coding or 5' noncoding regions of the carrot vacuolar H+ ATPase A subunit cDNA cloned in the antisense orientation behind the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter. Bafilomycin-sensitive ATPase, H(+)-pumping, and 14C-O-methyl-glucose uptake activities were specifically inhibited in the tonoplast fractions of mutant cell lines. Protein gel blotting confirmed that the expression of the A subunit was inhibited in the tonoplast fraction, but not in the Golgi fraction. Two-dimensional protein gel blots of total microsomes of wild-type and control transformant cell lines revealed two major immunoreactive polypeptides in the acidic pI range. In contrast, highly purified tonoplast membranes contained only the less acidic polypeptide. Because the less acidic polypeptide was preferentially diminished in the two antisense cell lines, we infer that the antisense constructs specifically blocked expression of a tonoplast-specific isoform of the V-ATPase A subunit in carrot. Regenerated plants containing the antisense constructs exhibited altered leaf morphologies and reduced cell expansion. The altered phenotype was correlated with the presence of the antisense construct. PMID:1392599

  8. The conditional inhibition of gene expression in cultured Drosophila cells by antisense RNA.

    PubMed Central

    Bunch, T A; Goldstein, L S

    1989-01-01

    Genes producing antisense RNA are becoming important tools for the selective inhibition of gene expression. Experiments in different biological systems, targeting different mRNAs have yielded diverse results with respect to the success of the technique and its mechanism of action. We have examined the potential of three antisense genes, whose transcription is driven by a Drosophila metallothionein promoter, to inhibit the expression of alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) or a microtubule associated protein (205K MAP) in cultured Drosophila cells. Expression of ADH was significantly reduced upon induction of the anti-ADH genes. The ADH mRNA does not appear to be destabilized by the presence of antisense RNA but rather exists at similar levels in hybrid form. Hybrids are detected with both spliced and unspliced ADH RNA. In contrast to these results, antisense genes producing antisense RNA in great excess to 205K MAP mRNA, which is itself far less abundant than the ADH mRNA, failed to show any inhibition of 205K MAP expression. Images PMID:2481266

  9. Genome-wide antisense transcription drives mRNA processing in bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Lasa, Iñigo; Toledo-Arana, Alejandro; Dobin, Alexander; Villanueva, Maite; de los Mozos, Igor Ruiz; Vergara-Irigaray, Marta; Segura, Víctor; Fagegaltier, Delphine; Penadés, José R.; Valle, Jaione; Solano, Cristina; Gingeras, Thomas R.

    2011-01-01

    RNA deep sequencing technologies are revealing unexpected levels of complexity in bacterial transcriptomes with the discovery of abundant noncoding RNAs, antisense RNAs, long 5′ and 3′ untranslated regions, and alternative operon structures. Here, by applying deep RNA sequencing to both the long and short RNA fractions (<50 nucleotides) obtained from the major human pathogen Staphylococcus aureus, we have detected a collection of short RNAs that is generated genome-wide through the digestion of overlapping sense/antisense transcripts by RNase III endoribonuclease. At least 75% of sense RNAs from annotated genes are subject to this mechanism of antisense processing. Removal of RNase III activity reduces the amount of short RNAs and is accompanied by the accumulation of discrete antisense transcripts. These results suggest the production of pervasive but hidden antisense transcription used to process sense transcripts by means of creating double-stranded substrates. This process of RNase III-mediated digestion of overlapping transcripts can be observed in several evolutionarily diverse Gram-positive bacteria and is capable of providing a unique genome-wide posttranscriptional mechanism to adjust mRNA levels. PMID:22123973

  10. Antisense transcripts from immunoglobulin heavy-chain locus V(D)J and switch regions

    PubMed Central

    Perlot, Thomas; Li, Gang; Alt, Frederick W.

    2008-01-01

    Activation-induced cytosine deaminase (AID) is essential for both somatic hypermutation (SHM) and class switch recombination (CSR), two processes involved in antibody diversification. Previously, various groups showed both in vitro and in vivo that AID initiates SHM and CSR by deaminating cytosines in DNA in a transcription-dependent manner. Although in vivo both DNA strands are equally targeted by AID, many in vitro and bacterial experiments found that AID almost exclusively targets the nontemplate strand of a transcribed substrate. Here, we report the detection of antisense transcripts in assembled Ig heavy chain (IgH) variable region exons and their immediate downstream region, as well as in switch regions, sequences that, respectively, are targets for SHM and CSR in vivo. In contrast, we did not detect antisense transcripts from the Cμ constant region exons, which lie between the IgH variable region exons and downstream S regions and which are not normally an AID target. Expression of the antisense variable region/flanking region and the S-region transcripts were found in all lymphocytes that transcribe these sequences in the sense direction. Steady-state levels of antisense transcripts appeared very low, and start sites potentially appeared heterogeneous. We discuss the potential implications of antisense IgH locus transcription for AID targeting or other processes. PMID:18292225

  11. Administration of antisense DNA for hepatocyte growth factor causes an depressive and anxiogenic response in rats.

    PubMed

    Wakatsuki, Masatoshi; Akiyoshi, Jotaro; Ichioka, Shugo; Tanaka, Yoshihiro; Tsuru, Jusen; Matsushita, Hirotaka; Hanada, Hiroaki; Isogawa, Koichi

    2007-12-01

    Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) is induced in neurons during ischemia and is neuroprotective against post-ischemic delayed neuronal death in the hippocampus. HGF might play an important role in the maturation and functioning of these neurons in the hippocampus. Our aim was to determine what effect HGF antisense has on depression and anxiety in rats. HGF antisense was infused at a constant rate into cerebral lateral ventricles and its effect on anxiety in rats was monitored. In forced swimming test, rats that received antisense DNA increased the length of time that they were immobile in the water. In the elevated plus maze test, the black and white box test and conditioned fear test, HGF antisense administration caused all indicators of anxiety to increase. Number of HGF-positive cells in C1 of hippocampus was significantly decreased in the HGF antisense-infused group compared to the vehicle- and scrambled oligonucleotide-treated group. No significant effect on general locomotor activity was seen. These results indicate that inhibition of HGF induces an increase in depression and anxiety-related behaviors suggesting a depressive and anxiogenic-like effect.

  12. The production of an inducible antisense alternative oxidase (Aox1a) plant.

    PubMed

    Potter, F J; Wiskich, J T; Dry, I B

    2001-01-01

    Plant mitochondria contain an alternative oxidase (AOX) acting as a terminal electron acceptor of the alternative pathway in the electron transport chain. Here we describe the production of inducible antisense Aox1a plants of Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh. and the procedures used to determine the resulting alternative pathway activity. The Arabidopsis Aox1a cDNA sequence was cloned behind a copper-inducible promoter system in the antisense orientation. Arabidopsis thaliana (Columbia) plants were transformed by in-planta vacuum infiltration with Agrobacterium containing the antisense construct. Whole-leaf ethanol production was used as a measure to investigate alternative pathway activity in the presence of antimycin A. After 24 h, leaves from the copper-induced, antisense line F1.1 produced up to 8.8 times more ethanol (via aerobic fermentation) than the non-induced and wild-type leaves, indicating effective cytochrome pathway inhibition by antimycin A and a decreased alternative pathway activity in induced F1.1 leaves. Transgene expression studies also revealed no expression in non-induced leaves and up until 24 h post-induction. Copper-induced transgenic leaves were less susceptible to alternative pathway inhibition than non-induced transgenic leaves, as seen via tissue-slice respiratory studies, and mitochondrial respiration, using F1.1 cell cultures, also supported this. These results demonstrate the successful production of a transgenic line of Arabidopsis in which the alternative pathway activity can be genetically manipulated with an inducible antisense system.

  13. Antisense oligonucleotides targeted to the p53 gene modulate liver regeneration in vivo.

    PubMed

    Arora, V; Iversen, P L

    2000-02-01

    The rapidly proliferating cells of the regenerating liver after partial hepatectomy (PH) present a reproducible in vivo model to study the functional role of the tumor suppressor gene p53. The present study uses the rat 70% PH model along with systemic administration of three different structural types of antisense oligonucleotides (ODNs) designed to suppress p53 expression. We tested the hypothesis that antisense ODNs can inhibit the expression of p53, resulting in the loss of the G(1)-S cell cycle checkpoint and an altered pattern of liver regeneration. Intraperitoneal administration of 5 mg/kg/day antisense phosphorothioate ODN after 70% PH resulted in reduced expression of the p53 protein in the regenerating liver. There were concomitant increases in weight gain of remnant-regenerating liver and expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen and p21(waf-1) compared with either saline or 5 mg/kg/day mispaired phosphorothioate ODN treatment. Flow cytometric analysis of DNA content of isolated hepatocytes revealed a reduction in the G(0)/G(1) cell population and accumulation of cells with more than 4n DNA in antisense-treated rats. The regenerating livers had significantly diminished cytochrome P-450 (CYP) enzyme activities. Rats treated with p53 antisense ODNs, but not saline or mispair ODN controls, had significantly elevated CYP activities. These observations functionally link the expression of p53 with diminished expression of several CYP isoforms in the liver regeneration model.

  14. SupraMolecular BioVectors (SMBV) improve antisense inhibition of erbB-2 expression.

    PubMed Central

    Allal, C.; Sixou, S.; Kravtzoff, R.; Soulet, N.; Soula, G.; Favre, G.

    1998-01-01

    New therapeutic strategies are now being developed against adenocarcinoma associated with erbB-2 amplification, particularly by inhibiting p185erbB-2 expression. Antisense oligodeoxynucleotides seem promising for this purpose as long as they are efficiently protected against degradation and targeted into the cells. We present antisense oligonucleotide carriers, the supramolecular biovectors (SMBVs), for which we have already demonstrated the ability to improve both cellular uptake and protection of oligodeoxynucleotide. The present work demonstrates that SMBVs elicit a specific and non-toxic action of antisense compounds in a cell model, irrespective of their sensitivity to nucleases. This is a major point, considering the specificity problems associated with the use of nuclease-resistant phosphorothioate oligodeoxynucleotide. SMBVs improve antisense efficiency of oligodeoxynucleotide designed against p185erbB-2, with a complete growth arrest of SK-Br-3, human adenocarcinoma mammary cells that overexpress p185erbB-2 and no effect on MCF-7 cells that normally express p185erbB-2. The comparison of SMBVs with DOTAP reveals the statistically higher efficiency of SMBVs, which allows the antisense inhibition of p185erbB-2 expression in 65-75% of SK-Br-3 cells (P < 0.05). The efficiency and controlled synthesis of SMBVs underline their potentialities as oligodeoxynucleotide carriers for in vivo experiments. PMID:9652760

  15. Modification of antisense phosphodiester oligodeoxynucleotides by a 5' cholesteryl moiety increases cellular association and improves efficacy.

    PubMed Central

    Krieg, A M; Tonkinson, J; Matson, S; Zhao, Q; Saxon, M; Zhang, L M; Bhanja, U; Yakubov, L; Stein, C A

    1993-01-01

    Phosphodiester oligodeoxynucleotides bearing a 5' cholesteryl (chol) modification bind to low density lipoprotein (LDL), apparently by partitioning the chol-modified oligonucleotides into the lipid layer. Both HL60 cells and primary mouse spleen T and B cells incubated with fluorescently labeled chol-modified oligonucleotide showed substantially increased cellular association by flow cytometry and increased internalization by confocal microscopy compared to an identical molecule not bearing the chol group. Cellular internalization of chol-modified oligonucleotide occurred at least partially through the LDL receptor; it was increased in mouse spleen cells by cell culture in lipoprotein-deficient medium and/or lovastatin, and it was decreased by culture in high serum medium. To determine whether chol-modified oligonucleotides are more potent antisense agents, we titered antisense unmodified phosphodiester and chol-modified oligonucleotides targeted against a mouse immunosuppressive protein. Murine spleen cells cultured with 20 microM phosphodiester antisense oligonucleotides had a 2-fold increase in RNA synthesis, indicating the expected lymphocyte activation. Antisense chol-modified oligonucleotides showed an 8-fold increase in relative potency: they caused a 2-fold increase in RNA synthesis at just 2.5 microM. The increased efficacy was blocked by heparin and was further increased by cell culture in 1% (vs. 10%) fetal bovine serum, suggesting that the effect may, at least in part, be mediated via the LDL receptor. Antisense chol-modified oligonucleotides are sequence specific and have increased potency as compared to unmodified oligonucleotides. Images PMID:8430072

  16. Antisense RNA Strategies for Metabolic Engineering of Clostridium acetobutylicum

    PubMed Central

    Desai, Ruchir P.; Papoutsakis, Eleftherios T.

    1999-01-01

    We examined the effectiveness of antisense RNA (as RNA) strategies for metabolic engineering of Clostridium acetobutylicum. Strain ATCC 824(pRD4) was developed to produce a 102-nucleotide asRNA with 87% complementarity to the butyrate kinase (BK) gene. Strain ATCC 824(pRD4) exhibited 85 to 90% lower BK and acetate kinase specific activities than the control strain. Strain ATCC 824(pRD4) also exhibited 45 to 50% lower phosphotransbutyrylase (PTB) and phosphotransacetylase specific activities than the control strain. This strain exhibited earlier induction of solventogenesis, which resulted in 50 and 35% higher final concentrations of acetone and butanol, respectively, than the concentrations in the control. Strain ATCC 824(pRD1) was developed to putatively produce a 698-nucleotide asRNA with 96% complementarity to the PTB gene. Strain ATCC 824(pRD1) exhibited 70 and 80% lower PTB and BK activities, respectively, than the control exhibited. It also exhibited 300% higher levels of a lactate dehydrogenase activity than the control exhibited. The growth yields of ATCC 824(pRD1) were 28% less than the growth yields of the control. While the levels of acids were not affected in ATCC 824(pRD1) fermentations, the acetone and butanol concentrations were 96 and 75% lower, respectively, than the concentrations in the control fermentations. The lower level of solvent production by ATCC 824(pRD1) was compensated for by ∼100-fold higher levels of lactate production. The lack of any significant impact on butyrate formation fluxes by the lower PTB and BK levels suggests that butyrate formation fluxes are not controlled by the levels of the butyrate formation enzymes. PMID:10049845

  17. The effect of pegylated antisense acetylcholinesterase on hematopoiesis.

    PubMed

    Patinkin, Deborah; Hidmi, Adel; Weiss, Lola; Slavin, Shimon; Katzhendler, Joshua

    2003-01-01

    To determine whether the efficacy of entry and action of antisense oligonucleotides (AS-ODN) on hematopoietic stem cells in vitro could be improved by the addition of polyethylene glycol (PEG), a molecule of PEG was bound to AS- or sense-acetylcholinesterase (AS-ACHE or S-ACHE). The introduction of 0.1-0.5 microM PEG-AS-ACHE or 0.5 microM AS-ACHE into methylcellulose bone marrow (BM) cultures produced a doubling in number of colony-forming unit-granulocyte-erythrocyte-macrophage-megakaryocyte (CFU-GEMM) and a 5-fold increase in cell number of the PEG-ODN. Further increase in concentration of the PEG-ODN reduced colony numbers. PEG-AS-ACHE induced higher colony numbers and greatly increased megakaryocyte (MK) formation when compared with PEG and AS-ACHE added separately to the culture. In addition, differentials of the CFU-GEMMs indicated there was a direct relationship between MK number and PEG-AS-ACHE concentration. Under these culture conditions, 5 microM PEG alone gave control values of CFU-GEMM. On addition of FITC-PEG-AS-ACHE to the cell cultures, using confocal microscopy, the nuclei of both early and mature MKs were labeled specifically, whereas all other cellular nuclei were negative to the stain. The use of PEG-AS-ODN, affording specific delivery of AS-ODN to target cells, increased cell proliferation, and enhanced ODN uptake, may be of potential importance in stem cell expansion for BM transplantation and gene therapy.

  18. Single base discrimination for ribonuclease H-dependent antisense effects within intact human leukaemia cells.

    PubMed Central

    Giles, R V; Ruddell, C J; Spiller, D G; Green, J A; Tidd, D M

    1995-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated, in vitro, that phosphodiester and phosphorothioate antisense oligodeoxynucleotides could direct ribonuclease H to cleave non-target RNA sites and that chimeric methylphosphonodiester/phosphodiester analogue structures were substantially more specific. In this report we show that such chimeric molecules can promote point mutation-specific scission of target mRNA by both Escherichia coli and human RNases H in vitro. Intact human leukaemia cells 'biochemically microinjected' with antisense effectors demonstrated efficient suppression of target mRNA expression. It was noted that the chimeric methylphosphonodiester/phosphodiester structures showed single base discrimination, whereas neither the phosphodiester nor phosphorothioate compounds were as stringent. Finally, we show that the antisense effects obtained in intact cells were due to endogenous RNase H activity. Images PMID:7731809

  19. High Frequency of Genetic Alterations in Non-small Cell Lung Cancer Detected by Multi-target Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Ji Un; Kwon, Kye Chul; Park, Jong Woo; Shin, So Youn; Kim, Jin Man; Jung, Sung Su

    2007-01-01

    Detection of genetic alterations could provide a tool as an adjuvant for the diagnosis of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and to define patients at risk for early relapse. In this study, a multi-target fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) assay was conducted to investigate the correlation between the alterations of chromosomes, including 5p15.2, 6p11.1-q11, 7p12, and 8q24.12-q24.13 (LaVysion Test), and clinicopathological variables, and to clarify the potential of the multi-target FISH assay in 37 NSCLC. The most notable finding was the higher frequency of a gain in chromosome 5p15.2 in early-stage (I+IIa) lung cancers. The frequency of the gain was 81.3% (16/22) in stage I tumors. The frequencies of gains in 6p11.1-q11 and 8q24.12-q24.13 were 61.5% (8/13) and 84.6% (11/13) in stage IIIa cancers, as compared with lower frequencies in stage I tumors at 25.0% and 31.3%, respectively. There was also a significant difference in the histological type. Our results suggest that a gain in 6p11.1-q11 and 8q24.12-q24.13 plays an important role in tumor progression and is associated with histological differentiation. On the other hand, gene amplification in the 5p region was one of the most consistent alterations in early-stage lung cancer, and thus a series of genes in the critical 5p15.2 region might potentially associated with the development of lung cancer. PMID:17923754

  20. High frequency of genetic alterations in non-small cell lung cancer detected by multi-target fluorescence in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Kang, Ji Un; Koo, Sun Hoe; Kwon, Kye Chul; Park, Jong Woo; Shin, So Youn; Kim, Jin Man; Jung, Sung Su

    2007-09-01

    Detection of genetic alterations could provide a tool as an adjuvant for the diagnosis of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and to define patients at risk for early relapse. In this study, a multi-target fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) assay was conducted to investigate the correlation between the alterations of chromosomes, including 5p15.2, 6p11.1-q11, 7p12, and 8q24.12-q24.13 (LaVysion Test), and clinicopathological variables, and to clarify the potential of the multi-target FISH assay in 37 NSCLC. The most notable finding was the higher frequency of a gain in chromosome 5p15.2 in early-stage (I+IIa) lung cancers. The frequency of the gain was 81.3% (16/22) in stage I tumors. The frequencies of gains in 6p11.1-q11 and 8q24.12-q24.13 were 61.5% (8/13) and 84.6% (11/13) in stage IIIa cancers, as compared with lower frequencies in stage I tumors at 25.0% and 31.3%, respectively. There was also a significant difference in the histological type. Our results suggest that a gain in 6p11.1-q11 and 8q24.12-q24.13 plays an important role in tumor progression and is associated with histological differentiation. On the other hand, gene amplification in the 5p region was one of the most consistent alterations in early-stage lung cancer, and thus a series of genes in the critical 5p15.2 region might potentially associated with the development of lung cancer.

  1. Antisense peptide nucleic acid–peptide conjugates for functional analyses of genes in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Maekawa, Kazuhiko; Azuma, Motoki; Okuno, Yousuke; Tsukamoto, Tasuku; Nishiguchi, Kenzo; Setsukinai, Ken-ichi; Maki, Hideki; Numata, Yoshito; Takemoto, Hiroshi; Rokushima, Masatomo

    2015-11-15

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is one of the most common and clinically important pathogens because of its resistance to a wide variety of antibiotics. A number of treatments of P. aeruginosa have been developed, but there is still no definitive one. Antisense drugs have a great potential to treat multidrug-resistant P. aeruginosa because this technology, in principle, can inhibit the expression of any essential genes. Nucleic Acid Ther.2012, 22, 323 reported that peptide nucleic acid (PNA) antisenses conjugated to the carrier peptide (RXR)4 and targeted to ftsZ and acpP (essential genes) had antibacterial activity in P. aeruginosa. However, growth inhibition was also found with peptide-PNA antisense conjugates of mismatched sequences (negative controls), and hence there remains a possibility for considerable enhancement of basal level activity due to the general toxicity. To assess the true potential of peptide-PNA conjugates, we measured sequence-dependent knockdown of the (RXR)4-PNA conjugates by using a scrambled sequence as a negative control. In addition, we evaluated (RXR)4-PNA antisenses against three other essential genes (lepB, lptD and mraY) and a non-essential gene (PA1303), and confirmed that multiple sequences targeting only the essential genes showed antimicrobial activity in P. aeruginosa PAO1 cells. We also conducted a rescue experiment and confirmed that the antimicrobial activity of anti-mraY antisenses was an on-target effect, not due to general toxicity. These findings indicate that the (RXR)4–PNA antisense should be a useful tool for target validation of a specific gene and could be a therapeutic platform capable of targeting a variety of genes in P. aeruginosa.

  2. The role of antisense long noncoding RNA in small RNA-triggered gene activation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xizhe; Li, Haitang; Rossi, John J.

    2014-01-01

    Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) are known to regulate neighboring protein-coding genes by directing chromatin remodeling complexes, imprinting, and X-chromosome inactivation. In this study, we explore the function of lncRNAs in small RNA-triggered transcriptional gene activation (TGA), a process in which microRNAs (miRNAs) or small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) associated with Argonaute (Ago) proteins induce chromatin remodeling and gene activation at promoters with sequence complementarity. We designed a model system with different lncRNA and chromatin environments to elucidate the molecular mechanisms required for mammalian TGA. Using RNA-fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE)-PCR, we demonstrated that small RNA-triggered TGA occurs at sites where antisense lncRNAs are transcribed through the reporter gene and promoter. Small RNA-induced TGA coincided with the enrichment of Ago2 at the promoter region, but Ago2-mediated cleavage of antisense lncRNAs was not observed. Moreover, we examined the allele-specific effects of lncRNAs through a Cre-induced inversion of a poly(A) sequence that was designed to block the transcription of antisense lncRNAs through the reporter gene region in an inducible and reversible manner. Termination of nascent antisense lncRNAs abrogated gene activation triggered by small RNAs, and only allele-specific cis-acting antisense lncRNAs, but not trans-acting lncRNAs, were capable of rescuing TGA. Hence, this model revealed that antisense lncRNAs can mediate TGA in cis and not in trans, serving as a molecular scaffold for a small RNA–Ago2 complex and chromatin remodeling. PMID:25344398

  3. The Role of Transcription Factors at Antisense-Expressing Gene Pairs in Yeast.

    PubMed

    Mostovoy, Yulia; Thiemicke, Alexander; Hsu, Tiffany Y; Brem, Rachel B

    2016-06-27

    Genes encoded close to one another on the chromosome are often coexpressed, by a mechanism and regulatory logic that remain poorly understood. We surveyed the yeast genome for tandem gene pairs oriented tail-to-head at which expression antisense to the upstream gene was conserved across species. The intergenic region at most such tandem pairs is a bidirectional promoter, shared by the downstream gene mRNA and the upstream antisense transcript. Genomic analyses of these intergenic loci revealed distinctive patterns of transcription factor regulation. Mutation of a given transcription factor verified its role as a regulator in trans of tandem gene pair loci, including the proximally initiating upstream antisense transcript and downstream mRNA and the distally initiating upstream mRNA. To investigate cis-regulatory activity at such a locus, we focused on the stress-induced NAD(P)H dehydratase YKL151C and its downstream neighbor, the metabolic enzyme GPM1 Previous work has implicated the region between these genes in regulation of GPM1 expression; our mutation experiments established its function in rich medium as a repressor in cis of the distally initiating YKL151C sense RNA, and an activator of the proximally initiating YKL151C antisense RNA. Wild-type expression of all three transcripts required the transcription factor Gcr2. Thus, at this locus, the intergenic region serves as a focal point of regulatory input, driving antisense expression and mediating the coordinated regulation of YKL151C and GPM1 Together, our findings implicate transcription factors in the joint control of neighboring genes specialized to opposing conditions and the antisense transcripts expressed between them.

  4. The Role of Transcription Factors at Antisense-Expressing Gene Pairs in Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Mostovoy, Yulia; Thiemicke, Alexander; Hsu, Tiffany Y.; Brem, Rachel B.

    2016-01-01

    Genes encoded close to one another on the chromosome are often coexpressed, by a mechanism and regulatory logic that remain poorly understood. We surveyed the yeast genome for tandem gene pairs oriented tail-to-head at which expression antisense to the upstream gene was conserved across species. The intergenic region at most such tandem pairs is a bidirectional promoter, shared by the downstream gene mRNA and the upstream antisense transcript. Genomic analyses of these intergenic loci revealed distinctive patterns of transcription factor regulation. Mutation of a given transcription factor verified its role as a regulator in trans of tandem gene pair loci, including the proximally initiating upstream antisense transcript and downstream mRNA and the distally initiating upstream mRNA. To investigate cis-regulatory activity at such a locus, we focused on the stress-induced NAD(P)H dehydratase YKL151C and its downstream neighbor, the metabolic enzyme GPM1. Previous work has implicated the region between these genes in regulation of GPM1 expression; our mutation experiments established its function in rich medium as a repressor in cis of the distally initiating YKL151C sense RNA, and an activator of the proximally initiating YKL151C antisense RNA. Wild-type expression of all three transcripts required the transcription factor Gcr2. Thus, at this locus, the intergenic region serves as a focal point of regulatory input, driving antisense expression and mediating the coordinated regulation of YKL151C and GPM1. Together, our findings implicate transcription factors in the joint control of neighboring genes specialized to opposing conditions and the antisense transcripts expressed between them. PMID:27190003

  5. Identification of sequence motifs in oligonucleotides whose presence is correlated with antisense activity.

    PubMed

    Matveeva, O V; Tsodikov, A D; Giddings, M; Freier, S M; Wyatt, J R; Spiridonov, A N; Shabalina, S A; Gesteland, R F; Atkins, J F

    2000-08-01

    Design of antisense oligonucleotides targeting any mRNA can be much more efficient when several activity-enhancing motifs are included and activity-decreasing motifs are avoided. This conclusion was made after statistical analysis of data collected from >1000 experiments with phosphorothioate-modified oligonucleotides. Highly significant positive correlation between the presence of motifs CCAC, TCCC, ACTC, GCCA and CTCT in the oligonucleotide and its antisense efficiency was demonstrated. In addition, negative correlation was revealed for the motifs GGGG, ACTG, AAA and TAA. It was found that the likelihood of activity of an oligonucleotide against a desired mRNA target is sequence motif content dependent.

  6. Identification of sequence motifs in oligonucleotides whose presence is correlated with antisense activity

    PubMed Central

    Matveeva, O. V.; Tsodikov, A. D.; Giddings, M.; Freier, S. M.; Wyatt, J. R.; Spiridonov, A. N.; Shabalina, S. A.; Gesteland, R. F.; Atkins, J. F.

    2000-01-01

    Design of antisense oligonucleotides targeting any mRNA can be much more efficient when several activity-enhancing motifs are included and activity-decreasing motifs are avoided. This conclusion was made after statistical analysis of data collected from >1000 experiments with phosphorothioate-modified oligonucleotides. Highly significant positive correlation between the presence of motifs CCAC, TCCC, ACTC, GCCA and CTCT in the oligonucleotide and its antisense efficiency was demonstrated. In addition, negative correlation was revealed for the motifs GGGG, ACTG, AAA and TAA. It was found that the likelihood of activity of an oligonucleotide against a desired mRNA target is sequence motif content dependent. PMID:10908347

  7. Method of Peptide Nucleic Acid (PNA)-Mediated Antisense Inhibition of Gene Expression in Campylobacter jejuni.

    PubMed

    Oh, Euna; Jeon, Byeonghwa

    2017-01-01

    Peptide nucleic acid (PNA) is an oligonucleotide mimic that recognizes and binds to nucleic acids. The strong binding affinity of PNA to mRNA coupled with its high sequence specificity enable antisense PNA to selectively inhibit (i.e., knockdown) the protein synthesis of a target gene. This novel technology provides a powerful tool for Campylobacter studies because molecular techniques have been relatively less well-developed for this bacterium as compared to other pathogens, such as Escherichia coli and Salmonella. This chapter describes a protocol for PNA-mediated antisense inhibition of gene expression in Campylobacter jejuni.

  8. Use of an Antisense RNA Strategy To Investigate the Functional Significance of Mn-Catalase in the Extreme Thermophile Thermus thermophilus

    PubMed Central

    Moreno, Renata; Hidalgo, Aurelio; Cava, Felipe; Fernández-Lafuente, Roberto; Guisán, José Manuel; Berenguer, José

    2004-01-01

    The expression of an antisense RNA revealed that an Mn-catalase was required in Thermus thermophilus for aerobic but not for anaerobic growth. The antisense system is based on the constitutive expression of a “bicistronic” transcript consisting of the kanamycin resistance gene mRNA followed by the antisense RNA against the selected target. PMID:15516595

  9. "Dilute-and-inject" multi-target screening assay for highly polar doping agents using hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography high resolution/high accuracy mass spectrometry for sports drug testing.

    PubMed

    Görgens, Christian; Guddat, Sven; Orlovius, Anne-Katrin; Sigmund, Gerd; Thomas, Andreas; Thevis, Mario; Schänzer, Wilhelm

    2015-07-01

    In the field of LC-MS, reversed phase liquid chromatography is the predominant method of choice for the separation of prohibited substances from various classes in sports drug testing. However, highly polar and charged compounds still represent a challenging task in liquid chromatography due to their difficult chromatographic behavior using reversed phase materials. A very promising approach for the separation of hydrophilic compounds is hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC). Despite its great potential and versatile advantages for the separation of highly polar compounds, HILIC is up to now not very common in doping analysis, although most manufacturers offer a variety of HILIC columns in their portfolio. In this study, a novel multi-target approach based on HILIC high resolution/high accuracy mass spectrometry is presented to screen for various polar stimulants, stimulant sulfo-conjugates, glycerol, AICAR, ethyl glucuronide, morphine-3-glucuronide, and myo-inositol trispyrophosphate after direct injection of diluted urine specimens. The usage of an effective online sample cleanup and a zwitterionic HILIC analytical column in combination with a new generation Hybrid Quadrupol-Orbitrap® mass spectrometer enabled the detection of highly polar analytes without any time-consuming hydrolysis or further purification steps, far below the required detection limits. The methodology was fully validated for qualitative and quantitative (AICAR, glycerol) purposes considering the parameters specificity; robustness (rRT < 2.0%); linearity (R > 0.99); intra- and inter-day precision at low, medium, and high concentration levels (CV < 20%); limit of detection (stimulants and stimulant sulfo-conjugates < 10 ng/mL; norfenefrine; octopamine < 30 ng/mL; AICAR < 10 ng/mL; glycerol 100 μg/mL; ETG < 100 ng/mL); accuracy (AICAR 103.8-105.5%, glycerol 85.1-98.3% at three concentration levels) and ion suppression/enhancement effects.

  10. Factor XI antisense oligonucleotide for prevention of venous thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Büller, Harry R; Bethune, Claudette; Bhanot, Sanjay; Gailani, David; Monia, Brett P; Raskob, Gary E; Segers, Annelise; Verhamme, Peter; Weitz, Jeffrey I

    2015-01-15

    Experimental data indicate that reducing factor XI levels attenuates thrombosis without causing bleeding, but the role of factor XI in the prevention of postoperative venous thrombosis in humans is unknown. FXI-ASO (ISIS 416858) is a second-generation antisense oligonucleotide that specifically reduces factor XI levels. We compared the efficacy and safety of FXI-ASO with those of enoxaparin in patients undergoing total knee arthroplasty. In this open-label, parallel-group study, we randomly assigned 300 patients who were undergoing elective primary unilateral total knee arthroplasty to receive one of two doses of FXI-ASO (200 mg or 300 mg) or 40 mg of enoxaparin once daily. The primary efficacy outcome was the incidence of venous thromboembolism (assessed by mandatory bilateral venography or report of symptomatic events). The principal safety outcome was major or clinically relevant nonmajor bleeding. Around the time of surgery, the mean (±SE) factor XI levels were 0.38±0.01 units per milliliter in the 200-mg FXI-ASO group, 0.20±0.01 units per milliliter in the 300-mg FXI-ASO group, and 0.93±0.02 units per milliliter in the enoxaparin group. The primary efficacy outcome occurred in 36 of 134 patients (27%) who received the 200-mg dose of FXI-ASO and in 3 of 71 patients (4%) who received the 300-mg dose of FXI-ASO, as compared with 21 of 69 patients (30%) who received enoxaparin. The 200-mg regimen was noninferior, and the 300-mg regimen was superior, to enoxaparin (P<0.001). Bleeding occurred in 3%, 3%, and 8% of the patients in the three study groups, respectively. This study showed that factor XI contributes to postoperative venous thromboembolism; reducing factor XI levels in patients undergoing elective primary unilateral total knee arthroplasty was an effective method for its prevention and appeared to be safe with respect to the risk of bleeding. (Funded by Isis Pharmaceuticals; FXI-ASO TKA ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT01713361.).

  11. The zebrafish progranulin gene family and antisense transcripts

    PubMed Central

    Cadieux, Benoît; Chitramuthu, Babykumari P; Baranowski, David; Bennett, Hugh PJ

    2005-01-01

    Background Progranulin is an epithelial tissue growth factor (also known as proepithelin, acrogranin and PC-cell-derived growth factor) that has been implicated in development, wound healing and in the progression of many cancers. The single mammalian progranulin gene encodes a glycoprotein precursor consisting of seven and one half tandemly repeated non-identical copies of the cystine-rich granulin motif. A genome-wide duplication event hypothesized to have occurred at the base of the teleost radiation predicts that mammalian progranulin may be represented by two co-orthologues in zebrafish. Results The cDNAs encoding two zebrafish granulin precursors, progranulins-A and -B, were characterized and found to contain 10 and 9 copies of the granulin motif respectively. The cDNAs and genes encoding the two forms of granulin, progranulins-1 and -2, were also cloned and sequenced. Both latter peptides were found to be encoded by precursors with a simplified architecture consisting of one and one half copies of the granulin motif. A cDNA encoding a chimeric progranulin which likely arises through the mechanism of trans-splicing between grn1 and grn2 was also characterized. A non-coding RNA gene with antisense complementarity to both grn1 and grn2 was identified which may have functional implications with respect to gene dosage, as well as in restricting the formation of the chimeric form of progranulin. Chromosomal localization of the four progranulin (grn) genes reveals syntenic conservation for grna only, suggesting that it is the true orthologue of mammalian grn. RT-PCR and whole-mount in situ hybridization analysis of zebrafish grns during development reveals that combined expression of grna and grnb, but not grn1 and grn2, recapitulate many of the expression patterns observed for the murine counterpart. This includes maternal deposition, widespread central nervous system distribution and specific localization within the epithelial compartments of various organs

  12. Factor XI Antisense Oligonucleotide for Prevention of Venous Thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Büller, Harry R.; Bethune, Claudette; Bhanot, Sanjay; Gailani, David; Monia, Brett P.; Raskob, Gary E.; Segers, Annelise; Verhamme, Peter; Weitz, Jeffrey I.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Experimental data indicate that reducing factor XI levels attenuates thrombosis without causing bleeding, but the role of factor XI in the prevention of postoperative venous thrombosis in humans is unknown. FXI-ASO (ISIS 416858) is a second-generation antisense oligonucleotide that specifically reduces factor XI levels. We compared the efficacy and safety of FXI-ASO with those of enoxaparin in patients undergoing total knee arthroplasty. METHODS In this open-label, parallel-group study, we randomly assigned 300 patients who were undergoing elective primary unilateral total knee arthroplasty to receive one of two doses of FXI-ASO (200 mg or 300 mg) or 40 mg of enoxaparin once daily. The primary efficacy outcome was the incidence of venous thromboembolism (assessed by mandatory bilateral venography or report of symptomatic events). The principal safety outcome was major or clinically relevant nonmajor bleeding. RESULTS Around the time of surgery, the mean (±SE) factor XI levels were 0.38±0.01 units per milliliter in the 200-mg FXI-ASO group, 0.20±0.01 units per milliliter in the 300-mg FXI-ASO group, and 0.93±0.02 units per milliliter in the enoxaparin group. The primary efficacy outcome occurred in 36 of 134 patients (27%) who received the 200-mg dose of FXI-ASO and in 3 of 71 patients (4%) who received the 300-mg dose of FXI-ASO, as compared with 21 of 69 patients (30%) who received enoxaparin. The 200-mg regimen was noninferior, and the 300-mg regimen was superior, to enoxaparin (P<0.001). Bleeding occurred in 3%, 3%, and 8% of the patients in the three study groups, respectively. CONCLUSIONS This study showed that factor XI contributes to postoperative venous thromboembolism; reducing factor XI levels in patients undergoing elective primary unilateral total knee arthroplasty was an effective method for its prevention and appeared to be safe with respect to the risk of bleeding. (Funded by Isis Pharmaceuticals; FXI-ASO TKA ClinicalTrials.gov number

  13. Transthyretin Antisense Oligonucleotides Lower Circulating RBP4 Levels and Improve Insulin Sensitivity in Obese Mice

    PubMed Central

    Zemany, Laura; Bhanot, Sanjay; Peroni, Odile D.; Murray, Susan F.; Moraes-Vieira, Pedro M.; Castoldi, Angela; Manchem, Prasad; Guo, Shuling; Monia, Brett P.

    2015-01-01

    Circulating transthyretin (TTR) is a critical determinant of plasma retinol-binding protein 4 (RBP4) levels. Elevated RBP4 levels cause insulin resistance, and the lowering of RBP4 levels improves glucose homeostasis. Since lowering TTR levels increases renal clearance of RBP4, we determined whether decreasing TTR levels with antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) improves glucose metabolism and insulin sensitivity in obesity. TTR-ASO treatment of mice with genetic or diet-induced obesity resulted in an 80–95% decrease in circulating levels of TTR and RBP4. Treatment with TTR-ASOs, but not control ASOs, decreased insulin levels by 30–60% and improved insulin sensitivity in ob/ob mice and high-fat diet–fed mice as early as after 2 weeks of treatment. The reduced insulin levels were sustained for up to 9 weeks of treatment and were associated with reduced adipose tissue inflammation. Body weight was not changed. TTR-ASO treatment decreased LDL cholesterol in high-fat diet–fed mice. The glucose infusion rate during a hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp was increased by 50% in high-fat diet–fed mice treated with TTR-ASOs, demonstrating improved insulin sensitivity. This was also demonstrated by 20% greater inhibition of hepatic glucose production, a 45–60% increase of glucose uptake into skeletal and cardiac muscle, and a twofold increase in insulin signaling in muscle. These data show that decreasing circulating TTR levels or altering TTR-RBP4 binding could be a potential therapeutic approach for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. PMID:25524914

  14. Control of seed dormancy in Arabidopsis by a cis-acting noncoding antisense transcript

    PubMed Central

    Fedak, Halina; Palusinska, Malgorzata; Krzyczmonik, Katarzyna; Brzezniak, Lien; Yatusevich, Ruslan; Pietras, Zbigniew; Kaczanowski, Szymon; Swiezewski, Szymon

    2016-01-01

    Seed dormancy is one of the most crucial process transitions in a plant’s life cycle. Its timing is tightly controlled by the expression level of the Delay of Germination 1 gene (DOG1). DOG1 is the major quantitative trait locus for seed dormancy in Arabidopsis and has been shown to control dormancy in many other plant species. This is reflected by the evolutionary conservation of the functional short alternatively polyadenylated form of the DOG1 mRNA. Notably, the 3′ region of DOG1, including the last exon that is not included in this transcript isoform, shows a high level of conservation at the DNA level, but the encoded polypeptide is poorly conserved. Here, we demonstrate that this region of DOG1 contains a promoter for the transcription of a noncoding antisense RNA, asDOG1, that is 5′ capped, polyadenylated, and relatively stable. This promoter is autonomous and asDOG1 has an expression profile that is different from known DOG1 transcripts. Using several approaches we show that asDOG1 strongly suppresses DOG1 expression during seed maturation in cis, but is unable to do so in trans. Therefore, the negative regulation of seed dormancy by asDOG1 in cis results in allele-specific suppression of DOG1 expression and promotes germination. Given the evolutionary conservation of the asDOG1 promoter, we propose that this cis-constrained noncoding RNA-mediated mechanism limiting the duration of seed dormancy functions across the Brassicaceae. PMID:27856735

  15. In vivo potentialities of EWS-Fli-1 targeted antisense oligonucleotides-nanospheres complexes.

    PubMed

    Maksimenko, Andrei; Polard, Valerie; Villemeur, Marie; Elhamess, Hind; Couvreur, Patrick; Bertrand, Jean-Remi; Aboubakar, Malam; Gottikh, Marina; Malvy, Claude

    2005-11-01

    The EWS/FLI-1 fusion gene, resulting from a t(11;22) translocation, plays a key role in the pathogenesis of Ewing sarcoma. Previously, we have shown that antisense oligonucleotides designed against EWS-Fli-1 inhibited tumor growth in nude mice provided they were delivered intratumorally by nanocapsules or by CTAB-coated nanospheres. In this study, we have used two types of nanospheres (designated as type 1 and type 2 nanospheres) stabilized with chitosan for both intratumoral and systemic administration of oligonucleotides. Inhibition of the tumor growth in vivo was found to be dependent on the carrier type as well as on antisense oligonucleotide modification. Indeed, whereas both types of nanospheres were efficient in reducing tumor growth after intratumoral injection, we have obtained only with type 2 nanospheres an antitumoral effect after intravenous injection in a preliminary experiment. Additionally, the anticancer efficacy of a localized modification of the EWS-Fli-1 phosphodiester/phosphorothioate chimeric antisense oligonucleotide was demonstrated. In cell culture the oligonucleotides inhibit cell growth by their antisense activity. Further investigations are needed in vivo to learn the mechanism of action of the complexes.

  16. Effects of an antisense napin gene on seed storage compounds in transgenic Brassica napus seeds.

    PubMed

    Kohno-Murase, J; Murase, M; Ichikawa, H; Imamura, J

    1994-11-01

    To manipulate the quantity and quality of storage components in Brassica napus seeds, we have constructed an antisense gene for the storage protein napin. The antisense gene was driven by the 5'-flanking region of the B. napus napin gene to express antisense RNA in a seed-specific manner. Seeds of transgenic plants with antisense genes often contained reduced amounts of napin. In some transgenic plants, no accumulation of napin was observed. However, the total protein content of transgenic and wild-type seeds did not differ significantly. Seeds lacking napin accumulated 1.4 to 1.5 times more cruciferin than untransformed seeds, although the oleosin content was not affected. Fatty acid content and composition in the seeds of transgenic plants were also analyzed by gas chromatography. Though the total fatty acid content of the transformants was the same as that of non-transformants, there was a reduction in 18:1 contents and a concomitant increase of 18:2 in seeds with reduced napin levels. This observed change in fatty acid composition was inherited in the next generation.

  17. Efficient hammerhead ribozyme and antisense RNA targeting in a slow ribosome Escherichia coli mutant.

    PubMed

    Chen, H; Ferbeyre, G; Cedergren, R

    1997-05-01

    We have evaluated inhibition of the plasmid-born chloramphenicol acetyl transferase gene (CAT) by the hammerhead ribozyme and antisense RNA in Escherichia coli where the translation and transcription rates have been modified. Whereas neither antisense nor the hammerhead had an inhibitory effect on CAT activity in wild-type E. coli, both reduced the level of the messenger RNA and the activity of the CAT gene by almost 60% in a slow ribosome mutant. Streptomycin, which increases the speed of translation in this mutant strain, restored full CAT activity. The level of CAT activity expressed from a T7 RNA polymerase promoter was not affected by the presence of either antisense RNA or the hammerhead ribozyme. When the target gene was expressed from a chromosomal locus in wild-type E. coli, both antisense RNA and the hammerhead ribozyme showed some inhibitory activity, but the level of inhibition was significantly increased in the slow ribosome strain. This bacterial system offers a unique entry to the study of cellular factors which mediate the activity of ribozymes in vivo.

  18. Avian Leukosis Virus Activation of an Antisense RNA Upstream of TERT in B-Cell Lymphomas

    PubMed Central

    Nehyba, Jiri; Malhotra, Sanandan; Winans, Shelby; O'Hare, Thomas H.; Justice, James

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Avian leukosis virus (ALV) induces tumors by integrating its proviral DNA into the chicken genome and altering the expression of nearby genes via strong promoter and enhancer elements. Viral integration sites that contribute to oncogenesis are selected in tumor cells. Deep-sequencing analysis of B-cell lymphoma DNA confirmed that the telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) gene promoter is a common ALV integration target. Twenty-six unique proviral integration sites were mapped between 46 and 3,552 nucleotides (nt) upstream of the TERT transcription start site, predominantly in the opposite transcriptional orientation to TERT. Transcriptome-sequencing (RNA-seq) analysis of normal bursa revealed a transcribed region upstream of TERT in the opposite orientation, suggesting the TERT promoter is bidirectional. This transcript appears to be an uncharacterized antisense RNA. We have previously shown that TERT expression is upregulated in tumors with integrations in the TERT promoter region. We now report that the viral promoter drives the expression of a chimeric transcript containing viral sequences spliced to exons 4 through 7 of this antisense RNA. Clonal expansion of cells with ALV integrations driving overexpression of the TERT antisense RNA suggest it may have a role in tumorigenesis. IMPORTANCE The data suggest that ALV integrations in the TERT promoter region drive the overexpression of a novel antisense RNA and contribute to the development of lymphomas. PMID:27512065

  19. Antisense Inhibition of the Photosynthetic Antenna Proteins CP29 and CP26

    PubMed Central

    Andersson, Jenny; Walters, Robin G.; Horton, Peter; Jansson, Stefan

    2001-01-01

    The specific roles of the chlorophyll a/b binding proteins CP29 and CP26 in light harvesting and energy dissipation within the photosynthetic apparatus have been investigated. Arabidopsis was transformed with antisense constructs against the genes encoding the CP29 or CP26 apoprotein, which gave rise to several transgenic lines with remarkably low amounts of the antisense target proteins. The decrease in the level of CP24 protein in the CP29 antisense lines indicates a physical interaction between these complexes. Analysis of chlorophyll fluorescence showed that removal of the proteins affected photosystem II function, probably as a result of changes in the organization of the light-harvesting antenna. However, whole plant measurements showed that overall photosynthetic rates were similar to those in the wild type. Both antisense lines were capable of the qE type of nonphotochemical fluorescence quenching, although there were minor changes in the capacity for quenching and in its induction kinetics. High-light-induced violaxanthin deepoxidation to zeaxanthin was not affected, although the pool size of these pigments was decreased slightly. We conclude that CP29 and CP26 are unlikely to be sites for nonphotochemical quenching. PMID:11340191

  20. Drug evaluation: ISIS-301012, an antisense oligonucleotide for the treatment of hypercholesterolemia.

    PubMed

    Burnett, John R

    2006-10-01

    ISIS-301012 is an antisense oligonucleotide inhibitor of apolipoprotein B-100, which is being developed by Isis Pharmaceuticals Inc for the potential treatment of hypercholesterolemia. A subcutaneous injectable formulation is currently undergoing phase 11 clinical trials, while phase I trials are underway with an oral formulation of the drug.

  1. [Amphiregulin antisense RNA expression inhibits angiogenesis of human breast cancer in nude mice].

    PubMed

    Ma, Lin; Serova, Maria; Podgorniak, Marie Pierre; Berthois, Yolande; Mourah, Samia; Calvo, Fabien

    2005-09-01

    To investigate the anti-angiogenic effect of amphiregulin (AR) antisense RNA expression in breast cancer. Human AR cDNA antisense plasmid was transfected into NS2T2A1 cells (a human breast cancer cell line). Two selected clones expressed AR antisense RNA (AR AS1 and AR AS3 cell lines) in which AR protein expression was reduced. Control cell line NS2T2A1 V was obtained by empty vector transfection. These cells were injected subcutaneously into nude mice. The effects of conditioned media on proliferation of human microvascular endothelial cells (HMEC) were evaluated and VEGF secreted by the cells was measured by ELISA method. In tumor tissues, VEGF expression levels were measured by quantitative RT-PCR, and CD31-immunostaining was used for intra-tumoral vascular quantification. The proliferation index of HMEC cells grown in conditioned media with AR AS1 and AR AS3 was significantly reduced in comparison with that of control cells, accompanied by a decreased VEGF secretion. In tumors derived from AR AS1 and AR AS3 cells, intra-tumoral vascularization was reduced to about 50% of that derived from control cell line, accompanied with a decrease of VEGF expression. Amphiregulin antisense RNA expression inhibits efficiently the angiogenesis in breast cancer, suggesting this growth factor could represent a novel therapeutic target in breast cancer.

  2. Antisense long noncoding RNAs regulate var gene activation in the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum.

    PubMed

    Amit-Avraham, Inbar; Pozner, Guy; Eshar, Shiri; Fastman, Yair; Kolevzon, Netanel; Yavin, Eylon; Dzikowski, Ron

    2015-03-03

    The virulence of Plasmodium falciparum, the causative agent of the deadliest form of human malaria, is attributed to its ability to evade human immunity through antigenic variation. These parasites alternate between expression of variable antigens, encoded by members of a multicopy gene family named var. Immune evasion through antigenic variation depends on tight regulation of var gene expression, ensuring that only a single var gene is expressed at a time while the rest of the family is maintained transcriptionally silent. Understanding how a single gene is chosen for activation is critical for understanding mutually exclusive expression but remains a mystery. Here, we show that antisense long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) initiating from var introns are associated with the single active var gene at the time in the cell cycle when the single var upstream promoter is active. We demonstrate that these antisense transcripts are incorporated into chromatin, and that expression of these antisense lncRNAs in trans triggers activation of a silent var gene in a sequence- and dose-dependent manner. On the other hand, interference with these lncRNAs using complement peptide nucleic acid molecules down-regulated the active var gene, erased the epigenetic memory, and induced expression switching. Altogether, our data provide evidence that these antisense lncRNAs play a key role in regulating var gene activation and mutually exclusive expression.

  3. The Association Between H3K4me3 and Antisense Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Peng; Liu, Wanfei; Zhao, Yuhui; Lin, Qiang; Ding, Feng; Xin, Chengqi; Geng, Jianing; Song, Shuhui; Sun, Fanglin; Hu, Songnian; Yu, Jun

    2012-01-01

    Histone H3 lysine 4 trimethylation (H3K4me3) is well known to occur in the promoter region of genes for transcription activation. However, when investigating the H3K4me3 profiles in the mouse cerebrum and testis, we discovered that H3K4me3 also has a significant enrichment at the 3′ end of actively transcribed (sense) genes, named as 3′-H3K4me3. 3′-H3K4me3 is associated with ∼15% of protein-coding genes in both tissues. In addition, we examined the transcriptional initiation signals including RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) binding sites and 5′-CAGE-tag that marks transcriptional start sites. Interestingly, we found that 3′-H3K4me3 is associated with the initiation of antisense transcription. Furthermore, 3′-H3K4me3 modification levels correlate positively with the antisense expression levels of the associated sense genes, implying that 3′-H3K4me3 is involved in the activation of antisense transcription. Taken together, our findings suggest that H3K4me3 may be involved in the regulation of antisense transcription that initiates from the 3′ end of sense genes. In addition, a positive correlation was also observed between the expression of antisense and the associated sense genes with 3′-H3K4me3 modification. More importantly, we observed the 3′-H3K4me3 enrichment among genes in human, fruitfly and Arabidopsis, and found that the sequences of 3′-H3K4me3-marked regions are highly conserved and essentially indistinguishable from known promoters in vertebrate. Therefore, we speculate that these 3′-H3K4me3-marked regions may serve as potential promoters for antisense transcription and 3′-H3K4me3 appear to be a universal epigenetic feature in eukaryotes. Our results provide a novel insight into the epigenetic roles of H3K4me3 and the regulatory mechanism of antisense transcription. PMID:22768981

  4. The association between H3K4me3 and antisense transcription.

    PubMed

    Cui, Peng; Liu, Wanfei; Zhao, Yuhui; Lin, Qiang; Ding, Feng; Xin, Chengqi; Geng, Jianing; Song, Shuhui; Sun, Fanglin; Hu, Songnian; Yu, Jun

    2012-04-01

    Histone H3 lysine 4 trimethylation (H3K4me3) is well known to occur in the promoter region of genes for transcription activation. However, when investigating the H3K4me3 profiles in the mouse cerebrum and testis, we discovered that H3K4me3 also has a significant enrichment at the 3' end of actively transcribed (sense) genes, named as 3'-H3K4me3. 3'-H3K4me3 is associated with ~15% of protein-coding genes in both tissues. In addition, we examined the transcriptional initiation signals including RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) binding sites and 5'-CAGE-tag that marks transcriptional start sites. Interestingly, we found that 3'-H3K4me3 is associated with the initiation of antisense transcription. Furthermore, 3'-H3K4me3 modification levels correlate positively with the antisense expression levels of the associated sense genes, implying that 3'-H3K4me3 is involved in the activation of antisense transcription. Taken together, our findings suggest that H3K4me3 may be involved in the regulation of antisense transcription that initiates from the 3' end of sense genes. In addition, a positive correlation was also observed between the expression of antisense and the associated sense genes with 3'-H3K4me3 modification. More importantly, we observed the 3'-H3K4me3 enrichment among genes in human, fruitfly and Arabidopsis, and found that the sequences of 3'-H3K4me3-marked regions are highly conserved and essentially indistinguishable from known promoters in vertebrate. Therefore, we speculate that these 3'-H3K4me3-marked regions may serve as potential promoters for antisense transcription and 3'-H3K4me3 appear to be a universal epigenetic feature in eukaryotes. Our results provide a novel insight into the epigenetic roles of H3K4me3 and the regulatory mechanism of antisense transcription.

  5. Antisense precision polymer micelles require less poly(ethylenimine) for efficient gene knockdown

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fakhoury, Johans J.; Edwardson, Thomas G.; Conway, Justin W.; Trinh, Tuan; Khan, Farhad; Barłóg, Maciej; Bazzi, Hassan S.; Sleiman, Hanadi F.

    2015-12-01

    Therapeutic nucleic acids are powerful molecules for shutting down protein expression. However, their cellular uptake is poor and requires transport vectors, such as cationic polymers. Of these, poly(ethylenimine) (PEI) has been shown to be an efficient vehicle for nucleic acid transport into cells. However, cytotoxicity has been a major hurdle in the development of PEI-DNA complexes as clinically viable therapeutics. We have synthesized antisense-polymer conjugates, where the polymeric block is completely monodisperse and sequence-controlled. Depending on the polymer sequence, these can self-assemble to produce micelles of very low polydispersity. The introduction of linear poly(ethylenimine) to these micelles leads to aggregation into size-defined PEI-mediated superstructures. Subsequently, both cellular uptake and gene silencing are greatly enhanced over extended periods compared to antisense alone, while at the same time cellular cytotoxicity remains very low. In contrast, gene silencing is not enhanced with antisense polymer conjugates that are not able to self-assemble into micelles. Thus, using antisense precision micelles, we are able to achieve significant transfection and knockdown with minimal cytotoxicity at much lower concentrations of linear PEI then previously reported. Consequently, a conceptual solution to the problem of antisense or siRNA delivery is to self-assemble these molecules into `gene-like' micelles with high local charge and increased stability, thus reducing the amount of transfection agent needed for effective gene silencing.Therapeutic nucleic acids are powerful molecules for shutting down protein expression. However, their cellular uptake is poor and requires transport vectors, such as cationic polymers. Of these, poly(ethylenimine) (PEI) has been shown to be an efficient vehicle for nucleic acid transport into cells. However, cytotoxicity has been a major hurdle in the development of PEI-DNA complexes as clinically viable

  6. Unified QSAR approach to antimicrobials. 4. Multi-target QSAR modeling and comparative multi-distance study of the giant components of antiviral drug-drug complex networks.

    PubMed

    Prado-Prado, Francisco J; Martinez de la Vega, Octavio; Uriarte, Eugenio; Ubeira, Florencio M; Chou, Kuo-Chen; González-Díaz, Humberto

    2009-01-15

    One limitation of almost all antiviral Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationships (QSAR) models is that they predict the biological activity of drugs against only one species of virus. Consequently, the development of multi-tasking QSAR models (mt-QSAR) to predict drugs activity against different species of virus is of the major vitally important. These mt-QSARs offer also a good opportunity to construct drug-drug Complex Networks (CNs) that can be used to explore large and complex drug-viral species databases. It is known that in very large CNs we can use the Giant Component (GC) as a representative sub-set of nodes (drugs) and but the drug-drug similarity function selected may strongly determines the final network obtained. In the three previous works of the present series we reported mt-QSAR models to predict the antimicrobial activity against different fungi [Gonzalez-Diaz, H.; Prado-Prado, F. J.; Santana, L.; Uriarte, E. Bioorg.Med.Chem.2006, 14, 5973], bacteria [Prado-Prado, F. J.; Gonzalez-Diaz, H.; Santana, L.; Uriarte E. Bioorg.Med.Chem.2007, 15, 897] or parasite species [Prado-Prado, F.J.; González-Díaz, H.; Martinez de la Vega, O.; Ubeira, F.M.; Chou K.C. Bioorg.Med.Chem.2008, 16, 5871]. However, including these works, we do not found any report of mt-QSAR models for antivirals drug, or a comparative study of the different GC extracted from drug-drug CNs based on different similarity functions. In this work, we used Linear Discriminant Analysis (LDA) to fit a mt-QSAR model that classify 600 drugs as active or non-active against the 41 different tested species of virus. The model correctly classifies 143 of 169 active compounds (specificity=84.62%) and 119 of 139 non-active compounds (sensitivity=85.61%) and presents overall training accuracy of 85.1% (262 of 308 cases). Validation of the model was carried out by means of external predicting series, classifying the model 466 of 514, 90.7% of compounds. In order to illustrate the performance of the model in practice, we develop a virtual screening recognizing the model as active 92.7%, 102 of 110 antivirus compounds. These compounds were never use in training or predicting series. Next, we obtained and compared the topology of the CNs and their respective GCs based on Euclidean, Manhattan, Chebychey, Pearson and other similarity measures. The GC of the Manhattan network showed the more interesting features for drug-drug similarity search. We also give the procedure for the construction of Back-Projection Maps for the contribution of each drug sub-structure to the antiviral activity against different species.

  7. A multi-target approach for pain treatment: dual inhibition of fatty acid amide hydrolase and TRPV1 in a rat model of osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Malek, Natalia; Mrugala, Monika; Makuch, Wioletta; Kolosowska, Natalia; Przewlocka, Barbara; Binkowski, Marcin; Czaja, Martyna; Morera, Enrico; Di Marzo, Vincenzo; Starowicz, Katarzyna

    2015-05-01

    The pharmacological inhibition of anandamide (AEA) hydrolysis by fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) attenuates pain in animal models of osteoarthritis (OA) but has failed in clinical trials. This may have occurred because AEA also activates transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1), which contributes to pain development. Therefore, we investigated the effectiveness of the dual FAAH-TRPV1 blocker OMDM-198 in an MIA-model of osteoarthritic pain. We first investigated the MIA-induced model of OA by (1) characterizing the pain phenotype and degenerative changes within the joint using X-ray microtomography and (2) evaluating nerve injury and inflammation marker (ATF-3 and IL-6) expression in the lumbar dorsal root ganglia of osteoarthritic rats and differences in gene and protein expression of the cannabinoid CB1 receptors FAAH and TRPV1. Furthermore, we compared OMDM-198 with compounds acting exclusively on FAAH or TRPV1. Osteoarthritis was accompanied by the fragmentation of bone microstructure and destroyed cartilage. An increase of the mRNA levels of ATF3 and IL-6 and an upregulation of AEA receptors and FAAH in the dorsal root ganglia were observed. OMDM-198 showed antihyperalgesic effects in the OA model, which were comparable with those of a selective TRPV1 antagonist, SB-366,791, and a selective FAAH inhibitor, URB-597. The effect of OMDM-198 was attenuated by the CB1 receptor antagonist, AM-251, and by the nonpungent TRPV1 agonist, olvanil, suggesting its action as an "indirect" CB1 agonist and TRPV1 antagonist. These results suggest an innovative strategy for the treatment of OA, which may yield more satisfactory results than those obtained so far with selective FAAH inhibitors in human OA.

  8. Antisense oligonucleotide inhibition of Heat Shock Protein (HSP) 47 improves bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis in rats

    PubMed Central

    Hagiwara, Satoshi; Iwasaka, Hideo; Matsumoto, Shigekiyo; Noguchi, Takayuki

    2007-01-01

    Background The most common pathologic form of pulmonary fibrosis arises from excessive deposition of extracellular matrix proteins such as collagen. The 47 kDa heat shock protein 47 (HSP47) is a collagen-specific molecular chaperone that has been shown to play a major role during the processing and/or secretion of procollagen. Objectives To determine whether inhibition of HSP47 could have beneficial effects in mitigating bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis in rats. Methods All experiments were performed with 250–300 g male Wistar rats. Animals were randomly divided into five experimental groups that were administered: 1) saline alone, 2) bleomycin alone, 3) antisense HSP47 oligonucleotides alone, 4) bleomycin + antisense HSP47 oligonucleotides, and 5) bleomycin + sense control oligonucleotides. We investigated lung histopathology and performed immunoblot and immunohistochemistry analyses. Results In rats treated with HSP47 antisense oligonucleotides, pulmonary fibrosis was significantly reduced. In addition, treatment with HSP47 antisense oligonucleotides significantly improved bleomycin-induced morphological changes. Treatment with HSP47 antisense oligonucleotides alone did not produce any significant changes to lung morphology. Immunoblot analyses of lung homogenates confirmed the inhibition of HSP47 protein by antisense oligonucleotides. The bleo + sense group, however, did not exhibit any improvement in lung pathology compared to bleomycin alone groups, and also had no effect on HSP47 expression. Conclusion These findings suggest that HSP47 antisense oligonucleotide inhibition of HSP47 improves bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis pathology in rats. PMID:17504519

  9. Conditional gene silencing of multiple genes with antisense RNAs and generation of a mutator strain of Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Nakashima, Nobutaka; Tamura, Tomohiro

    2009-01-01

    In this study, we describe a method of simultaneous conditional gene silencing of up to four genes in Escherichia coli by using antisense RNAs. We used antisense RNAs with paired termini, which carried flanking inverted repeats to create paired double-stranded RNA termini; these RNAs have been proven to have high silencing efficacy. To express antisense RNAs, we constructed four IPTG-inducible vectors carrying different but compatible replication origins. When the lacZ antisense RNA was expressed using these vectors, lacZ expression was successfully silenced by all the vectors, but the expression level of the antisense RNA and silencing efficacy differed depending on the used vectors. All the vectors were co-transformable; the antisense RNAs against lacZ, ackA, pta and pepN were co-expressed, and silencing of all the target genes was confirmed. Furthermore, when antisense RNAs were targeted to the mutator genes mutS, mutD (dnaQ) and ndk, which are involved in DNA replication or DNA mismatch repair, spontaneous mutation frequencies increased over 2000-fold. The resulting mutator strain is useful for random mutagenesis of plasmids. The method provides a robust tool for investigating functional relationships between multiple genes or altering cell phenotypes for biotechnological and industrial applications. PMID:19515932

  10. Delineating bacteriostatic and bactericidal targets in mycobacteria using IPTG inducible antisense expression.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Parvinder; Agarwal, Saurabh; Datta, Santanu

    2009-06-15

    In order to identify novel high value antibacterial targets it is desirable to delineate whether the inactivation of the target enzyme will lead to bacterial death or stasis. This knowledge is particularly important in slow growing organisms, like mycobacteria, where most of the viable anti-tubercular agents are bactericidal. A bactericidal target can be identified through the conditional deletion or inactivation of the target gene at a relatively high cell number and subsequently following the time course of survival for the bacteria. A simple protocol to execute conditional inactivation of a gene is by antisense expression. We have developed a mycobacteria specific IPTG inducible vector system and monitored the effect of antisense inhibition of several known essential genes in mycobacteria by following their survival kinetics. By this method, we could differentiate between genes whose down regulation lead to bacteriostatic or bactericidal effect. Targets for standard anti-tubercular drugs like inhA for isoniazid, rpoB and C for rifampicin, and gyr A/B for flouroquinolones were shown to be bactericidal. In contrast targets like FtsZ behaved in a bacteriostatic manner. Induction of antisense expression in embB and ribosomal RNA genes, viz., rplJ and rpsL showed only a marginal growth inhibition. The specificity of the antisense inhibition was conclusively shown in the case of auxotrophic gene ilvB. The bactericidal activity following antisense expression of ilvB was completely reversed when the growth media was supplemented with the isoleucine, leucine, valine and pantothenate. Additionally, under these conditions the expression of several genes in branched chain amino acid pathway was severely suppressed indicating targeted gene inactivation.

  11. Delineating Bacteriostatic and Bactericidal Targets in Mycobacteria Using IPTG Inducible Antisense Expression

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Parvinder; Agarwal, Saurabh; Datta, Santanu

    2009-01-01

    In order to identify novel high value antibacterial targets it is desirable to delineate whether the inactivation of the target enzyme will lead to bacterial death or stasis. This knowledge is particularly important in slow growing organisms, like mycobacteria, where most of the viable anti-tubercular agents are bactericidal. A bactericidal target can be identified through the conditional deletion or inactivation of the target gene at a relatively high cell number and subsequently following the time course of survival for the bacteria. A simple protocol to execute conditional inactivation of a gene is by antisense expression. We have developed a mycobacteria specific IPTG inducible vector system and monitored the effect of antisense inhibition of several known essential genes in mycobacteria by following their survival kinetics. By this method, we could differentiate between genes whose down regulation lead to bacteriostatic or bactericidal effect. Targets for standard anti-tubercular drugs like inhA for isoniazid, rpoB and C for rifampicin, and gyr A/B for flouroquinolones were shown to be bactericidal. In contrast targets like FtsZ behaved in a bacteriostatic manner. Induction of antisense expression in embB and ribosomal RNA genes, viz., rplJ and rpsL showed only a marginal growth inhibition. The specificity of the antisense inhibition was conclusively shown in the case of auxotrophic gene ilvB. The bactericidal activity following antisense expression of ilvB was completely reversed when the growth media was supplemented with the isoleucine, leucine, valine and pantothenate. Additionally, under these conditions the expression of several genes in branched chain amino acid pathway was severely suppressed indicating targeted gene inactivation. PMID:19526063

  12. Transcriptome analysis of antigenic variation in Plasmodium falciparum - var silencing is not dependent on antisense RNA

    PubMed Central

    Ralph, Stuart A; Bischoff, Emmanuel; Mattei, Denise; Sismeiro, Odile; Dillies, Marie-Agnès; Guigon, Ghislaine; Coppee, Jean-Yves; David, Peter H; Scherf, Artur

    2005-01-01

    Background Plasmodium falciparum, the causative agent of the most severe form of malaria, undergoes antigenic variation through successive presentation of a family of antigens on the surface of parasitized erythrocytes. These antigens, known as Plasmodium falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 (PfEMP1) proteins, are subject to a mutually exclusive expression system, and are encoded by the multigene var family. The mechanism whereby inactive var genes are silenced is poorly understood. To investigate transcriptional features of this mechanism, we conducted a microarray analysis of parasites that were selected to express different var genes by adhesion to chondroitin sulfate A (CSA) or CD36. Results In addition to oligonucleotides for all predicted protein-coding genes, oligonucleotide probes specific to each known var gene of the FCR3 background were designed and added to the microarray, as well as tiled sense and antisense probes for a subset of var genes. In parasites selected for adhesion to CSA, one full-length var gene (var2csa) was strongly upregulated, as were sense RNA molecules emanating from the 3' end of a limited subset of other var genes. No global relationship between sense and antisense production of var genes was observed, but notably, some var genes had coincident high levels of both antisense and sense transcript. Conclusion Mutually exclusive expression of PfEMP1 proteins results from transcriptional silencing of non-expressed var genes. The distribution of steady-state sense and antisense RNA at var loci are not consistent with a silencing mechanism based on antisense silencing of inactive var genes. Silencing of var loci is also associated with altered regulation of genes distal to var loci. PMID:16277748

  13. Antisense oligodeoxynucleotide inhibition of a swelling-activated cation channel in osteoblast-like osteosarcoma cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duncan, R. L.; Kizer, N.; Barry, E. L.; Friedman, P. A.; Hruska, K. A.

    1996-01-01

    By patch-clamp analysis, we have shown that chronic, intermittent mechanical strain (CMS) increases the activity of stretch-activated cation channels of osteoblast-like UMR-106.01 cells. CMS also produces a swelling-activated whole-cell conductance (Gm) regulated by varying strain levels. We questioned whether the swelling-activated conductance was produced by stretch-activated cation channel activity. We have identified a gene involved in the increase in conductance by using antisense oligodeoxynucleotides (ODN) derived from the alpha 1-subunit genes of calcium channels found in UMR-106.01 cells (alpha1S, alpha1C, and alpha1D). We demonstrate that alpha 1C antisense ODNs abolish the increase in Gm in response to hypotonic swelling following CMS. Antisense ODNs to alpha1S and alpha1D, sense ODNs to alpha1C, and sham permeabilization had no effect on the conductance increase. In addition, during cell-attached patch-clamp studies, antisense ODNs to alpha1c completely blocked the swelling-activated and stretch-activated nonselective cation channel response to strain. Antisense ODNs to alpha1S treatment produced no effect on either swelling-activated or stretch-activated cation channel activity. There were differences in the stretch-activated and swelling-activated cation channel activity, but whether they represent different channels could not be determined from our data. Our data indicate that the alpha1C gene product is involved in the Gm and the activation of the swelling-activated cation channels induced by CMS. The possibility that swelling-activated cation channel genes are members of the calcium channel superfamily exists, but if alpha1c is not the swelling-activated cation channel itself, then its expression is required for induction of swelling-activated cation channel activity by CMS.

  14. Decreased glucocorticoid receptor activity following glucocorticoid receptor antisense RNA gene fragment transfection.

    PubMed Central

    Pepin, M C; Barden, N

    1991-01-01

    Depression is often characterized by increased cortisol secretion caused by hyperactivity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and by nonsuppression of cortisol secretion following dexamethasone administration. This hyperactivity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis could result from a reduced glucocorticoid receptor (GR) activity in neurons involved in its control. To investigate the effect of reduced neuronal GR levels, we have blocked cellular GR mRNA processing and/or translation by introduction of a complementary GR antisense RNA strand. Two cell lines were transfected with a reporter plasmid carrying the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) gene under control of the mouse mammary tumor virus long terminal repeat (a glucocorticoid-inducible promoter). This gene construction permitted assay of the sensitivity of the cells to glucocorticoid hormones. Cells were also cotransfected with a plasmid containing 1,815 bp of GR cDNA inserted in the reverse orientation downstream from either a neurofilament gene promoter element or the Rous sarcoma virus promoter element. Northern (RNA) blot analysis demonstrated formation of GR antisense RNA strands. Measurement of the sensitivity of CAT activity to exogeneous dexamethasone showed that although dexamethasone increased CAT activity by as much as 13-fold in control incubations, expression of GR antisense RNA caused a 2- to 4-fold decrease in the CAT response to dexamethasone. Stable transfectants bearing the GR antisense gene fragment construction demonstrated a 50 to 70% decrease of functional GR levels compared with normal cells, as evidenced by a ligand-binding assay with the type II glucocorticoid receptor-specific ligand [3H]RU 28362. These results validate the use of antisense RNA to GR to decrease cellular response to glucocorticoids. Images PMID:1996114

  15. Antisense oligodeoxynucleotide inhibition of a swelling-activated cation channel in osteoblast-like osteosarcoma cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duncan, R. L.; Kizer, N.; Barry, E. L.; Friedman, P. A.; Hruska, K. A.

    1996-01-01

    By patch-clamp analysis, we have shown that chronic, intermittent mechanical strain (CMS) increases the activity of stretch-activated cation channels of osteoblast-like UMR-106.01 cells. CMS also produces a swelling-activated whole-cell conductance (Gm) regulated by varying strain levels. We questioned whether the swelling-activated conductance was produced by stretch-activated cation channel activity. We have identified a gene involved in the increase in conductance by using antisense oligodeoxynucleotides (ODN) derived from the alpha 1-subunit genes of calcium channels found in UMR-106.01 cells (alpha1S, alpha1C, and alpha1D). We demonstrate that alpha 1C antisense ODNs abolish the increase in Gm in response to hypotonic swelling following CMS. Antisense ODNs to alpha1S and alpha1D, sense ODNs to alpha1C, and sham permeabilization had no effect on the conductance increase. In addition, during cell-attached patch-clamp studies, antisense ODNs to alpha1c completely blocked the swelling-activated and stretch-activated nonselective cation channel response to strain. Antisense ODNs to alpha1S treatment produced no effect on either swelling-activated or stretch-activated cation channel activity. There were differences in the stretch-activated and swelling-activated cation channel activity, but whether they represent different channels could not be determined from our data. Our data indicate that the alpha1C gene product is involved in the Gm and the activation of the swelling-activated cation channels induced by CMS. The possibility that swelling-activated cation channel genes are members of the calcium channel superfamily exists, but if alpha1c is not the swelling-activated cation channel itself, then its expression is required for induction of swelling-activated cation channel activity by CMS.

  16. Antisense antibiotics: a brief review of novel target discovery and delivery.

    PubMed

    Bai, Hui; Xue, Xiaoyan; Hou, Zheng; Zhou, Ying; Meng, Jingru; Luo, Xiaoxing

    2010-06-01

    The nightmare of multi-drug resistant bacteria will still haunt if no panacea is ever found. Efforts on seeking desirable natural products with bactericidal property and screening chemically modified derivatives of traditional antibiotics have lagged behind the emergence of new multi-drug resistant bacteria. The concept of using antisense antibiotics, now as revolutionary as is on threshold has experienced ups and downs in the past decade. In the past five years, however, significant technology advances in the fields of microbial genomics, structural modification of oligonucleotides and efficient delivery system have led to fundamental progress in the research and in vivo application of this paradigm. The wealthy information provided in the microbial genomics era has allowed the identification and/or validation of a number of essential genes that may serve as possible targets for antisense inhibition; antisense oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs) based on the 3rd generation of modified structures, e.g., peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) and phosphorodiamidate morpholino oligomers (PMOs) have shown great potency in gene expression inhibition in a sequence-specific and dosedependent manner at low micromolar concentrations; and cell penetrating peptide mediated delivery system has enabled the effective display of intracellular antisense inhibition of targeted genes both in vitro and in vivo. The new methods show promise in the discovery of novel gene-specific antisense antibiotics that will be useful in the future battle against drug-resistant bacterial infections. This review describes this promising paradigm, the targets that have been identified and the recent technologies on which it is delivered.

  17. Natural antisense RNAs as mRNA regulatory elements in bacteria: a review on function and applications.

    PubMed

    Saberi, Fatemeh; Kamali, Mehdi; Najafi, Ali; Yazdanparast, Alavieh; Moghaddam, Mehrdad Moosazadeh

    2016-01-01

    Naturally occurring antisense RNAs are small, diffusible, untranslated transcripts that pair to target RNAs at specific regions of complementarity to control their biological function by regulating gene expression at the post-transcriptional level. This review focuses on known cases of antisense RNA control in prokaryotes and provides an overview of some natural RNA-based mechanisms that bacteria use to modulate gene expression, such as mRNA sensors, riboswitches and antisense RNAs. We also highlight recent advances in RNA-based technology. The review shows that studies on both natural and synthetic systems are reciprocally beneficial.

  18. Self-assembled phenylalanine-α,β-dehydrophenylalanine nanotubes for sustained intravitreal delivery of a multi-targeted tyrosine kinase inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Panda, Jiban J; Yandrapu, Sarath; Kadam, Rajendra S; Chauhan, Virander S; Kompella, Uday B

    2013-12-28

    Current standard of care for sustained back of the eye drug delivery is surgical placement or injection of large, slow release implants using a relatively large 22 gauge needle. We designed novel dipeptide (phenylalanine-α,β-dehydrophenylalanine; Phe-∆Phe) based nanotubes with a diameter of ~15-30 nm and a length of ~1500 nm that could be injected with a 33 gauge needle for sustained intravitreal delivery of pazopanib, a multi-targeted tyrosine kinase inhibitor. The drug could be loaded during nanotube assembly or post-loaded after nanotube formation, with the former being more efficient at 25% w/w pazopanib loading and ~55% loading efficiency. Plain and peptide loaded nanotube were non-cytotoxic to retinal pigment epithelial cells even at a concentration of 200 μg/ml. Following intravitreal injection of fluorescently labeled nanotubes using a 33 gauge needle in a rat model, the nanotube persistence and drug delivery were monitored using noninvasive fluorophotometry, electron microscopy and mass spectrometry analysis. Nanotubes persisted in the vitreous humor during the 15 days study and pazopanib levels in the vitreous humor, retina, and choroid-RPE at the end of the study were 4.5, 5, and 2.5-folds higher, respectively, compared to the plain drug. Thus, Phe-∆Phe nanotubes allow intravitreal injections with a small gauge needle and sustain drug delivery. © 2013.

  19. Multi-target determination of organic ultraviolet absorbents in organism tissues by ultrasonic assisted extraction and ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Peng, Xianzhi; Jin, Jiabin; Wang, Chunwei; Ou, Weihui; Tang, Caiming

    2015-03-06

    A sensitive and reliable method was developed for multi-target determination of 13 most widely used organic ultraviolet (UV) absorbents (including UV filters and UV stabilizers) in aquatic organism tissues. The organic UV absorbents were extracted using ultrasonic-assisted extraction, purified via gel permeation chromatography coupled with silica gel column chromatography, and determined by ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Recoveries of the UV absorbents from organism tissues mostly ranged from 70% to 120% from fish filet with satisfactory reproducibility. Method quantification limits were 0.003-1.0ngg(-1) dry weight (dw) except for 2-ethylhexyl 4-methoxycinnamate. This method has been applied to analysis of the UV absorbents in wild and farmed aquatic organisms collected from the Pearl River Estuary, South China. 2-Hydroxy-4-methoxybenzophenone and UV-P were frequently detected in both wild and farmed marine organisms at low ngg(-1)dw. 3-(4-Methylbenzylidene)camphor and most of the benzotriazole UV stabilizers were also frequently detected in maricultured fish. Octocrylene and 2-ethylhexyl 4-methoxycinnamate were not detected in any sample. This work lays basis for in-depth study about bioaccumulation and biomagnification of the UV absorbents in marine environment.

  20. TIMMA-R: an R package for predicting synergistic multi-targeted drug combinations in cancer cell lines or patient-derived samples

    PubMed Central

    He, Liye; Wennerberg, Krister; Aittokallio, Tero; Tang, Jing

    2015-01-01

    Summary: Network pharmacology-based prediction of multi-targeted drug combinations is becoming a promising strategy to improve anticancer efficacy and safety. We developed a logic-based network algorithm, called Target Inhibition Interaction using Maximization and Minimization Averaging (TIMMA), which predicts the effects of drug combinations based on their binary drug-target interactions and single-drug sensitivity profiles in a given cancer sample. Here, we report the R implementation of the algorithm (TIMMA-R), which is much faster than the original MATLAB code. The major extensions include modeling of multiclass drug-target profiles and network visualization. We also show that the TIMMA-R predictions are robust to the intrinsic noise in the experimental data, thus making it a promising high-throughput tool to prioritize drug combinations in various cancer types for follow-up experimentation or clinical applications. Availability and implementation: TIMMA-R source code is freely available at http://cran.r-project.org/web/packages/timma/. Contact: jing.tang@helsinki.fi Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:25638808

  1. Multi-targeting exploration of new 2-aminothiazolyl quinolones: Synthesis, antimicrobial evaluation, interaction with DNA, combination with topoisomerase IV and penetrability into cells.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yu; Avula, Srinivasa Rao; Gao, Wei-Wei; Addla, Dinesh; Tangadanchu, Vijai Kumar Reddy; Zhang, Ling; Lin, Jian-Mei; Zhou, Cheng-He

    2016-11-29

    A series of new potentially multi-targeting antimicrobial 2-aminothiazolyl quinolones were designed, synthesized and characterized by (1)H NMR, (13)C NMR, IR, MS and HRMS spectra. Bioactive assay manifested that some of the prepared compounds showed moderate to good antibacterial and antifungal activities. Noticeably, compound 10f could effectively inhibit the growth of B. typhi and MRSA with MIC values of 1 and 8 μg/mL, respectively. Experimental results revealed that compound 10f was membrane-active and had the ability to rapidly kill the tested strains and effectively prevent the development of bacterial resistance. Moreover, this compound also exhibited low toxicity against L929 cells. Molecular docking indicated that compound 10f could bind with topoisomerase IV-DNA complexes through hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic interactions. Quantum chemical studies were also performed on 10f to understand the structural features essential for activity. The preliminary mechanism research suggested that compound 10f could intercalate into calf thymus DNA to form a steady supramolecular complex which might block DNA replication to exert the powerful bioactivities.

  2. Using combination therapy to override stromal-mediated chemoresistance in mutant FLT3-positive AML: Synergism between FLT3 inhibitors, dasatinib/multi-targeted inhibitors, and JAK inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Weisberg, Ellen; Liu, Qingsong; Nelson, Erik; Kung, Andrew L.; Christie, Amanda L.; Bronson, Rod; Sattler, Martin; Sanda, Takaomi; Zhao, Zheng; Hur, Wooyoung; Mitsiades, Constantine; Smith, Robert; Daley, John F.; Stone, Richard; Galinsky, Ilene; Griffin, James D.; Gray, Nathanael

    2014-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) progenitors are frequently characterized by activating mutations in the receptor tyrosine kinase FLT3. Protein tyrosine kinases are integral components of signaling cascades that play a role in both FLT3-mediated transformation as well as viability pathways that are advantageous to leukemic cell survival. The bone marrow microenvironment can diminish AML sensitivity to tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs). We hypothesized that inhibition of protein kinases in addition to FLT3 may be effective in overriding drug resistance in AML. We used a cell-based model mimicking stromal protection as part of an unbiased high-throughput chemical screen to identify kinase inhibitors with the potential to override microenvironment-mediated drug resistance in mutant FLT3-positive AML. Several related multi-targeted kinase inhibitors, including dasatinib, with the capability of reversing microenvironment-induced resistance to FLT3 inhibition were identified and validated. We validated synergy in vitro and demonstrated effective combination potential in vivo. In particular Janus kinase (JAK) inhibitors were effective in overriding stromal protection and potentiating FLT3 inhibition in primary AML and cell lines. These results hint at a novel concept of using combination therapy to override drug resistance in mutant FLT3-positive AML in the bone marrow niche and suppress or eradicate residual disease. PMID:22469781

  3. A novel HBV antisense RNA gene delivery system targeting hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Chun-Hong; Sun, Wen-Sheng; Tian, Pei-Kun; Gao, Li-Fen; Liu, Su-Xia; Wang, Xiao-Yan; Zhang, Li-Ning; Cao, Ying-Lin; Han, Li-Hui; Liang, Xiao-Hong

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To construct a novel HBV antisense RNA delivery system targeting hapatocellular carcinoma and study its inhibitory effect in vitro and in vivo. METHODS: GE7,a 16-peptide specific to EGFR, and HA20, a homologue of N-terminus of haemagglutinin of influenza viral envelope protein, were synthesized and conjugated with polylysin. The above conjugates were organized into the pEBAF-as-preS2, a hepatocarcinoma specific HBV antisense expression vector, to construct a novel HBV antisense RNA delivery system, named AFP-enhancing 4-element complex. Hepatocelluar carcinoma HepG2.2.15 cells was used to assay the in vitro inhibition of the complex on HBV. Expression of HBV antigen was assayed by ELISA. BALB/c nude mice bearing HepG2.2.15 cells were injected with AFP-enhancing 4-element complex. The expression of HBV antisense RNA was examined by RT-PCR and the size of tumor in nude mice were measured. RESULTS: The AFP-enhancing 4-element complex was constructed and DNA was completely trapped at the slot with no DNA migration when the ratio of polypeptide to plasmid was 1:1.The expression of HBsAg and HBeAg of HepG2.2.15 cells was greatly decreased after being transfected by AFP-enhancing 4-element complex. The inhibitory rates were 33.4% and 58.5% respectively. RT-PCR showed HBV antisense RNA expressed specifically in liver tumor cells of tumor-bearing nude mice. After 4 injections of AFP-enhancing 4-element complex containing 0.2 μg DNA, the diameter of the tumor was 0.995 cm ± 0.35, which was significantly smaller than that of the control groups (2.215 cm ± 0.25, P < 0.05). CONCLUSION: AFP-enhancing 4-element complex could deliver HBV antisense RNA targeting on hepatocarcinoma and inhibit both HBV and liver tumor cells in vitro and in vivo. PMID:12632498

  4. An Explosive Antisense RNA Strategy for Inhibition of a Lactococcal Bacteriophage†

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Shirley A.; Klaenhammer, Todd R.

    2000-01-01

    The coding regions of six putative open reading frames (ORFs) identified near the phage φ31 late promoter and the right cohesive end (cos) of lactococcal bacteriophage φ31 were used to develop antisense constructs to inhibit the proliferation of phage φ31. Two middle-expressed ORFs (ORF 1 and ORF 2) and four late-expressed ORFs (ORF 3 through ORF 6) were cloned individually between the strong Lactobacillus P6 promoter and the T7 terminator (TT7) to yield a series of antisense RNA transcripts. When expressed on a high-copy-number vector from a strong promoter, the constructs had no effect on the efficiency of plaquing (EOP) or the plaque size of phage φ31. To increase the ratio of antisense RNA to the targeted sense mRNA appearing during a phage infection, the antisense cassettes containing the late-expressed ORFs (ORF 3 through ORF 6) were subcloned to pTRK360, a low-copy-number vector containing the phage φ31 origin of replication, ori31. ori31 allows for explosive amplification of the low-copy-number vector upon phage infection, thereby increasing levels of antisense RNA transcripts later in the lytic cycle. In addition, the presence of ori31 also lowers the burst size of phage φ31 fourfold, resulting in fewer sense, target mRNAs being expressed from the phage genome. The combination of ori31 and P6::anti-ORF 4H::TT7 resulted in a threefold decrease in the EOP of phage φ31 (EOP = 0.11 ± 0.03 [mean ± standard deviation]) compared to the presence of ori31 alone (EOP = 0.36). One-step growth curves showed that expression of anti-ORF 4H RNA decreased the percentage of successful centers of infection (75 to 80% for ori31 compared to 35 to 45% for ori31 plus anti-ORF 4H), with no further reduction in burst size. Growth curves performed in the presence of varying levels of phage φ31 showed that ori31 plus anti-ORF 4H offered significant protection to Lactococcus lactis, even at multiplicities of infection of 0.01 and 0.1. These results illustrate a successful

  5. Preparation and quality test of superparamagnetic iron oxide labeled antisense oligodeoxynucleotide probe: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Wen, Ming; Li, Bibo; Ouyang, Yu; Luo, Yi; Li, Shaolin

    2009-06-01

    Molecular imaging of tumor antisense gene techniques have been applied to the study of magnetic resonance (MR) gene imaging associated with malignant tumors. In this study, we designed, synthesized, and tested a novel molecular probe, in which the antisense oligodeoxynucleotide (ASODN) was labeled with superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO), and its efficiency was examined by in vitro MR imaging after SK-Br-3 mammary carcinoma cell lines (oncocytes) transfection. The SPIO-labeled ASODN probe was prepared through SPIO conjugated to ASODN using a chemical cross linking method. Its morphology and size were detected by atomic force microscope, size distribution were detected by laser granulometer, the conjugating rate and biological activity were determined by high performance liquid chromatography, and the stability was determined by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. After that, the probes were transfected into the SK-Br-3 oncocytes, cellular iron uptake was analyzed qualitatively at light and electron microscopy and was quantified at atomic absorption spectrometry, and the signal change of the transfected cells was observed and measured using MR imaging. The morphology of the SPIO-labeled ASODN probe was mostly spherical with well-distributed scattering, and the diameters were between 25 and 40 nm (95%) by atomic force microscope and laser granulometer, the conjugating rate of the probe was 99%. Moreover, this probe kept its activity under physiological conditions and could conjugate with antisense oligodeoxynucleotide. In addition, light microscopy revealed an intracellular uptake of iron oxides in the cytosol and electron microscopic studies revealed a lysosomal deposition of iron oxides in the transfected SK-Br-3 oncocytes by antisense probes, some of them gathered stacks, and the iron content of the group of transfected SK-Br-3 oncocytes by antisense probe is significantly higher (18.37 +/- 0.42 pg) than other contrast groups, the MR imaging showed that

  6. Cis-encoded non-coding antisense RNAs in streptococci and other low GC Gram (+) bacterial pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Kyu Hong; Kim, Jeong-Ho

    2015-01-01

    Due to recent advances of bioinformatics and high throughput sequencing technology, discovery of regulatory non-coding RNAs in bacteria has been increased to a great extent. Based on this bandwagon, many studies searching for trans-acting small non-coding RNAs in streptococci have been performed intensively, especially in the important human pathogen, group A and B streptococci. However, studies for cis-encoded non-coding antisense RNAs in streptococci have been scarce. A recent study shows antisense RNAs are involved in virulence gene regulation in group B streptococcus, S. agalactiae. This suggests antisense RNAs could have important roles in the pathogenesis of streptococcal pathogens. In this review, we describe recent discoveries of chromosomal cis-encoded antisense RNAs in streptococcal pathogens and other low GC Gram (+) bacteria to provide a guide for future studies. PMID:25859258