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Sample records for multi-trait genetic analysis

  1. Genetic analysis of calving traits by the multi-trait individual animal model.

    PubMed

    Weller, J I; Ezra, E

    2016-01-01

    Five alternative models were applied for analysis of dystocia and stillbirth in first and second parities. Models 1 and 2 were included only to estimate the parameters required for model 4, and models 3 and 5 are included only as comparisons to the model 4 estimates. Variance components were estimated by multi-trait REML, including cows with valid calving records for both parities. For the effects of sire of calf on first and second parities, variance components were estimated including only calvings with the same sire of calf for both parities. All heritabilities for the cow effect were quite low, but higher for dystocia than for stillbirth and higher in first parity. The sire-of-calf heritabilities were higher than the cow effect heritabilities, except for stillbirth in parity 2. Unlike the effect of cow correlations, all sire of calf correlations were >0.6, and the correlations for the same trait in parities 1 and 2 were >0.9. Thus, a multi-trait analysis should yield a significant gain in accuracy with respect to the sire of calf effects for bulls not mated to virgin heifers. A multi-trait individual animal model algorithm was developed for joint analysis of dystocia and stillbirth in first and second parities. Relationships matrices were included both for the effects of cow and sire of calf. In addition, random herd-year-season and fixed sex of calf effects were included in the model. Records were preadjusted for calving month and age. A total of 899,223 Israeli Holstein cows with first calvings since 1985 were included in the complete analysis. Approximate reliabilities were computed for both sire of cow and sire of calf effects. Correlations between these reliabilities and reliabilities obtained by direct inversion of the coefficient matrix for a sire of cow-sire of calf model were all close to 0.99. Phenotypic trends for cows born from 1983 through 2007 were economically unfavorable for dystocia and favorable for stillbirth in both parities. Genetic trends

  2. Multi-trait BLUP model indicates sorghum hybrids with genetic potential for agronomic and nutritional traits.

    PubMed

    Almeida Filho, J E; Tardin, F D; Guimarães, J F R; Resende, M D V; Silva, F F; Simeone, M L; Menezes, C B; Queiroz, V A V

    2016-02-26

    The breeding of sorghum, Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench, aimed at improving its nutritional quality, is of great interest, since it can be used as a highly nutritive alternative food source and can possibly be cultivated in regions with low rainfall. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the potential and genetic diversity of grain-sorghum hybrids for traits of agronomic and nutritional interest. To this end, the traits grain yield and flowering, and concentrations of protein, potassium, calcium, magnesium, sulfur, iron, manganese, and zinc in the grain were evaluated in 25 grain-sorghum hybrids, comprising 18 experimental hybrids of Embrapa Milho e Sorgo and seven commercial hybrids. The genetic potential was analyzed by a multi-trait best linear unbiased prediction (BLUP) model, and cluster analysis was accomplished by squared Mahalanobis distance using the predicted genotypic values. Hybrids 0306037 and 0306034 stood out in the agronomic evaluation. The hybrids with agronomic prominence, however, did not stand out for the traits related to the nutritional quality of the grain. Three clusters were formed from the dendrogram obtained with the unweighted pair group method with arithmetic mean method. From the results of the genotypic BLUP and the analysis of the dendrogram, hybrids 0577337, 0441347, 0307651, and 0306037 were identified as having the potential to establish a population that can aggregate alleles for all the evaluated traits of interest.

  3. Multi-trait QTL analysis for agronomic and quality characters of Agaricus bisporus (button mushrooms).

    PubMed

    Gao, Wei; Baars, Johan J P; Maliepaard, Chris; Visser, Richard G F; Zhang, Jinxia; Sonnenberg, Anton S M

    2016-12-01

    The demand for button mushrooms of high quality is increasing. Superior button mushroom varieties require the combination of multiple traits to maximize productivity and quality. Very often these traits are correlated and should, therefore, be evaluated together rather than as single traits. In order to unravel the genetic architecture of multiple traits of Agaricus bisporus and the genetic correlations among traits, we have investigated a total of six agronomic and quality traits through multi-trait QTL analyses in a mixed-model. Traits were evaluated in three heterokaryon sets. Significant phenotypic correlations were observed among traits. For instance, earliness (ER) correlated to firmness (FM), cap color, and compost colonization, and FM correlated to scales (SC). QTLs of different traits located on the same chromosomes genetically explains the phenotypic correlations. QTL detected on chromosome 10 mainly affects three traits, i.e., ER, FM and SC. It explained 31.4 % phenotypic variation of SC on mushroom cap (heterokaryon Set 1), 14.9 % that of the FM (heterokaryon Set 3), and 14.2 % that of ER (heterokaryon Set 3). High value alleles from the wild parental line showed beneficial effects for several traits, suggesting that the wild germplasm is a valuable donor in terms of those traits. Due to the limitations of recombination pattern, we only made a start at understanding the genetic base for several agronomic and quality traits in button mushrooms.

  4. The Role of Attention in Somatosensory Processing: A Multi-Trait, Multi-Method Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wodka, Ericka L.; Puts, Nicolaas A. J.; Mahone, E. Mark; Edden, Richard A. E.; Tommerdahl, Mark; Mostofsky, Stewart H.

    2016-01-01

    Sensory processing abnormalities in autism have largely been described by parent report. This study used a multi-method (parent-report and measurement), multi-trait (tactile sensitivity and attention) design to evaluate somatosensory processing in ASD. Results showed multiple significant within-method (e.g., parent report of different…

  5. The Role of Attention in Somatosensory Processing: A Multi-trait, Multi-method Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Puts, Nicolaas A. J.; Mahone, E. Mark; Edden, Richard A. E.; Tommerdahl, Mark; Mostofsky, Stewart H.

    2016-01-01

    Sensory processing abnormalities in autism have largely been described by parent report. This study used a multi-method (parent-report and measurement), multi-trait (tactile sensitivity and attention) design to evaluate somatosensory processing in ASD. Results showed multiple significant within-method (e.g., parent report of different traits)/cross-trait (e.g., attention and tactile sensitivity) correlations, suggesting that parent-reported tactile sensory dysfunction and performance-based tactile sensitivity describe different behavioral phenomena. Additionally, both parent-reported tactile functioning and performance-based tactile sensitivity measures were significantly associated with measures of attention. Findings suggest that sensory (tactile) processing abnormalities in ASD are multifaceted, and may partially reflect a more global deficit in behavioral regulation (including attention). Challenges of relying solely on parent-report to describe sensory difficulties faced by children/families with ASD are also highlighted. PMID:27448580

  6. A multi-trait, meta-analysis for detecting pleiotropic polymorphisms for stature, fatness and reproduction in beef cattle.

    PubMed

    Bolormaa, Sunduimijid; Pryce, Jennie E; Reverter, Antonio; Zhang, Yuandan; Barendse, William; Kemper, Kathryn; Tier, Bruce; Savin, Keith; Hayes, Ben J; Goddard, Michael E

    2014-03-01

    Polymorphisms that affect complex traits or quantitative trait loci (QTL) often affect multiple traits. We describe two novel methods (1) for finding single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) significantly associated with one or more traits using a multi-trait, meta-analysis, and (2) for distinguishing between a single pleiotropic QTL and multiple linked QTL. The meta-analysis uses the effect of each SNP on each of n traits, estimated in single trait genome wide association studies (GWAS). These effects are expressed as a vector of signed t-values (t) and the error covariance matrix of these t values is approximated by the correlation matrix of t-values among the traits calculated across the SNP (V). Consequently, t'V-1t is approximately distributed as a chi-squared with n degrees of freedom. An attractive feature of the meta-analysis is that it uses estimated effects of SNPs from single trait GWAS, so it can be applied to published data where individual records are not available. We demonstrate that the multi-trait method can be used to increase the power (numbers of SNPs validated in an independent population) of GWAS in a beef cattle data set including 10,191 animals genotyped for 729,068 SNPs with 32 traits recorded, including growth and reproduction traits. We can distinguish between a single pleiotropic QTL and multiple linked QTL because multiple SNPs tagging the same QTL show the same pattern of effects across traits. We confirm this finding by demonstrating that when one SNP is included in the statistical model the other SNPs have a non-significant effect. In the beef cattle data set, cluster analysis yielded four groups of QTL with similar patterns of effects across traits within a group. A linear index was used to validate SNPs having effects on multiple traits and to identify additional SNPs belonging to these four groups.

  7. Bayesian Multi-Trait Analysis Reveals a Useful Tool to Increase Oil Concentration and to Decrease Toxicity in Jatropha curcas L.

    PubMed Central

    Silva Junqueira, Vinícius; de Azevedo Peixoto, Leonardo; Galvêas Laviola, Bruno; Lopes Bhering, Leonardo; Mendonça, Simone; Agostini Costa, Tania da Silveira; Antoniassi, Rosemar

    2016-01-01

    The biggest challenge for jatropha breeding is to identify superior genotypes that present high seed yield and seed oil content with reduced toxicity levels. Therefore, the objective of this study was to estimate genetic parameters for three important traits (weight of 100 seed, oil seed content, and phorbol ester concentration), and to select superior genotypes to be used as progenitors in jatropha breeding. Additionally, the genotypic values and the genetic parameters estimated under the Bayesian multi-trait approach were used to evaluate different selection indices scenarios of 179 half-sib families. Three different scenarios and economic weights were considered. It was possible to simultaneously reduce toxicity and increase seed oil content and weight of 100 seed by using index selection based on genotypic value estimated by the Bayesian multi-trait approach. Indeed, we identified two families that present these characteristics by evaluating genetic diversity using the Ward clustering method, which suggested nine homogenous clusters. Future researches must integrate the Bayesian multi-trait methods with realized relationship matrix, aiming to build accurate selection indices models. PMID:27281340

  8. The influence of animals from embryo transfer on the genetic evaluation of growth in Simmental beef cattle by using multi-trait models

    PubMed Central

    Mota, Rodrigo Reis; Lopes, Paulo Sávio; Marques, Luiz Fernando Aarão; da Silva, Luciano Pinheiro; de Resende, Marcos Deon Vilela; de Almeida Torres, Robledo

    2013-01-01

    The weight records from Simmental beef cattle were used in a genetic evaluation of growth with or without the inclusion of animals obtained by embryo transfer. A multi-trait model in which embryo transfer individuals were excluded (MTM1) contained 29,510 records from 10,659 animals, while another model without exclusion of these animals (MTM2) contained 62,895 weight records from 23,160 animals. The weight records were adjusted for ages of 100, 205, 365, 450, 550 and 730 days. The (co)variance components and genetic parameters were estimated by the restricted maximum likelihood method. The (co)variance components were similar in both models, except for maternal permanent environment variance. Direct heritabilities (h2d) in MTM1 were 0.04, 0.11, 0.20, 0.27, 0.31 and 0.42, while in MTM2 they were 0.11, 0.11, 0.17, 0.21, 0.22 and 0.26 for 100, 205, 365, 450, 550 and 730 days of age, respectively. Estimates of h2d in MTM1 were higher than in MTM2 for the weight at 365 days of age. Genetic correlations between weights in both models ranged from moderate to high, suggesting that these traits may be determined mainly by the same genes. Animals from embryo transfer may be included in the genetic evaluation of Simmental beef cattle in Brazil; this inclusion may provide potential gains in accuracy and genetic gains by reducing the interval between generations. PMID:23569407

  9. Breeding value accuracy estimates for growth traits using random regression and multi-trait models in Nelore cattle.

    PubMed

    Boligon, A A; Baldi, F; Mercadante, M E Z; Lobo, R B; Pereira, R J; Albuquerque, L G

    2011-06-28

    We quantified the potential increase in accuracy of expected breeding value for weights of Nelore cattle, from birth to mature age, using multi-trait and random regression models on Legendre polynomials and B-spline functions. A total of 87,712 weight records from 8144 females were used, recorded every three months from birth to mature age from the Nelore Brazil Program. For random regression analyses, all female weight records from birth to eight years of age (data set I) were considered. From this general data set, a subset was created (data set II), which included only nine weight records: at birth, weaning, 365 and 550 days of age, and 2, 3, 4, 5, and 6 years of age. Data set II was analyzed using random regression and multi-trait models. The model of analysis included the contemporary group as fixed effects and age of dam as a linear and quadratic covariable. In the random regression analyses, average growth trends were modeled using a cubic regression on orthogonal polynomials of age. Residual variances were modeled by a step function with five classes. Legendre polynomials of fourth and sixth order were utilized to model the direct genetic and animal permanent environmental effects, respectively, while third-order Legendre polynomials were considered for maternal genetic and maternal permanent environmental effects. Quadratic polynomials were applied to model all random effects in random regression models on B-spline functions. Direct genetic and animal permanent environmental effects were modeled using three segments or five coefficients, and genetic maternal and maternal permanent environmental effects were modeled with one segment or three coefficients in the random regression models on B-spline functions. For both data sets (I and II), animals ranked differently according to expected breeding value obtained by random regression or multi-trait models. With random regression models, the highest gains in accuracy were obtained at ages with a low number of

  10. Multivariate simulation framework reveals performance of multi-trait GWAS methods

    PubMed Central

    Porter, Heather F.; O’Reilly, Paul F.

    2017-01-01

    Burgeoning availability of genome-wide association study (GWAS) results and national biobank data has led to growing interest in performing multi-trait genetic analyses. Numerous multi-trait GWAS methods that exploit either summary statistics or individual-level data have been developed, but their relative performance is unclear. Here we develop a simulation framework to model the complex networks underlying multivariate genetic epidemiology, enabling the vast model space of genetic effects on multiple correlated traits to be explored systematically. We perform a comprehensive comparison of the leading multi-trait GWAS methods, finding: (1) method performance is highly sensitive to the specific combination of genetic effects and phenotypic correlations, (2) most of the current multivariate methods have remarkably similar statistical power, and (3) multivariate methods may offer a substantial increase in the discovery of genetic variants over the standard univariate approach. We believe our findings offer the clearest picture to date of the relative performance of multi-trait GWAS methods and act as a guide for method selection. We provide a web application and open-source software program implementing our simulation framework, for: (i) further benchmarking of multivariate GWAS methods, (ii) power calculations for multivariate genetic studies, and (iii) generating data for testing any multivariate method in genetic epidemiology. PMID:28287610

  11. Comparison of single-trait to multi-trait national evaluations for yield, health, and fertility

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Flexible software was designed to replace the current animal model programs used for national genetic evaluations. Model improvements included 1) multi-trait processing, 2) multiple fixed class and regression variables, 3) differing models for different traits, 4) random regressions, and 5) foreign ...

  12. Efficient set tests for the genetic analysis of correlated traits.

    PubMed

    Casale, Francesco Paolo; Rakitsch, Barbara; Lippert, Christoph; Stegle, Oliver

    2015-08-01

    Set tests are a powerful approach for genome-wide association testing between groups of genetic variants and quantitative traits. We describe mtSet (http://github.com/PMBio/limix), a mixed-model approach that enables joint analysis across multiple correlated traits while accounting for population structure and relatedness. mtSet effectively combines the benefits of set tests with multi-trait modeling and is computationally efficient, enabling genetic analysis of large cohorts (up to 500,000 individuals) and multiple traits.

  13. Multi-Trait GWAS and New Candidate Genes Annotation for Growth Curve Parameters in Brahman Cattle

    PubMed Central

    Crispim, Aline Camporez; Kelly, Matthew John; Guimarães, Simone Eliza Facioni; e Silva, Fabyano Fonseca; Fortes, Marina Rufino Salinas; Wenceslau, Raphael Rocha; Moore, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the genetic architecture of beef cattle growth cannot be limited simply to the genome-wide association study (GWAS) for body weight at any specific ages, but should be extended to a more general purpose by considering the whole growth trajectory over time using a growth curve approach. For such an approach, the parameters that are used to describe growth curves were treated as phenotypes under a GWAS model. Data from 1,255 Brahman cattle that were weighed at birth, 6, 12, 15, 18, and 24 months of age were analyzed. Parameter estimates, such as mature weight (A) and maturity rate (K) from nonlinear models are utilized as substitutes for the original body weights for the GWAS analysis. We chose the best nonlinear model to describe the weight-age data, and the estimated parameters were used as phenotypes in a multi-trait GWAS. Our aims were to identify and characterize associated SNP markers to indicate SNP-derived candidate genes and annotate their function as related to growth processes in beef cattle. The Brody model presented the best goodness of fit, and the heritability values for the parameter estimates for mature weight (A) and maturity rate (K) were 0.23 and 0.32, respectively, proving that these traits can be a feasible alternative when the objective is to change the shape of growth curves within genetic improvement programs. The genetic correlation between A and K was -0.84, indicating that animals with lower mature body weights reached that weight at younger ages. One hundred and sixty seven (167) and two hundred and sixty two (262) significant SNPs were associated with A and K, respectively. The annotated genes closest to the most significant SNPs for A had direct biological functions related to muscle development (RAB28), myogenic induction (BTG1), fetal growth (IL2), and body weights (APEX2); K genes were functionally associated with body weight, body height, average daily gain (TMEM18), and skeletal muscle development (SMN1). Candidate

  14. Multi-trait evolution of farmer varieties of bread wheat after cultivation in contrasting organic farming systems in Europe.

    PubMed

    Dawson, J C; Serpolay, E; Giuliano, S; Schermann, N; Galic, N; Chable, V; Goldringer, I

    2012-03-01

    Because of the lack of varieties for organic agriculture, associations of organic farmers in several European countries have begun cultivating landraces and historic varieties, effectively practicing in situ conservation of agricultural biodiversity. To promote agrobiodiversity conservation, a special list for "conservation varieties" was implemented in 2008 by the EU because for any exchange and marketing of seeds in the EU, a variety must be registered in an official catalog. Our study aimed at improving knowledge on the phenotypic diversity and evolution of such varieties when cultivated on organic farms in Europe, in order to better define their specific characteristics and the implications for the registration process. We assessed multi-trait phenotypic evolution in eight European landraces and historic varieties of bread wheat and in two pureline variety checks, each grown by eight organic farmers over 2 years and then evaluated in a common garden experiment at an organic research farm. Measurements on each farmer's version of each variety included several standard evaluation criteria for assessing distinctness, uniformity and stability for variety registration. Significant phenotypic differentiation was found among farmers' versions of each variety. Some varieties showed considerable variation among versions while others showed fewer phenotypic changes, even in comparison to the two checks. Although farmers' variety would not satisfy uniformity or stability criteria as defined in the catalog evaluation requirements, each variety remained distinct when assessed using multivariate analysis. The amount of differentiation may be related to the initial genetic diversity within landraces and historic varieties.

  15. Multi-trait mimicry of ants by a parasitoid wasp

    PubMed Central

    Malcicka, Miriama; Bezemer, T. Martijn; Visser, Bertanne; Bloemberg, Mark; Snart, Charles J. P.; Hardy, Ian C. W.; Harvey, Jeffrey A.

    2015-01-01

    Many animals avoid attack from predators through toxicity or the emission of repellent chemicals. Defensive mimicry has evolved in many species to deceive shared predators, for instance through colouration and other morphological adaptations, but mimicry hardly ever seems to involve multi-trait similarities. Here we report on a wingless parasitoid wasp that exhibits a full spectrum of traits mimicing ants and affording protection against ground-dwelling predators (wolf spiders). In body size, morphology and movement Gelis agilis (Ichneumonidae) is highly similar to the black garden ant (Lasius niger) that shares the same habitat. When threatened, G. agilis also emits a volatile chemical that is similar to an ant-produced chemical that repels spiders. In bioassays with L. niger, G. agilis, G. areator, Cotesia glomerata and Drosophila melanogaster, ants and G. agilis were virtually immune to spider attack, in contrast the other species were not. Volatile characterisation with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry identified G. agilis emissions as 6-methyl-5-hepten-2-one, a known insect defence semiochemical that acts as an alarm pheromone in ants. We argue that multi-trait mimicry, as observed in G. agilis, might be much more common among animals than currently realized. PMID:25622726

  16. Regression-based multi-trait QTL mapping using a structural equation model

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Quantitative trait locus mapping often results in data on a number of traits that have well established causal relationships. Many multi-trait quantitative trait locus mapping methods that account for the correlation among the multiple traits have been developed to improve the statistical power and ...

  17. Udder health and female fertility traits are favourably correlated and support each other in multi-trait evaluations.

    PubMed

    Buch, L H; Sørensen, M K; Lassen, J; Berg, P; Jakobsen, J H; Johansson, K; Sørensen, A C

    2011-06-01

    Genetic parameters were estimated for protein yield (PY), clinical mastitis (CM), somatic cell score, number of inseminations (NI) and days from calving to first insemination (CFI) in first-parity Swedish Red cows by series of tri-variate linear animal models. The heritability of PY was moderate (0.34 ± 0.004), and the heritabilities of the functional traits were all low (0.014 ± 0.001-0.14 ± 0.004). The genetic correlation between CM and CFI (0.38 ± 0.05) was stronger than the correlation between CM and NI (0.05 ± 0.06), perhaps because CM and CFI usually are observed in early lactation when the cow is likely to be in negative energy balance, whereas NI generally is recorded when the cow is not in negative energy balance any more. The genetic correlation between NI and CFI was very close to zero (-0.002 ± 0.05), indicating that these two fertility traits have different genetic backgrounds. All genetic correlations between PY and the functional traits were moderate and unfavourable, ranging from 0.22 ± 0.02 to 0.47 ± 0.03. In addition, the effect of including genetic and phenotypic correlations between the trait groups milk production, udder health and female fertility on the accuracy of the selection index was quantified for a heifer, a cow and a proven bull. The difference between the accuracy obtained by multi-trait and single-trait evaluations was largest for the cow (0.012) and small for the heifer and the bull (0.006 and 0.004) because the phenotype of the cow for one trait could assist in predicting the Mendelian sampling term for a correlated trait.

  18. Multi-trait linear reaction norm model to describe the pattern of phenotypic expression of some economic traits in beef cattle across a range of environments.

    PubMed

    Santana, Mário Luiz; Eler, Joanir Pereira; Bignardi, Annaiza Braga; Menéndez-Buxadera, Alberto; Cardoso, Fernando Flores; Ferraz, José Bento Sterman

    2015-05-01

    The multi-trait reaction norm (MTRN) model was extended to beef cattle reared under tropical conditions with the following objectives: to compare multi-trait (MT) and MTRN models regarding the genetic parameters obtained; and to characterize G × E, the pattern of phenotypic expression, and the environmental sensitivity of animals for postweaning weight gain (PWG), scrotal circumference (SC), and annual average productivity of the cow (PRODAM). There was divergence in the estimates between the MT and MTRN models when the posterior probability intervals of additive genetic variances and heritability coefficients of PWG and PRODAM were analyzed. The MTRN model indicated an increase in heritability for PWG and PRODAM with improvement of the environmental conditions. For SC, heritability was practically the same, irrespective of the environmental conditions. The genetic correlations between the traits studied were low but varied over environments by the MTRN model. Considering genetic correlations obtained by the MTRN model for the same trait, lower estimates were obtained between extreme favorable and unfavorable environments. This finding suggest re-ranking of breeding values in different environments mainly for PWG and PRODAM. Thus, G × E is more important for PWG and PRODAM than for SC and should be included in the genetic evaluation of these traits. The traits PWG and PRODAM can be considered plastic traits, whereas SC is poorly plastic. The genetic trends in individual animal slopes indicate that the population is moving towards greater plasticity. This could be a matter of concern for breeders since greater plasticity seems to limit heritability and, consequently, the responses to selection.

  19. Genetic Analysis of Xenopus tropicalis

    PubMed Central

    Geach, Timothy J.; Stemple, Derek L.; Zimmerman, Lyle B.

    2014-01-01

    The pipid frog Xenopus tropicalis has emerged as a powerful new model system for combining genetic and genomic analysis of tetrapod development with robust embryological, molecular and biochemical assays. Its early development closely resembles that of its well-understood relative X. laevis, from which techniques and reagents can be readily transferred. In contrast to the tetraploid X. laevis, X. tropicalis has a compact diploid genome with strong synteny to those of amniotes. Recently, advances in high-throughput sequencing together with solution-hybridization whole-exome enrichment technology offer powerful strategies for cloning novel mutations as well as reverse genetic identification of sequence lesions in specific genes of interest. Further advantages include the wide range of functional and molecular assays available, the large number of embryos/meioses produced, and the ease of haploid genetics and gynogenesis. The addition of these genetic tools to X. tropicalis provides a uniquely flexible platform for analysis of gene function in vertebrate development. PMID:22956083

  20. Toward Automated Multi-Trait Scoring of Essays: Investigating Links among Holistic, Analytic, and Text Feature Scores

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Yong-Won; Gentile, Claudia; Kantor, Robert

    2010-01-01

    The main purpose of the study was to investigate the distinctness and reliability of analytic (or multi-trait) rating dimensions and their relationships to holistic scores and "e-rater"[R] essay feature variables in the context of the TOEFL[R] computer-based test (TOEFL CBT) writing assessment. Data analyzed in the study were holistic…

  1. Arthritis Genetics Analysis Aids Drug Discovery

    MedlinePlus

    ... Matters NIH Research Matters January 13, 2014 Arthritis Genetics Analysis Aids Drug Discovery An international research team ... may play a role in triggering the disease. Genetic factors are also thought to play a role. ...

  2. Multi-trait mimicry and the relative salience of individual traits.

    PubMed

    Kazemi, Baharan; Gamberale-Stille, Gabriella; Leimar, Olof

    2015-11-07

    Mimicry occurs when one species gains protection from predators by resembling an unprofitable model species. The degree of mimic-model similarity is variable in nature and is closely related to the number of traits that the mimic shares with its model. Here, we experimentally test the hypothesis that the relative salience of traits, as perceived by a predator, is an important determinant of the degree of mimic-model similarity required for successful mimicry. We manipulated the relative salience of the traits of a two-trait artificial model prey, and subsequently tested the survival of mimics of the different traits. The unrewarded model prey had two colour traits, black and blue, and the rewarded prey had two combinations of green, brown and grey shades. Blue tits were used as predators. We found that the birds perceived the black and blue traits to be similarly salient in one treatment, and mimic-model similarity in both traits was then required for high mimic success. In a second treatment, the blue trait was the most salient trait, and mimic-model similarity in this trait alone achieved high success. Our results thus support the idea that similar salience of model traits can explain the occurrence of multi-trait mimicry.

  3. Multi-trait mimicry and the relative salience of individual traits

    PubMed Central

    Kazemi, Baharan; Gamberale-Stille, Gabriella; Leimar, Olof

    2015-01-01

    Mimicry occurs when one species gains protection from predators by resembling an unprofitable model species. The degree of mimic–model similarity is variable in nature and is closely related to the number of traits that the mimic shares with its model. Here, we experimentally test the hypothesis that the relative salience of traits, as perceived by a predator, is an important determinant of the degree of mimic–model similarity required for successful mimicry. We manipulated the relative salience of the traits of a two-trait artificial model prey, and subsequently tested the survival of mimics of the different traits. The unrewarded model prey had two colour traits, black and blue, and the rewarded prey had two combinations of green, brown and grey shades. Blue tits were used as predators. We found that the birds perceived the black and blue traits to be similarly salient in one treatment, and mimic–model similarity in both traits was then required for high mimic success. In a second treatment, the blue trait was the most salient trait, and mimic–model similarity in this trait alone achieved high success. Our results thus support the idea that similar salience of model traits can explain the occurrence of multi-trait mimicry. PMID:26511051

  4. A Genomic Bayesian Multi-trait and Multi-environment Model

    PubMed Central

    Montesinos-López, Osval A.; Montesinos-López, Abelardo; Crossa, José; Toledo, Fernando H.; Pérez-Hernández, Oscar; Eskridge, Kent M.; Rutkoski, Jessica

    2016-01-01

    When information on multiple genotypes evaluated in multiple environments is recorded, a multi-environment single trait model for assessing genotype × environment interaction (G × E) is usually employed. Comprehensive models that simultaneously take into account the correlated traits and trait × genotype × environment interaction (T × G × E) are lacking. In this research, we propose a Bayesian model for analyzing multiple traits and multiple environments for whole-genome prediction (WGP) model. For this model, we used Half-t priors on each standard deviation term and uniform priors on each correlation of the covariance matrix. These priors were not informative and led to posterior inferences that were insensitive to the choice of hyper-parameters. We also developed a computationally efficient Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) under the above priors, which allowed us to obtain all required full conditional distributions of the parameters leading to an exact Gibbs sampling for the posterior distribution. We used two real data sets to implement and evaluate the proposed Bayesian method and found that when the correlation between traits was high (>0.5), the proposed model (with unstructured variance–covariance) improved prediction accuracy compared to the model with diagonal and standard variance–covariance structures. The R-software package Bayesian Multi-Trait and Multi-Environment (BMTME) offers optimized C++ routines to efficiently perform the analyses. PMID:27342738

  5. Microsatellite data analysis for population genetics.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyung Seok; Sappington, Thomas W

    2013-01-01

    Theories and analytical tools of population genetics have been widely applied for addressing various questions in the fields of ecological genetics, conservation biology, and any context where the role of dispersal or gene flow is important. Underlying much of population genetics is the analysis of variation at selectively neutral marker loci, and microsatellites continue to be a popular choice of marker. In recent decades, software programs to estimate population genetics parameters have been developed at an increasing pace as computational science and theoretical knowledge advance. Numerous population genetics software programs are presently available to analyze microsatellite genotype data, but only a handful are commonly employed for calculating parameters such as genetic variation, genetic structure, patterns of spatial and temporal gene flow, population demography, individual population assignment, and genetic relationships within and between populations. In this chapter, we introduce statistical analyses and relevant population genetic software programs that are commonly employed in the field of population genetics and molecular ecology.

  6. Microsatellite data analysis for population genetics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Theories and analytical tools of population genetics have been widely applied for addressing various questions in the fields of ecological genetics, conservation biology, and any context where the role of dispersal or gene flow is important. Underlying much of population genetics is the analysis of ...

  7. Multi-trait interactions, not phylogeny, fine-tune leaf size reduction with increasing altitude

    PubMed Central

    Milla, Rubén; Reich, Peter B.

    2011-01-01

    Background and Aims Despite long-held interest, knowledge on why leaf size varies widely among species is still incomplete. This study was conducted to assess whether abiotic factors, phylogenetic histories and multi-trait interactions act together to shape leaf size. Methods Fifty-seven pairs of altitudinal vicariant species were selected in northern Spain, and leaf area and a number of functionally related leaf, shoot and whole plant traits were measured for each pair. Structural equation modelling helped unravel trait interactions affecting leaf size, and Mantel tests weighed the relative relevance of phylogeny, environment and trait interactions to explain leaf size reduction with altitude. Key Results Leaves of highland vicariants were generally smaller than those of lowlands. However, the extent of leaf size reduction with increasing altitude was widely variable among genera: from approx. 700 cm2 reduction (96 % in Polystichum) to approx. 30 cm2 increase (37 % in Sorbus). This was partially explained by shifts in leaf, shoot and whole plant traits (35–64 % of explained variance, depending on models), with size/number trade-offs more influential than shifts in leaf form and leaf economics. Shifts in traits were more important than phylogenetic distances or site-specific environmental variation in explaining the degree of leaf size reduction with altitude. Conclusions Ecological filters, constraints due to phylogenetic history (albeit modest in the study system), and phenotypic integration contribute jointly to shape single-trait evolution. Here, it was found that phenotypic change was far more important than shared ancestry to explaine leaf size differences of closely related species segregated along altitudes. PMID:21199835

  8. Genetic Analysis of Plant Mixtures

    PubMed Central

    Griffing, B.

    1989-01-01

    Plant mixtures are difficult to analyze genetically because of possible interactions between neighboring plants (i.e., between plants in the same biological group). However, a genetic modeling scheme has been devised which, theoretically, can accommodate such interactions. This study was an attempt to put the theoretical modeling procedure to an experimental test. To this end an experimental procedure was devised that generated biological groups from a well defined base population. A cultural system was used which permitted growing plant mixtures in controlled environmental facilities. This allowed the experiment to be conducted over a wide range of temperature and nutrient conditions. Application of the theoretical gene model to the experimental data permitted identification of those classes of gene effects that were responsible for genetic variation exhibited by the mixtures. Adequacy of the genetic modeling description was corroborated by precise prediction of an independent genetic response. The genetic analyses also identified statistically significant temperature-and nutrient-dependent forms of heterosis. It was concluded that the study demonstrated the suitability of the theoretical group gene model for describing complexities inherent in plant mixtures. PMID:17246509

  9. Genetic epidemiology. Approaches to the genetic analysis of rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    John, S; Worthington, J

    2001-01-01

    The basis of susceptibility to rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is complex, comprising genetic and environmental susceptibility factors. We have reviewed the available approaches to the investigation of the genetic basis of complex diseases and how these are being applied to RA. Affected-sibling-pair methods for nonparametric linkage analysis, linkage-disequilibrium-based approaches, transmission disequilibrium testing, and disease-association studies are discussed. The pros, cons, and limitations of the approaches are considered and are illustrated by examples from the literature about rheumatoid arthritis.

  10. Genetic Analysis of Hyperthermophilic Archaebacterial Phenomena

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-02-28

    Sulfolobus acidocaldarius . Prior studies with these organisms were limited to those that could be done in liquid culture. This was a serious limitation...techniques for the study of the extremely hypertherthophiiic archaebacteriwn, Sulfolcbus acidocaldarius . APPROACH: Develop, refine and use genetic...resulted in several major advances in the development and analysis of genetics systems in the extreme thermophilic archaebacterium, Sulfolobus a

  11. Genetic analysis of mechanisms of aging.

    PubMed

    Rose, M R; Archer, M A

    1996-06-01

    A wide range of genetic models with postponed aging are now available, from selected mice and Drosophilia to mutant Caenorhabditis elegans and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. These systems allow efficient testing of alternative mechanistic hypotheses for aging. Genetic analysis is forging stronger connections between particular alleles and susceptibility to particular 'diseases of aging'; for example, two different genes for Alzheimer disease have been identified.

  12. [Chromosome analysis and genetic testing].

    PubMed

    Isobe, Yasushi; Miura, Ikuo

    2014-03-01

    Chromosomal and genetic tests are essential to establish correct diagnoses of the lymphoma. When the tissue examination is planned, these should be done simultaneously with the morphological and immunophenotypic evaluations. Chromosome analyses can identify the genomic alterations of tumor cells. Some chromosome abnormalities define disease subtypes. For example, recurrent 14q32 translocations involving the immunoglobulin heavy chain locus support the diagnosis of B-cell lymphoma, and their translocation partners identify the types. In contrast, genetic testings are performed to confirm the presence of certain abnormalities including gene rearrangements, mutations, amplifications and deletions in each case. These results provide us detailed information for diagnosis, prognosis, and choice of therapy.

  13. Genetic Association Analysis of Drusen Progression

    PubMed Central

    Hoffman, Joshua D.; van Grinsven, Mark J. J. P.; Li, Chun; Brantley, Milam; McGrath, Josephine; Agarwal, Anita; Scott, William K.; Schwartz, Stephen G.; Kovach, Jaclyn; Pericak-Vance, Margaret; Sanchez, Clara I.; Haines, Jonathan L.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Age-related macular degeneration is a common form of vision loss affecting older adults. The etiology of AMD is multifactorial and is influenced by environmental and genetic risk factors. In this study, we examine how 19 common risk variants contribute to drusen progression, a hallmark of AMD pathogenesis. Methods Exome chip data was made available through the International AMD Genomics Consortium (IAMDGC). Drusen quantification was carried out with color fundus photographs using an automated drusen detection and quantification algorithm. A genetic risk score (GRS) was calculated per subject by summing risk allele counts at 19 common genetic risk variants weighted by their respective effect sizes. Pathway analysis of drusen progression was carried out with the software package Pathway Analysis by Randomization Incorporating Structure. Results We observed significant correlation with drusen baseline area and the GRS in the age-related eye disease study (AREDS) dataset (ρ = 0.175, P = 0.006). Measures of association were not statistically significant between drusen progression and the GRS (P = 0.54). Pathway analysis revealed the cell adhesion molecules pathway as the most highly significant pathway associated with drusen progression (corrected P = 0.02). Conclusions In this study, we explored the potential influence of known common AMD genetic risk factors on drusen progression. Our results from the GRS analysis showed association of increasing genetic burden (from 19 AMD associated loci) to baseline drusen load but not drusen progression in the AREDS dataset while pathway analysis suggests additional genetic contributors to AMD risk. PMID:27116550

  14. Genetic Prediction in the Genetic Analysis Workshop 18 Sequencing Data

    PubMed Central

    Ziegler, Andreas; Bohossian, Nora; Diego, Vincent P.; Yao, Chen

    2015-01-01

    High-throughput sequencing data can be used to predict phenotypes from genotypes, and this corresponds to establishing a prognostic model. In extended pedigrees the relatedness of subjects provides additional information so that genetic values, fixed or random genetic components, and heritability can be estimated. At the Genetic Analysis Workshop 18 the working group on genetic prediction dealt with both establishing a prognostic model and, in one contribution, comparing standard logistic regression with robust logistic regression in a sample of unrelated affected or unaffected individuals. Results of both logistic regression approaches were similar. All other contributions to this group used extended family data, in general using the quantitative trait blood pressure. The individual contributions varied in several important aspects, such as the estimation of the kinship matrix and the estimation method. Contributors chose various approaches for model validation, including different versions of cross-validation or within-family validation. Within-family validation included model building in the upper generations and validation in later generations. The choice of the statistical model and the computational algorithm had substantial effects on computation time. If decorrelation approaches were applied, the computational burden was substantially reduced. Some software packages estimated negative eigenvalues, although eigenvalues of correlation matrices should be nonnegative. Most statistical models and software packages have been developed for experimental crosses and planned breeding programs. With their specialized pedigree structures, they are not sufficiently flexible to accommodate the variability of human pedigrees in general, and improved implementations are required. PMID:25112190

  15. TOPICAL REVIEW: Integrated genetic analysis microsystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lagally, Eric T.; Mathies, Richard A.

    2004-12-01

    With the completion of the Human Genome Project and the ongoing DNA sequencing of the genomes of other animals, bacteria, plants and others, a wealth of new information about the genetic composition of organisms has become available. However, as the demand for sequence information grows, so does the workload required both to generate this sequence and to use it for targeted genetic analysis. Microfabricated genetic analysis systems are well poised to assist in the collection and use of these data through increased analysis speed, lower analysis cost and higher parallelism leading to increased assay throughput. In addition, such integrated microsystems may point the way to targeted genetic experiments on single cells and in other areas that are otherwise very difficult. Concomitant with these advantages, such systems, when fully integrated, should be capable of forming portable systems for high-speed in situ analyses, enabling a new standard in disciplines such as clinical chemistry, forensics, biowarfare detection and epidemiology. This review will discuss the various technologies available for genetic analysis on the microscale, and efforts to integrate them to form fully functional robust analysis devices.

  16. Genome Wide Single Locus Single Trait, Multi-Locus and Multi-Trait Association Mapping for Some Important Agronomic Traits in Common Wheat (T. aestivum L.)

    PubMed Central

    Jaiswal, Vandana; Gahlaut, Vijay; Meher, Prabina Kumar; Mir, Reyazul Rouf; Jaiswal, Jai Prakash; Rao, Atmakuri Ramakrishna; Balyan, Harindra Singh; Gupta, Pushpendra Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Genome wide association study (GWAS) was conducted for 14 agronomic traits in wheat following widely used single locus single trait (SLST) approach, and two recent approaches viz. multi locus mixed model (MLMM), and multi-trait mixed model (MTMM). Association panel consisted of 230 diverse Indian bread wheat cultivars (released during 1910–2006 for commercial cultivation in different agro-climatic regions in India). Three years phenotypic data for 14 traits and genotyping data for 250 SSR markers (distributed across all the 21 wheat chromosomes) was utilized for GWAS. Using SLST, as many as 213 MTAs (p ≤ 0.05, 129 SSRs) were identified for 14 traits, however, only 10 MTAs (~9%; 10 out of 123 MTAs) qualified FDR criteria; these MTAs did not show any linkage drag. Interestingly, these genomic regions were coincident with the genomic regions that were already known to harbor QTLs for same or related agronomic traits. Using MLMM and MTMM, many more QTLs and markers were identified; 22 MTAs (19 QTLs, 21 markers) using MLMM, and 58 MTAs (29 QTLs, 40 markers) using MTMM were identified. In addition, 63 epistatic QTLs were also identified for 13 of the 14 traits, flag leaf length (FLL) being the only exception. Clearly, the power of association mapping improved due to MLMM and MTMM analyses. The epistatic interactions detected during the present study also provided better insight into genetic architecture of the 14 traits that were examined during the present study. Following eight wheat genotypes carried desirable alleles of QTLs for one or more traits, WH542, NI345, NI170, Sharbati Sonora, A90, HW1085, HYB11, and DWR39 (Pragati). These genotypes and the markers associated with important QTLs for major traits can be used in wheat improvement programs either using marker-assisted recurrent selection (MARS) or pseudo-backcrossing method. PMID:27441835

  17. Analysis of Genetically Complex Epilepsies

    PubMed Central

    Ottman, Ruth

    2006-01-01

    During the last decade, great progress has been made in the discovery of genes that influence risk for epilepsy. However, these gene discoveries have been in epilepsies with Mendelian modes of inheritance, which comprise only a tiny fraction of all epilepsy. Most people with epilepsy have no affected relatives, suggesting that the great majority of all epilepsies are genetically complex: multiple genes contribute to their etiology, none of which has a major effect on disease risk. Gene discovery in the genetically complex epilepsies is a formidable task. It is unclear which epilepsy phenotypes are most advantageous to study, and chromosomal localization and mutation detection are much more difficult than in Mendelian epilepsies. Association studies are very promising for the identification of complex epilepsy genes, but we are still in the earliest stages of their application in the epilepsies. Future studies should employ very large sample sizes to ensure adequate statistical power, clinical phenotyping methods of the highest quality, designs and analytic techniques that control for population stratification, and state-of-the-art molecular methods. Collaborative studies are essential to achieve these goals. PMID:16359464

  18. Monte Carlo methods in genetic analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Shili

    1996-12-31

    Many genetic analyses require computation of probabilities and likelihoods of pedigree data. With more and more genetic marker data deriving from new DNA technologies becoming available to researchers, exact computations are often formidable with standard statistical methods and computational algorithms. The desire to utilize as much available data as possible, coupled with complexities of realistic genetic models, push traditional approaches to their limits. These methods encounter severe methodological and computational challenges, even with the aid of advanced computing technology. Monte Carlo methods are therefore increasingly being explored as practical techniques for estimating these probabilities and likelihoods. This paper reviews the basic elements of the Markov chain Monte Carlo method and the method of sequential imputation, with an emphasis upon their applicability to genetic analysis. Three areas of applications are presented to demonstrate the versatility of Markov chain Monte Carlo for different types of genetic problems. A multilocus linkage analysis example is also presented to illustrate the sequential imputation method. Finally, important statistical issues of Markov chain Monte Carlo and sequential imputation, some of which are unique to genetic data, are discussed, and current solutions are outlined. 72 refs.

  19. An integrated system for genetic analysis

    PubMed Central

    Fiddy, Simon; Cattermole, David; Xie, Dong; Duan, Xiao Yuan; Mott, Richard

    2006-01-01

    Background Large-scale genetic mapping projects require data management systems that can handle complex phenotypes and detect and correct high-throughput genotyping errors, yet are easy to use. Description We have developed an Integrated Genotyping System (IGS) to meet this need. IGS securely stores, edits and analyses genotype and phenotype data. It stores information about DNA samples, plates, primers, markers and genotypes generated by a genotyping laboratory. Data are structured so that statistical genetic analysis of both case-control and pedigree data is straightforward. Conclusion IGS can model complex phenotypes and contain genotypes from whole genome association studies. The database makes it possible to integrate genetic analysis with data curation. The IGS web site contains further information. PMID:16623936

  20. Microfluidics for single-cell genetic analysis.

    PubMed

    Thompson, A M; Paguirigan, A L; Kreutz, J E; Radich, J P; Chiu, D T

    2014-09-07

    The ability to correlate single-cell genetic information to cellular phenotypes will provide the kind of detailed insight into human physiology and disease pathways that is not possible to infer from bulk cell analysis. Microfluidic technologies are attractive for single-cell manipulation due to precise handling and low risk of contamination. Additionally, microfluidic single-cell techniques can allow for high-throughput and detailed genetic analyses that increase accuracy and decrease reagent cost compared to bulk techniques. Incorporating these microfluidic platforms into research and clinical laboratory workflows can fill an unmet need in biology, delivering the highly accurate, highly informative data necessary to develop new therapies and monitor patient outcomes. In this perspective, we describe the current and potential future uses of microfluidics at all stages of single-cell genetic analysis, including cell enrichment and capture, single-cell compartmentalization and manipulation, and detection and analyses.

  1. A brief history of genetic variation analysis.

    PubMed

    Ahmadian, Afshin; Lundeberg, Joakim

    2002-05-01

    As the human genome sequence is determined, there is an emerging need for the analysis of human sequence variations as genetic markers in diagnosis, linkage and association studies, cancer research, and pharmacogenomics. There are several different techniques and approaches for detecting these genetic variations, and here we review some of these techniques and their application fields. However, all the techniques have advantages and disadvantages, andfactors such as laboratory instrumentation, personnel experience, required accuracy, required throughput, and cost often have to be taken into account before selecting a method.

  2. Survival analysis with incomplete genetic data.

    PubMed

    Lin, D Y

    2014-01-01

    Genetic data are now collected frequently in clinical studies and epidemiological cohort studies. For a large study, it may be prohibitively expensive to genotype all study subjects, especially with the next-generation sequencing technology. Two-phase sampling, such as case-cohort and nested case-control sampling, is cost-effective in such settings but entails considerable analysis challenges, especially if efficient estimators are desired. Another type of missing data arises when the investigators are interested in the haplotypes or the genetic markers that are not on the genotyping platform used for the current study. Valid and efficient analysis of such missing data is also interesting and challenging. This article provides an overview of these issues and outlines some directions for future research.

  3. Multilocus Genetic Analysis of Brain Images

    PubMed Central

    Hibar, Derrek P.; Kohannim, Omid; Stein, Jason L.; Chiang, Ming-Chang; Thompson, Paul M.

    2011-01-01

    The quest to identify genes that influence disease is now being extended to find genes that affect biological markers of disease, or endophenotypes. Brain images, in particular, provide exquisitely detailed measures of anatomy, function, and connectivity in the living brain, and have identified characteristic features for many neurological and psychiatric disorders. The emerging field of imaging genomics is discovering important genetic variants associated with brain structure and function, which in turn influence disease risk and fundamental cognitive processes. Statistical approaches for testing genetic associations are not straightforward to apply to brain images because the data in brain images is spatially complex and generally high dimensional. Neuroimaging phenotypes typically include 3D maps across many points in the brain, fiber tracts, shape-based analyses, and connectivity matrices, or networks. These complex data types require new methods for data reduction and joint consideration of the image and the genome. Image-wide, genome-wide searches are now feasible, but they can be greatly empowered by sparse regression or hierarchical clustering methods that isolate promising features, boosting statistical power. Here we review the evolution of statistical approaches to assess genetic influences on the brain. We outline the current state of multivariate statistics in imaging genomics, and future directions, including meta-analysis. We emphasize the power of novel multivariate approaches to discover reliable genetic influences with small effect sizes. PMID:22303368

  4. A Genetic Analysis of Mortality in Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Varona, Luis; Sorensen, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    An analysis of mortality is undertaken in two breeds of pigs: Danish Landrace and Yorkshire. Zero-inflated and standard versions of hierarchical Poisson, binomial, and negative binomial Bayesian models were fitted using Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC). The objectives of the study were to investigate whether there is support for genetic variation for mortality and to study the quality of fit and predictive properties of the various models. In both breeds, the model that provided the best fit to the data was the standard binomial hierarchical model. The model that performed best in terms of the ability to predict the distribution of stillbirths was the hierarchical zero-inflated negative binomial model. The best fit of the binomial hierarchical model and of the zero-inflated hierarchical negative binomial model was obtained when genetic variation was included as a parameter. For the hierarchical binomial model, the estimate of the posterior mean of the additive genetic variance (posterior standard deviation in brackets) at the level of the logit of the probability of a stillbirth was 0.173(0.039) in Landrace and 0.202(0.048) in Yorkshire. The implications of these results from a breeding perspective are briefly discussed. PMID:19901070

  5. Stochastic dynamic simulation modeling including multitrait genetics to estimate genetic, technical, and financial consequences of dairy farm reproduction and selection strategies

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this study was to develop a daily stochastic dynamic dairy simulation model which included multi-trait genetics, and to evaluate the effects of various reproduction and selection strategies on the genetic, technical and financial performance of a dairy herd. The 12 correlated geneti...

  6. Traditional Approaches to Molecular Genetic Analysis.

    PubMed

    Walker, Christopher J; Goodfellow, Paul J

    2017-01-01

    Molecular studies of endometrial cancer have evolved with the tools available to researchers: the methods for measuring nucleic acids, protein expression, and combinations thereof. Today "molecular genetic analysis" implies a broad range of indirect and direct tests that yield molecular phenotypes or genotypes, immunotypes, or signatures that were not conceived of when the histologic and biologic heterogeneity was first fully acknowledged.We will provide a historical perspective on molecular genetic studies of endometrial cancers focusing on candidate genes and how early foundational research shaped both our understanding of the disease and current research directions. Examples of direct tests (mutation, DNA methylation, and/or protein expression) will be provided along with examples of indirect tests that have been and continue to be central to endometrial cancer molecular biology, such as DNA content or microsatellite instability analysis. We will highlight clinically relevant examples of molecular phenotyping and direct evaluation of candidate genes that integrate direct and indirect testing as part of routine patient care. This is not intended to be an exhaustive review but rather an overview of the progress that has been made and how early work is shaping current molecular, clinical, and biologic studies of endometrial cancer.

  7. Estimates of genetic correlations among growth traits including competition effects

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective was to estimate genetic parameters of direct and competition effects for traits measured at the end of a growth test utilizing multi-trait analyses. A total of 9,720 boars were tested with 15 boars per pen from about 71 to 161 d of age and weight from 31 to 120 kg. Traits analyzed wi...

  8. Genetic analysis of glutamatergic function in Drosophila

    SciTech Connect

    Chase, B.A.; Kankel, D.R.

    1987-01-01

    Neurotransmitters are essential for communication between neurons and hence are vital in the overall integrative functioning of the nervous system. Previous work on acetylcholine metabolism in the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, has also raised the possibility that transmitter metabolism may play a prominent role in either the achievement or maintenance of the normal structure of the central nervous system in this species. Unfortunately, acetylcholine is rather poorly characterized as a neurotransmitter in Drosophila; consequently, we have begun an analysis of the role of glutamate (probably the best characterized transmitter in this organism) in the formation and/or maintenance of nervous system structure. We present here the results of a series of preliminary analyses. To suggest where glutamatergic function may be localized, an examination of the spatial distribution of high affinity (/sup 3/H)-glutamate binding sites are presented. We present the results of an analysis of the spatial and temporal distribution of enzymatic activities thought to be important in the regulation of transmitter-glutamate pools (i.e., glutamate oxaloacetic transaminase, glutaminase, and glutamate dehydrogenase). To begin to examine whether mutations in any of these functions are capable of affecting glutamatergic activity, we present the results of an initial genetic analysis of one enzymatic function, glutamate oxaloacetic transaminase (GOT), chosen because of its differential distribution within the adult central nervous system and musculature.

  9. GENETIC ANALYSIS OF ABSCISIC ACID BIOSYNTHESIS

    SciTech Connect

    MCCARTY D R

    2012-01-10

    The carotenoid cleavage dioxygenases (CCD) catalyze synthesis of a variety of apo-carotenoid secondary metabolites in plants, animals and bacteria. In plants, the reaction catalyzed by the 11, 12, 9-cis-epoxy carotenoid dioxygenase (NCED) is the first committed and key regulated step in synthesis of the plant hormone, abscisic acid (ABA). ABA is a key regulator of plant stress responses and has critical functions in normal root and seed development. The molecular mechanisms responsible for developmental control of ABA synthesis in plant tissues are poorly understood. Five of the nine CCD genes present in the Arabidopsis genome encode NCED's involved in control of ABA synthesis in the plant. This project is focused on functional analysis of these five AtNCED genes as a key to understanding developmental regulation of ABA synthesis and dissecting the role of ABA in plant development. For this purpose, the project developed a comprehensive set of gene knockouts in the AtNCED genes that facilitate genetic dissection of ABA synthesis. These mutants were used in combination with key molecular tools to address the following specific objectives: (1) the role of ABA synthesis in root development; (2) developmental control of ABA synthesis in seeds; (3) analysis of ATNCED over-expressers; (4) preliminary crystallography of the maize VP14 protein.

  10. Quantitative Analysis of Triple Mutant Genetic Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Braberg, Hannes; Alexander, Richard; Shales, Michael; Xu, Jiewei; Franks-Skiba, Kathleen E.; Wu, Qiuqin; Haber, James E.; Krogan, Nevan J.

    2014-01-01

    The quantitative analysis of genetic interactions between pairs of gene mutations has proven effective for characterizing cellular functions but can miss important interactions for functionally redundant genes. To address this limitation, we have developed an approach termed Triple Mutant Analysis (TMA). The procedure relies on a query strain that contains two deletions in a pair of redundant or otherwise related genes, that is crossed against a panel of candidate deletion strains to isolate triple mutants and measure their growth. A central feature of TMA is to interrogate mutants that are synthetically sick when two other genes are deleted but interact minimally with either single deletion. This approach has been valuable for discovering genes that restore critical functions when the principle actors are deleted. TMA has also uncovered double mutant combinations that produce severe defects because a third protein becomes deregulated and acts in a deleterious fashion, and it has revealed functional differences between proteins presumed to act together. The protocol is optimized for Singer ROTOR pinning robots, takes 3 weeks to complete, and measures interactions for up to 30 double mutants against a library of 1536 single mutants. PMID:25010907

  11. Worldwide Genetic Analysis of the CFTR Region

    PubMed Central

    Mateu, Eva; Calafell, Francesc; Lao, Oscar; Bonné-Tamir, Batsheva; Kidd, Judith R.; Pakstis, Andrew; Kidd, Kenneth K.; Bertranpetit, Jaume

    2001-01-01

    Mutations at the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator gene (CFTR) cause cystic fibrosis, the most prevalent severe genetic disorder in individuals of European descent. We have analyzed normal allele and haplotype variation at four short tandem repeat polymorphisms (STRPs) and two single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in CFTR in 18 worldwide population samples, comprising a total of 1,944 chromosomes. The rooted phylogeny of the SNP haplotypes was established by typing ape samples. STRP variation within SNP haplotype backgrounds was highest in most ancestral haplotypes—although, when STRP allele sizes were taken into account, differences among haplotypes became smaller. Haplotype background determines STRP diversity to a greater extent than populations do, which indicates that haplotype backgrounds are older than populations. Heterogeneity among STRPs can be understood as the outcome of differences in mutation rate and pattern. STRP sites had higher heterozygosities in Africans, although, when whole haplotypes were considered, no significant differences remained. Linkage disequilibrium (LD) shows a complex pattern not easily related to physical distance. The analysis of the fraction of possible different haplotypes not found may circumvent some of the methodological difficulties of LD measure. LD analysis showed a positive correlation with locus polymorphism, which could partly explain the unusual pattern of similar LD between Africans and non-Africans. The low values found in non-Africans may imply that the size of the modern human population that emerged “Out of Africa” may be larger than what previous LD studies suggested. PMID:11104661

  12. Genetic analysis of captive proboscis monkeys.

    PubMed

    Ogata, Mitsuaki; Seino, Satoru

    2015-01-01

    Information on the genetic relationships of captive founders is important for captive population management. In this study, we investigated DNA polymorphisms of four microsatellite loci and the mitochondrial control region sequence of five proboscis monkeys residing in a Japanese zoo as captive founders, to clarify their genetic relationship. We found that two of the five monkeys appeared to be genetically related. Furthermore, the haplotypes of the mitochondrial control region of the five monkeys were well differentiated from the haplotypes previously reported from wild populations from the northern area of Borneo, indicating a greater amount of genetic diversity in proboscis monkeys than previously reported.

  13. Analysis of Mlsc genetics. A novel instance of genetic redundancy

    PubMed Central

    1989-01-01

    The identity of the self determinants involved in the selection of the T cell repertoire has been a matter of considerable interest. In addition to the apparent critical role of MHC gene products, accumulated experimental results indicate the importance of non-MHC gene products in T cell repertoire selection. In particular, murine Mlsa and Mlsc determinants have been shown to be highly stimulatory to allogeneic T cells and to be involved in the negative selection (elimination) of self-reactive T cells expressing selected TCR V beta segments. In this work, a unique phenomenon of genetic redundancy is described in the control of Mlsc expression: Mlsc appears to be controlled by at least two unlinked loci, and the product of either one of these loci is sufficient to evoke Mlsc-specific T cell response and to act as a ligand in the deletion of self Mlsc-reactive V beta 3+ T cells. Based on these findings, we propose a possible explanation for the fact that Mls-like genes or gene products have not been identified in other species such as man. PMID:2477483

  14. Methods for genetic linkage analysis using trisomies

    SciTech Connect

    Feingold, E.; Lamb, N.E.; Sherman, S.L.

    1994-09-01

    Certain genetic disorders (e.g. congenital cataracts, duodenal atresia) are rare in the general population, but more common in people with Down`s syndrome. We present a method for using individuals with trisomy 21 to map genes for such traits. Our methods are analogous to methods for mapping autosomal dominant traits using affected relative pairs by looking for markers with greater than expected identity-by-descent. In the trisomy case, one would take trisomic individuals and look for markers with greater than expected reduction to homozygosity in the chromosomes inherited form the non-disjoining parent. We present statistical methods for performing such a linkage analysis, including a test for linkage to a marker, a method for estimating the distance from the marker to the gene, a confidence interval for that distance, and methods for computing power and sample sizes. The methods are described in the context of gene-dosage model for the etiology of the disorder, but can be extended to other models. We also resolve some practical issues involved in implementing the methods, including how to use partially informative markers, how to test candidate genes, and how to handle the effect of reduced recombination associated with maternal meiosis I non-disjunction.

  15. Genetic analysis of embryo dormancy. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Galau, G.

    1998-09-01

    Primary dormancy is the inability of mature seed to immediately germinate until specific environmental stimuli are perceived that predict that future conditions will support plant growth and seed set. The analysis of abscisic acid deficient and insensitive mutants, in particular in Arabidopsis, suggests that embryo abscisic acid may be directly involved in the development of primary dormancy. Other studies implicate the continued accumulation of LEA proteins as inhibiting germination in dormant embryos. The results of these physiological, molecular and genetic approaches are complex and equivocal. There is a real need for approaches that test the separate nature of vivipary inhibition and primary dormancy and deliberately seed to decouple and dissect them. These approaches should be of help in understanding both late embryo development and primary dormancy. The approach taken here is to directly isolate mutants of Arabidopsis that appear to be deficient only in primary dormancy, that is fresh seed that germinate rapidly without the normally-required cold-stratification. The authors have isolated at least 8 independent, rapidly germinating RGM mutants of Arabidopsis. All others aspects of plant growth and development appear normal in these lines, suggesting that the rgm mutants are defective only in the establishment or maintenance of primary dormancy. At least one of these may be tagged with T-DNA. In addition, about 50 RGM isolates have been recovered from EMS-treated seed.

  16. Genetic analysis of Vibrio parahaemolyticus intestinal colonization

    PubMed Central

    Hubbard, Troy P.; Chao, Michael C.; Abel, Sören; Blondel, Carlos J.; Abel zur Wiesch, Pia; Zhou, Xiaohui; Davis, Brigid M.; Waldor, Matthew K.

    2016-01-01

    Vibrio parahaemolyticus is the most common cause of seafood-borne gastroenteritis worldwide and a blight on global aquaculture. This organism requires a horizontally acquired type III secretion system (T3SS2) to infect the small intestine, but knowledge of additional factors that underlie V. parahaemolyticus pathogenicity is limited. We used transposon-insertion sequencing to screen for genes that contribute to viability of V. parahaemolyticus in vitro and in the mammalian intestine. Our analysis enumerated and controlled for the host infection bottleneck, enabling robust assessment of genetic contributions to in vivo fitness. We identified genes that contribute to V. parahaemolyticus colonization of the intestine independent of known virulence mechanisms in addition to uncharacterized components of T3SS2. Our study revealed that toxR, an ancestral locus in Vibrio species, is required for V. parahaemolyticus fitness in vivo and for induction of T3SS2 gene expression. The regulatory mechanism by which V. parahaemolyticus ToxR activates expression of T3SS2 resembles Vibrio cholerae ToxR regulation of distinct virulence elements acquired via lateral gene transfer. Thus, disparate horizontally acquired virulence systems have been placed under the control of this ancestral transcription factor across independently evolved human pathogens. PMID:27185914

  17. Longitudinal Genetic Analysis of Anxiety Sensitivity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zavos, Helena M. S.; Gregory, Alice M.; Eley, Thalia C.

    2012-01-01

    Anxiety sensitivity is associated with both anxiety and depression and has been shown to be heritable. Little, however, is known about the role of genetic influence on continuity and change of symptoms over time. The authors' aim was to examine the stability of anxiety sensitivity during adolescence. By using a genetically sensitive design, the…

  18. Genetic manipulation of Aspergillus nidulans: meiotic progeny for genetic analysis and strain construction.

    PubMed

    Todd, Richard B; Davis, Meryl A; Hynes, Michael J

    2007-01-01

    The multicellular microbial eukaryote Aspergillus nidulans is an excellent model for the study of a wide array of biological processes. Studies in this system contribute significantly to understanding fundamental biological principles and are relevant for biotechnology and industrial applications, as well as human, animal and plant fungal pathogenesis. A. nidulans is easily manipulated using classical and molecular genetics. Here, we describe the storage and handling of A. nidulans and procedures for genetic crossing, progeny analysis and growth testing. These procedures are used for Mendelian analysis of segregation of alleles to show whether a mutant phenotype segregates as a single gene and independent assortment of genes to determine the linkage relationship between genes. Meiotic crossing is used for construction of multiple mutant strains for genetic analysis. Genetic crossing and analysis of progeny can be undertaken in 2-3 weeks and growth testing takes 2-3 days.

  19. Integrative Lifecourse and Genetic Analysis of Military Working Dogs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-10-01

    September 2012 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Integrative Lifecourse and Genetic Analysis of Military Working Dogs 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH...methodology has been critical. I was able to acquire genetic material and appropriately identify dogs that were ideal for our new methodology. My direct...AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH-11-2-0225 TITLE: Integrative Lifecourse and Genetic

  20. Composing and Performing in the Key Stage 3 Classroom: A Study using Multi-Trait, Multi-Method Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fowler, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    "Music is both a creative and a performing art" (Hallam, 2006, p. 70). Many musicians and music educators maintain that composing and performing, although related, are essentially different aspects of musical activity. In the professional musical sphere, composition and performance are almost invariably separated; academic studies have…

  1. Multi-trait analysis of post-harvest storage in rocket salad (Diplotaxis tenuifolia) links sensorial, volatile and nutritional data.

    PubMed

    Spadafora, Natasha D; Amaro, Ana L; Pereira, Maria J; Müller, Carsten T; Pintado, Manuela; Rogers, Hilary J

    2016-11-15

    Rocket salad (Diplotaxis tenuifolia; wild rocket) is an important component of ready to eat salads providing a distinct peppery flavour and containing nutritionally relevant compounds. Quality deteriorates during post-harvest, in relation to time and storage temperature amongst other factors. Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are easily measurable from rocket leaves and may provide useful quality indicators for e.g. changes in isothiocyanates derived from nutritionally important glucosinolates. VOC profiles discriminated storage temperatures (0, 5 and 10°C) and times (over 14days). More specifically, concentrations of aldehydes and isothiocyanates decreased with time paralleling a fall in vitamin C and a reduction in sensorial quality at the two higher temperatures. Sulphur containing compounds rise at later time-points and at higher temperatures coincident with an increase in microbial titre, mirroring a further drop in sensorial quality thus indicating their contribution to off-odours.

  2. High volume molecular genetic identification of single nucleotide polymorphisms using Genetic Bit Analysis Application to human genetic diagnosis

    SciTech Connect

    Boyce-Jacino, M.T.; Reynolds, J.; Nikiforov, T.

    1994-09-01

    The most common type of genetic disease-associated mutation is the single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP). Because most genetic diseases can be caused by multiple SNPs in the same gene, effective routine diagnosis of complex genetic diseases is dependent on a simple and reliable method of interrogating SNP sites. Molecular Tool`s solid phase assay capable of direct genotyping (single base sequencing) of SNP sites, Genetic Bit Analysis (GBA), involves hybridization-capture of a single-stranded PCR product to a sequence-specific, microtiter plate-bound oligonucleotide primer. The captured PCR product then acts as template for single-base extension of the capture primer across the polymorphic site, enabling direct determination of the base composition of the polymorphism through a simple colormetric assay. Genotyping in a high volume, semi-automated, processing system with a current capacity of 100 SNP interrogations per technician per day enables the screening of candidate mutations rapidly and cost-effectively, critically important to comprehensive genetic diagnosis. Using this gel-free technology, we have developed prototype diagnostic tests for CFTR and ApoE polymorphisms which enable direct sequencing of the polymorphic base at each site of interest. Routine clinical diagnosis of genetically complex diseases such as cystic fibrosis is dependent on this combination of robust biochemistry and simple format. Additionally, the ability to transfer the format and biochemistry to any disease gene of interest enables the broad application of this technology to clinical diagnostics, especially for genetically complex diseases.

  3. Integrative Lifecourse and Genetic Analysis of Military Working Dogs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-12-01

    Award Number: W81XWH-11-2-0226 TITLE: Integrative Lifecourse and Genetic Analysis of Military Working Dogs PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Kun Huang...Integrative Lifecourse and Genetic Analysis of Military Working Dogs 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-11-2-0226 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER...of the military working dog population. There are several critical aspects to meeting the aims of this proposal. 1) development of data driven

  4. Molecular genetic analysis of giant cell glioblastomas.

    PubMed Central

    Meyer-Puttlitz, B.; Hayashi, Y.; Waha, A.; Rollbrocker, B.; Boström, J.; Wiestler, O. D.; Louis, D. N.; Reifenberger, G.; von Deimling, A.

    1997-01-01

    Glioblastomas (GBMs) are a heterogeneous group of tumors. Recently, distinct molecular genetic alterations have been linked to subgroups of patients with GBM. Giant cell (gc)GBMs are a rare variant of GBM characterized by a marked preponderance of multinucleated giant cells. Several reports have associated this entity with a more favorable prognosis than the majority of GBMs. To evaluate whether gcGBM may also represent a genetically defined subgroup of GBM, we analyzed a series of 19 gcGBMs for mutations in the TP53 gene for amplification of the EGFR and CDK4 genes and for homozygous deletions in the CDKN2A (p16/MTS1) gene. Seventeen of nineteen gcGBMs carried TP53 mutations whereas EGFR and CDK4 gene amplification was seen in only one tumor each and homozygous deletion of CDKN2A was not observed at all. The strikingly high incidence of TP53 mutations and the relative absence of other genetic alterations groups gcGBM together with a previously recognized molecular genetic variant of GBM (type 1 GBM). It is tempting to speculate that the better prognosis of gcGBM patients may result from the low incidence of EGFR amplification and CDKN2A deletion, changes known for their growth-promoting potential. Images Figure 1 PMID:9284834

  5. Global Population Genetic Analysis of Aspergillus fumigatus

    PubMed Central

    Ashu, Eta Ebasi; Hagen, Ferry; Chowdhary, Anuradha

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Aspergillus fumigatus is a ubiquitous opportunistic fungal pathogen capable of causing invasive aspergillosis, a globally distributed disease with a mortality rate of up to 90% in high-risk populations. Effective control and prevention of this disease require a thorough understanding of its epidemiology. However, despite significant efforts, the global molecular epidemiology of A. fumigatus remains poorly understood. In this study, we analyzed 2,026 A. fumigatus isolates from 13 countries in four continents using nine highly polymorphic microsatellite markers. Genetic cluster analyses suggest that our global sample of A. fumigatus isolates belonged to eight genetic clusters, with seven of the eight clusters showing broad geographic distributions. We found common signatures of sexual recombination within individual genetic clusters and clear evidence of hybridization between several clusters. Limited but statistically significant genetic differentiations were found among geographic and ecological populations. However, there was abundant evidence for gene flow at the local, regional, and global scales. Interestingly, the triazole-susceptible and triazole-resistant populations showed different population structures, consistent with antifungal drug pressure playing a significant role in local adaptation. Our results suggest that global populations of A. fumigatus are shaped by historical differentiation, contemporary gene flow, sexual reproduction, and the localized antifungal drug selection that is driving clonal expansion of genotypes resistant to multiple triazole drugs. IMPORTANCE The genetic diversity and geographic structure of the human fungal pathogen A. fumigatus have been the subject of many studies. However, most previous studies had relatively limited sample ranges and sizes and/or used genetic markers with low-level polymorphisms. In this paper, we characterize a global collection of strains of A. fumigatus using a panel of 9 highly

  6. Population genetic analysis of Giardia duodenalis: genetic diversity and haplotype sharing between clinical and environmental sources.

    PubMed

    Durigan, Mauricio; Ciampi-Guillardi, Maisa; Rodrigues, Ricardo C A; Greinert-Goulart, Juliane A; Siqueira-Castro, Isabel C V; Leal, Diego A G; Yamashiro, Sandra; Bonatti, Taís R; Zucchi, Maria I; Franco, Regina M B; de Souza, Anete P

    2017-01-11

    Giardia duodenalis is a flagellated intestinal protozoan responsible for infections in various hosts including humans and several wild and domestic animals. Few studies have correlated environmental contamination and clinical infections in the same region. The aim of this study was to compare groups of Giardia duodenalis from clinical and environmental sources through population genetic analyses to verify haplotype sharing and the degree of genetic similarity among populations from clinical and environmental sources in the metropolitan region of Campinas. The results showed high diversity of haplotypes and substantial genetic similarity between clinical and environmental groups of G. duodenalis. We demonstrated sharing of Giardia genotypes among the different populations studied. The comparison between veterinary and human sequences led us to identify new zoonotic genotypes, including human isolates from genetic assemblage C. The application of a population genetic analysis in epidemiological studies allows quantification of the degree of genetic similarity among populations of Giardia duodenalis from different sources of contamination. The genetic similarity of Giardia isolates among human, veterinary, and environmental groups reinforced the correlation between clinical and environmental isolates in this region, which is of great importance for public health.

  7. Collection of pedigree data for genetic analysis in isolate populations.

    PubMed

    Williams-Blangero, Sarah; Blangero, John

    2006-02-01

    Pedigree data are useful for a wealth of research purposes in human population biology and genetics. The collection of extended pedigrees represents the most powerful sampling design for quantitative genetic and linkage studies of both normal and disease-related quantitative traits. In this paper we outline an approach for collecting pedigree data in stable isolate populations. As an example, the pedigree for the Jirel population, which was obtained using the methods presented, is described. The Jirel pedigree contains 2,000 study participants and more than 62,000 pairwise relationships that are informative for genetic analysis. Once such pedigrees are genetically characterized by a genome scan for a given trait, they become an invaluable resource for future genetic studies of any quantitative trait.

  8. Polyglot programming in applications used for genetic data analysis.

    PubMed

    Nowak, Robert M

    2014-01-01

    Applications used for the analysis of genetic data process large volumes of data with complex algorithms. High performance, flexibility, and a user interface with a web browser are required by these solutions, which can be achieved by using multiple programming languages. In this study, I developed a freely available framework for building software to analyze genetic data, which uses C++, Python, JavaScript, and several libraries. This system was used to build a number of genetic data processing applications and it reduced the time and costs of development.

  9. Polyglot Programming in Applications Used for Genetic Data Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Nowak, Robert M.

    2014-01-01

    Applications used for the analysis of genetic data process large volumes of data with complex algorithms. High performance, flexibility, and a user interface with a web browser are required by these solutions, which can be achieved by using multiple programming languages. In this study, I developed a freely available framework for building software to analyze genetic data, which uses C++, Python, JavaScript, and several libraries. This system was used to build a number of genetic data processing applications and it reduced the time and costs of development. PMID:25197633

  10. Rice artificial hybridization for genetic analysis.

    PubMed

    Sha, Xueyan

    2013-01-01

    Artificial hybridization has probably been practiced since ancient time; however, the science of genetics did not initiate until Gregor Mendel conducted a series of crosses between different pure lines of garden pea and made careful observations and systematical analyses of their offspring. Artificial hybridization or crossing between carefully chosen parents has been and still is the primary way to transfer genes from different germplasm for self-pollinated rice. Through gene recombination, novel genetic variation is created by different arrangements of genes existing in parental lines. Procedures of artificial hybridization involve the selection of appropriate panicles from representative plants of the female parents, the emasculation of female parents, and the pollination of emasculated panicles with abundant pollens of selected male parents. Of the numerous proposed methods, hot water and vacuum emasculation have proven to be the most robust and reliable ones. A successful and efficient hybridization program also relies on the knowledge of parental lines or germplasm, the reproductive biology and development of rice, the conditions needed to promote flowering and seed development, and the techniques to synchronize flowering of diverse parents.

  11. Genetic risk score analysis indicates migraine with and without comorbid depression are genetically different disorders.

    PubMed

    Ligthart, Lannie; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Lewis, Cathryn M; Farmer, Anne E; Craig, Ian W; Breen, Gerome; Willemsen, Gonneke; Vink, Jacqueline M; Middeldorp, Christel M; Byrne, Enda M; Heath, Andrew C; Madden, Pamela A F; Pergadia, Michele L; Montgomery, Grant W; Martin, Nicholas G; Penninx, Brenda W J H; McGuffin, Peter; Boomsma, Dorret I; Nyholt, Dale R

    2014-02-01

    Migraine and major depressive disorder (MDD) are comorbid, moderately heritable and to some extent influenced by the same genes. In a previous paper, we suggested the possibility of causality (one trait causing the other) underlying this comorbidity. We present a new application of polygenic (genetic risk) score analysis to investigate the mechanisms underlying the genetic overlap of migraine and MDD. Genetic risk scores were constructed based on data from two discovery samples in which genome-wide association analyses (GWA) were performed for migraine and MDD, respectively. The Australian Twin Migraine GWA study (N = 6,350) included 2,825 migraine cases and 3,525 controls, 805 of whom met the diagnostic criteria for MDD. The RADIANT GWA study (N = 3,230) included 1,636 MDD cases and 1,594 controls. Genetic risk scores for migraine and for MDD were used to predict pure and comorbid forms of migraine and MDD in an independent Dutch target sample (NTR-NESDA, N = 2,966), which included 1,476 MDD cases and 1,058 migraine cases (723 of these individuals had both disorders concurrently). The observed patterns of prediction suggest that the 'pure' forms of migraine and MDD are genetically distinct disorders. The subgroup of individuals with comorbid MDD and migraine were genetically most similar to MDD patients. These results indicate that in at least a subset of migraine patients with MDD, migraine may be a symptom or consequence of MDD.

  12. Promoting utilization of Saccharum spp. genetic resources through genetic diversity analysis and core collection construction.

    PubMed

    Nayak, Spurthi N; Song, Jian; Villa, Andrea; Pathak, Bhuvan; Ayala-Silva, Tomas; Yang, Xiping; Todd, James; Glynn, Neil C; Kuhn, David N; Glaz, Barry; Gilbert, Robert A; Comstock, Jack C; Wang, Jianping

    2014-01-01

    Sugarcane (Saccharum spp.) and other members of Saccharum spp. are attractive biofuel feedstocks. One of the two World Collections of Sugarcane and Related Grasses (WCSRG) is in Miami, FL. This WCSRG has 1002 accessions, presumably with valuable alleles for biomass, other important agronomic traits, and stress resistance. However, the WCSRG has not been fully exploited by breeders due to its lack of characterization and unmanageable population. In order to optimize the use of this genetic resource, we aim to 1) genotypically evaluate all the 1002 accessions to understand its genetic diversity and population structure and 2) form a core collection, which captures most of the genetic diversity in the WCSRG. We screened 36 microsatellite markers on 1002 genotypes and recorded 209 alleles. Genetic diversity of the WCSRG ranged from 0 to 0.5 with an average of 0.304. The population structure analysis and principal coordinate analysis revealed three clusters with all S. spontaneum in one cluster, S. officinarum and S. hybrids in the second cluster and mostly non-Saccharum spp. in the third cluster. A core collection of 300 accessions was identified which captured the maximum genetic diversity of the entire WCSRG which can be further exploited for sugarcane and energy cane breeding. Sugarcane and energy cane breeders can effectively utilize this core collection for cultivar improvement. Further, the core collection can provide resources for forming an association panel to evaluate the traits of agronomic and commercial importance.

  13. Promoting Utilization of Saccharum spp. Genetic Resources through Genetic Diversity Analysis and Core Collection Construction

    PubMed Central

    Pathak, Bhuvan; Ayala-Silva, Tomas; Yang, Xiping; Todd, James; Glynn, Neil C.; Kuhn, David N.; Glaz, Barry; Gilbert, Robert A.; Comstock, Jack C.; Wang, Jianping

    2014-01-01

    Sugarcane (Saccharum spp.) and other members of Saccharum spp. are attractive biofuel feedstocks. One of the two World Collections of Sugarcane and Related Grasses (WCSRG) is in Miami, FL. This WCSRG has 1002 accessions, presumably with valuable alleles for biomass, other important agronomic traits, and stress resistance. However, the WCSRG has not been fully exploited by breeders due to its lack of characterization and unmanageable population. In order to optimize the use of this genetic resource, we aim to 1) genotypically evaluate all the 1002 accessions to understand its genetic diversity and population structure and 2) form a core collection, which captures most of the genetic diversity in the WCSRG. We screened 36 microsatellite markers on 1002 genotypes and recorded 209 alleles. Genetic diversity of the WCSRG ranged from 0 to 0.5 with an average of 0.304. The population structure analysis and principal coordinate analysis revealed three clusters with all S. spontaneum in one cluster, S. officinarum and S. hybrids in the second cluster and mostly non-Saccharum spp. in the third cluster. A core collection of 300 accessions was identified which captured the maximum genetic diversity of the entire WCSRG which can be further exploited for sugarcane and energy cane breeding. Sugarcane and energy cane breeders can effectively utilize this core collection for cultivar improvement. Further, the core collection can provide resources for forming an association panel to evaluate the traits of agronomic and commercial importance. PMID:25333358

  14. Analysis of Variance Components for Genetic Markers with Unphased Genotypes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tao

    2016-01-01

    An ANOVA type general multi-allele (GMA) model was proposed in Wang (2014) on analysis of variance components for quantitative trait loci or genetic markers with phased or unphased genotypes. In this study, by applying the GMA model, we further examine estimation of the genetic variance components for genetic markers with unphased genotypes based on a random sample from a study population. In one locus and two loci cases, we first derive the least square estimates (LSE) of model parameters in fitting the GMA model. Then we construct estimators of the genetic variance components for one marker locus in a Hardy-Weinberg disequilibrium population and two marker loci in an equilibrium population. Meanwhile, we explore the difference between the classical general linear model (GLM) and GMA based approaches in association analysis of genetic markers with quantitative traits. We show that the GMA model can retain the same partition on the genetic variance components as the traditional Fisher's ANOVA model, while the GLM cannot. We clarify that the standard F-statistics based on the partial reductions in sums of squares from GLM for testing the fixed allelic effects could be inadequate for testing the existence of the variance component when allelic interactions are present. We point out that the GMA model can reduce the confounding between the allelic effects and allelic interactions at least for independent alleles. As a result, the GMA model could be more beneficial than GLM for detecting allelic interactions.

  15. Quantitative genetic analysis of injury liability in infants and toddlers

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, K.; Matheny, A.P. Jr.

    1995-02-27

    A threshold model of latent liability was applied to infant and toddler twin data on total count of injuries sustained during the interval from birth to 36 months of age. A quantitative genetic analysis of estimated twin correlations in injury liability indicated strong genetic dominance effects, but no additive genetic variance was detected. Because interpretations involving overdominance have little research support, the results may be due to low order epistasis or other interaction effects. Boys had more injuries than girls, but this effect was found only for groups whose parents were prompted and questioned in detail about their children`s injuries. Activity and impulsivity are two behavioral predictors of childhood injury, and the results are discussed in relation to animal research on infant and adult activity levels, and impulsivity in adult humans. Genetic epidemiological approaches to childhood injury should aid in targeting higher risk children for preventive intervention. 30 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  16. Molecular genetic analysis of archival gliomas using diagnostic smears.

    PubMed

    Walker, C; Joyce, K; Du Plessis, D; MacHell, Y; Sibson, D R; Broome, J

    2000-10-01

    Investigation of the clinical significance of genetic alterations in gliomas requires molecular genetic analysis using samples from retrospective or prospective clinical studies. However, diagnostic tissue is often severely limited and because of fixation, paraffin-embedded tissues (PET) contain degraded DNA. Intra-operative cytological preparations (smears) archived after diagnosis may represent an additional source of clinical material for genetic analysis. In this study, tissue samples were obtained by precision microdissection of archived diagnostic smears from 20 cases (1961-1999). All samples produced polymerase chain reaction (PCR) products for the beta globin gene, but the most recent samples amplified best and gave longer amplimers. For six cases, direct comparison was made between samples microdissected from smears and the corresponding PET. Samples from smears showed improved PCR performance and similar alleles on microsatellite marker analysis. One case, with smears of uninvolved cortex and tumour tissue available for microdissection, showed allelic imbalance at 10q23 on the basis of the smear results alone. PCR products from smears were shown to be suitable for direct sequence analysis (p53 gene). A PTEN mutation, found previously in an anaplastic astrocytoma by analysis of PET, was detected in the corresponding diagnostic smear. The results of this study indicate that tissue samples microdissected from diagnostic intra-operative cytological preparations may be suitable for molecular genetic analysis of gliomas.

  17. A roadmap for the genetic analysis of renal aging

    PubMed Central

    Noordmans, Gerda A; Hillebrands, Jan-Luuk; van Goor, Harry; Korstanje, Ron

    2015-01-01

    Several studies show evidence for the genetic basis of renal disease, which renders some individuals more prone than others to accelerated renal aging. Studying the genetics of renal aging can help us to identify genes involved in this process and to unravel the underlying pathways. First, this opinion article will give an overview of the phenotypes that can be observed in age-related kidney disease. Accurate phenotyping is essential in performing genetic analysis. For kidney aging, this could include both functional and structural changes. Subsequently, this article reviews the studies that report on candidate genes associated with renal aging in humans and mice. Several loci or candidate genes have been found associated with kidney disease, but identification of the specific genetic variants involved has proven to be difficult. CUBN, UMOD, and SHROOM3 were identified by human GWAS as being associated with albuminuria, kidney function, and chronic kidney disease (CKD). These are promising examples of genes that could be involved in renal aging, and were further mechanistically evaluated in animal models. Eventually, we will provide approaches for performing genetic analysis. We should leverage the power of mouse models, as testing in humans is limited. Mouse and other animal models can be used to explain the underlying biological mechanisms of genes and loci identified by human GWAS. Furthermore, mouse models can be used to identify genetic variants associated with age-associated histological changes, of which Far2, Wisp2, and Esrrg are examples. A new outbred mouse population with high genetic diversity will facilitate the identification of genes associated with renal aging by enabling high-resolution genetic mapping while also allowing the control of environmental factors, and by enabling access to renal tissues at specific time points for histology, proteomics, and gene expression. PMID:26219736

  18. A roadmap for the genetic analysis of renal aging.

    PubMed

    Noordmans, Gerda A; Hillebrands, Jan-Luuk; van Goor, Harry; Korstanje, Ron

    2015-10-01

    Several studies show evidence for the genetic basis of renal disease, which renders some individuals more prone than others to accelerated renal aging. Studying the genetics of renal aging can help us to identify genes involved in this process and to unravel the underlying pathways. First, this opinion article will give an overview of the phenotypes that can be observed in age-related kidney disease. Accurate phenotyping is essential in performing genetic analysis. For kidney aging, this could include both functional and structural changes. Subsequently, this article reviews the studies that report on candidate genes associated with renal aging in humans and mice. Several loci or candidate genes have been found associated with kidney disease, but identification of the specific genetic variants involved has proven to be difficult. CUBN, UMOD, and SHROOM3 were identified by human GWAS as being associated with albuminuria, kidney function, and chronic kidney disease (CKD). These are promising examples of genes that could be involved in renal aging, and were further mechanistically evaluated in animal models. Eventually, we will provide approaches for performing genetic analysis. We should leverage the power of mouse models, as testing in humans is limited. Mouse and other animal models can be used to explain the underlying biological mechanisms of genes and loci identified by human GWAS. Furthermore, mouse models can be used to identify genetic variants associated with age-associated histological changes, of which Far2, Wisp2, and Esrrg are examples. A new outbred mouse population with high genetic diversity will facilitate the identification of genes associated with renal aging by enabling high-resolution genetic mapping while also allowing the control of environmental factors, and by enabling access to renal tissues at specific time points for histology, proteomics, and gene expression.

  19. Genetics

    MedlinePlus

    ... Inheritance; Heterozygous; Inheritance patterns; Heredity and disease; Heritable; Genetic markers ... The chromosomes are made up of strands of genetic information called DNA. Each chromosome contains sections of ...

  20. A genetic analysis of Adh1 regulation

    SciTech Connect

    Freeling, M.

    1992-01-01

    The overall goal of our research proposal is to understand the meaning of the various cis-acting sites responsible for AdH1 expression in the entire maize plant. Progress is reported in the following areas: Studies on the TATA box and analysis of revertants of the Adh1-3F1124 allele; screening for more different mutants that affect Adh1 expression differentially; studies on cis-acting sequences required for root-specific Adh1 expression; refinement of the use of the particle gun; and functional analysis of a non- glycolytic anaerobic protein.

  1. Molecular genetics of obsessive-compulsive disorder: a comprehensive meta-analysis of genetic association studies.

    PubMed

    Taylor, S

    2013-07-01

    Twin studies indicate that obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is strongly influenced by additive genetic factors. Yet, molecular genetic association studies have yielded inconsistent results, possibly because of differences across studies in statistical power. Meta-analysis can yield greater power. This study reports the first comprehensive meta-analysis of the relationship between OCD and all previously examined polymorphisms for which there was sufficient information in the source studies to compute odds ratios (ORs). A total of 230 polymorphisms from 113 genetic association studies were identified. A full meta-analysis was conducted for 20 polymorphisms that were examined in 5 or more data sets, and a secondary meta-analysis (limited to the computation of mean effect sizes) was conducted for 210 polymorphisms that were examined in fewer than 5 data sets. In the main meta-analysis, OCD was associated with serotonin-related polymorphisms (5-HTTLPR and HTR2A) and, in males only, with polymorphisms involved in catecholamine modulation (COMT and MAOA). Nonsignificant trends were identified for two dopamine-related polymorphisms (DAT1 and DRD3) and a glutamate-related polymorphism (rs3087879). The secondary meta-analysis identified another 18 polymorphisms with significant ORs that merit further investigation. This study demonstrates that OCD is associated with multiple genes, with most having a modest association with OCD. This suggests a polygenic model of OCD, consistent with twin studies, in which multiple genes make small, incremental contributions to the risk of developing the disorder. Future studies, with sufficient power to detect small effects, are needed to investigate the genetic basis of OCD subtypes, such as early vs late onset OCD.

  2. Genetic analysis in the Collaborative Cross breeding population

    PubMed Central

    Philip, Vivek M.; Sokoloff, Greta; Ackert-Bicknell, Cheryl L.; Striz, Martin; Branstetter, Lisa; Beckmann, Melissa A.; Spence, Jason S.; Jackson, Barbara L.; Galloway, Leslie D.; Barker, Paul; Wymore, Ann M.; Hunsicker, Patricia R.; Durtschi, David C.; Shaw, Ginger S.; Shinpock, Sarah; Manly, Kenneth F.; Miller, Darla R.; Donohue, Kevin D.; Culiat, Cymbeline T.; Churchill, Gary A.; Lariviere, William R.; Palmer, Abraham A.; O'Hara, Bruce F.; Voy, Brynn H.; Chesler, Elissa J.

    2011-01-01

    Genetic reference populations in model organisms are critical resources for systems genetic analysis of disease related phenotypes. The breeding history of these inbred panels may influence detectable allelic and phenotypic diversity. The existing panel of common inbred strains reflects historical selection biases, and existing recombinant inbred panels have low allelic diversity. All such populations may be subject to consequences of inbreeding depression. The Collaborative Cross (CC) is a mouse reference population with high allelic diversity that is being constructed using a randomized breeding design that systematically outcrosses eight founder strains, followed by inbreeding to obtain new recombinant inbred strains. Five of the eight founders are common laboratory strains, and three are wild-derived. Since its inception, the partially inbred CC has been characterized for physiological, morphological, and behavioral traits. The construction of this population provided a unique opportunity to observe phenotypic variation as new allelic combinations arose through intercrossing and inbreeding to create new stable genetic combinations. Processes including inbreeding depression and its impact on allelic and phenotypic diversity were assessed. Phenotypic variation in the CC breeding population exceeds that of existing mouse genetic reference populations due to both high founder genetic diversity and novel epistatic combinations. However, some focal evidence of allele purging was detected including a suggestive QTL for litter size in a location of changing allele frequency. Despite these inescapable pressures, high diversity and precision for genetic mapping remain. These results demonstrate the potential of the CC population once completed and highlight implications for development of related populations. PMID:21734011

  3. Genetic Analysis of Nitroaromatic Degradation by Clostridium

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-07-30

    Phenazine , a molecule produced by some soil bacteria was found to have a significant effect on metabolite pattern in two clostridium test strains...potential Effect on butyrate levels Methylene blue +0.011 no phenazine -1-carboxylic acid -0.116 More butyrate TNT -0.253 More butyrate Neutral red -0.325...interesting in light of the analysis of natural mobile soluble electron carriers in natural soil ecosystems where molecules such as quinones, and phenazines

  4. Multivariate Genetic Analysis of Learning and Early Reading Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byrne, Brian; Wadsworth, Sally; Boehme, Kristi; Talk, Andrew C.; Coventry, William L.; Olson, Richard K.; Samuelsson, Stefan; Corley, Robin

    2013-01-01

    The genetic factor structure of a range of learning measures was explored in twin children, recruited in preschool and followed to Grade 2 ("N"?=?2,084). Measures of orthographic learning and word reading were included in the analyses to determine how these patterned with the learning processes. An exploratory factor analysis of the…

  5. Genetic diversity of popcorn genotypes using molecular analysis.

    PubMed

    Resh, F S; Scapim, C A; Mangolin, C A; Machado, M F P S; do Amaral, A T; Ramos, H C C; Vivas, M

    2015-08-19

    In this study, we analyzed dominant molecular markers to estimate the genetic divergence of 26 popcorn genotypes and evaluate whether using various dissimilarity coefficients with these dominant markers influences the results of cluster analysis. Fifteen random amplification of polymorphic DNA primers produced 157 amplified fragments, of which 65 were monomorphic and 92 were polymorphic. To calculate the genetic distances among the 26 genotypes, the complements of the Jaccard, Dice, and Rogers and Tanimoto similarity coefficients were used. A matrix of Dij values (dissimilarity matrix) was constructed, from which the genetic distances among genotypes were represented in a more simplified manner as a dendrogram generated using the unweighted pair-group method with arithmetic average. Clusters determined by molecular analysis generally did not group material from the same parental origin together. The largest genetic distance was between varieties 17 (UNB-2) and 18 (PA-091). In the identification of genotypes with the smallest genetic distance, the 3 coefficients showed no agreement. The 3 dissimilarity coefficients showed no major differences among their grouping patterns because agreement in determining the genotypes with large, medium, and small genetic distances was high. The largest genetic distances were observed for the Rogers and Tanimoto dissimilarity coefficient (0.74), followed by the Jaccard coefficient (0.65) and the Dice coefficient (0.48). The 3 coefficients showed similar estimations for the cophenetic correlation coefficient. Correlations among the matrices generated using the 3 coefficients were positive and had high magnitudes, reflecting strong agreement among the results obtained using the 3 evaluated dissimilarity coefficients.

  6. Castor bean organelle genome sequencing and worldwide genetic diversity analysis.

    PubMed

    Rivarola, Maximo; Foster, Jeffrey T; Chan, Agnes P; Williams, Amber L; Rice, Danny W; Liu, Xinyue; Melake-Berhan, Admasu; Huot Creasy, Heather; Puiu, Daniela; Rosovitz, M J; Khouri, Hoda M; Beckstrom-Sternberg, Stephen M; Allan, Gerard J; Keim, Paul; Ravel, Jacques; Rabinowicz, Pablo D

    2011-01-01

    Castor bean is an important oil-producing plant in the Euphorbiaceae family. Its high-quality oil contains up to 90% of the unusual fatty acid ricinoleate, which has many industrial and medical applications. Castor bean seeds also contain ricin, a highly toxic Type 2 ribosome-inactivating protein, which has gained relevance in recent years due to biosafety concerns. In order to gain knowledge on global genetic diversity in castor bean and to ultimately help the development of breeding and forensic tools, we carried out an extensive chloroplast sequence diversity analysis. Taking advantage of the recently published genome sequence of castor bean, we assembled the chloroplast and mitochondrion genomes extracting selected reads from the available whole genome shotgun reads. Using the chloroplast reference genome we used the methylation filtration technique to readily obtain draft genome sequences of 7 geographically and genetically diverse castor bean accessions. These sequence data were used to identify single nucleotide polymorphism markers and phylogenetic analysis resulted in the identification of two major clades that were not apparent in previous population genetic studies using genetic markers derived from nuclear DNA. Two distinct sub-clades could be defined within each major clade and large-scale genotyping of castor bean populations worldwide confirmed previously observed low levels of genetic diversity and showed a broad geographic distribution of each sub-clade.

  7. Castor Bean Organelle Genome Sequencing and Worldwide Genetic Diversity Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Agnes P.; Williams, Amber L.; Rice, Danny W.; Liu, Xinyue; Melake-Berhan, Admasu; Huot Creasy, Heather; Puiu, Daniela; Rosovitz, M. J.; Khouri, Hoda M.; Beckstrom-Sternberg, Stephen M.; Allan, Gerard J.; Keim, Paul; Ravel, Jacques; Rabinowicz, Pablo D.

    2011-01-01

    Castor bean is an important oil-producing plant in the Euphorbiaceae family. Its high-quality oil contains up to 90% of the unusual fatty acid ricinoleate, which has many industrial and medical applications. Castor bean seeds also contain ricin, a highly toxic Type 2 ribosome-inactivating protein, which has gained relevance in recent years due to biosafety concerns. In order to gain knowledge on global genetic diversity in castor bean and to ultimately help the development of breeding and forensic tools, we carried out an extensive chloroplast sequence diversity analysis. Taking advantage of the recently published genome sequence of castor bean, we assembled the chloroplast and mitochondrion genomes extracting selected reads from the available whole genome shotgun reads. Using the chloroplast reference genome we used the methylation filtration technique to readily obtain draft genome sequences of 7 geographically and genetically diverse castor bean accessions. These sequence data were used to identify single nucleotide polymorphism markers and phylogenetic analysis resulted in the identification of two major clades that were not apparent in previous population genetic studies using genetic markers derived from nuclear DNA. Two distinct sub-clades could be defined within each major clade and large-scale genotyping of castor bean populations worldwide confirmed previously observed low levels of genetic diversity and showed a broad geographic distribution of each sub-clade. PMID:21750729

  8. Understanding genetics: Analysis of secondary students' conceptual status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsui, Chi-Yan; Treagust, David F.

    2007-02-01

    This article explores the conceptual change of students in Grades 10 and 12 in three Australian senior high schools when the teachers included computer multimedia to a greater or lesser extent in their teaching of a genetics course. The study, underpinned by a multidimensional conceptual-change framework, used an interpretive approach and a case-based design with multiple data collection methods. Over 4-8 weeks, the students learned genetics in classroom lessons that included BioLogica activities, which feature multiple representations. Results of the online tests and interview tasks revealed that most students improved their understanding of genetics as evidenced in the development of genetics reasoning. However, using Thorley's (1990) status analysis categories, a cross-case analysis of the gene conceptions of 9 of the 26 students interviewed indicated that only 4 students' postinstructional conceptions were intelligible-plausible-fruitful. Students' conceptual change was consistent with classroom teaching and learning. Findings suggested that multiple representations supported conceptual understanding of genetics but not in all students. It was also shown that status can be a viable hallmark enabling researchers to identify students' conceptual change that would otherwise be less accessible. Thorley's method for analyzing conceptual status is discussed.

  9. A genetic analysis of Adhl regulation

    SciTech Connect

    Freeling, M.

    1992-01-01

    Several separate but related studies are reported on the mechanism of alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh-1) are reported. A study of a deletion mutation in the TATA box region which resulted in an increase from 6--60% of wildtype Adh-1 expression in the revertant has led to a focus on trans-acting protein factors that bind the TATA box. Analysis of another revertant has led to study of cis-acting sequences in Adh-1 expression. Screening efforts aimed at defining different mutants affecting Adh-1 expression are reported.

  10. Genetic diversity analysis of fruit characteristics of hawthorn germplasm.

    PubMed

    Su, K; Guo, Y S; Wang, G; Zhao, Y H; Dong, W X

    2015-12-07

    One hundred and six accessions of hawthorn intraspecific resources, from the National Germplasm Repository at Shenyang, were subjected to genetic diversity and principal component analysis based on evaluation data of 15 fruit traits. Results showed that the genetic diversity of hawthorn fruit traits varied. Among the 15 traits, the fruit shape variable coefficient had the most obvious evaluation, followed by fruit surface state, dot color, taste, weight of single fruit, sepal posture, peduncle form, and metula traits. These are the primary traits by which hawthorn could be classified in the future. The principal component demonstrated that these traits are the most influential factors of hawthorn fruit characteristics.

  11. Methods for the survey and genetic analysis of populations

    DOEpatents

    Ashby, Matthew

    2003-09-02

    The present invention relates to methods for performing surveys of the genetic diversity of a population. The invention also relates to methods for performing genetic analyses of a population. The invention further relates to methods for the creation of databases comprising the survey information and the databases created by these methods. The invention also relates to methods for analyzing the information to correlate the presence of nucleic acid markers with desired parameters in a sample. These methods have application in the fields of geochemical exploration, agriculture, bioremediation, environmental analysis, clinical microbiology, forensic science and medicine.

  12. Molecular genetic analysis of plant gravitropism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lomax, T. L.

    1997-01-01

    The analysis of mutants is a powerful approach for elucidating the components of complex biological processes. A growing number of mutants have been isolated which affect plant gravitropism and the classes of mutants found thus far provide important information about the gravity response mechanism. The wide variety of mutants isolated, especially in Arabidopsis, indicates that gravitropism is a complex, multi-step process. The existence of mutants altered in either root gravitropism alone, shoot gravitropism alone, or both indicates that the root and shoot gravitropic mechanisms have both separate and common steps. Reduced starch mutants have confirmed the role of amyloplasts in sensing the gravity signal. The hormone auxin is thought to act as the transducing signal between the sites of gravity perception (the starch parenchyma cells surrounding the vascular tissue in shoots and the columella cells of root caps) and asymmetric growth (the epidermal cells of the elongation zone(s) of each organ). To date, all mutants that are resistant to high concentrations of auxin have also been found to exhibit a reduced gravitropic response, thus supporting the role of auxin. Not all gravitropic mutants are auxin-resistant, however, indicating that there are additional steps which do not involve auxin. Studies with mutants of tomato which exhibit either reduced or reversed gravitropic responses further support the role of auxin redistribution in gravitropism and suggest that both red light and cytokinin interact with gravitropism through controlling lateral auxin transport. Plant responses to gravity thus likely involve changes in both auxin transport and sensitivity.

  13. Molecular genetic analysis of plant gravitropism.

    PubMed

    Lomax, T L

    1997-06-01

    The analysis of mutants is a powerful approach for elucidating the components of complex biological processes. A growing number of mutants have been isolated which affect plant gravitropism and the classes of mutants found thus far provide important information about the gravity response mechanism. The wide variety of mutants isolated, especially in Arabidopsis, indicates that gravitropism is a complex, multi-step process. The existence of mutants altered in either root gravitropism alone, shoot gravitropism alone, or both indicates that the root and shoot gravitropic mechanisms have both separate and common steps. Reduced starch mutants have confirmed the role of amyloplasts in sensing the gravity signal. The hormone auxin is thought to act as the transducing signal between the sites of gravity perception (the starch parenchyma cells surrounding the vascular tissue in shoots and the columella cells of root caps) and asymmetric growth (the epidermal cells of the elongation zone(s) of each organ). To date, all mutants that are resistant to high concentrations of auxin have also been found to exhibit a reduced gravitropic response, thus supporting the role of auxin. Not all gravitropic mutants are auxin-resistant, however, indicating that there are additional steps which do not involve auxin. Studies with mutants of tomato which exhibit either reduced or reversed gravitropic responses further support the role of auxin redistribution in gravitropism and suggest that both red light and cytokinin interact with gravitropism through controlling lateral auxin transport. Plant responses to gravity thus likely involve changes in both auxin transport and sensitivity.

  14. [Genetical analysis on cross incubation of Beauveria bassiana].

    PubMed

    Wang, C; Ding, D; Wang, S; Li, Z

    2000-10-01

    Heterokaryon of Beauveria bassiana was formed during the cross incubation of two vegetative compatible strains with genetic markers of actidione resistance and 34 degrees C tolerance. The chromosome(s) or its fragment successive losses, recombination and segreation led to haploidization during the conidia formation period. After at least 4 generations of parasexual cycle, the genetic character of heterokayon could get to relative stable. Genetic marker and RAPD analysis indicated that the combinants showed the phenomenon of preferential selection of one parental type by unrandom chromosome lossing and the gene of the other parental strain was suppressed or lost completely. Different culture medium, in vivo or in vitro, and different mixture ratio of original strain spores could affect parasexual process and then the preferential selection. The results also demonstrated the heterosis effect of cross culture.

  15. Genetic diversity analysis in Piper species (Piperaceae) using RAPD markers.

    PubMed

    Sen, Sandeep; Skaria, Reby; Abdul Muneer, P M

    2010-09-01

    The genetic diversity of eight species of Piper (Piperaceae) viz., P. nigrum, P. longum, P. betle, P. chaba, P. argyrophyllum, P. trichostachyon, P. galeatum, and P. hymenophyllum from Kerala state, India were analyzed by Random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD). Out of 22 10-mer RAPD primers screened, 11 were selected for comparative analysis of different species of Piper. High genetic variations were found among different Piper species studied. Among the total of 149 RAPD fragments amplified, 12 bands (8.05%) were found monomorphic in eight species. The remaining 137 fragments were found polymorphic (91.95%). Species-specific bands were found in all eight species studied. The average gene diversity or heterozygosity (H) was 0.33 across all the species, genetic distances ranged from 0.21 to 0.69. The results of this study will facilitate germplasm identification, management, and conservation.

  16. [Screening of peafowl microsatellite primers and analysis of genetic diversity].

    PubMed

    Bao, Wen-Bin; Chen, Guo-Hong; Shu, Jing-Ting; Xu, Qi; Li, Hui-Fang

    2006-10-01

    The applicability of chicken microsatellite primers to peafowl population was analyzed in the present paper, and the results showed 14 of 29 pairs of microsatellite primers from chicken could amplify peafowl DNA and produce specific allele patterns. A mean of 1.71 alleles was found for each locus. Seven pairs were highly polymorphic, and MCW0080 and MCW0098 were ideal markers for peafowl. Genetic diversity analysis within and between the green peafowl and the blue peafowl populations demonstrated that the expected heterozygosity of two peafowl populations were 0.2482 and 0.2744, respectively. The inbreeding index (FST), Reynolds' genetic distance and gene flow between the two populations were 0.078, 0.0603 and 3.896 respectively. These results indicate that the heterozygosity and the genetic diversity of these two peafowl populations were very low, and suggest a tendency towards intermixing.

  17. Molecular population genetic analysis of emerged bacterial pathogens: selected insights.

    PubMed Central

    Musser, J. M.

    1996-01-01

    Research in bacterial population genetics has increased in the last 10 years. Population genetic theory and tools and related strategies have been used to investigate bacterial pathogens that have contributed to recent episodes of temporal variation in disease frequency and severity. A common theme demonstrated by these analyses is that distinct bacterial clones are responsible for disease outbreaks and increases in infection frequency. Many of these clones are characterized by unique combinations of virulence genes or alleles of virulence genes. Because substantial interclonal variance exists in relative virulence, molecular population genetic studies have led to the concept that the unit of bacterial pathogenicity is the clone or cell line. Continued new insights into host parasite interactions at the molecular level will be achieved by combining clonal analysis of bacterial pathogens with large-scale comparative sequencing of virulence genes. PMID:8903193

  18. Analysis of genetic diversity in Bolivian llama populations using microsatellites.

    PubMed

    Barreta, J; Gutiérrez-Gil, B; Iñiguez, V; Romero, F; Saavedra, V; Chiri, R; Rodríguez, T; Arranz, J J

    2013-08-01

    South American camelids (SACs) have a major role in the maintenance and potential future of rural Andean human populations. More than 60% of the 3.7 million llamas living worldwide are found in Bolivia. Due to the lack of studies focusing on genetic diversity in Bolivian llamas, this analysis investigates both the genetic diversity and structure of 12 regional groups of llamas that span the greater part of the range of distribution for this species in Bolivia. The analysis of 42 microsatellite markers in the considered regional groups showed that, in general, there were high levels of polymorphism (a total of 506 detected alleles; average PIC across per marker: 0.66), which are comparable with those reported for other populations of domestic SACs. The estimated diversity parameters indicated that there was high intrapopulational genetic variation (average number of alleles and average expected heterozygosity per marker: 12.04 and 0.68, respectively) and weak genetic differentiation among populations (FST range: 0.003-0.052). In agreement with these estimates, Bolivian llamas showed a weak genetic structure and an intense gene flow between all the studied regional groups, which is due to the exchange of reproductive males between the different flocks. Interestingly, the groups for which the largest pairwise FST estimates were observed, Sud Lípez and Nor Lípez, showed a certain level of genetic differentiation that is probably due to the pattern of geographic isolation and limited communication infrastructures of these southern localities. Overall, the population parameters reported here may serve as a reference when establishing conservation policies that address Bolivian llama populations.

  19. Genetic analysis of Streptococcus suis isolates from wild rabbits.

    PubMed

    Sánchez del Rey, V; Fernández-Garayzábal, J F; Briones, V; Iriso, A; Domínguez, L; Gottschalk, M; Vela, A I

    2013-08-30

    This work aims to investigate the presence of Streptococcus suis in wild rabbits. A total of 65 S. suis isolates were recovered from 33.3% of the wild rabbits examined. Most isolates (86.2%) belong to genotype cps9. These isolates were further characterized by pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), multilocus sequence typing (MLST) and virulence genotyping. Overall, S. suis exhibited a low genetic diversity. Only 5 genetic profiles were obtained by PFGE and most isolates (71.4%) were included in two pulsotypes that were also widely distributed among the wild rabbit population. MLST analysis assigned all cps9 isolates into three new singlestones (ST216, ST217 and ST284), which were not genetically related to the European ST87 and Spanish ST61 widespread swine clones, indicating a different genetic background for the S. suis isolates from wild rabbits and pigs. Wild rabbit isolates exhibited the genotype mrp-/epf-/sly-, different from those showed by most of the swine S. suis isolates of the ST87 and ST61 clones. None of the S. suis isolated from wild rabbits exhibited the genotype cps2/mrp+/epf+/sly+ associated with human infections. These results indicate that S. suis isolates from wild rabbits are not genetically related with prevalent clones usually associated with infections in pigs or humans in Europe and do not exhibit either their virulence genotypes. Therefore, although wild rabbits could represent an unknown reservoir of this pathogen, they could not represent a potential risk for pigs or humans.

  20. Population genetic analysis and sub-structuring in Babesia bovis.

    PubMed

    Simuunza, Martin; Bilgic, Huseyin; Karagenc, Tulin; Syakalima, Michelo; Shiels, Brian; Tait, Andy; Weir, William

    2011-06-01

    The tick-borne protozoan parasite, Babesia bovis is one of the causes of bovine babesiosis, an economically important disease of cattle in tropical and sub-tropical countries. Using the recently published genome sequence of the parasite, we developed a panel of eight mini- and micro-satellite markers and used these to investigate the role of genetic exchange in the population structure and diversity of the parasite using isolates from Zambia and Turkey. This population genetic analysis showed that genetic exchange occurs and that there are high levels of genetic diversity, with geographical sub-structuring quantified using Wright's F Index. Linkage disequilibrium was observed when isolates from both countries were treated as one population, but when isolates from Zambia were analysed separately linkage equilibrium was observed. The Turkish isolates were sub-structured, containing two genetically distinct sub-groups, both of which appeared to be in linkage equilibrium. The results of the Zambian study suggest that a sub-set of the parasite population is responsible for the westward spread of babesiosis into the previously disease-free central region of the country. The Zambian isolates had a significantly higher number of genotypes per sample than those from Turkey and age was found to be a significant predictor of the multiplicity of infection. The high levels of diversity seen in the Zambian and Turkish B. bovis populations have implications in the development of subunit vaccines against the disease and the spread of drug resistance.

  1. Analysis of mitochondrial genetic diversity of Ustilago maydis in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Jiménez-Becerril, María F; Hernández-Delgado, Sanjuana; Solís-Oba, Myrna; González Prieto, Juan M

    2016-10-11

    The current understanding of the genetic diversity of the phytopathogenic fungus Ustilago maydis is limited. To determine the genetic diversity and structure of U. maydis, 48 fungal isolates were analyzed using mitochondrial simple sequence repeats (SSRs). Tumours (corn smut or 'huitlacoche') were collected from different Mexican states with diverse environmental conditions. Using bioinformatic tools, five microsatellites were identified within intergenic regions of the U. maydis mitochondrial genome. SSRMUM4 was the most polymorphic marker. The most common repeats were hexanucleotides. A total of 12 allelic variants were identified, with a mean of 2.4 alleles per locus. An estimate of the genetic diversity using analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA) revealed that the highest variance component is within states (84%), with moderate genetic differentiation between states (16%) (FST = 0.158). A dendrogram generated using the unweighted paired-grouping method with arithmetic averages (UPGMA) and the Bayesian analysis of population structure grouped the U. maydis isolates into two subgroups (K = 2) based on their shared SSRs.

  2. Random amplified polymorphic DNA analysis of genetically modified organisms.

    PubMed

    Yoke-Kqueen, Cheah; Radu, Son

    2006-12-15

    Randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) was used to analyzed 78 samples comprises of certified reference materials (soya and maize powder), raw seeds (soybean and maize), processed food and animal feed. Combination assay of two arbitrary primers in the RAPD analysis enable to distinguish genetically modified organism (GMO) reference materials from the samples tested. Dendrogram analysis revealed 13 clusters at 45% similarity from the RAPD. RAPD analysis showed that the maize and soybean samples were clustered differently besides the GMO and non-GMO products.

  3. Metabolic engineering: techniques for analysis of targets for genetic manipulations.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, J

    Metabolic engineering has been defined as the purposeful modification of intermediary metabolism using recombinant DNA techniques. With this definition metabolic engineering includes: (1) inserting new pathways in microorganisms with the aim of producing novel metabolites, e.g., production of polyketides by Streptomyces; (2) production of heterologous peptides, e.g., production of human insulin, erythropoitin, and tPA; and (3) improvement of both new and existing processes, e.g., production of antibiotics and industrial enzymes. Metabolic engineering is a multidisciplinary approach, which involves input from chemical engineers, molecular biologists, biochemists, physiologists, and analytical chemists. Obviously, molecular biology is central in the production of novel products, as well as in the improvement of existing processes. However, in the latter case, input from other disciplines is pivotal in order to target the genetic modifications; with the rapid developments in molecular biology, progress in the field is likely to be limited by procedures to identify the optimal genetic changes. Identification of the optimal genetic changes often requires a meticulous mapping of the cellular metabolism at different operating conditions, and the application of metabolic engineering to process optimization is, therefore, expected mainly to have an impact on the improvement of processes where yield, productivity, and titer are important design factors, i.e., in the production of metabolites and industrial enzymes. Despite the prospect of obtaining major improvement through metabolic engineering, this approach is, however, not expected to completely replace the classical approach to strain improvement-random mutagenesis followed by screening. Identification of the optimal genetic changes for improvement of a given process requires analysis of the underlying mechanisms, at best, at the molecular level. To reveal these mechanisms a number of different techniques may be applied

  4. Genetic analysis in the Collaborative Cross breeding population

    SciTech Connect

    Philip, Vivek; Sokoloff, Greta; Ackert-Bicknell, Cheryl; Striz, Martin; Branstetter, Lisa R; Beckmann, Melissa; Spence, Jason S; Jackson, Barbara L; Galloway, Leslie D; Barker, Gene; Wymore, Ann M; Hunsicker, Patricia R; Durtschi, David W; Shaw, Ginger S; Shinpock, Sarah G; Manly, Kenneth F; Miller, Darla R; Donahue, Kevin; Culiat, Cymbeline T; Churchill, Gary A; Lariviere, William R; Palmer, Abraham; O'Hara, Bruce; Voy, Brynn H; Chesler, Elissa J

    2011-01-01

    Genetic reference populations in model organisms are critical resources for systems genetic analysis of disease related phenotypes. The breeding history of these inbred panels may influence detectable allelic and phenotypic diversity. The existing panel of common inbred strains reflects historical selection biases, and existing recombinant inbred panels have low allelic diversity. All such populations may be subject to consequences of inbreeding depression. The Collaborative Cross (CC) is a mouse reference population with high allelic diversity that is being constructed using a randomized breeding design that systematically outcrosses eight founder strains, followed by inbreeding to obtain new recombinant inbred strains. Five of the eight founders are common laboratory strains, and three are wild-derived. Since its inception, the partially inbred CC has been characterized for physiological, morphological, and behavioral traits. The construction of this population provided a unique opportunity to observe phenotypic variation as new allelic combinations arose through intercrossing and inbreeding to create new stable genetic combinations. Processes including inbreeding depression and its impact on allelic and phenotypic diversity were assessed. Phenotypic variation in the CC breeding population exceeds that of existing mouse genetic reference populations due to both high founder genetic diversity and novel epistatic combinations. However, some focal evidence of allele purging was detected including a suggestive QTL for litter size in a location of changing allele frequency. Despite these inescapable pressures, high diversity and precision for genetic mapping remain. These results demonstrate the potential of the CC population once completed and highlight implications for development of related populations. Supplementary material consists of Supplementary Table 1 Phenotypic means, variances, ranges and heritabilities for all traits and generations, Supplementary Table

  5. Genetic Analysis of Haploids from Industrial Strains of Baker's Yeast.

    PubMed

    Oda, Y; Ouchi, K

    1989-07-01

    Strains of baker's yeast conventionally used by the baking industry in Japan were tested for the ability to sporulate and produce viable haploid spores. Three isolates which possessed the properties of baker's yeasts were obtained from single spores. Each strain was a haploid, and one of these strains, YOY34, was characterized. YOY34 fermented maltose and sucrose, but did not utilize galactose, unlike its parental strain. Genetic analysis showed that YOY34 carried two MAL genes, one functional and one cryptic; two SUC genes; and one defective gal gene. The genotype of YOY34 was identified as MATalpha MAL1 MAL3g SUC2 SUC4 gall. The MAL1 gene from this haploid was constitutively expressed, was dominant over other wild-type MAL tester genes, and gave a weak sucrose fermentation. YOY34 was suitable for both bakery products, like conventional baker's yeasts, and for genetic analysis, like laboratory strains.

  6. Genetic linkage analysis of manic depression in Iceland.

    PubMed Central

    Curtis, D; Sherrington, R; Brett, P; Holmes, D S; Kalsi, G; Brynjolfsson, J; Petursson, H; Rifkin, L; Murphy, P; Moloney, E

    1993-01-01

    Genetic linkage analysis has been used to study five Icelandic pedigrees multiply affected with manic depression. Genetic markers were chosen from regions which had been implicated by other studies or to which candidate genes had been localized. The transmission model used was of a dominant gene with incomplete penetrance and allowing for a large number of phenocopies, especially for unipolar rather than bipolar cases. Multipoint analysis with linked markers enabled information to be gained from regions spanning large distances. Using this approach we have excluded regions of chromosome 11p, 11q, 8q, 5q, 9q and Xq. Candidate genes excluded include those for tyrosine hydroxylase, the dopamine type 2 receptor, proenkephalin, the 5HT1A receptor and dopamine beta hydroxylase. Nevertheless, we remain optimistic that this approach will eventually identify at least some of the genes predisposing to manic depression. PMID:8105081

  7. The S-leut anthropometric traits: genetic analysis.

    PubMed

    Paganini-Hill, A; Martin, A O; Spence, M A

    1981-05-01

    Genetic analyses were conducted on 51 anthropometric measurements and on four factors derived from them by factor analysis. These variables were obtained on 784 members of a religious isolate, the S-leut. Correlations were computed between relatives, and heritabilities were estimates using information on extended families. Longitudinal measurements generally exhibited the highest heritabilities. The test for fit of a major gene model was significant for 13 of the 55 variables, the circumferential and breadth measurements giving the strongest evidence for major gene control. In another approach to establishment of genetic control, linkage analysis was performed between the anthropometric variables and blood group and serum protein polymorphisms. Several traits showed some evidence for linkage but none achieved statistical significance.

  8. Describing the genetic architecture of epilepsy through heritability analysis.

    PubMed

    Speed, Doug; O'Brien, Terence J; Palotie, Aarno; Shkura, Kirill; Marson, Anthony G; Balding, David J; Johnson, Michael R

    2014-10-01

    Epilepsy is a disease with substantial missing heritability; despite its high genetic component, genetic association studies have had limited success detecting common variants which influence susceptibility. In this paper, we reassess the role of common variants on epilepsy using extensions of heritability analysis. Our data set consists of 1258 UK patients with epilepsy, of which 958 have focal epilepsy, and 5129 population control subjects, with genotypes recorded for over 4 million common single nucleotide polymorphisms. Firstly, we show that on the liability scale, common variants collectively explain at least 26% (standard deviation 5%) of phenotypic variation for all epilepsy and 27% (standard deviation 5%) for focal epilepsy. Secondly we provide a new method for estimating the number of causal variants for complex traits; when applied to epilepsy, our most optimistic estimate suggests that at least 400 variants influence disease susceptibility, with potentially many thousands. Thirdly, we use bivariate analysis to assess how similar the genetic architecture of focal epilepsy is to that of non-focal epilepsy; we demonstrate both significant differences (P = 0.004) and significant similarities (P = 0.01) between the two subtypes, indicating that although the clinical definition of focal epilepsy does identify a genetically distinct epilepsy subtype, there is also scope to improve the classification of epilepsy by incorporating genotypic information. Lastly, we investigate the potential value in using genetic data to diagnose epilepsy following a single epileptic seizure; we find that a prediction model explaining 10% of phenotypic variation could have clinical utility for deciding which single-seizure individuals are likely to benefit from immediate anti-epileptic drug therapy.

  9. Describing the genetic architecture of epilepsy through heritability analysis

    PubMed Central

    O’Brien, Terence J.; Palotie, Aarno; Shkura, Kirill; Marson, Anthony G.; Balding, David J.

    2014-01-01

    Epilepsy is a disease with substantial missing heritability; despite its high genetic component, genetic association studies have had limited success detecting common variants which influence susceptibility. In this paper, we reassess the role of common variants on epilepsy using extensions of heritability analysis. Our data set consists of 1258 UK patients with epilepsy, of which 958 have focal epilepsy, and 5129 population control subjects, with genotypes recorded for over 4 million common single nucleotide polymorphisms. Firstly, we show that on the liability scale, common variants collectively explain at least 26% (standard deviation 5%) of phenotypic variation for all epilepsy and 27% (standard deviation 5%) for focal epilepsy. Secondly we provide a new method for estimating the number of causal variants for complex traits; when applied to epilepsy, our most optimistic estimate suggests that at least 400 variants influence disease susceptibility, with potentially many thousands. Thirdly, we use bivariate analysis to assess how similar the genetic architecture of focal epilepsy is to that of non-focal epilepsy; we demonstrate both significant differences (P = 0.004) and significant similarities (P = 0.01) between the two subtypes, indicating that although the clinical definition of focal epilepsy does identify a genetically distinct epilepsy subtype, there is also scope to improve the classification of epilepsy by incorporating genotypic information. Lastly, we investigate the potential value in using genetic data to diagnose epilepsy following a single epileptic seizure; we find that a prediction model explaining 10% of phenotypic variation could have clinical utility for deciding which single-seizure individuals are likely to benefit from immediate anti-epileptic drug therapy. PMID:25063994

  10. Differential Network Analysis Reveals Genetic Effects on Catalepsy Modules

    PubMed Central

    Iancu, Ovidiu D.; Oberbeck, Denesa; Darakjian, Priscila; Kawane, Sunita; Erk, Jason; McWeeney, Shannon; Hitzemann, Robert

    2013-01-01

    We performed short-term bi-directional selective breeding for haloperidol-induced catalepsy, starting from three mouse populations of increasingly complex genetic structure: an F2 intercross, a heterogeneous stock (HS) formed by crossing four inbred strains (HS4) and a heterogeneous stock (HS-CC) formed from the inbred strain founders of the Collaborative Cross (CC). All three selections were successful, with large differences in haloperidol response emerging within three generations. Using a custom differential network analysis procedure, we found that gene coexpression patterns changed significantly; importantly, a number of these changes were concordant across genetic backgrounds. In contrast, absolute gene-expression changes were modest and not concordant across genetic backgrounds, in spite of the large and similar phenotypic differences. By inferring strain contributions from the parental lines, we are able to identify significant differences in allelic content between the selected lines concurrent with large changes in transcript connectivity. Importantly, this observation implies that genetic polymorphisms can affect transcript and module connectivity without large changes in absolute expression levels. We conclude that, in this case, selective breeding acts at the subnetwork level, with the same modules but not the same transcripts affected across the three selections. PMID:23555609

  11. Maternal genetic effect in DNA analysis: egg on your traits.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Golder N

    2012-07-01

    A dilemma of penetrance parallels the uncertainty principle as array analyses uncover a disturbing continuity of human molecular variation. Among mechanisms for altered penetrance is maternal genetic effect, hypothesized to explain mother-offspring discordance from 12/13 translocation [Wilson et al., 1991] and important to consider when confronting identical genetic changes in normal mothers and their abnormal children. A boy with developmental delays, autistic features, minimal dysmorphology, and maternally inherited 17p13.3 microduplication could exemplify maternal genetic effect, as could a boy with altered brain pattern and maternally inherited Sonic Hedgehog mutation reported by Schell-Apacik et al. [2009]. Maternal genetic effects, characterized in fly, fish, and mouse, are important to consider in human DNA analysis so that identical findings in mother and child are not routinely dismissed as benign variations. Suspect families can define relevant maternal-zygote transition (MZT) genes, provide assays for oocyte function and disruption, and shift anomaly emphasis from pattern recognition to pattern restoration.

  12. Genetic analysis of hispanic individuals with cystic fibrosis

    SciTech Connect

    Grebe, T.A.; Doane, W.W.; Norman, R.A.; Rhodes, S.N. ); Seltzer, W.K. ); DeMarchi, J.; Silva, D.K.; Gozal, D.; Bowman, C.M.; Accurso, F.J.; Jain, K.D. )

    1994-03-01

    The authors have performed molecular genetic analysis of Hispanic individuals with cystic fibrosis (CF) in the southwestern United States. Of 129 CF chromosomes analyzed, oly 46% (59/129) carry [Delta]F508. The G542X mutation was found on 5% (7/129) of CF chromosomes. The 3849+10kbC[yields]T mutation, detected primarily in Ashkenazi Jews, was present on 2% (3/129). R1162X and R334W, mutations identified in Spain and Italy, each occurred on 1.6% (2/129) of CF chromosomes. W1282X and R553X were each detected once. G551D and N1303K were not found. Overall, screening for 22 or more mutations resulted in detection of only 58% of CF transmembrane conductance regulator gene mutations among Hispanic individuals. Analysis of KM19/XV2c haplotypes revealed an unusual distribution. Although the majority of [Delta]508 mutations are on chromosomes of B haplotypes, the other CF mutations are on A and C haplotypes at higher-than-expected frequencies. These genetic analysis demonstrate significant differences between Hispanic individuals with CF and those of the general North American population. Assessment of carrier/affected risk in Hispanic CF individuals cannot, therefore, be based on the mutation frequencies found through studies of the general population but must be adjusted to better reflect the genetic makeup of this ethnic group. Further studies are necessary to identify the causative mutation(s) in this population and to better delineate genotype/phenotype correlations. These will enable counselors to provide more accurate genetic counseling. 22 refs., 2 tabs.

  13. A strategy analysis for genetic association studies with known inbreeding

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Association studies consist in identifying the genetic variants which are related to a specific disease through the use of statistical multiple hypothesis testing or segregation analysis in pedigrees. This type of studies has been very successful in the case of Mendelian monogenic disorders while it has been less successful in identifying genetic variants related to complex diseases where the insurgence depends on the interactions between different genes and the environment. The current technology allows to genotype more than a million of markers and this number has been rapidly increasing in the last years with the imputation based on templates sets and whole genome sequencing. This type of data introduces a great amount of noise in the statistical analysis and usually requires a great number of samples. Current methods seldom take into account gene-gene and gene-environment interactions which are fundamental especially in complex diseases. In this paper we propose to use a non-parametric additive model to detect the genetic variants related to diseases which accounts for interactions of unknown order. Although this is not new to the current literature, we show that in an isolated population, where the most related subjects share also most of their genetic code, the use of additive models may be improved if the available genealogical tree is taken into account. Specifically, we form a sample of cases and controls with the highest inbreeding by means of the Hungarian method, and estimate the set of genes/environmental variables, associated with the disease, by means of Random Forest. Results We have evidence, from statistical theory, simulations and two applications, that we build a suitable procedure to eliminate stratification between cases and controls and that it also has enough precision in identifying genetic variants responsible for a disease. This procedure has been successfully used for the beta-thalassemia, which is a well known Mendelian

  14. Genetic analysis of modern and historical burned human remains.

    PubMed

    von Wurmb-Schwark, Nicole; Ringleb, Arne; Gebühr, Michael; Simeoni, Eva

    2005-03-01

    Burning of corpses is a well-known funeral procedure that has been performed for a long time in many cultures. Nowadays more and more corpses are burned in crematories and buried in urns, often for practical and financial reasons. In some scientific, criminal or civil cases even after cremation there is the need of genetic investigations for identification or paternity testing. Furthermore, burned remains are the only remains left in North Europe from 1200 BC to 500 AD. This makes genetic investigation of those materials interesting for anthropological reasons. We present on one hand a systematic investigation of 10 corpses before and after the cremation and on the other hand the analysis of seven historical remains representing the bronze age. We chose the ground bone powder and the less destroyed bone parts respectively and employed a slightly modified commercially available DNA extraction method. The presence of human nuclear and mitochondrial DNA was tested by a simple but highly sensitive Duplex-PCR. DNA quantification was done using real time PCR, and genetic typing was tried out using the AmpFISTR Identifiler Multiplex Kit, followed by an automatic analysis on an AbiPrism310.

  15. Genetic heterogeneity and HOMOG analysis in British malignant hyperthermia families.

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, R; Curran, J L; Hall, W J; Halsall, P J; Hopkins, P M; Markham, A F; Stewart, A D; West, S P; Ellis, F R

    1998-01-01

    Malignant hyperthermia (MH) is an autosomal dominant genetic condition that presents in susceptible people undergoing general anaesthesia. The clinical disorder is a major cause of anaesthetic morbidity and mortality. The UK Malignant Hyperthermia Group has performed genetic linkage analysis on 20 large, well defined malignant hyperthermia families, using hypervariable markers on chromosome 19q13.1, including the candidate MH gene RYR1, the gene coding for the skeletal muscle ryanodine receptor protein. The results were analysed using LINKAGE to perform two point and multipoint lod scores, then HOMOG to calculate levels of heterogeneity. The results clearly showed genetic heterogeneity between MH families; nine of the families gave results entirely consistent with linkage to the region around RYR1 while the same region was clearly excluded in three families. In the remaining eight MHS families there were single recombinant events between RYR1 and MH susceptibility. HOMOG analysis was of little added benefit in determining the likelihood of linkage to RYR1 in these families. This confirmation of the presence of heterogeneity in the UK MH population, along with the possibility of the presence of two MH genes in some pedigrees, indicates that it would be premature and potentially dangerous to offer diagnosis of MH by DNA based methods at this time. PMID:9541102

  16. Integrated microfluidic systems for high-performance genetic analysis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Peng; Mathies, Richard A

    2009-10-01

    Driven by the ambitious goals of genome-related research, fully integrated microfluidic systems have developed rapidly to advance biomolecular and, in particular, genetic analysis. To produce a microsystem with high performance, several key elements must be strategically chosen, including device materials, temperature control, microfluidic control, and sample/product transport integration. We review several significant examples of microfluidic integration in DNA sequencing, gene expression analysis, pathogen detection, and forensic short tandem repeat typing. The advantages of high speed, increased sensitivity, and enhanced reliability enable these integrated microsystems to address bioanalytical challenges such as single-copy DNA sequencing, single-cell gene expression analysis, pathogen detection, and forensic identification of humans in formats that enable large-scale and point-of-analysis applications.

  17. Rabbit MSTN gene polymorphisms and genetic effect analysis.

    PubMed

    Qiao, X B; Xu, K Y; Li, B; Luan, X; Xia, T; Fan, X Z

    2014-04-08

    We analyzed meat samples of nine pure lines of rabbit and its 37 hybrid combinations by sequencing and single-strand conformation polymorphism techniques to explore genetic polymorphisms of all the three exon regions and part of the 5'-regulatory region of the myostatin (MSTN) gene. Thus, we detected a single nucleotide mutation (T→C) on the 476 locus of the 5'-regulatory region, but no mutation sites were detected in the exon areas. The correlation analysis showed that the mutation had some favorable genetic effects, and it resulted in increased liver weight, carcass weight, forelegs weight, back and waist weight, ham weight, and tare weight, whereas it decreased muscle drip loss and cooking loss (P < 0.05). These results suggest that the mutations in the upstream regulatory region of the MSTN gene are beneficial to the rabbit soma development, and the mutations can be used as molecular markers for the selection of the meat quality of rabbits.

  18. DNA degradation and genetic analysis of empty puparia: genetic identification limits in forensic entomology.

    PubMed

    Mazzanti, Morena; Alessandrini, Federica; Tagliabracci, Adriano; Wells, Jeffrey D; Campobasso, Carlo P

    2010-02-25

    Puparial cases are common remnants of necrophagous flies in crime investigations. They usually represent the longest developmental time and, therefore, they can be very useful for the estimation of the post-mortem interval (PMI). However, before any PMI estimate, it is crucial to identify the species of fly eclosed from each puparium associated with the corpse. Morphological characteristics of the puparium are often distinctive enough to permit a species identification. But, even an accurate morphological analysis of empty puparia cannot discriminate among different species of closely related flies. Furthermore, morphological identification may be impossible if the fly puparia are poorly preserved or in fragments. This study explores the applicability of biomolecular techniques on empty puparia and their fragments for identification purposes. A total of 63 empty puparia of necrophagous Diptera resulting from forensic casework were examined. Samples were divided into three groups according to size, type and time of eclosion in order to verify whether the physical characteristics and puparia weathering can influence the amount of DNA extraction. The results suggest that a reliable genetic identification of forensically important flies may also be performed from empty puparia and/or their fragments. However, DNA degradation can deeply compromise the genetic analysis since the older the fly puparia, the smaller are the amplified fragments.

  19. Genetic Geostatistical Framework for Spatial Analysis of Fine-Scale Genetic Heterogeneity in Modern Populations: Results from the KORA Study.

    PubMed

    Diaz-Lacava, A N; Walier, M; Holler, D; Steffens, M; Gieger, C; Furlanello, C; Lamina, C; Wichmann, H E; Becker, T

    2015-01-01

    Aiming to investigate fine-scale patterns of genetic heterogeneity in modern humans from a geographic perspective, a genetic geostatistical approach framed within a geographic information system is presented. A sample collected for prospective studies in a small area of southern Germany was analyzed. None indication of genetic heterogeneity was detected in previous analysis. Socio-demographic and genotypic data of German citizens were analyzed (212 SNPs; n = 728). Genetic heterogeneity was evaluated with observed heterozygosity (H O ). Best-fitting spatial autoregressive models were identified, using socio-demographic variables as covariates. Spatial analysis included surface interpolation and geostatistics of observed and predicted patterns. Prediction accuracy was quantified. Spatial autocorrelation was detected for both socio-demographic and genetic variables. Augsburg City and eastern suburban areas showed higher H O values. The selected model gave best predictions in suburban areas. Fine-scale patterns of genetic heterogeneity were observed. In accordance to literature, more urbanized areas showed higher levels of admixture. This approach showed efficacy for detecting and analyzing subtle patterns of genetic heterogeneity within small areas. It is scalable in number of loci, even up to whole-genome analysis. It may be suggested that this approach may be applicable to investigate the underlying genetic history that is, at least partially, embedded in geographic data.

  20. Genetic Analysis of Oncorhynchus Nerka : Life History and Genetic Analysis of Redfish Lake Oncorhynchus Nerka, 1993-1994 Completion Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Brannon, E.L.; Thorgaard, G.H.; Cummings, S.A.

    1994-10-01

    The study has shown through life history examination and DNA analysis that three forms of O. nerka are present in Redfish Lake. The three forms are closely related, but may be sufficiently different to be considered three separate stocks. Fishhook Creek kokanee are temporally isolated from the beach spawners, and may represent the gene pool most similar to the historic sockeye population that once spawned there. Fishhook Creek offers the best spawning area available in the lake system, and should be considered for use in reestablishing an anadromous Fishhook Creek sockeye swain. The resident beach spawning strain of O. nerka is likewise the most similar genetic form of the companion anadromous beach spawning O. nerka, and needs to be considered the most appropriate genetic source to help minimize reduced fitness of the sockeye from inbreeding.

  1. Genetic Analysis Workshop 16: Introduction to Workshop Summaries

    PubMed Central

    MacCluer, Jean W; Amos, Christopher I; Gregersen, Peter K; Heard-Costa, Nancy; Lee, Monica; Kraja, Aldi T; Borecki, Ingrid B; Cupples, L Adrienne; Almasy, Laura

    2010-01-01

    Genetic Analysis Workshop 16 GAW16) was held September 17-20, 2008 in St. Louis, Missouri. The focus of GAW16 was on methods and challenges in analysis of single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) data from genome-wide scans. GAW16 attracted 221 participants from 12 countries. The 168 contributions were organized into 17 discussion groups of 6 to 17 papers each. Three data sets were available for analysis. Two of these were data from ongoing studies, generously provided by the investigators. The North American Rheumatoid Arthritis Consortium provided case-control data on rheumatoid arthritis, and the Framingham Heart Study made available information on cardiovascular risk factors for participants in three generations of pedigree data. The third data set included simulated phenotypes for participants in the Framingham Heart Study, using actual pedigree structures and genotypes. This volume includes a paper for each of the 17 discussion groups, summarizing their main findings. PMID:19924709

  2. Overview of genetic analysis of human opioid receptors.

    PubMed

    Spampinato, Santi M

    2015-01-01

    The human μ-opioid receptor gene (OPRM1), due to its genetic and structural variation, has been a target of interest in several pharmacogenetic studies. The μ-opioid receptor (MOR), encoded by OPRM1, contributes to regulate the analgesic response to pain and also controls the rewarding effects of many drugs of abuse, including opioids, nicotine, and alcohol. Genetic polymorphisms of opioid receptors are candidates for the variability of clinical opioid effects. The non-synonymous polymorphism A118G of the OPRM1 has been repeatedly associated with the efficacy of opioid treatments for pain and various types of dependence. Genetic analysis of human opioid receptors has evidenced the presence of numerous polymorphisms either in exonic or in intronic sequences as well as the presence of synonymous coding variants that may have important effects on transcription, mRNA stability, and splicing, thus affecting gene function despite not directly disrupting any specific residue. Genotyping of opioid receptors is still in its infancy and a relevant progress in this field can be achieved by using advanced gene sequencing techniques described in this review that allow the researchers to obtain vast quantities of data on human genomes and transcriptomes in a brief period of time and with affordable costs.

  3. Molecular diversity analysis of eggplant (Solanum melongena) genetic resources.

    PubMed

    Ali, Z; Xu, Z L; Zhang, D Y; He, X L; Bahadur, S; Yi, J X

    2011-06-14

    Eggplant (Solanum melongena), a vegetable that is cultivated worldwide, is of considerable importance to agriculture in China. We analyzed the diversity of this plant using inter-simple sequence repeat (ISSR) and RAPD procedures to subdivide 143 Chinese-cultivated eggplants based on coefficient of parentage, genetic diversity index (GDI) and canonical discriminant analysis. ISSR markers were more effective than RAPD markers for detecting genetic diversity, which ranged from 0.10-0.51, slightly lower than what is known from other crops. Our ISSR/RAPD data provide molecular evidence that coincides with morphological-based classification into three varieties and further subdivision into eight groups, except for two groups. Intensive use of elite parents and extensive crossing within groups have resulted in increased coefficient of parentage and proportional contribution but decreased GDI during the past decades. The mean coefficient of parentage and proportional contribution increased from 0.05 to 0.10% and from 3.22 to 6.46% during 1980-1991 and 1992-2003, respectively. The GDI of landraces was 0.21, higher than the 0.09 and 0.08 calculated for the hybrid cultivars released during the two periods. The recent introduction of alien genotypes into eggplant breeding programs may broaden the genetic base.

  4. Genetic aspect of Alzheimer disease: Results of complex segregation analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Sadonvick, A.D.; Lee, I.M.L.; Bailey-Wilson, J.E.

    1994-09-01

    The study was designed to evaluate the possibility that a single major locus will explain the segregation of Alzheimer disease (AD). The data were from the population-based AD Genetic Database and consisted of 402 consecutive, unrelated probands, diagnosed to have either `probable` or `autopsy confirmed` AD and their 2,245 first-degree relatives. In this analysis, a relative was considered affected with AD only when there were sufficient medical/autopsy data to support diagnosis of AD being the most likely cause of the dementia. Transmission probability models allowing for a genotype-dependent and logistically distributed age-of-onset were used. The program REGTL in the S.A.G.E. computer program package was used for a complex segregation analysis. The models included correction for single ascertainment. Regressive familial effects were not estimated. The data were analyzed to test for single major locus (SML), random transmission and no transmission (environmental) hypotheses. The results of the complex segregation analysis showed that (1) the SML was the best fit, and (2) the non-genetic models could be rejected.

  5. Genetic analysis of Apuleia leiocarpa as revealed by random amplified polymorphic DNA markers: prospects for population genetic studies.

    PubMed

    Lencina, K H; Konzen, E R; Tsai, S M; Bisognin, D A

    2016-12-19

    Apuleia leiocarpa (Vogel) J.F. MacBride is a hardwood species native to South America, which is at serious risk of extinction. Therefore, it is of prime importance to examine the genetic diversity of this species, information required for developing conservation, sustainable management, and breeding strategies. Although scarcely used in recent years, random amplified polymorphic DNA markers are useful resources for the analysis of genetic diversity and structure of tree species. This study represents the first genetic analysis based on DNA markers in A. leiocarpa that aimed to investigate the levels of polymorphism and to select markers for the precise characterization of its genetic structure. We adapted the original DNA extraction protocol based on cetyltrimethyl ammonium bromide, and describe a simple procedure that can be used to obtain high-quality samples from leaf tissues of this tree. Eighteen primers were selected, revealing 92 bands, from which 75 were polymorphic and 61 were sufficient to represent the overall genetic structure of the population without compromising the precision of the analysis. Some fragments were conserved among individuals, which can be sequenced and used to analyze nucleotide diversity parameters through a wider set of A. leiocarpa individuals and populations. The individuals were separated into 11 distinct groups with variable levels of genetic diversity, which is important for selecting desirable genotypes and for the development of a conservation and sustainable management program. Our results are of prime importance for further investigations concerning the genetic characterization of this important, but vulnerable species.

  6. Random regression models on Legendre polynomials to estimate genetic parameters for weights from birth to adult age in Canchim cattle.

    PubMed

    Baldi, F; Albuquerque, L G; Alencar, M M

    2010-08-01

    The objective of this work was to estimate covariance functions for direct and maternal genetic effects, animal and maternal permanent environmental effects, and subsequently, to derive relevant genetic parameters for growth traits in Canchim cattle. Data comprised 49,011 weight records on 2435 females from birth to adult age. The model of analysis included fixed effects of contemporary groups (year and month of birth and at weighing) and age of dam as quadratic covariable. Mean trends were taken into account by a cubic regression on orthogonal polynomials of animal age. Residual variances were allowed to vary and were modelled by a step function with 1, 4 or 11 classes based on animal's age. The model fitting four classes of residual variances was the best. A total of 12 random regression models from second to seventh order were used to model direct and maternal genetic effects, animal and maternal permanent environmental effects. The model with direct and maternal genetic effects, animal and maternal permanent environmental effects fitted by quadric, cubic, quintic and linear Legendre polynomials, respectively, was the most adequate to describe the covariance structure of the data. Estimates of direct and maternal heritability obtained by multi-trait (seven traits) and random regression models were very similar. Selection for higher weight at any age, especially after weaning, will produce an increase in mature cow weight. The possibility to modify the growth curve in Canchim cattle to obtain animals with rapid growth at early ages and moderate to low mature cow weight is limited.

  7. Genetic analysis and attribution of microbial forensics evidence.

    PubMed

    Budowle, Bruce; Johnson, Martin D; Fraser, Claire M; Leighton, Terrance J; Murch, Randall S; Chakraborty, Ranajit

    2005-01-01

    Because of the availability of pathogenic microorganisms and the relatively low cost of preparing and disseminating bioweapons, there is a continuing threat of biocrime and bioterrorism. Thus, enhanced capabilities are needed that enable the full and robust forensic exploitation and interpretation of microbial evidence from acts of bioterrorism or biocrimes. To respond to the need, greater resources and efforts are being applied to the burgeoning field of microbial forensics. Microbial forensics focuses on the characterization, analysis and interpretation of evidence for attributional purposes from a bioterrorism act, biocrime, hoax or inadvertent agent release. To enhance attribution capabilities, a major component of microbial forensics is the analysis of nucleic acids to associate or eliminate putative samples. The degree that attribution can be addressed depends on the context of the case, the available knowledge of the genetics, phylogeny, and ecology of the target microorganism, and technologies applied. The types of genetic markers and features that can impact statistical inferences of microbial forensic evidence include: single nucleotide polymorphisms, repetitive sequences, insertions and deletions, mobile elements, pathogenicity islands, virulence and resistance genes, house keeping genes, structural genes, whole genome sequences, asexual and sexual reproduction, horizontal gene transfer, conjugation, transduction, lysogeny, gene conversion, recombination, gene duplication, rearrangements, and mutational hotspots. Nucleic acid based typing technologies include: PCR, real-time PCR, MLST, MLVA, whole genome sequencing, and microarrays.

  8. Genetic analysis of growth traits in Harnali sheep

    PubMed Central

    Lalit; Malik, Z. S.; Dalal, D. S.; Dahiya, S. P.; Patil, C. S.; Dahiya, Ravinder

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The present investigation was to study genetic characteristics of Harnali sheep with respect to growth performance and to estimate genetic parameters. Materials and Methods: The 22 years (1992-2013) data of growth traits of a 1603 synthetic population of Harnali sheep maintained at Lala Lajpat Rai University of Veterinary and Animal Sciences, Hisar, was utilized for this study. A mixed methodology with regression on their dam's weight was used to study the effect of non-genetic factors on growth traits. Heritability, genetic and phenotypic correlations were estimated using paternal half-sib analysis for body weight at various ages and average daily gain (ADG) for different growth periods. Result: The overall least squares mean of body weights recorded for birth weight (BW), weaning weight (WW), six months body weight (SMW), one yearling body weight (YBW), average daily gain from birth to 3 months (ADG1) and average daily gain from 3 to 12 months (ADG2) were 3.35±0.05 kg, 12.41±0.08 kg, 16.30±0.12 kg, 21.88±0.08 kg, 100.66±0.86 g/day and 35.07±0.39 g/day, respectively. The effects of year of birth significantly (p<0.01) influenced the BW, WW, SMW, YWB, ADG1 and ADG2. The effects of sex of lamb significantly (p<0.01) influenced the BW, WW SMW, YWB, ADG1 and ADG2. The effects of dam's weight at lambing significantly (p<0.01) influenced BW, WW, SMW, YWB, ADG1 and ADG2. No definite trend was observed over the years for the averages of body weight and gain. The heritability estimates of BW, WW, SMW, YBW, ADG1 and ADG2 were 0.40±0.05, 0.38±0.05, 0.45±0.06, 0.29±0.05, 0.40±0.06 and 0.33±0.02, respectively. The male lambs were significantly heavier than females at all stages of growth. The heritability estimates were moderate for all the growth traits and high genetic correlations of BW and WW with SMW were found. Conclusion: Due to high heritability and positive correlations of SMW with other body weights and daily gain, it was concluded that selection on

  9. Analysis of membrane lipid biogenesis pathways using yeast genetics.

    PubMed

    Gsell, Martina; Daum, Günther

    2013-01-01

    The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has become a valuable eukaryotic model organism to study biochemical and cellular processes at a molecular basis. A common strategy for such studies is the use of single and multiple mutants constructed by genetic manipulation which are compromised in individual enzymatic steps or certain metabolic pathways. Here, we describe selected examples of yeast research on phospholipid metabolism with emphasis on our own work dealing with investigations of phosphatidylethanolamine synthesis. Such studies start with the selection and construction of appropriate mutants and lead to phenotype analysis, lipid profiling, enzymatic analysis, and in vivo experiments. Comparing results obtained with wild-type and mutant strains allows us to understand the role of gene products and metabolic processes in more detail. Such studies are valuable not only for contributing to our knowledge of the complex network of lipid metabolism, but also of effects of lipids on structure and function of cellular membranes.

  10. An entropy test for single-locus genetic association analysis

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The etiology of complex diseases is due to the combination of genetic and environmental factors, usually many of them, and each with a small effect. The identification of these small-effect contributing factors is still a demanding task. Clearly, there is a need for more powerful tests of genetic association, and especially for the identification of rare effects Results We introduce a new genetic association test based on symbolic dynamics and symbolic entropy. Using a freely available software, we have applied this entropy test, and a conventional test, to simulated and real datasets, to illustrate the method and estimate type I error and power. We have also compared this new entropy test to the Fisher exact test for assessment of association with low-frequency SNPs. The entropy test is generally more powerful than the conventional test, and can be significantly more powerful when the genotypic test is applied to low allele-frequency markers. We have also shown that both the Fisher and Entropy methods are optimal to test for association with low-frequency SNPs (MAF around 1-5%), and both are conservative for very rare SNPs (MAF<1%) Conclusions We have developed a new, simple, consistent and powerful test to detect genetic association of biallelic/SNP markers in case-control data, by using symbolic dynamics and symbolic entropy as a measure of gene dependence. We also provide a standard asymptotic distribution of this test statistic. Given that the test is based on entropy measures, it avoids smoothed nonparametric estimation. The entropy test is generally as good or even more powerful than the conventional and Fisher tests. Furthermore, the entropy test is more computationally efficient than the Fisher's Exact test, especially for large number of markers. Therefore, this entropy-based test has the advantage of being optimal for most SNPs, regardless of their allele frequency (Minor Allele Frequency (MAF) between 1-50%). This property is quite beneficial

  11. Genetic analysis of human parainfluenza viruses circulating in Korea, 2006.

    PubMed

    Park, Kwang Sook; Yang, Mi Hwa; Lee, Chang Kyu; Song, Ki-Joon

    2014-06-01

    Human parainfluenza viruses (HPIV) are important causes of respiratory tract infections in young children. To characterize the molecular epidemiology of an HPIV outbreak occurring in Korea during 2006, genetic analysis of 269 cell culture isolates from HPIV-infected children, was conducted using nested reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR). HPIV-1 was detected in 70.3% of tested samples (189/269). The detection rate of HPIV-2 and HPIV-3 was 1.5% (4/269) and 9.3% (25/269), respectively. Mixed HPIV-1, -2 and -3 infections were detected in 19.0% (51/269): HPIV-1 and HPIV-2 in 15, HPIV-1 and HPIV-3 in 26, HPIV-2 and HPIV-3 in 6, and HPIV-1, -2 and -3 in 4. Of these positive samples for three different types HIPV-1, -2, and -3, two each representative strains were selected, the full length of hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) gene for HPIV was amplified by RT-PCR, and sequenced. Multiple alignment analysis, based on reference sequence of HPIV-1, -2, and -3 strains available in GenBank, showed that the identity of nucleotide and deduced amino acid sequences was 92.4-97.6% and 92.7-97.9%, respectively, for HPIV-1, 88.5-99.8% and 88.6-100% for HPIV-2, and 96.3-99.5% and 95.0-99.3% for HPIV-3, respectively. Phylogenetic analysis showed that HPIV-1, -2, and -3 strains identified in this study were closely related among the strains in the same type with no significant genetic variability. These results show that HPIV of multiple imported sources was circulating in Korea.

  12. Genetics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The genus Capsicum represents one of several well characterized Solanaceous genera. A wealth of classical and molecular genetics research is available for the genus. Information gleaned from its cultivated relatives, tomato and potato, provide further insight for basic and applied studies. Early ...

  13. Genetics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Maintaining genetic variation in wild populations of Arctic organisms is fundamental to the long-term persistence of high latitude biodiversity. Variability is important because it provides options for species to respond to changing environmental conditions and novel challenges such as emerging path...

  14. Genetics of acheiropodia (the handless and footless families of Brazil). VI. Formal genetic analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Freire-Maia, A; Freire-Maia, N; Morton, N E; Azevêdo, E S; Quelce-Salgado, A

    1975-01-01

    A genetic analysis is presented of data from 22 Brazilian sibships with cases of acheiropodia (the handless and footless families of Brazil). Segregation analysis performed using a 16K CDC 3100 computer showed a segregation frequency of .245 +/- .040, which is close to the expected value of .25. No sporadic cases were detected. The ascertainment of the probands was through multiple incomplete selection (pi = .55 +/- .07). The data are consistent with the hypothesis of an extremely rare autosomal recessive gene as the etiological factor in acheiropodia. Prevalence is estimated as 29 +/- 4, which is the same as the number of high risk cases; gene frequency equals .0009 +/- .0005, and the incidence at birth is 4 times 10(-6) by the indirect method or 7 times 10(-6) by the direct method. The frequency of heterozygotes at birth is assumed to be 0.18% (450 times the frequency of affected). Population size is approximately 10 million, and the number of founders on a unique-mutation hypothesis is estimated as about 500. All these estimates are first approximations and must be accepted with caution. Images Fig. 1 PMID:1155460

  15. Power analysis of principal components regression in genetic association studies.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yan-feng; Zhu, Jun

    2009-10-01

    Association analysis provides an opportunity to find genetic variants underlying complex traits. A principal components regression (PCR)-based approach was shown to outperform some competing approaches. However, a limitation of this method is that the principal components (PCs) selected from single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) may be unrelated to the phenotype. In this article, we investigate the theoretical properties of such a method in more detail. We first derive the exact power function of the test based on PCR, and hence clarify the relationship between the test power and the degrees of freedom (DF). Next, we extend the PCR test to a general weighted PCs test, which provides a unified framework for understanding the properties of some related statistics. We then compare the performance of these tests. We also introduce several data-driven adaptive alternatives to overcome difficulties in the PCR approach. Finally, we illustrate our results using simulations based on real genotype data. Simulation study shows the risk of using the unsupervised rule to determine the number of PCs, and demonstrates that there is no single uniformly powerful method for detecting genetic variants.

  16. Genetic analysis of peste des petits ruminants virus from Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Peste des petits ruminants (PPR) is an endemic and highly contagious disease in small ruminants of Pakistan. Despite the fact that an effective vaccine is available, outbreaks are regularly occurring in the country. Thus so far, the diagnosis has primarily been made based on clinical outcome or serology. This study was carried out to characterize PPRV from an emerging wave of outbreaks from Punjab, Pakistan. Results A total of 32 blood samples from five different flocks were tested with real-time PCR for the presence of PPRV genome. The samples detected positive in real-time PCR (n = 17) were subjected to conventional PCR for the amplification of the nucleoprotein (N) gene. Phylogenetic analysis of the sequenced N genes (n = 8) indicated the grouping of all the sequences in lineage IV along with PPRV strains from Asian and Middle East. However, interestingly sequences were divided into two groups. One group of viruses (n = 7) clustered with previously characterized Pakistani isolates whereas one strain of PPRV was distinct and clustered with Saudi Arabian and Iranian strains of PPRV. Conclusions Results demonstrated in this study expanded the information on the genetic nature of different PPRV population circulating in small ruminants. Such information is essential to understand genetic nature of PPRV strains throughout the country. Proper understanding of these viruses will help to devise control strategies in PPRV endemic countries such as Pakistan. PMID:23537146

  17. Genetic analysis of arsenic accumulation in maize using QTL mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Zhongjun; Li, Weihua; Xing, Xiaolong; Xu, Mengmeng; Liu, Xiaoyang; Li, Haochuan; Xue, Yadong; Liu, Zonghua; Tang, Jihua

    2016-02-01

    Arsenic (As) is a toxic heavy metal that can accumulate in crops and poses a threat to human health. The genetic mechanism of As accumulation is unclear. Herein, we used quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping to unravel the genetic basis of As accumulation in a maize recombinant inbred line population derived from the Chinese crossbred variety Yuyu22. The kernels had the lowest As content among the different maize tissues, followed by the axes, stems, bracts and leaves. Fourteen QTLs were identified at each location. Some of these QTLs were identified in different environments and were also detected by joint analysis. Compared with the B73 RefGen v2 reference genome, the distributions and effects of some QTLs were closely linked to those of QTLs detected in a previous study; the QTLs were likely in strong linkage disequilibrium. Our findings could be used to help maintain maize production to satisfy the demand for edible corn and to decrease the As content in As-contaminated soil through the selection and breeding of As pollution-safe cultivars.

  18. Genetic analysis of arsenic accumulation in maize using QTL mapping

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Zhongjun; Li, Weihua; Xing, Xiaolong; Xu, Mengmeng; Liu, Xiaoyang; Li, Haochuan; Xue, Yadong; Liu, Zonghua; Tang, Jihua

    2016-01-01

    Arsenic (As) is a toxic heavy metal that can accumulate in crops and poses a threat to human health. The genetic mechanism of As accumulation is unclear. Herein, we used quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping to unravel the genetic basis of As accumulation in a maize recombinant inbred line population derived from the Chinese crossbred variety Yuyu22. The kernels had the lowest As content among the different maize tissues, followed by the axes, stems, bracts and leaves. Fourteen QTLs were identified at each location. Some of these QTLs were identified in different environments and were also detected by joint analysis. Compared with the B73 RefGen v2 reference genome, the distributions and effects of some QTLs were closely linked to those of QTLs detected in a previous study; the QTLs were likely in strong linkage disequilibrium. Our findings could be used to help maintain maize production to satisfy the demand for edible corn and to decrease the As content in As-contaminated soil through the selection and breeding of As pollution-safe cultivars. PMID:26880701

  19. Genetic therapy in gliomas: historical analysis and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Mattei, Tobias Alécio; Ramina, Ricardo; Miura, Flavio Key; Aguiar, Paulo Henrique; Valiengo, Leandro da Costa

    2005-03-01

    High-grade gliomas are relatively frequent in adults, and consist of the most malignant kind of primary brain tumor. Being resistant to standard treatment modalities such as surgery, radiation, and chemotherapy, it is fatal within 1 to 2 years of onset of symptoms. Although several gene therapy systems proved to be efficient in controlling or eradicating these tumors in animal models, the clinical studies performed so far were not equally successful. Most clinical studies showed that methodologies that increase tumor infection/transduction and, consequently confer more permanent activity against the tumor, will lead to enhanced therapeutic results. Due to the promising practical clinical benefits that can be expected for the near future, an exposition to the practicing neurosurgeon about the basic issues in genetic therapy of gliomas seems convenient. Among the main topics, we shall discuss anti-tumoral mechanisms of various genes that can be transfected, the advantages and drawbacks of the different vectors utilized, the possibilities of tumor targeting by modifications in the native tropism of virus vectors, as well as the different physical methods for vector delivery to the tumors. Along with the exposition we will also review of the history of the genetic therapy for gliomas, with special focus on the main problems found during the advancement of scientific discoveries in this area. A general analysis is also made of the present state of this promising therapeutic modality, with reference to the problems that still must be solved and the new paradigms for future research in this area.

  20. Genetic Analysis of Southwestern Iranian Patients with Familial Mediterranean Fever

    PubMed Central

    Haghighat, Mahmoud; Moghtaderi, Mozhgan; Farjadian, Shirin

    2017-01-01

    Background: Familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) is an autosomal recessive genetic disorder characterized by recurrent episodes of self-limited fever and serosal tissues inflammation. Methods: To evaluate clinical symptoms and common genetic mutations in southwestern Iranian patients with FMF, 20 unrelated patients were enrolled in this study based on clinical criteria. A panel of 12 common MEFV gene mutations was tested Results: The most frequent clinical presentations of the patients were fever, colicky abdominal pain and arthritis. Eighteen patients responded completely to colchicine therapy. MEFV gene mutations were detected in only 40% of the patients. The most common mutation was E148Q, detected in five patients (25%). The V726A, M694V and P369S mutations were each observed in one patient. Conclusions: Although none of the 12 mutations we included in our test panel was detected in 60% of our patients, all of them had FMF symptoms and responded well to colchicine. MEFV full gene sequencing analysis in these patients may lead to finding new mutations in southwestern Iranian FMF patients which would be helpful in designing a local diagnostic kit. PMID:28367474

  1. Genetic analysis of arsenic accumulation in maize using QTL mapping.

    PubMed

    Fu, Zhongjun; Li, Weihua; Xing, Xiaolong; Xu, Mengmeng; Liu, Xiaoyang; Li, Haochuan; Xue, Yadong; Liu, Zonghua; Tang, Jihua

    2016-02-16

    Arsenic (As) is a toxic heavy metal that can accumulate in crops and poses a threat to human health. The genetic mechanism of As accumulation is unclear. Herein, we used quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping to unravel the genetic basis of As accumulation in a maize recombinant inbred line population derived from the Chinese crossbred variety Yuyu22. The kernels had the lowest As content among the different maize tissues, followed by the axes, stems, bracts and leaves. Fourteen QTLs were identified at each location. Some of these QTLs were identified in different environments and were also detected by joint analysis. Compared with the B73 RefGen v2 reference genome, the distributions and effects of some QTLs were closely linked to those of QTLs detected in a previous study; the QTLs were likely in strong linkage disequilibrium. Our findings could be used to help maintain maize production to satisfy the demand for edible corn and to decrease the As content in As-contaminated soil through the selection and breeding of As pollution-safe cultivars.

  2. Genetic Analysis of the Cytoplasmic Dynein Subunit Families

    PubMed Central

    Pfister, K. Kevin; Shah, Paresh R; Hummerich, Holger; Russ, Andreas; Cotton, James; Annuar, Azlina Ahmad; King, Stephen M; Fisher, Elizabeth M. C

    2006-01-01

    Cytoplasmic dyneins, the principal microtubule minus-end-directed motor proteins of the cell, are involved in many essential cellular processes. The major form of this enzyme is a complex of at least six protein subunits, and in mammals all but one of the subunits are encoded by at least two genes. Here we review current knowledge concerning the subunits, their interactions, and their functional roles as derived from biochemical and genetic analyses. We also carried out extensive database searches to look for new genes and to clarify anomalies in the databases. Our analysis documents evolutionary relationships among the dynein subunits of mammals and other model organisms, and sheds new light on the role of this diverse group of proteins, highlighting the existence of two cytoplasmic dynein complexes with distinct cellular roles. PMID:16440056

  3. Genetic Analysis of Mice Skin Exposed by Hyper-Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Rika; Terada, Masahiro; Seki, Masaya; Higashibata, Akira; Majima, Hideyuki J.; Ohira, Yoshinobu; Mukai, Chiaki; Ishioka, Noriaki

    2013-02-01

    In the space environment, physiological alterations, such as low bone density, muscle weakness and decreased immunity, are caused by microgravity and cosmic radiation. On the other hand, it is known that the leg muscles are hypertrophy by 2G-gravity. An understanding of the effects on human body from microgravity to hyper-gravity is very important. Recently, the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) has started a project to detect the changes on gene expression and mineral metabolism caused by microgravity by analyzing the hair of astronauts who stay in the international Space Station (ISS) for a long time. From these results of human hair’s research, the genetic effects of human hair roots by microgravity will become clear. However, it is unclear how the gene expression of hair roots was effected by hypergravity. Therefore, in this experiment, we analyzed the effect on mice skin contained hair roots by comparing microgravity or hypergravity exposed mice. The purpose of this experiment is to evaluate the genetic effects on mice skin by microgravity or 2G-gravity. The samples were taken from mice exposed to space flight (FL) or hypergravity environment (2G) for 3-months, respectively. The extracted and amplified RNA from these mice skin was used to DNA microarray analysis. in this experiment, we analyzed the effect of gravity by using mice skin contained hair roots, which exposed space (FL) and hyper-gravity (2G) for 3 months and each control. By DNA microarray analysis, we found the common 98 genes changed in both FL and 2G. Among these 98 genes, the functions and pathways were identified by Gene Ontology (GO) analysis and Ingenuity Pathways Analysis (IPA) software. Next, we focused the one of the identified pathways and compared the effects on each molecules in this pathways by the different environments, such as FL and 2G. As the results, we could detect some interesting molecules, which might be depended on the gravity levels. In addition, to investigate

  4. Analysis of Genetic Mosaics of the Nematode CAENORHABDITIS ELEGANS

    PubMed Central

    Herman, Robert K.

    1984-01-01

    A new method for producing genetic mosaics, which involves the spontaneous somatic loss of free chromosome fragments, is demonstrated. Four genes that affect the behavior of C. elegans were studied in mosaic animals. The analysis was greatly aided by the fact that the complete cell lineage of wild-type animals is known. Two of the mutant genes affect certain sensory responses and prevent uptake of fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) by certain sensory neurons. Mosaic analysis indicated that one of these mutant genes is cell autonomous with respect to its effect on FITC uptake and the other is cell nonautonomous. In the latter case, the genotype of a non-neuronal supporting cell that surrounds the processes of the neurons that normally take up FITC probably is critical. The other two mutant genes affect animal movement. Mosaic analysis indicated that the expression of one of these genes is specific to certain neurons (motor neurons of the ventral and dorsal nerve cords are prime candidates) and the expression of the other gene is specific to muscle cells. PMID:6434374

  5. [Genetic diversity and genetic differentiation of Rhododendron concinnum wild populations in Qinling Mountains of Northwest China: an AFLP analysis].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Bing; Xu, Man; Si, Guo-Chen; Li, Hou-Hua; Zhang, Yan-Long

    2012-11-01

    By using amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) technique, an investigation was made on the genetic diversity and genetic differentiation of seven wild populations of Rhododendron concinnum in Qinling Mountains of Northwest China. A total of 182 amplification products were generated from three AFLP selective primer combinations, of which, 151 were polymorphic. The percentage of polymorphism was 83.1%. The change trends showed by the percentage of polymorphic loci (PPL), Nei's gene diversity (h), and Shannon's information index (I) were uniform, and the order of the populations was Meixian > Zhashui > Zhen' an > Huxian > Ningqiang > Nanzheng > Zhouzhi. The POPGENE analysis showed that the R. concinnum had higher genetic diversity at both species level (PPL = 91.22%, I = 0.7217, h = 0.5095) and population level (PPL = 77.56%, I = 0.6409, h = 0.4725). The coefficient of gene differentiation among the populations (Gst) was 0.0726, indicating that 92.74% of genetic variation occurred within the populations. The analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA) showed that 85.3% of the genetic variation was within the populations, and 14.7% of it was among the populations. The unweighted pair group method with arithmeticmean (UPGMA) indicated that there was no significant correlation between the genetic distance and the geographic distance among the R. concinnum populations. The conservation strategies for R. concinnum germplasm resources were put forward.

  6. The Genetic Analysis of an Acinetobacter johnsonii Clinical Strain Evidenced the Presence of Horizontal Genetic Transfer.

    PubMed

    Montaña, Sabrina; Schramm, Sareda T J; Traglia, German Matías; Chiem, Kevin; Parmeciano Di Noto, Gisela; Almuzara, Marisa; Barberis, Claudia; Vay, Carlos; Quiroga, Cecilia; Tolmasky, Marcelo E; Iriarte, Andrés; Ramírez, María Soledad

    2016-01-01

    Acinetobacter johnsonii rarely causes human infections. While most A. johnsonii isolates are susceptible to virtually all antibiotics, strains harboring a variety of β-lactamases have recently been described. An A. johnsonii Aj2199 clinical strain recovered from a hospital in Buenos Aires produces PER-2 and OXA-58. We decided to delve into its genome by obtaining the whole genome sequence of the Aj2199 strain. Genome comparison studies on Aj2199 revealed 240 unique genes and a close relation to strain WJ10621, isolated from the urine of a patient in China. Genomic analysis showed evidence of horizontal genetic transfer (HGT) events. Forty-five insertion sequences and two intact prophages were found in addition to several resistance determinants such as blaPER-2, blaOXA-58, blaTEM-1, strA, strB, ereA, sul1, aacC2 and a new variant of blaOXA-211, called blaOXA-498. In particular, blaPER-2 and blaTEM-1 are present within the typical contexts previously described in the Enterobacteriaceae family. These results suggest that A. johnsonii actively acquires exogenous DNA from other bacterial species and concomitantly becomes a reservoir of resistance genes.

  7. The Genetic Analysis of an Acinetobacter johnsonii Clinical Strain Evidenced the Presence of Horizontal Genetic Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Montaña, Sabrina; Schramm, Sareda T. J.; Traglia, German Matías; Chiem, Kevin; Parmeciano Di Noto, Gisela; Almuzara, Marisa; Barberis, Claudia; Vay, Carlos; Quiroga, Cecilia; Tolmasky, Marcelo E.; Iriarte, Andrés; Ramírez, María Soledad

    2016-01-01

    Acinetobacter johnsonii rarely causes human infections. While most A. johnsonii isolates are susceptible to virtually all antibiotics, strains harboring a variety of β-lactamases have recently been described. An A. johnsonii Aj2199 clinical strain recovered from a hospital in Buenos Aires produces PER-2 and OXA-58. We decided to delve into its genome by obtaining the whole genome sequence of the Aj2199 strain. Genome comparison studies on Aj2199 revealed 240 unique genes and a close relation to strain WJ10621, isolated from the urine of a patient in China. Genomic analysis showed evidence of horizontal genetic transfer (HGT) events. Forty-five insertion sequences and two intact prophages were found in addition to several resistance determinants such as blaPER-2, blaOXA-58, blaTEM-1, strA, strB, ereA, sul1, aacC2 and a new variant of blaOXA-211, called blaOXA-498. In particular, blaPER-2 and blaTEM-1 are present within the typical contexts previously described in the Enterobacteriaceae family. These results suggest that A. johnsonii actively acquires exogenous DNA from other bacterial species and concomitantly becomes a reservoir of resistance genes. PMID:27548264

  8. Feature selection using genetic algorithms for fetal heart rate analysis.

    PubMed

    Xu, Liang; Redman, Christopher W G; Payne, Stephen J; Georgieva, Antoniya

    2014-07-01

    The fetal heart rate (FHR) is monitored on a paper strip (cardiotocogram) during labour to assess fetal health. If necessary, clinicians can intervene and assist with a prompt delivery of the baby. Data-driven computerized FHR analysis could help clinicians in the decision-making process. However, selecting the best computerized FHR features that relate to labour outcome is a pressing research problem. The objective of this study is to apply genetic algorithms (GA) as a feature selection method to select the best feature subset from 64 FHR features and to integrate these best features to recognize unfavourable FHR patterns. The GA was trained on 404 cases and tested on 106 cases (both balanced datasets) using three classifiers, respectively. Regularization methods and backward selection were used to optimize the GA. Reasonable classification performance is shown on the testing set for the best feature subset (Cohen's kappa values of 0.45 to 0.49 using different classifiers). This is, to our knowledge, the first time that a feature selection method for FHR analysis has been developed on a database of this size. This study indicates that different FHR features, when integrated, can show good performance in predicting labour outcome. It also gives the importance of each feature, which will be a valuable reference point for further studies.

  9. Genetic analysis of the chitinase system of Serratia marcescens 2170.

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, T; Kimura, K; Sumiya, T; Nikaidou, N; Suzuki, K; Suzuki, M; Taiyoji, M; Ferrer, S; Regue, M

    1997-01-01

    To carry out a genetic analysis of the degradation and utilization of chitin by Serratia marcescens 2170, various Tn5 insertion mutants with characteristic defects in chitinase production were isolated and partially characterized. Prior to the isolation of the mutants, proteins secreted into culture medium in the presence of chitin were analyzed. Four chitinases, A, B, C1, and C2, among other proteins, were detected in the culture supernatant of S. marcescens 2170. All four chitinases and a 21-kDa protein (CBP21) lacking chitinase activity showed chitin binding activity. Cloning and sequencing analysis of the genes encoding chitinases A and B of strain 2170 revealed extensive similarities to those of other strains of S. marcescens described previously. Tn5 insertion mutagenesis of strain 2170 was carried out, and mutants which formed altered clearing zones of colloidal chitin were selected. The obtained mutants were divided into five classes as follows: mutants with (i) no clearing zones, (ii) fuzzy clearing zones, (iii) large clearing zones, (iv) delayed clearing zones, and (v) small clearing zones. Preliminary characterization suggested that some of these mutants have defects in chitinase excretion, a negatively regulating mechanism of chitinase gene expression, an essential factor for chitinase gene expression, and a structural gene for a particular chitinase. These mutants could allow researchers to identify the genes involved in the degradation and utilization of chitin by S. marcescens 2170. PMID:9371460

  10. Genetic and Biochemical Analysis of High Iron Toxicity in Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Huilan; Li, Liangtao; Jia, Xuan; Ward, Diane McVey; Kaplan, Jerry

    2011-01-01

    Iron storage in yeast requires the activity of the vacuolar iron transporter Ccc1. Yeast with an intact CCC1 are resistant to iron toxicity, but deletion of CCC1 renders yeast susceptible to iron toxicity. We used genetic and biochemical analysis to identify suppressors of high iron toxicity in Δccc1 cells to probe the mechanism of high iron toxicity. All genes identified as suppressors of high iron toxicity in aerobically grown Δccc1 cells encode organelle iron transporters including mitochondrial iron transporters MRS3, MRS4, and RIM2. Overexpression of MRS3 suppressed high iron toxicity by decreasing cytosolic iron through mitochondrial iron accumulation. Under anaerobic conditions, Δccc1 cells were still sensitive to high iron toxicity, but overexpression of MRS3 did not suppress iron toxicity and did not result in mitochondrial iron accumulation. We conclude that Mrs3/Mrs4 can sequester iron within mitochondria under aerobic conditions but not anaerobic conditions. We show that iron toxicity in Δccc1 cells occurred under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions. Microarray analysis showed no evidence of oxidative damage under anaerobic conditions, suggesting that iron toxicity may not be solely due to oxidative damage. Deletion of TSA1, which encodes a peroxiredoxin, exacerbated iron toxicity in Δccc1 cells under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions, suggesting a unique role for Tsa1 in iron toxicity. PMID:21115478

  11. Quantitative analysis of triple-mutant genetic interactions.

    PubMed

    Braberg, Hannes; Alexander, Richard; Shales, Michael; Xu, Jiewei; Franks-Skiba, Kathleen E; Wu, Qiuqin; Haber, James E; Krogan, Nevan J

    2014-08-01

    The quantitative analysis of genetic interactions between pairs of gene mutations has proven to be effective for characterizing cellular functions, but it can miss important interactions for functionally redundant genes. To address this limitation, we have developed an approach termed triple-mutant analysis (TMA). The procedure relies on a query strain that contains two deletions in a pair of redundant or otherwise related genes, which is crossed against a panel of candidate deletion strains to isolate triple mutants and measure their growth. A central feature of TMA is to interrogate mutants that are synthetically sick when two other genes are deleted but interact minimally with either single deletion. This approach has been valuable for discovering genes that restore critical functions when the principal actors are deleted. TMA has also uncovered double-mutant combinations that produce severe defects because a third protein becomes deregulated and acts in a deleterious fashion, and it has revealed functional differences between proteins presumed to act together. The protocol is optimized for Singer ROTOR pinning robots, takes 3 weeks to complete and measures interactions for up to 30 double mutants against a library of 1,536 single mutants.

  12. Polygenic mutation in Droosophila melanogaster: Genetic analysis of selection lines

    SciTech Connect

    Fry, J.D.; deRonde, K.A.; Mackay, T.F.C.

    1995-03-01

    The authors have conducted genetic analyses of 12 long-term selection lines of Drosophila melanogaster derived from a highly inbred base population, containing new mutations affecting abdominal and sternopleural bristle number. Biometric analysis of the number of effective factors differentiating the selected lines from the base inbred indicated that with the exception of the three lines selected for increased number of abdominal bristles, three or more mutations contributed to the responses of the selection lines. Analysis of the chromosomal distribution of effects revealed that mutations affecting abdominal bristle number occurred on all three major chromosomes. In addition, Y-linked mutations with effects ranging from one to three bristles occurred in all three lines selected for decreased number of abdominal bristles, as well as in one line selected for increased abdominal bristle number. Mutations affecting sternopleural bristle number were mainly on the X and third chromosomes. One abdominal and one sternopleural selection line showed evidence of a segregating lethal with large effects on bristle number. As an indirect test for allelism of mutations occurring in different selection lines, the three lines selected in the same direction for the same trait were crossed in all possible combinations, and selection continued from the F{sub 2} hybrides. Responses of the hybrid lines usually did not exceed those of the most extreme parental lines, indicating that the responses of the parental lines may have been partly due to mutations at the same loci, although other interpretations are possible.

  13. Bivariate genomic analysis identifies a hidden locus associated with bacteria hypersensitive response in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Biao; Li, Zhuocheng; Xu, Weilin; Feng, Xiao; Wan, Qianhui; Zan, Yanjun; Sheng, Sitong; Shen, Xia

    2017-01-01

    Multi-phenotype analysis has drawn increasing attention to high-throughput genomic studies, whereas only a few applications have justified the use of multivariate techniques. We applied a recently developed multi-trait analysis method on a small set of bacteria hypersensitive response phenotypes and identified a single novel locus missed by conventional single-trait genome-wide association studies. The detected locus harbors a minor allele that elevates the risk of leaf collapse response to the injection of avrRpm1-modified Pseudomonas syringae (P = 1.66e-08). Candidate gene AT3G32930 with in the detected region and its co-expressed genes showed significantly reduced expression after P. syringae interference. Our results again emphasize that multi-trait analysis should not be neglected in association studies, as the power of specific multi-trait genotype-phenotype maps might only be tractable when jointly considering multiple phenotypes. PMID:28338080

  14. Analysis of genetic diversity in red clover (Trifolium pratense L.) breeding populations as revealed by RAPD genetic markers.

    PubMed

    Ulloa, Odeth; Ortega, Fernando; Campos, Hugo

    2003-08-01

    Red clover is an important forage legume species for temperate regions and very little is known about the genetic organization of its breeding populations. We used random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) genetic markers to address the genetic diversity and the distribution of variation in 20 breeding populations and cultivars from Chile, Argentina, Uruguay, and Switzerland. Genetic distances were calculated for all possible pairwise combinations. A high level of polymorphism was found and the proportion of polymorphic loci across populations was 74.2%. A population derived from a non-certified seedlot displayed a higher proportion of polymorphic loci than its respective certified seedlot. Gene diversity values and population genetics parameters suggest that the populations analyzed are diverse. An analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA) revealed that the largest proportion of variation (80.4%) resides at the within population level. RAPD markers are a useful tool for red clover breeding programs. A dendrogram based on genetic distances divided the breeding populations analyzed into three distinct groups. The amount and partition of diversity observed can be of value in identifying the populations that parents of synthetic cultivars are derived from and to exploit the variation available in the populations analyzed.

  15. Genetic Architecture of Atherosclerosis in Mice: A Systems Genetics Analysis of Common Inbred Strains

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, Brian J.; Davis, Richard C.; Civelek, Mete; Orozco, Luz; Wu, Judy; Qi, Hannah; Pan, Calvin; Packard, René R. Sevag; Eskin, Eleazar; Yan, Mujing; Kirchgessner, Todd; Wang, Zeneng; Li, Xinmin; Gregory, Jill C.; Hazen, Stanley L.; Gargalovic, Peter S.; Lusis, Aldons J.

    2015-01-01

    Common forms of atherosclerosis involve multiple genetic and environmental factors. While human genome-wide association studies have identified numerous loci contributing to coronary artery disease and its risk factors, these studies are unable to control environmental factors or examine detailed molecular traits in relevant tissues. We now report a study of natural variations contributing to atherosclerosis and related traits in over 100 inbred strains of mice from the Hybrid Mouse Diversity Panel (HMDP). The mice were made hyperlipidemic by transgenic expression of human apolipoprotein E-Leiden (APOE-Leiden) and human cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP). The mice were examined for lesion size and morphology as well as plasma lipid, insulin and glucose levels, and blood cell profiles. A subset of mice was studied for plasma levels of metabolites and cytokines. We also measured global transcript levels in aorta and liver. Finally, the uptake of acetylated LDL by macrophages from HMDP mice was quantitatively examined. Loci contributing to the traits were mapped using association analysis, and relationships among traits were examined using correlation and statistical modeling. A number of conclusions emerged. First, relationships among atherosclerosis and the risk factors in mice resemble those found in humans. Second, a number of trait-loci were identified, including some overlapping with previous human and mouse studies. Third, gene expression data enabled enrichment analysis of pathways contributing to atherosclerosis and prioritization of candidate genes at associated loci in both mice and humans. Fourth, the data provided a number of mechanistic inferences; for example, we detected no association between macrophage uptake of acetylated LDL and atherosclerosis. Fifth, broad sense heritability for atherosclerosis was much larger than narrow sense heritability, indicating an important role for gene-by-gene interactions. Sixth, stepwise linear regression

  16. Genetic Architecture of Atherosclerosis in Mice: A Systems Genetics Analysis of Common Inbred Strains.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Brian J; Davis, Richard C; Civelek, Mete; Orozco, Luz; Wu, Judy; Qi, Hannah; Pan, Calvin; Packard, René R Sevag; Eskin, Eleazar; Yan, Mujing; Kirchgessner, Todd; Wang, Zeneng; Li, Xinmin; Gregory, Jill C; Hazen, Stanley L; Gargalovic, Peter S; Lusis, Aldons J

    2015-12-01

    Common forms of atherosclerosis involve multiple genetic and environmental factors. While human genome-wide association studies have identified numerous loci contributing to coronary artery disease and its risk factors, these studies are unable to control environmental factors or examine detailed molecular traits in relevant tissues. We now report a study of natural variations contributing to atherosclerosis and related traits in over 100 inbred strains of mice from the Hybrid Mouse Diversity Panel (HMDP). The mice were made hyperlipidemic by transgenic expression of human apolipoprotein E-Leiden (APOE-Leiden) and human cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP). The mice were examined for lesion size and morphology as well as plasma lipid, insulin and glucose levels, and blood cell profiles. A subset of mice was studied for plasma levels of metabolites and cytokines. We also measured global transcript levels in aorta and liver. Finally, the uptake of acetylated LDL by macrophages from HMDP mice was quantitatively examined. Loci contributing to the traits were mapped using association analysis, and relationships among traits were examined using correlation and statistical modeling. A number of conclusions emerged. First, relationships among atherosclerosis and the risk factors in mice resemble those found in humans. Second, a number of trait-loci were identified, including some overlapping with previous human and mouse studies. Third, gene expression data enabled enrichment analysis of pathways contributing to atherosclerosis and prioritization of candidate genes at associated loci in both mice and humans. Fourth, the data provided a number of mechanistic inferences; for example, we detected no association between macrophage uptake of acetylated LDL and atherosclerosis. Fifth, broad sense heritability for atherosclerosis was much larger than narrow sense heritability, indicating an important role for gene-by-gene interactions. Sixth, stepwise linear regression

  17. Genetic variation analysis of the Bali street dog using microsatellites

    PubMed Central

    Irion, Dawn N; Schaffer, Alison L; Grant, Sherry; Wilton, Alan N; Pedersen, Niels C

    2005-01-01

    Background Approximately 800,000 primarily feral dogs live on the small island of Bali. To analyze the genetic diversity in this population, forty samples were collected at random from dogs in the Denpasar, Bali region and tested using 31 polymorphic microsatellites. Australian dingoes and 28 American Kennel Club breeds were compared to the Bali Street Dog (BSD) for allelic diversity, heterozygosities, F-statistics, GST estimates, Nei's DA distance and phylogenetic relationships. Results The BSD proved to be the most heterogeneous, exhibiting 239 of the 366 total alleles observed across all groups and breeds and had an observed heterozygosity of 0.692. Thirteen private alleles were observed in the BSD with an additional three alleles observed only in the BSD and the Australian dingo. The BSD was related most closely to the Chow Chow with a FST of 0.088 and also with high bootstrap support to the Australian dingo and Akita in the phylogenetic analysis. Conclusions This preliminary study into the diversity and relationship of the BSD to other domestic and feral dog populations shows the BSD to be highly heterogeneous and related to populations of East Asian origin. These results indicate that a viable and diverse population of dogs existed on the island of Bali prior to its geographic isolation approximately 12,000 years ago and has been little influenced by domesticated European dogs since that time. PMID:15701179

  18. Network-centric Analysis of Genetic Predisposition in Diabetic Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Ntemka, A; Iliadis, F; Papanikolaou, NA; Grekas, D

    2011-01-01

    Diabetic nephropathy is a serious, long-term complication of diabetes and the leading cause of end-stage renal disease throughout the world. Although this disease is progressively imposing a heavier burden on the health care system, in many aspects it remains poorly understood. In addition to environmental influences, there is abundant evidence in support of genetic susceptibility to microvascular complications of nephropathy in diabetic patients. Familial clustering of phenotypes such as end-stage renal disease, albuminuria and kidney disease have been reported in large scale population studies throughout the world demonstrating strong contribution of inherited factors. Recent genome-wide linkage scans identified several chromosomal regions that are likely to contain diabetic nephropathy susceptibility genes, and association analyses have evaluated positional candidate genes under linkage peaks. In this review we have extracted from the literature the most promising candidate genes thought to confer susceptibility to diabetic nephropathy and mapped them to affected pathways by using network-centric analysis. Several of the top susceptibility genes have been identified as network hubs and bottlenecks suggesting that they might be important agents in the onset of diabetic nephropathy. PMID:22435020

  19. Fine structure genetic analysis of a beta-globin promoter.

    PubMed

    Myers, R M; Tilly, K; Maniatis, T

    1986-05-02

    A novel procedure for saturation mutagenesis of cloned DNA was used to obtain more than 100 single base substitutions within the promoter of the mouse beta-major globin gene. The effects of these promoter substitutions on transcription were determined by transfecting the cloned mutant genes into HeLa cells on plasmids containing an SV40 transcription enhancer, and measuring the levels of correctly initiated beta-globin transcripts after 2 days. Mutations in three regions of the promoter resulted in a significant decrease in the level of transcription: (i) the CACCC box, located between -87 and -95, (ii) the CCAAT box, located between -72 and -77, and (iii) the TATA box, located between -26 and -30 relative to the start site of transcription. In contrast, two different mutations in nucleotides immediately upstream from the CCAAT box resulted in a 3- to 3.5-fold increase in transcription. With two minor exceptions, single base substitutions in all other regions of the promoter had no effect on transcription. These results precisely delineate the cis-acting sequences required for accurate and efficient initiation of beta-globin transcription, and they establish a general approach for the fine structure genetic analysis of eukaryotic regulatory sequences.

  20. Genetic analysis of teosinte for kernel composition traits in maize

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Teosinte (Zea mays ssp. parviglumis) is the wild ancestor of modern maize (Zea mays ssp. mays). Teosinte contains greater genetic diversity compared to maize inbreds and landraces, but its use is limited by insufficient genetic resources to evaluate its value. A population of teosinte near isogenic ...

  1. Analysis of Errors Made by Students Solving Genetics Problems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Costello, Sandra Judith

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the errors made by students solving genetics problems. A sample of 10 non-science undergraduate students was obtained from a private college in Northern New Jersey. The results support prior research in the area of genetics education and show that a weak understanding of the relationship of meiosis to…

  2. Analysis of Molecular Genetics Content in Spanish Secondary School Textbooks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martinez-Gracia, M. V.; Gil-Quilez, M. J.; Osada, J.

    2006-01-01

    The treatment of molecular biology in thirty-four Spanish high school biology textbooks has been analysed using a check-list made up of twenty-three items. The study showed a tendency to confuse the genetic code with genetic information. The treatment of DNA transcription, regulation of gene expression and translation were presented as masses of…

  3. Hierarchical linear modeling of longitudinal pedigree data for genetic association analysis.

    PubMed

    Tan, Qihua; B Hjelmborg, Jacob V; Thomassen, Mads; Jensen, Andreas Kryger; Christiansen, Lene; Christensen, Kaare; Zhao, Jing Hua; Kruse, Torben A

    2014-01-01

    Genetic association analysis on complex phenotypes under a longitudinal design involving pedigrees encounters the problem of correlation within pedigrees, which could affect statistical assessment of the genetic effects. Approaches have been proposed to integrate kinship correlation into the mixed-effect models to explicitly model the genetic relationship. These have proved to be an efficient way of dealing with sample clustering in pedigree data. Although current algorithms implemented in popular statistical packages are useful for adjusting relatedness in the mixed modeling of genetic effects on the mean level of a phenotype, they are not sufficiently straightforward to handle the kinship correlation on the time-dependent trajectories of a phenotype. We introduce a 2-level hierarchical linear model to separately assess the genetic associations with the mean level and the rate of change of a phenotype, integrating kinship correlation in the analysis. We apply our method to the Genetic Analysis Workshop 18 genome-wide association studies data on chromosome 3 to estimate the genetic effects on systolic blood pressure measured over time in large pedigrees. Our method identifies genetic variants associated with blood pressure with estimated inflation factors of 0.99, suggesting that our modeling of random effects efficiently handles the genetic relatedness in pedigrees. Application to simulated data captures important variants specified in the simulation. Our results show that the method is useful for genetic association studies in related samples using longitudinal design.

  4. Simulation Approach for Timing Analysis of Genetic Logic Circuits.

    PubMed

    Baig, Hasan; Madsen, Jan

    2017-02-01

    Constructing genetic logic circuits is an application of synthetic biology in which parts of the DNA of a living cell are engineered to perform a dedicated Boolean function triggered by an appropriate concentration of certain proteins or by different genetic components. These logic circuits work in a manner similar to electronic logic circuits, but they are much more stochastic and hence much harder to characterize. In this article, we introduce an approach to analyze the threshold value and timing of genetic logic circuits. We show how this approach can be used to analyze the timing behavior of single and cascaded genetic logic circuits. We further analyze the timing sensitivity of circuits by varying the degradation rates and concentrations. Our approach can be used not only to characterize the timing behavior but also to analyze the timing constraints of cascaded genetic logic circuits, a capability that we believe will be important for design automation in synthetic biology.

  5. Analysis of Plasminogen Genetic Variants in Multiple Sclerosis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Sadovnick, A. Dessa; Traboulsee, Anthony L.; Bernales, Cecily Q.; Ross, Jay P.; Forwell, Amanda L.; Yee, Irene M.; Guillot-Noel, Lena; Fontaine, Bertrand; Cournu-Rebeix, Isabelle; Alcina, Antonio; Fedetz, Maria; Izquierdo, Guillermo; Matesanz, Fuencisla; Hilven, Kelly; Dubois, Bénédicte; Goris, An; Astobiza, Ianire; Alloza, Iraide; Antigüedad, Alfredo; Vandenbroeck, Koen; Akkad, Denis A.; Aktas, Orhan; Blaschke, Paul; Buttmann, Mathias; Chan, Andrew; Epplen, Joerg T.; Gerdes, Lisa-Ann; Kroner, Antje; Kubisch, Christian; Kümpfel, Tania; Lohse, Peter; Rieckmann, Peter; Zettl, Uwe K.; Zipp, Frauke; Bertram, Lars; Lill, Christina M; Fernandez, Oscar; Urbaneja, Patricia; Leyva, Laura; Alvarez-Cermeño, Jose Carlos; Arroyo, Rafael; Garagorri, Aroa M.; García-Martínez, Angel; Villar, Luisa M.; Urcelay, Elena; Malhotra, Sunny; Montalban, Xavier; Comabella, Manuel; Berger, Thomas; Fazekas, Franz; Reindl, Markus; Schmied, Mascha C.; Zimprich, Alexander; Vilariño-Güell, Carles

    2016-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a prevalent neurological disease of complex etiology. Here, we describe the characterization of a multi-incident MS family that nominated a rare missense variant (p.G420D) in plasminogen (PLG) as a putative genetic risk factor for MS. Genotyping of PLG p.G420D (rs139071351) in 2160 MS patients, and 886 controls from Canada, identified 10 additional probands, two sporadic patients and one control with the variant. Segregation in families harboring the rs139071351 variant, identified p.G420D in 26 out of 30 family members diagnosed with MS, 14 unaffected parents, and 12 out of 30 family members not diagnosed with disease. Despite considerably reduced penetrance, linkage analysis supports cosegregation of PLG p.G420D and disease. Genotyping of PLG p.G420D in 14446 patients, and 8797 controls from Canada, France, Spain, Germany, Belgium, and Austria failed to identify significant association with disease (P = 0.117), despite an overall higher prevalence in patients (OR = 1.32; 95% CI = 0.93–1.87). To assess whether additional rare variants have an effect on MS risk, we sequenced PLG in 293 probands, and genotyped all rare variants in cases and controls. This analysis identified nine rare missense variants, and although three of them were exclusively observed in MS patients, segregation does not support pathogenicity. PLG is a plausible biological candidate for MS owing to its involvement in immune system response, blood-brain barrier permeability, and myelin degradation. Moreover, components of its activation cascade have been shown to present increased activity or expression in MS patients compared to controls; further studies are needed to clarify whether PLG is involved in MS susceptibility. PMID:27194806

  6. Two-phase analysis in consensus genetic mapping.

    PubMed

    Ronin, Y; Mester, D; Minkov, D; Belotserkovski, R; Jackson, B N; Schnable, P S; Aluru, S; Korol, A

    2012-05-01

    Numerous mapping projects conducted on different species have generated an abundance of mapping data. Consequently, many multilocus maps have been constructed using diverse mapping populations and marker sets for the same organism. The quality of maps varies broadly among populations, marker sets, and software used, necessitating efforts to integrate the mapping information and generate consensus maps. The problem of consensus genetic mapping (MCGM) is by far more challenging compared with genetic mapping based on a single dataset, which by itself is also cumbersome. The additional complications introduced by consensus analysis include inter-population differences in recombination rate and exchange distribution along chromosomes; variations in dominance of the employed markers; and use of different subsets of markers in different labs. Hence, it is necessary to handle arbitrary patterns of shared sets of markers and different level of mapping data quality. In this article, we introduce a two-phase approach for solving MCGM. In phase 1, for each dataset, multilocus ordering is performed combined with iterative jackknife resampling to evaluate the stability of marker orders. In this phase, the ordering problem is reduced to the well-known traveling salesperson problem (TSP). Namely, for each dataset, we look for order that gives minimum sum of recombination distances between adjacent markers. In phase 2, the optimal consensus order of shared markers is selected from the set of allowed orders and gives the minimal sum of total lengths of nonconflicting maps of the chromosome. This criterion may be used in different modifications to take into account the variation in quality of the original data (population size, marker quality, etc.). In the foregoing formulation, consensus mapping is considered as a specific version of TSP that can be referred to as "synchronized TSP." The conflicts detected after phase 1 are resolved using either a heuristic algorithm over the

  7. Genetic and evolutionary analysis of the Drosophila larval neuromuscular junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, Megan

    Although evolution of brains and behaviors is of fundamental biological importance, we lack comprehensive understanding of the general principles governing these processes or the specific mechanisms and molecules through which the evolutionary changes are effected. Because synapses are the basic structural and functional units of nervous systems, one way to address these problems is to dissect the genetic and molecular pathways responsible for morphological evolution of a defined synapse. I have undertaken such an analysis by examining morphology of the larval neuromuscular junction (NMJ) in wild caught D. melanogaster as well as in over 20 other species of Drosophila. Whereas variation in NMJ morphology within a species is limited, I discovered a surprisingly extensive variation among different species. Compared with evolution of other morphological traits, NMJ morphology appears to be evolving very rapidly. Moreover, my data indicate that natural selection rather than genetic drift is primarily responsible for evolution of NMJ morphology. To dissect underlying molecular mechanisms that may govern NMJ growth and evolutionary divergence, I focused on a naturally occurring variant in D. melanogaster that causes NMJ overgrowth. I discovered that the variant mapped to Mob2, a gene encoding a kinase adapter protein originally described in yeast as a member of the Mitotic Exit Network (MEN). I have subsequently examined mutations in the Drosophila orthologs of all the core components of the yeast MEN and found that all of them function as part of a common pathway that acts presynaptically to negatively regulate NMJ growth. As in the regulation of yeast cytokinesis, these components of the MEN appear to act ultimately by regulating actin dynamics during the process of bouton growth and division. These studies have thus led to the discovery of an entirely new role for the MEN---regulation of synaptic growth---that is separate from its function in cell division. This work

  8. Toward genetics-based virus taxonomy: comparative analysis of a genetics-based classification and the taxonomy of picornaviruses.

    PubMed

    Lauber, Chris; Gorbalenya, Alexander E

    2012-04-01

    Virus taxonomy has received little attention from the research community despite its broad relevance. In an accompanying paper (C. Lauber and A. E. Gorbalenya, J. Virol. 86:3890-3904, 2012), we have introduced a quantitative approach to hierarchically classify viruses of a family using pairwise evolutionary distances (PEDs) as a measure of genetic divergence. When applied to the six most conserved proteins of the Picornaviridae, it clustered 1,234 genome sequences in groups at three hierarchical levels (to which we refer as the "GENETIC classification"). In this study, we compare the GENETIC classification with the expert-based picornavirus taxonomy and outline differences in the underlying frameworks regarding the relation of virus groups and genetic diversity that represent, respectively, the structure and content of a classification. To facilitate the analysis, we introduce two novel diagrams. The first connects the genetic diversity of taxa to both the PED distribution and the phylogeny of picornaviruses. The second depicts a classification and the accommodated genetic diversity in a standardized manner. Generally, we found striking agreement between the two classifications on species and genus taxa. A few disagreements concern the species Human rhinovirus A and Human rhinovirus C and the genus Aphthovirus, which were split in the GENETIC classification. Furthermore, we propose a new supergenus level and universal, level-specific PED thresholds, not reached yet by many taxa. Since the species threshold is approached mostly by taxa with large sampling sizes and those infecting multiple hosts, it may represent an upper limit on divergence, beyond which homologous recombination in the six most conserved genes between two picornaviruses might not give viable progeny.

  9. Genetic Markers and Quantitative Genetic Variation in Medicago Truncatula (Leguminosae): A Comparative Analysis of Population Structure

    PubMed Central

    Bonnin, I.; Prosperi, J. M.; Olivieri, I.

    1996-01-01

    Two populations of the selfing annual Medicago truncatula Gaertn. (Leguminoseae), each subdivided into three subpopulations, were studied for both metric traits (quantitative characters) and genetic markers (random amplified polymorphic DNA and one morphological, single-locus marker). Hierarchical analyses of variance components show that (1) populations are more differentiated for quantitative characters than for marker loci, (2) the contribution of both within and among subpopulations components of variance to overall genetic variance of these characters is reduced as compared to markers, and (3) at the population level, within population structure is slightly but not significantly larger for markers than for quantitative traits. Under the hypothesis that most markers are neutral, such comparisons may be used to make hypotheses about the strength and heterogeneity of natural selection in the face of genetic drift and gene flow. We thus suggest that in these populations, quantitative characters are under strong divergent selection among populations, and that gene flow is restricted among populations and subpopulations. PMID:8844165

  10. Quantitative analysis of fitness and genetic interactions in yeast on a genome scale.

    PubMed

    Baryshnikova, Anastasia; Costanzo, Michael; Kim, Yungil; Ding, Huiming; Koh, Judice; Toufighi, Kiana; Youn, Ji-Young; Ou, Jiongwen; San Luis, Bryan-Joseph; Bandyopadhyay, Sunayan; Hibbs, Matthew; Hess, David; Gingras, Anne-Claude; Bader, Gary D; Troyanskaya, Olga G; Brown, Grant W; Andrews, Brenda; Boone, Charles; Myers, Chad L

    2010-12-01

    Global quantitative analysis of genetic interactions is a powerful approach for deciphering the roles of genes and mapping functional relationships among pathways. Using colony size as a proxy for fitness, we developed a method for measuring fitness-based genetic interactions from high-density arrays of yeast double mutants generated by synthetic genetic array (SGA) analysis. We identified several experimental sources of systematic variation and developed normalization strategies to obtain accurate single- and double-mutant fitness measurements, which rival the accuracy of other high-resolution studies. We applied the SGA score to examine the relationship between physical and genetic interaction networks, and we found that positive genetic interactions connect across functionally distinct protein complexes revealing a network of genetic suppression among loss-of-function alleles.

  11. Accelerating epistasis analysis in human genetics with consumer graphics hardware

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    available for other tasks. The GPU workstation containing three GPUs costs $2000 while obtaining similar performance on a Beowulf cluster requires 150 CPU cores which, including the added infrastructure and support cost of the cluster system, cost approximately $82,500. Conclusion Graphics hardware based computing provides a cost effective means to perform genetic analysis of epistasis using MDR on large datasets without the infrastructure of a computing cluster. PMID:19630950

  12. Genetic analysis of a Drosophila microtubule-associated protein

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    The 205-kD microtubule-associated protein (205K MAP) is one of the principal MAPs in Drosophila. 205K MAP is similar to the HeLa 210K/MAP4 family of MAPs since it shares the following biochemical properties: it is present in several isoforms, has a molecular mass of approximately 200 kD, and is thermostable. Furthermore, immuno-crossreactivity has been observed between mouse MAP4, HeLa 210K, and Drosophila 205K MAP. Currently, there is little information concerning the biological function of this group of nonmotor MAPs. We have used a classical genetic approach to try to identify the role of the 205K MAP in Drosophila by isolating mutations in the 205K MAP gene. An F2 lethal screen was used to acquire deficiencies of 100EF, the chromosomal location of the 205K MAP gene. Drosophila bearing a homozygous deficiency for the 205K MAP region are fully viable and show no obvious phenotype. A recently developed polymerase chain reaction screen was also used to recover five P-element insertions upstream from the 205K MAP gene. Western blot analysis has shown that these insertions result in hypomorphic mutations of the 205K MAP gene. As was seen with animals that have no 205K MAP, these mutations appear to have no phenotype. These data unambiguously demonstrate that the 205K MAP gene is inessential for development. These results also suggest that there may exist protein(s) with redundant function that can substitute for 205K MAP. PMID:1309812

  13. Genetic and genomic analysis of RNases in model cyanobacteria.

    PubMed

    Cameron, Jeffrey C; Gordon, Gina C; Pfleger, Brian F

    2015-10-01

    Cyanobacteria are diverse photosynthetic microbes with the ability to convert CO2 into useful products. However, metabolic engineering of cyanobacteria remains challenging because of the limited resources for modifying the expression of endogenous and exogenous biochemical pathways. Fine-tuned control of protein production will be critical to optimize the biological conversion of CO2 into desirable molecules. Messenger RNAs (mRNAs) are labile intermediates that play critical roles in determining the translation rate and steady-state protein concentrations in the cell. The majority of studies on mRNA turnover have focused on the model heterotrophic bacteria Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis. These studies have elucidated many RNA modifying and processing enzymes and have highlighted the differences between these Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria, respectively. In contrast, much less is known about mRNA turnover in cyanobacteria. We generated a compendium of the major ribonucleases (RNases) and provide an in-depth analysis of RNase III-like enzymes in commonly studied and diverse cyanobacteria. Furthermore, using targeted gene deletion, we genetically dissected the RNases in Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002, one of the fastest growing and industrially attractive cyanobacterial strains. We found that all three cyanobacterial homologs of RNase III and a member of the RNase II/R family are not essential under standard laboratory conditions, while homologs of RNase E/G, RNase J1/J2, PNPase, and a different member of the RNase II/R family appear to be essential for growth. This work will enhance our understanding of native control of gene expression and will facilitate the development of an RNA-based toolkit for metabolic engineering in cyanobacteria.

  14. Internal quantum efficiency analysis of solar cell by genetic algorithm

    SciTech Connect

    Xiong, Kanglin; Yang, Hui; Lu, Shulong; Zhou, Taofei; Wang, Rongxin; Qiu, Kai; Dong, Jianrong; Jiang, Desheng

    2010-11-15

    To investigate factors limiting the performance of a GaAs solar cell, genetic algorithm is employed to fit the experimentally measured internal quantum efficiency (IQE) in the full spectra range. The device parameters such as diffusion lengths and surface recombination velocities are extracted. Electron beam induced current (EBIC) is performed in the base region of the cell with obtained diffusion length agreeing with the fit result. The advantage of genetic algorithm is illustrated. (author)

  15. Genetic and Dyanmic Analysis of Murine Peak Bone Density

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-10-01

    Animal Care and Use, Human Subjects, civil Rights, Handicapped Individuals, Sex Discrimination, Scientific Fraud (Misconduct) Assurance, Delinquent ...B6CASTF2 cross served its purposes fully and will not be pursued further at this time. Biological stimulus tests show that genetic differences ...and endosteal surfaces of tibias. These data primarily reflect changes in cortical bone compartment. Genetic differences discriminating C57BL/6J from

  16. Basic principles and laboratory analysis of genetic variation.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Bosquet, Jesus; Chanock, Stephen J

    2011-01-01

    With the draft of the human genome and advances in technology, the approach toward mapping complex diseases and traits has changed. Human genetics has evolved into the study of the genome as a complex structure harbouring clues for multifaceted disease risk with the majority still unknown. The discovery of new candidate regions by genome-wide association studies (GWAS) has changed strategies for the study of genetic predisposition. More genome-wide, "agnostic" approaches, with increasing numbers of participants from high-quality epidemiological studies are for the first time replicating results in different settings. However, new-found regions (which become the new candidate "genes") require extensive follow-up and investigation of their functional significance. Understanding the true effect of genetic variability on the risk of complex diseases is paramount. The importance of designing high-quality studies to assess environmental contributions, as well as the interactions between genes and exposures, cannot be stressed enough. This chapter will address the basic issues of genetic variation, including population genetics, as well as analytical platforms and tools needed to investigate the contribution of genetics to human diseases and traits.

  17. Multivariate analysis in a genetic divergence study of Psidium guajava.

    PubMed

    Nogueira, A M; Ferreira, M F S; Guilhen, J H S; Ferreira, A

    2014-12-18

    The family Myrtaceae is widespread in the Atlantic Forest and is well-represented in the Espírito Santo State in Brazil. In the genus Psidium of this family, guava (Psidium guajava L.) is the most economically important species. Guava is widely cultivated in tropical and subtropical countries; however, the widespread cultivation of only a small number of guava tree cultivars may cause the genetic vulnerability of this crop, making the search for promising genotypes in natural populations important for breeding programs and conservation. In this study, the genetic diversity of 66 guava trees sampled in the southern region of Espírito Santo and in Caparaó, MG, Brazil were evaluated. A total of 28 morphological descriptors (11 quantitative and 17 multicategorical) and 18 microsatellite markers were used. Principal component, discriminant and cluster analyses, descriptive analyses, and genetic diversity analyses using simple sequence repeats were performed. Discrimination of accessions using molecular markers resulted in clustering of genotypes of the same origin, which was not observed using morphological data. Genetic diversity was detected between and within the localities evaluated, regardless of the methodology used. Genetic differentiation among the populations using morphological and molecular data indicated the importance of the study area for species conservation, genetic erosion estimation, and exploitation in breeding programs.

  18. Development of a Fluidigm SNP panel for genetic analysis in rainbow trout

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Although microsatellite markers have been widely used in aquaculture species for genetic analysis such as parentage assignment and genetic mapping, SNPs (single nucleotide polymorphism) are the marker of choice as they are highly abundant and are amenable for high throughput genotyping. Recently we ...

  19. A Behaviour-Genetic Analysis of Orthographic Learning, Spelling and Decoding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byrne, Brian; Coventry, William L.; Olson, Richard K.; Hulslander, Jacqueline; Wadsworth, Sally; DeFries, John C.; Corley, Robin; Willcutt, Erik G.; Samuelsson, Stefan

    2008-01-01

    As part of a longitudinal twin study of literacy and language, we conducted a behaviour-genetic analysis of orthographic learning, spelling and decoding in Grade 2 children (225 identical and 214 fraternal twin pairs) in the United States and Australia. Each variable showed significant genetic and unique environment influences. Multivariate…

  20. Genetic Analysis of Recombinant Inbred Lines For Sorghum Bicolor x Perennial S. Propinquum.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    From an annual S. bicolor x perennial S. propinquum F2 population used in early-generation genetic analysis, we have produced and describe here a recombinant inbred line (RIL) population of 161 F5 genotypes that segregates for rhizomatousness and many other traits. The genetic map of the recombinant...

  1. Genetic analysis on growth and carcass traits in Nelore cattle.

    PubMed

    Zuin, R G; Buzanskas, M E; Caetano, S L; Venturini, G C; Guidolin, D G F; Grossi, D A; Chud, T C S; Paz, C C P; Lôbo, R B; Munari, D P

    2012-07-01

    In this study, the objective was to estimate genetic parameters of body weight at 210 (BW210) and 365 (BW365) days of age in relation to rib eye area (REA), subcutaneous back fat thickness (BF) and rump fat (RF), and their respective genetic trends, in Nelore beef cattle. Estimates of genetic parameters and breeding values for the studied traits were obtained using the REML method. The direct and maternal heritability estimates were respectively: 0.25±0.02 and 0.21±0.01, for BW210, and 0.29±0.02 and 0.09±0.01, for BW365. The heritability estimates for transformed REA, BF and RF were 0.29±0.03, 0.21±0.02 and 0.23±0.03, respectively. There were genetic associations between BW210 and REA, BW365 and REA, and BF and RF, while the other correlations were low. The selection process that was conducted at the farms participating in the breeding program, taking the proposed selection index into consideration, caused genetic changes to these traits.

  2. Variogram Analysis of the Spatial Genetic Structure of Continuous Populations Using Multilocus Microsatellite Data

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Helene H.; Holderegger, Rolf; Werth, Silke; Gugerli, Felix; Hoebee, Susan E.; Scheidegger, Christoph

    2005-01-01

    A geostatistical perspective on spatial genetic structure may explain methodological issues of quantifying spatial genetic structure and suggest new approaches to addressing them. We use a variogram approach to (i) derive a spatial partitioning of molecular variance, gene diversity, and genotypic diversity for microsatellite data under the infinite allele model (IAM) and the stepwise mutation model (SMM), (ii) develop a weighting of sampling units to reflect ploidy levels or multiple sampling of genets, and (iii) show how variograms summarize the spatial genetic structure within a population under isolation-by-distance. The methods are illustrated with data from a population of the epiphytic lichen Lobaria pulmonaria, using six microsatellite markers. Variogram-based analysis not only avoids bias due to the underestimation of population variance in the presence of spatial autocorrelation, but also provides estimates of population genetic diversity and the degree and extent of spatial genetic structure accounting for autocorrelation. PMID:15654102

  3. Informed consent, participation in, and withdrawal from a population based cohort study involving genetic analysis

    PubMed Central

    Matsui, K; Kita, Y; Ueshima, H

    2005-01-01

    Design: Descriptive analyses. Setting and participants: The study evaluated two non-genetic subcohorts comprising 3166 people attending for a health checkup during 2002, and two genetic subcohorts comprising 2195 people who underwent a checkup during 2003. Main outcome measurements: Analysis endpoints were differences in participation rates between the non-genetic and genetic subcohorts, differences between providing non-extensive and extensive preliminary information, and changes in participation status between baseline and at 6 months. Results: Participation rates in the genetic subcohorts were 4·7–9·3% lower than those in the non-genetic subcohorts. The odds ratios (OR) of participation in genetic research were between 0·60 and 0·77, and the OR for withdrawal from the research was over 7·70; providing preliminary extensive information about genetic research reduced the withdrawal risks (OR 0·15 for all dependent variables) but worsened participation rates (OR 0·63–0·74). Conclusions: The general population responded sceptically towards genetic research. It is crucial that genetic researchers utilise an informative and educational consent process worthy of public trust. PMID:15994356

  4. Genetic and environmental influences on impulsivity: A meta-analysis of twin, family and adoption studies

    PubMed Central

    Bezdjian, Serena; Baker, Laura A.; Tuvblad, Catherine

    2011-01-01

    A meta-analysis of twin, family and adoption studies was conducted to estimate the magnitude of genetic and environmental influences on impulsivity. The best fitting model for 41 key studies (58 independent samples from 14 month old infants to adults; N = 27,147) included equal proportions of variance due to genetic (0.50) and non-shared environmental (0.50) influences, with genetic effects being both additive (0.38) and non-additive (0.12). Shared environmental effects were unimportant in explaining individual differences in impulsivity. Age, sex, and study design (twin vs. adoption) were all significant moderators of the magnitude of genetic and environmental influences on impulsivity. The relative contribution of genetic effects (broad sense heritability) and unique environmental effects were also found to be important throughout development from childhood to adulthood. Total genetic effects were found to be important for all ages, but appeared to be strongest in children. Analyses also demonstrated that genetic effects appeared to be stronger in males than in females. Method of assessment (laboratory tasks vs. questionnaires), however, was not a significant moderator of the genetic and environmental influences on impulsivity. These results provide a structured synthesis of existing behavior genetic studies on impulsivity by providing a clearer understanding of the relative genetic and environmental contributions in impulsive traits through various stages of development. PMID:21889436

  5. Genetically encoded optical indicators for the analysis of neuronal circuits.

    PubMed

    Knöpfel, Thomas

    2012-10-01

    In a departure from previous top-down or bottom-up strategies used to understand neuronal circuits, many forward-looking research programs now place the circuit itself at their centre. This has led to an emphasis on the dissection and elucidation of neuronal circuit elements and mechanisms, and on studies that ask how these circuits generate behavioural outputs. This movement towards circuit-centric strategies is progressing rapidly as a result of technological advances that combine genetic manipulation with light-based methods. The core tools of these new approaches are genetically encoded optical indicators and actuators that enable non-destructive interrogation and manipulation of neuronal circuits in behaving animals with cellular-level precision. This Review examines genetically encoded reporters of neuronal function and assesses their value for circuit-oriented neuroscientific investigations.

  6. The genetic analysis of tolerance to infections: a review

    PubMed Central

    Kause, Antti; Ødegård, Jørgen

    2012-01-01

    Tolerance to infections is defined as the ability of a host to limit the impact of a given pathogen burden on host performance. Uncoupling resistance and tolerance is a challenge, and there is a need to be able to separate them using specific trait recording or statistical methods. We present three statistical methods that can be used to investigate genetics of tolerance-related traits. Firstly, using random regressions, tolerance can be analyzed as a reaction norm slope in which host performance (y-axis) is regressed against an increasing pathogen burden (x-axis). Genetic variance in tolerance slopes is the genetic variance for tolerance. Variation in tolerance can induce genotype re-ranking and changes in genetic and phenotypic variation in host performance along the pathogen burden trajectory, contributing to environment-dependent genetic responses to selection. Such genotype-by-environment interactions can be quantified by combining random regressions and covariance functions. To apply random regressions, pathogen burden of individuals needs to be recorded. Secondly, when pathogen burden is not recorded, the cure model for time-until-death data allows separating two traits, susceptibility and endurance. Susceptibility is whether or not an individual was susceptible to an infection, whereas endurance denotes how long time it took until the infection killed a susceptible animal (influenced by tolerance). Thirdly, the normal mixture model can be used to classify continuously distributed host performance, such as growth rate, into different sub-classes (e.g., non-infected and infected), which allows estimation of host performance reduction specific to infected individuals. Moreover, genetics of host performance can be analyzed separately in healthy and affected animals, even in the absence of pathogen burden and survival data. These methods provide novel tools to increase our understanding on the impact of parasites, pathogens, and production diseases on host

  7. Genome-wide genetic diversity, population structure and admixture analysis in African and Asian cattle breeds.

    PubMed

    Edea, Z; Bhuiyan, M S A; Dessie, T; Rothschild, M F; Dadi, H; Kim, K S

    2015-02-01

    Knowledge about genetic diversity and population structure is useful for designing effective strategies to improve the production, management and conservation of farm animal genetic resources. Here, we present a comprehensive genome-wide analysis of genetic diversity, population structure and admixture based on 244 animals sampled from 10 cattle populations in Asia and Africa and genotyped for 69,903 autosomal single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) mainly derived from the indicine breed. Principal component analysis, STRUCTURE and distance analysis from high-density SNP data clearly revealed that the largest genetic difference occurred between the two domestic lineages (taurine and indicine), whereas Ethiopian cattle populations represent a mosaic of the humped zebu and taurine. Estimation of the genetic influence of zebu and taurine revealed that Ethiopian cattle were characterized by considerable levels of introgression from South Asian zebu, whereas Bangladeshi populations shared very low taurine ancestry. The relationships among Ethiopian cattle populations reflect their history of origin and admixture rather than phenotype-based distinctions. The high within-individual genetic variability observed in Ethiopian cattle represents an untapped opportunity for adaptation to changing environments and for implementation of within-breed genetic improvement schemes. Our results provide a basis for future applications of genome-wide SNP data to exploit the unique genetic makeup of indigenous cattle breeds and to facilitate their improvement and conservation.

  8. Genetic relatedness analysis: modern data and new challenges.

    PubMed

    Weir, Bruce S; Anderson, Amy D; Hepler, Amanda B

    2006-10-01

    Individuals who belong to the same family or the same population are related because of their shared ancestry. Population and quantitative genetics theory is built with parameters that describe relatedness, and the estimation of these parameters from genetic markers enables progress in fields as disparate as plant breeding, human disease gene mapping and forensic science. The large number of multiallelic microsatellite loci and biallelic SNPs that are now available have markedly increased the precision with which relationships can be estimated, although they have also revealed unexpected levels of genomic heterogeneity of relationship measures.

  9. K-mer natural vector and its application to the phylogenetic analysis of genetic sequences

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Jia; Chan, Raymond H.; Yau, Shek-Chung; He, Rong L.; Yau, Stephen S. T.

    2014-01-01

    Based on the well-known k-mer model, we propose a k-mer natural vector model for representing a genetic sequence based on the numbers and distributions of k-mers in the sequence. We show that there exists a one-to-one correspondence between a genetic sequence and its associated k-mer natural vector. The k-mer natural vector method can be easily and quickly used to perform phylogenetic analysis of genetic sequences without requiring evolutionary models or human intervention. Whole or partial genomes can be handled more effective with our proposed method. It is applied to the phylogenetic analysis of genetic sequences, and the obtaining results fully demonstrate that the k-mer natural vector method is a very powerful tool for analysing and annotating genetic sequences and determining evolutionary relationships both in terms of accuracy and efficiency. PMID:24858075

  10. Genetic analysis of Trichinella populations by 'cold' single-strand conformation polymorphism analysis.

    PubMed

    Gasser, Robin B; Hu, Min; El-Osta, Youssef Abs; Zarlenga, Dante S; Pozio, Edoardo

    2005-09-05

    A non-isotopic single-strand conformation polymorphism ('cold' SSCP) technique has been assessed for the analysis of sequence variability in the expansion segment 5 (ES5) of domain IV and the D3 domain of nuclear ribosomal DNA within and/or among isolates and individual muscle (first-stage) larvae representing all currently recognized species/genotypes of Trichinella. Data are consistent with the ability of cold SSCP to identify intra-specific as well as inter-specific variability among Trichinella genotypes. The cold SSCP approach should be applicable to a range of other genetic markers for comparative studies of Trichinella populations globally.

  11. Genetic and biochemical analysis of solvent formation in Clostridium acetobutylicum

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, G.N.; Rudolph, F.B.

    1998-05-01

    The anaerobic organism Clostridium acetobutylicum has been used for commercial production of important organic solvents due to its ability to convert a wide variety of crude substrates to acids and alcohols. Current knowledge concerning the molecular genetics, cell regulation and metabolic engineering of this organism is still rather limited. The objectives are to improve the knowledge of the molecular genetics and enzymology of Clostridia in order to make genetic alterations which will more effectively channel cell metabolism toward production of desired products. Two factors that limit butanol production in continuous cultures are: (1) The degeneration of the culture, with an increase in the proportion of cells which are incapable of solvent production. Currently isolated degenerate strains are being evaluated to analyze the molecular mechanism of degeneration to determine if it is due to a genetic loss of solvent related genes, loss of a regulatory element, or an increase in general mutagenesis. Recent studies show two general types of degenerates, one which seems to have lost essential solvent pathway genes and another which has not completely lost all solvent production capability and retains the DNA bearing solvent pathway genes. (2) The production of hydrogen which uses up reducing equivalents in the cell. If the reducing power were more fully directed to the reduction reactions involved in butanol production, the process would be more efficient. The authors have studied oxidation reduction systems related to this process. These studies focus on ferredoxin and rubredoxin and their oxidoreductases.

  12. Understanding Genetics: Analysis of Secondary Students' Conceptual Status

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsui, Chi-Yan; Treagust, David F.

    2007-01-01

    This article explores the conceptual change of students in Grades 10 and 12 in three Australian senior high schools when the teachers included computer multimedia to a greater or lesser extent in their teaching of a genetics course. The study, underpinned by a multidimensional conceptual-change framework, used an interpretive approach and a…

  13. Genome-wide analysis highlights genetic dilution in Algerian sheep.

    PubMed

    Gaouar, S B S; Lafri, M; Djaout, A; El-Bouyahiaoui, R; Bouri, A; Bouchatal, A; Maftah, A; Ciani, E; Da Silva, A B

    2017-03-01

    Algeria represents a reservoir of genetic diversity with local sheep breeds adapted to a large range of environments and showing specific features necessary to deal with harsh conditions. This remarkable diversity results from the traditional management of dryland by pastoralists over centuries. Most of these breeds are poorly productive, and the economic pressure leads farmers to realize anarchic cross-breeding (that is, not carried out in the framework of selection plans) with the hope to increase animal's conformation. In this study, eight of the nine local Algerian sheep breeds (D'men, Hamra, Ouled-Djellal, Rembi, Sidaoun, Tazegzawt, Berber and Barbarine) were investigated for the first time by genome-wide single-nucleotide polymorphism genotyping. At an international scale, Algerian sheep occupied an original position shaped by relations with African and European (particularly Italian) breeds. The strong genetic proximity with Caribbean and Brazilian breeds confirmed that the genetic make-up of these American breeds was largely influenced by the Atlantic slave trade. At a national scale, an alarming genetic dilution of the Berber (a primitive breed) and the Rembi was observed, as a consequence of uncontrolled mating practices with Ouled-Djellal. A similar, though less pronounced, phenomenon was also detected for the Barbarine, another ancestral breed. Genetic originality appeared to be better preserved in Tazegzawt, Hamra, D'men and Sidaoun. These breeds should be given high priority in the establishment of conservation plans to halt their progressive loss. For Berber and Barbarine that also occur in the bordering neighbor countries, urgent concerted transnational actions are needed.

  14. Large, Prospective Analysis of the Reasons Patients Do Not Pursue BRCA Genetic Testing Following Genetic Counseling.

    PubMed

    Hayden, Sommer; Mange, Sarah; Duquette, Debra; Petrucelli, Nancie; Raymond, Victoria M

    2017-01-16

    Genetic counseling (GC) and genetic testing (GT) identifies high-risk individuals who benefit from enhanced medical management. Not all individuals undergo GT following GC and understanding the reasons why can impact clinical efficiency, reduce GT costs through appropriate identification of high-risk individuals, and demonstrate the value of pre-GT GC. A collaborative project sponsored by the Michigan Department of Health and Human Services prospectively collects anonymous data on BRCA-related GC visits performed by providers in Michigan, including demographics, patient/family cancer history, GT results, and reasons for declining GT. From 2008 to 2012, 10,726 patients underwent GC; 3476 (32.4%) did not pursue GT. Primary reasons included: not the best test candidate (28.1%), not clinically indicated (23.3%), and insurance/out of pocket cost concerns (13.6%). Patient disinterest was the primary reason for declining in 17.1%. Insurance/out of pocket cost concerns were the primary reason for not testing in 13.4% of untested individuals with private insurance. Among untested individuals with breast and/or ovarian cancer, 22.5% reported insurance/out of pocket cost concerns as the primary reason for not testing and 6.6% failed to meet Medicare criteria. In a five-year time period, nearly one-third of patients who underwent BRCA GC did not pursue GT. GT was not indicated in almost half of patients. Insurance/out of pocket cost concerns continue to be barriers.

  15. Genetic analysis of 12 unrelated CADASIL families: Demonstration of genetic homogeneity: Physical mapping of the gene

    SciTech Connect

    Tournier-Lasserve, E.; Nibbio, A.; Vahedi, K.

    1994-09-01

    CADASIL is the acronym (Cerebral Autosomal Dominant Arteriopathy with Subcortical Ischemic Strokes and Leukoencephalopathy) designating a recently identified mendelian cerebral arteriopathy characterized by the recurrence of ischemic sensory and motor deficits leading to a progressive subcortical dementia. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain shows extensive areas of increased signal in the hemispheric white matter. We recently mapped the CADASIL locus in 2 large families on chromosome 19 in a 14 cM interval bracketed by D19S221 and D19S215{sup *}. Forty additional families have been collected. Twelve of them including more than 200 members have already been genotyped with a set of 10 highly polymorphic markers located between D19S221 and D19S215. All families are significantly linked to chromosome 19 demonstrating genetic homogeneity. Combined lod scores for several of these markers are above 30. The size of the mapping interval has been reduced to 2 cM. Genetic testing for presymptomatic individuals is now possible with respect to all ethical rules in this severe condition. Lastly, physical mapping of the affected gene has been started and data will be presented at the meeting.

  16. Great bustard population structure in central Spain: concordant results from genetic analysis and dispersal study.

    PubMed

    Martín, Carlos A; Alonso, Juan C; Alonso, Javier; Pitra, Christian; Lieckfeldt, Dietmar

    2002-01-22

    We found significant sex differences in the mtDNA genetic structure and dispersal patterns of great bustards in a population of 11 breeding groups, "leks", in central Spain. The analysis of genetic distances showed that the female population was divided into three groups of leks separated by ca. 50 km, whereas male haplotypes were randomly distributed among leks. Genetic distances among pairs of leks were positively correlated with geographical distances in females but not in males. While female haplotype distributions were homogeneous among leks at close distances, differences in male genetic structure were highly variable even between two close leks. These results from genetic analyses were concordant with those from a radiotracking study on natal dispersal. Natal dispersal distances were higher in males than in females. Also, the frequency of movement of a female between two leks was positively correlated with their genetic affinity and geographical proximity. In males, the frequency of movement was correlated with geographical proximity but not with genetic affinity. Males dispersed among genetically unrelated leks, contributing to keep nuclear genetic diversity in the population, whereas females tended to be philopatric. These results suggest that isolation-by-distance influences the distribution of maternal lineages at a regional level.

  17. Engineering and Functional Analysis of Mitotic Kinases Through Chemical Genetics.

    PubMed

    Jones, Mathew J K; Jallepalli, Prasad V

    2016-01-01

    During mitosis, multiple protein kinases transform the cytoskeleton and chromosomes into new and highly dynamic structures that mediate the faithful transmission of genetic information and cell division. However, the large number and strong conservation of mammalian kinases in general pose significant obstacles to interrogating them with small molecules, due to the difficulty in identifying and validating those which are truly selective. To overcome this problem, a steric complementation strategy has been developed, in which a bulky "gatekeeper" residue within the active site of the kinase of interest is replaced with a smaller amino acid, such as glycine or alanine. The enlarged catalytic pocket can then be targeted in an allele-specific manner with bulky purine analogs. This strategy provides a general framework for dissecting kinase function with high selectivity, rapid kinetics, and reversibility. In this chapter we discuss the principles and techniques needed to implement this chemical genetic approach in mammalian cells.

  18. Initial genetic analysis of Xylella fastidiosa in Texas.

    PubMed

    Morano, Lisa D; Bextine, Blake R; Garcia, Dennis A; Maddox, Shermel V; Gunawan, Stanley; Vitovsky, Natalie J; Black, Mark C

    2008-04-01

    Xylella fastidiosa is the causative agent of Pierce's Disease of grape. No published record of X. fastidiosa genetics in Texas exists despite growing financial risk to the U.S. grape industry, a Texas population of the glassy-winged sharpshooter insect vector (Homalodisca vitripennis) now spreading in California, and evidence that the bacterium is ubiquitous to southern states. Using sequences of conserved gyrB and mopB genes, we have established at least two strains in Texas, grape strain and ragweed strain, corresponding genetically with subsp. piercei and multiplex, respectively. The grape strain in Texas is found in Vitis vinifera varieties, hybrid vines, and wild Vitis near vineyards, whereas the ragweed strain in Texas is found in annuals, shrubs, and trees near vineyards or other areas. RFLP and QRT PCR techniques were used to differentiate grape and ragweed strains with greater efficiency than sequencing and are practical for screening numerous X. fastidiosa isolates for clade identity.

  19. Genetic variability of Lizard canary breed inferred from pedigree analysis.

    PubMed

    Cecchi, Francesca; Ciampolini, Roberta; Giacalone, Gianluca; Paci, Gisella

    2014-09-01

    The genealogical data of 471 (whole population: WP) Lizard canaries of an Italian breeder were analyzed to evaluate the genetic variability of the breed. The reference population (RP) comprised 346 living reproductive birds. Average generation interval was 1.61 ± 0.718 for males and 1.72 ± 0.863 for females. The average value of inbreeding (F) and relatedness (AR) in the RP were 15.83% and 22.63%, while the average increase in inbreeding was estimated to be 6.71% per generation (effective population size = 7.49). The results showed the need to reduce the level of inbreeding which would result in significant loss of genetic variation and in significant inbreeding depression.

  20. Genetic information analysis of bacteriophage phiX 174.

    PubMed

    Figueroa, R; Sepúleda, A; Soto, M A; Tohá, J

    1977-01-01

    The genetic information of phix 174 genome (genes and intermediate segments) is analyzed in terms of its independent (D1 index) and dependent information (D2 and D3 Markovian indexes), as well as of its ability to generate secondary structure. Genes B and E, enclosed in A and D respectively, have: 1) values of D1 and D3 indexes closer to the theoretical random distribution curves than those of (A-B) and (D-E) gene fractions, and 2) in the ability for secondary structure generation minor differences with genes A and D. F leads to G and mRNA start leads to A intermediate segments differ from randomness in their D1 and D2 indexes, but not so much in the D3 values. All these data point out the use of code degeneracy for increasing the genetic information density of the virus.

  1. Genetic analysis in neurology: the next 10 years.

    PubMed

    Pittman, Alan; Hardy, John

    2013-06-01

    In recent years, neurogenetics research had made some remarkable advances owing to the advent of genotyping arrays and next-generation sequencing. These improvements to the technology have allowed us to determine the whole-genome structure and its variation and to examine its effect on phenotype in an unprecedented manner. The identification of rare disease-causing mutations has led to the identification of new biochemical pathways and has facilitated a greater understanding of the etiology of many neurological diseases. Furthermore, genome-wide association studies have provided information on how common genetic variability impacts on the risk for the development of various complex neurological diseases. Herein, we review how these technological advances have changed the approaches being used to study the genetic basis of neurological disease and how the research findings will be translated into clinical utility.

  2. [Genetic analysis of life-style related diseases].

    PubMed

    Nagai, Tokihisa; Miki, Tetsuro

    2005-03-01

    In our country to which the aging society was invited, life-style related diseases, such as cancer, ischemic cardiac disease, apoplexy, and diabetes, are increasing. These life-style related diseases are multi-factor diseases. And genetic factors, environmental factors, and aging factors are concerned. This genetic factors are prescribed by gene polymorphism between individuals. The method of identifying these gene polymorphism has two kinds, microsatellite and single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP). If the relation of life-style related diseases and gene polymorphism will be solved from now on, realization of patient-tailored treatment according to the individual, extension of healthy life expectancy, improvement in quality of life, and decrease of medical expenses are expected.

  3. Microsatellite analysis of genetic relationships between wild and cultivated melons in Northwest and Central China.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jianbin; Wang, Panqiao; Li, Qiong; Su, Yan

    2014-12-01

    The genetic relationships between the wild and cultivated melon accessions from Northwest and Central China were dissected using 22 microsatellite markers. A total of 153 alleles, a high level of expected heterozygosity (0.669), and a low observed heterozygosity (0.156) were detected in the total panel. Differences on the allelic composition and heterozygosity levels were found between the two accession types and the wild accessions revealed a higher level of genetic diversity. The UPGMA analysis of the total panel showed that (a) most wild accessions from Northwest China were clustered independently from the cultivated accessions, and (b) the wild and cultivated accessions from Central China presented a high genetic closeness and showed a divergence from those of Northwest China. Similar positioning of the most accessions was observed with the principal coordinate analysis and STRUCTURE analysis. Pairwise FST and Nei's genetic distance quantified the genetic differentiation among the different accession types and further verified our findings. We concluded that the wild melons from Northwest China have a distinctive genetic background and could be the true wild forms, while the wild melons from Central China showed a close relationship to the local cultivars and could be a return from the cultivated melons in the same region. Our results offer an insight into the genetic resources of the main melon producing regions in China, which is essential for maximizing utilization of the traits of interest in wild melons.

  4. Genetic Analysis of Histamine Signaling in Larval Zebrafish Sleep

    PubMed Central

    Oikonomou, Grigorios

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Pharmacological studies in mammals and zebrafish suggest that histamine plays an important role in promoting arousal. However, genetic studies using rodents with disrupted histamine synthesis or signaling have revealed only subtle or no sleep/wake phenotypes. Studies of histamine function in mammalian arousal are complicated by its production in cells of the immune system and its roles in humoral and cellular immunity, which can have profound effects on sleep/wake states. To avoid this potential confound, we used genetics to explore the role of histamine in regulating sleep in zebrafish, a diurnal vertebrate in which histamine production is restricted to neurons in the brain. Similar to rodent genetic studies, we found that zebrafish that lack histamine due to mutation of histidine decarboxylase (hdc) exhibit largely normal sleep/wake behaviors. Zebrafish containing predicted null mutations in several histamine receptors also lack robust sleep/wake phenotypes, although we are unable to verify that these mutants are completely nonfunctional. Consistent with some rodent studies, we found that arousal induced by overexpression of the neuropeptide hypocretin (Hcrt) or by stimulation of hcrt-expressing neurons is not blocked in hdc or hrh1 mutants. We also found that the number of hcrt-expressing or histaminergic neurons is unaffected in animals that lack histamine or Hcrt signaling, respectively. Thus, while acute pharmacological manipulation of histamine signaling has been shown to have profound effects on zebrafish and mammalian sleep, our results suggest that chronic loss of histamine signaling due to genetic mutations has only subtle effects on sleep in zebrafish, similar to rodents. PMID:28275716

  5. Genetic Analysis of Daily Activity in Humans and Mice

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    of the technical developments that have made such genetic dissections a productive force in the mouse , have, when combined with innovations in...and Mice AFOSR grant F49620-97-1-0321 Joseph S. Takahashi Dept. of Neurobiology & Physiology Northwestern University 2153 North Campus Dr. Evanston...Activity in Humans and Mice Unclassified 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Takahashi, Joseph S. ; 5f. WORK

  6. Bioinformatics analysis and genetic diversity of the poliovirus.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yanhan; Ma, Tengfei; Liu, Jianzhu; Zhao, Xiaona; Cheng, Ziqiang; Guo, Huijun; Wang, Shujing; Xu, Ruixue

    2014-12-01

    Poliomyelitis, a disease which can manifest as muscle paralysis, is caused by the poliovirus, which is a human enterovirus and member of the family Picornaviridae that usually transmits by the faecal-oral route. The viruses of the OPV (oral poliovirus attenuated-live vaccine) strains can mutate in the human intestine during replication and some of these mutations can lead to the recovery of serious neurovirulence. Informatics research of the poliovirus genome can be used to explain further the characteristics of this virus. In this study, sequences from 100 poliovirus isolates were acquired from GenBank. To determine the evolutionary relationship between the strains, we compared and analysed the sequences of the complete poliovirus genome and the VP1 region. The reconstructed phylogenetic trees for the complete sequences and the VP1 sequences were both divided into two branches, indicating that the genetic relationships of the whole poliovirus genome and the VP1 sequences are very similar. This branching indicates that the virulence and pathogenicity of poliomyelitis may be associated with the VP1 region. Sequence alignment of the VP1 region revealed numerous mutation sites in which mutation rates of >30 % were detected. In a group of strains recorded in the USA, mutation sites and mutation types were the same and this may be associated with their distribution in the evolutionary tree and their genetic relationship. In conclusion, the genetic evolutionary relationships of poliovirus isolate sequences are determined to a great extent by the VP1 protein, and poliovirus strains located on the same branch of the phylogenetic tree contain the same mutation spots and mutation types. Hence, the genetic characteristics of the VP1 region in the poliovirus genome should be analysed to identify the transmission route of poliovirus and provide the basis of viral immunity development.

  7. Integrative Lifecourse and Genetic Analysis of Military Working Dogs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    not only the presence or absence of the binary A or B alleles at each marker , but also the signal intensity of the marker and the ratio of the two...put through the IUT compound hypothesis: i) for each subset of an IUT group, which genetic markers have statistically significant frequency...differences in cases and controls, ii) keep only the markers that are significant in all subsets of an IUT (thus not requiring multiple testing correction

  8. Genetic analysis of wheat domestication and evolution under domestication.

    PubMed

    Peleg, Zvi; Fahima, Tzion; Korol, Abraham B; Abbo, Shahal; Saranga, Yehoshua

    2011-10-01

    Wheat is undoubtedly one of the world's major food sources since the dawn of Near Eastern agriculture and up to the present day. Morphological, physiological, and genetic modifications involved in domestication and subsequent evolution under domestication were investigated in a tetraploid recombinant inbred line population, derived from a cross between durum wheat and its immediate progenitor wild emmer wheat. Experimental data were used to test previous assumptions regarding a protracted domestication process. The brittle rachis (Br) spike, thought to be a primary characteristic of domestication, was mapped to chromosome 2A as a single gene, suggesting, in light of previously reported Br loci (homoeologous group 3), a complex genetic model involved in spike brittleness. Twenty-seven quantitative trait loci (QTLs) conferring threshability and yield components (kernel size and number of kernels per spike) were mapped. The large number of QTLs detected in this and other studies suggests that following domestication, wheat evolutionary processes involved many genomic changes. The Br gene did not show either genetic (co-localization with QTLs) or phenotypic association with threshability or yield components, suggesting independence of the respective loci. It is argued here that changes in spike threshability and agronomic traits (e.g. yield and its components) are the outcome of plant evolution under domestication, rather than the result of a protracted domestication process. Revealing the genomic basis of wheat domestication and evolution under domestication, and clarifying their inter-relationships, will improve our understanding of wheat biology and contribute to further crop improvement.

  9. Genetic Analysis of the Henry Mountains Bison Herd.

    PubMed

    Ranglack, Dustin H; Dobson, Lauren K; du Toit, Johan T; Derr, James

    2015-01-01

    Wild American plains bison (Bison bison) populations virtually disappeared in the late 1800s, with some remnant animals retained in what would become Yellowstone National Park and on private ranches. Some of these private bison were intentionally crossbred with cattle for commercial purposes. This forced hybridization resulted in both mitochondrial and nuclear introgression of cattle genes into some of the extant bison genome. As the private populations grew, excess animals, along with their history of cattle genetics, provided founders for newly established public bison populations. Of the US public bison herds, only those in Yellowstone and Wind Cave National Parks (YNP and WCNP) appear to be free of detectable levels of cattle introgression. However, a small free-ranging population (~350 animals) exists on public land, along with domestic cattle, in the Henry Mountains (HM) of southern Utah. This isolated bison herd originated from a founder group translocated from YNP in the 1940s. Using genetic samples from 129 individuals, we examined the genetic status of the HM population and found no evidence of mitochondrial or nuclear introgression of cattle genes. This new information confirms it is highly unlikely for free-living bison to crossbreed with cattle, and this disease-free HM bison herd is valuable for the long-term conservation of the species. This bison herd is a subpopulation of the YNP/WCNP/HM metapopulation, within which it can contribute significantly to national efforts to restore the American plains bison to more of its native range.

  10. Genetic analysis of female gametophyte development and function.

    PubMed Central

    Drews, G N; Lee, D; Christensen, C A

    1998-01-01

    The female gametophyte is an absolutely essential structure for angiosperm reproduction. It produces the egg cell and central cell (which give rise to the embryo and endosperm, respectively) and mediates several reproductive processes including pollen tube guidance, fertilization, the induction of seed development, and perhaps also maternal control of embryo development. Although much has been learned about these processes at the cytological level, specific molecules mediating and controlling megagametogenesis and female gametophyte function have not been identified. A genetic approach to the identification of such molecules has been initiated in Arabidopsis and maize. Although genetic analyses are still in their infancy, mutations affecting female gametophyte function and specific steps of megagametogenesis have already been identified. Large-scale genetic screens aimed at identifying mutants affecting every step of megagametogenesis and female gametophyte function are in progress; the characterization of genes identified in these screens should go a long way toward defining the molecules that are required for female gametophyte development and function. PMID:9477569

  11. Functional and genetic analysis of choroid plexus development in zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Henson, Hannah E.; Parupalli, Chaithanyarani; Ju, Bensheng; Taylor, Michael R.

    2014-01-01

    The choroid plexus, an epithelial-based structure localized in the brain ventricle, is the major component of the blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier. The choroid plexus produces the cerebrospinal fluid and regulates the components of the cerebrospinal fluid. Abnormal choroid plexus function is associated with neurodegenerative diseases, tumor formation in the choroid plexus epithelium, and hydrocephaly. In this study, we used zebrafish (Danio rerio) as a model system to understand the genetic components of choroid plexus development. We generated an enhancer trap line, Et(cp:EGFP)sj2, that expresses enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) in the choroid plexus epithelium. Using immunohistochemistry and fluorescent tracers, we demonstrated that the zebrafish choroid plexus possesses brain barrier properties such as tight junctions and transporter activity. Thus, we have established zebrafish as a functionally relevant model to study choroid plexus development. Using an unbiased approach, we performed a forward genetic dissection of the choroid plexus to identify genes essential for its formation and function. Using Et(cp:EGFP)sj2, we isolated 10 recessive mutant lines with choroid plexus abnormalities, which were grouped into five classes based on GFP intensity, epithelial localization, and overall choroid plexus morphology. We also mapped the mutation for two mutant lines to chromosomes 4 and 21, respectively. The mutants generated in this study can be used to elucidate specific genes and signaling pathways essential for choroid plexus development, function, and/or maintenance and will provide important insights into how these genetic mutations contribute to disease. PMID:25426018

  12. Haplotype sharing analysis with SNPs in candidate genes: the Genetic Analysis Workshop 12 example.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Christine; Beckmann, Lars; Majoram, Paul; te Meerman, Gerard; Chang-Claude, Jenny

    2003-01-01

    Haplotype sharing analysis was used to investigate the association of affection status with single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) haplotypes within candidate gene 1 in one sample each from the isolated and the general population of Genetic Analysis Workshop (GAW) 12 simulated data. Gene 1 has direct influence on affection and harbors more than 70 SNPs. Haplotype sharing analysis depends heavily on previous haplotype estimation. Using GENEHUNTER haplotypes, strong evidence was found for most SNPs in the isolated population sample, thus providing evidence for an involvement of this gene, but the maximum -log(10)(p) values for the haplotype sharing statistics (HSS) test statistic did not correspond to the location of the true variant in either population. In comparison, transmission disequilibrium test (TDT) analysis showed the strongest results at the disease-causing variant in both populations, and these were outstanding in the general population. In this example, TDT analysis appears to perform better than HSS in identifying the disease-causing variant, using SNPs within a candidate gene in an outbred population. Simulations showed that the performance of HSS is hampered by closely spaced SNPs in strong linkage disequilibrium with the functional variant and by ambiguous haplotypes.

  13. Analysis of the genetic diversity of Candida isolates obtained from diabetic patients and kidney transplant recipients

    PubMed Central

    Benedetti, Volmir Pitt; Savi, Daiani Cristina; Aluizio, Rodrigo; Adamoski, Douglas; Kava-Cordeiro, Vanessa; Galli-Terasawa, Lygia V; Glienke, Chirlei

    2016-01-01

    Yeasts of the genus Candida have high genetic variability and are the most common opportunistic pathogenic fungi in humans. In this study, we evaluated the genetic diversity among 120 isolates of Candida spp. obtained from diabetic patients, kidney transplant recipients and patients without any immune deficiencies from Paraná state, Brazil. The analysis was performed using the ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 region and a partial sequence of 28S rDNA. In the phylogenetic analysis, we observed a consistent separation of the species C. albicans, C. dubliniensis, C. glabrata, C. tropicalis, C. parapsilosis, C. metapsilosis and C. orthopsilosis, however with low intraspecific variability. In the analysis of the C. albicans species, two clades were formed. Clade A included the largest number of isolates (91.2%) and the majority of isolates from GenBank (71.4%). The phylogenetic analysis showed low intraspecific genetic diversity, and the genetic polymorphisms between C. albicans isolates were similar to genetic divergence found in other studies performed with isolates from Brazil. This low genetic diversity of isolates can be explained by the geographic proximity of the patients evaluated. It was observed that yeast colonisation was highest in renal transplant recipients and diabetic patients and that C. albicans was the species most frequently isolated. PMID:27276363

  14. Population genetic analysis and trichothecene profiling of Fusarium graminearum from wheat in Uruguay.

    PubMed

    Pan, D; Mionetto, A; Calero, N; Reynoso, M M; Torres, A; Bettucci, L

    2016-03-11

    Fusarium graminearum sensu stricto (F. graminearum s.s.) is the major causal agent of Fusarium head blight of wheat worldwide, and contaminates grains with trichothecene mycotoxins that cause serious threats to food safety and animal health. An important aspect of managing this pathogen and reducing mycotoxin contamination of wheat is knowledge regarding its population genetics. Therefore, isolates of F. graminearum s.s. from the major wheat-growing region of Uruguay were analyzed by amplified fragment length polymorphism assays, PCR genotyping, and chemical analysis of trichothecene production. Of the 102 isolates identified as having the 15-ADON genotype via PCR genotyping, all were DON producers, but only 41 strains were also 15-ADON producers, as determined by chemical analysis. The populations were genotypically diverse but genetically similar, with significant genetic exchange occurring between them. Analysis of molecular variance indicated that most of the genetic variability resulted from differences between isolates within populations. Multilocus linkage disequilibrium analysis suggested that the isolates had a panmictic population genetic structure and that there is significant recombination occurs in F. graminearum s.s. In conclusion, tour findings provide the first detailed description of the genetic structure and trichothecene production of populations of F. graminearum s.s. from Uruguay, and expands our understanding of the agroecology of F. graminearum and of the correlation between genotypes and trichothecene chemotypes.

  15. Analysis of the genetic diversity of Candida isolates obtained from diabetic patients and kidney transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Benedetti, Volmir Pitt; Savi, Daiani Cristina; Aluizio, Rodrigo; Adamoski, Douglas; Kava-Cordeiro, Vanessa; Galli-Terasawa, Lygia V; Glienke, Chirlei

    2016-06-07

    Yeasts of the genus Candida have high genetic variability and are the most common opportunistic pathogenic fungi in humans. In this study, we evaluated the genetic diversity among 120 isolates of Candida spp. obtained from diabetic patients, kidney transplant recipients and patients without any immune deficiencies from Paraná state, Brazil. The analysis was performed using the ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 region and a partial sequence of 28S rDNA. In the phylogenetic analysis, we observed a consistent separation of the species C. albicans, C. dubliniensis, C. glabrata, C. tropicalis, C. parapsilosis, C. metapsilosis and C. orthopsilosis, however with low intraspecific variability. In the analysis of the C. albicans species, two clades were formed. Clade A included the largest number of isolates (91.2%) and the majority of isolates from GenBank (71.4%). The phylogenetic analysis showed low intraspecific genetic diversity, and the genetic polymorphisms between C. albicans isolates were similar to genetic divergence found in other studies performed with isolates from Brazil. This low genetic diversity of isolates can be explained by the geographic proximity of the patients evaluated. It was observed that yeast colonisation was highest in renal transplant recipients and diabetic patients and that C. albicans was the species most frequently isolated.

  16. Two-dimensional enrichment analysis for mining high-level imaging genetic associations.

    PubMed

    Yao, Xiaohui; Yan, Jingwen; Kim, Sungeun; Nho, Kwangsik; Risacher, Shannon L; Inlow, Mark; Moore, Jason H; Saykin, Andrew J; Shen, Li

    2017-03-01

    Enrichment analysis has been widely applied in the genome-wide association studies, where gene sets corresponding to biological pathways are examined for significant associations with a phenotype to help increase statistical power and improve biological interpretation. In this work, we expand the scope of enrichment analysis into brain imaging genetics, an emerging field that studies how genetic variation influences brain structure and function measured by neuroimaging quantitative traits (QT). Given the high dimensionality of both imaging and genetic data, we propose to study Imaging Genetic Enrichment Analysis (IGEA), a new enrichment analysis paradigm that jointly considers meaningful gene sets (GS) and brain circuits (BC) and examines whether any given GS-BC pair is enriched in a list of gene-QT findings. Using gene expression data from Allen Human Brain Atlas and imaging genetics data from Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative as test beds, we present an IGEA framework and conduct a proof-of-concept study. This empirical study identifies 25 significant high-level two-dimensional imaging genetics modules. Many of these modules are relevant to a variety of neurobiological pathways or neurodegenerative diseases, showing the promise of the proposal framework for providing insight into the mechanism of complex diseases.

  17. Analysis of Dengue Virus Genetic Diversity during Human and Mosquito Infection Reveals Genetic Constraints.

    PubMed

    Sessions, October M; Wilm, Andreas; Kamaraj, Uma Sangumathi; Choy, Milly M; Chow, Angelia; Chong, Yuwen; Ong, Xin Mei; Nagarajan, Niranjan; Cook, Alex R; Ooi, Eng Eong

    2015-01-01

    Dengue viruses (DENV) cause debilitating and potentially life-threatening acute disease throughout the tropical world. While drug development efforts are underway, there are concerns that resistant strains will emerge rapidly. Indeed, antiviral drugs that target even conserved regions in other RNA viruses lose efficacy over time as the virus mutates. Here, we sought to determine if there are regions in the DENV genome that are not only evolutionarily conserved but genetically constrained in their ability to mutate and could hence serve as better antiviral targets. High-throughput sequencing of DENV-1 genome directly from twelve, paired dengue patients' sera and then passaging these sera into the two primary mosquito vectors showed consistent and distinct sequence changes during infection. In particular, two residues in the NS5 protein coding sequence appear to be specifically acquired during infection in Ae. aegypti but not Ae. albopictus. Importantly, we identified a region within the NS3 protein coding sequence that is refractory to mutation during human and mosquito infection. Collectively, these findings provide fresh insights into antiviral targets and could serve as an approach to defining evolutionarily constrained regions for therapeutic targeting in other RNA viruses.

  18. Analysis of Dengue Virus Genetic Diversity during Human and Mosquito Infection Reveals Genetic Constraints

    PubMed Central

    Sessions, October M.; Wilm, Andreas; Kamaraj, Uma Sangumathi; Choy, Milly M.; Chow, Angelia; Chong, Yuwen; Ong, Xin Mei; Nagarajan, Niranjan; Cook, Alex R.; Ooi, Eng Eong

    2015-01-01

    Dengue viruses (DENV) cause debilitating and potentially life-threatening acute disease throughout the tropical world. While drug development efforts are underway, there are concerns that resistant strains will emerge rapidly. Indeed, antiviral drugs that target even conserved regions in other RNA viruses lose efficacy over time as the virus mutates. Here, we sought to determine if there are regions in the DENV genome that are not only evolutionarily conserved but genetically constrained in their ability to mutate and could hence serve as better antiviral targets. High-throughput sequencing of DENV-1 genome directly from twelve, paired dengue patients’ sera and then passaging these sera into the two primary mosquito vectors showed consistent and distinct sequence changes during infection. In particular, two residues in the NS5 protein coding sequence appear to be specifically acquired during infection in Ae. aegypti but not Ae. albopictus. Importantly, we identified a region within the NS3 protein coding sequence that is refractory to mutation during human and mosquito infection. Collectively, these findings provide fresh insights into antiviral targets and could serve as an approach to defining evolutionarily constrained regions for therapeutic targeting in other RNA viruses. PMID:26327586

  19. Adaptive divergence despite strong genetic drift: genomic analysis of the evolutionary mechanisms causing genetic differentiation in the island fox (Urocyon littoralis).

    PubMed

    Funk, W Chris; Lovich, Robert E; Hohenlohe, Paul A; Hofman, Courtney A; Morrison, Scott A; Sillett, T Scott; Ghalambor, Cameron K; Maldonado, Jesus E; Rick, Torben C; Day, Mitch D; Polato, Nicholas R; Fitzpatrick, Sarah W; Coonan, Timothy J; Crooks, Kevin R; Dillon, Adam; Garcelon, David K; King, Julie L; Boser, Christina L; Gould, Nicholas; Andelt, William F

    2016-05-01

    The evolutionary mechanisms generating the tremendous biodiversity of islands have long fascinated evolutionary biologists. Genetic drift and divergent selection are predicted to be strong on islands and both could drive population divergence and speciation. Alternatively, strong genetic drift may preclude adaptation. We conducted a genomic analysis to test the roles of genetic drift and divergent selection in causing genetic differentiation among populations of the island fox (Urocyon littoralis). This species consists of six subspecies, each of which occupies a different California Channel Island. Analysis of 5293 SNP loci generated using Restriction-site Associated DNA (RAD) sequencing found support for genetic drift as the dominant evolutionary mechanism driving population divergence among island fox populations. In particular, populations had exceptionally low genetic variation, small Ne (range = 2.1-89.7; median = 19.4), and significant genetic signatures of bottlenecks. Moreover, islands with the lowest genetic variation (and, by inference, the strongest historical genetic drift) were most genetically differentiated from mainland grey foxes, and vice versa, indicating genetic drift drives genome-wide divergence. Nonetheless, outlier tests identified 3.6-6.6% of loci as high FST outliers, suggesting that despite strong genetic drift, divergent selection contributes to population divergence. Patterns of similarity among populations based on high FST outliers mirrored patterns based on morphology, providing additional evidence that outliers reflect adaptive divergence. Extremely low genetic variation and small Ne in some island fox populations, particularly on San Nicolas Island, suggest that they may be vulnerable to fixation of deleterious alleles, decreased fitness and reduced adaptive potential.

  20. Molecular genetic analysis of heterosis in interspecific hybrids of Argopecten purpuratus x A. irradians irradians.

    PubMed

    Hu, L P; Huang, X T; Sun, Y; Mao, J X; Wang, S; Wang, C D; Bao, Z M

    2015-09-09

    Argopecten purpuratus and Argopecten irradians irradians hybridization was successfully performed and the hybrid offspring displayed apparent heterosis in growth traits. To better understand the genetic basis of heterosis, the genomic composition and genetic variation of the hybrids were analyzed with amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) and simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers. Seven of eight universal SSR primers displayed polymorphism in the hybrids and their parental groups, and hybrids inherited both parental geno-types at each locus. Using five primer combinations in AFLP analysis, 433 loci were amplified in the hybrids and their parental groups. The frequency of polymorphisms was 88.22%. F1 hybrids inherited 88.11 and 92.88% of AFLP bands from their parents. Some loci did not follow Mendelian Law, including 48 loci in parents that were lost, and 11 new loci that were amplified in the hybrids. The parameters of Nei's gene diversity, Shannon's Information index, genetic distance, and molecular variance between groups were calculated. The genetic differentiation between two hybrid groups (0.253) was smaller than that between hybrids and their parents (0.554 to 0.645), and was especially smaller than that between two parental groups (0.769). The high genetic similarity (0.9347) and low genetic differentiation (0.2531) between two hybrid groups suggests that these hybrid groups were genetically very close. Heterozygosities of hybrid groups were higher than those of parental groups, indicating that the hybrids had increased genetic diversity.

  1. The multi-niche crowding genetic algorithm: Analysis and applications

    SciTech Connect

    Cedeno, Walter

    1995-09-01

    The ability of organisms to evolve and adapt to the environment has provided mother nature with a rich and diverse set of species. Only organisms well adapted to their environment can survive from one generation to the next, transferring on the traits, that made them successful, to their offspring. Competition for resources and the ever changing environment drives some species to extinction and at the same time others evolve to maintain the delicate balance in nature. In this disertation we present the multi-niche crowding genetic algorithm, a computational metaphor to the survival of species in ecological niches in the face of competition. The multi-niche crowding genetic algorithm maintains stable subpopulations of solutions in multiple niches in multimodal landscapes. The algorithm introduces the concept of crowding selection to promote mating among members with qirnilar traits while allowing many members of the population to participate in mating. The algorithm uses worst among most similar replacement policy to promote competition among members with similar traits while allowing competition among members of different niches as well. We present empirical and theoretical results for the success of the multiniche crowding genetic algorithm for multimodal function optimization. The properties of the algorithm using different parameters are examined. We test the performance of the algorithm on problems of DNA Mapping, Aquifer Management, and the File Design Problem. Applications that combine the use of heuristics and special operators to solve problems in the areas of combinatorial optimization, grouping, and multi-objective optimization. We conclude by presenting the advantages and disadvantages of the algorithm and describing avenues for future investigation to answer other questions raised by this study.

  2. Functional Analysis of the Human Genome:. Study of Genetic Disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsui, Lap-Chee

    2003-04-01

    I will divide my remarks into 3 parts. First, I will give a brief summary of the Human Genome Project. Second, I will describe our work on human chromosome 7 to illustrate how we could contribute to the Project and disease research. Third, I would like to bring across the argument that study of genetic disease is an integral component of the Human Genome Project. In particular, I will use cystic fibrosis as an example to elaborate why I consider disease study is a part of functional genomics.

  3. Genetic Analysis of Gravity Signal Transduction in Arabidopsis thaliana Seedlings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boonsirichai, K.; Harrison, B.; Stanga, J.; Young, L.-S.; Neal, C.; Sabat, G.; Murthy, N.; Harms, A.; Sedbrook, J.; Masson, P.

    The primary roots of Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings respond to gravity stimulation by developing a tip curvature that results from differential cellular elongation on opposite flanks of the elongation zone. This curvature appears modulated by a lateral gradient of auxin that originates in the gravity-perceiving cells (statocytes) of the root cap through an apparent lateral repositioning of a component the auxin efflux carrier complex within these cells (Friml et al, 2002, Nature 415: 806-809). Unfortunately, little is known about the molecular mechanisms that govern early phases of gravity perception and signal transduction within the root-cap statocytes. We have used a molecular genetic approach to uncover some of these mechanisms. Mutations in the Arabidopsis ARG1 and ARL2 genes, which encode J-domain proteins, resulted in specific alterations in root and hypocotyl gravitropism, without pleiotropic phenotypes. Interestingly, ARG1 and ARL2 appear to function in the same genetic pathway. A combination of molecular genetic, biochemical and cell-biological approaches were used to demonstrate that ARG1 functions in early phases of gravity signal transduction within the root and hypocotyl statocytes, and is needed for efficient lateral auxin transport within the cap. The ARG1 protein is associated with components of the secretory and/or endosomal pathways, suggesting its role in the recycling of components of the auxin efflux carrier complex between plasma membrane and endosome (Boonsirichai et al, 2003, Plant Cell 15:2612-2625). Genetic modifiers of arg1-2 were isolated and shown to enhance the gravitropic defect of arg1-2, while resulting in little or no gravitropic defects in a wild type ARG1 background. A slight tendency for arg1-2;mar1-1 and arg1-2;mar2-1 double-mutant organs to display an opposite gravitropic response compared to wild type suggests that all three genes contribute to the interpretation of the gravity-vector information by seedling organs. The

  4. Economic methods for valuing the outcomes of genetic testing: beyond cost-effectiveness analysis.

    PubMed

    Grosse, Scott D; Wordsworth, Sarah; Payne, Katherine

    2008-09-01

    Genetic testing in health care can provide information to help with disease prediction, diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment. Assessing the clinical utility of genetic testing requires a process to value and weight different outcomes. This article discusses the relative merits of different economic measures and methods to inform recommendations relative to genetic testing for risk of disease, including cost-effectiveness analysis and cost-benefit analysis. Cost-effectiveness analyses refer to analyses that calculate the incremental cost per unit of health outcomes, such as deaths prevented or life-years saved because of some intervention. Cost-effectiveness analyses that use preference-based measures of health state utility such as quality-adjusted life-years to define outcomes are referred to as cost-utility analyses. Cost-effectiveness analyses presume that health policy decision makers seek to maximize health subject to resource constraints. Cost-benefit analyses can incorporate monetary estimates of willingness-to-pay for genetic testing, including the perceived value of information independent of health outcomes. These estimates can be derived from contingent valuation or discrete choice experiments. Because important outcomes of genetic testing do not fit easily within traditional measures of health, cost-effectiveness analyses do not necessarily capture the full range of outcomes of genetic testing that are important to decision makers and consumers. We recommend that health policy decision makers consider the value to consumers of information and other nonhealth attributes of genetic testing strategies.

  5. Integrative Bayesian Analysis of Neuroimaging-Genetic Data with Application to Cocaine Dependence

    PubMed Central

    Azadeh, Shabnam; Hobbs, Brian P.; Ma, Liangsuo; Nielsen, David A.; Moeller, F. Gerard; Baladandayuthapani, Veerabhadran

    2016-01-01

    Neuroimaging and genetic studies provide distinct and complementary information about the structural and biological aspects of a disease. Integrating the two sources of data facilitates the investigation of the links between genetic variability and brain mechanisms among different individuals for various medical disorders. This article presents a general statistical framework for integrative Bayesian analysis of neuroimaging-genetic (iBANG) data, which is motivated by a neuroimaging-genetic study in cocaine dependence. Statistical inference necessitated the integration of spatially dependent voxel-level measurements with various patient-level genetic and demographic characteristics under an appropriate probability model to account for the multiple inherent sources of variation. Our framework uses Bayesian model averaging to integrate genetic information into the analysis of voxel-wise neuroimaging data, accounting for spatial correlations in the voxels. Using multiplicity controls based on the false discovery rate, we delineate voxels associated with genetic and demographic features that may impact diffusion as measured by fractional anisotropy (FA) obtained from DTI images. We demonstrate the benefits of accounting for model uncertainties in both model fit and prediction. Our results suggest that cocaine consumption is associated with FA reduction in most white matter regions of interest in the brain. Additionally, gene polymorphisms associated with GABAergic, serotonergic and dopaminergic neurotransmitters and receptors were associated with FA. PMID:26484829

  6. Genetic Variability and Population Structure of Disanthus cercidifolius subsp. longipes (Hamamelidaceae) Based on AFLP Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yi; Fan, Qiang; Shen, Rujiang; Guo, Wei; Jin, Jianhua; Cui, Dafang; Liao, Wenbo

    2014-01-01

    Disanthus cercidifolius subsp. longipes is an endangered species in China. Genetic diversity and structure analysis of this species was investigated using amplified fragments length polymorphism (AFLP) fingerprinting. Nei's gene diversity ranged from 0.1290 to 0.1394. The AMOVA indicated that 75.06% of variation was distributed within populations, while the between-group component 5.04% was smaller than the between populations-within-group component 19.90%. Significant genetic differentiation was detected between populations. Genetic and geographical distances were not correlated. PCA and genetic structure analysis showed that populations from East China were together with those of the Nanling Range. These patterns of genetic diversity and levels of genetic variation may be the result of D. c. subsp. longipes restricted to several isolated habitats and “excess flowers production, but little fruit set”. It is necessary to protect all existing populations of D. c. subsp. longipes in order to preserve as much genetic variation as possible. PMID:25250583

  7. Current genetic methodologies in the identification of disaster victims and in forensic analysis.

    PubMed

    Ziętkiewicz, Ewa; Witt, Magdalena; Daca, Patrycja; Zebracka-Gala, Jadwiga; Goniewicz, Mariusz; Jarząb, Barbara; Witt, Michał

    2012-02-01

    This review presents the basic problems and currently available molecular techniques used for genetic profiling in disaster victim identification (DVI). The environmental conditions of a mass disaster often result in severe fragmentation, decomposition and intermixing of the remains of victims. In such cases, traditional identification based on the anthropological and physical characteristics of the victims is frequently inconclusive. This is the reason why DNA profiling became the gold standard for victim identification in mass-casualty incidents (MCIs) or any forensic cases where human remains are highly fragmented and/or degraded beyond recognition. The review provides general information about the sources of genetic material for DNA profiling, the genetic markers routinely used during genetic profiling (STR markers, mtDNA and single-nucleotide polymorphisms [SNP]) and the basic statistical approaches used in DNA-based disaster victim identification. Automated technological platforms that allow the simultaneous analysis of a multitude of genetic markers used in genetic identification (oligonucleotide microarray techniques and next-generation sequencing) are also presented. Forensic and population databases containing information on human variability, routinely used for statistical analyses, are discussed. The final part of this review is focused on recent developments, which offer particularly promising tools for forensic applications (mRNA analysis, transcriptome variation in individuals/populations and genetic profiling of specific cells separated from mixtures).

  8. Genetic analysis of 7 medieval skeletons from Aragonese Pyrenees

    PubMed Central

    Núńez, Carolina; Sosa, Cecilia; Baeta, Miriam; Geppert, Maria; Turnbough, Meredith; Phillips, Nicole; Casalod, Yolanda; Bolea, Miguel; Roby, Rhonda; Budowle, Bruce; Martínez-Jarreta, Begońa

    2011-01-01

    Aim To perform a genetic characterization of 7 skeletons from medieval age found in a burial site in the Aragonese Pyrenees. Methods Allele frequencies of autosomal short tandem repeats (STR) loci were determined by 3 different STR systems. Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and Y-chromosome haplogroups were determined by sequencing of the hypervariable segment 1 of mtDNA and typing of phylogenetic Y chromosome single nucleotide polymorphisms (Y-SNP) markers, respectively. Possible familial relationships were also investigated. Results Complete or partial STR profiles were obtained in 3 of the 7 samples. Mitochondrial DNA haplogroup was determined in 6 samples, with 5 of them corresponding to the haplogroup H and 1 to the haplogroup U5a. Y-chromosome haplogroup was determined in 2 samples, corresponding to the haplogroup R. In one of them, the sub-branch R1b1b2 was determined. mtDNA sequences indicated that some of the individuals could be maternally related, while STR profiles indicated no direct family relationships. Conclusions Despite the antiquity of the samples and great difficulty that genetic analyses entail, the combined use of autosomal STR markers, Y-chromosome informative SNPs, and mtDNA sequences allowed us to genotype a group of skeletons from the medieval age. PMID:21674829

  9. Genetic improvement of laying hens viability using survival analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ducrocq, Vincent; Besbes, Badi; Protais, Michel

    2000-01-01

    The survival of about eight generations of a large strain of laying hens was analysed separating the rearing period (RP) from the production period (PP), after hens were housed. For RP (respectively PP), 97.8% (resp., 94.1% ) of the 109 160 (resp., 100 665) female records were censored after 106 days (resp., 313 days) on the average. A Cox proportional hazards model stratified by flock (= season) and including a hatch-within-flock (HWF) fixed effect seemed to reasonably fit the RP data. For PP, this model could be further simplified to a non-stratified Weibull model. The extension of these models to sire-dam frailty (mixed) models permitted the estimation of the sire genetic variances at 0.261 ± 0.026 and 0.088 ± 0.010 for RP and PP, respectively. Heritabilities on the log scale were equal to 0.48 and 0.19. Non-additive genetic effects could not be detected. Selection was simulated by evaluating all sires and dams, after excluding all records from the last generation. Then, actual parents of this last generation were distributed into four groups according to their own pedigree index. Raw survivor curves of the progeny of extreme parental groups substantially differed (e.g., by 1.7% at 300 days for PP), suggesting that selection based on solutions from the frailty models could be efficient, despite the very large proportion of censored records. PMID:14736405

  10. Genetic Analysis of Stellate Elements of Drosophila Melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Palumbo, G.; Bonaccorsi, S.; Robbins, L. G.; Pimpinelli, S.

    1994-01-01

    Repeated elements are remarkably important for male meiosis and spermiogenesis in Drosophila melanogaster. Pairing of the X and Y chromosomes is mediated by the ribosomal RNA genes of the Y chromosome and X chromosome heterochromatin, spermiogenesis depends on the fertility factors of the Y chromosome. Intriguingly, a peculiar genetic system of interaction between the Y-linked crystal locus and the X-linked Stellate elements seem to be also involved in male meiosis and spermiogenesis. Deletion of the crystal element of the Y, via an interaction with the Stellate elements of the X, causes meiotic abnormalities, gamete-genotype dependent failure of sperm development (meiotic drive), and deposition of protein crystals in spermatocytes. The current hypothesis is that the meiotic abnormalities observed in cry(-) males is due to an induced overexpression of the normally repressed Ste elements. An implication of this hypothesis is that the strength of the abnormalities would depend on the amount of the Ste copies. To test this point we have genetically and cytologically examined the relationship of Ste copy number and organization to meiotic behavior in cry(-) males. We found that heterochromatic as well as euchromatic Ste repeats are functional and that the abnormality in chromosome condensation and the frequency of nondisjunction are related to Ste copy number. Moreover, we found that meiosis is disrupted after synapsis and that cry-induced meiotic drive is probably not mediated by Ste. PMID:7896100

  11. Poppr: an R package for genetic analysis of populations with mixed (clonal/sexual) reproduction

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Poppr is an R package for analysis of population genetic data. It extends the adegenet package and provides several novel tools, particularly with regard to analysis of data from admixed, clonal, and/or sexual populations. Currently, poppr can be used for dominant/codominant and haploid/diploid gene...

  12. Genetic variability analysis of Zymomonas mobilis strains from the UFPEDA microorganisms collection.

    PubMed

    Silva, L C N; Araújo, J M; Azevedo, J L; Padilha, R J S A; Yara, R

    2015-02-02

    Zymomonas mobilis is a Gram-negative bacterium that has drawn attention in the bioethanol industry. Besides bioethanol, this bacterium also produces other biotechnological products such as levans, which show antitumor activity. Molecular studies involving Z. mobilis have advanced to the point that allows us to characterize interspecies genetic diversity and understand their metabolism, and these data are essential for better utilization of this species. In this study, the genetic diversity of 24 strains from the Microorganisms Collection of Departamento de Antibióticos (UFPEDA) from Universidade Federal de Pernambuco were characterized. The methods used were amplified ribosomal DNA restriction analysis and diversity analysis of the internally transcribed 16S-23S rDNA spacer region (ISR). These analyses revealed low genetic variability of the 16S rDNA gene. These data confirm that these isolates are, or are closely related to, Z. mobilis. Moreover, the analysis of the ISR confirmed the genetic variability of strains deposited in the UFPEDA collection of microorganisms and grouped these strains into ten ribotypes, which can be used in the future for breeding programs and for the preservation of biodiversity. Furthermore, this study characterized the genetic variability between the UFPEDA 205/ ZAP, UFPEDA 98/AG11, and ZAG strains, which were obtained by spheroplast fusion among them. The data also indicate that there is genetic variability among the UFPEDA 202/CP4 and UFPEDA 633/ ZM4 strains, demonstrating that these important Z. mobilis strains are distinct, as suggested in previous studies.

  13. Cross-Disorder Genetic Analysis of Tic Disorders, Obsessive-Compulsive, and Hoarding Symptoms.

    PubMed

    Zilhão, Nuno R; Smit, Dirk J; Boomsma, Dorret I; Cath, Danielle C

    2016-01-01

    Hoarding, obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), and Tourette's disorder (TD) are psychiatric disorders that share symptom overlap, which might partly be the result of shared genetic variation. Population-based twin studies have found significant genetic correlations between hoarding and OCD symptoms, with genetic correlations varying between 0.1 and 0.45. For tic disorders, studies examining these correlations are lacking. Other lines of research, including clinical samples and GWAS or CNV data to explore genetic relationships between tic disorders and OCD, have only found very modest if any shared genetic variation. Our aim was to extend current knowledge on the genetic structure underlying hoarding, OC symptoms (OCS), and lifetime tic symptoms and, in a trivariate analysis, assess the degree of common and unique genetic factors contributing to the etiology of these disorders. Data have been gathered from participants in the Netherlands Twin Register comprising a total of 5293 individuals from a sample of adult monozygotic (n = 2460) and dizygotic (n = 2833) twin pairs (mean age 33.61 years). The data on Hoarding, OCS, and tic symptoms were simultaneously analyzed in Mplus. A liability threshold model was fitted to the twin data, analyzing heritability of phenotypes and of their comorbidity. Following the criteria for a probable clinical diagnosis in all phenotypes, 6.8% of participants had a diagnosis of probable hoarding disorder (HD), 6.3% of OCS, and 12.8% of any probable lifetime tic disorder. Genetic factors explained 50.4, 70.1, and 61.1% of the phenotypic covariance between hoarding-OCS, hoarding-tics, and OCS-tics, respectively. Substantial genetic correlations were observed between hoarding and OCS (0.41), hoarding and tics (0.35), and between OCS and tics (0.37). These results support the contribution of genetic factors in the development of these disorders and their comorbidity. Furthermore, tics were mostly influenced by specific

  14. Genetic analysis of photoreceptor action pathways in Arabidopsis thaliana

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    The specific strategies and long-term goals of this proposal remain intact relative to the original proposal. We continue to isolate and characterize photomorphogenic mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana. The molecular and biochemical characterization of one of these mutants, det1, has led to one publication of original data and to one Society for Experimental Biology Symposium paper (see below). The phenotype of a second mutant, det2, has also been studied during this funding period. In addition, we have continued work on a general strategy to isolate mutations in trans-acting regulatory factors that mediate light-regulated gene expression, and have identified several potentially interesting regulatory mutants. In the third funding period, we will concentrate on the genetical, biochemical, and molecular characterization of these new mutants. Construction of double mutants between the new mutants and the previously characterized morphological mutants should allow us to construct a pathway for light-regulated seedling development in Arabidopsis.

  15. Genetic analysis of CHCHD2 in a southern Spanish population.

    PubMed

    Tejera-Parrado, Cristina; Jesús, Silvia; Huertas-Fernández, Ismael; Bernal-Bernal, Inmaculada; Bonilla-Toribio, Marta; Córdoba-Tevar, Isabel; Abreu-Rodríguez, Irene; Carrillo, Fátima; Bernal-Escudero, Maravilla; Vargas-González, Laura; Carballo, Manuel; Gómez-Garre, Pilar; Mir, Pablo

    2017-02-01

    Researching genetic factors involved in Parkinson's disease (PD) is crucial to increase our knowledge about the pathophysiology of the disorder. A missense mutation has recently been reported within CHCHD2, a gene newly associated with autosomal dominant PD. Subsequent studies in different ethnic populations have not reached any conclusive result about the role of CHCHD2 in PD. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the implication of this gene for a PD population from southern Spain (including 536 PD patients and 518 unrelated control subjects). We studied all 4 exons of CHCHD2 and their exon-intron boundary regions. Four variants were observed in non-coding regions. No significant differences were observed in the allele frequencies of these variants between patients and controls. Thus, our study suggests that CHCHD2 is probably not involved in the etiopathogenesis of PD in our population.

  16. Historical analysis of Newfoundland dog fur colour genetics

    PubMed Central

    Bondeson, J.

    2015-01-01

    This article makes use of digitized historic newspapers to analyze Newfoundland dog fur colour genetics, and fur colour variations over time. The results indicate that contrary to the accepted view, the ‘Solid’ gene was introduced into the British population of Newfoundland dogs in the 1840s. Prior to that time, the dogs were white and black (Landseer) or white and brown, and thus spotted/spotted homozygotes. Due to ‘Solid’ being dominant over ‘spotted’, and selective breeding, today the majority of Newfoundland dogs are solid black. Whereas small white marks on the chest and/or paw appears to be a random event, the historical data supports the existence of an ‘Irish spotted’ fur colour pattern, with white head blaze, breast, paws and tail tip, in spotted/spotted homozygotes. PMID:26623371

  17. Genetic parameters and relationships between growth traits and scrotal circumference measured at different ages in Nellore cattle

    PubMed Central

    Boligon, Arione Augusti; Baldi, Fernando; de Albuquerque, Lucia Galvão

    2011-01-01

    Records from 106,212 Nellore animals, born between 1998 and 2006, were used to estimate (co)variance components and genetic parameters for birth weight (BW), average weight gains from birth to weaning (GBW), average weight gains from weaning to after yearling (GWAY), weaning hip height (WHH), postweaning hip height (PHH) and scrotal circumferences at 9 (SC9), 12 (SC12) and 15 (SC15) months of age. (Co)variance components were estimated by an animal model using multi-trait analysis. Heritability estimates for BW, GBW, GWAY, WHH, PHH, SC9, SC12 and SC15 were 0.31 ± 0.01; 0.25 ± 0.02; 0.30 ± 0.04; 0.51 ± 0.04; 0.54 ± 0.04; 0.39 ± 0.01; 0.41 ± 0.01 and 0.44 ± 0.02, respectively. Genetic correlations between growth traits ranged from 0.09 ± 0.01 to 0.88 ± 0.01, thereby implying that, at any age, selection to increase average weight gains will also increase stature. Genetic correlations between BW and average weight gains with scrotal circumferences were all positive and moderate (0.15 ± 0.03 to 0.38 ± 0.01). On the other hand, positive and low genetic associations were estimated between hip height and scrotal circumference at different ages (0.09 ± 0.01 to 0.17 ± 0.02). The results of this study pointed out that selection to larger scrotal circumferences in males will promote changes in average weight gains. In order to obtain Nellore cattle with the stature and size suitable for the production system, both weight gain and hip height should be included in a selection index. PMID:21734821

  18. Genetic parameters and relationships between growth traits and scrotal circumference measured at different ages in Nellore cattle.

    PubMed

    Boligon, Arione Augusti; Baldi, Fernando; de Albuquerque, Lucia Galvão

    2011-04-01

    Records from 106,212 Nellore animals, born between 1998 and 2006, were used to estimate (co)variance components and genetic parameters for birth weight (BW), average weight gains from birth to weaning (GBW), average weight gains from weaning to after yearling (GWAY), weaning hip height (WHH), postweaning hip height (PHH) and scrotal circumferences at 9 (SC9), 12 (SC12) and 15 (SC15) months of age. (Co)variance components were estimated by an animal model using multi-trait analysis. Heritability estimates for BW, GBW, GWAY, WHH, PHH, SC9, SC12 and SC15 were 0.31 ± 0.01; 0.25 ± 0.02; 0.30 ± 0.04; 0.51 ± 0.04; 0.54 ± 0.04; 0.39 ± 0.01; 0.41 ± 0.01 and 0.44 ± 0.02, respectively. Genetic correlations between growth traits ranged from 0.09 ± 0.01 to 0.88 ± 0.01, thereby implying that, at any age, selection to increase average weight gains will also increase stature. Genetic correlations between BW and average weight gains with scrotal circumferences were all positive and moderate (0.15 ± 0.03 to 0.38 ± 0.01). On the other hand, positive and low genetic associations were estimated between hip height and scrotal circumference at different ages (0.09 ± 0.01 to 0.17 ± 0.02). The results of this study pointed out that selection to larger scrotal circumferences in males will promote changes in average weight gains. In order to obtain Nellore cattle with the stature and size suitable for the production system, both weight gain and hip height should be included in a selection index.

  19. The effect of close relatives on unsupervised Bayesian clustering algorithms in population genetic structure analysis.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Ramilo, Silvia T; Wang, Jinliang

    2012-09-01

    The inference of population genetic structures is essential in many research areas in population genetics, conservation biology and evolutionary biology. Recently, unsupervised Bayesian clustering algorithms have been developed to detect a hidden population structure from genotypic data, assuming among others that individuals taken from the population are unrelated. Under this assumption, markers in a sample taken from a subpopulation can be considered to be in Hardy-Weinberg and linkage equilibrium. However, close relatives might be sampled from the same subpopulation, and consequently, might cause Hardy-Weinberg and linkage disequilibrium and thus bias a population genetic structure analysis. In this study, we used simulated and real data to investigate the impact of close relatives in a sample on Bayesian population structure analysis. We also showed that, when close relatives were identified by a pedigree reconstruction approach and removed, the accuracy of a population genetic structure analysis can be greatly improved. The results indicate that unsupervised Bayesian clustering algorithms cannot be used blindly to detect genetic structure in a sample with closely related individuals. Rather, when closely related individuals are suspected to be frequent in a sample, these individuals should be first identified and removed before conducting a population structure analysis.

  20. Molecular genetic analysis of activation-tagged transcription factors thought to be involved in photomorphogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Neff, Michael M.

    2011-06-23

    This is a final report for Department of Energy Grant No. DE-FG02-08ER15927 entitled “Molecular Genetic Analysis of Activation-Tagged Transcription Factors Thought to be Involved in Photomorphogenesis”. Based on our preliminary photobiological and genetic analysis of the sob1-D mutant, we hypothesized that OBP3 is a transcription factor involved in both phytochrome and cryptochrome-mediated signal transduction. In addition, we hypothesized that OBP3 is involved in auxin signaling and root development. Based on our preliminary photobiological and genetic analysis of the sob2-D mutant, we also hypothesized that a related gene, LEP, is involved in hormone signaling and seedling development.

  1. Analysis of genetic diversity and differentiation of seven stocks of Litopenaeus vannamei using microsatellite markers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Kai; Wang, Weiji; Li, Weiya; Zhang, Quanqi; Kong, Jie

    2014-08-01

    Seven microsatellite markers were used to evaluate the genetic diversity and differentiation of seven stocks of Litopenaeus vannamei, which were introduced from Central and South America to China. All seven microsatellite loci were polymorphic, with polymorphism information content ( PIC) values ranging from 0.593 to 0.952. Totally 92 alleles were identified, and the number of alleles ( Na) and effective alleles ( Ne) varied between 4 and 21 and 2.7 and 14.6, respectively. Observed heterozygosity ( H o) values were lower than the expected heterozygosity ( H e) values (0.526-0.754), which indicated that the seven stocks possessed a rich genetic diversity. Thirty-seven tests were detected for reasonable significant deviation from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. F is values were positive at five loci, suggesting that there was a relatively high degree of inbreeding within stocks. Pairwise F st values ranged from 0.0225 to 0.151, and most of the stock pairs were moderately differentiated. Genetic distance and cluster analysis using UPGMA revealed a close genetic relationship of L. vannamei between Pop2 and Pop3. AMOVA indicated that the genetic variation among stocks (11.3%) was much lower than that within stocks (88.7%). Although the seven stocks had a certain degree of genetic differentiation and a rich genetic diversity, there is an increasing risk of decreased performance due to inbreeding in subsequent generations.

  2. Genetic analysis of albuminuria in collaborative cross and multiple mouse intercross populations

    PubMed Central

    Thaisz, Jill; Tsaih, Shirng-Wern; Feng, Minjie; Philip, Vivek M.; Zhang, Yunyu; Yanas, Liane; Sheehan, Susan; Xu, Lingfei; Miller, Darla R.; Paigen, Beverly; Chesler, Elissa J.; Churchill, Gary A.

    2012-01-01

    Albuminuria is an important marker of nephropathy that increases the risk of progressive renal and chronic cardiovascular diseases. The genetic basis of kidney disease is well-established in humans and rodent models, but the causal genes remain to be identified. We applied several genetic strategies to map and refine genetic loci affecting albuminuria in mice and translated the findings to human kidney disease. First, we measured albuminuria in mice from 33 inbred strains, used the data for haplotype association mapping (HAM), and detected 10 genomic regions associated with albuminuria. Second, we performed eight F2 intercrosses between genetically diverse strains to identify six loci underlying albuminuria, each of which was concordant to kidney disease loci in humans. Third, we used the Oak Ridge National Laboratory incipient Collaborative Cross subpopulation to detect an additional novel quantitative trait loci (QTL) underlying albuminuria. We also performed a ninth intercross, between genetically similar strains, that substantially narrowed an albuminuria QTL on Chromosome 17 to a region containing four known genes. Finally, we measured renal gene expression in inbred mice to detect pathways highly correlated with albuminuria. Expression analysis also identified Glcci1, a gene known to affect podocyte structure and function in zebrafish, as a strong candidate gene for the albuminuria QTL on Chromosome 6. Overall, these findings greatly enhance our understanding of the genetic basis of albuminuria in mice and may guide future studies into the genetic basis of kidney disease in humans. PMID:22859403

  3. Genetic diversity in cultivated carioca common beans based on molecular marker analysis

    PubMed Central

    Küpper Cardoso Perseguini, Juliana Morini; Chioratto, Alisson Fernando; Zucchi, Maria Imaculada; Colombo, Carlos Augusto; Carbonell, Sérgio Augusto Moraes; Costa Mondego, Jorge Mauricio; Gazaffi, Rodrigo; Franco Garcia, Antonio Augusto; de Campos, Tatiana; de Souza, Anete Pereira; Rubiano, Luciana Benchimol

    2011-01-01

    A wide array of molecular markers has been used to investigate the genetic diversity among common bean species. However, the best combination of markers for studying such diversity among common bean cultivars has yet to be determined. Few reports have examined the genetic diversity of the carioca bean, commercially one of the most important common beans in Brazil. In this study, we examined the usefulness of two molecular marker systems (simple sequence repeats – SSRs and amplified fragment length polymorphisms – AFLPs) for assessing the genetic diversity of carioca beans. The amount of information provided by Roger’s modified genetic distance was used to analyze SSR data and Jaccards similarity coefficient was used for AFLP data. Seventy SSRs were polymorphic and 20 AFLP primer combinations produced 635 polymorphic bands. Molecular analysis showed that carioca genotypes were quite diverse. AFLPs revealed greater genetic differentiation and variation within the carioca genotypes (Gst = 98% and Fst = 0.83, respectively) than SSRs and provided better resolution for clustering the carioca genotypes. SSRs and AFLPs were both suitable for assessing the genetic diversity of Brazilian carioca genotypes since the number of markers used in each system provided a low coefficient of variation. However, fingerprint profiles were generated faster with AFLPs, making them a better choice for assessing genetic diversity in the carioca germplasm. PMID:21637550

  4. A theoretical analysis of population genetics of plants on restored habitats

    SciTech Connect

    Bogoliubov, A.G.; Loehle, C.

    1997-07-01

    Seed and propagules used for habitat restoration are not likely to be closely adapted to local site conditions. Rapid changes of genotypes frequencies on local microsites and/or microevolution would allow plants to become better adapted to a site. These same factors would help to maintain genetic diversity and ensure the survival of small endangered populations. The authors used population genetics models to examine the selection of genotypes during establishment on restored sites. Vegetative spread was shown to affect selection and significantly reduce genetic diversity. To study general microevolution, the authors linked a model of resource usage with a genetics model and analyzed competition between genotypes. A complex suite of feasible ecogenetic states was shown to result. The state actually resulting would depend strongly on initial conditions. This analysis indicated that genetic structure can vary locally and can produce overall genetic variability that is not simply the result of microsite adaptations. For restoration activities, the implication is that small differences in seed source could lead to large differences in local genetic structure after selection.

  5. A theoretical analysis of population genetics of plants on restored habitats

    SciTech Connect

    Bogoliubov, A.G.; Loehle, C.

    1995-02-01

    Seed and propagules used for habitat restoration are not likely to be closely adapted to local site conditions. Rapid changes of genotypes frequencies on local microsites and/or microevolution would allow plants to become better adapted to a site. These same factors would help to maintain genetic diversity and ensure the survival of small endangered populations. We used population genetics models to examine the selection of genotypes during establishment on restored sites. Vegetative spread was shown to affect selection and significantly reduce genetic diversity. To study general microevolution, we linked a model of resource usage with a genetics model and analyzed competition between genotypes. A complex suite of feasible ecogenetic states was shown to result. The state actually resulting would depend strongly on initial conditions. This analysis indicated that genetic structure can vary locally and can produce overall genetic variability that is not simply the result of microsite adaptations. For restoration activities, the implication is that small differences in seed source could lead to large differences in local genetic structure after selection.

  6. Comparative analysis of patterns of localization of mobile genetic elements in selection-genetic experiments on Drosophila melanogaster

    SciTech Connect

    Vasil`eva, L.A.; Ratner, V.A. |; Zabanov, S.A.

    1995-07-01

    A comparative selection-genetic analysis of three heterogeneous lines of Drosophila melanogaster with an interrupted longitudinal wing vein was performed. In the control line, riC, and two selection lines, riSP and riSN, overall patterns of localization of six families mobile genetic elements (MGE) (MDG1, MDG2, MDG3, MDG4, copia, and 297) were compared. In all, the lines contained 220 sites (copies) in 153 segments of the Bridges` map. According to response to selection, six classes of sites were identified: strong positive (P), weak positive (p), neutral (0), weak negative (n), strong negative (N), and abnormal (A). More than 50% of the sites (P + N + p + n) were shown to respond to selection; the contrasting classes (P and N and p and n) counterbalanced each other. These sites are assumed to mark actual parts of the genome, where polygenes are located. In other words, more than 50% of the total number of the genome sites act as polygenes controlling this quantitative character and respond to selection. Pleiotropy of polygenes in such a system must be very high. 22.2% of sites are neutral (class 0); apparently, they do not mark polygenes. The remaining 21.8% of sites (class A) show an anomalous response to selection. They are assumed to mark the polygenes of another genetic system, which participated in the maintenance of homeostasis in the original line riC. On the basis of this evidence, the concept of oligogenes and polygenes is developed. Oligogenes and polygenes are genes that occupy respectively limiting and nonlimiting positions in systems of expression. Adaptive properties of oligogenes are evaluated first and evolve rapidly. Adaptive properties of polygenes are evaluated only with regard to their total set and are limited by oligogenes. Variation of polygenic systems is generated by polygenic combination and spontaneous transpositions and excisions of MGE. 26 refs., 5 tabs.

  7. [Genetic analysis of microsatellite polymorphism in the Elliot's Pheasant (Syrmaticus ellioti) in China].

    PubMed

    Lin, Fang-Jun; Jiang, Ping-Ping; Ding, Ping

    2010-10-01

    In this study, we reported the population genetic analyses in the Elliot's Pheasant(Syrnaticus ellioti) using seven polymorphism microsatellite loci based on 105 individuals from 4 geographical populations. Departures from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium were found in four geographical populations. The average number of alleles was 8.86, with a total of 62 alleles across 7 loci; observed heterozygosity (HO) was generally low and the average number was 0.504. For the seven microsatellite loci, the polymorphism information content ranged from 0.549 to 0.860, with an average number 0.712. Population bottlenecks of the four geographical populations were tested by infinite allele mutation model, step-wise mutation model and two-phase mutation model, which found that each population had experienced bottleneck effect during the recent period. Fst analysis across all geographical populations indicated that the genetic differentiaton between the Guizhou geographical population and the Hunan geographical population was highly significant (P<0.001), a finding supported by the far genetic relationship showed by the neighbor-joining tree of four geographical populations based on Nei's unbiased genetic distances. Using hierarchical analysis of molecular variance (Guizhou geographical population relative to all others pooled), we found a low level of the genetic variation among geographical populations and that between groups. However, differences among populations relative to the total sample explained most of the genetic variance (92.84%), which was significant.

  8. Genetic analysis of gravity signal transduction in roots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masson, Patrick; Strohm, Allison; Baldwin, Katherine

    To grow downward into the soil, roots use gravity as a guide. Specialized cells, named stato-cytes, enable this directional growth response by perceiving gravity. Located in the columella region of the cap, these cells sense a reorientation of the root within the gravity field through the sedimentation of, and/or tension/pressure exerted by, dense amyloplasts. This process trig-gers a gravity signal transduction pathway that leads to a fast alkalinization of the cytoplasm and a change in the distribution of the plasma membrane-associated auxin-efflux carrier PIN3. The latter protein is uniformly distributed within the plasma membrane on all sides of the cell in vertically oriented roots. However, it quickly accumulates at the bottom side upon gravis-timulation. This process correlates with a preferential transport of auxin to the bottom side of the root cap, resulting in a lateral gradient across the tip. This gradient is then transported to the elongation zone where it promotes differential cellular elongation, resulting in downward curvature. We isolated mutations that affect gravity signal transduction at a step that pre-cedes cytoplasmic alkalinization and/or PIN3 relocalization and lateral auxin transport across the cap. arg1 and arl2 mutations identify a common genetic pathway that is needed for all three gravity-induced processes in the cap statocytes, indicating these genes function early in the pathway. On the other hand, adk1 affects gravity-induced PIN3 relocalization and lateral auxin transport, but it does not interfere with cytoplasmic alkalinization. ARG1 and ARL2 encode J-domain proteins that are associated with membranes of the vesicular trafficking path-way whereas ADK1 encodes adenosine kinase, an enzyme that converts adenosine derived from nucleic acid metabolism and the AdoMet cycle into AMP, thereby alleviating feedback inhibi-tion of this important methyl-donor cycle. Because mutations in ARG1 (and ARL2) do not completely eliminate

  9. Assessing genetic diversity in a sugarcane germplasm collection using an automated AFLP analysis.

    PubMed

    Besse, P; Taylor, G; Carroll, B; Berding, N; Burner, D; McIntyre, C L

    1998-10-01

    An assessment of genetic diversity within and between Saccharum, Old World Erianthus sect. Ripidium, and North American E.giganteus (S.giganteum) was conducted using Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphism (AFLP(TM)) markers. An automated gel scoring system (GelCompar(TM)) was successfully used to analyse the complex AFLP patterns obtained in sugarcane and its relatives. Similarity coefficient calculations and clustering revealed a genetic structure for Saccharum and Erianthus sect. Ripidium that was identical to the one previously obtained using other molecular marker types, showing the appropriateness of AFLP markers and the associated automated analysis in assessing genetic diversity in sugarcane. A genetic structure that correlated with cytotype (2n=30, 60, 90) was revealed within the North American species, E. giganteus (S.giganteum). Complex relationships among Saccharum, Erianthus sect. Ripidium, and North American E.giganteus were revealed and are discussed in the light of a similar study which involved RAPD markers.

  10. Combined sequence-based and genetic mapping analysis of complex traits in outbred rats.

    PubMed

    Baud, Amelie; Hermsen, Roel; Guryev, Victor; Stridh, Pernilla; Graham, Delyth; McBride, Martin W; Foroud, Tatiana; Calderari, Sophie; Diez, Margarita; Ockinger, Johan; Beyeen, Amennai D; Gillett, Alan; Abdelmagid, Nada; Guerreiro-Cacais, Andre Ortlieb; Jagodic, Maja; Tuncel, Jonatan; Norin, Ulrika; Beattie, Elisabeth; Huynh, Ngan; Miller, William H; Koller, Daniel L; Alam, Imranul; Falak, Samreen; Osborne-Pellegrin, Mary; Martinez-Membrives, Esther; Canete, Toni; Blazquez, Gloria; Vicens-Costa, Elia; Mont-Cardona, Carme; Diaz-Moran, Sira; Tobena, Adolf; Hummel, Oliver; Zelenika, Diana; Saar, Kathrin; Patone, Giannino; Bauerfeind, Anja; Bihoreau, Marie-Therese; Heinig, Matthias; Lee, Young-Ae; Rintisch, Carola; Schulz, Herbert; Wheeler, David A; Worley, Kim C; Muzny, Donna M; Gibbs, Richard A; Lathrop, Mark; Lansu, Nico; Toonen, Pim; Ruzius, Frans Paul; de Bruijn, Ewart; Hauser, Heidi; Adams, David J; Keane, Thomas; Atanur, Santosh S; Aitman, Tim J; Flicek, Paul; Malinauskas, Tomas; Jones, E Yvonne; Ekman, Diana; Lopez-Aumatell, Regina; Dominiczak, Anna F; Johannesson, Martina; Holmdahl, Rikard; Olsson, Tomas; Gauguier, Dominique; Hubner, Norbert; Fernandez-Teruel, Alberto; Cuppen, Edwin; Mott, Richard; Flint, Jonathan

    2013-07-01

    Genetic mapping on fully sequenced individuals is transforming understanding of the relationship between molecular variation and variation in complex traits. Here we report a combined sequence and genetic mapping analysis in outbred rats that maps 355 quantitative trait loci for 122 phenotypes. We identify 35 causal genes involved in 31 phenotypes, implicating new genes in models of anxiety, heart disease and multiple sclerosis. The relationship between sequence and genetic variation is unexpectedly complex: at approximately 40% of quantitative trait loci, a single sequence variant cannot account for the phenotypic effect. Using comparable sequence and mapping data from mice, we show that the extent and spatial pattern of variation in inbred rats differ substantially from those of inbred mice and that the genetic variants in orthologous genes rarely contribute to the same phenotype in both species.

  11. Combined sequence-based and genetic mapping analysis of complex traits in outbred rats

    PubMed Central

    Baud, Amelie; Hermsen, Roel; Guryev, Victor; Stridh, Pernilla; Graham, Delyth; McBride, Martin W.; Foroud, Tatiana; Calderari, Sophie; Diez, Margarita; Ockinger, Johan; Beyeen, Amennai D.; Gillett, Alan; Abdelmagid, Nada; Guerreiro-Cacais, Andre Ortlieb; Jagodic, Maja; Tuncel, Jonatan; Norin, Ulrika; Beattie, Elisabeth; Huynh, Ngan; Miller, William H.; Koller, Daniel L.; Alam, Imranul; Falak, Samreen; Osborne-Pellegrin, Mary; Martinez-Membrives, Esther; Canete, Toni; Blazquez, Gloria; Vicens-Costa, Elia; Mont-Cardona, Carme; Diaz-Moran, Sira; Tobena, Adolf; Hummel, Oliver; Zelenika, Diana; Saar, Kathrin; Patone, Giannino; Bauerfeind, Anja; Bihoreau, Marie-Therese; Heinig, Matthias; Lee, Young-Ae; Rintisch, Carola; Schulz, Herbert; Wheeler, David A.; Worley, Kim C.; Muzny, Donna M.; Gibbs, Richard A.; Lathrop, Mark; Lansu, Nico; Toonen, Pim; Ruzius, Frans Paul; de Bruijn, Ewart; Hauser, Heidi; Adams, David J.; Keane, Thomas; Atanur, Santosh S.; Aitman, Tim J.; Flicek, Paul; Malinauskas, Tomas; Jones, E. Yvonne; Ekman, Diana; Lopez-Aumatell, Regina; Dominiczak, Anna F; Johannesson, Martina; Holmdahl, Rikard; Olsson, Tomas; Gauguier, Dominique; Hubner, Norbert; Fernandez-Teruel, Alberto; Cuppen, Edwin; Mott, Richard; Flint, Jonathan

    2013-01-01

    Genetic mapping on fully sequenced individuals is transforming our understanding of the relationship between molecular variation and variation in complex traits. Here we report a combined sequence and genetic mapping analysis in outbred rats that maps 355 quantitative trait loci for 122 phenotypes. We identify 35 causal genes involved in 31 phenotypes, implicating novel genes in models of anxiety, heart disease and multiple sclerosis. The relation between sequence and genetic variation is unexpectedly complex: at approximately 40% of quantitative trait loci a single sequence variant cannot account for the phenotypic effect. Using comparable sequence and mapping data from mice, we show the extent and spatial pattern of variation in inbred rats differ significantly from those of inbred mice, and that the genetic variants in orthologous genes rarely contribute to the same phenotype in both species. PMID:23708188

  12. Moving toward System Genetics through Multiple Trait Analysis in Genome-Wide Association Studies

    PubMed Central

    Shriner, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Association studies are a staple of genotype–phenotype mapping studies, whether they are based on single markers, haplotypes, candidate genes, genome-wide genotypes, or whole genome sequences. Although genetic epidemiological studies typically contain data collected on multiple traits which themselves are often correlated, most analyses have been performed on single traits. Here, I review several methods that have been developed to perform multiple trait analysis. These methods range from traditional multivariate models for systems of equations to recently developed graphical approaches based on network theory. The application of network theory to genetics is termed systems genetics and has the potential to address long-standing questions in genetics about complex processes such as coordinate regulation, homeostasis, and pleiotropy. PMID:22303408

  13. Optimization of Volumetric Computed Tomography for Skeletal Analysis of Model Genetic Organisms

    PubMed Central

    Vasquez, Sergio X.; Hansen, Mark S.; Bahadur, Ali N.; Hockin, Matthew F.; Kindlmann, Gordon L.; Nevell, Lisa; Wu, Isabel Q.; Grunwald, David J.; Weinstein, David M.; Jones, Greg M.; Johnson, Christopher R.; Vandeberg, John L.; Capecchi, Mario R.; Keller, Charles

    2011-01-01

    Forward and reverse genetics now allow researchers to understand embryonic and postnatal gene function in a broad range of species. Although some genetic mutations cause obvious morphological change, other mutations can be more subtle and, without adequate observation and quantification, might be overlooked. For the increasing number of genetic model organisms examined by the growing field of phenomics, standardized but sensitive methods for quantitative analysis need to be incorporated into routine practice to effectively acquire and analyze ever-increasing quantities of phenotypic data. In this study, we present platform-independent parameters for the use of microscopic x-ray computed tomography (microCT) for phenotyping species-specific skeletal morphology of a variety of different genetic model organisms. We show that microCT is suitable for phenotypic characterization for prenatal and postnatal specimens across multiple species. PMID:18286615

  14. The complex genetics of gait speed: genome-wide meta-analysis approach

    PubMed Central

    Lunetta, Kathryn L.; Smith, Jennifer A.; Eicher, John D.; Vered, Rotem; Deelen, Joris; Arnold, Alice M.; Buchman, Aron S.; Tanaka, Toshiko; Faul, Jessica D.; Nethander, Maria; Fornage, Myriam; Adams, Hieab H.; Matteini, Amy M.; Callisaya, Michele L.; Smith, Albert V.; Yu, Lei; De Jager, Philip L.; Evans, Denis A.; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Hofman, Albert; Pattie, Alison; Corley, Janie; Launer, Lenore J.; Knopman, Davis S.; Parimi, Neeta; Turner, Stephen T.; Bandinelli, Stefania; Beekman, Marian; Gutman, Danielle; Sharvit, Lital; Mooijaart, Simon P.; Liewald, David C.; Houwing-Duistermaat, Jeanine J.; Ohlsson, Claes; Moed, Matthijs; Verlinden, Vincent J.; Mellström, Dan; van der Geest, Jos N.; Karlsson, Magnus; Hernandez, Dena; McWhirter, Rebekah; Liu, Yongmei; Thomson, Russell; Tranah, Gregory J.; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Weir, David R.; Zhao, Wei; Starr, John M.; Johnson, Andrew D.; Ikram, M. Arfan; Bennett, David A.; Cummings, Steven R.; Deary, Ian J.; Harris, Tamara B.; Kardia, Sharon L. R.; Mosley, Thomas H.; Srikanth, Velandai K.; Windham, Beverly G.; Newman, Ann B.; Walston, Jeremy D.; Davies, Gail; Evans, Daniel S.; Slagboom, Eline P.; Ferrucci, Luigi; Kiel, Douglas P.; Murabito, Joanne M.; Atzmon, Gil

    2017-01-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that the basis for variation in late-life mobility is attributable, in part, to genetic factors, which may become increasingly important with age. Our objective was to systematically assess the contribution of genetic variation to gait speed in older individuals. We conducted a meta-analysis of gait speed GWASs in 31,478 older adults from 17 cohorts of the CHARGE consortium, and validated our results in 2,588 older adults from 4 independent studies. We followed our initial discoveries with network and eQTL analysis of candidate signals in tissues. The meta-analysis resulted in a list of 536 suggestive genome wide significant SNPs in or near 69 genes. Further interrogation with Pathway Analysis placed gait speed as a polygenic complex trait in five major networks. Subsequent eQTL analysis revealed several SNPs significantly associated with the expression of PRSS16, WDSUB1 and PTPRT, which in addition to the meta-analysis and pathway suggested that genetic effects on gait speed may occur through synaptic function and neuronal development pathways. No genome-wide significant signals for gait speed were identified from this moderately large sample of older adults, suggesting that more refined physical function phenotypes will be needed to identify the genetic basis of gait speed in aging. PMID:28077804

  15. Partial least squares correspondence analysis: A framework to simultaneously analyze behavioral and genetic data.

    PubMed

    Beaton, Derek; Dunlop, Joseph; Abdi, Hervé

    2016-12-01

    For nearly a century, detecting the genetic contributions to cognitive and behavioral phenomena has been a core interest for psychological research. Recently, this interest has been reinvigorated by the availability of genotyping technologies (e.g., microarrays) that provide new genetic data, such as single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). These SNPs-which represent pairs of nucleotide letters (e.g., AA, AG, or GG) found at specific positions on human chromosomes-are best considered as categorical variables, but this coding scheme can make difficult the multivariate analysis of their relationships with behavioral measurements, because most multivariate techniques developed for the analysis between sets of variables are designed for quantitative variables. To palliate this problem, we present a generalization of partial least squares-a technique used to extract the information common to 2 different data tables measured on the same observations-called partial least squares correspondence analysis-that is specifically tailored for the analysis of categorical and mixed ("heterogeneous") data types. Here, we formally define and illustrate-in a tutorial format-how partial least squares correspondence analysis extends to various types of data and design problems that are particularly relevant for psychological research that include genetic data. We illustrate partial least squares correspondence analysis with genetic, behavioral, and neuroimaging data from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative. R code is available on the Comprehensive R Archive Network and via the authors' websites. (PsycINFO Database Record

  16. Buccal anomalies, cephalometric analysis and genetic study of two sisters with orofaciodigital syndrome type I.

    PubMed

    Romero, Martín; Franco, Brunella; del Pozo, Jaime Sánchez; Romance, Ana

    2007-11-01

    Orofaciodigital syndromes have many clinical and cephalometric anomalies, including facial irregularities, oral cavity abnormalities, and malformations of fingers and toes. In this case of twin girls, buccal exploration, cephalometric examination, and genetic analysis were performed to diagnose Orofaciodigital I or Orofaciodigital II syndrome. Clinically, the twins had several dental and skeletal irregularities. Genetic analysis revealed a DNA segment abnormality corresponding to exon 3 and presence of nucleotide change, 243C>G, leading to the missense mutation H81Q. This causative mutation associated with the OFD1 gene has not been reported previously. Both patients were diagnosed as having Orofaciodigital I syndrome.

  17. GeMes, Clusters of DNA Methylation under Genetic Control, Can Inform Genetic and Epigenetic Analysis of Disease

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yun; Li, Xin; Aryee, Martin J.; Ekström, Tomas J.; Padyukov, Leonid; Klareskog, Lars; Vandiver, Amy; Moore, Ann Zenobia; Tanaka, Toshiko; Ferrucci, Luigi; Fallin, M. Daniele; Feinberg, Andrew P.

    2014-01-01

    Epigenetic marks such as DNA methylation have generated great interest in the study of human disease. However, studies of DNA methylation have not established population-epigenetics principles to guide design, efficient statistics, or interpretation. Here, we show that the clustering of correlated DNA methylation at CpGs was similar to that of linkage-disequilibrium (LD) correlation in genetic SNP variation but for much shorter distances. Some clustering of methylated CpGs appeared to be genetically driven. Further, a set of correlated methylated CpGs related to a single SNP-based LD block was not always physically contiguous—segments of uncorrelated methylation as long as 300 kb could be interspersed in the cluster. Thus, we denoted these sets of correlated CpGs as GeMes, defined as potentially noncontiguous methylation clusters under the control of one or more methylation quantitative trait loci. This type of correlated methylation structure has implications for both biological functions of DNA methylation and for the design, analysis, and interpretation of epigenome-wide association studies. PMID:24656863

  18. Genetic analysis of inflorescence and plant height components in sorghum (Panicoidae) and comparative genetics with rice (Oryzoidae)

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Dong; Kong, Wenqian; Robertson, Jon; Goff, Valorie H; Epps, Ethan; Kerr, Alexandra; Mills, Gabriel; Cromwell, Jay; Lugin, Yelena; Phillips, Christine; Paterson, Andrew H

    2015-12-01

    Domestication has played an important role in shaping characteristics of the inflorescence and plant height in cultivated cereals. Taking advantage of meta-analysis of QTLs, phylogenetic analyses in 502 diverse sorghum accessions, GWAS in a sorghum association panel (n = 354) and comparative data, we provide insight into the genetic basis of the domestication traits in sorghum and rice. We performed genome-wide association studies (GWAS) on 6 traits related to inflorescence morphology and 6 traits related to plant height in sorghum, comparing the genomic regions implicated in these traits by GWAS and QTL mapping, respectively. In a search for signatures of selection, we identify genomic regions that may contribute to sorghum domestication regarding plant height, flowering time and pericarp color. Comparative studies across taxa show functionally conserved ‘hotspots’ in sorghum and rice for awn presence and pericarp color that do not appear to reflect corresponding single genes but may indicate co-regulated clusters of genes. We also reveal homoeologous regions retaining similar functions for plant height and flowering time since genome duplication an estimated 70 million years ago or more in a common ancestor of cereals. In most such homoeologous QTL pairs, only one QTL interval exhibits strong selection signals in modern sorghum. Intersections among QTL, GWAS and comparative data advance knowledge of genetic determinants of inflorescence and plant height components in sorghum, and add new dimensions to comparisons between sorghum and rice.

  19. Genetic analysis of inflorescence and plant height components in sorghum (Panicoidae) and comparative genetics with rice (Oryzoidae)

    DOE PAGES

    Zhang, Dong; Kong, Wenqian; Robertson, Jon; ...

    2015-12-01

    Domestication has played an important role in shaping characteristics of the inflorescence and plant height in cultivated cereals. Taking advantage of meta-analysis of QTLs, phylogenetic analyses in 502 diverse sorghum accessions, GWAS in a sorghum association panel (n = 354) and comparative data, we provide insight into the genetic basis of the domestication traits in sorghum and rice. We performed genome-wide association studies (GWAS) on 6 traits related to inflorescence morphology and 6 traits related to plant height in sorghum, comparing the genomic regions implicated in these traits by GWAS and QTL mapping, respectively. In a search for signatures ofmore » selection, we identify genomic regions that may contribute to sorghum domestication regarding plant height, flowering time and pericarp color. Comparative studies across taxa show functionally conserved ‘hotspots’ in sorghum and rice for awn presence and pericarp color that do not appear to reflect corresponding single genes but may indicate co-regulated clusters of genes. We also reveal homoeologous regions retaining similar functions for plant height and flowering time since genome duplication an estimated 70 million years ago or more in a common ancestor of cereals. In most such homoeologous QTL pairs, only one QTL interval exhibits strong selection signals in modern sorghum. Intersections among QTL, GWAS and comparative data advance knowledge of genetic determinants of inflorescence and plant height components in sorghum, and add new dimensions to comparisons between sorghum and rice.« less

  20. Genetic diversity analysis of Bt cotton genotypes in Pakistan using simple sequence repeat markers.

    PubMed

    Ullah, I; Iram, A; Iqbal, M Z; Nawaz, M; Hasni, S M; Jamil, S

    2012-03-14

    The popularity of genetically modified insect resistant (Bt) cotton has promoted large scale monocultures, which is thought to worsen the problem of crop genetic homogeneity. Information on genetic diversity among Bt cotton varieties is lacking. We evaluated genetic divergence among 19 Bt cotton genotypes using simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers. Thirty-seven of 104 surveyed primers were found informative. Fifty-two primers selected on the basis of reported intra-hirsutum polymorphism in a cotton marker database showed a high degree of polymorphism, 56% compared to 13% for randomly selected primers. A total of 177 loci were amplified, with an average of 1.57 loci per primer, generating 38 markers. The amplicons ranged in size from 98 to 256 bp. The genetic similarities among the 19 genotypes ranged from 0.902 to 0.982, with an average of 0.947, revealing a lack of diversity. Similarities among genotypes from public sector organizations were higher than genotypes developed by private companies. Hybrids were found to be more distant compared to commercial cultivars and advanced breeding lines. Cluster analysis grouped the 19 Bt cotton genotypes into three major clusters and two independent entries. Cultivars IR-3701, Ali Akbar-802 and advanced breeding line VH-259 grouped in subcluster B2, with very narrow genetic distances despite dissimilar parentage. We found a very high level of similarity among Pakistani-bred Bt cotton varieties, which means that genetically diverse recurrent parents should be included to enhance genetic diversity. The intra-hirsutum polymorphic SSRs were found to be highly informative for molecular genetic diversity studies in these cotton varieties.

  1. Meta-analysis of susceptibility of woody plants to loss of genetic diversity through habitat fragmentation.

    PubMed

    Vranckx, Guy; Jacquemyn, Hans; Muys, Bart; Honnay, Olivier

    2012-04-01

    Shrubs and trees are assumed less likely to lose genetic variation in response to habitat fragmentation because they have certain life-history characteristics such as long lifespans and extensive pollen flow. To test this assumption, we conducted a meta-analysis with data on 97 woody plant species derived from 98 studies of habitat fragmentation. We measured the weighted response of four different measures of population-level genetic diversity to habitat fragmentation with Hedge's d and Spearman rank correlation. We tested whether the genetic response to habitat fragmentation was mediated by life-history traits (longevity, pollination mode, and seed dispersal vector) and study characteristics (genetic marker and plant material used). For both tests of effect size habitat fragmentation was associated with a substantial decrease in expected heterozygosity, number of alleles, and percentage of polymorphic loci, whereas the population inbreeding coefficient was not associated with these measures. The largest proportion of variation among effect sizes was explained by pollination mechanism and by the age of the tissue (progeny or adult) that was genotyped. Our primary finding was that wind-pollinated trees and shrubs appeared to be as likely to lose genetic variation as insect-pollinated species, indicating that severe habitat fragmentation may lead to pollen limitation and limited gene flow. In comparison with results of previous meta-analyses on mainly herbaceous species, we found trees and shrubs were as likely to have negative genetic responses to habitat fragmentation as herbaceous species. We also found that the genetic variation in offspring was generally less than that of adult trees, which is evidence of a genetic extinction debt and probably reflects the genetic diversity of the historical, less-fragmented landscape.

  2. Genetic analysis of neuronal ionotropic glutamate receptor subunits.

    PubMed

    Granger, Adam J; Gray, John A; Lu, Wei; Nicoll, Roger A

    2011-09-01

    In the brain, fast, excitatory synaptic transmission occurs primarily through AMPA- and NMDA-type ionotropic glutamate receptors. These receptors are composed of subunit proteins that determine their biophysical properties and trafficking behaviour. Therefore, determining the function of these subunits and receptor subunit composition is essential for understanding the physiological properties of synaptic transmission. Here, we discuss and evaluate various genetic approaches that have been used to study AMPA and NMDA receptor subunits. These approaches have demonstrated that the GluA1 AMPA receptor subunit is required for activity-dependent trafficking and contributes to basal synaptic transmission, while the GluA2 subunit regulates Ca(2+) permeability, homeostasis and trafficking to the synapse under basal conditions. In contrast, the GluN2A and GluN2B NMDA receptor subunits regulate synaptic AMPA receptor content, both during synaptic development and plasticity. Ongoing research in this field is focusing on the molecular interactions and mechanisms that control these functions. To accomplish this, molecular replacement techniques are being used, where native subunits are replaced with receptors containing targeted mutations. In this review, we discuss a single-cell molecular replacement approach which should arguably advance our physiological understanding of ionotropic glutamate receptor subunits, but is generally applicable to study of any neuronal protein.

  3. Genetic Analysis of the Morphological Differences between Maize and Teosinte

    PubMed Central

    Doebley, J.; Stec, A.

    1991-01-01

    Molecular marker loci were used to investigate the inheritance of morphological traits that distinguish maize (Zea mays ssp. mays) from a closely related wild relative, teosinte (Z. mays ssp. mexicana). Regression and interval mapping analyses gave largely congruent results concerning the numbers of loci controlling the morphological traits and the magnitudes of their effects; however, interval mapping tended to give larger estimates for the magnitudes of the effects of the morphological trait loci. This tendency was exaggerated for traits that were non-normally distributed. Variation for most inflorescence traits is controlled by one or two regions of the genome with large effects plus several other regions with relatively small effects. As such, the data are congruent with a mode of inheritance for most traits involving one or two major loci plus several minor loci. Regions of the genome with large effects on one trait consistently had smaller effects on several other traits, possibly as a result of pleiotropy. Most of the variation for the dramatic differences in inflorescence morphology between maize and teosinte is explained by five restricted regions of the genome. One of these regions encompasses a previously described gene, tb1 (teosinte branched), and the effects of this region on inflorescence architecture are similar to the known effects of tb1. Implications of this work for the genetic basis of morphological evolution in plants are discussed. PMID:1682215

  4. The Adaptive Analysis of Visual Cognition using Genetic Algorithms

    PubMed Central

    Cook, Robert G.; Qadri, Muhammad A. J.

    2014-01-01

    Two experiments used a novel, open-ended, and adaptive test procedure to examine visual cognition in animals. Using a genetic algorithm, a pigeon was tested repeatedly from a variety of different initial conditions for its solution to an intermediate brightness search task. On each trial, the animal had to accurately locate and peck a target element of intermediate brightness from among a variable number of surrounding darker and lighter distractor elements. Displays were generated from six parametric variables, or genes (distractor number, element size, shape, spacing, target brightness, distractor brightness). Display composition changed over time, or evolved, as a function of the bird’s differential accuracy within the population of values for each gene. Testing three randomized initial conditions and one set of controlled initial conditions, element size and number of distractors were identified as the most important factors controlling search accuracy, with distractor brightness, element shape, and spacing making secondary contributions. The resulting changes in this multidimensional stimulus space suggested the existence of a set of conditions that the bird repeatedly converged upon regardless of initial conditions. This psychological “attractor” represents the cumulative action of the cognitive operations used by the pigeon in solving and performing this search task. The results are discussed regarding their implications for visual cognition in pigeons and the usefulness of adaptive, subject-driven experimentation for investigating human and animal cognition more generally. PMID:24000905

  5. Genetic analysis of the claret locus of Drosophila melanogaster

    SciTech Connect

    Sequeira, W.; Nelson, C.R.; Szauter, P. )

    1989-11-01

    The claret (ca) locus of Drosophila melanogaster comprises two separately mutable domains, one responsible for eye color and one responsible for proper disjunction of chromosomes in meiosis and early cleavage divisions. Previously isolated alleles are of three types: (1) alleles of the claret (ca) type that affect eye color only, (2) alleles of the claret-nondisjunctional (ca{sup nd}) type that affect eye color and chromosome behavior, and (3) a meiotic mutation, non-claret disjunctional (ncd), that affects chromosome behavior only. In order to investigate the genetic structure of the claret locus, the authors have isolated 19 radiation-induced alleles of claret on the basis of the eye color phenotype. Two of these 19 new alleles are of the ca{sup nd} type, while 17 are of the ca type, demonstrating that the two domains do not often act as a single target for mutagenesis. This suggests that the two separately mutable functions are likely to be encoded by separate or overlapping genes rather than by a single gene. One of the new alleles of the ca{sup nd} type is a chromosome rearrangement with a breakpoint at the position of the claret locus. If this breakpoint is the cause of the mutant phenotype and there are no other mutations associated with the rearrangement, the two functions must be encoded by overlapping genes.

  6. [Molecular, genetic and physiological analysis of photoinhibition and photosynthetic

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    A major goal of this project is to use a combined molecular genetic, biochemical and physiological approach to understand the relationship between photosynthetic performance and the structure of the multifunctional D1 reaction center protein of Photosystem II encoded by the chloroplast psbA gene. Relative to other chloroplast proteins, turover of D1 is rapid and highly light dependent and de novo synthesis of D1 is required for a plant's recovery from short term exposure to irradiances which induce photoinhibitory damage. These observations have led to models for a damage/repair cycle of PSII involving the targeted degradation and replacement of photodamaged D1. To investigate the effects of perturbing the D1 cycle on photosynthesis and autotrophic growth under high and low irradiance, we have examined the consequences of site-specific mutations of the psbA and 16S rRNA genes affecting synthesis, maturation and function/stability of the D1 protein introduced into the chloroplast genome of wildtype strain of the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii using biolistic transformation.

  7. Analysis of genetics and risk factors of Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Panpalli Ates, M; Karaman, Y; Guntekin, S; Ergun, M A

    2016-06-14

    Alzheimer's Disease is the leading neurodegenerative cause of dementia. The pathogenesis is not clearly understood yet, is believed to be the complex interaction between genetic and environmental factors. Consequently vascular risk factors and Apolipoprotein E genotyping are increasingly gaining importance. This study aimed at assessing the relationships between Alzheimer's Disease and Apolipoprotein E phenotype and vascular risk factors. Patients diagnosed with "possible Alzheimer's Disease" in the Gazi University, Department of Neurology, were included in the study and age-matched volunteer patients who attended the polyclinic were included as a control group. In this study, the risk factors including low education level, smoking, hyperlipidemia, higher serum total cholesterol levels, and hyperhomocysteinemia were found to be statistically significantly more common in the Alzheimer's Disease group in comparison to the Control Group, while all Apolipoprotein E ε4/ε4 genotypes were found in the Alzheimer's Disease group. The presence of the Apolipoprotein E ε4 allele is believed to increase vascular risk factors as well as to affect Alzheimer's Disease directly. The biological indicators which are used in identifying the patients' genes will be probably used in the treatment plan of the patients in the future.

  8. Genetic diversity analysis of highly incomplete SNP genotype data with imputations: an empirical assessment.

    PubMed

    Fu, Yong-Bi

    2014-03-13

    Genotyping by sequencing (GBS) recently has emerged as a promising genomic approach for assessing genetic diversity on a genome-wide scale. However, concerns are not lacking about the uniquely large unbalance in GBS genotype data. Although some genotype imputation has been proposed to infer missing observations, little is known about the reliability of a genetic diversity analysis of GBS data, with up to 90% of observations missing. Here we performed an empirical assessment of accuracy in genetic diversity analysis of highly incomplete single nucleotide polymorphism genotypes with imputations. Three large single-nucleotide polymorphism genotype data sets for corn, wheat, and rice were acquired, and missing data with up to 90% of missing observations were randomly generated and then imputed for missing genotypes with three map-independent imputation methods. Estimating heterozygosity and inbreeding coefficient from original, missing, and imputed data revealed variable patterns of bias from assessed levels of missingness and genotype imputation, but the estimation biases were smaller for missing data without genotype imputation. The estimates of genetic differentiation were rather robust up to 90% of missing observations but became substantially biased when missing genotypes were imputed. The estimates of topology accuracy for four representative samples of interested groups generally were reduced with increased levels of missing genotypes. Probabilistic principal component analysis based imputation performed better in terms of topology accuracy than those analyses of missing data without genotype imputation. These findings are not only significant for understanding the reliability of the genetic diversity analysis with respect to large missing data and genotype imputation but also are instructive for performing a proper genetic diversity analysis of highly incomplete GBS or other genotype data.

  9. Simple sequence repeat analysis of genetic diversity in primary core collection of peach (Prunus persica).

    PubMed

    Li, Tian-Hong; Li, Yin-Xia; Li, Zi-Chao; Zhang, Hong-Liang; Qi, Yong-Wen; Wang, Tao

    2008-01-01

    In this study, the genetic diversity of 51 cultivars in the primary core collection of peach (Prunus persica (L.) Batsch) was evaluated by using simple sequence repeats (SSRs). The phylogenetic relationships and the evolutionary history among different cultivars were determined on the basis of SSR data. Twenty-two polymorphic SSR primer pairs were selected, and a total of 111 alleles were identified in the 51 cultivars, with an average of 5 alleles per locus. According to traditional Chinese classification of peach cultivars, the 51 cultivars in the peach primary core collection belong to six variety groups. The SSR analysis revealed that the levels of the genetic diversity within each variety group were ranked as Sweet peach > Crisp peach > Flat peach > Nectarine > Honey Peach > Yellow fleshed peach. The genetic diversity among the Chinese cultivars was higher than that among the introduced cultivars. Cluster analysis by the unweighted pair group method with arithmetic averaging (UPGMA) placed the 51 cultivars into five linkage clusters. Cultivar members from the same variety group were distributed in different UPGMA clusters and some members from different variety groups were placed under the same cluster. Different variety groups could not be differentiated in accordance with SSR markers. The SSR analysis revealed rich genetic diversity in the peach primary core collection, representative of genetic resources of peach.

  10. Distribution and genetic analysis of TTV and TTMV major phylogenetic groups in French blood donors.

    PubMed

    Biagini, Philippe; Gallian, Pierre; Cantaloube, Jean-François; Attoui, Houssam; de Micco, Philippe; de Lamballerie, Xavier

    2006-02-01

    TTV and TTMV (recently assigned to the floating genus Anellovirus) infect human populations (including healthy individuals) at high prevalence (>80%). They display notably high levels of genetic diversity, but very little is known regarding the distribution of Anellovirus genetic groups in human populations. We analyzed the distribution of the major genetic groups of TTV and TTMV in healthy voluntary blood donors using group-independent and group-specific PCR amplifications systems, combined with sequence determination and phylogenetic analysis. Analysis of Anellovirus groups revealed a non-random pattern of group distribution with a predominant prevalence of TTV phylogenetic groups 1, 3, and 5, and of TTMV group 1. Multiple co-infections were observed. In addition, TTMV sequences exhibiting a high genetic divergence with reference sequences were identified. This study provided the first picture of the genetic distribution of the major phylogenetic groups of members of the genus Anellovirus in a cohort of French voluntary blood donors. Obtaining such data from a reference population comprising healthy individuals was an essential step that will allow the subsequent comparative analysis of cohorts including patients with well-characterized diseases, in order to identify any possible relationship between Anellovirus infection and human diseases.

  11. Molecular genetic analysis of patients with sporadic and X-linked infantile nystagmus

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Hui; Huang, Xiu-Feng; Zheng, Zhi-Li; Deng, Wen-Li; Lei, Xin-Lan; Xing, Dong-Jun; Ye, Liang; Xu, Su-Zhong; Chen, Jie; Zhang, Fang; Yu, Xin-Ping; Jin, Zi-Bing

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Infantile nystagmus (IN) is a genetically heterogeneous condition characterised by involuntary rhythmic oscillations of the eyes accompanied by different degrees of vision impairment. Two genes have been identified as mainly causing IN: FRMD7 and GPR143. The aim of our study was to identify the genetic basis of both sporadic IN and X-linked IN. Design Prospective analysis. Patients Twenty Chinese patients, including 15 sporadic IN cases and 5 from X-linked IN families, were recruited and underwent molecular genetic analysis. We first performed PCR-based DNA sequencing of the entire coding region and the splice junctions of the FRMD7 and GPR143 genes in participants. Mutational analysis and co-segregation confirmation were then performed. Setting All clinical examinations and genetic experiments were performed in the Eye Hospital of Wenzhou Medical University. Results Two mutations in the FRMD7 gene, including one novel nonsense mutation (c.1090C>T, p.Q364X) and one reported missense mutation (c.781C>G, p.R261G), were identified in two of the five (40%) X-linked IN families. However, none of putative mutations were identified in FRMD7 or GPR143 in any of the sporadic cases. Conclusions The results suggest that mutations in FRMD7 appeared to be the major genetic cause of X-linked IN, but not of sporadic IN. Our findings provide further insights into FRMD7 mutations, which could be helpful for future genetic diagnosis and genetic counselling of Chinese patients with nystagmus. PMID:27036142

  12. Multilocus spacer analysis revealed highly homogeneous genetic background of Asian type of Borrelia miyamotoi.

    PubMed

    Mukhacheva, Tatyana A; Salikhova, Irina I; Kovalev, Sergey Y

    2015-04-01

    Borrelia miyamotoi, a member of the relapsing fever group borreliae, was first isolated in Japan and subsequently found in Ixodes ticks in North America, Europe and Russia. Currently, there are three types of B. miyamotoi: Asian or Siberian (transmitted mainly by Ixodes persulcatus), European (Ixodesricinus) and American (Ixodesscapularis and Ixodespacificus). Despite the great genetic distances between B. miyamotoi types, isolates within a type are characterised by an extremely low genetic variability. In particular, strains of B. miyamotoi of Asian type, isolated in Russia from the Baltic sea to the Far East, have been shown to be identical based on the analysis of several conventional genetic markers, such as 16S rRNA, flagellin, outer membrane protein p66 and glpQ genes. Thus, protein or rRNA - coding genes were shown not to be informative enough in studying genetic diversity of B. miyamotoi within a type. In the present paper, we have attempted to design a new multilocus technique based on eight non-coding intergenic spacers (3686bp in total) and have applied it to the analysis of intra-type genetic variability of В. miyamotoi detected in different regions of Russia and from two tick species, I. persulcatus and Ixodespavlovskyi. However, even though potentially the most variable loci were selected, no genetic variability between studied DNA samples was found, except for one nucleotide substitution in two of them. The sequences obtained were identical to those of the reference strain FR64b. Analysis of the data obtained with the GenBank sequences indicates a highly homogeneous genetic background of B. miyamotoi from the Baltic Sea to the Japanese Islands. In this paper, a hypothesis of clonal expansion of B. miyamotoi is discussed, as well as possible mechanisms for the rapid dissemination of one B. miyamotoi clone over large distances.

  13. Genetic analysis, in silico prediction, and family segregation in long QT syndrome.

    PubMed

    Riuró, Helena; Campuzano, Oscar; Berne, Paola; Arbelo, Elena; Iglesias, Anna; Pérez-Serra, Alexandra; Coll-Vidal, Mònica; Partemi, Sara; Mademont-Soler, Irene; Picó, Ferran; Allegue, Catarina; Oliva, Antonio; Gerstenfeld, Edward; Sarquella-Brugada, Georgia; Castro-Urda, Víctor; Fernández-Lozano, Ignacio; Mont, Lluís; Brugada, Josep; Scornik, Fabiana S; Brugada, Ramon

    2015-01-01

    The heritable cardiovascular disorder long QT syndrome (LQTS), characterized by prolongation of the QT interval on electrocardiogram, carries a high risk of sudden cardiac death. We sought to add new data to the existing knowledge of genetic mutations contributing to LQTS to both expand our understanding of its genetic basis and assess the value of genetic testing in clinical decision-making. Direct sequencing of the five major contributing genes, KCNQ1, KCNH2, SCN5A, KCNE1, and KCNE2, was performed in a cohort of 115 non-related LQTS patients. Pathogenicity of the variants was analyzed using family segregation, allele frequency from public databases, conservation analysis, and Condel and Provean in silico predictors. Phenotype-genotype correlations were analyzed statistically. Sequencing identified 36 previously described and 18 novel mutations. In 51.3% of the index cases, mutations were found, mostly in KCNQ1, KCNH2, and SCN5A; 5.2% of cases had multiple mutations. Pathogenicity analysis revealed 39 mutations as likely pathogenic, 12 as VUS, and 3 as non-pathogenic. Clinical analysis revealed that 75.6% of patients with QTc≥500 ms were genetically confirmed. Our results support the use of genetic testing of KCNQ1, KCNH2, and SCN5A as part of the diagnosis of LQTS and to help identify relatives at risk of SCD. Further, the genetic tools appear more valuable as disease severity increases. However, the identification of genetic variations in the clinical investigation of single patients using bioinformatic tools can produce erroneous conclusions regarding pathogenicity. Therefore segregation studies are key to determining causality.

  14. Genetic analysis, in silico prediction, and family segregation in long QT syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Riuró, Helena; Campuzano, Oscar; Berne, Paola; Arbelo, Elena; Iglesias, Anna; Pérez-Serra, Alexandra; Coll-Vidal, Mònica; Partemi, Sara; Mademont-Soler, Irene; Picó, Ferran; Allegue, Catarina; Oliva, Antonio; Gerstenfeld, Edward; Sarquella-Brugada, Georgia; Castro-Urda, Víctor; Fernández-Lozano, Ignacio; Mont, Lluís; Brugada, Josep; Scornik, Fabiana S; Brugada, Ramon

    2015-01-01

    The heritable cardiovascular disorder long QT syndrome (LQTS), characterized by prolongation of the QT interval on electrocardiogram, carries a high risk of sudden cardiac death. We sought to add new data to the existing knowledge of genetic mutations contributing to LQTS to both expand our understanding of its genetic basis and assess the value of genetic testing in clinical decision-making. Direct sequencing of the five major contributing genes, KCNQ1, KCNH2, SCN5A, KCNE1, and KCNE2, was performed in a cohort of 115 non-related LQTS patients. Pathogenicity of the variants was analyzed using family segregation, allele frequency from public databases, conservation analysis, and Condel and Provean in silico predictors. Phenotype-genotype correlations were analyzed statistically. Sequencing identified 36 previously described and 18 novel mutations. In 51.3% of the index cases, mutations were found, mostly in KCNQ1, KCNH2, and SCN5A; 5.2% of cases had multiple mutations. Pathogenicity analysis revealed 39 mutations as likely pathogenic, 12 as VUS, and 3 as non-pathogenic. Clinical analysis revealed that 75.6% of patients with QTc≥500 ms were genetically confirmed. Our results support the use of genetic testing of KCNQ1, KCNH2, and SCN5A as part of the diagnosis of LQTS and to help identify relatives at risk of SCD. Further, the genetic tools appear more valuable as disease severity increases. However, the identification of genetic variations in the clinical investigation of single patients using bioinformatic tools can produce erroneous conclusions regarding pathogenicity. Therefore segregation studies are key to determining causality. PMID:24667783

  15. [Molecular-genetic analysis of wheat (T. aestivum L.) genome with introgression of Ae. cylindrica Host genetic elements].

    PubMed

    Galaev, A V; Sivolap, Iu M

    2005-01-01

    Wheat-aegilops hybrid plants Triticum aestivum L. (2n = 42) x Aegilops cylindrica Host (2n = 28) were investigated with using microsatellite markers. In two BC1F9 lines some genome modifications connected with losing DNA fragments of initial variety or appearing of Aegilops genome elements were detected. In some investigated hybrids new amplicons lacking in parental plants were found. Substitution of wheat chromosomes for aegilops chromosomes was not revealed. Analysis of microsatellite loci in BC2F5 plants showed stable introgression of aegilops genetic elements into wheat; elimination of some transferred aegilops DNA fragments in the course of backcrossing; decreasing size of introgressive elements after backcrossing. Introgressive lines were classified according to genome changes.

  16. Molecular genetic analysis of two families with keratosis follicularis spinulosa decalvans: refinement of gene localization and evidence for genetic heterogeneity.

    PubMed

    Oosterwijk, J C; Richard, G; van der Wielen, M J; van de Vosse, E; Harth, W; Sandkuijl, L A; Bakker, E; van Ommen, G J

    1997-10-01

    X-linked keratosis follicularis spinulosa decalvans (KFSD) is a rare disorder affecting both skin and eyes. In the two extended KFSD families analysed to date, the gene was mapped to Xp22.13-p22.2. By analyzing several new markers in this region, we were able to narrow the candidate region to a 1-Mb interval between DXS7161 and (DXS7593, DXS7105) in the large Dutch pedigree. In addition, we analyzed 23 markers in Xp21.2-p22.2 in a German family with KFSD. Haplotype and recombination analysis positioned the KFSD gene in this family most likely outside the candidate region on Xp22.13-p22.2. This finding is suggestive for genetic heterogeneity: in this pedigree there is either another locus on the X-chromosome, or KFSD is transmitted here as an autosomal dominant trait with variable expression.

  17. Genetic analysis of Eclosion hormone action during Drosophila larval ecdysis.

    PubMed

    Krüger, Eileen; Mena, Wilson; Lahr, Eleanor C; Johnson, Erik C; Ewer, John

    2015-12-15

    Insect growth is punctuated by molts, during which the animal produces a new exoskeleton. The molt culminates in ecdysis, an ordered sequence of behaviors that causes the old cuticle to be shed. This sequence is activated by Ecdysis triggering hormone (ETH), which acts on the CNS to activate neurons that produce neuropeptides implicated in ecdysis, including Eclosion hormone (EH), Crustacean cardioactive peptide (CCAP) and Bursicon. Despite more than 40 years of research on ecdysis, our understanding of the precise roles of these neurohormones remains rudimentary. Of particular interest is EH; although it is known to upregulate ETH release, other roles for EH have remained elusive. We isolated an Eh null mutant in Drosophila and used it to investigate the role of EH in larval ecdysis. We found that null mutant animals invariably died at around the time of ecdysis, revealing an essential role in its control. Further analyses showed that these animals failed to express the preparatory behavior of pre-ecdysis while directly expressing the motor program of ecdysis. Although ETH release could not be detected, the lack of pre-ecdysis could not be rescued by injections of ETH, suggesting that EH is required within the CNS for ETH to trigger the normal ecdysial sequence. Using a genetically encoded calcium probe, we showed that EH configured the response of the CNS to ETH. These findings show that EH plays an essential role in the Drosophila CNS in the control of ecdysis, in addition to its known role in the periphery of triggering ETH release.

  18. Genetic Analysis of Desiccation Tolerance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Calahan, Dean; Dunham, Maitreya; DeSevo, Chris; Koshland, Douglas E.

    2011-01-01

    Desiccation tolerance, the ability to survive nearly total dehydration, is a rare strategy for survival and reproduction observed in all taxa. However, the mechanism and regulation of this phenomenon are poorly understood. Correlations between desiccation tolerance and potential effectors have been reported in many species, but their physiological significance has not been established in vivo. Although the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae exhibits extreme desiccation tolerance, its usefulness has been hampered by an inability to reduce tolerance more than a few fold by physiological or genetic perturbations. Here we report that fewer than one in a million yeast cells from low-density logarithmic cultures survive desiccation, while 20–40% of cells from saturated cultures survive. Using this greatly expanded metric, we show that mutants defective in trehalose biosynthesis, hydrophilins, responses to hyperosmolarity, and hypersalinity, reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenging and DNA damage repair nevertheless retain wild-type levels of desiccation tolerance, suggesting that this trait involves a unique constellation of stress factors. A genome-wide screen for mutants that render stationary cells as sensitive as log phase cells identifies only mutations that block respiration. Respiration as a prerequisite for acquiring desiccation tolerance is corroborated by respiration inhibition and by growth on nonfermentable carbon sources. Suppressors bypassing the respiration requirement for desiccation tolerance reveal at least two pathways, one of which, involving the Mediator transcription complex, is associated with the shift from fermentative to respiratory metabolism. Further study of these regulators and their targets should provide important clues to the sensors and effectors of desiccation tolerance. PMID:21840858

  19. Molecular genetic analysis of circadian timekeeping in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Hardin, Paul E

    2011-01-01

    A genetic screen for mutants that alter circadian rhythms in Drosophila identified the first clock gene-the period (per) gene. The per gene is a central player within a transcriptional feedback loop that represents the core mechanism for keeping circadian time in Drosophila and other animals. The per feedback loop, or core loop, is interlocked with the Clock (Clk) feedback loop, but whether the Clk feedback loop contributes to circadian timekeeping is not known. A series of distinct molecular events are thought to control transcriptional feedback in the core loop. The time it takes to complete these events should take much less than 24h, thus delays must be imposed at different steps within the core loop. As new clock genes are identified, the molecular mechanisms responsible for these delays have been revealed in ever-increasing detail and provide an in-depth accounting of how transcriptional feedback loops keep circadian time. The phase of these feedback loops shifts to maintain synchrony with environmental cycles, the most reliable of which is light. Although a great deal is known about cell-autonomous mechanisms of light-induced phase shifting by CRYPTOCHROME (CRY), much less is known about non-cell autonomous mechanisms. CRY mediates phase shifts through an uncharacterized mechanism in certain brain oscillator neurons and carries out a dual role as a photoreceptor and transcription factor in other tissues. Here, I review how transcriptional feedback loops function to keep time in Drosophila, how they impose delays to maintain a 24-h cycle, and how they maintain synchrony with environmental light:dark cycles. The transcriptional feedback loops that keep time in Drosophila are well conserved in other animals, thus what we learn about these loops in Drosophila should continue to provide insight into the operation of analogous transcriptional feedback loops in other animals.

  20. Genetic and biochemical analysis of peptide transport in Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Andrews, J.C.

    1986-01-01

    E. coli peptide transport mutants have been isolated based on their resistance to toxic tripeptides. These genetic defects were found to map in two distinct chromosomal locations. The transport systems which require expression of the trp-linked opp genes and the oppE gene(s) for activity were shown to have different substrate preferences. Growth of E. coli in medium containing leucine results in increased entry of exogenously supplied tripeptides into the bacterial cell. This leucine-mediated elevation of peptide transport required expression of the trp-linked opp operon and was accompanied by increased sensitivity to toxic tripeptides, by an enhanced capacity to utilize nutritional peptides, and by an increase in both the velocity and apparent steady-state level of L-(U-/sup 14/C)alanyl-L-alanyl-L-alanine accumulation for E. coli grown in leucine-containing medium relative to these parameters of peptide transport measured with bacteria grown in media lacking leucine. Direct measurement of opp operon expression by pulse-labeling experiments demonstrated that growth of E. coli in the presence of leucine resulted in increased synthesis of the oppA-encoded periplasmic binding protein. The transcriptional regulation of the trp-linked opp operon of E. coli was investigated using lambda placMu51-generated lac operon fusions. Synthesis of ..beta..-galactosidase by strains harboring oppA-lac, oppB-lac, and oppD-lac fusions occurred at a basal level when the fusion-containing strains were grown in minimal medium.

  1. Genetic linkage analysis in the age of whole-genome sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Ott, Jurg; Wang, Jing; Leal, Suzanne M.

    2015-01-01

    For many years, linkage analysis was the primary tool used for the genetic mapping of Mendelian and complex traits with familial aggregation. Linkage analysis was largely supplanted by the wide adoption of genome-wide association studies (GWASs). However, with the recent increased use of whole-genome sequencing (WGS), linkage analysis is again emerging as an important and powerful analysis method for the identification of genes involved in disease aetiology, often in conjunction with WGS filtering approaches. Here, we review the principles of linkage analysis and provide practical guidelines for carrying out linkage studies using WGS data. PMID:25824869

  2. Temporal analysis of mtDNA variation reveals decreased genetic diversity in least terns

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Draheim, Hope M.; Baird, Patricia; Haig, Susan M.

    2012-01-01

    The Least Tern (Sternula antillarum) has undergone large population declines over the last century as a result of direct and indirect anthropogenic factors. The genetic implications of these declines are unknown. We used historical museum specimens (pre-1960) and contemporary (2001–2005) samples to examine range-wide phylogeographic patterns and investigate potential loss in the species' genetic variation. We obtained sequences (522 bp) of the mitochondrial gene for NADH dehydrogenase subunit 6 (ND6) from 268 individuals from across the species' range. Phylogeographic analysis revealed no association with geography or traditional subspecies designations. However, we detected potential reductions in genetic diversity in contemporary samples from California and the Atlantic coast Least Tern from that in historical samples, suggesting that current genetic diversity in Least Tern populations is lower than in their pre-1960 counterparts. Our results offer unique insights into changes in the Least Tern's genetic diversity over the past century and highlight the importance and utility of museum specimens in studies of conservation genetics.

  3. RAPD-SCAR marker and genetic relationship analysis of three Demodex species (Acari: Demodicidae).

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ya-E; Wu, Li-Ping

    2012-06-01

    For a long time, classification of Demodex mites has been mainly based on their hosts and phenotype characteristics. The study was the first to conduct molecular identification and genetic relationship analysis for six isolates of three Demodex species by random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) and sequence-characterized amplified region (SCAR) marker. Totally, 239 DNA fragments were amplified from six Demodex isolates with 10 random primers in RAPD, of which 165 were polymorphic. Using a single primer, at least five fragments and at most 40 in the six isolates were amplified, whereas within a single isolate, a range of 35-49 fragments were amplified. DNA fingerprints of primers CZ 1-9 revealed intra- and interspecies difference in six Demodex isolates, whereas primer CZ 10 only revealed interspecies difference. The genetic distance and dendrogram showed the intraspecific genetic distances were closer than the interspecific genetic distances. The interspecific genetic distances of Demodex folliculorum and Demodex canis (0.7931-0.8140) were shorter than that of Demodex brevis and D. canis (0.8182-0.8987). The RAPD-SCAR marker displayed primer CZ 10 could be applied to identify the three Demodex species. The 479-bp fragment was specific for D. brevis, and the 261-bp fragment was specific for D. canis. The conclusion was that the RAPD-SCAR multi-marker was effective in molecular identification of three Demodex species. The genetic relationship between D. folliculorum and D. canis was nearer than that between D. folliculorum and D. brevis.

  4. Borderline personality traits and adult attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder symptoms: a genetic analysis of comorbidity.

    PubMed

    Distel, Marijn A; Carlier, Angela; Middeldorp, Christel M; Derom, Catherine A; Lubke, Gitta H; Boomsma, Dorret I

    2011-12-01

    Previous research has established the comorbidity of adult Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) with different personality disorders including Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD). The association between adult ADHD and BPD has primarily been investigated at the phenotypic level and not yet at the genetic level. The present study investigates the genetic and environmental contributions to the association between borderline personality traits (BPT) and ADHD symptoms in a sample of 7,233 twins and siblings (aged 18-90 years) registered with the Netherlands Twin Register and the East Flanders Prospective Twin Survey (EFPTS) . Participants completed the Conners' Adult ADHD Rating Scales (CAARS-S:SV) and the Personality Assessment Inventory-Borderline Features Scale (PAI-BOR). A bivariate genetic analysis was performed to determine the extent to which genetic and environmental factors influence variation in BPT and ADHD symptoms and the covariance between them. The heritability of BPT and ADHD symptoms was estimated at 45 and 36%, respectively. The remaining variance in BPT and ADHD symptoms was explained by unique environmental influences. The phenotypic correlation between BPT and ADHD symptoms was estimated at r = 0.59, and could be explained for 49% by genetic factors and 51% by environmental factors. The genetic and environmental correlations between BPT and ADHD symptoms were 0.72 and 0.51, respectively. The shared etiology between BPT and ADHD symptoms is thus a likely cause for the comorbidity of the two disorders.

  5. Analysis of Genetic Variation and Potential Applications in Genome-Scale Metabolic Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Cardoso, João G. R.; Andersen, Mikael Rørdam; Herrgård, Markus J.; Sonnenschein, Nikolaus

    2015-01-01

    Genetic variation is the motor of evolution and allows organisms to overcome the environmental challenges they encounter. It can be both beneficial and harmful in the process of engineering cell factories for the production of proteins and chemicals. Throughout the history of biotechnology, there have been efforts to exploit genetic variation in our favor to create strains with favorable phenotypes. Genetic variation can either be present in natural populations or it can be artificially created by mutagenesis and selection or adaptive laboratory evolution. On the other hand, unintended genetic variation during a long term production process may lead to significant economic losses and it is important to understand how to control this type of variation. With the emergence of next-generation sequencing technologies, genetic variation in microbial strains can now be determined on an unprecedented scale and resolution by re-sequencing thousands of strains systematically. In this article, we review challenges in the integration and analysis of large-scale re-sequencing data, present an extensive overview of bioinformatics methods for predicting the effects of genetic variants on protein function, and discuss approaches for interfacing existing bioinformatics approaches with genome-scale models of cellular processes in order to predict effects of sequence variation on cellular phenotypes. PMID:25763369

  6. Molecular Analysis of Genetic Markers for Non-Hodgkin Lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Sholl, Lynette M; Longtine, Janina; Kuo, Frank C

    2017-04-06

    Molecular analysis complements the clinical and histopathologic tools used to diagnose and subclassify hematologic malignancies. The presence of clonal antigen-receptor gene rearrangements can help to confirm the diagnosis of a B or T cell lymphoma and can serve as a fingerprint of that neoplasm to be used in identifying concurrent disease at disparate sites or recurrence at future time points. Certain lymphoid malignancies harbor a characteristic chromosomal translocation, a finding that may have significant implications for an individual's prognosis or response to therapy. The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is typically used to detect antigen-receptor gene rearrangements as well as specific translocations that can be supplemented by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and karyotype analysis. © 2017 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  7. Classical mechanics approach applied to analysis of genetic oscillators.

    PubMed

    Vasylchenkova, Anastasiia; Mraz, Miha; Zimic, Nikolaj; Moskon, Miha

    2016-04-05

    Biological oscillators present a fundamental part of several regulatory mechanisms that control the response of various biological systems. Several analytical approaches for their analysis have been reported recently. They are, however, limited to only specific oscillator topologies and/or to giving only qualitative answers, i.e., is the dynamics of an oscillator given the parameter space oscillatory or not. Here we present a general analytical approach that can be applied to the analysis of biological oscillators. It relies on the projection of biological systems to classical mechanics systems. The approach is able to provide us with relatively accurate results in the meaning of type of behaviour system reflects (i.e. oscillatory or not) and periods of potential oscillations without the necessity to conduct expensive numerical simulations. We demonstrate and verify the proposed approach on three different implementations of amplified negative feedback oscillator.

  8. Whole-Genome sequencing and genetic variant analysis of a quarter Horse mare

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The catalog of genetic variants in the horse genome originates from a few select animals, the majority originating from the Thoroughbred mare used for the equine genome sequencing project. The purpose of this study was to identify genetic variants, including single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), insertion/deletion polymorphisms (INDELs), and copy number variants (CNVs) in the genome of an individual Quarter Horse mare sequenced by next-generation sequencing. Results Using massively parallel paired-end sequencing, we generated 59.6 Gb of DNA sequence from a Quarter Horse mare resulting in an average of 24.7X sequence coverage. Reads were mapped to approximately 97% of the reference Thoroughbred genome. Unmapped reads were de novo assembled resulting in 19.1 Mb of new genomic sequence in the horse. Using a stringent filtering method, we identified 3.1 million SNPs, 193 thousand INDELs, and 282 CNVs. Genetic variants were annotated to determine their impact on gene structure and function. Additionally, we genotyped this Quarter Horse for mutations of known diseases and for variants associated with particular traits. Functional clustering analysis of genetic variants revealed that most of the genetic variation in the horse's genome was enriched in sensory perception, signal transduction, and immunity and defense pathways. Conclusions This is the first sequencing of a horse genome by next-generation sequencing and the first genomic sequence of an individual Quarter Horse mare. We have increased the catalog of genetic variants for use in equine genomics by the addition of novel SNPs, INDELs, and CNVs. The genetic variants described here will be a useful resource for future studies of genetic variation regulating performance traits and diseases in equids. PMID:22340285

  9. Aceruloplasminemia in an asymptomatic patient with a new mutation. Diagnosis and family genetic analysis.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Aguilar, Fernando; Burguera, Juan A; Benlloch, Salvador; Berenguer, Marina; Rayón, Jose M

    2005-06-01

    A 39-year-old asymptomatic man showed elevated serum ferritin levels, mild hypertransaminasemia and serum ceruloplasmin almost undetectable. There was histological iron accumulation within the hepatocytes and also in the central nervous system (MRI). A genetic analysis revealed a new missense mutation in the ceruloplasmin gene. Two of the other four siblings were also affected by this mutation.

  10. Calibration of Uncertainty Analysis of the SWAT Model Using Genetic Algorithms and Bayesian Model Averaging

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In this paper, the Genetic Algorithms (GA) and Bayesian model averaging (BMA) were combined to simultaneously conduct calibration and uncertainty analysis for the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT). In this hybrid method, several SWAT models with different structures are first selected; next GA i...

  11. Towards an integrated ecosystem of R packages for the analysis of population genetic data

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Computer programs have early on taken a central place in the analysis of population genetic data. The continuous increase in amount and diversity of data, together with the emergence of new pressing questions related to the adaptation of populations of plants and animals in the face of global change...

  12. Genetic diversity and association analysis of leafminer (Liriomyza langei) resistance in spinach (Spinacia oleracea)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Leafminer (Liriomyza spp.) is a major insect pest of many important agricultural crops, including spinach (Spinacia oleracea). Use of genetic resistance is an efficient, economic and environment-friendly method to control this pest. The objective of this research was to conduct association analysis ...

  13. Web-Based Analysis for Student-Generated Complex Genetic Profiles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kass, David H.; LaRoe, Robert

    2007-01-01

    A simple, rapid method for generating complex genetic profiles using Alu-based markers was recently developed for students primarily at the undergraduate level to learn more about forensics and paternity analysis. On the basis of the Cold Spring Harbor Allele Server, which provides an excellent tool for analyzing a single Alu variant, we present a…

  14. Genetic and Environmental Components of Adolescent Adjustment and Parental Behavior: A Multivariate Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loehlin, John C.; Neiderhiser, Jenae M.; Reiss, David

    2005-01-01

    Adolescent adjustment measures may be related to each other and to the social environment in various ways. Are these relationships similar in genetic and environmental sources of covariation, or different? A multivariate behaviorgenetic analysis was made of 6 adjustment and 3 treatment composites from the study Nonshared Environment in Adolescent…

  15. Population and genomic lessons from genetic analysis of two Indian populations.

    PubMed

    Juyal, Garima; Mondal, Mayukh; Luisi, Pierre; Laayouni, Hafid; Sood, Ajit; Midha, Vandana; Heutink, Peter; Bertranpetit, Jaume; Thelma, B K; Casals, Ferran

    2014-10-01

    Indian demographic history includes special features such as founder effects, interpopulation segregation, complex social structure with a caste system and elevated frequency of consanguineous marriages. It also presents a higher frequency for some rare mendelian disorders and in the last two decades increased prevalence of some complex disorders. Despite the fact that India represents about one-sixth of the human population, deep genetic studies from this terrain have been scarce. In this study, we analyzed high-density genotyping and whole-exome sequencing data of a North and a South Indian population. Indian populations show higher differentiation levels than those reported between populations of other continents. In this work, we have analyzed its consequences, by specifically assessing the transferability of genetic markers from or to Indian populations. We show that there is limited genetic marker portability from available genetic resources such as HapMap or the 1,000 Genomes Project to Indian populations, which also present an excess of private rare variants. Conversely, tagSNPs show a high level of portability between the two Indian populations, in contrast to the common belief that North and South Indian populations are genetically very different. By estimating kinship from mates and consanguinity in our data from trios, we also describe different patterns of assortative mating and inbreeding in the two populations, in agreement with distinct mating preferences and social structures. In addition, this analysis has allowed us to describe genomic regions under recent adaptive selection, indicating differential adaptive histories for North and South Indian populations. Our findings highlight the importance of considering demography for design and analysis of genetic studies, as well as the need for extending human genetic variation catalogs to new populations and particularly to those with particular demographic histories.

  16. Flexible semiparametric analysis of longitudinal genetic studies by reduced rank smoothing

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yuanjia; Huang, Chiahui; Fang, Yixin; Yang, Qiong; Li, Runze

    2011-01-01

    In family-based longitudinal genetic studies, investigators collect repeated measurements on a trait that changes with time along with genetic markers. Since repeated measurements are nested within subjects and subjects are nested within families, both the subject-level and measurement-level correlations must be taken into account in the statistical analysis to achieve more accurate estimation. In such studies, the primary interests include to test for quantitative trait locus (QTL) effect, and to estimate age-specific QTL effect and residual polygenic heritability function. We propose flexible semiparametric models along with their statistical estimation and hypothesis testing procedures for longitudinal genetic designs. We employ penalized splines to estimate nonparametric functions in the models. We find that misspecifying the baseline function or the genetic effect function in a parametric analysis may lead to substantially inflated or highly conservative type I error rate on testing and large mean squared error on estimation. We apply the proposed approaches to examine age-specific effects of genetic variants reported in a recent genome-wide association study of blood pressure collected in the Framingham Heart Study. PMID:22581986

  17. Genetic Diversity Analysis of Sugarcane Parents in Chinese Breeding Programmes Using gSSR Markers

    PubMed Central

    You, Qian; Xu, Liping; Zheng, Yifeng; Que, Youxiong

    2013-01-01

    Sugarcane is the most important sugar and bioenergy crop in the world. The selection and combination of parents for crossing rely on an understanding of their genetic structures and molecular diversity. In the present study, 115 sugarcane genotypes used for parental crossing were genotyped based on five genomic simple sequence repeat marker (gSSR) loci and 88 polymorphic alleles of loci (100%) as detected by capillary electrophoresis. The values of genetic diversity parameters across the populations indicate that the genetic variation intrapopulation (90.5%) was much larger than that of interpopulation (9.5%). Cluster analysis revealed that there were three groups termed as groups I, II, and III within the 115 genotypes. The genotypes released by each breeding programme showed closer genetic relationships, except the YC series released by Hainan sugarcane breeding station. Using principle component analysis (PCA), the first and second principal components accounted for a cumulative 76% of the total variances, in which 43% were for common parents and 33% were for new parents, respectively. The knowledge obtained in this study should be useful to future breeding programs for increasing genetic diversity of sugarcane varieties and cultivars to meet the demand of sugarcane cultivation for sugar and bioenergy use. PMID:23990759

  18. Genetic linkage analysis of schizophrenia using chromosome 11q13-24 markers in Israeli pedigrees

    SciTech Connect

    Mulcrone, J.; Marchblanks, R.; Whatley, S.A.

    1995-04-24

    It is generally agreed that there is a genetic component in the etiology of schizophrenia which may be tested by the application of linkage analysis to multiply-affected families. One genetic region of interest is the long arm of chromosome 11 because of previously reported associations of genetic variation in this region with schizophrenia, and because of the fact that it contains the locus for the dopamine D2 receptor gene. In this study we have examined the segregation of schizophrenia with microsatellite dinucleotide repeat DNA markers along chromosome 11q in 5 Israeli families multiply-affected for schizophrenia. The hypothesis of linkage under genetic homogeneity of causation was tested under a number of genetic models. Linkage analysis provided no evidence for significant causal mutations within the region bounded by INT and D11S420 on chromosome 11q. It is still possible, however, that a gene of major effect exists in this region, either with low penetrance or with heterogeneity. 32 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

  19. Evolution of the genetic variability of eight French dairy cattle breeds assessed by pedigree analysis.

    PubMed

    Danchin-Burge, C; Leroy, G; Brochard, M; Moureaux, S; Verrier, E

    2012-06-01

    A pedigree analysis was performed on eight French dairy cattle breeds to assess their change in genetic variability since a first analysis completed in 1996. The Holstein, Normande and Montbéliarde breeds are selected internationally with over hundreds of thousands cows registered in the performance recording system. Three breeds are internationally selected but with limited numbers of cows in France (Brown Swiss, French Simmental and French Red Pied). The last two remaining breeds (Abondance and Tarentaise) are raised at regional level. The effective numbers of ancestors of cows born between 2004 and 2007 varied between 15 (Abondance and Tarentaise) and 51 (French Red Pied). The effective population sizes (classical approach) varied between 53 (Abondance) and 197 (French Red Pied). This article also compares the genetic variability of the ex situ (collections of the French National Cryobank) and in situ populations. The results were commented in regard to the recent history of gene flows in the different breeds as well as the existence of more or less stringent bottlenecks. Our results showed that whatever the size of the breeds, their genetic diversity impoverished quite rapidly since 1996 and they all could be considered as quite poor from a genetic diversity point of view. It shows the need for setting up cryobanks as gene reservoirs as well as sustainable breeding programmes that include loss of genetic diversity as an integrated control parameter.

  20. [Analysis of genetic variations in different goose breeds using microsatellite markers].

    PubMed

    Liu, Shuang; Li, Peng; Song, Yi; Li, Shi-Ze; Wei, Chun-Bo; Yang, Huan-Min

    2006-11-01

    The genetic diversity of six goose breeds (White Goose, Zi Goose, Huoyan Goose, Wanxi Goose, Rhin, Landoise) was analyzed using microsatellite markers. Heterozygosity(H), polymorphism information content (PIC) and genetic distances were calculated for each breed based on the allele frequency. Results showed that 7 microsatellite sites were highly polymorphic, and could be used as effective markers for analysis of genetic relationship among different goose breeds. The mean heterozygosityies of were between 0.6617 (Rhin) and 0.8814 (Zi goose), among six goose breeds, the lowest was Rhin goose (0.6617) and the highest was Zi goose (0.8814). The range of mean PIC was between 0.6145 and 0.7814, which was in the similar range as the mean heterozygosities. Based on the UPGMA cluster analysis results, six goose breeds were grouped into classes, White, Zi, Huoyan and Wanxi Goose in one class, and the foreign breeds of Rhin and Landoise goose in another class. These results indicated that the dendrogram obtain from genetic distance could be used to correctly reflect the phylogenetic relationship among the six goose breeds, suggesting that microsatellite DNA marker is a useful tool to determine the genetic diversity in closely related breeds.

  1. Teaching Genetics in Secondary Classrooms: a Linguistic Analysis of Teachers' Talk About Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thörne, Karin; Gericke, Niklas

    2014-02-01

    This study investigates Swedish biology teachers' inclusion of proteins when teaching genetics in grade nine (students 15-16 years old). For some years, there has been a call to give attention to proteins when teaching genetics as a means of linking the concepts `gene' and `trait'. Students are known to have problems with this relation because the concepts belong to different organizational levels. However, we know little about how the topic is taught and therefore this case study focuses on how teachers talk about proteins while teaching genetics and if they use proteins as a link between the micro and macro level. Four teachers were recorded during entire genetics teaching sequences, 45 lessons in total. The teachers' verbal communication was then analyzed using thematic pattern analysis, which is based in systemic functional linguistics. The linguistic analysis of teachers' talk in action revealed great variations in both the extent to which they used proteins in explanations of genetics and the ways they included proteins in linking genes and traits. Two of the teachers used protein as a link between gene and trait, while two did not. Three of the four teachers included instruction about protein synthesis. The common message from all teachers was that proteins are built, but none of the teachers talked about genes as exclusively encoding proteins. Our results suggest that students' common lack of understanding of proteins as an intermediate link between gene and trait could be explained by limitations in the way the subject is taught.

  2. [Genetic analysis of Turner syndrome: 89 cases in Tunisia].

    PubMed

    Kammoun, I; Chaabouni, M; Trabelsi, M; Ouertani, I; Kraoua, L; Chelly, I; M'rad, R; Ben Jemaa, L; Maâzoul, F; Chaabouni, H

    2008-11-01

    Turner's syndrome (TS) affects about 1/2500 female infants born alive. The syndrome results from total or partial absence of one of the two X chromosomes normally present in females. We report the results of a retrospective analysis of 89 cases of TS observed during a six-year period (2000-2005). The patients' age ranged from two days to 51 years at the time of this analysis. Most patients were adults (48%). The aim of this study is to ascertain the principal clinical features leading to a request for a karyotype, searching for a possible relationship between chromosomal anomalies and clinical expression of TS. Pediatric patients were referred for statural retardation or dysmorphic features, while reproduction anomalies were the main indication for karyotyping in patients aged over 20 years. Mosaicism was prevalent (47%), whereas the homogeneous karyotype 45,X was found in only 32% of the patients; structural anomalies were found in 21%. Regarding the advanced age of our patients, we established a relationship between chromosome anomalies and the clinical expression of TS, based on an analysis of stature and reproduction disorders. Short stature and primary amenorrhea were correlated with total deletion of one chromosome X or imbalanced gene dosage due to structural X anomalies. Whereas cases of infertility, recurrent miscarriages and secondary amenorrhea were associated with a mosaic karyotype pattern (45,X/46,XX or 45,X/46,XX/47,XXX ...), with a slight mosaicism in most cases. Thus, chromosome investigations should be performed in cases of reproduction failure even for women with normal stature.

  3. Genetic Analysis of Gravity Signal Transduction in Arabidopsis Roots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masson, Patrick; Strohm, Allison; Barker, Richard; Su, Shih-Heng

    Like most other plant organs, roots use gravity as a directional guide for growth. Specialized cells within the columella region of the root cap (the statocytes) sense the direction of gravity through the sedimentation of starch-filled plastids (amyloplasts). Amyloplast movement and/or pressure on sensitive membranes triggers a gravity signal transduction pathway within these cells, which leads to a fast transcytotic relocalization of plasma-membrane associated auxin-efflux carrier proteins of the PIN family (PIN3 and PIN7) toward the bottom membrane. This leads to a polar transport of auxin toward the bottom flank of the cap. The resulting lateral auxin gradient is then transmitted toward the elongation zones where it triggers a curvature that ultimately leads to a restoration of vertical downward growth. Our laboratory is using strategies derived from genetics and systems biology to elucidate the molecular mechanisms that modulate gravity sensing and signal transduction in the columella cells of the root cap. Our previous research uncovered two J-domain-containing proteins, ARG1 and ARL2, as contributing to this process. Mutations in the corresponding paralogous genes led to alterations of root and hypocotyl gravitropism accompanied by an inability for the statocytes to develop a cytoplasmic alkalinization, relocalize PIN3, and transport auxin laterally, in response to gravistimulation. Both proteins are associated peripherally to membranes belonging to various compartments of the vesicular trafficking pathway, potentially modulating the trafficking of defined proteins between plasma membrane and endosomes. MAR1 and MAR2, on the other end, are distinct proteins of the plastidic outer envelope protein import TOC complex (the transmembrane channel TOC75 and the receptor TOC132, respectively). Mutations in the corresponding genes enhance the gravitropic defects of arg1. Using transformation-rescue experiments with truncated versions of TOC132 (MAR2), we have shown

  4. Diagnosing the dead: the retrospective analysis of genetic diseases.

    PubMed

    Rushton, A R

    2013-01-01

    The suspected presence of hereditary disease in important historical and political figures has interested researchers for many decades. Whether Abraham Lincoln suffered from Marfan syndrome, if George III became 'mad' because he inherited variegate porphyria, and if the Romanov dynasty collapsed because the heir Alexei inherited haemophilia are important questions; physical illness can adversely affect the ability of leaders to function within the social and political realm of their day. This article will outline an approach to such a medical-historical analysis including assessment of hereditary predisposition, family history and the use of DNA technology to confirm or deny the clinical suspicions of the investigator.

  5. Genetic analysis of a novel nidovirus from fathead minnows

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Batts, William N.; Goodwin, Andrew E.; Winton, James R.

    2012-01-01

    A bacilliform virus was isolated from diseased fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas). Analysis of the complete genome coding for the polyprotein (pp1ab), spike (S), membrane (M) and nucleocapsid (N) proteins revealed that the virus was most like white bream virus (WBV), another bacilliform virus isolated from white bream (Blicca bjoerkna L.) and the type species of the genus Bafinivirus within the order Nidovirales. In addition to similar gene order and size, alignment of deduced amino acid sequences of the pp1ab, M, N and S proteins of the fathead minnow nidovirus (FHMNV) with those of WBV showed 46, 44, 39 and 15 % identities, respectively. Phylogenetic analysis using the conserved helicase domain of the replicase showed FHMNV was distinct from WBV, yet the closest relative identified to date. Thus, FHMNV appears to represent a second species in the genus Bafinivirus. A PCR assay was developed for the identification of future FHMNV-like isolates.

  6. A genetic study and meta-analysis of the genetic predisposition of prostate cancer in a Chinese population

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Shan-Chao; Ren, Guoping; Yu, Yongwei; Wu, Yudong; Wu, Ji; Xue, Yao; Zhou, Bo; Zhang, Yanling; Xu, Xingxing; Li, Jie; He, Weiyang; Benlloch, Sara; Ross-Adams, Helen; Chen, Li; Li, Jucong; Hong, Yingqia; Kote-Jarai, Zsofia; Cui, Xingang; Hou, Jianguo; Guo, Jianming; Xu, Lei; Yin, Changjun; Zhou, Yuanping; Neal, David E.; Oliver, Tim; Cao, Guangwen; Zhang, Zhengdong; Easton, Douglas F.; Chelala, Claude; Olama, Ali Amin Al; Eeles, Rosalind A.; Zhang, Hongwei; Lu, Yong-Jie

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer predisposition has been extensively investigated in European populations, but there have been few studies of other ethnic groups. To investigate prostate cancer susceptibility in the under-investigated Chinese population, we performed single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array analysis on a cohort of Chinese cases and controls and then meta-analysis with data from the existing Chinese prostate cancer genome-wide association study (GWAS). Genotyping 211,155 SNPs in 495 cases and 640 controls of Chinese ancestry identified several new suggestive Chinese prostate cancer predisposition loci. However, none of them reached genome-wide significance level either by meta-analysis or replication study. The meta-analysis with the Chinese GWAS data revealed that four 8q24 loci are the main contributors to Chinese prostate cancer risk and the risk alleles from three of them exist at much higher frequencies in Chinese than European populations. We also found that several predisposition loci reported in Western populations have different effect on Chinese men. Therefore, this first extensive single-nucleotide polymorphism study of Chinese prostate cancer in comparison with European population indicates that four loci on 8q24 contribute to a great risk of prostate cancer in a considerable large proportion of Chinese men. Based on those four loci, the top 10% of the population have six- or two-fold prostate cancer risk compared with men of the bottom 10% or median risk respectively, which may facilitate the design of prostate cancer genetic risk screening and prevention in Chinese men. These findings also provide additional insights into the etiology and pathogenesis of prostate cancer. PMID:26881390

  7. Convergent evidence from systematic analysis of GWAS revealed genetic basis of esophageal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jiu-qiang; Qu, Su-su; Qu, Yue; Sun, Hong-lei; Liu, Si-dang; Shang, Ying-li

    2016-01-01

    Recent genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with risk of esophageal cancer (EC). However, investigation of genetic basis from the perspective of systematic biology and integrative genomics remains scarce. In this study, we explored genetic basis of EC based on GWAS data and implemented a series of bioinformatics methods including functional annotation, expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) analysis, pathway enrichment analysis and pathway grouped network analysis. Two hundred and thirteen risk SNPs were identified, in which 44 SNPs were found to have significantly differential gene expression in esophageal tissues by eQTL analysis. By pathway enrichment analysis, 170 risk genes mapped by risk SNPs were enriched into 38 significant GO terms and 17 significant KEGG pathways, which were significantly grouped into 9 sub-networks by pathway grouped network analysis. The 9 groups of interconnected pathways were mainly involved with muscle cell proliferation, cellular response to interleukin-6, cell adhesion molecules, and ethanol oxidation, which might participate in the development of EC. Our findings provide genetic evidence and new insight for exploring the molecular mechanisms of EC. PMID:27331408

  8. Genetic linkage analysis of longitudinal hypertension phenotypes using three summary measures

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Shaoqi; Li, Lin; Li, Xia; Moser, Kathy L; Guo, Zheng; Shen, Gongqing; Cannata, Ruth; Zirzow, Erich; Topol, Eric J; Wang, Qing

    2003-01-01

    Background Longitudinal data often have multiple (repeated) measures recorded along a time trajectory. For example, the two cohorts from the Framingham Heart Study (GAW13 Problem 1) contain 21 and 5 repeated measures for hypertension phenotypes as well as epidemiological risk factors, respectively. Direct modelling of a large number of serially and biologically correlated traits in the context of linkage analysis can be prohibitively complex. Alternatively, we may consider using univariate transformation for linkage analysis of longitudinal repeated measures. Results We evaluated the utility of three conventional summary measures (mean, slope, and principal components) for genetic linkage analysis of longitudinal phenotypes by analyzing the chromosome 10 data of the Framingham Heart Study. Except for the temporal slope, all of the summary methods and the multivariate analysis identified the previously reported region, marker GATA64A09, for systolic blood pressure or high blood pressure. Further analysis revealed that this region may harbor gene(s) affecting human blood pressure at multiple stages of life. Conclusion We conclude that mean and principal components are feasible alternatives for genetic linkage analysis of longitudinal phenotypes, but the slope might have a separate genetic basis from that of the original longitudinal phenotypes. PMID:14975092

  9. [Comparative analysis of the genetic structure of Red Polish cattle in Poland and the Ukraine].

    PubMed

    Oblap, R V; Zvezhkhovski, L; Ivanchenko, E V; Glazko, V I

    2002-01-01

    Comparative analysis of genetic structure of two groups of Red Polish cattle, which reproduce in Poland and Ukraine, was made. Six molecular-genetic markers (kappa-casein, beta-lactoglobulin, leptin, myostatin, growth hormone, and pituitary-specific transcription factor Pit-I) were tested by PCR-RFLP. No significant differences between the considered intrabreed groups were found. High frequency of some alleles (Csn kappa B, Blg B, and Gh L) related to the important productivity traits were observed. The rare alleles in some genes were revealed. The obtained results are evidence of the unique characteristics of the investigated breed.

  10. Functional and genetic analysis of the colon cancer network.

    PubMed

    Emmert-Streib, Frank; de Matos Simoes, Ricardo; Glazko, Galina; McDade, Simon; Haibe-Kains, Benjamin; Holzinger, Andreas; Dehmer, Matthias; Campbell, Frederick

    2014-01-01

    Cancer is a complex disease that has proven to be difficult to understand on the single-gene level. For this reason a functional elucidation needs to take interactions among genes on a systems-level into account. In this study, we infer a colon cancer network from a large-scale gene expression data set by using the method BC3Net. We provide a structural and a functional analysis of this network and also connect its molecular interaction structure with the chromosomal locations of the genes enabling the definition of cis- and trans-interactions. Furthermore, we investigate the interaction of genes that can be found in close neighborhoods on the chromosomes to gain insight into regulatory mechanisms. To our knowledge this is the first study analyzing the genome-scale colon cancer network.

  11. Genetic analysis of small ruminant lentiviruses following lactogenic transmission.

    PubMed

    Pisoni, Giuliano; Bertoni, Giuseppe; Manarolla, Giovanni; Vogt, Hans-Rudolf; Scaccabarozzi, Licia; Locatelli, Clara; Moroni, Paolo

    2010-11-10

    Lactogenic transmission plays an important role in the biology of lentiviruses such as HIV and SIV or the small ruminant lentiviruses (SRLV). In this work we analyzed the characteristics of viruses that goats, naturally infected with two strains of SRLV, transmitted to their kids. The spectrum of viral genotypes transmitted was broader and the efficiency of transmission greater compared to their human and simian counterparts. The newly described A10 subgroup of SRLV was more efficiently transmitted than the B1 genotype. The analysis of a particular stretch of the envelope glycoprotein encompassing a potential neutralizing epitope revealed that, as in SIV, the transmitted viruses were positively charged in this region, but, in contrast to SIV, they tended to lack a glycosylation site that might protect against antibody neutralization. We conclude that the physiology of the ruminant neonatal intestine, which permits the adsorption of infected maternal cells, shaped the evolution of these particular lentiviruses that represent a valid model of lactogenic lentivirus transmission.

  12. Species identification through mitochondrial rRNA genetic analysis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Li; Tan, Zongqing; Wang, Daren; Xue, Ling; Guan, Min-xin; Huang, Taosheng; Li, Ronghua

    2014-01-01

    Inter-species and intraspecific variations in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) were observed in a bioinformatics analysis of the mitochondrial genomic sequences of 11 animal species. Some highly conserved regions were identified in the mitochondrial 12S and 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes of these species. To test whether these sequences are universally conserved, primers were designed to target the conserved regions of these two genes and were used to amplify DNA from 21 animal tissues, including two of unknown origin. By sequencing these PCR amplicons and aligning the sequences to a database of non-redundant nucleotide sequences, it was confirmed that these amplicons aligned specifically to mtDNA sequences from the expected species of origin. This molecular technique, when combined with bioinformatics, provides a reliable method for the taxonomic classification of animal tissues. PMID:24522485

  13. Genetic analysis of the role of amyloplasts in shoot gravisensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tasaka, M.; Morita, M.

    Plant can change the growth direction after sensing the gravity orientation This response calls gravitropism and the initial step is the gravisensing We have isolated many Arabidopsis mutants shoot gravitropism sgr with reduced or no gravitropic response in inflorescence stems The analysis of sgr1 and sgr7 revealed that endoderm cells in the inflorescence stems were gravisensing sites zig zigzag sgr4 and sgr3 showed no or reduced gravitropism in shoot respectively and their amyloplasts thought to be statoliths did not sedimented to the orientation of gravity in the endoderm cells ZIG encoded a SNARE AtVTI11 and SGR3 encoded other SNARE AtVAM3 These two SNAREs made a complex in the shoot endoderm cells suggesting that the vesicle transport from trans-Golgi network TGN to prevacuolar compartment PVC and or vacuole was involved in the amyloplasts localization and movement The analysis to visualize amyloplasts and vacuolar membrane in living endoderm cells supported that the vacuole function was important for the amyloplasts movement Recently we have isolated many suppressor mutants of zig One of them named zig suppressor zip 1 had a point mutation in the gene encoded other SNARE of AtVTI12 This protein is a homologous to ZIG AtVTI11 and these two proteins have partially redundant functions Although wild type At VTI 12 could not rescued zig mutated AtVTI12 protein ZIP1 could almost completely play the part of ZIG In zigzip1 amyloplasts in endoderm cells sedimented normally and the shoots showed normal gravitropic response The other

  14. Genetic and alkaloid analysis of Menispermum dauricum DC. by RAPD and HPLC.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jue; Qu, Fan; Nan, Rui

    2007-01-01

    The aim of the present work was to determine whether dauricine could be used as a taxonomic marker for Menispermum dauricum DC., and to explore the correlation among RAPD, ecological markers and chemical markers. To this end, the chemical and genetic differences of 173 individual samples of M. dauricum from nine different sources were studied based on the relevant ecological factors including longitude, latitude, annual precipitation, mean temperature, annual accumulated temperature and mean sea level. The contents of dauricine in the sample rhizomes were assayed by HPLC with photodiode array detection. The leaves from the same sample were assayed using randomly amplified polymorphism DNA (RAPD). The genetic distances were then compared. Hierarchical cluster analysis and multiple linear stepwise regression analysis were used in the statistical analysis. The results indicated that the contents of dauricine were respectively correlated with the genetic distance (r = 1.000), longitude (r = 0.849), latitude (r = 0.861), annual precipitation (r = 0.903), mean temperature(r = 0.912), annual accumulated temperature (r = 0.919) and mean sea level (r = 0.925). It is concluded that the content of dauricine in M. dauricum is significantly correlated with genetic distance and ecological factors, and may be used as the taxonomic marker.

  15. Microsatellite analysis of genetic diversity and population structure of Arabian horse populations.

    PubMed

    Khanshour, Anas; Conant, Eleanore; Juras, Rytis; Cothran, Ernest Gus

    2013-01-01

    The Arabian horse ignites imagination throughout the world. Populations of this breed exist in many countries, and recent genetic work has examined the diversity and ancestry of a few of these populations in isolation. Here, we explore 7 different populations of Arabians represented by 682 horses. Three of these are Middle Eastern populations from near the historical origin of the breed, including Syrian, Persian, and Saudi Arabian. The remaining Western populations are found in Europe (the Shagya Arabian and Polish Arabian) and in America (American Arabian). Analysis of genetic structure was carried out using 15 microsatellite loci. Genetic distances, analysis of molecular variance, factorial correspondence analysis, and a Bayesian method were applied. The results consistently show higher level of diversity within the Middle Eastern populations than the Western populations. The Western Arabian populations were the main source among population variation. Genetic differentiation was not strong among all Middle Eastern populations, but all American Arabians showed differentiation from Middle Eastern populations and were somewhat uniform among themselves. Here, we explore the diversities of many different populations of Arabian horses and find that populations not from the Middle East have noticeably lower levels of diversity, which may adversely affect the health of these populations.

  16. Developing genetic reagents to facilitate recovery, analysis, and maintenance of mouse mutations.

    PubMed

    Rinchik, E M

    2000-07-01

    Because the mouse has become the pre-eminent model system for functional genomics and analysis of complex-systems/pathways in mammals, there has been an escalation of interest in the generation and analysis of mouse mutations to use as tools in these analyses. I argue here for a parallel investment in continuing the development of appropriately marked chromosomal rearrangements to use as genetic reagents in mutation recovery, analysis, and maintenance crosses. Specifically, visibly marked interstitial chromosomal deletions can be valuable for regional mutagenesis screens for recessives based on hemizygosity, and they can also be used to simplify genetic fine-mapping as a prelude to gene identification based on positional cloning/candidacy strategies. Dominantly marked chromosomal inversions that also manifest some kind of recessive phenotype can be exploited in more extensive regional mutagenesis screens based on homozygosity, and are invaluable for simplified, low-cost and error-reduced mutant-stock maintenance. Also discussed are several issues concerning genetic background, particularly from the point of view of genetic-reagent resource development.

  17. Genetic analysis of lipolytic activities in Thermus thermophilus HB27.

    PubMed

    Leis, Benedikt; Angelov, Angel; Li, Haijuan; Liebl, Wolfgang

    2014-12-10

    The extremely thermophilic bacterium Thermus thermophilus HB27 displays lipolytic activity for the hydrolysis of triglycerides. In this study we performed a mutational in vivo analysis of esterases and lipases that confer growth on tributyrin. We interrupted 10 ORFs suspected to encode lipolytic enzymes. Two chromosomal loci were identified that resulted in reduced hydrolysis capabilities against tributyrin and various para-nitrophenyl acyl esters. By implementation of a convenient new one-step method which abstains from the use of selectable markers, a mutant strain with multiple scar-less deletions was constructed by sequentially deleting ORFs TT_C1787, TT_C0340, TT_C0341 and TT_C0904. The quadruple deletion mutant of T. thermophilus exhibited significantly lower lipolytic activity (approximately 25% residual activity compared to wild type strain) over a broad range of fatty acyl esters and had lost the ability to grow on agar plates containing tributyrin as the sole carbon source. Furthermore, we were able to determine the impact of each gene disruption on the lipolytic activity profile in this model organism and show that the esterase activity in T. thermophilus HB27 is due to a concerted action of several hydrolases having different substrate preferences and activities. The esterase-less T. thermophilus multi-deletion mutant from this study can be used as a screening and expression host for esterase genes from thermophiles or metagenomes.

  18. Genetic analysis of experimental allergic encephalomyelitis in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, D.; Rosenwasser, O.A.; O`Neill, J.K.; Turk, J.L.

    1995-10-15

    Experimental allergic encephalomyelitis (EAE) is an autoimmune disease of the central nervous system that exhibits many pathologic similarities with multiple sclerosis. While products of the MHC are known to control the development of EAE, it is clear that non-MHC products also influence susceptibility. The chromosomal locations of these were investigated in selective crosses between MHC class II-compatible, EAE-susceptible Biozzi ABH, and low responder nonobese diabetic (NOD) mice. The disease was dominant and highly influenced by gender in the backcross one (BC{sub 1}) generation. Female mice were significantly more susceptible than male mice. Segregation of disease frequency of female animals in this cross suggested that EAE was controlled by a major locus. Although microsatellite-based exclusion mapping indicated that a number of regions on chromosomes 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, and 18 showed evidence of linkage (p<0.05) compared with expected random distributions of alleles, disease susceptibility was most strongly linked (p<0.05) to chromosome 7. However, by selectively analyzing animals that were either severely affected or almost normal, additional susceptibility loci were mapped on chromosomes 18 and 11 that were linked (p<0.001) to resistance and the development of severe disease, respectively. The data indicate a major locus on chromosome 7, affecting initiation and severity of EAE that is probably modified by several other unlinked loci. These localizations may provide candidate loci for the analysis of human autoimmune-demyelinating disease. 30 refs., 5 tabs.

  19. Forensic genetic analysis of bio-geographical ancestry.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Chris

    2015-09-01

    With the great strides made in the last ten years in the understanding of human population variation and the detailed characterization of the genome, it is now possible to identify sets of ancestry informative markers suitable for relatively small-scale PCR-based assays and use them to analyze the ancestry of an individual from forensic DNA. This review outlines some of the current understanding of past human population structure and how it may have influenced the complex distribution of contemporary human diversity. A simplified description of human diversity can provide a suitable basis for choosing the best ancestry-informative markers, which is important given the constraints of multiplex sizes in forensic DNA tests. It is also important to decide the level of geographic resolution that is realistic to ensure the balance between informativeness and an over-simplification of complex human diversity patterns. A detailed comparison is made of the most informative ancestry markers suitable for forensic use and assessments are made of the data analysis regimes that can provide statistical inferences of a DNA donor's bio-geographical ancestry.

  20. Developmental Genetic Analysis of Contrabithorax Mutations in Drosophila Melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Gaitan, M. A.; Micol, J. L.; Garcia-Bellido, A.

    1990-01-01

    A developmental analysis of the Contrabithorax (Cbx) alleles offers the opportunity to examine the role of the Ultrabithorax (Ubx) gene in controlling haltere, as alternative to wing, morphogenesis in Drosophila. Several Cbx alleles are known with different spatial specificity in their wing toward haltere homeotic transformation. The molecular data on these mutations, however, does not readily explain differences among mutant phenotypes. In this work, we have analyzed the ``apogenetic'' mosaic spots of transformation in their adult phenotype, in mitotic recombination clones and in the spatial distribution of Ubx proteins in imaginal discs. The results suggest that the phenotypes emerge from early clonality in some Cbx alleles, and from cell-cell interactions leading to recruitment of cells to Ubx gene expression in others. We have found, in addition, mutual interactions between haltere and wing territories in pattern and dorsoventral symmetries, suggesting short distance influences, ``accommodation,'' during cell proliferation of the anlage. These findings are considered in an attempt to explain allele specificity in molecular and developmental terms. PMID:1977655

  1. Physical and genetic analysis of the ColD plasmid.

    PubMed

    Frey, J; Ghersa, P; Palacios, P G; Belet, M

    1986-04-01

    The plasmid ColD-CA23, a high-copy-number plasmid of 5.12 kilobases, encodes colicin D, a protein of approximately 87,000 daltons which inhibits bacterial protein synthesis. Colicin D production is under the control of the Escherichia coli SOS regulatory system and is released to the growth medium via the action of the lysis gene product(s). A detailed map of the ColD plasmid was established for 10 restriction enzymes. Using in vitro insertional omega mutagenesis and in vivo insertional Tn5 mutagenesis, we localized the regions of the plasmid responsible for colicin D activity (cda), for mitomycin C-induced lysis (cdl), and for colicin D immunity (cdi). These genes were all located contiguously on a 2,400-base-pair fragment similar to a large number of other Col plasmids (A, E1, E2, E3, E8, N, and CloDF). The ColD plasmid was mobilizable by conjugative transfer by helper plasmids of the IncFII incompatibility group, but not by plasmids belonging to the groups IncI-alpha or IncP. The location of the mobilization functions was determined by deletion analysis. The plasmid needs a segment of 400 base pairs, which is located between the mob genes and the gene for autolysis, for its replication.

  2. Physical and genetic analysis of the ColD plasmid.

    PubMed Central

    Frey, J; Ghersa, P; Palacios, P G; Belet, M

    1986-01-01

    The plasmid ColD-CA23, a high-copy-number plasmid of 5.12 kilobases, encodes colicin D, a protein of approximately 87,000 daltons which inhibits bacterial protein synthesis. Colicin D production is under the control of the Escherichia coli SOS regulatory system and is released to the growth medium via the action of the lysis gene product(s). A detailed map of the ColD plasmid was established for 10 restriction enzymes. Using in vitro insertional omega mutagenesis and in vivo insertional Tn5 mutagenesis, we localized the regions of the plasmid responsible for colicin D activity (cda), for mitomycin C-induced lysis (cdl), and for colicin D immunity (cdi). These genes were all located contiguously on a 2,400-base-pair fragment similar to a large number of other Col plasmids (A, E1, E2, E3, E8, N, and CloDF). The ColD plasmid was mobilizable by conjugative transfer by helper plasmids of the IncFII incompatibility group, but not by plasmids belonging to the groups IncI-alpha or IncP. The location of the mobilization functions was determined by deletion analysis. The plasmid needs a segment of 400 base pairs, which is located between the mob genes and the gene for autolysis, for its replication. Images PMID:3007432

  3. Transcriptional master regulator analysis in breast cancer genetic networks.

    PubMed

    Tovar, Hugo; García-Herrera, Rodrigo; Espinal-Enríquez, Jesús; Hernández-Lemus, Enrique

    2015-12-01

    Gene regulatory networks account for the delicate mechanisms that control gene expression. Under certain circumstances, gene regulatory programs may give rise to amplification cascades. Such transcriptional cascades are events in which activation of key-responsive transcription factors called master regulators trigger a series of gene expression events. The action of transcriptional master regulators is then important for the establishment of certain programs like cell development and differentiation. However, such cascades have also been related with the onset and maintenance of cancer phenotypes. Here we present a systematic implementation of a series of algorithms aimed at the inference of a gene regulatory network and analysis of transcriptional master regulators in the context of primary breast cancer cells. Such studies were performed in a highly curated database of 880 microarray gene expression experiments on biopsy-captured tissue corresponding to primary breast cancer and healthy controls. Biological function and biochemical pathway enrichment analyses were also performed to study the role that the processes controlled - at the transcriptional level - by such master regulators may have in relation to primary breast cancer. We found that transcription factors such as AGTR2, ZNF132, TFDP3 and others are master regulators in this gene regulatory network. Sets of genes controlled by these regulators are involved in processes that are well-known hallmarks of cancer. This kind of analyses may help to understand the most upstream events in the development of phenotypes, in particular, those regarding cancer biology.

  4. Analysis of genetically modified organisms by pyrosequencing on a portable photodiode-based bioluminescence sequencer.

    PubMed

    Song, Qinxin; Wei, Guijiang; Zhou, Guohua

    2014-07-01

    A portable bioluminescence analyser for detecting the DNA sequence of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) was developed by using a photodiode (PD) array. Pyrosequencing on eight genes (zSSIIb, Bt11 and Bt176 gene of genetically modified maize; Lectin, 35S-CTP4, CP4EPSPS, CaMV35S promoter and NOS terminator of the genetically modified Roundup ready soya) was successfully detected with this instrument. The corresponding limit of detection (LOD) was 0.01% with 35 PCR cycles. The maize and soya available from three different provenances in China were detected. The results indicate that pyrosequencing using the small size of the detector is a simple, inexpensive, and reliable way in a farm/field test of GMO analysis.

  5. Breakpoint analysis: Precise localization of genetic markers by means of nonstatistical computation using relatively few genotypes

    SciTech Connect

    Elsner, T.I.; Albertsen, H.; Gerken, S.C.; Cartwright, P.; White, R.

    1995-02-01

    Placing new markers on a previously existing genetic map by using conventional methods of multilocus linkage analysis requires that a large number of reference families be genotyped. This paper presents a methodology for placing new markers on existing genetic maps by genotyping only a few individuals in a selected subset of the reference panel. We show that by identifying meiotic breakpoint events within existing genetic maps and genotyping individuals who exhibit these events, along with one nonrecombinant sibling and their parents, we can determine precise locations for new markers even within subcentimorgan chromosomal regions. This method also improves detection of errors in genotyping and assists in the observation of chromosome behavior in specific regions. 31 refs., 9 figs.

  6. Novel sequence feature variant type analysis of the HLA genetic association in systemic sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Karp, David R.; Marthandan, Nishanth; Marsh, Steven G.E.; Ahn, Chul; Arnett, Frank C.; DeLuca, David S.; Diehl, Alexander D.; Dunivin, Raymond; Eilbeck, Karen; Feolo, Michael; Guidry, Paula A.; Helmberg, Wolfgang; Lewis, Suzanna; Mayes, Maureen D.; Mungall, Chris; Natale, Darren A.; Peters, Bjoern; Petersdorf, Effie; Reveille, John D.; Smith, Barry; Thomson, Glenys; Waller, Matthew J.; Scheuermann, Richard H.

    2010-01-01

    We describe a novel approach to genetic association analyses with proteins sub-divided into biologically relevant smaller sequence features (SFs), and their variant types (VTs). SFVT analyses are particularly informative for study of highly polymorphic proteins such as the human leukocyte antigen (HLA), given the nature of its genetic variation: the high level of polymorphism, the pattern of amino acid variability, and that most HLA variation occurs at functionally important sites, as well as its known role in organ transplant rejection, autoimmune disease development and response to infection. Further, combinations of variable amino acid sites shared by several HLA alleles (shared epitopes) are most likely better descriptors of the actual causative genetic variants. In a cohort of systemic sclerosis patients/controls, SFVT analysis shows that a combination of SFs implicating specific amino acid residues in peptide binding pockets 4 and 7 of HLA-DRB1 explains much of the molecular determinant of risk. PMID:19933168

  7. Genetic diversity in nine native Turkish sheep breeds based on microsatellite analysis.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Onur; Cemal, Ibrahim; Karaca, Orhan

    2014-08-01

    The genetic variability of 204 sheep from nine breeds (Awassi, Çine Çaparı, Karakaş, Karya, Karayaka, Morkaraman, Norduz, Sakız and Tuj) growing in four different regions (western, northern, eastern and south-eastern Anatolia) was assessed using 18 microsatellite loci. High mean number of alleles, allelic richness and factorial correspondence analysis showed the degree of admixture between native sheep breeds of Turkey. The Karya and Çine Çaparı breeds were observed as the most distinct of the breeds, and possible introgressions were detected in other breeds. It was found that 8.9% of genetic variation resulted from the difference between the populations. The genetic variation in Turkish breeds was not much higher than that of European breeds, which might be a consequence of the recent sharp decrease in sheep numbers.

  8. Genetic analysis of absB, a Streptomyces coelicolor locus involved in global antibiotic regulation.

    PubMed

    Adamidis, T; Champness, W

    1992-07-01

    The filamentous soil bacterium Streptomyces coelicolor is known to produce four antibiotics which are genetically and structurally distinct. An extensive search for antibiotic regulatory mutants led to the discovery of absB mutants, which are antibiotic deficient but sporulation proficient. Genetic analysis of the absB mutants has resulted in definition of the absB locus at 5 o'clock on the genetic map. Multiple cloned copies of the actII-ORF4 gene, an activator of synthesis of the antibiotic actinorhodin, restore actinorhodin biosynthetic capability to the absB mutants. These results are interpreted to mean that the failure of absB mutants to produce antibiotics results from decreased expression of the antibiotic genes. The absB gene is proposed to be involved in global regulation of antibiotic synthesis.

  9. Genetic analysis reveals multiple parentage in captive reared eastern hellbender salamanders (Cryptobranchus alleganiensis).

    PubMed

    Unger, Shem D; Williams, Rod N

    2015-11-01

    Information on the parentage of captive reared clutches is vital for conservation head-starting programs. Molecular methods, such as genotyping individuals with hyper-variable markers, can elucidate the genealogical contribution of captive-reared, reintroduced individuals to native populations. In this study, we used 12 polymorphic microsatellite loci to infer parentage of a clutch of 18 eastern hellbenders collected from a single nest from Buffalo Creek, West Virginia, subsequently reared in captivity, and used for translocations in Indiana. Collectively, these markers successfully detected the presence of multiple parentage for this species of conservation concern presently used in captive management programs in zoos across many states. This study highlights the need for genetic analysis of captive reared clutches used in translocations to minimize the loss of genetic diversity and potential for genetic swamping at release sites.

  10. Exome sequence analysis suggests genetic burden contributes to phenotypic variability and complex neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Gonzaga-Jauregui, Claudia; Harel, Tamar; Gambin, Tomasz; Kousi, Maria; Griffin, Laurie B.; Francescatto, Ludmila; Ozes, Burcak; Karaca, Ender; Jhangiani, Shalini; Bainbridge, Matthew N.; Lawson, Kim S.; Pehlivan, Davut; Okamoto, Yuji; Withers, Marjorie; Mancias, Pedro; Slavotinek, Anne; Reitnauer, Pamela J; Goksungur, Meryem T.; Shy, Michael; Crawford, Thomas O.; Koenig, Michel; Willer, Jason; Flores, Brittany N.; Pediaditrakis, Igor; Us, Onder; Wiszniewski, Wojciech; Parman, Yesim; Antonellis, Anthony; Muzny, Donna M.; Katsanis, Nicholas; Battaloglu, Esra; Boerwinkle, Eric; Gibbs, Richard A.; Lupski, James R.

    2015-01-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous distal symmetric polyneuropathy. Whole-exome sequencing (WES) of 40 individuals from 37 unrelated families with CMT-like peripheral neuropathy refractory to molecular diagnosis identified apparent causal mutations in ~45% (17/37) of families. Three candidate disease genes are proposed, supported by a combination of genetic and in vivo studies. Aggregate analysis of mutation data revealed a significantly increased number of rare variants across 58 neuropathy associated genes in subjects versus controls; confirmed in a second ethnically discrete neuropathy cohort, suggesting mutation burden potentially contributes to phenotypic variability. Neuropathy genes shown to have highly penetrant Mendelizing variants (HMPVs) and implicated by burden in families were shown to interact genetically in a zebrafish assay exacerbating the phenotype established by the suppression of single genes. Our findings suggest that the combinatorial effect of rare variants contributes to disease burden and variable expressivity. PMID:26257172

  11. Relationships between adaptive and neutral genetic diversity and ecological structure and functioning: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Whitlock, Raj

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the effects of intraspecific genetic diversity on the structure and functioning of ecological communities is a fundamentally important part of evolutionary ecology and may also have conservation relevance in identifying the situations in which genetic diversity coincides with species-level diversity.Early studies within this field documented positive relationships between genetic diversity and ecological structure, but recent studies have challenged these findings. Conceptual synthesis has been hampered because studies have used different measures of intraspecific variation (phenotypically adaptive vs. neutral) and have considered different measures of ecological structure in different ecological and spatial contexts. The aim of this study is to strengthen conceptual understanding by providing an empirical synthesis quantifying the relationship between genetic diversity and ecological structure.Here, I present a meta-analysis of the relationship between genetic diversity within plant populations and the structure and functioning of associated ecological communities (including 423 effect sizes from 70 studies). I used Bayesian meta-analyses to examine (i) the strength and direction of this relationship, (ii) the extent to which phenotypically adaptive and neutral (molecular) measures of diversity differ in their association with ecological structure and (iii) variation in outcomes among different measures of ecological structure and in different ecological contexts.Effect sizes measuring the relationship between adaptive diversity (genotypic richness) and both community- and ecosystem-level ecological responses were small, but significantly positive. These associations were supported by genetic effects on species richness and productivity, respectively.There was no overall association between neutral genetic diversity and measures of ecological structure, but a positive correlation was observed under a limited set of demographic conditions. These

  12. Cross-Disorder Genetic Analysis of Tic Disorders, Obsessive–Compulsive, and Hoarding Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Zilhão, Nuno R.; Smit, Dirk J.; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Cath, Danielle C.

    2016-01-01

    Hoarding, obsessive–compulsive disorder (OCD), and Tourette’s disorder (TD) are psychiatric disorders that share symptom overlap, which might partly be the result of shared genetic variation. Population-based twin studies have found significant genetic correlations between hoarding and OCD symptoms, with genetic correlations varying between 0.1 and 0.45. For tic disorders, studies examining these correlations are lacking. Other lines of research, including clinical samples and GWAS or CNV data to explore genetic relationships between tic disorders and OCD, have only found very modest if any shared genetic variation. Our aim was to extend current knowledge on the genetic structure underlying hoarding, OC symptoms (OCS), and lifetime tic symptoms and, in a trivariate analysis, assess the degree of common and unique genetic factors contributing to the etiology of these disorders. Data have been gathered from participants in the Netherlands Twin Register comprising a total of 5293 individuals from a sample of adult monozygotic (n = 2460) and dizygotic (n = 2833) twin pairs (mean age 33.61 years). The data on Hoarding, OCS, and tic symptoms were simultaneously analyzed in Mplus. A liability threshold model was fitted to the twin data, analyzing heritability of phenotypes and of their comorbidity. Following the criteria for a probable clinical diagnosis in all phenotypes, 6.8% of participants had a diagnosis of probable hoarding disorder (HD), 6.3% of OCS, and 12.8% of any probable lifetime tic disorder. Genetic factors explained 50.4, 70.1, and 61.1% of the phenotypic covariance between hoarding-OCS, hoarding-tics, and OCS-tics, respectively. Substantial genetic correlations were observed between hoarding and OCS (0.41), hoarding and tics (0.35), and between OCS and tics (0.37). These results support the contribution of genetic factors in the development of these disorders and their comorbidity. Furthermore, tics were mostly influenced by specific

  13. Genetic and Phytochemical Analysis to Evaluate the Diversity and Relationships of Mate (Ilex paraguariensis A.St.-Hil.) Elite Genetic Resources in a Germplasm Collection.

    PubMed

    Friedrich, Juliana Cristhina; Gonela, Adriana; Gonçalves Vidigal, Maria Celeste; Vidigal Filho, Pedro Soares; Sturion, José Alfredo; Cardozo Junior, Euclides Lara

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the phytochemical and genetic diversity, relationships and identification of mate (Ilex paraguariensis A.St.-Hil.) elite genetic resources belonging to the Brazilian germplasm collection and mate breeding program. Mate has been studied due to the presence of phytochemical compounds, especially methylxanthines and phenolic compounds. The samples were collected from the leaves of 76 mate elite genetic resources (16 progenies × 5 localities). Total DNA was extracted from mate leaves and 20 random primers were used for DNA amplification. Methylxanthines (caffeine and theobromine) and phenolic compounds (chlorogenic, neochlorogenic, and criptochlorogenic acids) were quantified by HPLC. The genetic divergence estimated was higher within (92%) than among (8%) the different populations. Analysis of genetic distance between origins provided the formation of two groups by UPGMA cluster analysis, with higher polymorphism (94.9%). The average content of caffeine ranged from 0.01 to 1.38% and theobromine of 0.10 - 0.85% (w/w). The caffeoylquinic acids concentrations (1.43 - 5.38%) showed a gradient 3-CQA > 5-CQA > 4-CQA. The coefficient of genetic variation (CVg) was of low magnitude for all mono-caffeoylquinics acids. Significant correlations (positive and negative) were observed between the phytochemical compounds. Genetic diversity analysis performed by RAPD markers showed a greater intra-populational diversity; genetic resources with low caffeine and higher theobromine content were identified and can be used in breeding programs; the correlation between methylxanthines and phenolic compounds can be used as a good predictor in future studies.

  14. Genome-Wide Pathway Analysis Identifies Genetic Pathways Associated with Psoriasis.

    PubMed

    Aterido, Adrià; Julià, Antonio; Ferrándiz, Carlos; Puig, Lluís; Fonseca, Eduardo; Fernández-López, Emilia; Dauden, Esteban; Sánchez-Carazo, José Luís; López-Estebaranz, José Luís; Moreno-Ramírez, David; Vanaclocha, Francisco; Herrera, Enrique; de la Cueva, Pablo; Dand, Nick; Palau, Núria; Alonso, Arnald; López-Lasanta, María; Tortosa, Raül; García-Montero, Andrés; Codó, Laia; Gelpí, Josep Lluís; Bertranpetit, Jaume; Absher, Devin; Capon, Francesca; Myers, Richard M; Barker, Jonathan N; Marsal, Sara

    2016-03-01

    Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory disease with a complex genetic architecture. To date, the psoriasis heritability is only partially explained. However, there is increasing evidence that the missing heritability in psoriasis could be explained by multiple genetic variants of low effect size from common genetic pathways. The objective of this study was to identify new genetic variation associated with psoriasis risk at the pathway level. We genotyped 598,258 single nucleotide polymorphisms in a discovery cohort of 2,281 case-control individuals from Spain. We performed a genome-wide pathway analysis using 1,053 reference biological pathways. A total of 14 genetic pathways (PFDR ≤ 2.55 × 10(-2)) were found to be significantly associated with psoriasis risk. Using an independent validation cohort of 7,353 individuals from the UK, a total of 6 genetic pathways were significantly replicated (PFDR ≤ 3.46 × 10(-2)). We found genetic pathways that had not been previously associated with psoriasis risk such as retinol metabolism (Pcombined = 1.84 × 10(-4)), the transport of inorganic ions and amino acids (Pcombined = 1.57 × 10(-7)), and post-translational protein modification (Pcombined = 1.57 × 10(-7)). In the latter pathway, MGAT5 showed a strong network centrality, and its association with psoriasis risk was further validated in an additional case-control cohort of 3,429 individuals (P < 0.05). These findings provide insights into the biological mechanisms associated with psoriasis susceptibility.

  15. Genetics of murine craniofacial morphology: Diallel analysis of the eight founders of the Collaborative Cross

    PubMed Central

    Percival, Christopher J.; Liberton, Denise K.; de Villena, Fernando Pardo-Manuel; Spritz, Richard; Marcucio, Ralph

    2016-01-01

    Summary Using eight inbred founder strains of the mouse Collaborative Cross (CC) project and their reciprocal F1 hybrids, we quantified variation in craniofacial morphology across mouse strains, explored genetic contributions to craniofacial variation that distinguish the founder strains, and tested whether specific or summary measures of craniofacial shape display stronger additive genetic contributions. This study thus provides critical information about phenotypic diversity among CC founder strains and about the genetic contributions to this phenotypic diversity, which is relevant to understanding the basis of variation in standard laboratory strains and natural populations. Craniofacial shape was quantified as a series of size-adjusted linear dimensions (RDs) and by principal components (PC) analysis of morphological landmarks captured from computed tomography images from 62 out of the 64 reciprocal crosses of the CC founder strains. We first identified aspects of skull morphology that vary between these phenotypically ‘normal’ founder strains and that are defining characteristics of these strains. We estimated the contributions of additive and various non-additive genetic factors to phenotypic variation using diallel analyses of a subset of these strongly differing RDs and the first 8 PCs of skull shape variation. We find little difference in the genetic contributions to RD measures and PC scores, suggesting fundamental similarities in the magnitude of genetic contributions to both specific and summary measures of craniofacial phenotypes. Our results indicate that there are stronger additive genetic effects associated with defining phenotypic characteristics of specific founder strains, suggesting these distinguishing measures are good candidates for use in genotype-phenotype association studies of CC mice. Our results add significantly to understanding of genotype-phenotype associations in the skull, which serve as a foundation for modeling the origins of

  16. Systematic documentation and analysis of human genetic variation using the microattribution approach

    PubMed Central

    Giardine, Belinda; Borg, Joseph; Higgs, Douglas R.; Peterson, Kenneth R.; Maglott, Donna; Basak, A. Nazli; Clark, Barnaby; Faustino, Paula; Felice, Alex E.; Francina, Alain; Gallivan, Monica V. E.; Georgitsi, Marianthi; Gibbons, Richard J.; Giordano, Piero C.; Harteveld, Cornelis L.; Joly, Philippe; Kanavakis, Emmanuel; Kollia, Panagoula; Menzel, Stephan; Miller, Webb; Moradkhani, Kamran; Old, John; Papachatzopoulou, Adamantia; Papadakis, Manoussos N.; Papadopoulos, Petros; Pavlovic, Sonja; Philipsen, Sjaak; Radmilovic, Milena; Riemer, Cathy; Schrijver, Iris; Stojiljkovic, Maja; Thein, Swee Lay; Traeger-Synodinos, Jan; Tully, Ray; Wada, Takahito; Waye, John; Wiemann, Claudia; Zukic, Branka; Chui, David H. K.; Wajcman, Henri; Hardison, Ross C.; Patrinos, George P.

    2013-01-01

    We developed a series of interrelated locus-specific databases to store all published and unpublished genetic variation related to these disorders, and then implemented microattribution to encourage submission of unpublished observations of genetic variation to these public repositories 1. A total of 1,941 unique genetic variants in 37 genes, encoding globins (HBA2, HBA1, HBG2, HBG1, HBD, HBB) and other erythroid proteins (ALOX5AP, AQP9, ARG2, ASS1, ATRX, BCL11A, CNTNAP2, CSNK2A1, EPAS1, ERCC2, FLT1, GATA1, GPM6B, HAO2, HBS1L, KDR, KL, KLF1, MAP2K1, MAP3K5, MAP3K7, MYB, NOS1, NOS2, NOS3, NOX3, NUP133, PDE7B, SMAD3, SMAD6, and TOX) are currently documented in these databases with reciprocal attribution of microcitations to data contributors. Our project provides the first example of implementing microattribution to incentivise submission of all known genetic variation in a defined system. It has demonstrably increased the reporting of human variants and now provides a comprehensive online resource for systematically describing human genetic variation in the globin genes and other genes contributing to hemoglobinopathies and thalassemias. The large repository of previously reported data, together with more recent data, acquired by microattribution, demonstrates how the comprehensive documentation of human variation will provide key insights into normal biological processes and how these are perturbed in human genetic disease. Using the microattribution process set out here, datasets which took decades to accumulate for the globin genes could be assembled rapidly for other genes and disease systems. The principles established here for the globin gene system will serve as a model for other systems and the analysis of other common and/or complex human genetic diseases. PMID:21423179

  17. Genetic parameters of Visual Image Analysis primal cut carcass traits of commercial prime beef slaughter animals.

    PubMed

    Moore, K L; Mrode, R; Coffey, M P

    2017-03-15

    Visual Image analysis (VIA) of carcass traits provides the opportunity to estimate carcass primal cut yields on large numbers of slaughter animals. This allows carcases to be better differentiated and farmers to be paid based on the primal cut yields. It also creates more accurate genetic selection due to high volumes of data which enables breeders to breed cattle that better meet the abattoir specifications and market requirements. In order to implement genetic evaluations for VIA primal cut yields, genetic parameters must first be estimated and that was the aim of this study. Slaughter records from the UK prime slaughter population for VIA carcass traits was available from two processing plants. After edits, there were 17 765 VIA carcass records for six primal cut traits, carcass weight as well as the EUROP conformation and fat class grades. Heritability estimates after traits were adjusted for age ranged from 0.32 (0.03) for EUROP fat to 0.46 (0.03) for VIA Topside primal cut yield. Adjusting the VIA primal cut yields for carcass weight reduced the heritability estimates, with estimates of primal cut yields ranging from 0.23 (0.03) for Fillet to 0.29 (0.03) for Knuckle. Genetic correlations between VIA primal cut yields adjusted for carcass weight were very strong, ranging from 0.40 (0.06) between Fillet and Striploin to 0.92 (0.02) between Topside and Silverside. EUROP conformation was also positively correlated with the VIA primal cuts with genetic correlation estimates ranging from 0.59 to 0.84, whereas EUROP fat was estimated to have moderate negative correlations with primal cut yields, estimates ranged from -0.11 to -0.46. Based on these genetic parameter estimates, genetic evaluation of VIA primal cut yields can be undertaken to allow the UK beef industry to select carcases that better meet abattoir specification and market requirements.

  18. Replicated analysis of the genetic architecture of quantitative traits in two wild great tit populations.

    PubMed

    Santure, Anna W; Poissant, Jocelyn; De Cauwer, Isabelle; van Oers, Kees; Robinson, Matthew R; Quinn, John L; Groenen, Martien A M; Visser, Marcel E; Sheldon, Ben C; Slate, Jon

    2015-12-01

    Currently, there is much debate on the genetic architecture of quantitative traits in wild populations. Is trait variation influenced by many genes of small effect or by a few genes of major effect? Where is additive genetic variation located in the genome? Do the same loci cause similar phenotypic variation in different populations? Great tits (Parus major) have been studied extensively in long-term studies across Europe and consequently are considered an ecological 'model organism'. Recently, genomic resources have been developed for the great tit, including a custom SNP chip and genetic linkage map. In this study, we used a suite of approaches to investigate the genetic architecture of eight quantitative traits in two long-term study populations of great tits--one in the Netherlands and the other in the United Kingdom. Overall, we found little evidence for the presence of genes of large effects in either population. Instead, traits appeared to be influenced by many genes of small effect, with conservative estimates of the number of contributing loci ranging from 31 to 310. Despite concordance between population-specific heritabilities, we found no evidence for the presence of loci having similar effects in both populations. While population-specific genetic architectures are possible, an undetected shared architecture cannot be rejected because of limited power to map loci of small and moderate effects. This study is one of few examples of genetic architecture analysis in replicated wild populations and highlights some of the challenges and limitations researchers will face when attempting similar molecular quantitative genetic studies in free-living populations.

  19. Comparison of benzodiazepine-like compounds using topological analysis and genetic algorithms.

    PubMed

    Meurice, N; Leherte, L; Vercauteren, D P

    1998-01-01

    Four compounds within a set of ligands for the benzodiazepine receptors are characterized by their electron density maps at different resolution levels and reconstructed from calculated structure factors. The resulting complex three-dimensional density maps are first simplified into connected graphs using topological analysis. Then, an original genetic algorithm method, GAGS (Genetic Algorithm for Graph Similarity search), is developed and implemented in order to compare the connected graphs. Finally, the analysis of the best solutions of the algorithm are expressed in terms of functional group superimpositions. The GAGS analysis is applied to different resolution levels of the electron density maps and the resulting models are compared in order to assess the influence of the resolution on the resulting pharmacophore models.

  20. Signature tagged mutagenesis in the functional genetic analysis of gastrointestinal pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Cummins, Joanne; Gahan, Cormac G.M.

    2012-01-01

    Signature tagged mutagenesis is a genetic approach that was developed to identify novel bacterial virulence factors. It is a negative selection method in which unique identification tags allow analysis of pools of mutants in mixed populations. The approach is particularly well suited to functional genetic analysis of the gastrointestinal phase of infection in foodborne pathogens and has the capacity to guide the development of novel vaccines and therapeutics. In this review we outline the technical principles underpinning signature-tagged mutagenesis as well as novel sequencing-based approaches for transposon mutant identification such as TraDIS (transposon directed insertion-site sequencing). We also provide an analysis of screens that have been performed in gastrointestinal pathogens which are a global health concern (Escherichia coli, Listeria monocytogenes, Helicobacter pylori, Vibrio cholerae and Salmonella enterica). The identification of key virulence loci through the use of signature tagged mutagenesis in mice and relevant larger animal models is discussed. PMID:22555467

  1. Transcriptomic and Genetic Analysis of Direct Interspecies Electron Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Rotaru, Amelia-Elena; Summers, Zarath M.; Shrestha, Minita; Liu, Fanghua; Lovley, Derek R.

    2013-01-01

    The possibility that metatranscriptomic analysis could distinguish between direct interspecies electron transfer (DIET) and H2 interspecies transfer (HIT) in anaerobic communities was investigated by comparing gene transcript abundance in cocultures in which Geobacter sulfurreducens was the electron-accepting partner for either Geobacter metallireducens, which performs DIET, or Pelobacter carbinolicus, which relies on HIT. Transcript abundance for G. sulfurreducens uptake hydrogenase genes was 7-fold lower in cocultures with G. metallireducens than in cocultures with P. carbinolicus, consistent with DIET and HIT, respectively, in the two cocultures. Transcript abundance for the pilus-associated cytochrome OmcS, which is essential for DIET but not for HIT, was 240-fold higher in the cocultures with G. metallireducens than in cocultures with P. carbinolicus. The pilin gene pilA was moderately expressed despite a mutation that might be expected to repress pilA expression. Lower transcript abundance for G. sulfurreducens genes associated with acetate metabolism in the cocultures with P. carbinolicus was consistent with the repression of these genes by H2 during HIT. Genes for the biogenesis of pili and flagella and several c-type cytochrome genes were among the most highly expressed in G. metallireducens. Mutant strains that lacked the ability to produce pili, flagella, or the outer surface c-type cytochrome encoded by Gmet_2896 were not able to form cocultures with G. sulfurreducens. These results demonstrate that there are unique gene expression patterns that distinguish DIET from HIT and suggest that metatranscriptomics may be a promising route to investigate interspecies electron transfer pathways in more-complex environments. PMID:23377933

  2. Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of Different Genetic Testing Strategies for Lynch Syndrome in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ying-Erh; Kao, Sung-Shuo; Chung, Ren-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Patients with Lynch syndrome (LS) have a significantly increased risk of developing colorectal cancer (CRC) and other cancers. Genetic screening for LS among patients with newly diagnosed CRC aims to identify mutations in the disease-causing genes (i.e., the DNA mismatch repair genes) in the patients, to offer genetic testing for relatives of the patients with the mutations, and then to provide early prevention for the relatives with the mutations. Several genetic tests are available for LS, such as DNA sequencing for MMR genes and tumor testing using microsatellite instability and immunohistochemical analyses. Cost-effectiveness analyses of different genetic testing strategies for LS have been performed in several studies from different countries such as the US and Germany. However, a cost-effectiveness analysis for the testing has not yet been performed in Taiwan. In this study, we evaluated the cost-effectiveness of four genetic testing strategies for LS described in previous studies, while population-specific parameters, such as the mutation rates of the DNA mismatch repair genes and treatment costs for CRC in Taiwan, were used. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratios based on discounted life years gained due to genetic screening were calculated for the strategies relative to no screening and to the previous strategy. Using the World Health Organization standard, which was defined based on Taiwan's Gross Domestic Product per capita, the strategy based on immunohistochemistry as a genetic test followed by BRAF mutation testing was considered to be highly cost-effective relative to no screening. Our probabilistic sensitivity analysis results also suggest that the strategy has a probability of 0.939 of being cost-effective relative to no screening based on the commonly used threshold of $50,000 to determine cost-effectiveness. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first cost-effectiveness analysis for evaluating different genetic testing strategies for LS in

  3. Comparative proteomic analysis of genetically modified maize grown under different agroecosystems conditions in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Profiling technologies allow the simultaneous measurement and comparison of thousands of cell components without prior knowledge of their identity. In the present study, we used two-dimensional gel electrophoresis combined with mass spectrometry to evaluate protein expression of Brazilian genetically modified maize hybrid grown under different agroecosystems conditions. To this effect, leaf samples were subjected to comparative analysis using the near-isogenic non-GM hybrid as the comparator. Results In the first stage of the analysis, the main sources of variation in the dataset were identified by using Principal Components Analysis which correlated most of the variation to the different agroecosystems conditions. Comparative analysis within each field revealed a total of thirty two differentially expressed proteins between GM and non-GM samples that were identified and their molecular functions were mainly assigned to carbohydrate and energy metabolism, genetic information processing and stress response. Conclusions To the best of our knowledge this study represents the first evidence of protein identities with differentially expressed isoforms in Brazilian MON810 genetic background hybrid grown under field conditions. As global databases on outputs from “omics” analysis become available, these could provide a highly desirable benchmark for safety assessments. PMID:24304660

  4. Genetic analysis of DNA methylation and gene expression levels in whole blood of healthy human subjects

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The predominant model for regulation of gene expression through DNA methylation is an inverse association in which increased methylation results in decreased gene expression levels. However, recent studies suggest that the relationship between genetic variation, DNA methylation and expression is more complex. Results Systems genetic approaches for examining relationships between gene expression and methylation array data were used to find both negative and positive associations between these levels. A weighted correlation network analysis revealed that i) both transcriptome and methylome are organized in modules, ii) co-expression modules are generally not preserved in the methylation data and vice-versa, and iii) highly significant correlations exist between co-expression and co-methylation modules, suggesting the existence of factors that affect expression and methylation of different modules (i.e., trans effects at the level of modules). We observed that methylation probes associated with expression in cis were more likely to be located outside CpG islands, whereas specificity for CpG island shores was present when methylation, associated with expression, was under local genetic control. A structural equation model based analysis found strong support in particular for a traditional causal model in which gene expression is regulated by genetic variation via DNA methylation instead of gene expression affecting DNA methylation levels. Conclusions Our results provide new insights into the complex mechanisms between genetic markers, epigenetic mechanisms and gene expression. We find strong support for the classical model of genetic variants regulating methylation, which in turn regulates gene expression. Moreover we show that, although the methylation and expression modules differ, they are highly correlated. PMID:23157493

  5. Analysis of population structure and genetic diversity of Egyptian and exotic rice (Oryza sativa L.) genotypes.

    PubMed

    Salem, Khaled F M; Sallam, Ahmed

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the population structure and genetic diversity is a very important goal to improve the economic value of crops. In rice, a loss of genetic diversity in the last few centuries is observed. To address this challenge, a set of 22 lines from three different regions - India (two), and Philippines (six), and Egypt (14) - were used to assess the genetic diversity and the features of population structure. These genotypes were analyzed using 106 SSR alleles that showed a clear polymorphism among the lines. Genetic diversity was estimated based on the number of different alleles, polymorphism information content (PIC), and gene diversity. A total of 106 SSR alleles was identified from the 23 SSR loci and used to study the population structure and carry out a cluster analysis. All SSR loci showed a wide range of the number of different alleles extended from two (one loci) to seven alleles (three loci). Five and eight loci showed high PIC and gene diversity (≥0.70), respectively. The results of population structure are in agreement with cluster analysis results. Both analyses revealed two different subpopulations (G1 and G2) with different genetic properties in number of private alleles, number of different alleles (Na), number of effective alleles (Ne), expected heterozygosity (He), and Shannon's Information Index (SII). Our findings indicate that five SSR loci (RM 111, RM 307, RM 22, RM 19, and RM 271) could be used in breeding programs to enhance the marker-assisted selection through QTL mapping and association studies. A high genetic diversity found between genotypes which can be exploited to improve and produce rice cultivars for important traits (e.g. high agronomic features and tolerance to biotic or/and abiotic stresses).

  6. Genetic structure of the Korean black scraper Thamnaconus modestus inferred from microsatellite marker analysis.

    PubMed

    An, Hye Suck; Lee, Jang Wook; Park, Jung Yeon; Jung, Hyung Taek

    2013-05-01

    The Korean black scraper, Thamnaconus modestus, is one of the most economically important maricultural fish species in Korea. However, the annual catch of this fish has been continuously declining over the past several decades. In this study, the genetic diversity and relationships among four wild populations and two hatchery stocks of Korean black scraper were assessed based on 16 microsatellite (MS) markers. A total of 319 different alleles were detected over all loci with an average of 19.94 alleles per locus. The hatchery stocks [mean number of alleles (N(A)) = 12, allelic richness (A(R)) = 12, expected heterozygosity (He) = 0.834] showed a slight reduction (P > 0.05) in genetic variability in comparison with wild populations (mean N(A) = 13.86, A(R) = 12.35, He = 0.844), suggesting a sufficient level of genetic variation in the hatchery populations. Similarly low levels of inbreeding and significant Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium deviations were detected in both wild and hatchery populations. The genetic subdivision among all six populations was low but significant (overall F(ST) = 0.008, P < 0.01). Pairwise F(ST), a phylogenetic tree, and multidimensional scaling analysis suggested the existence of three geographically structured populations based on different sea basin origins, although the isolation-by-distance model was rejected. This result was corroborated by an analysis of molecular variance. This genetic differentiation may result from the co-effects of various factors, such as historical dispersal, local environment and ocean currents. These three geographical groups can be considered as independent management units. Our results show that MS markers may be suitable not only for the genetic monitoring of hatchery stocks but also for revealing the population structure of Korean black scraper populations. These results will provide critical information for breeding programs, the management of cultured stocks and the conservation of this species.

  7. Genetic Analysis of Snake River Sockeye Salmon (Oncorhynchus Nerka), 2003 Technical Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Faler, Joyce; Powell, Madison

    2003-12-01

    A total of 1720 Oncorhynchus nerka tissue samples from 40 populations were characterized using mitochondrial DNA RFLPs (Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphisms). Analysis of anadromous sockeye populations indicated the historical presence of four major maternal lineages. Thirty-five composite mitochondrial haplotypes were observed from the 40 populations of O. nerka sampled throughout the Pacific Northwest. Six of these composite haplotypes ranged in frequency from 7-26% overall and were commonly observed in most populations. The six haplotypes together comprised 90% of the sampled O. nerka. An average of 4.6 composite haplotypes were observed per population. Genetic markers used were satisfactory in separating Redfish Lake anadromous sockeye, residual sockeye and outmigrants from the sympatric kokanee population that spawns in the Fishhook Creek tributary. Outmigrants appear to be primarily composed of progeny from resident residual sockeye, and captively-reared progeny of the captive broodstock program. Thus, residual sockeye may be considered a suitable source of genetic variation to maintain genetic diversity among captive broodstocks of anadromous sockeye. Fishhook Creek kokanee are genetically diverse and during spawning, are temporally and spatially isolated from the residual sockeye population. Eleven composite haplotypes were observed in the kokanee population. The unusually high number of haplotypes is most likely a consequence of periodic stocking of Redfish Lake with kokanee from other sources. Genetic data from Redfish Lake creel samples taken during 1996-1999 putatively indicate the incidental take of a listed resident sockeye.

  8. Genetic analysis of Père David's x red deer interspecies hybrids.

    PubMed

    Tate, M L; Goosen, G J; Patene, H; Pearse, A J; McEwan, K M; Fennessy, P F

    1997-01-01

    Interspecies hybrids provide unique opportunities for fundamental genetic analyses and for genetic improvement of farmed deer. We have bred F1 hybrids by artificial insemination of red deer hinds (Cervus elaphus) with semen from Père David's deer (Elaphurus davidianus). The male and female F1 Père David deer x red deer hybrids were fertile and in matings with red deer have produced over 300 viable backcross hybrids. DNA was collected from the backcross progeny as an international reference panel for gene linkage mapping and to investigate associations between segregating species-specific genetic markers and phenotypic traits. We have measured a range of phenotypic traits in the backcross hybrids and red deer. Several traits appear suitable for genetic analysis using mapped genetic markers, including gestation length, growth rate, live weight, head morphometrics, and tail length. Typically these traits show a large difference between Père David's deer and red deer and a high variance in the backcross so that many individuals have a phenotype outside the range observed in red deer.

  9. Genetic analysis of multiple synchronous lesions of the colon adenoma–carcinoma sequence

    PubMed Central

    Sedivy, R; Wolf, B; Kalipciyan, M; Steger, G G; Karner-Hanusch, J; Mader, R M

    2000-01-01

    The colorectal adenoma–carcinoma sequence represents a well-known paradigm for the sequential development of cancer driven by the accumulation of genomic defects. Although the colorectal adenoma–carcinoma sequence is well investigated, studies about tumours of different dignity co-existent in the same patient are seldom. In order to address the distribution of genetic alterations in different lesions of the same patient, we coincidently investigated carcinomas, adenomas and aberrant crypt foci in patients with sporadic colon cancer. By utilizing polymerase chain reaction, single-strand conformation polymorphism, heteroduplex-analysis, restriction fragment length polymorphism, protein truncation test and sequencing techniques we looked for mutations and microsatellite instability of APC, H- ras, K- ras, p53, DCC and the DNA repair genes hMLH1/hMSH2. In accordance with the suggested adenoma–carcinoma sequence of the colon, four patients reflected the progressive accumulation of genetic defects in synchronously appearing tumours during carcinogenesis. However, two patients with non-hereditary malignomas presented different genetic instabilities in different but synchronously appearing tumours suggesting non-clonal growth under almost identical conditions of the environment. Thus, sporadically manifesting multiple lesions of the colon were not necessarily driven by similar genetic mechanisms. Premalignant lesions may transform into malignant tumours starting from different types of genetic instability, which indicates independent and simultaneous tumorigenesis within the same organ. © 2000 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10755401

  10. High-throughput genetic analysis using time-resolved fluorometry and closed-tube detection.

    PubMed

    Nurmi, J; Kiviniemi, M; Kujanpää, M; Sjöroos, M; Ilonen, J; Lövgren, T

    2001-12-15

    Robust methods for genetic analysis are required for efficient exploitation of the constantly accumulating genetic information. We describe a closed-tube genotyping method suitable for high-throughput screening of genetic markers. The method is based on allele-specific probes labeled with an environment-sensitive lanthanide chelate, the fluorescence intensity of which is significantly increased upon PCR amplification of a complementary target. Genomic DNA samples were analyzed in an insulin gene single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) assay using universal amplification primers and probes that recognized the two different alleles. The feasibility of dry reagent based all-in-one PCR assays was tested using another diabetes-related genetic marker, human leukocyte antigen DQB1 allele *0302 as a model analyte in a dual-color, closed-tube end-point assay. There was a 100% correlation between the novel SNP assay and a conventional PCR restriction fragment length polymorphism assay. It was also demonstrated that using real-time monitoring, accurate genotyping results can be obtained despite strongly cross-reacting probes, minimizing the time and effort needed for optimization of probe sequence. Throughput can be maximized by using predried PCR mixtures that are stable for at least 6 months. This homogenous, all-in-one dry reagent assay chemistry permits cost-effective genetic screening on a large scale.

  11. Genetic-basis analysis of heterotic loci in Dongxiang common wild rice (Oryza rufipogon Griff.).

    PubMed

    Luo, Xiao-Jin; Xin, Xiao-Yun; Yang, Jin-Shui

    2012-04-01

    Heterosis is widely used in genetic crop improvement; however, the genetic basis of heterosis is incompletely understood. The use of whole-genome segregating populations poses a problem for establishing the genetic basis of heterosis, in that interactions often mask the effects of individual loci. However, introgression line (IL) populations permit the partitioning of heterosis into defined genomic regions, eliminating a major part of the genome-wide epistasis. In our previous study, based on mid-parental heterosis (HMP) value with single-point analysis, 42 heterotic loci (HLs) associated with six yield-related traits were detected in wild and cultivated rice using a set of 265 ILs of Dongxiang common wild rice (Oryza rufipogon Griff.). In this study, the genetic effects of HLs were determined as the combined effects of both additive and dominant gene actions, estimated from the performance values of testcross F1s and the dominance effects estimated from the HMP values of testcross F1s. We characterized the gene action type at each HL. Thirty-eight of the 42 HLs were over-dominant, and in the absence of epistasis, four HLs were dominant. Therefore, we favour that over-dominance is a major genetic basis of 'wild-cultivar' crosses at the single functional Mendelian locus level.

  12. Dissecting High-Dimensional Phenotypes with Bayesian Sparse Factor Analysis of Genetic Covariance Matrices

    PubMed Central

    Runcie, Daniel E.; Mukherjee, Sayan

    2013-01-01

    Quantitative genetic studies that model complex, multivariate phenotypes are important for both evolutionary prediction and artificial selection. For example, changes in gene expression can provide insight into developmental and physiological mechanisms that link genotype and phenotype. However, classical analytical techniques are poorly suited to quantitative genetic studies of gene expression where the number of traits assayed per individual can reach many thousand. Here, we derive a Bayesian genetic sparse factor model for estimating the genetic covariance matrix (G-matrix) of high-dimensional traits, such as gene expression, in a mixed-effects model. The key idea of our model is that we need consider only G-matrices that are biologically plausible. An organism’s entire phenotype is the result of processes that are modular and have limited complexity. This implies that the G-matrix will be highly structured. In particular, we assume that a limited number of intermediate traits (or factors, e.g., variations in development or physiology) control the variation in the high-dimensional phenotype, and that each of these intermediate traits is sparse – affecting only a few observed traits. The advantages of this approach are twofold. First, sparse factors are interpretable and provide biological insight into mechanisms underlying the genetic architecture. Second, enforcing sparsity helps prevent sampling errors from swamping out the true signal in high-dimensional data. We demonstrate the advantages of our model on simulated data and in an analysis of a published Drosophila melanogaster gene expression data set. PMID:23636737

  13. Targeted Analysis of Whole Genome Sequence Data to Diagnose Genetic Cardiomyopathy

    DOE PAGES

    Golbus, Jessica R.; Puckelwartz, Megan J.; Dellefave-Castillo, Lisa; ...

    2014-09-01

    Background—Cardiomyopathy is highly heritable but genetically diverse. At present, genetic testing for cardiomyopathy uses targeted sequencing to simultaneously assess the coding regions of more than 50 genes. New genes are routinely added to panels to improve the diagnostic yield. With the anticipated $1000 genome, it is expected that genetic testing will shift towards comprehensive genome sequencing accompanied by targeted gene analysis. Therefore, we assessed the reliability of whole genome sequencing and targeted analysis to identify cardiomyopathy variants in 11 subjects with cardiomyopathy. Methods and Results—Whole genome sequencing with an average of 37× coverage was combined with targeted analysis focused onmore » 204 genes linked to cardiomyopathy. Genetic variants were scored using multiple prediction algorithms combined with frequency data from public databases. This pipeline yielded 1-14 potentially pathogenic variants per individual. Variants were further analyzed using clinical criteria and/or segregation analysis. Three of three previously identified primary mutations were detected by this analysis. In six subjects for whom the primary mutation was previously unknown, we identified mutations that segregated with disease, had clinical correlates, and/or had additional pathological correlation to provide evidence for causality. For two subjects with previously known primary mutations, we identified additional variants that may act as modifiers of disease severity. In total, we identified the likely pathological mutation in 9 of 11 (82%) subjects. We conclude that these pilot data demonstrate that ~30-40× coverage whole genome sequencing combined with targeted analysis is feasible and sensitive to identify rare variants in cardiomyopathy-associated genes.« less

  14. Targeted Analysis of Whole Genome Sequence Data to Diagnose Genetic Cardiomyopathy

    SciTech Connect

    Golbus, Jessica R.; Puckelwartz, Megan J.; Dellefave-Castillo, Lisa; Fahrenbach, John P.; Nelakuditi, Viswateja; Pesce, Lorenzo L.; Pytel, Peter; McNally, Elizabeth M.

    2014-09-01

    Background—Cardiomyopathy is highly heritable but genetically diverse. At present, genetic testing for cardiomyopathy uses targeted sequencing to simultaneously assess the coding regions of more than 50 genes. New genes are routinely added to panels to improve the diagnostic yield. With the anticipated $1000 genome, it is expected that genetic testing will shift towards comprehensive genome sequencing accompanied by targeted gene analysis. Therefore, we assessed the reliability of whole genome sequencing and targeted analysis to identify cardiomyopathy variants in 11 subjects with cardiomyopathy. Methods and Results—Whole genome sequencing with an average of 37× coverage was combined with targeted analysis focused on 204 genes linked to cardiomyopathy. Genetic variants were scored using multiple prediction algorithms combined with frequency data from public databases. This pipeline yielded 1-14 potentially pathogenic variants per individual. Variants were further analyzed using clinical criteria and/or segregation analysis. Three of three previously identified primary mutations were detected by this analysis. In six subjects for whom the primary mutation was previously unknown, we identified mutations that segregated with disease, had clinical correlates, and/or had additional pathological correlation to provide evidence for causality. For two subjects with previously known primary mutations, we identified additional variants that may act as modifiers of disease severity. In total, we identified the likely pathological mutation in 9 of 11 (82%) subjects. We conclude that these pilot data demonstrate that ~30-40× coverage whole genome sequencing combined with targeted analysis is feasible and sensitive to identify rare variants in cardiomyopathy-associated genes.

  15. Analysis of genetic diversity in Larix gmelinii (Pinaceae) with RAPD and ISSR markers.

    PubMed

    Zhang, L; Zhang, H G; Li, X F

    2013-01-24

    Dahurian larch (Larix gmelinii), a deciduous conifer, is the northernmost tree, native to eastern Siberia and nearby regions of China. We used growth traits and molecular markers to assess genetic variation in different L. gmelinii growing regions; 105 individual samples were collected from seven regions of the Qingshan Forestry Centre, Heilongjiang Province, China. The greatest genetic regional variation was seen in the Youhao area, based on coefficients of variation for tree height, diameter and volume (14.73, 28.25, and 55.27%, respectively). Analysis using molecular markers showed rich genetic diversity. The RAPD and ISSR methods both indicated that most variation came from within populations. The seven regions were divided into two groups (Daxing'an and Xiaoxing'an Mountain ranges) by RAPD cluster analysis: Tianchi, Xiaojiuya, Yuanjiang, and Taiping regions were placed in the first group at a genetic distance of 0.08; while the other regions were in the second group. The correlation between RAPD markers and geographical distance was significant, with a correlation coefficient of 0.752.

  16. Genetic relationships among twelve Chinese indigenous goat populations based on microsatellite analysis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Meng-Hua; Zhao, Shu-Hong; Bian, Ci; Wang, Hai-Sheng; Wei, Hong; Liu, Bang; Yu, Mei; Fan, Bin; Chen, Shi-Lin; Zhu, Meng-Jin; Li, Shi-Jun; Xiong, Tong-An; Li, Kui

    2002-01-01

    Twelve Chinese indigenous goat populations were genotyped for twenty-six microsatellite markers recommended by the EU Sheep and Goat Biodiversity Project. A total of 452 goats were tested. Seventeen of the 26 microsatellite markers used in this analysis had four or more alleles. The mean expected heterozygosity and the mean observed heterozygosity for the population varied from 0.611 to 0.784 and 0.602 to 0.783 respectively. The mean FST (0.105) demonstrated that about 89.5% of the total genetic variation was due to the genetic differentiation within each population. A phylogenetic tree based on the Nei (1978) standard genetic distance displayed a remarkable degree of consistency with their different geographical origins and their presumed migration throughout China. The correspondence analysis did not only distinguish population groups, but also confirmed the above results, classifying the important populations contributing to diversity. Additionally, some specific alleles were shown to be important in the construction of the population structure. The study analyzed the recent origins of these populations and contributed to the knowledge and genetic characterization of Chinese indigenous goat populations. In addition, the seventeen microsatellites recommended by the EU Sheep and Goat Biodiversity Project proved to be useful for the biodiversity studies in goat breeds. PMID:12473236

  17. The apportionment of total genetic variation by categorical analysis of variance.

    PubMed

    Khang, Tsung Fei; Yap, Von Bing

    2010-01-01

    We wish to suggest the categorical analysis of variance as a means of quantifying the proportion of total genetic variation attributed to different sources of variation. This method potentially challenges researchers to rethink conclusions derived from a well-known method known as the analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA). The CATANOVA framework allows explicit definition, and estimation, of two measures of genetic differentiation. These parameters form the subject of interest in many research programmes, but are often confused with the correlation measures defined in AMOVA, which cannot be interpreted as relative contributions of particular sources of variation. Through a simulation approach, we show that under certain conditions, researchers who use AMOVA to estimate these measures of genetic differentiation may attribute more than justified amounts of total variation to population labels. Moreover, the two measures can also lead to incongruent conclusions regarding the genetic structure of the populations of interest. Fortunately, one of the two measures seems robust to variations in relative sample sizes used. Its merits are illustrated in this paper using mitochondrial haplotype and amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) data.

  18. Preliminary analysis of population genetic diversity of cultivated Laminaria japonica sporophyte via AFLP technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Heng; Sui, Zhenghong; Bao, Zhenmin

    2010-03-01

    The amplified fragment length polymorphic DNA (AFLP) technique was adopted to estimate the population genetic polymorphism among 30 sporophytes of Laminaria japonica collected from a cultivating farm in Rongcheng, China. Three methods were used for genomic DNA extraction from Laminaria japonica sporophyte and only the products obtained using the improved genomic DNA extraction kit method proved qualified for AFLP analysis. The parameters of the method were optimized. Samples of forty milligrams and the cell lysis time of 120 min were suggested to replace the parameters recommended by the manufacturer. Thirty individuals of Laminaria japonica from the same cultivating site were investigated using one pair of selective primers. A total of 21 loci were obtained and 17 of them were polymorphic. The mean percent age of polymorphic loci of this population was 80.95%. The Nei’s gene diversity (H) within this population was 0.3028 and the average Shannon’s Information index (I) was 0.4498. A genetic distance matrix among different individuals was constructed as well. Through this study, an applicable AFLP genetic analysis working system for Laminaria japonica sporophyte was established. The results of this research also revealed a high level of genetic diversity within the studied population.

  19. Y-chromosome analysis in Egypt suggests a genetic regional continuity in Northeastern Africa.

    PubMed

    Manni, Franz; Leonardi, Pascal; Barakat, Abdelhamid; Rouba, Hassan; Heyer, Evelyne; Klintschar, Michael; McElreavey, Ken; Quintana-Murci, Lluís

    2002-10-01

    The geographic location of Egypt, at the interface between North Africa, the Middle East, and southern Europe, prompted us to investigate the genetic diversity of this population and its relationship with neighboring populations. To assess the extent to which the modern Egyptian population reflects this intermediate geographic position, ten Unique Event Polymorphisms (UEPs), mapping to the nonrecombining portion of the Y chromosome, have been typed in 164 Y chromosomes from three North African populations. The analysis of these binary markers, which define 11 Y-chromosome lineages, were used to determine the haplogroup frequencies in Egyptians, Moroccan Arabs, and Moroccan Berbers and thereby define the Y-chromosome background in these regions. Pairwise comparisons with a set of 15 different populations from neighboring European, North African, and Middle Eastern populations and geographic analysis showed the absence of any significant genetic barrier in the eastern part of the Mediterranean area, suggesting that genetic variation and gene flow in this area follow the "isolation-by-distance" model. These results are in sharp contrast with the observation of a strong north-south genetic barrier in the western Mediterranean basin, defined by the Gibraltar Strait. Thus, the Y-chromosome gene pool in the modern Egyptian population reflects a mixture of European, Middle Eastern, and African characteristics, highlighting the importance of ancient and recent migration waves, followed by gene flow, in the region.

  20. Analysis of the genetic diversity of beach plums by simple sequence repeat markers.

    PubMed

    Wang, X M; Wu, W L; Zhang, C H; Zhang, Y P; Li, W L; Huang, T

    2015-08-19

    The purpose of this study was to measure the genetic diversity of wild beach plum and cultivated species, and to determine the species relationships using SSRs markers. An analysis of genetic diversity from ten beach plum germplasms was carried out using 11 simple sequence repeat (SSR) primers selected from 35 primers to generate distinct PCR products. From this plant material, 44 allele variations were detected, with 3-5 alleles identified from each primer. The analysis showed that the genetic similarity coefficient varied from 0.721 ± 0.155 to 0.848 ± 0.136 within each of the ten beach plum germplasms and changed within the range of 0.551 ± 0.084 to 0.695 ± 0.073 between any two pairs of germplasms. According to the genetic dissimilarity coefficient matrix, a cluster analysis of SSRs using the unweighted pair group mean average method in the NTSYSpc 2.10 software revealed that the ten germplasms could be divided into two groups at the dissimilarity coefficient of 0.606. Class I included 77.8, 12.5, 30, and 33.3% of MM, MI, NY, and CM, respectively. Class II contains the remaining 9 beach plum germplasms. The markers generated by 11 SSR primers proved very effective in distinguishing the beach plum germplasm resources. It was clear that the geographical distribution did not correspond with the genetic relationships among the different beach plum strains. This result will be of value to beach plum breeding programs.

  1. Genetic manipulation in Δku80 strains for functional genomic analysis of Toxoplasma gondii.

    PubMed

    Rommereim, Leah M; Hortua Triana, Miryam A; Falla, Alejandra; Sanders, Kiah L; Guevara, Rebekah B; Bzik, David J; Fox, Barbara A

    2013-07-12

    Targeted genetic manipulation using homologous recombination is the method of choice for functional genomic analysis to obtain a detailed view of gene function and phenotype(s). The development of mutant strains with targeted gene deletions, targeted mutations, complemented gene function, and/or tagged genes provides powerful strategies to address gene function, particularly if these genetic manipulations can be efficiently targeted to the gene locus of interest using integration mediated by double cross over homologous recombination. Due to very high rates of nonhomologous recombination, functional genomic analysis of Toxoplasma gondii has been previously limited by the absence of efficient methods for targeting gene deletions and gene replacements to specific genetic loci. Recently, we abolished the major pathway of nonhomologous recombination in type I and type II strains of T. gondii by deleting the gene encoding the KU80 protein(1,2). The Δku80 strains behave normally during tachyzoite (acute) and bradyzoite (chronic) stages in vitro and in vivo and exhibit essentially a 100% frequency of homologous recombination. The Δku80 strains make functional genomic studies feasible on the single gene as well as on the genome scale(1-4). Here, we report methods for using type I and type II Δku80Δhxgprt strains to advance gene targeting approaches in T. gondii. We outline efficient methods for generating gene deletions, gene replacements, and tagged genes by targeted insertion or deletion of the hypoxanthine-xanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HXGPRT) selectable marker. The described gene targeting protocol can be used in a variety of ways in Δku80 strains to advance functional analysis of the parasite genome and to develop single strains that carry multiple targeted genetic manipulations. The application of this genetic method and subsequent phenotypic assays will reveal fundamental and unique aspects of the biology of T. gondii and related significant human

  2. Multivariate Meta-Analysis of Genetic Association Studies: A Simulation Study.

    PubMed

    Neupane, Binod; Beyene, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    In a meta-analysis with multiple end points of interests that are correlated between or within studies, multivariate approach to meta-analysis has a potential to produce more precise estimates of effects by exploiting the correlation structure between end points. However, under random-effects assumption the multivariate estimation is more complex (as it involves estimation of more parameters simultaneously) than univariate estimation, and sometimes can produce unrealistic parameter estimates. Usefulness of multivariate approach to meta-analysis of the effects of a genetic variant on two or more correlated traits is not well understood in the area of genetic association studies. In such studies, genetic variants are expected to roughly maintain Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium within studies, and also their effects on complex traits are generally very small to modest and could be heterogeneous across studies for genuine reasons. We carried out extensive simulation to explore the comparative performance of multivariate approach with most commonly used univariate inverse-variance weighted approach under random-effects assumption in various realistic meta-analytic scenarios of genetic association studies of correlated end points. We evaluated the performance with respect to relative mean bias percentage, and root mean square error (RMSE) of the estimate and coverage probability of corresponding 95% confidence interval of the effect for each end point. Our simulation results suggest that multivariate approach performs similarly or better than univariate method when correlations between end points within or between studies are at least moderate and between-study variation is similar or larger than average within-study variation for meta-analyses of 10 or more genetic studies. Multivariate approach produces estimates with smaller bias and RMSE especially for the end point that has randomly or informatively missing summary data in some individual studies, when the missing data

  3. Population genetic analysis reveals a low level of genetic diversity of 'Candidatus Phytoplasma aurantifolia' causing witches' broom disease in lime.

    PubMed

    Al-Abadi, Shaikha Y; Al-Sadi, Abdullah M; Dickinson, Matthew; Al-Hammadi, Mohammed S; Al-Shariqi, Rashid; Al-Yahyai, Rashid A; Kazerooni, Elham A; Bertaccini, Assunta

    2016-01-01

    Witches' broom disease of lime (WBDL) is a serious phytoplasma disease of acid lime in Oman, the UAE and Iran. Despite efforts to study it, no systemic study attempted to characterize the relationship among the associated phytoplasma, 'Candidatus Phytoplasma aurantifolia', from the three countries. This study utilized sequences of the 16S rRNA, imp and secA genes to characterize 57 strains collected from Oman (38), the UAE (9) and Iran (10). Phylogenetic analysis based on the 16S rRNA gene showed that the 57 strains shared 98.5-100 % nucleotide similarity to each other and to strains of 'Ca. P. aurantifolia' available in GenBank. The level of genetic diversity was low based on the 16S rRNA (0-0.011), imp (0-0.002) and secA genes (0-0.015). The presence of low level of diversity among phytoplasma strains from Oman, the UAE and Iran can be explained by the movement of infected lime seedlings from one country to another through trading and exchange of infected plants. The study discusses implication of the findings on WBDL spread and management.

  4. Can Genetics Predict Response to Complex Behavioral Interventions? Evidence from a Genetic Analysis of the Fast Track Randomized Control Trial.

    PubMed

    Albert, Dustin; Belsky, Daniel W; Crowley, D Max; Latendresse, Shawn J; Aliev, Fazil; Riley, Brien; Sun, Cuie; Dick, Danielle M; Dodge, Kenneth A

    2015-01-01

    Early interventions are a preferred method for addressing behavioral problems in high-risk children, but often have only modest effects. Identifying sources of variation in intervention effects can suggest means to improve efficiency. One potential source of such variation is the genome. We conducted a genetic analysis of the Fast Track randomized control trial, a 10-year-long intervention to prevent high-risk kindergarteners from developing adult externalizing problems including substance abuse and antisocial behavior. We tested whether variants of the glucocorticoid receptor gene NR3C1 were associated with differences in response to the Fast Track intervention. We found that in European-American children, a variant of NR3C1 identified by the single-nucleotide polymorphism rs10482672 was associated with increased risk for externalizing psychopathology in control group children and decreased risk for externalizing psychopathology in intervention group children. Variation in NR3C1 measured in this study was not associated with differential intervention response in African-American children. We discuss implications for efforts to prevent externalizing problems in high-risk children and for public policy in the genomic era.

  5. Multidisciplinary Design, Analysis, and Optimization Tool Development Using a Genetic Algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pak, Chan-gi; Li, Wesley

    2009-01-01

    Multidisciplinary design, analysis, and optimization using a genetic algorithm is being developed at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Dryden Flight Research Center (Edwards, California) to automate analysis and design process by leveraging existing tools to enable true multidisciplinary optimization in the preliminary design stage of subsonic, transonic, supersonic, and hypersonic aircraft. This is a promising technology, but faces many challenges in large-scale, real-world application. This report describes current approaches, recent results, and challenges for multidisciplinary design, analysis, and optimization as demonstrated by experience with the Ikhana fire pod design.!

  6. Ssr analysis for genetic structure and diversity determination of maize local populations from former Yugoslavia territories.

    PubMed

    Ignjatović-Micić, D; Drinić, S Mladenović; Nikolić, A; Lazić-Jancić, V

    2008-11-01

    A collection of 2178 local populations from ex-Yugoslavia territories is maintained in Maize Research Institute (MRI) gene bank. These populations were characterized mainly by morphological markers. In this work 21 local populations belonging to seven different agro-ecological groups have been subjected to SSR analysis using a DNA-pooling strategy. The objective of this work was to develop genetic fingerprints for characterization, identification and classification of the populations, as well as for estimation of their genetic diversity. Also, a DNA-pooling strategy was employed with the aim to certify if it could be applied for population analysis with SSR markers. Statistical analysis of 25 informative SSR primers revealing 224 alleles (bands) showed that the average within-population mean number of alleles was 2.55, the average values for total and within-population diversity were 0.784 and 0.502, respectively and G(ST) value was 0.360. Genetic distance values calculated using Modified Rogers' Distance were in the range from 0.35 to 0.60. The silver staining method of DNA used for bulked samples showed some weakness that could be overcome with a more sensitive staining method. Nevertheless, the results in this work indicate that the SSR analysis of bulks could be used for characterizing a large number of populations in gene banks.

  7. Genetic Analysis of Male Reproductive Contributions in Chamaelirium Luteum (L.) Gray (Liliaceae)

    PubMed Central

    Smouse, P. E.; Meagher, T. R.

    1994-01-01

    Genealogical analysis is a powerful tool for analysis of reproductive performance in both natural and captive populations, but assignment of paternity has always been a stumbling block for this sort of work. Statistical methods for determining paternity have undergone several phases of development, ranging from straightforward genetic exclusion to assignment of paternity based on genetic likelihood criteria. In the present study, we present a genetic likelihood-based iterative procedure for fractional allocation of paternity within a progeny pool and apply this method to a population of Chamaelirium luteum, a dioecious member of the Liliaceae. Results from this analysis clearly demonstrate that different males make unequal contributions to the overall progeny pool, with many males contributing essentially nothing to the next generation. Furthermore, the distribution of paternal success among males shows a highly significant departure from (Poisson) randomness. The results from the present analysis were compared with earlier results obtained from the same data set, using likelihood-based categorical paternity assignments. The general biological pattern revealed by the two analyses is the same, but the estimates of reproductive success are only modestly (though significantly) correlated. The iterative procedure makes more complete use of the data and generates a more sharply resolved distribution of male reproductive success. PMID:8138167

  8. Genetic analysis of male reproductive contributions in Chamaelirium luteum (L.) gray (Liliaceae).

    PubMed

    Smouse, P E; Meagher, T R

    1994-01-01

    Genealogical analysis is a powerful tool for analysis of reproductive performance in both natural and captive populations, but assignment of paternity has always been a stumbling block for this sort of work. Statistical methods for determining paternity have undergone several phases of development, ranging from straightforward genetic exclusion to assignment of paternity based on genetic likelihood criteria. In the present study, we present a genetic likelihood-based iterative procedure for fractional allocation of paternity within a progeny pool and apply this method to a population of Chamaelirium luteum, a dioecious member of the Liliaceae. Results from this analysis clearly demonstrate that different males make unequal contributions to the overall progeny pool, with many males contributing essentially nothing to the next generation. Furthermore, the distribution of paternal success among males shows a highly significant departure from (Poisson) randomness. The results from the present analysis were compared with earlier results obtained from the same data set, using likelihood-based categorical paternity assignments. The general biological pattern revealed by the two analyses is the same, but the estimates of reproductive success are only modestly (though significantly) correlated. The iterative procedure makes more complete use of the data and generates a more sharply resolved distribution of male reproductive success.

  9. Genetic analysis of traits affecting the success of embryo transfer in dairy cattle.

    PubMed

    König, S; Bosselmann, F; von Borstel, U U; Simianer, H

    2007-08-01

    The primary aim of this study was to estimate variance components for traits related to embryo transfer (ET) by applying generalized linear mixed models (GLMM) for different distributions of traits (normal, binomial, and Poisson) in a synergistic context. Synergistic models were originally developed for traits affected by several genotypes, denoted as maternal, paternal, and direct effects. In the case of ET, the number of flushed ova (FO) only depends on a donor's maternal genetic effect, whereas paternal fertility must be considered for other embryo survival traits, such as the number of transferable embryos (TE), the number of degenerated embryos (DE), the number of unfertilized oocytes (UO), and the percentage of transferable embryos (PTE). Data for these traits were obtained from 4,196 flushes of 2,489 Holstein cows within 4 regions of northwest Germany from January 1998 through October 2004. Estimates of maternal heritability were 0.231 for FO, 0.096 for TE, 0.021 for DE, 0.135 for UO, and 0.099 for PTE, whereas the relative genetic impact of the paternal component was near zero. Estimates of the genetic correlations between the maternal and the paternal component were slightly negative, indicating a genetic antagonism. For the analysis of pregnancy after ET, 8,239 transfers to 6,819 different Holstein-Friesian recipients were considered by applying threshold methodology. The direct heritability for pregnancy in the recipient after ET was 0.056. The relative genetic impact of maternal and paternal components on pregnancy of recipients describing a donor's and a sire's ability to produce viable embryos was below 1%. The genetic correlations of the direct effect of the recipient with the sire of embryos (paternal effect) and the donor cow (maternal effect) for pregnancy after ET were -0.32 and -0.14, respectively. With the exception of FO and PTE (-0.17), estimates of genetic correlations among traits for the maternal site were distinctly positive, especially

  10. Genetic determinants of common epilepsies: a meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background The epilepsies are a clinically heterogeneous group of neurological disorders. Despite strong evidence for heritability, genome-wide association studies have had little success in identification of risk loci associated with epilepsy, probably because of relatively small sample sizes and insufficient power. We aimed to identify risk loci through meta-analyses of genome-wide association studies for all epilepsy and the two largest clinical subtypes (genetic generalised epilepsy and focal epilepsy). Methods We combined genome-wide association data from 12 cohorts of individuals with epilepsy and controls from population-based datasets. Controls were ethnically matched with cases. We phenotyped individuals with epilepsy into categories of genetic generalised epilepsy, focal epilepsy, or unclassified epilepsy. After standardised filtering for quality control and imputation to account for different genotyping platforms across sites, investigators at each site conducted a linear mixed-model association analysis for each dataset. Combining summary statistics, we conducted fixed-effects meta-analyses of all epilepsy, focal epilepsy, and genetic generalised epilepsy. We set the genome-wide significance threshold at p<1·66 × 10−8. Findings We included 8696 cases and 26 157 controls in our analysis. Meta-analysis of the all-epilepsy cohort identified loci at 2q24.3 (p=8·71 × 10−10), implicating SCN1A, and at 4p15.1 (p=5·44 × 10−9), harbouring PCDH7, which encodes a protocadherin molecule not previously implicated in epilepsy. For the cohort of genetic generalised epilepsy, we noted a single signal at 2p16.1 (p=9·99 × 10−9), implicating VRK2 or FANCL. No single nucleotide polymorphism achieved genome-wide significance for focal epilepsy. Interpretation This meta-analysis describes a new locus not previously implicated in epilepsy and provides further evidence about the genetic architecture of these disorders, with the

  11. Strains and stressors: an analysis of touchscreen learning in genetically diverse mouse strains.

    PubMed

    Graybeal, Carolyn; Bachu, Munisa; Mozhui, Khyobeni; Saksida, Lisa M; Bussey, Timothy J; Sagalyn, Erica; Williams, Robert W; Holmes, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Touchscreen-based systems are growing in popularity as a tractable, translational approach for studying learning and cognition in rodents. However, while mouse strains are well known to differ in learning across various settings, performance variation between strains in touchscreen learning has not been well described. The selection of appropriate genetic strains and backgrounds is critical to the design of touchscreen-based studies and provides a basis for elucidating genetic factors moderating behavior. Here we provide a quantitative foundation for visual discrimination and reversal learning using touchscreen assays across a total of 35 genotypes. We found significant differences in operant performance and learning, including faster reversal learning in DBA/2J compared to C57BL/6J mice. We then assessed DBA/2J and C57BL/6J for differential sensitivity to an environmental insult by testing for alterations in reversal learning following exposure to repeated swim stress. Stress facilitated reversal learning (selectively during the late stage of reversal) in C57BL/6J, but did not affect learning in DBA/2J. To dissect genetic factors underlying these differences, we phenotyped a family of 27 BXD strains generated by crossing C57BL/6J and DBA/2J. There was marked variation in discrimination, reversal and extinction learning across the BXD strains, suggesting this task may be useful for identifying underlying genetic differences. Moreover, different measures of touchscreen learning were only modestly correlated in the BXD strains, indicating that these processes are comparatively independent at both genetic and phenotypic levels. Finally, we examined the behavioral structure of learning via principal component analysis of the current data, plus an archival dataset, totaling 765 mice. This revealed 5 independent factors suggestive of "reversal learning," "motivation-related late reversal learning," "discrimination learning," "speed to respond," and "motivation during

  12. Novel R tools for analysis of genome-wide population genetic data with emphasis on clonality

    PubMed Central

    Kamvar, Zhian N.; Brooks, Jonah C.; Grünwald, Niklaus J.

    2015-01-01

    To gain a detailed understanding of how plant microbes evolve and adapt to hosts, pesticides, and other factors, knowledge of the population dynamics and evolutionary history of populations is crucial. Plant pathogen populations are often clonal or partially clonal which requires different analytical tools. With the advent of high throughput sequencing technologies, obtaining genome-wide population genetic data has become easier than ever before. We previously contributed the R package poppr specifically addressing issues with analysis of clonal populations. In this paper we provide several significant extensions to poppr with a focus on large, genome-wide SNP data. Specifically, we provide several new functionalities including the new function mlg.filter to define clone boundaries allowing for inspection and definition of what is a clonal lineage, minimum spanning networks with reticulation, a sliding-window analysis of the index of association, modular bootstrapping of any genetic distance, and analyses across any level of hierarchies. PMID:26113860

  13. Ecological risk analysis and genetically modified salmon: management in the face of uncertainty.

    PubMed

    Moreau, Darek T R

    2014-02-01

    The commercialization of growth hormone transgenic Atlantic salmon for aquaculture has become a controversial public policy issue. Concerns exist over the potential ecological effects of this biotechnology should animals escape captivity. From within an ecological risk-analysis framework, science has been sought to provide decision makers with evidence upon which to base regulatory decisions pertaining to genetically modified salmon. Here I review the available empirical information on the potential ecological and genetic effects of transgenic salmon and discuss the underlying eco-evolutionary science behind the topic. I conclude that data gaps and irreducible epistemic uncertainties limit the role of scientific inference in support of ecological risk management for transgenic salmon. I argue that predictive uncertainties are pervasive in complex eco-evolutionary systems and that it behooves those involved in the risk-analysis process to accept and communicate these limitations in the interest of timely, clear, and cautious risk-management options.

  14. Genetic Characterization and Comparative Genome Analysis of Brucella melitensis Isolates from India.

    PubMed

    Azam, Sarwar; Rao, Sashi Bhushan; Jakka, Padmaja; NarasimhaRao, Veera; Bhargavi, Bindu; Gupta, Vivek Kumar; Radhakrishnan, Girish

    2016-01-01

    Brucellosis is the most frequent zoonotic disease worldwide, with over 500,000 new human infections every year. Brucella melitensis, the most virulent species in humans, primarily affects goats and the zoonotic transmission occurs by ingestion of unpasteurized milk products or through direct contact with fetal tissues. Brucellosis is endemic in India but no information is available on population structure and genetic diversity of Brucella spp. in India. We performed multilocus sequence typing of four B. melitensis strains isolated from naturally infected goats from India. For more detailed genetic characterization, we carried out whole genome sequencing and comparative genome analysis of one of the B. melitensis isolates, Bm IND1. Genome analysis identified 141 unique SNPs, 78 VNTRs, 51 Indels, and 2 putative prophage integrations in the Bm IND1 genome. Our data may help to develop improved epidemiological typing tools and efficient preventive strategies to control brucellosis.

  15. Genetic Characterization and Comparative Genome Analysis of Brucella melitensis Isolates from India

    PubMed Central

    Azam, Sarwar; Rao, Sashi Bhushan; Jakka, Padmaja; NarasimhaRao, Veera; Bhargavi, Bindu; Gupta, Vivek Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Brucellosis is the most frequent zoonotic disease worldwide, with over 500,000 new human infections every year. Brucella melitensis, the most virulent species in humans, primarily affects goats and the zoonotic transmission occurs by ingestion of unpasteurized milk products or through direct contact with fetal tissues. Brucellosis is endemic in India but no information is available on population structure and genetic diversity of Brucella spp. in India. We performed multilocus sequence typing of four B. melitensis strains isolated from naturally infected goats from India. For more detailed genetic characterization, we carried out whole genome sequencing and comparative genome analysis of one of the B. melitensis isolates, Bm IND1. Genome analysis identified 141 unique SNPs, 78 VNTRs, 51 Indels, and 2 putative prophage integrations in the Bm IND1 genome. Our data may help to develop improved epidemiological typing tools and efficient preventive strategies to control brucellosis. PMID:27525259

  16. Identification of genetic recombination between Acinetobacter species based on multilocus sequence analysis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dae Hun; Park, Young Kyoung; Choi, Ji Young; Ko, Kwan Soo

    2012-07-01

    During multilocus sequence analysis of Acinetobacter calcoaceticus-Acinetobacter baumannii complex, we identified the evidence of recent genetic recombination between 2 Acinetobacter species. While 3 isolates belonged to A. nosocomialis based on 16S rRNA, gyrB, fusA, gdhB, and rplB gene sequences, they showed close relationships with Acinetobacter genomic species 'close to 13TU' in rpoB, recA, cpn60, rpoD, and gltA gene trees.

  17. Genetic polymorphism of MMP family and coronary disease susceptibility: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Li, Min; Shi, Jingpu; Fu, Lingyu; Wang, Hailong; Zhou, Bo; Wu, Xiaomei

    2012-03-01

    The issue that genetic polymorphism of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) family is in association with coronary disease is controversial. So we did a meta-analysis to clarify it clearly. We made a literature search of PubMed, the Web of Science, and Cochrane Collaboration's database to identify eligible reports. The methodological quality of each included studies was assessed. We calculated the pooled ORs with their 95%CI for each genetic polymorphism in STATA 11 software. Separate analysis was performed to address the consistency of results across the subgroup with different continents. A total of 39 studies were included, with a sample of 42269 individuals. This meta-analysis provided evidence that genetic polymorphism of MMP1-1607 1G/2G, MMP3-Gly45lys, MMP3-376 G/C, MMP3-1171 5A/6A, MMP9-1562 C/T and MMP9-R279Q have a small to medium effect on incidence of coronary disease. There was no evidence that MMP1-519 A/G, MMP1-340 T/C and MMP2-1306 C/T polymorphism could increase risk of coronary disease. Results from subgroup analysis supported a relation between MMP3-1711 5A allele, MMP9-1562 C allele and coronary disease especially in Asian population. The results provide moderate association between the six common genetic polymorphism of matrix metalloproteinase family and coronary disease. However, the challenge for researcher is identifying separate effect on different races.

  18. Genetic Diversity and Geographic Population Structure of Bovine Neospora caninum Determined by Microsatellite Genotyping Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Regidor-Cerrillo, Javier; Díez-Fuertes, Francisco; García-Culebras, Alicia; Moore, Dadín P.; González-Warleta, Marta; Cuevas, Carmen; Schares, Gereon; Katzer, Frank; Pedraza-Díaz, Susana; Mezo, Mercedes; Ortega-Mora, Luis M.

    2013-01-01

    The cyst-forming protozoan parasite Neosporacaninum is one of the main causes of bovine abortion worldwide and is of great economic importance in the cattle industry. Recent studies have revealed extensive genetic variation among N. caninum isolates based on microsatellite sequences (MSs). MSs may be suitable molecular markers for inferring the diversity of parasite populations, molecular epidemiology and the basis for phenotypic variations in N. caninum, which have been poorly defined. In this study, we evaluated nine MS markers using a panel of 11 N. caninum-derived reference isolates from around the world and 96 N. caninum bovine clinical samples and one ovine clinical sample collected from four countries on two continents, including Spain, Argentina, Germany and Scotland, over a 10-year period. These markers were used as molecular tools to investigate the genetic diversity, geographic distribution and population structure of N. caninum. Multilocus microsatellite genotyping based on 7 loci demonstrated high levels of genetic diversity in the samples from all of the different countries, with 96 microsatellite multilocus genotypes (MLGs) identified from 108 N. caninum samples. Geographic sub-structuring was present in the country populations according to pairwise FST. Principal component analysis (PCA) and Neighbor Joining tree topologies also suggested MLG segregation partially associated with geographical origin. An analysis of the MLG relationships, using eBURST, confirmed that the close genetic relationship observed between the Spanish and Argentinean populations may be the result of parasite migration (i.e., the introduction of novel MLGs from Spain to South America) due to cattle movement. The eBURST relationships also revealed genetically different clusters associated with the abortion. The presence of linkage disequilibrium, the co-existence of specific MLGs to individual farms and eBURST MLG relationships suggest a predominant clonal propagation for

  19. Analysis of genetic diversity of a native population of Myrcia lundiana Kiaersk. plants using ISSR markers.

    PubMed

    Alves, M F; Nizio, D A C; Brito, F A; Sampaio, T S; Silva, A V C; Arrigoni-Blank, M F; Carvalho, S V A; Blank, A F

    2016-12-02

    Myrcia lundiana Kiaersk. is a tree of the family Myrtaceae found in tropical and subtropical areas of the southern hemisphere that produces essential oil. The aim of this study was to characterize the genetic diversity of M. lundiana plants from a native population of Parque Nacional de Itabaiana, using inter-simple sequence repeat molecular markers. Thirty-five primers were tested, 20 of which were polymorphic, resulting in 135 polymorphic and informative bands. Results of the cluster analysis, obtained using the unweighted pair group method with arithmetic mean, grouped plants into three clusters: Cluster I - MLU001, MLU002, MLU003, MLU004, MLU005, MLU006, MLU018, MLU019, MLU020, MLU021, MLU022; MLU008, MLU011, MLU012, MLU014, MLU015, MLU017, MLU026, and MLU028; Cluster II - MLU007, MLU009, MLU010, MLU013, and MLU016; and Cluster III - MLU023, MLU024, MLU025, and MLU027. Jaccard similarity coefficients for pair-wise comparisons of plants ranged between 0.15 and 0.87. MLU014 and MLU015 presented low genetic diversity, with a similarity index of 0.87. Conversely, MLU007 and MLU019 presented high diversity, with a similarity index of 0.15. According to the structure analysis, three distinct clusters were formed. Genetic diversity of M. lundiana plants was intermediate, and expansion of its genetic diversity is necessary. MLU026 and MLU028 are the most suitable for selection in breeding programs, since they clearly represent all of the diversity present in these plants. Moreover, these results provide important information on the existing genetic variability, highlighting the importance of Parque Nacional de Itabaiana for the conservation of this species.

  20. Genetic analysis for a shared biological basis between migraine and coronary artery disease

    PubMed Central

    Winsvold, Bendik S.; Nelson, Christopher P.; Malik, Rainer; Gormley, Padhraig; Anttila, Verneri; Vander Heiden, Jason; Elliott, Katherine S.; Jacobsen, Line M.; Palta, Priit; Amin, Najaf; de Vries, Boukje; Hämäläinen, Eija; Freilinger, Tobias; Ikram, M. Arfan; Kessler, Thorsten; Koiranen, Markku; Ligthart, Lannie; McMahon, George; Pedersen, Linda M.; Willenborg, Christina; Won, Hong-Hee; Olesen, Jes; Artto, Ville; Assimes, Themistocles L.; Blankenberg, Stefan; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Cherkas, Lynn; Davey Smith, George; Epstein, Stephen E.; Erdmann, Jeanette; Ferrari, Michel D.; Göbel, Hartmut; Hall, Alistair S.; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Kallela, Mikko; Kaprio, Jaakko; Kathiresan, Sekar; Lehtimäki, Terho; McPherson, Ruth; März, Winfried; Nyholt, Dale R.; O'Donnell, Christopher J.; Quaye, Lydia; Rader, Daniel J.; Raitakari, Olli; Roberts, Robert; Schunkert, Heribert; Schürks, Markus; Stewart, Alexandre F.R.; Terwindt, Gisela M.; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; van den Maagdenberg, Arn M.J.M.; van Duijn, Cornelia; Wessman, Maija; Kurth, Tobias; Kubisch, Christian; Dichgans, Martin; Chasman, Daniel I.; Cotsapas, Chris; Zwart, John-Anker; Samani, Nilesh J.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To apply genetic analysis of genome-wide association data to study the extent and nature of a shared biological basis between migraine and coronary artery disease (CAD). Methods: Four separate methods for cross-phenotype genetic analysis were applied on data from 2 large-scale genome-wide association studies of migraine (19,981 cases, 56,667 controls) and CAD (21,076 cases, 63,014 controls). The first 2 methods quantified the extent of overlapping risk variants and assessed the load of CAD risk loci in migraineurs. Genomic regions of shared risk were then identified by analysis of covariance patterns between the 2 phenotypes and by querying known genome-wide significant loci. Results: We found a significant overlap of genetic risk loci for migraine and CAD. When stratified by migraine subtype, this was limited to migraine without aura, and the overlap was protective in that patients with migraine had a lower load of CAD risk alleles than controls. Genes indicated by 16 shared risk loci point to mechanisms with potential roles in migraine pathogenesis and CAD, including endothelial dysfunction (PHACTR1) and insulin homeostasis (GIP). Conclusions: The results suggest that shared biological processes contribute to risk of migraine and CAD, but surprisingly this commonality is restricted to migraine without aura and the impact is in opposite directions. Understanding the mechanisms underlying these processes and their opposite relationship to migraine and CAD may improve our understanding of both disorders. PMID:27066539

  1. Analysis of the association between host genetics, smoking, and sputum microbiota in healthy humans

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Mi Young; Yoon, Hyo Shin; Rho, Mina; Sung, Joohon; Song, Yun-Mi; Lee, Kayoung; Ko, GwangPyo

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies showing clear differences in the airway microbiota between healthy and diseased individuals shed light on the importance of the airway microbiota in health. Here, we report the associations of host genetics and lifestyles such as smoking, alcohol consumption, and physical activity with the composition of the sputum microbiota using 16S rRNA gene sequence data generated from 257 sputum samples of Korean twin-family cohort. By estimating the heritability of each microbial taxon, we found that several taxa, including Providencia and Bacteroides, were significantly influenced by host genetic factors. Smoking had the strongest effect on the overall microbial community structure among the tested lifestyle factors. The abundances of Veillonella and Megasphaera were higher in current-smokers, and increased with the pack-year value and the Fagerstrom Test of Nicotine Dependence (FTND) score. In contrast, Haemophilus decreased with the pack-year of smoking and the FTND score. Co-occurrence network analysis showed that the taxa were clustered according to the direction of associations with smoking, and that the taxa influenced by host genetics were found together. These results demonstrate that the relationships among sputum microbial taxa are closely associated with not only smoking but also host genetics. PMID:27030383

  2. Genetic linkage map and comparative genome analysis for the estuarine Atlantic killifish (Fundulus heteroclitus)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Genetic linkage maps are valuable tools in evolutionary biology; however, their availability for wild populations is extremely limited. Fundulus heteroclitus (Atlantic killifish) is a non-migratory estuarine fish that exhibits high allelic and phenotypic diversity partitioned among subpopulations that reside in disparate environmental conditions. An ideal candidate model organism for studying gene-environment interactions, the molecular toolbox for F. heteroclitus is limited. We identified hundreds of novel microsatellites which, when combined with existing microsatellites and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), were used to construct the first genetic linkage map for this species. By integrating independent linkage maps from three genetic crosses, we developed a consensus map containing 24 linkage groups, consistent with the number of chromosomes reported for this species. These linkage groups span 2300 centimorgans (cM) of recombinant genomic space, intermediate in size relative to the current linkage maps for the teleosts, medaka and zebrafish. Comparisons between fish genomes support a high degree of synteny between the consensus F. heteroclitus linkage map and the medaka and (to a lesser extent) zebrafish physical genome assemblies.This dataset is associated with the following publication:Waits , E., J. Martinson , B. Rinner, S. Morris, D. Proestou, D. Champlin , and D. Nacci. Genetic linkage map and comparative genome analysis for the estuarine Atlanti

  3. Genetic admixture history of Eastern Indonesia as revealed by Y-chromosome and mitochondrial DNA analysis.

    PubMed

    Mona, Stefano; Grunz, Katharina E; Brauer, Silke; Pakendorf, Brigitte; Castrì, Loredana; Sudoyo, Herawati; Marzuki, Sangkot; Barnes, Robert H; Schmidtke, Jörg; Stoneking, Mark; Kayser, Manfred

    2009-08-01

    Eastern Indonesia possesses more linguistic diversity than any other region in Southeast Asia, with both Austronesian (AN) languages that are of East Asian origin, as well as non-Austronesian (NAN) languages of likely Melanesian origin. Here, we investigated the genetic history of human populations from seven eastern Indonesian islands, including AN and NAN speakers, as well as the relationship between languages and genes, by means of nonrecombining Y-chromosomal (NRY) and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) analysis. We found that the eastern Indonesian gene pool consists of East Asian as well as Melanesian components, as might be expected based on linguistic evidence, but also harbors putative indigenous eastern Indonesian signatures that perhaps reflect the initial occupation of the Wallacea by aboriginal hunter-gatherers already in Palaeolithic times. Furthermore, both NRY and mtDNA data showed a complete lack of correlation between linguistic and genetic relationships, most likely reflecting genetic admixture and/or language shift. In addition, we noted a small fraction of the NRY and mtDNA data shared between eastern Indonesians and Australian Aborigines likely reflecting an ancient link between Asia and Australia. Our data thus provide insights into the complex genetic ancestry history of eastern Indonesian islanders characterized by several admixture episodes and demonstrate a clear example of the lack of the often-assumed correlation between the genes and languages of human populations.

  4. Analysis of genetic variability of Fasciola hepatica populations from different geographical locations by ISSR-PCR.

    PubMed

    Robles-Pérez, D; García-García, P; Martínez-Pérez, J M; Rojo-Vázquez, F A; Martínez-Valladares, M

    2015-04-01

    Inter-simple sequence repeats markers were used to determinate the genetic variability of Fasciola hepatica populations recovered from sheep and cattle from Spain (Sp1, Sp2, Sp3 and Sp4), UK (Eng), Ireland (Ir) and Mexico (Mex). Twenty five primers were tested but only five produced 39 reproducible bands, being 71.79% polymorphic bands. This percentage ranged from 10.26% in Sp4 to 48.72% in Sp1, and per host between 28.21 and 48.72% in sheep and between 10.26 and 38.46% in cattle. This relatively low range of genetic diversity within populations, with a mean of 34.40%, implies that a large proportion of variation resided among populations. The population differentiation (Gst = 0.547) indicated that 54.7% of variation is due to differences between populations and 45.3% due to differences within population. The Nei's distance ranged between 0.091 and 0.230 in sheep and between 0.150 and 0.337 in cattle. The genetic relationships between populations and individuals were shown by a UPGMA dendrogram and a principal coordinate analysis; both grouped all populations separately from Sp4, a population of from the Midwest of Spain with the lowest level of diversity. Small genetic distances were observed between Eng and Ir, on the one hand, and Sp1, Sp2, Sp3, from the Northwest of Spain, together with Mex, on the other.

  5. Genetic relationship between cultured populations of Pacific oyster revealed by RAPD analysis.

    PubMed

    Aranishi, Futoshi; Okimoto, Takane

    2004-01-01

    We developed random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) analysis for the assessment of the genetic relationship between cultured populations of the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas Thunberg in Hiroshima and Goseong, the largest oyster farming areas in Japan and Korea, respectively. Of 25 arbitrary primers comprising decamer nucleotides of random sequences, polymerase chain reaction amplifications with 5 different primers gave reproducible electrophoretic patterns. A total of 49 RAPD markers were clearly identified for the Hiroshima and Goseong populations, and 46 markers were polymorphic presenting mean polymorphism rates of the respective populations at 92.29% and 93.32%. Pairwise genetic distances of each 20 individuals from these populations served to produce a UPGMA dendrogram. The dendrogram comprised two main clusters, one of which was a nested cluster including all individuals of the Hiroshima population along with 12 individuals of the Goseong population, and the other cluster included the remaining individuals of the Goseong population. Results indicate that RAPD markers are useful for the assessment of the genetic relationships between populations of the Pacific oyster and further that a significant portion of oysters imported from Korea could be genetically related to the Hiroshima population.

  6. Genetic diversity, kinship analysis, and broodstock management of captive Atlantic sturgeon for population restoration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Henderson, A.P.; Spidle, A.P.; King, T.L.

    2005-01-01

    Captive Atlantic sturgeon Acipenser oxyrinchus considered for use as broodstock in a restoration program were genotyped using nuclear DNA microsatellites and compared to wild collections from the Hudson River, New York (source of parents of the captive sturgeon) and from Albemarle Sound, North Carolina. Because the potential broodfish were the progeny of a small number of parents, maintaining genetic diversity and minimizing inbreeding is essential to a successful breeding and supplementation program. The microsatellite loci used in this analysis generated unique multilocus genotypes for each of 136 Atlantic sturgeon. Analyses indicated significant genetic separation between the New York and North Carolina collections and correctly identified the potential broodstock as a subset of the Hudson River population. Pairwise genetic distance (-In proportion of shared alleles) between half and full siblings in the potential broodfish was as great as 1.386, a value exceeded by only 36% of the sampled broodfish pairs available for mating. Because the current broodstock population does not seem to have deviated far from their ancestral population in the Hudson River, progeny from that broodstock, or the parents themselves, would seem to be genetically suitable for release back into the Hudson River.

  7. Genetic variability analysis of Byrsonima crassifolia germplasm collected in Pará State using ISSR markers.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, S M; Moura, E F; Ramos, G K S; Oliveira, M S P

    2016-10-17

    Native of the Amazon, the nanche (Byrsonima crassifolia) is a fruit cultivated by family farmers and used in cooking; as such, it represents an opportunity for regional agribusiness. The Embrapa Eastern Amazon set up an active germplasm bank (BAG) consisting of 22 accessions sampled in 11 municipalities of Pará State. Due to its economic potential, there is an interest to advance the genetic breeding program of this species. The aim of this study was to characterize the BAG nanche collection using inter-simple sequence repeat (ISSR) markers. Accessions were genotyped using 23 pre-selected ISSR primers resulting in 109 amplified polymorphic and 51 monomorphic bands. With eight polymorphic bands each, the most polymorphic primers were UBC 809 and UBC 848. An unweighted pair-group method with arithmetic average cluster analysis based on Jaccard's coefficient indicated that the individuals clustered into two distinct groups. Accessions Igarapé Açu-2 and Augusto Corrêa-Pl 1 were most similar. The genetic dissimilarity values ranged from 0.10 to 0.59. We conclude that the ISSR markers were efficient in detecting polymorphisms in the nanche accessions, and that it is possible to infer the genetic variability among accessions of the collection. This demonstrate the importance of using molecular markers in poorly studied species and the advantages that this information can bring to the genetic improvement of such species.

  8. Partitioning heritability analysis reveals a shared genetic basis of brain anatomy and schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Phil H.; Baker, Justin T.; Holmes, Avram J.; Jahanshad, Neda; Ge, Tian; Jung, Jae-Yoon; Cruz, Yanela; Manoach, Dara S.; Hibar, Derrek P.; Faskowitz, Joshua; McMahon, Katie L.; de Zubicaray, Greig I.; Martin, Nicolas H.; Wright, Margaret J.; Öngür, Dost; Buckner, Randy; Roffman, Joshua; Thompson, Paul M.; Smoller, Jordan W.

    2016-01-01

    Schizophrenia is a devastating neurodevelopmental disorder with a complex genetic etiology. Widespread cortical gray matter loss has been observed in patients and prodromal samples. However, it remains unresolved whether schizophrenia-associated cortical structure variations arise due to disease etiology or secondary to the illness. Here we address this question using a partitioning-based heritability analysis of genome-wide SNP and neuroimaging data from 1,750 healthy individuals. We find that schizophrenia-associated genetic variants explain a significantly enriched proportion of trait heritability in eight brain phenotypes (FDR=10%). In particular, intracranial volume (ICV) and left superior frontal gyrus thickness exhibit significant and robust associations with schizophrenia genetic risk under varying SNP selection conditions. Cross disorder comparison suggests that the neurogenetic architecture of schizophrenia-associated brain regions is, at least in part, shared with other psychiatric disorders. Our study highlights key neuroanatomical correlates of schizophrenia genetic risk in the general population. These may provide fundamental insights into the complex pathophysiology of the illness, and a potential link to neurocognitive deficits shaping the disorder. PMID:27725656

  9. Genetic analysis in post-mortem samples with micro-ischemic alterations.

    PubMed

    Campuzano, Oscar; Sanchez-Molero, Olallo; Mademont-Soler, Irene; Coll, Monica; Allegue, Catarina; Ferrer-Costa, Carles; Mates, Jesus; Perez-Serra, Alexandra; Del Olmo, Bernat; Iglesias, Anna; Sarquella-Brugada, Georgia; Brugada, Josep; Borondo, Juan Carlos; Castella, Josep; Medallo, Jordi; Brugada, Ramon

    2017-02-01

    Sudden cardiac arrest is a leading cause of death worldwide. Most cardiac arrests happen in patients who have previously suffered a myocardial infarct. The risk of sudden death after infarction may increase in people who carry a pathogenic genetic alteration in cardiac ion channels. We hypothesized that micro-ischemia could trigger lethal arrhythmogenesis, thus we sought to identify genetic alterations in cardiac ion channels in patients with micro-ischemic disease. We studied a cohort of 56 post-mortem samples. Autopsy studies identified myocardial infarction as the cause of death in each case. We used both Sanger sequencing and next-generation sequencing to screen candidate genes associated with sudden cardiac death. We identified six rare missense genetic variations in five unrelated patients. Two variants have been previously reported; one is associated with atrial fibrillation (SCN5A_p.H445D), and the other is predicted to be benign (ANK2_p.T2059M). The novel variants were predicted in silico as benign, except for one (RyR2_p.M4019T), which was classified as deleterious. Our post-mortem, micro-infarction cohort displayed a rate of nearly 10% non-common genetic variants. However, the clinical significance of most of the identified variants remains unknown due to lack of family assessment. Further analyses should be performed in large cohorts to clarify the role of ion-channel gene analysis in samples showing microscopic ischemic alterations.

  10. Analysis of the association between host genetics, smoking, and sputum microbiota in healthy humans.

    PubMed

    Lim, Mi Young; Yoon, Hyo Shin; Rho, Mina; Sung, Joohon; Song, Yun-Mi; Lee, Kayoung; Ko, GwangPyo

    2016-03-31

    Recent studies showing clear differences in the airway microbiota between healthy and diseased individuals shed light on the importance of the airway microbiota in health. Here, we report the associations of host genetics and lifestyles such as smoking, alcohol consumption, and physical activity with the composition of the sputum microbiota using 16S rRNA gene sequence data generated from 257 sputum samples of Korean twin-family cohort. By estimating the heritability of each microbial taxon, we found that several taxa, including Providencia and Bacteroides, were significantly influenced by host genetic factors. Smoking had the strongest effect on the overall microbial community structure among the tested lifestyle factors. The abundances of Veillonella and Megasphaera were higher in current-smokers, and increased with the pack-year value and the Fagerstrom Test of Nicotine Dependence (FTND) score. In contrast, Haemophilus decreased with the pack-year of smoking and the FTND score. Co-occurrence network analysis showed that the taxa were clustered according to the direction of associations with smoking, and that the taxa influenced by host genetics were found together. These results demonstrate that the relationships among sputum microbial taxa are closely associated with not only smoking but also host genetics.

  11. Genetic parameter estimates of growth curve and reproduction traits in Japanese quail.

    PubMed

    Narinc, Dogan; Karaman, Emre; Aksoy, Tulin; Firat, Mehmet Ziya

    2014-01-01

    The goal of selection studies in broilers is to obtain genetically superior chicks in terms of major economic traits, which are mainly growth rate, meat yield, and feed conversion ratio. Multiple selection schedules for growth and reproduction are used in selection programs within commercial broiler dam lines. Modern genetic improvement methods have not been applied in experimental quail lines. The current research was conducted to estimate heritabilities and genetic correlations for growth and reproduction traits in a Japanese quail flock. The Gompertz equation was used to determine growth curve parameters. The Gibbs sampling under a multi-trait animal model was applied to estimate the heritabilities and genetic correlations for these traits. A total of 948 quail were used with complete pedigree information to estimate the genetic parameters. Heritability estimates of BW, absolute and relative growth rates at 5 wk of age (AGR and RGR), β0 and β2 parameters, and age at point of inflection (IPT) of Gompertz growth curve, total egg number (EN) from the day of first lay to 24 wk of age were moderate to high, with values ranging from 0.25 to 0.40. A low heritability (0.07) for fertility (FR) and a strong genetic correlation (0.83) between FR and EN were estimated in our study. Body weight exhibited negative genetic correlation with EN, FR, RGR, and IPT. This genetic antagonism among the mentioned traits may be overcome using modern poultry breeding methods such as selection using multi-trait best linear unbiased prediction and crossbreeding.

  12. Microsatellite analysis of genetic diversity and genetic structure in five consecutive breeding generations of mandarin fish Siniperca chuatsi (Basilewsky).

    PubMed

    Yi, T L; Guo, W J; Liang, X F; Yang, M; Lv, L Y; Tian, C X; Song, Y; Zhao, C; Sun, J

    2015-03-30

    In this report, 10 polymorphic microsatellites were applied to assess the genetic diversity and genetic differentiation of 5 consecutive breeding generations of mandarin fish, Siniperca chuatsi (Basilewsky). The results from total number of alleles, average polymorphism information content, and average homozygosity and heterozygosity showed that the genetic diversity of the breeding population was decreasing. The genetic identity between F1 and its descendant generations (F2, F3, F4, F5) decreased (from 0.9248 to 0.8803), while the genetic distance (from 0.0782 to 0.1275) and fixation index (from 0.03796 to 0.07393) increased. The allele frequency of SS181-235 and SS211-246 changed regularly in the 5 breeding generations, and they may be negatively associated with the selected trait, which needs to be confirmed by further research. Our study indicated that selective breeding was an efficient strategy for mandarin fish. In the process of breeding, some deleterious genes were phased out, and the genetic structure of the breeding populations became stable.

  13. Genetic diversity and species pattern of Trichoderma and Hypocrea in Manipur using in silico analysis.

    PubMed

    Kamala, Thongram; Devi, Sarangthem Indira; Thingnam, Gourshyam; Somkuwar, Bharat Gopalrao

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the occurrence and genetic diversity of Trichoderma and Hypocrea in Manipur which lies in the Indo-Burma biodiversity hot spot region. 65 Trichoderma isolates were identified at species level by morphological as well as sequence based analysis of the internal transcribed spacer region 1 and 4. Altogether 22 different species of Trichoderma and Hypocrea were found, of which Trichoderma harzianum represent the dominant species. Phylogenetic analysis reveals a clear cut distinction of strains isolated from various collection sites which further hints the need for detail study of Trichoderma on molecular level.

  14. A Pareto Optimal Design Analysis of Magnetic Thrust Bearings Using Multi-Objective Genetic Algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Jagu S.; Tiwari, R.

    2015-03-01

    A Pareto optimal design analysis is carried out on the design of magnetic thrust bearings using multi-objective genetic algorithms. Two configurations of bearings have been considered with the minimization of power loss and weight of the bearing as objectives for performance comparisons. A multi-objective evolutionary algorithm is utilized to generate Pareto frontiers at different operating loads. As the load increases, the Pareto frontier reduces to a single point at a peak load for both configurations. Pareto optimal design analysis is used to study characteristics of design variables and other parameters. Three distinct operating load zones have been observed.

  15. Envelope analysis with a genetic algorithm-based adaptive filter bank for bearing fault detection.

    PubMed

    Kang, Myeongsu; Kim, Jaeyoung; Choi, Byeong-Keun; Kim, Jong-Myon

    2015-07-01

    This paper proposes a fault detection methodology for bearings using envelope analysis with a genetic algorithm (GA)-based adaptive filter bank. Although a bandpass filter cooperates with envelope analysis for early identification of bearing defects, no general consensus has been reached as to which passband is optimal. This study explores the impact of various passbands specified by the GA in terms of a residual frequency components-to-defect frequency components ratio, which evaluates the degree of defectiveness in bearings and finally outputs an optimal passband for reliable bearing fault detection.

  16. Multidisciplinary Design, Analysis, and Optimization Tool Development using a Genetic Algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pak, Chan-gi; Li, Wesley

    2008-01-01

    Multidisciplinary design, analysis, and optimization using a genetic algorithm is being developed at the National Aeronautics and Space A dministration Dryden Flight Research Center to automate analysis and design process by leveraging existing tools such as NASTRAN, ZAERO a nd CFD codes to enable true multidisciplinary optimization in the pr eliminary design stage of subsonic, transonic, supersonic, and hypers onic aircraft. This is a promising technology, but faces many challe nges in large-scale, real-world application. This paper describes cur rent approaches, recent results, and challenges for MDAO as demonstr ated by our experience with the Ikhana fire pod design.

  17. Analysis of Genetic Code Ambiguity Arising from Nematode-Specific Misacylated tRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Hamashima, Kiyofumi; Mori, Masaru; Andachi, Yoshiki; Tomita, Masaru; Kohara, Yuji; Kanai, Akio

    2015-01-01

    The faithful translation of the genetic code requires the highly accurate aminoacylation of transfer RNAs (tRNAs). However, it has been shown that nematode-specific V-arm-containing tRNAs (nev-tRNAs) are misacylated with leucine in vitro in a manner that transgresses the genetic code. nev-tRNAGly (CCC) and nev-tRNAIle (UAU), which are the major nev-tRNA isotypes, could theoretically decode the glycine (GGG) codon and isoleucine (AUA) codon as leucine, causing GGG and AUA codon ambiguity in nematode cells. To test this hypothesis, we investigated the functionality of nev-tRNAs and their impact on the proteome of Caenorhabditis elegans. Analysis of the nucleotide sequences in the 3’ end regions of the nev-tRNAs showed that they had matured correctly, with the addition of CCA, which is a crucial posttranscriptional modification required for tRNA aminoacylation. The nuclear export of nev-tRNAs was confirmed with an analysis of their subcellular localization. These results show that nev-tRNAs are processed to their mature forms like common tRNAs and are available for translation. However, a whole-cell proteome analysis found no detectable level of nev-tRNA-induced mistranslation in C. elegans cells, suggesting that the genetic code is not ambiguous, at least under normal growth conditions. Our findings indicate that the translational fidelity of the nematode genetic code is strictly maintained, contrary to our expectations, although deviant tRNAs with misacylation properties are highly conserved in the nematode genome. PMID:25602944

  18. Remind me again what disease we are studying? A population genetics, genetic analysis, and real data perspective on why progress on identifying genetic influences on common epilepsies has been so slow.

    PubMed

    Greenberg, David A; Stewart, William L

    2014-01-01

    In this chapter, we will use the concepts and perspective of population genetics and genetic analysis to discuss the trends that are currently popular in the epilepsy genetics literature. We will also show that some of the recent approaches to understanding epilepsy genetics are unlikely to lead to insight into the causes of the most common epilepsies. Much effort has been directed toward very rare influences on epilepsy expression and away from approaches that could shed light on the most heritable epilepsies. The latest genetic technology, e.g., exome sequencing and copy number variants (CNV) analysis, has been applied without proper consideration of the important principles of population genetics, inheritance, or phenotype definition that are critical in common disease studies. We will show that ignoring these issues has led to unlikely suppositions about etiology and about which genes should be pursued. We also suggest that, taken together, the existing evidence supports a neurodevelopmental origin for common epilepsies. We recommend a return to thorough phenotype definition and family studies and a more careful and thoughtful application of the new technology.

  19. Genetic diversity analysis of sugarcane germplasm based on fluorescence-labeled simple sequence repeat markers and a capillary electrophoresis-based genotyping platform

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genetic diversity analysis, which refers to the elaboration of total extent of genetic characteristics in the genetic makeup of a certain species, constitutes a classical strategy for the study of diversity, population genetic structure, and breeding practices. In this study, fluorescence-labeled se...

  20. Comparison of variants of canonical correlation analysis and partial least squares for combined analysis of MRI and genetic data.

    PubMed

    Grellmann, Claudia; Bitzer, Sebastian; Neumann, Jane; Westlye, Lars T; Andreassen, Ole A; Villringer, Arno; Horstmann, Annette

    2015-02-15

    The standard analysis approach in neuroimaging genetics studies is the mass-univariate linear modeling (MULM) approach. From a statistical view, however, this approach is disadvantageous, as it is computationally intensive, cannot account for complex multivariate relationships, and has to be corrected for multiple testing. In contrast, multivariate methods offer the opportunity to include combined information from multiple variants to discover meaningful associations between genetic and brain imaging data. We assessed three multivariate techniques, partial least squares correlation (PLSC), sparse canonical correlation analysis (sparse CCA) and Bayesian inter-battery factor analysis (Bayesian IBFA), with respect to their ability to detect multivariate genotype-phenotype associations. Our goal was to systematically compare these three approaches with respect to their performance and to assess their suitability for high-dimensional and multi-collinearly dependent data as is the case in neuroimaging genetics studies. In a series of simulations using both linearly independent and multi-collinear data, we show that sparse CCA and PLSC are suitable even for very high-dimensional collinear imaging data sets. Among those two, the predictive power was higher for sparse CCA when voxel numbers were below 400 times sample size and candidate SNPs were considered. Accordingly, we recommend Sparse CCA for candidate phenotype, candidate SNP studies. When voxel numbers exceeded 500 times sample size, the predictive power was the highest for PLSC. Therefore, PLSC can be considered a promising technique for multivariate modeling of high-dimensional brain-SNP-associations. In contrast, Bayesian IBFA cannot be recommended, since additional post-processing steps were necessary to detect causal relations. To verify the applicability of sparse CCA and PLSC, we applied them to an experimental imaging genetics data set provided for us. Most importantly, application of both methods replicated

  1. Two-trait-locus linkage analysis: A powerful strategy for mapping complex genetic traits

    SciTech Connect

    Schork, N.J.; Boehnke, M. ); Terwilliger, J.D.; Ott, J. )

    1993-11-01

    Nearly all diseases mapped to date follow clear Mendelian, single-locus segregation patterns. In contrast, many common familial diseases such as diabetes, psoriasis, several forms of cancer, and schizophrenia are familial and appear to have a genetic component but do not exhibit simple Mendelian transmission. More complex models are required to explain the genetics of these important diseases. In this paper, the authors explore two-trait-locus, two-marker-locus linkage analysis in which two trait loci are mapped simultaneously to separate genetic markers. The authors compare the utility of this approach to standard one-trait-locus, one-marker-locus linkage analysis with and without allowance for heterogeneity. The authors also compare the utility of the two-trait-locus, two-marker-locus analysis to two-trait-locus, one-marker-locus linkage analysis. For common diseases, pedigrees are often bilineal, with disease genes entering via two or more unrelated pedigree members. Since such pedigrees often are avoided in linkage studies, the authors also investigate the relative information content of unilineal and bilineal pedigrees. For the dominant-or-recessive and threshold models that the authors consider, the authors find that two-trait-locus, two-marker-locus linkage analysis can provide substantially more linkage information, as measured by expected maximum lod score, than standard one-trait-locus, one-marker-locus methods, even allowing for heterogeneity, while, for a dominant-or-dominant generating model, one-locus models that allow for heterogeneity extract essentially as much information as the two-trait-locus methods. For these three models, the authors also find that bilineal pedigrees provide sufficient linkage information to warrant their inclusion in such studies. The authors discuss strategies for assessing the significance of the two linkages assumed in two-trait-locus, two-marker-locus models. 37 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  2. Promoting the Use of Common Oat Genetic Resources through Diversity Analysis and Core Collection Construction.

    PubMed

    Boczkowska, Maja; Łapiński, Bogusław; Kordulasińska, Izabela; Dostatny, Denise F; Czembor, Jerzy H

    2016-01-01

    The assessment of diversity and population structure and construction of a core collection is beneficial for the efficient use and management of germplasm. A unique collection of common oat landraces, cultivated in the temperate climate of central Europe until the end of the twentieth century, is preserved in the Polish gene bank. It consists of 91 accessions that have never been used in breeding programs. In order to optimise the use of this genetic resource, we aimed to: (1) determine genetic and agro-morphological diversity, (2) identify internal genetic variation of the tested accessions, (3) form a core collection and (4) recognise the accessions useful for breeding programs or re-release for cultivation. The collection was screened using ISSR markers (1520 loci) and eight agro-morphological traits. Uniquely, we performed molecular studies based on 24 individuals of every accession instead of bulk samples. Therefore, assessment of the degree of diversity within each population and the identification of overlapping gene pools were possible. The observed internal diversity (Nei unbiased coefficient) was in the range of 0.17-0.31. Based on combined genetic and agro-morphological data, we established the core collection composed of 21 landraces. Due to valuable compositions of important traits, some accessions were also identified as useful for breeding programs. The population structure and principal coordinate analysis revealed two major clusters. Based on the previous results, the accessions classified within the smaller one were identified as obsolete varieties instead of landraces. Our results show that the oat landraces are, in general, resistant to local races of diseases, well adapted to local conditions and, in some cases, yielding at the level of modern varieties. Therefore, in situ conservation of the landraces in the near future may be satisfactory for both farmers and researchers in terms of the genetic resources preservation.

  3. Promoting the Use of Common Oat Genetic Resources through Diversity Analysis and Core Collection Construction

    PubMed Central

    Łapiński, Bogusław; Kordulasińska, Izabela; Dostatny, Denise F.; Czembor, Jerzy H.

    2016-01-01

    The assessment of diversity and population structure and construction of a core collection is beneficial for the efficient use and management of germplasm. A unique collection of common oat landraces, cultivated in the temperate climate of central Europe until the end of the twentieth century, is preserved in the Polish gene bank. It consists of 91 accessions that have never been used in breeding programs. In order to optimise the use of this genetic resource, we aimed to: (1) determine genetic and agro-morphological diversity, (2) identify internal genetic variation of the tested accessions, (3) form a core collection and (4) recognise the accessions useful for breeding programs or re-release for cultivation. The collection was screened using ISSR markers (1520 loci) and eight agro-morphological traits. Uniquely, we performed molecular studies based on 24 individuals of every accession instead of bulk samples. Therefore, assessment of the degree of diversity within each population and the identification of overlapping gene pools were possible. The observed internal diversity (Nei unbiased coefficient) was in the range of 0.17–0.31. Based on combined genetic and agro-morphological data, we established the core collection composed of 21 landraces. Due to valuable compositions of important traits, some accessions were also identified as useful for breeding programs. The population structure and principal coordinate analysis revealed two major clusters. Based on the previous results, the accessions classified within the smaller one were identified as obsolete varieties instead of landraces. Our results show that the oat landraces are, in general, resistant to local races of diseases, well adapted to local conditions and, in some cases, yielding at the level of modern varieties. Therefore, in situ conservation of the landraces in the near future may be satisfactory for both farmers and researchers in terms of the genetic resources preservation. PMID:27959891

  4. AFLP analysis of genetic diversity in charcoal rot fungal populations impacted by crop rotations.

    PubMed

    Brooker, N; Lord, J R; Long, J; Jayawardhana, A

    2008-01-01

    The application of molecular markers enables scientists to clarify the genetic relationships among fungi who are difficult to classify or partition into sub-species using traditional morphological or physiological criteria. One such fungus is Macrophomina phaseolina, a plant pathogenic soil-borne fungus that is the causative agent of Charcoal Rot on soybeans and 500 other plant species world-wide. This plant pathogenic fungus is a very heterogeneous species and disease population dynamics and pathogen genetic diversity are poorly understood. Using a multi-variant Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphism (AFLP) approach for the analysis of genomic data, valuable insight into cultural and environmental pressures that shape the fungal genome was possible. Fungal isolates from 12-year rotated field plots ranging from 1-3 years of crop rotations of the same plant type(s), rotation duration and plant maturity groups provided a unique opportunity to survey M. phaseolina isolates taken from the different crop rotation conditions. Using different data interval partitioning of amplified restriction fragments it was possible to see trends associated with the specific cropping history of the fungal isolates. AFLP neutral primers of intermediate and large amplified products using 20-bp intervals were the most efficient and reliable for demonstrating intra-population dynamics. Results indicate that the highest amount of M. phaseolina genetic diversity was conclusively found in fungal isolates taken from three-year rotation plots. Lesser amounts of genetic diversity were found in two-year rotated and non-rotated fungal isolates. Insight gained from this study may now be incorporated into a larger understanding of how crop rotation and the availability of hosts shape and influence the genetic variability within Macrophomina isolates and populations. This information can then be used to make better-informed decisions regarding crop protection strategies against this diverse and

  5. Genome-wide Comparative Analysis of Atopic Dermatitis and Psoriasis Gives Insight into Opposing Genetic Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Baurecht, Hansjörg; Hotze, Melanie; Brand, Stephan; Büning, Carsten; Cormican, Paul; Corvin, Aiden; Ellinghaus, David; Ellinghaus, Eva; Esparza-Gordillo, Jorge; Fölster-Holst, Regina; Franke, Andre; Gieger, Christian; Hubner, Norbert; Illig, Thomas; Irvine, Alan D.; Kabesch, Michael; Lee, Young A.E.; Lieb, Wolfgang; Marenholz, Ingo; McLean, W.H. Irwin; Morris, Derek W.; Mrowietz, Ulrich; Nair, Rajan; Nöthen, Markus M.; Novak, Natalija; O’Regan, Grainne M.; Schreiber, Stefan; Smith, Catherine; Strauch, Konstantin; Stuart, Philip E.; Trembath, Richard; Tsoi, Lam C.; Weichenthal, Michael; Barker, Jonathan; Elder, James T.; Weidinger, Stephan; Cordell, Heather J.; Brown, Sara J.

    2015-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis and psoriasis are the two most common immune-mediated inflammatory disorders affecting the skin. Genome-wide studies demonstrate a high degree of genetic overlap, but these diseases have mutually exclusive clinical phenotypes and opposing immune mechanisms. Despite their prevalence, atopic dermatitis and psoriasis very rarely co-occur within one individual. By utilizing genome-wide association study and ImmunoChip data from >19,000 individuals and methodologies developed from meta-analysis, we have identified opposing risk alleles at shared loci as well as independent disease-specific loci within the epidermal differentiation complex (chromosome 1q21.3), the Th2 locus control region (chromosome 5q31.1), and the major histocompatibility complex (chromosome 6p21–22). We further identified previously unreported pleiotropic alleles with opposing effects on atopic dermatitis and psoriasis risk in PRKRA and ANXA6/TNIP1. In contrast, there was no evidence for shared loci with effects operating in the same direction on both diseases. Our results show that atopic dermatitis and psoriasis have distinct genetic mechanisms with opposing effects in shared pathways influencing epidermal differentiation and immune response. The statistical analysis methods developed in the conduct of this study have produced additional insight from previously published data sets. The approach is likely to be applicable to the investigation of the genetic basis of other complex traits with overlapping and distinct clinical features. PMID:25574825

  6. SecureMA: protecting participant privacy in genetic association meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Wei; Kantarcioglu, Murat; Bush, William S.; Crawford, Dana; Denny, Joshua C.; Heatherly, Raymond; Malin, Bradley A.

    2014-01-01

    Motivation: Sharing genomic data is crucial to support scientific investigation such as genome-wide association studies. However, recent investigations suggest the privacy of the individual participants in these studies can be compromised, leading to serious concerns and consequences, such as overly restricted access to data. Results: We introduce a novel cryptographic strategy to securely perform meta-analysis for genetic association studies in large consortia. Our methodology is useful for supporting joint studies among disparate data sites, where privacy or confidentiality is of concern. We validate our method using three multisite association studies. Our research shows that genetic associations can be analyzed efficiently and accurately across substudy sites, without leaking information on individual participants and site-level association summaries. Availability and implementation: Our software for secure meta-analysis of genetic association studies, SecureMA, is publicly available at http://github.com/XieConnect/SecureMA. Our customized secure computation framework is also publicly available at http://github.com/XieConnect/CircuitService Contact: b.malin@vanderbilt.edu Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:25147357

  7. Time-series analysis reveals genetic responses to intensive management of razorback sucker (Xyrauchen texanus)

    PubMed Central

    Dowling, Thomas E; Turner, Thomas F; Carson, Evan W; Saltzgiver, Melody J; Adams, Deborah; Kesner, Brian; Marsh, Paul C

    2014-01-01

    Time-series analysis is used widely in ecology to study complex phenomena and may have considerable potential to clarify relationships of genetic and demographic processes in natural and exploited populations. We explored the utility of this approach to evaluate population responses to management in razorback sucker, a long-lived and fecund, but declining freshwater fish species. A core population in Lake Mohave (Arizona-Nevada, USA) has experienced no natural recruitment for decades and is maintained by harvesting naturally produced larvae from the lake, rearing them in protective custody, and repatriating them at sizes less vulnerable to predation. Analyses of mtDNA and 15 microsatellites characterized for sequential larval cohorts collected over a 15-year time series revealed no changes in geographic structuring but indicated significant increase in mtDNA diversity for the entire population over time. Likewise, ratios of annual effective breeders to annual census size (Nb/Na) increased significantly despite sevenfold reduction of Na. These results indicated that conservation actions diminished near-term extinction risk due to genetic factors and should now focus on increasing numbers of fish in Lake Mohave to ameliorate longer-term risks. More generally, time-series analysis permitted robust testing of trends in genetic diversity, despite low precision of some metrics. PMID:24665337

  8. Genome-wide comparative analysis of atopic dermatitis and psoriasis gives insight into opposing genetic mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Baurecht, Hansjörg; Hotze, Melanie; Brand, Stephan; Büning, Carsten; Cormican, Paul; Corvin, Aiden; Ellinghaus, David; Ellinghaus, Eva; Esparza-Gordillo, Jorge; Fölster-Holst, Regina; Franke, Andre; Gieger, Christian; Hubner, Norbert; Illig, Thomas; Irvine, Alan D; Kabesch, Michael; Lee, Young A E; Lieb, Wolfgang; Marenholz, Ingo; McLean, W H Irwin; Morris, Derek W; Mrowietz, Ulrich; Nair, Rajan; Nöthen, Markus M; Novak, Natalija; O'Regan, Grainne M; Schreiber, Stefan; Smith, Catherine; Strauch, Konstantin; Stuart, Philip E; Trembath, Richard; Tsoi, Lam C; Weichenthal, Michael; Barker, Jonathan; Elder, James T; Weidinger, Stephan; Cordell, Heather J; Brown, Sara J

    2015-01-08

    Atopic dermatitis and psoriasis are the two most common immune-mediated inflammatory disorders affecting the skin. Genome-wide studies demonstrate a high degree of genetic overlap, but these diseases have mutually exclusive clinical phenotypes and opposing immune mechanisms. Despite their prevalence, atopic dermatitis and psoriasis very rarely co-occur within one individual. By utilizing genome-wide association study and ImmunoChip data from >19,000 individuals and methodologies developed from meta-analysis, we have identified opposing risk alleles at shared loci as well as independent disease-specific loci within the epidermal differentiation complex (chromosome 1q21.3), the Th2 locus control region (chromosome 5q31.1), and the major histocompatibility complex (chromosome 6p21-22). We further identified previously unreported pleiotropic alleles with opposing effects on atopic dermatitis and psoriasis risk in PRKRA and ANXA6/TNIP1. In contrast, there was no evidence for shared loci with effects operating in the same direction on both diseases. Our results show that atopic dermatitis and psoriasis have distinct genetic mechanisms with opposing effects in shared pathways influencing epidermal differentiation and immune response. The statistical analysis methods developed in the conduct of this study have produced additional insight from previously published data sets. The approach is likely to be applicable to the investigation of the genetic basis of other complex traits with overlapping and distinct clinical features.

  9. Genetic Association Analysis under Complex Survey Sampling: The Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Dan-Yu; Tao, Ran; Kalsbeek, William D.; Zeng, Donglin; Gonzalez, Franklyn; Fernández-Rhodes, Lindsay; Graff, Mariaelisa; Koch, Gary G.; North, Kari E.; Heiss, Gerardo

    2014-01-01

    The cohort design allows investigators to explore the genetic basis of a variety of diseases and traits in a single study while avoiding major weaknesses of the case-control design. Most cohort studies employ multistage cluster sampling with unequal probabilities to conveniently select participants with desired characteristics, and participants from different clusters might be genetically related. Analysis that ignores the complex sampling design can yield biased estimation of the genetic association and inflation of the type I error. Herein, we develop weighted estimators that reflect unequal selection probabilities and differential nonresponse rates, and we derive variance estimators that properly account for the sampling design and the potential relatedness of participants in different sampling units. We compare, both analytically and numerically, the performance of the proposed weighted estimators with unweighted estimators that disregard the sampling design. We demonstrate the usefulness of the proposed methods through analysis of MetaboChip data in the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos, which is the largest health study of the Hispanic/Latino population in the United States aimed at identifying risk factors for various diseases and determining the role of genes and environment in the occurrence of diseases. We provide guidelines on the use of weighted and unweighted estimators, as well as the relevant software. PMID:25480034

  10. Genetic polymorphism and evolutionary differentiation of Eastern Chinese Han: a comprehensive and comparative analysis on KIRs

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Caiyong; Hu, Li; Huang, Huijie; Yu, Yanfang; Li, Zheng; Ji, Qiang; Kong, Xiaochao; Wang, Zhongqun; Yan, Jinchuan; Yan, Jiangwei; Zhu, Bofeng; Chen, Feng

    2017-01-01

    Killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptor genes, namely KIRs, cluster together within the 160 kb genomic DNA region. In this study, we used PCR-SSP approach and successfully identified the genotype of 17 KIR genes in 123 independent healthy donors residing in the Jiangsu province, China. All individuals were positive at the 7 genes. The observed carrier gene frequencies (OFs) of remaining 10 KIRs ranged from 14.63% (KIR2DS3) to 95.93% (KIR3DL1). We found 27 distinct genotypes excluding KIR1D. The most frequent occurred in 63 individuals (51.22%). The linkage disequilibrium analysis signified 29 positive and 6 negative relations in 45 pairwise comparisons. To study population differentiation, we drew a Heatmap based on the data of KIRs from 59 populations and conducted Hierarchical Clustering by Euclidean distances. We next validated our results by estimating pairwise DA distances and illustrating a Neighbor-Joining tree, as well as a MDS plot covering 3 additional Chinese Han groups. The phylogenetic reconstruction and cluster analysis strongly indicated a genetically close relationship between Eastern and Jilin Hans. In conclusion, the present study provided a meritorious resource of KIR genotyping for population genetics, and could be helpful to uncover the genetic mechanism of KIRs in immune disease in the future. PMID:28205529

  11. Clinical and Genetic Analysis of Fibrodysplasia Ossificans Progressiva: A Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Chilakamarri, Vijaykrishna; Ranganath, Prajnya; Arora, Abhishek Jagdishchander; Vanaja, Maria Celestina

    2015-01-01

    Fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva (FOP) is a rare genetic disorder characterized by congenital malformation of the great toes and disabling heterotopic ossification in specific anatomic locations with a world wide prevalence of 1 in 2 million population. Nearly 90% of patients with FOP are misdiagnosed and mismanaged. We present a case of a four-year-old boy brought by his parents with the complaints of stiffness of right shoulder, neck and multiple swellings over the upper back noted over the past 4 months. On examination bilateral symmetrical hallux valgus with microdactyly of great toes and multiple bony hard swellings on both the scapulae were noted. Skeletal survey revealed all the classical features of FOP. Mutation of the ACVR1gene on genetic analysis confirmed the diagnosis of FOP. Invasive surgical procedures including biopsy and manipulations for stiff joints were avoided as they strikingly end up in rapid progression of FOP. Congenital hallux valgus with short great toe in a child should be considered as an early diagnostic tool for FOP even before the onset of mass lesions. Genetic analysis for mutation of ACVR1gene is confirmatory. Prevention of injury, medical management of acute painful flare-ups and rehabilitation are the mainstay of treatment. PMID:26436010

  12. Single-Cell Genetic Analysis Using Automated Microfluidics to Resolve Somatic Mosaicism.

    PubMed

    Szulwach, Keith E; Chen, Peilin; Wang, Xiaohui; Wang, Jing; Weaver, Lesley S; Gonzales, Michael L; Sun, Gang; Unger, Marc A; Ramakrishnan, Ramesh

    2015-01-01

    Somatic mosaicism occurs throughout normal development and contributes to numerous disease etiologies, including tumorigenesis and neurological disorders. Intratumor genetic heterogeneity is inherent to many cancers, creating challenges for effective treatments. Unfortunately, analysis of bulk DNA masks subclonal phylogenetic architectures created by the acquisition and distribution of somatic mutations amongst cells. As a result, single-cell genetic analysis is becoming recognized as vital for accurately characterizing cancers. Despite this, methods for single-cell genetics are lacking. Here we present an automated microfluidic workflow enabling efficient cell capture, lysis, and whole genome amplification (WGA). We find that ~90% of the genome is accessible in single cells with improved uniformity relative to current single-cell WGA methods. Allelic dropout (ADO) rates were limited to 13.75% and variant false discovery rates (SNV FDR) were 4.11x10(-6), on average. Application to ER-/PR-/HER2+ breast cancer cells and matched normal controls identified novel mutations that arose in a subpopulation of cells and effectively resolved the segregation of known cancer-related mutations with single-cell resolution. Finally, we demonstrate effective cell classification using mutation profiles with 10X average exome coverage depth per cell. Our data demonstrate an efficient automated microfluidic platform for single-cell WGA that enables the resolution of somatic mutation patterns in single cells.

  13. Genetic polymorphism and evolutionary differentiation of Eastern Chinese Han: a comprehensive and comparative analysis on KIRs.

    PubMed

    Yin, Caiyong; Hu, Li; Huang, Huijie; Yu, Yanfang; Li, Zheng; Ji, Qiang; Kong, Xiaochao; Wang, Zhongqun; Yan, Jinchuan; Yan, Jiangwei; Zhu, Bofeng; Chen, Feng

    2017-02-16

    Killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptor genes, namely KIRs, cluster together within the 160 kb genomic DNA region. In this study, we used PCR-SSP approach and successfully identified the genotype of 17 KIR genes in 123 independent healthy donors residing in the Jiangsu province, China. All individuals were positive at the 7 genes. The observed carrier gene frequencies (OFs) of remaining 10 KIRs ranged from 14.63% (KIR2DS3) to 95.93% (KIR3DL1). We found 27 distinct genotypes excluding KIR1D. The most frequent occurred in 63 individuals (51.22%). The linkage disequilibrium analysis signified 29 positive and 6 negative relations in 45 pairwise comparisons. To study population differentiation, we drew a Heatmap based on the data of KIRs from 59 populations and conducted Hierarchical Clustering by Euclidean distances. We next validated our results by estimating pairwise DA distances and illustrating a Neighbor-Joining tree, as well as a MDS plot covering 3 additional Chinese Han groups. The phylogenetic reconstruction and cluster analysis strongly indicated a genetically close relationship between Eastern and Jilin Hans. In conclusion, the present study provided a meritorious resource of KIR genotyping for population genetics, and could be helpful to uncover the genetic mechanism of KIRs in immune disease in the future.

  14. Genetic correlations between mature cow weight and productive and reproductive traits in Nellore cattle.

    PubMed

    Regatieri, I C; Boligon, A A; Baldi, F; Albuquerque, L G

    2012-08-29

    We investigated genetic associations between mature cow weight (MW) and weaning weight (WW), yearling weight (YW), weight gain from birth to weaning (GBW), weight gain from weaning to yearling (GWY), weaning hip height (WHH), yearling hip height (YHH), scrotal circumference (SC), and age at first calving (AFC). Data from 127,104 Nellore animals born between 1993 and 2006, belonging to Agropecuária Jacarezinho Ltda., were analyzed. (Co)variance components were obtained by the restricted maximum likelihood method, applying an animal model in a multi-traits analysis. The model included direct genetic and residual effects as random effects, the fixed effects of contemporary group, and the linear and quadratic effects of animal age at recording (except for AFC, GBW, and GWY) and age of cow at calving as covariates (except for MW). The numbers of days from birth to weaning and from weaning to yearling were included as covariates for GBW and GWY, respectively. Estimated direct heritabilities were 0.43 ± 0.02 (MW), 0.33 ± 0.01 (WW), 0.36 ± 0.01 (YW), 0.28 ± 0.02 (GBW), 0.31 ± 0.01 (GWY), 0.44 ± 0.02 (WHH), 0.48 ± 0.02 (YHH), 0.44 ± 0.01 (SC), and 0.16 ± 0.03 (AFC). Genetic correlations between MW and productive traits were positive and of medium to high magnitude (ranging from 0.47 ± 0.03 to 0.71 ± 0.01). A positive and low genetic correlation was observed between MW and SC (0.24 ± 0.04). A negative genetic correlation (-0.19 ± 0.03) was estimated between MW and AFC. Selection to increase weight or weight gains at any age, as well as hip height, will change MW in the same direction. Selection for higher SC may lead to a long-term increase in MW. The AFC can be included in selection indices to improve the reproductive performance of beef cattle without significant changes in MW.

  15. Endogenous allergens and compositional analysis in the allergenicity assessment of genetically modified plants.

    PubMed

    Fernandez, A; Mills, E N C; Lovik, M; Spoek, A; Germini, A; Mikalsen, A; Wal, J M

    2013-12-01

    Allergenicity assessment of genetically modified (GM) plants is one of the key pillars in the safety assessment process of these products. As part of this evaluation, one of the concerns is to assess that unintended effects (e.g. over-expression of endogenous allergens) relevant for the food safety have not occurred due to the genetic modification. Novel technologies are now available and could be used as complementary and/or alternative methods to those based on human sera for the assessment of endogenous allergenicity. In view of these developments and as a step forward in the allergenicity assessment of GM plants, it is recommended that known endogenous allergens are included in the compositional analysis as additional parameters to be measured.

  16. Internet and print resources to facilitate pathology analysis when phenotyping genetically engineered rodents.

    PubMed

    Bolon, B; Couto, S; Fiette, L; Perle, K La

    2012-01-01

    Genetically engineered mice and rats are increasingly used as models for exploring disease progression and mechanisms. The full spectrum of anatomic, biochemical, and functional changes that develop in novel, genetically engineered mouse and rat lines must be cataloged before predictions regarding the significance of the mutation may be extrapolated to diseases in other vertebrate species, including humans. A growing list of reference materials, including books, journal articles, and websites, has been produced in the last 2 decades to assist researchers in phenotyping newly engineered rodent lines. This compilation provides an extensive register of materials related to the pathology component of rodent phenotypic analysis. In this article, the authors annotate the resources they use most often, to allow for quick determination of their relevance to research projects.

  17. Molecular Genetic Analysis of a Suprasellar Immature Teratoma : Mutation of Exon 4 P53 Gene

    PubMed Central

    Udin, Nujaimin; Ahmad, Ku Asmarina Ku; Ahmad, Farizan; Omar, Effat; Aziz, Mohd Ezanee; Kumar, Raj; Abdullah, Jafri Malin

    2008-01-01

    We described an intracranial immature teratoma in a 13 year old Malay boy who presented with history of chronic headache and blurring of vision. Physical findings revealed bilateral papilloedema but no other localizing sign. A Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the brain revealed a suprasellar well defined lobulated midline heterogenous mass which was intraoperatively described as mainly solid tumour with multiple small cystic component filled with yellowish jelly like material. Histopathological finding confirmed the case as immature teratoma. Molecular genetic analysis of p53 and p27 genes revealed substitution of nucleotide G to C at location nucleotide 12139, exon 4 of gene p53. No alteration was detected at exon 5–6 and 8 of p53 gene and exon 1 and 2 of p27 gene. This is the first case report of an intracranial immature teratoma with genetic mutation occuring in a Malay boy. PMID:22589625

  18. Genetic linkage analysis in familial breast and ovarian cancer: Results from 214 families

    SciTech Connect

    Easton, D.F.; Ford, D. ); Bishop, D.T.; Crockford, G.P. )

    1993-04-01

    This paper reports the results of a collaborative linkage study involving 214 breast cancer families, including 57 breast-ovarian cancer families; this represents almost all the known families with 17q linkage data. Six markers on 17q, spanning approximately 30 cM, were typed in the families. The aims of the study were to define more precisely the localization of the disease gene, the extent of genetic heterogeneity and the characteristics of linked families and to estimate the penetrance of the 17q gene. Under the assumption of no genetic heterogeneity, the strongest linkage evidence was obtained with D17S588. Multipoint linkage analysis allowing for genetic heterogeneity provided evidence that the predisposing gene lies between the markers D17S588 and D17S250, an interval whose genetic length is estimated to be 8.3 cM in males and 18.0 cM in females. This position was supported over other intervals by odds of 66:1. The location of the gene with respect to D17S579 could not be determined unequivocally. Under the genetic model used in the analysis, the best estimate of the proportion of linked breast-ovarian cancer families was 1.0 (lower LOD -- 1 limit 0.79). In contrast, there was significant evidence of genetic heterogeneity among the families without ovarian cancer, with an estimated 45% being linked. These results suggest that a gene(s) on chromosome 17q accounts for the majority of families in which both early-onset breast cancer and ovarian cancer occur but that other genes predisposing to breast cancer exist. By examining the fit of the linkage data to different penetrance functions, the cumulative risk associated with the 17q gene was estimated to be 59% by age 50 years and 82% by age 70 years. The corresponding estimates for the breast-ovary families were 67% and 76%, and those for the families without ovarian cancer were 49% and 90%; these penetrance functions did not differ significantly from one another. 42 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. Inter simple sequence repeat (ISSR) analysis of genetic diversity in tef [Eragrostis tef (Zucc.) Trotter].

    PubMed

    Assefa, Kebebew; Merker, Arnulf; Tefera, Hailu

    2003-01-01

    The DNA polymorphism among 92 selected tef genotypes belonging to eight origin groups was assessed using eight inter simple sequence repeat (ISSR) primers. The objectives were to examine the possibility of using ISSR markers for unravelling genetic diversity in tef, and to assess the extent and pattern of genetic diversity in the test germplasm with respect to origin groups. The eight primers were able to separate or distinguish all of the 92 tef genotypes based on a total of 110 polymorphic bands among the test lines. The Jaccard similarity coefficient among the test genotypes ranged from 0.26 to 0.86, and at about 60 % similarity level the clustering of this matrix using the unweighted pair-group method based on arithmetic average (UPGMA) resulted in the formation of six major clusters of 2 to 37 lines with further eight lines remaining ungrouped. The standardized Nei genetic distance among the eight groups of origin ranged between 0.03 and 0.32. The UPGMA clustering using the standardized genetic distance matrix resulted in the identification of three clusters of the eight groups of origin with bootstrap values ranging from 56 to 97. The overall mean Shannon Weaver diversity index of the test lines was 0.73, indicating better resolution of genetic diversity in tef with ISSR markers than with phenotypic (morphological) traits used in previous studies. This can be attributed mainly to the larger number of loci generated for evaluation with ISSR analysis as compared to the few number of phenotypic traits amenable for assessment and which are further greatly affected by environment and genotype x environment interaction. Analysis of variance of mean Shannon Weaver diversity indices revealed substantial (P < or = 0.05) variation in the level of diversity among the eight groups of origin. In conclusion, our results indicate that ISSR can be useful as DNA-based molecular markers for studying genetic diversity and phylogenetic relationships, DNA fingerprinting for the

  20. A cross-species genetic analysis identifies candidate genes for mouse anxiety and human bipolar disorder

    PubMed Central

    Ashbrook, David G.; Williams, Robert W.; Lu, Lu; Hager, Reinmar

    2015-01-01

    Bipolar disorder (BD) is a significant neuropsychiatric disorder with a lifetime prevalence of ~1%. To identify genetic variants underlying BD genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have been carried out. While many variants of small effect associated with BD have been identified few have yet been confirmed, partly because of the low power of GWAS due to multiple comparisons being made. Complementary mapping studies using murine models have identified genetic variants for behavioral traits linked to BD, often with high power, but these identified regions often contain too many genes for clear identification of candidate genes. In the current study we have aligned human BD GWAS results and mouse linkage studies to help define and evaluate candidate genes linked to BD, seeking to use the power of the mouse mapping with the precision of GWAS. We use quantitative trait mapping for open field test and elevated zero maze data in the largest mammalian model system, the BXD recombinant inbred mouse population, to identify genomic regions associated with these BD-like phenotypes. We then investigate these regions in whole genome data from the Psychiatric Genomics Consortium's bipolar disorder GWAS to identify candidate genes associated with BD. Finally we establish the biological relevance and pathways of these genes in a comprehensive systems genetics analysis. We identify four genes associated with both mouse anxiety and human BD. While TNR is a novel candidate for BD, we can confirm previously suggested associations with CMYA5, MCTP1, and RXRG. A cross-species, systems genetics analysis shows that MCTP1, RXRG, and TNR coexpress with genes linked to psychiatric disorders and identify the striatum as a potential site of action. CMYA5, MCTP1, RXRG, and TNR are associated with mouse anxiety and human BD. We hypothesize that MCTP1, RXRG, and TNR influence intercellular signaling in the striatum. PMID:26190982

  1. Genetic analysis and QTL mapping of seed coat color in sesame (Sesamum indicum L.).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Haiyang; Miao, Hongmei; Wei, Libin; Li, Chun; Zhao, Ruihong; Wang, Cuiying

    2013-01-01

    Seed coat color is an important agronomic trait in sesame, as it is associated with seed biochemical properties, antioxidant content and activity and even disease resistance of sesame. Here, using a high-density linkage map, we analyzed genetic segregation and quantitative trait loci (QTL) for sesame seed coat color in six generations (P1, P2, F1, BC1, BC2 and F2). Results showed that two major genes with additive-dominant-epistatic effects and polygenes with additive-dominant-epistatic effects were responsible for controlling the seed coat color trait. Average heritability of the major genes in the BC1, BC2 and F2 populations was 89.30%, 24.00%, and 91.11% respectively, while the heritability of polygenes was low in the BC1 (5.43%), in BC2 (0.00%) and in F2 (0.89%) populations. A high-density map was constructed using 724 polymorphic markers. 653 SSR, AFLP and RSAMPL loci were anchored in 14 linkage groups (LG) spanning a total of 1,216.00 cM. The average length of each LG was 86.86 cM and the marker density was 1.86 cM per marker interval. Four QTLs for seed coat color, QTL1-1, QTL11-1, QTL11-2 and QTL13-1, whose heritability ranged from 59.33%-69.89%, were detected in F3 populations using CIM and MCIM methods. Alleles at all QTLs from the black-seeded parent tended to increase the seed coat color. Results from QTLs mapping and classical genetic analysis among the P1, P2, F1, BC1, BC2 and F2 populations were comparatively consistent. This first QTL analysis and high-density genetic linkage map for sesame provided a good foundation for further research on sesame genetics and molecular marker-assisted selection (MAS).

  2. Reconstruction of a beech population bottleneck using archival demographic information and Bayesian analysis of genetic data.

    PubMed

    Lander, Tonya A; Oddou-Muratorio, Sylvie; Prouillet-Leplat, Helene; Klein, Etienne K

    2011-12-01

    Range expansion and contraction has occurred in the history of most species and can seriously impact patterns of genetic diversity. Historical data about range change are rare and generally appropriate for studies at large scales, whereas the individual pollen and seed dispersal events that form the basis of geneflow and colonization generally occur at a local scale. In this study, we investigated range change in Fagus sylvatica on Mont Ventoux, France, using historical data from 1838 to the present and approximate Bayesian computation (ABC) analyses of genetic data. From the historical data, we identified a population minimum in 1845 and located remnant populations at least 200 years old. The ABC analysis selected a demographic scenario with three populations, corresponding to two remnant populations and one area of recent expansion. It also identified expansion from a smaller ancestral population but did not find that this expansion followed a population bottleneck, as suggested by the historical data. Despite a strong support to the selected scenario for our data set, the ABC approach showed a low power to discriminate among scenarios on average and a low ability to accurately estimate effective population sizes and divergence dates, probably due to the temporal scale of the study. This study provides an unusual opportunity to test ABC analysis in a system with a well-documented demographic history and identify discrepancies between the results of historical, classical population genetic and ABC analyses. The results also provide valuable insights into genetic processes at work at a fine spatial and temporal scale in range change and colonization.

  3. Transcriptomic analysis of genetically defined autism candidate genes reveals common mechanisms of action

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Austism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a heterogeneous behavioral disorder or condition characterized by severe impairment of social engagement and the presence of repetitive activities. The molecular etiology of ASD is still largely unknown despite a strong genetic component. Part of the difficulty in turning genetics into disease mechanisms and potentially new therapeutics is the sheer number and diversity of the genes that have been associated with ASD and ASD symptoms. The goal of this work is to use shRNA-generated models of genetic defects proposed as causative for ASD to identify the common pathways that might explain how they produce a core clinical disability. Methods Transcript levels of Mecp2, Mef2a, Mef2d, Fmr1, Nlgn1, Nlgn3, Pten, and Shank3 were knocked-down in mouse primary neuron cultures using shRNA constructs. Whole genome expression analysis was conducted for each of the knockdown cultures as well as a mock-transduced culture and a culture exposed to a lentivirus expressing an anti-luciferase shRNA. Gene set enrichment and a causal reasoning engine was employed to identify pathway level perturbations generated by the transcript knockdown. Results Quantification of the shRNA targets confirmed the successful knockdown at the transcript and protein levels of at least 75% for each of the genes. After subtracting out potential artifacts caused by viral infection, gene set enrichment and causal reasoning engine analysis showed that a significant number of gene expression changes mapped to pathways associated with neurogenesis, long-term potentiation, and synaptic activity. Conclusions This work demonstrates that despite the complex genetic nature of ASD, there are common molecular mechanisms that connect many of the best established autism candidate genes. By identifying the key regulatory checkpoints in the interlinking transcriptional networks underlying autism, we are better able to discover the ideal points of intervention that provide the

  4. Cumulative BRCA mutation analysis in the Greek population confirms that homogenous ethnic background facilitates genetic testing.

    PubMed

    Tsigginou, Alexandra; Vlachopoulos, Fotios; Arzimanoglou, Iordanis; Zagouri, Flora; Dimitrakakis, Constantine

    2015-01-01

    Screening for BRCA 1 and BRCA 2 mutations has long moved from the research lab to the clinic as a routine clinical genetic testing. BRCA molecular alteration pattern varies among ethnic groups which makes it already a less straightforward process to select the appropriate mutations for routine genetic testing on the basis of known clinical significance. The present report comprises an in depth literature review of the so far reported BRCA 1 and BRCA 2 molecular alterations in Greek families. Our analysis of Greek cumulative BRCA 1 and 2 molecular data, produced by several independent groups, confirmed that six recurrent deleterious mutations account for almost 60 % and 70 % of all BRCA 1 and 2 and BRCA 1 mutations, respectively. As a result, it makes more sense to perform BRCA mutation analysis in the clinic in two sequential steps, first conventional analysis for the six most prevalent pathogenic mutations and if none identified, a second step of New Generation Sequencing-based whole genome or whole exome sequencing would follow. Our suggested approach would enable more clinically meaningful, considerably easier and less expensive BRCA analysis in the Greek population which is considered homogenous.

  5. Multilocus sequence analysis reveals high genetic diversity in clinical isolates of Burkholderia cepacia complex from India.

    PubMed

    Gautam, Vikas; Patil, Prashant P; Kumar, Sunil; Midha, Samriti; Kaur, Mandeep; Kaur, Satinder; Singh, Meenu; Mali, Swapna; Shastri, Jayanthi; Arora, Anita; Ray, Pallab; Patil, Prabhu B

    2016-10-21

    Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc) is a complex group of bacteria causing opportunistic infections in immunocompromised and cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. Herein, we report multilocus sequence typing and analysis of the 57 clinical isolates of Bcc collected over the period of seven years (2005-2012) from several hospitals across India. A total of 21 sequence types (ST) including two STs from cystic fibrosis patient's isolates and twelve novel STs were identified in the population reflecting the extent of genetic diversity. Multilocus sequence analysis revealed two lineages in population, a major lineage belonging to B. cenocepacia and a minor lineage belonging to B. cepacia. Split-decomposition analysis suggests absence of interspecies recombination and intraspecies recombination contributed in generating genotypic diversity amongst isolates. Further linkage disequilibrium analysis indicates that recombination takes place at a low frequency, which is not sufficient to break down the clonal relationship. This knowledge of the genetic structure of Bcc population from a rapidly developing country will be invaluable in the epidemiology, surveillance and understanding global diversity of this group of a pathogen.

  6. Multilocus sequence analysis reveals high genetic diversity in clinical isolates of Burkholderia cepacia complex from India

    PubMed Central

    Gautam, Vikas; Patil, Prashant P.; Kumar, Sunil; Midha, Samriti; Kaur, Mandeep; Kaur, Satinder; Singh, Meenu; Mali, Swapna; Shastri, Jayanthi; Arora, Anita; Ray, Pallab; Patil, Prabhu B.

    2016-01-01

    Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc) is a complex group of bacteria causing opportunistic infections in immunocompromised and cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. Herein, we report multilocus sequence typing and analysis of the 57 clinical isolates of Bcc collected over the period of seven years (2005–2012) from several hospitals across India. A total of 21 sequence types (ST) including two STs from cystic fibrosis patient’s isolates and twelve novel STs were identified in the population reflecting the extent of genetic diversity. Multilocus sequence analysis revealed two lineages in population, a major lineage belonging to B. cenocepacia and a minor lineage belonging to B. cepacia. Split-decomposition analysis suggests absence of interspecies recombination and intraspecies recombination contributed in generating genotypic diversity amongst isolates. Further linkage disequilibrium analysis indicates that recombination takes place at a low frequency, which is not sufficient to break down the clonal relationship. This knowledge of the genetic structure of Bcc population from a rapidly developing country will be invaluable in the epidemiology, surveillance and understanding global diversity of this group of a pathogen. PMID:27767197

  7. Extended genetic analysis of Brazilian isolates of Bacillus cereus and Bacillus thuringiensis

    PubMed Central

    Zahner, Viviane; Silva, Ana Carolina Telles de Carvalho e; de Moraes, Gabriela Pinhel; McIntosh, Douglas; de Filippis, Ivano

    2013-01-01

    Multiple locus sequence typing (MLST) was undertaken to extend the genetic characterization of 29 isolates of Bacillus cereus and Bacillus thuringiensis previously characterized in terms of presence/absence of sequences encoding virulence factors and via variable number tandem repeat (VNTR). Additional analysis involved polymerase chain reaction for the presence of sequences (be, cytK, inA, pag, lef, cya and cap), encoding putative virulence factors, not investigated in the earlier study. MLST analysis ascribed novel and unique sequence types to each of the isolates. A phylogenetic tree was constructed from a single sequence of 2,838 bp of concatenated loci sequences. The strains were not monophyletic by analysis of any specific housekeeping gene or virulence characteristic. No clear association in relation to source of isolation or to genotypic profile based on the presence or absence of putative virulence genes could be identified. Comparison of VNTR profiling with MLST data suggested a correlation between these two methods of genetic analysis. In common with the majority of previous studies, MLST was unable to provide clarification of the basis for pathogenicity among members of the B. cereus complex. Nevertheless, our application of MLST served to reinforce the notion that B. cereus and B. thuringiensis should be considered as the same species. PMID:23440117

  8. Genetic and chemical components analysis of Papaver setigerum naturalized in Korea.

    PubMed

    Choe, Sanggil; Lee, Eunjung; Jin, Gang-nam; Lee, Yang Han; Kim, Soo Young; Choi, Hwakyung; Chung, Heesun; Hwang, Bang Yeon; Kim, Suncheun

    2012-10-10

    Of the 110 species of genus Papaver, only Papaver somniferum and P. setigerum are controlled poppies in Korea. All poppy samples share similar morphology therefore it is important to check if they contain controlled substances such as morphine and codeine for forensic purpose. Since the alkaloid content of Papaver plants varies according to their growing stage, chemical components analysis alone is not enough to identify exact species. In 2010, hundreds of poppy plants suspected to be P. somniferum were found in Jeju Island, South Korea. They had a slightly different but overall similar appearance to P. somniferum. Using GC-MS analysis, codeine, rhoeadine, papaverine, protopine, noscapine, setigeridine and trace amounts of morphine were detected in these samples. Although their chemical components were different from what has been described in literatures for P. setigerum, they could be assumed to be P. setigerum based on their morphological features and GC-MS results. Also, chromosome numbers using their seeds showed 2n=44 and the numbers were in accordance with those of P. setigerum. Nucleotide substitution or insertion/deletion of ITS (internal transcribed spacer), 18S rRNA (ribosomal RNA), rbcL (large subunit of ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase), trnL-trnF IGS (intergenic spacer), trnL intron and psbA-trnH were assessed as universal genetic markers for P. setigerum. Also, genetic analysis using six target genes involved in the biosynthesis of benzylisoquinoline alkaloids, including TYDC (tyrosine/dopa decarboxylase), SAT (salutaridinol-7-O-acetyltransferase), BBE (berberine bridge enzyme), COR (codeinone reductase), CYP80B1 ((S)-N-methylcoclaurine 3'-hydroxylase) and NCS (norcoclaurine synthase) were tested as Papaver-specific genetic markers by the existence of their PCR products. From the results, the sequences of the 6 universal genetic markers and 6 Papaver-specific genetic markers for P. setigerum were identified and then Genbank accession numbers of

  9. A MULTI-LOCUS, MULTI-TAXA PHYLOGEOGRAPHICAL ANALYSIS OF GENETIC DIVERSITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    In addition to measuring spatial patterns of genetic diversity, population genetic measures of biological resources should include temporal data that indicate whether the observed patterns are the result of historical or contemporary processes. In general, genetic measures focus...

  10. The Limits of Genetic Influence: A Behavior-Genetic Analysis of Infant-Caregiver Relationship Quality and Temperament

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roisman, Glenn I.; Fraley, R. Chris

    2006-01-01

    This report presents data on 9-month-old twin pairs (n[MZ]=172; n[DZ]=333) from the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study, demonstrating that the role of genetic variation among infants is trivial and the shared and nonshared environment is substantial in accounting for the observed quality of infant-caregiver relationships. In contrast, maternal…

  11. [Genetic variation and differentiation in striped field mouse Apodemus agrarius inferred from RAPD-PCR analysis].

    PubMed

    Atopkin, D M; Bogdanov, A S; Chelomina, G N

    2007-06-01

    Genetic variation and differentiation of the trans-Palearctic species Apodemus agrarius (striped field mouse), whose range consists of two large isolates-European-Siberian and Far Eastern-Chinese, were examined using RAPD-PCR analysis. The material from the both parts of the range was examined (41 individual of A. agrarius from 18 localities of Russia, Ukraine, Moldova, and Kazakhstan); the Far-Eastern part was represented by samples from the Amur region, Khabarovsk krai, and Primorye (Russia). Differences in frequencies of polymorphic RAPD loci were found between the European-Siberian and the Far Eastern population groups of striped field mouse. No "fixed" differences between them in RAPD spectra were found, and none of the used statistical methods permitted to distinguish with absolute certainty animals from the two range parts. Thus, genetic isolation of the European-Siberian and the Far Eastern population groups of A. agrarius is not strict. These results support the hypothesis on recent dispersal of striped field mouse from East to West Palearctics (during the Holocene climatic optimum, 7000 to 4500 years ago) and subsequent disjunction of the species range (not earlier than 4000-4500 years ago). The Far Eastern population group is more polymorphic than the European-Siberian one, while genetic heterogeneity is more uniformly distributed within it. This is probably explained by both historical events that happened during the species dispersal in the past, and different environmental conditions for the species in different parts of its range. The Far Eastern population group inhabits the area close to the distribution center of A. agrarius. It is likely that this group preserved genetic variation of the formerly integral ancestral form, while some amount of genetic polymorphism could be lost during the species colonization of the Siberian and European areas. To date, the settlement density and population number in general are higher than within the European

  12. About DNA databasing and investigative genetic analysis of externally visible characteristics: A public survey.

    PubMed

    Zieger, Martin; Utz, Silvia

    2015-07-01

    During the last decade, DNA profiling and the use of DNA databases have become two of the most employed instruments of police investigations. This very rapid establishment of forensic genetics is yet far from being complete. In the last few years novel types of analyses have been presented to describe phenotypically a possible perpetrator. We conducted the present study among German speaking Swiss residents for two main reasons: firstly, we aimed at getting an impression of the public awareness and acceptance of the Swiss DNA database and the perception of a hypothetical DNA database containing all Swiss residents. Secondly, we wanted to get a broader picture of how people that are not working in the field of forensic genetics think about legal permission to establish phenotypic descriptions of alleged criminals by genetic means. Even though a significant number of study participants did not even know about the existence of the Swiss DNA database, its acceptance appears to be very high. Generally our results suggest that the current forensic use of DNA profiling is considered highly trustworthy. However, the acceptance of a hypothetical universal database would be only as low as about 30% among the 284 respondents to our study, mostly because people are concerned about the security of their genetic data, their privacy or a possible risk of abuse of such a database. Concerning the genetic analysis of externally visible characteristics and biogeographical ancestry, we discover a high degree of acceptance. The acceptance decreases slightly when precise characteristics are presented to the participants in detail. About half of the respondents would be in favor of the moderate use of physical traits analyses only for serious crimes threatening life, health or sexual integrity. The possible risk of discrimination and reinforcement of racism, as discussed by scholars from anthropology, bioethics, law, philosophy and sociology, is mentioned less frequently by the study

  13. Molecular genetic analysis of a cattle population to reconstitute the extinct Algarvia breed

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Decisions to initiate conservation programmes need to account for extant variability, diversity loss and cultural and economic aspects. Molecular markers were used to investigate if putative Algarvia animals could be identified for use as progenitors in a breeding programme to recover this nearly extinct breed. Methods 46 individuals phenotypically representative of Algarvia cattle were genotyped for 27 microsatellite loci and compared with 11 Portuguese autochthonous and three imported breeds. Genetic distances and factorial correspondence analyses (FCA) were performed to investigate the relationship among Algarvia and related breeds. Assignment tests were done to identify representative individuals of the breed. Y chromosome and mtDNA analyses were used to further characterize Algarvia animals. Gene- and allelic-based conservation analyses were used to determine breed contributions to overall genetic diversity. Results Genetic distance and FCA results confirmed the close relationship between Algarvia and southern Portuguese breeds. Assignment tests without breed information classified 17 Algarvia animals in this cluster with a high probability (q > 0.95). With breed information, 30 cows and three bulls were identified (q > 0.95) that could be used to reconstitute the Algarvia breed. Molecular and morphological results were concordant. These animals showed intermediate levels of genetic diversity (MNA = 6.0 ± 1.6, Rt = 5.7 ± 1.4, Ho = 0.63 ± 0.19 and He = 0.69 ± 0.10) relative to other Portuguese breeds. Evidence of inbreeding was also detected (Fis = 0.083, P < 0.001). The four Algarvia bulls had Y-haplotypes H6Y2 and H11Y2, common in Portuguese cattle. The mtDNA composition showed prevalence of T3 matrilines and presence of the African-derived T1a haplogroup. This analysis confirmed the genetic proximity of Algarvia and Garvonesa breeds (Fst = 0.028, P > 0.05). Algarvia cattle provide an intermediate contribution (CB = 6.18, CW = -0.06 and D1 = 0

  14. Strains and Stressors: An Analysis of Touchscreen Learning in Genetically Diverse Mouse Strains

    PubMed Central

    Graybeal, Carolyn; Bachu, Munisa; Mozhui, Khyobeni; Saksida, Lisa M.; Bussey, Timothy J.; Sagalyn, Erica; Williams, Robert W.; Holmes, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Touchscreen-based systems are growing in popularity as a tractable, translational approach for studying learning and cognition in rodents. However, while mouse strains are well known to differ in learning across various settings, performance variation between strains in touchscreen learning has not been well described. The selection of appropriate genetic strains and backgrounds is critical to the design of touchscreen-based studies and provides a basis for elucidating genetic factors moderating behavior. Here we provide a quantitative foundation for visual discrimination and reversal learning using touchscreen assays across a total of 35 genotypes. We found significant differences in operant performance and learning, including faster reversal learning in DBA/2J compared to C57BL/6J mice. We then assessed DBA/2J and C57BL/6J for differential sensitivity to an environmental insult by testing for alterations in reversal learning following exposure to repeated swim stress. Stress facilitated reversal learning (selectively during the late stage of reversal) in C57BL/6J, but did not affect learning in DBA/2J. To dissect genetic factors underlying these differences, we phenotyped a family of 27 BXD strains generated by crossing C57BL/6J and DBA/2J. There was marked variation in discrimination, reversal and extinction learning across the BXD strains, suggesting this task may be useful for identifying underlying genetic differences. Moreover, different measures of touchscreen learning were only modestly correlated in the BXD strains, indicating that these processes are comparatively independent at both genetic and phenotypic levels. Finally, we examined the behavioral structure of learning via principal component analysis of the current data, plus an archival dataset, totaling 765 mice. This revealed 5 independent factors suggestive of “reversal learning,” “motivation-related late reversal learning,” “discrimination learning,” “speed to respond,” and

  15. Genetic Analysis of Teosinte Alleles for Kernel Composition Traits in Maize.

    PubMed

    Karn, Avinash; Gillman, Jason D; Flint-Garcia, Sherry A

    2017-02-10

    Teosinte (Zea mays ssp. parviglumis) is the wild ancestor of modern maize (Zea mays ssp. mays). Teosinte contains greater genetic diversity compared to maize inbreds and landraces, but its use is limited by insufficient genetic resources to evaluate its value. A population of teosinte near isogenic lines (teosinte NILs) was previously developed to broaden the resources for genetic diversity of maize, and to discover novel alleles for agronomic and domestication traits. The 961 teosinte NILs were developed by backcrossing ten geographically diverse parviglumis accessions into the B73 (reference genome inbred) background. The NILs were grown in two replications in 2009 and 2010 in Columbia, Missouri and Aurora, New York, respectively, and Near Infrared Reflectance (NIR) spectroscopy and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) calibrations were developed and used to rapidly predict total kernel starch, protein and oil content on a dry matter basis in bulk whole grains of teosinte NILs. Our joint-linkage quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping analysis identified two starch, three protein and six oil QTLs, which collectively explained 18%, 23% and 45% of the total variation, respectively. A range of strong additive allelic effects for kernel starch, protein and oil content were identified relative to the B73 allele. Our results support our hypothesis that teosinte harbors stronger alleles for kernel composition traits than maize, and that teosinte can be exploited for the improvement of kernel composition traits in modern maize germplasm.

  16. Systematic interactome mapping and genetic perturbation analysis of a C. elegans TGF-beta signaling network.

    PubMed

    Tewari, Muneesh; Hu, Patrick J; Ahn, Jin Sook; Ayivi-Guedehoussou, Nono; Vidalain, Pierre-Olivier; Li, Siming; Milstein, Stuart; Armstrong, Chris M; Boxem, Mike; Butler, Maurice D; Busiguina, Svetlana; Rual, Jean-François; Ibarrola, Nieves; Chaklos, Sabrina T; Bertin, Nicolas; Vaglio, Philippe; Edgley, Mark L; King, Kevin V; Albert, Patrice S; Vandenhaute, Jean; Pandey, Akhilesh; Riddle, Donald L; Ruvkun, Gary; Vidal, Marc

    2004-02-27

    To initiate a system-level analysis of C. elegans DAF-7/TGF-beta signaling, we combined interactome mapping with single and double genetic perturbations. Yeast two-hybrid (Y2H) screens starting with known DAF-7/TGF-beta pathway components defined a network of 71 interactions among 59 proteins. Coaffinity purification (co-AP) assays in mammalian cells confirmed the overall quality of this network. Systematic perturbations of the network using RNAi, both in wild-type and daf-7/TGF-beta pathway mutant animals, identified nine DAF-7/TGF-beta signaling modifiers, seven of which are conserved in humans. We show that one of these has functional homology to human SNO/SKI oncoproteins and that mutations at the corresponding genetic locus daf-5 confer defects in DAF-7/TGF-beta signaling. Our results reveal substantial molecular complexity in DAF-7/TGF-beta signal transduction. Integrating interactome maps with systematic genetic perturbations may be useful for developing a systems biology approach to this and other signaling modules.

  17. Genetic analysis of post-weaning growth traits of Thalli sheep under tropical conditions.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Asghar; Akhtar, Pervez; Ali, Safdar; Javed, Khalid; Younas, Muhammad; Shakoor, Abdul; Waheed, Usman

    2014-12-01

    Present investigation was carried out to study the influence of genetic and non-genetic factors affecting post-weaning performance traits in Thalli sheep. Data on post-weaning growth of Thalli sheep maintained at Livestock Experiment Station, Rakh Ghulaman, District Bhakkar-Punjab, Pakistan during 1977-2003 were subjected to genetic analysis. The average values for weight at 180 and 270 days of age, yearling weight and post-weaning average daily gain were 22.37 ± 4.21, 25.96 ± 4.90 and 28.93 ± 5.20 kg and 28 ± 0.01 g/day, respectively. Weight at 180, 270 and 365 days of age and post-weaning average daily gain were significantly affected by year of birth, sex, type of birth and weaning weight (covariable) whereas season of birth was a significant source of variation for 180 and 270 days of age. The heritability estimates for 180 and 270 days, yearling weight and post-weaning average daily gain were 0.07 ± 0.02, 0.08 ± 0.02, 0.07 ± 0.02 and 0.07 ± 0.02, respectively.

  18. Toward a comprehensive genetic analysis of male fertility in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed Central

    Wakimoto, Barbara T; Lindsley, Dan L; Herrera, Cheryl

    2004-01-01

    Drosophila melanogaster is a widely used model organism for genetic dissection of developmental processes. To exploit its full potential for studying the genetic basis of male fertility, we performed a large-scale screen for male-sterile (ms) mutations. From a collection of 12,326 strains carrying ethyl-methanesulfonate-treated, homozygous viable second or third chromosomes, 2216 ms lines were identified, constituting the largest collection of ms mutations described to date for any organism. Over 2000 lines were cytologically characterized and, of these, 81% failed during spermatogenesis while 19% manifested postspermatogenic processes. Of the phenotypic categories used to classify the mutants, the largest groups were those that showed visible defects in meiotic chromosome segregation or cytokinesis and those that failed in sperm individualization. We also identified 62 fertile or subfertile lines that showed high levels of chromosome loss due to abnormal mitotic or meiotic chromosome transmission in the male germ line or due to paternal chromosome loss in the early embryo. We argue that the majority of autosomal genes that function in male fertility in Drosophila are represented by one or more alleles in the ms collection. Given the conservation of molecular mechanisms underlying important cellular processes, analysis of these mutations should provide insight into the genetic networks that control male fertility in Drosophila and other organisms, including humans. PMID:15166148

  19. Comparative genomic analysis of Lactobacillus plantarum ZJ316 reveals its genetic adaptation and potential probiotic profiles* #

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ping; Li, Xuan; Gu, Qing; Lou, Xiu-yu; Zhang, Xiao-mei; Song, Da-feng; Zhang, Chen

    2016-01-01

    Objective: In previous studies, Lactobacillus plantarum ZJ316 showed probiotic properties, such as antimicrobial activity against various pathogens and the capacity to significantly improve pig growth and pork quality. The purpose of this study was to reveal the genes potentially related to its genetic adaptation and probiotic profiles based on comparative genomic analysis. Methods: The genome sequence of L. plantarum ZJ316 was compared with those of eight L. plantarum strains deposited in GenBank. BLASTN, Mauve, and MUMmer programs were used for genome alignment and comparison. CRISPRFinder was applied for searching the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPRs). Results: We identified genes that encode proteins related to genetic adaptation and probiotic profiles, including carbohydrate transport and metabolism, proteolytic enzyme systems and amino acid biosynthesis, CRISPR adaptive immunity, stress responses, bile salt resistance, ability to adhere to the host intestinal wall, exopolysaccharide (EPS) biosynthesis, and bacteriocin biosynthesis. Conclusions: Comparative characterization of the L. plantarum ZJ316 genome provided the genetic basis for further elucidating the functional mechanisms of its probiotic properties. ZJ316 could be considered a potential probiotic candidate. PMID:27487802

  20. Analysis of admixture and genetic structure of two Native American groups of Southern Argentinean Patagonia.

    PubMed

    Sala, Andrea; Corach, Daniel

    2014-03-01

    Argentinean Patagonia is inhabited by people that live principally in urban areas and by small isolated groups of individuals that belong to indigenous aboriginal groups; this territory exhibits the lowest population density of the country. Mapuche and Tehuelche (Mapudungun linguistic branch), are the only extant Native American groups that inhabit the Argentinean Patagonian provinces of Río Negro and Chubut. Fifteen autosomal STRs, 17 Y-STRs, mtDNA full length control region sequence and two sets of Y and mtDNA-coding region SNPs were analyzed in a set of 434 unrelated individuals. The sample set included two aboriginal groups, a group of individuals whose family name included Native American linguistic root and urban samples from Chubut, Río Negro and Buenos Aires provinces of Argentina. Specific Y Amerindian haplogroup Q1 was found in 87.5% in Mapuche and 58.82% in Tehuelche, while the Amerindian mtDNA haplogroups were present in all the aboriginal sample contributors investigated. Admixture analysis performed by means of autosomal and Y-STRs showed the highest degree of admixture in individuals carrying Mapuche surnames, followed by urban populations, and finally by isolated Native American populations as less degree of admixture. The study provided novel genetic information about the Mapuche and Tehuelche people and allowed us to establish a genetic correlation among individuals with Mapudungun surnames that demonstrates not only a linguistic but also a genetic relationship to the isolated aboriginal communities, representing a suitable proxy indicator for assessing genealogical background.

  1. Influence of parameter settings in automated scoring of AFLPs on population genetic analysis.

    PubMed

    Herrmann, Marc; Holderegger, Rolf; Van Strien, Maarten J

    2013-01-01

    The use of procedures for the automated scoring of amplified fragment length polymorphisms (AFLP) fragments has recently increased. Corresponding software does not only automatically score the presence or absence of AFLP fragments, but also allows an evaluation of how different settings of scoring parameters influence subsequent population genetic analyses. In this study, we used the automated scoring package rawgeno to evaluate how five scoring parameters influence the number of polymorphic bins and estimates of pairwise genetic differentiation between populations (F(st)). Steps were implemented in r to automatically run the scoring process in rawgeno for a set of different parameter combinations. While we found the scoring parameters minimum bin width and minimum number of samples per bin to have only weak influence on pairwise F(st) values, maximum bin width and bin reproducibility had much stronger effects. The minimum average bin fluorescence scoring parameter affected F(st) values in an only moderate way. At a range of scoring parameters around the default settings of rawgeno, the number of polymorphic bins as well as pairwise F(st) values stayed rather constant. This study thus shows the particularities of AFLP scoring, be it either manual or automatical, can have profound effects on subsequent population genetic analysis.

  2. Genetic Analysis of Teosinte Alleles for Kernel Composition Traits in Maize

    PubMed Central

    Karn, Avinash; Gillman, Jason D.; Flint-Garcia, Sherry A.

    2017-01-01

    Teosinte (Zea mays ssp. parviglumis) is the wild ancestor of modern maize (Zea mays ssp. mays). Teosinte contains greater genetic diversity compared with maize inbreds and landraces, but its use is limited by insufficient genetic resources to evaluate its value. A population of teosinte near isogenic lines (NILs) was previously developed to broaden the resources for genetic diversity of maize, and to discover novel alleles for agronomic and domestication traits. The 961 teosinte NILs were developed by backcrossing 10 geographically diverse parviglumis accessions into the B73 (reference genome inbred) background. The NILs were grown in two replications in 2009 and 2010 in Columbia, MO and Aurora, NY, respectively, and near infrared reflectance spectroscopy and nuclear magnetic resonance calibrations were developed and used to rapidly predict total kernel starch, protein, and oil content on a dry matter basis in bulk whole grains of teosinte NILs. Our joint-linkage quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping analysis identified two starch, three protein, and six oil QTL, which collectively explained 18, 23, and 45% of the total variation, respectively. A range of strong additive allelic effects for kernel starch, protein, and oil content were identified relative to the B73 allele. Our results support our hypothesis that teosinte harbors stronger alleles for kernel composition traits than maize, and that teosinte can be exploited for the improvement of kernel composition traits in modern maize germplasm. PMID:28188181

  3. Genetic diversity analysis of okra (Abelmoschus esculentus L.) by inter-simple sequence repeat (ISSR) markers.

    PubMed

    Yuan, C Y; Zhang, C; Wang, P; Hu, S; Chang, H P; Xiao, W J; Lu, X T; Jiang, S B; Ye, J Z; Guo, X H

    2014-04-25

    Okra (Abelmoschus esculentus L.) is not only a nutrient-rich vegetable but also an important medicinal herb. Inter-simple sequence repeat (ISSR) markers were employed to investigate the genetic diversity and differentiation of 24 okra genotypes. In this study, the PCR products were separated by electrophoresis on 8% nondenaturing polyacrylamide gel and visualized by silver staining. The 22 ISSR primers produced 289 amplified DNA fragments, and 145 (50%) fragments were polymorphic. The 289 markers were used to construct the dendrogram based on the unweighted pair-group method with arithmetic average (UPGMA) cluster analysis. The dendrogram indicated that 24 okras were clustered into 4 geographically distinct groups. The average polymorphism information content (PIC) was 0.531929, which showed that the majority of primers were informative. The high values of allele frequency, genetic diversity, and heterozygosity showed that primer-sample combinations produced measurable fragments. The mean distances ranged from 0.045455 to 0.454545. The dendrogram indicated that the ISSR markers succeeded in distinguishing most of the 24 varieties in relation to their genetic backgrounds and geographical origins.

  4. Genetic Analysis of the Lambda Spanins Rz and Rz1: Identification of Functional Domains

    PubMed Central

    Cahill, Jesse; Rajaure, Manoj; O’Leary, Chandler; Sloan, Jordan; Marrufo, Armando; Holt, Ashley; Kulkarni, Aneesha; Hernandez, Oscar; Young, Ry

    2016-01-01

    Coliphage lambda proteins Rz and Rz1 are the inner membrane and outer membrane subunits of the spanin complex—a heterotetramer that bridges the periplasm and is essential for the disruption of the outer membrane during phage lysis. Recent evidence suggests the spanin complex functions by fusing the inner and outer membrane. Here, we use a genetics approach to investigate and characterize determinants of spanin function. Because Rz1 is entirely embedded in the +1 reading frame of Rz, the genes were disembedded before using random mutagenesis to construct a library of lysis-defective alleles for both genes. Surprisingly, most of the lysis-defective missense mutants exhibited normal accumulation or localization in vivo, and also were found to be normal for complex formation in vitro. Analysis of the distribution and nature of single missense mutations revealed subdomains that resemble key motifs in established membrane-fusion systems, i.e., two coiled-coil domains in Rz, a proline-rich region of Rz1, and flexible linkers in both proteins. When coding sequences are aligned respective to the embedded genetic architecture of Rz1 within Rz, genetically silent domains of Rz1 correspond to mutationally sensitive domains in Rz, and vice versa, suggesting that the modular structure of the two subunits facilitated the evolutionary compression that resulted in the unique embedded gene architecture. PMID:28040784

  5. Molecular genetic analysis and evolution of begomoviruses and betasatellites causing yellow mosaic disease of bhendi.

    PubMed

    Kumar, R Vinoth; Prasanna, H C; Singh, A K; Ragunathan, D; Garg, G K; Chakraborty, S

    2017-04-01

    In India, Bhendi yellow vein mosaic disease (BYVMD) is one of the most economically important diseases of bhendi/okra and is caused by a complex of monopartite begomovirus (Bhendi yellow vein mosaic virus-BYVMV) and betasatellite (Bhendi yellow vein betasatellite-BYVB). In this study, we have analyzed the role of possible evolutionary factors involved in the evolution of BYVMV and BYVB isolates. Evidence of inter-species and inter-strain recombination events was detected among the viral isolates, and majority of these recombinant isolates possess microsatellites in their genome. Recombination analysis suggests that cotton-infecting and bhendi-infecting begomoviruses probably share a recent common ancestor. In addition to genetic differentiation and gene flow, high degree of genetic variability was detected among the viral population. A strong purifying selection seems to be acting on the viral coding regions. The nucleotide substitution rate of V1 gene (for BYVMV) and βC1 gene (for BYVB) was estimated to be 7.55 × 10(-4) and 2.25 × 10(-3) nucleotide substitutions/site/year, respectively. The present study underlines that the evolution of BYVMD-associated viral components is driven by selection acting on the genetic variation generated by recombination and mutation.

  6. Multilocus mutation scanning for the analysis of genetic variation within Malassezia (Basidiomycota: Malasseziales).

    PubMed

    Cafarchia, Claudia; Otranto, Domenico; Campbell, Bronwyn E; Latrofa, Maria Stefania; Guillot, Jacques; Gasser, Robin B

    2007-04-01

    Members of the genus Malassezia are budding yeasts, characterized by a thick cell wall. Recently, these yeasts have received attention as emerging pathogens. They are common commensals on the skin of animals and can become pathogenic under the influence of various predisposing factors. Central to studying their taxonomy, systematics, and ecology and to diagnosis is the accurate identification of species or operational taxonomic units. To overcome the limitations of current phenotypic and biochemical methods of identification, a PCR-coupled SSCP approach, utilizing sequence variation (0.4-33.5%) in short regions (approximately 250-270 bp) of the first internal transcribed spacer (ITS-1) of nuclear ribosomal DNA and the chitin synthase-2 gene (chs-2), was assessed for the identification and differentiation of different species/genotypes of Malassezia, characterized previously by DNA sequencing. Genomic DNA samples (n = 30) from Malassezia isolates cultured from canine skin scrapings were assessed by SSCP analysis of the two different genetic loci, and unequivocal delineation between genotypes and species was achieved. This SSCP approach is considered to provide a practical tool for the rapid and reliable genetic characterization of Malassezia genotypes/species from dogs and for investigating their population genetics and ecology. It will also provide a powerful tool for studies of Malassezia isolates from other animal species.

  7. Genetic analysis of a novel invasion of Puerto Rico by an exotic constricting snake

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reynolds, R. Graham; Puente-Rolón, Alberto R.; Reed, Robert N.; Revell, Liam J.

    2013-01-01

    The tropical island Puerto Rico is potentially vulnerable to invasion by some species of exotic snakes; however, until now no established populations had been reported. Here we report and genetically characterize the nascent invasion of Puerto Rico by an exotic constricting snake of the family Boidae (Boa constrictor) using mtDNA and microsatellite data. Over 150 individual B. constrictor have been removed from Mayagüez municipality since May 2011, and our results from the genetic analysis of 32 individuals suggest that this population was recently founded by individuals of one subspecies from a genetic lineage common to zoo and breeding collections, but that the potential propagule pool consists of two subspecies. We also suggest that anthropogenic long-distance dispersal within the island of Puerto Rico may be occurring from the established population, with implications for further establishment across the island. This study represents the first report of the naturalization of an invasive species of boid snake in Puerto Rico and will be important in determining mitigation strategies for this invasion as well as providing a basis for comparison to other on-going studies of invasive snakes.

  8. Genetic Analysis and Follow-Up of 25 Neonatal Diabetes Mellitus Patients in China

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Bingyan; Gong, Chunxiu; Wu, Di; Lu, Chaoxia; Liu, Fang; Liu, Xiaojing; Zhang, Yingxian; Gu, Yi; Qi, Zhan; Li, Xiaoqiao; Liu, Min; Li, Wenjing; Su, Chang; Liang, Xuejun; Feng, Mei

    2016-01-01

    Aims. To study the clinical features, genetic etiology, and the correlation between phenotype and genotype of neonatal diabetes mellitus (NDM) in Chinese patients. Methods. We reviewed the medical records of 25 NDM patients along with their follow-up details. Molecular genetic analysis was performed. We compared the HbA1c levels between PNDM group and infantile-onset T1DM patients. Results. Of 25 NDM patients, 18 (72.0%) were PNDM and 7 (28.0%) were TNDM. Among 18 PNDM cases, 6 (33.3%) had known KATP channel mutations (KATP-PNDM). There were six non-KATP mutations, five novel mutations, including INS, EIF2AK3 (n = 2), GLIS3, and SLC19A2, one known EIF2AK3 mutation. There are two ABCC8 mutations in TNDM cases and one paternal UPD6q24. Five of the six KATP-PNDM patients were tried for glyburide transition, and 3 were successfully switched to glyburide. Mean HbA1c of PNDM was not significantly different from infantile onset T1DM (7.2% versus 7.4%, P = 0.41). Conclusion. PNDM accounted for 72% of NDM patients. About one-third of PNDM and TNDM patients had KATP mutations. The genetic etiology could be determined in 50% of PNDM and 43% of TNDM cases. PNDM patients achieved good glycemic control with insulin or glyburide therapy. The etiology of NDM suggests polygenic inheritance. PMID:26839896

  9. Comprehensive Primer Design for Analysis of Population Genetics in Non-Sequenced Organisms

    PubMed Central

    Tezuka, Ayumi; Matsushima, Noe; Nemoto, Yoriko; Akashi, Hiroshi D.; Kawata, Masakado; Makino, Takashi

    2012-01-01

    Nuclear sequence markers are useful tool for the study of the history of populations and adaptation. However, it is not easy to obtain multiple nuclear primers for organisms with poor or no genomic sequence information. Here we used the genomes of organisms that have been fully sequenced to design comprehensive sets of primers to amplify polymorphic genomic fragments of multiple nuclear genes in non-sequenced organisms. First, we identified a large number of candidate polymorphic regions that were flanked on each side by conserved regions in the reference genomes. We then designed primers based on these conserved sequences and examined whether the primers could be used to amplify sequences in target species, montane brown frog (Rana ornativentris), anole lizard (Anolis sagrei), guppy (Poecilia reticulata), and fruit fly (Drosophila melanogaster), for population genetic analysis. We successfully obtained polymorphic markers for all target species studied. In addition, we found that sequence identities of the regions between the primer sites in the reference genomes affected the experimental success of DNA amplification and identification of polymorphic loci in the target genomes, and that exonic primers had a higher success rate than intronic primers in amplifying readable sequences. We conclude that this comparative genomic approach is a time- and cost-effective way to obtain polymorphic markers for non-sequenced organisms, and that it will contribute to the further development of evolutionary ecology and population genetics for non-sequenced organisms, aiding in the understanding of the genetic basis of adaptation. PMID:22393396

  10. Genetic Analysis of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolates from the Sputa of Australian Adult Cystic Fibrosis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Anthony, Mario; Rose, Barbara; Pegler, Mary Beard; Elkins, Mark; Service, Helen; Thamotharampillai, Keerthi; Watson, Jason; Robinson, Michael; Bye, Peter; Merlino, John; Harbour, Colin

    2002-01-01

    Genetic investigations were carried out with 50 phenotypically selected strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa from 18 patients attending an Australian cystic fibrosis (CF) center. The isolates were analyzed by restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). Phylogenetic analysis of the macrorestriction patterns showed rates of genetic similarity ranging from 76 to 100%; 24 (48%) of the strains from 11 patients had greater than 90% similarity. A dominant strain emerged: 15 isolates from seven patients had identical PFGE patterns, and 4 other isolates were very closely related. The 50 isolates were grouped into 21 pulsotypes on the basis of visual delineation of a three-band difference. Ten of the 18 (56%) patients were infected with clonal or subclonal strains. Sequence analysis of PCR products derived from the mucA gene showed 20 mutations, with the number of mutations in individual isolates ranging from 1 to 4; 19 of these changes are reported here for the first time. Potentially functional changes were found in 22 (44%) isolates. Eight changes (five transversions and three single base deletions) led to premature stop codons, providing support for the presence of mucA mutations as one pathway to mucoidy. There was a trend toward an association between the dominant strain and lack of potentially functional mucA mutations (P = 0.09 by the χ2 test) but no relationship between genotype and phenotype. This is the first study of genetic variation in P. aeruginosa isolates from adult Australian CF patients. The findings highlight the need for further investigations on the transmissibility of P. aeruginosa in CF patients. PMID:12149328

  11. Genetic mapping and comparative expression analysis of transcription factors in cotton.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xuemei; Jin, Xin; Li, Ximei; Lin, Zhongxu

    2015-01-01

    Transcription factors (TFs) play an important role in the regulation of plant growth and development. The study of the structure and function of TFs represents a research frontier in plant molecular biology. The findings of these studies will provide significant information regarding genetic improvement traits in crops. Currently, a large number of TFs have been cloned, and their function has been verified. However, relatively few studies that genetically map TFs in cotton are available. To genetically map TFs in cotton in this study, specific primers were designed for TF genes that were published in the Plant Transcription Factor Database. A total of 977 TF primers were obtained, and 31 TF polymorphic loci were mapped on 15 cotton chromosomes. These polymorphic loci were clearly preferentially distributed on chromosomes 5, 11, 19 and 20; and TFs from the same family mapped to homologous cotton chromosomes. In-silico mapping verified that many mapped TFs were mapped on their corresponding chromosomes or their homologous chromosomes' corresponding chromosomes in the diploid genomes. QTL mapping for fiber quality revealed that TF-Ghi005602-2 mapped on Chr19 was associated with fiber length. Eighty-five TF genes were selected for RT-PCR analysis, and 4 TFs were selected for qRT-PCR analysis, revealing unique expression patterns across different stages of fiber development between the mapping parents. Our data offer an overview of the chromosomal distribution of TFs in cotton, and the comparative expression analysis between Gossypium hirsutum and G. barbadense provides a rough understanding of the regulation of TFs during cotton fiber development.

  12. An improved Agrobacterium-mediated transformation system for the functional genetic analysis of Penicillium marneffei.

    PubMed

    Kummasook, Aksarakorn; Cooper, Chester R; Vanittanakom, Nongnuch

    2010-12-01

    We have developed an improved Agrobacterium-mediated transformation (AMT) system for the functional genetic analysis of Penicillium marneffei, a thermally dimorphic, human pathogenic fungus. Our AMT protocol included the use of conidia or pre-germinated conidia of P. marneffei as the host recipient for T-DNA from Agrobacterium tumefaciens and co-cultivation at 28°C for 36 hours. Bleomycin-resistant transformants were selected as yeast-like colonies following incubation at 37°C. The efficiency of transformation was approximately 123 ± 3.27 and 239 ± 13.12 transformants per plate when using 5 × 10(4) conidia and pre-germinated conidia as starting materials, respectively. Southern blot analysis demonstrated that 95% of transformants contained single copies of T-DNA. Inverse PCR was employed for identifying flanking sequences at the T-DNA insertion sites. Analysis of these sequences indicated that integration occurred as random recombination events. Among the mutants isolated were previously described stuA and gasC defective strains. These AMT-derived mutants possessed single T-DNA integrations within their particular coding sequences. In addition, other morphological and pigmentation mutants possessing a variety of gene-specific defects were isolated, including two mutants having T-DNA integrations within putative promoter regions. One of the latter integration events was accompanied by the deletion of the entire corresponding gene. Collectively, these results indicated that AMT could be used for large-scale, functional genetic analyses in P. marneffei. Such analyses can potentially facilitate the identification of those genetic elements related to morphogenesis, as well as pathogenesis in this medically important fungus.

  13. Genetic hotels for the standard genetic code: evolutionary analysis based upon novel three-dimensional algebraic models.

    PubMed

    José, Marco V; Morgado, Eberto R; Govezensky, Tzipe

    2011-07-01

    Herein, we rigorously develop novel 3-dimensional algebraic models called Genetic Hotels of the Standard Genetic Code (SGC). We start by considering the primeval RNA genetic code which consists of the 16 codons of type RNY (purine-any base-pyrimidine). Using simple algebraic operations, we show how the RNA code could have evolved toward the current SGC via two different intermediate evolutionary stages called Extended RNA code type I and II. By rotations or translations of the subset RNY, we arrive at the SGC via the former (type I) or via the latter (type II), respectively. Biologically, the Extended RNA code type I, consists of all codons of the type RNY plus codons obtained by considering the RNA code but in the second (NYR type) and third (YRN type) reading frames. The Extended RNA code type II, comprises all codons of the type RNY plus codons that arise from transversions of the RNA code in the first (YNY type) and third (RNR) nucleotide bases. Since the dimensions of remarkable subsets of the Genetic Hotels are not necessarily integer numbers, we also introduce the concept of algebraic fractal dimension. A general decoding function which maps each codon to its corresponding amino acid or the stop signals is also derived. The Phenotypic Hotel of amino acids is also illustrated. The proposed evolutionary paths are discussed in terms of the existing theories of the evolution of the SGC. The adoption of 3-dimensional models of the Genetic and Phenotypic Hotels will facilitate the understanding of the biological properties of the SGC.

  14. Mapping Genetic Diversity of Cherimoya (Annona cherimola Mill.): Application of Spatial Analysis for Conservation and Use of Plant Genetic Resources

    PubMed Central

    van Zonneveld, Maarten; Scheldeman, Xavier; Escribano, Pilar; Viruel, María A.; Van Damme, Patrick; Garcia, Willman; Tapia, César; Romero, José; Sigueñas, Manuel; Hormaza, José I.

    2012-01-01

    There is a growing call for inventories that evaluate geographic patterns in diversity of plant genetic resources maintained on farm and in species' natural populations in order to enhance their use and conservation. Such evaluations are relevant for useful tropical and subtropical tree species, as many of these species are still undomesticated, or in incipient stages of domestication and local populations can offer yet-unknown traits of high value to further domestication. For many outcrossing species, such as most trees, inbreeding depression can be an issue, and genetic diversity is important to sustain local production. Diversity is also crucial for species to adapt to environmental changes. This paper explores the possibilities of incorporating molecular marker data into Geographic Information Systems (GIS) to allow visualization and better understanding of spatial patterns of genetic diversity as a key input to optimize conservation and use of plant genetic resources, based on a case study of cherimoya (Annona cherimola Mill.), a Neotropical fruit tree species. We present spatial analyses to (1) improve the understanding of spatial distribution of genetic diversity of cherimoya natural stands and cultivated trees in Ecuador, Bolivia and Peru based on microsatellite molecular markers (SSRs); and (2) formulate optimal conservation strategies by revealing priority areas for in situ conservation, and identifying existing diversity gaps in ex situ collections. We found high levels of allelic richness, locally common alleles and expected heterozygosity in cherimoya's putative centre of origin, southern Ecuador and northern Peru, whereas levels of diversity in southern Peru and especially in Bolivia were significantly lower. The application of GIS on a large microsatellite dataset allows a more detailed prioritization of areas for in situ conservation and targeted collection across the Andean distribution range of cherimoya than previous studies could do, i.e. at

  15. Mapping genetic diversity of cherimoya (Annona cherimola Mill.): application of spatial analysis for conservation and use of plant genetic resources.

    PubMed

    Zonneveld, Maarten van; Scheldeman, Xavier; Escribano, Pilar; Viruel, María A; Van Damme, Patrick; Garcia, Willman; Tapia, César; Romero, José; Sigueñas, Manuel; Hormaza, José I

    2012-01-01

    There is a growing call for inventories that evaluate geographic patterns in diversity of plant genetic resources maintained on farm and in species' natural populations in order to enhance their use and conservation. Such evaluations are relevant for useful tropical and subtropical tree species, as many of these species are still undomesticated, or in incipient stages of domestication and local populations can offer yet-unknown traits of high value to further domestication. For many outcrossing species, such as most trees, inbreeding depression can be an issue, and genetic diversity is important to sustain local production. Diversity is also crucial for species to adapt to environmental changes. This paper explores the possibilities of incorporating molecular marker data into Geographic Information Systems (GIS) to allow visualization and better understanding of spatial patterns of genetic diversity as a key input to optimize conservation and use of plant genetic resources, based on a case study of cherimoya (Annona cherimola Mill.), a Neotropical fruit tree species. We present spatial analyses to (1) improve the understanding of spatial distribution of genetic diversity of cherimoya natural stands and cultivated trees in Ecuador, Bolivia and Peru based on microsatellite molecular markers (SSRs); and (2) formulate optimal conservation strategies by revealing priority areas for in situ conservation, and identifying existing diversity gaps in ex situ collections. We found high levels of allelic richness, locally common alleles and expected heterozygosity in cherimoya's putative centre of origin, southern Ecuador and northern Peru, whereas levels of diversity in southern Peru and especially in Bolivia were significantly lower. The application of GIS on a large microsatellite dataset allows a more detailed prioritization of areas for in situ conservation and targeted collection across the Andean distribution range of cherimoya than previous studies could do, i.e. at

  16. Genetic analysis of ewe stayability and its association with lamb growth and adult production.

    PubMed

    Borg, R C; Notter, D R; Kott, R W

    2009-11-01

    Records from 2,525 adult Targhee ewes and 10,099 lambs were used to estimate genetic parameters in an animal model for ewe stayability (STAY), productive life (PL), adult BW (AW) and BCS, fleece characteristics, and number of lambs born (NLB) and for lamb BW at birth and approximately 45 d, 120 d (120W; weaning), 12 mo, and 18 mo of age. Stayabilities were analyzed as overall stayability (STAYn|2), which indicated presence or absence of a ewe at n yr of age, given that she was present at 2 yr of age, or marginal stayability (STAYn|n-1) recording the presence of a ewe at n yr of age, given that she was present in the previous year. Productive life was measured as the age of ewe in years at her last lambing. Lamb BW were corrected for age at weighing; BW taken at or before weaning were adjusted for effects of type of birth and rearing, age of dam, and sex using National Sheep Improvement Program methods. The NLB was likewise adjusted for effects of ewe age before analysis. Birth year was included as a fixed effect for all traits. Year of record and, for AW and CS, the number of lambs born or born and reared were also included in models for adult traits. Models for all traits included random additive genetic and residual effects. Random maternal genetic and dam permanent environmental effects were also included in the model for lamb (pre)weaning BW, and random permanent environmental effects of the ewe were included in models for adult traits. The heritability estimate for PL was 0.05 (P < 0.10). Additive variance in STAY was only present after 5 yr of age (P < 0.05), with estimated heritabilities ranging from 0.04 to 0.10. Phenotypic correlations between STAY and other traits were near zero, ranging from -0.07 to 0.14. Estimates of genetic correlations of STAY5|4 and STAY6|2 with maternal genetic effects on 120W were positive (both 0.46; P < 0.05), suggesting that STAY and maternal effects on 120W both reflect genetic variation in ewe fitness characteristics. Genetic

  17. Relationships of OPG Genetic Polymorphisms with Susceptibility to Cardiovascular Disease: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Song, De-Hua; Zhou, Peng-Zhen; Xiu, Xiao-Lin; Zou, Guang-Hui; Sun, Yu-Xia; Song, Chun

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this meta-analysis was to determine whether genetic polymorphisms in the osteoprotegerin (OPG) gene contribute to increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Material/Methods Electronic databases were searched carefully without any language restriction. Analyses of data were conducted using STATA software. Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (95%CI) were also calculated. Results Seven clinical case-control studies that enrolled 1170 CVD patients and 1194 healthy subjects were included. The results indicated that OPG gene polymorphism might be closely associated with susceptibility to CVD, especially for rs2073617 T>C and rs2073618 G>C polymorphisms. Ethnicity-stratified analysis indicated that genetic polymorphism in the OPG were closely related with the pathogenesis of CVD among Asians (all P<0.001), but no obvious relationship was found among Caucasians (all P>0.05). Conclusions Our meta-analysis provided quantitative evidence that OPG gene polymorphism may be closely related to an increased risk of CVD, especially for rs2073617 T>C and rs2073618 G>C polymorphisms. PMID:27068490

  18. Multivariate analysis to determine the genetic distance among backcross papaya (Carica papaya) progenies.

    PubMed

    Ramos, H C C; Pereira, M G; Gonçalves, L S A; Berilli, A P C G; Pinto, F O; Ribeiro, E H

    2012-05-14

    Morpho-agronomic and molecular (RAPD and ISSR markers) data were used to evaluate genetic distances between papaya backcross progenies in order to help identify agronomically superior genotypes. Thirty-two papaya progenies were evaluated based on 15 morpho-agronomic characteristics, 20 ISSR and 19 RAPD primers. Manhattan, Jaccard and Gower distances were used to estimate differences based on continuous and binary data and combined analyses, respectively. Except for production, there were significant differences in the continuous variables among the genotypes. The molecular analysis revealed 193 dominant markers (ISSR and RAPD), being 53 polymorphic loci. Among the various clusters that were generated, the one based on a combined analysis of morpho-agronomic and molecular data gave the highest cophenetic correlation (0.72) compared to individual analysis, consistently allocating the progenies into six groups. We found that the Gower algorithm was more coherent in the discrimination of the genotypes, demonstrating that a combination of molecular and agronomic data is valuable for studies of genetic dissimilarity in papaya.

  19. Genetic analysis of three US population groups using an X-chromosomal STR decaplex.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Iva; Prinz, Mechthild; Pereira, Rui; Meyers, Carole; Mikulasovich, Rebecca S; Amorim, António; Carracedo, Angel; Gusmão, Leonor

    2007-05-01

    An X-chromosomal multiplex amplifying ten short tandem repeats (STRs) in one single PCR reaction was developed and optimized in this work. The X-STRs included were DXS8378, DXS9898, DXS8377, HPRTB, GATA172D05, DXS7423, DXS6809, DXS7132, DXS101, and DXS6789. Decaplex performance was tested on 377 male samples from three United States population groups, namely, 130 African Americans, 104 Asians, and 143 Hispanics. DXS8377 was the most polymorphic locus across all three populations, whereas DXS7423 was the least informative marker. Genetic distance analysis (R (ST) and F (ST)) performed for the three populations residing in New York showed significant genetic distances between population groups for most pairwise comparisons, except for HPRTB, DXS6809, and DXS7132. When testing linkage disequilibrium for all pairs of loci in the three groups, no significant association was found between any pair of the loci studied, after applying Bonferroni correction. The high values for the average probability of excluding a random man obtained in all three populations when both mother and daughter are tested or when father/daughter relationships are evaluated support the potential of this decaplex system in kinship analysis. Also, the overall high power of discrimination values for samples of female and male origin, confirms the usefulness of this decaplex system in identification analysis. As expected, results also support the use of independent databases comprising these ten X-linked loci for the three US populations evaluated.

  20. Genetic analysis of Upland cotton dynamic heterosis for boll number per plant at multiple developmental stages

    PubMed Central

    Shang, Lianguang; Wang, Yumei; Cai, Shihu; Ma, Lingling; Liu, Fang; Chen, Zhiwen; Su, Ying; Wang, Kunbo; Hua, Jinping

    2016-01-01

    Yield is an important breeding target. As important yield components, boll number per plant (BNP) shows dynamic character and strong heterosis in Upland cotton. However, the genetic basis underlying the dynamic heterosis is poorly understood. In this study, we conducted dynamic quantitative trait loci (QTL) analysis for BNP and heterosis at multiple developmental stages and environments using two recombinant inbred lines (RILs) and two corresponding backcross populations. By the single-locus analysis, 23 QTLs were identified at final maturity, while 99 QTLs were identified across other three developmental stages. A total of 48 conditional QTLs for BNP were identified for the adjacent stages. QTLs detected at later stage mainly existed in the partial dominance to dominance range and QTLs identified at early stage mostly showed effects with the dominance to overdominance range during plant development. By two-locus analysis, we observe that epistasis played an important role not only in the variation of the performance of the RIL population but also in the expression of heterosis in backcross population. Taken together, the present study reveals that the genetic basis of heterosis is dynamic and complicated, and it is involved in dynamic dominance effect, epistasis and QTL by environmental interactions. PMID:27748451

  1. Genetic analysis of the fragile-X mental retardation syndrome with two flanking polymorphic DNA markers

    SciTech Connect

    Oberle, I.; Heilig, R.; Moisan, J.P.; Kloepfer, C.; Mattei, M.G.; Mattei, J.F.; Boue, J.; Froster-Iskenius, U.; Jacobs, P.A.; Lathrop, G.M.; Lalouel, J.M.

    1986-02-01

    The fragile-X mental retardation syndrome, one of the most prevalent chromosome X-linked diseases (approx. = 1 of 2000 newborn males), is characterized by the presence in affected males and in a portion of carrier females of a fragile site at chromosome band Xq27. The authors have performed a linkage analysis in 16 families between the locus for the fragile-X syndrome, FRAXQ27, and two polymorphic DNA markers that correspond to the anonymous probe St14 and to the coagulation factor IX gene F9. The results indicate that the order of loci is centromere-F9-FRAXQ27-St14-Xqter. The estimate of the recombination fraction for the linkage F9-FRAXQ27 is 0.12 and 0.10 for FRAXQ27-St14. Recombination between St14 and F9 does not appear to be significantly different in normal and fragile-X families. The two flanking probes were used for diagnosis of the carrier state and for detection of transmission of the disease through phenotypically normal males. They should also allow first-trimester diagnosis with a reliability of about 98% in 40% of the families. Used in conjunction with the cytogenetic analysis, the segregation studies with both probes should improve the genetic counseling for the fragile-X syndrome and should be useful for the formal genetic analysis of this unique disease.

  2. DHLAS: A web-based information system for statistical genetic