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Sample records for multi-visit endodontic treatment

  1. Endodontic treatment of molars

    PubMed Central

    Habl, Claudia; Bodenwinkler, Andrea; Stürzlinger, Heidi

    2006-01-01

    Objective Commissioned by the German Institute of Medical Documentation and Information (DIMDI) the Austrian Health Institute (ÖBIG) prepared a HTA report on the long-term effectiveness of endodontic treatment (root canal treatment, RCT) of molars. The focus is to examine factors influencing the outcome of endodontic treatment and showing their impact on long-term results. Additionally, economic aspects of root canal treatment in Germany are discussed. Methodology By performing a systematic literature search in 29 databases (e.g. MEDLINE), the Cochrane Library and by hand searching two peer-reviewed endodontic journals the authors could identify 750 relevant articles, of which finally 18 qualified for assessment. Results The findings show that the most relevant factor influencing the long-term outcome of endodontic treatment is the preoperative status of a tooth. The lowest success rates are reported for molars with a preoperative devital or necrotic pulp and persisting periapical lesions (so called periapical disease). Discussion Even if there is no positive selection of patients and the RCT is performed by a normal dentist rather than an endodontist - a fact which is very common - long-term success rates of more then 90% are possible. The overall success rates for endodontic treatment of molars therefore seem to be similar to those of other tooth-types. Conclusions Especially primary, conventional (i.e. non-surgical) root canal treatment is an effective and efficient therapy for endodontically ill molars, especially if no large periapical lesion persists. Nonetheless, a long term successful endodontic therapy requires a thorough assessment of the pre-operative status of the molar and treatment according to established guidelines. PMID:21289954

  2. Multiple taurodontism: the challenge of endodontic treatment.

    PubMed

    Marques-da-Silva, Bruno; Baratto-Filho, Flares; Abuabara, Allan; Moura, Paula; Losso, Estela M; Moro, Alexandre

    2010-12-01

    This article describe a rare case of multiple taurodontism involving all molars in a 17-year-old male. Volumetric cone-beam computed tomography was used to investigate internal and external root morphology, including that of a maxillary first molar which required endodontic treatment and retreatment. Medical history was not contributory; however, Klinefelter syndrome was the diagnostic hypothesis in this case.

  3. Assessment of treatment failure in endodontic therapy.

    PubMed

    Bergenholtz, G

    2016-10-01

    There is a paucity of guidelines for the dental profession to assess failure of endodontic therapy. While a successful treatment can be well defined by the absence of apical periodontitis and clinical symptoms after a period of observation, failed treatment has escaped a distinct standing over the years. This article highlights aspects of significance and concludes that research ought to better explore the general health properties of persistent apical periodontitis on root-filled teeth and finally confirm the extent there is an association between apical periodontitis and adverse systemic health effects. Clearing this condition will determine whether clinicians should take a serious or relaxed attitude to persistent apical periodontitis subsequent to endodontic treatment. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Persistent endodontic infection--re-treatment or surgery?

    PubMed

    Love, Robert M

    2012-04-01

    Management of a tooth with persistent periradicular disease primarily involves management of persistent intraradicular infection. Conventional endodontic re-treatment is the main modality that will manage this condition although endodontic surgery with or without retreatment is a viable option in cases. Case selection involves an appreciation of the disease aetiology and expected outcomes and consideration of patient, tooth and clinician factors. Both conventional endodontic re-treatment and surgery have high long-term success and survival rates and it has been shown that an endodontically treated tooth with persistent periradicular pathology that can be managed by conventional endodontic re-treatment or surgery and restoration has comparable, and potentially more beneficial, outcomes to treatment options involving tooth loss and rehabilitation, such as an implant supported crown. As such endodontic retreatment should be the prime treatment modality unless a tooth has reached a stage where these techniques cannot manage ongoing disease and/or structural integrity.

  5. Post-endodontic treatment periodontal surgery: a case report.

    PubMed

    Azaripour, Adriano; Willershausen, Ines; Kämmerer, Philipp; Willershausen, Brita

    2013-02-01

    Two patients were diagnosed with combined endodontic-periodontal lesions. Endodontic treatment was performed, followed by surgery. In addition, the regeneration process was supported by the application of an enamel matrix derivate alone or in combination with guided bone regeneration techniques. At recall visits after 24 months, the teeth were asymptomatic and marked bone regeneration had occurred in both patients. The successful post-endodontic treatment of combined endodontic-periodontal lesions, using periodontal surgery and as adjunct guided tissue regenerative techniques, is presented. Further, the possibility of saving teeth, even with severely apparent pathology, should be highlighted.

  6. Is endodontic treatment performed under general anaesthesia technically acceptable?

    PubMed

    Alsaleh, Iyad; Cousson, Pierre-Yves; Nicolas, Emmanuel; Hennequin, Martine

    2012-12-01

    Undertaking endodontic treatment under general anaesthesia (GA) is often described as difficult and hazardous, but no study reports on safe and efficacious conditions for endodontic treatment under GA. This study aims to evaluate whether compromises made for the endodontic treatment of permanent teeth under GA are acceptable. It describes the quality of endodontic treatment undertaken in two series of consecutive patients treated either under GA or local anaesthesia (LA). Post-operative data sheets and periapical radiographs were collected for 255 permanent teeth treated under GA during a 4-year period (GA group, 125 patients with special needs) and for 246 permanent teeth treated under local anaesthesia over 7 months (LA group, 180 healthy patients). The radiographic criteria for quality of endodontic treatment (RCQET) were considered satisfactory when (1) the root filling was within 2 mm of the apex; (2) the filling displayed no voids or defects; and (3) all the visible canals had been obturated. The type of tooth, pulpal status and periapical status were considered independent variables for RCQET. The proportion of satisfactory RCQET reached 63% in both groups and differed by type of tooth, being significantly lower for molars than for other teeth. From a technical point of view, compromises made for the endodontic treatment of permanent teeth under GA are acceptable. Further studies should be conducted to evaluate the long-term success of endodontic treatment performed under GA. This study supports the feasibility of endodontic treatment for patients treated under GA.

  7. [Single file endodontic treatment: a new era?].

    PubMed

    Shay, B; Moshonov, J

    2013-04-01

    Root canal shaping is one of the key stages of endodontic treatment, when performed properly, it is a predictive factor for the outcome of the treatment. It is critical for an adequate disinfection, which is more effective at the completion of a proper shaping procedure. The introduction of NiTi instruments into endodontic greatly improved the root canal shaping and decreased the time required for a full mechanical preparation. Over the last 2 decades, numerous attempts have been made to further improve the procedure with a wide range of rotary NiTi endodontic file systems. All these systems require several subsequent files. Recently, three different concepts of single-file systems have been introduced: 1. The single file reciprocating working motion: it consists of a reciprocating counterclockwise and a clockwise motion. This reciprocal motion reduces torsional loads thus, allows safer instrumentation with less working time. 2. Single-file instrumentation using full 360 degrees rotational movement to be used in a full clockwise rotation. Some of these files also have an Anti Breakage Control (ABC) which protects from catastrophic procedural malfunction by unwinding of these file before breakage. 3. The Self-Adjusting File (SAF) which is a thin-walled, pointed cylinder, hollow nickel-titanium endodontic file that is elastically compressible into a root canal that has been previously negotiated using a #20 hand file and can widened inside it, facilitating removal of debris and dentin from the canal wall. The file conforms to the canal shape and permits irrigant flow through the file. The SAF works in a combined vibrating and partial rotational motions, and circumferentially simultaneously enlarging and irrigating the canal. The objectives of these new approaches is to reduce the working time and cost and improve safety of the shaping procedure, and suggest to have a lower procedural errors incidents. Few studies, conducted in the recent years, using these new

  8. Antimicrobial peptide-based treatment for endodontic infections--biotechnological innovation in endodontics.

    PubMed

    Lima, Stella Maris de Freitas; de Pádua, Gabriela Martins; Sousa, Maurício Gonçalves da Costa; Freire, Mirna de Souza; Franco, Octávio Luiz; Rezende, Taia Maria Berto

    2015-01-01

    The presence/persistence of microorganisms in the pulp and periapical area corresponds to the maintenance of an exacerbated immune response that leads to the start of periradicular bone resorption and its perpetuation. In endodontic treatment, the available intracanal medications do not have all the desirable properties in the context of endodontic infection and apical periodontitis; they need to include not only strong antimicrobial performance but also an immunomodulatory and reparative activity, without host damage. In addition, there are various levels of resistance to root canal medications. Thus, antimicrobial agents that effectively eliminate resistant species in root canals could potentially improve endodontic treatment. In the emergence of new therapies, an increasing number of studies on antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have been seen over the past few years. AMPs are defense biomolecules produced in response to infection, and they have a wide spectrum of action against many oral microorganisms. There are some studies that correlate peptides and oral infections, including oral peptides, neuropeptides, and bacterial, fish, bovine and synthetic peptides. So far, there are around 120 published studies correlating endodontic microbiota with AMPs but, according to our knowledge, there are no registered patents in the American patent database. There are a considerable number of AMPs that exhibit excellent antimicrobial activity against endodontic microbiota at a small inhibitory concentration and modulate an exacerbated immune response, down-regulating bone resorption. All these reasons indicate the antimicrobial peptide-based endodontic treatment as an emerging and promising option. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. A review of the regenerative endodontic treatment procedure

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Bin-Na; Moon, Jong-Wook; Chang, Hoon-Sang; Hwang, In-Nam; Oh, Won-Mann

    2015-01-01

    Traditionally, apexification has been used to treat immature permanent teeth that have lost pulp vitality. This technique promotes the formation of an apical barrier to close the open apex so that the filling materials can be confined to the root canal. Because tissue regeneration cannot be achieved with apexification, a new technique called regenerative endodontic treatment was presented recently to treat immature permanent teeth. Regenerative endodontic treatment is a treatment procedure designed to replace damaged pulp tissue with viable tissue which restores the normal function of the pulp-dentin structure. After regenerative endodontic treatment, continued root development and hard tissue deposition on the dentinal wall can occur under ideal circumstances. However, it is difficult to predict the result of regenerative endodontic treatment. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to summarize multiple factors effects on the result of regenerative endodontic treatment in order to achieve more predictable results. In this study, we investigated the features of regenerative endodontic treatment in comparison with those of other pulp treatment procedures and analyzed the factors that have an effect on regenerative endodontic treatment. PMID:26295020

  10. A review of the regenerative endodontic treatment procedure.

    PubMed

    Lee, Bin-Na; Moon, Jong-Wook; Chang, Hoon-Sang; Hwang, In-Nam; Oh, Won-Mann; Hwang, Yun-Chan

    2015-08-01

    Traditionally, apexification has been used to treat immature permanent teeth that have lost pulp vitality. This technique promotes the formation of an apical barrier to close the open apex so that the filling materials can be confined to the root canal. Because tissue regeneration cannot be achieved with apexification, a new technique called regenerative endodontic treatment was presented recently to treat immature permanent teeth. Regenerative endodontic treatment is a treatment procedure designed to replace damaged pulp tissue with viable tissue which restores the normal function of the pulp-dentin structure. After regenerative endodontic treatment, continued root development and hard tissue deposition on the dentinal wall can occur under ideal circumstances. However, it is difficult to predict the result of regenerative endodontic treatment. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to summarize multiple factors effects on the result of regenerative endodontic treatment in order to achieve more predictable results. In this study, we investigated the features of regenerative endodontic treatment in comparison with those of other pulp treatment procedures and analyzed the factors that have an effect on regenerative endodontic treatment.

  11. Irrigants in non-surgical endodontic treatment.

    PubMed

    Regan, John D; Fleury, Alex A P

    2006-01-01

    This paper highlights that one of the main goals of root canal treatment is the elimination of microorganisms from the contaminated root canal system. Instrumentation alone will not allow for adequate debridement and disinfection of the complex and diverse root canal system. Chemomechanical debridement is required. The importance of the use of irrigants during non-surgical root canal treatment has frequently been neglected both during instruction of dental students and later in the clinical practice of endodontics. The article highlights 'shape, clean and fill' vs. 'clean, shape and fill' to enable chemomechanical debridement. Our protocol advises mechanical debridement and copious irrigation for a minimum of twenty minutes with 2.5% to 6% solutions of sodium hypochlorite, followed by a rinse with a 17% solution of ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid and a final rinse with 2% chlorhexidine. The canals are dried with high volume aspirators and sterile paper points.

  12. Radiographic study of the problems and failures of endodontic treatment

    PubMed Central

    Akbar, Iftikhar

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The aim of the present study was to determine radiographically the different reasons and problems of endodontic treatment failure. Methods The periapical radiographs of 100 patients with one hundred teeth (130 root canals) were examined to identify the problems and failures of endodontic treatment. The various reasons of failure that is under filling, poor filling, over filling and presence of procedural errors were recorded for each root filled canal. Chi square test was used to determine statistical significance between different parameters. Results Under fillings were found in 46.9% of the root canals. The percentage of poor fillings and over fillings were 28.5% and 13% respectively. Separated instruments and strip perforations were present in 4% and 3% of the teeth, while the presence of furcal perforation and coronal leakage was observed in one case each (1%).Endodontic problems and failures were most commonly observed in molars compare to anterior and premolar teeth. Mesiobuccal, mesiolingual and distobuccal root canals were the most frequently canals with endodontic problems and failures. The relationship between mesiobuccal, mesiolingual and distal canals in mandibular molars and mesiobuccal, distobuccal and palatal canals in maxillary molars in terms of endodontic failures were statistically significant by chi square analysis (P≤0.05). Conclusion The most common cause of endodontic treatment failure was under filling followed by poor filling and over filling and first molar was the most frequently involved tooth with endodontic problems and failures. PMID:26309429

  13. Current trends in endodontic practice: emergency treatments and technological armamentarium.

    PubMed

    Lee, Michelle; Winkler, Johnathon; Hartwell, Gary; Stewart, Jeffrey; Caine, Rufus

    2009-01-01

    The current clinical practice of endodontics includes the utilization of a variety of new technological advances and materials. The last comprehensive survey that compared treatment modalities used in endodontic practices was conducted in 1990. The purpose of the current survey was to determine the frequency with which these new endodontic technologies and materials are being used in endodontic practices today. An e-mail questionnaire was sent to the 636 active diplomates of the American Board of Endodontics with current e-mail addresses. Two hundred thirty-two diplomates responded for a response rate of 35%. Calcium hydroxide was found to be the most frequently used intracanal medicament for all cases diagnosed with necrotic pulps. Ibuprofen was the most frequently prescribed medication for pain, and penicillin was the most frequently prescribed antibiotic when an active infection was present. Eighty-two percent of the respondents are still incorporating hand files in some fashion during the cleansing and shaping phase of treatment. Lateral condensation and continuous wave were the most common methods used for obturation. Digital radiography was reported as being used by 72.5% of the respondents, whereas 45.3% reported using the microscope greater than 75% of the patient treatment. Ultrasonics was used by 97.8% of the respondents. It appears from the results that new endodontic technology is currently being used in the endodontic offices of those who responded to the survey.

  14. A review of antibacterial agents in endodontic treatment.

    PubMed

    Rahimi, Saeed; Janani, Maryam; Lotfi, Mehrdad; Shahi, Shahriar; Aghbali, Amirala; Vahid Pakdel, Mahdi; Salem Milani, Amin; Ghasemi, Negin

    2014-01-01

    Microorganisms play a major role in initiation and perpetuation of pulpal and periapical diseases. Therefore, elimination of the microorganisms present in the root canal system is the fundamental objective of endodontic treatment. The use of mechanical debridement, chemical irrigation or other antimicrobial protocols and intra-canal medicaments are critical to attain this goal. The aim of this article was to review the antimicrobial agents and their properties in endodontics.

  15. A Review of Antibacterial Agents in Endodontic Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Rahimi, Saeed; Janani, Maryam; Lotfi, Mehrdad; Shahi, Shahriar; Aghbali, Amirala; Vahid Pakdel, Mahdi; Salem Milani, Amin; Ghasemi, Negin

    2014-01-01

    Microorganisms play a major role in initiation and perpetuation of pulpal and periapical diseases. Therefore, elimination of the microorganisms present in the root canal system is the fundamental objective of endodontic treatment. The use of mechanical debridement, chemical irrigation or other antimicrobial protocols and intra-canal medicaments are critical to attain this goal. The aim of this article was to review the antimicrobial agents and their properties in endodontics. PMID:25031587

  16. The treatment of the large periradicular endodontic injury.

    PubMed

    Riccitiello, F; Stabile, P; Amato, M; Rengo, S; D'Ambrosio, C

    2011-09-01

    Periradicular lesions of endodontic origin are characterized by polymicrobial infections, part of which appear to play a crucial role in the facultative anaerobic bacterical species. In literature there is a strong disagreement about the choice of treatment in large periradicular lesions of endodontic origin: some authors propose the orthograde root canal therapy, others surgical therapy with apicectomia, retrograde filling of the cavity and review instrument. The purpose of this study was to demonstrate the effectiveness of orthograde endodontic treatment in case of periapical lesions of endodontic origin of dimensions larger than 20 mm. It was evaluated a sample of 60 cases, ages between 18 and 70 years, 32 men and 28 women. The cases have been treated by orthograde endodontic. Were included mono and pluriradicular teeth with periapical lesion of endodontic origin primary or secondary at endodontic incongruous treatment, with dimensions larger than 20 mm. The sample was divided into Group A: 19 cases in which was possible to complete the root canal therapy in the same event; Group B: 41 cases in which there was drainage. Dressing was applied with pure calcium hydroxide, which was renewed every 10 days for a maximum of 30, was eventually completed the endodontic therapy. Group A: 13 out of 19 cases showed healing at 5 years. Of the remaining 6, there were three failures, a crown-root fracture, missed two follow-up. At 10 years of the 13 successes, 2 cases showed relapse. Group B: 41 cases, later reduced to 30 we had 19 successes in 5 years. Of the remaining 11: 3 crown-root fractures, 2 missed the follow-up, 6 failures. At 10 years of the 19 successes, two were lost because of fracture, one for a relapse. Discussion. The results show the importance of drainage, which can affect the apical seal and therefore the success of endodontic therapy, but allows decompression of the periradicular lesion and symptoms regression. The use of calcium hydroxide in the

  17. 3D Computer aided treatment planning in endodontics.

    PubMed

    van der Meer, Wicher J; Vissink, Arjan; Ng, Yuan Ling; Gulabivala, Kishor

    2016-02-01

    Obliteration of the root canal system due to accelerated dentinogenesis and dystrophic calcification can challenge the achievement of root canal treatment goals. This paper describes the application of 3D digital mapping technology for predictable navigation of obliterated canal systems during root canal treatment to avoid iatrogenic damage of the root. Digital endodontic treatment planning for anterior teeth with severely obliterated root canal systems was accomplished with the aid of computer software, based on cone beam computer tomography (CBCT) scans and intra-oral scans of the dentition. On the basis of these scans, endodontic guides were created for the planned treatment through digital designing and rapid prototyping fabrication. The custom-made guides allowed for an uncomplicated and predictable canal location and management. The method of digital designing and rapid prototyping of endodontic guides allows for reliable and predictable location of root canals of teeth with calcifically metamorphosed root canal systems. The endodontic directional guide facilitates difficult endodontic treatments at little additional cost. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  18. Application of Chitosan and Propolis in Endodontic Treatment: A Review.

    PubMed

    Skoskiewicz-Malinowska, Katarzyna; Kaczmarek, Urszula; Malicka, Barbara; Walczak, Katarzyna; Zietek, Marek

    2017-01-01

    Chitosan and propolis are natural substances that can be commonly found in the environment. Chitosan is one of the several cationic polysaccharides found in nature. It is a natural biopolymer transformed from chitin which is a product of crustacean shells. Propolis is produced by honeybees through mixing the secretions of their hypopharyngeal glands with the digested product of resins collected from plants. Due to their excellent chemical and biological properties, chitosan and propolis arouse keen interest in dental science, including endodontics. There are various possibilities for applying propolis and chitosan based medicaments in endodontic treatment of root canals, and what is particularly emphasized is their potential effectiveness against resistant microorganisms such as E. faecalis and C. albicans, as well as biocompatible to the periapical tissues in comparison with the most commonly used agents. They aim at microflora which is difficult to eliminate, and their medicinal properties, including anti-inflammatory, antifungal and antiseptic properties, make them suitable for use in endodontic treatment. Due to the potential side effects of commonly used synthetic drugs and other safety related reasons, natural alternatives for endodontic usage are continuously explored and tested. The paper presents the possibilities of applying propolis and chitosan in endodontic treatment on the basis of chosen articles published in recent years. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  19. Endodontic surgery.

    PubMed

    Chong, B S; Rhodes, J S

    2014-03-01

    A better understanding of endodontic disease and the causes of treatment failure has refined the role of surgery in endodontics. The advent of newer materials, advances in surgical armamentarium and techniques have also led to an improved endodontic surgical outcome. The aim of this article is to provide a contemporary and up-to-date overview of endodontic surgery. It will focus primarily on the procedures most commonly performed in endodontic surgery.

  20. Clinically Enhancing Local Anesthesia Techniques for Endodontic Treatment.

    PubMed

    Bahcall, James; Xie, Qian

    2017-02-01

    Local anesthesia is one of the most important drugs given to patients who undergo endodontic treatment. Yet, clinicians often do not view local anesthetic agents as drugs and, therefore, struggle clinically to consistently achieve profound pulpal anesthesia. To improve the clinical effects of local anesthesia for endodontic treatment, in conjunction with selecting the correct type of local anesthesia, clinicians need to thoroughly understand how the local anesthetic process works and how to objectively test for clinical signs of pulpal anesthesia and integrate supplemental anesthesia when appropriate.

  1. Treatment of periodontal-endodontic lesions--a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Julia C; Walter, Clemens; Amato, Mauro; Weiger, Roland

    2014-08-01

    The treatment of periodontal-endodontic lesions is challenging due to the involvement of both periodontal and endodontic tissues. To evaluate the treatment options and outcomes of periodontal-endodontic lesions. A systematic literature search was performed for articles published by 12 May 2013 using electronic databases and hand search. Two reviewers conducted the study selection, data collection and validity assessment. The PRISMA criteria were applied. From 1087 titles identified by the search strategy, five studies and 18 case reports were included. Clinical studies and case reports were published from the years 1981 to 2012. A pronounced heterogeneity exists among studies regarding applied treatment protocols and quality of reporting. In all clinical studies, comprising 111 teeth, a non-surgical root canal treatment (RCT) was performed as initial treatment step. Non-surgical and/or a surgical periodontal therapy was applied in some studies without re-evaluation of the endodontic healing. Probing pocket depth reductions were reported in all included studies, comprising the data from 80 teeth at follow-up. A sequential treatment with root canal treatment as a first treatment step appears to be reasonable. An adequate time for tissue healing is suggested prior to re-evaluation. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Inferior alveolar nerve paresthesia relieved by microscopic endodontic treatment.

    PubMed

    Yatsuhashi, Takaaki; Nakagawa, Kan-Ichi; Matsumoto, Miho; Kasahara, Masataka; Igarashi, Tomoko; Ichinohe, Tatsuya; Kaneko, Yuzuru

    2003-11-01

    We experienced two cases of inferior alveolar nerve paresthesia caused by root canal medicaments, which were successfully relieved by microscopic endodontic treatment. In the first case, the paresthesia might have been attributable to infiltration of calcium hydroxide into the mandibular canal through the root canals of the mandibular left second molar tooth. In the second case, the paresthesia might have been attributable to infiltration of paraformaldehyde through the root canals of the mandibular right second molar tooth. The paresthesia was relieved in both cases by repetitive microscopic endodontic irrigation using physiological saline solution in combination with oral vitamin B12 and adenosine triphosphate.

  3. Influence of endodontic treatment on systemic oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Inchingolo, Francesco; Marrelli, Massimo; Annibali, Susanna; Cristalli, Maria Paola; Dipalma, Gianna; Inchingolo, Alessio Danilo; Palladino, Antonio; Inchingolo, Angelo Michele; Gargari, Marco; Tatullo, Marco

    2014-01-01

    An increased production of oxidizing species related to reactive oral diseases, such as chronic apical periodontitis, could have systemic implications such as an increase in cardiovascular morbidity. Based on this consideration, we conducted a prospective study to assess whether subjects affected by chronic periodontitis presented with higher values of oxidative stress than reference values before endodontic treatment, and whether endodontic treatment can reduce the oxidative imbalance and bring it back to normal in these subjects. The authors recruited 2 groups of patients from private studies and dental clinics: these patients were recruited randomly. The oxidative balance in both patients with chronic apical periodontitis (CAP) and healthy control patients was determined by measuring the oxidant status, using an identification of the reactive oxygen metabolites (d-ROMs) test, while the antioxidant status in these patients was determined using a biological antioxidant potential (BAP) test. Both these tests were carried on plasma samples taken from enrolled patients. Values were measured both before the endodontic treatment of the patients with chronic apical periodontitis, and 30 and 90 days after treatment, and compared to those obtained from healthy control patients. It was found that, on recruitment, the patients with chronic apical periodontitis exhibited significantly higher levels of oxidative stress than control patients, as determined by the d-ROMs and BAP tests. Furthermore, the d-ROMs test values were shown to decrease and the BAP test values to increase over time in patients with chronic apical periodontitis following endodontic therapy. As the levels of oxidative stress in these patients tended to reduce and return to normal by 90 days following treatment. This study has demonstrated a positive association between chronic apical periodontitis and oxidative stress. Subjects affected by chronic apical periodontitis are exposed to a condition of

  4. Different Patterns of Restoration Provision Between Initial Endodontic Treatment and Retreatment: A Retrospective Clinical Study.

    PubMed

    Agrafioti, Anastasia; Giannakoulas, Dimitrios G; Kournetas, Nikos; Grigoriou, Stamatina; Kontakiotis, Evangelos G

    The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between type of endodontic treatment and choice of definitive restoration and to show the prevalence of endodontic treatment options according to patient age and type of tooth. Data were collected from the archive system of the School of Dentistry, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens in Athens, Greece. The sample included endodontically treated teeth being restored definitively at the time of data collection. Statistically significant difference was found regarding the type of restoration between initial endodontic treatments and retreatments (P < .001). Endodontic retreatment seemed to have a significant effect on the choice of definitive restoration of the tooth.

  5. A systematic review of nonsurgical single-visit versus multiple-visit endodontic treatment

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Amy WY; Zhang, Chengfei; Chu, Chun-hung

    2014-01-01

    Conventional endodontic treatment used to require multiple visits, but some clinicians have suggested that single-visit treatment is superior. Single-visit endodontic treatment and multiple-visit endodontic treatment both have their advantages and disadvantages. This paper is a literature review of the research on nonsurgical single-visit versus multiple-visit endodontic treatment. The PubMed database was searched using the keywords (endodontic treatment OR endodontic therapy OR root canal treatment OR root canal therapy) AND (single-visit OR one-visit OR 1-visit). Review papers, case reports, data studies, and irrelevant reports were excluded, and 47 papers on clinical trials were reviewed. The studies generally had small sample sizes, and the endodontic procedures varied among the studies. Meta-analysis on the selected studies was performed, and the results showed that the postoperative complications of the single-visit and multiple-visit endodontic treatment were similar. Furthermore, neither single-visit endodontic treatment nor multiple-visit treatment had superior results over the other in terms of healing or success rate. Results of limited studies on disinfection of the root canals using low-energy laser photodynamic therapy is inconclusive, and further studies are necessary to show whether laser should be used in endodontic treatment. This review also found that that neither single-visit endodontic treatment nor multiple-visit treatment could guarantee the absence of postoperative pain. Since the study design of many studies displayed significant limitation and the materials and equipment used in endodontic treatment have dramatically changed in recent years, prospective randomized clinical trials are needed to further verify the postoperative pain and success rates of single-visit versus multiple-visit endodontic treatment. PMID:24855389

  6. Endodontic Treatment of a Large Periradicular Lesion: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Asgary, Saeed; Ehsani, Sara

    2008-01-01

    This case report describes the endodontic treatment of a large cyst-like periradicular lesion a 29-year-old female with a large chronic periapical abscess in the region of right maxillary sinus presented into private practice, accompanied with non-vital first upper molar and poorly root treated second upper molar. Conservative root canal treatment was carried out for both of the involved teeth in a single appointment. Post operative examination after two weeks revealed complete resolution of the sinus tract. The clinical and radiographic examination after 9 months revealed complete periapical healing. The appropriate diagnosis of periradicular lesion and the treatment of the infected root canal system allowed complete healing of these large lesions without endodontic surgery. PMID:24082906

  7. [Treatment of a fractured endodontical instrument in the root canal].

    PubMed

    Schipper, M; Peters, L B

    2015-12-01

    A 53-year-old woman with continuing pain coming from a lower first molar was diagnosed with apical periodontitis, with a retained fractured instrument in the root canal. There are a variety of treatment options for dealing with a corpus alienum in a root canal. In this case it was decided to treat the tooth endodontically, and leave the fractured instrument fragment in situ. The selection of this treatment option was made on the basis of knowledge of the original diagnosis and the success rates of the various treatment options as described in the relevant literature, weighed against the possible risks and their effects on the prognosis. This suggested that the use of a dental operating microscope has a positive impact on the success rates of endodontic treatment The prognosis for endodontic treatment when a fractured instrument fragment is left within the root canal, as in this case, is not significantly reduced. The presence of preoperative periapical pathology, however, is a more clinically significant prognostic indicator.

  8. Endodontic or dental implant therapy: the factors affecting treatment planning.

    PubMed

    Torabinejad, Mahmoud; Goodacre, Charles J

    2006-07-01

    Clinicians are confronted with difficult choices regarding whether a tooth with pulpal and/or periapical disease should be saved through endodontic treatment or be extracted and replaced with an implant. The authors examined publications (research, literature reviews and systematic reviews) related to the factors affecting decision making for patients who have oral diseases or traumatic injuries. The factors to be considered included patient-related issues (systemic and oral health, as well as comfort and treatment perceptions), tooth- and periodontium-related factors (pulpal and periodontal conditions, color characteristics of the teeth, quantity and quality of bone, and soft-tissue anatomy) and treatment-related factors (the potential for procedural complications, required adjunctive procedures and treatment outcomes). On the basis of survival rates, it appears that more than 95 percent of dental implants and teeth that have undergone endodontic treatment remain functional over time. Clinicians need to consider carefully several factors before choosing whether to perform endodontic therapy or extract a tooth and place an implant. The result should be high levels of comfort, function, longevity and esthetics for patients.

  9. Antibiotic abuse during endodontic treatment in private dental centers.

    PubMed

    AlRahabi, Mothanna K; Abuong, Ziad A

    2017-08-01

    We evaluated antibiotic prescription practices during root canal treatments among general dentists in private dental clinics in Al-Madinah Al Munawarah, Saudi Arabia. Methods: A self-administered, questionnaire about antibiotic used during root canal treatment was distributed to 75 randomly selected general dental practitioners working in private dental clinics in Al-Madinah Al-Munawarah, Saudi Arabia, between March and April 2016. The questionnaires were collected one week later. To compare results of the collected data, Chi-square test was used.  Results: The results revealed that 60% of the dentists prescribed amoxicillin with clavulanic acid as the first choice treatment for endodontic pathosis. Clindamycin (51.6%) was the first choice for patients who were allergic to penicillin. Forty-five percent of the general practitioners prescribed antibiotics for 5 days. Approximately 83.3% of general practitioners prescribed antibiotics for acute apical abscesses. Prophylactic antibiotics were prescribed for cases with a history of infective endocarditis (65.5%), non-controlled diabetes (60.3%), placement of a prosthetic joint in the previous 2 years (46.6%), congenital heart disease (36.2%), and kidney dialysis shunts (34.5%). Conclusion: This study reveals antibiotic abuse in endodontic treatment practice in private dental clinics in Al-Madinah Al Munawarah, Saudi Arabia. General dental practitioners are lacking knowledge regarding the prescription of antibiotics in endodontic  treatment and situations requiring prophylactic antibiotics.

  10. Cytokine analysis in lesions refractory to endodontic treatment.

    PubMed

    Henriques, Luiz Carlos Feitosa; de Brito, Luciana Carla Neves; Tavares, Warley Luciano Fonseca; Vieira, Leda Quércia; Ribeiro Sobrinho, Antônio Paulino

    2011-12-01

    Failure in endodontic treatment is often caused by the persistence of microorganisms in the root canal after therapy. When treatment fails, an immune response develops that is characterized by an extensive network of immunologic mechanisms that lead to the production of cytokines and chemokines. The objective of this study was to determine the relative messenger RNA (mRNA) expression of IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-17A, IL-10, and MCP-1 in periapical dental lesions refractory to treatment. Clinical samples were taken from teeth presenting periapical lesions refractory to endodontic treatment (the experimental group) or from healthy teeth with pulp vitality (the control group). Three paper points passing through the root apex (2 mm) were used to collect the samples. The total RNA was extracted from each sample, complementary DNA was synthesized, and quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis was performed. The Mann-Whitney U test was used to determine the statistical significance of our findings (P < .05). Significant differences in the levels of IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-17A, and MCP-1 mRNA expression were observed in cases refractory to endodontic treatment as compared with the control group. The expression of IL-1β mRNA was not significantly different between the groups. The expression of IL-10 mRNA was insignificant in both the experimental and control groups. A significantly increased expression of TNF-α, IFN-γ, IL-17A, and MCP-1 mRNA was observed in the periapical immune response in cases of endodontic failure. These results suggest that a proinflammatory cytokine profile predominates in these types of dental lesions. Copyright © 2011 American Association of Endodontists. All rights reserved.

  11. [Endodontically treated teeth. Success--failure. Endorestorative treatment plan].

    PubMed

    Zabalegui, B

    1990-01-01

    More and more often the general dentist is finding the presence of endodontically treated teeth during his treatment planning procedure. He has to ask himself if the endo-treated tooth functions and will continue to function function successfully, when deciding which final endo-restorative procedure to apply. For this reason the dentist or the endodontist with whom he works should clinically evaluate these teeth, establish a diagnostic criteria of their success or failure and a treatment plan according to the prognosis. The purpose of this article is to offer an organized clinical view of the steps to follow when evaluating an endodontically treated tooth and how to establish a final endo-restorative plan.

  12. Differential Diagnosis and Treatment Proposal for Acute Endodontic Infection.

    PubMed

    Keine, Kátia Cristina; Kuga, Milton Carlos; Pereira, Kamila Figueiredo; Diniz, Ana Carolina Soares; Tonetto, Mateus Rodrigues; Galoza, Marina Oliveira Gonçalves; Magro, Miriam Graziele; de Barros, Yolanda Benedita Abadia Martins; Bandéca, Matheus Coelho; de Andrade, Marcelo Ferrarezi

    2015-12-01

    The objective of this study was to describe the main lesions that simulate clinically and propose a treatment protocol for acute endodontic infection. Signs and clinical symptoms of periodontal abscess, gingival abscess, odontoma, herpes simplex, pericoronitis, acute pulpitis and necrotizing ulcerative gingivitis/periodontitis (NUG/NUP) were described and compared with acute endodontic infections. A treatment protocol was described by optimizing the procedures in access cavity, microbial decontamination and detoxification of the root canal, apical debridement, intracanal and systemic medication and surgical drainage procedures. The convenience of the use of 5.25% sodium hypochlorite, root canal instrumentation using a crown-down technique, intracanal medication with 2% chlorhexidine or triple antibiotic paste and the convenience of the use of antibiotics, analgesics, and surgical drainage to solve cases of acute dentoalveolar abscess was discussed.

  13. A Naval Postgraduate Dental School Analysis of Initial Endodontic Treatment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-06-01

    which may refer to a tooth with persistent apical pathosis without clinical signs and symptoms, to “healing” when a decreasing size of apical lesion is...years old. He later noted a correlation between endodontic treatment history and CHD prevalence (9). Pre-existing conditions of the tooth may also...et al. (11) determined tooth type significantly affected outcome. Many studies (5, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16) have associated pre-operative symptoms and

  14. Endodontic treatment of hypertaurodontism with multiple bilateral taurodontism

    PubMed Central

    Simsek, Neslihan; Keles, Ali; Ocak, Mevlut Sinan

    2013-01-01

    The term taurodontism is derived from the Latin word tauros, for “bull,” and the Greek term odus, for “tooth,” or “bull tooth.” Taurodontism is a morpho-anatomical developmental anomaly, which is seen infrequently in teeth only. It is characterized by a deficiency in the constriction at the cement-enamel junction, with lengthened pulp chambers and apical displacement of the pulpal floor. This gives the tooth a quadrilateral or cylindrical look. This report presents a case of multiple bilateral taurodontism and the successful endodontic treatment of the tooth that had hypertaurodontism. A male patient was referred to the endodontic clinic with decayed left maxillary first molar. Hypertaurodontism was confirmed after clinical and radiographic examination. Panaromic X-rays revealed that all of the patient's molar teeth were taurodontic. Taurodontism offers challenges to the practitioner during shaping and disinfection and at the time of filling the root canals. PMID:24082583

  15. Endodontic treatment options after unsuccessful initial root canal treatment: Alternatives to single-tooth implants.

    PubMed

    Torabinejad, Mahmoud; White, Shane N

    2016-03-01

    Initial root canal treatment is highly successful, appreciated by patients, and cost-effective, but failures occur. Should a tooth with unsuccessful initial root canal treatment be treated by means of other endodontic procedures or be replaced by a single-tooth implant? Results from systematic reviews of the outcomes of nonsurgical retreatment, apical surgery, replantation, and autotransplantation show high tooth survival rates. Nonsurgical retreatment generally is prioritized before surgical endodontic treatment. Microsurgical endodontic treatment is superior to traditional surgical endodontic treatment and has high survival rates. Intentional replantation remains a viable alternative to extraction. Autotransplantation has a place, particularly in growing patients with an appropriate donor tooth. Single-tooth implants have higher survival rates, but the natural state has intrinsic value. The first-line treatment option after failure of initial root canal treatment is nonsurgical retreatment. Endodontic surgery, intentional replantation, and autotransplantation should be considered before extraction and replacement by a single-tooth implant. Comprehensive case assessment, evaluation of all endodontic options, and risk assessment for caries and periodontal disease are always necessary when choosing the optimal treatment for a patient when initial root canal treatment has failed to heal. Copyright © 2016 American Dental Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Diabetes mellitus, periapical inflammation and endodontic treatment outcome

    PubMed Central

    Castellanos-Cosano, Lizett; Machuca, Guillermo; López-López, Jose; Martín-González, Jenifer; Velasco-Ortega, Eugenio; Sánchez-Domínguez, Benito; López-Frías, Francisco J.

    2012-01-01

    The possible connection between chronic oral inflammatory processes, such as apical periodontitis and periodontal disease (PD), and systemic health is one of the most interesting aspects faced by the medical and dental scientific community. Chronic apical periodontitis shares important characteristics with PD: 1) both are chronic infections of the oral cavity, 2) the Gram-negative anaerobic microbiota found in both diseases is comparable, and 3) in both infectious processes increased local levels of inflammatory mediators may have an impact on systemic levels. One of the systemic disorders linked to PD is diabetes mellitus (DM); is therefore plausible to assume that chronic apical periodontitis and endodontic treatment are also associated with DM. The status of knowledge regarding the relationship between DM and endodontics is reviewed. Upon review, we conclude that there are data in the literature that associate DM with a higher prevalence of periapical lesions, greater size of the osteolityc lesions, greater likelihood of asymptomatic infections and worse prognosis for root filled teeth. The results of some studies suggest that periapical disease may contribute to diabetic metabolic dyscontrol. Key words: Apical periodontitis, diabetes mellitus, endodontics, root canal treatment. PMID:22143698

  17. Laser scanning dental probe for endodontic root canal treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blank, Molly A. B.; Friedrich, Michal; Hamilton, Jeffrey D.; Lee, Peggy; Berg, Joel; Seibel, Eric J.

    2011-03-01

    Complications that arise during endodontic procedures pose serious threats to the long-term integrity and health of the tooth. Potential complexities of root canals include residual pulpal tissue, cracks, mesial-buccal 2 and accessory canals. In the case of a failed root canal, a successful apicoectomy can be jeopardized by isthmuses, accessory canals, and root microfracture. Confirming diagnosis using a small imaging probe would allow proper treatment and prevent retreatment of endodontic procedures. An ultrathin and flexible laser scanning endoscope of 1.2 to 1.6mm outer diameter was used in vitro to image extracted teeth with varied root configurations. Teeth were opened using a conventional bur and high speed drill. Imaging within the opened access cavity clarified the location of the roots where canal filing would initiate. Although radiographs are commonly used to determine the root canal size, position, and shape, the limited 2D image perspective leaves ambiguity that could be clarified if used in conjunction with a direct visual imaging tool. Direct visualization may avoid difficulties in locating the root canal and reduce the number of radiographs needed. A transillumination imaging device with the separated illumination and light collection functions rendered cracks visible in the prepared teeth that were otherwise indiscernible using reflected visible light. Our work demonstrates that a small diameter endoscope with high spatial resolution may significantly increase the efficiency and success of endodontic procedures.

  18. Treatment of a Periodontic-Endodontic Lesion in a Patient with Aggressive Periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Case Description. This case report describes the successful management of a left mandibular first molar with a combined periodontic-endodontic lesion in a 35-year-old Caucasian woman with aggressive periodontitis using a concerted approach including endodontic treatment, periodontal therapy, and a periodontal regenerative procedure using an enamel matrix derivate. In spite of anticipated poor prognosis, the tooth lesion healed. This case report also discusses the rationale behind different treatment interventions. Practical Implication. Periodontic-endodontic lesions can be successfully treated if dental professionals follow a concerted treatment protocol that integrates endodontic and periodontic specialties. General dentists can be the gatekeepers in managing these cases. PMID:27418983

  19. [Analysis of the possible causes of endodontic treatment failure by inspection during apical microsurgery treatment].

    PubMed

    Qian, Wen-hao; Hong, Jin; Xu, Pei-cheng

    2015-04-01

    To analyze the possible causes of previous endodontic treatment failure by microscopic inspection during apical microsurgery. Two hundred and eighty-nine teeth of previous endodontic treatment failure were collected from patients in Shanghai Xuhui District Dental Center, between January 2006 and January 2014. All surgical procedures were performed by using an operating microscope, and 238 roots were included in the study. The surface of the apical root to be resected or the resected root surface after methylene blue staining was examined during the surgical procedure and inspected with 26 magnification to determine the state of the previous endodontic treatment by using an operating microscope. Fisher's exact test was used to analyze the data with SPSS 19.0 software package. Among the 238 roots with periapical surgery, analysis of the reasons for previous endodontic treatment failure included leaky canal (29.41%), missing canal (15.55%), underfilling (15.55%), anatomical complexity (7.98%), overfilling (4.20%), apical fenestration (4.20%), iatrogenic problem (3.36%), apical calculus (2.52%), apical cracks (1.68%) and unknown reasons (15.55%). The frequency of possible failure causes and tooth position were closely correlated (P<0.001). Apical microsurgery can better inspect possible causes of previous endodontic treatment failure, in order to improve the success rate of endodontic treatment.

  20. ANALYSIS OF ENTEROCOCCUS FAECALIS IN SAMPLES FROM TURKISH PATIENTS WITH PRIMARY ENDODONTIC INFECTIONS AND FAILED ENDODONTIC TREATMENT BY REAL-TIME PCR SYBR GREEN METHOD

    PubMed Central

    Ozbek, Selcuk M.; Ozbek, Ahmet; Erdogan, Aziz S.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: The aims of this study were to investigate the presence of Enterococcus faecalis in primary endodontic infections and failed endodontic treatments using real-time PCR and to determine the statistical importance of the presence of E. faecalis in a Turkish population with endodontic infections. Material and Methods: E. faecalis was investigated from 79 microbial samples collected from patients who were treated at the Endodontic Clinic of the Dental School of Atatürk University (Erzurum, Turkey). Microbial samples were taken from 43 patients (Group 1) with failed endodontic treatments and 36 patients (Group 2) with chronic apical periodontitis (primary endodontic infections). DNA was extracted from the samples by using a QIAamp® DNA mini-kit and analyzed with real-time PCR SYBR Green. Results: E. faecalis was detected in 41 out of 79 patients, suggesting that it exists in not less than 61% of all endodontic infections when the proportion test (z= -1.645, endodontic infections in Turkish patients, and is more often associated with failed endodontic treatments than primary endodontic infections. PMID:19936510

  1. Endodontic treatment of a multirooted permanent maxillary canine.

    PubMed

    Galhotra, Virat; Pandit, I K; Srivastava, Nikhil; Gugnani, Neeraj

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this paper was to report an unusual case of multirooted permanent maxillary canine. A 16-year-old female patient presented with pain and swelling related to the upper right permanent canine. Radiographic examination revealed a multirooted permanent maxillary canine--an unusual finding. Endodontic treatment was performed after amputation of 2 extra roots, and then the tooth was intentionally reimplanted. The prevalence of birooted permanent mandibular canines in the Japanese population has been reported, but the prevalence of this 3-rooted maxillary canine is still unknown. This report also states the potential etiological factors, effects on the developing dentition, and various treatment options for the multirooted maxillary permanent canine.

  2. Endodontic treatment of infected primary teeth, using Maisto's paste.

    PubMed

    Mass, E; Zilberman, U L

    1989-01-01

    A method of endodontic treatment, using a modification of Maisto's paste, is suggested for preservation of infected primary teeth. Adding more zinc-oxide reagent and other anti-bacterial materials to the original Walkhoff's paste (Kri 1), for pulp canal medication and final filling, seems to improve the pharmacological effect of the paste by reducing the resorption rate. The literature is reviewed and a case with a follow-up time of three and a half years is described, in which the tooth remained stable.

  3. Cone beam computed tomography aided diagnosis and treatment of endodontic cases: Critical analysis

    PubMed Central

    Yılmaz, Funda; Kamburoglu, Kıvanç; Yeta, Naz Yakar; Öztan, Meltem Dartar

    2016-01-01

    Although intraoral radiographs still remain the imaging method of choice for the evaluation of endodontic patients, in recent years, the utilization of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) in endodontics showed a significant jump. This case series presentation shows the importance of CBCT aided diagnosis and treatment of complex endodontic cases such as; root resorption, missed extra canal, fusion, oblique root fracture, non-diagnosed periapical pathology and horizontal root fracture. CBCT may be a useful diagnostic method in several endodontic cases where intraoral radiography and clinical examination alone are unable to provide sufficient information. PMID:27551342

  4. Are full cast crowns mandatory after endodontic treatment in posterior teeth?

    PubMed Central

    Tikku, Aseem Prakash; Chandra, Anil; Bharti, Ramesh

    2010-01-01

    The success of endodontic treatment is not only measured by the alleviation of pain and formation of healthy bone, replacing the diseased periapical tissue. Concepts for restoring pulpless teeth have been formed more from clinical observation than valid scientific investigation. Endodontically treated posterior teeth present numerous problems because of coronal destruction from dental caries, fractures, and previous restorations or endodontic techniques. The result is loss of tooth structure and a reduction in the capacity of the tooth to resist a myriad of intraoral forces. A summary of this review article suggests that coronal coverage significantly improves the clinical success rate of endodontically treated posterior teeth. PMID:21217953

  5. [Revascularization: a new treatment method in endodontics].

    PubMed

    Wigler, R; Kaufman, A Y; Steinbock, N; Lin, S

    2012-07-01

    Recently a number of published articles concerning a new treatment method in traumatized young permanent teeth with a wide open apex that have lost vitality, with or without periapical lesions have shown success. This new treatment is entitled "Revascularization" and its aim is to promote root maturation in infected immature teeth with open apices. This procedure stimulates the formation of hard tissue as well as elongation and thickening of the dentinal walls and closure of the root apex. Sometimes the vitality of the teeth is regained. The aim of the present publication is to describe the revascularization technique and to clarify the indications of its use.

  6. [Nonsurgical endodontic treatment of an invaginated canine].

    PubMed

    Fernández Guerrero, F; Miñana Laliga, R; Bullon Fernandez, P

    1989-01-01

    We present a case of a maxillary canine with a dens invaginatus treated successfully. The patient had pain, swelling and a sinus tract coming from the inmature apex of the canine. The canals were enlarged and cleaned and the main canal was filled with Calcium Hydroxide to allow the root development. Seven months later, the patient was asymptomatic and the tooth was obturated with guttapercha. One year later it was confirm the success in the treatment.

  7. Molecular analysis of Filifactor alocis, Tannerella forsythia, and treponema denticola associated with primary endodontic infections and failed endodontic treatment.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Brenda P F A; Jacinto, Rogério C; Pinheiro, Ericka T; Sousa, Ezilmara L R; Zaia, Alexandre A; Ferraz, Caio C R; Souza-Filho, Francisco J

    2006-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the presence of strict anaerobes such as Filifactor alocis, Tannerella forsythia, and Treponema denticola in primary and secondary root-infected canals with periapical lesions by molecular analysis and the association of these species with specific endodontic signs and symptoms. Microbial samples were taken from 100 root canals, 50 with necrotic pulp tissues (NPT, primary infection), and 50 with failed endodontic treatment (FET, secondary infection). DNA was extracted from the samples, which were analyzed for the presence of three endodontic pathogens using species-specific primers and PCR. F. alocis were isolated from 23 canals with NPT and 12 canals with FET; T. forsythia from 12 canals with NPT and three canals with FET; T. denticola from 19 canals with NPT and 12 canals with TEP. Suggested associations were found between primary infection and the presence of F. alocis and T. forsythia (both p < 0.05). In particular, associations were found between: pain and F. alocis; swelling and F. alocis; tenderness to percussion and T. forsythia; mobility and T. forsythia and T. denticola; wet canals and F. alocis, T. forsythia, and T. denticola; purulent exsudate and F. alocis, T. forsythia and T. denticola; abscess and F. alocis, T. forsythia, and T. denticola (all p < 0.05). The findings of this study indicated that F. alocis, T. forsythia, and T. denticola seem to be associated with endodontic signs and symptoms. Additionally, F. alocis and T. forsythia were detected more frequently in teeth with necrotic pulp than in teeth with failing endodontic treatment.

  8. Periradicular repair after two-visit endodontic treatment using two different intracanal medications compared to single-visit endodontic treatment.

    PubMed

    Silveira, Adriana M Vieira; Lopes, Hélio P; Siqueira, José F; Macedo, Sérgio B; Consolaro, Alberto

    2007-01-01

    The number of appointments necessary to treat infected root canals is one of the most controversial issues in endodontics. This study evaluated, in dogs, the response of the periradicular tissues to the endodontic treatment of infected root canals performed in a single visit or in two visits, using different interappointment dressings. Periradicular lesions were induced by inoculating Enterococcus faecalis in the root canals. After confirming that a periradicular lesion developed, the root canals were treated within one or two visits, using either ozonized oil or calcium hydroxide in camphorated paramonochlorophenol (CMCP) as an intracanal medication. After 6 months, the animals were sacrificed and the specimens were processed for histological and histobacteriological analysis. The root canals treated in a single visit showed a success rate of 46%. When a calcium hydroxide/CMCP-based interappointment intracanal medication was used, 74% of the cases were categorized as success. In cases where ozonized oil was used as the intracanal medication, a success rate of 77% was observed. These results of the present study demonstrated that the two-visit treatment offered a higher success rate compared to one-visit therapy. In addition, ozonized oil may potentially be used as an intracanal medication.

  9. The confidence of undergraduate dental students in Saudi Arabia in performing endodontic treatment.

    PubMed

    Alrahabi, Mothanna

    2017-01-01

    This study examined the endodontic experience, perceptions of endodontic practice, and self-rated confidence of dental students enrolled in Taibah University, Saudi Arabia. A questionnaire was distributed to 41 undergraduate dental students registered in endodontic courses in the 2015 academic year. The questionnaire evaluated their confidence performing nonsurgical root canal treatment. The level of confidence was classified using a 5-point scale as "very confident," "confident," "neutral," "not very confident," or "not at all confident." The data were analyzed using SPSS version 20.0 (SPSS, Chicago, IL, USA). The participation rate was 93%. The maxillary incisor was the most common first tooth treated. The students were relatively confident, but their confidence levels were lower regarding endodontic radiology, evaluation of root canal obturation, and determining the correct recall period for the patient. The confidence of undergraduates in endodontics must be enhanced to increase their clinical competence when performing root canal treatment.

  10. Micro-surgical endodontics.

    PubMed

    Eliyas, S; Vere, J; Ali, Z; Harris, I

    2014-02-01

    Non-surgical endodontic retreatment is the treatment of choice for endodontically treated teeth with recurrent or residual disease in the majority of cases. In some cases, surgical endodontic treatment is indicated. Successful micro-surgical endodontic treatment depends on the accuracy of diagnosis, appropriate case selection, the quality of the surgical skills, and the application of the most appropriate haemostatic agents and biomaterials. This article describes the armamentarium and technical procedures involved in performing micro-surgical endodontics to a high standard.

  11. Definition and endodontic treatment of dilacerated canals: a survey of Diplomates of the American Board of Endodontics.

    PubMed

    Dastmalchi, Nafiseh; Kazemi, Zeinab; Hashemi, Siroos; Peters, Ove A; Jafarzadeh, Hamid

    2011-01-01

    To gather data from Diplomates of the American Board of Endodontics regarding treatment of dilacerated canals. A questionnaire addressing definition, endodontic treatment procedures and prognosis was constructed and distributed via e-mail to 708 Diplomates of the American Board of Endodontics. Data from 150 respondents, a 21% response rate, were collected by using a Web-based interface. For statistical analysis, Chi-square tests were used. More than 25% of respondents believed that a dilacerated root should have a curvature > 40°. One-visit treatment is the best therapeutic approach and transportation is the most likely complication in preparation of these canals. A crown-down technique, watch-winding motion and a master apical file # 25 are the best choices for preparation of these canals. Any warm obturation technique is preferred over lateral compaction by most respondents. A crown-down technique for root canal preparation and a thermoplastic obturation technique are recommended for canals whose curvature is more than 40°. The prognosis of the treatment of these canals is judged not lower than normal canals. Crown-down technique and thermoplastic obturation are recommended for dilacerated canals.

  12. Healing of an Extensive Periradicular Lesion Subsequent to a Proper Endodontic Treatment of a Mandibular First Premolar with Complex Anatomy

    PubMed Central

    Ashraf, Hengameh; Paymanpour, Payam; Bidabadi, Maryam Mojtahed; Hajrezai, Reihaneh

    2013-01-01

    Long-term success of endodontic treatment is strictly dependent on proper shaping and cleaning of the root canal system followed by obturation of entire prepared space. Anatomical variations should be considered during radiographic and clinical evaluation as parts of endodontic treatment. A mandibular premolar with three canals is quite rare and such a tooth requires special canal preparation and obturation techniques. An astute clinician should identify different canal configurations and treat them endodontically well, because presence of an untreated canal could be a reason for failure of endodontic treatment. This paper describes the conventional orthograde endodontic therapy on an unusual mandibular first premolar with three root canals. PMID:24383015

  13. Healing of an extensive periradicular lesion subsequent to a proper endodontic treatment of a mandibular first premolar with complex anatomy.

    PubMed

    Ashraf, Hengameh; Paymanpour, Payam; Bidabadi, Maryam Mojtahed; Hajrezai, Reihaneh

    2013-01-01

    Long-term success of endodontic treatment is strictly dependent on proper shaping and cleaning of the root canal system followed by obturation of entire prepared space. Anatomical variations should be considered during radiographic and clinical evaluation as parts of endodontic treatment. A mandibular premolar with three canals is quite rare and such a tooth requires special canal preparation and obturation techniques. An astute clinician should identify different canal configurations and treat them endodontically well, because presence of an untreated canal could be a reason for failure of endodontic treatment. This paper describes the conventional orthograde endodontic therapy on an unusual mandibular first premolar with three root canals.

  14. Photodynamic treatment of endodontic polymicrobial infection in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Fimple, Jacob Lee; Fontana, Carla Raquel; Foschi, Federico; Ruggiero, Karriann; Song, Xiaoqing; Pagonis, Tom C.; Tanner, Anne C. R.; Kent, Ralph; Doukas, Apostolos G.; Stashenko, Philip P.; Soukos, Nikolaos S.

    2008-01-01

    We investigated the photodynamic effects of methylene blue (MB) on multi-species root canal biofilms comprising Actinomyces israelii, Fusobacterium nucleatum subspecies nucleatum, Porphyromonas gingivalis and Prevotella intermedia in experimentally infected root canals of extracted human teeth in vitro. The four test microorganisms were detected in root canals using DNA probes. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) showed the presence of biofilms in root canals prior to therapy. Root canal systems were incubated with MB (25 µg/ml) for 10 minutes followed by exposure to red light at 665 nm with an energy fluence of 30 J/cm2. Light was delivered from a diode laser via a 250 µm diameter polymethyl methacrylate optical fiber that uniformly distributed light at 360°. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) achieved up to 80% reduction of colony-forming unit counts. We conclude that PDT can be an effective adjunct to standard endodontic antimicrobial treatment when the PDT parameters are optimized. PMID:18498901

  15. Treatment Options: Biological Basis of Regenerative Endodontic Procedures

    PubMed Central

    Hargreaves, Kenneth M.; Diogenes, Anibal; Teixeira, Fabricio B.

    2013-01-01

    Dental trauma occurs frequently in children and often can lead to pulpal necrosis. The occurrence of pulpal necrosis in the permanent but immature tooth represents a challenging clinical situation since the thin and often short roots increase the risk of subsequent fracture. Current approaches for treating the traumatized immature tooth with pulpal necrosis do not reliably achieve the desired clinical outcomes, consisting of healing of apical periodontitis, promotion of continued root development and restoration of the functional competence of pulpal tissue. An optimal approach for treating the immature permanent tooth with a necrotic pulp would be to regenerate functional pulpal tissue. This review summarizes the current literature supporting a biological rationale for considering regenerative endodontic treatment procedures in treating the immature permanent tooth with pulp necrosis. PMID:23439043

  16. [The diagnostic value of oblique technique for periapical radiography and its usefulness in endodontic treatment].

    PubMed

    Mikołajczak, Teresa; Wilk, Grazyna

    2008-01-01

    The applicability of the intraoral X-rays in the oblique projection during the endodontic treatment is described in this study. The rules concerning the positioning of the X-ray tube, intraoral film and the examined tooth, necessary to obtain images in mesial and distal oblique projections are discussed. The usefulness of the aforementioned projections in visualizing the anatomy, anomalies as well as periapical changes of the dental roots and canals during the endodontic treatment is presented.

  17. [The place of radiography in endodontic treatment carried out in general practice in Dakar].

    PubMed

    Gaye, F; Mbaye, M; Faye, B; Diallo, B

    2002-03-01

    An investigation conducted over dental surgeons of 52 dental offices in Dakar and it's near suburb (40 from private sector and 12 from public and quasi-public) has shown that the use of retro-alveolar radiography during endodontic treatment was not systematic, due to the price of retro-alveolar film, waste of time and relative facility of the endodontic treatment of monoradicular teeth. The preparatory negative is favored (32.70%) particularly by private dental surgeons, who use two retro-alveolar films for endodontic treatment: pre and post operative radiography (30%). The immediate post operator control is executed only in case of post-operator pains by public and quasi-public dental surgeons (16.67%) with one retro-alveolar film on average for the endodontic treatment; at term any radiographic control is done. Three retro-alveolar films per endodontic treatment were exceptionally used (9.61%) and offset incidences (15%) are not much used as well as support-films (angulators). The retro-alveolar radiography is still a reliable guide for a clinical success in endodontic treatment with a minimum of three retro-alveolar films and offset incidences.

  18. Synergistic Antimicrobial Action of Chlorhexidine and Ozone in Endodontic Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Pina-Vaz, Cidália; Rocha, Rita; Carvalho, Manuel Fontes; Gonçalves, Acácio

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. The aim of this study was to determine whether irrigation with sodium hypochlorite, chlorhexidine, and ozone gas, alone or in combination, were effective against Enterococcus faecalis and Candida albicans; these are microorganisms frequently isolated from teeth with periapical lesions resistant to endodontic treatment. Material and Methods. 220 single root teeth, recently extracted, were inoculated with Candida albicans and Enterococcus faecalis. The formulations tested were sodium hypochlorite at 1, 3, and 5% chlorhexidine at 0.2% and 2% and ozone gas applied for different periods of time. The combination of sodium hypochlorite at 5% and chlorhexidine at 2%, with gaseous ozone, were also assessed. For the most active treatments the mechanism of action was assessed through flow cytometry. Results. Sodium hypochlorite, chlorhexidine, and gaseous ozone alone were ineffective in completely eliminating the microorganisms. The association of chlorhexidine at 2% followed by ozone gas for 24 seconds promoted the complete elimination of Candida albicans and Enterococcus faecalis. Flow cytometry shows that ozone and chlorhexidine act differently, which could explain its synergic activity. Conclusions. This new disinfection protocol, combining irrigation with chlorhexidine at 2% and ozone gas for 24 seconds, may be advantageous when treating infected root canals. PMID:24982899

  19. Regenerative endodontic treatment of permanent teeth after completion of root development: a report of 2 cases.

    PubMed

    Paryani, Khimiya; Kim, Sahng G

    2013-07-01

    Clinical regenerative endodontic treatment has been focused on immature necrotic teeth, but it should be extended to mature teeth as an alternative to conventional endodontic treatment. There have been no clinical reports to attempt to revascularize pulp in the entire root canals of mature necrotic teeth. The present report describes the treatment of mature, necrotic, permanent incisors with apical periodontitis by using regenerative endodontic therapy. In this case report, modified regenerative endodontic procedures were used to enhance the probability of pulp revasuclarization in mature necrotic teeth. At the first appointment, the root canals were mechanically instrumented to the apices with a large apical size by using the step-back technique and irrigated copiously with antimicrobial solution. Intracanal medicaments (calcium hydroxide or ciprofloxacin) were placed in the root canals. At the following appointment, the root canals were irrigated with antimicrobial solution, and bleeding was induced into the root canals by passing hand files beyond apices. Collagen membranes were placed in the canals as a matrix against which mineral trioxide aggregate was placed. Glass ionomer was used to restore the teeth. The resolution of apical radiolucency and regression of clinical signs and symptoms were observed at recall appointments. The present report presents modified regenerative endodontic procedures for mature necrotic permanent teeth. Further clinical studies with a large number of cases are needed to investigate the outcome of regenerative endodontic therapy for mature necrotic teeth. Copyright © 2013 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Periapical bacterial plaque in teeth refractory to endodontic treatment.

    PubMed

    Tronstad, L; Barnett, F; Cervone, F

    1990-04-01

    It has recently been found that bacteria are able to survive and maintain an infectious disease process in periapical lesions of nonvital teeth. The purpose of this study was to examine the surfaces of root tips removed during surgical-endodontic treatment for the presence of microorganisms. A full thickness flap was reflected under strict surgical asepsis and the periapical lesions were enucleated and removed. About 2-3 mm of the root was cut off, rinsed in sterile saline and placed in 10% neutral-buffered formalin. Upon fixation, the root tips were dehydrated, air-dried and given an electrically conducting coat of gold in a vacuum evaporator. The root tips were then studied in a Jeol, JSM-U3 scanning electron microscope, usually operated at 20 kV. The root surfaces were covered with soft tissue, except at the apex of the roots, where a continuous, smooth and structureless coating was seen, apparently adjacent to the apical foramen. At higher magnification a variety of bacterial forms were recognized in the smooth coating. A bacterial plaque was observed in irregularities of the surfaces between fiber bundles and cells and in crypts and holes. The bacteria were held together by an extracellular material and the plaque was dominated by cocci and rods. Fibrillar forms were recognized as well, often with cocci attached to their surfaces.

  1. Effect of cryogenic treatment on nickel-titanium endodontic instruments

    PubMed Central

    Kim, J. W.; Griggs, J. A.; Regan, J. D.; Ellis, R. A.; Cai, Z.

    2005-01-01

    Aim To investigate the effects of cryogenic treatment on nickel-titanium endodontic instruments. The null hypothesis was that cryogenic treatment would result in no changes in composition, microhardness or cutting efficiency of nickel-titanium instruments. Methodology Microhardness was measured on 30 nickel-titanium K-files (ISO size 25) using a Vicker’s indenter. Elemental composition was measured on two instruments using X-ray spectroscopy. A nickel-titanium bulk specimen was analysed for crystalline phase composition using X-ray diffraction. Half of the specimens to be used for each analysis were subjected to a cryogenic treatment in liquid nitrogen (−196 °C) for either 3 s (microhardness specimens) or 10 min (other specimens). Cutting efficiency was assessed by recording operator choice using 80 nickel-titanium rotary instruments (ProFile® 20, .06) half of which had been cryogenically treated and had been distributed amongst 14 clinicians. After conditioning by preparing four corresponding canals, each pair of instruments were evaluated for cutting efficiency by a clinician during preparation of one canal system in vitro. A Student’s t-test was used to analyse the microhardness data, and a binomial test was used to analyse the observer choice data. Composition data were analysed qualitatively. Results Cryogenically treated specimens had a significantly higher microhardness than the controls (P < 0.001; β > 0.999). Observers showed a preference for cryogenically treated instruments (61%), but this was not significant (P = 0.21). Both treated and control specimens were composed of 56% Ni, 44% Ti, 0% N (by weight) with a majority in the austenite phase. Conclusions Cryogenic treatment resulted in increased microhardness, but this increase was not detected clinically. There was no measurable change in elemental or crystalline phase composition. PMID:15910471

  2. Endodontic implants

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Rakesh K.; Tikku, A. P.; Chandra, Anil; Wadhwani, K. K.; Ashutosh kr; Singh, Mayank

    2014-01-01

    Endodontic implants were introduced back in 1960. Endodontic implants enjoyed few successes and many failures. Various reasons for failures include improper case selection, improper use of materials and sealers and poor preparation for implants. Proper case selection had given remarkable long-term success. Two different cases are being presented here, which have been treated successfully with endodontic implants and mineral trioxide aggregate Fillapex (Andreaus, Brazil), an MTA based sealer. We suggest that carefully selected cases can give a higher success rate and this method should be considered as one of the treatment modalities. PMID:25298723

  3. Comparison of the Success Rate of Endodontic Treatment and Implant Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Elemam, Ranya Faraj; Pretty, Iain

    2011-01-01

    Dentists and patients are facing a perplexity between saving a compromised tooth through endodontic treatment and restoration or by extraction and replacement with an implant. The purpose of this paper was to compare the success rates of these two treatments. Success was measured as the longevity of the tooth or implant. Studies which met strict inclusion criteria to ensure best evidence were included. Searches were performed in Ovid Medline, Pubmed, Scopus database, and the Cochrane Library. Evidence-based groups were formed following the assessment of inclusion/exclusion criteria. The overall success rates for primary endodontic, nonsurgical retreatment, and surgical treatment were (86.02%), (78.2%), and (63.4%), respectively, implants was 90.9%. In conclusion, choice between implant and endodontic therapy cannot be exclusively based on outcome as both treatments differ in the biological process, diagnostic modalities, failure patterns, and patients preferences. More research is required with improved study designs before long-term success rates can be compared. PMID:21991484

  4. Incidence of periradicular pathoses in endodontic treatment failures.

    PubMed

    Nobuhara, W K; del Rio, C E

    1993-06-01

    Biopsy reports from 150 periradicular tissue specimens obtained from teeth refractory to nonsurgical endodontic therapy were reviewed. The specimens were submitted by postdoctoral dental students in the Department of Endodontics, and the biopsy reports were prepared by oral pathologists at the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio. The study found that 59.3% of the periradicular lesions were granulomas, 22% cysts, 12% scars, and 6.7% other pathoses. The majority (56%) of endodontically treated cases which failed to heal were recognized within 2 yr after the completion of therapy. The most common location for surgical retreatment was the anterior maxilla, followed by the posterior maxilla, the posterior mandible, and the anterior mandible. The periapical granuloma was the predominant pathosis at each location.

  5. 3-dimensional analysis of regenerative endodontic treatment outcome.

    PubMed

    EzEldeen, Mostafa; Van Gorp, Gertrude; Van Dessel, Jeroen; Vandermeulen, Dirk; Jacobs, Reinhilde

    2015-03-01

    A growing body of evidence supports the regeneration potential of dental tissues after regenerative endodontic treatment (RET). Nevertheless, a standard method for the evaluation of RET outcome is lacking. The aim of this study was to develop a standardized quantitative method for RET outcome analysis based on cone-beam computed tomographic (CBCT) volumetric measurements. Five human teeth embedded in mandibular bone samples were scanned using both an Accuitomo 170 CBCT machine (Morita, Kyoto, Japan) and a SkyScan 1174 micro-computed tomographic (μCT) system (SkyScan, Antwerp, Belgium). For subsequent clinical application, clinical data and low-dose CBCT scans (preoperatively and follow-up) from 5 immature permanent teeth treated with RET were retrieved. In vitro and clinical 3-dimensional image data sets were imported into a dedicated software tool. Two segmentation steps were applied to extract the teeth of interest from the surrounding tissue (livewire) and to separate tooth hard tissue and root canal space (level set methods). In vitro and clinical volumetric measurements were assessed separately for differences using Wilcoxon matched pairs test. Pearson correlation analysis and Bland-Altman plots were used to evaluate the relation and agreement between the segmented CBCT and μCT volumes. The results showed no statistical differences and strong agreement between CBCT and μCT volumetric measurements. Volumetric comparison of the root hard tissue showed significant hard tissue formation. (The mean volume of newly formed hard tissue was 27.9 [±10.5] mm(3) [P < .05]). Analysis of 3-dimensional data for teeth treated with RET offers valuable insights into the treatment outcome and patterns of hard tissue formation. Copyright © 2015 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. [Analysis of the key points in the micro-endodontic treatment].

    PubMed

    Hou, B X

    2016-08-01

    Micro-endodontic treatment refers to the microscope-assisted endodontic treatment techniques. The microscope offers a stereoscopic, enlarged image under great magnification and illumination at a comfortable working position. It will greatly promote the precision and improve the outcomes of endodontic treatment through enhancing the ability to detect the complexity of the root canal system of teeth that probably cannot be seen by the naked eyes, remove the infectious substances in root canal more efficiently, provide a tight root canal obturation and carry out effective retreatment procedures. The requirements of micro-endodontic treatment are different from the conventional root canal therapy carried out without microscope due to the complicated structure of the microscope. In order to make the use of microscope easier, it is of great importance to learn how to adjust the position of the operator and the patient, preset the angle of objective lens and the eyepiece, select the proper magnification and instruments, practice eye-hand cooperation under the microscope, etc. The purpose of this article was to analyze the key points in the applications of the microscope in endodontic treatment by reviewing the literature together with the author's clinical experience.

  7. Non-linear indices of heart rate variability during endodontic treatment.

    PubMed

    Santana, Milana Drumond Ramos; Pita Neto, Ivo Cavalcante; Martiniano, Eli Carlos; Monteiro, Larissa Raylane Lucas; Ramos, José Lucas Souza; Garner, David M; Valenti, Vitor Engácia; Abreu, Luiz Carlos de

    2016-01-01

    Dental treatment promotes psychosomatic change that can influence the procedure and compromise the general well-being of the patient. In this context, it highlights the importance of evaluating the function of the autonomic nervous system in individuals undergoing endodontic treatment. Thus, this manuscript aimed to analyse cardiac autonomic modulation, through non-linear indices of heart rate variability (HRV) during endodontic treatment. Analysis of 50 subjects of either sex aged between 18 and 40 years diagnosed with irreversible pulp necrosis of lower molars undergoing endodontic treatment was undertaken. We carried out fractal and symbolic analysis of HRV, which was recorded in the first session of the endodontic treatment at four intervals: T1: 0-10 min before the onset of the treatment session; T2: 0-10 min after the application of anaesthesia; T3: throughout the period of treatment; and T4: 0-30 min after the end of the treatment session. There was reduction of α1 in T2 compared to T1 and T4 (p < 0.0001). The α2 index also reduced in T2 compared to T3 (p = 0.0035). There was an increase in the α1/α2 ratio in T4 compared to T2 and T3 (p = 0.0003). It was found that 0V% was significantly lower in T2 (p = 0.002), while 2UV% was significantly higher (p < 0.0001) when compared to other points in time. In conclusion, HRV is reduced during endodontic treatment, and after applying local anaesthetic the parasympathetic component of HRV increases. These data indicate that endodontic treatment acutely overcharges the heart, supporting the stress involved in this situation.

  8. Influence of fractured instruments on the success rate of endodontic treatment.

    PubMed

    Simon, Stephane; Machtou, Pierre; Tomson, Phillip; Adams, Nick; Lumley, Philip

    2008-04-01

    The fracture of an instrument is a recognized complication in endodontics. The immediate response to a fractured instrument is frequently to regard the treatment as a failure. Several factors must, however, be taken into account to evaluate the prognosis of the tooth in this situation. The objective of the endodontic treatment with or without a fractured instrument remains the same, namely to disinfect the root canal system and prevent its recontamination. The time at which file fracture occurred during treatment and the degree of canal infection should be considered when determining the potential effect of instrument fracture on treatment outcome. Patients must be informed about an instrument fracturing in their tooth for ethical and legal reasons. The aim of this paper is to attempt to place fractured instruments in context, not to provide an in depth description of fractured instrument management techniques. To understand the influence of fractured instruments on prognosis in endodontics.

  9. Perceptions of single-visit and multiple-visit endodontic treatment: a survey of endodontic specialists and general dentists in Hong Kong.

    PubMed

    Wong, Amy Wai-Yee; Zhang, Shinan; Zhang, Cheng-Fei; Chu, Chun-Hung

    2016-08-01

    To study the preference of practice for single- and multiple-visit endodontic treatment by Hong Kong endodontists and general dental practitioners (GDPs), and to investigate their reasons for choosing single- or multiple-visit treatment in their practice. An anonymous questionnaire was mailed to all 16 registered endodontists and 800 randomly selected GDPs in Hong Kong to explore their preference and reasons for selecting single- or multiple-visit endodontic treatment for their patients. Information on the use of magnifying loupes, microscopes and the number of years they have been in dental practice was also collected. Eight endodontists and 429 GDPs returned their questionnaires and the response rate was 50% and 53.6% respectively. Among the GDPs, 404 (94.2%) undertook endodontic treatment in their practices. For those performing endodontic treatment, the mean number of years of practice was 23.6 ± 4.8 for endodontists and 15.3 ± 9.1 for GDPs. Seven endodontists (87.5%) used a surgical microscope. For GDPs, only 25 (6.2%) used a surgical microscope and 123 (30.4%) used magnifying loupes during endodontic treatment. Seven endodontists (87.5%) and 375 GDPs (92.8%) predominantly performed multiple-visit treatment. The commonest reasons for choosing multiple-visit treatment for both endodontists and GDPs were the positive effects of interappointment medications (n = 3, 37.5%) and that the tooth to be treated had doubtful prognosis (n = 103, 25.5%). The commonest reason for choosing single-visit treatment for both endodontists and general dentists was that treatment could be completed in one visit (n = 4, 50%) and (n = 127, 31.4%). Most Hong Kong endodontists and GDPs preferred offering multiple-visit endodontic treatment. © 2015 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  10. [Bio-Oss collagen bone grafting in the treatment of endodontic-periodontic lesion].

    PubMed

    Sun, Jiang; Liu, Qiong

    2009-09-01

    To study the effect of Bio-Oss collagen for bone grafting in the treatment of endodontic-periodontic lesion. Thirty patients (37 teeth) with endodontic-periodontic lesions received root canal therapy and periodontal treatment. Four weeks after the treatment, Bio-Oss collagen was grafted in these teeth. Clinical examinations were performed 1, 3, 6, 9, and 12 months after the surgery. The mobility of these teeth improved 1 month after the surgery. At 3, 6, 9, and 12 months after the surgery, the pocket depth reduced obviously good attachment and further improvement of the tooth mobility. Bio-Oss collagen for bone grafting can achieve good therapeutic effect for endodontic-periodontic lesions.

  11. Regenerative Endodontics.

    PubMed

    Feigin, Kristina; Shope, Bonnie

    2017-09-01

    Regenerative endodontics has been defined as "biologically based procedure designed to replace damaged structures, including dentin and root structures, as well as cells of the pulp-dentin complex." This is an exciting and rapidly evolving field of human endodontics for the treatment of immature permanent teeth with infected root canal systems. These procedures have shown to be able not only to resolve pain and apical periodontitis but continued root development, thus increasing the thickness and strength of the previously thin and fracture-prone roots. In the last decade, over 80 case reports, numerous animal studies, and series of regenerative endodontic cases have been published. However, even with multiple successful case reports, there are still some remaining questions regarding terminology, patient selection, and procedural details. Regenerative endodontics provides the hope of converting a nonvital tooth into vital one once again.

  12. Glove Contamination during Endodontic Treatment Is One of the Sources of Nosocomial Endodontic Propionibacterium acnes Infections.

    PubMed

    Niazi, Sadia Ambreen; Vincer, Louise; Mannocci, Francesco

    2016-08-01

    The opportunistic Propionibacterium acnes recovered frequently from failed endodontic treatments might be the result of nosocomial endodontic infections. The study was aimed to determine if gloves worn by dentists could be one of the sources of these nosocomial infections and to investigate the P. acnes phylotypes involved. The cultivable microbiota of gloves (n = 8) at 4 time points (T1, immediately after wearing gloves; T2, after access cavity preparation; T3, after taking a working length/master cone radiograph; and T4, before sealing the cavity) were identified using 16S ribosomal RNA gene sequencing. recA gene sequencing of P. acnes isolates was done. The phylogenetic relationship was determined using MEGA 6 (http://www.megasoftware.net/fixedbugs.html; Megasoftware, Tempe, AZ). Data distributions were compared using the Fisher exact test; means were compared using the Mann-Whitney U test in SPSSPC (version 21; IBM, Armonk, NY). The quantitative viable counts at T4 (aerobically [2.93 ± 0.57], anaerobically [3.35 ± 0.43]) were greater (P < .001) than at T1 [(aerobically [0.48 ± 0.73], anaerobically [0.66 ± 0.86]) and T2 (aerobically [1.80 ± 0.54], anaerobically [2.41 ± 0.71]). Eighty cultivable bacterial taxa (5 phyla) were identified. The most prevalent ones were P. acnes and Staphylococcus epidermidis (100%). recA gene sequencing (n = 88) revealed 2 phylogenetic lineages with type I split into type IA and type IB. Type II was prevalent on gloves. Contamination of the gloves was detected at the final stages of the treatment. P. acnes and S. epidermidis are the prevalent taxa on gloves and are opportunistic endodontic pathogens. Changing gloves frequently, after gaining access into the pulp space and also after taking the working length/master gutta-percha point radiographs, is likely to reduce the risk of root canal reinfection. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. A Naval Postgraduate Dental School Analysis Of Initial Endodontic Treatment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-30

    normal contours, width, and strncture of the periodontal margin of the endodontically treated tooth (Strindberg, 1956). In 1986, Orstavik et al created a...scoring system for the radiographic assessment of apical periodontitis , called the periapical index (PAI). In this system, Orstavik et al used an...impaction or periodontal disease (Friedman, 2003; Farzaneh, 2004; Marquis, 2006; De Chevigny, 2008). Ng et al conducted a prospective outcomes study on

  14. The endodontic diagnostic puzzle.

    PubMed

    Schweitzer, Jordan L

    2009-01-01

    Endodontic diagnosis is the cornerstone of endodontic treatment. Endodontic diagnosis can be likened to a puzzle, where the pieces must be gathered and pieced together before a clinician can see the complete picture. This article discusses how to collect the pieces and fit them together to see the pulpal and periapical diagnosis emerge.

  15. Contemporary endodontic surgery.

    PubMed

    Rubinstein, Richard; Torabinejad, Mahmoud

    2004-06-01

    During the past decade, endodontics has seen a dramatic shift in the application of periradicular surgery and the role it plays in endodontic treatment. With the introduction of enhanced magnification, periradicular ultrasonics and other associative technologies, teeth that might otherwise be extracted now have a chance for retention. This article describes the role of these advances in contemporary endodontic surgery.

  16. The Application of Microencapsulation Techniques in the Treatment of Endodontic and Periodontal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Álvarez, Asteria Luzardo; Espinar, Francisco Otero; Méndez, José Blanco

    2011-01-01

    In the treatment of intracanal and periodontal infections, the local application of antibiotics and other therapeutic agents in the root canal or in periodontal pockets may be a promising approach to achieve sustained drug release, high antimicrobial activity and low systemic side effects. Microparticles made from biodegradable polymers have been reported to be an effective means of delivering antibacterial drugs in endodontic and periodontal therapy. The aim of this review article is to assess recent therapeutic strategies in which biocompatible microparticles are used for effective management of periodontal and endodontic diseases. In vitro and in vivo studies that have investigated the biocompatibility or efficacy of certain microparticle formulations and devices are presented. Future directions in the application of microencapsulation techniques in endodontic and periodontal therapies are discussed. PMID:24310596

  17. Endodontic treatment of a double-rooted maxillary second molar with four canals: a case report.

    PubMed

    Ashraf, Hengameh; Dianat, Omid; Hajrezai, Reihaneh; Paymanpour, Payam; Azadnia, Sina

    2014-01-01

    A healthy female was referred to Endodontic Department. The referral letter from her dentist expressed that an emergency pulpotomy of tooth #27 had been carried out with probable perforation of the chamber floor which was due to the unusual anatomy of the chamber. Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) revealed that the tooth had two mesial and two distal canals. Perforation site was repaired and endodontic treatment was completed. At 24-month follow-up, patient was asymptomatic and clinical and radiographic examinations showed successful outcomes.

  18. Endodontic Treatment of a Double-Rooted Maxillary Second Molar with Four Canals: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Ashraf, Hengameh; Dianat, Omid; Hajrezai, Reihaneh; Paymanpour, Payam; Azadnia, Sina

    2014-01-01

    A healthy female was referred to Endodontic Department. The referral letter from her dentist expressed that an emergency pulpotomy of tooth #27 had been carried out with probable perforation of the chamber floor which was due to the unusual anatomy of the chamber. Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) revealed that the tooth had two mesial and two distal canals. Perforation site was repaired and endodontic treatment was completed. At 24-month follow-up, patient was asymptomatic and clinical and radiographic examinations showed successful outcomes. PMID:25386215

  19. Genetic Variants in Cyclooxygenase-2 Contribute to Post-treatment Pain among Endodontic Patients.

    PubMed

    Applebaum, Elizabeth; Nackley, Andrea G; Bair, Eric; Maixner, William; Khan, Asma A

    2015-08-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) have a well-established analgesic efficacy for inflammatory pain. These drugs exert their effect by inhibiting the enzyme cyclooxygenase (COX) and are commonly used for the management of pain after endodontic treatment. There are 2 distinct isoforms of COX: COX-1, which is constitutively expressed, and COX-2, which is primarily induced by inflammation. Previous studies have shown that functional human genetic variants of the COX-2 gene may explain individual variations in acute pain. The present study extends this work by examining the potential contribution of the 2 COX isoforms to pain after endodontic treatment. Ninety-four patients treated by endodontic residents at the University of North Carolina School of Dentistry were enrolled into a prospective cohort study. Data on potential predictors of post-treatment pain were collected, and all patients submitted saliva samples for genetic analysis. Nonsurgical root canal therapy was performed, and participants recorded pain levels for 5 days after. In this study, 63% of patients experienced at least mild pain after root canal therapy, and 24% experienced moderate to severe pain. The presence of pretreatment pain was correlated with higher post-treatment pain (P = .01). Elevated heart rate (P = .02) and higher diastolic blood pressure (P = .024) were also correlated with decreased post-treatment pain. Finally, we identified genetic variants in COX-2 (haplotype composed of rs2383515 G, rs5277 G, rs5275 T, and rs2206593 A) associated with post-treatment pain after endodontic treatment (P = .025). Understanding the genetic basis of pain after endodontic treatment will advance its prevention and management. Copyright © 2015 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Musical Auditory Stimulation Influences Heart Rate Autonomic Responses to Endodontic Treatment.

    PubMed

    Santana, Milana Drumond Ramos; Martiniano, Eli Carlos; Monteiro, Larissa Raylane Lucas; Valenti, Vitor E; Garner, David M; Sorpreso, Isabel Cristina Esposito; de Abreu, Luiz Carlos

    2017-01-01

    We aimed to evaluate the acute effect of musical auditory stimulation on heart rate autonomic regulation during endodontic treatment. The study included 50 subjects from either gender between 18 and 40 years old, diagnosed with irreversible pulpitis or pulp necrosis of the upper front teeth and endodontic treatment indication. HRV was recorded 10 minutes before (T1), during (T2), and immediately (T3 and T4) after endodontic treatment. The volunteers were randomly divided into two equal groups: exposed to music (during T2, T3, and T4) or not. We found no difference regarding salivary cortisol and anxiety score. In the group with musical stimulation heart rate decreased in T3 compared to T1 and mean RR interval increased in T2 and T3 compared to T1. SDNN and TINN indices decreased in T3 compared to T4, the RMSSD and SD1 increased in T4 compared to T1, the SD2 increased compared to T3, and LF (low frequency band) increased in T4 compared to T1 and T3. In the control group, only RMSSD and SD1 increased in T3 compared to T1. Musical auditory stimulation enhanced heart rate autonomic modulation during endodontic treatment.

  1. Regenerative Endodontic Treatment as a Retreatment Option for a Tooth with Open Apex - A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Miltiadous, Maria-Elpida A; Floratos, Spyros G

    2015-10-01

    Treatment of non-vital immature teeth with apical periodontitis has always been a challenge in Endodontics. Regenerative endodontic treatment (RET) has been successfully used for the management of these cases. The aim of this study is to present a case of RET used for the retreatment of a previously endodontically treated permanent tooth with an open apex. A 14-year-old boy with a poor endodontic treatment done on his maxillary right central incisor developed symptomatic apical periodontitis. Radiographically, incomplete root development with thin dentinal walls and an open apex were evident. After accessing and removing previous filling materials, the canal was copiously irrigated with 2.5% sodium hypochlorite. A triple antibiotic paste was placed inside the canal and left for 15 days. After removal of the antibiotic mixture, bleeding was induced into the canal by passing a hand file out of the apex. A collagen membrane barrier was placed over the blood clot, followed by sealing with mineral trioxide aggregate. Access was sealed with permanent filling materials. Clinical examination at 12, 24 and 36 months revealed no symptoms. Radiographic examination showed resolution of the periapical lesion and apical closure. Sensitivity tests with cold and an electric pulp test elicited a negative response at all recall periods. On the basis of long-term results, RET may be an effective option for the retreatment of an immature permanent tooth with a failed previous treatment and periapical periodontitis.

  2. Musical Auditory Stimulation Influences Heart Rate Autonomic Responses to Endodontic Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Martiniano, Eli Carlos; Monteiro, Larissa Raylane Lucas; Valenti, Vitor E.; Sorpreso, Isabel Cristina Esposito; de Abreu, Luiz Carlos

    2017-01-01

    We aimed to evaluate the acute effect of musical auditory stimulation on heart rate autonomic regulation during endodontic treatment. The study included 50 subjects from either gender between 18 and 40 years old, diagnosed with irreversible pulpitis or pulp necrosis of the upper front teeth and endodontic treatment indication. HRV was recorded 10 minutes before (T1), during (T2), and immediately (T3 and T4) after endodontic treatment. The volunteers were randomly divided into two equal groups: exposed to music (during T2, T3, and T4) or not. We found no difference regarding salivary cortisol and anxiety score. In the group with musical stimulation heart rate decreased in T3 compared to T1 and mean RR interval increased in T2 and T3 compared to T1. SDNN and TINN indices decreased in T3 compared to T4, the RMSSD and SD1 increased in T4 compared to T1, the SD2 increased compared to T3, and LF (low frequency band) increased in T4 compared to T1 and T3. In the control group, only RMSSD and SD1 increased in T3 compared to T1. Musical auditory stimulation enhanced heart rate autonomic modulation during endodontic treatment. PMID:28182118

  3. A Survey of Standard Protocols for Endodontic Treatment in North of KSA

    PubMed Central

    Iqbal, Azhar; Qureshi, Beenish; Sghaireen, Mohd G.; AL-Omiri, Mahmoud K.

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to collect information regarding methods, materials, and attitudes employed during the endodontic treatment by dentists in north of Saudi Arabia. A questionnaire was designed and distributed among 300 dentists in north of Saudi Arabia to collect the data about the standard protocols of endodontic treatment. The collected data was analyzed by using the SPSS 10 computer software. Out of a total of 300 surveyed dentists, the 66% response rate showed that this study was true representation of the endodontic treatment performed by the dentists in north of Saudi Arabia. 152 (76%) were general dentists and 48 (24%) were endodontists. 18 (9%) were using rubber dam as the method of isolation during endodontic treatment. 173 (86.5%) were using only measurement radiographs for working length determination and 27 (13.5%) were using both electronic apex locator and measurement radiographs. 95 (47.5%) of the respondents were using standardized technique and 25 (12.5%) were using step-down as a root canal preparation technique. 127 (63.5%) of the respondents were using lateral condensation technique, with gutta percha points for root canal obturation. PMID:24944823

  4. [Endodontic re-treatment or apical surgery, is an evidence-based choice possible?].

    PubMed

    de Lange, J

    2016-02-01

    Treatment of a recurrence after an initial endodontic treatment can consist of endodontic re-treatment or apical surgery. The literature reports comparable success rates for these two options. However, randomised controlled trials that are truly comparable to each other are unavailable as a result of which comparison and an informed choice are not really possible. In addition to the treatment outcome, consideration also has to be given to cost-effectiveness and other patient-related factors, such as pain, swelling and medication. Regarding these considerations, too, little reliable information can be found in the literature. Moreover, factors relating to insurance play an important role in the Netherlands, where only apical surgery is covered by the basic healthcare insurance. In conclusion, all of these factors should be carefully considered before proceeding to an individual treatment strategy.

  5. Periapical healing outcome following single visit endodontic treatment in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Nayak, Moksha; Babshet, Medha

    2016-01-01

    Background The prevalence of apical periodontitis in diabetes mellitus patients is high. The altered immunity in diabetes affects the healing process of periapical tissue. Single visit endodontic treatment has shown to increase the periapical healing rate with better patient compliance. Hence the present study aims at evaluating the clinical and radiographic healing outcome of single visit endodontic treatment, in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients with periapical disease. Material and Methods Eighty patients with periapical disease were divided into 2 groups of 40 each: Group I, Control subjects and Group II, Type 2 diabetics. Glycosylated hemoglobin levels were assessed preoperatively and at follow up intervals in diabetics. Pre-operative assessment of periapical status was done using CPDR (Clinical periapical diagnosis of root), QLDR (Qualitative radiographic diagnosis of tooth) and QTDR (Quantitative radiographic diagnosis of tooth) criteria. Postoperative healing was evaluated following single-visit endodontic treatment by Strindberg criteria. Results Group 2 subjects had chronic and exacerbating lesions with significantly larger lesions (p=0.029). 100 % clinical healing outcome in diabetic group was seen in two months. Group 2 showed 85% success in one year on radiographic evaluation. Poor controlled diabetics showed failure compared to fair and good controlled. Conclusions Type 2 diabetics had chronic and larger sized lesions when compared to control subjects. The periapical lesions in patients with poor diabetic control showed failure. The clinical and radiographic healing outcome of single visit endodontic therapy was delayed in diabetic patients. Key words:Apical periodontitis, diabetes mellitus type 2, endodontics, periapical lesion, strindberg criteria. PMID:27957260

  6. Effects of endodontic treatment on apparent Young's modulus of human teeth: in vitro study using speckle interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-Peña, Rolando J.; Salvador, Rosario; Cibrián, Rosa M.; Martinez-Celorio, René A.; López, Francisco J.; Sala, Faustino; Paredes, Vanessa

    2012-04-01

    The introduction of new techniques for endodontic procedures requires the analysis of the biomechanical behavior of dental structures. Digital speckle shearing pattern interferometry (DSSPI) is a nondestructive optical measuring technique that allows one to directly quantify deformations in teeth that are subjected to stress. DSSPI technique was applied to measure small deformations caused by flexion in different types of teeth. The test was carried out both before and after endodontic treatment with the ProTaper method in order to evaluate the variation of dental elasticity, taking into the account the type of tooth and the endodontic treatment. The results obtained show that dental elasticity, established by means of the apparent Young's modulus, before and after the endodontic treatment, differs between incisors and premolars. The endodontic process does not affect dental elasticity (p>0.7). Specifically, 57.1% of central incisors and 56.3% of second premolars slightly increase their elasticity after the endodontic process. In turn, 42.9% of central incisors and 43.7% of second premolars slightly decrease elasticity. The endodontic treatment especially affects the ``neutral fibre'' therefore, there is little influence on elasticity by flexion. However, after finishing the process, the channel was restored with material, which can slightly increase tooth elasticity in some cases.

  7. Pregabalin in the treatment of inferior alveolar nerve paraesthesia following overfilling of endodontic sealer.

    PubMed

    Alonso-Ezpeleta, Oscar; Martín, Pablo J; López-López, José; Castellanos-Cosano, Lizett; Martín-González, Jenifer; Segura-Egea, Juan J

    2014-04-01

    A case of orofacial pain and inferior alveolar nerve (IAN) paraesthesia after extrusion of endodontic sealer within the mandibular canal treated with prednisone and pregabalin is described. A 36-year-old woman underwent root canal treatment of the mandibular second right premolar tooth. Post-operative panoramic radiograph revealed the presence of radiopaque canal sealer in the mandibular canal. Damage to IAN consecutive to extrusion of endodontic sealer was diagnosed. Non-surgical management was decided, including: 1 mg/kg/day prednisone 2 times/day, once-daily regimen, and 150 mg/day pregabalin, two doses per day, monitoring the progress with periodic follow-up visits. Six weeks after the incident the signs and symptoms were gone. The complete resolution of paraesthesia and the control of pain achieved suggest that a non-surgical approach, combining prednisone and the GABA analogue pregabalin, is a good option in the management of the IAN damage subsequent to endodontic sealer extrusion. Key words:Endodontics, inferior alveolar nerve, neuropathic pain, orofacial pain, paraesthesia, pregabalin.

  8. Temperature increases on the external root surface during endodontic treatment using single file systems.

    PubMed

    Özkocak, I; Taşkan, M M; Gökt Rk, H; Aytac, F; Karaarslan, E Şirin

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate increases in temperature on the external root surface during endodontic treatment with different rotary systems. Fifty human mandibular incisors with a single root canal were selected. All root canals were instrumented using a size 20 Hedstrom file, and the canals were irrigated with 5% sodium hypochlorite solution. The samples were randomly divided into the following three groups of 15 teeth: Group 1: The OneShape Endodontic File no.: 25; Group 2: The Reciproc Endodontic File no.: 25; Group 3: The WaveOne Endodontic File no.: 25. During the preparation, the temperature changes were measured in the middle third of the roots using a noncontact infrared thermometer. The temperature data were transferred from the thermometer to the computer and were observed graphically. Statistical analysis was performed using the Kruskal-Wallis analysis of variance at a significance level of 0.05. The increases in temperature caused by the OneShape file system were lower than those of the other files (P < 0.05). The WaveOne file showed the highest temperature increases. However, there were no significant differences between the Reciproc and WaveOne files. The single file rotary systems used in this study may be recommended for clinical use.

  9. Pregabalin in the treatment of inferior alveolar nerve paraesthesia following overfilling of endodontic sealer

    PubMed Central

    Alonso-Ezpeleta, Oscar; Martín, Pablo J.; López-López, José; Castellanos-Cosano, Lizett; Martín-González, Jenifer; Segura-Egea, Juan J.

    2014-01-01

    A case of orofacial pain and inferior alveolar nerve (IAN) paraesthesia after extrusion of endodontic sealer within the mandibular canal treated with prednisone and pregabalin is described. A 36-year-old woman underwent root canal treatment of the mandibular second right premolar tooth. Post-operative panoramic radiograph revealed the presence of radiopaque canal sealer in the mandibular canal. Damage to IAN consecutive to extrusion of endodontic sealer was diagnosed. Non-surgical management was decided, including: 1 mg/kg/day prednisone 2 times/day, once-daily regimen, and 150 mg/day pregabalin, two doses per day, monitoring the progress with periodic follow-up visits. Six weeks after the incident the signs and symptoms were gone. The complete resolution of paraesthesia and the control of pain achieved suggest that a non-surgical approach, combining prednisone and the GABA analogue pregabalin, is a good option in the management of the IAN damage subsequent to endodontic sealer extrusion. Key words:Endodontics, inferior alveolar nerve, neuropathic pain, orofacial pain, paraesthesia, pregabalin. PMID:24790724

  10. Regenerative Endodontic Treatment: Report of Two Cases with Different Clinical Management and Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Khoshkhounejad, Mehrfam; Shokouhinejad, Noushin

    2015-01-01

    Endodontic intervention in necrotic immature permanent teeth is usually a clinical challenge. With appropriate case selection, regenerative treatment can be effective, providing a desirable outcome. However, there is still no consensus on the optimal disinfection protocol or the method to achieve predictable clinical outcome. This article presents two cases of regenerative treatment in necrotic immature teeth, using mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) and BiodentineTM as coronal barriers and different irrigants, which led to different clinical outcomes. PMID:26884781

  11. Regenerative Endodontic Treatment: Report of Two Cases with Different Clinical Management and Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Khoshkhounejad, Mehrfam; Shokouhinejad, Noushin; Pirmoazen, Salma

    2015-06-01

    Endodontic intervention in necrotic immature permanent teeth is usually a clinical challenge. With appropriate case selection, regenerative treatment can be effective, providing a desirable outcome. However, there is still no consensus on the optimal disinfection protocol or the method to achieve predictable clinical outcome. This article presents two cases of regenerative treatment in necrotic immature teeth, using mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) and Biodentine(TM) as coronal barriers and different irrigants, which led to different clinical outcomes.

  12. The influence of previous non-surgical re-treatment on the outcome of endodontic surgery.

    PubMed

    Taschieri, S; Machtou, P; Rosano, G; Weinstein, T; Del Fabbro, M

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate retrospectively if the outcome of periradicular surgery at four year follow-up can be affected by a previous orthograde re-treatment. Eighty-one patients with 118 endodontically treated teeth who underwent surgical retreatment were divided in three groups. In group OA endodontic re-treatment was feasible and was attempted but, owing to the persistence of clinical symptoms and radiographic lesion, apical surgery was performed 4.8 ± 3.5 months later. In group OF endodontic re-treatment was feasible but was not performed, with subsequent apical surgery. In group ONF endodontic re-treatment was unfeasible, and apical surgery was performed. The treatment outcome was assessed four years postsurgery according to clinical and radiographic criteria. Seventy-six patients (112 teeth) could be evaluated at four years. In the ONF group five anterior maxillary teeth, belonging to three female patients, failed to heal. Three failures in three patients occurred in the OF group. No failure was recorded in the OA group. Three teeth in three patients were classified as uncertain healing in each group. The outcome of group OA resulted significantly better than the other treatment groups for both tooth-based and patient-based analysis. No significant effect was found as related to jaw, tooth type, presence of a post. A significant relation was found with gender (P=0.04). A negative correlation was found between outcome and age (Pearson's coefficient=-0.09), suggesting that the probability of failure increases with age. Orthograde re-treatment prior to apical surgery could be considered a valid alternative to tooth extraction and not an over-treatment.

  13. Combined endodontic therapy and surgery in the treatment of dens invaginatus Type 3: case report.

    PubMed

    da Silva Neto, Ulisses Xavier; Hirai, Vinício Hidemitsu Goto; Papalexiou, Vula; Gonçalves, Silvana Beltrami; Westphalen, Vânia Portela Ditzel; Bramante, Clovis Monteiro; Martins, Wilson Denis

    2005-12-01

    An accurate understanding of the morphology of the root canal system is a prerequisite for successful root canal treatment. Invaginated teeth have a complex root canal configuration that cannot be instrumented effectively and should be treated by both endodontic therapy and surgery. A case of dens invaginatus Type 3 in a maxillary lateral incisor with a periapical lesion and its successful treatment by these combined methods is reported.

  14. Regenerative endodontic treatment of an immature permanent canine following infant oral mutilation.

    PubMed

    Noy, Avia Fux; Nuni, Eyal; Moskovitz, Moti

    2013-01-01

    Extracting primary canine tooth buds is a ritual ceremony that prevails in some African countries. This procedure is considered infant oral mutilation (IOM) and may damage the permanent successor and adjacent primary and permanent teeth, resulting in dysplastic or deformed teeth. The purpose of this report was to describe regenerative endodontic treatment of a permanent mandibular canine with extensive coronal hypoplasia, immature root, and a periapical radiolucency following damage to the permanent canine that was probably a result of infant oral mutilation. Regenerative endodontic treatment was initiated by irrigating the root canal, followed by applying triple antibiotic paste dressing over three weeks and creating a blood clot scaffold covered with mineral trioxide aggregate. A 4-year clinical and radiographic follow-up demonstrated healing of the periapical radiolucency. This treatment may serve as a substitute for traditional apexification with calcium hydroxide or creation of an artificial apical barrier with mineral trioxide aggregate.

  15. Endodontic Treatment of a Maxillary Lateral Incisor with Two Roots; A Case Report with 6 Months Follow-Up

    PubMed Central

    Hoseini, Atefeh; Abbaszadegan, Abbas

    2014-01-01

    Maxillary lateral incisors are widely known to be single rooted with one root canal. Although rare cases with root canal variations are being reported in many populations, the reports regarding Iranian population is extremely limited. In this report, we are presenting the endodontic treatment of a double rooted maxillary lateral incisor. These rare root-canal variations should be considered in pretreatment evaluations by clinicians who perform endodontic treatments. PMID:25469361

  16. Penetrability of AH plus and MTA fillapex after endodontic treatment and retreatment: a confocal laser scanning microscopy study.

    PubMed

    Kok, Daniela; Rosa, Ricardo Abreu da; Barreto, Mirela Sangoi; Busanello, Fernanda Hoffmann; Santini, Manuela Favarin; Pereira, Jefferson Ricardo; Só, Marcus Vinícius Reis

    2014-06-01

    The aim of the study was to assess the penetrability of two endodontic sealers (AH Plus and MTA Fillapex) into dentinal tubules, submitted to endodontic treatment and subsequently to endodontic retreatment. Thirty ex vivo incisors were prepared using ProTaper rotary system up to F3 instrument and divided in three groups according to the endodontic sealer used for root canal filling: AH Plus (AHP), MTA Fillapex (MTAF), and control group (CG) without using EDTA previously to the root canal filling. Rhodamine B dye (red) was incorporated to the sealers in order to provide the fluorescence which will enable confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) assessment. All specimens were filled with gutta-percha cones using the lateral compaction technique. The specimens were submitted to endodontic retreatment using ProTaper Retreatment system, re-prepared up to F5 instruments and filled with gutta-percha cones and the same sealer used during endodontic retreatment. Fluorescein dye (green) was incorporated to the sealer in order to distinguish from the first filling. The roots were sectioned 2 mm from the apex and assessed by CLSM. No difference was found between the two experimental groups (P > 0.05). On the other hand, in the control group the sealers were not capable to penetrate into dentinal tubules after endodontic treatment (P > 0.05). In retreatment cases, none of the sealers were able to penetrate into dentin tubules. It can be concluded that sealer penetrability is high during endodontic treatment. However, MTA Fillapex and AH Plus do not penetrate into dentinal tubules after endodontic retreatment. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Patients’ Perceptions of Endodontic Treatment as Part of Public Health Services: A Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Melgaço-Costa, José Leonardo Barbosa; Martins, Renata Castro; Ferreira, Efigênia Ferreira; Sobrinho, Antônio Paulino Ribeiro

    2016-01-01

    Evaluations by patients constitute an important part of the process of improving health services. This study examined patients’ perceptions of secondary dental care in three cities in Minas Gerais, Brazil based on the endodontic treatment received. Data were collected using semi-structured interviews (addressing access, treatment and results) and a field diary (direct observations and report of professionals). The interviews were audiotaped, fully transcribed, and analyzed using content analysis. Two principal themes were identified: access to service and quality of service. The difficulties in accessing service were associated with the insufficient number of professionals to meet the high demand for endodontic treatment, problems in referring from primary to secondary care and geographic barriers. Service quality was related to the presence/absence of pain and anxiety that patients experienced, the time and number of sessions required to complete treatment, how patients were treated by dentists, and whether those patients would recommend the service to other patients. Access to endodontic treatment was a problem emphasized by users, and satisfaction with the quality of the service was more related to how patients were treated than to the technical competence of the dentist. PMID:27128932

  18. ENDODONTIC TREATMENT OF UNUSUALLY LONG DISCOLORED MAXILLARY CENTRAL INCISOR: A CASE REPORT

    PubMed Central

    Abiodun-Solanke, I.M.F.; Ajayi, D.M.; Abu, A.O.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Success in root canal treatment is achieved after thorough biomechanical preparation followed by complete obturation of the canal system together with prompt and adequate restoration. Therefore, the endodontic therapy requires specific and complete knowledge of the internal and external anatomy, and its variation in presentation. Such treatment may be performed in root canal systems that do not comply with normal anatomic features described in standard textbooks. This article presents a case of endodontic treatment in an unusually long discolored maxillary central incisor. Case Presentation: A 31 year-old male patient was referred to conservation clinic for endodontic treatment of discolored left maxillary central incisor with associated history of recurrent swelling. Root canal therapy was performed and patient was found to have an unusually long working length of 29mm. This was then followed by enucleation of apical cyst without apical resection. Conclusion: Though the patient presents a maxillary central incisor with canal length in the upper limit of some reported cases, it is unusual in our environment. PMID:25161420

  19. Periapical and endodontic status scale based on periapical bone lesions and endodontic treatment quality evaluation using cone-beam computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Venskutonis, Tadas; Plotino, Gianluca; Tocci, Luigi; Gambarini, Gianluca; Maminskas, Julius; Juodzbalys, Gintaras

    2015-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to present a new periapical and endodontic status scale (PESS) that is based on the complex periapical index (COPI), which was designed for the identification and classification of periapical bone lesions in cases of apical periodontitis, and the endodontically treated tooth index, which was designed for endodontic treatment quality evaluation by means of cone-beam computed tomographic (CBCT) analysis. Periapical and endodontic status parameters were selected from the already known indexes and scientific literature for radiologic evaluation. Radiographic images (CBCT imaging, digital orthopantomography [DOR], and digital periapical radiography) from 55 patients were analyzed. All parameters were evaluated on CBCT, DOR, and digital periapical radiographic images by 2 external observers. The statistical analysis was performed with software SPSS version 19.0 (SPSS Inc, Chicago, IL). Chi-square tests were used to compare frequencies of qualitative variables. The level of significance was set at P ≤ .05. Overall intraobserver and interobserver agreements were very good and good, respectively. CBCT analysis found more lesions and lesions of bigger dimension (P < .001). CBCT imaging was also superior in locating lesions in the apical part on the side compared with DOR and in the diagnosis of cortical bone destruction compared with both methods (P < .001). Through CBCT analysis, more root canals and more canals associated with lesions were found. The most informative and reproducible periapical and endodontic status parameters were selected, and a new PESS was proposed. The classification proposed in the present study seems to be reproducible and objective and adds helpful information with respect to the existing indexes. Future studies need to be conducted to validate PESS. Copyright © 2015 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Microscope-aided endodontic treatment of maxillary first premolars with three roots: a case series.

    PubMed

    Karumaran, C S; Gunaseelan, R; Krithikadatta, J

    2011-01-01

    Maxillary premolars have a highly variable root canal morphology. However, the presence of three roots is a rare occurrence. This clinical article describes the unusual anatomy detected in maxillary premolars during routine endodontic treatment using microscope. The diagnosis and clinical management of maxillary first premolars with three roots and canals using radiographic interpretation, access cavity modification and visual enhancement with operative microscopes is discussed in the article.

  1. Validity of self-reported history of endodontic treatment in the Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging

    PubMed Central

    Gomes, Maximiliano Schünke; Hugo, Fernando Neves; Hilgert, Juliana Balbinot; Padilha, Dalva Maria Pereira; Simonsick, Eleanor Marie; Ferrucci, Luigi; Reynolds, Mark Allan

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Self-reported history of endodontic treatment (SRHET) has been used as a simplified method to estimate history of endodontic disease and treatment. This study aimed to quantify the validity of SRHET, as reported in the Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging (BLSA), as a method to: 1- identify individuals who experienced endodontic treatment (ET); and 2- identify individuals who present with apical periodontitis (AP). Methods SRHET was collected through the BLSA questionnaire in 247 participants. Data on ET and AP were determined from panoramic radiographs. The total number of ET, AP and missing teeth were recorded for each individual. Validity of SRHET was determined based on ET and AP, separately. Accuracy, efficiency, sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values (+PV, −PV) and positive and negative likelihood ratios (+LR, −LR) were calculated according to standard methods. Results After exclusions, 229 participants were available for ET analysis and 129 for AP analysis. The SRHET validity values were: sensitivity (ET=0.915; AP=0.782), specificity (ET=0.891; AP=0.689), +PV (ET=0.824; AP=0.353), −PV (ET=0.949; AP=0.936), +LR (ET=8.394; AP=2.514) and −LR (ET=0.095; AP=0.316). Conclusions SRHET was found to be a highly accurate method to predict ET but a weak predictor of the presence of AP among participants in the BLSA. PMID:22515884

  2. Evaluation of dental students’ perception and self-confidence levels regarding endodontic treatment

    PubMed Central

    Tanalp, Jale; Güven, Esra Pamukçu; Oktay, Inci

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to obtain information about senior dental students’ perceptions and self-confidence levels regarding endodontic practice. Materials and Methods: Anonymous survey forms were handed out to senior students at Yeditepe University, Faculty of Dentistry. The students were asked to score their level of confidence using a 5-point scale and comment about future practices. Results: The response rate of the survey was 88%. 11.9% expressed endodontics as the first branch in terms of difficulty. The majority (90.5%) indicated they would perform root canal treatments within their expertise limit in the future but refer difficult cases to an endodontist. Bleaching of endodontically treated teeth, managing flare-ups, placement of a rubber dam were procedures in which students reported the lowest confidence (2.55 ± 1.17, 3.24 ± 0.96, 3.24 ± 1.19, respectively). On the other hand, students felt the lowest confidence in the treatment of maxillary molars followed by mandibular molars (3.43 ± 1.02 and 3.93 ± 0.97, respectively). Students also reported the lowest confidence in root resorptions, endo-perio lesions, traumas, retreatments and apexifications (2.93 ± 1.16, 3.07 ± 0.89, 3.24 ± 0.85, 3.33 ± 1.7 and 3.36 ± 1.1, respectively). Conclusions: The results showing students’ lower confidence in more challenging aspects of dentistry may be related with the attitude of dental schools to refer these cases to post graduate students and instilling information about these cases on a theoretical basis only. Though there seems to be a tendency for students to refer challenging cases to a specialist in future, authorities should give priority to enhance the way information and experience is conveyed regarding various aspects of endodontic treatment. PMID:24883030

  3. Preference and usage of intracanal medications during endodontic treatment.

    PubMed

    Madarati, Ahmad A; Zafar, Muhammad S; Sammani, Aya M N; Mandorah, Ayman O; Bani-Younes, Hamzah A

    2017-07-01

    To investigate the preferences of general dental practitioners (GDPs) and endodontists in using endodontic intra-canal medications (ICMs). This observational and descriptive study was conducted in 2014 in the western province of Saudi Arabia. Following ethical clearance and 2 pilot studies, a web-based questionnaire was electronically sent to 375 randomly and systematically selected GDPs and all endodontists in the western province (n=49). An accompanying e-mail explained the study's aims and confirmed that the data yielded would remain confidential. The responses were collected, and the data was analyzed using the Chi-square test at p=0.05. Significantly, the highest proportion of respondents (53.7%) reported disinfection of the root canals as the main function of ICMs. Calcium hydroxide (CH) was the preferred material of the majority of those who used the same ICM in all cases (85.7%). While the vast majority of all endodontists (87.5%) used CH after pulp extirpation, 48.5% of GDPs used formocresol (p less than 0.001). Almost 30% of those who used ICMs after pulp extirpation did not do so after cleaning and shaping of vital cases. Most endodontists used CH (62.5%) and antibiotics (37.5%) in necrotic pulp cases without apical lesions, which were significantly greater than those of GDPs who did the same (43.8% and 17.2%). Participants were aware that the main function of ICMs is disinfection of the root canal system. However, it is clear that GDPs should reduce their reliance on phenol- and formaldehyde-based medications. There was a distinct trend toward the use of ICMs, especially CH, in necrotic pulp cases.

  4. Preference and usage of intracanal medications during endodontic treatment

    PubMed Central

    Madarati, Ahmad A.; Zafar, Muhammad S.; Sammani, Aya M.N.; Mandorah, Ayman O.; Bani-Younes, Hamzah A.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate the preferences of general dental practitioners (GDPs) and endodontists in using endodontic intra-canal medications (ICMs). Methods: This observational and descriptive study was conducted in 2014 in the western province of Saudi Arabia. Following ethical clearance and 2 pilot studies, a web-based questionnaire was electronically sent to 375 randomly and systematically selected GDPs and all endodontists in the western province (n=49). An accompanying e-mail explained the study’s aims and confirmed that the data yielded would remain confidential. The responses were collected, and the data was analyzed using the Chi-square test at p=0.05. Results: Significantly, the highest proportion of respondents (53.7%) reported disinfection of the root canals as the main function of ICMs. Calcium hydroxide (CH) was the preferred material of the majority of those who used the same ICM in all cases (85.7%). While the vast majority of all endodontists (87.5%) used CH after pulp extirpation, 48.5% of GDPs used formocresol (p<0.001). Almost 30% of those who used ICMs after pulp extirpation did not do so after cleaning and shaping of vital cases. Most endodontists used CH (62.5%) and antibiotics (37.5%) in necrotic pulp cases without apical lesions, which were significantly greater than those of GDPs who did the same (43.8% and 17.2%). Conclusions: Participants were aware that the main function of ICMs is disinfection of the root canal system. However, it is clear that GDPs should reduce their reliance on phenol- and formaldehyde-based medications. There was a distinct trend toward the use of ICMs, especially CH, in necrotic pulp cases. PMID:28674723

  5. Regenerative endodontics.

    PubMed

    Simon, S; Smith, A J

    2014-03-01

    Significant advances in our understanding of the biological processes involved in tooth development and repair at the cellular and molecular levels have underpinned the newly emerging area of regenerative endodontics. Development of treatment protocols based on exploiting the natural wound healing properties of the dental pulp and applying tissue engineering principles has allowed reporting of case series showing preservation of tissue vitality and apexogenesis. To review current case series reporting regenerative endodontics. Current treatment approaches tend to stimulate more reparative than regenerative responses in respect of the new tissue generated, which often does not closely resemble the physiological structure of dentine-pulp. However, despite these biological limitations, such techniques appear to offer significant promise for improved treatment outcomes. Improved biological outcomes will likely emerge from the many experimental studies being reported and will further contribute to improvements in clinical treatment protocols.

  6. Surgical treatment of cementoblastoma associated with apicoectomy and endodontic therapy: Case report

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Bernardo Cesar; de Oliveira, Guilherme José Pimentel Lopes; Chaves, Maria das Graças Afonso Miranda; da Costa, Renan Roberto; Gabrielli, Mário Francisco Real; Guerreiro-Tanomaru, Juliane Maria; Tanomaru-Filho, Mário

    2016-01-01

    This case report describes the surgical removal of cementoblastoma associated with apicoectomy and endodontic therapy. The patient, an 18-year-old man, presented pain in the region of the mandibular body on the right side. On clinical exam, bone expansion was observed in the region at the bottom of the vestibular sulcus, pain on palpation, slight extrusion of tooth 46 with presence of pulp vitality. Radiographic exams demonstrated the presence of a radiopaque area and discrete radiolucent halo associated with the root of tooth 46, suggesting the diagnosis of cementoblastoma. Endodontic treatment of tooth 46 was performed and exeresis of the lesion by apicoectomy. Twelve months after the first surgery, recurrence of the lesion was observed, and a new apicoectomy was necessary, this time up to the middle third of the root. Clinical radiographic control 12 mo after the second surgical intervention demonstrated absence of signs and symptoms, radiographic repair, with tooth 46 shown to be fully functional. PMID:27672646

  7. Surgical treatment of cementoblastoma associated with apicoectomy and endodontic therapy: Case report.

    PubMed

    Costa, Bernardo Cesar; de Oliveira, Guilherme José Pimentel Lopes; Chaves, Maria das Graças Afonso Miranda; da Costa, Renan Roberto; Gabrielli, Mário Francisco Real; Guerreiro-Tanomaru, Juliane Maria; Tanomaru-Filho, Mário

    2016-09-16

    This case report describes the surgical removal of cementoblastoma associated with apicoectomy and endodontic therapy. The patient, an 18-year-old man, presented pain in the region of the mandibular body on the right side. On clinical exam, bone expansion was observed in the region at the bottom of the vestibular sulcus, pain on palpation, slight extrusion of tooth 46 with presence of pulp vitality. Radiographic exams demonstrated the presence of a radiopaque area and discrete radiolucent halo associated with the root of tooth 46, suggesting the diagnosis of cementoblastoma. Endodontic treatment of tooth 46 was performed and exeresis of the lesion by apicoectomy. Twelve months after the first surgery, recurrence of the lesion was observed, and a new apicoectomy was necessary, this time up to the middle third of the root. Clinical radiographic control 12 mo after the second surgical intervention demonstrated absence of signs and symptoms, radiographic repair, with tooth 46 shown to be fully functional.

  8. Outcome of Endodontic Treatments Made by Postgraduate Students in the Dental Clinic of Bretonneau Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Touboul, Virginie; Germa, Alice; Lasfargues, Jean-Jacques; Bonte, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Objective. The objective of this retrospective study is double: (1) to assess the 1–4 years of outcome of endodontic treatment performed by postgraduate students in endodontics in the Dental Clinic of Bretonneau Hospital and (2) to examine outcome predictors. Method. 363 teeth in 296 patients were treated between 2007 and 2011. 183 patients (224 teeth) were lost during the followup. 113 patients were included in the study (recall: 38%), corresponding to 139 teeth of which 8 were extracted. 131 remaining teeth (36%) were examined clinically and radiographically. Apical periodontitis (AP) was absent (PAI = 1) or present (PAI ≥ 2). Outcome was classified as “healed,” “healing,” or “diseased”. Results. The success rate was 92%. No failure was observed among the 23 initial endodontic treatments. Among the 108 retreated teeth, 80% were “healed” and 11% were “healing.” An association was found between success rate and preoperative signs or symptoms (absent 95% versus present 83%), preoperative root filling density (inadequate 93% versus adequate 57%), but not between preoperative AP status and success. Conclusion. Outcomes in this retrospective study were similar to those previously reported. However, a larger sample size is needed to assess outcome predictors more precisely. PMID:24778652

  9. Influence of endodontic treatment, post insertion, and ceramic restoration on the fracture resistance of maxillary premolars.

    PubMed

    Bitter, K; Meyer-Lueckel, H; Fotiadis, N; Blunck, U; Neumann, K; Kielbassa, A M; Paris, S

    2010-06-01

    To investigate the effects of endodontic treatment, post placement and ceramic restoration type on the fracture resistance of premolars. One hundred and twenty teeth maxillary premolars were allocated to four groups (A-D; n = 30). In group A, mesio-occlusal-distal-inlays with a buccal and palatal wall of 2 mm (MOD), in group B partial onlays with palatal cusp coverage and in group C total onlays with buccal and palatal cusp coverage were prepared. Group D served as untreated controls. Groups A-C were divided into three subgroups (n = 10): (i) teeth received solely the described preparations, (ii) teeth were root filled, (iii) teeth were root filled and quartz fibre posts were placed. Teeth were restored using Computer-assisted design/computer-assisted machining-ceramic-restorations and subjected to thermo-mechanical-loading; subsequently, the buccal cusp was loaded until fracture. Group D revealed significantly higher fracture resistance [mean (standard deviation)] [738 (272) N] compared to all other groups (P < 0.05; post hoc test Dunnett). For groups A-C, fracture resistance was significantly affected by the restoration type (P = 0.043) and endodontic treatment/post placement (P = 0.039; 2-way anova). Group A [380 (146) N] showed significantly lower fracture resistance compared to group B [470 (158) N] (P = 0.048; post hoc test Tukey). Compared to non-endodontically treated teeth [487 (120) N], root filled teeth revealed significantly lower fracture resistance [389 (171) N] (P = 0.031). The restoration of cavities with a remaining wall thickness of 2 mm using ceramic MOD-inlays is inferior with respect to the fracture resistance compared to partial onlay restorations. Root filled teeth without post placement show lower fracture resistance compared to non-endodontically treated teeth.

  10. COMPARISON OF RADIOGRAPHIC MEASUREMENTS OBTAINED WITH CONVENTIONAL AND INDIRECT DIGITAL IMAGING DURING ENDODONTIC TREATMENT

    PubMed Central

    Schmitd, Ligia Buloto; Lima, Tatiana de Castro; Chinellato, Luiz Eduardo Montenegro; Bramante, Clóvis Monteiro; Garcia, Roberto Brandão; de Moraes, Ivaldo Gomes; Bernardineli, Norberti

    2008-01-01

    The aims of this study were to evaluate the quality of indirect digitized radiographic images taken during endodontic procedures and to compare the measurements recorded with this technique to those obtained from conventional radiographs. Two-hundred conventional periapical radiographs taken at the undergraduate Endodontics Clinic of the Dental School of Bauru were digitized. The conventional and indirect digitized images were compared by three examiners as to the quality and accuracy of the measurements recorded during endodontic treatment, in canal length determination, gutta-percha adaptation, lateral condensation and final obturation. The conventional radiographs were observed on a film viewer, surrounded by a dark card, and measured with magnifying glass and a millimeter ruler; the indirect digitized images were evaluated on the Digora® for Windows software, with free utilization of the bright/contrast tool. Unlike the conventional radiographic images, all indirect digitized images were considered as having a high quality. The distance between the filling material and the root apex was 0.117 mm larger, on average, for the Digora® system (p<0.01). The measurements achieved by the investigated radiographic methods were clinically similar and they are thus equivalent. Changes in brightness and contrast of the images using Digora® software improved the diagnosis. PMID:19089211

  11. Effects of alpha-tocopherol on fracture resistance after endodontic treatment, bleaching and restoration.

    PubMed

    Jordão-Basso, Keren Cristina Fagundes; Kuga, Milton Carlos; Dantas, Andrea Abi Rached; Tonetto, Mateus Rodrigues; Lima, Suellen Nogueira Linhares; Bandéca, Matheus Coêlho

    2016-05-20

    This study evaluated the effects of 10% alphatocopherol on the fracture resistance of endodontically treated teeth subjected to tooth bleaching with hydrogen peroxide and immediately restored with composite resin. Fifty bovine incisors were selected, including 10 sound teeth that constituted the control group (G1 (C)). The remaining 40 teeth, which were endodontically treated, were divided into four groups (n = 10): G2 (CR), consisting of teeth immediately restored with composite resin; G3 (HP + CR), consisting of teeth subjected to tooth bleaching with 38% hydrogen peroxide and immediately restored with composite resin; G4 (HP + SA + CR), which received treatment similar to that used for G3, but with 10% sodium ascorbate gel applied after the bleaching protocol; and G5 (HP + AT + CR), which was similar to G4 but included 10% alphatocopherol gel as an antioxidant. After 24 h, composite restorations were performed, and teeth were subjected to a fracture resistance test at a speed of 0.5 mm/min in an electromechanical testing machine. The axial force was applied with an angle of incidence of 135° relative to the long axis of the root. Data were subjected to ANOVA and Tukey tests (p = 0.05). G1 exhibited the highest fracture resistance (p < 0.05). No significant differences among the other experimental groups were observed. The 10% sodium ascorbate and 10% alphatocopherol gels did not improve the fracture resistance of endodontically treated teeth subjected to bleaching with 38% hydrogen peroxide.

  12. Root resorption associated with an impacted mesiodens: a surgical and endodontic approach to treatment.

    PubMed

    Zmener, Osvaldo

    2006-10-01

    This article describes a case of root resorption of a maxillary non-vital immature incisor associated with an impacted and angulated mesiodens. The impacted tooth was surgically removed and the compromised incisor was subsequently endodontically treated. Over a period of 27 months the tooth was medicated with repeated applications of calcium hydroxide. Radiographically after 18 months, an incomplete hard tissue barrier was observed with full apical closure at the conclusion of 27 months of treatment. Once the patient was comfortable after surgical removal of the mesiodens, the tooth was asymptomatic and remained so for the duration of the treatment and after definitive restorative work had been completed.

  13. The need for endodontic treatment and systemic characteristics of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation patients.

    PubMed

    Braga-Diniz, Julia Mourão; Santa-Rosa, Caroline Christine; Martins, Renata de Castro; Silva, Maria Elisa Souza E; Vieira, Leda Quercia; Ribeiro Sobrinho, Antônio Paulino

    2017-07-03

    The aim of this study is to investigate the relationship between the epidemiological and clinical profiles of patients before and after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) and the need for endodontic treatment. The subjects included 188 individuals enrolled in the dental care program for transplanted patients of the School of Dentistry, Federal University of Minas Gerais (Faculdade de Odontologia da Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, FO-UFMG) from March 2011 through March 2016. The patients were subjected to an HSCT conditioning dental regimen based on a thorough clinical and radiographic evaluation. Intraoral periapical and bite-wing X-rays were obtained, and after evaluation, specific dental treatment was planned and performed. The following demographic and clinical data were collected from the patients' medical records: age, gender, transplantation stage, primary disease, transplant type, medication used, complete blood count at the time of visit, and need for endodontic treatment. The Kolmogorov-Smirnov and the chi-square tests were used. Leukemia (31.3%) and multiple myeloma (17.9%) were the most prevalent primary diseases. Most patients were subjected to allogeneic-related transplantation (83.6%). Most patients exhibited platelet counts and hemoglobin concentrations below the reference values in the pre-transplantation stage, while the neutrophil and platelet counts and the hemoglobin levels were within the reference ranges in the post-transplantation stage. The proportions of individuals requiring endodontic treatment were similar between the pre- and post-transplantation groups: 24.3% and 24.7%, respectively. The systemic conditions of the patients referred for dental treatment were compromised.

  14. A study of flare-ups following single-visit root canal treatment in endodontic patients.

    PubMed

    Kalhoro, Feroze Ali; Mirza, Assad Javed

    2009-07-01

    To determine the frequency of flare-ups in single-visit endodontic treatment and the associated factors. Observational. Baqai Dental College Hospital, Karachi, from November 2005 to May 2006. One hundred patients were assigned for single-visit root canal treatment. Patients that defaulted after the first appointment (incomplete treatment) were excluded from the study. For each tooth treated, the clinical factors and conditions existing before and after the completion of treatment were recorded. This data included patient's age, gender, type of tooth, pre-operative status of pulp and periapical tissues and recording pain and swelling (flare-ups) postoperatively after 1 day, 7 days and 1 month. The significance of results was obtained by applying paired-sample t-test and Pearson X2 test. Three of one hundred cases showed flare-ups after treated in single appointment. On the other hand, a marked number (n=97) of cases did not show flare-ups during the study period. None of the studied variables showed any statistically significant bearing on rate of flare-ups in single appointment root canal treatment. The single-visit root canal treatment was safe in terms of endodontic flare-ups as far as results of this study are concerned. It was safer in both vital and non-vital teeth, and even in teeth with periapical pathosis.

  15. Evaluation of the Role of Probiotics in Endodontic Treatment: A Preliminary Study

    PubMed Central

    Bohora, Aarti; Kokate, Sharad

    2017-01-01

    Aims and Objectives: The principal goal of endodontics is the prevention of periapical infection. Acute and chronic apical periodontitis occur due to the persistence of pathogenic microorganisms such as Enterococcus faecalis and Candida albicans harboring the root canal systems of the teeth. The concept of the use of probiotics in addressing endodontic disease is new and has not been studied adequately. On the basis of the success of probiotics in periodontal treatment, this preliminary work was performed (a) to evaluate the antibacterial efficacy of probiotics against common endodontic pathogens, i.e. E. faecalis and C. albicans, and (b) to evaluate the potential use of probiotic therapy as an additive in endodontic treatment procedures. Materials and Methods: Two commercial probiotics were selected and evaluated based upon the numbers and concentration of organisms. Pathogenic test organisms were C. albicans (ATCC 10231) and E. faecalis (ATCC 29212). Phase 1 of the study was conducted by agar cup method test to evaluate the antibacterial activity of the selected probiotics against E. faecalis and C. albicans by measuring zones of inhibition (ZOI) in mm. Microorganisms from probiotic samples were isolated following manufacturer's instructions. Pathogenic organisms were set to a 0.1 McFarland standard challenge. Circular wells of 8 mm diameter were punched in each of the poured plates. Appropriately diluted test samples were added to the above-punched wells. The volume of the solution added to each well was 100 μl. The plates were incubated in an upright position at 37°C for 24 hours under aerobic conditions. Post incubation, ZOI was measured (mm). Phase 2 was conducted by mixing 9 ml of 30% poloxamer 407 and de Man, Rogosa and Sharpe (MRS) broth in a test tube with 500 μl of either E. faecalis or C. albicans set at an optical density (OD) of 0.252, together with 500 μl of test probiotic strain, set at a respective OD. Samples were then incubated at 37°C for

  16. Efficacy of platelet-rich plasma as a scaffold in regenerative endodontic treatment.

    PubMed

    Bezgin, Tugba; Yilmaz, Ayca Dilara; Celik, Burcu Nihan; Kolsuz, Mehmet Eray; Sonmez, Hayriye

    2015-01-01

    Current research is concerned with discovering better scaffolds for use in regenerative endodontic treatment. This study aimed to clinically and radiographically evaluate the efficacy of platelet-rich plasma (PRP) used as a scaffold in regenerative endodontic treatment and compare it with that of a conventional blood clot (BC) scaffold. A total of 20 necrotic, single-rooted immature teeth were randomly distributed into 2 groups. After disinfecting the root canal space with triple antibiotic paste (1:1:1 ciprofloxacin, metronidazole, and cefaclor), a tissue scaffold was created by using either PRP or BC and covered with white mineral trioxide aggregate. Clinical and radiographic follow-up examinations were performed once every 3 months during an 18-month period. Differences in root area were calculated from preoperative and postoperative radiographs. Fisher exact and Mann-Whitney U tests were used to evaluate differences between groups, with P value <.05 considered to be statistically significant. All 20 teeth were clinically asymptomatic during 18-month follow-up period; however, 1 tooth in the BC group exhibited periapical pathosis and was judged radiographically unsuccessful. Complete apical closure was observed in a mean of 8.1 months in the PRP group compared with 9 months in the BC group. The PRP group exhibited 9.86% increase in root area, compared with 12.6% increase in the BC group. The difference in success rates between the groups was not statistically significant (P > .05). PRP successfully created a scaffold for regenerative endodontic treatment; however, treatment outcomes did not differ significantly between PRP and conventional BC scaffold. Copyright © 2015 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Orthograde retreatment and apexification after unsuccessful endodontic treatment, retreatment and apicectomy.

    PubMed

    Sedgley, C M; Wagner, R

    2003-11-01

    To describe a case where a second orthograde retreatment was successful in the management of an infected mandibular right first molar that previously had received both orthograde and retrograde treatments. Periapical surgery is unlikely to be successful unless the root canal system has been adequately debrided and sealed. A case is described where orthograde endodontic treatment, retreatment and apicectomy were unsuccessful in the management of and infected mandibular right first molar. The periapical radiolucency eventually disappeared following a second orthograde retreatment. Teh second retreatment included 12 months of intracanal calcium hydroxide placement to promote apexification, thus allowing subsequent controlled obturation with gutta percha and AH26. At a 5-year review following completion of treatment, the tooth remained asymptomatic and was in normal function. Orthograde retreatment is a treatment option to manage refractory lesions in teeth that have previously received endodontic treatment, retreatment and apicectomy. Orthograde retreatment using long-term intracanal calcium hydroxide can help promote root-end closure of a resected apex.

  18. Treatment Options for Failing Regenerative Endodontic Procedures: Report of 3 Cases.

    PubMed

    Chaniotis, Antonis

    2017-09-01

    Regenerative treatments in necrotic immature teeth are suggested as alternatives to conventional multiple or single-step apexification procedures. Although case reports and case series provide promising results, the treatment protocol is not yet fully established and regenerative procedure might fail. Once failure is encountered, the apexification treatment options still remain. Repetition of the regenerative procedure after initial revitalization failure has not been suggested yet. Here, 3 cases of failing regenerative endodontic procedures are reported. All 3 cases had been initially treated by single-step disinfection/revascularization procedures. In different time intervals, all cases showed signs of recurrent disease. The first case was managed with renegotiation and apical mineral trioxide aggregate plug placement; the second case was managed with renegotiation and conventional root canal treatment; and the third case was managed with renegotiation, long-term calcium hydroxide disinfection, and repetition of the regenerative endodontic procedure. Two years after the second intervention, all cases were considered successful. Repetition of failed regenerative treatment procedures might be a viable alternative to conventional apexification procedures. Copyright © 2017 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Curricular Guidelines for Endodontics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Dental Education, 1981

    1981-01-01

    Guidelines developed by the Section on Endodontics of the American Association of Dental Schools for use by educational institutions as curriculum development aids are provided. Endodontics is that branch of dentistry dealing with diagnosis and treatment of oral conditions that arise as a result of pathoses of dental pulp. (MLW)

  20. Curricular Guidelines for Endodontics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Dental Education, 1981

    1981-01-01

    Guidelines developed by the Section on Endodontics of the American Association of Dental Schools for use by educational institutions as curriculum development aids are provided. Endodontics is that branch of dentistry dealing with diagnosis and treatment of oral conditions that arise as a result of pathoses of dental pulp. (MLW)

  1. En face optical coherence tomography investigation of apical microleakage after laser-assisted endodontic treatment.

    PubMed

    Todea, Carmen; Balabuc, Cosmin; Sinescu, Cosmin; Filip, Laura; Kerezsi, Cristina; Calniceanu, Mircea; Negrutiu, Meda; Bradu, Adrian; Hughes, Michael; Podoleanu, Adrian Gh

    2010-09-01

    The aim of our study was to evaluate the potential of en face optical coherence tomography (OCT) for the detection of apical microleakage after 980 nm and 1,064 nm laser-assisted endodontic treatment. Ninety, human, single-rooted teeth with one straight root canal and closed apices were used. All roots were prepared biomechanically to the working length at an apical size 30 and 0.06 taper. The teeth were divided into three equal groups of 30 samples each, according to the treatment to be applied to the root canal. Group I received 980 nm diode laser (3 W, 0.01 s on time, 0.01 s off time, 5 s per procedure, four procedures); group II received neodymium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet (Nd:YAG) laser (1.5 W, 15 Hz, 5 s per procedure, four procedures). In group III the root canals were approached conventionally only. In all groups the root canal filling was performed with AH Plus endodontic sealer and gutta-percha points. An en face OCT prototype was used for the investigation of apical microleakage. According to one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and en face OCT, the number of defects in the laser groups was significantly lower (P < 0.005) than in the control group. No statistical differences were noted between the laser groups (P = 0.049). En face OCT imaging proved that laser-assisted endodontic treatment improved the prognosis of root canal filling and led to a reduction in apical microleakage.

  2. A Case of SAPHO Syndrome with Endodontic Implications and Treatment with Biologic Drugs.

    PubMed

    Cotti, Elisabetta; Careddu, Roberto; Schirru, Elia; Marongiu, Silvia; Barca, Maria Pina; Manconi, Paolo Emilio; Mercuro, Giuseppe

    2015-09-01

    SAPHO syndrome (SS) is an autoinflammatory disease characterized by synovitis, acne, pustulosis, hyperostosis, and osteitis. Among the sites affected by the osteoarticular manifestations of SS are the anterior chest wall and the mandible. The etiology of SS is still unknown; theories advocate a genetic predisposition and an infectious cause in association with disorders of the immune system. We report a case of SS in which there was the involvement of the mandible with a lesion of endodontic origin. A 44-year-old white woman diagnosed with SS at the university hospital was referred to the Department of Conservative Dentistry and Endodontics for a consultation. She reported spontaneous pain localized to the periapical area of tooth #19 with a history of multiple restorative and endodontic treatments. It was diagnosed as a previously treated tooth with symptomatic apical periodontitis (AP) at the time of the endodontic evaluation. A second retreatment was then performed in 1 appointment under local anesthesia. During retreatment, a separated instrument and a ledge were found in the mesiobuccal canal, and attempts to bypass it were not successful; the canal was then obturated to the reachable length. Within the same month, the patient was also administered an anti-tumor necrosis factor alpha biologic medication in association with a disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs for the treatment of SS. Within 3 months, the overall therapy had led to a marked improvement of the systemic and mandibular symptoms, and a periapical radiograph showed almost complete healing of the lesion. Medical examinations have shown a total remission of signs and symptoms starting 6 months after the initiation of treatment. After 5 years, the disease is under control, and tooth #19 is symptom free and shows absence of AP. The endodontists need to be aware of the existence of SS and the possible effects of the use of disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs and biologic medications on the

  3. The Impact of Apical Patency in the Success of Endodontic Treatment of Necrotic Teeth with Apical Periodontitis: A Brief Review.

    PubMed

    Machado, Ricardo; Ferrari, Carlos Henrique; Back, Eduardo; Comparin, Daniel; Tomazinho, Luiz Fernando; Vansan, Luiz Pascoal

    2016-01-01

    Accumulation of soft tissue or dentinal remnants in the apical region is a common event that can cause blockage of root canals. This event can be avoided if apical patency is performed during the root canal shaping procedures. However, there is no consensus on the role of apical patency in relation to the success of endodontic treatment of necrotic teeth with apical periodontitis. Therefore, the purpose of this paper was to conduct a brief review on the role of apical patency in guaranteeing the success of endodontic treatments of necrotic teeth with apical periodontitis considering two other key points; the root canal anatomy and microbiology.

  4. Apicoectomies with the erbium laser: a complementary technique for retrograde endodontic treatment.

    PubMed

    Angiero, Francesca; Benedicenti, Stefano; Signore, Antonio; Parker, Steven; Crippa, Rolando

    2011-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of erbium lasers for retrograde endodontic treatment, in terms of clinical outcome and therapeutic success. Apicoectomy with retrograde filling is a well-established surgical procedure to treat teeth affected by persistent periapical lesions. The apical root end is generally removed with burs, and the adjacent periapical tissue curetted, or alternatively treated with ultrasound or laser. Between 2000 and 2010, 65 apicoectomies were performed on necrotic teeth that presented apical lesions (29 men, 36 women). The lasers used in the study were the erbium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet (Er:YAG) laser, wavelength 2940 nm, and the erbium,chromium-doped:yttrium-scandium-gallium-garnet (Er,Cr:YSGG) laser, wavelength 2780 nm. Of the 65 teeth in the study, failure only occurred in 9 CASES, MANIFESTING AFTER DIFFERENT TIMES. THE REMAINING PATIENTS, 86.15%, experienced no complications, and their treatment followed a positive course. Laser-assisted surgery increases the range of therapeutic approaches in the sphere of retrograde endodontic treatment. The results of this study show that the erbium laser, used for apicoectomy, results in a high success rate with considerable benefit in terms of clinical outcome and therapeutic success.

  5. Endodontic treatment of permanent teeth in children with a new calcium-carbamide-formaldehyde paste.

    PubMed

    Georgieva, Maria G; Indjova, Kalinka N; Indjov, Stefan I

    2002-01-01

    AIM, MATERIAL AND METHODS: Endodontic treatment of a total of 303 teeth with pulpitis and periodontitis was performed with a new calcium-carbamide-formaldehyde paste. In three children with fractured teeth with complications, the applied treatment was combined (2 teeth with apical osteotomy and 1 with cystectomy). Control examinations were carried out at months 6, 12 and 24 and clinically healthy teeth and teeth with complications were registered. In the pulpitis group the clinically healthy teeth were 97.55% +/- 1.08 at the 6th month; 96.85% +/- 1.26 at the 12th month and 92.92% +/- 2.41 at the 24th month. In teeth with periodontitis 91.56% +/- 3.05 were clinically healthy at the 6th month; 93.83% +/- 2.67 at the 12th month and 98.03% +/- 1.98 at the 24th month. No statistical significance of the differences between pulpites and periodontites was found (P > 0.05). Recovery of the bone structure was observed in the teeth with combined endodontic and surgical treatment at the 12th month. The calcium-carbamide-formaldehyde paste stimulates bone regeneration and closing of the apex without coloring the hard dental tissues.

  6. Endodontic treatment of mandibular molars with atypical root canal anatomy: reports of 4 cases.

    PubMed

    Chauhan, Raju; Singh, Shweta

    2015-01-01

    The variations in root canal anatomy of multirooted teeth represent a continuous challenge to endodontic diagnosis and treatment. Although the most common configuration of mandibular molars is one containing 2 roots and 3 root canals, there are many different combinations. Very rarely, an additional third (supernumerary) root is seen. When it is located distolingually to the main distal root, this third root is called radix entomolaris (RE), and when it is located mesiobuccally to the mesial root, it is called radix paramolaris (RP). Variations of root canal systems need not always be in the form of extra roots or extra canals. Single roots with single canals can also occur. A general dentist should be aware of these unusual root canal morphologies in mandibular molars for the success of endodontic treatment. These case reports describe the root canal treatment of a case of RE in the mandibular first molar, 2 rare cases of RP (1 each in the mandibular first and second molars), and a mandibular second molar with a single root and root canal.

  7. Dental students' perceptions about the endodontic treatments performed using NiTi rotary instruments and hand stainless steel files.

    PubMed

    Martins, Renata Castro; Seijo, Marília Oliveira Saraiva; Ferreira, Efigênia Ferreira; Paiva, Saul Martins; Ribeiro Sobrinho, Antônio Paulino

    2012-01-01

    This study evaluated the perceptions of Brazilian undergraduate dental students about the endodontic treatments performed using NiTi rotary instruments and hand stainless steel. Data were collected using a questionnaire administered to undergraduate dental students enrolled in endodontic disciplines. The students were divided into 3 groups: G1, students who had treated straight canals with SS hand instruments; G2, students who had treated curved canals with SS hand instruments; and G3, students who had treated both straight and curved canals with NiTi rotary instruments. The number of endodontic treatments performed, types of treated teeth, students' learning, time spent, encountered difficulties, quality of endodontic treatment and characteristics of the employed technique were analyzed. There was a 91.3% rate of return for the questionnaires. Mandibular molars were the most frequently treated teeth, followed by maxillary incisors. The Kruskal-Wallis test showed no differences in learning (p=0.528) or in the characteristics of the technique employed (p=0.560) among the three groups. G3 students performed a greater number of endodontic treatments (p<0.001) in a smaller time (p<0.001) than did G1 and G2 students. Difficulties were reported primarily by students in G2 and G3 compared with G1 (p=0.048). The quality of endodontic treatments differed only between G1 and G2 (p=0.045). The use of NiTi rotary instruments should be included in undergraduate dental curriculum, contributing to the increase of patients assisted and consequently to improve the clinical experience of the students.

  8. Technological advances in endodontics: treatment of a mandibular molar with internal root resorption using a reciprocating single-file system.

    PubMed

    de Souza, Samir Noronha; Marques, André Augusto Franco; Sponchiado-Júnior, EmÍlio Carlos; Roberti Garcia, Lucas da Fonseca; da Frota, Matheus Franco; de Carvalho, Fredson Márcio Acris

    2017-01-01

    The field of endodontics has become increasingly successful due to technological advances that allow clinicians to solve clinical cases that would have been problematic a few years ago. Despite such advances, endodontic treatment of teeth with internal root resorption remains challenging. This article presents a clinical case in which a reciprocating single-file system was used for endodontic treatment of a mandibular molar with internal root resorption. Radiographic examination revealed the presence of internal root resorption in the distobuccal root canal of the mandibular right first molar. A reciprocating single-file system was used for root canal instrumentation and final preparation, and filling was obtained through a thermal compaction technique. No painful symptoms or periapical lesions were observed in 12 months of follow-up. The results indicate that a reciprocating single-file system is an adequate alternative for root canal instrumentation, particularly in teeth with internal root resorption.

  9. A Naval Postgraduate Dental School Analysis Of Initial Endodontic Treatment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-07-01

    resorption Open margin on restoration History of internal resorption Tooth location!type History of bleaching Follow-up time Presence of...2004; Siqueira, 2008) some studies use a more loose criteria in defining success where the tooth has no symptoms but does have a lesion that has...decreased in dimension since completion of treatment (Siqueira, 2008; Ng, 201 la). Tooth retention has the least strict criteria for success, and several

  10. A Naval Postgraduate Dental School Analysis of Initial Endodontic Treatment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-06-01

    quadrant Can locate pain by tooth Electric pulp tester EPT Palpation Sinus tract Swelling History (hx) of orthodontics Hx of external resorption ...case, the term “functional retention” or “functional” may be most appropriate: the tooth is clinically normal with an undetermined radiographic...factors contributing to tooth extraction following non- surgical root canal treatment (NSRCT) at 2 years in a retrospective study examining nearly

  11. Combined Endodontic Therapy and Intentional Replantation for the Treatment of Palatogingival Groove.

    PubMed

    Garrido, Iván; Abella, Francesc; Ordinola-Zapata, Ronald; Duran-Sindreu, Fernando; Roig, Miguel

    2016-02-01

    A palatogingival groove is an anatomic malformation that predisposes the involved tooth to a severe periodontal defect. When the condition is complicated by pulpal necrosis, affected teeth often present a dilemma in terms of diagnosis and treatment planning. In this report, we describe the case of a patient with a maxillary lateral incisor with a deep palatogingival groove extending to the root apex and severe periodontal destruction (local pocketing). Suggested treatment modalities included curettage of the affected tissues, elimination of the groove by grinding and/or sealing with a variety of filling materials, and surgical procedures. In this case, a combined treatment approach, involving both endodontic therapy and intentional replantation after restoration with a self-etching flowable composite, resulted in periodontal healing and significant healing of the periradicular radiolucency at 12 months. In short, intentional replantation offers a predictable procedure and should be considered a viable treatment modality for the management of palatogingival grooves, especially for single-rooted teeth.

  12. [Use of root-end filling materials in a surgical apical endodontic treatment in the Netherlands].

    PubMed

    Bronkhorst, M A; Bergé, S J; Van Damme, Ph A; Borstlap, W A; Merkx, M A W

    2008-08-01

    The material to be used for closing the root canal when carrying out a retrograde surgical apical endodontic treatment continues to be a subject of discussion. The aim of the present study was to inventory which materials are being used for this purpose at this moment by Dutch O&MF surgeons. All practicing Dutch OM&F surgeons (n = 195) were sent a questionnaire. The response rate was 77%. The results showed that at this moment intermediate restoration material (IRM) is the retrograde filling material most widely used by the Dutch O&MF surgeons (47.6%) in cases of surgical apical endodontic treatment. Amalgam, with 35%, was second, especially due to its plasticity and convenience. The choice of material is just as often determined by tradition, personal preference, individual experience or scientific results. There seems to be no relationship between the dental surgeon's number of years of experience and the type of retro grade filling material which he or she uses.

  13. Endodontic treatment of mandibular molar with root dilaceration using Reciproc single-file system

    PubMed Central

    Meireles, Daniely Amorin; Bastos, Mariana Mena Barreto; Marques, André Augusto Franco; Sponchiado, Emílio Carlos

    2013-01-01

    Biomechanical preparation of root canals with accentuated curvature is challenging. New rotatory systems, such as Reciproc, require a shorter period of time to prepare curved canals, and became a viable alternative for endodontic treatment of teeth with root dilaceration. Thus, this study aimed to report a clinical case of endodontic therapy of root with accentuated dilaceration using Reciproc single-file system. Mandibular right second molar was diagnosed as asymptomatic irreversible pulpitis. Pulp chamber access was performed, and glide path was created with #10 K-file (Dentsply Maillefer) and PathFile #13, #16 and #19 (Dentsply Maillefer) up to the temporary working length. The working length measured corresponded to 20 mm in the mesio-buccal and mesio-lingual canals, and 22 mm in the distal canal. The R25 file (VDW GmbH) was used in all the canals for instrumentation and final preparation, followed by filling with Reciproc gutta-percha cones (VDW GmbH) and AH Plus sealer (Dentsply Maillefer), using thermal compaction technique. The case has been receiving follow-up for 6 mon and no painful symptomatology or periapical lesions have been found. Despite the difficulties, the treatment could be performed in a shorter period of time than the conventional methods. PMID:24010084

  14. Antibiofilm and Antimicrobial Activity of Polyethylenimine: An Interesting Compound for Endodontic Treatment.

    PubMed

    Barros, Joana; Dias, Ana; Rodrigues, Miguel A; Pina-Vaz, Cidália; Lopes, Maria A; Pina-Vaz, Irene

    2015-06-01

    Bacteria levels of necrotic teeth are greatly reduced after endodontic treatment procedures but the presence of persisting microorganisms leads to continuous efforts to develop materials with antimicrobial properties. The purpose of the study was to determine the antimicrobial activity of polyethylenimine (PEI) against common bacteria and yeasts, regarding planktonic cells and biofilm, and to clarify its antimicrobial mechanism of action through flow cytometry. The antibiofilm and antimicrobial effect of PEI was determined against Enterococcus faecalis, Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli and Candida albicans strains using reference protocols. The effect of PEI was evaluated regarding adhesion, biofilm formation and biofilm disaggregation. In order to understand PEI cellular effects flow cytometric analysis was performed with different fluorescent markers. It was verified that minimal inhibitory concentrations (MIC) values and minimal lethal concentrations (MLC) obtained for PEI were similar and ranged between 50 and 400 mg/l, proving the microbicidal and fungicidal activity of this compound. Antibiofilm activity was also proved for all the microorganisms. Severe lesion of the membrane and cell depolarization was demonstrated. Polyethylenimine showed antimicrobial and antibiofilm activity against microorganisms often associated with apical periodontitis. Theoretically, prolonging the antibacterial effects of materials used in endodontics may be interesting to help prevent reinfection and possibly to affect residual bacteria that survived the treatment procedures.

  15. Influences of 432 Hz Music on the Perception of Anxiety during Endodontic Treatment: A Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial.

    PubMed

    Di Nasso, Luca; Nizzardo, Andrea; Pace, Riccardo; Pierleoni, Felicita; Pagavino, Gabriella; Giuliani, Valentina

    2016-09-01

    Patients undergoing endodontic therapy often have severe perioperative and intraoperative anxiety, which may lead to increased perceptions of pain and vital sign instability throughout treatment. The purpose of this study was to test the influences of music, as a nonpharmacologic adjuvant, in terms of significant changes for systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP) and heart rate (HR) before, during, and after endodontic treatment in a population with different levels of anxiety assessed with the Corah Dental Anxiety Scale. A total of 100 patients were recruited in the present study; before starting the endodontic treatment, the interviewer administered the Corah Dental Anxiety Scale to the participants to assess the baseline level of anxiety. Patients were randomly divided into 2 groups: the first one listened to the music and the second one did not. Before, during, and after the endodontic procedures, the vital signs (diastolic and systolic blood pressure and heart rate) were recorded. Results were collected and statistically analyzed. Direct contrasts between patients listening or not listening to music showed that all the measured vital signs decreased considering the overall period (during and after the canal therapy) in the group of patients listening to music (P < .05). This study shows the effects of music therapy on vital values and on subjective perception of anxiety during endodontic therapy. Music and medicine always work together; the soothing effects of sounds and musical frequencies make this union an extraordinary tool of synergistic care. Music therapy is a valid nonpharmacologic adjuvant to anxiety perception in endodontic therapies. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Effect of heat treatment on transformation temperatures and bending properties of nickel-titanium endodontic instruments.

    PubMed

    Yahata, Y; Yoneyama, T; Hayashi, Y; Ebihara, A; Doi, H; Hanawa, T; Suda, H

    2009-07-01

    To investigate the effect of heat treatment on the bending properties of nickel-titanium endodontic instruments in relation to their transformation behaviour. Nickel-titanium super-elastic alloy wire (1.00 mm Ø) was processed into a conical shape with a 0.30 mm diameter tip and 0.06 taper. The heat treatment temperature was set at 440 or 500 degrees C for a period of 10 or 30 min. Nonheat-treated specimens were used as controls. The phase transformation behaviour was examined using differential scanning calorimetry. A cantilever-bending test was used to evaluate the bending properties of the specimens. Data were analyzed by ANOVA and the Tukey-Kramer test (P = 0.05). The transformation temperature was higher for each heat treatment condition compared with the control. Two clear thermal peaks were observed for the heat treatment at 440 degrees C. The specimen heated at 440 degrees C for 30 min exhibited the highest temperatures for M(s) and A(f), with subsequently lower temperatures observed for specimens heated at 440 degrees C for 10 min, 500 degrees C for 30 min, 500 degrees C for 10 min, and control specimens. The sample heated at 440 degrees C for 30 min had the lowest bending load values (P < 0.05), both in the elastic range (0.5 mm deflection) and in the super-elastic range (2.0 mm deflection). The influence of heat treatment time was less than that of heat treatment temperature. Change in the transformation behaviour by heat treatment may be effective in increasing the flexibility of nickel-titanium endodontic instruments.

  17. Successful inferior alveolar nerve decompression for dysesthesia following endodontic treatment: report of 4 cases treated by mandibular sagittal osteotomy.

    PubMed

    Scolozzi, Paolo; Lombardi, Tommaso; Jaques, Bertrand

    2004-05-01

    Endodontic overfilling involving the mandibular canal may cause an injury of the inferior alveolar nerve (IAN) resulting in disabling sensory disturbances such as pain, dysesthesia, paresthesia, hypoesthesia, or anesthesia. Two fundamental mechanisms are responsible for the injury: the chemical neurotoxicity and the mechanical compression caused by the extruded material. Although spontaneous resorption has been described for some materials, early surgical exploration with removal of the material and decompression of the IAN should be performed, irrespective of the material used, given that the importance of nerve damage increases with the duration of the injury. We report 4 cases of disabling dysesthesia and paresthesia following endodontic treatment of lower molars in which sagittal osteotomy was used to remove the endodontic paste and to perform nerve decompression. All the patients experienced immediate relief of dysesthesia and paresthesia.

  18. Cleaning and decompression of inferior alveolar canal to treat dysesthesia and paresthesia following endodontic treatment of a third molar.

    PubMed

    Scala, Rudy; Cucchi, Alessandro; Cappellina, Luca; Ghensi, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    Endodontic overfilling involving the mandibular canal may cause an injury of the inferior alveolar nerve (IAN). We report a case of disabling dysesthesia and paresthesia of a 70-year-old man after endodontic treatment of his mandibular left third molar that caused leakage of root canal filling material into the mandibular canal. After radiographic evaluation, extraction of the third molar and distal osteotomy, a surgical exploration was performed and followed by removal of the material and decompression of the IAN. The patient reported an improvement in sensation and immediate disappearance of dysesthesia already from the first postoperative day.

  19. Antibiotic prescription for endodontic treatment: general dentist knowledge + practice in shiraz.

    PubMed

    Nabavizadeh, Mohammad Reza; Sahebi, Safoora; Nadian, Ilnaz

    2011-01-01

    Diseases of the dental pulp and periapical tissues are chiefly caused by microorganisms. Antibiotics are used in some endodontic cases; however, successful cases can predominantly be achieved by mechanical and chemical cleaning of the canal or surgical intervention. The aim of this study was to determine the knowledge of General Dental Practitioners (GDPs) in Shiraz in respect to antibiotic prescriptions during and after endodontic treatment. A one-page questionnaire was sent to 200 active general dentists. Of the 120 surveys returned, 93 were accepted. The data were analyzed using t-test, Chi-square, ANOVA and Fisher's Exact Test. Only 29% of dentists had full knowledge (correct answers to all questions) of antibiotic prescription protocols in pulpal and periapical disease. Amoxicillin 500 mg capsule was the drug of choice of dentists. Total of 42% of GDPs had full knowledge of antibiotic prescription protocols for persistent or systemic infections cases. GDPs more recently qualified had slightly greater knowledge compared to GDPs with experience; however, this difference was not significant. Also, there was no significant difference between genders. General practitioners' knowledge about antibiotics seems inadequate and further education is recommended to update the practitioners.

  20. Comparison of endodontic diagnosis and treatment planning decisions using cone-beam volumetric tomography versus periapical radiography.

    PubMed

    Ee, Jonathan; Fayad, Mohamed I; Johnson, Bradford R

    2014-07-01

    Accurate and confident treatment planning is an essential part of endodontic practice. Periapical radiographs have been used to aid in the diagnosis of pathology and to help establish an appropriate treatment strategy. Recently, a new imaging modality, cone-beam volumetric tomographic (CBVT) imaging, has been shown to be a useful tool in a number of endodontic applications. The aim of this study was to compare the relative value of preoperative periapical radiographs and CBVT scanning in the decision-making process in endodontic treatment planning. Thirty endodontic cases completed in a private endodontic practice were randomly selected to be included in this study. Each case was required to have a preoperative digital periapical radiograph and a CBVT scan. Three board-certified endodontists reviewed the 30 preoperative periapical radiographs. Two weeks later, the CBVT volumes were reviewed in random order by the same evaluators. The evaluators were asked to select a preliminary diagnosis and treatment plan based solely on their interpretation of the periapical and CBVT images. Diagnosis and treatment planning choices were then compared to determine if there was a change from the periapical radiograph to the CBVT scan. A difference in treatment plan between the 2 imaging modalities was recorded in 19 of 30 cases (63.3%, P = .001), 17 of 30 cases (56.6%, P = .012), and 20 of 30 cases (66.7%, P = .008) for examiners 1, 2, and 3, respectively. Under the conditions of this study, preoperative CBVT imaging provides additional information when compared with preoperative periapical radiographs, which may lead to treatment plan modifications in approximately 62% of the cases. Copyright © 2014 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. The efficacy of low-level laser treatment in reducing pain and swelling after endodontic surgery: a systematic review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moshari, Amirabbas; Vatanpour, Mehdi; Zakershahrak, Mehrsa

    2016-03-01

    Introduction: LLLT in oral cavity believed to reduce pain after endodontic surgery and wisdom tooth removal, to accelerate wound healing and to have an anti-inflammatory and regenerative effect. The aim of this systematic review therefore was to assess the proof available for the efficacy of low-level laser treatment in reducing pain and swelling after endodontic surgery. Methods: The PubMed service of the U.S. National Library of Medicine was searched with applicable search strategies. No language restriction was applied. The last electronic search was accomplished on August 31, 2015. All randomized clinical trials on the efficiency of low-level laser treatment in reducing pain and swelling after endodontic surgery was considered for the Meta-analysis. Quality consideration of the included randomized clinical trials was appraised according to CONSORT guidelines. Results: Only two randomized clinical trials were attained. These studies clarified that laser treatment could reduce pain and swelling, but the results were not significant. Conclusions: Low-level laser therapy can be advantageous for the reduction of postoperative pain but there is no strong confirmation for its efficiency. Its clinical utility and applicability relating to endodontic surgery, Along with the optimal energy dosage and the number of laser treatments needed after surgery, still, demand further research and experiment.

  2. The Factors Responsible for Endodontic Treatment Failure in the Permanent Dentitions of the Patients Reported to the College of Dentistry, the University of Aljouf, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The endodontic failure is a common problem in dentistry. The success of endodontic and re-endodontic treatment depends on many factors. These includes periodontal disease, root fractures, residual necrotic pulp tissue, presence of peri-radicular infection, broken instruments, mechanical perforations, root canal underfillings, root canal overfillings, missed canals or unfilled canals. Aim The present research was aimed at evaluating the different factors responsible for endodontic treatment failure in permanent dentitions of the patients. Materials and Methods In the present in vivo cross-sectional study, 90 patients, who reported in endodontic section of Department of Conservative Dentistry, with post endodontic treatment pain, tenderness to percussion, swelling and sinus tract in their permanent dentitions were considered as endodontic failure cases, and were considered for endodontic re-treatment. The teeth with vertical root fracture and badly broken down unrestorable teeth were excluded from the present study. The study subjects were divided into three groups on the basis of their age. Informed consent was taken from the study subjects and the approval was taken for this study from the college ethical committee. Results The results were obtained as frequencies and percentages after analysing the collected informations by using SPSS version 10 computer soft ware. The majority of the endodontic failures were noted in the age group III (41.11%) and minimum endodontic failures were found in the age group I (24.44%). According to the tooth type, the majority of the endodontic failures were noted in maxillary molars (44.4%), mandibular molars (20%) and maxillary premolars (15.5%). The endodontic treatment performed by the general dental practitioners (GDPs) showed the most failure rate (78.8%). The factors which were most responsible for endodontic failures were underfilled canals (33.3%), unfilled and missed canals (17.7%). Conclusion This study

  3. Photodynamic Therapy for the Endodontic Treatment of a Traumatic Primary Tooth in a Diabetic Pediatric Patient

    PubMed Central

    de Sant’Anna, Giselle

    2014-01-01

    Conservation of deciduous teeth with pulp alterations caused by caries or trauma is a major therapeutic challenge in pediatric dentistry. It is essential that the sanitizers used in root canal procedures perform well in eliminating bacteria. Antimicrobial photodynamic therapy (PDT) is an emerging and promising adjuvant therapy for endodontic treatment in an attempt to eliminate microorganisms persistent after chemomechanical preparation. This paper reports the case of a five-year-old male with type I diabetes mellitus, presenting the need for pulp therapy in maxillary primary left central incisor due to injury. The proposed treatment included the use of PDT for decontamination of root canals with the application of 50 μg/mL of methylene blue dye for 3-5 minutes and 40 J/cm2 as energy density, taking into account the need for tissue penetration and effec-tiveness of PDT inside the dentinal tubules. PMID:25024841

  4. Coronal microleakage of 3 temporary filling materials used for endodontic treatment: an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Feliz Matos, Leandro; Rodriguez, Indira De Los Santos; Gonzalez, Mally Luz Rodriguez; Pereyra, Dulce; Monzon Velez, Erick R

    2013-01-01

    Most root canal treatments are performed over multiple appointments. The temporary sealing material used between sessions must have sealing properties capable of preventing microleakage. This study assessed the degree of microleakage of temporary sealing materials according to time spent blocking the access cavity. Endodontic treatments with a standardized protocol were performed on 63 healthy, single-rooted, caries-free human teeth. The teeth were divided randomly into 5 groups. Groups 1-3 were each treated with 1 of 3 sealing materials, while Group 4 and 5 served as positive and negative controls, respectively. Data was obtained and analyzed with nonparametric tests (Kruskal-Wallis and Chi-square). Results indicated statistically significant differences between materials and the degree of microleakage (P = 0.000). All 3 sealing materials allowed microleakage within 48 hours, with glass ionomer cement demonstrating the most microleakage.

  5. Evaluation of pain in single and multi rooted teeth treated in single visit endodontic therapy.

    PubMed

    Raju, T B V G; Seshadri, Abitha; Vamsipavani, B; Abhilash, K; Subhash, A V; Kumari, K V Halini

    2014-02-01

    The incidence of post-operative pain was compared following single-visit canal treatment in single- and multi-rooted teeth, with and without periapical radiolucency. The article also reviews the issues of postoperative pain and healing, following single-visit and multi-visit endodontic therapy. Single-visit endodontic therapy (SVE) was performed in 50 single-rooted teeth and 60 multiple-rooted teeth. Single-visit endodontic therapy (SVE) was performed in 50 single-rooted teeth and 60 multiple-rooted teeth. The subjects were divided as follows: Group I -Single-rooted teeth with periapical radiolucency (n=25); Group II-Single-rooted teeth without periapical radiolucency (n=25); Group III-Multiple-rooted teeth with periapical radiolucency (n=30); and Group IV-Multiple-rooted teeth without periapical radiolucency (n=30). Assessment of postoperative pain was done at 24hrs, 3 days and 1 week using a self report questionnaire. The data was analyzed using non-parametric Kruskal -Wallis test. No statistically significant difference was observed in postoperative pain following SVE between the single-rooted and multiple-rooted teeth groups at 24hrs, 3 days and 1 week. The presence or absence of periapical radiolucency had no significant influence on the incidence of reported postoperative pain following SVE. There was no difference in incidence of pain in single rooted teeth and multi-rooted teeth with and without periapical radiolucencies following SVE. Thus, incidence of post-operative pain does not seem to be a valid comparison criterion between single- and multiple-visit endodontic therapies. Also, the literature suggests similar success rates with single-visit and multiple-visit root canal treatment. How to cite the article: Raju TB, Seshadri A, Vamsipavani B, Abhilash K, Subhash AV, Kumari KV. Evaluation of Pain in Single and Multi Rooted Teeth Treated in Single Visit Endodontic Therapy. J Int Oral Health 2014;6(1):27-32.

  6. Microbial Ecosystem Analysis in Root Canal Infections Refractory to Endodontic Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Henriques, LCF; Brito, LCN; Tavares, WLF; Teles, RP; Vieira, LQ; Teles, FRF; Ribeiro Sobrinho, AP

    2016-01-01

    Introduction To combine Multiple Displacement Amplification (MDA) and checkerboard DNA–DNA hybridization to qualitatively and quantitatively evaluate the microbiota present in infections refractory to endodontic treatment. Methods The subjects of this study were 40 patients presenting periapical lesions refractory to endodontic treatment. Samples were taken by scraping or filing root canal walls with a #10 K-type hand file. Sample DNA was amplified by MDA, and the levels of 107 bacterial taxa were analyzed by checkerboard DNA–DNA hybridization. The taxa were divided into three distinct microbial populations, depending on their mean proportion in samples (% DNA probe counts ± SEM), as follows: dominant (≥3.0%), sub-dominant (>1.6 to 3.0%) and residual (≤1.6%) populations. The significance of differences was determined using the Mann-Whitney test. Results The taxa present with the highest mean proportions (constituting the dominant population) were Corynebacterium diphtheriae (8.03±0.98), Porphyromonas gingivalis (5.42±2.09), Streptococcus sobrinus (5.33±0.69), and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia (4.72±1.73). Among the sub-dominant population were Eubacterium saphenum (3.85±1.06), Helicobacter pylori (3.16±0.62), Dialister pneumosintes (3.12±1.1), Clostridium difficile (2.74±0.41), Enterobacter agglomerans (2.64±0.54), Salmonella enterica (2.51±0.52), Mobiluncus mulieris (2.44±0.6), and Klebsiella oxytoca (2.32±0.66). In the population of bacteria present at the lowest mean proportions (the residual population), Bacteroides ureolyticus (0.04±0.01), Haemophilus influenzae (0.04±0.02), and Prevotella oris (0.01±0.01) were found at the lowest mean proportions. Enterococcus faecalis was detected in the residual population (0.52±0.26). Conclusion The microbial climax community in teeth refractory to endodontic treatment not only harbor medically important species, but also contains distinct microbial consortia present with different population levels

  7. Microbial Ecosystem Analysis in Root Canal Infections Refractory to Endodontic Treatment.

    PubMed

    Henriques, Luiz Carlos Feitosa; de Brito, Luciana Carla Neves; Tavares, Warley Luciano Faria; Teles, Ricardo Palmier; Vieira, Leda Quércia; Teles, Flávia Rodrigues; Sobrinho, Antônio Paulino Ribeiro

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to combine multiple displacement amplification and checkerboard DNA-DNA hybridization to qualitatively and quantitatively evaluate the microbiota present in infections refractory to endodontic treatment. The subjects of this study were 40 patients presenting with periapical lesions refractory to endodontic treatment. Samples were taken by scraping or filing root canal walls with a #10 K-type hand file. Sample DNA was amplified by multiple displacement amplification, and the levels of 107 bacterial taxa were analyzed by checkerboard DNA-DNA hybridization. The taxa were divided into 3 distinct microbial populations depending on their mean proportion in samples (% DNA probe counts ± standard error of the mean) as follows: dominant (≥3.0%), subdominant (>1.6%-3.0%), and residual (≤1.6%) populations. The significance of differences was determined using the Mann-Whitney test. The taxa present with the highest mean proportions (constituting the dominant population) were Corynebacterium diphtheriae (8.03 ± 0.98), Porphyromonas gingivalis (5.42 ± 2.09), Streptococcus sobrinus (5.33 ± 0.69), and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia (4.72 ± 1.73). Among the subdominant population were Eubacterium saphenum (3.85 ± 1.06), Helicobacter pylori (3.16 ± 0.62), Dialister pneumosintes (3.12 ± 1.1), Clostridium difficile (2.74 ± 0.41), Enterobacter agglomerans (2.64 ± 0.54), Salmonella enterica (2.51 ± 0.52), Mobiluncus mulieris (2.44 ± 0.6), and Klebsiella oxytoca (2.32 ± 0.66). In the population of bacteria present at the lowest mean proportions (the residual population), Bacteroides ureolyticus (0.04 ± 0.01), Haemophilus influenzae (0.04 ± 0.02), and Prevotella oris (0.01 ± 0.01) were found at the lowest mean proportions. Enterococcus faecalis was detected in the residual population (0.52 ± 0.26). The microbial climax community in teeth refractory to endodontic treatment not only harbors medically

  8. Current trends in endodontic treatment by general dental practitioners: report of a United States national survey.

    PubMed

    Savani, Gina M; Sabbah, Wael; Sedgley, Christine M; Whitten, Brian

    2014-05-01

    In the United States almost 70% of root canal treatment (RCT) is performed by general dentists (GPs), yet little is known about their treatment protocols. A paper survey was mailed to 2000 United States GPs with questions about the types of endodontic cases treated, routine treatment protocols, use of newer technologies, and endodontic continuing education (CE). Completed surveys were returned by 479 respondents (24%). GPs who perform RCT (84%) reported providing anterior (99%), bicuspid (95%), and molar (62%) RCT and retreatment (18%). Rubber dam was used always (60%), usually (16%), sometimes (13%), and never (11%). Newer technologies used by GPs included digital radiography (72%), magnification (80%), electronic apex locator (70%), and nickel-titanium rotary instrumentation (74%). Compared with GPs with >20 years of experience, those in practice for ≤10 years were more likely to use rubber dam (P < .05), nickel-titanium rotary instrumentation (P < .001), apex locators (P < .001), and magnification (P < .01); in contradistinction, GPs in practice >20 years were more likely to perform retreatments (P < .05). Women were less likely to perform retreatment or molar RCT (both P < .05). GPs with >5 hours of CE were more likely to use rotary instrumentation (P < .001), irrigant activation devices (P < .01), and apex locators (P < .001) and perform molar RCT (P < .001) and retreatment (P < .05), but no more likely to use rubber dam. Recent GP graduates (≤10 years) were more likely to adopt new technologies and use rubber dam than those who practiced for >20 years. More experienced GPs were more likely to take on complicated cases than those with fewer years of practice. There was no association between hours of CE and compliance with rubber dam usage. Copyright © 2014 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Detection of antibiotic resistance genes in samples from acute and chronic endodontic infections and after treatment.

    PubMed

    Rôças, Isabela N; Siqueira, José F

    2013-09-01

    The purpose of this study was twofold: survey samples from acute and chronic endodontic infections for the presence of genes encoding resistance to beta-lactams, tetracycline and erythromycin, and evaluate the ability of treatment to eliminate these genes from root canals. DNA extracts from samples of abscess aspirates (n=25) and root canals of teeth with asymptomatic apical periodontitis (n=24) were used as template for direct detection of the genes blaTEM, cfxA, tetM, tetQ, tetW, and ermC using real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Bacterial presence was determined using PCR with universal bacterial primers. Root canals of the asymptomatic cases were also sampled and evaluated after chemomechanical procedures using NiTi instruments with 2.5% NaOCl irrigation. All abscess and initial root canal samples were positive for bacteria. At least one of the target resistance genes was found in 36% of the abscess samples and 67% of the asymptomatic cases. The most prevalent genes in abscesses were blaTEM (24%) and ermC (24%), while tetM (42%) and tetW (29%) prevailed in asymptomatic cases. The blaTEM gene was significantly associated with acute cases (p=0.02). Conversely, tetM was significantly more prevalent in asymptomatic cases (p=0.008). Treatment eliminated resistance genes from most cases. Acute and chronic endodontic infections harboured resistance genes for 3 classes of widely used antibiotics. In most cases, treatment was effective in eliminating these genes, but there were a few cases in which they persisted. The implications of persistence are unknown. Direct detection of resistance genes in abscesses may be a potential method for rapid diagnosis and establishment of proactive antimicrobial therapy. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Digital video image processing from dental operating microscope in endodontic treatment.

    PubMed

    Suehara, Masataka; Nakagawa, Kan-Ichi; Aida, Natsuko; Ushikubo, Toshihiro; Morinaga, Kazuki

    2012-01-01

    Recently, optical microscopes have been used in endodontic treatment, as they offer advantages in terms of magnification, illumination, and documentation. Documentation is particularly important in presenting images to patients, and can take the form of both still images and motion video. Although high-quality still images can be obtained using a 35-mm film or CCD camera, the quality of still images produced by a video camera is significantly lower. The purpose of this study was to determine the potential of RegiStax in obtaining high-quality still images from a continuous video stream from an optical microscope. Video was captured continuously and sections with the highest luminosity chosen for frame alignment and stacking using the RegiStax program. The resulting stacked images were subjected to wavelet transformation. The results indicate that high-quality images with a large depth of field could be obtained using this method.

  11. Nonsurgical endodontic treatment of a maxillary lateral incisor with dens invaginatus type II: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Shadmehr, Elham; Kiaani, Sima; Mahdavian, Parinaz

    2015-01-01

    Dens invaginatus is a rare developmental anomaly of teeth with complex root canal system morphology. The present case describes a peg shape maxillary lateral incisor with dens invaginatus (Oehlers type II), necrotic pulp, and an associated large periradicular lesion. Nonsurgical endodontic treatment was performed with the aim of removing the blind sac with diamond bur under the use of operating surgical microscope. The root canal system was obturated with thermoplastic technique. Final restoration was done using composite. The 20-months clinical and radiological follow up revealed an asymptomatic tooth with healing of the periapical pathology; however, for complete healed periradicular lesion more follow up is needed. This case illustrated that a dens invaginatus malformed teeth with a large periradicular lesion can be managed successfully with nonsurgical root canal therapy (NSRCT). PMID:25878686

  12. Diode laser for endodontic treatment: investigations of light distribution and disinfection efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stock, Karl; Graser, Rainer; Udart, Martin; Kienle, Alwin; Hibst, Raimund

    2011-03-01

    Diode lasers are used in dentistry mainly for oral surgery and disinfection of root canals in endodontic treatment. The purpose of this study was to investigate and to improve the laser induced bacteria inactivation in endodontic treatment. An essential prerequisite of the optimization of the irradiation process and device is the knowledge about the determinative factors of bacteria killing: light intensity? light dosis? temperature? In order to find out whether high power NIR laser bacterial killing is caused by a photochemical or a photothermal process we heated bacteria suspensions of E. coli K12 by a water bath and by a diode laser (940 nm) with the same temporal temperature course. Furthermore, bacteria suspensions were irradiated while the temperature was fixed by ice water. Killing of bacteria was measured via fluorescence labeling. In order to optimize the irradiation of the root canal, we designed special fiber tips with radial light emission characteristic by optical ray tracing simulations. Also, we calculated the resulting light distribution in dentin by voxelbased Monte Carlo simulations. Furthermore, we irradiated root canals of extracted human teeth using different fiber tip geometries and measured the resulting light and heat distribution by CCD-camera and thermography. Comparison of killing rates between laser and water based heating shows no significant differences, and irradiation of ice cooled suspensions has no substantial killing effect. Thus, the most important parameter for bacterial killing is the maximum temperature. Irradiation of root canals using fiber tips with radial light emission results in a more defined irradiated area with minor irradiation of the apex and higher intensity and therefore higher temperature increase on root canal surface. In conclusion, our experiments show that at least for E. coli bacteria inactivation by NIR laser irradiation is solely based on a thermal process and that heat distribution in root canal can be

  13. Frequency and distribution of early tooth loss and endodontic treatment needs of permanent first molars in a Turkish pediatric population

    PubMed Central

    Demirbuga, Sezer; Tuncay, Oznur; Cantekin, Kenan; Cayabatmaz, Muhammed; Dincer, Asiye Nur; Kilinc, Halil İbrahim; Sekerci, Ahmet Ercan

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: The objective of this study is to evaluate the frequency and distribution of early tooth loss and endodontic treatment needs of permanent first molars in a Turkish pediatric population. Materials and Methods: A total of 7,895 panoramic radiographs taken for routine dental examination at the Department of Oral Maxillofacial Radiology between 2008 and 2012 years were investigated. Two independent specialists evaluated early tooth loss and endodontic treatment needs of permanent first molars using panoramic radiography and patient anamnesis forms. The teeth were classified according to the following data: (a) Missing teeth, (b) teeth requiring extraction, (c) endodontically treated teeth (ETT), (d) teeth requiring endodontic therapy. The data also classified according to four factors: Age group (6-12 and 13-16), gender (boy and girl), jaw (mandible and maxilla) and side (right and left). A Chi-square test was used for statistical analyses. Results: A total of 19,488 and 12,092 teeth were evaluated in the child group and adolescent group respectively. All data were higher in adolescents than children (P < 0.001). For gender factor, only ETT was higher in girls than it was in boys (P < 0.001). For the jaw factor, all data were higher (P < 0.001) in mandible than in the maxilla. For the side factor, no statistical difference existed between right and left. Conclusions: Early tooth loss and endodontic treatment needs of permanent first molars showed variability according to age groups and jaws. When the results were compared according to the side and gender factors, no statistical difference was found (P > 0.05) except with the data of ETT in gender groups. PMID:24966738

  14. Endodontic applications of short pulsed FR Nd:YAG dental laser: treatment of dystrophic calcification: a clinical trial report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregg, Robert H., II

    1992-06-01

    Formation of dystrophic calcification deposits within the root canal of a tooth, have historically been difficult clinical endodontic complications. Presently, removal of such tissue, mineralized through the deposition of calcareous materials in a root canal (a 'calcified canal'), remains resistant to conventional endodontic techniques. The subsequent treatment primarily involves undesirable surgical procedures and/or loss of the tooth. Described in this clinical trial is a technique using free running (RF) pulsed, Nd:YAG laser energy to ablate hard calcified tissue which obstructed mechanical access of the root canal and root apex--a technique employed after conventional endodontic methods failed. This paper discusses the 'plasma' effect, 'spallation', canal illumination and transillumination using the helium-neon (HeNe) aiming beam. A free running pulsed, FR Nd:YAG dental laser was successfully used at 20 pulses per second and 1.75 watts to photovaporize and photodisrupt enough calcified tissue obstruction, to allow a conventional endodontic file to pass the canal blockage, and access the root apex. This clinical trial achieved the immediate, short term objective of endodontic hard tissue removal via photovaporization and photodisruption. The pulsed FR Nd:YAG dental laser used as described in this clinical report appears to be a very safe and very effective technique; offers a treatment alternative to traditional therapy that suggests high patient acceptance; and is significantly less stressful for the doctor and staff than traditional treatment options. Long-term, controlled scientific and clinical studies are necessary to establish the safety and efficacy of both the helium-neon energy for visualization and the low- watt pulsed FR Nd:YAG energy for photovaporization and photodisruption of hard calcified tissue within the root canal. Research is especially needed to understand the effects of low- watt, pulsed FR, Nd:YAG laser on the activity of osteoclasts and

  15. The failure rate of NHS funded molar endodontic treatment delivered in general dental practice.

    PubMed

    Tickle, M; Milsom, K; Qualtrough, A; Blinkhorn, F; Aggarwal, V R

    2008-03-08

    outcomes of endodontic therapy. The similar failure rates for teeth that had optimal and suboptimal root fillings suggest that endodontic treatment is not as technique sensitive as previously thought. The results also support the notion that the coronal restoration is more important than radiographic appearance of the root filling.

  16. Immature permanent teeth with apical periodontitis and abscess treated by regenerative endodontic treatment using calcium hydroxide and MTA: a report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Park, Mirae; Ahn, Byung Duk

    2014-01-01

    Regenerative endodontic techniques have been introduced to overcome the limits of the traditional apexification approach and allow continued root development after treatment of infected immature permanent teeth. The purpose of this report was to describe two cases with severe apical periodontitis and abscess that were successfully treated by regenerative endodontic treatment using calcium hydroxide. The report involves treatment of two patients who developed apical periodontitis and abscesses on their immature premolars affected by dens evaginatus. Regenerative endodontic treatment was performed using calcium hydroxide. The treatment procedures have been shown to result in increased thickening of root walls and encourage continued root development. Different outcomes were observed when calcium hydroxide was placed past and within the coronal half of the canal. Calcium hydroxide can be used as an effective medicament in regenerative endodontic technique, and successful regeneration can be expected even in severe cases of apical periodontitis or abscess.

  17. Root canal hydrophobization by dentinal silanization: improvement of silicon-based endodontic treatment tightness.

    PubMed

    Collart Dutilleul, Pierre-Yves; Fonseca, Cesar Gaitán; Zimányi, László; Romieu, Olivier; Pozos-Guillén, Amaury J; Semetey, Vincent; Cuisinier, Frédéric; Pérez, Elías; Levallois, Bernard

    2013-07-01

    A new strategy to improve silicon-based endodontic treatment tightness by dentine hydrophobization is presented in this work: root dentine was silanized to obtain a hydrophobic dentine-sealer interface that limits fluid penetration. This strategy was based on the grafting of aliphatic carbon chains on the dentine through a silanization with the silane end groups [octadecyltrichlorosilane (OTS) and octadecyltriethoxysilane]. Dentine surface was previously pretreated, applying ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid and sodium hypochlorite, to expose hydroxyl groups of collagen for the silane grafting. Collagen fibers exposure after pretreatment was visible with scanning electron microscopy, and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy showed their correct exposition for the silanization (amide I and II, with 1630, 1580, and 1538 cm⁻¹ peaks corresponding to the vibration of C=O and C--N bonds). The grafting of aliphatic carbon chains was confirmed by FTIR (peaks at 2952 and 2923 cm⁻¹ corresponding to the stretching of C--H bonds) and by the increasing of the water contact angle. The most efficient hydrophobization was obtained with OTS in ethyl acetate, with a water contact angle turning from 51° to 109°. Gas and liquid permeability tests showed an increased seal tightness after silanization: the mean gas and water flows dropped from 2.02 × 10⁻⁸ to 1.62 × 10⁻⁸ mol s⁻¹ and from 10.8 × 10⁻³ to 5.4 × 10⁻³ µL min⁻¹, respectively. These results show clear evidences to turn hydrophilic dentine surface into a hydrophobic surface that may improve endodontic sealing.

  18. Longitudinal Cohort Study of Regenerative Endodontic Treatment for Immature Necrotic Permanent Teeth.

    PubMed

    Chan, Edwin Ka Meng; Desmeules, Mia; Cielecki, Margaret; Dabbagh, Basma; Ferraz Dos Santos, Beatriz

    2017-03-01

    The treatment of immature necrotic permanent teeth presents several clinical challenges in endodontics. Regenerative endodontic procedures (REPs) permit root development, increased canal wall thickness, and apical closure. This longitudinal cohort study aimed to evaluate the long-term clinical and radiographic outcomes of REPs of immature necrotic permanent teeth over a 30-month period. This study was performed at the Division of Dentistry of the Montreal Children's Hospital, Montreal, Quebec, Canada. Twenty-eight immature necrotic permanent teeth from 22 patients were included in this study. All teeth were treated with a standardized REP protocol. Patients had follow-up appointments at 1, 2, 3, 6, 12, 18, 24, and 30 months. At each appointment, signs and symptoms were evaluated. Radiographic evaluation was also performed by a calibrated endodontist in order to analyze different parameters. Our results show a high survival rate (96.4%), clinical success (92.8%), and resolution of apical pathology (100%). Significant increases in the average root length (8.1%, P < .0001) and root thickness area (11.6%, P = .03) were observed after 30 months. In the study period, a significant decrease in the apical diameter was also noted, with 30.8% of the cases showing complete apical closure. Teeth with more immature stages of root development had a higher percentage of change in root thickness, length, and apical diameter; however, these results were not statistically significant. Teeth treated with REPs presented resolution of symptoms. Although clinical meaningful change was not achieved in all cases, increased root thickness, root length, and apical closure were observed at 30 months. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. [Apical endodontic surgery].

    PubMed

    Lindeboom, J A

    2004-04-01

    If (a revision of) a conventional endodontic treatment is not possible or not successful, apical endodontic surgery can be indicated. The contemporary indications, the better retrograde preparation techniques with ultrasonic retro-tips, and the better visualisation of the operation area with an operation microscope can lead to higher success percentages. Moreover, the current developments in the field of compatible filling materials are promising. Also the application of lasers is promising, but has still to prove its clinical usefulness.

  20. Treatment of a large cystlike inflammatory periapical lesion associated with mature necrotic teeth using regenerative endodontic therapy.

    PubMed

    Saoud, Tarek Mohamed A; Sigurdsson, Asgeir; Rosenberg, Paul A; Lin, Louis M; Ricucci, Domenico

    2014-12-01

    Regenerative endodontic therapy is currently used to treat immature permanent teeth with necrotic pulp and/or apical periodontitis. However, mature teeth with necrotic pulp and apical periodontitis have also been treated using regenerative endodontic therapy. The treatment resulted in resolution of apical periodontitis, regression of clinical signs and symptoms but no apparent thickening of the canal walls, and/or continued root development. A recent study in an animal model showed that the tissues formed in the canals of mature teeth with apical periodontitis after regenerative endodontic therapy were cementumlike, bonelike, and periodontal ligament-like tissue with numerous blood vessels. These tissues are similar to the tissues observed in immature permanent teeth with apical periodontitis after regenerative endodontic therapy. A 23-year-old woman had a history of traumatic injury to her upper anterior teeth when she was 8 years old. Subsequently, #8 developed pulp necrosis and an acute apical abscess and #7 symptomatic apical periodontitis. The apex of #8 was slightly open, and the apex of #7 was completely formed. Instead of nonsurgical root canal therapy, regenerative endodontic therapy was attempted, including complete chemomechanical debridement on #8 and #7. This was based on the premise that filling of disinfected root canals with the host's biological vital tissue might be better than filling with foreign materials. After regenerative endodontic therapy of #8 and #7, there was radiographic evidence of periapical osseous healing and regression of clinical signs and symptoms. The pulp cavity of #8 decreased in size, and the apex closed. The pulp cavity of #7 appeared to be obliterated by mineralized tissue. These indicated ingrowth of new vital tissue into the chemomechanically debrided canals. Regenerative endodontic therapy of mature teeth with apical periodontitis and apical abscess can result in the regression of clinical signs and/or symptoms and

  1. Accidental injury of the inferior alveolar nerve due to the extrusion of calcium hydroxide in endodontic treatment: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    During clinical endodontic treatment, we often find radiopaque filling material beyond the root apex. Accidental extrusion of calcium hydroxide could cause the injury of inferior alveolar nerve, such as paresthesia or continuous inflammatory response. This case report presents the extrusion of calcium hydroxide and treatment procedures including surgical intervention. A 48 yr old female patient experienced Calcipex II extrusion in to the inferior alveolar canal on left mandibular area during endodontic treatment. After completion of endodontic treatment on left mandibular first molar, surgical intervention was planned under general anesthesia. After cortical bone osteotomy and debridement, neuroma resection and neurorrhaphy was performed, and prognosis was observed. But no improvement in sensory nerve was seen following surgical intervention after 20 mon. A clinician should be aware of extrusion of intracanal medicaments and the possibility of damage on inferior alveolar canal. Injectable type of calcium hydroxide should be applied with care for preventing nerve injury. The alternative delivery method such as lentulo spiral was suggested on the posterior mandibular molar. PMID:26877992

  2. Accidental injury of the inferior alveolar nerve due to the extrusion of calcium hydroxide in endodontic treatment: a case report.

    PubMed

    Shin, Yooseok; Roh, Byoung-Duck; Kim, Yemi; Kim, Taehyeon; Kim, Hyungjun

    2016-02-01

    During clinical endodontic treatment, we often find radiopaque filling material beyond the root apex. Accidental extrusion of calcium hydroxide could cause the injury of inferior alveolar nerve, such as paresthesia or continuous inflammatory response. This case report presents the extrusion of calcium hydroxide and treatment procedures including surgical intervention. A 48 yr old female patient experienced Calcipex II extrusion in to the inferior alveolar canal on left mandibular area during endodontic treatment. After completion of endodontic treatment on left mandibular first molar, surgical intervention was planned under general anesthesia. After cortical bone osteotomy and debridement, neuroma resection and neurorrhaphy was performed, and prognosis was observed. But no improvement in sensory nerve was seen following surgical intervention after 20 mon. A clinician should be aware of extrusion of intracanal medicaments and the possibility of damage on inferior alveolar canal. Injectable type of calcium hydroxide should be applied with care for preventing nerve injury. The alternative delivery method such as lentulo spiral was suggested on the posterior mandibular molar.

  3. Apical Periodontitis and Endodontic Treatment in Patients with Type II Diabetes Mellitus: Comparative Cross-sectional Survey.

    PubMed

    Smadi, Leena

    2017-05-01

    The aims of this study were to investigate the prevalence of apical periodontitis (AP) in diabetes mellitus (DM) patients compared with nondiabetic patients and to examine the effect of glycemic control on the prevalence of AP. Radiographs of a group of DM patients were compared with those of a matched nondiabetic group to identify AP. The diabetic group was subdivided according to the level of glycemic control into two subgroups: A well-controlled DM and a poorly controlled DM. The periapical index score was used to assess the periapical status. All groups were compared in regard to the presence of AP lesions, the number of end-odontically treated teeth (ET), and the percentage of failure of endodontically treated teeth (AP/ET ratio). Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS version 20.0, Chicago, Illinois, USA) was used for all the analyses; p ≤ 0.05 was considered as statistically significant. The prevalence of AP was higher in diabetic group than in the nondiabetic group (13.5 vs 11.9% respectively). Diabetic group had more teeth with endodontic treatment ET compared with nondiabetic group (4.18 vs 1.82% respectively); this difference was statistically significant (p = 0.001) along with higher AP/ET ratio (27.7 vs 19.3 respectively). The poorly controlled DM group had a higher prevalence of AP lesions compared with the well-controlled DM group (18.29 vs 9.21 respectively). This difference was statistically significant (p = 0.001); they also had a higher percentage of ET (5.55 vs 3.13% respectively) and AP/ ET ratio (32.0 vs 21.8% respectively). This survey demonstrates a higher prevalence of AP in DM patients compared with nondiabetic group, with an increased prevalence of persistent chronic AP. Compared with a well-controlled diabetic group, a poor glycemic control may be associated with a higher prevalence of AP and increased rate of endodontic failures. Counseling diabetic patients, particularly those with poor glycemic control, about the risk of

  4. Evaluation of microsurgery with SuperEBA as root-end filling material for treating post-treatment endodontic disease: a 2-year retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Li, Hong; Zhai, Fei; Zhang, Ru; Hou, Benxiang

    2014-03-01

    This retrospective study assessed the effects of microsurgical treatment of post-treatment endodontic disease using SuperEBA (Bosworth, Skokie, IL) as the root-end filling material and evaluated the potential prognostic factors in relation to outcome. Data were collected from patients diagnosed with post-treatment endodontic disease who then underwent endodontic microsurgery between April 2007 and October 2010. The effect was evaluated 2 years after the operation. Surgical procedures were performed by a single endodontic specialist. After surgery, operation records were recorded including preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative factors from the clinical and radiographic measures. For statistical analysis of the predisposing factors, the dependent variable was the dichotomous outcome (ie, success vs failure). Eighty-two patients with 101 treated teeth met the inclusion criteria. The recall rate was 87.2%. Of these microsurgically treated cases, the overall healing rate was 93.1%. At the 0.05 significance level, age, sex, tooth position, size of periapical radiolucency, biopsy result of periapical lesion, and presence of a sinus tract appeared to have no significant effects on the outcome (P > .05). Microsurgical endodontic treatment using SuperEBA as the root-end filling material is a favorable option for post-treatment endodontic disease. Copyright © 2014 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Regenerative Endodontics for Adult Patients.

    PubMed

    He, Ling; Kim, Sahng G; Gong, Qimei; Zhong, Juan; Wang, Sainan; Zhou, Xuedong; Ye, Ling; Ling, Junqi; Mao, Jeremy J

    2017-09-01

    The goal of endodontics is to save teeth. Since inception, endodontic treatments are performed to obturate disinfected root canals with inert materials such as gutta-percha. Although teeth can be saved after successful endodontic treatments, they are devitalized and therefore susceptible to reinfections and fractures. The American Association of Endodontists (AAE) has made a tremendous effort to revitalize disinfected immature permanent teeth in children and adolescents with diagnoses including pulp necrosis or apical periodontitis. The American Dental Association (ADA) in 2011 issued several clinical codes for regenerative endodontic procedures or apical revascularization in necrotic immature permanent teeth in children and adolescents. These AAE and ADA initiatives have stimulated robust interest in devising a multitude of tissue engineering approaches for dental pulp and dentin regeneration. Can the concept of regenerative endodontics be extended to revitalize mature permanent teeth with diagnoses including irreversible pulpitis and/or pulp necrosis in adults? The present article was written not only to summarize emerging findings to revitalize mature permanent teeth in adult patients but also to identify challenges and strategies that focus on realizing the goal of regenerative endodontics in adults. We further present clinical cases and describe the biological basis of potential regenerative endodontic procedures in adults. This article explores the frequently asked question if regenerative endodontic therapies should be developed for dental pulp and/or dentin regeneration in adults, who consist of the great majority of endodontic patients. Copyright © 2017 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis analysis of bacterial communities associated with failed endodontic treatment.

    PubMed

    Rôças, Isabela N; Siqueira, José F; Aboim, Marcela C R; Rosado, Alexandre S

    2004-12-01

    A great deal of evidence indicates that persistent infections of the root canal of human teeth play an important role in the failure of the root canal treatment. The present study was undertaken to apply the PCR-DGGE fingerprinting approach to examine the structure of the bacterial population infecting previously treated root canals of humans associated with persistent periradicular lesions. Samples were taken from 14 filled root canals, DNA was extracted, and part of the 16S rDNA of all bacteria was amplified by PCR and separated by DGGE, generating banding patterns representative of the community structure. Species-specific PCR for the detection of Enterococcus faecalis was also performed. The mean number of bands detected in the 16S rDNA community profiles was about 6, ranging from 1 to 26 bands. Each sample showed a unique structure of the microbial community. The species-specific PCR assay revealed the presence of E. faecalis in 10 of 14 samples, but DGGE analysis revealed it was not the dominant species. Results revealed that the intraradicular bacterial community associated with failed endodontic treatment significantly varied in composition from teeth to teeth. Persistent intraradicular infections were present in all root-filled teeth.

  7. Modern Endodontic Principles. Part 8: The Future of Endodontics.

    PubMed

    Roudsari, Reza Vahid; Jawad, Sarra; Taylor, Carly; Darcey, James; Qualtrough, Alison

    2016-06-01

    Although the principles of endodontics have remained unchanged for many decades, root canal treatment has been subject to major changes in the past few years. This paper outlines the cutting-edge advances including the materials and techniques used. CPD/Clinical Relevance: This article provides an overview of bioactive materials and insight into regenerative endodontics, vital pulp therapy and intentional replantation.

  8. Regenerative endodontics--biologically-based treatment for immature permanent teeth: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Thomson, A; Kahler, B

    2010-12-01

    A paradigm shift in the treatment of immature, necrotic teeth has occurred with biologically-based principles and regenerative endodontic protocols replacing traditional 'apexification' procedures. Preliminary research suggests that stem and progenitor cells from the pulp and/or periodontium contribute to continued root development when regenerative procedures are followed. A mandibular premolar tooth with a chronic periapical abscess was irrigated with sodium hypochlorite with minimal instrumentation and then dressed with tri-antibiotic paste consisting of ciprofloxacin, metronidazole and amoxicillin. At a subsequent visit a blood clot was evoked in the canal by irritating periapical tissues and the canal sealed with mineral trioxide aggregate, glass ionomer cement and composite resin. Resolution of apical periodontitis and the draining sinus, continued root maturation and apical closure occurred over an 18-month period. The tooth became responsive to pulp sensibility testing. It is important that dentists recognize the potential of regenerative endodontics in the treatment of necrotic, immature teeth. Initial management should involve irrigation with sodium hypochlorite only. Intra-canal medicaments, such as calcium hydroxide, are contraindicated as they inhibit further root growth. This report uses a variation of the tri-antibiotic paste currently recommended for regenerative procedures that avoided the discolouration of the crown associated with current protocols. Regenerative endodontics with continued root growth may reduce the risk of fracture and premature tooth loss associated with traditional 'apexification' procedures where the root remains thin and weak. © 2010 Australian Dental Association.

  9. Influence of calcium hydroxide on the post-treatment pain in Endodontics: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Anjaneyulu, K.; Nivedhitha, Malli Sureshbabu

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Pain of endodontic origin has been a major concern to the patients and the clinicians for many years. Post-operative pain is associated with inflammation in the periradicular tissues caused by irritants egressing from root canal during treatment. It has been suggested that calcium hydroxide intra-canal medicament has pain-preventive properties because of its anti-microbial or tissue altering effects. Some dispute this and reasoned that calcium hydroxide may initiate or increase pain by inducing or increasing inflammation. Objective: To evaluate the effectiveness of calcium hydroxide in reducing the post-treatment pain when used as an intra-canal medicament Materials and Methods: The following databases were searched: PubMed CENTRAL (until July 2013), MEDLINE, and Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews. Bibliographies of clinical studies and reviews identified in the electronic search were analyzed for studies published outside the electronically searched journals. The primary outcome measure was to evaluate the post-treatment pain reduction when calcium hydroxide is used as an intra-canal medicament in patients undergoing root canal therapy. Results: The reviews found some clinical evidence that calcium hydroxide is not very effective in reducing post-treatment pain when it is used alone, but its effectiveness can be increased when used in combination with other medicaments like chlorhexidine and camphorated monochlorophenol (CMCP). Conclusion: Even though calcium hydroxide is one of the most widely used intra-canal medicament due to its anti-microbial properties, there is no clear evidence of its effect on the post-treatment pain after the chemo-mechanical root canal preparation. PMID:24944439

  10. Magnification in modern endodontic practice.

    PubMed

    Taschieri, S; Del Fabbro, M; Weinstein, T; Rosen, E; Tsesis, I

    2010-07-01

    The use of magnification devices in endodontics is becoming more and more common, with the aim of improving the quality of treatment. The common magnification systems used in modern endodontics are the surgical operation microscope, fiber-optic endoscope, and surgical loupes. The benefits of using magnification devices for conventional endodontic treatment include the increased visualization of the treatment field, enhanced possibilities in locating canals, aid in the removal of separated instruments, diagnosis of root and tooth fractures, perforation repair, and case documentation. In endodontic surgery, the use of magnification improves the ability to locate, clean, and fill the root canal system, thus achieving a predictable outcome. Further evidence-based research might better clarify the advantages and limitations of using magnification in endodontic practice.

  11. Quality-Shaping Factors and Endodontic Treatment amongst General Dental Practitioners with a Focus on Denmark

    PubMed Central

    Demant, Sune; Markvart, Merete; Bjørndal, Lars

    2012-01-01

    There is a gap between the endodontic outcome that can be achieved and the outcome observed on the basis of worldwide general dental practitioner data. The quality of root canal treatment (RCT) is shaped by the dentist's knowledge, attitude, and skills, but it may also be influenced by the patient's demands and degree of satisfaction. The topic has only been sparsely investigated. Although dental health has increased over the years in Denmark, the number of performed root fillings has also increased, probably because the number of tooth extractions have declined and more molar teeth have been treated. Caries appears to be the main cause for performing RCT and a preventive approach by employing stepwise excavation may reduce RCT, but this strategy does not remove the gap. Factors influencing RCT quality could be the status on adoption of nickel-titanium rotary technology, more focus on infection control (rubber dam use, knowledge of factors important for prognosis), as dentists often think that they are good at doing RCT, but often perform inadequately, an alteration of clinician's awareness of their performance in the context of dental practices, seems warranted. Finally, the development of new preventive modalities for pulp and apical inflammation are crucial. PMID:22536241

  12. Temperature changes accompanying near infrared diode laser endodontic treatment of wet canals.

    PubMed

    Hmud, Raghad; Kahler, William A; Walsh, Laurence J

    2010-05-01

    Diode laser endodontic treatments such as disinfection or the generation of cavitations should not cause deleterious thermal changes in radicular dentin. This study assessed thermal changes in the root canal and on the root surface when using 940 and 980 nm lasers at settings of 4 W/10 Hz and 2.5 W/25 Hz, respectively, delivered into 2000-mum fibers to generate cavitations in water. The root surface temperature in the apical third was recorded, as was the water temperature in coronal, middle, and apical third regions, by using thermocouples placed inside the canal. Lasing was undertaken with either rest periods or rinsing between 5-second laser exposures. Both diode lasers induced only modest temperature changes on the external root surface at the settings used. Even though the temperature of the water within the canal increased during lasing by as much as 30 degrees C, the external root surface temperature increased by only a maximum of 4 degrees C. Irrigation between laser exposures was highly effective in minimizing thermal changes within the root canal and on the root surface. Diode laser parameters that induce cavitation do not result in adverse thermal changes in radicular dentin. Copyright (c) 2010 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Effect of Deep Cryogenic Treatment on Cyclic Fatigue of Endodontic Rotary Nickel Titanium Instruments.

    PubMed

    Yazdizadeh, Mohammad; Skini, Masoumeh; Hoseini Goosheh, Seyyed Mohsen; Jafarzadeh, Mansour; Shamohammadi, Milad; Rakhshan, Vahid

    2017-01-01

    Cyclic fatigue is the common reason for breakage of rotary instruments. This study was conducted to evaluate the effect of cryogenic treatment (CT) in improving the resistance to cyclic fatigue of endodontic rotary instruments. In this in vitro study, 20 RaCe and 20 Mtwo files were randomly divided into two groups of negative control and CT. CT files were stored in liquid nitrogen at -196(°)C for 24 h, and then were gradually warmed to the room temperature. All files were used (at torques and speeds recommended by their manufacturers) in a simulated canal with a 45(°) curvature until breakage. The time to fail (TF) was recorded and used to calculate the number of cycle to fail (NCF). Groups were compared using independent-samples t-test. Mean NCFs were 1248.2±68.1, 1281.6±78.6, 4126.0±179.2, and 4175.4±190.1 cycles, for the Mtwo-control, Mtwo-CT, RaCe-control, and RaCe-CT, respectively. The difference between the controls and their respective CT groups were not significant (P>0.3). The difference between the systems was significant. Deep CT did not improve resistance to cyclic fatigue of the evaluated rotary files.

  14. Effect of Deep Cryogenic Treatment on Cyclic Fatigue of Endodontic Rotary Nickel Titanium Instruments

    PubMed Central

    Yazdizadeh, Mohammad; Skini, Masoumeh; Hoseini Goosheh, Seyyed Mohsen; Jafarzadeh, Mansour; Shamohammadi, Milad; Rakhshan, Vahid

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Cyclic fatigue is the common reason for breakage of rotary instruments. This study was conducted to evaluate the effect of cryogenic treatment (CT) in improving the resistance to cyclic fatigue of endodontic rotary instruments. Methods and Materials: In this in vitro study, 20 RaCe and 20 Mtwo files were randomly divided into two groups of negative control and CT. CT files were stored in liquid nitrogen at -196°C for 24 h, and then were gradually warmed to the room temperature. All files were used (at torques and speeds recommended by their manufacturers) in a simulated canal with a 45° curvature until breakage. The time to fail (TF) was recorded and used to calculate the number of cycle to fail (NCF). Groups were compared using independent-samples t-test. Results: Mean NCFs were 1248.2±68.1, 1281.6±78.6, 4126.0±179.2, and 4175.4±190.1 cycles, for the Mtwo-control, Mtwo-CT, RaCe-control, and RaCe-CT, respectively. The difference between the controls and their respective CT groups were not significant (P>0.3). The difference between the systems was significant. Conclusion: Deep CT did not improve resistance to cyclic fatigue of the evaluated rotary files. PMID:28512489

  15. Preferred materials and methods employed for endodontic treatment by Iranian general practitioners.

    PubMed

    Raoof, Maryam; Zeini, Negar; Haghani, Jahangir; Sadr, Saeedeh; Mohammadalizadeh, Sakineh

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to gather information on the materials and methods employed in root canal treatment (RCT) by general dental practitioners (GDPs) in Iran. A questionnaire was distributed among 450 dentists who attended the 53(th) Iranian Dental Association congress. Participants were asked to consider demographic variables and answer the questions regarding the materials and methods commonly used in RCT. Descriptive statistics were given as absolute frequencies and valid percentages. The chi-square test was used to investigate the influence of gender and the years of professional activity for the employed materials and techniques. The response rate was 84.88%. The results showed that 61.5% of the participants did not perform pulp sensitivity tests prior to RCT. Less than half of the general dental practitioners (47.4%) said that they would trace a sinus tract before starting the treatment. Nearly 16% of practitioners preferred the rubber dam isolation method. Over 36% of the practitioners reported using formocresol for pulpotomy. The combined approach of working length (WL) radiographs and electronic apex locators was used by 35.2% of the practitioners. Most of the respondents used K-file hand instruments for canal preparation and the technique of choice was step-back (43.5%), while 40.1% of respondents used NiTi rotary files, mostly ProTaper and RaCe. The most widely used irrigant was normal saline (61.8%). Calcium hydroxide was the most commonly used inter appointment medicament (84.6%). The most popular obturation technique was cold lateral condensation (81.7%) with 51% using zinc oxide-eugenol-based sealers. The majority of Iranian GDPs who participated in the present survey do not comply with quality guidelines of endodontic treatment.

  16. Preferred Materials and Methods Employed for Endodontic Treatment by Iranian General Practitioners

    PubMed Central

    Raoof, Maryam; Zeini, Negar; Haghani, Jahangir; Sadr, Saeedeh; Mohammadalizadeh, Sakineh

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The aim of this study was to gather information on the materials and methods employed in root canal treatment (RCT) by general dental practitioners (GDPs) in Iran. Methods and Materials: A questionnaire was distributed among 450 dentists who attended the 53th Iranian Dental Association congress. Participants were asked to consider demographic variables and answer the questions regarding the materials and methods commonly used in RCT. Descriptive statistics were given as absolute frequencies and valid percentages. The chi-square test was used to investigate the influence of gender and the years of professional activity for the employed materials and techniques. Results: The response rate was 84.88%. The results showed that 61.5% of the participants did not perform pulp sensitivity tests prior to RCT. Less than half of the general dental practitioners (47.4%) said that they would trace a sinus tract before starting the treatment. Nearly 16% of practitioners preferred the rubber dam isolation method. Over 36% of the practitioners reported using formocresol for pulpotomy. The combined approach of working length (WL) radiographs and electronic apex locators was used by 35.2% of the practitioners. Most of the respondents used K-file hand instruments for canal preparation and the technique of choice was step-back (43.5%), while 40.1% of respondents used NiTi rotary files, mostly ProTaper and RaCe. The most widely used irrigant was normal saline (61.8%). Calcium hydroxide was the most commonly used inter appointment medicament (84.6%). The most popular obturation technique was cold lateral condensation (81.7%) with 51% using zinc oxide-eugenol-based sealers. Conclusions: The majority of Iranian GDPs who participated in the present survey do not comply with quality guidelines of endodontic treatment. PMID:25834595

  17. In vivo antimicrobial effects of endodontic treatment procedures as assessed by molecular microbiologic techniques.

    PubMed

    Rôças, Isabela N; Siqueira, José F

    2011-03-01

    This culture-independent molecular microbiology study evaluated the antimicrobial effects of chemomechanical preparation supplemented by intracanal medication during treatment of teeth with apical periodontitis. Samples were taken from 24 necrotic root canals at the baseline (S1), after chemomechanical preparation by using 2.5% NaOCl as the irrigant (S2), and after a 7-day interappointment medication with calcium hydroxide paste in either glycerin (CHG) or camphorated paramonochlorophenol/glycerin (CHPG) (S3). Bacterial, archaeal, and fungal presence was evaluated by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and bacterial identifications were performed by a closed-ended reverse-capture checkerboard approach targeting 28 candidate endodontic pathogens. All S1 samples were positive for bacteria but negative for both archaea and fungi. Treatment procedures were highly effective in reducing the bacterial levels and number of taxa. Overall, 46% of S2 samples and 62.5% of S3 samples were PCR-negative for bacteria. Specifically, S2 and S3 samples yielded negative PCR results in 50% and 58% of the canals in the CHG group and in 42% and 67% of the canals in the CHPG group, respectively. Except for comparisons with S1 samples, no other statistically significant differences were observed for intragroup and intergroup comparisons involving S2 and S3. Several taxa were still found in S2 and S3 samples, and the most prevalent were Propionibacterium acnes and Streptococcus species. Bacterial levels and number of taxa were substantially reduced after chemomechanical preparation and intracanal medication. However, presence of detectable levels of persisting bacteria in many cases indicates that the search for more effective antimicrobial treatment strategies should be stimulated. Copyright © 2011 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Learning experience in endodontics: Brazilian students' perceptions.

    PubMed

    Seijo, Marilia O S; Ferreira, Efigênia F; Ribeiro Sobrinho, Antônio P; Paiva, Saul M; Martins, Renata C

    2013-05-01

    Including students' perceptions in the educational process is considered a key component in monitoring the quality of academic programs. This study aimed to evaluate the concept of one's learning experience in endodontic teaching from the perspective of a group of Brazilian students. A total of 126 self-administered, structured questionnaires were distributed to undergraduate dental students enrolled in endodontics courses during the second semester of the 2009 academic year. The questionnaires were administered during final examinations and focused on students' opinions concerning learning during endodontic treatments, time spent during endodontic treatments, difficulties found during endodontic treatments, quality of endodontic treatments performed, characteristics of the technique employed, and suggestions to improve endodontic teaching. Ninety-one percent of the questionnaires were returned for evaluation. The obtained answers were discussed and analyzed, thereby generating quantitative and qualitative data showing students' perceptions of their experiences in endodontics courses. The main points that can affect the teaching of endodontics, according to the undergraduate students, included patients' absences and delays, selection of patients, preclinical and clinical training, difficulties found, type of technique employed, and teachers' orientation during endodontic treatment. The students' perceptions provided valuable information about the development of the course and the teacher-student relationship, together with the added intention of enhancing the teaching of endodontics as well as other courses.

  19. Polymerase chain reaction-based analysis of microorganisms associated with failed endodontic treatment.

    PubMed

    Siqueira, José F; Rôças, Isabela N

    2004-01-01

    In this study, we aimed to investigate the occurrence of several microbial species in cases of failed endodontic therapy by means of the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Study design Root canal samples were taken from 22 root-filled teeth with persistent periradicular lesions selected for re-treatment. DNA was extracted from the samples and analyzed for the presence of 19 microbial taxa by using the polymerase chain reaction. All samples were positive for at least 1 of the target microbial species. Enterococcus faecalis was the most prevalent species-detected in 77% of the cases. The other most prevalent species were Pseudoramibacter alactolyticus (52%), Propionibacterium propionicum (52%), Dialister pneumosintes (48%), and Filifactor alocis (48%). Candida albicans was found in 9% of the samples. The mean number of species in samples filled up to 2 mm short of the radiographic apex was 3 (range, 1-5), whereas cases in which the filling was greater than 2 mm from the apex yielded a mean of 5 species (range, 2-11). This difference was statistically significant (P <.05). Microorganisms occurred in all cases of root-filled teeth associated with periradicular lesions, which lends strong support to the assertion that treatment failures are rather of infectious etiology, caused by persistent or secondary intraradicular infections. E faecalis was the most prevalent species, followed by 4 other anaerobic species: P. alactolyticus, P. propionicum, D. pneumosintes, and F. alocis. All examined samples harbored at least 1 of the following gram-positive bacterial species: E. faecalis, P. alactolyticus, or P. propionicum.

  20. Bioactive materials in endodontics.

    PubMed

    Enkel, Bénédicte; Dupas, Cécile; Armengol, Valérie; Akpe Adou, Jonas; Bosco, Julia; Daculsi, Guy; Jean, Alain; Laboux, Olivier; LeGeros, Racquel Z; Weiss, Pierre

    2008-07-01

    Endodontic treatment in dentistry is a delicate procedure and many treatment attempts fail. Despite constant development of new root canal filling techniques, the clinician is confronted with both a complex root canal system and the use of filling materials that are harmful for periapical tissues. This paper evaluates reported studies on biomaterials used in endodontics, including calcium hydroxide, mineral trioxide aggregate, calcium phosphate ceramics and calcium phosphate cements. Special emphasis is made on promising new biomaterials, such as injectable bone substitute and injectable calcium phosphate cements. These materials, which combine biocompatibility, bioactivity and rheological properties, could be good alternatives in endodontics as root canal fillers. They could also be used as drug-delivery vehicles (e.g., for antibiotics and growth factors) or as scaffolds in pulp tissue engineering.

  1. Endodontic Epidemiology

    PubMed Central

    Shahravan, Arash; Haghdoost, Ali Akbar

    2014-01-01

    Epidemiology is the study of disease distribution and factors determining or affecting it. Likewise, endodontic epidemiology can be defined as the science of studying the distribution pattern and determinants of pulp and periapical diseases; specially apical periodontitis. Although different study designs have been used in endodontics, researchers must pay more attention to study designs with higher level of evidence such as randomized clinical trials. PMID:24688577

  2. Management of Teeth with Persistent Apical Periodontitis after Root Canal Treatment Using Regenerative Endodontic Therapy.

    PubMed

    Saoud, Tarek Mohamed A; Huang, George T-J; Gibbs, Jennifer L; Sigurdsson, Asgeir; Lin, Louis M

    2015-10-01

    Regenerative endodontic therapy (RET) is currently used to treat immature teeth with necrotic pulp and/or apical periodontitis. However, recently RET has been used to treat mature teeth with necrotic pulp and/or apical periodontitis and resulted in regression of clinical signs and/or symptoms and resolution of apical periodontitis. The purpose of this case report was to describe the potential of using RET to treat 2 mature teeth with persistent apical periodontitis after root canal therapy using RET. Two male patients, one 26-year old and another 12-year old, presented for retreatment of persistent apical periodontitis after root canal treatment of 2 mature teeth (#9 and #19). The gutta-percha fillings in the canals of teeth #9 and #19 were removed with Carvene gutta-percha solvent (Prevest DenPro, Jammu, India) and ProTaper Universal rotary retreatment files (Dentsply Maillefer, Ballaigues, Switzerland). The canals of both teeth were further chemomechanically debrided with rotary retreatment files and copious amounts of sodium hypochlorite irrigation and dressed with Metapaste (Meta Biomed, Chungbuk, Korea). RET was performed on teeth #9 and #19. Periapical bleeding was provoked into the disinfected root canals. The blood clots were covered with mineral trioxide aggregate plugs, and the access cavities were restored with intermediate restorative material. Teeth #9 and #19 showed regression of clinical signs and/or symptoms and healing of apical periodontitis after 13-month and 14-month follow-ups, respectively. Tooth #9 revealed narrowing of the canal space and apical closure by deposition of hard tissue. RET has the potential to be used to retreat teeth with persistent apical periodontitis after root canal therapy. Copyright © 2015 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Endodontic treatment including apexification in a chow chow with a necrotic immature mandibular canine tooth.

    PubMed

    Hennet, P

    1998-03-01

    A necrotic immature mandibular, canine tooth in a two year-old, male, intact Chow Chow was endodontically treated. This tooth had an open apex, wide root canal, thin dentinal walls, and there was periapical bone resorption. An apexification procedure was used to induce apical closure by calcified tissue formation, with resolution of the periapical inflammation.

  4. Evaluation of the Factors and Treatment Options of Separated Endodontic Files Among Dentists and Undergraduate Students in Riyadh Area

    PubMed Central

    Pedir, Samah Samir; Mahran, Abeer Hashem; Beshr, Khaled

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Separation of endodontic files during root canal treatment is a common multifactorial problem facing most of dental practitioners both dentists and students that has high impact on treatment and prognosis outcome. Aim To compare the incidence, factors and treatment options of separated endodontic files among dentists and undergraduate students in Riyadh area. Materials and Methods A survery of 35-questionnaire was formulated and e-mailed to all 149 dentists of different dental specialties who are working in different clinical centers in Riyadh area and are attending the 26th Saudi Dental Society International Dental Conference in addition to 130 undergraduate students in different dental colleges in Riyadh. Overall, 118 participants of dentists completed the survey, with response rate of 79% and the same number of students with response rate of 90.7%. Results Total of 57.6% dentists’ faced separated files problem during root canal preparation, while only 7.6% of students faced this problem. 53% of separated endodontic files (SEF) were hand files, 65% stainless steel files, 81% were small size files most common sizes (#15-20) (p <0.0001). Causes of SEF were root Canal anatomy, in 45%. 66% of SEF occurred in curved canals, 98% were in molars in mesiobuccal and mesiolingual canals, (p <0.0001). 44% of SEF were successfully bypassed, 53% were successfully removed from coronal third of root canal, 42% of SEF successfully removed using ultrasonics under visualization of operating microscope. 73% of retained SEF cases showed good prognosis, (p <0.0001). Conclusion SEF is a multifactorial clinical problem that must be either removed, by passed to allow complete cleaning, shaping, disinfection, obturation and effective coronal seal. PMID:27134994

  5. Successful treatment of chronic periapical osteomyelitis in a Parma wallaby (Macropus parma) using comprehensive endodontic therapy with apicoectomy.

    PubMed

    Kilgallon, Conor P; Bicknese, Beth; Fagan, David A

    2010-12-01

    Although necrobacillosis remains a common condition of captive macropods, there have been limited reports of successful treatment modalities by which it can be treated. Comprehensive endodontic therapy with apicoectomy has been used reliably in human and domestic animal dentistry. This report describes a case of periapical osteomyelitis involving a mandibular incisor in a Parma wallaby (Macropus parma) that was successfully treated using these techniques in conjunction with low-level laser therapy at 810 nm, which was used for decontamination of the pulp cavity, anti-inflammatory, and biostimulatory effects.

  6. Endodontic emergencies: Your medication may be the cause

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Promila; Chandra, Anil; Yadav, Rakesh

    2009-01-01

    An endodontic clinician may face unwanted situations during root canal treatment. We present here an unusual case of soft tissue and gingival necrosis of the oral cavity following the use of formocresol® during endodontic treatment. PMID:20617072

  7. A long-term study of apicoectomy and endodontic treatment of apically infected cheek teeth in 12 horses.

    PubMed

    Simhofer, Hubert; Stoian, Camil; Zetner, Karl

    2008-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the long-term results of apicoectomy and retrograde endodontic treatment in 12 horses with apical cheek teeth infections. The affected apices were removed using a diamond bur mounted on a dental drill, and after pulp removal the root canals were filed with Hedstrøm files and then alternately flushed with sodium hypochlorite, hydrogen peroxide and alcohol. The pulp canals were dried and filled with endodontic cement and gutta-percha points. An undercut was made in the apical aspect of the root canals that were then sealed with self-curing glass ionomer cement. Follow up information was obtained 38-67 months following treatment and indicated that the treatment had been successful in 7/12 horses (58%), partially successful in 2 horses (17%) and unsuccessful in 3 (25%). With good case selection, apicoectomy can preserve a proportion of apically infected cheek teeth. The use of advanced imaging techniques and improved surgical techniques could increase the success rate.

  8. Regenerative Endodontic Treatment of an Immature Necrotic Molar with Arrested Root Development by Using Recombinant Human Platelet-derived Growth Factor: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Zhujiang, Annie; Kim, Sahng G

    2016-01-01

    Regenerative endodontic treatment has provided a treatment option that aims to allow root maturation. The present report describes the regenerative endodontic treatment of a necrotic, immature molar by using recombinant human platelet-derived growth factor (rhPDGF-BB) and shows the continued root maturation in the tooth with arrested root development. A regenerative endodontic procedure that used a growth factor was performed for a necrotic molar with arrested root formation in a 20-year-old patient. Thorough disinfection by using mechanical instrumentation and copious irrigation of antimicrobial agents as well as intracanal medication with calcium hydroxide was performed throughout the first 2 appointments. At the third appointment, the root canals were irrigated with an antimicrobial solution and 17% EDTA, and bleeding was evoked by passing sterile paper points beyond the apex in each canal. Small pieces of a collagen membrane saturated with rhPDGF-BB solution from GEM 21S were packed into each canal. Mineral trioxide aggregate was placed, and Cavit and composite resin were used to restore the tooth. Complete root maturation and resolution of a periapical radiolucency were observed at the 15-month follow-up. The present report presents a regenerative endodontic procedure that uses rhPDGF-BB for a necrotic molar with arrested root development. The finding of continued root development in the present case suggests that regenerative endodontic treatment may be able to resume the root maturation process in teeth with arrested root formation. Further clinical studies are required to investigate the efficacy of rhPDGF-BB in regenerative endodontic treatment. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Endodontic re-treatment associated with the elimination of amalgam root-end filling through sinus tracts: a report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Soares, Janir Alves; Nunes, Eduardo; Silveira, Frank Ferreira; Santos, Suelleng Maria Cunha; Oliveira, Maiolino Thomaz Fonseca

    2009-08-01

    Two patients presented with complaints of recurrent drainage of purulent exudate from sinus tracts, inflammation and pain after endodontic re-treatment of the maxillary left (Case 1) and right (Case 2) lateral incisors. The periapical lesions persisted after apical curettage, apicectomy and root-end filling with silver amalgam. Radiographic examination exposed the poor quality of the endodontic treatments and the silver amalgam root-end fillings, which were associated with periapical radiolucent areas in both teeth. The sinus tract persisted after root canal cleaning and shaping, followed by a calcium hydroxide root canal dressing. The root-end fillings were periapically dislodged with endodontic K-files, and showed progressive displacement by sinus tracts up to elimination in the oral cavity. Follow ups of 42 and 65 months post procedure revealed clinical disappearance of the symptoms, sinus tracts and exudates, and radiographs revealed that the repair process of the periapical radiolucent areas was quite advanced.

  10. Bactericidal effect of hydroxyl radicals generated from a low concentration hydrogen peroxide with ultrasound in endodontic treatment.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Yoshimi; Hayashi, Makoto; Yoshino, Fumihiko; Tamura, Muneaki; Yoshida, Ayaka; Ibi, Haruna; Lee, Masaichi-Chang-Il; Ochiai, Kuniyasu; Ogiso, Bunnai

    2014-05-01

    One approach to enhance the disinfection of root canals in endodontic treatment is ultrasonic irrigation with sodium hypochlorite. Reactive oxygen species, such as hydroxyl radical, are generated by biological defense systems to kill invading bacteria. Ultrasonic irrigation with hydrogen peroxide may be a promising option to increase hydroxyl radical generation. We examined the bactericidal effects of hydroxyl radical generated from low concentration hydrogen peroxide with ultrasound in vitro. An ultrasonic tip was submerged in 0.5 or 1.0 M hydrogen peroxide in a microfuge tube. hydrogen peroxide was irradiated with the ultrasound, the tip of which was maintained centered in the tube to mimic ultrasonic irrigation. Hydroxyl radical generation was assessed by electron spin resonance spectroscopy. Subsequently, Enterococcus faecalis suspension in hydrogen peroxide was prepared and irradiated as described above. Bactericidal effects were assessed by viable counting. Electron spin resonance measurements showed that hydroxyl radical generation increased significantly in a time- and dose-dependent manner (two-way analysis of variance and Tukey's test, p<0.05). Moreover, the bactericidal effects of hydrogen peroxide against Enterococcus faecalis were enhanced by ultrasonic irradiation in a time- and dose-dependent manner. These results suggest that ultrasonic irrigation in the presence of low concentration hydrogen peroxide can serve as a disinfection strategy in endodontic treatment.

  11. The influence of three different instrumentation techniques on the incidence of postoperative pain after endodontic treatment

    PubMed Central

    Gambarini, Gianluca; Testarelli, Luca; De Luca, Massimo; Milana, Valerio; Plotino, Gianluca; Grande, Nicola Maria; Rubini, Alessio Giansiracusa; Al Sudani, Dina; Sannino, Gianpaolo

    2013-01-01

    Summary Aims. Apical extrusion of infected debris to the periradicular tissues is one of the principal causes of postoperative pain and discomfort. Recent researches have shown that reciprocating instrumentation techniques seem to significantly increase the amount of debris extruded beyond the apex and, consequently, the risk of postoperative pain. The goal of the present study was to evaluate and compare postoperative pain using three different nickel-titanium instrumentation techniques: a rotary crown-down technique using TF instruments (SybronEndo, Orange, Ca), a reciprocating single-file technique using WaveOne instruments (Maillefer DEntsply, Baillagues, CH), and a novel instrumentation technique (TF Adaptive, SybronEndo, Orange, Ca), using a unique, proprietary movement, combining reciprocation and continuous rotation. Methods. Ninety patients requiring endodontic treatment on permanent premolar and molar teeth with non vital pulps preoperatively were included in the study. The patients were assigned into three groups of 30 patients each, trying to make the groups very similar, concerning the number of root canals, presence of initial pain and periapical lesions. The teeth in group 1 (n = 30) were instrumented with a crown-down technique using TF instruments, whilst those in group 2 (n = 30) were instrumented with a single-file technique using Waveone 08 25. The third group (n = 30) used the 3-file Tf Adaprtive sequence. All techniques were performed following manufacturers’ instructions and all canals were shaped, cleaned and obturated in a single-visit by the same operator. The assessment of postoperative pain was carried out at 3 days by using a visual analogue scale. VAS pain scores were compared using one-way ANOVA post hoc Tukey test. A value of p < 0.05 was required for statistical significance. Results. Results for VAS pain scores showed a statistically significant difference was found between the WaveOne (p=0,021) technique and the other two

  12. The influence of three different instrumentation techniques on the incidence of postoperative pain after endodontic treatment.

    PubMed

    Gambarini, Gianluca; Testarelli, Luca; De Luca, Massimo; Milana, Valerio; Plotino, Gianluca; Grande, Nicola Maria; Rubini, Alessio Giansiracusa; Al Sudani, Dina; Sannino, Gianpaolo

    2013-01-01

    Apical extrusion of infected debris to the periradicular tissues is one of the principal causes of postoperative pain and discomfort. Recent researches have shown that reciprocating instrumentation techniques seem to significantly increase the amount of debris extruded beyond the apex and, consequently, the risk of postoperative pain. The goal of the present study was to evaluate and compare postoperative pain using three different nickel-titanium instrumentation techniques: a rotary crown-down technique using TF instruments (SybronEndo, Orange, Ca), a reciprocating single-file technique using WaveOne instruments (Maillefer DEntsply, Baillagues, CH), and a novel instrumentation technique (TF Adaptive, SybronEndo, Orange, Ca), using a unique, proprietary movement, combining reciprocation and continuous rotation. Ninety patients requiring endodontic treatment on permanent premolar and molar teeth with non vital pulps preoperatively were included in the study. The patients were assigned into three groups of 30 patients each, trying to make the groups very similar, concerning the number of root canals, presence of initial pain and periapical lesions. The teeth in group 1 (n = 30) were instrumented with a crown-down technique using TF instruments, whilst those in group 2 (n = 30) were instrumented with a single-file technique using Waveone 08 25. The third group (n = 30) used the 3-file Tf Adaprtive sequence. All techniques were performed following manufacturers' instructions and all canals were shaped, cleaned and obturated in a single-visit by the same operator. The assessment of postoperative pain was carried out at 3 days by using a visual analogue scale. VAS pain scores were compared using one-way ANOVA post hoc Tukey test. A value of p < 0.05 was required for statistical significance. Results for VAS pain scores showed a statistically significant difference was found between the WaveOne (p=0,021) technique and the other two techniques. No statistical significant

  13. One- versus two-visit endodontic treatment of teeth with apical periodontitis: a histobacteriologic study.

    PubMed

    Vera, Jorge; Siqueira, José F; Ricucci, Domenico; Loghin, Simona; Fernández, Nancy; Flores, Belina; Cruz, Alvaro G

    2012-08-01

    This study analyzed the in vivo microbiological status of the root canal systems of mesial roots of mandibular molars with primary apical periodontitis after 1- or 2-visit endodontic treatment. Mesial root canals were instrumented by using either a combination of K3 and LightSpeed instruments (mesiobuccal canals) or the ProTaper system (mesiolingual canals), with 5% NaOCl irrigation. Patency files were used. Smear layer was removed, and a final rinse with 5 mL of 2% chlorhexidine was performed. In the 2-visit group (7 roots, 14 canals), canals were medicated with calcium hydroxide for 1 week and then obturated by using the continuous wave of compaction technique. In the 1-visit group (6 roots, 12 canals), canals were immediately obturated after chemomechanical procedures. Teeth were extracted 1 week after root canal instrumentation and processed for histobacteriologic analysis. In the 1-visit group, no case was completely free of bacteria; residual bacteria occurred in the main root canal (5 of 6 cases), isthmus (5 of 6), apical ramifications (4 of 6), and dentinal tubules (5 of 6). In the 2-visit group, 2 cases were rendered bacteria-free; residual bacteria were found in the main canal only in 2 cases (none of them with persistent dentinal tubule infection), in the isthmus (4 of 7 cases), and in ramifications (2 of 7). The 2 instrumentation techniques performed similarly. When filling material was observed in ramifications, it was usually intermixed with necrotic tissue, debris, and bacteria. The 2-visit protocol by using an interappointment medication with calcium hydroxide resulted in improved microbiological status of the root canal system when compared with the 1-visit protocol. Residual bacteria were more frequent and abundant in ramifications, isthmuses, and dentinal tubules when root canals were treated without an interappointment medication. Apical ramifications and isthmuses were never completely filled. The use of an antibacterial interappointment agent

  14. Safety Irradiation Parameters of Nd:YAP Laser Beam for Endodontic Treatments: An In Vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Namour, A.; Geerts, S.; Zeinoun, T.; De Moor, R.; Nammour, S.

    2016-01-01

    Objective. Nd:YAP laser has several potentialities of clinical applications in endodontics. The aim of our study is to determine the safety range of irradiation parameters during endodontic application of Nd:YAP laser that can be used without damaging and overheating the periodontal tissue. Material and Methods. Twenty-seven caries-free single-rooted extracted human teeth were used. Crowns were sectioned to obtain 11 mm root canal length. Temperature increases at root surfaces were measured by a thermocouple during Nd:YAP laser irradiation of root canals at different energy densities. Canal irradiation was accomplished with a circular and retrograde movement from the apex until the cervical part of the canal during 10 seconds with an axial speed of 1 mm/s. Each irradiation was done in a canal irrigated continuously with 2.25% NaOCl solution. Results. Periodontal temperature increase depends on the value of energy density. Means and standard deviations of temperature increases at root surfaces were below 10°C (safe threshold level) when the average energy densities delivered per second were equal to or below 4981 J/cm2 and 9554 J/cm2, respectively, for irradiations using a fiber diameter of 320 μm and 200 μm. Conclusions. Within the limitations of this study and under specific irradiation conditions, Nd:YAP laser beam may be considered harmless for periodontal tissues during endodontic applications. PMID:27376084

  15. Nonsurgical endodontic therapy along with minimal invasive treatment utilizing Bhasker's hypothesis for the management of infected radicular cystic lesion: A rare case report

    PubMed Central

    Salaria, Sanjeev Kumar; Kamra, Shilpa; Ghuman, Simrat Kaur; Sharma, Garima

    2016-01-01

    Radicular cyst (RC) is the most common odontogenic cyst of inflammatory origin affecting the jaws; involves the roots of the carious or traumatic non-vital tooth. Different therapeutic modalities, such as nonsurgical endodontic therapy or surgical enucleation with primary closure, decompression etc., were proposed for the management of such lesions. Presenting a case of a 28-year-old otherwise healthy male patient who reported with pain and swelling with respect to tooth #41, 31. Diagnosis of infected RC at a rare location was established on the basis of clinical, radiographical and fine needle aspiration cytological examination. Looking after the clinical characteristics, origin, extension, size of cystic lesion and patient cooperation; nonsurgical endodontic therapy utilizing Bhasker's hypothesis was opted. One year post-operative result suggested that nonsurgical endodontic therapy along with minimally invasive treatment utilizing Bhasker's hypothesis is an effective tool to transform infected radicular cystic lesion to healthy periapical periodontal tissue. PMID:27994430

  16. Biomimetic microenvironments for regenerative endodontics.

    PubMed

    Kaushik, Sagar N; Kim, Bogeun; Walma, Alexander M Cruz; Choi, Sung Chul; Wu, Hui; Mao, Jeremy J; Jun, Ho-Wook; Cheon, Kyounga

    2016-01-01

    Regenerative endodontics has been proposed to replace damaged and underdeveloped tooth structures with normal pulp-dentin tissue by providing a natural extracellular matrix (ECM) mimicking environment; stem cells, signaling molecules, and scaffolds. In addition, clinical success of the regenerative endodontic treatments can be evidenced by absence of signs and symptoms; no bony pathology, a disinfected pulp, and the maturation of root dentin in length and thickness. In spite of the various approaches of regenerative endodontics, there are several major challenges that remain to be improved: a) the endodontic root canal is a strong harbor of the endodontic bacterial biofilm and the fundamental etiologic factors of recurrent endodontic diseases, (b) tooth discolorations are caused by antibiotics and filling materials, (c) cervical root fractures are caused by endodontic medicaments, (d) pulp tissue is not vascularized nor innervated, and (e) the dentin matrix is not developed with adequate root thickness and length. Generally, current clinical protocols and recent studies have shown a limited success of the pulp-dentin tissue regeneration. Throughout the various approaches, the construction of biomimetic microenvironments of pulp-dentin tissue is a key concept of the tissue engineering based regenerative endodontics. The biomimetic microenvironments are composed of a synthetic nano-scaled polymeric fiber structure that mimics native pulp ECM and functions as a scaffold of the pulp-dentin tissue complex. They will provide a framework of the pulp ECM, can deliver selective bioactive molecules, and may recruit pluripotent stem cells from the vicinity of the pulp apex. The polymeric nanofibers are produced by methods of self-assembly, electrospinning, and phase separation. In order to be applied to biomedical use, the polymeric nanofibers require biocompatibility, stability, and biodegradability. Therefore, this review focuses on the development and application of the

  17. Summary of: Regenerative endodontics.

    PubMed

    Clark, Stephen J

    2014-03-01

    Significant advances in our understanding of the biological processes involved in tooth development and repair at the cellular and molecular levels have underpinned the newly emerging area of regenerative endodontics. Development of treatment protocols based on exploiting the natural wound healing properties of the dental pulp and applying tissue engineering principles has allowed reporting of case series showing preservation of tissue vitality and apexogenesis. To review current case series reporting regenerative endodontics. Current treatment approaches tend to stimulate more reparative than regenerative responses in respect of the new tissue generated, which often does not closely resemble the physiological structure of dentine-pulp. However, despite these biological limitations, such techniques appear to offer significant promise for improved treatment outcomes. Improved biological outcomes will likely emerge from the many experimental studies being reported and will further contribute to improvements in clinical treatment protocols.

  18. Histological assessment of regenerative endodontic treatment in animal studies with different scaffolds: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Altaii, Milad; Richards, Lindsay; Rossi-Fedele, Giampiero

    2017-08-01

    The concept of regenerative endodontic procedures remains controversial. The aim of this study was to evaluate the histology of the tissues formed in immature animal teeth with necrotic and infected pulps after attempted endodontic regeneration procedures using different scaffolds. A systematic electronic literature search was performed in PubMed, Web of Science, Scopus, EMBASE, DOSS, and Cochrane Library databases. The terms used were a combination of the following: "immature permanent necrotic tooth or teeth" or "open apex or apices" and "regeneration or revitalization or revascularization" and "histology." The inclusion criteria comprised animal studies with histological examination following regenerative endodontics in immature necrotic-infected permanent teeth. From 123 screened studies, 13 met the inclusion criteria. Formation of dentin-like tissue on the dentinal walls was reported in only 4% of teeth treated with blood clot scaffold and 2% treated with blood clot with additional materials. Cementum-like hard tissue was found in 64% of teeth with blood clot, 80% treated with blood clot with additional materials, 50% treated with alternative scaffolds, and 5% that were left empty. Bone-like tissue was reported in 10% of teeth treated with blood clot, 2% treated with blood clot with additional materials, and 4% treated with alternative scaffolds. The tissues in the canal space were found to be connective tissue with infiltration of fibroblast-like cells and blood vessels. Forty-six percent of the studies reported formation of periodontal ligament-like tissues. None of the regeneration protocols resulted in the predictable formation of a true pulp-dentin complex. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. [An endodontic ultrasonic system for apical endodontic surgery].

    PubMed

    de Lange, I; Putters, T; Baas, E M; van Ingen, J M

    2009-09-01

    Apical endodontic surgery is applied frequently following a failed conventional endodontic treatment. The apical preparation can be carried out conventionally using a round bur or using an endodontic ultrasonic system. The purpose of this study was to compare the outcome of the 2 treatment options by a randomized prospective clinical study. Patients (n=399) were at random allocated to treatment using a conventional round bur or using an ultrasonic system (P-max Newtron) according to a for the rest similar treatment protocol. One year post treatment, the treatment outcomes were determined by 2 oral and maxillofacial surgeons, blinded for the treatment option. Adequate follow-up data were obtained from 290 patients. The overall success rate was 71% in the patients treated conventionally and 81% in the patients treated using the ultrasonic system. In molar teeth, the difference in success rate was statistically significant.

  20. Lasers in endodontics: an overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frentzen, Matthias; Braun, Andreas; Koort, Hans J.

    2002-06-01

    The interest in endodontic use of dental laser systems is increasing. Developing laser technology and a better understanding of laser effects widened the spectrum of possible endodontic indications. Various laser systems including excimer-, argon+-, diode-, Nd:YAG-, Er:YAG- and CO2-lasers are used in pulp diagnosis, treatment of hypersensitivity, pulp capping, sterilization of root canals, root canal shaping and obturation or apicoectomy. With the development of new delivery systems - thin and flexible fibers - for many different wavelengths laser applications in endodontics may increase. Since laser devices are still relatively costly, access to them is limited. Most of the clinical applications are laser assisted procedures such as the removing of pulp remnants and debris or disinfection of infected root canals. The essential question is whether a laser can provide improved treatment over conventional care. To perform laser therapy in endodontics today different laser types with adopted wavelengths and pulse widths are needed, each specific to a particular application. Looking into the future we will need endodontic laser equipment providing optimal laser parameters for different treatment modalities. Nevertheless, the quantity of research reports from the last decade promises a genuine future for lasers in endodontics.

  1. Cone Beam Computed Tomography Evaluation of the Diagnosis, Treatment Planning, and Long-Term Followup of Large Periapical Lesions Treated by Endodontic Surgery: Two Case Reports

    PubMed Central

    Shekhar, Vijay; Shashikala, K.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this case report is to present two cases where cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) was used for the diagnosis, treatment planning, and followup of large periapical lesions in relation to maxillary anterior teeth treated by endodontic surgery. Periapical disease may be detected sooner using CBCT, and their true size, extent, nature, and position can be assessed. It allows clinician to select the most relevant views of the area of interest resulting in improved detection of periapical lesions. CBCT scan may provide a better, more accurate, and faster method to differentially diagnose a solid (granuloma) from a fluid-filled lesion or cavity (cyst). In the present case report, endodontic treatment was performed for both the cases followed by endodontic surgery. Biopsy was done to establish the confirmatory histopathological diagnosis of the periapical lesions. Long-term assessment of the periapical healing following surgery was done in all the three dimensions using CBCT and was found to be more accurate than IOPA radiography. It was concluded that CBCT was a useful modality in making the diagnosis and treatment plan and assessing the outcome of endodontic surgery for large periapical lesions. PMID:23762646

  2. Cone beam computed tomography evaluation of the diagnosis, treatment planning, and long-term followup of large periapical lesions treated by endodontic surgery: two case reports.

    PubMed

    Shekhar, Vijay; Shashikala, K

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this case report is to present two cases where cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) was used for the diagnosis, treatment planning, and followup of large periapical lesions in relation to maxillary anterior teeth treated by endodontic surgery. Periapical disease may be detected sooner using CBCT, and their true size, extent, nature, and position can be assessed. It allows clinician to select the most relevant views of the area of interest resulting in improved detection of periapical lesions. CBCT scan may provide a better, more accurate, and faster method to differentially diagnose a solid (granuloma) from a fluid-filled lesion or cavity (cyst). In the present case report, endodontic treatment was performed for both the cases followed by endodontic surgery. Biopsy was done to establish the confirmatory histopathological diagnosis of the periapical lesions. Long-term assessment of the periapical healing following surgery was done in all the three dimensions using CBCT and was found to be more accurate than IOPA radiography. It was concluded that CBCT was a useful modality in making the diagnosis and treatment plan and assessing the outcome of endodontic surgery for large periapical lesions.

  3. Pro-oxidant status and matrix metalloproteinases in apical lesions and gingival crevicular fluid as potential biomarkers for asymptomatic apical periodontitis and endodontic treatment response.

    PubMed

    Dezerega, Andrea; Madrid, Sonia; Mundi, Verónica; Valenzuela, María A; Garrido, Mauricio; Paredes, Rodolfo; García-Sesnich, Jocelyn; Ortega, Ana V; Gamonal, Jorge; Hernández, Marcela

    2012-03-21

    Oxidative stress and matrix metalloproteinases -9 and -2 are involved in periodontal breakdown, whereas gingival crevicular fluid has been reported to reflect apical status. The aim of this study was to characterize oxidant balance and activity levels of MMP -2 and -9 in apical lesions and healthy periodontal ligament; and second, to determine whether potential changes in oxidant balance were reflected in gingival crevicular fluid from asymptomatic apical periodontitis (AAP)-affected teeth at baseline and after endodontic treatment. Patients with clinical diagnosis of AAP and healthy volunteers having indication of tooth extraction were recruited. Apical lesions and healthy periodontal ligaments, respectively, were homogenized or processed to obtain histological tissue sections. Matrix metalloproteinase -9 and -2 levels and/or activity were analyzed by Immunowestern blot, zymography and consecutive densitometric analysis, and their tissue localization was confirmed by immunohistochemistry. A second group of patients with AAP and indication of endodontic treatment was recruited. Gingival crevicular fluid was extracted from AAP-affected teeth at baseline, after endodontic treatment and healthy contralateral teeth. Total oxidant and antioxidant status were determined in homogenized tissue and GCF samples. Statistical analysis was performed using STATA v10 software with unpaired t test, Mann-Whitney test and Spearman's correlation. Activity of MMP-2 and MMP-9 along with oxidant status were higher in apical lesions (p < 0.05). Total oxidant status correlated positively with matrix metalloproteinase-2 and lesion size (p < 0.05). Gingival crevicular fluid showed significantly lower levels of total antioxidant status in diseased teeth at baseline compared to controls and endodontically-treated groups. Apical lesions display an oxidant imbalance along with increased activity of matrix metalloproteinase-2 and -9 and might contribute to AAP progression. Oxidant imbalance can

  4. Regenerative endodontics: A way forward.

    PubMed

    Diogenes, Anibal; Ruparel, Nikita B; Shiloah, Yoav; Hargreaves, Kenneth M

    2016-05-01

    Immature teeth are susceptible to infections due to trauma, anatomic anomalies, and caries. Traditional endodontic therapies for immature teeth, such as apexification procedures, promote resolution of the disease and prevent future infections. However, these procedures fail to promote continued root development, leaving teeth susceptible to fractures. Regenerative endodontic procedures (REPs) have evolved in the past decade, being incorporated into endodontic practice and becoming a viable treatment alternative for immature teeth. The authors have summarized the status of regenerative endodontics on the basis of the available published studies and provide insight into the different levels of clinical outcomes expected from these procedures. Substantial advances in regenerative endodontics are allowing a better understanding of a multitude of factors that govern stem cell-mediated regeneration and repair of the damaged pulp-dentin complex. REPs promote healing of apical periodontitis, continued radiographic root development, and, in certain cases, vitality responses. Despite the clinical success of these procedures, they appear to promote a guided endodontic repair process rather than a true regeneration of physiological-like tissue. Immature teeth with pulpal necrosis with otherwise poor prognosis can be treated with REPs. These procedures do not preclude the possibility of apexification procedures if attempts are unsuccessful. Therefore, REPs may be considered first treatment options for immature teeth with pulpal necrosis. Copyright © 2016 American Dental Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Endodontic treatment and esthetic management of a primary double tooth with direct composite using silicone buildup guide.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Vinaya Kumar; Ragavendra, T Raju; Deshmukh, Jeevanand; Vanka, Amit; Duddu, Mahesh Kumar; Patil, Anand Kumar G

    2012-04-01

    Gemination and fusion are morphological dental anomalies, characterized by the formation of a clinically wide tooth. Gemination occurs when one tooth bud tries to divide, while fusion occurs if two buds unite. The terms double teeth, double formation, conjoined teeth, geminifusion, vicinifusion and dental twinning are often used to describe fusion and gemination. Double teeth are associated with clinical problems such as poor esthetics, spacing problems and caries susceptibility. Management of such cases requires a comprehensive knowledge of the clinical entity as well as the problems associated with it. This report presents a case of primary double tooth in a 6-year-old boy involving maxillary left central incisor. The anomalous tooth was carious and pulpally involved. This was treated conservatively by endodontic treatment and esthetic rehabilitation was done with direct composite restoration using a silicone buildup guide. The treated tooth was followed up until exfoliation.

  6. The odontogenic keratocyst: a potential endodontic misdiagnosis.

    PubMed

    Garlock, J A; Pringle, G A; Hicks, M L

    1998-04-01

    Odontogenic keratocysts manifest themselves as radiolucencies that can appear anywhere in the maxilla or mandible, including periradicular areas; they may thus masquerade as lesions of endodontic origin. This retrospective study examined 239 odontogenic keratocysts received by the Oral Pathology Laboratory at Temple University School of Medicine over a 3-year period. Twenty-one (9%) of the cysts received were located periradicularly; of these 21, 12 (57%) were associated with nonvital or endodontically treated teeth and thus mimicked lesions of endodontic origin. Because of its aggressive nature and tendency to recur, the periradicular odontogenic keratocyst should be included in the differential diagnosis of lesions that are refractory to endodontic treatment.

  7. Discolouration potential of endodontic procedures and materials: a review.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, H M A; Abbott, P V

    2012-10-01

    Advances in endodontic materials and techniques are at the forefront of endodontic research. Despite continuous improvements, tooth discolouration, especially in anterior teeth, is considered an undesirable consequence following endodontic treatment as it creates a range of aesthetic problems. This article aims to discuss the intrinsic and internalized tooth discolouration caused by endodontic procedures, and to address the discolouration potential of materials used during root canal treatment, including root canal irrigants, intra-canal medicaments, endodontic and post-endodontic filling materials. In addition, the discolouration patterns caused by combined endodontic and nonendodontic aetiological factors are discussed. The recommended guidelines that should be followed by dental practitioners to prevent and manage tooth discolouration are also outlined. © 2012 International Endodontic Journal.

  8. A comparative study of four coronal obturation materials in endodontic treatment.

    PubMed

    Uranga, A; Blum, J Y; Esber, S; Parahy, E; Prado, C

    1999-03-01

    The aim of this study was to compare, in vitro, the ability of temporary versus permanent materials to seal the access cavity. Eighty human maxillary single-canal teeth were prepared biomechanically and obturated with gutta-percha and an endodontic cement AH Plus, using the warm vertical compaction technique. All access cavities were sealed with 1 of 4 materials (Cavit, Fermit, Tetric, or Dyract). Microleakage was assessed by methylene blue dye penetration. The teeth were submitted to 100 thermocycles, with temperature varying from 0 degree to 55 degrees C. The greatest degree of leakage was observed with the temporary materials (Cavit and Fermit). There was a significant difference (p < 0.05) in leakage between all materials except between Dyract and Tetric. This suggests that it may be more prudent to use a permanent restorative material for provisional restorations to prevent inadequate canal sealing and the resulting risk of fluid penetration.

  9. Aesthetic considerations in endodontics: internal bleaching.

    PubMed

    Abbott, P V

    1997-09-01

    During endodontic treatment of any tooth, aesthetics must be considered in the same manner as during any other dental treatment. The most common aesthetic challenge associated with endodontics is the discoloration of natural tooth structure. The discoloration may be a result of pulp pathosis, especially pulpal hemorrhage prior to or during treatment, or it may be due to various endodontic and restorative materials placed in the pulp chamber. There are several simple measures that can be utilized during and following endodontic treatment to eliminate or reduce aesthetic deficiency. The learning objective of this article is to discuss internal bleaching of discolored pulpless teeth that have been endodontically treated. The discussion includes the chemical composition of bleaching agents and principles by which they function during the bleaching procedures.

  10. [Clinical evaluation of periapical endodontic surgery for endodontic failure].

    PubMed

    Xu, Qiong; Chen, Yi-yang; Ling, Jun-qi; Gu, Hai-jing; Liu, Jian-wei

    2009-02-01

    To evaluate the clinical outcome of periapical endodontic surgery for teeth that can't be treated by nonsurgical endodontic methods. Sixty-two affected teeth were chosen for surgical endodontic treatment, of which 31 teeth underwent periapical curettage and the others were treated by root-end resection, retrograde preparation and filling. A radiography was taken immediately after surgery and was compared with those taken at 12 and 24 months. The results of two groups were analyzed using the chi2 test. The success rate for retrograde filling was higher (85% after 12 months, 88% after 24 months) compared with that of periapical curettage (52% after 12 months, 45% after 24 months). The difference in success rate between the two groups was statistically significant. Ultrasonic root-end preparation and retrograde filling is a good choice of treatment when the teeth can't be treated appropriately by nonsurgical treatment.

  11. Interaction between endodontics and periodontics.

    PubMed

    Rotstein, Ilan

    2017-06-01

    Endodontic-periodontal lesions present challenges to the clinician regarding diagnosis, treatment planning and prognosis. Etiologic factors, such as bacteria and viruses, as well as contributing factors, such as trauma, root resorptions, perforations, cracks and dental malformations, play an important role in the development and progression of such lesions. Treatment and prognosis of endodontic-periodontal lesions vary, depending on the etiology, pathogenesis and correct diagnosis of each specific condition. This chapter will appraise the interrelationship between endodontic and periodontal lesions and provide biological and clinical evidence for diagnosis, prognosis and decision-making in the treatment of these conditions. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Endodontics and the ageing patient.

    PubMed

    Johnstone, M; Parashos, P

    2015-03-01

    Patients are living longer and the rate of edentulism is decreasing. Endodontic treatment is an essential part of maintaining the health and well-being of the elderly. Retention of natural teeth improves the quality of life and the overall health and longevity of ageing patients. Also, teeth that might be otherwise extracted may be strategically valuable to retain a prosthesis, and elderly patients are more likely to have medical complications that may prevent dental extractions from being safely performed. The technical goals of endodontic treatment in the elderly are the same as those for younger patients. However, the pulpo-dentinal complex undergoes calcific changes over time, which may pose challenges for the clinician. The purposes of this review are to discuss age changes in the pulp and the challenges posed by diagnosing, treatment planning and treating the elderly endodontic patient.

  13. Survey of attitudes, materials and methods employed in endodontic treatment by general dental practitioners in North Jordan

    PubMed Central

    Al-Omari, Wael M

    2004-01-01

    Background General dental practitioners provide the majority of endodontic treatment in Jordan. The aim of this study was to gather information on the methods, materials and attitudes employed in root canal treatment by dentists in North Jordan, in order to evaluate and improve the quality of current practice. Methods A questionnaire was posted to all registered general dental practitioners working in private practice in Irbid Governate in North Jordan (n = 181). The questionnaire included information on methods, materials and techniques used in endodontic treatment. Results Reply rate was 72% (n = 131). The results demonstrated that only five dentists used rubber dam occasionally and not routinely. The majority used cotton rolls for isolation solely or in combination with a high volume saliva ejector (n = 116). The most widely used irrigants were sodium hypochlorite and hydrogen peroxide, which were used by 32.9% (n = 43) and 33.6% (n = 44) of the respondents, respectively. Forty eight percent of the respondents (n = 61) used the cold lateral condensation technique for canal obturation, 31.3% (n = 41) used single cone, 9.9% (n = 13) used vertical condensation and 12.2% (n = 16) used paste or cement only for the obturation. The majority used zinc oxide eugenol as a sealer (72.5%). All, but one, respondents used hand instruments for canal preparation and the technique of choice was step back (52.7%). More than 50% (n = 70) of the dentists took one radiograph for determining the working length, whilst 22.9% (n = 30) did not take any radiograph at all. Most practitioners performed treatment in three visits for teeth with two or more root canals, and in two visits for teeth with a single root canal. Conclusions This study indicates that dentists practicing in North Jordan do not comply with international quality standards and do not use recently introduced techniques. Many clinicians never take a radiograph for determining the working length and never used rubber dam

  14. Influence of deep dry cryogenic treatment on cutting efficiency and wear resistance of nickel-titanium rotary endodontic instruments.

    PubMed

    Vinothkumar, Thilla Sekar; Miglani, Revathi; Lakshminarayananan, Lakshmikanthanbharathi

    2007-11-01

    This study tested the effect of cryogenic treatment on nickel-titanium (NiTi) endodontic instruments. Ten rotary NiTi instruments (ProFile 30, 0.06; Dentsply Maillefer Instruments SA, Baillegues, Switzerland)) were subjected to deep dry cryogenic treatment at liquid nitrogen temperature (-185 degrees C) (group A) and compared with that of nontreated instruments (group B). Root canals of 30 extracted permanent mandibular premolars were prepared to size 25 using ProFile 0.04 taper rotary NiTi instruments. Each instrument was used in 4 root canals for a total of 240 seconds. Cutting efficiency in rotary motion was assessed from weight loss of tooth samples after instrumentation. Wear resistance was assessed from surface defects on cutting heads pre- and postinstrumentation using scanning electron microscope. The weight loss was significantly higher in group A (p < 0.05, Student t test). The presence of surface defects after use was higher in group B. Deep dry cryogenic treatment increases the cutting efficiency significantly but not the wear resistance.

  15. Antibacterial Efficacy of Calcium Hydroxide and Chlorhexidine Mixture for Treatment of Teeth with Primary Endodontic Lesions: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Donyavi, Zakiyeh; Ghahari, Parastoo; Esmaeilzadeh, Mohammad; Kharazifard, Mohammadjavad; Yousefi-Mashouf, Rasoul

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: This study compared the root canal microbial count of necrotic teeth after irrigation with 6% sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) (single session treatment) and two-session root canal treatment with two-week application of calcium hydroxide (CH) mixed with 0.2% chlorhexidine (CHX) as intracanal medicament. Methods and Materials: In this randomized clinical trial, single-rooted necrotic teeth were divided into two groups. Root canal was irrigated with 2 mL of 6% NaOCl in one group, and a mixture of 0.2% CHX and CH powder as an intracanal medicament for two weeks, in the other group. Root canal samples were obtained before and after the intervention and number of colony forming units (CFUs) was counted in each phase. Results: The reduction of Enterococcus faecalis CFU was not significantly different between the two groups (P=0.233) but the CFU of aerobic and anaerobic bacteria was significantly lower in CH+CHX group (P<0.001). Conclusion: Two-week application of CH+CHX caused significant reduced the aerobic, anaerobic and E. faecalis colony counts. Thus, it may be beneficial to carry out primary root canal treatment of necrotic teeth with endodontic lesions in two sessions with intracanal medicaments to achieve predictable results. PMID:27790252

  16. Apical leakage in maxillary type IV premolars with three different endodontic treatments.

    PubMed

    Staribratova-Reister, K; Reister, J P; Attin, T; Martus, P; Kielbassa, A M

    2003-09-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the sealing ability in orthogradely filled, apicoectomised and retrogradely filled maxillary premolars with two canals and two separate apical foramina. The root canals of 51 extracted maxillary premolars of type IV were uniformly shaped and filled by means of lateral condensation and subsequently randomly divided into three groups of 17 teeth each. The teeth of groups II and III received an apicoectomy. In group III an additional retrograde seal (Ketac Fil) was applied. Group I served as control. All specimens were immersed in a methylene blue solution for 24 h. The teeth were cross-sectioned and the maximal dye-penetration was measured. The significantly least dye-penetration was observed in group II (apicoectomy only), followed by group I and group III. The differences among all groups were statistically significant (p<0.05). Most of the retrograde restorations in group III revealed circular colouration around the retrograde fillings extending to the gutta percha. Although the teeth of group II revealed the least dye-penetration, an apicoectomy cannot be favoured against an endodontic retreatment in maxillary premolars of type IV. The application of retrograde fillings using Ketac Fil must be considered critically.

  17. Post-processing open-source software for the CBCT monitoring of periapical lesions healing following endodontic treatment: technical report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Villoria, Eduardo M; Lenzi, Antônio R; Soares, Rodrigo V; Souki, Bernardo Q; Sigurdsson, Asgeir; Marques, Alexandre P; Fidel, Sandra R

    2017-01-01

    To describe the use of open-source software for the post-processing of CBCT imaging for the assessment of periapical lesions development after endodontic treatment. CBCT scans were retrieved from endodontic records of two patients. Three-dimensional virtual models, voxel counting, volumetric measurement (mm(3)) and mean intensity of the periapical lesion were performed with ITK-SNAP v. 3.0 software. Three-dimensional models of the lesions were aligned and overlapped through the MeshLab software, which performed an automatic recording of the anatomical structures, based on the best fit. Qualitative and quantitative analyses of the changes in lesions size after treatment were performed with the 3DMeshMetric software. The ITK-SNAP v. 3.0 showed the smaller value corresponding to the voxel count and the volume of the lesion segmented in yellow, indicating reduction in volume of the lesion after the treatment. A higher value of the mean intensity of the segmented image in yellow was also observed, which suggested new bone formation. Colour mapping and "point value" tool allowed the visualization of the reduction of periapical lesions in several regions. Researchers and clinicians in the monitoring of endodontic periapical lesions have the opportunity to use open-source software.

  18. Effect of guided tissue regeneration on the outcome of surgical endodontic treatment of through-and-through lesions: a retrospective study at 4-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Taschieri, Silvio; Corbella, Stefano; Tsesis, Igor; Bortolin, Monica; Del Fabbro, Massimo

    2011-09-01

    The main purpose of this retrospective cohort study was to evaluate the 4-year success rate of endodontic surgery in combination with a collagen resorbable membrane for the treatment of through-and-through periradicular lesions. Patients with one or more teeth with a through-and-through periradicular lesion in need of endodontic surgery were treated. A clinical and radiographic evaluation was performed at 3, 6, 12, 24, 36, and 48 months. The outcome was categorized at 1 and 4-year follow-up as success, failure, and doubtful depending on clinical signs and symptoms and radiographic evaluation. Fisher's exact test was used to evaluate differences between successful and failed cases (P < 0.05). Forty-three teeth in 33 patients were radiographically and clinically evaluated after 4 years. Thirty-eight teeth were classified as success, 4 teeth as failure, and 1 tooth as doubtful. No statistically significant differences were found in results related to tooth type, tooth location, and presence of post. The association of endodontic surgery and guided tissue regeneration for the treatment of through-and-through periapical lesions leads to excellent outcomes up to 4 years. Standardized criteria are needed to determine the treatment outcome.

  19. Biofilm in endodontics: A review

    PubMed Central

    Jhajharia, Kapil; Parolia, Abhishek; Shetty, K Vikram; Mehta, Lata Kiran

    2015-01-01

    Endodontic disease is a biofilm-mediated infection, and primary aim in the management of endodontic disease is the elimination of bacterial biofilm from the root canal system. The most common endodontic infection is caused by the surface-associated growth of microorganisms. It is important to apply the biofilm concept to endodontic microbiology to understand the pathogenic potential of the root canal microbiota as well as to form the basis for new approaches for disinfection. It is foremost to understand how the biofilm formed by root canal bacteria resists endodontic treatment measures. Bacterial etiology has been confirmed for common oral diseases such as caries and periodontal and endodontic infections. Bacteria causing these diseases are organized in biofilm structures, which are complex microbial communities composed of a great variety of bacteria with different ecological requirements and pathogenic potential. The biofilm community not only gives bacteria effective protection against the host's defense system but also makes them more resistant to a variety of disinfecting agents used as oral hygiene products or in the treatment of infections. Successful treatment of these diseases depends on biofilm removal as well as effective killing of biofilm bacteria. So, the fundamental to maintain oral health and prevent dental caries, gingivitis, and periodontitis is to control the oral biofilms. From these aspects, the formation of biofilms carries particular clinical significance because not only host defense mechanisms but also therapeutic efforts including chemical and mechanical antimicrobial treatment measures have the most difficult task of dealing with organisms that are gathered in a biofilm. The aim of this article was to review the mechanisms of biofilms’ formation, their roles in pulpal and periapical pathosis, the different types of biofilms, the factors influencing biofilm formation, the mechanisms of their antimicrobial resistance, techniques to

  20. Endodontic surgery.

    PubMed

    Lieblich, Stuart E

    2012-01-01

    Conventional endodontic therapy is successful approximately 80-85% of the time. Many of these failures will occur after one year. The presence of continued pain, drainage, mobility or an increasing size of a radiolucent area are some of the indications to treat the case surgically. Since many of these cases may have had final restorations placed by the dentist, the salvage of these cases is of importance to the patient. Advances in periapical surgery have included the use of ultrasonic root end preparation. With the use of these piezoelectric devices, a more controlled apical preparation can be achieved. Additionally, isthmus areas between canals can be appropriately prepared and sealed. The precision afforded with these devices reduces the chances for a malpositioned fill and a more successful outcome.

  1. Endodontic treatment of a C-shaped mandibular second premolar with four root canals and three apical foramina: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Bertrand, Thikamphaa

    2016-01-01

    This case report describes a unique C-shaped mandibular second premolar with four canals and three apical foramina and its endodontic management with the aid of cone-beam computer tomography (CBCT). C-shaped root canal morphology with four canals was identified under a dental operating microscope. A CBCT scan was taken to evaluate the aberrant root canal anatomy and devise a better instrumentation strategy based on the anatomy. All canals were instrumented to have a 0.05 taper using 1.0 mm step-back filing with appropriate apical sizes determined from the CBCT scan images and filled using a warm vertical compaction technique. A C-shaped mandibular second premolar with multiple canals is an anatomically rare case for clinicians, yet its endodontic treatment may require a careful instrumentation strategy due to the difficulty in disinfecting the canals in the thin root area without compromising the root structure. PMID:26877993

  2. Three-dimensional imaging modalities in endodontics.

    PubMed

    Mao, Teresa; Neelakantan, Prasanna

    2014-09-01

    Recent research in endodontics has highlighted the need for three-dimensional imaging in the clinical arena as well as in research. Three-dimensional imaging using computed tomography (CT) has been used in endodontics over the past decade. Three types of CT scans have been studied in endodontics, namely cone-beam CT, spiral CT, and peripheral quantitative CT. Contemporary endodontics places an emphasis on the use of cone-beam CT for an accurate diagnosis of parameters that cannot be visualized on a two-dimensional image. This review discusses the role of CT in endodontics, pertaining to its importance in the diagnosis of root canal anatomy, detection of peri-radicular lesions, diagnosis of trauma and resorption, presurgical assessment, and evaluation of the treatment outcome.

  3. Three-dimensional imaging modalities in endodontics

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Teresa

    2014-01-01

    Recent research in endodontics has highlighted the need for three-dimensional imaging in the clinical arena as well as in research. Three-dimensional imaging using computed tomography (CT) has been used in endodontics over the past decade. Three types of CT scans have been studied in endodontics, namely cone-beam CT, spiral CT, and peripheral quantitative CT. Contemporary endodontics places an emphasis on the use of cone-beam CT for an accurate diagnosis of parameters that cannot be visualized on a two-dimensional image. This review discusses the role of CT in endodontics, pertaining to its importance in the diagnosis of root canal anatomy, detection of peri-radicular lesions, diagnosis of trauma and resorption, presurgical assessment, and evaluation of the treatment outcome. PMID:25279337

  4. Endodontic treatment of necrosed primary teeth using two different combinations of antibacterial drugs: an in vivo study.

    PubMed

    Pinky, C; Shashibhushan, K K; Subbareddy, V V

    2011-01-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate clinical and radiographic success of endodontic treatment of infected primary teeth using two combinations of antibacterial drugs consisting of ciprofloxacin, metronidazole, and minocycline in one group and ciprofloxacin, ornidazole, and minocycline in the other group. The selected 40 teeth were randomly divided into two groups, viz. groups A and B with 20 teeth in each group. In Group A, antibacterial paste containing ciprofloxacin, metronidazole, and minocycline and in Group B, antibacterial paste containing ciprofloxacin, ornidazole, and minocycline mixed with propylene glycol were used. Medication cavities were filled with antibiotic pastes, depending on the groups followed by Glass Ionomer restorations and stainless steel crown placement. Clinical and radiographic evaluation was carried out at 3, 6, and 12 months intervals. Both the groups showed considerable clinical and radiographic success. There was no statistically significant difference between Group A and B. However, group B showed better results clinically and radiographically compared with group A. Both the antibacterial pastes, i.e., combination of ciprofloxacin, metronidazole, and minocycline and ciprofloxacin, ornidazole, and minocycline mixed with propylene glycol have shown good clinical and radiographic success in treating necrotic primary teeth.

  5. Regenerative Endodontic Treatment of an Infected Immature Dens Invaginatus with the Aid of Cone-Beam Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Kaya-Büyükbayram, Işıl; Özalp, Şerife; Aydemir, Seda

    2014-01-01

    Dens invaginatus is a developmental anomaly that results in an enamel-lined cavity intruding into the crown or root before the mineralization phase. This report presents regenerative endodontic treatment of a necrotic immature tooth with Oehler's type III dens invaginatus of a nine-year-old female patient. A diagnosis of dens invaginatus (Oehler's type III) and a large periapical lesion was established with the aid of cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). In the presented case contrary to the classic revascularization protocol, mechanical instrumentation was performed which apparently did not interfere with the regeneration process. After mechanical instrumentation of the invaginated canal by manual K-files, the invaginated canal space was disinfected by triple antibiotic paste followed by blood clot induction from the periapical tissues and the placement of mineral trioxide aggregate. At one-year follow-up, the tooth remained clinically asymptomatic. Radiographic examination revealed complete healing of the periapical lesion. At the 20-month follow-up, the radiographic examination also showed that the open apex was closed and the walls of the root canal were thickened. PMID:25530890

  6. Type 2 diabetes mellitus and the prevalence of apical periodontitis and endodontic treatment in an adult Brazilian population.

    PubMed

    Marotta, Patrícia S; Fontes, Tatiana V; Armada, Luciana; Lima, Kenio C; Rôças, Isabela N; Siqueira, José F

    2012-03-01

    This cross-sectional study evaluated the prevalence of apical periodontitis (AP) and endodontic treatment in type 2 diabetic individuals as compared with nondiabetics from an adult Brazilian population. Full-mouth radiographs from 30 type 2 diabetic and 60 age- and sex-matched nondiabetic individuals were examined, and the presence of AP lesions in untreated and root canal-treated teeth was recorded. The number of teeth and the prevalence of root canal treatment were also evaluated. AP was significantly more present in teeth from diabetic individuals (98/652, 15%) than in nondiabetic controls (162/1,368, 12%) (P = .05). A separate analysis of untreated and treated teeth revealed that significance was mostly because of the prevalence of AP in untreated teeth, which was 10% in diabetics and 7% in nondiabetics (P = .03). No significant difference between diabetics and nondiabetics was observed for the other parameters under study, including the prevalence of AP in root canal-treated teeth, the number of teeth in the oral cavity, the number of treated teeth per individual, the number of individuals with at least 1 AP lesion or 1 root canal treatment, and the number of teeth with AP per individual (P > .05). AP was significantly more prevalent in untreated teeth from type 2 diabetics. This suggests that diabetes may serve as a disease modifier of AP in the sense that individuals with diabetes can be more prone to develop primary disease. However, findings do not confirm that diabetes may influence the response to root canal treatment because treated teeth had no increased prevalence of AP when compared with controls. Copyright © 2012 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Pro-oxidant status and matrix metalloproteinases in apical lesions and gingival crevicular fluid as potential biomarkers for asymptomatic apical periodontitis and endodontic treatment response

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Oxidative stress and matrix metalloproteinases -9 and -2 are involved in periodontal breakdown, whereas gingival crevicular fluid has been reported to reflect apical status. The aim of this study was to characterize oxidant balance and activity levels of MMP -2 and -9 in apical lesions and healthy periodontal ligament; and second, to determine whether potential changes in oxidant balance were reflected in gingival crevicular fluid from asymptomatic apical periodontitis (AAP)-affected teeth at baseline and after endodontic treatment. Methods Patients with clinical diagnosis of AAP and healthy volunteers having indication of tooth extraction were recruited. Apical lesions and healthy periodontal ligaments, respectively, were homogenized or processed to obtain histological tissue sections. Matrix metalloproteinase -9 and -2 levels and/or activity were analyzed by Immunowestern blot, zymography and consecutive densitometric analysis, and their tissue localization was confirmed by immunohistochemistry. A second group of patients with AAP and indication of endodontic treatment was recruited. Gingival crevicular fluid was extracted from AAP-affected teeth at baseline, after endodontic treatment and healthy contralateral teeth. Total oxidant and antioxidant status were determined in homogenized tissue and GCF samples. Statistical analysis was performed using STATA v10 software with unpaired t test, Mann-Whitney test and Spearman's correlation. Results Activity of MMP-2 and MMP-9 along with oxidant status were higher in apical lesions (p < 0.05). Total oxidant status correlated positively with matrix metalloproteinase-2 and lesion size (p < 0.05). Gingival crevicular fluid showed significantly lower levels of total antioxidant status in diseased teeth at baseline compared to controls and endodontically-treated groups. Conclusions Apical lesions display an oxidant imbalance along with increased activity of matrix metalloproteinase-2 and -9 and might contribute to

  8. A survey of attitude and opinions of endodontic residents towards regenerative endodontics

    PubMed Central

    Utneja, Shivani; Nawal, Ruchika Roongta; Ansari, Mohammed Irfan; Talwar, Sangeeta; Verma, Mahesh

    2013-01-01

    Aim: The objective of this survey was to study the level of awareness, current state of knowledge and opinions towards regenerative endodontic treatments amongst the endodontic residents of India. Settings and Design: Questionnaire based survey was designed. Materials and Methods: After approval from the organizing committee of 26th Federation of Operative Dentistry of India and 19th Indian Endodontic Society National conference 2011, 200 copies of the questionnaire were circulated amongst the endodontic residents in conservative dentistry and endodontics at various colleges across the country about regenerative endodontic procedures. The survey included profile of the respondents and consisted of 23 questions about their knowledge, attitude and opinions regarding use of these procedures as part of future dental treatment. Results: The survey showed that half the participants (50.6%) had received continued education in stem cells and/or regenerative dental treatments. The majority of participants were of the opinion (86.6%) that regenerative therapy should be incorporated into dentistry, and most of them (88%) were willing to acquire training in learning this new treatment strategy. The results indicated that half of the participants (52.6%) were already using some type of regenerative therapy in their clinical practice; however, with a majority of these limited to use of membranes, scaffolds or bioactive materials. Conclusions: These results reflect that endodontic residents are optimistic about the use of regenerative endodontic procedures; however, a need for more research and training was felt. PMID:23956532

  9. A survey of attitude and opinions of endodontic residents towards regenerative endodontics.

    PubMed

    Utneja, Shivani; Nawal, Ruchika Roongta; Ansari, Mohammed Irfan; Talwar, Sangeeta; Verma, Mahesh

    2013-07-01

    The objective of this survey was to study the level of awareness, current state of knowledge and opinions towards regenerative endodontic treatments amongst the endodontic residents of India. Questionnaire based survey was designed. After approval from the organizing committee of 26(th) Federation of Operative Dentistry of India and 19(th) Indian Endodontic Society National conference 2011, 200 copies of the questionnaire were circulated amongst the endodontic residents in conservative dentistry and endodontics at various colleges across the country about regenerative endodontic procedures. The survey included profile of the respondents and consisted of 23 questions about their knowledge, attitude and opinions regarding use of these procedures as part of future dental treatment. The survey showed that half the participants (50.6%) had received continued education in stem cells and/or regenerative dental treatments. The majority of participants were of the opinion (86.6%) that regenerative therapy should be incorporated into dentistry, and most of them (88%) were willing to acquire training in learning this new treatment strategy. The results indicated that half of the participants (52.6%) were already using some type of regenerative therapy in their clinical practice; however, with a majority of these limited to use of membranes, scaffolds or bioactive materials. These results reflect that endodontic residents are optimistic about the use of regenerative endodontic procedures; however, a need for more research and training was felt.

  10. Endodontic surgery prognostic factors.

    PubMed

    Azarpazhooh, Amir; Shah, Prakesh S

    2011-01-01

    Medline, (PubMed) and the Cochrane databases together with hand searching of the following journals: Journal of Endodontics, International Endodontic Journal, Oral Surgery Oral Medicine Oral Pathology (name changed to Oral Surgery Oral Medicine Oral Pathology Oral Radiology and Endodontics in 1995), Endodontics and Dental Traumatology (name changed to Dental Traumatology in 2001), Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, and International Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery. Clinical studies evaluating apical surgery with placement of a root-end filling were included. Studies on apical surgery with orthograde root canal filling or about apicectomy alone without root-end filling were excluded, as were experimental and animal studies. Only studies with ≥ ten patients with a minimum six month follow-up period and clearly defined radiographic and clinical healing criteria, with healing reported for at least two categories of a specific prognostic factor were accepted. Studies reporting in English, German, French, Spanish, Italian, Portuguese and Scandinavian languages were included. All studies were assessed separately by two of the three authors, with disagreements resolved by discussion. Prognostic factors were divided into patient related, tooth-related or treatment-related factors. The reported percentages of healed teeth were pooled per category. The statistical method of Mantel-Haenszel was applied to estimate the odds ratios and their 95% confidence intervals. Homogeneity was assessed using Woolf's test. With regard to tooth-related factors, the following were identified as predictors of healing: absence of preoperative pain or signs, good density of the root canal filling and a periapical lesion size of ≤ 5 mm. With regard to treatment-related factors, teeth treated with the use of an endoscope tended to have higher healed rates than teeth treated without the use of an endoscope. Although the clinician may be able to control treatment

  11. Effect of endodontic sealers on tooth color.

    PubMed

    Meincke, Débora Könzgen; Prado, Maíra; Gomes, Brenda Paula Figueiredo; Bona, Alvaro Della; Sousa, Ezilmara Leonor Rolim

    2013-08-01

    One of the goals of endodontic treatment is the adequate filling of the root canal,which is often done using gutta-percha and sealer. It has been reported that sealer remnants in the coronary pulp chamber cause tooth color changes. Therefore, this study was designed to examine the effect of endodontic sealer remnants on tooth color, testing the hypothesis that sealers cause coronal color changes. Forty single-rooted human teeth were endodontically treated leaving excess sealer material in the coronary pulp chamber. The specimens were divided into four groups (n = 10) according to the endodontic sealer used (AH, AH Plus; EF, Endofill; EN,endome´ thasoneN; and S26, Sealer 26). Teeth were stored at 37 8C moist environment.Color coordinates (L*a*b*) were measured with a spectrophotometer before endodontic treatment(baseline-control), 24 h and 6 months after treatment. L*a*b* values were used to calculate color changes (DE). Data were statistically analyzed using Kruskal–Wallis and Mann–Whitney-U tests. Color changes were observed for all groups with S26 and EN producing the greatest mean DE values after 6 months. Endodontic sealer remnants affect tooth color confirming the experimental hypothesis. This study examined the effect of endodontic sealer remnants on tooth color, and observed that after 6 months, the sealers produced unacceptable color changes. 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Modern Endodontic Principles. Part 6: Managing Complex Situations.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Carly; Roudsari, Reza Vahid; Jawad, Sarra; Darcey, James; Qualtrough, Alison

    2016-04-01

    Clinicians are often faced with endodontic cases that are significantly more challenging than the primary root canal treatment of mature adult teeth. This paper outlines some of the common treatment modalities which can be employed in situations in which either primary treatment has failed, or there is iatrogenic damage or unusual anatomy. CPD/Clinical Relevance: This paper will provide the reader with advice and techniques for undertaking orthograde endodontic retreatment, hemisection, endodontic surgery and management of teeth with incompletely formed roots.

  13. Single versus two visits with 1-week intracanal calcium hydroxide medication for endodontic treatment: One-year post-treatment results from a multicentre randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Fonzar, Federica; Mollo, Aniello; Venturi, Mauro; Pini, Pierpaolo; Fabian Fonzar, Riccardo; Trullenque-Eriksson, Anna; Esposito, Marco

    To evaluate whether it is more effective to complete endodontic treatment in a single visit or in two visits with 1-week intracanal calcium hydroxide medication in symptomatic teeth and teeth with periapical lesions. One hundred and ninety-nine patients, with one symptomatic tooth or a tooth with a periapical lesion, were randomised, according to a parallel group design, to receive a complete endodontic treatment in a single visit (99 patients) or in two visits with 1-week intracanal calcium hydroxide medication (100 patients), at two centres. Patients were followed for up to 1 year post-treatment and the outcome measures were tooth loss, radiographic healing, any complication, post-treatment pain and amount of painkillers used. Seven patients dropped out from the single-visit and ten patients from the two-visit group (all patients from one centre only). One patient lost his tooth from the single-visit and two patients from the two-visit group (difference in proportion = -0.01; 95% CI: -0.05 to 0.03; P = 0.619). Five single-visit patients and nine two-visit patients experienced one complication each (difference in proportion = -0.05; 95% CI: -0.12 to 0.03; P = 0.278). There were no statistically significant differences in tooth loss and complications. One year after treatment, complete radiographic healing was observed in 22 patients of the single-visit group and in 19 patients of the two-visit group; improvement in 43 patients of the single-visit group and in 54 patients of the two-visit group; and no changes/worsening in 24 patients of the single-visit group and in 15 patients of the two-visit group. There were no statistically significant differences in radiographic healing between the two groups (P = 0.509). Pre-treatment pain was reported by 68 single-visit patients and by 68 two-visit patients; 1-week post-treatment pain was reported by 27 single-visit patients and by 46 two-visit patients, and 2-week post-treatment pain was reported by 2

  14. Treatment of endodontic perforations using guided tissue regeneration and demineralized freeze-dried bone allograft: two case reports with 2-4 year post-surgical evaluations.

    PubMed

    Zenobio, Elton Golçalves; Shibli, Jamil Awad

    2004-08-15

    Clinicians often have difficulty with the diagnosis and treatment of root perforation. This paper reports two patients with root perforation treated with periodontal surgery associated with guided tissue regeneration (GTR) and demineralized freeze-dried bone allograft (DFDBA). This combined treatment resulted in minimal probing depths, minimal attachment loss, and radiographic evidence of bone gain after follow-up evaluations that ranged from 2 to 4 years. These case reports show a correct diagnosis and removal of etiologic factors can restore both periodontal and endodontic health.

  15. Stress distribution in molars restored with inlays or onlays with or without endodontic treatment: a three-dimensional finite element analysis.

    PubMed

    Jiang, W; Bo, H; Yongchun, G; LongXing, Ni

    2010-01-01

    Previous research into the strength of endodontically treated or vital teeth restored with inlays or onlays has not determined which restoration method and material provide the most favorable stress distribution upon loading. The purpose of this study was to calculate the von Mises stresses in a mandibular first molar using a 3-dimensional (3-D) finite element model. Models compared endodontically treated and vital teeth, a variety of restorative materials, and the use of either inlays or onlays to restore teeth. Four 3-D models of mandibular first molars were created: (1) the IV group (inlay restored, vital pulp); (2) the OV group (onlay restored, vital pulp); (3) the IE group (inlay restored, endodontically treated); and (4) the OE group (onlay restored, endodontically treated). In each group, 3 types of restorative material were tested: (1) composite resin, (2) ceramic, and (3) gold alloy. The materials had elastic moduli of 19 GPa, 65 GPa, and 96.6 GPa, respectively. Each model was subjected to a force of 45 N directed to the occlusal surface, applied either vertically or laterally (45 degrees obliquely). The stresses occurring in dentin tissue were calculated. The stress distribution patterns and the maximum von Mises stresses were calculated and compared. The different restorative materials exhibited similar stress distribution patterns under identical loading conditions. In each group, the gold-restored tooth exhibited the highest von Mises stress, followed by ceramic and composite resin. The maximum von Mises stress in dentin was found in the IE group (16.73 MPa), which was 5 times higher than the highest value found in the OV group (2.96 MPa). The highest stresses, which occurred at the floor of the preparation and the cervical region in dentin, were in the IE group. The stress concentration area in the IE group was also larger. The results indicate that endodontic treatment caused higher stress concentration in dentin compared with vital teeth, but that

  16. [Desmoplastic fibroma. Differential diagnosis of a periapical lesion from endodontic failure].

    PubMed

    Zabalegui, B; Gil, J; Zabalegui, I

    1989-01-01

    Treatment of endodontically involved teeth requires accurate diagnosis of the clinical pulpal condition to determine the primary cause of pathosis. The case presented shows the differential diagnosis between a desmoplastic fibroma and a failure of a misdiagnosed endodontic treatment. The initial direction of treatment should had never been the endodontic therapy but local surgical curettage of the lesion.

  17. The critical apical diameter to obtain regeneration of the pulp tissue after tooth transplantation, replantation, or regenerative endodontic treatment.

    PubMed

    Laureys, Wim G M; Cuvelier, Claude A; Dermaut, Luc R; De Pauw, Guy A M

    2013-06-01

    Regeneration of pulp-like tissue in the pulp chamber after tooth transplantation, replantation, or in regenerative endodontic treatment is only possible if the apical foramen is open. According to the literature, the success of regeneration decreases considerably if the foramen is smaller than 1 mm when measured on radiographs. The aim of this study was to study histologically the relation between the width of the apical foramen and regeneration of tissue in the pulp chamber after autotransplantation. Fifteen single-rooted mature teeth of 3 adult beagle dogs were used. All experimental teeth were extracted and underwent apicoectomy. The teeth were photographed from the apical side, and the width of the foramen was calculated. The foramen width ranged from 0.24-1.09 mm. All teeth were replanted in infraocclusion. The observation period was 90 days after transplantation. The 10 teeth with the smallest apical diameter, ranging between 0.24 and 0.53 mm, showed vital tissue in at least one third of the pulp chamber. The 6 most successful teeth showing vital tissue in the entire pulp chamber had an apical diameter between 0.32 and 0.65 mm, and 80% of the experimental teeth with a diameter varying between 1.09 and 0.31 mm showed vital tissue in at least one third of the pulp chamber 90 days after transplantation. The size of the apical foramen seems not to be the all decisive factor for successful revascularization and ingrowth of new tissue after transplantation. The minimum width of the apical foramen has not been determined, but a size smaller than 1 mm does not prevent revascularization and ingrowth of vital tissue. In this animal study an apical foramen of 0.32 mm did not prevent ingrowth of new tissue in two-thirds of the pulp chamber 90 days after transplantation. Copyright © 2013 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Ultrasonics in endodontics: a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Plotino, Gianluca; Pameijer, Cornelis H; Grande, Nicola Maria; Somma, Francesco

    2007-02-01

    During the past few decades endodontic treatment has benefited from the development of new techniques and equipment, which have improved outcome and predictability. Important attributes such as the operating microscope and ultrasonics (US) have found indispensable applications in a number of dental procedures in periodontology, to a much lesser extent in restorative dentistry, while being very prominently used in endodontics. US in endodontics has enhanced the quality of treatment and represents an important adjunct in the treatment of difficult cases. Since its introduction, US has become increasingly more useful in applications such as gaining access to canal openings, cleaning and shaping, obturation of root canals, removal of intracanal materials and obstructions, and endodontic surgery. This comprehensive review of the literature aims at presenting the numerous uses of US in clinical endodontics and emphasizes the broad applications in a modern-day endodontic practice.

  19. Endodontic retreatment in case of failure. Case report.

    PubMed

    Mărgărit, Ruxandra; Andrei, Oana Celia

    2011-01-01

    In medical practice, clinicians come across an increased number of endodontic treatments, which, like other dental treatments, can fail. The increase in the number of endodontic treatment resulted in an increased number of failures, their management raising complex and serious endodontic problems. The endodontic retreatment of a failure is required by the increased desire to preserve the tooth on the dental arch, thus preventing the need for dental extraction that may have adverse consequences in terms of functional and psychological effect on patients. This article presents two clinical cases that required endodontic retreatment in order to avoid the complications that could ultimately require tooth extraction. The teeth in question (a mandibular first molar and an upper central incisor) having a special importance, and a physiognomic role, the endodontic retreatment consisted in covering them in porcelain fused to the metal crowns.

  20. Regenerative endodontic treatment of an immature tooth with a necrotic pulp and apical periodontitis using platelet-rich plasma (PRP) and mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA): a case report.

    PubMed

    Sachdeva, G S; Sachdeva, L T; Goel, M; Bala, S

    2015-09-01

    To report the successful clinical and radiographic outcome of a regenerative endodontic treatment. A 16-year-old male patient presented with a discoloured, maxillary left lateral incisor with a necrotic pulp. Radiographic examination revealed an incompletely developed root with an open apex. Under local anaesthesia and rubber dam isolation, an access cavity was prepared and the necrotic pulpal remnants were removed. The canal was disinfected without mechanical instrumentation with 5.25% NaOCl solution and dried with sterile paper points. A triple antibiotic (metronidazole, ciprofloxacin and minocycline) mixed with distilled water was packed in the canal and left for 28 days. Ten millimetres of whole blood was drawn by venipuncture from the patients antecubital vein for preparation of platelet-rich plasma (PRP). After removal of the antibiotic mixture, the PRP was injected into the canal space up to the cementoenamel junction level. Three millimetres of white MTA was placed directly over the PRP clot. Two days later, the tooth was restored with permanent filling materials. The patient was recalled for 3, 6, 12, 24 and 36 months clinical/radiographic follow-up. A 3-year follow-up radiograph revealed resolution of the periapical lesion, increased thickening of the root walls, further root development and continued apical closure of the root apex. The tooth was not responsive to cold tests; however, sensitivity tests with an electric pulp tester (EPT) elicited a delayed positive response. Regeneration is a viable treatment modality that allows continued root development of immature teeth with open apices and necrotic pulps. Platelet-rich plasma appears to be a suitable scaffold for regeneration of vital tissues in teeth with a necrotic pulps and an associated periapical lesion. Regenerative endodontic procedures may offer an effective treatment option to save teeth with compromised structural integrity. © 2014 International Endodontic Journal. Published by John Wiley

  1. Prevalence of referral reasons and clinical symptoms for endodontic referrals

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the prevalence of different primary reasons for endodontic referrals and the clinical symptoms of the referred cases. Materials and Methods Clinical data of total endodontic treatment cases (1,014 teeth) including endodontic referral cases (224 teeth) between January 1, 2010 and December 31, 2012, at Kangdong Sacred Heart Hospital, were investigated retrospectively. The one major reason for referral, the clinical symptoms, and the resulting treatment procedures of referral cases were recorded. The percentages of clinical symptoms of the endodontic referral cases and the total endodontic treatment cases were compared by χ2 test for each symptom. Results Persistent pain was the most frequent reason for endodontic referral (29.5%), followed by presence of gingival swelling and sinus tract (24.1%), and apical radiolucency (12.9%). Referrals in cases involving endodontic difficulties such as canal calcification, broken instruments, post, perforation, and resorption were less than 5.0%, respectively. The percentages of four major clinical symptoms of pain, apical radiolucency, previous endodontic treatment, and gingival swelling and sinus tract were significantly higher in the endodontic referral cases than those in the total endodontic cases (p = 0.001). Among the included referral cases, 72.8% were treated with nonsurgical endodontic treatment only. Teeth other than the referred teeth were diagnosed as the origin of the problem in 5.8% of the referrals. Conclusions The high prevalence of pain, apical radiolucency, previous treatment, and gingival swelling and sinus tract in endodontic referral cases suggest that these symptoms may be what general practitioners consider to be difficult and refer to endodontists. PMID:25110645

  2. Endodontic Treatment of Type II Dens Invaginatus in a Maxillary Lateral Incisor: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Helvacioglu-Yigit, Dilek; Aydemir, Seda

    2012-01-01

    Dens invaginatus is a developmental anomaly that results in an enamel-lined cavity intruding into the crown or root before the mineralization phase. It typically affects permanent maxillary lateral incisors, central incisors, and premolars. This paper describes the root canal treatment of Oehlers' type II dens invaginatus in maxillary left lateral incisors. A 16-year-old boy presented to the Faculty of Dentistry, University of Kocaeli, to receive his dental treatments. During the caries removal, the pulp was exposed then anendodontic treatment was initiated. Two canals, one of which represented the invagination, were instrumented, irrigated, and then obturated with a lateral condensation technique. PMID:23213576

  3. Cross-sectional evaluation of post-operative pain and flare-ups in endodontic treatments using a type of rotary instruments.

    PubMed

    Tanalp, Jale; Sunay, Hakki; Bayirli, Gündüz

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this clinical study was to evaluate the general incidence of post-operative pain and flare-ups in patients who were endodontically treated by two endodontics specialists using rotary instruments (Hero 642, Micro Mega, France) with the same treatment protocol. Records of 382 teeth belonging to 268 patients treated by two endodontics specialists during a 6-month period were kept and evaluated. Post-operative pain between treatment visits was categorized using a pre-established scoring system. Ninety-five patients were males, whereas 173 were females. Pulpal necrosis without periapical pathosis was determined as the most common indication for endodontic treatment (21.7%) followed by irreversible pulpitis and re-treatment without periapical lesions (18.3%, 18.3%, respectively). The general prevalence of post-operative pain and flare-ups was determined as 8.1%, whereas cases that could be classified as real flare-ups which were severe and required an unscheduled visit (scores 2 and 3) comprised 3.4% of the cases. No statistically significant correlation was determined between gender and post-operative pain and flare-up (p = 0.05). There was a significant correlation between number of appointments and the presence of pain and flare-ups. Teeth undergoing multiple visits had a higher risk of developing post-operative pain and flare-ups compared to those with single appointments with a statistical significance (p = 0.03). Teeth with pre-operative pain were more prone to developing post-operative pain and discomfort with a statistically significant difference (p = 0.02). While no significant correlation was determined between tooth vitality and pain and flare-ups (p = 0.5), a statistically significant relationship existed between the presence of a periapical pathosis and post-operative pain and flare-ups. Cases with a periapical lesion had a higher risk of developing pain and flare-ups compared to those with no periapical involvement (p = 0.0001). Future

  4. Endodontic Re-Treatment of Maxillary Second Molar with Two Separate Palatal Roots: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Ghoddusi, Jamileh; Mesgarani, Abbas; Gharagozloo, Salman

    2008-01-01

    Maxillary second molar with two palatal roots is a rare dental anatomy. The diagnosis and treatment of exceeded root may create challenge for clinicians. The authors discuss the retreatment of a maxillary second molar in which exceeded root was undiagnosed in previous treatment. The case report underlines the importance of complete knowledge about root canal morphology which achieved by careful clinical and radiographic examination. In retreatment procedures clinicians should consider missed canals. PMID:24146676

  5. Applicability of bacterial cellulose as an alternative to paper points in endodontic treatment.

    PubMed

    Yoshino, Aya; Tabuchi, Mari; Uo, Motohiro; Tatsumi, Hiroto; Hideshima, Katsumi; Kondo, Seiji; Sekine, Joji

    2013-04-01

    Dental root canal treatment is required when dental caries progress to infection of the dental pulp. A major goal of this treatment is to provide complete decontamination of the dental root canal system. However, the morphology of dental root canal systems is complex, and many human dental roots have inaccessible areas. In addition, dental reinfection is fairly common. In conventional treatment, a cotton pellet and paper point made from plant cellulose is used to dry and sterilize the dental root canal. Such sterilization requires a treatment material with high absorbency to remove any residue, the ability to improve the efficacy of intracanal medication and high biocompatibility. Bacterial cellulose (BC) is produced by certain strains of bacteria. In this study, we developed BC in a pointed form and evaluated its applicability as a novel material for dental canal treatment with regard to solution absorption, expansion, tensile strength, drug release and biocompatibility. We found that BC has excellent material and biological characteristics compared with conventional materials, such as paper points (plant cellulose). BC showed noticeably higher absorption and expansion than paper points, and maintained a high tensile strength even when wet. The cumulative release of a model drug was significantly greater from BC than from paper points, and BC showed greater compatibility than paper points. Taken together, BC has great potential for use in dental root canal treatment. Copyright © 2012 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Endodontic management of patients with systemic complications

    PubMed Central

    Rajeswari, Kalaiselvam; Kandaswamy, Deivanayagam; Karthick, Soundararajan

    2016-01-01

    Successful endodontic practice requires complete knowledge about the various medical conditions and appropriateness in planning treatment as per the need with effective safety measures. This review focuses on a number of systemic complications encountered in endodontic practice and directions to be followed for avoiding potential complications. A detailed PubMed search was carried out using specific keywords, and 25 articles were referred for finalizing the content. PMID:27829742

  7. Endodontic management of patients with systemic complications.

    PubMed

    Rajeswari, Kalaiselvam; Kandaswamy, Deivanayagam; Karthick, Soundararajan

    2016-10-01

    Successful endodontic practice requires complete knowledge about the various medical conditions and appropriateness in planning treatment as per the need with effective safety measures. This review focuses on a number of systemic complications encountered in endodontic practice and directions to be followed for avoiding potential complications. A detailed PubMed search was carried out using specific keywords, and 25 articles were referred for finalizing the content.

  8. Surgical endodontic management of infected lateral canals of maxillary incisors

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    This case report presents surgical endodontic management outcomes of maxillary incisors that were infected via the lateral canals. Two cases are presented in which endodontically-treated maxillary central incisors had sustained lateral canal infections. A surgical endodontic treatment was performed on both teeth. Flap elevation revealed vertical bone destruction along the root surface and infected lateral canals, and microscopy revealed that the lateral canals were the origin of the lesions. After the infected lateral canals were surgically managed, both teeth were asymptomatic and labial fistulas were resolved. There were no clinical or radiographic signs of surgical endodontic management failure at follow-up visits. This case report highlights the clinical significance and surgical endodontic management of infected lateral canal of maxillary incisor. It is important to be aware of root canal anatomy variability in maxillary incisors. Maxillary central incisors infected via the lateral canal can be successfully managed by surgical endodontic treatment. PMID:25671217

  9. Endodontic and surgical treatment of root damage caused by orthodontic miniscrew placement.

    PubMed

    Lim, Geeyoung; Kim, Kee-Deog; Park, Wonse; Jung, Bock-Young; Pang, Nan-Sim

    2013-08-01

    Miniscrews are being increasingly used for anchorage control in orthodontics. Despite the concern over root damage caused by miniscrews, there are few reports of precise clinical evaluations and appropriate management of that damage. In the case presented herein, the root damage caused by the placement of miniscrews was repaired by root canal treatment and surgical intervention. A 44-year-old man received orthodontic treatment for intrusion of the left maxillary first molar with a miniscrew anchorage system. During that treatment, the miniscrews had fallen out and had to be reinserted more than 6 times in the same area. Two years later, the patient complained of a spontaneous pain in the maxillary left molar region. Although the patient received root canal treatment, intraoral sinus tracts could still be detected, and the patient's discomfort persisted. Periradicular surgery revealed that the persistent infection was related to root surface damage caused by orthodontic miniscrew placement. Healing was achieved by a combination of root canal treatment and surgical intervention. Scanning electron microscopy of the damaged distobuccal root apex revealed a mature biofilm consisting of a network of matrix that contained mostly rod-like and spherical bacteria. At a 12-month recall checkup, the patient was free of pain. A repeat periapical radiograph revealed reduction of the pretreatment radiolucent lesion. More careful planning of miniscrew placement is necessary to lessen the danger of root damage. Furthermore, a precise evaluation of both root and pulpal damage and careful consideration of the choice of optimal treatment modality are needed. Copyright © 2013 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Accidental separation and lodgment of rotary endodontic file into the dentist's thumb.

    PubMed

    Karnik, Rohit; Shetty, Subraj; Desai, Rajiv S; Shetty, Karthick

    2016-01-01

    Separation of the endodontic instrument within the root canal system and sharp injuries to the dentist is not an uncommon event in endodontic practice. Although root canal instruments can fracture at any stage of endodontic treatment, its fracture within the dentist's hand is a very rare event. An unusual case of accidental separation and lodgment of rotary endodontic file in the dentist's thumb is presented along with its management. A 33-year-old dentist reported with an accidental lodgment of rotary endodontic file into his thumb. The fractured instrument was removed successfully by a surgeon. The present case describes a rare event of occupational risk in endodontic practice.

  11. Identifying murder victims with endodontic radiographs

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Rhonan Ferreira; Franco, Ademir; Mendes, Solon Diego Santos Carvalho; Picoli, Fernando Fortes; Nunes, Fernando Gomes; Estrela, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Endodontics is a special branch of dentistry constantly guided by imaging examinations. From a forensic scope, endodontics plays a valuable role providing solid antemortem (AM) radiographic evidence for comparison with postmortem findings in human identifications. This study illustrates the interface between endodontics and forensic odontology describing three cases of human identification based on radiographic endodontic records. From 2009 to 2012, three unknown male victims of murder were examined in a local Brazilian medico-legal institute to retrieve identity and potential cause of death. Specifically, when asked for AM data, a relative of the three victims provided periapical radiographs of endodontic treatments. Based on that, forensic dentists reproduced the same imaging acquisition techniques obtaining similar periapical radiographs, enabling a comparative dental identification. All the victims were positively identified based on patterns of dental morphology and treatment intervention. This study draws the attention of general and forensic dentists highlight the importance of properly recording dental treatments and searching for evidence in AM endodontic data, respectively. PMID:28123272

  12. Identifying murder victims with endodontic radiographs.

    PubMed

    Silva, Rhonan Ferreira; Franco, Ademir; Mendes, Solon Diego Santos Carvalho; Picoli, Fernando Fortes; Nunes, Fernando Gomes; Estrela, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Endodontics is a special branch of dentistry constantly guided by imaging examinations. From a forensic scope, endodontics plays a valuable role providing solid antemortem (AM) radiographic evidence for comparison with postmortem findings in human identifications. This study illustrates the interface between endodontics and forensic odontology describing three cases of human identification based on radiographic endodontic records. From 2009 to 2012, three unknown male victims of murder were examined in a local Brazilian medico-legal institute to retrieve identity and potential cause of death. Specifically, when asked for AM data, a relative of the three victims provided periapical radiographs of endodontic treatments. Based on that, forensic dentists reproduced the same imaging acquisition techniques obtaining similar periapical radiographs, enabling a comparative dental identification. All the victims were positively identified based on patterns of dental morphology and treatment intervention. This study draws the attention of general and forensic dentists highlight the importance of properly recording dental treatments and searching for evidence in AM endodontic data, respectively.

  13. Treatment of Mature Permanent Teeth with Necrotic Pulps and Apical Periodontitis Using Regenerative Endodontic Procedures: A Case Series.

    PubMed

    Saoud, Tarek Mohamed; Martin, Gabriela; Chen, Yea-Huey M; Chen, Kuang-Liang; Chen, Chao-An; Songtrakul, Kamolthip; Malek, Matthew; Sigurdsson, Asgeir; Lin, Louis M

    2016-01-01

    Regenerative endodontic procedures (REPs) are usually used to treat human immature permanent teeth with necrotic pulps and/or apical periodontitis. Successful REPs result in the elimination of clinical signs/symptoms, the resolution of apical periodontitis, and, in some cases, thickening of the canal walls and/or continued root development with or without apical closure. REPs can restore the vitality of tissue in the canals of immature permanent teeth previously destroyed by infection or trauma. Vital tissue is inherited with immune defense mechanisms to protect itself from foreign invaders. Recently, REPs have also been used to successfully treat human mature permanent teeth with necrotic pulps and apical periodontitis. The purpose of this case series was to present the potential of using REPs for mature permanent teeth with necrotic pulps and apical periodontitis. This case series consisted of 6 patients, 4 females and 2 males. The patients' ages ranged from 8-21 years old. Seven permanent teeth, 4 anterior and 3 molar teeth, with necrotic pulps and apical periodontitis were treated using REP. Radiographically, the root development of all teeth was almost completed except the apices of 2 molars, which showed slightly open. Complete chemomechanical debridement of the canals of the teeth was performed, and the canals were dressed with Metapaste (Meta Biomed Co, Ltd, Chungbuk, Korea) during treatment visits. Periapical bleeding into the canals was induced at the last treatment visit by placing a hand #20 or #25 K-file with the tip slightly bent through the apical foramina into the periapical tissues. A 3-mm thickness of mineral trioxide aggregate was placed into the coronal canals over semicoagulated blood. The access cavities were restored with either composite resin or amalgam. Follow-ups of the 7 teeth ranged from 8 to 26 months. The periapical lesions of 2 teeth were considered healed, and 5 teeth revealed healing. Clinical signs/symptoms were absent in all

  14. Advances in endodontics: Potential applications in clinical practice

    PubMed Central

    Kishen, Anil; Peters, Ove A.; Zehnder, Matthias; Diogenes, Anibal R.; Nair, Madhu K.

    2016-01-01

    Contemporary endodontics has seen an unprecedented advance in technology and materials. This article aimed to review some of the challenges and advances in the following sections: (1) endodontic imaging, (2) root canal preparation, (3) root canal disinfection, (4) root canal filling, and (4) regenerative endodontic procedures (REPs). Jointly, these advances are aimed at improving the state of the art and science of root canal treatment. PMID:27217630

  15. Advances in endodontics: Potential applications in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Kishen, Anil; Peters, Ove A; Zehnder, Matthias; Diogenes, Anibal R; Nair, Madhu K

    2016-01-01

    Contemporary endodontics has seen an unprecedented advance in technology and materials. This article aimed to review some of the challenges and advances in the following sections: (1) endodontic imaging, (2) root canal preparation, (3) root canal disinfection, (4) root canal filling, and (4) regenerative endodontic procedures (REPs). Jointly, these advances are aimed at improving the state of the art and science of root canal treatment.

  16. Central Giant Cell Granuloma: A potential endodontic misdiagnosis.

    PubMed

    Seifi, Safoura; Fouroghi, Ramin

    2009-01-01

    Central Giant Cell Granulomas (CGCGs) may manifest as radiolucencies anywhere in the mandible or maxilla. In rare cases, it can appear as a localized periradicular area and mimic an endodontic lesion. This case report presents an uncommon location of CGCG which was not accurately diagnosed nor timely treated. Periodic follow ups of periapical radiolucencies after RCT are necessary. Dentists should include CGCG in differential diagnosis of lesions that are refractory to endodontic treatment. [Iranian Endodontic Journal 2009;4(4):158-60].

  17. Photodynamic therapy in endodontics: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Trindade, Alessandra Cesar; De Figueiredo, José Antônio Poli; Steier, Liviu; Weber, João Batista Blessmann

    2015-03-01

    Recently, several in vitro and in vivo studies demonstrated promising results about the use of photodynamic therapy during root canal system disinfection. However, there is no consensus on a standard protocol for its incorporation during root canal treatment. The purpose of this study was to summarize the results of research on photodynamic therapy in endodontics published in peer-reviewed journals. A review of pertinent literature was conducted using the PubMed database, and data obtained were categorized into sections in terms of relevant topics. Studies conducted in recent years highlighted the antimicrobial potential of photodynamic therapy in endodontics. However, most of these studies were not able to confirm a significant improvement in root canal disinfection for photodynamic therapy as a substitute for current disinfection methods. Its indication as an excellent adjunct to conventional endodontic therapy is well documented, however. Data suggest the need for protocol adjustments or new photosensitizer formulations to enhance photodynamic therapy predictability in endodontics.

  18. Conservative endodontic treatment of teeth fractured in the middle or apical part of the root.

    PubMed

    Cvek, M; Mejàre, I; Andreasen, J O

    2004-10-01

    According to treatment type, root-fractured teeth with pulp necrosis or exposed pulps were divided into five groups, group 1: 17 teeth in which the root canal of the coronal fragment only was filled with gutta-percha (GP); group 2: seven teeth in which the root canals of the coronal and apical fragments were both filled with GP; group 3: 19 teeth in which the coronal fragment was filled with GP and the apical fragment was surgically removed; group 4: 68 teeth where the root canal of the coronal fragment was treated with calcium hydroxide and subsequently filled with GP; and group 5: five vital teeth with root and concomitant crown fractures in which the exposed pulps were treated by partial pulpotomy. The frequency of periodontal healing was 76% in group 1, zero in group 2, 68% in group 3 and 86% in group 4. Compared with groups 1 and 2 combined, healing in group 4 was significantly more frequent. In groups 1, 2 and 4, failures occurred significantly more often in teeth showing overfilling, i.e. protrusion of GP into the space between the fragments, compared with teeth without overfilling. All five teeth in group 5 showed healing. It was concluded that root canal filling with GP of the coronal fragment only, with or without surgical removal of the apical fragment, can be successful in selected cases. Treatment of the root canal with calcium hydroxide followed by GP filling appears to be the treatment of choice in root-fractured non-vital teeth. Partial pulpotomy of exposed pulps in five teeth showed results similar to root-unfractured teeth with pulp exposure treated with this technique.

  19. Regenerative endodontics--Creating new horizons.

    PubMed

    Dhillon, Harnoor; Kaushik, Mamta; Sharma, Roshni

    2016-05-01

    Trauma to the dental pulp, physical or microbiologic, can lead to inflammation of the pulp followed by necrosis. The current treatment modality for such cases is non-surgical root canal treatment. The damaged tissue is extirpated and the root canal system prepared. It is then obturated with an inert material such a gutta percha. In spite of advances in techniques and materials, 10%-15% of the cases may end in failure of treatment. Regenerative endodontics combines principles of endodontics, cell biology, and tissue engineering to provide an ideal treatment for inflamed and necrotic pulp. It utilizes mesenchymal stem cells, growth factors, and organ tissue culture to provide treatment. Potential treatment modalities include induction of blood clot for pulp revascularization, scaffold aided regeneration, and pulp implantation. Although in its infancy, successful treatment of damaged pulp tissue has been performed using principles of regenerative endodontics. This field is dynamic and exciting with the ability to shape the future of endodontics. This article highlights the fundamental concepts, protocol for treatment, and possible avenues for research in regenerative endodontics. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Postoperative Pain after Endodontic Treatment of Asymptomatic Teeth Using Rotary Instruments: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Shahi, Shahriar; Asghari, Vahideh; Rahimi, Saeed; Lotfi, Mehrdad; Samiei, Mohammad; Yavari, Hamidreza; Shakouie, Sahar; Nezafati, Saeed

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The aim of the present study was to compare the effect of two different rotary instruments on postoperative pain in teeth with asymptomatic irreversible pulpitis. Methods and Materials: A total of 78 mandibular first and second molars were divided into two groups (n=39) and their root canal preparation was carried out with either RaCe or ProTaper rotary instruments. All the subjects underwent one-visit root canal treatment and the severity of postoperative pain was evaluated using visual analog scale (VAS) at 4-, 12-, 24-, 48- and 72-h and 1-week intervals. In addition, the need for taking analgesics was recorded. Data were analyzed with the repeated-measures ANOVA and the Mann-Whitney U test was used for two-by-two comparison. Statistical significance was set at 0.05. Results: Comparison of mean pain severity between the two groups at various postoperative intervals did not reveal any significant differences (P=0.10). The difference in amount of analgesics taken by each groups was not statistically significant (P=0.25). Conclusion: There were no significant differences in the postoperative pain reported between the two groups; which indicates the clinical acceptability of both systems. PMID:26843876

  1. A double blind randomized trial of ketofol versus propofol for endodontic treatment of anxious pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Mittal, N; Goyal, A; Gauba, K; Kapur, A; Jain, K

    2013-01-01

    To find out the safe and efficient sedative agent for primary molar pulpectomy in uncooperative pediatric patients. This double blind randomized trial enrolled 40 anxious and healthy 2-6 year olds. All subjects received IV propofol (1-1.5 mg/kg) or ketofol (1-1.5 mg/kg propofol with 0.25 mg/kg ketamine) as per group assignment after oral midazolam premedication (0.5 mg/kg). Sedation maintenance was done with propofol infusion at 25-75 microg/kg/min titrated to a predefined Worse level as per Houpt's sedation rating scale. Additional bolus/es was/were administered in the dosage similar to induction dose in case of inadequate sedation. Primary outcomes were intraoperative and postoperative adverse events. Secondary outcomes were vital signs, success of procedure, operator satisfaction, sedation quality, treatment time, recovery time and total propofol dose. Significantly greater incidence of respiratory depression was reported for ketofol group (11/20; 55%) when compared to propofol group (3/20; 15%) (p = 0.008). Desaturation was the most common adverse respiratory event with significantly greater incidence in ketofol group (9/20; 45%) when compared to propofol only group (3/20; 15%) (p = 0.033). No significant differences regarding secondary outcomes were reported in two groups. Both the regimen exhibited similar sedation profile while propofol alone emerged as a safer option.

  2. Discoloration Potential of Endodontic Sealers: A Brief Review.

    PubMed

    Tour Savadkouhi, Sohrab; Fazlyab, Mahta

    2016-01-01

    Tooth discoloration induced by endodontic sealers, is a common finding that impairs aesthetic outcome of endodontic treatment. The aim of the present mini literature review, was to summarize the existing data on discoloration potential of different endodontic sealers. The research covered the article published in PubMed and Google Scholar from 2000 to 2015. The searched keywords included 'tooth discoloration AND endodontic', 'tooth discoloration AND sealer, 'tooth discoloration AND zinc-oxide eugenol sealer', 'tooth discoloration AND Calcium Hydroxide Sealer', 'tooth discoloration AND Glass Ionomer Sealer', 'tooth discoloration AND epoxy-resin Sealer', 'tooth discoloration AND Silicon Based Sealer', 'tooth discoloration AND Bioceramic Sealer' and 'Spectrophotometry'.

  3. Irrigation in endodontics.

    PubMed

    Haapasalo, Markus; Shen, Ya; Qian, Wei; Gao, Yuan

    2010-04-01

    The success of endodontic treatment depends on the eradication of microbes from the root-canal system and prevention of reinfection. The root canal is shaped with hand and rotary instruments under constant irrigation to remove the inflamed and necrotic tissue, microbes/biofilms, and other debris from the root-canal space. Irrigants have traditionally been delivered into the root-canal space using syringes and metal needles of different size and tip design. Clinical experience and research have shown, however, that this classic approach typically results in ineffective irrigation. Many of the compounds used for irrigation have been chemically modified and several mechanical devices have been developed to improve the penetration and effectiveness of irrigation. This article summarizes the chemistry, biology, and procedures for safe and efficient irrigation and provides cutting-edge information on the most recent developments. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Microleakage in Endodontics

    PubMed Central

    Muliyar, Sabir; Shameem, K Abdul; Thankachan, Rekha P; Francis, P G; Jayapalan, C S; Hafiz, K A Abdul

    2014-01-01

    A three-dimensional obturation and complete coronal and apical seal is one the important aims of root canal treatment. Since microorganisms may remain in the root canal system after instrumentation, a tight apical seal is desired to prevent bacteria and their by-products from invading the apex. A perfect apical seal is also desired to prevent apical percolation. One of the major objectives of tooth restoration is the protection of exposed dentine against bacteria and their toxins. The interface between the restoration and dental hard tissue is an area of clinical concern as insufficient sealing can result in marginal discoloration, secondary caries, and pulpitis. For that reason, adequate sealing is essential for the optimal clinical performance Prevention of microleakage in endodontically treated teeth is most important for patients who rely on the combined expertise and quality care of dentist/endodontist colleagues. Microleakage is arguably the single most important risk factor for apical periodontitis. PMID:25628496

  5. Influence of irrigation protocols on the bond strength of fiber posts cemented with a self-adhesive luting agent 24 hours after endodontic treatment.

    PubMed

    Lima, Jessica Ferraz Carvalho; Lima, Adriano Fonseca; Humel, Maria Malerba Colombi; Paulillo, Luis Alexandre Maffei Sartini; Marchi, Giselle Maria; Ferraz, Caio Cezar Randi

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the influence of different irrigation protocols on the bond strength, at different root depths, of fiber posts cemented with a self-adhesive cement 24 hours after endodontic treatment. Fifty-six bovine incisor roots were endodontically prepared and separated into 7 groups (n = 8) according to irrigation protocols: group 1, sterile saline (control); group 2, chlorhexidine (CHX) gel 2% and saline; group 3, sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) 5.25% and saline; group 4, CHX and saline (final irrigation with ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid [EDTA] 17%); group 5, NaOCl and saline (final irrigation with EDTA); group 6, CHX and saline (final irrigation with NaOCl and EDTA); and group 7, NaOCl (final irrigation with CHX and EDTA). No statistically significant difference was found among the groups. Within the limitations of this study, it can be concluded that the different irrigation protocols did not influence the bond strength of self-adhesive resin cement, which presented similar behaviors at the 3 root depths studied.

  6. Efficacy of orally administered prednisolone versus partial endodontic treatment on pain reduction in emergency care of acute irreversible pulpitis of mandibular molars: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Kérourédan, Olivia; Jallon, Léonard; Perez, Paul; Germain, Christine; Péli, Jean-François; Oriez, Dominique; Fricain, Jean-Christophe; Arrivé, Elise; Devillard, Raphaël

    2017-03-28

    Irreversible pulpitis is a highly painful inflammatory condition of the dental pulp which represents a common dental emergency. Recommended care is partial endodontic treatment. The dental literature reports major difficulties in achieving adequate analgesia to perform this emergency treatment, especially in the case of mandibular molars. In current practice, short-course, orally administered corticotherapy is used for the management of oral pain of inflammatory origin. The efficacy of intraosseous local steroid injections for irreversible pulpitis in mandibular molars has already been demonstrated but resulted in local comorbidities. Oral administration of short-course prednisolone is simple and safe but its efficacy to manage pain caused by irreversible pulpitis has not yet been demonstrated. This trial aims to evaluate the noninferiority of short-course, orally administered corticotherapy versus partial endodontic treatment for the emergency care of irreversible pulpitis in mandibular molars. This study is a noninferiority, open-label, randomized controlled clinical trial conducted at the Bordeaux University Hospital. One hundred and twenty subjects will be randomized in two 1:1 parallel arms: the intervention arm will receive one oral dose of prednisolone (1 mg/kg) during the emergency visit, followed by one morning dose each day for 3 days and the reference arm will receive partial endodontic treatment. Both groups will receive planned complete endodontic treatment 72 h after enrollment. The primary outcome is the proportion of patients with pain intensity below 5 on a Numeric Scale 24 h after the emergency visit. Secondary outcomes include comfort during care, the number of injected anesthetic cartridges when performing complete endodontic treatment, the number of antalgic drugs and the number of patients coming back for consultation after 72 h. This randomized trial will assess the ability of short-term corticotherapy to reduce pain in irreversible

  7. Regenerative Endodontic Procedures: Clinical Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Diogenes, Anibal; Ruparel, Nikita B

    2017-01-01

    Immature teeth are at risk for pulp necrosis, resulting in arrested root development and poor long-term prognosis. There is growing evidence that regenerative endodontic procedures promote desirable clinical outcomes. Despite significant advances in the field of regenerative endodontics and acceptable clinical outcomes, current evidence suggests that the tissues formed following currently used procedures do not completely recapitulate the former pulp-dentin complex. Further research is needed to identify prognostic factors and predictors of successful outcomes and to develop different treatment strategies to better predictably achieve all identified clinical outcomes, while favoring tissue formation that more closely resembles the pulp-dentin complex. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  8. [Theory and practice of minimally invasive endodontics].

    PubMed

    Jiang, H W

    2016-08-01

    The primary goal of modern endodontic therapy is to achieve the long-term retention of a functional tooth by preventing or treating pulpitis or apical periodontitis is. The long-term retention of endodontically treated tooth is correlated with the remaining amount of tooth tissue and the quality of the restoration after root canal filling. In recent years, there has been rapid progress and development in the basic research of endodontic biology, instrument and applied materials, making treatment procedures safer, more accurate, and more efficient. Thus, minimally invasive endodontics(MIE)has received increasing attention at present. MIE aims to preserve the maximum of tooth structure during root canal therapy, and the concept covers the whole process of diagnosis and treatment of teeth. This review article focuses on describing the minimally invasive concepts and operating essentials in endodontics, from diagnosis and treatment planning to the access opening, pulp cavity finishing, root canal cleaning and shaping, 3-dimensional root canal filling and restoration after root canal treatment.

  9. Accidental Ingestion of Endodontic File: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Saraf, Hrushikesh P.; Nikhade, Pradnya P.; Chandak, Manoj G.

    2012-01-01

    Ingestion of the endodontic instrument during root canal treatment is rare but can result in serious complications. The present paper reports a case in which endodontic file was accidentally swallowed by the patient undergoing root canal therapy, which entered digestive tract and passed uneventfully. PMID:22577586

  10. Endodontic-periodontal microsurgery for combined endodontic-periodontal lesions: An overview

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Ritu; Hegde, Vivek; Siddharth, M; Hegde, Rashmi; Manchanda, Gunsha; Agarwal, Pratul

    2014-01-01

    Endodontic and periodontal microsurgery has surpassed the success rates for traditional endodontic and periodontal surgical procedures. Excellent healing results are being attributed to both the techniques, when employed, for isolated endodontic or periodontal defects. Combined endodontic-periodontal lesions have been referred to as a true challenge, requiring not only endodontic microsurgical management but also concurrent bone grafting and membrane barriers techniques. The prevention of epithelial downgrowth and regeneration of periodontal cementum, fiber, and bone seals the fate of these cases. Achieving primary closure with submergence of grafts has a positive effect on GTR outcome. New techniques of periodontal microsurgery, such as minimally invasive papilla preserving flaps with passive internal mattress suturing, have managed to obtain 90% primary flap closure over grafted sites. Root surface treatment and conditioning has also shown to be beneficial for GTR. Endodontic microsurgery for the combined lesion has not integrated these advances yet. These advances, along with a recently suggested treatment strategy, are ushering in the level next in management of the combined lesions. This article offers an overview of the combined lesion, the disease, its classification, treatment strategy, regenerative tools, microsurgical recommendations, and outcome studies. PMID:25506135

  11. Synchronized delivery of Er:YAG-laser pulses into water studied by a laser beam transmission probe for enhanced endodontic treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregorčič, P.; Lukač, N.; Možina, J.; Jezeršek, M.

    2016-04-01

    We examine the effects of the synchronized delivery of multiple Er:YAG-laser pulses during vapor-bubble oscillations into water. For this purpose, we used a laser beam transmission probe that enables monitoring of the bubble's dynamics from a single shot. To overcome the main drawbacks of this technique, we propose and develop an appropriate and robust calibration by simultaneous employment of shadow photography. By using the developed experimental method, we show that the resonance effect is obtained when the second laser pulse is delivered at the end or slightly after the first bubble's collapse. In this case, the resonance effect increases the mechanical energy of the secondary bubble's oscillations and prolongs their duration. The presented laser method for synchronized delivery of Er:YAG-laser pulses during bubble oscillations has great potential for further improvement of laser endodontic treatment, especially upon their safety and efficiency.

  12. Endodontic treatment of trauma-induced necrotic immature teeth using a tricalcium silicate-based bioactive cement. A report of 3 cases with 24-month follow-up.

    PubMed

    Martens, L; Rajasekharan, S; Cauwels, R

    2016-03-01

    Pulp necrosis is the second most common complication after traumatic dental injuries and occurs mostly within the first 6-24 months of follow-up period, depending on the type of dental trauma. Three cases with endodontic treatment scenarios of trauma-induced necrosis in immature permanent anterior teeth. All cases were treated by full canal obturation with Biodentine (Septodont, Saint Maur des Fosses, France) and documented for a follow-up period of 24 months. Copious irrigation of the root canal, minimal mechanical preparation, use of calcium hydroxide for a short period of time and complete obturation of these immature teeth with a bioactive cement with superior mechanical properties such as Biodentine were the prominent reasons attributed to the success of these three cases.

  13. Microsurgical re-treatment of an endodontically treated tooth with an apically located incomplete vertical root fracture: a clinical case report.

    PubMed

    Taschieri, Silvio; Del Fabbro, Massimo; El Kabbaney, Ahmed; Tsesis, Igor; Rosen, Eyal; Corbella, Stefano

    2016-11-01

    Although it is challenging, the early diagnosis of a vertical root fracture (VRF) is crucial in order to ensure tooth preservation. The purpose of this clinical case report was to describe reparative surgery performed to treat a tooth affected by an incomplete VRF. A 26 year old male patient was suspected to have a VRF in a maxillary left central incisor, and an exploratory flap was performed in order to confirm the diagnosis. After detecting the fracture, the lesion was surgically treated, the fracture and the infected root-end were removed, and a platelet-rich plasma membrane was used to cover the defect in order to prevent bacterial migration. A 24 month clinical and radiological follow-up examination showed that the tooth was asymptomatic and that the healing process was in progress. The surgical approach described here may be considered an effective treatment for a combined endodontic-periodontal lesion originating from an incomplete VRF and a recurrent periapical lesion.

  14. Current overview on challenges in regenerative endodontics

    PubMed Central

    Bansal, Ramta; Jain, Aditya; Mittal, Sunandan

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Regenerative endodontics provides hope of converting the non-vital tooth into vital once again. It focuses on substituting traumatized and pathological pulp with functional pulp tissue. Current regenerative procedures successfully produce root development but still fail to re-establish real pulp tissue and give unpredictable results. There are several drawbacks that need to be addressed to improve the quality and efficiency of the treatment. Aim: The aim of this review article is to discuss major priorities that ought to be dealt before applications of regenerative endodontics flourish the clinical practice. Materials and Methods: A web-based research on MEDLINE was done using filter terms Review, published in the last 10 years and Dental journals. Keywords used for research were “regenerative endodontics,” “dental stem cells,” “growth factor regeneration,” “scaffolds,” and “challenges in regeneration.” This review article screened about 150 articles and then the relevant information was compiled. Results: Inspite of the impressive growth in regenerative endodontic field, there are certain loopholes in the existing treatment protocols that might sometimes result in undesired and unpredictable outcomes. Conclusion: Considerable research and development efforts are required to improve and update existing regenerative endodontic strategies to make it an effective, safe, and biological mode to save teeth. PMID:25657518

  15. Current overview on challenges in regenerative endodontics.

    PubMed

    Bansal, Ramta; Jain, Aditya; Mittal, Sunandan

    2015-01-01

    Regenerative endodontics provides hope of converting the non-vital tooth into vital once again. It focuses on substituting traumatized and pathological pulp with functional pulp tissue. Current regenerative procedures successfully produce root development but still fail to re-establish real pulp tissue and give unpredictable results. There are several drawbacks that need to be addressed to improve the quality and efficiency of the treatment. The aim of this review article is to discuss major priorities that ought to be dealt before applications of regenerative endodontics flourish the clinical practice. A web-based research on MEDLINE was done using filter terms Review, published in the last 10 years and Dental journals. Keywords used for research were "regenerative endodontics," "dental stem cells," "growth factor regeneration," "scaffolds," and "challenges in regeneration." This review article screened about 150 articles and then the relevant information was compiled. Inspite of the impressive growth in regenerative endodontic field, there are certain loopholes in the existing treatment protocols that might sometimes result in undesired and unpredictable outcomes. Considerable research and development efforts are required to improve and update existing regenerative endodontic strategies to make it an effective, safe, and biological mode to save teeth.

  16. [Endodontics in horses. An experimental study].

    PubMed

    Garcia, F; Sanromán, F; Llorens, M P

    1990-04-01

    A total of 44 experimental endodontic treatments were performed in incisors of eight horses of different ages. Four different endodontic pastes were used: Cloropercha, AH26 De Trey, Eugenol-Endometasone, and Universal N2. Gutta-percha points were also included in the last two treatments. Access to the pulp cavity of incisors was gained through their vestibular and occlusal faces. Holes drilled in vestibular faces were sealed with composite and those drilled in occlusal faces were sealed with Amalgama. Animals were observed during eighteen months at least after endodontics. Radiographic controls were done just after surgery and before slaughtering. Treated incisors and alveoli were studied histopathologically. During the experiment all animals were in good condition. They ate apparently without trouble, and neither clinical nor radiological signs were present.

  17. [Endodontics in motion: new concepts, materials and techniques 3. The role of irrigants during root canal treatment].

    PubMed

    van der Sluis, L W M

    2015-10-01

    The aims of root canal irrigation are the chemical dissolution or disruption and the mechanical detachment of pulp tissue, dentin debris and smear layer (instrumentation products), microorganisms (planktonic or biofilm) and their products from the root canal wall, their removal out of the root canal system and their chemical dissolution or disruption. Each of the endodontic irrigation systems has its own irrigant flow characteristics, which should fulfill these aims. Without flow (convection), the irrigant would have to be distributed through diffusion. This process is slow and depends on temperature and concentration gradients. On the other hand, convection is a faster and more efficient transport mechanism. During irrigant flow, frictional forces will occur, for example between the irrigant and the root canal wall (wall shear stress). These frictional forces have a mechanical cleaning effect on the root canal wall. These frictional forces are the result of the flow characteristics related to the different irrigation systems.

  18. Cone beam computed tomography in endodontics.

    PubMed

    Durack, Conor; Patel, Shanon

    2012-01-01

    Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) is a contemporary, radiological imaging system designed specifically for use on the maxillo-facial skeleton. The system overcomes many of the limitations of conventional radiography by producing undistorted, three-dimensional images of the area under examination. These properties make this form of imaging particularly suitable for use in endodontics. The clinician can obtain an enhanced appreciation of the anatomy being assessed, leading to an improvement in the detection of endodontic disease and resulting in more effective treatment planning. In addition, CBCT operates with a significantly lower effective radiation dose when compared with conventional computed tomography (CT). The purpose of this paper is to review the current literature relating to the limitations and potential applications of CBCT in endodontic practice.

  19. Pulsed Nd-YAG laser in endodontics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ragot-Roy, Brigitte; Severin, Claude; Maquin, Michel

    1994-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to establish an operative method in endodontics. The effect of a pulsed Nd:YAG laser on root canal dentin has been examined with a scanning electron microscope. Our first experimentation was to observe the impacts carried out perpendicularly to root canal surface with a 200 micrometers fiber optic in the presence of dye. Secondarily, the optical fiber was used as an endodontic instrument with black dye. The irradiation was performed after root canal preparation (15/100 file or 40/100 file) or directly into the canal. Adverse effects are observed. The results show that laser irradiation on root canal dentin surfaces induces a nonhomogeneous modified dentin layer, melted and resolidified dentin closed partially dentinal tubules. The removal of debris is not efficient enough. The laser treatment seems to be indicated only for endodontic and periapical spaces sterilization after conventional root canal preparation.

  20. The Effect of Smear Layer Removal on Endodontic Outcomes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-06-01

    periodontitis . Endod Dent Traumatol 1986; 2: 20-34. 20. Hulsmann M, Heckendorff M, Lennon A. Chelating agents in root canal treatment: mode of action and...evaluation of one- and two-visit endodontic treatment of asymptomatic necrotic teeth with apical periodontitis : a randomized clinical trial. J Endod 2007...MI, Wenckus CS, BeGole EA, Johnson BR. Outcome of one-visit and two-visit endodontic treatment of necrotic teeth with apical periodontitis : a

  1. Regenerative therapy: a periodontal-endodontic perspective.

    PubMed

    Kinaia, Bassam Michael; Chogle, Sami M A; Kinaia, Atheel M; Goodis, Harold E

    2012-07-01

    Periodontal and endodontic diseases are inflammatory responses leading to periodontal and pulpal tissue loss. Regenerative therapies aim to restore the lost structures to vitality and function. Various materials and treatments methods have been used such as bone grafts, guided tissue regeneration, enamel matrix derivatives, growth and differentiation factors, and stem cells. Although the current materials and methods demonstrated adequate clinical results, true and complete biological tissue regeneration is not yet attainable. The current article reviews chronologically the materials and methods used in periodontal and endodontic regeneration highlighting their clinical success and shortcomings, and discussing future directions in regenerative therapy.

  2. Natural Therapeutic Options in Endodontics - A Review

    PubMed Central

    Venkateshbabu, Nagendrababu; Anand, Suresh; Abarajithan, Mohan; Sheriff, Sultan O.; Jacob, Pulikkotil S.; Sonia, Nath

    2016-01-01

    Complete eradication of microbial biofilms and elimination of the smear layer are the key factors during endodontic treatment. Various chemical irrigants have been proposed in the literature for the same. The major setback with these chemical irrigants is that they are not bio-friendly to the dental and peri-radicular tissues. In the recent years, research to use natural products for root canal disinfection has gained importance. The aim of this article is to compile various herbal products that have been used as an irrigants and intracanal medicaments in the field of Endodontics to eradicate the biofilm and remove smear layer. PMID:27386007

  3. Natural Therapeutic Options in Endodontics - A Review.

    PubMed

    Venkateshbabu, Nagendrababu; Anand, Suresh; Abarajithan, Mohan; Sheriff, Sultan O; Jacob, Pulikkotil S; Sonia, Nath

    2016-01-01

    Complete eradication of microbial biofilms and elimination of the smear layer are the key factors during endodontic treatment. Various chemical irrigants have been proposed in the literature for the same. The major setback with these chemical irrigants is that they are not bio-friendly to the dental and peri-radicular tissues. In the recent years, research to use natural products for root canal disinfection has gained importance. The aim of this article is to compile various herbal products that have been used as an irrigants and intracanal medicaments in the field of Endodontics to eradicate the biofilm and remove smear layer.

  4. Identification of bacteria enduring endodontic treatment procedures by a combined reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction and reverse-capture checkerboard approach.

    PubMed

    Rôças, Isabela N; Siqueira, José F

    2010-01-01

    This study identified the bacterial taxa enduring endodontic treatment procedures by using a combined 16S ribosomal RNA-based reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and reverse-capture checkerboard hybridization approach. Samples were taken from infected canals of 15 teeth with apical periodontitis before treatment (S1), after chemomechanical preparation with NaOCl as the irrigant (S2), and after interappointment medication with a calcium hydroxide paste (S3). Bacterial presence was first screened by a DNA-based single PCR assay. RNA extracts were subjected to RT-PCR, and the resulting products were surveyed for the presence of 28 targeted taxa by using the checkerboard method. Bacteria were found in all S1 samples. Detectable levels of bacterial ribosomal RNA, used as an indicator of viability, were observed in 60% of the cases after chemomechanical preparation and 53% after intracanal medication. The most prevalent taxa in S1 were Olsenella uli (67%), Pyramidobacter piscolens (60%), Streptococcus species (53%), and Bacteroidetes clone X083 (53%). Streptococcus species (47%), Fusobacterium nucleatum (40%), and O. uli (33%) prevailed in S2, whereas Streptococcus species (47%), Propionibacterium acnes (27%), and O. uli (27%) were the most frequent taxa in S3. The present study with a combined molecular approach revealed that bacterial diversity was overall markedly reduced by treatment procedures. Although bacterial taxa more frequently identified in post-treatment samples emerge as potential risk factors for persistent disease, this remains to be determined by longitudinal studies.

  5. Clastogenic activity of seven endodontic medications used in dental practice in human dental pulp cells.

    PubMed

    Someya, Hitomi; Higo, Yukari; Ohno, Maki; Tsutsui, Takeo W; Tsutsui, Takeki

    2008-01-31

    Numerous and varied chemical agents are used for endodontic treatments in dental practice. Endodontic medications are administered directly to the teeth in relatively high concentrations and chemical agents applied to enamel or dentin can penetrate the dental pulp tissue and circulate through the body in the bloodstream. In the present study, to assess safety regarding mutagenicity, we investigated the ability of seven endodontic medications to induce chromosome aberrations in human dental pulp cells. Chromosome aberrations were induced in cells treated with each of six endodontic medications, eugenol, guaiacol, modified phenol, phenol, thymol, and zinc oxide. The other endodontic medication, zinc chloride, failed to induce chromosome aberrations in the presence or absence of exogenous metabolic activation. The percentages of cells with polyploid or endoreduplication were not enhanced by any of the endodontic medications tested. Our results indicate that the endodontic medications that exhibited a positive response are potentially mutagenic to human cells.

  6. Preclinical endodontic teaching

    PubMed Central

    Narayanaraopeta, Udaya; AlShwaimi, Emad

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To provide an overview of the general curricula in preclinical endodontic training from 6 established dental schools in Saudi Arabia. Methods: This study was conducted in January 2014 including only schools that had more than 2 groups of student graduates prior to the study. We included 2 dental schools from the Central region, one from Qassim region, one from the Makkah region (west), one from Abha region (south west), and one from the eastern region. An internet-based questionnaire was sent to the course directors of preclinical endodontics department of the 6 schools. The survey comprised 20 questions that examined various aspects of preclinical endodontics. Results: It was demonstrated that a significant number of faculty members had Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) degrees (n=21), Master’s degrees (n=15), and Saudi board certifications (n=8). We determined that the faculty to student ratio varied from 2:1 to 8: 1 among the colleges. The participating dental schools were found to teach the Step Back, as well as the Step Down techniques for root canal preparation. Five of the 6 schools implemented the use of nickel titanium rotary instruments. All dental schools predominantly used radiographs as the means of the working length determination. Conclusion: The curriculum for preclinical endodontics in Saudi Arabia is comparable to that followed in most European countries. A more comprehensive survey is needed that would involve more schools to formulate generalized guidelines for preclinical endodontic training in Saudi Arabia. PMID:25630011

  7. Endodontic Treatment of the Mandibular First Molar with Six Roots Canals – Two Case Reports and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Craig

    2015-01-01

    The most common configuration of the mandibular first molar is the presence of two roots and three root canals. The objective of this work is to present two rare anatomic configurations with six root canals on two mandibular left first molars diagnosed during endodontic therapy. Root canal therapy was performed using a dental operating microscope. Ultrasonic troughing in the grooves in between the mesial root canals and in between the distal root canals was able to show the middle root canals. Large samples population characterization researches and systematic reviews were unable to detect a single case of six root canals configuration in a mandibular first molar in their investigations. Although it is a rare configuration, a six root canal configuration is possible to be found in the mandibular first molar. Three different pulp chamber configurations are possible to be found. Two or three roots may be present and the root configuration more common in the mesial root is the Type 8 and Type 12 for the distal root. Some concepts about the required technique to approach these cases are also debated. PMID:26023651

  8. Survival analysis of endodontically treated traumatized primary teeth.

    PubMed

    Rocha, Maria José de Carvalho; Cardoso, Mariane

    2007-12-01

    The present study aimed to verify the factors that interfere with the success of endodontic treatment of traumatized primary teeth as well as to determine the success level of the proposed treatment, through survival analysis. The research was conducted through the analysis of dental traumatism records and attached radiological exams of patients assisted by the Assistance Program for the Traumatized Patient at UFSC (Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina). Fifty-one dental records of patients aged between 10 and 60 months were analyzed. These patients had their traumatized teeth endodontically treated (n = 51), according to the indications of the UFSC protocol. In order to evaluate possible interference factors affecting the success of the endodontic treatment, the following items were analyzed: age of the child at the beginning of the endodontic treatment (over or below 36 months), trauma type (mild or severe) pathological root resorption type (replacement or inflammatory), localization of the pathological root resorption (in the apical third or in the middle third), bone resorption (absent or present), alteration of the soft tissue (absent or present), condition of the pulp tissue (vitality or necrosis) and trauma recurrence (absent or present). Through the chi-squared test (chi(2) = 9.594, P < 0.05) and survival analysis, it was verified that trauma recurrence in the same tooth is a factor that interferes in the success of endodontic treatment. It was also observed, through survival analysis, that levels of success of endodontic treatments are stabilized in the 19th month. A period of 48 months of follow up was observed. It was also verified that most failures occurred between the 7th and 12th months counting from the beginning of the endodontic treatment. It was concluded that endodontic treatment of traumatized primary teeth, performed according to the UFSC protocol, enables the maintenance of the traumatized tooth in acceptable conditions in the buccal cavity

  9. Technologic advances in endodontics.

    PubMed

    Mortman, Rory E

    2011-07-01

    This article addresses technologic advances in endodontics pertaining to new and emerging technology. Cone-beam computed tomography and optical occurrence tomography are 2 new imaging technologies that can assist the practitioner in the diagnosis of pulpal disease. The self-adjusting file and the Apexum device can be used for instrumentation and bulk debridement of an apical lesion, respectively. Neodymium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet laser, erbium:chromium:yttrium-scandium-gallium-garnet laser, EndoActivator, EndoVac, and light-activated disinfection may assist the practitioner in cleaning the root canal system. Computed tomography-guided surgery shows promise in making endodontic surgery easier, as does mineral trioxide aggregate cement for regenerative endodontic procedures.

  10. [Possibilities of endodontic therapy of endodonic-periodontal lesions].

    PubMed

    Nesković, Jelena; Zivković, Slavoljub

    2009-01-01

    Endoperiodontal lesions are frequent in clinical practice and may require complex therapy. It is very important to determine differential diagnosis and the origin of the lesion, because the treatment plan is based on aetiology and stadium of the development of the lesion. The aim of this clinical study was to analyze the efficacy of endodontic treatment in different types of endodontic-periodontal lesions. Thirty patients and 42 teeth with diagnosed endoperiodontal lesions were included in the study and divided in two groups. Vital pulp therapy was applied to 18 vital teeth where the diagnosis was perio-endodontic lesions. The therapy of infected canal system was applied to 24 teeth with endodontic-periodontal or combined lesions. Standard endodontic procedure consisted of cleaning and shaping of the root canal system and between sessions filling with calcium-hydroxide paste. Obturation was made by lateral compact of the guttapercha and Apexit paste. Efficiency was evaluated clinically and radiographically three, six and twelve months later. Radiographic and clinical follow-up showed a significant radiographic improvement and absence of subjective symptoms in a very high percentage of the treated vital and avital teeth. The results of this study showed that in the observation period of 12 months endodontic therapy was successful in 88.89% of vital teeth, and in the group of avital teeth the percentage was 91.67%. Endodontic treatment of the endoperiodontal lesions was sufficient and it was the basic condition to achieve a complete healing of endodontic-periodontal lesions. Such therapy ensures significant improvement or even complete healing of both types of lesions, of endodontic and periodontal origin.

  11. Restoration of endodontically treated teeth: criteria and technique considerations.

    PubMed

    Trushkowsky, Richard D

    2014-01-01

    The restoration of endodontically treated teeth is often required and may represent a challenge as there is no consensus on ideal treatment. The failure of endodontically treated teeth is usually not a consequence of endodontic treatment, but inadequate restorative therapy or periodontal reasons. Prior to the initiation of endodontic treatment the restorability, occlusal function, periodontal health, biologic width, and crown-to-root ratio need to be assessed. If acceptable, the appropriate technique, material, and type of restoration to restore function need to be considered. Posts are used to provide retention for the core material and to replace missing tooth structure. The residual amount of tooth structure will determine its stability for restoration. The creation of adequate ferrule (approaching 2 mm circumferentially is ideal) minimizes the damaging effects of lateral and rotational forces on the restoration and post.

  12. Fracture patterns of glass-ionomer cement overlays versus stainless steel bands during endodontic treatment: an ex-vivo study.

    PubMed

    Pakdeethai, S; Abuzar, M; Parashos, P

    2013-12-01

    To compare fracture patterns of posterior teeth temporized with: mesio-occlusal-distal (MOD) glass-ionomer cement (GIC) interim restorations, stainless steel (SS) bands, GIC dome overlays and GIC dome overlays with occlusal temporary restorations. The root canals of 92 extracted human premolars and molars were prepared with rotary NiTi instruments and dressed with calcium hydroxide paste prior to cavity preparation for standardized MOD restorations. Teeth were divided into four groups (n = 23) and temporarily restored with: GIC interim restorations (GIC group), stainless steel bands (SS group), GIC dome overlays (GIC-O group) or GIC dome overlays with intermediate restorative material (IRM) in the access cavities (GIC-IRM group). Teeth were subjected to compressive axial load until fracture; fracture forces and fracture modes were recorded. Statistical analysis included Kaplan-Meier plots, Cox proportional hazards model, one-way analysis of variance, chi-square and Fisher's exact tests. There was a significantly higher risk of failure in the GIC group compared with the SS (P < 0.001), GIC-O (P < 0.001) and GIC-IRM (P = 0.001) groups. The mean fracture force for SS was significantly higher than GIC-O (P = 0.03) and GIC-IRM (P < 0.001). GIC fracture force was significantly lower than all other groups (P < 0.001). Significantly fewer unfavourable fractures were observed in SS compared with GIC (P = 0.001), GIC-O (P = 0.007) and GIC-IRM (P < 0.001). Glass-ionomer cement dome overlays with reduced cuspal height and occlusal inclines may be recommended for broken-down posterior teeth, without any risk of poor aesthetics, gingival irritation or further proximal tooth structure loss. Stainless steel bands may only need to be used in extensively broken-down teeth or in the presence of parafunctional habits. © 2013 International Endodontic Journal. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Thermal sensitivity of endodontically treated teeth.

    PubMed

    Tidwell, E; Witherspoon, D E; Gutmann, J L; Vreeland, D L; Sweet, P M

    1999-03-01

    The problem of thermal sensitivity following non-surgical root-canal treatment is explored and case reports are presented. Possible causes for post-treatment discomfort from endodontic and restorative aetiologies are discussed, as are the mechanisms to explain the patients' painful experiences. Treatment of this problem may vary from the simple replacement of a defective restoration to a more extensive non-surgical retreatment of the case, despite radiographic evidence of an acceptable root filling and normal periradicular tissues.

  14. [The application of laser in endodontics].

    PubMed

    He, W X; Liu, N N; Wang, X L; He, X Y

    2016-08-01

    Since laser was introduced in the field of medicine in 1970's, its application range has continuously expanded. The application of laser in endodontics also increased due to its safety and effectiveness in dental treatments. The majority of the laser application researches in dentistry focused on dentin hypersensitivity, removal of carious tissues, tooth preparations, pulp capping or pulpotomy, and root canal treatment. In this article, we reviewed literature on the effects of laser in the treatments of dental and pulp diseases.

  15. Soft tissue management in endodontic surgery.

    PubMed

    Velvart, Peter; Peters, Christine I

    2005-01-01

    Modern endodontic surgery involves both root-end preparation and proper sealing of all apical portals of exit. Both components are requirements for mechanical and biological success, but the management of soft tissues becomes increasingly important for an esthetically successful treatment. A healthy appearance of soft tissues plays an important role in the esthetic outcome of periradicular surgery. This is true considering maintenance of attachment levels and regarding the amount of possible recession after surgical procedures. Complete, recession-free and predictable healing of gingival tissue is one important goal of endodontic surgical treatment. A critical review of currently used techniques based on clinical and scientific data reveals great potential for improvements. Possible reasons for scar formation and recession specifically in healthy periodontal conditions requiring surgical endodontic intervention are highlighted. Based on anatomical considerations various incision types are evaluated and recommendations made. Clear understanding of wound closure and tissue-healing patterns call for the use of atraumatic procedures, nonirritating suture materials and adequate suturing techniques. This article gives an overview and guidance for integrating current and new successful flap designs and wound closure methods. The methods described have the intention of maintaining the attachment level and avoiding postoperative recession after surgical endodontic therapy.

  16. Role of provisional restorations in endodontic therapy

    PubMed Central

    Sivakumar, Jambai Sampathkumar; Suresh Kumar, Beri Narasimiah; Shyamala, Palaniyandi Vadivel

    2013-01-01

    Root-canal treatment can be carried out in single visit in vital, non-infected teeth, eliminating the need for dressing and provisionalization. Many clinical cases with infected canals require dressing with antibacterial medicaments in a multivisit treatment in which effective provisionalization for different periods of time becomes mandatory. Successful root-canal treatment requires effective mechanical and chemical debridement, elimination of bacteria and pulp tissue remnants and proper canal shaping to facilitate effective obturation. Lack of satisfactory temporary restorations during endodontic therapy ranked second amongst the contributing factors in continuing pain after the commencement of treatment. This review aims to provide an overview of the materials used for provisionalization during and immediately after endodontic treatment. PMID:23946564

  17. Management of an Endodontic-Periodontal Lesion in a Maxillary Lateral Incisor with Palatal Radicular Groove: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Sooratgar, Aidin; Tabrizizade, Mehdi; Nourelahi, Maryam; Asadi, Yasin; Sooratgar, Hosein

    2016-01-01

    The radicular groove is a developmental anomaly that predisposes the tooth to periodontal break-down. Sometimes the situation becomes more complicated by pulp necrosis and development of a combined endodontic-periodontal lesion which is a diagnostic and treatment challenge for the clinician. This report presents the successful management of an endodontic-periodontal lesion in a maxillary lateral incisor that has a developmental palatal radicular groove using a combination of nonsurgical endodontic therapy and periodontal regenerative techniques. Conclusion: The combination of nonsurgical endodontic and periodontal regenerative treatment is a predictable method in treating combined endodontic-periodontal lesions caused by palato-gingival groove. PMID:27141225

  18. Photodvnamic Therapy in Endodontics.

    PubMed

    Mohammadi, Zahed; Jafarzadeh, Hamid; Shalavi, Sousan; Kinoshita, Jun-Ichiro

    2017-06-01

    Commonly used irrigants do not always eradicate the entire microbial flora in infected root canals. Therefore, several other strategies, such as photodynamic therapy (PDT) have been developed. Photoactivated disinfection is based on the interaction of a photosensitive antibacterial agent and a light source. It uses a nontoxic dye named photosensitizer (PS) and low-intensity visible light. In oxygen presentation, these combine to produce some cytotoxic species. The PS molecules attach to bacteria membrane. Irradiation with a specific wavelength of the light may lead to the production of singlet oxygen, resulting in rupture of the microbial cell wall. There are several applications for PDT in dentistry. A successful periodontal treatment is based on elimination of bacteria from the infected area. Phenothiazinium PSs have been shown to be highly effective and safe for this purpose. However, scaling/root planing should be performed before the PDT. While performing the PDT, PS should be first injected in the periodontal pocket and allowed to pigment. Then, the special fiber should be inserted 1 mm short of the pocket base and lased. Photodynamic therapy has also been used to disinfect caries dentin before restoration, disinfecting oral tissues before or during surgical procedures, treating denture stomatitis, and treating oral candidiasis in immunocompromised patients. Photodynamic therapy can be used in combination with mechanical instrumentation and chemical antimicrobial agents, such as sodium hypochlo-rite, too. The purpose of this study was to review historical perspective, mechanism of action, and applications of PDT in dentistry and especially in endodontics was reviewed. Furthermore, the effects of PDT on dentin bonding and endo-toxin are discussed. Photodynamic therapy has been advocated to increase the disinfection level of the root canal system.

  19. The Landscape of Predoctoral Endodontic Education in the United States and Canada: Results of a Survey.

    PubMed

    Woodmansey, Karl; Beck, Lynn G; Rodriguez, Tobias E

    2015-08-01

    Few recent surveys have examined the contemporary landscape of predoctoral endodontic education in the United States and Canada, but anecdotal reports suggest that current dental students have difficulty obtaining adequate clinical endodontic experiences. The aims of this study were to quantify the clinical endodontic experiences of current U.S. and Canadian dental students, to explore the issues surrounding their clinical endodontic competence, and to ask more broadly if current graduating dentists are competent to perform endodontic procedures. In August 2014, a hyperlink to a web-based survey with 27 questions was emailed to the 67 predoctoral endodontic directors of U.S. and Canadian dental schools using a list provided by the American Association of Endodontists. Out of these 67 possible participants, 40 responded, for a response rate of 60%. The findings were varied. The average 2014 graduate completed 5.9 (± 2.4) root canal treatments on live patients, and 69% of the respondents voiced concern regarding a shortage of patient experiences. A majority (59%) of the respondents reported thinking that the supply of endodontic patients has decreased and that students have an inadequate supply of endodontic patients. This study found that a clear majority of predoctoral endodontics directors perceived a shortage of patient experiences for their students although, in reality, the number of completed clinical cases appeared to be unchanged since 1975. In addition, 36% of the respondents reported feeling that their 2014 graduates were not competent to perform molar endodontic treatment in their practices.

  20. Microsurgical re-treatment of an endodontically treated tooth with an apically located incomplete vertical root fracture: a clinical case report

    PubMed Central

    El Kabbaney, Ahmed; Tsesis, Igor; Rosen, Eyal

    2016-01-01

    Although it is challenging, the early diagnosis of a vertical root fracture (VRF) is crucial in order to ensure tooth preservation. The purpose of this clinical case report was to describe reparative surgery performed to treat a tooth affected by an incomplete VRF. A 26 year old male patient was suspected to have a VRF in a maxillary left central incisor, and an exploratory flap was performed in order to confirm the diagnosis. After detecting the fracture, the lesion was surgically treated, the fracture and the infected root-end were removed, and a platelet-rich plasma membrane was used to cover the defect in order to prevent bacterial migration. A 24 month clinical and radiological follow-up examination showed that the tooth was asymptomatic and that the healing process was in progress. The surgical approach described here may be considered an effective treatment for a combined endodontic-periodontal lesion originating from an incomplete VRF and a recurrent periapical lesion. PMID:27847754

  1. Implants and endodontics: from facts and myths to beneficial synergisms.

    PubMed

    Iqbal, Mian

    2009-01-01

    Osseointegrated implants have affected the decision-making process for prosthodontic, periodontic, and endodontic treatment planning. As a result, the traditional endodontic care model has undergone a paradigm shift. As with any emerging technology, there is concern that the initial enthusiasm surrounding implants could supersede quality of patient care issues, especially since there is no consensus about whether it is better to restore or replace a compromised tooth. The results of a number of meta-analyses show no statistical difference in terms of the long-term outcomes for single -tooth implants and endodontically treated teeth. Obviously, the decision to treat a tooth endodontically or replace it with a single-tooth implant should be based on other criteria. This article compares how certain variables affect the outcome of cases in which teeth are treated using either root canal treatment or single-tooth implants and explores the beneficial synergistic relationship between these two viable alternatives.

  2. Ultrasonics in endodontic surgery: a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    De Paolis, Gianfranco; Vincenti, Valentina; Prencipe, Matteo; Milana, Valerio; Plotino, Gianluca

    2010-04-01

    Currently, although ultrasonics (US) is used in dentistry for therapeutic and diagnostic applications as well as for cleaning of instruments before sterilization, its main use is for scaling and root planing of teeth and in root canal therapy, both for orthograde and retrograde therapy. Both in conventional and surgical treatments, US in endodontics has enhanced quality of clinical procedures and represents an important adjunct in the treatment of difficult cases. More precisely it has become increasingly more useful in applications such as gaining access to canal openings, cleaning and shaping, obturation of root canals, removal of intracanal materials and obstructions, and endodontic surgery. This review of the literature aims at presenting the numerous advantages of US in surgical endodontics and emphasizes its application in a modern-day endodontic practice.

  3. Ultrasonics in endodontic surgery: a review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    De Paolis, Gianfranco; Vincenti, Valentina; Prencipe, Matteo; Milana, Valerio; Plotino, Gianluca

    2010-01-01

    Summary Currently, although ultrasonics (US) is used in dentistry for therapeutic and diagnostic applications as well as for cleaning of instruments before sterilization, its main use is for scaling and root planing of teeth and in root canal therapy, both for orthograde and retrograde therapy. Both in conventional and surgical treatments, US in endodontics has enhanced quality of clinical procedures and represents an important adjunct in the treatment of difficult cases. More precisely it has become increasingly more useful in applications such as gaining access to canal openings, cleaning and shaping, obturation of root canals, removal of intracanal materials and obstructions, and endodontic surgery. This review of the literature aims at presenting the numerous advantages of US in surgical endodontics and emphasizes its application in a modern-day endodontic practice. PMID:22238704

  4. Use of Cone Beam Computed Tomography in Endodontics

    PubMed Central

    Scarfe, William C.; Levin, Martin D.; Gane, David; Farman, Allan G.

    2009-01-01

    Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) is a diagnostic imaging modality that provides high-quality, accurate three-dimensional (3D) representations of the osseous elements of the maxillofacial skeleton. CBCT systems are available that provide small field of view images at low dose with sufficient spatial resolution for applications in endodontic diagnosis, treatment guidance, and posttreatment evaluation. This article provides a literature review and pictorial demonstration of CBCT as an imaging adjunct for endodontics. PMID:20379362

  5. Cell Survival After Exposure to a Novel Endodontic Irrigant

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-05-13

    developed for use as an endodontic irrigant. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of Endocyn on human periodontal ligament (PDL...principle cause of apical periodontitis (1,2,3). Since the goal of endodontic therapy is the prevention and treatment of apical periodontitis , the...dissolve necrotic tissue (5). A significant disadvantage of using sodium hypochlorite is its toxicity to periodontal ligament cells (6), stem cells of

  6. [Overall digitalization: leading innovation of endodontics in big data era].

    PubMed

    Ling, J Q

    2016-04-09

    In big data era, digital technologies bring great challenges and opportunities to modern stomatology. The applications of digital technologies, such as cone-beam CT(CBCT), computer aided design,(CAD)and computer aided manufacture(CAM), 3D printing and digital approaches for education , provide new concepts and patterns to the treatment and study of endodontic diseases. This review provides an overview of the application and prospect of commonly used digital technologies in the development of endodontics.

  7. Techniques and materials used by general dentists during endodontic treatment procedures: Findings from The National Dental Practice-Based Research Network.

    PubMed

    Eleazer, Paul D; Gilbert, Gregg H; Funkhouser, Ellen; Reams, Gregg J; Law, Alan S; Benjamin, Paul L

    2016-01-01

    Little is known about which materials and techniques general dentists (GDs) use during endodontic procedures. The objectives were to quantify GDs' use of specific endodontic tools, quantify inappropriate use, and ascertain whether inappropriate use is associated with GDs' practice characteristics. GDs in The National Dental Practice-Based Research Network reported in a questionnaire materials and techniques they use during endodontic procedures. Among eligible GDs, 1,490 (87%) participated. Most (93%; n = 1,383) used sodium hypochlorite to irrigate. The most commonly used sealers were zinc oxide eugenol (43%) and resin (40%), followed by calcium hydroxide (26%). Most (62%; n = 920) used a compaction obturation technique; 36% (n = 534) used a carrier-based method. Most (96%; n = 1,423) used gutta-percha as a filler; 5% used paste fillers. Few used irrigants (n = 46), techniques (n = 49), or fillers (n = 10) that investigators classified as inappropriate. GDs use a broad range of endodontic techniques and materials, often adapting to newer technologies as they become available. Few GDs use tools that the investigators classified as inappropriate. GDs use many types of endodontic techniques and materials, but only a small percentage of them are inappropriate. Copyright © 2016 American Dental Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Temperature Development on the External Root Surface During Laser-Assisted Endodontic Treatment Applying a Microchopped Mode of a 980 nm Diode Laser.

    PubMed

    Beer, Franziska; Farmakis, Eleftherios Terry R; Kopic, Josip; Kurzmann, Christoph; Moritz, Andreas

    2017-04-01

    The aim of this article was to investigate the temperature increase of the external root surface during laser-assisted endodontic treatment using a diode laser (980 nm) in a microchopped mode. Ten freshly extracted, human maxillary incisors with mature apices were collected, prepared to size F4 at working length (ProTaper; Dentsply Maillefer, Ballaigues, Switzerland), mounted to a holder, and irradiated (using spiral movements in coronal direction) with a diode laser (GENTLEray 980 Classic Plus; KaVo, Biberach, Germany) with a 200 μm fiber in four different treatment groups: Group 1 (control group) was irradiated in six cycles of 5-sec irradiation/20-sec pause with 2.5 W in the pulse mode. Groups 2 to 4 were irradiated at six cycles of 5-sec irradiation/20-sec pause in the microchopped mode (Group 2-1.6 W; Group 3-2.0 W; Group 4-2.5 W). The applied mode was 25 ms on/25 ms off. Within the on period, the laser delivered an intermittent sequence of energy complexes and the maximum output was equal to the nominated output of the device (12 W). Canals were kept moist by sterile saline irrigation in between irradiations, and temperature changes were continuously measured using a thermal imaging camera. Recordings were analyzed by a mixed model (analysis of variance [ANOVA] for repeated measurements). The highest mean of temperature rise, 1.94°C ± 1.07°C, was measured in Group 4, followed by Group 3 (1.74°C ± 1.22°C) and Group 2 (1.58°C ± 1.18°C). The lowest increase occurred in Group 1 (1.06°C ± 1.20°C). There was a significant difference (p = 0.041) between the groups. Significant differences were found between Groups 1 and 4 (p = 0.007) and 1 and 2 (p = 0.035). In addition, a marginally significant difference between Groups 1 and 2 (p = 0.052) was noted. There was no significant difference between Groups 2, 3, and 4. Despite the low mean values reported, the highest temperature increase (+5.7°C) was

  9. Comparison of Long-term Survival of Implants and Endodontically Treated Teeth

    PubMed Central

    Setzer, F.C.; Kim, S.

    2014-01-01

    The outcomes of both dental implants and endodontically treated teeth have been extensively studied. However, there is still a great controversy over when to keep a natural tooth and when to extract it for a dental implant. This article reviews the benefits and disadvantages of both treatment options and discusses success vs. survival outcomes, as well as the impact of technical advances for modern endodontics and endodontic microsurgery on the long-term prognosis of tooth retention. PMID:24065635

  10. In Vitro and In Vivo Toxicity Evaluation of Colloidal Silver Nanoparticles Used in Endodontic Treatments.

    PubMed

    Takamiya, Aline Satie; Monteiro, Douglas Roberto; Bernabé, Daniel Galera; Gorup, Luiz Fernando; Camargo, Emerson Rodrigues; Gomes-Filho, João Eduardo; Oliveira, Sandra Helena Penha; Barbosa, Debora Barros

    2016-06-01

    Silver nanoparticles have been used for different purposes in dentistry, including endodontic treatments. The aim of this study was to determine the cytotoxicity of different types of silver nanoparticles on mouse fibroblast cell line L929 and the reaction of subcutaneous connective tissue of Wistar rats to these nanoparticles. Silver nanoparticles of an average size of 5 nm were synthesized with ammonia (SNA) or polyvinylpyrrolidone (SNP). L929 was exposed to SNA and SNP (0.1-100 μg/mL), and 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays were performed after 6, 24, and 48 hours. Culture medium was used as the control. Sixteen rats received, individually, 3 polyethylene tubes filled with a fibrin sponge embedded in 100 μL SNA or SNP (1 μg/mL). A fibrin sponge with no embedding was the control. Tissue reaction was performed qualitatively and quantitatively after 7, 15, 30, and 90 days of implantation in the dorsal connective tissue of Wistar rats. SNA and SNP were cytotoxic to L929 in higher concentrations, with SNA significantly more toxic than SNP. SNA and SNP did not induce significant interleukin-1β and interleukin-6 production. The release of stem cell factor by L929 increased 48 hours after the treatment with SNP at 5 μg/mL. Histologic examination showed that the inflammatory responses caused by SNA and SNP at 1 μg/mL were similar to the control in all experimental periods. It was concluded that SNA and SNP were not cytotoxic at 25 μg/mL or lower concentrations. However, for safe clinical use, further studies establishing others points of its toxicologic profile are recommended. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Guided Tissue Regeneration Using a Barrier Membrane in Endodontic Surgery.

    PubMed

    Corbella, Stefano; Taschieri, Silvio; Elkabbany, Ahmed; Del Fabbro, Massimo; von Arx, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Endodontic surgery aims at the resolution of a periapical inflammatory process by surgical access followed by enucleation of the lesion and root-end filling to curb any potentially noxious agent within the physical confines of the affected root. Guided bone regeneration could be associated to endodontic surgery aiming to enhance periradicular tissue regeneration. The objective of this paper was to review the scientific literature about guided bone regeneration in endodontic surgery, evaluating the effects on periapical lesion healing process. The included articles are classified considering the anatomical characteristics of the lesion. Fourteen articles were included in the review after abstract and title selection. Eight articles were on studies on lesions affecting only the periapical region (three about through-and-through lesions) while six were about the treatment of apico-marginal lesions. On the basis of the currently available literature, there is a low scientific evidence of a benefit related. to the use of guided bone regeneration procedure in endodontic surgery.

  12. A practitioner survey of opinions toward regenerative endodontics.

    PubMed

    Epelman, Ingrid; Murray, Peter E; Garcia-Godoy, Franklin; Kuttler, Sergio; Namerow, Kenneth N

    2009-09-01

    The success of regenerative endodontic procedures requires practitioner acceptance, but little or no evidence is available. The purpose of this survey was to collect the opinions of attendee's of the 2008 Endodontic Board of Diplomates 2008 Summer Conference on the issue of regenerative endodontic procedures (REPs). After Nova Southeastern University institutional review board approval, 100 copies of a survey were circulated, and 56 completed surveys were returned anonymously. The survey found that 96% of participants thought that more regenerative therapies should be incorporated into treatments. Although only 14% of participants had used umbilical cord or stem cell banking for themselves or a relative, 63% thought that stem cell banking would be useful to regenerate dental tissues. Most (89%) of the participants would be willing to save teeth and dental tissues for stem cell banking. These results suggest that endodontic practitioners are supportive and optimistic about the future use of REPs.

  13. Antimicrobial Activity of Calcium Hydroxide in Endodontics: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Shalavi, S; Yazdizadeh, M

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of endodontic therapy is to preserve the patient's natural teeth without compromising the patient's local or systemic health. Calcium hydroxide has been included in several materials and antimicrobial formulations that are used in several treatment modalities in endodontics, such as inter-appointment intracanal medicaments. The purpose of this article was to review the antimicrobial properties of calcium hydroxide in endodontics. Calcium hydroxide has a high pH (approximately 12.5-12.8) and is classified chemically as a strong base. The lethal effects of calcium hydroxide on bacterial cells are probably due to protein denaturation and damage to DNA and cytoplasmic membranes. Calcium hydroxide has a wide range of antimicrobial activity against common endodontic pathogens but is less effective against Enterococcus faecalis and Candida albicans. Calcium hydroxide is also a valuable anti-endotoxin agent. However, its effect on microbial biofilms is controversial. PMID:23323217

  14. Outcomes of endodontic therapy in general practice

    PubMed Central

    Bernstein, Susan D.; Horowitz, Allan J.; Man, Martin; Wu, Hongyu; Foran, Denise; Vena, Donald A.; Collie, Damon; Matthews, Abigail G.; Curro, Frederick A.; Thompson, Van P.; Craig, Ronald G.

    2014-01-01

    Background The authors undertook a study involving members of a dental practice-based research network to determine the outcome and factors associated with success and failure of endodontic therapy. Methods Members in participating practices (practitioner-investigators [P-Is]) invited the enrollment of all patients seeking treatment in the practice who had undergone primary endodontic therapy and restoration in a permanent tooth three to five years previously. If a patient had more than one tooth so treated, the P-I selected as the index tooth the tooth treated earliest during the three- to five-year period. The authors excluded from the study any teeth that served as abutments for removable partial dentures or overdentures, third molars and teeth undergoing active orthodontic endodontic therapy. The primary outcome was retention of the index tooth. Secondary outcomes, in addition to extraction, that defined failure included clinical or radiographic evidence (or both) of periapical pathosis, endodontic retreatment or pain on percussion. Results P-Is in 64 network practices enrolled 1,312 patients with a mean (standard deviation) time to follow-up of 3.9 (0.6) years. During that period, 3.3 percent of the index teeth were extracted, 2.2 percent underwent retreatment, 3.6 percent had pain on percussion and 10.6 percent had periapical radiolucencies for a combined failure rate of 19.1 percent. The presence of preoperative periapical radiolucency with a diagnosis of either irreversible pulpitis or necrotic pulp was associated with failure after multivariate analysis, as were multiple canals, male sex and Hispanic/Latino ethnicity. Conclusions These results suggest that failure rates for endodontic therapy are higher than previously reported in general practices, according to results of studies based on dental insurance claims data. Clinical Implications The results of this study can help guide the practitioner in deciding the most appropriate course of therapy for

  15. Attitudes of general dental practitioners towards endodontic standards and adoption of new technology: literature review.

    PubMed

    Peciuliene, Vytaute; Maneliene, Rasmute; Drukteinis, Saulius; Rimkuviene, Jurate

    2009-01-01

    Research data regarding attitudes of general dental practitioners towards endodontic therapy is rare. The present review summarizes existing literature and analyzes human factors that could potentially influence the outcome of endodontic treatment in general dental practice. Root canal treatment usually fails when treatment falls short of acceptable standards. The results of questionnaire surveys from several countries indicate that differences between daily general practice and academic teaching exist. The results of studies indicated that majority of general practitioners disregard the most basic principles of endodontic treatment. The most striking finding is the generally negative attitude amongst general dental practitioners towards performing endodontic treatment and adoption of new technologies in a daily endodontic practice. The results confirm that root canal treatment is technically demanding and in general practice is carried out under less than optimal conditions. This review shows the importance of continuous dental education for practitioners in order to update their knowledge.

  16. Regenerative Endodontics: Burning Questions.

    PubMed

    Smith, Anthony J; Cooper, Paul R

    2017-09-01

    Pulp regeneration and its clinical translation into regenerative endodontic procedures are receiving increasing research attention, leading to significant growth of the published scientific and clinical literature within these areas. Development of research strategies, which consider patient-, clinician-, and scientist-based outcomes, will allow greater focus on key research questions driving more rapid clinical translation. Three key areas of focus for these research questions should include cells, signaling, and infection/inflammation. A translational pathway is envisaged in which clinical approaches are increasingly refined to provide regenerative endodontic protocols that are based on a robust understanding of the physiological processes and events responsible for the normal secretion, structure, and biological behavior of pulpal tissue. Copyright © 2017 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. [Use of Cone Beam Computed Tomography in endodontics: rational case selection criteria].

    PubMed

    Rosen, E; Tsesis, I

    2016-01-01

    To present rational case selection criteria for the use of CBCT (Cone Beam Computed Tomography) in endodontics. This article reviews the literature concerning the benefits of CBCT in endodontics, alongside its radiation risks, and present case selection criteria for referral of endodontic patients to CBCT. Up to date, the expected ultimate benefit of CBCT to the endodontic patient is yet uncertain, and the current literature is mainly restricted to its technical efficacy. In addition, the potential radiation risks of CBCT scan are stochastic in nature and uncertain, and are worrying especially in pediatric patients. Both the efficacy of CBCT in supporting the endodontic practitioner decision making and in affecting treatment outcomes, and its long term potential radiation risks are yet uncertain. Therefore, a cautious rational decision making is essential when a CBCT scan is considered in endodontics. Risk-benefit considerations are presented.

  18. Why intravenous moderate sedation should be taught in graduate endodontic programs.

    PubMed

    Montagnese, Thomas Anthony

    2012-03-01

    The purpose of this opinion article is to present reasons why intravenous moderate sedation should be taught in graduate endodontic programs. Access to oral health care is an area of much interest and concern, but some patients are unable to get endodontic care because they have special needs. Special needs can refer to patients who fear dentistry itself and other aspects of dental treatment. A variety of phobias and medical, developmental, and physical conditions can make it difficult for some patients to tolerate the endodontic care they need and want. Moderate sedation can help many of these patients. Endodontists in general are not trained to provide intravenous moderate sedation. By incorporating intravenous moderate sedation into endodontic practice, many of these patients can be treated. The first step in achieving this goal is to add intravenous moderate sedation training to graduate endodontic programs. The long-term effect will be to make specialty endodontic care available to more people.

  19. [Today's trends in endodontics].

    PubMed

    Malagnino, V A; Gatto, R

    2003-01-01

    Some new means and innovative operative techniques in the field of endodontics are presented that have been developed and perfected over time. Instruments such as the operative microscope, ultrasonography, miniaturised tools for surgery, new materials such as mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) should become part of the daily routine of the endodontist. For example, the operative microscope plays a role in diagnosing pulp damage after removal of deep caries; in orthograde endodontics in diagnosing perforations; alongside ultrasonography in the search for calcified canals, removal of pins (screw-type, fibre, etc.) and also in positioning MTA. In all these cases, the operative microscope is used discontinuously, alternating working and observation phases. In endodontic surgery, the operative microscope is on the contrary used continuously, enabling the surgeon to observe details of anatomy of the root apex at high magnification, and above all enabling positioning of canal obturation with perfect seal. It is clear that the operative microscope used in all surgical phases will enable complete management of the operation and facilitate the endodontist in observing the operative field, otherwise very difficult to control.

  20. Chlorhexidine in endodontics.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Brenda P F A; Vianna, Morgana E; Zaia, Alexandre A; Almeida, José Flávio A; Souza-Filho, Francisco J; Ferraz, Caio C R

    2013-01-01

    Chemical auxiliary substances (CAS) are essential for a successful disinfection and cleanness of the root canals, being used during the instrumentation and if necessary, as antimicrobial intracanal medicaments. Different CAS have been proposed and used, among which sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl), chlorhexidine (CHX), 17% EDTA, citric acid, MTAD and 37% phosphoric acid solution. CHX has been used in Endodontics as an irrigating substance or intracanal medicament, as it possesses a wide range of antimicrobial activity, substantivity (residual antimicrobial activity), lower cytotoxicity than NaOCl whilst demonstrating efficient clinical performance, lubricating properties, rheological action (present in the gel presentation, keeping the debris in suspension); it inhibits metalloproteinase, is chemically stable, does not stain cloths, it is odorless, water soluble, among other properties. CHX has been recommended as an alternative to NaOCl, especially in cases of open apex, root resorption, foramen enlargement and root perforation, due to its biocompatibility, or in cases of allergy related to bleaching solutions. The aim of this paper is to review CHX's general use in the medical field and in dentistry; its chemical structure, presentation form and storage; mechanism of action; antimicrobial activity including substantivity, effects on biofilms and endotoxins, effects on coronal and apical microbial microleakage; tissue dissolution ability; interaction with endodontic irrigants; effects on dentin bonding, metalloproteinases and collagen fibrils; its use as intracanal medicament and diffusion into the dentinal tubules; its use as disinfectant agent of obturation cones; other uses in the endodontic therapy; and possible adverse effects, cytotoxicity and genotoxicity.

  1. Effects of endodontic post surface treatment, dentin conditioning, and artificial aging on the retention of glass fiber-reinforced composite resin posts.

    PubMed

    Albashaireh, Zakereyya S; Ghazal, Muhamad; Kern, Matthias

    2010-01-01

    Several post surface treatments with or without the application of a bonding agent have been recommended to improve the bond strength of resin cements to posts. A regimen that produces the maximum bond strength of glass fiber-reinforced composite resin posts has not been verified. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of post surface conditioning methods and artificial aging on the retention and microleakage of adhesively luted glass fiber-reinforced composite resin posts. Seventy-two endodontically treated single-rooted teeth were prepared for glass fiber-reinforced composite resin posts. The posts were submitted to 3 different surface treatments (n=24), including no treatment, etching with phosphoric acid, and airborne-particle abrasion. Subgroups of the posts (n=8) were then allocated for 3 different experimental conditions: no artificial aging, no bonding agent; no artificial aging, bonding agent; or artificial aging, bonding agent. The posts were luted with resin cement (Calibra). Post retention was measured in tension at a crosshead speed of 2 mm/min. The posts assigned for microleakage investigation were placed in fuchsin dye for 72 hours. The dislodged posts and the post spaces were examined microscopically to evaluate the mode of failure and explore the microleakage. Data were analyzed by 2-way ANOVA followed by Tukey HSD test (alpha=.05). The mean (SD) retention values for test groups ranged from 269 (63.8) to 349 (52.2) N. The retention values of the airborne-particle-abrasion group were significantly higher than those of the acidic-treatment and no-treatment groups. The application of bonding agent on the post surface produced no significant influence on retention. The mean retention values after artificial aging were significantly higher than without artificial aging. Microscopic evaluation demonstrated that the failure mode was primarily mixed. Treating the surface of the posts with phosphoric acid for 15 seconds before cementation

  2. Translational science in disinfection for regenerative endodontics.

    PubMed

    Diogenes, Anibal R; Ruparel, Nikita B; Teixeira, Fabricio B; Hargreaves, Kenneth M

    2014-04-01

    The endodontic management of permanent immature teeth is fraught with challenges. Although treatment modalities for vital pulp therapy in these teeth provide long-term favorable outcome, the outcomes from the treatment of pulp necrosis and apical periodontitis are significantly less predictable. Immature teeth diagnosed with pulp necrosis have been traditionally treated with apexification or apexogenesis approaches. Unfortunately, these treatments provide little to no benefit in promoting continued root development. Regenerative endodontic procedures have emerged as an important alternative in treating teeth with otherwise questionable long-term prognosis because of thin, fragile dentinal walls and a lack of immunocompetency. These procedures rely heavily on root canal chemical disinfection of the root canal system. Traditionally, irrigants and medicaments have been chosen for their maximum antimicrobial effect without consideration for their effects on stem cells and the dentinal microenvironment. Translational research has been crucial to provide evidence for treatment modifications that aim to increase favorable outcome while steering away from common pitfalls in the currently used protocols. In this review, recent advances learned from translational research related to disinfection in regenerative endodontics are presented and discussed. Copyright © 2014 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Chloroform in the endodontic operatory

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, M.N.; Vire, D.E. )

    1992-06-01

    This article reviews the role chloroform has played in dentistry and describes an occupational health clinical investigation into the possible hazards of chloroform use in the operatory. Due to a Food and Drug Administration ban on drugs and cosmetics containing chloroform, there has been some confusion as to whether the use of chloroform in the practice of dentistry is considered unsafe or has been prohibited. Utilizing common endodontic treatment methods employing chloroform, this study reports no negative health effects to the dentist or assistant and air vapor levels well below Occupational Health and Safety Administration mandated maximum levels. The report concludes that, with careful and controlled use, chloroform can be a useful adjunct in the practice of dentistry. The Food and Drug Administration has no jurisdiction over a dentist's use of chloroform in clinical practice and has not proven that chloroform is a human carcinogen.

  4. Repair and regeneration in endodontics.

    PubMed

    Lin, L M; Rosenberg, P A

    2011-10-01

    The ideal objective of treatment of established diseases, including irreversible pulpitis and apical periodontitis, is to achieve wound healing. Wound healing can result in repair or regeneration. The ultimate goal of wound healing is to restore the original architecture and biological function of the injured tissue or organ. Although humans are equipped with powerful innate and adaptive immune defence mechanisms, many intrinsic and extrinsic factors can affect wound healing. Complete regeneration following injury in humans can occur only in the pre-natal foetus within 24 weeks of gestation. Post-natal wounds including irreversible pulpitis or apical periodontitis always heal by repair or by a combination of repair and regeneration. Somatic cells, such as fibroblasts, macrophages, cementoblasts and osteoblasts, in the pulp and periapical tissues have limited potential for regeneration following injury and lack of telomerase. Wound healing of irreversible pulpitis and apical periodontitis requires recruitment and differentiation of progenitor/stem cells into tissue-committed somatic cells. Stem cell differentiation is regulated by intrinsic factors and extrinsic micro-environmental cues. Functionality of stem cells appears to show an age-related decline because of the change in intrinsic properties and diminished signals within the extrinsic local and systemic environment that modulate the function of stem cells or their progeny. Infection induces an immuno-inflammatory response and tissue destruction, which hinders the potential of tissue regeneration. Therefore, prevention, early detection and treatment of inflammation/infection of pulpal and periapical disease can enhance regeneration and minimize the repair of pulpal and periapical tissues after endodontic therapy. © 2011 International Endodontic Journal.

  5. Outcome of Endodontically Treated Cracked Teeth

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-01

    reported retrospective results from 49 patients who received root canal treatment for cracked teeth. The data included the presence of periodontal pocketing... periodontal pocketing, patients’ age and gender, location of cracked teeth, type of teeth and presence of terminal cracked tooth. The 2-year survival rate was...85.5%. Factors that decreased outcomes were the terminal tooth position in the arch, the presence of periodontal pocketing prior to endodontic

  6. Improving the quality of endodontic record keeping through clinical audit.

    PubMed

    King, E; Shekaran, L; Muthukrishnan, A

    2017-03-10

    Introduction Record keeping is an essential part of day-to-day practice and plays an important role in treatment, audit and dento-legal procedures. Creating effective endodontic records is challenging due to the scope of information required for comprehensive notes. Two audits were performed to assess the standards of endodontic record keeping by dentists in a restorative dentistry department and students on an endodontic MSc course.Methods Fifty sets of departmental records and 10 sets of student records were retrospectively evaluated against the European Society of Endodontology 2006 guidelines. Results of the first cycle of both audits were presented to departmental staff and MSc students, alongside an educational session. Additionally, departmental guidelines, consent leaflets and endodontic record keeping forms were developed. Both audits were repeated using the same number of records, thus completing both audit cycles.Results The most commonly absent records included consent, anaesthetic details, rubber dam method, working length reference point, irrigation details and obturation technique. Almost all areas of record keeping improved following the second audit cycle, with some areas reaching 100% compliance when record keeping forms were used. Statistically significant improvements were seen in 24 of the 29 areas in the departmental audit and 14 of the 29 areas in the MSc audit (P = 0.05).Conclusions Significant improvements in endodontic record keeping can be achieved through the provision of education, departmental guidelines, consent leaflets and endodontic record keeping forms.

  7. Epidemiologic evaluation of the outcomes of orthograde endodontic retreatment.

    PubMed

    Salehrabi, Robert; Rotstein, Ilan

    2010-05-01

    Teeth undergoing initial endodontic therapy have a very high survival rate. Some teeth that continue to show signs of pathosis after the initial therapy will require nonsurgical (orthograde) retreatment. Outcome assessment of endodontic retreatment is crucial for appropriate case selection and treatment planning. However, reports on outcomes of orthograde endodontic retreatment performed by endodontists are limited in number, and the reported data vary. In this study, outcomes of orthograde endodontic retreatment performed on 4744 teeth were assessed during a period of 5 years. Data were obtained from retreatments that were performed by endodontists participating in the Delta Dental Insurance plan that insures approximately 15 million individuals in the USA. Overall, 89% of teeth were retained in the oral cavity 5 years after the endodontic retreatment. Four percent of all teeth underwent apical surgery that occurred mostly within 2 years from completion of orthograde retreatment. Eleven percent of teeth were extracted at the end of the 5-year observation period. It appears that orthograde endodontic retreatment yields high incidence of tooth retention after 5 years. Copyright (c) 2010 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Introduction of implants into postdoctoral endodontic residency programs.

    PubMed

    Aminoshariae, Anita; Montagnese, Thomas A; Solanki, Poonam D; Mickel, Andre K

    2011-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to survey the directors of postdoctoral endodontic programs in the United States to ascertain their attitudes and approaches regarding incorporation of implants into the endodontic curriculum. We hypothesized that program directors would agree that implant training should be incorporated into the endodontic curriculum. We also hypothesized that they would all prefer apical surgeries and retreatment over implants when plausible. A twenty-item online survey was emailed to all fifty-two postdoctoral endodontic program directors in the United States. A 100 percent response was received. The results showed that 78.6 percent agreed that implant training should be incorporated, 85.7 percent preferred the didactic approach, and 42.9 percent preferred clinical implant training. One hundred percent preferred apical surgeries and retreatment over implants when plausible, and 53.8 percent did not prefer implants over endodontic treatment for teeth with a questionable prognosis. This survey indicates that implant training has been incorporated into postdoctoral endodontic programs and that the Commission on Dental Accreditation standards are being met. The trend may be to become more hands-on in the future if program directors believe there is a need to provide training in actual placement of implants.

  9. Endodontic-related facial paresthesia: systematic review.

    PubMed

    Alves, Flávio R; Coutinho, Mariana S; Gonçalves, Lucio S

    2014-01-01

    Paresthesia is a neurosensitivity disorder caused by injury to the neural tissue. It is characterized by a burning or twinging sensation or by partial loss of local sensitivity. Paresthesia related to endodontic treatment can occur because of extravasation of filling material or the intracanal dressing, as a consequence of periapical surgery or because of periapical infection. A literature review of paresthesia in endodontics was undertaken, with a view to identifying and discussing the most commonly affected nerves, the diagnostic process and the treatment options. Among reported cases, the most commonly affected nerves were those passing through the jaw: the inferior alveolar nerve, the mental nerve and the lingual nerve. To diagnose paresthesia, the endodontist must carry out a complete medical history, panoramic and periapical radiography, and (in some cases) computed tomography, as well as mechanoceptive and nociceptive tests. To date, no specific treatment for endodontic-related paresthesia has been described in the literature, since the problem may be related to a variety of causes.

  10. Regenerative endodontics: a state of the art.

    PubMed

    Bansal, Rashmi; Bansal, Rajesh

    2011-01-01

    Scientific advances in the creation of restorative biomaterials, in vitro cell culture technology, tissue grafting, tissue engineering, molecular biology and the human genome project provide the basis for the introduction of new technologies into dentistry. Non-vital infected teeth have long been treated with root canal therapy (for mature root apex) and apexification (for immature root apex), or doomed to extraction. Although successful, current treatments fail to re-establish healthy pulp tissue in these teeth. But, what if the non-vital tooth could be made vital once again? That is the hope offered by regenerative endodontics, an emerging field focused on replacing traumatized and diseased pulp with functional pulp tissue. Restoration of vitality of non-vital tooth is based on tissue engineering and revascularization procedures. The purpose of this article is to review these biological procedures and the hurdles that must be overcome to develop regenerative endodontic procedures.

  11. Accidental Contamination with Oil during Endodontic Surgery.

    PubMed

    Plascencia, Hugo; Díaz, Mariana; Cholico, Patricia; Del Real, Monserrat; Márquez-de Alba, Salvador

    2016-01-01

    The modern surgical endodontic treatment is a safe and predictable procedure with high success rate. However, several factors can retard or impede the proper healing process. Use of a high speed handpiece during hard tissues management (osteotomy and apical resection) can potentially be one of these factors. Formation of metallic debris from the surgical diamond burs, production of necrotic local tissue due to overheating and the direct liberation of air from conventional handpiece into the working area are potential irritants able to delay the tissue healing. The aim of the present article is to report the histopathological findings of the trans-operational accidental contamination with oil in the surgical area during an endodontic surgery.

  12. Accidental Contamination with Oil during Endodontic Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Plascencia, Hugo; Díaz, Mariana; Cholico, Patricia; del Real, Monserrat; Márquez-de Alba, Salvador

    2016-01-01

    The modern surgical endodontic treatment is a safe and predictable procedure with high success rate. However, several factors can retard or impede the proper healing process. Use of a high speed handpiece during hard tissues management (osteotomy and apical resection) can potentially be one of these factors. Formation of metallic debris from the surgical diamond burs, production of necrotic local tissue due to overheating and the direct liberation of air from conventional handpiece into the working area are potential irritants able to delay the tissue healing. The aim of the present article is to report the histopathological findings of the trans-operational accidental contamination with oil in the surgical area during an endodontic surgery. PMID:27790269

  13. Endodontic performance by Flemish dentists: have they evolved?

    PubMed

    Neukermans, M; Vanobbergen, J; De Bruyne, M; Meire, M; De Moor, R J G

    2015-12-01

    To gather information on aspects of endodontic practice and referral behaviour by Flemish (Dutch-speaking Belgian) dentists and to compare the results with an earlier investigation. A postal questionnaire was distributed to 4468 active Flemish dentists. It consisted of multiple-choice questions on endodontic practice and endodontic referral need. Basic information on age, gender, year of qualification and clinical specialty was also obtained. The questionnaire was free of charge to return. Data were imported in a database, subjected to descriptive and analytical statistics and compared to those of an earlier, comparable survey. The response rate was 18.5%. Of all respondents, 95% were general practitioners. More than half (56%) of the respondents never or seldom used rubber dam during endodontic treatment. The use of sodium hypochlorite as an irrigant was well established (80% of respondents using it), whereas the use of EDTA was limited. Female respondents were more likely to refer to an endodontist than male (70 versus 49%). Referrals for treatment of root canal obstruction (48%), perforations and root resorption (42%) and retreatment (39%) were rated 'very important'. Younger respondents more frequently made use of magnification, rotary instruments and rubber dam. Activation of irrigants was incorporated by a small number of respondents (50% never, 12.6% seldom). Cold lateral condensation was used by most GDPs (35.3% always, 19.5% frequently). Endodontic practice of general dentists in Flanders did not always comply with quality guidelines. However, when comparing the present data with those of a previous study, an obvious trend towards a more present-day treatment protocol is noticeable, as well as an increased appeal for endodontic referral. © 2014 International Endodontic Journal. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Management of endodontic perforations.

    PubMed

    Martin, L R; Gilbert, B; Dickerson, A W

    1982-12-01

    1. Perforations in the floor of the pulp chambers of molars offer an improved prognosis when treated aseptically and quickly. 2. Perforations in the apical third of the root canal, when made with a reamer or file that leaves 2 mm. or less of unfilled root canal space, have a good prognosis. 3. If a perforation, either mechanical or resorptive in etiology, occurs on the lingual surface and requires surgical management, prognosis is poor. 4. Recent advances in the use of calcium hydroxide to treat endodontic perforations show promise.

  15. Experimental model: dye penetration of extensive interim restorations used during endodontic treatment while under load in a multiple axis chewing simulator.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Arna-Lee; Abbott, Paul V

    2007-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to design an experimental model that allowed extensive endodontic interim restorations to be tested for dye penetration while under simulated masticatory load. Extracted premolar teeth had standardized mesio-occluso-distal cavities prepared, and the root canals were instrumented. A cotton wool pellet was placed in the pulp chamber, and the cavities were restored with Cavit, IRM, Ketac-Fil Plus, Ketac-Silver, or composite resin (Z100). They were subjected to the equivalent of 3 months of clinical load while exposed to methylene blue dye. Results of this study could not support IRM as a suitable interim endodontic restorative material to use in extensive cavities. The dye penetration in the Ketac-Fil Plus and Ketac-Silver specimens was not predictable, and the results suggested Cavit and Z100 composite resin require further investigations as potentially useful materials for this purpose.

  16. Assessment of radicular dentin permeability after irradiation with CO2 laser and endodontic irrigation treatments with thermal imaging.

    PubMed

    Cho, Heajin; Lee, Robert C; Chan, Kenneth H; Fried, Daniel

    2017-01-28

    Previous studies have demonstrated that the permeability changes due to the surface modification of dentin can be quantified via thermal imaging during dehydration. The CO2 laser has been shown to remove the smear layer and disinfect root canals. Moreover, thermal modification via CO2 laser irradiation can be used to convert dentin into a highly mineralized enamel-like mineral. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the radicular dentin surface modification after CO2 laser irradiation by measuring the permeability with thermal imaging. Human molar specimens (n=12) were sectioned into 4 axial walls of the pulp chamber and treated with either 10% NaClO for 1 minute, 5% EDTA for 1 minute, CO2 laser or none. The CO2 laser was operated at 9.4 μm with a pulse duration of 26 μs, pulse repetition rate of 300 Hz and a fluence of 13 J/cm(2). The samples were dehydrated using an air spray for 60 seconds and imaged using a thermal camera. The resulting surface morphological changes were assessed using 3D digital microscopy. The images from digital microscopy confirmed melting of the mineral phase of dentin. The area enclosed by the time-temperature curve during dehydration, ΔQ, measured with thermal imaging increased significantly with treatments with EDTA and the CO2 laser (P<0.05). These results indicate that the surface modification due to CO2 laser treatment increases permeability of radicular dentin.

  17. Assessment of radicular dentin permeability after irradiation with CO2 laser and endodontic irrigation treatments with thermal imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Heajin; Lee, Robert C.; Chan, Kenneth H.; Fried, Daniel

    2017-02-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that the permeability changes due to the surface modification of dentin can be quantified via thermal imaging during dehydration. The CO2 laser has been shown to remove the smear layer and disinfect root canals. Moreover, thermal modification via CO2 laser irradiation can be used to convert dentin into a highly mineralized enamel-like mineral. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the radicular dentin surface modification after CO2 laser irradiation by measuring the permeability with thermal imaging. Human molar specimens (n=12) were sectioned into 4 axial walls of the pulp chamber and treated with either 10% NaClO for 1 minute, 5% EDTA for 1 minute, CO2 laser or none. The CO2 laser was operated at 9.4 μm with a pulse duration of 26 μs, pulse repetition rate of 300 Hz and a fluence of 13 J/cm2. The samples were dehydrated using an air spray for 60 seconds and imaged using a thermal camera. The resulting surface morphological changes were assessed using 3D digital microscopy. The images from digital microscopy confirmed melting of the mineral phase of dentin. The area enclosed by the time-temperature curve during dehydration, ▵Q, measured with thermal imaging increased significantly with treatments with EDTA and the CO2 laser (P<0.05). These results indicate that the surface modification due to CO2 laser treatment increases permeability of radicular dentin.

  18. Dental Identification Through Endodontic Radiographic Records: a Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Franco, Ademir; Picoli, Fernando Fortes; Nunes, Fernando Gomes; Estrela, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Objective of work The present study aims to report a case of successful human identification based on the comparison of ante-mortem and post-mortem records of endodontic treatment. Based on these, the legal value of storing and updating clinical records is highlighted throughout the text. Case report An unknown body was recovered from a traffic accident site. Forensic examination was conducted in order to establish the identity of the victim. Based on the absence of ante-mortem fingerprint registration in the national database, the search for AM data was performed using periapical radiographic records from private dental clinics. A positive dental identification was achieved analyzing evidence of endodontic treatment. Conclusion Dental radiographs play a valuable role as legal tools supporting the criminal demands on the daily forensic practice. Specifically in endodontics, periapical radiographs are essential for a proper treatment. In forensics, these radiographs represent a solid source of ante-mortem data for human identifications. PMID:27688359

  19. Development and treatment of retrograde peri-implantitis involving a site with a history of failed endodontic and apicoectomy procedures: a series of reports.

    PubMed

    Ayangco, L; Sheridan, P J

    2001-01-01

    Osseointegrated implants provide predictable restorative support for crowns, restorations, prosthesis abutments, and removable dentures. Their widespread use in recent years has produced different types of complications. Retrograde peri-implantitis, a lesion occurring at the periapical area of an osseointegrated implant, has recently been described. This paper presents a series of reports describing the occurrence and management of retrograde peri-implantitis involving implants replacing teeth with histories of failed endodontic and apicoectomy procedures.

  20. The 'E' factor -- evolving endodontics.

    PubMed

    Hunter, M J

    2013-03-01

    Endodontics is a constantly developing field, with new instruments, preparation techniques and sealants competing with trusted and traditional approaches to tooth restoration. Thus general dental practitioners must question and understand the significance of these developments before adopting new practices. In view of this, the aim of this article, and the associated presentation at the 2013 British Dental Conference & Exhibition, is to provide an overview of endodontic methods and constantly evolving best practice. The presentation will review current preparation techniques, comparing rotary versus reciprocation, and question current trends in restoration of the endodontically treated tooth.

  1. The smear layer in endodontics - a review.

    PubMed

    Violich, D R; Chandler, N P

    2010-01-01

    Root canal instrumentation produces a layer of organic and inorganic material called the smear layer that may also contain bacteria and their by-products. It can prevent the penetration of intracanal medicaments into dentinal tubules and influence the adaptation of filling materials to canal walls. This article provides an overview of the smear layer, focusing on its relevance to endodontics. The PubMed database was used initially; the reference list for smear layer featured 1277 articles, and for both smear layer dentine and smear layer root canal revealed 1455 publications. Smear layer endodontics disclosed 408 papers. A forward search was undertaken on selected articles and using some author names. Potentially relevant material was also sought in contemporary endodontic texts, whilst older books revealed historic information and primary research not found electronically, such that this paper does not represent a 'classical' review. Data obtained suggests that smear layer removal should enhance canal disinfection. Current methods of smear removal include chemical, ultrasonic and laser techniques - none of which are totally effective throughout the length of all canals or are universally accepted. If smear is to be removed, the method of choice seems to be the alternate use of ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid and sodium hypochlorite solutions. Conflict remains regarding the removal of the smear layer before filling root canals, with investigations required to determine the role of the smear layer in the outcomes of root canal treatment.

  2. CBCT: a revolutionary diagnostic aid for endodontic dilemmas.

    PubMed

    Gurtu, A; Aggarwal, A; Mohan, S; Singhal, A; Bansal, R; Agnihotri, K

    2014-09-01

    Successful management of endodontic problems is reliant on diagnostic imaging techniques to provide critical information about the teeth under investigation, and their surrounding anatomy. Until recently, most of this core information was obtained from conventional radiographs. The introduction of cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) specifically dedicated to imaging the maxillofacial region heralds a true paradigm shift from a two dimensional (2D) to a three dimensional (3D) approach to data acquisition and image reconstruction. CBCT systems provide small field of view images at low dose with sufficient spatial resolution for applications in endodontic diagnosis, treatment guidance, and post treatment evaluation. CBCT has been the subject of unparalleled levels of independent research in dental imaging in the area of endodontics. It gives the edge of 3D imaging at lower radiation level in comparison to conventional CT and has helped to treat endodontic cases with external resoption, root canal variations and apical periodontitis providing the size, site and extent accurately. This paper reviews the fundamentals of CBCT and presents the applications of this imaging system in contemporary endodontic practice.

  3. Maxillary fungus ball: zinc-oxide endodontic materials as a risk factor.

    PubMed

    Nicolai, P; Mensi, M; Marsili, F; Piccioni, M; Salgarello, S; Gilberti, E; Apostoli, P

    2015-04-01

    The objective of this study was to demonstrate the correlation between endodontic treatment on maxillary teeth and fungus ball with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry measurement of zinc and other metals (barium, lead and copper) in fungus ball samples. Samples of normal maxillary mucosa were used as comparison. Metal concentration was also measured in several endodontic materials. A significant difference was found between the concentration of zinc and copper in fungus ball compared to normal mucosa. Metal distribution was more similar in fungus ball and in the endodontic materials tested than normal mucosa. The similar metal concentration in the endodontic materials and fungus ball suggests that endodontic materials play a role in the pathogenesis of fungus ball. Endodontic materials accidentally pushed into the maxillary sinus during endodontic treatments may play a crucial role. Dentists should be as careful as possible when treating maxillary teeth to avoid perforating the maxillary sinus floor; the use of zinc-free endodontic materials, as zinc is a metal that plays a pivotal role in fungus growth, should be encouraged.

  4. Tooth discoloration induced by endodontic materials: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Krastl, Gabriel; Allgayer, Nikola; Lenherr, Patrik; Filippi, Andreas; Taneja, Pankaj; Weiger, Roland

    2013-02-01

    It is common knowledge that materials used in endodontics may cause discoloration and thus impair the aesthetic outcome of the treated tooth. The purpose of this review is to summarise the existing knowledge on the discoloration potential of materials used for endodontic procedures. A comprehensive literature search covering the period from 1966 to 2011 was conducted on Pubmed and the Cochrane Library using different keyword combinations including 'tooth', 'colour', 'discoloration', 'staining', 'endodontic''root canal''sealer', 'dressing', 'medicament', 'obturation', 'filling', 'treatment', 'portland cement', 'MTA' and 'antibiotic paste'. Any relevant work published in the English language in peer-reviewed journals and presenting pertinent information related to the purpose of this overview was considered for inclusion. In addition, bibliographies of all relevant papers and previous review articles were hand searched and the reference lists from endodontic textbooks were also reviewed. Articles were excluded if an English abstract was unavailable, if only single clinical reports or conference reports were included, or if the topic was unrelated to the subject. Ten in-vitro studies, one randomized controlled trial and one multicenter randomized controlled trial met the inclusion criteria. There were not any recently used endodontic materials that would not induce at least measurable colour changes. For a wide range of materials currently available on the market there is only scarce or no evidence available on their staining ability. Endodontic therapy should not focus solely on biological and functional aspects, but take aesthetic considerations into account as well. To reduce the risk of material-induced tooth discoloration all materials should be applied carefully in areas of aesthetic concern. The need for further research in this field and for the development of non-staining endodontic materials is evident. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  5. Non-surgical management of paraesthesia and pain associated with endodontic sealer extrusion into the mandibular canal.

    PubMed

    Froes, Fabiana Gama Benevides; Miranda, Aguida Maria Menezes Aguiar; Abad, Ernani da Costa; Riche, Fernanda Nehme; Pires, Fábio Ramôa

    2009-12-01

    The aim of this report was to present a case of endodontic sealer extrusion into the mandibular canal in a 42-year-old woman. The patient was referred to the Endodontology and Stomatology Clinics, School of Dentistry, Estácio de Sá University, complaining of 5-day duration intense spontaneous pain and paraesthesia, both arising after an endodontic intervention. Conventional radiographs and computed tomography of the mandible showed the presence of radiopacities inside the right mandibular canal. History and these radiographs confirmed extrusion of endodontic sealer. Treatment included an anti-inflammatory drug, completion of endodontic treatment and follow up. The patient reported gradual improvement, becoming asymptomatic after 2 months. Radiographs 30 months after initial examination revealed partial resorption of the foreign material. In conclusion, iatrogenic extrusion of endodontic materials should be included in differential diagnosis of endodontic pain and can sometimes be managed through non-surgical interventions in some cases.

  6. Resolution of persistent periapical infection by endodontic surgery.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, F B A; Ferreira, A L; Gomes, B P F A; Souza-Filho, F J

    2004-01-01

    To examine the surfaces of a root tip removed during surgical endodontic treatment for the presence of microorganisms. The present clinical case illustrates an endodontic retreatment of a maxillary premolar tooth with a fistula and periapical reaction. The case was under treatment for 1 year, during which an intracanal medicament was replaced several times. As the lesion did not decrease and exudate was persistent through the fistula and root canal, root end resection with root end filling was performed. Microbiological samples were collected from the fistula, where Propionibacterium acnes, a species associated with endodontic failures, was detected by appropriate anaerobic technique. The resected root apex was observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), which revealed cocci and fungal forms surrounding one of the foramina. After 12 months, the periapical lesion had reduced.

  7. Antimicrobial activity of sodium hypochlorite in endodontics.

    PubMed

    Mohammadi, Zahed; Shalavi, Sousan

    2013-01-01

    One of the major objectives in endodontic therapy is to disinfect the entire root canal system. This goal may be achieved using mechanical instrumenation and chemical irrigation in conjunrction with medication of the root canal between treatment sessions. Microorganisms and their by-products are considered to be the major cause of pulpal and periradicular patholic. In order to reduce or eliminate bacteria and popular tissue remnants, the use of various irrigation solution during treatment have been suggested. Sodium hypochlorite (NaOCI), the most common irrigant, is an excellent nonspecific proteolytic and antimicrobial agent. The purpose of this paper is to review the antimicrobial activity of sodium hypochlorite.

  8. Root dentine and endodontic instrumentation: cutting edge microscopic imaging

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Cutting of the dental hard tissues is an integral part of restorative dentistry. Cutting of the root dentine is also needed in preparation prior to endodontic treatment, with significant commercial investment for the development of flexible cutting instruments based around nickel titanium (NiTi) alloys. This paper describes the evolution of endodontic cutting instruments, both in materials used, e.g. the transition from stainless steel to NiTi, and the design of the actual instruments themselves and their method of activation—by hand or motor driven. We have been examining tooth-cutting interactions microscopically for over 25 years using a variety of microscopic techniques; in particular, video-rate confocal microscopy. This has given a unique insight into how many of the procedures that we take for granted are achieved in clinical practice, by showing microscopic video images of the cutting as it occurs within the tooth. This technology has now been extended to allow imaging of the endodontic instrument and the root canal wall for the first time. We are able to image dentine distortion and crack propagation during endodontic filing of the root canal space. We are also able to visualize the often claimed, but seldom seen action of contemporary endodontic instruments. PMID:27274802

  9. Rapid Kill—Novel Endodontic Sealer and Enterococcus faecalis

    PubMed Central

    Zaltsman, Nathan; Houri-Haddad, Yael; Abramovitz, Itzhak; Davidi, Michael Perez; Weiss, Ervin I.

    2013-01-01

    With growing concern over bacterial resistance, the identification of new antimicrobial means is paramount. In the oral cavity microorganisms are essential to the development of periradicular diseases and are the major causative factors associated with endodontic treatment failure. As quaternary ammonium compounds have the ability to kill a wide array of bacteria through electrostatic interactions with multiple anionic targets on the bacterial surface, it is likely that they can overcome bacterial resistance. Melding these ideas, we investigated the potency of a novel endodontic sealer in limiting Enterococcus faecalis growth. We used a polyethyleneimine scaffold to synthesize nano-sized particles, optimized for incorporation into an epoxy-based endodontic sealer. The novel endodontic sealer was tested for its antimicrobial efficacy and evaluated for biocompatibility and physical eligibility. Our results show that the novel sealer foundation affixes the nanoparticles, achieving surface bactericidal properties, but at the same time impeding nanoparticle penetration into eukaryotic cells and thereby mitigating a possible toxic effect. Moreover, adequate physical properties are maintained. The nanosized quaternary amine particles interact within minutes with bacteria, triggering cell death across wide pH values. Throughout this study we demonstrate a new antibacterial perspective for endodontic sealers; a novel antibacterial, effective and safe antimicrobial means. PMID:24223159

  10. Root dentine and endodontic instrumentation: cutting edge microscopic imaging.

    PubMed

    Atmeh, Amre R; Watson, Timothy F

    2016-06-06

    Cutting of the dental hard tissues is an integral part of restorative dentistry. Cutting of the root dentine is also needed in preparation prior to endodontic treatment, with significant commercial investment for the development of flexible cutting instruments based around nickel titanium (NiTi) alloys. This paper describes the evolution of endodontic cutting instruments, both in materials used, e.g. the transition from stainless steel to NiTi, and the design of the actual instruments themselves and their method of activation-by hand or motor driven. We have been examining tooth-cutting interactions microscopically for over 25 years using a variety of microscopic techniques; in particular, video-rate confocal microscopy. This has given a unique insight into how many of the procedures that we take for granted are achieved in clinical practice, by showing microscopic video images of the cutting as it occurs within the tooth. This technology has now been extended to allow imaging of the endodontic instrument and the root canal wall for the first time. We are able to image dentine distortion and crack propagation during endodontic filing of the root canal space. We are also able to visualize the often claimed, but seldom seen action of contemporary endodontic instruments.

  11. Discoloration Potential of Endodontic Sealers: A Brief Review

    PubMed Central

    Tour Savadkouhi, Sohrab; Fazlyab, Mahta

    2016-01-01

    Tooth discoloration induced by endodontic sealers, is a common finding that impairs aesthetic outcome of endodontic treatment. The aim of the present mini literature review, was to summarize the existing data on discoloration potential of different endodontic sealers. The research covered the article published in PubMed and Google Scholar from 2000 to 2015. The searched keywords included ‘tooth discoloration AND endodontic’, ‘tooth discoloration AND sealer, ‘tooth discoloration AND zinc-oxide eugenol sealer’, ‘tooth discoloration AND Calcium Hydroxide Sealer’, ‘tooth discoloration AND Glass Ionomer Sealer’, ‘tooth discoloration AND epoxy-resin Sealer’, ‘tooth discoloration AND Silicon Based Sealer’, ‘tooth discoloration AND Bioceramic Sealer’ and ‘Spectrophotometry’. Conclusion: A total number of 44 articles were gained which reduced to 11 after excluding the repetitive items. The available evidence for discoloration potential of endodontic sealers currently available on the market is scarce. However, it can be concluded that all endodontic sealers can potentially stain the tooth structure to different degrees. PMID:27790251

  12. Antibiotic resistance in primary and persistent endodontic infections

    PubMed Central

    Jungermann, Gretchen B.; Burns, Krystal; Nandakumar, Renu; Tolba, Mostafa; Venezia, Richard A.; Fouad, Ashraf F.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction The presence of antibiotic resistance genes in endodontic microorganisms may render the infection resistant to common antibiotics. The aims of this project were to identify selected antibiotics resistance genes in primary and persistent endodontic infections and determine the effectiveness of contemporary endodontic procedures in eliminating bacteria with these genes. Methods In patients undergoing primary endodontic treatment or retreatment, the root canals were aseptically accessed and sampled prior to endodontic procedures as well as following contemporary chemomechanical preparation and medication with calcium hydroxide. Identification of the following antibiotics resistance genes was performed using PCR: blaTEM−1, cfxA, blaZ, tetM, tetW, tetQ, vanA, vanD, and vanE. Limited phenotypic identification and antibiotic susceptibility verification was also performed. Results Overall, there were 45 specimens available for analysis: 30 from primary and 15 from persistent endodontic infections. In preoperative specimens, only blaTEM-1 was significantly more prevalent in primary vs. persistent infections (p=0.04). Following contemporary treatment procedures, there was an overall reduction in prevalence of these genes (p<0.001). blaTEM-1 and tetW were significantly reduced (p<0.05), cfxA, blaZ and tetQ were eliminated, but there was no change in tetM. No specimens contained vanA, vanD, or vanE. Antibiotic susceptibility testing showed significant differences among the antibiotics (p<0.001) and general concordance with the gene findings. Conclusions blaTEM-1 was more prevalent in primary than persistent infections. Vancomycin resistance was not present. The genes identified were reduced with treatment except for tetM. Genetic testing may be useful as a screening tool for antibiotic resistance. PMID:21924178

  13. Clinical radiological aspects of primary endodontic lesions with secondary periodontal involvement

    PubMed Central

    Jivoinovici, R; Suciu, Ileana; Gheorghiu, I; Suciu, Ioana

    2017-01-01

    Damage of pulp tissue usually begins in the coronal pulp. Its mistreatment or its lack of on time detection determines the progressive inclusion of the whole endodontic space in its evolution, opening the way of its expansion in the surrounding tissues of the tooth, and on the marginal apical tissue. Aim. The goal of this study was to highlight that the primary endodontic lesions with secondary periodontal implication healed and bone repair was obtained due to a proper disinfection and an adequate sealing of the endodontic system. In primary endodontic lesion with secondary periodontal involvement, endodontic treatment is required in the first stage followed by specific periodontal treatment. The prognosis is good if an appropriate endodontic approach is chosen, depending on the stage of the periodontal disease and the treatment response. The identification of the etiological factors is the most important to establish the appropriate treatment. In all clinical cases selected in this article, the healing tendency was noticed after an adequate disinfection and sealing of the endodontic system. PMID:28255382

  14. [Achievement of endodontics at the edge of the century].

    PubMed

    Kierklo, Anna

    2006-01-01

    Endodontics is the branch of dentistry which deals with dental pulp pathology and treatment of root canals. There has been noted a significant improvement in this discipline recently, which has made a substantial increase in therapeutical efficiency and made dentists' work easier. It was possible due to dynamic development of new material technologies and clinical procedures. Aim of this paper was to present the current state of knowledge in endodontics. The most important achievements were especially stressed. Among the most important for development of present endodontics there are: new methods of canal length estimation, modem methods of visualization, nickel titanium rotary instrumentation, numerous gutta-percha obturation systems and also more biocompatible obturation materials.

  15. Resolution of endodontic issues linked to complex anatomy.

    PubMed

    Migliau, Guido; Pepla, Erlind; Besharat, Laith Kostantinos; Gallottini, Livio

    2014-01-01

    Anatomical abnormalities of the root canal system are frequently seen in specialist endodontic practice, and represent a challenge to be faced with skill and thoroughness, beginning with an accurate diagnostic phase and devising the most appropriate treatment plan. Fortunately, much progress has been made in endodontic research thanks to technological advances and the evolution of higher performance instruments, which now consent even very complex cases to be resolved with relative ease. Below are described the salient features of recent progress in endodontics, along with a description of several clinical cases in which the operator has encountered numerous difficulties due to peculiar tooth morphology, overcome successfully thanks to the application of modern tools and consolidated clinical experience in the field.

  16. Regenerative endodontics and tissue engineering: what the future holds?

    PubMed

    Goodis, Harold E; Kinaia, Bassam Michael; Kinaia, Atheel M; Chogle, Sami M A

    2012-07-01

    The work performed by researchers in regenerative endodontics and tissue engineering over the last decades has been superb; however, many questions remain to be answered. The basic biologic mechanisms must be elucidated that will allow the development of dental pulp and dentin in situ. Stress must be placed on the many questions that will lead to the design of effective, safe treatment options and therapies. This article discusses those questions, the answers to which may become the future of regenerative endodontics. The future remains bright, but proper support and patience are required.

  17. Regenerative endodontics: regeneration or repair?

    PubMed

    Simon, Stéphane R J; Tomson, Phillip L; Berdal, Ariane

    2014-04-01

    Recent advances in biotechnology and translational research have made it possible to provide treatment modalities that protect the vital pulp, allow manipulation of reactionary and reparative dentinogenesis, and, more recently, permit revascularization of an infected root canal space. These approaches are referred to as regenerative procedures. The method currently used to determine the origin of the tissue secreted during the repair/regeneration process is largely based on the identification of cellular markers (usually proteins) left by cells that were responsible for this tissue production. The presence of these proteins in conjunction with other indicators of cellular behavior (especially biomineralization) and analysis of the structure of the newly generated tissue allow conclusions to be made of how it was formed. Thus far, it has not been possible to truly establish the biological mechanism controlling tertiary dentinogenesis. This article considers current therapeutic techniques to treat the dentin-pulp complex and contextualize them in terms of reparative and regenerative processes. Although it may be considered a semantic argument rather than a biological one, the definitions of regeneration and repair are explored to clarify our position in this era of regenerative endodontics. Copyright © 2014 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Glucocorticoids in endodontics: an online study guide.

    PubMed

    2008-05-01

    The Editorial Board of the Journal of Endodontics has developed a literature-based study guide of topical areas related to endodontics. This study guide is intended to give the reader a focused review of the essential endodontic literature and does not cite all possible articles related to each topic. Although citing all articles would be comprehensive, it would defeat the idea of a study guide. This section will cover the use of glucocorticoids in endodontics.

  19. Lasers in endodontics: an online study guide.

    PubMed

    2008-05-01

    The Editorial Board of the Journal of Endodontics has developed a literature-based study guide of topical areas related to endodontics. This study guide is intended to give the reader a focused review of the essential endodontic literature and does not cite all possible articles related to each topic. Although citing all articles would be comprehensive, it would defeat the idea of a study guide. This section will focus on the use of lasers in endodontics.

  20. Veterinary endodontics: an online study guide.

    PubMed

    2008-05-01

    The Editorial Board of the Journal of Endodontics has developed a literature-based study guide of topical areas related to endodontics. This study guide is intended to give the reader a focused review of the essential endodontic literature and does not cite all possible articles related to each topic. Although citing all articles would be comprehensive, it would defeat the idea of a study guide. This section will cover veterinary endodontics.

  1. Postextraction implant in sites with endodontic infection as an alternative to endodontic retreatment: a review of literature.

    PubMed

    Corbella, Stefano; Taschieri, Silvio; Tsesis, Igor; Del Fabbro, Massimo

    2013-06-01

    The aim of this literature review is to evaluate the outcomes of implants placed after extraction of teeth with infections of endodontic origin. An electronic search was performed through electronic databases (Medline and Embase) using the terms "immediate implant," "post-extractive implants," "endodontic infection," "infected site," and "extraction socket" combined with the use of Boolean operators ("AND" and "OR"). Only articles on human subjects were considered. At least 12 month of mean follow-up was required for inclusion. No restriction was placed regarding study design. Ten studies were included in this review. Survival rates ranged from 92% to 100%. A total of 497 implants were placed in sites with endodontic infection. In nine studies the use of bone substitutes was associated with immediate implant placement. Because of the low number of included studies and the heterogeneity of study design, more well-designed studies are required to assess the relevance of this treatment alternative.

  2. Orthograde endodontic retreatment of teeth with individual cast posts: report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Ramić, Bojana; Stojanac, Igor; Premović, Milica; Drobac, Milan; Petrović, Ljubomir

    2012-01-01

    The failure of primary endodontic treatment is manifested by various clinical symptoms following endodontic therapy or, more frequently, by the development of chronic inflammatory process in the apex region without any subjective symptoms. In case of unfavorable outcome of the primary endodontic treatment, orthograde endodontic retreatment is the method of choice for a prolonged therapy. Two female patients, 47 and 44 years old, were presented at the Dental Clinic of Vojvodina for endodontic retreatment of teeth 22, 23 and 13, within the repeated prosthetic restoration. Intraradicular individual cast posts were removed using ultrasonic instruments. Remains of gutta-percha were removed by engine driven rotary re-treatment files, root canals were shaped and cleaned using the crown-down technique, and obturated with gutta-percha and epoxy-resin-based sealer using the lateral compaction technique. When there are metal posts or broken instruments in the root canal, the use of ultrasonic instruments is considered a safe method characterized by negligible tooth substance loss and minimal root damage causing fractures and perforations, and the entire procedure is effective and predictable. Non-surgical orthograde endodontic retreatment, when properly performed in accessible and penetrable root canals, achieves a high cure rate, good and lasting results and eliminates the need for radical procedures, such as apical surgery or tooth extraction. When nonsurgical endodontic retreatment is done, treated teeth must be restored by full coronal coverage as soon as possible, to prevent coronal leakage or fracture.

  3. The importance of cone-beam computed tomography in the management of endodontic problems: a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Venskutonis, Tadas; Plotino, Gianluca; Juodzbalys, Gintaras; Mickevičienė, Lina

    2014-12-01

    To obtain essential information in clinical endodontics, cone-beam computed tomographic (CBCT) imaging can be used in all phases of treatment including diagnosis, treatment planning, during the treatment phase, and through post-treatment assessment and follow-up. The purpose of this article was to review the use of CBCT imaging in the diagnosis, treatment planning, and assessing the outcome of endodontic complications. Literature was selected through a search of PubMed electronic databases for the following keywords: tooth root injuries, tooth root radiography, tooth root perforation, tomography, cone-beam computed tomography, endodontic complications, tooth root internal/external resorption, root fractures, and broken instruments. The research was restricted to articles published in English. One hundred twelve articles met the inclusion criteria and were included in this review. Currently, intraoral radiography is the imaging technique of choice for the management of endodontic disease, but CBCT imaging appears to have a superior validity and reliability in the management of endodontic diagnosis and complications. Endodontic cases should be judged individually, and CBCT imaging should be considered in situations in which information from conventional imaging systems may not yield an adequate amount of information to allow the appropriate management of endodontic problems. CBCT imaging has the potential to become the first choice for endodontic treatment planning and outcome assessment, especially when new scanners with lower radiation doses will be available. Copyright © 2014 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Student Endodontic Performance with and without Numerical Requirements.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Charles Q.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    A study compared dental student performance in clinical endodontics under two instructional approaches, one in which number of procedures completed by students (n=79) was measured and one (n=84 students) emphasizing total patient care and stricter accounting of clinical treatment time. Results indicated the latter group treated fewer teeth but…

  5. Student Endodontic Performance with and without Numerical Requirements.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Charles Q.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    A study compared dental student performance in clinical endodontics under two instructional approaches, one in which number of procedures completed by students (n=79) was measured and one (n=84 students) emphasizing total patient care and stricter accounting of clinical treatment time. Results indicated the latter group treated fewer teeth but…

  6. A survey of dental residents' expectations for regenerative endodontics.

    PubMed

    Manguno, Christine; Murray, Peter E; Howard, Cameron; Madras, Jonathan; Mangan, Stephen; Namerow, Kenneth N

    2012-02-01

    The objective was to survey a group of dental residents regarding their expectations for using regenerative endodontic procedures as part of future dental treatments. After institutional review board approval, the opinions of 32 dentists who were having postgraduate residency training to become specialists in a dental school were surveyed. The survey had 40 questions about professional status, ethical beliefs, judgment, and clinical practice. It was found that 83.9% of dentists had no continuing education or training in stem cells or regenerative endodontic procedures. Results showed that 96.8% of dentists are willing to receive training to be able to provide regenerative endodontic procedures for their patients. Of the total group, 49.1% of dentists already use membranes, scaffolds, or bioactive materials to provide dental treatment. It was determined that 47.3% of dentists agree that the costs of regenerative procedures should be comparable with current treatments. It was also found that 55.1% of dentists were unsure whether regenerative procedures would be successful. Dentists are supportive of using regenerative endodontic procedures in their dental practice, and they are willing to undergo extra training and to buy new technology to provide new procedures. Nevertheless, dentists also need more evidence for the effectiveness and safety of regenerative treatments before they will be recommended for most patients. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. Tissue engineering in endodontics.

    PubMed

    Nakashima, Misako

    2005-12-01

    The key elements of the regeneration of dentine-pulp complex are stem cells, morphogens and a scaffold of extracellular matrix. The pulp stem cells have the potential to differentiate into odontoblasts in response to bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs). However, the use of BMPs in vivo has been restrained by lack of a suitable scaffold. Therefore, two alternative approaches, in vivo and ex vivo gene therapy were performed. Bmp I I/Gdf I I gene was directly transferred into amputated pulp by sonoporation and the reparative dentine formation was stimulated in vivo. However, there should be enough responsive stem cells in the pulp. Therefore, the isolated progenitor stem cells from pulp were transfected with Bmp I I/Gdf I I by electroporation and implanted onto the amputated pulp. This ex vivo gene therapy stimulated reparative dentine formation more optimally and rapidly compared with the in vivo gene therapy. These results suggest the possible clinical use of gene therapy of BMPs for endodontics.

  8. Microbiology in endodontics: an online study guide.

    PubMed

    2008-05-01

    The Editorial Board of the Journal of Endodontics has developed a literature-based study guide of topical areas related to endodontics. This study guide is intended to give the reader a focused review of the essential endodontic literature and does not cite all possible articles related to each topic. Although citing all articles would be comprehensive, it would defeat the idea of a study guide. This section will present the topical areas of microorganisms involved in primary infection; microorganisms involved with failing endodontics, culturing, bacteremia, and endodontics; leaving teeth open; antibiotics; actinomycosis; sterilization of instruments and sterilization of gutta-percha, microorganisms in periradicular lesions; biofilms; and fungi, viruses, and prions.

  9. Argon laser application to endodontics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blankenau, Richard J.; Ludlow, Marvin; Anderson, David

    1993-07-01

    The application of laser technology to endodontics has been studied for some time. At the present time several major problems are being investigated: (1) removal of infected tissues, (2) sterilization of canals, (3) obturation of canals, and (4) preservation of the vitality of supporting tissues. This list is not intended to imply other problems do not exist or have been solved, but it is a starting point. This paper reviews some of the literature that relates to laser applications to endodontics and concludes with some of the findings from our investigation.

  10. Endodontic surgery: an online study guide.

    PubMed

    2008-05-01

    The Editorial Board of the Journal of Endodontics has developed a literature-based study guide of topical areas related to endodontics. This study guide is intended to give the reader a focused review of the essential endodontic literature and does not cite all possible articles related to each topic. Although citing all articles would be comprehensive, it would defeat the idea of a study guide. This section will cover indications and contraindications, surgical anatomy related to endodontics, flap design, root-end resection, the beveled root surface, root-end preparation techniques, root-end filling materials, endodontic surgical aids, endodontic surgical wound healing, incision and drainage, surgical trephination, intentional replantation, endodontic endosseous implants, submergence of roots, transplantation of teeth, and cystic decompression.

  11. Survey of dentists to determine contemporary use of endodontic posts.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Sumitha N; Donovan, Terry E; Ghuman, Taneet

    2017-05-01

    Although the scientific literature provides sound decision-making tools for the restoration of endodontically treated teeth, dentists have different opinions on the rationale for the use of endodontic posts (dowels) and selection of post systems. The decision to place a post is at times contrary to the literature. Updated information on the treatment of endodontically treated teeth among general dentists is lacking. The purpose of this survey was to gain insight into the rationale for choice of endodontic posts and the different endodontic post systems currently used by dental practitioners. Post and core restorations distribute stress and replace missing tooth structure in endodontically treated teeth. Guidelines exist to help select post systems. With the advent of new materials, prefabricated posts have gained popularity among dentists. However, cast-metal post-and-core systems are still considered the gold standard. Surveys were distributed to dentists attending continuing education meetings in the United States, Canada, Scotland, Ireland, and Greece. The questions addressed years of practice, specialty training, and brand, type, shape, and material of the endodontic post systems used. Descriptive statistical analysis was used to assess the percentage of respondents. Ninety-two percent of the participants were general practitioners with 25.94 ±13.35 years of experience. The majority agreed upon using endodontic posts when insufficient coronal tooth structure remains and for stress distribution. Passive, parallel posts were the most commonly reported type and shape. With regard to post material, fiber posts were the most frequently used (72.2%), followed by prefabricated alloys (38.6%), cast-metal posts (33.9%), prefabricated titanium posts (30.1%), and stainless-steel posts (21.7%). For cementation, resin-modified glass ionomer (40%) was most frequently used, followed by self-adhesive resin (29.6%). The majority of the practitioners used fiber posts. This may

  12. Optical coherence tomography for endodontic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Soest, G.; Shemesh, H.; Wu, M.-K.; van der Sluis, L. W. M.; Wesselink, P. R.

    2008-02-01

    In root canal therapy, complications frequently arise as a result of root fracture or imperfect cleaning of fins and invaginations. To date, there is no imaging method for nondestructive in vivo evaluation of the condition of the root canal, during or after treatment. There is a clinical need for a technique to detect defects before they give rise to complications. In this study we evaluate the ability of optical coherence tomography (OCT) to image root canal walls, and its capacity to identify complicating factors in root canal treatment. While the potential of OCT to identify caries has been explored before, endodontic imaging has not been reported. We imaged extracted lower front teeth after endodontic preparation and correlated these images to histological sections. A 3D OCT pullback scan was made with an endoscopic rotating optical fiber probe inside the root canal. All oval canals, uncleaned fins, risk zones, and one perforation that were detected by histology were also imaged by OCT. As an example of an area where OCT has clinical potential, we present a study of vertical root fracture identification with OCT.

  13. Antibacterial Nanoparticles in Endodontics: A Review.

    PubMed

    Shrestha, Annie; Kishen, Anil

    2016-10-01

    A major challenge in root canal treatment is the inability of the current cleaning and shaping procedures to eliminate bacterial biofilms surviving within the anatomic complexities and uninstrumented portions of the root canal system. Nanoparticles with their enhanced and unique physicochemical properties, such as ultrasmall sizes, large surface area/mass ratio, and increased chemical reactivity, have led research toward new prospects of treating and preventing dental infections. This article presents a comprehensive review on the scientific knowledge that is available on the application of antibacterial nanoparticles in endodontics. The application of nanoparticles in the form of solutions for irrigation, medication, and as an additive within sealers/restorative materials has been evaluated to primarily improve the antibiofilm efficacy in root canal and restorative treatments. In addition, antibiotic or photosensitizer functionalized nanoparticles have been proposed recently to provide more potent antibacterial efficacy. The increasing interest in this field warrants sound research based on scientific and clinical collaborations to emphasize the near future potential of nanoparticles in clinical endodontics. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Access to endodontic care in North Carolina public health and Medicaid settings.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Steven L; Khan, Asma A; Rivera, Eric M; Phillips, Ceib

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate issues related to access to endodontic care in North Carolina for individuals who used dental public health resources such as public health clinics (PHCs) or private practices that accept Medicaid or other government-sponsored reimbursement programs private practices that accept Medicaid (PPM). Surveys were sent to 1,195 dentists regarding frequency and type of endodontic conditions encountered, treatments provided, and perceived barriers to care. Results were analyzed using logistic regression with the level of significance set at 0.05. Five hundred forty-six surveys were returned for a 45.7% response rate. Of the respondents, 79% reported frequently encountering an endodontic condition, but only 34% reported performing any type of definitive endodontic procedure. Graduates after the year 2000 were significantly more likely to perform definitive endodontic procedures (P < 0.05). Lack of insurance was the greatest barrier to care with 89% considering it a moderate to major barrier, followed by cost of the endodontic treatment (87%) and cost of the restoration following treatment (86%). PPMs were more likely to consider cost and insurance a major barrier (P < 0.05). In North Carolina public health and Medicaid settings, the frequency of endodontic treatments provided was much lower than the frequency of endodontic conditions encountered that might have benefited from treatment. Graduation year was the best indicator for the provision of root canal therapy. Additionally, treatment patterns and perceptions of barriers to care are different for PHCs and PPMs. © 2013 American Association of Public Health Dentistry.

  15. Outcome of orthograde endodontic retreatment--A two-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Nesković, Jelena; Zivković, Slavoljub; Medojević, Milica; Maksimović, Milos

    2016-01-01

    Endodontic retreatment is a complex intervention that requires detailed analysis of possible reasons for failure, and flawless practical execution of the procedure. The aim of the study was to assess the outcome of endodontic retreatment based on clinical and radiographic criteria after a two-year observation period. Clinical study included 49 teeth indicated for endodontic retreatment based on periapical index (PAI). All teeth were divided into two groups. Group I comprised teeth without any periapical lesion (PAI score of 1 and 2) while Group II consisted of teeth with visible periapical radiolucency (PAI score of 3, 4, and 5). Endodontic retreatment was completed in two visits with inter-appointment medication of 2% chlorhexidine and calcium hydroxide for two weeks. Outcome of endodontic retreatment was evaluated 12-24 months after final obturation. Endodontic retreatment was successful in 93.3% in Group I after 24 months. In Group II, successful treatment and complete healing was found in 52.9% of teeth, whereas 14.7% of teeth showed only partial healing. However, clinical symptomatology was not present in any of the cases. Considering the absence of clinical signs and subjective symptoms, retreatment was successful in 67.6% of cases where chronic periapical inflammation was present. Endodontic retreatment was successful in high percentage in teeth with and without periapical lesions.

  16. Inferior alveolar nerve paresthesia after overfilling of endodontic sealer into the mandibular canal.

    PubMed

    González-Martín, Maribel; Torres-Lagares, Daniel; Gutiérrez-Pérez, José Luis; Segura-Egea, Juan José

    2010-08-01

    The present study describes a case of endodontic sealer (AH Plus) penetration within and along the mandibular canal from the periapical zone of a lower second molar after endodontic treatment. The clinical manifestations comprised anesthesia of the left side of the lower lip, paresthesia and anesthesia of the gums in the third quadrant, and paresthesia and anesthesia of the left mental nerve, appearing immediately after endodontic treatment. The paresthesia and anesthesia of the lip and gums were seen to decrease, but the mental nerve paresthesia and anesthesia persisted after 3.5 years. This case illustrates the need to expend great care with all endodontic techniques when performing nonsurgical root canal therapy, especially when the root apices are in close proximity to vital anatomic structures such as the inferior alveolar canal.

  17. Endodontic management of a two rooted, three canaled mandibular canine with a fractured instrument

    PubMed Central

    Jadhav, Ganesh Ranganath

    2014-01-01

    It is important to assess the root canal morphology and its variations before initiating the endodontic procedure. This is because the inability to clean the complete root canal system forms the seat for the persistent infection which ultimately leads to endodontic treatment failure. This case reports the use of dental operating microscope for the successful endodontic management of a two rooted and three canaled mandibular canine with the fractured instrument in the middle canal of a 38-year-old healthy Asian woman. This case report highlights the need to use the dental operating microscope and ultrasonics in locating the elusive canal orifices. It is important to note the internal and external root canal morphological variations before starting the endodontic treatment without any pre-operative assumptions about the usual anatomy of the toot. PMID:24778521

  18. Endodontic and Orthodontic Management of Traumatically Intruded Teeth with Horizontal Root Fracture: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Jacobovitz, Marcos; Ramos, Adriana Maria Bonadio Lopes; Lima, Regina Karla de Pontes; Pappen, Fernanda Geraldes; Fuks, Anna B.

    2011-01-01

    This report describes the case of an 8-year-old boy that was referred to endodontic and orthodontic treatment after suffering an injury that led to intrusion of the maxillary right permanent central incisor, palatal displacement of the upper right lateral incisor, and root fracture of both central incisors. Both injured teeth were immature and had open apices. The intruded tooth was repositioned by endodontic and orthodontic management. Endodontic therapy was performed in both teeth with periodical changes of calcium-hydroxide-based paste as root canal dressing and introduction of MTA as an apical barrier. The postoperative course was uneventful with clinical and radiographic success up to 3 and 1/2 years of follow up. In the present case, orthodontic repositioning combined with endodontic therapy constitued a viable alternative treatment for intrusive luxations in immature permanent teeth. PMID:22567431

  19. Sodium hypochlorite in endodontics: an update review.

    PubMed

    Mohammadi, Zahed

    2008-12-01

    The major objective in root canal treatment is to disinfect the entire root canal system. This requires that the pulpal contents be eliminated as sources of infection. This goal may be accomplished using mechanical instrumentation and chemical irrigation, in conjunction with medication of the root canal between treatment sessions. Microorganisms and their by-products are considered to be the major cause of pulpal and periradicular pathosis. In order to reduce or eliminate bacteria and pulpal tissue remnants, various irrigation solutions have been suggested to be used during treatment. Sodium hypochlorite, an excellent non-specific proteolytic and antimicrobial agent, is the most common irrigation solution used during root canal therapy. The purpose of this paper was to review different aspects of sodium hypochlorite use in endodontics.

  20. Are clinical decisions in endodontics influenced by the patient's fee-paying status?

    PubMed

    Walker, I; Gilbert, D; Asimakopoulou, K

    2015-12-01

    We explored whether the fee status of a UK patient influences clinical decision-making in endodontics. In a randomised-controlled vignette study describing either an 'NHS-funded', 'Privately-funded' or undisclosed fee-status patient, we examined the importance vocational trainer dentists placed on a series of factors normally considered when deciding whether to offer patients endodontic treatment as opposed to extracting the tooth. N = 119 experienced (M years post qualification = 20.01) dentists participated. Having read a vignette describing a hypothetical patient who could potentially be treated either endodontically or through an extraction, dentists rated a series of factors they would normally consider (for example, poor oral hygiene, the rest of their mouth is unfilled and caries-free), before recommending either endodontic treatment or an extraction. The patient's funding status had no influence on these dentists' clinical decision-making when considering endodontic treatment as an option (p >0.05) with the exception of a single item relating to infrequent attendance where the NHS patient was more likely than the 'undisclosed-fee' patient, to be offered extractions (F (2, 116) 3.43, p <0.04). We have found no strong evidence to suggest that the fee-status of a patient influences clinical decision-making in endodontic treatment by experienced dentists.

  1. Scaffolds in regenerative endodontics: A review

    PubMed Central

    Gathani, Kinjal M.; Raghavendra, Srinidhi Surya

    2016-01-01

    Root canal therapy has enabled us to save numerous teeth over the years. The most desired outcome of endodontic treatment would be when diseased or nonvital pulp is replaced with healthy pulp tissue that would revitalize the teeth through regenerative endodontics. ‘A search was conducted using the Pubmed and MEDLINE databases for articles with the criteria ‘Platelet rich plasma’, ‘Platelet rich fibrin’, ‘Stem cells’, ‘Natural and artificial scaffolds’ from 1982–2015’. Tissues are organized as three-dimensional structures, and appropriate scaffolding is necessary to provide a spatially correct position of cell location and regulate differentiation, proliferation, or metabolism of the stem cells. Extracellular matrix molecules control the differentiation of stem cells, and an appropriate scaffold might selectively bind and localize cells, contain growth factors, and undergo biodegradation over time. Different scaffolds facilitate the regeneration of different tissues. To ensure a successful regenerative procedure, it is essential to have a thorough and precise knowledge about the suitable scaffold for the required tissue. This article gives a review on the different scaffolds providing an insight into the new developmental approaches on the horizon. PMID:27857762

  2. Scaffolds in regenerative endodontics: A review.

    PubMed

    Gathani, Kinjal M; Raghavendra, Srinidhi Surya

    2016-09-01

    Root canal therapy has enabled us to save numerous teeth over the years. The most desired outcome of endodontic treatment would be when diseased or nonvital pulp is replaced with healthy pulp tissue that would revitalize the teeth through regenerative endodontics. 'A search was conducted using the Pubmed and MEDLINE databases for articles with the criteria 'Platelet rich plasma', 'Platelet rich fibrin', 'Stem cells', 'Natural and artificial scaffolds' from 1982-2015'. Tissues are organized as three-dimensional structures, and appropriate scaffolding is necessary to provide a spatially correct position of cell location and regulate differentiation, proliferation, or metabolism of the stem cells. Extracellular matrix molecules control the differentiation of stem cells, and an appropriate scaffold might selectively bind and localize cells, contain growth factors, and undergo biodegradation over time. Different scaffolds facilitate the regeneration of different tissues. To ensure a successful regenerative procedure, it is essential to have a thorough and precise knowledge about the suitable scaffold for the required tissue. This article gives a review on the different scaffolds providing an insight into the new developmental approaches on the horizon.

  3. Evidence-based patient education: knowledge transfer to endodontic patients.

    PubMed

    Sorrell, John T; McNeil, Daniel W; Gochenour, Lori L; Jackson, C Russell

    2009-11-01

    Evidence-based treatment is emphasized in oral health care, but there has been less focus on empirically demonstrating the effects of patient education. Attempts to educate patients must be empirically demonstrated in order to provide evidence-based guidance to practitioners and educators. We conducted two studies that assessed information acquisition during five-minute audiovisual films on oral hygiene procedures, endodontic procedures, and fear about pain during root canal therapy. A fifteen-item Dental Knowledge Questionnaire (DKQ), with three subscales each focusing on the content of one of the films, was developed and psychometrically evaluated. Study 1 included 268 undergraduates; study 2 involved 104 endodontic patients. Participants completed the DKQ, viewed one of the three films, and repeated the questionnaire. The effects of information on knowledge were assessed using 3 (film group) X 3 (subscale of the DKQ) X 2 (time) repeated measures ANOVAs. Scores improved in a content-specific fashion relevant to the film viewed among undergraduates, F(4, 263)=211.33, p<.001, partial eta(2)=.62 and endodontic patients, F(4, 99)=87.22, p<.001, partial eta(2)=.63. The results provide evidence for using brief informational film as an efficacious method to increase patient knowledge, at least in the short term. The DKQ is proposed as a tool to assess patient knowledge in the arenas of oral hygiene and endodontics.

  4. Endodontic therapy in a postirradiated child: review of the literature and report of a case.

    PubMed

    Kielbassa, A M; Attin, T; Schaller, H G; Hellwig, E

    1995-06-01

    Exodontia of extremely carious teeth leads to a significant risk of osteoradionecrosis in patients who have undergone radiotherapy. In these patients, endodontic treatment could be an alternative. Successful root canal therapy in a girl who had been irradiated for head and neck neoplasms is reported. The results indicated that use of calcium hydroxide to obturate the root canals is a viable method of postirradiation endodontics in primary teeth.

  5. The Applications of Cone-Beam Computed Tomography in Endodontics: A Review of Literature

    PubMed Central

    Kiarudi, Amir Hosein; Eghbal, Mohammad Jafar; Safi, Yaser; Aghdasi, Mohammad Mehdi; Fazlyab, Mahta

    2015-01-01

    By producing undistorted three-dimensional images of the area under examination, cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) systems have met many of the limitations of conventional radiography. These systems produce images with small field of view at low radiation doses with adequate spatial resolution that are suitable for many applications in endodontics from diagnosis to treatment and follow-up. This review article comprehensively assembles all the data from literature regarding the potential applications of CBCT in endodontics. PMID:25598804

  6. Endodontic and Clinical Considerations in the Management of Variable Anatomy in Mandibular Premolars: A Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Hammo, Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    Mandibular premolars are known to have numerous anatomic variations of their roots and root canals, which are a challenge to treat endodontically. The paper reviews literature to detail the various clinically relevant anatomic considerations with detailed techniques and methods to successfully manage these anomalies. An emphasis and detailed description of every step of treatment including preoperative diagnosis, intraoperative identification and management, and surgical endodontic considerations for the successful management of these complex cases have been included. PMID:24895584

  7. The effectiveness of endodontic solvents to remove endodontic sealers.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Jae I; Chuang, Augustine H; Sidow, Stephanie J; McNally, Kathleen; Goodin, Jeremy L; McPherson, James C

    2015-03-01

    Dental emergencies negatively affect troop readiness, especially during combat. Endodontic retreatment, when required, is especially challenging when the removal of endodontic sealer is required. In this study, we investigated the effectiveness of synthetic endodontic solvents to remove endodontic sealers. Fifty capillary tubes (2.7 mm ID×22 mm L), each filled to 15 mm with either Roth 801, AH Plus, MetaSEAL, or gutta-percha, were stored at 75% humidity for 14 days at 37°C. Ten capillary tubes containing each sealer were treated with either chloroform, xylene, EndoSolv R, EndoSolv E, or no solvent, and then penetrated with D3 ProTaper Universal Retreatment file on the same day. The time for the file to penetrate the length of each sealer was recorded, and the data statistically analyzed. Roth 801 failed to set and was not tested. The file took 3.4±0.1, 4.8±0.3, 5.7±0.4, 4.5±0.2, and 10.6±1.0 seconds (mean±SD) to penetrate gutta-percha using chloroform, xylene, EndoSolv R, EndoSolv E, or no solvent, respectively, and was performed by one endodontic resident at one sitting. The time for penetration of gutta-percha with any solvent was significantly faster (p≤0.05) than for AH Plus or MetaSEAL.The time for AH Plus ranged from 23.1±1.0 to 81.5±4.5 seconds. The time for MetaSEAL ranged from 97.2±6.1 to >180 seconds. EndoSolv E was the most effective solvent for AH Plus. It took significantly more time to remove MetaSEAL than AH Plus, regardless of the solvent used. Our study indicated that the use of the proper endodontic solvent makes complete removal of a sealer much more effective during retreatment. Reprint & Copyright © 2015 Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S.

  8. [Developmental radicular groove as a cause of endodontic failure].

    PubMed

    Fabra Campos, H; Millet Part, J

    1989-01-01

    A clinical case of apical injury on an upper lateral incisor with endodontical and surgical failures in its treatment is presented. Extraction of the incisor and its study at the stereoscopic microscope showed the existence of a developmental groove running from the cingulum to the end of the root, establishing a communication between the crevice and the apical part of the tooth. Bacterial infection through the groove could provide an explanation for treatment failure.

  9. A Successful Endodontic Outcome with Non-Obturated Canals

    PubMed Central

    Asgary, Saeed; Fazlyab, Mahta

    2015-01-01

    This case report represents the outcome of endodontic treatment in an infected mandibular molar with periradicular periodontitis and inherent poor prognosis of root canal treatment due to severe root curvature. The tooth was successfully treated by leaving the mesial root non-obturated, the canal orifices were coronally sealed with calcium enriched mixture cement and a definitive coronal amalgam restoration, was placed at the subsequent visit. PMID:26213546

  10. Dentists with enhanced skills (Special Interest) in Endodontics: gatekeepers views in London.

    PubMed

    Ghotane, Swapnil G; Al-Haboubi, Mustafa; Kendall, Nick; Robertson, Claire; Gallagher, Jennifer E

    2015-09-21

    Dentists with a special interest hold enhanced skills enabling them to treat cases of intermediate complexity. The aim of this study was to explore primary dental care practitioners' views of dentists with a special interest (DwSIs) in Endodontics in London, with reference to an educational and service initiative established by (the former) London Deanery in conjunction with the NHS. A cross-sectional postal survey of primary care dentists working across different models of care within London was conducted, with a target to achieve views of at least 5 % of London's dentists. The questionnaire instrument was informed by qualitative research and the dental literature and piloted prior to distribution; data were analysed using SPSS v19 and STATA v12.0. Six per cent of London's primary care dentists (n = 243) responded to the survey; 53 % were male. Just over one third (37 %; n = 90) were aware of the DwSI service being provided. Most practitioners reported that having access to a DwSI in Endodontics would support the care of their patients (89 %; n = 215), would carry out more endodontic treatment in the NHS primary dental care if adequately reimbursed (93 %; n = 220), and had more time (76 %; n = 180). Female respondents appeared to be less confident in doing endodontic treatment (p = 0.001). More recently qualified respondents reported greater need for training/support for performing more endodontic treatment in the NHS primary dental care (p = 0.001), were more dissatisfied with access to endodontic service in the NHS primary dental care (p = 0.007) and more interested to train as a DwSI in endodontics (p = 0.001) compared with respondents having a greater number of years of clinical experience since qualification. The findings lend support to the concept of developing dentists with enhanced skills as well as ensuring additional funding, time and support to facilitate more routine endodontics through the NHS primary care to meet

  11. Non-surgical endodontic treatment for dens invaginatus type III using cone beam computed tomography and dental operating microscope: a case report.

    PubMed

    Kato, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    Dens invaginatus is a morphological abnormality of the tooth in which the coronal tooth enamel and dentin fold inwards towards the pulp cavity. Dens invaginatus type III (Oehlers: 1957) is characterized by infolding of the enamel and dentin as far as the root apex. This report describes a case of surgical and non-surgical endodontic therapy for a maxillary lateral incisor with type III dens invaginatus, necrotic pulp, and an associated large periradicular lesion. The patient was a 16-year-old man. Periapical radiographs suggested the presence of an untreated area of invagination. Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) was then used for three-dimensional observation of the morphological details of this area. The CBCT scans revealed invagination and its relationship with the pulp chamber. A dental operating microscope was used to access two primary root canals and the area of invagination. The root canals were then localized, negotiated, enlarged, and filled with calcium hydroxide. Two months later, the canal and invagination were obturated with core-based gutta-percha (FlexPoint Neo: FP core-carrier technique) and restored. Cone beam computed tomography and microscopic techniques allow even complicated cases of dens invaginatus to be diagnosed and treated using non-surgical root canal management.

  12. Risk management in clinical practice. Part 4. Endodontics.

    PubMed

    Webber, J

    2010-08-28

    Endodontic procedures are challenging and technically demanding. In the UK standards of treatment have been shown to have fallen short of acceptable guidelines, laying many dentists open to litigation on questions of clinical negligence by patients who understand and know what should be considered as current best practice in this area. Failure to communicate with patients about the procedure and not obtaining consent for treatment is a key area of complaint, as is inadequate record keeping. When treatment is undertaken within the framework of accepted guidelines it would be very difficult for a patient to open a claim for clinical negligence should a failure occur. This article looks at potential dento-legal problems in endodontics and how, through compliance with best practice, they may be avoided.

  13. Chlorhexidine gluconate, its properties and applications in endodontics

    PubMed Central

    Mohammadi, Zahed

    2008-01-01

    The major objective in endodontic therapy is to disinfect the entire root canal system. This requires that the pulpal content be eliminated as sources of infection. This goal may be accomplished by mechanical instrumentation and chemical irrigation, in conjunction with medication of the root canal between treatment sessions. Microorganisms and their by-products are considered to be the major cause of pulpal and periradicular pathosis. In order to reduce or eliminate bacteria from the root canal system, various irrigants have been used during treatment. Chlorhexidine is a cationic solution which can be used during treatment. It has a wide range of antimicrobial activity. Furthermore, because of its cationic structure, chlorhexidine has a unique property named substantivity. The purpose of this paper is to review different aspects of chlorhexidine in endodontics. PMID:24265633

  14. Evaluation of over-etching technique in the endodontically treated tooth restoration

    PubMed Central

    Migliau, Guido; Piccoli, Luca; Besharat, Laith Konstantinos; Di Carlo, Stefano; Pompa, Giorgio

    2015-01-01

    Summary The main purpose of a post-endodontic restoration with posts is to guarantee the retention of the restorative material. The aim of the study was to examine, through the push-out test, how bond strength between the post and the dentin varied with etching time with 37% orthophosphoric acid, before cementation of a glass fiber post. Moreover, it has been examined if over-etching (application time of the acid: 2 minutes) was an effective technique to improve the adhesion to the endodontic substrate, after highlighting the problems of adhesion concerning its anatomical characteristics and the changes after the endodontic treatment. Highest bond strength values were found by etching the substrate for 30 sec., while over-etching didn’t improve bond strength to the endodontic substrate. PMID:26161247

  15. Evaluation of Debridement Techniques for Endodontic Instruments

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-08-20

    Endodontic Practice . Philadelphia, 1970, Lea and Febiger, pp. 213-214. 9. Grossman, L. I.: Fate of endodontically treated teeth with fractured root...Cstf3 everse OFd neeO a 1 d IIeif by locLETEa WE~~ CLJANIATO OF TH)S PAITIE OFh~ Iat NOVnteSred) EVALUATION OF DEBRIDEMENT TECHNIQUES FOR ENDODONTIC ...INSTRUMENTS *RONALD 0. SEGALL, DMD **CARLOS E. del RIO, DDS ***JOHN M. BRADY, DDS, MSPH ****WILLIAM A. AYER, DDS, PhD :f*MAJ, DC Endodontic Resident, US

  16. Overview on the current antibiotic containing agents used in endodontics.

    PubMed

    Bansal, Ramta; Jain, Aditya

    2014-08-01

    Antibiotics are systemically and locally used extensively in endodontics. However, local antibiotic application mode is considered more effective than systemic administration. The local mode enables the dentist to target bacteria in every nook and corner of root canal system, which is otherwise beyond reach if targeted by instrumentation or conventional root canal treatment protocols. Therefore, they are an important adjunct to conventional treatment of root canal. The present study reviews the various antibiotic containing dental agents used in endodontics. A web-based research on MedLine was performed with terms Review Articles published in the last 10 year's dental journals in English for literature researching, extracting, and synthesizing data. Relevant articles were shortlisted. Important cross-reference articles were also reviewed.

  17. Overview on the Current Antibiotic Containing Agents Used in Endodontics

    PubMed Central

    Bansal, Ramta; Jain, Aditya

    2014-01-01

    Antibiotics are systemically and locally used extensively in endodontics. However, local antibiotic application mode is considered more effective than systemic administration. The local mode enables the dentist to target bacteria in every nook and corner of root canal system, which is otherwise beyond reach if targeted by instrumentation or conventional root canal treatment protocols. Therefore, they are an important adjunct to conventional treatment of root canal. The present study reviews the various antibiotic containing dental agents used in endodontics. A web-based research on MedLine was performed with terms Review Articles published in the last 10 year's dental journals in English for literature researching, extracting, and synthesizing data. Relevant articles were shortlisted. Important cross-reference articles were also reviewed. PMID:25210667

  18. [Irrigants and intracanal medicaments in endodontics].

    PubMed

    Zehnder, Matthias; Lehnert, Birgit; Schönenberger, Kathrin; Waltimo, Tuomas

    2003-01-01

    Modern, biologic root canal therapy should be performed with suitable irrigating solutions and intracanal medicaments. The goal of endodontic treatment is to free the treated tooth from infection and prevent reinfection as thoroughly as possible by means which do not put the organism at risk. In this review of the literature, an evidence-based concept for irrigation and medication of root canal systems is presented. Irrigants and medicaments are discussed with respect to their antimicrobial, tissue-dissolving and endotoxin-decontaminating capacity in relation to their systemic toxicity. Recent findings pertaining to interactions of root canal medicaments and irrigating solutions and their impact on a sound irrigating and medicating concept are discussed.

  19. Regenerative endodontics: a road less travelled.

    PubMed

    Bansal, Ramta; Jain, Aditya; Mittal, Sunandan; Kumar, Tarun; Kaur, Dilpreet

    2014-10-01

    Although traditional approaches like root canal therapy and apexification procedures have been successful in treating diseased or infected root canals, but these modalities fail to re-establish healthy pulp tissue in treated teeth. Regeneration-based approaches aims to offer high levels of success by replacing diseased or necrotic pulp tissues with healthy pulp tissue to revitalize teeth. The applications of regenerative approaches in dental clinics have potential to dramatically improve patients' quality of life. This review article offers a detailed overview of present regenerative endodontic approaches aiming to revitalize teeth and also outlines the problems to be dealt before this emerging field contributes to clinical treatment protocols. It conjointly covers the basic trilogy elements of tissue engineering.

  20. Tissue engineering in endodontics: root canal revascularization.

    PubMed

    Palit Madhu Chanda; Hegde, K Sundeep; Bhat, Sham S; Sargod, Sharan S; Mantha, Somasundar; Chattopadhyay, Sayan

    2014-01-01

    Root canal revascularization attempts to make necrotic tooth alive by the use of certain simple clinical protocols. Earlier apexification was the treatment of choice for treating and preserving immature permanent teeth that have lost pulp vitality. This procedure promoted the formation of apical barrier to seal the root canal of immature teeth and nonvital filling materials contained within root canal space. However with the success of root canal revascularization to regenerate the pulp dentin complex of necrotic immature tooth has made us to rethink if apexification is at the beginning of its end. The objective of this review is to discuss the new concepts of tissue engineering in endodontics and the clinical steps of root canal revascularization.

  1. Regenerative Endodontics: A Road Less Travelled

    PubMed Central

    Bansal, Ramta; Mittal, Sunandan; Kumar, Tarun; Kaur, Dilpreet

    2014-01-01

    Although traditional approaches like root canal therapy and apexification procedures have been successful in treating diseased or infected root canals, but these modalities fail to re-establish healthy pulp tissue in treated teeth. Regeneration-based approaches aims to offer high levels of success by replacing diseased or necrotic pulp tissues with healthy pulp tissue to revitalize teeth. The applications of regenerative approaches in dental clinics have potential to dramatically improve patients’ quality of life. This review article offers a detailed overview of present regenerative endodontic approaches aiming to revitalize teeth and also outlines the problems to be dealt before this emerging field contributes to clinical treatment protocols. It conjointly covers the basic trilogy elements of tissue engineering. PMID:25478476

  2. Comparative assessment of the incidence of vertical root fractures between conventional versus surgical endodontic retreatment.

    PubMed

    Karygianni, L; Krengel, M; Winter, M; Stampf, S; Wrbas, K T

    2014-11-01

    Vertical root fractures (VRFs) are a common cause of tooth loss. Little evidence exists though, relating the incidence of VRFs to the type of endodontic retreatment. This retrospective study aimed at evaluating the impact of conventional versus surgical endodontics on root canal-filled teeth with VRFs. Over a period of 13 years, 200 endodontically retreated teeth from 192 patients with VRFs were extracted and further examined. VRFs were assessed in relation to age, gender, tooth group, clinical signs, extension on the root surface, patency, as well as type of endodontic retreatment and restoration. Statistical analysis was conducted using a Cox PH Model, Chi-squared, Wilcoxon rank-sum, and Log rank tests at a significance level of 5 %. The majority of teeth with VRFs (62.31 %) had undergone the combination of conventional root canal retreatment and apical surgery. Women (64.06 %) presented VRFs more frequently than men (35.94 %) at the mean age of 51.1 and 55.1 years, respectively. Maxillary first (17.5 %) and second (16.5 %) premolars, restored by a resin-based material without a post (56.28 %) were more susceptible to VRFs. Apically initiated (84.1 %) VRFs could be diagnosed more easily on radiographs. The type of endodontic treatment strongly correlated with VRFs. The prevalence of VRFs in teeth having undergone both conventional and surgical endodontic retreatment could be attributed, among others, to additive dentin damage related to the aforementioned endodontic procedures. The possible involvement of endodontic retreatment in the multifactorial etiology of VRFs needs to be taken into consideration in clinical practice.

  3. Regenerative endodontics: a review of current status and a call for action.

    PubMed

    Murray, Peter E; Garcia-Godoy, Franklin; Hargreaves, Kenneth M

    2007-04-01

    Millions of teeth are saved each year by root canal therapy. Although current treatment modalities offer high levels of success for many conditions, an ideal form of therapy might consist of regenerative approaches in which diseased or necrotic pulp tissues are removed and replaced with healthy pulp tissue to revitalize teeth. Researchers are working toward this objective. Regenerative endodontics is the creation and delivery of tissues to replace diseased, missing, and traumatized pulp. This review provides an overview of regenerative endodontics and its goals, and describes possible techniques that will allow regenerative endodontics to become a reality. These potential approaches include root-canal revascularization, postnatal (adult) stem cell therapy, pulp implant, scaffold implant, three-dimensional cell printing, injectable scaffolds, and gene therapy. These regenerative endodontic techniques will possibly involve some combination of disinfection or debridement of infected root canal systems with apical enlargement to permit revascularization and use of adult stem cells, scaffolds, and growth factors. Although the challenges of introducing endodontic tissue engineering therapies are substantial, the potential benefits to patients and the profession are equally ground breaking. Patient demand is staggering both in scope and cost, because tissue engineering therapy offers the possibility of restoring natural function instead of surgical placement of an artificial prosthesis. By providing an overview of the methodological issues required to develop potential regenerative endodontic therapies, we hope to present a call for action to develop these therapies for clinical use.

  4. Imaging Techniques in Endodontics: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Deepak, B. S.; Subash, T. S.; Narmatha, V. J.; Anamika, T.; Snehil, T. K.; Nandini, D. B.

    2012-01-01

    This review provides an overview of the relevance of imaging techniques such as, computed tomography, cone beam computed tomography, and ultrasound, to endodontic practice. Many limitations of the conventional radiographic techniques have been overcome by the newer methods. Advantages and disadvantages of various imaging techniques in endodontic practice are also discussed. PMID:22530184

  5. Teacher Training in Graduate Endodontic Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burrell, William; Lee, Mickey M.

    1981-01-01

    A national survey of postdoctoral endodontic students on the perceived educational needs of dental faculty indicated that most endodontic students possess very little formal educational training, they perceive a strong need for it, and that they desire more training in evaluation/testing methods. (MLW)

  6. Teacher Training in Graduate Endodontic Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burrell, William; Lee, Mickey M.

    1981-01-01

    A national survey of postdoctoral endodontic students on the perceived educational needs of dental faculty indicated that most endodontic students possess very little formal educational training, they perceive a strong need for it, and that they desire more training in evaluation/testing methods. (MLW)

  7. Regenerative Endodontic Procedures: A Perspective from Stem Cell Niche Biology.

    PubMed

    Marí-Beffa, Manuel; Segura-Egea, Juan José; Díaz-Cuenca, Aránzazu

    2017-01-01

    Endodontics uses cell therapy strategies to treat pulpal and periapical diseases. During these therapies, surgeons aim to reconstruct the natural microenvironments that regulate the activity of dental stem cells. We searched for more than 400 articles in PubMed using key words from regenerative endodontics and dental stem cell biology. In 268 articles, we reviewed what factors may influence histologic results after preclinical dental treatments that use regenerative endodontic procedures after pulpectomy. Several factors, such as the origin of stem cells, the biomimicry of scaffolds used, and the size of lesions, are considered to influence the histologic appearance of the regenerated pulp-dentin complex after treatments. Information is accumulating on transcription factors that generate the pulp-dentin complex and survival/trophic factors that would benefit niche recovery and histologic results. In this article, we discuss the noninterchangeability of stem cells, the influence of dentin-entrapped molecule release on pulp regeneration and survival of stem cells, and the need of positional markers to assess treatments histologically. The ex vivo amplification of appropriate dental stem cells, the search for scaffolds storing the molecular diversity entrapped in the dentin, and the use of positional transcription factors as histologic markers are necessary to improve future preclinical experiments. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Healing of apical periodontitis through modern endodontic retreatment techniques.

    PubMed

    Ray, Jarom J; Kirkpatrick, Timothy C

    2013-01-01

    The presence of apical periodontitis in teeth which have undergone initial root canal treatment is largely attributed to bacteria residing in or invading from the apical root canal space. Bacteria-associated apical periodontitis will not heal spontaneously, nor will systemic antibiotics eradicate the infection. Only endodontic retreatment, endodontic surgery, or extraction will control the bacterial etiology. Modern retreatment is an effective means of addressing apical periodontitis. A mandibular premolar with apical periodontitis, apical root resorption, and overfilled gutta percha was retreated with post removal, retrieval of gutta percha from beyond the apex, ultrasonic irrigation and disinfection, and placement of a collagen internal matrix to facilitate a well-controlled MTA apical fill. The magnification and illumination imparted by the operating microscope was integral to achievement of treatment objectives. The patient's symptoms were resolved and complete osseous healing occurred. During treatment planning, clinicians should consider the capability of modern endodontic techniques to overcome technical challenges, often allowing the natural dentition to be preserved and restored to function days after retreatment.

  9. 21 CFR 872.3830 - Endodontic paper point.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Endodontic paper point. 872.3830 Section 872.3830...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3830 Endodontic paper point. (a) Identification. An endodontic paper point is a device made of paper intended for use during endodontic therapy to dry...

  10. 21 CFR 872.3830 - Endodontic paper point.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Endodontic paper point. 872.3830 Section 872.3830...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3830 Endodontic paper point. (a) Identification. An endodontic paper point is a device made of paper intended for use during endodontic therapy to dry...

  11. 21 CFR 872.3840 - Endodontic silver point.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Endodontic silver point. 872.3840 Section 872.3840...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3840 Endodontic silver point. (a) Identification. An endodontic silver point is a device made of silver intended for use during endodontic therapy...

  12. 21 CFR 872.3840 - Endodontic silver point.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Endodontic silver point. 872.3840 Section 872.3840...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3840 Endodontic silver point. (a) Identification. An endodontic silver point is a device made of silver intended for use during endodontic therapy...

  13. 21 CFR 872.3840 - Endodontic silver point.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Endodontic silver point. 872.3840 Section 872.3840...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3840 Endodontic silver point. (a) Identification. An endodontic silver point is a device made of silver intended for use during endodontic therapy...

  14. 21 CFR 872.3840 - Endodontic silver point.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Endodontic silver point. 872.3840 Section 872.3840...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3840 Endodontic silver point. (a) Identification. An endodontic silver point is a device made of silver intended for use during endodontic therapy...

  15. 21 CFR 872.3840 - Endodontic silver point.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Endodontic silver point. 872.3840 Section 872.3840...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3840 Endodontic silver point. (a) Identification. An endodontic silver point is a device made of silver intended for use during endodontic therapy...

  16. 21 CFR 872.6730 - Endodontic dry heat sterilizer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Endodontic dry heat sterilizer. 872.6730 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6730 Endodontic dry heat sterilizer. (a) Identification. An endodontic dry heat sterilizer is a device intended to sterilize endodontic...

  17. 21 CFR 872.6730 - Endodontic dry heat sterilizer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Endodontic dry heat sterilizer. 872.6730 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6730 Endodontic dry heat sterilizer. (a) Identification. An endodontic dry heat sterilizer is a device intended to sterilize endodontic...

  18. 21 CFR 872.6730 - Endodontic dry heat sterilizer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Endodontic dry heat sterilizer. 872.6730 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6730 Endodontic dry heat sterilizer. (a) Identification. An endodontic dry heat sterilizer is a device intended to sterilize endodontic...

  19. 21 CFR 872.6730 - Endodontic dry heat sterilizer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Endodontic dry heat sterilizer. 872.6730 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6730 Endodontic dry heat sterilizer. (a) Identification. An endodontic dry heat sterilizer is a device intended to sterilize endodontic...

  20. 21 CFR 872.6730 - Endodontic dry heat sterilizer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Endodontic dry heat sterilizer. 872.6730 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6730 Endodontic dry heat sterilizer. (a) Identification. An endodontic dry heat sterilizer is a device intended to sterilize endodontic...

  1. Laser applications in endodontics: an update review.

    PubMed

    Mohammadi, Zahed

    2009-02-01

    The search for new devices and technologies for endodontic procedures always has been challenging. Since the development of the ruby laser by Maiman in 1960 and the application of the laser for endodontics by Weichman in 1971, a variety of potential applications for lasers in endodontics have been proposed. With the development of thinner, more flexible and durable laser fibres, laser applications in endodontics have increased. Since laser devices are still relatively costly, access to them is limited. The purpose of this paper is to summarise laser applications in endodontics, including their use in pulp diagnosis, dentinal hypersensitivity, pulp capping and pulpotomy, sterilisation of root canals, root canal shaping and obturation and apicectomy. The effects of lasers on root canal walls and periodontal tissues are also reviewed.

  2. Interim endodontic therapy for alveolar socket bone regeneration of infected hopeless teeth prior to implant therapy.

    PubMed

    Rass, Marwan Abou

    2010-01-01

    The immediate placement of implants in the fresh extraction sockets of infected teeth with periradicular and periapical lesions is contraindicated because of both the infection and the loss of architecture required for proper implant placement. There are 4 approaches for implant replacement of a hopeless tooth with lesions: (1) extraction and delayed implant placement; (2) extraction, debridement, guided bone regeneration (GBR), guided tissue regeneration (GTR), and delayed implant placement; (3) extraction, intrasocket debridement, and immediate implant placement; or (4) extraction, debridement, GBR, GTR, and simultaneous implant placement. The extraction of such hopeless teeth often results in large bone and soft tissue defects that are difficult to repair. This article introduces an alternative approach: interim endodontic implant site preparation, defined as a transitional, surgical, or nonsurgical endodontic treatment to regenerate the hopeless tooth bone defects and prepare the site for proper implant placement. This article describes 3 distinct interim endodontic protocols used to manage 5 patients, all of whom had severely infected hopeless teeth with large lesions and were treatment planned for implant replacement: the first, interim nonsurgical endodontic treatment to restore the normal anatomy of the infected hopeless tooth; the second, interim surgical endodontics on the hopeless tooth with preexisting endodontic treatment to regenerate apical bone for primary implant stability, thus avoiding the involvement of the maxillary sinus and other critical anatomic structures; and the third, interim surgical endodontics on the hopeless tooth with preexisting endodontic treatment to confine the size of the osseous defect and simplify the GBR and GTR procedures. The outcome of interim endodontic treatment on these 5 patients demonstrated that tooth extraction would have been a less predictable approach. The interim treatment changed the overall direction of the

  3. Dentin permeability: effects of endodontic procedures on root slabs.

    PubMed

    Fogel, H M; Pashley, D H

    1990-09-01

    The permeability of human radicular dentin was measured as a hydraulic conductance before and after treatment with K files and before and after subsequent treatment of the endodontic smear layer with NaOCl, 50% citric acid, or 3% monopotassium-monohydrogen oxalate. Filing reduced dentin permeability 25 to 49%, respectively, depending upon whether outer or inner root dentin was filed. The permeability of these smear layers was unaffected by 5% NaOCl but increased many times after treatment with 50% citric acid for 2 min. Oxalate treatment lowered root dentin permeability to levels below that produced by creation of smear layers due to the production of a crystalline precipitate.

  4. Er:YAG laser for endodontics: efficiency and safety

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hibst, Raimund; Stock, Karl; Gall, Robert; Keller, Ulrich

    1997-12-01

    Recently it has been shown that bacterias can be sterilized by Er:YAG laser irradiation. By optical fiber transmission the bactericidal effect can also be used in endodontics. In order to explore potential laser parameters, we further investigated sterilization of caries and measured temperatures in models simulating endodontic treatment. It was found out that the bactericidal effect is cumulative, with single pulses being active. This offers to choose all laser parameters except pulse energy (radiant exposure) from technical, practical or safety considerations. For clinical studies the following parameter set is proposed for efficient and safe application (teeth with a root wall thickness > 1 mm, and prepared up to ISO 50): pulse energy: 50 mJ, repetition rate: 15 Hz, fiber withdrawal velocity: 2 mm/s. With these settings 4 passes must be performed to accumulate the total dose for sterilization.

  5. Rotary endodontics in primary teeth – A review

    PubMed Central

    George, Sageena; Anandaraj, S.; Issac, Jyoti S.; John, Sheen A.; Harris, Anoop

    2015-01-01

    Endodontic treatment in primary teeth can be challenging and time consuming, especially during canal preparation, which is considered one of the most important steps in root canal therapy. The conventional instrumentation technique for primary teeth remains the “gold-standard” over hand instrumentation, which makes procedures much more time consuming and adversely affects both clinicians and patients. Recently nickel–titanium (Ni–Ti) rotary files have been developed for use in pediatric endodontics. Using rotary instruments for primary tooth pulpectomies is cost effective and results in fills that are consistently uniform and predictable. This article reviews the use of nickel–titanium rotary files as root canal instrumentation in primary teeth. The pulpectomy technique is described here according to different authors and the advantages and disadvantages of using rotary files are discussed. PMID:26792964

  6. Diagnosis demystified: CT as diagnostic tool in endodontics.

    PubMed

    Shruthi, Nagaraja; Murthy, B V Sreenivasa; Sundaresh, K J; Mallikarjuna, Rachappa

    2013-06-27

    Diagnosis in endodontics is usually based on clinical and radiographical presentations, which are only empirical methods. The role of healing profession is to apply knowledge and skills towards maintaining and restoring the patient's health. Recent advances in imaging technologies have added to correct interpretation and diagnosis. CT is proving to be an effective tool in solving endodontic mysteries through its three-dimensional visualisation. CT imaging offers many diagnostic advantages to produce reconstructed images in selected projection and low-contrast resolution far superior to that of all other X-ray imaging modalities. This case report is an endeavour towards effective treatment planning of cases with root fracture, root resorption using spiral CT as an adjuvant diagnostic tool.

  7. Diagnosis demystified: CT as diagnostic tool in endodontics

    PubMed Central

    Shruthi, Nagaraja; Sreenivasa Murthy, B V; Sundaresh, K J; Mallikarjuna, Rachappa

    2013-01-01

    Diagnosis in endodontics is usually based on clinical and radiographical presentations, which are only empirical methods. The role of healing profession is to apply knowledge and skills towards maintaining and restoring the patient's health. Recent advances in imaging technologies have added to correct interpretation and diagnosis. CT is proving to be an effective tool in solving endodontic mysteries through its three-dimensional visualisation. CT imaging offers many diagnostic advantages to produce reconstructed images in selected projection and low-contrast resolution far superior to that of all other X-ray imaging modalities. This case report is an endeavour towards effective treatment planning of cases with root fracture, root resorption using spiral CT as an adjuvant diagnostic tool. PMID:23814212

  8. Nonsurgical endodontic retreatment of geminated teeth: a case report.

    PubMed

    Yücel, Ali Cağin; Güler, Eda

    2006-12-01

    The purpose of this case presentation is to describe nonsurgical retreatment of anterior teeth with gemination. A 21-year-old male patient was referred for endodontic treatment of his maxillary left lateral incisor. In the clinical examination, a large crown was observed in the left maxillary incisor region when compared with the right maxillary lateral incisor. In the present case, a tooth gemination of a maxillary lateral incisor has been described. A periapical radiograph showed that the tooth had partially separated two crowns having a single root and one root canal, but the access cavity of the distal crown had not been opened, and the root canal had been obturated with single cone technique. Nonsurgical endodontic retreatment was decided for geminated lateral incisor. At the 6-month follow-up, the tooth was asymptomatic and there was no radiolucency around the apical region.

  9. A New Classification of Endodontic-Periodontal Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Al-Fouzan, Khalid S.

    2014-01-01

    The interrelationship between periodontal and endodontic disease has always aroused confusion, queries, and controversy. Differentiating between a periodontal and an endodontic problem can be difficult. A symptomatic tooth may have pain of periodontal and/or pulpal origin. The nature of that pain is often the first clue in determining the etiology of such a problem. Radiographic and clinical evaluation can help clarify the nature of the problem. In some cases, the influence of pulpal pathology may cause the periodontal involvement and vice versa. The simultaneous existence of pulpal problems and inflammatory periodontal disease can complicate diagnosis and treatment planning. An endo-perio lesion can have a varied pathogenesis which ranges from simple to relatively complex one. The differential diagnosis of endodontic and periodontal diseases can sometimes be difficult, but it is of vital importance to make a correct diagnosis for providing the appropriate treatment. This paper aims to discuss a modified clinical classification to be considered for accurately diagnosing and treating endo-perio lesion. PMID:24829580

  10. A survey of endodontic practices among dentists in Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Udoye, Christopher I; Sede, Matthew A; Jafarzadeh, Hamid; Abbott, Paul V

    2013-03-01

    To investigate the pattern of routine endodontic practices among Nigerian dentists. This study was a questionnaire-based survey of samples of dentists in the Nigerian cities of Enugu and Benin. The self-administered questionnaire contained 25 close-ended questions with multiple choice options. The data collected included demographic details of respondents, root canal preparation techniques, irrigants and intracanal medicaments used, the number of appointments, method of working length determination, root filling techniques, cements used, and the scope of treatment performed. Most respondents used sodium hypochlorite as the irrigant, the step back technique for canal preparation, and lateral condensation with a zinc oxide-eugenol-based sealer for obturation. Most respondents did root canal treatment on all types of teeth and used radiographs to determine the working length 70% of the time. Most respondents followed up their patients for less than 12 months and most treated teeth with periapical areas larger than 10 mm by root canal therapy combined with apical surgery. Most Nigerian dentists use step back technique for canal preparation and lateral condensation for obturation. Endodontic practice by Nigerian dentists differs from some established practice quality guidelines in many other countries, particularly in nonperfusion of modern techniques into practice, popularity of antibiotic use for endodontic emergencies and a high rate of perforations.

  11. Prophylactic intraligamentary injection of piroxicam (feldene) for the management of post-endodontic pain in molar teeth with irreversible pulpitis.

    PubMed

    Atbaei, Adnan; Mortazavi, Nazanin

    2012-04-01

    The purpose of this prospective research was to evaluate the post-endodontic pain-reducing effect of piroxicam (feldene), a non-selective non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug. Pain following endodontic treatment is often linked to the inflammatory process as well as additional central mechanisms. The effects of intraligamentary injection of piroxicam have not previously been studied. Sixty-five patients with irreversible pulpitis were randomly divided into two groups. The active group received intraligamentary injections totalling 0.4 mL of piroxicam, while the placebo group received the same amount of lidocaine. One-appointment endodontic therapy was performed by a single endodontist. Visual Analogue Scale was used to record pain before treatment and 4, 8, 12, 24 and 48 h postoperatively. The decrease in the intensity of post-treatment pain between the two groups was very significant. Intraligamentary injection of piroxicam can be considered an effective method for reducing post-endodontic pain.

  12. Mechanical and ultrastructural evaluation of quartz post-endodontic reconstructions.

    PubMed

    Majori, M; Bedini, R; Altamura, C; Filippini, P; Caiazza, S

    2004-01-01

    Aesthetics is a very important element in dentistry, but requires the support of good mechanical performance. Quartz fiber used in post-endodontic reconstruction is an aesthetic material, although there is little research concerning its mechanical properties. This study evaluated the retentive property of post-endodontic reconstruction, composed of a quartz fiber post. Different thermal stresses were applied in vitro to post-endodontic reconstructions, in order to simulate oral thermal action on post-system dental structure linkage. We chose 30 human extracted teeth, endodontically treated and restored, and then divided them into three groups of 10 teeth. A different treatment was applied to each group before mechanical testing: in the 1st group no treatment was done (controls); in the 2nd group teeth were subjected, in a climatic chamber, to 10 thermo-cycles between 4 degrees C and 58 degrees C; in the 3rd group teeth were stored in a saline solution at 37 degrees C for 48 hr. The teeth then underwent tensile shear stress tests at break point using a computerized electronic dynamometer. After mechanical testing, two teeth from each group were longitudinally half-sectioned, sputter-coated in gold and observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The extracted quartz fiber post of each tooth also underwent SEM observation. Mechanical test results demonstrated that thermal cyclic variations could affect bond stability between dental structures and posts in quartz fiber reconstructions, whereas their bond strength seemed unaffected by humidity increases. Quartz fiber post SEM observation demonstrated a homogeneous structure and a regular fiber disposition. Dental root canal morphology SEM images always showed a different thickness in the cement layer. (Journal of Applied Biomaterials & Biomechanics 2004; 2: 156-61).

  13. Electromagnetic interference of endodontic equipments with cardiovascular implantable electronic device.

    PubMed

    Dadalti, Manoela Teixeira de Sant'Anna; da Cunha, Antônio José Ledo Alves; de Araújo, Marcos César Pimenta; de Moraes, Luis Gustavo Belo; Risso, Patrícia de Andrade

    2016-03-01

    Assess the electromagnetic interference (EMI) of endodontic equipment with cardiovascular implantable electronic devices (CIEDs) and related factors. The laser device, electronic apex locators (EAL), optical microscope, endodontic rotary motors, gutta-percha heat carrier (GH), gutta-percha gun and ultrasonic device were tested next to CIEDs (Medtronic and Biotronik) with varied sensitivity settings and distances. CIEDs were immersed in a saline solution to simulate the electrical resistence of the human body. The endodontic equipment was tested in both horizontal and vertical positions in relation to the components of the CIED. The tests were performed on a dental chair in order to assess the cumulative effect of electromagnetic fields. It was found no EMI with the Biotronik pacemaker. EALs caused EMI with Medtronic PM at a 2 cm distance, with the NSK(®) EAL also affecting the Medtronic defibrillator. GH caused EMI at 2 cm and 5 cm from the Medtronic defibrillator. EMI occurred when devices were horizontally positioned to the CIED. In the majority of the cases, EMI occurred when the pacemaker was set to maximum sensitivity. There was cumulative effect of electromagnetic fields between GH and dental chair. EALs and GH caused EMI which ranged according to type and sensitivity setting of the CIEDs and the distance. However, no endodontic equipment caused permanent damage to the CIED. The use of GH caused a cumulative effect of electromagnetic fields. It suggests that during the treatment of patients with CIEDs, only the necessary equipments should be kept turned on. Patients with CIEDs may be subject to EMI from electronic equipment used in dental offices, as they remain turned on throughout the treatment. This is the first article assessing the cumulative effect of electromagnetic fields. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  14. Regenerative Endodontics by Cell Homing.

    PubMed

    He, Ling; Zhong, Juan; Gong, Qimei; Cheng, Bin; Kim, Sahng G; Ling, Junqi; Mao, Jeremy J

    2017-01-01

    Apical revascularization (AR) and platelet-rich plasma have been used to restore dental pulp vitality in infected immature permanent teeth. Two regenerative therapies are cell transplantation and cell homing. This article updates and benchmarks these therapies with cell homing. A case report concluded that AR increased root length; however, quantitative and statistical assessments disproved this. Regenerative endodontic therapies require prospective clinical trials demonstrating safety and efficacy. These therapies are intrinsically susceptible to procedural and patient variations. Cell homing uses novel molecules that drive therapeutic efficacy, and may be less sensitive to procedural and patient variations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Endodontic therapy of a mandibular third molar with 5 canals: a case report.

    PubMed

    Silberman, Adrian; Heilborn, Carlos; Cohenca, Nestor

    2009-06-01

    Endodontic treatment of third molars often becomes part of comprehensive treatment plans, as it represents a more conservative and less invasive approach than its therapeutic alternatives. The frequency of anatomic variations in mandibular molars, particularly root canal configuration, requires 2 periapical radiographs from different angles. Upon reading and interpretation of the radiographs, the clinician should consider the anatomy and level of difficulty of the endodontic procedure and refer the patient to an endodontist, if deemed necessary. The present article discusses the successful treatment and preservation of a mandibular third molar with 5 root canals, as well as methods for its clinical management.

  16. Clinical Approach of High Technology Techniques for Control and Elimination of Endodontic Microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Chiniforush, Nasim; Pourhajibagher, Maryam; Shahabi, Sima; Bahador, Abbas

    2015-01-01

    The main goal in endodontic treatment is to eradicate or at least reduce intraradicular microbial population to levels that are more compatible with periapical lesions healing process. Since endodontic infections are polymicrobial in nature, intraradicular survival of endodontic microbiota and their pathogenic properties are influenced by a combination of their virulence factors. The purpose of this article is to review the endodontic microbiota and their respective virulence attributes, as well as perform a literature review of the effects of disinfection procedures in the treatment of endodontic infections to gain best practices. Conventional technique for root canal preparation includes mechanical debridement and application of antimicrobial irrigants. Recently, laser irradiation has been used to enhance the results of root canal treatment through its thermal effect. To reduce thermal side effects, laser activated irrigation (LAI) and photon induced photoacoustic streaming (PIPS) were introduced. Antimicrobial photodynamic therapy (aPDT) by photochemical reaction uses light at a specific wavelength to activate a nontoxic photosensitizer (PS) in the presence of oxygen to produce cytotoxic products. Different PSs are used in dentistry including methylene blue (MB), toluidine blue O (TBO), indocyanine green (ICG) and curcumin. Among different options, ICG could be the best choice due to its peak absorption at wavelength of 808 nm, which coincides with the commercial diode laser devices. Also, this wavelength has more penetration depth compared to other wavelengths used in aPDT. PMID:26705458

  17. Restoration of fractured endodontically treated mandibular first molar using custom made cast post and core.

    PubMed

    Guruprasada

    2015-07-01

    The successful treatment of posterior tooth with substantial damage to the tooth structure not only depends on root canal treatment but also by prompt restoration of lost coronal tooth structure. Endodontically treated teeth undergo loss of tooth substance due to dental caries, endodontic therapy or previous restoration and changes in physical characteristics, such as a reduced modulus of elasticity, which often leads to increased fracture susceptibility when compared to unrestored vital teeth.(1) Restoration of endodontically treated posterior teeth is more challenging because of their additional functional requirements. The restorative treatment of such teeth includes the decision of whether or not a post should be used. Post is a dental material placed in the root of structurally insufficient tooth when additional retention is needed to retain the core and coronal restoration.(2,3) However, preparation of a post space adds a certain degree of risk to restorative procedure like perforations and root fracture, especially if an over sized post channel is prepared.

  18. Paradigm Shift from Stem Cells to Cell-Free Regenerative Endodontic Procedures: A Critical Review.

    PubMed

    Žižka, Radovan; Šedý, Jiří

    2017-02-01

    Regenerative endodontic procedures of immature teeth with necrotic pulp have become a part of therapeutic endodontic spectrum and are considered as an alternative to calcium hydroxide or mineral trioxide aggregate apexification. In last decade, numerous case reports and series with usage of cell-free approaches known as revascularization, revitalization, or maturogenesis have been published. This cell-free approach prevails in clinical regenerative endodontics because of its relative ease of performance, lower financial demands, and absence of complications such as tumorigenesis of used stem cells. In this article, the integral steps of cell-free treatment approaches such as source of stem cells, possible endogenous scaffolds, sources of growth factors, and width of apical foramen in the context of sufficient disinfection of root canal system and outcome of treatment are discussed. Despite not being a fully established treatment protocol, the achieved outcomes are promising regardless of it having a reparative character than a regenerative one.

  19. MTA monoblock obturation technique in endodontic retreatment.

    PubMed

    Iqbal, Zahid; Qureshi, Abdul Hakeem

    2014-11-01

    A 48-year-old male patient presented to the Department of Endodontics for evaluation of right first permanent molar, which had received non-surgical root canal treatment two years ago and was restored with core material. The presenting symptoms included swelling in the buccal vestibule and pain overnight. Clinical examination demonstrated that the mandibular right first molar was sensitive to percussion and also showed fluctuant swelling in the vestibule proximal to the molar and mild mobility. Radiographic examination revealed a poor quality obturation of the mesial and distal root, distal root resorption, extensive periapical and furcation radiolucency and bone loss. A diagnosis of acute periapical abscess of the mandibular right first molar was made. Tooth was treated non-surgically by the manual application of MTA in the root canal. Follow-up evaluation was performed at one year after the treatment. Clinically, treatment was considered successful due to the absence of clinical signs, symptoms and radiographic appearance with substantial reduction (more than 50%) in the diameter of the periapical radiolucency. Mineral trioxide aggregate monoblock obturation technique appears to be a valid technique to obtain periradicular healing in re-treatment of previously root canal treated teeth with periapical lesion.

  20. Polymerase chain reaction detection of Propionibacterium propionicus and Actinomyces radicidentis in primary and persistent endodontic infections.

    PubMed

    Siqueira, José F; Rôças, Isabela N

    2003-08-01

    Propionibacterium propionicus and the recently described species Actinomyces radicidentis have been isolated from infections of endodontic origin; nevertheless, the possibility exists that their actual prevalence may have been underestimated by culture. The purpose of our study was to assess the occurrence of these 2 species in different types of endodontic infections by using the sensitive 16S rDNA-based nested polymerase chain reaction approach. To detect these 2 species, nested polymerase chain reaction was performed directly in samples taken from primary endodontic infections associated with asymptomatic periradicular lesions, acute apical periodontitis, or acute periradicular abscesses and in samples from patients in whom endodontic therapy had failed. DNA was extracted from the samples and initially amplified by using universal 16S rDNA primers. In the second round of amplification, the first polymerase chain reaction products were used to detect a specific 16S rDNA fragment of either P propionicus or A radicidentis. P propionicus was detected in 6/21 (29%) root canal samples from teeth with chronic periradicular lesions, in 5/10 (50%) cases diagnosed as acute apical periodontitis, and in 7/19 (37%) pus samples aspirated from acute periradicular abscesses. Overall, this species was found in 18/50 (36%) samples taken from primary endodontic infections. Of the root canal samples obtained from root-filled teeth with chronic periradicular lesions, P propionicus was detected in 7/12 (58%) cases. A radicidentis was detected in 1/21 (5%) root canal samples from teeth with chronic periradicular lesions and in 1/10 (10%) cases of acute apical periodontitis. No pus sample yielded this species. In general, A radicidentis was detected in 2/50 (4%) samples taken from primary endodontic infections and in 1/12 (8%) root canal samples taken from patients in whom endodontic treatment had failed. P propionicus was found in a relatively large number of patients with primary and

  1. Biomimetic endodontics: the final evolution?

    PubMed

    Clark, David J

    2007-07-01

    We are seeing a gradual evolution by a small but growing number of endodontists and general dentists toward delicate biomimetic, microscope-based shaping. This old-fashioned respect for periradicular dentin is paired with microscopes, ultrasonics, and an appreciation for root morphology. Although no 2 roots are the same, general anatomic patterns allow the microscope-equipped clinician to search for major pulpal regions that will yield a high probability of cleaning and shaping the clinically available pulpal zones. There are complex, anatomically improbable, and clinically impossible areas of pulp that are beyond the reach of even the most gifted hands. Regardless, the clinician has the responsibility to begin each procedure seeking perfection and joyfully finishing with excellence. The shapes that were introduced during the Schilder (crown-down) era have served as a transitional technique to allow the first real 3-dimensional compaction of gutta-percha. Nonetheless, endodontics is in the end a restoratively driven procedure. Large, arbitrary, round shapes create beautiful endodontics but can dramatically weaken the tooth. The shaping philosophy advanced in this treatise allows perfectly adequate shapes to achieve the hydraulics needed for modern obturation. It will require different skills and materials to shape, pack, and restore the exotic architecture of nature. (See Tables 1 to 3.).

  2. [Nonsurgical micro-endodontics and its outcome].

    PubMed

    Ling, Jun-qi; Wei, Xi

    2006-02-01

    The introduction of dental operating microscope and microscopic instruments including ultrasonic tips has revealed the endodontic therapy. Dental operating microscope provides magnification and illumination for the operational area. Cases which should be treated by surgical approach in the past can be managed predictably by nonsurgical micro-endodontics. The use of dental operating microscope and ultrasonics in non-surgical endodontics includes location of missed canal, removal of intracanal post and separated instruments, negotiation of ledged canals, management of apical transportation and perforation repair.

  3. Endoscope- and video-assisted endodontic surgery.

    PubMed

    von Arx, Thomas; Hunenbart, Stefan; Buser, Daniel

    2002-04-01

    Since the introduction of microsurgical principles in the 1990s, the field of endodontic surgery has made continuous and substantial progress. Particularly, root-end cavity preparation has been simplified and optimized by means of newly developed surgical microinstruments. However, the successful outcome of endodontic surgery depends to a large extent on accurate intraoperative diagnostics. Conventionally, micromirrors (retromirrors) and microprobes have been used for this purpose. Recently, the surgical microscope has been used to enhance visibility during dental procedures. In addition, endoscopy has been reported to provide the surgeon with outstanding vision and ease of use. This article describes the technical specifications and the diagnostic application of the endoscope during endodontic surgery.

  4. Endodontic retreatment: an online study guide.

    PubMed

    2008-05-01

    The Editorial Board of the Journal of Endodontics has developed a literature-based study guide of topical areas related to endodontics. This study guide is intended to give the reader a focused review of the essential endodontic literature and does not cite all possible articles related to each topic. Although citing all articles would be comprehensive, it would defeat the idea of a study guide. This section will cover retreatment rationale, corrosion of silver points, retreatment techniques, removal of posts, and possible complications during retreatment.

  5. Standardisation of sheep model for endodontic regeneration/revitalisation research.

    PubMed

    Altaii, Milad; Broberg, Marita; Cathro, Peter; Richards, Lindsay

    2016-05-01

    Different endodontic regeneration/revitalisation protocols have been suggested for the treatment of immature permanent teeth with pulp necrosis. Many aspects of these protocols require further investigating necessitating a suitable standardised animal model for research purposes. The focus of this study was to examine the anatomy and histology of sheep teeth at different stages of development to find an appropriate dental age for endodontic regeneration/revitalisation research. Sheep teeth at mature and immature dental ages were investigated. Standardized radiography, computed tomography, and histology were used to measure root length, apical-third dentine thickness and apex diameter, and to evaluate tissue development stages. A mature sheep tooth has an apical area which consists of a major foramen, intermediate dilatation and minor foramen. From the time of eruption to maturation no major changes occur in the incisor root lengths, but the apical foramen width decreases and the dentinal wall thickness increases. The two-tooth age exhibited the most similar features to that of an immature permanent human tooth. Sheep appears to be an appropriate animal model for endodontic regeneration/revitalization research with similar dimension and characteristics to human anterior teeth. Each dental age has its advantages and disadvantages. The two-tooth age showed the most favourable criteria making this age the most suitable for in vivo regeneration/revitalisation research. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  6. Antibacterial and antifungal activity of endodontic intracanal medications.

    PubMed

    Tonea, Andrada; Badea, Mandra; Oana, Liviu; Sava, Sorina; Vodnar, Dan

    2017-01-01

    The sterilization of the entire root canal system represents the main goal of every endodontist, given the fact that the control of the microbial flora is the key point of every root canal treatment. The diversity of microorganisms found inside the root canal and also the resistance of some bacterial species to intracanal medications led to a continuous development of new endodontic products. The present study focuses on the comparison of the antibacterial and antifungal properties of different endodontic products, two commercially available, one experimental plant based extract, and two control substances. The disc diffusion assay was used to determine the antibacterial and antifungal properties of chlorhexidine, calcium hydroxide, a mix extract between Arctium lappa root powder and Aloe barbadensis Miller gel, Amoxicillin with clavulanic acid and Fluconazole (as control substances). Two of the most common microorganisms found in endodontic infections were chosen: Enterococcus faecalis (ATCC 29212) and Candida albicans ATCC(10231). All tested substances showed inhibition zones around the discs, for Enterococcus faecalis and Candida albicans, including the experimental mix extract of Arctium lappa root powder with Aloe vera gel. The experimental mix extract of Arctium lappa root powder and Aloe vera gel is able to inhibit very resistant microorganisms, like Enterococcus faecalis and Candida albicans.

  7. Antibacterial and antifungal activity of endodontic intracanal medications

    PubMed Central

    TONEA, ANDRADA; BADEA, MANDRA; OANA, LIVIU; SAVA, SORINA; VODNAR, DAN

    2017-01-01

    Background and aims The sterilization of the entire root canal system represents the main goal of every endodontist, given the fact that the control of the microbial flora is the key point of every root canal treatment. The diversity of microorganisms found inside the root canal and also the resistance of some bacterial species to intracanal medications led to a continuous development of new endodontic products. The present study focuses on the comparison of the antibacterial and antifungal properties of different endodontic products, two commercially available, one experimental plant based extract, and two control substances. Methods The disc diffusion assay was used to determine the antibacterial and antifungal properties of chlorhexidine, calcium hydroxide, a mix extract between Arctium lappa root powder and Aloe barbadensis Miller gel, Amoxicillin with clavulanic acid and Fluconazole (as control substances). Two of the most common microorganisms found in endodontic infections were chosen: Enterococcus faecalis (ATCC 29212) and Candida albicans ATCC(10231). Results All tested substances showed inhibition zones around the discs, for Enterococcus faecalis and Candida albicans, including the experimental mix extract of Arctium lappa root powder with Aloe vera gel. Conclusion The experimental mix extract of Arctium lappa root powder and Aloe vera gel is able to inhibit very resistant microorganisms, like Enterococcus faecalis and Candida albicans. PMID:28781531

  8. The frequency of medically compromised patients in endodontic offices in iran.

    PubMed

    Parirokh, Masoud; Eghbal, Mohammad Jafar; Ghoddusi, Jamileh; Kakoei, Shahla; Haghdoost, Ali Akbar; Kakooei, Sina

    2013-01-01

    As the result of epidemiological transition and aging of Iranian population, the frequencies of systemic diseases among patients in of need endodontic treatment has increased, especially within developed cities. However, there have been no concise reports of systemic diseases in Iranian patients. Based on this need, the present investigation was conducted to assess the frequency of systemic disease among patients referred to endodontic private practice in three main cities in Iran. In a retrospective study, the frequency of systematic diseases were abstracted from the health records of patients who were referred to three private practices limited to endodontics in Kerman, Mashhad, and Tehran between 1994 to 2011. Overall, 15,413 records of patients were assessed. The patterns of systematic diseases among endodontic patients in these three cities were different. The overall frequency of systemic disease in Kerman was significantly higher than two other cities (Kerman: 55.03%, Mashhad: 24.32%, Tehran: 22.16%; P<0.001). The most commonly occurring diseases were cardiac disease, hypertension, allergy and neurological disorders. Since the number of endodontic patients with systematic diseases is considerably significant and varied, special training and educations for treatment of medically compromised patient should be considered at both post- and undergraduate training.

  9. The Frequency of Medically Compromised Patients in Endodontic Offices in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Parirokh, Masoud; Eghbal, Mohammad Jafar; Ghoddusi, Jamileh; Kakoei, Shahla; Haghdoost, Ali Akbar; Kakooei, Sina

    2013-01-01

    Introduction As the result of epidemiological transition and aging of Iranian population, the frequencies of systemic diseases among patients in of need endodontic treatment has increased, especially within developed cities. However, there have been no concise reports of systemic diseases in Iranian patients. Based on this need, the present investigation was conducted to assess the frequency of systemic disease among patients referred to endodontic private practice in three main cities in Iran. Materials and Methods In a retrospective study, the frequency of systematic diseases were abstracted from the health records of patients who were referred to three private practices limited to endodontics in Kerman, Mashhad, and Tehran between 1994 to 2011. Results Overall, 15,413 records of patients were assessed. The patterns of systematic diseases among endodontic patients in these three cities were different. The overall frequency of systemic disease in Kerman was significantly higher than two other cities (Kerman: 55.03%, Mashhad: 24.32%, Tehran: 22.16%; P<0.001). The most commonly occurring diseases were cardiac disease, hypertension, allergy and neurological disorders. Conclusion Since the number of endodontic patients with systematic diseases is considerably significant and varied, special training and educations for treatment of medically compromised patient should be considered at both post- and undergraduate training. PMID:23717328

  10. Nonsurgical Management of an Extensive Endodontic Periapical Lesion: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Moshari, Amirabbas; Vatanpour, Mehdi; EsnaAshari, Ehsan; Zakershahrak, Mehrsa; Jalali Ara, Afsoon

    2017-01-01

    Long-term success of endodontic treatment is dependent on adequate and appropriate cleaning and shaping of the root canal along with proper and correct obturation of the entire prepared space. This article aims to report an exceptional non-surgical and orthograde endodontic treatment of maxillary right central incisor with an extensive radiolucent lesion in a 17-year-old male. Six and 20-month follow-ups showed significant changes, including bone formation and periapical healing within the lesion. The patient was asymptomatic. After 20 months, complete radiographic and clinical healing of the periapical lesion was observed. PMID:28179937

  11. Bilateral Radicular Cyst with Severe Destruction of the Buccal Cortical Plate Secondary to Endodontic Failure.

    PubMed

    Ghafoor, Robia; Rehman, Kiran

    2016-04-01

    Large apical radiolucencies after endodontic treatment are usually advised orthograde retreatment, apical surgery and that too with a guarded prognosis. Microsurgical techniques, the use of ultrasonic and magnification aides, have been in use in the developed countries for the past few decades and have shown significant improvement in long-term success of such cases. MTA is proposed as one of the best materials for sealing root end surfaces. In this report, the healing response of cases of 2 large apical radiolucencies, found separately in the anterior maxilla, which were treated by orthograde as well as retrograde endodontic treatments and guided tissue regeneration techniques.

  12. Iatrogenic subcutaneous emphysema of endodontic origin - case report with literature review.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Lora; Patnaik, Swarnav; Patro, Sangram; Debnath, Nitai; Mishra, Satyaranjan

    2014-01-01

    Surgical emphysema is well known and many case reports have been published on this. Many authors have reported this as a complication post dentoalveolar treatment. Diffusion of air into facial planes and periorbital area during endodontic procedures has been rarely reported. The use of three way air syringe and forceful irrigation of root canal can lead to surgical emphysema of subcutaneous tissue planes in and around the teeth which are involved. This case report highlights one such complication seen during endodontic treatment, discusses aetiology, complications and conservative management of this dental office emergency.

  13. Endodontic retreatment of maxillary incisors previously treated with a conventional apexification protocol: a case report.

    PubMed

    Kahler, Bill

    2011-04-01

    This case reports on the treatment of an immature tooth initially treated with calcium hydroxide apexification techniques. When the patient subsequently sought treatment for aesthetic concerns, the presence of apical periodontitis required revision of the endodontic procedure. Resolution of the periapical radiolucency was evident at a 12-month review. The use of mineral trioxide aggregate as an apical filling material and restoration with chemically cured composite resin extending into the coronal third of the root may prevent further contamination of the root canal system and strengthen the tooth. © 2011 The Author. Australian Endodontic Journal © 2011 Australian Society of Endodontology.

  14. Irrigation in endodontics.

    PubMed

    Haapasalo, M; Shen, Y; Wang, Z; Gao, Y

    2014-03-01

    Irrigation is a key part of successful root canal treatment. It has several important functions, which may vary according to the irrigant used: it reduces friction between the instrument and dentine, improves the cutting effectiveness of the files, dissolves tissue, cools the file and tooth, and furthermore, it has a washing effect and an antimicrobial/antibiofilm effect. Irrigation is also the only way to impact those areas of the root canal wall not touched by mechanical instrumentation. Sodium hypochlorite is the main irrigating solution used to dissolve organic matter and kill microbes effectively. High concentration sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) has a better effect than 1 and 2% solutions. Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) is needed as a final rinse to remove the smear layer. Sterile water or saline may be used between these two main irrigants, however, they must not be the only solutions used. The apical root canal imposes a special challenge to irrigation as the balance between safety and effectiveness is particularly important in this area. Different means of delivery are used for root canal irrigation, from traditional syringe-needle delivery to various machine-driven systems, including automatic pumps and sonic or ultrasonic energy.

  15. Postextraction implant in sites with endodontic infection as an alternative to endodontic retreatment: a review of literature.

    PubMed

    Corbella, Stefano; Taschieri, Silvio; Tsesis, Igor; Massimo, Del Fabbro

    2012-05-22

    Abstract Objective: the aim of this literature review was to evaluate the outcomes of implants placed after extraction of teeth with infections of endodontic origin.Study design: an electronic search was performed through electronic databases (Medline and EMBASE) using the terms "immediate implant", "post-extractive implants", "endodontic infection", "infected site", "extraction socket" combined with the use of Boolean operators ("AND" and "OR"). Only articles on human subjects were considered. At least 12 month of mean follow-up was required for inclusion. No restriction was placed regarding study design.Results: Ten studies were included in this review. Survival rates ranged from 92% to 100%. A total of 497 implants were placed in sites with endodontic infection. In nine studies the use of bone substitutes was associated with immediate implant placement.Conclusion: because of the low number of included study and the heterogeneity in study design, more well-designed studies are required in order to assess relevance of this treatment alternative.

  16. Influence of academic training in endodontics and implantology on decision-making in undergraduate students.

    PubMed

    Pineda, Kenneth; Bueno, Rufino; Alvarado, Carlos; Abella, Francesc; Roig, Miguel; Duran-Sindreu, Fernando

    2017-06-23

    To evaluate the effect of academic training on decision-making in a group of undergraduates who have undergone training in endodontics and implantology. A single group of undergraduate dentistry students (n = 65) was given a survey consisting of 15 endodontic cases. Each case included periapical radiographs and clinical photographs. Students were asked to select one of the eight proposed treatments. In their 4th year, the students first responded to the survey after completing endodontics. One year later, after completing their studies in implantology, the same students completed the same survey again. Under the conditions of this study, differences in undergraduate training significantly affected treatment decisions. Undergraduate decision-making was affected by academic training. © 2017 Australian Society of Endodontology Inc.

  17. Root Canal Stripping: Malpractice or Common Procedural Accident—An Ethical Dilemma in Endodontics

    PubMed Central

    Ciobanu, Ionela Elisabeta; Rusu, Darian; Didilescu, Andreea Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Root canal stripping is defined as an oblong, vertical perforation that appears especially in the middle section of curved root canals during endodontic treatments with nickel-titanium (Ni-Ti) instruments. Its occurrence may drastically affect the outcome of the treatment, transforming a common otherwise efficient endodontic procedure into a complication such as tooth extraction. In order to discuss the ethical and legal consequences, two cases of dental strip perforations are herewith presented. Due to the existence of risk factors for dental strip perforation, experience of the clinician and the use of magnification and modern imagistic methods (CBCT) may avoid or reduce the frequency of this type of accidents. Under correct working circumstances, dental stripping should not be regarded as a malpractice but as a procedural accident. However, the patient must always be informed, before and during the endodontic procedure, about the event and the possible complications that may occur. PMID:27672458

  18. Root Canal Stripping: Malpractice or Common Procedural Accident-An Ethical Dilemma in Endodontics.

    PubMed

    Ciobanu, Ionela Elisabeta; Rusu, Darian; Stratul, Stefan-Ioan; Didilescu, Andreea Cristina; Cristache, Corina Marilena

    2016-01-01

    Root canal stripping is defined as an oblong, vertical perforation that appears especially in the middle section of curved root canals during endodontic treatments with nickel-titanium (Ni-Ti) instruments. Its occurrence may drastically affect the outcome of the treatment, transforming a common otherwise efficient endodontic procedure into a complication such as tooth extraction. In order to discuss the ethical and legal consequences, two cases of dental strip perforations are herewith presented. Due to the existence of risk factors for dental strip perforation, experience of the clinician and the use of magnification and modern imagistic methods (CBCT) may avoid or reduce the frequency of this type of accidents. Under correct working circumstances, dental stripping should not be regarded as a malpractice but as a procedural accident. However, the patient must always be informed, before and during the endodontic procedure, about the event and the possible complications that may occur.

  19. [Endodontics in motion: new concepts, materials and techniques 5. The dynamics of the periapical laesion].

    PubMed

    Warnsinck, C J; Shemesh, H

    2016-01-01

    Periapical laesions are a frequently occurring phenomenon, in both untreated teeth and teeth which have undergone endodontic treatment. Various factors have been found to positively influence the effectiveness of endodontic treatment, which is defined by a lack of clinical symptoms and also the absence or shrinkage of the periapical laesion. The chance of a painful exacerbation of a persistent periapical laesion is small, even if the area of the laesion has expanded, which happens in approximately 50% of the cases. The survival of endodontically treated teeth with a periapical laesion is 87% after 10 years. Restorative reasons frequently are the main reason for extraction and the presence of a periapical laesion is seldom the reason for losing a tooth. The influence of the periapical laesion on general health is still unclear.

  20. Retreatment of failed regenerative endodontic of orthodontically treated immature permanent maxillary central incisor: a case report.

    PubMed

    Al-Tammami, Musaed Fahad; Al-Nazhan, Saad A

    2017-02-01

    A revascularization procedure was shown to be the best alternative therapy for immature teeth with necrotic pulp and apical infection. A 12 year old female with a history of trauma to her upper central incisor and a sinus tract was referred for endodontic treatment. She was an active orthodontic patient and had undergone regenerative endodontic treatment for the past 2 years. Clinical examination revealed no response to sensibility, percussion, and palpation tests. The preoperative radiograph showed an open apex and apical rarefaction. The case was diagnosed as previously treated tooth with asymptomatic apical periodontitis. Regenerative endodontic retreatment was performed, and the case was followed for 3 years. Clinical, radiographic, and cone-beam computed tomography follow-up examination revealed an asymptomatic tooth, with evidence of periapical healing and root maturation.

  1. Retreatment of failed regenerative endodontic of orthodontically treated immature permanent maxillary central incisor: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Al-Tammami, Musaed Fahad

    2017-01-01

    A revascularization procedure was shown to be the best alternative therapy for immature teeth with necrotic pulp and apical infection. A 12 year old female with a history of trauma to her upper central incisor and a sinus tract was referred for endodontic treatment. She was an active orthodontic patient and had undergone regenerative endodontic treatment for the past 2 years. Clinical examination revealed no response to sensibility, percussion, and palpation tests. The preoperative radiograph showed an open apex and apical rarefaction. The case was diagnosed as previously treated tooth with asymptomatic apical periodontitis. Regenerative endodontic retreatment was performed, and the case was followed for 3 years. Clinical, radiographic, and cone-beam computed tomography follow-up examination revealed an asymptomatic tooth, with evidence of periapical healing and root maturation. PMID:28194367

  2. Endodontic Management of an Infected Primary Molar in a Child with Agenesis of the Permanent Premolar

    PubMed Central

    Asgary, Saeed; Fazlyab, Mahta

    2017-01-01

    Missing of mandibular second premolar is one of the most common types of tooth agenesis. In such cases, maintenance of the primary second molar, if possible at all, can prevent many treatment procedures in future. The present case report represents the endodontic management of a necrotic left mandibular primary second molar that had developed an abscess. Considering the missing of the permanent successor, the tooth was disinfected during endodontic preparation and the root canal system was filled with calcium-enriched mixture (CEM) cement in the same session. After 12 months of regular follow-up, not only the tooth was functional and symptom-free, but also healing of the inter-radicular bone lesion and re-establishment of the lamina dura was indicative of treatment success. Further trials are suggested to confirm CEM biomaterial use for management of infected primary molars associated with endodontic lesion. PMID:28179938

  3. Endodontic Retreatment of a Mandibular Second Molar with four Separate Roots: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Idris, Mohamed; Sakkir, Nasil; Kj, Nandakishore; Kini, Annapurna

    2014-03-01

    Aberrations in the root canal anatomy are a commonly occurring phenomenon. Although the mandibular second molar is commonly a bi-rooted tooth with an uncomplicated endodontic anatomy, variations have to be considered every time endodontic therapy is performed. This case report describes the non-surgical endodontic retreatment performed on a mandibular second molar with four seperate roots and canals. ProTaper Universal rotary nickel-titanium instruments (Dentsply Maillefer, Ballaigues, Switzerland) for treatment and retreatment were used to remove the old gutta percha and to clean and shape all root canals, followed by the complete obturation of root canal system. Post-operative CBCT scan was taken to confirm the quality of the performed treatment.

  4. Management of failed periodontal surgical intervention for a furcal lesion with a nonsurgical endodontic approach

    PubMed Central

    Asgary, Saeed

    2014-01-01

    As long as the prognosis of teeth remains a matter of concern, the endodontic-periodontal relationship will be considered a challenge for the clinician. Many etiologic factors, including bacteria, fungi, and viruses, plus other contributing factors, such as trauma, root resorptions/perforations, and dental malformations, play a role in the co-occurrence of endodontic and periodontal lesions. Whatever the cause, a correct diagnosis on which to base the treatment plan is the key to successful maintenance of the tooth. This article reports the successful endodontic management of a furcation lesion in a mandibular molar that was nonresponsive to a previous periodontal surgical graft. The case had presented a diagnostic challenge for the clinicians, and this article reviews the key points that can lead to a correct diagnosis and treatment planning. PMID:24790924

  5. Endodontic Retreatment of a Mandibular Second Molar with four Separate Roots: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Idris, Mohamed; Sakkir, Nasil; KJ, Nandakishore; Kini, Annapurna

    2014-01-01

    Aberrations in the root canal anatomy are a commonly occurring phenomenon. Although the mandibular second molar is commonly a bi-rooted tooth with an uncomplicated endodontic anatomy, variations have to be considered every time endodontic therapy is performed. This case report describes the non-surgical endodontic retreatment performed on a mandibular second molar with four seperate roots and canals. ProTaper Universal rotary nickel-titanium instruments (Dentsply Maillefer, Ballaigues, Switzerland) for treatment and retreatment were used to remove the old gutta percha and to clean and shape all root canals, followed by the complete obturation of root canal system. Post-operative CBCT scan was taken to confirm the quality of the performed treatment. PMID:24783160

  6. Clinical and pharmacological management of endodontic flare-up

    PubMed Central

    Jayakodi, Harikaran; Kailasam, Sivakumar; Kumaravadivel, Karthick; Thangavelu, Boopathi; Mathew, Sabeena

    2012-01-01

    Knowledge of the causes of and mechanisms behind interappointment pain in endodontics is of utmost importance for the clinician to properly prevent or manage this undesirable condition. The causative factors of interappointment pain encompass mechanical, chemical, and microbial injuries to the pulp or periradicular tissues, which are induced or exacerbated during root canal treatment. This review article underlines the various treatment modalities for relief of pain and swelling in such situations, including premedication, drainage establishment, relief of occlusion, and intracanal and systemic medication. PMID:23066274

  7. Endodontic Surgery of a Deviated Premolar Root in the Surgical Orthodontic Management of an Impacted Maxillary Canine.

    PubMed

    Pedullà, Eugenio; Valentino, Jessica; Rapisarda, Silvia

    2015-10-01

    Maxillary canine impactions are of multifactorial etiology. The incidence of maxillary canine impaction ranges from 1% to 4%. One of the reasons for canine impaction might be a deviated premolar root. This report describes surgical-orthodontic extrusion of an upper canine that occurred only after the endodontic surgery treatment of the adjacent deviated premolar root. Orthograde endodontic treatment followed by endodontic surgery with retrograde filling of the deviated premolar root was performed to obtain a surgical-orthodontic extrusion of the upper canine. A female patient, aged 15 years, with a class I molar relationship was referred to continue the orthodontic therapy. Although a correct surgical-orthodontic extrusion with adequate anchorage was carried out, the maxillary left canine had not erupted. Radiographic examination showed a deviated palatal root of the adjacent maxillary first premolar in the canine eruption path. Root canal filling followed by endodontic surgery of the first premolar deviated root has led to rapid progression of the canine and its placement in the arch in just 3 months. A multidisciplinary management involving endodontic treatment, endodontic surgery, and surgical-orthodontic extrusion could be considered a successful approach in the maxillary impacted canine cases in which adjacent premolar root is deviated. Long-term radiographic follow-up (6 years) indicated stable periodontal health of the canine and premolar without the presence of root resorption. Copyright © 2015 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. In vitro assessment of tooth color alteration by two different types of endodontic irrigants.

    PubMed

    Koursoumis, Anastasios Dimitrios; Kerezoudis, Nikolaos P; Kakaboura, Afrodite

    2014-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess in vitro the tooth color alterations associated with two commonly used endodontic irrigants, the chlorhexidine gluconate (CHX) and the sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) up to 15 days post-treatment. Additionally, the possible influence of endodontic access preparation on tooth color was investigated. Thirty intact human anterior teeth were used. Black adhesive tape with a 4 mm diameter window was used to standardize the enamel surface intended for color analysis. After the access cavity, preparation and the initial root canal negotiation with stainless steel hand files, the root canal shaping was completed with rotary nickel-titanium files. The teeth were divided into three groups (n = 10). Conventional syringe irrigation was performed with one irrigant for each group. The enamel surfaces were colorimetrically evaluated before access cavity, after cavity preparation and at 1, 3, 7 and 15 days post-treatment. The CIE color parameters (L*, a*, b*) were recorded and averaged for each material and the corresponding color differences (ΔE) were calculated and statistically analyzed. The most significant factor in tooth color alteration, during the endodontic treatment, was the access preparation. CHX and NaOCl caused tooth color changes comparable with the saline. CHX and NaOCl did not increase the tooth color changes relative to the values induced by the access preparation. The two endodontic irrigants were not able to induce tooth color alteration to a greater extent than the access preparation. Chlorhexidine and NaOCl cannot be considered as discoloring endodontic materials. The most contributing factor in tooth color alteration during endodontic treatment in the anterior teeth is access preparation.

  9. Endodontic therapy of traumatised teeth in children.

    PubMed

    Winter, G B

    1977-09-01

    One of the most difficult problems met with in endodontic therapy for children is the traumatized anterior tooth whose root is still incomplete. In cases where the pulp is vital, treatment by pulp capping or pulpotomy is directed to preserving the vitality of the radicular pulp to ensure completion of root formation. Calcium hydroxide remains the material of choice in both forms of treatment. Once root formation is complete, removal of the pulp residue and filling of the root canal may be performed as a preliminary to restoration by means of a post retained crown. Where the pulp is non vital, attempts to fill the funnel shaped apical part of the canal, whether from a coronal approach or by open operation for retrograde filling, have proved unsatisfactory. Many workers have shown however that a number of root filling materials and root dressings are capable of inducing either continued root growth or a closure of the apical region by a calcific scar. A detailed survey of 34 teeth treated by this method has been made and the important principles which appear to influence the success of the technique are enumerated.

  10. Effect of Different Obturation Techniques on the Prognosis of Endodontic Therapy: A Retrospective Comparative Analysis.

    PubMed

    Sarin, Anurag; Gupta, Priyanka; Sachdeva, Jyoti; Gupta, Ajai; Sachdeva, Shobhit; Nagpal, Ravi

    2016-07-01

    Success of root canal therapy (RCT) is largely dependent upon the quality of biomechanical preparation and obturation of the pulp canal. Improperly cleaned or shaped root canal, regardless of the type of obturation method and obturating material, cannot lead to the success of endodontic therapy. Hence, we conducted a clinical comparative analysis of two obturating techniques. A total of 140 patients receiving RCT at the department of Endodontic were included in the present study. The average follow-up time for the patients was 29 months (18-38 months). Patients were grouped into two depending on the type of obturating technique used. Evaluation of the clinical and radiographic follow-up records of the patients was done and analysis was made. One-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used for assessing the level of significance. The average age of the patients undergoing obturation with carrier-based obturation (CO) technique and lateral compaction (LC) technique was 43 and 48 years respectively. While comparing failure and success of the teeth at the time of follow-up, nonsignificant results were obtained. Significant difference was seen, while comparing the presence of voids and type of teeth in which endodontic therapy was performed using different obturating techniques. Endodontic therapy done with LC obturating technique or with CO technique shows prognostic difference on the outcome or quality of treatment therapy. Quality of obturation is more important rather than type while performing endodontic therapy for better prognosis.

  11. Saving Single-rooted Teeth with Combined Endodontic-periodontal Lesions.

    PubMed

    Pico-Blanco, Alexandre; Castelo-Baz, Pablo; Caneiro-Queija, Leticia; Liñares-González, Antonio; Martin-Lancharro, Pablo; Blanco-Carrión, Juan

    2016-12-01

    Teeth affected by combined endodontic-periodontal lesions are usually considered by all prognosis classifications as hopeless teeth. The development of new biomaterials combined with modern endodontic and periodontal regeneration techniques may improve dental prognosis and maintain the affected teeth. Moreover, 1 of the replacement options for those teeth, dental implants, has shown an increasing number of biological and technical complications. Five patients were included in this case series study. Full periodontal and radiographic examination revealed generalized chronic periodontitis. Moreover, endodontic-periodontal lesions affecting single-rooted teeth were detected in those patients with tissue destruction beyond the apex. After splinting those teeth, conventional endodontic and nonsurgical periodontal treatment was performed. Three months later, periodontal regeneration was applied at those teeth in order to reconstruct supporting tissues and to improve dental prognosis. After a follow-up period ranging from 14 months to 17 years, it was observed that all teeth remain asymptomatic and in normal function. No signs of apical pathosis were observed, and the periodontium was stable. All patients were included in a strict maintenance program to check the periodontal and apical status. This case series shows that it is possible to change the prognosis of teeth affected by combined endodontic-periodontal lesions, even if the periodontal support is destroyed beyond the apex. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. An investigation of current endodontic practice and training needs in primary care in the north west of England.

    PubMed

    Palmer, N O A; Ahmed, M; Grieveson, B

    2009-06-13

    To investigate current endodontic clinical practice in the north west of England and evaluate practitioner's training needs. A questionnaire was posted to 702 primary care dentists in the north west of England in January 2006. The questionnaire investigated aspects of dentists' endodontic clinical practice, the provision of endodontics within their practice, their recent postgraduate training in endodontics and their training needs. Responses to the questionnaire were received from 498 (70.9%) primary care dentists, of which 449 questionnaires contained useful information. Only 30% of respondents use rubber dam for isolation in all endodontic cases. The majority used radiographs either as the only method for establishing the working length (57.3%) or in conjunction with an apex locator (34.5%). Most dentists used sodium hypochlorite solution as an irrigant during the root canal treatment. Almost 55% used a combination of conventional hand files and rotary files to prepare root canals. Fifty-eight percent used the crown down technique while 35% used the step back technique for canal preparation. Almost two-thirds routinely used non-setting calcium hydroxide as an intra-canal medicament. Lateral condensation technique was the popular obturation method and the vast majority of respondents routinely took postoperative radiographs. Almost 25% of respondents had not received any teaching or training in endodontics in the past two years. The results of this study suggest that primary care dentists in the north west of England have embraced modern techniques and follow most aspects of accepted endodontic practice. Despite the majority having postgraduate training in the last two years, only a minority used rubber dam routinely for endodontic treatment.

  13. Using 3-dimensional printing to create presurgical models for endodontic surgery.

    PubMed

    Bahcall, James K

    2014-09-01

    Advances in endodontic surgery--from both a technological and procedural perspective-have been significant over the last 18 years. Although these technologies and procedural enhancements have significantly improved endodontic surgical treatment outcomes, there is still an ongoing challenge of overcoming the limitations of interpreting preoperative 2-dimensional (2-D) radiographic representation of a 3-dimensional (3-D) in vivo surgical field. Cone-beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) has helped to address this issue by providing a 3-D enhancement of the 2-D radiograph. The next logical step to further improve a presurgical case 3-D assessment is to create a surgical model from the CBCT scan. The purpose of this article is to introduce 3-D printing of CBCT scans for creating presurgical models for endodontic surgery.

  14. 21 CFR 872.3890 - Endodontic stabilizing splint.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3890 Endodontic stabilizing splint. (a) Identification. An endodontic stabilizing splint is a device made of a material, such as titanium, intended to be...

  15. Six-month healing success rates after endodontic treatment using the novel GentleWave™ System: The pure prospective multi-center clinical study

    PubMed Central

    Le, Khang T.; Woo, Stacey M.; Rassoulian, Shahriar A.; McLachlan, Kimberly; Abbassi, Farah; Garland, Randy W.

    2016-01-01

    Background This prospective multi-center (PURE) clinical study evaluated healing rates for molars after root canal treatment employing the GentleWave® System (Sonendo, Inc., Laguna Hills, CA). Material and Methods Eighty-nine patients met the inclusion criteria and consented for this clinical study after referral for a root canal treatment. All enrolled patients were treated with the GentleWave System. Five endodontists performed the clinical procedures and follow-up evaluations. Pre-operative, intra-operative, and post-operative data were collected from the consented patients. Each patient was evaluated for clinical signs and symptoms. Two trained, blinded, and independent evaluators scored the subject tooth radiographs for apical periodontitis using the periapical index (PAI). The teeth classified as healing or healed were considered as a success and composed of a cumulative success rate of healing. Statistical analysis was performed by using the Fisher’s exact test, Pearson correlation, and multivariate logistic regression analyses of the pre-operative prognostic factors at 0.05 significance level. Results Seventy-seven patients were evaluated at six months with a follow-up rate of 86.5%. The cumulative success rate of healing was 97.4%. Eleven prognostic factors were identified using bivariate analyses. Using logistic analyses, the two prognostic significant variables that were directly correlated to healing were the pre-operative presence of periapical index (p value=0.016), and single treatment visits (p value=0.024). Conclusions In this six-month PURE clinical study, the cumulative success rate of healing was 97.4% when patients were treated with the GentleWave® System. Key words:Healing rate, root canal treatment, molar, GentleWave™, Sonendo®, Multisonic Ultracleaning™ . PMID:27398180

  16. The effect of frequency of calcium hydroxide dressing change and various pre- and inter-operative factors on the endodontic treatment of traumatized immature permanent incisors.

    PubMed

    Yassen, Ghaeth H; Chin, Judith; Mohammedsharif, Ahmed G; Alsoufy, Saif S; Othman, Samer S; Eckert, George

    2012-08-01

    The objectives of this clinical study were as follows: (i) to determine the effect of frequency of calcium hydroxide [Ca(OH)(2)] dressing change on the apical barrier formation in immature permanent incisors with necrotic pulps and (ii) to investigate the effect of various clinical factors before and during treatment that may be associated with the frequency of Ca(OH)(2) dressing changes. The study involved 21 healthy subjects, 8-12 years old. Twenty-three immature traumatized permanent maxillary central incisors were treated using Ca(OH)(2) powder mixed with barium sulfate and distilled water. The progress of barrier formation was reviewed after 6 months of first placement of Ca(OH)(2) and then every 3 months until the detection of an apical barrier. Clinical and radiographic evaluations were performed before and after treatment. Data were evaluated using a chi-square test. Apical barrier formation was successful for all 23 teeth. Seventeen teeth (74%) needed only a single application of Ca(OH)(2), while six teeth (26%) required more than one application. The average time of apical barrier formation was 30 weeks, and the mean number of Ca(OH)(2) dressing changes was 1.3. A significant positive association was found between teeth that presented with displacement and the number of Ca(OH)(2) dressing changes (P = 0.004). An initial 6-month application of Ca(OH)(2) dressing followed by 3-month replacements (usually in teeth presenting with displacement and/or sinus tracts) may be successfully used in apexification treatment. This would assist in reducing the number of Ca(OH)(2) dressing changes, number of appointments, cost of treatment and radiation exposure. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  17. Nasopalatine duct cyst mimicking an endodontic periapical lesion: a case report.

    PubMed

    Bains, Rhythm; Verma, Promila; Chandra, Anil; Tikku, A P; Singh, Nimisha

    2016-01-01

    Lesions of nonendodontic origin, such as nasopalatine or globulomaxillary cysts, may mimic periapical radiolucencies associated with pulpal pathosis, and incorrect diagnosis may lead to unnecessary endodontic treatment. Horizontal root fractures most commonly affect the maxillary central and lateral incisors. Prognosis depends largely on the level of fracture; fractures in the apical third have the best prognosis, and those in the cervical third have the worst. This case report discusses surgical and restorative management of a patient who had a nasopalatine cyst that had been misdiagnosed and treated as an endodontic lesion of the maxillary right central incisor as well as a midroot horizontal fracture of the adjacent lateral incisor.

  18. Guided tissue regeneration in communicating periodontal and endodontic lesions - A hope for the hopeless!

    PubMed

    Mali, Rohini; Lele, Priya; Vishakha

    2011-10-01

    The use of guided tissue regeneration (GTR) has become a standard of care in Periodontology. GTR using membrane barriers and/or bone grafting materials has also been used in periapical surgery. However, the application of the GTR principle, particularly in communicating endodontic-periodontal lesions with loss of the buccal cortical plate, is a very challenging task, with very few reported human clinical studies. An interdisciplinary approach, combining endodontic and periodontal (surgical) procedures can save a tooth in the long run that has been defined as hopeless at the preliminary stage of treatment.

  19. Microsurgical endodontic retreatment of a maxillary molar with a separated file: a case report.

    PubMed

    Kahler, B

    2011-03-01

    A separated instrument complicated orthograde endodontic retreatment of a maxillary molar tooth with apical periodontitis. The tooth was treated utilizing microsurgical techniques that employed an operating microscope, ultrasonics, micro-instrumentation and mineral trioxide aggregate as a root-end filling material. Healing was evident at a 12-month review appointment. Microsurgical techniques have significantly improved the outcomes for healing of periapical lesions when compared to traditional approaches to endodontic surgery. Success rates have been shown to be comparable with conventional orthograde treatment. © 2010 Australian Dental Association.

  20. Clark's rule vis à vis the buccal object rule: its evolution & application in endodontics.

    PubMed

    Gutmann, James L; Endo, Cert

    2011-01-01

    Originally, Clark's rule was used to identify the position of unerupted or supernumerary teeth (a concept known as oral localization) prior to orthodontic tooth movement or surgical removal. However, the versatility of this rule's principles and concepts are also highly applicable to endodontic diagnosis and treatment. While contemporarily known by many different names, such as the "buccal object rule" and the "cone beam-shift technique," the importance of this rule in endodontics was not recognized in the literature until late in the 20th century, despite historical evidence demonstrating its incorporation into root canal procedures almost 100 years ago.

  1. [Study of some physical and biological properties of an endodontic sealer composed of calcium hydroxide].

    PubMed

    Birman, E G; Sampaio, J M; Magalhães, J; Sato, E

    1990-01-01

    The authors present a study of the physical and biological properties of a new endodontic cement known as Sealapex. In its composition the presence of calcium hydroxide is introduced in order to induce calcification of the periapical tissue. Our results using glass round cover slips implanted on the subcutaneous tissue of mice indicated a persistent foreign body reaction (60 days). The physical properties studied compared to N-Rickert ciment indicated, a decreased leakage. Adhesivity tests didn't give us significant values. Laboratorial studies and clinical trials are necessary to a complete acceptance of this new ciment in endodontic treatment.

  2. Antibacterial effects of N-acetylcysteine against endodontic pathogens.

    PubMed

    Moon, Ji-Hoi; Choi, Young-Suk; Lee, Hyeon-Woo; Heo, Jung Sun; Chang, Seok Woo; Lee, Jin-Yong

    2016-04-01

    The success of endodontic treatment depends on the eradication of microorganisms from the root canal system and the prevention of reinfection. The purpose of this investigation was to evaluate the antibacterial and antibiofilm efficacy of N-acetylcysteine (NAC), an antioxidant mucolytic agent, as an intracanal medicament against selected endodontic pathogens. Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of NAC for Actinomyces naeslundii, Lactobacillus salivarius, Streptococcus mutans, and Enterococcus faecalis were determined using the broth microdilution method. NAC showed antibacterial activity, with MIC values of 0.78-1.56 mg/ml. The effect of NAC on biofilm formation of each bacterium and a multispecies culture consisting of the four bacterial species was assessed by crystal violet staining. NAC significantly inhibited biofilm formation by all the monospecies and multispecies bacteria at minimum concentrations of 0.78-3.13 mg/ml. The efficacy of NAC for biofilm disruption was evaluated by scanning electron microscopy and ATP-bioluminescence quantification using mature multispecies biofilms. Preformed mature multispecies biofilms on saliva-coated hydroxyapatite disks were disrupted within 10 min by treatment with NAC at concentrations of 25 mg/ml or higher. After 24 h of treatment, the viability of mature biofilms was reduced by > 99% compared with the control. Moreover, the biofilm disrupting activity of NAC was significantly higher than that of saturated calcium hydroxide or 2% chlorhexidine solution. Within the limitations of this in vitro study, we conclude that NAC has excellent antibacterial and antibiofilm efficacy against endodontic pathogens and may be used as an alternative intracanal medicament in root canal therapies.

  3. Top-cited articles in endodontic journals.

    PubMed

    Fardi, Anastasia; Kodonas, Konstantinos; Gogos, Christos; Economides, Nikolaos

    2011-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the 100 top-cited articles published in journals dedicated to endodontology and analyze their characteristics to describe the quality and evolution of research in the field of endodontology. The Institute for Scientific Information Web of Knowledge Database and the Journal Citation Report Science Editions were used to retrieve the 100 most cited articles published in journals dedicated to endodontics. The top-cited articles were selected and analyzed with regard to journals, authors, institution, country of origin, publication title and year, number of citations, article type, study design, level of evidence, and field of study. The top 100 articles were cited between 87 and 554 times. These articles appeared in 4 different journals, with more than half in the Journal of Endodontics, followed by the journals Oral Surgery Oral Medicine Oral Pathology Oral Radiology and Endodontology, the International Endodontic Journal, and Endodontics & Dental Traumatology. Forty-eight articles were published between 1990 and 1999. All articles were published in English and primarily originated from the United States (n = 52). The majority of articles were basic science articles (n = 55), followed by clinical research studies (n = 28) and nonsystematic reviews (n = 17). Uncontrolled case series with level IV of evidence and narrative reviews with level V of evidence were the most frequent types of study design. The main topics covered by the top-cited articles were microleakage and endodontic microbiology. This analysis of citation rates reveals useful and interesting information about scientific progress in the field of endodontics. Basic research and observational studies published in high-impact endodontic journals had the highest citation rates. Copyright © 2011 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Endodontic-periodontal locally delivered antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Lacević, Amela; Vranić, Edina; Zulić, Irfan

    2004-02-01

    Endodontic pathology is a bacterial disease. It is well established that periapical disease is the result of bacteria, their product, and the host response to them. Periradicular disease will occur after microorganisms and their metabolic products affect the periradicular tissue. Aim of using antibiotics as part of a treatment regimen is to achieve, within the periodontal environment, a concentration of the drug that is sufficient either to kill (bactericidal) or arrest the growth (bacteriostatic) of pathogenic microorganisms. There are two possible approaches to improve the drug action: sustained and controlled drug release to reduce or eliminate side effects by improving the therapeutic index and site-specific drug delivery to minimize systemic effects. These two strategies have been explored by the association of drugs with different vehicles, either naturals or synthetics. A wide variety of specialized local delivery systems (i.e.intrapocket devices) have been designed to maintain the antibiotic in the GCF (gingival crevicular fluid) at a concentration higher than the MIC (minimum inhibitory concentration). Fibres, films, strips and microparticles made of biodegradable or non-biodegradable polymers have been reported as effective methods to administer antibacterial agents for periodontal therapy. Together with these solid devices, semisolid adhesive or non-adhesive formulations have also been proposed.

  5. Nanoparticle-based endodontic antimicrobial photodynamic therapy

    PubMed Central

    Pagonis, Tom C.; Chen, Judy; Fontana, Carla Raquel; Devalapally, Harikrishna; Ruggiero, Karriann; Song, Xiaoqing; Foschi, Federico; Dunham, Joshua; Skobe, Ziedonis; Yamazaki, Hajime; Kent, Ralph; Tanner, Anne C.R.; Amiji, Mansoor M.; Soukos, Nikolaos S.

    2009-01-01

    Objective To study the in vitro effects of poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanoparticles loaded with the photosensitizer methylene blue (MB) and light against Enterococcus faecalis (ATCC 29212). Materials and Methods The uptake and distribution of nanoparticles in E. faecalis in suspension was investigated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) after incubation with PLGA complexed with colloidal gold particles for 2.5, 5 and 10 minutes. E. faecalis species were sensitized in planktonic phase and in experimentally infected root canals of human extracted teeth with MB-loaded nanoparticles for 10 minutes followed by exposure to red light at 665 nm. Results The nanoparticles were found to be concentrated mainly on the cell walls of microorganisms at all three time points. The synergism of light and MB-loaded nanoparticles led to approximately 2 and 1 log10 reduction of colony-forming units in planktonic phase and root canals, respectively. In both cases, mean log10 CFU levels were significantly lower than controls and MB-loaded nanoparticles without light. Conclusion The utilization of PLGA nanoparticles encapsulated with photoactive drugs may be a promising adjunct in antimicrobial endodontic treatment. PMID:20113801

  6. Relationship between systemic diseases and endodontics: an online study guide.

    PubMed

    2008-05-01

    The Editorial Board of the Journal of Endodontics has developed a literature-based study guide of topical areas related to endodontics. This study guide is intended to give the reader a focused review of the essential endodontic literature and does not cite all possible articles related to each topic. Although citing all articles would be comprehensive, it would defeat the idea of a study guide. This section will cover the relationship between systemic diseases and endodontics.

  7. Single-visit endodontics: an online study guide.

    PubMed

    2008-05-01

    The Editorial Board of the Journal of Endodontics has developed a literature-based study guide of topical areas related to endodontics. This study guide is intended to give the reader a focused review of the essential endodontic literature and does not cite all possible articles related to each topic. Although citing all articles would be comprehensive, it would defeat the idea of a study guide. This section will cover single visit endodontics.

  8. Extraoral sinus tract misdiagnosed as an endodontic lesion.

    PubMed

    Cohenca, Nestor; Karni, Sunil; Rotstein, Ilan

    2003-12-01

    The extraoral sinus tract may occur as a result of an inflammatory process associated with a necrotic pulp. However, several non-odontogenic disorders may also produce an extraoral sinus tract. Thus, the differential diagnosis of this clinical finding is of paramount importance in providing appropriate clinical care because misdiagnosis of this condition may result in healing failure or unnecessary treatment. This case report of a 19-yr-old male patient describes an extraoral cutaneous sinus tract misdiagnosed as an endodontic lesion. Consequently, the patient underwent unnecessary exploratory procedures and antibiotic therapy. Identification of the inflammatory source of the lesion and removal of the affected tissue led to tissue healing.

  9. Antimicrobial irrigants in endodontic therapy: 1. Root canal disinfection.

    PubMed

    Eliyas, Shiyana; Briggs, Peter F; Porter, Richard W J

    2010-01-01

    This paper highlights the importance of root canal disinfection. It discusses the different endodontic irrigants available and comments on how these can be used most effectively. Eliminating bacteria from the root canal system is an essential stage in endodontic therapy. Practitioners should be adequately informed and skilled in this vital aspect of endodontics.

  10. Endodontic status and retention of molars in periodontally treated patients: results after 10 or more years of supportive periodontal therapy.

    PubMed

    Pretzl, Bernadette; Eickholz, Peter; Saure, Daniel; Pfefferle, Thorsten; Zeidler, Anna; Dannewitz, Bettina

    2016-12-01

    To assess the influence of endodontic status on retention of molars in patients under supportive periodontal treatment (SPT). A total of 136 subjects with 1015 molars at baseline were examined retrospectively, including 188 endodontically treated molars in 90 patients. Multilevel Cox regression analysis identified factors contributing to loss of molars. Root canal treatments contributed significantly to loss of molars during on average 13.2 years of SPT (Hazard ratio: 2.98, 95% CI: 1.74-5.1, p < 0.001). Endodontic treatment was more frequently present in first molars (p < 0.001) and in the maxilla (p = 0.01). In endodontically treated molars, degree III furcation involvement could be detected more often compared to molars without root canal treatment (p < 0.001). Among the root canal-treated molars, several patient and tooth-related factors showed an impact on tooth retention, but only molars with a periapical index of 4 and 5 (labelled "diseased") were significantly more often lost. The retention of molars in periodontally compromised patients after periodontal treatment is influenced by periodontal as well as endodontal factors. On a long-term basis, it is feasible to retain these teeth via active periodontal treatment and SPT for more than 10 years. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Manual versus mechanical endodontic glidepath.

    PubMed

    West, John

    2011-01-01

    This article, the second in a series of 3 articles on the endodontic Glidepath beginning with the September 2010 issue of Dentistry Today (archived articles can be found at dentistrytoday.com), represents an inquiry into the critical distinctions of the endodontic Glidepath. First, we reviewed the need for a confirmed and reproducible Glidepath as prerequisite to rotary or reciprocal shaping. In order to be safe, before rotary shaping, the dentist must always discover that a Glidepath already exists or that one needs to be created. Second, an emphasis was placed on a "finishing checklist" for Glidepath preparation for safe and successful rotary. The checklist is 2 parts: (1) minimum super loose No. 10 file sized k tunnel is verified; (2) the super loose No. 10 file sized tunnel must run from canal orifice through the canal PT to the RT. In this way, patency is preserved and yet the delicate and often fragile cemental anatomy remains undamaged and unchanged, therefore meeting Schilder's fourth mechanical objective of "keeping the foramen as small as practical." Third, we discussed that the question should not be "manual versus mechanical" but rather "manual, then mechanical." Always measure the existence of a Glidepath with manual before mechanical. The key elements for improving your performance of Glidepath mastery include a clear intention of what needs to be accomplished and yet at the same time, restraint; gentleness; copious irrigation with sodium hypochlorite; curved files; randomness; discovery; expecting the unexpected and surrendering to, honoring, and respecting the delicate anatomical structure called the root canal system. After all, nature has been demonstrating how to make a Glidepath for a long time, but we have not been paying attention. We have been too heavy-handed, we have pushed, we have forced, and we have not always been good stewards of nature's fragile framework. She has been giving us and teaching us the Glidepath answer all along. Listen

  12. Endodontics-related paresthesia of the mental and inferior alveolar nerves: an updated review.

    PubMed

    Mohammadi, Zahed

    2010-01-01

    Paresthesia is a burning or prickling sensation or partial numbness resulting from neural injury. Paresthesia resulting from periapical pathosis or various stages of root canal treatment is of great importance in the field of endodontics. The purpose of this paper is to review paresthesia caused by periapical lesions, local anesthesia, cleaning, shaping and obturation.

  13. Patient Demonstration Videos in Predoctoral Endodontic Education: Aspects Perceived as Beneficial by Students.

    PubMed

    Edrees, Hadeel Y; Ohlin, Johan; Ahlquist, Michael; Tessma, Mesfin K; Zary, Nabil

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the perceived benefits of video-mediated demonstrations in learning endodontics. Participants in the study were 75 third-year students enrolled in the undergraduate dentistry program at Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden. After the endodontic preclinical course, the students were introduced to the treatment protocol in the clinic by watching two live patient-demonstrated videos. The first video demonstrated how to communicate with the patient and perform diagnosis and root canal instrumentation. The second video illustrated how to perform bacterial sampling and root canal filling. After the students watched each video, a questionnaire was used to evaluate their opinions about various steps of the endodontic treatment protocol and the benefit of such educational material for their practice. Of the total 75 students, 72 completed the first questionnaire (96% response rate), and 65 completed the second questionnaire (87% response rate). The results showed that the students perceived high value in the video demonstrations related to treatment procedure. A statistically significant difference was observed between the perceived benefits of the first and second sessions in communication and treatment procedure (p<0.001). Further studies are needed to assess improvement in the design and delivery format for video demonstrations to enhance their effectiveness as a teaching modality for endodontics.

  14. Probable biofilm formation in the cheek as a complication of soft tissue filler resulting from improper endodontic treatment of tooth 16

    PubMed Central

    Marusza, Wojciech; Mlynarczyk, Grazyna; Olszanski, Romuald; Netsvyetayeva, Irina; Obrowski, Michael; Iannitti, Tommaso; Palmieri, Beniamino

    2012-01-01

    Injectable filling agents offer the promise of a better appearance without surgery and, among them, hyaluronic acid is the most commonly used. Although complications are rare, it is necessary to know the possible side effects and complications in order to be prepared for their management. That is why many researchers have been focusing on the interactions between hyaluronic acid and pathogens, inflammatory mediators, the immune system, and markers of oxidative stress to achieve efficient drug delivery, given that hyaluronic acid has widening applications in the field of nanomedicine. Here we report the case of a 37-year-old female patient who returned to our clinic with an abscess in her left cheek 3 months after a deep injection of 1 mL of stabilized hyaluronic acid in both cheeks. Steroid and antibiotic therapy was initiated without success, and abscess drainage was performed. Extraction of tooth 16 was performed 11 days after insertion of drains into the abscess. Laboratory blood tests showed acute inflammation of presumed bacterial etiology. Microbiological examination of pus was negative. Bacterial cultures were found in the extracted tooth. After antibiotic therapy, a complete reversal of the pathological process was observed. The present report highlights the need to assess periodontal problems prior to any aesthetic facial treatment. Analyses of further case reports and clinical studies are necessary to understand the potential role of hyaluronic acid in the formation of biofilm, and how to avoid this complication, thereby increasing the safety of hyaluronic acid-based procedures. PMID:22619504

  15. Probable biofilm formation in the cheek as a complication of soft tissue filler resulting from improper endodontic treatment of tooth 16.

    PubMed

    Marusza, Wojciech; Mlynarczyk, Grazyna; Olszanski, Romuald; Netsvyetayeva, Irina; Obrowski, Michael; Iannitti, Tommaso; Palmieri, Beniamino

    2012-01-01

    Injectable filling agents offer the promise of a better appearance without surgery and, among them, hyaluronic acid is the most commonly used. Although complications are rare, it is necessary to know the possible side effects and complications in order to be prepared for their management. That is why many researchers have been focusing on the interactions between hyaluronic acid and pathogens, inflammatory mediators, the immune system, and markers of oxidative stress to achieve efficient drug delivery, given that hyaluronic acid has widening applications in the field of nanomedicine. Here we report the case of a 37-year-old female patient who returned to our clinic with an abscess in her left cheek 3 months after a deep injection of 1 mL of stabilized hyaluronic acid in both cheeks. Steroid and antibiotic therapy was initiated without success, and abscess drainage was performed. Extraction of tooth 16 was performed 11 days after insertion of drains into the abscess. Laboratory blood tests showed acute inflammation of presumed bacterial etiology. Microbiological examination of pus was negative. Bacterial cultures were found in the extracted tooth. After antibiotic therapy, a complete reversal of the pathological process was observed. The present report highlights the need to assess periodontal problems prior to any aesthetic facial treatment. Analyses of further case reports and clinical studies are necessary to understand the potential role of hyaluronic acid in the formation of biofilm, and how to avoid this complication, thereby increasing the safety of hyaluronic acid-based procedures.

  16. Challenges in regenerative endodontics: a case series.

    PubMed

    Petrino, Joseph A; Boda, Kendra K; Shambarger, Sandra; Bowles, Walter R; McClanahan, Scott B

    2010-03-01

    An immature tooth with pulpal necrosis and apical periodontitis presents a unique challenge to the endodontist. Endodontic treatment options consist of apexification, apical barriers, or more recently, revascularization. The purpose of this case series is to report three cases that used revascularization protocol as described by Banchs and Trope. Each case presented its own special circumstances and challenges. The lessons learned from each case provided guidance for more predictable outcomes on subsequent cases. Six immature teeth with apical periodontitis (in three patients) were treated via the revascularization protocol using irrigants, a triple antibiotic paste, and a coronal seal of mineral trioxide aggregate and composite. For follow-up, all six teeth showed resolution of periapical radiolucencies, whereas three of six teeth showed continued root development. Two teeth displayed a positive response to vitality testing. Results from this case series show that revascularization is a technically challenging but effective treatment modality for the immature tooth with apical periodontitis. Based on this case series, the following recommendations are made to help with the revascularization technique: (1) clinicians should consider the use of an anesthetic without a vasoconstrictor when trying to induce bleeding, (2) a collagen matrix is useful for the controlled placement of MTA to a desired and optimal level, (3) patients/parents should be informed about the potential for staining, especially in anterior teeth when the paste contains minocycline, and (4) patient/parent compliance with the necessary multiple appointment treatment plan may be significant for case selection. Copyright (c) 2010 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Endodontics, Endodontic Retreatment, and Apical Surgery Versus Tooth Extraction and Implant Placement: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Chércoles-Ruiz, Anna; Sánchez-Torres, Alba; Gay-Escoda, Cosme

    2017-05-01

    The aim of this systematic review was to answer the following clinical question: Which is the best treatment option for a pulpally involved tooth? An electronic search was conducted in the Cochrane, PubMed (MEDLINE), and ScienceDirect databases between December 2015 and February 2016. A manual search was also performed. The inclusion criteria were randomized clinical trials, prospective or retrospective cohort studies, and cross-sectional studies performed on humans with at least 1 year of follow-up and published within the last 10 years. Two researchers independently screened the title and abstract of every article identified in the search in order to establish its eligibility. The selected articles were classified into different levels of evidence by means of the Strength of Recommendation Taxonomy criteria. Sixty articles met the inclusion criteria for this systematic review. The survival rate of single-tooth implants was greater than the success rate of the distinct conservative treatments. However, among comparative studies, no important differences between both treatments were observed until at least 8 years later. The endodontic treatment and the implant placement are both valid and complementary options for planning oral rehabilitation. Although a level B recommendation can be stated, these results come from retrospective comparative studies because there is a lack of randomized clinical studies comparing both types of therapeutic options. Copyright © 2017 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. [The investigation of ultrasound efficacy in cleaning the surface of new endodontic instruments].

    PubMed

    Popović, Jelena; Gasić, Jovanka; Radicević, Goran

    2009-01-01

    Active parts and tips of various new stainless steel and nickel-titanium endodontic instruments can be coated with fragments or metal residues, which can become detached during endodontic treatment. These fragments may obstruct the root canals or even reach the periapical tissue during biomechanical preparation and should be removed before clinical use. The aim of this study was to evaluate the presence of metal residues on both new stainless steel and nickel-titanium endodontic instruments, and to determine the cleaning efficacy of ultrasound using distilled water or disinfectant solution for removing these residues. Forty-eight stainless steel and nickel-titanium instruments were carefully removed from their original packages with dental tweezers, in order to avoid any contact with the cutting flutes and tips. The instruments were evaluated in term of metal debris presence, using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and x-ray energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). The instruments were then removed from the electron microscopy analysis stubs and placed in an ultrasonic bath for 15 minutes at a frequency of 28 kHz, using distilled water or disinfectant solution. The surfaces of the instruments were re-evaluated after cleaning. Before ultrasound cleaning, a larger amount of metal debris was observed on the nickel-titanium endodontic instruments when compared to those made of stainless steel. The presence of metal particles on the instruments was evaluated by using EDS analysis. The use of ultrasound was effective in removing the metal residues from both types of endodontic instrument surfaces. The use of ultrasound proved to be an efficient method for the removal of metal particles from the surface of new stainless steel and nickel-titanium endodontic instruments.

  19. ASSOCIATION BETWEEN INTRA-RADICULAR POSTS AND PERIAPICAL LESIONS IN ENDODONTICALLY TREATED TEETH*

    PubMed Central

    Rosalem, Cíntia Gonçalves Carvalho; Mattos, Claudia Machado de Almeida; Guerra, Selva Maria Gonçalves

    2007-01-01

    Introduction: A significant number of endodontically treated teeth restored with posts have associated periapical lesions, and several authors have discussed the probable causes of the development of these. Attention has been focused on restorative procedures performed after endodontic treatment and their association with the prognosis of endodontic therapy because a number of root-filled teeth will require post- and core-retained restorations. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate, by examination of periapical radiographs, whether the placement of intra-radicular posts in endodontically treated teeth may act as a risk factor for development of periapical lesions. Material and Methods: This case-control study analyzed periapical radiographs of 72 endodontically treated teeth with coronal restorations. All radiographs were obtained from a single private practice. Specimens were assigned to 2 groups: Group 1 (control) was composed of teeth without periapical lesions and Group 2 (case) was composed of teeth with periapical lesions. The number of teeth with and without posts in each group was recorded. Three calibrated examiners analyzed the radiographs visually under X4 magnification. Results: In Group 1, 28 (65.1%) out of 43 teeth were restored with posts. In Group 2, 24 (82.8%) out of 29 teeth had intra-radicular posts. The interpretation of chi-square test showed that these percentages were not significantly different (x2=2.687; p=0.101). Odds ratio was 2.571 (0.8158.118), which indicates that there was no statistically significant association between periapical lesions and posts. Conclusion: Intra-radicular posts placed in endodontically treated teeth were not a significant risk factor for development of periapical lesions in the practice where the cohort of patients was treated. PMID:19089134

  20. An Investigation of Current Endodontic Practice in Turkey

    PubMed Central

    Kaptan, R. F.; Haznedaroglu, F.; Kayahan, M. B.; Basturk, F. B.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives. The aim of this study was to gather information about the quality and quantity of root canal treatments carried out by general dental practitioners in Turkey. Methods. Questionnaires were given to 1400 dentists who attended the 16th National Congress organized by the Turkish Dental Association. The participants were asked to answer 34 multiple-choice questions. The questions were subdivided into 3 main topics; general information; general approach to endodontic treatment; and cleaning, shaping, and obturation of root canals. The statistical analysis was carried out by an χ2-test to compare the means at a significance level of P < 0.05. Results. The response rate for this study was 43%. There was a wide variation in the number of root canal treatments completed per month. Nearly 92% of practitioners stated that they never used rubber dam. The most commonly used working length determination technique was radiographic evaluation (P < 0.05). Sodium hypochlorite was the irrigant of choice with varying concentrations and AH Plus was the sealer of choice (P < 0.05). Resin composite was the most frequently used material for final restorations. Conclusions. Endodontic procedures in general practice in Turkey have differences from widely acknowledged quality guidelines. Despite the introduction of new instruments and techniques, most of the general practitioners chose conventional methods. PMID:23251103