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Sample records for multi-wavelength images detector

  1. Convolution kernels for multi-wavelength imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boucaud, A.; Bocchio, M.; Abergel, A.; Orieux, F.; Dole, H.; Hadj-Youcef, M. A.

    2016-12-01

    Astrophysical images issued from different instruments and/or spectral bands often require to be processed together, either for fitting or comparison purposes. However each image is affected by an instrumental response, also known as point-spread function (PSF), that depends on the characteristics of the instrument as well as the wavelength and the observing strategy. Given the knowledge of the PSF in each band, a straightforward way of processing images is to homogenise them all to a target PSF using convolution kernels, so that they appear as if they had been acquired by the same instrument. We propose an algorithm that generates such PSF-matching kernels, based on Wiener filtering with a tunable regularisation parameter. This method ensures all anisotropic features in the PSFs to be taken into account. We compare our method to existing procedures using measured Herschel/PACS and SPIRE PSFs and simulated JWST/MIRI PSFs. Significant gains up to two orders of magnitude are obtained with respect to the use of kernels computed assuming Gaussian or circularised PSFs. A software to compute these kernels is available at https://github.com/aboucaud/pypher

  2. Optical links for detector instrumentation: on-detector multi-wavelength silicon photonic transmitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karnick, D.; Skwierawski, P.; Schneider, M.; Eisenblätter, L.; Weber, M.

    2017-03-01

    We report on our recent progress in developing an optical transmission system based on wavelength division multiplexing (WDM) to enhance the read-out data rate of future particle detectors. The design and experimental results of the prototype of a monolithically integrated multi-wavelength transmitter are presented as well as temperature studies of electro-optic modulators. Furthermore, we show the successful permanent coupling of optical fibers to photonic chips, which is an essential step towards packaging of the opto-electronic components.

  3. Multi-wavelength imaging system for the Dutch Open Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bettonvil, Felix C.; Suetterlin, Peter; Hammerschlag, Robert H.; Jagers, Aswin P.; Rutten, Robert J.

    2003-02-01

    The Dutch Open Telescope (DOT) is an innovative solar telescope, completely open, on an open steel tower, without a vacuum system. The aim is long-duration high resolution imaging and in order to achieve this the DOT is equipped with a diffraction limited imaging system in combination with a data acquisition system designed for use with the speckle masking reconstruction technique for removing atmospheric aberrations. Currently the DOT is being equipped with a multi-wavelength system forming a high-resolution tomographic imager of magnetic fine structure, topology and dynamics in the photosphere and low- and high chromosphere. Finally the system will contain 6 channels: G-band (430.5 nm), Ca II H (K) (396.8 nm), H-α (656.3 nm), Ba II (455.4 nm), and two continuum channels (432 and 651 nm). Two channels are in full operation now and observations show that the DOT produces real diffraction limited movies (with 0.2" resolution) over hours in G-band (430.5 nm) and continuum (432 nm).

  4. High-speed multi-wavelength Fresnel diffraction imaging.

    PubMed

    Noom, Daniel W E; Boonzajer Flaes, Dirk E; Labordus, Elias; Eikema, Kjeld S E; Witte, Stefan

    2014-12-15

    We demonstrate a compact lensless microscope which can capture video-rate phase contrast images of moving objects and allows numerical scanning of the focal distance after recording. Using only an RGB-detector and illumination from a single mode fiber, diffraction patterns at three wavelengths are recorded simultaneously, enabling high-speed data collection and reconstruction of phase and amplitude. The technique is used for imaging of a moving test target, beads in a flow cell, and imaging of Caenorhabditis elegans moving in a droplet of liquid.

  5. Sub-picometer multi-wavelength detector based on highly sensitive nanomechanical resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maeda, Etsuo; Kometani, Reo

    2017-07-01

    The wavelength division multiplexing (WDM) method for near infrared (NIR) optical fiber (1530-1565 nm) is the system that is wildly used for intercontinental communication. WDM achieves high-speed and large-capacity communication, but costs a lot because the high-resolution (˜10 pm) wavelength locker for wavelength stabilization only corresponds to a single wavelength. In this report, we propose a highly sensitive sub-picometer multi-wavelength detector that substitutes a typical single-wavelength detector for WDM. Our wavelength detector consists of a narrow band (FWHM < 10 nm) photonic absorber with an aligned gold nano-fin array on a high-Q (Q-factor > 20 000) nanomechanical resonator. The photonic absorber confines and transforms the illuminated NIR light wave into thermal stress, and then, the thermal stress in the nanomechanical resonator will appear as the eigenfrequency shift of the nanomechanical resonator. Through experimental works with an NIR laser and optical Doppler vibration meter, the sensitivity of our wavelength detector was determined to be 0.196 pm in the 10-nm-range of the NIR region. Our sub-picometer multi-wavelength detector will achieve a fast, wide-band, and cost-effective optical communication system.

  6. Touch the Invisible Sky: A multi-wavelength Braille book featuring NASA images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steel, S.; Grice, N.; Daou, D.

    2008-06-01

    Multi-wavelength astronomy - the study of the Universe at wavelengths beyond the visible, has revolutionised our understanding and appreciation of the cosmos. Hubble, Chandra and Spitzer are examples of powerful, space-based telescopes that complement each other in their observations spanning the electromagnetic spectrum. While several Braille books on astronomical topics have been published, to this point, no printed material accessible to the sight disabled or Braille reading public has been available on the topic of multi-wavelength astronomy. Touch the Invisible Sky presents the first printed introduction to modern, multi-wavelength astronomy studies to the disabled sight community. On a more fundamental level, tactile images of a Universe that had, until recently, been invisible to all, sighted or non-sighted, is an important learning message on how science and technology broadens our senses and our understanding of the natural world.

  7. Hyperspectral fluorescence imaging with multi wavelength LED excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luthman, A. Siri; Dumitru, Sebastian; Quirós-Gonzalez, Isabel; Bohndiek, Sarah E.

    2016-04-01

    Hyperspectral imaging (HSI) can combine morphological and molecular information, yielding potential for real-time and high throughput multiplexed fluorescent contrast agent imaging. Multiplexed readout from targets, such as cell surface receptors overexpressed in cancer cells, could improve both sensitivity and specificity of tumor identification. There remains, however, a need for compact and cost effective implementations of the technology. We have implemented a low-cost wide-field multiplexed fluorescence imaging system, which combines LED excitation at 590, 655 and 740 nm with a compact commercial solid state HSI system operating in the range 600 - 1000 nm. A key challenge for using reflectance-based HSI is the separation of contrast agent fluorescence from the reflectance of the excitation light. Here, we illustrate how it is possible to address this challenge in software, using two offline reflectance removal methods, prior to least-squares spectral unmixing. We made a quantitative comparison of the methods using data acquired from dilutions of contrast agents prepared in well-plates. We then established the capability of our HSI system for non-invasive in vivo fluorescence imaging in small animals using the optimal reflectance removal method. The HSI presented here enables quantitative unmixing of at least four fluorescent contrast agents (Alexa Fluor 610, 647, 700 and 750) simultaneously in living mice. A successful unmixing of the four fluorescent contrast agents was possible both using the pure contrast agents and with mixtures. The system could in principle also be applied to imaging of ex vivo tissue or intraoperative imaging in a clinical setting. These data suggest a promising approach for developing clinical applications of HSI based on multiplexed fluorescence contrast agent imaging.

  8. Influence of color coatings on aircraft surface ice detection based on multi-wavelength imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuge, Jing-chang; Yu, Zhi-jing; Gao, Jian-shu; Zheng, Da-chuan

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, a simple aircraft surface ice detection system is proposed based on multi-wavelength imaging. Its feasibility is proved by the experimental results. The influence of color coatings of aircraft surface is investigated. The results show that the ice area can be clearly distinguished from the red, white, gray and blue coatings painted aluminum plates. Due to the strong absorption, not enough signals can be detected for the black coatings. Thus, a deep research is needed. Even though, the results of this paper are helpful to the development of aircraft surface ice detection.

  9. Multi-wavelength photoacoustic imaging for monitoring lesion formation during high-intensity focused ultrasound therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xun; Sanders, Jean; Dundar, Murat; Oralkan, Ömer

    2017-03-01

    Photoacoustic imaging (PAI) can be used to monitor lesion formation during high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) therapy because HIFU changes the optical absorption spectrum (OAS) of the tissue. However, in traditional PAI, the change could be too subtle to be observed either because the OAS does not change very significantly at the imaging wavelength or due to low signal-to-noise ratio in general. We propose a machine-learning-based method for lesion monitoring with multi-wavelength PAI (MWPAI), where PAI is repeated at a sequence of wavelengths and a stack of multi-wavelength photoacoustic (MWPA) images is acquired. Each pixel is represented by a vector and each element in the vector reflects the optical absorption at the corresponding wavelength. Based on the MWPA images, a classifier is trained to classify pixels into two categories: ablated and non-ablated. In our experiment, we create a lesion on a block of bovine tissue with a HIFU transducer, followed by MWPAI in the 690 nm to 950 nm wavelength range, with a step size of 5 nm. In the MWPA images, some of the ablated and non-ablated pixels are cropped and fed to a neural network (NN) as training examples. The NN is then applied to several groups of MWPA images and the results show that the lesions can be identified clearly. To apply MWPAI in/near real-time, sequential feature selection is performed and the number of wavelengths is decreased from 53 to 5 while retaining adequate performance. With a fast-switching tunable laser, the method can be implemented in/near real-time.

  10. Multi-wavelength Spatial LED illumination based detector for in vitro detection of Botulinum Neurotoxin A Activity

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Steven; Francis, Jesse; Sapsford, Kim E.; Kostov, Yordan; Rasooly, Avraham

    2010-01-01

    A portable and rapid detection system for the activity analysis of Botulinum Neurotoxins (BoNT) is needed for food safety and bio-security applications. To improve BoNT activity detection, a previously designed portable charge-coupled device (CCD) based detector was modified and equipped with a higher intensity more versatile multi-wavelength spatial light-emitting diode (LED) illumination, a faster CCD detector and the capability to simultaneously detect 30 samples. A FITC/DABCYL Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET)-labeled peptide substrate (SNAP-25), with BoNT-A target cleavage site sequence was used to measure BoNT-A light chain (LcA) activity through the FITC fluorescence increase that occurs upon peptide substrate cleavage. For fluorescence excitation, a multi-wavelength spatial LED illuminator was used and compared to our previous electroluminescent (EL) strips. The LED illuminator was equipped with blue, green, red and white LEDs, covering a spectrum of 450-680 nm (red 610-650 nm, green 492-550 nm, blue 450-495 nm, and white LED 440-680 nm). In terms of light intensity, the blue LED was found to be ~80 fold higher than the previously used blue EL strips. When measuring the activity of LcA the CCD detector limit of detection (LOD) was found to be 0.08 nM LcA for both the blue LED (2 s exposure) and the blue EL (which require ≥60 s exposure) while the limits of quantitation (LOQ) is about 1 nM. The LOD for white LED was higher at 1.4 nM while the white EL was not used for the assay due to a high variable background. Unlike the weaker intensity EL illumination the high intensity LED illumination enabled shorter exposure times and allowed multi-wavelength illumination without the need to physically change the excitation strip, thus making spectrum excitation of multiple fluorophores possible increasing the versatility of the detector platform for a variety of optical detection assays. PMID:20498728

  11. A High-resolution Multi-wavelength Simultaneous Imaging System with Solar Adaptive Optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Changhui; Zhu, Lei; Gu, Naiting; Rao, Xuejun; Zhang, Lanqiang; Bao, Hua; Kong, Lin; Guo, Youming; Zhong, Libo; Ma, Xue’an; Li, Mei; Wang, Cheng; Zhang, Xiaojun; Fan, Xinlong; Chen, Donghong; Feng, Zhongyi; Wang, Xiaoyun; Wang, Zhiyong

    2017-10-01

    A high-resolution multi-wavelength simultaneous imaging system from visible to near-infrared bands with a solar adaptive optics system, in which seven imaging channels, including the G band (430.5 nm), the Na i line (589 nm), the Hα line (656.3 nm), the TiO band (705.7 nm), the Ca ii IR line (854.2 nm), the He i line (1083 nm), and the Fe i line (1565.3 nm), are chosen, is developed to image the solar atmosphere from the photosphere layer to the chromosphere layer. To our knowledge, this is the solar high-resolution imaging system with the widest spectral coverage. This system was demonstrated at the 1 m New Vaccum Solar Telescope and the on-sky high-resolution observational results were acquired. In this paper, we will illustrate the design and performance of the imaging system. The calibration and the data reduction of the system are also presented.

  12. The Swift/UVOT Blazar Image Processing For Multi-Wavelength Campaigns And OJ287

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verrecchia, Francesco; Leto, C.; Giommi, P.; Ciprini, S.; et al.

    2016-10-01

    In the last years the Swift mission monitoring of non-GRB sources has become an essential tool in multi-frequencies time- domain studies. The ASI Science Data Center (ASDC), which hosts one of the three official Swift data archives and was deputy for the X-ray Telescope (XRT) Deep and Serendipitous surveys, has a long experience on Blazar multi-wavelength campaigns and has recently participated to various campaigns contemporary to observations of new space missions, such as Planck and NuSTAR (Balokovic et al 2016, Furniss et al. 2015, Giommi et al 2012). Since 2006 at the ASDC we have started an activity of UltraViolet Optical Telescope (UVOT) Blazar image processing. The dedicated standard processing procedure of UVOT images, using official software and calibrations, has the goal to add UVOT fluxes to source Spectral Energy Distributions (SEDs) and also support variability studies with comparison to X and gamma-ray data, even on the intra-observation time-scale. Currently data of about 430 sources have been processed, and results have been used in recent papers, such as those on Mkn 421 (Balokovic et al.2016) and OJ 287. The OJ287 UVOT image complete data processing is updated at each observation campaign and results have been published in some survey papers. The 2015 observations have been included in the internal long-term monitoring of the source and considered in the recent multi-frequency study Valtonen et al.(2016) of the new optical-UV outburst of the 12 years cycle, with comparison to the ground optical data and the contemporaneous Swift X-ray ones. We will report the results obtained with UVOT data.

  13. Hemodynamic and electrophysiological responses to functional activation accessed by multi-wavelength optical imaging and electrophysiological recording system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Nengyun; Liu, Yuan; Wang, Wenjia; Luo, Qingming; Li, Pengcheng

    2008-02-01

    A compact and convenient system is designed and realized for high-resolution simultaneous imaging hemodynamic parameters and recording electrophysiological signals in the brain by the combination of multi-wavelength optical imaging and electrophysiological recording system. Multi-wavelength optical imaging system uses an integration of light-emitting diode (LED which has three wavelengths) and laser diode (LD) as imaging illuminants to combine the laser speckle imaging and optical intrinsic signal imaging. Electrophysiological recording system is based on the virtual instrument technology. The spatial and temporal changes in oxy-hemoglobin, deoxy-hemoglobin, total hemoglobin concentration, cerebral blood flow, and the cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen in response to the brain activities are monitored by the multi-wavelength optical imaging system. Meanwhile the electrophysiological recording system can simultaneously collect the extra-cellular electrophysiological signals. The combination system provides the capability to simultaneously investigate hemodynamic parameters and electrophysiological signals, which may lead to a better understanding of the coupling between neuronal activation and vascular responses.

  14. Detector Having A Transmission Grating Beam Splitter For Multi-Wavelength Sample Analysis.

    DOEpatents

    Liu, Changsheng; Li, Qingbo

    2000-09-12

    A detector for DNA sample identification is provided with a transmission grating beam splitter (TGBS). The TGBS split fluoresced light from a tagged DNA sample into 0th order and a 1st order components, both of which are detected on a two-dimensional detector array of a CCD camera. The 0th and 1st order components are detected along a column of pixels in the detector array, and are spaced apart from one another. The DNA samples are tagged with four fluorescent dyes, one dye specific for each nucleotide, and all four dyes responding in slightly different manner to the same monochromatic excitation signal. The TGBS splits fluoresced incoming light into 0th and 1st order components, which are then spread out among a number of pixels in the detector array. The 1st component of this light is received by pixels whose position relative to the 0th order component depends on the frequency of fluorescence. Thus, the position at which signal energy is detected on the array is indicative of the particular dye, and therefore, the corresponding nucleotide tagged by that dye. Monitoring signal energy at the 0th order pixel and selected 1st order pixels, provides a set of data from which one may then identify the particular nucleotide.

  15. Detector Having A Transmission Grating Beam Splitter For Multi-Wavelength.

    DOEpatents

    Liu, Changsheng; Li, Qingbo (State College, PA

    1999-12-07

    A detector for DNA sample identification is provided with a transmission grating beam splitter (TGBS). The TGBS split fluoresced light from a tagged DNA sample into 0th order and a 1st order components, both of which are detected on a two-dimensional detector array of a CCD camera. The 0th and 1st order components are detected along a column of pixels in the detector array, and are spaced apart from one another. The DNA samples are tagged with four fluorescent dyes, one dye specific for each nucleotide, and all four dyes responding in slightly different manner to the same monochromatic excitation signal. The TGBS splits fluoresced incoming light into 0th and 1st order components, which are then spread out among a number of pixels in the detector array. The 1st component of this light is received by pixels whose position relative to the 0th order component depends on the frequency of fluorescence. Thus, the position at which signal energy is detected on the array is indicative of the particular dye, and therefore, the corresponding nucleotide tagged by that dye. Monitoring signal energy at the 0th order pixel and selected 1st order pixels, provides a set of data from which one may then identify the particular nucleotide.

  16. A time-resolved multi-wavelength fluorescence diffuse optical tomography system for small animal imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montcel, Bruno; Chabrier, Renee; Poulet, Patrick

    2005-08-01

    A tomographic approach, relying on diffuse near infrared photons to image the optical properties of tissues and the inner distribution of fluorescent probes is described. The method should improve the spatial resolution and quantification of fluorescence signals, thanks to multiple-projection acquisitions and to a reconstruction procedure using the principles of diffuse optical tomography. The scanner assembled uses picosecond laser diodes, an eight-anode photo-multiplier tube (PMT) and time-correlated single photon counting. Two sets of laser heads, each operating at four wavelengths, are fitted with furcated optical fibers, providing two sequential sources of light positioned on the animal or object studied. Multimode optical fibers are used to detect light at eight output points on the animal or object. These fibers are connected to the PMT, with an air-gap allowing the insertion of an optical filter to reject the excitation wavelength. The light sources and detectors can be rotated to increase the number of projections recorded. For the reconstruction process, the coordinates of the body surface of the animal to be imaged are necessary. These are acquired by interferometry, using a conoscope and an XY scanning system, before the animal is entered in the scanner. The profiles measured at the excitation wavelengths are used to compute absorption and reduced scattering images and perfusion/oxygenation images of the animal. Fluorescence images, free from diffusion and absorption artefacts, can then be computed with a-priori knowledge of the optical images of the animal. The scanner, its performances and images of light-scattering and fluorescent phantoms are presented.

  17. Multi-wavelength mid-infrared micro-spectral imaging using semiconductor lasers.

    PubMed

    Guo, B; Wang, Y; Peng, C; Luo, G P; Le, H Q

    2003-07-01

    Infrared (IR, 3-12-microm) microscopic spectral imaging is an important analytical technique. Many current instruments employ thermal IR light sources, which suffer the problem of low brightness and high noise. This paper evaluates the system engineering merit in using semiconductor lasers, which offer orders-of-magnitude-higher power, brightness, and lower noise. A microscopic spectral imaging system using semiconductor lasers (quantum cascade) as illuminators, and focal plane array detectors demonstrated a high signal-to-noise ratio (> 20 dB) at video frame rate for a large illuminated area. The comparative advantages of laser vs. thermal light source are analyzed and demonstrated. Microscopic spectral imaging with fixed-wavelength and tunable lasers of 4.6-, 5.1-, 6-, and 9.3-microm wavelength was applied to a number of representative samples that consist of biological tissues (plant and animal), solid material (a stack of laminated polymers), and liquid chemical (benzene). Transmission spectral images with approximately 30-dB dynamic range were obtained with clear evidence of spectral features for different samples. The potential of more advanced systems with a wide coverage of spectral bands is discussed.

  18. A compact, multi-wavelength, and high frequency response light source for diffuse optical spectroscopy and imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Kyoungsu; Lee, Minseok; Lee, Seung-ha; Cerussi, Albert E.; Chung, Phil-sang; Kim, Sehwan

    2015-03-01

    Many biomedical applications require an efficient combination and localization of multiple discrete light sources. In this paper, we present a compact six-channel combiner of optical sub-assembly type that couples the output of independent solid-state light sources into a single 400 μm diameter optical fiber. It is equipped with six discrete laser diodes, 658, 690, 705, 785, 830, and 850 nm for the measurement of the tissue optical properties from optical spectroscopy and imaging. We demonstrate coupling efficiencies ≥ 77% and output optical power ≥ 20 mW for each of the 6 laser diodes installed into the prototype. The design supports the use of continuous wave and intensity modulated laser diodes (with bandwidth ≥ 3 GHz). The developed light source could be used to construct custom multi-wavelength sources for tissue oximeters, diffuse optical imaging, and molecular imaging technologies.

  19. Improved quantitative phase imaging in lensless microscopy by single-shot multi-wavelength illumination using a fast convergence algorithm.

    PubMed

    Sanz, Martín; Picazo-Bueno, José Angel; García, Javier; Micó, Vicente

    2015-08-10

    We report on a novel algorithm for high-resolution quantitative phase imaging in a new concept of lensless holographic microscope based on single-shot multi-wavelength illumination. This new microscope layout, reported by Noom et al. along the past year and named by us as MISHELF (initials incoming from Multi-Illumination Single-Holographic-Exposure Lensless Fresnel) microscopy, rises from the simultaneous illumination and recording of multiple diffraction patterns in the Fresnel domain. In combination with a novel and fast iterative phase retrieval algorithm, MISHELF microscopy is capable of high-resolution (micron range) phase-retrieved (twin image elimination) biological imaging of dynamic events. In this contribution, MISHELF microscopy is demonstrated through qualitative concept description, algorithm implementation, and experimental validation using both a synthetic object (resolution test target) and a biological sample (swine sperm sample) for the case of three (RGB) illumination wavelengths. The proposed method becomes in an alternative instrument improving the capabilities of existing lensless microscopes.

  20. Multi-wavelength laser sensor surface for high frame rate imaging refractometry (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kristensen, Anders; Vannahme, Christoph; Sørensen, Kristian T.; Dufva, Martin

    2016-09-01

    A highly sensitive distributed feedback (DFB) dye laser sensor for high frame rate imaging refractometry without moving parts is presented. The laser sensor surface comprises areas of different grating periods. Imaging in two dimensions of space is enabled by analyzing laser light from all areas in parallel with an imaging spectrometer. Refractive index imaging of a 2 mm by 2 mm surface is demonstrated with a spatial resolution of 10 μm, a detection limit of 8 10-6 RIU, and a framerate of 12 Hz, limited by the CCD camera. Label-free imaging of dissolution dynamics is demonstrated.

  1. Real-time imaging for cerebral ischemia in rats using the multi-wavelength handheld photoacoustic system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yu-Hang; Xu, Yu; Chan, Kim Chuan; Mehta, Kalpesh; Thakor, Nitish; Liao, Lun-De

    2017-02-01

    Stroke is the second leading cause of death worldwide. Rapid and precise diagnosis is essential to expedite clinical decision and improve functional outcomes in stroke patients; therefore, real-time imaging plays an important role to provide crucial information for post-stroke recovery analysis. In this study, based on the multi-wavelength laser and 18.5 MHz array-based ultrasound platform, a real-time handheld photoacoustic (PA) system was developed to evaluate cerebrovascular functions pre- and post-stroke in rats. Using this system, hemodynamic information such as cerebral blood volume (CBV) can be acquired for assessment. One rat stroke model (i.e., photothrombotic ischemia (PTI)) was employed for evaluating the effect of local ischemia. For achieving better intrinsic PA contrast, Vantage and COMSOL simulations were applied to optimize the light delivery (e.g., interval between two arms) from customized fiber bundle, while phantom experiment was conducted to evaluate the imaging performance of this system. Results of phantom experiment showed that hairs ( 150 μm diameter) and pencil lead (500 μm diameter) can be imaged clearly. On the other hand, results of in vivo experiments also demonstrated that stroke symptoms can be observed in PTI model poststroke. In the near future, with the help of PA specific contrast agent, the system would be able to achieve blood-brain barrier leakage imaging post-stroke. Overall, the real-time handheld PA system holds great potential in disease models involving impairments in cerebrovascular functions.

  2. New Hubble Space Telescope Multi-Wavelength Imaging of the Eagle Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levay, Zoltan G.; Christian, Carol A.; Mack, Jennifer; Frattare, Lisa M.; Livio, Mario; Meyett, Michele L.; Mutchler, Maximilian J.; Noll, Keith S.; Hubble Heritage

    2015-01-01

    One of the most iconic images from the Hubble Space Telescope has been the 1995 WFPC2 image of the Eagle Nebula (M16, sometimes known as the "Pillars of Creation"). Nineteen years after those original observations, new images have been obtained with HST's current instrumentation: a small mosaic in visible-light, narrow-band filters with WFC3/UVIS, infrared, broad-band filters with WFC3/IR, and parallel Hα imaging with ACS/WFC. The wider field of view, higher resolution, and broader wavelength coverage of the new images highlight the improved capabilities of HST over its long-lasting operation, made possible by the upgraded instrumentation installed during Space Shuttle servicing missions. Csite images from these datasets are presented to commemorate the 25th anniversary of HST's launch. Carefully combined, aligned and calibrated datasets from the primary WFC3 fields are available as High-Level Science Products in MAST (http://archive.stsci.edu/prepds/heritage/). Color composite images from these datasets are presented to commemorate the 25th anniversary of HST's launch.

  3. HST/WFC3 Imaging and Multi-Wavelength Characterization of Edge-On Protoplanetary Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gould, Carolina; Duchene, Gaspard; Stapelfeldt, Karl R.; Menard, Francois; Padgett, Deborah; Perrin, Marshall D.; Pinte, Christophe; Wolff, Schuyler

    2016-06-01

    Edge-on views of protoplanetary disk systems provide a unique observing opportunity to assess the vertical dust structure of the disk, an opportunity that is not possible at any other viewing angle due to projection effects and the acute brightness of the central star. Comparing high-resolution scattered light images of edge-on disks with synthetic images from radiative transfer modeling is a powerful approach to constrain the disk mass, structure and dust content, although analyses based on single-wavelength images lead to ambiguous conclusions. In order to resolve these ambiguities, and to probe the most tenuous regions at high elevation above the disk midplane, it is critical to obtain high-resolution images of such objects at the shortest possible wavelengths, where dust opacity is maximized. In this contribution, we present new WFC3 F475W Hubble Space Telescope images of 6 known edge-on protoplanetary disks. We produced color maps across the visible band to identify and characterize wavelength-dependent properties of these disks. In turn, these allow us to differentiate features that are related to the dust properties (opacity, scattering phase function) from those tracing the physical structure of the disk (in particular its vertical density profile). By probing a diverse set of disks with a uniform approach, we will be able to probe possible signs of evolution in this critical stage of planet formation.

  4. Multi-wavelength sensitive holographic polymer dispersed liquid crystal grating applied within image splitter for autostereoscopic display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Jihong; Wang, Kangni; Gao, Hui; Lu, Feiyue; Sun, Lijia; Zhuang, Songlin

    2016-09-01

    Multi-wavelength sensitive holographic polymer dispersed liquid crystal (H-PDLC) grating and its application within image splitter for autostereoscopic display are reported in this paper. Two initiator systems consisting of photoinitiator, Methylene Blue and coinitiator, p-toluenesulfonic acid as well as photoinitiator, Rose Bengal and coinitiator, Nphenylglycine are employed. We demonstrate that Bragg gratings can be formed in this syrup polymerized under three lasers simultaneously including 632.8nm from He-Ne laser, 532nm from Verdi solid state laser, and 441.6nm from He- Cd laser. The diffraction efficiency of three kinds of gratings with different exposure wavelength are 57%, 75% and 33%, respectively. The threshold driving voltages of those gratings are 2.8, 3.05, and 2.85 V/μm, respectively. We also present the results for the feasibility of this proposed H-PDLC grating applied into image splitter without color dispersion for autostereoscopic display according to experimental splitting effect.

  5. Single camera system for multi-wavelength fluorescent imaging in the heart.

    PubMed

    Yamanaka, Takeshi; Arafune, Tatsuhiko; Shibata, Nitaro; Honjo, Haruo; Kamiya, Kaichiro; Kodama, Itsuo; Sakuma, Ichiro

    2012-01-01

    Optical mapping has been a powerful method to measure the cardiac electrophysiological phenomenon such as membrane potential(V(m)), intracellular calcium(Ca(2+)), and the other electrophysiological parameters. To measure two parameters simultaneously, the dual mapping system using two cameras is often used. However, the method to measure more than three parameters does not exist. To exploit the full potential of fluorescence imaging, an innovative method to measure multiple, more than three parameters is needed. In this study, we present a new optical mapping system which records multiple parameters using a single camera. Our system consists of one camera, custom-made optical lens units, and a custom-made filter wheel. The optical lens units is designed to focus the fluorescence light at filter position, and form an image on camera's sensor. To obtain optical signals with high quality, efficiency of light collection was carefully discussed in designing the optical system. The developed optical system has object space numerical aperture(NA) 0.1, and image space NA 0.23. The filter wheel was rotated by a motor, which allows filter switching corresponding with needed fluorescence wavelength. The camera exposure and filter switching were synchronized by phase locked loop, which allow this system to record multiple fluorescent signals frame by frame alternately. To validate the performance of this system, we performed experiments to observe V(m) and Ca(2+) dynamics simultaneously (frame rate: 125fps) with Langendorff perfused rabbit heart. Firstly, we applied basic stimuli to the heart base (cycle length: 500ms), and observed planer wave. The waveforms of V(m) and Ca(2+) show the same upstroke synchronized with cycle length of pacing. In addition, we recorded V(m) and Ca(2+) signals during ventricular fibrillation induced by burst pacing. According to these experiments, we showed the efficacy and availability of our method for cardiac electrophysiological research.

  6. Multi-wavelength thermal-infrared imaging of SL9 impact phenomena.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livengood, T. A.; Käufl, H. U.; Kostiuk, T.; Bjoraker, G. L.; Romani, P. N.; Wiedemann, G.; Mosser, B.; Sauvage, M.

    Jupiter was imaged in the thermal-infrared (λ ≍ 10 μm) on 15 - 18 and 22 - 31 July 1994 (UT). The site of fragment A impact showed substantial emission at λ ≍ 10 μm shortly after impact and a light curve was measured for 40 minutes post-impact. Strong emission was observed from the fragment H impact, including a "precursor" brightening observed 56 seconds after impact, well before the nominal impact longitude rotated into view on Jupiter's disc. The precursor event is interpreted as the debris front ("plume") from the explosive fireball phase of the impact, arriving at an altitude visible past the limb. Straightforward geometry (neglecting refraction) indicates that the impact H plume reached an altitude of at least ≍450 km above the tropopause (≍100 mbar), with a vertical speed of order 8 km/s. The main peak of the lightcurve for both impacts is interpreted as arising from the re-entry of plume ejecta into the upper atmosphere. The A and H lightcurves differ in the post-peak phase. Wavelength-dependent emission from the impact sites as of several hours post-impact differs between the filters and between the two impacts and is inconsistent with gray-body thermal emission.

  7. Position-sensitive multi-wavelength photon detectors based on epitaxial InGaAs/InAlAs quantum wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganbold, T.; Antonelli, M.; Cautero, G.; Menk, R. H.; Cucini, R.; Biasiol, G.

    2015-09-01

    Beam monitoring in synchrotron radiation or free electron laser facilities is extremely important for calibration and diagnostic issues. Here we propose an in-situ detector showing fast response and homogeneity for both diagnostics and calibration purposes. The devices are based on In0.75Ga0.25As/In0.75Al0.25As QWs, which offer several advantages due to their direct, low-energy band gap and high electron mobility at room temperature. A pixelation structure with 4 quadrants was developed on the back surface of the device, in order to fit commercially available readout chips. The QW devices have been tested with collimated monochromatic X-ray beams from synchrotron radiation. A rise in the current noise with positive bias was observed, which could be due to deep traps for hole carriers. Therefore, an optimized negative bias was chosen to minimize dark currents and noise. A decrease in charge collection efficiency was experienced as the beam penetrates into deeper layers, where a dislocation network is present. The prototype samples showed that individual currents obtained from each quadrant allow the position of the beam to be monitored for all the utilized energies. These detectors have a potential to estimate the position of the beam with a precision of about 10 μm.

  8. Multi-wavelength fluorescence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwong, Tiffany C.; Lo, Pei-An; Cho, Jaedu; Nouizi, Farouk; Chiang, Huihua K.; Kim, Chang-Seok; Gulsen, Gultekin

    2016-03-01

    The strong scattering and absorption of light in biological tissue makes it challenging to model the propagation of light, especially in deep tissue. This is especially true in fluorescent tomography, which aims to recover the internal fluorescence source distribution from the measured light intensities on the surface of the tissue. The inherently ill-posed and underdetermined nature of the inverse problem along with strong tissue scattering makes Fluorescence Tomography (FT) extremely challenging. Previously, multispectral detection fluorescent tomography (FT) has been shown to improve the image quality of FT by incorporating the spectral filtering of biological tissue to provide depth information to overcome the inherent absorption and scattering limitations. We investigate whether multi-wavelength fluorescent tomography can be used to distinguish the signals from multiple fluorophores with overlapping fluorescence spectrums using a unique near-infrared (NIR) swept laser. In this work, a small feasibility study was performed to see whether multi-wavelength FT can be used to detect subtle shifts in the absorption spectrum due to differences in fluorophore microenvironment.

  9. High-performance size exclusion chromatography with a multi-wavelength absorbance detector study on dissolved organic matter characterisation along a water distribution system.

    PubMed

    Huang, Huiping; Sawade, Emma; Cook, David; Chow, Christopher W K; Drikas, Mary; Jin, Bo

    2016-06-01

    This study examined the associations between dissolved organic matter (DOM) characteristics and potential nitrification occurrence in the presence of chloramine along a drinking water distribution system. High-performance size exclusion chromatography (HPSEC) coupled with a multiple wavelength detector (200-280nm) was employed to characterise DOM by molecular weight distribution, bacterial activity was analysed using flow cytometry, and a package of simple analytical tools, such as dissolved organic carbon, absorbance at 254nm, nitrate, nitrite, ammonia and total disinfectant residual were also applied and their applicability to indicate water quality changes in distribution systems were also evaluated. Results showed that multi-wavelength HPSEC analysis was useful to provide information about DOM character while changes in molecule weight profiles at wavelengths less than 230nm were also able to be related to other water quality parameters. Correct selection of the UV wavelengths can be an important factor for providing appropriate indicators associated with different DOM compositions. DOM molecular weight in the range of 0.2-0.5kDa measured at 210nm correlated positively with oxidised nitrogen concentration (r=0.99), and the concentrations of active bacterial cells in the distribution system (r=0.85). Our study also showed that the changes of DOM character and bacterial cells were significant in those sampling points that had decreases in total disinfectant residual. HPSEC-UV measured at 210nm and flow cytometry can detect the changes of low molecular weight of DOM and bacterial levels, respectively, when nitrification occurred within the chloraminated distribution system. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. Multi-wavelength holographic profilometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbosa, E. A.; Gesualdi, M. R.; Muramatsu, M.

    2006-01-01

    A novel method for surface profilometry by holography is presented. We used a diode laser emitting at many wavelengths simultaneously as the light source and a Bi 12TiO 20 (BTO) crystal as the holographic medium in single exposure processes. The employ of multi-wavelength, large free spectral range (FSR) lasers leads to holographic images covered of interference fringes corresponding to the contour lines of the studied surface. In order to obtain the relief of the studied surface, the fringe analysis was performed by the phase stepping technique (PST) and the phase unwrapping was carried out by the Cellular-automata method. We analysed the relief of a tilted flat metallic bar and a tooth prosthesis.

  11. Dust Temperatures and Opacities in the Central Parsec of the Galactic Center Modeled from Analysis of Multi-Wavelength Mid-Infrared Images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Varosi, F.; Gezari, D.; Dwek, E.; Telesco, C.

    2016-01-01

    We have analyzed multi-wavelength mid-infrared images of the central parsec of the Galactic Center using a two-temperature line-of-sight (LOS) radiative transfer model at each pixel of the images, giving maps of temperatures, luminosities and opacities of the hot, warm, cold (dark)dust components. The data consists of images at nine wavelengths in the mid-infrared (N-band and Q-band) from the Thermal Region Camera and Spectrograph (T-ReCS) instrument operating at the Gemini South Observatory. The results of the LOS modeling indicate that the extinction optical depth is quite large and varies substantially over the FOV. The high-resolution images of the central parsec of the Galactic center region were obtained with T-ReCS at Gemini South in January 2004. These images provide nearly diffraction-limited resolution (approx. 0.5) of the central parsec. The T-ReCS images were taken with nine filters (3.8, 4.7, 7.7, 8.7, 9.7, 10.3, 12.3, 18.3 and 24.5m), over a field-of-view (FOV) of 20 x 20 arcsec.

  12. Multi-wavelength Study of Transition Region Penumbral Bright Dots Using Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph and New Solar Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Na; Yurchyshyn, Vasyl B.; Tian, Hui; Kleint, Lucia; Liu, Chang; Xu, Yan; Wang, Haimin

    2016-05-01

    Using high-resolution transition region (TR) observations taken by the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) mission, Tian et al. (2014b) revealed numerous short-lived sub-arcsecond bright dots above sunspots (mostly located in the penumbrae), which indicate yet unexplained small-scale energy releases. Moreover, whether these TR brightenings have any signature in the lower atmosphere and how they are formed are still not fully resolved. This paper presents a study of these bright dots using a coordinated observation of a near disk-center sunspot with IRIS and the 1.6 m New Solar Telescope (NST) at the Big Bear Solar Observatory. NST provides high-resolution chromospheric and photospheric observations with narrow-band H-alpha imaging spectroscopy and broad-band TiO images, respectively, complementary to IRIS TR observations. A total of 2692 TR penumbral bright dots are identified from a 37-minute time series of IRIS 1400 A slitjaw images. Their locations tend to be associated more with downflowing and darker fibrils in the chromosphere, and weakly associated with bright penumbral features in the photosphere. However, temporal evolution analyses of the dots show that there is no consistent and convincing brightening response in the chromosphere. These results are compatible with a formation mechanism of the TR penumbral bright dots by falling plasma from coronal heights along more vertical and dense magnetic loops. The dots may also be produced by small-scale impulsive magnetic reconnection taking place sufficiently high in the atmosphere that has no energy release in the chromosphere.Acknowledgement: This work is mainly supported by NASA grants NNX14AC12G, NNX13AF76G and by NSF grant AGS 1408703.

  13. Mapping the Ionization State of Laser-Irradiated Ar Gas Jets With Multi-Wavelength Monochromatic X-Ray Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Kugland, N L; Doppner, T; Kemp, A; Schaeffer, D; Glenzer, S H; Niemann, C

    2010-04-08

    Two-dimensional monochromatic images of fast-electron stimulated Ar K{alpha} and He-{alpha} x-ray self-emission have recorded a time-integrated map of the extent of Ar{sup {approx}6+} and Ar{sup 16+} ions, respectively, within a high density (10{sup 20} cm{sup -3} atomic density) Ar plasma. This plasma was produced by irradiating a 2 mm wide clustering Ar gas jet with an ultra-high intensity (10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2}, 200 fs) Ti:Sapphire laser operating at 800 nm. Spherically bent quartz crystals in the 200 (for K{alpha}) and 201 (for He-{alpha}) planes were used as near-normal incidence reflective x-ray optics. We see that a large (830 {micro}m long) region of plasma emits K{alpha} primarily along the laser axis, while the He-{alpha} emission is confined to smaller hot spot (230 {micro}m long) region that likely corresponds to the focal volume of the f/8 laser beam. X-ray spectra from a Bragg spectrometer operating in the von Hamos geometry, which images in one dimension, indicate that the centroids of the K{alpha} and He-{alpha} emission regions are separated by approximately 330 {micro}m along the laser axis.

  14. INTEGRAL FIELD SPECTROSCOPY AND MULTI-WAVELENGTH IMAGING OF THE NEARBY SPIRAL GALAXY NGC 5668 : AN UNUSUAL FLATTENING IN METALLICITY GRADIENT

    SciTech Connect

    Marino, R. A.; Gil de Paz, A.; Castillo-Morales, A.; Perez-Gonzalez, P. G.; Gallego, J.; Zamorano, J.; Sanchez, S. F.

    2012-07-20

    We present an analysis of the full bidimensional optical spectral cube of the nearby spiral galaxy NGC 5668, observed with the Pmas fiber PAcK Integral Field Unit (IFU) at the Calar Alto observatory 3.5 m telescope. We make use of broadband imaging to provide further constraints on the evolutionary history of the galaxy. This data set will allow us to improve our understanding of the mechanisms that drive the evolution of disks. We investigated the properties of 62 H II regions and concentric rings in NGC 5668 and derived maps in ionized-gas attenuation and chemical (oxygen) abundances. We find that while inward of r {approx}36'' {approx} 4.4 kpc {approx} 0.36 (D{sub 25}/2) the derived O/H ratio follows the radial gradient typical of spiral galaxies, the abundance gradient beyond r {approx} 36'' flattens out. The analysis of the multi-wavelength surface brightness profiles of NGC 5668 is performed by fitting these profiles with those predicted by chemo-spectrophotometric evolutionary models of galaxy disks. From this, we infer a spin and circular velocity of {lambda} = 0.053 and v{sub c} = 167 km s{sup -1}, respectively. The metallicity gradient and rotation curve predicted by this best-fitting galaxy model nicely match the values derived from the IFU observations, especially within r {approx}36''. The same is true for the colors despite some small offsets and a reddening in the bluest colors beyond that radius. On the other hand, deviations of some of these properties in the outer disk indicate that a secondary mechanism, possibly gas transfer induced by the presence of a young bar, must have played a role in shaping the recent chemical and star formation histories of NGC 5668.

  15. Multi-wavelength applications of gravitational lensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fadely, Ross

    2010-12-01

    Using an array of multi-wavelength data, we examine a variety of astrophysical problems with gravitational lensing. First, we seek to understand the mass distribution of an early-type galaxy with an analysis of the lens Q0957+561. We dissect the lens galaxy into luminous and dark components, and model the environment using results from weak lensing. Combining constraints from newly-discovered lensed images and stellar population models, we find the lens has a density profile which is shallower than isothermal, unlike those of typical early-type galaxies. Finally, using the measured time delay between the quasar images we find the Hubble constant to be H 0 = 79.3+6.7-8.5 km s-1 Mpc-1 . One intriguing application of lensing is to exploit the lens magnification boost to study high-redshift objects in greater detail than otherwise possible. Here, we analyze the mid-infrared properties of two lensed z ˜ 2 star-forming galaxies, SDSS J120602.09+514229.5 and SDSS J090122.37+181432.3, using Spitzer /IRS spectra to study their rest-frame ˜ 5-12 μm emission. Both systems exhibit strong polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) features in the spectra, indicating strong star formation and the absence of significant AGN activity. For SDSS J090122.37+181432.3, this detection belies that inferred from optical measurements, indicating mid-IR spectroscopy provides key information needed to understand the properties of high-redshift star-forming galaxies. While lensing provides measurements of the macroscopic properties of lens systems, it can also shed light on small-scale structure of galaxies. To identify and understand lens substructure, we examine the multi-wavelength properties of flux ratios for six lenses. Variations of the flux ratios with wavelength can be used to study the lensed quasars and the small-scale mass distribution of lens galaxies. We detect strong multi-wavelength variations in the lenses HE 0435-1223 and SDSS 0806+2006. For HE 0435-1223, we study its

  16. A multi-wavelength (u.v. to visible) laser system for early detection of oral cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Najda, S. P.; Perlin, P.; Leszczyński, M.; Slight, T. J.; Meredith, W.; Schemmann, M.; Moseley, H.; Woods, J. A.; Valentine, R.; Kalra, S.; Mossey, P.; Theaker, E.; Macluskey, M.; Mimnagh, G.; Mimnagh, W.

    2015-03-01

    A multi-wavelength (360nm - 440nm), real-time Photonic Cancer Detector (PCD) optical system based on GaN semiconductor laser technology is outlined. A proof of concept using blue laser technology for early detection of cancer has already been tested and proven for esophageal cancer. This concept is expanded to consider a wider range of wavelengths and the PCD will initially be used for early diagnosis of oral cancers. The PCD creates an image of the oral cavity (broad field white light detection) and maps within the oral cavity any suspicious lesions with high sensitivity using a narrow field tunable detector.

  17. Integrated Dual Imaging Detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rust, David M.

    1999-01-01

    A new type of image detector was designed to simultaneously analyze the polarization of light at all picture elements in a scene. The integrated Dual Imaging detector (IDID) consists of a lenslet array and a polarizing beamsplitter bonded to a commercial charge coupled device (CCD). The IDID simplifies the design and operation of solar vector magnetographs and the imaging polarimeters and spectroscopic imagers used, for example, in atmosphere and solar research. When used in a solar telescope, the vector magnetic fields on the solar surface. Other applications include environmental monitoring, robot vision, and medical diagnoses (through the eye). Innovations in the IDID include (1) two interleaved imaging arrays (one for each polarization plane); (2) large dynamic range (well depth of 10(exp 5) electrons per pixel); (3) simultaneous readout and display of both images; and (4) laptop computer signal processing to produce polarization maps in field situations.

  18. Oscillation signature from multi-wavelength analysis on solar chromosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Mumpuni, Emanuel Sungging; Herdiwijaya, Dhani; Djamal, Mitra

    2014-03-24

    In this work, we investigate how the solar chromosphere responds to the photospheric dynamics by using tomography study, implementing multiwavelength analysis observations obtained from Dutch Open Telescope. By using high resolution, high-quality, simultaneous image sequences of multi-wavelength data, we try to obtain the oscillation signature that might play important role on chromospheric dynamic by using H-alpha (Hα) as primary diagnostic tool.

  19. Multi-wavelength Luminosity Functions of Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gardner, J. P.; Miller, N. A.

    2002-01-01

    Multivariate or multi-wavelength luminosity functions will reveal the interplay between star formation, chemical evolution, and absorption and re-emission of dust within evolving galaxy populations. By using principal component analysis to reduce the dimensionality of the problem, we optimally extract the relevant photometric information from large galaxy catalogs. As a demonstration of the technique, we derive the multi-wavelength luminosity function for the galaxies in the released SDSS catalog, and compare the results with those obtained by traditional methods. This technique will be applicable to catalogs of galaxies from datasets obtained by 2MASS, and the SIRTF and GALEX missions.

  20. Multi-Wavelength Luminosity Functions of Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gardner, Jonathan P.

    2002-01-01

    Multivariate or multi-wavelength luminosity functions will reveal the interplay between star formation, chemical evolution, and ab- sorption and re-emission of dust within evolving galaxy populations. By using principal component analysis to reduce the dimensionality of the problem, I optimally extract the relevant photometric information from large galaxy catalogs. As a demonstration of the technique, I derive the multi-wavelength luminosity function for the galaxies in the released SDSS catalog, and compare the results with those obtained by traditional methods. This technique will be applicable to catalogs of galaxies from datasets obtained by 2MASS, and the SIRTF and GALEX missions.

  1. A New Approach to the Optimization of the Extraction of Astrometric and Photometric Information from Multi-wavelength Images in Cosmological Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marquez, Maria Jose

    This paper describes a new approach to the optimization of information extraction in multiwavelength image cubes of cosmological fields. The objective is to create a framework for the automatic identification and tagging of sources according to various criteria (isolated source, partially overlapped, fully overlapped, cross-matched, etc.) and to set the basis for the automatic production of the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) for all objects detected in the many multiwavelength images in cosmological fields. To do this, a processing pipeline is designed that combines Voronoi tessellation, Bayesian cross-matching, and active contours to create a graph-based representation of the cross-match probabilities. This pipeline produces a set of SEDs with quality tags suitable for the application of already proven data mining methods. The pipeline briefly described here is also applicable to other astrophysical scenarios such as star forming regions.

  2. Multi-Wavelength Observations of Supernova Remnants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, B.

    2012-01-01

    Supernova remnants (SNRs) provide a laboratory for studying various astrophysical processes, including particle acceleration, thermal and non thermal emission processes across the spectrum, distribution of heavy elements, the physics of strong shock waves, and the progenitor systems and environments of supernovae. Long studied in radio and X-rays, the past decade has seen a dramatic increase in the detection and subsequent study of SNRs in the infrared and gamma-ray regimes. Understanding the evolution of SNRs and their interaction with the interstellar medium requires a multi-wavelength approach. I will review the various physical processes observed in SNRs and how these processes are intertwined. In particular, I will focus on X-ray and infrared observations, which probe two very different but intrinsically connected phases of the ISM: gas and dust. I will discuss results from multi-wavelength studies of several SNRs at various stages of evolution, including Kepler, RCW 86, and the Cygnus Loop.

  3. A multi-wavelength study of the 2009 impact on Jupiter: Comparison of high resolution images from Gemini, Keck and HST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Pater, Imke; Fletcher, Leigh N.; Pérez-Hoyos, Santiago; Hammel, Heidi B.; Orton, Glenn S.; Wong, Michael H.; Luszcz-Cook, Statia; Sánchez-Lavega, Agustin; Boslough, Mark

    2010-12-01

    Within several days of A. Wesley's announcement that Jupiter was hit by an object on UT 19 July 2009, we observed the impact site with (1) the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) at UV through visible (225-924 nm) wavelengths, (2) the 10-m W.M. Keck II telescope in the near-infrared (1-5 μm), and (3) the 8-m Gemini-North telescope in the mid-infrared (7.7-18 μm). All observations reported here were obtained between 22 and 25 July 2009. Observations at visible and near-infrared wavelengths show that large (˜0.75-μm radius) dark (imaginary index of refraction mi ˜ 0.01-0.1) particulates were deposited at atmospheric pressures between 10 and 200-300 mbar; analysis of HST-UV data reveals that in addition smaller-sized (˜0.1 μm radius) material must have been deposited at the highest altitudes (˜10 mbar). Differences in morphology between the UV and visible/near-IR images suggest three-dimensional variations in particle size and density across the impact site, which probably were induced during the explosion and associated events. At mid-infrared wavelengths the brightness temperature increased due to both an enhancement in the stratospheric NH 3 gas abundance and the physical temperature of the atmosphere. This high brightness temperature coincides with the center part of the impact site as seen with HST. This observation, combined with (published) numerical simulations of the Shoemaker-Levy 9 impacts on Jupiter and the Tunguska airburst on Earth, suggests that the downward jet from the terminal explosion probably penetrated down to the ˜700-mbar level.

  4. Imaging alpha particle detector

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, David F.

    1985-01-01

    A method and apparatus for detecting and imaging alpha particles sources is described. A conducting coated high voltage electrode (1) and a tungsten wire grid (2) constitute a diode configuration discharge generator for electrons dislodged from atoms or molecules located in between these electrodes when struck by alpha particles from a source (3) to be quantitatively or qualitatively analyzed. A thin polyester film window (4) allows the alpha particles to pass into the gas enclosure and the combination of the glass electrode, grid and window is light transparent such that the details of the source which is imaged with high resolution and sensitivity by the sparks produced can be observed visually as well. The source can be viewed directly, electronically counted or integrated over time using photographic methods. A significant increase in sensitivity over other alpha particle detectors is observed, and the device has very low sensitivity to gamma or beta emissions which might otherwise appear as noise on the alpha particle signal.

  5. Imaging alpha particle detector

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, D.F.

    1980-10-29

    A method and apparatus for detecting and imaging alpha particles sources is described. A dielectric coated high voltage electrode and a tungsten wire grid constitute a diode configuration discharge generator for electrons dislodged from atoms or molecules located in between these electrodes when struck by alpha particles from a source to be quantitatively or qualitatively analyzed. A thin polyester film window allows the alpha particles to pass into the gas enclosure and the combination of the glass electrode, grid and window is light transparent such that the details of the source which is imaged with high resolution and sensitivity by the sparks produced can be observed visually as well. The source can be viewed directly, electronically counted or integrated over time using photographic methods. A significant increase in sensitivity over other alpha particle detectors is observed, and the device has very low sensitivity to gamma or beta emissions which might otherwise appear as noise on the alpha particle signal.

  6. The Spectropyrometer—a Practical Multi-wavelength Pyrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felice, Ralph A.

    2003-09-01

    An expert-system multi-wavelength pyrometer, commercially available since 1997 and using a spectrophotometer as its detector, has been able to overcome many well-known difficulties of pyrometry, including unknown, changing, and/or spectral dependence of emissivity as well as environmental absorption of radiation. In addition to a spectrophotometer and the usual optics, the instrument includes a computer which analyzes each measurement and then returns the temperature, the tolerance (a real-time measure of accuracy), and the signal strength (a quantity directly related to the emissivity at a chosen wavelength). The computer allows the input data, namely the thermal spectrum for each temperature measurement, to be saved. Accuracy to 0.10 % is routinely achieved.

  7. Emissivity measurements of shocked tin using a multi-wavelength integrating sphere

    SciTech Connect

    Seifter, A; Holtkamp, D B; Iverson, A J; Stevens, G D; Turley, W D; Veeser, L R; Wilke, M D; Young, J A

    2011-11-01

    Pyrometric measurements of radiance to determine temperature have been performed on shock physics experiments for decades. However, multi-wavelength pyrometry schemes sometimes fail to provide credible temperatures in experiments, which incur unknown changes in sample emissivity, because an emissivity change also affects the spectral radiance. Hence, for shock physics experiments using pyrometry to measure temperatures, it is essential to determine the dynamic sample emissivity. The most robust way to determine the normal spectral emissivity is to measure the spectral normal-hemispherical reflectance using an integrating sphere. In this paper we describe a multi-wavelength (1.6–5.0 μm) integrating sphere system that utilizes a “reversed” scheme, which we use for shock physics experiments. The sample to be shocked is illuminated uniformly by scattering broadband light from inside a sphere onto the sample. A portion of the light reflected from the sample is detected at a point 12° from normal to the sample surface. For this experiment, we used the system to measure emissivity of shocked tin at four wavelengths for shock stress values between 17 and 33 GPa. The results indicate a large increase in effective emissivity upon shock release from tin when the shock is above 24–25 GPa, a shock stress that partially melts the sample. We also recorded an IR image of one of the shocked samples through the integrating sphere, and the emissivity inferred from the image agreed well with the integrating-sphere, pyrometer-detector data. Here, we discuss experimental data, uncertainties, and a data analysis process. We also describe unique emissivity-measurement problems arising from shock experiments and methods to overcome such problems.

  8. Transmission diamond imaging detector

    SciTech Connect

    Smedley, John Pinelli, Don; Gaoweia, Mengjia; Muller, Erik; Ding, Wenxiang; Zhou, Tianyi; Bohon, Jen

    2016-07-27

    Many modern synchrotron techniques are trending toward use of high flux beams and/or beams which require enhanced stability and precise understanding of beam position and intensity from the front end of the beamline all the way to the sample. For high flux beams, major challenges include heat load management in optics (including the vacuum windows) and a mechanism of real-time volumetric measurement of beam properties such as flux, position, and morphology. For beam stability in these environments, feedback from such measurements directly to control systems for optical elements or to sample positioning stages would be invaluable. To address these challenges, we are developing diamond-based instrumented vacuum windows with integrated volumetric x-ray intensity, beam profile and beam-position monitoring capabilities. A 50 µm thick single crystal diamond has been lithographically patterned to produce 60 µm pixels, creating a >1kilopixel free-standing transmission imaging detector. This device, coupled with a custom, FPGA-based readout, has been used to image both white and monochromatic x-ray beams and capture the last x-ray photons at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS). This technology will form the basis for the instrumented end-station window of the x-ray footprinting beamline (XFP) at NSLS-II.

  9. Ultrafast charge division imaging detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Alan; Woo, Brian; Odom, Robert W.

    2000-11-01

    We have developed position computing electronics having less than 60 ns dead times for resistive anode encoders, a form of charge division imaging detector. These electronics are at least a factor of 5 faster than anything available commercially and are based on using a fast, self-resetting charge integrator and subrange digital division techniques. Our primary application for this detector is secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS)/ions imaging and we demonstrate that SIMS imaging applications using these ultrafast electronics can readily be performed at ion intensities above 106 cps. This article discusses the overall electronics design and presents experimental data on dead-time measurements, detector lateral resolution, and SIMS imaging.

  10. Multi-wavelength probes of distant lensed galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serjeant, Stephen

    2012-08-01

    I summarise recent results on multi-wavelength properties of distant lensed galaxies, with a particular focus on Herschel. Submm surveys have already resulted in a breakthrough discovery of an extremely efficient selection technique for strong gravitational lenses. Benefitting from the gravitational magnification boost, blind mm-wave redshifts have been demonstrated on IRAM, SMA and GBT, and follow-up emission line detections have been made of water, [Oiii], [Cii] and other species, revealing the PDR/XDR/CRDR conditions. I also discuss HST imaging of submm lenses, lensed galaxy reconstruction, the prospects for ALMA and e-Merlin and the effects of differential magnification. Many emission line diagnostics are relatively unaffected by differential magnification, but SED-based estimates of bolometric fractions in lensed infrared galaxies are so unreliable as to be useless, unless a lens mass model is available to correct for differential amplification.

  11. Multi-wavelength characterization of carbonaceous aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massabò, Dario; Caponi, Lorenzo; Chiara Bove, Maria; Piazzalunga, Andrea; Valli, Gianluigi; Vecchi, Roberta; Prati, Paolo

    2014-05-01

    Carbonaceous aerosol is a major component of the urban PM. It mainly consists of organic carbon (OC) and elemental carbon (EC) although a minor fraction of carbonate carbon could be also present. Elemental carbon is mainly found in the finer PM fractions (PM2.5 and PM1) and it is strongly light absorbing. When determined by optical methods, it is usually called black carbon (BC). The two quantities, EC and BC, even if both related to the refractory components of carbonaceous aerosols, do not exactly define the same PM component (Bond and Bergstrom, 2006; and references therein). Moreover, another fraction of light-absorbing carbon exists which is not black and it is generally called brown carbon (Andreae and Gelencsér, 2006). We introduce a simple, fully automatic, multi-wavelength and non-destructive optical system, actually a Multi-Wavelength Absorbance Analyzer, MWAA, to measure off-line the light absorption in Particulate Matter (PM) collected on filters and hence to derive the black and brown carbon content in the PM This gives the opportunity to measure in the same sample the concentration of total PM by gravimetric analysis, black and brown carbon, metals by, for instance, X Ray Fluorescence, and finally ions by Ion Chromatography. Up to 16 samples can be analyzed in sequence and in an automatic and controlled way within a few hours. The filter absorbance measured by MWAA was successfully validated both against a MAAP, Multi Angle Absorption Photometer (Petzold and Schönlinner, 2004), and the polar photometer of the University of Milan. The measurement of sample absorbance at three wavelengths gives the possibility to apportion different sources of carbonaceous PM, for instance fossil fuels and wood combustion. This can be done following the so called "aethalometer method" (Sandradewi et al., 2008;) but with some significant upgrades that will be discussed together the results of field campaigns in rural and urban sites. Andreae, M.O, and Gelencsér, A

  12. Multi-wavelength studies of VHE gamma-ray blazars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gall, Daniel D.

    2010-12-01

    Blazars, particularly those detected in TeV gamma-rays, are some of the most violent astrophysical objects yet observered. They display extreme variability on multiple timescales over a broad range of energies. These sources make excellent laboratories for studying the environment within the jets of active galactic nuclei, as the bulk of the detected emission is from the jets. These sources have been well studied at multiple wavelengths, and much insight has been gained into the nature of these extreme objects. This work described in this dissertation attempts to expand the understanding of two particular blazars, Markarian 421 and Markarian 501, by improving on previous observational techniques and utilizing state of the art detectors for obtaining data. The first project described focused on obtaining strictly simultaneous multi-wavelength data, covering a broad energy range, to search for any multi-wavelength correlations and to provide an accurate spectral energy distribution. This simultaneous data is essential for these sources due to their rapid variability. The most widely accepted models for emission within blazars, known as synchrotron self Compton, depend on a strong connection between the X-ray and gamma-ray photons. The simplest of these models predicts a strong correlation between the observed flux in these two bands, but this study did not observe such a correlation, though the synchrotron self Compton models could match the data. The second project focused on obtaining a state of the art measurement of the quiescent state of the blazar Markarian 501. This object is generally quite weak, and previous very high energy (E > 100 GeV) gamma-ray experiments were not able to detect the source in the quiescent state. Neither was the source detected by previous gamma-ray space telescopes operating in a lower energy range. This project used data from the current generation of experiments to obtain a carefully sampled spectral energy distribution of the source

  13. Understanding Grb Physics With Multi-Wavelength Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Bing

    The study of Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) has entered a full multi-wavelength era. A rich trove of data from NASA GRB missions and ground-based follow up observations have been collected. Careful data mining with well-defined scientific objectives holds the key to address open questions in GRB physics, such as jet composition, radiation mechanism, progenitor and central engine physics. We propose to perform data analyses in the following three directions. 1. The time resolved GRB spectra have a dominant component that can be fit with a phenomenological ``Band'' function. The physical meaning of this function remains unclear. Recently we made a breakthrough in theoretical modeling, and showed that fast-cooling synchrotron radiation of electrons in a decreasing magnetic field can mimic the Band function in detector's bandpass, but differs from Band function slightly. We propose to apply this physically-motivated model to systematically fit the GRB prompt emission data collected by Fermi GBM and LAT, and test whether the dominant GRB emission mechanism is fast cooling synchrotron radiation. We will also fit time-dependent spectra with a time-dependent model to investigate whether a quasi- thermal "photosphere'' emission component is indeed needed to fit the observed spectra. This would shed light onto the unknown composition of GRB jets. By fitting the time resolved spectra, we will also constrain important physical parameters of GRB prompt emission, such as the emission site of GRBs, the strength of magnetic fields, as well as their evolution with radius. 2. Recent GRB multi-wavelength observations suggest that it is not straightforward to define the physical category of a GRB based on the traditional classification in the "duration''-"hardness'' domain. Some long-duration GRBs may not have a massive star origin, while some short-duration GRBs may instead have a massive star origin. We propose to systematically study the gamma-ray Swift/BAT, Fermi/GBM- LAT), X-ray (Swift

  14. Multi-wavelength Observations of Microflares Near an Active Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bein, B.; Veronig, A.; Rybak, J.; Gömöry, P.; Berkebile-Stoiser, S.; Sütterlin, P.

    We study the multi-wavelength characteristics of a microflaring active region (AR 10898) near disc centre. The analysed data were from the 4^{th} of July 2006, and were recorded by DOT (Hα, Ca II H), RHESSI (X-rays), TRACE (EUV) and SOHO/MDI (magnetograms). The identified microflare events were studied with respect to their magnetic field configuration and their multi-wavelength time evolution.

  15. The ROSAT WFC imaging detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barstow, M. A.; Sansom, A. E.

    1990-11-01

    Results of the calibration program performed on flight and flight-spare detectors for the Rosat Wide Field Camera (WFC) are presented. The result of an accelerated life test on a development model detector assembled to flight standard are summarized. Imaging tests demonstrate that the lookup table technique for removing distortion works efficiency with low differential nonlinearity. No undesirable 'chicken wire' effects are seen in the images, and the detector resolution matches the on-axis performance of the telescope and is constant across the field of view. Peaks in efficiency occur at 10.2, 20, and 100 eV and mimima at 13 and 45 eV. The secondary 13 eV minimum is correlated with the onset of two-electron photoemission. The mean change in gain as a function of photon energy in the EUV band is much less rapid than in the soft X-ray band.

  16. Multi-wavelength follow-up of ANTARES neutrino alerts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathieu, Aurore

    2015-10-01

    Transient sources are often associated with the most violent phenomena in the Universe, where the acceleration of hadrons may occur. Such sources include gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), active galactic nuclei (AGN) or core-collapse supernovae (CCSNe), and are promising candidates for the production of high energy cosmic rays and neutrinos. The ANTARES telescope, located in the Mediterranean sea, aims at detecting these high energy neutrinos, which could reveal the presence of a cosmic ray accelerator. However, to enhance the sensitivity to transient sources, a method based on multi-wavelength follow-up of neutrino alerts has been developed within the ANTARES collaboration. This program, denoted as TAToO, triggers a network of robotic optical telescopes and the Swift-XRT with a delay of only a few seconds after a neutrino detection. The telescopes start an observation program of the corresponding region of the sky in order to detect a possible electromagnetic counterpart to the neutrino event. The work presented in this thesis covers the development and implementation of an optical image analysis pipeline, as well as the analysis of optical and X-ray data to search for fast transient sources, such as GRB afterglows, and slowly varying transient sources, such as CCSNe.

  17. Measurement and correction of transverse chromatic offsets for multi-wavelength retinal microscopy in the living eye.

    PubMed

    Harmening, Wolf M; Tiruveedhula, Pavan; Roorda, Austin; Sincich, Lawrence C

    2012-09-01

    A special challenge arises when pursuing multi-wavelength imaging of retinal tissue in vivo, because the eye's optics must be used as the main focusing elements, and they introduce significant chromatic dispersion. Here we present an image-based method to measure and correct for the eye's transverse chromatic aberrations rapidly, non-invasively, and with high precision. We validate the technique against hyperacute psychophysical performance and the standard chromatic human eye model. In vivo correction of chromatic dispersion will enable confocal multi-wavelength images of the living retina to be aligned, and allow targeted chromatic stimulation of the photoreceptor mosaic to be performed accurately with sub-cellular resolution.

  18. Multi-Wavelength Views of Messier 81

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on individual images below for larger view

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    The magnificent spiral arms of the nearby galaxy Messier 81 are highlighted in this image from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope. Located in the northern constellation of Ursa Major (which also includes the Big Dipper), this galaxy is easily visible through binoculars or a small telescope. M81 is located at a distance of 12 million light-years.

    The main image is a composite mosaic obtained with the multiband imaging photometer for Spitzer and the infrared array camera. Thermal infrared emission at 24 microns detected by the photometer (red, bottom left inset) is combined with camera data at 8.0 microns (green, bottom center inset) and 3.6 microns (blue, bottom right inset).

    A visible-light image of Messier 81, obtained at Kitt Peak National Observatory, a ground-based telescope, is shown in the upper right inset. Both the visible-light picture and the 3.6-micron near-infrared image trace the distribution of stars, although the Spitzer image is virtually unaffected by obscuring dust. Both images reveal a very smooth stellar mass distribution, with the spiral arms relatively subdued.

    As one moves to longer wavelengths, the spiral arms become the dominant feature of the galaxy. The 8-micron emission is dominated by infrared light radiated by hot dust that has been heated by nearby luminous stars. Dust in the galaxy is bathed by ultraviolet and visible light from nearby stars. Upon absorbing an ultraviolet or visible-light photon, a dust grain is heated and re-emits the energy at longer infrared wavelengths. The dust particles are composed of silicates (chemically similar to beach sand), carbonaceous grains and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and

  19. Multi-Wavelength Radar Studies of Lunar Pyroclastic Deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carter, Lynn M.; Campbell, B. A.; Hawke, B. R.; Campbell, D. B.; Nolan, M. C.

    2008-09-01

    Lunar pyroclastic deposits were formed early in the Moon's history and are comprised of fine-grained, glassy materials. These low-albedo features are typically associated with mare boundaries, sites of mare volcanism, and fractures in and around impact craters. Optical, ultraviolet and infrared data have been used to map the locations of over one hundred pyroclastic deposits and to study their compositional differences (e.g. Gaddis et al., Icarus, 161, 262, 2003; Weitz et al., JGR, 103, 22725, 1998). We use multi-wavelength radar observations to study the distribution, depth and embedded rock abundance of these deposits. Data were acquired at S-band (12.6 cm wavelength) and P-band (70 cm wavelength) using Arecibo Observatory and the Green Bank Telescope in a bistatic configuration. The P-band images have resolutions of 150 m/pixel; S-band images have resolutions between 20 and 80 m/pixel. Pyroclastic deposits appear dark to the radar at both observed wavelengths because they are smooth, easily penetrable by radar waves, and generally contain few embedded blocks. At S-band wavelengths, changes in radar reflectivity across some of the pyroclastic deposits highlight areas with increased rock abundance. Radar circular polarization ratio maps can be used to identify fine-grained deposits in cases where optical or near-infrared data are ambiguous about the presence of pyroclastics. In some cases, data from multiple radar wavelengths (including archival 3.8 cm wavelength data) can place constraints on the deposit depth. We will present results for pyroclastic deposits surrounding Mare Serenitatis, including Sulpicius Gallus, Rima Menelaus, and Taurus-Littrow, as well as new polarimetry of the Aristarchus Plateau that compliments work done by Campbell et al. (2008, Geology, 36, 135). The S-band data are part of a larger study to map the entire lunar nearside at 80 m/pixel resolution.

  20. System and Method for Multi-Wavelength Optical Signal Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGlone, Thomas D. (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    The system and method for multi-wavelength optical signal detection enables the detection of optical signal levels significantly below those processed at the discrete circuit level by the use of mixed-signal processing methods implemented with integrated circuit technologies. The present invention is configured to detect and process small signals, which enables the reduction of the optical power required to stimulate detection networks, and lowers the required laser power to make specific measurements. The present invention provides an adaptation of active pixel networks combined with mixed-signal processing methods to provide an integer representation of the received signal as an output. The present invention also provides multi-wavelength laser detection circuits for use in various systems, such as a differential absorption light detection and ranging system.

  1. Identification of aerosol composition from multi-wavelength lidar measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, S. A.

    1984-01-01

    This paper seeks to develop the potential of lidar for the identification of the chemical composition of atmospheric aerosols. Available numerical computations suggest that aerosols can be identified by the wavelength dependence of aerosol optical properties. Since lidar can derive the volume backscatter coefficient as a function of wavelength, a multi-wavelength lidar system may be able to provide valuable information on the composition of aerosols. This research theoretically investigates the volume backscatter coefficients for the aerosol classes, sea-salts, and sulfates, as a function of wavelength. The results show that these aerosol compositions can be characterized and identified by their backscatter wavelength dependence. A method to utilize multi-wavelength lidar measurements to discriminate between compositionally different thin aerosol layers is discussed.

  2. Multi-Wavelength Studies of Low Redshift Clusters: Lessons Learned

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donahue, Megan

    2017-07-01

    I describe some of the insights about how AGN feedback works to regulate the gas supply for star formation and AGN activity achieved from multi-wavelength observations of (relatively) low redshift clusters of galaxies. The examples are mostly drawn from my group's work on Brightest Cluster Galaxies and their relation to the thermodynamic state of the hot intracluster gas in the core of their host clusters of galaxies.

  3. Swift Multi-wavelength Observing Campaigns: Strategies and Outcomes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krimm, Hans A.

    2007-01-01

    The Swift gamma-ray burst explorer has been operating since December 2004 as both a gamma-ray burst (GRB) monitor and telescope and a multi-wavelength observatory, covering the energy range from V band and near UV to hard X rays above 150 keV. It is designed to rapidly repoint to observe newly discovered GRBs, and this maneuverability, combined with an easily changed observing program, allows Swift to also be an effective multiwavelength observatory for non-GRB targets, both as targets of opportunity and pre-planned multi-wavelength observing campaigns. Blazars are particularly attractive targets for coordinated campaigns with TeV experiments since many blazars are bright in both the hard X-ray and TeV energy ranges. Successful coordinated campaigns have included observations of 3C454.3 during its 2005 outburst. The latest Swift funding cycles allow for non- GRB related observations to be proposed. The Burst Alert Telescope on Swift also serves as a hard X-ray monitor with a public web page that includes light curves for over 400 X-ray sources and is used to alert the astronomical community about increased activity from both known and newly discovered sources. This presentation mill include Swift capabilities, strategies and policies for coordinated multi-wavelength observations as well as discussion of the potential outcomes of such campaigns.

  4. Intravascular imaging with a storage phosphor detector.

    PubMed

    Shikhaliev, Polad M; Petrek, Peter; Matthews, Kenneth L; Fritz, Shannon G; Bujenovic, L Steven; Xu, Tong

    2010-05-21

    The aim of this study is to develop and test an intravascular positron imaging system based on a storage phosphor detector for imaging and detecting vulnerable plaques of human coronary arteries. The radiotracer F18-FDG accumulates in vulnerable plaques with inflammation of the overlying cap. The vulnerable plaques can, therefore, be imaged by recording positrons emitted from F18-FDG with a detector inserted into the artery. A prototype intravascular detector was constructed based on storage phosphor. The detector uses a flexible storage phosphor tube with 55 mm length, 2 mm diameter and 0.28 mm wall thickness. The intravascular detector is guided into the vessel using x-ray fluoroscopy and the accumulated x-ray signal must be erased prior to positron imaging. For this purpose, a light diffuser, 0.9 mm in diameter and 55 mm in length, was inserted into the detector tube. The light diffuser was connected to a laser source through a 2 m long optical fiber. The diffuser redirected the 0.38 W laser light to the inner surface of the phosphor detector to erase it. A heart phantom with 300 cm(3) volume and three coronary arteries with 3.2 mm diameter and with several plaques was constructed. FDG solution with 0.5 microCi cm(-3) activity concentration was filled in the heart and coronary arteries. The detector was inserted in a coronary artery and the signal from the plaques and surrounding background activity was recorded for 2 min. Then the phosphor detector was extracted and read out using a storage phosphor reader. The light diffuser erased the signal resulting from fluoroscopic exposure to level below that encountered during positron imaging. Vulnerable plaques with area activities higher than 1.2 nCi mm(-2) were visualized by the detector. This activity is a factor of 10-20 lower than that expected in human vulnerable plaques. The detector was able to image the internal surface of the coronary vessels with 50 mm length and 360 degrees circumference. Spatial

  5. Image Science with Photon-Processing Detectors

    PubMed Central

    Caucci, Luca; Jha, Abhinav K.; Furenlid, Lars R.; Clarkson, Eric W.; Kupinski, Matthew A.; Barrett, Harrison H.

    2015-01-01

    We introduce and discuss photon-processing detectors and we compare them with photon-counting detectors. By estimating a relatively small number of attributes for each collected photon, photon-processing detectors may help understand and solve a fundamental theoretical problem of any imaging system based on photon-counting detectors, namely null functions. We argue that photon-processing detectors can improve task performance by estimating position, energy, and time of arrival for each collected photon. We consider a continuous-to-continuous linear operator to relate the object being imaged to the collected data, and discuss how this operator can be analyzed to derive properties of the imaging system. Finally, we derive an expression for the characteristic functional of an imaging system that produces list-mode data. PMID:26347396

  6. Enhanced neutron imaging detector using optical processing

    SciTech Connect

    Hutchinson, D.P.; McElhaney, S.A.

    1992-01-01

    Existing neutron imaging detectors have limited count rates due to inherent property and electronic limitations. The popular multiwire proportional counter is qualified by gas recombination to a count rate of less than 10{sup 5} n/s over the entire array and the neutron Anger camera, even though improved with new fiber optic encoding methods, can only achieve 10{sup 6} cps over a limited array. We present a preliminary design for a new type of neutron imaging detector with a resolution of 2--5 mm and a count rate capability of 10{sup 6} cps pixel element. We propose to combine optical and electronic processing to economically increase the throughput of advanced detector systems while simplifying computing requirements. By placing a scintillator screen ahead of an optical image processor followed by a detector array, a high throughput imaging detector may be constructed.

  7. Ghost imaging with a single detector

    SciTech Connect

    Bromberg, Yaron; Katz, Ori; Silberberg, Yaron

    2009-05-15

    We experimentally demonstrate pseudothermal ghost imaging and ghost diffraction using only a single detector. We achieve this by replacing the high-resolution detector of the reference beam with a computation of the propagating field, following a recent proposal by Shapiro [Phys. Rev. A 78, 061802(R) (2008)]. Since only a single detector is used, this provides experimental evidence that pseudothermal ghost imaging does not rely on nonlocal quantum correlations. In addition, we show the depth-resolving capability of this ghost imaging technique.

  8. Multi-Wavelength and Nonlinear Quantum Cascade Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gmachl, Claire

    2006-03-01

    Quantum Cascade (QC) lasers are a rapidly evolving mid-infrared technology well suited for chemical sensing applications. For sensing of trace gas mixtures, large molecules, or liquids, probing at a single wavelength is often not sufficient, but the analyte must be sampled at various wavelengths. Here, we will discuss various means of providing multi-wavelength emission from QC lasers. Four different routes are currently being investigated. First, the active waveguide core of a QC laser can be subdivided into substacks of different active regions, hence allowing for multi-wavelength emission. We will discuss the design optimization procedures employed to develop a multi-wavelength laser module with several wavelengths covering the 7 -- 13 μm wavelength range. Second, QC lasers can be designed to emit different wavelength light when operated at different (positive or negative) bias settings. We have recently developed such a QC laser capable of emitting at ˜ 8 and ˜ 11 μm. Third, nonlinear QC lasers that in addition to QC laser active regions also include nonlinear mixing regions emit light not only at the fundamental frequency, but also at nonlinear frequencies. Second harmonic generation with up to 2 mW of nonlinear light has recently been demonstrated. Finally, QC lasers with very broad gain spectra can in principle be used to tune over significant wavelength ranges using an external cavity. A key component for such tunability is a low reflectance laser facet to suppress laser action based on feedback from the laser facets. We will show approaches to facet reflection reduction through sub-wavelength facet patterning. This work is supported through collaboration with Pacific Northwest National Labs / Battelle by DARPA L-PAS, the DOE, and the NSF ECS-0400615. This work is being conducted in collaboration with A. Dirisu, S.S. Howard, Z. Liu, O. Malis, G. Shu, D.L. Sivco, and F. Toor.

  9. Imaging Using Energy Discriminating Radiation Detector Array

    SciTech Connect

    Willson, Paul D.; Clajus, Martin; Tuemer, Tuemay O.; Visser, Gerard; Cajipe, Victoria

    2003-08-26

    Industrial X-ray radiography is often done using a broad band energy source and always a broad band energy detector. There exist several major advantages in the use of narrow band sources and or detectors, one of which is the separation of scattered radiation from primary radiation. ARDEC has developed a large detector array system in which every detector element acts like a multi-channel analyzer. A radiographic image is created from the number of photons detected in each detector element, rather than from the total energy absorbed in the elements. For high energies, 25 KeV to 4 MeV, used in radiography, energy discriminating detectors have been limited to less than 20,000 photons per second per detector element. This rate is much too slow for practical radiography. Our detector system processes over two million events per second per detector pixel, making radiographic imaging practical. This paper expounds on the advantages of the ARDEC radiographic imaging process.

  10. Molecular transport network security using multi-wavelength optical spins.

    PubMed

    Tunsiri, Surachai; Thammawongsa, Nopparat; Mitatha, Somsak; Yupapin, Preecha P

    2016-01-01

    Multi-wavelength generation system using an optical spin within the modified add-drop optical filter known as a PANDA ring resonator for molecular transport network security is proposed. By using the dark-bright soliton pair control, the optical capsules can be constructed and applied to securely transport the trapped molecules within the network. The advantage is that the dark and bright soliton pair (components) can securely propagate for long distance without electromagnetic interference. In operation, the optical intensity from PANDA ring resonator is fed into gold nano-antenna, where the surface plasmon oscillation between soliton pair and metallic waveguide is established.

  11. Multi-wavelength Accretion Studies of Cataclysmic Variable Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coppejans, Deanne

    2016-10-01

    Recent developments in the field of Cataclysmic Variable stars (CVs) have highlighted the need for large (more unbiased) samples of CVs with known properties, as well as the need for multi- wavelength studies to determine the accretion-outflow connection. In this thesis I have presented radio observations of non-magnetic CVs, proving them to be significant radio emitters. I have also presented optical follow-up studies of CVs, and developed an algorithm that automatically classifies these objects based on photometric data from large surveys. This was applied to the Catalina Real-time Transient Survey to produce a catalogue of accretion properties for 1031 CVs.

  12. Characteristics of a cascaded grating multi wavelength dye laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rana, Paramjit; Sridhar, G.; Manohar, K. G.

    2016-12-01

    Characteristics of a multi wavelength dye laser in two cascaded grating resonator configurations are presented. DCM dye dissolved in ethanol, was transversely pumped by second harmonic of Nd:YAG laser and four wavelength, independently tunable, collinear dye laser operation was obtained in Cascaded Grazing Incidence Grating cavity (CGIG) and Hybrid CGIG with fourth grating in Littrow angle (HCGIG) configuration. Gain competition effect of all the sub-cavities was fully characterized and wavelength zones of operation were identified for each cavity for sustaining four wavelength operation. Overall efficiency of the oscillator was measured to be around 2% in CGIG and 7% in HCGIG.

  13. Multi-Wavelength Observations of Nearby Starburst Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Kelsey; Lee, Janice

    Do cycles of violent, intense, but short-lived bursts constitute a significant mode of global starformation in present-day galaxies? Such events can have a profound effect on galaxies, particularly those with shallowpotential wells, and observational measures of their prevalence inform our understanding of a wide range of issues ingalaxy evolution. I will highlight what we have learned about starbursts from multi-wavelength observations of galaxiesin the local volume on both galactic and smaller scales, and explore how connections with the study of the deaths ofmassive stars may further our understanding of open issues in galaxy evolution.

  14. Multi-Wavelength Observations of Nearby Starburst Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Janice

    2015-08-01

    Do cycles of violent, intense, but short-lived bursts constitute a significant mode of global star formation in present-day galaxies? Such events can have a profound effect on galaxies, particularly those with shallow potential wells, and observational measures of their prevalence inform our understanding of a wide range of issues in galaxy evolution. I will highlight what we have learned about starbursts from multi-wavelength observations of galaxies in the local volume on both galactic and smaller scales, and explore how connections with the study of the deaths of massive stars may further our understanding of open issues in galaxy evolution.

  15. Multi-wavelength multi-level optical storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wullert, John R., II

    Current digital information storage technologies offer rapid access and seemingly ever-increasing capacities. New storage techniques that improve the data rate of high-density storage technologies are attractive, particularly for cost-sensitive services such as video on demand. Wavelength multiplexing of optical information storage has the potential to increase storage capacity, density and data rate. This dissertation addresses the design, simulation and fabrication of a multi-wavelength, multi-level optical storage structure that has the potential to increase the capacity, density and data rate of optical storage. Multi-wavelength, multi-layer optical storage is a technique for storing data in many separate layers in a medium, where each layer responds to a unique optical wavelength. This approach builds on the strengths of current optical storage technologies and addresses some of their limitations. Multiple layers of storage increase the high storage density possible with optical techniques and the parallelism of wavelength multiplexing improves the relatively low data rate. Multi-wavelength, multi-level optical storage has been investigated theoretically and experimentally. The experimental results provide the first demonstration of optical storage using three wavelengths to read three separate layers of information. These read-only optical memories were based on dielectric mirrors of silicon dioxide, magnesium oxide and aluminum oxide. The layers were designed to be read with semiconductor lasers of 635, 780 and 980 nanometers. The prototype devices exhibited open margins between the on and off states for all eight combinations of the presence and absence of the three mirrors. Theoretical simulations were employed to assess the dynamic operation of multi-wavelength storage devices. Through systematic simulations, variations in the thickness and refractive index of the layers in the structure were identified as the primary noise mechanism and a critical

  16. Multi-wavelength optical storage of diarylethene PMMA film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Haobo; Zhang, Fushi; Wu, Guo-shi; Sun, Fan; Pu, Shouzhi; Mai, Xuesong; Qi, Guosheng

    2003-05-01

    Current commercial optical storage technologies are all based on the heat effect of the recording laser, i.e., heat-mode optical storage. In the present work, photon-mode optical storage using photochromic diarylethene materials was investigated. Two diarylethene derivatives were dispersed into PMMA solution, and spin-coated on a glass substrate with Al reflective layer as the recording layer. Two laser beams of 532 and 650 nm were used in recording and readout simultaneously, and signals with high S/ N ratio were detected. Multi-wavelength optical storage was realized with the diarylethene PMMA film.

  17. Effect of multi-wavelength irradiation on color characterization with light-emitting diodes (LEDs)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Hyeong Ju; Song, Woosub; Lee, Byeong-Il; Kim, Hyejin; Kang, Hyun Wook

    2017-06-01

    In the current study, a multi-wavelength light-emitting diode (LED)-integrated CMOS imaging device was developed to investigate the effect of various wavelengths on multiple color characterization. Various color pigments (black, red, green, and blue) were applied on both white paper and skin phantom surfaces for quantitative analysis. The artificial skin phantoms were made of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) mixed with coffee and TiO2 powder to emulate the optical properties of the human dermis. The customized LED-integrated imaging device acquired images of the applied pigments by sequentially irradiating with the LED lights in the order of white, red, green, and blue. Each color pigment induced a lower contrast during illumination by the light with the equivalent color. However, the illumination by light with the complementary (opposite) color increased the signal-to-noise ratio by up to 11-fold due to the formation of a strong contrast ( i.e., red LED = 1.6 ± 0.3 vs. green LED = 19.0 ± 0.6 for red pigment). Detection of color pigments in conjunction with multi-wavelength LEDs can be a simple and reliable technique to estimate variations in the color pigments quantitatively.

  18. Tomographic imaging using poissonian detector data

    DOEpatents

    Aspelmeier, Timo; Ebel, Gernot; Hoeschen, Christoph

    2013-10-15

    An image reconstruction method for reconstructing a tomographic image (f.sub.j) of a region of investigation within an object (1), comprises the steps of providing detector data (y.sub.i) comprising Poisson random values measured at an i-th of a plurality of different positions, e.g. i=(k,l) with pixel index k on a detector device and angular index l referring to both the angular position (.alpha..sub.l) and the rotation radius (r.sub.l) of the detector device (10) relative to the object (1), providing a predetermined system matrix A.sub.ij assigning a j-th voxel of the object (1) to the i-th detector data (y.sub.i), and reconstructing the tomographic image (f.sub.j) based on the detector data (y.sub.i), said reconstructing step including a procedure of minimizing a functional F(f) depending on the detector data (y.sub.i) and the system matrix A.sub.ij and additionally including a sparse or compressive representation of the object (1) in an orthobasis T, wherein the tomographic image (f.sub.j) represents the global minimum of the functional F(f). Furthermore, an imaging method and an imaging device using the image reconstruction method are described.

  19. Learning object detectors from online image search

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Feng; Tretter, Daniel R.

    2011-03-01

    Being able to detect distinguishable objects is a key component in many high level computer vision applications. Traditional methods for building such detectors require a large amount of carefully collected and cleaned data. For example to build a face detector, a large number of face images need to be collected and faces in each image need to be cropped and aligned as the data for training. This process is tedious and error-pruning. Recently more and more people are sharing their photos on the internet, if we could leverage these data for building a detector, it will save tremendous amount of effort in collecting training data. Popular internet search engines and community photo websites like Google image search, Picassa, Flickr make it possible to harvesting online images for image understanding tasks. In this paper, we develop a method leveraging images obtained from online image search to build an object detector. The proposed method can automatically identify the most distinguishable features across the downloaded images. Using these learned features, a detector can be built to detect the object in a new image. Experiments show promising results of our approach.

  20. Explaining Multi-wavelength Photometric Variability in Young Stellar Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kesseli, Aurora; Whitney, B.; Wood, K.; Plavchan, P.; Terebey, S.; Stauffer, J. R.; Morales-Calderon, M.; YSOVAR

    2013-01-01

    We explore a variety of radiation transfer models to explain multi-wavelength photometric variability of young stellar objects in the Orion Nebula Cluster (Morales-Calderon et al. (2011). Our models include hotspots, warps in the accretion disk, and spiral arms. Variability comes in different types, which have been categorized as periodic or quasi-periodic, narrow or broad dips in the light curves, and rapid flux variations or “wild type” stars. Our models can successfully reproduce these. The optical and near-infrared light curves are sensitive to the stellar variations and obscurations from the circumstellar material. The mid-infrared provides an additional diagnostic because it is sensitive to emission from the inner disk and the inner wall height. Our models make specific predictions as to the shapes and phasing of optical through mid-infrared photometry that can be tested with multi-wavelength time-series data. This work is based in part on observations made with the Spitzer Space Telescope, which is operated by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology under a contract with NASA. Support for this work was provided by NASA through an award issued by JPL/Caltech and was partially supported by the National Science Foundation's REU program through NSF Award AST-1004881.

  1. Multi-wavelength photoplethysmography method for skin arterial pulse extraction

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jing; Yan, Bryan Ping-Yen; Dai, Wen-Xuan; Ding, Xiao-Rong; Zhang, Yuan-Ting; Zhao, Ni

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we present a multi-wavelength (MW) PPG method exploiting the wavelength dependence of light penetration in skin tissue to provide depth resolution of skin blood pulsation. The MW PPG system requires two to three light sources in different wavelengths and extracts the arterial blood pulsation through a multi-wavelength multi-layer light-skin interaction model, which removes the capillary pulsation (determined from the short-wavelength PPG signal) from the long-wavelength PPG signal using absorption weighting factors that are quasi-analytically calibrated. The extracted pulsations are used to calculate blood pressure (BP) through pulse transit time (PTT), and the results are compared with those obtained from the single wavelength PPG method. The comparative study is clinically performed on 20 subjects including 10 patients diagnosed with cardiovascular diseases and 10 healthy subjects. The result demonstrates that the MW PPG method significantly improves the measurement accuracy of systolic BP (SBP), reducing the mean absolute difference between the reference and the estimated SBP values from 5.7 mmHg (for single-wavelength PPG) to 2.9 mmHg (for three-wavelength PPG). PMID:27867733

  2. Multi-wavelength fluorometry for anaerobic digestion process monitoring.

    PubMed

    Morel, E; Santamaria, K; Perrier, M; Guiot, S R; Tartakovsky, B

    2005-01-01

    Applicability of multi-wavelength fluorometry for anaerobic digestion process monitoring was investigated in a 3.5 L upflow anaerobic sludge bed (UASB) lab-scale reactor. Both off-line and on-line monitoring of key process parameters was tested. Off-line emission spectra were measured at an angle of 90 degrees to the excitation beam using a cuvette. On-line measurements were carried out using a fiber optic probe in the external recirculation line of the digester. Fluorescence spectra were correlated to available analytical measurements to obtain partial least square regression models. An independent set of measurements was used to validate the regression models. Model estimations showed reasonable agreement with analytical measurements with multiple determination coefficients (R2) between 0.6 and 0.95. Results showed that offline fluorescence measurements can be used for fast estimation of anaerobic digestor effluent quality. At the same time, the on-line implementation of multi-wavelength fluorescence measurements can be used for realtime process monitoring and, potentially, for on-line process control.

  3. Multi-wavelength coverage of outburst decays of LMXBs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalemci, Emrah; Tomsick, John; Bailyn, Charles; Dincer, Tolga

    2016-07-01

    Low mass X-ray binaries (LMXB) are dynamic laboratories that are powered by accretion, and under some conditions these systems create strong outflows in the form of highly collimated jets, or winds. Outburst decays of transient LMXBs provide additional information about compact jets and their relation to changes in timing properties. Our group characterizes the multi-wavelength evolution of Galactic black hole transients during their outburst decays using simultaneous X-ray (RXTE, Swift, and INTEGRAL), optical/infrared (SMARTS) and radio (VLA, ATCA, VLBI). By characterizing the X-ray spectral and timing evolution of these systems, and merging this information with the evolution in the near-infrared and radio, we obtain the conditions necessary to launch stable compact jets, and discuss how jets can be influencing and/or influenced by X-ray timing and spectral properties of these systems. In this presentation, I will summarize recent results regarding multi-wavelength observations of not only black hole systems, but also neutron star X-ray binaries during outburst decays, and discuss models that explain not only the broad spectral energy distribution, but also some of the timing properties of these systems.

  4. Measurement and correction of transverse chromatic offsets for multi-wavelength retinal microscopy in the living eye

    PubMed Central

    Harmening, Wolf M.; Tiruveedhula, Pavan; Roorda, Austin; Sincich, Lawrence C.

    2012-01-01

    A special challenge arises when pursuing multi-wavelength imaging of retinal tissue in vivo, because the eye’s optics must be used as the main focusing elements, and they introduce significant chromatic dispersion. Here we present an image-based method to measure and correct for the eye’s transverse chromatic aberrations rapidly, non-invasively, and with high precision. We validate the technique against hyperacute psychophysical performance and the standard chromatic human eye model. In vivo correction of chromatic dispersion will enable confocal multi-wavelength images of the living retina to be aligned, and allow targeted chromatic stimulation of the photoreceptor mosaic to be performed accurately with sub-cellular resolution. PMID:23024901

  5. Fast time-lens-based line-scan single-pixel camera with multi-wavelength source

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Qiang; Chen, Hongwei; Weng, Zhiliang; Chen, Minghua; Yang, Sigang; Xie, Shizhong

    2015-01-01

    A fast time-lens-based line-scan single-pixel camera with multi-wavelength source is proposed and experimentally demonstrated in this paper. A multi-wavelength laser instead of a mode-locked laser is used as the optical source. With a diffraction grating and dispersion compensating fibers, the spatial information of an object is converted into temporal waveforms which are then randomly encoded, temporally compressed and captured by a single-pixel photodetector. Two algorithms (the dictionary learning algorithm and the discrete cosine transform-based algorithm) for image reconstruction are employed, respectively. Results show that the dictionary learning algorithm has greater capability to reduce the number of compressive measurements than the DCT-based algorithm. The effective imaging frame rate increases from 200 kHz to 1 MHz, which shows a significant improvement in imaging speed over conventional single-pixel cameras. PMID:26417527

  6. Multi-wavelength Monitoring of Lensed Quasars: Deciphering Quasar Structure at Micro-arcseconds Scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosquera, Ana; Morgan, Christopher W.; Kochanek, Christopher S.; Dai, Xinyu; Chen, Bin; MacLeod, Chelsea Louise; Chartas, George

    2016-01-01

    Microlensing in multiply imaged gravitationally lensed quasars provides us with a unique tool to zoom in on the structure of AGN and explore their physics in more detail. Microlensing magnification, caused primarily by stars and white dwarfs close to the line of sight towards the lensed quasar images, is seen as uncorrelated flux variations due to the relative motions of the quasar, the lens, its stars, and the observer, and it depends on the structural and dynamical properties of the source and the lens. Since the magnification depends upon the size of the source, we can use microlensing to measure the size of quasar emission regions. In essence, the amplitude of the microlensing variability encodes the source size, with smaller sources showing larger variability amplitudes. Using state of the art microlensing techniques, our team has performed pioneering research in the field based on multi-wavelength space and ground-based observations. Among the most remarkable results, using Chandra observations we have set the first quantitative constraints on the sizes of the X-ray emission regions of quasars. In this work l briefly describe the methodology, the results from our previous multi-wavelength monitoring programs, and the next frontier of exploring the dependence of the structure of the X-ray emission regions on black hole mass and X-ray energy.

  7. Towards a multi-wavelength spectroscopy platform for blood characterization and analysis.

    PubMed

    Kisomi, Alireza Avakh; Landari, Hamza; Boukadoum, Mounir; Miled, Amine; Gosselin, Benoit

    2016-08-01

    Passing multiple light wavelengths through a blood sample makes it possible to investigate the presence and composition of cells, metabolytes and analytes such as blood cells, glucose, lactate and oxygen, providing valuable indications for diagnostic and health monitoring. In this paper, we present a test prototype of a multi-wavelength blood spectroscopy platform integrated with a microfluidic substrate to collect and convey blood samples through a series of micro-LEDs and a photo-detector. This spectroscopy platform is a proof of concept for a system that can collect absorbance and transmittance parameters of blood samples at several wavelengths within the visible and NIR spectrum, and transmit them wirelessly to a base station for real-time calculation and analysis. In-vitro measurements are performed with the proposed prototype with 5 channels covering wavelength from 400 nm to 940 nm A full characterization results of the proposed device are presented.

  8. Gamma-ray imaging with germanium detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahoney, W. A.; Callas, J. L.; Ling, J. C.; Radocinski, R. G.; Skelton, R. T.; Varnell, L. S.; Wheaton, W. A.

    1993-01-01

    Externally segmented germanium detectors promise a breakthrough in gamma-ray imaging capabilities while retaining the superb energy resolution of germanium spectrometers. By combining existing position-sensitive detectors with an appropriate code aperture, two-dimensional imaging with 0.2-deg angular resolution becomes practical for a typical balloon experiment. Much finer resolutions are possible with larger separations between detectors and the coded aperture as would be applicable for space-based or lunar-based observatories. Two coaxial germanium detectors divided into five external segments have been fabricated and have undergone extensive performance evaluation and imaging testing in our laboratory. These tests together with detailed Monte Carlo modeling calculations have demonstrated the great promise of this sensor technology for future gamma-ray missions.

  9. Gamma-ray imaging with germanium detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mahoney, W. A.; Callas, J. L.; Ling, J. C.; Radocinski, R. G.; Skelton, R. T.; Varnell, L. S.; Wheaton, W. A.

    1993-01-01

    Externally segmented germanium detectors promise a breakthrough in gamma-ray imaging capabilities while retaining the superb energy resolution of germanium spectrometers. By combining existing position-sensitive detectors with an appropriate code aperture, two-dimensional imaging with 0.2-deg angular resolution becomes practical for a typical balloon experiment. Much finer resolutions are possible with larger separations between detectors and the coded aperture as would be applicable for space-based or lunar-based observatories. Two coaxial germanium detectors divided into five external segments have been fabricated and have undergone extensive performance evaluation and imaging testing in our laboratory. These tests together with detailed Monte Carlo modeling calculations have demonstrated the great promise of this sensor technology for future gamma-ray missions.

  10. Initiation of coronal mass ejection event observed on 2010 November 3: multi-wavelength perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Mulay, Sargam; Subramanian, Srividya; Tripathi, Durgesh; Isobe, Hiroaki; Glesener, Lindsay

    2014-10-10

    One of the major unsolved problems in solar physics is that of coronal mass ejection (CME) initiation. In this paper, we have studied the initiation of a flare-associated CME that occurred on 2010 November 3 using multi-wavelength observations recorded by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory and the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager. We report an observation of an inflow structure initially in the 304 Å and the 1600 Å images a few seconds later. This inflow structure was detected as one of the legs of the CME. We also observed a non-thermal compact source concurrent and near co-spatial with the brightening and movement of the inflow structure. The appearance of this compact non-thermal source, brightening, and movement of the inflow structure and the subsequent outward movement of the CME structure in the corona led us to conclude that the CME initiation was caused by magnetic reconnection.

  11. Multi-wavelength studies of the statistical properties of active galaxies using Big Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mickaelian, A. M.; Abrahamyan, H. V.; Gyulzadyan, M. V.; Mikayelyan, G. A.; Paronyan, G. M.

    2017-06-01

    Statistical studies of active galaxies (both AGN and Starburst) using large multi-wavelength data are presented, including new studies of Markarian galaxies, large sample of IR galaxies, variable radio sources, and large homogeneous sample of X-ray selected AGN. Markarian survey (the First Byurakan Survey) was digitized and the DFBS database was created, as the biggest spectroscopic database by the number of objects involved ( ~ 20 million). This database provides both 2D images and 1D spectra. We have carried out a number of projects aimed at revealing and multi-wavelength studies of active galaxies among optical, X-ray, IR and radio sources. Thousands of X-ray sources were identified from ROSAT, including many AGN (52% among all identified sources). IRAS PSC/FSC sources were studied having accurate positions from WISE and a large extragalactic sample was created for further search for AGNs. The fraction of active galaxies among IR-selected galaxies was estimated as 24%. Variable radio sources at 1.4 GHz were revealed by cross-correlation of NVSS and FIRST catalogues using the method introduced by us for optical variability. Radio-X-ray sources were revealed from NVSS and ROSAT for detection of new active galaxies. Big Data in astronomy is described that provide new possibilities for statistical research of active galaxies and other objects.

  12. Compton imager using room temperature silicon detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurfess, James D.; Novikova, Elena I.; Phlips, Bernard F.; Wulf, Eric A.

    2007-08-01

    We have been developing a multi-layer Compton Gamma Ray Imager using position-sensitive, intrinsic silicon detectors. Advantages of this approach include room temperature operation, reduced Doppler broadening, and use of conventional silicon fabrication technologies. We have obtained results on the imaging performance of a multi-layer instrument where each layer consists of a 2×2 array of double-sided strip detectors. Each detector is 63 mm×63 mm×2 mm thick and has 64 strips providing a strip pitch of approximately 0.9 mm. The detectors were fabricated by SINTEF ICT (Oslo Norway) from 100 mm diameter wafers. The use of large arrays of silicon detectors appears especially advantageous for applications that require excellent sensitivity, spectral resolution and imaging such as gamma ray astrophysics, detection of special nuclear materials, and medical imaging. The multiple Compton interactions (three or more) in the low-Z silicon enable the energy and direction of the incident gamma ray to be determined without full deposition of the incident gamma-ray energy in the detector. The performance of large volume instruments for various applications are presented, including an instrument under consideration for NASA's Advanced Compton Telescope (ACT) mission and applications to Homeland Security. Technology developments that could further extend the sensitivity and performance of silicon Compton Imagers are presented, including the use of low-energy (few hundred keV) electron tracking within novel silicon detectors and the potential for a wafer-bonding approach to produce thicker, position-sensitive silicon detectors with an associated reduction of required electronics and instrument cost.

  13. Multi-wavelength Observation of Recurrent Circular-Ribbon Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Chunming; Yang, Kai; Qiu, Jiong; Takeda, Aki; Yoshimura, Keiji

    2017-08-01

    Circular ribbon flare suggests the existence of a particular fan-spine magnetic topology in the solar corona. Here we present a multi-wavelength study of recurrent circular-ribbon flares in AR 12242 during 7 days when it passes across the solar disk. As the central parasitic polarities continuously emerge through the solar surface, the circular ribbons grow correspondingly. The evolution of the overall 3D magnetic configurations is studied with potential-field extrapolations. Following the expansion of the fan surface, the heights of the null point tend to increase and then decrease, while the length of the spine tends to shrink. We discuss the evolution of the fan-spine structure and its implications for varying flare emissions in different wavelengths.

  14. Multi-wavelength VCSEL arrays using high-contrast gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haglund, Erik; Gustavsson, Johan S.; Sorin, Wayne V.; Bengtsson, Jörgen; Fattal, David; Haglund, Àsa; Tan, Michael; Larsson, Anders

    2017-02-01

    The use of a high-contrast grating (HCG) as the top mirror in a vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL) allows for setting the resonance wavelength by the grating parameters in a post-epitaxial growth fabrication process. Using this technique, we demonstrate electrically driven multi-wavelength VCSEL arrays at 980 nm wavelength. The VCSELs are GaAs-based and the suspended GaAs HCGs were fabricated using electron-beam lithography, dry etching and selective removal of an InGaP sacrificial layer. The air-coupled cavity design enabled 4-channel arrays with 5 nm wavelength spacing and sub-mA threshold currents thanks to the high HCG reflectance.

  15. Multi-wavelength Observations of Cygnus X-3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varlotta, Angelo; VERITAS

    2011-09-01

    Cygnus X-3 is a X-ray binary system containing a stellar-mass black hole and a Wolf-Rayet companion star with prominent jets, placing it in the sub-category of microquasars. Due to their similarities with AGN and GRBs, they are thought to be possible gamma-ray emitters, as the recent Fermi LAT detection has proven. We have carried out VERITAS observations on this source to find a link between the hard X-ray, GeV gamma-ray and TeV gamma-ray emissions. These observations have been triggered on the recent AGILE and Swift ATels, respectively ATel #3386 and ATel #3439. This result aims to shed light on the mechanisms of particle acceleration and gamma-ray emission in microquasars within the high-energy multi-wavelength context.

  16. Multi-Wavelength Monitoring of GRS 1915+105

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bandyopadhyay, R.; Martini, P.; Gerard, E.; Charles, P. A.; Wagner, R. M.; Shrader, C.; Shahbaz, T.; Mirabel, I. F.

    1997-01-01

    Since its discovery in 1992, the superluminal X-ray transient GRS 1915+105 has been extensively observed in an attempt to understand its behaviour. We present here first results from a multi-wavelength campaign undertaken from July to September 1996. This study includes X-ray data from the RXTE All Sky Monitor and BATSE, two-frequency data from the Nancay radio telescope, and infrared photometry from the 1.8 m Perkins telescope at Lowell Observatory. The first long-term well-sampled IR light curve of GRS 1915+105 is presented herein and is consistent with the interpretation of this source as a long-period binary. We compare the various light curves, searching for correlations in the behaviour of the source at differing wavelengths and for possible periodicities.

  17. Advances from Recent Multi-wavelength Campaigns on Sgr A*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haggard, Daryl

    2017-01-01

    Sagittarius A* is the closest example of a supermassive black hole and our proximity allows us to detect emission from its accretion flow in the radio, submillimeter, near IR, and X-ray regimes. Ambitious monitoring campaigns have yielded rich multi-wavelength, time-resolved data that have the power to probe the physical processes underlying Sgr A*'s quiescent and flare emission. Here, I review the status of Sgr A* X-ray monitoring campaigns from the Chandra X-ray Observatory (also XMM Newton, and Swift), and efforts to coordinate these with observations across the electromagnetic spectrum. I also discuss how these observations constrain models for Sgr A*'s variability, which range from tidal disruption of asteroids to gravitational lensing to collimated outflows to magnetic reconnection.

  18. Multi-Wavelength Monitoring of GRS 1915+105

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bandyopadhyay, R.; Martini, P.; Gerard, E.; Charles, P. A.; Wagner, R. M.; Shrader, C.; Shahbaz, T.; Mirabel, I. F.

    1997-01-01

    Since its discovery in 1992, the superluminal X-ray transient GRS 1915+105 has been extensively observed in an attempt to understand its behaviour. We present here preliminary results from a multi-wavelength campaign undertaken from July to September 1996. This study includes X-ray data from the RXTE All Sky Monitor and BATSE, two-frequency data from the Nancay radio telescope, and infrared photometry from the 1.8m Perkins telescope at Lowell Observatory. The K-band data presented herein provide the first long-term well-sampled IR light curve of GRS 1915+105. We compare the various light curves, searching for correlations in the behaviour of the source at differing wavelengths and for possible periodicities.

  19. Preselecting AGN candidates from multi-wavelength data by ADTree

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yanxia; Zheng, Hongwen; Zhao, Yongheng

    2005-03-01

    With the information era in astronomy coming, this "data avalanche" may provide many answers to important problems in contemporary astrophysics. The most important problem is sifting through massive amounts of data to mine knowledge. In this paper, we positionally cross-identify multi-wavelength data from optical, near-infrared, and x-ray bands, and then employ alternating decision trees (adtree) to quickly and robustly separate AGN candidates to a high degree of accuracy. We emphasise the application of the method due to the development of large survey projects and the establishment of the virtual observatory, and conclude that the application of data mining algorithms in astronomy is of great importance to discover new knowledge impossible to obtain before, and promote the development of astronomy.

  20. Rules of Emissivity Sample Choice in Multi-wavelength Pyrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, M.; Sun, B.; Sun, X.; Xie, J.; Yu, C.

    2017-03-01

    Since the theory for emissivity sample (example) is not clear, there exists unavoidable blindness in the sample choice for the true temperature determination (create emissivity samples using an assumption to calculate the true temperature according to brightness temperature and wavelength) in multi-wavelength pyrometry, resulting in considerable computational complexity and slow computing speed. In this article, the rules of the emissivity sample were first discovered through the theoretical analysis of the relationship between brightness temperature and emissivity, which provide a theoretical basis for the emissivity sample choice. Furthermore, the rules can reduce the sample size (amount) and improve the calculation speed. The effectiveness of the proposed rules was verified by measuring the true temperature of a solid rocket engine plume, in which the rules were applied to effectively select emissivity samples. The experimental results demonstrate that the computing speed of the true temperature determination can be improved by 5.73% to 48.64%.

  1. Multi-wavelength analysis of Ellerman Bomb Light Curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herlender, M.; Berlicki, A.

    We present the results of a multi-wavelength photometric analysis of Ellerman Bomb (EB) observations obtained from the Dutch Open Telescope. In our data we have found 6 EBs located in the super-penumbra of the main spot in the active region NOAA 10781. We present light curves of EB observed in the Hα line centre and wing +0.7 Å, in the Ca II H line centre and wing~+2.35 Å, in the G-band and in the TRACE 1600 Å filter. We have shown that EBs were visible in the G-band and moreover, there was a good correlation between the light curves in the G-band and in the Hα line wings. We also found quasi-periodic oscillations of EBs brightness in the G-band, CaII H line and TRACE 1600 Å filter.

  2. Fast multi-wavelength variability from a black hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, Kieran

    2011-10-01

    Correlated fast multi-wavelength variability is quickly becoming a key tool for studying the physics of accretion and ejection of relativistic jets. Using simultaneous X-ray and near-infrared data we have recently discovered vibrations from a relativistic jet down to 62.5 ms time scale, which allowed us to estimate the speed and the size of the jet. We have also shown that the properties of the jet depend on the spectral state of the black hole. We propose to monitor the outburst evolution of a black hole transient with XMM, simultaneously with ground-based optical and infrared facilities, in order to apply the same technique to different spectral states. We propose to perform 10 short XMM observations (7 ks each) of an active black hole, in order to cover the different stages of the outburst.

  3. Multi-wavelength analysis from tomography study on solar chromosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Mumpuni, Emanuel Sungging; Herdiwijaya, Dhani; Djamal, Mitra

    2015-04-16

    The Sun as the most important star for scientific laboratory in astrophysics as well as encompassing all living aspect on Earth, still holds scientific mystery. As the established model that the Sun’s energy fueled by the nuclear reaction, along with transport process to the typical Solar surface on around 6000-K temperature, many aspects still left as an open questions, such as how the chromosphere responded to the photospheric dynamics. In this preliminary work, we try to analyze the Solar chromosphere respond to the Photospheric dynamics using tomography study implementing multi-wavelength analysis observation obtained from Dutch Open Telescope. Using the Hydrogen-alpha Doppler signal as the primary diagnostic tool, we try to investigate the inter-relation between the magnetic and gas pressure dynamics that occur in the chromosphere.

  4. Multi-wavelength study of MGRO J2019+37

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Chao; Chen, Song-Zhan; Yuan, Qiang; Cao, Zhen; He, Hui-Hai; Sheng, Xiang-Dong

    2014-08-01

    MGRO J2019+37, within the Cygnus region, is a bright extended source revealed by Milagro at 12-35 TeV. This source is almost as bright as the Crab Nebula in the northern sky, but is not confirmed by ARGO-YBJ around the TeV scale. Up to now, no obvious counterpart at low energy wavelengths has been found. Hence, MGRO J2019+37 is a rather mysterious object and its VHE γ-ray emission mechanism is worth investigating. In this paper, a brief summary of the multi-wavelength observations from radio to γ-rays is presented. All the available data from XMM-Newton and INTEGRAL at X-ray, and Fermi-LAT at γ-ray bands, are used to get constraints on its emission flux at low energy wavelengths. Then, its possible counterparts and the VHE emission mechanism are discussed.

  5. Novel gaseous detectors for medical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danielsson, M.; Fonte, P.; Francke, T.; Iacobaeus, C.; Ostling, J.; Peskov, V.

    2004-02-01

    We have developed and successfully tested prototypes of two new types of gaseous detectors for medical imaging purposes. The first one is called the Electronic Portal Imaging Device (EPID). It is oriented on monitoring and the precise alignment of the therapeutic cancer treatment beam (pulsed gamma radiation) with respect to the patient's tumor position. The latest will be determined from an X-ray image of the patient obtained in the time intervals between the gamma pulses. The detector is based on a "sandwich" of hole-type gaseous detectors (GEM and glass microcapillary plates) with metallic gamma and X-ray converters coated with CsI layers. The second detector is an X-ray image scanner oriented on mammography and other radiographic applications. It is based on specially developed by us high rate RPCs that are able to operate at rates of 10 5 Hz/mm 2 with a position resolution better than 50 μm at 1 atm. The quality of the images obtained with the latest version of this device were in most cases more superior than those obtained from commercially available detectors.

  6. Multi-wavelength study of a high velocity event near a sunspot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Chia-Hsien; Banerjee, D.; O'Shea, E.; Doyle, J. G.

    2006-05-01

    Context: .Jets with velocities higher than 200 km s-1 are often observed in the X-ray spectral range in the solar atmosphere, however, very few such objects are observed in the EUV range. Aims: .We report on an eruptive event observed in the south-west side of a sunspot, within active region, AR0554, in a range of spectral lines formed in the transition region and corona. Methods: .The main data were time-series observations obtained with the Coronal Diagnostic Spectrometer (CDS), in addition to images from the Michelson Doppler Imager (MDI) and Extreme ultraviolet Imaging Telescope (EIT) on board the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory. Additional high resolution images from the Transition Region and Coronal Explorer (TRACE) were also used. Results: .The event brightened a loop connecting the sunspot and a bright-point structure, triggering both a high-speed flow in the loop and a transient, low-speed ambient flow into the sunspot. The energy released is quickly conducted to the chromosphere, as deduced from the TRACE 1600 Å images and the light curve of He i 522 Å as seen by CDS. The results from our multi-wavelength study further indicates that the effect of the eruptive event may have reached temperatures higher than 2 × 106 K. Relative Doppler velocities of over 300 km s-1 were detected in the transition region line, O v 629 Å. Conclusions: .The multi-wavelength analysis indicates that the event is likely due to fast magnetic reconnection in the transition region. The velocities detected are consistent with the results obtained by the evaporation jet model.

  7. [Remote system of natural gas leakage based on multi-wavelength characteristics spectrum analysis].

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Lu, Xu-Tao; Yang, Ze-Hui

    2014-05-01

    In order to be able to quickly, to a wide range of natural gas pipeline leakage monitoring, the remote detection system for concentration of methane gas was designed based on static Fourier transform interferometer. The system used infrared light, which the center wavelength was calibrated to absorption peaks of methane molecules, to irradiated tested area, and then got the interference fringes by converging collimation system and interference module. Finally, the system calculated the concentration-path-length product in tested area by multi-wavelength characteristics spectrum analysis algorithm, furthermore the inversion of the corresponding concentration of methane. By HITRAN spectrum database, Selected wavelength position of 1. 65 microm as the main characteristic absorption peaks, thereby using 1. 65 pm DFB laser as the light source. In order to improve the detection accuracy and stability without increasing the hardware configuration of the system, solved absorbance ratio by the auxiliary wave-length, and then get concentration-path-length product of measured gas by the method of the calculation proportion of multi-wavelength characteristics. The measurement error from external disturbance is caused by this innovative approach, and it is more similar to a differential measurement. It will eliminate errors in the process of solving the ratio of multi-wavelength characteristics, and can improve accuracy and stability of the system. The infrared absorption spectrum of methane is constant, the ratio of absorbance of any two wavelengths by methane is also constant. The error coefficients produced by the system is the same when it received the same external interference, so the measured noise of the system can be effectively reduced by the ratio method. Experimental tested standards methane gas tank with leaking rate constant. Using the tested data of PN1000 type portable methane detector as the standard data, and were compared to the tested data of the system

  8. Neutron beam imaging with GEM detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albani, G.; Croci, G.; Cazzaniga, C.; Cavenago, M.; Claps, G.; Muraro, A.; Murtas, F.; Pasqualotto, R.; Perelli Cippo, E.; Rebai, M.; Tardocchi, M.; Gorini, G.

    2015-04-01

    Neutron GEM-based detectors represent a new frontier of devices in neutron physics applications where a very high neutron flux must be measured such as future fusion experiments (e.g. ITER Neutral beam Injector) and spallation sources (e.g. the European Spallation source). This kind of detectors can be properly adapted to be used both as beam monitors but also as neutron diffraction detectors that could represent a valid alternative for the 3He detectors replacement. Fast neutron GEM detectors (nGEM) feature a cathode composed by one layer of polyethylene and one of aluminium (neutron scattering on hydrogen generates protons that are detected in the gas) while thermal neutron GEM detectors (bGEM) are equipped with a borated aluminium cathode (charged particles are generated through the 10B(n,α)7Li reaction). GEM detectors can be realized in large area (1 m2) and their readout can be pixelated. Three different prototypes of nGEM and one prototype of bGEM detectors of different areas and equipped with different types of readout have been built and tested. All the detectors have been used to measure the fast and thermal neutron 2D beam image at the ISIS-VESUVIO beamline. The different kinds of readout patterns (different areas of the pixels) have been compared in similar conditions. All the detectors measured a width of the beam profile consitent with the expected one. The imaging property of each detector was then tested by inserting samples of different material and shape in the beam. All the samples were correctly reconstructed and the definition of the reconstruction depends on the type of readout anode. The fast neutron beam profile reconstruction was then compared to the one obtained by diamond detectors positioned on the same beamline while the thermal neutron one was compared to the imaged obtained by cadmium-coupled x-rays films. Also efficiency and the gamma background rejection have been determined. These prototypes represent the first step towards the

  9. Electron imaging with an EBSD detector.

    PubMed

    Wright, Stuart I; Nowell, Matthew M; de Kloe, René; Camus, Patrick; Rampton, Travis

    2015-01-01

    Electron Backscatter Diffraction (EBSD) has proven to be a useful tool for characterizing the crystallographic orientation aspects of microstructures at length scales ranging from tens of nanometers to millimeters in the scanning electron microscope (SEM). With the advent of high-speed digital cameras for EBSD use, it has become practical to use the EBSD detector as an imaging device similar to a backscatter (or forward-scatter) detector. Using the EBSD detector in this manner enables images exhibiting topographic, atomic density and orientation contrast to be obtained at rates similar to slow scanning in the conventional SEM manner. The high-speed acquisition is achieved through extreme binning of the camera-enough to result in a 5 × 5 pixel pattern. At such high binning, the captured patterns are not suitable for indexing. However, no indexing is required for using the detector as an imaging device. Rather, a 5 × 5 array of images is formed by essentially using each pixel in the 5 × 5 pixel pattern as an individual scattered electron detector. The images can also be formed at traditional EBSD scanning rates by recording the image data during a scan or can also be formed through post-processing of patterns recorded at each point in the scan. Such images lend themselves to correlative analysis of image data with the usual orientation data provided by and with chemical data obtained simultaneously via X-Ray Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (XEDS). Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Uncooled IR imaging using optomechanical detectors.

    PubMed

    Miao, Zhengyu; Zhang, Qingchuan; Chen, Dapeng; Guo, Zheying; Dong, Fengliang; Xiong, Zhiming; Wu, Xiaoping; Li, Chaobo; Jiao, Binbin

    2007-08-01

    In this study, we present an uncooled infrared imaging detector using knife-edge filter optical readout method. The tilt angle change of each cantilever in a focal plane array (FPA) can be simultaneously detected with a resolution of 10(-5) degrees. A deformation magnifying substrate-free microcantilever unit is specially designed. The multi-fold legs of microcantilever are interval metal coated to form a thermal deformation magnifying structure. Thermal and thermomechanical performance of this microcantilever unit are modeled and analyzed. An FPA with 100 x 100 pixels is fabricated and thermal images of human body are obtained by this detector.

  11. Linear fitting of multi-threshold counting data with a pixel-array detector for spectral X-ray imaging

    PubMed Central

    Muir, Ryan D.; Pogranichney, Nicholas R.; Muir, J. Lewis; Sullivan, Shane Z.; Battaile, Kevin P.; Mulichak, Anne M.; Toth, Scott J.; Keefe, Lisa J.; Simpson, Garth J.

    2014-01-01

    Experiments and modeling are described to perform spectral fitting of multi-threshold counting measurements on a pixel-array detector. An analytical model was developed for describing the probability density function of detected voltage in X-ray photon-counting arrays, utilizing fractional photon counting to account for edge/corner effects from voltage plumes that spread across multiple pixels. Each pixel was mathematically calibrated by fitting the detected voltage distributions to the model at both 13.5 keV and 15.0 keV X-ray energies. The model and established pixel responses were then exploited to statistically recover images of X-ray intensity as a function of X-ray energy in a simulated multi-wavelength and multi-counting threshold experiment. PMID:25178010

  12. Linear fitting of multi-threshold counting data with a pixel-array detector for spectral X-ray imaging.

    PubMed

    Muir, Ryan D; Pogranichney, Nicholas R; Muir, J Lewis; Sullivan, Shane Z; Battaile, Kevin P; Mulichak, Anne M; Toth, Scott J; Keefe, Lisa J; Simpson, Garth J

    2014-09-01

    Experiments and modeling are described to perform spectral fitting of multi-threshold counting measurements on a pixel-array detector. An analytical model was developed for describing the probability density function of detected voltage in X-ray photon-counting arrays, utilizing fractional photon counting to account for edge/corner effects from voltage plumes that spread across multiple pixels. Each pixel was mathematically calibrated by fitting the detected voltage distributions to the model at both 13.5 keV and 15.0 keV X-ray energies. The model and established pixel responses were then exploited to statistically recover images of X-ray intensity as a function of X-ray energy in a simulated multi-wavelength and multi-counting threshold experiment.

  13. Spectral x-ray diffraction using a 6 megapixel photon counting array detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muir, Ryan D.; Pogranichniy, Nicholas R.; Muir, J. Lewis; Sullivan, Shane Z.; Battaile, Kevin P.; Mulichak, Anne M.; Toth, Scott J.; Keefe, Lisa J.; Simpson, Garth J.

    2015-03-01

    Pixel-array array detectors allow single-photon counting to be performed on a massively parallel scale, with several million counting circuits and detectors in the array. Because the number of photoelectrons produced at the detector surface depends on the photon energy, these detectors offer the possibility of spectral imaging. In this work, a statistical model of the instrument response is used to calibrate the detector on a per-pixel basis. In turn, the calibrated sensor was used to perform separation of dual-energy diffraction measurements into two monochromatic images. Targeting applications include multi-wavelength diffraction to aid in protein structure determination and X-ray diffraction imaging.

  14. Spectral X-Ray Diffraction using a 6 Megapixel Photon Counting Array Detector.

    PubMed

    Muir, Ryan D; Pogranichniy, Nicholas R; Muir, J Lewis; Sullivan, Shane Z; Battaile, Kevin P; Mulichak, Anne M; Toth, Scott J; Keefe, Lisa J; Simpson, Garth J

    2015-03-12

    Pixel-array array detectors allow single-photon counting to be performed on a massively parallel scale, with several million counting circuits and detectors in the array. Because the number of photoelectrons produced at the detector surface depends on the photon energy, these detectors offer the possibility of spectral imaging. In this work, a statistical model of the instrument response is used to calibrate the detector on a per-pixel basis. In turn, the calibrated sensor was used to perform separation of dual-energy diffraction measurements into two monochromatic images. Targeting applications include multi-wavelength diffraction to aid in protein structure determination and X-ray diffraction imaging.

  15. Imaging radiation detector with gain

    DOEpatents

    Morris, C.L.; Idzorek, G.C.; Atencio, L.G.

    1982-07-21

    A radiation imaging device which has application in x-ray imaging. The device can be utilized in CAT scanners and other devices which require high sensitivity and low x-ray fluxes. The device utilizes cumulative multiplication of charge carriers on the anode plane and the collection of positive ion charges to image the radiation intensity on the cathode plane. Parallel and orthogonal cathode wire arrays are disclosed as well as a two-dimensional grid pattern for collecting the positive ions on the cathode.

  16. Imaging radiation detector with gain

    DOEpatents

    Morris, Christopher L.; Idzorek, George C.; Atencio, Leroy G.

    1984-01-01

    A radiation imaging device which has application in x-ray imaging. The device can be utilized in CAT scanners and other devices which require high sensitivity and low x-ray fluxes. The device utilizes cumulative multiplication of charge carriers on the anode plane and the collection of positive ion charges to image the radiation intensity on the cathode plane. Parallel and orthogonal cathode wire arrays are disclosed as well as a two-dimensional grid pattern for collecting the positive ions on the cathode.

  17. Ultraviolet imaging detectors for the GOLD mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siegmund, O. H. W.; McPhate, J.; Curtis, T.; Jelinsky, S.; Vallerga, J. V.; Hull, J.; Tedesco, J.

    2016-07-01

    The GOLD mission is a NASA Explorer class ultraviolet Earth observing spectroscopy instrument that will be flown on a telecommunications satellite in geostationary orbit in 2018. Microchannel plate detectors operating in the 132 nm to 162 nm FUV bandpass with 2D imaging cross delay line readouts and electronics have been built for each of the two spectrometer channels for GOLD. The detectors are "open face" with CsI photocathodes, providing 30% efficiency at 130.4 nm and 15% efficiency at 160.8 nm. These detectors with their position encoding electronics provide 600 x 500 FWHM resolution elements and are photon counting, with event handling rates of > 200 KHz. The operational details of the detectors and their performance are discussed.

  18. A multi-scale, multi-wavelength source extraction method: getsources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Men'shchikov, A.; André, Ph.; Didelon, P.; Motte, F.; Hennemann, M.; Schneider, N.

    2012-06-01

    We present a multi-scale, multi-wavelength source extraction algorithm called getsources. Although it has been designed primarily for use in the far-infrared surveys of Galactic star-forming regions with Herschel, the method can be applied to many other astronomical images. Instead of the traditional approach of extracting sources in the observed images, the new method analyzes fine spatial decompositions of original images across a wide range of scales and across all wavebands. It cleans those single-scale images of noise and background, and constructs wavelength-independent single-scale detection images that preserve information in both spatial and wavelength dimensions. Sources are detected in the combined detection images by following the evolution of their segmentation masks across all spatial scales. Measurements of the source properties are done in the original background-subtracted images at each wavelength; the background is estimated by interpolation under the source footprints and overlapping sources are deblended in an iterative procedure. In addition to the main catalog of sources, various catalogs and images are produced that aid scientific exploitation of the extraction results. We illustrate the performance of getsources on Herschel images by extracting sources in sub-fields of the Aquila and Rosette star-forming regions. The source extraction code and validation images with a reference extraction catalog are freely available.

  19. Position sensitive detector for fluorescence lifetime imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prokazov, Y.; Turbin, E.; Weber, A.; Hartig, R.; Zuschratter, W.

    2014-12-01

    We present a detector system with a microchannel plate based photomultiplier tube (MCP-PMT) and its application for fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) in visible light. A capacity coupled imaging technique (charge image) combined with a charge division anode is employed for the positional readout. Using an artificial neural network's (ANN) computation model we are able to reconstruct the position of the incident photon as precise as 20 microns over the detector active area of 25 mm diameter. Thus, the resulting image quality corresponds roughly to a megapixel conventional CCD camera. Importantly, it is feasible to reach such resolution using only 9 charge acquisition channels supporting the anode structure of 14 interconnected readout electrodes. Additionally, the system features better than 50 ps temporal resolution allowing single photon counting FLIM acquisition with a regular fluorescence wide-field microscope.

  20. Multi-wavelength mid-infrared plasmonic antennas with single nanoscale focal point.

    PubMed

    Blanchard, Romain; Boriskina, Svetlana V; Genevet, Patrice; Kats, Mikhail A; Tetienne, Jean-Philippe; Yu, Nanfang; Scully, Marlan O; Dal Negro, Luca; Capasso, Federico

    2011-10-24

    We propose and demonstrate a novel photonic-plasmonic antenna capable of confining electromagnetic radiation at several mid-infrared wavelengths to a single sub-wavelength spot. The structure relies on the coupling between the localized surface plasmon resonance of a bow-tie nanoantenna with the photonic modes of surrounding multi-periodic particle arrays. Far-field measurements of the transmission through the central bow-tie demonstrate the presence of Fano-like interference effects resulting from the interaction of the bow-tie antenna with the surrounding nanoparticle arrays. The near-field of the multi-wavelength antenna is imaged using an aperture-less near-field scanning optical microscope. This antenna is relevant for the development of near-field probes for nanoimaging, spectroscopy and biosensing.

  1. Microchannel Plate Imaging Detectors for the Ultraviolet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegmund, O. H. W.; Gummin, M. A.; Stock, J.; Marsh, D.

    1992-01-01

    There has been significant progress over the last few years in the development of technologies for microchannel plate imaging detectors in the Ultraviolet (UV). Areas where significant developments have occurred include enhancements of quantum detection efficiency through improved photocathodes, advances in microchannel plate performance characteristics, and development of high performance image readout techniques. The current developments in these areas are summarized, with their applications in astrophysical instrumentation.

  2. Microchannel Plate Imaging Detectors for the Ultraviolet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegmund, O. H. W.; Gummin, M. A.; Stock, J.; Marsh, D.

    1992-01-01

    There has been significant progress over the last few years in the development of technologies for microchannel plate imaging detectors in the Ultraviolet (UV). Areas where significant developments have occurred include enhancements of quantum detection efficiency through improved photocathodes, advances in microchannel plate performance characteristics, and development of high performance image readout techniques. The current developments in these areas are summarized, with their applications in astrophysical instrumentation.

  3. A Multi-wavelength Ozone Lidar for the EASOE Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Godin, S.; Ancellet, G.; David, C.; Porteneuve, J.; Leroy, C.; Mitev, V.; Emery, Y.; Flesia, C.; Rizi, V.; Visconti, G.

    1992-01-01

    The study of the ozone layer during winter and springtime in high latitude regions is a major issue in atmospheric research. For a better understanding of these problems, an important experimental campaign called EASOE (European Arctic Stratospheric Ozone Experiment) was organized by the European Community during the winter 1991-1992. Its main objective was to establish a budget of the ozone destruction processes on the whole northern hemisphere. This implied the simultaneous operation of different types of instruments located in both high and mid-latitude regions in order to study the destruction processes as well as the evolution of the ozone layer during the period of the campaign. A description will be given here of a mobile ozone lidar instrument specially designed for operation during the EASOE campaign. This system, which performs ozone measurements in the 5 to 40 km altitude range was located in Sodankyla, Finland as part of the ELSA experiment which also includes operation of another multi-wavelength lidar designed for polar stratospheric cloud measurements.

  4. Multi-Wavelength Spectroscopy of Super-Earth Atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dragomir, Diana; Benneke, Björn; Crossfield, Ian; Lothringer, Joshua; Knutson, Heather

    2017-01-01

    The Kepler mission has revealed that super-Earths (planets with radii between 1 and 4 R_Earth) are the most common class of planets in the Galaxy, though none are known in our own Solar System. These planets can theoretically have a wide range of compositions which we are just beginning to explore observationally. While studies based on Kepler data have revolutionized many areas of exoplanet research, the relative faintness of most of the host stars in the Kepler field means that atmospheric characterization of these super-Earths with currently available instruments is extremely challenging. However, a handful of transiting super-Earths are within reach of existing facilities. We have pointed both the HST and Spitzer toward these systems in an effort to paint a thorough picture of their atmospheres. Our transmission spectroscopy observations explore the transition region between terrestrial planets and miniature gas giants, and contribute to distinguishing between low-density hydrogen-dominated atmospheres and compact high-metallicity atmospheres. Transmission spectroscopy over a wide wavelength range is also essential to understanding the properties and effects of clouds in these atmospheres. The results of this program will inform the direction to be taken by future multi-wavelength studies of these worlds, in particular those enabled when the HST joins forces with the upcoming JWST.

  5. Multi-wavelength high efficiency laser system for lidar applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willis, Christina C. C.; Culpepper, Charles; Burnham, Ralph

    2015-09-01

    Motivated by the growing need for more efficient, high output power laser transmitters, we demonstrate a multi-wavelength laser system for lidar-based applications. The demonstration is performed in two stages, proving energy scaling and nonlinear conversion independently for later combination. Energy scaling is demonstrated using a 1064 nm MOPA system which employs two novel ceramic Nd:YAG slab amplifiers, the structure of which is designed to improve the amplifier's thermal performance and energy extraction via three progressive doping stages. This structure improved the extraction efficiency by 19% over previous single-stage dopant designs. A maximum energy of 34 mJ was produced at 500 Hz with a 10.8 ns pulse duration. High efficiency non-linear conversion from 1064 nm to 452 nm is demonstrated using a KTP ring OPO with a BBO intra-cavity doubler pumped with 50 Hz, 16 ns 1064 nm pulses. The OPO generates 1571 nm signal which is frequency doubled to 756 nm by the BBO. Output 786 nm pulses are mixed with the 1064 nm pump pulses to generate 452 nm. A conversion efficiency of 17.1% was achieved, generating 3 mJ of 452 nm pulses of 7.8 ns duration. Pump power was limited by intra-cavity damage thresholds, and in future experiments we anticipate >20% conversion efficiency.

  6. A multi-wavelength view of NGC 1624-2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    David-Uraz, A.; Petit, V.; MacInnis, R.; Erba, C.; Owocki, S. P.; Fullerton, A. W.; Walborn, N. R.; Cohen, D. H.

    2017-07-01

    Large magnetometric surveys have contributed to the detection of an increasing number of magnetic massive stars, and to the recognition of a population of magnetic massive stellar objects with distinct properties. Among these, NGC 1624-2 possesses the largest magnetic field of any O-type star; such a field confines the stellar wind into a circumstellar magnetosphere, which can be probed using observations at different wavelength regimes. Recent optical and X-ray observations suggest that NGC 1624-2's magnetosphere is much larger than that of any other magnetic O star. By modeling the variations of UV resonance lines, we can constrain its velocity structure. Furthermore, recent spectropolarimetric observations raise the possibility of a more complex field topology than previously expected. Putting all of these multi-wavelength constraints together will allow us to paint a consistent picture of NGC 1624-2 and its surprising behavior, giving us valuable insight into the ve! ry nature of massive star magnetospheres.

  7. Multi-wavelength analysis of young pulsars: an overview.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maritz, J. M.; Meintjes, P. J.; Buchner, S. J.

    Young pulsars emit a broad spectrum of radiation that range from radio to gamma ray energies. These pulsars are considered as rotation powered pulsars that spin rapidly and are strongly magnetized. Following the discovery of pulsars nearly four decades ago, the population of known pulsars already reached a number of roughly two thousand. This known population of pulsars includes both millisecond and normal pulsars that were discovered by several telescopes. We analyze both HartRAO radio data and Fermi gamma ray data of the Vela pulsar. We also explore a proposed method of probing the electron column density of the instellar gas through analyzing the gamma ray diffuse data associated with the Fermi two-year observation. This paper serves as an overview of gamma ray and radio timing analysis of bright young pulsars with respect to the use of open source timing analysis tools (Tempo2, Psrchive, Enrico and the Fermi tools). We reason that the multi-wavelength picture of pulsars can help clarify questions regarding the origin of pulsed radiation emission mechanisms in several energy bands, but that radio observations will prove adequate for timing noise analysis, given the accurate and long radio data sets. The process of identifying gravitational waves in timing data, rests on gaining a deeper insight into the timing noise phenomena.

  8. 40nm tunable multi-wavelength fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Qingsong; Wang, Tianshu; Zhang, Peng; Dong, Keyan; Jiang, Huilin

    2014-12-01

    A Brillouin-Erbium multi-wavelength tunable fiber laser at C-band is demostrated. A 10 km long singlemode fiber(SMF), a 6 m long Erbium-doped fiber, two couplers, a wavelength division multiplexer, a isolator, an optical circulator, a 980nm pump laser and a narrow linewidth tunable laser are included in the structure. A segment of 10 km-long single-mode fiber (SMF) between the two ports of a 1×2 coupler is used as Brillouin gain. Ebiumdoped fiber amplifier (EDFA) consists of a segment of 6m er-doped fiber pumped by 980nm laser dioder . A narrow linewidth tunable laser from 1527 to 1607 nm as Brillouin bump, At the Brillouin pump power of 8mW and the 980 nm pump power of 400 mw, 16 output channels with 0.08 nm spacing and tuning range of 40 nm from 1527 nm to 1567 nm are achieved. We realize the tunable output of wavelength by adjusting the 980 nm pump power and the Brillouin pump wavelength. Stability of the multiwavelength fiber laser is also observed.

  9. X-ray detectors in medical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spahn, Martin

    2013-12-01

    Healthcare systems are subject to continuous adaptation, following trends such as the change of demographic structures, the rise of life-style related and chronic diseases, and the need for efficient and outcome-oriented procedures. This also influences the design of new imaging systems as well as their components. The applications of X-ray imaging in the medical field are manifold and have led to dedicated modalities supporting specific imaging requirements, for example in computed tomography (CT), radiography, angiography, surgery or mammography, delivering projection or volumetric imaging data. Depending on the clinical needs, some X-ray systems enable diagnostic imaging while others support interventional procedures. X-ray detector design requirements for the different medical applications can vary strongly with respect to size and shape, spatial resolution, frame rates and X-ray flux, among others. Today, integrating X-ray detectors are in common use. They are predominantly based on scintillators (e.g. CsI or Gd2O2S) and arrays of photodiodes made from crystalline silicon (Si) or amorphous silicon (a-Si) or they employ semiconductors (e.g. Se) with active a-Si readout matrices. Ongoing and future developments of X-ray detectors will include optimization of current state-of-the-art integrating detectors in terms of performance and cost, will enable the usage of large size CMOS-based detectors, and may facilitate photon counting techniques with the potential to further enhance performance characteristics and foster the prospect of new clinical applications.

  10. LISe pixel detector for neutron imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrera, Elan; Hamm, Daniel; Wiggins, Brenden; Milburn, Rob; Burger, Arnold; Bilheux, Hassina; Santodonato, Louis; Chvala, Ondrej; Stowe, Ashley; Lukosi, Eric

    2016-10-01

    Semiconducting lithium indium diselenide, 6LiInSe2 or LISe, has promising characteristics for neutron detection applications. The 95% isotopic enrichment of 6Li results in a highly efficient thermal neutron-sensitive material. In this study, we report on a proof-of-principle investigation of a semiconducting LISe pixel detector to demonstrate its potential as an efficient neutron imager. The LISe pixel detector had a 4×4 of pixels with a 550 μm pitch on a 5×5×0.56 mm3 LISe substrate. An experimentally verified spatial resolution of 300 μm was observed utilizing a super-sampling technique.

  11. Characterisation of a track structure imaging detector.

    PubMed

    Casiraghi, M; Bashkirov, V A; Hurley, R F; Schulte, R W

    2015-09-01

    The spatial distribution of radiation-induced ionisations in sub-cellular structures plays an important role in the initial formation of radiation damage to biological tissues. Using the nanodosimetry approach, physical characteristics of the track structure can be measured and correlated to DNA damage. In this work, a novel nanodosimeter is presented, which detects positive ions produced by radiation interacting with a gas-sensitive volume in order to obtain a high resolution image of the radiation track structure. The characterisation of the detector prototype was performed and different configurations of the device were tested by varying the detector cathode material and the working gas. Preliminary results show that the ionisation cluster size distribution can be obtained with this approach. Further work is planned to improve the detector efficiency in order to register the complete three-dimensional track structure of ionising radiation.

  12. Multi-wavelength fibril dynamics and oscillations above sunspot - I. morphological signature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sungging Mumpuni, Emanuel; Herdiwijaya, Dhani; Djamal, Mitra; Djamaluddin, Thomas

    2015-11-01

    In this work we selected one particular fibril from a high resolution observation of the solar chromosphere with the Dutch Open Telescope, and tried to obtain a broad picture of the intricate mechanism that might be operating in the multiple layers of the solar atmosphere visible in high cadence multi-wavelength observations. We analyzed the changing fibril pattern using multi-wavelength tomography, which consists of both the Hα line center and the blue wing, Doppler signal, Ca II H, and the G-band. We have found that the intermittent ejected material through the fibril from Doppler images has clearly shown an oscillation mode, as seen in the Hα blue wing. The oscillations in the umbrae and penumbrae magnetic field lines that are above the sunspot cause a broadening and the area forms a ring shape from 3 to 15 minute oscillations as a function of height. These made a distinct boundary between the umbrae and penumbrae which suggests a comb structure, and indicates that the oscillations could propagate along the inclined magnetic flux tubes from below. The 3 minute oscillations strongly appeared in the broadly inclined penumbrae magnetic field lines and showed a clear light bridge. The well known 5 minute oscillations were dominant in the umbrae-penumbrae region boundary. The long 7 minute oscillations were transparent in the Hα blue wing, as well as the 10 and 15 minute oscillations. They were concentrated in the inner-penumbrae, as seen in the Hα line center. From these findings we propose that the fibril acts as a fabric for interaction between the layers, as well as related activities around the active region under investigation.

  13. A Multi-wavelength 3D Model of BD+30°3639

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freeman, M. J.; Kastner, Joel H.

    2016-10-01

    We present a 3D multi-wavelength reconstruction of BD+30°3639, one of the best-studied planetary nebulae in the solar neighborhood. BD+30°3639, which hosts a [WR]-type central star, has been imaged at wavelength regimes that span the electromagnetic spectrum, from radio to X-rays. We have used the astrophysical modeling software SHAPE to construct a 3D morpho-kinematic model of BD+30°3639. This reconstruction represents the most complete 3D model of a PN to date from the standpoint of the incorporation of multi-wavelength data. Based on previously published kinematic data in optical emission lines and in lines of CO (radio) and H2 (near-IR), we were able to reconstruct BD+30's basic velocity components assuming a set of homologous velocity expansion laws combined with collimated flows along the major axis of the nebula. We confirm that the CO “bullets” in the PN lie along an axis that is slightly misaligned with respect to the major axis of the optical nebula, and that these bullets are likely responsible for the disrupted structures of the ionized and H2-emitting shells within BD+30. Given the relative geometries and thus dynamical ages of BD+30's main structural components, it is furthermore possible that the same jets that ejected the CO bullets are responsible for the generation of the X-ray-emitting hot bubble within the PN. Comparison of alternative viewing geometries for our 3D reconstruction of BD+30°3639 with imagery of NGC 40 and NGC 6720 suggests a common evolutionary path for these nebulae.

  14. The Herschel-ATLAS Data Release 1 - II. Multi-wavelength counterparts to submillimetre sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourne, N.; Dunne, L.; Maddox, S. J.; Dye, S.; Furlanetto, C.; Hoyos, C.; Smith, D. J. B.; Eales, S.; Smith, M. W. L.; Valiante, E.; Alpaslan, M.; Andrae, E.; Baldry, I. K.; Cluver, M. E.; Cooray, A.; Driver, S. P.; Dunlop, J. S.; Grootes, M. W.; Ivison, R. J.; Jarrett, T. H.; Liske, J.; Madore, B. F.; Popescu, C. C.; Robotham, A. G.; Rowlands, K.; Seibert, M.; Thompson, M. A.; Tuffs, R. J.; Viaene, S.; Wright, A. H.

    2016-10-01

    This paper is the second in a pair of papers presenting data release 1 (DR1) of the Herschel Astrophysical Terahertz Large Area Survey (H-ATLAS), the largest single open-time key project carried out with the Herschel Space Observatory. The H-ATLAS is a wide-area imaging survey carried out in five photometric bands at 100, 160, 250, 350 and 500 μm covering a total area of 600 deg2. In this paper, we describe the identification of optical counterparts to submillimetre sources in DR1, comprising an area of 161 deg2 over three equatorial fields of roughly 12 × 4.5 deg centred at 9h, 12h and 14{^h.}5, respectively. Of all the H-ATLAS fields, the equatorial regions benefit from the greatest overlap with current multi-wavelength surveys spanning ultraviolet (UV) to mid-infrared regimes, as well as extensive spectroscopic coverage. We use a likelihood ratio technique to identify Sloan Digital Sky Survey counterparts at r < 22.4 for 250-μm-selected sources detected at ≥4σ (≈28 mJy). We find `reliable' counterparts (reliability R ≥ 0.8) for 44 835 sources (39 per cent), with an estimated completeness of 73.0 per cent and contamination rate of 4.7 per cent. Using redshifts and multi-wavelength photometry from GAMA and other public catalogues, we show that H-ATLAS-selected galaxies at z < 0.5 span a wide range of optical colours, total infrared (IR) luminosities and IR/UV ratios, with no strong disposition towards mid-IR-classified active galactic nuclei in comparison with optical selection. The data described herein, together with all maps and catalogues described in the companion paper, are available from the H-ATLAS website at www.h-atlas.org.

  15. Multi-wavelength studies of wind driving cataclysmic variables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witherick, Dugan Kenneth

    This thesis presents several case studies of disc winds from high-state cataclysmic variable stars, based on multi-wavelength time-series spectroscopy. The research presented here primarily focuses on three low-inclination, nova-like systems: RW Sextansis, V592 Cassiopeiae and BZ Camelopardalis. The aim was to derive and compare key spectral line diagnostics of the outflows, spanning a wide range of ionisation and excitation using (new) FUSE, HST, IUE and optical data. Analysis of the far-UV time-series of RW Sex reveals the wind to be highly variable but generally confined to between ~ -1000 and ~ 0 km/s for all ionisation states; no evidence of the wind at red-shifted velocities is found. This wind is modulated on the orbital period of the system and it is argued that the observed variability is due to changes in the blue-shifted absorption rather than a variable velocity emission. The Balmer profiles observed in the optical time-series of V592 Cas were found to be characterised by three components: a broad, shallow absorption trough, a narrow central emission and a blue-shifted absorption from the disc wind. The wind is also found to be modulated on the systems orbital period, although this modulation is slightly out of phase with the Balmer emission radial velocities. The wind of BZ Cam was found to behave very differently to that of RW Sex and V592 Cas. At times, it was seen (in the Balmer lines and some of the He I lines) to be extremely strong and variable but at other times is was seemingly not present; there was no evidence to suggest that it is modulated on the orbital or any other period. This study is an immense source of data on CV disc winds and importantly tries to parameterise three nova-like CVs to understand the similarities and differences between them and their winds.

  16. Comparative Study of Edge Detectors in case of Echocardiographic Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saini, Kalpana; Dewal, M. L.; Rohit, Manoj Kumar

    2010-11-01

    In this paper we compare different edge detectors based on peak signal to noise ratio on Echocardiographic images. Edge detection is a critical element in image processing, since edges contain a major function of image information. The function of edge detection is to identify the boundaries of homogeneous regions in an image based on properties such as intensity and texture.We have taken Perwitt edge detector, Robarts edge detector, LoG edge detector, Canny edge detector, and Sobel edge detector for this comparison and study.

  17. Multispectral imaging using a single bucket detector.

    PubMed

    Bian, Liheng; Suo, Jinli; Situ, Guohai; Li, Ziwei; Fan, Jingtao; Chen, Feng; Dai, Qionghai

    2016-04-22

    Existing multispectral imagers mostly use available array sensors to separately measure 2D data slices in a 3D spatial-spectral data cube. Thus they suffer from low photon efficiency, limited spectrum range and high cost. To address these issues, we propose to conduct multispectral imaging using a single bucket detector, to take full advantage of its high sensitivity, wide spectrum range, low cost, small size and light weight. Technically, utilizing the detector's fast response, a scene's 3D spatial-spectral information is multiplexed into a dense 1D measurement sequence and then demultiplexed computationally under the single pixel imaging scheme. A proof-of-concept setup is built to capture multispectral data of 64 pixels × 64 pixels × 10 wavelength bands ranging from 450 nm to 650 nm, with the acquisition time being 1 minute. The imaging scheme holds great potentials for various low light and airborne applications, and can be easily manufactured as production-volume portable multispectral imagers.

  18. Multi-Wavelength Based Optical Density Sensor for Autonomous Monitoring of Microalgae

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Fei; Kacira, Murat; Ogden, Kimberly L.

    2015-01-01

    A multi-wavelength based optical density sensor unit was designed, developed, and evaluated to monitor microalgae growth in real time. The system consisted of five main components including: (1) laser diode modules as light sources; (2) photodiodes as detectors; (3) driver circuit; (4) flow cell; and (5) sensor housing temperature controller. The sensor unit was designed to be integrated into any microalgae culture system for both real time and non-real time optical density measurements and algae growth monitoring applications. It was shown that the sensor unit was capable of monitoring the dynamics and physiological changes of the microalgae culture in real-time. Algae biomass concentration was accurately estimated with optical density measurements at 650, 685 and 780 nm wavelengths used by the sensor unit. The sensor unit was able to monitor cell concentration as high as 1.05 g·L−1 (1.51 × 108 cells·mL−1) during the culture growth without any sample preparation for the measurements. Since high cell concentrations do not need to be diluted using the sensor unit, the system has the potential to be used in industrial microalgae cultivation systems for real time monitoring and control applications that can lead to improved resource use efficiency. PMID:26364640

  19. Multi-wavelength fine structure and mass flows in solar microflares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berkebile-Stoiser, S.; Gömöry, P.; Veronig, A. M.; Rybák, J.; Sütterlin, P.

    2009-10-01

    Aims: We study the multi-wavelength characteristics at high spatial resolution, as well as chromospheric evaporation signatures of solar microflares. To this end, we analyze the fine structure and mass flow dynamics in the chromosphere, transition region and corona of three homologous microflares (GOES class multi-wavelength analysis using temporally and spatially highly resolved imaging data from the Dutch open telescope (Hα, Ca ii H), the transition region and coronal explorer (17.1 nm), the extreme-ultraviolet imaging telescope (19.5 nm), and the Reuven Ramaty high energy solar spectroscopic imager (≳3 keV) was carried out. EUV line spectra provided by the coronal diagnostic spectrometer are searched for Doppler shifts in order to study associated plasma flows at chromospheric (He i, T˜3.9× 104 K), transition region (e.g. O v, T˜ 2.6× 105 K), and coronal temperatures (Si xii, T˜ 2× 106 K). RHESSI X-ray spectra provide information about non-thermal electrons. Results: The multi-wavelength appearance of the microflares is in basic agreement with the characteristics of large flares. For the first event, a complex flare sequence is observed in TRACE 17.1 nm images (T≈ 1 MK), which show several brightenings, narrow loops of enhanced emission, and an EUV jet. EIT 19.5 nm data (T≈ 1.5 MK) exhibit similar features for the third event. DOT measurements show finely structured chromospheric flare brightenings for all three events, loop-shaped fibrils of increased emission between Hα brightenings, as well as a similar feature in Ca ii. For all three events, a RHESSI X-ray source (3-8 keV, T ≳ 10 MK) is located in between two chromospheric brightenings situated in magnetic flux of opposite polarity. We find the flow dynamics associated with the events to be very complex. In the chromosphere and transition region, CDS observed downflows for the first (v ≲ 40 km s-1), and

  20. A multi-wavelength database of water vapor in planet-forming regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pontoppidan, Klaus

    The inner few astronomical units of gas-rich protoplanetary disk are environments characterized by a rich and active gaseous chemistry. Primitive material left over from the formation of our own Solar System has for a long time yielded tantalizing clues to a heterogenous nebula with intricate dynamical, thermal and chemical structure that ultimately led to a great diversity in the planets and planetesimals of the Solar System. The discovery of a rich chemistry in protoplanetary disks via a forest of strong 3-40 micron molecular emission lines (H2O, OH, CO2, HCN, C2H2,...) allows us for the first time to investigate chemical diversity in other planet-forming environmments (Salyk et al. 2008; Carr & Najita 2008). Further efforts, supported by the Origins program, has established that this molecular forest is seen in the disks surrounding most young solar- type stars (Pontoppidan et al. 2010). We propose a 3-year program to analyze our growing multi-wavelength database of observations of water, OH and organic molecules in the surfaces of protoplanetary disks. The database includes high (R~25,000-100,000) and medium resolution (R~600-3000) 3- 200 micron spectra from a wide range of facilities (Keck-NIRSPEC, VLT-CRIRES, Spitzer-IRS, VLT-VISIR, Gemini-Michelle and Herschel-PACS). Our previous efforts have focused on demonstrating feasibility for observing water and other molecules in planet-forming regions, building statistics to show that the molecular forest is ubiquitous in disks around low-mass and solar-type stars and taking the first steps in understanding the implied chemical abundances. Now, as the next logical step, we will combine multi- wavelength data from our unique multi-wavelength database to map the radial distribution of, in particular, water and its derivatives. 1) Â We will use both line profile information from the high-resolution spectra, as well as line strengths, from a combination of high and low temperature lines to constrain the radial

  1. A multi-wavelength database of water vapor in planet-forming regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pontoppidan, Klaus

    The inner few astronomical units of gas-rich protoplanetary disk are environments characterized by a rich and active gaseous chemistry. Primitive material left over from the formation of our own Solar System has for a long time yielded tantalizing clues to a heterogenous nebula with intricate dynamical, thermal and chemical structure that ultimately led to a great diversity in the planets and planetesimals of the Solar System. The discovery of a rich chemistry in protoplanetary disks via a forest of strong 3-40 micron molecular emission lines (H2O, OH, CO2, HCN, C2H2,...) allows us for the first time to investigate chemical diversity in other planet-forming environmments (Salyk et al. 2008; Carr & Najita 2008). Further efforts, supported by the Origins program, has established that this molecular forest is seen in the disks surrounding most young solar- type stars (Pontoppidan et al. 2010). We propose a 3-year program to analyze our growing multi-wavelength database of observations of water, OH and organic molecules in the surfaces of protoplanetary disks. The database includes high (R~25,000-100,000) and medium resolution (R~600-3000) 3- 200 micron spectra from a wide range of facilities (Keck-NIRSPEC, VLT-CRIRES, Spitzer-IRS, VLT-VISIR, Gemini-Michelle and Herschel-PACS). Our previous efforts have focused on demonstrating feasibility for observing water and other molecules in planet-forming regions, building statistics to show that the molecular forest is ubiquitous in disks around low-mass and solar-type stars and taking the first steps in understanding the implied chemical abundances. Now, as the next logical step, we will combine multi- wavelength data from our unique multi-wavelength database to map the radial distribution of, in particular, water and its derivatives. 1) We will use both line profile information from the high-resolution spectra, as well as line strengths, from a combination of high and low temperature lines to constrain the radial abundance

  2. Advanced digital detectors for neutron imaging.

    SciTech Connect

    Doty, F. Patrick

    2003-12-01

    Neutron interrogation provides unique information valuable for Nonproliferation & Materials Control and other important applications including medicine, airport security, protein crystallography, and corrosion detection. Neutrons probe deep inside massive objects to detect small defects and chemical composition, even through high atomic number materials such as lead. However, current detectors are bulky gas-filled tubes or scintillator/PM tubes, which severely limit many applications. Therefore this project was undertaken to develop new semiconductor radiation detection materials to develop the first direct digital imaging detectors for neutrons. The approach relied on new discovery and characterization of new solid-state sensor materials which convert neutrons directly to electronic signals via reactions BlO(n,a)Li7 and Li6(n,a)T.

  3. V404 Cygni: coordination of multi-wavelength observations and request for coverage during HST visits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knigge, C.; Marsh, T. R.; Sivakoff, G. R.; Altamirano, D.; Hernández Santisteban, J. V.; Shaw, A.; Charles, P. A.; Gandhi, P.

    2015-06-01

    In an effort to coordinate the multi-wavelength observations covering the ongoing outburst of the black hole X-ray transient V404 Cygni, we have set up a mailing list to facilitate communication between observers.

  4. Measurement of nonlinear refractive index based on multiple configuration of FBG in generating multi wavelength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdullah, Mohd Nizam; Shaari, Sahbudin; Ehsan, Abang Annuar; Menon, Susthitha; Zakaria, Osman

    2015-06-01

    A reliable method for measurement of the nonlinear refractive index through application of multi wavelength phenomenon. Multi wavelength realisation based on Erbium doped fibre laser (EDFL) is proposed and experimentally demonstrated. A combination of 15 m high efficiency Erbium doped fibre (EDF) and a 20 m Photonic Crystal Fibre (PCF) as main catalyst to suppress the homogenous broadening of EDF and to obtain highly stability of multi wavelength through insertion of a set of fibre Bragg gratings (FBGs) in the cavity. This PCF has zero dispersion of 1040 nm which mismatch from transmission window of 1550 nm. A reliable repeatability of multi wavelength based on multiple configuration of FBGs less than 0.2% obtained. This consistent results influence in determination of nonlinear refractive index by relation of four wave mixing (FWM).

  5. Characteristics of stereo images from detectors in focal plane array.

    PubMed

    Son, Jung-Young; Yeom, Seokwon; Chun, Joo-Hwan; Guschin, Vladmir P; Lee, Dong-Su

    2011-07-01

    The equivalent ray geometry of two horizontally aligned detectors at the focal plane of the main antenna in a millimeter wave imaging system is analyzed to reveal the reason why the images from the detectors are fused as an image with a depth sense. Scanning the main antenna in both horizontal and vertical directions makes each detector perform as a camera, and the two detectors can work like a stereo camera in the millimeter wave range. However, the stereo camera geometry is different from that of the stereo camera used in the visual spectral range because the detectors' viewing directions are diverging to each other and they are a certain distance apart. The depth sense is mainly induced by the distance between detectors. The images obtained from the detectors in the millimeter imaging system are perceived with a good depth sense. The disparities responsible for the depth sense are identified in the images.

  6. Microtomography with sandwich detectors for small-animal bone imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, S. H.; Kim, D. W.; Kim, D.; Youn, H.; Cho, S.; Kim, H. K.

    2016-10-01

    An x-ray radiographic system consisting of two detectors in tandem, or a sandwich detector, can produce dual-energy image from a single-shot exposure. Subtraction of two images obtained from the two detectors can produce a sharper image through an unsharp masking effect if the two images are formed at different spatial resolutions. This is indeed possible by incorporating different thicknesses of x-ray conversion layers in the detectors. In this study, we have developed a microtomography system with a sandwich detector in pursuit of high-resolution bone-enhanced small-animal imaging. The results show that the bone-enhanced images reconstructed from the dual-energy projection data provide higher visibility of bone details than the conventionally reconstructed images. The microtomography with the single-shot dual-energy sandwich detector will be useful for the high-resolution bone-enhanced small-animal imaging.

  7. Parallel online multi-wavelength (2D) fluorescence spectroscopy in each well of a continuously shaken microtiter plate.

    PubMed

    Ladner, Tobias; Beckers, Mario; Hitzmann, Bernd; Büchs, Jochen

    2016-12-01

    Small-scale high-throughput screening devices are becoming increasingly important in bioprocess development. Conventional dipping probes for process monitoring are often too large to be used in these devices. Thus, optical measurements are often the method of choice. Even some parameters that cannot directly be measured by fluorescence become accessible via sensitive fluorescence dyes. However, not all compounds of interest are measurable by this technique. Recent studies applying multi-wavelength (2D) fluorescence spectroscopy in combination with chemometrics have shown that information on numerous analytes is obscured by the fluorescence data. Hitherto, this measurement technique has only been available on the scale of stirred tank fermenters. This work introduces a new device for multi-wavelength (2D) fluorescence spectroscopy in each well of a continuously shaken microtiter plate. Using a combination of spectrograph and CCD detector, the required time per measurement cycle in a 48-well microtiter plate was 0.5 h. Cultures of Hansenula polymorpha and Escherichia coli are monitored. The concentrations of glycerol, glucose and acetate as well as pH are determined using partial least square (PLS) models. Because a pH-sensitive fluorescence dye was not required, no dependency of the pKa of a fluorescence dye exists, and measurements in the low pH range can be obtained.

  8. AGLITE: a multi-wavelength lidar for measuring emitted aerosol concentrations and fluxes and air motion from agricultural facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkerson, Thomas D.; Bingham, Gail E.; Zavyalov, Vladimir V.; Swasey, Jason A.; Hancock, Jed J.; Crowther, Blake G.; Cornelsen, Scott S.; Marchant, Christian; Cutts, James N.; Huish, David C.; Earl, Curtis L.; Andersen, Jan M.; Cox, McLain L.

    2006-12-01

    AGLITE is a multi-wavelength lidar developed for the Agricultural Research Service (ARS), United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) and its program on particle emissions from animal production facilities. The lidar transmitter is a 10 kHz pulsed NdYAG laser at 355, 532 and 1064 nm. We analyze lidar backscatter and extinction to extract aerosol physical properties. All-reflective optics and dichroic and interferometric filters permit all wavelengths to be measured simultaneously, day or night, using photon counting by MTs, an APD, and fast data acquisition. The lidar housing is a transportable trailer suitable for all-weather operation at any accessible site. We direct the laser and telescope FOVs to targets of interest in both azimuth and elevation. The lidar has been applied in atmospheric studies at a swine production farm in Iowa and a dairy in Utah. Prominent aerosol plumes emitted from the swine facility were measured as functions of temperature, turbulence, stability and the animal feed cycle. Particle samplers and turbulence detectors were used by colleagues specializing in those fields. Lidar measurements also focused on air motion as seen by scans of the farm volume. The value of multi-wavelength, eye-safe lidars for agricultural aerosol measurements has been confirmed by the successful operation of AGLITE.

  9. Programmable Illumination and High-Speed, Multi-Wavelength, Confocal Microscopy Using a Digital Micromirror

    PubMed Central

    Martial, Franck P.; Hartell, Nicholas A.

    2012-01-01

    Confocal microscopy is routinely used for high-resolution fluorescence imaging of biological specimens. Most standard confocal systems scan a laser across a specimen and collect emitted light passing through a single pinhole to produce an optical section of the sample. Sequential scanning on a point-by-point basis limits the speed of image acquisition and even the fastest commercial instruments struggle to resolve the temporal dynamics of rapid cellular events such as calcium signals. Various approaches have been introduced that increase the speed of confocal imaging. Nipkov disk microscopes, for example, use arrays of pinholes or slits on a spinning disk to achieve parallel scanning which significantly increases the speed of acquisition. Here we report the development of a microscope module that utilises a digital micromirror device as a spatial light modulator to provide programmable confocal optical sectioning with a single camera, at high spatial and axial resolution at speeds limited by the frame rate of the camera. The digital micromirror acts as a solid state Nipkov disk but with the added ability to change the pinholes size and separation and to control the light intensity on a mirror-by-mirror basis. The use of an arrangement of concave and convex mirrors in the emission pathway instead of lenses overcomes the astigmatism inherent with DMD devices, increases light collection efficiency and ensures image collection is achromatic so that images are perfectly aligned at different wavelengths. Combined with non-laser light sources, this allows low cost, high-speed, multi-wavelength image acquisition without the need for complex wavelength-dependent image alignment. The micromirror can also be used for programmable illumination allowing spatially defined photoactivation of fluorescent proteins. We demonstrate the use of this system for high-speed calcium imaging using both a single wavelength calcium indicator and a genetically encoded, ratiometric, calcium

  10. On designing a SWIR multi-wavelength facial-based acquisition system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourlai, Thirimachos; Narang, Neeru; Cukic, Bojan; Hornak, Lawrence

    2012-06-01

    In harsh environmental conditions characterized by unfavorable lighting and pronounced shadows, human recognition based on Short-Wave Infrared (0.9-1.7 microns) images may be advantageous. SWIR imagery (i) is more tolerant to low levels of obscurants like fog and smoke; (ii) the active illumination source can be eye-safe and (iii) the active illumination source is invisible to the human eye making it suitable for surveillance applications. The key drawback of current SWIR-based acquisition systems is that they lack the capability of real-time simultaneous acquisition of multiple SWIR wavelengths. The contributions of our work are four-fold. First, we constructed a SWIR multi-wavelength acquisition system (MWAS) that can capture face images at 5 different wavelengths (1150, 1250, 1350, 1450, 1550 nm) in rapid succession using a 5-filter rotating filter wheel. Each filter has a band pass of 100 nm and all 5 images are acquired within 260 milliseconds. The acquisition system utilizes a reflective optical sensor to generate a timing signal corresponding to the filter wheel position that is used to trigger each camera image acquisition when the appropriate filter is in front of the camera. The timing signal from the reflective sensor transmits to a display panel to confirm the synchronization of the camera with the wheel. Second, we performed an empirical optimization on the adjustment of the exposure time of the camera and speed of the wheel when different light sources (fluorescent, tungsten, both) were used. This improved the quality of the images acquired. Third, a SWIR spectrometer was used to measure the response from the different light sources and was used to evaluate which one provides better images as a function of wavelength. Finally, the selection of the band pass filter, to focus the camera to acquire the good quality SWIR images was done by using a number of image quality and distortion metrics (e.g. universal quality index and Structural index method).

  11. Programmable illumination and high-speed, multi-wavelength, confocal microscopy using a digital micromirror.

    PubMed

    Martial, Franck P; Hartell, Nicholas A

    2012-01-01

    Confocal microscopy is routinely used for high-resolution fluorescence imaging of biological specimens. Most standard confocal systems scan a laser across a specimen and collect emitted light passing through a single pinhole to produce an optical section of the sample. Sequential scanning on a point-by-point basis limits the speed of image acquisition and even the fastest commercial instruments struggle to resolve the temporal dynamics of rapid cellular events such as calcium signals. Various approaches have been introduced that increase the speed of confocal imaging. Nipkov disk microscopes, for example, use arrays of pinholes or slits on a spinning disk to achieve parallel scanning which significantly increases the speed of acquisition. Here we report the development of a microscope module that utilises a digital micromirror device as a spatial light modulator to provide programmable confocal optical sectioning with a single camera, at high spatial and axial resolution at speeds limited by the frame rate of the camera. The digital micromirror acts as a solid state Nipkov disk but with the added ability to change the pinholes size and separation and to control the light intensity on a mirror-by-mirror basis. The use of an arrangement of concave and convex mirrors in the emission pathway instead of lenses overcomes the astigmatism inherent with DMD devices, increases light collection efficiency and ensures image collection is achromatic so that images are perfectly aligned at different wavelengths. Combined with non-laser light sources, this allows low cost, high-speed, multi-wavelength image acquisition without the need for complex wavelength-dependent image alignment. The micromirror can also be used for programmable illumination allowing spatially defined photoactivation of fluorescent proteins. We demonstrate the use of this system for high-speed calcium imaging using both a single wavelength calcium indicator and a genetically encoded, ratiometric, calcium

  12. High density scintillating glass proton imaging detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkinson, C. J.; Goranson, K.; Turney, A.; Xie, Q.; Tillman, I. J.; Thune, Z. L.; Dong, A.; Pritchett, D.; McInally, W.; Potter, A.; Wang, D.; Akgun, U.

    2017-03-01

    In recent years, proton therapy has achieved remarkable precision in delivering doses to cancerous cells while avoiding healthy tissue. However, in order to utilize this high precision treatment, greater accuracy in patient positioning is needed. An accepted approximate uncertainty of +/-3% exists in the current practice of proton therapy due to conversions between x-ray and proton stopping power. The use of protons in imaging would eliminate this source of error and lessen the radiation exposure of the patient. To this end, this study focuses on developing a novel proton-imaging detector built with high-density glass scintillator. The model described herein contains a compact homogeneous proton calorimeter composed of scintillating, high density glass as the active medium. The unique geometry of this detector allows for the measurement of both the position and residual energy of protons, eliminating the need for a separate set of position trackers in the system. Average position and energy of a pencil beam of 106 protons is used to reconstruct the image rather than by analyzing individual proton data. Simplicity and efficiency were major objectives in this model in order to present an imaging technique that is compact, cost-effective, and precise, as well as practical for a clinical setting with pencil-beam scanning proton therapy equipment. In this work, the development of novel high-density glass scintillator and the unique conceptual design of the imager are discussed; a proof-of-principle Monte Carlo simulation study is performed; preliminary two-dimensional images reconstructed from the Geant4 simulation are presented.

  13. A Multi-Wavelength View of the Environments of Extreme Clustered Star Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Buizer, James M.

    2017-01-01

    It is believed that the vast majority of, if not all, stars form within OB clusters. Most theories of star formation assume a star forms in isolation and ignore the fact that the cluster environment and, especially, the presence of extremely energetic and high mass young stellar objects nearby, may have a profound impact on the formation process of a typical cluster member. Giant HII (GHII) regions are Galactic analogs to starburst regions seen in external galaxies, hosting the most active areas of clustered star formation. As such, GHII regions represent a population of objects that can reveal a wealth of information on the environment of the earliest stages of clustered star formation and how it is affected by feedback from the most massive cluster members. This study employs new mid-infrared imaging data obtained from the airborne observatory, SOFIA, as well as archival imaging data from the near-infrared to cm radio wavelengths to create a rich multi-wavelength dataset of a dozen galactic GHII regions. These data allow quantification of the detailed physical conditions within GHII regions individually and as a population on both global and small scales.

  14. Gallium arsenide pixel detectors for medical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Da Via, C.; Bates, R.; Bertolucci, E.; Bottigli, U.; Campbell, M.; Chesi, E.; Conti, M.; D'Auria, S.; DelPapa, C.; Fantacci, M. E.; Grossi, G.; Heijne, E.; Mancini, E.; Middelkamp, P.; Raine, C.; Russo, P.; O'Shea, V.; Scharfetter, L.; Smith, K.; Snoeys, W.; Stefanini, A.

    1997-08-01

    Gallium arsenide pixel detectors processed on a 200 μm Semi-Insulating (SI) Hitachi substrate were bump-bonded to the Omega3 electronics developed at CERN for high energy physics [1]. The pixel dimensions are 50 μm × 500 μm for a total of 2048 cells and an active area of ˜0.5 cm 2. Our aim is to use this system for medical imaging. We report the results obtained after irradiation of the detector with different X-ray sources on phantoms with different contrasts. The system showed good sensitivity to X-rays from 241Am (60 keV) and 109Cd (22.1 keV). It is also sensitive to β- particles from 90Sr as well as from 32P which is used as a tracer for autoradiography applications. The inherent high absorption efficiency of GaAs associated with the self-triggering capabilities of the pixel readout system reduced considerably the acquisition time compared with traditional systems based on silicon or emulsions. The present configuration is not optimised for X-ray imaging. The reduction of the pixel dimensions to 200 μm × 200 μm together with the integration of a counter in the pixel electronics would make the detector competitive for applications like mammography or dental radiology. For certain applications in biochemistry, such as DNA sequencing, where good spatial resolution is required only in one direction, the present setup should allow the best spatial resolution available up to now with respect to other digital autoradiographic systems. DNA sequencing tests are now under way.

  15. Multispectral imaging using a single bucket detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bian, Liheng; Suo, Jinli; Situ, Guohai; Li, Ziwei; Fan, Jingtao; Chen, Feng; Dai, Qionghai

    2016-04-01

    Existing multispectral imagers mostly use available array sensors to separately measure 2D data slices in a 3D spatial-spectral data cube. Thus they suffer from low photon efficiency, limited spectrum range and high cost. To address these issues, we propose to conduct multispectral imaging using a single bucket detector, to take full advantage of its high sensitivity, wide spectrum range, low cost, small size and light weight. Technically, utilizing the detector’s fast response, a scene’s 3D spatial-spectral information is multiplexed into a dense 1D measurement sequence and then demultiplexed computationally under the single pixel imaging scheme. A proof-of-concept setup is built to capture multispectral data of 64 pixels × 64 pixels × 10 wavelength bands ranging from 450 nm to 650 nm, with the acquisition time being 1 minute. The imaging scheme holds great potentials for various low light and airborne applications, and can be easily manufactured as production-volume portable multispectral imagers.

  16. Multispectral imaging using a single bucket detector

    PubMed Central

    Bian, Liheng; Suo, Jinli; Situ, Guohai; Li, Ziwei; Fan, Jingtao; Chen, Feng; Dai, Qionghai

    2016-01-01

    Existing multispectral imagers mostly use available array sensors to separately measure 2D data slices in a 3D spatial-spectral data cube. Thus they suffer from low photon efficiency, limited spectrum range and high cost. To address these issues, we propose to conduct multispectral imaging using a single bucket detector, to take full advantage of its high sensitivity, wide spectrum range, low cost, small size and light weight. Technically, utilizing the detector’s fast response, a scene’s 3D spatial-spectral information is multiplexed into a dense 1D measurement sequence and then demultiplexed computationally under the single pixel imaging scheme. A proof-of-concept setup is built to capture multispectral data of 64 pixels × 64 pixels × 10 wavelength bands ranging from 450 nm to 650 nm, with the acquisition time being 1 minute. The imaging scheme holds great potentials for various low light and airborne applications, and can be easily manufactured as production-volume portable multispectral imagers. PMID:27103168

  17. Aerosol Optical Properties Characterization By Means Of The CNR-IMAA Multi-Wavelength Raman Lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mona, L.; Amodeo, A.; D'Amico, G.; Pappalardo, G.

    2007-12-01

    A Raman/elastic lidar for tropospheric aerosol study is operational at CNR-IMAA (40°36'N, 15°44'E, 760 m above sea level) since May 2000 in the framework of EARLINET. Since August 2005, this system provides aerosol backscatter coefficient profiles at 1064 nm, and independent measurements of aerosol extinction and backscatter coefficient profiles at 355 and 532 nm. In this way, lidar ratio (i.e. extinction to backscatter ratio) profiles at 355 and 532 nm are also obtained. In addition, depolarization ratio measurements at 532 nm are obtained by means of detection of components of backscattered light polarized perpendicular and parallel to the direction of the linearly polarized transmitted laser beam. Depolarization ratio measurements provide information about shape and orientation of aerosolic particles, while lidar ratio measurements and wavelength dependences of both backscatter and extinction are important for aerosol characterization in terms of aerosol type and size. In addition, high quality multi-wavelength measurements (3 backscatter + 2 extinction) can allow the determination of microphysical aerosol properties (refractive index, single-scattering albedo and effective particles radii). Systematic measurements are performed three times per week according to the EARLINET schedule since May 2000, and further measurements are performed in order to investigate particular events, like dust intrusions, volcanic eruptions and forest fires. This extended dataset allows the optical characterization of aerosol located close to the surface, namely in the Planetary Boundary Layer, as well as in the free troposphere. In the free troposphere, an high occurrence of Saharan dust intrusions at CNR-IMAA (about 1 day of Saharan dust intrusion every 10 days) has been identified by means of back-trajectory analysis and in accordance with satellite images, because of the short distance from the Sahara region. In addition, CNR-IMAA is pretty close to Etna, the largest European

  18. De-blending deep Herschel surveys: A multi-wavelength approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearson, W. J.; Wang, L.; van der Tak, F. F. S.; Hurley, P. D.; Burgarella, D.; Oliver, S. J.

    2017-07-01

    Aims: Cosmological surveys in the far-infrared are known to suffer from confusion. The Bayesian de-blending tool, XID+, currently provides one of the best ways to de-confuse deep Herschel SPIRE images, using a flat flux density prior. This work is to demonstrate that existing multi-wavelength data sets can be exploited to improve XID+ by providing an informed prior, resulting in more accurate and precise extracted flux densities. Methods: Photometric data for galaxies in the COSMOS field were used to constrain spectral energy distributions (SEDs) using the fitting tool CIGALE. These SEDs were used to create Gaussian prior estimates in the SPIRE bands for XID+. The multi-wavelength photometry and the extracted SPIRE flux densities were run through CIGALE again to allow us to compare the performance of the two priors. Inferred ALMA flux densities (FinferALMA), at 870 μm and 1250 μm, from the best fitting SEDs from the second CIGALE run were compared with measured ALMA flux densities (FmeasALMA) as an independent performance validation. Similar validations were conducted with the SED modelling and fitting tool MAGPHYS and modified black-body functions to test for model dependency. Results: We demonstrate a clear improvement in agreement between the flux densities extracted with XID+ and existing data at other wavelengths when using the new informed Gaussian prior over the original uninformed prior. The residuals between FmeasALMA and FinferALMA were calculated. For the Gaussian priors these residuals, expressed as a multiple of the ALMA error (σ), have a smaller standard deviation, 7.95σ for the Gaussian prior compared to 12.21σ for the flat prior; reduced mean, 1.83σ compared to 3.44σ; and have reduced skew to positive values, 7.97 compared to 11.50. These results were determined to not be significantly model dependent. This results in statistically more reliable SPIRE flux densities and hence statistically more reliable infrared luminosity estimates. Herschel

  19. The new MQ/AAO/Strasbourg multi-wavelength and spectroscopic PNe database: MASPN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, Quentin Andrew; Bojicic, Ivan; Frew, David; Acker, Agnes; Ochsenbein, Francois; MASPN Database Team

    2015-01-01

    We are in a new golden age of PN discovery. This is thanks in particular to high sensitivity, wide-field, narrow-band surveys of the Galactic plane undertaken on the UKST in Australia and the Isaac Newton telescope on La Palma. Together these telescopes and their H-alpha surveys have provided very significant Planetary Nebulae (PNe) discoveries that have more than doubled the totals accrued by all telescopes over the previous 250 years. However, these PNe are not simply more of the same found in previous catalogues. Most new PNe are more obscured, evolved and of lower surface brightness than previous compilations while others are faint but compact and more distant. This has required an extensive and time-consuming programme of spectroscopic confirmation on a variety of 2m and 4m telescopes that is now largely complete. The scope of any future large-scale PNe studies, particularly those of a statistical nature or undertaken to understand true PNe diversity and evolution should now reflect this fresh PN population landscape of the combined sample of ~3500 Galactic PNe now available. Such studies should be coloured and nuanced by these recent major discoveries and the massive, high sensitivity, high resolution, multi-wavelength imaging surveys now available across much of the electromagnetic spectrum.Following this motivation we provide, for the first time, an accessible, reliable, on-line "one-stop" SQL database for essential, up-to date information for all known Galactic PN. We have attempted to: i) Reliably remove the many PN mimics/false ID's that have biased previous compilations and subsequent studies; ii) Provide accurate, updated positions, sizes, morphologies, radial velocities, fluxes, multi-wavelength imagery and spectroscopy; iii) Link to CDS/Vizier and hence provide archival history for each object; iv) Provide an interface to sift, select, browse, collate, investigate, download and visualise the complete currently known Galactic PNe diaspora and v

  20. Lensless phase microscopy and diffraction tomography with multi-angle and multi-wavelength illuminations using a LED matrix.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Chao; Sun, Jiasong; Zhang, Jialin; Hu, Yan; Chen, Qian

    2015-06-01

    We demonstrate lensless quantitative phase microscopy and diffraction tomography based on a compact on-chip platform, using only a CMOS image sensor and a programmable color LED matrix. Based on the multi-wavelength phase retrieval and multi-angle illumination diffraction tomography, this platform offers high quality, depth resolved images with a lateral resolution of 3.72μm and an axial resolution of 5μm, across a wide field-of-view of 24mm2. We experimentally demonstrate the success of our method by imaging cheek cells, micro-beads, and fertilized eggs of Parascaris equorum. Such high-throughput and miniaturized imaging device can provide a cost-effective tool for telemedicine applications and point-of-care diagnostics in resource-limited environments.

  1. Comparative Analysis of Oscillations of a Solar Quiet Region Using Multi-Wavelength Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kontogiannis, I.; Tsiropoula, G.; Tziotziou, K.

    2010-07-01

    We analyze the temporal behavior of a solar quiet region using a set of multi-wavelength observations obtained during a coordinated campaign. The observations were acquired by the ground-based Dutch Open Telescope (DOT), the Michelson Doppler Imager (MDI) on-board SOHO and the UV filters of the Transition Region and Coronal Explorer (TRACE). A large range of height in the solar atmosphere, from the deep photosphere to the upper chromosphere is covered by these instruments. We investigate the oscillation properties of the intensities and velocities in distinct regions of the quiet Sun, i.e. internetwork, bright points (NBP) defining the network boundaries and dark mottles forming a well-defined rosette, as observed by the different instruments and in the different heights. The variations of the intensities and velocities are studied with wavelet analysis. The aim of our work is to find similarities and/or differences in the oscillatory phenomena observed in the different examined regions, as well as comprehensive information on the interaction of the oscillations and the magnetic field.

  2. Multi-Wavelength Analysis of the Quasar CTA102 during a Dramatic Outburst in 2016 December

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jorstad, Svetlana G.; Marscher, Alan P.; Williamson, Karen E.; Larionov, Valeri M.; Smith, Paul S.; Gurwell, Mark A.; Lahteenmaki, Anne

    2017-08-01

    Abstract: The quasar CTA102 underwent a dramatic outburst from gamma-ray toradio wavelengths in late 2016. The gamma-ray emission at 0.1-200 GeV roseup to (12.1+-0.7)x10^{-6} phot/s/cm^2, with a significant flattening of the spectral index. The blazar reached an optical brightness level never observed previously, < 11 mag in R band, and an increase of the radio flux density at millimeter wavelengths with flattening of the radio spectrum was observed as well.We present analysis of multi-wavelength data during the event obtained at gamma-rays with the Fermi Large Area telescope, at X-rays provided by the NuStar X-ray telescope and Swift XRT and UVOT, in optical bands measured at different telescopes around the world along with polarimetric observations, and at mm-waves obtained at Metsahovi Radio Observatory and SubMillimeter Array, along with imaging of theparsec-scale jet of the quasar with the VLBA at 43 GHz. This research is funded in part by NASA through Fermi Guest Investigator grant NNX14AQ58G and by the National Science Foundation through grant AST-1615796.

  3. Multi-wavelength pulsars study : Long-term timing of XMM, HESS and GLAST sources with the Nancay radiotelescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theureau, G.; Cognard, I.; Smith, D.; Webb, N.; Gallant, Y.

    2006-06-01

    We present here the current Nançay observing program gathering the pulsar french community around the radio follow-up of X- and gamma-ray pulsars for the building of a complete multi-wavelength sample. The goal of this project is double : 1) provide strong constraints on the physics and emission mechanisms of pulsars , 2) guarantee the success of pulsar harvest at high energy by providing good and contemporaneous ephemerides for folding the few gamma and X-ray photons . The community is well involved in the last generation of gamma-ray and X-ray detectors and the availability of the NRT and its dedicated backend BON represents a very good opportunity for acquiring the necessary and complementary radio data.

  4. Computational imaging with a balanced detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soldevila, F.; Clemente, P.; Tajahuerce, E.; Uribe-Patarroyo, N.; Andrés, P.; Lancis, J.

    2016-06-01

    Single-pixel cameras allow to obtain images in a wide range of challenging scenarios, including broad regions of the electromagnetic spectrum and through scattering media. However, there still exist several drawbacks that single-pixel architectures must address, such as acquisition speed and imaging in the presence of ambient light. In this work we introduce balanced detection in combination with simultaneous complementary illumination in a single-pixel camera. This approach enables to acquire information even when the power of the parasite signal is higher than the signal itself. Furthermore, this novel detection scheme increases both the frame rate and the signal-to-noise ratio of the system. By means of a fast digital micromirror device together with a low numerical aperture collecting system, we are able to produce a live-feed video with a resolution of 64 × 64 pixels at 5 Hz. With advanced undersampling techniques, such as compressive sensing, we can acquire information at rates of 25 Hz. By using this strategy, we foresee real-time biological imaging with large area detectors in conditions where array sensors are unable to operate properly, such as infrared imaging and dealing with objects embedded in turbid media.

  5. Computational imaging with a balanced detector.

    PubMed

    Soldevila, F; Clemente, P; Tajahuerce, E; Uribe-Patarroyo, N; Andrés, P; Lancis, J

    2016-06-29

    Single-pixel cameras allow to obtain images in a wide range of challenging scenarios, including broad regions of the electromagnetic spectrum and through scattering media. However, there still exist several drawbacks that single-pixel architectures must address, such as acquisition speed and imaging in the presence of ambient light. In this work we introduce balanced detection in combination with simultaneous complementary illumination in a single-pixel camera. This approach enables to acquire information even when the power of the parasite signal is higher than the signal itself. Furthermore, this novel detection scheme increases both the frame rate and the signal-to-noise ratio of the system. By means of a fast digital micromirror device together with a low numerical aperture collecting system, we are able to produce a live-feed video with a resolution of 64 × 64 pixels at 5 Hz. With advanced undersampling techniques, such as compressive sensing, we can acquire information at rates of 25 Hz. By using this strategy, we foresee real-time biological imaging with large area detectors in conditions where array sensors are unable to operate properly, such as infrared imaging and dealing with objects embedded in turbid media.

  6. Computational imaging with a balanced detector

    PubMed Central

    Soldevila, F.; Clemente, P.; Tajahuerce, E.; Uribe-Patarroyo, N.; Andrés, P.; Lancis, J.

    2016-01-01

    Single-pixel cameras allow to obtain images in a wide range of challenging scenarios, including broad regions of the electromagnetic spectrum and through scattering media. However, there still exist several drawbacks that single-pixel architectures must address, such as acquisition speed and imaging in the presence of ambient light. In this work we introduce balanced detection in combination with simultaneous complementary illumination in a single-pixel camera. This approach enables to acquire information even when the power of the parasite signal is higher than the signal itself. Furthermore, this novel detection scheme increases both the frame rate and the signal-to-noise ratio of the system. By means of a fast digital micromirror device together with a low numerical aperture collecting system, we are able to produce a live-feed video with a resolution of 64 × 64 pixels at 5 Hz. With advanced undersampling techniques, such as compressive sensing, we can acquire information at rates of 25 Hz. By using this strategy, we foresee real-time biological imaging with large area detectors in conditions where array sensors are unable to operate properly, such as infrared imaging and dealing with objects embedded in turbid media. PMID:27353733

  7. Imaging in (high pressure) Micromegas TPC detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luzón, G.; Cebrián, S.; Castel, J.; Dafni, Th.; Galán, J.; Garza, J. G.; Irastorza, I. G.; Iguaz, F. J.; Mirallas, H.; Ruíz-Choliz, E.

    2016-11-01

    The T-REX project of the group of the University of Zaragoza includes a number of R&D and prototyping activities to explore the applicability of gaseous Time Projection Chambers (TPCs) with Micromesh Gas Structures (Micromegas) in rare event searches where the pattern recognition of the signal is crucial for background discrimination. In the CAST experiment (CERN Axion Solar Telescope) a background level as low as 0.8 × 10-6 counts keV-1 cm-2 s-1 was achieved. Prototyping and simulations promise a 105 better signal-to-noise ratio than CAST for the future IAXO (International Axion Observatory) using x-ray telescopes. A new strategy is also explored in the search of WIMPS based on high gas pressure: the TREX-DM experiment, a low energy threshold detector. In both cases, axion and WIMP searches, the image of the expected signal is quite simple: a one cluster deposition coming from the magnet bore in the case of axions and, if possible, with a tadpole form in the case of WIMPs. It is the case of double beta decay (DBD) where imaging and pattern recognition play a major role. Results obtained in Xe + trimethylamine (TMA) mixture point to a reduction in electron diffusion which improves the quality of the topological pattern, with a positive impact on the discrimination capability, as shown in TREX-ββ prototype. Microbulk Micromegas are able to image the DBD ionization signature with high quality while, at the same time, measuring its energy deposition with a resolution of at least a ~ 3% FWHM at the transition energy Qββ and even better (up to ~ 1% FWHM) as extrapolated from low energy events. That makes Micromegas-based HPXe TPC a very competitive technique for the next generation DBD experiments (as PANDAX-III). Here, it will be shown the last results of the TREX project detectors and software concerning Axions, Dark matter and double beta decay.

  8. Multi-wavelength Study of Transition Region Penumbral Subarcsecond Bright Dots Using IRIS and NST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Na; Yurchyshyn, Vasyl; Tian, Hui; Kleint, Lucia; Liu, Chang; Xu, Yan; Wang, Haimin

    2016-10-01

    Using high-resolution transition region (TR) observations taken by the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) mission, Tian et al. revealed numerous short-lived subarcsecond bright dots (BDs) above sunspots (mostly located in the penumbrae), which indicate yet unexplained small-scale energy releases. Moreover, whether or not these subarcsecond TR brightenings have any signature in the lower atmosphere and how they are formed are still not fully resolved. This paper presents a multi-wavelength study of the TR penumbral BDs using a coordinated observation of a near disk center sunspot with IRIS and the 1.6 m New Solar Telescope (NST) at the Big Bear Solar Observatory. NST provides high-resolution chromospheric and photospheric observations with narrowband Hα imaging spectroscopy and broadband TiO images, respectively, complementary to IRIS TR observations. A total of 2692 TR penumbral BDs are identified from a 37 minute time series of IRIS 1400 Å slit-jaw images. Their locations tend to be associated more with downflowing and darker fibrils in the chromosphere, and weakly associated with bright penumbral features in the photosphere. However, temporal evolution analyses of the BDs show that there is no consistent and convincing brightening response in the chromosphere. These results are compatible with a formation mechanism of the TR penumbral BDs by falling plasma from coronal heights along more vertical and dense magnetic loops. The BDs may also be produced by small-scale impulsive magnetic reconnection taking place sufficiently high in the atmosphere that has no energy release in the chromosphere.

  9. Receiver Performance Analysis of a Multi-wavelength Sampling Integrated Path Differential Absorption CO2 Lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, X.; Abshire, J. B.; Ramanathan, A. K.; Mao, J.; Kawa, S. R.

    2016-12-01

    A multi-wavelength sampling integrated path differential (IPDA) CO2 lidar is analyzed and modeled. The instrument transmits laser pulses at a series of wavelengths across the 1572.33 nm CO2 absorption line. The receiver measures the received laser pulse energy and time of flight at each wavelength. The measurements are then fit to a CO2 absorption line shape to determine the total column CO2 mixing ratio. The receiver model includes effects of solar background, photon detection shot noise, detector dark current, preamplifier noise and laser speckle noise. The least-square curve fit is a linear fit in the optical depth domain and the logarithm of the raw measurements. The column CO2 mixing ratio is proportional to the scaling factor resulted from the curve fit. There are several advantages to performing the curve fit in the optical depth domain: (a) the result is directly proportional to the CO2molecule number density of the column; (b) it is a standard linear least square error fit where the theory is well established; (c) there is no need to separately estimate the off-line optical transmission. The receiver model further gives insight about the effects of various instrument parameters and the difference between the atmosphere model used in the curve fit and the actual atmosphere. For example, we can use the model to estimate the biases in the retrieved CO2 mixing ratio from small errors in the meteorological data used to generate the line shape used in the curve fit. We have shown that the estimated instrument performance using this receiver model agrees with the results from our recent airborne measurements. The receiver model is also used in the simulation of the impact of the lidar measurements of the global greenhouse gas distribution and their projected impact on quantification of surface sources and sinks.

  10. Multi-wavelength laser tuning based on cholesteric liquid crystals with nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Sheng-Chieh; Lin, Jia-De; Lee, Chia-Rong; Hwang, Shug-June

    2016-04-01

    A controllable multi-wavelength laser from a dye-doped cholesteric liquid crystal (DDCLC) cell is demonstrated by incorporating self-assembled polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS) nanoparticles (NPs). Multi-wavelength lasing emission is achieved by formation of multiple planar domains; this formation is dominantly influenced by the vertical alignment of NP clusters adsorbed on the substrate surface through a rapid thermal annealing process. The multi-wavelength lasing peaks are generated through the resultant effect of multiple longitudinal resonant modes of a Fabry-Pérot etalon between the cell substrates and the amplification of fluorescence photons with the resonant wavelengths within the broadening long-wavelength edge of the reflection band of the multi-domain CLC. The amount of multi-wavelength lasing peaks can be controlled by changing the POSS NP concentration and the cooling rate of the cell. Furthermore, thermo-reversible control of the multi-wavelength lasing emission can be attained by controlling the thermally induced phase separation process of the POSS/DDCLC cell via a heating/cooling cyclic process.

  11. The Hadron Blind Ring Imaging Cherenkov Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blatnik, Marie; Zajac, Stephanie; Hemmick, Tom

    2013-10-01

    Heavy Ion Collisions in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven Lab have hinted at the existence of a new form of matter at high gluon density, the Color Glass Condensate. High energy electron scattering off of nuclei, focusing on the low-x components of the nuclear wave function, will definitively measure this state of matter. However, when a nucleus contributes a low x parton, the reaction products are highly focused in the electron-going direction and have large momentum in the lab system. High-momentum particle identification is particularly challenging. A particle is identifiable by its mass, but tracking algorithms only yield a particle's momentum based on its track's curvature. The particle's velocity is needed to identify the particle. A ring-imaging Cerenkov detector is being developed for the forward angle particle identification from the technological advancements of PHENIX's Hadron-Blind Detector (HBD), which uses Gas Electron Multipliers (GEMs) and pixelated pad planes to detect Cerenkov photons. The new HBD will focus the Cerenkov photons into a ring to determine the parent particle's velocity. Results from the pad plane simulations, construction tests, and test beam run will be presented.

  12. Software development for a Ring Imaging Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torisky, Benjamin; Benmokhtar, Fatiha

    2015-04-01

    Jefferson Lab (Jlab) is performing a large-scale upgrade to their Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) up to 12 GeV beam. The Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS12) in Hall B is being upgraded and a new Ring Imaging CHerenkov (RICH) detector is being developed to provide better kaon - pion separation throughout the 3 to 12 GeV range. With this addition, when the electron beam hits the target, the resulting pions, kaons, and other particles will pass through a wall of translucent aerogel tiles and create Cherenkov radiation. This light can then be accurately detected by a large array of Multi-Anode PhotoMultiplier Tubes (MA-PMT). I am presenting my work on the implementation of Java based reconstruction programs for the RICH in the CLAS12 main analysis package.

  13. Software Development for Ring Imaging Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torisky, Benjamin

    2016-03-01

    Jefferson Lab (Jlab) is performing a large-scale upgrade to their Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) up to 12GeV beam. The Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS12) in Hall B is being upgraded and a new Ring Imaging Cherenkov (RICH) detector is being developed to provide better kaon - pion separation throughout the 3 to 12 GeV range. With this addition, when the electron beam hits the target, the resulting pions, kaons, and other particles will pass through a wall of translucent aerogel tiles and create Cherenkov radiation. This light can then be accurately detected by a large array of Multi-Anode PhotoMultiplier Tubes (MA-PMT). I am presenting an update on my work on the implementation of Java based reconstruction programs for the RICH in the CLAS12 main analysis package.

  14. Gallium nitride photocathode development for imaging detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siegmund, Oswald H. W.; Tremsin, Anton S.; Vallerga, John V.; McPhate, Jason B.; Hull, Jeffrey S.; Malloy, James; Dabiran, Amir M.

    2008-07-01

    Recent progress in Gallium Nitride (GaN, AlGaN, InGaN) photocathodes show great promise for future detector applications in Astrophysical instruments. Efforts with opaque GaN photocathodes have yielded quantum efficiencies up to 70% at 120 nm and cutoffs at ~380 nm, with low out of band response, and high stability. Previous work with semitransparent GaN photocathodes produced relatively low quantum efficiencies in transmission mode (4%). We now have preliminary data showing that quantum efficiency improvements of a factor of 5 can be achieved. We have also performed two dimensional photon counting imaging with 25mm diameter semitransparent GaN photocathodes in close proximity to a microchannel plate stack and a cross delay line readout. The imaging performance achieves spatial resolution of ~50μm with low intrinsic background (below 1 event sec-1 cm-2) and reasonable image uniformity. GaN photocathodes with significant quantum efficiency have been fabricated on ceramic MCP substrates. In addition GaN has been deposited at low temperature onto quartz substrates, also achieving substantial quantum efficiency.

  15. Multi-Wavelength Views of Protostars in IC 1396

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-12-18

    This archival image from 2003 captured by NASA Spitzer Space Telescope captured the Elephant Trunk Nebula, an elongated dark globule within the emission nebula IC 1396 in the constellation of Cepheus.

  16. Multi-wavelength polarimetric studies of relativistic jets in active galactic nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casadio, Carolina

    This Thesis is focussed on the study of relativistic jets, commonly present in multiple astrophysical sites, from active galactic nuclei (AGN), to micro- quasars or gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). In the case of AGN, huge amounts of energy across the whole electromagnetic spectrum are released as a conse- quence of the accretion of material onto a supermassive back hole (SMBH) lurking at their centers. The accretion leads to the formation of a pair of very powerful and highly collimated jets extending far beyond the size of the host galaxy. We analyzed the correlation between the multi-wavelength emission and the radio jet in three powerful AGN, the radio galaxies 3C 120 and M 87, and the quasar CTA 102. The main goal of this Thesis is to obtain a better understanding of the jet dynamics and the role played by the magnetic field, and to determine what are the sites and mechanisms for the production of the γ-ray emission observed in these sources. We have performed multi-wavelength studies of the radio galaxy 3C 120 and the blazar CTA 102 during unprecedented γ-ray flares for both sources. The NASA satellite Fermi registered in September-October 2012 a bright γ-ray flare in CTA 102, and between December 2012 and October 2014 a prolonged γ-ray activity in the radio galaxy 3C 120. In both studies, to determine where the γ-ray emission is produced, the analysis of Fermi data has been compared with a detailed study of the morphology and evolution of the parsec scale jet through a series of extremely-high angular resolution Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) images at 43 GHz from the Boston University blazar monitoring program, in which our research group is actively participating. In the case of 3C 120 we have also collected 15 GHz VLBA data from the MOJAVE monitoring program, extending our study of the radio jet from June 2008 to May 2014. For the study of CTA 102 a total of 80 VLBA images at 43 GHz have been analyzed and compared with observations across the whole

  17. MULTI-WAVELENGTH AFTERGLOWS OF FAST RADIO BURSTS

    SciTech Connect

    Yi, Shuang-Xi; Gao, He; Zhang, Bing

    2014-09-01

    The physical origin of fast radio bursts (FRBs) is unknown. Detecting electromagnetic counterparts to FRBs in other wavelengths is essential to measure their distances and to determine their physical origin. Assuming that at least some of them are of cosmological origin, we calculate their afterglow light curves in multiple wavelengths (X-rays, optical, and radio) by assuming a range of total kinetic energies and redshifts. We focus on forward shock emission, but also consider the possibility that some of the FRBs might have bright reverse shock emission. In general, FRB afterglows are too faint to be detected by current detectors. Only if an FRB has a very low radiative efficiency in radio (hence, a very large kinetic energy), and when it is close enough to observe can its afterglow be detected in the optical and radio bands. We discuss observational strategies for detecting these faint afterglows using future telescopes such as Large Synoptic Survey Telescope and Expanded Very Large Array.

  18. Multi-wavelength solar activity complexes evolution from Solar Dynamic Observatory (SDO)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korolkova, Olga; Benevolenskaya, Elena

    The main problem of the solar physics is to understand a nature of the solar magnetic activity. New space missions and background observations provide us by data describing solar activity with a good space and time resolution. Space missions data observe the solar activity in multi-wavelength emissions come from photosphere to corona. The complex of the solar activity has roots in inte-rior and extends to the solar corona. Thus, modern data give an opportunity to study the activity on the Sun at different levels simultaneously. Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) [1] which launched at the beginning of 2010, looks at Sun in different wavelengths such as coronal lines 171Å & 335Å. Also SDO measures photospheric magnetic flux (line-of-sight component of the magnetic field strength) and gives images in continuum. We have studied a stable complexes of the solar activity (about 30 com-plexes) during 6 hours from 10 March 2013 to 14 October 2013 using 720s ca-dence of HMI (Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager) [2] and AIA (Atmospheric Imaging Assembly) [3] instruments of SDO. We have found a good relationship between the magnetic flux and coronal emissions. Here we discuss properties of the complexes in the different levels from photosphere to corona. References 1. W. Dean Pesnell, B.J. Thompson, P.C. Chamberlin // Solar Phys., v. 275, p. 3-15, (2012). 2. P.H. Scherrer, J. Schou, R.I. Bush et al. // Solar Phys., v. 275, p. 207-227, (2012). 3. James R. Lemen • Alan M. Title • David J. Akin et al. // Solar Phys., v. 275, p. 17-40, (2012).

  19. Asteroid detection using a single multi-wavelength CCD scan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melton, Jonathan

    2016-09-01

    Asteroid detection is a topic of great interest due to the possibility of diverting possibly dangerous asteroids or mining potentially lucrative ones. Currently, asteroid detection is generally performed by taking multiple images of the same patch of sky separated by 10-15 minutes, then subtracting the images to find movement. However, this is time consuming because of the need to revisit the same area multiple times per night. This paper describes an algorithm that can detect asteroids using a single CCD camera scan, thus cutting down on the time and cost of an asteroid survey. The algorithm is based on the fact that some telescopes scan the sky at multiple wavelengths with a small time separation between the wavelength components. As a result, an object moving with sufficient speed will appear in different places in different wavelength components of the same image. Using image processing techniques we detect the centroids of points of light in the first component and compare these positions to the centroids in the other components using a nearest neighbor algorithm. The algorithm was used on a test set of 49 images obtained from the Sloan telescope in New Mexico and found 100% of known asteroids with only 3 false positives. This algorithm has the advantage of decreasing the amount of time required to perform an asteroid scan, thus allowing more sky to be scanned in the same amount of time or freeing a telescope for other pursuits.

  20. Multi-wavelength Observations of South Atlantic Anomaly Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiang, C. Y.; Tam, S. W. Y.; Chang, T. F.

    2015-12-01

    The South Atlantic Anomaly (SAA) is a region where the Earth's magnetic field is at its weakest. The energetic particles captured by the geomagnetic field can come closest to the Earth's surface forming a high-radiation region. The ISUAL (Imager of Sprites and Upper Atmospheric Lightning) is a scientific payload aboard the FORMOSAT-2 satellite. The scientific payload consists of an intensifier CCD Imager, an array photometer, and a six-channel spectrophotometers. ISUAL had been monitoring airglow and aurora in the global ionosphere. In this study, we will use ISUAL images and photometer data to analyze the background emissions in the SAA region. From the emission production mechanisms for different measurement channels, we can estimate the properties of the plasma precipitating from the inner radiation belt into the ionosphere of the SAA region. Besides, the ratios of different emissions are also discussed.

  1. High time-resolution imaging with the MAMA detector systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, Jeffrey S.; Timothy, J. Gethyn; Smith, Andrew M.; Hill, Bob; Kasle, David B.

    1990-01-01

    Current uses of the MAMA detector which utilize the photon time-tagging capabilities of these detectors are reported. These applications currently include image stabilization by means of post-processing corrections of platform drift and speckle interferometry. The initial results of a sounding rocket experiment to obtain UV images of NGC 6240 and results from speckle interferometry of Neptune's moon Triton are presented.

  2. Microbolometer Detectors for Passive Millimeter-Wave Imaging

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-03-01

    Proc. SPIE April 2003, 5077, 33–41. 6. Rahman A.; et al. Micromachined room - temperature microbolometer for mm-wave detection and focal-plane... Microbolometer Detectors for Passive Millimeter -Wave Imaging by Joseph Nemarich ARL-TR-3460 March 2005...GRANT NUMBER 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Microbolometer Detectors for Passive Millimeter -Wave Imaging 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 5d. PROJECT NUMBER

  3. ProtoEXIST2: Advanced Wide-field Imaging CZT Detector Development For The HET On The Proposed EXIST Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, JaeSub; Allen, B.; Grindlay, J.; Barthelmy, S.; Baker, R.; Gehrels, N.; Cook, W.; Kaye, S.; Harrison, F.

    2010-03-01

    We describe our development of ProtoEXIST2, the advanced CZT imaging detector and wide field telescope prototype for the High Energy Telescope (HET) on the proposed Energetic X-ray Imaging Survey Telescope (EXIST) mission. EXIST is a multi-wavelength Medium class mission which would explore the early Universe using high redshift Gamma-ray Bursts and survey black holes on all scales. ProtoEXIST2 will demonstrate the feasibility of a large scale imaging module (256 cm2) with a close-tiled array of fine pixel (0.6 mm) CZT with a balloon flight test in 2010 or 2011. This second generation close-tiled CZT imager follows ProtoEXIST1, which had a recent successful balloon flight (see Allen et al in this meeting) using the same area CZT detector module (256 cm2) but with larger pixel size (2.5mm). For signal readout and event processing, we use the Direct-Bond (DB) ASIC, developed for the NuSTAR mission to be used in a close-tiled 2 x 2 array of 2x2 cm2 CZT detectors, each with 32x32 pixels. The DB-ASIC is attractive for a large scale implementation of tiled imaging CZT detectors given its low noise and power consumption (70uW/pixel). We are developing readout for the DB-ASIC that incorporates our back-end FPGA readout architecture developed for ProtoEXIST1 in order to accomplish the 256 cm2 detector module area with totally vertical integration (i.e. no auxialliary boards to the sides of the module. This is required to tile large numbers of modules into the very large total area (4.5m^2) proposed for the HET on EXIST. We review the design of the EXIST/HET and its optimum shielding in light of our ProtoEXIST1 balloon flight and our plan for future development of ProtoEXIST3, a final EXIST/HET detector module that would incorporate a still lower power version of the DB ASIC.

  4. Real-time imaging detectors for portal imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roehrig, Hans; Cheng, Chee-Wai

    1993-12-01

    This paper reviews the status of real-time imaging systems which are used in radiation-therapy for radiotherapy localization and verification. Imaging systems under review include (1) metal- fluorescent screens, optically coupled to video cameras; (2) metal-phosphor screen in direct contact with two-dimensional photo-diode array (flat panel detector); (3) two-dimensional liquid ionization chamber; and (4) linear diode arrays. These systems permit frequent verification during the treatment and have been shown to be very useful. Unfortunately the image quality achieved, while impressive considering the short time the devices have been on the market, is significantly inferior to that which is available from the metal/film combination (port film).

  5. Quantum dot SOA/silicon external cavity multi-wavelength laser.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi; Yang, Shuyu; Zhu, Xiaoliang; Li, Qi; Guan, Hang; Magill, Peter; Bergman, Keren; Baehr-Jones, Thomas; Hochberg, Michael

    2015-02-23

    We report a hybrid integrated external cavity, multi-wavelength laser for high-capacity data transmission operating near 1310 nm. This is the first demonstration of a single cavity multi-wavelength laser in silicon to our knowledge. The device consists of a quantum dot reflective semiconductor optical amplifier and a silicon-on-insulator chip with a Sagnac loop mirror and microring wavelength filter. We show four major lasing peaks from a single cavity with less than 3 dB power non-uniformity and demonstrate error-free 4 × 10 Gb/s data transmission.

  6. [Solid-state multi-wavelength lasers equipment for retina treatment].

    PubMed

    Liu, Wenlu; Zhou, Chuanqing; Ren, Qiushi

    2012-09-01

    Solid-state multi-wavelength laser equipment is the treatment device with selected wavelength Nd: YAG laser frequency technology, integrated red (659 nm), yellow (589 nm) and green (532 nm) of three solid-state lasers. The device is designed by the accurate controlled laser output system, precision optical and electronic control through the optical coupler into the optical fiber transmission system. It's combined with an eye slit lamp integration of high precision, good stability stability for all solid-state multi-wavelength lasers equipment.

  7. X-ray imaging detectors for synchrotron and XFEL sources

    PubMed Central

    Hatsui, Takaki; Graafsma, Heinz

    2015-01-01

    Current trends for X-ray imaging detectors based on hybrid and monolithic detector technologies are reviewed. Hybrid detectors with photon-counting pixels have proven to be very powerful tools at synchrotrons. Recent developments continue to improve their performance, especially for higher spatial resolution at higher count rates with higher frame rates. Recent developments for X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) experiments provide high-frame-rate integrating detectors with both high sensitivity and high peak signal. Similar performance improvements are sought in monolithic detectors. The monolithic approach also offers a lower noise floor, which is required for the detection of soft X-ray photons. The link between technology development and detector performance is described briefly in the context of potential future capabilities for X-ray imaging detectors. PMID:25995846

  8. X-ray imaging detectors for synchrotron and XFEL sources.

    PubMed

    Hatsui, Takaki; Graafsma, Heinz

    2015-05-01

    Current trends for X-ray imaging detectors based on hybrid and monolithic detector technologies are reviewed. Hybrid detectors with photon-counting pixels have proven to be very powerful tools at synchrotrons. Recent developments continue to improve their performance, especially for higher spatial resolution at higher count rates with higher frame rates. Recent developments for X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) experiments provide high-frame-rate integrating detectors with both high sensitivity and high peak signal. Similar performance improvements are sought in monolithic detectors. The monolithic approach also offers a lower noise floor, which is required for the detection of soft X-ray photons. The link between technology development and detector performance is described briefly in the context of potential future capabilities for X-ray imaging detectors.

  9. Multi-Wavelength Near Infrared Observations of Marum and Yasur Volcanoes, Vanuatu

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howell, Robert R.; Radebaugh, Jani; Lopes, Rosaly M.; Lorenz, Ralph D.; Turtle, Elizabeth P.

    2014-11-01

    To help understand and test models of thermal emission from planetary volcanoes, we obtained in May 2014 a variety of near-infrared observations of the very active Marum lava lake on Ambrym, Vanuatu, as well as the Strombolian activity at Yasur on Tanna. Our observations include high resolution images and movies made with standard and modified cameras and camcorders. In addition, to test the planetary emission models, which typically rely on multi-wavelength observations, we developed a small inexpensive prototype imager named "Kerby", which consists of three simultaneously active near-infrared cameras operating at 0.860, 0.775, and 0.675 microns, as well as a fourth visible wavelength RGB camera. This prototype is based on the Raspberry Pi and Pi-NoIR cameras. It can record full high definition video, and is light enough to be carried by backpack and run from batteries. To date we have concentrated on the analysis of the Marum data. During our observations of the 40 m diameter lava lake, convection was so vigorous that areas of thin crust formed only intermittently and persisted for tens of seconds to a few minutes at most. The convection pattern primarily consisted of two upwelling centers located about 8 m in from the margins on opposite sides of the lake. Horizontal velocities away from the upwelling centers were approximately 4 m/s. A hot bright margin roughly 0.4 m wide frequently formed around parts of the lake perimeter. We are in the process of establishing the absolute photometry calibration to obtain temperatures, temperature distributions, and magma cooling rates.

  10. THE MULTI-WAVELENGTH EXTREME STARBURST SAMPLE OF LUMINOUS GALAXIES. I. SAMPLE CHARACTERISTICS

    SciTech Connect

    Laag, Edward; Croft, Steve; Canalizo, Gabriela; Lacy, Mark

    2010-12-15

    This paper introduces the Multi-wavelength Extreme Starburst Sample (MESS), a new catalog of 138 star-forming galaxies (0.1 < z < 0.3) optically selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey using emission line strength diagnostics to have a high absolute star formation rate (SFR; minimum 11 M{sub sun} yr{sup -1} with median SFR {approx} 61 M{sub sun} yr{sup -1} based on a Kroupa initial mass function). The MESS was designed to complement samples of nearby star-forming galaxies such as the luminous infrared galaxies (LIRGs) and ultraviolet luminous galaxies (UVLGs). Observations using the Multi-band Imaging Photometer (24, 70, and 160 {mu}m channels) on the Spitzer Space Telescope indicate that the MESS galaxies have IR luminosities similar to those of LIRGs, with an estimated median L{sub TIR} {approx} 3 x 10{sup 11} L{sub sun}. The selection criteria for the MESS objects suggest they may be less obscured than typical far-IR-selected galaxies with similar estimated SFRs. Twenty out of 70 of the MESS objects detected in the Galaxy Evolution Explorer FUV band also appear to be UVLGs. We estimate the SFRs based directly on luminosities to determine the agreement for these methods in the MESS. We compare these estimates to the emission line strength technique, since the effective measurement of dust attenuation plays a central role in these methods. We apply an image stacking technique to the Very Large Array FIRST survey radio data to retrieve 1.4 GHz luminosity information for 3/4 of the sample covered by FIRST including sources too faint, and at too high a redshift, to be detected in FIRST. We also discuss the relationship between the MESS objects and samples selected through alternative criteria. Morphologies will be the subject of a forthcoming paper.

  11. Multi-wavelength Observations of Solar Active Region NOAA 7154

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruner, M. E.; Nitta, N. V.; Frank. Z. A.; Dame, L.; Suematsu, Y.

    2000-01-01

    We report on observations of a solar active region in May 1992 by the Solar Plasma Diagnostic Experiment (SPDE) in coordination with the Yohkoh satellite (producing soft X-ray images) and ground-based observatories (producing photospheric magnetograms and various filtergrams including those at the CN 3883 A line). The main focus is a study of the physical conditions of hot (T is approximately greater than 3 MK) coronal loops at their foot-points. The coronal part of the loops is fuzzy but what appear to be their footpoints in the transition region down to the photosphere are compact. Despite the morphological similarities, the footpoint emission at 10(exp 5) K is not quantitatively correlated with that at approximately 300 km above the tau (sub 5000) = 1 level, suggesting that the heat transport and therefore magnetic field topology in the intermediate layer is complicated. High resolution imaging observations with continuous temperature coverage are crucially needed.

  12. A Multi-Wavelength View of Radio Galaxy Hercules A

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-09-27

    Spectacular jets powered by the gravitational energy of a super massive black hole in the core of the elliptical galaxy Hercules A illustrate the combined imaging power of two of astronomy's cutting-edge tools, the Hubble Space Telescope's Wide Field Camera 3, and the recently upgraded Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) radio telescope in New Mexico. To view a video of this go to: bit.ly/Ue2ypS Some two billion light-years away, the yellowish elliptical galaxy in the center of the image appears quite ordinary as seen by Hubble in visible wavelengths of light. The galaxy is roughly 1,000 times more massive than the Milky Way and harbors a 2.5-billion-solar-mass central black hole that is 1,000 times more massive than the black hole in the Milky Way. But the innocuous-looking galaxy, also known as 3C 348, has long been known as the brightest radio-emitting object in the constellation Hercules. Emitting nearly a billion times more power in radio wavelengths than our Sun, the galaxy is one of the brightest extragalactic radio sources in the entire sky. Credit: NASA, ESA, S. Baum and C. O'Dea (RIT), R. Perley and W. Cotton (NRAO/AUI/NSF), and the Hubble Heritage Team (STScI/AURA) To read more about this image go to: 1.usa.gov/Yu7uvX NASA image use policy. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission. Follow us on Twitter Like us on Facebook Find us on Instagram

  13. Mosaic-Detector-Based Fluorescence Spectral Imager

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Son, Kyung-Ah; Moon, Jeong

    2007-01-01

    A battery-powered, pen-sized, portable instrument for measuring molecular fluorescence spectra of chemical and biological samples in the field has been proposed. Molecular fluorescence spectroscopy is among the techniques used most frequently in laboratories to analyze compositions of chemical and biological samples. Heretofore, it has been possible to measure fluorescence spectra of molecular species at relative concentrations as low as parts per billion (ppb), with a few nm spectral resolution. The proposed instrument would include a planar array (mosaic) of detectors, onto which a fluorescence spectrum would be spatially mapped. Unlike in the larger laboratory-type molecular fluorescence spectrometers, mapping of wavelengths to spatial positions would be accomplished without use of relatively bulky optical parts. The proposed instrument is expected to be sensitive enough to enable measurement of spectra of chemical species at relative concentrations <1 ppb, with spectral resolution that could be tailored by design to be comparable to a laboratory molecular fluorescence spectrometer. The proposed instrument (see figure) would include a button-cell battery and a laser diode, which would generate the monochromatic ultraviolet light needed to excite fluorescence in a sample. The sample would be held in a cell bounded by far-ultraviolet-transparent quartz or optical glass. The detector array would be, more specifically, a complementary metal oxide/ semiconductor or charge-coupled- device imaging photodetector array, the photodetectors of which would be tailored to respond to light in the wavelength range of the fluorescence spectrum to be measured. The light-input face of the photodetector array would be covered with a matching checkerboard array of multilayer thin film interference filters, such that each pixel in the array would be sensitive only to light in a spectral band narrow enough so as not to overlap significantly with the band of an adjacent pixel. The

  14. Multi-Wavelength Views of Protostars in IC 1396

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on individual images below for larger view

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope has captured a glowing stellar nursery within a dark globule that is opaque at visible light. These new images pierce through the obscuration to reveal the birth of new protostars, or embryonic stars, and young stars never before seen.

    The Elephant's Trunk Nebula is an elongated dark globule within the emission nebula IC 1396 in the constellation of Cepheus. Located at a distance of 2,450 light-years, the globule is a condensation of dense gas that is barely surviving the strong ionizing radiation from a nearby massive star. The globule is being compressed by the surrounding ionized gas.

    The large composite image above is a product of combining data from the observatory's multiband imaging photometer and the infrared array camera. The thermal emission at 24 microns measured by the photometer (red) is combined with near-infrared emission from the camera at 3.6/4.5 microns (blue) and from 5.8/8.0 microns (green). The colors of the diffuse emission and filaments vary, and are a combination of molecular hydrogen (which tends to be green) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (brown) emissions.

    Within the globule, a half dozen newly discovered protostars, or embryonic stars, are easily discernible as the bright red-tinted objects, mostly along the southern rim of the globule. These were previously undetected at visible wavelengths due to obscuration by the thick cloud ('globule body') and by dust surrounding the newly forming stars. The newborn stars form in the dense gas because of compression by the wind and radiation from a nearby massive star (located outside the field of view to the left). The winds from this unseen star are also responsible for producing the

  15. Multi-Wavelength Views of Protostars in IC 1396

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on individual images below for larger view

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope has captured a glowing stellar nursery within a dark globule that is opaque at visible light. These new images pierce through the obscuration to reveal the birth of new protostars, or embryonic stars, and young stars never before seen.

    The Elephant's Trunk Nebula is an elongated dark globule within the emission nebula IC 1396 in the constellation of Cepheus. Located at a distance of 2,450 light-years, the globule is a condensation of dense gas that is barely surviving the strong ionizing radiation from a nearby massive star. The globule is being compressed by the surrounding ionized gas.

    The large composite image above is a product of combining data from the observatory's multiband imaging photometer and the infrared array camera. The thermal emission at 24 microns measured by the photometer (red) is combined with near-infrared emission from the camera at 3.6/4.5 microns (blue) and from 5.8/8.0 microns (green). The colors of the diffuse emission and filaments vary, and are a combination of molecular hydrogen (which tends to be green) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (brown) emissions.

    Within the globule, a half dozen newly discovered protostars, or embryonic stars, are easily discernible as the bright red-tinted objects, mostly along the southern rim of the globule. These were previously undetected at visible wavelengths due to obscuration by the thick cloud ('globule body') and by dust surrounding the newly forming stars. The newborn stars form in the dense gas because of compression by the wind and radiation from a nearby massive star (located outside the field of view to the left). The winds from this unseen star are also responsible for producing the

  16. Image scanning microscopy using a SPAD detector array (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castello, Marco; Tortarolo, Giorgio; Buttafava, Mauro; Tosi, Alberto; Sheppard, Colin J. R.; Diaspro, Alberto; Vicidomini, Giuseppe

    2017-02-01

    The use of an array of detectors can help overcoming the traditional limitation of confocal microscopy: the compromise between signal and theoretical resolution. Each element independently records a view of the sample and the final image can be reconstructed by pixel reassignment or by inverse filtering (e.g. deconvolution). In this work, we used a SPAD array of 25 detectors specifically designed for this goal and our scanning microscopy control system (Carma) to acquire the partial images and to perform online image processing. Further work will be devoted to optimize the image reconstruction step and to improve the fill-factor of the detector.

  17. A Multi Wavelength Study of Active Region Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lara, A.; Gopalswamy, N.; Kundu, M. R.; Perez-Enriquez, R.; Koshiishi, H.; Enome, S.

    1996-05-01

    We report on a study of the evolution of several active regions during 1993 April 17-28 using data obtained at multiple wavelengths that probe various heights of the active region corona. We use simultaneous microwave (1.5 and 17 GHz) and Soft X-ray images obtained by the Very Large Array (VLA), the Nobeyama Radio Heliograph (NRH) and the Soft X-ray Telescope (SXT) on board the Yohkoh spacecraft. We also use photospheric magnetograms from Kitt Peak National Observatory to study the development of Solar Active Regions. We have followed the development of various observed parameters such as brightness temperature and polarization using radio images. The X-ray data were used to track the development of density and temperature of active regions. Using the fact that the quiet active region radiation is thermal and adopting proper emission mechanism at each frequency domain, we construct a consistent picture for the three dimensional structure of the active regions. Particular attention has been paid to the mode coupling observed at 17 GHz while the active regions crossed the solar disk.

  18. Germanium orthogonal strip detector system for gamma-ray imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hull, Ethan L.; Burks, Morgan; Cork, Chris P.; Craig, William W.; Eckels, Del; Fabris, Lorenzo; Lavietes, Anthony D.; Luke, Paul N.; Madden, Norman W.; Pehl, Richard H.; Ziock, Klaus

    2001-12-01

    A germanium-detector based, gamma-ray imaging system has been designed, fabricated, and tested. The detector, cryostat, electronics, readout, and imaging software are discussed. An 11 millimeter thick, 2 millimeter pitch 19x19 orthogonal strip planar germanium detector is used in front of a coaxial detector to provide broad energy coverage. The planar detector was fabricated using amorphous germanium contacts. Each channel is read out with a compact, low noise external FET preamplifier specially designed for this detector. A bank of shaping amplifiers, fast amplifiers, and fast leading edge discriminators were designed and fabricated to process the signals from preamplifiers. The readout system coordinates time coincident x-y strip addresses with an x-strip spectroscopy signal and a spectroscopy signal from the coaxial detector. This information is sent to a computer where an image is formed. Preliminary shadow and pinhole images demonstrate the viability of a germanium based imaging system. The excellent energy resolution of the germanium detector system provides isotopic imaging.

  19. Multi-wavelength Analysis of a Solar Network Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsiropoula, G.; Tziotziou, K.; Schwartz, P.; Heinzel, P.

    We analyse co-temporal observations of a network region found near the solar disc centre, obtained by the Dutch Open Telescope (DOT) and the Coronal Diagnostic Spectrometer (CDS) on-board SOHO during a coordinated observing campaign in October 2005. DOT obtained images in 5 wavelengths along the ha\\ profile, while CDS obtained sit-and-stare observations in several EUV spectral lines that span the upper solar atmosphere. After fitting the CDS spectral line profiles we obtained 2-D space-time maps of intensities, Doppler velocities and Doppler widths. We study the appearance of the network region in the different spectral lines and the temporal variations of the obtained physical parameters. We employ a wavelet analysis to examine the existence of oscillations at the network in the different solar layers.

  20. Multi-wavelength observations of Jupiter's aurora coordinated with Hisaki and other space telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, T.; Badman, S. V.; Tao, C.; Yoshioka, K.; Murakami, G.; Yamazaki, A.; Tsuchiya, F.; Bonfond, B.; Steffl, A. J.; Kraft, R.; Branduardi-Raymont, G.; Elsner, R.; Ezoe, Y.; Fujimoto, M.

    2014-12-01

    From January to April 2014, two observing campaigns by multi-wavelength remote sensing from X-ray to radio were performed to uncover energy transport process in Jupiter's plasma environment using space telescopes and ground-based facilities. These campaigns were triggered by the new Hisaki spacecraft launched in September 2013, which is an extremely ultraviolet (EUV) space telescope of JAXA designed for planetary observations. In the first campaign in January, Hubble Space Telescope (HST) made imaging of far ultraviolet (FUV) aurora with a high special resolution (0.08") through two weeks while Hisaki continuously monitored aurora and plasma torus emissions in EUV wavelength with a high temporal resolution (1 min<). We discovered new magnetospheric activities from the campaign data: e.g., internally-driven type auroral brightening associated with hot plasma injection, and plasma and electromagnetic filed modulations in the inner magnetosphere externally driven by the solar wind modulation. The second campaign in April was performed by Chandra X-ray Observatory (CXO), XMM newton, and Suzaku satellite simultaneously with Hisaki. Relativistic auroral accelerations in the polar region and hot plasma in the inner magnetosphere were captured by the X-ray space telescopes simultaneously with EUV monitoring of aurora and plasma torus. Auroral intensity in EUV indicated a clear periodicity of 45 minutes whereas the periodicity was not evident in X-ray intensity although previous observations by CXO indicated clear 40-minute periodicity in the polar cap X-ray aurora. In this presentation, we show remarkable scientific results obtained these campaigns.

  1. Multi-Wavelength Observations of Asteroid 2100 Ra-Shalom: Visible, Infrared, and Thermal Spectroscopy Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, Beth Ellen; Shepard, M.; Bus, S. J.; Vilas, F.; Rivkin, A. S.; Lim, L.; Lederer, S.; Jarvis, K.; Shah, S.; McConnochie, T.

    2004-01-01

    The August 2003 apparition of asteroid 2100 Ra-Shalom brought together a collaboration of observers with the goal of obtaining rotationally resolved multiwavelength spectra at each of 5 facilities: infrared spectra at the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility (Clark and Shepard), radar images at Arecibo (Shepard and Clark), thermal infrared spectra at Palomar (Lim, McConnochie and Bell), visible spectra at McDonald Observatory (Vilas, Lederer and Jarvis), and visible lightcurves at Ondrojev Observatory (Pravec). The radar data was to be used to develop a high spatial resolution physical model to be used in conjunction with spectral data to investigate compositional and textural properties on the near surface of Ra Shalom as a function of rotation phase. This was the first coordinated multi-wavelength investigation of any Aten asteroid. There are many reasons to study near-Earth asteroid (NEA) 2100 Ra-Shalom: 1) It has a controversial classification (is it a C- or K-type object)? 2) There would be interesting dynamical ramifications if Ra-Shalom is a K-type because most K-types come from the Eos family and there are no known dynamical pathways from Eos to the Aten population. 3) The best available spectra obtained previously may indicate a heterogeneous surface (most asteroids appear to be fairly homogeneous). 4) Ra-Shalom thermal observations obtained previously indicated a lack of regolith, minimizing the worry of space weathering effects in the spectra. 5) Radar observations obtained previously hinted at interesting surface structures. 6) Ra-Shalom is one of the largest Aten objects. And 7) Ra-Shalom is on a short list of proposed NEAs for spacecraft encounters and possible sample returns. Preliminary results from the visible, infrared, and thermal spectroscopy measurements will be presented here.

  2. Multi-wavelength Polarimetry and Spectral Study of the M87 Jet During 2002-2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avachat, Sayali S.; Perlman, Eric S.; Adams, Steven C.; Cara, Mihai; Owen, Frazer; Sparks, William B.; Georganopoulos, Markos

    2016-11-01

    We present a multi-wavelength polarimetric and spectral study of the M87 jet obtained at sub-arcsecond resolution between 2002 and 2008. The observations include multi-band archival VLA polarimetry data sets along with Hubble Space Telescope (HST) imaging polarimetry. These observations have better angular resolution than previous work by factors of 2-3 and in addition, allow us to explore the time domain. These observations envelop the huge flare in HST-1 located 0.″86 from the nucleus. The increased resolution enables us to view more structure in each knot, showing several resolved sub-components. We also see apparent helical structure in the polarization vectors in several knots, with polarization vectors turning either clockwise or counterclockwise near the flux maxima in various places as well as showing filamentary undulations. Some of these characteristics are correlated with flux and polarization maxima while others are not. We also examine the total flux and fractional polarization and look for changes in both radio and optical since the observations of Perlman et al. (1999) and test them against various models based on shocks and instabilities in the jet. Our results are broadly consistent with previous spine-sheath models and recollimation shock models; however, they require additional combinations of features to explain the observed complexity, e.g., shearing of magnetic field lines near the jet surface and compression of the toroidal component near shocks. In particular, in many regions we find apparently helical features both in total flux and polarization. We discuss the physical interpretation of these features. Based on the observations made with the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA), operated by the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO), and Hubble Sapce Telescope (HST), obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute (STScI), which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc.

  3. Multi-wavelength Lens Reconstruction of a Planck and Herschel-detected Star-bursting Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timmons, Nicholas; Cooray, Asantha; Riechers, Dominik A.; Nayyeri, Hooshang; Fu, Hai; Jullo, Eric; Gladders, Michael D.; Baes, Maarten; Bussmann, R. Shane; Calanog, Jae; Clements, David L.; da Cunha, Elisabete; Dye, Simon; Eales, Stephen A.; Furlanetto, Cristina; Gonzalez-Nuevo, Joaquin; Greenslade, Joshua; Gurwell, Mark; Messias, Hugo; Michałowski, Michał J.; Oteo, Iván; Pérez-Fournon, Ismael; Scott, Douglas; Valiante, Elisabetta

    2016-09-01

    We present a source-plane reconstruction of a Herschel and Planck-detected gravitationally lensed dusty star-forming galaxy (DSFG) at z = 1.68 using Hubble, Submillimeter Array (SMA), and Keck observations. The background submillimeter galaxy (SMG) is strongly lensed by a foreground galaxy cluster at z = 0.997 and appears as an arc with a length of ˜15″ in the optical images. The continuum dust emission, as seen by SMA, is limited to a single knot within this arc. We present a lens model with source-plane reconstructions at several wavelengths to show the difference in magnification between the stars and dust, and highlight the importance of multi-wavelength lens models for studies involving lensed DSFGs. We estimate the physical properties of the galaxy by fitting the flux densities to model spectral energy distributions leading to a magnification-corrected star-formation rate (SFR) of 390 ± 60 M {}⊙ yr-1 and a stellar mass of 1.1+/- 0.4× {10}11 {M}⊙ . These values are consistent with high-redshift massive galaxies that have formed most of their stars already. The estimated gas-to-baryon fraction, molecular gas surface density, and SFR surface density have values of 0.43 ± 0.13, 350 ± 200 {M}⊙ pc-2, and ˜ 12+/- 7 M {}⊙ yr-1 kpc-2, respectively. The ratio of SFR surface density to molecular gas surface density puts this among the most star-forming systems, similar to other measured SMGs and local ULIRGs.

  4. A Multi-wavelength Analysis of Dust and Gas in the SR 24S Transition Disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinilla, P.; Pérez, L. M.; Andrews, S.; van der Marel, N.; van Dishoeck, E. F.; Ataiee, S.; Benisty, M.; Birnstiel, T.; Juhász, A.; Natta, A.; Ricci, L.; Testi, L.

    2017-04-01

    We present new Atacama Large Millimeter/sub-millimeter Array (ALMA) 1.3 mm continuum observations of the SR 24S transition disk with an angular resolution ≲ 0\\buildrel{ \\prime}\\over{.} 18 (12 au radius). We perform a multi-wavelength investigation by combining new data with previous ALMA data at 0.45 mm. The visibilities and images of the continuum emission at the two wavelengths are well characterized by a ring-like emission. Visibility modeling finds that the ring-like emission is narrower at longer wavelengths, in good agreement with models of dust-trapping in pressure bumps, although there are complex residuals that suggest potentially asymmetric structures. The 0.45 mm emission has a shallower profile inside the central cavity than the 1.3 mm emission. In addition, we find that the 13CO and C18O (J = 2-1) emission peaks at the center of the continuum cavity. We do not detect either continuum or gas emission from the northern companion to this system (SR 24N), which is itself a binary system. The upper limit for the dust disk mass of SR 24N is ≲ 0.12 {M}\\bigoplus , which gives a disk mass ratio in dust between the two components of {M}{dust,{SR}24{{S}}}/{M}{dust,{SR}24{{N}}}≳ 840. The current ALMA observations may imply that either planets have already formed in the SR 24N disk or that dust growth to millimeter sizes is inhibited there and that only warm gas, as seen by rovibrational CO emission inside the truncation radii of the binary, is present.

  5. Multi-wavelength observations of the peculiar red giant HR 3126

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pesce, Joseph E.; Stencel, Robert E.; Walter, Frederick M.; Doggett, Jesse; Dachs, Joachim; Whitelock, Patricia A.; Mundt, Reinhard

    1988-01-01

    Ultraviolet observations of the red giant HR 3126 are combined with multi-wavelength data in order to provide a firmer basis for explaining the arc-minute sized nebula surrounding the object. Possibilities as to the location of HR 3126 on the Hertzsprung-Russel diagram, and to the formation mechanisms of the reflection nebula IC 2220 associated with it, are summarized.

  6. Multi-Wavelength Mode-Locked Laser Arrays for WDM Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, L.; Young, M.; Dougherty, D.; Keo, S.; Muller, R.; Maker, P.

    1998-01-01

    Multi-wavelength arrays of colliding pulse mode-locked (CPM) lasers have been demonstrated for wavelength division multiplexing (WDM) applications. The need for increased bandwidth is driving the development of both increased speed in time division multiplexing (TDM) and more channels in WDM for fiber optic communication systems.

  7. Multi-Wavelength Study of Active Region Loop Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, D.

    2006-11-01

    Observations have revealed the existence of weak transient disturbances in extended coronal loop systems. These propagating disturbances (PDs) originate from small scale brightenings at the footpoints of the loops and propagate upward along the loops. In all cases observed, the projected propagation speed is close to, but below the expected sound speed in the loops. This suggests that the PDs could be interpreted as slow mode MHD waves. Interpreting the oscillation in terms of different wave modes and/or plasma motions always depend on the line of sight as we observe in the limb or on the center of the disk. The JOP 165 campaign will address some of these questions. MDI and TRACE photospheric and UV imaging of TRACE and SPIRIT have been acquired simultaneously with high temporal and spatial coverage along with the spectroscopic data from CDS. EIT was operated in the shutter-less mode to achieve high Cadence. Some of the off- limb active region dynamics and oscillations observed during this JOP campaign will be focused in this presentation. Plasma condensations and temporal variations in active region loops will be also addressed.

  8. Multi-Wavelength Time Variability of Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatterjee, Ritaban

    2009-01-01

    Due to their large distances, AGNs are not spatially resolved with current and near-future technologies except by radio interferometry. However, we can use time variability, one of the defining properties of AGNs, to probe the location and physical processes related to the emission at resolutions even finer than provided by VLBI. I use extensive multi-frequency monitoring data of the blazars 3C 279 and PKS 1510-089 (over 10 years long) and the radio galaxy 3C 120 ( 5 years), including well-sampled light curves (radiative flux vs. time) at X-ray energies (2-10 keV), optical wavelengths (R band), and radio frequencies (14.5 GHz and 37 GHz), as well as monthly images obtained with the Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) at 43 GHz that follow changes in the emission structure of the jet on parsec scales. I have developed and applied a set of statistical tools to characterize the time variability of AGNs. This includes the power spectral density (PSD) and its uncertainties, discrete cross-correlation functions and their significance using random light curves simulated from the previously calculated PSDs, and decomposition of light curves into individual flares. I also model the time variable emission spectrum of an AGN jet using a numerical code that includes conical geometry, turbulent magnetic field and density, and energization of electrons due to a moving shock front. Comparing the results of the model calculations and the application of the above-mentioned statistical procedures on the real data, I draw conclusions about the location of the emission regions of these objects. I also identify the ongoing emission mechanisms and implications regarding the physics of jets. This work is supported by NASA through grants NNX08AJ64G (ADP) and NNX08AV65G (Fermi).

  9. Multianode microchannel array detectors for Space Shuttle imaging applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Timothy, J. G.; Bybee, R. L.

    1981-01-01

    The Multi-Anode Microchannel Arrays (MAMAs) are a family of photoelectric, photoncounting array detectors that have been developed and qualified specifically for use in space. MAMA detectors with formats as large as 256 x 1024 pixels are now in use or under construction for a variety of imaging and tracking applications. These photo-emissive detectors can be operated in a windowless configuration at extreme ultraviolet and soft X-ray wavelengths or in a sealed configuration at ultraviolet and visible wavelengths. The construction and modes-of-operation of the MAMA detectors are briefly described and the scientific objectives of a number of sounding rocket and Space Shuttle instruments utilizing these detectors are outlined. Performance characteristics of the MAMA detectors that are of fundamental importance for operation in the Space Shuttle environment are described and compared with those of the photo-conductive array detectors such as the CCDs and CIDs.

  10. Imaging detectors and electronics - A view of the future

    SciTech Connect

    Spieler, Helmuth

    2004-06-16

    Imaging sensors and readout electronics have made tremendous strides in the past two decades. The application of modern semiconductor fabrication techniques and the introduction of customized monolithic integrated circuits have made large scale imaging systems routine in high energy physics. This technology is now finding its way into other areas, such as space missions, synchrotron light sources, and medical imaging. I review current developments and discuss the promise and limits of new technologies. Several detector systems are described as examples of future trends. The discussion emphasizes semiconductor detector systems, but I also include recent developments for large-scale superconducting detector arrays.

  11. Scintillator-fiber charged-particle track-imaging detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Binns, W. R.; Israel, M. H.; Klarmann, J.

    1983-01-01

    A scintillator-fiber charged-particle track-imaging detector has been developed using a bundle of square cross-section plastic scintillator fiber optics, proximity focused onto an image intensified Charge Injection Device (CID) camera. Detector to beams of 15 MeV protons and relativistic Neon, Manganese, and Gold nuclei have been exposed and images of their tracks are obtained. This paper presents details of the detector technique, properties of the tracks obtained, and range measurements of 15 MeV protons stopping in the fiber bundle.

  12. Mid-Infrared and multi-wavelength monitoring of the microquasar GRS 1915+105.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuchs, Yael; Chaty, Sylvain; Diana, Hannikainen; Mirabel, Felix; Rodriguez, Jerome

    2004-09-01

    We propose mid-infrared photometric and spectroscopic observations of the microquasar GRS 1915+105 in the context of a multi-wavelength follow-up campaign of the source. GRS 1915+105 is used as a laboratory to understand the accretion / ejection phenomena occurring in stellar-mass accreting black hole (microquasars) and by analogy in supermassive black holes (AGNs). A key question is the nature of the time-variable infrared emission in this system. Depending on the state of the source, we wish to know what is the contribution in the mid-infrared of the different possible emission mechanisms: the thermal emission from the K-M giant donor star, the synchrotron emission from the compact relativistic jets, X-ray reprocessing in the accretion disc and free-free emission from a dense wind. A particular contribution of the Spitzer Telescope will be the observation of this dense wind in GRS 1915+105, which is very difficult to detect in X-ray spectra due to pile-up phenomena in X-ray detectors. The continuum in a wavelength range as large as possible and the possible emission lines observed thanks to the Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) and the Infrared Spectrograph (IRS) are important clues to achieve this study. These mid-infrared observations will be combined with observations with the RXTE and INTEGRAL satellites in the X-rays and gamma-rays, the ESO/NTT in near-infrared and the Ryle Telescope in radio. Thanks to these simultaneous multiwavelength observations we will identify the accretion state of the source and determine the contribution of each emission component of the system. As GRS 1915+105 had been rarely observed in the mid-infrared range in the past, the Spitzer Space Telescope will bring the unique opportunity to do so, shedding light on the physical mechanisms occurring in this particular binary system and which could apply to the other black hole binaries.

  13. Simultaneous retrieval of aerosol optical thickness and chlorophyll concentration from multi-wavelength measurement over East China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, C.; Nakajima, T.; Hashimoto, M.

    2016-12-01

    A flexible inversion algorithm is proposed for simultaneously retrieving aerosol optical thickness (AOT) and surface chlorophyll a (Chl) concentration from multi-wavelength observation over the ocean. In this algorithm, forward radiation calculation is performed by an accurate coupled atmosphere-ocean model with a sophisticated bio-optical ocean module, which is different from those in the classic ocean color algorithms that decouple the atmosphere and ocean systems using atmospheric correction procedures. Then, a full-physical nonlinear optimization approximation approach is used to retrieve AOT and Chl. For AOT retrieval, a global three-dimensional spectral radiation-transport aerosol model is used as the priori constraint to increase the retrieval accuracy of aerosol. To investigate the algorithm's availability, the retrieval experiment is conducted using simulated radiance data to demonstrate that the relative errors in simultaneously determining AOT and Chl can be mostly controlled to within 10% using multi-wavelength and angle coving in and out of sunglint. Furthermore, the inversion results are assessed using the actual satellite observation data obtained from Greenhouse gas Observation SATellite (GOSAT) and MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS)/Aqua instruments through comparison to Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) aerosol and ocean color (OC) products over East China Sea. Both the retrieved AOT and Chl compare favorably to the reported AERONET values, particularly when using the CASE 2 ocean module in turbid water, even when the retrieval is performed in the presence of high aerosol loading and sun glint. Finally, the MODIS images are used to jointly retrieve the spatial distribution of AOT and Chl in comparison to the MODIS AOT and OC products.

  14. Recent advances in CZT strip detectors and coded mask imagers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matteson, J. L.; Gruber, D. E.; Heindl, W. A.; Pelling, M. R.; Peterson, L. E.; Rothschild, R. E.; Skelton, R. T.; Hink, P. L.; Slavis, K. R.; Binns, W. R.; Tumer, T.; Visser, G.

    1999-09-01

    The UCSD, WU, UCR and Nova collaboration has made significant progress on the necessary techniques for coded mask imaging of gamma-ray bursts: position sensitive CZT detectors with good energy resolution, ASIC readout, coded mask imaging, and background properties at balloon altitudes. Results on coded mask imaging techniques appropriate for wide field imaging and localization of gamma-ray bursts are presented, including a shadowgram and deconvolved image taken with a prototype detector/ASIC and MURA mask. This research was supported by NASA Grants NAG5-5111, NAG5-5114, and NGT5-50170.

  15. Quantified H I morphology - I. Multi-wavelength analysis of the THINGS galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holwerda, B. W.; Pirzkal, N.; de Blok, W. J. G.; Bouchard, A.; Blyth, S.-L.; van der Heyden, K. J.; Elson, E. C.

    2011-10-01

    Galaxy evolution is driven to a large extent by interactions and mergers with other galaxies and the gas in galaxies is extremely sensitive to the interactions. One method to measure such interactions uses the quantified morphology of galaxy images. Well-established parameters are Concentration, Asymmetry, Smoothness, Gini and M20 of a galaxy image. Thus far, the application of this technique has mostly been restricted to rest-frame ultraviolet and optical images. However, with the new radio observatories being commissioned [South African Karoo Array Telescope (MeerKAT), Australian SKA Pathfinder (ASKAP), Extended Very Large Array (EVLA), Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope/APERture Tile In Focus instrument (WSRT/APERTIF) and ultimately the Square Kilometer Array (SKA)], a new window on the neutral atomic hydrogen gas (H I) morphology of large numbers of galaxies will open up. The quantified morphology of gas discs of spirals can be an alternative indicator of the level and frequency of interaction. The H I in galaxies is typically spatially more extended and more sensitive to low-mass or weak interactions. In this paper, we explore six morphological parameters calculated over the extent of the stellar (optical) disc and the extent of the gas disc for a range of wavelengths spanning ultraviolet (UV), optical, near- and far-infrared and 21 cm (H I) of 28 galaxies from The H I Nearby Galaxy Survey (THINGS). Although the THINGS sample is small and contains only a single ongoing interaction, it spans both non-interacting and post-interacting galaxies with a wealth of multi-wavelength data. We find that the choice of area for the computation of the morphological parameters is less of an issue than the wavelength at which they are measured. The signal of interaction is as good in the H I as at any of the other wavelengths at which morphology has been used to trace the interaction rate to date, mostly star formation dominated ones (near- and far-ultraviolet). The

  16. Coincidence velocity map imaging using a single detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Arthur; Sándor, Péter; Weinacht, Thomas

    2017-07-01

    We demonstrate a single-detector velocity map imaging setup which is capable of rapidly switching between coincidence and non-coincidence measurements. By rapidly switching the extraction voltages on the electrostatic lenses, both electrons and ions can be collected in coincidence with a single detector. Using a fast camera as the 2D detector avoids the saturation problem associated with traditional delay line detectors and allows for easy transitions between coincidence and non-coincidence data collection modes. This is a major advantage in setting up a low-cost and versatile coincidence apparatus. We present both coincidence and non-coincidence measurements of strong field atomic and molecular ionization.

  17. Flat-panel-detector-based volume tomographic angiography imaging: detector evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ning, Ruola; Zhang, Dinghua; Chen, Biao; Conover, David L.; Yu, Rongfeng

    1999-09-01

    Recent development of large area flat panel solid state detector arrays indicates that flat panel image sensors have some common potential advantages: compactness, absence of geometric distortion and veiling glare with the benefits of high resolution, high DQE, high frame rate and high dynamic range, small image lag (less than 1%) and excellent linearity (approximately 1%). The advantages of the new flat-panel detector make it a promising candidate for cone beam volume tomographic angiography imaging. The purpose of this study is to characterize a Selenium thin film transistor (STFT) flat panel detector-based imaging system for cone beam volume tomographic angiography imaging applications. A prototype STFT detector-based cone beam volume tomographic angiography imaging system has been designed and constructed based on the modification of a GE 8800 CT scanner. This system is evaluated using a vascular phantom with different x-ray spectra, different sizes of vessels and different iodine concentration levels. The results indicate that with the currently available STFT flat panel detector, 90 kVp is the optimal kVp to achieve the highest signal-to-noise ratio for volume tomographic angiography imaging and the low contrast resolution of the system is 4 mg/ml iodine for a 2 mm vessel.

  18. Photoconducting positions monitor and imaging detector

    DOEpatents

    Shu, Deming; Kuzay, Tuncer M.

    2000-01-01

    A photoconductive, high energy photon beam detector/monitor for detecting x-rays and gamma radiation, having a thin, disk-shaped diamond substrate with a first and second surface, and electrically conductive coatings, or electrodes, of a predetermined configuration or pattern, disposed on the surfaces of the substrate. A voltage source and a current amplifier is connected to the electrodes to provide a voltage bias to the electrodes and to amplify signals from the detector.

  19. Further developments of electrographic image detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carruthers, G. R.

    1981-01-01

    This paper reports the current status of a program to develop far- and middle-ultraviolet-sensitive electrographic detectors. These include large-format, semitransparent-photocathode detectors and opaque-photocathode electrographic Schmidt cameras. Modifications of a previously-demonstrated far-UV large-format detector to make it suitable for possible Shuttle/Spacelab space astronomy investigations have been implemented and tested. Middle-ultraviolet-sensitive large-format and Schmidt electrographic detectors are now in the laboratory development stage. Cesium telluride photocathodes are used to provide sensitivity in the 1700-3100 A spectral range, and techniques for processing these photocathodes are discussed. The preparation and use of polyimide barrier membranes, for protecting the photocathodes from deterioration by film outgassing, are described. A new opaque-photocathode vacuum-ultraviolet-sensitive electrographic detector has been demonstrated, which is based on an oblique-focusing electron optical system similar to that used by Princeton with electron-bombarded CCD arrays. Test results and potential applications of this detector are described.

  20. Imaging characteristics of the Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer microchannel plate detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vallerga, J. V.; Kaplan, G. C.; Siegmund, O. H. W.; Lampton, M.; Malina, R. F.

    1989-01-01

    The Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer (EUVE) satellite will conduct an all-sky survey over the wavelength range from 70 A to 760 A using four grazing-incidence telescopes and seven microchannel-plate (MCP) detectors. The imaging photon-counting MCP detectors have active areas of 19.6 cm2. Photon arrival position is determined using a wedge-and-strip anode and associated pulse-encoding electronics. The imaging characteristics of the EUVE flight detectors are presented including image distortion, flat-field response, and spatial differential nonlinearity. Also included is a detailed discussion of image distortions due to the detector mechanical assembly, the wedge-and-strip anode, and the electronics. Model predictions of these distortions are compared to preflight calibration images which show distortions less than 1.3 percent rms of the detector diameter of 50 mm before correction. The plans for correcting these residual detector image distortions to less than 0.1 percent rms are also presented.

  1. Imaging characteristics of the Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer microchannel plate detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vallerga, J. V.; Kaplan, G. C.; Siegmund, O. H. W.; Lampton, M.; Malina, R. F.

    1989-01-01

    The Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer (EUVE) satellite will conduct an all-sky survey over the wavelength range from 70 A to 760 A using four grazing-incidence telescopes and seven microchannel-plate (MCP) detectors. The imaging photon-counting MCP detectors have active areas of 19.6 cm2. Photon arrival position is determined using a wedge-and-strip anode and associated pulse-encoding electronics. The imaging characteristics of the EUVE flight detectors are presented including image distortion, flat-field response, and spatial differential nonlinearity. Also included is a detailed discussion of image distortions due to the detector mechanical assembly, the wedge-and-strip anode, and the electronics. Model predictions of these distortions are compared to preflight calibration images which show distortions less than 1.3 percent rms of the detector diameter of 50 mm before correction. The plans for correcting these residual detector image distortions to less than 0.1 percent rms are also presented.

  2. Uncooled infrared detector and imager development at DALI Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Lijun; Liu, Haitao; Chi, Jiguang; Qian, Liangshan; Pan, Feng; Liu, Xiang; Zhu, Xiaorong; Ma, Zhigang

    2015-06-01

    Zhejiang Dali Technology Co. Ltd. is one of the major players in the China Infrared industry. The company has been working on infrared imagers using uncooled FPAs for about 15 years. It started the research and development of uncooled microbolometer detectors since 2006, and has brought several uncooled detectors into mass production, including 35um 384x288, 25um 160x120, 384x288, 640x480, and 17um 384x288, 640x480. In this presentation, we will describe the uncooled infrared detector and imager development at DALI Technology.

  3. DIRC, the internally reflecting ring imaging Cherenkov detector for BABAR

    SciTech Connect

    Adam, I.; Aston, D.; Aleksan, R.

    1997-11-01

    The DIRC is a new type of Cherenkov imaging device that will be used for the first time in the BABAR detector at the asymmetric B-factory, PEP-II. It is based on total internal reflection and uses long, rectangular bars made from synthetic fused silica as Cherenkov radiator and light guide. The principles of the DIRC ring imaging Cherenkov technique are explained and results from the prototype program are presented. Its choice for the BABAR detector particle identification system is motivated, followed by a discussion of the quartz radiator properties and the detector design.

  4. X-ray imaging with the PILATUS 100k detector.

    PubMed

    Bech, M; Bunk, O; David, C; Kraft, P; Brönnimann, C; Eikenberry, E F; Pfeiffer, F

    2008-04-01

    We report on the application of the PILATUS 100K pixel detector for medical imaging. Experimental results are presented in the form of X-ray radiographs using standard X-ray absorption contrast and a recently developed phase contrast imaging method. The results obtained with the PILATUS detector are compared to results obtained with a conventional X-ray imaging system consisting of an X-ray scintillation screen, lens optics, and a charge coupled device. Finally, the results for both systems are discussed more quantitatively based on an image power spectrum analysis.

  5. Athermalization and on-chip multi-wavelength integration of VCSELs employing thermally actuated micromachined mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakahama, M.; Sakaguchi, T.; Matsutani, A.; Koyama, F.

    2014-09-01

    An athermal multi-wavelength vertical cavity surface emitting laser (VCSEL) array is demonstrated using a thermally actuated cantilever structure with different cantilever lengths. The cavity length of each VCSEL is precisely controlled via the deflection of the cantilever due to difference in the lattice constant of GaAlAs layers. Also, the thermally induced actuation of the cantilever reduces the cavity length as the ambient temperature increases, which compensates the thermal wavelength drift of the VCSEL. The wavelength drift could be reduced within ±0.017 nm/K, which is 4 times smaller than that of conventional VCSELs. The proposed multi-wavelength VCSEL array enables four wavelength channels with 2.5 nm spacing under uncooled operations.

  6. Versatile multi-wavelength ultrafast fiber laser mode-locked by carbon nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xueming; Han, Dongdong; Sun, Zhipei; Zeng, Chao; Lu, Hua; Mao, Dong; Cui, Yudong; Wang, Fengqiu

    2013-01-01

    Multi-wavelength lasers have widespread applications (e.g. fiber telecommunications, pump-probe measurements, terahertz generation). Here, we report a nanotube-mode-locked all-fiber ultrafast oscillator emitting three wavelengths at the central wavelengths of about 1540, 1550, and 1560 nm, which are tunable by stretching fiber Bragg gratings. The output pulse duration is around 6 ps with a spectral width of ~0.5 nm, agreeing well with the numerical simulations. The triple-laser system is controlled precisely and insensitive to environmental perturbations with <0.04% amplitude fluctuation. Our method provides a simple, stable, low-cost, multi-wavelength ultrafast-pulsed source for spectroscopy, biomedical research and telecommunications. PMID:24056500

  7. Multi-wavelength Raman spectroscopy study of supported vanadia catalysts: Structure identification and quantification

    DOE PAGES

    Wu, Zili

    2014-10-20

    Revealing the structure of supported metal oxide catalysts is a prerequisite for establishing the structure - catalysis relationship. Among a variety of characterization techniques, multi-wavelength Raman spectroscopy, combining resonance Raman and non-resonance Raman with different excitation wavelengths, has recently emerged as a particularly powerful tool in not only identifying but also quantifying the structure of supported metal oxide clusters. In our review, we make use of two supported vanadia systems, VOx/SiO2 and VOx/CeO2, as examples to showcase how one can employ this technique to investigate the heterogeneous structure of active oxide clusters and to understand the complex interaction between themore » oxide clusters and the support. Moreover, the qualitative and quantitative structural information gained from the multi-wavelength Raman spectroscopy can be utilized to provide fundamental insights for designing more efficient supported metal oxide catalysts.« less

  8. Multi-wavelength Raman spectroscopy study of supported vanadia catalysts: Structure identification and quantification

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Zili

    2014-10-20

    Revealing the structure of supported metal oxide catalysts is a prerequisite for establishing the structure - catalysis relationship. Among a variety of characterization techniques, multi-wavelength Raman spectroscopy, combining resonance Raman and non-resonance Raman with different excitation wavelengths, has recently emerged as a particularly powerful tool in not only identifying but also quantifying the structure of supported metal oxide clusters. In our review, we make use of two supported vanadia systems, VOx/SiO2 and VOx/CeO2, as examples to showcase how one can employ this technique to investigate the heterogeneous structure of active oxide clusters and to understand the complex interaction between the oxide clusters and the support. Moreover, the qualitative and quantitative structural information gained from the multi-wavelength Raman spectroscopy can be utilized to provide fundamental insights for designing more efficient supported metal oxide catalysts.

  9. Multi-wavelength observations of PSR B1259-63 during the 2014 periastron passage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Soelen, B.; Armstrong, R. P.; Väisänen, P.; Sushch, I.; Odendaal, A.; Meintjes, P. J.

    The gamma-ray binary star system PSR B1259-63 is unique among the five known systems since it is the only one where a radio pulsar has been directly detected. Close to periastron the system produces non-thermal/unpulsed emission from radio to TeV gamma-ray energies. In 2010 Fermi/LAT detected a rapid increase and peak emission at ˜30 days after periastron, at a time when emission at other wavelengths was already decreasing. PSR B1259-63 will go through periastron again on 2014 May 4. We have proposed to use the Southern African Large Telescope and the KAT-7 radio telescope array in order to contribute to the multi-wavelength coverage of the system. An outline of this proposed multi-wavelength campaign is presented.

  10. Novel multi wavelength sensor concept to detect total hemoglobin concentration, methemoglobin and oxygen saturation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timm, Ulrich; Gewiss, Helge; Kraitl, Jens; Stuepmann, Kirstin; Hinz, Michael; Koball, Sebastian; Ewald, Hartmut

    2015-03-01

    The paper will describe the novel multi-wavelength photometric device OxyTrue Hb® which is capable to measure the hemoglobin (Hb) and methemoglobin (MetHb) concentration non-invasively. Clinic trails in blood donation centers and during the dialysis are done to prove and demonstrate the performance of the system. The results are compared to the gold standard, the BGA measurement.

  11. Focus detection criterion for refocusing in multi-wavelength digital holography.

    PubMed

    Xu, Li; Mater, Mike; Ni, Jun

    2011-08-01

    The majority of focus detection criteria reported is based on amplitude contrast. Due to phase wrapping, phase contrast was previously reported unsuitable for focus finding tasks. By taking the advantage of multi-wavelength digital holography, we propose a new focus detection criterion based on phase contrast. Experimental results are presented to prove the feasibility of the developed criterion. Possible applications of the developed technology include inspecting machined surfaces in the auto industry.

  12. Multi-Wavelength Optical Code-Division-Multiplexing Based on Passive, Linear, Unitary Filters

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    EG) Prescribed by ANSI Std. 238.18 Designed using Perform Pro, WHS/DIOR, Oct 94 Multi-Wavelength Optical Code-Division-Multiplexing Based on... FTTH ) and fiber to the desk (FTTD) a reality. Every hertz of bandwidth available in optical fiber is now valuable for carrying data traffic in...contemporary communication systems. A different paradigm is required in designing multiple access optical communication systems to meet the challenges in

  13. A New Multi-Wavelength Synoptic Network for Solar Physics and Space Weather

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, Frank; Roth, Markus; Thompson, Michael

    2013-04-01

    Continuous solar observations are important for many research topics in solar physics, such as magnetic field evolution, flare and CME characteristics, and p-mode oscillation measurements. In addition, space weather operations require constant streams of solar data as input. The deployment of a number of identical instruments around the world in a network has proven to be a very effective strategy for obtaining nearly continuous solar observations. The financial costs of a network are 1-2 orders of magnitude lower than space-based platforms; network instrumentation can be easily accessed for maintenance and upgrades; and telemetry bandwidth is readily available. Currently, there are two solar observing networks with consistent instruments: BiSON and GONG, both designed primarily for helioseismology. In addition, GONG has been augmented with continual magnetic field measurements and H-alpha imagery, with both being used for space weather operational purposes. However, GONG is now 18 years old and getting increasingly more challenging to maintain. There are also at least three scientific motivations for a multi-wavelength network: Recent advances in helioseismology have demonstrated the need for multi-wavelength observations to allow more accurate interpretation of the structure and dynamics below sunspots. Vector magnetometry would greatly benefit from multi-wavelength observations to provide height information and resolve the azimuthal ambiguity. Finally, space weather operations always need a consistent reliable source of continual solar data. This presentation will outline the scientific need for a multi-wavelength network, and discuss some concepts for the design of the instrumentation. A workshop on the topic will be held in Boulder this April.

  14. A novel phoswich imaging detector for simultaneous beta and coincidence-gamma imaging of plant leaves.

    PubMed

    Wu, Heyu; Tai, Yuan-Chuan

    2011-09-07

    To meet the growing demand for functional imaging technology for use in studying plant biology, we are developing a novel technique that permits simultaneous imaging of escaped positrons and coincidence gammas from annihilation of positrons within an intake leaf. The multi-modality imaging system will include two planar detectors: one is a typical PET detector array and the other is a phoswich imaging detector that detects both beta and gamma. The novel phoswich detector is made of a plastic scintillator, a lutetium oxyorthosilicate (LSO) array, and a position sensitive photomultiplier tube (PS-PMT). The plastic scintillator serves as a beta detector, while the LSO array serves as a gamma detector and light guide that couples scintillation light from the plastic detector to the PMT. In our prototype, the PMT signal was fed into the Siemens QuickSilver electronics to achieve shaping and waveform sampling. Pulse-shape discrimination based on the detectors' decay times (2.1 ns for plastic and 40 ns for LSO) was used to differentiate beta and gamma events using the common PMT signals. Using our prototype phoswich detector, we simultaneously measured a beta image and gamma events (in single mode). The beta image showed a resolution of 1.6 mm full-width-at-half-maximum using F-18 line sources. Because this shows promise for plant-scale imaging, our future plans include development of a fully functional simultaneous beta-and-coincidence-gamma imager with sub-millimeter resolution imaging capability for both modalities.

  15. A novel phoswich imaging detector for simultaneous beta and coincidence-gamma imaging of plant leaves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Heyu; Tai, Yuan-Chuan

    2011-09-01

    To meet the growing demand for functional imaging technology for use in studying plant biology, we are developing a novel technique that permits simultaneous imaging of escaped positrons and coincidence gammas from annihilation of positrons within an intake leaf. The multi-modality imaging system will include two planar detectors: one is a typical PET detector array and the other is a phoswich imaging detector that detects both beta and gamma. The novel phoswich detector is made of a plastic scintillator, a lutetium oxyorthosilicate (LSO) array, and a position sensitive photomultiplier tube (PS-PMT). The plastic scintillator serves as a beta detector, while the LSO array serves as a gamma detector and light guide that couples scintillation light from the plastic detector to the PMT. In our prototype, the PMT signal was fed into the Siemens QuickSilver electronics to achieve shaping and waveform sampling. Pulse-shape discrimination based on the detectors' decay times (2.1 ns for plastic and 40 ns for LSO) was used to differentiate beta and gamma events using the common PMT signals. Using our prototype phoswich detector, we simultaneously measured a beta image and gamma events (in single mode). The beta image showed a resolution of 1.6 mm full-width-at-half-maximum using F-18 line sources. Because this shows promise for plant-scale imaging, our future plans include development of a fully functional simultaneous beta-and-coincidence-gamma imager with sub-millimeter resolution imaging capability for both modalities.

  16. Multi-Wavelength Observations of 3C 273 in 1993-1995

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    vonMontigny, C.; Aller, H.; Aller, M.; Bruhweiler, F.; Collmar, W.; Courvoisier, T. J.-L.; Edwards, P. G.; Fichtel, C. E.; Fruscione, A.; Ghisellini, G.

    1997-01-01

    We present the results of the multi-wavelength campaigns on 3C 273 in 1993-1995. During the observations in late 1993 this quasar showed an increase of its flux for energies >= 100 MeV from about 2.1 x 10(exp -7) photons/sq cm.s to approximately 5.6 x 10(exp -7) photons/sq cm.s during a radio outburst at 14.5, 22 and 37 GHz. However, no one-to-one correlation of the gamma-ray radiation with any frequency could be found. The photon spectral index of the high energy spectrum changed from GAMMA(sub gamma) = (3.20 +/- 0.54) to GAMMA(sub gamma) = (2.20 +/- 0.22) in the sense that the spectrum flattened when the gamma-ray flux increased. Fits of the three most prominent models (synchrotron self-Comptonization, external inverse Comptonization and the proton initiated cascade model) for the explanation of the high gamma-ray emission of active galactic nuclei were performed to the multi-wavelength spectrum of 3C 273 . All three models are able to represent the basic features of the multi-wavelength spectrum. Although there are some differences the data are still not decisive enough to discriminate between the models.

  17. Multi-wavelength coherent transmission using an optical frequency comb as a local oscillator.

    PubMed

    Kemal, Juned N; Pfeifle, Joerg; Marin-Palomo, Pablo; Pascual, M Deseada Gutierrez; Wolf, Stefan; Smyth, Frank; Freude, Wolfgang; Koos, Christian

    2016-10-31

    Steadily increasing data rates of optical interfaces require spectrally efficient coherent transmission using higher-order modulation formats in combination with scalable wavelength-division multiplexing (WDM) schemes. At the transmitter, optical frequency combs (OFC) lend themselves to particularly precise multi-wavelength sources for WDM transmission. In this work we demonstrate that these advantages can also be leveraged at the receiver by using an OFC as a highly scalable multi-wavelength local oscillator (LO) for coherent detection. In our experiments, we use a pair of OFC that rely on gain switching of injection-locked semiconductor lasers both for WDM transmission and intradyne reception. We synchronize the center frequency and the free spectral range of the receiver comb to the transmitter, keeping the intradyne frequencies for all data channels below 15 MHz. Using 13 WDM channels, we transmit an aggregate line rate (net data rate) of 1.104 Tbit/s (1.032 Tbit/s) over a 10 km long standard single mode fiber at a spectral efficiency of 5.16 bit/s/Hz. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of coherent WDM transmission using synchronized frequency combs as light source at the transmitter and as multi-wavelength LO at the receiver.

  18. HELP: The Herschel Extragalactic Legacy Project and The Coming of Age of Multi-wavelength Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaccari, M.

    How did galaxies form and evolve? This is one of the most challenging questions in astronomy today. Answering it requires a careful combination of observational and theoretical work to reliably determine the observed properties of cosmic bodies over large portions of the distant Universe on the one hand, and accurately model the physical processes driving their evolution on the other. Most importantly, it requires bringing together disparate multi-wavelength and multi-resolution spectro-photometric datasets in an homogeneous and well-characterized manner so that they are suitable for a rigorous statistical analysis. The Herschel Extragalactic Legacy Project (HELP) funded by the EC FP7 SPACE program aims to achieve this goal by combining the expertise of optical, infrared and radio astronomers to provide a multi-wavelength database for the distant Universe as an accessible value-added resource for the astronomical community. It will do so by bringing together multi-wavelength datasets covering the 1,000 deg2 mapped by Herschel extragalactic surveys in an homogeneous and well-characterized manner, creating a joint lasting legacy from several ambitious sky surveys.

  19. The challenge of highly curved monolithic imaging detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwert, Olaf; Delabre, Bernard

    2010-07-01

    In a recent optical design study of CODEX - a visible spectrograph planned for the European Extremely Large Telescope (E-ELT) - it was determined that a significant simplification of the optical design - accompanied by an improvement of the image quality - could be achieved through the application of large format (90mm square) concave spherically curved detectors with a low radius of curvature (500 to 250mm). Current assemblies of image sensors and optics rely on the optics to project a corrected image onto a flat detector. While scientific large-size CCDs (49mm square) have been produced unintentionally with a spherical radius of convex curvature of around 5m, in the past most efforts have concentrated onto flattening the light-sensitive detector silicon area as best as possible for both scientific state-of-the-art systems, as well as commercial low-cost consumer products. In some cases curved focal planes are mosaicked out of individual flat detectors, but a standard method to derive individual spherically curved large size detectors has not been demonstrated. This paper summarizes important developments in the area of curved detectors in the past and their different technical approaches mostly linked to specific thinning processes. ESO's specifications for an ongoing feasibility study are presented. First results of the latter are described with a link to theoretical and practical examinations of currently available technology to implement curved CCD and CMOS detectors for scientific applications.

  20. Multi-wavelength seds of Herschel-selected galaxies in the cosmos field

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Nicholas; Sanders, D. B.; Casey, Caitlin M.; Hung, Chao-Ling; Scoville, N. Z.; Capak, Peter; Bock, J.; Le Floc'h, Emeric; Aussel, Hervé; Ilbert, Olivier; Kartaltepe, Jeyhan S.; Roseboom, Isaac; Oliver, S. J.; Salvato, Mara; Aravena, M.; Berta, S.; Riguccini, L.; Symeonidis, M.

    2013-12-01

    We combine Herschel Photodetector Array Camera and Spectrometer and Spectral and Photometric Imaging Receiver maps of the full 2 deg{sup 2} Cosmic Evolution Survey (COSMOS) field with existing multi-wavelength data to obtain template and model-independent optical-to-far-infrared spectral energy distributions (SEDs) for 4218 Herschel-selected sources with log(L {sub IR}/L {sub ☉}) = 9.4-13.6 and z = 0.02-3.54. Median SEDs are created by binning the optical to far-infrared (FIR) bands available in COSMOS as a function of infrared luminosity. Herschel probes rest-frame wavelengths where the bulk of the infrared radiation is emitted, allowing us to more accurately determine fundamental dust properties of our sample of infrared luminous galaxies. We find that the SED peak wavelength (λ{sub peak}) decreases and the dust mass (M {sub dust}) increases with increasing total infrared luminosity (L {sub IR}). In the lowest infrared luminosity galaxies (log(L {sub IR}/L {sub ☉}) = 10.0-11.5), we see evidence of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) features (λ ∼ 7-9 μm), while in the highest infrared luminosity galaxies (L {sub IR} > 10{sup 12} L {sub ☉}) we see an increasing contribution of hot dust and/or power-law emission, consistent with the presence of heating from an active galactic nucleus (AGN). We study the relationship between stellar mass and star formation rate of our sample of infrared luminous galaxies and find no evidence that Herschel-selected galaxies follow the SFR/M {sub *} 'main sequence' as previously determined from studies of optically selected, star-forming galaxies. Finally, we compare the mid-infrared to FIR properties of our infrared luminous galaxies using the previously defined diagnostic, IR8 ≡ L {sub IR}/L {sub 8}, and find that galaxies with L {sub IR} ≳ 10{sup 11.3} L {sub ☉} tend to systematically lie above (× 3-5) the IR8 'infrared main sequence', suggesting either suppressed PAH emission or an increasing contribution from

  1. Multi-wavelength SEDs of Herschel-selected Galaxies in the COSMOS Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Nicholas; Sanders, D. B.; Casey, Caitlin M.; Scoville, N. Z.; Hung, Chao-Ling; Le Floc'h, Emeric; Ilbert, Olivier; Aussel, Hervé; Capak, Peter; Kartaltepe, Jeyhan S.; Roseboom, Isaac; Salvato, Mara; Aravena, M.; Berta, S.; Bock, J.; Oliver, S. J.; Riguccini, L.; Symeonidis, M.

    2013-12-01

    We combine Herschel Photodetector Array Camera and Spectrometer and Spectral and Photometric Imaging Receiver maps of the full 2 deg2 Cosmic Evolution Survey (COSMOS) field with existing multi-wavelength data to obtain template and model-independent optical-to-far-infrared spectral energy distributions (SEDs) for 4218 Herschel-selected sources with log(L IR/L ⊙) = 9.4-13.6 and z = 0.02-3.54. Median SEDs are created by binning the optical to far-infrared (FIR) bands available in COSMOS as a function of infrared luminosity. Herschel probes rest-frame wavelengths where the bulk of the infrared radiation is emitted, allowing us to more accurately determine fundamental dust properties of our sample of infrared luminous galaxies. We find that the SED peak wavelength (λpeak) decreases and the dust mass (M dust) increases with increasing total infrared luminosity (L IR). In the lowest infrared luminosity galaxies (log(L IR/L ⊙) = 10.0-11.5), we see evidence of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) features (λ ~ 7-9 μm), while in the highest infrared luminosity galaxies (L IR > 1012 L ⊙) we see an increasing contribution of hot dust and/or power-law emission, consistent with the presence of heating from an active galactic nucleus (AGN). We study the relationship between stellar mass and star formation rate of our sample of infrared luminous galaxies and find no evidence that Herschel-selected galaxies follow the SFR/M * "main sequence" as previously determined from studies of optically selected, star-forming galaxies. Finally, we compare the mid-infrared to FIR properties of our infrared luminous galaxies using the previously defined diagnostic, IR8 ≡ L IR/L 8, and find that galaxies with L IR >~ 1011.3 L ⊙ tend to systematically lie above (× 3-5) the IR8 "infrared main sequence," suggesting either suppressed PAH emission or an increasing contribution from AGN heating.

  2. THCOBRA X-ray imaging detector operating in pure Kr

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carramate, L. F. N. D.; Silva, A. L. M.; Azevedo, C. D. R.; Fortes, I.; Monteiro, S. G.; Sousa, S.; Ribeiro, F. M.; De Francesco, S.; Covita, D. S.; Veloso, J. F. C. A.

    2017-05-01

    MicroPattern Gaseous Detectors (MPGD) have been explored for X-ray imaging, namely for photon counting imaging which allows the improvement of image quality and the collection of more information than the conventional commercial systems. A 2D-THCOBRA based detector was developed, studied and used to acquire X-ray transmission images. The 2D-THCOBRA structure used has an active area of 2.8 × 2.8 cm2 and allows obtaining the position and energy information of each single photon that interacts with the detector. It is filled with pure Kr at 1 bar operating in a sealed mode. Within this work the performance of the detector is evaluated in terms of charge gain, count rate, time stability, energy and spatial resolutions. The detector presents a charge gain of 2 × 104 and an energy resolution of 23% for 5.9 keV, showing gain stability along time for a count rate of about 1 × 105 Hz/mm2. It presents a spatial resolution of 600 μm (σ = 255 μm) and 500 μm (σ = 213 μm) for x and y directions, respectively, and, considering energy bins about 650 μm (σ = 277 μm) for approximately 16.5 keV. X-ray transmission images of some samples presented here show good prospects for X-ray imaging applications.

  3. Digital Images of Breast Biopsies using a Silicon Strip Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Montano, Luis M.; Diaz, Claudia C.; Leyva, Antonio; Cabal, Fatima

    2006-09-08

    In our study we have used a silicon strip detector to obtain digital images of some breast tissues with micro calcifications. Some of those images will be shown and we will discuss the perspectives of using this technique as an improvement of breast cancer diagnostics.

  4. Simulation of computed radiography with imaging plate detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Tisseur, D.; Costin, M.; Mathy, F.; Schumm, A.

    2014-02-18

    Computed radiography (CR) using phosphor imaging plate detectors is taking an increasing place in Radiography Testing. CR uses similar equipment as conventional radiography except that the classical X-ray film is replaced by a numerical detector, called image plate (IP), which is made of a photostimulable layer and which is read by a scanning device through photostimulated luminescence. Such digital radiography has already demonstrated important benefits in terms of exposure time, decrease of source energies and thus reduction of radioprotection area besides being a solution without effluents. This paper presents a model for the simulation of radiography with image plate detectors in CIVA together with examples of validation of the model. The study consists in a cross comparison between experimental and simulation results obtained on a step wedge with a classical X-ray tube. Results are proposed in particular with wire Image quality Indicator (IQI) and duplex IQI.

  5. Scintillator-fiber charged particle track-imaging detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Binns, W. R.; Israel, M. H.; Klarmann, J.

    1983-01-01

    A scintillator-fiber charged-particle track-imaging detector was developed using a bundle of square cross section plastic scintillator fiber optics, proximity focused onto an image intensified charge injection device (CID) camera. The tracks of charged particle penetrating into the scintillator fiber bundle are projected onto the CID camera and the imaging information is read out in video format. The detector was exposed to beams of 15 MeV protons and relativistic Neon, Manganese, and Gold nuclei and images of their tracks were obtained. Details of the detector technique, properties of the tracks obtained, and preliminary range measurements of 15 MeV protons stopping in the fiber bundle are presented.

  6. Detectors for medical radioisotope imaging: demands and perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopes, M. I.; Chepel, V.

    2004-10-01

    Radioisotope imaging is used to obtain information on biochemical processes in living organisms, being a tool of increasing importance for medical diagnosis. The improvement and expansion of these techniques depend on the progress attained in several areas, such as radionuclide production, radiopharmaceuticals, radiation detectors and image reconstruction algorithms. This review paper will be concerned only with the detector technology. We will review in general terms the present status of medical radioisotope imaging instrumentation with the emphasis put on the developments of high-resolution gamma cameras and PET detector systems for scinti-mammography and animal imaging. The present trend to combine two or more modalities in a single machine in order to obtain complementary information will also be considered.

  7. A Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) Detector for Fast Neutron Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jewett, C. C.; McMahan, M.; Cerny, J.; Heilbronn, L.; Johnson, M.

    2008-10-01

    We have built a Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) detector for detection of fast neutrons at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The detector consists of a 0.0625 inch thick polypropylene neutron converter, three GEM foils and a grid of 16 readout pads on a printed circuit board. In this talk, we present images of the GEM detector, the results of tests with ^60Co, AmBe sources and our neutron beam, and a comparison between the proposed fast neutron GEM detector and a fast neutron ^238U fission chamber we purchased. One of the advantages of the GEM detector over the fission chamber is the fact that it provides the x-y position information of the neutrons.

  8. Advanced infrared detectors for multimode active and passive imaging applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Ian; Owton, Daniel; Trundle, Keith; Thorne, Peter; Storie, Kevin; Oakley, Philip; Copley, Jeremy

    2008-04-01

    Active systems, using a near-infrared pulse laser and a fast, gated detector, are now adopted for most long range imaging applications. This concept is often called laser-gated imaging (LGI) or burst-illumination LIDAR (BIL). The SELEX solid state detector is based on an array of HgCdTe avalanche photodiodes, and a custom-designed CMOS multiplexer to perform the fast gating and photon signal capture. This paper describes two recent developments. The first is aimed at reducing the size, weight, power and cost of steerable platforms which often have to contain a large number of electrooptic tools such as lasers, range finders, BIL, thermal imaging and visible cameras. A dual-mode infrared detector has been developed with the aim of shrinking the system to one camera. The detector can be switched to operate as a passive thermal imager, a laser-gated imager or a solar flux imager. The detector produces a sensitivity in the MW thermal band of 16-18mK and a sensitivity in the BIL mode as low as 10 photons rms, in other words close to the performance of dedicated imagers. A second development was to extend the current BIL capability to 3D. In complex scenes, with camouflage and concealment, the ability to generate 3D images provides a signal-to-clutter advantage. Also in airborne applications, especially, it is useful to have 3D information to provide agile, feedback control of the range gating in a dynamic environment. This report describes the development of the 3D detector and camera, and the results of field trials using a prototype system.

  9. Flat-panel detector-based cone beam volume CT breast imaging: detector evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Yong; Conover, David L.; Ning, Ruola

    2003-06-01

    Preliminary evaluation of large-area flat panel detectors (FPDs) indicates that FPDs have some potential advantages over film-screen and CCD-based imagers: compactness, high resolution, high frame rate, large dynamic range, small image lag (<1%), and excellent linearity (~1%). A real time large-area flat panel detector (FPD) Varian PaxScan 2520 was evaluated for cone-beam volume breast imaging (CBVCTBI) in terms of dynamic range, linearity, image lag, and spatial as well as low contrast resolution. In addition, specially made breast phantoms were imaged with our prototyped CBVCTBI system to provide real outcomes to evaluate the detector under full imaging system conditions including the x-ray source, gantry geometry, x-ray technique selection, data acquisition system and reconstruction algorithms. We have concentrated on the low kVp range (30 to 80 kVp) in the context of the breast-imaging task. For ~288 images/scan the exposure required was ~2.5mR/projection. This is equivalent to that of a conventional mammography screening exam. The results indicate that the FPD-based CBVCTBI system can achieve sufficient high- and low-contrast resolution for diagnostic CBVCT breast imaging with a clinically acceptable exposure level. The advantages of the new FPD make it a promising candidate for CBVCTBI.

  10. Musculoskeletal imaging with a prototype photon-counting detector.

    PubMed

    Gruber, M; Homolka, P; Chmeissani, M; Uffmann, M; Pretterklieber, M; Kainberger, F

    2012-01-01

    To test a digital imaging X-ray device based on the direct capture of X-ray photons with pixel detectors, which are coupled with photon-counting readout electronics. The chip consists of a matrix of 256 × 256 pixels with a pixel pitch of 55 μm. A monolithic image of 11.2 cm × 7 cm was obtained by the consecutive displacement approach. Images of embalmed anatomical specimens of eight human hands were obtained at four different dose levels (skin dose 2.4, 6, 12, 25 μGy) with the new detector, as well as with a flat-panel detector. The overall rating scores for the evaluated anatomical regions ranged from 5.23 at the lowest dose level, 6.32 at approximately 6 μGy, 6.70 at 12 μGy, to 6.99 at the highest dose level with the photon-counting system. The corresponding rating scores for the flat-panel detector were 3.84, 5.39, 6.64, and 7.34. When images obtained at the same dose were compared, the new system outperformed the conventional DR system at the two lowest dose levels. At the higher dose levels, there were no significant differences between the two systems. The photon-counting detector has great potential to obtain musculoskeletal images of excellent quality at very low dose levels.

  11. Speckle imaging with the PAPA detector. [Precision Analog Photon Address

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papaliolios, C.; Nisenson, P.; Ebstein, S.

    1985-01-01

    A new 2-D photon-counting camera, the PAPA (precision analog photon address) detector has been built, tested, and used successfully for the acquisition of speckle imaging data. The camera has 512 x 512 pixels and operates at count rates of at least 200,000/sec. In this paper, technical details on the camera are presented and some of the laboratory and astronomical results are included which demonstrate the detector's capabilities.

  12. A Photon Counting Imaging Detector for NASA Exoplanet Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Figer, Donald

    The key objective of the proposed project is to advance the maturity of a 256x256 pixel single-photon optical imaging detector. The detector has zero read noise and is resilient against the harsh effects of radiation in space. We expect that the device will have state-of-the-art performance in other parameters, e.g., high quantum efficiency from UV to 1 #m, low dark current, etc.

  13. Speckle imaging with the PAPA detector. [Precision Analog Photon Address

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papaliolios, C.; Nisenson, P.; Ebstein, S.

    1985-01-01

    A new 2-D photon-counting camera, the PAPA (precision analog photon address) detector has been built, tested, and used successfully for the acquisition of speckle imaging data. The camera has 512 x 512 pixels and operates at count rates of at least 200,000/sec. In this paper, technical details on the camera are presented and some of the laboratory and astronomical results are included which demonstrate the detector's capabilities.

  14. Monte Carlo studies for medical imaging detector optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fois, G. R.; Cisbani, E.; Garibaldi, F.

    2016-02-01

    This work reports on the Monte Carlo optimization studies of detection systems for Molecular Breast Imaging with radionuclides and Bremsstrahlung Imaging in nuclear medicine. Molecular Breast Imaging requires competing performances of the detectors: high efficiency and high spatial resolutions; in this direction, it has been proposed an innovative device which combines images from two different, and somehow complementary, detectors at the opposite sides of the breast. The dual detector design allows for spot compression and improves significantly the performance of the overall system if all components are well tuned, layout and processing carefully optimized; in this direction the Monte Carlo simulation represents a valuable tools. In recent years, Bremsstrahlung Imaging potentiality in internal radiotherapy (with beta-radiopharmaceuticals) has been clearly emerged; Bremsstrahlung Imaging is currently performed with existing detector generally used for single photon radioisotopes. We are evaluating the possibility to adapt an existing compact gamma camera and optimize by Monte Carlo its performance for Bremsstrahlung imaging with photons emitted by the beta- from 90 Y.

  15. Development of a multi-wavelength diffuse optical tomography system for early diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis: simulation, phantoms and healthy human studies

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Hao Yang; Filer, Andrew; Styles, Iain; Dehghani, Hamid

    2016-01-01

    A multi-wavelength diffuse optical tomography (DOT) system has been developed to directly extract physiological information, such as total haemoglobin concentration, from tissue in human hand joints. Novel methods for 3D surface imaging and spectrally constrained image reconstruction are introduced and their potential application to imaging of rheumatoid arthritis is discussed. Results are presented from simulation studies as well as experiments using phantoms and data from imaging of three healthy volunteers. The image features are recovered partially for phantom data using transmission measurements only. Images that reveal joint regions and surrounding features within the hand are shown to co-register with co–acquired ultrasound images which are shown to be related to total haemoglobin concentration. PMID:27896015

  16. Reconstruction algorithms for optoacoustic imaging based on fiber optic detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamela, Horacio; Díaz-Tendero, Gonzalo; Gutiérrez, Rebeca; Gallego, Daniel

    2011-06-01

    Optoacoustic Imaging (OAI), a novel hybrid imaging technology, offers high contrast, molecular specificity and excellent resolution to overcome limitations of the current clinical modalities for detection of solid tumors. The exact time-domain reconstruction formula produces images with excellent resolution but poor contrast. Some approximate time-domain filtered back-projection reconstruction algorithms have also been reported to solve this problem. A wavelet transform implementation filtering can be used to sharpen object boundaries while simultaneously preserving high contrast of the reconstructed objects. In this paper, several algorithms, based on Back Projection (BP) techniques, have been suggested to process OA images in conjunction with signal filtering for ultrasonic point detectors and integral detectors. We apply these techniques first directly to a numerical generated sample image and then to the laserdigitalized image of a tissue phantom, obtaining in both cases the best results in resolution and contrast for a waveletbased filter.

  17. Residual images in charged-coupled device detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rest, Armin; Mündermann, Lars; Widenhorn, Ralf; Bodegom, Erik; McGlinn, T. C.

    2002-05-01

    We present results of a systematic study of persistent, or residual, images that occur in charged-coupled device (CCD) detectors. A phenomenological model for these residual images, also known as "ghosting," is introduced. This model relates the excess dark current in a CCD after exposure to the number of filled impurity sites which is tested for various temperatures and exposure times. We experimentally derive values for the cross section, density, and characteristic energy of the impurity sites responsible for the residual images.

  18. The SCUBA-2 Cosmology Legacy Survey: Multi-wavelength Properties of ALMA-identified Submillimeter Galaxies in UKIDSS UDS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simpson, J. M.; Smail, Ian; Swinbank, A. M.; Ivison, R. J.; Dunlop, J. S.; Geach, J. E.; Almaini, O.; Arumugam, V.; Bremer, M. N.; Chen, Chian-Chou; Conselice, C.; Coppin, K. E. K.; Farrah, D.; Ibar, E.; Hartley, W. G.; Ma, C. J.; Michałowski, M. J.; Scott, D.; Spaans, M.; Thomson, A. P.; van der Werf, P. P.

    2017-04-01

    We present a multi-wavelength analysis of 52 submillimeter galaxies (SMGs), identified using ALMA 870 μm continuum imaging in a pilot program to precisely locate bright SCUBA-2-selected submillimeter sources in the UKIDSS Ultra Deep Survey (UDS) field. Using the available deep (especially near-infrared) panoramic imaging of the UDS field at optical-to-radio wavelengths we characterize key properties of the SMG population. The median photometric redshift of the bright ALMA/SCUBA-2 UDS (AS2UDS) SMGs that are detected in a sufficient number of wavebands to derive a robust photometric redshift is z = 2.65 ± 0.13. However, similar to previous studies, 27% of the SMGs are too faint at optical-to-near-infrared wavelengths to derive a reliable photometric redshift. Assuming that these SMGs lie at z ≳ 3 raises the median redshift of the full sample to z = 2.9 ± 0.2. A subset of 23 unlensed, bright AS2UDS SMGs have sizes measured from resolved imaging of their rest-frame far-infrared emission. We show that the extent and luminosity of the far-infrared emission are consistent with the dust emission arising from regions that are, on average, optically thick at a wavelength of {λ }0≥slant 75 μ {{m}} (1σ dispersion of 55-90 μm). Using the dust masses derived from our optically thick spectral energy distribution models, we determine that these galaxies have a median hydrogen column density of N H = 9.8{}-0.7+1.4 × 1023 cm-2, or a corresponding median V-band obscuration of A v = 540{}-40+80 mag, averaged along the line of sight to the source of their rest-frame ˜200 μm emission. We discuss the implications of this extreme attenuation by dust for the multi-wavelength study of dusty starbursts and reddening-sensitive tracers of star formation.

  19. Generation of tunable multi-wavelength EDFL by using graphene thin film as nonlinear medium and stabilizer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Harith; Hassan, Nor Ahya; Aidit, Siti Nabila; Tiu, Zian Cheak

    2016-07-01

    The applications of graphene thin film as a nonlinear medium and stabilizer to generate a stable multi-wavelength is proposed and demonstrated. A 50 m long highly nonlinear photonic crystal fiber (PCF) is incorporated into the cavity to achieve unstable multi-wavelength based on nonlinear polarization rotation (NPR) effect. By introducing the graphene thin film into the cavity, a stable multi-wavelength oscillation is obtained. The laser generates more than 7 lasings with constant spacing of 0.47 nm. The output is highly stable with power fluctuation of less than 3 dB within a period of 30 min. The multi-wavelength EDFL exhibits a tunability from the center wavelength of 1550 nm to 1560 nm.

  20. Development and performance of a gamma-ray imaging detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gálvez, J. L.; Hernanz, M.; Álvarez, J. M.; La Torre, M.; Álvarez, L.; Karelin, D.; Lozano, M.; Pellegrini, G.; Ullán, M.; Cabruja, E.; Martínez, R.; Chmeissani, M.; Puigdengoles, C.

    2012-09-01

    In the last few years we have been working on feasibility studies of future instruments in the gamma-ray range, from several keV up to a few MeV. The innovative concept of focusing gamma-ray telescopes in this energy range, should allow reaching unprecedented sensitivities and angular resolution, thanks to the decoupling of collecting area and detector volume. High sensitivities are essential to perform detailed studies of cosmic explosions and cosmic accelerators, e.g., Supernovae, Classical Novae, Supernova Remnants (SNRs), Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs), Pulsars, Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN). In order to achieve the needed performance, a gamma-ray imaging detector with mm spatial resolution and large enough efficiency is required. In order to fulfill the combined requirement of high detection efficiency with good spatial and energy resolution, an initial prototype of a gamma-ray imaging detector based on CdTe pixel detectors is being developed. It consists of a stack of several layers of CdTe detectors with increasing thickness, in order to enhance the gamma-ray absorption in the Compton regime. A CdTe module detector lies in a 11 x 11 pixel detector with a pixel pitch of 1mm attached to the readout chip. Each pixel is bump bonded to a fan-out board made of alumina (Al2O3) substrate and routed to the corresponding input channel of the readout ASIC to measure pixel position and pulse height for each incident gamma-ray photon. We will report the main features of the gamma-ray imaging detector performance such as the energy resolution for a set of radiation sources at different operating temperatures.

  1. Multi-wavelength fiber ring laser based on a sampled chirped fiber Bragg grating with a hybrid gain medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moon, Dae Seung; Chung, Youngjoo

    2012-04-01

    The novel multi-wavelength fiber ring laser based on a sampled chirped fiber Bragg grating with a single SOA or a hybrid gain medium is demonstrated, respectively. In case of a hybrid gain medium, the SMSR improvement of ~ 5 dB was obtained when compared with the system with a single SOA. The proposed fiber laser offers advantages such as simple structure, low loss, multi-wavelength lasing lines with moderate output power.

  2. Background measurements from balloon-born imaging CZT detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenkins, Jonathan A.; Narita, Tomohiko; Grindlay, Jonathan E.; Bloser, Peter F.; Stahle, Carl M.; Parker, Bradford H.; Barthelmy, Scott D.

    2003-03-01

    We report detector characteristics and background measurements from two prototype imaging CdZnTe (CZT) detectors flown on a scientific balloon payload in May 2001. The detectors are both platinum-contact 10 mm × 10 mm × 5 mm CZT crystals, each with a 4 × 4 array of pixels tiling the anode. One is made from IMARAD horizontal Bridgman CZT, the other from eV Products high-pressure Bridgman CZT. Both detectors were mounted side-by-side in a flip-chip configuration and read out by a 32-channel IDE VA/TA ASIC preamp/shaper. We enclosed the detectors in the same 40o field-of-view collimator used in our previously-reported September 2000 flight. I-V curves for the detectors are diode-like, and we find that the platinum contacts adhere significantly better to the CZT surfaces than gold to previosu detectors. The detectors and instrumentation performed well in a 20-hour balloon flight on 23/24 May 2001. Although we discovered a significant instrumental background component in flight, it was possible to measure and subtract this component from the spectra. The resulting IMARAD detector background spectrum reaches ~5×10-3 counts cm-2s-1keV-1 at 100 keV and has a power-law index of ~2 at hgih energies. The eV Products detector has a similar spectrum, although there is more uncertainty in the enregy scale because of calibration complications.

  3. Gamma-ray imaging with coaxial HPGe detector

    SciTech Connect

    Niedermayr, T; Vetter, K; Mihailescu, L; Schmid, G J; Beckedahl, D; Kammeraad, J; Blair, J

    2005-04-12

    We report on the first experimental demonstration of Compton imaging of gamma rays with a single coaxial high-purity germanium (HPGe) detector. This imaging capability is realized by two-dimensional segmentation of the outside contact in combination with digital pulse-shape analysis, which enables to image gamma rays in 4{pi} without employing a collimator. We are able to demonstrate the ability to image the 662keV gamma ray from a {sup 137}Cs source with preliminary event selection with an angular accuracy of 5 degree with an relative efficiency of 0.2%. In addition to the 4{pi} imaging capability, such a system is characterized by its excellent energy resolution and can be implemented in any size possible for Ge detectors to achieve high efficiency.

  4. Spectral X-Ray Diffraction using a 6 Megapixel Photon Counting Array Detector

    PubMed Central

    Muir, Ryan D.; Pogranichniy, Nicholas R.; Muir, J. Lewis; Sullivan, Shane Z.; Battaile, Kevin P.; Mulichak, Anne M.; Toth, Scott J.; Keefe, Lisa J.; Simpson, Garth J.

    2016-01-01

    Pixel-array array detectors allow single-photon counting to be performed on a massively parallel scale, with several million counting circuits and detectors in the array. Because the number of photoelectrons produced at the detector surface depends on the photon energy, these detectors offer the possibility of spectral imaging. In this work, a statistical model of the instrument response is used to calibrate the detector on a per-pixel basis. In turn, the calibrated sensor was used to perform separation of dual-energy diffraction measurements into two monochromatic images. Targeting applications include multi-wavelength diffraction to aid in protein structure determination and X-ray diffraction imaging. PMID:27041789

  5. The faint radio source population at 15.7 GHz - II. Multi-wavelength properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whittam, I. H.; Riley, J. M.; Green, D. A.; Jarvis, M. J.; Vaccari, M.

    2015-11-01

    A complete, flux density limited sample of 96 faint (>0.5 mJy) radio sources is selected from the 10C survey at 15.7 GHz in the Lockman Hole. We have matched this sample to a range of multi-wavelength catalogues, including Spitzer Extragalactic Representative Volume Survey, Spitzer Wide-area Infrared Extragalactic survey, United Kingdom Infrared Telescope Infrared Deep Sky Survey and optical data; multi-wavelength counterparts are found for 80 of the 96 sources and spectroscopic redshifts are available for 24 sources. Photometric redshifts are estimated for the sources with multi-wavelength data available; the median redshift of the sample is 0.91 with an interquartile range of 0.84. Radio-to-optical ratios show that at least 94 per cent of the sample are radio loud, indicating that the 10C sample is dominated by radio galaxies. This is in contrast to samples selected at lower frequencies, where radio-quiet AGN and star-forming galaxies are present in significant numbers at these flux density levels. All six radio-quiet sources have rising radio spectra, suggesting that they are dominated by AGN emission. These results confirm the conclusions of Paper I that the faint, flat-spectrum sources which are found to dominate the 10C sample below ˜1 mJy are the cores of radio galaxies. The properties of the 10C sample are compared to the Square Kilometre Array Design Studies Simulated Skies; a population of low-redshift star-forming galaxies predicted by the simulation is not found in the observed sample.

  6. The PICASSO digital detector for Diffraction Enhanced Imaging at ELETTRA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arfelli, F.; Astolfo, A.; Menk, R.-H.; Rigon, L.; Zanconati, F.; De Pellegrin, A.; Chen, R. C.; Dreossi, D.; Longo, R.; Vallazza, E.; Castelli, E.

    2010-07-01

    A clinical mammography program is in progress at the medical beamline SYRMEP of the Italian synchrotron radiation laboratory ELETTRA in Trieste. A conventional screen-film system is utilized as detector for the examinations on patients. For the next experimental step a digital detector has been designed taking into account the essential requirements for mammography such as high spatial and contrast resolution, high efficiency for low dose examinations and high speed for short acquisition time. A double-layer prototype has already been tested in the frame of the PICASSO project. In addition, an analyzer crystal set-up for Diffraction Enhanced Imaging (DEI) has been available for many years at the SYRMEP beamline. Applying the DEI technique several successful experiments have been carried out in biomedical imaging and in particular in-vitro breast imaging utilizing commercially available detectors. Recently a system upgrade yielded a double-crystal analyzer set-up with improved stability and higher angular resolution. In this study the PICASSO detector has been utilized in combination with the new analyzer set-up for imaging in-vitro breast tissue samples. In order to test the potential of the combined system planar and tomographic images have been acquired and the first results are here presented.

  7. The HERMES dual-radiator ring imaging Cherenkov detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akopov, N.; Aschenauer, E. C.; Bailey, K.; Bernreuther, S.; Bianchi, N.; Capitani, G. P.; Carter, P.; Cisbani, E.; De Leo, R.; De Sanctis, E.; De Schepper, D.; Djordjadze, V.; Filippone, B. W.; Frullani, S.; Garibaldi, F.; Hansen, J.-O.; Hommez, B.; Iodice, M.; Jackson, H. E.; Jung, P.; Kaiser, R.; Kanesaka, J.; Kowalczyk, R.; Lagamba, L.; Maas, A.; Muccifora, V.; Nappi, E.; Negodaeva, K.; Nowak, W.-D.; O'Connor, T.; O'Neill, T. G.; Potterveld, D. H.; Ryckbosch, D.; Sakemi, Y.; Sato, F.; Schwind, A.; Shibata, T.-A.; Suetsugu, K.; Thomas, E.; Tytgat, M.; Urciuoli, G. M.; Van de Kerckhove, K.; Van de Vyver, R.; Yoneyama, S.; Zohrabian, H.; Zhang, L. F.

    2002-03-01

    The construction and use of a dual radiator Ring Imaging Cherenkov (RICH) detector is described. This instrument was developed for the HERMES experiment at DESY which emphasises measurements of semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering. It provides particle identification for pions, kaons, and protons in the momentum range from 2 to 15 GeV, which is essential to these studies. The instrument uses two radiators, C 4F 10, a heavy fluorocarbon gas, and a wall of silica aerogel tiles. The use of aerogel in a RICH detector has only recently become possible with the development of clear, large, homogeneous and hydrophobic aerogel. A lightweight mirror was constructed using a newly perfected technique to make resin-coated carbon-fiber surfaces of optical quality. The photon detector consists of 1934 photomultiplier tubes (PMT) for each detector half, held in a soft steel matrix to provide shielding against the residual field of the main spectrometer magnet.

  8. Reliability of temperature determination from curve-fitting in multi-wavelength pyrometery

    SciTech Connect

    Ni, P. A.; More, R. M.; Bieniosek, F. M.

    2013-08-04

    Abstract This paper examines the reliability of a widely used method for temperature determination by multi-wavelength pyrometry. In recent WDM experiments with ion-beam heated metal foils, we found that the statistical quality of the fit to the measured data is not necessarily a measure of the accuracy of the inferred temperature. We found a specific example where a second-best fit leads to a more realistic temperature value. The physics issue is the wavelength-dependent emissivity of the hot surface. We discuss improvements of the multi-frequency pyrometry technique, which will give a more reliable determination of the temperature from emission data.

  9. Gamma-Ray Bursts and Fast Transients. Multi-wavelength Observations and Multi-messenger Signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willingale, R.; Mészáros, P.

    2017-07-01

    The current status of observations and theoretical models of gamma-ray bursts and some other related transients, including ultra-long bursts and tidal disruption events, is reviewed. We consider the impact of multi-wavelength data on the formulation and development of theoretical models for the prompt and afterglow emission including the standard fireball model utilizing internal shocks and external shocks, photospheric emission, the role of the magnetic field and hadronic processes. In addition, we discuss some of the prospects for non-photonic multi-messenger detection and for future instrumentation, and comment on some of the outstanding issues in the field.

  10. Stable multi-wavelength fiber lasers for temperature measurements using an optical loop mirror.

    PubMed

    Diaz, Silvia; Socorro, Abian Bentor; Martínez Manuel, Rodolfo; Fernandez, Ruben; Monasterio, Ioseba

    2016-10-10

    In this work, two novel stable multi-wavelength fiber laser configurations are proposed and demonstrated by using a spool of a single-mode fiber as an optical loop mirror and one or two fiber ring cavities, respectively. The lasers are comprised of fiber Bragg grating reflectors as the oscillation wavelength selecting filters. The influence of the length of the spool of fiber on the laser stability both in terms of wavelength and laser output power was investigated. An application for temperature measurement is also shown.

  11. Multi-wavelength laser generation with Bismuthbased Erbium-doped fiber.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, H; Shahi, S; Harun, S W

    2009-01-05

    A multi-wavelength laser comb is demonstrated using a nonlinear effect in a backward pumped Bismuth-based Erbium-doped fiber (Bi-EDF) for the first time. It uses a ring cavity resonator scheme containing a 215 cm long highly nonlinear Bi-EDF, optical isolators, polarisation controller and 10 dB output coupler. The laser generates more than 10 lines of optical comb with a line spacing of approximately 0.41 nm at 1615.5 nm region using 146 mW of 1480 nm pump power.

  12. Multi-wavelength generation based on cascaded Raman scattering and self-frequency-doubling in KTA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, K.; Li, J. S.; Xu, D. G.; Ding, X.; Zhou, R.; Wen, W. Q.; Li, Z. Y.; Xu, X. Y.; Wang, P.; Yao, J. Q.

    2010-04-01

    A multi-wavelength laser is developed based on cascaded stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) and self-frequency-doubling in an x-cut KTA crystal pumped by an A-O Q-switched Nd:YAG laser. The generation of 1178 nm from cascaded SRS of 234 and 671 cm-1 Raman modes is observed. The six wavelengths, including the fundamental 1064 nm, four Stokes waves at 1091, 1120, 1146, 1178 nm, and the second harmonic generation (SHG) of 1146 nm, are tens to hundreds of millwatts for each at 10 kHz, corresponding to a total conversion efficiency of 8.72%.

  13. A multi-wavelength LIDAR system based on an erbium-doped fiber MOPA-system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Töws, Albert; Kurtz, Alfred

    2014-10-01

    A multi-wavelength fiber based MOPA-system is proposed to increase performance of coherent Doppler lidar systems. The setup of the four-wavelength lidar system is described and characterized. We show that the speckle patterns of each wavelength are uncorrelated. The measured Goodman's M-parameter is 3.8 for four wavelengths, using hard target reflections. Atmospheric measurements show uncorrelated speckle patterns as well. Consequently, the precision of the measured wind velocity can be improved by a factor of two.

  14. SOA-based multi-wavelength laser using fiber Bragg gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, H.; Sulaiman, A. H.; Shahi, S.; Harun, S. W.

    2009-05-01

    We propose and experimentally demonstrate a triple-wavelength fiber ring laser using a semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA) in conjunction with a series of fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs). The three channels operate at 1554.4, 1555.3, and 1556.1 nm with a peak power above -25 dBm and optical signal-to-noise (OSNR) above 30 dB at SOA drive current of 350 mA under the room temperature. The proposed laser configuration has the advantages of a simple and compact structure, multi-wavelength operation and the system can be upgraded to generate more wavelengths by increasing the number of FBG used.

  15. Novel multi wavelength sensor concept to measure carboxy- and methemoglobin concentration non-invasively

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timm, Ulrich; Kraitl, Jens; Gewiss, Helge; Kamysek, Svend; Brock, Beate; Ewald, Hartmut

    2016-03-01

    This paper will describe a novel multi-wavelength photometric method to measure carboxyhemoglobin (COHb) and methemoglobin (MetHb) concentration non-invasively. COHb and MetHb are so called dysfunctional hemoglobin derivatives and they are not able to carry oxygen. Standard pulse oximeters are only able to measure two derivatives, namely oxyhemoglobin (O2Hb) and deoxyhemoglobin (HHb) but the presence of other derivatives in the blood may distort the readings. The paper presents a new approach of a noninvasive sensor system to measure COHb and MetHb and the validation in vivo and in vitro.

  16. Integrated 10 Gb/s AWG-based correlator for multi-wavelength optical header recognition.

    PubMed

    Aljada, Muhsen; Alameh, Kamal E

    2008-03-31

    In this paper we experimentally demonstrate a novel optical correlator employing dual integrated Arrayed Waveguide Grating (AWG) in conjunction with variable delay lines. The variable delay lines provide wavelength-dependent time delays and generate a wavelength profile that matches arbitrary bit patterns, whereas the AWGs are used to demultiplex and multiplex the wavelength components of the multi-wavelength header bit pattern. The recognition of 4-bit optical patterns at different wavelengths is experimentally demonstrated at 10 Gb/s by showing that the correlator produces an autocorrelation waveform of high peak whenever the input bit pattern matches the wavelengths profile, and a low-amplitude cross-correlation function otherwise.

  17. Multi-wavelength erbium-doped fiber laser based on random distributed feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yuanyang; Dong, Xinyong; Jiang, Meng; Yu, Xia; Shum, Ping

    2016-09-01

    We experimentally demonstrated a multi-wavelength erbium-doped fiber laser based on random distributed feedback via a 20-km-long single-mode fiber together with a Sagnac loop mirror. The number of channels can be modulated from 2 to 8 at room temperature when the pump power is changed from 30 to 180 mW, indicating that wavelength competition caused by homogenous gain broadening of erbium-doped fiber is significantly suppressed. Other advantages of the laser include low cost, low-threshold pump power and simple fabrication.

  18. Linear FBG Temperature Sensor Interrogation with Fabry-Perot ITU Multi-wavelength Reference

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hyoung-Jun; Song, Minho

    2008-01-01

    The equidistantly spaced multi-passbands of a Fabry-Perot ITU filter are used as an efficient multi-wavelength reference for fiber Bragg grating sensor demodulation. To compensate for the nonlinear wavelength tuning effect in the FBG sensor demodulator, a polynomial fitting algorithm was applied to the temporal peaks of the wavelength-scanned ITU filter. The fitted wavelength values are assigned to the peak locations of the FBG sensor reflections, obtaining constant accuracy, regardless of the wavelength scan range and frequency. A linearity error of about 0.18% against a reference thermocouple thermometer was obtained with the suggested method. PMID:27873898

  19. Switchable multi-wavelength Tm-doped mode-locked fiber laser.

    PubMed

    Yan, Zhiyu; Tang, Yulong; Sun, Biao; Liu, Tao; Li, Xiaohui; Ping, Perry Shum; Yu, Xia; Zhang, Ying; Wang, Qi Jie

    2015-05-01

    We propose and demonstrate for the first time a switchable tri-wavelength Tm-doped ultra-fast fiber laser based on nonlinear polarization evolution (NPE) technique. The NPE effect induces wavelength-dependent loss in the cavity that changes the homogeneous broadening of the effective gain to become inhomogeneous. This inhomogeneous effective gain spectral profile enables the multi-wavelength mode locking. Binary control of three bits can be realized by controlling the polarization in the compact fiber ring cavity. Such switchable laser has potential applications in optical signal processing and communication.

  20. Linear FBG Temperature Sensor Interrogation with Fabry-Perot ITU Multi-wavelength Reference.

    PubMed

    Park, Hyoung-Jun; Song, Minho

    2008-10-29

    The equidistantly spaced multi-passbands of a Fabry-Perot ITU filter are used as an efficient multi-wavelength reference for fiber Bragg grating sensor demodulation. To compensate for the nonlinear wavelength tuning effect in the FBG sensor demodulator, a polynomial fitting algorithm was applied to the temporal peaks of the wavelength-scanned ITU filter. The fitted wavelength values are assigned to the peak locations of the FBG sensor reflections, obtaining constant accuracy, regardless of the wavelength scan range and frequency. A linearity error of about 0.18% against a reference thermocouple thermometer was obtained with the suggested method.

  1. Design considerations for ultrasound detectors in photoacoustic breast imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Wenfeng; Piras, Daniele; Singh, Mithun K. A.; van Hespen, Johan C. G.; van Veldhoven, Spiridon; Prins, Christian; van Leeuwen, Ton G.; Steenbergen, Wiendelft; Manohar, Srirang

    2013-03-01

    The ultrasound detector is the heart of a photoacoustic imaging system. In photoacoustic imaging of the breast there is a requirement to detect tumors located a few centimeters deep in tissue, where the light is heavily attenuated. Thus a sensitive ultrasound transducer is of crucial importance. As the frequency content of photoacoustic waves are inversely proportional to the dimensions of the absorbing structures, and in tissue can range from hundreds of kHz to tens of MHz, a broadband ultrasound transducer is required centered on an optimum frequency. A single element piezoelectric transducer structurally consists of the active piezoelectric material, front- and back-matching layers and a backing layer. To have both high sensitivity and broad bandwidth, the materials, their acoustic characteristics and their dimensions should be carefully chosen. In this paper, we present design considerations of an ultrasound transducer for imaging the breast such as the detector sensitivity and frequency response, which guides the selection of active material, matching layers and their geometries. We iterate between simulation of detector performance and experimental characterization of functional models to arrive at an optimized implementation. For computer simulation, we use 1D KLM and 3D finite-element based models. The optimized detector has a large-aperture possessing a center frequency of 1 MHz with fractional bandwidth of more than 80%. The measured minimum detectable pressure is 0.5 Pa, which is two orders of magnitude lower than the detector used in the Twente photoacoustic mammoscope.

  2. Detectors for single-molecule fluorescence imaging and spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    MICHALET, X.; SIEGMUND, O.H.W.; VALLERGA, J.V.; JELINSKY, P.; MILLAUD, J.E.; WEISS, S.

    2010-01-01

    Single-molecule observation, characterization and manipulation techniques have recently come to the forefront of several research domains spanning chemistry, biology and physics. Due to the exquisite sensitivity, specificity, and unmasking of ensemble averaging, single-molecule fluorescence imaging and spectroscopy have become, in a short period of time, important tools in cell biology, biochemistry and biophysics. These methods led to new ways of thinking about biological processes such as viral infection, receptor diffusion and oligomerization, cellular signaling, protein-protein or protein-nucleic acid interactions, and molecular machines. Such achievements require a combination of several factors to be met, among which detector sensitivity and bandwidth are crucial. We examine here the needed performance of photodetectors used in these types of experiments, the current state of the art for different categories of detectors, and actual and future developments of single-photon counting detectors for single-molecule imaging and spectroscopy. PMID:20157633

  3. A Compact Imaging Detector of Polarization and Spectral Content

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rust, D. M.; Kumar, A.; Thompson, K. E.

    1993-01-01

    A new type of image detector will simultaneously analyze the polarization of light at all picture elements in a scene. The integrated Dual Imaging Detector (IDID) consists of a polarizing beam splitter bonded to a charge-coupled device (CCD), with signal-analysis circuitry and analog-to-digital converters, all integrated on a silicon chip. The polarizing beam splitter can be either a Ronchi ruling, or an array of cylindrical lenslets, bonded to a birefringent wafer. The wafer, in turn, is bonded to the CCD so that light in the two orthogonal planes of polarization falls on adjacent pairs of pixels. The use of a high-index birefringent material, e.g., rutile, allows the IDID to operate at f-numbers as high as f/3.5. Other aspects of the detector are discussed.

  4. Broadband terahertz imaging with highly sensitive silicon CMOS detectors.

    PubMed

    Schuster, Franz; Coquillat, Dominique; Videlier, Hadley; Sakowicz, Maciej; Teppe, Frédéric; Dussopt, Laurent; Giffard, Benoît; Skotnicki, Thomas; Knap, Wojciech

    2011-04-11

    This paper investigates terahertz detectors fabricated in a low-cost 130 nm silicon CMOS technology. We show that the detectors consisting of a nMOS field effect transistor as rectifying element and an integrated bow-tie coupling antenna achieve a record responsivity above 5 kV/W and a noise equivalent power below 10 pW/Hz(0.5) in the important atmospheric window around 300 GHz and at room temperature. We demonstrate furthermore that the same detectors are efficient for imaging in a very wide frequency range from ~0.27 THz up to 1.05 THz. These results pave the way towards high sensitivity focal plane arrays in silicon for terahertz imaging.

  5. Development of high resolution imaging detectors for x ray astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murray, S. S.; Schwartz, D. A.

    1992-01-01

    This final report summarizes our past activities and discusses the work performed over the period of 1 April 1990 through 1 April 1991 on x-ray optics, soft x-ray (0.1 - 10 KeV) imaging detectors, and hard x-ray (10 - 300 KeV) imaging detectors. If microchannel plates (MCPs) can be used to focus x-rays with a high efficiency and good angular resolution, they will revolutionize the field of x-ray optics. An x-ray image of a point source through an array of square MCP pores compared favorably with our ray tracing model for the MCP. Initial analysis of this image demonstrates the feasibility of MCPs for soft x-rays. Our work continues with optimizing the performance of our soft x-ray MCP imaging detectors. This work involves readout technology that should provide improved MCP readout devices (thin film crossed grid, curved, and resistive sheets), defect removal in MCPs, and photocathode optimization. In the area of hard x-ray detector development we have developed two different techniques for producing a CsI photocathode thickness of 10 to 100 microns, such that it is thick enough to absorb the high energy x-rays and still allow the photoelectrons to escape to the top MCP of a modified soft x-ray imaging detector. The methods involve vacuum depositing a thick film of CsI on a strong back, and producing a converter device that takes the place of the photocathode.

  6. A low-energy gamma-ray imaging detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yin, L. I.; Trombka, J. I.; Seltzer, S. M.

    1979-01-01

    We describe a hard-X-ray/soft-gamma-ray imaging detector, incorporating a microchannel-plate (MCP) electron multiplier for possible use in future telescopes. In contrast to previous attempts using MCP's this approach promises to achieve high quantum detection efficiencies in addition to high spatial and temporal resolution. Preliminary results indicate not only the capability of simultaneous imaging and single-photon counting, but also coarse energy resolution.

  7. Speckle imaging with the MAMA detector: Preliminary results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horch, E.; Heanue, J. F.; Morgan, J. S.; Timothy, J. G.

    1994-01-01

    We report on the first successful speckle imaging studies using the Stanford University speckle interferometry system, an instrument that uses a multianode microchannel array (MAMA) detector as the imaging device. The method of producing high-resolution images is based on the analysis of so-called 'near-axis' bispectral subplanes and follows the work of Lohmann et al. (1983). In order to improve the signal-to-noise ratio in the bispectrum, the frame-oversampling technique of Nakajima et al. (1989) is also employed. We present speckle imaging results of binary stars and other objects from V magnitude 5.5 to 11, and the quality of these images is studied. While the Stanford system is capable of good speckle imaging results, it is limited by the overall quantum efficiency of the current MAMA detector (which is due to the response of the photocathode at visible wavelengths and other detector properties) and by channel saturation of the microchannel plate. Both affect the signal-to-noise ratio of the power spectrum and bispectrum.

  8. Speckle imaging with the MAMA detector: Preliminary results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horch, E.; Heanue, J. F.; Morgan, J. S.; Timothy, J. G.

    1994-01-01

    We report on the first successful speckle imaging studies using the Stanford University speckle interferometry system, an instrument that uses a multianode microchannel array (MAMA) detector as the imaging device. The method of producing high-resolution images is based on the analysis of so-called 'near-axis' bispectral subplanes and follows the work of Lohmann et al. (1983). In order to improve the signal-to-noise ratio in the bispectrum, the frame-oversampling technique of Nakajima et al. (1989) is also employed. We present speckle imaging results of binary stars and other objects from V magnitude 5.5 to 11, and the quality of these images is studied. While the Stanford system is capable of good speckle imaging results, it is limited by the overall quantum efficiency of the current MAMA detector (which is due to the response of the photocathode at visible wavelengths and other detector properties) and by channel saturation of the microchannel plate. Both affect the signal-to-noise ratio of the power spectrum and bispectrum.

  9. MODELING MULTI-WAVELENGTH STELLAR ASTROMETRY. I. SIM LITE OBSERVATIONS OF INTERACTING BINARIES

    SciTech Connect

    Coughlin, Jeffrey L.; Harrison, Thomas E.; Gelino, Dawn M.; Ciardi, David R.; Hoard, D. W.; Wachter, Stefanie; Benedict, G. Fritz; McArthur, Barbara E.; Howell, Steve B.

    2010-07-10

    Interacting binaries (IBs) consist of a secondary star that fills or is very close to filling its Roche lobe, resulting in accretion onto the primary star, which is often, but not always, a compact object. In many cases, the primary star, secondary star, and the accretion disk can all be significant sources of luminosity. SIM Lite will only measure the photocenter of an astrometric target, and thus determining the true astrometric orbits of such systems will be difficult. We have modified the Eclipsing Light Curve code to allow us to model the flux-weighted reflex motions of IBs, in a code we call REFLUX. This code gives us sufficient flexibility to investigate nearly every configuration of IB. We find that SIM Lite will be able to determine astrometric orbits for all sufficiently bright IBs where the primary or secondary star dominates the luminosity. For systems where there are multiple components that comprise the spectrum in the optical bandpass accessible to SIM Lite, we find it is possible to obtain absolute masses for both components, although multi-wavelength photometry will be required to disentangle the multiple components. In all cases, SIM Lite will at least yield accurate inclinations and provide valuable information that will allow us to begin to understand the complex evolution of mass-transferring binaries. It is critical that SIM Lite maintains a multi-wavelength capability to allow for the proper deconvolution of the astrometric orbits in multi-component systems.

  10. Demonstration of Aerosol Property Profiling by Multi-wavelength Lidar Under Varying Relative Humidity Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whiteman, D.N.; Veselovskii, I.; Kolgotin, A.; Korenskii, M.; Andrews, E.

    2008-01-01

    The feasibility of using a multi-wavelength Mie-Raman lidar based on a tripled Nd:YAG laser for profiling aerosol physical parameters in the planetary boundary layer (PBL) under varying conditions of relative humidity (RH) is studied. The lidar quantifies three aerosol backscattering and two extinction coefficients and from these optical data the particle parameters such as concentration, size and complex refractive index are retrieved through inversion with regularization. The column-integrated, lidar-derived parameters are compared with results from the AERONET sun photometer. The lidar and sun photometer agree well in the characterization of the fine mode parameters, however the lidar shows less sensitivity to coarse mode. The lidar results reveal a strong dependence of particle properties on RH. The height regions with enhanced RH are characterized by an increase of backscattering and extinction coefficient and a decrease in the Angstrom exponent coinciding with an increase in the particle size. We present data selection techniques useful for selecting cases that can support the calculation of hygroscopic growth parameters using lidar. Hygroscopic growth factors calculated using these techniques agree with expectations despite the lack of co-located radiosonde data. Despite this limitation, the results demonstrate the potential of multi-wavelength Raman lidar technique for study of aerosol humidification process.

  11. Optical arbitrary waveform generation based on multi-wavelength semiconductor fiber ring laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Peili; Ma, Xiaolu; Shi, Weihua; Xu, Enming

    2017-09-01

    A new scheme of generating optical arbitrary waveforms based on multi-wavelength semiconductor fiber ring laser (SFRL) is proposed. In this novel scheme, a wide and flat optical frequency comb (OFC) is provided directly by multi-wavelength SFRL, whose central frequency and comb spacing are tunable. OFC generation, de-multiplexing, amplitude and phase modulation, and multiplexing are implementing in an intensity and phase tunable comb filter, as induces the merits of high spectral coherence, satisfactory waveform control and low system loss. By using the mode couple theory and the transfer matrix method, the theoretical model of the scheme is established. The impacts of amplitude control, phase control, number of spectral line, and injection current of semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA) on the waveform similarity are studied using the theoretical model. The results show that, amplitude control and phase control error should be smaller than 1% and 0.64% respectively to achieve high similarity. The similarity of the waveform is improved with the increase of the number of spectral line. When the injection current of SOA is in a certain range, the optical arbitrary waveform reaches a high similarity.

  12. MODELING MULTI-WAVELENGTH PULSE PROFILES OF THE MILLISECOND PULSAR PSR B1821–24

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Yuanjie; Shuai, Ping; Bei, Xiaomin; Chen, Shaolong; Fu, Linzhong; Huang, Liangwei; Lin, Qingqing; Meng, Jing; Wu, Yaojun; Zhang, Hengbin; Zhang, Qian; Zhang, Xinyuan; Qiao, Guojun

    2015-03-10

    PSR B1821–24 is a solitary millisecond pulsar that radiates multi-wavelength pulsed photons. It has complex radio, X-ray, and γ-ray pulse profiles with distinct peak phase separations that challenge the traditional caustic emission models. Using the single-pole annular gap model with a suitable magnetic inclination angle (α = 40°) and viewing angle (ζ = 75°), we managed to reproduce its pulse profiles of three wavebands. It is found that the middle radio peak originated from the core gap region at high altitudes, and the other two radio peaks originated from the annular gap region at relatively low altitudes. Two peaks of both X-ray and γ-ray wavebands basically originated from the annular gap region, while the γ-ray emission generated from the core gap region contributes somewhat to the first γ-ray peak. Precisely reproducing the multi-wavelength pulse profiles of PSR B1821–24 enables us to understand emission regions of distinct wavebands and justify pulsar emission models.

  13. Modelling the multi-wavelength emission of flat-spectrum radio quasar 3C 279

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Y. G.; Yang, C. Y.

    2016-04-01

    We employ a length-dependent conical jet model for the jet structure and emission properties of flat-spectrum radio quasar 3C 279 in the steady state. In the model, ultra-relativistic leptons are injected at the base of the jet and propagate along the jet structure. Non-thermal photons are produced by both synchrotron emission and inverse Compton scattering off synchrotron photons and external soft photons at each segment of the jet. We derive the total energy spectra contribution through integrating every segment. We apply the model to the quasi-simultaneous multi-wavelength observed data of two quiescent epochs. Using the observed radio data of the source, we determine the length of the jet L ˜ 100 pc and the magnetic field B0 ˜ 0.1-1 G at the base of the jet. Assuming a steady geometry of the jet structure and suitable physical parameters, we reproduce the multi-wavelength spectra during two quiescent observed epochs. Our results show that the initial γ-ray emission site is ˜0.5 pc from the black hole.

  14. Application of spectral unmixing in multi-wavelength time-resolved spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chorvat, D., Jr.; Mateasik, A.; Kirchnerova, J.; Chorvatova, A.

    2007-09-01

    We present a new approach for analysis of multi-wavelength time-resolved spectroscopy data, based on sequential spectral unmixing. Principal component analysis was used to identify the number and spectral profiles of the main components of intrinsic flavin signal in multi-wavelength time-resolved fluorescence recordings from isolated living cardiac myocytes. To determine these components, natural variations in the cardiomyocyte autofluorescence spectra were induced by modulators of mitochondrial metabolism and respiration. Using aforementioned approach we have identified two main components of intrinsic flavin emission in cardiac myocytes. The first component show emission maximum at 486-504 nm and mean lifetime of 1.2 nanoseconds, the second component with peak at 522 nm has two-exponential decay with fluorescence lifetimes of 0.3 and 3.1 nanoseconds. Comparison of gathered new results to our previous studies of flavins in vitro and in cardiac cells clearly points to the fact that the estimated spectral components correspond to flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) bound to enzyme(s) of mitochondrial metabolic chain, and to free FAD, respectively.

  15. Double spacing multi-wavelength L-band Brillouin erbium fiber laser with Raman pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, B. A.; Al-Alimi, A. W.; Abas, A. F.; Mokhtar, M.; Harun, S. W.; Mahdi, M. A.

    2012-11-01

    A new multi-wavelength Brillouin erbium fiber laser (BEFL), which operates in the L-band region with double frequency Brillouin spacing, is demonstrated. This design uses a Raman pump (RP) and a piece of 2 km highly nonlinear fiber as a gain medium. The double frequency spacing is achieved by employing a dual ring configuration, which is formed by utilizing a four-port circulator that removes the odd-order Stoke signals. Twenty Stokes and seventeen anti-Stokes lines, which have optical signal to noise ratio (OSNR) greater than 15 dB, are generated simultaneously with a spacing of 0.16 nm when Brillouin pump and RP powers were fixed at the optimum values of 8 dBm and 40 mW, respectively. The BEFL can be tuned in the range between 1591 nm to 1618 nm. The proposed configuration increases the number of lines generated and the OSNR, and thus allows a compact multi-wavelength laser source to be realized.

  16. [Measurement of multi-wavelength pulse oxygen saturation based on dynamic spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao-Fei; Zhao, Wen-Jun

    2014-05-01

    The present paper puts forward multi-wavelength pulse oxygen saturation measurement based on dynamic spectroscopy to do the non-invasive determination of oxygen saturation. Compared to conventional ways, the new method makes full use of more wavelengths light and improves the measurement accuracy. During the experiment, the in-vivo measurements were carried out on 60 patients and their spectroscopic data were collected by the high sensitivity type fiber optic spectrometer. Singletrial estimation method was used to extract the dynamic spectroscopy at the wavelengths of 606. 44 approximately 987. 55 nm. Oxygen saturation obtained from arterial blood gas analysis is regarded as the true value. Synergy interval partial least square (siPLS) was used to establish the calibration model of subjects' oxygen saturation values against dynamic spectroscopy data. The relative error of prediction is +/-0. 017 6, but the relative error of the subjects in the same set measured by the patient monitor which was two-wavelength measure system is +/-0. 116 4. Measurement results show that the use of the high sensitivity type fiber optic spectrometer to collect multi-wavelength spectroscopic data and dynamic spectroscopy method to process data can do better in improving the accuracy of the oxygen saturation measurement.

  17. Multi-wavelength polarimetry: a powerful tool to study the physics of active galactic nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goosmann, R. W.

    2009-11-01

    Accreting supermassive black holes reside in a very complex environment and the inner structure and dynamics of active galactic nuclei (AGN) are not well understood yet. In this note, I point out the important role that multi-wavelength polarimetry can play in understanding AGN. In addition to spectroscopy, the measurement of the polarization percentage and position angle provides two more observables that are sensitive to the geometry and kinematics of emission and scattering regions. Furthermore, time-dependent polarimetry allows to measure spatial distances between emission regions and scattering mirrors by applying a reverberation technique. For radiation coming from the direct vicinity of the black hole, the polarization also contains information about the space-time metric. Spectropolarimetry observations of AGN are obtained in the radio, the infrared, the optical, and the ultraviolet wave bands and in the future they are going be available also in the X-ray range. To interpret these observations in a coherent way, it is necessary to study models that do not only reproduce the broad-band spectroscopy properties of AGN but also their multi-wavelength polarization signature. I present a first step towards such models for the case of radio-quiet AGN. The modeling reveals the optical/UV and X-ray polarization properties of the reprocessed radiation coming from the obscuring torus. The discussion about the implications of such models includes prospects for the up-coming technique of X-ray (spectro-)polarimetry.

  18. Novel detector for portal imaging in radiation therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostling, Janina; Wallmark, M.; Brahme, Anders; Danielsson, Mats; Iacobaeus, Christian; Fonte, P.; Peskov, Vladimir N.

    2000-04-01

    We are developing a novel concept for portal imaging that would allow for on-line control and verification of the radiation treatment of cancer patients both at diagnostic and therapeutic energies. This device will consist of two consecutive detectors confided in one gas chamber: a KeV- photon detector, which can visualize the internal soft tissue of the patient, and an MeV-photon detector, which will measure the absolute intensity of the therapeutic beam and its position with respect to the tumor and normal tissues. Both detectors are based on gas and solid photon to electron converters combined with recently invented gas electron multipliers. The device will have a common charge collecting pad-type readout plate equipped with ASIC-based electronics for both detectors. A first simplified prototype device has recently been built and extensively tested. Special efforts were made to find conditions for a safe and reliable operation of the readout electronics that can be damaged by plasma-type discharge effects induced specially at high dose rates. Results obtained so far indicate that our new detector concept may satisfy all requirements on advanced therapy beam monitoring systems.

  19. Energy dispersive photon counting detectors for breast imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barber, William C.; Wessel, Jan C.; Malakhov, Nail; Wawrzyniak, Gregor; Hartsough, Neal E.; Gandhi, Thulasidharan; Nygard, Einar; Iwanczyk, Jan S.

    2013-09-01

    We report on our efforts toward the development of silicon (Si) strip detectors for energy-resolved clinical breast imaging. Typically, x-ray integrating detectors based on scintillating cesium iodide CsI(Tl) or amorphous selenium (a- Se) are used in most commercial systems. Recently, mammography instrumentation has been introduced based on photon counting silicon Si strip detectors. Mammography requires high flux from the x-ray generator, therefore, in order to achieve energy resolved single photon counting, a high output count rate (OCR) for the detector must be achieved at the required spatial resolution and across the required dynamic range for the application. The required performance in terms of the OCR, spatial resolution, and dynamic range must be obtained with sufficient field of view (FOV) for the application thus requiring the tiling of pixel arrays and scanning techniques. Room temperature semiconductors, operating as direct conversion x-ray sensors, can provide the required speed when connected to application specific integrated circuits (ASICs) operating at fast peaking times with multiple fixed thresholds per pixel, provided that the sensors are designed for rapid signal formation across the x-ray energy ranges of the application at the required energy and spatial resolutions. We present our methods and results from the optimization of prototype detectors based on Si strip structures. We describe the detector optimization and the development of ASIC readout electronics that provide the required spatial resolution, low noise, high count rate capabilities and minimal power consumption.

  20. Autoradiography Imaging in Targeted Alpha Therapy with Timepix Detector

    PubMed Central

    AL Darwish, Ruqaya; Staudacher, Alexander Hugo; Bezak, Eva; Brown, Michael Paul

    2015-01-01

    There is a lack of data related to activity uptake and particle track distribution in targeted alpha therapy. These data are required to estimate the absorbed dose on a cellular level as alpha particles have a limited range and traverse only a few cells. Tracking of individual alpha particles is possible using the Timepix semiconductor radiation detector. We investigated the feasibility of imaging alpha particle emissions in tumour sections from mice treated with Thorium-227 (using APOMAB), with and without prior chemotherapy and Timepix detector. Additionally, the sensitivity of the Timepix detector to monitor variations in tumour uptake based on the necrotic tissue volume was also studied. Compartmental analysis model was used, based on the obtained imaging data, to assess the Th-227 uptake. Results show that alpha particle, photon, electron, and muon tracks were detected and resolved by Timepix detector. The current study demonstrated that individual alpha particle emissions, resulting from targeted alpha therapy, can be visualised and quantified using Timepix detector. Furthermore, the variations in the uptake based on the tumour necrotic volume have been observed with four times higher uptake for tumours pretreated with chemotherapy than for those without chemotherapy. PMID:25688285

  1. Autoradiography imaging in targeted alpha therapy with Timepix detector.

    PubMed

    A L Darwish, Ruqaya; Staudacher, Alexander Hugo; Bezak, Eva; Brown, Michael Paul

    2015-01-01

    There is a lack of data related to activity uptake and particle track distribution in targeted alpha therapy. These data are required to estimate the absorbed dose on a cellular level as alpha particles have a limited range and traverse only a few cells. Tracking of individual alpha particles is possible using the Timepix semiconductor radiation detector. We investigated the feasibility of imaging alpha particle emissions in tumour sections from mice treated with Thorium-227 (using APOMAB), with and without prior chemotherapy and Timepix detector. Additionally, the sensitivity of the Timepix detector to monitor variations in tumour uptake based on the necrotic tissue volume was also studied. Compartmental analysis model was used, based on the obtained imaging data, to assess the Th-227 uptake. Results show that alpha particle, photon, electron, and muon tracks were detected and resolved by Timepix detector. The current study demonstrated that individual alpha particle emissions, resulting from targeted alpha therapy, can be visualised and quantified using Timepix detector. Furthermore, the variations in the uptake based on the tumour necrotic volume have been observed with four times higher uptake for tumours pretreated with chemotherapy than for those without chemotherapy.

  2. Study on the thermal imaging application of quantum cascade detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhai, Shen-Qiang; Liu, Jun-Qi; Wang, Xue-Jiao; Tan, Song; Liu, Feng-Qi; Wang, Zhan-Guo

    2014-03-01

    A 2D mechanical scanning setup was constructed, and was used to evaluate the potential of quantum cascade detector (QCD) for IR imaging. The peak responsivity of the studied QCD is 22.3 mA/W at 9.3 μm, and the Noise Equivalent Power (NEP) reaches 6.7×10-10W/Hz at temperature of 82 K. The Noise Equivalent Temperature Difference (NETD) for this imaging system is estimated to be 102.6 mK. With this experimental setup, thermal images of an operating electric soldering iron and a projection lamp at about 310 K are obtained. The image of the projection lamp demonstrates the feasibility of human body imaging with this QCD. Our research provides a proof-of-concept demonstration of thermal imaging with QCDs and displays that QCDs are potentially useful for thermal imaging applications.

  3. SWIR hyperspectral imaging detector for surface residues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Matthew P.; Mangold, Paul; Gomer, Nathaniel; Klueva, Oksana; Treado, Patrick

    2013-05-01

    ChemImage has developed a SWIR Hyperspectral Imaging (HSI) sensor which uses hyperspectral imaging for wide area surveillance and standoff detection of surface residues. Existing detection technologies often require close proximity for sensing or detecting, endangering operators and costly equipment. Furthermore, most of the existing sensors do not support autonomous, real-time, mobile platform based detection of threats. The SWIR HSI sensor provides real-time standoff detection of surface residues. The SWIR HSI sensor provides wide area surveillance and HSI capability enabled by liquid crystal tunable filter technology. Easy-to-use detection software with a simple, intuitive user interface produces automated alarms and real-time display of threat and type. The system has potential to be used for the detection of variety of threats including chemicals and illicit drug substances and allows for easy updates in the field for detection of new hazardous materials. SWIR HSI technology could be used by law enforcement for standoff screening of suspicious locations and vehicles in pursuit of illegal labs or combat engineers to support route-clearance applications- ultimately to save the lives of soldiers and civilians. In this paper, results from a SWIR HSI sensor, which include detection of various materials in bulk form, as well as residue amounts on vehicles, people and other surfaces, will be discussed.

  4. A Multi-wavelength Look At Dust Evolution At z 0.16, 0.24 And 0.32

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Carolynn A.; Dale, D. A.; Barlow, R. J.; Cohen, S. A.; Cook, D.; Johnson, L. C.; Kattner, S. M.; Schuster, M. D.; Staudaher, S.; Thatcher, J. W.

    2009-01-01

    We report results from the Wyoming Survey for Hα (WySH), a comprehensive four-square degree survey to probe the evolution of star-forming galaxies over the latter half of the age of the Universe. We have supplemented the Hα data from WySH with infrared data from the Spitzer Wide-area Infrared Extragalactic Survey (SWIRE) and ultraviolet data from the Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX) Deep Imaging Survey. This dataset provides a multi-wavelength look at the evolution of dust extinction, and here we compare a traditional measure of dust extinction (TIR/FUV) to a more recent diagnostic, [L(Hα) + 0.031L(24μm)]/L(Hα), which is based on a new robust star formation rate (SFR) indicator, SFR[Hα+24μm]. With such data over multiple epochs, the evolution in dust extinction with redshift can be assessed. We present preliminary results from the ELAIS-N1 and Lockman Hole regions at z 0.16, 0.24, and 0.32. This research has been funded by the National Science Foundation and the Wyoming Space Grant Consortium.

  5. DUNBID, the Delft University neutron backscattering imaging detector.

    PubMed

    Bom, V R; van Eijk, C W E; Ali, M A

    2005-01-01

    In the search for low-metallic land mines, the neutron backscattering technique may be applied if the soil is sufficiently dry. An advantage of this method is the speed of detection: the scanning speed may be made comparable to that of a metal detector. A two-dimensional position sensitive detector is tested to obtain an image of the back scattered thermal neutron radiation. Results of experiments using a radionuclide neutron source are presented. The on-mine to no-mine signal ratio can be improved by the application of a window on the neutron time-of-flight. Results using a pulsed neutron generator are also presented.

  6. The Edge Detectors Suitable for Retinal OCT Image Segmentation

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jing; Gao, Qian; Zhou, Sheng

    2017-01-01

    Retinal layer thickness measurement offers important information for reliable diagnosis of retinal diseases and for the evaluation of disease development and medical treatment responses. This task critically depends on the accurate edge detection of the retinal layers in OCT images. Here, we intended to search for the most suitable edge detectors for the retinal OCT image segmentation task. The three most promising edge detection algorithms were identified in the related literature: Canny edge detector, the two-pass method, and the EdgeFlow technique. The quantitative evaluation results show that the two-pass method outperforms consistently the Canny detector and the EdgeFlow technique in delineating the retinal layer boundaries in the OCT images. In addition, the mean localization deviation metrics show that the two-pass method caused the smallest edge shifting problem. These findings suggest that the two-pass method is the best among the three algorithms for detecting retinal layer boundaries. The overall better performance of Canny and two-pass methods over EdgeFlow technique implies that the OCT images contain more intensity gradient information than texture changes along the retinal layer boundaries. The results will guide our future efforts in the quantitative analysis of retinal OCT images for the effective use of OCT technologies in the field of ophthalmology.

  7. Detector defect correction of medical images on graphics processors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Membarth, Richard; Hannig, Frank; Teich, Jürgen; Litz, Gerhard; Hornegger, Heinz

    2011-03-01

    The ever increasing complexity and power dissipation of computer architectures in the last decade blazed the trail for more power efficient parallel architectures. Hence, such architectures like field-programmable gate arrays (FPGAs) and particular graphics cards attained great interest and are consequently adopted for parallel execution of many number crunching loop programs from fields like image processing or linear algebra. However, there is little effort to deploy barely computational, but memory intensive applications to graphics hardware. This paper considers a memory intensive detector defect correction pipeline for medical imaging with strict latency requirements. The image pipeline compensates for different effects caused by the detector during exposure of X-ray images and calculates parameters to control the subsequent dosage. So far, dedicated hardware setups with special processors like DSPs were used for such critical processing. We show that this is today feasible with commodity graphics hardware. Using CUDA as programming model, it is demonstrated that the detector defect correction pipeline consisting of more than ten algorithms is significantly accelerated and that a speedup of 20x can be achieved on NVIDIA's Quadro FX 5800 compared to our reference implementation. For deployment in a streaming application with steadily new incoming data, it is shown that the memory transfer overhead of successive images to the graphics card memory is reduced by 83% using double buffering.

  8. Multi-pinhole SPECT Imaging with Silicon Strip Detectors

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, Todd E.; Shokouhi, Sepideh; Furenlid, Lars R.; Wilson, Donald W.

    2010-01-01

    Silicon double-sided strip detectors offer outstanding instrinsic spatial resolution with reasonable detection efficiency for iodine-125 emissions. This spatial resolution allows for multiple-pinhole imaging at low magnification, minimizing the problem of multiplexing. We have conducted imaging studies using a prototype system that utilizes a detector of 300-micrometer thickness and 50-micrometer strip pitch together with a 23-pinhole collimator. These studies include an investigation of the synthetic-collimator imaging approach, which combines multiple-pinhole projections acquired at multiple magnifications to obtain tomographic reconstructions from limited-angle data using the ML-EM algorithm. Sub-millimeter spatial resolution was obtained, demonstrating the basic validity of this approach. PMID:20953300

  9. Pixel detectors for x-ray imaging spectroscopy in space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Treis, J.; Andritschke, R.; Hartmann, R.; Herrmann, S.; Holl, P.; Lauf, T.; Lechner, P.; Lutz, G.; Meidinger, N.; Porro, M.; Richter, R. H.; Schopper, F.; Soltau, H.; Strüder, L.

    2009-03-01

    Pixelated semiconductor detectors for X-ray imaging spectroscopy are foreseen as key components of the payload of various future space missions exploring the x-ray sky. Located on the platform of the new Spectrum-Roentgen-Gamma satellite, the eROSITA (extended Roentgen Survey with an Imaging Telescope Array) instrument will perform an imaging all-sky survey up to an X-ray energy of 10 keV with unprecedented spectral and angular resolution. The instrument will consist of seven parallel oriented mirror modules each having its own pnCCD camera in the focus. The satellite born X-ray observatory SIMBOL-X will be the first mission to use formation-flying techniques to implement an X-ray telescope with an unprecedented focal length of around 20 m. The detector instrumentation consists of separate high- and low energy detectors, a monolithic 128 × 128 DEPFET macropixel array and a pixellated CdZTe detector respectively, making energy band between 0.5 to 80 keV accessible. A similar concept is proposed for the next generation X-ray observatory IXO. Finally, the MIXS (Mercury Imaging X-ray Spectrometer) instrument on the European Mercury exploration mission BepiColombo will use DEPFET macropixel arrays together with a small X-ray telescope to perform a spatially resolved planetary XRF analysis of Mercury's crust. Here, the mission concepts and their scientific targets are briefly discussed, and the resulting requirements on the detector devices together with the implementation strategies are shown.

  10. Imaging MAMA detector systems. [Multi-Anode Microchannel Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slater, David C.; Timothy, J. G.; Morgan, Jeffrey S.; Kasle, David B.

    1990-01-01

    Imaging multianode microchannel array (MAMA) detector systems with 1024 x 1024 pixel formats have been produced for visible and UV wavelengths; the UV types employ 'solar blind' photocathodes whose detective quantum efficiencies are significantly higher than those of currently available CCDs operating at far-UV and EUV wavelengths. Attention is presently given to the configurations and performance capabilities of state-of-the-art MAMA detectors, with a view to the development requirements of the hybrid electronic circuits needed for forthcoming spacecraft-sensor applications. Gain, dark noise, uniformity, and dynamic range performance data are presented for the curved-channel 'chevron', 'Z-plate', and helical-channel high gain microchannel plate configurations that are currently under evaluation with MAMA detector systems.

  11. Imaging MAMA detector systems. [Multi-Anode Microchannel Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slater, David C.; Timothy, J. G.; Morgan, Jeffrey S.; Kasle, David B.

    1990-01-01

    Imaging multianode microchannel array (MAMA) detector systems with 1024 x 1024 pixel formats have been produced for visible and UV wavelengths; the UV types employ 'solar blind' photocathodes whose detective quantum efficiencies are significantly higher than those of currently available CCDs operating at far-UV and EUV wavelengths. Attention is presently given to the configurations and performance capabilities of state-of-the-art MAMA detectors, with a view to the development requirements of the hybrid electronic circuits needed for forthcoming spacecraft-sensor applications. Gain, dark noise, uniformity, and dynamic range performance data are presented for the curved-channel 'chevron', 'Z-plate', and helical-channel high gain microchannel plate configurations that are currently under evaluation with MAMA detector systems.

  12. A semiconductor radiation imaging pixel detector for space radiation dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Kroupa, Martin; Bahadori, Amir; Campbell-Ricketts, Thomas; Empl, Anton; Hoang, Son Minh; Idarraga-Munoz, John; Rios, Ryan; Semones, Edward; Stoffle, Nicholas; Tlustos, Lukas; Turecek, Daniel; Pinsky, Lawrence

    2015-07-01

    Progress in the development of high-performance semiconductor radiation imaging pixel detectors based on technologies developed for use in high-energy physics applications has enabled the development of a completely new generation of compact low-power active dosimeters and area monitors for use in space radiation environments. Such detectors can provide real-time information concerning radiation exposure, along with detailed analysis of the individual particles incident on the active medium. Recent results from the deployment of detectors based on the Timepix from the CERN-based Medipix2 Collaboration on the International Space Station (ISS) are reviewed, along with a glimpse of developments to come. Preliminary results from Orion MPCV Exploration Flight Test 1 are also presented. Copyright © 2015 The Committee on Space Research (COSPAR). All rights reserved.

  13. Imaging performance of the hybrid pixel detectors XPAD3-S

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunner, F. Cassol; Clemens, J. C.; Hemmer, C.; Morel, C.

    2009-03-01

    Hybrid pixel detectors, originally developed for tracking particles in high-energy physics experiments, have recently been used in material sciences and macromolecular crystallography. Their capability to count single photons and to apply a threshold on the photon energy suggests that they could be optimal digital x-ray detectors in low energy beams such as for small animal computed tomography (CT). To investigate this issue, we have studied the imaging performance of photon counting hybrid pixel detectors based on the XPAD3-S chip. Two detectors are considered, connected either to a Si or to a CdTe sensor, the latter being of interest for its higher efficiency. Both a standard 'International Electrotechnical Commission' (IEC) mammography beam and a beam used for mouse CT results published in the literature are employed. The detector stability, linearity and noise are investigated as a function of the dose for several imaging exposures (~0.1-400 µGy). The perfect linearity of both detectors is confirmed, but an increase in internal noise for counting statistics higher than ~5000 photons has been found, corresponding to exposures above ~110 µGy and ~50 µGy for the Si and CdTe sensors, respectively. The noise power spectrum (NPS), the modulation transfer function (MTF) and the detective quantum efficiency (DQE) are then measured for two energy threshold configurations (5 keV and 18 keV) and three doses (~3, 30 and 300 µGy), in order to obtain a complete estimation of the detector performances. In general, the CdTe sensor shows a clear superiority with a maximal DQE(0) of ~1, thanks to its high efficiency (~100%). The DQE of the Si sensor is more dependent on the radiation quality, due to the energy dependence of its efficiency its maximum is ~0.4 with respect to the softer radiation. Finally, we compare the XPAD3-S DQE with published curves of other digital devices in a similar radiation condition. The XPAD3-S/CdTe detector appears to be the best with the highest

  14. Imaging performance of the hybrid pixel detectors XPAD3-S.

    PubMed

    Brunner, F Cassol; Clemens, J C; Hemmer, C; Morel, C

    2009-03-21

    Hybrid pixel detectors, originally developed for tracking particles in high-energy physics experiments, have recently been used in material sciences and macromolecular crystallography. Their capability to count single photons and to apply a threshold on the photon energy suggests that they could be optimal digital x-ray detectors in low energy beams such as for small animal computed tomography (CT). To investigate this issue, we have studied the imaging performance of photon counting hybrid pixel detectors based on the XPAD3-S chip. Two detectors are considered, connected either to a Si or to a CdTe sensor, the latter being of interest for its higher efficiency. Both a standard 'International Electrotechnical Commission' (IEC) mammography beam and a beam used for mouse CT results published in the literature are employed. The detector stability, linearity and noise are investigated as a function of the dose for several imaging exposures ( approximately 0.1-400 microGy). The perfect linearity of both detectors is confirmed, but an increase in internal noise for counting statistics higher than approximately 5000 photons has been found, corresponding to exposures above approximately 110 microGy and approximately 50 microGy for the Si and CdTe sensors, respectively. The noise power spectrum (NPS), the modulation transfer function (MTF) and the detective quantum efficiency (DQE) are then measured for two energy threshold configurations (5 keV and 18 keV) and three doses ( approximately 3, 30 and 300 microGy), in order to obtain a complete estimation of the detector performances. In general, the CdTe sensor shows a clear superiority with a maximal DQE(0) of approximately 1, thanks to its high efficiency ( approximately 100%). The DQE of the Si sensor is more dependent on the radiation quality, due to the energy dependence of its efficiency its maximum is approximately 0.4 with respect to the softer radiation. Finally, we compare the XPAD3-S DQE with published curves of

  15. Atmospheric aerosol characterization combining multi-wavelength Raman lidar and MAX-DOAS measurements in Gwanjgu

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chong, Jihyo; Shin, Dong Ho; Kim, Kwang Chul; Lee, Kwon-Ho; Shin, Sungkyun; Noh, Young M.; Müller, Detlef; Kim, Young J.

    2011-11-01

    Integrated approach has been adopted at the ADvanced Environmental Research Center (ADEMRC), Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology (GIST), Korea for effective monitoring of atmospheric aerosol. Various active and passive optical remote sensing techniques such as multi-wavelength (3β+2α+1δ) Raman LIDAR, sun-photometry, MAX-DOAS, and satellite retrieval have been utilized. This integrated monitoring system approach combined with in-situ surface measurement is to allow better characterization of physical and optical properties of atmospheric aerosol. Information on the vertical distribution and microphysical properties of atmospheric aerosol is important for understanding its transport characteristics as well as radiative effect. The GIST multi-wavelength (3β + 2α+1δ) Raman lidar system can measure vertical profiles of optical properties of atmospheric aerosols such as extinction coefficients at 355 and 532nm, particle backscatter coefficients at 355, 532 and 1064 nm, and depolarization ratio at 532nm. The incomplete overlap between the telescope field-of-view and beam divergence of the transmitting laser significantly affects lidar measurement, resulting in higher uncertainty near the surface where atmospheric aerosols of interest are concentrated. Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS) technique is applied as a complementary tool for the detection of atmospheric aerosols near the surface. The passive Multi-Axis DOAS (MAX-DOAS) technique uses scattered sunlight as a light source from several viewing directions. Recently developed aerosol retrieval algorithm based on O4 slant column densities (SCDs) measured at UV and visible wavelengths has been utilized to derive aerosol information (e.g., aerosol optical depth (AOD) and aerosol extinction coefficients (AECs)) in the lower troposphere. The aerosol extinction coefficient at 356 nm was retrieved for the 0-1 and 1-2 km layers based on the MAX-DOAS measurements using the retrieval algorithm

  16. An Integrated Imaging Detector of Polarization and Spectral Content

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rust, D. M.; Thompson, K. E.

    1993-01-01

    A new type of image detector has been designed to simultaneously analyze the polarization of light at all picture elements in a scene. The Integrated Dual Imaging Detector (IDID) consists of a polarizing beamsplitter bonded to a charge-coupled device (CCD), with signal-analysis circuitry and analog-to-digital converters, all integrated on a silicon chip. It should be capable of 1:10(exp 4) polarization discrimination. The IDID should simplify the design and operation of imaging polarimeters and spectroscopic imagers used, for example, in atmospheric and solar research. Innovations in the IDID include (1) two interleaved 512 x 1024-pixel imaging arrays (one for each polarization plane); (2) large dynamic range (well depth of 10(exp 6) electrons per pixel); (3) simultaneous readout of both images at 10 million pixels per second each; (4) on-chip analog signal processing to produce polarization maps in real time; (5) on-chip 10-bit A/D conversion. When used with a lithium-niobate Fabry-Perot etalon or other color filter that can encode spectral information as polarization, the IDID can collect and analyze simultaneous images at two wavelengths. Precise photometric analysis of molecular or atomic concentrations in the atmosphere is one suggested application. When used in a solar telescope, the IDID will charge the polarization, which can then be converted to maps of the vector magnetic fields on the solar surface.

  17. Terahertz detectors for long wavelength multi-spectral imaging.

    SciTech Connect

    Lyo, Sungkwun Kenneth; Wanke, Michael Clement; Reno, John Louis; Shaner, Eric Arthur; Grine, Albert D.

    2007-10-01

    The purpose of this work was to develop a wavelength tunable detector for Terahertz spectroscopy and imaging. Our approach was to utilize plasmons in the channel of a specially designed field-effect transistor called the grating-gate detector. Grating-gate detectors exhibit narrow-linewidth, broad spectral tunability through application of a gate bias, and no angular dependence in their photoresponse. As such, if suitable sensitivity can be attained, they are viable candidates for Terahertz multi-spectral focal plane arrays. When this work began, grating-gate gate detectors, while having many promising characteristics, had a noise-equivalent power (NEP) of only 10{sup -5} W/{radical}Hz. Over the duration of this project, we have obtained a true NEP of 10{sup -8} W/{radical}Hz and a scaled NEP of 10{sup -9}W/{radical}Hz. The ultimate goal for these detectors is to reach a NEP in the 10{sup -9{yields}-10}W/{radical}Hz range; we have not yet seen a roadblock to continued improvement.

  18. Electron imaging with Medipix2 hybrid pixel detector.

    PubMed

    McMullan, G; Cattermole, D M; Chen, S; Henderson, R; Llopart, X; Summerfield, C; Tlustos, L; Faruqi, A R

    2007-01-01

    The electron imaging performance of Medipix2 is described. Medipix2 is a hybrid pixel detector composed of two layers. It has a sensor layer and a layer of readout electronics, in which each 55 microm x 55 microm pixel has upper and lower energy discrimination and MHz rate counting. The sensor layer consists of a 300 microm slab of pixellated monolithic silicon and this is bonded to the readout chip. Experimental measurement of the detective quantum efficiency, DQE(0) at 120 keV shows that it can reach approximately 85% independent of electron exposure, since the detector has zero noise, and the DQE(Nyquist) can reach approximately 35% of that expected for a perfect detector (4/pi(2)). Experimental measurement of the modulation transfer function (MTF) at Nyquist resolution for 120 keV electrons using a 60 keV lower energy threshold, yields a value that is 50% of that expected for a perfect detector (2/pi). Finally, Monte Carlo simulations of electron tracks and energy deposited in adjacent pixels have been performed and used to calculate expected values for the MTF and DQE as a function of the threshold energy. The good agreement between theory and experiment allows suggestions for further improvements to be made with confidence. The present detector is already very useful for experiments that require a high DQE at very low doses.

  19. Evaluation of cassette-based digital radiography detectors using standardized image quality metrics: AAPM TG-150 Draft Image Detector Tests.

    PubMed

    Li, Guang; Greene, Travis C; Nishino, Thomas K; Willis, Charles E

    2016-09-08

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate several of the standardized image quality metrics proposed by the American Association of Physics in Medicine (AAPM) Task Group 150. The task group suggested region-of-interest (ROI)-based techniques to measure nonuniformity, minimum signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), number of anomalous pixels, and modulation transfer function (MTF). This study evaluated the effects of ROI size and layout on the image metrics by using four different ROI sets, assessed result uncertainty by repeating measurements, and compared results with two commercially available quality control tools, namely the Carestream DIRECTVIEW Total Quality Tool (TQT) and the GE Healthcare Quality Assurance Process (QAP). Seven Carestream DRX-1C (CsI) detectors on mobile DR systems and four GE FlashPad detectors in radiographic rooms were tested. Images were analyzed using MATLAB software that had been previously validated and reported. Our values for signal and SNR nonuniformity and MTF agree with values published by other investigators. Our results show that ROI size affects nonuniformity and minimum SNR measurements, but not detection of anomalous pixels. Exposure geometry affects all tested image metrics except for the MTF. TG-150 metrics in general agree with the TQT, but agree with the QAP only for local and global signal nonuniformity. The difference in SNR nonuniformity and MTF values between the TG-150 and QAP may be explained by differences in the calculation of noise and acquisition beam quality, respectively. TG-150's SNR nonuniformity metrics are also more sensitive to detector nonuniformity compared to the QAP. Our results suggest that fixed ROI size should be used for consistency because nonuniformity metrics depend on ROI size. Ideally, detector tests should be performed at the exact calibration position. If not feasible, a baseline should be established from the mean of several repeated measurements. Our study indicates that the TG-150 tests can be

  20. Hybrid CMOS SiPIN detectors as astronomical imagers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simms, Lance Michael

    Charge Coupled Devices (CCDs) have dominated optical and x-ray astronomy since their inception in 1969. Only recently, through improvements in design and fabrication methods, have imagers that use Complimentary Metal Oxide Semiconductor (CMOS) technology gained ground on CCDs in scientific imaging. We are now in the midst of an era where astronomers might begin to design optical telescope cameras that employ CMOS imagers. The first three chapters of this dissertation are primarily composed of introductory material. In them, we discuss the potential advantages that CMOS imagers offer over CCDs in astronomical applications. We compare the two technologies in terms of the standard metrics used to evaluate and compare scientific imagers: dark current, read noise, linearity, etc. We also discuss novel features of CMOS devices and the benefits they offer to astronomy. In particular, we focus on a specific kind of hybrid CMOS sensor that uses Silicon PIN photodiodes to detect optical light in order to overcome deficiencies of commercial CMOS sensors. The remaining four chapters focus on a specific type of hybrid CMOS Silicon PIN sensor: the Teledyne Hybrid Visible Silicon PIN Imager (HyViSI). In chapters four and five, results from testing HyViSI detectors in the laboratory and at the Kitt Peak 2.1m telescope are presented. We present our laboratory measurements of the standard detector metrics for a number of HyViSI devices, ranging from 1k×1k to 4k×4k format. We also include a description of the SIDECAR readout circuit that was used to control the detectors. We then show how they performed at the telescope in terms of photometry, astrometry, variability measurement, and telescope focusing and guiding. Lastly, in the final two chapters we present results on detector artifacts such as pixel crosstalk, electronic crosstalk, and image persistence. One form of pixel crosstalk that has not been discussed elsewhere in the literature, which we refer to as Interpixel Charge

  1. Tunable multi-wavelength fiber lasers based on an Opto-VLSI processor and optical amplifiers.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Feng; Alameh, Kamal; Lee, Yong Tak

    2009-12-07

    A multi-wavelength tunable fiber laser based on the use of an Opto-VLSI processor in conjunction with different optical amplifiers is proposed and experimentally demonstrated. The Opto-VLSI processor can simultaneously select any part of the gain spectrum from each optical amplifier into its associated fiber ring, leading to a multiport tunable fiber laser source. We experimentally demonstrate a 3-port tunable fiber laser source, where each output wavelength of each port can independently be tuned within the C-band with a wavelength step of about 0.05 nm. Experimental results demonstrate a laser linewidth as narrow as 0.05 nm and an optical side-mode-suppression-ratio (SMSR) of about 35 dB. The demonstrated three fiber lasers have excellent stability at room temperature and output power uniformity less than 0.5 dB over the whole C-band.

  2. Completing multi-wavelength studies of the REFLEX-DXL sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yu-Ying

    2005-10-01

    To use massive clusters as the most sensitive probes to study the evolution of cosmic structure and to test cosmological models, it is important to control the systematics of the mass--observable relations. To meet this requirements, we constructed a morphology-unbiased and volume-limited sample with a well defined flux limit, consisting of 14 distant X-ray luminous clusters in the REFLEX survey (the REFLEX-DXL sample). The sample was observed in AO1 and AO3. We published detailed studies of 13 clusters. However, the observations of RXCJ2011.3-5725 were seriously spoiled by flares. To complete the REFLEX-DXL sample to finish the multi-wavelength studies, we request a re-observation of 36 ks for RXCJ2011.3-5725.

  3. Multi-wavelength study of Galactic H II region W40

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallick, K. K.; Kumar, M. S. N.; Ojha, D. K.; Bachiller, R.; Samal, M. R.; Pirogov, Lev

    Study of Galactic H II regions is one of the vital tools in understanding the effect of high-mass star(s). Copious amount of UV photons from high-mass stars can ionise the neighbouring ISM, injecting energy and momentum, which leads to a host of interesting features. Such regions can be used as test-beds for triggered star formation theories such as radiation driven implosion and collect-and-collapse model. Tangentially, it can also be tested if such processes can lead to the formation of second generation high-mass stars. The sheer complexity of an H II region makes multi-wavelength study an imperative. In this respect, we have carried out infrared, sub-millimeter, and radio continuum analysis of the W40 Galactic H II region to decipher the global star formation scenario. We discuss the preliminary results in this talk.

  4. Multi-wavelength resonance Raman spectroscopy of bacteria to study the effects of growth condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunapareddy, Nagapratima; Grun, Jacob; Lunsford, Robert; Gillis, David; Nikitin, Sergei; Wang, Zheng

    2012-06-01

    We will examine the use of multi-wavelength UV resonance-Raman signatures to identify the effects of growth phase on different types of bacteria. Gram positive and gram-negative species, Escherichia coli, Bacillus cereus, Citrobacter koseri and Citrobacter braakii were grown to logarithmic and stationary phases in different culture media. Raman spectra of bacteria were obtained by sequential illumination of samples between 220 and 260 nm; a range which encompasses the resonance frequencies of cellular components. In addition to the information contained in the single spectrum, this two-dimensional signature contains information reflecting variations in resonance cross sections with illumination wavelength. Results of our algorithms in identifying the differences between these germs are discussed. Preliminary results indicate that growth affects the Raman signature, but not to an extent that would negate identification of the species.

  5. Yangbajing Astronomical Observatory of NAOC in Tibet: a good multi-wavelength site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jun-Jie

    2015-08-01

    Yangbajing Astronomical Station of National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Science (NAOC) is located in Yangbajing Tibet (90°31'50" E 30°06'38" N, 4300m ). It is the first professional observatory operated by NAOC for science project in Tibet. This station was established on August 17, 2011, which means that Tibet has its first astronomical observatory. There are one 3-meter in diameter submillimeter telescope CCOSMA and five 40-50 cm optical telescopes. This could lay a solid foundation for attracting more international cooperation on large telescope projects in Tibet in future. we have already tested the radio, millimeter/submillimeter and optical environment in Yangbajing. The result shows that Yangbajing station is a good desirable multi-wavelength astronomical observation site.

  6. Aerosol Properties over Southeastern China from Multi-Wavelength Raman and Depolarization Lidar Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heese, Birgit; Althausen, Dietrich; Baars, Holger; Bohlmann, Stephanie; Deng, Ruru

    2016-06-01

    A dataset of particle optical properties of highly polluted urban aerosol over the Pearl River Delta, Guangzhou, China is presented. The data were derived from multi-wavelengths Raman and depolarization lidar PollyXT and AERONET sun photometer measurements. The measurement campaign was conducted from Nov 2011 to June 2012. High aerosol optical depth was observed in the polluted atmosphere over this megacity, with a mean value of 0.54 ± 0.33 and a peak value of even 1.9. For the particle characterization the lidar ratio and the linear particle depolarization ratio, both at 532 nm, were used. The mean values of these properties are 48.0 sr ± 10.7 sr for the lidar ratio and 4%+-4% for the particle depolarization ratio, which means most depolarization measurements stayed below 10%. So far, most of these results indicate urban pollution particles mixed with particles arisen from biomass and industrial burning.

  7. Mass specific optical absorption coefficients of mineral dust components measured by a multi wavelength photoacoustic spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utry, N.; Ajtai, T.; Pintér, M.; Tombácz, E.; Illés, E.; Bozóki, Z.; Szabó, G.

    2014-09-01

    Mass specific optical absorption coefficients of various mineral dust components including silicate clays (illite, kaolin and bentonite), oxides (quartz, hematite and rutile), and carbonate (limestone) were determined at wavelengths of 1064, 532, 355 and 266 nm. These values were calculated from aerosol optical absorption coefficients measured by a multi-wavelength photoacoustic (PA) instrument, the mass concentration and the number size distribution of the generated aerosol samples as well as the size transfer functions of the measuring instruments. These results are expected to have considerable importance in global radiative forcing calculations. They can also serve as reference for validating calculated wavelength dependent imaginary parts (κ) of complex refractive indices which up to now have been typically deduced from bulk phase measurements by using indirect measurement methods. Accordingly, the presented comparison of the measured and calculated aerosol optical absorption spectra revealed the strong need for standardized sample preparation and measurement methodology in case of bulk phase measurements.

  8. Multi-wavelength Observations of Fast Infrared Flares from V404 Cygni in 2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dallilar, Yigit; Casella, Piergiorgio; Marsh, Tom; Gandhi, Poshak; Fender, Rob; Littlefair, Stuart; Eikenberry, Steve; Garner, Alan; Stelter, Deno; Dhillon, Vik; Mooley, Kunal

    2016-07-01

    We used the fast photometry mode of our new Canarias InfraRed Camera Experiment (CIRCE) on the 10.4-meter Gran Telescopio Canarias to observe V404 Cyg, a stellar mass black hole binary, on June 25, 2015 during its 2015 outburst. CIRCE provided 10Hz sampling in the Ks-band (2.2 microns) In addition, we obtained simultaneous multi wavelength data from our collaborators: three GHz radio bands from the AMI telescope and three optical/UV bands (u', g', r') from ULTRACAM on the William Herschel 4.2-meter telescope. We identify fast (1-second) IR flares with optical counterparts of varying strength/color, which we argue arise from a relativistic jet outflow. These observations provide important constraints on the emission processes and physical conditions in the jet forming region in V404 Cygni. We will discuss these results as well as their implications for relativistic jet formation around stellar-mass black holes.

  9. Multi-wavelength Observations of Fast Infrared Flares from V404 Cygni in 2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eikenberry, Stephen S.; Dallilar, Yigit; Garner, Alan; Deno Stelter, R.; Gandhi, Poshak; Dhillon, Vik; Littlefair, Stuart; Marsh, Thomas; Fender, Rob P.; Mooley, Kunal

    2016-04-01

    We used the fast photometry mode of our new Canarias InfraRed Camera Experiment (CIRCE) on the 10.4-meter Gran Telescopio Canarias to observe V404 Cyg, a stellar mass black hole binary, on June 25, 2015 during its 2015 outburst. CIRCE provided 10Hz sampling in the Ks-band (2.2 microns) In addition, we obtained simultaneous multi wavelength data from our collaborators: three GHz radio bands from the AMI telescope and three optical/UV bands (u', g', r') from ULTRACAM on the William Herschel 4.2-meter telescope. We identify fast (1-second) IR flares with optical counterparts of varying strength/color, which we argue arise from a relativistic jet outflow. These observations provide important constraints on the emission processes and physical conditions in the jet forming region in V404 Cygni. We will discuss these results as well as their implications for relativistic jet formation around stellar-mass black holes.

  10. Direct writing of tunable multi-wavelength polymer lasers on a flexible substrate.

    PubMed

    Zhai, Tianrui; Wang, Yonglu; Chen, Li; Zhang, Xinping

    2015-08-07

    Tunable multi-wavelength polymer lasers based on two-dimensional distributed feedback structures are fabricated on a transparent flexible substrate using interference ablation. A scalene triangular lattice structure was designed to support stable tri-wavelength lasing emission and was achieved through multiple exposure processes. Three wavelengths were controlled by three periods of the compound cavity. Mode competition among different cavity modes was observed by changing the pump fluence. Both a redshift and blueshift of the laser wavelength could be achieved by bending the soft substrate. These results not only provide insight into the physical mechanisms behind co-cavity polymer lasers but also introduce new laser sources and laser designs for white light lasers.

  11. Multi-wavelength Brillouin fiber laser generation using dual-pass approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parvizi, R.; Ali, N. M.; Harun, S. W.; Emami, S. D.; Ahmad, H.

    2012-03-01

    A simple and compact multi-wavelength tunable Brillouin fiber laser (BFL) in conjunction with dual-pass approach is proposed and experimentally compared with the output of a conventional single ring cavity architecture. This BFL source is demonstrated using 10 km long non-zero dispersion shifted fiber (NZ-DSF) as a Brillouin gain medium. By single ring cavity configuration, odd-order Brillouin Stokes lines appear in the backward direction with the line spacing 0.16 nm (˜20 GHz) between each two consecutive waves. However, this single ring cavity in conjunction with dual-pass configuration is able to generate Brillouin Stokes lines with 0.08 nm spacing by providing bi-directional oscillations of Brillouin waves in both forward and backward directions. With a Brillouin pump power of 15.3 dBm, approximately up to 17 Brillouin Stokes lines are generated which is tunable over 40 nm tuning range.

  12. Flexibly switchable multi-wavelength fiber optical parametric oscillator based on a Lyot-Sagnac filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, K.; Wei, Y.; Sun, B.; Wang, T.; Chen, D.

    2012-12-01

    We experimentally demonstrate a flexibly switchable multi-wavelength fiber optical parametric oscillator (MW-FOPO) by employing a highly nonlinear dispersion-shifted fiber (HNL-DSF) as the gain medium and a Lyot-Sagnac fiber ring as the comb filter. The wavelength spacing and the number of channels in the switchable MW-FOPO are adjustable by controlling the effective length of polarization maintaining fiber (PMF) segments in the intracavity Lyot-Sagnac filter. We achieve 36 lasing channels with 0.5 nm-spacing and 22 lasing channels with 0.8 nm-spacing in a wavelength range from 1541 to 1559 nm at room temperature. A comparison of the output spectra between the dual-pump MW-FOPO and single-pump MW-FOPO is presented as well.

  13. A 12 GHz wavelength spacing multi-wavelength laser source for wireless communication systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, P. C.; Shiu, R. K.; Bitew, M. A.; Chang, T. L.; Lai, C. H.; Junior, J. I.

    2017-08-01

    This paper presents a multi-wavelength laser source with 12 GHz wavelength spacing based on a single distributed feedback laser. A light wave generated from the distributed feedback laser is fed into a frequency shifter loop consisting of 50:50 coupler, dual-parallel Mach-Zehnder modulator, optical amplifier, optical filter, and polarization controller. The frequency of the input wavelength is shifted and then re-injected into the frequency shifter loop. By re-injecting the shifted wavelengths multiple times, we have generated 84 optical carriers with 12 GHz wavelength spacing and stable output power. For each channel, two wavelengths are modulated by a wireless data using the phase modulator and transmitted through a 25 km single mode fiber. In contrast to previously developed schemes, the proposed laser source does not incur DC bias drift problem. Moreover, it is a good candidate for radio-over-fiber systems to support multiple users using a single distributed feedback laser.

  14. Multi-wavelength Raman scattering of nanostructured Al-doped zinc oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russo, V.; Ghidelli, M.; Gondoni, P.; Casari, C. S.; Li Bassi, A.

    2014-02-01

    In this work we present a detailed Raman scattering investigation of zinc oxide and aluminum-doped zinc oxide (AZO) films characterized by a variety of nanoscale structures and morphologies and synthesized by pulsed laser deposition under different oxygen pressure conditions. The comparison of Raman spectra for pure ZnO and AZO films with similar morphology at the nano/mesoscale allows to investigate the relation between Raman features (peak or band positions, width, relative intensity) and material properties such as local structural order, stoichiometry, and doping. Moreover Raman measurements with three different excitation lines (532, 457, and 325 nm) point out a strong correlation between vibrational and electronic properties. This observation confirms the relevance of a multi-wavelength Raman investigation to obtain a complete structural characterization of advanced doped oxide materials.

  15. Electro-optically tunable, multi-wavelength optical parametric generators in aperiodically poled lithium niobates.

    PubMed

    Chen, Y H; Chung, H P; Chang, W K; Lyu, H T; Chang, J W; Tseng, C H

    2012-12-17

    We report on the design and demonstration of electro-optically tunable, multi-wavelength optical parametric generators (OPGs) based on aperiodically poled lithium niobate (APPLN) crystals. Two methods have been proposed to significantly enhance the electro-optic (EO) tunability of an APPLN OPG constructed by the aperiodic optical superlattice (AOS) technique. This is done by engineering the APPLN domain structure either in the crystal fabrication or in the crystal design process to increase the length or block-number difference of the two opposite-polarity domains used in the structure. Several orders of magnitude enhancement on the EO tuning rate of the APPLN OPGs constructed by the proposed techniques for simultaneous multiple signal wavelength generation over a conventional one has been demonstrated in a near infrared band (1500-1600 nm).

  16. Simultaneous multi-wavelength campaign on PKS 2005-489 in a high state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    H.E.S.S. Collaboration; Abramowski, A.; Acero, F.; Aharonian, F.; Akhperjanian, A. G.; Anton, G.; Barnacka, A.; Barres de Almeida, U.; Bazer-Bachi, A. R.; Becherini, Y.; Becker, J.; Behera, B.; Bernlöhr, K.; Bochow, A.; Boisson, C.; Bolmont, J.; Bordas, P.; Brucker, J.; Brucker, J.; Brun, F.; Brun, P.; Bulik, T.; Büsching, I.; Casanova, S.; Cerruti, M.; Chadwick, P. M.; Charbonnier, A.; Chaves, R. C. G.; Cheesebrough, A.; Chounet, L.-M.; Clapson, A. C.; Coignet, G.; Conrad, J.; Dalton, M.; Daniel, M. K.; Davids, I. D.; Degrange, B.; Deil, C.; Dickinson, H. J.; Djannati-Ataï, A.; Domainko, W.; O'C. Drury, L.; Dubois, F.; Dubus, G.; Dyks, J.; Dyrda, M.; Egberts, K.; Eger, P.; Espigat, P.; Fallon, L.; Farnier, C.; Fegan, S.; Feinstein, F.; Fernandes, M. V.; Fiasson, A.; Fontaine, G.; Förster, A.; Füßling, M.; Gabici, S.; Gallant, Y. A.; Gast, H.; Gérard, L.; Gerbig, D.; Giebels, B.; Glicenstein, J. F.; Glück, B.; Goret, P.; Göring, D.; Hague, J. D.; Hampf, D.; Hauser, M.; Heinz, S.; Heinzelmann, G.; Henri, G.; Hermann, G.; Hinton, J. A.; Hoffmann, A.; Hofmann, W.; Hofverberg, P.; Horns, D.; Jacholkowska, A.; de Jager, O. C.; Jahn, C.; Jamrozy, M.; Jung, I.; Kastendieck, M. A.; Katarzynski, K.; Katz, U.; Kaufmann, S.; Keogh, D.; Kerschhaggl, M.; Khangulyan, D.; Khélifi, B.; Klochkov, D.; Kluzniak, W.; Kneiske, T.; Komin, Nu.; Kosack, K.; Kossakowski, R.; Laffon, H.; Lamanna, G.; Lenain, J.-P.; Lennarz, D.; Lohse, T.; Lopatin, A.; Lu, C.-C.; Marandon, V.; Marcowith, A.; Masbou, J.; Maurin, D.; Maxted, N.; McComb, T. J. L.; Medina, M. C.; Méhault, J.; Nguyen, N.; Moderski, R.; Moulin, E.; Naumann-Godo, M.; de Naurois, M.; Nedbal, D.; Nekrassov, D.; Nicholas, B.; Niemiec, J.; Nolan, S. J.; Ohm, S.; Olive, J.-F.; de Oña Wilhelmi, E.; Opitz, B.; Ostrowski, M.; Oya, I.; Panter, M.; Paz Arribas, M.; Pedaletti, G.; Pelletier, G.; Petrucci, P.-O.; Pita, S.; Pühlhofer, G.; Punch, M.; Quirrenbach, A.; Raue, M.; Rayner, S. M.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Renaud, M.; de Los Reyes, R.; Rieger, F.; Ripken, J.; Rob, L.; Rosier-Lees, S.; Rowell, G.; Rudak, B.; Rulten, C. B.; Ruppel, J.; Ryde, F.; Sahakian, V.; Santangelo, A.; Schlickeiser, R.; Schöck, F. M.; Schulz, A.; Schwanke, U.; Schwarzburg, S.; Schwemmer, S.; Shalchi, A.; Sikora, M.; Skilton, J. L.; Sol, H.; Spengler, G.; Stawarz, L.; Steenkamp, R.; Stegmann, C.; Stinzing, F.; Sushch, I.; Szostek, A.; Tam, P. H.; Tavernet, J.-P.; Terrier, R.; Tibolla, O.; Tluczykont, M.; Valerius, K.; van Eldik, C.; Vasileiadis, G.; Venter, C.; Vialle, J. P.; Viana, A.; Vincent, P.; Vivier, M.; Völk, H. J.; Volpe, F.; Vorobiov, S.; Vorster, M.; Wagner, S. J.; Ward, M.; White, R.; Wierzcholska, A.; Zajczyk, A.; Zdziarski, A. A.; Zech, A.; Zechlin, H.-S.; Fermi LAT Collboration; Abdo, A. A.; Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Bechtol, K.; Bellazzini, R.; Berenji, B.; Blandford, R. D.; Bonamente, E.; Borgland, A. W.; Bregeon, J.; Brez, A.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.; Buehler, R.; Buson, S.; Caliandro, G. A.; Cameron, R. A.; Cannon, A.; Caraveo, P. A.; Carrigan, S.; Casandjian, J. M.; Cavazzuti, E.; Cecchi, C.; Çelik, Ö.; Chekhtman, A.; Cheung, C. C.; Chiang, J.; Ciprini, S.; Claus, R.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Cutini, S.; Dermer, C. D.; de Palma, F.; Do Couto E Silva, E.; Drell, P. S.; Dubois, R.; Dumora, D.; Escande, L.; Favuzzi, C.; Ferrara, E. C.; Focke, W. B.; Fortin, P.; Frailis, M.; Fukazawa, Y.; Fusco, P.; Gargano, F.; Gasparrini, D.; Gehrels, N.; Germani, S.; Giglietto, N.; Giommi, P.; Giordano, F.; Giroletti, M.; Glanzman, T.; Godfrey, G.; Grenier, I. A.; Grove, J. E.; Guiriec, S.; Hadasch, D.; Hays, E.; Horan, D.; Hughes, R. E.; Jóhannesson, G.; Johnson, A. S.; Johnson, W. N.; Kamae, T.; Katagiri, H.; Kataoka, J.; Knödlseder, J.; Kuss, M.; Lande, J.; Latronico, L.; Lee, S.-H.; Longo, F.; Loparco, F.; Lott, B.; Lovellette, M. N.; Lubrano, P.; Madejski, G. M.; Makeev, A.; Mazziotta, M. N.; McConville, W.; McEnery, J. E.; Michelson, P. F.; Mizuno, T.; Monte, C.; Monzani, M. E.; Morselli, A.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Murgia, S.; Nakamori, T.; Nishino, S.; Nolan, P. L.; Norris, J. P.; Nuss, E.; Ohsugi, T.; Okumura, A.; Omodei, N.; Orlando, E.; Ormes, J. F.; Ozaki, M.; Paneque, D.; Panetta, J. H.; Parent, D.; Pelassa, V.; Pepe, M.; Pesce-Rollins, M.; Piron, F.; Porter, T. A.; Rainò, S.; Rando, R.; Razzano, M.; Sadrozinski, H. F.-W.; Sanchez, D.; Sander, A.; Sgrò, C.; Siskind, E. J.; Smith, P. D.; Spandre, G.; Spinelli, P.; Strickman, M. S.; Suson, D. J.; Takahashi, H.; Takahashi, T.; Tanaka, T.; Thayer, J. B.; Thayer, J. G.; Thompson, D. J.; Tibaldo, L.; Torres, D. F.; Tosti, G.; Tramacere, A.; Troja, E.; Uehara, T.; Usher, T. L.; Vandenbroucke, J.; Vianello, G.; Vilchez, N.; Vitale, V.; Waite, A. P.; Wang, P.; Winer, B. L.; Wood, K. S.; Yang, Z.; Ylinen, T.; Ziegler, M.

    2011-09-01

    The high-frequency peaked BL Lac object PKS 2005-489 was the target of a multi-wavelength campaign with simultaneous observations in the TeV γ-ray (H.E.S.S.), GeV γ-ray (Fermi/LAT), X-ray (RXTE, Swift), UV (Swift) and optical (ATOM, Swift) bands. This campaign was carried out during a high flux state in the synchrotron regime. The flux in the optical and X-ray bands reached the level of the historical maxima. The hard GeV spectrum observed with Fermi/LAT connects well to the very high energy (VHE, E > 100 GeV) spectrum measured with H.E.S.S.

  17. High-Resolution Multi-Wavelength Observations of AGN Obscurers and Absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behar, Ehud

    2017-08-01

    The talk will include highlights from several of our recent multi-wavelength campaigns on AGN Outflows.New results from XMM-Newton, HST, NuStar and Swift will be shown.The fast, obscurers - transient on different time scales - which are observed in NGC 5548, and just this year in NGC 3783, will be compared with the steady, ionized absorbers that are prevalent in Seyfert galaxies.Their different roles in the AGN system and contributions to galactic feedback will be discussed and quantified.The challenge of measuring the variability of these absorbers will be exemplified at high resolution, and the best constraints will be presented.Finally, simultaneous X-ray and radio monitoring of NGC 7469 will be shown and the connection between the X-ray and radio source in this AGN will be demonstrated.

  18. Multi-channel multi-carrier generation using multi-wavelength frequency shifting recirculating loop.

    PubMed

    Li, Xinying; Yu, Jianjun; Dong, Ze; Zhang, Junwen; Shao, Yufeng; Chi, Nan

    2012-09-24

    We propose and experimentally demonstrate a novel scheme to generate optical frequency-locked multi-channel multi-carriers (MCMC), using a recirculating frequency shifter (RFS) loop based on multi-wavelength frequency shifting single side band (MWFS-SSB) modulation. In this scheme, optical subcarriers with multiple wavelengths can be generated each round. Furthermore, the generated MCMC are frequency- and phase-locked within each channel, and therefore can be effectively used for WDM superchannel. Dual-wavelength frequency shifting SSB modulation is carried out with dual-wavelength optical seed source in our experimental demonstration. Using this scheme, we successfully generate dual-channel multi-carriers, and one channel has 28 subcarriers while the other has 29 ones with 25-GHz subcarrier spacing. We also experimentally demonstrate that this kind of source can be used to carry 50-Gb/s optical polarization-division-multiplexing quadrature phase shift keying (PDM-QPSK) signal.

  19. Multi-wavelength Raman scattering of nanostructured Al-doped zinc oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Russo, V.; Ghidelli, M.; Gondoni, P.

    2014-02-21

    In this work we present a detailed Raman scattering investigation of zinc oxide and aluminum-doped zinc oxide (AZO) films characterized by a variety of nanoscale structures and morphologies and synthesized by pulsed laser deposition under different oxygen pressure conditions. The comparison of Raman spectra for pure ZnO and AZO films with similar morphology at the nano/mesoscale allows to investigate the relation between Raman features (peak or band positions, width, relative intensity) and material properties such as local structural order, stoichiometry, and doping. Moreover Raman measurements with three different excitation lines (532, 457, and 325 nm) point out a strong correlation between vibrational and electronic properties. This observation confirms the relevance of a multi-wavelength Raman investigation to obtain a complete structural characterization of advanced doped oxide materials.

  20. Measurements of aerosol and cloud layers using a multi-wavelength Elastic-Raman lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arapi, A.

    2016-12-01

    Aerosols and clouds play an important role in air-quality, weather and climate relevant studies. The discrimination of aerosol and cloud and their subtype classification are critical in the remote sensing measurements from ground and space. In this presentation, we first present the visual measurements of aloft aerosol and cloud layers from a multi-wavelength Elastic-Raman lidar this summer in New York City. Then, we implement an algorithm and Matlab codes for discriminating aerosol and cloud based on spectral dependence or attenuated color-ratio of aerosols and clouds. The color-ratios at the three-wavelength pairs and the different thresholds are examined for improving the detection sensitivity or capability. Furthermore, a wavelet-analysis technique with different scales parameter is refined to estimate the heights of aerosol and clouds. Finally, a few cases studies are shown for the algorithm evaluation.

  1. Absolute positioning by multi-wavelength interferometry referenced to the frequency comb of a femtosecond laser.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guochao; Jang, Yoon-Soo; Hyun, Sangwon; Chun, Byung Jae; Kang, Hyun Jay; Yan, Shuhua; Kim, Seung-Woo; Kim, Young-Jin

    2015-04-06

    A multi-wavelength interferometer utilizing the frequency comb of a femtosecond laser as the wavelength ruler is tested for its capability of ultra-precision positioning for machine axis control. The interferometer uses four different wavelengths phase-locked to the frequency comb and then determines the absolute position through a multi-channel scheme of detecting interference phases in parallel so as to enable fast, precise and stable measurements continuously over a few meters of axis-travel. Test results show that the proposed interferometer proves itself as a potential candidate of absolute-type position transducer needed for next-generation ultra-precision machine axis control, demonstrating linear errors of less than 61.9 nm in peak-to-valley over a 1-meter travel with an update rate of 100 Hz when compared to an incremental-type He-Ne laser interferometer.

  2. Demonstration of multi-wavelength tunable fiber lasers based on a digital micromirror device processor.

    PubMed

    Ai, Qi; Chen, Xiao; Tian, Miao; Yan, Bin-bin; Zhang, Ying; Song, Fei-jun; Chen, Gen-xiang; Sang, Xin-zhu; Wang, Yi-quan; Xiao, Feng; Alameh, Kamal

    2015-02-01

    Based on a digital micromirror device (DMD) processor as the multi-wavelength narrow-band tunable filter, we demonstrate a multi-port tunable fiber laser through experiments. The key property of this laser is that any lasing wavelength channel from any arbitrary output port can be switched independently over the whole C-band, which is only driven by single DMD chip flexibly. All outputs display an excellent tuning capacity and high consistency in the whole C-band with a 0.02 nm linewidth, 0.055 nm wavelength tuning step, and side-mode suppression ratio greater than 60 dB. Due to the automatic power control and polarization design, the power uniformity of output lasers is less than 0.008 dB and the wavelength fluctuation is below 0.02 nm within 2 h at room temperature.

  3. Application of multi-wavelength fluorometry for on-line monitoring of an anaerobic digestion process.

    PubMed

    Morel, E; Santamaria, K; Perrier, M; Guiot, S R; Tartakovsky, B

    2004-01-01

    This work examined the use of multi-wavelength fluorometry for on-line monitoring of an anaerobic digestion process. Experiments were carried out in a laboratory-scale anaerobic digestor fed with either synthetic or agricultural (cheese factory) wastewater. An in-line fiber optic probe installed in the external recirculation loop of the reactor was used to acquire fluorescence spectra with an interval of 5-10 min. The spectra were compared with analytical measurements taken at the same time to develop regression models, which were then used to predict concentrations of chemical oxygen demand, volatile fatty acids, and other key process parameters. A comparison of partial least squares (PLS), nonlinear principal components regression, and step-wise regression models on an independent set of data showed that the PLS model gave the best prediction accuracy.

  4. The astrocosmic databases for multi-wavelength and cosmological properties of extragalactic sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vavilova, I. B.; Ivashchenko, G. Yu.; Babyk, Yu. V.; Sergijenko, O.; Dobrycheva, D. V.; Torbaniuk, O. O.; Vasylenko, A. A.; Pulatova, N. G.

    2015-12-01

    The article briefly describes the new specially-oriented Astro Space databases obtained with ground-based telescopes and space observatories. As a result, multi-wavelength spectral and physical properties of galaxies and galaxy clusters were analyzed in more details, particularly 1) to study the spectral properties of quasars and the distribution of matter in intergalactic scales using Lyman-alpha forest; 2) to study galaxies (including with active nuclei), especially for the formation of large-scale structures in the Universe and influence of the environment on the internal parameters of galaxies; 3) to estimate a visible and dark matter content in galaxy clusters and to test cosmological parameters and the evolution of matter in a wide range of age of the Universe.

  5. Noctilucent cloud particle size determination based on multi-wavelength all-sky analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ugolnikov, Oleg S.; Galkin, Alexey A.; Pilgaev, Sergey V.; Roldugin, Alexey V.

    2017-10-01

    The article deals with the analysis of color distribution in noctilucent clouds (NLC) in the sky based on multi-wavelength (RGB) CCD-photometry provided with the all-sky camera in Lovozero in the north of Russia (68.0°N, 35.1°E) during the bright expanded NLC performance in the night of August 12, 2016. Small changes in the NLC color across the sky are interpreted as the atmospheric absorption and extinction effects combined with the difference in the Mie scattering functions of NLC particles for the three color channels of the camera. The method described in this paper is used to find the effective monodisperse radius of particles about 55 nm. The result of these simple and cost-effective measurements is in good agreement with previous estimations of comparable accuracy. Non-spherical particles, Gaussian and lognormal distribution of the particle size are also considered.

  6. Radiography image detector capability in MCNP4B{trademark}

    SciTech Connect

    Snow, E.C.; Court, J.D.

    1998-12-31

    For some time now, people have been interested in adding a capability to the MCNP code to provide computational simulations of imagery such as x-ray images or pinhole projections of an object from an internal or external source. The main focus of these interests are in the ability to generate the direct or source contribution to the image, in addition to the total image obtained from both scattered and direct contributions. With this ability, simulations can be done to determine methods for image enhancement or to extract a direct image from one composed of direct, scattered, and background contributions. A patch extending the existing point detector capabilities in MCNP has been created to provide radiography-type imagery as a tally option in MCNP. In addition to the patch available to MCNP4B, this feature is being considered for permanent inclusion in MCNPX, the high-energy transport version of MCNP.

  7. A linearly frequency-swept high-speed-rate multi-wavelength laser for optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qiyu; Wang, Zhaoying; Yuan, Quan; Ma, Rui; Du, Tao; Yang, Tianxin

    2017-02-01

    We proposed and demonstrated a linearly frequency-swept multi-wavelength laser source for optical coherence tomography (OCT) eliminating the need of wavenumber space resampling in the postprocessing progress. The source consists of a multi-wavelength fiber laser source (MFS) and an optical sweeping loop. In this novel laser source, an equally spaced multi-wavelength laser is swept simultaneously by a certain step each time in the frequency domain in the optical sweeping loop. The sweeping step is determined by radio frequency (RF) signal which can be precisely controlled. Thus the sweeping behavior strictly maintains a linear relationship between time and frequency. We experimentally achieved linear time-frequency sweeping at a sweeping rate of 400 kHz with our laser source.

  8. Tunable multi-wavelength SOA based linear cavity dual-output port fiber laser using Lyot-Sagnac loop mirror.

    PubMed

    Ummy, M A; Madamopoulos, N; Joyo, A; Kouar, M; Dorsinville, R

    2011-02-14

    We propose and demonstrate a simple dual port tunable from the C- to the L-band multi-wavelength fiber laser based on a SOA designed for C-band operation and fiber loop mirrors. The laser incorporates a polarization maintaining fiber in one of the fiber loop mirrors and delivers multi-wavelength operation at 9 laser lines with a wavelength separation of ~2.8 nm at room temperature. We show that the number of lasing wavelengths increases with the increase of the bias current of the SOA. Wavelength tunability from the C to L-band is achieved by exploiting the gain compression of a SOA. Stable multi-wavelength operation is achieved at room temperature without temperature compensation techniques, with measured power and the wavelength stability within < ±0.5 dB and 
±0.1 nm, respectively.

  9. A multi-wavelength fiber laser based on superimposed fiber grating and chirp fiber Bragg grating for wavelength selection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Feng; Bi, Wei-hong; Fu, Xing-hu; Jiang, Peng; Wu, Yang

    2015-11-01

    In this paper, a new type of multi-wavelength fiber laser is proposed and demonstrated experimentally. Superimposed fiber grating (SIFG) and chirp fiber Bragg grating (CFBG) are used for wavelength selection. Based on gain equalization technology, by finely adjusting the stress device in the cavity, the gain and loss are equal, so as to suppress the modal competition and achieve multi-wavelength lasing at room temperature. The experimental results show that the laser can output stable multi-wavelength lasers simultaneously. The laser coupling loss is small, the structure is simple, and it is convenient for integration, so it can be widely used in dense wavelength division multiplexing (DWDM) system and optical fiber sensors.

  10. Detector blur associated with MeV radiographic imaging systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Stuart A.; Lutz, Stephen S.; Smalley, Duane D.; Brown, Kristina K.; Danielson, Jeremy; Haines, Todd J.; Howe, Russell A.; Mitchell, Stephen E.; Morgan, Dane; Schultz, Larry J.

    2015-08-01

    We are investigating scintillator performance in radiographic imaging systems at x-ray endpoint energies of 0.4 and 2.3 MeV in single-pulse x-ray machines. The effect of scene magnification and geometric setup will be examined along with differences between the detector response of radiation and optical scatter. Previous discussion has reviewed energy absorption and efficiency of various imaging scintillators with a 2.3 MeV x-ray source. The focal point of our study is to characterize scintillator blur to refine system models. Typical detector geometries utilize thin tiled LYSO:Ce (cerium-doped lutetium yttrium orthosilicate) assembled in a composite mosaic. Properties of individual tiles are being studied to understand system resolution effects present in the experimental setup. Comparison of two different experiments with different geometric configurations is examined. Results are then compared to different scene magnifications generated in a Monte-Carlo simulation.

  11. Multi-wavelength Raman Lidar Measurements For CALIPSO Validation At CNR-IMAA EARLINET Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amodeo, A.; D'Amico, G.; Mona, L.; Pappalardo, G.

    2006-12-01

    A Raman/elastic lidar for tropospheric aerosol study is operational at CNR-IMAA (40° 36'N, 15° 44'E, 760 m above sea level) since May 2000 in the framework of EARLINET (European Aerosol Research LIdar NETwork), the first lidar network for tropospheric aerosol study on continental scale. This system provides aerosol backscatter coefficient profiles at 1064 nm, and independent measurements of aerosol extinction and backscatter coefficient profiles at 355 and 532 nm. In this way, lidar ratio (i.e. extinction to backscatter ratio) profiles at 355 and 532 nm are also obtained. In addition, the detection of components of backscattered light polarized perpendicular and parallel to the direction of the linearly polarized transmitted laser beam at 532 nm allows the measurements of the aerosol depolarization ratio vertical profiles. High quality multi-wavelength measurements (3 backscatter + 2 extinction) allow the determination of microphysical aerosol properties (refractive index, single-scattering albedo and effective particles radii), while depolarization ratio measurements give information about shape and orientation of aerosolic particles and lidar ratio measurements are important for aerosol characterization. This multi-wavelength system is optimal for the validation of CALIPSO data products: it provides a reference point for depolarization ratio and aerosol backscatter at 532 and 1064 nm measurements with the direct comparison of measurements derived from CALIPSO and our lidar system, furthermore aerosol extinction measurements at 532 nm and 355 nm and backscatter measurements at 355 nm add useful information about microphysical aerosol properties that can be used to improve the retrieval of aerosol backscatter coefficient from pure backscatter lidar. Since 14 June 2006, devoted measurements are performed at CNR-IMAA in coincidence of CALIPSO overpasses (maximum 80 km and 2 hours of spatial and temporal distance). First results of the CNR-IMAA observations for

  12. Probabilistic classification method on multi wavelength chromatographic data for photosynthetic pigments identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prilianti, K. R.; Setiawan, Y.; Indriatmoko, Adhiwibawa, M. A. S.; Limantara, L.; Brotosudarmo, T. H. P.

    2014-02-01

    Environmental and health problem caused by artificial colorant encourages the increasing usage of natural colorant nowadays. Natural colorant refers to the colorant that is derivate from living organism or minerals. Extensive research topic has been done to exploit these colorant, but recent data shows that only 0.5% of the wide range of plant pigments in the earth has been exhaustively used. Hence development of the pigment characterization technique is an important consideration. High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) is a widely used technique to separate pigments in a mixture and identify it. In former HPLC fingerprinting, pigment characterization was based on a single chromatogram from a fixed wavelength (one dimensional) and discard the information contained at other wavelength. Therefore, two dimensional fingerprints have been proposed to use more chromatographic information. Unfortunately this method leads to the data processing problem due to the size of its data matrix. The other common problem in the chromatogram analysis is the subjectivity of the researcher in recognizing the chromatogram pattern. In this research an automated analysis method of the multi wavelength chromatographic data was proposed. Principal component analysis (PCA) was used to compress the data matrix and Maximum Likelihood (ML) classification was applied to identify the chromatogram pattern of the existing pigments in a mixture. Three photosynthetic pigments were selected to show the proposed method. Those pigments are β-carotene, fucoxanthin and zeaxanthin. The result suggests that the method could well inform the existence of the pigments in a particular mixture. A simple computer application was also developed to facilitate real time analysis. Input of the application is multi wavelength chromatographic data matrix and the output is information about the existence of the three pigments.

  13. Multi-wavelength Raman Spectroscopic Study of Silica-supported Vanadium Oxide Catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Zili; Dai, Sheng; Overbury, Steven {Steve} H

    2010-01-01

    The molecular structure of silica-supported vanadium oxide (VOx) catalysts over wide range of surface VOx density (0.0002 8 V/nm2) has been investigated in detail under dehydrated condition by in situ multi-wavelength Raman spectroscopy (laser excitations at 244, 325, 442, 532, and 633 nm) and in situ UV-Vis diffuse reflectance spectroscopy. Resonance Raman scattering is clearly observed using 244 and 325-nm excitations while normal Raman scattering occurs using excitation at the three visible wavelengths. The observation of strong fundamentals, overtones and combinational bands due to selective resonance enhancement effect helps clarify assignments of some of the VOx Raman bands (920, 1032, and 1060 cm-1) whose assignments have been controversial. The resonance Raman spectra of dehydrated VOx/SiO2 show V=O band at smaller Raman shift than that in visible Raman spectra, an indication of the presence of two different surface VOx species on dehydrated SiO2 even at sub-monolayer VOx loading. Quantitative estimation shows that the two different monomeric VOx species coexist on silica surface from very low VOx loadings and transform to crystalline V2O5 at VOx loadings above monolayer. It is postulated that one of the two monomeric VOx species has pyramidal structure and the other is in partially hydroxylated pyramidal mode. The two VOx species show similar reduction-oxidation behavior and may both participate in redox reactions catalyzed by VOx/SiO2 catalysts. This study demonstrates the advantages of multi-wavelength Raman spectroscopy over conventional single-wavelength Raman spectroscopy in structural characterization of supported metal oxide catalysts.

  14. Fabrication of an X-Ray Imaging Detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alcorn, G. E.; Burgess, A. S.

    1986-01-01

    X-ray detector array yields mosaic image of object emitting 1- to 30-keV range fabricated from n-doped silicon wafer. In proposed fabrication technique, thin walls of diffused n+ dopant divide wafer into pixels of rectangular cross section, each containing central electrode of thermally migrated p-type metal. This pnn+ arrangement reduces leakage current by preventing transistor action caused by pnp structure of earlier version.

  15. Optical butting of linear infrared detector array for pushbroom imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Minpu; Ma, Wenpo

    2017-02-01

    High resolution and large FOV represents the developing trends of space optical imaging systems, Considering the characters of infrared optical systems, A low cost and low technical risk method of optical butting concept which offer the promise of butting smaller arrays into long linear detector assemblies is presented in this paper, the design method of optical butting is described, and a hypothetical system is demonstrated as well.

  16. Initial performance of the SLD Cherenkov Ring Imaging Detector system

    SciTech Connect

    Abe, K.; Hasegawa, K.; Suekane, F.; Yuta, H.; Antilogus, P.; Aston, D.; Bienz, T.; Bird, F.; Dasu, S.; Dolinsky, S.; Dunwoodie, W.; Hallewell, G.; Kawahara, H.; Kwon, Y.; Leith, D.W.G.S.; Muller, D.; Nagamine, T.; Pavel, T.J.; Ratcliff, B.; Rensing, P.; Schultz, D.; Shapiro, S.; Simopoulos, C.; Solodov, E.; Toge, N.; Va`vra, J.; Williams, S.H.; Baird, K.; Jacques, P.; Kalelkar, M.; Plano, R.; Stamer, P.; Word, G.; Bean, A.; Caldwell, D.O.; Duboscq, J.; Huber, J.; Lu, A.; Mathys, L.; McHugh, S.; Witherell, M.; Yellin, S.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Coyle, P.; Coyne, D.; Gagnon, P.; Liu, X.; Williams, D.A.; d`Oliveira, A.; Johnson, R.A.; Martinez, J.; Meadows, B.; Nussbaum, M.; Santha, A.K.S.; Shoup, A.; Sokoloff, M.; Stockdale, I.; Shank, J.; Whitaker, J.S.; Wilson, R.J.

    1991-11-01

    All of the major subsystems for the barrel Cherenkov Ring Imaging Detector (CRID) in the SLD at SLAC have now been commissioned. The CRID participated in the SLD engineering run of June--August 1991. In a cosmic ray test at the end of the run, Cherenkov rings were observed for the first time. Initial data from the CRID, including Cherenkov rings, studies of minimum ionizing particles, and data from the fiber optics calibration system are presented here.

  17. Fabrication of an X-Ray Imaging Detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alcorn, G. E.; Burgess, A. S.

    1986-01-01

    X-ray detector array yields mosaic image of object emitting 1- to 30-keV range fabricated from n-doped silicon wafer. In proposed fabrication technique, thin walls of diffused n+ dopant divide wafer into pixels of rectangular cross section, each containing central electrode of thermally migrated p-type metal. This pnn+ arrangement reduces leakage current by preventing transistor action caused by pnp structure of earlier version.

  18. SLAC Large Detector (SLD) Image and Event Display Collections

    DOE Data Explorer

    Perl, Joseph; Cowan, Ray; Johnson, Tony

    The SLD makes use of the unique capabilities of the Stanford Linear Collider (SLC) to perform studies of polarized Z particles produced in collisions between electrons and positrons. The SLD Event Display Collection shows computer generated pictures of a number of Z particle decays as reconstructed by the SLD detector. More than 90 images, each in several formats, captured from 1991 - 1996 events, are archived here. There are also figures and data plots available.

  19. Construction and testing of the SLD Cerenkov Ring Imaging Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Coyle, P.; Coyne, D.; Gagnon, P.; Williams, D.A.; Zucchelli, P. . Inst. for Particle Physics); Whitaker, J.S.; Wilson, R.J. . Dept. of Physics); Bean, A.; Caldwell, D.; Duboscq, J.; Huber, J.; Lu, A.; Mathys, L.; McHugh, S.; Morrison, R.; Witherell, M.; Yellin, S. . Dept. of Physics); Johns

    1990-01-01

    We report on the construction of the Cerenkov Ring Imaging Detector (CRID) for the SLD experiment at the SLAC Linear Collider and the testing of its components. We include results from testing the drift boxes, liquid radiator trays, and mirrors for the barrel CRID. We also discuss development of the support systems essential for the operation of the CRID: gas and liquid recirculator systems and monitoring. 15 refs., 9 figs.

  20. Mode switching in a multi-wavelength distributed feedback quantum cascade laser using an external micro-cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Sidler, Meinrad; Rauter, Patrick; Blanchard, Romain; Métivier, Pauline; Capasso, Federico; Mansuripur, Tobias S.; Wang, Christine; Huang, Yong; Ryou, Jae-Hyun; Dupuis, Russell D.; Faist, Jérôme

    2014-02-03

    We demonstrate a multi-wavelength distributed feedback (DFB) quantum cascade laser (QCL) operating in a lensless external micro-cavity and achieve switchable single-mode emission at three distinct wavelengths selected by the DFB grating, each with a side-mode suppression ratio larger than 30 dB. Discrete wavelength tuning is achieved by modulating the feedback experienced by each mode of the multi-wavelength DFB QCL, resulting from a variation of the external cavity length. This method also provides a post-fabrication control of the lasing modes to correct for fabrication inhomogeneities, in particular, related to the cleaved facets position.

  1. The RoF-WDM-PON for Wireless and Wire Layout with Multi-wavelength Fiber Laser and Carrier Reusing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Wei; Zheng, Zhuowen

    2013-09-01

    In this paper, we design a WDM-RoF-PON based on multi-wavelength fiber laser and CSRZ-DPSK, which can achieve wire-line and wireless access synchronously without any RF source in ONU. The multi-wavelength fiber laser is the union light source of WDM-PON. By the RSOA and downstream light source reusing, the ONU can also omit laser source and makes the WDM-PON to be colorless. The networking has the credible transmission property, including wireless access and fiber transmission. The networking also has excellent covering range.

  2. Switchable multi-wavelength fiber ring laser using a side-leakage photonic crystal fiber based filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Weiguo; Lou, Shuqin; Wang, Liwen; Zou, Hui; Lu, Wenliang; Jian, Shuisheng

    2012-04-01

    A switchable multi-wavelength fiber ring laser is proposed and experimentally demonstrated with a novel side-leakage photonic crystal fiber (SLPCF) based filter incorporated into the ring cavity at room temperature. Stable multi-wavelength laser operations can be achieved due to the spatial mode beating, polarization hole burning and spectral hole burning effects. By adjusting the polarization controller appropriately, the laser can be switched among the single-, dual- and triple-wavelength lasing oscillations whose signal-to-noise ratio is up to 50 dB. In addition, the lasing wavelength can be also tuned and switched by applying the strain to the filter.

  3. Hybrid Pixel Detectors for gamma/X-ray imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatzistratis, D.; Theodoratos, G.; Zografos, V.; Kazas, I.; Loukas, D.; Lambropoulos, C. P.

    2015-09-01

    Hybrid pixel detectors are made by direct converting high-Z semi-insulating single crystalline material coupled to complementary-metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) readout electronics. They are attractive because direct conversion exterminates all the problems of spatial localization related to light diffusion, energy resolution, is far superior from the combination of scintillation crystals and photomultipliers and lithography can be used to pattern electrodes with very fine pitch. We are developing 2-D pixel CMOS ASICs, connect them to pixilated CdTe crystals with the flip chip and bump bonding method and characterize the hybrids. We have designed a series of circuits, whose latest member consists of a 50×25 pixel array with 400um pitch and an embedded controller. In every pixel a full spectroscopic channel with time tagging information has been implemented. The detectors are targeting Compton scatter imaging and they can be used for coded aperture imaging too. Hybridization using CMOS can overcome the limit put on pixel circuit complexity by the use of thin film transistors (TFT) in large flat panels. Hybrid active pixel sensors are used in dental imaging and other applications (e.g. industrial CT etc.). Thus X-ray imaging can benefit from the work done on dynamic range enhancement methods developed initially for visible and infrared CMOS pixel sensors. A 2-D CMOS ASIC with 100um pixel pitch to demonstrate the feasibility of such methods in the context of X-ray imaging has been designed.

  4. Development of CRID (Cerenkov Ring Imaging Detector) single electron wire detector

    SciTech Connect

    Aston, D.; Bean, A.; Bienz, T.; Bird, F.; Caldwell, D.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Coyle, P.; Coyne, D.; Dasu, S.; Dunwoodie, W.

    1989-02-01

    We describe the R and D effort to define the design parameters, method of construction and experimental results from the single electron wire detectors. These detectors will be used for particle identification using the Cerenkov Ring Imaging techniques in the SLD experiment at SLAC. We present measurements of pulse heights for several gases as a function of gas gain, charge division performance on a single electron signal using both 7 /mu/m and 33 /mu/m diameter carbon wires, photon feedback in TMAE laden gas, average pulse shape, and its comparison with the predicted shape and cross-talk. In addition, we present results of wire aging tests, and other tests associated with construction of this unusual type of wire chamber. 12 refs., 9 figs.

  5. Image quality of digital radiography using flat detector technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ducourant, Thierry; Couder, David; Wirth, Thibaut; Trochet, J. C.; Bastiaens, Raoul J. M.; Bruijns, Tom J. C.; Luijendijk, Hans A.; Sandkamp, Bernhard; Davies, Andrew G.; Didier, Dominique; Gonzalez, Agustin; Terraz, Sylvain; Ruefenacht, Daniel

    2003-06-01

    One of the most demanding applications in dynamic X-Ray imaging is Digital Subtraction Angiography (DSA). As opposed to other applications such as Radiography or Fluoroscopy, there has been so far limited attempts to introduce DSA with flat detector (FD) technology: Up to now, only part of the very demanding requirements could be taken into account. In order to enable an introduction of FD technology also in this area, a complete understanding of all physical phenomena related to the use of this technology in DSA is necessary. This knowledge can be used for detector design and performance optimization. Areas of research include fast switching between several detector operating modes (e.g. switching between fluoroscopy and high dose exposure modes and vice versa) and non stability during the DSA run e.g. due to differences in gain between subsequent images. Furthermore, effects of local and global X-Ray overexposure (due to direct radiation), which can cause temporal artifacts such as ghosting, may have a negative impact on the image quality. Pixel shift operations and image subtraction enhance the visibility of any artifact. The use of a refresh light plays an important role in the optimization process. Both an 18x18 cm2 as well as a large area 30x40 cm2 flat panel detector are used for studying the various phenomena. Technical measurements were obtained using complex imaging sequences representing the most demanding application conditions. Studies on subtraction test objects were performed and vascular applications have been carried out in order to confirm earlier findings. The basis for comparison of DSA is, still, the existing and mature IITV technology. The results of this investigation show that the latest generation of dynamic flat detectors is capable of handling this kind of demanding application. Not only the risk areas and their solutions and points of attention will be addressed, but also the benefits of present FD technology with respect to state

  6. Upgrade of the Detector for Imaging of Explosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shekhtman, L. I.; Aulchenko, V. M.; Kudryavtsev, V. N.; Kutovenko, V. D.; Titov, V. M.; Zhulanov, V. V.; Pruuel, E. L.; Ten, K. A.; Tolochko, B. P.

    Methods of dynamic imaging of explosions at a synchrotron radiation (SR) beam and small-angle X-ray scattering experiments with exploding samples are being developed in the Siberian Synchrotron Radiation Center (SSRC) at the Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics for more than fifteen years. The detector for imaging of explosions (DIMEX) was developed for these purposes and successfully operating at the beam line 0 at the VEPP-3 storage ring and at the beam line 8 at the VEPP-4 M storage ring. The DIMEX is based on gas technology and allow to measure SR flux as a function of position and time with spatial resolution of ∼200 μm (FWHM), maximum frame rate of 2 MHz and time resolution of ∼80 ns. Maximum value of the SR flux that can be measured by the present detector corresponds to ∼5000 photons/(channel*bunch) (20 keV average energy, channel area 0.1x0.5 mm2, bunch revolution frequency 4 MHz). Maximum number of frames that can be stored in the present detector is 32 and the number of channels with 0.1 mm width is 512. In order to significantly improve the precision of data obtained by the DIMEX an upgrade of the detector has been started. The electronics of the gaseous version of the detector has been changed such that the new detector is able to operate with frame rate of 8 MHz and store data in up to 100 frames. A new ASIC was developed for this purpose called DMXG64A that includes 64 channels with low noise integrator and 100 analogue memory cells in each channel. Input charge can be stored to and read out from analogue cells with maximum frequency 10 MHz. This new version of the detector is called the DIMEX-G and is planned to be used at the VEPP-3 storage ring and for SAXS studies at the VEPP-4 M storage ring. For imaging of explosions at the beam line 8 at the VEPP-4 M storage ring, where SR flux is expected to be about 10-100 times higher than at the VEPP-3, a new detector based on Si micro-strip technology is being developed. Si micro-strip sensors with

  7. Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectroscopy and Energy-Resolving Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eisenhauer, Frank; Raab, Walfried

    2015-08-01

    Imaging spectroscopy has seen rapid progress over the past 25 years, leading to breakthroughs in many fields of astronomy that would not have been otherwise possible. This review overviews the visible/infrared imaging spectroscopy techniques as well as energy-resolving detectors. We introduce the working principle of scanning Fabry-Perot and Fourier transform spectrometers and explain the most common integral field concepts based on mirror slicers, lenslet arrays, and fibers. The main advantage of integral field spectrographs is the simultaneous measurement of spatial and spectral information. Although Fabry-Perot and Fourier transform spectrometers can provide a larger field of view, it is ultimately the higher sensitivity of integral field units that make them the technique of choice. This is arguably the case for image slicers, which make the most efficient use of the available detector pixels and have equal or higher transmission than lenslet arrays and fiber integral field units, respectively. We also address the more specific issues of large étendue operation, focal ratio degradation, anamorphic magnification, and diffraction-limited operation. This review also covers the emerging technology of energy-resolving detectors, which promise very simple and efficient instrument designs. These energy-resolving detectors are based on superconducting thin film technology and exploit either the very small superconducting energy to count the number of quasi-particles excited in the absorption of the photon or the extremely steep phase transition between the normal- and superconducting phase to measure a temperature increase. We have put special emphasis on an overview of the underlying physical phenomena as well as on the recent technological progress and astronomical path finder experiments.

  8. Phasor imaging with a widefield photon-counting detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colyer, Ryan A.; Siegmund, Oswald H. W.; Tremsin, Anton S.; Vallerga, John V.; Weiss, Shimon; Michalet, Xavier

    2012-01-01

    Fluorescence lifetime can be used as a contrast mechanism to distinguish fluorophores for localization or tracking, for studying molecular interactions, binding, assembly, and aggregation, or for observing conformational changes via Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) between donor and acceptor molecules. Fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) is thus a powerful technique but its widespread use has been hampered by demanding hardware and software requirements. FLIM data is often analyzed in terms of multicomponent fluorescence lifetime decays, which requires large signals for a good signal-to-noise ratio. This confines the approach to very low frame rates and limits the number of frames which can be acquired before bleaching the sample. Recently, a computationally efficient and intuitive graphical representation, the phasor approach, has been proposed as an alternative method for FLIM data analysis at the ensemble and single-molecule level. In this article, we illustrate the advantages of combining phasor analysis with a widefield time-resolved single photon-counting detector (the H33D detector) for FLIM applications. In particular we show that phasor analysis allows real-time subsecond identification of species by their lifetimes and rapid representation of their spatial distribution, thanks to the parallel acquisition of FLIM information over a wide field of view by the H33D detector. We also discuss possible improvements of the H33D detector's performance made possible by the simplicity of phasor analysis and its relaxed timing accuracy requirements compared to standard time-correlated single-photon counting (TCSPC) methods.

  9. Sparse Detector Imaging Sensor with Two-Class Silhouette Classification

    PubMed Central

    Russomanno, David; Chari, Srikant; Halford, Carl

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents the design and test of a simple active near-infrared sparse detector imaging sensor. The prototype of the sensor is novel in that it can capture remarkable silhouettes or profiles of a wide-variety of moving objects, including humans, animals, and vehicles using a sparse detector array comprised of only sixteen sensing elements deployed in a vertical configuration. The prototype sensor was built to collect silhouettes for a variety of objects and to evaluate several algorithms for classifying the data obtained from the sensor into two classes: human versus non-human. Initial tests show that the classification of individually sensed objects into two classes can be achieved with accuracy greater than ninety-nine percent (99%) with a subset of the sixteen detectors using a representative dataset consisting of 512 signatures. The prototype also includes a Webservice interface such that the sensor can be tasked in a network-centric environment. The sensor appears to be a low-cost alternative to traditional, high-resolution focal plane array imaging sensors for some applications. After a power optimization study, appropriate packaging, and testing with more extensive datasets, the sensor may be a good candidate for deployment in vast geographic regions for a myriad of intelligent electronic fence and persistent surveillance applications, including perimeter security scenarios. PMID:27873972

  10. A multi-wavelength scattered light analysis of the dust grain population in the GG Tau circumbinary ring

    SciTech Connect

    Duchene, G; McCabe, C; Ghez, A; Macintosh, B

    2004-02-04

    We present the first 3.8 {micro}m image of the dusty ring surrounding the young binary system GG Tau, obtained with the W. M. Keck II 10m telescope's adaptive optics system. THis is the longest wavelength at which the ring has been detected in scattered light so far, allowing a multi-wavelength analysis of the scattering proiperties of the dust grains present in this protoplanetary disk in combination with previous, shorter wavelengths, HST images. We find that the scattering phase function of the dust grains in the disk is only weakly dependent on the wavelength. This is inconsistent with dust models inferred from observations of the interstellar medium or dense molecular clouds. In particular, the strongly forward-throwing scattering phase function observed at 3.8 {micro}m implies a significant increase in the population of large ({approx}> 1 {micro}m) grains, which provides direct evidence for grain growth in the ring. However, the grain size distribution required to match the 3.8 {micro}m image of the ring is incompatible with its published 1 {micro}m polarization map, implying that the dust population is not uniform throughout the ring. We also show that our 3.8 {micro}m image of the ring is incompatible with its published 1 {micro}m polarization map, implying that the dust population is not uniform throughout the ring. We also show that our 3.8 {micro}m scattered light image probes a deeper layer of the ring than previous shorter wavelength images, as demonstrated by a shift in the location of the inner edge of the disk's scattered light distribution between 1 and 3.8 {micro}m. We therefore propose a stratified structure for the ring in which the surface layers, located {approx} 50 AU above the ring midplane, contain dust grains that are very similar to those found in dense molecular clouds, while the region of the ring located {approx} 25 AU from the midplane contains significantly larger grains. This stratified structure is likely the result of vertical

  11. Dynamic flat panel detector versus image intensifier in cardiac imaging: dose and image quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vano, E.; Geiger, B.; Schreiner, A.; Back, C.; Beissel, J.

    2005-12-01

    The practical aspects of the dosimetric and imaging performance of a digital x-ray system for cardiology procedures were evaluated. The system was configured with an image intensifier (II) and later upgraded to a dynamic flat panel detector (FD). Entrance surface air kerma (ESAK) to phantoms of 16, 20, 24 and 28 cm of polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) and the image quality of a test object were measured. Images were evaluated directly on the monitor and with numerical methods (noise and signal-to-noise ratio). Information contained in the DICOM header for dosimetry audit purposes was also tested. ESAK values per frame (or kerma rate) for the most commonly used cine and fluoroscopy modes for different PMMA thicknesses and for field sizes of 17 and 23 cm for II, and 20 and 25 cm for FD, produced similar results in the evaluated system with both technologies, ranging between 19 and 589 µGy/frame (cine) and 5 and 95 mGy min-1 (fluoroscopy). Image quality for these dose settings was better for the FD version. The 'study dosimetric report' is comprehensive, and its numerical content is sufficiently accurate. There is potential in the future to set those systems with dynamic FD to lower doses than are possible in the current II versions, especially for digital cine runs, or to benefit from improved image quality.

  12. Dynamic flat panel detector versus image intensifier in cardiac imaging: dose and image quality.

    PubMed

    Vano, E; Geiger, B; Schreiner, A; Back, C; Beissel, J

    2005-12-07

    The practical aspects of the dosimetric and imaging performance of a digital x-ray system for cardiology procedures were evaluated. The system was configured with an image intensifier (II) and later upgraded to a dynamic flat panel detector (FD). Entrance surface air kerma (ESAK) to phantoms of 16, 20, 24 and 28 cm of polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) and the image quality of a test object were measured. Images were evaluated directly on the monitor and with numerical methods (noise and signal-to-noise ratio). Information contained in the DICOM header for dosimetry audit purposes was also tested. ESAK values per frame (or kerma rate) for the most commonly used cine and fluoroscopy modes for different PMMA thicknesses and for field sizes of 17 and 23 cm for II, and 20 and 25 cm for FD, produced similar results in the evaluated system with both technologies, ranging between 19 and 589 microGy/frame (cine) and 5 and 95 mGy min(-1) (fluoroscopy). Image quality for these dose settings was better for the FD version. The 'study dosimetric report' is comprehensive, and its numerical content is sufficiently accurate. There is potential in the future to set those systems with dynamic FD to lower doses than are possible in the current II versions, especially for digital cine runs, or to benefit from improved image quality.

  13. Three dimensional imaging detector employing wavelength-shifting optical fibers

    DOEpatents

    Worstell, W.A.

    1997-02-04

    A novel detector element structure and method for its use is provided. In a preferred embodiment, one or more inorganic scintillating crystals are coupled through wavelength shifting optical fibers (WLSFs) to position sensitive photomultipliers (PS-PMTs). The superior detector configuration in accordance with this invention is designed for an array of applications in high spatial resolution gamma ray sensing with particular application to SPECT, PET and PVI imaging systems. The design provides better position resolution than prior art devices at a lower total cost. By employing wavelength shifting fibers (WLSFs), the sensor configuration of this invention can operate with a significant reduction in the number of photomultipliers and electronics channels, while potentially improving the resolution of the system by allowing three dimensional reconstruction of energy deposition positions. 11 figs.

  14. Three dimensional imaging detector employing wavelength-shifting optical fibers

    DOEpatents

    Worstell, William A.

    1997-01-01

    A novel detector element structure and method for its use is provided. In a preferred embodiment, one or more inorganic scintillating crystals are coupled through wavelength shifting optical fibers (WLSFs) to position sensitive photomultipliers (PS-PMTs). The superior detector configuration in accordance with this invention is designed for an array of applications in high spatial resolution gamma ray sensing with particular application to SPECT, PET and PVI imaging systems. The design provides better position resolution than prior art devices at a lower total cost. By employing wavelength shifting fibers (WLSFs), the sensor configuration of this invention can operate with a significant reduction in the number of photomultipliers and electronics channels, while potentially improving the resolution of the system by allowing three dimensional reconstruction of energy deposition positions.

  15. Two-dimensional Detector for High Resolution Soft X-ray Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Ejima, Takeo; Ogasawara, Shodo; Hatano, Tadashi; Yanagihara, Mihiro; Yamamoto, Masaki

    2010-06-23

    A new two-dimensional (2D) detector for detecting soft X-ray (SX) images was developed. The detector has a scintillator plate to convert a SX image into a visible (VI) one, and a relay optics to magnify and detect the converted VI image. In advance of the fabrication of the detector, quantum efficiencies of scintillators were investigated. As a result, a Ce:LYSO single crystal on which Zr thin film was deposited was used as an image conversion plate. The spatial resolution of fabricated detector is 3.0 {mu}m, and the wavelength range which the detector has sensitivity is 30-6 nm region.

  16. Space and ground-based multi-wavelength observing campaign of Jupiter's aurora and the Io Plasma Torus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Branduardi-Raymont, G.; Yoshikawa, I.; Badman, S.

    2013-09-01

    The EXCEED EUV spectrograph (55 - 145 nm) on-board the Japanese mission Sprint-A, due for launch into low Earth orbit in August 2013, will be dedicated to the study of the tenuous plasma surrounding planets in our solar system. A target of special interest will be Jupiter and its environment, and the emission from the Io Plasma Torus (IPT) in particular. A systematic campaign of observations of Jupiter and the IPT is planned over the period Oct. 2013 - March 2014. This is a unique opportunity to explore the possible links between the IPT emission distribution, the strength and character of Jupiter's auroral emissions and the conditions of the solar wind. Hence, concurrently with the EXCEED observations, a large multi-wavelength campaign has been organised to exploit this unique opportunity of gathering important diagnostic data on the complex array of physical processes taking place in Jupiter's environment. This campaign includes (this is by no means a complete list) approved FUV imaging and spectroscopy of Jupiter's Northern aurora with HSTSTIS (PI: Sarah Badman), Kitt Peak 4m visible spectroscopy of the IPT (PI: Sarah Badman), Gemini observations of Jupiter H3+ (4 µm) aurora (PI: Melin), submitted proposals for HST-STIS FUV observations of Jupiter's Southern aurora, Io and Ganymede's footprints (PI: Bonfond), Chandra and XMM-Newton pointings of Jupiter and the IPT (PI: Kraft), Suzaku observations of diffuse X-rays from the Jovian inner magnetosphere (PI: Ezoe); in addition, ground based observations with IRTF, Subaru and other facilities are planned. This talk will review the motivation for this vaste coordinated observing campaign, and the science that we expect to draw from it: essentially a better understanding of how the Jupiter's system works.

  17. Mrk 421 active state in 2008: the MAGIC view, simultaneous multi-wavelength observations and SSC model constrained

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aleksić, J.; Alvarez, E. A.; Antonelli, L. A.; Antoranz, P.; Asensio, M.; Backes, M.; Barrio, J. A.; Bastieri, D.; Becerra González, J.; Bednarek, W.; Berdyugin, A.; Berger, K.; Bernardini, E.; Biland, A.; Blanch, O.; Bock, R. K.; Boller, A.; Bonnoli, G.; Borla Tridon, D.; Braun, I.; Bretz, T.; Cañellas, A.; Carmona, E.; Carosi, A.; Colin, P.; Colombo, E.; Contreras, J. L.; Cortina, J.; Cossio, L.; Covino, S.; Dazzi, F.; De Angelis, A.; De Caneva, G.; De Cea del Pozo, E.; De Lotto, B.; Delgado Mendez, C.; Diago Ortega, A.; Doert, M.; Domínguez, A.; Dominis Prester, D.; Dorner, D.; Doro, M.; Elsaesser, D.; Ferenc, D.; Fonseca, M. V.; Font, L.; Fruck, C.; García López, R. J.; Garczarczyk, M.; Garrido, D.; Giavitto, G.; Godinović, N.; Hadasch, D.; Häfner, D.; Herrero, A.; Hildebrand, D.; Höhne-Mönch, D.; Hose, J.; Hrupec, D.; Huber, B.; Jogler, T.; Kellermann, H.; Klepser, S.; Krähenbühl, T.; Krause, J.; La Barbera, A.; Lelas, D.; Leonardo, E.; Lindfors, E.; Lombardi, S.; López, A.; López, M.; Lorenz, E.; Makariev, M.; Maneva, G.; Mankuzhiyil, N.; Mannheim, K.; Maraschi, L.; Mariotti, M.; Martínez, M.; Mazin, D.; Meucci, M.; Miranda, J. M.; Mirzoyan, R.; Miyamoto, H.; Moldón, J.; Moralejo, A.; Munar-Adrover, P.; Nieto, D.; Nilsson, K.; Orito, R.; Oya, I.; Paneque, D.; Paoletti, R.; Pardo, S.; Paredes, J. M.; Partini, S.; Pasanen, M.; Pauss, F.; Perez-Torres, M. A.; Persic, M.; Peruzzo, L.; Pilia, M.; Pochon, J.; Prada, F.; Prada Moroni, P. G.; Prandini, E.; Puljak, I.; Reichardt, I.; Reinthal, R.; Rhode, W.; Ribó, M.; Rico, J.; Rügamer, S.; Saggion, A.; Saito, K.; Saito, T. Y.; Salvati, M.; Satalecka, K.; Scalzotto, V.; Scapin, V.; Schultz, C.; Schweizer, T.; Shayduk, M.; Shore, S. N.; Sillanpää, A.; Sitarek, J.; Sobczynska, D.; Spanier, F.; Spiro, S.; Stamerra, A.; Steinke, B.; Storz, J.; Strah, N.; Surić, T.; Takalo, L.; Takami, H.; Tavecchio, F.; Temnikov, P.; Terzić, T.; Tescaro, D.; Teshima, M.; Tibolla, O.; Torres, D. F.; Treves, A.; Uellenbeck, M.; Vankov, H.; Vogler, P.; Wagner, R. M.; Weitzel, Q.; Zabalza, V.; Zandanel, F.; Zanin, R.

    2012-06-01

    Context. The blazar Markarian 421 is one of the brightest TeV gamma-ray sources of the northern sky. From December 2007 until June 2008 it was intensively observed in the very high energy (VHE, E > 100 GeV) band by the single-dish Major Atmospheric Gamma-ray Imaging Cherenkov telescope (MAGIC-I). Aims: We aimed to measure the physical parameters of the emitting region of the blazar jet during active states. Methods: We performed a dense monitoring of the source in VHE with MAGIC-I, and also collected complementary data in soft X-rays and optical-UV bands; then, we modeled the spectral energy distributions (SED) derived from simultaneous multi-wavelength data within the synchrotron self-Compton (SSC) framework. Results: The source showed intense and prolonged γ-ray activity during the whole period, with integral fluxes (E > 200 GeV) seldom below the level of the Crab Nebula, and up to 3.6 times this value. Eight datasets of simultaneous optical-UV (KVA, Swift/UVOT), soft X-ray (Swift/XRT) and MAGIC-I VHE data were obtained during different outburst phases. The data constrain the physical parameters of the jet, once the spectral energy distributions obtained are interpreted within the framework of a single-zone SSC leptonic model. Conclusions: The main outcome of the study is that within the homogeneous model high Doppler factors (40 ≤ δ ≤ 80) are needed to reproduce the observed SED; but this model cannot explain the observed short time-scale variability, while it can be argued that inhomogeneous models could allow for less extreme Doppler factors, more intense magnetic fields and shorter electron cooling times compatible with hour or sub-hour scale variability.

  18. A MULTI-WAVELENGTH POLARIMETRIC STUDY OF THE BLAZAR CTA 102 DURING A GAMMA-RAY FLARE IN 2012

    SciTech Connect

    Casadio, Carolina; Gómez, José L.; Agudo, Iván; Molina, Sol N.; Jorstad, Svetlana G.; Marscher, Alan P.; Bala, Vishal; Joshi, Manasvita; Taylor, Brian; Williamson, Karen E.; Larionov, Valeri M.; Blinov, Dmitry A.; Grishina, Tatiana S.; Hagen-Thorn, Vladimir A.; Smith, Paul S.; Gurwell, Mark A.; Lähteenmäki, Anne; Arkharov, Arkady A.; Borman, George A.; Paola, Andrea Di; and others

    2015-11-01

    We perform a multi-wavelength polarimetric study of the quasar CTA 102 during an extraordinarily bright γ-ray outburst detected by the Fermi Large Area Telescope in 2012 September–October when the source reached a flux of F{sub >100} {sub MeV} = 5.2 ± 0.4 × 10{sup −6} photons cm{sup −2} s{sup −1}. At the same time, the source displayed an unprecedented optical and near-infrared (near-IR) outburst. We study the evolution of the parsec-scale jet with ultra-high angular resolution through a sequence of 80 total and polarized intensity Very Long Baseline Array images at 43 GHz, covering the observing period from 2007 June to 2014 June. We find that the γ-ray outburst is coincident with flares at all the other frequencies and is related to the passage of a new superluminal knot through the radio core. The powerful γ-ray emission is associated with a change in direction of the jet, which became oriented more closely to our line of sight (θ ∼ 1.°2) during the ejection of the knot and the γ-ray outburst. During the flare, the optical polarized emission displays intra-day variability and a clear clockwise rotation of electric vector position angles (EVPAs), which we associate with the path followed by the knot as it moves along helical magnetic field lines, although a random walk of the EVPA caused by a turbulent magnetic field cannot be ruled out. We locate the γ-ray outburst a short distance downstream of the radio core, parsecs from the black hole. This suggests that synchrotron self-Compton scattering of NIR to ultraviolet photons is the probable mechanism for the γ-ray production.

  19. Multi-Wavelength Spectroscopic Observations of a White Light Flare Produced Directly by Non-thermal Electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kyoung-Sun; Imada, Shinsuke; Watanabe, Kyoko; Bamba, Yumi; Brooks, David

    2017-08-01

    An X1.6 flare on 2014 October 22 was observed by multiple spectrometers in UV, EUV and X-ray (Hinode/EIS, IRIS, and RHESSI), and multi-wavelength imaging observations (SDO/AIA and HMI). We analyze a bright kernel that produces a white light (WL) flare with continuum enhancement and a hard X-ray (HXR) peak. Taking advantage of the spectroscopic observations of IRIS and Hinode/EIS, we measure the temporal variation of the plasma properties in the bright kernel in the chromosphere and corona. We find that explosive evaporation was observed when the WL emission occurred. The temporal correlation of the WL emission, HXR peak, and evaporation flows indicates that the WL emission was produced by accelerated electrons. We calculated the energy flux deposited by non-thermal electrons (observed by RHESSI) and compared it to the dissipated energy estimated from a chromospheric line (Mg II triplet) observed by IRIS. The deposited energy flux from the non-thermal electrons is about (3-7.7)x1010 erg cm-2 s-1 for a given low-energy cutoff of 30-40 keV, assuming the thick-target model. The energy flux estimated from the changes in temperature in the chromosphere measured using the Mg II subordinate line is about (4.6-6.7)×109 erg cm-2 s-1: ˜6%-22% of the deposited energy. This comparison of estimated energy fluxes implies that the continuum enhancement was directly produced by the non-thermal electrons.

  20. Imaging around corners with single-pixel detector by computational ghost imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Bin; He, Yuchen; Liu, Jianbin; Zhou, Yu; Zheng, Huaibin; Zhang, Songlin; Xu, Zhuo

    2017-10-01

    We have designed a single-pixel camera with imaging around corners based on computational ghost imaging. It can obtain the image of an object when the camera cannot look at the object directly. Our imaging system explores the fact that a bucket detector in a ghost imaging setup has no spatial resolution capability. A series of experiments have been designed to confirm our predictions. This camera has potential applications for imaging around corner or other similar environments where the object cannot be observed directly.

  1. High Resolution Emission and Transmission Imaging Using the Same Detector.

    PubMed

    Panse, Ashish S; Jain, A; Wang, W; Yao, R; Bednarek, D R; Rudin, S

    2010-10-30

    We demonstrate the capability of one detector, the Micro-Angiographic Fluoroscope (MAF) detector, to image for two types of applications: nuclear medicine imaging and radiography. The MAF has 1024 × 1024 pixels with an effective pixel size of 35 microns and is capable of real-time imaging at 30 fps. It has a CCD camera coupled by a fiber-optic taper to a light image intensifier (LII) viewing a 300-micron thick CsI phosphor. The large variable gain of the LII provides quantum-limited operation with little additive instrumentation noise and enables operation in both energy-integrating (EI) and sensitive low-exposure single photon counting (SPC) modes. We used the EI mode to take a radiograph, and the SPC mode to image a custom phantom filled with 1 mCi of I-125. The phantom is made of hot rods with diameters ranging from 0.9 mm to 2.3 mm. A 1 mm diameter parallel hole, medium energy gamma camera collimator was placed between the phantom and the MAF and was moved multiple times at equal intervals in random directions to eliminate the grid pattern corresponding to the collimator septa. Data was acquired at 20 fps. Two algorithms to localize the events were used: 1) simple threshold and 2) a weighted centroid method. Although all the hot rods could be clearly identified, the image generated with the simple threshold method shows more blurring than that with the weighted centroid method. With the diffuse cluster of pixels from each single detection event localized to a single pixel, the weighted centroid method shows improved spatial resolution. A radiograph of the phantom was taken with the same MAF in EI mode without the collimator. It shows clear structural details of the rods. Compared to the radiograph, the sharpness of the emission image is limited by the collimator resolution and could be improved by optimized collimator design. This study demonstrated that the same MAF detector can be used in both radioisotope and x-ray imaging, combining the benefits of each.

  2. Multi-wavelength Radio Continuum Emission Studies of Dust-free Red Giants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Gorman, Eamon; Harper, Graham M.; Brown, Alexander; Drake, Stephen; Richards, Anita M. S.

    2013-10-01

    Multi-wavelength centimeter continuum observations of non-dusty, non-pulsating K spectral-type red giants directly sample their chromospheres and wind acceleration zones. Such stars are feeble emitters at these wavelengths, however, and previous observations have provided only a small number of modest signal-to-noise measurements slowly accumulated over three decades. We present multi-wavelength Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array thermal continuum observations of the wind acceleration zones of two dust-free red giants, Arcturus (α Boo: K2 III) and Aldebaran (α Tau: K5 III). Importantly, most of our observations of each star were carried out over just a few days, so that we obtained a snapshot of the different stellar atmospheric layers sampled at different wavelengths, independent of any long-term variability. We report the first detections at several wavelengths for each star including a detection at 10 cm (3.0 GHz: S band) for both stars and a 20 cm (1.5 GHz: L band) detection for α Boo. This is the first time single (non-binary) luminosity class III red giants have been detected at these continuum wavelengths. Our long-wavelength data sample the outer layers of α Boo's atmosphere where its wind velocity is approaching (or possibly has reached) its terminal value and the ionization balance is becoming frozen-in. For α Tau, however, our long-wavelength data are still sampling its inner atmosphere, where the wind is still accelerating probably due to its lower mass-loss rate. We compare our data with published semi-empirical models based on ultraviolet data, and the marked deviations highlight the need for new atmospheric models to be developed. Spectral indices are used to discuss the possible properties of the stellar atmospheres, and we find evidence for a rapidly cooling wind in the case of α Boo. Finally, we develop a simple analytical wind model for α Boo based on our new long-wavelength flux measurements.

  3. First multi-wavelength campaign on the gamma-ray-loud active galaxy IC 310

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahnen, M. L.; Ansoldi, S.; Antonelli, L. A.; Arcaro, C.; Babić, A.; Banerjee, B.; Bangale, P.; Barres de Almeida, U.; Barrio, J. A.; Becerra González, J.; Bednarek, W.; Bernardini, E.; Berti, A.; Biasuzzi, B.; Biland, A.; Blanch, O.; Bonnefoy, S.; Bonnoli, G.; Borracci, F.; Bretz, T.; Carosi, R.; Carosi, A.; Chatterjee, A.; Colin, P.; Colombo, E.; Contreras, J. L.; Cortina, J.; Covino, S.; Cumani, P.; Da Vela, P.; Dazzi, F.; De Angelis, A.; De Lotto, B.; de Oña Wilhelmi, E.; Di Pierro, F.; Doert, M.; Domínguez, A.; Dominis Prester, D.; Dorner, D.; Doro, M.; Einecke, S.; Eisenacher Glawion, D.; Elsaesser, D.; Engelkemeier, M.; Fallah Ramazani, V.; Fernández-Barral, A.; Fidalgo, D.; Fonseca, M. V.; Font, L.; Fruck, C.; Galindo, D.; García López, R. J.; Garczarczyk, M.; Gaug, M.; Giammaria, P.; Godinović, N.; Gora, D.; Guberman, D.; Hadasch, D.; Hahn, A.; Hassan, T.; Hayashida, M.; Herrera, J.; Hose, J.; Hrupec, D.; Hughes, G.; Idec, W.; Ishio, K.; Kodani, K.; Konno, Y.; Kubo, H.; Kushida, J.; Lelas, D.; Lindfors, E.; Lombardi, S.; Longo, F.; López, M.; Majumdar, P.; Makariev, M.; Mallot, K.; Maneva, G.; Manganaro, M.; Mannheim, K.; Maraschi, L.; Mariotti, M.; Martínez, M.; Mazin, D.; Menzel, U.; Mirzoyan, R.; Moralejo, A.; Moretti, E.; Nakajima, D.; Neustroev, V.; Niedzwiecki, A.; Nievas Rosillo, M.; Nilsson, K.; Nishijima, K.; Noda, K.; Nogués, L.; Nöthe, M.; Paiano, S.; Palacio, J.; Palatiello, M.; Paneque, D.; Paoletti, R.; Paredes, J. M.; Paredes-Fortuny, X.; Pedaletti, G.; Peresano, M.; Perri, L.; Persic, M.; Poutanen, J.; Prada Moroni, P. G.; Prandini, E.; Puljak, I.; Garcia, J. R.; Reichardt, I.; Rhode, W.; Ribó, M.; Rico, J.; Saito, T.; Satalecka, K.; Schroeder, S.; Schweizer, T.; Shore, S. N.; Sillanpää, A.; Sitarek, J.; Snidaric, I.; Sobczynska, D.; Stamerra, A.; Strzys, M.; Surić, T.; Takalo, L.; Tavecchio, F.; Temnikov, P.; Terzić, T.; Tescaro, D.; Teshima, M.; Torres, D. F.; Torres-Albà, N.; Toyama, T.; Treves, A.; Vanzo, G.; Vazquez Acosta, M.; Vovk, I.; Ward, J. E.; Will, M.; Wu, M. H.; Krauß, F.; Schulz, R.; Kadler, M.; Wilms, J.; Ros, E.; Bach, U.; Beuchert, T.; Langejahn, M.; Wendel, C.; Gehrels, N.; Baumgartner, W. H.; Markwardt, C. B.; Müller, C.; Grinberg, V.; Hovatta, T.; Magill, J.

    2017-07-01

    Context. The extragalactic very-high-energy gamma-ray sky is rich in blazars. These are jetted active galactic nuclei that are viewed at a small angle to the line-of-sight. Only a handful of objects viewed at a larger angle are so far known to emit above 100 GeV. Multi-wavelength studies of such objects up to the highest energies provide new insights into the particle and radiation processes of active galactic nuclei. Aims: We aim to report the results from the first multi-wavelength campaign observing the TeV detected nucleus of the active galaxy IC 310, whose jet is observed at a moderate viewing angle of 10°-20°. Methods: The multi-instrument campaign was conducted between 2012 November and 2013 January, and involved observations with MAGIC, Fermi, INTEGRAL, Swift, OVRO, MOJAVE and EVN. These observations were complemented with archival data from the AllWISE and 2MASS catalogs. A one-zone synchrotron self-Compton model was applied to describe the broadband spectral energy distribution. Results: IC 310 showed an extraordinary TeV flare at the beginning of the campaign, followed by a low, but still detectable TeV flux. Compared to previous measurements in this energy range, the spectral shape was found to be steeper during the low emission state. Simultaneous observations in the soft X-ray band showed an enhanced energy flux state and a harder-when-brighter spectral shape behavior. No strong correlated flux variability was found in other frequency regimes. The broadband spectral energy distribution obtained from these observations supports the hypothesis of a double-hump structure. Conclusions: The harder-when-brighter trend in the X-ray and VHE emission, observed for the first time during this campaign, is consistent with the behavior expected from a synchrotron self-Compton scenario. The contemporaneous broadband spectral energy distribution is well described with a one-zone synchrotron self-Compton model using parameters that are comparable to those found for

  4. Virtual Sky Surveys and Multi-wavelength Investigations of Galaxy Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nord, Brian D.

    2010-12-01

    The advent of large and overlapping sky surveys brings promise of a new era in the study of galaxy clusters and dark energy. Clusters have been used for decades as faithful buoys of space-time, tracing cosmic evolution through their matter content and spatial distribution. High-fidelity tracking relies on a robust connection between observable cluster signatures and the underlying dark matter content, which is otherwise invisible. Until now, clusters have been mostly viewed through independent signals in distinct wavebands. The next era of cluster cosmology may be led by multi-variate, cross-waveband detections and analyses of clusters, where different facets of clusters can be cross-correlated to develop a more complete, unified picture of cluster populations. To these ends, in this dissertation, I perform multi-variate analyses of galaxy cluster populations and develop a simulated sky survey, with which to prepare for the next generation of multi-wavelength cluster observations. First, in a new multi-variate framework, I quantify the effects of observational biases on measures of the cluster distribution function and on cosmological constraints derived from X-ray cluster populations. I also demonstrate the indispensability of the multi-variate approach in measuring the evolution of X-ray galaxy clusters; without it, we find that the combination of scatter, intrinsic correlation and irrevocable survey flux limits substantially confuses any measure of redshift evolution. Next, I construct the Millennium Gas Simulation-Virtual Sky Survey (MGSVSS), a multi-wavelength mock sky derived from an N-body gas-dynamic simulation. The MGSVSS contains both sub-mm and optical wavelength sky signals to redshift, z = 1., in a 5 x 5deg2 field of view, with O (103) halos, O (104) optically selected clusters, and O (102) clusters selected via the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) signature. The SZ sky also includes a minimal level of sky and instrumental noise, which nearly mimics that of

  5. MULTI-WAVELENGTH RADIO CONTINUUM EMISSION STUDIES OF DUST-FREE RED GIANTS

    SciTech Connect

    O'Gorman, Eamon; Harper, Graham M.; Brown, Alexander; Drake, Stephen; Richards, Anita M. S.

    2013-10-01

    Multi-wavelength centimeter continuum observations of non-dusty, non-pulsating K spectral-type red giants directly sample their chromospheres and wind acceleration zones. Such stars are feeble emitters at these wavelengths, however, and previous observations have provided only a small number of modest signal-to-noise measurements slowly accumulated over three decades. We present multi-wavelength Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array thermal continuum observations of the wind acceleration zones of two dust-free red giants, Arcturus (α Boo: K2 III) and Aldebaran (α Tau: K5 III). Importantly, most of our observations of each star were carried out over just a few days, so that we obtained a snapshot of the different stellar atmospheric layers sampled at different wavelengths, independent of any long-term variability. We report the first detections at several wavelengths for each star including a detection at 10 cm (3.0 GHz: S band) for both stars and a 20 cm (1.5 GHz: L band) detection for α Boo. This is the first time single (non-binary) luminosity class III red giants have been detected at these continuum wavelengths. Our long-wavelength data sample the outer layers of α Boo's atmosphere where its wind velocity is approaching (or possibly has reached) its terminal value and the ionization balance is becoming frozen-in. For α Tau, however, our long-wavelength data are still sampling its inner atmosphere, where the wind is still accelerating probably due to its lower mass-loss rate. We compare our data with published semi-empirical models based on ultraviolet data, and the marked deviations highlight the need for new atmospheric models to be developed. Spectral indices are used to discuss the possible properties of the stellar atmospheres, and we find evidence for a rapidly cooling wind in the case of α Boo. Finally, we develop a simple analytical wind model for α Boo based on our new long-wavelength flux measurements.

  6. Multi-wavelength Radio Continuum Emission Studies of Dust-free Red Giants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Gorman, Eamon; Harper, Graham M.; Brown, Alexander; Dranke, Stephen; Richards, Anita M. S.

    2013-01-01

    Multi-wavelength centimeter continuum observations of non-dusty, non-pulsating K spectral-type red giants directly sample their chromospheres and wind acceleration zones. Such stars are feeble emitters at these wavelengths, however, and previous observations have provided only a small number of modest signal-to-noise measurements slowly accumulated over three decades. We present multi-wavelength Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array thermal continuum observations of the wind acceleration zones of two dust-free red giants, Arcturus (alpha Boo: K2 III) and Aldebaran (alpha Tau: K5 III). Importantly, most of our observations of each star were carried out over just a few days, so that we obtained a snapshot of the different stellar atmospheric layers sampled at different wavelengths, independent of any long-term variability. We report the first detections at several wavelengths for each star including a detection at 10 cm (3.0 GHz: S band) for both stars and a 20 cm (1.5 GHz: L band) detection for alpha Boo. This is the first time single (non-binary) luminosity class III red giants have been detected at these continuum wavelengths. Our long-wavelength data sample the outer layers of alpha Boo's atmosphere where its wind velocity is approaching (or possibly has reached) its terminal value and the ionization balance is becoming frozen-in. For alpha Tau, however, our long-wavelength data are still sampling its inner atmosphere, where the wind is still accelerating probably due to its lower mass-loss rate. We compare our data with published semi-empirical models based on ultraviolet data, and the marked deviations highlight the need for new atmospheric models to be developed. Spectral indices are used to discuss the possible properties of the stellar atmospheres, and we find evidence for a rapidly cooling wind in the case of alpha Boo. Finally, we develop a simple analytical wind model for alpha Boo based on our new long-wavelength flux measurements.

  7. A Multi-Wavelength Census of Dust and Star Formation in Galaxies at z ~ 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shivaei, Irene; Reddy, Naveen; MOSDEF Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Redshift of z ~ 2 is an important era in the history of the universe, as it contains the peak of star formation rate density and quasar activity. We study the galaxy properties during this era from two different, yet complementary, aspects: by studying formation of stars and mass assembly, and exploring the properties of galactic dust. We use a wealth of multi-wavelength data, from UV to far-IR, to obtain a complete census of obscured and unobscured star formation in galaxies. Our data consists of rest-frame optical spectra from the MOSDEF survey, rest-frame UV and optical photometric data from the 3D-HST survey, and mid- and far-IR data obtained by the Spitzer and Herschel telescopes. In the MOSDEF survey, we acquired rest-frame optical spectra of ~ 1500 galaxies with the MOSFIRE spectrograph on the Keck I telescope. MOSDEF is currently the largest survey of the rest-frame optical properties of galaxies at 1.37 ≤ z ≤ 3.80. Using the multi-wavelength data sets, we show that Hα SFRs, corrected for dust attenuation using the Hβ line, accurately trace SFRs up to ~ 300 M⊙ yr-1, when compared with panchromatic (UV-to-far-IR) SED models. Using Hα SFRs for a large sample of ~ 200 galaxies at z ~ 2, we explore the SFR-M* relation and show that the slope of this relation is shallower than previously measured. We conclude that the scatter in the SFR-M* relation is dominated by uncertainties in dust correction and cannot be used to measure the star formation stochasticity. Furthermore, we investigate the robustness of Spitzer/MIPS 24 micron flux as an SFR indicator and its variation with ISM physical parameters. We find that 24 micron flux, which at z ~ 2 traces the emission from the PAH grains, significantly depends on metallicity, such that there is a PAH deficiency in metal-poor galaxies. We demonstrate that commonly-used conversions of 24 micron flux to IR luminosity underestimate the IR luminosity of low-mass galaxies by more than a factor of 2. Our results

  8. Evaluation of cassette-based digital radiography detectors using standardized image quality metrics: AAPM TG-150 Draft Image Detector Tests.

    PubMed

    Li, Guang; Greene, Travis C; Nishino, Thomas K; Willis, Charles E

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate several of the standardized image quality metrics proposed by the American Association of Physics in Medicine (AAPM) Task Group 150. The task group suggested region-of-interest (ROI)-based techniques to measure nonuniformity, minimum signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), number of anomalous pixels, and modulation transfer function (MTF). This study evaluated the effects of ROI size and layout on the image metrics by using four different ROI sets, assessed result uncertainty by repeating measurements, and compared results with two commercially available quality control tools, namely the Carestream DIRECTVIEW Total Quality Tool (TQT) and the GE Healthcare Quality Assurance Process (QAP). Seven Carestream DRX-1C (CsI) detectors on mobile DR systems and four GE FlashPad detectors in radiographic rooms were tested. Images were analyzed using MATLAB software that had been previously validated and reported. Our values for signal and SNR nonuniformity and MTF agree with values published by other investigators. Our results show that ROI size affects nonuniformity and minimum SNR measurements, but not detection of anomalous pixels. Exposure geometry affects all tested image metrics except for the MTF. TG-150 metrics in general agree with the TQT, but agree with the QAP only for local and global signal nonuniformity. The difference in SNR nonuniformity and MTF values between the TG-150 and QAP may be explained by differences in the calculation of noise and acquisition beam quality, respectively. TG-150's SNR nonuniformity metrics are also more sensitive to detector nonuniformity compared to the QAP. Our results suggest that fixed ROI size should be used for consistency because nonuniformity metrics depend on ROI size. Ideally, detector tests should be performed at the exact calibration position. If not feasible, a baseline should be established from the mean of several repeated measurements. Our study indicates that the TG-150 tests can be

  9. Tunable and switchable multi-wavelength fiber laser based on semiconductor optical amplifier and twin-core photonic crystal fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Bongkyun; Han, Jihee; Chung, Youngjoo

    2012-02-01

    Multi-wavelength fiber lasers have attracted a lot of interest, recently, because of their potential applications in wavelength-division-multiplexing (WDM) systems, optical fiber sensing, and fiber-optics instruments, due to their numerous advantages such as multiple wavelength operation, low cost, and compatibility with the fiber optic systems. Semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA)-based multi-wavelength fiber lasers exhibit stable operation because of the SOA has the property of primarily inhomogeneous broadening and thus can support simultaneous oscillation of multiple lasing wavelengths. In this letter, we propose and experimentally demonstrate a switchable multi-wavelength fiber laser employing a semiconductor optical amplifier and twin-core photonic crystal fiber (TC-PCF) based in-line interferometer comb filter. The fabricated two cores are not symmetric due to the associated fiber fabrication process such as nonuniform heat gradient in furnace and asymmetric microstructure expansion during the gas pressurization which results in different silica strut thickness and core size. The induced asymmetry between two cores considerably alters the linear power transfer, by seriously reducing it. These nominal twin cores form effective two optical paths and associated effective refractive index difference. The in-fiber comb filter is effectively constructed by splicing a section of TC-PCF between two single mode fibers (SMFs). The proposed laser can be designed to operate in stable multi-wavelength lasing states by adjusting the states of the polarization controller (PC). The lasing modes are switched by varying the state of PC and the change is reversible. In addition, we demonstrate a tunable multi-wavelength fiber laser operation by applying temperature changes to TC-PCF in the multi-channel filter.

  10. Touch the Invisible Sky: A Multi-Wavelength Braille Book Featuring Tactile NASA Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grice, N.; Steel, S.; Daou, D.

    2008-06-01

    According to the American Foundation for the Blind and the National Federation of the Blind, there are approximately 10 million blind and visually impaired people in the United States. Because astronomy is often visually based, many people assume that it cannot be made accessible. A new astronomy book, Touch the Invisible Sky, makes wavelengths not visible to human eyes, accessible to all audiences through text in print and Braille and with pictures that are touchable and in color.

  11. Performance Characterization of the Atmospheric Velocity Imaging Detector (AVID)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardiner, J. D.

    2015-12-01

    Central to the improvement of upper atmospheric models is a dramatic expansion in current understanding of the coupling and dynamics within the Ionosphere / Thermosphere (IT) system. Conventional in situ measurement techniques using energy scanning and analog current detection are limited by poor sensitivity and have produced incomplete datasets. The Atmospheric Velocity Imaging Detector (AVID) overcomes the limitations of current instruments through the use of two orthogonally mounted Imaging Dispersive Energy Analyzers (IDEAs) which share a single pulse-counting ion detector. The second-generation IDEA design uses inexpensive and lightweight printed circuit boards, with parallel exposed copper traces connected via resistors to generate a highly uniform deflection field. This arrangement allows AVID to make accurate and sensitive in situ measurements of neutral wind / ion drift velocities, temperature, density, and composition, with no voltage scanning required. We present results from the development progress of AVID, through laboratory testing and characterization of an individual IDEA unit when exposed to angle-resolved hypervelocity ion beams emulating 4.7 eV O and 8.2 eV N2. Through these measurements, the projected performance of the AVID system and recently developed image processing algorithms are compared against SIMION ion trajectory calculations and Monte Carlo simulations.

  12. Constraints on cosmic-ray efficiency in the supernova remnant RCW 86 using multi-wavelength observations

    DOE PAGES

    Lemoine-Goumard, M.; Renaud, M.; Vink, J.; ...

    2012-08-31

    Several young supernova remnants (SNRs) have recently been detected in the high-energy (HE; 0.1 < E < 100 GeV) and very-high-energy (VHE; E > 100 GeV) gamma-ray domains. As exemplified by RX J1713.7-3946, the nature of this emission has been hotly debated, and direct evidence for the efficient acceleration of cosmic-ray protons at the SNR shocks still remains elusive. Here, we study the broadband gamma-ray emission from one of these young SNRs, namely RCW 86, for which several observational lines of evidence indirectly point towards the presence of accelerated hadrons. We then attempt to detect any putative hadronic signal from this SNR in the available gamma-ray data, in order to assess the level of acceleration efficiency. We also analyzed more than 40 months of data acquired by the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on-board the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope in the HE domain, and gathered all of the relevant multi-wavelength (from radio to VHE gamma-rays) information about the broadband nonthermal emission from RCW 86. For this purpose, we re-analyzed the archival X-ray data from the ASCA/Gas Imaging Spectrometer (GIS), the XMM-Newton/EPIC-MOS, and the RXTE/Proportional Counter Array (PCA). Beyond the expected Galactic diffuse background, no significant gamma-ray emission in the direction of RCW 86 is detected in any of the 0.1–1, 1–10 and 10–100 GeV Fermi-LAT maps. The derived HE upper limits, together with the H.E.S.S. measurements in the VHE domain, are incompatible with a standard Dmore » $$-2\\atop{p}$$ hadronic emission arising from proton-proton interactions, and can only be accommodated by a spectral index Γ ≤ 1.8, i.e. a value in-between the standard (test-particle) index and the asymptotic limit of theoretical particle spectra in the case of strongly modified shocks. In such a hadronic scenario, the total energy in accelerated particles is at the level of ηCR = ECR/ESN ~0.07 d$$2\\atop{2.5}$$kpc/$$\\tilde{n}$$ (with the distance d2.5 kpc ≡ d/2

  13. Constraints on cosmic-ray efficiency in the supernova remnant RCW 86 using multi-wavelength observations

    SciTech Connect

    Lemoine-Goumard, M.; Renaud, M.; Vink, J.; Allen, G. E.; Bamba, A.; Giordano, F.; Uchiyama, Y.

    2012-08-31

    Several young supernova remnants (SNRs) have recently been detected in the high-energy (HE; 0.1 < E < 100 GeV) and very-high-energy (VHE; E > 100 GeV) gamma-ray domains. As exemplified by RX J1713.7-3946, the nature of this emission has been hotly debated, and direct evidence for the efficient acceleration of cosmic-ray protons at the SNR shocks still remains elusive. Here, we study the broadband gamma-ray emission from one of these young SNRs, namely RCW 86, for which several observational lines of evidence indirectly point towards the presence of accelerated hadrons. We then attempt to detect any putative hadronic signal from this SNR in the available gamma-ray data, in order to assess the level of acceleration efficiency. We also analyzed more than 40 months of data acquired by the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on-board the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope in the HE domain, and gathered all of the relevant multi-wavelength (from radio to VHE gamma-rays) information about the broadband nonthermal emission from RCW 86. For this purpose, we re-analyzed the archival X-ray data from the ASCA/Gas Imaging Spectrometer (GIS), the XMM-Newton/EPIC-MOS, and the RXTE/Proportional Counter Array (PCA). Beyond the expected Galactic diffuse background, no significant gamma-ray emission in the direction of RCW 86 is detected in any of the 0.1–1, 1–10 and 10–100 GeV Fermi-LAT maps. The derived HE upper limits, together with the H.E.S.S. measurements in the VHE domain, are incompatible with a standard D$-2\\atop{p}$ hadronic emission arising from proton-proton interactions, and can only be accommodated by a spectral index Γ ≤ 1.8, i.e. a value in-between the standard (test-particle) index and the asymptotic limit of theoretical particle spectra in the case of strongly modified shocks. In such a hadronic scenario, the total energy in accelerated particles is at the level of ηCR = ECR/ESN ~0.07 d$2\\atop{2.5}$kpc/$\\tilde{n}$ (with the distance d2.5 kpc ≡ d/2

  14. POISSON project. II. A multi-wavelength spectroscopic and photometric survey of young protostars in L 1641

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caratti o Garatti, A.; Garcia Lopez, R.; Antoniucci, S.; Nisini, B.; Giannini, T.; Eislöffel, J.; Ray, T. P.; Lorenzetti, D.; Cabrit, S.

    2012-02-01

    Context. Characterising stellar and circumstellar properties of embedded young stellar objects (YSOs) is mandatory for understanding the early stages of the stellar evolution. This task requires the combination of both spectroscopy and photometry, covering the widest possible wavelength range, to disentangle the various protostellar components and activities. Aims: As part of the POISSON project (Protostellar Optical-Infrared Spectral Survey On NTT), we present a multi-wavelength spectroscopic and photometric investigation of embedded YSOs in L 1641, aimed to derive the stellar parameters and evolutionary stages and to infer their accretion properties. Methods: Our multi-wavelength database includes low-resolution optical-IR spectra from the NTT and Spitzer (0.6-40 μm) and photometric data covering a spectral range from 0.4 to 1100 μm, which allow us to construct the YSOs spectral energy distributions (SEDs) and to infer the main stellar parameters (visual extinction, spectral type, accretion, stellar, bolometric luminosity, mass accretion, and ejection rates). Results: The NTT optical-NIR spectra are rich in emission lines, which are mostly associated with YSO accretion, ejection, and chromospheric activities. A few emission lines, prominent ice (H2O and CO2), and amorphous silicate absorption features have also been detected in the Spitzer spectra. The SED analysis allows us to group our 27 YSOs into nine Class I, eleven Flat, and seven Class II objects. However, on the basis of the derived stellar properties, only six Class I YSOs have an age of ~105 yr, while the others are older (5 × 105-106 yr), and, among the Flat sources, three out of eleven are more evolved objects (5 × 106-107 yr), indicating that geometrical effects can significantly modify the SED shapes. Inferred mass accretion rates (Ṁacc) show a wide range of values (3.6 × 10-9 to 1.2 × 10-5 M⊙ yr-1), which reflects the age spread observed in our sample well. Average values of mass

  15. Development and construction of the SLD Cerenkov Ring Imaging Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Aston, D.; Bean, A.; Bienz, T.; Bird, F.; Caldwell, D.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Coyle, P.; Coyne, D.; Dasu, S.; Dunwoodie, W.

    1989-06-01

    We report on the development and construction of the Cerenkov Ring Imaging Detector (CRID) for the SLD experiment at the SLAC linear collider. In particular, we outline recent progress in the construction, and results from testing the first components of the barrel CRID, including the drift boxes, liquid radiator trays and mirror system. We also review progress in the construction of the barrel CRID gas radiator vessel, the liquid radiator recirculator system, and the electronic readout system. The development of a comprehensive monitor and control system -- upon which the stable operation and physics efficacy of the CRID depend -- is also described. 19 refs., 9 figs.

  16. The SLD Cerenkov Ring Imaging Detector: Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Ashford, V.; Bienz, T.; Bird, F.; Crawford, G.; Gaillard, M.; Hallewell, G.; Leith, D.; McShurley, D.; Nuttall, A.; Oxoby, G.

    1986-10-01

    We describe test beam results from a prototype Cerenkov Ring Imaging Detector (CRID) for the SLD experiment at the SLAC Linear Collider (SLC). The system includes both liquid and gas radiators, a long drift box containing gaseous TMAE and a proportional wire chamber with charge division readout. Measurements of the multiplicity and detection resolution of Cerenkov photons, from both radiators are presented. Various design aspects of a new engineering prototype, currently under construction, are discussed and recent R and D results relevant to this effort are reported.

  17. High gain multigap avalanche detectors for Cerenkov ring imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Gilmore, R.S.; Lavender, W.M.; Leith, D.W.G.S.; Williams, S.H.

    1980-10-01

    We report on a continuing study of multigap parallel plate avalanche chambers, primarily as photoelectron detectors for use with Cerenkov ring imaging counters. By suitable control of the fields in successive gaps and by introducing screens to reduce photon feedback to the cathode the gain many be increased considerably. We have obtained gains in excess of 6 x 10/sup 7/ for photoelectrons with a good pulse height spectrum and expect to increase this further. We discuss the use of resistive anodes to give avalanche positions in two dimensions by charge division.

  18. The fluid systems for the SLD Cherenkov ring imaging detector

    SciTech Connect

    Abe, K.; Hasegawa, K.; Hasegawa, Y.; Iwasaki, Y.; Suekane, F.; Yuta, H.; Antilogus, P.; Aston, D.; Bienz, T.; Bird, F.; Dasu, S.; Dolinsky, S.; Dunwoodie, W.; Hallewell, G.; Kawahara, H.; Kwon, Y.; Leith, D.W.G.S.; McCulloch, M.; McShurley, D.; Mueller, G.; Muller, D.; Nagamine, T.; Pavel, T.J.; Peterson, H.; Ratcliff, B.; Reif, R.; Rensing, P.; Schultz, D.; Shapiro, S.; Shaw, H.; Simopoulos, C.; Solodov, E.; Toge, N.; Vavra, J.; Watt, R.; Weber, T.; Williams, S.H.; Baird, K.; Jacques, P.; Kalelkar, M.; Plano, R.; Stamer, P.; Word, G.; Bean, A.; Caldwell, D.O.; Duboscq, J.; Huber, J.; Lu, A.; Mathys, L.; McHugh, S.; Yellin, S.; Ben-David, R.; Manly, S.; Snyder, J.; Turk, J.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Coyle, P.; Coyne, D.; Gagnon, P.; Liu, X.; Schneider, M.; Williams, D.A.; Coller, J.; Shank, J.T.; Whitaker, J.S.; d`Oliveira, A.; Johnson, R.A.; Martinez, J.; Nussbaum, M.; Santha, A.K.S.; Sokoloff, M.D.; Stockdale, I.; Wilson, R.J.

    1992-10-01

    We describe the design and operation of the fluid delivery, monitor and control systems for the SLD barrel Cherenkov Ring Imaging Detector (CRID). The systems deliver drift gas (C{sub 2}H{sub 6} + TMAE), radiator gas (C{sub 5}F{sub 12} + N{sub 2}) and radiator liquid (C{sub 6}F{sub 14}). Measured critical quantities such as electron lifetime in the drift gas and ultra-violet (UV) transparencies of the radiator fluids, together with the operational experience, are also reported.

  19. MULTI-WAVELENGTH OBSERVATIONS OF 3FGL J2039.6–5618: A CANDIDATE REDBACK MILLISECOND PULSAR

    SciTech Connect

    Salvetti, D.; Mignani, R. P.; Luca, A. De; Belfiore, A.; Marelli, M.; Pizzocaro, D.; Delvaux, C.; Greiner, J.; Becker, W.; Pallanca, C.; Breeveld, A. A.

    2015-12-01

    We present multi-wavelength observations of the unassociated γ-ray source 3FGL J2039.6−5618 detected by the Fermi Large Area Telescope. The source γ-ray properties suggest that it is a pulsar, most likely a millisecond pulsar, for which neither radio nor γ-ray pulsations have been detected. We observed 3FGL J2039.6−5618 with XMM-Newton and discovered several candidate X-ray counterparts within/close to the γ-ray error box. The brightest of these X-ray sources is variable with a period of 0.2245 ± 0.0081 days. Its X-ray spectrum can be described by a power law with photon index Γ{sub X} = 1.36 ± 0.09, and hydrogen column density N{sub H} < 4 × 10{sup 20} cm{sup −2}, which gives an unabsorbed 0.3–10 keV X-ray flux of 1.02 × 10{sup −13} erg cm{sup −2} s{sup −1}. Observations with the Gamma-Ray Burst Optical/Near-Infrared Detector discovered an optical counterpart to this X-ray source, with a time-averaged magnitude g′ ∼ 19.5. The counterpart features a flux modulation with a period of 0.22748 ± 0.00043 days that coincides, within the errors, with that of the X-ray source, confirming the association based on the positional coincidence. We interpret the observed X-ray/optical periodicity as the orbital period of a close binary system where one of the two members is a neutron star. The light curve profile of the companion star, which has two asymmetric peaks, suggests that the optical emission comes from two regions with different temperatures on its tidally distorted surface. Based upon its X-ray and optical properties, we consider this source as the most likely X-ray counterpart to 3FGL J2039.6−5618, which we propose to be a new redback system.

  20. Multi-wavelength Observations of 3FGL J2039.6-5618: A Candidate Redback Millisecond Pulsar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvetti, D.; Mignani, R. P.; De Luca, A.; Delvaux, C.; Pallanca, C.; Belfiore, A.; Marelli, M.; Breeveld, A. A.; Greiner, J.; Becker, W.; Pizzocaro, D.

    2015-12-01

    We present multi-wavelength observations of the unassociated γ-ray source 3FGL J2039.6-5618 detected by the Fermi Large Area Telescope. The source γ-ray properties suggest that it is a pulsar, most likely a millisecond pulsar, for which neither radio nor γ-ray pulsations have been detected. We observed 3FGL J2039.6-5618 with XMM-Newton and discovered several candidate X-ray counterparts within/close to the γ-ray error box. The brightest of these X-ray sources is variable with a period of 0.2245 ± 0.0081 days. Its X-ray spectrum can be described by a power law with photon index ΓX = 1.36 ± 0.09, and hydrogen column density NH < 4 × 1020 cm-2, which gives an unabsorbed 0.3-10 keV X-ray flux of 1.02 × 10-13 erg cm-2 s-1. Observations with the Gamma-Ray Burst Optical/Near-Infrared Detector discovered an optical counterpart to this X-ray source, with a time-averaged magnitude g‧ ˜ 19.5. The counterpart features a flux modulation with a period of 0.22748 ± 0.00043 days that coincides, within the errors, with that of the X-ray source, confirming the association based on the positional coincidence. We interpret the observed X-ray/optical periodicity as the orbital period of a close binary system where one of the two members is a neutron star. The light curve profile of the companion star, which has two asymmetric peaks, suggests that the optical emission comes from two regions with different temperatures on its tidally distorted surface. Based upon its X-ray and optical properties, we consider this source as the most likely X-ray counterpart to 3FGL J2039.6-5618, which we propose to be a new redback system.

  1. Advanced Scintillator Detectors for Neutron Imaging in Inertial Confinement Fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geppert-Kleinrath, Verena; Danly, Christopher; Merrill, Frank; Simpson, Raspberry; Volegov, Petr; Wilde, Carl

    2016-10-01

    The neutron imaging team at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) has been providing two-dimensional neutron imaging of the inertial confinement fusion process at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) for over five years. Neutron imaging is a powerful tool in which position-sensitive detectors register neutrons emitted in the fusion reactions, producing a picture of the burning fuel. Recent images have revealed possible multi-dimensional asymmetries, calling for additional views to facilitate three-dimensional imaging. These will be along shorter lines of sight to stay within the existing facility at NIF. In order to field imaging capabilities equivalent to the existing system several technological challenges have to be met: high spatial resolution, high light output, and fast scintillator response to capture lower-energy neutrons, which have scattered from non-burning regions of fuel. Deuterated scintillators are a promising candidate to achieve the timing and resolution required; a systematic study of deuterated and non-deuterated polystyrene and liquid samples is currently ongoing. A test stand has been implemented to measure the response function, and preliminary data on resolution and light output have been obtained at the LANL Weapons Neutrons Research facility.

  2. Multi-wavelength Characterization of Exoplanet Host Stars with the MUSCLES Treasury Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    France, Kevin; Youngblood, Allison; Parke Loyd, R. O.; Schneider, Christian

    2017-01-01

    High-energy photons (X-ray to NUV) from exoplanet host stars regulate the atmospheric temperature profiles and photochemistry on orbiting planets, influencing the long-term stability of planetary atmospheres and the production of potential “biomarker” gases. However, relatively few observational and theoretical constraints exist on the high-energy irradiance from typical (i.e., weakly active) M and K dwarf exoplanet host stars. In this talk, I will describe results from a panchromatic survey (Chandra/XMM/Hubble/ground) of M and K dwarf exoplanet hosts. The MUSCLES Treasury Survey (Measurements of the Ultraviolet Spectral Characteristics of Low-mass Exoplanetary Systems) combines UV, X-ray, and optical observations with reconstructed Lyman-alpha and EUV (100-900 Ang) radiation to create 5 Angstrom to 5 micron stellar irradiance spectra that are available as a High-Level Science Product on STScI/MAST. I will discuss how we use multi-wavelength observations to study possible abiotic production of the suggested biomarkers O2 and O3, develop scaling relations to infer the high-energy particle fluxes from these stars based on solar UV flare/particle flux measurements, calibrate visible-wavelength proxies for the high-energy irradiance, and characterize the UV variability and flare frequency of “optically inactive” M dwarfs.

  3. The Angular Momentum of Disk Galaxies: A Multi-Wavelength Study Using the Virtual Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cortese, Luca; Catinella, B.; Springob, C. M.

    2006-12-01

    The determination of the angular momentum distribution of disk galaxies and its dependence on other galaxy properties and environment is essential in order to develop an accurate picture of galaxy formation and evolution. N-body simulations and semi-analytic models of galaxy formation within the standard cosmological framework identify the spin parameter of the dark matter halos as one of the main drivers of galaxy evolution and yield insights into its properties and distribution in present-day galaxies. Various relations have been proposed to link the halo spin parameter to observational data. In this work, we exploit such relations to obtain observational constraints for theoretical models of galaxy formation. To this extent, we used the Virtual Observatory to create a multi-wavelength database for the study of the properties of the angular momentum distribution of disk galaxies. Our sample builds upon the SFI++ database, which includes the largest collection of long-slit optical galaxy rotation curves currently available. Preliminary results of our analysis will be presented. This work is partially funded by PPARC under grant PPA/G/O/2002/00497. The Arecibo Observatory is part of the National Astronomy and Ionosphere Center, which is operated by Cornell University under a cooperative agreement with the National Science Foundation.

  4. Surface roughness prediction model and experimental results based on multi-wavelength fiber optic sensors.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Nan-Nan; Zhang, Jun

    2016-10-31

    The surface roughness prediction model based on a support vector machine was proposed and the multi-wavelength fiber optic sensor was established. The specimens with different surface roughness selected as the test samples were analyzed by using the prediction model when the incident wavelengths were 650 nm and 1310 nm, respectively. The working distance of 2.5 mm ~3.5 mm was chosen as the optimum measurement distance. The experimental results indicate that the error range of surface roughness is 0.74% ~7.56% at 650 nm, and the error range of surface roughness is 1.03% ~5.92% at 1310 nm. The average relative error is about 2.669% at 650 nm, while it is about 2.431% at 1310 nm. The error of roughness measurement is less than 3% by using the model, which is acceptable. The error of surface roughness based on the prediction model is smaller than that by using the characteristic curves between surface roughness and the scattering intensity ratio.

  5. Temporal characterization of a multi-wavelength Brillouin-erbium fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambin Iezzi, Victor; Büttner, Thomas F. S.; Tehranchi, Amirhossein; Loranger, Sébastien; Kabakova, Irina V.; Eggleton, Benjamin J.; Kashyap, Raman

    2016-05-01

    This paper provides the first detailed temporal characterization of a multi-wavelength-Brillouin-erbium fiber laser (MWBEFL) by measuring the optical intensity of the individual frequency channels with high temporal resolution. It is found that the power in each channel is highly unstable due to the excitation of several cavity modes for typical conditions of operation. Also provided is the real-time measurements of the MWBEFL output power for two configurations that were previously reported to emit phase-locked picosecond pulse trains, concluded from their autocorrelation measurements. Real-time measurements reveal a high degree of instability without the formation of a stable pulse train. Finally, we model the MWBEFL using coupled wave equations describing the evolution of the Brillouin pump, Stokes and acoustic waves in the presence of stimulated Brillouin scattering, and the optical Kerr effect. A good qualitative consistency between the simulation and experimental results is evident, in which the interference signal at the output shows strong instability as well as the chaotic behavior due to the dynamics of participating pump and Stokes waves.

  6. MULTI-WAVELENGTH OBSERVATIONS OF COMET C/2011 L4 (PAN-STARRS)

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Bin; Keane, Jacqueline; Meech, Karen; Owen, Tobias; Wainscoat, Richard

    2014-04-01

    The dynamically new comet C/2011 L4 (Pan-STARRS) is one of the brightest comets observed since the great comet C/1995 O1 (Hale-Bopp). Here, we present our multi-wavelength observations of C/2011 L4 during its in-bound passage to the inner solar system. A strong absorption band of water ice at 2.0 μm was detected in the near-infrared spectra, obtained with the 8 m Gemini-North and 3 m Infrared Telescope Facility Telescopes. The companion 1.5 μm band of water ice, however, was not observed. Spectral modeling shows that the absence of the 1.5 μm feature can be explained by the presence of sub-micron-sized fine ice grains. No gas lines (i.e., CN, HCN, or CO) were observed pre-perihelion in either the optical or the submillimeter. We derived 3σ upper limits for the CN and CO production rates. The comet exhibited a very strong continuum in the optical and its slope seemed to become redder as the comet approached the Sun. Our observations suggest that C/2011 L4 is an unusually dust-rich comet with a dust-to-gas mass ratio >4.

  7. Multi-wavelength injection seeded mid-infrared optical parametric oscillator for DIAL

    SciTech Connect

    Webb, M.S.; Stanion, K.B.; Deane, D.J.

    1996-01-27

    We have constructed and fielded a multi-wavelength injection seeded mid-IR OPO source for DIAL. This OPO system was built for ground based remote sensing measurements of species with both broad (300 cm{sup -1}) and narrow absorption bandwidths (0.07 cm{sup -1} FWHM). The OPO utilizes a single frequency tunable diode laser for the injection seeded signal wavelength in the region from 6400 to 6700 cm{sup -1} and an angle phase-matched 5 cm LiNbO3 crystal to provide large tuning excursions on a slow time scale. The pump was a diode pumped Nd:YAG MOPA (9398 cm{sup -1}) running at 180 Hz. This pump source was repeatedly injection seeded with a different wavelength on each of film sequential shots forming a set of three pulses having wavelength separations on the order of 0.4 cm{sup -1} at a three color set repetition rate of 60 Hz. This combination of OPO signal and pump source produced a set of three time staggered idler wavelengths separated by 0.4 cm{sup -1} with the center wavelength tunable from 2700 to 3000 cm{sup -1}. This OPO system was used in field test experiments to detect the release of chemicals from a standoff distance of 3.3 Km. We present key OPO design criteria, performance data, and numerical simulations that agree with our observations of pump induced spectral impurities in the OPO output.

  8. An L-band multi-wavelength Brillouin-erbium fiber laser with switchable frequency spacing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Xuefang; Hu, Kongwen; Wei, Yizhen; Bi, Meihua; Yang, Guowei

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, a novel L-band multi-wavelength Brillouin-erbium fiber laser consisting of two ring cavities is proposed and demonstrated. The frequency spacing can be switched, corresponding to the single and double Brillouin frequency shifts, by toggling the optical switch. Under a 980 nm pump power of 600 mw, and a Brillouin pump power of 4 mW and wavelength of 1599.4 nm, up to 16 Stokes signals with a frequency spacing of 0.089 nm and 5 Stokes signals with double spacing of 0.178 nm are generated. A wavelength tunability of 15 nm (1593 nm  -  1608 nm) is realized for both frequency spacings. The fluctuation of Stokes signals for both single and double Brillouin spacing regimes in the proposed setup is less than 1.5 dB throughout a 30 min time span.

  9. Tunable multi-wavelength polymer laser based on a triangular-lattice photonic crystal structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Wenbin; Pu, Donglin; Qiao, Wen; Wan, Wenqiang; Liu, Yanhua; Ye, Yan; Wu, Shaolong; Chen, Linsen

    2016-08-01

    A continuously tunable multi-wavelength polymer laser based on a triangular-lattice photonic crystal cavity is demonstrated. The triangular-lattice resonator was initially fabricated through multiple interference exposure and was then replicated into a low refractive index polymer via UV-nanoimprinting. The blend of a blue-emitting conjugated polymer and a red-emitting one was used as the gain medium. Three periods in the scalene triangular-lattice structure yield stable tri-wavelength laser emission (625.5 nm, 617.4 nm and 614.3 nm) in six different directions. A uniformly aligned liquid crystal (LC) layer was incorporated into the cavity as the top cladding layer. Upon heating, the orientation of LC molecules and thus the effective refractive index of the lasing mode changes which continuously shifts the lasing wavelength. A maximum tuning range of 12.2 nm was observed for the lasing mode at 625.5 nm. This tunable tri-wavelength polymer laser is simple constructed and cost-effective. It may find application in the fields of biosensors and photonic integrated circuits.

  10. Notes on the apparent discordance of pulse oximetry and multi-wavelength haemoglobin photometry.

    PubMed

    Nijland, R; Jongsma, H W; Nijhuis, J G; Oeseburg, B; Zijlstra, W G

    1995-01-01

    Multi-wavelength photometers, blood gas analysers and pulse oximeters are widely used to measure various oxygen-related quantities. The definitions of these quantities are not always correct. This paper gives insight in the various definitions for oxygen quantities. Furthermore, the possible influences of dyshaemoglobins and fetal haemoglobin on the accuracy of pulse oximetry are discussed. As pulse oximeters are constructed for the determination of arterial oxygen saturation, they should be validated with sample oxygen saturation values and not with the oxyhaemoglobin fraction. The influence of carboxyhaemoglobin is insubstantial over an oxygen saturation range of 0% to 100%. Through the presence of methaemoglobin, pulse oximetry will give an underestimation above 70% and an overestimation below 70% oxygen saturation. The influence of fetal haemoglobin is insignificant in the neonatal use of pulse oximetry, in the range of 75% to 100% arterial oxygen saturation. However, a pulse oximeter underestimates the arterial oxygen saturation at the 25% level with 5%, if the pulse oximeter has been calibrated in human adults. Such a low level of arterial oxygen saturation can be present in the fetus during labor.

  11. Multi-wavelength optical determination of black and brown carbon in atmospheric aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massabò, D.; Caponi, L.; Bernardoni, V.; Bove, M. C.; Brotto, P.; Calzolai, G.; Cassola, F.; Chiari, M.; Fedi, M. E.; Fermo, P.; Giannoni, M.; Lucarelli, F.; Nava, S.; Piazzalunga, A.; Valli, G.; Vecchi, R.; Prati, P.

    2015-05-01

    In this paper, a new way to apportion the absorption coefficient (babs) of carbonaceous atmospheric aerosols starting from a multi-wavelength optical analysis is shown. This methodology can disentangle and quantify the contribution to total absorption of equivalent black carbon (EBC) emitted by wood burning (EBCWB) and fossil fuel (EBCFF) as well as brown carbon (BrC) due to incomplete combustion. The method uses the information gathered at five different wavelengths in a renewed and upgraded version of the approach usually referred to as Aethalometer model. Moreover, we present the results of an apportionment study of carbonaceous aerosol sources performed in a rural area and in a coastal city, both located in the North-West of Italy. Results obtained by the proposed approach are validated against independent measurements of levoglucosan and radiocarbon. At the rural site the EBCWB and EBCFF relative contributions are about 40% and 60% in winter and 15% and 85% in summer, respectively. At the coastal urban site, EBCWB and EBCFF are about 15% and 85% during fall. The OC contribution to the wood burning source at the rural site results approximately 50% in winter and 10% in summer and about 15% at the coastal urban site in fall. The new methodology also provides a direct measurement of the absorption Ångström exponent of BrC (αBrC) which resulted αBrC = 3.95 ± 0.20.

  12. Closed Box Nature of Galaxy Clusters through Multi-wavelength Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farahi, Arya; Mulroy, Sarah; Evrard, August E.; Smith, Graham

    2017-08-01

    Relating observations of cluster galaxies or the gas content to the total mass of the underlying dark matter halos is a key challenge in the current cluster cosmology community. On the other hand, accurate measurement of hot and cold phase baryon covariance in clusters will offer important constraints on hydrodynamic models of cluster formation. This property covariance has been predicted by hydrodynamics simulations of Wu et al. (2015). Wu et al. (2015) predicts massive dark-matter halos are essentially ``Closed Box'' that retain all their gaseous and stellar matter, despite a diverse set of astrophysical disruptions happening inside them.We build a forward Bayesian model to constrain the mass observable scaling relation and test ``Closed Box'' scenario through the property covariance, simultanously. We, then, present results of this method applied to multi-wavelength observations of clusters from the Local Cluster Substructure Survey (LoCuSS). We find ~3σ evidence that at least one of the covariances between hot gaseous probes and stellar mass probes is negative. These results provide the first observational evidence in favor of the ``Closed Box'' nature of clusters at the high mass end.

  13. Multi-wavelength photoacoustic system based on high-power diode laser bars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leggio, Luca; Wiśniowski, Bartosz; Gawali, Sandeep Babu; Rodríguez, Sergio; Sánchez, Miguel; Gallego, Daniel; Carpintero, Guillermo; Lamela, Horacio

    2017-03-01

    Multi-wavelength laser sources are necessary for a functional photoacoustic (PA) spectroscopy. The use of high-power diode lasers (HPDLs) has aroused great interest for their relatively low costs and small sizes if compared to solid state lasers. However, HPDLs are only available at few wavelengths and can deliver low optical energy (normally in the order of μJ), while diode laser bars (DLBs) offer more wavelengths in the market and can deliver more optical energy. We show the simulations of optical systems for beam coupling of single high-power DLBs operating at different wavelengths (i.e. 808 nm, 880 nm, 910 nm, 940 nm, and 980 nm) into 400-μm optical fibers. Then, in a separate design, the beams of the DLBs are combined in a compact system making use of dichroic mirrors and focusing lenses for beam coupling into a 400-μm optical fiber. The use of optical fibers with small core diameter (< 1 mm) is particularly suggestive for future photoacoustic endoscopy (PAE) applications that require interior examination of the body.

  14. Multi-wavelength Observations of Comet C/2011 L4 (Pan-STARRS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Bin; Keane, Jacqueline; Meech, Karen; Owen, Tobias; Wainscoat, Richard

    2014-04-01

    The dynamically new comet C/2011 L4 (Pan-STARRS) is one of the brightest comets observed since the great comet C/1995 O1 (Hale-Bopp). Here, we present our multi-wavelength observations of C/2011 L4 during its in-bound passage to the inner solar system. A strong absorption band of water ice at 2.0 μm was detected in the near-infrared spectra, obtained with the 8 m Gemini-North and 3 m Infrared Telescope Facility Telescopes. The companion 1.5 μm band of water ice, however, was not observed. Spectral modeling shows that the absence of the 1.5 μm feature can be explained by the presence of sub-micron-sized fine ice grains. No gas lines (i.e., CN, HCN, or CO) were observed pre-perihelion in either the optical or the submillimeter. We derived 3σ upper limits for the CN and CO production rates. The comet exhibited a very strong continuum in the optical and its slope seemed to become redder as the comet approached the Sun. Our observations suggest that C/2011 L4 is an unusually dust-rich comet with a dust-to-gas mass ratio >4.

  15. Multi-wavelength Modeling of Globular Clusters—The Millisecond Pulsar Scenario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopp, A.; Venter, C.; Büsching, I.; de Jager, O. C.

    2013-12-01

    The potentially large number of millisecond pulsars (MSPs) in globular cluster (GC) cores makes these parent objects ideal laboratories for studying the collective properties of an ensemble of MSPs. Such a population is expected to radiate several spectral components in the radio through γ-ray waveband. First, pulsed emission is expected via curvature and synchrotron radiation (CR and SR) and possibly even via inverse Compton (IC) scattering inside the pulsar magnetospheres. Second, unpulsed emission should transpire through the continuous injection of relativistic leptons by the MSPs into the ambient region, which in turn produce SR and IC emission when they encounter the cluster magnetic field, as well as several background photon components. In this paper we continue to develop the MSP scenario for explaining the multi-wavelength properties of GCs by considering the entire modeling chain, including the full transport equation, refined emissivities of stellar and Galactic background photons, integration of the flux along the line of sight, and comparison with observations. As an illustration, we apply the model to Terzan 5, where we can reasonably fit both the (line-of-sight-integrated) X-ray surface flux and spectral energy density data, using the first to constrain the leptonic diffusion coefficient within the GC. We lastly discuss possible future extensions to and applications of this maturing model.

  16. Smoke plume optical properties and transport observed by a multi-wavelength lidar, sunphotometer and satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yonghua; Cordero, Lina; Gross, Barry; Moshary, Fred; Ahmed, Sam

    2012-12-01

    Optical characteristics and long-distance transport of smoke plumes are studied using satellite observations and ground-based remote sensing in New York City. Vertical distribution and column optical properties of aerosol plume are derived from a combination of multi-wavelength lidar and sunphotometer measurement. Aloft smoke plumes from two cases are investigated in this paper from U.S. western and south-western forest fires. The smoke source and transport pathway to the U.S. east coast are analyzed by MODIS and CALIOP imageries as well as HYSPLIT backward trajectory analysis. In both cases, the plumes have relatively high optical depth (as much as 1.2 at 500-nm) and Angstrom exponent of up to 1.8, but show different intrusion heights, source regions and transport process. Lidar profiling observations indicate these smoke plumes mixing downward into the planetary-boundary-layer which are coincident with increasing trends of surface PM2.5 (particulate matter, diameter < 2.5 μm) concentrations.

  17. CANDELS Multi-wavelength Catalogs: Source Identification and Photometry in the CANDELS COSMOS Survey Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nayyeri, H.; Hemmati, S.; Mobasher, B.; Ferguson, H. C.; Cooray, A.; Barro, G.; Faber, S. M.; Dickinson, M.; Koekemoer, A. M.; Peth, M.; Salvato, M.; Ashby, M. L. N.; Darvish, B.; Donley, J.; Durbin, M.; Finkelstein, S.; Fontana, A.; Grogin, N. A.; Gruetzbauch, R.; Huang, K.; Khostovan, A. A.; Kocevski, D.; Kodra, D.; Lee, B.; Newman, J.; Pacifici, C.; Pforr, J.; Stefanon, M.; Wiklind, T.; Willner, S. P.; Wuyts, S.; Castellano, M.; Conselice, C.; Dolch, T.; Dunlop, J. S.; Galametz, A.; Hathi, N. P.; Lucas, R. A.; Yan, H.

    2017-01-01

    We present a multi-wavelength photometric catalog in the COSMOS field as part of the observations by the Cosmic Assembly Near-infrared Deep Extragalactic Legacy Survey. The catalog is based on Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Camera 3 (HST/WFC3) and Advanced Camera for Surveys observations of the COSMOS field (centered at R.A.: {10}{{h}}{00}{{m}}{28}{{s}}, Decl.: +02^\\circ 12\\prime {21}\\prime\\prime ). The final catalog has 38671 sources with photometric data in 42 bands from UV to the infrared (∼ 0.3{--}8 μ {{m}}). This includes broadband photometry from HST, CFHT, Subaru, the Visible and Infrared Survey Telescope for Astronomy, and Spitzer Space Telescope in the visible, near-infrared, and infrared bands along with intermediate- and narrowband photometry from Subaru and medium-band data from Mayall NEWFIRM. Source detection was conducted in the WFC3 F160W band (at 1.6 μm) and photometry is generated using the Template FITting algorithm. We further present a catalog of the physical properties of sources as identified in the HST F160W band and measured from the multi-band photometry by fitting the observed spectral energy distributions of sources against templates.

  18. Cosmic rays from multi-wavelength observations of the Galactic diffuse emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orlando, Elena

    2016-05-01

    Cosmic rays (CRs) generate diffuse emission while interacting with the Galactic magnetic field (B-field), the interstellar gas and the radiation field. This diffuse emission extends from radio, microwaves, through X-rays, to high-energy gamma rays. Diffuse emission has considerably increased the interest of the astrophysical community due to recent detailed observations by Planck, Fermi-LAT, and by very-high energy Cherenkov telescopes. Observations of this diffuse emission and comparison with detailed predictions are used to gain information on the properties of CRs, such as their density, spectra, distribution and propagation in the Galaxy. Unfortunately disentangling and characterizing this diffuse emission strongly depends on uncertainties in the knowledge of unresolved sources, gas, radiation fields, and B-fields, other than CRs throughout the Galaxy. We discuss here the diffuse emission produced by CRs and its uncertainties, and the comparison of this predicted emission with recent multi-wavelength observations. We show insights on CR spectra and intensities. Then we address the importance for forthcoming telescopes, especially for the Square Kilometre Array telescope (SKA) and the Cherencov Telescope Array (CTA), and for missions at MeV.

  19. CANDELS Multi-wavelength Catalogs: Source Identification and Photometry in the CANDELS Extended Groth Strip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefanon, Mauro; Yan, Haojing; Mobasher, Bahram; Barro, Guillermo; Donley, Jennifer L.; Fontana, Adriano; Hemmati, Shoubaneh; Koekemoer, Anton M.; Lee, BoMee; Lee, Seong-Kook; Nayyeri, Hooshang; Peth, Michael; Pforr, Janine; Salvato, Mara; Wiklind, Tommy; Wuyts, Stijn; Ashby, Matthew L. N.; Castellano, Marco; Conselice, Christopher J.; Cooper, Michael C.; Cooray, Asantha R.; Dolch, Timothy; Ferguson, Henry; Galametz, Audrey; Giavalisco, Mauro; Guo, Yicheng; Willner, Steven P.; Dickinson, Mark E.; Faber, Sandra M.; Fazio, Giovanni G.; Gardner, Jonathan P.; Gawiser, Eric; Grazian, Andrea; Grogin, Norman A.; Kocevski, Dale; Koo, David C.; Lee, Kyoung-Soo; Lucas, Ray A.; McGrath, Elizabeth J.; Nandra, Kirpal; Newman, Jeffrey A.; van der Wel, Arjen

    2017-04-01

    We present a 0.4–8 μm multi-wavelength photometric catalog in the Extended Groth Strip (EGS) field. This catalog is built on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) WFC3 and ACS data from the Cosmic Assembly Near-infrared Deep Extragalactic Legacy Survey (CANDELS), and it incorporates the existing HST data from the All-wavelength Extended Groth strip International Survey (AEGIS) and the 3D-HST program. The catalog is based on detections in the F160W band reaching a depth of F160W = 26.62 AB (90% completeness, point sources). It includes the photometry for 41,457 objects over an area of ≈ 206 arcmin2 in the following bands: HST/ACS F606W and F814W; HST WFC3 F125W, F140W, and F160W; Canada–France–Hawaii Telescope (CFHT)/Megacam u*, g\\prime , r\\prime , i\\prime and z\\prime ; CFHT/WIRCAM J, H, and K S; Mayall/NEWFIRM J1, J2, J3, H1, H2, and K; Spitzer IRAC 3.6, 4.5, 5.8, and 8.0 μm. We are also releasing value-added catalogs that provide robust photometric redshifts and stellar mass measurements. The catalogs are publicly available through the CANDELS repository.

  20. Multi-Wavelength Observations of an Unusual Impulsive Flare Associated with Cme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uddin, Wahab; Jain, Rajmal; Yoshimura, Keiji; Chandra, Ramesh; Sakao, T.; Kosugi, T.; Joshi, Anita; Despande, M. R.

    2004-12-01

    We present the results of a detailed analysis of multi-wavelength observations of a very impulsive solar flare 1B/M6.7, which occurred on 10 March, 2001 in NOAA AR 9368 (N27 W42). The observations show that the flare is very impulsive with a very hard spectrum in HXR that reveal that non-thermal emission was most dominant. On the other hand, this flare also produced a type II radio burst and coronal mass ejections (CME), which are not general characteristics for impulsive flares. In Hα we observed bright mass ejecta (BME) followed by dark mass ejecta (DME). Based on the consistency of the onset times and directions of BME and CME, we conclude that these two phenomena are closely associated. It is inferred that the energy build-up took place due to photospheric reconnection between emerging positive parasitic polarity and predominant negative polarity, which resulted as a consequence of flux cancellation. The shear increased to >80° due to further emergence of positive parasitic polarity causing strongly enhanced cancellation of flux. It appears that such enhanced magnetic flux cancellation in a strongly sheared region triggered the impulsive flare.

  1. Multi-wavelength modeling of globular clusters–the millisecond pulsar scenario

    SciTech Connect

    Kopp, A.; Venter, C.; Büsching, I.; De Jager, O. C.

    2013-12-20

    The potentially large number of millisecond pulsars (MSPs) in globular cluster (GC) cores makes these parent objects ideal laboratories for studying the collective properties of an ensemble of MSPs. Such a population is expected to radiate several spectral components in the radio through γ-ray waveband. First, pulsed emission is expected via curvature and synchrotron radiation (CR and SR) and possibly even via inverse Compton (IC) scattering inside the pulsar magnetospheres. Second, unpulsed emission should transpire through the continuous injection of relativistic leptons by the MSPs into the ambient region, which in turn produce SR and IC emission when they encounter the cluster magnetic field, as well as several background photon components. In this paper we continue to develop the MSP scenario for explaining the multi-wavelength properties of GCs by considering the entire modeling chain, including the full transport equation, refined emissivities of stellar and Galactic background photons, integration of the flux along the line of sight, and comparison with observations. As an illustration, we apply the model to Terzan 5, where we can reasonably fit both the (line-of-sight-integrated) X-ray surface flux and spectral energy density data, using the first to constrain the leptonic diffusion coefficient within the GC. We lastly discuss possible future extensions to and applications of this maturing model.

  2. Non-invasive in vivo monitoring of circulating amphotericin b using multi-wavelength photoplethysmography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adhikari, Pratik; Eklund, Wakako; O'Neal, D. P.

    2015-03-01

    A novel multi-wavelength photoplethysmograph (PPG), previously utilized to quantify optically absorptive circulating gold nanoparticles, has demonstrated the potential to enhance therapeutic treatment predictability as pharmacokinetic metrics are provided throughout the intravenous delivery and clearance phase of amphotericin b (injected in the lipid form Abelcet®) in real-time. This report demonstrates how the PPG could be used to assess the real-time bioavailability of intravenously delivered optically-absorbing therapeutic agents. The drug currently under investigation is antifungal amphotericin b (absorption peak ~355 nm). We describe how the algorithm has been adapted to quantify the concentration of amphotericin b in the pulsatile, circulating blood based on its extinction at three wavelengths (355, 660 and 940 nm) corresponding to the peaks of amphotericin b and wavelengths for oxygen saturation measurements, respectively. We show an example of the system collecting data representing the baseline, injection, and the clearance phases. The PPG device showed a measurement range of concentrations between 0.0987 mg/mL to 0.025mg/ml in blood. An examination of the data obtained suggests that the system is well suited to sense the concentration of amphotericin b at a therapeutic dose (≍5 mg/kg/day).

  3. Multi-Wavelength Study of the 2008-2009 Outburst of V1647 Ori

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Alvarez, D.; Wright, N. J.; Drake, J. J.; Abraham, P.; Anandarao, B. G.; Kashyap, V.; Kospal, A.; Kun, M.; Marengo, M.; Moor, A.; Peneva, S.; Semkov, E.; Venkat, V.; Sanz-Forcada, J.

    2011-12-01

    V1647 Ori is a young eruptive variable star, illuminating a reflection nebula (McNeil's Nebula). It underwent an outburst in 2003 before fading back to its pre-outburst brightness in 2006. In 2008, V1647 Ori underwent a new outburst. The observed properties of the 2003-2006 event are different in several respects from both the EXor and FUor type outbursts, and suggest that this star might represent a new class of eruptive young stars, younger and more deeply embedded than EXors, and exhibiting variations on shorter time scales than FUors. In outburst, the star lights up the otherwise invisible McNeil's nebular -- a conical cloud likely accumulated from previous outbursts. We present follow-up photometric as well as optical and near-IR spectroscopy of the nebula obtainted during the 2008-2009 outburst. We will also present results from contemporaneous X-ray observations. These multi-wavelength observations of V1647 Ori, obtained at this key early stage of the outburst, provide a snapshot of the "lighting up" of the nebula, probe its evolution through the event, and enable comparison with the 2003-2006 outburst.

  4. Compact Galaxy Groups: A Multi-wavelength Perspective Into Galaxy Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konstantopoulos, Iraklis; HCG Collaboration

    2011-01-01

    Galaxies are seldom found in isolation. As a small unit of large clusters, individual members are subject to the volition of their groupings and evolve most commonly through interactions and mergers. In the parameter-space between too many friends and none at all lie compact galaxy groups. The ones classified by Hickson (1982; Hickson compact groups, or HCGs) share the distinctive characteristics of low membership, isolation and high density. They exhibit low velocity dispersions, which which lead to prolonged interactions, when such events occur, or quasi-secular evolution, when they do not. They are also HI-deficient, to a very intriguing extent. I will be discussing multi-wavelength observations of a sample of 12 HCGs in the context of galaxy evolution in general. For example, in HCG 7 we observed the strengthening of interactions due to the complexity of the tidal field, in a system that is likely headed toward a dry merger. In the low mass grouping of HCG 31 we recorded morphological transformation reminiscent of the intermediate redshift universe, with multiple simultaneous interactions leading to the build-up of a gaseous intra-group medium. These results, along with many more, allow us to examine the overall themes that arise from the study of the aforementioned dozen: the usage of gas; the possibility of rapid morphological transformation of compact group galaxies; and the role of groups as the tail end of the galaxy clustering N-distribution.

  5. A new multi-wavelength model-based method for determination of enzyme kinetic parameters.

    PubMed

    Sorouraddin, Mohammad-Hossein; Amini, Kaveh; Naseri, Abdolhossein; Vallipour, Javad; Hanaee, Jalal; Rashidi, Mohammad-Reza

    2010-09-01

    Lineweaver-Burk plot analysis is the most widely used method to determine enzyme kinetic parameters. In the spectrophotometric determination of enzyme activity using the Lineweaver-Burk plot, it is necessary to find a wavelength at which only the substrate or the product has absorbance without any spectroscopic interference of the other reaction components. Moreover, in this method, different initial concentrations of the substrate should be used to obtain the initial velocities required for Lineweaver-Burk plot analysis. In the present work, a multi-wavelength model-based method has been developed and validated to determine Michaelis-Menten constants for some enzyme reactions. In this method, a selective wavelength region and several experiments with different initial concentrations of the substrate are not required. The absorbance data of the kinetic assays are fitted by non-linear regression coupled to the numeric integration of the related differential equation. To indicate the applicability of the proposed method, the Michaelis-Menten constants for the oxidation of phenanthridine, 6-deoxypenciclovir and xanthine by molybdenum hydroxylases were determined using only a single initial concentration of the substrate, regardless of any spectral overlap.

  6. Characterization and optimization of a thin direct electron detector for fast imaging applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dourki, I.; Westermeier, F.; Schopper, F.; Richter, R. H.; Andricek, L.; Ninkovic, J.; Treis, J.; Koffmane, C.; Wassatsch, A.; Peric, I.; Epp, S. W.; Miller, R. J. D.

    2017-03-01

    Direct electron detectors are increasingly used to explore the dynamics of macromolecules in real space and real time using transmission electron microscopy. The purpose of this work is to optimize the most suitable detector configuration of a thin silicon detector by Monte Carlo Simulations. Several simulations were performed to achieve an advanced detector geometry that reduces significantly the background signal due to backscattered electrons resulting in an enhanced imaging performance of the detector. Utilizing DEPFET (DEpleted P-channel Field Effect Transistor) technology and the novel ideas for the optimized detector geometry, a unique direct hit electron detector is currently being produced.

  7. Development of a neutron imager based on superconducting detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyajima, Shigeyuki; Yamaguchi, Hiroyuki; Nakayama, Hirotaka; Shishido, Hiroaki; Fujimaki, Akira; Hidaka, Mutsuo; Harada, Masahide; Oikawa, Kenichi; Oku, Takayuki; Arai, Masatoshi; Ishida, Takekazu

    2016-11-01

    We succeeded in demonstrating a neutron detector based on a Nb superconducting meander line with a 10B conversion layer for a neutron imager based on superconductor devices. We use a current-biased kinetic inductance detector (CB-KID), which is composed of a meander line, for detection of a neutron with high spatial resolution and fast response time. The thickness of Nb meander lines is 40 nm and the line width is narrower than 3 mu m. The area of 8 mm × 8 mm is covered by CB-KIDs, which are assembled at the center of the Si chip of the size 22 mm × 22 mm. The Nb CB-KIDs with a 10B conversion layer output the voltage by irradiating pulsed neutrons. We have investigated γ/n discrimination of a Nb-based CB-KID with 10B conversion layer using a Cd plate, which indicates that a CB-KID can operate as a neutron detector under the strong γ-ray fields.

  8. Cadmium Telluride Semiconductor Detector for Improved Spatial and Energy Resolution Radioisotopic Imaging.

    PubMed

    Abbaspour, Samira; Mahmoudian, Babak; Islamian, Jalil Pirayesh

    2017-01-01

    The detector in single-photon emission computed tomography has played a key role in the quality of the images. Over the past few decades, developments in semiconductor detector technology provided an appropriate substitution for scintillation detectors in terms of high sensitivity, better energy resolution, and also high spatial resolution. One of the considered detectors is cadmium telluride (CdTe). The purpose of this paper is to review the CdTe semiconductor detector used in preclinical studies, small organ and small animal imaging, also research in nuclear medicine and other medical imaging modalities by a complete inspect on the material characteristics, irradiation principles, applications, and epitaxial growth method.

  9. Cadmium Telluride Semiconductor Detector for Improved Spatial and Energy Resolution Radioisotopic Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Abbaspour, Samira; Mahmoudian, Babak; Islamian, Jalil Pirayesh

    2017-01-01

    The detector in single-photon emission computed tomography has played a key role in the quality of the images. Over the past few decades, developments in semiconductor detector technology provided an appropriate substitution for scintillation detectors in terms of high sensitivity, better energy resolution, and also high spatial resolution. One of the considered detectors is cadmium telluride (CdTe). The purpose of this paper is to review the CdTe semiconductor detector used in preclinical studies, small organ and small animal imaging, also research in nuclear medicine and other medical imaging modalities by a complete inspect on the material characteristics, irradiation principles, applications, and epitaxial growth method. PMID:28553175

  10. Star Formation in the Filamentary Dark Cloud GF-9: a Multi-Wavelength Intra-Cloud Comparative Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciardi, David Robert

    Filamentary dark clouds (FDCs) are a subclass of small molecular clouds containing small numbers of somewhat regularly spaced dense cores connected by lower density gas and dust. Most of the previous work performed on FDCs has concerned the star formation properties of individual dense cores within the FDCs and has not concerned the FDCs as entities of their own. As a result little is known about the general star formation properties of FDCs. The primary question addressed in this work is 'Within filamentary dark clouds, how does the star formation process within a core region compare to that within a filamentary region?' In order to address the above question, a multi-wavelength observational comparative study has been performed upon a representative dense core (hereafter, GF9-Core) and filamentary region (hereafter, GF9-Fila) within the FDC GF-9 (LDN 1082). At the Five College Radio Astronomy Observatory, the core and filamentary region were observed in the rotational transitions of 12CO/ (J=1/to0),/ 13CO/ (J=1/to0)/ and/ CS/ (J=2/to1) covering a region of 10' x 8'. The temperature, density and kinematic structures of the two regions were deduced from the radio imaging spectroscopy data and were used to estimate the energy balance of the regions. We also obtained 70, 100, 135 and 200 μm images from the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) covering approximately 12' x 9' which were used to investigate the temperature and density distributions of the dust within the two regions. Finally, at the Wyoming Infrared Observatory using the Aerospace Corporation NICMOS3 camera, the core and filament were imaged in the near-infrared broadband filters J, H, and K-short covering a slightly smaller region of 7' x 7'. The near-infrared survey data were used to search for embedded Class I and Class II protostars and to investigate the density distribution of the dust. We have found that the evolutionary processes of the core region and the filament region proceed along similar

  11. High-density scintillating glasses for a proton imaging detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tillman, I. J.; Dettmann, M. A.; Herrig, V.; Thune, Z. L.; Zieser, A. J.; Michalek, S. F.; Been, M. O.; Martinez-Szewczyk, M. M.; Koster, H. J.; Wilkinson, C. J.; Kielty, M. W.; Jacobsohn, L. G.; Akgun, U.

    2017-06-01

    High-density scintillating glasses are proposed for a novel proton-imaging device that can improve the accuracy of the hadron therapy. High-density scintillating glasses are needed to build a cost effective, compact calorimeter that can be attached to a gantry. This report summarizes the study on Europium, Terbium, and Cerium-doped scintillating glasses that were developed containing heavy elements such as Lanthanum, Gadolinium, and Tungsten. The density of the samples reach up to 5.9 g/cm3, and their 300-600 nm emission overlaps perfectly with the peak cathode sensitivity of the commercial photo detectors. The developed glasses do not require any special quenching and can be poured easily, which makes them a good candidate for production in various geometries. Here, the glass making conditions, preliminary tests on optical and physical properties of these scintillating, high-density, oxide glasses developed for a novel medical imaging application are reported.

  12. Multilayer fluorescence imaging on a single-pixel detector

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Kaikai; Jiang, Shaowei; Zheng, Guoan

    2016-01-01

    A critical challenge for fluorescence imaging is the loss of high frequency components in the detection path. Such a loss can be related to the limited numerical aperture of the detection optics, aberrations of the lens, and tissue turbidity. In this paper, we report an imaging scheme that integrates multilayer sample modeling, ptychography-inspired recovery procedures, and lensless single-pixel detection to tackle this challenge. In the reported scheme, we directly placed a 3D sample on top of a single-pixel detector. We then used a known mask to generate speckle patterns in 3D and scanned this known mask to different positions for sample illumination. The sample was then modeled as multiple layers and the captured 1D fluorescence signals were used to recover multiple sample images along the z axis. The reported scheme may find applications in 3D fluorescence sectioning, time-resolved and spectrum-resolved imaging. It may also find applications in deep-tissue fluorescence imaging using the memory effect. PMID:27446679

  13. Multilayer fluorescence imaging on a single-pixel detector.

    PubMed

    Guo, Kaikai; Jiang, Shaowei; Zheng, Guoan

    2016-07-01

    A critical challenge for fluorescence imaging is the loss of high frequency components in the detection path. Such a loss can be related to the limited numerical aperture of the detection optics, aberrations of the lens, and tissue turbidity. In this paper, we report an imaging scheme that integrates multilayer sample modeling, ptychography-inspired recovery procedures, and lensless single-pixel detection to tackle this challenge. In the reported scheme, we directly placed a 3D sample on top of a single-pixel detector. We then used a known mask to generate speckle patterns in 3D and scanned this known mask to different positions for sample illumination. The sample was then modeled as multiple layers and the captured 1D fluorescence signals were used to recover multiple sample images along the z axis. The reported scheme may find applications in 3D fluorescence sectioning, time-resolved and spectrum-resolved imaging. It may also find applications in deep-tissue fluorescence imaging using the memory effect.

  14. Laser system for testing radiation imaging detector circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zubrzycka, Weronika; Kasinski, Krzysztof

    2015-09-01

    Performance and functionality of radiation imaging detector circuits in charge and position measurement systems need to meet tight requirements. It is therefore necessary to thoroughly test sensors as well as read-out electronics. The major disadvantages of using radioactive sources or particle beams for testing are high financial expenses and limited accessibility. As an alternative short pulses of well-focused laser beam are often used for preliminary tests. There are number of laser-based devices available on the market, but very often their applicability in this field is limited. This paper describes concept, design and validation of laser system for testing silicon sensor based radiation imaging detector circuits. The emphasis is put on keeping overall costs low while achieving all required goals: mobility, flexible parameters, remote control and possibility of carrying out automated tests. The main part of the developed device is an optical pick-up unit (OPU) used in optical disc drives. The hardware includes FPGA-controlled circuits for laser positioning in 2 dimensions (horizontal and vertical), precision timing (frequency and number) and amplitude (diode current) of short ns-scale (3.2 ns) light pulses. The system is controlled via USB interface by a dedicated LabVIEW-based application enabling full manual or semi-automated test procedures.

  15. The CdTe detector module and its imaging performance.

    PubMed

    Mori, I; Takayama, T; Motomura, N

    2001-12-01

    In recent years investigations into the application of semiconductor detector technology in gamma cameras have become active world-wide. The reason for this burst of activity is the expectation that the semiconductor-based gamma camera would outperform the conventional Anger-type gamma camera with a large scintillator and photomultipliers. Nevertheless, to date, it cannot be said that this expectation has been met. While most of the studies have used CZT (Cadmium Zinc Telluride) as the semiconductor material, we designed and fabricated an experimental detector module of CdTe (Cadmium Telluride). The module consists of 512 elements and its pixel pitch is 1.6 mm. We have evaluated its energy resolution, planar image performance, single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) image performance and time resolution for coincidence detection. The average energy resolution was 5.5% FWHM at 140 keV. The intrinsic spatial resolution was 1.6 mm. The quality of the phantom images, both planar and SPECT, was visually superior to that of the Anger-type gamma camera. The quantitative assessment of SPECT images showed accuracy far better than that of the Anger-type camera. The coincidence time resolution was 8.6 ns. All measurements were done at room temperature, and the polarization effect that had been the biggest concern for CdTe was not significant. The results indicated that the semiconductor-based gamma camera is superior in performance to the Anger-type and has the possibility of being used as a positron emission computed tomography (PET) scanner.

  16. Single Photon Counting Detectors for Low Light Level Imaging Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolb, Kimberly

    2015-10-01

    This dissertation presents the current state-of-the-art of semiconductor-based photon counting detector technologies. HgCdTe linear-mode avalanche photodiodes (LM-APDs), silicon Geiger-mode avalanche photodiodes (GM-APDs), and electron-multiplying CCDs (EMCCDs) are compared via their present and future performance in various astronomy applications. LM-APDs are studied in theory, based on work done at the University of Hawaii. EMCCDs are studied in theory and experimentally, with a device at NASA's Jet Propulsion Lab. The emphasis of the research is on GM-APD imaging arrays, developed at MIT Lincoln Laboratory and tested at the RIT Center for Detectors. The GM-APD research includes a theoretical analysis of SNR and various performance metrics, including dark count rate, afterpulsing, photon detection efficiency, and intrapixel sensitivity. The effects of radiation damage on the GM-APD were also characterized by introducing a cumulative dose of 50 krad(Si) via 60 MeV protons. Extensive development of Monte Carlo simulations and practical observation simulations was completed, including simulated astronomical imaging and adaptive optics wavefront sensing. Based on theoretical models and experimental testing, both the current state-of-the-art performance and projected future performance of each detector are compared for various applications. LM-APD performance is currently not competitive with other photon counting technologies, and are left out of the application-based comparisons. In the current state-of-the-art, EMCCDs in photon counting mode out-perform GM-APDs for long exposure scenarios, though GM-APDs are better for short exposure scenarios (fast readout) due to clock-induced-charge (CIC) in EMCCDs. In the long term, small improvements in GM-APD dark current will make them superior in both long and short exposure scenarios for extremely low flux. The efficiency of GM-APDs will likely always be less than EMCCDs, however, which is particularly disadvantageous for

  17. Infrared light field imaging using single carbon nanotube detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xi, Ning; Chen, Liangliang; Zhou, Zhanxin; Yang, Ruiguo; Song, Bo; Sun, Zhiyong

    2014-06-01

    The conventional photographs only record the sum total of light rays of each point on image plane so that they tell little about the amount of light traveling along individual rays. The focus and lens aberration problems have challenged photographers since the very beginning therefore light field photography was proposed to solve these problems. Lens array and multiple camera systems are used to capture 4D light rays, by reordering the different views of scene from multiple directions. The coded aperture is another method to encode the angular information in frequency domain. However, infrared light field sensing is still widely opening to research. In the paper, we will propose micro plane mirror optics together with compressive sensing algorithm to record light field in infrared spectrum. The micro mirror reflects objects irradiation and forms a virtual image behind the plane in which the mirror lies. The Digital Micromirror (DMD) consists of millions microscale mirrors which work as CCD array in the camera and it is controlled separately so as to project linear combination of object image onto lens. Coded aperture could be utilized to control angular resolution of infrared light rays. The carbon nanotube based infrared detector, which has ultra high signal to noise ratio and ultra fast responsibility, will sum up all image information on it without image distortion. Based on a number of measurements, compressive sensing algorithm was used to recover images from distinct angles, which could compute different views of scene to reconstruct infrared light field scence. Two innovative applications of full image recovery using nano scale photodetector and DMD based synthetic aperture photography will also be discussed in this paper.

  18. Multi-wavelength View of Kiloparsec-scale Clumps in Star-forming Galaxies at z ~ 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Yicheng; Giavalisco, Mauro; Ferguson, Henry C.; Cassata, Paolo; Koekemoer, Anton M.

    2012-10-01

    This paper studies the properties of kiloparsec-scale clumps in star-forming galaxies at z ~ 2 through multi-wavelength broadband photometry. A sample of 40 clumps is identified from Hubble Space Telescope (HST)/Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) z-band images through auto-detection and visual inspection from 10 galaxies with 1.5 < z < 2.5 in the Hubble Ultra Deep Field, where deep and high-resolution HST/WFC3 and ACS images enable us to resolve structures of z ~ 2 galaxies down to the kiloparsec scale in the rest-frame UV and optical bands and to detect clumps toward the faint end. The physical properties of clumps are measured through fitting spatially resolved seven-band (BVizYJH) spectral energy distribution to models. On average, the clumps are blue and have similar median rest-frame UV-optical color as the diffuse components of their host galaxies, but the clumps have large scatter in their colors. Although the star formation rate (SFR)-stellar mass relation of galaxies is dominated by the diffuse components, clumps emerge as regions with enhanced specific star formation rates, contributing individually ~10% and together ~50% of the SFR of the host galaxies. However, the contributions of clumps to the rest-frame UV/optical luminosity and stellar mass are smaller, typically a few percent individually and ~20% together. On average, clumps are younger by 0.2 dex and denser by a factor of eight than diffuse components. Clump properties have obvious radial variations in the sense that central clumps are redder, older, more extincted, denser, and less active on forming stars than outskirt clumps. Our results are broadly consistent with a widely held view that clumps are formed through gravitational instability in gas-rich turbulent disks and would eventually migrate toward galactic centers and coalesce into bulges. Roughly 40% of the galaxies in our sample contain a massive clump that could be identified as a proto-bulge, which seems qualitatively consistent with

  19. MULTI-WAVELENGTH VIEW OF KILOPARSEC-SCALE CLUMPS IN STAR-FORMING GALAXIES AT z {approx} 2

    SciTech Connect

    Guo Yicheng; Giavalisco, Mauro; Cassata, Paolo; Ferguson, Henry C.; Koekemoer, Anton M.

    2012-10-01

    This paper studies the properties of kiloparsec-scale clumps in star-forming galaxies at z {approx} 2 through multi-wavelength broadband photometry. A sample of 40 clumps is identified from Hubble Space Telescope (HST)/Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) z-band images through auto-detection and visual inspection from 10 galaxies with 1.5 < z < 2.5 in the Hubble Ultra Deep Field, where deep and high-resolution HST/WFC3 and ACS images enable us to resolve structures of z {approx} 2 galaxies down to the kiloparsec scale in the rest-frame UV and optical bands and to detect clumps toward the faint end. The physical properties of clumps are measured through fitting spatially resolved seven-band (BVizYJH) spectral energy distribution to models. On average, the clumps are blue and have similar median rest-frame UV-optical color as the diffuse components of their host galaxies, but the clumps have large scatter in their colors. Although the star formation rate (SFR)-stellar mass relation of galaxies is dominated by the diffuse components, clumps emerge as regions with enhanced specific star formation rates, contributing individually {approx}10% and together {approx}50% of the SFR of the host galaxies. However, the contributions of clumps to the rest-frame UV/optical luminosity and stellar mass are smaller, typically a few percent individually and {approx}20% together. On average, clumps are younger by 0.2 dex and denser by a factor of eight than diffuse components. Clump properties have obvious radial variations in the sense that central clumps are redder, older, more extincted, denser, and less active on forming stars than outskirt clumps. Our results are broadly consistent with a widely held view that clumps are formed through gravitational instability in gas-rich turbulent disks and would eventually migrate toward galactic centers and coalesce into bulges. Roughly 40% of the galaxies in our sample contain a massive clump that could be identified as a proto-bulge, which

  20. A piecewise-focused high DQE detector for MV imaging.

    PubMed

    Star-Lack, Josh; Shedlock, Daniel; Swahn, Dennis; Humber, Dave; Wang, Adam; Hirsh, Hayley; Zentai, George; Sawkey, Daren; Kruger, Isaac; Sun, Mingshan; Abel, Eric; Virshup, Gary; Shin, Mihye; Fahrig, Rebecca

    2015-09-01

    Electronic portal imagers (EPIDs) with high detective quantum efficiencies (DQEs) are sought to facilitate the use of the megavoltage (MV) radiotherapy treatment beam for image guidance. Potential advantages include high quality (treatment) beam's eye view imaging, and improved cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) generating images with more accurate electron density maps with immunity to metal artifacts. One approach to increasing detector sensitivity is to couple a thick pixelated scintillator array to an active matrix flat panel imager (AMFPI) incorporating amorphous silicon thin film electronics. Cadmium tungstate (CWO) has many desirable scintillation properties including good light output, a high index of refraction, high optical transparency, and reasonable cost. However, due to the 0 1 0 cleave plane inherent in its crystalline structure, the difficulty of cutting and polishing CWO has, in part, limited its study relative to other scintillators such as cesium iodide and bismuth germanate (BGO). The goal of this work was to build and test a focused large-area pixelated "strip" CWO detector. A 361 × 52 mm scintillator assembly that contained a total of 28 072 pixels was constructed. The assembly comprised seven subarrays, each 15 mm thick. Six of the subarrays were fabricated from CWO with a pixel pitch of 0.784 mm, while one array was constructed from BGO for comparison. Focusing was achieved by coupling the arrays to the Varian AS1000 AMFPI through a piecewise linear arc-shaped fiber optic plate. Simulation and experimental studies of modulation transfer function (MTF) and DQE were undertaken using a 6 MV beam, and comparisons were made between the performance of the pixelated strip assembly and the most common EPID configuration comprising a 1 mm-thick copper build-up plate attached to a 133 mg/cm(2) gadolinium oxysulfide scintillator screen (Cu-GOS). Projection radiographs and CBCT images of phantoms were acquired. The work also introduces the use of a

  1. A piecewise-focused high DQE detector for MV imaging

    PubMed Central

    Star-Lack, Josh; Shedlock, Daniel; Swahn, Dennis; Humber, Dave; Wang, Adam; Hirsh, Hayley; Zentai, George; Sawkey, Daren; Kruger, Isaac; Sun, Mingshan; Abel, Eric; Virshup, Gary; Shin, Mihye; Fahrig, Rebecca

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Electronic portal imagers (EPIDs) with high detective quantum efficiencies (DQEs) are sought to facilitate the use of the megavoltage (MV) radiotherapy treatment beam for image guidance. Potential advantages include high quality (treatment) beam’s eye view imaging, and improved cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) generating images with more accurate electron density maps with immunity to metal artifacts. One approach to increasing detector sensitivity is to couple a thick pixelated scintillator array to an active matrix flat panel imager (AMFPI) incorporating amorphous silicon thin film electronics. Cadmium tungstate (CWO) has many desirable scintillation properties including good light output, a high index of refraction, high optical transparency, and reasonable cost. However, due to the 0 1 0 cleave plane inherent in its crystalline structure, the difficulty of cutting and polishing CWO has, in part, limited its study relative to other scintillators such as cesium iodide and bismuth germanate (BGO). The goal of this work was to build and test a focused large-area pixelated “strip” CWO detector. Methods: A 361  ×  52 mm scintillator assembly that contained a total of 28 072 pixels was constructed. The assembly comprised seven subarrays, each 15 mm thick. Six of the subarrays were fabricated from CWO with a pixel pitch of 0.784 mm, while one array was constructed from BGO for comparison. Focusing was achieved by coupling the arrays to the Varian AS1000 AMFPI through a piecewise linear arc-shaped fiber optic plate. Simulation and experimental studies of modulation transfer function (MTF) and DQE were undertaken using a 6 MV beam, and comparisons were made between the performance of the pixelated strip assembly and the most common EPID configuration comprising a 1 mm-thick copper build-up plate attached to a 133 mg/cm2 gadolinium oxysulfide scintillator screen (Cu-GOS). Projection radiographs and CBCT images of phantoms were acquired. The work

  2. Rapid multi-wavelength optical assessment of circulating blood volume without a priori data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loginova, Ekaterina V.; Zhidkova, Tatyana V.; Proskurnin, Mikhail A.; Zharov, Vladimir P.

    2016-03-01

    The measurement of circulating blood volume (CBV) is crucial in various medical conditions including surgery, iatrogenic problems, rapid fluid administration, transfusion of red blood cells, or trauma with extensive blood loss including battlefield injuries and other emergencies. Currently, available commercial techniques are invasive and time-consuming for trauma situations. Recently, we have proposed high-speed multi-wavelength photoacoustic/photothermal (PA/PT) flow cytometry for in vivo CBV assessment with multiple dyes as PA contrast agents (labels). As the first step, we have characterized the capability of this technique to monitor the clearance of three dyes (indocyanine green, methylene blue, and trypan blue) in an animal model. However, there are strong demands on improvements in PA/PT flow cytometry. As additional verification of our proof-of-concept of this technique, we performed optical photometric CBV measurements in vitro. Three label dyes—methylene blue, crystal violet and, partially, brilliant green—were selected for simultaneous photometric determination of the components of their two-dye mixtures in the circulating blood in vitro without any extra data (like hemoglobin absorption) known a priori. The tests of single dyes and their mixtures in a flow system simulating a blood transfusion system showed a negligible difference between the sensitivities of the determination of these dyes under batch and flow conditions. For individual dyes, the limits of detection of 3×10-6 M‒3×10-6 M in blood were achieved, which provided their continuous determination at a level of 10-5 M for the CBV assessment without a priori data on the matrix. The CBV assessment with errors no higher than 4% were obtained, and the possibility to apply the developed procedure for optical photometric (flow cytometry) with laser sources was shown.

  3. Multi-wavelength mid-IR light source for gas sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karioja, Pentti; Alajoki, Teemu; Cherchi, Matteo; Ollila, Jyrki; Harjanne, Mikko; Heinilehto, Noora; Suomalainen, Soile; Viheriälä, Jukka; Zia, Nouman; Guina, Mircea; Buczyński, Ryszard; Kasztelanic, Rafał; Kujawa, Ireneusz; Salo, Tomi; Virtanen, Sami; Kluczyński, Paweł; Sagberg, Hâkon; Ratajczyk, Marcin; Kalinowski, Przemyslaw

    2017-02-01

    Cost effective multi-wavelength light sources are key enablers for wide-scale penetration of gas sensors at Mid-IR wavelength range. Utilizing novel Mid-IR Si-based photonic integrated circuits (PICs) filter and wide-band Mid-IR Super Luminescent Light Emitting Diodes (SLEDs), we show the concept of a light source that covers 2.5…3.5 μm wavelength range with a resolution of <1nm. The spectral bands are switchable and tunable and they can be modulated. The source allows for the fabrication of an affordable multi-band gas sensor with good selectivity and sensitivity. The unit price can be lowered in high volumes by utilizing tailored molded IR lens technology and automated packaging and assembling technologies. The status of the development of the key components of the light source are reported. The PIC is based on the use of micron-scale SOI technology, SLED is based on AlGaInAsSb materials and the lenses are tailored heavy metal oxide glasses fabricated by the use of hot-embossing. The packaging concept utilizing automated assembly tools is depicted. In safety and security applications, the Mid-IR wavelength range covered by the novel light source allows for detecting several harmful gas components with a single sensor. At the moment, affordable sources are not available. The market impact is expected to be disruptive, since the devices currently in the market are either complicated, expensive and heavy instruments, or the applied measurement principles are inadequate in terms of stability and selectivity.

  4. THEoretical Modelling and multi-wavelength Observations of evolved Stars (THEMOS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uscanga, L.; Boumis, P.

    2013-09-01

    Planetary Nebulae (PNe) are one of the last phases in the evolution of low/intermediate mass stars (<8Msun), characterized by extended diffuse ionized and neutral gas surrounding the dying hot cores of highly evolved stars. Their immediate precursors are stars in the asymptotic giant branch (AGB), characterized by a strong mass-loss, followed by a short (100-10000 yr) transitional post-AGB phase. While the morphology of the mass-loss processes in the AGB phase is usually spherically symmetric, PNe show complex bipolar or multipolar structures. Diverse structural components of these evolved stars can be observed at different wavelengths, i.e., 1) ionised bipolar/multipolar structures in PNe, observed from optical to cm-wavelengths; 2) maser emission tracing outflows/discs in post- AGBs/extremely young Pne, observed at cm-wavelengths; 3) circumstellar molecular gas presumably tracing dense toroidal structures towards the centre of PNe, observed at mm/submm-wavelengths. These multi wavelength studies together with theoretical modelling (3D hydrodynamical simulations, kinematical models, and radiative transfer studies) are important to derive a complete picture of the evolution of low/intermediate mass stars. The aim of THEMOS project is to determine the genesis of the asymmetry in these evolved stars by studying their physical conditions, morphology, and kinematics of ionized and neutral gas. These studies will cover a wide range of spatial scales from hundreds of AU for optical studies, down to a few AU, using radio interferometric techniques. We will present our first results from our radio interferometric observations in PNe, as well as the hydrodynamical modeling of the morphology and kinematics of the PN NGC 6302.

  5. Multi-wavelength Characterization of Brown and Black Carbon from Filter Samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, M. M.; Yatavelli, R. L. N.; Chen, L. W. A. A.; Gyawali, M. S.; Arnott, W. P.; Wang, X.; Chakrabarty, R. K.; Moosmüller, H.; Watson, J. G.; Chow, J. C.

    2014-12-01

    Particulate matter (PM) scatters and absorbs solar radiation and thereby affects visibility, the Earth's radiation balance, and properties and lifetimes of clouds. Understanding the radiative forcing (RF) of PM is essential to reducing the uncertainty in total anthropogenic and natural RF. Many instruments that measure light absorption coefficients (βabs [λ], Mm-1) of PM have used light at near-infrared (NIR; e.g., 880 nm) or red (e.g., 633 nm) wavelengths. Measuring βabs over a wider wavelength range, especially including the ultraviolet (UV) and visible, allows for contributions from black carbon (BC), brown carbon (BrC), and mineral dust (MD) to be differentiated. This will help to determine PM RF and its emission sources. In this study, source and ambient samples collected on Teflon-membrane and quartz-fiber filters are used to characterize and develop a multi-wavelength (250 - 1000 nm) filter-based measurement method of PM light absorption. A commercially available UV-visible spectrometer coupled with an integrating sphere is used for quantifying diffuse reflectance and transmittance of filter samples, from which βabs and absorption Ǻngström exponents (AAE) of the PM deposits are determined. The filter-based light absorption measurements of laboratory generated soot and biomass burning aerosol are compared to 3-wavelength photoacoustic absorption measurements to evaluate filter media and loading effects. Calibration factors are developed to account for differences between filter types (Teflon-membrane vs. quartz-fiber), and between filters and in situ photoacoustic absorption values. Application of multi-spectral absorption measurements to existing archived filters, including specific source samples (e.g. diesel and gasoline engines, biomass burning, dust), will also be discussed.

  6. Synthetic 3D modeling of active regions and simulation of their multi-wavelength emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nita, Gelu M.; Fleishman, Gregory; Kuznetsov, Alexey A.; Loukitcheva, Maria A.; Viall, Nicholeen M.; Klimchuk, James A.; Gary, Dale E.

    2015-04-01

    To facilitate the study of solar active regions, we have created a synthetic modeling framework that combines 3D magnetic structures obtained from magnetic extrapolations with simplified 1D thermal models of the chromosphere, transition region, and corona. To handle, visualize, and use such synthetic data cubes to compute multi-wavelength emission maps and compare them with observations, we have undertaken a major enhancement of our simulation tools, GX_Simulator (ftp://sohoftp.nascom.nasa.gov/solarsoft/packages/gx_simulator/), developed earlier for modeling emission from flaring loops. The greatly enhanced, object-based architecture, which now runs on Windows, Mac, and UNIX platform, offers important new capabilities that include the ability to either import 3D density and temperature distribution models, or to assign to each individual voxel numerically defined coronal or chromospheric temperature and densities, or coronal Differential Emission Measure distributions. Due to these new capabilities, the GX_Simulator can now apply parametric heating models involving average properties of the magnetic field lines crossing a given voxel volume, as well as compute and investigate the spatial and spectral properties of radio (to be compared with VLA or EOVSA data), (sub-)millimeter (ALMA), EUV (AIA/SDO), and X-ray (RHESSI) emission calculated from the model. The application integrates shared-object libraries containing fast free-free, gyrosynchrotron, and gyroresonance emission codes developed in FORTRAN and C++, and soft and hard X-ray and EUV codes developed in IDL. We use this tool to model and analyze an active region and compare the synthetic emission maps obtained in different wavelengths with observations.This work was partially supported by NSF grants AGS-1250374, AGS-1262772, NASA grant NNX14AC87G, the Marie Curie International Research Staff Exchange Scheme "Radiosun" (PEOPLE-2011-IRSES-295272), RFBR grants 14-02-91157, 15-02-01089, 15-02-03717, 15

  7. Multi-wavelength Study of Blazars Using Variability as a Tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baliyan, Kiran S.; Kaur, Navpreet; Chandra, Sunil; Sameer, Sameer; Ganesh, Shashikiran

    2016-09-01

    Active galactic nuclei (AGN) are too compact to be resolved by any existing optical telescope facility, making it difficult to understand their structure and the emission processes responsible for their huge energy output. However, variability, one of their characteristic properties, provides a tool to probe the inner regions of AGN. Blazars are the best candidates for such a study, and hence a considerable amount of effort is being made to investigate variability in these sources across the electromagnetic spectrum. Here, using the Mt. Abu infrared observatory (MIRO) blazar monitoring program, we present intra-night, inter-night, and long term aspects of the variability in S5 0716+71, 3C66A, and OJ 287. These stars show significant variability on short (a few tens of mins, to a few hours, to a few days) to long term (months to years) timescales. Based on the light travel time argument, the shortest variability timescales (micro-variability) provide upper limits to the size of the emission region. While S5 0716 shows a very high duty cycle of variability (> 80 %), 3C66A shows a much lower intra day variability (IDV) duty cycle (< 20 %). All three show rapid variations within 2.5 to 3.5 hr, which, perhaps, are generated near the vicinity of black holes. Assuming this, estimates of the masses of the black holes are made at 10^{9} , 8×10^{8}, and 2.7×10^{9} M⨀ for S5 0716+71, 3C66A, and OJ 287, respectively. Multi-wavelength light-curves for the blazar PKS 1510-089 are discussed to infer the emission processes responsible for the recent flaring episodes in this source.

  8. Multi-wavelength properties and SMBH's masses of the isolated AGNs in the Local Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vavilova, I. B.; Vasylenko, A. A.; Babyk, Iu. V.; Pulatova, N. G.

    2016-08-01

    The sample of 36 nearest isolated AGNs was cross-matched by 2MIG and Veron-Cetty catalogues and limited to Ks ≤ 12.0m and Vr < 15 000 km/s in the northern sky (δ ≥ -15°). These objects were in isolation during ~ 3 Gyrs. For revealing their multi-wavelength properties we used all the available databases obtained with ground-based and space observatories (from radio to X-ray ranges). It is allowed us to separate the internal evolution mechanisms from the environment influence and consider them as two separate processes related to fueling nuclear activity and accretion on the SMBHs outside of the environment. In this report we present briefly main results, which were already published (Pulatova N., Vavilova I., Sawangwit U. et al. The 2MIG isolated AGNs - I. General and multiwavelength properties of AGNs and host galaxies in the northern sky, MNRAS, 447, Issue 3, p. 2209-2223 (2015)). We accentuate that for the first time we revealed that the host isolated galaxies with AGNs of Sy1 type (without faint companions) appear to possess the bar morphological features (e.g., the interaction with neighboring galaxies is not necessary condition for broad-line region formation). We give also current results as concerns with more detail X-ray analysis, emission features and spectral models for several AGNs for which a cumulative soft and hard energy spectrum was reconstructed. The estimates of SMBH masses show that are systematically lower than the SMBH masses of AGNs located in a dense environment.

  9. Unveiling the First Black Holes With JWST:Multi-wavelength Spectral Predictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Natarajan, Priyamvada; Pacucci, Fabio; Ferrara, Andrea; Agarwal, Bhaskar; Ricarte, Angelo; Zackrisson, Erik; Cappelluti, Nico

    2017-04-01

    Growing supermassive black holes (˜ {10}9 {M}⊙ ) that power luminous z> 6 quasars from light seeds—the remnants of the first stars—within a Gyr of the Big Bang poses a timing challenge. The formation of massive black hole seeds via direct collapse with initial masses ˜ {10}4{--}{10}5 {M}⊙ alleviates this problem. Viable direct-collapse black hole formation sites, the satellite halos of star-forming galaxies, merge and acquire stars to produce a new, transient class of high-redshift objects, obese black hole galaxies (OBGs). The accretion luminosity outshines that of the stars in OBGs. We predict the multi-wavelength energy output of OBGs and growing Pop III remnants at z = 9 for standard and slim disk accretion, as well as high and low metallicities of the associated stellar population. We derive robust selection criteria for OBGs—a pre-selection to eliminate blue sources, followed by color-color cuts ([{F}090W-{F}220W]> 0;-0.3< [{F}200W-{F}444W]< 0.3) and the ratio of X-ray flux to rest-frame optical flux ({F}X/{F}444W\\gg 1). Our cuts sift out OBGs from other bright, high- and low-redshift contaminants in the infrared. OBGs with predicted {M}{AB}< 25 are unambiguously detectable by the Mid-Infrared Instrument (MIRI), on the upcoming James Webb Space Telescope (JWST). For parameters explored here, growing Pop III remnants with predicted {M}{AB}< 30 will likely be undetectable by JWST. We demonstrate that JWST has the power to discriminate between initial seeding mechanisms.

  10. Multi-wavelength Observations of GRB 111228A and Implications for the Fireball and its Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xin, Li-Ping; Wang, Yuan-Zhu; Lin, Ting-Ting; Liang, En-Wei; Lü, Hou-Jun; Zhong, Shu-Qing; Urata, Yuji; Zhao, Xiao-Hong; Wu, Chao; Wei, Jian-Yan; Huang, Kui-Yun; Qiu, Yu-Lei; Deng, Jin-Song

    2016-02-01

    Observations of very early multi-wavelength afterglows are critical to reveal the properties of the radiating fireball and its environment as well as the central engine of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). We report our optical observations of GRB 111228A from 95 s to about 50 hr after the burst trigger and investigate its properties of the prompt gamma-rays and the ambient medium using our data and the data from the Swift and Fermi missions. Our joint optical and X-ray spectral fits to the afterglow data show that the ambient medium features a low dust-to-gas ratio. Incorporating the energy injection effect, our best fit to the afterglow light curves with the standard afterglow model via the Markov Chain Monte Carlo technique shows that {ɛ }e=(6.9+/- 0.3)× {10}-2, {ɛ }B=(7.73+/- 0.62)× {10}-6,{E}K=(6.32+/- 0.86)× {10}53 {erg}, n=0.100+/- 0.014 cm-3. The low medium density likely implies that the afterglow jet may be in a halo or in a hot ISM. A chromatic shallow decay segment observed in the optical and X-ray bands is well explained with the long-lasting energy injection from the central engine, which would be a magnetar with a period of about 1.92 ms inferred from the data. The Ep of its time-integrated prompt gamma-ray spectrum is ˜26 KeV. Using the initial Lorentz factor ({{{Γ }}}0={476}-237+225) derived from our afterglow model fit, it is found that GRB 111228A satisfies the {L}{{iso}}-{E}p,z-{{{Γ }}}0 relation and bridges the typical GRBs and low luminosity GRBs in this relation.

  11. Multi-wavelength study of the opposition effect on Saturn's Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degiorgio, K.; Ferrari, C. C.; Rodriguez, S.

    2012-12-01

    The opposition effect manifests itself as an important surge of the radiance factor when the phase angle approaches 0°. Since its discovery on Saturn's rings (1), several effects have been proposed to explain it, such as the Ring-Shadow Hiding Opposition Effect (R-SHOE), the Coherent Backscattering Opposition Effect (CBOE) or the SHOE within the regolith that may cover ring particles. The relative importance of all these effects is still badly constraint (2). It is usually assumed that the R-SHOE cannot provide such a narrow peak as observed and is therefore considered as negligible. We will show that if the full viewing and lighting geometry are considered, this effect has to be taken into account, therefore providing a very good probe to measure the thickness and the filling factor of Saturn's Rings. Furthermore, the regolith contributions to the effect, i.e. CBOE and SHOE, depend on its absorption coefficient and its mean free path (3) and therefore should then depend on the wavelength. This is not the case for the R-SHOE because it mostly depends on the filling factor, the thickness and the particle size. We will present a multi-wavelength study of Saturn's rings opposition effect supported by the data of the VIMS-CASSINI instrument (Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer) and show if our understanding of those effects is incomplete as proposed by (4) or not. (1) H,Abhandl.Bayer.Akad.Wiss.K1.II18,172,188 (2) Salo and French, Icarus, 2010 (3) Hapke, Icarus, 2002, (4) Hapke et al., Journal of Geophysical Reasearch, Vol 117, 2012

  12. Simultaneous multi-wavelength campaign on PKS 2005-489 in a high state

    SciTech Connect

    Abramowski, A.

    2011-09-01

    The high-frequency peaked BL Lac object PKS 2005-489 was the target of amulti-wavelength campaignwith simultaneous observations in the TeV γ-ray (H.E.S.S.), GeV γ-ray (Fermi/LAT), X-ray (RXTE, Swift), UV (Swift) and optical (ATOM, Swift) bands. This campaign was carried out during a high flux state in the synchrotron regime. The flux in the optical and X-ray bands reached the level of the historical maxima. The hard GeV spectrum observed with Fermi/LAT connects well to the very high energy (VHE, E> 100 GeV) spectrum measured with H.E.S.S. with a peak energy between ~ 5 and 500 GeV. Compared to observations with contemporaneous coverage in the VHE and X-ray bands in 2004, the X-ray flux was ~ 50 times higher during the 2009 campaign while the TeV γ-ray flux shows marginal variation over the years. The spectral energy distribution during this multi-wavelength campaign was fit by a one zone synchrotron self-Compton model with a well determined cutoff in X-rays. The parameters of a one zone SSC model are inconsistent with variability time scales. The variability behaviour over years with the large changes in synchrotron emission and small changes in the inverse Compton emission does not warrant an interpretation within a one-zone SSC model despite an apparently satisfying fit to the broadband data in 2009.

  13. LIVAS: a 3-D multi-wavelength aerosol/cloud climatology based on CALIPSO and EARLINET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amiridis, V.; Marinou, E.; Tsekeri, A.; Wandinger, U.; Schwarz, A.; Giannakaki, E.; Mamouri, R.; Kokkalis, P.; Binietoglou, I.; Solomos, S.; Herekakis, T.; Kazadzis, S.; Gerasopoulos, E.; Balis, D.; Papayannis, A.; Kontoes, C.; Kourtidis, K.; Papagiannopoulos, N.; Mona, L.; Pappalardo, G.; Le Rille, O.; Ansmann, A.

    2015-01-01

    We present LIVAS, a 3-dimentional multi-wavelength global aerosol and cloud optical climatology, optimized to be used for future space-based lidar end-to-end simulations of realistic atmospheric scenarios as well as retrieval algorithm testing activities. LIVAS database provides averaged profiles of aerosol optical properties for the potential space-borne laser operating wavelengths of 355, 532, 1064, 1570 and 2050 nm and of cloud optical properties at the wavelength of 532 nm. The global climatology is based on CALIPSO observations at 532 and 1064 nm and on aerosol-type-dependent spectral conversion factors for backscatter and extinction, derived from EARLINET ground-based measurements for the UV and scattering calculations for the IR wavelengths, using a combination of input data from AERONET, suitable aerosol models and recent literature. The required spectral conversion factors are calculated for each of the CALIPSO aerosol types and are applied to CALIPSO extinction and backscatter data correspondingly to the aerosol type retrieved by the CALIPSO aerosol classification scheme. A cloud climatology based on CALIPSO measurements at 532 nm is also provided, neglecting wavelength conversion due to approximately neutral scattering behavior of clouds along the spectral range of LIVAS. Averages of particle linear depolarization ratio profiles at 532 nm are provided as well. Finally, vertical distributions for a set of selected scenes of specific atmospheric phenomena (e.g., dust outbreaks, volcanic eruptions, wild fires, polar stratospheric clouds) are analyzed and spectrally converted so as to be used as case studies for space-borne lidar performance assessments. The final global climatology includes 4-year (1 January 2008-31 December 2011) time-averaged CALIPSO data on a uniform grid of 1×1 degree with the original high vertical resolution of CALIPSO in order to ensure realistic simulations of the atmospheric variability in lidar end-to-end simulations.

  14. Mid-Infrared and multi-wavelength monitoring of the microquasar GRS 1915+105.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuchs, Yael; Chaty, Sylvain; Dhawan, Vivek; Diana, Hannikainen; Mirabel, Felix; Pooley, Guy; Ribo, Marc; Rodriguez, Jerome; Rupen, Michael

    2005-06-01

    We propose to continue mid-infrared photometric and spectroscopic observations of the microquasar GRS 1915+105 in the context of a campaign of multi-wavelength observations of the source. GRS 1915+105 is used as a laboratory to understand the accretion / ejection phenomena occurring in stellar-mass accreting black hole (microquasars) and by analogy in supermassive black holes (AGNs). A key question is the nature of the time-variable infrared emission in this system. Depending on the state of the source, we wish to know what is the contribution in the mid-infrared of the different possible emission mechanisms: the thermal emission from the K-M giant donor star, the synchrotron emission from the compact relativistic jets, X-ray reprocessing in the accretion disc and free-free emission from a possible disc-wind. The continuum in a wavelength range as large as possible and the possible emission lines observed thanks to the Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) and the Infrared Spectrograph (IRS) are important clues to achieve this study. These mid-infrared observations will be combined with observations with the RXTE and INTEGRAL satellites in the X-rays and gamma-rays, the ESO/NTT in near-infrared and the VLA/VLBA and Ryle Telescopes in radio. Thanks to these simultaneous multiwavelength observations we will identify the accretion state of the source and determine the contribution of each emission component of the system. As GRS 1915+105 had been rarely observed in the mid-infrared range in the past, the Spitzer Space Telescope brings the unique opportunity to do so, shedding light on the physical mechanisms occurring in this particular binary system and which could apply to the other black hole binaries.

  15. A Multi-wavelength Study of Star Formation Activity in the S235 Complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dewangan, L. K.; Ojha, D. K.; Luna, A.; Anandarao, B. G.; Ninan, J. P.; Mallick, K. K.; Mayya, Y. D.

    2016-03-01

    We have carried out an extensive multi-wavelength study to investigate the star formation process in the S235 complex. The S235 complex has a spherelike shell appearance at wavelengths longer than 2 μm and harbors an O9.5V type star approximately at its center. A near-infrared extinction map of the complex traces eight subregions (having AV > 8 mag), and five of them appear to be distributed in an almost regularly spaced manner along the spherelike shell surrounding the ionized emission. This picture is also supported by the integrated 12CO and 13CO intensity maps and by Bolocam 1.1 mm continuum emission. The position-velocity analysis of CO reveals an almost semi-ringlike structure, suggesting an expanding H ii region. We find that the Bolocam clump masses increase as we move away from the location of the ionizing star. This correlation is seen only for those clumps that are distributed near the edges of the shell. Photometric analysis reveals 435 young stellar objects (YSOs), 59% of which are found in clusters. Six subregions (including five located near the edges of the shell) are very well correlated with the dust clumps, CO gas, and YSOs. The average values of Mach numbers derived using NH3 data for three (East 1, East 2, and Central E) out of these six subregions are 2.9, 2.3, and 2.9, indicating these subregions are supersonic. The molecular outflows are detected in these three subregions, further confirming the ongoing star formation activity. Together, all these results are interpreted as observational evidence of positive feedback of a massive star.

  16. Simultaneous multi-wavelength campaign on PKS 2005-489 in a high state

    DOE PAGES

    Abramowski, A.

    2011-09-01

    The high-frequency peaked BL Lac object PKS 2005-489 was the target of amulti-wavelength campaignwith simultaneous observations in the TeV γ-ray (H.E.S.S.), GeV γ-ray (Fermi/LAT), X-ray (RXTE, Swift), UV (Swift) and optical (ATOM, Swift) bands. This campaign was carried out during a high flux state in the synchrotron regime. The flux in the optical and X-ray bands reached the level of the historical maxima. The hard GeV spectrum observed with Fermi/LAT connects well to the very high energy (VHE, E> 100 GeV) spectrum measured with H.E.S.S. with a peak energy between ~ 5 and 500 GeV. Compared to observations with contemporaneousmore » coverage in the VHE and X-ray bands in 2004, the X-ray flux was ~ 50 times higher during the 2009 campaign while the TeV γ-ray flux shows marginal variation over the years. The spectral energy distribution during this multi-wavelength campaign was fit by a one zone synchrotron self-Compton model with a well determined cutoff in X-rays. The parameters of a one zone SSC model are inconsistent with variability time scales. The variability behaviour over years with the large changes in synchrotron emission and small changes in the inverse Compton emission does not warrant an interpretation within a one-zone SSC model despite an apparently satisfying fit to the broadband data in 2009.« less

  17. Structure of vanadium oxide supported on ceria by multi-wavelength Raman spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Zili; Rondinone, Adam Justin; Overbury, Steven {Steve} H

    2011-01-01

    ABSTRACT The structure of vanadium oxide species supported on ceria (VOx/CeO2) was investigated under various conditions by in situ multi-wavelength Raman spectroscopy, IR spectroscopy, isotopic labeling and temperature programmed reduction (TPR). For the first time, the detailed structure of dehydrated VOx species was revealed on the polycrystalline ceria support. VOx species can co-exist on ceria surface in the structure of monomer, dimer, trimer, polymer, crystalline V2O5 and CeVO4 as a function of VOx loading. These species interact strongly with both the defect sites and labile surface oxygen of ceria, passivating the redox property of ceria. Under ambient condition, the dispersed VOx species are hydrated into polyvanadate species which can be reversibly dehydrated back to the original structure forms. The ceria support with defect sites facilitates the interaction between water (H218O) and V16Ox species, leading to very facile isotopic oxygen exchange between the two even at room temperature. During H2 reduction, both the VOx species and the ceria support can be reduced with ceria surface being more reducible. The reducibility of various dispersed VOx species scales with their polymerization degree, i.e., polymer > trimer > dimer > monomer. The reoxidation of reduced VOx species is found to proceed via ceria lattice oxygen instead of the gas phase oxygen where ceria acts as an oxygen buffer. The revealed structure evolution of surface VOx species on ceria under hydrated, dehydrated, reduced, and regenerated conditions provides a basis for understanding the vanadia-ceria catalysis.

  18. A MULTI-WAVELENGTH STUDY OF STAR FORMATION ACTIVITY IN THE S235 COMPLEX

    SciTech Connect

    Dewangan, L. K.; Luna, A.; Mayya, Y. D.; Ojha, D. K.; Ninan, J. P.; Mallick, K. K.; Anandarao, B. G.

    2016-03-01

    We have carried out an extensive multi-wavelength study to investigate the star formation process in the S235 complex. The S235 complex has a spherelike shell appearance at wavelengths longer than 2 μm and harbors an O9.5V type star approximately at its center. A near-infrared extinction map of the complex traces eight subregions (having A{sub V} > 8 mag), and five of them appear to be distributed in an almost regularly spaced manner along the spherelike shell surrounding the ionized emission. This picture is also supported by the integrated {sup 12}CO and {sup 13}CO intensity maps and by Bolocam 1.1 mm continuum emission. The position–velocity analysis of CO reveals an almost semi-ringlike structure, suggesting an expanding H ii region. We find that the Bolocam clump masses increase as we move away from the location of the ionizing star. This correlation is seen only for those clumps that are distributed near the edges of the shell. Photometric analysis reveals 435 young stellar objects (YSOs), 59% of which are found in clusters. Six subregions (including five located near the edges of the shell) are very well correlated with the dust clumps, CO gas, and YSOs. The average values of Mach numbers derived using NH{sub 3} data for three (East 1, East 2, and Central E) out of these six subregions are 2.9, 2.3, and 2.9, indicating these subregions are supersonic. The molecular outflows are detected in these three subregions, further confirming the ongoing star formation activity. Together, all these results are interpreted as observational evidence of positive feedback of a massive star.

  19. Multi-wavelength dual polarisation lidar for monitoring precipitation process in the cloud seeding technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sudhakar, P.; Sheela, K. Anitha; Ramakrishna Rao, D.; Malladi, Satyanarayana

    2016-05-01

    In recent years weather modification activities are being pursued in many countries through cloud seeding techniques to facilitate the increased and timely precipitation from the clouds. In order to induce and accelerate the precipitation process clouds are artificially seeded with suitable materials like silver iodide, sodium chloride or other hygroscopic materials. The success of cloud seeding can be predicted with confidence if the precipitation process involving aerosol, the ice water balance, water vapor content and size of the seeding material in relation to aerosol in the cloud is monitored in real time and optimized. A project on the enhancement of rain fall through cloud seeding is being implemented jointly with Kerala State Electricity Board Ltd. Trivandrum, Kerala, India at the catchment areas of the reservoir of one of the Hydro electric projects. The dual polarization lidar is being used to monitor and measure the microphysical properties, the extinction coefficient, size distribution and related parameters of the clouds. The lidar makes use of the Mie, Rayleigh and Raman scattering techniques for the various measurement proposed. The measurements with the dual polarization lidar as above are being carried out in real time to obtain the various parameters during cloud seeding operations. In this paper we present the details of the multi-wavelength dual polarization lidar being used and the methodology to monitor the various cloud parameters involved in the precipitation process. The necessary retrieval algorithms for deriving the microphysical properties of clouds, aerosols characteristics and water vapor profiles are incorporated as a software package working under Lab-view for online and off line analysis. Details on the simulation studies and the theoretical model developed in this regard for the optimization of various parameters are discussed.

  20. A multi-wavelength survey of obscured and reddened quasars at the peak of galaxy formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexandroff, Rachael

    2017-01-01

    While in the nearby universe the unification model seems firmly established, we are now seeing hints that at the peak of quasar activity and black hole growth (z~2.5) both obscured and reddened quasars may represent not just a specific quasar orientation but instead a unique stage of quasar evolution. Our group has developed several observational techniques to identify obscured and highly reddened quasars at z~2.5 using a combination of the SDSS spectroscopy and WISE photometry. Our sample contains objects with some of the most extreme ionized gas velocities observed (> 5000 km/s), indicating wind speeds too large to be contained by the galaxy potential though they are radio quiet. I will present both our sample selection and initial results from multi-wavelength follow-up of this sample using near-infrared spectroscopy, Keck spectropolarimentry and the VLA to test the AGN unification model and search for evidence of galaxy-wide quasar winds. High levels of polarized light (reaching ~20% of the total continuum emission in some cases) and changes in the polarization fraction and position angle across emission lines may argue for the presence of dusty outflows in our objects. This is supported by evidence from stacking analysis in the radio that presents a correlation between the observed outflow speeds in ionized gas (as measured by [OIII]) and the radio luminosity—arguing for a wind origin for the radio emission in these objects as well. The most extreme of these objects may thus represent the “blowout phase” of AGN evolution that proceeds or accompanies the cessation of star formation in the host galaxy due to the effects of radiatively-driven quasar driven winds.

  1. Lights and shadows: multi-wavelength analysis of young stellar objects and their protoplanetary discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rigon, Laura

    2016-03-01

    Stars form from the collapse of molecular clouds and evolve in an environment rich in gas and dust before becoming Main Sequence stars. During this phase, characterised by the presence of a protoplanetary disc, stars manifest changes in the structure and luminosity. This thesis performs a multi-wavelength analysis, from optical to mm range, on a sample of young stars (YSOs), mainly Classical T Tauri (CTTS). The purpose is to study optical and infrared variability and its relation with the protoplanetary disc. Longer wavelength, in the mm range, are used instead to investigate the evolution of the disc, in terms of dust growth. In optical, an F-test on a sample of 39 CTTS reveals that 67% of the stars are variable. The variability, quantified through pooled sigma, is visible both in magnitude amplitudes and changes over time. Time series analysis applied on the more variable stars finds the presence of quasi periodicity, with periods longer than two weeks, interpreted either as eclipsing material in the disc happening on a non-regular basis, or as a consequence of star-disc interaction via magnetic field lines. The variability of YSOs is confirmed also in infrared, even if with lower amplitude. No strong correlations are found between optical and infrared variability, which implies a different cause or a time shift in the two events. By using a toy model to explore their origin, I find that infrared variations are likely to stem from emissions in the inner disc. The evolution of discs in terms of dust growth is confirmed in most discs by the analysis of the slope of the spectral energy distribution (SED), after correcting for wind emission and optical depth effects. However, the comparison with a radiative transfer model highlights that a number of disc parameters, in particular disc masses and temperature, dust size distribution and composition, can also affect the slope of the SED.

  2. Monte Carlo simulation of amorphous selenium imaging detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Yuan; Badal, Andreu; Allec, Nicholas; Karim, Karim S.; Badano, Aldo

    2010-04-01

    We present a Monte Carlo (MC) simulation method for studying the signal formation process in amorphous Selenium (a-Se) imaging detectors for design validation and optimization of direct imaging systems. The assumptions and limitations of the proposed and previous models are examined. The PENELOPE subroutines for MC simulation of radiation transport are used to model incident x-ray photon and secondary electron interactions in the photoconductor. Our simulation model takes into account applied electric field, atomic properties of the photoconductor material, carrier trapping by impurities, and bimolecular recombination between drifting carriers. The particle interaction cross-sections for photons and electrons are generated for Se over the energy range of medical imaging applications. Since inelastic collisions of secondary electrons lead to the creation of electron-hole pairs in the photoconductor, the electron inelastic collision stopping power is compared for PENELOPE's Generalized Oscillator Strength model with the established EEDL and NIST ESTAR databases. Sample simulated particle tracks for photons and electrons in Se are presented, along with the energy deposition map. The PENEASY general-purpose main program is extended with custom transport subroutines to take into account generation and transport of electron-hole pairs in an electromagnetic field. The charge transport routines consider trapping and recombination, and the energy required to create a detectable electron-hole pair can be estimated from simulations. This modular simulation model is designed to model complete image formation.

  3. Development of a Navigator and Imaging Techniques for the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Wilen, Chris; /Carleton Coll. /KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2011-06-22

    This project contributes to the detection of flaws in the germanium detectors for the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS) experiment. Specifically, after imaging the detector surface with a precise imaging and measuring device, they developed software to stitch the resulting images together, applying any necessary rotations, offsets, and averaging, to produce a smooth image of the whole detector that can be used to detect flaws on the surface of the detector. These images were also tiled appropriately for the Google Maps API to use as a navigation tool, allowing viewers to smoothly zoom and pan across the detector surface. Automated defect identification can now be implemented, increasing the scalability of the germanium detector fabrication.

  4. Calibration of photon counting imaging microchannel plate detectors for EUV astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegmund, O. H. W.; Vallerga, J.; Jelinsky, P.

    1986-01-01

    The calibration of photon counting imaging detectors for satellite based EUV astronomy is a complex process designed to ensure the validity of the data received 'in orbit'. The methods developed to accomplish calibration of microchannel plate detectors for the Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer are described and illustrated. The characterization of these detectors can be subdivided into three categories: stabilization, performance tests, and environmental tests.

  5. Calibration of photon counting imaging microchannel plate detectors for EUV astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegmund, O. H. W.; Vallerga, J.; Jelinsky, P.

    1986-01-01

    The calibration of photon counting imaging detectors for satellite based EUV astronomy is a complex process designed to ensure the validity of the data received 'in orbit'. The methods developed to accomplish calibration of microchannel plate detectors for the Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer are described and illustrated. The characterization of these detectors can be subdivided into three categories: stabilization, performance tests, and environmental tests.

  6. Detectors

    DOEpatents

    Orr, Christopher Henry; Luff, Craig Janson; Dockray, Thomas; Macarthur, Duncan Whittemore; Bounds, John Alan; Allander, Krag

    2002-01-01

    The apparatus and method provide techniques through which both alpha and beta emission determinations can be made simultaneously using a simple detector structure. The technique uses a beta detector covered in an electrically conducting material, the electrically conducting material discharging ions generated by alpha emissions, and as a consequence providing a measure of those alpha emissions. The technique also offers improved mountings for alpha detectors and other forms of detectors against vibration and the consequential effects vibration has on measurement accuracy.

  7. X-Ray Detector for Digital Fluoroscopy and Digital Radiography in Medical Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Keiichi

    Recently digital X-ray detectors are developed for medical imaging. By comparison with the structure of X-ray image intensifier system and X-ray flat panel detector (FPD), the dynamic of digital images is more superior and would result in enhanced diagnosis. Moreover the difference from the detective quantum efficiency (DQE) of X-ray image intensifier and FPD is shown as the significant index of X-ray image quality.

  8. Diode-end-pumped solid-state lasers with dual gain media for multi-wavelength emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, C. Y.; Chang, C. C.; Chen, Y. F.

    2015-01-01

    We develop a theoretical model for designing a compact efficient multi-wavelength laser with dual gain media in a shared resonator. The developed model can be used to analyze the optimal output reflectivity for each wavelength to achieve maximum output power for multi-wavelength emission. We further demonstrate a dual-wavelength laser at 946 nm and 1064 nm with Nd:YAG and Nd:YVO4 crystals to confirm the numerical analysis. Under optimum conditions and at incident pump power of 17 W, output power at 946 nm and 1064 nm was up to 2.51 W and 2.81 W, respectively.

  9. Performance enhancement of multi-wavelength generations based on SOAs with a microfiber Mach-Zehnder interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kharraz, Osayd M.; Mohammad, Abu Bakar B.; Ahmad, Harith; Jasim, Ali A.

    2017-07-01

    Functionality improvement of a non-linear semiconductor optical amplifier for multi-wavelength generation is reported. A microfiber Mach-Zehnder interferometer (MMZI) is incorporated to enhance the multi-wavelength generation performance in terms of optical signal-to-noise ratio (OSNR) and full-width-half-maximum linewidth. The proposed scheme offers better dynamic functionality, with flexible tunable and switchable properties. Incorporating the MMZI causes spatial mode beating interference, resulting in narrow bands and power-efficient modes. Tunable and switchable octuple wavelength is demonstrated using non-linear polarization rotation (NPR), with frequency separation with respect to the free spectral range of the implemented MMZI over a greater than 30 nm span. The NPR effect is induced to suppress mode competition within the homogeneous broadening linewidth of the employed semiconductor optical amplifier.

  10. Phasor imaging with a widefield photon-counting detector

    PubMed Central

    Siegmund, Oswald H. W.; Tremsin, Anton S.; Vallerga, John V.; Weiss, Shimon

    2012-01-01

    Abstract. Fluorescence lifetime can be used as a contrast mechanism to distinguish fluorophores for localization or tracking, for studying molecular interactions, binding, assembly, and aggregation, or for observing conformational changes via Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) between donor and acceptor molecules. Fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) is thus a powerful technique but its widespread use has been hampered by demanding hardware and software requirements. FLIM data is often analyzed in terms of multicomponent fluorescence lifetime decays, which requires large signals for a good signal-to-noise ratio. This confines the approach to very low frame rates and limits the number of frames which can be acquired before bleaching the sample. Recently, a computationally efficient and intuitive graphical representation, the phasor approach, has been proposed as an alternative method for FLIM data analysis at the ensemble and single-molecule level. In this article, we illustrate the advantages of combining phasor analysis with a widefield time-resolved single photon-counting detector (the H33D detector) for FLIM applications. In particular we show that phasor analysis allows real-time subsecond identification of species by their lifetimes and rapid representation of their spatial distribution, thanks to the parallel acquisition of FLIM information over a wide field of view by the H33D detector. We also discuss possible improvements of the H33D detector’s performance made possible by the simplicity of phasor analysis and its relaxed timing accuracy requirements compared to standard time-correlated single-photon counting (TCSPC) methods. PMID:22352658

  11. sCMOS detector for imaging VNIR spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eckardt, Andreas; Reulke, Ralf; Schwarzer, Horst; Venus, Holger; Neumann, Christian

    2013-09-01

    The facility Optical Information Systems (OS) at the Robotics and Mechatronics Center of the German Aerospace Center (DLR) has more than 30 years of experience with high-resolution imaging technology. This paper shows the scientific results of the institute of leading edge instruments and focal plane designs for EnMAP VIS/NIR spectrograph. EnMAP (Environmental Mapping and Analysis Program) is one of the selected proposals for the national German Space Program. The EnMAP project includes the technological design of the hyper spectral space borne instrument and the algorithms development of the classification. The EnMAP project is a joint response of German Earth observation research institutions, value-added resellers and the German space industry like Kayser-Threde GmbH (KT) and others to the increasing demand on information about the status of our environment. The Geo Forschungs Zentrum (GFZ) Potsdam is the Principal Investigator of EnMAP. DLR OS and KT were driving the technology of new detectors and the FPA design for this project, new manufacturing accuracy and on-chip processing capability in order to keep pace with the ambitious scientific and user requirements. In combination with the engineering research, the current generations of space borne sensor systems are focusing on VIS/NIR high spectral resolution to meet the requirements on earth and planetary observation systems. The combination of large swath and high spectral resolution with intelligent synchronization control, fast-readout ADC chains and new focal-plane concepts open the door to new remote-sensing and smart deep space instruments. The paper gives an overview over the detector verification program at DLR on FPA level, new control possibilities for sCMOS detectors in global shutter mode and key parameters like PRNU, DSNU, MTF, SNR, Linearity, Spectral Response, Quantum Efficiency, Flatness and Radiation Tolerance will be discussed in detail.

  12. X-ray characterization of CMOS imaging detector with high resolution for fluoroscopic imaging application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cha, Bo Kyung; Kim, Cho Rong; Jeon, Seongchae; Kim, Ryun Kyung; Seo, Chang-Woo; Yang, Keedong; Heo, Duchang; Lee, Tae-Bum; Shin, Min-Seok; Kim, Jong-Boo; Kwon, Oh-Kyung

    2013-12-01

    This paper introduces complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) active pixel sensor (APS)-based X-ray imaging detectors with high spatial resolution for medical imaging application. In this study, our proposed X-ray CMOS imaging sensor has been fabricated by using a 0.35 μm 1 Poly 4 Metal CMOS process. The pixel size is 100 μm×100 μm and the pixel array format is 24×96 pixels, which provide a field-of-view (FOV) of 9.6 mm×2.4 mm. The 14.3-bit extend counting analog-to digital converter (ADC) with built-in binning mode was used to reduce the area and simultaneously improve the image resolution. Both thallium-doped CsI (CsI:Tl) and Gd2O2S:Tb scintillator screens were used as converters for incident X-rays to visible light photons. The optical property and X-ray imaging characterization such as X-ray to light response as a function of incident X-ray exposure dose, spatial resolution and X-ray images of objects were measured under different X-ray energy conditions. The measured results suggest that our developed CMOS-based X-ray imaging detector has the potential for fluoroscopic imaging and cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) imaging applications.

  13. EPR Imaging at a Few Megahertz Using SQUID Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hahn, Inseob; Day, Peter; Penanen, Konstantin; Eom, Byeong Ho

    2010-01-01

    An apparatus being developed for electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) imaging operates in the resonance-frequency range of about 1 to 2 MHz well below the microwave frequencies used in conventional EPR. Until now, in order to obtain sufficient signal-to-noise radios (SNRs) in conventional EPR, it has been necessary to place both detectors and objects to be imaged inside resonant microwave cavities. EPR imaging has much in common with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which is described briefly in the immediately preceding article. In EPR imaging as in MRI, one applies a magnetic pulse to make magnetic moments (in this case, of electrons) precess in an applied magnetic field having a known gradient. The magnetic moments precess at a resonance frequency proportional to the strength of the local magnetic field. One detects the decaying resonance-frequency magnetic- field component associated with the precession. Position is encoded by use of the known relationship between the resonance frequency and the position dependence of the magnetic field. EPR imaging has recently been recognized as an important tool for non-invasive, in vivo imaging of free radicals and reduction/oxidization metabolism. However, for in vivo EPR imaging of humans and large animals, the conventional approach is not suitable because (1) it is difficult to design and construct resonant cavities large enough and having the required shapes; (2) motion, including respiration and heartbeat, can alter the resonance frequency; and (3) most microwave energy is absorbed in the first few centimeters of tissue depth, thereby potentially endangering the subject and making it impossible to obtain adequate signal strength for imaging at greater depth. To obtain greater penetration depth, prevent injury to the subject, and avoid the difficulties associated with resonant cavities, it is necessary to use lower resonance frequencies. An additional advantage of using lower resonance frequencies is that one can use

  14. Progress and commissioning of the SLD Cherenkov Ring Imaging Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Abe, K.; Hasegawa, K.; Suekane, F.; Yuta, H. . Dept. of Physics); Antilogus, P.; Aston, D.; Bienz, T.; Bird, F.; Dasu, S.; Dolinsky, S.; Dunwoodie, W.; Hallewell, G.: Kawahara, H.; Kwon, Y.; Leith, D.W.G.S.; Muller, D.; Nagamine, T.; Pavel, T.J.; Ratcliff, B.; Rensing, P.; Schultz, D.; Shapiro, S.; Simopoulos, C.; Solodov, E.; Toge, N.; Va'vra, J.; Williams, S.H. (Stanford Linear Accelerator

    1991-11-01

    We report the recent progress of the SLD Cherenkov Ring Imaging Detector. All of the individual components of the device (TPC's, mirrors, liquid radiator trays) have been completed and installed. Almost half of the electronics packages are installed and operational, and the data acquisition system has been commissioned. The liquid C{sub 6}F{sub 14} recirculation system is functioning. The drift gas supply systems are operating well with TMAE, and the gaseous Freon C{sub 5}F{sub 12} recirculator is being brought on-line. Our monitor and control systems are fully functional. The commissioning of all 40 TPCs at full operating voltage has gone very smoothly. The system shows a remarkable immunity to the SLC backgrounds, and yields very clean events, while operating with a single electron sensitivity.

  15. A novel fast-neutron detector concept for energy-selective imaging and imaging spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Cortesi, M.; Prasser, H.-M.; Dangendorf, V.; Zboray, R.

    2014-07-15

    We present and discuss the operational principle of a new fast-neutron detector concept suitable for either energy-selective imaging or for imaging spectroscopy. The detector is comprised of a series of energy-selective stacks of converter foils immersed in a noble-gas based mixture, coupled to a position-sensitive charge readout. Each foil in the various stacks is made of two layers of different thicknesses, fastened together: a hydrogen-rich (plastic) layer for neutron-to-proton conversion, and a hydrogen-free coating to selectively stop/absorb the recoil protons below a certain energy cut-off. The neutron-induced recoil protons, that escape the converter foils, release ionization electrons in the gas gaps between consecutive foils. The electrons are then drifted towards and localized by a position-sensitive charge amplification and readout stage. Comparison of the images detected by stacks with different energy cut-offs allows energy-selective imaging. Neutron energy spectrometry is realized by analyzing the responses of a sufficient large number of stacks of different energy response and unfolding techniques. In this paper, we present the results of computer simulation studies and discuss the expected performance of the new detector concept. Potential applications in various fields are also briefly discussed, in particularly, the application of energy-selective fast-neutron imaging for nuclear safeguards application, with the aim of determining the plutonium content in Mixed Oxide (MOX) fuels.

  16. A novel fast-neutron detector concept for energy-selective imaging and imaging spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Cortesi, M; Dangendorf, V; Zboray, R; Prasser, H-M

    2014-07-01

    We present and discuss the operational principle of a new fast-neutron detector concept suitable for either energy-selective imaging or for imaging spectroscopy. The detector is comprised of a series of energy-selective stacks of converter foils immersed in a noble-gas based mixture, coupled to a position-sensitive charge readout. Each foil in the various stacks is made of two layers of different thicknesses, fastened together: a hydrogen-rich (plastic) layer for neutron-to-proton conversion, and a hydrogen-free coating to selectively stop/absorb the recoil protons below a certain energy cut-off. The neutron-induced recoil protons, that escape the converter foils, release ionization electrons in the gas gaps between consecutive foils. The electrons are then drifted towards and localized by a position-sensitive charge amplification and readout stage. Comparison of the images detected by stacks with different energy cut-offs allows energy-selective imaging. Neutron energy spectrometry is realized by analyzing the responses of a sufficient large number of stacks of different energy response and unfolding techniques. In this paper, we present the results of computer simulation studies and discuss the expected performance of the new detector concept. Potential applications in various fields are also briefly discussed, in particularly, the application of energy-selective fast-neutron imaging for nuclear safeguards application, with the aim of determining the plutonium content in Mixed Oxide (MOX) fuels.

  17. A novel fast-neutron detector concept for energy-selective imaging and imaging spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cortesi, M.; Dangendorf, V.; Zboray, R.; Prasser, H.-M.

    2014-07-01

    We present and discuss the operational principle of a new fast-neutron detector concept suitable for either energy-selective imaging or for imaging spectroscopy. The detector is comprised of a series of energy-selective stacks of converter foils immersed in a noble-gas based mixture, coupled to a position-sensitive charge readout. Each foil in the various stacks is made of two layers of different thicknesses, fastened together: a hydrogen-rich (plastic) layer for neutron-to-proton conversion, and a hydrogen-free coating to selectively stop/absorb the recoil protons below a certain energy cut-off. The neutron-induced recoil protons, that escape the converter foils, release ionization electrons in the gas gaps between consecutive foils. The electrons are then drifted towards and localized by a position-sensitive charge amplification and readout stage. Comparison of the images detected by stacks with different energy cut-offs allows energy-selective imaging. Neutron energy spectrometry is realized by analyzing the responses of a sufficient large number of stacks of different energy response and unfolding techniques. In this paper, we present the results of computer simulation studies and discuss the expected performance of the new detector concept. Potential applications in various fields are also briefly discussed, in particularly, the application of energy-selective fast-neutron imaging for nuclear safeguards application, with the aim of determining the plutonium content in Mixed Oxide (MOX) fuels.

  18. Image restoration for TV-scan moving images acquired through a semiconductor backscattered electron detector.

    PubMed

    Oho, Eisaku; Suzuki, Kazuhiko

    2009-01-01

    A semiconductor backscattered electron (BSE) detector has become popular in scanning electron microscopy session. However, detectors of semiconductor type have a serious disadvantage on the frequency characteristics. As a result, fast scan (e.g. TV-scan) BSE image should be blurred remarkably. It is the purpose of this study to restore this degradation by using digital image processing technology. In order to improve it practically, we have to settle several problems, such as noise, undesirable processing artifacts, and ease of use. Image processing techniques in an impromptu manner like a conventional mask processing are unhelpful for this study, because a complicated degradation of output signal affects severely the phase response as well as the amplitude response of our SEM system. Hence, based on the characteristics of an SEM signal obtained from the semiconductor BSE detector, a proper inverse filter in Fourier domain is designed successfully. Finally, the inverse filter is converted to a special convolution mask, which is skillfully designed, and applied for TV-scan moving BSE images. The improved BSE image is very effective in the work for finding important objects. (c) 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Imaging CO2 reservoirs using muons borehole detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonneville, A.; Bonal, N.; Lintereur, A.; Mellors, R. J.; Paulsson, B. N. P.; Rowe, C. A.; Varner, G. S.; Kouzes, R.; Flygare, J.; Mostafanezhad, I.; Yamaoka, J. A. K.; Guardincerri, E.; Chapline, G.

    2016-12-01

    Monitoring of the post-injection fate of CO2 in subsurface reservoirs is of utmost importance. Generally, monitoring options are active methods, such as 4D seismic reflection or pressure measurements in monitoring wells. We present a method of 4D density tomography of subsurface CO2 reservoirs using cosmic-ray muon detectors deployed in a borehole. Although muon flux rapidly decreases with depth, preliminary analyses indicate that the muon technique is sufficiently sensitive to effectively map density variations caused by fluid displacement at depths consistent with proposed CO2reservoirs. The intensity of the muon flux is, to first order, inversely proportional to the density times the path length, with resolution increasing with measurement time. The primary technical challenge preventing deployment of this technology in subsurface locations is the lack of miniaturized muon-tracking detectors both capable of fitting in standard boreholes and that will be able to resist the harsh underground conditions (temperature, pressure, corrosion) for long periods of time. Such a detector with these capabilities has been developed through a collaboration supported by the U.S. Department of Energy. A prototype has been tested in underground laboratories during 2016. In particular, we will present results from a series of tests performed in a tunnel comparing efficiencies, and angular and position resolution to measurements collected at the same locations by large instruments developed by Los Alamos and Sandia National Laboratories. We will also present the results of simulations of muon detection for various CO2 reservoir situations and muon detector configurations. Finally, to improve imaging of 3D subsurface structures, a combination of seismic data, gravity data, and muons can be used. Because seismic waves, gravity anomalies, and muons are all sensitive to density, the combination of two or three of these measurements promises to be a powerful way to improve spatial

  20. Electronic noise in CT detectors: Impact on image noise and artifacts.

    PubMed

    Duan, Xinhui; Wang, Jia; Leng, Shuai; Schmidt, Bernhard; Allmendinger, Thomas; Grant, Katharine; Flohr, Thomas; McCollough, Cynthia H

    2013-10-01

    The objective of our study was to evaluate in phantoms the differences in CT image noise and artifact level between two types of commercial CT detectors: one with distributed electronics (conventional) and one with integrated electronics intended to decrease system electronic noise. Cylindric water phantoms of 20, 30, and 40 cm in diameter were scanned using two CT scanners, one equipped with integrated detector electronics and one with distributed detector electronics. All other scanning parameters were identical. Scans were acquired at four tube potentials and 10 tube currents. Semianthropomorphic phantoms were scanned to mimic the shoulder and abdominal regions. Images of two patients were also selected to show the clinical values of the integrated detector. Reduction of image noise with the integrated detector depended on phantom size, tube potential, and tube current. Scans that had low detected signal had the greatest reductions in noise, up to 40% for a 30-cm phantom scanned using 80 kV. This noise reduction translated into up to 50% in dose reduction to achieve equivalent image noise. Streak artifacts through regions of high attenuation were reduced by up to 45% on scans obtained using the integrated detector. Patient images also showed superior image quality for the integrated detector. For the same applied radiation level, the use of integrated electronics in a CT detector showed a substantially reduced level of electronic noise, resulting in reductions in image noise and artifacts, compared with detectors having distributed electronics.

  1. CANDELS MULTI-WAVELENGTH CATALOGS: SOURCE DETECTION AND PHOTOMETRY IN THE GOODS-SOUTH FIELD

    SciTech Connect

    Guo Yicheng; Barro, Guillermo; Faber, Sandra M.; Koo, David C.; Giavalisco, Mauro; Willner, S. P.; Ashby, Matthew L. N.; Donley, Jennifer L.; Fontana, Adriano; Galametz, Audrey; Grazian, Andrea; Kocevski, Dale D.; McGrath, Elizabeth J.; Peth, Michael; Salvato, Mara; Wuyts, Stijn; and others

    2013-08-15

    We present a UV to mid-infrared multi-wavelength catalog in the CANDELS/GOODS-S field, combining the newly obtained CANDELS HST/WFC3 F105W, F125W, and F160W data with existing public data. The catalog is based on source detection in the WFC3 F160W band. The F160W mosaic includes the data from CANDELS deep and wide observations as well as previous ERS and HUDF09 programs. The mosaic reaches a 5{sigma} limiting depth (within an aperture of radius 0.''17) of 27.4, 28.2, and 29.7 AB for CANDELS wide, deep, and HUDF regions, respectively. The catalog contains 34,930 sources with the representative 50% completeness reaching 25.9, 26.6, and 28.1 AB in the F160W band for the three regions. In addition to WFC3 bands, the catalog also includes data from UV (U band from both CTIO/MOSAIC and VLT/VIMOS), optical (HST/ACS F435W, F606W, F775W, F814W, and F850LP), and infrared (HST/WFC3 F098M, VLT/ISAAC Ks, VLT/HAWK-I Ks, and Spitzer/IRAC 3.6, 4.5, 5.8, 8.0 {mu}m) observations. The catalog is validated via stellar colors, comparison with other published catalogs, zero-point offsets determined from the best-fit templates of the spectral energy distribution of spectroscopically observed objects, and the accuracy of photometric redshifts. The catalog is able to detect unreddened star-forming (passive) galaxies with stellar mass of 10{sup 10} M{sub Sun} at a 50% completeness level to z {approx} 3.4 (2.8), 4.6 (3.2), and 7.0 (4.2) in the three regions. As an example of application, the catalog is used to select both star-forming and passive galaxies at z {approx} 2-4 via the Balmer break. It is also used to study the color-magnitude diagram of galaxies at 0 < z < 4.

  2. CANDELS Multi-wavelength Catalogs: Source Detection and Photometry in the GOODS-South Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Yicheng; Ferguson, Henry C.; Giavalisco, Mauro; Barro, Guillermo; Willner, S. P.; Ashby, Matthew L. N.; Dahlen, Tomas; Donley, Jennifer L.; Faber, Sandra M.; Fontana, Adriano; Galametz, Audrey; Grazian, Andrea; Huang, Kuang-Han; Kocevski, Dale D.; Koekemoer, Anton M.; Koo, David C.; McGrath, Elizabeth J.; Peth, Michael; Salvato, Mara; Wuyts, Stijn; Castellano, Marco; Cooray, Asantha R.; Dickinson, Mark E.; Dunlop, James S.; Fazio, G. G.; Gardner, Jonathan P.; Gawiser, Eric; Grogin, Norman A.; Hathi, Nimish P.; Hsu, Li-Ting; Lee, Kyoung-Soo; Lucas, Ray A.; Mobasher, Bahram; Nandra, Kirpal; Newman, Jeffery A.; van der Wel, Arjen

    2013-08-01

    We present a UV to mid-infrared multi-wavelength catalog in the CANDELS/GOODS-S field, combining the newly obtained CANDELS HST/WFC3 F105W, F125W, and F160W data with existing public data. The catalog is based on source detection in the WFC3 F160W band. The F160W mosaic includes the data from CANDELS deep and wide observations as well as previous ERS and HUDF09 programs. The mosaic reaches a 5σ limiting depth (within an aperture of radius 0.''17) of 27.4, 28.2, and 29.7 AB for CANDELS wide, deep, and HUDF regions, respectively. The catalog contains 34,930 sources with the representative 50% completeness reaching 25.9, 26.6, and 28.1 AB in the F160W band for the three regions. In addition to WFC3 bands, the catalog also includes data from UV (U band from both CTIO/MOSAIC and VLT/VIMOS), optical (HST/ACS F435W, F606W, F775W, F814W, and F850LP), and infrared (HST/WFC3 F098M, VLT/ISAAC Ks, VLT/HAWK-I Ks, and Spitzer/IRAC 3.6, 4.5, 5.8, 8.0 μm) observations. The catalog is validated via stellar colors, comparison with other published catalogs, zero-point offsets determined from the best-fit templates of the spectral energy distribution of spectroscopically observed objects, and the accuracy of photometric redshifts. The catalog is able to detect unreddened star-forming (passive) galaxies with stellar mass of 1010 M ⊙ at a 50% completeness level to z ~ 3.4 (2.8), 4.6 (3.2), and 7.0 (4.2) in the three regions. As an example of application, the catalog is used to select both star-forming and passive galaxies at z ~ 2-4 via the Balmer break. It is also used to study the color-magnitude diagram of galaxies at 0 < z < 4.

  3. SIMULTANEOUS MULTI-WAVELENGTH OBSERVATIONS OF Sgr A* DURING 2007 APRIL 1-11

    SciTech Connect

    Yusef-Zadeh, F.; Bushouse, H.; Wardle, M.; Heinke, C.; Roberts, D. A.; Dowell, C. D.; Brunthaler, A.; Reid, M. J.; Martin, C. L.; Marrone, D. P.; Porquet, D.; Grosso, N.; Dodds-Eden, K.; Gillessen, S.; Bower, G. C.; Wiesemeyer, H.; Miyazaki, A.; Pal, S.; Goldwurm, A.

    2009-11-20

    We report the detection of variable emission from Sgr A* in almost all wavelength bands (i.e., centimeter, millimeter, submillimeter, near-IR, and X-rays) during a multi-wavelength observing campaign. Three new moderate flares are detected simultaneously in both near-IR and X-ray bands. The ratio of X-ray to near-IR flux in the flares is consistent with inverse Compton scattering of near-IR photons by submillimeter emitting relativistic particles which follow scaling relations obtained from size measurements of Sgr A*. We also find that the flare statistics in near-IR wavelengths is consistent with the probability of flare emission being inversely proportional to the flux. At millimeter wavelengths, the presence of flare emission at 43 GHz (7 mm) using the Very Long Baseline Array with milliarcsecond spatial resolution indicates the first direct evidence that hourly timescale flares are localized within the inner 30 x 70 Schwarzschild radii of Sgr A*. We also show several cross-correlation plots between near-IR, millimeter, and submillimeter light curves that collectively demonstrate the presence of time delays between the peaks of emission up to 5 hr. The evidence for time delays at millimeter and submillimeter wavelengths are consistent with the source of emission initially being optically thick followed by a transition to an optically thin regime. In particular, there is an intriguing correlation between the optically thin near-IR and X-ray flare and optically thick radio flare at 43 GHz that occurred on 2007 April 4. This would be the first evidence of a radio flare emission at 43 GHz delayed with respect to the near-IR and X-ray flare emission. The time delay measurements support the expansion of hot self-absorbed synchrotron plasma blob and weaken the hot spot model of flare emission. In addition, a simultaneous fit to 43 and 84 GHz light curves, using an adiabatic expansion model of hot plasma, appears to support a power law rather than a relativistic

  4. LIVAS: a 3-D multi-wavelength aerosol/cloud database based on CALIPSO and EARLINET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amiridis, V.; Marinou, E.; Tsekeri, A.; Wandinger, U.; Schwarz, A.; Giannakaki, E.; Mamouri, R.; Kokkalis, P.; Binietoglou, I.; Solomos, S.; Herekakis, T.; Kazadzis, S.; Gerasopoulos, E.; Proestakis, E.; Kottas, M.; Balis, D.; Papayannis, A.; Kontoes, C.; Kourtidis, K.; Papagiannopoulos, N.; Mona, L.; Pappalardo, G.; Le Rille, O.; Ansmann, A.

    2015-07-01

    We present LIVAS (LIdar climatology of Vertical Aerosol Structure for space-based lidar simulation studies), a 3-D multi-wavelength global aerosol and cloud optical database, optimized to be used for future space-based lidar end-to-end simulations of realistic atmospheric scenarios as well as retrieval algorithm testing activities. The LIVAS database provides averaged profiles of aerosol optical properties for the potential spaceborne laser operating wavelengths of 355, 532, 1064, 1570 and 2050 nm and of cloud optical properties at the wavelength of 532 nm. The global database is based on CALIPSO observations at 532 and 1064 nm and on aerosol-type-dependent backscatter- and extinction-related Ångström exponents, derived from EARLINET (European Aerosol Research Lidar Network) ground-based measurements for the UV and scattering calculations for the IR wavelengths, using a combination of input data from AERONET, suitable aerosol models and recent literature. The required spectral conversions are calculated for each of the CALIPSO aerosol types and are applied to CALIPSO backscatter and extinction data corresponding to the aerosol type retrieved by the CALIPSO aerosol classification scheme. A cloud optical database based on CALIPSO measurements at 532 nm is also provided, neglecting wavelength conversion due to approximately neutral scattering behavior of clouds along the spectral range of LIVAS. Averages of particle linear depolarization ratio profiles at 532 nm are provided as well. Finally, vertical distributions for a set of selected scenes of specific atmospheric phenomena (e.g., dust outbreaks, volcanic eruptions, wild fires, polar stratospheric clouds) are analyzed and spectrally converted so as to be used as case studies for spaceborne lidar performance assessments. The final global data set includes 4-year (1 January 2008-31 December 2011) time-averaged CALIPSO (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations) data on a uniform grid of 1

  5. Multi-Wavelength Observations of Comet C/2011 L4 (PanSTARRS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Bin; Keane, J. V.; Meech, K. J.; Owen, T.; Wainscoat, R.

    2013-10-01

    Comet C/2011 L4 (PanSTARRS), which reached a visual magnitude brighter than 0 mag near its perihelion in March 2013, is one of the brightest comets since the great comet C/1995 O1 (Hale-Bopp). Discovered at 8AU from the Sun, the apparition of comet C/2011 L4 (PanSTARRS) provided a rare opportunity to monitor the dynamically new comet over a significant time period as well as a wide range of heliocentric distances. We will present our multi-wavelength observations of this dynamically new comet during its first in-bound leg from the Oort Cloud. A strong absorption band of water ice was detected at 2.0 microns in the moderate- to low-resolution spectra taken with 8-m Gemini-North and 3-m IRTF telescopes atop Mauna Kea, Hawaii. However, the companion 1.5 micron band of water ice was not observed. Our spectral models show that the weakened or absent 1.5 micron band can be explained by submicron-sized fine ice grains. Hindered by the weakness of the 1.5 micron feature, we were not able to constrain the crystallinity of the water ice particles in the coma of C/2011 L4. No gas emission (i.e. CN, HCN and CO) was observed pre-perihelion both in the optical and in the sub-millimeter using the 8-m Gemini-N and the 15-m JCMT telescopes. An estimated upper limit for CO production rate is at a level of 10^27 mol/sec when the comet was 3.44-2.31 AU from the Sun. The comet showed a very strong continuum in the optical that became redder as the comet approaching the Sun. Based on the Gemini optical spectroscopy, we calculated the Afρ quantity of this comet and found the value to be ~120 m. We further estimated the pre-perihelion dust production rate of ~650 kg/s which yielded a lower limit of the dust-to-gas ratio of 4. Our observations show that C/2011 L4 is a dust-rich/gas-poor comet. We will discuss the comparison between C/2011 L4 and other Oort Cloud comets.

  6. A multi-wavelength analysis of Hickson Compact Groups of galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bitsakis, T.; Charmandaris, V.

    2012-01-01

    We present a comprehensive study on the impact of the environment of compact galaxy groups on the evolution of their members using a multi-wavelength analysis, from the UV to the infrared, for a sample of 32 Hickson compact groups (HCGs) containing 135 galaxies. Fitting the SEDs of all galaxies with the state-of-the-art model of da Cunha (2008) we can accurately calculate their mass, SFR, and extinction, as well as estimate their infrared luminosity and dust content. We compare our findings with samples of field galaxies, early-stage interacting pairs, and cluster galaxies with similar data. We find that classifying the groups as dynamically "old" or "young", depending on whether or not at least one quarter of their members are early-type systems, is physical and consistent with past classifications of HCGs based on their atomic gas content. Dynamically "old" groups are more compact and display higher velocity dispersions than "young" groups. Late-type galaxies in dynamically "young" groups have specific star formation rates (sSFRs), NUV-r, and mid-infrared colors which are similar to those of field and early stage interacting pair spirals. Late-type galaxies in dynamically "old" groups have redder NUV-r colors, as they have likely experienced several tidal encounters in the past building up their stellar mass, and display lower sSFRs. We identify several late-type galaxies which have sSFRs and colors similar to those of elliptical galaxies, since they lost part of their gas due to numerous interactions with other group members. Also, 25% of the elliptical galaxies in these groups have bluer UV/optical colors than normal ellipticals in the field, probably due to star formation as they accreted gas from other galaxies of the group, or via merging of dwarf companions. Finally, our SED modeling suggests that in 13 groups, 10 of which are dynamically "old", there is diffuse cold dust in the intragroup medium. All this evidence point to an evolutionary scenario in which

  7. Multi-wavelength campaign on NGC 7469. I. The rich 640 ks RGS spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behar, Ehud; Peretz, Uria; Kriss, Gerard A.; Kaastra, Jelle; Arav, Nahum; Bianchi, Stefano; Branduardi-Raymont, Graziella; Cappi, Massimo; Costantini, Elisa; De Marco, Barbara; Di Gesu, Laura; Ebrero, Jacobo; Kaspi, Shai; Mehdipour, Missagh; Paltani, Stéphane; Petrucci, Pierre-Olivier; Ponti, Gabriele; Ursini, Francesco

    2017-05-01

    Aims: Outflows in active galaxies (AGNs) are common, although their launching mechanism, location, and physical impact on the host galaxy remain controversial. We conducted a multi-wavelength six-month campaign to observe the nearby Seyfert galaxy NGC 7469 with several observatories in order to better understand and quantify the outflow in this AGN. Methods: We report on the time-integrated line-resolved X-ray spectrum of NGC 7469 obtained with the Reflection Grating Spectrometer (RGS) on board XMM-Newton. We used the RGS spectrum to discern the many AGN outflow components and applied a global fit to obtain their physical parameters. Results: We find that the AGN wind can be well described by three narrow velocity components at -650, -950, and -2050 km s-1. The RGS clearly resolves the -2050 km s-1 component in C5+ Ly α, while the -650 km s-1 and -950 km s-1 velocities are blended. Similar velocities (±200 km s-1) are resolved in the UV. The H-equivalent column densities of these components are, respectively, NH 7 × 1020, 2.2 × 1021, and 1020 cm-2, for a total of 3 × 1021 cm-2, which was also measured in 2004, indicating the absorber did not significantly change. The -650 km s-1 component shows a broad ionization distribution (-1 ≲ log ξ ≲ 2,ξ being the ionization parameter in erg s-1 cm). We identify a photo-ionized emission component blue-shifted by -450 km s-1, somewhat broad (FWHM = 1400 km s-1), and with -1 ≲ log ξ ≲ 1 erg s-1 cm, which we ascribe to the same outflow that produces the absorption lines. We also find a collisionally ionized component at kT = 0.35 keV that we associate with the circum-nuclear star-formation activity of NGC 7469, as it follows the LFIR/LX ≈ 104 relation found in star forming galaxies. The elemental abundance ratios of C, N, Ne, S, and Fe to O in the outflow tend to be between one and two times solar. Preliminary estimates of the absorber distance from the AGN center suggest it is at least a few pc away from the

  8. A MULTI-WAVELENGTH VIEW OF THE STAR FORMATION ACTIVITY AT z {approx} 3

    SciTech Connect

    Magdis, G. E.; Elbaz, D.; Daddi, E.; Gobat, R.; Hwang, H. S.; Dickinson, M.; Rigopoulou, D.

    2010-05-10

    We present a multi-wavelength, UV-to-radio analysis for a sample of massive (M{sub *} {approx} 10{sup 10} M{sub sun}) IRAC- and MIPS 24 {mu}m detected Lyman break galaxies (LBGs) with spectroscopic redshifts z {approx} 3 in the GOODS-North field. For LBGs without individual 24 {mu}m detections, we employ stacking techniques at 24 {mu}m, 1.1 mm, and 1.4 GHz to construct the average UV-to-radio spectral energy distribution and find it to be consistent with that of a luminous infrared galaxy with L{sub IR} = 4.5{sup +1.1}{sub -2.3} x 10{sup 11} L{sub sun} and a specific star formation rate of 4.3 Gyr{sup -1} that corresponds to a mass doubling time {approx}230 Myr. On the other hand, when considering the 24 {mu}m detected LBGs we find among them galaxies with L{sub IR}>10{sup 12} L{sub sun}, indicating that the space density of z {approx} 3 UV-selected ultra-luminous infrared galaxies (ULIRGs) is {approx}(1.5 {+-} 0.5) x 10{sup -5} Mpc{sup -3}. We compare measurements of star formation rates from data at different wavelengths and find that there is tight correlation (Kendall's {tau}>99.7%) and excellent agreement between the values derived from dust-corrected UV, mid-IR, millimeter, and radio data for the whole range of L{sub IR} up to L{sub IR} {approx} 10{sup 13} L{sub sun}. This range is greater than that for which the correlation is known to hold at z {approx} 2, possibly due to the lack of significant contribution from polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons to the 24 {mu}m flux at z {approx} 3. The fact that this agreement is observed for galaxies with L{sub IR}>10{sup 12} L{sub sun} suggests that star formation in UV-selected ULIRGs, as well as the bulk of star formation activity at this redshift, is not embedded in optically thick regions as seen in local ULIRGs and submillimeter-selected galaxies at z = 2.

  9. Proposed helmet PET geometries with add-on detectors for high sensitivity brain imaging.

    PubMed

    Tashima, Hideaki; Yamaya, Taiga

    2016-10-07

    For dedicated brain PET, we can significantly improve sensitivity for the cerebrum region by arranging detectors in a compact hemisphere. The geometrical sensitivity for the top region of the hemisphere is increased compared with conventional cylindrical PET consisting of the same number of detectors. However, the geometrical sensitivity at the center region of the hemisphere is still low because the bottom edge of the field-of-view is open, the same as for the cylindrical PET. In this paper, we proposed a helmet PET with add-on detectors for high sensitivity brain PET imaging for both center and top regions. The key point is the add-on detectors covering some portion of the spherical surface in addition to the hemisphere. As the location of the add-on detectors, we proposed three choices: a chin detector, ear detectors, and a neck detector. For example, the geometrical sensitivity for the region-of-interest at the center was increased by 200% by adding the chin detector which increased the size by 12% of the size of the hemisphere detector. The other add-on detectors gave almost the same increased sensitivity effect as the chin detector did. Compared with standard whole-body-cylindrical PET, the proposed geometries can achieve 2.6 times higher sensitivity for brain region even with less than 1/4 detectors. In addition, we conducted imaging simulations for geometries with a diameter of 250 mm and with high resolution depth-of-interaction detectors. The simulation results showed that the proposed geometries increased image quality, and all of the add-on detectors were equivalently effective. In conclusion, the proposed geometries have high potential for widespread applications in high-sensitivity, high-resolution, and low-cost brain PET imaging.

  10. Proposed helmet PET geometries with add-on detectors for high sensitivity brain imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tashima, Hideaki; Yamaya, Taiga

    2016-10-01

    For dedicated brain PET, we can significantly improve sensitivity for the cerebrum region by arranging detectors in a compact hemisphere. The geometrical sensitivity for the top region of the hemisphere is increased compared with conventional cylindrical PET consisting of the same number of detectors. However, the geometrical sensitivity at the center region of the hemisphere is still low because the bottom edge of the field-of-view is open, the same as for the cylindrical PET. In this paper, we proposed a helmet PET with add-on detectors for high sensitivity brain PET imaging for both center and top regions. The key point is the add-on detectors covering some portion of the spherical surface in addition to the hemisphere. As the location of the add-on detectors, we proposed three choices: a chin detector, ear detectors, and a neck detector. For example, the geometrical sensitivity for the region-of-interest at the center was increased by 200% by adding the chin detector which increased the size by 12% of the size of the hemisphere detector. The other add-on detectors gave almost the same increased sensitivity effect as the chin detector did. Compared with standard whole-body-cylindrical PET, the proposed geometries can achieve 2.6 times higher sensitivity for brain region even with less than 1/4 detectors. In addition, we conducted imaging simulations for geometries with a diameter of 250 mm and with high resolution depth-of-interaction detectors. The simulation results showed that the proposed geometries increased image quality, and all of the add-on detectors were equivalently effective. In conclusion, the proposed geometries have high potential for widespread applications in high-sensitivity, high-resolution, and low-cost brain PET imaging.

  11. Multi-wavelength UV-detection in capillary hydrodynamic fractionation. Data treatment for an absolute estimate of the particle size distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clementi, Luis A.; Aguirre, Miren; Leiza, José R.; Gugliotta, Luis M.; Vega, Jorge R.

    2017-03-01

    A new approach is proposed for estimating the particle size distribution (PSD) of hydrophobic colloids by capillary hydrodynamic fractionation (CHDF) based on UV-detection at several wavelengths. At each elution time, the multi-wavelength UV signal is used to estimate the instantaneous PSD at the detector cell by solving the involved inverse problem through an artificial neural network. Then, the global PSD is obtained as a weighted sum of the estimated instantaneous PSDs along the entire elution time interval. With the current approach, the estimation procedure is absolute in the sense that no calibration of diameters is required and the instrumental broadening introduced by the fractionation capillary is automatically compensated for. The proposed method was evaluated on the basis of narrow polystyrene standards, as follows: i) a single standard, to emulate a narrow unimodal PSD; ii) a mixture of three standards of relatively close average diameters, to emulate a broad unimodal PSD; and iii) a mixture of two standards of quite different average diameters, to emulate a bimodal PSD. Experimental results indicate that the new approach is able to produce adequate PSD estimates provided that the particle refractive index is known with a relatively high accuracy.

  12. Non-degenerate fs pump-probe study on InGaN with multi-wavelength second-harmonic generation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hsiang-Chen; Lu, Yen-Cheng; Chen, Cheng-Yen; Chi, Chun-Yung; Chin, Shu-Cheng; Yang, C C

    2005-07-11

    Non-degenerate fs pump-probe experiments in the UV-visible range for ultrafast carrier dynamics study of InGaN with adjustable pump and probe photon energies are implemented with simultaneously multiwavelength second-harmonic generation (SHG) of a 10 fs Ti:sapphire laser. The multi-wavelength SHG is realized with two beta-barium borate crystals of different cutting angles. The full-widths at half-maximum of the SHG pulses are around 150 fs, which are obtained from the cross-correlation measurement with a reverse-biased 280-nm light-emitting diode as the twophoton absorption photo-detector. Such pulses are used to perform nondegenerate pump-probe experiments on an InGaN thin film, in which indium-rich nano-clusters and compositional fluctuations have been identified. Relaxation of carriers from the pump level to the probe one through the scattering-induced local thermalization (<1 ps) and then the carrier-transport-dominating global thermalization (in several ps) processes is observed.

  13. Gamma-Ray Bursts and Afterglows: a Multi-Wavelength Study in the Swift Era

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Y. W.

    2010-01-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), which are generally followed by long-lasting low-frequency afterglow emission, are short and intense pulses of gamma-rays observed from the sky in arbitrary directions. In order to observe the multi-wavelength emission at the early afterglow phase and even the prompt emission phase, NASA launched the Swift satellite on Nov. 20th 2004. Swift can localize GRBs within about 10 seconds. A brief review on the recent progress in observations and theories in the Swift era is given in Chapter 1. This paper focuses on the features of the early afterglows and the multi-wavelength prompt emission. In Chapters 2 and 3, we try to explain the shallow-decaying X-ray afterglows and X-ray flares, both of which are unaccountable in the standard afterglow model. (1) It is widely accepted that the shallow decay phase indicates a continuous energy injection into the GRB blast wave, and this energy could be released from the central engine after the burst. Based on the knowledge of the evolution of a pulsar wind, we argue that the injected flow interacting with the GRB blast wave is an ultra-relativistic kinetic-energy flow (i.e., wind) rather than pure electromagnetic waves. Therefore, a relativistic wind bubble (RWB) including a pair of shocks will be formed. Our numerical calculations and the fitting results show that the emission from an RWB can well account for the X-ray shallow decay phase. (2) For the X-ray flares that are attributed to some intermediate late activities of the central engine, we analyze the detailed dynamics of late internal shocks which directly produce the flare emission. Comparing the theoretical results with the lower limits of the observational luminosities and the profiles of the flare light curves, we find some constraints on the properties of the pre-collision shells, which are directly determined by the central object. In Chapter 4, we investigate the high-energy afterglow emission during the shallow decay phase in two models, i

  14. A prototype of radiation imaging detector using silicon strip sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryu, S.; Hyun, H. J.; Kah, D. H.; Kang, H. D.; Kim, H. J.; Kim, Kyeryung; Kim, Y. I.; Park, H.; Son, D. H.

    2008-06-01

    The aim of this work is to evaluate the performance of a strip sensor with a single photon counting data acquisition system based on VA1 readout chips to study the feasibility of a silicon microstrip detector for medical application. The sensor is an AC-coupled single-sided microstrip sensor and the active area of the sensor is 32.0 mm×32.0 mm with a thickness of 380 μm. The sensor has 64 readout strips with a pitch of 500 μm. The sensor was biased at 45 V and the experiment was performed at room temperature. Two silicon strip sensors were mounted perpendicularly one another to get two-dimensional position information with a 5 mm space gap. Two low noise analog ASICs, VA1 chips, were used for signal readout of the strip sensor. The assembly of sensors and readout electronics was housed in an Al light-tight box. A CsI(Tl) scintillation crystal and a 2-in. photomultiplier tube were used to trigger signal events. The data acquisition system was based on a 64 MHz FADC and control softwares for the PC-Linux platform. Imaging tests were performed by using a lead phantom with a 90Sr radioactive source and a 45 MeV proton beam at Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Science in Seoul, respectively. Results of the S/ N ratio measurement and phantom images are presented.

  15. Fast readout of GEM detectors for medical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bucciantonio, M.; Amaldi, U.; Kieffer, R.; Malakhov, N.; Sauli, F.; Watts, D.

    2013-08-01

    We describe the design and implementation of a fast data acquisition (DAQ) system for Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) trackers applied to imaging and dosimetry in hadrontherapy. Within the AQUA project of the TERA foundation a prototype of Proton Range Radiography of 30×30 cm2 active area has been designed and built to provide in-beam integrated density images of the patient before treatment. It makes use of a pair of GEMs to record position and direction of protons emerging from the target. A fast data acquisition rate close to 1 MHz will allow obtaining a good resolution in-beam proton radiography in a few seconds. A dedicated fast front-end circuit for GEM detectors (GEMROC by AGH-Crakow University) is read by the FPGA based DAQ card (GR_DAQ), developed by the AQUA group. The same system is under evaluation (within the ENVISION European project) to realize the in-vivo dosimetry, based on detecting secondary light particles during the treatment of the patient.

  16. Characterization of CCD-based imaging x-ray detectors for diffraction experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Naday, I.; Ross, S.; Kanyo, M.; Westbrook, E.; Westbrook, M.

    1993-09-01

    High resolution CCD-based imaging detectors are successfully used in X-ray diffraction experiments. Some of the detectors are commercially available, others have been developed by research groups around the world. Reliable comparison of the performance must be based on through testing of all relevant characteristics of these detectors. We describe methods of measurements of detector parameters such as conversion gain, linearity, uniformity, point spread function, geometrical uniformity, dark current, and detective quantum efficiency. As an example for the characterization, test results of a single module fiberoptic taper/CCD X-ray detector will be presented. The projected performance of a large area, array detector consisting of 9 CCD`s and fiberoptic taper modules, will be given. This new detector (the ``Gold`` detector) will be installed on Beamline X8C at the Brookhaven National Laboratory at the NSLS Synchrotron.

  17. Solid-state, flat-panel, digital radiography detectors and their physical imaging characteristics.

    PubMed

    Cowen, A R; Kengyelics, S M; Davies, A G

    2008-05-01

    Solid-state, digital radiography (DR) detectors, designed specifically for standard projection radiography, emerged just before the turn of the millennium. This new generation of digital image detector comprises a thin layer of x-ray absorptive material combined with an electronic active matrix array fabricated in a thin film of hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H). DR detectors can offer both efficient (low-dose) x-ray image acquisition plus on-line readout of the latent image as electronic data. To date, solid-state, flat-panel, DR detectors have come in two principal designs, the indirect-conversion (x-ray scintillator-based) and the direct-conversion (x-ray photoconductor-based) types. This review describes the underlying principles and enabling technologies exploited by these designs of detector, and evaluates their physical