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Sample records for multi-wavelength images detector

  1. Multi-wavelength compressive computational ghost imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welsh, Stephen S.; Edgar, Matthew P.; Jonathan, Phillip; Sun, Baoqing; Padgett, Miles J.

    2013-03-01

    The field of ghost imaging encompasses systems which can retrieve the spatial information of an object through correlated measurements of a projected light field, having spatial resolution, and the associated reflected or transmitted light intensity measured by a photodetector. By employing a digital light projector in a computational ghost imaging system with multiple spectrally filtered photodetectors we obtain high-quality multi-wavelength reconstructions of real macroscopic objects. We compare different reconstruction algorithms and reveal the use of compressive sensing techniques for achieving sub-Nyquist performance. Furthermore, we demonstrate the use of this technology in non-visible and fluorescence imaging applications.

  2. Independent component analysis for unmixing multi-wavelength photoacoustic images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Lu; Cox, Ben

    2016-03-01

    Independent component analysis (ICA) is a blind source unmixing method that may be used under certain circumstances to decompose multi-wavelength photoacoustic (PA) images into separate components representing individual chromophores. It has the advantages of being fast, easy to implement and computationally inexpensive. This study uses simulated multi-wavelength PA images to investigate the conditions required for ICA to be an accurate unmixing method and compares its performance to linear inversion. An approximate fluence adjustment based on spatially homogeneous optical properties equal to that of the background region was applied to the PA images before unmixing with ICA or LI. ICA is shown to provide accurate separation of the chromophores in cases where the absorption coefficients are lower than certain thresholds, some of which are comparable to physiologically relevant values. However, the results also show that the performance of ICA abruptly deteriorates when the absorption is increased beyond these thresholds. In addition, the accuracy of ICA decreases in the presence of spatially inhomogeneous absorption in the background.

  3. Touch the Invisible Sky: A multi-wavelength Braille book featuring NASA images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steel, S.; Grice, N.; Daou, D.

    2008-06-01

    Multi-wavelength astronomy - the study of the Universe at wavelengths beyond the visible, has revolutionised our understanding and appreciation of the cosmos. Hubble, Chandra and Spitzer are examples of powerful, space-based telescopes that complement each other in their observations spanning the electromagnetic spectrum. While several Braille books on astronomical topics have been published, to this point, no printed material accessible to the sight disabled or Braille reading public has been available on the topic of multi-wavelength astronomy. Touch the Invisible Sky presents the first printed introduction to modern, multi-wavelength astronomy studies to the disabled sight community. On a more fundamental level, tactile images of a Universe that had, until recently, been invisible to all, sighted or non-sighted, is an important learning message on how science and technology broadens our senses and our understanding of the natural world.

  4. Hyperspectral fluorescence imaging with multi wavelength LED excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luthman, A. Siri; Dumitru, Sebastian; Quirós-Gonzalez, Isabel; Bohndiek, Sarah E.

    2016-04-01

    Hyperspectral imaging (HSI) can combine morphological and molecular information, yielding potential for real-time and high throughput multiplexed fluorescent contrast agent imaging. Multiplexed readout from targets, such as cell surface receptors overexpressed in cancer cells, could improve both sensitivity and specificity of tumor identification. There remains, however, a need for compact and cost effective implementations of the technology. We have implemented a low-cost wide-field multiplexed fluorescence imaging system, which combines LED excitation at 590, 655 and 740 nm with a compact commercial solid state HSI system operating in the range 600 - 1000 nm. A key challenge for using reflectance-based HSI is the separation of contrast agent fluorescence from the reflectance of the excitation light. Here, we illustrate how it is possible to address this challenge in software, using two offline reflectance removal methods, prior to least-squares spectral unmixing. We made a quantitative comparison of the methods using data acquired from dilutions of contrast agents prepared in well-plates. We then established the capability of our HSI system for non-invasive in vivo fluorescence imaging in small animals using the optimal reflectance removal method. The HSI presented here enables quantitative unmixing of at least four fluorescent contrast agents (Alexa Fluor 610, 647, 700 and 750) simultaneously in living mice. A successful unmixing of the four fluorescent contrast agents was possible both using the pure contrast agents and with mixtures. The system could in principle also be applied to imaging of ex vivo tissue or intraoperative imaging in a clinical setting. These data suggest a promising approach for developing clinical applications of HSI based on multiplexed fluorescence contrast agent imaging.

  5. Multi-modal and multi-wavelength imaging in xenografts bearing human tumor cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Sunkuk; Ke, Shi; Wang, Wei; Cameron, Arlin G.; Sevick Muraca, Eva M.

    2007-02-01

    Dynamic multi-wavelength fluorescence imaging was accomplished using a liquid crystal tunable filter (LCTF). Since several different emission wavelengths can be selected by tuning the LCTF, two wavelength dynamic fluorescence imaging was conducted in mice bearing human melanoma M21 and M21L after injection of a mixture of (i) RGD peptide conjugated with a near-infrared (NIR) dye that targeted integrin αvβ3 and (ii) non-specific dye, Cy5.5. Dynamic multi-wavelength imaging with LCTF can differentiate the uptake of the two different fluorescent contrast agents between tumor and normal tissue ROIs in the M21 and M21L xenograft models. Although the LCTF attenuated fluorescence signals by a factor of two when compared to holographic and bandpass filter sets used previously, Tumor to background ratio (TBR) from NIR fluorescence images with a bandpass and holographic filter were not statistically different from those acquired with the LCTF. Therefore, the benefit of spectral information as well as dynamic multi-wavelength may outweigh the impact of the lower transmission efficiencies, and could enable in vivo small animal imaging.

  6. Multi-wavelength photoacoustic imaging of inducible tyrosinase reporter gene expression in xenograft tumors

    PubMed Central

    Paproski, Robert J.; Heinmiller, Andrew; Wachowicz, Keith; Zemp, Roger J.

    2014-01-01

    Photoacoustic imaging is an emerging hybrid imaging technology capable of breaking through resolution limits of pure optical imaging technologies imposed by optical-scattering to provide fine-resolution optical contrast information in deep tissues. We demonstrate the ability of multi-wavelength photoacoustic imaging to estimate relative gene expression distributions using an inducible expression system and co-register images with hemoglobin oxygen saturation estimates and micro-ultrasound data. Tyrosinase, the rate-limiting enzyme in melanin production, is used as a reporter gene owing to its strong optical absorption and enzymatic amplification mechanism. Tetracycline-inducible melanin expression is turned on via doxycycline treatment in vivo. Serial multi-wavelength imaging reveals very low estimated melanin expression in tumors prior to doxycycline treatment or in tumors with no tyrosinase gene present, but strong signals after melanin induction in tumors tagged with the tyrosinase reporter. The combination of new inducible reporters and high-resolution photoacoustic and micro-ultrasound technology is poised to bring a new dimension to the study of gene expression in vivo. PMID:24936769

  7. Influence of color coatings on aircraft surface ice detection based on multi-wavelength imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuge, Jing-chang; Yu, Zhi-jing; Gao, Jian-shu; Zheng, Da-chuan

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, a simple aircraft surface ice detection system is proposed based on multi-wavelength imaging. Its feasibility is proved by the experimental results. The influence of color coatings of aircraft surface is investigated. The results show that the ice area can be clearly distinguished from the red, white, gray and blue coatings painted aluminum plates. Due to the strong absorption, not enough signals can be detected for the black coatings. Thus, a deep research is needed. Even though, the results of this paper are helpful to the development of aircraft surface ice detection.

  8. Detection of foreign materials in cotton using a multi-wavelength imaging method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, D. Y.; Ding, T. H.

    2005-06-01

    Technologies currently in use cannot effectively detect foreign materials in cotton because they appear the same as the cotton fibres. The objective of this research was to develop a multiwavelength imaging system (MIS) for detecting foreign materials in the spectral region from 405 nm to 940 nm. This method is based on the principle that different materials have different spectral absorptions and reflectance characteristics. Through experiments, we determined an optimal wavelength for detecting each particular kind of foreign material. Then multi-wavelength images of foreign materials were captured using a CCD camera at different optimal wavelengths for each source of illumination. An image fusion algorithm based on wavelet analysis was created to acquire complete information on foreign materials. Imaging results showed that a combination of the wavelengths 405 nm and 850 nm was the most appropriate for detection of a wide range of foreign materials, and this provided an effective method for the detection of these foreign materials in cotton.

  9. Multi-wavelength mid-infrared micro-spectral imaging using semiconductor lasers.

    PubMed

    Guo, B; Wang, Y; Peng, C; Luo, G P; Le, H Q

    2003-07-01

    Infrared (IR, 3-12-microm) microscopic spectral imaging is an important analytical technique. Many current instruments employ thermal IR light sources, which suffer the problem of low brightness and high noise. This paper evaluates the system engineering merit in using semiconductor lasers, which offer orders-of-magnitude-higher power, brightness, and lower noise. A microscopic spectral imaging system using semiconductor lasers (quantum cascade) as illuminators, and focal plane array detectors demonstrated a high signal-to-noise ratio (> 20 dB) at video frame rate for a large illuminated area. The comparative advantages of laser vs. thermal light source are analyzed and demonstrated. Microscopic spectral imaging with fixed-wavelength and tunable lasers of 4.6-, 5.1-, 6-, and 9.3-microm wavelength was applied to a number of representative samples that consist of biological tissues (plant and animal), solid material (a stack of laminated polymers), and liquid chemical (benzene). Transmission spectral images with approximately 30-dB dynamic range were obtained with clear evidence of spectral features for different samples. The potential of more advanced systems with a wide coverage of spectral bands is discussed.

  10. A compact, multi-wavelength, and high frequency response light source for diffuse optical spectroscopy and imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Kyoungsu; Lee, Minseok; Lee, Seung-ha; Cerussi, Albert E.; Chung, Phil-sang; Kim, Sehwan

    2015-03-01

    Many biomedical applications require an efficient combination and localization of multiple discrete light sources. In this paper, we present a compact six-channel combiner of optical sub-assembly type that couples the output of independent solid-state light sources into a single 400 μm diameter optical fiber. It is equipped with six discrete laser diodes, 658, 690, 705, 785, 830, and 850 nm for the measurement of the tissue optical properties from optical spectroscopy and imaging. We demonstrate coupling efficiencies ≥ 77% and output optical power ≥ 20 mW for each of the 6 laser diodes installed into the prototype. The design supports the use of continuous wave and intensity modulated laser diodes (with bandwidth ≥ 3 GHz). The developed light source could be used to construct custom multi-wavelength sources for tissue oximeters, diffuse optical imaging, and molecular imaging technologies.

  11. New Hubble Space Telescope Multi-Wavelength Imaging of the Eagle Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levay, Zoltan G.; Christian, Carol A.; Mack, Jennifer; Frattare, Lisa M.; Livio, Mario; Meyett, Michele L.; Mutchler, Maximilian J.; Noll, Keith S.; Hubble Heritage

    2015-01-01

    One of the most iconic images from the Hubble Space Telescope has been the 1995 WFPC2 image of the Eagle Nebula (M16, sometimes known as the "Pillars of Creation"). Nineteen years after those original observations, new images have been obtained with HST's current instrumentation: a small mosaic in visible-light, narrow-band filters with WFC3/UVIS, infrared, broad-band filters with WFC3/IR, and parallel Hα imaging with ACS/WFC. The wider field of view, higher resolution, and broader wavelength coverage of the new images highlight the improved capabilities of HST over its long-lasting operation, made possible by the upgraded instrumentation installed during Space Shuttle servicing missions. Csite images from these datasets are presented to commemorate the 25th anniversary of HST's launch. Carefully combined, aligned and calibrated datasets from the primary WFC3 fields are available as High-Level Science Products in MAST (http://archive.stsci.edu/prepds/heritage/). Color composite images from these datasets are presented to commemorate the 25th anniversary of HST's launch.

  12. Multi-wavelength imaging photometer for the topside observation of gravity waves

    SciTech Connect

    Mende, S.B.; Swenson, G.R.; Hecht, J.H.

    1994-12-31

    An imaging instrument is being developed for the NASA Thermosphere Ionosphere Mesosphere Energetics and Dynamics (TIMED) mission. This instrument images the small, few km scale structure of the earth airglow. The measurement permits the remote sensing of the temperature and intensity fluctuations produced by atmospheric gravity waves propagating through the mesopause region. Instrument modules look in the nadir direction to observe the fine structure of the airglow. Other modules look at the limb in the satellite orbit plane to monitor the limb altitude profiles. The measurement is performed by observing the rotational temperature of the O{sub 2}(0,0) band at 762 nm in nadir and limb. The waves also modulate the airglow intensity and the instrument will record the modulations of the O{sub 2}(0,0), O{sub 2}(0,1) and OH emissions in the nadir. The nadir channels of the instrument use a wide angle telecentric imager in which the distortion of the image is closely controlled so that the motion of the satellite can be compensated during the extended integration time by Time Delayed Integration (TDI) mode of scanning of the CCD. The TDI method requires the CCD pixel columns to be aligned parallel with the orbital velocity vector and the shifting of the rows to be synchronized with the satellite motion. Through TDI scanning the imager can stare at a target at atmospheric altitude for an extended exposure duration. Each telecentric instrument module contains a single filter, and adjacent wavelength bands are imaged simultaneously by passing the light through the filter at different angles. The limb imagers use CCD-s in the frame transfer mode.

  13. HST/WFC3 Imaging and Multi-Wavelength Characterization of Edge-On Protoplanetary Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gould, Carolina; Duchene, Gaspard; Stapelfeldt, Karl R.; Menard, Francois; Padgett, Deborah; Perrin, Marshall D.; Pinte, Christophe; Wolff, Schuyler

    2016-06-01

    Edge-on views of protoplanetary disk systems provide a unique observing opportunity to assess the vertical dust structure of the disk, an opportunity that is not possible at any other viewing angle due to projection effects and the acute brightness of the central star. Comparing high-resolution scattered light images of edge-on disks with synthetic images from radiative transfer modeling is a powerful approach to constrain the disk mass, structure and dust content, although analyses based on single-wavelength images lead to ambiguous conclusions. In order to resolve these ambiguities, and to probe the most tenuous regions at high elevation above the disk midplane, it is critical to obtain high-resolution images of such objects at the shortest possible wavelengths, where dust opacity is maximized. In this contribution, we present new WFC3 F475W Hubble Space Telescope images of 6 known edge-on protoplanetary disks. We produced color maps across the visible band to identify and characterize wavelength-dependent properties of these disks. In turn, these allow us to differentiate features that are related to the dust properties (opacity, scattering phase function) from those tracing the physical structure of the disk (in particular its vertical density profile). By probing a diverse set of disks with a uniform approach, we will be able to probe possible signs of evolution in this critical stage of planet formation.

  14. Multi-wavelength imaging of the peculiar Vela Molecular Ridge nebula BBW 192E

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burkert, A.; Stecklum, B.; Henning, Th.; Fischer, O.

    2000-01-01

    We present the first images of the nebula BBW 192E at near- and mid-infrared wavelengths as well as a 1.3 mm continuum map. The nebula BBW 192E is associated with the IRAS point source 08513-4201 which has a luminosity of about 1400 L_sun and a strongly rising spectral energy distribution towards mid-infrared wavelengths. The infrared images show a pronounced bipolar nebula, which is offset by about 10arcsec from the known optical emission, as well as several point sources. We interpret this morphology as evidence for an inclined disk-like structure and scattered light emerging from the lobes. This is supported by our near-infrared imaging polarimetry at sub-arcsecond resolution which furthermore indicates that the central energy source is seen directly at near-infrared wavelengths. At 1.3 millimetre, we detected a cometary shaped source in the dust continuum radiation, 151arcsec x 55arcsec in size, with a total mass of 180 M_sun as well as average hydrogen column and number densities of 4.5x1022 cm-2 and 2.6x105 cm-3, respectively. This dust cloud is also responsible for the strong spatial variation of the extinction across the nebula. We discuss the physical properties of the infrared point sources and conclude that some might be young, low-mass pre-main sequence stars. The main energy source of the nebula is an embedded intermediate-mass young stellar object. These observations are among the first infrared detections of a disk-like system associated with a bipolar nebula surrounding an intermediate-mass young stellar object. Based on observations collected at the European Southern Observatory, La Silla, Chile (Proposal-IDs: 57.B-0392, 52.7-0086, 57.D-0260, 58.D-0213, and 63.I-0173)

  15. Multi-wavelength fluorescence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwong, Tiffany C.; Lo, Pei-An; Cho, Jaedu; Nouizi, Farouk; Chiang, Huihua K.; Kim, Chang-Seok; Gulsen, Gultekin

    2016-03-01

    The strong scattering and absorption of light in biological tissue makes it challenging to model the propagation of light, especially in deep tissue. This is especially true in fluorescent tomography, which aims to recover the internal fluorescence source distribution from the measured light intensities on the surface of the tissue. The inherently ill-posed and underdetermined nature of the inverse problem along with strong tissue scattering makes Fluorescence Tomography (FT) extremely challenging. Previously, multispectral detection fluorescent tomography (FT) has been shown to improve the image quality of FT by incorporating the spectral filtering of biological tissue to provide depth information to overcome the inherent absorption and scattering limitations. We investigate whether multi-wavelength fluorescent tomography can be used to distinguish the signals from multiple fluorophores with overlapping fluorescence spectrums using a unique near-infrared (NIR) swept laser. In this work, a small feasibility study was performed to see whether multi-wavelength FT can be used to detect subtle shifts in the absorption spectrum due to differences in fluorophore microenvironment.

  16. High-performance size exclusion chromatography with a multi-wavelength absorbance detector study on dissolved organic matter characterisation along a water distribution system.

    PubMed

    Huang, Huiping; Sawade, Emma; Cook, David; Chow, Christopher W K; Drikas, Mary; Jin, Bo

    2016-06-01

    This study examined the associations between dissolved organic matter (DOM) characteristics and potential nitrification occurrence in the presence of chloramine along a drinking water distribution system. High-performance size exclusion chromatography (HPSEC) coupled with a multiple wavelength detector (200-280nm) was employed to characterise DOM by molecular weight distribution, bacterial activity was analysed using flow cytometry, and a package of simple analytical tools, such as dissolved organic carbon, absorbance at 254nm, nitrate, nitrite, ammonia and total disinfectant residual were also applied and their applicability to indicate water quality changes in distribution systems were also evaluated. Results showed that multi-wavelength HPSEC analysis was useful to provide information about DOM character while changes in molecule weight profiles at wavelengths less than 230nm were also able to be related to other water quality parameters. Correct selection of the UV wavelengths can be an important factor for providing appropriate indicators associated with different DOM compositions. DOM molecular weight in the range of 0.2-0.5kDa measured at 210nm correlated positively with oxidised nitrogen concentration (r=0.99), and the concentrations of active bacterial cells in the distribution system (r=0.85). Our study also showed that the changes of DOM character and bacterial cells were significant in those sampling points that had decreases in total disinfectant residual. HPSEC-UV measured at 210nm and flow cytometry can detect the changes of low molecular weight of DOM and bacterial levels, respectively, when nitrification occurred within the chloraminated distribution system. PMID:27266320

  17. Surface mineral mapping at Virginia City and Steamboat Springs, Nevada with multi-wavelength infrared remote sensing image data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaughan, R. Greg

    The purpose of this study was to use a combination of high spatial resolution airborne visible, near infrared, short wave infrared (VNIR/SWIR) and thermal infrared (TIR) image data to remotely identify and map exposed alteration minerals around both active and ancient hydrothermal systems, and the mineral by-products of weathered mine tailings. Three case study areas were evaluated: (1) Steamboat Springs, as an active geothermal system; (2) Geiger Grade and Virginia City, as ancient hydrothermal systems; and (3) Virginia City, as a historic mining district. Remote sensing data from the Airborne Visible Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS), as well as data from newly developed airborne imaging spectrometers: SpecTIR Corporation's airborne hyperspectral imager (HyperSpecTIR), the MODIS-ASTER airborne simulator (MASTER), and the Spatially Enhanced Broadband Array Spectrograph System (SEBASS) were acquired and processed into mineral maps based on the unique spectral signatures of image pixels. VNIR/SWIR and TIR field spectrometer data were collected for both calibration and validation of the remote data sets, and field sampling, laboratory spectral analyses and XRD analyses were made to corroborate the surface mineralogy identified by spectroscopic methods. In all of the case study areas the minerals mapped included sinter, quartz/chalcedony, albite, calcite, dolomite, hydrous sulfate minerals (tamarugite, alunogen, gypsum and hexahydrite), jarosite, hematite, goethite, alunite, pyrophyllite, kaolinite, montmorillonite/muscovite, and chlorite. The results were synthesized into single thematic mineral maps and indicate that the combination of multi-channel infrared remote sensing data is an effective technique for the unique identification and mapping of weathering and alteration minerals that are characteristic of active and fossil hydrothermal systems, as well as acid mine drainage potential. This study provides many examples of the advantages of high spatial and

  18. Multi-wavelength Study of Transition Region Penumbral Bright Dots Using Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph and New Solar Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Na; Yurchyshyn, Vasyl B.; Tian, Hui; Kleint, Lucia; Liu, Chang; Xu, Yan; Wang, Haimin

    2016-05-01

    Using high-resolution transition region (TR) observations taken by the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) mission, Tian et al. (2014b) revealed numerous short-lived sub-arcsecond bright dots above sunspots (mostly located in the penumbrae), which indicate yet unexplained small-scale energy releases. Moreover, whether these TR brightenings have any signature in the lower atmosphere and how they are formed are still not fully resolved. This paper presents a study of these bright dots using a coordinated observation of a near disk-center sunspot with IRIS and the 1.6 m New Solar Telescope (NST) at the Big Bear Solar Observatory. NST provides high-resolution chromospheric and photospheric observations with narrow-band H-alpha imaging spectroscopy and broad-band TiO images, respectively, complementary to IRIS TR observations. A total of 2692 TR penumbral bright dots are identified from a 37-minute time series of IRIS 1400 A slitjaw images. Their locations tend to be associated more with downflowing and darker fibrils in the chromosphere, and weakly associated with bright penumbral features in the photosphere. However, temporal evolution analyses of the dots show that there is no consistent and convincing brightening response in the chromosphere. These results are compatible with a formation mechanism of the TR penumbral bright dots by falling plasma from coronal heights along more vertical and dense magnetic loops. The dots may also be produced by small-scale impulsive magnetic reconnection taking place sufficiently high in the atmosphere that has no energy release in the chromosphere.Acknowledgement: This work is mainly supported by NASA grants NNX14AC12G, NNX13AF76G and by NSF grant AGS 1408703.

  19. Mapping the Ionization State of Laser-Irradiated Ar Gas Jets With Multi-Wavelength Monochromatic X-Ray Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Kugland, N L; Doppner, T; Kemp, A; Schaeffer, D; Glenzer, S H; Niemann, C

    2010-04-08

    Two-dimensional monochromatic images of fast-electron stimulated Ar K{alpha} and He-{alpha} x-ray self-emission have recorded a time-integrated map of the extent of Ar{sup {approx}6+} and Ar{sup 16+} ions, respectively, within a high density (10{sup 20} cm{sup -3} atomic density) Ar plasma. This plasma was produced by irradiating a 2 mm wide clustering Ar gas jet with an ultra-high intensity (10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2}, 200 fs) Ti:Sapphire laser operating at 800 nm. Spherically bent quartz crystals in the 200 (for K{alpha}) and 201 (for He-{alpha}) planes were used as near-normal incidence reflective x-ray optics. We see that a large (830 {micro}m long) region of plasma emits K{alpha} primarily along the laser axis, while the He-{alpha} emission is confined to smaller hot spot (230 {micro}m long) region that likely corresponds to the focal volume of the f/8 laser beam. X-ray spectra from a Bragg spectrometer operating in the von Hamos geometry, which images in one dimension, indicate that the centroids of the K{alpha} and He-{alpha} emission regions are separated by approximately 330 {micro}m along the laser axis.

  20. Multi-wavelength phase-shifting interferometry for micro-structures measurement based on color image processing in white light interference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Tong; Li, Feng; Chen, Jinping; Fu, Xing; Hu, Xiaotang

    2016-07-01

    Conventional multi-wavelength phase-shifting interferometry utilizes two or three monochromatic light sources, such as lasers, to realize the measurement of the surface topography with large discontinuity. In this paper, the white light source, with a single-chip CCD color camera, is used to accomplish multi-wavelength phase-shifting interferometry. In addition, we propose an algorithm which combines white light phase-shifting algorithm, equivalent wavelength method and fringe order method to achieve measuring and calibrating the micro-structures ranging from nanometer scale to micrometer scale. Finally, the proposed method is validated by a traceable step height standard.

  1. INTEGRAL FIELD SPECTROSCOPY AND MULTI-WAVELENGTH IMAGING OF THE NEARBY SPIRAL GALAXY NGC 5668 : AN UNUSUAL FLATTENING IN METALLICITY GRADIENT

    SciTech Connect

    Marino, R. A.; Gil de Paz, A.; Castillo-Morales, A.; Perez-Gonzalez, P. G.; Gallego, J.; Zamorano, J.; Sanchez, S. F.

    2012-07-20

    We present an analysis of the full bidimensional optical spectral cube of the nearby spiral galaxy NGC 5668, observed with the Pmas fiber PAcK Integral Field Unit (IFU) at the Calar Alto observatory 3.5 m telescope. We make use of broadband imaging to provide further constraints on the evolutionary history of the galaxy. This data set will allow us to improve our understanding of the mechanisms that drive the evolution of disks. We investigated the properties of 62 H II regions and concentric rings in NGC 5668 and derived maps in ionized-gas attenuation and chemical (oxygen) abundances. We find that while inward of r {approx}36'' {approx} 4.4 kpc {approx} 0.36 (D{sub 25}/2) the derived O/H ratio follows the radial gradient typical of spiral galaxies, the abundance gradient beyond r {approx} 36'' flattens out. The analysis of the multi-wavelength surface brightness profiles of NGC 5668 is performed by fitting these profiles with those predicted by chemo-spectrophotometric evolutionary models of galaxy disks. From this, we infer a spin and circular velocity of {lambda} = 0.053 and v{sub c} = 167 km s{sup -1}, respectively. The metallicity gradient and rotation curve predicted by this best-fitting galaxy model nicely match the values derived from the IFU observations, especially within r {approx}36''. The same is true for the colors despite some small offsets and a reddening in the bluest colors beyond that radius. On the other hand, deviations of some of these properties in the outer disk indicate that a secondary mechanism, possibly gas transfer induced by the presence of a young bar, must have played a role in shaping the recent chemical and star formation histories of NGC 5668.

  2. Fast fiber-optic multi-wavelength pyrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Tairan; Tan, Peng; Pang, Chuanhe; Zhao, Huan; Shen, Yi

    2011-06-01

    A fast fiber-optic multi-wavelength pyrometer was developed for the ultraviolet-visible-near infrared spectra from 200 nm to 1700 nm using a CCD detector and an InGaAs detector. The pyrometer system conveniently and quickly provides the sufficient choices of multiple measurement wavelengths using optical diffraction, which avoids the use of narrow-band filters. Flexible optical fibers are used to transmit the radiation so the pyrometer can be used for temperature measurements in harsh environments. The setup and calibrations (wavelength calibration, nonlinearity calibration, and radiation response calibration) of this pyrometer system were described. Development of the multi-wavelength pyrometer involved optimization of the bandwidth and temperature discrimination of the multiple spectra data. The analysis results showed that the wavelength intervals, ΔλCCD = 30 nm and ΔλInGaAs = 50 nm, are the suitable choices as a tradeoff between the simple emissivity model assumption and the multiple signal discrimination. The temperature discrimination was also quantificationally evaluated for various wavelengths and temperatures. The measurement performance of the fiber-optic multi-wavelength pyrometer was partially verified through measurements with a high-temperature blackbody and actual hot metals. This multi-wavelength pyrometer can be used for remote high-temperature measurements.

  3. Fast fiber-optic multi-wavelength pyrometer.

    PubMed

    Fu, Tairan; Tan, Peng; Pang, Chuanhe; Zhao, Huan; Shen, Yi

    2011-06-01

    A fast fiber-optic multi-wavelength pyrometer was developed for the ultraviolet-visible-near infrared spectra from 200 nm to 1700 nm using a CCD detector and an InGaAs detector. The pyrometer system conveniently and quickly provides the sufficient choices of multiple measurement wavelengths using optical diffraction, which avoids the use of narrow-band filters. Flexible optical fibers are used to transmit the radiation so the pyrometer can be used for temperature measurements in harsh environments. The setup and calibrations (wavelength calibration, nonlinearity calibration, and radiation response calibration) of this pyrometer system were described. Development of the multi-wavelength pyrometer involved optimization of the bandwidth and temperature discrimination of the multiple spectra data. The analysis results showed that the wavelength intervals, Δλ(CCD) = 30 nm and Δλ(InGaAs) = 50 nm, are the suitable choices as a tradeoff between the simple emissivity model assumption and the multiple signal discrimination. The temperature discrimination was also quantificationally evaluated for various wavelengths and temperatures. The measurement performance of the fiber-optic multi-wavelength pyrometer was partially verified through measurements with a high-temperature blackbody and actual hot metals. This multi-wavelength pyrometer can be used for remote high-temperature measurements. PMID:21721719

  4. A multi-wavelength (u.v. to visible) laser system for early detection of oral cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Najda, S. P.; Perlin, P.; Leszczyński, M.; Slight, T. J.; Meredith, W.; Schemmann, M.; Moseley, H.; Woods, J. A.; Valentine, R.; Kalra, S.; Mossey, P.; Theaker, E.; Macluskey, M.; Mimnagh, G.; Mimnagh, W.

    2015-03-01

    A multi-wavelength (360nm - 440nm), real-time Photonic Cancer Detector (PCD) optical system based on GaN semiconductor laser technology is outlined. A proof of concept using blue laser technology for early detection of cancer has already been tested and proven for esophageal cancer. This concept is expanded to consider a wider range of wavelengths and the PCD will initially be used for early diagnosis of oral cancers. The PCD creates an image of the oral cavity (broad field white light detection) and maps within the oral cavity any suspicious lesions with high sensitivity using a narrow field tunable detector.

  5. Oscillation signature from multi-wavelength analysis on solar chromosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Mumpuni, Emanuel Sungging; Herdiwijaya, Dhani; Djamal, Mitra

    2014-03-24

    In this work, we investigate how the solar chromosphere responds to the photospheric dynamics by using tomography study, implementing multiwavelength analysis observations obtained from Dutch Open Telescope. By using high resolution, high-quality, simultaneous image sequences of multi-wavelength data, we try to obtain the oscillation signature that might play important role on chromospheric dynamic by using H-alpha (Hα) as primary diagnostic tool.

  6. Integrated Dual Imaging Detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rust, David M.

    1999-01-01

    A new type of image detector was designed to simultaneously analyze the polarization of light at all picture elements in a scene. The integrated Dual Imaging detector (IDID) consists of a lenslet array and a polarizing beamsplitter bonded to a commercial charge coupled device (CCD). The IDID simplifies the design and operation of solar vector magnetographs and the imaging polarimeters and spectroscopic imagers used, for example, in atmosphere and solar research. When used in a solar telescope, the vector magnetic fields on the solar surface. Other applications include environmental monitoring, robot vision, and medical diagnoses (through the eye). Innovations in the IDID include (1) two interleaved imaging arrays (one for each polarization plane); (2) large dynamic range (well depth of 10(exp 5) electrons per pixel); (3) simultaneous readout and display of both images; and (4) laptop computer signal processing to produce polarization maps in field situations.

  7. Multi-Wavelength Observations of Supernova Remnants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, B.

    2012-01-01

    Supernova remnants (SNRs) provide a laboratory for studying various astrophysical processes, including particle acceleration, thermal and non thermal emission processes across the spectrum, distribution of heavy elements, the physics of strong shock waves, and the progenitor systems and environments of supernovae. Long studied in radio and X-rays, the past decade has seen a dramatic increase in the detection and subsequent study of SNRs in the infrared and gamma-ray regimes. Understanding the evolution of SNRs and their interaction with the interstellar medium requires a multi-wavelength approach. I will review the various physical processes observed in SNRs and how these processes are intertwined. In particular, I will focus on X-ray and infrared observations, which probe two very different but intrinsically connected phases of the ISM: gas and dust. I will discuss results from multi-wavelength studies of several SNRs at various stages of evolution, including Kepler, RCW 86, and the Cygnus Loop.

  8. Imaging alpha particle detector

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, D.F.

    1980-10-29

    A method and apparatus for detecting and imaging alpha particles sources is described. A dielectric coated high voltage electrode and a tungsten wire grid constitute a diode configuration discharge generator for electrons dislodged from atoms or molecules located in between these electrodes when struck by alpha particles from a source to be quantitatively or qualitatively analyzed. A thin polyester film window allows the alpha particles to pass into the gas enclosure and the combination of the glass electrode, grid and window is light transparent such that the details of the source which is imaged with high resolution and sensitivity by the sparks produced can be observed visually as well. The source can be viewed directly, electronically counted or integrated over time using photographic methods. A significant increase in sensitivity over other alpha particle detectors is observed, and the device has very low sensitivity to gamma or beta emissions which might otherwise appear as noise on the alpha particle signal.

  9. Imaging alpha particle detector

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, David F.

    1985-01-01

    A method and apparatus for detecting and imaging alpha particles sources is described. A conducting coated high voltage electrode (1) and a tungsten wire grid (2) constitute a diode configuration discharge generator for electrons dislodged from atoms or molecules located in between these electrodes when struck by alpha particles from a source (3) to be quantitatively or qualitatively analyzed. A thin polyester film window (4) allows the alpha particles to pass into the gas enclosure and the combination of the glass electrode, grid and window is light transparent such that the details of the source which is imaged with high resolution and sensitivity by the sparks produced can be observed visually as well. The source can be viewed directly, electronically counted or integrated over time using photographic methods. A significant increase in sensitivity over other alpha particle detectors is observed, and the device has very low sensitivity to gamma or beta emissions which might otherwise appear as noise on the alpha particle signal.

  10. Emissivity measurements of shocked tin using a multi-wavelength integrating sphere

    SciTech Connect

    Seifter, A; Holtkamp, D B; Iverson, A J; Stevens, G D; Turley, W D; Veeser, L R; Wilke, M D; Young, J A

    2011-11-01

    Pyrometric measurements of radiance to determine temperature have been performed on shock physics experiments for decades. However, multi-wavelength pyrometry schemes sometimes fail to provide credible temperatures in experiments, which incur unknown changes in sample emissivity, because an emissivity change also affects the spectral radiance. Hence, for shock physics experiments using pyrometry to measure temperatures, it is essential to determine the dynamic sample emissivity. The most robust way to determine the normal spectral emissivity is to measure the spectral normal-hemispherical reflectance using an integrating sphere. In this paper we describe a multi-wavelength (1.6–5.0 μm) integrating sphere system that utilizes a “reversed” scheme, which we use for shock physics experiments. The sample to be shocked is illuminated uniformly by scattering broadband light from inside a sphere onto the sample. A portion of the light reflected from the sample is detected at a point 12° from normal to the sample surface. For this experiment, we used the system to measure emissivity of shocked tin at four wavelengths for shock stress values between 17 and 33 GPa. The results indicate a large increase in effective emissivity upon shock release from tin when the shock is above 24–25 GPa, a shock stress that partially melts the sample. We also recorded an IR image of one of the shocked samples through the integrating sphere, and the emissivity inferred from the image agreed well with the integrating-sphere, pyrometer-detector data. Here, we discuss experimental data, uncertainties, and a data analysis process. We also describe unique emissivity-measurement problems arising from shock experiments and methods to overcome such problems.

  11. Multi-wavelength characterization of carbonaceous aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massabò, Dario; Caponi, Lorenzo; Chiara Bove, Maria; Piazzalunga, Andrea; Valli, Gianluigi; Vecchi, Roberta; Prati, Paolo

    2014-05-01

    Carbonaceous aerosol is a major component of the urban PM. It mainly consists of organic carbon (OC) and elemental carbon (EC) although a minor fraction of carbonate carbon could be also present. Elemental carbon is mainly found in the finer PM fractions (PM2.5 and PM1) and it is strongly light absorbing. When determined by optical methods, it is usually called black carbon (BC). The two quantities, EC and BC, even if both related to the refractory components of carbonaceous aerosols, do not exactly define the same PM component (Bond and Bergstrom, 2006; and references therein). Moreover, another fraction of light-absorbing carbon exists which is not black and it is generally called brown carbon (Andreae and Gelencsér, 2006). We introduce a simple, fully automatic, multi-wavelength and non-destructive optical system, actually a Multi-Wavelength Absorbance Analyzer, MWAA, to measure off-line the light absorption in Particulate Matter (PM) collected on filters and hence to derive the black and brown carbon content in the PM This gives the opportunity to measure in the same sample the concentration of total PM by gravimetric analysis, black and brown carbon, metals by, for instance, X Ray Fluorescence, and finally ions by Ion Chromatography. Up to 16 samples can be analyzed in sequence and in an automatic and controlled way within a few hours. The filter absorbance measured by MWAA was successfully validated both against a MAAP, Multi Angle Absorption Photometer (Petzold and Schönlinner, 2004), and the polar photometer of the University of Milan. The measurement of sample absorbance at three wavelengths gives the possibility to apportion different sources of carbonaceous PM, for instance fossil fuels and wood combustion. This can be done following the so called "aethalometer method" (Sandradewi et al., 2008;) but with some significant upgrades that will be discussed together the results of field campaigns in rural and urban sites. Andreae, M.O, and Gelencsér, A

  12. Multi-wavelength studies of VHE gamma-ray blazars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gall, Daniel D.

    2010-12-01

    Blazars, particularly those detected in TeV gamma-rays, are some of the most violent astrophysical objects yet observered. They display extreme variability on multiple timescales over a broad range of energies. These sources make excellent laboratories for studying the environment within the jets of active galactic nuclei, as the bulk of the detected emission is from the jets. These sources have been well studied at multiple wavelengths, and much insight has been gained into the nature of these extreme objects. This work described in this dissertation attempts to expand the understanding of two particular blazars, Markarian 421 and Markarian 501, by improving on previous observational techniques and utilizing state of the art detectors for obtaining data. The first project described focused on obtaining strictly simultaneous multi-wavelength data, covering a broad energy range, to search for any multi-wavelength correlations and to provide an accurate spectral energy distribution. This simultaneous data is essential for these sources due to their rapid variability. The most widely accepted models for emission within blazars, known as synchrotron self Compton, depend on a strong connection between the X-ray and gamma-ray photons. The simplest of these models predicts a strong correlation between the observed flux in these two bands, but this study did not observe such a correlation, though the synchrotron self Compton models could match the data. The second project focused on obtaining a state of the art measurement of the quiescent state of the blazar Markarian 501. This object is generally quite weak, and previous very high energy (E > 100 GeV) gamma-ray experiments were not able to detect the source in the quiescent state. Neither was the source detected by previous gamma-ray space telescopes operating in a lower energy range. This project used data from the current generation of experiments to obtain a carefully sampled spectral energy distribution of the source

  13. Understanding Grb Physics With Multi-Wavelength Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Bing

    The study of Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) has entered a full multi-wavelength era. A rich trove of data from NASA GRB missions and ground-based follow up observations have been collected. Careful data mining with well-defined scientific objectives holds the key to address open questions in GRB physics, such as jet composition, radiation mechanism, progenitor and central engine physics. We propose to perform data analyses in the following three directions. 1. The time resolved GRB spectra have a dominant component that can be fit with a phenomenological ``Band'' function. The physical meaning of this function remains unclear. Recently we made a breakthrough in theoretical modeling, and showed that fast-cooling synchrotron radiation of electrons in a decreasing magnetic field can mimic the Band function in detector's bandpass, but differs from Band function slightly. We propose to apply this physically-motivated model to systematically fit the GRB prompt emission data collected by Fermi GBM and LAT, and test whether the dominant GRB emission mechanism is fast cooling synchrotron radiation. We will also fit time-dependent spectra with a time-dependent model to investigate whether a quasi- thermal "photosphere'' emission component is indeed needed to fit the observed spectra. This would shed light onto the unknown composition of GRB jets. By fitting the time resolved spectra, we will also constrain important physical parameters of GRB prompt emission, such as the emission site of GRBs, the strength of magnetic fields, as well as their evolution with radius. 2. Recent GRB multi-wavelength observations suggest that it is not straightforward to define the physical category of a GRB based on the traditional classification in the "duration''-"hardness'' domain. Some long-duration GRBs may not have a massive star origin, while some short-duration GRBs may instead have a massive star origin. We propose to systematically study the gamma-ray Swift/BAT, Fermi/GBM- LAT), X-ray (Swift

  14. Mercuric iodine imaging detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Ortale, C.; Padgett, L.; Schnepple, W.F.

    1982-01-01

    Linear and two-dimensional monolithic arrays of different configurations have been fabricated using photolithographic techniques. The fabrication technology, electronic setup, and pinhole imaging experiments are described. Spatial resolutions of 1 to 2 mm have been achieved.

  15. Multi-Wavelength Photoacoustic Visualization of High Intensity Focused Ultrasound Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Gray, J. P.; Dana, N.; Dextraze, K. L.; Maier, F.; Emelianov, S.; Bouchard, R. R.

    2016-01-01

    High intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) thermal therapies are limited by deficiencies in existing image-guidance techniques. Previous studies using single-wavelength photoacoustic (PA) imaging have demonstrated that HIFU lesions generate contrast with respect to native tissues but have not sufficiently assessed lesion extent. The purpose of this study is to demonstrate feasibility of characterization of in vitro HIFU ablation lesion dimensions using 3D multi-wavelength PA imaging. Fresh porcine cardiac and liver tissue samples were embedded in agar phantoms and ablated using a 2.5 MHz small-animal HIFU system. Both 2D and 3D multi-wavelength photoacoustic-ultrasonic (PAUS) scans were performed in the near-infrared (NIR) range to characterize the change in the absorption spectrum of tissues following ablation and were compared to stained gross pathology to assess treatment margins and lesion extent. Comprehensive 2D multi-wavelength PA imaging yielded a spectrum in ablated tissue that did not display the characteristic local maximum in the optical absorption spectrum of deoxy-hemoglobin (Hb) near 760 nm. Two-dimensional tissue characterization map (TCM) images reconstructed from 3D TCM volumes reliably characterized lesion area and showed >70% area agreement with stained gross pathology. In addition, tissue samples were heated via water bath and concurrently interrogated with 2D PAUS imaging. PA signal exhibited an initial amplitude increase across all wavelengths, corresponding to an initial temperature increase, before then exhibiting a spectral change. This study suggests that multi-wavelength PA imaging has potential to obtain accurate characterization of HIFU lesion extent and may be better suited to guide HIFU ablation therapies during clinical treatments than single-wavelength methods. PMID:26149314

  16. Multi-Wavelength Diagnostics of Starbirth in Starbursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waller, William

    2005-07-01

    From the Orion Nebula to the Hubble Deep Field, starburst activity can be seen transforming galaxian clouds of gas into populous clusters of stars. The pyrotechnics and chemical enrichment associated with this activity have led to outcomes as ubiquitous as interstellar dust and as exquisite as life on Earth. In this talk, I will focus on the circumstances of star formation in the environmental context of ongoing starburst activity. I begin with the premises that (1) the formation of a single star takes time, (2) the formation of a populous cluster takes even more time, and (3) ``stuff'' happens in the interim. Hubble images of the Orion Nebula and Eagle Nebula show how hot stars can excavate neighboring clouds of gas and photoevaporate the star-forming cores that are exposed. Hubble observations of giant HII regions in M33 reveal a significant variation in the stellar populations, such that the most metal-rich HII regions contain the greatest proportions of the most massive stars. ISO and Spitzer observations of these same HII regions reveal corresponding variations in the nebular response. These multi-wavelength diagnostics of the stellar-nebular feedback in galaxian starbursts suggest a star-forming mechanism which is subject to photo-evaporative ablation -- an erosive process that is mediated by the metal abundance and corresponding amounts of protective dust in the starbursting environment.

  17. Exploring the Multi-Wavelength, Low Surface Brightness Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunner, R. J.; Djorgovski, S. G.; Gal, R. R.; Odewahn, S. C.

    1999-12-01

    Our current understanding of the low surface brightness universe is quite incomplete, not only in the optical, but also in other wavelength regimes. We have, therefore, begun an exploration of the multi-wavelength, low surface brightness universe. This project currently involves data from DPOSS (Digitized Palomar Optical Sky Survey), 2MASS (Two Micron All Sky Survey), IRAS (Infrared Astronomical Satellite), and several neutral hydrogen surveys. We present some initial results of this work as well as discuss the implications of this work on future virtual observatories. Our main scientific goals have been the search for low surface brightness galaxies, including local group dwarf spheroidals, and also optical counterparts to high velocity clouds. Our techniques are complimentary to normal data reduction pipeline techniques in that we focus on the diffuse emission that is ignored or removed by more traditional algorithms. This requires, of course, a spatial filtering which must account for objects of interest, in addition to observational artifacts (e.g.,\\ bright stellar halos). Finally, with this work, we are exploring the intersection of the catalog and image domains in order to maximize the scientific information we can extract from the federation of large survey data.

  18. Multi-Wavelength Views of Messier 81

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on individual images below for larger view

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    The magnificent spiral arms of the nearby galaxy Messier 81 are highlighted in this image from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope. Located in the northern constellation of Ursa Major (which also includes the Big Dipper), this galaxy is easily visible through binoculars or a small telescope. M81 is located at a distance of 12 million light-years.

    The main image is a composite mosaic obtained with the multiband imaging photometer for Spitzer and the infrared array camera. Thermal infrared emission at 24 microns detected by the photometer (red, bottom left inset) is combined with camera data at 8.0 microns (green, bottom center inset) and 3.6 microns (blue, bottom right inset).

    A visible-light image of Messier 81, obtained at Kitt Peak National Observatory, a ground-based telescope, is shown in the upper right inset. Both the visible-light picture and the 3.6-micron near-infrared image trace the distribution of stars, although the Spitzer image is virtually unaffected by obscuring dust. Both images reveal a very smooth stellar mass distribution, with the spiral arms relatively subdued.

    As one moves to longer wavelengths, the spiral arms become the dominant feature of the galaxy. The 8-micron emission is dominated by infrared light radiated by hot dust that has been heated by nearby luminous stars. Dust in the galaxy is bathed by ultraviolet and visible light from nearby stars. Upon absorbing an ultraviolet or visible-light photon, a dust grain is heated and re-emits the energy at longer infrared wavelengths. The dust particles are composed of silicates (chemically similar to beach sand), carbonaceous grains and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and

  19. Multi-wavelength modeling of protoplanetary disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinte, C.; Ménard, F.; Duchêne, G.; Augereau, J.-C.

    2006-06-01

    The on-going revolution of high angular resolution observations and increasing wavelength coverage promises to unlock tightly-kept secrets of circumstellar disks. Thanks to these advances, many issues have already been addressed : large scale geometry of disks, evidence of grain growth, of dust settling, ldots Most of these results are based on models that emphasize on fitting either SEDs or scattered light images or, more recently, interferometric visibilities. In this contribution, we present a global approach which aims at interpreting the increasing amount of observational data coherently, in the framework of a single model, in order to get a more global picture and to better characterize both the dust population and the disk properties. Results of such a modeling approach, applied to a few disks for which large observational data-sets are available, are presented.

  20. Identification of aerosol composition from multi-wavelength lidar measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, S. A.

    1984-01-01

    This paper seeks to develop the potential of lidar for the identification of the chemical composition of atmospheric aerosols. Available numerical computations suggest that aerosols can be identified by the wavelength dependence of aerosol optical properties. Since lidar can derive the volume backscatter coefficient as a function of wavelength, a multi-wavelength lidar system may be able to provide valuable information on the composition of aerosols. This research theoretically investigates the volume backscatter coefficients for the aerosol classes, sea-salts, and sulfates, as a function of wavelength. The results show that these aerosol compositions can be characterized and identified by their backscatter wavelength dependence. A method to utilize multi-wavelength lidar measurements to discriminate between compositionally different thin aerosol layers is discussed.

  1. Multi-wavelength differential absorption measurements of chemical species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, David M.

    algorithms to select filters for use with a MWIR (midwave infrared) imager for detection of plumes of methane, propane, gasoline vapor, and diesel vapor. These simulations were prepared for system designs operating on a down-looking airborne platform. A data analysis algorithm for use with a hydrocarbon imaging system extracts regions of interest from the field-of-view for further analysis. An error analysis is presented for a scanning DAS (Differential Absorption Spectroscopy) lidar system operating from an airborne platform that uses signals scattered from topographical targets. The analysis is built into a simulation program for testing real-time data processing approaches, and to gauge the effects on measurements of path column concentration due to ground reflectivity variations. An example simulation provides a description of the data expected for methane. Several accomplishments of this research include: (1) A new lidar technique for detection and measurement of concentrations of atmospheric species is demonstrated that uses a low-power supercontinuum source. (2) A new multi-wavelength algorithm, which demonstrates excellent performance, is applied to processing spectroscopic data collected by a longpath supercontinuum laser absorption instrument. (3) A simulation program for topographical scattering of a scanning DAS system is developed, and it is validated with aircraft data from the ITT Industries ANGEL (Airborne Natural Gas Emission Lidar) 3-lambda lidar system. (4) An error analysis procedure for DAS is developed, and is applied to measurements and simulations for an airborne platform. (5) A method for filter selection is developed and tested for use with an infrared imager that optimizes the detection for various hydrocarbons that absorb in the midwave infrared. (6) The development of a Fourier analysis algorithm is described that allows a user to rapidly separate hydrocarbon plumes from the background features in the field of view of an imaging system.

  2. Intravascular imaging with a storage phosphor detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shikhaliev, Polad M.; Petrek, Peter; Matthews, Kenneth L., II; Fritz, Shannon G.; Bujenovic, L. Steven; Xu, Tong

    2010-05-01

    The aim of this study is to develop and test an intravascular positron imaging system based on a storage phosphor detector for imaging and detecting vulnerable plaques of human coronary arteries. The radiotracer F18-FDG accumulates in vulnerable plaques with inflammation of the overlying cap. The vulnerable plaques can, therefore, be imaged by recording positrons emitted from F18-FDG with a detector inserted into the artery. A prototype intravascular detector was constructed based on storage phosphor. The detector uses a flexible storage phosphor tube with 55 mm length, 2 mm diameter and 0.28 mm wall thickness. The intravascular detector is guided into the vessel using x-ray fluoroscopy and the accumulated x-ray signal must be erased prior to positron imaging. For this purpose, a light diffuser, 0.9 mm in diameter and 55 mm in length, was inserted into the detector tube. The light diffuser was connected to a laser source through a 2 m long optical fiber. The diffuser redirected the 0.38 W laser light to the inner surface of the phosphor detector to erase it. A heart phantom with 300 cm3 volume and three coronary arteries with 3.2 mm diameter and with several plaques was constructed. FDG solution with 0.5 µCi cm-3 activity concentration was filled in the heart and coronary arteries. The detector was inserted in a coronary artery and the signal from the plaques and surrounding background activity was recorded for 2 min. Then the phosphor detector was extracted and read out using a storage phosphor reader. The light diffuser erased the signal resulting from fluoroscopic exposure to level below that encountered during positron imaging. Vulnerable plaques with area activities higher than 1.2 nCi mm-2 were visualized by the detector. This activity is a factor of 10-20 lower than that expected in human vulnerable plaques. The detector was able to image the internal surface of the coronary vessels with 50 mm length and 360° circumference. Spatial resolution was 0

  3. Enhanced neutron imaging detector using optical processing

    SciTech Connect

    Hutchinson, D.P.; McElhaney, S.A.

    1992-08-01

    Existing neutron imaging detectors have limited count rates due to inherent property and electronic limitations. The popular multiwire proportional counter is qualified by gas recombination to a count rate of less than 10{sup 5} n/s over the entire array and the neutron Anger camera, even though improved with new fiber optic encoding methods, can only achieve 10{sup 6} cps over a limited array. We present a preliminary design for a new type of neutron imaging detector with a resolution of 2--5 mm and a count rate capability of 10{sup 6} cps pixel element. We propose to combine optical and electronic processing to economically increase the throughput of advanced detector systems while simplifying computing requirements. By placing a scintillator screen ahead of an optical image processor followed by a detector array, a high throughput imaging detector may be constructed.

  4. [Research on detecting trace formaldehyde gas by the multi-wavelengths characteristics method].

    PubMed

    Li, Yang-jun; Wang, Gao

    2011-12-01

    In order to overcome the slow speed of detecting trace formaldehyde in the sample gas, material consumption by chemical reaction, and the limitations of the sampling area in the detection of trace formaldehyde, a multi-wavelength characteristics method for getting the exact concentration of formaldehyde quickly was designed. According to the spectrum characteristics of formaldehyde and the main interfering gases the system chose multiple wavelengths with the minimum degree of coherence (the number of characteristic wavelengths were selected to be 3, 4 and 5), in conjunction with the corresponding groups of narrow-band filters. With the infrared light of the light source through the chamber windows and narrow-band filters, the infrared light was collected by the PCI-2TE-13 infrared detectors, and the concentration of formaldehyde in the sample gas was calculated by the characteristics spectrum absorption algorithm. In the experiments, the system analyzed and calculated the concentration of formaldehyde in four gas samples collected in the newly renovated house, building materials market, supermarkets and outdoor parks. Experimental results of the system and test results of ARCSpectro-AMIR infrared spectrometer were compared, the results show that test data above 10 mg x m(-3) were close to true value by the multi-wavelengths characteristics method, and the average error is less than 5%. So the system meets the requirements of practical applications, and it has the advantages of real-time detection, not poisoning so on.

  5. Multi-Wavelength Observations of Nearby Starburst Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Janice

    2015-08-01

    Do cycles of violent, intense, but short-lived bursts constitute a significant mode of global star formation in present-day galaxies? Such events can have a profound effect on galaxies, particularly those with shallow potential wells, and observational measures of their prevalence inform our understanding of a wide range of issues in galaxy evolution. I will highlight what we have learned about starbursts from multi-wavelength observations of galaxies in the local volume on both galactic and smaller scales, and explore how connections with the study of the deaths of massive stars may further our understanding of open issues in galaxy evolution.

  6. Molecular transport network security using multi-wavelength optical spins.

    PubMed

    Tunsiri, Surachai; Thammawongsa, Nopparat; Mitatha, Somsak; Yupapin, Preecha P

    2016-01-01

    Multi-wavelength generation system using an optical spin within the modified add-drop optical filter known as a PANDA ring resonator for molecular transport network security is proposed. By using the dark-bright soliton pair control, the optical capsules can be constructed and applied to securely transport the trapped molecules within the network. The advantage is that the dark and bright soliton pair (components) can securely propagate for long distance without electromagnetic interference. In operation, the optical intensity from PANDA ring resonator is fed into gold nano-antenna, where the surface plasmon oscillation between soliton pair and metallic waveguide is established.

  7. Molecular transport network security using multi-wavelength optical spins.

    PubMed

    Tunsiri, Surachai; Thammawongsa, Nopparat; Mitatha, Somsak; Yupapin, Preecha P

    2016-01-01

    Multi-wavelength generation system using an optical spin within the modified add-drop optical filter known as a PANDA ring resonator for molecular transport network security is proposed. By using the dark-bright soliton pair control, the optical capsules can be constructed and applied to securely transport the trapped molecules within the network. The advantage is that the dark and bright soliton pair (components) can securely propagate for long distance without electromagnetic interference. In operation, the optical intensity from PANDA ring resonator is fed into gold nano-antenna, where the surface plasmon oscillation between soliton pair and metallic waveguide is established. PMID:25058032

  8. Ghost imaging with a single detector

    SciTech Connect

    Bromberg, Yaron; Katz, Ori; Silberberg, Yaron

    2009-05-15

    We experimentally demonstrate pseudothermal ghost imaging and ghost diffraction using only a single detector. We achieve this by replacing the high-resolution detector of the reference beam with a computation of the propagating field, following a recent proposal by Shapiro [Phys. Rev. A 78, 061802(R) (2008)]. Since only a single detector is used, this provides experimental evidence that pseudothermal ghost imaging does not rely on nonlocal quantum correlations. In addition, we show the depth-resolving capability of this ghost imaging technique.

  9. Probing the Multi-Wavelength Nature of Stellar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osten, R. A.; Brown, A.; Ayres, T. R.; Linsky, J. L.

    2000-05-01

    The Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer has been instrumental in advancing our understanding of flares on late-type stars. Its long observations of coronal sources for > 100 ks are perfectly matched for studying flaring variability on active binary systems, whose flaring time scales can last for tens of hours. This ability makes EUVE an ideal companion for multi-wavelength observations of flares, as it can place the shorter observations of other satellites and telescopes in perspective of the coronal variability. For example, EUVE recently participated in a campaign to observe the RS CVn binary HR 1099 (V711 Tau) during a calibration observation with the Chandra X-ray Observatory, with accompanying high-resolution UV coverage from HST/STIS and radio coverage from the VLA. I will discuss the results of this campaign as well as earlier multi-wavelength observations involving EUVE and other satellites such as ASCA, RXTE, and BeppoSAX of flaring variability on active binary systems. RAO acknowledges funding from a NASA GSRP fellowship, grant number NGT5-50241. AB and TRA acknowledge funding from NASA grant NAG5-3226 and JLL acknowledges support from NASA through grants S-56500-D and H-04630D.

  10. Multi-wavelength coverage of outburst decays of LMXBs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalemci, Emrah; Tomsick, John; Bailyn, Charles; Dincer, Tolga

    2016-07-01

    Low mass X-ray binaries (LMXB) are dynamic laboratories that are powered by accretion, and under some conditions these systems create strong outflows in the form of highly collimated jets, or winds. Outburst decays of transient LMXBs provide additional information about compact jets and their relation to changes in timing properties. Our group characterizes the multi-wavelength evolution of Galactic black hole transients during their outburst decays using simultaneous X-ray (RXTE, Swift, and INTEGRAL), optical/infrared (SMARTS) and radio (VLA, ATCA, VLBI). By characterizing the X-ray spectral and timing evolution of these systems, and merging this information with the evolution in the near-infrared and radio, we obtain the conditions necessary to launch stable compact jets, and discuss how jets can be influencing and/or influenced by X-ray timing and spectral properties of these systems. In this presentation, I will summarize recent results regarding multi-wavelength observations of not only black hole systems, but also neutron star X-ray binaries during outburst decays, and discuss models that explain not only the broad spectral energy distribution, but also some of the timing properties of these systems.

  11. Fast time-lens-based line-scan single-pixel camera with multi-wavelength source

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Qiang; Chen, Hongwei; Weng, Zhiliang; Chen, Minghua; Yang, Sigang; Xie, Shizhong

    2015-01-01

    A fast time-lens-based line-scan single-pixel camera with multi-wavelength source is proposed and experimentally demonstrated in this paper. A multi-wavelength laser instead of a mode-locked laser is used as the optical source. With a diffraction grating and dispersion compensating fibers, the spatial information of an object is converted into temporal waveforms which are then randomly encoded, temporally compressed and captured by a single-pixel photodetector. Two algorithms (the dictionary learning algorithm and the discrete cosine transform-based algorithm) for image reconstruction are employed, respectively. Results show that the dictionary learning algorithm has greater capability to reduce the number of compressive measurements than the DCT-based algorithm. The effective imaging frame rate increases from 200 kHz to 1 MHz, which shows a significant improvement in imaging speed over conventional single-pixel cameras. PMID:26417527

  12. Multi-wavelength Monitoring of Lensed Quasars: Deciphering Quasar Structure at Micro-arcseconds Scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosquera, Ana; Morgan, Christopher W.; Kochanek, Christopher S.; Dai, Xinyu; Chen, Bin; MacLeod, Chelsea Louise; Chartas, George

    2016-01-01

    Microlensing in multiply imaged gravitationally lensed quasars provides us with a unique tool to zoom in on the structure of AGN and explore their physics in more detail. Microlensing magnification, caused primarily by stars and white dwarfs close to the line of sight towards the lensed quasar images, is seen as uncorrelated flux variations due to the relative motions of the quasar, the lens, its stars, and the observer, and it depends on the structural and dynamical properties of the source and the lens. Since the magnification depends upon the size of the source, we can use microlensing to measure the size of quasar emission regions. In essence, the amplitude of the microlensing variability encodes the source size, with smaller sources showing larger variability amplitudes. Using state of the art microlensing techniques, our team has performed pioneering research in the field based on multi-wavelength space and ground-based observations. Among the most remarkable results, using Chandra observations we have set the first quantitative constraints on the sizes of the X-ray emission regions of quasars. In this work l briefly describe the methodology, the results from our previous multi-wavelength monitoring programs, and the next frontier of exploring the dependence of the structure of the X-ray emission regions on black hole mass and X-ray energy.

  13. Tomographic imaging using poissonian detector data

    DOEpatents

    Aspelmeier, Timo; Ebel, Gernot; Hoeschen, Christoph

    2013-10-15

    An image reconstruction method for reconstructing a tomographic image (f.sub.j) of a region of investigation within an object (1), comprises the steps of providing detector data (y.sub.i) comprising Poisson random values measured at an i-th of a plurality of different positions, e.g. i=(k,l) with pixel index k on a detector device and angular index l referring to both the angular position (.alpha..sub.l) and the rotation radius (r.sub.l) of the detector device (10) relative to the object (1), providing a predetermined system matrix A.sub.ij assigning a j-th voxel of the object (1) to the i-th detector data (y.sub.i), and reconstructing the tomographic image (f.sub.j) based on the detector data (y.sub.i), said reconstructing step including a procedure of minimizing a functional F(f) depending on the detector data (y.sub.i) and the system matrix A.sub.ij and additionally including a sparse or compressive representation of the object (1) in an orthobasis T, wherein the tomographic image (f.sub.j) represents the global minimum of the functional F(f). Furthermore, an imaging method and an imaging device using the image reconstruction method are described.

  14. Initiation of Coronal Mass Ejection Event Observed on 2010 November 3: Multi-wavelength Perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulay, Sargam; Subramanian, Srividya; Tripathi, Durgesh; Isobe, Hiroaki; Glesener, Lindsay

    2014-10-01

    One of the major unsolved problems in solar physics is that of coronal mass ejection (CME) initiation. In this paper, we have studied the initiation of a flare-associated CME that occurred on 2010 November 3 using multi-wavelength observations recorded by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory and the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager. We report an observation of an inflow structure initially in the 304 Å and the 1600 Å images a few seconds later. This inflow structure was detected as one of the legs of the CME. We also observed a non-thermal compact source concurrent and near co-spatial with the brightening and movement of the inflow structure. The appearance of this compact non-thermal source, brightening, and movement of the inflow structure and the subsequent outward movement of the CME structure in the corona led us to conclude that the CME initiation was caused by magnetic reconnection.

  15. Initiation of coronal mass ejection event observed on 2010 November 3: multi-wavelength perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Mulay, Sargam; Subramanian, Srividya; Tripathi, Durgesh; Isobe, Hiroaki; Glesener, Lindsay

    2014-10-10

    One of the major unsolved problems in solar physics is that of coronal mass ejection (CME) initiation. In this paper, we have studied the initiation of a flare-associated CME that occurred on 2010 November 3 using multi-wavelength observations recorded by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory and the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager. We report an observation of an inflow structure initially in the 304 Å and the 1600 Å images a few seconds later. This inflow structure was detected as one of the legs of the CME. We also observed a non-thermal compact source concurrent and near co-spatial with the brightening and movement of the inflow structure. The appearance of this compact non-thermal source, brightening, and movement of the inflow structure and the subsequent outward movement of the CME structure in the corona led us to conclude that the CME initiation was caused by magnetic reconnection.

  16. Emissivity range constraints algorithm for multi-wavelength pyrometer (MWP).

    PubMed

    Xing, Jian; Rana, R S; Gu, Weihong

    2016-08-22

    In order to realize rapid and real temperature measurement for high temperature targets by multi-wavelength pyrometer (MWP), emissivity range constraints to optimize data processing algorithm without effect from emissivity has been developed. Through exploring the relation between emissivity deviation and true temperature by fitting of large number of data from different emissivity distribution target models, the effective search range of emissivity for every time iteration is obtained, so data processing time is greatly reduced. Simulation and experimental results indicate that calculation time is less by 0.2 seconds with 25K absolute error at 1800K true temperature, and the efficiency is improved by more than 90% compared with the previous algorithm. The method has advantages of simplicity, rapidity, and suitability for in-line high temperature measurement.

  17. Multi-Wavelength Monitoring of GRS 1915+105

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bandyopadhyay, R.; Martini, P.; Gerard, E.; Charles, P. A.; Wagner, R. M.; Shrader, C.; Shahbaz, T.; Mirabel, I. F.

    1997-01-01

    Since its discovery in 1992, the superluminal X-ray transient GRS 1915+105 has been extensively observed in an attempt to understand its behaviour. We present here first results from a multi-wavelength campaign undertaken from July to September 1996. This study includes X-ray data from the RXTE All Sky Monitor and BATSE, two-frequency data from the Nancay radio telescope, and infrared photometry from the 1.8 m Perkins telescope at Lowell Observatory. The first long-term well-sampled IR light curve of GRS 1915+105 is presented herein and is consistent with the interpretation of this source as a long-period binary. We compare the various light curves, searching for correlations in the behaviour of the source at differing wavelengths and for possible periodicities.

  18. Multi-wavelength analysis from tomography study on solar chromosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Mumpuni, Emanuel Sungging; Herdiwijaya, Dhani; Djamal, Mitra

    2015-04-16

    The Sun as the most important star for scientific laboratory in astrophysics as well as encompassing all living aspect on Earth, still holds scientific mystery. As the established model that the Sun’s energy fueled by the nuclear reaction, along with transport process to the typical Solar surface on around 6000-K temperature, many aspects still left as an open questions, such as how the chromosphere responded to the photospheric dynamics. In this preliminary work, we try to analyze the Solar chromosphere respond to the Photospheric dynamics using tomography study implementing multi-wavelength analysis observation obtained from Dutch Open Telescope. Using the Hydrogen-alpha Doppler signal as the primary diagnostic tool, we try to investigate the inter-relation between the magnetic and gas pressure dynamics that occur in the chromosphere.

  19. Multi-wavelength analysis of Ellerman Bomb Light Curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herlender, M.; Berlicki, A.

    We present the results of a multi-wavelength photometric analysis of Ellerman Bomb (EB) observations obtained from the Dutch Open Telescope. In our data we have found 6 EBs located in the super-penumbra of the main spot in the active region NOAA 10781. We present light curves of EB observed in the Hα line centre and wing +0.7 Å, in the Ca II H line centre and wing~+2.35 Å, in the G-band and in the TRACE 1600 Å filter. We have shown that EBs were visible in the G-band and moreover, there was a good correlation between the light curves in the G-band and in the Hα line wings. We also found quasi-periodic oscillations of EBs brightness in the G-band, CaII H line and TRACE 1600 Å filter.

  20. Switchable multi-wavelength fiber laser based on modal interference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Lin; Jiang, Sun; Qi, Yan-Hui; Kang, Ze-Xin; Jian, Shui-Sheng

    2015-08-01

    A comb fiber filter based on modal interference is proposed and demonstrated in this paper. Here two cascaded up-tapers are used to excite the cladding mode, and a core-offset jointing point is used to act as an interference component. Experimental results show that this kind of structure possesses a comb filter property in a range of the C-band. The measured extinction ratio is better than 12 dB with an insertion loss of about 11 dB. A switchable multi-wavelength erbium-doped fiber laser based on this novel comb filter is demonstrated. By adjusting the polarization controller, the output laser can be switched among single-, dual-, and three-wavelengths with a side mode suppression ratio of better than 45 dB.

  1. Emissivity range constraints algorithm for multi-wavelength pyrometer (MWP).

    PubMed

    Xing, Jian; Rana, R S; Gu, Weihong

    2016-08-22

    In order to realize rapid and real temperature measurement for high temperature targets by multi-wavelength pyrometer (MWP), emissivity range constraints to optimize data processing algorithm without effect from emissivity has been developed. Through exploring the relation between emissivity deviation and true temperature by fitting of large number of data from different emissivity distribution target models, the effective search range of emissivity for every time iteration is obtained, so data processing time is greatly reduced. Simulation and experimental results indicate that calculation time is less by 0.2 seconds with 25K absolute error at 1800K true temperature, and the efficiency is improved by more than 90% compared with the previous algorithm. The method has advantages of simplicity, rapidity, and suitability for in-line high temperature measurement. PMID:27557198

  2. Multi-Wavelength Monitoring of GRS 1915+105

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bandyopadhyay, R.; Martini, P.; Gerard, E.; Charles, P. A.; Wagner, R. M.; Shrader, C.; Shahbaz, T.; Mirabel, I. F.

    1997-01-01

    Since its discovery in 1992, the superluminal X-ray transient GRS 1915+105 has been extensively observed in an attempt to understand its behaviour. We present here preliminary results from a multi-wavelength campaign undertaken from July to September 1996. This study includes X-ray data from the RXTE All Sky Monitor and BATSE, two-frequency data from the Nancay radio telescope, and infrared photometry from the 1.8m Perkins telescope at Lowell Observatory. The K-band data presented herein provide the first long-term well-sampled IR light curve of GRS 1915+105. We compare the various light curves, searching for correlations in the behaviour of the source at differing wavelengths and for possible periodicities.

  3. Increasing image resolution using the pyramidal detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isakson, Steve; Sahagun, Luis Roberto; Wade, Glen

    2002-11-01

    The knife-edge detector (KED) has been used in transverse wave, scanning laser acoustic microscopes (SLAM) successfully for many years. It possesses a good balance between spatial bandwidth, detector noise insensitivity, and detector grain stability. Many detectors have tried to increase the bandwidth to improve the image resolution, only to be difficult to use and susceptible to vibration and mechanical variations. The authors have invented and designed a pyramidal detector (PD) that combines the stability and noise insensitivity of the KED with a significantly improved bandwidth in both axes of the object plane. The detector uses the entire signal provided at the detector to increase the signal to noise ratio and significantly decrease the cover slip spatial frequencies that are difficult to detect. The increased bandwidth allows image resolution approaching what an ideal detector could achieve. Additionally, unlike the KED, the PD spatial bandwidth is approximately isotropic to waves traveling in the cover slip. Increased spatial resolution and uniformity result. This property is particularly useful for back-propagation in tomographic applications.

  4. Compton imager using room temperature silicon detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurfess, James D.; Novikova, Elena I.; Phlips, Bernard F.; Wulf, Eric A.

    2007-08-01

    We have been developing a multi-layer Compton Gamma Ray Imager using position-sensitive, intrinsic silicon detectors. Advantages of this approach include room temperature operation, reduced Doppler broadening, and use of conventional silicon fabrication technologies. We have obtained results on the imaging performance of a multi-layer instrument where each layer consists of a 2×2 array of double-sided strip detectors. Each detector is 63 mm×63 mm×2 mm thick and has 64 strips providing a strip pitch of approximately 0.9 mm. The detectors were fabricated by SINTEF ICT (Oslo Norway) from 100 mm diameter wafers. The use of large arrays of silicon detectors appears especially advantageous for applications that require excellent sensitivity, spectral resolution and imaging such as gamma ray astrophysics, detection of special nuclear materials, and medical imaging. The multiple Compton interactions (three or more) in the low-Z silicon enable the energy and direction of the incident gamma ray to be determined without full deposition of the incident gamma-ray energy in the detector. The performance of large volume instruments for various applications are presented, including an instrument under consideration for NASA's Advanced Compton Telescope (ACT) mission and applications to Homeland Security. Technology developments that could further extend the sensitivity and performance of silicon Compton Imagers are presented, including the use of low-energy (few hundred keV) electron tracking within novel silicon detectors and the potential for a wafer-bonding approach to produce thicker, position-sensitive silicon detectors with an associated reduction of required electronics and instrument cost.

  5. [Remote system of natural gas leakage based on multi-wavelength characteristics spectrum analysis].

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Lu, Xu-Tao; Yang, Ze-Hui

    2014-05-01

    In order to be able to quickly, to a wide range of natural gas pipeline leakage monitoring, the remote detection system for concentration of methane gas was designed based on static Fourier transform interferometer. The system used infrared light, which the center wavelength was calibrated to absorption peaks of methane molecules, to irradiated tested area, and then got the interference fringes by converging collimation system and interference module. Finally, the system calculated the concentration-path-length product in tested area by multi-wavelength characteristics spectrum analysis algorithm, furthermore the inversion of the corresponding concentration of methane. By HITRAN spectrum database, Selected wavelength position of 1. 65 microm as the main characteristic absorption peaks, thereby using 1. 65 pm DFB laser as the light source. In order to improve the detection accuracy and stability without increasing the hardware configuration of the system, solved absorbance ratio by the auxiliary wave-length, and then get concentration-path-length product of measured gas by the method of the calculation proportion of multi-wavelength characteristics. The measurement error from external disturbance is caused by this innovative approach, and it is more similar to a differential measurement. It will eliminate errors in the process of solving the ratio of multi-wavelength characteristics, and can improve accuracy and stability of the system. The infrared absorption spectrum of methane is constant, the ratio of absorbance of any two wavelengths by methane is also constant. The error coefficients produced by the system is the same when it received the same external interference, so the measured noise of the system can be effectively reduced by the ratio method. Experimental tested standards methane gas tank with leaking rate constant. Using the tested data of PN1000 type portable methane detector as the standard data, and were compared to the tested data of the system

  6. A simple controller for bidimensional image detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angeles, F.; Martínez, L. A.

    2012-07-01

    The increasing use of many and different kind of light detectors to acquire, monitor and control various aspects of the observation imposes the need to standardize the acquisition and processing of images and data. While scientific image acquisition systems usually include a complex controller, some less demanding subsystems require the development of electronics and software to read the image. Most of the times these image detectors are rather small and high speed is of no concern, so controllers need not to be fast; take for instance a telescope guider. With these directives in mind, in this work we present a very simple image acquisition system based on a Texas Instruments microcontroller of the family MSP430 and a serial static memory as a standard instrumentation starting for small image acquisition controllers.

  7. Cerenkov ring imaging detector development: Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Aston, D.; Bienz, T.; Bird, F.; Dasu, S.; Dunwoodie, W.; Hallewell, G.; Kawahara, H.; Kwon, Y.; Leith, D.; Ratcliff, B.

    1988-10-01

    We present recent progress on the construction and testing of the first drift boxes and single electron detectors as they come from the production line. These detectors will be used for particle identification using the Ring Imaging technique in the SLD experiment at SLAC. Various experimental results are presented, including single electron pulse height measurements as a function of gas gain, detector gating capability, uniformity of response across the wire plane, charge division performance of a single electron signal, average pulse shape and its comparison with predicted shape, and cross-talk. 14 refs., 11 figs.

  8. The BRAHMS ring imaging Cherenkov detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debbe, R.; Jørgensen, C. E.; Olness, J.; Yin, Z.

    2007-01-01

    A Ring Imaging Cherenkov detector built for the BRAHMS experiment at the Brookhaven RHIC is described. This detector has a high index of refraction gas radiator. Cherenkov light is focused on a photo-multiplier based photon detector with a large spherical mirror. The combination of momentum and ring radius measurement provides particle identification from 2.5 to 35 GeV/ c for pions and kaons and well above 40 GeV/ c for protons during runs that had the radiator index of refraction set at n-1=1700×10-6.

  9. Neutron beam imaging with GEM detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albani, G.; Croci, G.; Cazzaniga, C.; Cavenago, M.; Claps, G.; Muraro, A.; Murtas, F.; Pasqualotto, R.; Perelli Cippo, E.; Rebai, M.; Tardocchi, M.; Gorini, G.

    2015-04-01

    Neutron GEM-based detectors represent a new frontier of devices in neutron physics applications where a very high neutron flux must be measured such as future fusion experiments (e.g. ITER Neutral beam Injector) and spallation sources (e.g. the European Spallation source). This kind of detectors can be properly adapted to be used both as beam monitors but also as neutron diffraction detectors that could represent a valid alternative for the 3He detectors replacement. Fast neutron GEM detectors (nGEM) feature a cathode composed by one layer of polyethylene and one of aluminium (neutron scattering on hydrogen generates protons that are detected in the gas) while thermal neutron GEM detectors (bGEM) are equipped with a borated aluminium cathode (charged particles are generated through the 10B(n,α)7Li reaction). GEM detectors can be realized in large area (1 m2) and their readout can be pixelated. Three different prototypes of nGEM and one prototype of bGEM detectors of different areas and equipped with different types of readout have been built and tested. All the detectors have been used to measure the fast and thermal neutron 2D beam image at the ISIS-VESUVIO beamline. The different kinds of readout patterns (different areas of the pixels) have been compared in similar conditions. All the detectors measured a width of the beam profile consitent with the expected one. The imaging property of each detector was then tested by inserting samples of different material and shape in the beam. All the samples were correctly reconstructed and the definition of the reconstruction depends on the type of readout anode. The fast neutron beam profile reconstruction was then compared to the one obtained by diamond detectors positioned on the same beamline while the thermal neutron one was compared to the imaged obtained by cadmium-coupled x-rays films. Also efficiency and the gamma background rejection have been determined. These prototypes represent the first step towards the

  10. Linear fitting of multi-threshold counting data with a pixel-array detector for spectral X-ray imaging

    PubMed Central

    Muir, Ryan D.; Pogranichney, Nicholas R.; Muir, J. Lewis; Sullivan, Shane Z.; Battaile, Kevin P.; Mulichak, Anne M.; Toth, Scott J.; Keefe, Lisa J.; Simpson, Garth J.

    2014-01-01

    Experiments and modeling are described to perform spectral fitting of multi-threshold counting measurements on a pixel-array detector. An analytical model was developed for describing the probability density function of detected voltage in X-ray photon-counting arrays, utilizing fractional photon counting to account for edge/corner effects from voltage plumes that spread across multiple pixels. Each pixel was mathematically calibrated by fitting the detected voltage distributions to the model at both 13.5 keV and 15.0 keV X-ray energies. The model and established pixel responses were then exploited to statistically recover images of X-ray intensity as a function of X-ray energy in a simulated multi-wavelength and multi-counting threshold experiment. PMID:25178010

  11. Uncooled IR imaging using optomechanical detectors.

    PubMed

    Miao, Zhengyu; Zhang, Qingchuan; Chen, Dapeng; Guo, Zheying; Dong, Fengliang; Xiong, Zhiming; Wu, Xiaoping; Li, Chaobo; Jiao, Binbin

    2007-08-01

    In this study, we present an uncooled infrared imaging detector using knife-edge filter optical readout method. The tilt angle change of each cantilever in a focal plane array (FPA) can be simultaneously detected with a resolution of 10(-5) degrees. A deformation magnifying substrate-free microcantilever unit is specially designed. The multi-fold legs of microcantilever are interval metal coated to form a thermal deformation magnifying structure. Thermal and thermomechanical performance of this microcantilever unit are modeled and analyzed. An FPA with 100 x 100 pixels is fabricated and thermal images of human body are obtained by this detector. PMID:17317012

  12. Imaging radiation detector with gain

    DOEpatents

    Morris, Christopher L.; Idzorek, George C.; Atencio, Leroy G.

    1984-01-01

    A radiation imaging device which has application in x-ray imaging. The device can be utilized in CAT scanners and other devices which require high sensitivity and low x-ray fluxes. The device utilizes cumulative multiplication of charge carriers on the anode plane and the collection of positive ion charges to image the radiation intensity on the cathode plane. Parallel and orthogonal cathode wire arrays are disclosed as well as a two-dimensional grid pattern for collecting the positive ions on the cathode.

  13. Imaging radiation detector with gain

    DOEpatents

    Morris, C.L.; Idzorek, G.C.; Atencio, L.G.

    1982-07-21

    A radiation imaging device which has application in x-ray imaging. The device can be utilized in CAT scanners and other devices which require high sensitivity and low x-ray fluxes. The device utilizes cumulative multiplication of charge carriers on the anode plane and the collection of positive ion charges to image the radiation intensity on the cathode plane. Parallel and orthogonal cathode wire arrays are disclosed as well as a two-dimensional grid pattern for collecting the positive ions on the cathode.

  14. A search for binary pulsar companions using multi-wavelength OBSERVATIONS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mignani, Roberto; Yershov, Vladimir; Oates, Samantha; Breeveld, Alice; Pallanca, Cristina; Corongiu, Alessandro; Ferraro, Francesco

    The identification of the stellar companions to binary pulsars is key to study the evolution of the binary system and how this is influenced by the interactions between the two stars. For only a fraction of the known binary pulsars, the stellar companion has been identified. Here, we used 11 source catalogues available from multi-wavelength (optical, infrared, ultraviolet) imaging sky surveys, including the recently released Swift/UVOT and XMM-Newton/OM, to search for the stellar companions of a sample of 144 field binary pulsars (i.e. not in Globular Clusters) selected from the Australia Telescope National Facility (ATNF) data base (version 1.48) and from the public list of gamma-ray pulsars detected by Fermi.

  15. Multi-wavelength mid-infrared plasmonic antennas with single nanoscale focal point.

    PubMed

    Blanchard, Romain; Boriskina, Svetlana V; Genevet, Patrice; Kats, Mikhail A; Tetienne, Jean-Philippe; Yu, Nanfang; Scully, Marlan O; Dal Negro, Luca; Capasso, Federico

    2011-10-24

    We propose and demonstrate a novel photonic-plasmonic antenna capable of confining electromagnetic radiation at several mid-infrared wavelengths to a single sub-wavelength spot. The structure relies on the coupling between the localized surface plasmon resonance of a bow-tie nanoantenna with the photonic modes of surrounding multi-periodic particle arrays. Far-field measurements of the transmission through the central bow-tie demonstrate the presence of Fano-like interference effects resulting from the interaction of the bow-tie antenna with the surrounding nanoparticle arrays. The near-field of the multi-wavelength antenna is imaged using an aperture-less near-field scanning optical microscope. This antenna is relevant for the development of near-field probes for nanoimaging, spectroscopy and biosensing.

  16. Multi-wavelength observations of high energy sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motch, C.; Pineau, F.-X.

    2009-07-01

    Gathering large sets of clean multi-wavelength measurements on specific classes of astrophysical objects or conversely, unveiling rare outliers, both first require a careful handling of the cross-identification process, taking into account positional errors and probabilities of spurious matches. Most high energy telescopes offer significantly lower spatial resolution than those operating at optical or infrared wavelengths. This can lead to confusion issues particularly in regions of high optical and infrared source densities such as in the Galactic plane. We review here the elementary steps leading to a statistically controlled identification and classification of X-ray sources and illustrate these methods and related problems with some examples extracted from the work carried out by the Survey Science Center of the XMM-Newton satellite. We then list some functionality and interoperability requirements on a few basic VO tools which would ease the proper identification and subsequent classification of high energy sources and, in general, facilitate the computation of the reliabilities of the cross-identifications of sources in pairs of catalogues collected at any wavelengths.

  17. 40nm tunable multi-wavelength fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Qingsong; Wang, Tianshu; Zhang, Peng; Dong, Keyan; Jiang, Huilin

    2014-12-01

    A Brillouin-Erbium multi-wavelength tunable fiber laser at C-band is demostrated. A 10 km long singlemode fiber(SMF), a 6 m long Erbium-doped fiber, two couplers, a wavelength division multiplexer, a isolator, an optical circulator, a 980nm pump laser and a narrow linewidth tunable laser are included in the structure. A segment of 10 km-long single-mode fiber (SMF) between the two ports of a 1×2 coupler is used as Brillouin gain. Ebiumdoped fiber amplifier (EDFA) consists of a segment of 6m er-doped fiber pumped by 980nm laser dioder . A narrow linewidth tunable laser from 1527 to 1607 nm as Brillouin bump, At the Brillouin pump power of 8mW and the 980 nm pump power of 400 mw, 16 output channels with 0.08 nm spacing and tuning range of 40 nm from 1527 nm to 1567 nm are achieved. We realize the tunable output of wavelength by adjusting the 980 nm pump power and the Brillouin pump wavelength. Stability of the multiwavelength fiber laser is also observed.

  18. A Multi-wavelength Ozone Lidar for the EASOE Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Godin, S.; Ancellet, G.; David, C.; Porteneuve, J.; Leroy, C.; Mitev, V.; Emery, Y.; Flesia, C.; Rizi, V.; Visconti, G.

    1992-01-01

    The study of the ozone layer during winter and springtime in high latitude regions is a major issue in atmospheric research. For a better understanding of these problems, an important experimental campaign called EASOE (European Arctic Stratospheric Ozone Experiment) was organized by the European Community during the winter 1991-1992. Its main objective was to establish a budget of the ozone destruction processes on the whole northern hemisphere. This implied the simultaneous operation of different types of instruments located in both high and mid-latitude regions in order to study the destruction processes as well as the evolution of the ozone layer during the period of the campaign. A description will be given here of a mobile ozone lidar instrument specially designed for operation during the EASOE campaign. This system, which performs ozone measurements in the 5 to 40 km altitude range was located in Sodankyla, Finland as part of the ELSA experiment which also includes operation of another multi-wavelength lidar designed for polar stratospheric cloud measurements.

  19. Multi-wavelength observations of Cygnus X-3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varlotta, Angelo

    2012-07-01

    Cygnus X-3 is a X-ray binary consisting of an accreting compact object orbiting a Wolf-Rayet star with collimated relativistic jets, placing it firmly in the category of microquasars. It has been detected at radio frequencies and up to the high-energy gamma rays (>100 MeV) by the Fermi LAT. Many theoretical models envision very-high-energy (VHE) emission (>100 GeV) when the source manifests relativistic persistent jets or transient ejections. In light of our multi-wavelength studies of Cygnus X-3 in the radio, infra-red, soft x-ray, hard x-ray and gamma-ray (<100 GeV) bands and with the aid of VERITAS, we believe we can cast light on the particular conditions which could trigger VHE emission. We argue this can help us understand the mechanisms that may trigger VHE gamma-ray emission, thus improving our knowledge of particle acceleration and radiative processes in the jets. The implications have far reaching consequences on the understanding of other microquasars and also of active galactic nuclei, which are in many ways similar to microquasars and are prominent VHE gamma-ray sources.

  20. Multi-Wavelength Dielectrometer (MWD) Sensor For Planetary Subsurface Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deshpande, Manohar; VanSteenberg, Michael; Hilliard, Lawrence

    2006-01-01

    NASA's mission to Moon, Mars, and Beyond envisions landing of a light weight measurement platform on the planetary surface. The Multi-Wavelength Dielectrometer (MWD) on-board consists of essential electronics and metallic plates acting as electrodes attached to the body of such platform. An electric signal applied to one of the electrodes acting as a cathode sets up electric field pattern (in the soil medium) between the cathode and other electrodes acting as anodes. The electrodes are swept through multiple wavelengths (1Hz-1MHz) and the electric current drawn by the electrodes is measured at each frequency. The measured current whose amplitude and phase depend upon electrode spacing, dielectric constant of the subsurface soil, and the frequency is then used to estimate electrical properties of the soil. In this paper the MWD sensor that will measure the dielectric properties of Moon/Mars s soil is presented. A procedure to process the MWD measured data for extracting the soil properties is also described. Assuming the subsurface soil structure as multilayer strata having varying electric properties, an electric equivalent circuit of the multiple electrodes configuration placed on a multi-layer soil sample is obtained. The current drawn by the equivalent circuit from the low frequency signal generator is then calculated. By minimizing the difference between the model s estimated current and measured MWD data the electric properties of soil samples are extracted. Experimental and simulated results will be presented to validate the proposed procedure for extracting soil properties.

  1. Multi-wavelength analysis of young pulsars: an overview.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maritz, J. M.; Meintjes, P. J.; Buchner, S. J.

    Young pulsars emit a broad spectrum of radiation that range from radio to gamma ray energies. These pulsars are considered as rotation powered pulsars that spin rapidly and are strongly magnetized. Following the discovery of pulsars nearly four decades ago, the population of known pulsars already reached a number of roughly two thousand. This known population of pulsars includes both millisecond and normal pulsars that were discovered by several telescopes. We analyze both HartRAO radio data and Fermi gamma ray data of the Vela pulsar. We also explore a proposed method of probing the electron column density of the instellar gas through analyzing the gamma ray diffuse data associated with the Fermi two-year observation. This paper serves as an overview of gamma ray and radio timing analysis of bright young pulsars with respect to the use of open source timing analysis tools (Tempo2, Psrchive, Enrico and the Fermi tools). We reason that the multi-wavelength picture of pulsars can help clarify questions regarding the origin of pulsed radiation emission mechanisms in several energy bands, but that radio observations will prove adequate for timing noise analysis, given the accurate and long radio data sets. The process of identifying gravitational waves in timing data, rests on gaining a deeper insight into the timing noise phenomena.

  2. Simulation and Analysis of Large-Scale Compton Imaging Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Manini, H A; Lange, D J; Wright, D M

    2006-12-27

    We perform simulations of two types of large-scale Compton imaging detectors. The first type uses silicon and germanium detector crystals, and the second type uses silicon and CdZnTe (CZT) detector crystals. The simulations use realistic detector geometry and parameters. We analyze the performance of each type of detector, and we present results using receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curves.

  3. The Herschel-ATLAS Data Release 1 - II. Multi-wavelength counterparts to submillimetre sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourne, N.; Dunne, L.; Maddox, S. J.; Dye, S.; Furlanetto, C.; Hoyos, C.; Smith, D. J. B.; Eales, S.; Smith, M. W. L.; Valiante, E.; Alpaslan, M.; Andrae, E.; Baldry, I. K.; Cluver, M. E.; Cooray, A.; Driver, S. P.; Dunlop, J. S.; Grootes, M. W.; Ivison, R. J.; Jarrett, T. H.; Liske, J.; Madore, B. F.; Popescu, C. C.; Robotham, A. G.; Rowlands, K.; Seibert, M.; Thompson, M. A.; Tuffs, R. J.; Viaene, S.; Wright, A. H.

    2016-10-01

    This paper is the second in a pair of papers presenting data release 1 (DR1) of the Herschel Astrophysical Terahertz Large Area Survey (H-ATLAS), the largest single open-time key project carried out with the Herschel Space Observatory. The H-ATLAS is a wide-area imaging survey carried out in five photometric bands at 100, 160, 250, 350 and 500 μm covering a total area of 600 deg2. In this paper, we describe the identification of optical counterparts to submillimetre sources in DR1, comprising an area of 161 deg2 over three equatorial fields of roughly 12 × 4.5 deg centred at 9h, 12h and 14{^h.}5, respectively. Of all the H-ATLAS fields, the equatorial regions benefit from the greatest overlap with current multi-wavelength surveys spanning ultraviolet (UV) to mid-infrared regimes, as well as extensive spectroscopic coverage. We use a likelihood ratio technique to identify Sloan Digital Sky Survey counterparts at r < 22.4 for 250-μm-selected sources detected at ≥4σ (≈28 mJy). We find `reliable' counterparts (reliability R ≥ 0.8) for 44 835 sources (39 per cent), with an estimated completeness of 73.0 per cent and contamination rate of 4.7 per cent. Using redshifts and multi-wavelength photometry from GAMA and other public catalogues, we show that H-ATLAS-selected galaxies at z < 0.5 span a wide range of optical colours, total infrared (IR) luminosities and IR/UV ratios, with no strong disposition towards mid-IR-classified active galactic nuclei in comparison with optical selection. The data described herein, together with all maps and catalogues described in the companion paper, are available from the H-ATLAS website at www.h-atlas.org.

  4. A Multi-wavelength 3D Model of BD+30°3639

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freeman, M. J.; Kastner, Joel H.

    2016-10-01

    We present a 3D multi-wavelength reconstruction of BD+30°3639, one of the best-studied planetary nebulae in the solar neighborhood. BD+30°3639, which hosts a [WR]-type central star, has been imaged at wavelength regimes that span the electromagnetic spectrum, from radio to X-rays. We have used the astrophysical modeling software SHAPE to construct a 3D morpho-kinematic model of BD+30°3639. This reconstruction represents the most complete 3D model of a PN to date from the standpoint of the incorporation of multi-wavelength data. Based on previously published kinematic data in optical emission lines and in lines of CO (radio) and H2 (near-IR), we were able to reconstruct BD+30's basic velocity components assuming a set of homologous velocity expansion laws combined with collimated flows along the major axis of the nebula. We confirm that the CO “bullets” in the PN lie along an axis that is slightly misaligned with respect to the major axis of the optical nebula, and that these bullets are likely responsible for the disrupted structures of the ionized and H2-emitting shells within BD+30. Given the relative geometries and thus dynamical ages of BD+30's main structural components, it is furthermore possible that the same jets that ejected the CO bullets are responsible for the generation of the X-ray-emitting hot bubble within the PN. Comparison of alternative viewing geometries for our 3D reconstruction of BD+30°3639 with imagery of NGC 40 and NGC 6720 suggests a common evolutionary path for these nebulae.

  5. LISe pixel detector for neutron imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrera, Elan; Hamm, Daniel; Wiggins, Brenden; Milburn, Rob; Burger, Arnold; Bilheux, Hassina; Santodonato, Louis; Chvala, Ondrej; Stowe, Ashley; Lukosi, Eric

    2016-10-01

    Semiconducting lithium indium diselenide, 6LiInSe2 or LISe, has promising characteristics for neutron detection applications. The 95% isotopic enrichment of 6Li results in a highly efficient thermal neutron-sensitive material. In this study, we report on a proof-of-principle investigation of a semiconducting LISe pixel detector to demonstrate its potential as an efficient neutron imager. The LISe pixel detector had a 4×4 of pixels with a 550 μm pitch on a 5×5×0.56 mm3 LISe substrate. An experimentally verified spatial resolution of 300 μm was observed utilizing a super-sampling technique.

  6. Characterisation of a track structure imaging detector.

    PubMed

    Casiraghi, M; Bashkirov, V A; Hurley, R F; Schulte, R W

    2015-09-01

    The spatial distribution of radiation-induced ionisations in sub-cellular structures plays an important role in the initial formation of radiation damage to biological tissues. Using the nanodosimetry approach, physical characteristics of the track structure can be measured and correlated to DNA damage. In this work, a novel nanodosimeter is presented, which detects positive ions produced by radiation interacting with a gas-sensitive volume in order to obtain a high resolution image of the radiation track structure. The characterisation of the detector prototype was performed and different configurations of the device were tested by varying the detector cathode material and the working gas. Preliminary results show that the ionisation cluster size distribution can be obtained with this approach. Further work is planned to improve the detector efficiency in order to register the complete three-dimensional track structure of ionising radiation.

  7. Multispectral imaging with type II superlattice detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ariyawansa, Gamini; Duran, Joshua M.; Grupen, Matt; Scheihing, John E.; Nelson, Thomas R.; Eismann, Michael T.

    2012-06-01

    Infrared (IR) focal plane arrays (FPAs) with multispectral detector elements promise significant advantages for airborne threat warning, surveillance, and targeting applications. At present, the use of type II superlattice (T2SL) structures based on the 6.1Å-family materials (InAs, GaSb, and AlSb) has become an area of interest for developing IR detectors and their FPAs. The ability to vary the bandgap in the IR range, suppression of Auger processes, prospective reduction of Shockley-Read-Hall centers by improved material growth capabilities, and the material stability are a few reasons for the predicted dominance of the T2SL technology over presently leading HgCdTe and quantum well technologies. The focus of the work reported here is on the development of T2SL based dual-band IR detectors and their applicability for multispectral imaging. A new NpBPN detector designed for the detection of IR in the 3-5 and 8-12 μm atmospheric windows is presented; comparing its advantages over other T2SL based approaches. One of the key challenges of the T2SL dual-band detectors is the spectral crosstalk associated with the LWIR band. The properties of the state-of-the-art T2SLs (i.e., absorption coefficient, minority carrier lifetime and mobility, etc.) and the present growth limitations that impact spectral crosstalk are discussed.

  8. Cerenkov ring imaging detector development at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, S.H.

    1984-06-01

    The imaging of Cerenkov light on to photosensitive detectors promises to be a powerful technique for identifying particles in colliding beam spectrometers. Toward this end two and three dimensional imaging photon detectors are being developed at SLAC. The present techniques involve photon conversion using easily ionized exotic chemicals like tetrakisdimethyl-amino-ethylene (TMAE) in a drift and amplifying gas mixture of methane and isobutane. Single photoelectrons from Cerenkov light are currently being drifted 20 cm and a new device under study will be used to study drifting up to 80 cm along a magnetic field. A short description of a large device currently being designed for the SLD spectrometer at the Stanford Linear Collider will be given.

  9. Multi-Wavelength Based Optical Density Sensor for Autonomous Monitoring of Microalgae.

    PubMed

    Jia, Fei; Kacira, Murat; Ogden, Kimberly L

    2015-09-02

    A multi-wavelength based optical density sensor unit was designed, developed, and evaluated to monitor microalgae growth in real time. The system consisted of five main components including: (1) laser diode modules as light sources; (2) photodiodes as detectors; (3) driver circuit; (4) flow cell; and (5) sensor housing temperature controller. The sensor unit was designed to be integrated into any microalgae culture system for both real time and non-real time optical density measurements and algae growth monitoring applications. It was shown that the sensor unit was capable of monitoring the dynamics and physiological changes of the microalgae culture in real-time. Algae biomass concentration was accurately estimated with optical density measurements at 650, 685 and 780 nm wavelengths used by the sensor unit. The sensor unit was able to monitor cell concentration as high as 1.05 g·L(-1) (1.51 × 10⁸ cells·mL(-1)) during the culture growth without any sample preparation for the measurements. Since high cell concentrations do not need to be diluted using the sensor unit, the system has the potential to be used in industrial microalgae cultivation systems for real time monitoring and control applications that can lead to improved resource use efficiency.

  10. Multi-Wavelength Based Optical Density Sensor for Autonomous Monitoring of Microalgae

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Fei; Kacira, Murat; Ogden, Kimberly L.

    2015-01-01

    A multi-wavelength based optical density sensor unit was designed, developed, and evaluated to monitor microalgae growth in real time. The system consisted of five main components including: (1) laser diode modules as light sources; (2) photodiodes as detectors; (3) driver circuit; (4) flow cell; and (5) sensor housing temperature controller. The sensor unit was designed to be integrated into any microalgae culture system for both real time and non-real time optical density measurements and algae growth monitoring applications. It was shown that the sensor unit was capable of monitoring the dynamics and physiological changes of the microalgae culture in real-time. Algae biomass concentration was accurately estimated with optical density measurements at 650, 685 and 780 nm wavelengths used by the sensor unit. The sensor unit was able to monitor cell concentration as high as 1.05 g·L−1 (1.51 × 108 cells·mL−1) during the culture growth without any sample preparation for the measurements. Since high cell concentrations do not need to be diluted using the sensor unit, the system has the potential to be used in industrial microalgae cultivation systems for real time monitoring and control applications that can lead to improved resource use efficiency. PMID:26364640

  11. Programmable Illumination and High-Speed, Multi-Wavelength, Confocal Microscopy Using a Digital Micromirror

    PubMed Central

    Martial, Franck P.; Hartell, Nicholas A.

    2012-01-01

    Confocal microscopy is routinely used for high-resolution fluorescence imaging of biological specimens. Most standard confocal systems scan a laser across a specimen and collect emitted light passing through a single pinhole to produce an optical section of the sample. Sequential scanning on a point-by-point basis limits the speed of image acquisition and even the fastest commercial instruments struggle to resolve the temporal dynamics of rapid cellular events such as calcium signals. Various approaches have been introduced that increase the speed of confocal imaging. Nipkov disk microscopes, for example, use arrays of pinholes or slits on a spinning disk to achieve parallel scanning which significantly increases the speed of acquisition. Here we report the development of a microscope module that utilises a digital micromirror device as a spatial light modulator to provide programmable confocal optical sectioning with a single camera, at high spatial and axial resolution at speeds limited by the frame rate of the camera. The digital micromirror acts as a solid state Nipkov disk but with the added ability to change the pinholes size and separation and to control the light intensity on a mirror-by-mirror basis. The use of an arrangement of concave and convex mirrors in the emission pathway instead of lenses overcomes the astigmatism inherent with DMD devices, increases light collection efficiency and ensures image collection is achromatic so that images are perfectly aligned at different wavelengths. Combined with non-laser light sources, this allows low cost, high-speed, multi-wavelength image acquisition without the need for complex wavelength-dependent image alignment. The micromirror can also be used for programmable illumination allowing spatially defined photoactivation of fluorescent proteins. We demonstrate the use of this system for high-speed calcium imaging using both a single wavelength calcium indicator and a genetically encoded, ratiometric, calcium

  12. On designing a SWIR multi-wavelength facial-based acquisition system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourlai, Thirimachos; Narang, Neeru; Cukic, Bojan; Hornak, Lawrence

    2012-06-01

    In harsh environmental conditions characterized by unfavorable lighting and pronounced shadows, human recognition based on Short-Wave Infrared (0.9-1.7 microns) images may be advantageous. SWIR imagery (i) is more tolerant to low levels of obscurants like fog and smoke; (ii) the active illumination source can be eye-safe and (iii) the active illumination source is invisible to the human eye making it suitable for surveillance applications. The key drawback of current SWIR-based acquisition systems is that they lack the capability of real-time simultaneous acquisition of multiple SWIR wavelengths. The contributions of our work are four-fold. First, we constructed a SWIR multi-wavelength acquisition system (MWAS) that can capture face images at 5 different wavelengths (1150, 1250, 1350, 1450, 1550 nm) in rapid succession using a 5-filter rotating filter wheel. Each filter has a band pass of 100 nm and all 5 images are acquired within 260 milliseconds. The acquisition system utilizes a reflective optical sensor to generate a timing signal corresponding to the filter wheel position that is used to trigger each camera image acquisition when the appropriate filter is in front of the camera. The timing signal from the reflective sensor transmits to a display panel to confirm the synchronization of the camera with the wheel. Second, we performed an empirical optimization on the adjustment of the exposure time of the camera and speed of the wheel when different light sources (fluorescent, tungsten, both) were used. This improved the quality of the images acquired. Third, a SWIR spectrometer was used to measure the response from the different light sources and was used to evaluate which one provides better images as a function of wavelength. Finally, the selection of the band pass filter, to focus the camera to acquire the good quality SWIR images was done by using a number of image quality and distortion metrics (e.g. universal quality index and Structural index method).

  13. Advanced digital detectors for neutron imaging.

    SciTech Connect

    Doty, F. Patrick

    2003-12-01

    Neutron interrogation provides unique information valuable for Nonproliferation & Materials Control and other important applications including medicine, airport security, protein crystallography, and corrosion detection. Neutrons probe deep inside massive objects to detect small defects and chemical composition, even through high atomic number materials such as lead. However, current detectors are bulky gas-filled tubes or scintillator/PM tubes, which severely limit many applications. Therefore this project was undertaken to develop new semiconductor radiation detection materials to develop the first direct digital imaging detectors for neutrons. The approach relied on new discovery and characterization of new solid-state sensor materials which convert neutrons directly to electronic signals via reactions BlO(n,a)Li7 and Li6(n,a)T.

  14. Heuristic edge detector for noisy range images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Kung C.

    1994-10-01

    This paper presents a heuristic edge detector for extracting wireframe representations of objects from noisy range data. Jump and roof edges were detected successfully from range images containing additive white Gaussian noise with a standard deviation equal to as high as 1.2% of the measured range values. This represents an appreciable amount of noise since approximately 5% of the errors are greater than 12 cm and 32% of errors are greater than 6 cm at a distance of 5 meters. The noise insensitive characteristic of the heuristic edge detector enables low cost range scanners to be used for practical industrial applications. The availability of low cost active vision systems greatly broadens the horizon of integrating robotics vision systems to manufacturing automation.

  15. The new MQ/AAO/Strasbourg multi-wavelength and spectroscopic PNe database: MASPN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, Quentin Andrew; Bojicic, Ivan; Frew, David; Acker, Agnes; Ochsenbein, Francois; MASPN Database Team

    2015-01-01

    We are in a new golden age of PN discovery. This is thanks in particular to high sensitivity, wide-field, narrow-band surveys of the Galactic plane undertaken on the UKST in Australia and the Isaac Newton telescope on La Palma. Together these telescopes and their H-alpha surveys have provided very significant Planetary Nebulae (PNe) discoveries that have more than doubled the totals accrued by all telescopes over the previous 250 years. However, these PNe are not simply more of the same found in previous catalogues. Most new PNe are more obscured, evolved and of lower surface brightness than previous compilations while others are faint but compact and more distant. This has required an extensive and time-consuming programme of spectroscopic confirmation on a variety of 2m and 4m telescopes that is now largely complete. The scope of any future large-scale PNe studies, particularly those of a statistical nature or undertaken to understand true PNe diversity and evolution should now reflect this fresh PN population landscape of the combined sample of ~3500 Galactic PNe now available. Such studies should be coloured and nuanced by these recent major discoveries and the massive, high sensitivity, high resolution, multi-wavelength imaging surveys now available across much of the electromagnetic spectrum.Following this motivation we provide, for the first time, an accessible, reliable, on-line "one-stop" SQL database for essential, up-to date information for all known Galactic PN. We have attempted to: i) Reliably remove the many PN mimics/false ID's that have biased previous compilations and subsequent studies; ii) Provide accurate, updated positions, sizes, morphologies, radial velocities, fluxes, multi-wavelength imagery and spectroscopy; iii) Link to CDS/Vizier and hence provide archival history for each object; iv) Provide an interface to sift, select, browse, collate, investigate, download and visualise the complete currently known Galactic PNe diaspora and v

  16. Continuous Wave Spectroscopy with Diffusion Theory for Quantification of Optical Properties: Comparison Between Multi-distance and Multi-wavelength Data Fitting Methods.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yung-Chi; Lin, Zhi-Fong; Nioka, Shoko; Chen, Li-Hsin; Tseng, Sheng-Hao; Chung, Pau-Choo

    2016-01-01

    Typically, continuous wave spectroscopy (CWS) can be used to accurately quantify biological tissue optical properties (μ a and μ s ') by employing the diffuse reflectance information acquired at multiple source-detector separations (multi-distance). On the other hand, sample optical properties can also be obtained by fitting multi-wavelength light reflectance acquired at a single source detector separation to the diffusion theory equation. To date, multi-wavelength and multi-distance methods have not yet been rigorously compared for their accuracy in quantification of the sample optical properties. In this investigation, we compared the accuracy of the two above-mentioned quantifying methods in the optical properties recovery. The liquid phantoms had μ a between 0.004 and 0.011 mm(-1) and μ s ' between 0.55 and 1.07 mm(-1) whose optical properties mimic the human breast. Multi-distance data and multi-wavelength data were fitted to the same diffusion equation for consistency. The difference between benchmark μ a and μ s ' and the fitted results, ΔError (ΔE) was used to evaluate the accuracy of the two methods. The results showed that either method yielded ΔE within 15-30 % when values were within certain limits to standard values applicable to μ s ' and μ a for human adipose tissue. Both methods showed no significant differences in ΔE values. Our results suggest that both multi-distance and multi-wavelength methods can yield similar reasonable optical properties in biological tissue with a proper calibration. PMID:27526161

  17. Multispectral imaging using a single bucket detector

    PubMed Central

    Bian, Liheng; Suo, Jinli; Situ, Guohai; Li, Ziwei; Fan, Jingtao; Chen, Feng; Dai, Qionghai

    2016-01-01

    Existing multispectral imagers mostly use available array sensors to separately measure 2D data slices in a 3D spatial-spectral data cube. Thus they suffer from low photon efficiency, limited spectrum range and high cost. To address these issues, we propose to conduct multispectral imaging using a single bucket detector, to take full advantage of its high sensitivity, wide spectrum range, low cost, small size and light weight. Technically, utilizing the detector’s fast response, a scene’s 3D spatial-spectral information is multiplexed into a dense 1D measurement sequence and then demultiplexed computationally under the single pixel imaging scheme. A proof-of-concept setup is built to capture multispectral data of 64 pixels × 64 pixels × 10 wavelength bands ranging from 450 nm to 650 nm, with the acquisition time being 1 minute. The imaging scheme holds great potentials for various low light and airborne applications, and can be easily manufactured as production-volume portable multispectral imagers. PMID:27103168

  18. Multispectral imaging using a single bucket detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bian, Liheng; Suo, Jinli; Situ, Guohai; Li, Ziwei; Fan, Jingtao; Chen, Feng; Dai, Qionghai

    2016-04-01

    Existing multispectral imagers mostly use available array sensors to separately measure 2D data slices in a 3D spatial-spectral data cube. Thus they suffer from low photon efficiency, limited spectrum range and high cost. To address these issues, we propose to conduct multispectral imaging using a single bucket detector, to take full advantage of its high sensitivity, wide spectrum range, low cost, small size and light weight. Technically, utilizing the detector’s fast response, a scene’s 3D spatial-spectral information is multiplexed into a dense 1D measurement sequence and then demultiplexed computationally under the single pixel imaging scheme. A proof-of-concept setup is built to capture multispectral data of 64 pixels × 64 pixels × 10 wavelength bands ranging from 450 nm to 650 nm, with the acquisition time being 1 minute. The imaging scheme holds great potentials for various low light and airborne applications, and can be easily manufactured as production-volume portable multispectral imagers.

  19. Characterization of female breast lesions from multi-wavelength time-resolved optical mammography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spinelli, Lorenzo; Torricelli, Alessandro; Pifferi, Antonio; Taroni, Paola; Danesini, Gianmaria; Cubeddu, Rinaldo

    2005-06-01

    Characterization of both malignant and benign lesions in the female breast is presented as the result of a clinical study that involved more than 190 subjects in the framework of the OPTIMAMM European project. All the subjects underwent optical mammography, by means of a multi-wavelength time-resolved mammograph, in the range 637-985 nm. Optical images were processed by applying a perturbation model, relying on a nonlinear approximation of time-resolved transmittance curves in the presence of an inclusion, with the aim of estimating the major tissue constituents (i.e. oxy- and deoxy-haemoglobin, lipid and water) and structural parameters (linked to dimension and density of the scatterer centres) for both the lesion area and the surrounding tissue. The critical factors for the application of the perturbation model on in vivo data are also discussed. Forty-six malignant and 68 benign lesions were analysed. A subset of 32 cancers, 40 cysts and 14 fibroadenomas were found reliable for the perturbation analysis. For cancers, we show a higher blood content with respect to the surrounding tissue, while cysts are characterized by a lower concentration of scattering centres with respect to the surrounding tissue. For fibroadenomas, the low number of cases does not allow any definite conclusions.

  20. Multi-wavelength Study of Transition Region Penumbral Subarcsecond Bright Dots Using IRIS and NST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Na; Yurchyshyn, Vasyl; Tian, Hui; Kleint, Lucia; Liu, Chang; Xu, Yan; Wang, Haimin

    2016-10-01

    Using high-resolution transition region (TR) observations taken by the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) mission, Tian et al. revealed numerous short-lived subarcsecond bright dots (BDs) above sunspots (mostly located in the penumbrae), which indicate yet unexplained small-scale energy releases. Moreover, whether or not these subarcsecond TR brightenings have any signature in the lower atmosphere and how they are formed are still not fully resolved. This paper presents a multi-wavelength study of the TR penumbral BDs using a coordinated observation of a near disk center sunspot with IRIS and the 1.6 m New Solar Telescope (NST) at the Big Bear Solar Observatory. NST provides high-resolution chromospheric and photospheric observations with narrowband Hα imaging spectroscopy and broadband TiO images, respectively, complementary to IRIS TR observations. A total of 2692 TR penumbral BDs are identified from a 37 minute time series of IRIS 1400 Å slit-jaw images. Their locations tend to be associated more with downflowing and darker fibrils in the chromosphere, and weakly associated with bright penumbral features in the photosphere. However, temporal evolution analyses of the BDs show that there is no consistent and convincing brightening response in the chromosphere. These results are compatible with a formation mechanism of the TR penumbral BDs by falling plasma from coronal heights along more vertical and dense magnetic loops. The BDs may also be produced by small-scale impulsive magnetic reconnection taking place sufficiently high in the atmosphere that has no energy release in the chromosphere.

  1. Computational imaging with a balanced detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soldevila, F.; Clemente, P.; Tajahuerce, E.; Uribe-Patarroyo, N.; Andrés, P.; Lancis, J.

    2016-06-01

    Single-pixel cameras allow to obtain images in a wide range of challenging scenarios, including broad regions of the electromagnetic spectrum and through scattering media. However, there still exist several drawbacks that single-pixel architectures must address, such as acquisition speed and imaging in the presence of ambient light. In this work we introduce balanced detection in combination with simultaneous complementary illumination in a single-pixel camera. This approach enables to acquire information even when the power of the parasite signal is higher than the signal itself. Furthermore, this novel detection scheme increases both the frame rate and the signal-to-noise ratio of the system. By means of a fast digital micromirror device together with a low numerical aperture collecting system, we are able to produce a live-feed video with a resolution of 64 × 64 pixels at 5 Hz. With advanced undersampling techniques, such as compressive sensing, we can acquire information at rates of 25 Hz. By using this strategy, we foresee real-time biological imaging with large area detectors in conditions where array sensors are unable to operate properly, such as infrared imaging and dealing with objects embedded in turbid media.

  2. Computational imaging with a balanced detector.

    PubMed

    Soldevila, F; Clemente, P; Tajahuerce, E; Uribe-Patarroyo, N; Andrés, P; Lancis, J

    2016-01-01

    Single-pixel cameras allow to obtain images in a wide range of challenging scenarios, including broad regions of the electromagnetic spectrum and through scattering media. However, there still exist several drawbacks that single-pixel architectures must address, such as acquisition speed and imaging in the presence of ambient light. In this work we introduce balanced detection in combination with simultaneous complementary illumination in a single-pixel camera. This approach enables to acquire information even when the power of the parasite signal is higher than the signal itself. Furthermore, this novel detection scheme increases both the frame rate and the signal-to-noise ratio of the system. By means of a fast digital micromirror device together with a low numerical aperture collecting system, we are able to produce a live-feed video with a resolution of 64 × 64 pixels at 5 Hz. With advanced undersampling techniques, such as compressive sensing, we can acquire information at rates of 25 Hz. By using this strategy, we foresee real-time biological imaging with large area detectors in conditions where array sensors are unable to operate properly, such as infrared imaging and dealing with objects embedded in turbid media. PMID:27353733

  3. Computational imaging with a balanced detector

    PubMed Central

    Soldevila, F.; Clemente, P.; Tajahuerce, E.; Uribe-Patarroyo, N.; Andrés, P.; Lancis, J.

    2016-01-01

    Single-pixel cameras allow to obtain images in a wide range of challenging scenarios, including broad regions of the electromagnetic spectrum and through scattering media. However, there still exist several drawbacks that single-pixel architectures must address, such as acquisition speed and imaging in the presence of ambient light. In this work we introduce balanced detection in combination with simultaneous complementary illumination in a single-pixel camera. This approach enables to acquire information even when the power of the parasite signal is higher than the signal itself. Furthermore, this novel detection scheme increases both the frame rate and the signal-to-noise ratio of the system. By means of a fast digital micromirror device together with a low numerical aperture collecting system, we are able to produce a live-feed video with a resolution of 64 × 64 pixels at 5 Hz. With advanced undersampling techniques, such as compressive sensing, we can acquire information at rates of 25 Hz. By using this strategy, we foresee real-time biological imaging with large area detectors in conditions where array sensors are unable to operate properly, such as infrared imaging and dealing with objects embedded in turbid media. PMID:27353733

  4. Multi-wavelength laser tuning based on cholesteric liquid crystals with nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Sheng-Chieh; Lin, Jia-De; Lee, Chia-Rong; Hwang, Shug-June

    2016-04-01

    A controllable multi-wavelength laser from a dye-doped cholesteric liquid crystal (DDCLC) cell is demonstrated by incorporating self-assembled polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS) nanoparticles (NPs). Multi-wavelength lasing emission is achieved by formation of multiple planar domains; this formation is dominantly influenced by the vertical alignment of NP clusters adsorbed on the substrate surface through a rapid thermal annealing process. The multi-wavelength lasing peaks are generated through the resultant effect of multiple longitudinal resonant modes of a Fabry-Pérot etalon between the cell substrates and the amplification of fluorescence photons with the resonant wavelengths within the broadening long-wavelength edge of the reflection band of the multi-domain CLC. The amount of multi-wavelength lasing peaks can be controlled by changing the POSS NP concentration and the cooling rate of the cell. Furthermore, thermo-reversible control of the multi-wavelength lasing emission can be attained by controlling the thermally induced phase separation process of the POSS/DDCLC cell via a heating/cooling cyclic process.

  5. Thermal characteristics of multi-wavelength emission during a B8.3 flare occurred on July 04, 2009

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Awasthi, Arun Kumar; Sylwester, Barbara; Sylwester, Janusz; Jain, Rajmal

    2015-08-01

    We explore the temporal evolution of flare plasma parameters including temperature (T) - differential emission measure (DEM) relationship by analyzing high spectral and temporal cadence X-ray emission in 1.2-20 keV energy band, recorded by SphinX (Polish) and Solar X-ray Spectrometer (SOXS; Indian) instruments, during a B8.3 flare which occurred on July 04, 2009. SphinX records X-ray emission in 1.2-15 keV energy band with the temporal and spectral cadence as good as 6µs and 0.4 keV, respectively. On the other hand, SOXS provides X-ray observations in 4-25 keV energy band with the temporal and spectral resolution of 3s and 0.7 keV, respectively. In addition, we integrate co-temporal EUV line emission in 171, 194 and 284 angstrom obtained from STEREO mission in order to explore low-temperature response to the flare emission. In order to fit observed evolution of multi-wavelength emission during the flare, we incorporate multi-Gaussian and well-established Withbroe - Sylwester maximum likelihood DEM inversion algorithms. Thermal energetics are also estimated using geometrically corrected flaring loop structure obtained through EUV images of the active region from STEREO twin satellites. In addition, we also study the trigger and energy release scenario of this low-intensity class flare in terms of magnetic field as well as multi-wavelength emission.

  6. MULTI-WAVELENGTH AFTERGLOWS OF FAST RADIO BURSTS

    SciTech Connect

    Yi, Shuang-Xi; Gao, He; Zhang, Bing

    2014-09-01

    The physical origin of fast radio bursts (FRBs) is unknown. Detecting electromagnetic counterparts to FRBs in other wavelengths is essential to measure their distances and to determine their physical origin. Assuming that at least some of them are of cosmological origin, we calculate their afterglow light curves in multiple wavelengths (X-rays, optical, and radio) by assuming a range of total kinetic energies and redshifts. We focus on forward shock emission, but also consider the possibility that some of the FRBs might have bright reverse shock emission. In general, FRB afterglows are too faint to be detected by current detectors. Only if an FRB has a very low radiative efficiency in radio (hence, a very large kinetic energy), and when it is close enough to observe can its afterglow be detected in the optical and radio bands. We discuss observational strategies for detecting these faint afterglows using future telescopes such as Large Synoptic Survey Telescope and Expanded Very Large Array.

  7. The endcap Cherenkov ring imaging detector at SLD

    SciTech Connect

    Abe, K.; Hasegawa, K.; Hawegawa, Y.; Iwasaki, Y.; Suekane, F.; Yuta, H.; Antilogus, P.; Aston, D.; Bienz, T.; Bird, F.; Dolinsky, S.

    1995-05-01

    The authors present the Cherenkov Ring Imaging Detector in the endcap regions of the SLD detector and report initial performance. The endcap CRID was completed and commissioned in 1993 and is fully operational for the 1994 run. First Cherenkov rings have been observed. The endcap CRID detectors and fluid systems are described and initial operational experience is discussed.

  8. Multi-wavelength Observations of South Atlantic Anomaly Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiang, C. Y.; Tam, S. W. Y.; Chang, T. F.

    2015-12-01

    The South Atlantic Anomaly (SAA) is a region where the Earth's magnetic field is at its weakest. The energetic particles captured by the geomagnetic field can come closest to the Earth's surface forming a high-radiation region. The ISUAL (Imager of Sprites and Upper Atmospheric Lightning) is a scientific payload aboard the FORMOSAT-2 satellite. The scientific payload consists of an intensifier CCD Imager, an array photometer, and a six-channel spectrophotometers. ISUAL had been monitoring airglow and aurora in the global ionosphere. In this study, we will use ISUAL images and photometer data to analyze the background emissions in the SAA region. From the emission production mechanisms for different measurement channels, we can estimate the properties of the plasma precipitating from the inner radiation belt into the ionosphere of the SAA region. Besides, the ratios of different emissions are also discussed.

  9. The Hadron Blind Ring Imaging Cherenkov Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blatnik, Marie; Zajac, Stephanie; Hemmick, Tom

    2013-10-01

    Heavy Ion Collisions in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven Lab have hinted at the existence of a new form of matter at high gluon density, the Color Glass Condensate. High energy electron scattering off of nuclei, focusing on the low-x components of the nuclear wave function, will definitively measure this state of matter. However, when a nucleus contributes a low x parton, the reaction products are highly focused in the electron-going direction and have large momentum in the lab system. High-momentum particle identification is particularly challenging. A particle is identifiable by its mass, but tracking algorithms only yield a particle's momentum based on its track's curvature. The particle's velocity is needed to identify the particle. A ring-imaging Cerenkov detector is being developed for the forward angle particle identification from the technological advancements of PHENIX's Hadron-Blind Detector (HBD), which uses Gas Electron Multipliers (GEMs) and pixelated pad planes to detect Cerenkov photons. The new HBD will focus the Cerenkov photons into a ring to determine the parent particle's velocity. Results from the pad plane simulations, construction tests, and test beam run will be presented.

  10. Software Development for Ring Imaging Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torisky, Benjamin

    2016-03-01

    Jefferson Lab (Jlab) is performing a large-scale upgrade to their Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) up to 12GeV beam. The Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS12) in Hall B is being upgraded and a new Ring Imaging Cherenkov (RICH) detector is being developed to provide better kaon - pion separation throughout the 3 to 12 GeV range. With this addition, when the electron beam hits the target, the resulting pions, kaons, and other particles will pass through a wall of translucent aerogel tiles and create Cherenkov radiation. This light can then be accurately detected by a large array of Multi-Anode PhotoMultiplier Tubes (MA-PMT). I am presenting an update on my work on the implementation of Java based reconstruction programs for the RICH in the CLAS12 main analysis package.

  11. Software development for a Ring Imaging Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torisky, Benjamin; Benmokhtar, Fatiha

    2015-04-01

    Jefferson Lab (Jlab) is performing a large-scale upgrade to their Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) up to 12 GeV beam. The Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS12) in Hall B is being upgraded and a new Ring Imaging CHerenkov (RICH) detector is being developed to provide better kaon - pion separation throughout the 3 to 12 GeV range. With this addition, when the electron beam hits the target, the resulting pions, kaons, and other particles will pass through a wall of translucent aerogel tiles and create Cherenkov radiation. This light can then be accurately detected by a large array of Multi-Anode PhotoMultiplier Tubes (MA-PMT). I am presenting my work on the implementation of Java based reconstruction programs for the RICH in the CLAS12 main analysis package.

  12. New optical modalities utilizing curved focal plane imaging detector devices and large arrays for terrestrial and spaceborne telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mark, David

    2010-07-01

    As terrestrial and spaceborne astronomical telescopes advance in multi-functional design sophistication, incorporating greater spectral resolutions, the utilization of curved focal plane ccd and cmos imaging detectors, contoured to match the telescope's Petzval field of curvature, provides a fundamental and novel optical simplicity facilitating new imaging frontiers in astronomical research. For space based telescopes, curved focal plane detector devices require significantly fewer optics than their flat counterparts, which require field flattening optics, in achieving maximum imaging resolutions for adjoining spectrometers or imaging cameras. consequently, with fewer optics comes greater room to place other optics within the same space to accomplish other tasks, providing much greater diversification of observing functions and techniques reserved simultaneously for the telescope. Included within this is the operational capability of producing multi-wavelength spectrometers gathering data concurrently at a multitude of selected wavelengths, with greater sensitivity, reliability, size reduction, and operational longevity of the restructured optical system. Specialized applications involving optical interferometry are also achievable with further enhancements when the curved detectors are applied specifically to refine or maximize detection of fringes, and when employing occulting mask algorithms for existing light paths. for planetary surface mapping space probes, curved focal plane detection provides real-time 3D multi-perspective image acquisition for streaming 3D data sets, replacing onboard or remote computationally intensive 3D reconstructions used for examining terrestrial surface features performed with corresponding flat detectors. For earth based telescopes, where mass of the telescope's optics are not so constrained, more degrees of freedom are also part of the benefits introduced by curved focal plane detector device optimization. Associated with the very

  13. Multi-Wavelength Near Infrared Observations of Marum and Yasur Volcanoes, Vanuatu

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howell, Robert R.; Radebaugh, Jani; Lopes, Rosaly M.; Lorenz, Ralph D.; Turtle, Elizabeth P.

    2014-11-01

    To help understand and test models of thermal emission from planetary volcanoes, we obtained in May 2014 a variety of near-infrared observations of the very active Marum lava lake on Ambrym, Vanuatu, as well as the Strombolian activity at Yasur on Tanna. Our observations include high resolution images and movies made with standard and modified cameras and camcorders. In addition, to test the planetary emission models, which typically rely on multi-wavelength observations, we developed a small inexpensive prototype imager named "Kerby", which consists of three simultaneously active near-infrared cameras operating at 0.860, 0.775, and 0.675 microns, as well as a fourth visible wavelength RGB camera. This prototype is based on the Raspberry Pi and Pi-NoIR cameras. It can record full high definition video, and is light enough to be carried by backpack and run from batteries. To date we have concentrated on the analysis of the Marum data. During our observations of the 40 m diameter lava lake, convection was so vigorous that areas of thin crust formed only intermittently and persisted for tens of seconds to a few minutes at most. The convection pattern primarily consisted of two upwelling centers located about 8 m in from the margins on opposite sides of the lake. Horizontal velocities away from the upwelling centers were approximately 4 m/s. A hot bright margin roughly 0.4 m wide frequently formed around parts of the lake perimeter. We are in the process of establishing the absolute photometry calibration to obtain temperatures, temperature distributions, and magma cooling rates.

  14. A novel tunable multi-wavelength Brillouin fiber laser with switchable frequency spacing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Lifen; Fen, Danqi; Xie, Heng; Sun, Junqiang

    2015-04-01

    We propose and experimentally demonstrate a novel wavelength tunable and frequency spacing switchable multi-wavelength Brillouin fiber laser by employing optical gain and absorption during the Stimulated Brillouin scattering process. The frequency spacing can be switched by only varying the Brillouin pump power. Up to 16 Stokes lines with single Brillouin frequency spacing are observed under the lower Brillouin pump power, and 7 Stokes lines with double Brillouin frequency spacing are realized under the high Brillouin pump power by exploiting the Brillouin pump absorption. The proposed multi-wavelength laser can also be tuned from 1547 to 1569 nm and has the potential applications in the areas of optical communications and sensing.

  15. Quantum dot SOA/silicon external cavity multi-wavelength laser.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi; Yang, Shuyu; Zhu, Xiaoliang; Li, Qi; Guan, Hang; Magill, Peter; Bergman, Keren; Baehr-Jones, Thomas; Hochberg, Michael

    2015-02-23

    We report a hybrid integrated external cavity, multi-wavelength laser for high-capacity data transmission operating near 1310 nm. This is the first demonstration of a single cavity multi-wavelength laser in silicon to our knowledge. The device consists of a quantum dot reflective semiconductor optical amplifier and a silicon-on-insulator chip with a Sagnac loop mirror and microring wavelength filter. We show four major lasing peaks from a single cavity with less than 3 dB power non-uniformity and demonstrate error-free 4 × 10 Gb/s data transmission. PMID:25836504

  16. Multi-wavelength Observations of Solar Active Region NOAA 7154

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruner, M. E.; Nitta, N. V.; Frank. Z. A.; Dame, L.; Suematsu, Y.

    2000-01-01

    We report on observations of a solar active region in May 1992 by the Solar Plasma Diagnostic Experiment (SPDE) in coordination with the Yohkoh satellite (producing soft X-ray images) and ground-based observatories (producing photospheric magnetograms and various filtergrams including those at the CN 3883 A line). The main focus is a study of the physical conditions of hot (T is approximately greater than 3 MK) coronal loops at their foot-points. The coronal part of the loops is fuzzy but what appear to be their footpoints in the transition region down to the photosphere are compact. Despite the morphological similarities, the footpoint emission at 10(exp 5) K is not quantitatively correlated with that at approximately 300 km above the tau (sub 5000) = 1 level, suggesting that the heat transport and therefore magnetic field topology in the intermediate layer is complicated. High resolution imaging observations with continuous temperature coverage are crucially needed.

  17. Compton imager based on a single planar segmented HPGe detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khaplanov, A.; Pettersson, J.; Cederwall, B.

    2007-10-01

    A collimator-free Compton imaging system has been developed based on a single high-purity germanium detector and used to generate images of radioactive sources emitting γ rays. The detector has a planar crystal with one pixellated contact with a total of 25 segments. Pulse shape analysis has been applied to achieve a 3D-position sensitivity of the detector. The first imaging results from this detector are presented, based on the reconstruction of events where a γ ray is fully absorbed after scattering between adjacent segments.

  18. Multi-Wavelength Views of Protostars in IC 1396

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on individual images below for larger view

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope has captured a glowing stellar nursery within a dark globule that is opaque at visible light. These new images pierce through the obscuration to reveal the birth of new protostars, or embryonic stars, and young stars never before seen.

    The Elephant's Trunk Nebula is an elongated dark globule within the emission nebula IC 1396 in the constellation of Cepheus. Located at a distance of 2,450 light-years, the globule is a condensation of dense gas that is barely surviving the strong ionizing radiation from a nearby massive star. The globule is being compressed by the surrounding ionized gas.

    The large composite image above is a product of combining data from the observatory's multiband imaging photometer and the infrared array camera. The thermal emission at 24 microns measured by the photometer (red) is combined with near-infrared emission from the camera at 3.6/4.5 microns (blue) and from 5.8/8.0 microns (green). The colors of the diffuse emission and filaments vary, and are a combination of molecular hydrogen (which tends to be green) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (brown) emissions.

    Within the globule, a half dozen newly discovered protostars, or embryonic stars, are easily discernible as the bright red-tinted objects, mostly along the southern rim of the globule. These were previously undetected at visible wavelengths due to obscuration by the thick cloud ('globule body') and by dust surrounding the newly forming stars. The newborn stars form in the dense gas because of compression by the wind and radiation from a nearby massive star (located outside the field of view to the left). The winds from this unseen star are also responsible for producing the

  19. Pulsed neutron imaging using 2-dimensional position sensitive detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiyanagi, Y.; Kamiyama, T.; Kino, K.; Sato, H.; Sato, S.; Uno, S.

    2014-07-01

    2-dimensional position sensitive detectors are used for pulsed neutron imaging and at each pixel of the detector a time of flight spectrum is recorded. Therefore, a transmission spectrum through the object has wavelength dependent structure reflecting the neutron total cross section. For such measurements, the detectors are required to have ability to store neutron events as a function of the flight time as well as to have good spatial resolution. Furthermore, high counting rate is also required at the high intensity neutron sources like J-PARC neutron source in Japan. We have developed several types of detectors with different characteristics; two counting type detectors for high counting rate with coarse spatial resolution and one camera type detector for high spatial resolution. One of counting type detectors is a pixel type. The highest counting rate is about 28 MHz. Better spatial resolution is obtained by a GEM detector. Effective area is 10 × 10 cm2, pixel size is 0.8 mm. The maximum counting rate is 3.65 MHz. To get higher spatial resolution we are now developing the camera type detector system using a neutron image intensifier, which have image integration function as a function of time of flight. We have succeeded to obtain time dependent images in this camera system. By using these detectors we performed transmission measurements for obtaining the crystallographic information and elemental distribution images.

  20. Multi-wavelength flare study and magnetic configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmieder, Brigitte; Berlicki, A.; Vilmer, N.; Aulanier, G.; Démoulin, P.; Mein, P.; Mandrini, C.; Deluca, E.

    Recent results of two observation campaigns (October 2002 and October 2003) are presented with the objective of understanding the onset of flares and CMEs. The magnetic field was observed with THEMIS and MDI, the chromosphere with the MSDP operating on the German telescope VTT and on THEMIS, the EUV images with SOHO/CDS and TRACE, the X-ray with RHESSI. We show how important is the magnetic configuration of the active region to produce CMEs using two examples: the October 28 2003 X 17 flare and the October 22 2002 M 1.1 flare. The X 17 flare gave a halo CME while the M 1.1 flare has no corresponding CME. The magnetic topology analysis of the active regions is processed with a linear-force-free field configuration.

  1. X-ray imaging detectors for synchrotron and XFEL sources

    PubMed Central

    Hatsui, Takaki; Graafsma, Heinz

    2015-01-01

    Current trends for X-ray imaging detectors based on hybrid and monolithic detector technologies are reviewed. Hybrid detectors with photon-counting pixels have proven to be very powerful tools at synchrotrons. Recent developments continue to improve their performance, especially for higher spatial resolution at higher count rates with higher frame rates. Recent developments for X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) experiments provide high-frame-rate integrating detectors with both high sensitivity and high peak signal. Similar performance improvements are sought in monolithic detectors. The monolithic approach also offers a lower noise floor, which is required for the detection of soft X-ray photons. The link between technology development and detector performance is described briefly in the context of potential future capabilities for X-ray imaging detectors. PMID:25995846

  2. Multi-wavelength Spectropolarimetry Of A Sunspot Superpenumbra With Firs And Ibis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schad, Thomas A.; Tritschler, A.; Penn, M. J.

    2012-05-01

    Extending nearly radially from magnetic field concentrations like sunspot umbrae or pores, threadlike fibrils observed in the chromosphere and transition region host a variety of dynamic behavior and have long been considered local tracers for the magnetic field. Morphologically, fibrils are similar to spicules seen on the limb. The connectivity of fibrils outside of the magnetic field concentrations with the photosphere and/or corona is not well understood, and probing the magnetic field in these features remains challenging. In this contribution we describe multi-wavelength spectropolarimetric observations from the Dunn Solar Telescope in New Mexico using the Facility Infrared Spectropolarimeter (FIRS) and the Interferometric BiDimensional Spectropolarimeter (IBIS). FIRS performs high resolution slit spectropolarimetry in the He I triplet at 1083 nm, which is a promising diagnostic of chromospheric vector fields. Significant progress has been made to boost the accuracy and sensitivity of these measurements. Here we present measurements of an active region sunspot at a spatial resolution of 0.3 arcsec and an RMS noise in Stokes Q,U,V spectra down to 0.0003 in units of the local continuum (SNR > 3300). We perform full inversions of these spectra taking into account both Zeeman and Hanle effects. Initial results lend support for field-aligned fibrils near the penumbral boundary of a sunspot. Jointly with the FIRS observations, we use IBIS to observe the Stokes vectors of Ca II 854.2 nm and Fe I 617.3 nm and the intensity spectrum of H-alpha 656.3 nm. As a spectral imaging instrument, IBIS rapidly scans through the three spectral lines over a 45'' by 95'' FOV at an overall cadence of 50 seconds, allowing a much better description the dynamics of fibrils observed by both FIRS and IBIS.

  3. Multi-wavelength Lens Reconstruction of a Planck and Herschel-detected Star-bursting Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timmons, Nicholas; Cooray, Asantha; Riechers, Dominik A.; Nayyeri, Hooshang; Fu, Hai; Jullo, Eric; Gladders, Michael D.; Baes, Maarten; Bussmann, R. Shane; Calanog, Jae; Clements, David L.; da Cunha, Elisabete; Dye, Simon; Eales, Stephen A.; Furlanetto, Cristina; Gonzalez-Nuevo, Joaquin; Greenslade, Joshua; Gurwell, Mark; Messias, Hugo; Michałowski, Michał J.; Oteo, Iván; Pérez-Fournon, Ismael; Scott, Douglas; Valiante, Elisabetta

    2016-09-01

    We present a source-plane reconstruction of a Herschel and Planck-detected gravitationally lensed dusty star-forming galaxy (DSFG) at z = 1.68 using Hubble, Submillimeter Array (SMA), and Keck observations. The background submillimeter galaxy (SMG) is strongly lensed by a foreground galaxy cluster at z = 0.997 and appears as an arc with a length of ˜15″ in the optical images. The continuum dust emission, as seen by SMA, is limited to a single knot within this arc. We present a lens model with source-plane reconstructions at several wavelengths to show the difference in magnification between the stars and dust, and highlight the importance of multi-wavelength lens models for studies involving lensed DSFGs. We estimate the physical properties of the galaxy by fitting the flux densities to model spectral energy distributions leading to a magnification-corrected star-formation rate (SFR) of 390 ± 60 M {}⊙ yr-1 and a stellar mass of 1.1+/- 0.4× {10}11 {M}⊙ . These values are consistent with high-redshift massive galaxies that have formed most of their stars already. The estimated gas-to-baryon fraction, molecular gas surface density, and SFR surface density have values of 0.43 ± 0.13, 350 ± 200 {M}⊙ pc-2, and ˜ 12+/- 7 M {}⊙ yr-1 kpc-2, respectively. The ratio of SFR surface density to molecular gas surface density puts this among the most star-forming systems, similar to other measured SMGs and local ULIRGs.

  4. MegaMorph: classifying galaxy morphology using multi-wavelength Sérsic profile fits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vika, Marina; Vulcani, Benedetta; Bamford, Steven P.; Häußler, Boris; Rojas, Alex L.

    2015-05-01

    Aims: This work investigates the potential of using the wavelength-dependence of galaxy structural parameters (Sérsic index, n, and effective radius, Re) to separate galaxies into distinct types. Methods: A sample of nearby galaxies with reliable visual morphologies is considered, for which we measure structural parameters by fitting multi-wavelength single-Sérsic models. Additionally, we use a set of artificially redshifted galaxies to test how these classifiers behave when the signal-to-noise ratio decreases. Results: We show that the wavelength-dependence of n may be employed to separate visually-classified early- and late-type galaxies in a manner similar to the use of colour and n. Furthermore, we find that the wavelength variation of n can recover galaxies that are misclassified by these other morphological proxies. Roughly half of the spiral galaxies that contaminate an early-type sample selected using (u - r) versus n can be correctly identified as late-types by N, the ratio of n measured in two different bands. Using a set of artificially redshifted images, we show that this technique remains effective up to z ~ 0.1. Therefore, N can be used to achieve purer samples of early-types and more complete samples of late-types than using a colour-n cut alone. We also study the suitability of ℛ, the ratio of Re in two different bands, as a morphological classifier, but find that the average sizes of both early- and late-type galaxies do not change substantially over optical wavelengths.

  5. Multi-Wavelength Study of Active Region Loop Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, D.

    2006-11-01

    Observations have revealed the existence of weak transient disturbances in extended coronal loop systems. These propagating disturbances (PDs) originate from small scale brightenings at the footpoints of the loops and propagate upward along the loops. In all cases observed, the projected propagation speed is close to, but below the expected sound speed in the loops. This suggests that the PDs could be interpreted as slow mode MHD waves. Interpreting the oscillation in terms of different wave modes and/or plasma motions always depend on the line of sight as we observe in the limb or on the center of the disk. The JOP 165 campaign will address some of these questions. MDI and TRACE photospheric and UV imaging of TRACE and SPIRIT have been acquired simultaneously with high temporal and spatial coverage along with the spectroscopic data from CDS. EIT was operated in the shutter-less mode to achieve high Cadence. Some of the off- limb active region dynamics and oscillations observed during this JOP campaign will be focused in this presentation. Plasma condensations and temporal variations in active region loops will be also addressed.

  6. Multi-wavelength observations of the peculiar red giant HR 3126

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pesce, Joseph E.; Stencel, Robert E.; Walter, Frederick M.; Doggett, Jesse; Dachs, Joachim; Whitelock, Patricia A.; Mundt, Reinhard

    1988-01-01

    Ultraviolet observations of the red giant HR 3126 are combined with multi-wavelength data in order to provide a firmer basis for explaining the arc-minute sized nebula surrounding the object. Possibilities as to the location of HR 3126 on the Hertzsprung-Russel diagram, and to the formation mechanisms of the reflection nebula IC 2220 associated with it, are summarized.

  7. Pulse-Shape Control in an All Fiber Multi-Wavelength Doppler Lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Töws, Albert; Lehmann, Jan; Kurtz, Alfred

    2016-06-01

    Pulse distortion during amplification in fiber amplifiers due to gain saturation and cross talk in a multi-wavelength Doppler lidar are discussed. We present a feedback control technique which is capable of adjusting any predefined pulse shape and show some examples of feedback controlled pulse shapes.

  8. Using quantum filters as edge detectors in infrared images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolaños Marín, Daniela

    2014-06-01

    Some new filters inspired in quantum models are used as edge detectors in infrared images. In this case, Bessel, Hermite and Morse filters will be applied to detect edges and fibrillar structures in infrared images. The edge detectors will be built by the Laplacian of the mentioned quantum filters. Furthermore, using curvature operators, curvature detectors and amplifiers of contrast will be constructed to analyze infrared images. The quantum filter prototyping will be done using computer algebra software, specifically Maple and its package, ImageTools. The quantum filters will be applied to infrared images using the technique of convolutions and blurred derivatives. It is expected that designed quantum filters will be useful for analysis and processing of infrared images. As future investigations, we propose to design plugins with the quantum filters that can be incorporated into the program ImageJ, which will facilitate the use of the quantum filters for the infrared image processing.

  9. Scintillator-fiber charged-particle track-imaging detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Binns, W. R.; Israel, M. H.; Klarmann, J.

    1983-01-01

    A scintillator-fiber charged-particle track-imaging detector has been developed using a bundle of square cross-section plastic scintillator fiber optics, proximity focused onto an image intensified Charge Injection Device (CID) camera. Detector to beams of 15 MeV protons and relativistic Neon, Manganese, and Gold nuclei have been exposed and images of their tracks are obtained. This paper presents details of the detector technique, properties of the tracks obtained, and range measurements of 15 MeV protons stopping in the fiber bundle.

  10. Imaging detectors and electronics - A view of the future

    SciTech Connect

    Spieler, Helmuth

    2004-06-16

    Imaging sensors and readout electronics have made tremendous strides in the past two decades. The application of modern semiconductor fabrication techniques and the introduction of customized monolithic integrated circuits have made large scale imaging systems routine in high energy physics. This technology is now finding its way into other areas, such as space missions, synchrotron light sources, and medical imaging. I review current developments and discuss the promise and limits of new technologies. Several detector systems are described as examples of future trends. The discussion emphasizes semiconductor detector systems, but I also include recent developments for large-scale superconducting detector arrays.

  11. VLSI readout for imaging with polycrystalline mercuric iodide detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turchetta, Renato; Dulinski, Wojtek; Husson, D.; Klein, N.; Riester, J. L.; Schieber, Michael M.; Zuck, A.; Braiman, M.; Melekhov, L.; Nissenbaum, J.; Sanguinetti, S.

    1998-11-01

    Recently polycrystalline mercuric iodide have become available, for room temperature radiation detectors over large areas at low cost. Though the quality of this material is still under improvement, ceramic detectors have been already been successfully tested with dedicated low-noise, low-power mixed signal VLSI electronics which can be used for compact, imaging solutions. The detectors used are of different kinds: microstrips and pixels; of different sizes, up to about 1 square inch; and of different thickness, up to 600 microns. The properties of this first-generation detectors are quite uniform from one detector to another. Also for each single detector the response is quite uniform and no charge loss in the inter-electrode space have been detected. Because of the low cost and of the polycrystallinity, detectors can be potentially fabricated in any size and shape, using standard ceramic technology equipment, which is an attractive feature where low cost and large area applications are needed.

  12. Performance of a Ge-microstrip imaging detector and polarimeter.

    PubMed

    Spillmann, U; Bräuning, H; Hess, S; Beyer, H; Stöhlker, Th; Dousse, J-Cl; Protic, D; Krings, T

    2008-08-01

    Using 98% linearly polarized radiation at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility in Grenoble, the performance of a prototype two-dimensional microstrip Ge(i) detector for x-ray imaging and as a Compton polarimeter has been evaluated. Using the energy and position sensitivity of the detector, the ability to obtain a complete reconstruction of the Compton event has been demonstrated. The modulation coefficient of the polarimeter is in good agreement with the theoretical limit of a perfect detector. PMID:19044330

  13. Performance of a Ge-microstrip imaging detector and polarimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Spillmann, U.; Braeuning, H.; Hess, S.; Beyer, H.; Stoehlker, Th.; Dousse, J.-Cl.; Protic, D.; Krings, T.

    2008-08-15

    Using 98% linearly polarized radiation at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility in Grenoble, the performance of a prototype two-dimensional microstrip Ge(i) detector for x-ray imaging and as a Compton polarimeter has been evaluated. Using the energy and position sensitivity of the detector, the ability to obtain a complete reconstruction of the Compton event has been demonstrated. The modulation coefficient of the polarimeter is in good agreement with the theoretical limit of a perfect detector.

  14. Infrared imaging using carbon nanotube-based detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hongzhi; Xi, Ning; Song, Bo; Chen, Liangliang; Lai, King W. C.; Lou, Jianyong

    2011-06-01

    Using carbon nanotubes (CNT), high performance infrared detectors have been developed. Since the CNTs have extraordinary optoelectronics properties due to its unique one dimensional geometry and structure, the CNT based infrared detectors have extremely low dark current, low noise equivalent temperature difference (NETD), short response time, and high dynamic range. Most importantly, it can detect 3-5 um middle-wave infrared (MWIR) at room temperature. This unique feature can significantly reduce the size and weight of a MWIR imaging system by eliminating a cryogenic cooling system. However, there are two major difficulties that impede the application of CNT based IR detectors for imaging systems. First, the small diameter of the CNTs results in low fill factor. Secondly, it is difficult to fabricate large scale of detector array for high resolution focal plane due to the limitations on the efficiency and cost of the manufacturing. In this paper, a new CNT based IR imaging system will be presented. Integrating the CNT detectors with photonic crystal resonant cavity, the fill factor of the CNT based IR sensor can reach as high as 0.91. Furthermore, using the compressive sensing technology, a high resolution imaging can be achieved by CNT based IR detectors. The experimental testing results show that the new imaging system can achieve the superb performance enabled by CNT based IR detectors, and, at the same time, overcame its difficulties to achieve high resolution and efficient imaging.

  15. Multi-wavelength studies of Saturn's rings to constrain ring particle properties and ring structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spilker, L.; Deau, E.; Morishima, R.; Filacchione, G.; Hedman, M.; Nicholson, P.; Colwell, J.; Bradley, T.

    2012-04-01

    A great deal can be learned about the nature of Saturn's ring particles and their regoliths by modeling the changes in brightness, color and temperature with changing viewing geometry over a wide range of wavelengths, from ultraviolet through the thermal infrared. Data from Cassini's Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS), Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS), Imaging Science Subsystem (ISS) and Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) are jointly being studied using scans of the lit and unlit main rings (A, B, C and Cassini Division) at multiple geometries and solar elevations. Using multi-wavelength data sets allow us to test different thermal models by combining the effects of particle albedo, regolith grain size and surface roughness with thermal emissivity and inertia, particle spin rate and spin axis orientation. With the high spatial resolution of the Cassini data it is now possible to analyze these effects at smaller spatial scales and characterize regions such as the C ring plateaus and ringlets, where albedo differences may be present. In the CIRS data, over a range of solar elevations from -23 degrees to -8 degrees, the bulk of the temperature variations are confined primarily to phase angle. Only small temperature differences are observed with changing spacecraft elevation. Similar behavior is seen in the ISS color data. Color and temperature dependence with changing solar elevation angle are also observed. VIMS observations show that the IR ice absorption band depths are (almost) independent of phase angle, out to ~140 deg phase, suggesting that interparticle light scattering is relatively unimportant except at very high phase angles. These results imply that the individual properties of the ring particles may play a larger role than the collective properties of the rings, in particular at visible wavelengths. The temperature and color variation with phase angle may be a result of scattering within the regolith and on possibly rough surfaces

  16. Photoconducting positions monitor and imaging detector

    DOEpatents

    Shu, Deming; Kuzay, Tuncer M.

    2000-01-01

    A photoconductive, high energy photon beam detector/monitor for detecting x-rays and gamma radiation, having a thin, disk-shaped diamond substrate with a first and second surface, and electrically conductive coatings, or electrodes, of a predetermined configuration or pattern, disposed on the surfaces of the substrate. A voltage source and a current amplifier is connected to the electrodes to provide a voltage bias to the electrodes and to amplify signals from the detector.

  17. Versatile multi-wavelength ultrafast fiber laser mode-locked by carbon nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xueming; Han, Dongdong; Sun, Zhipei; Zeng, Chao; Lu, Hua; Mao, Dong; Cui, Yudong; Wang, Fengqiu

    2013-01-01

    Multi-wavelength lasers have widespread applications (e.g. fiber telecommunications, pump-probe measurements, terahertz generation). Here, we report a nanotube-mode-locked all-fiber ultrafast oscillator emitting three wavelengths at the central wavelengths of about 1540, 1550, and 1560 nm, which are tunable by stretching fiber Bragg gratings. The output pulse duration is around 6 ps with a spectral width of ~0.5 nm, agreeing well with the numerical simulations. The triple-laser system is controlled precisely and insensitive to environmental perturbations with <0.04% amplitude fluctuation. Our method provides a simple, stable, low-cost, multi-wavelength ultrafast-pulsed source for spectroscopy, biomedical research and telecommunications. PMID:24056500

  18. Multi-wavelength Raman spectroscopy study of supported vanadia catalysts: Structure identification and quantification

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Zili

    2014-10-20

    Revealing the structure of supported metal oxide catalysts is a prerequisite for establishing the structure - catalysis relationship. Among a variety of characterization techniques, multi-wavelength Raman spectroscopy, combining resonance Raman and non-resonance Raman with different excitation wavelengths, has recently emerged as a particularly powerful tool in not only identifying but also quantifying the structure of supported metal oxide clusters. In our review, we make use of two supported vanadia systems, VOx/SiO2 and VOx/CeO2, as examples to showcase how one can employ this technique to investigate the heterogeneous structure of active oxide clusters and to understand the complex interaction between the oxide clusters and the support. Moreover, the qualitative and quantitative structural information gained from the multi-wavelength Raman spectroscopy can be utilized to provide fundamental insights for designing more efficient supported metal oxide catalysts.

  19. Multi-wavelength Raman spectroscopy study of supported vanadia catalysts: Structure identification and quantification

    DOE PAGES

    Wu, Zili

    2014-10-20

    Revealing the structure of supported metal oxide catalysts is a prerequisite for establishing the structure - catalysis relationship. Among a variety of characterization techniques, multi-wavelength Raman spectroscopy, combining resonance Raman and non-resonance Raman with different excitation wavelengths, has recently emerged as a particularly powerful tool in not only identifying but also quantifying the structure of supported metal oxide clusters. In our review, we make use of two supported vanadia systems, VOx/SiO2 and VOx/CeO2, as examples to showcase how one can employ this technique to investigate the heterogeneous structure of active oxide clusters and to understand the complex interaction between themore » oxide clusters and the support. Moreover, the qualitative and quantitative structural information gained from the multi-wavelength Raman spectroscopy can be utilized to provide fundamental insights for designing more efficient supported metal oxide catalysts.« less

  20. Imaging characteristics of the Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer microchannel plate detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vallerga, J. V.; Kaplan, G. C.; Siegmund, O. H. W.; Lampton, M.; Malina, R. F.

    1989-01-01

    The Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer (EUVE) satellite will conduct an all-sky survey over the wavelength range from 70 A to 760 A using four grazing-incidence telescopes and seven microchannel-plate (MCP) detectors. The imaging photon-counting MCP detectors have active areas of 19.6 cm2. Photon arrival position is determined using a wedge-and-strip anode and associated pulse-encoding electronics. The imaging characteristics of the EUVE flight detectors are presented including image distortion, flat-field response, and spatial differential nonlinearity. Also included is a detailed discussion of image distortions due to the detector mechanical assembly, the wedge-and-strip anode, and the electronics. Model predictions of these distortions are compared to preflight calibration images which show distortions less than 1.3 percent rms of the detector diameter of 50 mm before correction. The plans for correcting these residual detector image distortions to less than 0.1 percent rms are also presented.

  1. Semiconductor detectors for Compton imaging in nuclear medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harkness, LJ; Judson, D. S.; Kennedy, H.; Sweeney, A.; Boston, A. J.; Boston, H. C.; Cresswell, J. R.; Nolan, P. J.; Sampson, J. A.; Burrows, I.; Groves, J.; Headspith, J.; Lazarus, I. H.; Simpson, J.; Bimson, W. E.; Kemp, G. J.

    2012-01-01

    An investigation is underway at the University of Liverpool to assess the suitability of two position sensitive semiconductor detectors as components of a Compton camera for nuclear medical imaging. The ProSPECTus project aims to improve image quality, provide shorter data acquisition times and lower patient doses by replacing conventional Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) systems. These mechanically collimated systems are employed to locate a radioactive tracer that has been administered to a patient to study specifically targeted physiological processes. The ProSPECTus system will be composed of a Si(Li) detector and a High Purity Germanium (HPGe) detector, a configuration deemed optimum using a validated Geant4 simulation package. Characterising the response of the detectors to gamma irradiation is essential in maximising the sensitivity and image resolution of the system. To this end, the performance of the HPGe ProSPECTus detector and a suitable Si(Li) detector has been assessed at the University of Liverpool. The energy resolution of the detectors has been measured and a surface scan of the Si(Li) detector has been performed using a finely collimated 241Am gamma ray source. Results from the investigation will be presented.

  2. Compton imaging with thick Si and CZT detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subramanian, Mythili; Wulf, Eric A.; Phlips, Bernard; Krawczynski, Henric; Martin, Jerrad; Dowknott, Paul

    2012-08-01

    A Compton imaging telescope has been constructed using a 0.2 cm thick Silicon (Si) detector of active area 9.0×9.0 cm2 and a pixelated Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT) detector of dimensions 2.0×2.0×0.5 cm3. The Si detector is double sided with 64 strips per side in two orthogonal directions. The CZT detector has 64 pixels of pitch 0.25 cm. We used several ASICs (32 channel) to read out both detectors. A 137Cs source was used in the study. The energy deposited in the Si and CZT detectors and the points of interaction of the γ-ray in both detectors were read out. We varied the position of the source as well as the vertical separation between the Si and CZT detectors and measured the angular resolution of the source image for the different configurations. The best angular resolution (1σ) was 2.4°. Monte Carlo simulations were run for similar detector configurations and agree with the experimental results.

  3. Novel multi wavelength sensor concept to detect total hemoglobin concentration, methemoglobin and oxygen saturation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timm, Ulrich; Gewiss, Helge; Kraitl, Jens; Stuepmann, Kirstin; Hinz, Michael; Koball, Sebastian; Ewald, Hartmut

    2015-03-01

    The paper will describe the novel multi-wavelength photometric device OxyTrue Hb® which is capable to measure the hemoglobin (Hb) and methemoglobin (MetHb) concentration non-invasively. Clinic trails in blood donation centers and during the dialysis are done to prove and demonstrate the performance of the system. The results are compared to the gold standard, the BGA measurement.

  4. A New Multi-Wavelength Synoptic Network for Solar Physics and Space Weather

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, Frank; Roth, Markus; Thompson, Michael

    2013-04-01

    Continuous solar observations are important for many research topics in solar physics, such as magnetic field evolution, flare and CME characteristics, and p-mode oscillation measurements. In addition, space weather operations require constant streams of solar data as input. The deployment of a number of identical instruments around the world in a network has proven to be a very effective strategy for obtaining nearly continuous solar observations. The financial costs of a network are 1-2 orders of magnitude lower than space-based platforms; network instrumentation can be easily accessed for maintenance and upgrades; and telemetry bandwidth is readily available. Currently, there are two solar observing networks with consistent instruments: BiSON and GONG, both designed primarily for helioseismology. In addition, GONG has been augmented with continual magnetic field measurements and H-alpha imagery, with both being used for space weather operational purposes. However, GONG is now 18 years old and getting increasingly more challenging to maintain. There are also at least three scientific motivations for a multi-wavelength network: Recent advances in helioseismology have demonstrated the need for multi-wavelength observations to allow more accurate interpretation of the structure and dynamics below sunspots. Vector magnetometry would greatly benefit from multi-wavelength observations to provide height information and resolve the azimuthal ambiguity. Finally, space weather operations always need a consistent reliable source of continual solar data. This presentation will outline the scientific need for a multi-wavelength network, and discuss some concepts for the design of the instrumentation. A workshop on the topic will be held in Boulder this April.

  5. Uncooled infrared detector and imager development at DALI Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Lijun; Liu, Haitao; Chi, Jiguang; Qian, Liangshan; Pan, Feng; Liu, Xiang; Zhu, Xiaorong; Ma, Zhigang

    2015-06-01

    Zhejiang Dali Technology Co. Ltd. is one of the major players in the China Infrared industry. The company has been working on infrared imagers using uncooled FPAs for about 15 years. It started the research and development of uncooled microbolometer detectors since 2006, and has brought several uncooled detectors into mass production, including 35um 384x288, 25um 160x120, 384x288, 640x480, and 17um 384x288, 640x480. In this presentation, we will describe the uncooled infrared detector and imager development at DALI Technology.

  6. MULTI-WAVELENGTH EMISSION REGION OF {gamma}-RAY EMITTING PULSARS

    SciTech Connect

    Kisaka, S.; Kojima, Y. E-mail: kojima@theo.phys.sci.hiroshima-u.ac.jp

    2011-09-20

    Using the outer gap model, we investigate the emission region for the multi-wavelength light curve from energetic pulsars. We assume that {gamma}-ray and non-thermal X-ray photons are emitted from a particle acceleration region in the outer magnetosphere, and UV/optical photons originate above that region. We assume that {gamma}-rays are radiated only by outwardly moving particles, whereas the other photons are produced by particles moving inward and outward. We parameterize the altitude of the emission region as the deviation from the rotating dipole in a vacuum and determine it from the observed multi-wavelength pulse profile using the observationally constrained magnetic dipole inclination angle and viewing angle of the pulsars. We find that the outer gap model can explain the multi-wavelength pulse behavior by a simple distribution of emissivity, and discuss the possibility of further improvement. From observational fitting, we also find a general tendency for the altitude of the {gamma}-ray emission region to depend on the inclination angle. In particular, the emission region for low inclination angle is required to be located at very low altitude, which corresponds to the inner region within the last-open field line of the rotating dipole in a vacuum. This model suggests a modification of the statistics for observed {gamma}-ray pulsars: the number of sources with low inclination and viewing angles increases compared with previous estimates.

  7. Triggering processes and star formation in AGN: multi-wavelength matters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellison, Sara

    2016-08-01

    AGN can be selected via an array of multi-wavelength diagnostics, spanning the X-ray and optical, to the mid-IR and radio. Many studies of AGN and host galaxy properties focus on samples selected in only one of these domains. However, AGN selected at different wavelengths can exhibit very different properties, such that understanding the "big picture" requires a simultaneous multi-wavelength approach. In this talk, I will present a homogeneous analysis of 3 large samples of z~0 AGN, selected in the radio, mid-IR and optical in order to address the following two questions: what are the triggering mechanisms of AGN accretion, and what are the star formation rates of the host galaxies? Thanks to the combination of multi-wavelength data, large samples, and homogeneous treatment, it is possible to distinguish different triggering mechanisms (e.g. mergers vs. secular) contributing to different AGN samples, and clearly measure differences in their relative star formation rates.

  8. Multi-Wavelength Observations of 3C 273 in 1993-1995

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    vonMontigny, C.; Aller, H.; Aller, M.; Bruhweiler, F.; Collmar, W.; Courvoisier, T. J.-L.; Edwards, P. G.; Fichtel, C. E.; Fruscione, A.; Ghisellini, G.

    1997-01-01

    We present the results of the multi-wavelength campaigns on 3C 273 in 1993-1995. During the observations in late 1993 this quasar showed an increase of its flux for energies >= 100 MeV from about 2.1 x 10(exp -7) photons/sq cm.s to approximately 5.6 x 10(exp -7) photons/sq cm.s during a radio outburst at 14.5, 22 and 37 GHz. However, no one-to-one correlation of the gamma-ray radiation with any frequency could be found. The photon spectral index of the high energy spectrum changed from GAMMA(sub gamma) = (3.20 +/- 0.54) to GAMMA(sub gamma) = (2.20 +/- 0.22) in the sense that the spectrum flattened when the gamma-ray flux increased. Fits of the three most prominent models (synchrotron self-Comptonization, external inverse Comptonization and the proton initiated cascade model) for the explanation of the high gamma-ray emission of active galactic nuclei were performed to the multi-wavelength spectrum of 3C 273 . All three models are able to represent the basic features of the multi-wavelength spectrum. Although there are some differences the data are still not decisive enough to discriminate between the models.

  9. Multi-wavelength study of the Seyfert 1 galaxy NGC 3783 with XMM-Newton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blustin, A. J.; Branduardi-Raymont, G.; Behar, E.; Kaastra, J. S.; Kahn, S. M.; Page, M. J.; Sako, M.; Steenbrugge, K. C.

    2002-09-01

    We present the analysis of multi-wavelength XMM-Newton data from the Seyfert galaxy NGC 3783, including UV imaging, X-ray and UV lightcurves, the 0.2-10 keV X-ray continuum, the iron Kalpha emission line, and high-resolution spectroscopy and modelling of the soft X-ray warm absorber. The 0.2-10 keV spectral continuum can be well reproduced by a power-law at higher energies; we detect a prominent Fe Kalpha emission line, with both broad and narrow components, and a weaker emission line at 6.9 keV which is probably a combination of Fe Kbeta and Fe Xxvi. We interpret the significant deficit of counts in the soft X-ray region as being due to absorption by ionised gas in the line of sight. This is demonstrated by the large number of narrow absorption lines in the RGS spectrum from iron, oxygen, nitrogen, carbon, neon, argon, magnesium, silicon and sulphur. The wide range of iron states present in the spectrum enables us to deduce the ionisation structure of the absorbing medium. We find that our spectrum contains evidence of absorption by at least two phases of gas: a hotter phase containing plasma with a log ionisation parameter xi (where xi is in erg cm s-1) of 2.4 and greater, and a cooler phase with log xi centred around 0.3. The gas in both phases is outflowing at speeds of around 800 km s-1. The main spectral signature of the cold phase is the Unresolved Transition Array (UTA) of M-shell iron, which is the deepest yet observed; its depth requires either that the abundance of iron, in the cold phase, is several times that of oxygen, with respect to solar abundances, or that the absorption lines associated with this phase are highly saturated. The cold phase is associated with ionisation states that would also absorb in the UV.

  10. Multi-wavelength seds of Herschel-selected galaxies in the cosmos field

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Nicholas; Sanders, D. B.; Casey, Caitlin M.; Hung, Chao-Ling; Scoville, N. Z.; Capak, Peter; Bock, J.; Le Floc'h, Emeric; Aussel, Hervé; Ilbert, Olivier; Kartaltepe, Jeyhan S.; Roseboom, Isaac; Oliver, S. J.; Salvato, Mara; Aravena, M.; Berta, S.; Riguccini, L.; Symeonidis, M.

    2013-12-01

    We combine Herschel Photodetector Array Camera and Spectrometer and Spectral and Photometric Imaging Receiver maps of the full 2 deg{sup 2} Cosmic Evolution Survey (COSMOS) field with existing multi-wavelength data to obtain template and model-independent optical-to-far-infrared spectral energy distributions (SEDs) for 4218 Herschel-selected sources with log(L {sub IR}/L {sub ☉}) = 9.4-13.6 and z = 0.02-3.54. Median SEDs are created by binning the optical to far-infrared (FIR) bands available in COSMOS as a function of infrared luminosity. Herschel probes rest-frame wavelengths where the bulk of the infrared radiation is emitted, allowing us to more accurately determine fundamental dust properties of our sample of infrared luminous galaxies. We find that the SED peak wavelength (λ{sub peak}) decreases and the dust mass (M {sub dust}) increases with increasing total infrared luminosity (L {sub IR}). In the lowest infrared luminosity galaxies (log(L {sub IR}/L {sub ☉}) = 10.0-11.5), we see evidence of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) features (λ ∼ 7-9 μm), while in the highest infrared luminosity galaxies (L {sub IR} > 10{sup 12} L {sub ☉}) we see an increasing contribution of hot dust and/or power-law emission, consistent with the presence of heating from an active galactic nucleus (AGN). We study the relationship between stellar mass and star formation rate of our sample of infrared luminous galaxies and find no evidence that Herschel-selected galaxies follow the SFR/M {sub *} 'main sequence' as previously determined from studies of optically selected, star-forming galaxies. Finally, we compare the mid-infrared to FIR properties of our infrared luminous galaxies using the previously defined diagnostic, IR8 ≡ L {sub IR}/L {sub 8}, and find that galaxies with L {sub IR} ≳ 10{sup 11.3} L {sub ☉} tend to systematically lie above (× 3-5) the IR8 'infrared main sequence', suggesting either suppressed PAH emission or an increasing contribution from

  11. Detectors for medical radioisotope imaging: demands and perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopes, M. I.; Chepel, V.

    2004-10-01

    Radioisotope imaging is used to obtain information on biochemical processes in living organisms, being a tool of increasing importance for medical diagnosis. The improvement and expansion of these techniques depend on the progress attained in several areas, such as radionuclide production, radiopharmaceuticals, radiation detectors and image reconstruction algorithms. This review paper will be concerned only with the detector technology. We will review in general terms the present status of medical radioisotope imaging instrumentation with the emphasis put on the developments of high-resolution gamma cameras and PET detector systems for scinti-mammography and animal imaging. The present trend to combine two or more modalities in a single machine in order to obtain complementary information will also be considered.

  12. Scintillator-fiber charged particle track-imaging detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Binns, W. R.; Israel, M. H.; Klarmann, J.

    1983-01-01

    A scintillator-fiber charged-particle track-imaging detector was developed using a bundle of square cross section plastic scintillator fiber optics, proximity focused onto an image intensified charge injection device (CID) camera. The tracks of charged particle penetrating into the scintillator fiber bundle are projected onto the CID camera and the imaging information is read out in video format. The detector was exposed to beams of 15 MeV protons and relativistic Neon, Manganese, and Gold nuclei and images of their tracks were obtained. Details of the detector technique, properties of the tracks obtained, and preliminary range measurements of 15 MeV protons stopping in the fiber bundle are presented.

  13. Simulation of computed radiography with imaging plate detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Tisseur, D.; Costin, M.; Mathy, F.; Schumm, A.

    2014-02-18

    Computed radiography (CR) using phosphor imaging plate detectors is taking an increasing place in Radiography Testing. CR uses similar equipment as conventional radiography except that the classical X-ray film is replaced by a numerical detector, called image plate (IP), which is made of a photostimulable layer and which is read by a scanning device through photostimulated luminescence. Such digital radiography has already demonstrated important benefits in terms of exposure time, decrease of source energies and thus reduction of radioprotection area besides being a solution without effluents. This paper presents a model for the simulation of radiography with image plate detectors in CIVA together with examples of validation of the model. The study consists in a cross comparison between experimental and simulation results obtained on a step wedge with a classical X-ray tube. Results are proposed in particular with wire Image quality Indicator (IQI) and duplex IQI.

  14. Imaging electron detectors for low-voltage TEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moldovan, G.; Kirkland, A. I.

    2010-07-01

    There is an increasing effort for the development of transmission electron microscopes operating at accelerating voltages of less that 100 kV, down to 20 kV. This work aims to clarify if the technology of conventional indirect scintillator-CCD cameras is suitable to record images formed with electrons of such low energy and how its performance compare to that of novel direct silicon imaging detectors. The performance of these imaging detectors is discussed in terms of modulation transfer function and detective quantum efficiency. It is demonstrated that whilst the performance of conventional scintillator-CCDs improves as the electron energy is dropped, it then peaks at 70 keV and then drops again. Optimum imaging performance at even lower energies is expected for the novel directly exposed detectors, which are capable of near 100% detective quantum efficiency at very low electron energies.

  15. Monte Carlo studies for medical imaging detector optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fois, G. R.; Cisbani, E.; Garibaldi, F.

    2016-02-01

    This work reports on the Monte Carlo optimization studies of detection systems for Molecular Breast Imaging with radionuclides and Bremsstrahlung Imaging in nuclear medicine. Molecular Breast Imaging requires competing performances of the detectors: high efficiency and high spatial resolutions; in this direction, it has been proposed an innovative device which combines images from two different, and somehow complementary, detectors at the opposite sides of the breast. The dual detector design allows for spot compression and improves significantly the performance of the overall system if all components are well tuned, layout and processing carefully optimized; in this direction the Monte Carlo simulation represents a valuable tools. In recent years, Bremsstrahlung Imaging potentiality in internal radiotherapy (with beta-radiopharmaceuticals) has been clearly emerged; Bremsstrahlung Imaging is currently performed with existing detector generally used for single photon radioisotopes. We are evaluating the possibility to adapt an existing compact gamma camera and optimize by Monte Carlo its performance for Bremsstrahlung imaging with photons emitted by the beta- from 90 Y.

  16. Generation of tunable multi-wavelength EDFL by using graphene thin film as nonlinear medium and stabilizer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Harith; Hassan, Nor Ahya; Aidit, Siti Nabila; Tiu, Zian Cheak

    2016-07-01

    The applications of graphene thin film as a nonlinear medium and stabilizer to generate a stable multi-wavelength is proposed and demonstrated. A 50 m long highly nonlinear photonic crystal fiber (PCF) is incorporated into the cavity to achieve unstable multi-wavelength based on nonlinear polarization rotation (NPR) effect. By introducing the graphene thin film into the cavity, a stable multi-wavelength oscillation is obtained. The laser generates more than 7 lasings with constant spacing of 0.47 nm. The output is highly stable with power fluctuation of less than 3 dB within a period of 30 min. The multi-wavelength EDFL exhibits a tunability from the center wavelength of 1550 nm to 1560 nm.

  17. A Photon Counting Imaging Detector for NASA Exoplanet Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Figer, Donald

    The key objective of the proposed project is to advance the maturity of a 256x256 pixel single-photon optical imaging detector. The detector has zero read noise and is resilient against the harsh effects of radiation in space. We expect that the device will have state-of-the-art performance in other parameters, e.g., high quantum efficiency from UV to 1 #m, low dark current, etc.

  18. A ring imaging Cherenkov detector for CLAS12

    SciTech Connect

    Montgomery, Rachel A.

    2013-12-01

    The energy increase of Jefferson Lab's Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) to 12 GeV promises to greatly extend the physics reach of its experiments. This will include an upgrade of the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS) to CLAS12, offering unique possibilities to study internal nucleon dynamics. For this excellent hadron identification over the full kinematical range of 3–8 GeV/c is essential. This will be achieved by the installation of a Ring Imaging CHerenkov (RICH) detector. A novel hybrid imaging design incorporating mirrors, aerogel radiators and Hamamatsu H8500 multianode photomultiplier tubes is proposed. Depending on the incident particle track angle, Cherenkov light will either be imaged directly or after two reflections and passes through the aerogel. The detector design is described, along with preliminary results on individual detector components tests and from recent testbeam studies.

  19. Astronomical imaging with infrared array detectors.

    PubMed

    Gatley, I; Depoy, D L; Fowler, A M

    1988-12-01

    History shows that progress in astronomy often stems directly from technological innovation and that each portion of the electromagnetic spectrum offers unique insights into the nature of the universe. Most recently, the widespread availability of infrared-sensitive two-dimensional array detectors has led to dramatic improvements in the capabilities of conventional ground-based observatories. The impact of this new technology on our understanding of a wide variety of phenomena is illustrated here by infrared pictures of star-forming regions, of nebulae produced by the late stages of stellar evolution, of the nucleus of our own galaxy(the Milky Way), and of activity in other galaxies. PMID:17817072

  20. A multi-wavelength LIDAR system based on an erbium-doped fiber MOPA-system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Töws, Albert; Kurtz, Alfred

    2014-10-01

    A multi-wavelength fiber based MOPA-system is proposed to increase performance of coherent Doppler lidar systems. The setup of the four-wavelength lidar system is described and characterized. We show that the speckle patterns of each wavelength are uncorrelated. The measured Goodman's M-parameter is 3.8 for four wavelengths, using hard target reflections. Atmospheric measurements show uncorrelated speckle patterns as well. Consequently, the precision of the measured wind velocity can be improved by a factor of two.

  1. Multi-Wavelength AGN from Ground and Space, from Far-IR to High-Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stern, Daniel

    2014-07-01

    I will discuss multi-wavelength AGN studies, with a focus on mid-IR and radio selected obscured AGN. Obscured AGN, which are robustly identified across the full sky by WISE, are the dominant AGN population. I will discuss several aspects of the mid-IR obscured AGN population, ranging from detailed studies of extreme sources, the so-called WISE ultraluminous `hot dust-obscured galaxy' or `hot DOG' sample, as well as more general studies comparing obscured and unobscured AGN identified in wide-area surveys.

  2. Novel multi wavelength sensor concept to measure carboxy- and methemoglobin concentration non-invasively

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timm, Ulrich; Kraitl, Jens; Gewiss, Helge; Kamysek, Svend; Brock, Beate; Ewald, Hartmut

    2016-03-01

    This paper will describe a novel multi-wavelength photometric method to measure carboxyhemoglobin (COHb) and methemoglobin (MetHb) concentration non-invasively. COHb and MetHb are so called dysfunctional hemoglobin derivatives and they are not able to carry oxygen. Standard pulse oximeters are only able to measure two derivatives, namely oxyhemoglobin (O2Hb) and deoxyhemoglobin (HHb) but the presence of other derivatives in the blood may distort the readings. The paper presents a new approach of a noninvasive sensor system to measure COHb and MetHb and the validation in vivo and in vitro.

  3. Reliability of temperature determination from curve-fitting in multi-wavelength pyrometery

    SciTech Connect

    Ni, P. A.; More, R. M.; Bieniosek, F. M.

    2013-08-04

    Abstract This paper examines the reliability of a widely used method for temperature determination by multi-wavelength pyrometry. In recent WDM experiments with ion-beam heated metal foils, we found that the statistical quality of the fit to the measured data is not necessarily a measure of the accuracy of the inferred temperature. We found a specific example where a second-best fit leads to a more realistic temperature value. The physics issue is the wavelength-dependent emissivity of the hot surface. We discuss improvements of the multi-frequency pyrometry technique, which will give a more reliable determination of the temperature from emission data.

  4. Multi-wavelength laser generation with Bismuthbased Erbium-doped fiber.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, H; Shahi, S; Harun, S W

    2009-01-01

    A multi-wavelength laser comb is demonstrated using a nonlinear effect in a backward pumped Bismuth-based Erbium-doped fiber (Bi-EDF) for the first time. It uses a ring cavity resonator scheme containing a 215 cm long highly nonlinear Bi-EDF, optical isolators, polarisation controller and 10 dB output coupler. The laser generates more than 10 lines of optical comb with a line spacing of approximately 0.41 nm at 1615.5 nm region using 146 mW of 1480 nm pump power.

  5. Multi-wavelength erbium-doped fiber laser based on random distributed feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yuanyang; Dong, Xinyong; Jiang, Meng; Yu, Xia; Shum, Ping

    2016-09-01

    We experimentally demonstrated a multi-wavelength erbium-doped fiber laser based on random distributed feedback via a 20-km-long single-mode fiber together with a Sagnac loop mirror. The number of channels can be modulated from 2 to 8 at room temperature when the pump power is changed from 30 to 180 mW, indicating that wavelength competition caused by homogenous gain broadening of erbium-doped fiber is significantly suppressed. Other advantages of the laser include low cost, low-threshold pump power and simple fabrication.

  6. Multi-wavelength generation based on cascaded Raman scattering and self-frequency-doubling in KTA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, K.; Li, J. S.; Xu, D. G.; Ding, X.; Zhou, R.; Wen, W. Q.; Li, Z. Y.; Xu, X. Y.; Wang, P.; Yao, J. Q.

    2010-04-01

    A multi-wavelength laser is developed based on cascaded stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) and self-frequency-doubling in an x-cut KTA crystal pumped by an A-O Q-switched Nd:YAG laser. The generation of 1178 nm from cascaded SRS of 234 and 671 cm-1 Raman modes is observed. The six wavelengths, including the fundamental 1064 nm, four Stokes waves at 1091, 1120, 1146, 1178 nm, and the second harmonic generation (SHG) of 1146 nm, are tens to hundreds of millwatts for each at 10 kHz, corresponding to a total conversion efficiency of 8.72%.

  7. PIXSCAN: Pixel detector CT-scanner for small animal imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delpierre, P.; Debarbieux, F.; Basolo, S.; Berar, J. F.; Bonissent, A.; Boudet, N.; Breugnon, P.; Caillot, B.; Cassol Brunner, F.; Chantepie, B.; Clemens, J. C.; Dinkespiler, B.; Khouri, R.; Koudobine, I.; Mararazzo, V.; Meessen, C.; Menouni, M.; Morel, C.; Mouget, C.; Pangaud, P.; Peyrin, F.; Rougon, G.; Sappey-Marinier, D.; Valton, S.; Vigeolas, E.

    2007-02-01

    The PIXSCAN is a small animal CT-scanner based on hybrid pixel detectors. These detectors provide very large dynamic range of photons counting at very low detector noise. They also provide high counting rates with fast image readout. Detection efficiency can be optimized by selecting the sensor medium according to the working energy range. Indeed, the use of CdTe allows a detection efficiency of 100% up to 50 keV. Altogether these characteristics are expected to improve the contrast of the CT-scanner, especially for soft tissues, and to reduce both the scan duration and the absorbed dose. A proof of principle has been performed by assembling into a PIXSCAN-XPAD2 prototype the photon counting pixel detector initially built for detection of X-ray synchrotron radiations. Despite the relatively large pixel size of this detector (330×330 μm 2), we can present three-dimensional tomographic reconstruction of mice at good contrast and spatial resolution. A new photon counting chip (XPAD3) is designed in sub-micronique technology to achieve 130×130 μm 2 pixels. This improved circuit has been equipped with an energy selection circuit to act as a band-pass emission filter. Furthermore, the PIXSCAN-XPAD3 hybrid pixel detectors will be combined with the Lausanne ClearPET scanner demonstrator. CT image reconstruction in this non-conventional geometry is under study for this purpose.

  8. Aerosol optical depth assimilation for a size-resolved sectional model: impacts of observationally constrained, multi-wavelength and fine mode retrievals on regional scale analyses and forecasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saide, P. E.; Carmichael, G. R.; Liu, Z.; Schwartz, C. S.; Lin, H. C.; da Silva, A. M.; Hyer, E.

    2013-10-01

    An aerosol optical depth (AOD) three-dimensional variational data assimilation technique is developed for the Gridpoint Statistical Interpolation (GSI) system for which WRF-Chem forecasts are performed with a detailed sectional model, the Model for Simulating Aerosol Interactions and Chemistry (MOSAIC). Within GSI, forward AOD and adjoint sensitivities are performed using Mie computations from the WRF-Chem optical properties module, providing consistency with the forecast. GSI tools such as recursive filters and weak constraints are used to provide correlation within aerosol size bins and upper and lower bounds for the optimization. The system is used to perform assimilation experiments with fine vertical structure and no data thinning or re-gridding on a 12 km horizontal grid over the region of California, USA, where improvements on analyses and forecasts is demonstrated. A first set of simulations was performed, comparing the assimilation impacts of using the operational MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) dark target retrievals to those using observationally constrained ones, i.e., calibrated with AERONET (Aerosol RObotic NETwork) data. It was found that using the observationally constrained retrievals produced the best results when evaluated against ground based monitors, with the error in PM2.5 predictions reduced at over 90% of the stations and AOD errors reduced at 100% of the monitors, along with larger overall error reductions when grouping all sites. A second set of experiments reveals that the use of fine mode fraction AOD and ocean multi-wavelength retrievals can improve the representation of the aerosol size distribution, while assimilating only 550 nm AOD retrievals produces no or at times degraded impact. While assimilation of multi-wavelength AOD shows positive impacts on all analyses performed, future work is needed to generate observationally constrained multi-wavelength retrievals, which when assimilated will generate size

  9. High-resolution imaging microchannel plate detector for EUV spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bannister, Nigel P.; Lapington, Jonathan S.; Barstow, Martin A.; Fraser, George W.; Sanderson, B. S.; Tandy, J. A.; Pearson, James F.; Spragg, J. E.

    2000-12-01

    We describe the development of an imaging microchannel plate detector for a new class of high resolution EUV spectrometer. The detector incorporates a front MCP coated with a CsI photocathode to enhance quantum efficiency, while the rear MCP, supplied by Photonis SAS for a European Space Agency Technology Research Program, represents one of the first uses of a 6 micron pore device in astronomy. The detector uses a unique design of charge division anode, the Vernier readout, enabling it to deliver a spatial resolution better than 15 microns FWHM. The detector forms an integral component of J- PEX, a sounding rocket EUV spectrometer operating at near- normal incidence, using multilayer coated gratings to deliver a resolution and effective area 10 times that of EUVE in the 225 - 245 angstrom band.

  10. Spectral X-Ray Diffraction using a 6 Megapixel Photon Counting Array Detector

    PubMed Central

    Muir, Ryan D.; Pogranichniy, Nicholas R.; Muir, J. Lewis; Sullivan, Shane Z.; Battaile, Kevin P.; Mulichak, Anne M.; Toth, Scott J.; Keefe, Lisa J.; Simpson, Garth J.

    2016-01-01

    Pixel-array array detectors allow single-photon counting to be performed on a massively parallel scale, with several million counting circuits and detectors in the array. Because the number of photoelectrons produced at the detector surface depends on the photon energy, these detectors offer the possibility of spectral imaging. In this work, a statistical model of the instrument response is used to calibrate the detector on a per-pixel basis. In turn, the calibrated sensor was used to perform separation of dual-energy diffraction measurements into two monochromatic images. Targeting applications include multi-wavelength diffraction to aid in protein structure determination and X-ray diffraction imaging. PMID:27041789

  11. [Measurement of multi-wavelength pulse oxygen saturation based on dynamic spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao-Fei; Zhao, Wen-Jun

    2014-05-01

    The present paper puts forward multi-wavelength pulse oxygen saturation measurement based on dynamic spectroscopy to do the non-invasive determination of oxygen saturation. Compared to conventional ways, the new method makes full use of more wavelengths light and improves the measurement accuracy. During the experiment, the in-vivo measurements were carried out on 60 patients and their spectroscopic data were collected by the high sensitivity type fiber optic spectrometer. Singletrial estimation method was used to extract the dynamic spectroscopy at the wavelengths of 606. 44 approximately 987. 55 nm. Oxygen saturation obtained from arterial blood gas analysis is regarded as the true value. Synergy interval partial least square (siPLS) was used to establish the calibration model of subjects' oxygen saturation values against dynamic spectroscopy data. The relative error of prediction is +/-0. 017 6, but the relative error of the subjects in the same set measured by the patient monitor which was two-wavelength measure system is +/-0. 116 4. Measurement results show that the use of the high sensitivity type fiber optic spectrometer to collect multi-wavelength spectroscopic data and dynamic spectroscopy method to process data can do better in improving the accuracy of the oxygen saturation measurement.

  12. [Measurement of multi-wavelength pulse oxygen saturation based on dynamic spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao-Fei; Zhao, Wen-Jun

    2014-05-01

    The present paper puts forward multi-wavelength pulse oxygen saturation measurement based on dynamic spectroscopy to do the non-invasive determination of oxygen saturation. Compared to conventional ways, the new method makes full use of more wavelengths light and improves the measurement accuracy. During the experiment, the in-vivo measurements were carried out on 60 patients and their spectroscopic data were collected by the high sensitivity type fiber optic spectrometer. Singletrial estimation method was used to extract the dynamic spectroscopy at the wavelengths of 606. 44 approximately 987. 55 nm. Oxygen saturation obtained from arterial blood gas analysis is regarded as the true value. Synergy interval partial least square (siPLS) was used to establish the calibration model of subjects' oxygen saturation values against dynamic spectroscopy data. The relative error of prediction is +/-0. 017 6, but the relative error of the subjects in the same set measured by the patient monitor which was two-wavelength measure system is +/-0. 116 4. Measurement results show that the use of the high sensitivity type fiber optic spectrometer to collect multi-wavelength spectroscopic data and dynamic spectroscopy method to process data can do better in improving the accuracy of the oxygen saturation measurement. PMID:25095431

  13. A microwave photonic filter based on multi-wavelength fiber laser and infinite impulse response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Dong; Cao, Ye; Zhao, Ai-hong; Tong, Zheng-rong

    2016-09-01

    A microwave photonic filter (MPF) based on multi-wavelength fiber laser and infinite impulse response (IIR) is proposed. The filter uses a multi-wavelength fiber laser as the light source, two sections of polarization maintaining fiber (PMF) and three polarization controllers (PCs) as the laser frequency selection device. By adjusting the PC to change the effective length of the PMF, the laser can obtain three wavelength spacings, which are 0.44 nm, 0.78 nm and 1.08 nm, respectively. And the corresponding free spectral ranges ( FSRs) are 8.46 GHz, 4.66 GHz and 3.44 GHz, respectively. Thus changing the wavelength spacing of the laser can make the FSR variable. An IIR filter is introduced based on a finite impulse response (FIR) filter. Then the 3-dB bandwidth of the MPF is reduced, and the main side-lobe suppression ratio ( MSSR) is increased. By adjusting the gain of the radio frequency (RF) signal amplifier, the frequency response of the filter can be enhanced.

  14. [A model study on noninvasive blood glucose measurement with multi-wavelength infrared array].

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Bian, Zhengzhong; Zhang, Dalong

    2003-12-01

    The concentration of glucose in the blood may soon be measured noninvasively by near infrared multi-wavelength sensor array without the painful puncture for obtaining a drop of blood. For overcoming the limitation of low measuring accurate degree and unstable working state, according to the Lambert-Beer Law, the authors analyzed the feature of blood adsorption spectroscopy and designed an infrared multi-wavelength blood glucose measuring sensor array to surmount the difficulties in noninvasive blood glucose measurement. The key technique, most suitable for detecting site and the influencing factors from human body were discussed, and the Mixture of Expert(ME) algorithm was adopted in building calibration model with multiple parameters of human body. It can overcome the existing problems and get more exact blood glucose information from the weak changes in spectral signals. Also presented and addressed in this paper are the detailed implementing steps of ME and the system, as well as the problems need to be solved. PMID:14716885

  15. Demonstration of Aerosol Property Profiling by Multi-wavelength Lidar Under Varying Relative Humidity Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whiteman, D.N.; Veselovskii, I.; Kolgotin, A.; Korenskii, M.; Andrews, E.

    2008-01-01

    The feasibility of using a multi-wavelength Mie-Raman lidar based on a tripled Nd:YAG laser for profiling aerosol physical parameters in the planetary boundary layer (PBL) under varying conditions of relative humidity (RH) is studied. The lidar quantifies three aerosol backscattering and two extinction coefficients and from these optical data the particle parameters such as concentration, size and complex refractive index are retrieved through inversion with regularization. The column-integrated, lidar-derived parameters are compared with results from the AERONET sun photometer. The lidar and sun photometer agree well in the characterization of the fine mode parameters, however the lidar shows less sensitivity to coarse mode. The lidar results reveal a strong dependence of particle properties on RH. The height regions with enhanced RH are characterized by an increase of backscattering and extinction coefficient and a decrease in the Angstrom exponent coinciding with an increase in the particle size. We present data selection techniques useful for selecting cases that can support the calculation of hygroscopic growth parameters using lidar. Hygroscopic growth factors calculated using these techniques agree with expectations despite the lack of co-located radiosonde data. Despite this limitation, the results demonstrate the potential of multi-wavelength Raman lidar technique for study of aerosol humidification process.

  16. MODELING MULTI-WAVELENGTH STELLAR ASTROMETRY. I. SIM LITE OBSERVATIONS OF INTERACTING BINARIES

    SciTech Connect

    Coughlin, Jeffrey L.; Harrison, Thomas E.; Gelino, Dawn M.; Ciardi, David R.; Hoard, D. W.; Wachter, Stefanie; Benedict, G. Fritz; McArthur, Barbara E.; Howell, Steve B.

    2010-07-10

    Interacting binaries (IBs) consist of a secondary star that fills or is very close to filling its Roche lobe, resulting in accretion onto the primary star, which is often, but not always, a compact object. In many cases, the primary star, secondary star, and the accretion disk can all be significant sources of luminosity. SIM Lite will only measure the photocenter of an astrometric target, and thus determining the true astrometric orbits of such systems will be difficult. We have modified the Eclipsing Light Curve code to allow us to model the flux-weighted reflex motions of IBs, in a code we call REFLUX. This code gives us sufficient flexibility to investigate nearly every configuration of IB. We find that SIM Lite will be able to determine astrometric orbits for all sufficiently bright IBs where the primary or secondary star dominates the luminosity. For systems where there are multiple components that comprise the spectrum in the optical bandpass accessible to SIM Lite, we find it is possible to obtain absolute masses for both components, although multi-wavelength photometry will be required to disentangle the multiple components. In all cases, SIM Lite will at least yield accurate inclinations and provide valuable information that will allow us to begin to understand the complex evolution of mass-transferring binaries. It is critical that SIM Lite maintains a multi-wavelength capability to allow for the proper deconvolution of the astrometric orbits in multi-component systems.

  17. Direct writing of tunable multi-wavelength polymer lasers on a flexible substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhai, Tianrui; Wang, Yonglu; Chen, Li; Zhang, Xinping

    2015-07-01

    Tunable multi-wavelength polymer lasers based on two-dimensional distributed feedback structures are fabricated on a transparent flexible substrate using interference ablation. A scalene triangular lattice structure was designed to support stable tri-wavelength lasing emission and was achieved through multiple exposure processes. Three wavelengths were controlled by three periods of the compound cavity. Mode competition among different cavity modes was observed by changing the pump fluence. Both a redshift and blueshift of the laser wavelength could be achieved by bending the soft substrate. These results not only provide insight into the physical mechanisms behind co-cavity polymer lasers but also introduce new laser sources and laser designs for white light lasers.Tunable multi-wavelength polymer lasers based on two-dimensional distributed feedback structures are fabricated on a transparent flexible substrate using interference ablation. A scalene triangular lattice structure was designed to support stable tri-wavelength lasing emission and was achieved through multiple exposure processes. Three wavelengths were controlled by three periods of the compound cavity. Mode competition among different cavity modes was observed by changing the pump fluence. Both a redshift and blueshift of the laser wavelength could be achieved by bending the soft substrate. These results not only provide insight into the physical mechanisms behind co-cavity polymer lasers but also introduce new laser sources and laser designs for white light lasers. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr01871d

  18. A Compact Imaging Detector of Polarization and Spectral Content

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rust, D. M.; Kumar, A.; Thompson, K. E.

    1993-01-01

    A new type of image detector will simultaneously analyze the polarization of light at all picture elements in a scene. The integrated Dual Imaging Detector (IDID) consists of a polarizing beam splitter bonded to a charge-coupled device (CCD), with signal-analysis circuitry and analog-to-digital converters, all integrated on a silicon chip. The polarizing beam splitter can be either a Ronchi ruling, or an array of cylindrical lenslets, bonded to a birefringent wafer. The wafer, in turn, is bonded to the CCD so that light in the two orthogonal planes of polarization falls on adjacent pairs of pixels. The use of a high-index birefringent material, e.g., rutile, allows the IDID to operate at f-numbers as high as f/3.5. Other aspects of the detector are discussed.

  19. Detectors for single-molecule fluorescence imaging and spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    MICHALET, X.; SIEGMUND, O.H.W.; VALLERGA, J.V.; JELINSKY, P.; MILLAUD, J.E.; WEISS, S.

    2010-01-01

    Single-molecule observation, characterization and manipulation techniques have recently come to the forefront of several research domains spanning chemistry, biology and physics. Due to the exquisite sensitivity, specificity, and unmasking of ensemble averaging, single-molecule fluorescence imaging and spectroscopy have become, in a short period of time, important tools in cell biology, biochemistry and biophysics. These methods led to new ways of thinking about biological processes such as viral infection, receptor diffusion and oligomerization, cellular signaling, protein-protein or protein-nucleic acid interactions, and molecular machines. Such achievements require a combination of several factors to be met, among which detector sensitivity and bandwidth are crucial. We examine here the needed performance of photodetectors used in these types of experiments, the current state of the art for different categories of detectors, and actual and future developments of single-photon counting detectors for single-molecule imaging and spectroscopy. PMID:20157633

  20. Development of high resolution imaging detectors for x ray astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murray, S. S.; Schwartz, D. A.

    1992-01-01

    This final report summarizes our past activities and discusses the work performed over the period of 1 April 1990 through 1 April 1991 on x-ray optics, soft x-ray (0.1 - 10 KeV) imaging detectors, and hard x-ray (10 - 300 KeV) imaging detectors. If microchannel plates (MCPs) can be used to focus x-rays with a high efficiency and good angular resolution, they will revolutionize the field of x-ray optics. An x-ray image of a point source through an array of square MCP pores compared favorably with our ray tracing model for the MCP. Initial analysis of this image demonstrates the feasibility of MCPs for soft x-rays. Our work continues with optimizing the performance of our soft x-ray MCP imaging detectors. This work involves readout technology that should provide improved MCP readout devices (thin film crossed grid, curved, and resistive sheets), defect removal in MCPs, and photocathode optimization. In the area of hard x-ray detector development we have developed two different techniques for producing a CsI photocathode thickness of 10 to 100 microns, such that it is thick enough to absorb the high energy x-rays and still allow the photoelectrons to escape to the top MCP of a modified soft x-ray imaging detector. The methods involve vacuum depositing a thick film of CsI on a strong back, and producing a converter device that takes the place of the photocathode.

  1. SWIR hyperspectral imaging detector for surface residues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Matthew P.; Mangold, Paul; Gomer, Nathaniel; Klueva, Oksana; Treado, Patrick

    2013-05-01

    ChemImage has developed a SWIR Hyperspectral Imaging (HSI) sensor which uses hyperspectral imaging for wide area surveillance and standoff detection of surface residues. Existing detection technologies often require close proximity for sensing or detecting, endangering operators and costly equipment. Furthermore, most of the existing sensors do not support autonomous, real-time, mobile platform based detection of threats. The SWIR HSI sensor provides real-time standoff detection of surface residues. The SWIR HSI sensor provides wide area surveillance and HSI capability enabled by liquid crystal tunable filter technology. Easy-to-use detection software with a simple, intuitive user interface produces automated alarms and real-time display of threat and type. The system has potential to be used for the detection of variety of threats including chemicals and illicit drug substances and allows for easy updates in the field for detection of new hazardous materials. SWIR HSI technology could be used by law enforcement for standoff screening of suspicious locations and vehicles in pursuit of illegal labs or combat engineers to support route-clearance applications- ultimately to save the lives of soldiers and civilians. In this paper, results from a SWIR HSI sensor, which include detection of various materials in bulk form, as well as residue amounts on vehicles, people and other surfaces, will be discussed.

  2. Autoradiography Imaging in Targeted Alpha Therapy with Timepix Detector

    PubMed Central

    AL Darwish, Ruqaya; Staudacher, Alexander Hugo; Bezak, Eva; Brown, Michael Paul

    2015-01-01

    There is a lack of data related to activity uptake and particle track distribution in targeted alpha therapy. These data are required to estimate the absorbed dose on a cellular level as alpha particles have a limited range and traverse only a few cells. Tracking of individual alpha particles is possible using the Timepix semiconductor radiation detector. We investigated the feasibility of imaging alpha particle emissions in tumour sections from mice treated with Thorium-227 (using APOMAB), with and without prior chemotherapy and Timepix detector. Additionally, the sensitivity of the Timepix detector to monitor variations in tumour uptake based on the necrotic tissue volume was also studied. Compartmental analysis model was used, based on the obtained imaging data, to assess the Th-227 uptake. Results show that alpha particle, photon, electron, and muon tracks were detected and resolved by Timepix detector. The current study demonstrated that individual alpha particle emissions, resulting from targeted alpha therapy, can be visualised and quantified using Timepix detector. Furthermore, the variations in the uptake based on the tumour necrotic volume have been observed with four times higher uptake for tumours pretreated with chemotherapy than for those without chemotherapy. PMID:25688285

  3. Autoradiography imaging in targeted alpha therapy with Timepix detector.

    PubMed

    A L Darwish, Ruqaya; Staudacher, Alexander Hugo; Bezak, Eva; Brown, Michael Paul

    2015-01-01

    There is a lack of data related to activity uptake and particle track distribution in targeted alpha therapy. These data are required to estimate the absorbed dose on a cellular level as alpha particles have a limited range and traverse only a few cells. Tracking of individual alpha particles is possible using the Timepix semiconductor radiation detector. We investigated the feasibility of imaging alpha particle emissions in tumour sections from mice treated with Thorium-227 (using APOMAB), with and without prior chemotherapy and Timepix detector. Additionally, the sensitivity of the Timepix detector to monitor variations in tumour uptake based on the necrotic tissue volume was also studied. Compartmental analysis model was used, based on the obtained imaging data, to assess the Th-227 uptake. Results show that alpha particle, photon, electron, and muon tracks were detected and resolved by Timepix detector. The current study demonstrated that individual alpha particle emissions, resulting from targeted alpha therapy, can be visualised and quantified using Timepix detector. Furthermore, the variations in the uptake based on the tumour necrotic volume have been observed with four times higher uptake for tumours pretreated with chemotherapy than for those without chemotherapy.

  4. Autoradiography imaging in targeted alpha therapy with Timepix detector.

    PubMed

    A L Darwish, Ruqaya; Staudacher, Alexander Hugo; Bezak, Eva; Brown, Michael Paul

    2015-01-01

    There is a lack of data related to activity uptake and particle track distribution in targeted alpha therapy. These data are required to estimate the absorbed dose on a cellular level as alpha particles have a limited range and traverse only a few cells. Tracking of individual alpha particles is possible using the Timepix semiconductor radiation detector. We investigated the feasibility of imaging alpha particle emissions in tumour sections from mice treated with Thorium-227 (using APOMAB), with and without prior chemotherapy and Timepix detector. Additionally, the sensitivity of the Timepix detector to monitor variations in tumour uptake based on the necrotic tissue volume was also studied. Compartmental analysis model was used, based on the obtained imaging data, to assess the Th-227 uptake. Results show that alpha particle, photon, electron, and muon tracks were detected and resolved by Timepix detector. The current study demonstrated that individual alpha particle emissions, resulting from targeted alpha therapy, can be visualised and quantified using Timepix detector. Furthermore, the variations in the uptake based on the tumour necrotic volume have been observed with four times higher uptake for tumours pretreated with chemotherapy than for those without chemotherapy. PMID:25688285

  5. Energy dispersive photon counting detectors for breast imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barber, William C.; Wessel, Jan C.; Malakhov, Nail; Wawrzyniak, Gregor; Hartsough, Neal E.; Gandhi, Thulasidharan; Nygard, Einar; Iwanczyk, Jan S.

    2013-09-01

    We report on our efforts toward the development of silicon (Si) strip detectors for energy-resolved clinical breast imaging. Typically, x-ray integrating detectors based on scintillating cesium iodide CsI(Tl) or amorphous selenium (a- Se) are used in most commercial systems. Recently, mammography instrumentation has been introduced based on photon counting silicon Si strip detectors. Mammography requires high flux from the x-ray generator, therefore, in order to achieve energy resolved single photon counting, a high output count rate (OCR) for the detector must be achieved at the required spatial resolution and across the required dynamic range for the application. The required performance in terms of the OCR, spatial resolution, and dynamic range must be obtained with sufficient field of view (FOV) for the application thus requiring the tiling of pixel arrays and scanning techniques. Room temperature semiconductors, operating as direct conversion x-ray sensors, can provide the required speed when connected to application specific integrated circuits (ASICs) operating at fast peaking times with multiple fixed thresholds per pixel, provided that the sensors are designed for rapid signal formation across the x-ray energy ranges of the application at the required energy and spatial resolutions. We present our methods and results from the optimization of prototype detectors based on Si strip structures. We describe the detector optimization and the development of ASIC readout electronics that provide the required spatial resolution, low noise, high count rate capabilities and minimal power consumption.

  6. Atmospheric aerosol characterization combining multi-wavelength Raman lidar and MAX-DOAS measurements in Gwanjgu

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chong, Jihyo; Shin, Dong Ho; Kim, Kwang Chul; Lee, Kwon-Ho; Shin, Sungkyun; Noh, Young M.; Müller, Detlef; Kim, Young J.

    2011-11-01

    Integrated approach has been adopted at the ADvanced Environmental Research Center (ADEMRC), Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology (GIST), Korea for effective monitoring of atmospheric aerosol. Various active and passive optical remote sensing techniques such as multi-wavelength (3β+2α+1δ) Raman LIDAR, sun-photometry, MAX-DOAS, and satellite retrieval have been utilized. This integrated monitoring system approach combined with in-situ surface measurement is to allow better characterization of physical and optical properties of atmospheric aerosol. Information on the vertical distribution and microphysical properties of atmospheric aerosol is important for understanding its transport characteristics as well as radiative effect. The GIST multi-wavelength (3β + 2α+1δ) Raman lidar system can measure vertical profiles of optical properties of atmospheric aerosols such as extinction coefficients at 355 and 532nm, particle backscatter coefficients at 355, 532 and 1064 nm, and depolarization ratio at 532nm. The incomplete overlap between the telescope field-of-view and beam divergence of the transmitting laser significantly affects lidar measurement, resulting in higher uncertainty near the surface where atmospheric aerosols of interest are concentrated. Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS) technique is applied as a complementary tool for the detection of atmospheric aerosols near the surface. The passive Multi-Axis DOAS (MAX-DOAS) technique uses scattered sunlight as a light source from several viewing directions. Recently developed aerosol retrieval algorithm based on O4 slant column densities (SCDs) measured at UV and visible wavelengths has been utilized to derive aerosol information (e.g., aerosol optical depth (AOD) and aerosol extinction coefficients (AECs)) in the lower troposphere. The aerosol extinction coefficient at 356 nm was retrieved for the 0-1 and 1-2 km layers based on the MAX-DOAS measurements using the retrieval algorithm

  7. Towards large scale HTS Josephson detector arrays for THz imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, J.; Hellicar, A. D.; Leslie, K. E.; Nikolic, N.; Hanham, S. M.; Macfarlane, J. C.; Foley, C. P.

    2013-11-01

    We present the design and implementation of a high-temperature superconducting (HTS) Josephson junction detector array for terahertz (THz) imaging. The array device is made of ten YBa2Cu3Ox-7 (YBCO) step-edge junctions coupled to gold thin-film ring-slot antennas on a MgO substrate. The design and characterization of the detector array in response to a 0.6 THz signal are presented. The development of multi-channel biasing and read-out electronics and the system integration with a commercial cryocooler are also described.

  8. Detectors based on silicon photomultiplier arrays for medical imaging applications

    SciTech Connect

    Llosa, G.; Barrio, J.; Cabello, J.; Lacasta, C.; Oliver, J. F.; Stankova, V.; Solaz, C.

    2011-07-01

    Silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs) have experienced a fast development and are now employed in different research fields. The availability of 2D arrays that provide information of the interaction position in the detector has had a high interest for medical imaging. Continuous crystals combined with segmented photodetectors can provide higher efficiency than pixellated crystals and very high spatial resolution. The IRIS group at IFIC is working on the development of detector heads based on continuous crystals coupled to SiPM arrays for different applications, including a small animal PET scanner in collaboration with the Univ. of Pisa and INFN Pisa, and a Compton telescope for dose monitoring in hadron therapy. (authors)

  9. Performance and applications of a high rate imaging pixel detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavel, N. A.; Besch, H. J.; Menk, R.; Sarvestani, A.; Sauer, N.; Stiehler, R.; Walenta, A. H.

    2002-01-01

    In the past years a large variety of gas filled micro pattern detectors have been developed for applications in high energy physics as well as for X-ray imaging in synchrotron light experiments. Here, we present the most recent developments on the MicroCAT detector with resistive position encodeing readout, which has been demonstrated to meet even the strong requirements in high resolution protein crystallography and time resolved small angle scattering at synchrotron light sources of the third generation. Recent test measurements with the prototype under the working conditions of a synchrotron light source as well as high time resolved measurements in the laboratory are presented.

  10. An Integrated Imaging Detector of Polarization and Spectral Content

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rust, D. M.; Thompson, K. E.

    1993-01-01

    A new type of image detector has been designed to simultaneously analyze the polarization of light at all picture elements in a scene. The Integrated Dual Imaging Detector (IDID) consists of a polarizing beamsplitter bonded to a charge-coupled device (CCD), with signal-analysis circuitry and analog-to-digital converters, all integrated on a silicon chip. It should be capable of 1:10(exp 4) polarization discrimination. The IDID should simplify the design and operation of imaging polarimeters and spectroscopic imagers used, for example, in atmospheric and solar research. Innovations in the IDID include (1) two interleaved 512 x 1024-pixel imaging arrays (one for each polarization plane); (2) large dynamic range (well depth of 10(exp 6) electrons per pixel); (3) simultaneous readout of both images at 10 million pixels per second each; (4) on-chip analog signal processing to produce polarization maps in real time; (5) on-chip 10-bit A/D conversion. When used with a lithium-niobate Fabry-Perot etalon or other color filter that can encode spectral information as polarization, the IDID can collect and analyze simultaneous images at two wavelengths. Precise photometric analysis of molecular or atomic concentrations in the atmosphere is one suggested application. When used in a solar telescope, the IDID will charge the polarization, which can then be converted to maps of the vector magnetic fields on the solar surface.

  11. Demonstration of multi-wavelength tunable fiber lasers based on a digital micromirror device processor.

    PubMed

    Ai, Qi; Chen, Xiao; Tian, Miao; Yan, Bin-bin; Zhang, Ying; Song, Fei-jun; Chen, Gen-xiang; Sang, Xin-zhu; Wang, Yi-quan; Xiao, Feng; Alameh, Kamal

    2015-02-01

    Based on a digital micromirror device (DMD) processor as the multi-wavelength narrow-band tunable filter, we demonstrate a multi-port tunable fiber laser through experiments. The key property of this laser is that any lasing wavelength channel from any arbitrary output port can be switched independently over the whole C-band, which is only driven by single DMD chip flexibly. All outputs display an excellent tuning capacity and high consistency in the whole C-band with a 0.02 nm linewidth, 0.055 nm wavelength tuning step, and side-mode suppression ratio greater than 60 dB. Due to the automatic power control and polarization design, the power uniformity of output lasers is less than 0.008 dB and the wavelength fluctuation is below 0.02 nm within 2 h at room temperature. PMID:25967765

  12. Tunable multi-wavelength fiber lasers based on an Opto-VLSI processor and optical amplifiers.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Feng; Alameh, Kamal; Lee, Yong Tak

    2009-12-01

    A multi-wavelength tunable fiber laser based on the use of an Opto-VLSI processor in conjunction with different optical amplifiers is proposed and experimentally demonstrated. The Opto-VLSI processor can simultaneously select any part of the gain spectrum from each optical amplifier into its associated fiber ring, leading to a multiport tunable fiber laser source. We experimentally demonstrate a 3-port tunable fiber laser source, where each output wavelength of each port can independently be tuned within the C-band with a wavelength step of about 0.05 nm. Experimental results demonstrate a laser linewidth as narrow as 0.05 nm and an optical side-mode-suppression-ratio (SMSR) of about 35 dB. The demonstrated three fiber lasers have excellent stability at room temperature and output power uniformity less than 0.5 dB over the whole C-band.

  13. Multi-wavelength Solar Flare Observations with Ground- and Space-based Observatories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleint, Lucia

    2016-07-01

    Solar flares affect a wide range of atmospheric heights from the corona to the photosphere. Solar instruments are generally designed for high-resolution observations in limited spectral windows and therefore only capture part of the flare. To obtain a more complete flare picture from coronal reconnection to the atmospheric response of the chromosphere and photosphere, it is necessary to combine data from multiple instruments. I will review multi-wavelength flare observations with ground- and space-based observatories. By taking the X1 flare on March 29, 2014 as an example, which was observed with an unprecedented number of telescopes, I will demonstrate how to investigate the origin of the flare by looking at a filament eruption, the chromospheric evaporation by means of spectroscopy, the flare heating by analyzing continuum emission, and the changes of chromospheric magnetic fields using polarimetric data.

  14. Development of Multi-Wavelength Raman Lidar and its Application on Aerosol and Cloud Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Dong; Wang, Yingjian; Wang, Zhenzhu; Tao, Zongming; Wu, Decheng; Wang, Bangxin; Zhong, Zhiqing; Xie, Chenbo

    2016-06-01

    A movable multi-wavelength Raman lidar (TMPRL) was built in Hefei, China. Emitting with three wavelengths at 1064, 532, and 355nm, receiving three above Mie scattering signals and two nitrogen Raman signals at 386 and 607nm, and depolarization signal at 532nm, TMPRL has the capacity to investigate the height resolved optical and microphysical properties of aerosol and cloud. The retrieval algorithms of optical parameters base on Mie-Raman technique and the microphysical parameters based on Bayesian optimization method were also developed and applied to observed lidar data. Designing to make unattended operation and 24/7 continuous working, TMPRL has joined several field campaigns to study on the aerosol, cloud and their interaction researches. Some observed results of aerosol and cloud optical properties and the first attempt to validate the vertical aerosol size distribution retrieved by TMPRL and in-situ measurement by airplane are presented and discussed.

  15. High channel count and high precision channel spacing multi-wavelength laser array for future PICs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Yuechun; Li, Simin; Chen, Xiangfei; Li, Lianyan; Li, Jingsi; Zhang, Tingting; Zheng, Jilin; Zhang, Yunshan; Tang, Song; Hou, Lianping; Marsh, John H.; Qiu, Bocang

    2014-12-01

    Multi-wavelength semiconductor laser arrays (MLAs) have wide applications in wavelength multiplexing division (WDM) networks. In spite of their tremendous potential, adoption of the MLA has been hampered by a number of issues, particularly wavelength precision and fabrication cost. In this paper, we report high channel count MLAs in which the wavelengths of each channel can be determined precisely through low-cost standard μm-level photolithography/holographic lithography and the reconstruction-equivalent-chirp (REC) technique. 60-wavelength MLAs with good wavelength spacing uniformity have been demonstrated experimentally, in which nearly 83% lasers are within a wavelength deviation of +/-0.20 nm, corresponding to a tolerance of +/-0.032 nm in the period pitch. As a result of employing the equivalent phase shift technique, the single longitudinal mode (SLM) yield is nearly 100%, while the theoretical yield of standard DFB lasers is only around 33.3%.

  16. Mass specific optical absorption coefficients of mineral dust components measured by a multi wavelength photoacoustic spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utry, N.; Ajtai, T.; Pintér, M.; Tombácz, E.; Illés, E.; Bozóki, Z.; Szabó, G.

    2014-09-01

    Mass specific optical absorption coefficients of various mineral dust components including silicate clays (illite, kaolin and bentonite), oxides (quartz, hematite and rutile), and carbonate (limestone) were determined at wavelengths of 1064, 532, 355 and 266 nm. These values were calculated from aerosol optical absorption coefficients measured by a multi-wavelength photoacoustic (PA) instrument, the mass concentration and the number size distribution of the generated aerosol samples as well as the size transfer functions of the measuring instruments. These results are expected to have considerable importance in global radiative forcing calculations. They can also serve as reference for validating calculated wavelength dependent imaginary parts (κ) of complex refractive indices which up to now have been typically deduced from bulk phase measurements by using indirect measurement methods. Accordingly, the presented comparison of the measured and calculated aerosol optical absorption spectra revealed the strong need for standardized sample preparation and measurement methodology in case of bulk phase measurements.

  17. Multi-wavelength measurements of aerosol optical absorption coefficients using a photoacoustic spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Qiang; Huang, Hong-Hua; Wang, Yao; Wang, Gui-Shi; Cao, Zhen-Song; Liu, Kun; Chen, Wei-Dong; Gao, Xiao-Ming

    2014-06-01

    The atmospheric aerosol absorption capacity is a critical parameter determining its direct and indirect effects on climate. Accurate measurement is highly desired for the study of the radiative budget of the Earth. A multi-wavelength (405 nm, 532 nm, 780 nm) aerosol absorption meter based on photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS) invovling a single cylindrical acoustic resonator is developed for measuring the aerosol optical absorption coefficients (OACs). A sensitivity of 1.3 Mm-1 (at 532 nm) is demonstrated. The aerosol absorption meter is successfully tested through measuring the OACs of atmospheric nigrosin and ambient aerosols in the suburbs of Hefei city. The absorption cross section and absorption Ångström exponent (AAE) for ambient aerosol are determined for characterizing the component of the ambient aerosol.

  18. Multi-wavelength pulse plethysmography for real-time drug delivery monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adhikari, Pratik; Magaña, Isidro B.; O'Neal, Patrick D.

    2014-02-01

    A novel multi-wavelength photoplethysmograph (PPG), previously utilized to quantify optically absorptive circulating gold nanoparticles, has demonstrated the potential to enhance therapeutic treatment predictability as pharmacokinetic metrics are provided throughout the intravenous delivery phase of quinine in real-time. This report demonstrates how the PPG could be used to assess the real-time bioavailability of other types of intravenously delivered optically-absorbing nanoparticles and drugs. The drug currently under investigation is anti-malarial quinine (absorption peak ~350 nm). We describe how the algorithm has been adapted to quantify the concentration of quinine in the pulsatile, circulating blood based on its extinction at three wavelengths (340, 660 and 940 nm). We show an example of the system collecting data representing the baseline, injection, and the clearance phases. An examination of the raw signal suggests that the system is well suited to sense the concentration of quinine in the therapeutic range (10mg/kg).

  19. The astrocosmic databases for multi-wavelength and cosmological properties of extragalactic sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vavilova, I. B.; Ivashchenko, G. Yu.; Babyk, Yu. V.; Sergijenko, O.; Dobrycheva, D. V.; Torbaniuk, O. O.; Vasylenko, A. A.; Pulatova, N. G.

    2015-12-01

    The article briefly describes the new specially-oriented Astro Space databases obtained with ground-based telescopes and space observatories. As a result, multi-wavelength spectral and physical properties of galaxies and galaxy clusters were analyzed in more details, particularly 1) to study the spectral properties of quasars and the distribution of matter in intergalactic scales using Lyman-alpha forest; 2) to study galaxies (including with active nuclei), especially for the formation of large-scale structures in the Universe and influence of the environment on the internal parameters of galaxies; 3) to estimate a visible and dark matter content in galaxy clusters and to test cosmological parameters and the evolution of matter in a wide range of age of the Universe.

  20. Yangbajing Astronomical Observatory of NAOC in Tibet: a good multi-wavelength site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jun-Jie

    2015-08-01

    Yangbajing Astronomical Station of National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Science (NAOC) is located in Yangbajing Tibet (90°31'50" E 30°06'38" N, 4300m ). It is the first professional observatory operated by NAOC for science project in Tibet. This station was established on August 17, 2011, which means that Tibet has its first astronomical observatory. There are one 3-meter in diameter submillimeter telescope CCOSMA and five 40-50 cm optical telescopes. This could lay a solid foundation for attracting more international cooperation on large telescope projects in Tibet in future. we have already tested the radio, millimeter/submillimeter and optical environment in Yangbajing. The result shows that Yangbajing station is a good desirable multi-wavelength astronomical observation site.

  1. Development of SAC-OCDMA in FSO with multi-wavelength laser source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moghaddasi, Majid; Mamdoohi, Ghazaleh; Muhammad Noor, Ahmad Shukri; Mahdi, Mohd Adzir; Ahmad Anas, Siti Barirah

    2015-12-01

    We propose and demonstrate a free space optical network, based on spectral amplitude coding optical code division multiple access (SAC-OCDMA) with a multi-wavelength laser source. A detailed theoretical analysis that represents the characteristics of SAC-OCDMA system was developed. In addition to the impact of turbulence, influences of several system noises such as optical beat interference (OBI), relative intensity noise, and receiver noises, have been studied. From the numerical results, it was found that the influence of OBI is more dominant, especially at higher received power. Two different codes, namely, modified quadratic congruence and modified double weight, are then compared with the latter which provides better performance. A transmission distance of 2.6 km with 10 users and an 8 cm aperture diameter is advisable whenever the turbulence is moderate. These results can be improved when a beam divergence smaller than 1 mrad is utilized.

  2. Demonstration of multi-wavelength tunable fiber lasers based on a digital micromirror device processor.

    PubMed

    Ai, Qi; Chen, Xiao; Tian, Miao; Yan, Bin-bin; Zhang, Ying; Song, Fei-jun; Chen, Gen-xiang; Sang, Xin-zhu; Wang, Yi-quan; Xiao, Feng; Alameh, Kamal

    2015-02-01

    Based on a digital micromirror device (DMD) processor as the multi-wavelength narrow-band tunable filter, we demonstrate a multi-port tunable fiber laser through experiments. The key property of this laser is that any lasing wavelength channel from any arbitrary output port can be switched independently over the whole C-band, which is only driven by single DMD chip flexibly. All outputs display an excellent tuning capacity and high consistency in the whole C-band with a 0.02 nm linewidth, 0.055 nm wavelength tuning step, and side-mode suppression ratio greater than 60 dB. Due to the automatic power control and polarization design, the power uniformity of output lasers is less than 0.008 dB and the wavelength fluctuation is below 0.02 nm within 2 h at room temperature.

  3. Multi-wavelength Observations of Fast Infrared Flares from V404 Cygni in 2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dallilar, Yigit; Casella, Piergiorgio; Marsh, Tom; Gandhi, Poshak; Fender, Rob; Littlefair, Stuart; Eikenberry, Steve; Garner, Alan; Stelter, Deno; Dhillon, Vik; Mooley, Kunal

    2016-07-01

    We used the fast photometry mode of our new Canarias InfraRed Camera Experiment (CIRCE) on the 10.4-meter Gran Telescopio Canarias to observe V404 Cyg, a stellar mass black hole binary, on June 25, 2015 during its 2015 outburst. CIRCE provided 10Hz sampling in the Ks-band (2.2 microns) In addition, we obtained simultaneous multi wavelength data from our collaborators: three GHz radio bands from the AMI telescope and three optical/UV bands (u', g', r') from ULTRACAM on the William Herschel 4.2-meter telescope. We identify fast (1-second) IR flares with optical counterparts of varying strength/color, which we argue arise from a relativistic jet outflow. These observations provide important constraints on the emission processes and physical conditions in the jet forming region in V404 Cygni. We will discuss these results as well as their implications for relativistic jet formation around stellar-mass black holes.

  4. Multi-wavelength Observations of Fast Infrared Flares from V404 Cygni in 2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eikenberry, Stephen S.; Dallilar, Yigit; Garner, Alan; Deno Stelter, R.; Gandhi, Poshak; Dhillon, Vik; Littlefair, Stuart; Marsh, Thomas; Fender, Rob P.; Mooley, Kunal

    2016-04-01

    We used the fast photometry mode of our new Canarias InfraRed Camera Experiment (CIRCE) on the 10.4-meter Gran Telescopio Canarias to observe V404 Cyg, a stellar mass black hole binary, on June 25, 2015 during its 2015 outburst. CIRCE provided 10Hz sampling in the Ks-band (2.2 microns) In addition, we obtained simultaneous multi wavelength data from our collaborators: three GHz radio bands from the AMI telescope and three optical/UV bands (u', g', r') from ULTRACAM on the William Herschel 4.2-meter telescope. We identify fast (1-second) IR flares with optical counterparts of varying strength/color, which we argue arise from a relativistic jet outflow. These observations provide important constraints on the emission processes and physical conditions in the jet forming region in V404 Cygni. We will discuss these results as well as their implications for relativistic jet formation around stellar-mass black holes.

  5. Direct writing of tunable multi-wavelength polymer lasers on a flexible substrate.

    PubMed

    Zhai, Tianrui; Wang, Yonglu; Chen, Li; Zhang, Xinping

    2015-08-01

    Tunable multi-wavelength polymer lasers based on two-dimensional distributed feedback structures are fabricated on a transparent flexible substrate using interference ablation. A scalene triangular lattice structure was designed to support stable tri-wavelength lasing emission and was achieved through multiple exposure processes. Three wavelengths were controlled by three periods of the compound cavity. Mode competition among different cavity modes was observed by changing the pump fluence. Both a redshift and blueshift of the laser wavelength could be achieved by bending the soft substrate. These results not only provide insight into the physical mechanisms behind co-cavity polymer lasers but also introduce new laser sources and laser designs for white light lasers. PMID:26138990

  6. Multi-wavelength Raman scattering of nanostructured Al-doped zinc oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Russo, V.; Ghidelli, M.; Gondoni, P.

    2014-02-21

    In this work we present a detailed Raman scattering investigation of zinc oxide and aluminum-doped zinc oxide (AZO) films characterized by a variety of nanoscale structures and morphologies and synthesized by pulsed laser deposition under different oxygen pressure conditions. The comparison of Raman spectra for pure ZnO and AZO films with similar morphology at the nano/mesoscale allows to investigate the relation between Raman features (peak or band positions, width, relative intensity) and material properties such as local structural order, stoichiometry, and doping. Moreover Raman measurements with three different excitation lines (532, 457, and 325 nm) point out a strong correlation between vibrational and electronic properties. This observation confirms the relevance of a multi-wavelength Raman investigation to obtain a complete structural characterization of advanced doped oxide materials.

  7. Aerosol Properties over Southeastern China from Multi-Wavelength Raman and Depolarization Lidar Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heese, Birgit; Althausen, Dietrich; Baars, Holger; Bohlmann, Stephanie; Deng, Ruru

    2016-06-01

    A dataset of particle optical properties of highly polluted urban aerosol over the Pearl River Delta, Guangzhou, China is presented. The data were derived from multi-wavelengths Raman and depolarization lidar PollyXT and AERONET sun photometer measurements. The measurement campaign was conducted from Nov 2011 to June 2012. High aerosol optical depth was observed in the polluted atmosphere over this megacity, with a mean value of 0.54 ± 0.33 and a peak value of even 1.9. For the particle characterization the lidar ratio and the linear particle depolarization ratio, both at 532 nm, were used. The mean values of these properties are 48.0 sr ± 10.7 sr for the lidar ratio and 4%+-4% for the particle depolarization ratio, which means most depolarization measurements stayed below 10%. So far, most of these results indicate urban pollution particles mixed with particles arisen from biomass and industrial burning.

  8. Multi-wavelength resonance Raman spectroscopy of bacteria to study the effects of growth condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunapareddy, Nagapratima; Grun, Jacob; Lunsford, Robert; Gillis, David; Nikitin, Sergei; Wang, Zheng

    2012-06-01

    We will examine the use of multi-wavelength UV resonance-Raman signatures to identify the effects of growth phase on different types of bacteria. Gram positive and gram-negative species, Escherichia coli, Bacillus cereus, Citrobacter koseri and Citrobacter braakii were grown to logarithmic and stationary phases in different culture media. Raman spectra of bacteria were obtained by sequential illumination of samples between 220 and 260 nm; a range which encompasses the resonance frequencies of cellular components. In addition to the information contained in the single spectrum, this two-dimensional signature contains information reflecting variations in resonance cross sections with illumination wavelength. Results of our algorithms in identifying the differences between these germs are discussed. Preliminary results indicate that growth affects the Raman signature, but not to an extent that would negate identification of the species.

  9. A semiconductor radiation imaging pixel detector for space radiation dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kroupa, Martin; Bahadori, Amir; Campbell-Ricketts, Thomas; Empl, Anton; Hoang, Son Minh; Idarraga-Munoz, John; Rios, Ryan; Semones, Edward; Stoffle, Nicholas; Tlustos, Lukas; Turecek, Daniel; Pinsky, Lawrence

    2015-07-01

    Progress in the development of high-performance semiconductor radiation imaging pixel detectors based on technologies developed for use in high-energy physics applications has enabled the development of a completely new generation of compact low-power active dosimeters and area monitors for use in space radiation environments. Such detectors can provide real-time information concerning radiation exposure, along with detailed analysis of the individual particles incident on the active medium. Recent results from the deployment of detectors based on the Timepix from the CERN-based Medipix2 Collaboration on the International Space Station (ISS) are reviewed, along with a glimpse of developments to come. Preliminary results from Orion MPCV Exploration Flight Test 1 are also presented.

  10. A semiconductor radiation imaging pixel detector for space radiation dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Kroupa, Martin; Bahadori, Amir; Campbell-Ricketts, Thomas; Empl, Anton; Hoang, Son Minh; Idarraga-Munoz, John; Rios, Ryan; Semones, Edward; Stoffle, Nicholas; Tlustos, Lukas; Turecek, Daniel; Pinsky, Lawrence

    2015-07-01

    Progress in the development of high-performance semiconductor radiation imaging pixel detectors based on technologies developed for use in high-energy physics applications has enabled the development of a completely new generation of compact low-power active dosimeters and area monitors for use in space radiation environments. Such detectors can provide real-time information concerning radiation exposure, along with detailed analysis of the individual particles incident on the active medium. Recent results from the deployment of detectors based on the Timepix from the CERN-based Medipix2 Collaboration on the International Space Station (ISS) are reviewed, along with a glimpse of developments to come. Preliminary results from Orion MPCV Exploration Flight Test 1 are also presented. PMID:26256630

  11. Imaging MAMA detector systems. [Multi-Anode Microchannel Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slater, David C.; Timothy, J. G.; Morgan, Jeffrey S.; Kasle, David B.

    1990-01-01

    Imaging multianode microchannel array (MAMA) detector systems with 1024 x 1024 pixel formats have been produced for visible and UV wavelengths; the UV types employ 'solar blind' photocathodes whose detective quantum efficiencies are significantly higher than those of currently available CCDs operating at far-UV and EUV wavelengths. Attention is presently given to the configurations and performance capabilities of state-of-the-art MAMA detectors, with a view to the development requirements of the hybrid electronic circuits needed for forthcoming spacecraft-sensor applications. Gain, dark noise, uniformity, and dynamic range performance data are presented for the curved-channel 'chevron', 'Z-plate', and helical-channel high gain microchannel plate configurations that are currently under evaluation with MAMA detector systems.

  12. Simulation and Comparison of Various Gamma-Ray Imaging Detector Configurations for IPRL Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Manini, H A

    2006-12-27

    Simulations are performed for seven different geometrical configurations of CdZnTe (CZT) detector arrays for Intelligent Personal Radiation Locator (IPRL) devices. IPRL devices are portable radiation detectors that have gamma-ray imaging capability. The detector performance is analyzed for each type of IPRL configuration, and the intrinsic photopeak efficiency, intrinsic photopeak count rate, detector image resolution, imaging efficiency, and imaging count rate are determined.

  13. Multi-wavelength access gate for WDM-formatted words in optical RAM row architectures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitsios, D.; Alexoudi, T.; Vagionas, C.; Miliou, A.; Kanellos, G. T.; Pleros, N.

    2013-03-01

    Optical RAM has emerged as a promising solution for overcoming the "Memory Wall" of electronics, indicating the use of light in RAM architectures as the approach towards enabling ps-regime memory access times. Taking a step further towards exploiting the unique wavelength properties of optical signals, we reveal new architectural perspectives in optical RAM structures by introducing WDM principles in the storage area. To this end, we demonstrate a novel SOAbased multi-wavelength Access Gate for utilization in a 4x4 WDM optical RAM bank architecture. The proposed multiwavelength Access Gate can simultaneously control random access to a 4-bit optical word, exploiting Cross-Gain-Modulation (XGM) to process 8 Bit and Bit channels encoded in 8 different wavelengths. It also suggests simpler optical RAM row architectures, allowing for the effective sharing of one multi-wavelength Access Gate for each row, substituting the eight AGs in the case of conventional optical RAM architectures. The scheme is shown to support 10Gbit/s operation for the incoming 4-bit data streams, with a power consumption of 15mW/Gbit/s. All 8 wavelength channels demonstrate error-free operation with a power penalty lower than 3 dB for all channels, compared to Back-to-Back measurements. The proposed optical RAM architecture reveals that exploiting the WDM capabilities of optical components can lead to RAM bank implementations with smarter column/row encoders/decoders, increased circuit simplicity, reduced number of active elements and associated power consumption. Moreover, exploitation of the wavelength entity can release significant potential towards reconfigurable optical cache mapping schemes when using the wavelength dimension for memory addressing.

  14. Probabilistic classification method on multi wavelength chromatographic data for photosynthetic pigments identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prilianti, K. R.; Setiawan, Y.; Indriatmoko, Adhiwibawa, M. A. S.; Limantara, L.; Brotosudarmo, T. H. P.

    2014-02-01

    Environmental and health problem caused by artificial colorant encourages the increasing usage of natural colorant nowadays. Natural colorant refers to the colorant that is derivate from living organism or minerals. Extensive research topic has been done to exploit these colorant, but recent data shows that only 0.5% of the wide range of plant pigments in the earth has been exhaustively used. Hence development of the pigment characterization technique is an important consideration. High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) is a widely used technique to separate pigments in a mixture and identify it. In former HPLC fingerprinting, pigment characterization was based on a single chromatogram from a fixed wavelength (one dimensional) and discard the information contained at other wavelength. Therefore, two dimensional fingerprints have been proposed to use more chromatographic information. Unfortunately this method leads to the data processing problem due to the size of its data matrix. The other common problem in the chromatogram analysis is the subjectivity of the researcher in recognizing the chromatogram pattern. In this research an automated analysis method of the multi wavelength chromatographic data was proposed. Principal component analysis (PCA) was used to compress the data matrix and Maximum Likelihood (ML) classification was applied to identify the chromatogram pattern of the existing pigments in a mixture. Three photosynthetic pigments were selected to show the proposed method. Those pigments are β-carotene, fucoxanthin and zeaxanthin. The result suggests that the method could well inform the existence of the pigments in a particular mixture. A simple computer application was also developed to facilitate real time analysis. Input of the application is multi wavelength chromatographic data matrix and the output is information about the existence of the three pigments.

  15. Multi-Wavelength Study of HD50896 (WN+C?) Origin of its Variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conti, Peter S.

    We propose to secure a further time sequence of SWP HIRES spectra of HD 50896 (WN5+c?) for the first time to be coordinated with simultaneous optical spectroscopy, photometry and polarimetry, and (possibly) ROSAT X-ray observations, in order to unambiguously determine the origin(s) of its known variability at these wavelengths. HD 50896 has been one of the more promising WR+n.s. candidate systems, baud an observations of a 3^d.7 periodicity of optical radial velocity and light variations. However, this scenario has been questioned through the lack of high levels of X-ray emission, and the long-term nature of its polarisation variability. Our previous TUB studies of the star have revealed UV P Cygni profile variability with 'event' tin and decay, and recurrence timescales of ~1 day, suggestive of an origin intrinsic to the WN5 wind, and possible caused by radiative-induced wind instabilities. There is no observed UV Hatchett & McCray effect seen in our IUE data. It is clear that HD 50896 is highly variable at all observed wavelengths; the variability character is highly epochdependent in all measurable variables; and it is potentially possible that different mechanism we responsible for the wavelength-dependent changes (binarity, single star rotation-surface inhomogenities, intrinsic wind instabilities). To date, there has been no coordinated multi-wavelength study of its variability. At the recent IAU Symposium held in Indonesia in June 1990 on WR star and interrelations with other massive stars is galaxies, a working group was established with the objective of securing simultaneous, multi-wavelength observations of HD 50896. It was agreed there that only through such a coordinated campaign could one hope to determine the true nature of this object. The present proposal is to provide the UV line profile variability component of this study, essential to the prosecution of the overall programme objective.

  16. Hybrid CMOS SiPIN detectors as astronomical imagers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simms, Lance Michael

    Charge Coupled Devices (CCDs) have dominated optical and x-ray astronomy since their inception in 1969. Only recently, through improvements in design and fabrication methods, have imagers that use Complimentary Metal Oxide Semiconductor (CMOS) technology gained ground on CCDs in scientific imaging. We are now in the midst of an era where astronomers might begin to design optical telescope cameras that employ CMOS imagers. The first three chapters of this dissertation are primarily composed of introductory material. In them, we discuss the potential advantages that CMOS imagers offer over CCDs in astronomical applications. We compare the two technologies in terms of the standard metrics used to evaluate and compare scientific imagers: dark current, read noise, linearity, etc. We also discuss novel features of CMOS devices and the benefits they offer to astronomy. In particular, we focus on a specific kind of hybrid CMOS sensor that uses Silicon PIN photodiodes to detect optical light in order to overcome deficiencies of commercial CMOS sensors. The remaining four chapters focus on a specific type of hybrid CMOS Silicon PIN sensor: the Teledyne Hybrid Visible Silicon PIN Imager (HyViSI). In chapters four and five, results from testing HyViSI detectors in the laboratory and at the Kitt Peak 2.1m telescope are presented. We present our laboratory measurements of the standard detector metrics for a number of HyViSI devices, ranging from 1k×1k to 4k×4k format. We also include a description of the SIDECAR readout circuit that was used to control the detectors. We then show how they performed at the telescope in terms of photometry, astrometry, variability measurement, and telescope focusing and guiding. Lastly, in the final two chapters we present results on detector artifacts such as pixel crosstalk, electronic crosstalk, and image persistence. One form of pixel crosstalk that has not been discussed elsewhere in the literature, which we refer to as Interpixel Charge

  17. New techniques for imaging photon-counting and particle detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapington, Jonathan Stephen

    Since the advent of space-based astronomy in the early 1960's, there has been a need for space-qualified detectors with sufficient sensitivity and resolution to detect and image single photons, ions or electrons. This thesis describes a research programme to develop detectors that fulfil these requirements. I begin by describing the role of detectors in space astronomy and follow with a review of detector technologies, with particular emphasis on imaging techniques. Conductive charge division image readouts offer high performance, simplicity, and flexibility and their potential is investigated in both theory and practice. I introduce the basic design concept and discuss the fundamental factors limiting performance in relation to physical design and to underlying physical processes. Readout manufacturing techniques are reviewed and a novel method presented. I describe specific space and ground-based readout applications which proved valuable in teaching lessons and raising questions. These questions initiated an experimental programme, whose goals were to understand limiting physical processes and find techniques to overcome them. Results are presented, and the innovation of the progressive geometry readout technique, which this programme also spawned, is described. Progressive geometry readout devices, such as the Vernier anode, offer dramatically improved performance and have been successfully flight-proven. I describe the development of a Vernier readout for the J-PEX sounding rocket experiment, and discuss the instrument calibration and the flight programme. First investigations into a next generation of charge division readout design are presented. These devices will use charge comparison instead of amplitude measurement to further enhance resolution and count rate capability. In conclusion, I summarize the advances made during the course of this research, and discuss ongoing technological developments and further work which will enable MCP detectors to

  18. Evaluation of cassette-based digital radiography detectors using standardized image quality metrics: AAPM TG-150 Draft Image Detector Tests.

    PubMed

    Li, Guang; Greene, Travis C; Nishino, Thomas K; Willis, Charles E

    2016-09-08

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate several of the standardized image quality metrics proposed by the American Association of Physics in Medicine (AAPM) Task Group 150. The task group suggested region-of-interest (ROI)-based techniques to measure nonuniformity, minimum signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), number of anomalous pixels, and modulation transfer function (MTF). This study evaluated the effects of ROI size and layout on the image metrics by using four different ROI sets, assessed result uncertainty by repeating measurements, and compared results with two commercially available quality control tools, namely the Carestream DIRECTVIEW Total Quality Tool (TQT) and the GE Healthcare Quality Assurance Process (QAP). Seven Carestream DRX-1C (CsI) detectors on mobile DR systems and four GE FlashPad detectors in radiographic rooms were tested. Images were analyzed using MATLAB software that had been previously validated and reported. Our values for signal and SNR nonuniformity and MTF agree with values published by other investigators. Our results show that ROI size affects nonuniformity and minimum SNR measurements, but not detection of anomalous pixels. Exposure geometry affects all tested image metrics except for the MTF. TG-150 metrics in general agree with the TQT, but agree with the QAP only for local and global signal nonuniformity. The difference in SNR nonuniformity and MTF values between the TG-150 and QAP may be explained by differences in the calculation of noise and acquisition beam quality, respectively. TG-150's SNR nonuniformity metrics are also more sensitive to detector nonuniformity compared to the QAP. Our results suggest that fixed ROI size should be used for consistency because nonuniformity metrics depend on ROI size. Ideally, detector tests should be performed at the exact calibration position. If not feasible, a baseline should be established from the mean of several repeated measurements. Our study indicates that the TG-150 tests can be

  19. Evaluation of cassette-based digital radiography detectors using standardized image quality metrics: AAPM TG-150 Draft Image Detector Tests.

    PubMed

    Li, Guang; Greene, Travis C; Nishino, Thomas K; Willis, Charles E

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate several of the standardized image quality metrics proposed by the American Association of Physics in Medicine (AAPM) Task Group 150. The task group suggested region-of-interest (ROI)-based techniques to measure nonuniformity, minimum signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), number of anomalous pixels, and modulation transfer function (MTF). This study evaluated the effects of ROI size and layout on the image metrics by using four different ROI sets, assessed result uncertainty by repeating measurements, and compared results with two commercially available quality control tools, namely the Carestream DIRECTVIEW Total Quality Tool (TQT) and the GE Healthcare Quality Assurance Process (QAP). Seven Carestream DRX-1C (CsI) detectors on mobile DR systems and four GE FlashPad detectors in radiographic rooms were tested. Images were analyzed using MATLAB software that had been previously validated and reported. Our values for signal and SNR nonuniformity and MTF agree with values published by other investigators. Our results show that ROI size affects nonuniformity and minimum SNR measurements, but not detection of anomalous pixels. Exposure geometry affects all tested image metrics except for the MTF. TG-150 metrics in general agree with the TQT, but agree with the QAP only for local and global signal nonuniformity. The difference in SNR nonuniformity and MTF values between the TG-150 and QAP may be explained by differences in the calculation of noise and acquisition beam quality, respectively. TG-150's SNR nonuniformity metrics are also more sensitive to detector nonuniformity compared to the QAP. Our results suggest that fixed ROI size should be used for consistency because nonuniformity metrics depend on ROI size. Ideally, detector tests should be performed at the exact calibration position. If not feasible, a baseline should be established from the mean of several repeated measurements. Our study indicates that the TG-150 tests can be

  20. Terahertz detectors for long wavelength multi-spectral imaging.

    SciTech Connect

    Lyo, Sungkwun Kenneth; Wanke, Michael Clement; Reno, John Louis; Shaner, Eric Arthur; Grine, Albert D.

    2007-10-01

    The purpose of this work was to develop a wavelength tunable detector for Terahertz spectroscopy and imaging. Our approach was to utilize plasmons in the channel of a specially designed field-effect transistor called the grating-gate detector. Grating-gate detectors exhibit narrow-linewidth, broad spectral tunability through application of a gate bias, and no angular dependence in their photoresponse. As such, if suitable sensitivity can be attained, they are viable candidates for Terahertz multi-spectral focal plane arrays. When this work began, grating-gate gate detectors, while having many promising characteristics, had a noise-equivalent power (NEP) of only 10{sup -5} W/{radical}Hz. Over the duration of this project, we have obtained a true NEP of 10{sup -8} W/{radical}Hz and a scaled NEP of 10{sup -9}W/{radical}Hz. The ultimate goal for these detectors is to reach a NEP in the 10{sup -9{yields}-10}W/{radical}Hz range; we have not yet seen a roadblock to continued improvement.

  1. Cd1-xZnxTe detector imaging array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butler, Jack F.; Friesenhahn, Stan J.; Lingren, Clinton L.; Apotovsky, Boris A.; Doty, F. P.; Ashburn, William L.; Dillon, William P.

    1993-09-01

    A prototype portable gamma ray camera using 32 X 32 channels was developed. An experimental 3 X 3 sub-array of 5 mm X 5 mm CZT detectors was fabricated for use in system checkout and to investigate the applicability of CZT imaging arrays to nuclear medical imaging. Experiments were carried out to make a direct comparison of the imaging capabilities of the CZT sub-array with a state-of-the-art Anger camera. In a linespread study using a Tc-99m source embedded in a tissue equivalent absorber, contrasts of 9.5 for the CZT array and 3.4 for the Anger camera were observed. In a dynamic imaging experiment, the CZT imager appeared to have comparable resolution to and be somewhat more regular than the Anger camera.

  2. Multi-wavelength studies of Saturn's rings to constrain ring particle properties and ring structure: the VIMS perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filacchione, G.; Capaccioni, F.; Ciarniello, M.; Nicholson, P. D.; Hedmann, M. M.; Clark, R. N.; Cerroni, P.; Spilker, L. J.; Colwell, J.; Bradley, T.

    2012-04-01

    Saturn has the most prominent and complex ring system in our solar system, extending along radial axis from 74658 km (inner C ring edge) to 136780 km (outer A). The physical and dynamical properties of ring particles can be fully understood only using a broad spectral range, which allow us to recognize very different processes. In this context, the scientific goal of our investigation is the study of Saturn's rings particle properties using combined datasets returned from different instruments aboard the Cassini mission. We are merging rings observations and compare results collected by Cassini's UV Imaging Spectrometer (UVIS), Imaging Science Subsystem (ISS), Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) and Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS). Merging multi-wavelength data sets allow us to test different thermal models, combining the effects of particle albedo, regolith composition, grain size and thermal properties with the ring structure. In this work we report about the VIMS contributions to this investigation, coming from the analysis of 0.35-5.1 µm spectra of A, B, C rings and Cassini Division. VIMS, in fact, has the capabilities to determine ring particles composition (water ice vs. chromophores mixed within ice), surface regolith grain size and particle albedo. After having described the dataset considered in this work (several rings radial mosaics taken at 12° ≤ phase ≤ 136° and -21° ≤ opening angle ≤ +5°) and the method to reduce data to spectrograms, we explain how the spectral indicators we have selected (slopes and band parameters) allow us to infer ring particle properties across different regions. Specifically, we report about: 1) the variations induced by illumination phase on visible reddening and water ice bands depth; 2) the average composition and regolith grain size of ring particles in A, B, C rings and CD; 3) an application of Hapke's model to compare VIMS data with synthetic spectra.

  3. The RoF-WDM-PON for Wireless and Wire Layout with Multi-wavelength Fiber Laser and Carrier Reusing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Wei; Zheng, Zhuowen

    2013-09-01

    In this paper, we design a WDM-RoF-PON based on multi-wavelength fiber laser and CSRZ-DPSK, which can achieve wire-line and wireless access synchronously without any RF source in ONU. The multi-wavelength fiber laser is the union light source of WDM-PON. By the RSOA and downstream light source reusing, the ONU can also omit laser source and makes the WDM-PON to be colorless. The networking has the credible transmission property, including wireless access and fiber transmission. The networking also has excellent covering range.

  4. Mode switching in a multi-wavelength distributed feedback quantum cascade laser using an external micro-cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Sidler, Meinrad; Rauter, Patrick; Blanchard, Romain; Métivier, Pauline; Capasso, Federico; Mansuripur, Tobias S.; Wang, Christine; Huang, Yong; Ryou, Jae-Hyun; Dupuis, Russell D.; Faist, Jérôme

    2014-02-03

    We demonstrate a multi-wavelength distributed feedback (DFB) quantum cascade laser (QCL) operating in a lensless external micro-cavity and achieve switchable single-mode emission at three distinct wavelengths selected by the DFB grating, each with a side-mode suppression ratio larger than 30 dB. Discrete wavelength tuning is achieved by modulating the feedback experienced by each mode of the multi-wavelength DFB QCL, resulting from a variation of the external cavity length. This method also provides a post-fabrication control of the lasing modes to correct for fabrication inhomogeneities, in particular, related to the cleaved facets position.

  5. Data acquisition for a medical imaging MWPC detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKee, B. T. A.; Harvey, P. J.; MacPhail, J. D.

    1991-12-01

    Multiwire proportional chambers, combined with drilled Pb converter stacks, are used as position sensitive gamma-ray detectors for medical imaging at Queen's University. This paper describes novel features of the address readout and data acquisition system. To obtain the interaction position, induced charges from wires in each cathode plane are combined using a three-level encoding scheme into 16 channels for amplification and discrimination, and then decoded within 150 ns using a lookup table in a 64 Kbyte EPROM. A custom interface card in an AT-class personal computer provides handshaking, rate buffering, and diagnostic capabilities for the detector data. Real-time software controls the data transfer and provides extensive monitor and control functions. The data are then transferred through an Ethernet link to a workstation for subsequent image analysis.

  6. Power detectors for integrated microwave/mm-wave imaging systems in mainstream silicon technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Qun Jane; Li, James C.; Tang, Adrian

    2016-04-01

    This paper analyzes and compares three different types of detectors, including CMOS power detectors, bipolar power detectors, and super-regenerative detectors, deployed in the literature for integrated microwave/mm-wave imaging systems in mainstream silicon technologies. Each detector has unique working mechanism and demonstrates different behavior with respects to bias conditions, input signal power, as well as bandwidth responses. Two Figure-of-Merits for both wideband and narrowband imaging have been defined to quantify the detector performance comparison. CMOS and Bipolar detectors are good for passive imaging, while super regenerative detectors are superior for active imaging. The analytical results have been verified by both simulation and measurement results. These analyses intend to provide design insights and guidance for integrated microwave/mm-wave imaging power detectors.

  7. Construction and testing of the SLD Cerenkov ring imaging detector

    SciTech Connect

    Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Coyle, P.; Coyne, D.; Gagnon, P.; Williams, D.A. . Inst. for Particle Physics); Zucchelli, P. . Ist. di Fisica); Jacques, P.; Piano, R.; Stamer, P. . Serin Physics Lab.); Whitaker, J.S.; Wilson, R.J. . Dept. of Physics); Bean, A.; Caldwell, D.; Duboscq, J.; Huber, J.; Lu, A.; Mathys, L.; HcHugh, S.; Morrison, R.; Witherell, M.; Yellin, S. . Dept. of Physics); Antiligus, P.; Aston, D.; Bienz, T.; Bird, F.; Dosu, S.; Dunwoodie, W.; Hallewell, B.; Kawahara, H.; Kwon, Y.; Leith, D.; Muller, D.; Nagamine, T.; Pavel, T.; Ratcliff, B.; Rensing, P.; Schultz, D.; Shapiro, S.; Simopoulos, C.; Solodov, E.; Toge, N.; Valvre, J.; Williams, S. ); Abe, K.; Hasegawa, K.; Suekane, F.; Yuta, H. . Dept. of Physics)

    1990-06-01

    The authors report on the construction of the Cherenkov Ring Imaging Detector (CRID) for the SLD experiment at the SLAC Linear Collider and the testing of its components. The authors include results from testing the drift boxes, liquid radiator trays, and mirrors for the barrel CRID. The authors also discuss development of the support systems essential for the operation of the CRID: gas and liquid recirculator systems and monitoring.

  8. SLAC Large Detector (SLD) Image and Event Display Collections

    DOE Data Explorer

    Perl, Joseph; Cowan, Ray; Johnson, Tony

    The SLD makes use of the unique capabilities of the Stanford Linear Collider (SLC) to perform studies of polarized Z particles produced in collisions between electrons and positrons. The SLD Event Display Collection shows computer generated pictures of a number of Z particle decays as reconstructed by the SLD detector. More than 90 images, each in several formats, captured from 1991 - 1996 events, are archived here. There are also figures and data plots available.

  9. Construction and testing of the SLD Cerenkov Ring Imaging Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Coyle, P.; Coyne, D.; Gagnon, P.; Williams, D.A.; Zucchelli, P. . Inst. for Particle Physics); Whitaker, J.S.; Wilson, R.J. . Dept. of Physics); Bean, A.; Caldwell, D.; Duboscq, J.; Huber, J.; Lu, A.; Mathys, L.; McHugh, S.; Morrison, R.; Witherell, M.; Yellin, S. . Dept. of Physics); Johns

    1990-01-01

    We report on the construction of the Cerenkov Ring Imaging Detector (CRID) for the SLD experiment at the SLAC Linear Collider and the testing of its components. We include results from testing the drift boxes, liquid radiator trays, and mirrors for the barrel CRID. We also discuss development of the support systems essential for the operation of the CRID: gas and liquid recirculator systems and monitoring. 15 refs., 9 figs.

  10. A multi-wavelength scattered light analysis of the dust grain population in the GG Tau circumbinary ring

    SciTech Connect

    Duchene, G; McCabe, C; Ghez, A; Macintosh, B

    2004-02-04

    We present the first 3.8 {micro}m image of the dusty ring surrounding the young binary system GG Tau, obtained with the W. M. Keck II 10m telescope's adaptive optics system. THis is the longest wavelength at which the ring has been detected in scattered light so far, allowing a multi-wavelength analysis of the scattering proiperties of the dust grains present in this protoplanetary disk in combination with previous, shorter wavelengths, HST images. We find that the scattering phase function of the dust grains in the disk is only weakly dependent on the wavelength. This is inconsistent with dust models inferred from observations of the interstellar medium or dense molecular clouds. In particular, the strongly forward-throwing scattering phase function observed at 3.8 {micro}m implies a significant increase in the population of large ({approx}> 1 {micro}m) grains, which provides direct evidence for grain growth in the ring. However, the grain size distribution required to match the 3.8 {micro}m image of the ring is incompatible with its published 1 {micro}m polarization map, implying that the dust population is not uniform throughout the ring. We also show that our 3.8 {micro}m image of the ring is incompatible with its published 1 {micro}m polarization map, implying that the dust population is not uniform throughout the ring. We also show that our 3.8 {micro}m scattered light image probes a deeper layer of the ring than previous shorter wavelength images, as demonstrated by a shift in the location of the inner edge of the disk's scattered light distribution between 1 and 3.8 {micro}m. We therefore propose a stratified structure for the ring in which the surface layers, located {approx} 50 AU above the ring midplane, contain dust grains that are very similar to those found in dense molecular clouds, while the region of the ring located {approx} 25 AU from the midplane contains significantly larger grains. This stratified structure is likely the result of vertical

  11. Hybrid Pixel Detectors for gamma/X-ray imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatzistratis, D.; Theodoratos, G.; Zografos, V.; Kazas, I.; Loukas, D.; Lambropoulos, C. P.

    2015-09-01

    Hybrid pixel detectors are made by direct converting high-Z semi-insulating single crystalline material coupled to complementary-metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) readout electronics. They are attractive because direct conversion exterminates all the problems of spatial localization related to light diffusion, energy resolution, is far superior from the combination of scintillation crystals and photomultipliers and lithography can be used to pattern electrodes with very fine pitch. We are developing 2-D pixel CMOS ASICs, connect them to pixilated CdTe crystals with the flip chip and bump bonding method and characterize the hybrids. We have designed a series of circuits, whose latest member consists of a 50×25 pixel array with 400um pitch and an embedded controller. In every pixel a full spectroscopic channel with time tagging information has been implemented. The detectors are targeting Compton scatter imaging and they can be used for coded aperture imaging too. Hybridization using CMOS can overcome the limit put on pixel circuit complexity by the use of thin film transistors (TFT) in large flat panels. Hybrid active pixel sensors are used in dental imaging and other applications (e.g. industrial CT etc.). Thus X-ray imaging can benefit from the work done on dynamic range enhancement methods developed initially for visible and infrared CMOS pixel sensors. A 2-D CMOS ASIC with 100um pixel pitch to demonstrate the feasibility of such methods in the context of X-ray imaging has been designed.

  12. Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectroscopy and Energy-Resolving Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eisenhauer, Frank; Raab, Walfried

    2015-08-01

    Imaging spectroscopy has seen rapid progress over the past 25 years, leading to breakthroughs in many fields of astronomy that would not have been otherwise possible. This review overviews the visible/infrared imaging spectroscopy techniques as well as energy-resolving detectors. We introduce the working principle of scanning Fabry-Perot and Fourier transform spectrometers and explain the most common integral field concepts based on mirror slicers, lenslet arrays, and fibers. The main advantage of integral field spectrographs is the simultaneous measurement of spatial and spectral information. Although Fabry-Perot and Fourier transform spectrometers can provide a larger field of view, it is ultimately the higher sensitivity of integral field units that make them the technique of choice. This is arguably the case for image slicers, which make the most efficient use of the available detector pixels and have equal or higher transmission than lenslet arrays and fiber integral field units, respectively. We also address the more specific issues of large étendue operation, focal ratio degradation, anamorphic magnification, and diffraction-limited operation. This review also covers the emerging technology of energy-resolving detectors, which promise very simple and efficient instrument designs. These energy-resolving detectors are based on superconducting thin film technology and exploit either the very small superconducting energy to count the number of quasi-particles excited in the absorption of the photon or the extremely steep phase transition between the normal- and superconducting phase to measure a temperature increase. We have put special emphasis on an overview of the underlying physical phenomena as well as on the recent technological progress and astronomical path finder experiments.

  13. Dynamic flat panel detector versus image intensifier in cardiac imaging: dose and image quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vano, E.; Geiger, B.; Schreiner, A.; Back, C.; Beissel, J.

    2005-12-01

    The practical aspects of the dosimetric and imaging performance of a digital x-ray system for cardiology procedures were evaluated. The system was configured with an image intensifier (II) and later upgraded to a dynamic flat panel detector (FD). Entrance surface air kerma (ESAK) to phantoms of 16, 20, 24 and 28 cm of polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) and the image quality of a test object were measured. Images were evaluated directly on the monitor and with numerical methods (noise and signal-to-noise ratio). Information contained in the DICOM header for dosimetry audit purposes was also tested. ESAK values per frame (or kerma rate) for the most commonly used cine and fluoroscopy modes for different PMMA thicknesses and for field sizes of 17 and 23 cm for II, and 20 and 25 cm for FD, produced similar results in the evaluated system with both technologies, ranging between 19 and 589 µGy/frame (cine) and 5 and 95 mGy min-1 (fluoroscopy). Image quality for these dose settings was better for the FD version. The 'study dosimetric report' is comprehensive, and its numerical content is sufficiently accurate. There is potential in the future to set those systems with dynamic FD to lower doses than are possible in the current II versions, especially for digital cine runs, or to benefit from improved image quality.

  14. A MULTI-WAVELENGTH POLARIMETRIC STUDY OF THE BLAZAR CTA 102 DURING A GAMMA-RAY FLARE IN 2012

    SciTech Connect

    Casadio, Carolina; Gómez, José L.; Agudo, Iván; Molina, Sol N.; Jorstad, Svetlana G.; Marscher, Alan P.; Bala, Vishal; Joshi, Manasvita; Taylor, Brian; Williamson, Karen E.; Larionov, Valeri M.; Blinov, Dmitry A.; Grishina, Tatiana S.; Hagen-Thorn, Vladimir A.; Smith, Paul S.; Gurwell, Mark A.; Lähteenmäki, Anne; Arkharov, Arkady A.; Borman, George A.; Paola, Andrea Di; and others

    2015-11-01

    We perform a multi-wavelength polarimetric study of the quasar CTA 102 during an extraordinarily bright γ-ray outburst detected by the Fermi Large Area Telescope in 2012 September–October when the source reached a flux of F{sub >100} {sub MeV} = 5.2 ± 0.4 × 10{sup −6} photons cm{sup −2} s{sup −1}. At the same time, the source displayed an unprecedented optical and near-infrared (near-IR) outburst. We study the evolution of the parsec-scale jet with ultra-high angular resolution through a sequence of 80 total and polarized intensity Very Long Baseline Array images at 43 GHz, covering the observing period from 2007 June to 2014 June. We find that the γ-ray outburst is coincident with flares at all the other frequencies and is related to the passage of a new superluminal knot through the radio core. The powerful γ-ray emission is associated with a change in direction of the jet, which became oriented more closely to our line of sight (θ ∼ 1.°2) during the ejection of the knot and the γ-ray outburst. During the flare, the optical polarized emission displays intra-day variability and a clear clockwise rotation of electric vector position angles (EVPAs), which we associate with the path followed by the knot as it moves along helical magnetic field lines, although a random walk of the EVPA caused by a turbulent magnetic field cannot be ruled out. We locate the γ-ray outburst a short distance downstream of the radio core, parsecs from the black hole. This suggests that synchrotron self-Compton scattering of NIR to ultraviolet photons is the probable mechanism for the γ-ray production.

  15. Space and ground-based multi-wavelength observing campaign of Jupiter's aurora and the Io Plasma Torus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Branduardi-Raymont, G.; Yoshikawa, I.; Badman, S.

    2013-09-01

    The EXCEED EUV spectrograph (55 - 145 nm) on-board the Japanese mission Sprint-A, due for launch into low Earth orbit in August 2013, will be dedicated to the study of the tenuous plasma surrounding planets in our solar system. A target of special interest will be Jupiter and its environment, and the emission from the Io Plasma Torus (IPT) in particular. A systematic campaign of observations of Jupiter and the IPT is planned over the period Oct. 2013 - March 2014. This is a unique opportunity to explore the possible links between the IPT emission distribution, the strength and character of Jupiter's auroral emissions and the conditions of the solar wind. Hence, concurrently with the EXCEED observations, a large multi-wavelength campaign has been organised to exploit this unique opportunity of gathering important diagnostic data on the complex array of physical processes taking place in Jupiter's environment. This campaign includes (this is by no means a complete list) approved FUV imaging and spectroscopy of Jupiter's Northern aurora with HSTSTIS (PI: Sarah Badman), Kitt Peak 4m visible spectroscopy of the IPT (PI: Sarah Badman), Gemini observations of Jupiter H3+ (4 µm) aurora (PI: Melin), submitted proposals for HST-STIS FUV observations of Jupiter's Southern aurora, Io and Ganymede's footprints (PI: Bonfond), Chandra and XMM-Newton pointings of Jupiter and the IPT (PI: Kraft), Suzaku observations of diffuse X-rays from the Jovian inner magnetosphere (PI: Ezoe); in addition, ground based observations with IRTF, Subaru and other facilities are planned. This talk will review the motivation for this vaste coordinated observing campaign, and the science that we expect to draw from it: essentially a better understanding of how the Jupiter's system works.

  16. Experimental tests of a hybrid pixellated detector for gamma imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gal, O.; Mikulec, B.; Million, M.

    2001-03-01

    In the framework of the MEDIPIX Collaboration, a hybrid pixel detector has been developed primarily for X-ray radiography. This detector consists of a 64×64 pixel photon counting chip (PCC), bump bonded to a 200 μm thick GaAs substrate. The PCC is optimised for energy depositions in the range of a few keV to a few tens of keV. The aim of this study is to evaluate the detector for applications in decommissioning of nuclear power plants where typical sources have energies in range of a few hundred keV. Tests were realised using a 137Cs gamma source (660 keV). At this energy, Monte-Carlo simulations predict that, on average, for more than 60% of primary interactions, there is at least one pixel on which the deposited energy exceeds 100 keV. Simulations also allow modelling of the spatial energy spreading. The comparison of the simulation results with experimental data should indicate if there is a significant contribution of electrical cross-coupling between pixels to the cluster size of the detected hits. The results obtained demonstrate promising perspectives for this kind of detector towards gamma imaging applications.

  17. Virtual Sky Surveys and Multi-wavelength Investigations of Galaxy Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nord, Brian D.

    2010-12-01

    The advent of large and overlapping sky surveys brings promise of a new era in the study of galaxy clusters and dark energy. Clusters have been used for decades as faithful buoys of space-time, tracing cosmic evolution through their matter content and spatial distribution. High-fidelity tracking relies on a robust connection between observable cluster signatures and the underlying dark matter content, which is otherwise invisible. Until now, clusters have been mostly viewed through independent signals in distinct wavebands. The next era of cluster cosmology may be led by multi-variate, cross-waveband detections and analyses of clusters, where different facets of clusters can be cross-correlated to develop a more complete, unified picture of cluster populations. To these ends, in this dissertation, I perform multi-variate analyses of galaxy cluster populations and develop a simulated sky survey, with which to prepare for the next generation of multi-wavelength cluster observations. First, in a new multi-variate framework, I quantify the effects of observational biases on measures of the cluster distribution function and on cosmological constraints derived from X-ray cluster populations. I also demonstrate the indispensability of the multi-variate approach in measuring the evolution of X-ray galaxy clusters; without it, we find that the combination of scatter, intrinsic correlation and irrevocable survey flux limits substantially confuses any measure of redshift evolution. Next, I construct the Millennium Gas Simulation-Virtual Sky Survey (MGSVSS), a multi-wavelength mock sky derived from an N-body gas-dynamic simulation. The MGSVSS contains both sub-mm and optical wavelength sky signals to redshift, z = 1., in a 5 x 5deg2 field of view, with O (103) halos, O (104) optically selected clusters, and O (102) clusters selected via the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) signature. The SZ sky also includes a minimal level of sky and instrumental noise, which nearly mimics that of

  18. Multi-wavelength Radio Continuum Emission Studies of Dust-free Red Giants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Gorman, Eamon; Harper, Graham M.; Brown, Alexander; Dranke, Stephen; Richards, Anita M. S.

    2013-01-01

    Multi-wavelength centimeter continuum observations of non-dusty, non-pulsating K spectral-type red giants directly sample their chromospheres and wind acceleration zones. Such stars are feeble emitters at these wavelengths, however, and previous observations have provided only a small number of modest signal-to-noise measurements slowly accumulated over three decades. We present multi-wavelength Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array thermal continuum observations of the wind acceleration zones of two dust-free red giants, Arcturus (alpha Boo: K2 III) and Aldebaran (alpha Tau: K5 III). Importantly, most of our observations of each star were carried out over just a few days, so that we obtained a snapshot of the different stellar atmospheric layers sampled at different wavelengths, independent of any long-term variability. We report the first detections at several wavelengths for each star including a detection at 10 cm (3.0 GHz: S band) for both stars and a 20 cm (1.5 GHz: L band) detection for alpha Boo. This is the first time single (non-binary) luminosity class III red giants have been detected at these continuum wavelengths. Our long-wavelength data sample the outer layers of alpha Boo's atmosphere where its wind velocity is approaching (or possibly has reached) its terminal value and the ionization balance is becoming frozen-in. For alpha Tau, however, our long-wavelength data are still sampling its inner atmosphere, where the wind is still accelerating probably due to its lower mass-loss rate. We compare our data with published semi-empirical models based on ultraviolet data, and the marked deviations highlight the need for new atmospheric models to be developed. Spectral indices are used to discuss the possible properties of the stellar atmospheres, and we find evidence for a rapidly cooling wind in the case of alpha Boo. Finally, we develop a simple analytical wind model for alpha Boo based on our new long-wavelength flux measurements.

  19. Multi-wavelength aerosol light absorption measurements in the Amazon rainforest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saturno, Jorge; Chi, Xuguang; Pöhlker, Christopher; Morán, Daniel; Ditas, Florian; Massabò, Dario; Prati, Paolo; Rizzo, Luciana; Artaxo, Paulo; Andreae, Meinrat

    2015-04-01

    The most important light-absorbing aerosol is black carbon (BC), which is emitted by incomplete combustion of fossil fuels and biomass. BC is considered the second anthropogenic contributor to global warming. Beyond BC, other aerosols like some organics, dust, and primary biological aerosol particles are able to absorb radiation. In contrast to BC, the light absorption coefficient of these aerosols is wavelength dependent. Therefore, multi-wavelength measurements become important in environments where BC is not the predominant light-absorbing aerosol like in the Amazon. The Amazon Tall Tower Observatory (ATTO) site is located in the remote Amazon rainforest, one of the most pristine continental sites in the world during the wet season. In the dry season, winds coming from the southern hemisphere are loaded with biomass burning aerosol particles originated by farming-related deforestation. BC and aerosol number concentration data from the last two years indicate this is the most polluted period. Two different techniques have been implemented to measure the light absorption at different wavelengths; one of them is the 7-wavelengths Aethalometer, model AE30, an instrument that measures the light attenuation on a filter substrate and requires multiple scattering and filter-loading corrections to retrieve the light absorption coefficient. The other method is an offline technique, the Multi-Wavelength Absorbance Analysis (MWAA), which is able to measure reflectance and absorbance by aerosols collected on a filter and, by means of a radiative model, can retrieve the light absorption coefficient. Filters collected during May-September 2014, comprehending wet-to-dry transition and most of the dry season, were analyzed. The results indicate that the Absorption Ångström Exponent (AAE), a parameter that is directly proportional to the wavelength dependence of the aerosol light absorption, is close to 1.0 during the transition period and slightly decreases in the beginning of

  20. Multi-wavelength observations of pulsar wind nebulae and composite supernova remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Temim, Tea

    Multi-wavelength studies of pulsar wind nebulae (PWNe) and supernova remnants (SNRs) lead to a better understanding of their evolutionary development, the interaction of supernovae (SNe) and pulsar winds with their surroundings, and nucleosynthesis and production and processing of dust grains by SNe. PWNe and composite supernova remnants, in particular, are unique laboratories for the study of the energetic pulsar winds, particle injection processes, and the impact of PWNe on the evolving SNR. They provide information on SNR shock properties, densities and temperatures, and the chemical composition and the ionization state of the material ejected by SNe. SNRs also serve as laboratories for the study of dust production and processing in SNe. While X-ray observations yield important information about the SN progenitor, hot gas properties, SN explosion energy, and the surrounding interstellar medium (ISM), the IR can provide crucial information about the faint non-thermal emission, continuum emission from dust, and forbidden line emission from SN ejecta. Combining observations at a wide range of wavelengths provides a more complete picture of the SNR development and helps better constrain current models describing a SNR's evolution and its impact on the surrounding medium. This thesis focuses on a multi-wavelength study of PWNe in various stages of their evolution and investigates their interaction with the expanding SN ejecta and dust and the SNR reverse shock. The study of these interactions can provide important information on the SNR properties that may otherwise be unobservable. The work in this thesis has been carried out under the supervision of Patrick Slane at the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, and Charles E. Woodward and Rebert D. Gehrz at the University of Minnesota. The first part of the thesis summarizes the evolution and observational properties of SNRs and PWNe, with a focus on the evolution of young PWNe that are sweeping up inner SN

  1. Touch the Invisible Sky: A Multi-Wavelength Braille Book Featuring Tactile NASA Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grice, N.; Steel, S.; Daou, D.

    2008-06-01

    According to the American Foundation for the Blind and the National Federation of the Blind, there are approximately 10 million blind and visually impaired people in the United States. Because astronomy is often visually based, many people assume that it cannot be made accessible. A new astronomy book, Touch the Invisible Sky, makes wavelengths not visible to human eyes, accessible to all audiences through text in print and Braille and with pictures that are touchable and in color.

  2. Multi-wavelength diagnostics and modelling of the emission during a B6.4 flare of August 20, 2005

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Awasthi, Arun Kumar; Berlicki, Arkadiusz; Rudawy, Powel; Heinzel, Petr

    2015-08-01

    We study the temporal, spatial and spectral evolution of multi-wavelength emission observed during a B6.4 flare occurred on August 20, 2005 with the motivation to outline the thermal and non-thermal processes during the precursor and gradual phase of the flare. Precursor phase is designated as the gradual enhancement of soft X-ray emission prior to onset of the impulsive phase. Observations from several space and ground based observatories viz. RHESSI, TRACE, GONG, SoHO/EIT and NoRP are included in this study. Temporal evolution of X-ray emission does not show the presence of hard X-rays (>12 keV) emission during the precursor phase of the flare. We synthesized X-ray images in 6-12 keV from RHESSI observations, which show several discrete sources during the precursor phase. Following to this, one of these sources pronounced during the main phase of the flare. We carry out in-depth analysis of chromospheric response in various phases of the flare employing high temporal cadence images of the Sun in Hα line centre as well as wings obtained from the Multi-channel Subtractive Double Pass Spectrograph (MSDP) at the Bialkow Observatory of the University of Wroclaw, Poland. Our analysis of Hα images during the main phase of the flare suggests localized emission in the form of kernels. On the contrary, we note extended and diffused source morphology of emitting region during the precursor phase of the flare. We also study various kinematic properties of different structures visible in the Hα images in the line centre as well as wings. In addition, the correlation of the relative timing of X-ray and Hα emission profile is performed to estimate the delay in the chromospheric response during different phases of flare. Further, we employ thermal plasma parameters estimated during the precursor and gradual phase to model the associated Hα emission. For the modeling we employ NLTE numerical codes modified for flare conditions. The modeled and observed flare emission

  3. Raman characterization of high temperature materials using an imaging detector

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenblatt, G.M.; Veirs, D.K.

    1989-03-01

    The characterization of materials by Raman spectroscopy has been advanced by recent technological developments in light detectors. Imaging photomultiplier-tube detectors are now available that impart position information in two dimensions while retaining photon-counting sensitivity, effectively greatly reducing noise. The combination of sensitivity and reduced noise allows smaller amounts of material to be analyzed. The ability to observe small amount of material when coupled with position information makes possible Raman characterization in which many spatial elements are analyzed simultaneously. Raman spectroscopy making use of these capabilities has been used, for instance, to analyze the phases present in carbon films and fibers and to map phase-transformed zones accompanying crack propagation in toughened zirconia ceramics. 16 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. Three dimensional imaging detector employing wavelength-shifting optical fibers

    DOEpatents

    Worstell, W.A.

    1997-02-04

    A novel detector element structure and method for its use is provided. In a preferred embodiment, one or more inorganic scintillating crystals are coupled through wavelength shifting optical fibers (WLSFs) to position sensitive photomultipliers (PS-PMTs). The superior detector configuration in accordance with this invention is designed for an array of applications in high spatial resolution gamma ray sensing with particular application to SPECT, PET and PVI imaging systems. The design provides better position resolution than prior art devices at a lower total cost. By employing wavelength shifting fibers (WLSFs), the sensor configuration of this invention can operate with a significant reduction in the number of photomultipliers and electronics channels, while potentially improving the resolution of the system by allowing three dimensional reconstruction of energy deposition positions. 11 figs.

  5. Three dimensional imaging detector employing wavelength-shifting optical fibers

    DOEpatents

    Worstell, William A.

    1997-01-01

    A novel detector element structure and method for its use is provided. In a preferred embodiment, one or more inorganic scintillating crystals are coupled through wavelength shifting optical fibers (WLSFs) to position sensitive photomultipliers (PS-PMTs). The superior detector configuration in accordance with this invention is designed for an array of applications in high spatial resolution gamma ray sensing with particular application to SPECT, PET and PVI imaging systems. The design provides better position resolution than prior art devices at a lower total cost. By employing wavelength shifting fibers (WLSFs), the sensor configuration of this invention can operate with a significant reduction in the number of photomultipliers and electronics channels, while potentially improving the resolution of the system by allowing three dimensional reconstruction of energy deposition positions.

  6. Two-dimensional Detector for High Resolution Soft X-ray Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Ejima, Takeo; Ogasawara, Shodo; Hatano, Tadashi; Yanagihara, Mihiro; Yamamoto, Masaki

    2010-06-23

    A new two-dimensional (2D) detector for detecting soft X-ray (SX) images was developed. The detector has a scintillator plate to convert a SX image into a visible (VI) one, and a relay optics to magnify and detect the converted VI image. In advance of the fabrication of the detector, quantum efficiencies of scintillators were investigated. As a result, a Ce:LYSO single crystal on which Zr thin film was deposited was used as an image conversion plate. The spatial resolution of fabricated detector is 3.0 {mu}m, and the wavelength range which the detector has sensitivity is 30-6 nm region.

  7. Temporal characterization of a multi-wavelength Brillouin–erbium fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambin Iezzi, Victor; Büttner, Thomas F. S.; Tehranchi, Amirhossein; Loranger, Sébastien; Kabakova, Irina V.; Eggleton, Benjamin J.; Kashyap, Raman

    2016-05-01

    This paper provides the first detailed temporal characterization of a multi-wavelength-Brillouin–erbium fiber laser (MWBEFL) by measuring the optical intensity of the individual frequency channels with high temporal resolution. It is found that the power in each channel is highly unstable due to the excitation of several cavity modes for typical conditions of operation. Also provided is the real-time measurements of the MWBEFL output power for two configurations that were previously reported to emit phase-locked picosecond pulse trains, concluded from their autocorrelation measurements. Real-time measurements reveal a high degree of instability without the formation of a stable pulse train. Finally, we model the MWBEFL using coupled wave equations describing the evolution of the Brillouin pump, Stokes and acoustic waves in the presence of stimulated Brillouin scattering, and the optical Kerr effect. A good qualitative consistency between the simulation and experimental results is evident, in which the interference signal at the output shows strong instability as well as the chaotic behavior due to the dynamics of participating pump and Stokes waves.

  8. Profiling snow-precipitating clouds with Doppler multi-wavelength radars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kollias, Pavlos; Battaglia, Alessandro; Kneifel, Stefan; Loenhert, Ulrich; Tanelli, Simone; Szyrmer, Wanda

    2010-05-01

    Precipitation is an essential climate variable. Knowledge of precipitation and its underlying processes are required in a number of research and application disciplines directly related to the global energy and water cycle. At high latitudes precipitation typically occurs in the form of snow. All current active and passive remote sensing techniques are known to perform poorly when estimating snow-rate and even worse when trying to predict microphysical properties (e.g. snow size distribution, snow habit, coexistence of super cooled liquid water). In this paper we investigate the potential of multi-wavelength Doppler radars in overcoming this problem. Subsets of frequencies are selected from the following set: 13.8, 35.0, 94.0, 150, 220 GHz. The first three values are associated with already deployed radar systems, the last two refer to new research avenues. The notional study is based on thermodynamic and bulk-microphysical profiles extracted from cloud resolving model simulations and on a database of scattering properties for non-spherical ice crystals. This framework allows the evaluation of the combined effect of spectral differential attenuation and differential reflectivity to be investigated. Dual-wavelength systems generally improve the capabilities in sizing the snowflakes while the use of very high frequency is particularly effective for the detection of mixed phased clouds. This work has relevance for the evaluation of ground-based and space-borne millimetre wave radar performances currently under study.

  9. Tunable multi-wavelength polymer laser based on a triangular-lattice photonic crystal structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Wenbin; Pu, Donglin; Qiao, Wen; Wan, Wenqiang; Liu, Yanhua; Ye, Yan; Wu, Shaolong; Chen, Linsen

    2016-08-01

    A continuously tunable multi-wavelength polymer laser based on a triangular-lattice photonic crystal cavity is demonstrated. The triangular-lattice resonator was initially fabricated through multiple interference exposure and was then replicated into a low refractive index polymer via UV-nanoimprinting. The blend of a blue-emitting conjugated polymer and a red-emitting one was used as the gain medium. Three periods in the scalene triangular-lattice structure yield stable tri-wavelength laser emission (625.5 nm, 617.4 nm and 614.3 nm) in six different directions. A uniformly aligned liquid crystal (LC) layer was incorporated into the cavity as the top cladding layer. Upon heating, the orientation of LC molecules and thus the effective refractive index of the lasing mode changes which continuously shifts the lasing wavelength. A maximum tuning range of 12.2 nm was observed for the lasing mode at 625.5 nm. This tunable tri-wavelength polymer laser is simple constructed and cost-effective. It may find application in the fields of biosensors and photonic integrated circuits.

  10. Multi-wavelength modeling of globular clusters–the millisecond pulsar scenario

    SciTech Connect

    Kopp, A.; Venter, C.; Büsching, I.; De Jager, O. C.

    2013-12-20

    The potentially large number of millisecond pulsars (MSPs) in globular cluster (GC) cores makes these parent objects ideal laboratories for studying the collective properties of an ensemble of MSPs. Such a population is expected to radiate several spectral components in the radio through γ-ray waveband. First, pulsed emission is expected via curvature and synchrotron radiation (CR and SR) and possibly even via inverse Compton (IC) scattering inside the pulsar magnetospheres. Second, unpulsed emission should transpire through the continuous injection of relativistic leptons by the MSPs into the ambient region, which in turn produce SR and IC emission when they encounter the cluster magnetic field, as well as several background photon components. In this paper we continue to develop the MSP scenario for explaining the multi-wavelength properties of GCs by considering the entire modeling chain, including the full transport equation, refined emissivities of stellar and Galactic background photons, integration of the flux along the line of sight, and comparison with observations. As an illustration, we apply the model to Terzan 5, where we can reasonably fit both the (line-of-sight-integrated) X-ray surface flux and spectral energy density data, using the first to constrain the leptonic diffusion coefficient within the GC. We lastly discuss possible future extensions to and applications of this maturing model.

  11. Photosynthetic acclimation of Nannochloropsis oculata investigated by multi-wavelength chlorophyll fluorescence analysis.

    PubMed

    Szabó, Milán; Parker, Kieran; Guruprasad, Supriya; Kuzhiumparambil, Unnikrishnan; Lilley, Ross McC; Tamburic, Bojan; Schliep, Martin; Larkum, Anthony W D; Schreiber, Ulrich; Raven, John A; Ralph, Peter J

    2014-09-01

    Multi-wavelength chlorophyll fluorescence analysis was utilised to examine the photosynthetic efficiency of the biofuel-producing alga Nannochloropsis oculata, grown under two light regimes; low (LL) and high (HL) irradiance levels. Wavelength dependency was evident in the functional absorption cross-section of Photosystem II (σII(λ)), absolute electron transfer rates (ETR(II)), and non-photochemical quenching (NPQ) of chlorophyll fluorescence in both HL and LL cells. While σII(λ) was not significantly different between the two growth conditions, HL cells upregulated ETR(II) 1.6-1.8-fold compared to LL cells, most significantly in the wavelength range of 440-540 nm. This indicates preferential utilisation of blue-green light, a highly relevant spectral region for visible light in algal pond conditions. Under these conditions, the HL cells accumulated saturated fatty acids, whereas polyunsaturated fatty acids were more abundant in LL cells. This knowledge is of importance for the use of N. oculata for fatty acid production in the biofuel industry.

  12. Multi-wavelength optical determination of black and brown carbon in atmospheric aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massabò, D.; Caponi, L.; Bernardoni, V.; Bove, M. C.; Brotto, P.; Calzolai, G.; Cassola, F.; Chiari, M.; Fedi, M. E.; Fermo, P.; Giannoni, M.; Lucarelli, F.; Nava, S.; Piazzalunga, A.; Valli, G.; Vecchi, R.; Prati, P.

    2015-05-01

    In this paper, a new way to apportion the absorption coefficient (babs) of carbonaceous atmospheric aerosols starting from a multi-wavelength optical analysis is shown. This methodology can disentangle and quantify the contribution to total absorption of equivalent black carbon (EBC) emitted by wood burning (EBCWB) and fossil fuel (EBCFF) as well as brown carbon (BrC) due to incomplete combustion. The method uses the information gathered at five different wavelengths in a renewed and upgraded version of the approach usually referred to as Aethalometer model. Moreover, we present the results of an apportionment study of carbonaceous aerosol sources performed in a rural area and in a coastal city, both located in the North-West of Italy. Results obtained by the proposed approach are validated against independent measurements of levoglucosan and radiocarbon. At the rural site the EBCWB and EBCFF relative contributions are about 40% and 60% in winter and 15% and 85% in summer, respectively. At the coastal urban site, EBCWB and EBCFF are about 15% and 85% during fall. The OC contribution to the wood burning source at the rural site results approximately 50% in winter and 10% in summer and about 15% at the coastal urban site in fall. The new methodology also provides a direct measurement of the absorption Ångström exponent of BrC (αBrC) which resulted αBrC = 3.95 ± 0.20.

  13. Multi-wavelength Observations of Comet C/2011 L4 (Pan-STARRS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Bin; Keane, Jacqueline; Meech, Karen; Owen, Tobias; Wainscoat, Richard

    2014-04-01

    The dynamically new comet C/2011 L4 (Pan-STARRS) is one of the brightest comets observed since the great comet C/1995 O1 (Hale-Bopp). Here, we present our multi-wavelength observations of C/2011 L4 during its in-bound passage to the inner solar system. A strong absorption band of water ice at 2.0 μm was detected in the near-infrared spectra, obtained with the 8 m Gemini-North and 3 m Infrared Telescope Facility Telescopes. The companion 1.5 μm band of water ice, however, was not observed. Spectral modeling shows that the absence of the 1.5 μm feature can be explained by the presence of sub-micron-sized fine ice grains. No gas lines (i.e., CN, HCN, or CO) were observed pre-perihelion in either the optical or the submillimeter. We derived 3σ upper limits for the CN and CO production rates. The comet exhibited a very strong continuum in the optical and its slope seemed to become redder as the comet approached the Sun. Our observations suggest that C/2011 L4 is an unusually dust-rich comet with a dust-to-gas mass ratio >4.

  14. MULTI-WAVELENGTH OBSERVATIONS OF COMET C/2011 L4 (PAN-STARRS)

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Bin; Keane, Jacqueline; Meech, Karen; Owen, Tobias; Wainscoat, Richard

    2014-04-01

    The dynamically new comet C/2011 L4 (Pan-STARRS) is one of the brightest comets observed since the great comet C/1995 O1 (Hale-Bopp). Here, we present our multi-wavelength observations of C/2011 L4 during its in-bound passage to the inner solar system. A strong absorption band of water ice at 2.0 μm was detected in the near-infrared spectra, obtained with the 8 m Gemini-North and 3 m Infrared Telescope Facility Telescopes. The companion 1.5 μm band of water ice, however, was not observed. Spectral modeling shows that the absence of the 1.5 μm feature can be explained by the presence of sub-micron-sized fine ice grains. No gas lines (i.e., CN, HCN, or CO) were observed pre-perihelion in either the optical or the submillimeter. We derived 3σ upper limits for the CN and CO production rates. The comet exhibited a very strong continuum in the optical and its slope seemed to become redder as the comet approached the Sun. Our observations suggest that C/2011 L4 is an unusually dust-rich comet with a dust-to-gas mass ratio >4.

  15. Smoke plume optical properties and transport observed by a multi-wavelength lidar, sunphotometer and satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yonghua; Cordero, Lina; Gross, Barry; Moshary, Fred; Ahmed, Sam

    2012-12-01

    Optical characteristics and long-distance transport of smoke plumes are studied using satellite observations and ground-based remote sensing in New York City. Vertical distribution and column optical properties of aerosol plume are derived from a combination of multi-wavelength lidar and sunphotometer measurement. Aloft smoke plumes from two cases are investigated in this paper from U.S. western and south-western forest fires. The smoke source and transport pathway to the U.S. east coast are analyzed by MODIS and CALIOP imageries as well as HYSPLIT backward trajectory analysis. In both cases, the plumes have relatively high optical depth (as much as 1.2 at 500-nm) and Angstrom exponent of up to 1.8, but show different intrusion heights, source regions and transport process. Lidar profiling observations indicate these smoke plumes mixing downward into the planetary-boundary-layer which are coincident with increasing trends of surface PM2.5 (particulate matter, diameter < 2.5 μm) concentrations.

  16. The Angular Momentum of Disk Galaxies: A Multi-Wavelength Study Using the Virtual Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cortese, Luca; Catinella, B.; Springob, C. M.

    2006-12-01

    The determination of the angular momentum distribution of disk galaxies and its dependence on other galaxy properties and environment is essential in order to develop an accurate picture of galaxy formation and evolution. N-body simulations and semi-analytic models of galaxy formation within the standard cosmological framework identify the spin parameter of the dark matter halos as one of the main drivers of galaxy evolution and yield insights into its properties and distribution in present-day galaxies. Various relations have been proposed to link the halo spin parameter to observational data. In this work, we exploit such relations to obtain observational constraints for theoretical models of galaxy formation. To this extent, we used the Virtual Observatory to create a multi-wavelength database for the study of the properties of the angular momentum distribution of disk galaxies. Our sample builds upon the SFI++ database, which includes the largest collection of long-slit optical galaxy rotation curves currently available. Preliminary results of our analysis will be presented. This work is partially funded by PPARC under grant PPA/G/O/2002/00497. The Arecibo Observatory is part of the National Astronomy and Ionosphere Center, which is operated by Cornell University under a cooperative agreement with the National Science Foundation.

  17. The ECLAIRs micro-satellite mission for gamma-ray burst multi-wavelength observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schanne, S.; Atteia, J.-L.; Barret, D.; Basa, S.; Boer, M.; Casse, F.; Cordier, B.; Daigne, F.; Klotz, A.; Limousin, O.; Manchanda, R.; Mandrou, P.; Mereghetti, S.; Mochkovitch, R.; Paltani, S.; Paul, J.; Petitjean, P.; Pons, R.; Ricker, G.; Skinner, G.

    2006-11-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRB)—at least those with a duration longer than a few seconds—are the most energetic events in the Universe and occur at cosmological distances. The ECLAIRs micro-satellite, to be launched in 2009, will provide multi-wavelength observations of GRB, to study their astrophysics and to use them as cosmological probes. Furthermore, in 2009 ECLAIRs is expected to be the only space-borne instrument capable of providing a GRB trigger in near real-time with sufficient localization accuracy for GRB follow-up observations with the powerful ground-based spectroscopic telescopes available by then. A “Phase A study” of the ECLAIRs project has recently been launched by the French Space Agency CNES, aiming at a detailed mission design and selection for flight in 2006. The ECLAIRs mission is based on a CNES micro-satellite of the “Myriade” family and dedicated ground-based optical telescopes. The satellite payload combines a 2 sr field-of-view coded aperture mask gamma-camera using 6400 CdTe pixels for GRB detection and localization with 10 arcmin precision in the 4 50 keV energy band, together with a soft X-ray camera for onboard position refinement to 1 arcmin. The ground-based optical robotic telescopes will detect the GRB prompt/early afterglow emission and localize the event to arcsec accuracy, for spectroscopic follow-up observations.

  18. Multi-Wavelength Observations of an Unusual Impulsive Flare Associated with Cme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uddin, Wahab; Jain, Rajmal; Yoshimura, Keiji; Chandra, Ramesh; Sakao, T.; Kosugi, T.; Joshi, Anita; Despande, M. R.

    2004-12-01

    We present the results of a detailed analysis of multi-wavelength observations of a very impulsive solar flare 1B/M6.7, which occurred on 10 March, 2001 in NOAA AR 9368 (N27 W42). The observations show that the flare is very impulsive with a very hard spectrum in HXR that reveal that non-thermal emission was most dominant. On the other hand, this flare also produced a type II radio burst and coronal mass ejections (CME), which are not general characteristics for impulsive flares. In Hα we observed bright mass ejecta (BME) followed by dark mass ejecta (DME). Based on the consistency of the onset times and directions of BME and CME, we conclude that these two phenomena are closely associated. It is inferred that the energy build-up took place due to photospheric reconnection between emerging positive parasitic polarity and predominant negative polarity, which resulted as a consequence of flux cancellation. The shear increased to >80° due to further emergence of positive parasitic polarity causing strongly enhanced cancellation of flux. It appears that such enhanced magnetic flux cancellation in a strongly sheared region triggered the impulsive flare.

  19. Multi-wavelength transmission spectroscopy revisited for micron and submicron particle characterization.

    PubMed

    Smith, Jennifer M; Roth, Alison; Huffman, Debra E; Serebrennikova, Yulia M; Lindon, Jack; García-Rubio, Luis H

    2012-10-01

    Multi-wavelength transmission (MWT) ultraviolet-visible-near-infrared (UV-Vis-NIR) spectroscopy, a technique underappreciated for particle characterization, is systematically explored using a set of NIST traceable standards over the nominal size range of 20 to 20,000 nm. Experimental results demonstrate that the particle size distributions obtained from MWT spectral data are in excellent agreement with the values reported by the manufacturer. In addition, it is shown that quantitative information on the particle concentration can be obtained--which is not currently accessible from commercially available light scattering instrumentation. The results validate that MWT UV-Vis-NIR spectroscopy has a considerable dynamic range for particle size measurements and offers significant advantages over other particle characterization techniques. Among these are the simplicity of the instrumentation and the measurements and the wealth of quantitative information contained in the MWT spectra. Most importantly, with standardized measurement protocols and standardized spectrometer configurations, MWT measurements can be used to provide the user and the manufacturer of particles with traceable data (i.e., the spectra and the quantitative analysis) for quality assurance.

  20. MULTI-WAVELENGTH OBSERVATIONS OF 3FGL J2039.6–5618: A CANDIDATE REDBACK MILLISECOND PULSAR

    SciTech Connect

    Salvetti, D.; Mignani, R. P.; Luca, A. De; Belfiore, A.; Marelli, M.; Pizzocaro, D.; Delvaux, C.; Greiner, J.; Becker, W.; Pallanca, C.; Breeveld, A. A.

    2015-12-01

    We present multi-wavelength observations of the unassociated γ-ray source 3FGL J2039.6−5618 detected by the Fermi Large Area Telescope. The source γ-ray properties suggest that it is a pulsar, most likely a millisecond pulsar, for which neither radio nor γ-ray pulsations have been detected. We observed 3FGL J2039.6−5618 with XMM-Newton and discovered several candidate X-ray counterparts within/close to the γ-ray error box. The brightest of these X-ray sources is variable with a period of 0.2245 ± 0.0081 days. Its X-ray spectrum can be described by a power law with photon index Γ{sub X} = 1.36 ± 0.09, and hydrogen column density N{sub H} < 4 × 10{sup 20} cm{sup −2}, which gives an unabsorbed 0.3–10 keV X-ray flux of 1.02 × 10{sup −13} erg cm{sup −2} s{sup −1}. Observations with the Gamma-Ray Burst Optical/Near-Infrared Detector discovered an optical counterpart to this X-ray source, with a time-averaged magnitude g′ ∼ 19.5. The counterpart features a flux modulation with a period of 0.22748 ± 0.00043 days that coincides, within the errors, with that of the X-ray source, confirming the association based on the positional coincidence. We interpret the observed X-ray/optical periodicity as the orbital period of a close binary system where one of the two members is a neutron star. The light curve profile of the companion star, which has two asymmetric peaks, suggests that the optical emission comes from two regions with different temperatures on its tidally distorted surface. Based upon its X-ray and optical properties, we consider this source as the most likely X-ray counterpart to 3FGL J2039.6−5618, which we propose to be a new redback system.

  1. Performance Characterization of the Atmospheric Velocity Imaging Detector (AVID)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardiner, J. D.

    2015-12-01

    Central to the improvement of upper atmospheric models is a dramatic expansion in current understanding of the coupling and dynamics within the Ionosphere / Thermosphere (IT) system. Conventional in situ measurement techniques using energy scanning and analog current detection are limited by poor sensitivity and have produced incomplete datasets. The Atmospheric Velocity Imaging Detector (AVID) overcomes the limitations of current instruments through the use of two orthogonally mounted Imaging Dispersive Energy Analyzers (IDEAs) which share a single pulse-counting ion detector. The second-generation IDEA design uses inexpensive and lightweight printed circuit boards, with parallel exposed copper traces connected via resistors to generate a highly uniform deflection field. This arrangement allows AVID to make accurate and sensitive in situ measurements of neutral wind / ion drift velocities, temperature, density, and composition, with no voltage scanning required. We present results from the development progress of AVID, through laboratory testing and characterization of an individual IDEA unit when exposed to angle-resolved hypervelocity ion beams emulating 4.7 eV O and 8.2 eV N2. Through these measurements, the projected performance of the AVID system and recently developed image processing algorithms are compared against SIMION ion trajectory calculations and Monte Carlo simulations.

  2. Development and construction of the SLD Cerenkov Ring Imaging Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Aston, D.; Bean, A.; Bienz, T.; Bird, F.; Caldwell, D.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Coyle, P.; Coyne, D.; Dasu, S.; Dunwoodie, W.

    1989-06-01

    We report on the development and construction of the Cerenkov Ring Imaging Detector (CRID) for the SLD experiment at the SLAC linear collider. In particular, we outline recent progress in the construction, and results from testing the first components of the barrel CRID, including the drift boxes, liquid radiator trays and mirror system. We also review progress in the construction of the barrel CRID gas radiator vessel, the liquid radiator recirculator system, and the electronic readout system. The development of a comprehensive monitor and control system -- upon which the stable operation and physics efficacy of the CRID depend -- is also described. 19 refs., 9 figs.

  3. The SLD Cerenkov Ring Imaging Detector: Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Ashford, V.; Bienz, T.; Bird, F.; Crawford, G.; Gaillard, M.; Hallewell, G.; Leith, D.; McShurley, D.; Nuttall, A.; Oxoby, G.

    1986-10-01

    We describe test beam results from a prototype Cerenkov Ring Imaging Detector (CRID) for the SLD experiment at the SLAC Linear Collider (SLC). The system includes both liquid and gas radiators, a long drift box containing gaseous TMAE and a proportional wire chamber with charge division readout. Measurements of the multiplicity and detection resolution of Cerenkov photons, from both radiators are presented. Various design aspects of a new engineering prototype, currently under construction, are discussed and recent R and D results relevant to this effort are reported.

  4. High gain multigap avalanche detectors for Cerenkov ring imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Gilmore, R.S.; Lavender, W.M.; Leith, D.W.G.S.; Williams, S.H.

    1980-10-01

    We report on a continuing study of multigap parallel plate avalanche chambers, primarily as photoelectron detectors for use with Cerenkov ring imaging counters. By suitable control of the fields in successive gaps and by introducing screens to reduce photon feedback to the cathode the gain many be increased considerably. We have obtained gains in excess of 6 x 10/sup 7/ for photoelectrons with a good pulse height spectrum and expect to increase this further. We discuss the use of resistive anodes to give avalanche positions in two dimensions by charge division.

  5. Gamma detectors for spectroscopy and imaging based on scintillators coupled to semiconductor detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiorini, Carlo

    2000-11-01

    Silicon photodetectors have been successfully employed for scintillation detection in gamma-ray spectroscopy and imaging applications. When compared to photomultiplier tubes (PMTs), silicon photodetectors are characterized by higher quantum efficiency to the scintillation light. Moreover, these devices are more compact, immune to magnetic fields and can be easily integrated in monolithic arrays of units whose size could range from few mm2 up to some cm2. New gamma-ray detection systems based on scintillators coupled to silicon photodetectors have been recently developed for astrophysics experiments as well as for imaging systems in nuclear medicine. Among silicon detectors, conventional silicon PN photodiodes (PDs), avalanche photodiodes (APDs) and silicon drift detectors (SDDs) have been used with scintillators both as single units and as monolithic arrays. In the paper, the main features of silicon photodetectors used with scintillators for gamma detection are shortly described and the more recent achievements in their development are overviewed. Finally, a comparison of the achievable performances with PDs, APDs, and SDDs is reported.

  6. Multilayer fluorescence imaging on a single-pixel detector.

    PubMed

    Guo, Kaikai; Jiang, Shaowei; Zheng, Guoan

    2016-07-01

    A critical challenge for fluorescence imaging is the loss of high frequency components in the detection path. Such a loss can be related to the limited numerical aperture of the detection optics, aberrations of the lens, and tissue turbidity. In this paper, we report an imaging scheme that integrates multilayer sample modeling, ptychography-inspired recovery procedures, and lensless single-pixel detection to tackle this challenge. In the reported scheme, we directly placed a 3D sample on top of a single-pixel detector. We then used a known mask to generate speckle patterns in 3D and scanned this known mask to different positions for sample illumination. The sample was then modeled as multiple layers and the captured 1D fluorescence signals were used to recover multiple sample images along the z axis. The reported scheme may find applications in 3D fluorescence sectioning, time-resolved and spectrum-resolved imaging. It may also find applications in deep-tissue fluorescence imaging using the memory effect. PMID:27446679

  7. Application of imaging plate neutron detector to neutron radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujine, Shigenori; Yoneda, Kenji; Kamata, Masahiro; Etoh, Masahiro

    1999-11-01

    As an imaging plate neutron detector (IP-ND) has been available for thermal neutron radiography (TNR) which has high resolution, high sensitivity and wide range, some basic characteristics of the IP-ND system were measured at the E-2 facility of the KUR. After basic performances of the IP were studied, images with high quality were obtained at a neutron fluence of 2 to 7×10 8 n cm -2. It was found that the IP-ND system with Gd 2O 3 as a neutron converter material has a higher sensitivity to γ-ray than that of a conventional film method. As a successful example, clear radiographs of the flat view for the fuel side plates with boron burnable poison were obtained. An application of the IP-ND system to neutron radiography (NR) is presented in this paper.

  8. Laser system for testing radiation imaging detector circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zubrzycka, Weronika; Kasinski, Krzysztof

    2015-09-01

    Performance and functionality of radiation imaging detector circuits in charge and position measurement systems need to meet tight requirements. It is therefore necessary to thoroughly test sensors as well as read-out electronics. The major disadvantages of using radioactive sources or particle beams for testing are high financial expenses and limited accessibility. As an alternative short pulses of well-focused laser beam are often used for preliminary tests. There are number of laser-based devices available on the market, but very often their applicability in this field is limited. This paper describes concept, design and validation of laser system for testing silicon sensor based radiation imaging detector circuits. The emphasis is put on keeping overall costs low while achieving all required goals: mobility, flexible parameters, remote control and possibility of carrying out automated tests. The main part of the developed device is an optical pick-up unit (OPU) used in optical disc drives. The hardware includes FPGA-controlled circuits for laser positioning in 2 dimensions (horizontal and vertical), precision timing (frequency and number) and amplitude (diode current) of short ns-scale (3.2 ns) light pulses. The system is controlled via USB interface by a dedicated LabVIEW-based application enabling full manual or semi-automated test procedures.

  9. Rapid multi-wavelength optical assessment of circulating blood volume without a priori data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loginova, Ekaterina V.; Zhidkova, Tatyana V.; Proskurnin, Mikhail A.; Zharov, Vladimir P.

    2016-03-01

    The measurement of circulating blood volume (CBV) is crucial in various medical conditions including surgery, iatrogenic problems, rapid fluid administration, transfusion of red blood cells, or trauma with extensive blood loss including battlefield injuries and other emergencies. Currently, available commercial techniques are invasive and time-consuming for trauma situations. Recently, we have proposed high-speed multi-wavelength photoacoustic/photothermal (PA/PT) flow cytometry for in vivo CBV assessment with multiple dyes as PA contrast agents (labels). As the first step, we have characterized the capability of this technique to monitor the clearance of three dyes (indocyanine green, methylene blue, and trypan blue) in an animal model. However, there are strong demands on improvements in PA/PT flow cytometry. As additional verification of our proof-of-concept of this technique, we performed optical photometric CBV measurements in vitro. Three label dyes—methylene blue, crystal violet and, partially, brilliant green—were selected for simultaneous photometric determination of the components of their two-dye mixtures in the circulating blood in vitro without any extra data (like hemoglobin absorption) known a priori. The tests of single dyes and their mixtures in a flow system simulating a blood transfusion system showed a negligible difference between the sensitivities of the determination of these dyes under batch and flow conditions. For individual dyes, the limits of detection of 3×10-6 M‒3×10-6 M in blood were achieved, which provided their continuous determination at a level of 10-5 M for the CBV assessment without a priori data on the matrix. The CBV assessment with errors no higher than 4% were obtained, and the possibility to apply the developed procedure for optical photometric (flow cytometry) with laser sources was shown.

  10. Multi-wavelength Characterization of Brown and Black Carbon from Filter Samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, M. M.; Yatavelli, R. L. N.; Chen, L. W. A. A.; Gyawali, M. S.; Arnott, W. P.; Wang, X.; Chakrabarty, R. K.; Moosmüller, H.; Watson, J. G.; Chow, J. C.

    2014-12-01

    Particulate matter (PM) scatters and absorbs solar radiation and thereby affects visibility, the Earth's radiation balance, and properties and lifetimes of clouds. Understanding the radiative forcing (RF) of PM is essential to reducing the uncertainty in total anthropogenic and natural RF. Many instruments that measure light absorption coefficients (βabs [λ], Mm-1) of PM have used light at near-infrared (NIR; e.g., 880 nm) or red (e.g., 633 nm) wavelengths. Measuring βabs over a wider wavelength range, especially including the ultraviolet (UV) and visible, allows for contributions from black carbon (BC), brown carbon (BrC), and mineral dust (MD) to be differentiated. This will help to determine PM RF and its emission sources. In this study, source and ambient samples collected on Teflon-membrane and quartz-fiber filters are used to characterize and develop a multi-wavelength (250 - 1000 nm) filter-based measurement method of PM light absorption. A commercially available UV-visible spectrometer coupled with an integrating sphere is used for quantifying diffuse reflectance and transmittance of filter samples, from which βabs and absorption Ǻngström exponents (AAE) of the PM deposits are determined. The filter-based light absorption measurements of laboratory generated soot and biomass burning aerosol are compared to 3-wavelength photoacoustic absorption measurements to evaluate filter media and loading effects. Calibration factors are developed to account for differences between filter types (Teflon-membrane vs. quartz-fiber), and between filters and in situ photoacoustic absorption values. Application of multi-spectral absorption measurements to existing archived filters, including specific source samples (e.g. diesel and gasoline engines, biomass burning, dust), will also be discussed.

  11. A Multi-wavelength Study of Star Formation Activity in the S235 Complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dewangan, L. K.; Ojha, D. K.; Luna, A.; Anandarao, B. G.; Ninan, J. P.; Mallick, K. K.; Mayya, Y. D.

    2016-03-01

    We have carried out an extensive multi-wavelength study to investigate the star formation process in the S235 complex. The S235 complex has a spherelike shell appearance at wavelengths longer than 2 μm and harbors an O9.5V type star approximately at its center. A near-infrared extinction map of the complex traces eight subregions (having AV > 8 mag), and five of them appear to be distributed in an almost regularly spaced manner along the spherelike shell surrounding the ionized emission. This picture is also supported by the integrated 12CO and 13CO intensity maps and by Bolocam 1.1 mm continuum emission. The position-velocity analysis of CO reveals an almost semi-ringlike structure, suggesting an expanding H ii region. We find that the Bolocam clump masses increase as we move away from the location of the ionizing star. This correlation is seen only for those clumps that are distributed near the edges of the shell. Photometric analysis reveals 435 young stellar objects (YSOs), 59% of which are found in clusters. Six subregions (including five located near the edges of the shell) are very well correlated with the dust clumps, CO gas, and YSOs. The average values of Mach numbers derived using NH3 data for three (East 1, East 2, and Central E) out of these six subregions are 2.9, 2.3, and 2.9, indicating these subregions are supersonic. The molecular outflows are detected in these three subregions, further confirming the ongoing star formation activity. Together, all these results are interpreted as observational evidence of positive feedback of a massive star.

  12. Multi-wavelength Observations of GRB 111228A and Implications for the Fireball and its Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xin, Li-Ping; Wang, Yuan-Zhu; Lin, Ting-Ting; Liang, En-Wei; Lü, Hou-Jun; Zhong, Shu-Qing; Urata, Yuji; Zhao, Xiao-Hong; Wu, Chao; Wei, Jian-Yan; Huang, Kui-Yun; Qiu, Yu-Lei; Deng, Jin-Song

    2016-02-01

    Observations of very early multi-wavelength afterglows are critical to reveal the properties of the radiating fireball and its environment as well as the central engine of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). We report our optical observations of GRB 111228A from 95 s to about 50 hr after the burst trigger and investigate its properties of the prompt gamma-rays and the ambient medium using our data and the data from the Swift and Fermi missions. Our joint optical and X-ray spectral fits to the afterglow data show that the ambient medium features a low dust-to-gas ratio. Incorporating the energy injection effect, our best fit to the afterglow light curves with the standard afterglow model via the Markov Chain Monte Carlo technique shows that {ɛ }e=(6.9+/- 0.3)× {10}-2, {ɛ }B=(7.73+/- 0.62)× {10}-6,{E}K=(6.32+/- 0.86)× {10}53 {erg}, n=0.100+/- 0.014 cm-3. The low medium density likely implies that the afterglow jet may be in a halo or in a hot ISM. A chromatic shallow decay segment observed in the optical and X-ray bands is well explained with the long-lasting energy injection from the central engine, which would be a magnetar with a period of about 1.92 ms inferred from the data. The Ep of its time-integrated prompt gamma-ray spectrum is ˜26 KeV. Using the initial Lorentz factor ({{{Γ }}}0={476}-237+225) derived from our afterglow model fit, it is found that GRB 111228A satisfies the {L}{{iso}}-{E}p,z-{{{Γ }}}0 relation and bridges the typical GRBs and low luminosity GRBs in this relation.

  13. Multi-wavelength properties and SMBH's masses of the isolated AGNs in the Local Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vavilova, I. B.; Vasylenko, A. A.; Babyk, Iu. V.; Pulatova, N. G.

    2016-08-01

    The sample of 36 nearest isolated AGNs was cross-matched by 2MIG and Veron-Cetty catalogues and limited to Ks ≤ 12.0m and Vr < 15 000 km/s in the northern sky (δ ≥ -15°). These objects were in isolation during ~ 3 Gyrs. For revealing their multi-wavelength properties we used all the available databases obtained with ground-based and space observatories (from radio to X-ray ranges). It is allowed us to separate the internal evolution mechanisms from the environment influence and consider them as two separate processes related to fueling nuclear activity and accretion on the SMBHs outside of the environment. In this report we present briefly main results, which were already published (Pulatova N., Vavilova I., Sawangwit U. et al. The 2MIG isolated AGNs - I. General and multiwavelength properties of AGNs and host galaxies in the northern sky, MNRAS, 447, Issue 3, p. 2209-2223 (2015)). We accentuate that for the first time we revealed that the host isolated galaxies with AGNs of Sy1 type (without faint companions) appear to possess the bar morphological features (e.g., the interaction with neighboring galaxies is not necessary condition for broad-line region formation). We give also current results as concerns with more detail X-ray analysis, emission features and spectral models for several AGNs for which a cumulative soft and hard energy spectrum was reconstructed. The estimates of SMBH masses show that are systematically lower than the SMBH masses of AGNs located in a dense environment.

  14. Multi-wavelength Studies Of Saturn's Rings To Constrain Ring Particle Properties And Ring Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spilker, Linda J.; Deau, E.; Morishima, R.; Filacchione, G.; Hedman, M. M.; Nicholson, P.; Bradley, T.; Colwell, J.

    2012-10-01

    The characteristics of Saturn’s ring particles and their regoliths are examined by modeling variations in brightness, color, temperature and spectral parameters with changing viewing geometry over a wide range of wavelengths. Data from Cassini CIRS, ISS, VIMS and UVIS scans of the lit and unlit main rings at multiple geometries and solar elevations are used. Using multi-wavelength data sets allows us to test different thermal models by combining effects of particle albedo, regolith grain size and surface roughness with thermal emissivity and inertia, and particle spin rate and spin axis orientation. Over a range of solar elevations the CIRS temperature and ISS color variations are confined primarily to phase angle with only small differences from changing spacecraft elevation. Color and temperature dependence with varying solar elevation angle are also observed. Brightness dependence with changing solar elevation angle and phase angle is observed with UVIS. VIMS observations show that IR water ice absorption band depths are a very weak function of phase angle, out to 140 deg phase, suggesting that interparticle light scattering is relatively unimportant except at very high phase angles. These results imply that the individual properties of the ring particles may play a larger role than the collective properties of the rings, in particular at visible wavelengths. The temperature and color variation with phase angle may be a result of scattering within the regolith and on possibly rough surfaces of the clumps, as well as a contribution from scattering between individual particles in a many-particle-thick layer. Preliminary results from our joint studies will be presented. This research was carried out in part at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under contract with NASA. Copyright 2012 California Institute of Technology. Government sponsorship is acknowledged.

  15. Knowledge Discovery workflows for the classification of AGNs in multi-wavelength spaces: the Blazars case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Abrusco, Raffaele; Massaro, F.; Paggi, A.; Fabbiano, G.

    2014-07-01

    The development of new AGNs selection techniques based on the massive multi-wavelength datasets that are becoming more and more frequent in astronomy is a crucial task to gather statistically significant samples and shed light on the physical nature of this diverse class of extragalactic sources. Novel characterizations of specific classes of sources from unexplored region of their spectrum and unusual combinations of the observational parameters can translate into new classification criteria. In this innovative data environment, the whole process ranging from the discovery of new patterns to the application of such patters to the selection of new AGNs, has to be tackled using a Knowledge Discovery (KD) workflow. A KD workflows is a combination of different KD methods that automatically extract the more interesting patters from data, reduce the complexity of the dataset and provide astronomers with the simplest possible amount of information to be interpreted. In this talk, I will describe an original KD workflow which, in one of its first applications, has led to the discovery of a previously unknown peculiar pattern followed by blazars in the mid-Infrared color space (the blazars WISE locus), and the development of a new classification criterion based on this pattern and useful to tackle different problems. The comprehensive KD workflow used to derive these results encompasses unsupervised methods for the exploration of the multi-dimensional observable spaces, and supervised method for the training and optimization of classifiers based on the patterns determined in the observable spaces. In particular, I will describe the new methods for the association of unidentified gamma-ray sources and the extraction of candidate blazars from mid-Infrared photometric catalog based on the WISE blazars locus.

  16. Multi-wavelength Study of Blazars Using Variability as a Tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baliyan, Kiran S.; Kaur, Navpreet; Chandra, Sunil; Sameer, Sameer; Ganesh, Shashikiran

    2016-09-01

    Active galactic nuclei (AGN) are too compact to be resolved by any existing optical telescope facility, making it difficult to understand their structure and the emission processes responsible for their huge energy output. However, variability, one of their characteristic properties, provides a tool to probe the inner regions of AGN. Blazars are the best candidates for such a study, and hence a considerable amount of effort is being made to investigate variability in these sources across the electromagnetic spectrum. Here, using the Mt. Abu infrared observatory (MIRO) blazar monitoring program, we present intra-night, inter-night, and long term aspects of the variability in S5 0716+71, 3C66A, and OJ 287. These stars show significant variability on short (a few tens of mins, to a few hours, to a few days) to long term (months to years) timescales. Based on the light travel time argument, the shortest variability timescales (micro-variability) provide upper limits to the size of the emission region. While S5 0716 shows a very high duty cycle of variability (> 80 %), 3C66A shows a much lower intra day variability (IDV) duty cycle (< 20 %). All three show rapid variations within 2.5 to 3.5 hr, which, perhaps, are generated near the vicinity of black holes. Assuming this, estimates of the masses of the black holes are made at 10^{9} , 8×10^{8}, and 2.7×10^{9} M⨀ for S5 0716+71, 3C66A, and OJ 287, respectively. Multi-wavelength light-curves for the blazar PKS 1510-089 are discussed to infer the emission processes responsible for the recent flaring episodes in this source.

  17. Synthetic 3D modeling of active regions and simulation of their multi-wavelength emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nita, Gelu M.; Fleishman, Gregory; Kuznetsov, Alexey A.; Loukitcheva, Maria A.; Viall, Nicholeen M.; Klimchuk, James A.; Gary, Dale E.

    2015-04-01

    To facilitate the study of solar active regions, we have created a synthetic modeling framework that combines 3D magnetic structures obtained from magnetic extrapolations with simplified 1D thermal models of the chromosphere, transition region, and corona. To handle, visualize, and use such synthetic data cubes to compute multi-wavelength emission maps and compare them with observations, we have undertaken a major enhancement of our simulation tools, GX_Simulator (ftp://sohoftp.nascom.nasa.gov/solarsoft/packages/gx_simulator/), developed earlier for modeling emission from flaring loops. The greatly enhanced, object-based architecture, which now runs on Windows, Mac, and UNIX platform, offers important new capabilities that include the ability to either import 3D density and temperature distribution models, or to assign to each individual voxel numerically defined coronal or chromospheric temperature and densities, or coronal Differential Emission Measure distributions. Due to these new capabilities, the GX_Simulator can now apply parametric heating models involving average properties of the magnetic field lines crossing a given voxel volume, as well as compute and investigate the spatial and spectral properties of radio (to be compared with VLA or EOVSA data), (sub-)millimeter (ALMA), EUV (AIA/SDO), and X-ray (RHESSI) emission calculated from the model. The application integrates shared-object libraries containing fast free-free, gyrosynchrotron, and gyroresonance emission codes developed in FORTRAN and C++, and soft and hard X-ray and EUV codes developed in IDL. We use this tool to model and analyze an active region and compare the synthetic emission maps obtained in different wavelengths with observations.This work was partially supported by NSF grants AGS-1250374, AGS-1262772, NASA grant NNX14AC87G, the Marie Curie International Research Staff Exchange Scheme "Radiosun" (PEOPLE-2011-IRSES-295272), RFBR grants 14-02-91157, 15-02-01089, 15-02-03717, 15

  18. Infrared light field imaging using single carbon nanotube detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xi, Ning; Chen, Liangliang; Zhou, Zhanxin; Yang, Ruiguo; Song, Bo; Sun, Zhiyong

    2014-06-01

    The conventional photographs only record the sum total of light rays of each point on image plane so that they tell little about the amount of light traveling along individual rays. The focus and lens aberration problems have challenged photographers since the very beginning therefore light field photography was proposed to solve these problems. Lens array and multiple camera systems are used to capture 4D light rays, by reordering the different views of scene from multiple directions. The coded aperture is another method to encode the angular information in frequency domain. However, infrared light field sensing is still widely opening to research. In the paper, we will propose micro plane mirror optics together with compressive sensing algorithm to record light field in infrared spectrum. The micro mirror reflects objects irradiation and forms a virtual image behind the plane in which the mirror lies. The Digital Micromirror (DMD) consists of millions microscale mirrors which work as CCD array in the camera and it is controlled separately so as to project linear combination of object image onto lens. Coded aperture could be utilized to control angular resolution of infrared light rays. The carbon nanotube based infrared detector, which has ultra high signal to noise ratio and ultra fast responsibility, will sum up all image information on it without image distortion. Based on a number of measurements, compressive sensing algorithm was used to recover images from distinct angles, which could compute different views of scene to reconstruct infrared light field scence. Two innovative applications of full image recovery using nano scale photodetector and DMD based synthetic aperture photography will also be discussed in this paper.

  19. Single Photon Counting Detectors for Low Light Level Imaging Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolb, Kimberly

    2015-10-01

    This dissertation presents the current state-of-the-art of semiconductor-based photon counting detector technologies. HgCdTe linear-mode avalanche photodiodes (LM-APDs), silicon Geiger-mode avalanche photodiodes (GM-APDs), and electron-multiplying CCDs (EMCCDs) are compared via their present and future performance in various astronomy applications. LM-APDs are studied in theory, based on work done at the University of Hawaii. EMCCDs are studied in theory and experimentally, with a device at NASA's Jet Propulsion Lab. The emphasis of the research is on GM-APD imaging arrays, developed at MIT Lincoln Laboratory and tested at the RIT Center for Detectors. The GM-APD research includes a theoretical analysis of SNR and various performance metrics, including dark count rate, afterpulsing, photon detection efficiency, and intrapixel sensitivity. The effects of radiation damage on the GM-APD were also characterized by introducing a cumulative dose of 50 krad(Si) via 60 MeV protons. Extensive development of Monte Carlo simulations and practical observation simulations was completed, including simulated astronomical imaging and adaptive optics wavefront sensing. Based on theoretical models and experimental testing, both the current state-of-the-art performance and projected future performance of each detector are compared for various applications. LM-APD performance is currently not competitive with other photon counting technologies, and are left out of the application-based comparisons. In the current state-of-the-art, EMCCDs in photon counting mode out-perform GM-APDs for long exposure scenarios, though GM-APDs are better for short exposure scenarios (fast readout) due to clock-induced-charge (CIC) in EMCCDs. In the long term, small improvements in GM-APD dark current will make them superior in both long and short exposure scenarios for extremely low flux. The efficiency of GM-APDs will likely always be less than EMCCDs, however, which is particularly disadvantageous for

  20. A piecewise-focused high DQE detector for MV imaging

    PubMed Central

    Star-Lack, Josh; Shedlock, Daniel; Swahn, Dennis; Humber, Dave; Wang, Adam; Hirsh, Hayley; Zentai, George; Sawkey, Daren; Kruger, Isaac; Sun, Mingshan; Abel, Eric; Virshup, Gary; Shin, Mihye; Fahrig, Rebecca

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Electronic portal imagers (EPIDs) with high detective quantum efficiencies (DQEs) are sought to facilitate the use of the megavoltage (MV) radiotherapy treatment beam for image guidance. Potential advantages include high quality (treatment) beam’s eye view imaging, and improved cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) generating images with more accurate electron density maps with immunity to metal artifacts. One approach to increasing detector sensitivity is to couple a thick pixelated scintillator array to an active matrix flat panel imager (AMFPI) incorporating amorphous silicon thin film electronics. Cadmium tungstate (CWO) has many desirable scintillation properties including good light output, a high index of refraction, high optical transparency, and reasonable cost. However, due to the 0 1 0 cleave plane inherent in its crystalline structure, the difficulty of cutting and polishing CWO has, in part, limited its study relative to other scintillators such as cesium iodide and bismuth germanate (BGO). The goal of this work was to build and test a focused large-area pixelated “strip” CWO detector. Methods: A 361  ×  52 mm scintillator assembly that contained a total of 28 072 pixels was constructed. The assembly comprised seven subarrays, each 15 mm thick. Six of the subarrays were fabricated from CWO with a pixel pitch of 0.784 mm, while one array was constructed from BGO for comparison. Focusing was achieved by coupling the arrays to the Varian AS1000 AMFPI through a piecewise linear arc-shaped fiber optic plate. Simulation and experimental studies of modulation transfer function (MTF) and DQE were undertaken using a 6 MV beam, and comparisons were made between the performance of the pixelated strip assembly and the most common EPID configuration comprising a 1 mm-thick copper build-up plate attached to a 133 mg/cm2 gadolinium oxysulfide scintillator screen (Cu-GOS). Projection radiographs and CBCT images of phantoms were acquired. The work

  1. Development of a Navigator and Imaging Techniques for the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Wilen, Chris; /Carleton Coll. /KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2011-06-22

    This project contributes to the detection of flaws in the germanium detectors for the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS) experiment. Specifically, after imaging the detector surface with a precise imaging and measuring device, they developed software to stitch the resulting images together, applying any necessary rotations, offsets, and averaging, to produce a smooth image of the whole detector that can be used to detect flaws on the surface of the detector. These images were also tiled appropriately for the Google Maps API to use as a navigation tool, allowing viewers to smoothly zoom and pan across the detector surface. Automated defect identification can now be implemented, increasing the scalability of the germanium detector fabrication.

  2. sCMOS detector for imaging VNIR spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eckardt, Andreas; Reulke, Ralf; Schwarzer, Horst; Venus, Holger; Neumann, Christian

    2013-09-01

    The facility Optical Information Systems (OS) at the Robotics and Mechatronics Center of the German Aerospace Center (DLR) has more than 30 years of experience with high-resolution imaging technology. This paper shows the scientific results of the institute of leading edge instruments and focal plane designs for EnMAP VIS/NIR spectrograph. EnMAP (Environmental Mapping and Analysis Program) is one of the selected proposals for the national German Space Program. The EnMAP project includes the technological design of the hyper spectral space borne instrument and the algorithms development of the classification. The EnMAP project is a joint response of German Earth observation research institutions, value-added resellers and the German space industry like Kayser-Threde GmbH (KT) and others to the increasing demand on information about the status of our environment. The Geo Forschungs Zentrum (GFZ) Potsdam is the Principal Investigator of EnMAP. DLR OS and KT were driving the technology of new detectors and the FPA design for this project, new manufacturing accuracy and on-chip processing capability in order to keep pace with the ambitious scientific and user requirements. In combination with the engineering research, the current generations of space borne sensor systems are focusing on VIS/NIR high spectral resolution to meet the requirements on earth and planetary observation systems. The combination of large swath and high spectral resolution with intelligent synchronization control, fast-readout ADC chains and new focal-plane concepts open the door to new remote-sensing and smart deep space instruments. The paper gives an overview over the detector verification program at DLR on FPA level, new control possibilities for sCMOS detectors in global shutter mode and key parameters like PRNU, DSNU, MTF, SNR, Linearity, Spectral Response, Quantum Efficiency, Flatness and Radiation Tolerance will be discussed in detail.

  3. Calibration of photon counting imaging microchannel plate detectors for EUV astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegmund, O. H. W.; Vallerga, J.; Jelinsky, P.

    1986-01-01

    The calibration of photon counting imaging detectors for satellite based EUV astronomy is a complex process designed to ensure the validity of the data received 'in orbit'. The methods developed to accomplish calibration of microchannel plate detectors for the Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer are described and illustrated. The characterization of these detectors can be subdivided into three categories: stabilization, performance tests, and environmental tests.

  4. EPR Imaging at a Few Megahertz Using SQUID Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hahn, Inseob; Day, Peter; Penanen, Konstantin; Eom, Byeong Ho

    2010-01-01

    An apparatus being developed for electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) imaging operates in the resonance-frequency range of about 1 to 2 MHz well below the microwave frequencies used in conventional EPR. Until now, in order to obtain sufficient signal-to-noise radios (SNRs) in conventional EPR, it has been necessary to place both detectors and objects to be imaged inside resonant microwave cavities. EPR imaging has much in common with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which is described briefly in the immediately preceding article. In EPR imaging as in MRI, one applies a magnetic pulse to make magnetic moments (in this case, of electrons) precess in an applied magnetic field having a known gradient. The magnetic moments precess at a resonance frequency proportional to the strength of the local magnetic field. One detects the decaying resonance-frequency magnetic- field component associated with the precession. Position is encoded by use of the known relationship between the resonance frequency and the position dependence of the magnetic field. EPR imaging has recently been recognized as an important tool for non-invasive, in vivo imaging of free radicals and reduction/oxidization metabolism. However, for in vivo EPR imaging of humans and large animals, the conventional approach is not suitable because (1) it is difficult to design and construct resonant cavities large enough and having the required shapes; (2) motion, including respiration and heartbeat, can alter the resonance frequency; and (3) most microwave energy is absorbed in the first few centimeters of tissue depth, thereby potentially endangering the subject and making it impossible to obtain adequate signal strength for imaging at greater depth. To obtain greater penetration depth, prevent injury to the subject, and avoid the difficulties associated with resonant cavities, it is necessary to use lower resonance frequencies. An additional advantage of using lower resonance frequencies is that one can use

  5. A novel fast-neutron detector concept for energy-selective imaging and imaging spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Cortesi, M.; Prasser, H.-M.; Dangendorf, V.; Zboray, R.

    2014-07-15

    We present and discuss the operational principle of a new fast-neutron detector concept suitable for either energy-selective imaging or for imaging spectroscopy. The detector is comprised of a series of energy-selective stacks of converter foils immersed in a noble-gas based mixture, coupled to a position-sensitive charge readout. Each foil in the various stacks is made of two layers of different thicknesses, fastened together: a hydrogen-rich (plastic) layer for neutron-to-proton conversion, and a hydrogen-free coating to selectively stop/absorb the recoil protons below a certain energy cut-off. The neutron-induced recoil protons, that escape the converter foils, release ionization electrons in the gas gaps between consecutive foils. The electrons are then drifted towards and localized by a position-sensitive charge amplification and readout stage. Comparison of the images detected by stacks with different energy cut-offs allows energy-selective imaging. Neutron energy spectrometry is realized by analyzing the responses of a sufficient large number of stacks of different energy response and unfolding techniques. In this paper, we present the results of computer simulation studies and discuss the expected performance of the new detector concept. Potential applications in various fields are also briefly discussed, in particularly, the application of energy-selective fast-neutron imaging for nuclear safeguards application, with the aim of determining the plutonium content in Mixed Oxide (MOX) fuels.

  6. Image restoration for TV-scan moving images acquired through a semiconductor backscattered electron detector.

    PubMed

    Oho, Eisaku; Suzuki, Kazuhiko

    2009-01-01

    A semiconductor backscattered electron (BSE) detector has become popular in scanning electron microscopy session. However, detectors of semiconductor type have a serious disadvantage on the frequency characteristics. As a result, fast scan (e.g. TV-scan) BSE image should be blurred remarkably. It is the purpose of this study to restore this degradation by using digital image processing technology. In order to improve it practically, we have to settle several problems, such as noise, undesirable processing artifacts, and ease of use. Image processing techniques in an impromptu manner like a conventional mask processing are unhelpful for this study, because a complicated degradation of output signal affects severely the phase response as well as the amplitude response of our SEM system. Hence, based on the characteristics of an SEM signal obtained from the semiconductor BSE detector, a proper inverse filter in Fourier domain is designed successfully. Finally, the inverse filter is converted to a special convolution mask, which is skillfully designed, and applied for TV-scan moving BSE images. The improved BSE image is very effective in the work for finding important objects.

  7. Multi-wavelength S-band Tm:ZBLAN fiber lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frison, B.; Sarmani, A. R.; Chen, L. R.; Gu, X.; Saad, M.

    2013-02-01

    Tm3+-doped fluoride (ZBLAN) fibers offer amplification and lasing in a wide variety of wavelength ranges, including 810 nm, 1480 nm, 1900 nm, and 2300 nm.1 Amplification and lasing around 1480 nm through the 3H4→3F4 transition is of interest for extending the capacity of WDM transmission systems, as well as developing sources for pumping erbium-doped fiber and fiber Raman amplifiers. The 3H4-->3F4 transition, however, poses a challenge due to its self terminating nature. As such, the 3F4 level can be depleted either by colasing at 1900 nm2 or by using upconversion pumping at 1064 nm. High-power 1480 nm Tm3+:ZBLAN fiber lasers with upconversion pumping at 1064 nm have been demonstrated.3-6 Recent research has focused on improving further the power conversion efficiency as well as the development of monolithic fiber lasers, e.g., by incorporating fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs) directly within the Tm3+: ZBLAN fiber gain medium. Dual-wavelength and multi-wavelength sources can have many applications in instrumentation (e.g., component testing), LIDAR systems, and fiber optics sensing. There have been several reports of dual-wavelength Tm3+-doped fiber lasers. For example, Androz et al. demonstrated operation at 785 nm and 810 nm, corresponding to the 1G4→3H5 and 3H4→3H6 transitions, respectively, with a Tm3+:ZBLAN fiber gain medium.7 Wang et al. obtained dual-wavelength lasing around 2 μm with a tunable wavelength spacing from 1 nm - 40 nm in a Tm3+:silica fiber laser.8 We realized oscillation at 805 nm and 810 nm through the 3H4→3H6 transition in a Tm3+:ZBLAN fiber laser; we also reported wavelength switching capability as well as bistable operation in both single cavity and cascaded cavity configurations.9 In this paper, we extend our work further and report a dual-wavelength Tm3+:ZBLAN fiber laser operating in the S-band. Wavelength spacings of 11 nm and as narrow as 0.6 nm are achieved in a linear cascaded cavity configuration with bidirectional upconversion

  8. SIMULTANEOUS MULTI-WAVELENGTH OBSERVATIONS OF Sgr A* DURING 2007 APRIL 1-11

    SciTech Connect

    Yusef-Zadeh, F.; Bushouse, H.; Wardle, M.; Heinke, C.; Roberts, D. A.; Dowell, C. D.; Brunthaler, A.; Reid, M. J.; Martin, C. L.; Marrone, D. P.; Porquet, D.; Grosso, N.; Dodds-Eden, K.; Gillessen, S.; Bower, G. C.; Wiesemeyer, H.; Miyazaki, A.; Pal, S.; Goldwurm, A.

    2009-11-20

    We report the detection of variable emission from Sgr A* in almost all wavelength bands (i.e., centimeter, millimeter, submillimeter, near-IR, and X-rays) during a multi-wavelength observing campaign. Three new moderate flares are detected simultaneously in both near-IR and X-ray bands. The ratio of X-ray to near-IR flux in the flares is consistent with inverse Compton scattering of near-IR photons by submillimeter emitting relativistic particles which follow scaling relations obtained from size measurements of Sgr A*. We also find that the flare statistics in near-IR wavelengths is consistent with the probability of flare emission being inversely proportional to the flux. At millimeter wavelengths, the presence of flare emission at 43 GHz (7 mm) using the Very Long Baseline Array with milliarcsecond spatial resolution indicates the first direct evidence that hourly timescale flares are localized within the inner 30 x 70 Schwarzschild radii of Sgr A*. We also show several cross-correlation plots between near-IR, millimeter, and submillimeter light curves that collectively demonstrate the presence of time delays between the peaks of emission up to 5 hr. The evidence for time delays at millimeter and submillimeter wavelengths are consistent with the source of emission initially being optically thick followed by a transition to an optically thin regime. In particular, there is an intriguing correlation between the optically thin near-IR and X-ray flare and optically thick radio flare at 43 GHz that occurred on 2007 April 4. This would be the first evidence of a radio flare emission at 43 GHz delayed with respect to the near-IR and X-ray flare emission. The time delay measurements support the expansion of hot self-absorbed synchrotron plasma blob and weaken the hot spot model of flare emission. In addition, a simultaneous fit to 43 and 84 GHz light curves, using an adiabatic expansion model of hot plasma, appears to support a power law rather than a relativistic

  9. CANDELS Multi-wavelength Catalogs: Source Detection and Photometry in the GOODS-South Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Yicheng; Ferguson, Henry C.; Giavalisco, Mauro; Barro, Guillermo; Willner, S. P.; Ashby, Matthew L. N.; Dahlen, Tomas; Donley, Jennifer L.; Faber, Sandra M.; Fontana, Adriano; Galametz, Audrey; Grazian, Andrea; Huang, Kuang-Han; Kocevski, Dale D.; Koekemoer, Anton M.; Koo, David C.; McGrath, Elizabeth J.; Peth, Michael; Salvato, Mara; Wuyts, Stijn; Castellano, Marco; Cooray, Asantha R.; Dickinson, Mark E.; Dunlop, James S.; Fazio, G. G.; Gardner, Jonathan P.; Gawiser, Eric; Grogin, Norman A.; Hathi, Nimish P.; Hsu, Li-Ting; Lee, Kyoung-Soo; Lucas, Ray A.; Mobasher, Bahram; Nandra, Kirpal; Newman, Jeffery A.; van der Wel, Arjen

    2013-08-01

    We present a UV to mid-infrared multi-wavelength catalog in the CANDELS/GOODS-S field, combining the newly obtained CANDELS HST/WFC3 F105W, F125W, and F160W data with existing public data. The catalog is based on source detection in the WFC3 F160W band. The F160W mosaic includes the data from CANDELS deep and wide observations as well as previous ERS and HUDF09 programs. The mosaic reaches a 5σ limiting depth (within an aperture of radius 0.''17) of 27.4, 28.2, and 29.7 AB for CANDELS wide, deep, and HUDF regions, respectively. The catalog contains 34,930 sources with the representative 50% completeness reaching 25.9, 26.6, and 28.1 AB in the F160W band for the three regions. In addition to WFC3 bands, the catalog also includes data from UV (U band from both CTIO/MOSAIC and VLT/VIMOS), optical (HST/ACS F435W, F606W, F775W, F814W, and F850LP), and infrared (HST/WFC3 F098M, VLT/ISAAC Ks, VLT/HAWK-I Ks, and Spitzer/IRAC 3.6, 4.5, 5.8, 8.0 μm) observations. The catalog is validated via stellar colors, comparison with other published catalogs, zero-point offsets determined from the best-fit templates of the spectral energy distribution of spectroscopically observed objects, and the accuracy of photometric redshifts. The catalog is able to detect unreddened star-forming (passive) galaxies with stellar mass of 1010 M ⊙ at a 50% completeness level to z ~ 3.4 (2.8), 4.6 (3.2), and 7.0 (4.2) in the three regions. As an example of application, the catalog is used to select both star-forming and passive galaxies at z ~ 2-4 via the Balmer break. It is also used to study the color-magnitude diagram of galaxies at 0 < z < 4.

  10. Multi-Wavelength Observations of Comet C/2011 L4 (PanSTARRS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Bin; Keane, J. V.; Meech, K. J.; Owen, T.; Wainscoat, R.

    2013-10-01

    Comet C/2011 L4 (PanSTARRS), which reached a visual magnitude brighter than 0 mag near its perihelion in March 2013, is one of the brightest comets since the great comet C/1995 O1 (Hale-Bopp). Discovered at 8AU from the Sun, the apparition of comet C/2011 L4 (PanSTARRS) provided a rare opportunity to monitor the dynamically new comet over a significant time period as well as a wide range of heliocentric distances. We will present our multi-wavelength observations of this dynamically new comet during its first in-bound leg from the Oort Cloud. A strong absorption band of water ice was detected at 2.0 microns in the moderate- to low-resolution spectra taken with 8-m Gemini-North and 3-m IRTF telescopes atop Mauna Kea, Hawaii. However, the companion 1.5 micron band of water ice was not observed. Our spectral models show that the weakened or absent 1.5 micron band can be explained by submicron-sized fine ice grains. Hindered by the weakness of the 1.5 micron feature, we were not able to constrain the crystallinity of the water ice particles in the coma of C/2011 L4. No gas emission (i.e. CN, HCN and CO) was observed pre-perihelion both in the optical and in the sub-millimeter using the 8-m Gemini-N and the 15-m JCMT telescopes. An estimated upper limit for CO production rate is at a level of 10^27 mol/sec when the comet was 3.44-2.31 AU from the Sun. The comet showed a very strong continuum in the optical that became redder as the comet approaching the Sun. Based on the Gemini optical spectroscopy, we calculated the Afρ quantity of this comet and found the value to be ~120 m. We further estimated the pre-perihelion dust production rate of ~650 kg/s which yielded a lower limit of the dust-to-gas ratio of 4. Our observations show that C/2011 L4 is a dust-rich/gas-poor comet. We will discuss the comparison between C/2011 L4 and other Oort Cloud comets.

  11. CANDELS MULTI-WAVELENGTH CATALOGS: SOURCE DETECTION AND PHOTOMETRY IN THE GOODS-SOUTH FIELD

    SciTech Connect

    Guo Yicheng; Barro, Guillermo; Faber, Sandra M.; Koo, David C.; Giavalisco, Mauro; Willner, S. P.; Ashby, Matthew L. N.; Donley, Jennifer L.; Fontana, Adriano; Galametz, Audrey; Grazian, Andrea; Kocevski, Dale D.; McGrath, Elizabeth J.; Peth, Michael; Salvato, Mara; Wuyts, Stijn; and others

    2013-08-15

    We present a UV to mid-infrared multi-wavelength catalog in the CANDELS/GOODS-S field, combining the newly obtained CANDELS HST/WFC3 F105W, F125W, and F160W data with existing public data. The catalog is based on source detection in the WFC3 F160W band. The F160W mosaic includes the data from CANDELS deep and wide observations as well as previous ERS and HUDF09 programs. The mosaic reaches a 5{sigma} limiting depth (within an aperture of radius 0.''17) of 27.4, 28.2, and 29.7 AB for CANDELS wide, deep, and HUDF regions, respectively. The catalog contains 34,930 sources with the representative 50% completeness reaching 25.9, 26.6, and 28.1 AB in the F160W band for the three regions. In addition to WFC3 bands, the catalog also includes data from UV (U band from both CTIO/MOSAIC and VLT/VIMOS), optical (HST/ACS F435W, F606W, F775W, F814W, and F850LP), and infrared (HST/WFC3 F098M, VLT/ISAAC Ks, VLT/HAWK-I Ks, and Spitzer/IRAC 3.6, 4.5, 5.8, 8.0 {mu}m) observations. The catalog is validated via stellar colors, comparison with other published catalogs, zero-point offsets determined from the best-fit templates of the spectral energy distribution of spectroscopically observed objects, and the accuracy of photometric redshifts. The catalog is able to detect unreddened star-forming (passive) galaxies with stellar mass of 10{sup 10} M{sub Sun} at a 50% completeness level to z {approx} 3.4 (2.8), 4.6 (3.2), and 7.0 (4.2) in the three regions. As an example of application, the catalog is used to select both star-forming and passive galaxies at z {approx} 2-4 via the Balmer break. It is also used to study the color-magnitude diagram of galaxies at 0 < z < 4.

  12. An automatic coastline detector for use with SAR images

    SciTech Connect

    Erteza, Ireena A.

    1998-09-01

    SAR imagery for coastline detection has many potential advantages over conventional optical stereoscopic techniques. For example, SAR does not have restrictions on being collected during daylight or when there is no cloud cover. In addition, the techniques for coastline detection witth SAR images can be automated. In this paper, we present the algorithmic development of an automatic coastline detector for use with SAR imagery. Three main algorithms comprise the automatic coastline detection algorithm, The first algorithm considers the image pre-processing steps that must occur on the original image in order to accentuate the land/water boundary. The second algorithm automatically follows along the accentuated land/water boundary and produces a single-pixel-wide coastline. The third algorithm identifies islands and marks them. This report describes in detail the development of these three algorithms. Examples of imagery are used throughout the paper to illustrate the various steps in algorithms. Actual code is included in appendices. The algorithms presented are preliminary versions that can be applied to automatic coastline detection in SAR imagery. There are many variations and additions to the algorithms that can be made to improve robustness and automation, as required by a particular application.

  13. Progress and commissioning of the SLD Cherenkov Ring Imaging Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Abe, K.; Hasegawa, K.; Suekane, F.; Yuta, H. . Dept. of Physics); Antilogus, P.; Aston, D.; Bienz, T.; Bird, F.; Dasu, S.; Dolinsky, S.; Dunwoodie, W.; Hallewell, G.: Kawahara, H.; Kwon, Y.; Leith, D.W.G.S.; Muller, D.; Nagamine, T.; Pavel, T.J.; Ratcliff, B.; Rensing, P.; Schultz, D.; Shapiro, S.; Simopoulos, C.; Solodov, E.; Toge, N.; Va'vra, J.; Williams, S.H. (Stanford Linear Accelerator

    1991-11-01

    We report the recent progress of the SLD Cherenkov Ring Imaging Detector. All of the individual components of the device (TPC's, mirrors, liquid radiator trays) have been completed and installed. Almost half of the electronics packages are installed and operational, and the data acquisition system has been commissioned. The liquid C{sub 6}F{sub 14} recirculation system is functioning. The drift gas supply systems are operating well with TMAE, and the gaseous Freon C{sub 5}F{sub 12} recirculator is being brought on-line. Our monitor and control systems are fully functional. The commissioning of all 40 TPCs at full operating voltage has gone very smoothly. The system shows a remarkable immunity to the SLC backgrounds, and yields very clean events, while operating with a single electron sensitivity.

  14. New high-gain detectors for active imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pistone, Frederic; Tribolet, P.; Lefoul, X.; Zecri, M.; Courtas, S.; Jenouvrier, P.; Rothman, Johan

    2009-05-01

    New applications require high sensitivity infrared (IR) sensors in order to detect very low incident fluxes. Laser gated imaging has, in particular, additional specific needs. IR sensors for this type of application are synchronized with eye-safe lasers, and have to detect a weak signal backscattered from the target on the order of 10 photons per pulse. They also have to be able to operate with a very short integration time, typically one hundred nanoseconds, to gate the backscattered signal around the target. In partnership with Sofradir, CEA/LETI, France) has developed high quality HgCdTe avalanche photodiodes satisfying these requirements. In parallel, specific studies have been carried out at the Read-Out Circuit level to develop optimized architectures. Thanks to these advances, a new Integrated Dewar Detector Cooler Assembly has been developed. This new product is the first step in a road-map to address low flux infrared sensors in the next few years.

  15. Gamma-Ray Bursts and Afterglows: a Multi-Wavelength Study in the Swift Era

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Y. W.

    2010-01-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), which are generally followed by long-lasting low-frequency afterglow emission, are short and intense pulses of gamma-rays observed from the sky in arbitrary directions. In order to observe the multi-wavelength emission at the early afterglow phase and even the prompt emission phase, NASA launched the Swift satellite on Nov. 20th 2004. Swift can localize GRBs within about 10 seconds. A brief review on the recent progress in observations and theories in the Swift era is given in Chapter 1. This paper focuses on the features of the early afterglows and the multi-wavelength prompt emission. In Chapters 2 and 3, we try to explain the shallow-decaying X-ray afterglows and X-ray flares, both of which are unaccountable in the standard afterglow model. (1) It is widely accepted that the shallow decay phase indicates a continuous energy injection into the GRB blast wave, and this energy could be released from the central engine after the burst. Based on the knowledge of the evolution of a pulsar wind, we argue that the injected flow interacting with the GRB blast wave is an ultra-relativistic kinetic-energy flow (i.e., wind) rather than pure electromagnetic waves. Therefore, a relativistic wind bubble (RWB) including a pair of shocks will be formed. Our numerical calculations and the fitting results show that the emission from an RWB can well account for the X-ray shallow decay phase. (2) For the X-ray flares that are attributed to some intermediate late activities of the central engine, we analyze the detailed dynamics of late internal shocks which directly produce the flare emission. Comparing the theoretical results with the lower limits of the observational luminosities and the profiles of the flare light curves, we find some constraints on the properties of the pre-collision shells, which are directly determined by the central object. In Chapter 4, we investigate the high-energy afterglow emission during the shallow decay phase in two models, i

  16. Gamma-Ray Bursts and Afterglows: a Multi-Wavelength Study in the Swift Era

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Y. W.

    2010-01-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), which are generally followed by long-lasting low-frequency afterglow emission, are short and intense pulses of gamma-rays observed from the sky in arbitrary directions. In order to observe the multi-wavelength emission at the early afterglow phase and even the prompt emission phase, NASA launched the Swift satellite on Nov. 20th 2004. Swift can localize GRBs within about 10 seconds. A brief review on the recent progress in observations and theories in the Swift era is given in Chapter 1. This paper focuses on the features of the early afterglows and the multi-wavelength prompt emission. In Chapters 2 and 3, we try to explain the shallow-decaying X-ray afterglows and X-ray flares, both of which are unaccountable in the standard afterglow model. (1) It is widely accepted that the shallow decay phase indicates a continuous energy injection into the GRB blast wave, and this energy could be released from the central engine after the burst. Based on the knowledge of the evolution of a pulsar wind, we argue that the injected flow interacting with the GRB blast wave is an ultra-relativistic kinetic-energy flow (i.e., wind) rather than pure electromagnetic waves. Therefore, a relativistic wind bubble (RWB) including a pair of shocks will be formed. Our numerical calculations and the fitting results show that the emission from an RWB can well account for the X-ray shallow decay phase. (2) For the X-ray flares that are attributed to some intermediate late activities of the central engine, we analyze the detailed dynamics of late internal shocks which directly produce the flare emission. Comparing the theoretical results with the lower limits of the observational luminosities and the profiles of the flare light curves, we find some constraints on the properties of the pre-collision shells, which are directly determined by the central object. In Chapter 4, we investigate the high-energy afterglow emission during the shallow decay phase in two models, i

  17. Non-degenerate fs pump-probe study on InGaN with multi-wavelength second-harmonic generation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hsiang-Chen; Lu, Yen-Cheng; Chen, Cheng-Yen; Chi, Chun-Yung; Chin, Shu-Cheng; Yang, C C

    2005-07-11

    Non-degenerate fs pump-probe experiments in the UV-visible range for ultrafast carrier dynamics study of InGaN with adjustable pump and probe photon energies are implemented with simultaneously multiwavelength second-harmonic generation (SHG) of a 10 fs Ti:sapphire laser. The multi-wavelength SHG is realized with two beta-barium borate crystals of different cutting angles. The full-widths at half-maximum of the SHG pulses are around 150 fs, which are obtained from the cross-correlation measurement with a reverse-biased 280-nm light-emitting diode as the twophoton absorption photo-detector. Such pulses are used to perform nondegenerate pump-probe experiments on an InGaN thin film, in which indium-rich nano-clusters and compositional fluctuations have been identified. Relaxation of carriers from the pump level to the probe one through the scattering-induced local thermalization (<1 ps) and then the carrier-transport-dominating global thermalization (in several ps) processes is observed.

  18. Characterization of winemaking yeast by cell number-size distribution analysis through flow field-flow fractionation with multi-wavelength turbidimetric detection.

    PubMed

    Zattoni, Andrea; Melucci, Dora; Reschiglian, Pierluigi; Sanz, Ramsés; Puignou, Lluís; Galceran, Maria Teresa

    2004-10-29

    Yeasts are widely used in several areas of food industry, e.g. baking, beer brewing, and wine production. Interest in new analytical methods for quality control and characterization of yeast cells is thus increasing. The biophysical properties of yeast cells, among which cell size, are related to yeast cell capabilities to produce primary and secondary metabolites during the fermentation process. Biophysical properties of winemaking yeast strains can be screened by field-flow fractionation (FFF). In this work we present the use of flow FFF (FlFFF) with turbidimetric multi-wavelength detection for the number-size distribution analysis of different commercial winemaking yeast varieties. The use of a diode-array detector allows to apply to dispersed samples like yeast cells the recently developed method for number-size (or mass-size) analysis in flow-assisted separation techniques. Results for six commercial winemaking yeast strains are compared with data obtained by a standard method for cell sizing (Coulter counter). The method here proposed gives, at short analysis time, accurate information on the number of cells of a given size, and information on the total number of cells.

  19. The semi-insulating GaAs-based particle detector at IEE SAS: first imaging results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darmo, J.; Dubecký, F.; Zat'ko, B.; Boháček, P.; Sekáčová, M.; Kvitkovič, J.; Nečas, V.; Pelfer, P. G.

    2001-02-01

    A particle detector made of semi-insulating GaAs is used for preliminary study of X-ray imaging. A standard technology developed in our laboratory is applied to prepare this detector. The detector works at room temperature in the photon counting mode. Results show that the quality of images taken at chosen exposure range is limited only by the photonic noise from used X-ray source 241Am.

  20. Detectors

    DOEpatents

    Orr, Christopher Henry; Luff, Craig Janson; Dockray, Thomas; Macarthur, Duncan Whittemore; Bounds, John Alan; Allander, Krag

    2002-01-01

    The apparatus and method provide techniques through which both alpha and beta emission determinations can be made simultaneously using a simple detector structure. The technique uses a beta detector covered in an electrically conducting material, the electrically conducting material discharging ions generated by alpha emissions, and as a consequence providing a measure of those alpha emissions. The technique also offers improved mountings for alpha detectors and other forms of detectors against vibration and the consequential effects vibration has on measurement accuracy.

  1. Structure of the Accretion Disk in the Lensed Quasar Q2237+0305 from Multi-epoch and Multi-wavelength Narrowband Photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muñoz, J. A.; Vives-Arias, H.; Mosquera, A. M.; Jiménez-Vicente, J.; Kochanek, C. S.; Mediavilla, E.

    2016-02-01

    We present estimates for the size and the logarithmic slope of the disk temperature profile of the lensed quasar Q2237+0305, independent of the component velocities. These estimates are based on six epochs of multi-wavelength narrowband images from the Nordic Optical Telescope. For each pair of lensed images and each photometric band, we determine the microlensing amplitude and chromaticity using pre-existing mid-IR photometry to define the baseline for no microlensing magnification. A statistical comparison of the combined microlensing data (6 epochs × 5 narrow bands × 6 image pairs) with simulations based on microlensing magnification maps gives Bayesian estimates for the half-light radius of {R}1/2={8.5}-4.0+7.5\\sqrt{< M> /0.3 {M}⊙ } lt-day, and p = 0.95 ± 0.33 for the exponent of the logarithmic temperature profile T\\propto {R}-1/{\\text{}p}. This size estimate is in good agreement with most recent studies. Other works based on the study of single microlensing events predict smaller sizes, but could be statistically biased by focusing on high-magnification events.

  2. Proposed helmet PET geometries with add-on detectors for high sensitivity brain imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tashima, Hideaki; Yamaya, Taiga

    2016-10-01

    For dedicated brain PET, we can significantly improve sensitivity for the cerebrum region by arranging detectors in a compact hemisphere. The geometrical sensitivity for the top region of the hemisphere is increased compared with conventional cylindrical PET consisting of the same number of detectors. However, the geometrical sensitivity at the center region of the hemisphere is still low because the bottom edge of the field-of-view is open, the same as for the cylindrical PET. In this paper, we proposed a helmet PET with add-on detectors for high sensitivity brain PET imaging for both center and top regions. The key point is the add-on detectors covering some portion of the spherical surface in addition to the hemisphere. As the location of the add-on detectors, we proposed three choices: a chin detector, ear detectors, and a neck detector. For example, the geometrical sensitivity for the region-of-interest at the center was increased by 200% by adding the chin detector which increased the size by 12% of the size of the hemisphere detector. The other add-on detectors gave almost the same increased sensitivity effect as the chin detector did. Compared with standard whole-body-cylindrical PET, the proposed geometries can achieve 2.6 times higher sensitivity for brain region even with less than 1/4 detectors. In addition, we conducted imaging simulations for geometries with a diameter of 250 mm and with high resolution depth-of-interaction detectors. The simulation results showed that the proposed geometries increased image quality, and all of the add-on detectors were equivalently effective. In conclusion, the proposed geometries have high potential for widespread applications in high-sensitivity, high-resolution, and low-cost brain PET imaging.

  3. A new method of imaging particle tracks in solid state nuclear track detectors.

    PubMed

    Wertheim, D; Gillmore, G; Brown, L; Petford, N

    2010-01-01

    Solid state nuclear track detectors are used to determine the concentration of alpha particles in the environment. The standard method for assessing exposed detectors involves 2D image analysis. However 3D imaging has the potential to provide additional information relating to angle as well as to differentiate clustered hit sequences and possibly energy of alpha particles but this could be time consuming. Here we describe a new method for rapid high-resolution 3D imaging of solid state nuclear track detectors. A 'LEXT' OLS3100 confocal laser scanning microscope (Olympus Corporation, Tokyo, Japan) was used in confocal mode to successfully obtain 3D image data on four CR-39 plastic detectors. Three-dimensional visualization and image analysis enabled characterization of track features. This method may provide a means of rapid and detailed 3D analysis of solid state nuclear track detectors.

  4. First-Light Galaxies or Intrahalo Stars: Multi-Wavelength Measurements of the Infrared Background Anisotropies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooray, Asantha

    The research program described in this proposal can be broadly described as data analysis, measurement, and interpretation of the spatial fluctuations of the unresolved cosmic IR background. We will focus primarily on the background at optical and near-IR wavelengths as probed by Hubble and Spitzer. As absolute background intensity measurements are challenging, the focus is on the spatial fluctuations similar to the anisotropiesof the cosmic microwave background (CMB). Measurements of the unresolved Spitzer fluctuations by two independent teams on multiple fields agree within the measurement errors. However, there are now two interpretations on the origin of the unresolved IRAC fluctuations. One involves a population of faint sources at very high redshifts (z > 6) during the epoch of reionization. The second interpretation involves the integrated emission from intrahalo light associated with diffuse stars in the outskirts of z of 1 to 3 dark matter halos of galaxies. We now propose to further test these two interpretations with a new set of measurements at shorter IR and optical wavelengths with HST/ACS and WFC3 overlapping with deep IRAC surveys. A multi-wavelength study from 0.5 to 4.5 micron will allow us to independently determine the relative contribution of intrahalo light and z > 8 faint galaxies to the unresolved IR fluctuations. We will also place strong limits on the surface density of faint sources at z > 8. Such a limit will be useful for planning deep surveys with JWST. Moving to the recent wide IRAC fields with the warm mission, we propose to study fluctuations at tens of degree angular scales. At such large angular scales IRAC fluctuations should trace diffuse Galactic light (DGL), ISM dust-scattered starlight in our Galaxy. We will measure the amplitude and slope of the DGL power spectrum and compare them to measurements of the Galactic dust power spectrum from IRAS and Planck and study if the large degree-scale fluctuations seen in CIBER can be

  5. Multi-Wavelength Study of Nearby Dwarf Galaxies: Properties of Low-Metallicity Interstellar Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galliano, Frédéric

    2004-04-01

    This thesis is devoted to the multi-wavelength observations and the modelling of dust, in nearby low-metallicity dwarf galaxies. The main motivations of this project are: (i) the study of dust properties - composition, size distribution, etc. - in non-solar interstellar media; (ii) the study of global spectral energy distributions of dwarf galaxies which are thought, due to their chemical youth, to be similar to primordial galaxies that we can not observe; and (iii) obtaining informations about the chemical evolution of these galaxies by studying the gas-to-dust mass ratio. I begin with the detailed study of mid-infrared ISO spectra of these galaxies. The main spectral characteristics that we outline are: (i) the weakness of the aromatic band emission, compared to what is observed in normal starburst galaxies; (ii) the similarity with Galactic HII region spectra - a steep very small grain continuum and prominent ionic lines. After that, we study the spectra of a more diversified sample - spiral, starburst, dwarf galaxies and HII regions - in order to plot the band ratios. The 6.2/11.3, 7.7/11.3 and 8.6/11.3 correlations are, for the first time, established on such a large sample. They show that dwarf galaxies occupy a particular region in this diagram, different than the one occupied by Galactic HII regions, inducing a different PAH structure - ionization, hydrogenation, size, etc. The second step of this project is the modelling of the spectral energy distributions of four dwarf galaxies (He 2-10, II Zw 40, NGC 1140, NG 1569), from ultraviolet to millimeter. In order to achieve this goal, I have added, to our own observations, data from the litterature. The modelling is done self-consistently, using constraints on dust emission, stellar radiation and on ionic lines. We synthesize the spectral energy distributions of these galaxies, as well as the corresponding extinction curves. The properties that we are able to outline are that: (i) the emission is dominated by

  6. A cryogen-free HTS Josephson junction detector for terahertz imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, J.; Smart, K.; Li, L.; Leslie, K. E.; Hanham, S. M.; Wang, D. H. C.; Foley, C. P.; Ji, F.; Li, X. D.; Zeng, D. Z.

    2015-08-01

    A cryogen-free terahertz (THz) imaging system based on a high-temperature superconducting (HTS) Josephson junction detector is reported. The detector was made of a YBa2Cu3O7-x step-edge Josephson junction and integrated into an on-chip thin-film antenna. The HTS Josephson detector was cooled via a commercial mechanical cryocooler; an important step towards cryogen-free THz instrumentation, which is critical for industrial acceptance. In addition, it is shown that operating the detector in a cryocooler provides improved flexibility for optimizing the detector parameters and performance due to the ability to adjust the temperature compared to liquid nitrogen cooling methods. The dc and ac characteristics, the detector responsivity and the noise-equivalent power of the detector, and resulting image quality were studied as the function of operating temperatures.

  7. High quantum efficiency megavoltage imaging with thick scintillator detectors for image guided radiation therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopal, Arun

    In image guided radiation therapy (IGRT), imaging devices serve as guidance systems to aid patient set-up and tumor volume localization. Traditionally, 2-D megavoltage x-ray imagers, referred to as electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs), have been used for planar target localization, and have recently been extended to perform 3-D volumetric reconstruction via cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). However, current EPIDs utilize thin and inefficient phosphor screen detectors and are subsequently limited by poor soft tissue visualization, which limits their use for CBCT. Therefore, the use of thick scintillation media as megavoltage x-ray detectors for greater x-ray sensitivity and enhanced image quality has recently been of significant interest. In this research, two candidates for thick scintillators: CsI(Tl) and terbium doped scintillation glass were investigated in separate imaging configurations. In the first configuration, a thick scintillation crystal (TSC) consisting of a thick, monolithic slab of CsI(Tl) was coupled to a mirror-lens-camera system. The second configuration is based on a fiber-optic scintillation glass array (FOSGA), wherein the scintillation glass is drawn into long fiber-optic conduits, inserted into a grid-type housing constructed out of polymer-tungsten alloy, and coupled to an array of photodiodes for digital read-out. The imaging prototypes were characterized using theoretical studies and imaging measurements to obtain fundamental metrics of imaging performance. Spatial resolution was measured based on a modulation transfer function (MTF), noise was evaluated in terms of a noise power spectrum (NPS), and overall contrast was characterized in the form of detective quantum efficiency (DQE). The imaging studies were used to optimize the TSC and FOSGA imagers and propose prototype configurations for order-of-magnitude improvements in overall image quality. In addition, a fast and simple technique was developed to measure the MTF, NPS, and

  8. Introduction of a Sun/Sky-Radiometer Observation Network with the Extension of Multi-Wavelength Polarization Measurements in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, H.; Li, Z.; Li, D.; Li, K.; Chen, X.; Chen, C.; Xie, Y.; Lv, Y.; Li, L.; Li, W.; Gu, X.

    2014-12-01

    Sun/sky-radiometer is a type of ground-based remote sensing instrument which plays an important role in sun radiometry and aerosol observation in fields of climate change, atmospheric environment and earth observation. A worldwide network, known as AERONET, is initially built in 1993 and now composed of overpass 500 sites. For us, the new type of polarized sun/sky-radiometer is applied by using multi-wavelength polarimetric measuring techniques, and a Sun/Sky-radiometer Observation NETwork (SONET) has been established in China. SONET provides an long-term and reliable observation for remote sensing of aerosol optical and microphysical properties. In this paper, we introduce (i) characteristics, principles and functions of the multi-wavelength polarization radiometer and basic information about distributed field sites of SONET in Chinese typical regions; (ii) running modes, as well as parameter settings, of sun/sky radiation and polarization measurements under direct-sun, solar principal plane and almucantar geometries; (iii) calibration methods we use for solar irradiance, sky radiance and degree of linear polarization measurements, and data processing of aerosol and water vapor products together with examples under clean and haze conditions; (iv) the total column atmospheric aerosol models (urban, rural and haze models) derived from long-term continuous observation at typical sites in China. On the basis of extension of multi-wavelength polarization measurements, we also have developed other operation techniques of sun/sky-radiometer observation network including automatic observation, quick data processing, routine calibration and maintenance, which can contribute to construction of typical atmospheric aerosol models, retrieval and validation of satellite aerosol products and monitoring of atmospheric environment.

  9. Solid-state, flat-panel, digital radiography detectors and their physical imaging characteristics.

    PubMed

    Cowen, A R; Kengyelics, S M; Davies, A G

    2008-05-01

    Solid-state, digital radiography (DR) detectors, designed specifically for standard projection radiography, emerged just before the turn of the millennium. This new generation of digital image detector comprises a thin layer of x-ray absorptive material combined with an electronic active matrix array fabricated in a thin film of hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H). DR detectors can offer both efficient (low-dose) x-ray image acquisition plus on-line readout of the latent image as electronic data. To date, solid-state, flat-panel, DR detectors have come in two principal designs, the indirect-conversion (x-ray scintillator-based) and the direct-conversion (x-ray photoconductor-based) types. This review describes the underlying principles and enabling technologies exploited by these designs of detector, and evaluates their physical imaging characteristics, comparing performance both against each other and computed radiography (CR). In standard projection radiography indirect conversion DR detectors currently offer superior physical image quality and dose efficiency compared with direct conversion DR and modern point-scan CR. These conclusions have been confirmed in the findings of clinical evaluations of DR detectors. Future trends in solid-state DR detector technologies are also briefly considered. Salient innovations include WiFi-enabled, portable DR detectors, improvements in x-ray absorber layers and developments in alternative electronic media to a-Si:H. PMID:18374710

  10. Multi-wavelength and time-domain diffuse optical tomography data processing by using a material basis and Mellin-Laplace transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hervé, Lionel; Planat-Chrétien, Anne; Di Sieno, Laura; Berger, Michel; Puszka, Agathe; Dalla Mora, Alberto; Contini, Davide; Boso, Gianluca; Dinten, Jean-Marc

    2014-03-01

    In order to increase sensitivity in the depth of diffusive media and to separate chromophores with distinct spectral signatures, we developed a method to process time-domain/multi-wavelength diffuse optical acquisitions: 3D Reconstructions of chromophore concentrations are performed with an algorithm based on the use of Mellin-Laplace Transform and material basis. A noise weighted data matching term is optimized by using the conjugated gradients method without expressing the Jacobian matrix of the system. As the algorithm uses reference measurements on a known medium, it does not require measurements or computations of the instrument response function of the system. Validations are performed in the reflectance geometry on a tissue-mimicking phantom composed of intralipid and black ink and a cylindrical blue dye inclusion with a radius of 4mm located at 15mm in depth. The optical tomography setup includes a laser whose picosecond pulses are injected via an optical fiber to the probed diffusive medium and the light collected by two fibers (located 15mm apart from the source), is sent to a Single-Photon Avalanche Diode (SPAD) connected to a Time-Correlated Single-Photon Counting (TCSPC) board. The source and two detectors scan the surface of the medium so as to provide 30 source-detector couples, 900 time-bins and 5 wavelength signals. 3D reconstructions performed on the black ink and blue dye materials on a mesh of around 10000 nodes show that we are able to detect, localize and determine the composition of the inclusion and the background.

  11. A multi-wavelength, high-contrast contact radiography system for the study of low-density aerogel foams.

    PubMed

    Opachich, Y P; Koch, J A; Haugh, M J; Romano, E; Lee, J J; Huffman, E; Weber, F A; Bowers, J W; Benedetti, L R; Wilson, M; Prisbrey, S T; Wehrenberg, C E; Baumann, T F; Lenhardt, J M; Cook, A; Arsenlis, A; Park, H-S; Remington, B A

    2016-07-01

    A multi-wavelength, high contrast contact radiography system has been developed to characterize density variations in ultra-low density aerogel foams. These foams are used to generate a ramped pressure drive in materials strength experiments at the National Ignition Facility and require precision characterization in order to reduce errors in measurements. The system was used to characterize density variations in carbon and silicon based aerogels to ∼10.3% accuracy with ∼30 μm spatial resolution. The system description, performance, and measurement results collected using a 17.8 mg/cc carbon based JX-6 (C20H30) aerogel are discussed in this manuscript. PMID:27475564

  12. Multiple optical code-label processing using multi-wavelength frequency comb generator and multi-port optical spectrum synthesizer.

    PubMed

    Moritsuka, Fumi; Wada, Naoya; Sakamoto, Takahide; Kawanishi, Tetsuya; Komai, Yuki; Anzai, Shimako; Izutsu, Masayuki; Kodate, Kashiko

    2007-06-11

    In optical packet switching (OPS) and optical code division multiple access (OCDMA) systems, label generation and processing are key technologies. Recently, several label processors have been proposed and demonstrated. However, in order to recognize N different labels, N separate devices are required. Here, we propose and experimentally demonstrate a large-scale, multiple optical code (OC)-label generation and processing technology based on multi-port, a fully tunable optical spectrum synthesizer (OSS) and a multi-wavelength electro-optic frequency comb generator. The OSS can generate 80 different OC-labels simultaneously and can perform 80-parallel matched filtering. We also demonstrated its application to OCDMA.

  13. A multi-wavelength, high-contrast contact radiography system for the study of low-density aerogel foams.

    PubMed

    Opachich, Y P; Koch, J A; Haugh, M J; Romano, E; Lee, J J; Huffman, E; Weber, F A; Bowers, J W; Benedetti, L R; Wilson, M; Prisbrey, S T; Wehrenberg, C E; Baumann, T F; Lenhardt, J M; Cook, A; Arsenlis, A; Park, H-S; Remington, B A

    2016-07-01

    A multi-wavelength, high contrast contact radiography system has been developed to characterize density variations in ultra-low density aerogel foams. These foams are used to generate a ramped pressure drive in materials strength experiments at the National Ignition Facility and require precision characterization in order to reduce errors in measurements. The system was used to characterize density variations in carbon and silicon based aerogels to ∼10.3% accuracy with ∼30 μm spatial resolution. The system description, performance, and measurement results collected using a 17.8 mg/cc carbon based JX-6 (C20H30) aerogel are discussed in this manuscript.

  14. A multi-wavelength, high-contrast contact radiography system for the study of low-density aerogel foams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Opachich, Y. P.; Koch, J. A.; Haugh, M. J.; Romano, E.; Lee, J. J.; Huffman, E.; Weber, F. A.; Bowers, J. W.; Benedetti, L. R.; Wilson, M.; Prisbrey, S. T.; Wehrenberg, C. E.; Baumann, T. F.; Lenhardt, J. M.; Cook, A.; Arsenlis, A.; Park, H.-S.; Remington, B. A.

    2016-07-01

    A multi-wavelength, high contrast contact radiography system has been developed to characterize density variations in ultra-low density aerogel foams. These foams are used to generate a ramped pressure drive in materials strength experiments at the National Ignition Facility and require precision characterization in order to reduce errors in measurements. The system was used to characterize density variations in carbon and silicon based aerogels to ˜10.3% accuracy with ˜30 μm spatial resolution. The system description, performance, and measurement results collected using a 17.8 mg/cc carbon based JX-6 (C20H30) aerogel are discussed in this manuscript.

  15. The capacitive division image readout: a novel imaging device for microchannel plate detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapington, J. S.; Conneely, T. M.; Leach, S. A.; Moore, L.

    2013-09-01

    The Capacitive Division Image Readout (C-DIR) is a simple and novel image readout for photon counting detectors offering major performance advantages. C-DIR is a charge centroiding device comprising three elements; (i) a resistive anode providing event charge localization, event current return path and electrical isolation from detector high voltage, (ii) a dielectric substrate which capacitively couples the event transient signal to the third element, (iii) the readout device; an array of capacitively coupled electrodes which divides the signal among the readout charge measurement nodes. The resistive anode and dielectric substrate constitute the rear interface of the detector and capacitively couple the signal to the external C-DIR readout device. The C-DIR device is a passive, multilayer printed circuit board type device comprising a matrix of isolated electrodes whose geometries define the capacitive network. C-DIR is manufactured using conventional PCB geometries and is straightforward and economical to construct. C-DIR's robustness and simplicity belie its performance advantages. Its capacitive nature avoids partition noise, the Poisson noise associated with collection of discrete charges. The dominant noise limiting position resolution is electronic noise. However C-DIR also presents a low input capacitance to the readout electronics, minimising this noise component thus maximising spatial resolution. Optimisation of the C-DIR pattern-edge geometry can provide ~90% linear dynamic range. We present data showing image resolution and linearity of the C-DIR device in a microchannel plate detector and describe various electronic charge measurement scheme designed to exploit the full performance potential of the C-DIR device.

  16. Cherenkov detectors for spatial imaging applications using discrete-energy photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rose, Paul B.; Erickson, Anna S.

    2016-08-01

    Cherenkov detectors can offer a significant advantage in spatial imaging applications when excellent timing response, low noise and cross talk, large area coverage, and the ability to operate in magnetic fields are required. We show that an array of Cherenkov detectors with crude energy resolution coupled with monochromatic photons resulting from a low-energy nuclear reaction can be used to produce a sharp image of material while providing large and inexpensive detector coverage. The analysis of the detector response to relative transmission of photons with various energies allows for reconstruction of material's effective atomic number further aiding in high-Z material identification.

  17. Imaging results and TOF studies with axial PET detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joram, Christian

    2013-12-01

    We have developed a fully operational PET demonstrator setup which allows true 3D reconstruction of the 511 keV photons and therefore leads to practically parallax free images. The AX-PET concept is based on thin 100 mm long scintillation crystals (LYSO), axially oriented and arranged in layers around the field of view. Layers of wavelength shifting plastic strips mounted in between the crystal layers give the axial coordinate. Both crystals and WLS strips are individually read out by G-APD (SiPM) photodetectors. The fully scalable concept overcomes the dilemma of sensitivity versus spatial resolution which is inherent to classical PET designs. A demonstrator set-up based on two axial modules was exhaustively characterized using point-like sources, phantoms filled with radiotracer and finally rats and a mouse. The results entirely meet the performance expectations (<2 mm FWHM in all three coordinates over the complete field of view) and also demonstrated the ability to include Compton interactions (inter-crystal scatter) in the reconstruction without noticeable performance loss. Our recent studies focus on a TOF extension of the AX-PET concept making use of the novel digital SiPM detectors by Philips. After reproducing comparable energy and spatial resolution on a small digital AX-PET set-up with 100 mm long crystals, we demonstrated a coincidence resolving time of about 210 ps FWHM.

  18. Method for growing a back surface contact on an imaging detector used in conjunction with back illumination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blacksberg, Jordana (Inventor); Hoenk, Michael Eugene (Inventor); Nikzad, Shouleh (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A method is provided for growing a back surface contact on an imaging detector used in conjunction with back illumination. In operation, an imaging detector is provided. Additionally, a back surface contact (e.g. a delta-doped layer, etc.) is grown on the imaging detector utilizing a process that is performed at a temperature less than 450 degrees Celsius.

  19. Initial performance of the Wire Imaging Synchrotron Radiation Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Von Zanthier, C.; Gomez Cadenas, J.J.; Kent, J.; King, M.; Watson, S. ); Briggs, D.D.; Rouse, F.; Tinsman, J. )

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes the initial performance of a novel detector that measures the positions of intense synchrotron-radiation beams with high precision. Two detectors of this kind are used for the precision energy spectrometers of the Stanford Linear Collider (SLC). The detectors accurately determine the distance between pairs of intense synchrotron beams of typically 1 MeV photons, which are emitted by the primary electron and positron beams of the SLC. The detectors intercept the synchrotron beams with arrays of fine wires. The ejection of Compton-recoil electrons leaves positive charges on the wires, enabling a determination of beam positions. 6 refs., 6 figs.

  20. Multi-wavelength observations of the narrow-line Seyfert 1 galaxy RX J2314.9+2243

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komossa, S.; Myserlis, I.; Fuhrmann, L.; Xu, D.; Grupe, D.; Fan, Z.; Yao, S.; Angelakis, E.; Karamanavis, V.; Zensus, J. A.; Yuan, W.

    2016-02-01

    Narrow-line Seyfert 1 (NLS1) galaxies are a sub-class of active galactic nuclei (AGN) with relatively low-mass black holes, accreting near the Eddington rate. A small fraction of them is radio-loud and harbors relativistic jets. As a class, these provide us with new insights into the cause(s) of radio-loudness, the blazar phenomenon at low black hole masses, and the operation of radio-mode feedback. The NLS1 galaxy RXJ2314.9+2243 is remarkable for its multi-wavelength properties. We present new radio observations taken at Effelsberg, and a summary of the recent results from our multi-wavelength study. RXJ2314.9+2243 is radio-loud, luminous in the infrared, has a flat X-ray spectrum and peculiar UV spectrum, and hosts an exceptionally broad and blueshifted [OIII]λ5007 emission line, indicating the presence of a strong outflow. RXJ2314.9+2243 likely represents an extreme case of AGN induced feedback in the local universe.

  1. Demodulation of a fiber Bragg grating sensor system based on a linear cavity multi-wavelength fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cong, Shan; Sun, Yunxu; Pan, Lifeng; Fang, Yating; Tian, Jiajun; Yang, Yanfu; Yong, Yao

    2011-12-01

    A fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensor demodulation scheme based on a multi-wavelength erbium-doped fiber laser (EDFL) with linear cavity configuration is presented and demonstrated. The scheme is one linear fiber laser cavity with two FBG sensors as its filters. One is for strain sensing, and the other one is for temperature compensation. A power-symmetric nonlinear optical loop mirror (NOLM) is utilized in the laser in order to suppress the mode competition and hole-burning effect to lase two wavelengths output that correspond with two FBG sensors. The sensing quantity, which is demodulated by spectrometer, is represented by the output wavelength shift of the EDFL with temperature and strain applying on FBG sensors. In the experiment, strain measurement with a minimize resolution of 0.746μɛ, i.e. 0.9pm and adjustable linear sensitivity are achieved. Due to utilizing the linear cavity multi-wavelength EDFL with a NOLM as the light source, the scheme also exhibits important advantages including obviously high signal and noise ratio (SNR) of 40.467dB and low power consuming comparing with common FBG sensors with broadband light as the light source.

  2. Stable multi-wavelength PM-EDF linear cavity laser employing a TCF fiber comb filter and an SNOLM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Hui; Lou, Shuqin; Su, Wei; Wang, Xin; Han, Bolin

    2013-10-01

    We propose and demonstrate a stable multi-wavelength polarization-maintaining erbium-doped fiber (PM-EDF) linear cavity laser by using a twin-core fiber (TCF) comb filter and a symmetric nonlinear optical loop mirror (SNOLM). Using a homemade TCF, we fabricate a TCF comb filter with a channel spacing of 0.29 nm. By adjusting the polarization controllers (PCs) carefully, the polarization hole-burning effect in the PM-EDF is enhanced and intensity-dependent loss is produced by a nonlinear polarization rotation effect in the SNOLM. As a result, the homogeneous broadening gain medium is effectively reduced, and the mode competition of the EDF is distinctly suppressed. With only 100 mW pump power, up to 52-wavelength stable outputs with channel spacing of 0.29 nm have been achieved at room temperature. The power fluctuation and wavelength shift for each lasing wavelength are less than 0.1 dB and 0.02 nm in an hour, respectively. Experimental results illustrate that the proposed structure of a fiber laser can realize multi-wavelength outputs with high stability at lower pump power.

  3. Photon-counting H33D detector for biological fluorescence imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michalet, X.; Siegmund, O. H. W.; Vallerga, J. V.; Jelinsky, P.; Millaud, J. E.; Weiss, S.

    2006-11-01

    We have developed a photon-counting High-temporal and High-spatial resolution, High-throughput 3-Dimensional detector (H33D) for biological imaging of fluorescent samples. The design is based on a 25 mm diameter S20 photocathode followed by a 3-microchannel plate stack, and a cross-delay line anode. We describe the bench performance of the H33D detector, as well as preliminary imaging results obtained with fluorescent beads, quantum dots and live cells and discuss applications of future generation detectors for single-molecule imaging and high-throughput study of biomolecular interactions.

  4. Photon-Counting H33D Detector for Biological Fluorescence Imaging.

    PubMed

    Michalet, X; Siegmund, O H W; Vallerga, J V; Jelinsky, P; Millaud, J E; Weiss, S

    2006-11-01

    We have developed a photon-counting High-temporal and High-spatial resolution, High-throughput 3-Dimensional detector (H33D) for biological imaging of fluorescent samples. The design is based on a 25 mm diameter S20 photocathode followed by a 3-microchannel plate stack, and a cross delay line anode. We describe the bench performance of the H33D detector, as well as preliminary imaging results obtained with fluorescent beads, quantum dots and live cells and discuss applications of future generation detectors for single-molecule imaging and high-throughput study of biomolecular interactions. PMID:20151021

  5. UCD-SPI: Un-Collimated Detector Single-Photon Imaging System for Small Animal and Plant Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, Katherine Leigh

    Medical imaging systems using single gamma-ray emitting radioisotopes implement collimators in order to form images. However, a tradeoff in sensitivity is inherent in the use of collimators, and modern preclinical single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) systems detect a very small fraction of emitted gamma-rays (<0.3%). We have built a collimator-less system, which can reach sensitivity of 40% for 99mTc imaging, while still producing images of sufficient spatial resolution for certain applications in "thin" objects such as mice, small plants, and well plates used for in vitro experiments. This flexible geometry un-collimated detector single-photon imaging (UCD-SPI) system consists of two large (5 cm x 10 cm), thin (3 mm and 5 mm), closely spaced, pixelated scintillation detectors of either NaI(Tl), CsI(Na), or BGO. The detectors are read out by two adjacent Hamamatsu H8500 multichannel photomultiplier tubes. The detector heads enable the interchange of scintillation detectors of different materials and thicknesses to optimize performance for a wide range of gamma-ray energies and imaging subjects. The detectors are horizontally oriented for animal imaging, and for plant imaging the system is rotated on its side to orient the detectors vertically. While this un-collimated detector system is unable to approach the sub-mm spatial resolution obtained by the most advanced preclinical pinhole SPECT systems, the high sensitivity could enable significant and new use in molecular imaging applications which do not require good spatial resolution- for example, screening applications for drug development (small animals), for material transport and sequestration studies for phytoremediation (plants), or for counting radiolabeled cells in vitro (well plates).

  6. The CLEO-III ring imaging Cherenkov detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mountain, R. J.; Artuso, M.; Ayad, R.; Azfar, F.; Efimov, A.; Kopp, S.; Majumder, G.; Schuh, S.; Skwarnicki, T.; Stone, S.; Viehhauser, G.; Wang, J. C.; Anderson, S.; Smith, A.; Kubota, Y.; Lipeles, E.; Coan, T.; Staeck, J.; Fadeyev, V.; Volobouev, I.; Ye, J.

    1999-08-01

    The CLEO-III detector upgrade for charged particle identification is discussed. The RICH design uses solid LiF crystal radiators coupled with multi-wire chamber photon detectors, using TEA as the photosensor, and low-noise Viking readout electronics. Results from our beam test at Fermilab are presented.

  7. THE WYOMING SURVEY FOR H{alpha}. III. A MULTI-WAVELENGTH LOOK AT ATTENUATION BY DUST IN GALAXIES OUT TO z {approx} 0.4

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, Carolynn A.; Dale, Daniel A.; Barlow, Rebecca J.; Cohen, Seth A.; Cook, David O.; Johnson, L. C.; Kattner, ShiAnne M.; Staudaher, Shawn M.; Lee, Janice C.

    2010-07-15

    We report results from the Wyoming Survey for H{alpha} (WySH), a comprehensive four-square degree survey to probe the evolution of star-forming galaxies over the latter half of the age of the universe. We have supplemented the H{alpha} data from WySH with infrared data from the Spitzer Wide-area Infrared Extragalactic Survey and ultraviolet data from the Galaxy Evolution Explorer Deep Imaging Survey. This data set provides a multi-wavelength look at the evolution of the attenuation by dust, and here we compare a traditional measure of dust attenuation (L(TIR)/L(FUV)) to a diagnostic based on a recently developed robust star formation rate (SFR) indicator, [Ha{sub obs}+24{mu}m]/Ha{sub obs}. With such data over multiple epochs, the evolution in the attenuation by dust with redshift can be assessed. We present results from the ELAIS-N1 and Lockman Hole regions at z {approx} 0.16, 0.24, 0.32, and 0.40. While the ensemble averages of both diagnostics are relatively constant from epoch to epoch, each epoch individually exhibits a larger attenuation by dust for higher SFRs. Hence, an epoch-to-epoch comparison at a fixed SFR suggests a mild decrease in dust attenuation with redshift.

  8. Charge Detector for the Imaging Calorimeter for ACCESS (ICA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Jeongin; Adams, J. H., Jr.

    2000-01-01

    NASA's Advanced Cosmic Ray Experiment for the Space Station (ACCESS) Mission is planned to consist of a transition radiation detector (TRD) and a thin ionization calorimeter. In order to measure the charge of the primary cosmic ray, it is necessary for the calorimeter to have its own charge detector. Silicon detectors are chosen for the charge detector because of their excellent resolution, small size and nearly square shape. Monte Carlo simulations are performed to find the probability of misidentifying protons as alpha particles due to backscattered radiation from the calorimeter. Simulations were also used to investigate identifying primary cosmic rays that fragmented in the TRD before reaching the calorimeter. For this study algorithms have been developed for determining a direction of the core shower in the calorimeter. These algorithms are used to find the approximate location of the primary particle in the silicon detectors. Results show the probability to misidentify the charge depends upon the energy and direction of the primary particles.

  9. Chemical imaging of cotton fibers using an infrared microscope and a focal-plane array detector

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In this presentation, the chemical imaging of cotton fibers with an infrared microscope and a Focal-Plane Array (FPA) detector will be discussed. Infrared spectroscopy can provide us with information on the structure and quality of cotton fibers. In addition, FPA detectors allow for simultaneous spe...

  10. Electrostatic design of the barrel CRID (Cherenkov Ring Imaging Detector) and associated measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Abe, K.; Hasegawa, K.; Suekane, F.; Yuta, H. . Dept. of Physics); Antilogus, P.; Aston, D.; Bienz, T.; Bird, F.; Dunwoodie, W.; Hallewell, G.; Kawahara, H.; Kwon, Y.; Leith, D.W.G.S.; Muller, D.; Nagamine, T.; Pavel, T.; Ratcliff, B.; Rensing, P.; Schultz, D.; Shapiro, S.; Simopoulos, C.; Solodov, E.; Toge, N.; Va'Vra, J. Williams, H. (Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Menlo Park, CA (US

    1990-04-01

    We report on the electrostatic design and related measurements of the barrel Cherenkov Ring Imaging Detector for the Stanford Large Detector experiment at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center Linear Collider. We include test results of photon feedback in TMAE-laden gas, distortion measurements in the drift boxes and corona measurements. 13 refs., 21 figs.

  11. Scintillating-fiber imaging detector for 14-MeV neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Ress, D.; Lerche, R.A.; Ellis, R.J.; Heaton, G.W.; Nelson, M.B.; Mant, G.; Lehr, D.E.

    1994-07-25

    The authors have created a detector to image the neutrons emitted by imploded inertial-confinement fusion targets. The 14-MeV neutrons, which are produced by deuterium-tritium fusion events in the target, pass through an aperture to create an image on the detector. The neutron radiation is converted to blue light (430 nm) with a 20-cm-square array of plastic scintillating fibers. Each fiber is 10-cm long with a 1-mm-square cross section; approximately 35-thousand fibers make up the array. The resulting blue-light image is reduced and amplified by a sequence of fiber-optic tapers and image intensifiers, then acquired by a CCD camera. The fiber-optic readout system was tested optically for overall throughput the resolution. The authors plan to characterize the scintillator array reusing an ion-beam neutron source as well as DT-fusion neutrons emitted by inertial confinement targets. Characterization experiments will measure the light-production efficiency, spatial resolution, and neutron scattering within the detector. Several neutron images of laser-fusion targets have been obtained with the detector. Several neutron images of laser-fusion targets have been obtained with the detector. They describe the detector and their characterization methods, present characterization results, and give examples of the neutron images.

  12. Effects of the energy-separation filter on the performance of each detector layer in the sandwich detector for single-shot dual-energy imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, J.; Kim, D. W.; Kam, S.; Park, E.; Youn, H.; Kim, H. K.

    2016-02-01

    A novel sandwich-style single-shot detector has been built by stacking two indirect-conversion flat-panel detectors for preclinical dual-energy mouse imaging. Although this single-shot method is more immune to motion artifacts compared with the conventional dual-shot method (i.e., fast kVp switching), it may suffer from reduced image quality because of poor spectral separation between the two detectors. Spectral separation can be improved by using an intermediate filter between the two detector layers. Adversely, the filter reduces the number of x-ray photons reaching the rear detector, hence probably increasing image noise. For a better design and practical use of the sandwich detector for single-shot dual-energy imaging, imaging performances of each detector layer in the sandwich detector are investigated for various spectral-separation extents and applied tube voltages. The imaging performances include the modulation-transfer function, the Wiener noise-power spectrum, and the detective quantum efficiency. According to the experimental results, impacts of the intermediate filter on the imaging performances of each detector layer are marginal. The detailed experimental results are shown in this study.

  13. Application of a high-temperature superconducting detector to terahertz imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hellicar, Andrew D.; Du, Jia; Hanham, Stephen M.; Li, Li

    2009-05-01

    The performance of a high temperature superconducting junction detector is evaluated. The detector has been built to explore applications of terahertz imaging. The detector device is a high-temperature superconductor (HTS) Josephson junction, which is integrated with a thin-film ring-slot antenna. The ring-slot antenna is patterned on a magnesium oxide (MgO) substrate which is compatible with the detector's YBCO superconducting material lattice. A hyper-hemispherical lens made from high resistivity float zone silicon (HRFZ-Si) is mounted on the rear side of the substrate. The lens couples energy from an imaging system onto the antenna which couples the energy into the device. An existing terahertz imaging system is used in conjunction with the detector to allow for the exploration of relevant applications. The imaging system is based on a conventional quasi-optical design with a backward-wave oscillator as the source and raster scans samples for image acquisition. The imaging capability of the system has been assessed by trialing a range of applications in both transmission and reflection modes. Applications explored include imaging concealed weapons in packaging, non-destructive testing of materials, and imaging devices through plastic structures. The results generated by the imaging system demonstrate its capability for these applications.

  14. EDGES: Deep Multi-Wavelength Photometry and Radial SED Analysis for Six Nearby Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mclane, Jacob Noel; Leung, Andrew S.; Dale, Daniel A.; Barnes, Kate L.; Beltz-Mohrmann, Gillian; Egan, Arika; Hatlestad, Alan; Herzog, Laura; Kobulnicky, Henry A.; Phenicie, Christopher; Roberts, Jareth; Staudaher, Shawn; van Zee, Liese

    2015-01-01

    New deep ugr imaging was obtained on the Wyoming Infrared Observatory 2.3 meter telescope for NGC4220, NGC4618, NGC5055, NGC5523 and NGC5608, five galaxies in the Extended Disk Galaxy Exploration Science Survey (EDGES). Additional imaging was obtained for NGC4625, a non-EDGES target of opportunity. These data are coupled with deep GALEX ultraviolet and Spitzer/WISE infrared imaging to study the radial variations in the spectral energy distributions. Results from the CIGALE SED modeling software will be presented, including trends in the galaxy star formation histories. This work is supported by the National Science Foundation under REU grant AST 1063146.

  15. Velocity map photoelectron-photoion coincidence imaging on a single detector.

    PubMed

    Lehmann, C Stefan; Ram, N Bhargava; Janssen, Maurice H M

    2012-09-01

    Here we report on a new simplified setup for velocity map photoelectron-photoion coincidence imaging using only a single particle detector. We show that both photoelectrons and photoions can be extracted toward the same micro-channel-plate delay line detector by fast switching of the high voltages on the ion optics. This single detector setup retains essentially all the features of a standard two-detector coincidence imaging setup, viz., the high spatial resolution for electron and ion imaging, while only slightly decreasing the ion time-of-flight mass resolution. The new setup paves the way to a significant cost reduction in building a coincidence imaging setup for experiments aiming to obtain the complete correlated three-dimensional momentum distribution of electrons and ions.

  16. Velocity map photoelectron-photoion coincidence imaging on a single detector

    SciTech Connect

    Lehmann, C. Stefan; Ram, N. Bhargava; Janssen, Maurice H. M.

    2012-09-15

    Here we report on a new simplified setup for velocity map photoelectron-photoion coincidence imaging using only a single particle detector. We show that both photoelectrons and photoions can be extracted toward the same micro-channel-plate delay line detector by fast switching of the high voltages on the ion optics. This single detector setup retains essentially all the features of a standard two-detector coincidence imaging setup, viz., the high spatial resolution for electron and ion imaging, while only slightly decreasing the ion time-of-flight mass resolution. The new setup paves the way to a significant cost reduction in building a coincidence imaging setup for experiments aiming to obtain the complete correlated three-dimensional momentum distribution of electrons and ions.

  17. Applications of multi-spectral imaging: failsafe industrial flame detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wing Au, Kwong; Larsen, Christopher; Cole, Barry; Venkatesha, Sharath

    2016-05-01

    Industrial and petrochemical facilities present unique challenges for fire protection and safety. Typical scenarios include detection of an unintended fire in a scene, wherein the scene also includes a flare stack in the background. Maintaining a high level of process and plant safety is a critical concern. In this paper, we present a failsafe industrial flame detector which has significant performance benefits compared to current flame detectors. The design involves use of microbolometer in the MWIR and LWIR spectrum and a dual band filter. This novel flame detector can help industrial facilities to meet their plant safety and critical infrastructure protection requirements while ensuring operational and business readiness at project start-up.

  18. Single Brillouin frequency shifted S-band multi-wavelength Brillouin-Raman fiber laser utilizing fiber Bragg grating and Raman amplifier in ring cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reshak, A. H.; Hambali, N. A. M. Ahmad; Shahimin, M. M.; Wahid, M. H. A.; Anwar, Nur Elina; Alahmed, Zeyad A.; Chyský, J.

    2016-10-01

    This paper is focusing on simulation and analyzing of S-band multi-wavelength Brillouin-Raman fiber laser performance utilizing fiber Bragg grating and Raman amplifier in ring cavity. Raman amplifier-average power model is employed for signal amplification. This laser system is operates in S-band wavelength region due to vast demanding on transmitting the information. Multi-wavelength fiber lasers based on hybrid Brillouin-Raman gain configuration supported by Raman scattering effect have attracted significant research interest due to its ability to produced multi-wavelength signals from a single light source. In multi-wavelength Brillouin-Raman fiber, single mode fiber is utilized as the nonlinear gain medium. From output results, 90% output coupling ratio has ability to provide the maximum average output power of 43 dBm at Brillouin pump power of 20 dBm and Raman pump power of 14 dBm. Furthermore, multi-wavelength Brillouin-Raman fiber laser utilizing fiber Bragg grating and Raman amplifier is capable of generated 7 Brillouin Stokes signals at 1480 nm, 1510 nm and 1530 nm.

  19. A Multi-Wavelength View of Radio Galaxy Hercules-A

    NASA Video Gallery

    Spectacular jets powered by the gravitational energy of a supermassive black hole in the core of the elliptical galaxy Hercules A illustrate the combined imaging power of two of astronomy's cutting...

  20. Subtractive imaging in confocal scanning microscopy using a CCD camera as a detector.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Ortiga, Emilio; Sheppard, Colin J R; Saavedra, Genaro; Martínez-Corral, Manuel; Doblas, Ana; Calatayud, Arnau

    2012-04-01

    We report a scheme for the detector system of confocal microscopes in which the pinhole and a large-area detector are substituted by a CCD camera. The numerical integration of the intensities acquired by the active pixels emulates the signal passing through the pinhole. We demonstrate the imaging capability and the optical sectioning of the system. Subtractive-imaging confocal microscopy can be implemented in a simple manner, providing superresolution and improving optical sectioning.

  1. X-ray imaging with ``edge-on'' microchannel plate detector: first experimental results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shikhaliev, Polad M.; Molloi, Sabee

    2003-09-01

    A novel scanning slit X-ray imaging system based on an "edge-on" microchannel plate detector was developed and tested. Images were acquired at 50 kV(p) X-ray tube voltage with a limiting spatial resolution of 7 lp/mm. The pixel noise was measured to be 0.3 count/pixel/s for a 50×70 μm 2 pixel size. This photon counting detector can be considered to be virtually noise free.

  2. Recent Developments: The Gamma Ray Imager/Polarimeter for Solar Flares (GRIPS) Imaging and Detector systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duncan, Nicole; Shih, A. Y.; Hurford, G. J.; Saint-Hilaire, P.; Bain, H.; Zoglauer, A.; Lin, R. P.; Boggs, S. E.

    2013-07-01

    In two of the best-observed flares of the last cycle, the Reuven Ramaty High-Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) satellite found the centroids of ion and relativistic electron emission to have a significant displacement. This result is surprising; co-spatially accelerated ions and electrons are thought to be transported along the same field lines, implying they would enter the chromosphere together and have similar emission locations. The Gamma-Ray Imager/Polarimeter for Solar Flares (GRIPS) balloon instrument will investigate particle transport in solar flares by providing enhanced imaging, spectroscopy and polarimetry of gamma/HXR flare emission (20keV - 10MeV). GRIPS’ key technological improvements over the solar state of the art in HXR/gamma ray energies (RHESSI) include three-dimensional position-sensitive germanium detectors (3D-GeDs) and a single-grid modulating collimator, the multi-pitch rotating modulator (MPRM). The 3D-GeDs allow GRIPS to Compton track energy deposition within the crystal. This capability (1) enables the MPRM design by acting as a second modulation grid, (2) provides significant background rejection and (3) makes solar polarization measurements possible. The MPRM imager provides quasi-continuous resolution from 12.5 - 162 arcsecs with 2x the throughput of a dual grid collimator system like RHESSI. This spatial resolution can resolve the separate footpoints of many flare sizes. In comparison, RHESSI images with a minimum of 35 arcsecs for gamma-rays, making these footpoints resolvable in only the largest flares. Here, we present the intial calibration of GRIPS’ 3D-GED detectors using laboratory radioactive sources. We evaluate charge sharing between adjacent strips, the detection of coincidences and preliminary depth measurements. The detectors have been shown to have a linear response and resolve line emission. The MPRM modulation grid is constructed and we present initial results from calibration. GRIPS is scheduled for a

  3. Review on the characteristics of radiation detectors for dosimetry and imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seco, Joao; Clasie, Ben; Partridge, Mike

    2014-10-01

    The enormous advances in the understanding of human anatomy, physiology and pathology in recent decades have led to ever-improving methods of disease prevention, diagnosis and treatment. Many of these achievements have been enabled, at least in part, by advances in ionizing radiation detectors. Radiology has been transformed by the implementation of multi-slice CT and digital x-ray imaging systems, with silver halide films now largely obsolete for many applications. Nuclear medicine has benefited from more sensitive, faster and higher-resolution detectors delivering ever-higher SPECT and PET image quality. PET/MR systems have been enabled by the development of gamma ray detectors that can operate in high magnetic fields. These huge advances in imaging have enabled equally impressive steps forward in radiotherapy delivery accuracy, with 4DCT, PET and MRI routinely used in treatment planning and online image guidance provided by cone-beam CT. The challenge of ensuring safe, accurate and precise delivery of highly complex radiation fields has also both driven and benefited from advances in radiation detectors. Detector systems have been developed for the measurement of electron, intensity-modulated and modulated arc x-ray, proton and ion beams, and around brachytherapy sources based on a very wide range of technologies. The types of measurement performed are equally wide, encompassing commissioning and quality assurance, reference dosimetry, in vivo dosimetry and personal and environmental monitoring. In this article, we briefly introduce the general physical characteristics and properties that are commonly used to describe the behaviour and performance of both discrete and imaging detectors. The physical principles of operation of calorimeters; ionization and charge detectors; semiconductor, luminescent, scintillating and chemical detectors; and radiochromic and radiographic films are then reviewed and their principle applications discussed. Finally, a general

  4. MULTI-WAVELENGTH HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE PHOTOMETRY OF STELLAR POPULATIONS IN NGC 288

    SciTech Connect

    Piotto, G.; Milone, A. P.; Marino, A. F.; Jerjen, H.; Bedin, L. R.; Anderson, J.; Bellini, A.; Cassisi, S. E-mail: luigi.bedin@oapd.inaf.it E-mail: amarino@mso.anu.edu.au E-mail: jayander@stsci.edu E-mail: cassisi@oa-teramo.inaf.it

    2013-09-20

    We present new UV observations for NGC 288, taken with the WFC3 detector on board the Hubble Space Telescope, and combine them with existing optical data from the archive to explore the multiple-population phenomenon in this globular cluster (GC). The WFC3's UV filters have demonstrated an uncanny ability to distinguish multiple populations along all photometric sequences in GCs thanks to their exquisite sensitivity to the atmospheric changes that are telltale signs of second-generation enrichment. Optical filters, on the other hand, are more sensitive to stellar-structure changes related to helium enhancement. By combining both UV and optical data, we can measure the helium variation. We quantify this enhancement for NGC 288 and find that the variation is typical of what we have come to expect in other clusters.

  5. The New Maia Detector System: Methods For High Definition Trace Element Imaging Of Natural Material

    SciTech Connect

    Ryan, C. G.; Siddons, D. P.; Kuczewski, A.; Kirkham, R.; Dunn, P. A.; Hough, R. M.; Lintern, M. J.; Cleverley, J.; Moorhead, G.; De Geronimo, G.; Paterson, D. J.; Jonge, M. D. de; Howard, D. L.; Kappen, P.

    2010-04-06

    Motivated by the need for megapixel high definition trace element imaging to capture intricate detail in natural material, together with faster acquisition and improved counting statistics in elemental imaging, a large energy-dispersive detector array called Maia has been developed by CSIRO and BNL for SXRF imaging on the XFM beamline at the Australian Synchrotron. A 96 detector prototype demonstrated the capacity of the system for real-time deconvolution of complex spectral data using an embedded implementation of the Dynamic Analysis method and acquiring highly detailed images up to 77 M pixels spanning large areas of complex mineral sample sections.

  6. The New Maia Detector System: Methods For High Definition Trace Element Imaging Of Natural Material

    SciTech Connect

    Ryan, C.G.; Siddons, D.P.; Kirkham, R.; Dunn, P.A.; Kuczewski, A.; Moorhead, G.; De Geronimo, G.; Paterson, D.J.; de Jonge, M.D.; Hough, R.M.; Lintern, M.J.; Howard, D.L.; Kappen, P.; Cleverley, J.

    2010-05-25

    Motivated by the need for megapixel high definition trace element imaging to capture intricate detail in natural material, together with faster acquisition and improved counting statistics in elemental imaging, a large energy-dispersive detector array called Maia has been developed by CSIRO and BNL for SXRF imaging on the XFM beamline at the Australian Synchrotron. A 96 detector prototype demonstrated the capacity of the system for real-time deconvolution of complex spectral data using an embedded implementation of the Dynamic Analysis method and acquiring highly detailed images up to 77 M pixels spanning large areas of complex mineral sample sections.

  7. Compressive spectral polarization imaging by a pixelized polarizer and colored patterned detector.

    PubMed

    Fu, Chen; Arguello, Henry; Sadler, Brian M; Arce, Gonzalo R

    2015-11-01

    A compressive spectral and polarization imager based on a pixelized polarizer and colored patterned detector is presented. The proposed imager captures several dispersed compressive projections with spectral and polarization coding. Stokes parameter images at several wavelengths are reconstructed directly from 2D projections. Employing a pixelized polarizer and colored patterned detector enables compressive sensing over spatial, spectral, and polarization domains, reducing the total number of measurements. Compressive sensing codes are specially designed to enhance the peak signal-to-noise ratio in the reconstructed images. Experiments validate the architecture and reconstruction algorithms.

  8. Development of a cold-neutron imaging detector based on thick gaseous electron multiplier.

    PubMed

    Cortesi, M; Zboray, R; Kaestner, A; Prasser, H-M

    2013-02-01

    We present the results of our recent studies on a cold-neutron imaging detector prototype based on THick Gaseous Electron Multiplier (THGEM). The detector consists of a thin Boron layer, for neutron-to-charged particle conversion, coupled to two THGEM electrodes in cascade for charge amplification and a position-sensitive charge-readout anode. The detector operates in Ne∕(5%)CF4, at atmospheric pressure, in a stable condition at a gain of around 10(4). Due to the geometrical structure of the detector elements (THGEM geometry and charge read-out anode), the image of detector active area shows a large inhomogeneity, corrected using a dedicated flat-filed correction algorithm. The prototype provides a detection efficiency of 5% and an effective spatial resolution of the order of 1.3 mm.

  9. Development of a cold-neutron imaging detector based on thick gaseous electron multiplier

    SciTech Connect

    Cortesi, M.; Zboray, R.; Kaestner, A.; Prasser, H.-M.

    2013-02-15

    We present the results of our recent studies on a cold-neutron imaging detector prototype based on THick Gaseous Electron Multiplier (THGEM). The detector consists of a thin Boron layer, for neutron-to-charged particle conversion, coupled to two THGEM electrodes in cascade for charge amplification and a position-sensitive charge-readout anode. The detector operates in Ne/(5%)CF{sub 4}, at atmospheric pressure, in a stable condition at a gain of around 10{sup 4}. Due to the geometrical structure of the detector elements (THGEM geometry and charge read-out anode), the image of detector active area shows a large inhomogeneity, corrected using a dedicated flat-filed correction algorithm. The prototype provides a detection efficiency of 5% and an effective spatial resolution of the order of 1.3 mm.

  10. Neutron diffractometer for bio-crystallography (BIX) with an imaging plate neutron detector

    SciTech Connect

    Niimura, Nobuo

    1994-12-31

    We have constructed a dedicated diffractometer for neutron crystallography in biology (BIX) on the JRR-3M reactor at JAERI (Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute). The diffraction intensity from a protein crystal is weaker than that from most inorganic materials. In order to overcome the intensity problem, an elastically bent silicon monochromator and a large area detector system were specially designed. A preliminary result of diffraction experiment using BIX has been reported. An imaging plate neutron detector has been developed and a feasibility experiment was carried out on BIX. Results are reported. An imaging plate neutron detector has been developed and a feasibility test was carried out using BIX.

  11. Evaluation of XRI-UNO CdTe detector for nuclear medical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jambi, L. K.; Lees, J. E.; Bugby, S. L.; Tipper, S.; Alqahtani, M. S.; Perkins, A. C.

    2015-06-01

    Over the last two decades advances in semiconductor detector technology have reached the point where they are sufficiently sensitive to become an alternative to scintillators for high energy gamma ray detection for application in fields such as medical imaging. This paper assessed the Cadmium-Telluride (CdTe) XRI-UNO semiconductor detector produced by X-RAY Imatek for photon energies of interest in nuclear imaging. The XRI-UNO detector was found to have an intrinsic spatial resolution of <0.5mm and a high incident count rate capability up to at least 1680cps. The system spatial resolution, uniformity and sensitivity characteristics are also reported.

  12. A multi-wavelength erbium-doped fiber ring laser using an intrinsic Fabry-Perot interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jauregui-Vazquez, D.; Rojas-Laguna, R.; Estudillo-Ayala, J. M.; Hernandez-Garcia, J. C.; Lopez-Dieguez, Y.; Sierra-Hernandez, J. M.

    2016-10-01

    In this experimental paper, a multi-wavelength erbium-doped ring fiber laser based on an all fiber intrinsic Fabry-Perot interferometer is presented and demonstrated. The interferometer was fabricated by an arc and splicing technique using hollow core photonic crystal fiber (HCPCF) and conventional single mode fiber (SMF28). The fiber laser can be operated in single, dual and triple lasing mode by applying a transversal load over the all fiber interferometer. The laser spectrums present minimal mode spacing of 1 nm, high wavelength stability and power fluctuations around 0.5 dB. The average signal to noise ratio (SNR) of the laser emissions spectrum is around 35 dB. This fiber laser offers low cost, compactness and high wavelength stability.

  13. A screening method of oil-soluble synthetic dyes in chilli products based on multi-wavelength chromatographic fingerprints comparison.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yonghong; Wu, Yanlei; Zhou, Chunjie; Zhao, Bo; Yun, Wen; Huang, Siyu; Tao, Peng; Tu, Dawei; Chen, Shiqi

    2016-02-01

    A multi-wavelength HPLC fingerprint comparison method was proposed for the screening of oil-soluble synthetic dyes in chilli products. The screening was based on the fingerprint differences of normal unadulterated chilli sample with tested chilli samples. The samples were extracted with acetone and fingerprinted by HPLC under four visible light wavelengths (450 nm, 490 nm, 520 nm, and 620 nm). It was found that the fingerprints of different chilli product samples had a relatively fixed number of peaks and stable retention time. When 16 kinds of known synthetic dyes were used as model analytes to assess the screening efficiency, 14 of them could be screened using fingerprint comparison method, with LOD of 0.40-2.41 mg/kg. The new screening method was simple and had the possibility of finding existence of the adulterated dyes which could not be identified using known standard analytes as control. PMID:26304371

  14. A screening method of oil-soluble synthetic dyes in chilli products based on multi-wavelength chromatographic fingerprints comparison.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yonghong; Wu, Yanlei; Zhou, Chunjie; Zhao, Bo; Yun, Wen; Huang, Siyu; Tao, Peng; Tu, Dawei; Chen, Shiqi

    2016-02-01

    A multi-wavelength HPLC fingerprint comparison method was proposed for the screening of oil-soluble synthetic dyes in chilli products. The screening was based on the fingerprint differences of normal unadulterated chilli sample with tested chilli samples. The samples were extracted with acetone and fingerprinted by HPLC under four visible light wavelengths (450 nm, 490 nm, 520 nm, and 620 nm). It was found that the fingerprints of different chilli product samples had a relatively fixed number of peaks and stable retention time. When 16 kinds of known synthetic dyes were used as model analytes to assess the screening efficiency, 14 of them could be screened using fingerprint comparison method, with LOD of 0.40-2.41 mg/kg. The new screening method was simple and had the possibility of finding existence of the adulterated dyes which could not be identified using known standard analytes as control.

  15. Energy-resolved CT imaging with a photon-counting silicon-strip detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Persson, Mats; Huber, Ben; Karlsson, Staffan; Liu, Xuejin; Chen, Han; Xu, Cheng; Yveborg, Moa; Bornefalk, Hans; Danielsson, Mats

    2014-11-01

    Photon-counting detectors are promising candidates for use in the next generation of x-ray computed tomography (CT) scanners. Among the foreseen benefits are higher spatial resolution, better trade-off between noise and dose and energy discriminating capabilities. Silicon is an attractive detector material because of its low cost, mature manufacturing process and high hole mobility. However, it is sometimes overlooked for CT applications because of its low absorption efficiency and high fraction of Compton scatter. The purpose of this work is to demonstrate that silicon is a feasible material for CT detectors by showing energy-resolved CT images acquired with an 80 kVp x-ray tube spectrum using a photon-counting silicon-strip detector with eight energy thresholds developed in our group. We use a single detector module, consisting of a linear array of 50 0.5 × 0.4 mm detector elements, to image a phantom in a table-top lab setup. The phantom consists of a plastic cylinder with circular inserts containing water, fat and aqueous solutions of calcium, iodine and gadolinium, in different concentrations. By using basis material decomposition we obtain water, calcium, iodine and gadolinium basis images and demonstrate that these basis images can be used to separate the different materials in the inserts. We also show results showing that the detector has potential for quantitative measurements of substance concentrations.

  16. EDGES: Deep Multi-Wavelength Photometry and Radial SED Analysis for UGC8303 and UGC8320

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phenicie, Christopher; Dale, Daniel A.; Barnes, Kate L.; Beltz-Mohrmann, Gillian; Egan, Arika; Hatlestad, Alan; Herzog, Laura; Kobulnicky, Henry A.; Leung, Andrew S.; McLane, Jacob; Roberts, Jareth; Staudaher, Shawn; van Zee, Liese

    2015-01-01

    New deep ugr imaging was obtained on the Wyoming Infrared Observatory 2.3 meter telescope for UGC8303 and UGC8320, two galaxies in the Extended Disk Galaxy Exploration Science survey. These data are coupled with deep GALEX ultraviolet and Spitzer infrared imaging to study the radial variations in the spectral energy distributions. Results from the CIGALE SED modeling software will be presented, including trends in the galaxy star formation histories. This work is supported by the National Science Foundation under REU grant AST 1063146.

  17. EDGES: Deep Multi-Wavelength Photometry and Radial SED Analysis for NGC4707 and NGC5229

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herzog, Laura; Dale, Daniel A.; Barnes, Kate L.; Beltz-Mohrmann, Gillian; Egan, Arika; Hatlestad, Alan; Kobulnicky, Henry A.; Leung, Andrew S.; McLane, Jacob; Phenicie, Christopher; Roberts, Jareth; Staudaher, Shawn; van Zee, Liese

    2015-01-01

    New deep ugr imaging was obtained on the Wyoming Infrared Observatory 2.3 meter telescope for NGC4707 and NGC5229, two galaxies in the Extended Disk Galaxy Exploration Science survey. These data are coupled with deep GALEX ultraviolet and Spitzer infrared imaging to study the radial variations in the spectral energy distributions. Results from the CIGALE SED modeling software will be presented, including trends in the galaxy star formation histories. This work is supported by the National Science Foundation under REU grant AST 1063146.

  18. EDGES: Deep Multi-Wavelength Photometry and Radial SED Analysis for NGC4242 and UGC7301

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egan, Arika; Dale, Daniel A.; Barnes, Kate L.; Beltz-Mohrmann, Gillian; Hatlestad, Alan; Herzog, Laura; Kobulnicky, Henry A.; Leung, Andrew S.; McLane, Jacob; Phenicie, Christopher; Roberts, Jareth; Staudaher, Shawn; van Zee, Liese

    2015-01-01

    New deep ugr imaging was obtained on the Wyoming Infrared Observatory 2.3 meter telescope for NGC4242 and UGC7301, two galaxies in the Extended Disk Galaxy Exploration Science survey. These data are coupled with deep GALEX ultraviolet and Spitzer/WISE infrared imaging to study the radial variations in the spectral energy distributions. Results from the CIGALE SED modeling software will be presented, including trends in the galaxy star formation histories. This work is supported by the National Science Foundation under REU grant AST 1063146.

  19. Dual source and dual detector arrays tetrahedron beam computed tomography for image guided radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Kim, Joshua; Lu, Weiguo; Zhang, Tiezhi

    2014-02-01

    Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) is an important online imaging modality for image guided radiotherapy. But suboptimal image quality and the lack of a real-time stereoscopic imaging function limit its implementation in advanced treatment techniques, such as online adaptive and 4D radiotherapy. Tetrahedron beam computed tomography (TBCT) is a novel online imaging modality designed to improve on the image quality provided by CBCT. TBCT geometry is flexible, and multiple detector and source arrays can be used for different applications. In this paper, we describe a novel dual source-dual detector TBCT system that is specially designed for LINAC radiation treatment machines. The imaging system is positioned in-line with the MV beam and is composed of two linear array x-ray sources mounted aside the electrical portal imaging device and two linear arrays of x-ray detectors mounted below the machine head. The detector and x-ray source arrays are orthogonal to each other, and each pair of source and detector arrays forms a tetrahedral volume. Four planer images can be obtained from different view angles at each gantry position at a frame rate as high as 20 frames per second. The overlapped regions provide a stereoscopic field of view of approximately 10-15 cm. With a half gantry rotation, a volumetric CT image can be reconstructed having a 45 cm field of view. Due to the scatter rejecting design of the TBCT geometry, the system can potentially produce high quality 2D and 3D images with less radiation exposure. The design of the dual source-dual detector system is described, and preliminary results of studies performed on numerical phantoms and simulated patient data are presented.

  20. Characterization of forest fire smoke event near Washington, DC in summer 2013 with multi-wavelength lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veselovskii, I.; Whiteman, D. N.; Korenskiy, M.; Suvorina, A.; Kolgotin, A.; Lyapustin, A.; Wang, Y.; Chin, M.; Bian, H.; Kucsera, T. L.; Pérez-Ramírez, D.; Holben, B.

    2015-02-01

    The multi-wavelength lidar technique was applied to the study of a smoke event near Washington, DC on 26-28 August 2013. Satellite observations combined with transport model predictions imply that the smoke plume originated mainly from Wyoming/Idaho forest fires and its transportation to Washington, DC took approximately 5 days. The NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) multi-wavelength Mie-Raman lidar was used to measure the smoke particle intensive parameters such as extinction and backscatter Ångström exponents together with lidar ratios at 355 and 532 nm wavelengths. For interpretation of the observed vertical profiles of the backscatter Ångström exponents γβ at 355-532 and 532-1064 nm, numerical simulation was performed. The results indicate that, for fine-mode dominant aerosols, the Ångström exponents γβ(355-532) and γβ(532-1064) have essentially different dependence on the particle size and refractive index. Inversion of 3 β + 2 α lidar observations on 27-28 August provided vertical variation of the particle volume, effective radius and the real part of the refractive index through the planetary boundary layer (PBL) and the smoke layer. The particle effective radius decreased with height from approximately 0.27 μm inside the PBL to 0.15 μm in the smoke layer, which was situated above the PBL. Simultaneously the real part of the refractive index in the smoke layer increased to mR ≈ 1.5. The retrievals demonstrate also that the fine mode is predominant in the particle size distribution, and that the decrease of the effective radius with height is due to a shift of the fine mode toward smaller radii.

  1. Multi-wavelength study of Mrk 421 TeV flare observed with TACTIC telescope in February 2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, K. K.; Yadav, K. K.; Chandra, P.; Sahayanathan, S.; Bhatt, N.; Rannot, R. C.; Tickoo, A. K.; Koul, R.

    2015-02-01

    We present results from multi-wavelength study of intense flaring activity from a high frequency peaked BL Lac object Mrk 421. The source was observed in its flaring state on February 16, 2010 with the TACTIC at energies above 1.5 TeV. Near simultaneous multi-wavelength data were obtained from high energy (MeV-GeV) γ -ray observations with Fermi-LAT, X-ray observations by the Swift and MAXI satellites, optical V-band observation by SPOL at Steward Observatory and radio 15 GHz observation at OVRO 40 meter-telescope. We have performed a detailed spectral and temporal analysis of TACTIC, Fermi-LAT and Swift-XRT observations of Mrk 421 during February 10-23, 2010 (MJD 55237-55250). The flaring activity of the source is studied by investigating the properties of daily light curves from radio to TeV energy range and we present the correlation and variability analysis in each energy band. The TeV flare detected by TACTIC on February 16, 2010 is well correlated with the activity in lower energy bands. The differential energy spectrum of the source, in the energy range 1.5-11 TeV, as measured by TACTIC on this night is described by a power law (dN / dE ∝E-Γ) with spectral index Γ = 2.6 ± 0.3 . After accounting for absorption of TeV photons by low energy extragalactic background light photons via pair production, the intrinsic TeV spectrum reveals a power law index of 2.3 ± 0.3 . Finally the broad band spectral energy distribution of the source in flaring state is reproduced using a simple emission model involving synchrotron and synchrotron self Compton processes. The obtained parameters are then used to understand the energetics of the source during the flaring episode.

  2. Effects of cuff inflation and deflation on pulse transit time measured from ECG and multi-wavelength PPG.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jing; Li, Yao; Ding, Xiao-Rong; Dai, Wen-Xuan; Zhang, Yuan-Ting

    2015-01-01

    Pulse transit time (PTT), which refers to the time it takes a pulse wave to travel between two arterial sites is a promising index for cuff-less blood pressure (BP) estimation, as well as non-invasive assessment of arterial functions. However, it has not been investigated whether PTTs measured from ECG and different wavelength PPG are equally affected by the arterial status. Furthermore, comparison between the changes of different PTTs can provide enlightenment on the hardware implementation of the PTT-based BP estimation method. This work mainly studied the changes of PTTs calculated from electrocardiogram (ECG) and multi-wavelength photoplethysmogram (PPG) after exerting cuff pressure on the upper arm. A four-channel PPG acquisition system was developed to collect the multi-wavelength PPG signals of red, yellow, green and blue light at the fingertip simultaneously. Ten subjects participated in the experiment and their PTTs measured from different PPG and ECG signals before and after exerting cuff pressure were compared. This study found that within one minute after the four-minute cuff inflation and deflation process, the PTT measured from ECG and yellow PPG experienced a significant increase (p<;0.05) while the PTT from ECG and blue PPG had no statistical difference (p>0.9) compared with that before exerting cuff pressure. This indicates that PTTs calculated from different wavelength PPG have different recoverability from smooth muscle relaxation. Another interesting finding is that the PTT calculated from ECG and yellow PPG had a strong correlation (|r|>0.7) with the time difference between yellow PPG and other PPG signals, which implies the potential of the time difference between yellow PPG and other PPGs as a complementary to PTT-based model for blood pressure estimation. PMID:26737652

  3. MODELING MULTI-WAVELENGTH STELLAR ASTROMETRY. III. DETERMINATION OF THE ABSOLUTE MASSES OF EXOPLANETS AND THEIR HOST STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Coughlin, J. L.; Lopez-Morales, Mercedes

    2012-05-10

    Astrometric measurements of stellar systems are becoming significantly more precise and common, with many ground- and space-based instruments and missions approaching 1 {mu}as precision. We examine the multi-wavelength astrometric orbits of exoplanetary systems via both analytical formulae and numerical modeling. Exoplanets have a combination of reflected and thermally emitted light that causes the photocenter of the system to shift increasingly farther away from the host star with increasing wavelength. We find that, if observed at long enough wavelengths, the planet can dominate the astrometric motion of the system, and thus it is possible to directly measure the orbits of both the planet and star, and thus directly determine the physical masses of the star and planet, using multi-wavelength astrometry. In general, this technique works best for, though is certainly not limited to, systems that have large, high-mass stars and large, low-mass planets, which is a unique parameter space not covered by other exoplanet characterization techniques. Exoplanets that happen to transit their host star present unique cases where the physical radii of the planet and star can be directly determined via astrometry alone. Planetary albedos and day-night contrast ratios may also be probed via this technique due to the unique signature they impart on the observed astrometric orbits. We develop a tool to examine the prospects for near-term detection of this effect, and give examples of some exoplanets that appear to be good targets for detection in the K to N infrared observing bands, if the required precision can be achieved.

  4. Performance Analysis of Multi-Wavelength Transmission Scanner for Polarized NIR Light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atroshchenko, K.; Fontana, C. L.; De Rosa, M.; Bello, M.; Moschini, G.; Uzunov, N. M.; Rossi, P.

    2012-12-01

    A system for small-object imaging, comprising a multiple-wavelength scanner for Near Infra-Red (NIR) light is under development in the Laboratory of Radiopharmaceuticals and Molecular Imaging (LRMI) at the National Laboratories of Legnaro, INFN, Italy. The System performs scanning of biological objects using NIR light in the interval of 900nm - 1700nm. The scanned region is a rectangular with dimensions of 50mm × 80mm and is performed by consecutive positioning of InGaAs linear image sensor sliding close to the scanned object. The scanning is carried out in two different modes. The first mode is performed in transmitted linearly polarized NIR light using a set of five light emitting diodes with fixed wavelengths. The process of scanning is realized by a consecutive positioning of the NIR sensor and signal acquisition at the corresponding position. In the second scanning mode the fluorescence emission of nanoparticles such as single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs), administered in the imaged object, is excited by NIR lasers with different wavelengths. Spatial resolution of the system for transmitted linearly polarized NIR at five fixed wavelengths has been determined. Polarimetric measurements of some optically active sugars such as fructose and lactose were conducted at some fixed wavelengths in the range of 900-1200nm. The system sensitivity with respect to the concentrations of these agents has been estimated.

  5. Vision 20/20: Single photon counting x-ray detectors in medical imaging

    PubMed Central

    Taguchi, Katsuyuki; Iwanczyk, Jan S.

    2013-01-01

    Photon counting detectors (PCDs) with energy discrimination capabilities have been developed for medical x-ray computed tomography (CT) and x-ray (XR) imaging. Using detection mechanisms that are completely different from the current energy integrating detectors and measuring the material information of the object to be imaged, these PCDs have the potential not only to improve the current CT and XR images, such as dose reduction, but also to open revolutionary novel applications such as molecular CT and XR imaging. The performance of PCDs is not flawless, however, and it seems extremely challenging to develop PCDs with close to ideal characteristics. In this paper, the authors offer our vision for the future of PCD-CT and PCD-XR with the review of the current status and the prediction of (1) detector technologies, (2) imaging technologies, (3) system technologies, and (4) potential clinical benefits with PCDs. PMID:24089889

  6. A design of an uncooled thermal imaging system to block image blurring using an optimum detector warm shield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Junho; Youn, Byungyeol; Shin, Sanghoon; Park, Sangyeong; Kim, Youngjin; Lee, Jungsuk; Kim, Kihong

    2009-05-01

    Uncooled TIS is in the spotlight for its small size and low-voltage operation for personal and portable use compare to other TIS. Generally, uncooled TIS using temperature control by TEC converts the gap between TEC temperature and input-image into voltage by ROIC and outputs the analog image. For cooled detector, it is possible to block undesirable infrared input since F number of the optics and the detector are same but for uncooled detector, it is easy to get undesirable infrared input around because the F numbers are different. It becomes more obvious when temperature gap between the equipment and background gets bigger. For TIS, background temperature easily changes inside the system and around the detector because the radiating heat from the electrical circuit inside the system is getting higher as usage time passes, and it makes worse the non-uniformity output characteristics of the detector. In particular, the temperature change of the system itself which depends on its setting position and other temperaturechanging factors like electrical circuit inside the system make the additional non-uniformity worse which caused by infrared photon radiates from structures which includes optics and detector. This article would indicate the method of minimizing its image blurring which originates from the F number gap between optics and detector.

  7. 3-D imaging of particle tracks in solid state nuclear track detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wertheim, D.; Gillmore, G.; Brown, L.; Petford, N.

    2010-05-01

    It has been suggested that 3 to 5% of total lung cancer deaths in the UK may be associated with elevated radon concentration. Radon gas levels can be assessed using CR-39 plastic detectors which are often assessed by 2-D image analysis of surface images. 3-D analysis has the potential to provide information relating to the angle at which alpha particles impinge on the detector. In this study we used a "LEXT" OLS3100 confocal laser scanning microscope (Olympus Corporation, Tokyo, Japan) to image tracks on five CR-39 detectors. We were able to identify several patterns of single and coalescing tracks from 3-D visualisation. Thus this method may provide a means of detailed 3-D analysis of Solid State Nuclear Track Detectors.

  8. Continuous Scintillator Detector Blocks for Simultaneous Pet-Mr Imaging of the Human Brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rato Mendes, Pedro

    2010-04-01

    Continuous scintillator detector blocks have several advantages over pixelated designs, presenting a larger active volume and a lower cost with comparable or better energy and spatial resolutions. In this paper we describe the operation of continuous detector blocks for positron emission tomography (PET) and their suitability for multimodality imaging operating inside a magnetic resonance (MR) scanner. This detector technology is being used on a full-scale clinical scanner for human brain PET studies presently under development at Ciemat. Results will be presented on the laboratory characterization of monolithic scintillators coupled to APD matrices with ASIC readout, including images of point sources from a prototype dual-head demonstrator illustrating the potential of continuous scintillator detector blocks for high-resolution PET-MR imaging.

  9. Development and investigation of a magnetic resonance imaging-compatible microlens-based optical detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paar, Steffen; Umathum, Reiner; Jiang, Xiaoming; Majer, Charles L.; Peter, Jörg

    2015-09-01

    A noncontact optical detector for in vivo imaging has been developed that is compatible with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The optical detector employs microlens arrays and might be classified as a plenoptic camera. As a resulting of its design, the detector possesses a slim thickness and is self-shielding against radio frequency (RF) pulses. For experimental investigation, a total of six optical detectors were arranged in a cylindrical fashion, with the imaged object positioned in the center of this assembly. A purposely designed RF volume resonator coil has been developed and is incorporated within the optical imaging system. The whole assembly was placed into the bore of a 1.5 T patient-sized MRI scanner. Simple-geometry phantom studies were performed to assess compatibility and performance characteristics regarding both optical and MR imaging systems. A bimodal ex vivo nude mouse measurement was conducted. From the MRI data, the subject surface was extracted. Optical images were projected on this surface by means of an inverse mapping algorithm. Simultaneous measurements did not reveal influences from the magnetic field and RF pulses onto optical detector performance (spatial resolution, sensitivity). No significant influence of the optical imaging system onto MRI performance was detectable.

  10. Multi-wavelength optical measurement to enhance thermal/optical analysis for carbonaceous aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, L.-W. A.; Chow, J. C.; Wang, X. L.; Robles, J. A.; Sumlin, B. J.; Lowenthal, D. H.; Zimmermann, R.; Watson, J. G.

    2015-01-01

    A thermal/optical carbon analyzer equipped with seven-wavelength light source/detector (405-980 nm) for monitoring spectral reflectance (R) and transmittance (T) of filter samples allowed "thermal spectral analysis (TSA)" and wavelength (λ)-dependent organic-carbon (OC)-elemental-carbon (EC) measurements. Optical sensing was calibrated with transfer standards traceable to absolute R and T measurements, adjusted for loading effects to report spectral light absorption (as absorption optical depth (τa, λ)), and verified using diesel exhaust samples. Tests on ambient and source samples show OC and EC concentrations equivalent to those from conventional carbon analysis when based on the same wavelength (~ 635 nm) for pyrolysis adjustment. TSA provides additional information that evaluates black-carbon (BC) and brown-carbon (BrC) contributions and their optical properties in the near infrared to the near ultraviolet parts of the solar spectrum. The enhanced carbon analyzer can add value to current aerosol monitoring programs and provide insight into more accurate OC and EC measurements for climate, visibility, or health studies.

  11. Multi-wavelength optical measurement to enhance thermal/optical analysis for carbonaceous aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, L.-W. A.; Chow, J. C.; Wang, X. L.; Robles, J. A.; Sumlin, B.; Lowenthal, D. H.; Zimmermann, R.; Watson, J. G.

    2014-09-01

    A thermal/optical carbon analyzer equipped with seven-wavelength light source/detector (405-980 nm) for monitoring spectral reflectance (R) and transmittance (T) of filter samples allows "thermal spectral analysis (TSA)" and wavelength (λ)-dependent organic carbon (OC)-elemental carbon (EC) measurements. Optical sensing is calibrated with transfer standards traceable to absolute R and T measurements and adjusted for loading effects to determine spectral light absorption (as absorption optical depth [τa, λ]) using diesel exhaust samples as a reference. Tests on ambient and source samples show OC and EC concentrations equivalent to those from conventional carbon analysis when based on the same wavelength (~635 nm) for pyrolysis adjustment. TSA provides additional information that evaluates black carbon (BC) and brown carbon (BrC) contributions and their optical properties in the near-IR to the near-UV parts of the solar spectrum. The enhanced carbon analyzer can add value to current aerosol monitoring programs and provide insight into more accurate OC and EC measurements for climate, visibility, or health studies.

  12. UV-TO-FIR ANALYSIS OF SPITZER/IRAC SOURCES IN THE EXTENDED GROTH STRIP. I. MULTI-WAVELENGTH PHOTOMETRY AND SPECTRAL ENERGY DISTRIBUTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Barro, Guillermo; Perez-Gonzalez, P. G.; Gallego, J.; Villar, V.; Zamorano, J.; Ashby, M. L. N.; Kajisawa, M.; Yamada, T.; Miyazaki, S.

    2011-03-15

    We present an IRAC 3.6+4.5 {mu}m selected catalog in the Extended Groth Strip (EGS) containing photometry from the ultraviolet to the far-infrared and stellar parameters derived from the analysis of the multi-wavelength data. In this paper, we describe the method used to build coherent spectral energy distributions (SEDs) for all the sources. In a forthcoming companion paper, we analyze those SEDs to obtain robust estimations of stellar parameters such as photometric redshifts, stellar masses, and star formation rates. The catalog comprises 76,936 sources with [3.6] {<=} 23.75 mag (85% completeness level of the IRAC survey in the EGS) over 0.48 deg{sup 2}. For approximately 16% of this sample, we are able to deconvolve the IRAC data to obtain robust fluxes for the multiple counterparts found in ground-based optical images. Typically, the SEDs of the IRAC sources in our catalog count with more than 15 photometric data points, spanning from the ultraviolet wavelengths probed by GALEX to the far-infrared observed by Spitzer, and going through ground- and space-based optical and near-infrared data taken with 2-8 m class telescopes. Approximately 95% and 90% of all IRAC sources are detected in the deepest optical and near-infrared bands. These fractions are reduced to 85% and 70% for S/N > 5 detections in each band. Only 10% of the sources in the catalog have optical spectroscopy and redshift estimations. Almost 20% and 2% of the sources are detected by MIPS at 24 and 70 {mu}m, respectively. We also cross-correlate our catalog with public X-ray and radio catalogs. Finally, we present the Rainbow Navigator public Web interface utility, designed to browse all the data products resulting from this work, including images, spectra, photometry, and stellar parameters.

  13. Stellar Populations in Compact Galaxy Groups: a Multi-wavelength Study of HCGs 16, 22, and 42, Their Star Clusters, and Dwarf Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Konstantopoulos, I. S.; Maybhate, A.; Charlton, J. C.; Fedotov, K.; Durrell, P. R.; Mulchaey, J. S.; English, J.; Desjardins, T. D.; Gallagher, S. C.; Walker, L. M.; Johnson, K. E.; Tzanavaris, Panayiotis; Gronwall, C.

    2013-01-01

    We present a multi-wavelength analysis of three compact galaxy groups, Hickson compact groups (HCGs) 16, 22, and 42, which describe a sequence in terms of gas richness, from space- (Swift, Hubble Space Telescope (HST), and Spitzer) and ground-based (Las Campanas Observatory and Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory) imaging and spectroscopy.We study various signs of past interactions including a faint, dusty tidal feature about HCG 16A, which we tentatively age-date at <1 Gyr. This represents the possible detection of a tidal feature at the end of its phase of optical observability. Our HST images also resolve what were thought to be double nuclei in HCG 16C and D into multiple, distinct sources, likely to be star clusters. Beyond our phenomenological treatment, we focus primarily on contrasting the stellar populations across these three groups. The star clusters show a remarkable intermediate-age population in HCG 22, and identify the time at which star formation was quenched in HCG 42. We also search for dwarf galaxies at accordant redshifts. The inclusion of 33 members and 27 "associates" (possible members) radically changes group dynamical masses, which in turn may affect previous evolutionary classifications. The extended membership paints a picture of relative isolation in HCGs 16 and 22, but shows HCG 42 to be part of a larger structure, following a dichotomy expected from recent studies. We conclude that (1) star cluster populations provide an excellent metric of evolutionary state, as they can age-date the past epochs of star formation; and (2) the extended dwarf galaxy population must be considered in assessing the dynamical state of a compact group.

  14. STELLAR POPULATIONS IN COMPACT GALAXY GROUPS: A MULTI-WAVELENGTH STUDY OF HCGs 16, 22, AND 42, THEIR STAR CLUSTERS, AND DWARF GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Konstantopoulos, I. S.; Maybhate, A.; Charlton, J. C.; Gronwall, C.; Fedotov, K.; Desjardins, T. D.; Gallagher, S. C.; Durrell, P. R.; Mulchaey, J. S.; English, J.; Walker, L. M.; Johnson, K. E.; Tzanavaris, P.

    2013-06-20

    We present a multi-wavelength analysis of three compact galaxy groups, Hickson compact groups (HCGs) 16, 22, and 42, which describe a sequence in terms of gas richness, from space- (Swift, Hubble Space Telescope (HST), and Spitzer) and ground-based (Las Campanas Observatory and Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory) imaging and spectroscopy. We study various signs of past interactions including a faint, dusty tidal feature about HCG 16A, which we tentatively age-date at <1 Gyr. This represents the possible detection of a tidal feature at the end of its phase of optical observability. Our HST images also resolve what were thought to be double nuclei in HCG 16C and D into multiple, distinct sources, likely to be star clusters. Beyond our phenomenological treatment, we focus primarily on contrasting the stellar populations across these three groups. The star clusters show a remarkable intermediate-age population in HCG 22, and identify the time at which star formation was quenched in HCG 42. We also search for dwarf galaxies at accordant redshifts. The inclusion of 33 members and 27 ''associates'' (possible members) radically changes group dynamical masses, which in turn may affect previous evolutionary classifications. The extended membership paints a picture of relative isolation in HCGs 16 and 22, but shows HCG 42 to be part of a larger structure, following a dichotomy expected from recent studies. We conclude that (1) star cluster populations provide an excellent metric of evolutionary state, as they can age-date the past epochs of star formation; and (2) the extended dwarf galaxy population must be considered in assessing the dynamical state of a compact group.

  15. Recent progress with the MicroCAT gaseous imaging detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orthen, A.; Wagner, H.; Besch, H. J.; Menk, R. H.; Sarvestani, A.; Walenta, A. H.; Walliser, H.

    2002-02-01

    The detector, presented here, is a combination of the MicroCAT gas gain device with a truly two-dimensional interpolating readout structure. A new spacer concept has been developed to keep a constant distance between the gas gain and the readout structure, also for increased detection areas. Thus, it was possible to enlarge the sensitive area by a factor 16 to 56×56 mm2. The interpolating anode combines the advantages of a pure pixel device with a reduced number of electronic readout channels, nevertheless reaching a spatial resolution of about 200 μm. In order to understand the physical behaviour of the two-dimensional interpolating structure and to optimise this device for different applications a numerical simulation of the signal development was performed. Recent results of the MicroCAT detector demonstrate the applicability of this detector system in the field of protein crystallography and time resolved measurements in the microsecond range.

  16. Dead-time effects in microchannel-plate imaging detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zombeck, Martin V.; Fraser, George W.

    1991-01-01

    The observed counting rates of microchannel plate (MCP) based detectors for high resolution observations of celestial EUV and X-ray sources vary over many orders of magnitude; the counting capability of an individual channel, however, is not high, and is associated with dead-times ranging from 0.1 msec to 1 sec. The dead-time increases with the area illuminated; attention is presently given to laboratory determinations of the count rate characteristics of a MCP detector as a function of illuminated area, and a model is developed for these results' use in the interpretation of space observations.

  17. The Development of the Detector and Imaging Systems of the Masco Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damico, Flavio

    1997-08-01

    In this thesis the detector and imaging systems of the MASCO telescope are described. MASCO is a gamma-ray imaging telescope with both high angular resolution and sensitivity. Conceived to be able to individually study sources in crowded fields, MASCO is an ideal mission to map sky regions like the Galactic Center. A revision of recent observational results obtained with imaging telescopes of this particular region is presented. Also presented is the sensitivity of the telescope for pulsed gamma-ray sources, taking GX 1+4 as an example. MASCO employs the coded-aperture imaging technique, and will be the first telescope to use a new type of mask patterns, the modified uniformly redundant arrays (MURAs). The coded-aperture imaging technique is reviewed and interesting properties of the MURAs discussed. This work gives two original contributions for MURA based coded mask telescopes: an empirical rule that says which MURA pattern is convenient to build a mask when we want to make observations with the mask-antimask method and the definition of the rotation center of a MURA pattern. MASCO uses a large number of scintillation detectors. The main detector of the experiment is a 41 cm diameter and 5 cm thick inorganic NaI(Tl) scintillation detector in an Anger Camera configuration, with approximately 10% energy resolution in 662 keV. Organic scintillation detectors are used to minimize the telescope background. and large volume scintillation detectors were built for the first time in Brazil. MASCO uses 12 of these scintillation detectors and the fabrication process are discussed together with tests for 2 different types of these detectors. MASCO shall have an angular resolution of 14 min in a 14 deg field-of-view and 20 micro-s of temporal resolution. A simulated image of the Galactic Center region in the 50-150 keV energy band is presented in order to show the imaging capabilities of the telescope. Preliminary tests results obtained with the detector and imaging systems

  18. X-ray imaging using a 320 x 240 hybrid GaAs pixel detector

    SciTech Connect

    Irsigler, R.; Andersson, J.; Alverbro, J.

    1999-06-01

    The authors present room temperature measurements on 200 {micro}m thick GaAs pixel detectors, which were hybridized to silicon readout circuits. The whole detector array contains 320 x 240 square shaped pixel with a pitch of 38 {micro}m and is based on semi-insulating liquid-encapsulated Czochralski (LEC) GaAs material. After fabricating and dicing, the detector chips were indium bump flip chip bonded to CMOS readout circuits based on charge integration and finally evaluated. This readout chip was originally designed for the readout of flip chip bonded infrared detectors, but appears to be suitable for X-ray applications as well. A bias voltage between 50 V and 100 V was sufficient to operate the detector at room temperature. The detector array did respond to x-ray radiation by an increase in current due to production of electron hole pairs by the ionization processes. Images of various objects and slit patterns were acquired by using a standard X-ray source for dental imaging. The new X-ray hybrid detector was analyzed with respect to its imaging properties. Due to the high absorption coefficient for X-rays in GaAs and the small pixel size, the sensor shows a high modulation transfer function up to the Nyquist frequency.

  19. Photoacoustic projection imaging using a 64-channel fiber optic detector array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer-Marschallinger, Johannes; Felbermayer, Karoline; Bouchal, Klaus-Dieter; Veres, Istvan A.; Grün, Hubert; Burgholzer, Peter; Berer, Thomas

    2015-03-01

    In this work we present photoacoustic projection imaging with a 64-channel integrating line detector array, which average the pressure over cylindrical surfaces. For imaging, the line detectors are arranged parallel to each other on a cylindrical surface surrounding a specimen. Thereby, the three-dimensional imaging problem is reduced to a twodimensional problem, facilitating projection imaging. After acquisition of a dataset of pressure signals, a twodimensional photoacoustic projection image is reconstructed. The 64 channel line detector array is realized using optical fibers being part of interferometers. The parts of the interferometers used to detect the ultrasonic pressure waves consist of graded-index polymer-optical fibers (POFs), which exhibit better sensitivity than standard glass-optical fibers. Ultrasonic waves impinging on the POFs change the phase of light in the fiber-core due to the strain-optic effect. This phase shifts, representing the pressure signals, are demodulated using high-bandwidth balanced photo-detectors. The 64 detectors are optically multiplexed to 16 detection channels, thereby allowing fast imaging. Results are shown on a Rhodamine B dyed microsphere.

  20. A Multi-Wavelength Investigation of the Star Formation Processes in the SHIELD Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teich, Yaron G.; McNichols, Andrew Thomas; Cannon, John M.

    2015-08-01

    We analyze the relationships between HI mass surface density and star formation in the 12 galaxies that comprise the Survey of HI in Extremely Low-Mass Dwarfs (SHIELD). The SHIELD galaxies were selected from the first ~10% of data from the Arecibo Legacy Fast ALFA (ALFALFA) survey; they harbor low-mass HI reservoirs (6.6 < log(M(HI)) < 7.8) that make them critical testbeds for our understanding of the process of star formation in shallow potential wells. Using HI imaging from the VLA, Hα imaging from the WIYN 3.5m telescope, and archival GALEX imaging (available for most sample members), we compare the locations and intensities of star formation with the properties of the neutral ISM. Despite the low HI column densities observed in these systems, each SHIELD galaxy has a significant blue stellar population; there is ongoing star formation in all but one of the galaxies. We find that the regions of Hα emission are co-located with regions of high HI column densities. We compare the degree of overlap of HI dense knots with local UV maxima, with the goal of identifying whether Hα or UV emission more strongly correlates with regions of high HI column density. We calculate the specific SFR and SFR density for the galaxies in the sample, and examine the relationships of HI mass and SFR (from Hα, UV, and averaged from both) for selected sources. We also calculate the star formation efficiency (SFE) for each galaxy in the sample (total SFR / total gas mass) and note its dependence on HI column density.This work is a result of collaboration with the SHIELD Team and is supported by NSF grant 1211683.

  1. Multi-wavelengths digital holography: reconstruction, synthesis and display of holograms using adaptive transformation.

    PubMed

    Memmolo, P; Finizio, A; Paturzo, M; Ferraro, P; Javidi, B

    2012-05-01

    A method based on spatial transformations of multiwavelength digital holograms and the correlation matching of their numerical reconstructions is proposed, with the aim to improve superimposition of different color reconstructed images. This method is based on an adaptive affine transform of the hologram that permits management of the physical parameters of numerical reconstruction. In addition, we present a procedure to synthesize a single digital hologram in which three different colors are multiplexed. The optical reconstruction of the synthetic hologram by a spatial light modulator at one wavelength allows us to display all color features of the object, avoiding loss of details.

  2. Tests of innovative photon detectors and integrated electronics for the large-area CLAS12 ring-imaging Cherenkov detector

    SciTech Connect

    Contalbrigo, Marco

    2015-07-01

    A large area ring-imaging Cherenkov detector has been designed to provide clean hadron identification capability in the momentum range from 3 GeV/c to 8 GeV/c for the CLAS12 experiments at the upgraded 12 GeV continuous electron beam accelerator facility of Jefferson Lab. Its aim is to study the 3D nucleon structure in the yet poorly explored valence region by deep-inelastic scattering, and to perform precision measurements in hadron spectroscopy. The adopted solution foresees a novel hybrid optics design based on an aerogel radiator, composite mirrors and a densely packed and highly segmented photon detector. Cherenkov light will either be imaged directly (forward tracks) or after two mirror reflections (large angle tracks). Extensive tests have been performed on Hamamatsu H8500 and novel flat multi-anode photomultipliers under development and on various types of silicon photomultipliers. A large scale prototype based on 28 H8500 MA-PMTs has been realized and tested with few GeV/c hadron beams at the T9 test-beam facility of CERN. In addition a small prototype was used to study the response of customized SiPM matrices within a temperature interval ranging from 25 down to –25 °C. The preliminary results of the individual photon detector tests and of the prototype performance at the test-beams are here reported.

  3. Development of a three-layer phoswich alpha-beta-gamma imaging detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Seiichi; Ishibashi, Hiroyuki

    2015-06-01

    For radiation monitoring at the sites of such nuclear power plant accidents as Fukushima Daiichi, radiation detectors are needed not only for gamma photons but also for alpha and beta particles because some nuclear fission products emit beta particles and gamma photons and some nuclear fuels contain plutonium that emits alpha particles. In some applications, imaging detectors are required to detect the distribution of plutonium particles that emit alpha particles and radiocesium in foods that emits beta particles and gamma photons. To solve these requirements, we developed an imaging detector that can measure the distribution of alpha and beta particles as well as gamma photons. The imaging detector consists of three-layer scintillators optically coupled to each other and to a position sensitive photomultiplier tube (PSPMT). The first layer, which is made of a thin plastic scintillator (decay time: ~5 ns), detects alpha particles. The second layer, which is made of a thin Gd2SiO5 (GSO) scintillator with 1.5 mol% Ce (decay time: 35 ns), detects beta particles. The third layer made of a thin GSO scintillator with 0.4 mol% Ce (decay time: 70 ns) detects gamma photons. Using pulse shape discrimination, the images of these layers can be separated. The position information is calculated by the Anger principle from 8×8 anode signals from the PSPMT. The images for the alpha and beta particles and the gamma photons are individually formed by the pulse shape discriminations for each layer. We detected alpha particle images in the first layer and beta particle images in the second layer. Gamma photon images were detected in the second and third layers. The spatial resolution for the alpha and beta particles was ~1.25 mm FWHM and less than 2 mm FWHM for the gamma photons. We conclude that our developed alpha-beta-gamma imaging detector is promising for imaging applications not only for the environmental monitoring of radionuclides but also for medical and molecular imaging.

  4. COMPARISON OF WIRELESS DETECTORS FOR DIGITAL RADIOGRAPHY SYSTEMS: IMAGE QUALITY AND DOSE.

    PubMed

    Mourik, J E M; van der Tol, P; Veldkamp, W J H; Geleijns, J

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare dose and image quality of wireless detectors for digital chest radiography. Entrance dose at both the detector (EDD) and phantom (EPD) and image quality were measured for wireless detectors of seven different vendors. Both the local clinical protocols and a reference protocol were evaluated. In addition, effective dose was calculated. Main differences in clinical protocols involved tube voltage, tube current, the use of a small or large focus and the use of additional filtration. For the clinical protocols, large differences in EDD (1.4-11.8 µGy), EPD (13.9-80.2 µGy) and image quality (IQFinv: 1.4-4.1) were observed. Effective dose was <0.04 mSv for all protocols. Large differences in performance were observed between the seven different systems. Although effective dose is low, further improvement of imaging technology and acquisition protocols is warranted for optimisation of digital chest radiography.

  5. 2D dose distribution images of a hybrid low field MRI-γ detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abril, A.; Agulles-Pedrós, L.

    2016-07-01

    The proposed hybrid system is a combination of a low field MRI and dosimetric gel as a γ detector. The readout system is based on the polymerization process induced by the gel radiation. A gel dose map is obtained which represents the functional part of hybrid image alongside with the anatomical MRI one. Both images should be taken while the patient with a radiopharmaceutical is located inside the MRI system with a gel detector matrix. A relevant aspect of this proposal is that the dosimetric gel has never been used to acquire medical images. The results presented show the interaction of the 99mTc source with the dosimetric gel simulated in Geant4. The purpose was to obtain the planar γ 2D-image. The different source configurations are studied to explore the ability of the gel as radiation detector through the following parameters; resolution, shape definition and radio-pharmaceutical concentration.

  6. Analysis and design of concave grating-based devices for multi-wavelength optical networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Churin, Evgeny G.

    This thesis is focused on the analysis and design of concave holographic gratings for applications in wavelength division multiplexed (WDM) optical network devices, such as multi/demultiplexers, routers and channel equalizers. The main advantage of this approach is that a single optical element can perform both functions of dispersion and imaging. However, the design of such gratings for operation in optical fibre communication networks requires the understanding and control of dominant optical aberrations, stray light, and polarization sensitivity. The solution of these problems forms the basis of the work in this thesis. Chapter 1 presents the motivation for the work, describes the major objectives and lists the main original contributions. Chapter 2 reviews related works in the field of WDM optical networks. Different published methods and techniques used for channel separation are described. Chapter 3 describes the analysis of crosstalk in free-space WDM demultiplexers and wavelength routers due to aberrations, diffraction at the aperture, and diffuse scattering from non-uniformities. It is demonstrated experimentally that holographic grating can give background crosstalk as low as -60 dB. Holographic grating-based wavelength routers are shown to be absolutely scalable from the coherent crosstalk point of view, allowing a large number of subscribers/nodes to be interconnected. Chapter 4 presents aberration analysis of concave grating. New general analytic formulae that define the parameters of concave grating mounts providing stationary and superstationary astigmatism are derived. These mounts offer diffraction-limited imaging within operating spectral range of WDM demultiplexers. A novel retro-reflective scheme of demultiplexer with concave grating and convex mirror resulting in double dispersion and large image field is proposed and analyzed. Chapter 5 describes in detail all stages of design and adjustment of an athermal 49-channel demultiplexer. The method

  7. Image blurring due to light-sharing in PET block detectors

    SciTech Connect

    St James, Sara; Thompson, Christopher J.

    2006-02-15

    The spatial resolution in PET is poorer than that of CT or MRI. All modern PET scanners use block detectors, i.e., clusters of scintillation crystals coupled to four photomultiplier tubes. Some of the loss of spatial resolution in PET is attributed to the use of block detectors, because a photon that interacts with one crystal in the cluster may be incorrectly positioned, resulting in blurring of the reconstructed image. This is called the ''block effect.'' The block effect was measured for detectors from the CTI HR+ scanner, and the GE Advance scanner; two popular clinical PET scanners. The effect of changing the depth of first interaction of a gamma ray in the scintillation crystals was also studied to determine if it may be a contributor to the block effect. The block effect was found to be 1.2{+-}0.5 mm for the central crystals and negligible for the edge crystals in the CTI HR+ block. It was 0.9{+-}0.3 mm in the central crystals of the GE Advance detector, and 0.7{+-}0.3 mm in the edge crystals of the GE Advance detector. In the CTI HR+ detector, a depth dependence on the positioning of the event was observed, as was a dependence on the crystal location (edge versus center). In the GE Advance detector events that occurred at different interaction depths were positioned consistently. The percentage of events that may be positioned inaccurately was also calculated for both detectors. In the CTI HR+ detector as many as 16% of all events in the block detector may be positioned incorrectly. In the GE Advance detector as many as 13% of all events in the block detector may be positioned inaccurately. These results suggest that the depth of interaction of an annihilation photon may contribute to the block effect in detectors that use crystals cut from a single scintillation crystal (pseudodiscrete crystals), and is less dominant a factor for detectors that use discrete crystals with light sharing between the crystals. Investigating the effect of changing photon

  8. Multi-wavelength analysis of a 2011 stellar occultation by Chiron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sickafoose, Amanda A.; Emery, Joshua P.; Bosh, Amanda S.; Person, Michael J.; Zuluaga, Carlos; Ruprecht, Jessica D.; Bianco, Federica; Bus, Schelte J.; Zangari, Amanda Marie

    2016-10-01

    The centaur (2060) Chiron was originally thought to be asteroid-like; however, photometry in the late 1980s revealed an increase in brightness and eventually a directly-imaged coma (e.g. Meech, K.J., & Belton, M.J.S., 1990, AJ, 100,4). Previous stellar occultation observations for Chiron have detected features thought to be narrow jets, a gravitationally-bound dust coma, and a near-circular ring or shell of material (Elliot, J.L., 1995, Nature, 373, 46; Bus, S.J., et al., 1996, Icarus, 123, 478; Ruprecht, J.D., et al. 2015, Icarus, 252, 271). These detections are unusual given Chiron's relatively large distance from the Sun and its relatively large nucleus compared to comet nuclei. The discovery of a ring system around the centaur Chariklo (Braga-Ribas, F., et al. 2014, Nature, 508, 78) provides context for Chiron. A ring system for Chiron has recently been proposed based on a combined analysis of occultation data, the rotational light curve, and spectral variability (Ortiz, J.L., et al. 2015, A&A, 576, A18).Chiron occulted a fairly bright star (R = 14.8) on 2011 November 29. We observed the event with high-speed, visible imaging from NASA's 3-m Infrared Telescope Facility (IRTF) on Mauna Kea and the 2-m Faulkes Telescope North at Haleakala (run by the Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope network, LCOGT). At the IRTF, we simultaneously obtained low-resolution, near-infrared spectra spanning 0.9-2.4 microns. Here, we present an analysis of the combined visible and near-infrared occultation data. Distinct extinction features were detected in the visible data, located roughly 300 km from the center (Ruprecht, J.D., et al. 2015, Icarus, 252, 271). We investigate flux versus wavelength trends in the near-infrared data in order to constrain the properties of extinction-causing particles.

  9. Multi-wavelength Observations of a Subarcsecond Penumbral Transient Brightening Event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, X. Y.; Su, J. T.; Cao, W. D.; Liu, S. Q.; Deng, Y. Y.; Priya, T. G.

    2016-05-01

    We report a subarcsecond penumbral transient brightening event with the high-spatial resolution observations from the 1.6 m New Solar Telescope (NST), Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS), and the Solar Dynamics Observatory. The transient brightening, whose thermal energy is in the range of nanoflares, has signatures in the chromosphere, the transient region, and the corona. NST's Hα channel reveals the fine structure of the event with a width as narrow as 101 km (0.″14), which is much smaller than the width from the previous observation. The transient brightening lasts for about 3 minutes. It is associated with a redshift of about 17 km s-1, found in the Si iv 1402.77 Å line and exhibits an inward motion to the umbra with a speed of 87 km s-1. The small-scale energy released from the event has a multi-temperature component. Spectral analysis of the brightening region from IRIS shows that not only the transition region lines such as Si iv 1402.77 Å and C ii 1334.53 Å, but also the chromospheric Mg ii k 2796.35 Å line are significantly enhanced and broadened. In addition, the event can be found in all the extreme-ultraviolet passbands of the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly and the derived differential emission measure profile increases between 4 and 15 MK (or 6.6 ≤ log T ≤ 7.2) in the transient brightening phase. It is possible that the penumbral transient brightening event is caused by magnetic reconnection.

  10. Development of the MAMA Detectors for the Hubble Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Timothy, J. Gethyn

    1997-01-01

    The development of the Multi-Anode Microchannel Array (MAMA) detector systems started in the early 1970's in order to produce multi-element detector arrays for use in spectrographs for solar studies from the Skylab-B mission. Development of the MAMA detectors for spectrographs on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) began in the late 1970's, and reached its culmination with the successful installation of the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) on the second HST servicing mission (STS-82 launched 11 February 1997). Under NASA Contract NAS5-29389 from December 1986 through June 1994 we supported the development of the MAMA detectors for STIS, including complementary sounding rocket and ground-based research programs. This final report describes the results of the MAMA detector development program for STIS.

  11. A multi-channel high time resolution detector for high content imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapington, J. S.; Fraser, G. W.; Miller, G. M.; Ashton, T. J. R.; Jarron, P.; Despeisse, M.; Powolny, F.; Howorth, J.; Milnes, J.

    2009-10-01

    Medical imaging has long benefited from advances in photon counting detectors arising from space and particle physics. We describe a microchannel plate-based detector system for high content (multi-parametric) analysis, specifically designed to provide a step change in performance and throughput for measurements in imaged live cells and tissue for the 'omics'. The detector system integrates multi-channel, high time resolution, photon counting capability into a single miniaturized detector with integrated ASIC electronics, comprising a fast, low power amplifier discriminator and TDC for every channel of the discrete pixel electronic readout, and achieving a pixel density improvement of order two magnitudes compared with current comparable devices. The device combines high performance, easy reconfigurability, and economy within a compact footprint. We present simulations and preliminary measurements in the context of our ultimate goals of 20 ps time resolution with multi-channel parallel analysis (1024 channels).

  12. Position sensitive detectors for the proposed AXAF imaging optical/UV monitor (AXIOM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allington-Smith, J. R.; Mason, I. M.; Schwarz, H. E.; Culhane, J. L.

    1985-02-01

    A description is given of the imaging detectors of the AXIOM instrument proposed for NASA's Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility (AXAF). The instrument is aligned with the X-ray telescope and consists of a diffraction limited, 30-cm aperture, telescope with redundant position sensitive detectors at the focus. This allows simultaneous imaging at optical and near UV wavelengths of the X-ray target objects. The proposed detectors cover a field of view of 8.5 x 8.5 sq arcmin with a resolution of 1 arcsec (= 50 microns FWHM). The quantum efficiency peaks at 30 percent and exceeds 10 percent over the wavelength range 125 to 540 nm. The detector design consists of a bi-alkali photocathode on a UV-transmitting window, proximity focussed onto a microchannel plate intensifier with a wedge and strip readout system, and is optimized for high count rates both from point sources and from the sky background.

  13. High energy X-ray photon counting imaging using linear accelerator and silicon strip detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Y.; Shimazoe, K.; Yan, X.; Ueda, O.; Ishikura, T.; Fujiwara, T.; Uesaka, M.; Ohno, M.; Tomita, H.; Yoshihara, Y.; Takahashi, H.

    2016-09-01

    A photon counting imaging detector system for high energy X-rays is developed for on-site non-destructive testing of thick objects. One-dimensional silicon strip (1 mm pitch) detectors are stacked to form a two-dimensional edge-on module. Each detector is connected to a 48-channel application specific integrated circuit (ASIC). The threshold-triggered events are recorded by a field programmable gate array based counter in each channel. The detector prototype is tested using 950 kV linear accelerator X-rays. The fast CR shaper (300 ns pulse width) of the ASIC makes it possible to deal with the high instant count rate during the 2 μs beam pulse. The preliminary imaging results of several metal and concrete samples are demonstrated.

  14. IR Imaging Using Arrays of SiO2 Micromechanical Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Grbovic, Dragoslav; Lavrik, Nickolay V; Rajic, Slobodan; Datskos, Panos G; Hunter, Scott Robert

    2012-01-01

    In this letter, we describe the fabrication of an array of bimaterial detectors for infrared (IR) imaging that utilize SiO2 as a structural material. All the substrate material underneath the active area of each detector element was removed. Each detector element incorporates an optical resonant cavity layer in the IR absorbing region of the sensing element. The simplified microfabrication process requires only four photolithographic steps with no wet etching or sacrificial layers. The thermomechanical deflection sensitivity was 7.9 10-3 rad/K which corresponds to a noise equivalent temperature difference (NETD) of 2.9 mK. In the present work the array was used to capture IR images while operating at room temperature and atmospheric pressure and no need for vacuum packaging. The average measured NETD of our IR detector system was approximately 200 mK but some sensing elements exhibited an NETD of 50 mK.

  15. Image reconstruction for single detector rosette scanning systems based on compressive sensing theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uzeler, Hande; Cakir, Serdar; Aytaç, Tayfun

    2016-02-01

    Compressive sensing (CS) is a signal processing technique that enables a signal that has a sparse representation in a known basis to be reconstructed using measurements obtained below the Nyquist rate. Single detector image reconstruction applications using CS have been shown to give promising results. In this study, we investigate the application of CS theory to single detector infrared (IR) rosette scanning systems which suffer from low performance compared to costly focal plane array (FPA) detectors. The single detector pseudoimaging rosette scanning system scans the scene with a specific pattern and performs processing to estimate the target location without forming an image. In this context, this generation of scanning systems may be improved by utilizing the samples obtained by the rosette scanning pattern in conjunction with the CS framework. For this purpose, we consider surface-to-air engagement scenarios using IR images containing aerial targets and flares. The IR images have been reconstructed from samples obtained with the rosette scanning pattern and other baseline sampling strategies. It has been shown that the proposed scheme exhibits good reconstruction performance and a large size FPA imaging performance can be achieved using a single IR detector with a rosette scanning pattern.

  16. Chord-based image reconstruction in cone-beam CT with a curved detector

    SciTech Connect

    Zuo Nianming; Xia Dan; Zou Yu; Jiang Tianzi; Pan Xiaochuan

    2006-10-15

    Modern computed tomography (CT) scanners use cone-beam configurations for increasing volume coverage, improving x-ray-tube utilization, and yielding isotropic spatial resolution. Recently, there have been significant developments in theory and algorithms for exact image reconstruction from cone-beam projections. In particular, algorithms have been proposed for image reconstruction on chords; and advantages over the existing algorithms offered by the chord-based algorithms include the high flexibility of exact image reconstruction for general scanning trajectories and the capability of exact reconstruction of images within a region of interest from truncated data. These chord-based algorithms have been developed only for flat-panel detectors. Many cone-beam CT scanners employ curved detectors for important practical considerations. Therefore, in this work, we have derived chord-based algorithms for a curved detector so that they can be applied to reconstructing images directly from data acquired by use of a CT scanner with a curved detector. We have also conducted preliminary numerical studies to demonstrate and evaluate the reconstruction properties of the derived chord-based algorithms for curved detectors.

  17. Non-volatile resistive photo-switches for flexible image detector arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nau, Sebastian; Wolf, Christoph; Sax, Stefan; List-Kratochvil, Emil J. W.

    2015-09-01

    The increasing quest to find lightweight, conformable or flexible image detectors for machine vision or medical imaging brings organic electronics into the spotlight for these fields of application. Here were we introduce a unique imaging device concept and its utilization in an organic, flexible detector array with simple passive matrix wiring. We present a flexible organic image detector array built up from non-volatile resistive multi-bit photo-switchable elements. This unique realization is based on an organic photodiode combined with an organic resistive memory device wired in a simple crossbar configuration. The presented concept exhibits significant advantages compared to present organic and inorganic detector array technologies, facilitating the detection and simultaneous storage of the image information in one detector pixel, yet also allowing for simple read-out of the information from a simple passive-matrix crossbar wiring. This concept is demonstrated for single photo-switchable pixels as well as for arrays with sizes up to 32 by 32 pixels (1024 bit). The presented results pave the way for a versatile flexible and easy-to-fabricate sensor array technology. In a final step, the concept was expanded to detection of x-rays.

  18. A Three-year Multi-wavelength Study of the Very-high-energy γ-Ray Blazar 1ES 0229+200

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aliu, E.; Archambault, S.; Arlen, T.; Aune, T.; Behera, B.; Beilicke, M.; Benbow, W.; Berger, K.; Bird, R.; Bouvier, A.; Buckley, J. H.; Bugaev, V.; Byrum, K.; Cerruti, M.; Chen, X.; Ciupik, L.; Connolly, M. P.; Cui, W.; Duke, C.; Dumm, J.; Errando, M.; Falcone, A.; Federici, S.; Feng, Q.; Finley, J. P.; Fleischhack, H.; Fortin, P.; Fortson, L.; Furniss, A.; Galante, N.; Gillanders, G. H.; Griffin, S.; Griffiths, S. T.; Grube, J.; Gyuk, G.; Hanna, D.; Holder, J.; Hughes, G.; Humensky, T. B.; Johnson, C. A.; Kaaret, P.; Kertzman, M.; Khassen, Y.; Kieda, D.; Krawczynski, H.; Krennrich, F.; Lang, M. J.; Madhavan, A. S.; Maier, G.; Majumdar, P.; McArthur, S.; McCann, A.; Meagher, K.; Millis, J.; Moriarty, P.; Mukherjee, R.; Nieto, D.; O'Faoláin de Bhróithe, A.; Ong, R. A.; Otte, A. N.; Park, N.; Perkins, J. S.; Pohl, M.; Popkow, A.; Prokoph, H.; Quinn, J.; Ragan, K.; Reyes, L. C.; Reynolds, P. T.; Richards, G. T.; Roache, E.; Sembroski, G. H.; Smith, A. W.; Staszak, D.; Telezhinsky, I.; Theiling, M.; Varlotta, A.; Vassiliev, V. V.; Vincent, S.; Wakely, S. P.; Weekes, T. C.; Weinstein, A.; Welsing, R.; Williams, D. A.; Zajczyk, A.; Zitzer, B.

    2014-02-01

    The high-frequency-peaked BL Lacertae object 1ES 0229+200 is a relatively distant (z = 0.1396), hard-spectrum (Γ ~ 2.5), very-high-energy (VHE; E > 100 GeV) emitting γ-ray blazar. VHE measurements of this active galactic nucleus have been used to place constraints on the intensity of the extragalactic background light and the intergalactic magnetic field (IGMF). A multi-wavelength study of this object centered around VHE observations by Very Energetic Radiation Imaging Telescope Array System (VERITAS) is presented. This study obtained, over a period of three years, an 11.7 standard deviation detection and an average integral flux F(E > 300 GeV) = (23.3 ± 2.8stat ± 5.8sys) × 10-9 photons m-2 s-1, or 1.7% of the Crab Nebula's flux (assuming the Crab Nebula spectrum measured by H.E.S.S). Supporting observations from Swift and RXTE are analyzed. The Swift observations are combined with previously published Fermi observations and the VHE measurements to produce an overall spectral energy distribution which is then modeled assuming one-zone synchrotron-self-Compton emission. The χ2 probability of the TeV flux being constant is 1.6%. This, when considered in combination with measured variability in the X-ray band, and the demonstrated variability of many TeV blazars, suggests that the use of blazars such as 1ES 0229+200 for IGMF studies may not be straightforward and challenges models that attribute hard TeV spectra to secondary γ-ray production along the line of sight.

  19. A three-year multi-wavelength study of the very-high-energy γ-ray blazar 1ES 0229+200

    SciTech Connect

    Aliu, E.; Archambault, S.; Arlen, T.; Aune, T.; Behera, B.; Chen, X.; Beilicke, M.; Buckley, J. H.; Bugaev, V.; Benbow, W.; Cerruti, M.; Berger, K.; Bird, R.; Bouvier, A.; Byrum, K.; Ciupik, L.; Connolly, M. P.; Cui, W.; Duke, C.; Dumm, J. E-mail: jeremy.s.perkins@nasa.gov; and others

    2014-02-10

    The high-frequency-peaked BL Lacertae object 1ES 0229+200 is a relatively distant (z = 0.1396), hard-spectrum (Γ ∼ 2.5), very-high-energy (VHE; E > 100 GeV) emitting γ-ray blazar. VHE measurements of this active galactic nucleus have been used to place constraints on the intensity of the extragalactic background light and the intergalactic magnetic field (IGMF). A multi-wavelength study of this object centered around VHE observations by Very Energetic Radiation Imaging Telescope Array System (VERITAS) is presented. This study obtained, over a period of three years, an 11.7 standard deviation detection and an average integral flux F(E > 300 GeV) = (23.3 ± 2.8{sub stat} ± 5.8{sub sys}) × 10{sup –9} photons m{sup –2} s{sup –1}, or 1.7% of the Crab Nebula's flux (assuming the Crab Nebula spectrum measured by H.E.S.S). Supporting observations from Swift and RXTE are analyzed. The Swift observations are combined with previously published Fermi observations and the VHE measurements to produce an overall spectral energy distribution which is then modeled assuming one-zone synchrotron-self-Compton emission. The χ{sup 2} probability of the TeV flux being constant is 1.6%. This, when considered in combination with measured variability in the X-ray band, and the demonstrated variability of many TeV blazars, suggests that the use of blazars such as 1ES 0229+200 for IGMF studies may not be straightforward and challenges models that attribute hard TeV spectra to secondary γ-ray production along the line of sight.

  20. Monte Carlo Simulations of Background Spectra in Integral Imager Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, T. W.; Colborn, B. L.; Dietz, K. L.; Ramsey, B. D.; Weisskopf, M. C.

    1998-01-01

    Predictions of the expected gamma-ray backgrounds in the ISGRI (CdTe) and PiCsIT (Csl) detectors on INTEGRAL due to cosmic-ray interactions and the diffuse gamma-ray background have been made using a coupled set of Monte Carlo radiation transport codes (HETC, FLUKA, EGS4, and MORSE) and a detailed, 3-D mass model of the spacecraft and detector assemblies. The simulations include both the prompt background component from induced hadronic and electromagnetic cascades and the delayed component due to emissions from induced radioactivity. Background spectra have been obtained with and without the use of active (BGO) shielding and charged particle rejection to evaluate the effectiveness of anticoincidence counting on background rejection.

  1. Ultraviolet /UV/ sensitive phosphors for silicon imaging detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Viehmann, W.; Cowens, M. W.; Butner, C. L.

    1981-01-01

    The fluorescence properties of UV sensitive organic phosphors and the radiometric properties of phosphor coated silicon detectors in the VUV, UV, and visible wavelengths are described. With evaporated films of coronene and liumogen, effective quantum efficiencies of up to 20% have been achieved on silicon photodiodes in the vacuum UV. With thin films of methylmethacrylate (acrylic), which are doped with organic laser dyes and deposited from solution, detector quantum efficiencies of the order of 15% for wavelengths of 120-165 nm and of 40% for wavelengths above 190 nm have been obtained. The phosphor coatings also act as antireflection coatings and thereby enhance the response of coated devices throughout the visible and near IR.

  2. A Multi-Wavelength Study of the X-Ray Sources in the NGC 5018

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghosh, Kajal K.; Swartz, Douglas A.; Tennant, Allyn F.; Wu, Kinwah; Saripalli, Lakshmi

    2004-01-01

    The E3 giant elliptical galaxy NGC-5018 was observed with the cxo X-ray Observatory's Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer for 30-h on 14 April 2001. Results of analysis of these X-ray data as well as of complementary optical, infrared, and radio data are reported. Seven X-ray point sources, including the nucleus, were detected. If they are intrinsic to NGC-5018, then all six non-nuclear sources have luminosities exceeding 10(exp 39)-ergl in the 0.5-8.0-keV energy band; placing them in the class of Ultra- luminous X-ray sources. Comparison of X-ray source positions to archival Hubble Space Telescope/Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 (hst/WFPC2) images reveal four of the six non-nuclear sources are spatially--coincident with bright, M$(sub V)LA -8.6 mag, objects. These four objects have optical magnitudes and (V-I) colors consistent with globular clusters in NGC-5018. However, one of these objects was observed to vary by siml mag in both V and I between observations taken 28 July 1997 and 04 Feb 1999 indicating this source is a background active galactic nucleus (AGN). The nature of the other three optically-bright objects cannot be determined from the available optical data but all have X-ray-to-optical flux ratios consistent with background AGNs. Strong, unpolarized, radio emission has been detected from another of the optically-bright counterparts. It displays an inverted radio spectrum and is the most absorbed of the seven sources in the X-ray band. It, too, is most readily explained as a background AGN, though alternative explanations cannot be ruled out. Extended X-ray emission is detected within a siml5 arcsec radius of the galaxy center at a luminosity of sim lO(exp 40)-ergl in the X-ray band. Its thermal X-ray spectrum (kT sim0.4-keV) and its spatial coincidence with strong H(alpha) emission are consistent with a hot gas origin. The nucleus itself is a weak X-ray source, LA-5 times 10(exp 39)-ergl, but displays a radio spectrum typical of AGN.

  3. First Results from the XXL Survey and Associated Multi-wavelength Programmes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adami, C.; Pierre, M.; Baran, N.; Eckert, D.; Fotopoulou, S.; Giles, P. A.; Koulouridis, E.; Lidman, C.; Lieu, M.; Mantz, A. B.; Pacaud, F.; Pompei, E.; Smolčić, V.; Ziparo, F.; XXL Team

    2016-06-01

    The XXL survey has mapped two extragalactic regions of 25 square degrees, using 10 ks XMM observations down to a point source sensitivity of ~ 5 × 10-15 erg s-1 cm-2 in the 0.5-2 keV band. It is the largest XMM project approved to date (> 6 Ms in total). The two fields have been or will be observed by several ground- and space-based facilities from ultra-violet to radio wavelengths. Besides the imaging, the spectroscopic follow-up is of special interest and ESO has contributed through Large Programmes and dedicated allocations. As of December 2015, ~ 450 new galaxy clusters are detected to z ~ 1.5-2, as well as more than 22 000 active galactic nuclei (AGN) to z ~ 4. The main goal of the project is to constrain the dark energy equation of state using clusters of galaxies. This survey will have lasting legacy value for cluster scaling laws and studies of AGNs and the X-ray background. The first XXL scientific results are summarised.

  4. Using Cloud Computing To Create A Multi-Wavelength Atlas Of The Galactic Plane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berriman, G. B.; Good, J.; Rynge, M.; Juve, G.; Deelman, E.; Kinney, J.; Merrihew, A.

    2014-01-01

    We describe by example how to optimize cloud-computing resources offered by Amazon Web Services (AWS) to create and curate new datasets at scale. We are producing a co-registered atlas of the Galactic Plane at 16 wavelengths from 1 micron to 24 microns with a spatial sampling of 1 arcsec. The atlas is being created by using the Montage mosaic engine to generate co-registered mosaics of images released by the major surveys WISE, 2MASS, ADASS, GLIMPSE and MIPSGAL. The Atlas, when complete, will be 45 TB in size, composed of over 9,600 5 deg x 5 deg tiles with one degree overlap between them. The dataset will be housed on Amazon S3, designed for at-scale storage with access via web protocols. It will be publicly accessible through an API that will support access to the data and creation of cutouts according to the users’ specifications. The processing, which is estimated to require 340,000 compute hours for completion, has exploited virtual clusters created and managed on AWS platforms through the Pegasus workflow management system. We will describe the optimization methods, compute time and processing costs, as a guide for others wishing to exploit cloud platforms for processing and data creation.

  5. A Multi-Wavelength Survey of Intermediate-Mass Star-Forming Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lundquist, Michael J.; Kobulnicky, Henry A.; Kerton, Charles R.

    2015-01-01

    Current research into Galactic star formation has focused on either massive star-forming regions or nearby low-mass regions. We present results from a survey of Galactic intermediate-mass star-forming regions (IM SFRs). These regions were selected from IRAS colors that specify cool dust and large PAH contribution, suggesting that they produce stars up to but not exceeding about 8 solar masses. Using WISE data we have classified 984 candidate IM SFRs as star-like objects, galaxies, filamentary structures, or blobs/shells based on their mid-infrared morphologies. Focusing on the blobs/shells, we combined follow-up observations of deep near-infrared (NIR) imaging with optical and NIR spectroscopy to study the stellar content, confirming the intermediate-mass nature of these regions. We also gathered CO data from OSO and APEX to study the molecular content and dynamics of these regions. We compare these results to those of high-mass star formation in order to better understand their role in the star-formation paradigm.

  6. Chromospheric Multi-Wavelength Observations near the Solar Limb: Techniques and Prospects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, C.; Rezaei, R.

    2012-12-01

    Observations of chromospheric spectral lines near and beyond the solar limb provide information on the solar chromosphere without any photospheric contamination. For ground-based observations near and off the limb with real-time image correction by adaptive optics (AO), some technical requirements have to be met, such as an AO lock point that is independent of the location of the field of view observed by the science instruments, both for 1D and 2D instruments. We show how to obtain simultaneous AO-corrected spectra in Ca II H, Hα, Ca II IR at 854 nm, and He I at 1083 nm with the instrumentation at the German Vacuum Tower Telescope in Izaña, Tenerife. We determined the spectral properties of an active-region macrospicule inside the field of view in the four chromospheric lines, including its signature in polarization in He I at 1083 nm. Compared to the line-core intensities, the Doppler shifts of the lines change on a smaller spatial scale in the direction parallel to the limb, suggesting the presence of coherent rotating structures or the passage of upwards propagating helical waves on the surfaces of expanding flux tubes.

  7. MULTI-WAVELENGTH OBSERVATIONS OF SOLAR FLARES WITH A CONSTRAINED PEAK X-RAY FLUX

    SciTech Connect

    Bowen, Trevor A.; Testa, Paola; Reeves, Katharine K.

    2013-06-20

    We present an analysis of soft X-ray (SXR) and extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) observations of solar flares with an approximate C8 Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) class. Our constraint on peak GOES SXR flux allows for the investigation of correlations between various flare parameters. We show that the duration of the decay phase of a flare is proportional to the duration of its rise phase. Additionally, we show significant correlations between the radiation emitted in the flare rise and decay phases. These results suggest that the total radiated energy of a given flare is proportional to the energy radiated during the rise phase alone. This partitioning of radiated energy between the rise and decay phases is observed in both SXR and EUV wavelengths. Though observations from the EUV Variability Experiment show significant variation in the behavior of individual EUV spectral lines during different C8 events, this work suggests that broadband EUV emission is well constrained. Furthermore, GOES and Atmospheric Imaging Assembly data allow us to determine several thermal parameters (e.g., temperature, volume, density, and emission measure) for the flares within our sample. Analysis of these parameters demonstrate that, within this constrained GOES class, the longer duration solar flares are cooler events with larger volumes capable of emitting vast amounts of radiation. The shortest C8 flares are typically the hottest events, smaller in physical size, and have lower associated total energies. These relationships are directly comparable with several scaling laws and flare loop models.

  8. MODELING MULTI-WAVELENGTH STELLAR ASTROMETRY. II. DETERMINING ABSOLUTE INCLINATIONS, GRAVITY-DARKENING COEFFICIENTS, AND SPOT PARAMETERS OF SINGLE STARS WITH SIM LITE

    SciTech Connect

    Coughlin, Jeffrey L.; Harrison, Thomas E.; Gelino, Dawn M.

    2010-11-10

    We present a novel technique to determine the absolute inclination of single stars using multi-wavelength submilliarcsecond astrometry. The technique exploits the effect of gravity darkening, which causes a wavelength-dependent astrometric displacement parallel to a star's projected rotation axis. We find that this effect is clearly detectable using SIM Lite for various giant stars and rapid rotators, and present detailed models for multiple systems using the REFLUX code. We also explore the multi-wavelength astrometric reflex motion induced by spots on single stars. We find that it should be possible to determine spot size, relative temperature, and some positional information for both giant and nearby main-sequence stars utilizing multi-wavelength SIM Lite data. These data will be extremely useful in stellar and exoplanet astrophysics, as well as supporting the primary SIM Lite mission through proper multi-wavelength calibration of the giant star astrometric reference frame, and reduction of noise introduced by starspots when searching for extrasolar planets.

  9. Absolute calibration of photostimulable image plate detectors used as (0.5-20 MeV) high-energy proton detectors.

    PubMed

    Mancić, A; Fuchs, J; Antici, P; Gaillard, S A; Audebert, P

    2008-07-01

    In this paper, the absolute calibration of photostimulable image plates (IPs) used as proton detectors is presented. The calibration is performed in a wide range of proton energies (0.5-20 MeV) by exposing simultaneously the IP and calibrated detectors (radiochromic films and solid state detector CR39) to a source of broadband laser-accelerated protons, which are spectrally resolved. The final result is a calibration curve that enables retrieving the proton number from the IP signal. PMID:18681694

  10. Near optimal energy selective x-ray imaging system performance with simple detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Alvarez, Robert E.

    2010-02-15

    Purpose: This article describes a method to achieve near optimal performance with low energy resolution detectors. Tapiovaara and Wagner [Phys. Med. Biol. 30, 519-529 (1985)] showed that an energy selective x-ray system using a broad spectrum source can produce images with a larger signal to noise ratio (SNR) than conventional systems using energy integrating or photon counting detectors. They showed that there is an upper limit to the SNR and that it can be achieved by measuring full spectrum information and then using an optimal energy dependent weighting. Methods: A performance measure is derived by applying statistical detection theory to an abstract vector space of the line integrals of the basis set coefficients of the two function approximation to the x-ray attenuation coefficient. The approach produces optimal results that utilize all the available energy dependent data. The method can be used with any energy selective detector and is applied not only to detectors using pulse height analysis (PHA) but also to a detector that simultaneously measures the total photon number and integrated energy, as discussed by Roessl et al. [Med. Phys. 34, 959-966 (2007)]. A generalization of this detector that improves the performance is introduced. A method is described to compute images with the optimal SNR using projections in a ''whitened'' vector space transformed so the noise is uncorrelated and has unit variance in both coordinates. Material canceled images with optimal SNR can also be computed by projections in this space. Results: The performance measure is validated by showing that it provides the Tapiovaara-Wagner optimal results for a detector with full energy information and also a conventional detector. The performance with different types of detectors is compared to the ideal SNR as a function of x-ray tube voltage and subject thickness. A detector that combines two bin PHA with a simultaneous measurement of integrated photon energy provides near ideal

  11. Neptune’s global circulation deduced from multi-wavelength observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Pater, Imke; Fletcher, Leigh N.; Luszcz-Cook, Statia; DeBoer, David; Butler, Bryan; Hammel, Heidi B.; Sitko, Michael L.; Orton, Glenn; Marcus, Philip S.

    2014-07-01

    We observed Neptune between June and October 2003 at near- and mid-infrared wavelengths with the 10-m W.M. Keck II and I telescopes, respectively; and at radio wavelengths with the Very Large Array. Images were obtained at near-infrared wavelengths with NIRC2 coupled to the adaptive optics system in both broad- and narrow-band filters between 1.2 and 2.2 μm. In the mid-infrared we imaged Neptune at wavelengths between 8 and 22 μm, and obtained slit-resolved spectra at 8-13 μm and 18-22 μm. At radio wavelengths we mapped the planet in discrete filters between 0.7 and 6 cm. We analyzed each dataset separately with a radiative-transfer program that is optimized for that particular wavelength regime. At southern midlatitudes the atmosphere appears to be cooler at mid-infrared wavelengths than anywhere else on the planet. We interpret this to be caused by adiabatic cooling due to air rising at midlatitudes at all longitudes from the upper troposphere up to ≲0.1 mbar levels. At near-infrared wavelengths we find two distinct cloud layers at these latitudes: a relatively deep layer of clouds (presumably methane) in the troposphere at pressure levels P∼300-≳600 mbar, which we suggest to be caused by the large-scale upwelling and its accompanying adiabatic cooling and condensation of methane; and a higher, spatially intermittent, layer of clouds in the stratosphere at 20-30 mbar. The latitudes of these high clouds encompass an anticyclonic band of zonal flow, which suggests that they may be due to strong, but localized, vertical upwellings associated with local anticyclones, rather than plumes in convective (i.e., cyclonic) storms. Clouds at northern midlatitudes are located at the highest altitudes in the atmosphere, near 10 mbar. Neptune’s south pole is considerably enhanced in brightness at both mid-infrared and radio wavelengths, i.e., from ∼0.1 mbar levels in the stratosphere down to tens of bars in the troposphere. We interpret this to be due to subsiding

  12. A new generation of detectors for scanning x-ray beam imaging systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rommel, J. Martin

    2016-01-01

    Scanning x-ray beam imaging systems were first developed by American Science and Engineering, Inc. (AS&E) in the early 1970s [1]. Since then, these systems have found a wide range of applications in security inspection and non-destructive testing. Large-area detectors are most frequently used to collect backscattered radiation but smaller transmission detectors are also employed for selected applications. Until recently, only two basic detector designs have been used: large scintillator blocks with attached photomultiplier tubes (PMTs) or large-volume light-sealed boxes, lined with scintillating screens and port windows for PMTs. In both cases, the detectors have required considerable depth to provide acceptable light collection efficiency. A new design recently developed by AS&E relies on wavelength shifting fibres (WSF) for light collection. For the first time, this approach enables the construction of thin large-area detectors. Stacking layers of WSF ribbons and scintillating screens in varying combinations enables optimization of the detection efficiency for different applications. Taking separate readings from different layers provides an energy-sensitive signal combination. Energy sensitivity can be improved further by adding filtration between the signal channels. Several prototype configurations have been built and characterized for both backscatter and transmission imaging. A WSF-based detector has been commercialized for a transmission x-ray imaging application.

  13. High-resolution imaging gamma-ray spectroscopy with externally segmented germanium detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Callas, J. L.; Mahoney, W. A.; Varnell, L. S.; Wheaton, W. A.

    1993-01-01

    Externally segmented germanium detectors promise a breakthrough in gamma-ray imaging capabilities while retaining the superb energy resolution of germanium spectrometers. An angular resolution of 0.2 deg becomes practical by combining position-sensitive germanium detectors having a segment thickness of a few millimeters with a one-dimensional coded aperture located about a meter from the detectors. Correspondingly higher angular resolutions are possible with larger separations between the detectors and the coded aperture. Two-dimensional images can be obtained by rotating the instrument. Although the basic concept is similar to optical or X-ray coded-aperture imaging techniques, several complicating effects arise because of the penetrating nature of gamma rays. The complications include partial transmission through the coded aperture elements, Compton scattering in the germanium detectors, and high background count rates. Extensive electron-photon Monte Carlo modeling of a realistic detector/coded-aperture/collimator system has been performed. Results show that these complicating effects can be characterized and accounted for with no significant loss in instrument sensitivity.

  14. Super-resolution x-ray imaging by CdTe discrete detector arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoki, T.; Ishida, Y.; Morii, H.; Tomita, Y.; Ohashi, G.; Temmyo, J.; Hatanaka, Y.

    2005-08-01

    512-pixel CdTe super-liner imaging scanner was developed. This device was consist with 512 chips of M-π-n CdTe diode detector fabricated by excimer laser doping process, 8 chips of photon-counting mode 64ch ASIC with FPGA circuit, USB2.0 interface with 1-CPU. It has 5 discriminated levels and over 2Mcps count rate for X-ray penetration imaging. This imaging scanner has 512 discrete CdTe chips for detector arrays with the length of 2.0mm, width of 0.8mm and thickness of 0.5mm. These chips were mounted in four plover array rows for high-resolution imaging with 0.5mm-pitch, therefore the pixel pitch was over the pixel width. When images were taken with scanning system with this arrays, we could obtain over-resolution than pixel width. In this paper, this "over-resolution" imaging will be called "super resolution imaging". In high-resolution imaging device, the pixel devices on one substrate were formed by integrated process, or many discrete detector chips were installed on circuit board, usually. In the latter case, it is easer to make each detector chips than former case, and it are no need to consider charge sharing phenomena compare with one-chip pixel devices. However, a decrease in pixel pitch makes the mount to the detector chip to the ASIC board difficult because the handling will also be difficult The super-resolution technique in this scanner by pixel-shift method for X-ray imaging is shown in this paper

  15. Tracing the evolution within nearby galaxy groups: a multi-wavelength approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bettoni, Daniela; Marino, Antonina; Rampazzo, Roberto; Plana, Henri; Rosado, Margarita; Galletta, Giuseppe; Mazzei, Paola; Bianchi, Luciana; Buson, Lucio M.; Ambrocio-Cruz, Patricia; Gabbasov, Ruslan

    2015-03-01

    Evolutionary scenarios suggest that several mechanisms (from inner secular evolution to accretion/merging) may transform galaxy members, driving groups from an active star forming phase to a more passive, typical of dense environments. We are investigating this transition in a nearby group sample, designed to cover a wide range of properties (see also Marino et al. (2010), Bettoni et al. (2011) and Marino et al. (2012)). We study two groups, USGC U268 and USGC U376 located in different regions of the Leo cloud, through a photometric and kinematic characterization of their member galaxies. We revisit the group membership, using results from recent red-shift surveys, and we investigate their substructures. U268, composed of 10 catalogued members and 11 new added members, has a small fraction (~24%) of early-type galaxies (ETGs). U376 has 16 plus 8 new added members, with ~38% of ETGs. We find the significant substructuring in both groups suggesting that they are likely accreting galaxies. U268 is located in a more loose environment than U376. For each member galaxy, broad band integrated and surface photometry have been obtained in far-UV (FUV) and near-UV (NUV) with GALEX, and in u, g, r, i, z (SDSS) bands. Hα imaging and 2D high resolution kinematical data have been obtained using PUMA Scanning Fabry-Perot interferometer at the 2.12 m telescope in San Pedro Mártir (Baja California, México). We improved the galaxy classification and we detected morphological and kinematical distortions that may be connected to either on-going and/or past interaction/accretion events or environmental induced secular evolution. U268 appears more active than U376, with a large fraction of galaxies showing interaction signatures (60% vs. 13%). The presence of bars among late-type galaxies is ~10% in U268 and 29% in U376. The cumulative distribution of (FUV - NUV) colors of galaxies in U268 is significantly different (bluer) than that of U376's galaxies. Most (80%) of the early

  16. A multi-wavelength study of galaxy clusters hosting radio sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wing, Joshua David

    Galaxy clusters play an important role in understanding the formation of structure in the Universe and can be used to constrain cosmological parameters. Thousands of clusters are known in the nearby Universe, but few are confirmed at large distances. Remote clusters provide a view of the early Universe, and are important for studying galaxy evolution. Here, I describe a technique for finding distant clusters using bent, double-lobed radio galaxies. These radio sources are active galactic nuclei (AGN) that result from outflows of material surrounding supermassive black holes in the centers of massive galaxies. These outflows are typically bent as a result of the relative motion between the host galaxy and the surrounding hot gas that fills clusters. Using the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and the Faint Images of the Radio Sky at Twenty-centimeters (FIRST) survey, I determine the frequency with which bent radio sources are associated with rich galaxy clusters in the nearby Universe (z < 0.5), as compared to non-bent radio sources. I find that > 60% of bent radio sources are located in rich cluster environments, compared to 10 -- 20% of non-bent radio sources. Therefore, bent radio sources are efficient tracers for clusters and are useful as beacons of clusters at large distances. Bent radio sources may achieve their morphologies through large-scale cluster mergers that set the intracluster medium (ICM) in motion. Using a suite of substructure tests, I determine the significance of optical substructure in clusters containing radio sources. I find no preference for substructure in clusters with bent double-lobed sources compared to other types of radio sources, indicating that bent sources will not necessarily preferentially select clusters undergoing recent large-scale mergers. Having established that bent radio sources efficiently locate clusters, I have obtained deep, follow-up observations at optical and near-infrared wavelengths to uncover associated distant

  17. Multi-wavelength speckle reduction for laser pico-projectors using diffractive optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Weston H.

    Personal electronic devices, such as cell phones and tablets, continue to decrease in size while the number of features and add-ons keep increasing. One particular feature of great interest is an integrated projector system. Laser pico-projectors have been considered, but the technology has not been developed enough to warrant integration. With new advancements in diode technology and MEMS devices, laser-based projection is currently being advanced for pico-projectors. A primary problem encountered when using a pico-projector is coherent interference known as speckle. Laser speckle can lead to eye irritation and headaches after prolonged viewing. Diffractive optical elements known as diffusers have been examined as a means to lower speckle contrast. Diffusers are often rotated to achieve temporal averaging of the spatial phase pattern provided by diffuser surface. While diffusers are unable to completely eliminate speckle, they can be utilized to decrease the resultant contrast to provide a more visually acceptable image. This dissertation measures the reduction in speckle contrast achievable through the use of diffractive diffusers. A theoretical Fourier optics model is used to provide the diffuser's stationary and in-motion performance in terms of the resultant contrast level. Contrast measurements of two diffractive diffusers are calculated theoretically and compared with experimental results. In addition, a novel binary diffuser design based on Hadamard matrices will be presented. Using two static in-line Hadamard diffusers eliminates the need for rotation or vibration of the diffuser for temporal averaging. Two Hadamard diffusers were fabricated and contrast values were subsequently measured, showing good agreement with theory and simulated values. Monochromatic speckle contrast values of 0.40 were achieved using the Hadamard diffusers. Finally, color laser projection devices require the use of red, green, and blue laser sources; therefore, using a

  18. Multi-Wavelength, Multi-Beam, and Polarization-Sensitive Laser Transmitter for Surface Mapping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, Anthony W.; Ramos-Izquierdo, Luis; Harding, David; Huss, Tim

    2011-01-01

    A multi-beam, multi-color, polarized laser transmitter has been developed for mapping applications. It uses commercial off-the-shelf components for a lowcost approach for a ruggedized laser suitable for field deployment. The laser transmitter design is capable of delivering dual wavelengths, multiple beams on each wavelength with equal (or variable) intensities per beam, and a welldefined state of polarization. This laser transmitter has been flown on several airborne campaigns for the Slope Imaging Multi-Polarization Photon Counting Lidar (SIMPL) instrument, and at the time of this reporting is at a technology readiness level of between 5 and 6. The laser is a 1,064-nm microchip high-repetition-rate laser emitting energy of about 8 microjoules per pulse. The beam was frequency-doubled to 532 nm using a KTP (KTiOPO4) nonlinear crystal [other nonlinear crystals such as LBO (LiB3O5) or periodically poled lithium niobiate can be used as well, depending on the conversion efficiency requirements], and the conversion efficiency was approximately 30 percent. The KTP was under temperature control using a thermoelectric cooler and a feedback monitoring thermistor. The dual-wavelength beams were then spectrally separated and each color went through its own optical path, which consisted of a beam-shaping lens, quarterwave plate (QWP), and a birefringent crystal (in this case, a calcite crystal, but others such as vanadate can be used). The QWP and calcite crystal set was used to convert the laser beams from a linearly polarized state to circularly polarized light, which when injected into a calcite crystal, will spatially separate the circularly polarized light into the two linear polarized components. The spatial separation of the two linearly polarized components is determined by the length of the crystal. A second set of QWP and calcite then further separated the two beams into four. Additional sets of QWP and calcite can be used to further split the beams into multiple

  19. Standoff passive video imaging at 350 GHz with 251 superconducting detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Daniel; Gentry, Cale; Smirnov, Ilya; Ade, Peter; Beall, James; Cho, Hsiao-Mei; Dicker, Simon; Duncan, William; Halpern, Mark; Hilton, Gene; Irwin, Kent; Li, Dale; Paulter, Nicholas; Reintsema, Carl; Schwall, Robert; Tucker, Carole

    2014-06-01

    Millimeter wavelength radiation holds promise for detection of security threats at a distance, including suicide bomb belts and maritime threats in poor weather. The high sensitivity of superconducting Transition Edge Sensor (TES) detectors makes them ideal for passive imaging of thermal signals at these wavelengths. We have built a 350 GHz video-rate imaging system using a large-format array of feedhorn-coupled TES bolometers. The system operates at a standoff distance of 16m to 28m with a spatial resolution of 1:4 cm (at 17m). It currently contains one 251-detector subarray, and will be expanded to contain four subarrays for a total of 1004 detectors. The system has been used to take video images which reveal the presence of weapons concealed beneath a shirt in an indoor setting. We present a summary of this work.

  20. Ultrafast secondary emission X-ray imaging detectors: A possible application to TRD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akkerman, A.; Breskin, A.; Chechik, R.; Elkind, V.; Gibrekhterman, A.; Majewski, S.

    1992-05-01

    Fist high accuracy, X-ray imaging at high photon flux can be achieved when coupling thin solid convertors to gaseous electron multipliers, operating at low gas pressures. Secondary electrons emitted from the convertor foil are multiplied in several successive amplification elements. The obvious advantages of solid X-ray convertors, as compared to gaseous conversion, are the production of parallax-free images and the fast (subnanosecond) response. These X-ray detectors have many potential applications in basic and applied research. Of particular interest is the possibility of an efficient and ultrafast high resolution imaging of transition radiation (TR), with a reduced d E/d x background. We present experimental results on the operation of secondary emission X-ray (SEX) detectors, their detection efficiency, localization and time resolution. The experimental work is accompanied by mathematical modelling and computer simulation of transition radiation detectors (TRDs) based on CsI TR convertors.

  1. Multi-wavelength Yb:YAG/Nd3+:YVO4 continuous-wave microchip Raman laser.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao-Lei; Dong, Jun; Wang, Xiao-Jie; Xu, Jie; Ueda, Ken-Ichi; Kaminskii, Alexander A

    2016-08-01

    Multi-wavelength continuous-wave (CW) Raman lasers in a laser diode pumped Yb:YAG/Nd3+:YVO4 microchip Raman laser have been demonstrated for the first time to our best knowledge. The multi-wavelength laser of the first Stokes radiation around 1.08 μm has been achieved with a Raman shift of 261  cm-1 for a-cut Nd:YVO4 crystal corresponding to the fundamental wavelength at 1.05 μm. Multi-wavelength laser operation simultaneously around 1.05 and 1.08 μm has been achieved under the incident pump power between 1.5 and 1.7 W. Multi-wavelength Raman laser with frequency separation of 1 THz around 1.08 μm has been obtained when the incident pump power is higher than 1.7 W. The maximum Raman laser output power of 260 mW at 1.08 μm is obtained and the corresponding optical-to-optical conversion efficiency is 4.2%. Elliptically polarized fundamental laser and linearly polarized Raman laser were observed in an Yb:YAG/Nd:YVO4 CW microchip Raman laser. The experimental results of linearly polarized, multi-wavelength Yb:YAG/Nd:YVO4 CW microchip Raman laser with adjustable frequency separation provide a novel approach for developing potential compact laser sources for Terahertz generation. PMID:27472618

  2. Automatic detection of cone photoreceptors in split detector adaptive optics scanning light ophthalmoscope images.

    PubMed

    Cunefare, David; Cooper, Robert F; Higgins, Brian; Katz, David F; Dubra, Alfredo; Carroll, Joseph; Farsiu, Sina

    2016-05-01

    Quantitative analysis of the cone photoreceptor mosaic in the living retina is potentially useful for early diagnosis and prognosis of many ocular diseases. Non-confocal split detector based adaptive optics scanning light ophthalmoscope (AOSLO) imaging reveals the cone photoreceptor inner segment mosaics often not visualized on confocal AOSLO imaging. Despite recent advances in automated cone segmentation algorithms for confocal AOSLO imagery, quantitative analysis of split detector AOSLO images is currently a time-consuming manual process. In this paper, we present the fully automatic adaptive filtering and local detection (AFLD) method for detecting cones in split detector AOSLO images. We validated our algorithm on 80 images from 10 subjects, showing an overall mean Dice's coefficient of 0.95 (standard deviation 0.03), when comparing our AFLD algorithm to an expert grader. This is comparable to the inter-observer Dice's coefficient of 0.94 (standard deviation 0.04). To the best of our knowledge, this is the first validated, fully-automated segmentation method which has been applied to split detector AOSLO images.

  3. Automatic detection of cone photoreceptors in split detector adaptive optics scanning light ophthalmoscope images

    PubMed Central

    Cunefare, David; Cooper, Robert F.; Higgins, Brian; Katz, David F.; Dubra, Alfredo; Carroll, Joseph; Farsiu, Sina

    2016-01-01

    Quantitative analysis of the cone photoreceptor mosaic in the living retina is potentially useful for early diagnosis and prognosis of many ocular diseases. Non-confocal split detector based adaptive optics scanning light ophthalmoscope (AOSLO) imaging reveals the cone photoreceptor inner segment mosaics often not visualized on confocal AOSLO imaging. Despite recent advances in automated cone segmentation algorithms for confocal AOSLO imagery, quantitative analysis of split detector AOSLO images is currently a time-consuming manual process. In this paper, we present the fully automatic adaptive filtering and local detection (AFLD) method for detecting cones in split detector AOSLO images. We validated our algorithm on 80 images from 10 subjects, showing an overall mean Dice’s coefficient of 0.95 (standard deviation 0.03), when comparing our AFLD algorithm to an expert grader. This is comparable to the inter-observer Dice’s coefficient of 0.94 (standard deviation 0.04). To the best of our knowledge, this is the first validated, fully-automated segmentation method which has been applied to split detector AOSLO images. PMID:27231641

  4. Multi-wavelength properties of Spitzer selected starbursts at z ~ 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiolet, N.; Omont, A.; Polletta, M.; Owen, F.; Berta, S.; Shupe, D.; Siana, B.; Lonsdale, C.; Strazzullo, V.; Pannella, M.; Baker, A. J.; Beelen, A.; Biggs, A.; De Breuck, C.; Farrah, D.; Ivison, R.; Lagache, G.; Lutz, D.; Tacconi, L. J.; Zylka, R.

    2009-12-01

    Context: Wide-field Spitzer surveys allow identification of thousands of potentially high-z submillimeter galaxies (SMGs) through their bright 24 μm emission and their mid-IR colors. Aims: We want to determine the average properties of such z˜2 Spitzer-selected SMGs by combining millimeter, radio, and infrared photometry for a representative IR-flux (λ_rest˜ 8 μm) limited sample of SMG candidates. Methods: A complete sample of 33 sources believed to be starbursts (“5.8 μm-peakers”) was selected in the (0.5 deg^2) J1046+56 field with selection criteria F24 μ m > 400 μJy, the presence of a redshifted stellar emission peak at 5.8 μm, and r^prime_Vega > 23. The field, part of the SWIRE Lockman Hole field, benefits from very deep VLA/GMRT 20 cm, 50 cm, and 90 cm radio data (all 33 sources are detected at 50 cm), and deep 160 μm and 70 μm Spitzer data. The 33 sources, with photometric redshifts 1.5-2.5, were observed at 1.2 mm with IRAM-30m/MAMBO to an rms 0.7-0.8 mJy in most cases. Their millimeter, radio, 7-band Spitzer, and near-IR properties were jointly analyzed. Results: The entire sample of 33 sources has an average 1.2 mm flux density of 1.56 ± 0.22 mJy and a median of 1.61 mJy, so the majority of the sources can be considered SMGs. Four sources have confirmed 4σ detections, and nine were tentatively detected at the 3σ level. Because of its 24 μm selection, our sample shows systematically lower F_1.2 mm/F24 μ m flux ratios than classical SMGs, probably because of enhanced PAH emission. A median FIR SED was built by stacking images at the positions of 21 sources in the region of deepest Spitzer coverage. Its parameters are T_dust = 37 ± 8 K, L_FIR = 2.5 × 1012 L⊙, and SFR = 450 M⊙ yr-1. The FIR-radio correlation provides another estimate of L_FIR for each source, with an average value of 4.1 × 1012 L⊙; however, this value may be overestimated because of some AGN contribution. Most of our targets are also luminous star-forming Bz

  5. Novel Neutron Detector for High Rate Imaging Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Lacy, Jeffrey, L.

    2004-08-27

    The Phase II period performance was May 30, 2002 through May 29, 2004. This development effort was successfully completed within the period and budget allotted. The proposed design was successfully fabricated from B{sub 4}C-coated aluminum and copper film, slit and wound to form 4 mm diameter straws, cut to 100 cm in length, and threaded with resistive anode wires (20 {micro}m in diameter). This paper reports testing done with two 50-straw detector modules at the reactor of the Nuclear Science Center at Texas A&M University (TAMU NSC).

  6. Workflow for the use of a high-resolution image detector in endovascular interventional procedures

    PubMed Central

    Rana, R.; Loughran, B.; Swetadri Vasan, S. N.; Pope, L.; Ionita, C. N.; Siddiqui, A.; Lin, N.; Bednarek, D. R.; Rudin, S.

    2014-01-01

    Endovascular image-guided intervention (EIGI) has become the primary interventional therapy for the most widespread vascular diseases. These procedures involve the insertion of a catheter into the femoral artery, which is then threaded under fluoroscopic guidance to the site of the pathology to be treated. Flat Panel Detectors (FPDs) are normally used for EIGIs; however, once the catheter is guided to the pathological site, high-resolution imaging capabilities can be used for accurately guiding a successful endovascular treatment. The Micro-Angiographic Fluoroscope (MAF) detector provides needed high-resolution, high-sensitivity, and real-time imaging capabilities. An experimental MAF enabled with a Control, Acquisition, Processing, Image Display and Storage (CAPIDS) system was installed and aligned on a detector changer attached to the C-arm of a clinical angiographic unit. The CAPIDS system was developed and implemented using LabVIEW software and provides a user-friendly interface that enables control of several clinical radiographic imaging modes of the MAF including: fluoroscopy, roadmap, radiography, and digital-subtraction-angiography (DSA). Using the automatic controls, the MAF detector can be moved to the deployed position, in front of a standard FPD, whenever higher resolution is needed during angiographic or interventional vascular imaging procedures. To minimize any possible negative impact to image guidance with the two detector systems, it is essential to have a well-designed workflow that enables smooth deployment of the MAF at critical stages of clinical procedures. For the ultimate success of this new imaging capability, a clear understanding of the workflow design is essential. This presentation provides a detailed description and demonstration of such a workflow design. PMID:25302003

  7. Workflow for the use of a high-resolution image detector in endovascular interventional procedures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rana, R.; Loughran, B.; Swetadri Vasan, S. N.; Pope, L.; Ionita, C. N.; Siddiqui, A.; Lin, N.; Bednarek, D. R.; Rudin, S.

    2014-03-01

    Endovascular image-guided intervention (EIGI) has become the primary interventional therapy for the most widespread vascular diseases. These procedures involve the insertion of a catheter into the femoral artery, which is then threaded under fluoroscopic guidance to the site of the pathology to be treated. Flat Panel Detectors (FPDs) are normally used for EIGIs; however, once the catheter is guided to the pathological site, high-resolution imaging capabilities can be used for accurately guiding a successful endovascular treatment. The Micro-Angiographic Fluoroscope (MAF) detector provides needed high-resolution, high-sensitivity, and real-time imaging capabilities. An experimental MAF enabled with a Control, Acquisition, Processing, Image Display and Storage (CAPIDS) system was installed and aligned on a detector changer attached to the C-arm of a clinical angiographic unit. The CAPIDS system was developed and implemented using LabVIEW software and provides a user-friendly interface that enables control of several clinical radiographic imaging modes of the MAF including: fluoroscopy, roadmap, radiography, and digital-subtraction-angiography (DSA). Using the automatic controls, the MAF detector can be moved to the deployed position, in front of a standard FPD, whenever higher resolution is needed during angiographic or interventional vascular imaging procedures. To minimize any possible negative impact to image guidance with the two detector systems, it is essential to have a well-designed workflow that enables smooth deployment of the MAF at critical stages of clinical procedures. For the ultimate success of this new imaging capability, a clear understanding of the workflow design is essential. This presentation provides a detailed description and demonstration of such a workflow design.

  8. Evaluation of a Wobbling Method Applied to Correcting Defective Pixels of CZT Detectors in SPECT Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Zhaoheng; Li, Suying; Yang, Kun; Xu, Baixuan; Ren, Qiushi

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a wobbling method to correct bad pixels in cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) detectors, using information of related images. We build up an automated device that realizes the wobbling correction for small animal Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) imaging. The wobbling correction method is applied to various constellations of defective pixels. The corrected images are compared with the results of conventional interpolation method, and the correction effectiveness is evaluated quantitatively using the factor of peak signal-to-noise ratio (PSNR) and structural similarity (SSIM). In summary, the proposed wobbling method, equipped with the automatic mechanical system, provides a better image quality for correcting defective pixels, which could be used for all pixelated detectors for molecular imaging. PMID:27240368

  9. Tunable multi-wavelength thulium-doped fiber laser incorporating two-stage cascaded Sagnac loop comb filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Lianqing; He, Wei; Dong, Mingli; Lou, Xiaoping; Luo, Fei

    2016-08-01

    A tunable multi-wavelength narrow-linewidth thulium-doped fiber laser employing two-stage cascaded Sagnac loop mirrors is proposed and experimentally demonstrated. The designed fiber laser is composed of a pump source, wavelength division multiplex, circulator, thulium-doped fiber, polarization controllers (PCs), couplers and polarization-maintaining fibers (PMFs). Two cascaded Sagnac loops are used as the cavity reflector and filter, and the proposed filter is fabricated using two sections of PMFs with 2-m and 1-m lengths, respectively. In the experiment, the laser threshold is 110 mW, and laser can emit single, double, triple, quadruple and quintuple wavelengths in the spectral range of 1873-1901 nm through the simultaneous adjustment of the two PCs. The power fluctuations and 3-dB linewidth are less than 2.1 dB and 0.2 nm, respectively, over 10 min at room temperature, and the side-mode suppression ratio is greater than 20 dB. The proposed laser will be useful in various fields, such as spectral analysis, fiber sensing and optical communication.

  10. Assessment of multi-wavelength pulse photometry for non-invasive dose estimation of circulating drugs and nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adhikari, Pratik; Eklund, Wakako; Sherer, Eric A.; O'Neal, D. Patrick

    2016-03-01

    The feasibility of multi-wavelength photoplethysmography for the real-time sensing of absorptive and scattering agents in pulsatile blood is discussed. The use of pulsatile signals extracted from trans-illumination of an accessible section of tissue allows us to calculate the concentration of the optically extinctive species in the pulsatile blood. This technology, initially used for pulse oximetry and dye densitometry, can be applied to monitor in vivo concentration and clearance of various absorptive species. Recently, our prototype has been used monitor the concentration of therapeutic gold nanoparticles, antimalarial quinine, and the antifungal agent amphotericin B. The assessment of the optical properties, device specifications, and signal quality for each compound are presented. We observe that this technology can be used to monitor numerous extinctive drug and nano-materials that present features in the 350-1100 nm range. The rationale for using this technology in a clinical setting would be to improve outcomes by real-time pharmacological feedback and/or control at point of care in addition to the elimination of invasive blood draws for collection of data.

  11. MULTI-WAVELENGTH STUDY OF FLARING ACTIVITY IN BL Lac OBJECT S5 0716+714 DURING THE 2015 OUTBURST

    SciTech Connect

    Chandra, Sunil; Kushwaha, Pankaj; Singh, K. P.; Zhang, Haocheng; Bottcher, M.; Kaur, Navpreet; Baliyan, K. S.

    2015-08-20

    We present a detailed investigation of the flaring activity observed from a BL Lac object, S5 0716+714 , during its brightest ever optical state in the second half of 2015 January. Observed almost simultaneously in the optical, X-rays, and γ-rays, a significant change in the degree of optical polarization (PD) and a swing in the position angle (PA) of polarization were recorded. A TeV (VHE) detection was also reported by the MAGIC consortium during this flaring episode. Two prominent sub-flares, peaking about five days apart, were seen in almost all of the energy bands. The multi-wavelength light curves, spectral energy distribution, and polarization are modeled using the time-dependent code developed by Zhang et al. This model assumes a straight jet threaded by large-scale helical magnetic fields taking into account the light travel time effects, incorporating synchrotron flux and polarization in 3D geometry. The rapid variation in PD and rotation in PA are most likely due to reconnections happening in the emission region in the jet, as suggested by the change in the ratio of toroidal to poloidal components of the magnetic field during the quiescent and flaring states.

  12. A Multi-Wavelength Study of the Gamma-Ray Binary 1FGL J1018.6-5856

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coley, Joel Barry; Corbet, Robin; Cheung, Chi C.; Dubus, Guillaume; Edwards, Philip; McBride, Vanessa; Stevens, Jamie

    2016-04-01

    1FGL J1018.6-5856, the first gamma-ray binary discovered by the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT), consists of an O6 V((f)) star and suspected rapidly spinning pulsar. While 1FGL J1018.6-5856 has been postulated to be powered by the interaction between a relativistic pulsar wind and the stellar wind of the companion, a microquasar scenario where the compact object is a black hole cannot be ruled out. We present the first extensive multi-wavelength analysis of 1FGL J1018.6-5856 with the Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA), Fermi LAT and the Swift X-ray Telescope (XRT) to better determine the properties of the 16.531$\\pm$0.006 day orbital modulation. The radio amplitude modulation is found to decline with increasing frequency, which is a possible indication of the presence of free-free absorption. This is further supported by the absence of clear modulation in the 33.0 and 35.0\\,GHz bands, which were not previously reported. The best-fit spectral model of the Swift XRT data consists of a featureless power law with index $\\Gamma\\sim$1.3--1.7 modified by an absorber that fully covers the source. This is possible evidence that 1FGL J1018.6-5856 is a non-accreting system.

  13. Multi-wavelength study of flaring activity in BL Lac object S5 0716+714 during the 2015 outburst

    SciTech Connect

    Chandra, Sunil; Zhang, Haocheng; Kushwaha, Pankaj; Singh, K. P.; Bottcher, M.; Kaur, Navpreet; Baliyan, K. S.

    2015-08-17

    We present a detailed investigation of the flaring activity observed from a BL Lac object, S5 0716+714 , during its brightest ever optical state in the second half of 2015 January. Observed almost simultaneously in the optical, X-rays, and γ-rays, a significant change in the degree of optical polarization (PD) and a swing in the position angle (PA) of polarization were recorded. A TeV (VHE) detection was also reported by the MAGIC consortium during this flaring episode. Two prominent sub-flares, peaking about five days apart, were seen in almost all of the energy bands. The multi-wavelength light curves, spectral energy distribution, and polarization are modeled using the time-dependent code developed by Zhang et al. This model assumes a straight jet threaded by large-scale helical magnetic fields taking into account the light travel time effects, incorporating synchrotron flux and polarization in 3D geometry. Furthermore, the rapid variation in PD and rotation in PA are most likely due to reconnections happening in the emission region in the jet, as suggested by the change in the ratio of toroidal to poloidal components of the magnetic field during the quiescent and flaring states.

  14. MULTI-WAVELENGTH OBSERVATIONS OF BLAZAR AO 0235+164 IN THE 2008-2009 FLARING STATE

    SciTech Connect

    Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Blandford, R. D.; Bloom, E. D.; Borgland, A. W.; Bottacini, E.; Buehler, R.; Cameron, R. A.; Ballet, J.; Casandjian, J. M.; Bastieri, D.; Buson, S.; Bellazzini, R.; Bregeon, J.; Bonamente, E.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.; Caraveo, P. A. E-mail: madejski@slac.stanford.edu E-mail: silvia.raino@ba.infn.it E-mail: knalew@colorado.edu; Collaboration: Fermi-LAT Collaboration; GASP-WEBT consortium; F-GAMMA; Iram-PdBI; Kanata; RXTE; SMARTS; Swift-XRT; and others

    2012-06-01

    The blazar AO 0235+164 (z = 0.94) has been one of the most active objects observed by Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) since its launch in Summer 2008. In addition to the continuous coverage by Fermi, contemporaneous observations were carried out from the radio to {gamma}-ray bands between 2008 September and 2009 February. In this paper, we summarize the rich multi-wavelength data collected during the campaign (including F-GAMMA, GASP-WEBT, Kanata, OVRO, RXTE, SMARTS, Swift, and other instruments), examine the cross-correlation between the light curves measured in the different energy bands, and interpret the resulting spectral energy distributions in the context of well-known blazar emission models. We find that the {gamma}-ray activity is well correlated with a series of near-IR/optical flares, accompanied by an increase in the optical polarization degree. On the other hand, the X-ray light curve shows a distinct 20 day high state of unusually soft spectrum, which does not match the extrapolation of the optical/UV synchrotron spectrum. We tentatively interpret this feature as the bulk Compton emission by cold electrons contained in the jet, which requires an accretion disk corona with an effective covering factor of 19% at a distance of 100 R{sub g}. We model the broadband spectra with a leptonic model with external radiation dominated by the infrared emission from the dusty torus.

  15. Multi-wavelength Observations of Blazar AO 0235+164 in the 2008-2009 Flaring State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Bellazzini, R.; Blandford, R. D.; Bloom, E. D.; Bonamente, E.; Borgland, A. W.; Bottacini, E.; Bregeon, J.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.; Buehler, R.; Buson, S.; Caliandro, G. A.; Cameron, R. A.; Caraveo, P. A.; Casandjian, J. M.; Cavazzuti, E.; Cecchi, C.; Charles, E.; Chekhtman, A.; Chiang, J.; Ciprini, S.; Claus, R.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Cutini, S.; D'Ammando, F.; de Palma, F.; Dermer, C. D.; Silva, E. do Couto e.; Drell, P. S.; Drlica-Wagner, A.; Dubois, R.; Favuzzi, C.; Fegan, S. J.; Ferrara, E. C.; Focke, W. B.; Fortin, P.; Fuhrmann, L.; Fukazawa, Y.; Fusco, P.; Gargano, F.; Gasparrini, D.; Gehrels, N.; Germani, S.; Giglietto, N.; Giommi, P.; Giordano, F.; Giroletti, M.; Glanzman, T.; Godfrey, G.; Grenier, I. A.; Guiriec, S.; Hadasch, D.; Hayashida, M.; Hughes, R. E.; Itoh, R.; Jóhannesson, G.; Johnson, A. S.; Katagiri, H.; Kataoka, J.; Knödlseder, J.; Kuss, M.; Lande, J.; Larsson, S.; Lee, S.-H.; Longo, F.; Loparco, F.; Lott, B.; Lovellette, M. N.; Lubrano, P.; Madejski, G. M.; Mazziotta, M. N.; McEnery, J. E.; Mehault, J.; Michelson, P. F.; Mitthumsiri, W.; Mizuno, T.; Monte, C.; Monzani, M. E.; Morselli, A.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Murgia, S.; Naumann-Godo, M.; Nishino, S.; Norris, J. P.; Nuss, E.; Ohsugi, T.; Okumura, A.; Omodei, N.; Orlando, E.; Ozaki, M.; Paneque, D.; Panetta, J. H.; Pelassa, V.; Pesce-Rollins, M.; Pierbattista, M.; Piron, F.; Pivato, G.; Porter, T. A.; Rainò, S.; Rando, R.; Rastawicki, D.; Razzano, M.; Readhead, A.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Reyes, L. C.; Richards, J. L.; Sbarra, C.; Sgrò, C.; Siskind, E. J.; Spandre, G.; Spinelli, P.; Szostek, A.; Takahashi, H.; Tanaka, T.; Thayer, J. G.; Thayer, J. B.; Thompson, D. J.; Tinivella, M.; Torres, D. F.; Tosti, G.; Troja, E.; Usher, T. L.; Vandenbroucke, J.; Vasileiou, V.; Vianello, G.; Vitale, V.; Waite, A. P.; Winer, B. L.; Wood, K. S.; Yang, Z.; Zimmer, S.; Fermi-LAT Collaboration; Moderski, R.; Nalewajko, K.; Sikora, M.; Villata, M.; Raiteri, C. M.; Aller, H. D.; Aller, M. F.; Arkharov, A. A.; Benítez, E.; Berdyugin, A.; Blinov, D. A.; Boettcher, M.; Bravo Calle, O. J. A.; Buemi, C. S.; Carosati, D.; Chen, W. P.; Diltz, C.; Di Paola, A.; Dolci, M.; Efimova, N. V.; Forné, E.; Gurwell, M. A.; Heidt, J.; Hiriart, D.; Jordan, B.; Kimeridze, G.; Konstantinova, T. S.; Kopatskaya, E. N.; Koptelova, E.; Kurtanidze, O. M.; Lähteenmäki, A.; Larionova, E. G.; Larionova, L. V.; Larionov, V. M.; Leto, P.; Lindfors, E.; Lin, H. C.; Morozova, D. A.; Nikolashvili, M. G.; Nilsson, K.; Oksman, M.; Roustazadeh, P.; Sievers, A.; Sigua, L. A.; Sillanpää, A.; Takahashi, T.; Takalo, L. O.; Tornikoski, M.; Trigilio, C.; Troitsky, I. S.; Umana, G.; GASP-WEBT Consortium; Angelakis, E.; Krichbaum, T. P.; Nestoras, I.; Riquelme, D.; F-GAMMA; Krips, M.; Trippe, S.; Iram-PdBI; Arai, A.; Kawabata, K. S.; Sakimoto, K.; Sasada, M.; Sato, S.; Uemura, M.; Yamanaka, M.; Yoshida, M.; Kanata; Belloni, T.; Tagliaferri, G.; RXTE; Bonning, E. W.; Isler, J.; Urry, C. M.; SMARTS; Hoversten, E.; Falcone, A.; Pagani, C.; Stroh, M.; (Swift-XRT

    2012-06-01

    The blazar AO 0235+164 (z = 0.94) has been one of the most active objects observed by Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) since its launch in Summer 2008. In addition to the continuous coverage by Fermi, contemporaneous observations were carried out from the radio to γ-ray bands between 2008 September and 2009 February. In this paper, we summarize the rich multi-wavelength data collected during the campaign (including F-GAMMA, GASP-WEBT, Kanata, OVRO, RXTE, SMARTS, Swift, and other instruments), examine the cross-correlation between the light curves measured in the different energy bands, and interpret the resulting spectral energy distributions in the context of well-known blazar emission models. We find that the γ-ray activity is well correlated with a series of near-IR/optical flares, accompanied by an increase in the optical polarization degree. On the other hand, the X-ray light curve shows a distinct 20 day high state of unusually soft spectrum, which does not match the extrapolation of the optical/UV synchrotron spectrum. We tentatively interpret this feature as the bulk Compton emission by cold electrons contained in the jet, which requires an accretion disk corona with an effective covering factor of 19% at a distance of 100 R g. We model the broadband spectra with a leptonic model with external radiation dominated by the infrared emission from the dusty torus.

  16. Multi-wavelength emissions from the millisecond pulsar binary PSR J1023+0038 during an accretion active state

    SciTech Connect

    Takata, J.; Leung, Gene C. K.; Wu, E. M. H.; Cheng, K. S.; Li, K. L.; Kong, A. K. H.; Tam, P. H. T.; Hui, C. Y.; Xing, Yi; Wang, Zhongxiang; Cao, Yi; Tang, Sumin E-mail: akong@phys.nthu.edu.tw

    2014-04-20

    Recent observations strongly suggest that the millisecond pulsar binary PSR J1023+0038 has developed an accretion disk since 2013 June. We present a multi-wavelength analysis of PSR J1023+0038, which reveals that (1) its gamma-rays suddenly brightened within a few days in 2013 June/July and has remained at a high gamma-ray state for several months; (2) both UV and X-ray fluxes have increased by roughly an order of magnitude; and (3) the spectral energy distribution has changed significantly after the gamma-ray sudden flux change. Time variabilities associated with UV and X-rays are on the order of 100-500 s and 50-100 s, respectively. Our model suggests that a newly formed accretion disk, due to the sudden increase of the stellar wind, could explain the changes of all these observed features. The increase of UV is emitted from the disk, and a new component in gamma-rays is produced by inverse Compton scattering between the new UV component and pulsar wind. The increase of X-rays results from the enhancement of injection pulsar wind energy into the intra-binary shock due to the increase of the stellar wind. We also predict that the radio pulses may be blocked by the evaporated winds from the disk, and the pulsar is still powered by rotation.

  17. Performance improvement of FSO/CDMA systems over dispersive turbulence channel using multi-wavelength PPM signaling.

    PubMed

    Dang, Ngoc T; Pham, Anh T

    2012-11-19

    Previous studies show that, compared to on-off keying (OOK) signaling, pulse-position modulation (PPM) is favorable in FSO/CDMA systems thanks to its energy efficiency and simple detection. Nevertheless, when the system bit rate increases and the transmission distance is far, the FSO/CDMA systems using PPM signaling critically suffer from the impact of pulse broadening caused by dispersion, especially when the modulation level is high. In this paper, we therefore propose to use multi-wavelength PPM (MWPPM) signaling to overcome the limitation of PPM. To further improve the system performance, avalanche photodiode (APD) is also used. The performance of the proposed system is theoretically analyzed using a realistic model of Gaussian pulse propagation. To model the impact of intensity fluctuation caused by the atmospheric turbulence, the log-normal channel is used. We find that, by using MWPPM, the effects of both intensity fluctuation and pulse broadening are mitigated, the BER is therefore significantly improved. Additionally, we quantitatively show that the system performance is further improved by using APD, especially when the average APD gain is chosen properly.

  18. Overview of North Ecliptic Pole Deep Multi-wavelength Survey as a Probe of the Cosmic Noon Era

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuhara, Hideo; Oi, Nagisa

    2015-08-01

    An overview of the North Ecliptic Pole deep (0.5 deg2, NEP-Deep) multi-wavelength survey covering from X-ray to radio-wave is presented. The NEP-Deep provides us with several thousands of 15 μm or 18 μm selected sample of galaxies, which is the largest sample ever made at these wavelengths. A continuous filter coverage in the mid-infrared wavelength (7, 9, 11, 15, 18, and 24 μm) is unique and vital to diagnose the contributions from starbursts and AGNs in the galaxies out to z=2. The goal of the project is to resolve the nature of the cosmic star formation history at the cosmic noon era (e.g. z=1--2), and to find a clue to understand its decline from z=1 to present universe by utilizing the unique power of the multiwavelength survey. To achieve the goal we use a few diagnostic physical parameters unique to the NEP dataset: specific star-formation rate, dust attenuation, and obscured AGN fraction, etc.It is also noteworthy that the NEP is the legacy field thanks to its high visibility by the space observatories, such as eROSITA, Euclid, JWST, and SPICA. SPICA, the next generation large cooled space telescope is extremely powerful to study the rise and fall of the cosmic star-formation history in the universe.

  19. Multi-wavelength photometry of the T Tauri binary V582 Mon (KH 15D): A new epoch of occultations

    SciTech Connect

    Windemuth, Diana; Herbst, William

    2014-01-01

    We present multi-wavelength (VRIJHK) observations of KH 15D obtained in 2012/2013, as well as a master table of standard photometry spanning the years 1967 to 2013. The system is a close, eccentric T Tauri binary embedded in an inclined precessing circumbinary (CB) ring. The most recent data show the continued rise of star B with respect to the trailing edge of the occulting horizon as the system's maximum brightness steadily increases. The wealth of data in time and wavelength domains allows us to track the long-term CCD color evolution of KH 15D. We find that the V – I behavior is consistent with direct and scattered light from the composite color of two stars with slightly different temperatures. There is no evidence for any reddening or bluing associated with extinction or scattering by interstellar-medium-size dust grains. Furthermore, we probe the system's faint phase behavior at near-infrared wavelengths in order to investigate extinction properties of the ring and signatures of a possible shepherding planet sometimes invoked to confine the CB ring at ∼5 AU. The wavelength independence of eclipse depth at second contact is consistent with the ring material being fully opaque to 2.2 μm. The color-magnitude diagrams demonstrate excess flux in J and H at low light levels, which may be due to the presence of a hot, young Jupiter-mass planet.

  20. Improved Constraints on Type Ia Supernova Host Galaxy Properties using Multi-Wavelength Photometry and their Correlations with Supernova Properties

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, Ravi R.; D'Andrea, Chris B.; Sako, Masao; Conroy, Charlie; Smith, Mathew; Bassett, Bruce; Frieman, Joshua A.; Garnavich, Peter M.; Jha, Saurabh W.; Kessler, Richard; Lampeitl, Hubert; /Portsmouth U., ICG /Fermilab

    2011-07-01

    We improve estimates of the stellar mass and mass-weighted average age of Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) host galaxies by combining UV and near-IR photometry with optical photometry in our analysis. Using 206 SNe Ia drawn from the full three-year Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS-II) Supernova Survey (median redshift of z {approx} 0.2) and multi-wavelength host-galaxy photometry from SDSS, the Galaxy Evolution Explorer, and the United Kingdom Infrared Telescope Infrared Deep Sky Survey, we present evidence of a correlation (1.9{sigma} confidence level) between the residuals of SNe Ia about the best-fit Hubble relation and the mass-weighted average age of their host galaxies. The trend is such that older galaxies host SNe Ia that are brighter than average after standard light-curve corrections are made. We also confirm, at the 3.0{sigma} level, the trend seen by previous studies that more massive galaxies often host brighter SNe Ia after light-curve correction.

  1. Brown carbon and thermal-optical analysis: A correction based on optical multi-wavelength apportionment of atmospheric aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massabò, D.; Caponi, L.; Bove, M. C.; Prati, P.

    2016-01-01

    Thermo-optical analysis is widely adopted for the quantitative determination of total, TC, organic, OC and elemental, EC, Carbon in aerosol samples collected on quartz fibre filters. Nevertheless, the methodology presents several issues in particular about the artefacts related to the formation of pyrolytic carbon. It is usually neglected the uncertainty due to the possible presence of brown carbon (BrC) in the sample under analysis, i.e. the optically active fraction of OC produced by biomass burning and with characteristics intermediate between OC and EC. We introduce here a novel correction to the standard thermo-optical protocol based on the determination of the fraction of the sample absorbance due to the (possible) presence of BrC. This is achievable thanks to the coupled use of the Multi Wavelength Absorbance Analyser (MWAA) of the University of Genoa and a standard Sunset Inc. EC/OC analyser. Our correction provides a firmer OC/EC separation as well as an operative quantification of the BrC mass. The methodology has been validated against independent determination of the levoglucosan content in the same filters sent to the Sunset analysis. Corrections up to 23% in the OC and EC values, determined via the standard and new thermo-optical analysis, have been found in a set of PM10 (i.e. Particulate Matter with aerodynamic diameter less than 10 μm) samples collected wintertime at a mountain site in Northern Italy.

  2. Multi-wavelength study of flaring activity in BL Lac object S5 0716+714 during the 2015 outburst

    DOE PAGES

    Chandra, Sunil; Zhang, Haocheng; Kushwaha, Pankaj; Singh, K. P.; Bottcher, M.; Kaur, Navpreet; Baliyan, K. S.

    2015-08-17

    We present a detailed investigation of the flaring activity observed from a BL Lac object, S5 0716+714 , during its brightest ever optical state in the second half of 2015 January. Observed almost simultaneously in the optical, X-rays, and γ-rays, a significant change in the degree of optical polarization (PD) and a swing in the position angle (PA) of polarization were recorded. A TeV (VHE) detection was also reported by the MAGIC consortium during this flaring episode. Two prominent sub-flares, peaking about five days apart, were seen in almost all of the energy bands. The multi-wavelength light curves, spectral energymore » distribution, and polarization are modeled using the time-dependent code developed by Zhang et al. This model assumes a straight jet threaded by large-scale helical magnetic fields taking into account the light travel time effects, incorporating synchrotron flux and polarization in 3D geometry. Furthermore, the rapid variation in PD and rotation in PA are most likely due to reconnections happening in the emission region in the jet, as suggested by the change in the ratio of toroidal to poloidal components of the magnetic field during the quiescent and flaring states.« less

  3. Multi-wavelength Photometry of the T Tauri Binary V582 Mon (KH 15D): a New Epoch of Occultations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Windemuth, Diana; Herbst, William

    2014-01-01

    We present multi-wavelength (VRIJHK) observations of KH 15D obtained in 2012/2013, as well as a master table of standard photometry spanning the years 1967 to 2013. The system is a close, eccentric T Tauri binary embedded in an inclined precessing circumbinary (CB) ring. The most recent data show the continued rise of star B with respect to the trailing edge of the occulting horizon as the system's maximum brightness steadily increases. The wealth of data in time and wavelength domains allows us to track the long-term CCD color evolution of KH 15D. We find that the V - I behavior is consistent with direct and scattered light from the composite color of two stars with slightly different temperatures. There is no evidence for any reddening or bluing associated with extinction or scattering by interstellar-medium-size dust grains. Furthermore, we probe the system's faint phase behavior at near-infrared wavelengths in order to investigate extinction properties of the ring and signatures of a possible shepherding planet sometimes invoked to confine the CB ring at ~5 AU. The wavelength independence of eclipse depth at second contact is consistent with the ring material being fully opaque to 2.2 μm. The color-magnitude diagrams demonstrate excess flux in J and H at low light levels, which may be due to the presence of a hot, young Jupiter-mass planet.

  4. A Multi-Wavelength Simultaneous Study of the Composition of the Halley Family Comet 8P/Tuttle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jehin, E.; Bockelée-Morvan, D.; Dello Russo, N.; Manfroid, J.; Hutsemékers, D.; Kawakita, H.; Kobayashi, H.; Schulz, R.; Smette, A.; Stüwe, J.; Weiler, M.; Arpigny, C.; Biver, N.; Cochran, A.; Crovisier, J.; Magain, P.; Rauer, H.; Sana, H.; Vervack, R. J.; Weaver, H.; Zucconi, J.-M.

    2009-09-01

    We report on simultaneous optical and infrared observations of the Halley Family comet 8P/Tuttle performed with the ESO Very Large Telescope. Such multi-wavelength and coordinated observations are a good example of what can be done to support space missions. From high resolution optical spectroscopy of the CN (0,0) 388 nm and NH2 (0,9,0) 610 nm bands using UVES at UT2 we determined 12C/13C = 90 ± 10 and 14N/15N = 150 ± 20 in CN and we derived a nuclear spin temperature of NH3 of 29 ± 1 K. These values are similar to those found in Oort-Cloud and Jupiter Family comets. From low resolution long slit spectroscopy with FORS1 at UT2 we determined the CN, C3 and C2 production rates and the parent and daughter scale lengths up to 5.2 105 km tailward. From high resolution IR spectroscopy with CRIRES at UT1 we measured simultaneously the production rates and mixing ratios of H2O, HCN, C2H2, CH4, C2H6, and CH3OH.

  5. Tunable multi-wavelength thulium-doped fiber laser incorporating two-stage cascaded Sagnac loop comb filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Lianqing; He, Wei; Dong, Mingli; Lou, Xiaoping; Luo, Fei

    2016-08-01

    A tunable multi-wavelength narrow-linewidth thulium-doped fiber laser employing two-stage cascaded Sagnac loop mirrors is proposed and experimentally demonstrated. The designed fiber laser is composed of a pump source, wavelength division multiplex, circulator, thulium-doped fiber, polarization controllers (PCs), couplers and polarization-maintaining fibers (PMFs). Two cascaded Sagnac loops are used as the cavity reflector and filter, and the proposed filter is fabricated using two sections of PMFs with 2-m and 1-m lengths, respectively. In the experiment, the laser threshold is 110 mW, and laser can emit single, double, triple, quadruple and quintuple wavelengths in the spectral range of 1873-1901 nm through the simultaneous adjustment of the two PCs. The power fluctuations and 3-dB linewidth are less than 2.1 dB and 0.2 nm, respectively, over 10 min at room temperature, and the side-mode suppression ratio is greater than 20 dB. The proposed laser will be useful in various fields, such as spectral analysis, fiber sensing and optical communication.

  6. Multi-wavelength Observations of Photospheric Vortex Flows in the Photosphere Using Ground-based and Space-borne Telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palacios, J.; Vargas Domínguez, S.; Balmaceda, L. A.; Cabello, I.; Domingo, V.

    2016-04-01

    In this work we follow a series of papers on high-resolution observations of small-scale structures in the solar atmosphere (Balmaceda et al. 2009, 2010; Vargas Domínguez et al. 2011; Palacios et al. 2012; Domingo et al. 2012; Vargas Domínguez et al. 2015, Cabello et al., in prep), combining several multi-wavelength data series. These were acquired by both ground-based (SST) and space-borne (Hinode) instruments during the joint campaign of the Hinode Operation Program 14, in September 2007. Diffraction-limited SST data were taken in the G-band and G-cont, and were restored by the MFBD technique. Hinode instruments, on the other hand, provided multispectral data from SOT-FG in the CN band, and Mg I and Ca II lines, as well as from SOT-SP in the Fe I line. In this series of works we have thoroughly studied vortex flows and their statistical occurrences, horizontal velocity fields by means of Local Correlation Tracking (LCT), divergence and vorticity. Taking advantage of the high-cadence and high spatial resolution data, we have also studied bright point statistics and magnetic field intensification, highlighting the importance of the smallest-scale magnetic element observations.

  7. Switchable and multi-wavelength linear fiber laser based on Fabry-Perot and Mach-Zehnder interferometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutierrez-Gutierrez, J.; Rojas-Laguna, R.; Estudillo-Ayala, J. M.; Sierra-Hernández, J. M.; Jauregui-Vazquez, D.; Vargas-Treviño, M.; Tepech-Carrillo, L.; Grajales-Coutiño, R.

    2016-09-01

    In this manuscript, switchable and multi-wavelength erbium-doped fiber laser arrangement, based on Fabry-Perot (FPI) and Mach-Zehnder (MZI) interferometers is presented. Here, the FPI is composed by two air-microcavities set into the tip of conventional single mode fiber, this one is used as a partially reflecting mirror and lasing modes generator. And the MZI fabricated by splicing a segment of photonic crystal fiber (PCF) between a single-mode fiber section, was set into an optical fiber loop mirror that acts as full-reflecting and wavelength selective filter. Both interferometers, promotes a cavity oscillation into the fiber laser configuration, besides by curvature applied over the MZI, the fiber laser generates: single, double, triple and quadruple laser emissions with a signal to noise ratio (SNR) of 30 dB. These laser emissions can be switching between them from 1525 nm to 1534 nm by adjusting the curvature radius over the MZI. This laser fiber offers a wavelength and power stability at room temperature, compactness and low implementation cost. Moreover the linear laser proposed can be used in several fields such as spectroscopy, telecommunications and fiber optic sensing systems.

  8. Quantitative photoacoustic blood oxygenation measurement of whole porcine blood samples using a multi-wavelength semiconductor laser system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedrich, Claus-Stefan; Mienkina, Martin P.; Brenner, Carsten; Gerhardt, Nils C.; Jörger, Manfred; Strauß, Andreas; Beckmann, Martin F.; Schmitz, Georg; Hofmann, Martin R.

    2011-07-01

    We present a photoacoustic measurement system based on semiconductor lasers for blood oxygenation measurements. It permits to use four different optical wavelengths (650nm, 808nm, 850nm, 905nm) to generate photoacoustic signals. As the optical extinction coefficient of oxygenated hemoglobin and deoxygenated hemoglobin is different at specific wavelengths, a blood oxygenation measurement by a multi-wavelength photoacoustic laser system is feasible. Especially at 650nm, the clear difference between the extinction coefficients of the two hemoglobin derivates permits to determine the blood oxygenation in combination with other near infrared wavelengths. A linear model based on tabulated values of extinction coefficients for fully oxygenated and fully deoxygenated hemoglobin is presented. We used heparin stabilized whole porcine blood samples to model the optical behavior of human blood, as the optical absorption behavior of porcine hemoglobin does not differ significantly from human hemoglobin. To determine the real oxygen saturation values of the blood samples, we measured the partial oxygen pressure with an IRMA Trupoint Blood Analysis System. The oxygen saturation values were calculated from a dissociation curve for porcine blood. The results of the photoacoustic measurement are in qualitatively good agreement with the predicted linear model. Further, we analyze the abilities and the limitations of quantitative oxygenation measurements.

  9. Diode-pumped simultaneous multi-wavelength linearly polarized Nd:YVO4 laser at 1062, 1064 and 1066 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Zhi; Wang, Yi; Xu, Bin; Xu, Huiying; Cai, Zhiping

    2016-01-01

    We report on a diode-end-pumped simultaneous multiple wavelength Nd:YVO4 laser. Dual-wavelength laser is achieved at a π-polarized 1064 nm emission line and a σ-polarized 1066 nm emission line with total maximum output power of 1.38 W. Moreover, tri-wavelength laser emission at the π-polarized 1064 nm emission line and σ-polarized 1062 and 1066 nm emission lines can also be obtained with total maximum output power of about 1.23 W, for the first time to our knowledge. The operation of such simultaneous dual- and tri-wavelength lasers is only realized by employing a simple glass etalon to modulate the intracavity losses for these potential lasing wavelengths inside of an intracavity polarizer, which therefore makes a very compact two-mirror linear cavity and simultaneous orthogonal lasing possible. Such orthogonal linearly polarized multi-wavelength laser sources could be especially promising in THz wave generation and in efficient nonlinear frequency conversion to visible lasers.

  10. PKS 2155-304 in July 2006: H.E.S.S. results and simultaneous multi-wavelength observations

    SciTech Connect

    Lenain, Jean-Philippe; Boisson, Catherine; Sol, Helne; Zech, Andreas; Benbow, Wystan; Buehler, Rolf; Costamante, Luigi; Raue, Martin; Giebels, Berrie; Superina, Giulia; Punch, Michael; Volpe, Francesca

    2008-12-24

    The high-frequency-peaked BL Lac PKS 2155-304 is one of the brightest and best-studied VHE {gamma}-ray sources in the southern hemisphere. The High Energy Stereoscopic System (H.E.S.S.) has monitored PKS 2155-304 in 2006 and a multi-wavelength campaign involving X-ray, optical and radio observatories was triggered by the detection of an active state in July 2006, followed by the detection of two extraordinary flares on July, 28th and 30th, with peak fluxes {approx}100 times the usual values. We present results from the spectral and flux variability analysis of the VHE and simultaneous X-ray observations with Chandra during the second flare, as well as the detailed evolution of the VHE flux of PKS 2155-304 observed by H.E.S.S. in 2006. A study of flux correlations in the different frequency ranges during the second flare and the adjacent nights is discussed. We also present an interpretation of the active state of PKS 2155-304 in the framework of synchrotron self-Compton emission.

  11. First Results of Small Animal Imaging Spect Detector for Cardiovascular Disease Studies on Mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magliozzi, M. L.; Ballerini, M.; Cisbani, E.; Colilli, S.; Cusanno, F.; Fratoni, R.; Garibaldi, F.; Giuliani, F.; Gricia, M.; Lucentini, M.; Santavenere, F.; Torrioli, S.; Veneroni, P.; Majewsky, S.; Mok, S. P. G.; Tsui, B. M. W.; Wang, Y.; Marano, G.; Musumeci, M.; Palazzesi, S.; Ciccariello, G.; de Vincentis, G.; Accorsi, R.

    2008-06-01

    We have developed a compact, open, Dual Head pinhole SPECT system for high resolution molecular imaging with radionuclides of mice, dedicated mainly to preclinical study of stem cells capability to recover myocardial infarction. The gamma detector is made of pinhole tungsten collimators, pixellated scintillators, matrix of multi-anode PMTs and individual channel readout. Measurements have been performed on phantoms and live mice devoted initially to test and calibrate the system and to optimize protocols. The implemented system and the first results will be presented, demonstrating the effectiveness of our dedicated SPECT detector for small animal imaging.

  12. Performance of an X-ray imaging detector based on a structured scintillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svenonius, Olof; Sahlholm, Anna; Wiklund, Per; Linnros, Jan

    2009-08-01

    Structured scintillator plates have been fabricated by filling thallium-doped caesium iodide (CsI) into a silicon pore array. Their X-ray imaging properties have been characterized using a standard dental X-ray source and a charge coupled device (CCD) detector. Results indicate that finer structured pore arrays provide superior imaging resolution while their light output is lower. Direct absorption of X-ray quanta in the CCD is a significant contributor of detector noise. This can be avoided by using a thick fibre optic plate or, in certain cases, by using a hot-pixel software algorithm.

  13. Optimization-based image reconstruction from sparse-view data in offset-detector CBCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bian, Junguo; Wang, Jiong; Han, Xiao; Sidky, Emil Y.; Shao, Lingxiong; Pan, Xiaochuan

    2013-01-01

    The field of view (FOV) of a cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) unit in a single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)/CBCT system can be increased by offsetting the CBCT detector. Analytic-based algorithms have been developed for image reconstruction from data collected at a large number of densely sampled views in offset-detector CBCT. However, the radiation dose involved in a large number of projections can be of a health concern to the imaged subject. CBCT-imaging dose can be reduced by lowering the number of projections. As analytic-based algorithms are unlikely to reconstruct accurate images from sparse-view data, we investigate and characterize in the work optimization-based algorithms, including an adaptive steepest descent-weighted projection onto convex sets (ASD-WPOCS) algorithms, for image reconstruction from sparse-view data collected in offset-detector CBCT. Using simulated data and real data collected from a physical pelvis phantom and patient, we verify and characterize properties of the algorithms under study. Results of our study suggest that optimization-based algorithms such as ASD-WPOCS may be developed for yielding images of potential utility from a number of projections substantially smaller than those used currently in clinical SPECT/CBCT imaging, thus leading to a dose reduction in CBCT imaging.

  14. Optimization-based image reconstruction from sparse-view data in offset-detector CBCT.

    PubMed

    Bian, Junguo; Wang, Jiong; Han, Xiao; Sidky, Emil Y; Shao, Lingxiong; Pan, Xiaochuan

    2013-01-21

    The field of view (FOV) of a cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) unit in a single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)/CBCT system can be increased by offsetting the CBCT detector. Analytic-based algorithms have been developed for image reconstruction from data collected at a large number of densely sampled views in offset-detector CBCT. However, the radiation dose involved in a large number of projections can be of a health concern to the imaged subject. CBCT-imaging dose can be reduced by lowering the number of projections. As analytic-based algorithms are unlikely to reconstruct accurate images from sparse-view data, we investigate and characterize in the work optimization-based algorithms, including an adaptive steepest descent-weighted projection onto convex sets (ASD-WPOCS) algorithms, for image reconstruction from sparse-view data collected in offset-detector CBCT. Using simulated data and real data collected from a physical pelvis phantom and patient, we verify and characterize properties of the algorithms under study. Results of our study suggest that optimization-based algorithms such as ASD-WPOCS may be developed for yielding images of potential utility from a number of projections substantially smaller than those used currently in clinical SPECT/CBCT imaging, thus leading to a dose reduction in CBCT imaging.

  15. SU-C-201-03: Coded Aperture Gamma-Ray Imaging Using Pixelated Semiconductor Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Joshi, S; Kaye, W; Jaworski, J; He, Z

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Improved localization of gamma-ray emissions from radiotracers is essential to the progress of nuclear medicine. Polaris is a portable, room-temperature operated gamma-ray imaging spectrometer composed of two 3×3 arrays of thick CdZnTe (CZT) detectors, which detect gammas between 30keV and 3MeV with energy resolution of <1% FWHM at 662keV. Compton imaging is used to map out source distributions in 4-pi space; however, is only effective above 300keV where Compton scatter is dominant. This work extends imaging to photoelectric energies (<300keV) using coded aperture imaging (CAI), which is essential for localization of Tc-99m (140keV). Methods: CAI, similar to the pinhole camera, relies on an attenuating mask, with open/closed elements, placed between the source and position-sensitive detectors. Partial attenuation of the source results in a “shadow” or count distribution that closely matches a portion of the mask pattern. Ideally, each source direction corresponds to a unique count distribution. Using backprojection reconstruction, the source direction is determined within the field of view. The knowledge of 3D position of interaction results in improved image quality. Results: Using a single array of detectors, a coded aperture mask, and multiple Co-57 (122keV) point sources, image reconstruction is performed in real-time, on an event-by-event basis, resulting in images with an angular resolution of ∼6 degrees. Although material nonuniformities contribute to image degradation, the superposition of images from individual detectors results in improved SNR. CAI was integrated with Compton imaging for a seamless transition between energy regimes. Conclusion: For the first time, CAI has been applied to thick, 3D position sensitive CZT detectors. Real-time, combined CAI and Compton imaging is performed using two 3×3 detector arrays, resulting in a source distribution in space. This system has been commercialized by H3D, Inc. and is being acquired for

  16. High resolution, multiple-energy linear sweep detector for x-ray imaging

    DOEpatents

    Perez-Mendez, Victor; Goodman, Claude A.

    1996-01-01

    Apparatus for generating plural electrical signals in a single scan in response to incident X-rays received from an object. Each electrical signal represents an image of the object at a different range of energies of the incident X-rays. The apparatus comprises a first X-ray detector, a second X-ray detector stacked upstream of the first X-ray detector, and an X-ray absorber stacked upstream of the first X-ray detector. The X-ray absorber provides an energy-dependent absorption of the incident X-rays before they are incident at the first X-ray detector, but provides no absorption of the incident X-rays before they are incident at the second X-ray detector. The first X-ray detector includes a linear array of first pixels, each of which produces an electrical output in response to the incident X-rays in a first range of energies. The first X-ray detector also includes a circuit that generates a first electrical signal in response to the electrical output of each of the first pixels. The second X-ray detector includes a linear array of second pixels, each of which produces an electrical output in response to the incident X-rays in a second range of energies, broader than the first range of energies. The second X-ray detector also includes a circuit that generates a second electrical signal in response to the electrical output of each of the second pixels.

  17. High resolution, multiple-energy linear sweep detector for x-ray imaging

    DOEpatents

    Perez-Mendez, V.; Goodman, C.A.

    1996-08-20

    Apparatus is disclosed for generating plural electrical signals in a single scan in response to incident X-rays received from an object. Each electrical signal represents an image of the object at a different range of energies of the incident X-rays. The apparatus comprises a first X-ray detector, a second X-ray detector stacked upstream of the first X-ray detector, and an X-ray absorber stacked upstream of the first X-ray detector. The X-ray absorber provides an energy-dependent absorption of the incident X-rays before they are incident at the first X-ray detector, but provides no absorption of the incident X-rays before they are incident at the second X-ray detector. The first X-ray detector includes a linear array of first pixels, each of which produces an electrical output in response to the incident X-rays in a first range of energies. The first X-ray detector also includes a circuit that generates a first electrical signal in response to the electrical output of each of the first pixels. The second X-ray detector includes a linear array of second pixels, each of which produces an electrical output in response to the incident X-rays in a second range of energies, broader than the first range of energies. The second X-ray detector also includes a circuit that generates a second electrical signal in response to the electrical output of each of the second pixels. 12 figs.

  18. Evaluation of a CMOS image detector for low-cost and power medical x-ray imaging applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Scott T.; Bednarek, Daniel R.; Wobschall, Darold C.; Jeong, Myoungki; Kim, Hyunkeun; Rudin, Stephen

    1999-05-01

    Recent developments in CMOS image detectors are changing the way digital imaging is performed for many applications. The replacement of charge coupled devices (CCDs), with CMOS detectors is a desirable paradigm shift that will depend on the ability to match the high performance characteristics of CCDs. Digital X-ray imaging applications (chest X-ray, mammography) would benefit greatly from this shift because CMOS detectors have the following inherent characteristics: (1) Low operating power (5 - 10 times lower than CCD/processing electronics). (2) Standard CMOS manufacturing process (CCD requires special manufacturing). (3) On-chip integration of analog/digital processing functions (difficult with CCD). (4) Low Cost (5 - 10 times lower cost than CCD). The achievement of both low cost and low power is highly desirable for portable applications as well as situations where large, expensive X-ray imaging machines are not feasible (small hospitals and clinics, emergency medical vehicles, remote sites). Achieving this goal using commercially available components would allow rapid development of such digital X-ray systems as compared with the development difficulties incurred through specialized direct detectors and systems. The focus of this paper is to evaluate a CMOS image detector for medical X-ray applications and to demonstrate the results obtained from a prototype CMOS digital X-ray camera. Results from the images collected from this optically-coupled camera are presented for a particular lens, X-ray conversion screen, and demagnification factor. Further, an overview of the overall power consumption and cost of a multi-sensor CMOS mosaic compared to its CCD counterpart are also reported.

  19. Fourier synthesis image reconstruction by use of one-dimensional position-sensitive detectors.

    PubMed

    Kotoku, Jun'ichi; Makishima, Kazuo; Okada, Yuu; Negoro, Hitoshi; Terada, Yukikatsu; Kaneda, Hidehiro; Oda, Minoru

    2003-07-10

    An improvement of Fourier synthesis optics for hard x-ray imaging is described, and the basic performance of the new optics is confirmed through numerical simulations. The original concept of the Fourier synthesis imager utilizes nonposition-sensitive hard x-ray detectors coupled to individual bigrid modulation collimators. The improved concept employs a one-dimensional position-sensitive detector (such as a CdTe strip detector) instead of the second grid layer of each bigrid modulation collimator. This improves the imaging performance in several respects over the original design. One performance improvement is a two-fold increase in the average transmission, from 1/4 to 1/2. The second merit is that both the sine and cosine components can be derived from a single grid-detector module, and hence the number of imaging modules can be halved. Furthermore, it provides information along the depth direction simultaneously. This in turn enables a three-dimensional imaging hard x-ray microscope for medical diagnostics, incorporating radioactive tracers. A conceptual design of such a microscope is presented, designed to provide a field of view of 4 mm and a spatial resolution of 400 microm.

  20. Performance characteristics of the imaging MAMA detector systems for SOHO, STIS, and FUSE/Lyman

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Timothy, J. G.

    1991-01-01

    Imaging Extreme Ultraviolet (EUV) Multi-Anode Microchannel Array (MAMA) detector systems with formats of 360 x 1024 pixels and pixel dimensions of 25 x 25 sq microns are being fabricated and tested for flight in two instruments on the ESA/NASA Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO). In addition, very-large-format (1024 x 1024)- and (2048 x 2048)-pixel Far Ultraviolet (FUV) and EUV MAMA detectors with pixel dimensions of 25 x 25 sq microns are being fabricated and tested for use in the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center's Hubble Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS), a second-generation instrument scheduled for in-orbit installation in 1997. Finally, FUV MAMA detectors with formats of 224 x 960 pixels and pixel dimensions of 14 x 14 sq microns are being evaluated as prototypes of the detector for the prime FUV spectrograph of the Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE/Lyman) mission. The configurations and performance characteristics of the different detector systems are described, and the plans for further development of the Advanced Technology MAMA detector system discussed.

  1. HIGH SPATIAL RESOLUTION IMAGING OF INERTIAL FUSION TARGET PLASMAS USING BUBBLE NEWTRON DETECTORS

    SciTech Connect

    FISHER,RK

    2002-10-01

    OAK B202 HIGH SPATIAL RESOLUTION IMAGING OF INERTIAL FUSION TARGET PLASMAS USING BUBBLE NEWTRON DETECTORS. Bubble detectors, which can detect neutrons with a spatial resolution of 5 to 30 {micro}, are a promising approach to high-resolution imaging of NIF target plasmas. Gel bubble detectors were used in successful proof-of-principle imaging experiments on OMEGA. Until recently, bubble detectors appeared to be the only approach capable of achieving neutron images of NIF targets with the desired 5 {micro} spatial resolution in the target plane. In 2001, NIF reduced the required standoff distance from the target, so that diagnostic components can now be placed as close as 10 cm to the target plasma. This will allow neutron imaging with higher magnification and may make it possible to obtain 5 {micro}m resolution images on NIF using deuterated scintillators. Having accomplished all that they can hope to on OMEGA using gel detectors, they suggested that the 2002 NLUF shots be used to allow experimental tests of the spatial resolution of the CEA-built deuterated scintillators. The preliminary CEA data from the June 2002 run appears to show the spatial resolution using the deuterated scintillator detector array is improved over that obtained in earlier experiments using the proton-based scintillators. Gel detectors, which consist of {approx} 10 {micro}m diameter drops of bubble detector liquid suspended in an inactive support gel that occupies {approx} 99% of the detector volume, were chosen for the initial tests on OMEGA since they are easy to use. The bubbles could be photographed several hours after the neutron exposure. Imaging NIF target plasmas at neutron yields of 10{sup 15} will require a higher detection efficiency detector. Using a liquid bubble chamber detector should result in {approx} 1000 times higher neutron detection efficiency which is comparable to that possible using scintillation detectors. A pressure-cycled liquid bubble detector will require a light

  2. Ground penetrating radar and imaging metal detector for antipersonnel mine detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruschini, Claudio; Gros, Bertrand; Guerne, Frédéric; Pièce, Pierre-Yves; Carmona, Olivier

    1998-10-01

    DeTeC (Demining Technology Center) is developing a sensor system for humanitarian demining enabling reduction in the number of false alarms and usable by a man or an autonomous robot (see http://diwww.epfl.ch/lami/detec/). We have chosen to concentrate our first experiments on a commercial impulse ground penetrating radar with a 1 GHz antenna and a metal detector used for imaging purposes. The metal detector should help to distinguish two objects with similar radar echoes but different metal content, e.g. a mine and a stone of the same size. The GPR should in turn differentiate a mine from metallic debris, which often gives a similar metal detector answer. An experimental setup, consisting of a double sandbox with a computerized system that allows the automated positioning of the sensors, has been constructed. Preliminary results of data acquisition and treatment on both sensor technologies are presented with a comparison between the metal detector and the GPR data.

  3. Parasitic antenna effect in terahertz plasmon detector array for real-time imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jong-Ryul; Lee, Woo-Jae; Ryu, Min Woo; Rok Kim, Kyung; Han, Seong-Tae

    2015-10-01

    The performance uniformity of each pixel integrated with a patch antenna in a terahertz plasmon detector array is very important in building the large array necessary for a real-time imaging system. We found a parasitic antenna effect in the terahertz plasmon detector whose response is dependent on the position of the detector pixel in the illumination area of the terahertz beam. It was also demonstrated that the parasitic antenna effect is attributed to the physical structure consisting of signal pads, bonding wires, and interconnection lines on a chip and a printed circuit board. Experimental results show that the performance of the detector pixel is determined by the sum of the effects of each parasitic antenna and the on-chip integrated antenna designed to detect signals at the operating frequency. The parasitic antenna effect can be minimized by blocking the interconnections with a metallic shield.

  4. High resolution resonance ionization imaging detector and method

    DOEpatents

    Winefordner, James D.; Matveev, Oleg I.; Smith, Benjamin W.

    1999-01-01

    A resonance ionization imaging device (RIID) and method for imaging objects using the RIID are provided, the RIID system including a RIID cell containing an ionizable vapor including monoisotopic atoms or molecules, the cell being positioned to intercept scattered radiation of a resonance wavelength .lambda..sub.1 from the object which is to be detected or imaged, a laser source disposed to illuminate the RIID cell with laser radiation having a wavelength .lambda..sub.2 or wavelengths .lambda..sub.2, .lambda..sub.3 selected to ionize atoms in the cell that are in an excited state by virtue of having absorbed the scattered resonance laser radiation, and a luminescent screen at the back surface of the RIID cell which presents an image of the number and position of charged particles present in the RIID cell as a result of the ionization of the excited state atoms. The method of the invention further includes the step of initially illuminating the object to be detected or imaged with a laser having a wavelength selected such that the object will scatter laser radiation having the resonance wavelength .lambda..sub.1.

  5. ANL CT Image Reconstruction Algorithm for Utilizing Digital X-ray Detector Array

    2004-08-05

    Reconstructs X-ray computed tomographic images from large data sets known as 16-bit binary sinograms. The algorithm uses the concept of generation of an image from carefully obtained multiple l-D or 2-0 X-ray projections. The individual projections are filtered using a digital Fast Fourier Transform. The literature refers to this as filtered back projection. The software is capable of processing a large file for reconstructing single images or volumetnc (3-D) images from large area high resolutionmore » digital X-ray detectors.« less

  6. Development of EXITE3, Imaging Detectors and a Long Duration Balloon Gondola

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    In this Report we summarize the work conducted for the EXITE program under grant NAG5-5103. This grant supported the ongoing EXITE program at Harvard for the development of imaging hard x-ray detectors and telescopes over the 3 year period 1997-2000 with a one year extension to 2001 to transition to the next SR&T grant in this program. Work was conducted in three major parts: analysis of the EXITE2 balloon flight data (from our May 1997 flight); development of pixellated imaging Cd-Zn-Te detector arrays and readout systems for the proposed EXITE3 detector and telescope; and development of systems for a Long Duration Balloon (LDB) gondola. Progress on all three major aspects of this research is summarized for each of the years of this grant.

  7. Design and optimization of resistive anode for a two-dimensional imaging GEM detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ju, Xu-Dong; Dong, Ming-Yi; Zhao, Yi-Chen; Zhou, Chuan-Xing; Qun, Ou-Yang

    2016-08-01

    A resistive anode for two-dimensional imaging detectors, which consists of a series of high resistivity pads surrounded by low resistivity strips, can provide good spatial resolution while reducing the number of electronics channels required. The optimization of this kind of anode has been studied by both numerical simulations and experimental tests. It is found that to obtain good detector performance, the resistance ratio of the pads to the strips should be larger than 5, the nonuniformity of the pad surface resistivity should be less than 20%, a smaller pad width leads to a smaller spatial resolution, and when the pad width is 6 mm, the spatial resolution (σ) can reach about 105 μm. Based on the study results, a 2-D GEM detector prototype with optimized resistive anode is constructed and a good imaging performance is achieved. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11375219) and CAS Center for Excellence in Particle Physics (CCEPP)

  8. High-Resolution Gamma-Ray Imaging Measurements Using Externally Segmented Germanium Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Callas, J.; Mahoney, W.; Skelton, R.; Varnell, L.; Wheaton, W.

    1994-01-01

    Fully two-dimensional gamma-ray imaging with simultaneous high-resolution spectroscopy has been demonstrated using an externally segmented germanium sensor. The system employs a single high-purity coaxial detector with its outer electrode segmented into 5 distinct charge collection regions and a lead coded aperture with a uniformly redundant array (URA) pattern. A series of one-dimensional responses was collected around 511 keV while the system was rotated in steps through 180 degrees. A non-negative, linear least-squares algorithm was then employed to reconstruct a 2-dimensional image. Corrections for multiple scattering in the detector, and the finite distance of source and detector are made in the reconstruction process.

  9. High resolution, two-dimensional imaging, microchannel plate detector for use on a sounding rocket experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bush, Brett C.; Cotton, Daniel M.; Siegmund, Oswald H.; Chakrabarti, Supriya; Harris, Walter; Clarke, John

    1991-01-01

    We discuss a high resolution microchannel plate (MCP) imaging detector to be used in measurements of Doppler-shifted hydrogen Lyman-alpha line emission from Jupiter and the interplanetary medium. The detector is housed in a vacuum-tight stainless steel cylinder (to provide shielding from magnetic fields) with a MgF2 window. Operating at nominal voltage, the four plate configuration provides a gain of 1.2 x 10 exp 7 electrons per incident photon. The wedge-and-strip anode has two-dimensional imaging capabilities, with a resolution of 40 microns FWHM over a one centimeter diameter area. The detector has a high quantum efficiency while retaining a low background rate. A KBr photocathode is used to enhance the quantum efficiency of the bare MCPs to a value of 35 percent at Lyman-alpha.

  10. Development of a detector based on Silicon Drift Detectors for gamma-ray spectroscopy and imaging applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Busca, P.; Butt, A. D.; Fiorini, C.; Marone, A.; Occhipinti, M.; Peloso, R.; Quaglia, R.; Bombelli, L.; Giacomini, G.; Piemonte, C.; Camera, F.; Giaz, A.; Million, B.; Nelms, N.; Shortt, B.

    2014-05-01

    This work deals with the development of a new gamma detector based on Silicon Drift Detectors (SDDs) to readout large LaBr3:Ce scintillators for gamma-ray spectroscopy and imaging applications. The research is supported by the European Space Agency through the Technology Research Programme (TRP) and by Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN) within the Gamma project. The SDDs, produced at Fondazione Bruno Kessler (FBK) semiconductor laboratories, are designed as monolithic arrays of 3 × 3 units, each one of an active area of 8 mm × 8 mm (overall area of 26 mm × 26 mm). The readout electronics and the architecture of the camera are briefly described and then first experimental results coupling the SDD array with a 1'' × 1'' LaBr3:Ce scintillator are reported. An energy resolution of 3% FWHM at 662 keV has been measured at -20°C, better than coupling the same scintillator with a photomultiplier tube. The same scintillator is also used to evaluate position sensitivity with a 1 mm collimated Cs-137 source. The main difficulty in determining the position of the gamma-ray interaction in the crystal is associated to the high thickness/diameter ratio of the crystal (1:1) and the use of reflectors on all lateral and top sides the crystal. This last choice enhances energy resolution but makes imaging capability more challenging because light is spread over all photodetectors. Preliminary results show that the camera is able to detect shifts in the measured signals, when the source is moved with steps of 5 mm. A modified version of the centroid method is finally implemented to evaluate the imaging capability of the system.

  11. Coded aperture imaging with a HURA coded aperture and a discrete pixel detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byard, Kevin

    An investigation into the gamma ray imaging properties of a hexagonal uniformly redundant array (HURA) coded aperture and a detector consisting of discrete pixels constituted the major research effort. Such a system offers distinct advantages for the development of advanced gamma ray astronomical telescopes in terms of the provision of high quality sky images in conjunction with an imager plane which has the capacity to reject background noise efficiently. Much of the research was performed as part of the European Space Agency (ESA) sponsored study into a prospective space astronomy mission, GRASP. The effort involved both computer simulations and a series of laboratory test images. A detailed analysis of the system point spread function (SPSF) of imaging planes which incorporate discrete pixel arrays is presented and the imaging quality quantified in terms of the signal to noise ratio (SNR). Computer simulations of weak point sources in the presence of detector background noise were also investigated. Theories developed during the study were evaluated by a series of experimental measurements with a Co-57 gamma ray point source, an Anger camera detector, and a rotating HURA mask. These tests were complemented by computer simulations designed to reproduce, as close as possible, the experimental conditions. The 60 degree antisymmetry property of HURA's was also employed to remove noise due to detector systematic effects present in the experimental images, and rendered a more realistic comparison of the laboratory tests with the computer simulations. Plateau removal and weighted deconvolution techniques were also investigated as methods for the reduction of the coding error noise associated with the gamma ray images.

  12. Organic non-volatile resistive photo-switches for flexible image detector arrays.

    PubMed

    Nau, Sebastian; Wolf, Christoph; Sax, Stefan; List-Kratochvil, Emil J W

    2015-02-01

    A unique implementation of an organic image detector using resistive photo-switchable pixels is presented. This resistive photo-switch comprises the vertical integration of an organic photodiode and an organic resistive switching memory element. The photodiodes act as a photosensitive element while the resistive switching elements simultaneously store the detected light information.

  13. Image processing analysis of nuclear track parameters for CR-39 detector irradiated by thermal neutron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Jobouri, Hussain A.; Rajab, Mustafa Y.

    2016-03-01

    CR-39 detector which covered with boric acid (H3Bo3) pellet was irradiated by thermal neutrons from (241Am - 9Be) source with activity 12Ci and neutron flux 105 n. cm-2. s-1. The irradiation times -TD for detector were 4h, 8h, 16h and 24h. Chemical etching solution for detector was sodium hydroxide NaOH, 6.25N with 45 min etching time and 60 C˚ temperature. Images of CR-39 detector after chemical etching were taken from digital camera which connected from optical microscope. MATLAB software version 7.0 was used to image processing. The outputs of image processing of MATLAB software were analyzed and found the following relationships: (a) The irradiation time -TD has behavior linear relationships with following nuclear track parameters: i) total track number - NT ii) maximum track number - MRD (relative to track diameter - DT) at response region range 2.5 µm to 4 µm iii) maximum track number - MD (without depending on track diameter - DT). (b) The irradiation time -TD has behavior logarithmic relationship with maximum track number - MA (without depending on track area - AT). The image processing technique principally track diameter - DT can be take into account to classification of α-particle emitters, In addition to the contribution of these technique in preparation of nano- filters and nano-membrane in nanotechnology fields.

  14. The use of nuclear physics and high energy physics detectors in medical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Guerra, Alberto; Bisogni, Maria Giuseppina

    2013-06-01

    The development of radiation detectors in the field of nuclear and particle physics has had a terrific impact in medical imaging since this latter discipline took off in late '70 with the invention of the CT scanners. The massive use in Nuclear Physics and High Energy Physics of position sensitive gas detectors, of high Z and high density scintillators coupled to Photomultiplier (PMT) and Position Sensitive Photomultipliers (PSPMT), and of solid state detectors has triggered during the last 30 years a series of novel applications in Medical Imaging with ionizing radiation. The accelerated scientific progression in genetics and molecular biology has finally generated what it is now called Molecular Imaging. This field of research presents additional challenges not only in the technology of radiation detector, but more and more in the ASIC electronics, fast digital readout and parallel software. In this paper we will try to present how Nuclear Physics/High Energy Physics and Medical Imaging have both benefited by the cross-fertilization of research activities between the two fields and how much they will take advantage in the future.

  15. Imaging of Ra-223 with a small-pixel CdTe detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scuffham, J. W.; Pani, S.; Seller, P.; Sellin, P. J.; Veale, M. C.; Wilson, M. D.; Cernik, R. J.

    2015-01-01

    Ra-223 Dichloride (Xofigo™) is a promising new radiopharmaceutical offering survival benefit and palliation of painful bone metastases in patients with hormone-refractory prostate cancer [1]. The response to radionuclide therapy and toxicity are directly linked to the absorbed radiation doses to the tumour and organs at risk respectively. Accurate dosimetry necessitates quantitative imaging of the biodistribution and kinetics of the radiopharmaceutical. Although primarily an alpha-emitter, Ra-223 also has some low-abundance X-ray and gamma emissions, which enable imaging of the biodistribution in the patient. However, the low spectral resolution of conventional gamma camera detectors makes in-vivo imaging of Ra-223 challenging. In this work, we present spectra and image data of anthropomorphic phantoms containing Ra-223 acquired with a small-pixel CdTe detector (HEXITEC) [2] with a pinhole collimator. Comparison is made with similar data acquired using a clinical gamma camera. The results demonstrate the advantages of the solid state detector in terms of scatter rejection and quantitative accuracy of the images. However, optimised collimation is needed in order for the sensitivity to rival current clinical systems. As different dosage levels and administration regimens for this drug are explored in current clinical trials, there is a clear need to develop improved imaging technologies that will enable personalised treatments to be designed for patients.

  16. Comparison of two detector systems for cone beam CT small animal imaging - a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Meng, Yang; Shaw, Chris C; Liu, Xinming; Altunbas, Mustafa C; Wang, Tianpeng; Chen, Lingyun; Tu, Shu-Ju; Kappadath, S Cheenu; Lai, Chao-Jen

    2006-03-01

    To compare two detector systems - one based on the charge-coupled device (CCD) and image amplifier, the other based on a-Si/CsI flat panel, for cone beam computed-tomography (CT) imaging of small animals.A high resolution, high framing rate detector system for the cone beam CT imaging of small animals was developed. The system consists of a 2048x3072x12 bit CCD optically coupled to an image amplifier and an x-ray phosphor screen. The CCD has an intrinsic pixel size of 12 mum but the effective pixel size can be adjusted through the magnification adjustment of the optical coupling systems. The system is used in conjunction with an x-ray source and a rotating stage for holding and rotating the scanned object in the cone beam CT imaging experiments. The advantages of the system include but are not limited to the ability to adjust the effective pixel size and to achieve extremely high spatial resolution and temporal resolution. However, the need to use optical coupling compromises the detective quanta efficiency (DQE) of the system. In this paper, the imaging characteristics of the system were presented and compared with those of an a-Si/CsI flat-panel detector system. PMID:18160972

  17. Comparison of two detector systems for cone beam CT small animal imaging - a preliminary study

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Yang; Shaw, Chris C.; Liu, Xinming; Altunbas, Mustafa C.; Wang, Tianpeng; Chen, Lingyun; Tu, Shu-Ju; Kappadath, S. Cheenu; Lai, Chao-Jen

    2007-01-01

    Purpose To compare two detector systems - one based on the charge-coupled device (CCD) and image amplifier, the other based on a-Si/CsI flat panel, for cone beam computed-tomography (CT) imaging of small animals. A high resolution, high framing rate detector system for the cone beam CT imaging of small animals was developed. The system consists of a 2048×3072×12 bit CCD optically coupled to an image amplifier and an x-ray phosphor screen. The CCD has an intrinsic pixel size of 12 μm but the effective pixel size can be adjusted through the magnification adjustment of the optical coupling systems. The system is used in conjunction with an x-ray source and a rotating stage for holding and rotating the scanned object in the cone beam CT imaging experiments. The advantages of the system include but are not limited to the ability to adjust the effective pixel size and to achieve extremely high spatial resolution and temporal resolution. However, the need to use optical coupling compromises the detective quanta efficiency (DQE) of the system. In this paper, the imaging characteristics of the system were presented and compared with those of an a-Si/CsI flat-panel detector system. PMID:18160972

  18. Multi-wavelength properties and smbh's masses of the isolated galaxies with active nuclei in the Local Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vavilova, Iryna; Vasylenko, Anatolij; Babyk, Iuri; Pulatova, Nadya

    2016-07-01

    We apply the specially-oriented Astro-Space databases obtained with ground-based telescopes and space observatories to study the multi-wavelength spectral and physical properties of galaxies with active nuclei (AGNs), namely of isolated AGNs that are poorly investigated especially in X-rays. Such a study allowed us 1) to separate the internal evolution mechanisms from the environment influence and consider them as two separate processes related to fueling nuclear activity, 2) to explore absorption features and the X-ray continuum radiation from accretion disks around SMBHs (e.g. to select accretion models). In the case of detecting the Fe K emission line, it was possible to analyze the physical conditions in the AGNs innermost parts in more details. Using the SDSS spectral Hβ-line data we were able to estimate the SMBH masses of several isolated AGNs in the Local Universe, which are systematically lower than the SMBH masses of AGNs located in a dense environment. We present also the results of analysis of the spectral data obtained by XMM-Newton, Swift, Chandra, and INTEGRAL space observatories for several isolated AGNs from 2MIG catalogue, for which the available X-ray data were accessed. Among these objects are CGCG 179-005, NGC 6300, NGC 1050, NGC 2989, WKK 3050, ESO 438-009, ESO 317-038 and others. We determined corresponding spectral models and values of their parameters (spectral index, intrinsic absorption etc.). X-ray spectra for bright galaxies, NGC 6300 and Circinus, were analyzed up to 250 keV and their characteristics of emission features were determined in 6-7 keV range.

  19. Quasi-Periodic Pulsations with Varying Period in Multi-Wavelength Observations of an X-class Flare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jing; Tan, Baolin; Zhang, Yin; Karlický, Marian; Mészárosová, Hana

    2014-08-01

    This work presents an interesting phenomenon of the period variation in quasi-periodic pulsations (QPPs) observed during the impulsive phase of a coronal mass ejection-related X1.1 class flare on 2012 July 6. The period of QPPs was changed from 21 s at soft X-rays (SXR) to 22-23 s at microwaves, to ~24 s at extreme ultraviolet emissions (EUV), and to 27-32 s at metric-decimetric waves. The microwave, EUV, and SXR QPPs, emitted from flare loops of different heights, were oscillating in phase. Fast kink mode oscillations were proposed to be the modulation mechanism, which may exist in a wide region in the solar atmosphere from the chromosphere to the upper corona or even to the interplanetary space. Changed parameters of flare loops through the solar atmosphere could result in the varying period of QPPs at different wavelengths. The first appearing microwave QPPs and quasi-periodic metric-decimetric type III bursts were generated by energetic electrons. This may imply that particle acceleration or magnetic reconnection were located between these two non-thermal emission sources. Thermal QPPs (in SXR and EUV emissions) occurred later than the nonthermal ones, which would suggest a some time for plasma heating or energy dissipation in flare loops during burst processes. At the beginning of flare, a sudden collapse and expansion of two separated flare loop structures occurred simultaneously with the multi-wavelength QPPs. An implosion in the corona, including both collapse and expansion of flare loops, could be a trigger of loop oscillations in a very large region in the solar atmosphere.

  20. Quasi-periodic pulsations with varying period in multi-wavelength observations of an X-class flare

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Jing; Tan, Baolin; Zhang, Yin; Karlický, Marian; Mészárosová, Hana

    2014-08-10

    This work presents an interesting phenomenon of the period variation in quasi-periodic pulsations (QPPs) observed during the impulsive phase of a coronal mass ejection-related X1.1 class flare on 2012 July 6. The period of QPPs was changed from 21 s at soft X-rays (SXR) to 22-23 s at microwaves, to ∼24 s at extreme ultraviolet emissions (EUV), and to 27-32 s at metric-decimetric waves. The microwave, EUV, and SXR QPPs, emitted from flare loops of different heights, were oscillating in phase. Fast kink mode oscillations were proposed to be the modulation mechanism, which may exist in a wide region in the solar atmosphere from the chromosphere to the upper corona or even to the interplanetary space. Changed parameters of flare loops through the solar atmosphere could result in the varying period of QPPs at different wavelengths. The first appearing microwave QPPs and quasi-periodic metric-decimetric type III bursts were generated by energetic electrons. This may imply that particle acceleration or magnetic reconnection were located between these two non-thermal emission sources. Thermal QPPs (in SXR and EUV emissions) occurred later than the nonthermal ones, which would suggest a some time for plasma heating or energy dissipation in flare loops during burst processes. At the beginning of flare, a sudden collapse and expansion of two separated flare loop structures occurred simultaneously with the multi-wavelength QPPs. An implosion in the corona, including both collapse and expansion of flare loops, could be a trigger of loop oscillations in a very large region in the solar atmosphere.

  1. Study of Scintillator thickness optimization of lens-coupled X-ray imaging detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, H.; Du, G.; Deng, B.; Chen, R.; Xiao, T.

    2016-03-01

    Lens-coupled X-ray in-direct imaging detectors are very popular for high-resolution X-ray imaging at the third generation synchrotron radiation facilities. This imaging system consists of a scintilator producing a visible-light image of X-ray beam, a microscope objective, a mirror reflecting at 90° and a CCD camera. When the thickness of the scintillator is matched with the numerical aperture (NA) of the microscope objective, the image quality of experimental results will be improved obviously. This paper used an imaging system at BL13W beamline of Shanghai Synchrotron Radiation Facility (SSRF) to study the matching relation between the scintillator thickness and the NA of the microscope objective with a real sample. By use of the matching relation between the scintillator thickness and the NA of the microscope objective, the optimal imaging results have been obtained.

  2. Low-noise small-size microring ultrasonic detectors for high-resolution photoacoustic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Sung-Liang; Ling, Tao; Guo, L. Jay

    2011-05-01

    Small size polymer microring resonators have been exploited for photoacoustic (PA) imaging. To demonstrate the advantages of the wide acceptance angle of ultrasound detection of small size microrings, photoacoustic tomography (PAT), and delay-and-sum beamforming PA imaging was conducted. In PAT, we compared the imaging quality using different sizes of detectors with similar noise-equivalent pressures and the same wideband response: 500 μm hydrophone and 100, 60, and 40 μm microrings. The results show significantly improved imaging contrast and high resolution over the whole imaging region using smaller size detectors. The uniform high resolution in PAT imaging using 40 μm microrings indicates the potential to resolve microvasculature over a large imaging region. The improved lateral resolution of two-dimensional and three-dimensional delay-and-sum beamforming PA imaging using a synthetic array demonstrate another advantageous application of small microrings. The small microrings can also be applied to other ultrasound-related imaging applications.

  3. Design considerations for soft X-ray television imaging detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kalata, Kenneth; Golub, Leon

    1988-01-01

    Television sensors for X-rays can be coupled to converters and image intensifiers to obtain active areas, high flux capabilities, quantum efficiency, high time resolution, or ease of construction and operation that may not be obtained with a directly illuminated sensor. A general purpose system which makes use of these capabilities for a number of applications is decribed. Some of the performance characteristics of this type of system are examined, and the expected future developments for such systems are briefly addressed.

  4. Radiation Hard AlGaN Detectors and Imager

    SciTech Connect

    2012-05-01

    Radiation hardness of AlGaN photodiodes was tested using a 65 MeV proton beam with a total proton fluence of 3x10{sup 12} protons/cm{sup 2}. AlGaN Deep UV Photodiode have extremely high radiation hardness. These new devices have mission critical applications in high energy density physics (HEDP) and space explorations. These new devices satisfy radiation hardness requirements by NIF. NSTec is developing next generation AlGaN optoelectronics and imagers.

  5. CMOS Image Sensor with a Built-in Lane Detector.

    PubMed

    Hsiao, Pei-Yung; Cheng, Hsien-Chein; Huang, Shih-Shinh; Fu, Li-Chen

    2009-01-01

    This work develops a new current-mode mixed signal Complementary Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor (CMOS) imager, which can capture images and simultaneously produce vehicle lane maps. The adopted lane detection algorithm, which was modified to be compatible with hardware requirements, can achieve a high recognition rate of up to approximately 96% under various weather conditions. Instead of a Personal Computer (PC) based system or embedded platform system equipped with expensive high performance chip of Reduced Instruction Set Computer (RISC) or Digital Signal Processor (DSP), the proposed imager, without extra Analog to Digital Converter (ADC) circuits to transform signals, is a compact, lower cost key-component chip. It is also an innovative component device that can be integrated into intelligent automotive lane departure systems. The chip size is 2,191.4 × 2,389.8 μm, and the package uses 40 pin Dual-In-Package (DIP). The pixel cell size is 18.45 × 21.8 μm and the core size of photodiode is 12.45 × 9.6 μm; the resulting fill factor is 29.7%. PMID:22573983

  6. XEMIS: A liquid xenon detector for medical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallego Manzano, L.; Bassetto, S.; Beaupere, N.; Briend, P.; Carlier, T.; Cherel, M.; Cussonneau, J.-P.; Donnard, J.; Gorski, M.; Hamanishi, R.; Kraeber Bodéré, F.; Le Ray, P.; Lemaire, O.; Masbou, J.; Mihara, S.; Morteau, E.; Scotto Lavina, L.; Stutzmann, J.-S.; Tauchi, T.; Thers, D.

    2015-07-01

    A new medical imaging technique based on the precise 3D location of a radioactive source by the simultaneous detection of 3γ rays has been proposed by Subatech laboratory. To take advantage of this novel technique a detection device based on a liquid xenon Compton telescope and a specific (β+, γ) emitter radionuclide, 44Sc, are required. A first prototype of a liquid xenon time projection chamber called XEMIS1 has been successfully developed showing very promising results for the energy and spatial resolutions for the ionization signal in liquid xenon, thanks to an advanced cryogenics system, which has contributed to a high liquid xenon purity with a very good stability and an ultra-low noise front-end electronics (below 100 electrons) operating at liquid xenon temperature. The very positive results obtained with XEMIS1 have led to the development of a second prototype for small animal imaging, XEMIS2, which is now under development. To study the feasibility of the 3γ imaging technique and optimize the characteristics of the device, a complete Monte Carlo simulation has been also carried out. A preliminary study shows very positive results for the sensitivity, energy and spatial resolutions of XEMIS2.

  7. CMOS Image Sensor with a Built-in Lane Detector.

    PubMed

    Hsiao, Pei-Yung; Cheng, Hsien-Chein; Huang, Shih-Shinh; Fu, Li-Chen

    2009-01-01

    This work develops a new current-mode mixed signal Complementary Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor (CMOS) imager, which can capture images and simultaneously produce vehicle lane maps. The adopted lane detection algorithm, which was modified to be compatible with hardware requirements, can achieve a high recognition rate of up to approximately 96% under various weather conditions. Instead of a Personal Computer (PC) based system or embedded platform system equipped with expensive high performance chip of Reduced Instruction Set Computer (RISC) or Digital Signal Processor (DSP), the proposed imager, without extra Analog to Digital Converter (ADC) circuits to transform signals, is a compact, lower cost key-component chip. It is also an innovative component device that can be integrated into intelligent automotive lane departure systems. The chip size is 2,191.4 × 2,389.8 μm, and the package uses 40 pin Dual-In-Package (DIP). The pixel cell size is 18.45 × 21.8 μm and the core size of photodiode is 12.45 × 9.6 μm; the resulting fill factor is 29.7%.

  8. CMOS Image Sensor with a Built-in Lane Detector

    PubMed Central

    Hsiao, Pei-Yung; Cheng, Hsien-Chein; Huang, Shih-Shinh; Fu, Li-Chen

    2009-01-01

    This work develops a new current-mode mixed signal Complementary Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor (CMOS) imager, which can capture images and simultaneously produce vehicle lane maps. The adopted lane detection algorithm, which was modified to be compatible with hardware requirements, can achieve a high recognition rate of up to approximately 96% under various weather conditions. Instead of a Personal Computer (PC) based system or embedded platform system equipped with expensive high performance chip of Reduced Instruction Set Computer (RISC) or Digital Signal Processor (DSP), the proposed imager, without extra Analog to Digital Converter (ADC) circuits to transform signals, is a compact, lower cost key-component chip. It is also an innovative component device that can be integrated into intelligent automotive lane departure systems. The chip size is 2,191.4 × 2,389.8 μm, and the package uses 40 pin Dual-In-Package (DIP). The pixel cell size is 18.45 × 21.8 μm and the core size of photodiode is 12.45 × 9.6 μm; the resulting fill factor is 29.7%. PMID:22573983

  9. Imaging, Detection, and Identification Algorithms for Position-Sensitive Gamma-Ray Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wahl, Christopher G.

    Three-dimensional-position-sensitive semiconductors record both the locations and energies of gamma-ray interactions with high resolution, enabling spectroscopy and imaging of gamma-ray-emitting materials. Imaging enables the detection of point sources of gamma rays in an otherwise extended-source background, even when the background spectrum is unknown and may share the point source's spectrum. The generalized likelihood ratio test (GLRT) and source-intensity test (SIT) are applied to this situation to detect one-or-more unshielded point sources from a library of isotopes in a spectrally unknown or known background when the background intensity varies spatially by a factor of two or less. In addition to estimating the number of sources present, their activities, isotopes, and directions from the detector are estimated. Experimental and some simulated results are presented for a single detector and an 18-detector array of 2 cm by 2 cm by 1.5 cm CdZnTe crystals and compared with the performance of spectral-only detection when the background and source are assumed to be spectrally different. Furthermore, the expected detection performance of the 18-detector array system is investigated statistically using experimental data in the case where the background is distinct spectrally from the point source and the possible source location and isotopic identity are known. Including imaging gave at least 7% higher SNR compared to ignoring the image dimension. Also, imaging methods based on the maximum-likelihood, expectation-maximization method are introduced to determine the spatial distribution of isotopes and to find the activity distributions within targets moving with known motion through a radioactive background. Software has also been developed to support the analysis of the data from 3D-position-sensitive spectroscopic systems, for a range of detector designs and applications. The software design and unique features that allow fast multidimensional data analysis are

  10. Anamorphic preclinical SPECT imaging with high-resolution silicon double-sided strip detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durko, Heather L.

    Preclinical single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) is an essential tool for studying progression, response to treatment, and physiological changes in small animal models of human disease. The wide range of imaging applications is often limited by the static design of many preclinical SPECT systems. We have developed a prototype imaging system that replaces the standard static pinhole aperture with two sets of movable, keel-edged copper-tungsten blades configured as crossed (skewed) slits. These apertures can be positioned independently between the object and detector, producing an anamorphic image in which the axial and transaxial magnications are not constrained to be equal. We incorporated a 60 mm x 60 mm, millimeter-thick megapixel silicon double-sided strip detector that permits ultrahigh-resolution imaging. While the stopping power of silicon is low for many common clinical radioisotopes, its performance is sufficient in the range of 20-60 keV to allow practical imaging experiments. The low-energy emissions of 125I fall within this energy window, and the 60-day half life provides an advantage for longitudinal studies. The flexible nature of this system allows the future application of adaptive imaging techniques. We have demonstrated ˜225-mum axial and ˜175-mum transaxial resolution across a 2.65 cm3 cylindrical field of view, as well as the capability for simultaneous multi-isotope acquisitions. We describe the key advancements that have made this system operational, including bringing up a new detector readout ASIC, development of detector control software and data-processing algorithms, and characterization of operating characteristics. We describe design and fabrication of the adjustable slit aperture platform, as well as the development of an accurate imaging forward model and its application in a novel geometric calibration technique and a GPU-based ultrahigh-resolution reconstruction code.

  11. Optimization of Proton CT Detector System and Image Reconstruction Algorithm for On-Line Proton Therapy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chae Young; Song, Hankyeol; Park, Chan Woo; Chung, Yong Hyun; Kim, Jin Sung; Park, Justin C

    2016-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to optimize a proton computed tomography system (pCT) for proton range verification and to confirm the pCT image reconstruction algorithm based on projection images generated with optimized parameters. For this purpose, we developed a new pCT scanner using the Geometry and Tracking (GEANT) 4.9.6 simulation toolkit. GEANT4 simulations were performed to optimize the geometric parameters representing the detector thickness and the distance between the detectors for pCT. The system consisted of four silicon strip detectors for particle tracking and a calorimeter to measure the residual energies of the individual protons. The optimized pCT system design was then adjusted to ensure that the solution to a CS-based convex optimization problem would converge to yield the desired pCT images after a reasonable number of iterative corrections. In particular, we used a total variation-based formulation that has been useful in exploiting prior knowledge about the minimal variations of proton attenuation characteristics in the human body. Examinations performed using our CS algorithm showed that high-quality pCT images could be reconstructed using sets of 72 projections within 20 iterations and without any streaks or noise, which can be caused by under-sampling and proton starvation. Moreover, the images yielded by this CS algorithm were found to be of higher quality than those obtained using other reconstruction algorithms. The optimized pCT scanner system demonstrated the potential to perform high-quality pCT during on-line image-guided proton therapy, without increasing the imaging dose, by applying our CS based proton CT reconstruction algorithm. Further, we make our optimized detector system and CS-based proton CT reconstruction algorithm potentially useful in on-line proton therapy.

  12. Optimization of Proton CT Detector System and Image Reconstruction Algorithm for On-Line Proton Therapy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chae Young; Song, Hankyeol; Park, Chan Woo; Chung, Yong Hyun; Kim, Jin Sung; Park, Justin C

    2016-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to optimize a proton computed tomography system (pCT) for proton range verification and to confirm the pCT image reconstruction algorithm based on projection images generated with optimized parameters. For this purpose, we developed a new pCT scanner using the Geometry and Tracking (GEANT) 4.9.6 simulation toolkit. GEANT4 simulations were performed to optimize the geometric parameters representing the detector thickness and the distance between the detectors for pCT. The system consisted of four silicon strip detectors for particle tracking and a calorimeter to measure the residual energies of the individual protons. The optimized pCT system design was then adjusted to ensure that the solution to a CS-based convex optimization problem would converge to yield the desired pCT images after a reasonable number of iterative corrections. In particular, we used a total variation-based formulation that has been useful in exploiting prior knowledge about the minimal variations of proton attenuation characteristics in the human body. Examinations performed using our CS algorithm showed that high-quality pCT images could be reconstructed using sets of 72 projections within 20 iterations and without any streaks or noise, which can be caused by under-sampling and proton starvation. Moreover, the images yielded by this CS algorithm were found to be of higher quality than those obtained using other reconstruction algorithms. The optimized pCT scanner system demonstrated the potential to perform high-quality pCT during on-line image-guided proton therapy, without increasing the imaging dose, by applying our CS based proton CT reconstruction algorithm. Further, we make our optimized detector system and CS-based proton CT reconstruction algorithm potentially useful in on-line proton therapy. PMID:27243822

  13. High-resolution image reconstruction for PET using estimated detector response functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tohme, Michel S.; Qi, Jinyi

    2007-02-01

    The accuracy of the system model in an iterative reconstruction algorithm greatly affects the quality of reconstructed PET images. For efficient computation in reconstruction, the system model in PET can be factored into a product of geometric projection matrix and detector blurring matrix, where the former is often computed based on analytical calculation, and the latter is estimated using Monte Carlo simulations. In this work, we propose a method to estimate the 2D detector blurring matrix from experimental measurements. Point source data were acquired with high-count statistics in the microPET II scanner using a computer-controlled 2-D motion stage. A monotonically convergent iterative algorithm has been derived to estimate the detector blurring matrix from the point source measurements. The algorithm takes advantage of the rotational symmetry of the PET scanner with the modeling of the detector block structure. Since the resulting blurring matrix stems from actual measurements, it can take into account the physical effects in the photon detection process that are difficult or impossible to model in a Monte Carlo simulation. Reconstructed images of a line source phantom show improved resolution with the new detector blurring matrix compared to the original one from the Monte Carlo simulation. This method can be applied to other small-animal and clinical scanners.

  14. High-speed X-ray imaging pixel array detector for synchrotron bunch isolation.

    PubMed

    Philipp, Hugh T; Tate, Mark W; Purohit, Prafull; Shanks, Katherine S; Weiss, Joel T; Gruner, Sol M

    2016-03-01

    A wide-dynamic-range imaging X-ray detector designed for recording successive frames at rates up to 10 MHz is described. X-ray imaging with frame rates of up to 6.5 MHz have been experimentally verified. The pixel design allows for up to 8-12 frames to be stored internally at high speed before readout, which occurs at a 1 kHz frame rate. An additional mode of operation allows the integration capacitors to be re-addressed repeatedly before readout which can enhance the signal-to-noise ratio of cyclical processes. This detector, along with modern storage ring sources which provide short (10-100 ps) and intense X-ray pulses at megahertz rates, opens new avenues for the study of rapid structural changes in materials. The detector consists of hybridized modules, each of which is comprised of a 500 µm-thick silicon X-ray sensor solder bump-bonded, pixel by pixel, to an application-specific integrated circuit. The format of each module is 128 × 128 pixels with a pixel pitch of 150 µm. In the prototype detector described here, the three-side buttable modules are tiled in a 3 × 2 array with a full format of 256 × 384 pixels. The characteristics, operation, testing and application of the detector are detailed. PMID:26917125

  15. A fast 1-D detector for imaging and time resolved SAXS experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menk, R. H.; Arfelli, F.; Bernstorff, S.; Pontoni, D.; Sarvestani, A.; Besch, H. J.; Walenta, A. H.

    1999-02-01

    A one-dimensional test detector on the principle of a highly segmented ionization chamber with shielding grid (Frisch grid) was developed to evaluate if this kind of detector is suitable for advanced small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) experiments. At present it consists of 128 pixels which can be read out within 0.2 ms with a noise floor of 2000 e-ENC. A quantum efficiency of 80% for a photon energy of 8 keV was achieved. This leads to DQE values of 80% for photon fluxes above 1000 photons/pixel and integration time. The shielding grid is based on the principles of the recently invented MCAT structure and the GEM structure which also allows electron amplification in the gas. In the case of the MCAT structure, an energy resolution of 20% at 5.9 keV was observed. The gas amplification mode enables imaging with this integrating detector on a subphoton noise level with respect to the integration time. Preliminary experiments of saturation behavior show that this kind of detector digests a photon flux density up to 10 12 photons/mm 2 s and operates linearly. A spatial resolution of at least three line pairs/mm was obtained. All these features show that this type of detector is well suited for time-resolved SAXS experiments as well as high flux imaging applications.

  16. High-speed X-ray imaging pixel array detector for synchrotron bunch isolation.

    PubMed

    Philipp, Hugh T; Tate, Mark W; Purohit, Prafull; Shanks, Katherine S; Weiss, Joel T; Gruner, Sol M

    2016-03-01

    A wide-dynamic-range imaging X-ray detector designed for recording successive frames at rates up to 10 MHz is described. X-ray imaging with frame rates of up to 6.5 MHz have been experimentally verified. The pixel design allows for up to 8-12 frames to be stored internally at high speed before readout, which occurs at a 1 kHz frame rate. An additional mode of operation allows the integration capacitors to be re-addressed repeatedly before readout which can enhance the signal-to-noise ratio of cyclical processes. This detector, along with modern storage ring sources which provide short (10-100 ps) and intense X-ray pulses at megahertz rates, opens new avenues for the study of rapid structural changes in materials. The detector consists of hybridized modules, each of which is comprised of a 500 µm-thick silicon X-ray sensor solder bump-bonded, pixel by pixel, to an application-specific integrated circuit. The format of each module is 128 × 128 pixels with a pixel pitch of 150 µm. In the prototype detector described here, the three-side buttable modules are tiled in a 3 × 2 array with a full format of 256 × 384 pixels. The characteristics, operation, testing and application of the detector are detailed.

  17. High-speed X-ray imaging pixel array detector for synchrotron bunch isolation

    PubMed Central

    Philipp, Hugh T.; Tate, Mark W.; Purohit, Prafull; Shanks, Katherine S.; Weiss, Joel T.; Gruner, Sol M.

    2016-01-01

    A wide-dynamic-range imaging X-ray detector designed for recording successive frames at rates up to 10 MHz is described. X-ray imaging with frame rates of up to 6.5 MHz have been experimentally verified. The pixel design allows for up to 8–12 frames to be stored internally at high speed before readout, which occurs at a 1 kHz frame rate. An additional mode of operation allows the integration capacitors to be re-addressed repeatedly before readout which can enhance the signal-to-noise ratio of cyclical processes. This detector, along with modern storage ring sources which provide short (10–100 ps) and intense X-ray pulses at megahertz rates, opens new avenues for the study of rapid structural changes in materials. The detector consists of hybridized modules, each of which is comprised of a 500 µm-thick silicon X-ray sensor solder bump-bonded, pixel by pixel, to an application-specific integrated circuit. The format of each module is 128 × 128 pixels with a pixel pitch of 150 µm. In the prototype detector described here, the three-side buttable modules are tiled in a 3 × 2 array with a full format of 256 × 384 pixels. The characteristics, operation, testing and application of the detector are detailed. PMID:26917125

  18. The GOES-R Advanced Baseline Imager: detector spectral response effects on thermal emissive band calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearlman, Aaron J.; Padula, Francis; Cao, Changyong; Wu, Xiangqian

    2015-10-01

    The Advanced Baseline Imager (ABI) will be aboard the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite R-Series (GOES-R) to supply data needed for operational weather forecasts and long-term climate variability studies, which depend on high quality data. Unlike the heritage operational GOES systems that have two or four detectors per band, ABI has hundreds of detectors per channel requiring calibration coefficients for each one. This increase in number of detectors poses new challenges for next generation sensors as each detector has a unique spectral response function (SRF) even though only one averaged SRF per band is used operationally to calibrate each detector. This simplified processing increases computational efficiency. Using measured system-level SRF data from pre-launch testing, we have the opportunity to characterize the calibration impact using measured SRFs, both per detector and as an average of detector-level SRFs similar to the operational version. We calculated the spectral response impacts for the thermal emissive bands (TEB) theoretically, by simulating the ABI response viewing an ideal blackbody and practically, with the measured ABI response to an external reference blackbody from the pre-launch TEB calibration test. The impacts from the practical case match the theoretical results using an ideal blackbody. The observed brightness temperature trends show structure across the array with magnitudes as large as 0.1 K for and 12 (9.61 µm), and 0.25 K for band 14 (11.2 µm) for a 300 K blackbody. The trends in the raw ABI signal viewing the blackbody support the spectral response measurements results, since they show similar trends in bands 12 (9.61µm), and 14 (11.2 µm), meaning that the spectral effects dominate the response differences between detectors for these bands. We further validated these effects using the radiometric bias calculated between calibrations using the external blackbody and

  19. Prospects of functional magnetic resonance imaging as lie detector.

    PubMed

    Rusconi, Elena; Mitchener-Nissen, Timothy

    2013-01-01

    that fMRI is unlikely to constitute a viable lie detector for criminal courts.

  20. Prospects of functional magnetic resonance imaging as lie detector.

    PubMed

    Rusconi, Elena; Mitchener-Nissen, Timothy

    2013-01-01

    that fMRI is unlikely to constitute a viable lie detector for criminal courts. PMID:24065912