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Sample records for multiband nonthermal radiative

  1. MULTIBAND NONTHERMAL EMISSION FROM THREE TeV SHELL-TYPE SUPERNOVA REMNANTS

    SciTech Connect

    Fang Jun; Tang Yunyong; Zhang Li

    2011-04-10

    Nonthermal radiative properties of three TeV shell-type supernova remnants (SNRs) RX J1713.7-3946, RX J0852.0-4622, and RCW 86, argued to be expanding into low-density hot bubbles created by the wind of the massive progenitor stars, are investigated based on a semi-analytical solution to diffusive acceleration at nonlinear shocks. In the model, a free-escape boundary upstream of the shock is used to mimic the escape of cosmic rays from the SNR, with the dynamic reaction of the self-generated magnetic field via resonant streaming instability on the shock taken into account. Origins of the {gamma}-rays from the three remnants are studied with appropriate parameters, and consistent results with the multiband observed fluxes are obtained within the nonlinear diffusive shock acceleration regime. The order of the resulting downstream magnetic field strength for the three SNRs is between 60 and 100 {mu}G, and the observed TeV {gamma}-rays are mainly produced via the decay of neutral {pi} mesons produced from the hadronic collisions.

  2. Relativistic Non-Thermal Bremsstrahlung Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeković, Vladimir; Arbutina, Bojan; Dobardžić, Aleksandra; Pavlović, Marko Z.

    2013-11-01

    By applying a method of virtual quanta we derive formulae for relativistic non-thermal bremsstrahlung radiation from relativistic electrons as well as from protons and heavier particles with power-law momentum distribution N(p)dp = k p-qdp. We show that emission which originates from an electron scattering on an ion, represents the most significant component of relativistic non-thermal bremsstrahlung. Radiation from an ion scattering on electron, known as inverse bremsstrahlung, is shown to be negligible in overall non-thermal bremsstrahlung emission. These results arise from theory refinement, where we introduce the dependence of relativistic kinetic energy of an incident particle, upon the energy of scattered photon. In part, it is also a consequence of a different mass of particles and relativistic effects.

  3. Detection of nonthermal continuum radiation in Saturn's magnetosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Kuth, W.S.; Scarf, F.L.; Sullivan, J.D.; Gurnett, D.A.

    1982-08-01

    A detailed analysis of high resolution wideband data from the Voyager 1 and 2 plasma wave receivers has revealed the presence of heretofore undiscovered nonthermal continuum radiation trapped within the Saturnian magnetosphere. The discovery of Saturnian trapped continuum radiation fills a disturbing void in the Saturnian radio spectrum. On the basis of observations at both the Earth and Jupiter it was expected that continuum radiation should be a pervasive signature of planetary magnetospheres in general. Special processing of the Voyager 1 plasma wave data at Saturn has now confirmed the existence of weak emissions that have a spectrum characteristic of trapped continuum radiation. Similar radiation was also detected by Voyager 2; however, in this case it is not certain that Saturn was the only source. Considerable evidence exists which suggests that Saturn may have been immersed in the Jovian tail during the Voyager 2 encounter, so that Jupiter may provide an additional source of the continuum radiation detected by Voyager 2.

  4. Parallel LC circuit model for multi-band absorption and preliminary design of radiative cooling.

    PubMed

    Feng, Rui; Qiu, Jun; Liu, Linhua; Ding, Weiqiang; Chen, Lixue

    2014-12-15

    We perform a comprehensive analysis of multi-band absorption by exciting magnetic polaritons in the infrared region. According to the independent properties of the magnetic polaritons, we propose a parallel inductance and capacitance(PLC) circuit model to explain and predict the multi-band resonant absorption peaks, which is fully validated by using the multi-sized structure with identical dielectric spacing layer and the multilayer structure with the same strip width. More importantly, we present the application of the PLC circuit model to preliminarily design a radiative cooling structure realized by merging several close peaks together. This omnidirectional and polarization insensitive structure is a good candidate for radiative cooling application.

  5. Nonthermal axion dark radiation and constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazumdar, Anupam; Qutub, Saleh; Saikawa, Ken'ichi

    2016-09-01

    The Peccei-Quinn mechanism presents a neat solution to the strong C P problem. As a by-product, it provides an ideal dark matter candidate, "the axion", albeit with a tiny mass. Axions therefore can act as dark radiation if excited with large momenta after the end of inflation. Nevertheless, the recent measurement of relativistic degrees of freedom from cosmic microwave background radiation strictly constrains the abundance of such extra relativistic species. We show that ultrarelativistic axions can be abundantly produced if the Peccei-Quinn field was initially displaced from the minimum of the potential. This in lieu places an interesting constraint on the axion dark matter window with large decay constant which is expected to be probed by future experiments. Moreover, an upper bound on the reheating temperature can be placed, which further constrains the thermal history of our Universe.

  6. Nonthermal Particle Acceleration and Radiation in Relativistic Magnetic Reconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werner, Gregory

    2015-11-01

    Many spectacular and violent phenomena in the high-energy universe exhibit nonthermal radiation spectra, from which we infer power-law energy distributions of the radiating particles. Relativistic magnetic reconnection, recognized as a leading mechanism of nonthermal particle acceleration, can efficiently transfer magnetic energy to energetic particles. We present a comprehensive particle-in-cell study of particle acceleration in 2D relativistic reconnection in both electron-ion and pair plasmas without guide field. We map out the power-law index α and the high-energy cutoff of the electron energy spectrum as functions of three key parameters: the system size (and initial layer length) L, the ambient plasma magnetization σ, and the ion/electron mass ratio (from 1 to 1836). We identify the transition between small- and large-system regimes: for small L, the system size affects the slope and extent of the high-energy spectrum, while for large enough L, α and the cutoff energy are independent of L. We compare high energy particle spectra and radiative (synchrotron and inverse Compton) signatures of the electrons, for pair and electron-ion reconnection. The latter cases maintain highly relativistic electrons, but include a range of different magnetizations yielding sub- to highly-relativistic ions. Finally, we show how nonthermal acceleration and radiative signatures alter when the radiation back-reaction becomes important. These results have important implications for assessing the promise and the limitations of relativistic reconnection as an astrophysically-important particle acceleration mechanism. This work is funded by NSF, DOE, and NASA.

  7. Quantum nonthermal radiation of nonstationary rotating de Sitter cosmological model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meitei, Irom Ablu; Singh, T. Ibungochouba; Singh, K. Yugindro

    2014-08-01

    Using the Hamilton-Jacobi method a study of quantum nonthermal radiation of nonstationary rotating de Sitter cosmological model is carried out. It is shown that there exist seas of positive and negative energy states in the vicinity of the cosmological event horizon and there also exists a forbidden energy gap between the two seas. The forbidden energy gap vanishes on the surface of the cosmological event horizon so that the positive and negative energy levels overlap. The width of the forbidden energy gap and the energy of the particle at the cosmological event horizon are found to depend on the cosmological constant, the rotation parameter, positions of the particle and the cosmological event horizon, angular momentum of the particle, evaporation rate and shape of the cosmological event horizon. The tunneling probability of the emitted particles constituting Hawking radiation is also deduced for stationary nonrotating de Sitter cosmological model and the standard Hawking temperature is recovered.

  8. Non-thermal electromagnetic radiation damage to lens epithelium.

    PubMed

    Bormusov, Elvira; P Andley, Usha; Sharon, Naomi; Schächter, Levi; Lahav, Assaf; Dovrat, Ahuva

    2008-05-21

    High frequency microwave electromagnetic radiation from mobile phones and other modern devices has the potential to damage eye tissues, but its effect on the lens epithelium is unknown at present. The objective of this study was to investigate the non-thermal effects of high frequency microwave electromagnetic radiation (1.1GHz, 2.22 mW) on the eye lens epithelium in situ. Bovine lenses were incubated in organ culture at 35°C for 10-15 days. A novel computer-controlled microwave source was used to investigate the effects of microwave radiation on the lenses. 58 lenses were used in this study. The lenses were divided into four groups: (1) Control lenses incubated in organ culture for 10 to15 days. (2) Electromagnetic radiation exposure group treated with 1.1 GHz, 2.22 mW microwave radiation for 90 cycles of 50 minutes irradiation followed by 10 minutes pause and cultured up to 10 days. (3) Electromagnetic radiation exposure group treated as group 2 with 192 cycles of radiation and cultured for 15 days. (4) Lenses exposed to 39.5°C for 2 hours 3 times with 24 hours interval after each treatment beginning on the second day of the culture and cultured for 11 days. During the culture period, lens optical quality was followed daily by a computer-operated scanning laser beam. At the end of the culture period, control and treated lenses were analyzed morphologically and by assessment of the lens epithelial ATPase activity. Exposure to 1.1 GHz, 2.22 mW microwaves caused a reversible decrease in lens optical quality accompanied by irreversible morphological and biochemical damage to the lens epithelial cell layer. The effect of the electromagnetic radiation on the lens epithelium was remarkably different from those of conductive heat. The results of this investigation showed that electromagnetic fields from microwave radiation have a negative impact on the eye lens. The lens damage by electromagnetic fields was distinctly different from that caused by conductive heat.

  9. Non-thermal Radiation Processes in Relativistic Outflows from AGN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lefa, Eva

    2012-11-01

    Non-thermal, leptonic radiation processes have been extensively studied for the interpretation of the observed radiation from jets of Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN). This work addresses the synchrotron and Inverse Compton scattering (ICS) mechanisms, and investigates the potential of a self-consistent, time-dependent approach to currently unsolved problems. Furthermore, it examines how deviations from standard, one-zone models can modify the radiated spectrum. A detailed analysis of the shape of the ICS spectrum is also performed. In the first part a possible interpretation of the hard γ-ray blazar spectra in the framework of leptonic models is investigated. It is demonstrated that hard γ-ray spectra can be generated and maintained in the presence of energy losses, under the basic assumption of a narrow electron energy distribution (EED). Broader spectra can also be modeled if multiple zones contribute to the emission. In such a scheme, hard flaring events, like the one in Mkn 501 in 2009, can be successfully interpreted within a "leading blob" scenario, when one or few zones of emission become dominant. In the second part the shape of the Compton spectrum close to the maximum cutoff is investigated. Analytical approximations for the spectral shape in the cutoff region are derived for various soft photon fields, providing a direct link between the parent EED and the upscattered spectrum. Additionally, a generalization of the beaming pattern for various processes is derived, which accounts for non-stationary, anisotropic and non-homogeneous EEDs. It is shown that anisotropic EEDs may lead to radiated spectra substantially different from the isotropic case. Finally, a self-consistent, non-homogeneous model describing the synchrotron emission from stratified jets is developed. It is found that transverse jet stratification leads to characteristic features in the emitted spectrum different to expectations in homogeneous models.

  10. Multi-band near-field radiative heat transfer between two anisotropic fishnet metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Yang; Jiang, Yongyuan; Liu, Linhua

    2015-06-01

    We study the near-field radiative heat transfer between two metal-insulator-metal sandwiched-like fishnet metamaterials (FMMs) by fluctuation electrodynamics. Results show that multi-band heat flux between the fishnet metamaterials is achieved, which is attributed to the thermally excited surface modes within the FMM. Apart from the electric response mode of the near-field heat flux, magnetic modes are also existed, which are related with the excitations of the surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) propagating on the outer surface of metal (external SPPs) and along the inner metal-dielectric interface (internal SPPs). Moreover, we show that the electromagnetic parameters of this anisotropic fishnet metamaterial depend on the angles θ of the incident light when heating the fishnet metamaterial, and thus the overall effect of the anisotropic FMM parameters is considered to predict the near-field radiative heat transfer. Different external-SPPs and internal-SPPs modes are excited at different frequencies which is attributed to the anisotropic electromagnetic response of FMM, which open new frequency channels of the near-field radiative heat transfer. This kind of anisotropic metamaterial should assist in thermal management in nanoscale.

  11. Non-thermal continuous and modulated electromagnetic radiation fields effects on sleep EEG of rats.

    PubMed

    Mohammed, Haitham S; Fahmy, Heba M; Radwan, Nasr M; Elsayed, Anwar A

    2013-03-01

    In the present study, the alteration in the sleep EEG in rats due to chronic exposure to low-level non-thermal electromagnetic radiation was investigated. Two types of radiation fields were used; 900 MHz unmodulated wave and 900 MHz modulated at 8 and 16 Hz waves. Animals has exposed to radiation fields for 1 month (1 h/day). EEG power spectral analyses of exposed and control animals during slow wave sleep (SWS) and rapid eye movement sleep (REM sleep) revealed that the REM sleep is more susceptible to modulated radiofrequency radiation fields (RFR) than the SWS. The latency of REM sleep increased due to radiation exposure indicating a change in the ultradian rhythm of normal sleep cycles. The cumulative and irreversible effect of radiation exposure was proposed and the interaction of the extremely low frequency radiation with the similar EEG frequencies was suggested.

  12. Nonthermal production of dark radiation and dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reece, Matthew; Roxlo, Thomas

    2016-09-01

    Dark matter may be coupled to dark radiation: light degrees of freedom that mediate forces between dark sector particles. Cosmological constraints favor dark radiation that is colder than Standard Model radiation. In models with fixed couplings between dark matter and the Standard Model, these constraints can be difficult to satisfy if thermal equilibrium is assumed in the early universe. We construct a model of asymmetric reheating of the visible and dark sectors from late decays of a long-lived particle (for instance, a modulus). We show, as a proof of principle, that such a model can populate a sufficiently cold dark sector while also generating baryon and dark matter asymmetries through the out-of-equilibrium decay. We frame much of our discussion in terms of the scenario of dissipative dark matter, as in the Double-Disk Dark Matter scenario. However, our results may also be of interest for other scenarios like the Twin Higgs model that are in danger of overproducing dark radiation due to nonnegligible dark-visible couplings.

  13. Hawking radiation in the ghost condensate is nonthermal

    SciTech Connect

    Feldstein, Brian

    2008-09-15

    We consider a Schwarzschild black hole immersed in a ghost condensate background. It is shown that the Hawking radiation in the quanta of small perturbations around this background is highly suppressed - in particular, it is not given by a thermal spectrum. This result is in accord with observations that such black holes can be used to violate the generalized second law of thermodynamics, and thus cannot have a standard entropy/area relation.

  14. A test of two theories for the low-frequency cutoffs of nonthermal continuum radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaw, R. R.; Gurnett, D. A.

    1980-01-01

    A discussion and analysis of two theories that differently identify the low-frequency cutoffs of nonthermal continuum radiation are presented. The cold plasma theory and an alternate one proposed by Jones (1976) are compared experimentally with the use of continuum radiation data obtained in the outer magnetosphere by the Imp 6 and ISEE 1 spacecraft. It is found that the characteristics of this specific radiation are consistent with those expected of ordinary and extraordinary mode waves described by the cold plasma theory and it is shown that the cutoff frequencies occur at the local plasma frequency and R = 0 cutoff frequency as proposed by the same theory. The inconsistencies which were found between the Jones theory (1976) and observation are presented, and in addition no evidence is found for a component of continuum radiation propagating in the Z mode in the outer magnetosphere.

  15. Nonthermal WIMPs as ``dark radiation'' in light of ATACAMA, SPT, WMAP9, and Planck

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelso, Chris; Profumo, Stefano; Queiroz, Farinaldo S.

    2013-07-01

    The Planck and WMAP9 satellites, as well as the ATACAMA and South Pole telescopes, have recently presented results on the angular power spectrum of the comic microwave background. Data tentatively point to the existence of an extra radiation component in the early Universe. Here, we show that this extra component can be mimicked by ordinary weakly interacting massive particle dark matter particles whose majority is cold, but with a small fraction being nonthermally produced in a relativistic state. We present a few example theories where this scenario is explicitly realized and explore the relevant parameter space consistent with big bang nucleosynthesis, cosmic microwave background, and structure formation bounds.

  16. Nonthermal radiative transfer of oxygen 98.9 nm ultraviolet emission: Solving an old mystery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubert, B.; Gérard, J.-C.; Shematovich, V. I.; Bisikalo, D. V.; Chakrabarti, S.; Gladstone, G. R.

    2015-12-01

    Sounding rocket measurements conducted in 1988 under high solar activity conditions revealed that the intensity of thermospheric OI emissions at 98.9 nm presents an anomalous vertical profile, showing exospheric intensities much higher than expected from radiative transfer model results, which included the known sources of excited oxygen. All attempts based on modeling of the photochemical processes and radiative transfer were unable to account for the higher than predicted brightnesses. More recently, the SOHO-Solar Ultraviolet Measurements of Emitted Radiation instrument measured the UV solar flux at high-spectral resolution, revealing the importance of a significant additional source of oxygen emission at 98.9 nm that had not been accounted for before. In this study, we simulate the radiative transfer of the OI-98.9 nm multiplet, including the photochemical sources of excited oxygen, the resonant scattering of solar photons, and the effects of nonthermal atoms, i.e., a population of fast-moving oxygen atoms in excess of the Maxwellian distribution. Including resonance scattering of the 98.9 nm solar multiplet, we find good agreement with the previous sounding rocket observation. The inclusion of a nonthermal oxygen population with a consistent increase of the total density produces a larger intensity at high altitude that apparently better accounts for the observation, but such a correction cannot be demonstrated given the uncertainties of the observations. A good agreement between model and sounding rocket observation is also found with the triplet at 130.4 nm. We further investigate the radiative transfer of the OI-98.9 nm multiplet and the oxygen emissions at 130.4 and 135.6 nm using observations from the STP78-1 satellite. We find a less satisfying agreement between the model and the STP78-1 data that can be accounted for by scaling the modeled intensity within a range acceptable given the uncertainties on the STP78-1 absolute calibration.

  17. Non-thermal effects of 94 GHz radiation on bacterial metabolism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raitt, Brittany J.

    Bacillus subtilis, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, and Klebsiella pneumoniae were used to investigate the non-thermal effects of terahertz (THz) radiation exposure on bacterial cells. The THz source used was a 94 GHz (0.94 THz) Millitech Gunn Diode Oscillator with a power density of 1.3 mW/cm2. The cultures were placed in the middle sixty wells of two 96-well microplates, one serving as the experimental plate and one serving as a control. The experimental plate was placed on the radiation source for either two, eighteen, or twenty-four hours and the metabolism of the cells was measured in a spectrophotometer using the tetrazolium dye XTT. The results showed no consistent significant differences in either the growth rates or the metabolism of any of the bacterial species at this frequency and power density.

  18. NONTHERMAL RADIATION FROM SUPERNOVA REMNANTS: EFFECTS OF MAGNETIC FIELD AMPLIFICATION AND PARTICLE ESCAPE

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Hyesung; Jones, T. W.; Edmon, Paul P. E-mail: twj@msi.umn.edu

    2013-11-01

    We explore nonlinear effects of wave-particle interactions on the diffusive shock acceleration (DSA) process in Type Ia-like supernova remnant (SNR) blast waves by implementing phenomenological models for magnetic field amplification (MFA), Alfvénic drift, and particle escape in time-dependent numerical simulations of nonlinear DSA. For typical SNR parameters, the cosmic-ray (CR) protons can be accelerated to PeV energies only if the region of amplified field ahead of the shock is extensive enough to contain the diffusion lengths of the particles of interest. Even with the help of Alfvénic drift, it remains somewhat challenging to construct a nonlinear DSA model for SNRs in which of the order of 10% of the supernova explosion energy is converted into CR energy and the magnetic field is amplified by a factor of 10 or so in the shock precursor, while, at the same time, the energy spectrum of PeV protons is steeper than E {sup –2}. To explore the influence of these physical effects on observed SNR emission, we also compute the resulting radio-to-gamma-ray spectra. Nonthermal emission spectra, especially in X-ray and gamma-ray bands, depend on the time-dependent evolution of the CR injection process, MFA, and particle escape, as well as the shock dynamic evolution. This result comes from the fact that the high-energy end of the CR spectrum is composed of particles that are injected in the very early stages of the blast wave evolution. Thus, it is crucial to better understand the plasma wave-particle interactions associated with collisionless shocks in detailed modeling of nonthermal radiation from SNRs.

  19. Hawking non-thermal and thermal radiations of Schwarzschild anti-de Sitter black hole by Hamilton-Jacobi method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, M. Atiqur; Hossain, M. Ilias

    2013-06-01

    The massive particles tunneling method has been used to investigate the Hawking non-thermal and purely thermal radiations of Schwarzschild Anti-de Sitter (SAdS) black hole. Considering the spacetime background to be dynamical, incorporate the self-gravitation effect of the emitted particles the imaginary part of the action has been derived from Hamilton-Jacobi equation. Using the conservation laws of energy and angular momentum we have showed that the non-thermal and purely thermal tunneling rates are related to the change of Bekenstein-Hawking entropy and the derived emission spectrum deviates from the pure thermal spectrum. The result obtained for SAdS black hole is also in accordance with Parikh and Wilczek's opinion and gives a correction to the Hawking radiation of SAdS black hole.

  20. Theory-Agnostic Constraints on Black-Hole Dipole Radiation with Multiband Gravitational-Wave Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barausse, Enrico; Yunes, Nicolás; Chamberlain, Katie

    2016-06-01

    The aLIGO detection of the black-hole binary GW150914 opens a new era for probing extreme gravity. Many gravity theories predict the emission of dipole gravitational radiation by binaries. This is excluded to high accuracy in binary pulsars, but entire classes of theories predict this effect predominantly (or only) in binaries involving black holes. Joint observations of GW150914-like systems by aLIGO and eLISA will improve bounds on dipole emission from black-hole binaries by 6 orders of magnitude relative to current constraints, provided that eLISA is not dramatically descoped.

  1. Theory-Agnostic Constraints on Black-Hole Dipole Radiation with Multiband Gravitational-Wave Astrophysics.

    PubMed

    Barausse, Enrico; Yunes, Nicolás; Chamberlain, Katie

    2016-06-17

    The aLIGO detection of the black-hole binary GW150914 opens a new era for probing extreme gravity. Many gravity theories predict the emission of dipole gravitational radiation by binaries. This is excluded to high accuracy in binary pulsars, but entire classes of theories predict this effect predominantly (or only) in binaries involving black holes. Joint observations of GW150914-like systems by aLIGO and eLISA will improve bounds on dipole emission from black-hole binaries by 6 orders of magnitude relative to current constraints, provided that eLISA is not dramatically descoped. PMID:27367380

  2. Theory-Agnostic Constraints on Black-Hole Dipole Radiation with Multiband Gravitational-Wave Astrophysics.

    PubMed

    Barausse, Enrico; Yunes, Nicolás; Chamberlain, Katie

    2016-06-17

    The aLIGO detection of the black-hole binary GW150914 opens a new era for probing extreme gravity. Many gravity theories predict the emission of dipole gravitational radiation by binaries. This is excluded to high accuracy in binary pulsars, but entire classes of theories predict this effect predominantly (or only) in binaries involving black holes. Joint observations of GW150914-like systems by aLIGO and eLISA will improve bounds on dipole emission from black-hole binaries by 6 orders of magnitude relative to current constraints, provided that eLISA is not dramatically descoped.

  3. Time delays in the nonthermal radiation of solar flares according to observations of the CORONAS-F satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsap, Yu. T.; Stepanov, A. V.; Kashapova, L. K.; Myagkova, I. N.; Bogomolov, A. V.; Kopylova, Yu. G.; Goldvarg, T. B.

    2016-07-01

    In 2001-2003, the X-ray and microwave observations of ten solar flares of M- and X-classes were carried out by the CORONAS-F orbital station, the RSTN Sun service, and Nobeyama radio polarimeters. Based on these observations, a correlation analysis of time profiles of nonthermal radiation was performed. On average, hard X-ray radiation outstrips the microwave radiation in 9 events, i.e., time delays are positive. The appearance of negative delays is associated with effective scattering of accelerated electrons in pitch angles, where the length of the free path of a particle is less than the half-length of a flare loop. The additional indications are obtained in favor of the need to account for the effect of magnetic mirrors on the dynamics of energetic particles in the coronal arches.

  4. NON-THERMAL RADIATION FROM COLLISIONS OF COMPACT OBJECTS WITH INTERMEDIATE-SCALE JETS IN ACTIVE GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Bednarek, W.; Banasiński, P.

    2015-07-10

    Massive black holes in active galaxies are immersed in huge concentrations of late-type stars in the galactic bulges and also early-type massive stars in the nuclear stellar clusters, which are additionally surrounded by quasi-spherical halos on a scale of several kpc that contain from a few hundred up to several thousand globular clusters (GCs). It is expected that significant numbers of red giant stars, massive stars, and also GCs can move through the jet expelled from the central engine of the active galaxy. We consider collisions of stars from the galactic bulge, nuclear cluster, and GCs with the jet plasma. As a result of such collisions, multiple shocks are expected to appear in the jet around these compact objects. Therefore, the plasma in the kpc-scale jet can be significantly disturbed. We show that particles can be accelerated on these shocks up to multi-TeV energies. TeV leptons emit synchrotron radiation, extending up to X-ray energies, and also comptonize radiation produced in a stellar cluster and also the microwave background radiation to TeV γ-ray energies. We show that such non-thermal radiation is likely to be detectable from the intermediate-scale jets of nearby active galaxies for a reasonable number of stars and GCs immersed within the jet. As an example, we calculate the expected non-thermal emission in X-ray and gamma-ray energies from the nearby radio galaxy Cen A, from which steady gamma-ray emission with a complex spectrum has recently been reported by Fermi and the HESS Observatories.

  5. Hawking effect and quantum nonthermal radiation of an arbitrarily accelerating charged black hole using a new tortoise coordinate transformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Wei-Zhen; Yang, Xue-Jun; Xie, Zhi-Kun

    2011-04-01

    Using a new tortoise coordinate transformation, this paper investigates the Hawking effect from an arbitrarily accelerating charged black hole by the improved Damour—Ruffini method. After the tortoise coordinate transformation, the Klein—Gordon equation can be written as the standard form at the event horizon. Then extending the outgoing wave from outside to inside of the horizon analytically, the surface gravity and Hawking temperature can be obtained automatically. It is found that the Hawking temperatures of different points on the surface are different. The quantum nonthermal radiation characteristics of a black hole near the event horizon is also discussed by studying the Hamilton—Jacobi equation in curved spacetime and the maximum overlap of the positive and negative energy levels near the event horizon is given. There is a dimensional problem in the standard tortoise coordinate and the present results may be more reasonable.

  6. The quantum nonthermal radiation and horizon surface gravity of an arbitrarily accelerating black hole with electric charge and magnetic charge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Zhi-Kun; Pan, Wei-Zhen; Yang, Xue-Jun

    2013-03-01

    Using a new tortoise coordinate transformation, we discuss the quantum nonthermal radiation characteristics near an event horizon by studying the Hamilton-Jacobi equation of a scalar particle in curved space-time, and obtain the event horizon surface gravity and the Hawking temperature on that event horizon. The results show that there is a crossing of particle energy near the event horizon. We derive the maximum overlap of the positive and negative energy levels. It is also found that the Hawking temperature of a black hole depends not only on the time, but also on the angle. There is a problem of dimension in the usual tortoise coordinate, so the present results obtained by using a correct-dimension new tortoise coordinate transformation may be more reasonable.

  7. Interpretation of the microwave non-thermal radiation of the Moon during impact events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grimalsky, V.; Berezhnoy, A.; Kotsarenko, A.; Makarets, N.; Koshevaya, S.; Pérez Enríquez, R.

    2004-11-01

    The results of recent observations of the non-thermal electromagnetic (EM) emission at wavelengths of 2.5cm, 13cm, and 21cm are summarized. After strong impacts of meteorites or spacecrafts (Lunar Prospector) with the Moon's surface, the radio emissions in various frequency ranges were recorded. The most distinctive phenomenon is the appearance of quasi-periodic oscillations with amplitudes of 3-10K during several hours. The mechanism concerning the EM emission from a propagating crack within a piezoactive dielectric medium is considered. The impact may cause the global acoustic oscillations of the Moon. These oscillations lead to the crackening of the Moon's surface. The propagation of a crack within a piezoactive medium is accompanied by the excitation of an alternative current source. It is revealed that the source of the EM emission is the effective transient magnetization that appears in the case of a moving crack in piezoelectrics. The moving crack creates additional non-stationary local mechanical stresses around the apex of the crack, which generate the non-stationary electromagnetic field. For the cracks with a length of 0.1-1µm, the maximum of the EM emission may be in the 1-10GHz range.

  8. Hawking non-thermal and thermal radiations of Reissner Nordström anti-de Sitter black hole by Hamilton-Jacobi method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilias Hossain, M.; Atiqur Rahman, M.

    2013-09-01

    We have investigated Hawking non-thermal and purely thermal Radiations of Reissner Nordström anti-de Sitter (RNAdS) black hole by massive particles tunneling method. The spacetime background has taken as dynamical, incorporate the self-gravitation effect of the emitted particles the imaginary part of the action has derived from Hamilton-Jacobi equation. We have supposed that energy and angular momentum are conserved and have shown that the non-thermal and thermal tunneling rates are related to the change of Bekenstein-Hawking entropy and the derived emission spectrum deviates from the pure thermal spectrum. The results for RNAdS black hole is also in the same manner with Parikh and Wilczek's opinion and explored the new result for Hawking radiation of RNAdS black hole.

  9. Non-thermal effects of terahertz radiation on gene expression in mouse stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Alexandrov, Boian S.; Rasmussen, Kim Ø.; Bishop, Alan R.; Usheva, Anny; Alexandrov, Ludmil B.; Chong, Shou; Dagon, Yossi; Booshehri, Layla G.; Mielke, Charles H.; Phipps, M. Lisa; Martinez, Jennifer S.; Chen, Hou-Tong; Rodriguez, George

    2011-01-01

    Abstract In recent years, terahertz radiation sources are increasingly being exploited in military and civil applications. However, only a few studies have so far been conducted to examine the biological effects associated with terahertz radiation. In this study, we evaluated the cellular response of mesenchymal mouse stem cells exposed to THz radiation. We apply low-power radiation from both a pulsed broad-band (centered at 10 THz) source and from a CW laser (2.52 THz) source. Modeling, empirical characterization, and monitoring techniques were applied to minimize the impact of radiation-induced increases in temperature. qRT-PCR was used to evaluate changes in the transcriptional activity of selected hyperthermic genes. We found that temperature increases were minimal, and that the differential expression of the investigated heat shock proteins (HSP105, HSP90, and CPR) was unaffected, while the expression of certain other genes (Adiponectin, GLUT4, and PPARG) showed clear effects of the THz irradiation after prolonged, broad-band exposure. PMID:21991556

  10. Microwave absorption by magnetite: a possible mechanism for coupling nonthermal levels of radiation to biological systems.

    PubMed

    Kirschvink, J L

    1996-01-01

    The presence of trace amounts of biogenic magnetite (Fe3O4) in animal and human tissues and the observation that ferromagnetic particles are ubiquitous in laboratory materials (including tissue culture media) provide a physical mechanism through which microwave radiation might produce or appear to produce biological effects. Magnetite is an excellent absorber of microwave radiation at frequencies between 0.5 and 10.0 GHz through the process of ferromagnetic resonance, where the magnetic vector of the incident field causes precession of Bohr magnetons around the internal demagnetizing field of the crystal. Energy absorbed by this process is first transduced into acoustic vibrations at the microwave carrier frequency within the crystal lattice via the magnetoacoustic effect; then, the energy should be dissipated in cellular structures in close proximity to the magnetite crystals. Several possible methods for testing this hypothesis experimentally are discussed. Studies of microwave dosimetry at the cellular level should consider effects of biogenic magnetite.

  11. Terahertz radiation induces non-thermal structural changes associated with Fröhlich condensation in a protein crystal

    PubMed Central

    Lundholm, Ida V.; Rodilla, Helena; Wahlgren, Weixiao Y.; Duelli, Annette; Bourenkov, Gleb; Vukusic, Josip; Friedman, Ran; Stake, Jan; Schneider, Thomas; Katona, Gergely

    2015-01-01

    Whether long-range quantum coherent states could exist in biological systems, and beyond low-temperature regimes where quantum physics is known to be applicable, has been the subject to debate for decades. It was proposed by Fröhlich that vibrational modes within protein molecules can order and condense into a lowest-frequency vibrational mode in a process similar to Bose-Einstein condensation, and thus that macroscopic coherence could potentially be observed in biological systems. Despite the prediction of these so-called Fröhlich condensates almost five decades ago, experimental evidence thereof has been lacking. Here, we present the first experimental observation of Fröhlich condensation in a protein structure. To that end, and to overcome the challenges associated with probing low-frequency molecular vibrations in proteins (which has hampered understanding of their role in proteins' function), we combined terahertz techniques with a highly sensitive X-ray crystallographic method to visualize low-frequency vibrational modes in the protein structure of hen-egg white lysozyme. We found that 0.4 THz electromagnetic radiation induces non-thermal changes in electron density. In particular, we observed a local increase of electron density in a long α-helix motif consistent with a subtle longitudinal compression of the helix. These observed electron density changes occur at a low absorption rate indicating that thermalization of terahertz photons happens on a micro- to milli-second time scale, which is much slower than the expected nanosecond time scale due to damping of delocalized low frequency vibrations. Our analyses show that the micro- to milli-second lifetime of the vibration can only be explained by Fröhlich condensation, a phenomenon predicted almost half a century ago, yet never experimentally confirmed. PMID:26798828

  12. Terahertz radiation induces non-thermal structural changes associated with Fröhlich condensation in a protein crystal.

    PubMed

    Lundholm, Ida V; Rodilla, Helena; Wahlgren, Weixiao Y; Duelli, Annette; Bourenkov, Gleb; Vukusic, Josip; Friedman, Ran; Stake, Jan; Schneider, Thomas; Katona, Gergely

    2015-09-01

    Whether long-range quantum coherent states could exist in biological systems, and beyond low-temperature regimes where quantum physics is known to be applicable, has been the subject to debate for decades. It was proposed by Fröhlich that vibrational modes within protein molecules can order and condense into a lowest-frequency vibrational mode in a process similar to Bose-Einstein condensation, and thus that macroscopic coherence could potentially be observed in biological systems. Despite the prediction of these so-called Fröhlich condensates almost five decades ago, experimental evidence thereof has been lacking. Here, we present the first experimental observation of Fröhlich condensation in a protein structure. To that end, and to overcome the challenges associated with probing low-frequency molecular vibrations in proteins (which has hampered understanding of their role in proteins' function), we combined terahertz techniques with a highly sensitive X-ray crystallographic method to visualize low-frequency vibrational modes in the protein structure of hen-egg white lysozyme. We found that 0.4 THz electromagnetic radiation induces non-thermal changes in electron density. In particular, we observed a local increase of electron density in a long α-helix motif consistent with a subtle longitudinal compression of the helix. These observed electron density changes occur at a low absorption rate indicating that thermalization of terahertz photons happens on a micro- to milli-second time scale, which is much slower than the expected nanosecond time scale due to damping of delocalized low frequency vibrations. Our analyses show that the micro- to milli-second lifetime of the vibration can only be explained by Fröhlich condensation, a phenomenon predicted almost half a century ago, yet never experimentally confirmed.

  13. [Non-thermal effect of GSM electromagnetic radiation on quality of pea seeds].

    PubMed

    Veselova, T V; Veselovskiĭ, V A; Deev, L I; Baĭzhumanov, A A

    2012-01-01

    The seeds with low level of room temperature phosphorescence (RTP) were selected from a lot of air-dry peas (Pisum sativum) with 62% germination. These strong seeds (95-97% germination percentage) in air-dry, imbibed or emerged states were exposed to 905 MHz GSM-band electromagnetic radiation (EMR). The following effects of EMR were observed. Fraction II with higher RTP level appeared in the air-dry seeds. The germination rate decreased 2-3 fold in the air-dry, swollen and sprouting seeds due to an increase in the ratio of the seedlings with morphological defects (from 3 to 38%) and suffocated seeds (from 1 to 15%). We suggest tentative mechanisms to account for the decreased fitness of peas under GSM-band EMR (905 MHz); also discussed is the role of non-enzymatic hydrolysis of carbohydrates and amino-carbonyl reaction in this process.

  14. Nonthermal Radiation of Young Supernova Remnants: The Case of CAS A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zirakashvili, V. N.; Aharonian, F. A.; Yang, R.; Oña-Wilhelmi, E.; Tuffs, R. J.

    2014-04-01

    The processes responsible for the broadband radiation of the young supernova remnant Cas A are explored by using a new code that is designed for a detailed treatment of the diffusive shock acceleration of particles in the nonlinear regime. The model is based on spherically symmetric hydrodynamic equations complemented with transport equations for relativistic particles. Electrons, protons, and the oxygen ions accelerated by forward and reverse shocks are included in the numerical calculations. We show that the available multi-wavelength observations in the radio, X-ray, and gamma-ray bands can be best explained by invoking particle acceleration by both forward and reversed shocks. Although the TeV gamma-ray observations can be interpreted by interactions of both accelerated electrons and protons/ions, the measurements by Fermi Large Area Telescope at energies below 1 GeV give a tentative preference to the hadronic origin of gamma-rays. Then, the acceleration efficiency in this source, despite the previous claims, should be very high; 25% of the explosion energy (or approximately 3 × 1050 erg) should already be converted to cosmic rays, mainly by the forward shock. At the same time, the model calculations do not provide extension of the maximum energy of accelerated protons beyond 100 TeV. In this model, the acceleration of electrons is dominated by the reverse shock; the required 1048 erg can be achieved under the assumption that the injection of electrons (positrons) is supported by the radioactive decay of 44Ti.

  15. Nonthermal radiation of young supernova remnants: The case of Cas A

    SciTech Connect

    Zirakashvili, V. N.; Aharonian, F. A.; Yang, R.; Oña-Wilhelmi, E.; Tuffs, R. J.

    2014-04-20

    The processes responsible for the broadband radiation of the young supernova remnant Cas A are explored by using a new code that is designed for a detailed treatment of the diffusive shock acceleration of particles in the nonlinear regime. The model is based on spherically symmetric hydrodynamic equations complemented with transport equations for relativistic particles. Electrons, protons, and the oxygen ions accelerated by forward and reverse shocks are included in the numerical calculations. We show that the available multi-wavelength observations in the radio, X-ray, and gamma-ray bands can be best explained by invoking particle acceleration by both forward and reversed shocks. Although the TeV gamma-ray observations can be interpreted by interactions of both accelerated electrons and protons/ions, the measurements by Fermi Large Area Telescope at energies below 1 GeV give a tentative preference to the hadronic origin of gamma-rays. Then, the acceleration efficiency in this source, despite the previous claims, should be very high; 25% of the explosion energy (or approximately 3 × 10{sup 50} erg) should already be converted to cosmic rays, mainly by the forward shock. At the same time, the model calculations do not provide extension of the maximum energy of accelerated protons beyond 100 TeV. In this model, the acceleration of electrons is dominated by the reverse shock; the required 10{sup 48} erg can be achieved under the assumption that the injection of electrons (positrons) is supported by the radioactive decay of {sup 44}Ti.

  16. The Influence of Nonthermal Particles and Radiation on the Charge State of Heavy Ions in Solar Cosmic Rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kartavykh, Yu. Yu.; Ostryakov, V. M.; Möbius, E.; Popecki, M. A.

    2004-09-01

    The influence of various types of nonthermal electron and proton distributions and photoionization on the charge state of energetic heavy elements moving in a plasma is investigated. The mean charges of Mg, Si, and Fe are calculated for a bi-Maxwellian distribution of the background electrons and for electron and neutral beams with power-law energy distributions. An anomalously high density of the nonthermal component is required to obtain substantial deviations of the equilibrium mean charges of these elements (a few charge units) from the case when they interact with a purely Maxwellian plasma. In this context, the mean charges for O, Ne, Mg, Si, and Fe ions are also calculated for a model with charge-consistent acceleration. The results indicate that photoionization does not significantly influence the charge state of solar cosmic rays if the parameters of the plasma are those characteristic of impulsive solar events.

  17. Multi-band gap and new solar cell options workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hutchby, J.; Timmons, M.; Olson, J. M.

    1993-01-01

    Discussions of the multi-band gap (MBG) and new solar cell options workshop are presented. Topics discussed include: greater than 2 terminal cells; radiation damage preventing development of MBG cells for space; lattice matching; measurement of true performance; future of II-VI materials in MBG devices; and quaternaries.

  18. Heating and ionization of stellar chromospheres by nonthermal proton beams: Implications for impulsive phase, redshifted Lyman-alpha radiation in stellar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brosius, Jeffrey W.; Robinson, Richard D.; Maran, Stephen P.

    1995-01-01

    We investigate the physical basis for the timescale of impulsive-phase, redshifted Lyman-alpha emission in stellar flares on the assumption that it is determined by energy losses in a nonthermal proton beam that is penetrating the chromosphere from above. The temporal evolution of ionization and heating in representative model chromospheres subjected to such beams is calculated. The treatment of 'stopping' of beam protons takes into account their interactions with (1) electrons bound in neutral hydrogen, (2) nuclei of neutral hydrogen, (3) free electrons, and (4) ambient thermal protons. We find that, for constant incident beam flux, the system attains an equilibrium with the beam energy input to the chromosphere balanced by radiative losses. In equilibrium, the beam penetration depth is constant, and erosion of the chromosphere ceases. If the redshifted, impulsive-phase stellar flare Lyman-alpha emission is produced by downstreaming hydrogen formed through charge exchange between beam protons and ambient hydrogen, then the emission should end when the beam no longer reaches neutral hydrogen. The durations of representative emission events calculated on this assumption range from 0.1 to 14 s. The stronger the beam, the shorter the timescale over which the redshifted Lyman-alpha emission can be observed.

  19. Changes in the spectral composition of animal-brain electrical activity under the influence of nonthermal millimeter-wave radiation on acupuncture points

    SciTech Connect

    Khramov, R.N.; Vorob`ev, V.V.

    1994-07-01

    The frequency spectra (0-26 Hz) of electrograms (EG) of the preoptic region of the hypothalamus were studied in chronic experiments on nine awake rabbits under the influence of nonthermal millimeter-bank (55-75 GHz) electromagnetic fields on various acupuncture points: (I) the auricular {open_quotes}heart{close_quotes} point (after F. G. Portnov); (II) the cranial acupoint (TR-20; the {open_quotes}hypothalamus{close_quotes} point after R. Voll); and (III) the {open_quotes}longevity{close_quotes} acupoint (E-36). Irradiation of point I was accompanied by significant suppression of hypothalamic electrical activity at 5 and 16 Hz and enhancement at 7-8, 12, and 26 Hz. Irradiation of point II, and III were, respectively, 31%, 21%, and 5% (p < 0.05, U-criterion). These results suggest that acupuncture points I and II are more sensitive to millimeter-band radiation than is point III. The presence of individual characteristics of the effects and their change after stress to sign inversion were shown in rat experiments in which the acupuncture points were irradiated.

  20. An electronic multiband camera film viewer.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, L. H.

    1972-01-01

    An electronic viewer for real-time viewing and processing of multiband camera imagery is described. The Multiband Camera Film Viewer (MCFV) is a high-resolution, 1000-line system scanning three channels of multiband imagery. The MCFV provides a calibrated output from each of the three channels for viewing in composite true color, analog false-color, and digitized, enhanced false color.

  1. Increase in radiation-induced HPRT gene mutation frequency after nonthermal exposure to nonionizing 60 Hz electromagnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Walleczek, J; Shiu, E C; Hahn, G M

    1999-04-01

    It is widely accepted that moderate levels of nonionizing electric or magnetic fields, for example 50/60 Hz magnetic fields of about 1 mT, are not mutagenic. However, it is not known whether such fields can enhance the action of known mutagens. To explore this question, a stringent experimental protocol, which included blinding and systematic negative controls, was implemented, minimizing the possibility of observer bias or experimental artifacts. As a model system, we chose to measure mutation frequencies induced by 2 Gy gamma rays in the redox-sensitive hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (HPRT) gene in Chinese hamster ovary cells. We tested whether a 12-h exposure to a 60 Hz sinusoidally oscillating magnetic-flux density (Brms = 0.7 mT) could affect the mutagenic effects of ionizing radiation on the HPRT gene locus. We determined that the magnetic-field exposure induced an approximate 1.8-fold increase in HPRT mutation frequency. Additional experiments at Brms = 0.23 and 0.47 mT revealed that the effect was reduced at lower flux densities. The field exposure did not enhance radiation-induced cytotoxicity or mutation frequencies in cells not exposed to ionizing radiation. These results suggest that moderate-strength, oscillating magnetic fields may act as an enhancer of mutagenesis in mammalian cells.

  2. Signatures of nonthermal melting.

    PubMed

    Zier, Tobias; Zijlstra, Eeuwe S; Kalitsov, Alan; Theodonis, Ioannis; Garcia, Martin E

    2015-09-01

    Intense ultrashort laser pulses can melt crystals in less than a picosecond but, in spite of over thirty years of active research, for many materials it is not known to what extent thermal and nonthermal microscopic processes cause this ultrafast phenomenon. Here, we perform ab-initio molecular-dynamics simulations of silicon on a laser-excited potential-energy surface, exclusively revealing nonthermal signatures of laser-induced melting. From our simulated atomic trajectories, we compute the decay of five structure factors and the time-dependent structure function. We demonstrate how these quantities provide criteria to distinguish predominantly nonthermal from thermal melting. PMID:26798822

  3. Signatures of nonthermal melting

    PubMed Central

    Zier, Tobias; Zijlstra, Eeuwe S.; Kalitsov, Alan; Theodonis, Ioannis; Garcia, Martin E.

    2015-01-01

    Intense ultrashort laser pulses can melt crystals in less than a picosecond but, in spite of over thirty years of active research, for many materials it is not known to what extent thermal and nonthermal microscopic processes cause this ultrafast phenomenon. Here, we perform ab-initio molecular-dynamics simulations of silicon on a laser-excited potential-energy surface, exclusively revealing nonthermal signatures of laser-induced melting. From our simulated atomic trajectories, we compute the decay of five structure factors and the time-dependent structure function. We demonstrate how these quantities provide criteria to distinguish predominantly nonthermal from thermal melting. PMID:26798822

  4. Environmental remediation by an integrated microwave/UV illumination method. V. Thermal and nonthermal effects of microwave radiation on the photocatalyst and on the photodegradation of rhodamine-B under UV/Vis radiation.

    PubMed

    Horikoshi, Satoshi; Saitou, Aiko; Hidaka, Hisao; Serpone, Nick

    2003-12-15

    The photocatalyzed degradation (PD) of the cationic rhodamine-B (RhB) dye was examined in aqueous TiO2 dispersions using UV/Vis illumination assisted by microwave radiation (PD/MW). The initial degradation by the PD/MW method is compared to the PD method and to the thermally assisted PD method using conventional heating (PD/TH). Total organic carbon (TOC) assays show that the efficiency of complete mineralization of the dye follows PD/MW > PD/TH > PD > MW. In all cases, microwave radiation alone had no effect on the loss of TOC. The degradation involving microwave radiation was especially efficient when coupled to UV irradiation. By contrast, the extent of degradation of RhB involving suitable excited states through visible irradiation of the dye was rather inefficient when coupled to microwave radiation. Contact angle measurements on the TiO2 photocatalyst particles indicate that microwave radiation also causes an increase in the hydrophobic character of the TiO2 surface, with consequences on the adsorption mode of the dye substrate and thus on the overall mechanism of degradation. Deethylated RhB intermediates were identified by an electrospray ESI ionization mass spectral technique in the positive ion mode and subsequently confirmed by HPLC/absorption spectroscopy. Computer simulations led to estimates of frontier electron densities of all atoms of the RhB structure, affording inferences as to the position of radical attack on RhB. The nitrogen atoms of the dye were all converted to NH4+ ions. The major difference between the thermally assisted PD/TH method and the microwave-assisted PD/MW method showed that nonthermal effects from the microwave radiation impact significantly on the nature of the photocatalyst surface. These effects led to a more efficient photodegradation and mineralization of the dye substrate.

  5. Nonthermal cosmic neutrino background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Mu-Chun; Ratz, Michael; Trautner, Andreas

    2015-12-01

    We point out that, for Dirac neutrinos, in addition to the standard thermal cosmic neutrino background (C ν B ), there could also exist a nonthermal neutrino background with comparable number density. As the right-handed components are essentially decoupled from the thermal bath of standard model particles, relic neutrinos with a nonthermal distribution may exist until today. The relic density of the nonthermal (nt) background can be constrained by the usual observational bounds on the effective number of massless degrees of freedom Neff and can be as large as nν nt≲0.5 nγ. In particular, Neff can be larger than 3.046 in the absence of any exotic states. Nonthermal relic neutrinos constitute an irreducible contribution to the detection of the C ν B and, hence, may be discovered by future experiments such as PTOLEMY. We also present a scenario of chaotic inflation in which a nonthermal background can naturally be generated by inflationary preheating. The nonthermal relic neutrinos, thus, may constitute a novel window into the very early Universe.

  6. Analysis and design of low profile multiband multifunctional antenna arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunsicker, Walker F.

    Light-weight phased array antennas for aerospace and mobile applications require utilizing the same antenna aperture to provide multiple functions with dissimilar radiation pattern specifications (e.g., multiband operation for communications and tracking). Multi-functional antennas provide advantages over aggregate antenna clusters by reducing space requirements, and can aid in the optimal placement of all required apertures to provide adequate isolation between channels. Furthermore, the combination of antenna apertures into a common geometry mitigates co-site installation issues by addressing interference within the integrated radiator design itself as opposed to the extensive analysis which is required to configure multiple radiators in close proximity. The combination of multiple radiators into a single aperture can only be achieved with the proper selection of antenna topology and accompanying feed network design. This research proposes a new technique for the design of multiband arrays in which a common aperture is used. Highlighted by this method is the integration of a tri-band array comprised of an X-band (12 GHz) microstrip patch array on a superstrate above printed dual-band (1 and 2 GHz) slot loop antenna arrays in an octave-spaced lattice. The selection of a ground backing reflector is considered for improved gain and system packaging, but restricts the utility of the design principally due to the lambda/4 depth of the ground plane. Therefore, a novel multiband high impedance surfaces (HIS) is proposed to load the slot apertures for reduced height. The novel techniques proposed here will enable the design of a low profile and conformal single aperture supporting multi-band and multi-functional operations.

  7. Entwurfskonzept einer Car2Car-Multiband-Dachantenne

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y.; Reit, M.; Mathis, W.

    2012-09-01

    Due to the vastly increasing use of wireless services in the car, such as WiFi, Car2Car and LTE, the requirements on bandwidth and radiation pattern of the roof antenna systems become more challenging. In this work, a design concept for multi-band roof antenna systems is presented. We aim to get a higher bandwidth and an almost circular radiation pattern on the horizontal plane. Moreover, the antenna length is considered in order to fulfill the requirements set by construction ECE-regulations (ECE, 2010). The applicability of the design concept is not limited to multi-band roof antennas, it can also be used for a general wideband antenna design. For illustration of this concept, a multi-band roof antenna with a bandwidth of 780 MHz to 5.9 GHz and a near circular radiation pattern with an average gain of G = 3 dBi (at 5.9 GHz) on the horizontal plane is designed. The simulation and measurement results are presented.

  8. Nonthermal 'WIMP miracle'

    SciTech Connect

    Acharya, Bobby Samir; Kane, Gordon; Watson, Scott; Kumar, Piyush

    2009-10-15

    Light scalar fields with only gravitational strength couplings are typically present in UV complete theories of physics beyond the standard model. In the early universe it is natural for these fields to dominate the energy density, and their subsequent decay - if prior to big bang nucleosynthesis - will typically yield some dark matter particles in their decay products. In this paper we make the observation that a Nonthermal 'WIMP Miracle' may result: that is, in the simplest solution to the cosmological moduli problem, nonthermally produced WIMPs can naturally account for the observed dark matter relic density.

  9. Nonthermal Supermassive Dark Matter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chung, Daniel J. H.; Kolb, Edward W.; Riotto, Antonio

    1999-01-01

    We discuss several cosmological production mechanisms for nonthermal supermassive dark matter and argue that dark matter may he elementary particles of mass much greater than the weak scale. Searches for dark matter should ma be limited to weakly interacting particles with mass of the order of the weak scale, but should extend into the supermassive range as well.

  10. Non-thermal excitation and ionization in supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chengdong; Hillier, D. John; Dessart, Luc

    2012-10-01

    We incorporate non-thermal excitation and ionization processes arising from non-thermal electrons that result from γ-ray energy deposition into our radiative transfer code CMFGEN. The non-thermal electron distribution is obtained by solving the Spencer-Fano equation using the procedure of Kozma & Fransson. We applied the non-thermal calculations to the blue supergiant explosion model whose early evolution was studied in Dessart & Hillier. Non-thermal processes generally increase excitation and ionization and decrease the temperature of the ejecta. We confirm that non-thermal processes are crucial for modelling nebular spectra. Both optical H I and He I lines are significantly strengthened. While optical He I lines are not easily discerned in observational spectra due to severe blending with other lines, He I 2.058 μm provides an excellent opportunity to infer the influence of non-thermal processes. We also discuss the processes controlling the formation of He I lines during nebular epochs. Most lines of other species are only slightly affected. We also show that the inclusion of Fe I has substantial line-blanketing effects on optical spectra. Our model spectra and synthetic light curves are compared to the observations of SN 1987A. The spectral evolution shows broad agreement with the observations, especially Hα. The uncertainties of the non-thermal solver are studied, and are expected to be small. With this new addition of non-thermal effects in CMFGEN, we now treat all known important processes controlling the radiative transfer of supernova ejecta, whatever the type and the epoch.

  11. Nonthermal Radio Emission and the HR Diagram

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibson, D. M.

    1985-01-01

    Perhaps the most reliable indicator of non-radiative heating/momentum in a stellar atmosphere is the presence of nonthermal radio emission. To date, 77 normal stellar objects have been detected and identified as nonthermal sources. These stellar objects are tabulated herein. It is apparent that non-thermal radio emission is not ubiquitous across the HR diagram. This is clearly the case for the single stars; it is not as clear for the binaries unless the radio emission is associated with their late-type components. Choosing to make this association, the single stars and the late-type components are plotted together. The following picture emerges: (1) there are four locations on the HR diagram where non-thermal radio stars are found; (2) the peak incoherent 5 GHz luminosities show a suprisingly small range for stars within each class; (3) the fraction of stellar energy that escapes as radio emission can be estimated by comparing the integrated maximum radio luminosity to the bolometric luminosity; (4) there are no apparent differences in L sub R between binaries with two cool components, binaries with one hot and one cool component, and single stars for classes C and D; and (5) The late-type stars (classes B, C, and D) are located in parts of the HR diagram where there is reason to suspect that the surfaces of the stars are being braked with respect to their interiors.

  12. Multiband radar for homeland security

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tahim, Raghbir S.; Foshee, James; Chang, Kai

    2004-09-01

    Radar systems, which can operate in a variety of frequency bands, could provide significant flexibility in the operation of future Battle-space Management and Air Defense Systems (BMADS). Phased array antennas, which support high pulse rates and power, are well suited for surveillance, tracking and identifying the targets. These phased array antennas with the multiplicity of elements in phased array could provide accurate beam pointing, very rapid changes in beam location, and multiple beams, including algorithms for null steering for unwanted signals. No single radar band possesses characteristics that provide optimum performance. For example, L and S-bands are typically considered the best frequency ranges for acquisition and X-band is best for tracking. For many of the current phased array antennas the circuit components are narrow-band and therefore are not suitable for multi-band radar design. In addition, the cost, size, power dissipation, the weight, and, in general, the complexity has limited the development of multi-band phased array antenna systems. The system bandwidth of antenna array employing high loss phase shifters for beam steering also becomes limited due to the dispersion loss from the beam steering. As a result phased array radar design can result in a very large, complex, expensive, narrow band and less efficient system. This paper describes an alternative design approach in the design of wide-band phased array radar system based on multi-octave band antenna elements; and wide-band low loss phase shifters, switching circuits and T/R modules.

  13. Search for Nonthermal X-Rays from Supernova Remnant Shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petre, R.; Keohane, J.; Hwang, U.; Allen, G.; Gotthelf, E.

    The demonstration by ASCA that the nonthermal X-ray emission from the rim of SN1006 is synchrotron emission from TeV electrons, produced in the same environment responsible for cosmic ray protons and nuclei (Koyama et al. 1995, Nature 378, 255), has stimulated a search for nonthermal X-rays from other remnants. Nonthermal emission has subsequently been found to arise in the shells of at least two other remnants, Cas A and IC 443. In Cas A, a hard tail is detected using ASCA, XTE, and OSSE to energies exceeding 100 keV; the shape of the spectrum rules out all mechanisms except synchrotron radiation. In IC 443, the previously known hard emission has been shown using ASCA to be isolated to a small region along the rim of the remnant, where the shock is interacting most strongly with a molecular cloud. Nonthermal X-ray emission is thought to arise here by enhanced cosmic ray production associated with the shock/cloud interaction (Keohane et al. 1997, ApJ in press). We describe the properties of the nonthermal emission in SN1006, Cas A, and IC 443, and discuss the status of our search for nonthermal emission associated with the shocks of other Galactic and LMC SNR's.

  14. Nonthermal histories and implications for structure formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, JiJi; Özsoy, Ogan; Watson, Scott

    2014-08-01

    We examine the evolution of cosmological perturbations in a nonthermal inflationary history with a late-time matter domination period prior to big bang nucleosynthesis. Such a cosmology could arise naturally in the well-motivated moduli scenario in the context of supersymmetry (SUSY)—in particular in models of split SUSY. Subhorizon dark matter perturbations grow linearly during the matter dominated phase before reheating and can lead to an enhancement in the growth of substructure on small scales, even in the presence of dark matter annihilations. This suggests that a new scale (the horizon size at reheating) could be important for determining the primordial matter power spectrum. However, we find that in many nonthermal models free-streaming effects or kinetic decoupling after reheating can completely erase the enhancement leading to small-scale structures. In particular, in the moduli scenario with wino or Higgsino dark matter we find that the dark matter particles produced from moduli decays would thermalize with radiation and kinetically decouple below the reheating temperature. Thus, the growth of dark matter perturbations is not sustained, and the predictions for the matter power spectrum are similar to a standard thermal history. We comment on possible exceptions, but these appear difficult to realize within standard moduli scenarios. We conclude that although enhanced structure does not provide a new probe for investigating the cosmic dark ages within these models, it does suggest that nonthermal histories offer a robust alternative to a strictly thermal post inflationary history.

  15. Non-thermal Plasma and Oxidative Stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toyokuni, Shinya

    2015-09-01

    Thermal plasmas and lasers have been used in medicine to cut and ablate tissues and for coagulation. Non-equilibrium atmospheric pressure plasma (NEAPP; non-thermal plasma) is a recently developed, non-thermal technique with possible biomedical applications. Although NEAPP reportedly generates reactive oxygen/nitrogen species, electrons, positive ions, and ultraviolet radiation, few research projects have been conducted to merge this technique with conventional free radical biology. Recently, Prof. Masaru Hori's group (Plasma Nanotechnology Research Center, Nagoya University) developed a NEAPP device with high electron density. Here electron spin resonance revealed hydroxyl radicals as a major product. To merge non-thermal plasma biology with the preexisting free radical biology, we evaluated lipid peroxidation and DNA modifications in various in vitro and ex vivo experiments. Conjugated dienes increased after exposure to linoleic and alfa-linolenic acids. An increase in 2-thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances was also increased after exposure to phosphatidylcholine, liposomes or liver homogenate. Direct exposure to rat liver in medium produced immunohistochemical evidence of 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal- and acrolein-modified proteins. Exposure to plasmid DNA induced dose-dependent single/double strand breaks and increased the amounts of 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine and cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers. These results indicate that oxidative biomolecular damage by NEAPP is dose-dependent and thus can be controlled in a site-specific manner. Simultaneous oxidative and UV-specific DNA damage may be useful in cancer treatment. Other recent advancements in the related studies of non-thermal plasma in Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine will also be discussed.

  16. Spectroscopy and nonthermal processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Querci, Monique

    1987-01-01

    Stellar spectra are analyzed to determine nonthermal processes for cool stars. A shock wave crossing model is supported by a study of the behavior of absorption and emission spectra. The shock waves are attributed to atmospheric kinetics. Circumstellar spectral lines are studied for information about gaseous circumstellar layers. The description of stellar envelopes is carried on through circumstellar dust. Characteristic properties of polarization in the dust are described in the case of specific stars, emphasizing narrowband observations in Mira, semiregular, and supergiant stars. Finally, the direct approach to measuring the angular diameters of stars and mapping the distribution of circumstellar dust and gas by lunar occultation or interferometry is discussed, using two prototype stars, an M supergiant and a dusty carbon star.

  17. Fast pulse nonthermal plasma reactor

    DOEpatents

    Rosocha, Louis A.

    2005-06-14

    A fast pulsed nonthermal plasma reactor includes a discharge cell and a charging assembly electrically connected thereto. The charging assembly provides plural high voltage pulses to the discharge cell. Each pulse has a rise time between one and ten nanoseconds and a duration of three to twenty nanoseconds. The pulses create nonthermal plasma discharge within the discharge cell. Accordingly, the nonthermal plasma discharge can be used to remove pollutants from gases or break the gases into smaller molecules so that they can be more efficiently combusted.

  18. Quantum structures for multiband photon detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perera, A. G. U.

    2005-09-01

    The work describes multiband photon detectors based on semiconductor micro- and nano-structures. The devices considered include quantum dot, homojunction, and heterojunction structures. In the quantum dot structures, transitions are from one state to another, while free carrier absorption and internal photoemission play the dominant role in homo or heterojunction detectors. Quantum Dots-in-a-Well (DWELL) detectors can tailor the response wavelength by varying the size of the well. A tunneling Quantum Dot Infrared Photodetector (T-QDIP) could operate at room temperature by blocking the dark current except in the case of resonance. Photoexcited carriers are selectively collected from InGaAs quantum dots by resonant tunneling, while the dark current is blocked by AlGaAs/InGaAs tunneling barriers placed in the structure. A two-color infrared detector with photoresponse peaks at ~6 and ~17 μm at room temperature will be discussed. A Homojunction or HEterojunction Interfacial Workfunction Internal Photoemission (HIWIP or HEIWIP) infrared detector, formed by a doped emitter layer, and an intrinsic layer acting as the barrier followed by another highly doped contact layer, can detect near infrared (NIR) photons due to interband transitions and mid/far infrared (MIR/FIR) radiation due to intraband transitions. The threshold wavelength of the interband response depends on the band gap of the barrier material, and the MIR/FIR response due to intraband transitions can be tailored by adjusting the band offset between the emitter and the barrier. GaAs/AlGaAs will provide NIR and MIR/FIR dual band response, and with GaN/AlGaN structures the detection capability can be extended into the ultraviolet region. These detectors are useful in numerous applications such as environmental monitoring, medical diagnosis, battlefield-imaging, space astronomy applications, mine detection, and remote-sensing.

  19. Development and validation of nonthermal and advanced thermal food safety intervention technologies

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Alternative nonthermal and thermal food safety interventions are gaining acceptance by the food processing industry and consumers. These technologies include high pressure processing, ultraviolet and pulsed light, ionizing radiation, pulsed and radiofrequency electric fields, cold atmospheric plasm...

  20. Lyman-alpha emission from nonthermal proton beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orrall, F. Q.; Zirker, J. B.

    1976-01-01

    Nonthermal fast protons penetrating an atmosphere containing neutral hydrogen will produce some nonthermal fast neutrals which will radiate Doppler-shifted photons. The hydrogen line profiles observed from such an atmosphere will thus have nonthermal, partially polarized wings that contain information on the flux, energy spectrum, and direction of the incident proton beam. This paper develops the theory of this effect and applies it to proton beams from impulsive solar flares impacting on the sun's atmosphere. Calculations of the L-alpha profile from the region of impact have been made for the Vernazza-Avrett-Loeser solar atmosphere assuming proton energy fluxes and power-law spectra similar to those inferred for the electron beams believed responsible for hard X-ray bursts. The resulting profiles show that the effect should be detectable and that it could serve as a diagnostic for flare protons near their place of origin on the sun.

  1. LARSPEC spectroradiometer-multiband radiometer data formats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biehl, L. L.

    1982-01-01

    The data base software system, LARSPEC, is discussed and the data base format for agronomic, meteorological, spectroradiometer, and multiband radiometer data is described. In addition, the contents and formats of each record of data and the wavelength tables are listed and the codes used for some of the parameters are described.

  2. Hexagonal and Pentagonal Fractal Multiband Antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tang, Philip W.; Wahid, Parveen

    2005-01-01

    Multiband dipole antennas based on hexagonal and pentagonal fractals have been analyzed by computational simulations and functionally demonstrated in experiments on prototypes. These antennas are capable of multiband or wide-band operation because they are subdivided into progressively smaller substructures that resonate at progressively higher frequencies by virtue of their smaller dimensions. The novelty of the present antennas lies in their specific hexagonal and pentagonal fractal configurations and the resonant frequencies associated with them. These antennas are potentially applicable to a variety of multiband and wide-band commercial wireless-communication products operating at different frequencies, including personal digital assistants, cellular telephones, pagers, satellite radios, Global Positioning System receivers, and products that combine two or more of the aforementioned functions. Perhaps the best-known prior multiband antenna based on fractal geometry is the Sierpinski triangle antenna (also known as the Sierpinski gasket), shown in the top part of the figure. In this antenna, the scale length at each iteration of the fractal is half the scale length of the preceding iteration, yielding successive resonant frequencies related by a ratio of about 2. The middle and bottom parts of the figure depict the first three iterations of the hexagonal and pentagonal fractals along with typical dipole-antenna configuration based on the second iteration. Successive resonant frequencies of the hexagonal fractal antenna have been found to be related by a ratio of about 3, and those of the pentagonal fractal antenna by a ratio of about 2.59.

  3. [Electromagnetic radiation of non-thermal intensity and short exposition as a sub-threshold irritant for the central nervous system].

    PubMed

    Luk'ianova, S N

    2013-01-01

    This work represents generalization and the analysis of the long-term own materials characterizing reaction of the brain on electromagnetic radiation of low intensity (energy flow density in the continuous regime or in the impulse approximately 500 microW/sm2) and a short exposition (approximately 30 min). A set of the experimental results received on separate neurons, formations and brain as a whole give an idea about the reaction of the central nervous system to the studied influence. Comparison of these data with the corresponding responses to the known incentives (light, sound, electric current) testifies to the electromagnetic radiation of low energy flow density and a short exposition as a sub-threshold irritant for the central nervous system.

  4. [Electromagnetic radiation of non-thermal intensity and short exposition as a sub-threshold irritant for the central nervous system].

    PubMed

    2013-01-01

    This work represents generalization and the analysis of the long-term own materials characterizing reaction of the brain on electromagnetic radiation of low intensity (energy flow density in the continuous regime or in the impulse approximately 500 microW/sm2) and a short exposition (aproximately 30 min). A set of the experimental results received on separate neurons, formations and brain as a whole give an idea about the reaction of the central nervous system to the studied influence. Comparison of these data with the corresponding responses to the known incentives (light, sound, electric current) testifies to the electromagnetic radiation of low energy flow density and a short exposition as a sub-threshold irritant for the central nervous system.

  5. Multi-Band Miniaturized Patch Antennas for a Compact, Shielded Microwave Breast Imaging Array.

    PubMed

    Aguilar, Suzette M; Al-Joumayly, Mudar A; Burfeindt, Matthew J; Behdad, Nader; Hagness, Susan C

    2013-12-18

    We present a comprehensive study of a class of multi-band miniaturized patch antennas designed for use in a 3D enclosed sensor array for microwave breast imaging. Miniaturization and multi-band operation are achieved by loading the antenna with non-radiating slots at strategic locations along the patch. This results in symmetric radiation patterns and similar radiation characteristics at all frequencies of operation. Prototypes were fabricated and tested in a biocompatible immersion medium. Excellent agreement was obtained between simulations and measurements. The trade-off between miniaturization and radiation efficiency within this class of patch antennas is explored via a numerical analysis of the effects of the location and number of slots, as well as the thickness and permittivity of the dielectric substrate, on the resonant frequencies and gain. Additionally, we compare 3D quantitative microwave breast imaging performance achieved with two different enclosed arrays of slot-loaded miniaturized patch antennas. Simulated array measurements were obtained for a 3D anatomically realistic numerical breast phantom. The reconstructed breast images generated from miniaturized patch array data suggest that, for the realistic noise power levels assumed in this study, the variations in gain observed across this class of multi-band patch antennas do not significantly impact the overall image quality. We conclude that these miniaturized antennas are promising candidates as compact array elements for shielded, multi-frequency microwave breast imaging systems.

  6. Multi-Band Miniaturized Patch Antennas for a Compact, Shielded Microwave Breast Imaging Array.

    PubMed

    Aguilar, Suzette M; Al-Joumayly, Mudar A; Burfeindt, Matthew J; Behdad, Nader; Hagness, Susan C

    2013-12-18

    We present a comprehensive study of a class of multi-band miniaturized patch antennas designed for use in a 3D enclosed sensor array for microwave breast imaging. Miniaturization and multi-band operation are achieved by loading the antenna with non-radiating slots at strategic locations along the patch. This results in symmetric radiation patterns and similar radiation characteristics at all frequencies of operation. Prototypes were fabricated and tested in a biocompatible immersion medium. Excellent agreement was obtained between simulations and measurements. The trade-off between miniaturization and radiation efficiency within this class of patch antennas is explored via a numerical analysis of the effects of the location and number of slots, as well as the thickness and permittivity of the dielectric substrate, on the resonant frequencies and gain. Additionally, we compare 3D quantitative microwave breast imaging performance achieved with two different enclosed arrays of slot-loaded miniaturized patch antennas. Simulated array measurements were obtained for a 3D anatomically realistic numerical breast phantom. The reconstructed breast images generated from miniaturized patch array data suggest that, for the realistic noise power levels assumed in this study, the variations in gain observed across this class of multi-band patch antennas do not significantly impact the overall image quality. We conclude that these miniaturized antennas are promising candidates as compact array elements for shielded, multi-frequency microwave breast imaging systems. PMID:25392561

  7. Multi-Band Miniaturized Patch Antennas for a Compact, Shielded Microwave Breast Imaging Array

    PubMed Central

    Aguilar, Suzette M.; Al-Joumayly, Mudar A.; Burfeindt, Matthew J.; Behdad, Nader; Hagness, Susan C.

    2014-01-01

    We present a comprehensive study of a class of multi-band miniaturized patch antennas designed for use in a 3D enclosed sensor array for microwave breast imaging. Miniaturization and multi-band operation are achieved by loading the antenna with non-radiating slots at strategic locations along the patch. This results in symmetric radiation patterns and similar radiation characteristics at all frequencies of operation. Prototypes were fabricated and tested in a biocompatible immersion medium. Excellent agreement was obtained between simulations and measurements. The trade-off between miniaturization and radiation efficiency within this class of patch antennas is explored via a numerical analysis of the effects of the location and number of slots, as well as the thickness and permittivity of the dielectric substrate, on the resonant frequencies and gain. Additionally, we compare 3D quantitative microwave breast imaging performance achieved with two different enclosed arrays of slot-loaded miniaturized patch antennas. Simulated array measurements were obtained for a 3D anatomically realistic numerical breast phantom. The reconstructed breast images generated from miniaturized patch array data suggest that, for the realistic noise power levels assumed in this study, the variations in gain observed across this class of multi-band patch antennas do not significantly impact the overall image quality. We conclude that these miniaturized antennas are promising candidates as compact array elements for shielded, multi-frequency microwave breast imaging systems. PMID:25392561

  8. Multiband stereometamaterial-based polarization spectral filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, J. H.; Ma, H. F.; Jiang, W. X.; Cui, T. J.

    2012-07-01

    We propose a kind of stereometamaterial composed of periodic structures with twisted asymmetrical split-ring (ASR) resonators. The proposed stereometamaterial has intrinsic chirality and can be used as a multiband polarization spectral filter. Full-wave simulation and experimental results demonstrate that the stereometamaterial with the twist angle of φ=90∘ exhibits three ripple-free cross-polarization transmission peaks at normal incidence of plane waves. The cross-polarization transmission bands are centered at the maxima of circular dichroism, accompanied by pairs of pure circular birefringence points. In physics, the near-field electric and magnetic coupling of orthogonal ASR molecules in parallel planes contributes to the conversion of two orthogonal linear polarizations. The transmission of the proposed multiband polarization spectral filter can be engineered via the mutual twist angle and asymmetry of the ASRs and the thickness of the dielectric spacer layer and also be tuned via the angle of incidence.

  9. Multiband Photonic Phased-Array Antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tang, Suning

    2015-01-01

    A multiband phased-array antenna (PAA) can reduce the number of antennas on shipboard platforms while offering significantly improved performance. Crystal Research, Inc., has developed a multiband photonic antenna that is based on a high-speed, optical, true-time-delay beamformer. It is capable of simultaneously steering multiple independent radio frequency (RF) beams in less than 1,000 nanoseconds. This high steering speed is 3 orders of magnitude faster than any existing optical beamformer. Unlike other approaches, this technology uses a single controlling device per operation band, eliminating the need for massive optical switches, laser diodes, and fiber Bragg gratings. More importantly, only one beamformer is needed for all antenna elements.

  10. Nonthermal processing technologies for food

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Looking forward into the future of food science/technology/engineering, in the emerging area of nonthermal processing of foods, is definitely an adventure. It is open-ended and full of uncertainties. Lessons learned from the past should always serve as a good basis for envisioning the future of this...

  11. Tomographic diagnostics of nonthermal plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denisova, Natalia

    2009-10-01

    In the previous work [1], we discussed a ``technology'' of tomographic method and relations between the tomographic diagnostics in thermal (equilibrium) and nonthermal (nonequilibrium) plasma sources. The conclusion has been made that tomographic reconstruction in thermal plasma sources is the standard procedure at present, which can provide much useful information on the plasma structure and its evolution in time, while the tomographic reconstruction of nonthermal plasma has a great potential at making a contribution to understanding the fundamental problem of substance behavior in strongly nonequilibrium conditions. Using medical terminology, one could say, that tomographic diagnostics of the equilibrium plasma sources studies their ``anatomic'' structure, while reconstruction of the nonequilibrium plasma is similar to the ``physiological'' examination: it is directed to study the physical mechanisms and processes. The present work is focused on nonthermal plasma research. The tomographic diagnostics is directed to study spatial structures formed in the gas discharge plasmas under the influence of electrical and gravitational fields. The ways of plasma ``self-organization'' in changing and extreme conditions are analyzed. The analysis has been made using some examples from our practical tomographic diagnostics of nonthermal plasma sources, such as low-pressure capacitive and inductive discharges. [0pt] [1] Denisova N. Plasma diagnostics using computed tomography method // IEEE Trans. Plasma Sci. 2009 37 4 502.

  12. Integrated nonthermal treatment system study

    SciTech Connect

    Biagi, C.; Bahar, D.; Teheranian, B.; Vetromile, J.; Quapp, W.J.; Bechtold, T.; Brown, B.; Schwinkendorf, W.; Swartz, G.

    1997-01-01

    This report presents the results of a study of nonthermal treatment technologies. The study consisted of a systematic assessment of five nonthermal treatment alternatives. The treatment alternatives consist of widely varying technologies for safely destroying the hazardous organic components, reducing the volume, and preparing for final disposal of the contact-handled mixed low-level waste (MLLW) currently stored in the US Department of Energy complex. The alternatives considered were innovative nonthermal treatments for organic liquids and sludges, process residue, soil and debris. Vacuum desorption or various washing approaches are considered for treatment of soil, residue and debris. Organic destruction methods include mediated electrochemical oxidation, catalytic wet oxidation, and acid digestion. Other methods studied included stabilization technologies and mercury separation of treatment residues. This study is a companion to the integrated thermal treatment study which examined 19 alternatives for thermal treatment of MLLW waste. The quantities and physical and chemical compositions of the input waste are based on the inventory database developed by the US Department of Energy. The Integrated Nonthermal Treatment Systems (INTS) systems were evaluated using the same waste input (2,927 pounds per hour) as the Integrated Thermal Treatment Systems (ITTS). 48 refs., 68 figs., 37 tabs.

  13. PERIODOGRAMS FOR MULTIBAND ASTRONOMICAL TIME SERIES

    SciTech Connect

    VanderPlas, Jacob T.; Ivezic, Željko

    2015-10-10

    This paper introduces the multiband periodogram, a general extension of the well-known Lomb–Scargle approach for detecting periodic signals in time-domain data. In addition to advantages of the Lomb–Scargle method such as treatment of non-uniform sampling and heteroscedastic errors, the multiband periodogram significantly improves period finding for randomly sampled multiband light curves (e.g., Pan-STARRS, DES, and LSST). The light curves in each band are modeled as arbitrary truncated Fourier series, with the period and phase shared across all bands. The key aspect is the use of Tikhonov regularization which drives most of the variability into the so-called base model common to all bands, while fits for individual bands describe residuals relative to the base model and typically require lower-order Fourier series. This decrease in the effective model complexity is the main reason for improved performance. After a pedagogical development of the formalism of least-squares spectral analysis, which motivates the essential features of the multiband model, we use simulated light curves and randomly subsampled SDSS Stripe 82 data to demonstrate the superiority of this method compared to other methods from the literature and find that this method will be able to efficiently determine the correct period in the majority of LSST’s bright RR Lyrae stars with as little as six months of LSST data, a vast improvement over the years of data reported to be required by previous studies. A Python implementation of this method, along with code to fully reproduce the results reported here, is available on GitHub.

  14. Vitamin D synthesis measured with a multiband filter radiometer in Río Gallegos, Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orte, Facundo; Wolfram, Elian; Salvador, Jacobo; D'Elia, Raúl; Bulnes, Daniela; Leme, N. Paes; Quel, Eduardo

    2013-05-01

    Vitamin D plays an important role in human health. Vitamin D production from the sun is affected by UVB solar radiation. This paper presents a simple method for retrieving vitamin D-weighted UV by using a multiband filter radiometer GUV-541 installed at the Atmospheric Observatory of Southern Patagonia (OAPA) (51 ° 33' S, 69° 19' W), Río Gallegos. The methodology used combines irradiance measurements from a multiband filter radiometer with spectral irradiance modeled by the SOS radiative transfer code (developed by Lille University of Science and Technology (USTL)). The spectrum modeled is weighted with vitamin D action spectra published by the International Commission on Illumination (CIE), which describes the relative effectiveness of different wavelengths in the generation of this particular biological response. This method is validated using the vitamin D-weighted UV derived from a Brewer MKIII spectrophotometer (SN 124) belonging to the National Institute for Spatial Research (INPE), Brazil, which is able to measure solar spectra between 290 and 325nm. The method presents a good correlation between the two independent instruments. This procedure increases the instrumental capabilities of the multiband filter radiometer. Moreover, it evaluates the annual variation of vitamin D-weighted UV doses from exposure to ultraviolet radiation. These values are likely to be lower than suitable levels of vitamin D during winter and part of spring and autumn at these latitudes.

  15. Periodograms for multiband astronomical time series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivezic, Z.; VanderPlas, J. T.

    2016-05-01

    We summarize the multiband periodogram, a general extension of the well-known Lomb-Scargle approach for detecting periodic signals in time- domain data developed by VanderPlas & Ivezic (2015). A Python implementation of this method is available on GitHub. The multiband periodogram significantly improves period finding for randomly sampled multiband light curves (e.g., Pan-STARRS, DES, and LSST), and can treat non-uniform sampling and heteroscedastic errors. The light curves in each band are modeled as arbitrary truncated Fourier series, with the period and phase shared across all bands. The key aspect is the use of Tikhonov regularization which drives most of the variability into the so-called base model common to all bands, while fits for individual bands describe residuals relative to the base model and typically require lower-order Fourier series. We use simulated light curves and randomly subsampled SDSS Stripe 82 data to demonstrate the superiority of this method compared to other methods from the literature, and find that this method will be able to efficiently determine the correct period in the majority of LSST's bright RR Lyrae stars with as little as six months of LSST data.

  16. Passband switchable microwave photonic multiband filter

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Jia; Fok, Mable P.

    2015-01-01

    A reconfigurable microwave photonic (MWP) multiband filter with selectable and switchable passbands is proposed and experimentally demonstrated, with a maximum of 12 simultaneous passbands evenly distributed from 0 to 10 GHz. The scheme is based on the generation of tunable optical comb lines using a two-stage Lyot loop filter, such that various filter tap spacings and spectral combinations are obtained for the configuration of the MWP filter. Through polarization state adjustment inside the Lyot loop filter, an optical frequency comb with 12 different comb spacings is achieved, which corresponds to a MWP filter with 12 selectable passbands. Center frequencies of the filter passbands are switchable, while the number of simultaneous passbands is tunable from 1 to 12. Furthermore, the MWP multiband filter can either work as an all-block, single-band or multiband filter with various passband combinations, which provide exceptional operation flexibility. All the passbands have over 30 dB sidelobe suppression and 3-dB bandwidth of 200 MHz, providing good filter selectivity. PMID:26521693

  17. A thermal/nonthermal approach to solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benka, Stephen G.

    1991-01-01

    An approach for modeling solar flare high-energy emissions is developed in which both thermal and nonthermal particles coexist and contribute to the radiation. The thermal/nonthermal distribution function is interpreted physically by postulating the existence of DC sheets in the flare region. The currents then provide both primary plasma heating through Joule dissipation, and runaway electron acceleration. The physics of runaway acceleration is discussed. Several methods are presented for obtaining approximations to the thermal/nonthermal distribution function, both within the current sheets and outside of them. Theoretical hard x ray spectra are calculated, allowing for thermal bremsstrahlung from the heated plasma electrons impinging on the chromosphere. A simple model for hard x ray images of two-ribbon flares is presented. Theoretical microwave gyrosynchrotron spectra are calculated and analyzed, uncovering important new effects caused by the interplay of thermal and nonthermal particles. The theoretical spectra are compared with observed high resolution spectra of solar flares, and excellent agreement is found, in both hard x rays and microwaves. The future detailed application of this approach to solar flares is discussed, as are possible refinements to this theory.

  18. Voyager detection of nonthermal radio emission from Saturn

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaiser, M. L.; Desch, M. D.; Warwick, J. W.; Pearce, J. B.

    1980-01-01

    The detection of bursts of nonthermal radio noise from Saturn by the planetary radio astonomy experiment onboard the Voyager spacecraft is discussed. The emissions occur near 200 kHz with a peak flux density comparable to higher frequency Jovian emissions. The radiation is right-hand polarized and is most likely emitted in the extraordinary magnetoionic mode from Saturn's northern hemisphere. Modulation is apparent in the data which is consistent with a planetary rotation period of 10 hr 39.9 min.

  19. Voyager detection of nonthermal radio emission from saturn.

    PubMed

    Kaiser, M L; Desch, M D; Warwick, J W; Pearce, J B

    1980-09-12

    The planetary radio astronomy experiment on board the Voyager spacecraft has detected bursts of nonthermal radio noise from Saturn occurring near 200 kilohertz, with a peak flux density comparable to higher frequency Jovian emissions. The radiation is right-hand polarized and is most likely emitted in the extraordinary magnetoionic mode from Saturn's northern hemisphere. Modulation that is consistent with a planetary rotation period of 10 hours 39.9 minutes is apparent in the data.

  20. Anomalous Hall effect in disordered multiband metals.

    PubMed

    Kovalev, Alexey A; Sinova, Jairo; Tserkovnyak, Yaroslav

    2010-07-16

    We present a microscopic theory of the anomalous Hall effect (AHE) in metallic multiband ferromagnets, which accounts for all scattering-independent contributions, i.e., both the intrinsic and the so-called side jump. For a model of Gaussian disorder, the AHE is expressed solely in terms of the material's electronic band structure. Our theory handles systematically the interband-scattering coherence effects. We demonstrate the method in the 2D Rashba and 3D ferromagnetic (III,Mn)V semiconductor models. Our formalism is directly amenable to ab initio treatments for a wide range of ferromagnetic metals.

  1. Evaluation of multiband photography for rock discrimination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raines, G. L.

    1974-01-01

    An evaluation is presented of the multiband photography concept that tonal differences between rock formations on aerial photography can be improved through the selection of the appropriate bands. The concept involves: (1) acquiring band reference data for the rocks being considered; (2) selecting the best combination of bands to discriminate the rocks using these reference data; (3) acquiring aerial photography using these selected bands; and (4) extracting the desired geologic information in an optimum manner. The test site geology and rock reflectance are discussed in detail. The evaluation found that the differences in contrast ratios are not statistically significant, and the spectral information in different bands is not advantageous.

  2. Particle Acceleration and Nonthermal Emission in Relativistic Astrophysical Shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sironi, Lorenzo

    The common observational feature of Pulsar Wind Nebulae (PWNe), gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), and AGN jets is a broad nonthermal spectrum of synchrotron and inverse Compton radiation. It is usually assumed that the emitting electrons are accelerated to a power-law distribution at relativistic shocks, via the so-called Fermi mechanism. Despite decades of research, the Fermi acceleration process is still not understood from first principles. An assessment of the micro-physics of particle acceleration in relativistic shocks is of paramount importance to unveil the properties of astrophysical nonthermal sources, and it is the subject of this dissertation. In the first part of this thesis, I explore by means of fully-kinetic first-principle particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations the properties of relativistic shocks that propagate in electron-positron and electron-proton plasmas carrying uniform magnetic fields. I find that nonthermal particle acceleration only occurs if the upstream magnetization is weak (sigma<0.001), or if the pre-shock field is nearly aligned with the shock direction of propagation (quasi-parallel shocks). Relativistic shocks in PWNe, GRBs and AGN jets are usually thought to be appreciably magnetized (sigma>0.01) and quasi-perpendicular, yet they need to be efficient particle accelerators, in order to explain the prominent nonthermal signatures of these sources. Motivated by this discrepancy, I then relax the assumption of uniform pre-shock fields, and investigate the acceleration efficiency of perpendicular shocks that propagate in high-sigma flows with alternating magnetic fields. This is the geometry expected at the termination shock of pulsar winds, but it could also be relevant for Poynting-dominated jets in GRBs and AGNs. I show by means of PIC simulations that compression of the flow at the shock will force annihilation of nearby field lines, a process known as shock-driven reconnection. Magnetic reconnection can efficiently transfer the energy of

  3. Nonthermal dark matter in mirage mediation

    SciTech Connect

    Nagai, Minoru; Nakayama, Kazunori

    2007-12-15

    In mirage-mediation models there exists a modulus field whose mass is O(1000) TeV and its late decay may significantly change the standard thermal relic scenario of the dark matter. We study nonthermal production of the dark matter directly from the modulus decay, and find that for some parameter regions nonthermally produced neutralinos can become the dark matter.

  4. Supersymmetry, nonthermal dark matter, and precision cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Easther, Richard; Galvez, Richard; Özsoy, Ogan; Watson, Scott

    2014-01-01

    Within the minimal supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM), LHC bounds suggest that scalar superpartner masses are far above the electroweak scale. Given a high superpartner mass, nonthermal dark matter is a viable alternative to WIMP dark matter generated via freezeout. In the presence of moduli fields, nonthermal dark matter production is associated with a long matter-dominated phase, modifying the spectral index and primordial tensor amplitude relative to those in a thermalized primordial universe. Nonthermal dark matter can have a higher self-interaction cross section than its thermal counterpart, enhancing astrophysical bounds on its annihilation signals. We constrain the contributions to the neutralino mass from the bino, wino and Higgsino using existing astrophysical bounds and direct detection experiments for models with nonthermal neutralino dark matter. Using these constraints we quantify the expected change to inflationary observables resulting from the nonthermal phase.

  5. Giant paramagnetic Meissner effect in multiband superconductors.

    PubMed

    da Silva, R M; Milošević, M V; Shanenko, A A; Peeters, F M; Aguiar, J Albino

    2015-01-01

    Superconductors, ideally diamagnetic when in the Meissner state, can also exhibit paramagnetic behavior due to trapped magnetic flux. In the absence of pinning such paramagnetic response is weak, and ceases with increasing sample thickness. Here we show that in multiband superconductors paramagnetic response can be observed even in slab geometries, and can be far larger than any previous estimate - even multiply larger than the diamagnetic Meissner response for the same applied magnetic field. We link the appearance of this giant paramagnetic response to the broad crossover between conventional Type-I and Type-II superconductors, where Abrikosov vortices interact non-monotonically and multibody effects become important, causing unique flux configurations and their locking in the presence of surfaces. PMID:26244936

  6. Giant paramagnetic Meissner effect in multiband superconductors

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, R. M.; Milošević, M. V.; Shanenko, A. A.; Peeters, F. M.; Aguiar, J. Albino

    2015-01-01

    Superconductors, ideally diamagnetic when in the Meissner state, can also exhibit paramagnetic behavior due to trapped magnetic flux. In the absence of pinning such paramagnetic response is weak, and ceases with increasing sample thickness. Here we show that in multiband superconductors paramagnetic response can be observed even in slab geometries, and can be far larger than any previous estimate - even multiply larger than the diamagnetic Meissner response for the same applied magnetic field. We link the appearance of this giant paramagnetic response to the broad crossover between conventional Type-I and Type-II superconductors, where Abrikosov vortices interact non-monotonically and multibody effects become important, causing unique flux configurations and their locking in the presence of surfaces. PMID:26244936

  7. An evaluation of multiband photography for rock discrimination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raines, G. L.; Lee, K.

    1974-01-01

    The ability of multiband photography to discriminate sedimentary rocks is investigated. Measurements showed that there is a large natural variation in the band reflectance of rock formations and that the differences in the contrast ratios for different Wratten filters is small, making it statistically impossible to select a set of best bands from in situ reflectance measurements. It is concluded that the designed multiband photography concept is not a practical method for improving sedimentary-rock discrimination capabilities.

  8. Multiband CMOS sensor simplify FPA design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Weng Lyang B.; Ling, Jer

    2015-10-01

    Push broom multi-band Focal Plane Array (FPA) design needs to consider optics, image sensor, electronic, mechanic as well as thermal. Conventional FPA use two or several CCD device as an image sensor. The CCD image sensor requires several high speed, high voltage and high current clock drivers as well as analog video processors to support their operation. Signal needs to digitize using external sample / hold and digitized circuit. These support circuits are bulky, consume a lot of power, must be shielded and placed in close to the CCD to minimize the introduction of unwanted noise. The CCD also needs to consider how to dissipate power. The end result is a very complicated FPA and hard to make due to more weighs and draws more power requiring complex heat transfer mechanisms. In this paper, we integrate microelectronic technology and multi-layer soft / hard Printed Circuit Board (PCB) technology to design electronic portion. Since its simplicity and integration, the optics, mechanic, structure and thermal design will become very simple. The whole FPA assembly and dis-assembly reduced to a few days. A multi-band CMOS Sensor (dedicated as C468) was used for this design. The CMOS Sensor, allow for the incorporation of clock drivers, timing generators, signal processing and digitization onto the same Integrated Circuit (IC) as the image sensor arrays. This keeps noise to a minimum while providing high functionality at reasonable power levels. The C468 is a first Multiple System-On-Chip (MSOC) IC. This device used our proprietary wafer butting technology and MSOC technology to combine five long sensor arrays into a size of 120 mm x 23.2 mm and 155 mm x 60 mm for chip and package, respectively. The device composed of one Panchromatic (PAN) and four different Multi- Spectral (MS) sensors. Due to its integration on the electronic design, a lot of room is clear for the thermal design. The optical and mechanical design is become very straight forward. The flight model FPA

  9. Non-thermal radio emission from Saturn

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warwick, J. W.

    1978-01-01

    Direct, strong evidence for non-thermal radio emission from Saturn exists in the hectometric data observed by Imp 6. The planet has been tentatively identified as a decametric source, but the most sensitive and most recent data fail to confirm this. At metric or decimetric wavelengths Saturn has no non-thermal emission like Jupiter's synchrotron sources. Finally, a comparative study of Earth and Jupiter radio emissions suggests lightning discharges.

  10. Design of a multiband terahertz perfect absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dan, Hu; Hong-yan, Wang; Zhen-jie, Tang; Xi-wei, Zhang; Lin, Ju; Hua-ying, Wang

    2016-03-01

    A thin-flexible multiband terahertz metamaterial absorber (MA) has been investigated. Each unit cell of the MA consists of a simple metal structure, which includes the top metal resonator ring and the bottom metallic ground plane, separated by a thin-flexible dielectric spacer. Finite-difference time domain simulation indicates that this MA can achieve over 99% absorption at frequencies of 1.50 THz, 3.33 THz, and 5.40 THz by properly assembling the sandwiched structure. However, because of its asymmetric structure, the MA is polarization-sensitive and can tune the absorptivity of the second absorption peak by changing the incident polarization angle. The effect of the error of the structural parameters on the absorption efficiency is also carefully analyzed in detail to guide the fabrication. Moreover, the proposed MA exhibits high refractive-index sensing sensitivity, which has potential applications in multi-wavelength sensing in the terahertz region. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11504006), the Key Scientific Research Project of Higher Education of Henan Province, China (Grant No. 15A140002), and the Science and Technology Planning Project of Henan Province, China (Grant No. 142300410366).

  11. Emission of terahertz radiations from fractal antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyamaru, F.; Saito, Y.; Takeda, M. W.; Liu, L.; Hou, B.; Wen, W.; Sheng, Ping

    2009-11-01

    We investigate the emission of terahertz radiation from a photoconductive fractal antenna fabricated on a semi-insulating gallium arsenide substrate. Owing to the self-similarity of fractal structures, our fractal antenna shows a multiband emission of terahertz radiation. The emission intensity at peak frequency is about twice that from a bow-tie antenna. We also investigate the mechanism of the multiband emission by using the finite-difference time-domain calculation.

  12. Space Object Temperature Determination from Multi-Band Infrared Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paxson, C.; Snell, H.; Griffin, J.; Kraemer, K.; Price, S.; Kendra, M.; Mizuno, D. %P. E37

    We describe a technique to determine the temperature of a Resident Space Object (RSO) from multiple infrared (IR) bands. The characteristic temperature of an object is the temperature of the Planck function that has the closest least squares fit to the observed irradiance in at least three infrared bands. The characteristic temperature and the effective solid angle are free parameters in a formulation that requires simultaneous minimization, across all bands, of chi-square expressions using modeled irradiances and the measured irradiances and their errors. Solutions are determined from a multi-dimensional Levenberg-Marquardt fitting algorithm. The advantage of this approach is that it provides a single, best-fit solution to the RSO modeled as a gray body radiator. In contrast, a 2-band (color) temperature approach using three or more bands produces different solutions for different band combinations with no objective way of determining which solution is best. We apply this technique to IR measurements of RSOs obtained by the Midcourse Space Experiment (MSX) satellite. The AFRL MSX database of serendipitous RSO observations contains multi-band IR measurements for hundreds of objects, including payloads, rocket bodies, and debris. Using this technique, we have obtained object characteristic temperatures and Infrared Cross Sections (IRCS) under a large variety of phase angle and solar illumination conditions, including eclipse. We examine specific cases in detail. We also compare and contrast results for population groups based on orbit type (LEO - low earth orbit, MEO - medium earth orbit, and GEO - geostationary earth orbit) and other parameters of interest. In addition, we look at a number of cases where color and characteristic temperatures and solid angles have been determined for the same object measurements and show that the characteristic parameters are more consistent with the Planck function model when expressed as their equivalent isophotal emissions.

  13. AMICA (Antarctic Multiband Infrared CAmera) project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolci, Mauro; Straniero, Oscar; Valentini, Gaetano; Di Rico, Gianluca; Ragni, Maurizio; Pelusi, Danilo; Di Varano, Igor; Giuliani, Croce; Di Cianno, Amico; Valentini, Angelo; Corcione, Leonardo; Bortoletto, Favio; D'Alessandro, Maurizio; Bonoli, Carlotta; Giro, Enrico; Fantinel, Daniela; Magrin, Demetrio; Zerbi, Filippo M.; Riva, Alberto; Molinari, Emilio; Conconi, Paolo; De Caprio, Vincenzo; Busso, Maurizio; Tosti, Gino; Nucciarelli, Giuliano; Roncella, Fabio; Abia, Carlos

    2006-06-01

    The Antarctic Plateau offers unique opportunities for ground-based Infrared Astronomy. AMICA (Antarctic Multiband Infrared CAmera) is an instrument designed to perform astronomical imaging from Dome-C in the near- (1 - 5 μm) and mid- (5 - 27 μm) infrared wavelength regions. The camera consists of two channels, equipped with a Raytheon InSb 256 array detector and a DRS MF-128 Si:As IBC array detector, cryocooled at 35 and 7 K respectively. Cryogenic devices will move a filter wheel and a sliding mirror, used to feed alternatively the two detectors. Fast control and readout, synchronized with the chopping secondary mirror of the telescope, will be required because of the large background expected at these wavelengths, especially beyond 10 μm. An environmental control system is needed to ensure the correct start-up, shut-down and housekeeping of the camera. The main technical challenge is represented by the extreme environmental conditions of Dome C (T about -90 °C, p around 640 mbar) and the need for a complete automatization of the overall system. AMICA will be mounted at the Nasmyth focus of the 80 cm IRAIT telescope and will perform survey-mode automatic observations of selected regions of the Southern sky. The first goal will be a direct estimate of the observational quality of this new highly promising site for Infrared Astronomy. In addition, IRAIT, equipped with AMICA, is expected to provide a significant improvement in the knowledge of fundamental astrophysical processes, such as the late stages of stellar evolution (especially AGB and post-AGB stars) and the star formation.

  14. Optically addressed multiband photodetector for infrared imaging applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cellek, O. O.; Zhang, Y.-H.

    2012-01-01

    Multiband infrared focal plane arrays (FPAs) with small pixel pitch have increased device processing complexity since they often need more than two terminals per pixel for readouts. Simpler FPAs are enabled by our newly demonstrated optically-addressed two-terminal multiband photodetector architecture. For long-wavelength infrared (LWIR) and midwavelength infrared (MWIR) imaging applications, the use of quantum well infrared photodetectors (QWIP) has been investigated. The results show that the utilization of unipolar QWIPs with bipolar near infrared (NIR) devices is feasible with this new optical-addressing scheme. Potential device performance is analyzed with an equivalent AC circuit model. Proposed design maximizes fill factor and enables small pixel-pitch FPA with single indium-bump per pixel for NIR/MWIR/LWIR multiband detection capability.

  15. Phenomenology of passive multi-band submillimeter-wave imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enestam, Sissi; Kajatkari, Perttu; Kivimäki, Olli; Leivo, Mikko M.; Rautiainen, Anssi; Tamminen, Aleksi A.; Luukanen, Arttu R.

    2016-05-01

    In 2015, Asqella Oy commercialized a passive multi-band submillimeter-wave camera system intended for use in walk-by personnel security screening applications. In this paper we study the imagery acquired with the prototype of the ARGON passive multi-band submm-wave video camera. To challenge the system and test its limits, imagery has been obtained in various environments with varying background surface temperatures, with people of different body types, with different clothing materials and numbers of layers of clothing and with objects of different materials. In addition to the phenomenological study, we discuss the detection statistics of the system, evaluated by running blind trials with human operators. While significant improvements have been made particularly in the software side since the beginning of the testing, the obtained imagery enables a comprehensive evaluation of the capabilities and challenges of the multiband submillimeter-wave imaging system.

  16. Combining hydrodynamic modeling with nonthermal test particle tracking to improve flare simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winter, Henry Degraffenried, III

    Solar flares remain a subject of intense study in the solar physics community. These huge releases of energy on the Sun have direct consequences for humans on Earth and in space. The processes that impart tremendous amounts of energy are not well understood. In order to test theoretical models of flare formation and evolution, state of the art, numerical codes must be created that can accurately simulate the wide range of electromagnetic radiation emitted by flares. A direct comparison of simulated radiation to increasingly detailed observations will allow scientists to test the validity of theoretical models. To accomplish this task, numerical codes were developed that can simulate both the thermal and nonthermal components of a flaring plasma, their interactions, and their emissions. The HYLOOP code combines a hydrodynamic equation solver with a nonthermal particle tracking code in order to simulate the thermal and nonthermal aspects of a flare. A solar flare was simulated using this new code with a static atmosphere and with a dynamic atmosphere, to illustrate the importance of considering hydrodynamic effects on nonthermal beam evolution. The importance of density gradients in the evolution of nonthermal electron beams was investigated by studying their effects in isolation. The importance of the initial pitch-angle cosine distribution to flare dynamics was investigated. Emission in XRT filters were calculated and analyzed to see if there were soft X-ray signatures that could give clues to the nonthermal particle distributions. Finally the HXR source motions that appeared in the simulations were compared to real observations of this phenomena.

  17. Functional multi-band THz meta-foils

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jianfeng; Moser, Herbert O.; Xu, Su; Jian, Linke; Banas, Agnieszka; Banas, Krzysztof; Chen, Hongsheng; Bettiol, Andrew A.; Breese, Mark B. H.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we present the first experimental demonstration of double- and triple-band negative refraction index meta-foils in the terahertz (THz) region. Multi-band meta-foils constructed by multi-cell S-string resonators in a single structure exhibit simultaneously negative permittivity and negative permeability responses at multiple frequencies. The phenomena are confirmed by numerical simulations and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy measurements. The flexible, freestanding multi-band meta-foils provide a promising candidate for the development of multi-frequency THz materials and devices. PMID:24346309

  18. Analysis on the electromagnetic scattering properties of crops at multi-band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Tao; Wu, Zhensen; Liu, Xiaoyi

    2014-12-01

    The vector radiative transfer (VRT) theory for active microwave remote sensing and Rayleigh-Gans approximation (GRG) are applied in the study, and an iterative algorithm is used to solve the RT equations, thus we obtain the zeroorder and first-order equation for numerical results. The Michigan Microwave Canopy Scattering (MIMICS) model is simplified to adapt to the crop model, by analyzing body-surface bistatic scattering and backscattering properties between a layer of soybean or wheat consisting of stems and leaves and different underlying soil surface at multi-band (i.e. P, L, S, X, Ku-band), we obtain microwave scattering mechanisms of crop components and the effect of underlying ground on total crop scattering. Stem and leaf are regard as a needle and a circular disk, respectively. The final results are compared with some literature data to verify our calculating method, numerical results show multi-band crop microwave scattering properties differ from scattering angle, azimuth angle and moisture of vegetation and soil, which offer the part needed information for the design of future bistatic radar systems for crop sensing applications.

  19. Signature of a Spin-up Magnetar from Multi-band Afterglow Rebrightening of GRB 100814A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Y. B.; Huang, Y. F.; Wu, X. F.; Xu, M.; Geng, J. J.

    2015-06-01

    In recent years, more and more gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) with late rebrightenings in their multi-band afterglows have revealed the late-time activity of their central engines. GRB 100814A is a special case among the well-sampled events, with complex temporal and spectral evolution. The single power-law shallow decay index of the optical light curve observed by GROND between 640 s and 10 ks is {{α }opt}=0.57+/- 0.02, which apparently conflicts with expectations from the simple external shock model. In particular, there is remarkable rebrightening in the optical to near-infrared bands at late times, challenging the external shock model with synchrotron emission coming from the interaction of the blast wave with the surrounding interstellar medium. In this paper, we invoke a magnetar with spin evolution to explain the complex multi-band afterglow emission of GRB 100814A. The initial shallow decay phase in the optical bands and the plateau in the X-ray can be explained as being due to energy injection from a spin-down magnetar. At late times, with materials from the fall-back disk falling onto the central object of the burster, the angular momentum of the accreted materials is transferred to the magnetar, which leads to a spin up process. As a result, the magnetic dipole radiation luminosity will increase, resulting in significant rebrightening of the optical afterglow. We show that the model can well reproduce the observed multi-band afterglow emission.

  20. Quantum waveguide theory of the Josephson effect in multiband superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nappi, C.; Romeo, F.; Sarnelli, E.; Citro, R.

    2015-12-01

    We formulate a quantum waveguide theory of the Josephson effect in multiband superconductors, with special emphasis on iron-based materials. By generalizing the boundary conditions of the scattering problem, we first determine the Andreev levels spectrum and then derive an explicit expression for the Josephson current which generalizes the formula of the single-band case. In deriving the results, we provide a second quantization field theory, allowing us to evaluate the current-phase relation and the Josephson current fluctuations in multiband systems. We present results for two different order parameter symmetries, namely s± and s++, which are relevant in multiband systems. The obtained results show that the s± symmetry can support π states which are absent in the s++ case. We also argue that there is a certain fragility of the Josephson current against phase fluctuations in the s++ case. The temperature dependence of the Josephson critical current is also analyzed and we find, for both the order parameter symmetries, remarkable violations of the Ambegaokar-Baratoff relation. The results are relevant in view of possible experiments aimed at investigating the order parameter symmetry of multiband superconductors using mesoscopic Josephson junctions.

  1. Optical multiband vector breathers in tunable waveguide arrays.

    PubMed

    Fratalocchi, Andrea; Assanto, Gaetano; Brzdakiewicz, Kasia A; Karpierz, Mirek A

    2005-01-15

    We investigate multiband optical breathers in a voltage-adjustable array of coupled waveguides in nematic liquid crystals. Symmetric breathers resulting from vector composition of modes from two bands are observed over large propagation distances and are described in terms of the Floquet-Bloch theory.

  2. Nonthermal WIMPs and primordial black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georg, Julian; Şengör, Gizem; Watson, Scott

    2016-06-01

    Nonthermal histories for the early universe have received notable attention as they are a rich source of phenomenology, while also being well motivated by top-down approaches to beyond the Standard Model physics. The early (pre-big bang nucleosynthesis) matter phase in these models leads to enhanced growth of density perturbations on sub-Hubble scales. Here, we consider whether primordial black hole formation associated with the enhanced growth is in conflict with existing observations. Such constraints depend on the tilt of the primordial power spectrum, and we find that nonthermal histories are tightly constrained in the case of a significantly blue spectrum. Alternatively, if dark matter is taken to be of nonthermal origin, we can restrict the primordial power spectrum on scales inaccessible to cosmic microwave background and large scale structure observations. We establish constraints for a wide range of scalar masses (reheat temperatures) with the most stringent bounds resulting from the formation of 1015 g black holes. These black holes would be evaporating today and are constrained by FERMI observations. We also consider whether the breakdown of the coherence of the scalar oscillations on subhorizon scales can lead to a Jean's pressure preventing black hole formation and relaxing our constraints. Our main conclusion is that primordial black hole constraints, combined with existing constraints on nonthermal weakly interacting massive particles, favor a primordial spectrum closer to scale invariance or a red tilted spectrum.

  3. Enhanced integrated nonthermal treatment system study

    SciTech Connect

    Biagi, C.; Schwinkendorf, B.; Teheranian, B.

    1997-02-01

    The purpose of the Enhanced Nonthermal Treatment Systems (ENTS) study is to evaluate alternative configurations of one of the five systems evaluated in the Integrated Nonthermal Treatment Systems (INTS) study. Five alternative configurations are evaluated. Each is designed to enhance the final waste form performance by replacing grout with improved stabilization technologies, or to improve system performance by improving the destruction efficiency for organic contaminants. AU enhanced systems are alternative configurations of System NT-5, which has the following characteristics: Nonthermal System NT-5: (1) catalytic wet oxidation (CWO) to treat organic material including organic liquids, sludges, and soft (or combustible) debris, (2) thermal desorption of inorganic sludge and process residue, (3) washing of soil and inorganic debris with treatment by CWO of removed organic material, (4) metal decontamination by abrasive blasting, (5) stabilization of treated sludge, soil, debris, and untreated debris with entrained contamination in grout, and (6) stabilization of inorganic sludge, salts and secondary waste in polymer. System NT-5 was chosen because it was designed to treat combustible debris thereby minimizing the final waste form volume, and because it uses grout for primary stabilization. The enhanced nonthermal systems were studied to determine the cost and performance impact of replacing grout (a commonly used stabilization agent in the DOE complex) with improved waste stabilization methods such as vitrification and polymer.

  4. Business developments of nonthermal solar technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, S.A.; Watts, R.L.; Williams, T.A.

    1985-10-01

    Information on the developments of nonthermal solar technologies is presented. The focus is on the success of wind energy conversion systems (WECS) and photovoltaics. Detailed information on the installed generating capacity, market sectors, financing sources, systems costs and warranties of WECS and photovoltaic systems is summarized. (BCS)

  5. Mechanisms of interaction of non-thermal plasma with living cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalghatgi, Sameer Ulhas

    independent, suggesting that non-thermal plasma may induce formation of bulky lesions unlike ionizing radiation (IR) or H2O2 which primarily produce DNA double strand breaks. Moreover, it is found that the pathway by which plasma generated oxidative stress is transferred across cellular membranes does not involve lipid peroxidation by-products, although lipid peroxidation does occur.

  6. Ground state, collective mode, phase soliton and vortex in multiband superconductors.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shi-Zeng

    2014-12-10

    This article reviews theoretical and experimental work on the novel physics in multiband superconductors. Multiband superconductors are characterized by multiple superconducting energy gaps in different bands with interaction between Cooper pairs in these bands. The discovery of prominent multiband superconductors MgB2 and later iron-based superconductors, has triggered enormous interest in multiband superconductors. The most recently discovered superconductors exhibit multiband features. The multiband superconductors possess novel properties that are not shared with their single-band counterpart. Examples include: the time-reversal symmetry broken state in multiband superconductors with frustrated interband couplings; the collective oscillation of number of Cooper pairs between different bands, known as the Leggett mode; and the phase soliton and fractional vortex, which are the main focus of this review. This review presents a survey of a wide range of theoretical exploratory and experimental investigations of novel physics in multiband superconductors. A vast amount of information derived from these studies is shown to highlight unusual and unique properties of multiband superconductors and to reveal the challenges and opportunities in the research on the multiband superconductivity. PMID:25398159

  7. Development of practical multiband algorithms for estimating land-surface temperature from EOS/MODIS data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dozier, J.; Wan, Z.

    1994-01-01

    A practical multiband, hierarchical algorithm for estimating land-surface temperature from NASA's future Earth Observing System (EOS) instruments Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and Advance Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) is developed through comprehensive, accurate, radiative transfer simulations at moderate spectral steps of 1-5/cm for wide ranges of atmospheric and surface conditions. The algorithm will accept empirical or estimated information about the surface emissivity and reflectivity and the atmospheric temperature and water-vapor profiles. Ground-based and aircraft measurements are necessary to validate and improve the algorithm and to establish its quality. Its accuracy depends on the calibration accuracy of thermal infrared data, uncertainties in surface heterogeneity, and temperature-dependent atmospheric absorption coefficients. Better knowledge of land-surface spectral emissivities and more accurate coefficients for atmospheric molecular band absorption and water vapor continuum absorption are needed to develop global land-surface temperature algorithms accurate to 1-2 K.

  8. Experimental study of the use of multiband acousto-optic filters for spectral encoding / decoding the optical signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Proklov, V. V.; Byshevski-Konopko, O. A.; Filatov, A. L.; Lugovskoi, A. V.; Pisarevsky, Yu V.

    2016-08-01

    A prototype of the acousto-optic (AO) decoder of optical signals is created on the base of the multiband AO filter. The joint work of the decoder with the developed previously AO coder has been verified experimentally. The main qualitative and quantitate characteristics of the spectral coding and decoding by Walsh sequences of the industrial LED radiation in the near infrared range are investigated. It is shown, that in the proposed data transmission system realization Signal-to-Interference Ratio (SIR) is not less than 13 dB.

  9. The Effect of a Nonthermal Tail on the Sunyaev-Zeldovich Effect in Clusters of Galaxies.

    PubMed

    Blasi; Olinto; Stebbins

    2000-06-01

    We study the spectral distortions of the cosmic microwave background radiation induced by the effect in clusters of galaxies when the target electrons have a modified Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution with a high-energy nonthermal tail. Bremsstrahlung radiation from this type of electron distribution may explain the suprathermal X-ray emission observed in some clusters such as the Coma Cluster and A2199 and serve as an alternative to the classical but problematic inverse Compton scattering interpretation. We show that the Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect can be used as a powerful tool to probe the electron distribution in clusters of galaxies and discriminate among these different interpretations of the X-ray excess. The existence of a nonthermal tail can have important consequences for cluster-based estimators of cosmological parameters.

  10. A multiband perfect absorber based on hyperbolic metamaterials.

    PubMed

    Sreekanth, Kandammathe Valiyaveedu; ElKabbash, Mohamed; Alapan, Yunus; Rashed, Alireza R; Gurkan, Umut A; Strangi, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, considerable research efforts have been focused on near-perfect and perfect light absorption using metamaterials spanning frequency ranges from microwaves to visible frequencies. This relatively young field is currently facing many challenges that hampers its possible practical applications. In this paper, we present grating coupled-hyperbolic metamaterials (GC-HMM) as multiband perfect absorber that can offer extremely high flexibility in engineering the properties of electromagnetic absorption. The fabricated GC-HMMs exhibit several highly desirable features for technological applications such as polarization independence, wide angle range, broad- and narrow- band modes, multiband perfect and near perfect absorption in the visible to near-IR and mid-IR spectral range. In addition, we report a direct application of the presented system as an absorption based plasmonic sensor with a record figure of merit for this class of sensors. PMID:27188789

  11. A multiband perfect absorber based on hyperbolic metamaterials

    PubMed Central

    Sreekanth, Kandammathe Valiyaveedu; ElKabbash, Mohamed; Alapan, Yunus; Rashed, Alireza R.; Gurkan, Umut A.; Strangi, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, considerable research efforts have been focused on near-perfect and perfect light absorption using metamaterials spanning frequency ranges from microwaves to visible frequencies. This relatively young field is currently facing many challenges that hampers its possible practical applications. In this paper, we present grating coupled-hyperbolic metamaterials (GC-HMM) as multiband perfect absorber that can offer extremely high flexibility in engineering the properties of electromagnetic absorption. The fabricated GC-HMMs exhibit several highly desirable features for technological applications such as polarization independence, wide angle range, broad- and narrow- band modes, multiband perfect and near perfect absorption in the visible to near-IR and mid-IR spectral range. In addition, we report a direct application of the presented system as an absorption based plasmonic sensor with a record figure of merit for this class of sensors. PMID:27188789

  12. A multiband perfect absorber based on hyperbolic metamaterials.

    PubMed

    Sreekanth, Kandammathe Valiyaveedu; ElKabbash, Mohamed; Alapan, Yunus; Rashed, Alireza R; Gurkan, Umut A; Strangi, Giuseppe

    2016-05-18

    In recent years, considerable research efforts have been focused on near-perfect and perfect light absorption using metamaterials spanning frequency ranges from microwaves to visible frequencies. This relatively young field is currently facing many challenges that hampers its possible practical applications. In this paper, we present grating coupled-hyperbolic metamaterials (GC-HMM) as multiband perfect absorber that can offer extremely high flexibility in engineering the properties of electromagnetic absorption. The fabricated GC-HMMs exhibit several highly desirable features for technological applications such as polarization independence, wide angle range, broad- and narrow- band modes, multiband perfect and near perfect absorption in the visible to near-IR and mid-IR spectral range. In addition, we report a direct application of the presented system as an absorption based plasmonic sensor with a record figure of merit for this class of sensors.

  13. Flexible metamaterial absorbers with multi-band infrared response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dayal, Govind; Ramakrishna, S. Anantha

    2015-01-01

    A flexible metamaterial with a tri-layer metal-dielectric-metal structure is fabricated by combining Excimer laser micromachining of a polyimide sheet and oblique angle physical vapour deposition methods. Excimer laser micromachining is used to generate an array of micro-disks on the flexible polymer sheet followed by physical vapour deposition at normal incidence to produce continuous metal and dielectric layers while oblique angle deposition of metal vapour is used to finally form discrete oblate ellipsoids on top of the micro-disks. The fabricated metamaterial shows multi-band metamaterial absorption exceeding 90% simultaneously over infrared bands centred at 3 µm, 5 µm, and 13.85 µm. The multi-band absorption arises due to multipole resonances of the disk structure and is accurately modelled by electromagnetic simulation as well. A theoretical model of a perfect absorber as an array of optimally impedance matched antennas is also presented.

  14. Multi-band terahertz active device with complementary metamaterial

    SciTech Connect

    Qiao, Shen; Zhang, Yaxin Sun, Linlin; Sun, Han; Xu, Gaiqi; Zhao, Yuncheng; Yang, Ziqiang; Liang, Shixiong

    2015-09-28

    We describe a multi-band terahertz-active device using a composite structure made of complementary metamaterial and doped silicon that can be dynamically controlled. This special complementary metamaterial exhibits three resonances that produce three pass-bands. The pass-bands can be uniformly manipulated by exploiting the photoinduced characteristics of the doped silicon. Simulations were performed to analyze the magnetic field and surface current distributions. The simulation results agree well with experimental results obtained from terahertz time-domain spectroscopy. Using an 808-nm-wavelength laser beam, a modulation depth of up to 80% was obtained. In numerical simulations, we used a conductivity mode to characterize photoinduction. The development of multi-band terahertz-active devices has many potential applications, for example, in filters, modulators, switches, and sensors.

  15. A Matrix Pencil Algorithm Based Multiband Iterative Fusion Imaging Method

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Yong Qiang; Gao, Xun Zhang; Li, Xiang; Liu, Yong Xiang

    2016-01-01

    Multiband signal fusion technique is a practicable and efficient way to improve the range resolution of ISAR image. The classical fusion method estimates the poles of each subband signal by the root-MUSIC method, and some good results were get in several experiments. However, this method is fragile in noise for the proper poles could not easy to get in low signal to noise ratio (SNR). In order to eliminate the influence of noise, this paper propose a matrix pencil algorithm based method to estimate the multiband signal poles. And to deal with mutual incoherent between subband signals, the incoherent parameters (ICP) are predicted through the relation of corresponding poles of each subband. Then, an iterative algorithm which aimed to minimize the 2-norm of signal difference is introduced to reduce signal fusion error. Applications to simulate dada verify that the proposed method get better fusion results at low SNR. PMID:26781194

  16. A Matrix Pencil Algorithm Based Multiband Iterative Fusion Imaging Method.

    PubMed

    Zou, Yong Qiang; Gao, Xun Zhang; Li, Xiang; Liu, Yong Xiang

    2016-01-01

    Multiband signal fusion technique is a practicable and efficient way to improve the range resolution of ISAR image. The classical fusion method estimates the poles of each subband signal by the root-MUSIC method, and some good results were get in several experiments. However, this method is fragile in noise for the proper poles could not easy to get in low signal to noise ratio (SNR). In order to eliminate the influence of noise, this paper propose a matrix pencil algorithm based method to estimate the multiband signal poles. And to deal with mutual incoherent between subband signals, the incoherent parameters (ICP) are predicted through the relation of corresponding poles of each subband. Then, an iterative algorithm which aimed to minimize the 2-norm of signal difference is introduced to reduce signal fusion error. Applications to simulate dada verify that the proposed method get better fusion results at low SNR.

  17. Homogenization limit for a multiband effective mass model in heterostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Morandi, O.

    2014-06-15

    We study the homogenization limit of a multiband model that describes the quantum mechanical motion of an electron in a quasi-periodic crystal. In this approach, the distance among the atoms that constitute the material (lattice parameter) is considered a small quantity. Our model include the description of materials with variable chemical composition, intergrowth compounds, and heterostructures. We derive the effective multiband evolution system in the framework of the kp approach. We study the well posedness of the mathematical problem. We compare the effective mass model with the standard kp models for uniform and non-uniforms crystals. We show that in the limit of vanishing lattice parameter, the particle density obtained by the effective mass model, converges to the exact probability density of the particle.

  18. A multiband perfect absorber based on hyperbolic metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sreekanth, Kandammathe Valiyaveedu; Elkabbash, Mohamed; Alapan, Yunus; Rashed, Alireza R.; Gurkan, Umut A.; Strangi, Giuseppe

    2016-05-01

    In recent years, considerable research efforts have been focused on near-perfect and perfect light absorption using metamaterials spanning frequency ranges from microwaves to visible frequencies. This relatively young field is currently facing many challenges that hampers its possible practical applications. In this paper, we present grating coupled-hyperbolic metamaterials (GC-HMM) as multiband perfect absorber that can offer extremely high flexibility in engineering the properties of electromagnetic absorption. The fabricated GC-HMMs exhibit several highly desirable features for technological applications such as polarization independence, wide angle range, broad- and narrow- band modes, multiband perfect and near perfect absorption in the visible to near-IR and mid-IR spectral range. In addition, we report a direct application of the presented system as an absorption based plasmonic sensor with a record figure of merit for this class of sensors.

  19. Bilayer fractal structure with multiband left-handed characteristics.

    PubMed

    Du, Qiujiao; Liu, Jinsong; Yang, Hongwu; Yi, Xunong

    2011-08-20

    We present a bilayer fractal structure for the realization of multiband left-handed metamaterial at terahertz frequencies. The structure is composed of metallic H-fractal pairs separated by a dielectric layer. The electromagnetic properties of periodic H-fractal pairs have been investigated by numerical simulation. The period in the propagation direction is extremely small as compared to the wavelength at the operational frequency. Under the electromagnetic wave normal incidence, the material exhibits negative refraction simultaneously around the frequencies of 0.10 and 0.15 THz for parallel polarization, and around the frequencies of 0.19 and 0.38 THz for perpendicular polarization. The design provides a left-handed metamaterial suitable for multiband and compact devices at terahertz frequencies.

  20. Distinct magnetic signatures of fractional vortex configurations in multiband superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Silva, R. M. da; Domínguez, D.; Aguiar, J. Albino

    2014-12-08

    Vortices carrying fractions of a flux quantum are predicted to exist in multiband superconductors, where vortex core can split between multiple band-specific components of the superconducting condensate. Using the two-component Ginzburg-Landau model, we examine such vortex configurations in a two-band superconducting slab in parallel magnetic field. The fractional vortices appear due to the band-selective vortex penetration caused by different thresholds for vortex entry within each band-condensate, and stabilize near the edges of the sample. We show that the resulting fractional vortex configurations leave distinct fingerprints in the static measurements of the magnetization, as well as in ac dynamic measurements of the magnetic susceptibility, both of which can be readily used for the detection of these fascinating vortex states in several existing multiband superconductors.

  1. A Matrix Pencil Algorithm Based Multiband Iterative Fusion Imaging Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Yong Qiang; Gao, Xun Zhang; Li, Xiang; Liu, Yong Xiang

    2016-01-01

    Multiband signal fusion technique is a practicable and efficient way to improve the range resolution of ISAR image. The classical fusion method estimates the poles of each subband signal by the root-MUSIC method, and some good results were get in several experiments. However, this method is fragile in noise for the proper poles could not easy to get in low signal to noise ratio (SNR). In order to eliminate the influence of noise, this paper propose a matrix pencil algorithm based method to estimate the multiband signal poles. And to deal with mutual incoherent between subband signals, the incoherent parameters (ICP) are predicted through the relation of corresponding poles of each subband. Then, an iterative algorithm which aimed to minimize the 2-norm of signal difference is introduced to reduce signal fusion error. Applications to simulate dada verify that the proposed method get better fusion results at low SNR.

  2. Quantum nonthermal effect of the Vaidya-Bonner-de Sitter black hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Wei-Zhen; Yang, Xue-Jun; Yu, Guo-Xiang

    2014-02-01

    Using the Hamilton-Jacobi equation of a scalar particle in the curve space-time and a correct-dimension new tortoise coordinate transformation, the quantum nonthermal radiation of the Vaidya-Bonner-de Sitter black hole is investigated. The energy condition for the occurrence of the Starobinsky-Unruh process is obtained. The event horizon surface gravity and the Hawking temperature on the event horizon are also given.

  3. Model for fluctuating inflaton coupling: sneutrino induced adiabatic perturbations and nonthermal leptogenesis.

    PubMed

    Mazumdar, Anupam

    2004-06-18

    We discuss a unique possibility of generating adiabatic density perturbations and leptogenesis from the spatial fluctuations of the inflaton decay rate. The key assumption is that the initial isocurvature perturbations are created in the right-handed sneutrino sector during inflation which is then converted into adiabatic perturbations when the inflaton decays. We discuss distinct imprints on the cosmic microwave background radiation, which can distinguish nonthermal versus thermal leptogenesis.

  4. LAMBDAR: Lambda Adaptive Multi-Band Deblending Algorithm in R

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, Angus H.

    2016-04-01

    LAMBDAR measures galaxy fluxes from an arbitrary FITS image, covering an arbitrary photometric wave-band, when provided all parameters needed to construct galactic apertures at the required locations for multi-band matched aperture galactic photometry. Through sophisticated matched aperture photometry, the package develops robust Spectral Energy Distributions (SEDs) and accurately establishes the physical properties of galactic objects. LAMBDAR was based on a package detailed in Bourne et al. (2012) that determined galactic fluxes in low resolution Herschel images.

  5. Sneutrino hybrid inflation and nonthermal leptogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Antusch, Stefan; Baumann, Jochen P.; Domcke, Valerie F.; Kostka, Philipp M. E-mail: jbaumann@mppmu.mpg.de E-mail: kostka@mppmu.mpg.de

    2010-10-01

    In sneutrino hybrid inflation the superpartner of one of the right-handed neutrinos involved in the seesaw mechanism plays the role of the inflaton field. It obtains its large mass after the ''waterfall'' phase transition which ends hybrid inflation. After this phase transition the oscillations of the sneutrino inflaton field may dominate the universe and efficiently produce the baryon asymmetry of the universe via nonthermal leptogenesis. We investigate the conditions under which inflation, with primordial perturbations in accordance with the latest WMAP results, as well as successful nonthermal leptogenesis can be realized simultaneously within the sneutrino hybrid inflation scenario. We point out which requirements successful inflation and leptogenesis impose on the seesaw parameters, i.e. on the Yukawa couplings and the mass of the right-handed (s)neutrino, and derive the predictions for the CMB observables in terms of the right-handed (s)neutrino mass and the other relevant model parameters.

  6. Multiband RF pulses with improved performance via convex optimization.

    PubMed

    Shang, Hong; Larson, Peder E Z; Kerr, Adam; Reed, Galen; Sukumar, Subramaniam; Elkhaled, Adam; Gordon, Jeremy W; Ohliger, Michael A; Pauly, John M; Lustig, Michael; Vigneron, Daniel B

    2016-01-01

    Selective RF pulses are commonly designed with the desired profile as a low pass filter frequency response. However, for many MRI and NMR applications, the spectrum is sparse with signals existing at a few discrete resonant frequencies. By specifying a multiband profile and releasing the constraint on "don't-care" regions, the RF pulse performance can be improved to enable a shorter duration, sharper transition, or lower peak B1 amplitude. In this project, a framework for designing multiband RF pulses with improved performance was developed based on the Shinnar-Le Roux (SLR) algorithm and convex optimization. It can create several types of RF pulses with multiband magnitude profiles, arbitrary phase profiles and generalized flip angles. The advantage of this framework with a convex optimization approach is the flexible trade-off of different pulse characteristics. Designs for specialized selective RF pulses for balanced SSFP hyperpolarized (HP) (13)C MRI, a dualband saturation RF pulse for (1)H MR spectroscopy, and a pre-saturation pulse for HP (13)C study were developed and tested. PMID:26754063

  7. Nonthermal gravitino production in tribrid inflation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antusch, Stefan; Dutta, Koushik

    2015-10-01

    We investigate nonthermal gravitino production after tribrid inflation in supergravity, which is a variant of supersymmetric hybrid inflation where three fields are involved in the inflationary model and where the inflaton field resides in the matter sector of the theory. In contrast to conventional supersymmetric hybrid inflation, where nonthermal gravitino production imposes severe constraints on the inflationary model, we find that the "nonthermal gravitino problem" is generically absent in models of tribrid inflation, mainly due to two effects: (i) With the inflaton in tribrid inflation (after inflation) being lighter than the waterfall field, the latter has a second decay channel with a much larger rate than for the decay into gravitinos. This reduces the branching ratio for the decay of the waterfall field into gravitinos. (ii) The inflaton generically decays later than the waterfall field, and it does not produce gravitinos when it decays. This leads to a dilution of the gravitino population from the decays of the waterfall field. The combination of both effects generically leads to a strongly reduced gravitino production in tribrid inflation.

  8. Scanning Tunneling Spectroscopy Studies of Multiband and Unconventional Superconductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fridman, Igor

    Scanning tunneling spectroscopy at low temperature and in a magnetic field has been used to study multiband superconductivity in 2H-NbSe 2, superconductivity in iron chalcogenides and pnictides, and the superconducting proximity effect between a high-Tc cuprate and a half-metallic manganite. In superconductors with complex band structures, pairing can involve multiple bands with multiple superconducting gaps. To search for new phenomena, a scanning tunneling microscope that operates at 300 mK was specially designed for a magnetic field of up to 9 T to be applied parallel to the sample surface. In the mixed state, field-induced supercurrents give the Cooper pairs a finite superfluid momentum, enabling the study of the quasiparticle density of states spectrum using the Doppler energy shift as a perturbation. This technique was applied to 2H-NbSe2, a layered s-wave superconductor with a multi-sheeted and anisotropic Fermi surface. We identify spectral features that evolve with field, and a zero-bias conductance that changes slope at 0.7 T. Our observations are interpreted as signatures of multiband superconductivity with different gaps on parts of the Fermi surface. Spatial conductance maps on the surface of 2H-NbSe 2 revealed a field-dependent stripe pattern that can be quantitatively identified as the lateral projection of a subsurface vortex lattice. The dominant periodicity of the stripes undergoes a discrete shift at 0.7 T, applied along [100], which is evidence for a novel reorientation transition of the inplane lattice. This observation is correlated with multiband characteristics seen in bulk measurements, implicating the multiband pairing of 2 H-NbSe2 in the transition. This technique demonstrates a general method for probing multiband superconductivity, as well as studying the subsurface vortex lattice and isolated vortices in real space. Measurements down to 300 mK on Fe1+yTe 1-xSex showed a gap structure and the presence of low-energy quasiparticles, which

  9. Fuel injector utilizing non-thermal plasma activation

    DOEpatents

    Coates, Don M.; Rosocha, Louis A.

    2009-12-01

    A non-thermal plasma assisted combustion fuel injector that uses an inner and outer electrode to create an electric field from a high voltage power supply. A dielectric material is operatively disposed between the two electrodes to prevent arcing and to promote the formation of a non-thermal plasma. A fuel injector, which converts a liquid fuel into a dispersed mist, vapor, or aerosolized fuel, injects into the non-thermal plasma generating energetic electrons and other highly reactive chemical species.

  10. Radio frequency electromagnetic field compliance assessment of multi-band and MIMO equipped radio base stations.

    PubMed

    Thors, Björn; Thielens, Arno; Fridén, Jonas; Colombi, Davide; Törnevik, Christer; Vermeeren, Günter; Martens, Luc; Joseph, Wout

    2014-05-01

    In this paper, different methods for practical numerical radio frequency exposure compliance assessments of radio base station products were investigated. Both multi-band base station antennas and antennas designed for multiple input multiple output (MIMO) transmission schemes were considered. For the multi-band case, various standardized assessment methods were evaluated in terms of resulting compliance distance with respect to the reference levels and basic restrictions of the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection. Both single frequency and multiple frequency (cumulative) compliance distances were determined using numerical simulations for a mobile communication base station antenna transmitting in four frequency bands between 800 and 2600 MHz. The assessments were conducted in terms of root-mean-squared electromagnetic fields, whole-body averaged specific absorption rate (SAR) and peak 10 g averaged SAR. In general, assessments based on peak field strengths were found to be less computationally intensive, but lead to larger compliance distances than spatial averaging of electromagnetic fields used in combination with localized SAR assessments. For adult exposure, the results indicated that even shorter compliance distances were obtained by using assessments based on localized and whole-body SAR. Numerical simulations, using base station products employing MIMO transmission schemes, were performed as well and were in agreement with reference measurements. The applicability of various field combination methods for correlated exposure was investigated, and best estimate methods were proposed. Our results showed that field combining methods generally considered as conservative could be used to efficiently assess compliance boundary dimensions of single- and dual-polarized multicolumn base station antennas with only minor increases in compliance distances.

  11. Low-cost dielectric substrate for designing low profile multiband monopole microstrip antenna.

    PubMed

    Ahsan, M R; Islam, M T; Habib Ullah, M; Arshad, H; Mansor, M F

    2014-01-01

    This paper proposes a small sized, low-cost multiband monopole antenna which can cover the WiMAX bands and C-band. The proposed antenna of 20 × 20 mm(2) radiating patch is printed on cost effective 1.6 mm thick fiberglass polymer resin dielectric material substrate and fed by 4 mm long microstrip line. The finite element method based, full wave electromagnetic simulator HFSS is efficiently utilized for designing and analyzing the proposed antenna and the antenna parameters are measured in a standard far-field anechoic chamber. The experimental results show that the prototype of the antenna has achieved operating bandwidths (voltage stand wave ratio (VSWR) less than 2) 360 MHz (2.53-2.89 GHz) and 440 MHz (3.47-3.91 GHz) for WiMAX and 1550 MHz (6.28-7.83 GHz) for C-band. The simulated and measured results for VSWR, radiation patterns, and gain are well matched. Nearly omnidirectional radiation patterns are achieved and the peak gains are of 3.62 dBi, 3.67 dBi, and 5.7 dBi at 2.66 GHz, 3.65 GHz, and 6.58 GHz, respectively. PMID:25136648

  12. Low-Cost Dielectric Substrate for Designing Low Profile Multiband Monopole Microstrip Antenna

    PubMed Central

    Ahsan, M. R.; Islam, M. T.; Habib Ullah, M.; Arshad, H.; Mansor, M. F.

    2014-01-01

    This paper proposes a small sized, low-cost multiband monopole antenna which can cover the WiMAX bands and C-band. The proposed antenna of 20 × 20 mm2 radiating patch is printed on cost effective 1.6 mm thick fiberglass polymer resin dielectric material substrate and fed by 4 mm long microstrip line. The finite element method based, full wave electromagnetic simulator HFSS is efficiently utilized for designing and analyzing the proposed antenna and the antenna parameters are measured in a standard far-field anechoic chamber. The experimental results show that the prototype of the antenna has achieved operating bandwidths (voltage stand wave ratio (VSWR) less than 2) 360 MHz (2.53–2.89 GHz) and 440 MHz (3.47–3.91 GHz) for WiMAX and 1550 MHz (6.28–7.83 GHz) for C-band. The simulated and measured results for VSWR, radiation patterns, and gain are well matched. Nearly omnidirectional radiation patterns are achieved and the peak gains are of 3.62 dBi, 3.67 dBi, and 5.7 dBi at 2.66 GHz, 3.65 GHz, and 6.58 GHz, respectively. PMID:25136648

  13. Low-cost dielectric substrate for designing low profile multiband monopole microstrip antenna.

    PubMed

    Ahsan, M R; Islam, M T; Habib Ullah, M; Arshad, H; Mansor, M F

    2014-01-01

    This paper proposes a small sized, low-cost multiband monopole antenna which can cover the WiMAX bands and C-band. The proposed antenna of 20 × 20 mm(2) radiating patch is printed on cost effective 1.6 mm thick fiberglass polymer resin dielectric material substrate and fed by 4 mm long microstrip line. The finite element method based, full wave electromagnetic simulator HFSS is efficiently utilized for designing and analyzing the proposed antenna and the antenna parameters are measured in a standard far-field anechoic chamber. The experimental results show that the prototype of the antenna has achieved operating bandwidths (voltage stand wave ratio (VSWR) less than 2) 360 MHz (2.53-2.89 GHz) and 440 MHz (3.47-3.91 GHz) for WiMAX and 1550 MHz (6.28-7.83 GHz) for C-band. The simulated and measured results for VSWR, radiation patterns, and gain are well matched. Nearly omnidirectional radiation patterns are achieved and the peak gains are of 3.62 dBi, 3.67 dBi, and 5.7 dBi at 2.66 GHz, 3.65 GHz, and 6.58 GHz, respectively.

  14. Ubiquitous Non-thermals in Astrophysical Plasmas: Restating the Difficulty of Maintaining Maxwellians

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scudder, J. D.; Karimabadi, H.

    2013-06-01

    This paper outlines the rather narrow conditions on a radiatively decoupled plasma where a Maxwell-Boltzmann (MB) distribution can be assumed with confidence. The complementary non-thermal distribution with non-perturbative kurtosis is argued to have a much broader purview than has previously been accepted. These conditions are expressed in terms of the electron Knudsen number, Ke , the ratio of the electron mean free path to the scale length of electron pressure. Rather generally, f(v < v 2(Ke )) will be Gaussian, so that MB atomic or wave particle effects controlled by speeds v < v 2 ≡ w(15/8Ke )1/4 will remain defensible, where w is the most probable speed. The sufficient condition for Spitzer-Braginskii plasma fluid closure at the energy equation requires globally Ke (s) <= 0.01; this global condition pertains to the maximum value of Ke along the arc length s of the magnetic field (to its extremities) provided that contiguous plasma remains uncoupled from the radiation field. The non-thermal regime Ke > 0.01 is common in all main-sequence stellar atmospheres above approximately 0.05 stellar radii from the surface. The entire solar corona and wind are included in this regime where non-thermal distributions with kurtosis are shown to be ubiquitous, heat flux is not well modeled by Spitzer-Braginskii closure, and fluid modeling is qualitative at best.

  15. [Innovations in food processing: nonthermal methods].

    PubMed

    Herrero, A M; Romero de Avila, M D

    2006-01-01

    Consumers' desires for foods that are minimally preserved and processed are encouraging the development of new methods for the inactivation of micro-organisms in foods. Non-thermal processes (such as high hydrostatic pressure, ultrasound, irradiation, high intensity pulsed electric fields, oscillating magnetic fields and light pulses) can be used for the inactivation of food-spoilage micro-organisms without affecting the quality of the food. While the efficacy of many of these methods was demonstrated many years ago, technological advances are only now beginning to make possible their commercial exploitation.

  16. BOREAS TE-6 Multiband Vegetation Imager Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Curd, Shelaine (Editor); Kucharik, Christopher J.

    2000-01-01

    The BOREAS TE-6 team collected data in support of its efforts to examine the influence of vegetation and climate on the major carbon fluxes in boreal tree species. A newly developed ground-based canopy imaging system called an MVI was tested and used by the BOREAS TE-06 team to collect measurements of the canopy crap fraction (sky fraction), canopy gap-size distribution (size and frequency of gaps between foliage in canopy), branch architecture, and leaf angle distribution (fraction of leaf area in specific leaf inclination classes assuming azimuthal symmetry). Measurements of the canopy gap-size distribution are used to derive canopy clumping indices that can be used to adjust indirect LAI measurements made in nonrandom forests. These clumping factors will also help to describe the radiation penetration in clumped canopies more accurately by allowing for simple adjustments to Beer's law. Measurements of the above quantities were obtained at BOREAS NSA-OJP site in IFC-2 in 1994, at the SSA-OA in July 1995, and at the SSA-OBS and SSA-OA sites in IFC-2 in 1996. Modeling studies were also performed to further validate MVI measurements and to gain a more complete understanding of boreal forest canopy architecture. By using MVI measurements and Monte Carlo simulations, clumping indices as a function of zenith angle were derived for the three main boreal species studied during BOREAS. The analyzed data are stored in tabular ASCII files. The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884), or from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distrobuted Activity Archive Center (DAAC).

  17. Engineering the Electronic Band Structure for Multiband Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez, N.; Reichertz, L.A.; Yu, K.M.; Campman, K.; Walukiewicz, W.

    2010-07-12

    Using the unique features of the electronic band structure of GaNxAs1-x alloys, we have designed, fabricated and tested a multiband photovoltaic device. The device demonstrates an optical activity of three energy bands that absorb, and convert into electrical current, the crucial part of the solar spectrum. The performance of the device and measurements of electroluminescence, quantum efficiency and photomodulated reflectivity are analyzed in terms of the Band Anticrossing model of the electronic structure of highly mismatched alloys. The results demonstrate the feasibility of using highly mismatched alloys to engineer the semiconductor energy band structure for specific device applications.

  18. Precision limits of the twin-beam multiband URSULA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Debiase, G. A.; Paterno, L.; Fedel, B.; Santagati, G.; Ventura, R.

    1988-01-01

    URSULA is a multiband astronomical photoelectric photometer which minimizes errors introduced by the presence of the atmosphere. It operates with two identical channels, one for the star to be measured and the other for a reference star. After a technical description of the present version of the apparatus, some measurements of stellar sources of different brightness, and in different atmospheric conditions are presented. These measurements, based on observations made with the 91 cm Cassegrain telescope of the Catania Astrophysical Observatory, are used to check the photometer accuracy and compare its performance with that of standard photometers.

  19. The magnetic field in Lynds 1457: multiband photopolarimetry.

    PubMed

    Andersson, B G; Wannier, P G

    1995-04-10

    We have performed multiband photopolarimetry toward stars behind the molecular cloud L1457 (MBM 12). This cloud is the nearest known molecular cloud (65 pc) and is thought to be contained within the local "hot bubble." The polarization shows a regular structure, indicating that the cloud is threaded by an ordered magnetic field. The wavelength dependence of the polarization seems to indicate that the grains in L1457 have higher indices of refraction than normal for interstellar clouds. However, the wavelength of maximum polarization indicates that their size distribution is close to normal.

  20. Conversion of sunflower multiband radiometer polarization measurements to polarization parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biehl, Larry L.

    1995-01-01

    The data processing analysis and conversion of polarization measurements to polarization parameters from the Sunflower multiband radiometer is presented in this final report. Included is: (1) the actual data analysis; (2) the comparison of the averaging techniques and the percent polarization derived from the original and averaged I, Q, U parameters; (3) the polarizer angles used in conversion; (4) the Matlab files; (5) the relative ground size, field of view location, and view zenith angles, and (6) the summary of all the sky data for all dates.

  1. Time-dependent Gutzwiller theory for multiband Hubbard models.

    PubMed

    Oelsen, E v; Seibold, G; Bünemann, J

    2011-08-12

    Based on the variational Gutzwiller theory, we present a method for the computation of response functions for multiband Hubbard models with general local Coulomb interactions. The improvement over the conventional random-phase approximation is exemplified for an infinite-dimensional two-band Hubbard model where the incorporation of the local multiplet structure leads to a much larger sensitivity of ferromagnetism on the Hund coupling. Our method can be implemented into local-density approximation and Gutzwiller schemes and will therefore be an important tool for the computation of response functions for strongly correlated materials.

  2. A Self-Calibrating Multi-Band Region Growing Approach to Segmentation of Single and Multi-Band Images

    SciTech Connect

    Paglieroni, D W

    2002-12-20

    Image segmentation transforms pixel-level information from raw images to a higher level of abstraction in which related pixels are grouped into disjoint spatial regions. Such regions typically correspond to natural or man-made objects or structures, natural variations in land cover, etc. For many image interpretation tasks (such as land use assessment, automatic target cueing, defining relationships between objects, etc.), segmentation can be an important early step. Remotely sensed images (e.g., multi-spectral and hyperspectral images) often contain many spectral bands (i.e., multiple layers of 2D images). Multi-band images are important because they contain more information than single-band images. Objects or natural variations that are readily apparent in certain spectral bands may be invisible in 2D broadband images. In this paper, the classical region growing approach to image segmentation is generalized from single to multi-band images. While it is widely recognized that the quality of image segmentation is affected by which segmentation algorithm is used, this paper shows that algorithm parameter values can have an even more profound effect. A novel self-calibration framework is developed for automatically selecting parameter values that produce segmentations that most closely resemble a calibration edge map (derived separately using a simple edge detector). Although the framework is generic in the sense that it can imbed any core segmentation algorithm, this paper only demonstrates self-calibration with multi-band region growing. The framework is applied to a variety of AVIRIS image blocks at different spectral resolutions, in an effort to assess the impact of spectral resolution on segmentation quality. The image segmentations are assessed quantitatively, and it is shown that segmentation quality does not generally appear to be highly correlated with spectral resolution.

  3. Nonthermal Quantum Channels as a Thermodynamical Resource.

    PubMed

    Navascués, Miguel; García-Pintos, Luis Pedro

    2015-07-01

    Quantum thermodynamics can be understood as a resource theory, whereby thermal states are free and the only allowed operations are unitary transformations commuting with the total Hamiltonian of the system. Previous literature on the subject has just focused on transformations between different state resources, overlooking the fact that quantum operations which do not commute with the total energy also constitute a potentially valuable resource. In this Letter, given a number of nonthermal quantum channels, we study the problem of how to integrate them in a thermal engine so as to distill a maximum amount of work. We find that, in the limit of asymptotically many uses of each channel, the distillable work is an additive function of the considered channels, computable for both finite dimensional quantum operations and bosonic channels. We apply our results to bound the amount of distillable work due to the natural nonthermal processes postulated in the Ghirardi-Rimini-Weber (GRW) collapse model. We find that, although GRW theory predicts the possibility of extracting work from the vacuum at no cost, the power which a collapse engine could, in principle, generate is extremely low. PMID:26182086

  4. Intracranial nonthermal irreversible electroporation: in vivo analysis.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Paulo A; Rossmeisl, John H; Neal, Robert E; Ellis, Thomas L; Olson, John D; Henao-Guerrero, Natalia; Robertson, John; Davalos, Rafael V

    2010-07-01

    Nonthermal irreversible electroporation (NTIRE) is a new minimally invasive technique to treat cancer. It is unique because of its nonthermal mechanism of tumor ablation. Intracranial NTIRE procedures involve placing electrodes into the targeted area of the brain and delivering a series of short but intense electric pulses. The electric pulses induce irreversible structural changes in cell membranes, leading to cell death. We correlated NTIRE lesion volumes in normal brain tissue with electric field distributions from comprehensive numerical models. The electrical conductivity of brain tissue was extrapolated from the measured in vivo data and the numerical models. Using this, we present results on the electric field threshold necessary to induce NTIRE lesions (495-510 V/cm) in canine brain tissue using 90 50-mus pulses at 4 Hz. Furthermore, this preliminary study provides some of the necessary numerical tools for using NTIRE as a brain cancer treatment. We also computed the electrical conductivity of brain tissue from the in vivo data (0.12-0.30 S/m) and provide guidelines for treatment planning and execution. Knowledge of the dynamic electrical conductivity of the tissue and electric field that correlates to lesion volume is crucial to ensure predictable complete NTIRE treatment while minimizing damage to surrounding healthy tissue. PMID:20668843

  5. Nonthermal dark matter models and signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okada, Hiroshi; Orikasa, Yuta; Toma, Takashi

    2016-03-01

    Many experiments exploring weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) such as direct, indirect and collider searches have been carried out until now. However, a clear signal of a WIMP has not been found yet and it makes us to suspect that WIMPs are questionable as a dark matter candidate. Taking into account this situation, we propose two models in which dark matter relic density is produced by decay of a metastable particle. In the first model, the metastable particle is a feebly interacting massive particle, which is the so-called FIMP, produced by freeze-in mechanism in the early universe. In the second model, the decaying particle is thermally produced the same as the usual WIMP. However decay of the particle into dark matter is led by a higher dimensional operator. As a phenomenologically interesting feature of nonthermal dark matter discussed in this paper, a strong sharp gamma-ray emission as an indirect detection signal occurs due to internal bremsstrahlung, although some parameter space has already been ruled out by this process. Moreover combining other experimental and theoretical constraints such as dark matter relic density, big bang nucleosynthesis, collider, gamma-rays and perturbativity of couplings, we discuss the two nonthermal DM models.

  6. Nonthermal Quantum Channels as a Thermodynamical Resource

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navascués, Miguel; García-Pintos, Luis Pedro

    2015-07-01

    Quantum thermodynamics can be understood as a resource theory, whereby thermal states are free and the only allowed operations are unitary transformations commuting with the total Hamiltonian of the system. Previous literature on the subject has just focused on transformations between different state resources, overlooking the fact that quantum operations which do not commute with the total energy also constitute a potentially valuable resource. In this Letter, given a number of nonthermal quantum channels, we study the problem of how to integrate them in a thermal engine so as to distill a maximum amount of work. We find that, in the limit of asymptotically many uses of each channel, the distillable work is an additive function of the considered channels, computable for both finite dimensional quantum operations and bosonic channels. We apply our results to bound the amount of distillable work due to the natural nonthermal processes postulated in the Ghirardi-Rimini-Weber (GRW) collapse model. We find that, although GRW theory predicts the possibility of extracting work from the vacuum at no cost, the power which a collapse engine could, in principle, generate is extremely low.

  7. Nonthermal Plasma Synthesis of Nanocrystals: Fundamental Principles, Materials, and Applications.

    PubMed

    Kortshagen, Uwe R; Sankaran, R Mohan; Pereira, Rui N; Girshick, Steven L; Wu, Jeslin J; Aydil, Eray S

    2016-09-28

    Nonthermal plasmas have emerged as a viable synthesis technique for nanocrystal materials. Inherently solvent and ligand-free, nonthermal plasmas offer the ability to synthesize high purity nanocrystals of materials that require high synthesis temperatures. The nonequilibrium environment in nonthermal plasmas has a number of attractive attributes: energetic surface reactions selectively heat the nanoparticles to temperatures that can strongly exceed the gas temperature; charging of nanoparticles through plasma electrons reduces or eliminates nanoparticle agglomeration; and the large difference between the chemical potentials of the gaseous growth species and the species bound to the nanoparticle surfaces facilitates nanocrystal doping. This paper reviews the state of the art in nonthermal plasma synthesis of nanocrystals. It discusses the fundamentals of nanocrystal formation in plasmas, reviews practical implementations of plasma reactors, surveys the materials that have been produced with nonthermal plasmas and surface chemistries that have been developed, and provides an overview of applications of plasma-synthesized nanocrystals.

  8. Nonthermal Plasma Synthesis of Nanocrystals: Fundamental Principles, Materials, and Applications.

    PubMed

    Kortshagen, Uwe R; Sankaran, R Mohan; Pereira, Rui N; Girshick, Steven L; Wu, Jeslin J; Aydil, Eray S

    2016-09-28

    Nonthermal plasmas have emerged as a viable synthesis technique for nanocrystal materials. Inherently solvent and ligand-free, nonthermal plasmas offer the ability to synthesize high purity nanocrystals of materials that require high synthesis temperatures. The nonequilibrium environment in nonthermal plasmas has a number of attractive attributes: energetic surface reactions selectively heat the nanoparticles to temperatures that can strongly exceed the gas temperature; charging of nanoparticles through plasma electrons reduces or eliminates nanoparticle agglomeration; and the large difference between the chemical potentials of the gaseous growth species and the species bound to the nanoparticle surfaces facilitates nanocrystal doping. This paper reviews the state of the art in nonthermal plasma synthesis of nanocrystals. It discusses the fundamentals of nanocrystal formation in plasmas, reviews practical implementations of plasma reactors, surveys the materials that have been produced with nonthermal plasmas and surface chemistries that have been developed, and provides an overview of applications of plasma-synthesized nanocrystals. PMID:27550744

  9. 3D Display Using Conjugated Multiband Bandpass Filters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bae, Youngsam; White, Victor E.; Shcheglov, Kirill

    2012-01-01

    Stereoscopic display techniques are based on the principle of displaying two views, with a slightly different perspective, in such a way that the left eye views only by the left eye, and the right eye views only by the right eye. However, one of the major challenges in optical devices is crosstalk between the two channels. Crosstalk is due to the optical devices not completely blocking the wrong-side image, so the left eye sees a little bit of the right image and the right eye sees a little bit of the left image. This results in eyestrain and headaches. A pair of interference filters worn as an optical device can solve the problem. The device consists of a pair of multiband bandpass filters that are conjugated. The term "conjugated" describes the passband regions of one filter not overlapping with those of the other, but the regions are interdigitated. Along with the glasses, a 3D display produces colors composed of primary colors (basis for producing colors) having the spectral bands the same as the passbands of the filters. More specifically, the primary colors producing one viewpoint will be made up of the passbands of one filter, and those of the other viewpoint will be made up of the passbands of the conjugated filter. Thus, the primary colors of one filter would be seen by the eye that has the matching multiband filter. The inherent characteristic of the interference filter will allow little or no transmission of the wrong side of the stereoscopic images.

  10. The simulation and analysis of infrared target multi-band characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Lanfang; Zhou, Jinmei

    2014-09-01

    The infrared characteristic simulation of the target is the basis of true and false infrared target recognition. With the development of stealth technology, imaging features of the decoy in the detector are more and more close to the real target, so it is not easy to distinguish between the target and decoy by using information acquired from single-band infrared detector. Based on this, in the paper infrared imaging properties of the target in a number of bands are simulated and analyzed, followed by fusing the characteristic differences of multiple bands between true and false target for classification and recognition. First of all, we construct the geometrical model of target and decoy in a simple background, and then the model of infrared radiation is built. What is more, in accordance with laws of infrared radiation and other relevant laws, the characteristics of target and decoy under the condition of different bands are analyzed. Experimental results show that the proposed multi-band target simulation and analysis method can effectively identify the target and decoy in the same field of view.

  11. Quantum funneling in blended multi-band gap core/shell colloidal quantum dot solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Neo, Darren C. J.; Assender, Hazel E.; Watt, Andrew A. R.; Stranks, Samuel D.; Eperon, Giles E.; Snaith, Henry J.

    2015-09-07

    Multi-band gap heterojunction solar cells fabricated from a blend of 1.2 eV and 1.4 eV PbS colloidal quantum dots (CQDs) show poor device performance due to non-radiative recombination. To overcome this, a CdS shell is epitaxially formed around the PbS core using cation exchange. From steady state and transient photoluminescence measurements, we understand the nature of charge transfer between these quantum dots. Photoluminescence decay lifetimes are much longer in the PbS/CdS core/shell blend compared to PbS only, explained by a reduction in non-radiative recombination resulting from CdS surface passivation. PbS/CdS heterojunction devices sustain a higher open-circuit voltage and lower reverse saturation current as compared to PbS-only devices, implying lower recombination rates. Further device performance enhancement is attained by modifying the composition profile of the CQD species in the absorbing layer resulting in a three dimensional quantum cascade structure.

  12. Motion of 3-6 keV Nonthermal Sources Along the Legs of a Flare Loop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sui, Linhui; Holman, Gordon D.; Dennis, Brian R.

    2007-01-01

    Observations of nonthermal X-ray sources me critical to studying electron acceleration and transport in solar flares. Strong thermal emission radiated from the preheated plasma before the flare impulsive phase often makes it difficult to detect low-energy X-ray sources that are produced by relatively low-energy nonthermal electrons. Knowledge of the distribution of these low-energy nonthermal electrons is particularly important in determining the total nonthermal electron energy in solar flares. We report on an 'early impulsive flare' in which impulsive hard X-ray emission was seen early in the flare before the soft X-ray emission had risen significantly, indicating limited plasma pre-heating. Early in the flare, RHESSI < 25 keV images show coronal sources that moved first downward and then upwards along the legs of a flare loop. In particular, the 3-6 keV source appeared as a single coronal source at the start of the flare, and then it involved into two coronal sources moving down along the two legs of the loop. After nearly reaching the two footpoints at the hard X-ray peak, the two sources moved back up to the looptop again. RHESSI images and light curves all indicate that nonthermal emission dominated at energies as low as 3-6 keV. We suggest that the evolution of both the spectral index and the low-energy cutoff of the injected electron distribution could result in the accelerated electrons reaching a lower altitude along the legs of the dense flare loop and hence result in the observed downward and upward motions of the nonthermal sources.

  13. DUST DESTRUCTION IN A NON-RADIATIVE SHOCK IN THE CYGNUS LOOP SUPERNOVA REMNANT

    SciTech Connect

    Sankrit, Ravi; Gaetz, Terrance J.; Raymond, John C.; Blair, William P.; Ghavamian, Parviz; Long, Knox S.

    2010-04-01

    We present 24 {mu}m and 70 {mu}m images of a non-radiative shock in the Cygnus Loop supernova remnant, obtained with the Multiband Imaging Photometer for Spitzer on board the Spitzer Space Telescope. The post-shock region is resolved in these images. The ratio of the 70 {mu}m to the 24 {mu}m flux rises from about 14 at a distance 0.'1 behind the shock front to about 22 in a zone 0.'75 further downstream, as grains are destroyed in the hot plasma. Models of dust emission and destruction using post-shock electron temperatures between 0.15 keV and 0.30 keV and post-shock densities, n{sub H}{approx} 2.0 cm{sup -3}, predict flux ratios that match the observations. Non-thermal sputtering (i.e., sputtering due to bulk motion of the grains relative to the gas) contributes significantly to the dust destruction under these shock conditions. From the model calculations, we infer that about 35% by mass of the grains are destroyed over a 0.14 pc region behind the shock front.

  14. Nonthermal galactic emission below 10 MHz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Novaco, J. C.; Brown, L. W.

    1977-01-01

    The Radio Astronomy Explorer-2 (RAE-2) satellite has provided new measurements of the nonthermal galactic radio emission at frequencies below 10 MHz. Measurements of the emission spectra are presented for the center, anticenter, north polar, and south polar directions at 22 frequencies between 0.25 and 9.18 MHz. Survey maps of the spatial distribution of the observed low frequency galactic emission at 1.31, 2.20, 3.93, 4.70, 6.55, and 9.18 MHz are presented. The observations were obtained with the 229-meter traveling-wave V-antenna on this lunar orbiting spacecraft. The improved frequency coverage offers additional insights into structure of the local galactic neighborhood.

  15. Nonthermal plasma technology for organic destruction

    SciTech Connect

    Heath, W.O.; Birmingham, J.G.

    1995-06-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) is investigating the use of nonthermal, electrically driven plasmas for destroying organic contaminants near ambient temperatures and pressures. Three different plasma systems have been developed to treat organics in air, water, and soil. These systems are the Gas-Phase Corona Reactor (GPCR)III for treating air, the Liquid-Phase Corona Reactor for treating water, and In Situ Corona for treating soils. This presentation focuses on recent technical developments, commercial status, and project costs of OPCR as a cost-effective alternative to other air-purification technologies that are now in use to treat off-gases from site-remediation efforts as well as industrial emissions.

  16. Modelling of Nonthermal Microwave Emission from Twisted Magnetic Loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharykin, I. N.; Kuznetsov, A. A.

    2016-05-01

    Microwave gyrosynchrotron radio emission generated by nonthermal electrons in twisted magnetic loops is modelled using the recently developed simulation tool GX Simulator. We consider isotropic and anisotropic pitch-angle distributions. The main scope of the work is to understand the impact of a twisted magnetic field topology on radio emission maps. We have found that nonthermal electrons inside twisted magnetic loops produce gyrosynchrotron radio emission with a particular polarisation distribution. The polarisation sign inversion line is inclined relatively to the axis of the loop. The radio emission source is more compact in the case of a less twisted loop, assuming an anisotropic pitch-angle distribution of nonthermal electrons.

  17. Nonthermal plasma sterilization of living and nonliving surfaces.

    PubMed

    De Geyter, N; Morent, R

    2012-01-01

    The recent tremendous progress in understanding physical plasma phenomena, together with the development of new plasma sources, has put a growing focus on the application of nonthermal plasmas in the biomedical domain. Among several novel applications, the inactivation of bacteria by nonthermal plasmas (so-called plasma sterilization) is particularly interesting. This introductory review provides a summary of the current status of this emerging research field. In addition to the inactivation of bacteria on nonliving surfaces, this review also focuses on the sterilization of living surfaces, such as animal and human tissues. Clearly, nonthermal plasmas have undoubtedly great potential as a novel method for low-temperature sterilization. PMID:22559318

  18. Alternative route to charge density wave formation in multiband systems.

    PubMed

    Eiter, Hans-Martin; Lavagnini, Michela; Hackl, Rudi; Nowadnick, Elizabeth A; Kemper, Alexander F; Devereaux, Thomas P; Chu, Jiun-Haw; Analytis, James G; Fisher, Ian R; Degiorgi, Leonardo

    2013-01-01

    Charge and spin density waves, periodic modulations of the electron, and magnetization densities, respectively, are among the most abundant and nontrivial low-temperature ordered phases in condensed matter. The ordering direction is widely believed to result from the Fermi surface topology. However, several recent studies indicate that this common view needs to be supplemented. Here, we show how an enhanced electron-lattice interaction can contribute to or even determine the selection of the ordering vector in the model charge density wave system ErTe(3). Our joint experimental and theoretical study allows us to establish a relation between the selection rules of the electronic light scattering spectra and the enhanced electron-phonon coupling in the vicinity of band degeneracy points. This alternative proposal for charge density wave formation may be of general relevance for driving phase transitions into other broken-symmetry ground states, particularly in multiband systems, such as the iron-based superconductors.

  19. Ultra-flexible polarization-insensitive multiband terahertz metamaterial absorber.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xu; Fan, Wenhui

    2015-03-20

    A thin-flexible and polarization-insensitive multiband terahertz metamaterial absorber (MMA) has been investigated. Each unit cell of the MMA consists of two metallic structures, which include the top metal resonator ring and the bottom metal ground plane, separated by a thin-flexible dielectric spacer. Finite element simulation indicates that this MMA has three high absorption peaks in the terahertz region, with absorptivities of 89% at 0.72 THz, 98% at 1.4 THz, and 85% at 2.3 THz. However, because of its rotationally symmetric structure, this MMA is polarization-insensitive and can perform very well at a wide range of incident angles, namely, 30° for transverse electric waves and 40° for transverse magnetic waves. The thin-flexible device structure and good performance shows that this MMA is very promising to disguise objects and make them less detectable to radar in the terahertz region. PMID:25968524

  20. Traffic placement policies for a multi-band network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maly, Kurt J.; Foudriat, E. C.; Game, David; Mukkamala, R.; Overstreet, C. Michael

    1990-01-01

    Recently protocols were introduced that enable the integration of synchronous traffic (voice or video) and asynchronous traffic (data) and extend the size of local area networks without loss in speed or capacity. One of these is DRAMA, a multiband protocol based on broadband technology. It provides dynamic allocation of bandwidth among clusters of nodes in the total network. A number of traffic placement policies for such networks are proposed and evaluated. Metrics used for performance evaluation include average network access delay, degree of fairness of access among the nodes, and network throughput. The feasibility of the DRAMA protocol is established through simulation studies. DRAMA provides effective integration of synchronous and asychronous traffic due to its ability to separate traffic types. Under the suggested traffic placement policies, the DRAMA protocol is shown to handle diverse loads, mixes of traffic types, and numbers of nodes, as well as modifications to the network structure and momentary traffic overloads.

  1. Optically addressed near and long-wave infrared multiband photodetectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cellek, O. O.; Reno, J. L.; Zhang, Y.-H.

    2012-06-01

    Optically addressed dual-band photodetector incorporating of a 0.82 μm cut-off wavelength near-infrared (NIR) AlGaAs/GaAs p-i-n photodetector and a 8.2 μm peak wavelength long-wave infrared (LWIR) AlGaAs/GaAs quantum well infrared photodetector on GaAs substrate is fabricated and characterized. Switching between NIR and LWIR bands is demonstrated by using external light bias. The dual-band photodetector gives 65% quantum efficiency in NIR band and specific detectivity of 2 × 109cm Hz1/2/W in LWIR band at 68 K. Spectral crosstalk is better than 25 dB. These devices enable the use of only a single indium-bump per pixel for multiband image sensor arrays to have maximum fill factor.

  2. Gamma-ray burst spectra from photon-deficient Compton scattering by nonthermal electrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zdziarski, Andrzej A.; Lamb, Don Q.

    1986-01-01

    Consideration is given to a model of gamma-ray burst sources based on repeated Compton scatterings of soft photons by relativistic nonthermal electrons. Relativistic electrons which are continuously produced in the source radiate the total power L supplied to them. Higher order Compton scatterings, which occur when L(soft) is much less than L make the model distinct. The spectrum having an X-ray energy index of about one results from the superposition of the spectral components from several orders of Compton scattering; the change of the slope at several hundred keV arises from the Klein-Nishina decline of the scattering cross section.

  3. Tomographic analysis of the nonthermal x-ray bursts during disruption instability in the T-10 tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Savrukhin, P. V.; Ermolaeva, A. I.; Shestakov, E. A.; Khramenkov, A. V.

    2014-10-01

    Non-thermal x-ray radiation (E{sub γ} up to 150 keV) is measured in the T-10 tokamaks during disruption instability using two sets of CdTe detectors (10 vertical and 7 horizontal view detectors). Special narrow cupper tubes collimators with lead screening and CdTe detectors integrated with amplifiers inside metallic containers provides enhanced spatial resolution of the system (r ~ 3 cm) and assures protection from the parasitic hard x-ray (E{sub γ} up to 1.5 MeV) and electromagnetic loads during disruption. Spatial localization of the nonthermal x-ray emissivity is reconstructed using tomographic Cormack technique with SVD matrix inversion. Analysis indicated appearance of an intensive non-thermal x-ray bursts during initial stage of the disruptions at high density. The bursts are characterized by repetitive spikes (2–3 kHz) of the x-ray emissivity from the plasma core area. Analysis indicated that the spikes can be connected with acceleration of the non-thermal electrons in enhanced longitudinal electric fields induced during energy quench at the disruption instability.

  4. Preradiation studies for non-thermal Z-pinch wire load experiments on Saturn

    SciTech Connect

    Sanford, T.W.L.; Humphreys, D.R.; Poukey, J.W.; Marder, B.M.; Halbleib, J.A.; Crow, J.T.; Spielman, R.B.; Mock, R.C.

    1994-06-01

    The implosion dynamics of compact wire arrays on Saturn are explored as a function of wire mass m, wire length {ell}, wire radii R, and radial power-flow feed geometry using the ZORK code. Electron losses and the likelihood of arcing in the radial feed adjacent the wire load are analyzed using the TWOQUICK and CYLTRAN codes. The physical characteristics of the implosion and subsequent thermal radiation production are estimated using the LASNEX code in one dimension. These analyses show that compact tungsten wire arrays with parameters suggested by D. Mosher and with a 21-nH vacuum feed geometry satisfy the empirical scaling criterion I/(M/{ell}) {approximately} 2 MA/(mg/cm) of Mosher for optimizing non-thermal radiation from z pinches, generate low electron losses in the radial feeds, and generate electric fields at the insulator stack below the Charlie Martin flashover limit thereby permitting full power to be delivered to the load. Under such conditions, peak currents of {approximately}5 MA can be delivered to wire loads {approximately}20 ns before the driving voltage reverses at the insulator stack, potentially allowing the m = 0 instability to develop with the subsequent emission of non-thermal radiation as predicted by the Mosher model.

  5. Surface identification from multiband LADAR reflectance with varied incidence angle via database mapping.

    PubMed

    Guiang, Chona; Jin, Xuemin; Levine, Robert Y

    2015-02-10

    Incident angle dependencies of LADAR reflection depend on bulk material reflectivity and surface texture properties that can be exploited for surface identification. In this paper, surface identification via multiband LADAR reflected radiance is assessed using the nonconventional exploitation factors data system database. A statistics-based dimension reduction algorithm, stochastic neighborhood embedding (t-SNE), is used to separate the data clouds resulting from the monostatic LADAR reflected radiance and corresponding band ratios. The application of t-SNE to multiband reflected radiance effectively separates the data clouds, making surface identification via multiband LADAR reflectance possible in the presence of unknown incident angle dependencies and uncertainties. It is demonstrated that, for both the multiband monostatic reflected radiance and band ratios, the application of t-SNE mapping yields a significant improvement in surface identification from measurements with unknown or varied incident angles.

  6. An evaluation of multiband photography for rock discrimination. [sedimentary rocks of Front Range, Colorado

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, K. (Principal Investigator); Raines, G. L.

    1974-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. With the advent of ERTS and Skylab satellites, multiband imagery and photography have become readily available to geologists. The ability of multiband photography to discriminate sedimentary rocks was examined. More than 8600 in situ measurements of band reflectance of the sedimentary rocks of the Front Range, Colorado, were acquired. Statistical analysis of these measurements showed that: (1) measurements from one site can be used at another site 100 miles away; (2) there is basically only one spectral reflectance curve for these rocks, with constant amplitude differences between the curves; and (3) the natural variation is so large that at least 150 measurements per formation are required to select best filters. These conclusions are supported by subjective tests with aerial multiband photography. The designed multiband photography concept for rock discrimination is not a practical method of improving sedimentary rock discrimination capabilities.

  7. Nonthermal Linewidths from Serts: Implications for Coronal Heating Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davila, Joseph M.

    1999-01-01

    Observations from Solar Extreme-ultraviolet Research Telescope and Spectrograph (SERTS) are used to determine the nonthermal velocity in the corona for active and quiet Sun regions in 1991 and 1993. A nonthermal velocity of 20-30 km/s is obtained in all solar structures observed at both observing times. These observations can be used to constrain coronal heating models. The idea that magnetic reconnection could provide energy to heat the non-transient corona is not supported by the data.

  8. Design of a planar multiband Sierpinski E-shaped carpet antenna with CPW fed for multi standard wireless terminals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahu, K. Satyabrat; Panda, Asit K.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper Sierpinski E-Carpet antenna based on the implementation of fractal technique is proposed for multiband applications in 2-10 GHz band. There appeared 5 resonant frequencies at 2.35 GHz, 3.5 GHz, 5.503 GHz, 7.248GHz, and 8.79GHz for 2nd iteration. From the return loss plot it is seen that antenna achieved the IEEE Bluetooth/WLAN (2.4-2.484 GHz), WiMAX (3.4-3.69 GHz) and WIFI (5.1-5.825 GHz) frequency band with -10dB return loss. Also nearly omni-directional radiation pattern is observed. A prototype of the design is successfully implemented with close agreement between measurement and simulation result.

  9. Silicon drift detector based X-ray spectroscopy diagnostic system for the study of non-thermal electrons at Aditya tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Purohit, S. Joisa, Y. S.; Raval, J. V.; Ghosh, J.; Tanna, R.; Shukla, B. K.; Bhatt, S. B.

    2014-11-15

    Silicon drift detector based X-ray spectrometer diagnostic was developed to study the non-thermal electron for Aditya tokamak plasma. The diagnostic was mounted on a radial mid plane port at the Aditya. The objective of diagnostic includes the estimation of the non-thermal electron temperature for the ohmically heated plasma. Bi-Maxwellian plasma model was adopted for the temperature estimation. Along with that the study of high Z impurity line radiation from the ECR pre-ionization experiments was also aimed. The performance and first experimental results from the new X-ray spectrometer system are presented.

  10. Silicon drift detector based X-ray spectroscopy diagnostic system for the study of non-thermal electrons at Aditya tokamak.

    PubMed

    Purohit, S; Joisa, Y S; Raval, J V; Ghosh, J; Tanna, R; Shukla, B K; Bhatt, S B

    2014-11-01

    Silicon drift detector based X-ray spectrometer diagnostic was developed to study the non-thermal electron for Aditya tokamak plasma. The diagnostic was mounted on a radial mid plane port at the Aditya. The objective of diagnostic includes the estimation of the non-thermal electron temperature for the ohmically heated plasma. Bi-Maxwellian plasma model was adopted for the temperature estimation. Along with that the study of high Z impurity line radiation from the ECR pre-ionization experiments was also aimed. The performance and first experimental results from the new X-ray spectrometer system are presented.

  11. Evolution of streamer groups in nonthermal plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Okubo, M.

    2015-12-15

    Nonthermal plasmas (NTPs) induced by atmospheric nanosecond pulsed corona discharge have been studied for controlling pollution from combustors, such as boilers, incinerators, and diesel engines. In high-speed short-width high-voltage pulsed corona discharge-induced plasmas, primary streamer evolution is followed by secondary streamer evolution. Though this phenomenon is known experimentally, the details of the structures of the streamers and their evolution mechanisms have not been fully clarified. In this letter, we perform quasi two-dimensional numerical analysis of nonequilibrium NTP induced by a nanosecond positive pulsed corona discharge. The continuum fluid equations for two-temperature nonequilibrium NTP are used as governing equations. In this study, 197 gas phase reactions for 25 chemical species and 21 surface reactions on the inner glass wall surface are considered in an air plasma under atmospheric pressure. The simulated behavior of the streamer groups agrees with experimental observations. Soon after the voltage increases on the reactor, primary streamers are formed, which may transit the complete gap, disappearing near the peak voltage. Next, second streamers appear, disappearing at the end of the applied voltage pulse. The streamer wavelength and the distance between the streamers in the axial direction are determined. Moreover, ozone generation is shown to be more significant in the secondary streamer. This simulation will allow better predictions for nanosecond positive pulsed plasma systems.

  12. Nonthermal Atmospheric Plasmas in Dental Restoration.

    PubMed

    Liu, Y; Liu, Q; Yu, Q S; Wang, Y

    2016-05-01

    It is well known that the service life of contemporary composite restoration is unsatisfactory, and longevity of dentin bonding is one of the major culprits. Bonding is essentially a hybridization process in which dental substrate and adhesive resin interact with each other through an exchange process. Thus, the longevity of dentin bonding can only be improved with enhanced qualities in substrate, adhesive resin, and their interaction within the hybridization zone. This review aims to collect and summarize recent advances in utilizing nonthermal atmospheric plasmas (NTAPs)-a novel technology that delivers highly reactive species in a gaseous medium at or below physiologic temperature-to improve the durability of dentin bonding by addressing these 3 issues simultaneously. Overall, NTAP has demonstrated efficacies in improving a number of critical properties for dentin bonding, including deactivation of oral pathogens, modification of surface chemistry/properties, resin polymerization, improvement in adhesive-dentin interactions, and establishment of auxiliary bonding mechanism. While a few preliminary studies have indicated the benefit of NTAP to bond strength and stability, additional researches are warranted to employ knowledge acquired so far and to evaluate these properties in a systematic way.

  13. Evolution of streamer groups in nonthermal plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okubo, M.

    2015-12-01

    Nonthermal plasmas (NTPs) induced by atmospheric nanosecond pulsed corona discharge have been studied for controlling pollution from combustors, such as boilers, incinerators, and diesel engines. In high-speed short-width high-voltage pulsed corona discharge-induced plasmas, primary streamer evolution is followed by secondary streamer evolution. Though this phenomenon is known experimentally, the details of the structures of the streamers and their evolution mechanisms have not been fully clarified. In this letter, we perform quasi two-dimensional numerical analysis of nonequilibrium NTP induced by a nanosecond positive pulsed corona discharge. The continuum fluid equations for two-temperature nonequilibrium NTP are used as governing equations. In this study, 197 gas phase reactions for 25 chemical species and 21 surface reactions on the inner glass wall surface are considered in an air plasma under atmospheric pressure. The simulated behavior of the streamer groups agrees with experimental observations. Soon after the voltage increases on the reactor, primary streamers are formed, which may transit the complete gap, disappearing near the peak voltage. Next, second streamers appear, disappearing at the end of the applied voltage pulse. The streamer wavelength and the distance between the streamers in the axial direction are determined. Moreover, ozone generation is shown to be more significant in the secondary streamer. This simulation will allow better predictions for nanosecond positive pulsed plasma systems.

  14. Nonthermal Atmospheric Plasmas in Dental Restoration.

    PubMed

    Liu, Y; Liu, Q; Yu, Q S; Wang, Y

    2016-05-01

    It is well known that the service life of contemporary composite restoration is unsatisfactory, and longevity of dentin bonding is one of the major culprits. Bonding is essentially a hybridization process in which dental substrate and adhesive resin interact with each other through an exchange process. Thus, the longevity of dentin bonding can only be improved with enhanced qualities in substrate, adhesive resin, and their interaction within the hybridization zone. This review aims to collect and summarize recent advances in utilizing nonthermal atmospheric plasmas (NTAPs)-a novel technology that delivers highly reactive species in a gaseous medium at or below physiologic temperature-to improve the durability of dentin bonding by addressing these 3 issues simultaneously. Overall, NTAP has demonstrated efficacies in improving a number of critical properties for dentin bonding, including deactivation of oral pathogens, modification of surface chemistry/properties, resin polymerization, improvement in adhesive-dentin interactions, and establishment of auxiliary bonding mechanism. While a few preliminary studies have indicated the benefit of NTAP to bond strength and stability, additional researches are warranted to employ knowledge acquired so far and to evaluate these properties in a systematic way. PMID:26848068

  15. Nonthermal dark matter from cosmic strings

    SciTech Connect

    Cui Yanou; Morrissey, David E.

    2009-04-15

    Cosmic strings can be created in the early universe during symmetry-breaking phase transitions, such as might arise if the gauge structure of the standard model is extended by additional U(1) factors at high energies. Cosmic strings presented in the early universe form a network of long horizon-length segments, as well as a population of closed string loops. The closed loops are unstable against decay, and can be a source of nonthermal particle production. In this work we compute the density of weakly-interacting massive particle dark matter formed by the decay of gauge theory cosmic string loops derived from a network of long strings in the scaling regime or under the influence of frictional forces. We find that for symmetry-breaking scales larger than 10{sup 10} GeV, this mechanism has the potential to account for the observed relic density of dark matter. For symmetry-breaking scales lower than this, the density of dark matter created by loop decays from a scaling string network lies below the observed value. In particular, the cosmic strings originating from a U(1) gauge symmetry broken near the electroweak scale, that could lead to a massive Z{sup '} gauge boson observable at the LHC, produces a negligibly small dark matter relic density by this mechanism.

  16. Radiation mechanisms and physical properties of the γ-ray narrow-line Seyfert 1 galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jianping; Zhou, Bing

    2015-12-01

    We investigate the physical properties and radiation mechanisms of 11 states of five narrow-line Seyfert 1 (NLS1) galaxies detected by the Large Area Telescope on board Fermi through modeling the quasi-simultaneous multi-band observations. We obtain the best-fitting model parameters and their uncertainties for each state with the χ2-minimization procedure and discuss their implications on the characteristics of jet. Similar to blazars, their spectral energy distributions (SEDs) have a two-humped structure and their non-thermal emission can be modelled with the single-zone synchrotron + inverse Compton (IC) model. For all states, the GeV γ-rays may be contributed by the external Compton (EC) emission components. The observations of Fermi are mostly located at the declining stage of the EC humps. Text < 0.5 eV in all cases (Text is the characteristic temperature of external soft photons), suggesting that their radiation zones may be usually located outside of the broad line region (BLR) and the soft photons of Compton scattering mainly come from the dust torus. Compared with the bright Fermi blazars studied by Ghisellini et al. (2014, Nature, 515, 376), the Pjet (the power of the jets) of NLS1 galaxies detected by Fermi is similar to that of the flat spectrum radio quasars (FSRQs) but a little larger than that of the BL Lac objects (BL Lacs). However, a comparison of Pr (the powers of radiations) with the FSRQs and BL Lac objects shows that NLS1 galaxies' Pr has values comparable to BL Lac objects but lower than FSRQs in spite of having similar Pjet values and the same energy carrier (the cold protons) as the FSRQs. Observations indicate that γ-NLS1 galaxies might have lower η (efficiency of gravitational energy release) values than GeV blazars.

  17. Signatures of time reversal symmetry breaking in multiband superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maiti, Saurabh

    Multiband superconductors serve as natural host to several possible gound states that compete with each other. At the boundaries of such competing phases, the system usually compromises and settles for `mixed' phases that can show intriguing properties like co-existence of magnetism and superconductiivty or even co-existence of different superconducting phases. The latter is particularly interesting as it can lead to non-magnetic ground states that spontaneously break Time-Reversal symmetry. While the experimental verification of such states has proved to been challenging, the theoretical investigations have provided exciting new insights into the nature of the ground state and its excitations all of which have experimental consequences of some sort. These include extrinsic properties like spontaneous currents around impurity sites, and intrinsic properties in the form of collective excitations. These collective modes bear a unique signature and should provide clear evidence for time reversal symmetry broken state. While the results are general, in light of recent Raman scattering experiments, its direct relevance to extremely hole doped Ba(1-x)K(FeAs)2 will be presented where a strong competition of s-wave and d-wave ground state is expected.

  18. Multiband superconductivity with competing intra- and interband pair channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kristoffel, N.; Rubin, P.

    2016-03-01

    In multiband superconductivity interband interaction channels creating the pairs of intraband (Wa) and interband (Wb) compositions can appear. Simultaneous functioning of these channels is investigated here. A three-band model where two similar bands (a; b) interact with the itinerant-band has been proposed. The mean field Hamiltonian incorporates three order parameters Δa; Δad; Δb1,2 genetically associated with dispersive bands. Calculated quasiparticle energies and operator averages lead to a coupled nonlinear equation system for the order parameters. Illustrative calculations versus temperature have been made for overlapping bands. At fixed parameters, the basic system has two independent solutions. The free energy has a complicated structure of extremal points. The interaction of channels with intra- and interband points is seen. These channels compete in general. From the point where the gap, type parameters associated with one channel become zero, the other continues as the first channel was logged out. The general behaviour of order parameters distribution is very sensible to Wb. Events of critical nature appear. Weakening of Wb stimulates the formation of closed bubbles built up by the same type parameters from different parallel solutions.

  19. Recording and rendering for art paintings based on multiband data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tominaga, Shoji; Tanaka, Norihiro; Matsumoto, Toshinori

    2001-12-01

    The present paper proposes a method for recoding and rendering of art paintings using only spectral reflectance data of the object surfaces. A multiband camera system with six spectral channels of fixed wavelength bands is used for spectral imaging. No range finder is used for measuring the surface shape. We show that it is possible to render realistic images of the object for different directions of illumination, without using the 3D shape data. First, a method for estimating spectral reflectance for body reflection component of a rough surface is described. Next a method is proposed for practical image rendering. The method is based on interpolation among the images reproduced in the known illumination directions. The color signal for an arbitrary illumination direction is estimated from the color signals observed for three illumination directions. As a result, the image of an art painting object illuminated from any direction is rendered using the reflectance data obtained for three illumination directions. We present algorithms for estimating surface-spectral reflectances of an object and rendering the image for any lighting conditions. An experiment using an oil painting is executed for demonstrating the feasability of the proposed method.

  20. Interleaved numerical renormalization group as an efficient multiband impurity solver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stadler, K. M.; Mitchell, A. K.; von Delft, J.; Weichselbaum, A.

    2016-06-01

    Quantum impurity problems can be solved using the numerical renormalization group (NRG), which involves discretizing the free conduction electron system and mapping to a "Wilson chain." It was shown recently that Wilson chains for different electronic species can be interleaved by use of a modified discretization, dramatically increasing the numerical efficiency of the RG scheme [Phys. Rev. B 89, 121105(R) (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevB.89.121105]. Here we systematically examine the accuracy and efficiency of the "interleaved" NRG (iNRG) method in the context of the single impurity Anderson model, the two-channel Kondo model, and a three-channel Anderson-Hund model. The performance of iNRG is explicitly compared with "standard" NRG (sNRG): when the average number of states kept per iteration is the same in both calculations, the accuracy of iNRG is equivalent to that of sNRG but the computational costs are significantly lower in iNRG when the same symmetries are exploited. Although iNRG weakly breaks SU(N ) channel symmetry (if present), both accuracy and numerical cost are entirely competitive with sNRG exploiting full symmetries. iNRG is therefore shown to be a viable and technically simple alternative to sNRG for high-symmetry models. Moreover, iNRG can be used to solve a range of lower-symmetry multiband problems that are inaccessible to sNRG.

  1. Nonthermal effect of microwave irradiation in nonaqueous enzymatic esterification.

    PubMed

    Wan, Hui-da; Sun, Shi-yu; Hu, Xue-yi; Xia, Yong-mei

    2012-03-01

    Microwave has nonthermal effects on enzymatic reactions, mainly caused by the polarities of the solvents and substrates. In this experiment, a model reaction with caprylic acid and butanol that was catalyzed by lipase from Mucor miehei in alkanes or arenes was employed to investigate the nonthermal effect in nonaqueous enzymatic esterification. With the comparison of the esterification carried by conventional heating and consecutive microwave irradiation, the positive nonthermal effect on the initial reaction rates was found substrate concentration-dependent and could be vanished ostensibly when the substrate concentration was over 2.0 mol L(-1). The polar parameter log P well correlates the solvent polarity with the microwave effect, comparing to dielectric constant and assayed solvatochromic solvent polarity parameters. The log P rule presented in conventional heating-enzymatic esterification still fits in the microwaved enzymatic esterification. Alkanes or arenes with higher log P provided positive nonthermal effect in the range of 2 ≤ log P ≤ 4, but yielded a dramatic decrement after log P = 4. Isomers of same log P with higher dielectric constant received stronger positive nonthermal effect. With lower substrate concentration, the total log P of the reaction mixture has no obvious functional relation with the microwave effect.

  2. Non-thermal X-rays from bow shock runaways: a legacy programme for XMM-Newton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Becker, Michael

    2013-10-01

    Massive stars ejected from their birth place, the so-called runaway massive stars, are likely to produce strong bow shocks through the interaction of the their stellar winds with the interstellar medium. Such shocks have been proven to be efficient at accelerating particles, as revealed by the identification of non-thermal radiation in a couple of objects. This large programme aims at obtaining measurements of the non-thermal X-ray flux of a carefully selected sample of bow shock runaways (BSRs), to quantify their capability to accelerate particles, in relation with their potential contribution to the production of Galactic cosmic-rays. Such an unprecedented collection of data is aimed at constituting some kind of legacy programme for XMM-Newton, before the advent of future generation X-ray observatories.

  3. Multiband optical variability of the blazar S5 0716+714 in outburst state during 2014-2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agarwal, Aditi; Gupta, Alok C.; Bachev, R.; Strigachev, A.; Semkov, E.; Wiita, Paul J.; Fan, J. H.; Pandey, U. S.; Boeva, S.; Spassov, B.

    2016-01-01

    We analysed the multiband optical behaviour of the BL Lacertae object, S5 0716+714, during its outburst state from 2014 November to 2015 March. We took data on 23 nights at three observatories, one in India and two in Bulgaria, making quasi-simultaneous observations in B, V, R, and I bands. We measured multiband optical fluxes, colour, and spectral variations for this blazar on intraday and short time-scales. The source was in a flaring state during the period analysed and displayed intense variability in all wavelengths. R-band magnitude of 11.6 was attained by the target on 2015 January 18, which is the brightest value ever recorded for S5 0716+714. The discrete correlation function method yielded good correlation between the bands with no measurable time lags, implying that radiation in these bands originate from the same region and by the same mechanism. We also used the structure function technique to look for characteristic time-scales in the light curves. During the times of rapid variability, no evidence for the source to display spectral changes with magnitude was found on either of the time-scales. The amplitude of variations tends to increase with increasing frequency with a maximum of ˜22 per cent seen during flaring states in B band. A mild trend of larger variability amplitude as the source brightens was also found. We found the duty cycle of our source during the analysed period to be ˜90 per cent. We also investigated the optical spectral energy distribution of S5 0716+714 using B, V, R, and I data points for 21 nights. We briefly discuss physical mechanisms most likely responsible for its flux and spectral variations.

  4. Synthesis of vitamin D and erythemal irradiance obtained with a multiband filter radiometer and annual variation analysis in Río Gallegos, Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orte, P. F.; Wolfram, E. A.; Salvador, J.; D'Elia, R.; Paes Leme, N.; Quel, E. J.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we examined the annual variability of the erythemal solar radiation (a health risk) and the solar irradiance for synthesis of vitamin D (a health benefit) in Río Gallegos, Argentina. We use ultraviolet radiation measurements made by a multiband filter radiometer GUV-541 and a Brewer spectrophotometer located at CEILAP-RG Station (CITEFA-CONICET) (51° 33' S, 69° 19' W). These measurements are weighted with action spectra published by the CIE (International Commission on Illumination). An action spectrum describes the relative effectiveness of different wavelengths in the generation of a particular biological response. The analyzed data correspond to September 2008-December 2009 period. The methodology used to obtain the erythemal irradiance and synthesis of vitamin D values combines irradiance measurements of a multiband filter radiometer with modeled values (output of radiative transfer model) and measurements of a Brewer spectrophotometer. This procedure increases the instrumental capabilities of this instrument. The synthesis of vitamin D and erythema are affected by UVB solar radiation. Therefore, its effect is strongly dependent of the stratospheric ozone amount, which undergoes large variations in the Río Gallegos city due to ozone hole passage and its influence on these sub-polar latitudes. We observed that could exist cases of sunburn for reasonable exposure in abnormal situations of low total ozone column, resulting in high levels of ultraviolet radiation. Furthermore, the synthesis of vitamin D through exposure to ultraviolet radiation would be lower than the appropriate values to the majority of the year for these latitudes. Therefore it is important to evaluate the annual variation of these quantities realizing seasonal balance between this health risk and this health benefit.

  5. A model for the non-thermal emission of the very massive colliding-wind binary HD 93129A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    del Palacio, Santiago; Bosch-Ramon, Valentí; Romero, Gustavo E.; Benaglia, Paula

    2016-06-01

    Context. Recently, the colliding-wind region of the binary stellar system HD 93129A was resolved for the first time using Very Large Baseline Interferometry. This system, one of the most massive known binaries in our Galaxy, presents non-thermal emission in the radio band, which can be used to infer the physical conditions in the system, and make predictions for the high-energy band. Aims: We intend to constrain some of the unknown parameters of HD 93129A through modeling the non-thermal emitter. We also aim to analyse the detectability of this source in hard X-rays and γ-rays. Finally, we want to predict how the non-thermal emission will evolve in the future, when the stars approach periastron. Methods: A broadband radiative model for the wind-collision region (WCR) has been developed taking into account the evolution of the accelerated particles streaming along the shocked region, the emission by different radiative processes, and the attenuation of the emission propagating through the local matter and radiation fields. We reproduce the available radio data, and make predictions of the emission in hard X-rays and γ-rays under different assumptions. Results: From the analysis of the radio emission, we find that the binary HD 93129A is more likely to have a low inclination and a high eccentricity, with the more massive star being currently closer to the observer. The minimum energy of the non-thermal electrons seems to be between ~20-100 MeV, depending on the intensity of the magnetic field in the WCR. The latter can be in the range ~20-1500 mG. Conclusions: Our model is able to reproduce the observed radio emission, and predicts that the non-thermal radiation from HD 93129A will increase in the near future. With instruments such as NuSTAR, Fermi, and CTA, it will be possible to constrain the relativistic particle content of the source, and other parameters such as the magnetic field strength in the WCR which, in turn, can be used to obtain upper-limits of the

  6. ON THE ROLE AND ORIGIN OF NONTHERMAL ELECTRONS IN HOT ACCRETION FLOWS

    SciTech Connect

    Niedźwiecki, Andrzej; Stȩpnik, Agnieszka

    2015-02-01

    We study the X-ray spectra of tenuous, two-temperature accretion flows using a model involving an exact, Monte Carlo computation of the global Comptonization effect as well as a general relativistic description of both the flow structure and radiative processes. In our previous work, we found that in flows surrounding supermassive black holes, thermal synchrotron radiation is not capable of providing a sufficient seed photon flux to explain the X-ray spectral indices as well as the cut-off energies measured in several best-studied active galactic nuclei (AGNs). In this work, we complete the model by including seed photons provided by nonthermal synchrotron radiation and we find that it allows us to reconcile the hot flow model with the AGN data. We take into account two possible sources of nonthermal electrons. First, we consider e {sup ±} produced by charged-pion decay, which should always be present in the innermost part of a two-temperature flow due to proton-proton interactions. We find that for a weak heating of thermal electrons (small δ) the synchrotron emission of pion-decay e {sup ±} is much stronger than the thermal synchrotron emission in the considered range of bolometric luminosities, L ∼ (10{sup –4}-10{sup –2}) L {sub Edd}. The small-δ model including hadronic effects, in general, agrees with the AGN data, except for the case of a slowly rotating black hole and a thermal distribution of protons. For large δ, the pion-decay e {sup ±} have a negligible effect and, in this model, we consider nonthermal electrons produced by direct acceleration. We find an approximate agreement with the AGN data for the fraction of the heating power of electrons, which is used for the nonthermal acceleration η ∼ 0.1. However, for constant η and δ, the model predicts a positive correlation of the X-ray spectral index with the Eddington ratio, and hence a fine tuning of η and/or δ with the accretion rate is required to explain the negative correlation

  7. Non-thermal Aftertreatment of Particulates

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, S.E.

    2000-08-20

    Modern diesel passenger vehicles employing common rail, high speed direct injection engines are capable of matching the drivability of gasoline powered vehicles with the additional benefit of providing high torque at low engine speed [1]. The diesel engine also offers considerable fuel economy and CO2 emissions advantages. However, future emissions standards [2,3] present a significant challenge for the diesel engine, as its lean exhaust precludes the use of aftertreatment strategies employing 3- way catalytic converters, which operate under stoichiometric conditions. In recent years significant developments by diesel engine manufacturers have greatly reduced emissions of both particulates (PM) and oxides of nitrogen (NOx) [4,5]. However to achieve compliance with future legislative limits it has been suggested that an integrated approach involving a combination of engine modifications and aftertreatment technology [1] will be required. A relatively new approach to exhaust aftertreatment is the application of non-thermal plasma (NTP) or plasma catalyst hybrid systems. These have the potential for treatment of both NOx and PM emissions [6- 8]. The primary focus of recent plasma aftertreatment studies [9-12] has concentrated on the removal of NOx. It has been shown that by combining plasmas with catalysts it is possible to chemically reduce NOx. The most common approach is to use a 2- stage system relying upon the plasma oxidation of hydrocarbons to promote NO to NO2 conversion as a precursor to NO2 reduction over a catalyst. However, relatively little work has yet been published on the oxidation of PM by plasma [ 8,13]. Previous investigations [8] have reported that a suitably designed NTP reactor containing a packing material designed to filter and retain PM can effect the oxidation of PM in diesel exhausts at low temperatures. It has been suggested that the retained PM competes with hydrocarbons for O, and possibly OH, radicals. This is an important consideration

  8. Direct/indirect detection signatures of nonthermally produced dark matter

    SciTech Connect

    Nagai, Minoru; Nakayama, Kazunori

    2008-09-15

    We study direct and indirect detection possibilities of neutralino dark matter produced nonthermally by, e.g., the decay of long-lived particles, as is easily implemented in the case of anomaly or mirage-mediation models. In this scenario, large self-annihilation cross sections are required to account for the present dark matter abundance, and it leads to significant enhancement of the gamma-ray signature from the galactic center and the positron flux from the dark matter annihilation. It is found that GLAST and PAMELA will find the signal or give tight constraints on such nonthermal production scenarios of neutralino dark matter.

  9. Atmospheric pressure non-thermal plasma: Sources and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Napartovich, A. P.

    2008-07-01

    Non-thermal plasma at atmospheric pressure is an inherently unstable object. Nature of discharge plasma instabilities and conditions for observation of uniform non-thermal plasma at atmospheric pressure in different environments will be discussed. Various discharge techniques have been developed, which could support uniform non-thermal plasma with parameters varied in a wide range. Time limitation by plasma instabilities can be overcome by shortening pulse length or by restriction of plasma plug residence time with a fast gas flow. Discharge instabilities leading to formation of filaments or sparks are provoked by a positive feedback between the electric field and plasma density, while the counteracting process is plasma and thermal diffusion. With gas pressure growth the size of plasma fluctuation, which could be stabilized by diffusion, diminishes. As a result, to have long lived uniform plasma one should miniaturize discharge. There exist a number of active methods to organize negative feedback between the electric field and plasma density in order to suppress or, at least, delay the instability. Among them are ballast resistors in combination with electrode sectioning, reactive ballast, electronic feedback, and dielectric barrier across the electric current. The last methods are relevant for ac discharges. In the lecture an overview will be given of different discharge techniques scalable in pressure up to one atmosphere. The interest in this topic is dictated by a potential economic benefit from numerous non-thermal plasma technologies. The spectrum of non-thermal plasma applications is continuously broadening. An incomplete list of known applications includes: plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition, etching, polymerization, gas-phase synthesis, protective coating deposition, toxic and harmful gas decomposition, destruction of warfare agents, electromagnetic wave shielding, polymer surface modifications, gas laser excitation, odor control, plasma assisted

  10. Multiband array detection and location of seismic sources recorded by dense seismic networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poiata, Natalia; Satriano, Claudio; Vilotte, Jean-Pierre; Bernard, Pascal; Obara, Kazushige

    2016-06-01

    We present a new methodology for detection and space-time location of seismic sources based on multiscale, frequency-selective coherence of the wave field recorded by dense large-scale seismic networks and local antennas. The method is designed to enhance coherence of the signal statistical features across the array of sensors and consists of three steps: signal processing, space-time imaging, and detection and location. The first step provides, for each station, a simplified representation of seismic signal by extracting multiscale non-stationary statistical characteristics, through multiband higher-order statistics or envelopes. This signal processing scheme is designed to account for a priori unknown transients, potentially associated with a variety of sources (e.g. earthquakes, tremors), and to prepare data for a better performance in posterior steps. Following space-time imaging is carried through 3-D spatial mapping and summation of station-pair time-delay estimate functions. This step produces time-series of 3-D spatial images representing the likelihood that each pixel makes part of a source. Detection and location is performed in the final step by extracting the local maxima from the 3-D spatial images. We demonstrate the efficiency of the method in detecting and locating seismic sources associated with low signal-to-noise ratio on an example of the aftershock earthquake records from local stations of International Maule Aftershock Deployment in Central Chile. The performance and potential of the method to detect, locate and characterize the energy release associated with possibly mixed seismic radiation from earthquakes and low-frequency tectonic tremors is further tested on continuous data from southwestern Japan.

  11. Multi-band reflector antenna with double-ring element frequency selective subreflector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Te-Kao; Lee, S. W.

    1993-01-01

    Frequency selective subreflectors (FSS) are often employed in the reflector antenna system of a communication satellite or a deep space exploration vehicle for multi-frequency operations. In the past, FSS's have been designed for diplexing two frequency bands. For example, the Voyager FSS was designed to diplex S and X bands and the TDRSS FSS was designed to diplex S and Ku bands. Recently, NASA's CASSINI project requires an FSS to multiplex four frequency (S/X/Ku/Ka) bands. Theoretical analysis and experimental verifications are presented for a multi-band flat pannel FSS with double-ring elements. Both the exact formulation and the thin-ring approximation are described for analyzing and designing this multi-ring patch element FSS. It is found that the thin-ring approximation fails to predict the electrically wide ring element FSS's performance. A single screen double-ring element FSS is demonstrated for the tri-band system that reflects the X-band signal while transmitting through the S- and Ku-band signals. In addition, a double screen FSS with non-similar double-ring elements is presented for the Cassini's four-band system which reflects the X- and Ka-band signals while passing the S- and Ku-band signals. To accurately predict the FSS effects on a dual reflector antenna's radiation pattern, the FSS subreflector's transmitted/reflected field variation as functions of the polarization and incident angles with respect to the local coordinates was taken into account. An FSS transmission/reflection coefficient table is computed for TE and TM polarizations at various incident angles based on the planar FSS model. Next, the hybrid Geometric Optics (GO) and Physical Optics (PO) technique is implemented with linearly interpolating the FSS table to efficiently determine the FSS effects in a dual reflector antenna.

  12. Origin of multi-band emission from the microquasar Cygnus X-1

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jianfu; Lu, Jufu; Xu, Bing

    2014-06-20

    We study the origin of non-thermal emissions from the Galactic black hole X-ray binary Cygnus X-1, which is a confirmed high-mass microquasar. By analogy with the methods used in studies of active galactic nuclei, we propose a two-dimensional, time-dependent radiation model from the microquasar Cygnus X-1. In this model, the evolution equation for relativistic electrons in a conical jet are numerically solved by including escape, adiabatic, and various radiative losses. The radiative processes involved are synchrotron emission, its self-Compton scattering, and inverse Compton scatterings of an accretion disk and its surrounding stellar companion. This model also includes an electromagnetic cascade process of an anisotropic γ-γ interaction. We study the spectral properties of electron evolution and its emission spectral characteristic at different heights of the emission region located in the jet. We find that radio data from Cygnus X-1 are reproduced by the synchrotron emission, the Fermi Large Area Telescope measurements by the synchrotron emission and Comptonization of photons of the stellar companion, and the TeV band emission fluxes by the Comptonization of the stellar photons. Our results show the following. (1) The radio emission region extends from the binary system scales to the termination of the jet. (2) The GeV band emissions should originate from the distance close to the binary system scales. (3) The TeV band emissions could be inside the binary system, and these emissions could be probed by the upcoming Cherenkov Telescope Array. (4) The MeV tail emissions, which produce a strongly linearly polarized signal, are emitted inside the binary system. The location of the emissions is very close to the inner region of the jet.

  13. The Hayabusa Spacecraft Asteroid Multi-band Imaging Camera (AMICA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishiguro, Masateru; Nakamura, Ryosuke; Tholen, David J.; Hirata, Naru; Demura, Hirohide; Nemoto, Etsuko; Nakamura, Akiko M.; Higuchi, Yuta; Sogame, Akito; Yamamoto, Aya; Kitazato, Kohei; Yokota, Yasuhiro; Kubota, Takashi; Hashimoto, Tatsuaki; Saito, Jun

    2010-06-01

    The Hayabusa Spacecraft Asteroid Multi-band Imaging Camera (AMICA) has acquired more than 1400 multispectral and high-resolution images of its target asteroid, 25143 Itokawa, since late August 2005. In this paper, we summarize the design and performance of AMICA. In addition, we describe the calibration methods, assumptions, and models, based on measurements. Major calibration steps include corrections for linearity and modeling and subtraction of bias, dark current, read-out smear, and pixel-to-pixel responsivity variations. AMICA v-band data were calibrated to radiance using in-flight stellar observations. The other band data were calibrated to reflectance by comparing them to ground-based observations to avoid the uncertainty of the solar irradiation in those bands. We found that the AMICA signal was linear with respect to the input signal to an accuracy of ≪1% when the signal level was <3800 DN. We verified that the absolute radiance calibration of the AMICA v-band (0.55 μm) was accurate to 4% or less, the accuracy of the disk-integrated spectra with respect to the AMICA v-band was about 1%, and the pixel-to-pixel responsivity (flat-field) variation was 3% or less. The uncertainty in background zero level was 5 DN. From wide-band observations of star clusters, we found that the AMICA optics have an effective focal length of 120.80 ± 0.03 mm, yielding a field-of-view (FOV) of 5.83° × 5.69°. The resulting geometric distortion model was accurate to within a third of a pixel. We demonstrated an image-restoration technique using the point-spread functions of stars, and confirmed that the technique functions well in all loss-less images. An artifact not corrected by this calibration is scattered light associated with bright disks in the FOV.

  14. A multi-band spoof surface plasmon polariton coupling metasurface based on dispersion engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Guoxiang; Shi, Hongyu; Li, Wei; He, Yuchen; Zhang, Anxue; Xu, Zhuo; Wei, Xiaoyong; Xia, Song

    2016-08-01

    We propose a metasurface to achieve multi-band helicity dependent directional spoof surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) coupling for circular polarized light in the microwave range. Our work shows that the coupling frequencies of spoof SPPs on the gradient metasurface are related to the dispersion relations of the metasurface, which indicate the desired coupling frequency can be manipulated by dispersion engineering. The proposed metasurface has counter-directional phase gradients for different helicity incidents and possesses multiple different dispersion relations by carefully designing the geometric parameters of each unit, which leads to the multi-band helicity-controlled directional spoof SPPs coupling. Both the simulation and experiment show that the multi-band helicity-controlled directional spoof SPPs coupling is achieved with a high efficiency.

  15. An efficient color transfer algorithm for recoloring multiband night vision imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Guangxin; Xu, Shuyan; Zhao, Xin

    2010-04-01

    A color transfer method is presented to give fused multiband nighttime imagery a natural daytime color appearance in a simple and efficient way. Instead of using the traditional nonlinear lαβ space, the proposed method transfers the color distribution of the target image (daylight color image) to the source image (fused multiband nighttime imagery) in the linear YCBCR color space. The YCBCR transformation is simpler and more suitable for image fusion compared to the lαβ conversion. The YCBCR transformation can be extended into a general formalism. And the paper mathematically proves that, for color transfer, using color spaces conforming to this general YCBCR space framework can produce same recoloring results as using the YCBCR space. Experimental results demonstrate that the YCBCR based color transfer method works surprisingly well for transferring natural color characteristics of daylight color images to false color fused multiband nighttime imagery, and moreover, can also be successfully applied to recoloring a variety of color images.

  16. Triangle orientation discrimination performance model for a multiband IR imaging system with human vision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xin; Wang, Xiaorui; Zhang, Jianqi; Bai, Honggang

    2011-08-01

    In support of multiband imaging system performance forecasting, an equation-based triangle orientation discrimination (TOD) model is developed. Specifically, with the characteristic of the test pattern related to spectrum, the mathematical equations for predicting the TOD threshold of the system with distributed fusion architecture in the IR spectrum band are derived based on human vision with the ``k/N'' fusion rule, with emphasis on the impacts of fusion on the threshold. Furthermore, a figure of merit Q related to the TOD calculation results is introduced to analyze the relation of the discrimination performance of multiband imaging system to the size and the spectral difference of test pattern. The preliminary validation with the experiment results suggests that our proposed model can provide a reasonable prediction of the performance for a multiband imaging system.

  17. Investigation of nonthermal particle effects on ionization dynamics in high current density ion beam transport experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, H. K.; MacFarlane, J. J.; Wang, P.; Moses, G. A.; Bailey, J. E.; Olson, C. L.; Welch, D. R.

    1997-01-01

    Light ion inertial fusion experiments require the presence of a moderate density background gas in the transport region to provide charge and current neutralization for a high current density ion beam. In this article, we investigate the effects of nonthermal particles such as beam ions or non-Maxwellian electron distributions on the ionization dynamics of the background gas. In particular, we focus on the case of Li beams being transported in an argon gas. Nonthermal particles as well as thermal electrons are included in time-dependent collisional-radiative calculations to determine time-dependent atomic level populations and charge state distributions in a beam-produced plasma. We also briefly discuss the effects of beam ions and energetic electrons on the visible and vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) spectral regions. It is found that the mean charge state of the gas, and hence the electron density, is significantly increased by collisions with energetic particles. This higher ionization significantly impacts the VUV spectral region, where numerous resonance lines occur. On the other hand, the visible spectrum tends to be less affected because the closely spaced excited states are populated by lower energy thermal electrons.

  18. Time-variable Non-thermal Emission in the Planetary Nebula IRAS 15103-5754

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suárez, Olga; Gómez, José F.; Bendjoya, Philippe; Miranda, Luis F.; Guerrero, Martín A.; Uscanga, Lucero; Green, James A.; Rizzo, J. Ricardo; Ramos-Larios, Gerardo

    2015-06-01

    The beginning of photoionization marks the transition between the post-AGB and planetary nebula (PN) phases of stars with masses ≲ 8 M ⊙ . This critical phase is difficult to observe, as it lasts only a few decades. The combination of jets and magnetic fields, the key agents of PN shaping, could give rise to synchrotron emission, but this has never been observed before in any PNe, since free-free emission from the ionized gas is expected to dominate its radio spectrum. In this paper we report radio continuum observations taken with the ATCA between 1 and 46 GHz of the young PN IRAS 15103-5754. Our observations in 2010-2011 show non-thermal emission compatible with synchrotron emission from electrons accelerated at a shock with spectral index α ≃ -0.54. However, in 2012, the spectral index α ≃ -0.28 is no longer compatible with synchrotron emission in these types of processes. Several hypotheses are discussed to explain this change. The more plausible ones are related to the presence of the newly photoionized region in this young PN: either energy loss of electrons due to Coulomb collisions with the plasma, or selective suppression of synchrotron radiation due to the Razin effect. We postulate that the observed flattening of non-thermal radio spectra could be a hallmark identifying the beginning of the PN phase.

  19. Nonthermal production of WIMPs, cosmic e{sup {+-}} excesses, and {gamma} rays from the Galactic Center

    SciTech Connect

    Bi Xiaojun; Brandenberger, Robert; Gondolo, Paolo; Li Tianjun; Yuan, Qiang; Zhang Xinmin

    2009-11-15

    In this paper we propose a dark matter model and study aspects of its phenomenology. Our model is based on a new dark matter sector with a U(1)' gauge symmetry plus a discrete symmetry added to the standard model of particle physics. The new fields of the dark matter sector have no hadronic charges and couple only to leptons. Our model cannot only give rise to the observed neutrino mass hierarchy, but can also generate the baryon number asymmetry via nonthermal leptogenesis. The breaking of the new U(1)' symmetry produces cosmic strings. The dark matter particles are produced nonthermally from cosmic string loop decay which allows one to obtain sufficiently large annihilation cross sections to explain the observed cosmic ray positron and electron fluxes recently measured by the PAMELA, ATIC, PPB-BETS, Fermi-LAT, and HESS experiments while maintaining the required overall dark matter energy density. The high velocity of the dark matter particles from cosmic string loop decay leads to a low phase space density and thus to a dark matter profile with a constant density core in contrast to what happens in a scenario with thermally produced cold dark matter where the density keeps rising towards the center. As a result, the flux of {gamma} rays radiated from the final leptonic states of dark matter annihilation from the Galactic center is suppressed and satisfies the constraints from the HESS {gamma}-ray observations.

  20. Nonthermal production of WIMPs, cosmic e± excesses, and γ rays from the Galactic Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bi, Xiao-Jun; Brandenberger, Robert; Gondolo, Paolo; Li, Tianjun; Yuan, Qiang; Zhang, Xinmin

    2009-11-01

    In this paper we propose a dark matter model and study aspects of its phenomenology. Our model is based on a new dark matter sector with a U(1)' gauge symmetry plus a discrete symmetry added to the standard model of particle physics. The new fields of the dark matter sector have no hadronic charges and couple only to leptons. Our model cannot only give rise to the observed neutrino mass hierarchy, but can also generate the baryon number asymmetry via nonthermal leptogenesis. The breaking of the new U(1)' symmetry produces cosmic strings. The dark matter particles are produced nonthermally from cosmic string loop decay which allows one to obtain sufficiently large annihilation cross sections to explain the observed cosmic ray positron and electron fluxes recently measured by the PAMELA, ATIC, PPB-BETS, Fermi-LAT, and HESS experiments while maintaining the required overall dark matter energy density. The high velocity of the dark matter particles from cosmic string loop decay leads to a low phase space density and thus to a dark matter profile with a constant density core in contrast to what happens in a scenario with thermally produced cold dark matter where the density keeps rising towards the center. As a result, the flux of γ rays radiated from the final leptonic states of dark matter annihilation from the Galactic center is suppressed and satisfies the constraints from the HESS γ-ray observations.

  1. Non-thermal CMSSM with a 125 GeV Higgs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aparicio, Luis; Cicoli, Michele; Dutta, Bhaskar; Krippendorf, Sven; Maharana, Anshuman; Muia, Francesco; Quevedo, Fernando

    2015-05-01

    We study the phenomenology of the CMSSM/mSUGRA with non-thermal neutralino dark matter. Besides the standard parameters of the CMSSM we include the reheating temperature as an extra parameter. Imposing radiative electroweak symmetry breaking with a Higgs mass around 125 GeV and no dark matter overproduction, we contrast the scenario with different experimental bounds from colliders (LEP, LHC), cosmic microwave background (Planck), direct (LUX, XENON100, CDMS, IceCube) and indirect (Fermi) dark matter searches. The allowed parameter space is characterised by a Higgsino-like LSP with a mass around 300 GeV. The observed dark matter abundance can be saturated for reheating temperatures around 2GeV while larger temperatures require extra non-neutralino dark matter candidates and extend the allowed parameter space. Sfermion and gluino masses are in the few TeV region. These scenarios can be achieved in string models of sequestered supersymmetry breaking which avoid cosmological moduli problems and are compatible with gauge coupling unification. Astrophysics and particle physics experiments will fully investigate this non-thermal scenario in the near future.

  2. Magnetic behavior of dirty multiband superconductors near the upper critical field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silaev, Mikhail

    2016-06-01

    Magnetic properties of dirty multiband superconductors near the upper critical field are studied. The parameter κ2 characterizing magnetization slope is shown to have a significant temperature variation which is quite sensitive to the pairing interactions and relative strengths of intraband impurity scattering. In contrast to single-band superconductors the increase of κ2 at low temperatures can be arbitrarily large determined by the ratio of maximal and minimal diffusion coefficients in different bands. Temperature dependencies of κ2(T ) in two-band MgB2 and iron-based superconductors are shown to be much more sensitive to the multiband effects than the upper critical field Hc 2(T ) .

  3. Cold Plasma as a nonthermal food processing technology

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Contamination of fresh and fresh-cut fruits and vegetables by foodborne pathogens has prompted research into novel interventions. Cold plasma is a nonthermal food processing technology which uses energetic, reactive gases to inactivate contaminating microbes. This flexible sanitizing method uses ele...

  4. Effect of Non-Thermal Processing on Peanut Allergens.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Peanut allergy is on the rise, and the reason is still unclear. Previously, roasting by thermal method has been shown to increase the allergenic potency of peanuts. In this study, we determined if non-thermal methods, such as, pulsed electric fields (PEF) and pulsed UV lights (PUV) affect peanut all...

  5. Cold plasma as a nonthermal food processing technology

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Contamination of meats, seafood, poultry, eggs, and fresh and fresh-cut fruits and vegetables is an ongoing concern. Although well-established in non-food applications for surface treatment and modification, cold plasma is a relatively new food safety intervention. As a nonthermal food processing te...

  6. Nonthermal Plasma-Mediated Cancer Cell Death; Targeted Cancer Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Byul-Bora; Choi, Yeon-Sik; Lee, Hae-Jun; Lee, Jae-Koo; Kim, Uk-Kyu; Kim, Gyoo-Cheon

    Non-thermal air plasma can kill cancer cells. However, there is no selectivity between normal and cancer cells. Therefore, cancer specific antibody conjugated gold nanoparticle (GNP) was pretreated before plasma irradiation. Stimulation of antibody conjugated GNP by plasma treatment resulted in a significant decrease in viability of cancer cells. This technology shows the feasibility of using plasma therapy for killing cancer cells selectively.

  7. Combined effects of laser and non-thermal electron beams on hydrodynamics and shock formation in the Shock Ignition scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicolai, Ph.; Feugeas, J. L.; Touati, M.; Breil, J.; Dubroca, B.; Nguyen-Buy, T.; Ribeyre, X.; Tikhonchuk, V.; Gus'kov, S.

    2014-10-01

    An issue to be addressed in Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) is the detailed description of the kinetic transport of relativistic or non-thermal electrons generated by laser within the time and space scales of the imploded target hydrodynamics. We have developed at CELIA the model M1, a fast and reduced kinetic model for relativistic electron transport. The latter has been implemented into the 2D radiation hydrodynamic code CHIC. In the framework of the Shock Ignition (SI) scheme, it has been shown in simplified conditions that the energy transferred by the non-thermal electrons from the corona to the compressed shell of an ICF target could be an important mechanism for the creation of ablation pressure. Nevertheless, in realistic configurations, taking the density profile and the electron energy spectrum into account, the target has to be carefully designed to avoid deleterious effects on compression efficiency. In addition, the electron energy deposition may modify the laser-driven shock formation and its propagation through the target. The non-thermal electron effects on the shock propagation will be analyzed in a realistic configuration.

  8. Multifrequency constraints on the nonthermal pressure in galaxy clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colafrancesco, S.; Emritte, M. S.; Mhlahlo, N.; Marchegiani, P.

    2014-06-01

    Context. The origin of radio halos in galaxy clusters is still unknown and is the subject of a vibrant debate from both observational and theoretical points of view. In particular, the amount and the nature of nonthermal plasma and of the magnetic field energy density in clusters hosting radio halos is still unclear. Aims: The aim of this paper is to derive an estimate of the pressure ratio X = Pnon - th/Pth between the nonthermal and thermal plasma in radio halo clusters that have combined radio, X-ray and Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) effect observations. Methods: From the simultaneous P1.4 - LX and P1,4 - YSZ correlations for a sample of clusters observed with Planck, we derive a correlation between YSZ and LX that we use to derive a value for X. This is possible since the Compton parameter YSZ is proportional to the total plasma pressure in the cluster, which we characterize as the sum of the thermal and nonthermal pressure, while the X-ray luminosity LX is proportional only to the thermal pressure of the intracluster plasma. Results: Our results indicate that the average (best-fit) value of the pressure ratio in a self-similar cluster formation model is X = 0.55 ± 0.05 in the case of an isothermal β-model with β = 2/3 and a core radius rc = 0.3·R500, holding on average for the cluster sample. We also show that the theoretical prediction for the YSZ - LX correlation in this model has a slope that is steeper than the best-fit value for the available data. The agreement with the data can be recovered if the pressure ratio X decreases with increasing X-ray luminosity as LX-0.96. Conclusions: We conclude that the available data on radio halo clusters indicate a substantial amount of nonthermal pressure in cluster atmospheres whose value must decrease with increasing X-ray luminosity or increasing cluster mass (temperature). This is in agreement with the idea that nonthermal pressure is related to nonthermal sources of cosmic rays that live in cluster cores and inject

  9. Radiation

    NASA Video Gallery

    Outside the protective cocoon of Earth's atmosphere, the universe is full of harmful radiation. Astronauts who live and work in space are exposed not only to ultraviolet rays but also to space radi...

  10. Fabrication and characterization of multiband solar cells based on highly mismatched alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López, N.; Braña, A. F.; García Núñez, C.; Hernández, M. J.; Cervera, M.; Martínez, M.; Yu, K. M.; Walukiewicz, W.; García, B. J.

    2015-10-01

    Multiband solar cells are one type of third generation photovoltaic devices in which an increase of the power conversion efficiency is achieved through the absorption of low energy photons while preserving a large band gap that determines the open circuit voltage. The ability to absorb photons from different parts of the solar spectrum originates from the presence of an intermediate energy band located within the band gap of the material. This intermediate band, acting as a stepping stone allows the absorption of low energy photons to transfer electrons from the valence band to the conduction band by a sequential two photons absorption process. It has been demonstrated that highly mismatched alloys offer a potential to be used as a model material system for practical realization of multiband solar cells. Dilute nitride GaAs1-xNx highly mismatched alloy with low mole fraction of N is a prototypical multiband semiconductor with a well-defined intermediate band. Currently, we are using chemical beam epitaxy to synthesize dilute nitride highly mismatched alloys. The materials are characterized by a variety of structural and optical methods to optimize their properties for multiband photovoltaic devices.

  11. Ultrahigh Efficiency Multiband Solar Cells Final Report forDirector's Innovation Initiative Project DII-2005-1221

    SciTech Connect

    Ager III, Joel W.; Walukiewicz, W.; Yu, Kin Man

    2006-03-29

    The unique properties of the semiconductor ZnTeO were explored and developed to make multiband solar cells. Like a multijunction cell, multiband solar cells use different energy gaps to convert the majority of the solar spectrum to electrical current while minimizing losses due to heating. Unlike a multijunction cell, this is accomplished within a single material in a multiband cell. ZnTe{sub 1-x}O{sub x} films with x up to 2% were synthesized and shown to have the requisite unique band structure (2 conduction bands) for multiband function. Prototype solar cells based on an n-type ZnTe{sub 1-x}O{sub x} multiband top layer and a p-type ZnTe substrate were fabricated. Contacts to the cell and the series resistance of the substrate were identified as challenges for good electrical performance. Both photovoltage and small photocurrents were demonstrated under AMO illumination. A second semiconductor system, GaN{sub x}As{sub 1-y-x}P{sub y}, was shown to have multiband function. This alloy system may have the greatest potential to realize the promise of high efficiency multiband solar cells because of the relatively advanced technology base that exists for the manufacturing of III-V-alloy-based IC and opto-electronic devices (including multijunction solar cells).

  12. A fluid-particle hybrid framework for the PLUTO code: applications to non-thermal emission in jets.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaidya, B.; Mignone, A.; Bodo, G.; Massaglia, S.

    2016-05-01

    We present an implementation of a fully parallel hybrid framework for the evolution of Lagrangian particles coupled to a MHD fluid for the PLUTO code. For the applications of interest, particles represent ensembles of electrons whose spectral energy distribution is governed by a kinetic transport equation that takes into account different physical processes such as diffusive shock acceleration, synchrotron emission and adiabatic expansion. An application to model non-thermal emission from extragalactic jets shows the effectiveness and strength of the approach in describing not only the dynamics but also the radiation properties of jets and, in general, of high-energy astrophysical plasma environments.

  13. A bidirectional radio over fiber system with multiband-signal generation using one single-drive MZM.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liang; Hu, Xiaofeng; Cao, Pan; Wang, Tao; Su, Yikai

    2011-03-14

    We propose and experimentally demonstrate a simple and cost-effective bidirectional radio-over-fiber (RoF) system for transmission of downstream multiband signals and upstream data. At the central station (CS), the multiband data consisting of baseband, micro-wave (MW) and millimeter-wave (MMW) signals are generated using only one single-drive x-cut Mach-Zehnder modulator (MZM), which is driven by a clock signal at radio frequency (RF) port and an electrical data at bias port. Upstream data transmission is realized by re-modulation of filtered frequency-shift-keying (FSK) signal, selected from the multiband signals.

  14. THE NON-THERMAL INTRACLUSTER MEDIUM

    SciTech Connect

    Lieu, Richard; Bonamente, Massimiliano; Quenby, John

    2010-10-01

    WMAP's detection of the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect at a much reduced level among several large samples of rich clusters is interpreted in terms of conventional physics. It has been suggested that the central soft X-ray and EUV excess found in some clusters cannot be of thermal origin, due to problems with rapid gas cooling and the persistent non-detection of the O VII line, but may arise from inverse Compton scattering between intracluster relativistic electrons and the cosmic microwave background (CMB). In fact, recent XMM-Newton observations of the soft X-rays from Coma and Abell 3112 are equally well fitted by a power law or a thermal virialized gas. Therefore, the missing Sunyaev-Zel'dovich flux could partly be due to an overestimate of the central density of virialized electrons which scatter the CMB. Synchrotron radiation in an intracluster magnetic field of strength of a few {mu}G is responsible for significant additional electron energy loss. Equipartition between relativistic particle and magnetic field energy densities is a realistic possibility. GHz radiation data from a Coma cluster halo yields information on the high-energy steepening of the cluster relativistic electron spectrum. Cluster microwave emission in the WMAP passbands by higher energy cosmic-ray electrons and gamma-ray emission from an accompanying cosmic-ray proton flux are also considered. The energetic electrons could originate from active galactic nucleus jet injection, then distributed cluster wide by Alfven wave sweeping, with accompanying in situ Fermi acceleration.

  15. Characterizing canopy nonrandomness with a multiband vegetation imager (MVI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kucharik, C. J.; Norman, J. M.; Murdock, L. M.; Gower, S. T.

    1997-12-01

    A new method for measuring plant canopy nonrandomness and other architectural components has been developed using a 16 bit (65535 gray scale levels) charged-coupled device (CCD) camera that captures images of plant canopies in two wavelength bands. This complete system is referred to as a multiband vegetation imager (MVI). The use of two wavelength bands (visible (VIS) 400-620 nm and near infrared (NIR) 720-950 nm) permits identification of sunlit and shaded foliage, sunlit and shaded branch area, clouds, and blue sky based on the camera's resolution, and the varying spectral properties that scene components have in the two wavelength bands. This approach is different from other canopy imaging methods (such as fish-eye photography) because it emphasizes measuring the fraction of an image occupied by various scene components (branches, shaded leaves, sunlit leaves) under different sky conditions rather than simply the canopy gap fraction under uniform sky conditions. The MVI has been used during the Boreal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study (BOREAS) in aspen (Populus tremuloides) and balsam poplar (Populus balsamifera) to estimate architectural characteristics of each canopy. The leaf area index (LAI), sunlit LAI, and degree of nonrandomness within a canopy are architectural properties that have been measured with the MVI. Using a crown-based Monte Carlo model for nonrandom canopies, nonrandomness factors are calculated from MVI data using two approaches (gap fraction and gap-size distribution theories) to correct total and sunlit LAI estimates from indirect methods that assume random foliage distributions. Canopy nonrandomness factors obtained from analyzing the gap-size distribution in a Monte Carlo model are shown to be a function of path length (angle) through the canopy (Ωe(θ)); thus we suggest that LAI-2000 indirect measurements of LAI be adjusted with the value of Ωe(θ) at θ=35° because this is the mean angle at which the canopy gap fraction is measured by the

  16. Non-thermal emission in astrophysical environments: From pulsars to supernova remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lomiashvili, David

    The study of electromagnetic radiation from distant astrophysical objects provides essential data in understanding physics of these sources. In particular, non-thermal radiation provides great insight into the properties of local environments, particle populations, and emission mechanisms, knowledge which otherwise would remain untapped. Throughout the projects conducted for this dissertation, we modeled certain aspects of observed non-thermal emission from three classes of sources: radio pulsars, pulsar wind nebulae, and supernova remnants. Orbital variation in the double pulsar system PSR J0737-3039A/B can be used to probe the details of the magnetospheric structure of pulsar B. Strongly magnetized wind from pulsar A distorts the magnetosphere of pulsar B in a way similar to the solar wind's distortion of the Earth's magnetosphere. Using the two complimentary models of pulsar B's magnetosphere, adapted from the Earth's magnetosphere models by Dungey and Tsyganenko, we determine the precise location of the coherent radio emission generation region in pulsar B's magnetosphere. This analysis is complemented by modeling the observed evolution of the pulse profiles of B due to geodetic precession. The emission region is located at about 3750 stellar radii and has a horseshoe-like shape centered on the polar magnetic field lines. The best fit angular parameters of the emission region indicate that radio emission is generated on the field lines which, according to the theoretical models, originate close to the poles and carry the maximum current. When considered together, not only do the results of the two models converge, they can explain why the modulation of B's radio emission at A's period is observed only within a certain orbital phase region. We discuss the implications of these results for pulsar magnetospheric models and mechanisms of coherent radio emission generation. We also developed a spatially-resolved, analytic model for the high-energy non-thermal

  17. The Non-thermal Intracluster Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lieu, Richard; Quenby, John; Bonamente, Massimiliano

    2010-10-01

    WMAP's detection of the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect at a much reduced level among several large samples of rich clusters is interpreted in terms of conventional physics. It has been suggested that the central soft X-ray and EUV excess found in some clusters cannot be of thermal origin, due to problems with rapid gas cooling and the persistent non-detection of the O VII line, but may arise from inverse Compton scattering between intracluster relativistic electrons and the cosmic microwave background (CMB). In fact, recent XMM-Newton observations of the soft X-rays from Coma and Abell 3112 are equally well fitted by a power law or a thermal virialized gas. Therefore, the missing Sunyaev-Zel'dovich flux could partly be due to an overestimate of the central density of virialized electrons which scatter the CMB. Synchrotron radiation in an intracluster magnetic field of strength of a few μG is responsible for significant additional electron energy loss. Equipartition between relativistic particle and magnetic field energy densities is a realistic possibility. GHz radiation data from a Coma cluster halo yields information on the high-energy steepening of the cluster relativistic electron spectrum. Cluster microwave emission in the WMAP passbands by higher energy cosmic-ray electrons and gamma-ray emission from an accompanying cosmic-ray proton flux are also considered. The energetic electrons could originate from active galactic nucleus jet injection, then distributed cluster wide by Alfvén wave sweeping, with accompanying in situ Fermi acceleration.

  18. Non-thermal irreversible electroporation for deep intracranial disorders.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Paulo A; Neal, Robert E; Rossmeisl, John H; Davalos, Rafael V

    2010-01-01

    Non-thermal irreversible electroporation (N-TIRE) is a new minimally invasive technique to kill undesirable tissue. We build on our previous intracranial studies in order to evaluate the possibility of using N-TIRE for deep intracranial disorders. In this manuscript we describe a minimally invasive computed tomography (CT) guided N-TIRE procedure in white matter. In addition, we report the electric field threshold needed for white matter ablation (630 - 875 V/cm) using four sets of twenty 50 µs pulses at a voltage-to-distance ratio of 1000 V/cm. We also confirm the non-thermal aspect of the technique with real time temperature data measured at the electrode-tissue interface. PMID:21095962

  19. On nonthermal processes in the core of the Sun

    SciTech Connect

    Voronchev, V. T.

    2015-06-15

    Nonthermal nuclear processes in the core of the Sun that are induced by fast particles appearing as nonthermalized products of exothermic reactions are discussed. Among other things, properties of 8.7-MeV alpha particles originating from the reaction p + {sup 7}Li → 2α are studied, and their effect on the balance of the processes p + {sup 17}O ai α + {sup 14}N, which close the CNO-II cycle, is determined. It is shown that the effective temperature of fast alpha particles is approximately 1000 times as high as the temperature of the plasma in the Sun’s core and that, under some specific conditions, the rate of the reverse reaction α + {sup 14}N → p + {sup 17}O may be one to two orders of magnitude higher than the rate of the forward reaction p + {sup 17}O → α + {sup 14}N.

  20. Review of the integrated thermal and nonthermal treatment system studies

    SciTech Connect

    1996-10-01

    This report contains a review and evaluation of three systems analysis studies performed by LITCO on integrated thermal treatment systems and integrated nonthermal treatment systems for the remediation of mixed low-level waste stored throughout the US Department of Energy weapons complex. The review was performed by an independent team of nine researchers from the Energy and Environmental Research Center, Science Applications International Corporation, the Waste Policy Institute, and Virginia Tech. The purpose of this review was to (1) determine whether the assumptions of the studies were adequate to produce an unbiased review of both thermal and nonthermal systems, (2) to identify the critical areas of the studies that would benefit from further investigation, and (3) to develop a standard template that could be used in future studies to assure a sound application of systems engineering.

  1. Auroral electrostatic solitons and supersolitons in a magnetized nonthermal plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Rufai, O. R.

    2015-05-15

    Exploiting the spacecraft measurements in the auroral region, finite amplitude nonlinear low frequency electrostatic solitons and supersolitons in a magnetized plasma consisting of cold ions fluid, Boltzmann protons, and nonthermal hot electrons are studied by applying a pseudo-potential technique. The localized solution of the nonlinear structures is obtained through the charge neutrality condition. Further numerical investigation shows the existence of supersoliton solutions at supersonic Mach numbers regime. The amplitude of ion-acoustic structures decreased with an increase in nonthermal electrons and ion density ratio. For the plasma parameters relevant to the auroral zone of the Earth's magnetosphere, the electric field amplitude of supersolitons is found to be about 9 mV/m, which is in agreement with satellite observations.

  2. Non-thermal fixed point in a holographic superfluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ewerz, Carlo; Gasenzer, Thomas; Karl, Markus; Samberg, Andreas

    2015-05-01

    We study the far-from-equilibrium dynamics of a (2 + 1)-dimensional super-fluid at finite temperature and chemical potential using its holographic description in terms of a gravitational system in 3 + 1 dimensions. Starting from various initial conditions corresponding to ensembles of vortex defects we numerically evolve the system to long times. At intermediate times the system exhibits Kolmogorov scaling the emergence of which depends on the choice of initial conditions. We further observe a universal late- time regime in which the occupation spectrum and different length scales of the superfluid exhibit scaling behaviour. We study these scaling laws in view of superfluid turbulence and interpret the universal late-time regime as a non-thermal fixed point of the dynamical evolution. In the holographic superfluid the non-thermal fixed point can be understood as a stationary point of the classical equations of motion of the dual gravitational description.

  3. Process modeling for the Integrated Nonthermal Treatment System (INTS) study

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, B.W.

    1997-04-01

    This report describes the process modeling done in support of the Integrated Nonthermal Treatment System (INTS) study. This study was performed to supplement the Integrated Thermal Treatment System (ITTS) study and comprises five conceptual treatment systems that treat DOE contract-handled mixed low-level wastes (MLLW) at temperatures of less than 350{degrees}F. ASPEN PLUS, a chemical process simulator, was used to model the systems. Nonthermal treatment systems were developed as part of the INTS study and include sufficient processing steps to treat the entire inventory of MLLW. The final result of the modeling is a process flowsheet with a detailed mass and energy balance. In contrast to the ITTS study, which modeled only the main treatment system, the INTS study modeled each of the various processing steps with ASPEN PLUS, release 9.1-1. Trace constituents, such as radionuclides and minor pollutant species, were not included in the calculations.

  4. CO2 reduction using adsorption followed by nonthermal plasma treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakajima, Kenji; Takahashi, Kazuya; Tanaka, Masanari; Kuroki, Tomoyuki; Okubo, Masaaki

    2015-10-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) is one of the main substances linked to global warming, and its emission should be reduced. In this study, a CO2 reduction treatment using an adsorbent and a nonthermal plasma flow is investigated. This treatment comprises a physical adsorption process and nitrogen (N2) plasma reduction process. In the physical adsorption process, CO2 is adsorbed by the adsorbent. In the N2 plasma reduction process, the adsorbed CO2 is reduced to CO by a nonthermal plasma flow that is generated by a plasma reactor with a circulating N2 plasma flow. The generated CO can be reused as a fuel. We estimate this experimental results by calculating conversion efficiency of CO2 to CO. In the N2 plasma reduction process, the CO concentration reaches approximately 1%, regardless of the number of experiments, and conversion efficiency reaches at most 5.3%.

  5. Non-thermal plasma for exhaust gases treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alva R., Elvia; Pacheco P., Marquidia; Gómez B., Fernando; Pacheco P., Joel; Colín C., Arturo; Sánchez-Mendieta, Víctor; Valdivia B., Ricardo; Santana D., Alfredo; Huertas C., José; Frías P., Hilda

    2015-09-01

    This article describes a study on a non-thermal plasma device to treat exhaust gases in an internal combustion engine. Several tests using a plasma device to treat exhaust gases are conducted on a Honda GX200-196 cm3 engine at different rotational speeds. A plasma reactor could be efficient in degrading nitrogen oxides and particulate matter. Monoxide and carbon dioxide treatment is minimal. However, achieving 1%-3% degradation may be interesting to reduce the emission of greenhouse gases.

  6. Collisional heating by nonthermal electrons in a tapered magnetic loop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chandrashekar, S.; Emslie, A. Gordon

    1987-01-01

    The behavior of nonthermal electrons ejected into a tapered magnetic loop, under the action of both Coulomb collisional and magnetic field gradient forces is studied. An approximate analytic formula for the heating rate as a function of distance along the loop is developed, and found to be in good agreement with exact numerical solutions of the relevant equations. Such a formula is useful as a source term in many situations, such as hydrodynamic simulations of atmospheric response to flare energy input.

  7. Corona: Coordinated research on non-thermal processes in astrophysics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mullan, Dermott J.

    1991-01-01

    Several problems in astrophysics are examined where departures from purely thermal behavior are expected to produce effects which are detectable by a variety of NASA satellites. The problems identified as worthy of study include coronal heating in stars, deposition of non-thermal particle energy in stars from external sources, and turbulence in atmospheres and winds of stars. The progress in solving these problems is summarized.

  8. Detection of nonthermal melting by ultrafast X-ray diffraction.

    PubMed

    Siders, C W; Cavalleri, A; Sokolowski-Tinten, K; Tóth, C; Guo, T; Kammler, M; Horn von Hoegen, M; Wilson, K R; von der Linde, D; Barty, C P

    1999-11-12

    Using ultrafast, time-resolved, 1.54 angstrom x-ray diffraction, thermal and ultrafast nonthermal melting of germanium, involving passage through nonequilibrium extreme states of matter, was observed. Such ultrafast, optical-pump, x-ray diffraction probe measurements provide a way to study many other transient processes in physics, chemistry, and biology, including direct observation of the atomic motion by which many solid-state processes and chemical and biochemical reactions take place.

  9. Non-thermal plasma mills bacteria: Scanning electron microscopy observations

    SciTech Connect

    Lunov, O. Churpita, O.; Zablotskii, V.; Jäger, A.; Dejneka, A.; Deyneka, I. G.; Meshkovskii, I. K.; Syková, E.; Kubinová, Š.

    2015-02-02

    Non-thermal plasmas hold great promise for a variety of biomedical applications. To ensure safe clinical application of plasma, a rigorous analysis of plasma-induced effects on cell functions is required. Yet mechanisms of bacteria deactivation by non-thermal plasma remain largely unknown. We therefore analyzed the influence of low-temperature atmospheric plasma on Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Using scanning electron microscopy, we demonstrate that both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria strains in a minute were completely destroyed by helium plasma. In contrast, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) were not affected by the same treatment. Furthermore, histopathological analysis of hematoxylin and eosin–stained rat skin sections from plasma–treated animals did not reveal any abnormalities in comparison to control ones. We discuss possible physical mechanisms leading to the shred of bacteria under non-thermal plasma irradiation. Our findings disclose how helium plasma destroys bacteria and demonstrates the safe use of plasma treatment for MSCs and skin cells, highlighting the favorability of plasma applications for chronic wound therapy.

  10. Review of the integrated thermal and nonthermal treatment system studies

    SciTech Connect

    Durrani, H.A.; Schmidt, L.J.; Erickson, T.A.; Sondreal, E.A.; Erjavec, J.; Steadman, E.N.; Fabrycky, W.J.; Wilson, J.S.; Musich, M.A.

    1996-07-01

    This report analyzes three systems engineering (SE) studies performed on integrated thermal treatment systems (ITTSs) and integrated nonthermal treatment systems (INTSs) for the remediation of mixed low-level waste (MLLW) stored throughout the US Department of Energy (DOE) weapons complex. The review was performed by an independent team of nine researchers from the Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC), Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC), the Waste Policy Institute (WPI), and Virginia Tech (VT). The three studies reviewed were as follows: Integrated Thermal Treatment System Study, Phase 1--issued July 1994; Integrated Thermal Treatment System Study, Phase 2--issued February 1996; and Integrated Nonthermal Treatment System Study--drafted March 1996. The purpose of this review was to (1) determine whether the assumptions taken in the studies might bias the resulting economic evaluations of both thermal and nonthermal systems, (2) identify the critical areas of the studies that would benefit from further investigation, and (3) develop a standard template that could be used in future studies to produce sound SE applications.

  11. Review of the integrated thermal and nonthermal treatment system studies

    SciTech Connect

    1996-08-01

    This report contains a review and evaluation of three systems analysis studies performed by LITCO on integrated thermal treatment systems and integrated nonthermal treatment systems for the remediation of mixed low-level waste stored throughout the US Department of Energy weapons complex. The review was performed by an independent team of nine researchers from the Energy and Environmental Research Center, Science Applications International Corporation, the Waste Policy Institute, and Virginia Tech. The three studies reviewed were as follows: Integrated Thermal Treatment System Study, Phase 1--issued July 1994; Integrated Thermal Treatment System Study, Phase 2--issued February 1996; and Integrated Nonthermal Treatment System Study--drafted March 1996. The purpose of this review was to (1) determine whether the assumptions of the studies were adequate to produce an unbiased review of both thermal and nonthermal systems, (2) to identify the critical areas of the studies that would benefit from further investigation, and (3) to develop a standard template that could be used in future studies to assure a sound application of systems engineering.

  12. Toward a Philosophy and Theory of Volumetric Nonthermal Processing.

    PubMed

    Sastry, Sudhir K

    2016-06-01

    Nonthermal processes for food preservation have been under intensive investigation for about the past quarter century, with varying degrees of success. We focus this discussion on two volumetrically acting nonthermal processes, high pressure processing (HPP) and pulsed electric fields (PEF), with emphasis on scientific understanding of each, and the research questions that need to be addressed for each to be more successful in the future. We discuss the character or "philosophy" of food preservation, with a question about the nature of the kill step(s), and the sensing challenges that need to be addressed. For HPP, key questions and needs center around whether its nonthermal effectiveness can be increased by increased pressures or pulsing, the theoretical treatment of rates of reaction as influenced by pressure, the assumption of uniform pressure distribution, and the need for (and difficulties involved in) in-situ measurement. For PEF, the questions include the rationale for pulsing, difficulties involved in continuous flow treatment chambers, the difference between electroporation theory and experimental observations, and the difficulties involved in in-situ measurement and monitoring of electric field distribution.

  13. Non-thermal plasma mills bacteria: Scanning electron microscopy observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lunov, O.; Churpita, O.; Zablotskii, V.; Deyneka, I. G.; Meshkovskii, I. K.; Jäger, A.; Syková, E.; Kubinová, Š.; Dejneka, A.

    2015-02-01

    Non-thermal plasmas hold great promise for a variety of biomedical applications. To ensure safe clinical application of plasma, a rigorous analysis of plasma-induced effects on cell functions is required. Yet mechanisms of bacteria deactivation by non-thermal plasma remain largely unknown. We therefore analyzed the influence of low-temperature atmospheric plasma on Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Using scanning electron microscopy, we demonstrate that both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria strains in a minute were completely destroyed by helium plasma. In contrast, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) were not affected by the same treatment. Furthermore, histopathological analysis of hematoxylin and eosin-stained rat skin sections from plasma-treated animals did not reveal any abnormalities in comparison to control ones. We discuss possible physical mechanisms leading to the shred of bacteria under non-thermal plasma irradiation. Our findings disclose how helium plasma destroys bacteria and demonstrates the safe use of plasma treatment for MSCs and skin cells, highlighting the favorability of plasma applications for chronic wound therapy.

  14. Nonthermal atmospheric argon plasma jet effects on Escherichia coli biomacromolecules.

    PubMed

    Hosseinzadeh Colagar, Abasalt; Memariani, Hamed; Sohbatzadeh, Farshad; Valinataj Omran, Azadeh

    2013-12-01

    Nonthermal atmospheric plasma jet, a promising technology based on ionized gas at low temperatures, can be applied for disinfection of contaminated surfaces. In this study, Escherichia coli cells and their macromolecules were exposed to the nonthermal atmospheric argon plasma jet for different time durations. Total protein, genomic DNA, and malondialdehyde (MDA) levels of E. coli were assessed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and silver staining; agarose gel electrophoresis; and measurement of absorbance at 534 nm, respectively. After exposure, the spectroscopic results of liquid samples indicated that the survival reduction of E. coli can reach to 100 % in an exposure time of 600 s. Moreover, inactivation zones of E. coli, DNA degradation, and MDA levels were significantly increased. Additionally, banding patterns of total protein were changed and amino acid concentrations increased following ninhydrin test. The experimental results suggest that the nonthermal plasma could serve as an effective instrument for both sterilizing E. coli and degrading macromolecules from the surface of the objects being sterilized.

  15. Energetic consequences of thermal and nonthermal food processing.

    PubMed

    Carmody, Rachel N; Weintraub, Gil S; Wrangham, Richard W

    2011-11-29

    Processing food extensively by thermal and nonthermal techniques is a unique and universal human practice. Food processing increases palatability and edibility and has been argued to increase energy gain. Although energy gain is a well-known effect from cooking starch-rich foods, the idea that cooking meat increases energy gain has never been tested. Moreover, the relative energetic advantages of cooking and nonthermal processing have not been assessed, whether for meat or starch-rich foods. Here, we describe a system for characterizing the energetic effects of cooking and nonthermal food processing. Using mice as a model, we show that cooking substantially increases the energy gained from meat, leading to elevations in body mass that are not attributable to differences in food intake or activity levels. The positive energetic effects of cooking were found to be superior to the effects of pounding in both meat and starch-rich tubers, a conclusion further supported by food preferences in fasted animals. Our results indicate significant contributions from cooking to both modern and ancestral human energy budgets. They also illuminate a weakness in current food labeling practices, which systematically overestimate the caloric potential of poorly processed foods. PMID:22065771

  16. Toward a Philosophy and Theory of Volumetric Nonthermal Processing.

    PubMed

    Sastry, Sudhir K

    2016-06-01

    Nonthermal processes for food preservation have been under intensive investigation for about the past quarter century, with varying degrees of success. We focus this discussion on two volumetrically acting nonthermal processes, high pressure processing (HPP) and pulsed electric fields (PEF), with emphasis on scientific understanding of each, and the research questions that need to be addressed for each to be more successful in the future. We discuss the character or "philosophy" of food preservation, with a question about the nature of the kill step(s), and the sensing challenges that need to be addressed. For HPP, key questions and needs center around whether its nonthermal effectiveness can be increased by increased pressures or pulsing, the theoretical treatment of rates of reaction as influenced by pressure, the assumption of uniform pressure distribution, and the need for (and difficulties involved in) in-situ measurement. For PEF, the questions include the rationale for pulsing, difficulties involved in continuous flow treatment chambers, the difference between electroporation theory and experimental observations, and the difficulties involved in in-situ measurement and monitoring of electric field distribution. PMID:27149642

  17. Energetic consequences of thermal and nonthermal food processing.

    PubMed

    Carmody, Rachel N; Weintraub, Gil S; Wrangham, Richard W

    2011-11-29

    Processing food extensively by thermal and nonthermal techniques is a unique and universal human practice. Food processing increases palatability and edibility and has been argued to increase energy gain. Although energy gain is a well-known effect from cooking starch-rich foods, the idea that cooking meat increases energy gain has never been tested. Moreover, the relative energetic advantages of cooking and nonthermal processing have not been assessed, whether for meat or starch-rich foods. Here, we describe a system for characterizing the energetic effects of cooking and nonthermal food processing. Using mice as a model, we show that cooking substantially increases the energy gained from meat, leading to elevations in body mass that are not attributable to differences in food intake or activity levels. The positive energetic effects of cooking were found to be superior to the effects of pounding in both meat and starch-rich tubers, a conclusion further supported by food preferences in fasted animals. Our results indicate significant contributions from cooking to both modern and ancestral human energy budgets. They also illuminate a weakness in current food labeling practices, which systematically overestimate the caloric potential of poorly processed foods.

  18. Energetic consequences of thermal and nonthermal food processing

    PubMed Central

    Carmody, Rachel N.; Weintraub, Gil S.; Wrangham, Richard W.

    2011-01-01

    Processing food extensively by thermal and nonthermal techniques is a unique and universal human practice. Food processing increases palatability and edibility and has been argued to increase energy gain. Although energy gain is a well-known effect from cooking starch-rich foods, the idea that cooking meat increases energy gain has never been tested. Moreover, the relative energetic advantages of cooking and nonthermal processing have not been assessed, whether for meat or starch-rich foods. Here, we describe a system for characterizing the energetic effects of cooking and nonthermal food processing. Using mice as a model, we show that cooking substantially increases the energy gained from meat, leading to elevations in body mass that are not attributable to differences in food intake or activity levels. The positive energetic effects of cooking were found to be superior to the effects of pounding in both meat and starch-rich tubers, a conclusion further supported by food preferences in fasted animals. Our results indicate significant contributions from cooking to both modern and ancestral human energy budgets. They also illuminate a weakness in current food labeling practices, which systematically overestimate the caloric potential of poorly processed foods. PMID:22065771

  19. Analysis of Multi-band Photometry of Violently Variable Gamma-Ray Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadowaki, Jennifer; Malkan, M. A.

    2013-01-01

    We studied the relationship between rapid variations in the jet intensities and changes in accretion disk activity of blazar subtype, Flat Spectrum Radio Quasar (FSRQ). Fifteen known FSRQs were specifically chosen for their prominent big blue bumps with redshifts near z=1, in order for the rest-frame UV to be redshifted into the blue-band pass. Flux changes for these 15 FSRQs were monitored for 15 observational nights in BVRI-bands and 20 nights in JHK-bands over a 12 month period using NASA's Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope, Lick Observatory's Nickel Telescope, and Kitt Peak National Observatory's 2.1 m Telescope. With 6.3’ x 6.3’ field of view for Nickel’s Direct Imaging Camera and 20’ x 20’ for Flamingos IR Imaging Spectrometer, approximately a half dozen, bright and non-variable stars were available to compare the concurrent changes in each of the quasar’s brightness. This process of differential photometry yielded photometric measurements of quasar brightness with 1-2% level precision. Light curves were then created for these 15 monitored quasars in optical, infrared, and gamma-ray energy bands. Dominating the redder emission spectrum due to non-thermal, synchrotron radiation and compton scattering of gamma-rays off high energy electrons, jet activity was compared to bluer spectral regions having strong accretion disk component with rest frame of approximately 2000 Angstroms. Most of the targeted FSRQs varied significantly over the 12 month monitoring period, with varying levels of fluctuations for each observed wavelength. Some correlations between gamma-ray and optical wavelengths were also present, which will be further discussed in the poster.

  20. Nonthermal effects of acceleration in the resonance interaction between two uniformly accelerated atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rizzuto, Lucia; Lattuca, Margherita; Marino, Jamir; Noto, Antonio; Spagnolo, Salvatore; Zhou, Wenting; Passante, Roberto

    2016-07-01

    We study the resonance interaction between two uniformly accelerated identical atoms, one excited and the other in the ground state, prepared in a correlated (symmetric or antisymmetric) state and interacting with the scalar field or the electromagnetic field in the vacuum state. In this case (resonance interaction), the interatomic interaction is a second-order effect in the atom-field coupling. We separate the contributions of vacuum fluctuations and radiation reaction to the resonance energy shift of the system, and show that only radiation reaction contributes, while Unruh thermal fluctuations do not affect the resonance interaction. We also find that beyond a characteristic length scale related to the atomic acceleration, nonthermal effects in the radiation-reaction contribution change the distance dependence of the resonance interaction. Finally, we find that previously unidentified features appear, compared with the scalar field case, when the interaction with the electromagnetic field is considered, as a consequence of the peculiar nature of the vacuum quantum noise of the electromagnetic field in a relativistically accelerated background.

  1. Anti-screening optically allowed and forbidden collisional excitations in nonthermal astrophysical plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Woo-Pyo; Jung, Young-Dae

    2014-08-01

    The influence of nonthermal shielding on the optically allowed and forbidden anti-screening channels for ion-ion collisional excitations is investigated in astrophysical Lorentzian plasmas. The semiclassical trajectory method and effective interaction Hamiltonian are employed to obtain the transition amplitudes, differential cross-sections, and momentum transfer-dependent effective projectile charges for the optically allowed and forbidden excitation channels as functions of the impact parameter, collision energy, Debye radius, and spectral index of nonthermal astrophysical plasmas. It is found that the nonthermal effect suppresses the ion-ion collisional excitation probability in astrophysical Lorentzian plasmas. Additionally, the influence of nonthermal shielding on the optically allowed transition is found to be more significant than that on the optically forbidden transition. The variations of the nonthermal shielding effects on the optically allowed and forbidden anti-screening channels in astrophysical nonthermal plasmas are also discussed.

  2. Role of positively charged dust grains on dust acoustic wave propagation in presence of nonthermal ions

    SciTech Connect

    Sarkar, Susmita; Maity, Saumyen

    2013-08-15

    An expression for ion current flowing to the dust grains is proposed, when dust charge is positive and the ions are nonthermal. Secondary electron emission has been considered as the source of positive charging of the dust grains. Investigation shows that presence of positively charged dust grains along with thermal electrons and nonthermal ions generate purely growing dust acoustic waves for both the cases of ion nonthermal parameter greater than one and less than one. In the later case, the growth is conditional.

  3. Cylindrical and spherical ion acoustic waves in a plasma with nonthermal electrons and warm ions

    SciTech Connect

    Sahu, Biswajit; Roychoudhury, Rajkumar

    2005-05-15

    Using the reductive perturbation technique, nonlinear cylindrical and spherical Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) and modified KdV equations are derived for ion acoustic waves in an unmagnetized plasma consisting of warm adiabatic ions and nonthermal electrons. The effects of nonthermally distributed electrons on cylindrical and spherical ion acoustic waves are investigated. It is found that the nonthermality has a very significant effect on the nature of ion acoustic waves.

  4. Miniaturized Multi-Band Antenna via Element Collocation

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, R. P.

    2012-04-19

    Although much research has been performed on a driven element parasitically loaded by another element shorted to ground for dual frequency operation, the novel concept of two or more coplanar-driven elements in close proximity designed for multiple frequency operation has not been represented in the literature. Since each higher frequency antenna is built into the lower frequency elements, the largest element controls the structure’s total size. Furthermore, by using the self-resonant frequency inherent in reactive elements due to device packaging, the aperture of each antenna, due to a low insertion loss path at the frequency of the larger element, will include that of all smaller radiators. This configuration provides a large standing wave ratio at the shorter wavelengths via several series capacitive-inductive connections. Therefore, each antenna element provides the required surface area for the frequency of operation while being isolated from the larger radiators. For this study, a dual 2.45/5.8 GHz microstrip patch encompasses a small surface area of 9 square inches and provides circularly polarized electromagnetic radiation in excess of 6 dBi. This concept can be extrapolated to include additional radiators or may be scaled to other frequencies of interest.

  5. Plasma motions and non-thermal line broadening in flaring twisted coronal loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordovskyy, M.; Kontar, E. P.; Browning, P. K.

    2016-05-01

    Context. Observation of coronal extreme ultra-violet (EUV) spectral lines sensitive to different temperatures offers an opportunity to evaluate the thermal structure and flows in flaring atmospheres. This, in turn, can be used to estimate the partitioning between the thermal and kinetic energies released in flares. Aims: Our aim is to forward-model large-scale (50-10 000 km) velocity distributions to interpret non-thermal broadening of different spectral EUV lines observed in flares. The developed models allow us to understand the origin of the observed spectral line shifts and broadening, and link these features to particular physical phenomena in flaring atmospheres. Methods: We use ideal magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) to derive unstable twisted magnetic fluxtube configurations in a gravitationally stratified atmosphere. The evolution of these twisted fluxtubes is followed using resistive MHD with anomalous resistivity depending on the local density and temperature. The model also takes thermal conduction and radiative losses in the continuum into account. The model allows us to evaluate average velocities and velocity dispersions, which would be interpreted as non-thermal velocities in observations, at different temperatures for different parts of the models. Results: Our models show qualitative and quantitative agreement with observations. Thus, the line-of-sight (LOS) velocity dispersions demonstrate substantial correlation with the temperature, increasing from about 20-30 km s-1 around 1 MK to about 200-400 km s-1 near 10-20 MK. The average LOS velocities also correlate with velocity dispersions, although they demonstrate a very strong scattering compared to the observations. We also note that near footpoints the velocity dispersions across the magnetic field are systematically lower than those along the field. We conclude that the correlation between the flow velocities, velocity dispersions, and temperatures are likely to indicate that the same heating

  6. Non-Thermal Emission from the massive stellar association Cygnus OB2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fenech, Danielle Marie; Prinja, Raman; Morford, Jack

    2015-08-01

    The Cygnus OB2 association is located in the Galactic Cygnus X region at a distance of 1.4 kpc, making it one of the closest young massive stellar clusters. Cyg OB2 is not only very rich in stellar density but also in its diversity. It is known to contain a rich population of massive stars including almost 2600 OB stars, a large number of binaries (including a collection of some of the most interesting radio emitting colliding-wind binaries), and a considerable number of pre-main sequence stars.We report here on the first results from The Cyg OB2 Radio Survey (COBRaS), which is a UCL-led e-MERLIN legacy project to provide a deep-field radio mapping of the Cygnus OB2 association. The project has been awarded a total allocation of 252 hours at C-band (5GHz) and 42 hours at L-band (1.6GHz) to image the core of the cluster.We discuss in particular the presence of non-thermal radio emission at 20 cm (L-band), and its potential as a highly efficient way to identify binaries via single-epoch observations, particularly for colliding-wind binaries. COBRaS data will provide a powerful tool for establishing binary incidence in Cyg~OB2, specifically in the difficult intermediate-period range (1--100~yr). Knowing the binary frequency over the whole period range is important for population synthesis.Additionally, Weak-lined T Tauri (WTT) stars in Cyg OB2 also emit non-thermal radiation from magnetically active regions. Hence these observations will be used to detect the considerable population of younger stars.Ultimately, we aim to assemble a substantial and uniquely sensitive radio dataset, which will be exploited to address several fundamentally important areas of stellar astrophysics, including mass-loss, binary frequency, stellar cluster dynamics, and triggered star-formation.

  7. Effective Ginzburg-Landau free energy functional for multi-band isotropic superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigorishin, Konstantin V.

    2016-04-01

    It has been shown that interband mixing of gradients of two order parameters (drag effect) in an isotropic bulk two-band superconductor plays important role - such a quantity of the intergradients coupling exists that the two-band superconductor is characterized with a single coherence length and a single Ginzburg-Landau (GL) parameter. Other quantities or neglecting of the drag effect lead to existence of two coherence lengths and dynamical instability due to violation of the phase relations between the order parameters. Thus so-called type-1.5 superconductors are impossible. An approximate method for solving of set of GL equations for a multi-band superconductor has been developed: using the result about the drag effect it has been shown that the free-energy functional for a multi-band superconductor can be reduced to the GL functional for an effective single-band superconductor.

  8. EAM-based multiband OFDM systems incorporating PAPR reduction and SSII cancellation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Pengfei; Shi, Hu; Chen, Xue

    2016-04-01

    Multiband orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) subcarrier allocation is a good scheme to fully utilize the available bandwidth under the restriction of dispersion- and chirp-induced power fading in electro-absorption modulator (EAM)-based intensity-modulation-direct-detection (IMDD) OFDM system. In this paper, a modified Tone Reservation (TR) technique combined with subcarrier interleaving is proposed to reduce high peak to average power ratio (PAPR) while minimizing the penalty of subcarrier-to-subcarrier intermixing interference. In the experiment, by incorporating of these two techniques, the receiver sensitivity is improved by about 1.8 dB when a 20 Gbps OFDM signal transmitted along 100 km long single mode fiber in an EAM-based multiband IMDD-OFDM system.

  9. Tunable multi-band chiral metamaterials based on double-layered asymmetric split ring resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Xiuli; Wang, Xiaoou; Meng, Qingxin; Zhou, Zhongxiang

    2016-07-01

    We have numerically demonstrated chiral metamaterials based on double-layered asymmetric Au film with hollow out design of split ring resonators on either side of the polyimide. Multiple electric dipoles and magnetic dipoles resulted from parallel and antiparallel currents between the eight split ring resonators. Multi-band circular dichroism is found in the visible frequency regime by studying the transmission properties. Huge optical activity and the induced multi-band negative refractive index are obtained at resonance by calculating the optical activity and ellipticity of the transmitted E-fields. Chirality parameter and effective refractive index are retrieved to illustrate the tunable optical properties of the metamaterials. The underlying mechanisms for the observed circular dichroism are analyzed. These metamaterials would offer flexible electromagnetic applications in the infrared and visible regime.

  10. Efficient multiband and broadband cross polarization converters based on slotted L-shaped nanoantennas.

    PubMed

    Ding, Jun; Arigong, Bayaner; Ren, Han; Zhou, Mi; Shao, Jin; Lin, Yuankun; Zhang, Hualiang

    2014-11-17

    In this paper, we presented highly efficient reflective cross polarization converters based on metamaterials operating in the infrared regime, which are composed of a dielectric spacer sandwiched between slotted L-shaped metallic nanoantennas and a ground plane. The proposed polarization converters can convert a linearly polarized wave to its cross polarized wave with high polarization conversion ratio (> 0.95) over multiple / broad frequency bands. The resulting multi-band and broadband operations are induced by the localized mode hybridizations between the slot and the original metallic nanoantenna. Furthermore, the performance of the proposed converters under different incident angles is also explored. It is found that the first broad band (or the first two resonant frequencies) of the proposed broadband (or multi-band) converters appears to be independent of the incident angle (up to 47°).

  11. R-FUSE: Robust Fast Fusion of Multiband Images Based on Solving a Sylvester Equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Qi; Dobigeon, Nicolas; Tourneret, Jean-Yves; Bioucas-Dias, Jose; Godsill, Simon

    2016-11-01

    This paper proposes a robust fast multi-band image fusion method to merge a high-spatial low-spectral resolution image and a low-spatial high-spectral resolution image. Following the method recently developed in [1], the generalized Sylvester matrix equation associated with the multi-band image fusion problem is solved in a more robust and efficient way by exploiting the Woodbury formula, avoiding any permutation operation in the frequency domain as well as the blurring kernel invertibility assumption required in [1]. Thanks to this improvement, the proposed algorithm requires fewer computational operations and is also more robust with respect to the blurring kernel compared with the one in [1]. The proposed new algorithm is tested with different priors considered in [1]. Our conclusion is that the proposed fusion algorithm is more robust than the one in [1] with a reduced computational cost.

  12. Multi-band local microwave signal generation based on an optical frequency comb generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wen Ting; Liu, Jian Guo; Sun, Wen Hui; Chen, Wei; Zhu, Ning Hua

    2015-03-01

    We propose and experimental demonstrate a new method to generate multi-band local microwave signals based on an optical frequency comb generator (OFCG) by applying an optical sideband injection locking technique and an optical heterodyning technique. The generated microwave signal can cover multi bands from S band to Ka band. A tunable multiband microwave signal spanning from 5 GHz to 40 GHz can be generated by the beating between the optical carrier and injection locked modulation sidebands in a photodetector without an optical filter. The wavelength of the slave laser can be continuously and near-linearly adjusted by proper changing its bias current. By tuning the bias current of the slave laser, the wavelength of that is matched to one of the modulation sidebands of the OFCG. The performance of the arrangement in terms of the tunability and stability of the generated microwave signal is also studied.

  13. Broadband transient absorption study of photoexcitations in lead halide perovskites: Towards a multiband picture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anand, Benoy; Sampat, Siddharth; Danilov, Evgeny O.; Peng, Weina; Rupich, Sara M.; Chabal, Yves J.; Gartstein, Yuri N.; Malko, Anton V.

    2016-04-01

    Ultrafast transient pump-probe measurements of thin CH3NH3PbI3 perovskite films over a wide spectral range from 350 to 800 nm reveal a family of photoinduced bleach (PB) and absorption (PA) features unequivocally pointing to the fundamentally multiband character of the underlying electronic structure. Excitation pump-energy dependent kinetics of three long-lived PB peaks at 1.65, 2.55, and 3.15 eV along with a broad PA band shows the involvement of band-edge thermalized carriers in all transitions and at least four, possibly more, electronic bands. The evolution of the transient signatures is described in terms of the redistribution of the conserved oscillator strength of the whole system. The multiband perspective opens up different directions for understanding and controlling photoexcitations in hybrid perovskites.

  14. Multi-band silicon quantum dots embedded in an amorphous matrix of silicon carbide.

    PubMed

    Chang, Geng-rong; Ma, Fei; Ma, Da-yan; Xu, Ke-wei

    2010-11-19

    Silicon quantum dots embedded in an amorphous matrix of silicon carbide were realized by a magnetron co-sputtering process and post-annealing. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, glancing x-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy were used to characterize the chemical composition and the microstructural properties. The results show that the sizes and size distribution of silicon quantum dots can be tuned by changing the annealing atmosphere and the atom ratio of silicon and carbon in the matrix. A physicochemical mechanism is proposed to demonstrate this formation process. Photoluminescence measurements indicate a multi-band configuration due to the quantum confinement effect of silicon quantum dots with different sizes. The PL spectra are further widened as a result of the existence of amorphous silicon quantum dots. This multi-band configuration would be extremely advantageous in improving the photoelectric conversion efficiency of photovoltaic solar cells.

  15. Multi-band silicon quantum dots embedded in an amorphous matrix of silicon carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Geng-rong; Ma, Fei; Ma, Da-yan; Xu, Ke-wei

    2010-11-01

    Silicon quantum dots embedded in an amorphous matrix of silicon carbide were realized by a magnetron co-sputtering process and post-annealing. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, glancing x-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy were used to characterize the chemical composition and the microstructural properties. The results show that the sizes and size distribution of silicon quantum dots can be tuned by changing the annealing atmosphere and the atom ratio of silicon and carbon in the matrix. A physicochemical mechanism is proposed to demonstrate this formation process. Photoluminescence measurements indicate a multi-band configuration due to the quantum confinement effect of silicon quantum dots with different sizes. The PL spectra are further widened as a result of the existence of amorphous silicon quantum dots. This multi-band configuration would be extremely advantageous in improving the photoelectric conversion efficiency of photovoltaic solar cells.

  16. Waveguide transition with vacuum window for multiband dynamic nuclear polarization systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rybalko, Oleksandr; Bowen, Sean; Zhurbenko, Vitaliy; Ardenkjær-Larsen, Jan Henrik

    2016-05-01

    A low loss waveguide transition section and oversized microwave vacuum window covering several frequency bands (94 GHz, 140 GHz, 188 GHz) is presented. The transition is compact and was optimized for multiband Dynamic Nuclear Polarization (DNP) systems in a full-wave simulator. The window is more broadband than commercially available windows, which are usually optimized for single band operation. It is demonstrated that high-density polyethylene with urethane adhesive can be used as a low loss microwave vacuum window in multiband DNP systems. The overall assembly performance and dimensions are found using full-wave simulations. The practical aspects of the window implementation in the waveguide are discussed. To verify the design and simulation results, the window is tested experimentally at the three frequencies of interest.

  17. Miniaturized Multi-Band Antenna via Element Collocation

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, R P

    2012-06-01

    The resonant frequency of a microstrip patch antenna may be reduced through the addition of slots in the radiating element. Expanding upon this concept in favor of a significant reduction in the tuned width of the radiator, nearly 60% of the antenna metallization is removed, as seen in the top view of the antenna’s radiating element (shown in red, below, left). To facilitate an increase in the gain of the antenna, the radiator is suspended over the ground plane (green) by an air substrate at a height of 0.250" while being mechanically supported by 0.030" thick Rogers RO4003 laminate in the same profile as the element. Although the entire surface of the antenna (red) provides 2.45 GHz operation with insignificant negative effects on performance after material removal, the smaller square microstrip in the middle must be isolated from the additional aperture in order to afford higher frequency operation. A low insertion loss path centered at 2.45 GHz may simultaneously provide considerable attenuation at additional frequencies through the implementation of a series-parallel, resonant reactive path. However, an inductive reactance alone will not permit lower frequency energy to propagate across the intended discontinuity. To mitigate this, a capacitance is introduced in series with the inductor, generating a resonance at 2.45 GHz with minimum forward transmission loss. Four of these reactive pairs are placed between the coplanar elements as shown. Therefore, the aperture of the lower-frequency outer segment includes the smaller radiator while the higher frequency section is isolated from the additional material. In order to avoid cross-polarization losses due to the orientation of a transmitter or receiver in reference to the antenna, circular polarization is realized by a quadrature coupler for each collocated antenna as seen in the bottom view of the antenna (right). To generate electromagnetic radiation concentrically rotating about the direction of propagation

  18. Observation of Leggett's collective mode in a multiband MgB2 superconductor.

    PubMed

    Blumberg, G; Mialitsin, A; Dennis, B S; Klein, M V; Zhigadlo, N D; Karpinski, J

    2007-11-30

    We report observation of Leggett's collective mode in a multiband MgB2 superconductor with Tc=39 K arising from the fluctuations in the relative phase between two superconducting condensates. The novel mode is observed by Raman spectroscopy at 9.4 meV in the fully symmetric scattering channel. The observed mode frequency is consistent with theoretical considerations based on first-principles computations.

  19. Multi-band Differential Photometry of the Eclipsing Variable Star NSVS 5750160

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berrington, R. C.; Tuhey, E. M.

    2014-12-01

    We present new multi-band differential aperture photometry of the eclipsing variable star NSVS 5750160. The light curves are analyzed with the Wilson-Devinney model to determine best-fit stellar models. Our models show that NSVS 5750160 is consistent with a W-type W Ursae Majoris eclipsing variable star, and require the presence of a spot to fit the observed O’Connell effect. Two different spot models are presented but neither model is conclusive.

  20. Multi-band Monopole Antennas Loaded with Metamaterial TL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Zhi-jie; Liang, Jian-gang

    2015-05-01

    A novel metamaterial transmission line (TL) by loading complementary single Archimedean spiral resonator pair (CSASRP) is investigated and used to design a set of multi-frequency monopole antennas. The particularity is that the CSASRP which features dual-shunt branches in the equivalent circuit model is directly etched in the signal strip. By smartly controlling the element parameters, three antennas are designed and one of them covering UMTS and Bluetooth bands is fabricated and measured. The antenna exhibits impedance matching better than -10 dB and normal monopolar radiation patterns at working bands of 1.9-2.22 and 2.38-2.5 GHz. Moreover, the loaded element also contributes to the radiation, which is the major advantage of this prescription over previous lumped-element loadings. The proposed antenna is also more compact over previous designs.

  1. Multi-band implications of external-IC flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richter, Stephan; Spanier, Felix

    2015-02-01

    Very fast variability on scales of minutes is regularly observed in Blazars. The assumption that these flares are emerging from the dominant emission zone of the very high energy (VHE) radiation within the jet challenges current acceleration and radiation models. In this work we use a spatially resolved and time dependent synchrotron-self-Compton (SSC) model that includes the full time dependence of Fermi-I acceleration. We use the (apparent) orphan γ -ray flare of Mrk501 during MJD 54952 and test various flare scenarios against the observed data. We find that a rapidly variable external radiation field can reproduce the high energy lightcurve best. However, the effect of the strong inverse Compton (IC) cooling on other bands and the X-ray observations are constraining the parameters to rather extreme ranges. Then again other scenarios would require parameters even more extreme or stronger physical constraints on the rise and decay of the source of the variability which might be in contradiction with constraints derived from the size of the black hole's ergosphere.

  2. Non-thermal plasma for inactivated-vaccine preparation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guomin; Zhu, Ruihao; Yang, Licong; Wang, Kaile; Zhang, Qian; Su, Xia; Yang, Bing; Zhang, Jue; Fang, Jing

    2016-02-17

    Vaccines are of great importance in controlling the spread of infectious diseases in poultry farming. The safety and efficacy of vaccines are also essential. To explore the feasibility of a novel technology (non-thermal plasma) in inactivated vaccine preparation, an alternating current atmospheric pressure non-thermal plasma (NTP) jet with Ar/O2/N2 as the operating gas was used to inactivate a Newcastle disease virus (NDV, LaSota) strain and H9N2 avian influenza virus (AIV, A/Chicken/Hebei/WD/98) for vaccine preparation. The results showed that complete inactivation could be achieved with 2 min of NTP treatment for both NDV and AIV. Moreover, a proper NTP treatment time is needed for inactivation of a virus without destruction of the antigenic determinants. Compared to traditional formaldehyde-inactivated vaccine, the vaccine made from NDV treated by NTP for 2 min (NTP-2 min-NDV-vaccine) could induce a higher NDV-specific antibody titer in specific pathogen-free (SPF) chickens, and the results of a chicken challenge experiment showed that NTP-2 min-NDV-vaccine could protect SPF chickens from a lethal NDV challenge. Vaccines made from AIV treated by NTP for 2 min (NTP-2 min-AIV-vaccine) also showed a similar AIV-specific antibody titer compared with traditional AIV vaccines prepared using formaldehyde inactivation. Studies of the morphological changes of the virus, chemical analysis of NDV allantoic fluid and optical emission spectrum analysis of NTP suggested that reactive oxygen species and reactive nitrogen species produced by NTP played an important role in the virus inactivation process. All of these results demonstrated that it could be feasible to use non-thermal NTP as an alternative strategy to prepare inactivated vaccines for Newcastle disease and avian influenza.

  3. Non-thermal plasma for inactivated-vaccine preparation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guomin; Zhu, Ruihao; Yang, Licong; Wang, Kaile; Zhang, Qian; Su, Xia; Yang, Bing; Zhang, Jue; Fang, Jing

    2016-02-17

    Vaccines are of great importance in controlling the spread of infectious diseases in poultry farming. The safety and efficacy of vaccines are also essential. To explore the feasibility of a novel technology (non-thermal plasma) in inactivated vaccine preparation, an alternating current atmospheric pressure non-thermal plasma (NTP) jet with Ar/O2/N2 as the operating gas was used to inactivate a Newcastle disease virus (NDV, LaSota) strain and H9N2 avian influenza virus (AIV, A/Chicken/Hebei/WD/98) for vaccine preparation. The results showed that complete inactivation could be achieved with 2 min of NTP treatment for both NDV and AIV. Moreover, a proper NTP treatment time is needed for inactivation of a virus without destruction of the antigenic determinants. Compared to traditional formaldehyde-inactivated vaccine, the vaccine made from NDV treated by NTP for 2 min (NTP-2 min-NDV-vaccine) could induce a higher NDV-specific antibody titer in specific pathogen-free (SPF) chickens, and the results of a chicken challenge experiment showed that NTP-2 min-NDV-vaccine could protect SPF chickens from a lethal NDV challenge. Vaccines made from AIV treated by NTP for 2 min (NTP-2 min-AIV-vaccine) also showed a similar AIV-specific antibody titer compared with traditional AIV vaccines prepared using formaldehyde inactivation. Studies of the morphological changes of the virus, chemical analysis of NDV allantoic fluid and optical emission spectrum analysis of NTP suggested that reactive oxygen species and reactive nitrogen species produced by NTP played an important role in the virus inactivation process. All of these results demonstrated that it could be feasible to use non-thermal NTP as an alternative strategy to prepare inactivated vaccines for Newcastle disease and avian influenza. PMID:26529075

  4. Nonthermal atoms in planetary, satellite, and cometary atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kupperman, David Gerson

    1999-08-01

    The effect of nonthermal atoms is investigated in planetary, satellite, and cometary atmospheres. In the Earth's lower thermosphere, it is demonstrated that nonthermal N(4S) and O(3P) atoms increase the peak NO density, bringing closer model and observational (108 cm-3) densities. However, they are insufficient to remove the total NO deficit and only result in a peak NO density of approximately 3 × 107 cm-3 at 105 km. The loss of nonthermal N(4S) atoms from Titan and Triton are found to be 9 × 1024 and 1.5 × 1024 N atoms s-1, respectively. We find that the observational estimates of Strobel et al. [1992] are consistent with our modeling of escape from Titan. The loss of O atoms from Mars by nonthermal processes is a vital part of understanding the H2O and CO2 budgets in respect to how the Martian atmosphere has evolved. Anderson and Hord [1971] inferred the H escape flux to be approximately 1.8 × 108 cm -2 s-1 from Mariner 6 and 7 ultraviolet data. McElroy et al. [1977] initially calculated an 0 atom escape rate that was approximately half the H escape rate. However, with more sophisticated modeling this result was shown to be an order of magnitude too large [Lammer and Bauer, 1991; Fox, 1993; Luhmann, 1997]. In this work, we demonstrate that the O escape rate due to dissociative recombination of O2 + can be in stoichiometric balance with H escape over a solar cycle. Observations of comet Hale-Bopp reveal a third type of tail consisting of neutral sodium atoms. Using a point source of atomic sodium to model the observed tail, the sodium production is found to be 3.5 × 10 25 atoms s-1. This result suggests that the source of the sodium is either from the nucleus or inner coma. The production rates of water and carbon monoxide near perihelion are found to be 1031 s-1 and 2.7 × 1030 s-1 , respectively. The abundance of observed Na in the tail is inconsistent with cosmic abundances, suggesting that the majority of the sodium is trapped in the comet nucleus or

  5. Non-thermal Plasma for VOC Treatment in Flue Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikaunieks, Janis; Mezmale, Liga; Zandeckis, Aivars; Pubule, Jelena; Blumberga, Andra; Veidenbergs, Ivars

    2011-01-01

    The paper discusses non-thermal plasmas, their generation and characteristics, formation mechanisms of ozone and the treatment of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). In the experimental part, undecane (C11H24 as model VOCs) was treated with assistance of low temperature plasma at an atmospheric pressure which was generated in the so-called stack reactor. The gas composition was 13% of oxygen in nitrogen with impurities of carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide and undecane. The formation of by-products, as well as the removal efficiency, were investigated.

  6. Single-file diffusion with non-thermal initial conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lizana, Ludvig; Lomholt, Michael A.; Ambjörnsson, Tobias

    2014-02-01

    Single-file diffusion is a theoretically challenging many-body problem where the calculation of even the simplest observables, e.g. mean square displacement, for a tracer particle requires an elaborate mathematical machinery. There is therefore a need for simple approaches which provide intuitive understandings and predict qualitatively correct behaviours. Here we put forward a scaling-type method which we use to investigate the influence of non-thermal initial conditions on the dynamics of a tracer particle. With our new approach we reproduce, up to scaling, several known long and short time asymptotic results for the tracer particle mean square displacement.

  7. Effects of nonthermal electrons on plasma expansion into vacuum

    SciTech Connect

    Bennaceur-Doumaz, D. Bara, D.; Benkhelifa, E.; Djebli, M.

    2015-01-28

    The expansion of semi-infinite plasma into vacuum is analyzed with a hydrodynamic model for cold ions assuming electrons modelled by a kappa-type distribution. Similarly to Mora study of a plasma expansion into vacuum [P. Mora, Phys. Rev. Lett. 90, 185002 (2003)], we formulated empirical expressions for the electric field strength, velocity, and position of the ion front in one-dimensional nonrelativistic, collisionless isothermally expanding plasma. Analytic expressions for the maximum ion energy and the spectrum of the accelerated ions in the plasma were derived and discussed to highlight the electron nonthermal effects on enhancing the ion acceleration in plasma expansion into vacuum.

  8. Non-thermal mechanism of weak microwave fields influence on neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shneider, M. N.; Pekker, M.

    2013-09-01

    A non-thermal mechanism of weak microwave field impact on a nerve fiber is proposed. It is shown that in the range of about 30-300 GHz, there are strongly pronounced resonances associated with the excitation of ultrasonic vibrations in the membrane as a result of interaction with electromagnetic radiation. The viscous dissipation limits the resonances and results in their broadening. These forced vibrations create acoustic pressure, which may lead to the redistribution of the protein transmembrane channels, and thus changing the threshold of the action potential excitation in the axons of the neural network. The influence of the electromagnetic microwave radiation on various specific areas of myelin nerve fibers was analyzed: the nodes of Ranvier, and the initial segment—the area between the neuron hillock and the first part of the axon covered with the myelin layer. It was shown that the initial segment is the most sensitive area of the myelined neurons from which the action potential normally starts.

  9. Multiple-wavelength analysis of energy release during a solar flare - Thermal and nonthermal electron populations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willson, Robert F.; Lang, Kenneth R.; Klein, Karl-Ludwig; Kerdraon, Alain; Trottet, Gerard

    1990-01-01

    Collaborative solar investigations by Tufts University and the Observatoire de Paris have resulted in simultaneous radio observations with the Very Large Array (VLA) and the Nancay Radioheliograph (NR), comparisons of this radio data with X-ray observations, and theoretical interpretations of the dominant radiation mechanisms during a weak impulsive solar flare observed on May 28, 1988. The VLA has mapped the flaring structures at time intervals of 3.3 s, showing that the preflash and flash-phase components of the impulsive emission originate in spatially separated sources. The 20.7 cm preflash source is ascribed to thermal gyroresonance emission from coronal loops with typical magnetic field strengths of up to 270 G; this emission is associated with heating and exhibits no detectable hard X-ray radiation above 30 keV. The flash-phase 20.7 cm source and the hard X-ray emission are attributed to nonthermal electrons in the coronal and chromospheric portions of a magnetic loop. The combination of imaging observations at 20.7 and 91.6 cm excludes emission from a confined hot plasma during the flash phase.

  10. Quantum radiation of general nonstationary black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hua, Jia-Chen; Huang, Yong-Chang

    2009-02-01

    Quantum radiation of general nonstationary black holes is investigated by using the method of generalized tortoise-coordinate transformation (GTT). It is shown in general that the temperature and the shape of the event horizon of this kind of black holes depend on time and angle. Further, we find that the chemical potential in the thermal-radiation spectrum is equal to the highest energy of the negative-energy state of particles in nonthermal radiation for general nonstationary black holes.

  11. Description of recommended non-thermal mixed waste treatment technologies: Version 1.0

    SciTech Connect

    1995-08-01

    This document contains description of the technologies selected for inclusions in the Integrated Nonthermal Treatment Systems (INTS) Study. The purpose of these descriptions is to provide a more complete description of the INTS technologies. It supplements the summary descriptions of candidate nonthermal technologies that were considered for the INTS.

  12. Nonthermal inactivation of norovirus surrogates on blueberries using atmospheric cold plasma

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Viruses are currently the leading cause of foodborne outbreaks, most of which are associated with foods consumed raw. Cold plasma (CP) is an emerging novel nonthermal technology that can be used to surface decontaminate foods. This study investigated CP technology for the nonthermal inactivation of ...

  13. Nonthermal inactivation of the norovirus surrogate tulane virus on blueberries using atmospheric cold plasma

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Viruses are currently the leading cause of foodborne outbreaks, most of which are associated with foods consumed raw. Cold plasma (CP) is an emerging novel nonthermal technology that can be used for the surface decontamination of foods. This study investigated CP technology for the nonthermal inacti...

  14. Effect Of Grain Size-Distribution And Nonthermal Ion Distribution On Dust Acoustic Solitons

    SciTech Connect

    Annou, K.; Annou, R.

    2005-10-31

    The investigation of the formation of non-linear coherent structures in dusty plasmas taking into account the dust size and non-thermal ion distributions is conducted. Conditions of the existence of solitons in terms of the Mach number, concentration of non-thermal ions, dust charge and the permeability of the grains are evaluated.

  15. Effects of nonthermal atmospheric cold plasma on blueberry native microbiota and sensory attributes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nonthermal processing interventions are important steps in decontaminating and/or preserving fresh fruits, such as blueberries. Cold plasma (CP) is a novel nonthermal technology potentially useful in food processing settings. The objectives of this work were to determine CP reduction of blueberry ba...

  16. Effects of Non-thermal Electrons from ECCD on ECE Temperature Measurements for ITER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subhash, P. V.; Pandya, Hitesh Kumar B.; Kumar, Ravinder; Vasu, P.

    2012-09-01

    In tokamaks, the radial temperature profile measured using Electron Cyclotron Emission (ECE) diagnostics are affected by many phenomena like harmonics overlap, relativistic down shifting, presence of non-thermals etc. In this paper we have estimated effects of a small non-thermal electron population on measured temperature profile for ITER-Scenario 2. For ITER like plasma, radial temperature profiles can be obtained from the second harmonic ECE spectrum. It is possible that, higher harmonics produced from the non-thermals can be relativistically downshifted to second harmonics and introduce error in the measured temperature profile. Generally Non-thermals are produced from Electron Cyclotron Resonance heating (ECRH), Electron Cyclotron Current Drive (ECCD) etc. In the present study the non-thermals are assumed to be produced from proposed ECCD, which is being considered for suppressing Neoclassical Tearing Modes (NTM). We have ignored any other source of non-thermals in the present study. All the numerical calculations reported in this paper is performed using NOTEC computer code which is capable of handling non-thermal populations. The locations and spatial extents of non-thermals are taken from previous report on optimization study of the ITER ECRH top launcher. The non-thermals are assumed to be centered around safety points q=1, q=1.5 and q=2, where the ECCD is expected to be used for suppressing the NTMs. The main results of the present study are summarized below. In the first part of the paper we present the results for temperature measurement with out non-thermal populations for the purpose of validation. Secondly the rage of higher harmonic frequencies (due to nonthermals) which possibly reach antenna and induce error in the temperature measurement are identified and the corresponding energies of non-thermal populations are calculated analytically. This calculations are further checked by simulations using NOTEC code. Finally non-thermal populations are

  17. Non-thermal line-broadening in solar prominences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stellmacher, G.; Wiehr, E.

    2015-09-01

    Aims: We show that the line broadening in quiescent solar prominences is mainly due to non-thermal velocities. Methods: We have simultaneously observed a wide range of optically thin lines in quiescent prominences, selected for bright and narrow Mg b emission without line satellites from macro-shifts. Results: We find a ratio of reduced widths, ΔλD/λ0, of Hγ and Hδ of 1.05 ± 0.03, which can hardly be attributed to saturation, since both are optically thin for the prominences observed: τγ ≤ 0.3, τδ ≤ 0.15. We confirm the ratio of reduced widths of He 4772 (triplet) and He 5015 (singlet) of 1.1 ± 0.05 at higher significance and detect a width ratio of Mg b2 and Mg 4571 (both from the triplet system) of 1.3 ± 0.1. Conclusions: The discrepant widths of lines from different atoms, and even from the same atom, cannot be represented by a unique pair [Tkin; Vnth]. Values of Tkin deduced from observed line radiances using models indicate low temperatures down to Tkin ≈ 5000 K. Non-thermal velocities, related to different physical states of the respective emitting prominence region, seem to be the most important line broadening mechanism.

  18. Nonthermal desorption from surfaces of ices and other oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madey, Theodore E.

    2001-03-01

    Non-thermal DIET processes at surfaces (desorption induced by electronic transitions) may affect both terrestrial and planetary atmospheres. One case concerns observations of neutral sodium and potassium vapor in the tenuous atmospheres of the planet Mercury and the Moon, as well as Jupiter's icy satellite, Europa. In a series of model experiments, we find strong evidence that non-thermal processes - mainly photon-stimulated desorption (PSD) by UV photons - play a dominant role in desorption of Na atoms from the lunar surface, and may affect Na and K in the other atmospheres also. The second case involves measurements that may impact on understanding the destruction of ozone-depleting chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) in the earth's upper atmosphere, via electron-induced processes on ice particles in polar stratospheric clouds. We observe giant Cl^- and F^- enhancements by several orders of magnitude in electron-stimulated desorption (ESD) of a fractional monolayer of CF_2Cl2 coadsorbed with water ice and ammonia ice on a metal surface at ~25 K, respectively. The negative-ion enhancements are attributed to dissociation of CF_2Cl2 by capture of low-energy secondary electrons trapped by coadsorbed polar water or ammonia.

  19. Mechanism of NO reduction with non-thermal plasma.

    PubMed

    Yu, Gang; Yu, Qi; Jiang, Yan-Long; Zeng, Ke-Si; Gu, Fan

    2005-01-01

    Non-thermal plasma has been proved to be an effective and competitive technology for removing NO in flue gas since 1970. In this paper, the NO reduction mechanism of the non-thermal plasma reaction in NO/N2/O2 system was investigated using the method of spectral analysis and quantum chemistry. By the establishment of NO reduction and gas discharge plasma emission spectrum measuring system, the NO reduction results, gas discharge emission spectra of NO/N2/O2 and pure N2 were obtained, and then the model of molecular orbit of N2 either in ground state or its excited state was worked out using the method of molecular orbit Ab initio in Self-Consistent Field (SCF). It was found that NO reduction in NO/N2 gas discharge plasma was achieved mainly through a series of fast elementary reactions and the N(E6) at excited state was the base for NO reduction.

  20. The Composition of the Lunar Crust as Revealed by the Study of Impact Basin Rings using the Kaguya Multiband Imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemelin, M.; Lucey, P. G.; Gaddis, L. R.; Miljkovic, K.

    2015-12-01

    Impact basins excavate material from below the lunar surface and expose it on their peak rings. Peak rings can thus be used as probes to study the composition of the lunar crust with depth, which can in turn be compared to models of the formation of the lunar crust. Global surveys conducted to find exposures of nearly pure minerals have found rare lithologies such as norites, troctolites, and anorthosites associated with many basins rings [Yamamoto et al., 2010; 2012, Nakamura et al., 2012], but the abundance of these lithologies relative to the rings as a whole was not determined. Taking a comprehensive approach, Cheek et al. [2013] found that every immature exposure in the inner rook ring of the Orientale basin consists of anorthosite, suggesting that a massive layer of anorthosite is present at the Orientale target site. In this study, we take the approach of Cheek et al. [2013] and examine all the immature exposures in the rings of 14 impact basins. We use Multiband Imager (415-1550 nm) data and radiative transfer modeling to quantify the abundance of the four major lunar minerals in the inner ring of these basins, and determine the dominant lithologies exposed by the rings. We identify the inner ring of these basins using GRAIL crustal thickness data, and derived the mineralogy at a spatial resolution of 80 meters per pixel. Our preliminary results indicate that the dominant lithology in the inner ring of 12 of the 14 basins is anorthosite, with modal plagioclase content ranging between 92-94 wt%, suggesting that a massive layer of anorthosite is widespread under the lunar surface. The dominant lithologies in the other two basins are noritic and gabbroic anorthosites. The other lithologies present in the 14 basins will be investigated next, and the depth of excavation of each of these basin rings as well as the crustal thickness at these sites will be used to determine the composition of the crust with depth.

  1. Non-thermal radio emission from colliding flows in classical nova V1723 Aql

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weston, Jennifer H. S.; Sokoloski, J. L.; Metzger, Brian D.; Zheng, Yong; Chomiuk, Laura; Krauss, Miriam I.; Linford, Justin D.; Nelson, Thomas; Mioduszewski, Amy J.; Rupen, Michael P.; Finzell, Tom; Mukai, Koji

    2016-03-01

    The importance of shocks in nova explosions has been highlighted by Fermi's discovery of γ-ray-producing novae. Over three years of multiband Very Large Array radio observations of the 2010 nova V1723 Aql show that shocks between fast and slow flows within the ejecta led to the acceleration of particles and the production of synchrotron radiation. Soon after the start of the eruption, shocks in the ejecta produced an unexpected radio flare, resulting in a multipeaked radio light curve. The emission eventually became consistent with an expanding thermal remnant with mass 2 × 10-4 M⊙ and temperature 104 K. However, during the first two months, the ≳106 K brightness temperature at low frequencies was too high to be due to thermal emission from the small amount of X-ray-producing shock-heated gas. Radio imaging showed structures with velocities of 400 km s-1 (d/6 kpc) in the plane of the sky, perpendicular to a more elongated 1500 km s-1 (d/6 kpc) flow. The morpho-kinematic structure of the ejecta from V1723 Aql appears similar to nova V959 Mon, where collisions between a slow torus and a faster flow collimated the fast flow and gave rise to γ-ray-producing shocks. Optical spectroscopy and X-ray observations of V1723 Aql during the radio flare are consistent with this picture. Our observations support the idea that shocks in novae occur when a fast flow collides with a slow collimating torus. Such shocks could be responsible for hard X-ray emission, γ-ray production, and double-peaked radio light curves from some classical novae.

  2. Nonthermal ionization and excitation in Type IIb supernova 1993J.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utrobin, V. P.

    1996-02-01

    A non-LTE study of Type IIb supernova 1993J in the galaxy M 81 accounting for nonthermal ionization and line blocking effects is carried out. Hydrodynamical models and theoretical spectra clearly show that nonthermal ionization and excitation dominate after the second maximum, at day ~30, and play a decisive role in reproducing both a smooth tail of the light curve and an emergence of helium lines in the spectrum similar to those observed. Based on our model of supernova 1993J, we predict that the light curves of Type IIb supernovae should be subject to nonthermal ionization and excitation at earlier times than even that of supernova 1993J. To fit the bolometric and visual light curves of supernova 1993J, an outer layer of ~1Msun_ has to be helium-rich hydrogen shell with a hydrogen mass fraction of ~0.1. In this shell there is no nearly pure helium mantle as contrasted to most of the evolutionary models at the time of explosion. The fact that such a distribution of hydrogen results in a characteristic maximum of hydrogen number density at velocity of ~8600km/s in the expelled envelope is well consistent with late time observations of Hα emission at epochs of 0.5-1 year after the explosion. An emergence of helium lines between day 24 and day 30 illustrated by the evolution of calculated profile of the He I line λ6678A completely fits the spectral observations of supernova 1993J. The bolometric and visual light curves and the spectral evolution of helium lines are consistent with a mass of the ejected envelope of ~2.4Msun_ including a hydrogen mass of ~0.12Msun_, an explosion energy of ~1.6x10^51^ergs, and a mass of radioactive ^56^Ni of ~0.078Msun_. It is found that the bulk of the radioactive material should be confined to layers of the ejected envelope expanding with velocities less than ~3800km/s. In our model, the outburst of supernova 1993J is interpreted as the explosion of a ~4Msun_ red supergiant undergoing core collapse and leaving a neutron star in a

  3. Multiband optical/IR transmissometry during the VAMPIRA trials, Spring 2004

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Jong, Arie N.; Cohen, Leo H.; Moerman, Marcel M.

    2004-11-01

    Scattering by atmospheric aerosols is one of the environmental parameters determining the range performance of optical and infrared sensors. Extinction of the target contrast along the path due to scattering is difficult to estimate in real operational conditions due to uncertainties in the size distribution of the particles, their constitution and concentration along the path. Knowledge on their behaviour allows calculation of the atmospheric transmission by means of standard scattering formulae. In-situ measurement of the characteristics of the particles by means of counters provides data of limited value due to the possible impact of the direct environment. The data may also be not representative for the particles at other locations along the path. Similarly the measurement of the particle characteristics by means of LIDAR provide an asymmetric view, while the backscatter by the particles is difficult to translate into extinction coefficients in forward direction. Multi-band transmissometry along the path of interest provides however direct information on the real atmospheric propagation characteristics. Furthermore the multi-band data allow the validation of the aerosol model, to be used in transmission models such as MODTRAN. The VAMPIRA trials, organised in March/April 2004 by Germany in the Baltic Sea near Echernforde, provided an opportunity to test the usefulness of a 7-channel optical/IR transmissometer, developed at TNO-FEL. In this paper the set-up of the system is desribed and samples of data are presented. The multi-band transmission data, collected over an 8.6 km path over water, are compared with extinction values obtained from in-situ particle measurements. The data show clearly that the aerosols have rural characteristics during most of the time.

  4. Modeling of multi-band drift in nanowires using a full band Monte Carlo simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hathwar, Raghuraj; Saraniti, Marco; Goodnick, Stephen M.

    2016-07-01

    We report on a new numerical approach for multi-band drift within the context of full band Monte Carlo (FBMC) simulation and apply this to Si and InAs nanowires. The approach is based on the solution of the Krieger and Iafrate (KI) equations [J. B. Krieger and G. J. Iafrate, Phys. Rev. B 33, 5494 (1986)], which gives the probability of carriers undergoing interband transitions subject to an applied electric field. The KI equations are based on the solution of the time-dependent Schrödinger equation, and previous solutions of these equations have used Runge-Kutta (RK) methods to numerically solve the KI equations. This approach made the solution of the KI equations numerically expensive and was therefore only applied to a small part of the Brillouin zone (BZ). Here we discuss an alternate approach to the solution of the KI equations using the Magnus expansion (also known as "exponential perturbation theory"). This method is more accurate than the RK method as the solution lies on the exponential map and shares important qualitative properties with the exact solution such as the preservation of the unitary character of the time evolution operator. The solution of the KI equations is then incorporated through a modified FBMC free-flight drift routine and applied throughout the nanowire BZ. The importance of the multi-band drift model is then demonstrated for the case of Si and InAs nanowires by simulating a uniform field FBMC and analyzing the average carrier energies and carrier populations under high electric fields. Numerical simulations show that the average energy of the carriers under high electric field is significantly higher when multi-band drift is taken into consideration, due to the interband transitions allowing carriers to achieve higher energies.

  5. Ultrathin multi-band planar metamaterial absorber based on standing wave resonances.

    PubMed

    Peng, Xiao-Yu; Wang, Bing; Lai, Shumin; Zhang, Dao Hua; Teng, Jing-Hua

    2012-12-01

    We present a planar waveguide model and a mechanism based on standing wave resonances to interpret the unity absorptions of ultrathin planar metamaterial absorbers. The analytical model predicts that the available absorption peaks of the absorber are corresponding to the fundamental mode and only its odd harmonic modes of the standing wave. The model is in good agreement with numerical simulation and can explain the main features observed in typical ultrathin planar metamaterial absorbers. Based on this model, ultrathin planar metamaterial absorbers with multi-band absorptions at desired frequencies can be easily designed.

  6. Isotope effect on electron-phonon interaction in the multiband superconductor MgB2

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Mou, Daixiang; Manni, Soham; Taufour, Valentin; Wu, Yun; Huang, Lunan; Bud'ko, S. L.; Canfield, P. C.; Kaminski, Adam

    2016-04-07

    We investigate the effect of isotope substitution on the electron-phonon interaction in the multiband superconductor MgB2 using tunable laser-based angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy. The kink structure around 70 meV in the σ band, which is caused by electron coupling to the E2g phonon mode, is shifted to higher binding energy by ~3.5 meV in Mg10B2 and the shift is not affected by superconducting transition. Furthermore, these results serve as the benchmark for investigations of isotope effects in known, unconventional superconductors and newly discovered superconductors where the origin of pairing is unknown.

  7. PSF homogenization for multi-band photometry from space on extended objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boucaud, A.; Dole, H.; Abergel, A.; Ayasso, H.; Orieux, F.

    2016-09-01

    We present a fast and robust tool to create PSF matching kernels for multi-band photometric studies. Such kernels are useful for convolving images down to the same PSF prior to computing flux measurements like aperture photometry or spectral fitting. Unlike similar existing methods, we use a Wiener filter to take into account the real shape of the effective PSF, usually very complex for space telescopes. We apply this scheme to Euclid simulated PSF images to demonstrate the efficiency of the algorithm. This tool is publicly available http://www.github.io/aboucaud/pypher.

  8. Isotope Effect on Electron-Phonon Coupling in Multiband Superconductor MgB2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mou, Daixiang; Taufour, Valentin; Wu, Yun; Huang, Lunan; Bud'Ko, Serguei; Canfield, Paul; Kaminski, Adam

    We systematically investigate the isotope effect of electron-phonon coupling in multi-band superconductor MgB2 by laser based Angle Resolved Photoemission Spectroscopy. The kink structure around 70 meV on two σ bands, which is caused by electron coupling to E2 g phonon mode, is shifted to higher binding energy in Mg10B2 than that in Mg11B2. The measured shifting energy of 3.5 meV is consistent with theoretical calculation based on harmonic phonon in MgB2. Our temperature dependent measurement also indicates the isotope effect of kink structure is not dependent on superconducting transition.

  9. Isotope effect on electron-phonon interaction in the multiband superconductor MgB2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mou, Daixiang; Manni, Soham; Taufour, Valentin; Wu, Yun; Huang, Lunan; Bud'ko, S. L.; Canfield, P. C.; Kaminski, Adam

    2016-04-01

    We investigate the effect of isotope substitution on the electron-phonon interaction in the multiband superconductor MgB2 using tunable laser-based angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy. The kink structure around 70 meV in the σ band, which is caused by electron coupling to the E2 g phonon mode, is shifted to higher binding energy by ˜3.5 meV in Mg 10B2 and the shift is not affected by superconducting transition. These results serve as the benchmark for investigations of isotope effects in known, unconventional superconductors and newly discovered superconductors where the origin of pairing is unknown.

  10. Multi-band asymmetric acoustic transmission in a bended waveguide with multiple mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yu-lei; Sun, Hong-xiang; Xia, Jian-ping; Yuan, Shou-qi; Ding, Xin-lei

    2016-07-01

    We report the realization of a multi-band device of the asymmetric acoustic transmission by placing a phononic crystal inside a bended waveguide immersed in water, as determined both experimentally and numerically. The asymmetric acoustic transmission exists in three frequency bands below 500 kHz induced by multiple mechanisms. Besides the band gap of the phononic crystal, we also introduce the deaf mode and interaction between the phononic crystal and waveguide. More importantly, this asymmetric transmission can be systematically controlled by mechanically rotating the square rods of the phononic crystal. The device has the advantages of multiple band, broader bandwidth, and adjustable property, showing promising applications in ultrasonic devices.

  11. NIMBUS: A Near-Infrared Multi-Band Ultraprecise Spectroimager for SOFIA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McElwain, Michael W.; Mandell, Avi; Woodgate, Bruce E.; Spiegel, David S.; Madhusudhan, Nikku; Amatucci, Edward; Blake, Cullen; Budinoff, Jason; Burgasser, Adam; Burrows, Adam; Clampin, Mark C.; Conroy, Charlie; Deming, L. Drake; Dunham, Edward; Foltz, Roger; Gong, Qian; Knutson, Heather; Muench, Theodore; Murray-Clay, Ruth; Peabody, Hume; Rauscher, Bernard J.; Rinehart, Stephen A.; Villanueva, Geronimo

    2012-01-01

    We present a new and innovative near-infrared multi-band ultraprecise spectroimager (NIMBUS) for SOFIA. This instrument will enable many exciting observations in the new age of precision astronomy. This optical design splits the beam into 8 separate spectral bandpasses, centered around key molecular bands from 1 to 4 microns. Each spectral channel has a wide field of view for simultaneous observations of a reference star that can decorrelate time-variable atmospheric and optical assembly effects, allowing the instrument to achieve ultraprecise photometry for a wide variety of astrophysical sources

  12. Non-thermal modification of heat-loss responses during exercise in humans.

    PubMed

    Kondo, Narihiko; Nishiyasu, Takeshi; Inoue, Yoshimitsu; Koga, Shunsaku

    2010-10-01

    This review focuses on the characteristics of heat-loss responses during exercise with respect to non-thermal factors. In addition, the effects of physical training on non-thermal heat-loss responses are discussed. When a subject is already sweating the sweating rate increases at the onset of dynamic exercise without changes in core temperature, while cutaneous vascular conductance (skin blood flow) is temporarily decreased. Although exercise per se does not affect the threshold for the onset of sweating, it is possible that an increase in exercise intensity induces a higher sensitivity of the sweating response. Exercise increases the threshold for cutaneous vasodilation, and at higher exercise intensities, the sensitivity of the skin-blood-flow response decreases. Facilitation of the sweating response with increased exercise intensity may be due to central command, peripheral reflexes in the exercising muscle, and mental stimuli, whereas the attenuation of skin-blood-flow responses with decreased cutaneous vasodilation is related to many non-thermal factors. Most non-thermal factors have negative effects on magnitude of cutaneous vasodilation; however, several of these factors have positive effects on the sweating response. Moreover, thermal and non-thermal factors interact in controlling heat-loss responses, with non-thermal factors having a greater impact until core temperature elevations become significant, after which core temperature primarily would control heat loss. Finally, as with thermally induced sweating responses, physical training seems to also affect sweating responses governed by non-thermal factors.

  13. Strong enhancement of dispersion forces from microwave radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sernelius, B. E.

    2002-11-01

    We have studied non-thermal effects of microwave radiation on the forces between objects. This is the first step in a study of possible effects of microwave radiation from cellular phones on biological tissue. We have used a simplified model for human blood cells in blood. We find for the normal radiation level of cellular phones an enhancement of the attractive force with ten orders of magnitude as compared to the corresponding effect at thermal radiation.

  14. Universality of nonthermal behavior in spinor Bose condensates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patil, Yogesh Sharad; Cheung, Hil F. H.; Shaffer, Airlia; Chen, Huiyao Y.; Vengalattore, Mukund

    2016-05-01

    Spinor Bose condensates exhibit a rich phase diagram with varied magnetic ordering and topological defects because of the close competition between their spin and charge dependent interactions. Quenching such a spinor condensate into a ferromagnetic state realizes robust non-equilibrium and prethermalized states whose macroscopic behavior differs from thermodynamic predictions. In previous work, we have identified the microscopic origin of prethermalization in Rubidium spinor gases as being the disparate energy scales of the phonon and magnon excitations in this gas. This identification of the microscopic origin enables us to broaden the scope of our studies to address fundamental questions regarding the equilibration of isolated quantum systems. We will discuss our recent results that suggest the universality of this coarsening behavior and evidence that this system can be mapped on to a non-thermal fixed point studied in high energy field theories. This work is supported by the ARO MURI on non-equilibrium dynamics.

  15. Fluctuation theorem in driven nonthermal systems with quenched disorder

    SciTech Connect

    Reichhardt, Charles; Reichhardt, C J; Drocco, J A

    2009-01-01

    We demonstrate that the fluctuation theorem of Evans and Searles can be used to characterize the class of dynamics that arises in nonthermal systems of collectively interacting particles driven over random quenched disorder. By observing the frequency of entropy-destroying trajectories, we show that there are specific dynamical regimes near depinning in which this theorem holds. Hence the fluctuation theorem can be used to characterize a significantly wider class of non-equilibrium systems than previously considered. We discuss how the fluctuation theorem could be tested in specific systems where noisy dynamics appear at the transition from a pinned to a moving phase such as in vortices in type-II superconductors, magnetic domain walls, and dislocation dynamics.

  16. Frequency Stratification of the Nonthermal Emission in Blazars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marscher, Alan P.

    2001-01-01

    Research supported by this grant involved theoretical investigations of the multifrequency nonthermal emission from the relativistic jets in blazars, which are quasars and related objects with highly variable brightness. In the initial stage of the project, one-dimensional, conical (i.e., spherical symmetry between the jet axis and surface is assumed) jet models were used to explain the multi-waveband spectra and variability of blazars. The results were applied to two flares observed in the object PKS 2155-304, leading to the conclusion that the distinct differences in the observed characteristics of the two flares can be explained with the same jet model if two different physical parameters (the magnetic field in the first flare and the efficiency of acceleration of electrons to high energies in the second) varied.

  17. RELATIVISTIC RECONNECTION: AN EFFICIENT SOURCE OF NON-THERMAL PARTICLES

    SciTech Connect

    Sironi, Lorenzo; Spitkovsky, Anatoly E-mail: anatoly@astro.princeton.edu

    2014-03-01

    In magnetized astrophysical outflows, the dissipation of field energy into particle energy via magnetic reconnection is often invoked to explain the observed non-thermal signatures. By means of two- and three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations, we investigate anti-parallel reconnection in magnetically dominated electron-positron plasmas. Our simulations extend to unprecedentedly long temporal and spatial scales, so we can capture the asymptotic state of the system beyond the initial transients, and without any artificial limitation by the boundary conditions. At late times, the reconnection layer is organized into a chain of large magnetic islands connected by thin X-lines. The plasmoid instability further fragments each X-line into a series of smaller islands, separated by X-points. At the X-points, the particles become unmagnetized and they get accelerated along the reconnection electric field. We provide definitive evidence that the late-time particle spectrum integrated over the whole reconnection region is a power law whose slope is harder than –2 for magnetizations σ ≳ 10. Efficient particle acceleration to non-thermal energies is a generic by-product of the long-term evolution of relativistic reconnection in both two and three dimensions. In three dimensions, the drift-kink mode corrugates the reconnection layer at early times, but the long-term evolution is controlled by the plasmoid instability which facilitates efficient particle acceleration, analogous to the two-dimensional physics. Our findings have important implications for the generation of hard photon spectra in pulsar winds and relativistic astrophysical jets.

  18. Numerical Simulation of Non-Thermal Food Preservation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rauh, C.; Krauss, J.; Ertunc, Ö.; Delgado, a.

    2010-09-01

    Food preservation is an important process step in food technology regarding product safety and product quality. Novel preservation techniques are currently developed, that aim at improved sensory and nutritional value but comparable safety than in conventional thermal preservation techniques. These novel non-thermal food preservation techniques are based for example on high pressures up to one GPa or pulsed electric fields. in literature studies the high potential of high pressures (HP) and of pulsed electric fields (PEF) is shown due to their high retention of valuable food components as vitamins and flavour and selective inactivation of spoiling enzymes and microorganisms. for the design of preservation processes based on the non-thermal techniques it is crucial to predict the effect of high pressure and pulsed electric fields on the food components and on the spoiling enzymes and microorganisms locally and time-dependent in the treated product. Homogenous process conditions (especially of temperature fields in HP and PEF processing and of electric fields in PEF) are aimed at to avoid the need of over-processing and the connected quality loss and to minimize safety risks due to under-processing. the present contribution presents numerical simulations of thermofluiddynamical phenomena inside of high pressure autoclaves and pulsed electric field treatment chambers. in PEF processing additionally the electric fields are considered. Implementing kinetics of occurring (bio-) chemical reactions in the numerical simulations of the temperature, flow and electric fields enables the evaluation of the process homogeneity and efficiency connected to different process parameters of the preservation techniques. Suggestions to achieve safe and high quality products are concluded out of the numerical results.

  19. Non-thermal Nanoelectroablation of UV-induced Murine Melanomas Stimulates an Immune Response

    PubMed Central

    Nuccitelli, Richard; Tran, Kevin; Lui, Kaying; Huynh, Joanne; Athos, Brian; Kreis, Mark; Nuccitelli, Pamela; De Fabo, Edward C.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Non-thermal nanoelectroablation therapy completely ablates UV-induced murine melanomas. C57/BL6-HGF/SF transgenic mice were exposed to UV radiation as pups and began to develop visible melanomas 5–6 months later. We have treated 27 of these melanomas in 14 mice with nanosecond pulsed electric field (nsPEF) therapy delivering 2000 electric pulses each 100 ns long and 30 kV/cm at a rate of 5–7 pulses per second. All nanoelectroablated melanoma tumors began to shrink within a day after treatment and gradually disappeared over a period of 12–29 days. Pyknosis of nuclei was evident within 1 h of nsPEF treatment, and DNA fragmentation as detected by TUNEL staining was evident by 6 h after nsPEF treatment. In a melanoma allograft system, nsPEF treatment was superior to tumor excision at accelerating secondary tumor rejection in immune-competent mice, suggesting enhanced stimulation of a protective immune response by nsPEF-treated melanomas. This is supported by the presence of CD4+-T cells within treated tumors as well as within untreated tumors located in mice with other melanomas that had been treated with nanoelectroablation at least 19 days earlier. PMID:22686288

  20. EVIDENCE OF NON-THERMAL X-RAY EMISSION FROM HH 80

    SciTech Connect

    López-Santiago, J.; Peri, C. S.; Benaglia, P.; Bonito, R.; Miceli, M.; Albacete-Colombo, J. F.; De Castro, E.

    2013-10-20

    Protostellar jets appear at all stages of star formation when the accretion process is still at work. Jets travel at velocities of hundreds of km s{sup –1}, creating strong shocks when interacting with the interstellar medium. Several cases of jets have been detected in X-rays, typically showing soft emission. For the first time, we report evidence of hard X-ray emission possibly related to non-thermal processes not explained by previous models of the post-shock emission predicted in the jet/ambient interaction scenario. HH 80 is located at the south head of the jet associated with the massive protostar IRAS 18162-2048. It shows soft and hard X-ray emission in regions that are spatially separated, with the soft X-ray emission region situated behind the region of hard X-ray emission. We propose a scenario for HH 80 where soft X-ray emission is associated with thermal processes from the interaction of the jet with denser ambient matter and hard X-ray emission is produced by synchrotron radiation at the front shock.

  1. Non-thermal plasma-induced photocatalytic degradation of 4-chlorophenol in water.

    PubMed

    Hao, Xiao Long; Zhou, Ming Hua; Lei, Le Cheng

    2007-03-22

    TiO(2) photocatalyst (P-25) (50mgL(-1)) was tentatively introduced into pulsed high-voltage discharge process for non-thermal plasma-induced photocatalytic degradation of the representative mode organic pollutant parachlorophenol (4-CP), including other compounds phenol and methyl red in water. The experimental results showed that rate constant of 4-CP degradation, energy efficiency for 4-CP removal and TOC removal with TiO(2) were obviously increased. Pulsed high-voltage discharge process with TiO(2) had a promoted effect for the degradation of these pollutants under a broad range of liquid conductivity. Furthermore, the apparent formation rates of chemically active species (e.g., ozone and hydrogen peroxide) were increased, the hydrogen peroxide formation rate from 1.10x10(-6) to 1.50x10(-6)Ms(-1), the ozone formation rate from 1.99x10(-8) to 2.35x10(-8)Ms(-1), respectively. In addition, this process had no influence on the photocatalytic properties of TiO(2). The introduction of TiO(2) photocatalyst into pulsed discharge plasma process in the utilizing of ultraviolet radiation and electric field in pulsed discharge plasma process enhanced the yields of chemically active species, which were available for highly efficient removal and mineralization of organic pollutants.

  2. Finite amplitude solitary excitations in rotating magnetized nonthermal complex (dusty) plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    El-Taibany, W. F.; Mushtaq, A.; Moslem, W. M.; Wadati, Miki

    2010-03-15

    The nonlinear dynamics of finite amplitude dust acoustic solitary waves in rotating magnetized nonthermal plasma are investigated. For this purpose, the hydrodynamic equations for the dust grains, nonthermal ion density, and Boltzmann electron distributions together with the Poisson equation are used to derive the energy integral equation with a new Sagdeev potential. It is found that the solitary excitations strongly depend on the nonthermal ion parameters, rotational frequency, as well as dust gyrofrequency. The present investigations may be applicable to the dusty plasma situation near to the moon.

  3. Nonthermal Inactivation of Cronobacter sakazakii in Infant Formula Milk: A Review.

    PubMed

    Pina-Pérez, M C; Rodrigo, D; Martínez, A

    2016-07-26

    Up-to-date, nonthermal technologies and combinations of them, in accordance with the "hurdle technology" concept, are being applied by different research groups in response to calls by the International Food and Human Health Organizations (ESPGHAN, 2004; FAO/WHO, 2006, 2008) for alternatives to thermal control of Cronobacter sakazakii in reconstituted powdered infant formula milk. This review highlights (i) current knowledge on the application of nonthermal technologies to control C. sakazakii in infant formula milk and (ii) the importance of the application of nonthermal technologies for the control of C. sakazakii as part of the development of strategies in the context of improving food safety and quality of this product.

  4. Weakly nonlinear dust ion-acoustic shock waves in a dusty plasma with nonthermal electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Berbri, Abderrezak; Tribeche, Mouloud

    2009-05-15

    Weakly nonlinear dust ion-acoustic (DIA) shock waves are investigated in a dusty plasma with nonthermal electrons. A modified Korteweg-de Vries equation with a cubic nonlinearity is derived. Due to the net negative dust charge {mu}Z{sub d} and electron nonthermality, the present plasma model can admit compressive and rarefactive weak DIA shock waves. The effect of increasing {mu}Z{sub d} is to lower the critical nonthermal parameter {beta}{sub c} above which only rarefactive DIA shock waves are admitted. Our investigation may help to understand the nonlinear structures observed in the auroral acceleration regions.

  5. Large amplitude double layers in a positively charged dusty plasma with nonthermal electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Djebli, M.; Marif, H.

    2009-06-15

    A pseudopotential approach is used to investigate large amplitude dust-acoustic solitary structures for a plasma composed of positively charged dust, cold electrons, and nonthermal hot electrons. Numerical investigation for an adiabatic situation is conducted to examine the existence region of the wave. The negative potential of the double layers is found to be dependent on nonthermal parameters, Mach number, and electrons temperature. A range of the nonthermal parameters values exists for which two possible double layers for the same plasma mix at different Mach numbers and with significant different amplitudes. The present model is used to investigate localized structures in the lower-altitude Earth's ionosphere.

  6. Acceleration of relativistic electrons by magnetohydrodynamic turbulence: Implications for non-thermal emission from black hole accretion disks

    SciTech Connect

    Lynn, Jacob W.; Quataert, Eliot; Chandran, Benjamin D. G.; Parrish, Ian J.

    2014-08-10

    We use analytic estimates and numerical simulations of test particles interacting with magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence to show that subsonic MHD turbulence produces efficient second-order Fermi acceleration of relativistic particles. This acceleration is not well described by standard quasi-linear theory but is a consequence of resonance broadening of wave-particle interactions in MHD turbulence. We provide momentum diffusion coefficients that can be used for astrophysical and heliospheric applications and discuss the implications of our results for accretion flows onto black holes. In particular, we show that particle acceleration by subsonic turbulence in radiatively inefficient accretion flows can produce a non-thermal tail in the electron distribution function that is likely important for modeling and interpreting the emission from low-luminosity systems such as Sgr A* and M87.

  7. Multiband electron resonant Raman scattering in quantum wells in a magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López-Richard, V.; Hai, G.-Q.; Trallero-Giner, C.; Marques, G. E.

    2003-04-01

    A theoretical model has been developed for the electronic resonant Raman scattering processes in direct band zinc blende type semiconductor quantum wells in a magnetic field. In order to take into account the spin-flip transitions, anomalous behavior of the Landau levels and the Landè g factor, an 8×8 Kane-Weiler Hamiltonian model has been considered for the evaluation of the Raman scattering amplitude. Elements concerning the selection rules of resonant inelastic light scattering in quantum well systems are reported. The multiband model predicts conditions for resonant spin-flip Raman processes in several light scattering configurations for crossed and parallel polarization. Special emphasis is given to the effects of the interlevel coupling and mixing within the conduction subband and their relation to spin-flip and inter-Landau level transitions. Symmetry and electronic properties of the level structure in the first conduction subband as well as anomalous Landè factors are discussed in terms of complementary Raman scattering configurations, Fermi energy, and multiband parameters.

  8. Atomically flat superconducting nanofilms: multiband properties and mean-field theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shanenko, A. A.; Aguiar, J. Albino; Vagov, A.; Croitoru, M. D.; Milošević, M. V.

    2015-05-01

    Recent progress in materials synthesis enabled fabrication of superconducting atomically flat single-crystalline metallic nanofilms with thicknesses down to a few monolayers. Interest in such nano-thin systems is attracted by the dimensional 3D-2D crossover in their coherent properties which occurs with decreasing the film thickness. The first fundamental aspect of this crossover is dictated by the Mermin-Wagner-Hohenberg theorem and concerns frustration of the long-range order due to superconductive fluctuations and the possibility to track its impact with an unprecedented level of control. The second important aspect is related to the Fabri-Pérot modes of the electronic motion strongly bound in the direction perpendicular to the nanofilm. The formation of such modes results in a pronounced multiband structure that changes with the nanofilm thickness and affects both the mean-field behavior and superconductive fluctuations. Though the subject is very rich in physics, it is scarcely investigated to date. The main obstacle is that there are no manageable models to study a complex magnetic response in this case. Full microscopic consideration is rather time consuming, if practicable at all, while the standard Ginzburg-Landau theory is not applicable. In the present work we review the main achievements in the subject to date, and construct and justify an efficient multiband mean-field formalism which allows for numerical and even analytical treatment of nano-thin superconductors in applied magnetic fields.

  9. RRI-GBT Multi-band Receiver: Motivation, Design, and Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maan, Yogesh; Deshpande, Avinash A.; Chandrashekar, Vinutha; Chennamangalam, Jayanth; Raghavendra Rao, K. B.; Somashekar, R.; Anderson, Gary; Ezhilarasi, M. S.; Sujatha, S.; Kasturi, S.; Sandhya, P.; Bauserman, Jonah; Duraichelvan, R.; Amiri, Shahram; Aswathappa, H. A.; Barve, Indrajit V.; Sarabagopalan, G.; Ananda, H. M.; Beaudet, Carla; Bloss, Marty; Dhamnekar, Deepa B.; Egan, Dennis; Ford, John; Krishnamurthy, S.; Mehta, Nikhil; Minter, Anthony H.; Nagaraja, H. N.; Narayanaswamy, M.; O'Neil, Karen; Raja, Wasim; Sahasrabudhe, Harshad; Shelton, Amy; Srivani, K. S.; Venugopal, H. V.; Viswanathan, Salna T.

    2013-01-01

    We report the design and development of a self-contained multi-band receiver (MBR) system, intended for use with a single large aperture to facilitate sensitive and high time-resolution observations simultaneously in 10 discrete frequency bands sampling a wide spectral span (100-1500 MHz) in a nearly log-periodic fashion. The development of this system was primarily motivated by need for tomographic studies of pulsar polar emission regions. Although the system design is optimized for the primary goal, it is also suited for several other interesting astronomical investigations. The system consists of a dual-polarization multi-band feed (with discrete responses corresponding to the 10 bands pre-selected as relatively radio frequency interference free), a common wide-band radio frequency front-end, and independent back-end receiver chains for the 10 individual sub-bands. The raw voltage time sequences corresponding to 16 MHz bandwidth each for the two linear polarization channels and the 10 bands are recorded at the Nyquist rate simultaneously. We present the preliminary results from the tests and pulsar observations carried out with the Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope using this receiver. The system performance implied by these results and possible improvements are also briefly discussed.

  10. FIR filters for hardware-based real-time multi-band image blending

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popovic, Vladan; Leblebici, Yusuf

    2015-02-01

    Creating panoramic images has become a popular feature in modern smart phones, tablets, and digital cameras. A user can create a 360 degree field-of-view photograph from only several images. Quality of the resulting image is related to the number of source images, their brightness, and the used algorithm for their stitching and blending. One of the algorithms that provides excellent results in terms of background color uniformity and reduction of ghosting artifacts is the multi-band blending. The algorithm relies on decomposition of image into multiple frequency bands using dyadic filter bank. Hence, the results are also highly dependant on the used filter bank. In this paper we analyze performance of the FIR filters used for multi-band blending. We present a set of five filters that showed the best results in both literature and our experiments. The set includes Gaussian filter, biorthogonal wavelets, and custom-designed maximally flat and equiripple FIR filters. The presented results of filter comparison are based on several no-reference metrics for image quality. We conclude that 5/3 biorthogonal wavelet produces the best result in average, especially when its short length is considered. Furthermore, we propose a real-time FPGA implementation of the blending algorithm, using 2D non-separable systolic filtering scheme. Its pipeline architecture does not require hardware multipliers and it is able to achieve very high operating frequencies. The implemented system is able to process 91 fps for 1080p (1920×1080) image resolution.

  11. RRI-GBT MULTI-BAND RECEIVER: MOTIVATION, DESIGN, AND DEVELOPMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Maan, Yogesh; Deshpande, Avinash A.; Chandrashekar, Vinutha; Chennamangalam, Jayanth; Rao, K. B. Raghavendra; Somashekar, R.; Ezhilarasi, M. S.; Sujatha, S.; Kasturi, S.; Sandhya, P.; Duraichelvan, R.; Amiri, Shahram; Aswathappa, H. A.; Sarabagopalan, G.; Ananda, H. M.; Anderson, Gary; Bauserman, Jonah; Beaudet, Carla; Bloss, Marty; Barve, Indrajit V.; and others

    2013-01-15

    We report the design and development of a self-contained multi-band receiver (MBR) system, intended for use with a single large aperture to facilitate sensitive and high time-resolution observations simultaneously in 10 discrete frequency bands sampling a wide spectral span (100-1500 MHz) in a nearly log-periodic fashion. The development of this system was primarily motivated by need for tomographic studies of pulsar polar emission regions. Although the system design is optimized for the primary goal, it is also suited for several other interesting astronomical investigations. The system consists of a dual-polarization multi-band feed (with discrete responses corresponding to the 10 bands pre-selected as relatively radio frequency interference free), a common wide-band radio frequency front-end, and independent back-end receiver chains for the 10 individual sub-bands. The raw voltage time sequences corresponding to 16 MHz bandwidth each for the two linear polarization channels and the 10 bands are recorded at the Nyquist rate simultaneously. We present the preliminary results from the tests and pulsar observations carried out with the Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope using this receiver. The system performance implied by these results and possible improvements are also briefly discussed.

  12. Highly Efficient Multi-Band Power Amplifier Employing Reconfigurable Matching and Biasing Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuda, Atsushi; Okazaki, Hiroshi; Narahashi, Shoichi

    This paper presents a highly efficient multi-band power amplifier (PA) with a novel reconfigurable configuration. It consists of band-switchable matching networks (BS-MNs) and a biasing network (BS-BN) that are available for multi-band operation. BS-MNs with a susceptance block (SB) require a shorter transmission line (TL) than those without the SB at some target impedances. This paper theoretically derives the relationships of the required TL lengths for the BS-MN with or without the SB and the target impedances. The required TL lengths at the target impedances are evaluated numerically in order to discuss the advantages of the proposed configuration. The BS-BN employing switches for band switching can supply DC power to an amplification device without additional DC power dissipation because the DC bias current does not flow through the switches. Numerical analyses confirm that a BS-BN can be configured with low loss in multiple bands. Based on the proposed configuration, a 1/1.5/1.9/2.5-GHz quad-band reconfigurable PA is designed and fabricated employing RF microelectro mechanical systems switches and partitioned low temperature co-fired ceramics substrates. The fabricated 1W-class PA achieves a high output power of greater than 30dBm and a maximum power added efficiency of over 40% in all operating modes.

  13. CONSTRAINING GAMMA-RAY BURST EMISSION PHYSICS WITH EXTENSIVE EARLY-TIME, MULTIBAND FOLLOW-UP

    SciTech Connect

    Cucchiara, A.; Cenko, S. B.; Bloom, J. S.; Morgan, A.; Perley, D. A.; Li, W.; Butler, N. R.; Filippenko, A. V.; Melandri, A.; Kobayashi, S.; Smith, R. J.; Mundell, C. G.; Steele, I. A.; Hora, J. L.; Da Silva, R. L.; Prochaska, J. X.; Worseck, G.; Fumagalli, M.; Cobb, B.; and others

    2011-12-20

    Understanding the origin and diversity of emission processes responsible for gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) remains a pressing challenge. While prompt and contemporaneous panchromatic observations have the potential to test predictions of the internal-external shock model, extensive multiband imaging has been conducted for only a few GRBs. We present rich, early-time, multiband data sets for two Swift events, GRB 110205A and GRB 110213A. The former shows optical emission since the early stages of the prompt phase, followed by the steep rising in flux up to {approx}1000 s after the burst (t{sup -{alpha}} with {alpha} = -6.13 {+-} 0.75). We discuss this feature in the context of the reverse-shock scenario and interpret the following single power-law decay as being forward-shock dominated. Polarization measurements, obtained with the RINGO2 instrument mounted on the Liverpool Telescope, also provide hints on the nature of the emitting ejecta. The latter event, instead, displays a very peculiar optical to near-infrared light curve, with two achromatic peaks. In this case, while the first peak is probably due to the onset of the afterglow, we interpret the second peak to be produced by newly injected material, signifying a late-time activity of the central engine.

  14. Generation of multiband chorus by lower band cascade in the Earth's magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Xinliang; Lu, Quanming; Bortnik, Jacob; Li, Wen; Chen, Lunjin; Wang, Shui

    2016-03-01

    Chorus waves are intense electromagnetic whistler mode emissions in the magnetosphere, typically falling into two distinct frequency bands: a lower band (0.1-0.5fce) and an upper band (0.5-0.8fce) with a power gap at about 0.5fce. In this letter, with the Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms satellite, we observed two special chorus events, which are called as multiband chorus because upper band chorus is located at harmonics of lower band chorus. We propose a new potential generation mechanism for multiband chorus, which is called as lower band cascade. In this scenario, a density mode with a frequency equal to that of lower band chorus is generated by the ponderomotive effect (inhomogeneity of the electric amplitude) along the wave vector, and then upper band chorus with the frequency twice that of lower band chorus is generated through wave-wave couplings between lower band chorus and the density mode. The mechanism provides a new insight into the evolution of whistler mode chorus in the Earth's magnetosphere.

  15. Optical frequency comb based multi-band microwave frequency conversion for satellite applications.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xinwu; Xu, Kun; Yin, Jie; Dai, Yitang; Yin, Feifei; Li, Jianqiang; Lu, Hua; Liu, Tao; Ji, Yuefeng

    2014-01-13

    Based on optical frequency combs (OFC), we propose an efficient and flexible multi-band frequency conversion scheme for satellite repeater applications. The underlying principle is to mix dual coherent OFCs with one of which carrying the input signal. By optically channelizing the mixed OFCs, the converted signal in different bands can be obtained in different channels. Alternatively, the scheme can be configured to generate multi-band local oscillators (LO) for widely distribution. Moreover, the scheme realizes simultaneous inter- and intra-band frequency conversion just in a single structure and needs only three frequency-fixed microwave sources. We carry out a proof of concept experiment in which multiple LOs with 2 GHz, 10 GHz, 18 GHz, and 26 GHz are generated. A C-band signal of 6.1 GHz input to the proposed scheme is successfully converted to 4.1 GHz (C band), 3.9 GHz (C band) and 11.9 GHz (X band), etc. Compared with the back-to-back (B2B) case measured at 0 dBm input power, the proposed scheme shows a 9.3% error vector magnitude (EVM) degradation at each output channel. Furthermore, all channels satisfy the EVM limit in a very wide input power range.

  16. Lecture on Thermal Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dennis, Brian R.

    2006-01-01

    This lecture will cover solar thermal radiation, particularly as it relates to the high energy solar processes that are the subject of this summer school. After a general review of thermal radiation from the Sun and a discussion of basic definitions, the various emission and absorption mechanisms will be described including black-body emission, bremsstrahlung, free-bound, and atomic line emissions of all kinds. The bulk of the time will be spent discussing the observational characteristics of thermal flare plasma and what can be learned about the flare energy release process from observations of the thermal radiation at all wavelengths. Information that has been learned about the morphology, temperature distribution, and composition of the flare plasma will be presented. The energetics of the thermal flare plasma will be discussed in relation to the nonthermal energy of the particles accelerated during the flare. This includes the total energy, the radiated and conductive cooling processes, and the total irradiated energy.

  17. Tracking the energetics of the non-thermal disc-corona-jet in the very high state GX 339 - 4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubota, A.; Done, C.

    2016-06-01

    The dramatic hard-soft spectral transition in black hole binaries is important as it is associated with the collapse of the jet and with the strongest low-frequency quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs). These transition spectra (intermediate and very high state: VHS) are complex, with soft but distinctly non-thermal Comptonization which merges smoothly into the disc emission. Here we develop a physical model for the accretion flow which can accommodate all these features, with an outer standard disc, which can make a transition to an energetically coupled disc-corona region, and make a further transition to a hot inner flow which can be radiatively inefficient if required. The code explicitly uses fully relativistic emissivity (Novikov-Thorne), and all Comptonization is calculated with a hybrid (thermal and non-thermal) electron distribution. We fit this to a VHS spectrum from GX 339 - 4. We show that the complex continuum curvature produced by a hybrid electron distribution is enough to remove the strong constraint on black hole spin derived from reflection using simpler Comptonization models. More fundamentally, we show that the VHS cannot be fit with the same Novikov-Thorne emissivity which can fit the disc-dominated spectrum but instead requires that the inner flow is somewhat radiatively inefficient. This is consistent with an accretion powered jet, but simultaneous radio data show that the jet has already collapsed at the time of our data. Instead, it could point to truncation of the inner flow at radii larger than the innermost stable circular orbit, as predicted by the Lense-Thirring QPO models.

  18. Simulating three-dimensional nonthermal high-energy photon emission in colliding-wind binaries

    SciTech Connect

    Reitberger, K.; Kissmann, R.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.

    2014-07-01

    Massive stars in binary systems have long been regarded as potential sources of high-energy γ rays. The emission is principally thought to arise in the region where the stellar winds collide and accelerate relativistic particles which subsequently emit γ rays. On the basis of a three-dimensional distribution function of high-energy particles in the wind collision region—as obtained by a numerical hydrodynamics and particle transport model—we present the computation of the three-dimensional nonthermal photon emission for a given line of sight. Anisotropic inverse Compton emission is modeled using the target radiation field of both stars. Photons from relativistic bremsstrahlung and neutral pion decay are computed on the basis of local wind plasma densities. We also consider photon-photon opacity effects due to the dense radiation fields of the stars. Results are shown for different stellar separations of a given binary system comprising of a B star and a Wolf-Rayet star. The influence of orbital orientation with respect to the line of sight is also studied by using different orbital viewing angles. For the chosen electron-proton injection ratio of 10{sup –2}, we present the ensuing photon emission in terms of two-dimensional projections maps, spectral energy distributions, and integrated photon flux values in various energy bands. Here, we find a transition from hadron-dominated to lepton-dominated high-energy emission with increasing stellar separations. In addition, we confirm findings from previous analytic modeling that the spectral energy distribution varies significantly with orbital orientation.

  19. Low dust charging rate induced weakly dissipative dust acoustic solitary waves: Role of nonthermal ions

    SciTech Connect

    Chaudhuri, Tushar Kanti; Khan, Manoranjan; Gupta, M. R.; Ghosh, Samiran

    2007-10-15

    The effects of low dust charging rate compared to the dust oscillation frequency and nonthermal ions on small but finite amplitude nonlinear dust acoustic wave have been investigated. It is seen that because of the low dust charging rate, the nonlinear wave exhibits weakly dissipative solitary wave that is governed by a modified form of the Korteweg-de Vries equation. The solitary wave possesses both rarefactive and compressive soliton solution depending on the values of ion nonthermality parameter a. An analytical solution reveals that because of the simultaneous effects of low dust charging rate and nonthermal ions, the wave amplitude may grow exponentially with time if the ion nonthermality parameter (a) exceeds a critical value provided the ion-electron temperature ratio ({sigma}{sub i}) is less than 0.11.

  20. Cancer therapy using non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma with ultra-high electron density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Hiromasa; Mizuno, Masaaki; Toyokuni, Shinya; Maruyama, Shoichi; Kodera, Yasuhiro; Terasaki, Hiroko; Adachi, Tetsuo; Kato, Masashi; Kikkawa, Fumitaka; Hori, Masaru

    2015-12-01

    Cancer therapy using non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma is a big challenge in plasma medicine. Reactive species generated from plasma are key factors for treating cancer cells, and thus, non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma with high electron density has been developed and applied for cancer treatment. Various cancer cell lines have been treated with plasma, and non-thermal atmospheric plasma clearly has anti-tumor effects. Recent innovative studies suggest that plasma can both directly and indirectly affect cells and tissues, and this observation has widened the range of applications. Thus, cancer therapy using non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma is promising. Animal experiments and understanding the mode of action are essential for clinical application in the future. A new academic field that combines plasma science, the biology of free radicals, and systems biology will be established.

  1. Observation of Nonthermal Emission from the Supernova Remnant IC443 with RXTE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sturner, S. J.; Keohane, J. W.; Reimer, O.

    2002-01-01

    In this paper we present analysis of X-ray spectra from the supernova remnant IC443 obtained using the PCA on RXTE. The spectra in the 3 - 20 keV band are well fit by a two-component model consisting of thermal and nonthermal components. We compare these results with recent results of other X-ray missions and discuss the need for a cut-off in the nonthermal spectrum. Recent Chandra and XMM-Newton observations suggest that much of the nonthermal emission from IC443 can be attributed to a pulsar wind nebula. We present the results of our search for periodic emission in the RXTE PCA data. We then discuss the origin o f the nonthermal component and its possible association with the unidentified EGRET source.

  2. Cancer therapy using non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma with ultra-high electron density

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, Hiromasa; Mizuno, Masaaki; Toyokuni, Shinya; Maruyama, Shoichi; Kodera, Yasuhiro; Terasaki, Hiroko; Adachi, Tetsuo; Kato, Masashi; Kikkawa, Fumitaka; Hori, Masaru

    2015-12-15

    Cancer therapy using non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma is a big challenge in plasma medicine. Reactive species generated from plasma are key factors for treating cancer cells, and thus, non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma with high electron density has been developed and applied for cancer treatment. Various cancer cell lines have been treated with plasma, and non-thermal atmospheric plasma clearly has anti-tumor effects. Recent innovative studies suggest that plasma can both directly and indirectly affect cells and tissues, and this observation has widened the range of applications. Thus, cancer therapy using non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma is promising. Animal experiments and understanding the mode of action are essential for clinical application in the future. A new academic field that combines plasma science, the biology of free radicals, and systems biology will be established.

  3. A comprehensive study of channel estimation for WBAN-based healthcare systems: feasibility of using multiband UWB.

    PubMed

    Islam, S M Riazul; Kwak, Kyung Sup

    2012-06-01

    Wireless personal area network (WPAN) is an emerging in wireless technology for short range indoor and outdoor communication applications. A more specific category of WPAN is the wireless body area network (WBAN) used for health monitoring. On the other hand, multiband orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (MB-OFDM) ultra-wideband (UWB) comes with a number of desirable features at the physical layer for wireless communications, for example, very high data rate. One big challenge in adoption of multiband UWB in WBAN is the fact that channel estimation becomes difficult under the constraint of extremely low transmission power. Moreover, the heterogeneous environment of WBAN causes a dense multipath wireless channel. Therefore, effective channel estimation is required in the receiver of WBAN-based healthcare system that uses multiband UWB. In this paper, we first outline the MB-OFDM UWB system. Then, we present an overview of channel estimation techniques proposed/investigated for multiband UWB communications with emphasis on their strengths and weaknesses. Useful suggestions are given to overcome the weaknesses so that these methods can be particularly useful for WBAN channels. Also, we analyze the comparative performances of the techniques using computer simulation in order to find the energy-efficient channel estimation methods for WBAN-based healthcare systems.

  4. The influence of nonthermal electron distributions on the charge state of heavy ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kartavykh, Yu.; Ostryakov, V.

    2001-08-01

    We investigate the influence of non-thermal electrons on the formation of ionic states of heavy elements in SEP events. The equilibrium mean charge of Mg, Si and Fe for several samples of non-Maxwellian populations (power law electron beam and bi-Maxwellian distribution) were calculated. According to our estimates the anomalously high density of non-thermal electrons is required to obtain substantial difference in the mean charge of heavy ions as compared with `pure' thermal dstribution.

  5. Nonlinear localized dust acoustic waves in a charge varying dusty plasma with nonthermal ions

    SciTech Connect

    Tribeche, Mouloud; Amour, Rabia

    2007-10-15

    A numerical investigation is presented to show the existence, formation, and possible realization of large-amplitude dust acoustic (DA) solitary waves in a charge varying dusty plasma with nonthermal ions. These nonlinear localized structures are self-consistent solutions of the collisionless Vlasov equation with a population of fast particles. The spatial patterns of the variable charge DA solitary wave are significantly modified by the nonthermal effects. The results complement and provide new insights into previously published results on this problem.

  6. A Link Between Massive Binary Stars and Non-thermal Radio Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallace, Debra

    1999-07-01

    Non-thermal radio emission in Wolf-Rayet {WR} stars is explained in terms of synchrotron emission from shocks in the wind. For single star models, the shocks arise from instabilities in the wind itself, whereas in binary models, the shocks form at the wind-wind interaction zone. In Niemela et al. 1998 {from WFPC2 data}, we support the binary theory, for two WR stars, linking the non-thermal emission with the colliding wind region. Before we can conclusively link non- thermal emission to binarity, we must demonstrate that all non-thermal emitters are binary, and that all thermal emitters are either single stars or binary systems with separations that are either too wide or too close to result in a wind-wind interaction that produces shocks. We cannot yet conclusively state this because WFPC2 does not resolve binaries with separations less than about 0.100''. We propose to use the FGS to observe 9 non-thermal and 9 thermal WR stars to search for binary companions. The FGS ca n resolve angular separations as s mall as .007''. If the non-thermal stars are resolved as binaries and the thermal emitters are determined to be single, the single star theory of non-thermal emission can be disavowed. Co-latterally, we will have demonstrated a new method of detecting massive binaries, and, for all WR stars, we will establish a more accurate binary incidence rate.

  7. Hydrodynamic simulation of non-thermal pressure profiles of galaxy clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, Kaylea; Nagai, Daisuke; Lau, Erwin T.

    2014-09-01

    Cosmological constraints from X-ray and microwave observations of galaxy clusters are subjected to systematic uncertainties. Non-thermal pressure support due to internal gas motions in galaxy clusters is one of the major sources of astrophysical uncertainties. Using a mass-limited sample of galaxy clusters from a high-resolution hydrodynamical cosmological simulation, we characterize the non-thermal pressure fraction profile and study its dependence on redshift, mass, and mass accretion rate. We find that the non-thermal pressure fraction profile is universal across redshift when galaxy cluster radii are defined with respect to the mean matter density of the universe instead of the commonly used critical density. We also find that the non-thermal pressure is predominantly radial, and the gas velocity anisotropy profile exhibits strong universality when galaxy cluster radii are defined with respect to the mean matter density of the universe. However, we find that the non-thermal pressure fraction is strongly dependent on the mass accretion rate of the galaxy cluster. We provide fitting formulae for the universal non-thermal pressure fraction and velocity anisotropy profiles of gas in galaxy clusters, which should be useful in modeling astrophysical uncertainties pertinent to using galaxy clusters as cosmological probes.

  8. Optimization of Non-Thermal Plasma Treatment in an In Vivo Model Organism

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Amanda; Lin, Abraham; Shah, Kajol; Singh, Harpreet; Miller, Vandana; Gururaja Rao, Shubha

    2016-01-01

    Non-thermal plasma is increasingly being recognized for a wide range of medical and biological applications. However, the effect of non-thermal plasma on physiological functions is not well characterized in in vivo model systems. Here we use a genetically amenable, widely used model system, Drosophila melanogaster, to develop an in vivo system, and investigate the role of non-thermal plasma in blood cell differentiation. Although the blood system in Drosophila is primitive, it is an efficient system with three types of hemocytes, functioning during different developmental stages and environmental stimuli. Blood cell differentiation in Drosophila plays an essential role in tissue modeling during embryogenesis, morphogenesis and also in innate immunity. In this study, we optimized distance and frequency for a direct non-thermal plasma application, and standardized doses to treat larvae and adult flies so that there is no effect on the viability, fertility or locomotion of the organism. We discovered that at optimal distance, time and frequency, application of plasma induced blood cell differentiation in the Drosophila larval lymph gland. We articulate that the augmented differentiation could be due to an increase in the levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) upon non-thermal plasma application. Our studies open avenues to use Drosophila as a model system in plasma medicine to study various genetic disorders and biological processes where non-thermal plasma has a possible therapeutic application. PMID:27505063

  9. Analytical model for non-thermal pressure in galaxy clusters - II. Comparison with cosmological hydrodynamics simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Xun; Komatsu, Eiichiro; Nelson, Kaylea; Nagai, Daisuke

    2015-03-01

    Turbulent gas motion inside galaxy clusters provides a non-negligible non-thermal pressure support to the intracluster gas. If not corrected, it leads to a systematic bias in the estimation of cluster masses from X-ray and Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) observations assuming hydrostatic equilibrium, and affects interpretation of measurements of the SZ power spectrum and observations of cluster outskirts from ongoing and upcoming large cluster surveys. Recently, Shi & Komatsu developed an analytical model for predicting the radius, mass, and redshift dependence of the non-thermal pressure contributed by the kinetic random motions of intracluster gas sourced by the cluster mass growth. In this paper, we compare the predictions of this analytical model to a state-of-the-art cosmological hydrodynamics simulation. As different mass growth histories result in different non-thermal pressure, we perform the comparison on 65 simulated galaxy clusters on a cluster-by-cluster basis. We find an excellent agreement between the modelled and simulated non-thermal pressure profiles. Our results open up the possibility of using the analytical model to correct the systematic bias in the mass estimation of galaxy clusters. We also discuss tests of the physical picture underlying the evolution of intracluster non-thermal gas motions, as well as a way to further improve the analytical modelling, which may help achieve a unified understanding of non-thermal phenomena in galaxy clusters.

  10. Uninformed Hawking radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakalli, I.; Ovgun, A.

    2015-04-01

    We show in detail that the Parikh-Wilczek tunneling method (PWTM), which was designed for resolving the information loss problem in Hawking radiation (HR) fails whenever the radiation occurs from an isothermal process. The PWTM aims to produce a non-thermal HR which adumbrates the resolution of the problem of unitarity in quantum mechanics (QM), and consequently the entropy (or information) conservation problem. The effectiveness of the method has been satisfactorily tested on numerous black holes (BHs). However, it has been shown that the isothermal HR, which results from the emission of the uncharged particles of the linear dilaton BH (LDBH) described in the Einstein-Maxwell-Dilaton (EMD) theory, the PWTM has vulnerability in having non-thermal radiation. In particular, we consider Painlevé-Gullstrand coordinates (PGCs) and isotropic coordinates (ICs) in order to prove the aforementioned failure in the PWTM. While carrying out calculations in the ICs, we also highlight the effect of the refractive index on the null geodesics.

  11. Feasibility analysis report for hybrid non-thermal plasma reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Rosocha, L.A.

    1998-01-15

    The purpose of the Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program (SERDP) project CP-1038 is to evaluate and develop non-thermal plasma (NTP) reactor technology for Department of Defense (DoD) air emissions control applications. The primary focus is on oxides of nitrogen (NO{sub x}) and a secondary focus on hazardous air pollutants (HAPs), especially volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Examples of NO{sub x} sources are jet engine test cells (JETCs) and diesel-engine powered electrical generators. Examples of VOCs are organic solvents used in painting, paint-stripping, and parts cleaning. Because pollutant-containing air-emission streams within the Department of Defense (DoD) frequently span a broad range of pollutant concentrations, flow rates, and gas conditions (e.g., temperature, humidity), a single type of NTP reactor is not expected to fit all types of emissions streams. Additionally, stand-alone NTP reactors may provide neither an adequate means of pollutant removal nor an acceptable economic solution. Therefore, hybrid systems (combinations of different NTP reactor types or architectures), which employ adsorbents and/or catalytic media are being examined by researchers in this field. This report is intended to provide a preliminary summary analysis of a few representative hybrid systems as a means of introducing the hybrid or staged-system concept.

  12. Nonthermal Argon Plasma Generator and Some Potential Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bunoiu, M.; Jugunaru, I.; Bica, I.; Balasoiu, M.

    2015-12-01

    A laboratory - made nonthermal plasma generator is presented. It has a diameter of 0.020 m and length of 0.155 m and contains two electrodes. The first electrode is a 2% Th-W alloy, 0.002 m in diameter bar, centred inside the generator's body by means of a four channel teflon piece; the other three channels, 0.003 m in diameter, are used for Ar supply. The second electrode is a nozzle of 0.002 m - 0.008 m diameter and 0.005m length. A ~500 kV/m electric field is generated between the two electrodes by a high frequency source (13.56 MHz ±5%), equipped with a OT-1000 (Tungsram) power triode. For Ar flows ranging from 0.00008 m3/s to 0.00056 m3/s, a plasma jet of length not exceeding 0.015 m and temperature below 315 K is obtained. Anthurium andraeanumis sample , blood matrix, human hair and textile fibers may be introduced in the plasma jet. For time periods of 30 s and 60 s, various effects like, cell detexturization, fast blood coagulation or textile fiber or hair cleaning and smoothing are obtained. These effects are presented and discussed in the paper.

  13. Calibrated Landsat ETM+ nonthermal-band image mosaics of Afghanistan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Davis, Philip A.

    2006-01-01

    In 2005, the U.S. Agency for International Development and the U.S. Trade and Development Agency contracted with the U.S. Geological Survey to perform assessments of the natural resources within Afghanistan. The assessments concentrate on the resources that are related to the economic development of that country. Therefore, assessments were initiated in oil and gas, coal, mineral resources, water resources, and earthquake hazards. All of these assessments require geologic, structural, and topographic information throughout the country at a finer scale and better accuracy than that provided by the existing maps, which were published in the 1970s by the Russians and Germans. The very rugged terrain in Afghanistan, the large scale of these assessments, and the terrorist threat in Afghanistan indicated that the best approach to provide the preliminary assessments was to use remotely sensed, satellite image data, although this may also apply to subsequent phases of the assessments. Therefore, the first step in the assessment process was to produce satellite image mosaics of Afghanistan that would be useful for these assessments. This report discusses the production and characteristics of the fundamental satellite image databases produced for these assessments, which are calibrated image mosaics of all six Landsat nonthermal (reflected) bands.

  14. Head-on collisions of electrostatic solitons in nonthermal plasmas.

    PubMed

    Verheest, Frank; Hellberg, Manfred A; Hereman, Willy A

    2012-09-01

    In contrast to overtaking interactions, head-on collisions between two electrostatic solitons can be dealt with only by use of an approximate method, which limits the range of validity but offers valuable insights. Treatments in the plasma physics literature all use assumptions in the stretching of space and time and in the expansion of the dependent variables that are seldom, if ever, discussed. All models force a separability to lowest order, corresponding to two linear waves with opposite but equally large velocities. A systematic exposition of the underlying hypotheses is illustrated by considering a plasma composed of cold ions and nonthermal electrons. This is general enough to yield critical compositions that lead to modified rather than standard Korteweg-de Vries equations, an aspect not discussed so far. The nonlinear evolution equations for both solitons and their phase shifts due to the collision are established. A Korteweg-de Vries description is the generic conclusion, except when the plasma composition is critical, rendering the nonlinearity in the evolution equations cubic, with concomitant repercussions on the phase shifts. In the latter case, the solitons can have either polarity, so combinations of negative and positive solitons can occur, contrary to the generic case, where both solitons necessarily have the same polarity. PMID:23031029

  15. Non-thermal plasma for air and water remediation.

    PubMed

    Hashim, Siti Aiasah; Samsudin, Farah Nadia Dayana Binti; Wong, Chiow San; Abu Bakar, Khomsaton; Yap, Seong Ling; Mohd Zin, Mohd Faiz

    2016-09-01

    A modular typed dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) device is designed and tested for air and water remediation. The module is made of a number of DBD tubes that can be arranged in series or parallel. Each of the DBD tubes comprises inner electrode enclosed with dielectric barrier and arranged as such to provide a gap for the passage of gases. Non-thermal plasma generated in the gap effectively creates gaseous chemical reactions. Its efficacy in the remediation of gas stream containing high NOx, similar to diesel emission and wastewater containing latex, are presented. A six tubes DBD module has successfully removed more than 80% of nitric oxide from the gas stream. In another arrangement, oxygen was fed into a two tubes DBD to generate ozone for treatment of wastewater. Samples of wastewater were collected from a treatment pond of a rubber vulcanization pilot plant. The water pollution load was evaluated by the chemical oxygen demand (COD) and biological oxygen demand (BOD5) values. Preliminary results showed some improvement (about 13%) on the COD after treatment and at the same time had increased the BOD5 by 42%. This results in higher BOD5/COD ratio after ozonation which indicate better biodegradability of the wastewater.

  16. Non-thermal plasma for air and water remediation.

    PubMed

    Hashim, Siti Aiasah; Samsudin, Farah Nadia Dayana Binti; Wong, Chiow San; Abu Bakar, Khomsaton; Yap, Seong Ling; Mohd Zin, Mohd Faiz

    2016-09-01

    A modular typed dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) device is designed and tested for air and water remediation. The module is made of a number of DBD tubes that can be arranged in series or parallel. Each of the DBD tubes comprises inner electrode enclosed with dielectric barrier and arranged as such to provide a gap for the passage of gases. Non-thermal plasma generated in the gap effectively creates gaseous chemical reactions. Its efficacy in the remediation of gas stream containing high NOx, similar to diesel emission and wastewater containing latex, are presented. A six tubes DBD module has successfully removed more than 80% of nitric oxide from the gas stream. In another arrangement, oxygen was fed into a two tubes DBD to generate ozone for treatment of wastewater. Samples of wastewater were collected from a treatment pond of a rubber vulcanization pilot plant. The water pollution load was evaluated by the chemical oxygen demand (COD) and biological oxygen demand (BOD5) values. Preliminary results showed some improvement (about 13%) on the COD after treatment and at the same time had increased the BOD5 by 42%. This results in higher BOD5/COD ratio after ozonation which indicate better biodegradability of the wastewater. PMID:27056469

  17. Non-thermal discharge processing of gaseous pollutants

    SciTech Connect

    Vogtlin, G.; Penetrante, B.; Wallman, H.

    1993-08-27

    The electrical discharge techniques, called non-thermal, utilize high voltage breakdown of gases using short pulses of one to a few hundred nanoseconds. These short pulses between metal electrodes generate energetic electrons without appreciable thermal heating of the gas. The energetic electrons collide with gas molecules to form radicals. The radicals then react with pollutants to form harmless compounds. Our experimental device uses a wire in a pipe geometry. The wire is driven by a 40 kilovolt pulse 100 nanoseconds long. Gas is circulated in a loop through the pipe geometry in a closed system. This system permits the introduction of various gas combinations prior to testing. The recirculated gas can be heated to determine the effect on the electrical discharge, and chemical reactions. The efficiency of pollutant removal is the key to applications. We have been able to significantly improve the efficiency of NO removal by the addition of hydrocarbons. Nitric oxide has been removed with an energy cost of 15 ev per NO molecule. We believe the hydrocarbon additive serves by recycling the hydroxyl radicals during the oxidation and reduction of NO. The implementation of this process will depend largely on how much additives, electrical power consumption, and final NO{sub x} concentration are acceptable for a particular application.

  18. Nitrogen oxides and methane treatment by non-thermal plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alva, E.; Pacheco, M.; Colín, A.; Sánchez, V.; Pacheco, J.; Valdivia, R.; Soria, G.

    2015-03-01

    Non thermal plasma was used to treat nitrogen oxides (NOx) and methane (CH4), since they are important constituents of hydrocarbon combustion emissions processes and, both gases, play a key role in the formation of tropospheric ozone. These gases are involved in environmental problems like acid rain and some diseases such as bronchitis and pneumonia. In the case of methane is widely known its importance in the global climate change, and currently accounts for 30% of global warming. There is a growing concern for methane leaks, associated with a rapid expansion of unconventional oil and gas extraction techniques as well as a large-scale methane release from Arctic because of ice melting and the subsequent methane production of decaying organic matter. Therefore, methane mitigation is a key to avoid dangerous levels of global warming. The research, here reported, deals about the generation of non-thermal plasma with a double dielectric barrier (2DBD) at atmospheric pressure with alternating current (AC) for NOx and CH4 treatment. The degradation efficiencies and their respective power consumption for different reactor configurations (cylindrical and planar) are also reported. Qualitative and quantitative analysis of gases degradation are reported before and after treatment with cold plasma. Experimental and theoretical results are compared obtaining good removal efficiencies, superior to 90% and to 20% respectively for NOx and CH4.

  19. A model for the non-thermal emission of the very massive colliding-wind binary HD 93129A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    del Palacio, S.; Romero, G. E.; Bosch-Ramon, V.; Benaglia, P.

    2016-08-01

    Recently, the wind collision region of the system HD 93129A was resolved for the first time using very large baseline interferometry. This system is one of the most massive known binaries in our Galaxy. In this work we develop a broadband radiative model for the wind collision region. The model takes into account the evolution of accelerated particles streaming along the shocked region, their emission through different radiative processes, and the attenuation of the radiation while it propagates across all local fields. We reproduce the available radio data, and analyze the consequent detectability of the source in hard X/gamma-rays. We predict how the emission from the system will evolve in the forthcoming years when the stars come closer, and we also provide synthetic radio maps that allow to interpret the future observations with very large baseline interferometry in 2.3 GHz and 8.6 GHz. According to our results, the non-thermal emission from this system will enhance in the near future. With instruments such as NuSTAR, Fermi, and CTA, it will be possible to determine whether the relativistic particle content is hadron or lepton dominated, and other parameters such as the strength of the magnetic field in the wind collision region and, indirectly, the magnetic field in the surface of the very massive stars.

  20. The behavior of beams of relativistic non-thermal electrons under the influence of collisions and synchrotron losses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mctiernan, James M.; Petrosian, Vahe

    1989-01-01

    For many astrophysical situations, such as in solar flares or cosmic gamma-ray bursts, continuum gamma rays with energies up to hundreds of MeV were observed, and can be interpreted to be due to bremsstrahlung radiation by relativistic electrons. The region of acceleration for these particles is not necessarily the same as the region in which the radiation is produced, and the effects of the transport of the electrons must be included in the general problem. Hence it is necessary to solve the kinetic equation for relativistic electrons, including all the interactions and loss mechanisms relevant at such energies. The resulting kinetic equation for non-thermal electrons, including the effects of Coulomb collisions and losses due to synchrotron emission, was solved analytically in some simple limiting cases, and numerically for the general cases including constant and varying background plasma density and magnetic field. New approximate analytic solutions are presented for collision dominated cases, for small pitch angles and all energies, synchrotron dominated cases, both steady-state and time dependent, for all pitch angles and energies, and for cases when both synchrotron and collisional energy losses are important, but for relativistic electrons. These analytic solutions are compared to the full numerical results in the proper limits. These results will be useful for calculation of spectra and angular distribution of the radiation (x rays, gamma-rays, and microwaves) emitted via synchrotron or bremsstrahlung processes by the electrons. These properties and their relevance to observations will be observed in subsequent papers.

  1. Strong interaction between electrons and collective excitations in the multiband superconductor MgB2

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Mou, Daixiang; Jiang, Rui; Taufour, Valentin; Flint, Rebecca; Bud'ko, S. L.; Canfield, P. C.; Wen, J. S.; Xu, Z. J.; Gu, Genda; Kaminski, Adam

    2015-04-08

    We use a tunable laser angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy to study the electronic properties of the prototypical multiband BCS superconductor MgB2. Our data reveal a strong renormalization of the dispersion (kink) at ~65meV, which is caused by the coupling of electrons to the E2g phonon mode. In contrast to cuprates, the 65 meV kink in MgB2 does not change significantly across Tc. More interestingly, we observe strong coupling to a second, lower energy collective mode at a binding energy of 10 meV. As a result, this excitation vanishes above Tc and is likely a signature of the elusive Leggett mode.

  2. Multi-band metamaterial absorber based on the arrangement of donut-type resonators.

    PubMed

    Park, Jin Woo; Tuong, Pham Van; Rhee, Joo Yull; Kim, Ki Won; Jang, Won Ho; Choi, Eun Ha; Chen, Liang Yao; Lee, YoungPak

    2013-04-22

    We propose multi-band metamaterial absorbers at microwave frequencies. The design, the analysis, the fabrication, and the measurement of the absorbers working in multiple bands are presented. The numerical simulations and the experiments in the microwave anechoic chamber were performed. The metamaterial absorbers consist of an delicate arrangement of donut-shape resonators with different sizes and a metallic background plane, separated by a dielectric. The near-perfect absorptions of dual, triple and quad peaks are persistent with polarization independence, and the effect of angle of incidence for both TE and TM modes was also elucidated. It was also found that the multiple-reflection theory was not suitable for explaining the absorption mechanism of our investigated structures. The results of this study are promising for the practical applications.

  3. Fast Fusion of Multi-Band Images Based on Solving a Sylvester Equation.

    PubMed

    Wei, Qi; Dobigeon, Nicolas; Tourneret, Jean-Yves

    2015-11-01

    This paper proposes a fast multi-band image fusion algorithm, which combines a high-spatial low-spectral resolution image and a low-spatial high-spectral resolution image. The well admitted forward model is explored to form the likelihoods of the observations. Maximizing the likelihoods leads to solving a Sylvester equation. By exploiting the properties of the circulant and downsampling matrices associated with the fusion problem, a closed-form solution for the corresponding Sylvester equation is obtained explicitly, getting rid of any iterative update step. Coupled with the alternating direction method of multipliers and the block coordinate descent method, the proposed algorithm can be easily generalized to incorporate prior information for the fusion problem, allowing a Bayesian estimator. Simulation results show that the proposed algorithm achieves the same performance as the existing algorithms with the advantage of significantly decreasing the computational complexity of these algorithms.

  4. Multi-Band Multi-Tone Tunable Millimeter-Wave Frequency Synthesizer For Satellite Beacon Transmitter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simons, Rainee N.; Wintucky, Edwin G.

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the design and test results of a multi-band multi-tone tunable millimeter-wave frequency synthesizer, based on a solid-state frequency comb generator. The intended application of the synthesizer is in a satellite beacon transmitter for radio wave propagation studies at K-band (18 to 26.5 GHz), Q-band (37 to 42 GHz), and E-band (71 to 76 GHz). In addition, the architecture for a compact beacon transmitter, which includes the multi-tone synthesizer, polarizer, horn antenna, and power/control electronics, has been investigated for a notional space-to-ground radio wave propagation experiment payload on a small satellite. The above studies would enable the design of robust high throughput multi-Gbps data rate future space-to-ground satellite communication links.

  5. Study of multiband disordered systems using the typical medium dynamical cluster approximation

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Zhang, Yi; Terletska, Hanna; Moore, C.; Ekuma, Chinedu; Tam, Ka-Ming; Berlijn, Tom; Ku, Wei; Moreno, Juana; Jarrell, Mark

    2015-11-06

    We generalize the typical medium dynamical cluster approximation to multiband disordered systems. Using our extended formalism, we perform a systematic study of the nonlocal correlation effects induced by disorder on the density of states and the mobility edge of the three-dimensional two-band Anderson model. We include interband and intraband hopping and an intraband disorder potential. Our results are consistent with those obtained by the transfer matrix and the kernel polynomial methods. We also apply the method to KxFe2-ySe2 with Fe vacancies. Despite the strong vacancy disorder and anisotropy, we find the material is not an Anderson insulator. Moreover our resultsmore » demonstrate the application of the typical medium dynamical cluster approximation method to study Anderson localization in real materials.« less

  6. Study of multiband disordered systems using the typical medium dynamical cluster approximation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yi; Terletska, Hanna; Moore, C.; Ekuma, Chinedu; Tam, Ka-Ming; Berlijn, Tom; Ku, Wei; Moreno, Juana; Jarrell, Mark

    2015-11-06

    We generalize the typical medium dynamical cluster approximation to multiband disordered systems. Using our extended formalism, we perform a systematic study of the nonlocal correlation effects induced by disorder on the density of states and the mobility edge of the three-dimensional two-band Anderson model. We include interband and intraband hopping and an intraband disorder potential. Our results are consistent with those obtained by the transfer matrix and the kernel polynomial methods. We also apply the method to KxFe2-ySe2 with Fe vacancies. Despite the strong vacancy disorder and anisotropy, we find the material is not an Anderson insulator. Moreover our results demonstrate the application of the typical medium dynamical cluster approximation method to study Anderson localization in real materials.

  7. Theory of macroscopic quantum tunneling with Josephson-Leggett collective excitations in multiband superconducting Josephson junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asai, Hidehiro; Ota, Yukihiro; Kawabata, Shiro; Machida, Masahiko; Nori, Franco

    2014-06-01

    Collective excitations reveal fundamental properties and potential applications of superconducting states. We theoretically study macroscopic quantum tunneling (MQT) in a Josephson junction composed of multiband superconductors, focusing on a phase mode induced by interband fluctuations: the Josephson-Leggett (JL) collective excitation mode. Using the imaginary-time path-integral method, we derive a formula for the MQT escape rate for low-temperature switching events. We clarify that the JL mode has two major effects on the MQT: (i) the zero-point fluctuations enhance the escape rate, and (ii) the quantum dissipation induced by the couplings to the gauge-invariant phase difference suppresses the quantum tunneling. We show that the enhancement exceeds the suppression for a wide range of junction parameters. This enhancement originates from the single-mode interaction between the tunneling variable and the interband fluctuations.

  8. Cross-correlation and image alignment for multi-band IR sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Thomas; Chao, Tien-Hsin; Chen, Kang (Frank); Luong, Andrew; Dewees, Mallory; Yan, Xinyi; Chow, Edward; Torres, Gilbert

    2016-04-01

    We present the development of a cross-correlation algorithm for correlating objects in the long wave, mid wave and short wave Infrared sensor arrays. The goal is to align the images in the multisensor suite by correlating multiple key features in the images. Due to the wavelength differences, the object appears very differently in the sensor images even the sensors focus on the same object. In order to perform accurate correlation of the same object in the multi-band images, we perform image processing on the images so that the features of the object become similar to each other. Fourier domain band pass filters are used to enhance the images. Mexican Hat and Gaussian Derivative Wavelets are used to further enhance the features of the object. A Python based QT graphical user interface has been implemented to carry out the process. We show reliable results of the cross-correlation of the objects in multiple band videos.

  9. Comparison of Tunneling in Fe-based Superconductors with Multi-band MgB2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zasadzinski, John; Iavarone, Maria

    MgB2 is an s-wave, phonon coupled, multiband superconductor that exhibits novel tunneling spectra including a subtle dip feature due to quasiparticle transfer between bands. Since this feature mimics the above-gap spectral dip feature observed in Fe-based superconductors, typically attributed to a strong coupling boson, it is worthwhile to consider whether quasiparticle transfer is relevant. We first show that the dip in MgB2 appears in the π-band, DOS (Δ = 2.4 meV) and is due to quasiparticle transfer to the σ-band with Δ = 7.2 meV. Reviewing the spectral dip in Fe-based superconductors, including new data on FeSe crystals, there are inconsistencies with quasiparticle transfer as the origin. The conclusion is that the spectral dip is more likely due to a boson, the resonance spin excitation, as found in cuprate superconductors.

  10. Simplified radio-over-fiber transport systems with a low-cost multiband light source.

    PubMed

    Chang, Ching-Hung; Peng, Peng-Chun; Lu, Hai-Han; Shih, Chine-Liang; Chen, Hwan-Wen

    2010-12-01

    In this Letter, low-cost radio-over-fiber (ROF) transport systems are proposed and experimentally demonstrated. By utilizing a laser diode (LD) and a local oscillator (LO) to generate coherent multiband optical carriers, as well as a self-composed wavelength selector to separate every two carriers for different ROF transport systems, no any other dedicated LD or electrical frequency upconverting circuit/process is needed in the central station (CS). Compared with current ROF systems, the required numbers of LDs, LOs, and mixers in a CS are significantly reduced. Reducing the number of components not only can simplify the network structure but can also reduce the volume and complexity of the relative logistics. To demonstrate the practice of the proposed ROF transport systems, clear eye diagrams and error-free transmission performance are experimentally presented.

  11. Spectral and energy parameters of multiband barrier-discharge KrBr excilamps

    SciTech Connect

    Avdeev, S M; Erofeev, M V; Skakun, V S; Sosnin, E A; Suslov, A I; Tarasenko, V F; Schitz, D V

    2008-07-31

    The spectral and energy characteristics of multiband barrier-discharge coaxial KrBr excilamps are studied experimentally at pressures from a few tens of Torr to 0.4 atm. It is shown that an increase in the Br{sub 2} concentration reduces the emission intensity of KrBr* molecules with respect to the emission intensity of Br{sub 2}* molecules and reduces the total emission power of the excilamp. This can be explained by the nonradiative decay of exciplex KrBr* molecules caused by their quenching by molecular bromine. The emission power and efficiency in the Kr:Br{sub 2} = 400:1 mixture at a pressure of {approx}230 Torr and a discharge gap of 8.5 mm were 4.8 W and 2.4%, respectively. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  12. Multiband Te p Based Superconductivity of Ta4Pd3Te16

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Singh, David J.

    2014-10-06

    We recently discovered that Ta4Pd3Te16 is a superconductor that has been suggested to be an unconventional superconductor near magnetism. Here, we report electronic structure calculations showing that despite the layered crystal structure the material is an anisotropic three-dimensional (3D) metal. The Fermi surface contains prominent one-dimensional (1D) and two-dimensional (2D) features, including nested 1D sheets, a 2D cylindrical section, and a 3D sheet. Moreover, the electronic states that make up the Fermi surface are mostly derived from Te p states with small Ta d and Pd d contributions. This places the compound far from magnetic instabilities. The results are discussedmore » in terms of multiband superconductivity.« less

  13. Multi-band frequency encoding method for metabolic imaging with hyperpolarized [1- 13C]pyruvate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Morze, Cornelius; Reed, Galen; Shin, Peter; Larson, Peder E. Z.; Hu, Simon; Bok, Robert; Vigneron, Daniel B.

    2011-08-01

    A new method was developed for simultaneous spatial localization and spectral separation of multiple compounds based on a single echo, by designing the acquisition to place individual compounds in separate frequency encoding bands. This method was specially designed for rapid and robust metabolic imaging of hyperpolarized 13C substrates and their metabolic products, and was investigated in phantom studies and studies in normal mice and transgenic models of prostate cancer to provide rapid metabolic imaging of hyperpolarized [1- 13C]pyruvate and its metabolic products [1- 13C]lactate and [1- 13C]alanine at spatial resolutions up to 3 mm in-plane. Elevated pyruvate and lactate signals in the vicinity of prostatic tissues were observed in transgenic tumor mice. The multi-band frequency encoding technique enabled rapid metabolic imaging of hyperpolarized 13C compounds with important advantages over prior approaches, including less complicated acquisition and reconstruction methods.

  14. Multi-bands photoconductive response in AlGaN/GaN multiple quantum wells

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, G.; Rong, X.; Xu, F. J.; Tang, N.; Wang, X. Q. Shen, B.; Fu, K.; Zhang, B. S.; Hashimoto, H.; Yoshikawa, A.; Ge, W. K.

    2014-04-28

    Based on the optical transitions among the quantum-confined electronic states in the conduction band, we have fabricated multi-bands AlGaN/GaN quantum well infrared photodetectors. Crack-free AlGaN/GaN multiple quantum wells (MQWs) with atomically sharp interfaces have been achieved by inserting an AlN interlayer, which releases most of the tensile strain in the MQWs grown on the GaN underlayer. With significant reduction of dark current by using thick AlGaN barriers, photoconductive responses are demonstrated due to intersubband transition in multiple regions with center wavelengths of 1.3, 2.3, and 4 μm, which shows potential applications on near infrared detection.

  15. MULTIBAND OPTICAL OBSERVATION OF THE P/2010 A2 DUST TAIL

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Junhan; Ishiguro, Masateru; Hanayama, Hidekazu; Hasegawa, Sunao; Usui, Fumihiko; Sarugaku, Yuki; Yanagisawa, Kenshi; Watanabe, Jun-ichi; Yoshida, Michitoshi

    2012-02-10

    An inner main-belt asteroid, P/2010 A2, was discovered on 2010 January 6. Based on its orbital elements, it is considered that the asteroid belongs to the Flora collisional family, where S-type asteroids are common, while showing a comet-like dust tail. Although analysis of images taken by the Hubble Space Telescope and Rosetta spacecraft suggested that the dust tail resulted from a recent head-on collision between asteroids, an alternative idea of ice sublimation was suggested based on the morphological fitting of ground-based images. Here, we report a multiband observation of P/2010 A2 made on 2010 January with a 105 cm telescope at the Ishigakijima Astronomical Observatory. Three broadband filters, g', R{sub c} , and I{sub c} , were employed for the observation. The unique multiband data reveal that the reflectance spectrum of the P/2010 A2 dust tail resembles that of an Sq-type asteroid or that of ordinary chondrites rather than that of an S-type asteroid. Due to the large error of the measurement, the reflectance spectrum also resembles the spectra of C-type asteroids, even though C-type asteroids are uncommon in the Flora family. The reflectances relative to the g' band (470 nm) are 1.096 {+-} 0.046 at the R{sub c} band (650 nm) and 1.131 {+-} 0.061 at the I{sub c} band (800 nm). We hypothesize that the parent body of P/2010 A2 was originally S-type but was then shattered upon collision into scattering fresh chondritic particles from the interior, thus forming the dust tail.

  16. Monitoring System for Atmospheric Water Vapor with a Ground-Based Multi-Band Radiometer: Meteorological Application of Radio Astronomy Technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagasaki, T.; Araki, K.; Ishimoto, H.; Kominami, K.; Tajima, O.

    2016-08-01

    High-resolution estimation of thermodynamic properties in the atmosphere can help to predict and mitigate meteorological disasters, such as local heavy rainfall and tornadic storms. For the purposes of short-term forecasting and nowcasting of severe storms, we propose a novel ground-based measurement system, which observes the intensity of atmospheric radiation in the microwave range. Our multi-band receiver system is designed to identify a rapid increase in water vapor before clouds are generated. At frequencies between 20 and 30 GHz, our system simultaneously measures water vapor as a broad absorption peak at 22 GHz as well as cloud liquid water. Another band at 50-60 GHz provides supplementary information from oxygen radiation to give vertical profiles of physical temperature. For the construction of this cold receiver system, novel technologies originally developed for observations of cosmic microwave background radiation were applied. The input atmospheric signal is amplified by a cold low-noise amplifier maintained below 10 K, while the spectrum of this amplified signal is measured using a signal analyzer under ambient conditions. The cryostat also contains a cold black body at 40 K to act as a calibration signal. This calibration signal is transported to each of the receivers via a wire grid. We can select either the atmospheric signal or the calibration signal by changing the orientation of this wire. Each receiver can be calibrated using this setup. Our system is designed to be compact (<1 m3), with low power consumption (˜ 1.5 kW). Therefore, it is easy to deploy on top of high buildings, mountains, and ship decks.

  17. Intrinsic Josephson junctions in the iron-based multi-band superconductor (V2Sr4O6)Fe2As2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moll, Philip J. W.; Zhu, Xiyu; Cheng, Peng; Wen, Hai-Hu; Batlogg, Bertram

    2014-09-01

    In layered superconductors, Josephson junctions may be formed within the unit cell as a result of sufficiently low inter-layer coupling. These intrinsic Josephson junction (iJJ) systems have attracted considerable interest for their application potential in quantum computing as well as efficient sources of THz radiation, closing the famous `THz gap'. So far, iJJ have been demonstrated in single-band, copper-based high-Tc superconductors, mainly in Bi-Sr-Ca-Cu-O (refs , , ). Here we report clear experimental evidence for iJJ behaviour in the iron-based superconductor (V2Sr4O6)Fe2As2. The intrinsic junctions are identified by periodic oscillations of the flux-flow voltage on increasing a well-aligned in-plane magnetic field. The periodicity is explained by commensurability effects between the Josephson vortex lattice and the crystal structure, which is a hallmark signature of Josephson vortices confined into iJJ stacks. This finding adds the pnictide (V2Sr4O6)Fe2As2 to the copper-based iJJ materials of interest for Josephson junction applications. In particular, novel devices based on multi-band Josephson coupling may be realized.

  18. Lunar central peak mineralogy and iron content using the Kaguya Multiband Imager: Reassessment of the compositional structure of the lunar crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemelin, Myriam; Lucey, Paul G.; Song, Eugenie; Taylor, G. Jeffrey

    2015-05-01

    Ryder and Wood (1977) suggested that the lunar crust becomes more mafic with depth because the impact melts associated with the large Imbrium and Serenitatis basins are more mafic than the surface composition of the Moon. In this study, we reexamine the hypothesis that the crust becomes more mafic with depth; we analyze the composition of crater central peaks by using recent remote sensing data and combining the best practices of previous studies. We compute the mineralogy for 34 central peaks using (1) nine-band visible and near-infrared data from the Kaguya Multiband Imager, (2) an improved version of Hapke's radiative transfer model validated with spectra of lunar soils with well-known modal mineralogy, and (3) new crustal thickness models from the Gravity Recovery and Interior Laboratory data to examine the variation in composition with depth. We find that there is no increase in mafic mineral abundances with proximity to the crust/mantle boundary or with depth from the current lunar surface and, therefore, that the crust does not become more mafic with depth. We find that anorthosite with very low mafic abundance ("purest anorthosite" or PAN) is a minority constituent in these peaks, and there is no clear evidence of a distinct PAN-rich layer in the middle crust as previously proposed. The composition of most of the central peaks we analyze is more mafic than classically defined anorthosites with an average noritic anorthosite composition similar to that of the lunar surface.

  19. Observing the Non-Thermal Universe with the Highest Energy Photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dingus, Brenda L.; HAWC, VERITAS, CTA

    2016-01-01

    Astrophysical sources of relativistic particles radiate gamma rays to such high energies that they can be detected from the ground. The existence of high energy gamma rays implies that even higher energy particles are being accelerated placing strong constraints on these non-thermal accelerators. Within our galaxy, TeV gamma rays have been detected from supernova remnants, pulsar wind nebula, x-ray binaries and some yet to be identified sources in the Galactic plane. In addition, these gamma rays have sufficient energy to be attenuated by the interaction with infrared photons producing an electron-positron pair. Thus the spectrum of gamma rays can also constrain the infrared photon density, which for distant extragalactic sources is a direct probe of cosmology. The known extragalactic TeV sources are primarily the blazer class of active galactic nuclei. And TeV gamma rays might even be produced by annihilating dark matter.The US currently supports two ground-based gamma-ray observatories—HAWC and VERITAS—and NSF is developing a prototype for the international Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) observatory. The HAWC (High Altitude Water Cherenkov) observatory just began operation of the full detector in March 2015 and with its wide field of view scans ~2/3 of the sky each day for TeV sources. VERITAS (Very EneRgetic Imaging Telescope Array System) is an array of four imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes that follows individual sources to produce lightcurves and spectra from 85 GeV to > 30 TeV. The combination of both a survey and pointed observatory is very complementary with a broad scientific reach that includes the study of extragalactic and Galactic objects as well as the search for astrophysical signatures of dark matter and the measurement of cosmic rays. I will present the current view of the TeV sky and the latest results from HAWC and VERITAS as well as plans for CTA.

  20. Non-Thermal Plasma System Development for CIDI Exhaust Aftertreatment

    SciTech Connect

    Balmer, M. Lou ); Tonkyn, Russell ); Maupin, Gary; Yoon, Steven; Kolwaite, Ana; Barlow, Stephen; Domingo, Norberto; Storey, John M.; Hoard, John Wm.; Howden, Ken

    2000-04-01

    There is a need for an efficient, durable technology to reduce NOx emissions from oxidative exhaust streams such as those produced by compression-ignition, direct injection (CIDI) diesel or lean-burn gasoline engines. A partnership formed between the DOE Office of Advanced Automotive Technology, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the USCAR Low Emission Technologies Research and Development Partnership is evaluating the effectiveness of a non-thermal plasma in conjunction with catalytic materials to mediate NOx and particulate emissions from diesel fueled light duty (CIDI) engines. Preliminary studies showed that plasma-catalyst systems could reduce up to 70% of NOx emissions at an equivalent cost of 3.5% of the input fuel in simulated diesel exhaust. These studies also showed that the type and concentration of hydrocarbon play a key role in both the plasma gas phase chemistry and the catalyst surface chemistry. More recently, plasma/catalyst systems have been evaluated for NOx reduction and particulate removal on a CIDI engine. Performance results for select plasma-catalyst systems for both simulated and actual CIDI exhaust will be presented. The effect of NOx and hydrocarbon concentration on plasma-catalyst performance will also be shown. SAE Paper SAE-2000-01-1601 {copyright} 2000 SAE International. This paper is published on this website with permission from SAE International. As a user of this website, you are permitted to view this paper on-line, download this pdf file and print one copy of this paper at no cost for your use only. The downloaded pdf file and printout of this SAE paper may not be copied, distributed or forwarded to others or for the use of others.

  1. Mitochondria-Mediated Anticancer Effects of Non-Thermal Atmospheric Plasma.

    PubMed

    Zhunussova, Aigul; Vitol, Elina A; Polyak, Boris; Tuleukhanov, Sultan; Brooks, Ari D; Sensenig, Richard; Friedman, Gary; Orynbayeva, Zulfiya

    2016-01-01

    Non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma has attracted great interest due to its multiple potential biomedical applications with cancer treatment being among the most urgent. To realize the clinical potential of non-thermal plasma, the exact cellular and molecular mechanisms of plasma effects must be understood. This work aimed at studying the prostate cancer specific mechanisms of non-thermal plasma effects on energy metabolism as a central regulator of cell homeostasis and proliferation. It was found that cancer cells with higher metabolic rate initially are more resistant to plasma treated phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) since the respiratory and calcium sensitive signaling systems were not responsive to plasma exposure. However, dramatic decline of cancer oxidative phosphorylation developed over time resulted in significant progression of cell lethality. The normal prostate cells with low metabolic activity immediately responded to plasma treated PBS by suppression of respiratory functions and sustained elevation of cytosolic calcium. However, over time the normal cells start recovering their mitochondria functions, proliferate and restore the cell population. We found that the non-thermal plasma induced increase in intracellular ROS is of primarily non-mitochondrial origin. The discriminate non-thermal plasma effects hold a promise for clinical cancer intervention. PMID:27270230

  2. Non-thermal Dupree diffusivity and shielding effects on atomic collisions in Lorentzian turbulent plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Myoung-Jae; Jung, Young-Dae

    2016-05-01

    The influence of non-thermal Dupree turbulence and the plasma shielding on the electron-ion collision is investigated in Lorentzian turbulent plasmas. The second-order eikonal analysis and the effective interaction potential including the Lorentzian far-field term are employed to obtain the eikonal scattering phase shift and the eikonal collision cross section as functions of the diffusion coefficient, impact parameter, collision energy, Debye length and spectral index of the astrophysical Lorentzian plasma. It is shown that the non-thermal effect suppresses the eikonal scattering phase shift. However, it enhances the eikonal collision cross section in astrophysical non-thermal turbulent plasmas. The effect of non-thermal turbulence on the eikonal atomic collision cross section is weakened with increasing collision energy. The variation of the atomic cross section due to the non-thermal Dupree turbulence is also discussed. This research was supported by Nuclear Fusion Research Program through NRF funded by the Ministry of Science, ICT & Future Planning (Grant No. 2015M1A7A1A01002786).

  3. Mitochondria-Mediated Anticancer Effects of Non-Thermal Atmospheric Plasma

    PubMed Central

    Zhunussova, Aigul; Vitol, Elina A.; Polyak, Boris; Tuleukhanov, Sultan; Brooks, Ari D.; Sensenig, Richard; Friedman, Gary; Orynbayeva, Zulfiya

    2016-01-01

    Non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma has attracted great interest due to its multiple potential biomedical applications with cancer treatment being among the most urgent. To realize the clinical potential of non-thermal plasma, the exact cellular and molecular mechanisms of plasma effects must be understood. This work aimed at studying the prostate cancer specific mechanisms of non-thermal plasma effects on energy metabolism as a central regulator of cell homeostasis and proliferation. It was found that cancer cells with higher metabolic rate initially are more resistant to plasma treated phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) since the respiratory and calcium sensitive signaling systems were not responsive to plasma exposure. However, dramatic decline of cancer oxidative phosphorylation developed over time resulted in significant progression of cell lethality. The normal prostate cells with low metabolic activity immediately responded to plasma treated PBS by suppression of respiratory functions and sustained elevation of cytosolic calcium. However, over time the normal cells start recovering their mitochondria functions, proliferate and restore the cell population. We found that the non-thermal plasma induced increase in intracellular ROS is of primarily non-mitochondrial origin. The discriminate non-thermal plasma effects hold a promise for clinical cancer intervention. PMID:27270230

  4. Generation of ordinary mode electromagnetic radiation near the upper hybrid frequency in the magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashour-Abdalla, M.; Okuda, H.

    1984-01-01

    It is shown by means of plasma numerical simulations that long-wavelength ordinary mode electromagnetic radiation can be generated from short-wavelength electrostatic waves near the upper hybrid resonance frequency in an inhomogeneous plasma. A possible relation of this process to nonthermal continuum radiation in the magnetosphere is discussed.

  5. Experimental investigation on multi-dimensional digital predistortion for multi-band radio-over-fiber systems.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hao; Li, Jianqiang; Xu, Kun; Pei, Yinqing; Dai, Yitang; Yin, Feifei; Lin, Jintong

    2014-02-24

    The recently-proposed multi-dimensional digital predistortion (DPD) technique is experimentally investigated in terms of nonlinearity order, memory length, oversampling rate, digital-to-analog conversion resolution, carrier frequency dependence and RF input power tolerance, in both directly-modulated and externally-modulated multi-band radio-over-fiber (RoF) systems. Similar characteristics of the multi-dimensional digital predistorter are identified in directly-modulated and externally-modulated RoF systems. The experimental results suggest implementing a memory-free multi-dimensional digital predistorter involving nonlinearity orders up to 5 at 2 × oversampling rate for practical multi-band RoF systems. Using the suggested parameters, the multi-dimensional DPD is able to improve the RF input power tolerance by greater than 3dB for each band in a two-band RoF system, indicating an enhancement of RF power transmitting efficiency.

  6. Quantitative Microwave Imaging of Realistic Numerical Breast Phantoms Using an Enclosed Array of Multiband, Miniaturized Patch Antennas.

    PubMed

    Burfeindt, Matthew J; Behdad, Nader; Van Veen, Barry D; Hagness, Susan C

    2012-01-01

    We present a 3-D microwave breast imaging study in which we reconstruct the dielectric profiles of MRI-derived numerical breast phantoms from simulated array measurements using an enclosed array of multiband, miniaturized patch antennas. The array is designed to overcome challenges relating to the ill-posed nature of the inverse scattering system. We use a multifrequency formulation of the distorted Born iterative method to image four normal-tissue breast phantoms, each corresponding to a different density class. The reconstructed fibroglandular distributions are very faithful to the true distributions in location and basic shape. These results establish the feasibility of using an enclosed array of miniaturized, multiband patch antennas for quantitative microwave breast imaging.

  7. Momentum dependence of the superconducting gap and in-gap states in MgB2 multiband superconductor

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Mou, Daixiang; Jiang, Rui; Taufour, Valentin; Bud'ko, S. L.; Canfield, P. C.; Kaminski, Adam

    2015-06-29

    We use tunable laser-based angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy to study the electronic structure of the multiband superconductor MgB2. These results form the baseline for detailed studies of superconductivity in multiband systems. We find that the magnitude of the superconducting gap on both σ bands follows a BCS-like variation with temperature with Δ0 ~ 7meV. Furthermore, the value of the gap is isotropic within experimental uncertainty and in agreement with a pure s-wave pairing symmetry. We observe in-gap states confined to kF of the σ band that occur at some locations of the sample surface. As a result, the energy of thismore » excitation, ~ 3 meV, was found to be somewhat larger than the previously reported gap on π Fermi sheet and therefore we cannot exclude the possibility of interband scattering as its origin.« less

  8. Ion Streaming Instabilities in Pair Ion Plasma and Localized Structure with Non-Thermal Electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasir Khattak, M.; Mushtaq, A.; Qamar, A.

    2015-12-01

    Pair ion plasma with a fraction of non-thermal electrons is considered. We investigate the effects of the streaming motion of ions on linear and nonlinear properties of unmagnetized, collisionless plasma by using the fluid model. A dispersion relation is derived, and the growth rate of streaming instabilities with effect of streaming motion of ions and non-thermal electrons is calculated. A qausi-potential approach is adopted to study the characteristics of ion acoustic solitons. An energy integral equation involving Sagdeev potential is derived during this process. The presence of the streaming term in the energy integral equation affects the structure of the solitary waves significantly along with non-thermal electrons. Possible application of the work to the space and laboratory plasmas are highlighted.

  9. Effect of electron nonthermality on nonlinear electrostatic solitary waves in a charge varying dusty plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Tribeche, Mouloud; Boumezoued, Ghania

    2008-05-15

    The effect of nonthermal electrons with excess of fast energetic electrons on large amplitude electrostatic solitary waves is investigated in a charge varying dusty plasma. The correct nonthermal electron charging is investigated based on the orbit-motion-limited approach. It is found that the nonlinear localized potential structure shrinks when the electrons deviate from isothermality. The dust particles are locally expelled and pushed out the region of the soliton localization as the electrons evolve far away from their thermodynamic equilibrium. Under certain conditions, the dust charge fluctuation may provide an alternate physical mechanism causing anomalous dissipation, the strength of which becomes important and may prevail over that of dispersion as the value of the electron nonthermal parameter {alpha} increases.

  10. The Lyman alpha bulge of Jupiter - Effects of non-thermal velocity field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ben Jaffel, Lotfi; Clarke, John T.; Prange, Renee; Gladstone, G. R.; Vidal-Madjar, Alfred

    1993-01-01

    We outline for the first time the effect of such nonthermal line broadening processes as turbulence, random waves, convection, etc., on the shape and intensity of the H Ly-alpha line resonance scattered from the atmosphere of Jupiter. We show how a nonthermal velocity field confined to the bulge region, in the upper atmosphere of Jupiter, may account for most of the H Ly-alpha bulge features. Both the shape and the brightness of the Ly-alpha line from the bulge region as reported by the IUE instrument and the Voyager UV Spectrometer can be recovered assuming resonant scattering with a total atomic hydrogen of about 4 x 10 exp 17/sq cm, and a nonthermal component H of about 2 x 10 exp 15/sq cm above the thermopause.

  11. Multiband superconductivity in 2 H -NbSe2 probed by Doppler-modulated scanning tunneling spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fridman, I.; Kloc, C.; Petrovic, C.; Wei, J. Y. T.

    Cooper pairing in multiband superconductors can involve carriers from bands having different dimensionalities, and the interband coupling can provide for novel pairing interactions. In addition to MgB2, recent experiments on 2 H -NbSe2 have studied the Fermi surface topology using angle- and temperature-dependent scanning tunneling spectroscopy. We present another novel method for probing multiband pairing: using a field-induced diamagnetic supercurrent, applied along different crystal axes, to perturb the quasiparticle density-of-states spectrum. By measuring the evolution of the quasiparticle spectrum under finite superfluid momentum, we characterize the pairing gaps and gap anisotropies. This approach is demonstrated on 2 H -NbSe2 at 300 mK with a magnetic field of up to 9 T applied in the ab -plane. The STM measurements revealed unambiguous evidence for multiband pairing, and evidence for a novel transition of the in-plane vortex lattice. We discuss the characteristics of this transition in light of data from other probes Work supported by NSERC, CFI/OIT, CIFAR, U.S. DOE and Brookhaven Science Associates (No. DE-AC02-98CH10886).

  12. Multi-band morpho-Spectral Component Analysis Deblending Tool (MuSCADeT): Deblending colourful objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joseph, R.; Courbin, F.; Starck, J.-L.

    2016-05-01

    We introduce a new algorithm for colour separation and deblending of multi-band astronomical images called MuSCADeT which is based on Morpho-spectral Component Analysis of multi-band images. The MuSCADeT algorithm takes advantage of the sparsity of astronomical objects in morphological dictionaries such as wavelets and their differences in spectral energy distribution (SED) across multi-band observations. This allows us to devise a model independent and automated approach to separate objects with different colours. We show with simulations that we are able to separate highly blended objects and that our algorithm is robust against SED variations of objects across the field of view. To confront our algorithm with real data, we use HST images of the strong lensing galaxy cluster MACS J1149+2223 and we show that MuSCADeT performs better than traditional profile-fitting techniques in deblending the foreground lensing galaxies from background lensed galaxies. Although the main driver for our work is the deblending of strong gravitational lenses, our method is fit to be used for any purpose related to deblending of objects in astronomical images. An example of such an application is the separation of the red and blue stellar populations of a spiral galaxy in the galaxy cluster Abell 2744. We provide a python package along with all simulations and routines used in this paper to contribute to reproducible research efforts. Codes can be found at http://lastro.epfl.ch/page-126973.html

  13. Thermal and Nonthermal Processes on Single Crystal Transition Metal Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Xingcai

    This dissertation contains three parts. Part I, "Fundamentals", provides concise description of concepts, detailed accounts of historic studies, and extensive reviews of current activities. Chapter 1 deals with thermal processes (adsorption and desorption), and Chapter 2 with nonthermal processes induced by electrons and by photons. Part II, "Experimental" (Chapter 3), describes the ultrahigh vacuum apparatus, surface science techniques, and procedures for single crystal preparation and gas exposure. Part III, "Results", is a collection of ten selected publications in refereed journals. Each chapter is self-contained. Thermal desorption of CO from Pd(111) (Chapter 4) has been studied by temperature programmed desorption. It is demonstrated that the effective desorption kinetic parameters extracted from desorption spectra are correlated with the adlayer structures and dependent on the sizes of ordered domains--a nonequilibrium effect. Site exchange of CO (Chapter 5) and site retention of O_2 (Chapter 6) on Pt(112) during thermal desorption are observed with isotope labeled adsorption on specific sites--steps or terraces. The adsorption and desorption kinetics of O _2 are compared on Pt(111) and Pt(112) surfaces (Chapter 7). The mechanisms of adsorption and the effect of well-defined defects are elucidated. O_2 adsorbed on Pd(111) is studied with thermal activation (Chapter 8), electron impact (Chapter 9), and photon irradiation (Chapter 10 -12). Various thermal processes are delineated with isotopic mixing experiments. Electron-induced conversion, dissociation, and desorption processes are observed. Cross sections (10^{-17} cm^2 ) and their electron energy dependences (0-500 eV) are measured. A resonance-enhanced desorption of atomic oxygen from Pd(111) is found at ~10 eV. Photon-induced conversion, dissociation, and desorption processes are observed. Cross sections (10^ {-19} cm^2) and photon energy dependence (1.4-5.4 eV) are extracted. Possible mechanisms are

  14. DNA damage and mitochondria dysfunction in cell apoptosis induced by nonthermal air plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, G. J.; Lee, J. K.; Kim, W.; Kim, K. T.

    2010-01-11

    Nonthermal plasma is known to induce animal cell death but the mechanism is not yet clear. Here, cellular and biochemical regulation of cell apoptosis is demonstrated for plasma treated cells. Surface type nonthermal air plasma triggered apoptosis of B16F10 mouse melanoma cancer cells causing DNA damage and mitochondria dysfunction. Plasma treatment activated caspase-3, apoptosis executioner. The plasma treated cells also accumulated gamma-H2A.X, marker for DNA double strand breaks, and p53 tumor suppressor gene as a response to DNA damage. Interestingly, cytochrome C was released from mitochondria and its membrane potential was changed significantly.

  15. On the operation of machines powered by quantum non-thermal baths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niedenzu, Wolfgang; Gelbwaser-Klimovsky, David; Kofman, Abraham G.; Kurizki, Gershon

    2016-08-01

    Diverse models of engines energised by quantum-coherent, hence non-thermal, baths allow the engine efficiency to transgress the standard thermodynamic Carnot bound. These transgressions call for an elucidation of the underlying mechanisms. Here we show that non-thermal baths may impart not only heat, but also mechanical work to a machine. The Carnot bound is inapplicable to such a hybrid machine. Intriguingly, it may exhibit dual action, concurrently as engine and refrigerator, with up to 100% efficiency. We conclude that even though a machine powered by a quantum bath may exhibit an unconventional performance, it still abides by the traditional principles of thermodynamics.

  16. DNA damage and mitochondria dysfunction in cell apoptosis induced by nonthermal air plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, G. J.; Kim, W.; Kim, K. T.; Lee, J. K.

    2010-01-01

    Nonthermal plasma is known to induce animal cell death but the mechanism is not yet clear. Here, cellular and biochemical regulation of cell apoptosis is demonstrated for plasma treated cells. Surface type nonthermal air plasma triggered apoptosis of B16F10 mouse melanoma cancer cells causing DNA damage and mitochondria dysfunction. Plasma treatment activated caspase-3, apoptosis executioner. The plasma treated cells also accumulated gamma-H2A.X, marker for DNA double strand breaks, and p53 tumor suppressor gene as a response to DNA damage. Interestingly, cytochrome C was released from mitochondria and its membrane potential was changed significantly.

  17. Nonlinear features of electrostatic waves in a plasma with nonthermal-Tsallis distributed electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutta, Debjit; Sahu, Biswajit

    2016-06-01

    Linear and nonlinear properties of electrostatic waves are investigated in an unmagnetized multicomponent plasma system consisting of cold and hot electrons obeying nonthermal-Tsallis distribution and warm ions using the Sagdeev pseudopotential technique. It is found that such a plasma supports soliton, supersoliton, and double layer structures. Also, the present plasma system supports the coexistence of arbitrary amplitude compressive and rarefactive solitons in a certain region of parameter space. Furthermore, numerical results reveal that the nonthermal-Tsallis distribution of electrons may affect the spatial profiles as well as the nature of the electrostatic nonlinear structures.

  18. Refined scenario of standard Big Bang nucleosynthesis allowing for nonthermal nuclear reactions in the primordial plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Voronchev, Victor T.; Nakao, Yasuyuki; Nakamura, Makoto; Tsukida, Kazuki

    2012-11-12

    The standard scenario of big bang nucleosynthesis (BBN) is generalized to take into account nonthermal nuclear reactions in the primordial plasma. These reactions are naturally triggered in the BBN epoch by fast particles generated in various exoergic processes. It is found that, although such particles can appreciably enhance the rates of some individual reactions, their influence on the whole process of element production is not significant. The nonthermal corrections to element abundances are obtained to be 0.1% ({sup 3}H), -0.03% ({sup 7}Li), and 0.34 %-0.63% (CNO group).

  19. Electrostatic solitary wave and double layer in a plasma with heavy ions and nonthermally distributed electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, C.-R.; Min, K.-W.; Woo, M.-H.; Ryu, C.-M.

    2010-09-15

    The existence condition for bump and dip type, as well as double layer (DL), solutions of electrostatic solitary waves (ESWs) in a nonthermal electron plasma with heavy ions is investigated by a pseudopotential method. It is found that the nonthermality of electrons determines the existence of the DL solution and that the amplitude of ESWs is enhanced by the density of heavy ions. When the heavy ion density is beyond a certain critical value, ESWs and DLs cannot exist. It is also found that both the lower and upper critical Mach numbers are reduced by the presence of heavy ions.

  20. Instability of nonplanar modulated dust acoustic wave packets in a strongly coupled nonthermal dusty plasma

    SciTech Connect

    El-Labany, S. K. Zedan, N. A.; El-Taibany, W. F. E-mail: eltaibany@du.edu.eg

    2015-07-15

    Cylindrical and spherical amplitude modulations of dust acoustic (DA) solitary wave envelopes in a strongly coupled dusty plasma containing nonthermal distributed ions are studied. Employing a reductive perturbation technique, a modified nonlinear Schrödinger equation including the geometrical effect is derived. The influences of nonthermal ions, polarization force, and the geometries on the modulational instability conditions are analyzed and the possible rogue wave structures are discussed in detail. It is found that the spherical DA waves are more structurally stable to perturbations than the cylindrical ones. Possible applications of these theoretical findings are briefly discussed.

  1. Shock wave in magnetized dusty plasmas with dust charging and nonthermal ion effects

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Liping; Xue Jukui

    2005-04-15

    The effects of the external magnetized field, nonadiabatic dust charge fluctuation, and nonthermally distributed ions on three-dimensional dust acoustic shock wave in dusty plasmas have been investigated. By using the reductive perturbation method, a Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) Burger equation governing the dust acoustic shock wave is derived. The results of numerical integrations of KdV Burger equation show that the external magnetized field, nonthermally distributed ions, and nonadiabatic dust charge fluctuation have strong influence on the shock structures.

  2. Compressive and rarefactive dressed solitons in plasma with nonthermal electrons and positrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdelwahed, H. G.; El-Shewy, E. K.; Zahran, M. A.; Elwakil, S. A.

    2016-02-01

    The study of dressed solitary ion waves in a collisionless unmagnetized plasma composed warm fluid of ion, nonthermal distributed positrons and electrons are discussed. Concerning nonlinear ion acoustic waves, a reductive perturbation method is applied to obtain the KdV equation in terms of first order potential. Our results exemplify that, if soliton amplitude enlarged, the shape of the wave sidetrack from KdV equation. In order to improve the soliton shape, the perturbed KdV equation is suggest. In particular, the effects of nonthermal positrons and ionic temperature on the electrostatic dressed rarefactive and compressive soliton structures are discussed.

  3. Role of nonthermal electron on the dynamics of relativistic electromagnetic soliton in the interaction of laser-plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rostampooran, Shabnam; Dorranian, Davoud

    2016-08-01

    A system of nonlinear one-dimensional equations of the electron hydrodynamics with Maxwell's equations was developed to describe electromagnetic (EM) solitons in plasma with nonthermal electrons. Equation of vector potential was derived in relativistic regime by implementing the multiple scales technique, and their solitonic answers were introduced. The allowed regions for bright and dark electromagnetic solitons were discussed in detail. Roles of number density of nonthermal electrons, temperature of electrons, and frequency of fast participate of vector potential on the Sagdeev potential and properties of EM soliton were investigated. Results show that with increasing the number of nonthermal electrons, the amplitude of vector potential of bright solitons increases. By increasing the number of nonthermal electrons, dark EM solitons may be changed to bright solitons. Increasing the energy of nonthermal electrons leads to generation of high amplitude solitons.

  4. Quantum radiation of Maxwell’s electromagnetic field in nonstationary Kerr-de Sitter black hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibungochouba Singh, T.; Ablu Meitei, I.; Yugindro Singh, K.

    2016-03-01

    Quantum radiation properties of nonstationary Kerr-de Sitter (KdS) black hole is investigated using the method of generalized tortoise coordinate transformation. The locations of horizons and the temperature of the thermal radiation as well as the maximum energy of the nonthermal radiation are derived. It is found that the surface gravity and the Hawking temperature depend on both time and different angles. An extra coupling effect is obtained in the thermal radiation spectrum of Maxwell’s electromagnetic field equations which is absent in the thermal radiation spectrum of scalar particles. Further, the chemical potential derived from the thermal radiation spectrum of scalar particle has been found to be equal to the highest energy of the negative energy state of the scalar particle in the nonthermal radiation for KdS black hole. It is also shown that the generalized tortoise coordinate transformation produces a constant term in the expression of the surface gravity and Hawking temperature.

  5. The image registration of multi-band images by geometrical optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Yung-Jhe; Chiang, Hou-Chi; Tsai, Yu-Hsiang; Huang, Ting-Wei; Mang, Ou-Yang

    2015-09-01

    The image fusion is combination of two or more images into one image. The fusion of multi-band spectral images has been in many applications, such as thermal system, remote sensing, medical treatment, etc. Images are taken with the different imaging sensors. If the sensors take images through the different optical paths in the same time, it will be in the different positions. The task of the image registration will be more difficult. Because the images are in the different field of views (F.O.V.), the different resolutions and the different view angles. It is important to build the relationship of the viewpoints in one image to the other image. In this paper, we focus on the problem of image registration for two non-pinhole sensors. The affine transformation between the 2-D image and the 3-D real world can be derived from the geometrical optics of the sensors. In the other word, the geometrical affine transformation function of two images are derived from the intrinsic and extrinsic parameters of two sensors. According to the affine transformation function, the overlap of the F.O.V. in two images can be calculated and resample two images in the same resolution. Finally, we construct the image registration model by the mapping function. It merges images for different imaging sensors. And, imaging sensors absorb different wavebands of electromagnetic spectrum at the different position in the same time.

  6. Multiband optical-NIR variability of blazars on diverse time-scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agarwal, Aditi; Gupta, Alok C.; Bachev, R.; Strigachev, A.; Semkov, E.; Wiita, Paul J.; Böttcher, M.; Boeva, S.; Gaur, H.; Gu, M. F.; Peneva, S.; Ibryamov, S.; Pandey, U. S.

    2015-08-01

    To search for optical variability on a wide range of time-scales, we have carried out photometric monitoring of two flat spectrum radio quasars, 3C 454.3 and 3C 279, plus one BL Lac, S5 0716+714, all of which have been exhibiting remarkably high activity and pronounced variability at all wavelengths. CCD magnitudes in B, V, R, and I passbands were determined for ˜7000 new optical observations from 114 nights made during 2011-2014, with an average length of ˜4 h each, at seven optical telescopes: four in Bulgaria, one in Greece, and two in India. We measured multiband optical flux and colour variations on diverse time-scales. Discrete correlation functions were computed among B, V, R, and I observations, to search for any time delays. We found weak correlations in some cases with no significant time lags. The structure function method was used to estimate any characteristic time-scales of variability. We also investigated the spectral energy distribution of the three blazars using B, V, R, I, J, and K passband data. We found that the sources almost always follow a bluer-when-brighter trend. We discuss possible physical causes of the observed spectral variability.

  7. Beyond the standard model of Ginzburg-Landau theory: multiband superconductors.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Brendan J; Das, Mukunda P

    2014-08-13

    The recently discovered multiband superconductors have created a new class of novel superconductors. In these materials multiple superconducting gaps arise due to the formation of Cooper pairs on different sheets of the Fermi surfaces. An important feature of these superconductors is the interband couplings, which not only change the individual gap properties, but also create new collective modes. Here we investigate the effect of the interband couplings in the Ginzburg-Landau theory. We produce a general τ((2n + 1)/2) expansion (τ = 1 - T/Tc) and show that this expansion has unexpected behaviour for n ⩾ 2. This point emphasises the weaker validity of the GL theory for lower temperatures and gives credence to the existence of hidden criticality near the critical temperature of the uncoupled subdominant band. We apply this theory to a range of material parameters fitted to experimental measurements and find that for some cases the theory performs very well at all temperatures, but for other materials the range of applicability can be very limited. PMID:25036286

  8. Intra-night optical multiband variability of BL Lacertae during the 2011 outburst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhai, M.; Wei, J. Y.

    2012-02-01

    Aims: We present our optical multiband (B and R) observations of BL Lacertae, which were acquired over 20 nights from May 26 to August 3, 2011, and analyse our data to study the optical emission variability properties of BL Lac. Methods: The simultaneous photometric observations were carried out using the 0.8 m Tsinghua-NAOC Telescope (TNT) at the Xinglong Observatory of National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences (NAOC). TNT is equipped with the Princeton Instrument CCD and standard Johnson-Cousin UBVRI filters. Exposure times were well chosen to make a good compromise between high precision and high temporal density. Results: A multipeak outburst was observed in 2011 observing season. The brightest magnitudes for BL Lac during our observations were B = 14.48 mag and R = 12.89 mag at JD = 2 455 709.2810 (May 27). One of the most rapid variations was detected on July 9, when a flux increase of about 0.34 mag occurred over 2.8 h. In general, both the amplitude of variability and the variation rate are higher at the shorter wavelength. A colour analysis shows that the colour variability processes are apparently complicated. A bluer-when-brighter trend was detected during the outburst. These trends may be the interactive contribution from a "mildly-chromatic" component and a "strongly-chromatic" one. Meanwhile, intra-night variability in B and R bands was found to be correlated, without any time delay exceeding 2.5 min.

  9. Multiband optical variability of three TeV blazars on diverse time-scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Alok C.; Agarwal, A.; Bhagwan, J.; Strigachev, A.; Bachev, R.; Semkov, E.; Gaur, H.; Damljanovic, G.; Vince, O.; Wiita, Paul J.

    2016-05-01

    We present our optical photometric observations of three TeV blazars, PKS 1510-089, PG 1553+113, and Mrk 501, taken using two telescopes in India, one in Bulgaria, one in Greece, and one in Serbia during 2012-2014. These observations covered a total of 95 nights with a total of 202 B filter frames, 247 images in V band, 817 in R band while 229 images were taken in the I filter. This work is focused on multiband flux and colour variability studies of these blazars on diverse time-scales which are useful in understanding the emission mechanisms. We studied the variability characteristics of above three blazars and found all to be active over our entire observational campaigns. We also searched for any correlation between the brightness of the sources and their colour indices. During the times of variability, no significant evidence for the sources to display spectral changes correlated with magnitude was found on time-scales of a few months. We briefly discuss the possible physical mechanisms most likely responsible for the observed flux variability.

  10. Independent polarization and multi-band THz absorber base on Jerusalem cross

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arezoomand, Afsaneh Saee; Zarrabi, Ferdows B.; Heydari, Samaneh; Gandji, Navid P.

    2015-10-01

    In this paper, we present the design and simulation of a single and multi-band perfect metamaterial absorber (MA) in the THz region base on Jerusalem cross (JC) and metamaterial load in unit cells. The structures consist of dual metallic layers for allowing near-perfect absorption with absorption peak of more than 99%. In this novel design, four-different shape of Jerusalem cross is presented and by adding L, U and W shape loaded to first structure, we tried to achieve a dual-band absorber. In addition, by good implementation of these loaded, we are able to control the absorption resonance at second resonance at 0.9, 0.7 and 0.85 THz respectively. In the other hand, we achieved a semi stable designing at first resonance between 0.53 and 0.58 THz. The proposed absorber has broadband polarization angle. The surface current modeled and proved the broadband polarization angle at prototype MA. The LC resonance of the metamaterial for Jerusalem cross and modified structures are extracting from equivalent circuit. As a result, proposed MA is useful for THz medical imaging and communication systems and the dual-band absorber has applications in many scientific and technological areas.

  11. Low-Loss Matching Network Design for Band-Switchable Multi-Band Power Amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuda, Atsushi; Furuta, Takayuki; Okazaki, Hiroshi; Narahashi, Shoichi; Nojima, Toshio

    This paper presents a novel design scheme for a band-switchable multi-band power amplifier (BS-MPA). A key point of the design scheme is configuring multi-section reconfigurable matching networks (MR-MNs) optimally in terms of low loss matching in multiple frequency bands from 0.7 to 2.5GHz. The MR-MN consists of several matching sections, each of which has a matching block connected to a transmission line via a switch. Power dissipation at an actual on-state switch results in the insertion loss of the MR-MN and depends on how the impedance is transformed by the MR-MN. The proposed design scheme appropriately transforms the impedance of a high power transistor to configure a low loss MR-MN. Numerical analyses show quantitative improvement in the loss using the proposed scheme. A 9-band 3-stage BS-MPA is newly designed following the proposed scheme and fabricated on a multi-layer low temperature co-fired ceramic substrate for compactness. The BS-MPA achieves a gain of over 30dB, an output power of greater than 33dBm and a power added efficiency of over 40% at the supply voltage of 4V in each operating band.

  12. Multiband tissue classification for ultrasonic transmission tomography using spectral profile detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Jeong-Won; Kim, Tae-Seong; Shin, Dae-Chul; Do, Synho; Marmarelis, Vasilis Z.

    2004-04-01

    Recently it was shown that soft tissue can be differentiated with spectral unmixing and detection methods that utilize multi-band information obtained from a High-Resolution Ultrasonic Transmission Tomography (HUTT) system. In this study, we focus on tissue differentiation using the spectral target detection method based on Constrained Energy Minimization (CEM). We have developed a new tissue differentiation method called "CEM filter bank". Statistical inference on the output of each CEM filter of a filter bank is used to make a decision based on the maximum statistical significance rather than the magnitude of each CEM filter output. We validate this method through 3-D inter/intra-phantom soft tissue classification where target profiles obtained from an arbitrary single slice are used for differentiation in multiple tomographic slices. Also spectral coherence between target and object profiles of an identical tissue at different slices and phantoms is evaluated by conventional cross-correlation analysis. The performance of the proposed classifier is assessed using Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) analysis. Finally we apply our method to classify tiny structures inside a beef kidney such as Styrofoam balls (~1mm), chicken tissue (~5mm), and vessel-duct structures.

  13. Aerosol and Surface Parameter Retrievals for a Multi-Angle, Multiband Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Broderick, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    This software retrieves the surface and atmosphere parameters of multi-angle, multiband spectra. The synthetic spectra are generated by applying the modified Rahman-Pinty-Verstraete Bidirectional Reflectance Distribution Function (BRDF) model, and a single-scattering dominated atmosphere model to surface reflectance data from Multiangle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR). The aerosol physical model uses a single scattering approximation using Rayleigh scattering molecules, and Henyey-Greenstein aerosols. The surface and atmosphere parameters of the models are retrieved using the Lavenberg-Marquardt algorithm. The software can retrieve the surface and atmosphere parameters with two different scales. The surface parameters are retrieved pixel-by-pixel while the atmosphere parameters are retrieved for a group of pixels where the same atmosphere model parameters are applied. This two-scale approach allows one to select the natural scale of the atmosphere properties relative to surface properties. The software also takes advantage of an intelligent initial condition given by the solution of the neighbor pixels.

  14. Achieving a multi-band metamaterial perfect absorber via a hexagonal ring dielectric resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Li-Yang; Wang, Jun; Du, Hong-Liang; Wang, Jia-Fu; Qu, Shao-Bo

    2015-06-01

    A multi-band absorber composed of high-permittivity hexagonal ring dielectric resonators and a metallic ground plate is designed in the microwave band. Near-unity absorptions around 9.785 GHz, 11.525 GHz, and 12.37 GHz are observed for this metamaterial absorber. The dielectric hexagonal ring resonator is made of microwave ceramics with high permittivity and low loss. The mechanism for the near-unity absorption is investigated via the dielectric resonator theory. It is found that the absorption results from electric and magnetic resonances where enhanced electromagnetic fields are excited inside the dielectric resonator. In addition, the resonance modes of the hexagonal resonator are similar to those of standard rectangle resonators and can be used for analyzing hexagonal absorbers. Our work provides a new research method as well as a solid foundation for designing and analyzing dielectric metamaterial absorbers with complex shapes. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61331005, 11204378, 11274389, 11304393, and 61302023), the Aviation Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 20132796018 and 20123196015), the Natural Science Foundation for Post-Doctoral Scientists of China (Grant Nos. 2013M532131 and 2013M532221), the Natural Science Foundation of Shaanxi Province, China (Grant No. 2013JM6005), and the Special Funds for Authors of Annual Excellent Doctoral Degree Dissertations of China (Grant No. 201242).

  15. Multiband mucosectomy for advanced dysplastic lesions in the upper digestive tract

    PubMed Central

    Espinel, Jesús; Pinedo, Eugenia; Ojeda, Vanesa; del Rio, Maria Guerra

    2015-01-01

    Endoscopic resection (ER) is at present an accepted treatment for superficial gastrointestinal neoplasia. ER provides similar efficacy to surgery; however, it is minimally invasive and less expensive. Endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR) is superior to biopsy for diagnosing advanced dysplasia and can change the diagnostic grade and the management. Several EMR techniques have been described that are alternatively used dependent upon the endoscopist personal experience, the anatomic conditions and the endoscopic appearance of the lesion to be resected. The literature suggests that EMR offers comparable outcomes to surgery for selected indications. EMR techniques using a cap fitted endoscope and EMR using a ligation device [multiband mucosectomy (MBM)] are the most frequently use. MBM technique does not require submucosal injection as with the endoscopic resection-cap technique, multiple resections can be performed with the same snare, pre-looping the endoscopic resection-snare in the ridge of the cap is not necessary, MBM does not require withdrawal of the endoscope between resections and up to six consecutive resections can be performed. This reduces the time and cost required for the procedure, while also reducing patient discomfort. Despite the increasing popularity of MBM, data on the safety and efficacy of this technique in upper gastrointestinal lesions with advanced dysplasia, defined as those lesions that have high-grade dysplasia or early cancer, is limited. PMID:25901216

  16. Compact multi-band fluorescent microscope with an electrically tunable lens for autofocusing

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhaojun; Lei, Ming; Yao, Baoli; Cai, Yanan; Liang, Yansheng; Yang, Yanlong; Yang, Xibin; Li, Hui; Xiong, Daxi

    2015-01-01

    Autofocusing is a routine technique in redressing focus drift that occurs in time-lapse microscopic image acquisition. To date, most automatic microscopes are designed on the distance detection scheme to fulfill the autofocusing operation, which may suffer from the low contrast of the reflected signal due to the refractive index mismatch at the water/glass interface. To achieve high autofocusing speed with minimal motion artifacts, we developed a compact multi-band fluorescent microscope with an electrically tunable lens (ETL) device for autofocusing. A modified searching algorithm based on equidistant scanning and curve fitting is proposed, which no longer requires a single-peak focus curve and then efficiently restrains the impact of external disturbance. This technique enables us to achieve an autofocusing time of down to 170 ms and the reproductivity of over 97%. The imaging head of the microscope has dimensions of 12 cm × 12 cm × 6 cm. This portable instrument can easily fit inside standard incubators for real-time imaging of living specimens. PMID:26601001

  17. Using precise word timing information improves decoding accuracy in a multiband-accelerated multimodal reading experiment.

    PubMed

    Vu, An T; Phillips, Jeffrey S; Kay, Kendrick; Phillips, Matthew E; Johnson, Matthew R; Shinkareva, Svetlana V; Tubridy, Shannon; Millin, Rachel; Grossman, Murray; Gureckis, Todd; Bhattacharyya, Rajan; Yacoub, Essa

    2016-01-01

    The blood-oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD) signal measured in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) experiments is generally regarded as sluggish and poorly suited for probing neural function at the rapid timescales involved in sentence comprehension. However, recent studies have shown the value of acquiring data with very short repetition times (TRs), not merely in terms of improvements in contrast to noise ratio (CNR) through averaging, but also in terms of additional fine-grained temporal information. Using multiband-accelerated fMRI, we achieved whole-brain scans at 3-mm resolution with a TR of just 500 ms at both 3T and 7T field strengths. By taking advantage of word timing information, we found that word decoding accuracy across two separate sets of scan sessions improved significantly, with better overall performance at 7T than at 3T. The effect of TR was also investigated; we found that substantial word timing information can be extracted using fast TRs, with diminishing benefits beyond TRs of 1000 ms. PMID:27686111

  18. Using precise word timing information improves decoding accuracy in a multiband-accelerated multimodal reading experiment.

    PubMed

    Vu, An T; Phillips, Jeffrey S; Kay, Kendrick; Phillips, Matthew E; Johnson, Matthew R; Shinkareva, Svetlana V; Tubridy, Shannon; Millin, Rachel; Grossman, Murray; Gureckis, Todd; Bhattacharyya, Rajan; Yacoub, Essa

    2016-01-01

    The blood-oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD) signal measured in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) experiments is generally regarded as sluggish and poorly suited for probing neural function at the rapid timescales involved in sentence comprehension. However, recent studies have shown the value of acquiring data with very short repetition times (TRs), not merely in terms of improvements in contrast to noise ratio (CNR) through averaging, but also in terms of additional fine-grained temporal information. Using multiband-accelerated fMRI, we achieved whole-brain scans at 3-mm resolution with a TR of just 500 ms at both 3T and 7T field strengths. By taking advantage of word timing information, we found that word decoding accuracy across two separate sets of scan sessions improved significantly, with better overall performance at 7T than at 3T. The effect of TR was also investigated; we found that substantial word timing information can be extracted using fast TRs, with diminishing benefits beyond TRs of 1000 ms.

  19. WIDE-FIELD MULTIBAND PHOTOMETRY OF GLOBULAR CLUSTER SYSTEMS IN THE FORNAX GALAXY CLUSTER

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Hak-Sub; Yoon, Suk-Jin; Chung, Chul; Lee, Sang-Yoon; Lee, Young-Wook; Sohn, Sangmo Tony; Kim, Sang Chul; Kim, Eunhyeuk

    2013-01-20

    We present wide-field multiband photometry of globular cluster (GC) systems in NGC 1399, NGC 1404, and NGC 1387 located in the central region of the Fornax galaxy cluster. Observation was carried out through U, B, V, and I bands, which marks one of the widest and deepest U-band studies on extragalactic GC systems. The present U-band photometry enables us to significantly reduce the contamination by a factor of two for faint sources (V {sub 0} {approx} 23.5). The main results based on some 2000 GC candidates around NGC 1399, NGC 1404, and NGC 1387 are as follows: (1) the GC system in each galaxy exhibits bimodal color distributions in all colors examined, but the shape of color histograms varies systematically depending on colors; (2) NGC 1399 shows that the mean colors of both blue and red GCs become bluer with increasing galactocentric radius; (3) NGC 1399 shows overabundance of GCs in the directions of NGC 1404 and NGC 1387, indicating their ongoing interactions; and (4) NGC 1399 also exhibits a {approx}0.'5 offset between the center of the inner GC distribution and the galaxy's optical center, suggesting that NGC 1399 is not yet dynamically relaxed and may be undergoing merger events.

  20. Optimization of data coils in a multiband wireless link for neuroprosthetic implantable devices.

    PubMed

    Uei-Ming Jow; Ghovanloo, M

    2010-10-01

    We have presented the design methodology along with detailed simulation and measurement results for optimizing a multiband transcutaneous wireless link for high-performance implantable neuroprosthetic devices. We have utilized three individual carrier signals and coil/antenna pairs for power transmission, forward data transmission from outside into the body, and back telemetry in the opposite direction. Power is transmitted at 13.56 MHz through a pair of printed spiral coils (PSCs) facing each other. Two different designs have been evaluated for forward data coils, both of which help to minimize power carrier interference in the received data carrier. One is a pair of perpendicular coils that are wound across the diameter of the power PSCs. The other design is a pair of planar figure-8 coils that are in the same plane as the power PSCs. We have compared the robustness of each design against horizontal misalignments and rotations in different directions. Simulation and measurements are also conducted on a miniature spiral antenna, designed to operate with impulse-radio ultra-wideband (IR-UWB) circuitry for back telemetry. PMID:21918679

  1. Multiband excitation pulses for hyperpolarized 13C dynamic chemical-shift imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larson, Peder E. Z.; Kerr, Adam B.; Chen, Albert P.; Lustig, Michael S.; Zierhut, Matthew L.; Hu, Simon; Cunningham, Charles H.; Pauly, John M.; Kurhanewicz, John; Vigneron, Daniel B.

    2008-09-01

    Hyperpolarized 13C offers high signal-to-noise ratios for imaging metabolic activity in vivo, but care must be taken when designing pulse sequences because the magnetization cannot be recovered once it has decayed. It has a short lifetime, on the order of minutes, and gets used up by each RF excitation. In this paper, we present a new dynamic chemical-shift imaging method that uses specialized RF pulses designed to maintain most of the hyperpolarized substrate while providing adequate SNR for the metabolic products. These are multiband, variable flip angle, spectral-spatial RF pulses that use spectral selectivity to minimally excite the injected prepolarized 13C-pyruvate substrate. The metabolic products of lactate and alanine are excited with a larger flip angle to increase SNR. This excitation was followed by an RF amplitude insensitive double spin-echo and an echo-planar flyback spectral-spatial readout gradient. In vivo results in rats and mice are presented showing improvements over constant flip angle RF pulses. The metabolic products are observable for a longer window because the low pyruvate flip angle preserves magnetization, allowing for improved observation of spatially varying metabolic reactions.

  2. Energetic electron propagation in the decay phase of non-thermal flare emission

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Jing; Yan, Yihua; Tsap, Yuri T.

    2014-06-01

    On the basis of the trap-plus-precipitation model, the peculiarities of non-thermal emission in the decay phase of solar flares have been considered. The calculation formulas for the escape rate of trapped electrons into the loss cone in terms of time profiles of hard X-ray (HXR) and microwave (MW) emission have been obtained. It has been found that the evolution of the spectral indices of non-thermal emission depend on the regimes of the pitch angle diffusion of trapped particles into the loss cone. The properties of non-thermal electrons related to the HXR and MW emission of the solar flare on 2004 November 3 are studied with Nobeyama Radioheliograph, Nobeyama Radio Polarimeters, RHESSI, and Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite observations. The spectral indices of non-thermal electrons related to MW and HXR emission remained constant or decreased, while the MW escape rate as distinguished from that of the HXRs increased. This may be associated with different diffusion regimes of trapped electrons into the loss cone. New arguments in favor of an important role of the superstrong diffusion for high-energy electrons in flare coronal loops have been obtained.

  3. Non-thermal emission from the interaction of extragalactic jets with stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vieyro, Florencia; Bosch-Ramon, Valenti; Torres-Albà, Núria

    2016-07-01

    The central regions of galaxies are rich environments, often full with stars and medium inhomogeneities. For galaxies hosting active galactic nuclei, the interaction of a relativistic jet with these objects can lead to the formation of shocks, where particles can be accelerated up to relativistic energies. Recent numerical simulations show that the effective surface of the shock induced by the obstacle is higher than the obstacle section, increasing the available non-thermal energy. In this work, we analyze the non-thermal processes in these shocks. First, we make a detailed characterization of the stellar population in the central region of the galaxy, taking into account the evolution of stars with different masses. This allows us to obtain good estimates of the non-thermal energy. Then, we study the transport of relativistic electron accelerated in the shocks, and compute the gamma-ray emission. The interaction of relativistic jets with ambient objects, such as stars and clouds, can contribute significantly to the non-thermal emission from these sources.

  4. Experimental evidence of nonthermal acceleration of relativistic electrons by an intensive laser pulse

    SciTech Connect

    Kuramitsu, Y.; Sakawa, Y.; Takeda, K.; Tampo, M.; Takabe, H.; Nakanii, N.; Kondo, K.; Tsuji, K.; Kimura, K.; Fukumochi, S.; Kashihara, M.; Tanimoto, T.; Nakamura, H.; Ishikura, T.; Kodama, R.; Mima, K.; Tanaka, K. A.; Mori, Y.; Miura, E.; Kitagawa, Y.

    2011-02-15

    Nonthermal acceleration of relativistic electrons is investigated with an intensive laser pulse. An energy distribution function of energetic particles in the universe or cosmic rays is well represented by a power-law spectrum, therefore, nonthermal acceleration is essential to understand the origin of cosmic rays. A possible candidate for the origin of cosmic rays is wakefield acceleration at relativistic astrophysical perpendicular shocks. The wakefield is considered to be excited by large-amplitude precursor light waves in the upstream of the shocks. Substituting an intensive laser pulse for the large amplitude light waves, we performed a model experiment of the shock environments in a laboratory plasma. An intensive laser pulse was propagated in a plasma tube created by imploding a hollow polystyrene cylinder, as the large amplitude light waves propagated in the upstream plasma at an astrophysical shock. Nonthermal electrons were generated, and the energy distribution functions of the electrons have a power-law component with an index of {approx}2. We described the detailed procedures to obtain the nonthermal components from data obtained by an electron spectrometer.

  5. Experimental evidence of nonthermal acceleration of relativistic electrons by an intensive laser pulse.

    PubMed

    Kuramitsu, Y; Nakanii, N; Kondo, K; Sakawa, Y; Mori, Y; Miura, E; Tsuji, K; Kimura, K; Fukumochi, S; Kashihara, M; Tanimoto, T; Nakamura, H; Ishikura, T; Takeda, K; Tampo, M; Kodama, R; Kitagawa, Y; Mima, K; Tanaka, K A; Hoshino, M; Takabe, H

    2011-02-01

    Nonthermal acceleration of relativistic electrons is investigated with an intensive laser pulse. An energy distribution function of energetic particles in the universe or cosmic rays is well represented by a power-law spectrum, therefore, nonthermal acceleration is essential to understand the origin of cosmic rays. A possible candidate for the origin of cosmic rays is wakefield acceleration at relativistic astrophysical perpendicular shocks. The wakefield is considered to be excited by large-amplitude precursor light waves in the upstream of the shocks. Substituting an intensive laser pulse for the large amplitude light waves, we performed a model experiment of the shock environments in a laboratory plasma. An intensive laser pulse was propagated in a plasma tube created by imploding a hollow polystyrene cylinder, as the large amplitude light waves propagated in the upstream plasma at an astrophysical shock. Nonthermal electrons were generated, and the energy distribution functions of the electrons have a power-law component with an index of ~2. We described the detailed procedures to obtain the nonthermal components from data obtained by an electron spectrometer. PMID:21405912

  6. Food irradiation and nonthermal food processing: an overview for food science professionals

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Irradiation is a nonthermal process that has been shown to inactivate human pathogens from meats, seafood and produce. Irradiation treatment at 1.0 kGy can reduce the surface populations of E. coli O157:H7 on leafy vegetables by 4 logs (99.99%), without significantly impacting the product’s visual a...

  7. TURBULENCE IN THE SUPERMODEL: MASS RECONSTRUCTION WITH NONTHERMAL PRESSURE FOR A1835

    SciTech Connect

    Fusco-Femiano, R.; Lapi, A.

    2013-07-10

    The total mass derived from X-ray emission is biased low in a large number of clusters when compared with the mass estimated via strong and weak lensing. Suzaku and Chandra observations out to the virial radius report in several relaxed clusters' steep temperature gradients that on assuming pure thermal hydrostatic equilibrium (HE) imply an unphysically decreasing mass profile. Moreover, the gas mass fraction appears to be inconsistent with the cosmic value measured from the cosmic microwave background. Such findings can be interpreted as evidence for an additional nonthermal pressure in the outskirts of these clusters. This nonthermal component may be due to turbulence stirred by residual bulk motions of extragalactic gas infalling into the cluster. Here, we present a SuperModel analysis of A1835 observed by Chandra out to the virial radius. The SuperModel formalism can include in the equilibrium a nonthermal component whose level and distribution are derived imposing that the gas mass fraction (f{sub gas}) equals the cosmic value at the virial radius. Including such a nonthermal component, we reconstruct from X-rays an increasing mass profile consistent with the HE also in the cluster outskirts and in agreement at the virial boundary with the weak-lensing value. The increasing f{sub gas} profile confirms that the baryons are not missing but located at the cluster outskirts.

  8. A Study of Nonthermal X-Ray and Radio Emission from the O Star 9 Sgr

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waldron, Wayne L.; Corcoran, Michael F.; Drake, Stephen A.

    1999-01-01

    The observed X-ray and highly variable nonthermal radio emission from OB stars has eluded explanation for more than 18 years. The most favorable model of X-ray production in these stars (shocks) predicts both nonthermal radio and X-ray emission. The nonthermal X-ray emission should occur above 2 keV and the variability of this X-ray component should also be comparable to the observed radio variability. To test this scenario, we proposed an ASC/VLA monitoring program to observe the OB star, 9 Sgr, a well known nonthermal, variable radio source and a strong X-ray source. We requested 625 ks ASCA observations with a temporal spacing of approximately 4 days which corresponds to the time required for a density disturbance to propagate to the 6 cm radio free-free photosphere. The X-ray observations were coordinated with 5 multi-wavelength VLA observations. These observations represent the first systematic attempt to investigate the relationship between the X-ray and radio emission in OB stars.

  9. Nonthermal plasma system for extending shelf life of raw broiler breast fillets

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A nonthermal dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma system was developed and enhanced to treat broiler breast fillets (BBF) in order to improve the microbial quality of the meat. The system consisted of a high-voltage source and two parallel, round-aluminum electrodes separated by three semi-rig...

  10. Non-thermal Plasma Activates Human Keratinocytes by Stimulation of Antioxidant and Phase II Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Anke; Dietrich, Stephan; Steuer, Anna; Weltmann, Klaus-Dieter; von Woedtke, Thomas; Masur, Kai; Wende, Kristian

    2015-01-01

    Non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma provides a novel therapeutic opportunity to control redox-based processes, e.g. wound healing, cancer, and inflammatory diseases. By spatial and time-resolved delivery of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, it allows stimulation or inhibition of cellular processes in biological systems. Our data show that both gene and protein expression is highly affected by non-thermal plasma. Nuclear factor erythroid-related factor 2 (NRF2) and phase II enzyme pathway components were found to act as key controllers orchestrating the cellular response in keratinocytes. Additionally, glutathione metabolism, which is a marker for NRF2-related signaling events, was affected. Among the most robustly increased genes and proteins, heme oxygenase 1, NADPH-quinone oxidoreductase 1, and growth factors were found. The roles of NRF2 targets, investigated by siRNA silencing, revealed that NRF2 acts as an important switch for sensing oxidative stress events. Moreover, the influence of non-thermal plasma on the NRF2 pathway prepares cells against exogenic noxae and increases their resilience against oxidative species. Via paracrine mechanisms, distant cells benefit from cell-cell communication. The finding that non-thermal plasma triggers hormesis-like processes in keratinocytes facilitates the understanding of plasma-tissue interaction and its clinical application. PMID:25589789

  11. Experimental evidence of nonthermal acceleration of relativistic electrons by an intensive laser pulse.

    PubMed

    Kuramitsu, Y; Nakanii, N; Kondo, K; Sakawa, Y; Mori, Y; Miura, E; Tsuji, K; Kimura, K; Fukumochi, S; Kashihara, M; Tanimoto, T; Nakamura, H; Ishikura, T; Takeda, K; Tampo, M; Kodama, R; Kitagawa, Y; Mima, K; Tanaka, K A; Hoshino, M; Takabe, H

    2011-02-01

    Nonthermal acceleration of relativistic electrons is investigated with an intensive laser pulse. An energy distribution function of energetic particles in the universe or cosmic rays is well represented by a power-law spectrum, therefore, nonthermal acceleration is essential to understand the origin of cosmic rays. A possible candidate for the origin of cosmic rays is wakefield acceleration at relativistic astrophysical perpendicular shocks. The wakefield is considered to be excited by large-amplitude precursor light waves in the upstream of the shocks. Substituting an intensive laser pulse for the large amplitude light waves, we performed a model experiment of the shock environments in a laboratory plasma. An intensive laser pulse was propagated in a plasma tube created by imploding a hollow polystyrene cylinder, as the large amplitude light waves propagated in the upstream plasma at an astrophysical shock. Nonthermal electrons were generated, and the energy distribution functions of the electrons have a power-law component with an index of ~2. We described the detailed procedures to obtain the nonthermal components from data obtained by an electron spectrometer.

  12. Non-thermal plasma activates human keratinocytes by stimulation of antioxidant and phase II pathways.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Anke; Dietrich, Stephan; Steuer, Anna; Weltmann, Klaus-Dieter; von Woedtke, Thomas; Masur, Kai; Wende, Kristian

    2015-03-13

    Non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma provides a novel therapeutic opportunity to control redox-based processes, e.g. wound healing, cancer, and inflammatory diseases. By spatial and time-resolved delivery of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, it allows stimulation or inhibition of cellular processes in biological systems. Our data show that both gene and protein expression is highly affected by non-thermal plasma. Nuclear factor erythroid-related factor 2 (NRF2) and phase II enzyme pathway components were found to act as key controllers orchestrating the cellular response in keratinocytes. Additionally, glutathione metabolism, which is a marker for NRF2-related signaling events, was affected. Among the most robustly increased genes and proteins, heme oxygenase 1, NADPH-quinone oxidoreductase 1, and growth factors were found. The roles of NRF2 targets, investigated by siRNA silencing, revealed that NRF2 acts as an important switch for sensing oxidative stress events. Moreover, the influence of non-thermal plasma on the NRF2 pathway prepares cells against exogenic noxae and increases their resilience against oxidative species. Via paracrine mechanisms, distant cells benefit from cell-cell communication. The finding that non-thermal plasma triggers hormesis-like processes in keratinocytes facilitates the understanding of plasma-tissue interaction and its clinical application.

  13. Non-thermal plasmas as gas-phase advanced oxidation processes

    SciTech Connect

    Rosocha, L.A.

    1997-08-01

    Non-thermal plasmas are useful for generating reactive species (free radicals) in a gas stream. Because radical attack reaction rate constants are very large for many chemical species, entrained pollutants are readily decomposed by radicals. Such plasmas can generate both oxidative and reductive radicals; therefore, they show promise for treating a wide variety of pollutants.

  14. Knowledge and Attitudes of Produce and Seafood Processors and Food Safety Educators Regarding Nonthermal Processes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pivarnik, Lori F.; Richard, Nicole L.; Gable, Robert K.; Worobo, Randy W.

    2016-01-01

    A needs assessment survey was designed and administered to measure knowledge of and attitudes toward food safety impacts of nonthermal processing technologies of shellfish and produce industry personnel and extension educators. An online survey was sent via e-mail notification with the survey link through professional listserves. The survey…

  15. The effects of non-thermal plasmas on selected mammalian cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leduc, Mathieu

    Non-thermal plasma surface modifications have become indispensable processing steps in various industry and research sectors. Applications range from semiconductor processing to biotechnology and recently, plasma medicine. Non-thermal plasma sources have the advantage that a number of electron-driven chemical reactions can be produced while maintaining the gas (heavy species) temperature low, thus enabling the treatment of temperature-sensitive surfaces such as polymers, tissues and live cells. In the fields of biology and medicine, non-thermal plasmas have been primarily used for the deposition or modification of biocompatible polymers and for sterilization. Recently, non-thermal plasmas have been used to treat tissues and cells. A new field of research has emerged, Plasma Medicine, which studies the effects of non-thermal plasmas on cells and tissues for clinical applications. The Atmospheric Pressure Glow Discharge torch (APGD-t), a non-thermal plasma source, built in our laboratory was used to study the effects of non-thermal plasmas on mammalian cells. In its first application, we indirectly used the APGD-t to deposit a plasma-polymer on a glass surface and studied its effects on cultured cells. It was shown that the cells grew preferentially on the plasma-polymer, and their proliferation rate increased. The second application of the APGD-t was to further investigate previous observations of cell permeabilization obtained by plasma treatments and to apply non-thermal plasmas to cell transfection. It was demonstrated that the APGD-t is able to locally transfect adherent cells. We estimated the diameter of the pores created to be below 10 nm and that the pores remain open for less than 5 seconds. However, while investigating the mechanisms involved in cell transfection we observed that the use of higher gas flows in the negative controls (using the APGD-t but with the plasma turned off) also resulted in cell transfection. To further study this phenomena, we

  16. Behavioral modeling and digital compensation of nonlinearity in DFB lasers for multi-band directly modulated radio-over-fiber systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jianqiang; Yin, Chunjing; Chen, Hao; Yin, Feifei; Dai, Yitang; Xu, Kun

    2014-11-01

    The envisioned C-RAN concept in wireless communication sector replies on distributed antenna systems (DAS) which consist of a central unit (CU), multiple remote antenna units (RAUs) and the fronthaul links between them. As the legacy and emerging wireless communication standards will coexist for a long time, the fronthaul links are preferred to carry multi-band multi-standard wireless signals. Directly-modulated radio-over-fiber (ROF) links can serve as a lowcost option to make fronthaul connections conveying multi-band wireless signals. However, directly-modulated radioover- fiber (ROF) systems often suffer from inherent nonlinearities from directly-modulated lasers. Unlike ROF systems working at the single-band mode, the modulation nonlinearities in multi-band ROF systems can result in both in-band and cross-band nonlinear distortions. In order to address this issue, we have recently investigated the multi-band nonlinear behavior of directly-modulated DFB lasers based on multi-dimensional memory polynomial model. Based on this model, an efficient multi-dimensional baseband digital predistortion technique was developed and experimentally demonstrated for linearization of multi-band directly-modulated ROF systems.

  17. Nonthermal ion acceleration in magnetic reconnection: Results from magnetospheric observations and particle simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirai, Mariko; Hoshino, Masahiro

    Nonthermal ion acceleration in magnetic reconnection is investigated by using spacecraft ob-servations in the Earth's magnetotail and particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations. Magnetic recon-nection is believed to be an efficient particle accelerator in various environments in space, such as the pulsar magnetosphere, the solar corona and the Earth's magnetosphere. The Earth's magnetosphere particularly gives crucial clues to understand particle acceleration in magnetic reconnection since precise information on both fields and particles is available from spacecraft observations. Several nonthermal electron acceleration mechanisms, including the acceleration around the X-point and the magnetic pile-up region in the downstream, have been proposed and tested by recent PIC simulations as well as spacecraft observations. However nonthermal ion acceleration in magnetic reconnection still remains to be poorly understood in both ob-servational and simulation studies. We report on the first ever direct observational evidence of nonthermal ion acceleration in magnetic reconnection in the Earth's magnetotail based on the Geotail observations. Nonthermal protons accelerated up to several hundreds keV exhibit a power-law energy spectrum with a typical spectrum index 3-5. By conducting a statistical study on reconnection events in the Earth's magnetotail, we found efficient ion acceleration when the reconnection electric field is strong. On the other hand, the statistical study indicates that the efficiency of electron acceleration is rather controlled by the thickness of the reconnec-tion current sheet. We also performed PIC simulations of driven reconnection to investigate in detail acceleration mechanisms of both ions and electrons. Acceleration mechanisms as well as conditions necessary for the efficient particle acceleration are discussed based on these results.

  18. Slightly thermal springs and non-thermal springs at Mount Shasta, California: Chemistry and recharge elevations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nathenson, M.; Thompson, J. M.; White, L. D.

    2003-02-01

    Temperature measurements, isotopic contents, and dissolved constituents are presented for springs at Mount Shasta to understand slightly thermal springs in the Shasta Valley based on the characteristics of non-thermal springs. Non-thermal springs on Mount Shasta are generally cooler than mean annual air temperatures for their elevation. The specific conductance of non-thermal springs increases linearly with discharge temperature. Springs at higher and intermediate elevations on Mount Shasta have fairly limited circulation paths, whereas low-elevation springs have longer paths because of their higher-elevation recharge. Springs in the Shasta Valley are warmer than air temperatures for their elevation and contain significant amounts of chloride and sulfate, constituents often associated with volcanic hydrothermal systems. Data for the Shasta Valley springs generally define mixing trends for dissolved constituents and temperature. The isotopic composition of the Shasta Valley springs indicates that water fell as precipitation at a higher elevation than any of the non-thermal springs. It is possible that the Shasta Valley springs include a component of the outflow from a proposed 210°C hydrothermal system that boils to supply steam for the summit acid-sulfate spring. In order to categorize springs such as those in the Shasta Valley, we introduce the term slightly thermal springs for springs that do not meet the numerical criterion of 10°C above air temperature for thermal springs but have temperatures greater than non-thermal springs in the area and usually also have dissolved constituents normally found in thermal waters.

  19. Slightly thermal springs and non-thermal springs at Mount Shasta, California: Chemistry and recharge elevations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nathenson, M.; Thompson, J.M.; White, L.D.

    2003-01-01

    Temperature measurements, isotopic contents, and dissolved constituents are presented for springs at Mount Shasta to understand slightly thermal springs in the Shasta Valley based on the characteristics of non-thermal springs. Non-thermal springs on Mount Shasta are generally cooler than mean annual air temperatures for their elevation. The specific conductance of non-thermal springs increases linearly with discharge temperature. Springs at higher and intermediate elevations on Mount Shasta have fairly limited circulation paths, whereas low-elevation springs have longer paths because of their higher-elevation recharge. Springs in the Shasta Valley are warmer than air temperatures for their elevation and contain significant amounts of chloride and sulfate, constituents often associated with volcanic hydrothermal systems. Data for the Shasta Valley springs generally define mixing trends for dissolved constituents and temperature. The isotopic composition of the Shasta Valley springs indicates that water fell as precipitation at a higher elevation than any of the non-thermal springs. It is possible that the Shasta Valley springs include a component of the outflow from a proposed 210??C hydrothermal system that boils to supply steam for the summit acid-sulfate spring. In order to categorize springs such as those in the Shasta Valley, we introduce the term slightly thermal springs for springs that do not meet the numerical criterion of 10??C above air temperature for thermal springs but have temperatures greater than non-thermal springs in the area and usually also have dissolved constituents normally found in thermal waters. ?? 2002 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. A Multi-Band Analytical Algorithm for Deriving Absorption and Backscattering Coefficients from Remote-Sensing Reflectance of Optically Deep Waters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Zhong-Ping; Carder, Kendall L.

    2001-01-01

    A multi-band analytical (MBA) algorithm is developed to retrieve absorption and backscattering coefficients for optically deep waters, which can be applied to data from past and current satellite sensors, as well as data from hyperspectral sensors. This MBA algorithm applies a remote-sensing reflectance model derived from the Radiative Transfer Equation, and values of absorption and backscattering coefficients are analytically calculated from values of remote-sensing reflectance. There are only limited empirical relationships involved in the algorithm, which implies that this MBA algorithm could be applied to a wide dynamic range of waters. Applying the algorithm to a simulated non-"Case 1" data set, which has no relation to the development of the algorithm, the percentage error for the total absorption coefficient at 440 nm a (sub 440) is approximately 12% for a range of 0.012 - 2.1 per meter (approximately 6% for a (sub 440) less than approximately 0.3 per meter), while a traditional band-ratio approach returns a percentage error of approximately 30%. Applying it to a field data set ranging from 0.025 to 2.0 per meter, the result for a (sub 440) is very close to that using a full spectrum optimization technique (9.6% difference). Compared to the optimization approach, the MBA algorithm cuts the computation time dramatically with only a small sacrifice in accuracy, making it suitable for processing large data sets such as satellite images. Significant improvements over empirical algorithms have also been achieved in retrieving the optical properties of optically deep waters.

  1. A High-resolution Multiband Survey of Westerlund 2 with the Hubble Space Telescope. II. Mass Accretion in the Pre-main-sequence Population

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeidler, Peter; Grebel, Eva K.; Nota, Antonella; Sabbi, Elena; Pasquali, Anna; Tosi, Monica; Bonanos, Alceste Z.; Christian, Carol

    2016-10-01

    We present a detailed analysis of the pre-main-sequence (PMS) population of the young star cluster Westerlund 2 (Wd2), the central ionizing cluster of the H ii region RCW 49, using data from a high-resolution multiband survey with the Hubble Space Telescope. The data were acquired with the Advanced Camera for Surveys in the F555W, F814W, and F658N filters and with the Wide Field Camera 3 in the F125W, F160W, and F128N filters. We find a mean age of the region of 1.04 ± 0.72 Myr. The combination of dereddened F555W and F814W photometry in combination with F658N photometry allows us to study and identify stars with Hα excess emission. With a careful selection of 240 bona-fide PMS Hα excess emitters we were able to determine their Hα luminosity, which has a mean value L({{H}}α )=1.67× {10}-31 {{erg}} {{{s}}}-1. Using the PARSEC 1.2S isochrones to obtain the stellar parameters of the PMS stars, we determined a mean mass accretion rate {\\dot{M}}{{acc}}=4.43× {10}-8 {M}⊙ {{{yr}}}-1 per star. A careful analysis of the spatial dependence of the mass accretion rate suggests that this rate is ˜25% lower in the center of the two density peaks of Wd2 in close proximity to the luminous OB stars, compared to the Wd2 average. This rate is higher with increasing distance from the OB stars, indicating that the PMS accretion disks are being rapidly destroyed by the far-ultraviolet radiation emitted by the OB population.

  2. Dust acoustic solitons in a charge varying dusty plasma in the presence of ion nonthermality and background nonextensivity

    SciTech Connect

    Benzekka, Moufida; Tribeche, Mouloud

    2013-08-15

    Dust acoustic (DA) solitons are addressed in a charge varying dusty plasma in the presence of ion nonthermality and background nonextensivity. A physically meaningful nonthermal nonextensive ion distribution is outlined. The correct non-Maxwellian ion charging current is derived based on the orbit-limited motion theory. Under grain-current balance, the variable dust charge is expressed in terms of the Lambert function. It is found that nonthermality and its nonextensive nature may act concurrently and influence the restoring force and hence the soliton profile. Due to the flexibility provided by the nonextensive parameter, we think that our model should provide a better fit of the space observations.

  3. Measuring the beaming angle of GRB 030329 by fitting the rebrightenings in its multiband afterglow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Wei; Huang, Yong-Feng; Kong, Si-Wei

    2010-11-01

    Multiple rebrightenings have been observed in the multiband afterglow of GRB 030329. In particular, a marked and quick rebrightening occurred at about t ~ 1.2 × 105 s. Energy injection from late and slow shells seems to be the best interpretation for these rebrightenings. Usually it is assumed that the energy is injected into the whole external shock. However, in the case of GRB 030329, the rebrightenings are so quick that the usual consideration fails to give a satisfactory fit to the observed light curves. Actually, since these late/slow shells freely coast in the wake of the external shock, they should be cold and may not expand laterally. The energy injection then should only occur at the central region of the external shock. Considering this effect, we numerically re-fit the quick rebrightenings observed in GRB 030329. By doing this, we were able to derive the beaming angle of the energy injection process. Our result, with a relative residual of only 5% - 10% during the major rebrightening, is better than any previous modeling. The derived energy injection angle is about 0.035. We assume that these late shells are ejected by the central engine via the same mechanism as those early shells that produce the prompt gamma-ray burst. The main difference is that their velocities are much slower, so that they catch up with the external shock relatively late and are manifested as the observed quick rebrightenings. If this were true, then the derived energy injection angle can give a good measure of the beaming angle of the prompt γ-ray emission. Our study may hopefully provide a novel method to measure the beaming angle of gamma-ray bursts.

  4. Long-term Multi-band Photometric Monitoring of Blazar S5 0716+714

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Ben-zhong; Zeng, Wei; Jiang, Ze-jun; Fan, Zhong-hui; Hu, Wen; Zhang, Peng-fei; Yang, Qing-yun; Yan, Da-hai; Wang, Dan; Zhang, Li

    2015-06-01

    We present long-term optical multi-band photometric monitoring of blazar S5 0716+714, from 2004 January 11 to 2012 November 4, with high temporal resolution of approximately 15 minutes in the BVRI bands. The source was in an active state during the whole monitoring campaign, showing intraday variability in 11 of 72 days. The average magnitudes in each band were B = 14.398, V = 13.821, R = 13.255, and I = 12.885. The overall variability amplitudes were {Δ }B=1\\buildrel{{m}}\\over{.}834, {Δ }V=2\\buildrel{{m}}\\over{.}167, {Δ }R=2\\buildrel{{m}}\\over{.}148, and {Δ }I=1\\buildrel{{m}}\\over{.}912. The structure function showed that typical timescales for intraday variability were between approximately 2 and 7.5 hr. The intraday variability amplitudes were from a few percent to approximately 30%. We found typical variation rates of approximately 0.05 mag hr-1 in both the rising and falling phases, with a minimal variability timescale of 130 minutes. A 10 day period short-term variability was observed simultaneously in the BVRI bands. The discrete correlation function suggests that there is significant correlated variability between the B- and I-band light curves. However, no significant time lags were detected. The spectral behaviors in the different variability episodes were studied, and our observations show bluer-when-brighter behavior on long, short, and intraday timescales for the blazar S5 0716+714. The variability and relevant spectral trends can be explained by the shock-in-jet scenario.

  5. Predictions for Cosmological Infrared Surveys from Space with the Multiband Imaging Photometer for SIRTF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dole, H.; Lagache, G.; Puget, J.-L.

    2003-03-01

    We make predictions for the cosmological surveys to be conducted by the Multiband Imaging Photometer for SIRTF (MIPS) at 24, 70, and 160 μm for the Guaranteed Time Observer and the Legacy programs, using the latest knowledge of the instrument. In addition to the detector noise and the cirrus confusion noise, we discuss in detail the derivation of the confusion noise due to extragalactic sources, which depends strongly on the shape of the source counts at a given wavelength and on the telescope and detector pixel sizes. We show that it is wise in general to compare the classical photometric criterion, used for decades, and the so-called source density criterion to predict the confusion levels. We obtain, using the model of Lagache, Dole, and Puget, limiting fluxes of 50 μJy, 3.2 mJy, and 36 mJy at 24, 70, and 160 μm, respectively. After taking into account other known sources of noise that will limit the surveys' sensitivities, we compute the redshift distributions of the detected sources at each wavelength and show that they extend up to z~2.7 at 24 μm and up to z~2.5 at 70 and 160 μm, leading to the resolution of at most 69%, 54%, and 24% of the cosmic infrared background (CIB) at 24, 70, and 160 μm, respectively. We estimate which galaxy populations will be used to derive the luminosity function evolution with redshift. We also give the redshift distributions of the unresolved sources in the far-IR range, which dominates the fluctuations of the CIB, and a predicted power spectrum showing the feasibility of fluctuations (due to both Poissonian and clustered source distributions) measurements. The main conclusion is that MIPS (and SIRTF in general) cosmological surveys will greatly improve our understanding of galaxy evolution by giving data with unprecedented accuracy in the mid-IR and far-IR range.

  6. Multi-band, multi-epoch observations of the transiting warm Jupiter WASP-80b

    SciTech Connect

    Fukui, Akihiko; Kuroda, Daisuke; Kawashima, Yui; Ikoma, Masahiro; Kurosaki, Kenji; Narita, Norio; Nishiyama, Shogo; Takahashi, Yasuhiro H.; Nagayama, Shogo; Onitsuka, Masahiro; Baba, Haruka; Ryu, Tsuguru; Ita, Yoshifusa; Onozato, Hiroki; Hirano, Teruyuki; Kawauchi, Kiyoe; Hori, Yasunori; Nagayama, Takahiro; Tamura, Motohide; Kawai, Nobuyuki; and others

    2014-08-01

    WASP-80b is a warm Jupiter transiting a bright late-K/early-M dwarf, providing a good opportunity to extend the atmospheric study of hot Jupiters toward the lower temperature regime. We report multi-band, multi-epoch transit observations of WASP-80b by using three ground-based telescopes covering from optical (g', R{sub c}, and I{sub c} bands) to near-infrared (NIR; J, H, and K{sub s} bands) wavelengths. We observe 5 primary transits, each in 3 or 4 different bands simultaneously, obtaining 17 independent transit light curves. Combining them with results from previous works, we find that the observed transmission spectrum is largely consistent with both a solar abundance and thick cloud atmospheric models at a 1.7σ discrepancy level. On the other hand, we find a marginal spectral rise in the optical region compared to the NIR region at the 2.9σ level, which possibly indicates the existence of haze in the atmosphere. We simulate theoretical transmission spectra for a solar abundance but hazy atmosphere, finding that a model with equilibrium temperature of 600 K can explain the observed data well, having a discrepancy level of 1.0σ. We also search for transit timing variations, but find no timing excess larger than 50 s from a linear ephemeris. In addition, we conduct 43 day long photometric monitoring of the host star in the optical bands, finding no significant variation in the stellar brightness. Combined with the fact that no spot-crossing event is observed in the five transits, our results confirm previous findings that the host star appears quiet for spot activities, despite the indications of strong chromospheric activities.

  7. Interplay of charge density wave and multiband superconductivity in 2H-PdxTaSe2.

    PubMed

    Bhoi, D; Khim, S; Nam, W; Lee, B S; Kim, Chanhee; Jeon, B-G; Min, B H; Park, S; Kim, Kee Hoon

    2016-04-05

    2H-TaSe2 has been one of unique transition metal dichalcogenides exhibiting several phase transitions due to a delicate balance among competing electronic ground states. An unusual metallic state at high-T is sequentially followed by an incommensurate charge density wave (ICDW) state at ≈122 K and a commensurate charge density wave (CCDW) state at ≈90 K, and superconductivity at TC ~ 0.14 K. Upon systematic intercalation of Pd ions into TaSe2, we find that CCDW order is destabilized more rapidly than ICDW to indicate a hidden quantum phase transition point at x ~ 0.09-0.10. Moreover, TC shows a dramatic enhancement up to 3.3 K at x = 0.08, ~24 times of TC in 2H-TaSe2, in proportional to the density of states N(EF). Investigations of upper critical fields Hc2 in single crystals reveal evidences of multiband superconductivity as temperature-dependent anisotropy factor γH = , quasi-linear increase of , and an upward, positive-curvature in near TC. Furthermore, analysis of temperature-dependent electronic specific heat corroborates the presence of multiple superconducting gaps. Based on above findings and electronic phase diagram vs x, we propose that the increase of N(EF) and effective electron-phonon coupling in the vicinity of CDW quantum phase transition should be a key to the large enhancement of TC in PdxTaSe2.

  8. Nonparametric test of consistency between cosmological models and multiband CMB measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Aghamousa, Amir; Shafieloo, Arman E-mail: shafieloo@kasi.re.kr

    2015-06-01

    We present a novel approach to test the consistency of the cosmological models with multiband CMB data using a nonparametric approach. In our analysis we calibrate the REACT (Risk Estimation and Adaptation after Coordinate Transformation) confidence levels associated with distances in function space (confidence distances) based on the Monte Carlo simulations in order to test the consistency of an assumed cosmological model with observation. To show the applicability of our algorithm, we confront Planck 2013 temperature data with concordance model of cosmology considering two different Planck spectra combination. In order to have an accurate quantitative statistical measure to compare between the data and the theoretical expectations, we calibrate REACT confidence distances and perform a bias control using many realizations of the data. Our results in this work using Planck 2013 temperature data put the best fit ΛCDM model at 95% (∼ 2σ) confidence distance from the center of the nonparametric confidence set while repeating the analysis excluding the Planck 217 × 217 GHz spectrum data, the best fit ΛCDM model shifts to 70% (∼ 1σ) confidence distance. The most prominent features in the data deviating from the best fit ΛCDM model seems to be at low multipoles  18 < ℓ < 26 at greater than 2σ, ℓ ∼ 750 at ∼1 to 2σ and ℓ ∼ 1800 at greater than 2σ level. Excluding the 217×217 GHz spectrum the feature at ℓ ∼ 1800 becomes substantially less significance at ∼1 to 2σ confidence level. Results of our analysis based on the new approach we propose in this work are in agreement with other analysis done using alternative methods.

  9. Optical fabrication and metrology for a visible through thermal infrared multi-band imaging system

    SciTech Connect

    Magner, J.; Henson, T.

    1998-04-01

    The optical fabrication, metrology, and system wavefront testing of an off-axis three mirror anastigmatic telescope will be presented. The telescope is part of a multi-band imaging system which includes a single mechanically cooled focal plane with 15 spectral bands covering a wavelength range from 0.45 microns to 10.7 microns and an on board calibration subsystem. The imaging system is to be operated in a low earth orbit in a pushbroom scanning mode. The telescope has a 36 cm aperture, a 1.38 degree cross track by 1.82 degree along-track field of view (FOV), near diffraction limited performance in the visible, and strictly diffraction limited performance from 1.3 microns to 10.7 microns. The primary and the tertiary mirrors are general aspheres which have undergone 80% lightweighting. The secondary mirror is a hyperbola. The primary mirror was extremely difficult to fabricate and test due to its large departure from sphericity, fast f-number, and large off axis distance. The tertiary mirror has a small departure from sphericity and is only slightly off-axis, but it has a very fast f-number also. The surface wavefront measurements for the three mirrors after final figuring and lightweighting are 0.048 waves rms {at}0.6328 microns for the primary mirror and 0.025 waves rms {at}0.6328 microns for the secondary and tertiary mirrors. The telescope wavefront requirement at the center of the along-track FOV is 0.178 waves rms {at}0.6328 microns and at the edge of the along-track FOV is 0.677 waves rms {at} 0.6328 microns.

  10. Interplay of charge density wave and multiband superconductivity in 2H-PdxTaSe2

    PubMed Central

    Bhoi, D.; Khim, S.; Nam, W.; Lee, B. S.; Kim, Chanhee; Jeon, B.-G.; Min, B. H.; Park, S.; Kim, Kee Hoon

    2016-01-01

    2H-TaSe2 has been one of unique transition metal dichalcogenides exhibiting several phase transitions due to a delicate balance among competing electronic ground states. An unusual metallic state at high-T is sequentially followed by an incommensurate charge density wave (ICDW) state at ≈122 K and a commensurate charge density wave (CCDW) state at ≈90 K, and superconductivity at TC ~ 0.14 K. Upon systematic intercalation of Pd ions into TaSe2, we find that CCDW order is destabilized more rapidly than ICDW to indicate a hidden quantum phase transition point at x ~ 0.09–0.10. Moreover, TC shows a dramatic enhancement up to 3.3 K at x = 0.08, ~24 times of TC in 2H-TaSe2, in proportional to the density of states N(EF). Investigations of upper critical fields Hc2 in single crystals reveal evidences of multiband superconductivity as temperature-dependent anisotropy factor γH = , quasi-linear increase of , and an upward, positive-curvature in near TC. Furthermore, analysis of temperature-dependent electronic specific heat corroborates the presence of multiple superconducting gaps. Based on above findings and electronic phase diagram vs x, we propose that the increase of N(EF) and effective electron-phonon coupling in the vicinity of CDW quantum phase transition should be a key to the large enhancement of TC in PdxTaSe2. PMID:27045426

  11. Enhancing accuracy with subpixel smoothing for multiband effective-mass Hamiltonians of semiconductor nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, Chi-Ti; Hsieh, Tung-Han; Chang, Shu-Wei

    2016-03-01

    The spatial discontinuity of physical parameters at an abrupt interface may increase numerical errors when solving partial differential equations. Rather than generating boundary-adapted meshes for objects with complicated geometry in the finite-element method, the subpixel smoothing (SPS) replaces discontinuous parameters inside square elements that are bisected by interfaces in, for example, the finite-difference (FD) method, with homogeneous counterparts and matches physical boundary conditions therein. In this work, we apply the idea of SPS to the eight-band effective-mass Luttinger-Kohn (LK) and Burt-Foreman (BF) Hamiltonians of semiconductor nanostructures. Two smoothing approaches are proposed. One stems from eliminations of the first-order perturbation in energy, and the other is an application of the Hellmann-Feynman (HF) theorem. We employ the FD method to numerically solve the eigenvalue problem corresponding to the multiband Schrodinger's equation for circular quantum wires (QWRs). The eigen-energies and envelope (wave) functions for valence and conduction states in III-V circular QWRs are examined. We find that while the procedure of perturbation theory seems to have the better accuracy than that of HF theorem, the errors of both schemes are considerably lower than that without smoothing or with direct but unjustified averages of parameters. On the other hand, even in the presence of SPS, the numerical results for the LK Hamiltonian of nanostructures could still contain nonphysical spurious solutions with extremely localized states near heterostructure interfaces. The proper operator ordering embedded in the BF Hamiltonian mitigates this problem. The proposed approaches may improve numerical accuracies and reduce computational cost for the modeling of nanostructures in optoelectronic devices.

  12. Multi-band algorithms for the estimation of chlorophyll concentration in the Chesapeake Bay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilerson, Alexander; Ondrusek, Michael; Tzortziou, Maria; Foster, Robert; El-Habashi, Ahmed; Tiwari, Surya Prakash; Ahmed, Sam

    2015-10-01

    Standard blue-green ratio algorithms do not usually work well in turbid productive waters because of the contamination of the blue and green bands by CDOM absorption and scattering by non-algal particles. One of the alternative approaches is based on the two- or three band ratio algorithms in the red/NIR part of the spectrum, which require 665, 708, 753 nm bands (or similar) and which work well in various waters all over the world. The critical 708 nm band for these algorithms is not available on MODIS and VIIRS sensors, which limits applications of this approach. We report on another approach where a combination of the 745nm band with blue-green-red bands was the basis for the new algorithms. A multi-band algorithm which includes ratios Rrs(488)/Rrs(551)and Rrs(671)/Rrs(745) and two band algorithm based on Rrs671/Rrs745 ratio were developed with the main focus on the Chesapeake Bay (USA) waters. These algorithms were tested on the specially developed synthetic datasets, well representing the main relationships between water parameters in the Bay taken from the NASA NOMAD database and available literature, on the field data collected by our group during a 2013 campaign in the Bay, as well as NASA SeaBASS data from the other group and on matchups between satellite imagery and water parameters measured by the Chesapeake Bay program. Our results demonstrate that the coefficient of determination can be as high as R2 > 0.90 for the new algorithms in comparison with R2 = 0.6 for the standard OC3V algorithm on the same field dataset. Substantial improvement was also achieved by applying a similar approach (inclusion of Rrs(667)/Rrs(753) ratio) for MODIS matchups. Results for VIIRS are not yet conclusive.

  13. A NEW MULTI-BAND RADIAL VELOCITY TECHNIQUE FOR DETECTING EXOPLANETS AROUND ACTIVE STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Ma Bo; Ge Jian E-mail: jge@astrto.ufl.edu

    2012-05-10

    The radial velocity (RV) technique is one of the most efficient ways of detecting exoplanets. However, large RV jitters induced by starspots on an active star can inhibit detection of any exoplanet present or even lead to a false positive detection. This paper presents a new multi-band RV technique capable of substantially reducing starspot-induced RV jitters from stellar RV measurements to allow efficient and accurate extraction of RV signals caused by exoplanets. It takes full advantage of the correlation of RV jitters at different spectral bands and the independence of exoplanet signals at the corresponding bands. Simulations with a single-spot model and a multi-spot model have been conducted to investigate the RV jitter reduction capability of this method. The results show that this method can reduce the RV jitter amplitude by at least an order of magnitude, allowing detection of weaker exoplanet signals without significantly increasing RV observation time and cadence. This method can greatly reduce the observation time required to detect Earth-like planets around solar type stars with {approx}0.1 m s{sup -1} long term Doppler precision if spot-induced jitter is the dominant astrophysical noise source for RV measurements. This method can work efficiently for RV jitter removal if: (1) all the spots on a target star have approximately the same temperature during RV observations; (2) the RV jitter amplitude changes with wavelength, i.e., the RV jitter amplitude ratio, {alpha}, between two different spectral bands is not close to one; (3) the spot-induced RV jitter dominates the RV measurement error.

  14. Vetting Kepler planet candidates in the sub-Jovian desert with multiband photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colón, Knicole D.; Morehead, Robert C.; Ford, Eric B.

    2015-09-01

    We present new multiband transit photometry of three small (Rp ≲ 6 R⊕), short-period (P ≲ 6 d) Kepler planet candidates acquired with the Gran Telescopio Canarias. These observations supplement the results presented in Colón & Ford and Colón, Ford & Morehead, where we used multicolour transit photometry of five Kepler planet candidates to search for wavelength-dependent transit depths and either validate planet candidates or identify eclipsing binary false positives within our sample. In those previous studies, we provided evidence that three targets were false positives and two targets were planets. Here, we present observations that provide evidence supporting a planetary nature for Kepler Object of Interest (KOI) 439.01 and KOI 732.01, and we find that KOI 531.01, a 6 R⊕ planet candidate around an M dwarf, is likely a false positive. We also present a discussion of the purported `sub-Jovian desert' in the orbital period-planet radius plane, which cannot be easily explained by observational bias. Both KOI 439.01 and KOI 732.01 are likely planets located within the so-called desert and should be investigated with further follow-up observations. As only ˜30 of the ˜3600 currently active Kepler planet candidates are located within the sub-Jovian desert, it will be interesting to see if these candidates also survive the vetting process and fill in the gap in the period-radius plane. Confirming planets in this regime will be important for understanding planetary migration and evolution processes, and we urge additional follow-up observations of these planet candidates to confirm their nature.

  15. Mass accretion rates from multiband photometry in the Carina Nebula: the case of Trumpler 14

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beccari, G.; De Marchi, G.; Panagia, N.; Valenti, E.; Carraro, G.; Romaniello, M.; Zoccali, M.; Weidner, C.

    2015-01-01

    Context. We present a study of the mass accretion rates of pre-main sequence (PMS) stars in the cluster Trumpler 14 (Tr 14) in the Carina Nebula. Using optical multiband photometry we were able to identify 356 PMS stars showing Hα excess emission with equivalent width EW(Hα) > 20 Å. We interpret this observational feature as an indication that these objects are still actively accreting gas from their circumstellar medium. From a comparison of the HR diagram with PMS evolutionary models we derive ages and masses of the PMS stars. We find that most of the PMS objects are younger than 10 Myr with a median age of ~3 Myr. Surprisingly, we also find that ~20% of the mass accreting objects are older than 10 Myr. For each PMS star in Trumpler 14 we determine the mass accretion rate (Ṁacc) and discuss its dependence on mass and age. We finally combine the optical photometry with near-IR observations to build the spectral energy distribution (SED) for each PMS star in Tr 14. The analysis of the SEDs suggests the presence of transitional discs in which a large amount of gas is still present and sustains accretion onto the PMS object at ages older than 10 Myr. Our results, discussed in light of recent recent discoveries with Herschel of transitional discs containing a massive gas component around the relatively old PMS stars TW Hydrae, 49 Ceti, and HD 95086, support a new scenario n which old and evolved debris discs still host a significant amount of gas. Aims: Methods: Results:

  16. Radiation from Relativistic Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishikawa, K.-I.; Mizuno, Y.; Hardee, P.; Sol, H.; Medvedev, M.; Zhang, B.; Nordlund, A.; Frederiksen, J. T.; Fishman, G. J.; Preece, R.

    2008-01-01

    Nonthermal radiation observed from astrophysical systems containing relativistic jets and shocks, e.g., gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), active galactic nuclei (AGNs), and Galactic microquasar systems usually have power-law emission spectra. Recent PIC simulations of relativistic electron-ion (electron-positron) jets injected into a stationary medium show that particle acceleration occurs within the downstream jet. In the presence of relativistic jets, instabilities such as the Buneman instability, other two-streaming instability, and the Weibel (filamentation) instability create collisionless shocks, which are responsible for particle (electron, positron, and ion) acceleration. The simulation results show that the Weibel instability is responsible for generating and amplifying highly nonuniform, small-scale magnetic fields. These magnetic fields contribute to the electron's transverse deflection behind the jet head. The 'jitter' radiation from deflected electrons in small-scale magnetic fields has different properties than synchrotron radiation which is calculated in a uniform magnetic field. This jitter radiation, a case of diffusive synchrotron radiation, may be important to understand the complex time evolution and/or spectral structure in gamma-ray bursts, relativistic jets, and supernova remnants.

  17. Generation and transmission of multiband and multi-gigabit 60-GHz MMW signals in an RoF system with frequency quintupling technique.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liang; Zhu, Ming; Ye, Chenhui; Fan, Shu-Hao; Liu, Cheng; Hu, Xiaofeng; Cao, Pan; Chang, Qingjiang; Su, Yikai; Chang, Gee-Kung

    2013-04-22

    We propose and experimentally demonstrate a cost-effective radio-over-fiber (RoF) system to simultaneously generate and transmit multiband and multi-gigabit 60-GHz millimeter wave (MMW) signals using frequency quintupling technique. Multiband signals at 56-GHz and 60-GHz are realized with two cascaded single-drive Mach-Zehnder modulators (MZMs), where phase control is not required. Furthermore, only low-frequency (≤12GHz) optical and electrical devices are used in the central station (CS), which enable a cost-effective system. At the user-terminal, two-stage down-conversions are employed by envelope detection (ED) and intermediate frequency (IF) mixing, eliminating expensive high-speed synthesizer and critical phase control components. Error-free performances are achieved for the multiband MMW signals after 50-km single-mode fiber (SMF) and 10-ft wireless link transmissions.

  18. Program GROUPIE (version 79-1): calculation of Bondarenko self-shielded neutron cross sections and multiband parameters from data in the ENDF/B format

    SciTech Connect

    Cullen, D.E.

    1980-07-04

    Program GROUPIE reads evaluated data in the ENDF/B format and uses these data to calculate Bondarenko self-shielded cross sections and multiband parameters. To give as much generality as possible, the program allows the user to specify arbitrary energy groups and an arbitrary energy groups and an arbitrary energy-dependent neutron spectrum (weighing function). To guarantee the accuracy of the results, all integrals are performed analytically; in no case is iteration or any approximate form of integration used. The output from this program includes both listings and multiband parameters suitable for use either in a normal multigroup transport calculation or in a multiband transport calculation. A listing of the source deck is available on request.

  19. Analysis of multi-band pyrometry for emissivity and temperature measurements of gray surfaces at ambient temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araújo, António

    2016-05-01

    A multi-band pyrometry model is developed to evaluate the potential of measuring temperature and emissivity of assumably gray target surfaces at 300 K. Twelve wavelength bands between 2 and 60 μm are selected to define the spectral characteristics of the pyrometers. The pyrometers are surrounded by an enclosure with known background temperature. Multi-band pyrometry modeling results in an overdetermined system of equations, in which the solution for temperature and emissivity is obtained through an optimization procedure that minimizes the sum of the squared residuals of each system equation. The Monte Carlo technique is applied to estimate the uncertainties of temperature and emissivity, resulting from the propagation of the uncertainties of the pyrometers. Maximum reduction in temperature uncertainty is obtained from dual-band to tri-band systems, a small reduction is obtained from tri-band to quad-band, with a negligible reduction above quad-band systems (a reduction between 6.5% and 12.9% is obtained from dual-band to quad-band systems). However, increasing the number of bands does not always reduce uncertainty, and uncertainty reduction depends on the specific band arrangement, indicating the importance of choosing the most appropriate multi-band spectral arrangement if uncertainty is to be reduced. A reduction in emissivity uncertainty is achieved when the number of spectral bands is increased (a reduction between 6.3% and 12.1% is obtained from dual-band to penta-band systems). Besides, emissivity uncertainty increases for pyrometers with high wavelength spectral arrangements. Temperature and emissivity uncertainties are strongly dependent on the difference between target and background temperatures: uncertainties are low when the background temperature is far from the target temperature, tending to very high values as the background temperature approaches the target temperature.

  20. A Chandra view of non-thermal emission in the northwestern region of supernova remnant RCW 86: Particle acceleration and magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Castro, Daniel; Lopez, Laura A.; Figueroa-Feliciano, Enectali; Slane, Patrick O.; Yamaguchi, Hiroya; Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico

    2013-12-10

    The shocks of supernova remnants are believed to accelerate particles to cosmic ray (CR) energies. The amplification of the magnetic field due to CRs propagating in the shock region is expected to have an impact on both the emission from the accelerated particle population as well as the acceleration process itself. Using a 95 ks observation with the Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer on board the Chandra X-Ray Observatory, we map and characterize the synchrotron emitting material in the northwest region of RCW 86. We model spectra from several different regions, both filamentary and diffuse, where emission appears to be dominated by synchrotron radiation. The fine spatial resolution of Chandra allows us to obtain accurate emission profiles across three different non-thermal rims in this region. The narrow width (l ≈ 10''-30'') of these filaments constrains the minimum magnetic field strength at the post-shock region to approximately 80 μG.

  1. EDITORIAL: Non-thermal plasma-assisted fuel conversion for green chemistry Non-thermal plasma-assisted fuel conversion for green chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nozaki, Tomohiro; Gutsol, Alexander

    2011-07-01

    This special issue is based on the symposium on Non-thermal Plasma Assisted Fuel Conversion for Green Chemistry, a part of the 240th ACS National Meeting & Exposition held in Boston, MA, USA, 22-26 August 2010. Historically, the Division of Fuel Chemistry of the American Chemical Society (ACS) has featured three plasma-related symposia since 2000, and has launched special issues in Catalysis Today on three occasions: 'Catalyst Preparation using Plasma Technologies', Fall Meeting, Washington DC, USA, 2000. Special issue in Catalysis Today 72 (3-4) with 12 peer-reviewed articles. 'Plasma Technology and Catalysis', Spring Meeting, New Orleans, LA, USA, 2003. Special issue in Catalysis Today 89 (1-2) with more than 30 peer-reviewed articles. 'Utilization of Greenhouse Gases II' (partly focused on plasma-related technologies), Spring Meeting, Anaheim, CA, USA, 2004. Special issue in Catalysis Today 98 (4) with 25 peer-reviewed articles. This time, selected presentations are published in this Journal of Physics D: Applied Physics special issue. An industrial material and energy conversion technology platform is established on thermochemical processes including various catalytic reactions. Existing industry-scale technology is already well established; nevertheless, further improvement in energy efficiency and material saving has been continuously demanded. Drastic reduction of CO2 emission is also drawing keen attention with increasing recognition of energy and environmental issues. Green chemistry is a rapidly growing research field, and frequently highlights renewable bioenergy, bioprocesses, solar photocatalysis of water splitting, and regeneration of CO2 into useful chemicals. We would also like to emphasize 'plasma catalysis' of hydrocarbon resources as an important part of the innovative next-generation green technologies. The peculiarity of non-thermal plasma is that it can generate reactive species almost independently of reaction temperature. Plasma

  2. Multi-band imaging camera and its sciences for the Japanese near-earth asteroid mission MUSES-C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Tsuko; Nakamura, Akiko M.; Saito, Jun; Sasaki, Sho; Nakamura, Ryosuke; Demura, Hirohide; Akiyama, Hiroaki; Tholen, David

    2001-11-01

    In this paper we present current development status of our Asteroid Multi-band Imaging CAmera (AMICA) for the Japan-US joint asteroid sample return mission MUSES-C. The launch of the spacecraft is planned around the end of 2002 and the whole mission period till sample retrieval on Earth will be approximately five years. The nominal target is the asteroid 1998SF36, one of the Amor-type asteroids. The AMICA specifications for the mission are shown here along with its ground-based and inflight calibration methods. We also describe the observational scenario at the asteroid, in relation to scientific goals.

  3. Detailed observations of the source of terrestrial narrowband electromagnetic radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurth, W. S.

    1982-01-01

    Detailed observations are presented of a region near the terrestrial plasmapause where narrowband electromagnetic radiation (previously called escaping nonthermal continuum radiation) is being generated. These observations show a direct correspondence between the narrowband radio emissions and electron cyclotron harmonic waves near the upper hybrid resonance frequency. In addition, electromagnetic radiation propagating in the Z-mode is observed in the source region which provides an extremely accurate determination of the electron plasma frequency and, hence, density profile of the source region. The data strongly suggest that electrostatic waves and not Cerenkov radiation are the source of the banded radio emissions and define the coupling which must be described by any viable theory.

  4. Multiband electronic transport in α-Yb1-x Sr x AlB4 [x  =  0, 0.19(3)] single crystals.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Hyejin; Abeykoon, Milinda; Bozin, Emil; Matsumoto, Yosuke; Nakatsuji, S; Petrovic, C

    2016-10-26

    We report on the evidence for the multiband electronic transport in α-YbAlB4 and α-Yb0.81(2)Sr0.19(3)AlB4. Multiband transport reveals itself below 10 K in both compounds via Hall effect measurements, whereas anisotropic magnetic ground state sets in below 3 K in α-Yb0.81(2)Sr0.19(3)AlB4. Our results show that Sr(2+) substitution enhances conductivity, but does not change the quasiparticle mass of bands induced by heavy fermion hybridization. PMID:27541840

  5. Multiband electronic transport in α-Yb1-x Sr x AlB4 [x  =  0, 0.19(3)] single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryu, Hyejin; Abeykoon, Milinda; Bozin, Emil; Matsumoto, Yosuke; Nakatsuji, S.; Petrovic, C.

    2016-10-01

    We report on the evidence for the multiband electronic transport in α-YbAlB4 and α-Yb0.81(2)Sr0.19(3)AlB4. Multiband transport reveals itself below 10 K in both compounds via Hall effect measurements, whereas anisotropic magnetic ground state sets in below 3 K in α-Yb0.81(2)Sr0.19(3)AlB4. Our results show that Sr2+ substitution enhances conductivity, but does not change the quasiparticle mass of bands induced by heavy fermion hybridization.

  6. Effects of nonthermal ions and polarization force on dust-acoustic waves in a density-varying dusty plasma.

    PubMed

    Asaduzzaman, M; Mamun, A A

    2012-07-01

    A rigorous theoretical investigation has been made of the effects of nonthermal ions and polarization force (which arises due to the dust density inhomogeneity) on the propagation of dust-acoustic (DA) waves in a density-varying unmagnetized dusty plasma (consisting of nonthermal ions, Maxwellian electrons, and negatively charged mobile dust) by the normal mode analysis. It has been shown that the dispersion properties of the DA waves are significantly modified by the presence of nonthermal ions and polarization force. It has been also found that the phase speed of the DA waves, as well as the dust density perturbation, increases (decreases) with the increase of nonthermal ions (polarization force), and that the potential associated with the DA waves decreases with the increase of the equilibrium dust number density. The implications of our results in the specific situation of space environments (dust-ion plasma situation) are also briefly discussed. PMID:23005552

  7. Collisionless damping of dust-acoustic waves in a charge varying electronegative dusty plasma with nonthermal ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benzekka, Moufida; Tribeche, Mouloud

    2016-07-01

    The aim of the present communication is to investigate the charge variation induced nonlinear dust acoustic wave damping in a charge varying electronegative dusty plasma with nonthermal ions. It is shown that the collisionless damping due to dust charge fluctuation causes the nonlinear dust acoustic wave propagation to be described by a damped Korteweg-de Vries equation (dK-dV). The latter is significantly modified by the nonthermal negative ions effects. It may be useful to note that we consider nonthermal negative ions because of the role of their distribution into the formation and dynamics of nonlinear dust acoustic structures. Moreover, the observation of nonthermal ion distributions made by Phobos and Nozomi motivated us to consider non- Maxwellian ions.

  8. OBSERVATIONS OF ENHANCED RADIATIVE GRAIN ALIGNMENT NEAR HD 97300

    SciTech Connect

    Andersson, B-G; Potter, S. B. E-mail: sbp@saao.ac.z

    2010-09-10

    We have obtained optical multi-band polarimetry toward sightlines through the Chamaeleon I cloud, particularly in the vicinity of the young B9/A0 star HD 97300. We show, in agreement with earlier studies, that the radiation field impinging on the cloud in the projected vicinity of the star is dominated by the flux from the star, as evidenced by a local enhancement in the grain heating. By comparing the differential grain heating with the differential change in the location of the peak of the polarization curve, we show that the grain alignment is enhanced by the increase in the radiation field. We also find a weak, but measurable, variation in the grain alignment with the relative angle between the radiation field anisotropy and the magnetic field direction. Such an anisotropy in the grain alignment is consistent with a unique prediction of modern radiative alignment torque theory and provides direct support for radiatively driven grain alignment.

  9. Nonthermal and geometric effects on the symmetric and anti-symmetric surface waves in a Lorentzian dusty plasma slab

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Myoung-Jae; Jung, Young-Dae

    2015-02-15

    The nonthermal and geometric effects on the propagation of the surface dust acoustic waves are investigated in a Lorentzian dusty plasma slab. The symmetric and anti-symmetric dispersion modes of the dust acoustic waves are obtained by the plasma dielectric function with the spectral reflection conditions the slab geometry. The variation of the nonthermal and geometric effects on the symmetric and the anti-symmetric modes of the surface plasma waves is also discussed.

  10. Modulation instability of ion acoustic waves, solitons, and their interactions in nonthermal electron-positron-ion plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Jiefang; Wang Yueyue; Wu Lei

    2009-06-15

    The propagation of ion acoustic waves in plasmas composed of ions, positrons, and nonthermally distributed electrons is investigated. By means of the reduction perturbation technique, a nonlinear Schroedinger equation is derived and the modulation instability of ion acoustic wave is analyzed, where the nonthermal parameter is found to be of significant importance. Furthermore, analytical expressions for the bright and dark solitons are obtained, and the interaction of multiple solitons is discussed.

  11. Radiative Magnetic Reconnection in Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uzdensky, D. A.

    In this chapter we review a new and rapidly growing area of research in high-energy plasma astrophysics—radiative magnetic reconnection, defined here as a regime of reconnection where radiation reaction has an important influence on the reconnection dynamics, energetics, and/or nonthermal particle acceleration. This influence be may be manifested via a variety of radiative effects that are critical in many high-energy astrophysical applications. The most notable radiative effects in astrophysical reconnection include radiation-reaction limits on particle acceleration, radiative cooling, radiative resistivity, braking of reconnection outflows by radiation drag, radiation pressure, viscosity, and even pair creation at highest energy densities. The self-consistent inclusion of these effects into magnetic reconnection theory and modeling sometimes calls for serious modifications to our overall theoretical approach to the problem. In addition, prompt reconnection-powered radiation often represents our only observational diagnostic tool available for studying remote astrophysical systems; this underscores the importance of developing predictive modeling capabilities to connect the underlying physical conditions in a reconnecting system to observable radiative signatures. This chapter presents an overview of our recent theoretical progress in developing basic physical understanding of radiative magnetic reconnection, with a special emphasis on astrophysically most important radiation mechanisms like synchrotron, curvature, and inverse-Compton. The chapter also offers a broad review of key high-energy astrophysical applications of radiative reconnection, illustrated by multiple examples such as: pulsar wind nebulae, pulsar magnetospheres, black-hole accretion-disk coronae and hot accretion flows in X-ray Binaries and Active Galactic Nuclei and their relativistic jets, magnetospheres of magnetars, and Gamma-Ray Bursts. Finally, this chapter discusses the most critical

  12. Propagation of nonlinear coherent structures in a collisional magnetoplasma with nonthermal electrons and finite ion temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Masood, W.; Rizvi, H.; Imtiaz, N.

    2012-01-15

    Nonlinear electrostatic waves in dissipative magnetized electron-ion (e-i) plasmas are investigated employing the two fluid model. In this regard, Zakharov Kuznetsov Burgers (ZKB) equation is derived using the small amplitude perturbation expansion method. It is observed that the nonthermal electron population, obliqueness, ion thermal effects, and kinematic viscosity significantly alter the structure of obliquely propagating nonlinear ion acoustic shock waves in dissipative e-i magnetoplasmas. It is observed that the system can admit both compressive and rarefactive shocks. The condition for the formation of both types of shocks is also given. The present study may be useful to understand the nonlinear propagation characteristics of electrostatic shock structures in space environments where the nonthermal electrons have been observed by various satellite missions such as Voyager and Freja.

  13. General formulation for acoustic solitons in three-component nonthermal plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Chuang, S.-H.; Hau, L.-N.

    2011-06-15

    A generalized formulation is developed for nonlinear acoustic solitons in three-component such as dust-ion-electron and electron-positron-ion plasmas with the charge of each species being unspecified. The heavy, cold charged particles (ions or dust particles) are treated as a fluid while the light, hot components are described by the kinetic Vlasov equation with separate velocity distributions which can be of {kappa} function or highly nonthermal (non-monotonic) distributions. The model is also applicable for two-component such as ion-electron plasmas with two different temperatures for electrons. The generalized dispersion relation for acoustic waves and the Korteweg-de Vries equations as well as the Sagdeev potential are derived for various models with different combinations of velocity distributions. The parameter regimes for the existence of acoustic solitons are analyzed and examples of nonlinear solutions are illustrated. The polarity of electric potential is found to exhibit anomaly for highly nonthermal cases.

  14. Nonthermally Dominated Electron Acceleration during Magnetic Reconnection in a Low-beta Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Xiaocan

    2015-07-21

    This work was motivated by electron acceleration during solar flares. After some introductory remarks on proposed particle acceleration mechanisms and questions needing answers, dynamic simulations and simulation results are presented including energy spectra and the formation of the power law distribution. In summary, magnetic reconnection is highly efficient at converting the free magnetic energy stored in a magnetic shear and accelerating electrons to nonthermal energies in low-β regime. The nonthermal electrons have a dominant fraction and form power-law energy spectra with spectral index p ~ 1 in low-β regime. Electrons are preferentially accelerated along the curvature drift direction along the electric field induced by the reconnection outflow. The results can be applied to explain the observations of electron acceleration during solar flares.

  15. Imprints of nonthermal Wino dark matter on small-scale structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibe, Masahiro; Kamada, Ayuki; Matsumoto, Shigeki

    2013-03-01

    We study how “warm” the Wino dark matter is when it is nonthermally produced by the decays of the gravitino in the early Universe. We clarify the energy distribution of the Wino at the decay of the gravitino and the energy loss process after their production. By solving the Boltzmann equation, we show that a sizable fraction of the Wino dark matter can be warm for the Wino mass mw˜≃100-500GeV. The warmness of the Wino dark matter leaves imprints on the matter power spectra and may provide further insights on the origin of dark matter via the future 21 cm line survey. Our calculations can be applied to other nonthermal Wino production scenarios such as the Wino dark matter produced by the decay of the moduli fields.

  16. Nonthermal plasma processor utilizing additive-gas injection and/or gas extraction

    DOEpatents

    Rosocha, Louis A.

    2006-06-20

    A device for processing gases includes a cylindrical housing in which an electrically grounded, metal injection/extraction gas supply tube is disposed. A dielectric tube surrounds the injection/extraction gas supply tube to establish a gas modification passage therearound. Additionally, a metal high voltage electrode circumscribes the dielectric tube. The high voltage electrode is energizable to create nonthermal electrical microdischarges between the high voltage electrode and the injection/extraction gas supply tube across the dielectric tube within the gas modification passage. An injection/extraction gas and a process gas flow through the nonthermal electrical microdischarges within the gas modification passage and a modified process gas results. Using the device contaminants that are entrained in the process gas can be destroyed to yield a cleaner, modified process gas.

  17. Non-thermal x-ray emission from wire array z-pinches

    SciTech Connect

    Ampleford, David; Hansen, Stephanie B.; Jennings, Christopher Ashley; Webb, Timothy Jay; Harper-Slaboszewicz, V.; Loisel, Guillaume Pascal; Flanagan, Timothy McGuire; Bell, Kate Suzanne; Jones, Brent M.; McPherson, Leroy A.; Rochau, Gregory A.; Chittenden, Jeremy P.; Sherlock, Mark; Appelbe, Brian; Giuliani, John; Ouart, Nicholas; Seely, John

    2015-12-01

    We report on experiments demonstrating the transition from thermally-dominated K-shell line emission to non-thermal, hot-electron-driven inner-shell emission for z pinch plasmas on the Z machine. While x-ray yields from thermal K-shell emission decrease rapidly with increasing atomic number Z, we find that non-thermal emission persists with favorable Z scaling, dominating over thermal emission for Z=42 and higher (hn ≥ 17keV). Initial experiments with Mo (Z=42) and Ag (Z=47) have produced kJ-level emission in the 17-keV and 22-keV Kα lines respectively. We will discuss the electron beam properties that could excite these non - thermal lines. We also report on experiments that have attempted to control non - thermal K - shell line emission by modifying the wire array or load hardware setup.

  18. Photon-deficient Compton scattering by nonthermal electrons - Comparison with gamma-ray burst spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zdziarski, Andrzej A.; Lamb, Don Q.

    1986-01-01

    The model of gamma-ray-burst spectra proposed by Zdziarski and Lamb (1986, 1987) is reviewed and compared with observed spectra. In the model, the spectrum arises from multiple Compton scatterings in a nonthermal source with a deficit of soft photons. The steady-state electron distribution in such a source is a nonthermal power law that joins at low energies onto a thermal distribution that may be either optically thick or thin. Both cases lead naturally to a two-component spectrum with a photon-energy index in the X-ray spectrum which is much less than one and a photon-energy index in the gamma-ray spectrum which is larger than the X-ray photon-energy index. Fits to the observed gamma-ray-burst spectra (where data exist for both X-ray and gamma-ray energies) show good agreement with the model.

  19. Compressive and rarefactive solitary waves in nonthermal two-component plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Verheest, Frank; Hellberg, Manfred A.

    2010-10-15

    Using a Sagdeev pseudopotential formalism where nonlinear structures are stationary in a comoving frame, large ion-acoustic solitary waves and double layers have been studied in plasmas with positive ions and nonthermal electrons. The velocity range of positive, compressive solitary waves is limited by the ion density reaching infinite compression, whereas negative, rarefactive solitary waves and double layers can exist when the electron nonthermality exceeds a certain minimum. There are even regions of coexistence, the limits of which can be elucidated by considering the properties of the special Sagdeev pseudopotential at the acoustic speed. In particular, when the compositional parameters and Mach numbers admit only compressive or rarefactive solitary structures, these have to be superacoustic, their amplitude vanishing at the acoustic speed. When both compressive and rarefactive modes can occur, one of them is Korteweg-de Vries (KdV)-like, the other having a non-KdV character, with a finite amplitude at the acoustic speed.

  20. Electrostatic solitary structures in dusty plasmas with nonthermal and superthermal electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Aoutou, Kamel; Tribeche, Mouloud; Zerguini, Taha Houssine

    2008-01-15

    A theoretical model is presented to show the existence, formation, and possible realization of arbitrary amplitude solitary potentials in a dusty plasma with both nonthermal and superthermal electrons. A physically meaningful {kappa}-like electron distribution function is outlined. It is shown that due to electron superthermality, the present dusty plasma model can support subsonic as well as supersonic electrostatic solitary waves involving cusped potential humps. Interestingly, one finds that the effect of increasing the spectral index {kappa} is to reduce and restrict the domain of allowable dust Mach numbers. An increase of the nonthermal parameter {alpha} would lead to a shift of this domain and a drastic restriction of the spectral index regime in which compressive and rarefactive solitons can coexist. Our results may provide an explanation for the strong spiky waveforms observed in auroral electric fields measurements by Viking and Fast.

  1. Non-thermal leptogenesis in a simple 5D SO(10) GUT

    SciTech Connect

    Fukuyama, Takeshi; Okada, Nobuchika E-mail: okadan@ua.edu

    2010-09-01

    We discuss non-thermal leptogenesis in the scheme of 5D orbifold SO(10) GUT with the smooth hybrid inflation. With unambiguously determined Dirac Yukawa couplings and an assumption for the neutrino mixing matrix of the tri-bimaximal from, we analyze baryon asymmetry of the universe via non-thermal leptogenesis in two typical cases for the light neutrino mass spectrum, the normal and inverted hierarchical cases. The resultant baryon asymmetry is obtained as a function of the lightest mass eigenvalue of the light neutrinos, and we find that a suitable amount of baryon asymmetry of the universe can be produced in the normal hierarchical case, while in the inverted hierarchical case the baryon asymmetry is too small to be consistent with the observation.

  2. Electron acoustic solitary waves in a magnetized plasma with nonthermal electrons and an electron beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, S. V.; Devanandhan, S.; Lakhina, G. S.; Bharuthram, R.

    2016-08-01

    A theoretical investigation is carried out to study the obliquely propagating electron acoustic solitary waves having nonthermal hot electrons, cold and beam electrons, and ions in a magnetized plasma. We have employed reductive perturbation theory to derive the Korteweg-de-Vries-Zakharov-Kuznetsov (KdV-ZK) equation describing the nonlinear evolution of these waves. The two-dimensional plane wave solution of KdV-ZK equation is analyzed to study the effects of nonthermal and beam electrons on the characteristics of the solitons. Theoretical results predict negative potential solitary structures. We emphasize that the inclusion of finite temperature effects reduces the soliton amplitudes and the width of the solitons increases by an increase in the obliquity of the wave propagation. The numerical analysis is presented for the parameters corresponding to the observations of "burst a" event by Viking satellite on the auroral field lines.

  3. A multi-band spectral subtraction-based algorithm for real-time noise cancellation applied to gunshot acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramos, António L. L.; Holm, Sverre; Gudvangen, Sigmund; Otterlei, Ragnvald

    2013-06-01

    Acoustical sniper positioning is based on the detection and direction-of-arrival estimation of the shockwave and the muzzle blast acoustical signals. In real-life situations, the detection and direction-of-arrival estimation processes is usually performed under the influence of background noise sources, e.g., vehicles noise, and might result in non-negligible inaccuracies than can affect the system performance and reliability negatively, specially when detecting the muzzle sound under long range distance and absorbing terrains. This paper introduces a multi-band spectral subtraction based algorithm for real-time noise reduction, applied to gunshot acoustical signals. The ballistic shockwave and the muzzle blast signals exhibit distinct frequency contents that are affected differently by additive noise. In most real situations, the noise component is colored and a multi-band spectral subtraction approach for noise reduction contributes to reducing the presence of artifacts in denoised signals. The proposed algorithm is tested using a dataset generated by combining signals from real gunshots and real vehicle noise. The noise component was generated using a steel tracked military tank running on asphalt and includes, therefore, the sound from the vehicle engine, which varies slightly in frequency over time according to the engine's rpm, and the sound from the steel tracks as the vehicle moves.

  4. Dichotomy between the Hole and Electron Behavior in Multiband Superconductor FeSe Probed by Ultrahigh Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, M. D.; Yamashita, T.; Kasahara, S.; Knafo, W.; Nardone, M.; Béard, J.; Hardy, F.; McCollam, A.; Narayanan, A.; Blake, S. F.; Wolf, T.; Haghighirad, A. A.; Meingast, C.; Schofield, A. J.; v. Löhneysen, H.; Matsuda, Y.; Coldea, A. I.; Shibauchi, T.

    2015-07-01

    Magnetoresistivity ρx x and Hall resistivity ρx y in ultrahigh magnetic fields up to 88 T are measured down to 0.15 K to clarify the multiband electronic structure in high-quality single crystals of superconducting FeSe. At low temperatures and high fields we observe quantum oscillations in both resistivity and the Hall effect, confirming the multiband Fermi surface with small volumes. We propose a novel approach to identify from magnetotransport measurements the sign of the charge carriers corresponding to a particular cyclotron orbit in a compensated metal. The observed significant differences in the relative amplitudes of the quantum oscillations between the ρx x and ρx y components, together with the positive sign of the high-field ρx y, reveal that the largest pocket should correspond to the hole band. The low-field magnetotransport data in the normal state suggest that, in addition to one hole and one almost compensated electron band, the orthorhombic phase of FeSe exhibits an additional tiny electron pocket with a high mobility.

  5. Dichotomy between the Hole and Electron Behavior in Multiband Superconductor FeSe Probed by Ultrahigh Magnetic Fields.

    PubMed

    Watson, M D; Yamashita, T; Kasahara, S; Knafo, W; Nardone, M; Béard, J; Hardy, F; McCollam, A; Narayanan, A; Blake, S F; Wolf, T; Haghighirad, A A; Meingast, C; Schofield, A J; Löhneysen, H v; Matsuda, Y; Coldea, A I; Shibauchi, T

    2015-07-10

    Magnetoresistivity ρ(xx) and Hall resistivity ρ(xy) in ultrahigh magnetic fields up to 88 T are measured down to 0.15 K to clarify the multiband electronic structure in high-quality single crystals of superconducting FeSe. At low temperatures and high fields we observe quantum oscillations in both resistivity and the Hall effect, confirming the multiband Fermi surface with small volumes. We propose a novel approach to identify from magnetotransport measurements the sign of the charge carriers corresponding to a particular cyclotron orbit in a compensated metal. The observed significant differences in the relative amplitudes of the quantum oscillations between the ρ(xx) and ρ(xy) components, together with the positive sign of the high-field ρ(xy), reveal that the largest pocket should correspond to the hole band. The low-field magnetotransport data in the normal state suggest that, in addition to one hole and one almost compensated electron band, the orthorhombic phase of FeSe exhibits an additional tiny electron pocket with a high mobility.

  6. Dichotomy between the Hole and Electron Behavior in Multiband Superconductor FeSe Probed by Ultrahigh Magnetic Fields.

    PubMed

    Watson, M D; Yamashita, T; Kasahara, S; Knafo, W; Nardone, M; Béard, J; Hardy, F; McCollam, A; Narayanan, A; Blake, S F; Wolf, T; Haghighirad, A A; Meingast, C; Schofield, A J; Löhneysen, H v; Matsuda, Y; Coldea, A I; Shibauchi, T

    2015-07-10

    Magnetoresistivity ρ(xx) and Hall resistivity ρ(xy) in ultrahigh magnetic fields up to 88 T are measured down to 0.15 K to clarify the multiband electronic structure in high-quality single crystals of superconducting FeSe. At low temperatures and high fields we observe quantum oscillations in both resistivity and the Hall effect, confirming the multiband Fermi surface with small volumes. We propose a novel approach to identify from magnetotransport measurements the sign of the charge carriers corresponding to a particular cyclotron orbit in a compensated metal. The observed significant differences in the relative amplitudes of the quantum oscillations between the ρ(xx) and ρ(xy) components, together with the positive sign of the high-field ρ(xy), reveal that the largest pocket should correspond to the hole band. The low-field magnetotransport data in the normal state suggest that, in addition to one hole and one almost compensated electron band, the orthorhombic phase of FeSe exhibits an additional tiny electron pocket with a high mobility. PMID:26207500

  7. Detecteur multibandes libs a base de reseaux holographiques epais: Conception optomecanique et gestion de l'innovation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gagnon, Daniel

    Detection of sulfur by optical emission spectroscopy generally presents difficulties because the strongest lines are in the vacuum ultraviolet and therefore are readily absorbed by oxygen molecules in air. A novel concept for a low cost and efficient system to detect sulfur using near infrared lines by Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy is proposed in this thesis. The concept proposes to use customized thick holographic gratings, also referred as Volume Bragg Grating, for spectral filtering of the plasma light, and built-in custom electronics that amplify and integrate photodiodes output signals. In this work, the optomechanical design, manufacturing and trials of a multiband sensor's prototype is reviewed. Preliminary results has been presented at NASLIBS 2011 and showed a limit of detection comparable to that of a conventional high-end system. An article describing the concept and results has been published in a special issue of the Applied Optics journal. To turn this newly patented concept into commercial success, the management of the innovation has been performed by proposing strategic and tactic alliances for commercialisation purposes applied to strategic business positioning structured along the 3 axis Technology -- Product -- Market. Open innovation is here acting as the paradigm to efficiently reach the market. Discussion relative to strategic and tactic alliance is actually taking place for deployment of the LIBS multiband sensor in the mining industry.

  8. Dust-acoustic solitary waves in dusty plasmas with non-thermal ions

    SciTech Connect

    Asgari, H.; Muniandy, S. V.; Wong, C. S.

    2013-02-15

    Most studies on dusty plasmas have assumed that electrons and ions follow Maxwellian distributions. However, in the presence of energetic ions, the distribution of ions tends to be non-Maxwellian. It is shown here that the existence of non-thermal ions would increase the phase velocity of a dust-acoustic wave. It is also found that the change in the phase velocity profoundly affects the characteristics of a dust-acoustic solitary wave.

  9. The Swift BAT Perspective on Non-Thermal Emission in HIFLUGCS Galaxy Clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wik, Daniel R.

    2011-01-01

    The search for diffuse non-thermal, inverse Compton (IC) emission from galaxy clusters at hard X-ray energies has been underway for many years, with most detections being either of low significance or controversial. Until recently, comprehensive surveys of hard X-ray emission from clusters were not possible; instead, individually proposed-for. long observations would be collated from the archive. With the advent of the Swift BAT all sky survey, any c1u,;ter's emission above 14 keV can be probed with nearly uniform sensitivity. which is comparable to that of RXTE, Beppo-SAX, and Suzaku with the 58-month version of the survey. In this work. we search for non-thermal excess emission above the exponentially decreasing, high energy thermal emission in the flux-limited HIFLUGCS sample. The BAT emission from many of the detected clusters is marginally extended; we are able to extract the total flux for these clusters using fiducial models for their spatial extent. To account for thermal emission at BAT energies, XMM-Newton EPIC spectra are extracted from coincident spatial regions so that both the thermal and non-thermal spectral components can be determined simultaneou,;ly in joint fits. We find marginally significant IC components in 6 clusters, though after closer inspection and consideration of systematic errors we are unable to claim a clear detection in any of them. The spectra of all clusters are also summed to enhance a cumulative non-thermal signal not quite detectable in individual clusters. After constructing a model based on single temperature

  10. Thermal and nonthermal melting of silicon under femtosecond x-ray irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medvedev, Nikita; Li, Zheng; Ziaja, Beata

    2015-02-01

    As is known from visible-light experiments, silicon under femtosecond pulse irradiation can undergo so-called "nonthermal melting" if the density of electrons excited from the valence to the conduction band overcomes a certain critical value. Such ultrafast transition is induced by strong changes in the atomic potential energy surface, which trigger atomic relocation. However, heating of a material due to the electron-phonon coupling can also lead to a phase transition, called "thermal melting." This thermal melting can occur even if the excited-electron density is much too low to induce nonthermal effects. To study phase transitions, and in particular, the interplay of the thermal and nonthermal effects in silicon under a femtosecond x-ray irradiation, we propose their unified treatment by going beyond the Born-Oppenheimer approximation within our hybrid model based on tight-binding molecular dynamics. With our extended model we identify damage thresholds for various phase transitions in irradiated silicon. We show that electron-phonon coupling triggers the phase transition of solid silicon into a low-density liquid phase if the energy deposited into the sample is above ˜0.65 eV per atom. For the deposited doses of over ˜0.9 eV per atom, solid silicon undergoes a phase transition into high-density liquid phase triggered by an interplay between electron-phonon heating and nonthermal effects. These thresholds are much lower than those predicted with the Born-Oppenheimer approximation (˜2.1 eV/atom), and indicate a significant contribution of electron-phonon coupling to the relaxation of the laser-excited silicon. We expect that these results will stimulate dedicated experimental studies, unveiling in detail various paths of structural relaxation within laser-irradiated silicon.

  11. Non-Thermal Treatment of Hanford Site Low-Level Mixed Waste

    SciTech Connect

    1998-09-01

    DOE proposes to transport contact-handled LLMW from the Hanford Site to the Allied Technology Group (ATG) Mixed Waste Facility (MWF) in Richland, Washington, for non-thermal treatment and to return the treated waste to the Hanford Site for eventual land disposal. Over a 3-year period the waste would be staged to the ATG MWF, and treated waste would be returned to the Hanford Site. The ATG MWF would be located on an 18 hectare (ha) (45 acre [at]) ATG Site adjacent to ATG's licensed low-level waste processing facility at 2025 Battelle Boulevard. The ATG MWF is located approximately 0.8 kilometers (km) (0.5 miles [mi]) south of Horn Rapids Road and 1.6 km (1 mi) west of Stevens Drive. The property is located within the Horn Rapids triangle in northern Richland (Figure 2.1). The ATG MWF is to be located on the existing ATG Site, near the DOE Hanford Site, in an industrial area in the City of Richland. The effects of siting, construction, and overall operation of the MWF have been evaluated in a separate State Environmental Policy Act (SEPA) EIS (City of Richland 1998). The proposed action includes transporting the LLMW from the Hanford Site to the ATG Facility, non-thermal treatment of the LLMW at the ATG MWF, and transporting the waste from ATG back to the Hanford Site. Impacts fi-om waste treatment operations would be bounded by the ATG SEPA EIS, which included an evaluation of the impacts associated with operating the non-thermal portion of the MWF at maximum design capacity (8,500 metric tons per year) (City of Richland 1998). Up to 50 employees would be required for non-thermal treatment portion of the MWF. This includes 40 employees that would perform waste treatment operations and 10 support staff. Similar numbers were projected for the thermal treatment portion of the MWF (City of Richland 1998).

  12. SOLCOST - Version 3. 0. Solar energy design program for non-thermal specialists

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-05-01

    The SOLCOST solar energy design program is a public domain computerized design tool intended for use by non-thermal specialists to size solar systems with a methodology based on life cycle cost. An overview of SOLCOST capabilities and options is presented. A detailed guide to the SOLCOST input parameters is included. Sample problems showing typical imput decks and resulting SOLCOST output sheets are given. Details of different parts of the analysis are appended. (MHR)

  13. Determination of Non-Thermal Velocity Distributions from SERTS Linewidth Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coyner, Aaron J.; Davila, Joseph M.

    2011-01-01

    Non-thermal velocities obtained from the measurement of coronal Extreme Ultraviolet (EUV) linewidths have been consistently observed in solar EUV spectral observations and have been theorized to result fro m many plausible scenarios including wave motions, turbulence, or magnetic reconnection. Constraining these velocities can provide a physical limit for the available energy resulting from unresolved motions in the corona. We statistically determine a series of non-thermal velocity distributions from linewidth measurements of 390 emission lines from a wide array of elements and ionization states observed during the Solar Extreme Ultraviolet Research Telescope and Spectrograph 1991-1997 flights covering the spectral range 174-418 A and a temperature range from 80,000 K to 12.6 MK. This sample includes 248 lines from active regions, 101 lines from quiet-Sun regions, and 41 lines were observed from plasma off the solar limb. We find a strongly peaked distribution corresponding to a non-thermal velocity of 19-22 km/s in all three of the quiet-Sun, active region, and off-limb distributions. For the possibility of Alfven wave resonance heating, we find thai velocities in the core of these distributions do not provide sufficient energy, given typical densities and magnetic field strengths for the coronal plasma, to overcome the estimated coronal energy losses required to maintain the corona at the typical temperatures working as the sole mechanism. We find that at perfect efficiency 50%-60% of the needed energy flux can be produced from the non-thermal velocities measured.

  14. Nonthermal X-ray Spectral Flattening toward Low Energies in Early Impulsive Flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holman, Gordon D.

    2007-01-01

    The determination of the low-energy cutoff to nonthermal electron distributions is critical to the calculation of the nonthermal energy in solar flares. The most direct evidence for low-energy cutoffs is flattening of the power-law, nontherma1 X-ray spectra at low energies. However, because of the plasma preheating often seen in flares, the thermal emissions at low energies may hide such spectral flattening of the nonthermal component. We select a category of flares, which we call "early impulsive flares", in which the > 25 keV hard X-ray (HXR) flux increase is delayed by less than 30 s after the flux increase at lower energies. Thus, the plasma preheating in these flares is minimal, so the nonthermal spectrum can be determined to lower energies than in flares with significant preheating. Out of a sample of 33 early impulsive flares observed by the Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopy Imager (RHESSI), 9 showed spectral flattening toward low energies. In these events, the break energy of the double power-law fit to the HXR spectra lies in the range of 10-50 keV, significantly lower than the value we have seen for other flares that do not show such early impulsive emissions. In particular, it correlates with the HXR flux. After correcting the spatially-integrated spectra for albedo from isotropically emitted X-rays and using RHESSI imaging spectroscopy to exclude the extended albedo halo, we find that albedo associated with isotropic or nearly isotropic electrons can only account for the spectral flattening in 3 flares near Sun center. The spectral flattening in the remaining 6 flares is found to be consistent with the existence of a low-energy cutoff in the electron spectrum, falling in the range of 15-50 keV, which also correlates with the HXR flux.

  15. DETERMINATION OF NON-THERMAL VELOCITY DISTRIBUTIONS FROM SERTS LINEWIDTH OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Coyner, Aaron J.; Davila, Joseph M.

    2011-12-01

    Non-thermal velocities obtained from the measurement of coronal Extreme Ultraviolet (EUV) linewidths have been consistently observed in solar EUV spectral observations and have been theorized to result from many plausible scenarios including wave motions, turbulence, or magnetic reconnection. Constraining these velocities can provide a physical limit for the available energy resulting from unresolved motions in the corona. We statistically determine a series of non-thermal velocity distributions from linewidth measurements of 390 emission lines from a wide array of elements and ionization states observed during the Solar Extreme Ultraviolet Research Telescope and Spectrograph 1991-1997 flights covering the spectral range 174-418 A and a temperature range from 80,000 K to 12.6 MK. This sample includes 248 lines from active regions, 101 lines from quiet-Sun regions, and 41 lines were observed from plasma off the solar limb. We find a strongly peaked distribution corresponding to a non-thermal velocity of 19-22 km s{sup -1} in all three of the quiet-Sun, active region, and off-limb distributions. For the possibility of Alfven wave resonance heating, we find that velocities in the core of these distributions do not provide sufficient energy, given typical densities and magnetic field strengths for the coronal plasma, to overcome the estimated coronal energy losses required to maintain the corona at the typical temperatures working as the sole mechanism. We find that at perfect efficiency 50%-60% of the needed energy flux can be produced from the non-thermal velocities measured.

  16. Dust-acoustic Solitary Waves in Dusty Plasma with Non-thermal Ions

    SciTech Connect

    Saini, Nareshpal Singh; Gill, Tarsem Singh; Kaur, Harvinder

    2005-10-31

    In the present research paper, characteristics of dust-acoustic solitary waves in dusty plasma are studied. The dust charge is treated as variable. KdV equation has been derived using reductive perturbation method. The effect of relative number density, relative ion temperature, non-thermal parameter and variable charge has been numerically studied for possibility of both type of dust-acoustic solitary waves.

  17. Multi-band search for volcanic outgassing in the Tharsis and Syrtis Major regions on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khayat, Alain S. J.

    We carried out the first and most comprehensive to date (2015), ground-based, semisimultaneous, multi-band and multi-species search for sulphuretted gases (SO2, H2S, OCS and SO) above the Tharsis and Syrtis volcanic regions on Mars. The submillimeter search extended between 23 November 2011 and 25 May 2014 which corresponded to Mars' mid Northern Spring and mid Northern Summer seasons (Ls = 34 - 135°). SO2, SO and H2S were targeted at their rotational transitions at 346.652 GHz, 304.078 GHz and 300.505 GHz, respectively, using the high-resolution heterodyne receiver Barney on the 10.4 m single-dish antenna of the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory (CSO), and SO2 at HARP on the 15 m James Clerk Maxwell Telescope (JCMT) at Maunakea, Hawai'i. No sulphuretted gases were detected. We infer 2sigma upper limits across the disk of the planet using the CSO of 1.1 ppb, 0.7 ppb and 1.3 ppb for SO2, SO and H2S, respectively, and 3.1 ppb on SO2 using the JCMT. The infrared search covered OCS in its combination band (nu1+nu3) at 3.42 mum (2924 cm -1), during Mars' late Northern Spring and mid Northern Summer seasons, spanning Ls= 43° and Ls= 145°, between 15 Dec. 2011 and 13 June 2014, using the high resolution infrared spectrometer CSHELL on the 3 m NASA Infrared Telescope Facility (IRTF). No absorption of atmospheric OCS has been detected, and we infer a 2sigma upper limit of 0.8 ppb on OCS. Our current limit 1.1 ppb for SO2 yields an outgassing rate of less than 55 tons/day. Compared to two terrestrial analogs, we would have been able to detect any volcanic release that is more than 4% the size of Kilauea (Hawai'i) or one twentieth the size of the Masaya volcano (Nicaragua). The mass rate of magma that is able to degas 55 tons of SO2 per day is estimated as 37 kilotons of magma per day, or 12,000 m3 per day (0.14 m3/s). The non-detection of any of the sulfur compounds in the atmosphere of Mars provides limits to the level of current volcanic activity in the crust of Mars.

  18. Characteristics of Quantum Radiation of Slowly Varying Nonstationary Kerr-Newman Black Holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hua, Jia-Chen; Huang, Yong-Chang

    Quantum radiative characteristics of slowly varying nonstationary Kerr-Newman black holes are investigated by using the method of generalized tortoise coordinate transformation. It is shown that the temperature and the shape of the event horizon of this kind of black holes depend on the time and the angle. Further, we reveal a previously ignored relationship between thermal radiation and nonthermal radiation, which is that the chemical potential in the thermal radiation spectrum is equal to the highest energy of the negative energy state of particles in nonthermal radiation for slowly varying nonstationary Kerr-Newman black holes. Also, we show that the deduced general results can be degenerated to the known conclusion of stationary Kerr-Newman black holes.

  19. Transient thermal and nonthermal electron and phonon relaxation after short-pulsed laser heating of metals

    SciTech Connect

    Giri, Ashutosh; Hopkins, Patrick E.

    2015-12-07

    Several dynamic thermal and nonthermal scattering processes affect ultrafast heat transfer in metals after short-pulsed laser heating. Even with decades of measurements of electron-phonon relaxation, the role of thermal vs. nonthermal electron and phonon scattering on overall electron energy transfer to the phonons remains unclear. In this work, we derive an analytical expression for the electron-phonon coupling factor in a metal that includes contributions from equilibrium and nonequilibrium distributions of electrons. While the contribution from the nonthermal electrons to electron-phonon coupling is non-negligible, the increase in the electron relaxation rates with increasing laser fluence measured by thermoreflectance techniques cannot be accounted for by only considering electron-phonon relaxations. We conclude that electron-electron scattering along with electron-phonon scattering have to be considered simultaneously to correctly predict the transient nature of electron relaxation during and after short-pulsed heating of metals at elevated electron temperatures. Furthermore, for high electron temperature perturbations achieved at high absorbed laser fluences, we show good agreement between our model, which accounts for d-band excitations, and previous experimental data. Our model can be extended to other free electron metals with the knowledge of the density of states of electrons in the metals and considering electronic excitations from non-Fermi surface states.

  20. Electrostatic envelope modes in multi-component non-thermal plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saiful Islam, Md; Sultana, Sharmin; Mamun, A. A.

    2016-07-01

    A theoretical study of envelope type solitary structures and their modulational instability has been made in a multi-component unmagnetized non-thermal plasma (consisting of negatively charged immobile heavy ions, inertial light ions and non-thermal electrons of two distinct temperatures). The cubic nonlinear Schrödinger equation (which describes the evolution of a slowly varying wave envelope with space and time) is derived by adopting the multiple scale (in space and time) perturbation technique. It is found that the plasma system under consideration supports two types (bright and dark) envelope solitons. It is also seen that the dark (bright) envelope solitons are modulationally stable (unstable). The variation of the growth rate of the unstable bright envelope solitons with various plasma parameters (e.g. wave number, temperature of plasma non-thermality, etc.) are found to be significant. The modulational instability criterions of the envelope modes are also seen to be influenced due to the variation of the intrinsic plasma parameters. This theoretical study may be useful in understanding the basic features of localized electrostatic structures in some space plasma systems (viz. Saturn's magnetosphere) where high energetic particles are available.

  1. Non-Thermal Atmospheric-Pressure Plasma Possible Application in Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Haertel, Beate; von Woedtke, Thomas; Weltmann, Klaus-Dieter; Lindequist, Ulrike

    2014-01-01

    Non-thermal atmospheric-pressure plasma, also named cold plasma, is defined as a partly ionized gas. Therefore, it cannot be equated with plasma from blood; it is not biological in nature. Non-thermal atmospheric-pressure plasma is a new innovative approach in medicine not only for the treatment of wounds, but with a wide-range of other applications, as e.g. topical treatment of other skin diseases with microbial involvement or treatment of cancer diseases. This review emphasizes plasma effects on wound healing. Non-thermal atmospheric-pressure plasma can support wound healing by its antiseptic effects, by stimulation of proliferation and migration of wound relating skin cells, by activation or inhibition of integrin receptors on the cell surface or by its pro-angiogenic effect. We summarize the effects of plasma on eukaryotic cells, especially on keratinocytes in terms of viability, proliferation, DNA, adhesion molecules and angiogenesis together with the role of reactive oxygen species and other components of plasma. The outcome of first clinical trials regarding wound healing is pointed out. PMID:25489414

  2. Nonthermal Electron Energization from Magnetic Reconnection in Laser-Driven Plasmas.

    PubMed

    Totorica, Samuel R; Abel, Tom; Fiuza, Frederico

    2016-03-01

    The possibility of studying nonthermal electron energization in laser-driven plasma experiments of magnetic reconnection is studied using two- and three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations. It is demonstrated that nonthermal electrons with energies more than an order of magnitude larger than the initial thermal energy can be produced in plasma conditions currently accessible in the laboratory. Electrons are accelerated by the reconnection electric field, being injected at varied distances from the X points, and in some cases trapped in plasmoids, before escaping the finite-sized system. Trapped electrons can be further energized by the electric field arising from the motion of the plasmoid. This acceleration gives rise to a nonthermal electron component that resembles a power-law spectrum, containing up to ∼8% of the initial energy of the interacting electrons and ∼24% of the initial magnetic energy. Estimates of the maximum electron energy and of the plasma conditions required to observe suprathermal electron acceleration are provided, paving the way for a new platform for the experimental study of particle acceleration induced by reconnection. PMID:26991182

  3. Non-thermal Plasma Exposure Rapidly Attenuates Bacterial AHL-Dependent Quorum Sensing and Virulence

    PubMed Central

    Flynn, Padrig B.; Busetti, Alessandro; Wielogorska, Ewa; Chevallier, Olivier P.; Elliott, Christopher T.; Laverty, Garry; Gorman, Sean P.; Graham, William G.; Gilmore, Brendan F.

    2016-01-01

    The antimicrobial activity of atmospheric pressure non-thermal plasma has been exhaustively characterised, however elucidation of the interactions between biomolecules produced and utilised by bacteria and short plasma exposures are required for optimisation and clinical translation of cold plasma technology. This study characterizes the effects of non-thermal plasma exposure on acyl homoserine lactone (AHL)-dependent quorum sensing (QS). Plasma exposure of AHLs reduced the ability of such molecules to elicit a QS response in bacterial reporter strains in a dose-dependent manner. Short exposures (30–60 s) produce of a series of secondary compounds capable of eliciting a QS response, followed by the complete loss of AHL-dependent signalling following longer exposures. UPLC-MS analysis confirmed the time-dependent degradation of AHL molecules and their conversion into a series of by-products. FT-IR analysis of plasma-exposed AHLs highlighted the appearance of an OH group. In vivo assessment of the exposure of AHLs to plasma was examined using a standard in vivo model. Lettuce leaves injected with the rhlI/lasI mutant PAO-MW1 alongside plasma treated N-butyryl-homoserine lactone and n-(3-oxo-dodecanoyl)-homoserine lactone, exhibited marked attenuation of virulence. This study highlights the capacity of atmospheric pressure non-thermal plasma to modify and degrade AHL autoinducers thereby attenuating QS-dependent virulence in P. aeruginosa. PMID:27242335

  4. Non-thermal Plasma Exposure Rapidly Attenuates Bacterial AHL-Dependent Quorum Sensing and Virulence.

    PubMed

    Flynn, Padrig B; Busetti, Alessandro; Wielogorska, Ewa; Chevallier, Olivier P; Elliott, Christopher T; Laverty, Garry; Gorman, Sean P; Graham, William G; Gilmore, Brendan F

    2016-05-31

    The antimicrobial activity of atmospheric pressure non-thermal plasma has been exhaustively characterised, however elucidation of the interactions between biomolecules produced and utilised by bacteria and short plasma exposures are required for optimisation and clinical translation of cold plasma technology. This study characterizes the effects of non-thermal plasma exposure on acyl homoserine lactone (AHL)-dependent quorum sensing (QS). Plasma exposure of AHLs reduced the ability of such molecules to elicit a QS response in bacterial reporter strains in a dose-dependent manner. Short exposures (30-60 s) produce of a series of secondary compounds capable of eliciting a QS response, followed by the complete loss of AHL-dependent signalling following longer exposures. UPLC-MS analysis confirmed the time-dependent degradation of AHL molecules and their conversion into a series of by-products. FT-IR analysis of plasma-exposed AHLs highlighted the appearance of an OH group. In vivo assessment of the exposure of AHLs to plasma was examined using a standard in vivo model. Lettuce leaves injected with the rhlI/lasI mutant PAO-MW1 alongside plasma treated N-butyryl-homoserine lactone and n-(3-oxo-dodecanoyl)-homoserine lactone, exhibited marked attenuation of virulence. This study highlights the capacity of atmospheric pressure non-thermal plasma to modify and degrade AHL autoinducers thereby attenuating QS-dependent virulence in P. aeruginosa.

  5. Transient thermal and nonthermal electron and phonon relaxation after short-pulsed laser heating of metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giri, Ashutosh; Hopkins, Patrick E.

    2015-12-01

    Several dynamic thermal and nonthermal scattering processes affect ultrafast heat transfer in metals after short-pulsed laser heating. Even with decades of measurements of electron-phonon relaxation, the role of thermal vs. nonthermal electron and phonon scattering on overall electron energy transfer to the phonons remains unclear. In this work, we derive an analytical expression for the electron-phonon coupling factor in a metal that includes contributions from equilibrium and nonequilibrium distributions of electrons. While the contribution from the nonthermal electrons to electron-phonon coupling is non-negligible, the increase in the electron relaxation rates with increasing laser fluence measured by thermoreflectance techniques cannot be accounted for by only considering electron-phonon relaxations. We conclude that electron-electron scattering along with electron-phonon scattering have to be considered simultaneously to correctly predict the transient nature of electron relaxation during and after short-pulsed heating of metals at elevated electron temperatures. Furthermore, for high electron temperature perturbations achieved at high absorbed laser fluences, we show good agreement between our model, which accounts for d-band excitations, and previous experimental data. Our model can be extended to other free electron metals with the knowledge of the density of states of electrons in the metals and considering electronic excitations from non-Fermi surface states.

  6. Review of the integrated thermal and nonthermal treatment system studies. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1996-10-01

    This report contains a review and evaluation of three systems analysis studies performed by LITCO on integrated thermal treatment systems and integrated nonthermal treatment systems for the remediation of mixed low-level waste stored throughout the US Department of Energy weapons complex. The review was performed by an independent team of nine researchers from the Energy and Environmental Research Center, Science Applications International Corporation, the Waste Policy Institute, and Virginia Tech. The three studies reviewed were as follows: Integrated Thermal Treatment System Study, Phase 1 -- issued July 1994; Integrated Thermal Treatment System Study, Phase 2 -- issued February 1996; and Integrated Nonthermal Treatment System Study -- drafted March 1996. The purpose of this review was to (1) determine whether the assumptions of the studies were adequate to produce an unbiased review of both thermal and nonthermal systems, (2) to identify the critical areas of the studies that would benefit from further investigation, and (3) to develop a standard template that could be used in future studies to assure a sound application of systems engineering.

  7. Nonthermally dominated electron acceleration during magnetic reconnection in a low-β plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Xiaocan; Guo, Fan; Li, Hui; Li, Gang

    2015-09-24

    By means of fully kinetic simulations, we investigate electron acceleration during magnetic reconnection in a nonrelativistic proton–electron plasma with conditions similar to solar corona and flares. We demonstrate that reconnection leads to a nonthermally dominated electron acceleration with a power-law energy distribution in the nonrelativistic low-β regime but not in the high-β regime, where β is the ratio of the plasma thermal pressure and the magnetic pressure. The accelerated electrons contain most of the dissipated magnetic energy in the low-β regime. A guiding-center current description is used to reveal the role of electron drift motions during the bulk nonthermal energization. We find that the main acceleration mechanism is a Fermi-type acceleration accomplished by the particle curvature drift motion along the electric field induced by the reconnection outflows. Although the acceleration mechanism is similar for different plasma β, low-β reconnection drives fast acceleration on Alfvénic timescales and develops power laws out of thermal distribution. Thus, the nonthermally dominated acceleration resulting from magnetic reconnection in low-β plasma may have strong implications for the highly efficient electron acceleration in solar flares and other astrophysical systems.

  8. Nonthermally dominated electron acceleration during magnetic reconnection in a low-β plasma

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Li, Xiaocan; Guo, Fan; Li, Hui; Li, Gang

    2015-09-24

    By means of fully kinetic simulations, we investigate electron acceleration during magnetic reconnection in a nonrelativistic proton–electron plasma with conditions similar to solar corona and flares. We demonstrate that reconnection leads to a nonthermally dominated electron acceleration with a power-law energy distribution in the nonrelativistic low-β regime but not in the high-β regime, where β is the ratio of the plasma thermal pressure and the magnetic pressure. The accelerated electrons contain most of the dissipated magnetic energy in the low-β regime. A guiding-center current description is used to reveal the role of electron drift motions during the bulk nonthermal energization.more » We find that the main acceleration mechanism is a Fermi-type acceleration accomplished by the particle curvature drift motion along the electric field induced by the reconnection outflows. Although the acceleration mechanism is similar for different plasma β, low-β reconnection drives fast acceleration on Alfvénic timescales and develops power laws out of thermal distribution. Thus, the nonthermally dominated acceleration resulting from magnetic reconnection in low-β plasma may have strong implications for the highly efficient electron acceleration in solar flares and other astrophysical systems.« less

  9. Non-thermal atmospheric-pressure plasma possible application in wound healing.

    PubMed

    Haertel, Beate; von Woedtke, Thomas; Weltmann, Klaus-Dieter; Lindequist, Ulrike

    2014-11-01

    Non-thermal atmospheric-pressure plasma, also named cold plasma, is defined as a partly ionized gas. Therefore, it cannot be equated with plasma from blood; it is not biological in nature. Non-thermal atmospheric-pressure plasma is a new innovative approach in medicine not only for the treatment of wounds, but with a wide-range of other applications, as e.g. topical treatment of other skin diseases with microbial involvement or treatment of cancer diseases. This review emphasizes plasma effects on wound healing. Non-thermal atmospheric-pressure plasma can support wound healing by its antiseptic effects, by stimulation of proliferation and migration of wound relating skin cells, by activation or inhibition of integrin receptors on the cell surface or by its pro-angiogenic effect. We summarize the effects of plasma on eukaryotic cells, especially on keratinocytes in terms of viability, proliferation, DNA, adhesion molecules and angiogenesis together with the role of reactive oxygen species and other components of plasma. The outcome of first clinical trials regarding wound healing is pointed out.

  10. Hollow silicon carbide nanoparticles from a non-thermal plasma process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coleman, Devin; Lopez, Thomas; Yasar-Inceoglu, Ozgul; Mangolini, Lorenzo

    2015-05-01

    We demonstrate the synthesis of hollow silicon carbide nanoparticles via a two-step process involving the non-thermal plasma synthesis of silicon nanoparticles, followed by their in-flight carbonization, also initiated by a non-thermal plasma. Simple geometric considerations associated with the expansion of the silicon lattice upon carbonization, in combination of the spherical geometry of the system, explain the formation of hollow nanostructures. This is in contrast with previous reports that justify the formation of hollow particles by means of out-diffusion of the core element, i.e., by the Kirkendall nanoscale effect. A theoretical analysis of the diffusion kinetics indicates that interaction with the ionized gas induces significant nanoparticle heating, allowing for the fast transport of carbon into the silicon particle and for the subsequent nucleation of the beta-silicon carbide phase. This work confirms the potential of non-thermal plasma processes for the synthesis of nanostructures composed of high-melting point materials, and suggests that such processes can be tuned to achieve morphological control.

  11. The advent of non-thermal, non-tumescent techniques for treatment of varicose veins.

    PubMed

    Bootun, Roshan; Lane, Tristan R A; Davies, Alun H

    2016-02-01

    Varicose veins are common and their management has undergone a number of changes over the years. Surgery has been the traditional treatment option, but towards the 21st century, new endovenous thermal ablation techniques, namely, radiofrequency ablation and endovenous laser ablation, were introduced which have revolutionised the way varicose veins are treated. These minimally invasive techniques are associated with earlier return to normal activity and less pain, as well as enabling procedures to be carried out as day cases. They are, however, also known to cause a number of side-effects and involve infiltration of tumescent fluid which can cause discomfort. Non-thermal, non-tumescent methods are believed to be the answer to these unwelcome effects. Ultrasound-guided foam sclerotherapy is one such non-thermal, non-tumescent method and, despite a possible lower occlusion, has been shown to improve the quality of life of patients. The early results of two recently launched non-thermal, non-tumescent methods, mechanochemical ablation and cyanoacrylate glue, are promising and are discussed.

  12. Analysis of Secondary Chemistry and Treatment of Burn Wounds with Nonthermal Plasma Induced Effluent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golkowski, Mark; Plimpton, S. Reed; Golkowski, Czeslaw

    2013-10-01

    Exploitation of non-thermal plasmas in the biomedical setting is a rapidly growing field with a large number of diverse technologies under investigation. Potential applications of such devices range from instrument sterilization to clinical therapy. One of the key hurdles to the implementation of non-thermal plasma technologies in the relatively poor understanding of the chemical processes taking place. Our group has recently completed precise analysis of chemical species created by our indirect exposure non-thermal plasma device with hydrogen peroxide additives. Reactive nitrogen and oxygen species are observed using optical absorption spectroscopy. We report the unique detection of short lived hydroxyl radicals at a significant distance from the discharge using electron paramagnetic spin resonance trapping. The hydroxyl radicals are shown to be generated in secondary ozonide based chemical processes away from the discharge. The plasma device is applied to a porcine model of infected full thickness burn wounds. The bacteria load reduction after treatment with our device is shown to be 10-100 fold improvement over Silvadene which is the main treatment currently used in the clinic. Partially funded by NIH SBIR R43 AI096594.

  13. Effect of nonthermal electrons on oblique electrostatic excitations in a magnetized electron-positron-ion plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Alinejad, H.

    2012-05-15

    The linear and nonlinear propagation of ion-acoustic waves are investigated in a magnetized electron-positron-ion (e-p-i) plasma with nonthermal electrons. In the linear regime, the propagation of two possible modes and their evolution are studied via a dispersion relation. In the cases of parallel and perpendicular propagation, it is shown that these two possible modes are always stable. Then, the Korteweg-de Vries equation describing the dynamics of ion-acoustic solitary waves is derived from a weakly nonlinear analysis. The influence on the solitary wave characteristics of relevant physical parameters such as nonthermal electrons, magnetic field, obliqueness, positron concentration, and temperature ratio is examined. It is observed that the increasing nonthermal electrons parameter makes the solitary structures much taller and narrower. Also, it is revealed that the magnetic field strength makes the solitary waves more spiky. The present investigation contributes to the physics of the nonlinear electrostatic ion-acoustic waves in space and laboratory e-p-i plasmas in which wave damping produces an electron tail.

  14. COLLISIONAL RELAXATION OF ELECTRONS IN A WARM PLASMA AND ACCELERATED NONTHERMAL ELECTRON SPECTRA IN SOLAR FLARES

    SciTech Connect

    Kontar, Eduard P.; Jeffrey, Natasha L. S.; Bian, N. H.; Emslie, A. Gordon

    2015-08-10

    Extending previous studies of nonthermal electron transport in solar flares, which include the effects of collisional energy diffusion and thermalization of fast electrons, we present an analytic method to infer more accurate estimates of the accelerated electron spectrum in solar flares from observations of the hard X-ray spectrum. Unlike for the standard cold-target model, the spatial characteristics of the flaring region, especially the necessity to consider a finite volume of hot plasma in the source, need to be taken into account in order to correctly obtain the injected electron spectrum from the source-integrated electron flux spectrum (a quantity straightforwardly obtained from hard X-ray observations). We show that the effect of electron thermalization can be significant enough to nullify the need to introduce an ad hoc low-energy cutoff to the injected electron spectrum in order to keep the injected power in non-thermal electrons at a reasonable value. Rather, the suppression of the inferred low-energy end of the injected spectrum compared to that deduced from a cold-target analysis allows the inference from hard X-ray observations of a more realistic energy in injected non-thermal electrons in solar flares.

  15. Non-thermal Plasma Exposure Rapidly Attenuates Bacterial AHL-Dependent Quorum Sensing and Virulence.

    PubMed

    Flynn, Padrig B; Busetti, Alessandro; Wielogorska, Ewa; Chevallier, Olivier P; Elliott, Christopher T; Laverty, Garry; Gorman, Sean P; Graham, William G; Gilmore, Brendan F

    2016-01-01

    The antimicrobial activity of atmospheric pressure non-thermal plasma has been exhaustively characterised, however elucidation of the interactions between biomolecules produced and utilised by bacteria and short plasma exposures are required for optimisation and clinical translation of cold plasma technology. This study characterizes the effects of non-thermal plasma exposure on acyl homoserine lactone (AHL)-dependent quorum sensing (QS). Plasma exposure of AHLs reduced the ability of such molecules to elicit a QS response in bacterial reporter strains in a dose-dependent manner. Short exposures (30-60 s) produce of a series of secondary compounds capable of eliciting a QS response, followed by the complete loss of AHL-dependent signalling following longer exposures. UPLC-MS analysis confirmed the time-dependent degradation of AHL molecules and their conversion into a series of by-products. FT-IR analysis of plasma-exposed AHLs highlighted the appearance of an OH group. In vivo assessment of the exposure of AHLs to plasma was examined using a standard in vivo model. Lettuce leaves injected with the rhlI/lasI mutant PAO-MW1 alongside plasma treated N-butyryl-homoserine lactone and n-(3-oxo-dodecanoyl)-homoserine lactone, exhibited marked attenuation of virulence. This study highlights the capacity of atmospheric pressure non-thermal plasma to modify and degrade AHL autoinducers thereby attenuating QS-dependent virulence in P. aeruginosa. PMID:27242335

  16. Measurements of Non-thermal Line Widths in Solar Active Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brooks, David H.; Warren, Harry P.

    2016-03-01

    Spectral line widths are often observed to be larger than can be accounted for by thermal and instrumental broadening alone. This excess broadening is a key observational constraint for both nanoflare and wave dissipation models of coronal heating. Here we present a survey of non-thermal velocities measured in the high temperature loops (1-4 MK) often found in the cores of solar active regions. This survey of Hinode Extreme Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) observations covers 15 non-flaring active regions that span a wide range of solar conditions. We find relatively small non-thermal velocities, with a mean value of 17.6 ± 5.3 km s-1, and no significant trend with temperature or active region magnetic flux. These measurements appear to be inconsistent with those expected from reconnection jets in the corona, chromospheric evaporation induced by coronal nanoflares, and Alfvén wave turbulence models. Furthermore, because the observed non-thermal widths are generally small, such measurements are difficult and susceptible to systematic effects.

  17. NONTHERMALLY DOMINATED ELECTRON ACCELERATION DURING MAGNETIC RECONNECTION IN A LOW-β PLASMA

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Xiaocan; Li, Gang; Guo, Fan; Li, Hui

    2015-10-01

    By means of fully kinetic simulations, we investigate electron acceleration during magnetic reconnection in a nonrelativistic proton–electron plasma with conditions similar to solar corona and flares. We demonstrate that reconnection leads to a nonthermally dominated electron acceleration with a power-law energy distribution in the nonrelativistic low-β regime but not in the high-β regime, where β is the ratio of the plasma thermal pressure and the magnetic pressure. The accelerated electrons contain most of the dissipated magnetic energy in the low-β regime. A guiding-center current description is used to reveal the role of electron drift motions during the bulk nonthermal energization. We find that the main acceleration mechanism is a Fermi-type acceleration accomplished by the particle curvature drift motion along the electric field induced by the reconnection outflows. Although the acceleration mechanism is similar for different plasma β, low-β reconnection drives fast acceleration on Alfvénic timescales and develops power laws out of thermal distribution. The nonthermally dominated acceleration resulting from magnetic reconnection in low-β plasma may have strong implications for the  highly efficient electron acceleration in solar flares and other astrophysical systems.

  18. An experimental burn wound-healing study of non-thermal atmospheric pressure microplasma jet arrays.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ok Joo; Ju, Hyung Woo; Khang, Gilson; Sun, Peter P; Rivera, Jose; Cho, Jin Hoon; Park, Sung-Jin; Eden, J Gary; Park, Chan Hum

    2016-04-01

    In contrast with a thermal plasma surgical instrument based on coagulative and ablative properties, low-temperature (non-thermal) non-equilibrium plasmas are known for novel medicinal effects on exposed tissue while minimizing undesirable tissue damage. In this study we demonstrated that arrays of non-thermal microplasma jet devices fabricated from a transparent polymer can efficiently inactivate fungi (Candida albicans) as well as bacteria (Escherichia coli), both in vitro and in vivo, and that this leads to a significant wound-healing effect. Microplasma jet arrays offer several advantages over conventional single-jet devices, including superior packing density, inherent scalability for larger treatment areas, unprecedented material flexibility in a plasma jet device, and the selective generation of medically relevant reactive species at higher plasma densities. The therapeutic effects of our multi-jet device were verified on second-degree burns in animal rat models. Reduction of the wound area and the histology of the wound after treatment have been investigated, and expression of interleukin (IL)-1α, -6 and -10 was verified to evaluate the healing effects. The consistent effectiveness of non-thermal plasma treatment has been observed especially in decreasing wound size and promoting re-epithelialization through collagen arrangement and the regulation of expression of inflammatory genes.

  19. Emission, absorption and polarization of gyrosynchrotron radiation of mildly relativistic particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petrosian, V.; Mctiernan, J. M.

    1983-01-01

    Approximate analytic expressions are presented for the emissivity and absorption coefficient of synchrotron radiation of mildly relativistic particles with an arbitrary energy spectrum and pitch angle distribution. From these, an expression for the degree of polarization is derived. The analytic results are compared with numerical results for both thermal and non-thermal (power law) distributions of particles.

  20. Gamma radiation inactivation of non-0157:H7 shiga-toxin producing Escherichia coli in foods

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Non-O157:H7 serovars of shiga-toxin producing Escherichia coli are emerging foodborne pathogens that have been associated with illness outbreaks and food product recalls on a global basis. Ionizing (gamma) radiation is a nonthermal food safety intervention technology that has been approved for use i...