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Sample records for multidetector row ct

  1. Diagnostic Imaging of Pulmonary Thromboembolism by Multidetector-row CT

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    For diagnosis of pulmonary thromboembolism, multidetector-row computed tomography (CT) is a minimally invasive imaging technique that can be performed rapidly with high sensitivity and specificity, and has been increasingly employed as the imaging modality of first choice for this disease. Since deep vein thrombosis in the legs, which is important as a thrombus source, can be evaluated immediately after the diagnosis of pulmonary thromboembolism, this diagnostic method is considered to provide important information when deciding on a comprehensive therapeutic strategy for this disease. PMID:23555409

  2. Multi-detector row CT of pancreatic islet cell tumors.

    PubMed

    Horton, Karen M; Hruban, Ralph H; Yeo, Charles; Fishman, Elliot K

    2006-01-01

    Pancreatic islet cell tumors (ICTs) are neuroendocrine neoplasms that produce and secrete hormones to a variable degree. These neoplasms can present a diagnostic challenge, both clinically and radiologically. ICTs can be classified as either syndromic or nonsyndromic on the basis of their clinical manifestations. Multi-detector row computed tomography (CT) plays an important role in the diagnosis and staging of both syndromic and nonsyndromic ICTs. In general, syndromic ICTs are less than 3 cm in size. They are typically hyperenhancing and are usually best seen on CT scans obtained during the arterial phase. Nonsyndromic ICTs tend to be larger than syndromic ICTs at presentation and are more likely to be cystic or necrotic. It is important for the radiologist to be familiar with appropriate CT protocol for the evaluation of patients with suspected pancreatic ICT and to understand the variable CT appearances of these neoplasms. (c) RSNA, 2006.

  3. Recent technologic advances in multi-detector row cardiac CT.

    PubMed

    Halliburton, Sandra Simon

    2009-11-01

    Recent technical advances in multi-detector row CT have resulted in lower radiation dose, improved temporal and spatial resolution, decreased scan time, and improved tissue differentiation. Lower radiation doses have resulted from the use of pre-patient z collimators, the availability of thin-slice axial data acquisition, the increased efficiency of ECG-based tube current modulation, and the implementation of iterative reconstruction algorithms. Faster gantry rotation and the simultaneous use of two x-ray sources have led to improvements in temporal resolution, and gains in spatial resolution have been achieved through application of the flying x-ray focal-spot technique in the z-direction. Shorter scan times have resulted from the design of detector arrays with increasing numbers of detector rows and through the simultaneous use of two x-ray sources to allow higher helical pitch. Some improvement in tissue differentiation has been achieved with dual energy CT. This article discusses these recent technical advances in detail.

  4. Classification of lung area using multidetector-row CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukaibo, Tsutomu; Kawata, Yoshiki; Niki, Noboru; Ohmatsu, Hironobu; Kakinuma, Ryutaro; Eguchi, Kenji; Kaneko, Masahiro; Moriyama, Noriyuki

    2002-05-01

    Recently, we can get high quality images in the short time for the progress of X-ray CT scanner. And the three dimensional (3-D) analysis of pulmonary organs using multidetector-row CT (MDCT) images, is expected. This paper presents a method for classifying lung area into each lobe using pulmonary MDCT images of the whole lung area. It is possible to recognize the position of nodule by classifying lung area into these lobes. The structure of lungs differs on the right one and left one. The right lung is divided into three domains by major fissure and minor fissure. And, the left lung is divided into two domains by major fissure. Watching MDCT images carefully, we find that the surroundings of fissures have few blood vessels. Therefore, lung area is classified by extraction of the domain that the distance from pulmonary blood vessels is large and connective search of these extracted domains. These extraction and search are realized by 3-D weighted Hough transform.

  5. Relationship between noise, dose, and pitch in cardiac multi-detector row CT.

    PubMed

    Primak, Andrew N; McCollough, Cynthia H; Bruesewitz, Michael R; Zhang, Jie; Fletcher, Joel G

    2006-01-01

    In spiral computed tomography (CT), dose is always inversely proportional to pitch. However, the relationship between noise and pitch (and hence noise and dose) depends on the scanner type (single vs multi-detector row) and reconstruction mode (cardiac vs noncardiac). In single detector row spiral CT, noise is independent of pitch. Conversely, in noncardiac multi-detector row CT, noise depends on pitch because the spiral interpolation algorithm makes use of redundant data from different detector rows to decrease noise for pitch values less than 1 (and increase noise for pitch values > 1). However, in cardiac spiral CT, redundant data cannot be used because such data averaging would degrade the temporal resolution. Therefore, the behavior of noise versus pitch returns to the single detector row paradigm, with noise being independent of pitch. Consequently, since faster rotation times require lower pitch values in cardiac multi-detector row CT, dose is increased without a commensurate decrease in noise. Thus, the use of faster rotation times will improve temporal resolution, not alter noise, and increase dose. For a particular application, the higher dose resulting from faster rotation speeds should be justified by the clinical benefits of the improved temporal resolution.

  6. Multidetector-row CT with a 64-row amorphous silicon flat panel detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shapiro, Edward G.; Colbeth, Richard E.; Daley, Earl T.; Job, Isaias D.; Mollov, Ivan P.; Mollov, Todor I.; Pavkovich, John M.; Roos, Pieter G.; Star-Lack, Josh M.; Tognina, Carlo A.

    2007-03-01

    A unique 64-row flat panel (FP) detector has been developed for sub-second multidetector-row CT (MDCT). The intent was to explore the image quality achievable with relatively inexpensive amorphous silicon (a-Si) compared to existing diagnostic scanners with discrete crystalline diode detectors. The FP MDCT system is a bench-top design that consists of three FP modules. Each module uses a 30 cm x 3.3 cm a-Si array with 576 x 64 photodiodes. The photodiodes are 0.52 mm x 0.52 mm, which allows for about twice the spatial resolution of most commercial MDCT scanners. The modules are arranged in an overlapping geometry, which is sufficient to provide a full-fan 48 cm diameter scan. Scans were obtained with various detachable scintillators, e.g. ceramic Gd IIO IIS, particle-in-binder Gd IIO IIS:Tb and columnar CsI:Tl. Scan quality was evaluated with a Catphan-500 performance phantom and anthropomorphic phantoms. The FP MDCT scans demonstrate nearly equivalent performance scans to a commercial 16-slice MDCT scanner at comparable 10 - 20 mGy/100mAs doses. Thus far, a high contrast resolution of 15 lp/cm and a low contrast resolution of 5 mm @ 0.3 % have been achieved on 1 second scans. Sub-second scans have been achieved with partial rotations. Since the future direction of MDCT appears to be in acquiring single organ coverage per scan, future efforts are planned for increasing the number of detector rows beyond the current 64- rows.

  7. Intercostal Artery Supplying Hepatocellular Carcinoma: Demonstration of a Tumor Feeder by C-arm CT and Multidetector Row CT

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Hyo-Cheol Chung, Jin Wook; Lee, In Joon; An, Sangbu; Seong, Nak Jong; Son, Kyu Ri; Jae, Hwan Jun; Park, Jae Hyung

    2011-02-15

    This study was designed to describe tumor feeders from the intercostal artery supplying hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) on C-arm CT and multidetector row CT. From March 2008 to May 2009, C-arm CT of the intercostal artery was prospectively performed in 24 HCC patients. Two interventional radiologists, who performed C-arm CT, evaluated tumor feeders on C-arm CT and multidetector row CT scans by consensus. In total, 35 intercostal arteries were examined by C-arm CT. All tumor feeders except one showed a sharp upward turn at or near the costochondral junction. On axial C-arm CT images, all tumor feeders were observed as an enhancing dot in the upper intercostal space along the diaphragm. On multidetector CT scans, 17 tumor feeders were observed and 18 were not. Tumor feeders from the intercostal artery are observed as an enhancing dot along the diaphragm on C-arm CT and can be seen on multidetector row CT in approximately half of patients.

  8. [Multidetector row CT in assessment of coronary artery calcification on hemodialisis].

    PubMed

    Caro, P; Delgado, R; Dapena, F; Núñez, A

    2007-01-01

    Vascular calcification is a strong predictor of cardiovascular and all-cause mortality. Coronary artery calcification is more frequent, more extensive and progresses more rapidly in CKD than in general population. They are also considered a marker of coronary heart disease, with high prevalence and functional significance. It suggests that detection and surveillance may be worthwhile in general clinical practice. New non-invasive image techniques, like Multi-detector row CT, a type of spiral scanner, assess density and volume of calcification at multiple sites and allow quantitative scoring of vascular calcification using calcium scores analogous to those from electron-beam CT. We have assessed and quantified coronary artery calcification with 16 multidetector row CT in 44 patients on hemodialysis and their relationship with several cardiovascular risk factors. Coronary artery calcification prevalence was of 84 % with mean calcium score of 1580 +/- 2010 ( r 0-9844) with calcium score > 400 in 66% of patients. It was usually multiple, affecting more than two vessels in more than 50%. In all but one patient, left anterior descending artery was involved with higher calcium score level at right coronary artery. Advanced age, male, diabetes, smoking, more morbidity, cerebrovascular disease previous, and calcium-binders phosphate and analogous vitamin D treatment would seem to be associated with coronary artery calcification. Coronary artery calcification is very frequent and extensive, usually multiple and associated to modifiable risk factors in hemodialysis patients. Multi-detector-row CT seems an effective, suitable, readily applicable method to assess and quantify coronary artery calcification.

  9. Noninvasive imaging of coronary arteries: current and future role of multi-detector row CT.

    PubMed

    Schoenhagen, Paul; Halliburton, Sandra S; Stillman, Arthur E; Kuzmiak, Stacie A; Nissen, Steven E; Tuzcu, E Murat; White, Richard D

    2004-07-01

    While invasive imaging techniques, especially selective conventional coronary angiography, will remain vital to planning and guiding catheter-based and surgical treatment of significantly stenotic coronary lesions, the comprehensive and serial assessment of asymptomatic or minimally symptomatic stages of coronary artery disease (CAD) for preventive purposes will eventually need to rely on noninvasive imaging techniques. Cardiovascular imaging with tomographic modalities, including computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging, has great potential for providing valuable information. This review article will describe the current and future role of cardiac CT, and in particular that of multi-detector row CT, for imaging of atherosclerotic and other pathologic changes of the coronary arteries. It will describe how tomographic coronary imaging may eventually supplement traditional angiographic techniques in understanding the patterns of atherosclerotic CAD development.

  10. Bronchial anatomy of left lung: a study of multi-detector row CT.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xinya; Ju, Yuanrong; Liu, Cheng; Li, Jianfeng; Huang, Min; Sun, Jian; Wang, Tao

    2009-02-01

    Familiarity with prevailing pattern and variations in the bronchial tree is not only essential for the anatomist to explain bronchial variation in bronchial specimens, but also useful for guiding bronchoscopy and instructing pulmonary segmental resection. The purpose of this study was designed to demonstrate various branching patterns of left lung with 3D images, with special attention given to identify the major types at transverse thin-section CT. Two hundred and sixteen patients with routine thorax scans were enrolled. The images of bronchial tree, virtual bronchoscopy were reconstructed using post-processing technique of multi-detector row CT. We attempted to classify the segmental bronchi by interpreting the post-processing images, and identified them in transverse thin-section CT. Our results showed that the segmental bronchial ramifications of the left superior lobe were classified into three types mainly, i.e., common stem of apical and posterior segmental bronchi (64%, 138/216); trifurcation (23%, 50/216); common stem of apical and anterior segmental bronchi (10%, 22/216), and they could be identified at two typical sections of transverse thin-section CT. There were two major types in left basal segmental bronchi, i.e., bifurcation (75%, 163/216), trifurcation (18%, 39/216), and they could also be identified at two typical sections of transverse thin-section CT. In conclusion, our study have offered simplified branching patterns of bronchi and demonstrated various unusual bronchial branching patterns perfectly with 3D images, and have also revealed how to identify the main branching patterns in transverse thin-section CT.

  11. Novel ultrahigh resolution data acquisition and image reconstruction for multi-detector row CT

    SciTech Connect

    Flohr, T. G.; Stierstorfer, K.; Suess, C.; Schmidt, B.; Primak, A. N.; McCollough, C. H.

    2007-05-15

    We present and evaluate a special ultrahigh resolution mode providing considerably enhanced spatial resolution both in the scan plane and in the z-axis direction for a routine medical multi-detector row computed tomography (CT) system. Data acquisition is performed by using a flying focal spot both in the scan plane and in the z-axis direction in combination with tantalum grids that are inserted in front of the multi-row detector to reduce the aperture of the detector elements both in-plane and in the z-axis direction. The dose utilization of the system for standard applications is not affected, since the grids are moved into place only when needed and are removed for standard scanning. By means of this technique, image slices with a nominal section width of 0.4 mm (measured full width at half maximum=0.45 mm) can be reconstructed in spiral mode on a CT system with a detector configuration of 32x0.6 mm. The measured 2% value of the in-plane modulation transfer function (MTF) is 20.4 lp/cm, the measured 2% value of the longitudinal (z axis) MTF is 21.5 lp/cm. In a resolution phantom with metal line pair test patterns, spatial resolution of 20 lp/cm can be demonstrated both in the scan plane and along the z axis. This corresponds to an object size of 0.25 mm that can be resolved. The new mode is intended for ultrahigh resolution bone imaging, in particular for wrists, joints, and inner ear studies, where a higher level of image noise due to the reduced aperture is an acceptable trade-off for the clinical benefit brought about by the improved spatial resolution.

  12. Acute appendicitis: comparison of low-dose and standard-dose unenhanced multi-detector row CT.

    PubMed

    Keyzer, Caroline; Tack, Denis; de Maertelaer, Viviane; Bohy, Pascale; Gevenois, Pierre Alain; Van Gansbeke, Daniel

    2004-07-01

    To prospectively compare low- and standard-dose unenhanced multi-detector row computed tomography (CT) in patients suspected of having acute appendicitis. Ninety-five consecutive patients underwent two unenhanced multi-detector row CT examinations with 4 x 2.5-mm collimation, 120 kVp, and 30 and 100 effective mAs. Two radiologists independently read the images obtained at each dose during two sessions. Readers recorded visualization of the appendix and presence of gas in its lumen, appendicolith, periappendiceal fat stranding, cecal wall thickening, and abscess or phlegmon to measure the diameter of the appendix and to propose diagnosis (appendicitis or alternative). Data were compared according to dose and reader, with definite diagnosis established on basis of surgical findings (n = 37) or clinical follow-up. chi(2) tests and logistic regression were used. Measurement agreements were assessed with Cohen kappa statistics. Twenty-nine patients had a definite diagnosis of appendicitis. No difference was observed between the frequency of visualization of the appendix (P =.874) neither in its mean diameter (P =.101-.696, according to readers and sessions) nor in the readers' overall diagnosis (P =.788) at each dose. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, and accuracy of each sign were not different between doses. Fat stranding, appendicolith, and diameter were the most predictive signs, regardless of dose, yielding approximately 90% of correct diagnoses. The ability to propose a correct alternative diagnosis was not influenced by the dose. Low-dose unenhanced multi-detector row CT has similar diagnostic performance as standard-dose unenhanced multi-detector row CT for the diagnosis of acute appendicitis. Copyright RSNA, 2004

  13. Multi-detector row CT scanning in Paleoanthropology at various tube current settings and scanning mode.

    PubMed

    Badawi-Fayad, J; Yazbeck, C; Balzeau, A; Nguyen, T H; Istoc, A; Grimaud-Hervé, D; Cabanis, E- A

    2005-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the optimal tube current setting and scanning mode for hominid fossil skull scanning, using multi-detector row computed tomography (CT). Four fossil skulls (La Ferrassie 1, Abri Pataud 1, CroMagnon 2 and Cro-Magnon 3) were examined by using the CT scanner LightSpeed 16 (General Electric Medical Systems) with varying dose per section (160, 250, and 300 mAs) and scanning mode (helical and conventional). Image quality of two-dimensional (2D) multiplanar reconstructions, three-dimensional (3D) reconstructions and native images was assessed by four reviewers using a four-point grading scale. An ANOVA (analysis of variance) model was used to compare the mean score for each sequence and the overall mean score according to the levels of the scanning parameters. Compared with helical CT (mean score=12.03), the conventional technique showed sustained poor image quality (mean score=4.17). With the helical mode, we observed a better image quality at 300 mAs than at 160 in the 3D sequences (P=0.03). Whereas in native images, a reduction in the effective tube current induced no degradation in image quality (P=0.05). Our study suggests a standardized protocol for fossil scanning with a 16 x 0.625 detector configuration, a 10 mm beam collimation, a 0.562:1 acquisition mode, a 0.625/0.4 mm slice thickness/reconstruction interval, a pitch of 5.62, 120 kV and 300 mAs especially when a 3D study is required.

  14. Automated multidetector row CT dataset segmentation with an interactive watershed transform (IWT) algorithm: Part 2. Body CT angiographic and orthopedic applications.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Pamela T; Hahn, Horst K; Heath, David G; Fishman, Elliot K

    2008-12-01

    The preceding manuscript describes the principles behind the Interactive Watershed Transform (IWT) segmentation tool. The purpose of this manuscript is to illustrate the clinical utility of this editing technique for body multidetector row computed tomography (MDCT) imaging. A series of cases demonstrates clinical applications where automated segmentation of skeletal structures with IWT is most useful. Both CT angiography and orthopedic applications are presented.

  15. Comparison of air kerma between C-arm CT and 64-multidetector-row CT using a phantom.

    PubMed

    Hosokawa, Seiki; Kawai, Nobuyuki; Sato, Morio; Minamiguchi, Hiroki; Nakai, Motoki; Murotani, Kazuhiro; Nishioku, Tadayoshi; Shirai, Shintaro; Sonomura, Tetsuo

    2014-05-01

    To compare air kerma after scanning a phantom with C-arm CT and with 64-multidetector row CT (64MDCT). A phantom was scanned using parameters based on data of ten patients with hepatocellular carcinoma who had C-arm CT during hepatic arteriography and 64MDCT during arterial portography. Radiation monitors were used to measure air kerma ten times at each of five points: the center (A), top (B), left side (C), bottom (D), and right side (E). For C-arm CT vs. 64MDCT, air kerma after scanning was 10.5 ± 0.2 vs. 6.4 ± 0.0 for A, 1.5 ± 0.0 vs. 11.6 ± 0.2 for B, 37.1 ± 0.2 vs. 11.1 ± 0.1 for C, 55.6 ± 1.0 vs. 10.6 ± 0.1 for D, and 40.5 ± 0.5 vs. 11.7 ± 0.1 for E, respectively. Air kerma for A, B, C, D, and E was 1.64, 0.13, 3.34, 5.24, and 3.46 times greater for C-arm CT than for 64MDCT, respectively. Using the same scanning parameters as for clinical cases, air kerma values were greater with C-arm CT than with 64MDCT; at the dorsal side of the phantom, they were 5.24 times greater with C-arm CT compared with 64MDCT.

  16. Suspected aortic dissection and other aortic disorders: multi-detector row CT in 373 cases in the emergency setting.

    PubMed

    Hayter, Robert G; Rhea, James T; Small, Andrew; Tafazoli, Faranak S; Novelline, Robert A

    2006-03-01

    To retrospectively review the authors' experience with multi-detector row computed tomography (CT) for detection of aortic dissection in the emergency setting. The investigation was institutional review board approved, did not require informed patient consent, and was HIPAA compliant. In 373 clinical evaluations in the emergency setting, 365 patients suspected of having aortic dissection and/or other aortic disorders underwent multidetector CT. Criteria for acute aortic disorder were confirmed by using surgical and pathologic diagnoses or findings at clinical follow-up and any subsequent imaging as the reference standard. Positive cases were characterized according to type of disorder interpreted. Resulting sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), negative predictive value (NPV), and accuracy were calculated by using two-way contingency tables. All cases found to be negative for acute aortic disorders were grouped according to alternative CT findings. Sixty-seven (18.0%) of the 373 cases were interpreted as positive for acute aortic disorder. One hundred twelve acute aortic disorders were identified in these 67 cases: 23 acute aortic dissections, 14 acute aortic intramural hematomas, 20 acute penetrating aortic ulcers, 44 new or enlarging aortic aneurysms, and 11 acute aortic ruptures. Three hundred five (81.8%) cases were interpreted as negative for acute aortic disorder. In 48 negative cases, multidetector CT depicted alternative findings that accounted for the clinical presentation. Of these, three included both acute aortic disorders and alternative findings, and 45 included only alternative findings. One (0.3%) case was indeterminate for acute aortic disorder. Overall, 112 findings were interpreted as positive for acute aortic disorder, an alternative finding, or both at CT. No interpretations were false-positive, one was false-negative, 67 were true-positive, and 304 were true-negative. Sensitivity, specificity, PPV, NPV, and accuracy were

  17. Multi-detector row CT colonography: effect of collimation, pitch, and orientation on polyp detection in a human colectomy specimen.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Stuart A; Halligan, Steve; Bartram, Clive I; Morgan, Paul R; Talbot, Ian C; Fry, Nicola; Saunders, Brian P; Khosraviani, Kirosh; Atkin, Wendy

    2003-10-01

    To investigate the effects of orientation, collimation, pitch, and tube current setting on polyp detection at multi-detector row computed tomographic (CT) colonography and to determine the optimal combination of scanning parameters for screening. A colectomy specimen containing 117 polyps of different sizes was insufflated and imaged with a multi-detector row CT scanner at various collimation (1.25 and 2.5 mm), pitch (3 and 6), and tube current (50, 100, and 150 mA) settings. Two-dimensional multiplanar reformatted images and three-dimensional endoluminal surface renderings from the 12 resultant data sets were examined by one observer for the presence and conspicuity of polyps. The results were analyzed with Poisson regression and logistic regression to determine the effects of scanning parameters and of specimen orientation on polyp detection. The percentage of polyps that were detected significantly increased when collimation (P =.008) and table feed (P =.03) were decreased. Increased tube current resulted in improved detection only of polyps with a diameter of less than 5 mm. Polyps of less than 5 mm were optimally depicted with a collimation of 1.25 mm, a pitch of 3, and a tube current setting of 150 mA; polyps with a diameter greater than 5 mm were adequately depicted with 1.25-mm collimation and with either pitch setting and any of the three tube current settings. Small polyps in the transverse segment (positioned at a 90 degrees angle to the z axis of scanning) were significantly less visible than those in parallel or oblique orientations (P <.001). The effective radiation dose, calculated with a Monte Carlo simulation, was 1.4-10.0 mSv. Detection of small polyps (<5 mm) with multi-detector row CT is highly dependent on collimation, pitch, and, to a lesser extent, tube current. Collimation of 1.25 mm, combined with pitch of 6 and tube current of 50 mA, provides for reliable detection of polyps 5 mm or larger while limiting the effective radiation dose

  18. The role of multidetector-row CT in the diagnosis, classification and management of acute aortic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Brown, I W; Peebles, C R; Harden, S P; Shambrook, J S

    2014-01-01

    The term “acute aortic syndrome” (AAS) encompasses several non-traumatic life-threatening pathologies of the thoracic aorta presenting in patients with a similar clinical profile. These include aortic dissection, intramural haematoma and penetrating atherosclerotic ulcers. These different pathological entities can be indistinguishable on clinical grounds alone and may be confused with other causes of chest pain, including myocardial infarction. Multidetector-row CT (MDCT) is the current modality of choice for imaging AAS with a sensitivity and specificity approaching 100%. Early diagnosis and accurate radiological classification is associated with improved clinical outcomes in AAS. We review the characteristic radiological features of the different pathologies that encompass AAS and highlight the vital role of MDCT in determining the management of these life-threatening conditions. PMID:25083552

  19. Prevalence of Temporal Bone Fractures in Patients with Mandibular Fractures Using Multidetector-Row CT.

    PubMed

    Ogura, I; Kaneda, T; Sasaki, Y; Buch, K; Sakai, O

    2015-06-01

    Temporal bone fracture after mandibular trauma is thought to be rare, and its prevalence has not been reported in the literature. The purpose of this study was to investigate the prevalence of temporal bone fractures in patients with mandibular fractures and the relationship between temporal bone fractures and the mandibular fracture location using multidetector-row computed tomography (MDCT). A prospective study was performed in 201 patients with mandibular fractures who underwent 64-MDCT scans. The mandibular fracture locations were classified as median, paramedian, angle, and condylar types. Statistical analysis for the relationship between prevalence of temporal bone fractures and mandibular fracture locations was performed using χ(2) test with Fisher's exact test. A P-value < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. The percentage of cases with temporal bone fracture was 3.0 % of all patients with mandibular fractures and 19.0 % of those with multiple mandibular fractures of paramedian and condylar type. There was a significant relationship between the incidence of temporal bone fracture and the paramedian- and condylar-type mandibular fracture (P = 0.001). Multiple mandibular fractures of paramedian and condylar type may be a stronger indicator for temporal bone fractures. This study suggests that patients with mandibular fracture, especially the paramedian and condylar type, should be examined for coexisting temporal bone fracture using MDCT.

  20. The radiological diagnosis of fenestral otosclerosis: the utility of histogram analysis using multidetector row CT.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Koji; Yoshiura, Takashi; Hiwatashi, Akio; Togao, Osamu; Kikuchi, Kazufumi; Inoguchi, Takashi; Kumazawa, Seiji; Honda, Hiroshi

    2014-12-01

    Bone density measurements using high-resolution CT have been reported to be useful to diagnose fenestral otosclerosis. However, small region of interest (ROI) chosen by less-experienced radiologists may result in false-negative findings. Semi-automatic analysis such as CT histogram analysis may offer improved assessment. The aim of this study was to evaluate the utility of CT histogram analysis in diagnosing fenestral otosclerosis. Temporal bone CT of consecutive patients with otosclerosis and normal controls was retrospectively analyzed. The control group consisted of the normal-hearing contralateral ears of patients with otitis media, cholesteatoma, trauma, facial nerve palsy, or tinnitus. All CT images were obtained using a 64-detector-row CT scanner with 0.5-mm collimation. AROI encompassing 10 × 10 pixels was placed in the bony labyrinth located anterior to the oval window. The mean CT value, variance and entropy were compared between otosclerosis patients and normal controls using Student's t test. The number of pixels below mean minus SD in the control (%Lowcont) and total subjects (%Lowtotal) were also compared. In addition, the area under the receiver operating characteristic curves (AUC) value for the discrimination between otosclerosis patients and normal controls was calculated. 51 temporal bones of 38 patients with otosclerosis and 30 temporal bones of 30 control subjects were included. The mean CT value was significantly lower in otosclerosis cases than in normal controls (p < 0.01). In addition, variance, entropy, %Lowcont and %Lowtotal were significantly higher in otosclerosis cases than in normal controls (p < 0.01, respectively). The AUC values for the mean CT value, %Lowcont and %Lowtotal were 0.751, 0.760 and 0.765, respectively. In conclusion, our results demonstrated that histogram analysis of CT image may be of clinical value in diagnosing otosclerosis.

  1. Evaluation of Deep Vein Thrombosis with Multidetector Row CT after Orthopedic Arthroplasty: a Prospective Study for Comparison with Doppler Sonography

    PubMed Central

    Byun, Sung Su; Kim, Youn Jeong; Chun, Yong Sun; Park, Chul Hi; Kim, Won-Hong

    2008-01-01

    Objective This prospective study evaluated the ability of indirect 16-row multidetector CT venography, in comparison with Doppler sonography, to detect deep vein thrombosis after total hip or knee replacement. Materials and Methods Sixty-two patients had undergone orthopedic replacement surgery on a total of 30 hip joints and 54 knee joints. The CT venography (scan delay time: 180 seconds; slice thickness/increment: 2/1.5 mm) and Doppler sonography were performed 8 to 40 days after surgery. We measured the z-axis length of the beam hardening artifact that degraded the image quality so that the presence of deep vein thrombosis couldn't be evaluated on the axial CT images. The incidence and location of deep vein thrombosis was analyzed. The diagnostic performance of the CT venograms was evaluated and compared with that of Doppler sonography as a standard of reference. Results The z-axis length (mean±standard deviation) of the beam hardening artifact was 4.5 ± 0.8 cm in the arthroplastic knees and 3.9 ± 2.9 cm in the arthroplastic hips. Deep vein thrombosis (DVT) was found in the popliteal or calf veins on Doppler sonography in 30 (48%) of the 62 patients. The CT venography has a sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value and accuracy of 90%, 97%, 96%, 91% and 94%, respectively. Conclusion The ability of CT venography to detect DVT was comparable to that of Doppler sonography despite of beam hardening artifact. Therefore, CT venography is feasible to use as an alternative modality for evaluating postarthroplasty patients. PMID:18253077

  2. Use of an automatic exposure control mechanism for dose optimization in multi-detector row CT examinations: clinical evaluation.

    PubMed

    Mulkens, Tom H; Bellinck, Patrick; Baeyaert, Michel; Ghysen, Dirk; Van Dijck, Xavier; Mussen, Elvier; Venstermans, Caroline; Termote, Jean-Luc

    2005-10-01

    To prospectively compare dose reduction and image quality achieved with an automatic exposure control system that is based on both angular (x-y axis) and z-axis tube current modulation with dose reduction and image quality achieved with an angular modulation system for multi-detector row computed tomography (CT). The study protocol was approved by the institutional review board, and oral informed consent was obtained. In two groups of 200 patients, five anatomic regions (ie, the thorax, abdomen-pelvis, abdomen-liver, lumbar spine, and cervical spine) were examined with this modulation system and a six-section multi-detector row CT scanner. Data from these patients were compared with data from 200 patients who were examined with an angular modulation system. Dose reduction by means of reduction of the mean effective tube current in 600 examinations, image noise in 200 examinations performed with each modulation system, and subjective image quality scores in 100 examinations per-formed with each modulation system were compared with Wilcoxon signed rank tests. Mean dose reduction for the angular and z-axis tube current modulation system and for the angular modulation system was as follows: thorax, 20% and 14%, respectively; abdomen-liver, 38% and 18%, respectively; abdomen-pelvis, 32% and 26%, respectively; lumbar spine, 37% and 10%, respectively; and cervical spine, 68% and 16%, respectively. These differences were statistically significant (P < .05). There was no significant difference in image noise and mean image quality scores between modulation systems, with the exception of cervical spinal examinations (P < .001 for both), where the examinations with angular modulation resulted in better scores. There is good correlation between the mean effective tube current level and the body mass index of patients with the new modulation system. Correlation was as follows: thorax, 0.77; abdomen-pelvis, 0.83; abdomen-liver, 0.84; lumbar spine, 0.8; and cervical spine, 0

  3. A new 3-D diagnosis strategy for duodenal malignant lesions using multidetector row CT, CT virtual duodenoscopy, duodenography, and 3-D multicholangiography.

    PubMed

    Sata, N; Endo, K; Shimura, K; Koizumi, M; Nagai, H

    2007-01-01

    Recent advances in multidetector row computed tomography (MD-CT) technology provide new opportunities for clinical diagnoses of various diseases. Here we assessed CT virtual duodenoscopy, duodenography, and three-dimensional (3D) multicholangiography created by MD-CT for clinical diagnosis of duodenal malignant lesions. The study involved seven cases of periduodenal carcinoma (four ampullary carcinomas, two duodenal carcinomas, one pancreatic carcinoma). Biliary contrast medium was administered intravenously, followed by intravenous administration of an anticholinergic agent and oral administration of effervescent granules for expanding the upper gastrointestinal tract. Following intravenous administration of a nonionic contrast medium, an upper abdominal MD-CT scan was performed in the left lateral position. Scan data were processed on a workstation to create CT virtual duodenoscopy, duodenography, 3D multicholangiography, and various postprocessing images, which were then evaluated for their effectiveness as preoperative diagnostic tools. Carcinoma location and extent were clearly demonstrated as defects or colored low-density areas in 3-D multicholangiography images and as protruding lesions in virtual duodenography and duodenoscopy images. These findings were confirmed using multiplanar or curved planar reformation images. In conclusion, CT virtual duodenoscopy, doudenography, 3-D multicholangiography, and various images created by MD-CT alone provided necessary and adequate preoperative diagnostic information.

  4. Split-Bolus Single-Pass Multidetector-Row CT Protocol for Diagnosis of Acute Pulmonary Embolism

    PubMed Central

    Scialpi, Michele; Rebonato, Alberto; Cagini, Lucio; Brunese, Luca; Piscioli, Irene; Pierotti, Luisa; Bellantonio, Lucio; D’Andrea, Alfredo; Rotondo, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Background: Currently computed tomography pulmonary angiography (CTPA) has become a widely accepted clinical tool in the diagnosis of acute pulmonary embolism (PE). Objectives: To report split-bolus single-pass 64-multidetector-row CT (MDCT) protocol for diagnosis of PE. Patients and Methods: MDCT split-bolus results in 40 patients suspicious of PE were analyzed in terms of image quality of target pulmonary vessels (TPVs) and occurrence and severity of flow-related artifact, flow-related artifact, false filling defect of the pulmonary veins and beam hardening streak artifacts. Dose radiation to patients was calculated. Results: MDCT split-bolus protocol allowed diagnostic images of high quality in all cases. Diagnosis of PE was obtained in 22 of 40 patients. Mean attenuation for target vessels was higher than 250 HU all cases: 361 ± 98 HU in pulmonary artery trunk (PAT); 339 ± 93 HU in right pulmonary artery (RPA); 334 ± 100 HU in left pulmonary artery (LPA). Adequate enhancement was obtained in the right atrium (RA):292 ± 83 HU; right pulmonary vein (RPV): 302 ± 91 HU, and left pulmonary vein (LPV): 291 ± 83 HU. The flow related artifacts and the beam hardening streak artifacts have been detected respectively in 4 and 25 patients. No false filling defect of the pulmonary veins was revealed. Conclusion: MDCT split-bolus technique by simultaneous opacification of pulmonary arteries and veins represents an accurate technique for diagnosis of acute PE, removes the false filling defects of the pulmonary veins, and reduces flow related artifacts. PMID:27110334

  5. Quantitative Features of Liver Lesions, Lung Nodules, and Renal Stones at Multi-Detector Row CT Examinations: Dependency on Radiation Dose and Reconstruction Algorithm.

    PubMed

    Solomon, Justin; Mileto, Achille; Nelson, Rendon C; Roy Choudhury, Kingshuk; Samei, Ehsan

    2016-04-01

    To determine if radiation dose and reconstruction algorithm affect the computer-based extraction and analysis of quantitative imaging features in lung nodules, liver lesions, and renal stones at multi-detector row computed tomography (CT). Retrospective analysis of data from a prospective, multicenter, HIPAA-compliant, institutional review board-approved clinical trial was performed by extracting 23 quantitative imaging features (size, shape, attenuation, edge sharpness, pixel value distribution, and texture) of lesions on multi-detector row CT images of 20 adult patients (14 men, six women; mean age, 63 years; range, 38-72 years) referred for known or suspected focal liver lesions, lung nodules, or kidney stones. Data were acquired between September 2011 and April 2012. All multi-detector row CT scans were performed at two different radiation dose levels; images were reconstructed with filtered back projection, adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction, and model-based iterative reconstruction (MBIR) algorithms. A linear mixed-effects model was used to assess the effect of radiation dose and reconstruction algorithm on extracted features. Among the 23 imaging features assessed, radiation dose had a significant effect on five, three, and four of the features for liver lesions, lung nodules, and renal stones, respectively (P < .002 for all comparisons). Adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction had a significant effect on three, one, and one of the features for liver lesions, lung nodules, and renal stones, respectively (P < .002 for all comparisons). MBIR reconstruction had a significant effect on nine, 11, and 15 of the features for liver lesions, lung nodules, and renal stones, respectively (P < .002 for all comparisons). Of note, the measured size of lung nodules and renal stones with MBIR was significantly different than those for the other two algorithms (P < .002 for all comparisons). Although lesion texture was significantly affected by the

  6. Multi-detector row CT of the left atrium and pulmonary veins before radio-frequency catheter ablation for atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Lacomis, Joan M; Wigginton, William; Fuhrman, Carl; Schwartzman, David; Armfield, Derek R; Pealer, Karen M

    2003-10-01

    Radio-frequency catheter ablation (RFCA) of the distal pulmonary veins and posterior left atrium is increasingly being used to treat recurrent or refractory atrial fibrillation that resists pharmacologic therapy or cardioversion. Successful RFCA of atrial fibrillation requires resolution of abnormal rhythms while minimizing complications and can be achieved with precise, preprocedural, three-dimensional (3D) anatomic delineation of the target, the atriopulmonary venous junction. Three-dimensional multi-detector row computed tomography (CT) of the pulmonary veins and left atrium provides the necessary anatomic information for successful RFCA, including (a) the number, location, and angulation of pulmonary veins and their ostial branches unobscured by adjacent cardiac and vascular anatomy, and (b) left atrial volume. The 3D multi-detector row CT scanning and postprocessing techniques used for pre-RFCA planning are straightforward. Radiologists must not only understand these techniques but must also be familiar with atrial fibrillation and the technical considerations and complications associated with RFCA of this condition. In addition, radiologists must be familiar with anatomic variants of the left atrium and distal pulmonary veins and understand the importance of these variants to the referring cardiac interventional electrophysiologist. Copyright RSNA, 2003

  7. Coronary artery calcium measurement with multi-detector row CT: in vitro assessment of effect of radiation dose.

    PubMed

    Hong, Cheng; Bae, Kyongtae T; Pilgram, Thomas K; Suh, Jongdae; Bradley, David

    2002-12-01

    The authors assessed in vitro the effect of radiation dose on coronary artery calcium quantification with multi-detector row computed tomography. A cardiac phantom with calcified cylinders was scanned at various milliampere second settings (20-160 mAs). A clear tendency was found for image noise to decrease as tube current increased (P <.001). No tendency was found for the Agatson score or calcium volume and mass errors to vary with tube current. Calcium measurements were not significantly affected by the choice of tube current. Calcium mass error was strongly correlated with calcium volume error (P <.001). The calcium mass measurement was more accurate and less variable than the calcium volume measurement.

  8. [Comparison of a dental cone beam CT with a multi-detector row CT on effective doses and physical image quality].

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Yutaka; Tokumori, Kenji; Okamura, Kazutoshi; Yoshiura, Kazunori

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare a dental cone beam computed tomography (dental CBCT) and a multi-detector row CT (MDCT) using effective doses and physical image quality. A dental mode (D-mode) and an implant mode (I-mode) were employed for calculating effective doses. Field of view (FOV) size of the MDCT was 150 mm. Three types of images were obtained using 3 different reconstruction functions: FC1 (for abdomen images), FC30 (for internal ear and bone images) and FC81 (for high resolution images). Effective doses obtained with the D-mode and with the I-mode were about 20% and 50% of those obtained with the MDCT, respectively. Resolution properties obtained with the D-mode and I-mode were superior to that of the MDCT in a high frequency range. Noise properties of the D-mode and the I-mode were better than those with FC81. It was found that the dental CBCT has better potential as compared with MDCT in both dental and implant modes.

  9. Multi-detector row CT as a "one-stop" examination in the preoperative evaluation of the morphology and function of living renal donors: preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Su, Chen; Yan, Chaogui; Guo, Yan; Zhou, Xuhui; Chen, Yaqing; Liu, Mingjuan; Wang, Wenjuan; Zhang, Xiaoling

    2011-02-01

    We designed to investigate the feasibility of multi-detector row computerized tomography (CT) as a "one-stop" examination for the simultaneous preoperative evaluation of the morphology and function of living renal donors. 21 living renal donors were examined by 64-slice spiral CT with a three-phase enhancement CT scan and two inserted dynamic scans. The maximum intensity projection (MIP), multi-planar reformation (MPR), and volume reconstruction (VR) procedures were performed to compare the renal parenchyma, renal vessels, and collecting system with operational findings. The known Patlak equation was used to calculate the glomerular filtration rate (GFR); exact GFR information was acquired by single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). Our results as following, there were 3 cases of artery variation and 3 cases of vein variation. CT findings all corresponded with the operation, and the sensitivity, positive predictive value, specialty, and negative predictive value of CT were all 100%. The r of the GFR values estimated from CT is 0.894 (left) (P < 0.001) and 0.881 (right) (P < 0.001). In conclusions, our findings demonstrate that 64-slice spiral CT may offer a "one-stop" examination to replace SPECT in the preoperative evaluation of living renal donors to simultaneously provide information regarding both anatomy and the GFR of living renal donors.

  10. Comparison of dynamic contrast-enhanced 3T MR and 64-row multidetector CT angiography for the localization of spinal dural arteriovenous fistulas.

    PubMed

    Oda, S; Utsunomiya, D; Hirai, T; Kai, Y; Ohmori, Y; Shigematsu, Y; Iryo, Y; Uetani, H; Azuma, M; Yamashita, Y

    2014-02-01

    For the localization of spinal dural arteriovenous fistulas, it is not determined whether dynamic contrast-enhanced MRA is more reliable than multidetector CTA. The aim of this study was to compare the agreement between intra-arterial DSA, dynamic contrast-enhanced MRA at 3T, and 64-row multidetector CTA for the localization of spinal dural arteriovenous fistulas. We enrolled 12 consecutive patients (11 men, 1 woman; age range, 46-83 years; mean, 65 years) who underwent preoperative dynamic contrast-enhanced MRA at 3T and 64-row multidetector CTA. The spinal dural arteriovenous fistula location was confirmed by intra-arterial DSA as the reference standard. Two reviewers independently evaluated the level of the artery feeding the spinal dural arteriovenous fistula on the basis of continuity between the feeder and abnormal spinal vessels on 3T dynamic contrast-enhanced MRA and 64-row multidetector CTA images. Interobserver and intermodality agreement was determined by calculation of the κ coefficient. On DSA, the vessel feeding the spinal dural arteriovenous fistula was the intercostal artery (7 cases), the lumbar artery (3 cases), and the internal iliac artery or the ascending pharyngeal artery (1 case each). For the fistula level, interobserver agreement was excellent for 3T dynamic contrast-enhanced MRA (κ = 0.97; 95% CI, 0.92-1.00) and very good for 64-row multidetector CTA (κ = 0.84; 95% CI, 0.72-0.96). Intermodality agreement with DSA was good for 3T dynamic contrast-enhanced MRA (κ = 0.78; 95% CI, 0.49-1.00) and moderate for 64-row multidetector CTA (κ = 0.41; 95% CI, 0.020-0.84). For the localization of spinal dural arteriovenous fistulas, 3T dynamic contrast-enhanced MRA may be more reliable than 64-row multidetector CTA.

  11. Right heart on multidetector CT

    PubMed Central

    Gopalan, D

    2011-01-01

    Right ventricular function plays an integral role in the pathogenesis and outcome of many cardiovascular diseases. Imaging the right ventricle has long been a challenge because of its complex geometry. In recent years there has been a tremendous expansion in multidetector row CT (MDCT) and its cardiac applications. By judicious modification of contrast medium protocol, it is possible to achieve good opacification of the right-sided cardiac chambers, thereby paving the way for exploring the overshadowed right heart. This article will describe the key features of right heart anatomy, review MDCT acquisition techniques, elaborate the various morphological and functional information that can be obtained, and illustrate some important clinical conditions associated with an abnormal right heart. PMID:22723537

  12. Radiation dose is reduced with a single-pass whole-body multi-detector row CT trauma protocol compared with a conventional segmented method: initial experience.

    PubMed

    Ptak, Thomas; Rhea, James T; Novelline, Robert A

    2003-12-01

    Radiation dose data were collected from a calibrated multi-detector row computed tomographic (CT) scanner during trauma CT. One protocol (used with 10 case subjects) involved a single-pass continuous whole-body acquisition from cranial vertex to symphysis pubis, while the other, conventional protocol (used with 10 control subjects) involved scouting and scanning body segments (head, cervical spine, chest, abdomen, and pelvis) individually. Technical factors were kept constant within each body segment for the single-pass and the segmented protocols. Statistics included univariate analysis, two-tailed t testing to evaluate statistical significance of the summary statistic, and power and subject population contingency tables. The mean dose length product (DLP) with the single-pass protocol was 17% lower than the sum of the DLPs of each of the individual body segment scans (P <.001). Analysis of power and subject population by using a difference in mean of 500 mGy. cm and an alpha of.05 revealed a (1-beta) of higher than 0.90 for a sample of 10 patients. Thus, a whole-body single-pass trauma protocol, compared with a typical segmented acquisition protocol matched for imaging technique, resulted in reduced total radiation dose. The reduction in radiation dose is thought to represent a reduction in redundant imaging at overlap zones between body segments scanned in the segmental protocol but not in the continuous acquisition.

  13. Optimization of Z-axis automatic exposure control for multidetector row CT evaluation of neck and comparison with fixed tube current technique for image quality and radiation dose.

    PubMed

    Namasivayam, S; Kalra, M K; Pottala, K M; Waldrop, S M; Hudgins, P A

    2006-01-01

    Z-axis automatic exposure control (AEC) technique automatically adjusts tube current based on size of body region scanned. The purpose of the current study was to compare diagnostic acceptability, noise, and radiation exposure of multidetector row CT (MDCT) of neck performed with z-axis AEC and with fixed current. Two study groups of 26 patients each underwent MDCT of neck using z-axis AEC with 8 noise index (NI), 150-440 mA, and 10 NI, 75-440 mA, respectively. A control group consisting of another 26 patients underwent MDCT of neck with fixed-current technique (300 mA). Objective noise and mean tube current-time products (mA . s) were recorded. Two radiologists evaluated images for diagnostic acceptability and subjective noise on a 5-point scale. All CT examinations of study and control groups were diagnostically acceptable, though objective noise was significantly more with z-axis AEC (shoulder: NI 8, 20.6 +/- 6.2 HU; NI 10, 22.2 +/- 4.6 HU) than with fixed current (16.2 +/- 6 HU) (P = .01). There was no significant difference between AEC and fixed current in diagnostic acceptability and subjective noise (P = .22-.42). AEC resulted in significant radiation dose reduction (NI 8, 186.3 +/- 20.5 mA . s; NI 10, 158.1 +/- 21.2 mA x s), compared with fixed current (235 +/- 21.8 mA x s). Z-axis AEC resulted in similar subjective noise and diagnostic acceptability, with radiation dose reduction of 21% for NI of 8 and 33% for NI of 10, respectively, for MDCT evaluation of neck, compared with those of fixed current technique.

  14. 64-Slice multidetector row CT angiography of the abdomen: comparison of low versus high concentration iodinated contrast media in a porcine model

    PubMed Central

    Holalkere, N-S; Matthes, K; Kalva, S P; Brugge, W R; Sahani, D V

    2011-01-01

    Objective In this study we aimed to assess the image quality and degree of vascular enhancement using low-concentration contrast media (LCCM) (300 mg I ml–1) and high-concentration contrast media (HCCM) (370 mg I ml–1) on 64-slice multidetector row CT (MDCT) abdominal CT angiography (CTA). In addition, we aimed to study the feasibility of using HCCM with a reduced total iodine dose. Methods CTA of the abdomen on a 64-slice MDCT was performed on 15 anaesthetised pigs. Study pigs were divided into three groups of five each based on the iodine concentration and dose received: Group A (LCCM; 300 mg I ml–1), Group B (HCCM; 370 mg I ml–1) and Group C HCCM with 20% less iodine dose. The total iodine injected was kept constant (600 mg kg–1) in Groups A and B. Qualitative and quantitative analyses were performed to study and compare each group for image quality, visibility of the branch order of the superior mesenteric artery (SMA), artefacts, degree of enhancement in the aorta and main stem arteries and uniformity of enhancement in the aorta. Groups were compared using the analysis of variance test. Results The image quality of 64-slice MDCT angiography was excellent with a mean score of 4.63 and confident visualisation of the third to fifth order branches of the SMA in all groups. Group B demonstrated superior vascular enhancement, as compared with Groups A and C (p≤0.05). Uniform aortic enhancement was achieved with the use of LCCM and HCCM with 20% less iodine dose. Conclusion 64-slice MDCT angiography of the abdomen was of excellent quality. HCCM improves contrast enhancement and overall CTA image quality and allows the iodine dose to be reduced. PMID:21081582

  15. 64-Slice multidetector row CT angiography of the abdomen: comparison of low versus high concentration iodinated contrast media in a porcine model.

    PubMed

    Holalkere, N-S; Matthes, K; Kalva, S P; Brugge, W R; Sahani, D V

    2011-03-01

    In this study we aimed to assess the image quality and degree of vascular enhancement using low-concentration contrast media (LCCM) (300 mg I ml(-1)) and high-concentration contrast media (HCCM) (370 mg I ml(-1)) on 64-slice multidetector row CT (MDCT) abdominal CT angiography (CTA). In addition, we aimed to study the feasibility of using HCCM with a reduced total iodine dose. CTA of the abdomen on a 64-slice MDCT was performed on 15 anaesthetised pigs. Study pigs were divided into three groups of five each based on the iodine concentration and dose received: Group A (LCCM; 300 mg I ml(-1)), Group B (HCCM; 370 mg I ml(-1)) and Group C HCCM with 20% less iodine dose. The total iodine injected was kept constant (600 mg kg(-1)) in Groups A and B. Qualitative and quantitative analyses were performed to study and compare each group for image quality, visibility of the branch order of the superior mesenteric artery (SMA), artefacts, degree of enhancement in the aorta and main stem arteries and uniformity of enhancement in the aorta. Groups were compared using the analysis of variance test. The image quality of 64-slice MDCT angiography was excellent with a mean score of 4.63 and confident visualisation of the third to fifth order branches of the SMA in all groups. Group B demonstrated superior vascular enhancement, as compared with Groups A and C (p≤0.05). Uniform aortic enhancement was achieved with the use of LCCM and HCCM with 20% less iodine dose. 64-slice MDCT angiography of the abdomen was of excellent quality. HCCM improves contrast enhancement and overall CTA image quality and allows the iodine dose to be reduced.

  16. Assessment of organ absorbed doses and estimation of effective doses from pediatric anthropomorphic phantom measurements for multi-detector row CT with and without automatic exposure control.

    PubMed

    Brisse, Hervé J; Robilliard, Magalie; Savignoni, Alexia; Pierrat, Noelle; Gaboriaud, Geneviève; De Rycke, Yann; Neuenschwander, Sylvia; Aubert, Bernard; Rosenwald, Jean-Claude

    2009-10-01

    This study was designed to measure organ absorbed doses from multi-detector row computed tomography (MDCT) on pediatric anthropomorphic phantoms, calculate the corresponding effective doses, and assess the influence of automatic exposure control (AEC) in terms of organ dose variations. Four anthropomorphic phantoms (phantoms represent the equivalent of a newborn, 1-, 5-, and 10-y-old child) were scanned with a four-channel MDCT coupled with a z-axis-based AEC system. Two CT torso protocols were compared: a first protocol without AEC and constant tube current-time product and a second protocol with AEC using age-adjusted noise indices. Organ absorbed doses were monitored by thermoluminescent dosimeters (LiF: Mg, Cu, P). Effective doses were calculated according to the tissue weighting factors of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (). For fixed mA acquisitions, organ doses normalized to the volume CT dose index in a 16-cm head phantom (CTDIvol16) ranged from 0.6 to 1.5 and effective doses ranged from 8.4 to 13.5 mSv. For the newborn-equivalent phantom, the AEC-modulated scan showed almost no significant dose variation compared to the fixed mA scan. For the 1-, 5- and 10-y equivalent phantoms, the use of AEC induced a significant dose decrease on chest organs (ranging from 61 to 31% for thyroid, 37 to 21% for lung, 34 to 17% for esophagus, and 39 to 10% for breast). However, AEC also induced a significant dose increase (ranging from 28 to 48% for salivary glands, 22 to 51% for bladder, and 24 to 70% for ovaries) related to the high density of skull base and pelvic bones. These dose increases should be considered before using AEC as a dose optimization tool in children.

  17. Is aortic atherothrombotic disease detected using multidetector-row CT associated with an increased risk of early ischemic lesion recurrence after acute ischemic stroke?

    PubMed

    Ko, Youngchai; Kim, Wook-Joo; Jang, Myung Suk; Yang, Mi Hwa; Park, Jung Hyun; Choi, Sang Il; Chun, Eun Ju; Lee, Soo Joo; Han, Moon-Ku; Bae, Hee-Joon

    2012-03-01

    Multidetector-row CT (MDCT) is emerging as a new tool for diagnosing aortic atherothrombotic disease (AAD). We elucidated whether MDCT-detected AAD is associated with an increased risk of early ischemic lesion recurrence on diffusion-weighted MRI after ischemic stroke. A consecutive series of patients with acute ischemic stroke confirmed using diffusion-weighted MRI who were hospitalized within 48 hours after symptom onset and underwent MDCT were identified in a prospective stroke registry database. AAD on MDCT was defined as the presence of plaque formation that was noncalcified and ≥4 mm thick, ulcerative, or soft and thrombosed (vulnerable) in the proximal aortic arch. Ischemic lesion recurrence on diffusion-weighted MRI was defined as the occurrence of any new lesion separate from the index lesion on follow-up diffusion-weighted MRI performed within 14 days after symptom onset. A total of 138 patients was selected. MDCT detected AAD in 24 of 138 (17.4%); ≥4 mm thickness in 17 of 138 (12.3%); ulcerated plaque in 20 of 138 (14.5%); and vulnerable plaque in 16 of 138 (11.6%). With respect to diffusion-weighted MRI lesion recurrence, the crude ORs (95% CIs) were as follows: AAD, 3.56 (1.43-8.89); vulnerable plaque, 3.21 (1.11-9.30); ulcerated plaque, 3.37 (1.27-8.95); and ≥4 mm thickness of the noncalcified plaque, 4.23 (1.11-16.19). These results remained significant after adjustments for potential confounders were made. This study shows that AAD detected by MDCT increases the risk of early ischemic lesion recurrence after acute ischemic stroke, thus supporting the role of MDCT in diagnosing AAD and assessing its contribution to recurrence.

  18. Automated multidetector row CT dataset segmentation with an interactive watershed transform (IWT) algorithm: Part 1. Understanding the IWT technique.

    PubMed

    Heath, David G; Hahn, Horst K; Johnson, Pamela T; Fishman, Elliot K

    2008-12-01

    Segmentation of volumetric computed tomography (CT) datasets facilitates evaluation of 3D CT angiography renderings, particularly with maximum intensity projection displays. This manuscript describes a novel automated bone editing program that uses an interactive watershed transform (IWT) technique to rapidly extract the skeletal structures from the volume. Advantages of this tool include efficient segmentation of large datasets with minimal need for correction. In the first of this two-part series, the principles of the IWT technique are reviewed, followed by a discussion of clinical utility based on our experience.

  19. Role of multidetector-row CT in assessing the source of arterial haemorrhage in patients with pelvic vascular trauma. Comparison with angiography.

    PubMed

    Pinto, A; Niola, R; Tortora, G; Ponticiello, G; Russo, G; Di Nuzzo, L; Gagliardi, N; Scaglione, M; Merola, S; Stavolo, C; Maglione, F; Romano, L

    2010-06-01

    We investigated the role of multidetector-row computed tomography (MDCT) in identifying active bleeding and its source in polytrauma patients with pelvic vascular injuries with or without associated fractures of the pelvis. From January 2003 to December 2007, 28 patients (19 men and nine women, age range 16-80 years) with acute symptoms from blunt pelvic trauma and a drop in haematocrit underwent MDCT and angiography. Conventional radiography of the pelvis was performed in all patients at the time of admission to the emergency department. MDCT was performed with a four-row unit in 15 patients and a 16-row unit in the remaining 13 patients. The study included whole-body CT to identify craniocerebral, vertebral, thoracic, abdominal and pelvic injuries. CT was performed before and after rapid infusion (4-5 ml/s) of intravenous contrast material (120 ml) using a power injector. A triphasic contrast-enhanced study was performed in all patients. MDCT images were transferred to a workstation to assess pelvic fracture, site of haematoma and active extravasation of contrast material, visibility of possible vascular injuries and associated traumatic lesions. At angiography, an abdominal and pelvic aortogram was obtained in all cases before selective catheterisation of the internal iliac arteries and superselective catheterisation of their branches for embolisation purposes. Results related to identifying the source of bleeding at MDCT were compared with sites of bleeding or vascular injury identified by selective pelvic angiography. The sensitivity and positive predictive value (PPV) of MDCT were determined. MDCT allowed us to identify pelvic bleeding in 21/28 patients (75%), with most cases being detected in the delayed contrast-enhanced phase (13/21 cases, 61.9%). Injured arteries were identified on MDCT in 12/21 cases (57%): the obturator artery (n=9), internal iliac artery (n=6), internal pudendal artery (n=6) and superior gluteal artery (n=5) were most frequently

  20. Impaired left ventricular function has a detrimental effect on image quality in multi-detector row CT coronary angiography.

    PubMed

    Manghat, N E; Morgan-Hughes, G J; Shaw, S R; Marshall, A J; Roobottom, C A

    2008-04-01

    To determine whether there is a relationship between left ventricular (LV) haemodynamic parameters, circulation times, and arterial contrast opacification that might affect the image quality of computed tomography (CT) coronary angiography. Thirty-six patients were included in the study: 18 with cardiomyopathy (CM) and LV dilatation of suspected ischaemic aetiology [age 57.9+/-13.7 years, range 30-77 years; 14 male, four female; body mass index (BMI)=27.7+/-4.5, range 25.5-31.8] and 18 controls (age 62.3+/-9.4 years, range 47-89 years; 10 male, eight female; BMI 27.8+/-6.6; range 19.2-33.6). Coronary artery image quality was assessed using a three-point visual scale; contrast medium circulation times, aortic root contrast attenuation, and LV functional parameters were studied. Visually reduced contrast opacification impaired image quality more often in the CM group than the control group (27.4 versus 5.1%). A total of 55.6% CM patients had a contrast transit time ranging from 30-75 s; the number of "unassessable" segments increased with increasing transit time conforming to a fitted quadratic model (R2=0.74). The relationship between LV ejection fraction and contrast attenuation may also conform to a quadratic model (R2=0.71). LV haemodynamics influence coronary artery opacification using cardiac CT, and users imaging this subgroup must do so with the knowledge of this potential pitfall. The results indicate the need for further studies examining CT protocols in this clinical subgroup.

  1. Hepatocellular carcinoma: prediction of blood supply from an intercostal artery with multidetector row computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Kim, Min-Uk; Kim, Hyo-Cheol; Chung, Jin Wook; An, Sangbu; Seong, Nak Jong; Jae, Hwan Jun; Park, Jae Hyung

    2011-10-01

    To evaluate the ability of multidetector row computed tomography (CT) to detect blood supply from the intercostal artery in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Between January 2003 and December 2007, angiography of the intercostal artery was performed in 93 patients (76 men and 17 women, mean age 58 years) with HCC who had also undergone multidetector row CT. CT scans and digital subtraction angiograms of these patients were retrospectively reviewed by two investigators in consensus to evaluate tumor feeding vessels. Multiple logistic regression analysis was used to identify factors that predict the presence of an HCC blood supply from an intercostal artery. Tumor staining fed by an intercostal artery was noted in 65 patients (70%; 112 tumor feeding vessels) by intercostal angiography. Readers interpreted that tumor feeding vessels were evident by CT in 35 (54%) of these 65 patients with tumor staining supplied by an intercostal artery by angiography. Multiple logistic regression analysis showed that a visible tumor feeding vessel by CT (P = .003) and hepatic artery attenuation by angiography (P = .014) were significantly related to the presence of a blood supply from an intercostal artery. Visualization of a tumor feeding vessel from the intercostal artery by multidetector row CT is an important sign of parasitic supply to an HCC. Copyright © 2011 SIR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. The added diagnostic value of 64-row multidetector CT combined with contrast-enhanced US in the evaluation of hepatocellular nodule vascularity: implications in the diagnosis of malignancy in patients with liver cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Quaia, Emilio; Alaimo, Valerio; Baratella, Elisa; Medeot, Alessandro; Midiri, Massimo; Cova, Maria Assunta

    2009-03-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the added diagnostic value of contrast-enhanced US (CEUS) combined with 64-row multidetector CT (CT) in the assessment of hepatocellular nodule vascularity in patients with liver cirrhosis. One hundred and six cirrhotic patients (68 male, 38 female; mean age +/- SD, 70 +/- 7 years) with 121 biopsy-proven hepatocellular nodules (72 hepatocellular carcinomas, 10 dysplastic and 15 regenerative nodules, 12 hemangiomas, and 12 other benignancies) detected during US surveillance were prospectively recruited. Each nodule was scanned by CEUS during the arterial (10-40 s), portal venous (45-90 s), and delayed sinusoidal phase (from 100 s after microbubble injection to microbubble disappearance). Nodule vascularity at CEUS, CT, and combined CEUS/CT was evaluated side-by-side by two independent blinded readers who classified nodules as benign or malignant according to reference diagnostic criteria. The combined assessment of CEUS/CT provided higher sensitivity (97%, both readers) than did separate assessment of CEUS (88% reader 1; 87% reader 2) and CT (74% reader 1; 71% reader 2; P < 0.05), while no change in specificity was provided by combined analysis. The combined assessment of hepatocellular nodule vascularity at CT and CEUS improved sensitivity in the diagnosis of malignancy in patients with liver cirrhosis.

  3. Diagnostic accuracy of 16-slice multidetector-row CT for detection of in-stent restenosis vs detection of stenosis in nonstented coronary arteries.

    PubMed

    Kefer, Joelle M; Coche, Emmanuel; Vanoverschelde, Jean-Louis J; Gerber, Bernhard L

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the diagnostic accuracy of 16-slice multidetector-row computed tomography (MDCT) for detecting in-stent restenosis. Fifty patients with 69 previously implanted coronary stents underwent 16-slice MDCT before quantitative coronary angiography (QCA). Diagnostic accuracy of MDCT for detection of in-stent restenosis defined as >50% lumen diameter stenosis (DS) in stented and nonstented coronary segments >1.5-mm diameter was computed using QCA as reference. According to QCA, 18/69 (25%) stented segments had restenosis. In addition, 33/518 (6.4%) nonstented segments had >50% DS. In-stent restenosis was correctly identified on MDCT images in 12/18 stents, and absence of restenosis was correctly identified in 50/51 stents. Stenosis in native coronary arteries was correctly identified in 22/33 segments and correctly excluded in 482/485 segments. Thus, sensitivity (67% vs 67% p=1.0), specificity (98% vs 99%, p=0.96) and overall diagnostic accuracy (90% vs 97%, p=0.68) was similarly high for detecting in-stent restenosis as for detecting stenosis in nonstented coronary segments. MDCT has similarly high diagnostic accuracy for detecting in-stent restenosis as for detecting coronary artery disease in nonstented segments. This suggests that MDCT could be clinically useful for identification of restenosis in patients after coronary stenting.

  4. Comparison of transplenic multidetector CT portography to multidetector CT-angiography in normal dogs.

    PubMed

    Echandi, Rita L; Morandi, Federica; Daniel, William T; Paquette, Janet L; Daniel, Gregory B

    2007-01-01

    We evaluated transplenic injection of iodinated contrast medium for computed tomography (CT) assessment of the portal vasculature. Specific aims were to: (1) establish a protocol for transplenic transplenic CT portography using a 40-row multidetector scanner; (2) compare transplenic CT portography to dual-phase CT angiography in terms of image quality, opacification of the portal system, and contrast enhancement of the portal vasculature and liver; (3) compare personnel exposure during transplenic CT portography and transplenic portal scintigraphy. Seven juvenile dogs underwent transplenic portal scintigraphy, CT angiography, and transplenic CT portography. Transplenic portal scintigraphy and CT angiography were performed using previously established protocols. For transplenic CT portography, a 20- or 22 gauge needle attached to an extension set was placed into the splenic parenchyma using CT guidance. Iodinated contrast medium (175 mg I/ml) was administered, and CT acquisition was started at the time of the injection. Transplenic CT portography was simple, rapid and provided more intense enhancement of the splenic and portal veins, with a lower contrast medium dose (median dose: 525 mg I for transplenic CT portography, 7700 mg I for CT angiography), but caused inconsistent intrahepatic portal branches and parenchymal opacification due to streamlining and streak artifacts. Despite significantly lower attenuation values in the portal vein, CT angiography provided sufficient enhancement for vessel identification and more consistent parenchymal hepatic enhancement. Personnel radiation exposure rate was higher during transplenic CT portography (0.0725 mSv/min) compared with transplenic portal scintigraphy (0.000125 mSv/min). As transplenic CT portography requires an average injection time of 1 min per study; over 650 [corrected] studies must be performed before reaching the maximum permissible whole body dose of 0.05 [corrected] Sv.

  5. Consideration of the Pathological Features of Pediatric Congenital Heart Diseases Which Are Ideally Suitable for Diagnosing With Multidetector-row CT

    PubMed Central

    Hayabuchi, Yasunobu; Inoue, Miki; Watanabe, Noriko; Sakata, Miho; Ohnishi, Tatsuya; Kagami, Shoji

    2011-01-01

    Background A lots of articles published regarding the usefulness of multidetector-row computed tomography (MDCT) in children with congenital heart disease (CHD) mostly describe that it can be an alternative to the invasive catheterization and angiography. The unique diagnostic features of this imaging modality have been largely ignored or disregarded. We described the pathological conditions that cannot be diagnosed by conventional angiography with cardiac catheterization but can be accurately diagnosed by MDCT. Methods We retrospectively reviewed non-ECG-gated MDCT images acquired from 452 children and young adults with CHD between 2005 and 2010 in our institute. In this article, we focused on the diagnostic advantages of MDCT, and indicated five pathological conditions. (1) When Blalock-Taussig shunt total occlusion prevents catheter insertion into the artificial vessel and angiography is ruled out, the peripheral pulmonary artery during the peripheral pulmonary artery can be imaged and diagnosed using MDCT based on blood flow supplied from many small collateral vessels originating from the aorta. (2) The location and protrusion of the device in the vessel after coil embolization to treat patent ductus arteriosus can be accurately visualized by virtual endoscopy using MDCT. (3) Calcification of patches, synthetic blood vessels, and other prostheses that is indistinct on conventional angiograms is clear on MDCT. (4) Simultaneous MDCT observations of the anatomical relationships between arterial and venous systems on the same image can clarify the detail diagnosis for surgical treatment. (5) Compression of the airways by the great vessels and pulmonary segmental emphysematous change can be diagnosed by MDCT. Results and Conclusions Among patients with CHD, MDCT is useful not only as a non-invasive alternative to conventional angiography, but also as a tool for specific morphological diagnoses. In the future, it will be necessary to accumulate experience in the

  6. Advances and perspectives in lung cancer imaging using multidetector row computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Coche, Emmanuel

    2012-10-01

    The introduction of multidetector row computed tomography (CT) into clinical practice has revolutionized many aspects of the clinical work-up. Lung cancer imaging has benefited from various breakthroughs in computing technology, with advances in the field of lung cancer detection, tissue characterization, lung cancer staging and response to therapy. Our paper discusses the problems of radiation, image visualization and CT examination comparison. It also reviews the most significant advances in lung cancer imaging and highlights the emerging clinical applications that use state of the art CT technology in the field of lung cancer diagnosis and follow-up.

  7. Comparison of the Diagnostic Image Quality of the Canine Maxillary Dentoalveolar Structures Obtained by Cone Beam Computed Tomography and 64-Multidetector Row Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Soukup, Jason W.; Drees, Randi; Koenig, Lisa J.; Snyder, Christopher J.; Hetzel, Scott; Miles, Chanda R.; Schwarz, Tobias

    2016-01-01

    Summary The objective of this blinded study was to validate the use of cone beam computed tomography (CT) for imaging of the canine maxillary dentoalveolar structures by comparing its diagnostic image quality with that of 64-multidetector row CT. Sagittal slices of a tooth-bearing segment of the maxilla of a commercially purchased dog skull embedded in methyl methacrylate were obtained along a line parallel with the dental arch using a commercial histology diamond saw. The slice of tooth-bearing bone that best depicted the dentoalveolar structures was chosen and photographed. The maxilla segment was imaged with cone beam CT and 64-multidetector row CT. Four blinded evaluators compared the cone beam CT and 64-multidetector row CT images and image quality was scored as it related to the anatomy of dentoalveolar structures. Trabecular bone, enamel, dentin, pulp cavity, periodontal ligament space, and lamina dura were scored. In addition, a score depicting the evaluators overall impression of the image was recorded. Images acquired with cone beam CT were found to be significantly superior in image quality to images acquired with 64-multidetector row CT overall, and in all scored categories. In our study setting, cone beam CT was found to be a valid and clinically superior imaging modality for the canine maxillary dentoalveolar structures when compared to 64-multidetector row CT. PMID:26415384

  8. Comparison of the Diagnostic Image Quality of the Canine Maxillary Dentoalveolar Structures Obtained by Cone Beam Computed Tomography and 64-Multidetector Row Computed Tomography.

    PubMed

    Soukup, Jason W; Drees, Randi; Koenig, Lisa J; Snyder, Christopher J; Hetzel, Scott; Miles, Chanda R; Schwarz, Tobias

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this blinded study was to validate the use of cone beam computed tomography (C) for imaging of the canine maxillary dentoalveolar structures by comparing its diagnostic image quality with that of 64-multidetector row CT Sagittal slices of a tooth-bearing segment of the maxilla of a commercially purchased dog skull embedded in methylmethacrylate were obtained along a line parallel with the dental arch using a commercial histology diamond saw. The slice of tooth-bearing bone that best depicted the dentoalveolar structures was chosen and photographed. The maxillary segment was imaged with cone beam CT and 64-multidetector row CT. Four blinded evaluators compared the cone beam CT and 64-multidetector row CT images and image quality was scored as it related to the anatomy of dentoalveolar structures. Trabecular bone, enamel, dentin, pulp cavity, periodontal ligament space, and lamina dura were scored In addition, a score depicting the evaluators overall impression of the image was recorded. Images acquired with cone beam CT were found to be significantly superior in image quality to images acquired with 64-multidetector row CT overall, and in all scored categories. In our study setting cone beam CT was found to be a valid and clinically superior imaging modality for the canine maxillary dentoalveolar structures when compared to 64-multidetector row CT.

  9. Multidetector CT of blunt thoracic trauma.

    PubMed

    Kaewlai, Rathachai; Avery, Laura L; Asrani, Ashwin V; Novelline, Robert A

    2008-10-01

    Thoracic injuries are significant causes of morbidity and mortality in trauma patients. These injuries account for approximately 25% of trauma-related deaths in the United States, second only to head injuries. Radiologic imaging plays an important role in the diagnosis and management of blunt chest trauma. In addition to conventional radiography, multidetector computed tomography (CT) is increasingly being used, since it can quickly and accurately help diagnose a wide variety of injuries in trauma patients. Furthermore, multiplanar and volumetric reformatted CT images provide improved visualization of injuries, increased understanding of trauma-related diseases, and enhanced communication between the radiologist and the referring clinician. (c) RSNA, 2008.

  10. The relevance of image quality indices for dose optimization in abdominal multi-detector row CT in children: experimental assessment with pediatric phantoms.

    PubMed

    Brisse, H J; Brenot, J; Pierrat, N; Gaboriaud, G; Savignoni, A; De Rycke, Y; Neuenschwander, S; Aubert, B; Rosenwald, J-C

    2009-04-07

    This study assessed and compared various image quality indices in order to manage the dose of pediatric abdominal MDCT protocols and to provide guidance on dose reduction. PMMA phantoms representing average body diameters at birth, 1 year, 5 years, 10 years and 15 years of age were scanned in a four-channel MDCT with a standard pediatric abdominal CT protocol. Image noise (SD, standard deviation of CT number), noise derivative (ND, derivative of the function of noise with respect to dose) and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) were measured. The 'relative' low-contrast detectability (rLCD) was introduced as a new quantity to adjust LCD to the various phantom diameters on the basis of the LCD(1%) assessed in a Catphan phantom and a constant central absorbed dose. The required variations of CTDIvol(16) with respect to phantom size were analyzed in order to maintain each image quality index constant. The use of a fixed SD or CNR level leads to major dose ratios between extreme patient sizes (factor 22.7 to 44 for SD, 31.7 to 51.5 for CNR(2.8%)), whereas fixed ND and rLCD result in acceptable dose ratios ranging between factors of 2.9 and 3.9 between extreme phantom diameters. For a 5-9 mm rLCD1(%), adjusted ND values range between -0.84 and -0.11 HU mGy(-1). Our data provide guidance on dose reduction on the basis of patient dimensions and the required rLCD (e.g., to get a constant 7 mm rLCD(1%) for abdominal diameters of 10, 13, 16, 20 and 25 cm, tube current-time product should be adjusted in order to obtain CTDIvol(16) values of 6.2, 7.2, 8.8, 11.6 and 17.7 mGy, respectively).

  11. The relevance of image quality indices for dose optimization in abdominal multi-detector row CT in children: experimental assessment with pediatric phantoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brisse, H. J.; Brenot, J.; Pierrat, N.; Gaboriaud, G.; Savignoni, A.; DeRycke, Y.; Neuenschwander, S.; Aubert, B.; Rosenwald, J.-C.

    2009-04-01

    This study assessed and compared various image quality indices in order to manage the dose of pediatric abdominal MDCT protocols and to provide guidance on dose reduction. PMMA phantoms representing average body diameters at birth, 1 year, 5 years, 10 years and 15 years of age were scanned in a four-channel MDCT with a standard pediatric abdominal CT protocol. Image noise (SD, standard deviation of CT number), noise derivative (ND, derivative of the function of noise with respect to dose) and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) were measured. The 'relative' low-contrast detectability (rLCD) was introduced as a new quantity to adjust LCD to the various phantom diameters on the basis of the LCD1% assessed in a Catphan® phantom and a constant central absorbed dose. The required variations of CTDIvol16 with respect to phantom size were analyzed in order to maintain each image quality index constant. The use of a fixed SD or CNR level leads to major dose ratios between extreme patient sizes (factor 22.7 to 44 for SD, 31.7 to 51.5 for CNR2.8%), whereas fixed ND and rLCD result in acceptable dose ratios ranging between factors of 2.9 and 3.9 between extreme phantom diameters. For a 5-9 mm rLCD1%, adjusted ND values range between -0.84 and -0.11 HU mGy-1. Our data provide guidance on dose reduction on the basis of patient dimensions and the required rLCD (e.g., to get a constant 7 mm rLCD1% for abdominal diameters of 10, 13, 16, 20 and 25 cm, tube current-time product should be adjusted in order to obtain CTDIvol16 values of 6.2, 7.2, 8.8, 11.6 and 17.7 mGy, respectively).

  12. Lymphoepithelial cyst of the pancreas--evaluation with multidetector CT.

    PubMed

    Neyman, Edward G; Georgiades, Christos S; Horton, Karen H; Lillemoe, Keith D; Fishman, Elliot K

    2005-01-01

    Lymphoepithelial cyst of the pancreas is a rare cystic pancreatic tumor. In this case report we provide the imaging perspective of the lesion including the role of multidetector CT (MDCT) and CT angiography and 3D imaging.

  13. Multidetector CT of emergent biliary pathologic conditions.

    PubMed

    Patel, Neel B; Oto, Aytekin; Thomas, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    Various biliary pathologic conditions can lead to acute abdominal pain. Specific diagnosis is not always possible clinically because many biliary diseases have overlapping signs and symptoms. Imaging can help narrow the differential diagnosis and lead to a specific diagnosis. Although ultrasonography (US) is the most useful imaging modality for initial evaluation of the biliary system, multidetector computed tomography (CT) is helpful when US findings are equivocal or when biliary disease is suspected. Diagnostic accuracy can be increased by optimizing the CT protocol and using multiplanar reformations to localize biliary obstruction. CT can be used to diagnose and stage acute cholecystitis, including complications such as emphysematous, gangrenous, and hemorrhagic cholecystitis; gallbladder perforation; gallstone pancreatitis; gallstone ileus; and Mirizzi syndrome. CT also can be used to evaluate acute biliary diseases such as biliary stone disease, benign and malignant biliary obstruction, acute cholangitis, pyogenic hepatic abscess, hemobilia, and biliary necrosis and iatrogenic complications such as biliary leaks and malfunctioning biliary drains and stents. Treatment includes radiologic, endoscopic, or surgical intervention. Familiarity with CT imaging appearances of emergent biliary pathologic conditions is important for prompt diagnosis and appropriate clinical referral and treatment.

  14. Automatic liver segmentation method featuring a novel filter for multiphase multidetector-row helical computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Hirose, Tomohiro; Nitta, Norihisa; Tsudagawa, Masaru; Takahashi, Masashi; Murata, Kiyoshi

    2011-01-01

    To introduce an automatic liver segmentation method that includes a novel filter for multiphase multidetector-row helical computed tomography. We acquired 3-phase multidetector-row computed tomographic scans that included unenhanced, arterial, and portal phases. The liver was segmented using our novel adaptive linear prediction filter designed to reduce the difference between filter input and output values in the liver region and to increase these values outside the liver region. The segmentation algorithm produced a mean dice similarity coefficient (DSC) value of 91.4%. The application of our adaptive linear prediction filter was effective in automatically extracting liver regions.

  15. CT Coronary Angiography: 256-Slice and 320-Detector Row Scanners

    PubMed Central

    Hsiao, Edward M.; Rybicki, Frank J.; Steigner, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) has rapidly evolved from 4-detector row systems in 1998 to 256-slice and 320-detector row CT systems. With smaller detector element size and faster gantry rotation speed, spatial and temporal resolution of the 64-detector MDCT scanners have made coronary artery imaging a reliable clinical test. Wide-area coverage MDCT, such as the 256-slice and 320-detector row MDCT scanners, has enabled volumetric imaging of the entire heart free of stair-step artifacts at a single time point within one cardiac cycle. It is hoped that these improvements will be realized with greater diagnostic accuracy of CT coronary angiography. Such scanners hold promise in performing a rapid high quality “triple rule-out” test without high contrast load, improved myocardial perfusion imaging, and even four-dimensional CT subtraction angiography. These emerging technical advances and novel applications will continue to change the way we study coronary artery disease beyond detecting luminal stenosis. PMID:20425186

  16. Multidetector row computed tomography evaluation of potential living laparoscopic renal donors: the story so far.

    PubMed

    Namasivayam, Saravanan; Kalra, Mannudeep K; Small, William C; Torres, William E; Mittal, Pardeep K

    2006-01-01

    Renal transplantation is the treatment of choice for end-stage renal disease. Living related kidney donation is the major source of renal grafts due to limited availability of cadaveric kidneys. Open nephrectomy was used to harvest donor kidneys. However, the laparoscopic approach is associated with less postoperative pain and quick recovery. So, most centers now prefer a laparoscopic approach to explant donor kidneys. Laparoscopic approach is technically challenging due to limited operative visibility. Hence, accurate preoperative detection of renal arterial and venous anomalies is imperative to avoid inadvertent vascular injury and bleeding. The preoperative workup of renal donors includes clinical evaluation, laboratory tests, and imaging. Traditionally, the renal donors were evaluated with conventional imaging techniques, which included renal catheter angiography and intravenous urography. However, conventional imaging is invasive, expensive, and less accurate for evaluation of complex renal venous anomalies, small calculi, and diffuse or focal renal parenchymal lesions. The introduction of multidetector row computed tomography (MDCT) revolutionized the CT technology by enabling isotropic resolution with faster scan coverage in a single, short breath-hold. Consequently, MDCT has now replaced conventional imaging for comprehensive imaging of potential living renal donors. MDCT is a minimally invasive technique that can accurately detect urolithiasis, renal arterial and venous anomalies, renal parenchymal lesions, and urinary tract anomalies. Renal vascular anomalies detected by MDCT can help the surgeon in planning donor nephrectomy. MDCT with three-dimensional CT angiography enables accurate preoperative renal vascular mapping. This article reviews the role of MDCT in preoperative evaluation of potential laparoscopic renal donors.

  17. Variations of the popliteal artery branching with multidetector CT angiography.

    PubMed

    Yanik, Bahar; Bulbul, Erdogan; Demirpolat, Gulen

    2015-04-01

    To date the anatomy of the popliteal artery variations using multidetector-row computed tomography angiography (MD CTA) was not assessed. The objective of this study is to establish 3D CT anatomy of the popliteal artery variations. A total of 126 lower limbs that underwent CTA using 64-detector MDCT were retrospectively reviewed. The anatomical variations of the distal popliteal artery branching were assessed. Ninety-seven lower limbs (83.6%) had the usual branching pattern (type 1 A) with tibialis anterior artery (TA) arising first followed by the tibial-peroneal trunk, which then gives rise to the tibialis posterior artery (TP) and peroneal artery. Variations in popliteal branching pattern were seen in 19 (16.4%) limbs. The commonest variation was first branch of the TP in 5 (4.4%) of the limbs (type 1 C) or high origin with anterior course of popliteus muscle of the TA in 5 (4.4%) limbs (type 2 A II). Many variations exist in the running patterns of the branching pattern of the popliteal artery. Knowledge of the branching pattern of the popliteal artery will be beneficial to radiologist for the evaluation of CT angiograms and interventional vascular procedures, and to vascular surgeons for various surgical approaches. MD CTA provides noninvasive means of assessing distal popliteal artery variations.

  18. Rectal cancer staging: Multidetector-row computed tomography diagnostic accuracy in assessment of mesorectal fascia invasion.

    PubMed

    Ippolito, Davide; Drago, Silvia Girolama; Franzesi, Cammillo Talei; Fior, Davide; Sironi, Sandro

    2016-05-28

    To assess the diagnostic accuracy of multidetector-row computed tomography (MDCT) as compared with conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), in identifying mesorectal fascia (MRF) invasion in rectal cancer patients. Ninety-one patients with biopsy proven rectal adenocarcinoma referred for thoracic and abdominal CT staging were enrolled in this study. The contrast-enhanced MDCT scans were performed on a 256 row scanner (ICT, Philips) with the following acquisition parameters: tube voltage 120 KV, tube current 150-300 mAs. Imaging data were reviewed as axial and as multiplanar reconstructions (MPRs) images along the rectal tumor axis. MRI study, performed on 1.5 T with dedicated phased array multicoil, included multiplanar T2 and axial T1 sequences and diffusion weighted images (DWI). Axial and MPR CT images independently were compared to MRI and MRF involvement was determined. Diagnostic accuracy of both modalities was compared and statistically analyzed. According to MRI, the MRF was involved in 51 patients and not involved in 40 patients. DWI allowed to recognize the tumor as a focal mass with high signal intensity on high b-value images, compared with the signal of the normal adjacent rectal wall or with the lower tissue signal intensity background. The number of patients correctly staged by the native axial CT images was 71 out of 91 (41 with involved MRF; 30 with not involved MRF), while by using the MPR 80 patients were correctly staged (45 with involved MRF; 35 with not involved MRF). Local tumor staging suggested by MDCT agreed with those of MRI, obtaining for CT axial images sensitivity and specificity of 80.4% and 75%, positive predictive value (PPV) 80.4%, negative predictive value (NPV) 75% and accuracy 78%; while performing MPR the sensitivity and specificity increased to 88% and 87.5%, PPV was 90%, NPV 85.36% and accuracy 88%. MPR images showed higher diagnostic accuracy, in terms of MRF involvement, than native axial images, as compared to the

  19. Determining contrast medium dose and rate on basis of lean body weight: does this strategy improve patient-to-patient uniformity of hepatic enhancement during multi-detector row CT?

    PubMed

    Ho, Lisa M; Nelson, Rendon C; Delong, David M

    2007-05-01

    To prospectively evaluate the use of lean body weight (LBW) as the main determinant of the volume and rate of contrast material administration during multi-detector row computed tomography of the liver. This HIPAA-compliant study had institutional review board approval. All patients gave written informed consent. Four protocols were compared. Standard protocol involved 125 mL of iopamidol injected at 4 mL/sec. Total body weight (TBW) protocol involved 0.7 g iodine per kilogram of TBW. Calculated LBW and measured LBW protocols involved 0.86 g of iodine per kilogram and 0.92 g of iodine per kilogram calculated or measured LBW for men and women, respectively. Injection rate used for the three experimental protocols was determined proportionally on the basis of the calculated volume of contrast material. Postcontrast attenuation measurements during portal venous phase were obtained in liver, portal vein, and aorta for each group and were summed for each patient. Patient-to-patient enhancement variability in same group was measured with Levene test. Two-tailed t test was used to compare the three experimental protocols with the standard protocol. Data analysis was performed in 101 patients (25 or 26 patients per group), including 56 men and 45 women (mean age, 53 years). Average summed attenuation values for standard, TBW, calculated LBW, and measured LBW protocols were 419 HU +/- 50 (standard deviation), 443 HU +/- 51, 433 HU +/- 50, and 426 HU +/- 33, respectively (P = not significant for all). Levene test results for summed attenuation data for standard, TBW, calculated LBW, and measured LBW protocols were 40 +/- 29, 38 +/- 33 (P = .83), 35 +/- 35 (P = .56), and 26 +/- 19 (P = .05), respectively. By excluding highly variable but poorly perfused adipose tissue from calculation of contrast medium dose, the measured LBW protocol may lessen patient-to-patient enhancement variability while maintaining satisfactory hepatic and vascular enhancement.

  20. [Weighted-averaging multi-planar reconstruction method for multi-detector row computed tomography].

    PubMed

    Aizawa, Mitsuhiro; Nishikawa, Keiichi; Sasaki, Keita; Kobayashi, Norio; Yama, Mitsuru; Sano, Tsukasa; Murakami, Shin-ichi

    2012-01-01

    Development of multi-detector row computed tomography (MDCT) has enabled three-dimensions (3D) scanning with minute voxels. Minute voxels improve spatial resolution of CT images. At the same time, however, they increase image noise. Multi-planar reconstruction (MPR) is one of effective 3D-image processing techniques. The conventional MPR technique can adjust slice thickness of MPR images. When a thick slice is used, the image noise is decreased. In this case, however, spatial resolution is deteriorated. In order to deal with this trade-off problem, we have developed the weighted-averaging multi-planar reconstruction (W-MPR) technique to control the balance between the spatial resolution and noise. The weighted-average is determined by the Gaussian-type weighting function. In this study, we compared the performance of W-MPR with that of conventional simple-addition-averaging MPR. As a result, we could confirm that W-MPR can decrease the image noise without significant deterioration of spatial resolution. W-MPR can adjust freely the weight for each slice by changing the shape of the weighting function. Therefore, W-MPR can allow us to select a proper balance of spatial resolution and noise and at the same time produce suitable MPR images for observation of targeted anatomical structures.

  1. Transcatheter Arterial Embolization Therapy for a Hypoplastic Pelvic Kidney with a Single Vaginal Ectopic Ureter to Control Incontinence: The Usefulness of Three-Dimensional CT Angiography Using Multidetector-Row Helical CT

    SciTech Connect

    Kudoh, Kouichi Kadota, Masataka; Nakayama, Yoshiharu; Imuta, Masanori; Yasuda, Tsuyoshi; Yamashita, Yasuyuki; Inadome, Akito; Yoshida, Masaki; Ueda, Shouichi

    2003-09-15

    A girl with continuous urinary incontinence was successfully treated by angiographic embolization of a hypoplastic pelvic kidney with a single unilateral vaginal ectopic opening of the ureter. For this intervention, CT angiography was useful for detecting the corresponding renal artery of the hypoplastic kidney.

  2. Clinical significance of multidetector-row computed tomography in breast surgery.

    PubMed

    Doihara, Hiroyoshi; Fujita, Takeo; Takabatake, Daisuke; Takahashi, Hirotoshi; Ogasawara, Yutaka; Shimizu, Nobuyoshi

    2006-01-01

    Several reports support the association of higher ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence rates with positive or intermediate margins compared with negative pathologic margins. Precise evaluation of tumor extension and adequate surgical margin are important factors affecting tumor recurrence after breast-conserving surgery (BCS). Many studies have reported the utility of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for diagnosing the tumor extension of breast cancer, but few have evaluated the utility of multidetector-row computed tomography (MDCT). The results of this study show the clinical significance of MDCT for detecting cancer extension and demonstrate the clinical role of MDCT in BCS. Subjects comprised 136 patients grouped into two categories based on whether or not tumor extension was evaluated with MDCT preoperatively. The positive surgical margin rate and breast conservation rate were analyzed in each group and the clinical role of MDCT in BCS was evaluated. Moreover, evaluation of intraductal extension was done both with MDCT and histologically, and computed tomography (CT)-pathologic correlations were examined retrospectively. Finally, the margin-positive cases were analyzed in relation to their clinical characteristics. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value for detection of the intraductal component were 71.8%, 85.7%, 82.1%, and 76.9%, respectively. The positive surgical margin rate and conservation rate are 7.46% and 81.9%, respectively, for those who were diagnosed with MDCT preoperatively; their corresponding rates without MDCT were 16.67% and 67.9%. Most margin-positive patients have remarkable lymphatic space invasion. Positive surgical margins were often recognized toward the nipple. For diagnosing the intraductal extension, MDCT shows sufficient diagnosability. Moreover, MDCT can provide appropriate information for the determination of adequate surgical margins and contribute to increases in breast conservation

  3. [Study of renal veins by multidetector-row computed tomography scans].

    PubMed

    Bouali, O; Mouttalib, S; Labarre, D; Munzer, C; Lopez, R; Lauwers, F; Moscovici, J

    2014-12-01

    To determine the prevalence of renal vein variants. To investigate the distribution of renal veins. We retrospectively reviewed spiral computed tomography (CT) scans of the abdomen performed during a two-month period. The same protocol was used for all CT scans: same multidetector-row CT scanner (Siemens(®)), 1 to 2-mm section thickness, injection of intravenous iomeprol. The study group included 121 patients, aged 21.7 to 93.4 years (mean age 60.9 ± 15.4 years). The sex ratio was 2/1, with 80 men and 41 women. Seventy-three percent of the study group (88 patients) had no variants of the renal veins. Indeed almost 40% (48 patients) had one artery and one vein on each side, with typical course, and 33% (40 patients) had course and/or number variants of the renal arteries. Variants of the right renal vein consisted in multiple veins in 20.6% (25 cases). We detected no case of multiple left renal veins, but we described variations of its course in 9.1% (11 cases): 5 cases of retroaortic left renal vein (4.1%) and 6 cases of circumaortic left renal vein (5%). Three of these 11 patients had an associated double right renal vein. The probability to have a right renal vein variant was significantly higher than a left one (OR = 2.6, P = 0.01). And we found a significantly higher risk of having a venous variant in women (OR = 2.4, P = 0.04). We detected no case of inferior vena cava variant. In our study, prevalence of a circum- or retroaortic left renal vein appeared higher than previously reported in the literature (9.1%). Knowledge of anatomical variants of renal vasculature is crucial and this study puts the emphasis on variations of course and number of renal vessels. Those variations are not so uncommon and should be known by radiologists and also by surgeons. Their knowledge has major clinical implications in practice and it contributes to the safety of renal and retroperitoneal surgery. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. [Atypical appearance of pneumatosis intestinalis at multidetector CT].

    PubMed

    Lorusso, Valentina; Stabile Ianora, Antonio Amato; Rubini, Giuseppe; Losco, Matteo; Niccoli Asabella, Artor; Fonio, Paolo; Moschetta, Marco

    2012-11-01

    Pneumatosis intestinalis may be caused by bowel ischemia and may display different patterns of appearance. We report a case of pneumatosis intestinalis with an atypical target pattern, detected by multidetector computed tomography (CT) in a 66-year-old male presenting with acute abdominal syndrome. Abdominal CT scan showed a double gas collection within the wall of a jejunal segment, with a characteristic target air distribution. The patient was surgically treated and successfully discharged from our hospital with the diagnosis of acute bowel ischemia. The target air sign can be an initial CT finding of the typical pneumatosis intestinalis and it can be useful in the early diagnosis of bowel ischemia.

  5. [Multidetector CT for the assessment of the groin region].

    PubMed

    Stabile Ianora, Amato Antonio; Lorusso, Filomenamila; Niccoli Asabella, Artor; Di Maggio, Paola; Fonio, Paolo; Losco, Matteo; Rubini, Giuseppe

    2012-11-01

    Assessment of the complex anatomy of the groin region using different imaging modalities is important to identify those pathological conditions that may present with atypical symptoms. In obese patients or in the presence of complications, physical examination may be unremarkable and instrumental studies based on non-invasive techniques (e.g., ultrasounds) do not allow accurate assessment of this region. Multidetector CT scanning and reconstruction can provide useful information on inguinal canal anatomy and its related diseases, contributing to timely therapeutic interventions.

  6. The clinical outcome of occult pulmonary contusion on multidetector-row computed tomography in blunt trauma patients.

    PubMed

    Deunk, Jaap; Poels, Tielke C; Brink, Monique; Dekker, Helena M; Kool, Digna R; Blickman, Johan G; van Vugt, Arie B; Edwards, Michael John Richard

    2010-02-01

    Multidetector-row computed tomography (MDCT) is a more sensitive modality as compared with conventional radiography (CR) in detecting pulmonary injuries. MDCT often detects pulmonary contusion that is not visualized by CR, defined as occult pulmonary contusion (OPC). The aim of this study was to investigate whether OPC on MDCT has implications for the outcome in blunt trauma patients. We used prospectively collected data from 1,040 adult high-energy blunt trauma patients who were primarily presented at our emergency department and who underwent CR and MDCT of the chest. All patients with pulmonary contusion were identified and divided into two groups: The "CR/computed tomography (CT) group" consisted of patients with pulmonary contusion visible on both CR and MDCT. The "CT-only" group consisted of patients with OPC, visible exclusively on MDCT. The control group consisted of blunt trauma patients without pulmonary contusion. These groups were compared with respect to difference in mortality and other outcome measures. In addition, a multivariate analysis was performed. Two hundred fifty-five patients suffered pulmonary contusion: The CT-only group consisted of 157 and the CR/CT group of 98 patients. The CT-only group did not differ from the control group with respect to mortality rate and other outcome measures. However, compared with the CR/CT group, mortality rate was significantly lower (8% versus 16%, p = 0.039) and most other outcome measures were significantly better in the CT-only group. OPC on MDCT is not associated with a worse outcome as compared with patients without pulmonary contusion. OPC has a better outcome as compared with pulmonary contusion visible on both CR and MDCT.

  7. [Gatrointestinal imaging with multidetector CT and MRI].

    PubMed

    Lorusso, Filomenamila; Fonio, Paolo; Scardapane, Arnaldo; Giganti, Melchiore; Rubini, Giuseppe; Ferrante, Annunziata; Stabile Ianora, Amato Antonio

    2012-11-01

    Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are important diagnostic tools for evaluating gastrointestinal disorders. A rigorous examination protocol is needed to achieve the best results. This paper describes the technical issues of CT and MRI for the study of gastrointestinal tracts (esophagus, stomach, small and large bowel).

  8. Radiation dose reduction in multidetector CT in fracture evaluation.

    PubMed

    Yi, Jung Woo; Park, Hee Jin; Lee, So Yeon; Rho, Myung Ho; Hong, Hyun Pyo; Choi, Yoon Jung; Kim, Mi Sung

    2017-08-01

    To evaluate whether multidetector CT with low-dose radiation (low-dose CT) of joints can be useful when evaluating fractures. Our study included CT scans of 398 patients, 103 shoulder cases, 109 wrist cases, 98 pelvis cases and 88 ankle cases. There were 191 females and 207 males. The low-dose CTs were performed using identical voltage and parameters with the exception of decreased (half of standard dose) tube current. Low-dose and standard-dose images were compared with regards to objective image quality, subjective evaluation of image quality and diagnostic performance for the fractures. There was no significant difference of image noise between standard-dose CT and low-dose CT in every joint (p > 0.05). Each mean value of subjective score did not show significant difference according to the dosage of the CT scan. There were no statistically significant differences in the sensitivity (96-100%), specificity (95.2-100%) or accuracy (97.9-100%) between standard-dose CT and low-dose CT (p values, 0.1336-1.000). The evaluation of extremities for fractures using low-dose CT can reduce radiation exposure by about 50% compared with standard-dose CT without affecting image quality or diagnostic performance. Advances in knowledge: Low-dose CT of the extremities (shoulder, pelvis, ankle and wrist) can reduce radiation dose by about 50% compared with standard-dose CT and does not significantly affect image quality or diagnostic performance in fracture detection.

  9. Multidetector CT in children: current concepts and dose reduction strategies

    PubMed Central

    van Dam, Ingrid M.; van der Molen, Aart J.

    2010-01-01

    The recent technical development of multidetector CT (MDCT) has contributed to a substantial increase in its diagnostic applications and accuracy in children. A major drawback of MDCT is the use of ionising radiation with the risk of inducing secondary cancer. Therefore, justification and optimisation of paediatric MDCT is of great importance in order to minimise these risks (“as low as reasonably achievable” principle). This review will focus on all technical and non-technical aspects relevant for paediatric MDCT optimisation and includes guidelines for radiation dose level-based CT protocols. PMID:20535463

  10. Multidetector CT in children: current concepts and dose reduction strategies.

    PubMed

    Nievelstein, Rutger A J; van Dam, Ingrid M; van der Molen, Aart J

    2010-08-01

    The recent technical development of multidetector CT (MDCT) has contributed to a substantial increase in its diagnostic applications and accuracy in children. A major drawback of MDCT is the use of ionising radiation with the risk of inducing secondary cancer. Therefore, justification and optimisation of paediatric MDCT is of great importance in order to minimise these risks ("as low as reasonably achievable" principle). This review will focus on all technical and non-technical aspects relevant for paediatric MDCT optimisation and includes guidelines for radiation dose level-based CT protocols.

  11. Radiation dose in 320-slice multidetector cardiac CT: a single center experience of evolving dose minimization.

    PubMed

    Tung, Matthew K; Cameron, James D; Casan, Joshua M; Crossett, Marcus; Troupis, John M; Meredith, Ian T; Seneviratne, Sujith K

    2013-01-01

    Minimization of radiation exposure remains an important subject that occurs in parallel with advances in scanner technology. We report our experience of evolving radiation dose and its determinants after the introduction of 320-multidetector row cardiac CT within a single tertiary cardiology referral service. Four cohorts of consecutive patients (total 525 scans), who underwent cardiac CT at defined time points as early as 2008, are described. These include a cohort just after scanner installation, after 2 upgrades of the operating system, and after introduction of an adaptive iterative image reconstruction algorithm. The proportions of nondiagnostic coronary artery segments and studies with nondiagnostic segments were compared between cohorts. Significant reductions were observed in median radiation doses in all cohorts compared with the initial cohort (P < .001). Median dose-length product fell from 944 mGy · cm (interquartile range [IQR], 567.3-1426.5 mGy · cm) to 156 mGy · cm (IQR, 99.2-265.0 mGy · cm). Although the proportion of prospectively triggered scans has increased, reductions in radiation dose have occurred independently of distribution of scan formats. In multiple regression that combined all groups, determinants of dose-length product were tube output, the number of cardiac cycles scanned, tube voltage, scan length, scan format, body mass index, phase width, and heart rate (adjusted R(2) = 0.85, P < .001). The proportion of nondiagnostic coronary artery segments was slightly increased in group 4 (2.9%; P < .01). While maintaining diagnostic quality in 320-multidetector row cardiac CT, the radiation dose has decreased substantially because of a combination of dose-reduction protocols and technical improvements. Continued minimization of radiation dose will increase the potential for cardiac CT to expand as a cardiac imaging modality. Copyright © 2013 Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Accessory Spleen: Prevalence and Multidetector CT Appearance.

    PubMed

    Rashid, Sameeah Abdulrahman

    2014-07-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence and computed tomography (CT) appearances of accessory spleens in hospital-based patients, and to measure and make comparisons between accessory spleen size and density. A cross-sectional study was carried out in a diagnostic center in Erbil, Iraq during January-December, 2012. Biphasic abdominal CT images of 334 consecutive patients with different age groups were evaluated for the presence of an accessory spleen, and if identified, it was further analysed for shape, diameter, density, number, and location. Patients with inadequate CT techniques, splenectomy, hematological disorders, and widespread lesions in the abdomen were excluded from this study. Of the 334 patients (198 female, 136 male), with a mean age of 47.2 years (SD 15.7), 82 accessory spleens were detected in 63 patients (18.8%). Their mean diameter was 14.7 mm (range 3-79 mm), 68% were round in shape and 75.6% were medial to the main spleen. Sixty percent of the cases showed a single accessory spleen and 40% had more than one (up to 4 detected). A significant difference in the mean diameter of accessory spleens between similar and different densities than the main spleen was observed (P = 0.018), 71 accessory spleens (mean diameter = 15.97 mm) displayed similar densities to the main spleen, while 11 (mean diameter = 7.09 mm) were hypodense or hyperdense to the main spleen. The prevalence of an accessory spleen is high, and should be considered by radiologists during abdominal CT scan reporting.

  13. Computed tomography angiography: state-of-the-art imaging using multidetector-row technology.

    PubMed

    Napoli, Alessandro; Fleischmann, Dominik; Chan, Frandics P; Catalano, Carlo; Hellinger, Jeffrey C; Passariello, Roberto; Rubin, Geoffrey D

    2004-01-01

    Multidetector-row computed tomography (MDCT) is an essential diagnostic modality for many clinical algorithms. This is particularly true with regard to the evaluation of cardiovascular disease. As a result of increased image acquisition speed, improved spatial resolution, and greater scan volume, MDCT angiography (computed tomography angiography [CTA]) has become an excellent noninvasive imaging technique, replacing intra-arterial digital subtraction angiography for most vascular territories. The clinical success of CTA depends on precise synchronization of image acquisition with optimal vascular enhancement. As technology continuously evolves, however, this task can be challenging. It remains important to have a fundamental knowledge of the principles behind technical parameters and contrast medium administration. This article reviews these essential principles, followed by an overview of current clinical applications.

  14. Multidetector CT Findings of Bowel Transection in Blunt Abdominal Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Hyun Suk; Hong, Hye-Suk; Park, Mee Hyun; Ha, Hong Il; Yang, Ik; Lee, Yul; Jung, Ah Young; Hwang, Ji-Young

    2013-01-01

    Objective Though a number of CT findings of bowel and mesenteric injuries in blunt abdominal trauma are described in literature, no studies on the specific CT signs of a transected bowel have been published. In the present study we describe the incidence and new CT signs of bowel transection in blunt abdominal trauma. Materials and Methods We investigated the incidence of bowel transection in 513 patients admitted for blunt abdominal trauma who underwent multidetector CT (MDCT). The MDCT findings of 8 patients with a surgically proven complete bowel transection were assessed retrospectively. We report novel CT signs that are unique for transection, such as complete cutoff sign (transection of bowel loop), Janus sign (abnormal dual bowel wall enhancement, both increased and decreased), and fecal spillage. Results The incidence of bowel transection in blunt abdominal trauma was 1.56%. In eight cases of bowel transection, percentage of CT signs unique for bowel transection were as follows: complete cutoff in 8 (100%), Janus sign in 6 (100%, excluding duodenal injury), and fecal spillage in 2 (25%). The combination of complete cutoff and Janus sign were highly specific findings in patients with bowel transection. Conclusion Complete cut off and Janus sign are the unique CT findings to help detect bowel transection in blunt abdominal trauma and recognition of these findings enables an accurate and prompt diagnosis for emergency laparotomy leading to reduced mortality and morbidity. PMID:23901318

  15. Pulmonary arterial hypertension: an imaging review comparing MR pulmonary angiography and perfusion with multidetector CT angiography

    PubMed Central

    Junqueira, F P; Lima, C M A O; Coutinho, A C; Parente, D B; Bittencourt, L K; Bessa, L G P; Domingues, R C; Marchiori, E

    2012-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is a progressive disease that leads to substantial morbidity and eventual death. Pulmonary multidetector CT angiography (MDCTA), pulmonary MR angiography (MRA) and MR-derived pulmonary perfusion (MRPP) imaging are non-invasive imaging techniques for the differential diagnosis of PH. MDCTA is considered the gold standard for the diagnosis of pulmonary embolism, one of the most common causes of PH. MRA and MRPP are promising techniques that do not require the use of ionising radiation or iodinated contrast material, and can be useful for patients for whom such material cannot be used. This review compares the imaging aspects of pulmonary MRA and 64-row MDCTA in patients with chronic thromboembolic or idiopathic PH. PMID:22932061

  16. Pulmonary arterial hypertension: an imaging review comparing MR pulmonary angiography and perfusion with multidetector CT angiography.

    PubMed

    Junqueira, F P; Lima, C M A O; Coutinho, A C; Parente, D B; Bittencourt, L K; Bessa, L G P; Domingues, R C; Marchiori, E

    2012-11-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is a progressive disease that leads to substantial morbidity and eventual death. Pulmonary multidetector CT angiography (MDCTA), pulmonary MR angiography (MRA) and MR-derived pulmonary perfusion (MRPP) imaging are non-invasive imaging techniques for the differential diagnosis of PH. MDCTA is considered the gold standard for the diagnosis of pulmonary embolism, one of the most common causes of PH. MRA and MRPP are promising techniques that do not require the use of ionising radiation or iodinated contrast material, and can be useful for patients for whom such material cannot be used. This review compares the imaging aspects of pulmonary MRA and 64-row MDCTA in patients with chronic thromboembolic or idiopathic PH.

  17. Detection of hypervascular hepatocellular carcinoma: Comparison of multi-detector CT with digital subtraction angiography and Lipiodol CT

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Xiao-Hua; Guan, Yong-Song; Zhou, Xiang-Ping; Huang, Juan; Sun, Long; Li, Xiao; Liu, Yuan

    2005-01-01

    AIM: The purpose of this study was to compare the diagnostic accuracy of biphasic multi-detector row helical computed tomography (MDCT), digital subtraction angiography (DSA) and Lipiodol computed tomography (CT) in detection of hypervascular hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). METHODS: Twenty-eight patients with nodular HCC underwent biphasic MDCT examination: hepatic arterial phase (HAP) 25 s and portal venous phase (PVP) 70 s after injection of the contrast medium (1.5 mL/kg). They also underwent hepatic angiography and intra-arterial infusion of iodized oil. Lipiodol CT was performed 3-4 wk after infusion. MDCT images were compared with DSA and Lipiodol CT images for detection of hepatic nodules. RESULTS: The three imaging techniques had the same sensitivity in detecting nodules >20 mm in diameter. There was no significant difference in the sensitivity among HAP-MDCT, Lipiodol CT and DSA for nodules of 10-20 mm in diameter. For the nodules <10 mm in diameter, HAP-MDCT identified 47, Lipiodol CT detected 27 (χ2 = 11.3, P = 0.005<0.01, HAP-MDCT vs Lipiodol CT) and DSA detected 16 (χ2 = 9.09, P = 0.005<0.01 vs Lipiodol CT and χ2 = 29.03, P = 0.005<0.01vs HAP-MDCT). However, six nodules <10 mm in diameter were detected only by Lipiodol CT. CONCLUSION: MDCT and Lipiodol CT are two complementary modalities. At present, MDCT does not obviate the need for DSA and subsequent Lipiodol CT as a preoperative examination for HCC. PMID:15633215

  18. Automated assessment of the aortic root dimensions with multidetector row computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Delgado, Victoria; Ng, Arnold C T; Schuijf, Joanne D; van der Kley, Frank; Shanks, Miriam; Tops, Laurens F; van de Veire, Nico R L; de Roos, Albert; Kroft, Lucia J M; Schalij, Martin J; Bax, Jeroen J

    2011-03-01

    Accurate aortic root measurements and evaluation of spatial relationships with coronary ostia are crucial in preoperative transcatheter aortic valve implantation assessments. Standardization of measurements may increase intraobserver and interobserver reproducibility to promote procedural success rate and reduce the frequency of procedurally related complications. This study evaluated the accuracy and reproducibility of a novel automated multidetector row computed tomography (MDCT) imaging postprocessing software, 3mensio Valves (version 4.1.sp1, Medical Imaging BV, Bilthoven, The Netherlands), in the assessment of patients with severe aortic stenosis candidates for transcatheter aortic valve implantation. Ninety patients with aortic valve disease were evaluated with 64-row and 320-row MDCT. Aortic valve annular size, aortic root dimensions, and height of the coronary ostia relative to the aortic valve annular plane were measured with the 3mensio Valves software. The measurements were compared with those obtained manually by the Vitrea2 software (Vital Images, Minneapolis, MN). Assessment of aortic valve annulus and aortic root dimensions were feasible in all the patients using the automated 3mensio Valves software. There were excellent agreements with minimal bias between automated and manual MDCT measurements as demonstrated by Bland-Altman analysis and intraclass correlation coefficients ranging from 0.97 to 0.99. The automated 3mensio Valves software had better interobserver reproducibility and required less image postprocessing time than manual assessment. Novel automated MDCT postprocessing imaging software (3mensio Valves) permits reliable, reproducible, and automated assessments of the aortic root dimensions and spatial relations with the surrounding structures. This has important clinical implications for preoperative assessments of patients undergoing transcatheter aortic valve implantation. Copyright © 2011 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by

  19. Scenes from the past: initial investigation of early jurassic vertebrate fossils with multidetector CT.

    PubMed

    Bolliger, Stephan A; Ross, Steffen; Thali, Michael J; Hostettler, Bernhard; Menkveld-Gfeller, Ursula

    2012-01-01

    The study of fossils permits the reconstruction of past life on our planet and enhances our understanding of evolutionary processes. However, many fossils are difficult to recognize, being encased in a lithified matrix whose tedious removal is required before examination is possible. The authors describe the use of multidetector computed tomography (CT) in locating, identifying, and examining fossil remains of crocodilians (Mesosuchia) embedded in hard shale, all without removing the matrix. In addition, they describe how three-dimensional (3D) reformatted CT images provided details that were helpful for extraction and preparation. Multidetector CT can help experienced paleontologists localize and characterize fossils in the matrix of a promising rock specimen in a nondestructive manner. Moreover, with its capacity to generate highly accurate 3D images, multidetector CT can help determine whether the fossils warrant extraction and can assist in planning the extraction process. Thus, multidetector CT may well become an invaluable tool in the field of paleoradiology.

  20. Cam-type deformities: Concepts, criteria, and multidetector CT features.

    PubMed

    Mellado, J M; Radi, N

    2015-01-01

    Interpreting imaging studies of a painful hip requires detailed knowledge of the regional anatomy. Some variants of the proximal femur, such as cam-type deformities, can course asymptomatically or cause femoroacetabular impingement. The principal numerical criterion for defining cam-type deformities, the alpha angle, has some limitations. In this article, we review the anatomic variants of the anterior aspect of the proximal femur, focusing on cam-type deformities. Using diagrams and multidetector CT images, we describe the parameters that are useful for characterizing these deformities in different imaging techniques. We also discuss the potential correspondence of imaging findings of cam-type deformities with the terms coined by anatomists and anthropologists to describe these phenomena. Copyright © 2014 SERAM. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  1. Multidetector CT of pulmonary cavitation: filling in the holes.

    PubMed

    Mortensen, K H; Babar, J L; Balan, A

    2015-04-01

    Pulmonary cavitation causes significant morbidity and mortality. Early diagnosis of the presence and aetiology of a cavity is therefore crucial in order to avoid further demise in both the localized pulmonary and systemic disorders that may manifest with pulmonary cavity formation. Multidetector CT has become the principal diagnostic technique for detecting pulmonary cavitation and its complications. This review provides an overview of the aetiologies and their imaging findings using this technique. Combining a literature review with case illustration, a synopsis of the different imaging features and constellations is provided, which may suggest a particular cause and aid the differentiation from diseases with similar findings. Copyright © 2015 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Imaging of patent foramen ovale with 64-section multidetector CT.

    PubMed

    Saremi, Farhood; Channual, Stephanie; Raney, Aidan; Gurudevan, Swaminatha V; Narula, Jagat; Fowler, Steven; Abolhoda, Amir; Milliken, Jeffrey C

    2008-11-01

    To investigate the feasibility of 64-section multidetector computed tomography (CT) by using CT angiography (a) to demonstrate anatomic detail of the interatrial septum pertinent to the patent foramen ovale (PFO), and (b) to visually detect left-to-right PFO shunts and compare these findings in patients who also underwent transesophageal echocardiography (TEE). In this institutional review board-approved HIPAA-compliant study, electrocardiographically gated coronary CT angiograms in 264 patients (159 men, 105 women; mean age, 60 years) were reviewed for PFO morphologic features. The length and diameter of the opening of the PFO tunnel, presence of atrial septal aneurysm (ASA), and PFO shunts were evaluated. A left-to-right shunt was assigned a grade according to length of contrast agent jet (grade 1, 1 cm to 2 cm; grade 3, >2 cm). In addition, 23 patients who underwent both modalities were compared (Student t test and linear regression analysis). A difference with P < .05 was significant. A flap valve, seen in 101 (38.3%) patients, was patent at the entry into the right atrium (PFO) in 62 patients (61.4% of patients with flap valve, 23.5% of total patients). A left-to-right shunt was detected in 44 (16.7% of total) patients (grade 1, 61.4%; grade 2, 34.1%; grade 3, 4.5%). No shunt was seen in patients without a flap valve. Mean length of PFO tunnel was 7.1 mm in 44 patients with a shunt and 12.1 mm in 57 patients with a flap valve without a shunt (P < .0001). In patients with a tunnel length of 6 mm or shorter, 92.6% of the shunts were seen. ASA was seen in 11 (4.2%) patients; of these patients, a shunt was seen in seven (63.6%). In 23 patients who underwent CT angiography and TEE, both modalities showed a PFO shunt in seven. Multidetector CT provides detailed anatomic information about size, morphologic features, and shunt grade of the PFO. Shorter tunnel length and septal aneurysms are frequently associated with left-to-right shunts in

  3. The validity of investigating occult hip fractures using multidetector CT

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Huw L M; Carpenter, Eleanor C; Lyons, Kathleen

    2016-01-01

    Objective: 10% of all hip fractures are occult on plain radiography, requiring further investigation to ascertain the diagnosis. MRI is presently the gold standard investigation, but frequently has disadvantages of time delay, resulting in increased hospital stay and mortality. Our aim was to establish whether multidetector CT (MDCT) is an appropriate first-line investigation of occult femoral neck (NOF) fractures. Methods: From 2013, we elected to use MDCT as the first-line investigation in patients believed to have an NOF fracture with negative plain films. These were reported by consultant musculoskeletal radiologists. We retrospectively analysed the data of consecutive patients presenting to the University Hospital of Wales, over 30 months with a clinical suspicion of a hip fracture. Results: 1443 patients were admitted during the study period. 209 (14.5%) patients had negative plain films requiring further investigation to exclude an NOF fracture, of which 199 patients had a CT. 93 patients had no fracture and 20 patients had isolated greater trochanter fractures. None of these patients progressed to develop an intracapsular femoral neck fracture at 4-month follow-up, although one patient sustained an extracapsular fracture following a high-energy fall whilst admitted. 26 femoral neck fractures were diagnosed on CT, whilst the remaining 60 patients were diagnosed with other pelvic ring fractures. Conclusion: When interpreted by experienced radiologists, MDCT has both sensitivity and specificity of 100%. Advances in knowledge: We recommend the use of MDCT as a safe and appropriate first-line investigation for NOF fractures. PMID:26838948

  4. Multidetector CT angiography in evaluation of prosthetic heart valve dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Habets, Jesse; Mali, Willem P T M; Budde, Ricardo P J

    2012-01-01

    Prosthetic heart valves (PHVs) are commonly implanted to replace diseased native heart valves. PHV dysfunction is an infrequent but potentially life-threatening condition. In daily clinical practice, transthoracic and transesophageal echocardiography and fluoroscopy are the imaging modalities used for diagnostic evaluation of suspected PHV dysfunction. These modalities may not allow determination of the cause of PHV dysfunction, mostly because of acoustic shadowing. Multidetector computed tomographic (CT) angiography is a promising complementary technique for evaluation of PHVs, especially in patients with PHV obstruction and endocarditis. The CT image quality of PHVs mainly depends on their composition, with most causing only limited artifacts. Retrospectively electrocardiographically gated acquisition is advisable for PHV imaging because it enables dynamic leaflet evaluation and anatomic assessment in both systole and diastole. For accurate image interpretation, dedicated reconstruction in plane with and perpendicular to the PHV leaflets is mandatory. Besides PHV assessment, CT also provides information on the coronary arteries, the location and patency of bypass grafts, the dimensions of the aorta, and the distance between the sternum and right ventricle, information valuable for planning repeat surgery. To achieve the optimal diagnostic yield in PHV imaging, multidisciplinary cooperation between the departments of cardiology, cardiothoracic surgery, and radiology is crucial.

  5. A Structural and Functional Assessment of the Lung via Multidetector-Row Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Hoffman, Eric A.; Simon, Brett A.; McLennan, Geoffrey

    2006-01-01

    With advances in multidetector-row computed tomography (MDCT), it is now possible to image the lung in 10 s or less and accurately extract the lungs, lobes, and airway tree to the fifth- through seventh-generation bronchi and to regionally characterize lung density, texture, ventilation, and perfusion. These methods are now being used to phenotype the lung in health and disease and to gain insights into the etiology of pathologic processes. This article outlines the application of these methodologies with specific emphasis on chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. We demonstrate the use of our methods for assessing regional ventilation and perfusion and demonstrate early data that show, in a sheep model, a regionally intact hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstrictor (HPV) response with an apparent inhibition of HPV regionally in the presence of inflammation. We present the hypothesis that, in subjects with pulmonary emphysema, one major contributing factor leading to parenchymal destruction is the lack of a regional blunting of HPV when the regional hypoxia is related to regional inflammatory events (bronchiolitis or alveolar flooding). If maintaining adequate blood flow to inflamed lung regions is critical to the nondestructive resolution of inflammatory events, the pathologic condition whereby HPV is sustained in regions of inflammation would likely have its greatest effect in the lung apices where blood flow is already reduced in the upright body posture. PMID:16921136

  6. Trapping volumetric measurement by multidetector CT in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: Effect of CT threshold

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xiaohua; Yuan, Huishu; Duan, Jianghui; Du, Yipeng; Shen, Ning; He, Bei

    2013-08-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of various computed tomography (CT) thresholds on trapping volumetric measurements by multidetector CT in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD).Methods: Twenty-three COPD patients were scanned with a 64-slice CT scanner in both the inspiratory and expiratory phase. CT thresholds of −950 Hu in inspiration and −950 to −890 Hu in expiration were used, after which trapping volumetric measurements were made using computer software. Trapping volume percentage (Vtrap%) under the different CT thresholds in the expiratory phase and below −950 Hu in the inspiratory phase was compared and correlated with lung function.Results: Mean Vtrap% was similar under −930 Hu in the expiratory phase and below −950 Hu in the inspiratory phase, being 13.18 ± 9.66 and 13.95 ± 6.72 (both lungs), respectively; this difference was not significant (P= 0.240). Vtrap% under −950 Hu in the inspiratory phase and below the −950 to −890 Hu threshold in the expiratory phase was moderately negatively correlated with the ratio of forced expiratory volume in one second to forced vital capacity and the measured value of forced expiratory volume in one second as a percentage of the predicted value.Conclusions: Trapping volumetric measurement with multidetector CT is a promising method for the quantification of COPD. It is important to know the effect of various CT thresholds on trapping volumetric measurements.

  7. Multidetector CT angiography for acute gastrointestinal bleeding: technique and findings.

    PubMed

    Artigas, José M; Martí, Milagros; Soto, Jorge A; Esteban, Helena; Pinilla, Inmaculada; Guillén, Eugenia

    2013-01-01

    Acute gastrointestinal bleeding is a common reason for emergency department admissions and an important cause of morbidity and mortality. Factors that complicate its clinical management include patient debility due to comorbidities; intermittence of hemorrhage; and multiple sites of simultaneous bleeding. Its management, therefore, must be multidisciplinary and include emergency physicians, gastroenterologists, and surgeons, as well as radiologists for diagnostic imaging and interventional therapy. Upper gastrointestinal tract bleeding is usually managed endoscopically, with radiologic intervention reserved as an alternative to be used if endoscopic therapy fails. Endoscopy is often less successful in the management of acute lower gastrointestinal tract bleeding, where colonoscopy may be more effective. The merits of performing bowel cleansing before colonoscopy in such cases might be offset by the resultant increase in response time and should be weighed carefully against the deficits in visualization and diagnostic accuracy that would result from performing colonoscopy without bowel preparation. In recent years, multidetector computed tomographic (CT) angiography has gained acceptance as a first-line option for the diagnosis and management of lower gastrointestinal tract bleeding. In selected cases of upper gastrointestinal tract bleeding, CT angiography also provides accurate information about the presence or absence of active bleeding, its source, and its cause. This information helps shorten the total diagnostic time and minimizes or eliminates the need for more expensive and more invasive procedures. © RSNA, 2013.

  8. [Extra-organic primary tumor in pelvis: correlation of multi-detector row computed tomography, anatomy and pathology].

    PubMed

    Dong, Zhihui; Yang, Zhigang; Li, Yuan; Min, Pengqiu; Zhang, Xiaochun

    2009-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the correlation between multi-detector row CT (MDCT) features, pathological findings and the anatomic basis of extra-organic primary tumors in pelvis so as to improve the document diagnosis of these entities. We retrospectively analyzed the MDCT manifestations of 20 cases with surgically and/or pathologically evidenced diagnoses of extra-organic primary tumors in pelvis. The results showed that, in 14 cases, the tumors were located in the pelvis, and 6 of them involved both pelvis and hypogastric zone. There were 8 tumors located in the peritoneal cavity of the pelvis, and 3 of them also involved the extraperitoneal space of the pelvis. In the peritoneal cavity, 2 tumors of male patients were located in the rectovesical pouch while 3 tumors of female patients were located in the rectouterine pouch. The majority of entities in these 2 pouches were germ cell tumors (3/5 cases, 60.0%). In the extraperitoneal space, 5 of 12 tumors were located in the pararectal space and 5 of them were located in the retrorectal space. The majority entities of these 10 cases were germ cell tumors (7/10 cases, 70.0%). Lymphoma mainly involved paravesical and pararectal space in disorder. Calcification occurred in 6 cases, including 4 cases of teratoma, 1 case of neurilemmoma, and 1 case of malignant teratoma. The fatty element occurred in 7 masses, including 4 cases of teratoma, 1 case of malignant teratoma, 1 case of mixed germ cell tumor, and 1 case of liposarcoma. MDCT with multi-planar reconstruction (MPR) could more clearly reveal the anatomic location of the extra-organic primary tumor in pelvis, could unveil the tumor's relationship with its surrounding organs, and could help to differentiate benign tumors from malignant tumors.

  9. Three-dimensional image reconstruction of an anorectal malformation with multidetector-row helical computed tomography technology.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Yoshio; Ando, Hisami; Seo, Takahiko; Kaneko, Kentaro; Katsuno, Shinsuke; Shinohara, Tsuyoshi; Mori, Kensaku; Toriwaki, Junichiro

    2003-05-01

    The presentation of the surgical anatomy of anorectal malformation by standard anatomical figures is not suitable for individual anorectoplasty. It is essential to understand the anatomy of the pelvic muscle (striated muscle complex: SMC) including the external anal sphincter and their three-dimensional (3D) configuration in each patient. Thus, we studied the SMC three-dimensionally with multidetector-row helical computed tomography (MRH-CT) preoperatively, and evaluated its usefulness. Fourteen patients with anorectal malformations before anorectoplasty (types: high n=6, intermediate n=2, low n=6) and two patients without anorectal malformations as controls (total: male n=8, female n=8) were investigated. An image of pelvic region was prepared with a slice thickness of 0.5 mm and a reconstruction pitch of 0.5 mm. A 3D reconstruction on a conventional personal computer (PC) was made with a volume rendering method, and assisted by our own software. The SMC was analyzed with three modified modes of 3D reconstruction corresponding to the surrounding tissues. A length of the parasagittal muscle, and both the sagittal and transverse width of the vertical fibers in the SMC at the connection to the parasagittal muscle were measured on a 3D image and then compared among three different types and controls. To eliminate variations in age, a length index was used to allow comparison. The 3D configuration of the SMC was different in every case. The arranged image mode, which displayed the SMC and the pelvic bones simultaneously, enabled to use conventional knowledge in cysto-urethrography. The length of the parasagittal muscle was longest in the high type but the width of the vertical fibers was smallest. Anatomical figures of the SMC including the external anal sphincter were clearly demonstrated on a PC in every anorectal malformation by our program. A 3D reconstruction image provides positional information on the SMC for the body surface and pelvic bone at the same time

  10. Multiphase Multi-Detector Row Computed Tomography Imaging Characteristics of Large (>5 cm) Focal Hepatocellular Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Blaschke, Eric M; Rao, Vijaya L; Xiong, Lingyun; Te, Helen S; Hart, John; Reddy, K Gautham; Oto, Aytekin

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the multiphase multi-detector row computed tomography (MDCT) imaging findings of large (>5 cm) focal hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Following review of the medical records of 321 patients with newly diagnosed HCC who underwent MDCT within the radiology database from January 2007 to November 2014, 27 patients (20 men and 7 women; mean age, 69 [SD, 10.1] years [range, 49-87 years]) with histologically confirmed HCC greater than 5 cm were included in this institutional review board-approved study. Multiphase, dedicated liver MDCT images of these cases were retrospectively reviewed by 2 radiologists in consensus to describe the enhancement characteristics of these lesions. Mean tumor diameter was 8.4 (SD, 2.4) cm (range, 5.2-13.5 cm). Cirrhosis was present in 16 (59%) of 27 patients. Seventeen (85%) of 20 patients with available laboratory data presented with elevated alpha-fetoprotein (median, 97 ng/mL). Twenty-three (85%) of 27 demonstrated either heterogeneous enhancement with gradual fill-in (14/27 [52%]) or peripheral enhancement with centripetal fill-in (9/27 [33%]). Twenty-two (81%) of 27 lacked washout on delayed phase images, and 21 (78%) of 27 demonstrated a pseudocapsule. Twenty-seven of 27 lesions were well defined, 8 (30%) of 27 were exophytic, 15 (56%) of 27 were unifocal, 5 (25%) of 20 cases demonstrated vascular invasion, and 7 (26%) of 27 cases presented with extrahepatic metastases. Large (>5 cm) focal HCC may present as a dominant mass with a pseudocapsule and initial heterogeneous or peripheral enhancement with gradual or centripetal fill-in without washout on multiphase MDCT. Awareness of this variant is important to allow distinction from other benign (eg, hemangioma) and malignant (eg, cholangiocarcinoma) focal liver lesions.

  11. Multidetector CT of Surgically Proven Blunt Bowel and Mesenteric Injury.

    PubMed

    Bates, David D B; Wasserman, Michael; Malek, Anita; Gorantla, Varun; Anderson, Stephan W; Soto, Jorge A; LeBedis, Christina A

    2017-01-01

    Blunt traumatic injury is one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality in the United States. Unintentional injury represents the leading cause of death in the United States for all persons between the ages of 1 and 44 years. In the setting of blunt abdominal trauma, the reported rate of occurrence of bowel and mesenteric injuries ranges from 1% to 5%. Despite the relatively low rate of blunt bowel and mesenteric injury in patients with abdominal and pelvic trauma, delays in diagnosis are associated with increased rates of sepsis, a prolonged course in the intensive care unit, and increased mortality. During the past 2 decades, as multidetector computed tomography (CT) has emerged as an essential tool in emergency radiology, several direct and indirect imaging features have been identified that are associated with blunt bowel and mesenteric injury. The imaging findings in cases of blunt bowel and mesenteric injury can be subtle and may be seen in the setting of multiple complex injuries, such as multiple solid-organ injuries and spinal fractures. Familiarity with the various imaging features of blunt bowel and mesenteric injury, as well as an understanding of their clinical importance with regard to the care of the patient, is essential to making a timely diagnosis. Once radiologists are familiar with the spectrum of findings of blunt bowel and mesenteric injury, they will be able to make timely diagnoses that will lead to improved patient outcomes. (©)RSNA, 2017.

  12. Differentiation of Lymphoma Presenting as Retroperitoneal Mass and Retroperitoneal Fibrosis: Evaluation with Multidetector-row Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shuai; Chen, Min; Li, Chun-Mei; Song, Guo-Dong; Liu, Ying

    2017-01-01

    Background: Retroperitoneal fibrosis (RPF) and lymphoma presenting as retroperitoneal mass may closely resemble each other and misdiagnosis may occur. This study investigated the differential imaging features of RPF and lymphoma which presented as a retroperitoneal soft tissue using multidetector-row computed tomography (MDCT). Methods: The 42 consecutive patients were included in this retrospective review, including 19 RPF patients (45.2%; including 13 males and 6 females; mean age: 56.7 ± 6.2 years) and 23 patients with lymphoma (54.8%; including 14 males and 9 females; mean age: 57.4 ± 12.3 years). An array of qualitative computed tomography (CT) features of lesions in 42 consecutive patients with newly diagnosed untreated RPF and lymphoma were retrospectively analyzed. The quantitative size of the lesion at the para-aortic region and attenuation in the precontrast, arterial, and portal phases were calculated in regions of interest and compared between the patients with newly diagnosed untreated RPF and with lymphoma. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis was used to assess the potential diagnostic value of each quantitative parameter. Inter-reader concordance was also calculated. Results: Mean ages between patients with RPF and lymphoma were not significantly different (56.7 ± 6.2 years vs. 57.4 ± 12.3 years P = 0.595). Compared to those in patients with lymphoma, homogeneous enhancement (65.2% vs. 94.7%, P = 0.027) and pelvic extension (52.2% vs. 89.5%, P = 0.017) were significantly more common while the involvement of additional nodes (78.3% vs. 5.3%, P < 0.001), suprarenal extension (60.9% vs. 15.8%, P = 0.004), and aortic displacement (43.5% vs. 5.3%, P = 0.006) were significantly less common in patients with RPF. Lesion size at the para-aorta was significantly greater in patients with lymphoma, compared with RPF patients (3.9 ± 1.2 cm vs. 1.8 ± 0.6 cm; P < 0.001). The attenuation values in three phases were not significantly different

  13. Differentiation of Lymphoma Presenting as Retroperitoneal Mass and Retroperitoneal Fibrosis: Evaluation with Multidetector-row Computed Tomography.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shuai; Chen, Min; Li, Chun-Mei; Song, Guo-Dong; Liu, Ying

    2017-03-20

    Retroperitoneal fibrosis (RPF) and lymphoma presenting as retroperitoneal mass may closely resemble each other and misdiagnosis may occur. This study investigated the differential imaging features of RPF and lymphoma which presented as a retroperitoneal soft tissue using multidetector-row computed tomography (MDCT). The 42 consecutive patients were included in this retrospective review, including 19 RPF patients (45.2%; including 13 males and 6 females; mean age: 56.7 ± 6.2 years) and 23 patients with lymphoma (54.8%; including 14 males and 9 females; mean age: 57.4 ± 12.3 years). An array of qualitative computed tomography (CT) features of lesions in 42 consecutive patients with newly diagnosed untreated RPF and lymphoma were retrospectively analyzed. The quantitative size of the lesion at the para-aortic region and attenuation in the precontrast, arterial, and portal phases were calculated in regions of interest and compared between the patients with newly diagnosed untreated RPF and with lymphoma. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis was used to assess the potential diagnostic value of each quantitative parameter. Inter-reader concordance was also calculated. Mean ages between patients with RPF and lymphoma were not significantly different (56.7 ± 6.2 years vs. 57.4 ± 12.3 years P = 0.595). Compared to those in patients with lymphoma, homogeneous enhancement (65.2% vs. 94.7%, P = 0.027) and pelvic extension (52.2% vs. 89.5%, P = 0.017) were significantly more common while the involvement of additional nodes (78.3% vs. 5.3%, P < 0.001), suprarenal extension (60.9% vs. 15.8%, P = 0.004), and aortic displacement (43.5% vs. 5.3%, P = 0.006) were significantly less common in patients with RPF. Lesion size at the para-aorta was significantly greater in patients with lymphoma, compared with RPF patients (3.9 ± 1.2 cm vs. 1.8 ± 0.6 cm; P < 0.001). The attenuation values in three phases were not significantly different between patients with RPF and

  14. Coronary CT angiography using 64 detector rows: methods and design of the multi-centre trial CORE-64

    PubMed Central

    Vavere, Andrea L.; Rochitte, Carlos E.; Niinuma, Hiroyuki; Arbab-Zadeh, Armin; Paul, Narinder; Hoe, John; de Roos, Albert; Yoshioka, Kunihiro; Lemos, Pedro A.; Bush, David E.; Lardo, Albert C.; Texter, John; Brinker, Jeffery; Cox, Christopher; Clouse, Melvin E.; Lima, João A. C.

    2012-01-01

    Multislice computed tomography (MSCT) for the noninvasive detection of coronary artery stenoses is a promising candidate for widespread clinical application because of its noninvasive nature and high sensitivity and negative predictive value as found in several previous studies using 16 to 64 simultaneous detector rows. A multi-centre study of CT coronary angiography using 16 simultaneous detector rows has shown that 16-slice CT is limited by a high number of nondiagnostic cases and a high false-positive rate. A recent meta-analysis indicated a significant interaction between the size of the study sample and the diagnostic odds ratios suggestive of small study bias, highlighting the importance of evaluating MSCT using 64 simultaneous detector rows in a multi-centre approach with a larger sample size. In this manuscript we detail the objectives and methods of the prospective “CORE-64” trial (“Coronary Evaluation Using Multidetector Spiral Computed Tomography Angiography using 64 Detectors”). This multi-centre trialwas unique in that it assessed the diagnostic performance of 64-slice CT coronary angiography in nine centres worldwide in comparison to conventional coronary angiography. In conclusion, the multi-centre, multi-institutional and multi-continental trial CORE-64 has great potential to ultimately assess the per-patient diagnostic performance of coronary CT angiography using 64 simultaneous detector rows. PMID:18998142

  15. Coronary CT angiography using 64 detector rows: methods and design of the multi-centre trial CORE-64.

    PubMed

    Miller, Julie M; Dewey, Marc; Vavere, Andrea L; Rochitte, Carlos E; Niinuma, Hiroyuki; Arbab-Zadeh, Armin; Paul, Narinder; Hoe, John; de Roos, Albert; Yoshioka, Kunihiro; Lemos, Pedro A; Bush, David E; Lardo, Albert C; Texter, John; Brinker, Jeffery; Cox, Christopher; Clouse, Melvin E; Lima, João A C

    2009-04-01

    Multislice computed tomography (MSCT) for the noninvasive detection of coronary artery stenoses is a promising candidate for widespread clinical application because of its non-invasive nature and high sensitivity and negative predictive value as found in several previous studies using 16 to 64 simultaneous detector rows. A multi-centre study of CT coronary angiography using 16 simultaneous detector rows has shown that 16-slice CT is limited by a high number of nondiagnostic cases and a high false-positive rate. A recent meta-analysis indicated a significant interaction between the size of the study sample and the diagnostic odds ratios suggestive of small study bias, highlighting the importance of evaluating MSCT using 64 simultaneous detector rows in a multi-centre approach with a larger sample size. In this manuscript we detail the objectives and methods of the prospective "CORE-64" trial ("Coronary Evaluation Using Multidetector Spiral Computed Tomography Angiography using 64 Detectors"). This multi-centre trial was unique in that it assessed the diagnostic performance of 64-slice CT coronary angiography in nine centres worldwide in comparison to conventional coronary angiography. In conclusion, the multi-centre, multi-institutional and multi-continental trial CORE-64 has great potential to ultimately assess the per-patient diagnostic performance of coronary CT angiography using 64 simultaneous detector rows.

  16. Significance of PQ interval in acquisition of coronary multidetector row computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Sano, Tomonari; Kondo, Takeshi; Matsutani, Hideyuki; Morita, Hitomi; Arai, Takehiro; Sekine, Takako; Takase, Shinichi; Oida, Akitsugu; Fukazawa, Hiroshi; Kodama, Takahide; Kondo, Makoto; Orihara, Tadaaki; Yamada, Norikazu; Narula, Jagat

    2009-12-01

    Since image quality obtained in the mid-diastolic [or slow filling (SF)] phase is generally superior to end-systolic image in coronary multidetector row computed tomography (MDCT), low heart rate (HR) comprises the most important factor for acquisition of high-quality images. However, despite HR <70 and optimum breath-hold, sometimes high quality images cannot be obtained in SF. We assessed the significance of PQ interval in acquisition of coronary MDCT. Of 541 consecutive patients who underwent coronary MDCT, 7 patients with incomplete breath-hold, 62 HR ≥70, and 70 arrhythmias were excluded. The remaining 402 patients (M: 222, 66±11 years), including 38 with first-degree atrioventricular block (1° AVB, PQ >200 ms) were evaluated. RR and PQ were measured on electrocardiogram and systolic and SF phase with 4-chamber cine cardiac computed tomography. SF significantly (p<0.0001) correlated with RR (SF=-471+0.720RR, r=0.887) in all subjects. The SF of without 1° AVB (292±97 ms) was significantly (p<0.0147) longer than that of with 1° AVB (251±121 ms), although RR was not significantly different between the two groups. The SF/RR of without 1° AVB (27.2±6.1%) was also significantly (p<0.0001) higher than that of with 1° AVB (22.7±8.0%). The coefficient of correlation between (RR-PQ) and SF [r=0.915, p<0.0001, SF=-362+0.742(RR-PQ)] was significantly (p<0.034) higher than that of correlation between RR and SF in all subjects. The SF of rank A image quality was significantly longer than that of rank B (p<0.0001) or rank C (p=0.0042). In critical HR (60-69 bpm), the optimum phase was ES in 7/139 patients without 1° AVB, and SF in 3/13 patients with 1° AVB (chi(2), p<0.0416). Since SF depends on (RR-PQ), if PQ is long in critical HR, it might be difficult to reconstruct high quality images in the SF phase.

  17. Determinants of aortic bioprosthetic valve calcification assessed by multidetector CT.

    PubMed

    Mahjoub, Haïfa; Mathieu, Patrick; Larose, Eric; Dahou, Abdelaziz; Sénéchal, Mario; Dumesnil, Jean-Gaston; Després, Jean-Pierre; Pibarot, Philippe

    2015-03-01

    Cusp calcification is the main mechanism leading to bioprosthetic heart valve (BPV) failure. Recent studies suggest that BPV calcification is an active rather than passive process probably modulated by several mechanisms including lipid-mediated inflammation and dysfunctional phosphocalcic metabolism. To identify the clinical and metabolic determinants of BPV calcification assessed by multidetector CT (MDCT). Presence of BPV calcification was assessed by MDCT in 194 patients who had undergone aortic valve replacement. A calcification score was individually calculated and expressed in mm(3). Patients also underwent a clinical evaluation, a Doppler echocardiographic exam, and a plasma lipid and phosphocalcic profile. 46 patients (24%) had BPV calcification (cusp calcification score >0 mm(3)). After adjustment for age, gender, and time interval since BPV implantation, increased calcium-phosphorus product (OR 1.11, 95% CI 1.01 to 1.23 per 1 unit; p=0.02) and the presence of prosthesis-patient mismatch (OR 3.67, 95% CI 1.25 to 10.6; p=0.01) were the strongest independent factors associated with BPV calcification. Calcium supplement intake, age and female gender were independently associated with increased calcium-phosphorus product. This study suggests that higher calcium-phosphorus product and prosthesis-patient mismatch promote BPV calcification. Furthermore, this study reports that calcium supplements, which are extensively prescribed in elderly patients, are independently associated with higher calcium-phosphorus product. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  18. Myocardial perfusion 320-row multidetector computed tomography-guided treatment strategy for the clinical management of patients with recent acute-onset chest pain: Design of the CArdiac cT in the treatment of acute CHest pain (CATCH)-2 randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Sørgaard, Mathias; Linde, Jesper J; Hove, Jens D; Petersen, Jan R; Jørgensen, Tem B S; Abdulla, Jawdat; Heitmann, Merete; Kragelund, Charlotte; Hansen, Thomas Fritz; Udholm, Patricia M; Pihl, Christian; Kühl, J Tobias; Engstrøm, Thomas; Jensen, Jan Skov; Høfsten, Dan E; Kelbæk, Henning; Kofoed, Klaus F

    2016-09-01

    Patients admitted with chest pain are a diagnostic challenge because the majority does not have coronary artery disease (CAD). Assessment of CAD with coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA) is safe, cost-effective, and accurate, albeit with a modest specificity. Stress myocardial computed tomography perfusion (CTP) has been shown to increase the specificity when added to CCTA, without lowering the sensitivity. This article describes the design of a randomized controlled trial, CATCH-2, comparing a clinical diagnostic management strategy of CCTA alone against CCTA in combination with CTP. Patients with acute-onset chest pain older than 50 years and with at least one cardiovascular risk factor for CAD are being prospectively enrolled to this study from 6 different clinical sites since October 2013. A total of 600 patients will be included. Patients are randomized 1:1 to clinical management based on CCTA or on CCTA in combination with CTP, determining the need for further testing with invasive coronary angiography including measurement of the fractional flow reserve in vessels with coronary artery lesions. Patients are scanned with a 320-row multidetector computed tomography scanner. Decisions to revascularize the patients are taken by the invasive cardiologist independently of the study allocation. The primary end point is the frequency of revascularization. Secondary end points of clinical outcome are also recorded. The CATCH-2 will determine whether CCTA in combination with CTP is diagnostically superior to CCTA alone in the management of patients with acute-onset chest pain. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Aortic valve area assessment: multidetector CT compared with cine MR imaging and transthoracic and transesophageal echocardiography.

    PubMed

    Pouleur, Anne-Catherine; le Polain de Waroux, Jean-Benoît; Pasquet, Agnès; Vanoverschelde, Jean-Louis J; Gerber, Bernhard L

    2007-09-01

    To prospectively compare the accuracy of multidetector computed tomographic (CT) measurements of the aortic valve area (AVA) with transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) and cine magnetic resonance (MR) measurements of this area for preoperative examination of patients undergoing cardiac surgery, with transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) as the reference standard. After giving informed consent for the institutional review board-approved study protocol, 48 patients (33 men, 15 women; mean age, 62 years+/-13 [standard deviation]) with (n=27) or without (n=21) aortic stenosis underwent multidetector CT, cine MR, TTE, and TEE before undergoing cardiac surgery. AVAs derived with manual planimetry by using cine short-axis multidetector CT, MR, and TEE images obtained through the aortic valve were compared among each other and with AVAs measured by using continuity equation TTE at regression and Bland-Altman analyses. The diagnostic accuracy of multidetector CT for detection of aortic stenosis was compared with that of TTE by using kappa statistics and receiver operating characteristic curves. Multidetector CT-derived AVA correlated highly with MR-derived (r=0.98, P<.001), TEE-derived (r=0.98, P<.001), and TTE-derived (r=0.96, P<.001) AVA. Multidetector CT planimetry AVAs (mean AVA+/-standard deviation, 2.5 cm2+/-1.7) were not significantly different from MR planimetry (2.4 cm2+/-1.8, P>.99) or TEE planimetery (2.5 cm2+/-1.7, P=.21) AVAs, but they were significantly larger than TTE-derived AVAs (2.0 cm2+/-1.5, P<.001). With TTE as the reference standard, multidetector CT correctly (kappa=0.88, P<.001) depicted all 21 normal, six of eight mildly stenotic (AVA>or=1.2 cm2 and <2.0 cm2), seven of eight moderately stenotic (AVA>or= 0.8 cm2 and <1.2 cm2), and 10 of 11 severely stenotic (AVA<0.8 cm2) valves. It also correctly depicted all 14 bicuspid valves identified with TEE, eight of which were missed with TTE. Multidetector CT enables accurate noninvasive assessment of the

  20. Penetrating wounds to the torso: evaluation with triple-contrast multidetector CT.

    PubMed

    Lozano, J Diego; Munera, Felipe; Anderson, Stephan W; Soto, Jorge A; Menias, Christine O; Caban, Kim M

    2013-01-01

    Penetrating injuries account for a large percentage of visits to emergency departments and trauma centers worldwide. Emergency laparotomy is the accepted standard of care in patients with a penetrating torso injury who are not hemodynamically stable and have a clinical indication for exploratory laparotomy, such as evisceration or gastrointestinal bleeding. Continuous advances in technology have made computed tomography (CT) an indispensable tool in the evaluation of many patients who are hemodynamically stable, have no clinical indication for exploratory laparotomy, and are candidates for conservative treatment. Multidetector CT may depict the trajectory of a penetrating injury and help determine what type of intervention is necessary on the basis of findings such as active arterial extravasation and major vascular, hollow viscus, or diaphragmatic injuries. Because multidetector CT plays an increasing role in the evaluation of patients with penetrating wounds to the torso, the radiologists who interpret these studies should be familiar with the CT findings that mandate intervention.

  1. A Study of Internal Thoracic Arteriovenous Principal Perforators by Using Multi-detector Row Computed Tomography Angiography.

    PubMed

    Okumura, Ko; Hashikawa, Kazunobu; Sakakibara, Shunsuke; Onishi, Hiroyuki; Terashi, Hiroto

    2016-01-01

    There are numerous reports of perforating branches from the intercostal spaces of the internal thoracic vessels. These branches have varying diameters, and a main perforating branch, the principal perforator, most often found in the second or third intercostal space. We report different results based on multi-detector row computed tomography. We evaluated 121 sides from 70 women scheduled for breast reconstruction with free lower abdominal skin flaps who underwent preoperative multi-detector row computed tomographic scan between June 2008 and June 2015. For primary reconstruction, we analyzed both sides, and for 1-sided secondary reconstruction, we analyzed only the unaffected side. We evaluated both early arterial phase and late venous phase 5-mm horizontal, cross-sectional, and volume-rendering images for perforation sites and internal thoracic arteriovenous perforating branches' intercostal space thickness. We analyzed differences in thickness between the internal thoracic arteries and veins and symmetry in cases involving both sides. Venous principal perforators nearly always perforated the same intercostal spaces as accompanying veins of arterial principal perforators (99.2%), forming arteriovenous principal perforators. We found 49 principal perforators in the first intercostal space (37.4%), 52 in the second intercostal space (39.7%), 23 in the third intercostal space (17.6%), 6 in the fourth intercostal space (4.6%), and 1 in the fifth intercostal space (0.7%). Of the 51 cases in which we studied both sides, 25 cases (49%) had principal perforators with bilateral symmetry. In contrast to findings from past reports, we found that internal thoracic arteriovenous principal perforators were often present in almost the same numbers in the first and second intercostal spaces.

  2. A Study of Internal Thoracic Arteriovenous Principal Perforators by Using Multi-detector Row Computed Tomography Angiography

    PubMed Central

    Hashikawa, Kazunobu; Sakakibara, Shunsuke; Onishi, Hiroyuki; Terashi, Hiroto

    2016-01-01

    Objective: There are numerous reports of perforating branches from the intercostal spaces of the internal thoracic vessels. These branches have varying diameters, and a main perforating branch, the principal perforator, most often found in the second or third intercostal space. We report different results based on multi-detector row computed tomography. Methods: We evaluated 121 sides from 70 women scheduled for breast reconstruction with free lower abdominal skin flaps who underwent preoperative multi-detector row computed tomographic scan between June 2008 and June 2015. For primary reconstruction, we analyzed both sides, and for 1-sided secondary reconstruction, we analyzed only the unaffected side. We evaluated both early arterial phase and late venous phase 5-mm horizontal, cross-sectional, and volume-rendering images for perforation sites and internal thoracic arteriovenous perforating branches’ intercostal space thickness. We analyzed differences in thickness between the internal thoracic arteries and veins and symmetry in cases involving both sides. Results: Venous principal perforators nearly always perforated the same intercostal spaces as accompanying veins of arterial principal perforators (99.2%), forming arteriovenous principal perforators. We found 49 principal perforators in the first intercostal space (37.4%), 52 in the second intercostal space (39.7%), 23 in the third intercostal space (17.6%), 6 in the fourth intercostal space (4.6%), and 1 in the fifth intercostal space (0.7%). Of the 51 cases in which we studied both sides, 25 cases (49%) had principal perforators with bilateral symmetry. Conclusions: In contrast to findings from past reports, we found that internal thoracic arteriovenous principal perforators were often present in almost the same numbers in the first and second intercostal spaces. PMID:26958104

  3. Internal Hernias in the Era of Multidetector CT: Correlation of Imaging and Surgical Findings.

    PubMed

    Doishita, Satoshi; Takeshita, Tohru; Uchima, Yasutake; Kawasaki, Masayasu; Shimono, Taro; Yamashita, Akiyoshi; Sugimoto, Michiko; Ninoi, Teruhisa; Shima, Hideki; Miki, Yukio

    2016-01-01

    Clinical diagnosis of internal hernias is challenging because of their nonspecific signs and symptoms. Many types of internal hernias have been defined: paraduodenal, small bowel mesentery-related, greater omentum-related, lesser sac, transverse mesocolon-related, pericecal, sigmoid mesocolon-related, falciform ligament, pelvic internal, and Roux-en-Y anastomosis-related. An internal hernia is a surgical emergency that can develop into intestinal strangulation and ischemia. Accurate preoperative diagnosis is crucial for appropriate management. Multidetector computed tomography (CT), with its thin-section axial images, high-quality multiplanar reformations, and three-dimensional images, currently plays an essential role in preoperative diagnosis of internal hernias. The diagnostic approach to internal hernias at multidetector CT includes detecting an intestinal closed loop, identifying the hernia orifice, and analyzing abnormal displacement of surrounding structures and key vessels around the hernia orifice and hernia sac. At each step, multidetector CT can depict pathognomonic findings. A saclike appearance suggests an intestinal closed loop in several types of internal hernias. Convergence, engorgement, and twisting of mesenteric vessels in the hernia orifice can be seen clearly at multidetector CT, especially with use of multiplanar reformations. For definitive diagnosis of an internal hernia, analysis of displacement of anatomic landmarks around the hernia orifice is particularly important, and thin-section images provide the required information. Detailed knowledge of the anatomy, etiology, and imaging landmarks of the various hernia types is also necessary. Familiarity with the appearances of internal hernias at multidetector CT allows accurate and specific preoperative diagnosis. (©)RSNA, 2015.

  4. Multidetector CT: what do we do with all the images generated?

    PubMed

    Strickland, N H

    2004-01-01

    Multidetector spiral CT technology generates much more acquisition data than the previous generation of single detector spiral CT machines, and permits more sophisticated and better quality post-processing options, which in turn generate even more imaging data. Such large quantities of data have repercussions upon the mode of image interpretation (hard copy vs soft copy), the speed of data transmission and the storage of these data.

  5. Multidetector CT and postprocessing in planning and assisting in minimally invasive bronchoscopic airway interventions.

    PubMed

    Nair, Arjun; Godoy, Myrna C; Holden, Emma L; Madden, Brendan P; Chua, Felix; Ost, David E; Roos, Justus E; Naidich, David P; Vlahos, Ioannis

    2012-01-01

    A widening spectrum of increasingly advanced bronchoscopic techniques is available for the diagnosis and treatment of various bronchopulmonary diseases. The evolution of computed tomography (CT)-multidetector CT in particular-has paralleled these advances. The resulting development of two-dimensional and three-dimensional (3D) postprocessing techniques has complemented axial CT interpretation in providing more anatomically familiar information to the pulmonologist. Two-dimensional techniques such as multiplanar recontructions and 3D techniques such as virtual bronchoscopy can provide accurate guidance for increasing yield in transbronchial needle aspiration and transbronchial biopsy of mediastinal and hilar lymph nodes. Sampling of lesions located deeper within the lung periphery via bronchoscopic pathways determined at virtual bronchoscopy are also increasingly feasible. CT fluoroscopy for real-time image-guided sampling is now widely available; electromagnetic navigation guidance is being used in select centers but is currently more costly. Minimally invasive bronchoscopic techniques for restoring airway patency in obstruction caused by both benign and malignant conditions include mechanical strategies such as airway stent insertion and ablative techniques such as electrocauterization and cryotherapy. Multidetector CT postprocessing techniques provide valuable information for planning and surveillance of these treatment methods. In particular, they optimize the evaluation of dynamic obstructive conditions such as tracheobronchomalacia, especially with the greater craniocaudal coverage now provided by wide-area detectors. Multidetector CT also provides planning information for bronchoscopic treatment of bronchopleural fistulas and bronchoscopic lung volume reduction for carefully selected patients with refractory emphysema.

  6. Coronary artery calcium score: influence of reconstruction interval at 16-detector row CT with retrospective electrocardiographic gating.

    PubMed

    Schlosser, Thomas; Hunold, Peter; Schmermund, Axel; Kühl, Hilmar; Waltering, Kai-Uwe; Debatin, Jörg F; Barkhausen, Jörg

    2004-11-01

    In 30 patients, Agatston and volumetric scores were assessed by using retrospectively gated multi-detector row computed tomography (CT). For each patient, 10 data sets were created at different times and were evenly spaced throughout the cardiac cycle. For each reconstruction, patients were assigned a percentile that described the level of cardiovascular risk. Nineteen (63%) of 30 patients could be assigned to more than one risk group depending on the reconstruction interval used. Agatston and volumetric scores both proved highly dependent on the reconstruction interval used (coefficient of variation, < or =63.1%) even with the most advanced CT scanners. Accurate and reproducible quantification of coronary calcium seems to require analysis of multiple reconstructions.

  7. Fast scanning tomosynthesis for the detection of pulmonary nodules: diagnostic performance compared with chest radiography, using multidetector-row computed tomography as the reference.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Yoshitake; Jinzaki, Masahiro; Hasegawa, Ichiro; Shiomi, Eisuke; Sugiura, Hiroaki; Abe, Takayuki; Sato, Yuji; Kuribayashi, Sachio; Ogawa, Kenji

    2011-08-01

    : To evaluate the diagnostic performance of fast scanning tomosynthesis in comparison with that of chest radiography for the detection of pulmonary nodules, using multidetector-row computed tomography (MDCT) as the reference, and to assess the association of the true-positive fraction (TPF) with the size, CT attenuation value, and location of the nodules. : The institutional review board approved this study, and written informed consent was obtained from all patients. Fifty-seven patients with and 59 without pulmonary nodules underwent chest MDCT, fast scanning tomosynthesis, and radiography. The images of tomosynthesis and radiography were randomly read by 3 blinded radiologists; MDCT served as the reference standard. Free-response receiver-operating characteristic (FROC) and receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) analyses, Cochran-Armitage trend or Fisher exact test, a conditional logistic regression model, and McNemar test were used. : Both FROC and ROC analyses revealed significantly better performance (P < 0.01) of fast scanning tomosynthesis than radiography for the detection of pulmonary nodules. For fast scanning tomosynthesis, the average TPF and false-positive rate as determined by FROC analysis were 0.80 and 0.10, respectively. For both fast scanning tomosynthesis and radiography, the average TPF increased with increasing nodule size and CT attenuation values, and was lower for subpleural nodules (all P < 0.01). : The diagnostic performance of fast scanning tomosynthesis for the detection of pulmonary nodules was significantly superior to that of radiography. The TPF was affected by the size, CT attenuation value, and location of the nodule, in both fast scanning tomosynthesis and radiography.

  8. Dual-energy CT revisited with multidetector CT: review of principles and clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Karçaaltıncaba, Muşturay; Aktaş, Aykut

    2011-09-01

    Although dual-energy CT (DECT) was first conceived in the 1970s, it was not widely used for CT indications. Recently, the simultaneous acquisition of volumetric dual-energy data has been introduced using multidetector CT (MDCT) with two X-ray tubes and rapid kVp switching (gemstone spectral imaging). Two major advantages of DECT are material decomposition by acquiring two image series with different kVp and the elimination of misregistration artifacts. Hounsfield unit measurements by DECT are not absolute and can change depending on the kVp used for an acquisition. Typically, a combination of 80/140 kVp is used for DECT, but for some applications, 100/140 kVp is preferred. In this study, we summarized the clinical applications of DECT and included images that were acquired using the dual-source CT and rapid kVp switching. In general, unenhanced images can be avoided by using DECT for body and neurological applications; iodine can be removed from the image, and a virtual, non-contrast (water) image can be obtained. Neuroradiological applications allow for the removal of bone and calcium from the carotid and brain CT angiography. Thorax applications include perfusion imaging in patients with pulmonary thromboemboli and other chest diseases, xenon ventilation-perfusion imaging and solitary nodule characterization. Cardiac applications include dual-energy cardiac perfusion, viability and cardiac iron detection. The removal of calcific plaques from arteries, bone removal and aortic stent graft evaluation may be achieved in the vascular system. Abdominal applications include the detection and characterization of liver and pancreas masses, the diagnosis of steatosis and iron overload, DECT colonoscopy and CT cholangiography. Urinary system applications are urinary calculi characterization (uric acid vs. non-uric acid), renal cyst characterization and mass characterization. Musculoskeletal applications permit the differentiation of gout from pseudogout and a reduction of

  9. Role of (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography in diagnosis and management of pancreatic cancer; comparison with multidetector row computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging and endoscopic ultrasonography.

    PubMed

    Ergul, N; Gundogan, C; Tozlu, M; Toprak, H; Kadıoglu, H; Aydin, M; Cermik, T F

    2014-01-01

    We aimed to analyze the contribution of (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG PET/CT) imaging to the diagnosis and management of pancreatic cancer compared with multidetector row computed tomography (MDCT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS). We retrospectively scanned the data of 52 patients who were referred for FDG PET/CT imaging for evaluation of pancreatic lesions greater than 10mm. The diagnostic performances of 4 imaging methods and the impact of PET/CT on the management of pancreatic cancer were defined. Pancreatic adenocarcinoma was diagnosed in 33 of 52 patients (63%), 15 patients had benign diseases of pancreas (29%), and 4 patients were normal (8%). Sensitivity and NPV of EUS and PET/CT were equal (100%) and higher than MDCT and MRI. Specificity, PPV and NPV of PET/CT were significantly higher than MDCT. However, sensitivities of two imaging methods were not significantly different. There was no significant difference between PET/CT and MRI and EUS for these values. When the cut-off value of SUVmax was 3.2, the most effective sensitivity and specificity values were obtained. PET/CT contributed to the management of pancreatic cancer in 30% of patients. FDG PET/CT is a valuable imaging method for the diagnosis and management of pancreatic cancer, especially when applied along with EUS as first line diagnostic tools. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. and SEMNIM. All rights reserved.

  10. Multidetector CT (MD-CT) in the diagnosis of uncertain open globe injuries.

    PubMed

    Hoffstetter, P; Schreyer, A G; Schreyer, C I; Jung, E M; Heiss, P; Zorger, N; Framme, C

    2010-02-01

    To evaluate the significance of multislice CT for the diagnosis of uncertain penetrating globe injuries. Based on a retrospective chart review between 2002 and 2007, we identified 59 patients presenting with severe ocular trauma with uncertain rupture of the globe due to massive subconjunctival and/or anterior chamber hemorrhage. The IOP (intraocular pressure) was within normal range in all patients. High resolution multidetector CT (MD-CT) scans (16 slice scans) with axial and coronar reconstructions were performed in all patients. The affected eye was examined for signs of penetrating injury such as abnormal eye shape, scleral irregularities, lens dislocation or intravitreal hemorrhages. Four experienced radiologists read the CT scans independently. Beside the diagnosis, the relevant morphological criteria and the optimal plane orientation (axial or coronar) were specified. The sensitivity, specificity, and negative and positive predictive value were calculated. Additionally the interobserver variability was determined by applying the Cohen's kappa test. Surgical sclera inspections were performed in all cases as a standard of reference. The evaluations of the CT examination were compared with the surgery reports. 59 patients were evaluated (42 men, 17 women). The mean age was 29 years (range 7 - 91). In 17 patients a rupture of the globe was diagnosed during surgery. 12 of these 17 penetrating injuries (70.6 %) were classified correctly by MDCT, 5 of the 17 (29.4 %) were not detectable. 42 patients did not have an open globe injury. 41 of these patients were diagnosed correctly negative by MDCT, and one patient was classified false positive. This results in a sensitivity of 70 % with a specificity of 98 %. There was high inter-rater agreement with kappa values between 0.89 - 0.96. Most discrepancies were caused by wrong negative findings. The most frequent morphologic criteria for open globe injury were the deformation (n = 10) and the volume reduction (n = 7) of

  11. Multidetector CT and dentascan software: dosimetric evaluation and technique improvement.

    PubMed

    Fanucci, E; Leporace, M; Di Costanzo, G; Fiaschetti, V; Simonetti, G

    2006-02-01

    The development of new operative techniques in oral and maxillofacial surgery within the last few years has led to an increasing demand for Dentascan examination, also in paediatric patients. It is necessary to modify acquisition parameters to reduce the absorbed dose. The aim of this study was to define a Dentascan protocol in which a reduced X-ray dose could be used. Dosimeters were applied to the eyes, mouth, parotid glands, thyroid and back of the neck of an anthropomorphic Plexiglas phantom that underwent multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) Dentascan examinations. Both 120kV and 80 kV were used to study the mandibular and maxillary arches. Examinations obtained with the 80 kV protocol showed a ten-fold reduction in the absorbed dose, without affecting image quality. We suggest a Dentascan protocol that reduces the X-ray dose administered to the patient while ensuring the same high diagnostic accuracy.

  12. Isolation of the left subclavian artery-origin from the left pulmonary artery by way of ductus arteriosus: multidetector row computed tomographic angiographic imaging.

    PubMed

    Jesudian, Vimala; Ravikumar, Radhakrishnan; Kumar, R Suresh

    2009-05-01

    Right aortic arch with isolation of the left subclavian artery is a rare anomaly. It has been reported to occur with conotruncal anomalies and may be associated with 22q11 deletion. Multidetector-row computed tomographic angiogram images of a 15-year-old African boy with Tetralogy of Fallot who had right aortic arch and isolated left subclavian artery arising from the left pulmonary artery by way of ductus arteriosus are presented.

  13. High pitch CT in triple rule-out studies: Radiation dose and image quality compared to multidetector CT.

    PubMed

    Fernández del Valle, A; Delgado Sánchez-Gracián, C; Oca Pernas, R; Grande Astorquiza, A; Bustos Fiore, A; Trinidad López, C; Tardáguila de la Fuente, G

    2015-01-01

    To compare the image quality and radiation dose from high pitch dual source CT (128-DSCT) versus those from retrospective acquisition with 64-row multidetector CT (64-MDCT) in triple rule-out studies. We retrospectively studied 60 patients with acute chest pain: 30 with a retrospective EKG acquisition with 64-MDCT and 30 with high pitch 128-DSCT. We quantitatively analyzed the image quality by calculating the vascular density, muscular density (DM), noise, vascular density/noise ratio (VDNR), and contrast/noise ratio (CNR). We qualitatively evaluated the artifacts in the vena cava, aorta, and coronary arteries. We estimated the effective dose (ED) of radiation by means of the dose-length product. There were no significant differences between 128-DSCT and 64-MDCT in the vascular density. The VDNR and CNR were higher on 128-DSCT than on 64-MDCT in the aorta (VDNR: 28.9 ± 11.7 vs. 20 ± 5.5; CNR: 24.4 ± 10.9 vs. 16.8 ± 5.4; P<.01), in the pulmonary arteries (VDNR: 25.5 ± 10 vs. 20.6 ± 6.5; CNR: 24.5 ± 5.4 vs. 17.4 ± 6.4; P<.01), and in the coronary arteries (VDNR: 25.9 ± 8.2 vs. 18.9 ± 4.9; CNR: 24.9 ± 8.2 vs. 15.6 ± 4.6; P<.01). There were fewer artifacts in the coronary arteries on 128-DSCT than on 64-MDCT (3 vs. 34 nondiagnostic segments; P<.001), and the ED in 128-DSCT was lower than in 64-MDCT (13.77 ± 4 vs. 2.77 ± 0.6 mSv; P<.001). In triple rule-out studies, high pitch 128-DSCT delivers a lower dose of radiation and provides better image quality than retrospective acquisition with 64-MDCT. Copyright © 2014 SERAM. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  14. Multidetector CT of carpal injuries: anatomy, fractures, and fracture-dislocations.

    PubMed

    Kaewlai, Rathachai; Avery, Laura L; Asrani, Ashwin V; Abujudeh, Hani H; Sacknoff, Richard; Novelline, Robert A

    2008-10-01

    Fractures and dislocations of the carpal bones are more common in young active patients. These injuries can lead to pain, dysfunction, and loss of productivity. Conventional radiography remains the primary imaging modality for evaluation of suspected carpal fractures and dislocations. However, multidetector computed tomography (CT) is playing an increasingly important role, especially in the following situations: (a) when results from initial radiographs are negative in patients with suspected carpal fractures, (b) when initial radiographic findings are indeterminate, and (c) when knowledge of the extent of carpal fractures or dislocations is required before surgical treatment. The advantages of multidetector CT include quick and accurate diagnosis with availability in most emergency centers. Multidetector CT can easily display the extent of carpal fractures and dislocations, often depicting fractures that are occult at radiography. In addition, with multiplanar (two-dimensional) and volumetric (three-dimensional) reformation, pathologic conditions and anatomic relationships are better perceived. This information can be easily conveyed to orthopedic and trauma surgeons and can be crucial for surgical treatment and planning. (c) RSNA, 2008.

  15. Multidetector CT of blunt traumatic venous injuries in the chest, abdomen, and pelvis.

    PubMed

    Holly, Brian P; Steenburg, Scott D

    2011-01-01

    Venous injuries as a result of blunt trauma are rare. Even though current protocols for multidetector computed tomography (CT) of patients with trauma are designed to evaluate primarily the solid organs and arteries, blunt venous injuries may nevertheless be identified, or at least suspected, on the basis of the multidetector CT findings. Venous injuries are associated with high morbidity and mortality rates. Diagnosis of a possible venous injury is crucial because the physical findings of a venous injury are nonspecific and may be absent. This article aims to make the radiologist aware of various venous injuries caused by blunt trauma and to provide helpful hints to aid in the identification of venous injuries. Multidetector CT technology, in combination with interactive manipulation of the raw dataset, can be useful in the creation of multiplanar reconstructed images and in the identification of a venous injury caused by blunt trauma. Familiarity with direct and indirect signs of venous injuries, as well as with examples of blunt traumatic venous injuries in the chest, abdomen, and pelvis, will help in the diagnosis of these injuries.

  16. Multi-detector CT in the paediatric urinary tract.

    PubMed

    Damasio, M B; Darge, K; Riccabona, M

    2013-07-01

    The use of paediatric multi-slice CT (MSCT) is rapidly increasing worldwide. As technology advances its application in paediatric care is constantly expanding with an increasing need for radiation dose control and appropriate utilization. Recommendations on how and when to use CT for assessment of the paediatric urinary tract appear to be an important issue. Therefore the European Society of Paediatric Radiology (ESPR) uroradiology task force and European Society of Urogenital Radiology (ESUR) paediatric working groups created a proposal for performing renal CT in children that has recently been published. The objective of this paper is to discuss paediatric urinary tract CT (uro-CT) in more detail and depth. The specific aim is not only to offer general recommendations on clinical indications and optimization processes of paediatric CT examination, but also to address various childhood characteristics and phenomena that facilitate understanding the different approach and use of uro-CT in children compared to adults. According to ALARA principles, paediatric uro-CT should only be considered for selected indications provided high-level comprehensive US is not conclusive and alternative non-ionizing techniques such as MR are not available or appropriate. Optimization of paediatric uro-CT protocols (considering lower age-adapted kV and mAs) is mandatory, and the number of phases and acquisition series should be kept as few as possible.

  17. Penetrating diaphragmatic injury: accuracy of 64-section multidetector CT with trajectography.

    PubMed

    Dreizin, David; Borja, Maria J; Danton, Gary H; Kadakia, Kevin; Caban, Kim; Rivas, Luis A; Munera, Felipe

    2013-09-01

    To (a) determine the diagnostic performance of 64-section multidetector computed tomography (CT) trajectography for penetrating diaphragmatic injury (PDI), (b) determine the diagnostic performance of classic signs of diaphragmatic injury at 64-section multidetector CT, and (c) compare the performance of these signs with that of trajectography. This HIPAA-compliant retrospective study had institutional review board approval, with a waiver of the informed consent requirement. All patients who had experienced penetrating thoracoabdominal trauma, who had undergone preoperative 64-section multidetector CT of the chest and abdomen, and who had surgical confirmation of findings during a 2.5-year period were included in this study (25 male patients, two female patients; mean age, 32.6 years). After a training session, four trauma radiologists unaware of the surgical outcome independently reviewed all CT studies and scored the probability of PDI on a six-point scale. Collar sign, dependent viscera sign, herniation, contiguous injury on both sides of the diaphragm, discontinuous diaphragm sign, and transdiaphragmatic trajectory were evaluated for sensitivity, specificity, negative predictive value (NPV), and positive predictive value (PPV). Accuracies were determined and receiver operating characteristic curves were analyzed. Sensitivities for detection of PDI by using 64-section multidetector CT with postprocessing software ranged from 73% to 100%, specificities ranged from 50% to 92%, NPVs ranged from 71% to 100%, PPVs ranged from 68% to 92%, and accuracies ranged from 70% to 89%. Discontinuous diaphragm, herniation, collar, and dependent viscera signs were highly specific (92%-100%) but nonsensitive (0%-60%). Contiguous injury was generally more sensitive (80%-93% vs 73%-100%) but less specific (50%-67% vs 83%-92%) than transdiaphragmatic trajectory when patients with multiple entry wounds were included in the analysis. Transdiaphragmatic trajectory was a much more

  18. Multidetector-row computed tomography of thoracic aortic anomalies in dogs and cats: Patent ductus arteriosus and vascular rings

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Diagnosis of extracardiac intrathoracic vascular anomalies is of clinical importance, but remains challenging. Traditional imaging modalities, such as radiography, echocardiography, and angiography, are inherently limited by the difficulties of a 2-dimensional approach to a 3-dimensional object. We postulated that accurate characterization of malformations of the aorta would benefit from 3-dimensional assessment. Therefore, multidetector-row computed tomography (MDCT) was chosen as a 3-dimensional, new, and noninvasive imaging technique. The purpose of this study was to evaluate patients with 2 common diseases of the intrathoracic aorta, either patent ductus arteriosus or vascular ring anomaly, by contrast-enhanced 64-row computed tomography. Results Electrocardiography (ECG)-gated and thoracic nongated MDCT images were reviewed in identified cases of either a patent ductus arteriosus or vascular ring anomaly. Ductal size and morphology were determined in 6 dogs that underwent ECG-gated MDCT. Vascular ring anomalies were characterized in 7 dogs and 3 cats by ECG-gated MDCT or by a nongated thoracic standard protocol. Cardiac ECG-gated MDCT clearly displayed the morphology, length, and caliber of the patent ductus arteriosus in 6 affected dogs. Persistent right aortic arch was identified in 10 animals, 8 of which showed a coexisting aberrant left subclavian artery. A mild dilation of the proximal portion of the aberrant subclavian artery near its origin of the aorta was present in 4 dogs, and a diverticulum analogous to the human Kommerell's diverticulum was present in 2 cats. Conclusions Contrast-enhanced MDCT imaging of thoracic anomalies gives valuable information about the exact aortic arch configuration. Furthermore, MDCT was able to characterize the vascular branching patterns in dogs and cats with a persistent right aortic arch and the morphology and size of the patent ductus arteriosus in affected dogs. This additional information can be of help

  19. Assessment of modified Blalock-Taussig shunt in children with congenital heart disease using multidetector-row computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Nabo, Manal Mohamed Helmy; Hayabuchi, Yasunobu; Inoue, Miki; Watanabe, Noriko; Sakata, Miho; Kagami, Shoji

    2010-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the feasibility of multidetector-row computed tomography (MDCT) for the evaluation of modified Blalock-Taussig (B-T) shunt in children with congenital heart disease associated with reduced pulmonary blood flow. A total of 25 consecutive patients (mean age, 2.6 ± 3.6 years; range, 2 months-16 years) underwent MDCT angiography of the thorax with a 16-detector row scanner prior to cardiac catheterization. A total of 39 shunts (right, 22; left, 17) were included in the study. Conventional angiographic findings were used as the gold standard for the detection of B-T shunts. Shunt diameter was measured quantitatively and independently at four sites (the subclavian artery site, the pulmonary artery site, the widest site, and the stenotic site) on MDCT and on conventional invasive angiography. All B-T shunts were depicted on multiplanar reconstruction (MPR), maximum intensity projection (MIP), curved planar reconstruction (CPR), and three-dimensional volume-rendered (VR) images, enabling evaluation in all patients except for one with occluded shunt. There were excellent correlations between MDCT- and conventional angiography-based measurements of shunt diameter at the subclavian artery site, pulmonary artery site, and the widest site (R² = 0.46, 0.74 and 0.64, respectively; p < 0.0001 for each), although systematic overestimation was observed for MDCT (mean percentage of overestimation, 23.1 ± 32.4%). Stenotic site diameter and degree of stenosis showed a mild correlation (R² = 010 and 0.25, respectively; p < 0.01 for each). This study demonstrates that MDCT is a promising tool for the detection of lesions in B-T shunts.

  20. Multi-detector CT imaging in the postoperative orthopedic patient with metal hardware.

    PubMed

    Vande Berg, Bruno; Malghem, Jacques; Maldague, Baudouin; Lecouvet, Frederic

    2006-12-01

    Multi-detector CT imaging (MDCT) becomes routine imaging modality in the assessment of the postoperative orthopedic patients with metallic instrumentation that degrades image quality at MR imaging. This article reviews the physical basis and CT appearance of such metal-related artifacts. It also addresses the clinical value of MDCT in postoperative orthopedic patients with emphasis on fracture healing, spinal fusion or arthrodesis, and joint replacement. MDCT imaging shows limitations in the assessment of the bone marrow cavity and of the soft tissues for which MR imaging remains the imaging modality of choice despite metal-related anatomic distortions and signal alteration.

  1. Accurate estimation of global and regional cardiac function by retrospectively gated multidetector row computed tomography: comparison with cine magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Belge, Bénédicte; Coche, Emmanuel; Pasquet, Agnès; Vanoverschelde, Jean-Louis J; Gerber, Bernhard L

    2006-07-01

    Retrospective reconstruction of ECG-gated images at different parts of the cardiac cycle allows the assessment of cardiac function by multi-detector row CT (MDCT) at the time of non-invasive coronary imaging. We compared the accuracy of such measurements by MDCT to cine magnetic resonance (MR). Forty patients underwent the assessment of global and regional cardiac function by 16-slice MDCT and cine MR. Left ventricular (LV) end-diastolic and end-systolic volumes estimated by MDCT (134+/-51 and 67+/-56 ml) were similar to those by MR (137+/-57 and 70+/-60 ml, respectively; both P=NS) and strongly correlated (r=0.92 and r=0.95, respectively; both P<0.001). Consequently, LV ejection fractions by MDCT and MR were also similar (55+/-21 vs. 56+/-21%; P=NS) and highly correlated (r=0.95; P<0.001). Regional end-diastolic and end-systolic wall thicknesses by MDCT were highly correlated (r=0.84 and r=0.92, respectively; both P<0.001), but significantly lower than by MR (8.3+/-1.8 vs. 8.8+/-1.9 mm and 12.7+/-3.4 vs. 13.3+/-3.5 mm, respectively; both P<0.001). Values of regional wall thickening by MDCT and MR were similar (54+/-30 vs. 51+/-31%; P=NS) and also correlated well (r=0.91; P<0.001). Retrospectively gated MDCT can accurately estimate LV volumes, EF and regional LV wall thickening compared to cine MR.

  2. Lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing pancreatitis (autoimmune pancreatitis): evaluation with multidetector CT.

    PubMed

    Kawamoto, Satomi; Siegelman, Stanley S; Hruban, Ralph H; Fishman, Elliot K

    2008-01-01

    Lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing pancreatitis is a form of chronic pancreatitis characterized by a mixed inflammatory infiltrate that centers on the pancreatic ducts. It is a cause of benign pancreatic disease that can clinically mimic pancreatic cancer. Preoperative detection of lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing pancreatitis is important because patients usually respond to steroid therapy. Patients with lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing pancreatitis are often referred for computed tomography (CT) when they are suspected of having a pancreatic or biliary neoplasm; therefore, it is important to search for potential findings suggestive of lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing pancreatitis when typical findings of a pancreatic or biliary neoplasm are not found. Typical CT findings include diffuse or focal enlargement of the pancreas without dilatation of the main pancreatic duct. Focal enlargement is most commonly seen in the head of the pancreas, and the involved pancreas on contrast material-enhanced CT images may be iso-attenuating relative to the rest of the pancreas, or hypo-attenuating, especially during the early postcontrast phase. Thickening and contrast enhancement of the wall of the common bile duct and gallbladder may reflect inflammatory infiltrate and fibrosis associated with lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing pancreatitis. There are several features seen at CT that may help to differentiate lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing pancreatitis from pancreatic cancer, such as diffuse enlargement of the pancreas with minimal peripancreatic stranding in patients with obstructive jaundice, an absence of significant pancreatic atrophy, and an absence of significant main pancreatic duct dilatation. When these findings are encountered, clinical, other imaging, and serologic data should be evaluated.

  3. Dedicated multi-detector CT of the esophagus: spectrum of diseases.

    PubMed

    Ba-Ssalamah, Ahmed; Zacherl, Johannes; Noebauer-Huhmann, Iris Melanie; Uffmann, Martin; Matzek, Wolfgang Karl; Pinker, Katja; Herold, Christian; Schima, Wolfgang

    2009-01-01

    Multi-detector computed tomography (CT) offers new opportunities in the imaging of the gastrointestinal tract. Its ability to cover a large volume in a very short scan time, and in a single breath hold with thin collimation and isotropic voxels, allows the imaging of the entire esophagus with high-quality multiplanar reformation and 3D reconstruction. Proper distention of the esophagus and stomach (by oral administration of effervescent granules and water) and optimally timed administration of intravenous contrast material are required to detect and characterize disease. In contrast to endoscopy and double-contrast studies of the upper GI tract, CT provides information about both the esophageal wall and the extramural extent of disease. Preoperative staging of esophageal carcinoma appears to be the main indication for MDCT. In addition, MDCT allows detection of other esophageal malignancies, such as lymphoma and benign esophageal tumors, such as leiomyma. A diagnosis of rupture or fistula of the esophagus can be firmly established using MDCT. Furthermore, miscellaneous esophageal conditions, such as achalasia, esophagitis, diverticula, and varices, are incidental findings and can also be visualized with hydro-multi-detector CT. Multi-detector CT is a valuable tool for the evaluation of esophageal wall disease and serves as an adjunct to endoscopy.

  4. Hepatocellular carcinoma in cirrhotic patients at multidetector CT: hepatic venous phase versus delayed phase for the detection of tumour washout

    PubMed Central

    Furlan, A; Marin, D; Vanzulli, A; Patera, G Palermo; Ronzoni, A; Midiri, M; Bazzocchi, M; Lagalla, R; Brancatelli, G

    2011-01-01

    Objectives Our aim was to compare retrospectively hepatic venous and delayed phase images for the detection of tumour washout during multiphasic multidetector row CT (MDCT) of the liver in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Methods 30 cirrhotic patients underwent multiphasic MDCT in the 90 days before liver transplantation. MDCT was performed before contrast medium administration and during hepatic arterial hepatic venous and delayed phases, images were obtained at 12, 55 and 120 s after trigger threshold. Two radiologists qualitatively evaluated images for lesion attenuation. Tumour washout was evaluated subjectively and objectively. Tumour-to-liver contrast (TLC) was measured for all pathologically proven HCCs. Results 48 HCCs were detected at MDCT. 46 of the 48 tumours (96%) appeared as either hyper- or isoattenuating during the hepatic arterial phase subjective washout was present in 15 HCCs (33%) during the hepatic venous phase and in 35 (76%) during the delayed phase (p<0.001, McNemar’s test). Objective washout was present in 30 of the 46 HCCs (65%) during the hepatic venous phase and in 42 of the HCCs (91%) during the delayed phase (p=0.001). The delayed phase yielded significantly higher mean TLC absolute values compared with the hepatic venous phase (−16.1±10.8 HU vs −10.5±10.2 HU; p<0.001). Conclusions The delayed phase is superior to the hepatic venous phase for detection of tumour washout of pathologically proven HCC in cirrhotic patients. PMID:21081569

  5. Improvement in the quality of the cardiac vein images by optimizing the scan protocol of multidetector-row computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Hara, Tetsuya; Yamashiro, Kohei; Okajima, Katsunori; Hayashi, Takatoshi; Kajiya, Teishi

    2009-11-01

    The present study aimed at optimizing the scan protocol for multidetector-row computed tomography (MDCT) to adequately visualize coronary veins. Circulation time (Cir.T) was defined as the time period from the injection of contrast media into the coronary artery to the pervasion of the contrast media into the coronary sinus as observed by coronary angiography. We investigated the relation between the Cir.T and echocardiographic parameters in 64 patients. The left ventricular end-diastolic diameter (LVDd) and left ventricular end-systolic diameter (LVDs) were correlated with the Cir.T (r = 0.58, P < 0.0001, and r = 0.60, P < 0.0001 respectively). In addition, the left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) was negatively correlated with the Cir.T (r = 0.48, P < 0.0001). The average Cir. T was longer in patients with LVEF < 35% (8.0 s vs 6.7 s; P < 0.05) or LVDd > 55 mm (7.9 s vs 6.2 s; P < 0.05) than in the other patients. The quality of the MDCT images of the coronary veins obtained at different scan timings (coronary artery phase and 10 s or 15 s after the coronary artery phase) were graded and classified into four categories (0 = worst, 3 = best) in 25 patients with LVEF < 35%. The delays of 10 and 15 s after the coronary artery phase significantly improved the mean image quality (P < 0.05). The Cir.T was prolonged in patients with low LVEF and LV dilation. An appropriate delay improved the quality of the MDCT images of the coronary veins in patients with LV dysfunction.

  6. Multidetector CT for Evaluation of the Extrapleural Space.

    PubMed

    Santamarina, Mario G; Beddings, Ignacio; Lermanda Holmgren, Guillermo V; Opazo Sanchez, Hector; Volpacchio, Mariano M

    2017-01-01

    The extrapleural space (EPS) is an anatomic space at the periphery of the chest that can be involved in a number of disease processes. This space lies between the inner surface of the ribs and the parietal pleura and contains adipose tissue, loose connective tissue, lymph nodes, vessels, endothoracic fascia, and the innermost intercostal muscle. It is often overlooked on cross-sectional imaging studies and almost invariably overlooked on conventional radiographic studies. At conventional radiography, the EPS occasionally can be seen when there is extrapleural fat proliferation, which might be confused with pleural thickening or pleural effusion. Knowledge of the normal anatomy of the EPS depicted at computed tomography (CT) and of the relationship of the EPS with parenchymal, pleural, and chest wall processes is key to the detection of extrapleural abnormalities. Disease entities that most commonly affect the EPS include chronic inflammatory disorders, infection, trauma, and neoplasms. Chronic inflammatory conditions and infectious processes of the lungs and pleurae induce adipocyte proliferation adjacent to the inflamed tissue, resulting in increased extrapleural fat. Chest wall trauma with extrapleural hematoma formation causes characteristic CT findings that enable differentiation of the extrapleural hematoma from hemothorax and warrant a different treatment approach. Extrapleural air is commonly seen in patients with pneumomediastinum and should be distinguished from pneumothorax because it requires a different treatment approach. Intrathoracic neoplasms can cause an increase in the attenuation of normal extrapleural fat owing to pleural inflammation, lymphatic obstruction, lymphangitic spread, or direct invasion by tumor. The normal and pathologic appearances of the EPS, as depicted at thoracic CT, and the differential diagnosis of findings in the EPS are reviewed. (©)RSNA, 2017.

  7. Assessment of trabecular bone structure of the calcaneus using multi-detector CT: correlation with microCT and biomechanical testing.

    PubMed

    Diederichs, Gerd; Link, Thomas M; Kentenich, Marie; Schwieger, Karsten; Huber, Markus B; Burghardt, Andrew J; Majumdar, Sharmila; Rogalla, Patrik; Issever, Ahi S

    2009-05-01

    The prediction of bone strength can be improved when determining bone mineral density (BMD) in combination with measures of trabecular microarchitecture. The goal of this study was to assess parameters of trabecular bone structure and texture of the calcaneus by clinical multi-detector row computed tomography (MDCT) in an experimental in situ setup and to correlate these parameters with microCT (microCT) and biomechanical testing. Thirty calcanei in 15 intact cadavers were scanned using three different protocols on a 64-slice MDCT scanner with an in-plane pixel size of 208 microm and 500 microm slice thickness. Bone cores were harvested from each specimen and microCT images with a voxel size of 16 microm were obtained. After image coregistration, trabecular bone structure and texture were evaluated in identical regions on the MDCT images. After data acquisition, uniaxial compression testing was performed. Significant correlations between MDCT- and microCT-derived measures of bone volume fraction (BV/TV), trabecular thickness (Tb.Th) and trabecular separation (Tb.Sp) were found (range, R(2)=0.19-0.65, p<0.01 or 0.05). The MDCT-derived parameters of volumetric BMD, app. BV/TV, app. Tb.Th and app. Tb.Sp were capable of predicting 60%, 63%, 53% and 25% of the variation in bone strength (p<0.01). When combining those measures with one additional texture index (either GLCM, TOGLCM or MF.euler), prediction of mechanical competence was significantly improved to 86%, 85%, 71% and 63% (p<0.01). In conclusion, this study showed the feasibility of trabecular microarchitecture assessment using MDCT in an experimental setup simulating the clinical situation. Multivariate models of BMD or structural parameters combined with texture indices improved prediction of bone strength significantly and might provide more reliable estimates of fracture risk in patients.

  8. Multidetector CT of expected findings and complications after contemporary inguinal hernia repair surgery

    PubMed Central

    Tonolini, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    Inguinal hernia repair (IHR) with prosthetic mesh implantation is the most common procedure in general surgery, and may be performed using either an open or laparoscopic approach. This paper provides an overview of contemporary tension-free IHR techniques and materials, and illustrates the expected postoperative imaging findings and iatrogenic injuries. Emphasis is placed on multidetector CT, which represents the ideal modality to comprehensively visualize the operated groin region and deeper intra-abdominal structures. CT consistently depicts seroma, mesh infections, hemorrhages, bowel complications and urinary bladder injuries, and thus generally provides a consistent basis for therapeutic choice. Since radiologists are increasingly requested to investigate suspected iatrogenic complications, this paper aims to provide an increased familiarity with early CT studies after IHR, including complications and normal postoperative appearances such as focal pseudolesions, in order to avoid misinterpretation and inappropriate management. PMID:27460285

  9. Calcified plaque: measurement of area at thin-section flat-panel CT and 64-section multidetector CT and comparison with histopathologic findings.

    PubMed

    Sarwar, Ammar; Rieber, Johannes; Mooyaart, Eline A Q; Seneviratne, Sujith K; Houser, Stuart L; Bamberg, Fabian; Raffel, O Christopher; Gupta, Rajiv; Kalra, Mannudeep K; Pien, Homer; Lee, Hang; Brady, Thomas J; Hoffmann, Udo

    2008-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the blooming artifacts in ex vivo coronary arteries at multidetector computed tomography (CT) and flat-panel-volume CT by comparing measured areas of calcified plaque with respect to the reference standard of histopathologic findings. Three ex vivo hearts were scanned with multidetector CT and flat-panel-volume CT after institutional review board approval. The area of calcified plaque was measured at histopathologic examination, multidetector CT, and flat-panel-volume CT. The plaque area was overestimated at multidetector CT by 400% (4.61/1.15) on average, and the predicted difference between the measurements was significant (3.46 mm(2), P = .018). The average overestimation of plaque area at flat-panel-volume CT was twofold (214% [2.18/1.02]), and the predicted difference was smaller (1.16 mm(2), P = .08). The extent of the blooming artifact in visualizing calcified coronary plaque is reduced by using flat-panel-volume CT. (c) RSNA, 2008.

  10. Minimizing the acquisition phase in coronary CT angiography using the second generation 320-row CT.

    PubMed

    Tomizawa, Nobuo; Kanno, Shigeaki; Maeda, Eriko; Akahane, Masaaki; Torigoe, Rumiko; Ohtomo, Kuni

    2014-07-01

    We aimed to compare the radiation dose and image quality of a minimal phase window centered at 77 % compared with a wide phase window in coronary CT angiography using the second-generation 320-row CT. Eighty patients with heart rate ≤75 bpm were retrospectively included. The first 40 patients underwent scanning with a wide phase window (65-85 %), while the last 40 patients underwent scanning with a minimal phase window centered at 77 %. Subjective image quality was graded using a 4-point scale (4 = excellent). Image noise and contrast-to-noise ratio at the proximal segments were also analyzed. The mean effective dose was derived from the dose length product multiplied by a chest conversion coefficient (κ = 0.014 mSv mGy(-1) cm(-1)). Minimal phase window scanning centered at 77 % reduced the radiation dose by 30 % compared with wide phase window scanning (1.7 vs 2.4 mSv, p = 0.0009). The subjective image quality showed no significant difference (3.75 vs 3.76, p = 0.77). No significant difference was observed in the image noise, CT number, and contrast-to-noise ratio. Radiation dose could be reduced while maintaining image quality by use of a minimal phase window centered at 77 % compared with a wide phase window in coronary CT angiography using the second generation 320-row CT.

  11. Usefulness of 40-slice multidetector row computed tomography to detect coronary disease in patients prior to cardiac valve surgery.

    PubMed

    Pouleur, Anne-Catherine; le Polain de Waroux, Jean-Benoît; Kefer, Joëlle; Pasquet, Agnès; Coche, Emmanuel; Vanoverschelde, Jean-Louis; Gerber, Bernhard L

    2007-12-01

    Preoperative identification of significant coronary artery disease (CAD) in patients prior to valve surgery requires systematic invasive coronary angiography. The purpose of this current prospective study was to evaluate whether exclusion of CAD by multi-detector CT (MDCT) might potentially avoid systematic cardiac catheterization in these patients. Eighty-two patients (53 males, 62 +/- 13 years) scheduled to undergo valve surgery underwent 40-slice MDCT before invasive quantitative coronary angiography (QCA). According to QCA, 15 patients had CAD (5 one-vessel, 6 two-vessel and 4 three-vessel disease). The remaining 67 patients had no CAD. On a per-vessel basis, MDCT correctly identified 27/29 (sensitivity 93%) vessels with and excluded 277/299 vessels (specificity 93%) without CAD. On a per-patient basis, MDCT correctly identified 14/15 patients with (sensitivity 93%) and 60/67 patients without CAD (specificity 90%). Positive and negative predictive values of MDCT were 67% and 98%. Performing invasive angiography only in patients with abnormal MDCT might have avoided QCA in 60/82 (73%). MDCT could be potentially useful in the preoperative evaluation of patients with valve disease. By selecting only those patients with coronary lesions to undergo invasive coronary angiography, it could avoid cardiac catheterization in a large number of patients without CAD.

  12. MULTIDETECTOR-ROW COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY PATTERNS OF BRONCHOESPHAGEAL ARTERY HYPERTROPHY AND SYSTEMIC-TO-PULMONARY FISTULA IN DOGS.

    PubMed

    Ledda, Gianluca; Caldin, Marco; Mezzalira, Giorgia; Bertolini, Giovanna

    2015-01-01

    Anomalies involving arterial branches in the lungs are one of the causes of hemoptysis in humans and dogs. Congenital and acquired patterns of bronchoesophageal artery hypertrophy have been reported in humans based on CT characteristics. The purpose of this retrospective study was to describe clinical, echocardiographic, and multidetector computed tomography features of bronchoesophageal artery hypertrophy and systemic-to-pulmonary arterial communications in a sample of 14 dogs. Two main vascular patterns were identified in dogs that resembled congenital and acquired conditions reported in humans. Pattern 1 appeared as an aberrant origin of the right bronchoesophageal artery, normal origin of the left one, and enlargement of both the bronchial and esophageal branches that formed a dense network terminating in a pulmonary artery through an orifice. Pattern 2 appeared as a normal origin of both right and left bronchoesophageal arteries, with an enlarged and tortuous course along the bronchi to the periphery of the lung, where they communicated with subsegmental pulmonary arteries. Dogs having Pattern 1 also had paraesophageal and esophageal varices, with the latter being confirmed by videoendoscopy examination. Authors conclude that dogs with Pattern 1 should be differentiated from dogs with other congenital vascular systemic-to-pulmonary connections. Dogs having Pattern 2 should be evaluated for underlying pleural or pulmonary diseases. Bronchoesophageal artery hypertrophy can be accompanied by esophageal venous engorgement and should be included in the differential diagnosis for esophageal and paraesophageal varices in dogs.

  13. Virtual anthropology and forensic identification using multidetector CT.

    PubMed

    Dedouit, F; Savall, F; Mokrane, F-Z; Rousseau, H; Crubézy, E; Rougé, D; Telmon, N

    2014-04-01

    Virtual anthropology is made possible by modern cross-sectional imaging. Multislice CT (MSCT) can be used for comparative bone and dental identification, reconstructive identification and lesion identification. Comparative identification, the comparison of ante- and post-mortem imaging data, can be performed on both teeth and bones. Reconstructive identification, a considerable challenge for the radiologist, identifies the deceased by determining sex, geographical origin, stature and age at death. Lesion identification combines virtual autopsy and virtual anthropology. MSCT can be useful in palaeopathology, seeking arthropathy, infection, oral pathology, trauma, tumours, haematological disorders, stress indicators or occupational stress in bones and teeth. We examine some of the possibilities offered by this new radiological subspeciality that adds a new dimension to the work of the forensic radiologist. A multidisciplinary approach is crucial and involves communication and data exchange between radiologists, forensic pathologists, anthropologists and radiographers.

  14. Virtual anthropology and forensic identification using multidetector CT

    PubMed Central

    Savall, F; Mokrane, F-Z; Rousseau, H; Crubézy, E; Rougé, D; Telmon, N

    2014-01-01

    Virtual anthropology is made possible by modern cross-sectional imaging. Multislice CT (MSCT) can be used for comparative bone and dental identification, reconstructive identification and lesion identification. Comparative identification, the comparison of ante- and post-mortem imaging data, can be performed on both teeth and bones. Reconstructive identification, a considerable challenge for the radiologist, identifies the deceased by determining sex, geographical origin, stature and age at death. Lesion identification combines virtual autopsy and virtual anthropology. MSCT can be useful in palaeopathology, seeking arthropathy, infection, oral pathology, trauma, tumours, haematological disorders, stress indicators or occupational stress in bones and teeth. We examine some of the possibilities offered by this new radiological subspeciality that adds a new dimension to the work of the forensic radiologist. A multidisciplinary approach is crucial and involves communication and data exchange between radiologists, forensic pathologists, anthropologists and radiographers. PMID:24234584

  15. Assessment of non-invasive chronic fungal rhinosinusitis by cone beam CT: comparison with multidetector CT findings.

    PubMed

    Yamauchi, Tomohiko; Tani, Akiko; Yokoyama, Shuji; Ogawa, Hiroshi

    2017-08-09

    To investigate the accuracy of cone beam CT (CBCT) to diagnose non-invasive chronic fungal rhinosinusitis. Preoperative CT evaluation of non-invasive chronic fungal rhinosinusitis was performed by CBCT (3D Accuitomo 170(®)) and traditional multidetector CT (MDCT) (Aquilion 32(®)) in 13 and 38 patients with non-invasive chronic fungal maxillary sinusitis, respectively, in different facilities. Detection of intrasinus calcification was compared between these two groups. Detection of intrasinus calcification in patients with non-invasive chronic fungal maxillary sinusitis was higher in the MDCT group (84.2%) than the CBCT group (46.2%). CBCT is inferior to MDCT in detection of intrasinus calcification in patients with non-invasive chronic fungal maxillary sinusitis. CBCT is frequently used in the screening of the paranasal lesion, but it is not enough to evaluate non-invasive chronic fungal maxillary sinusitis alone. Retrospective study.

  16. Quantitative measurement of radiofrequency volumetric tissue reduction by multidetector CT in patients with inferior turbinate hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Bahadir, Osman; Kosucu, Polat

    2012-12-01

    To objectively assess the efficacy of radiofrequency thermal ablation of inferior turbinate hypertrophy. Thirty-five patients with nasal obstruction secondary to inferior turbinate hypertrophy were prospectively enrolled. Radiofrequency energy was delivered to four sites in each inferior turbinate. Patients were evaluated before and 8 weeks after intervention. Subjective evaluation of nasal obstruction was performed using a visual analogue scale (VAS), and objective evaluation of the turbinate volume reduction was calculated using multidetector CT. Volumetric measurements of the preoperative inferior turbinate were compared with postoperative values on both sides. The great majority of patients (91.4%) exhibited subjective postoperative improvement. Mean obstruction (VAS) improved significantly from 7.45±1.48 to 3.54±1.96. Significant turbinate volume reduction was achieved by the surgery on both right and left sides [(preoperative vs. postoperative, right: 6.55±1.62cm(3) vs. 5.10±1.47cm(3), (P<0.01); left: 6.72±1.53cm(3) vs. 5.00±1.37cm(3), (P<0.01)] respectively. Radiofrequency is a safe and effective surgical procedure in reducing turbinate volume in patients with inferior turbinate hypertrophy. Multidetector CT is an objective method of assessment in detecting radiofrequency turbinate volume reduction. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Update on multidetector coronary CT angiography of coronary stents: in vitro evaluation of 29 different stent types with dual-source CT.

    PubMed

    Maintz, David; Burg, Matthias C; Seifarth, Harald; Bunck, Alexander C; Ozgün, Murat; Fischbach, Roman; Jürgens, Kai Uwe; Heindel, Walter

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to test a large sample of the latest coronary artery stents using four image reconstruction approaches with respect to lumen visualization, lumen attenuation, and image noise in dual-source multidetector row CT (DSCT) in vitro and to provide a CT catalogue of currently used coronary artery stents. Twenty-nine different coronary artery stents (19 steel, 6 cobalt-chromium, 2 tantalum, 1 iron, 1 magnesium) were examined in a coronary artery phantom (vessel diameter 3 mm, intravascular attenuation 250 HU, extravascular density -70 HU). Stents were imaged in axial orientation with standard parameters: 32 x 0.6 collimation, pitch 0.24, 400 mAs, 120 kV, rotation time 0.33 s. Image reconstructions were obtained with four different convolution kernels (soft, medium-soft, standard high-resolution, stent-dedicated). To evaluate visualization characteristics of the stent, the lumen diameter, intraluminal density, and noise were measured. The stent-dedicated kernel offered best average lumen visualization (54 +/- 8.3%) and most realistic lumen attenuation (222 +/- 44 HU) at the expense of increased noise (23.9 +/- 1.9 HU) compared with standard CTA protocols (p < 0.001 for all). The magnesium stent showed the least artifacts with a lumen visibility of 90%. The majority of stents (79%) exhibited a lumen visibility of 50-59%. Less than half of the stent lumen was visible in only six stents. Stent lumen visibility largely varies depending on the stent type. Magnesium is by far more favorable a stent material with regard to CT imaging when compared with the more common materials steel, cobalt-chromium, or tantalum. The magnesium stent exhibits a lumen visibility of 90%, whereas the majority of the other stents exhibit a lumen visibility of 50-59%.

  18. Multidetector CT in emergency radiology: acute and generalized non-traumatic abdominal pain

    PubMed Central

    Paolantonio, Pasquale; Rengo, Marco; Ferrari, Riccardo

    2016-01-01

    Multidetector CT (MDCT) is an imaging technique that provides otherwise unobtainable information in the diagnostic work-up of patients presenting with acute abdominal pain. A correct working diagnosis depends essentially on understanding the individual patient's clinical data and laboratory findings. In haemodynamically stable patients with acute severe and generalized abdominal pain, MDCT is now the preferred imaging test and gives invaluable diagnostic information, also in unstable patients after stabilization. In this descriptive review, we focus our attention on acute, severe and generalized or undifferentiated non-traumatic abdominal pain. The main differential diagnoses are acute pancreatitis, gastrointestinal perforation, ruptured abdominal aneurysm and acute mesenteric ischaemia. We will provide radiologist readers with a technical guide to optimize MDCT imaging protocols and list the major CT signs essential to reach a correct diagnosis and guide the best treatment. PMID:26689097

  19. Mandibular arteriovenous malformation: A rare life-threatening condition depicted on multidetector CT angiography

    PubMed Central

    Dwivedi, Amit Nandan Dhar; Pandey, Anubha; Kumar, Ishan; Agarwal, Arjit

    2014-01-01

    Arteriovenous malformation (AVM) of the mandible is a rare and potentially life-threatening condition which can lead to massive hemorrhage. The following is a description where a large mandibular AVM presented with torrential bleeding following tooth extraction for caries. An orthopantomogram (OPG) was performed which was suggestive of aneurysmal bone cyst or ameloblastoma. A computed tomography (CT) angiography revealed a large mandibular AVM with submandibular extension. It is important for both clinicians and radiologist to be aware of this type of lesion that can have life-threatening complications. It is important to define the anatomical location and the feeder vessels of the entity in detail preoperatively. This communication highlights the common differential and use of multidetector CT (MDCT) angiography along with other imaging modalities to prevent a fatal hemorrhage and arrive at a correct diagnosis. PMID:24959049

  20. High resolution multidetector CT aided tissue analysis and quantification of lung fibrosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zavaletta, Vanessa A.; Karwoski, Ronald A.; Bartholmai, Brian; Robb, Richard A.

    2006-03-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF, also known as Idiopathic Usual Interstitial Pneumontis, pathologically) is a progressive diffuse lung disease which has a median survival rate of less than four years with a prevalence of 15-20/100,000 in the United States. Global function changes are measured by pulmonary function tests and the diagnosis and extent of pulmonary structural changes are typically assessed by acquiring two-dimensional high resolution CT (HRCT) images. The acquisition and analysis of volumetric high resolution Multi-Detector CT (MDCT) images with nearly isotropic pixels offers the potential to measure both lung function and structure. This paper presents a new approach to three dimensional lung image analysis and classification of normal and abnormal structures in lungs with IPF.

  1. Detection of vascular injuries in patients with blunt pelvic trauma by using 64-channel multidetector CT.

    PubMed

    Kertesz, Jennifer L; Anderson, Stephan W; Murakami, Akira M; Pieroni, Sabrina; Rhea, James T; Soto, Jorge A

    2009-01-01

    Vascular injuries are a major source of morbidity and mortality in patients with blunt pelvic trauma. Digital subtraction angiography (DSA) has traditionally been used to detect pelvic arterial injuries and to treat active arterial hemorrhage. Improvements in the technology of computed tomography (CT) have facilitated the implementation of CT angiography, which is beginning to replace DSA in the evaluation of patients with acute trauma. Pelvic CT angiography can reliably depict various pelvic arterial injuries and can help differentiate arterial hemorrhage from venous hemorrhage on the basis of multiphasic acquisitions, a method that may be used to tailor the subsequent clinical approach. With the use of a 64-channel multidetector CT scanner, multiphasic pelvic CT angiography can be integrated into the evaluation of trauma patients by using 1.25-mm reconstructed section thickness, pitch of 1:0.987, and gantry revolution time of 0.5 second to achieve near-isotropic results. A standard dose of 100 mL intravenous contrast material is injected at a rate of 5 mL/sec, and 30 mL saline solution, also at 5 mL/sec, is injected as a "chasing" bolus to follow the contrast material. (c) RSNA, 2009.

  2. Normal or abnormal? Demystifying uterine and cervical contrast enhancement at multidetector CT.

    PubMed

    Yitta, Silaja; Hecht, Elizabeth M; Mausner, Elizabeth V; Bennett, Genevieve L

    2011-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) is not generally advocated as the first-line imaging examination for disorders of the female pelvis. However, multidetector CT is often the modality of choice for evaluating nongynecologic pelvic abnormalities, particularly in emergent settings, in which all the pelvic organs are invariably assessed. Incidental findings of uterine and cervical contrast enhancement in such settings may easily be mistaken for abnormalities, given the broad spectrum of anatomic variants and enhancement patterns that may be seen in the normal uterus and cervix. The authors' review of CT and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging enhancement patterns, augmented by case examples from their clinical radiology practice, provides a solid foundation for understanding the spectrum of normal uterine and cervical appearances and avoiding potential pitfalls in the diagnosis of benign cervical lesions, adenomyosis, infection, malignancy, and postpartum effects. This information should help radiologists more confidently differentiate between normal and abnormal CT findings and, when CT findings are not definitive, offer appropriate recommendations for follow-up ultrasonography or MR imaging.

  3. Influence of z overscanning on normalized effective doses calculated for pediatric patients undergoing multidetector CT examinations

    SciTech Connect

    Tzedakis, Antonis; Damilakis, John; Perisinakis, Kostas; Karantanas, Apostolos; Karabekios, Spiros; Gourtsoyiannis, Nicholas

    2007-04-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of z overscanning on normalized effective dose for pediatric patients undergoing multidetector-computed tomography (CT) examinations. Five commercially available mathematical anthropomorphic phantoms representing newborn, 1-, 5-, 10-, and 15-year-old patients and the Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP, version 4C2) radiation transport code were employed in the current study to simulate pediatric CT exposures. For all phantoms, axial and helical examinations at 120 kV tube voltage were simulated. Scans performed at 80 kV were also simulated. Sex-specific normalized effective doses were estimated for four standard CT examinations i.e., head-neck, chest, abdomen-pelvis, and trunk, for all pediatric phantoms. Data for both axial and helical mode acquisition were obtained. In the helical mode, z overscanning was taken into account. The validity of the Monte Carlo results was verified by comparison with dose data obtained using thermoluminescence dosimetry and a physical pediatric anthropomorphic phantom simulating a 10-year-old child. In all cases normalized effective dose values were found to increase with increasing z overscanning. The percentage differences in normalized data between axial and helical scans may reach 43%, 70%, 36%, and 26% for head-neck, chest, abdomen-pelvis, and trunk studies, respectively. Normalized data for female pediatric patients was in general higher compared to male patients for all ages, examined regions, and z overscanning values. For both male and female children, the normalized effective dose values were reduced as the age was increased. For the same typical exposure conditions, dose values decreased when lower tube voltage was used; for a 1-year-old child, for example, the effective dose was 3.8 times lower when 80 kV instead of 120 kV was used. Normalized data for the estimation of effective dose to pediatric patients undergoing standard axial and helical CT examinations on an

  4. Dynamic multidetector CT and non-contrast-enhanced MR for right adrenal vein imaging: comparison with catheter venography in adrenal venous sampling.

    PubMed

    Ota, Hideki; Seiji, Kazumasa; Kawabata, Masahiro; Satani, Nozomi; Omata, Kei; Ono, Yoshikiyo; Iwakura, Yoshitsugu; Morimoto, Ryo; Matsuura, Tomonori; Kudo, Masataka; Tominaga, Junya; Satoh, Fumitoshi; Ito, Sadayoshi; Takase, Kei

    2016-03-01

    To evaluate visualization of the right adrenal vein (RAV) with multidetector CT and non-contrast-enhanced MR imaging in patients with primary aldosteronism. A total of 125 patients (67 men) scheduled for adrenal venous sampling (AVS) were included. Dynamic 64-detector-row CT and balanced steady-state free precession-based non-contrast-enhanced 3-T MR imaging were performed. RAV visualization based on a four-point score was documented. Both anatomical location and variation on cross-sectional imaging were evaluated, and the findings were compared with catheter venography as the gold standard. The RAV was visualized in 93.2% by CT and 84.8% by MR imaging (p = 0.02). Positive predictive values of RAV visualization were 100% for CT and 95.2% for MR imaging. Imaging score was significantly higher in CT than MR imaging (p < 0.01). The RAV formed a common trunk with an accessory hepatic vein in 16% of patients. The RAV orifice level on cross-sectional imaging was concordant with catheter venography within the range of 1/3 vertebral height in >70% of subjects. Success rate of AVS was 99.2%. Dynamic CT is a reliable way to map the RAV prior to AVS. Non-contrast-enhanced MR imaging is an alternative when there is a risk of complication from contrast media or radiation exposure. Dynamic CT and non-contrast-enhanced MR imaging detect the right adrenal vein (RAV). Dynamic CT can visualize the RAV more than non-contrast-enhanced MR imaging. Mapping the RAV helps to achieve successful adrenal venous sampling. Sixteen per cent of RAVs share the common trunk with accessory hepatic veins.

  5. A comparison of the use of contrast media with different iodine concentrations for multidetector CT of the kidney.

    PubMed

    Jung, Seung Chai; Kim, Seung Hyup; Cho, Jeong Yeon

    2011-01-01

    To determine the optimal iodine concentration of contrast media for kidney multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) by comparing the degree of renal parenchymal enhancement and the severity of the renal streak artifact with contrast media of different iodine concentrations. A 16-row MDCT was performed in 15 sedated rabbits by injection of 2 mL contrast media/kg body weight at a rate of 0.3 mL/sec. Monomeric nonionic contrast media of 250, 300, and 370 mg iodine/mL were injected at 1-week intervals. Mean attenuation values were measured in each renal structure with attenuation differences among the structures. The artifact was evaluated by CT window width/level and three grading methods. The values were compared with iodine concentrations. The 370 mg iodine/mL concentration showed significantly higher cortical enhancement than 250 mg iodine/mL in all phases (p < 0.05). There was however no significant difference in the degree of enhancement between the 300 mg iodine/mL and 370 mg iodine/mL concentrations in all phases. There is a significant difference in attenuation for the cortex-outer medulla between 250 mg iodine/mL and 300 mg iodine/mL (p < 0.05). The artifact was more severe with a medium of 370 mg iodine/mL than with 250 mg iodine/mL by all grading methods (p < 0.05). The 300 mg iodine/mL is considered to be the most appropriate iodine concentration in an aspect of the enhancement and artifact on a kidney MDCT scan.

  6. A Comparison of the Use of Contrast Media with Different Iodine Concentrations for Multidetector CT of the Kidney

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Seung Chai; Cho, Jeong Yeon

    2011-01-01

    Objective To determine the optimal iodine concentration of contrast media for kidney multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) by comparing the degree of renal parenchymal enhancement and the severity of the renal streak artifact with contrast media of different iodine concentrations. Materials and Methods A 16-row MDCT was performed in 15 sedated rabbits by injection of 2 mL contrast media/kg body weight at a rate of 0.3 mL/sec. Monomeric nonionic contrast media of 250, 300, and 370 mg iodine/mL were injected at 1-week intervals. Mean attenuation values were measured in each renal structure with attenuation differences among the structures. The artifact was evaluated by CT window width/level and three grading methods. The values were compared with iodine concentrations. Results The 370 mg iodine/mL concentration showed significantly higher cortical enhancement than 250 mg iodine/mL in all phases (p < 0.05). There was however no significant difference in the degree of enhancement between the 300 mg iodine/mL and 370 mg iodine/mL concentrations in all phases. There is a significant difference in attenuation for the cortex-outer medulla between 250 mg iodine/mL and 300 mg iodine/mL (p < 0.05). The artifact was more severe with a medium of 370 mg iodine/mL than with 250 mg iodine/mL by all grading methods (p < 0.05). Conclusion The 300 mg iodine/mL is considered to be the most appropriate iodine concentration in an aspect of the enhancement and artifact on a kidney MDCT scan. PMID:22043154

  7. [Role of multidetector CT in the evaluation of large bowel obstruction].

    PubMed

    Scardapane, Arnaldo; Rubini, Giuseppe; Lorusso, Filomenamila; Fonio, Paolo; Suriano, Claudia; Giganti, Melchiore; Stabile Ianora, Amato Antonio

    2012-11-01

    The aim of the study was to assess the accuracy of multidetector CT (MDCT) with MPR reformation in the evaluation of large bowel obstruction. Thirty-one patients were evaluated retrospectively in a blinded fashion by two radiologists. All patients underwent MDCT with multiplanar reformation (MPR). The two radiologists interpreted independently the axial images and then the reconstructions. Each patient received a score from 1 (absent occlusion) to 5 (confirmed occlusion). The results were compared with surgical findings. Both axial and MPR images showed a very high accuracy in the diagnosis of bowel obstruction with a significant advantage of MPRs over native images and without any difference between the two radiologists. MDCT is an accurate technique in the evaluation of large bowel obstruction and use of MPRs facilitates the interpretation of imaging findings.

  8. Multidetector CT angiography influences the choice of treatment for blunt carotid artery injury

    PubMed Central

    Beliaev, Andrei M; Civil, Ian

    2014-01-01

    A 43-year-old woman presented with a 2 h history of left neck pain after striking her neck against a marble bench while playing with her son. The patient was screened for blunt cerebrovascular injury (BCVI) and a left carotid bruit was identified. Subsequently, she underwent multidetector CT angiography (MCTA) of the aortic arch and neck vessels, which demonstrated a flow-limiting dissection of the left common carotid artery (CCA). The patient was started on heparin infusion and underwent an emergency operation. At surgery, a circumferential intimal dissection was excised and the arteriotomy defect closed with an autologous venous patch. This case emphasises the importance of adequately examining patients with direct injury to the neck, screening relevant patients for BCVI and investigating them with MCTA that influences the choice of a treatment option. PMID:25103313

  9. Malignant tumours of the small intestine: a review of histopathology, multidetector CT and MRI aspects.

    PubMed

    Anzidei, M; Napoli, A; Zini, C; Kirchin, M A; Catalano, C; Passariello, R

    2011-08-01

    Small bowel neoplasms, including adenocarcinoma, carcinoid tumour, lymphoma and gastrointestinal stromal tumours, represent a small percentage of gastrointestinal cancers, yet are among those with the poorest prognosis compared with other gastrointestinal malignancies. Unclear clinical scenarios and difficult radiological diagnosis often delay treatment with negative effects on patient survival. Recently, multidetector CT (MDCT) and MRI have been introduced as feasible and accurate diagnostic techniques for the identification and staging of small bowel neoplasms. These techniques are gradually replacing conventional barium radiography as the tool of choice. However, the inherent technical and physiological challenges of small bowel imaging require a familiarity with patient preparation and scan protocols. Adequate knowledge of the histopathology and natural evolution of small bowel neoplasms is also important for differential diagnosis. The aim of this article is to review MDCT and MRI protocols for the evaluation of small bowel tumours and to provide a concise yet comprehensive guide to the most relevant imaging features relative to histopathology.

  10. Multidetector CT appearance of the pelvis after cesarean delivery: normal and abnormal acute findings

    PubMed Central

    Gui, Benedetta; Danza, Francesco Maria; Valentini, Anna Lia; Laino, Maria Elena; Caruso, Alessandro; Carducci, Brigida; Rodolfino, Elena; Devicienti, Ersilia; Bonomo, Lorenzo

    2016-01-01

    Cesarean section (CS) may have several acute complications that can occur in the early postoperative period. The most common acute complications are hematomas and hemorrhage, infection, ovarian vein thrombosis, uterine dehiscence and rupture. Pelvic hematomas usually occur at specific sites and include bladder flap hematoma (between the lower uterine segment and the bladder) and subfascial or rectus sheath hematoma (rectus sheath or prevescical space). Puerperal hemorrhage can be associated with uterine dehiscence or rupture. Pelvic infections include endometritis, abscess, wound infection, and retained product of conception. Radiologists play an important role in the diagnosis and management of postoperative complications as a result of increasing use of multidetector CT in emergency room. The knowledge of normal and abnormal postsurgical anatomy and findings should facilitate the correct diagnosis so that the best management can be chosen for the patient, avoiding unnecessary surgical interventions and additional treatments. In this article we review the surgical cesarean technique and imaging CT technique followed by description of normal and abnormal post-CS CT findings. PMID:27756714

  11. Multidetector CT appearance of the pelvis after cesarean delivery: normal and abnormal acute findings.

    PubMed

    Gui, Benedetta; Danza, Francesco Maria; Valentini, Anna Lia; Laino, Maria Elena; Caruso, Alessandro; Carducci, Brigida; Rodolfino, Elena; Devicienti, Ersilia; Bonomo, Lorenzo

    2016-01-01

    Cesarean section (CS) may have several acute complications that can occur in the early postoperative period. The most common acute complications are hematomas and hemorrhage, infection, ovarian vein thrombosis, uterine dehiscence and rupture. Pelvic hematomas usually occur at specific sites and include bladder flap hematoma (between the lower uterine segment and the bladder) and subfascial or rectus sheath hematoma (rectus sheath or prevescical space). Puerperal hemorrhage can be associated with uterine dehiscence or rupture. Pelvic infections include endometritis, abscess, wound infection, and retained product of conception. Radiologists play an important role in the diagnosis and management of postoperative complications as a result of increasing use of multidetector CT in emergency room. The knowledge of normal and abnormal postsurgical anatomy and findings should facilitate the correct diagnosis so that the best management can be chosen for the patient, avoiding unnecessary surgical interventions and additional treatments. In this article we review the surgical cesarean technique and imaging CT technique followed by description of normal and abnormal post-CS CT findings.

  12. Relationship between indexed epicardial fat volume and coronary plaque volume assessed by cardiac multidetector CT

    PubMed Central

    You, Seulgi; Sun, Joo Sung; Park, Seon Young; Baek, Yoolim; Kang, Doo Kyoung

    2016-01-01

    Abstract We explored whether baseline indexed epicardial fat volume (EFVi) and serial changes in EFVi were associated with increase in coronary plaque volume as assessed by multidetector computed tomography. We retrospectively reviewed 87 patients with coronary artery plaque, identified during either baseline or follow-up cardiac computed tomography (CT) examinations. Each plaque volume was measured in volumetric units using a semiautomatic software tool. EFVi was quantified by calculating the total volume of epicardial tissue of CT density −190 to −30 HU, indexed to the body surface area. Clinical cardiovascular risk factors were extracted by medical record review at the time of the cardiac CT examinations. The relationship between EFVi and coronary plaque volume was explored by regression analysis. Although the EFVi did not change significantly from baseline to the time of the follow-up CT (65.7 ± 21.8 vs 66.0 ± 21.8 cm3/m3, P = 0.620), the plaque volumes were increased significantly on the follow-up CT scans. The annual change in EFVi was not accompanied by a parallel change in coronary plaque volume (P = 0.096–0.500). On univariate analysis, smoking, hypercholesterolemia, 10-year coronary heart disease risk, obesity, and baseline EFVi predicted rapid increases in lipid-rich and fibrous plaque volumes. On multivariate analysis, baseline EFVi (odds ratio = 1.029, P = 0.016) was an independent predictor of a rapid increase in lipid-rich plaque volume. EFVi was shown to be an independent predictor of a rapid increase in lipid-rich plaque volume. However, changes in EFVi were not associated with parallel changes in coronary plaque volume. PMID:27399137

  13. Evaluation of accuracy of 3D reconstruction images using multi-detector CT and cone-beam CT

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Mija; YI, Won-Jin; Heo, Min-Suk; Lee, Sam-Sun; Choi, Soon-Chul

    2012-01-01

    Purpose This study was performed to determine the accuracy of linear measurements on three-dimensional (3D) images using multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT) and cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). Materials and Methods MDCT and CBCT were performed using 24 dry skulls. Twenty-one measurements were taken on the dry skulls using digital caliper. Both types of CT data were imported into OnDemand software and identification of landmarks on the 3D surface rendering images and calculation of linear measurements were performed. Reproducibility of the measurements was assessed using repeated measures ANOVA and ICC, and the measurements were statistically compared using a Student t-test. Results All assessments under the direct measurement and image-based measurements on the 3D CT surface rendering images using MDCT and CBCT showed no statistically difference under the ICC examination. The measurements showed no differences between the direct measurements of dry skull and the image-based measurements on the 3D CT surface rendering images (P>.05). Conclusion Three-dimensional reconstructed surface rendering images using MDCT and CBCT would be appropriate for 3D measurements. PMID:22474645

  14. A multidetector CT angiography study of variations in the circle of Willis in a Chinese population.

    PubMed

    Li, Qi; Li, Jialun; Lv, Fajin; Li, Kewei; Luo, Tianyou; Xie, Peng

    2011-03-01

    The circle of Willis is a major collateral circulation that has an important role in ischemic events. The purpose of our study was to investigate the collateral circulation in a Chinese population with 64-section multidetector CT angiography (CTA). A total of 170 patients who underwent 64-section CT angiography at The First Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University were included in our study. The morphological variations in the anterior and posterior circle of Willis were assessed in each patient. A total of 160 patients were included in the final analysis, of whom 126 (79%) demonstrated a complete anterior circle of Willis, and 50 (31%) had a complete posterior circle of Willis. A complete circle of Willis was seen in 43 of 160 participants (27%). A fetal-type posterior circle of Willis was seen in 15 (9.4%) patients. This is the first report of a CTA study of collateral circulation in a Chinese population. A higher prevalence of compromised posterior collaterals was observed in this Chinese population compared to Western and Japanese populations. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Contrast enhanced multi-detector CT and MR findings of a well-differentiated pancreatic vipoma.

    PubMed

    Camera, Luigi; Severino, Rosa; Faggiano, Antongiulio; Masone, Stefania; Mansueto, Gelsomina; Maurea, Simone; Fonti, Rosa; Salvatore, Marco

    2014-10-28

    Pancreatic vipoma is an extremely rare tumor accounting for less than 2% of endocrine pancreatic neoplasms with a reported incidence of 0.1-0.6 per million. While cross-sectional imaging findings are usually not specific, exact localization of the tumor by means of either computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance (MR) is pivotal for surgical planning. However, cross-sectional imaging findings are usually not specific and further characterization of the tumor may only be achieved by somatostatin-receptor scintigraphy (SRS). We report the case of a 70 years old female with a two years history of watery diarrhoea who was found to have a solid, inhomogeneously enhancing lesion at the level of the pancreatic tail at Gadolinium-enhanced MR (Somatom Trio 3T, Siemens, Germany). The tumor had been prospectively overlooked at a contrast-enhanced multi-detector CT (Aquilion 64, Toshiba, Japan) performed after i.v. bolus injection of only 100 cc of iodinated non ionic contrast media because of a chronic renal failure (3.4 mg/mL) but it was subsequently confirmed by SRS. The patient first underwent a successful symptomatic treatment with somatostatin analogues and was then submitted to a distal pancreasectomy with splenectomy to remove a capsulated whitish tumor which turned out to be a well-differentiated vipoma at histological and immuno-histochemical analysis.

  16. Acetabular Cartilage Thickness: Accuracy of Three-Dimensional Reconstructions from Multidetector CT Arthrograms in a Cadaver Study1

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Bryce C; Peters, Christopher L.; Brown, Nicholas A. T.; Anderson, Andrew E.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To prospectively quantify the accuracy of hip cartilage thickness estimated from three-dimensional (3D) surfaces, generated by segmenting multidetector computed tomographic (CT) arthrograms by using direct physical measurements of cartilage thickness as the reference standard. Materials and Methods: Four fresh-frozen cadaver hip joints from two male donors, ages 43 and 46 years, were obtained; institutional review board approval for cadaver research was also obtained. Sixteen holes were drilled perpendicular to the cartilage of four cadaveric acetabula (two specimens). Hip capsules were surgically closed, injected with contrast material, and scanned by using multidetector CT. After scanning, 5.3-mmcores were harvested concentrically at each drill hole and cartilage thickness was measured with a microscope. Cartilage was reconstructed in 3D by using commercial software. Segmentations were repeated by two authors. Reconstructed cartilage thickness was determined by using a published algorithm. Bland-Altman plots and linear regression were used to assess accuracy. Repeatability was quantified by using the coefficient of variation, intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC), repeatability coefficient, and percentage variability. Results: Cartilage was reconstructed to a bias of −0.13 mm and a repeatability coefficient of ±0.46 mm. Regression of the scatterplots indicated a tendency for multidetector CT to overestimate thickness. Intra- and interobserver repeatability were very good. For intraobserver correlation, the coefficient of variation was 14.80%, the ICC was 0.88, the repeatability coefficient was 0.55 mm, and the percentage variability was 11.77%. For interobserver correlation, the coefficient of variation was 13.47%, the ICC was 0.90, the repeatability coefficient was 0.52 mm, and the percentage variability was 11.63%. Conclusion: Assuming that an accuracy of approximately ±0.5 mm is sufficient, reconstructions of cartilage geometry from

  17. Accuracy of linear intraoral measurements using cone beam CT and multidetector CT: a tale of two CTs

    PubMed Central

    Patcas, R; Markic, G; Müller, L; Ullrich, O; Peltomäki, T; Kellenberger, C J; Karlo, C A

    2012-01-01

    Objectives The aim was to compare the accuracy of linear bone measurements of cone beam CT (CBCT) with multidetector CT (MDCT) and validate intraoral soft-tissue measurements in CBCT. Methods Comparable views of CBCT and MDCT were obtained from eight intact cadaveric heads. The anatomical positions of the gingival margin and the buccal alveolar bone ridge were determined. Image measurements (CBCT/MDCT) were performed upon multiplanar reformatted data sets and compared with the anatomical measurements; the number of non-assessable sites (NASs) was evaluated. Results Radiological measurements were accurate with a mean difference from anatomical measurements of 0.14 mm (CBCT) and 0.23 mm (MDCT). These differences were statistically not significant, but the limits of agreement for bone measurements were broader in MDCT (−1.35 mm; 1.82 mm) than in CBCT (−0.93 mm; 1.21 mm). The limits of agreement for soft-tissue measurements in CBCT were smaller (−0.77 mm; 1.07 mm), indicating a slightly higher accuracy. More NASs occurred in MDCT (14.5%) than in CBCT (8.3%). Conclusions CBCT is slightly more reliable for linear measurements than MDCT and less affected by metal artefacts. CBCT accuracy of linear intraoral soft-tissue measurements is similar to the accuracy of bone measurements. PMID:22554987

  18. Multidetector CT and three-dimensional CT angiography of upper extremity arterial injury.

    PubMed

    Fritz, Jan; Efron, David T; Fishman, Elliot K

    2015-06-01

    Successful management of upper extremity arterial injury requires fast and accurate diagnosis. The rate of limb preservation depends on the location, severity, and time of ischemia. Indications for diagnostic imaging depend on the mechanism and type of injury, clinical signs, cardiovascular stability, and clinical suspicion. Because of ease of access, speed, and high accuracy for this diagnosis, multidetector computed tomographic (MDCT) angiography is often used as the first line imaging modality. MDCT systems with 64 slice configuration and more afford high temporal and spatial high-resolution, isotropic data acquisition and integration with whole-body trauma MDCT protocols. The use of individual injection timing protocols ensures high diagnostic image quality. Several strategies are available to reduce radiation exposure. Direct MDCT angiography findings of arterial injuries include active extravasation, luminal narrowing, lack of luminal contrast opacification, filling defect, arteriovenous fistula, and pseudoaneurysm. Important descriptors are location and length of defect, degree of luminal narrowing, and presence of distal arterial supply reconstitution. Proximal arterial injuries include the subclavian, axillary, and brachial arteries. Distal arterial injuries include the ulnar and radial arteries, as well as the palmar arterial arches. Concomitant venous injury, musculoskeletal injury, and nerve damage are common. In this exhibit, we outline the role of MDCT angiography in the diagnosis and management of upper extremity arterial injury, discuss strategies for MDCT angiography acquisition and concepts of data visualization, and illustrate various types of injuries.

  19. Multidetector CT: a new gold standard in the diagnosis of pulmonary embolism? State of the art and diagnostic algorithms.

    PubMed

    Russo, V; Piva, T; Lovato, L; Fattori, R; Gavelli, G

    2005-01-01

    From the early 90s, spiral CT technology has considerably changed the diagnostic capability of Pulmonary Embolism (PE), giving a direct vision of intravascular thrombi. Further technological progress has strengthened its diagnostic impact leading to an essential role in clinical practice. The advent of Multi-Detector CT (MDCT) has subsequently increased the reliability of this technique to the point of undermining the role of pulmonary angiography as the gold standard and occupying a central position in diagnostic algorithms. The aim of this paper is to appraise this evolution by means of a meta-analysis of the relevant literature from 1995 to 2004. The review of the literature showed the sensitivity and specificity of CT to have increased from 37-94% and 81-100% (single-detector CT) to 87-94% and 94-100% (4-channel multidetector CT), especially thanks to the possibility of depicting subsegmental clots, with an interobserver agreement of 0.63-0.94 (k). CT is one of the most reliable and effective methods in the diagnosis is PE, with the advantage of being extremely fast and providing alternative diagnoses. Recent improvements in MDCT technology confers the highest value of diagnostic accuracy with respect to other imaging modalities such as scintigraphy, angiography, MRI, D-dimer assay and Doppler US.

  20. Clinical indications and utilization of 320-detector row CT in 2500 outpatients.

    PubMed

    Tabibian, Benjamin; Roach, Cayce J; Hanson, Eric H; Wynn, Brad L; Orrison, William W

    2011-06-01

    Clinical indications and utilization patterns for 3963 CT scans on 2500 consecutive patents on a 320-detector row CT in an outpatient setting were retrospectively analyzed and compared with previously reported CT studies. The impact of the latest generation CT technology, including whole organ perfusion, on indications and utilization patterns during the study period was also assessed. The top five requested CT scan types were abdomen/pelvis, chest, head, sinuses, and coronary CT angiography. Indication and utilization rates were similar to prior studies for abdomen/pelvis, non-cardiac chest, and head CT scans. Abdominal pain and headaches were the most frequent indications for abdomen/pelvis and head CTs, respectively. The 7.3% cardiac CT scan utilization rate was not comparable to rates of up to 72% in self-referral outpatient settings. Whole organ volume CT imaging was utilized in 100% of coronary CT angiography and 22.7% of head CTs. The 320-row CT had fewer negative head and body CT findings as compared to prior reports. The availability of new technology, such as whole organ dynamic scans, appears to have influenced CT indications, utilization and finding rates with a decrease in negative brain and body results. Comparisons with previous outpatient CT studies were similar for multiple categories with the exception of cardiac CT utilization, which is heavily influenced by self-referral. Further study of outpatient imaging indications and utilization rates from multiple centers may benefit from a standardized categorization to improve understanding of the disparate outpatient imaging environment. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Latest generation of flat detector CT as a peri-interventional diagnostic tool: a comparative study with multidetector CT.

    PubMed

    Leyhe, Johanna Rosemarie; Tsogkas, Ioannis; Hesse, Amélie Carolina; Behme, Daniel; Schregel, Katharina; Papageorgiou, Ismini; Liman, Jan; Knauth, Michael; Psychogios, Marios-Nikos

    2016-12-20

    Flat detector CT (FDCT) has been used as a peri-interventional diagnostic tool in numerous studies with mixed results regarding image quality and detection of intracranial lesions. We compared the diagnostic aspects of the latest generation FDCT with standard multidetector CT (MDCT). 102 patients were included in our retrospective study. All patients had undergone interventional procedures. FDCT was acquired peri-interventionally and compared with postinterventional MDCT regarding depiction of ventricular/subarachnoidal spaces, detection of intracranial hemorrhage, and delineation of ischemic lesions using an ordinal scale. Ischemic lesions were quantified with the Alberta Stroke Program Early CT Scale (ASPECTS) on both examinations. Two neuroradiologists with varying grades of experience and a medical student scored the anonymized images separately, blinded to the clinical history. The two methods were of equal diagnostic value regarding evaluation of the ventricular system and the subarachnoidal spaces. Subarachnoidal, intraventricular, and parenchymal hemorrhages were detected with a sensitivity of 95%, 97%, and 100% and specificity of 97%, 100%, and 99%, respectively, using FDCT. Gray-white differentiation was feasible in the majority of FDCT scans, and ischemic lesions were detected with a sensitivity of 71% on FDCT, compared with MDCT scans. The mean difference in ASPECTS values on FDCT and MDCT was 0.5 points (95% CI 0.12 to 0.88). The latest generation of FDCT is a reliable and accurate tool for the detection of intracranial hemorrhage. Gray-white differentiation is feasible in the supratentorial region. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  2. Cirsoid Aneurysm of Coronary Arteries Associated with Arterioventricular Fistula Evaluated by 64-Multidetector CT Coronary Angiography: Depiction of a Case

    SciTech Connect

    Marrone, Gianluca Mamone, Giuseppe; Milazzo, Mariapina; Caruso, Settimo; Baravoglia, Cesar Hernandez; Vitulo, Patrizio; Gridelli, Bruno; Luca, Angelo

    2009-05-15

    A female patient with severe pulmonary hypertension was admitted for lung transplant evaluation. As an incidental finding, the chest CT showed diffuse and dilated coronaries, not detected at previous echocardiography. A coronary CT angiography was then performed using a 64-multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) scanner to better evaluate the coronary tree. The images obtained after postprocessing demonstrated tremendously aneurysmatic and tortuous coronary arteries and the presence of a septal branch deepening into the myocardium and penetrating the right ventricle cavity, forming an abnormal arterioventricular fistula. A causal relation between the aneurysms and the fistula is suspected.

  3. Multidetector CT cystography for imaging colovesical fistulas and iatrogenic bladder leaks.

    PubMed

    Tonolini, Massimo; Bianco, Roberto

    2012-04-01

    Multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) cystography currently represents the modality of choice to image the urinary bladder in traumatized patients. In this review we present our experience with MDCT cystography applications outside the trauma setting, particularly for diagnosing bladder fistulas and leaks. A detailed explanation is provided concerning exam preparation, acquisition technique, image reconstruction and interpretation. Colovesical fistulas most commonly occur as a complication of sigmoid diverticular disease, and often remain occult after extensive diagnostic work-up including cystoscopy and contrast-enhanced CT. We consistently achieved accurate preoperative visualization of colovesical fistulas using MDCT cystography. Urinary leaks and injuries represent a non-negligible occurrence after pelvic surgery, particularly obstetric and gynaecological procedures: in our experience MDCT cystography is useful to investigate iatrogenic bladder leaks or fistulas. In our opinion, MDCT cystography should be recommended as the first line modality for direct visualization or otherwise confident exclusion of both spontaneous enterovesical fistulas and bladder injuries following instrumentation procedures, obstetric or surgical interventions. Main Messages • Explanation of exam preparation, acquisition technique, image reconstruction and interpretation. • Preoperative visualization of colovesical fistulas, usually secondary to sigmoid diverticulitis. • Visualization or exclusion of iatrogenic bladder injuries following instrumentation or surgery.

  4. Paratracheal air cysts: prevalence and relevance to pulmonary emphysema and bronchiectasis using thoracic multidetector CT.

    PubMed

    Boyaci, Nurefsan; Sen Dokumaci, Dilek; Karakas, Ekrem; Yalcin, Funda; Oney Kurnaz, Ayse Gul

    2015-01-01

    We aimed to determine the prevalence of paratracheal air cysts (PTACs) and the relationship of PTACs with emphysema and bronchiectasis through retrospective analysis of multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) findings. MDCT findings of 1027 consecutive patients who underwent routine thorax examination between January 2012 and January 2013 were evaluated retrospectively for the presence of PTACs. Localization of the PTACs, as well as their size, shape, and relationship with the trachea were examined. Presence of emphysema and bronchiectasis was recorded, and bronchiectasis severity index was calculated when present. We randomly selected 80 patients who had no visible PTACs as the control group. The findings of patients with and without PTACs were compared. PTACs were determined in 82 of 1027 patients (8%), in 8.8% of females and 7.3% of males. The presence of PTACs was determined to be independent of gender (P = 0.361). Eighty-one PTACs (98.8%) were located in the right side of the trachea and 56.1% had a tracheal connection. The presence of PTACs significantly correlated with the presence and severity of bronchiectasis (P = 0.001 and P = 0.005 respectively). There was no significant relationship between the presence of PTACs and the presence of emphysema on CT images (P = 0.125). The prevalence of PTACs was determined as 8% in this study. There was significant association between PTACs and bronchiectasis.

  5. Paratracheal air cysts on thoracic multidetector CT: incidence, morphological characteristics and relevance to pulmonary emphysema.

    PubMed

    Bae, H-J; Kang, E-Y; Yong, H S; Kim, Y K; Woo, O H; Oh, Y-W; Doo, K W

    2013-01-01

    To determine the incidence, morphological characteristics and relevance of paratracheal air cysts (PTACs) with pulmonary emphysema, as seen on thoracic multidetector CT (MDCT). The CT images of 854 consecutive patients who underwent thoracic MDCT during a period of 2 months at our institution were reviewed. 538 of the patients were male and 316 were female. The incidence, size and shape of the PTACs and their relation to pulmonary emphysema were retrospectively analysed. Among the 854 patients, 69 (8.1%) had PTACs. 37 (6.9%) of the 538 male patients and 32 (10.1%) of the 316 female patients had PTACs. The highest prevalence of PTACs (25 patients, 11.2%) was found in those who were in the sixth decade of life. 48 (69.6%) PTACs measured 3-10 mm at the longest diameter and 33 (47.8%) were elongated on the coronal section images. 12 (17.4%) patients with PTACs had underlying gross morphological emphysema. The relationship between the presence of PTACs and the presence of emphysema and the relationship between the presence of PTACs and the severity of emphysema were not statistically significant. The size of PTACs showed an inverse relation to the severity of emphysema. The incidence of PTACs was estimated to be much higher than that of previous studies. There was a slight female predilection for PTACs, most commonly found in the sixth decade of life; PTACs mostly measured 3-10 mm and were elongated in shape. The relation of PTACs to gross morphological emphysema was low. PTACs are not correlated with the presence of emphysema on MDCT.

  6. New absorbed dose measurement with cylindrical water phantoms for multidetector CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohno, Takeshi; Araki, Fujio; Onizuka, Ryota; Hioki, Kazunari; Tomiyama, Yuuki; Yamashita, Yusuke

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study was to develop new dosimetry with cylindrical water phantoms for multidetector computed tomography (MDCT). The ionization measurement was performed with a Farmer ionization chamber at the center and four peripheral points in the body-type and head-type cylindrical water phantoms. The ionization was converted to the absorbed dose using a 60Co absorbed-dose-to-water calibration factor and Monte Carlo (MC) -calculated correction factors. The correction factors were calculated from MDCT (Brilliance iCT, 64-slice, Philips Electronics) modeled with GMctdospp (IMPS, Germany) software based on the EGSnrc MC code. The spectrum of incident x-ray beams and the configuration of a bowtie filter for MDCT were determined so that calculated photon intensity attenuation curves for aluminum (Al) and calculated off-center ratio (OCR) profiles in air coincided with those measured. The MC-calculated doses were calibrated by the absorbed dose measured at the center in both cylindrical water phantoms. Calculated doses were compared with measured doses at four peripheral points and the center in the phantom for various beam pitches and beam collimations. The calibration factors and the uncertainty of the absorbed dose determined using this method were also compared with those obtained by CTDIair (CT dose index in air). Calculated Al half-value layers and OCRs in air were within 0.3% and 3% agreement with the measured values, respectively. Calculated doses at four peripheral points and the centers for various beam pitches and beam collimations were within 5% and 2% agreement with measured values, respectively. The MC-calibration factors by our method were 44-50% lower than values by CTDIair due to the overbeaming effect. However, the calibration factors for CTDIair agreed within 5% with those of our method after correction for the overbeaming effect. Our method makes it possible to directly measure the absorbed dose for MDCT and is more robust and accurate than the

  7. Evaluation of bone substitute materials: comparison of flat-panel based volume CT to conventional multidetector CT.

    PubMed

    Sauerbier, Sebastian; Duttenhoefer, Fabian; Sachlos, Elefterios; Haberstroh, Jörg; Scheifele, Christian; Wrbas, Karl-Thomas; Voss, Pit Jacob; Veigel, Egle; Smedek, Jörg; Ganter, Philip; Tuna, Taskin; Gutwald, Ralf; Palmowski, Moritz

    2013-10-01

    Over the last decade tissue engineering has emerged as a key factor in bone regeneration within the field of cranio-maxillofacial surgery. Despite this in vivo analysis of tissue-engineered-constructs to monitor bone rehabilitation are difficult to conduct. Novel high-resolving flat-panel based volume CTs (fp-VCT) are increasingly used for imaging bone structures. This study compares the potential value of novel fp-VCT with conventional multidetector CT (MDCT) based on a sheep sinus floor elevation model. Calcium-hydroxyapatite reinforced collagen scaffolds were populated with autologous osteoblasts and implanted into sheep maxillary sinus. After 8, 16 and 24 weeks MDCT and fp-VCT scans were performed to investigate the volume of the augmented area; densities of cancellous and compact bone were assessed as comparative values. fp-VCT imaging resulted in higher spatial resolution, which was advantageous when separating closely related anatomical structures (i.e. trabecular and compact bone, biomaterials). Fp-VCT facilitated imaging of alterations occurring in test specimens over time. fp-VCTs therefore displayed high volume coverage, dynamic imaging potential and superior performance when investigating superfine bone structures and bone remodelling of biomaterials. Thus, fp-VCTs may be a suitable instrument for intraoperative imaging and future in vivo tissue-engineering studies.

  8. Optimization of multiplanar reformations from isotropic data sets acquired with 16-detector row helical CT scanner.

    PubMed

    Jaffe, Tracy A; Nelson, Rendon C; Johnson, G Allan; Lee, Ellie R; Yoshizumi, Terry T; Lowry, Carolyn R; Bullard, Anthony B; DeLong, David M; Paulson, Erik K

    2006-01-01

    Institutional review board approval and waiver of consent were obtained for the patient component of this retrospective HIPAA-compliant study. By using an anthropomorphic phantom and metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistor detectors, radiation dose was determined for one eight-detector row and two 16-detector row computed tomographic (CT) protocols. A custom phantom was scanned by using the three protocols to identify isotropy. Contrast-to-noise ratios (CNRs) were determined for the same protocols by using a third phantom. Seven patients had undergone isotropic 16-detector row CT of the abdomen and pelvis. Anonymized coronal reformations at various thicknesses were ranked qualitatively by three radiologists. Effective dose equivalents were similar for the eight- and 16-detector row protocols. When transverse and coronal reformations of data acquired in the custom phantom were compared, coronal reformations obtained with the 16-detector row and 0.625-mm section thickness protocol were found to be nearly identical to the transverse image for all sets of line pairs. CNRs were consistently highest on 5-mm-thick coronal reformations (CNR range, 1.2-3.3). For qualitative assessment, 2- and 3-mm-thick coronal reformations were consistently preferred.

  9. An ancient Roman bowl embedded in a soil sample: surface shaded three dimensional display using data from a multi-detector CT.

    PubMed

    De Maeseneer, M; Buls, N; Cleeren, N; Lenchik, L; De Mey, J

    2006-01-01

    We present an unusual application of multidetector CT and shaded surface rendering in the investigation of a soil sample, containing an ancient Roman bronze bowl. The CT findings were of fundamental importance in helping the archaeologists study the bronze bowl from the soil sample.

  10. A method of estimating conceptus doses resulting from multidetector CT examinations during all stages of gestation

    SciTech Connect

    Damilakis, John; Tzedakis, Antonis; Perisinakis, Kostas; Papadakis, Antonios E.

    2010-12-15

    Purpose: Current methods for the estimation of conceptus dose from multidetector CT (MDCT) examinations performed on the mother provide dose data for typical protocols with a fixed scan length. However, modified low-dose imaging protocols are frequently used during pregnancy. The purpose of the current study was to develop a method for the estimation of conceptus dose from any MDCT examination of the trunk performed during all stages of gestation. Methods: The Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) radiation transport code was employed in this study to model the Siemens Sensation 16 and Sensation 64 MDCT scanners. Four mathematical phantoms were used, simulating women at 0, 3, 6, and 9 months of gestation. The contribution to the conceptus dose from single simulated scans was obtained at various positions across the phantoms. To investigate the effect of maternal body size and conceptus depth on conceptus dose, phantoms of different sizes were produced by adding layers of adipose tissue around the trunk of the mathematical phantoms. To verify MCNP results, conceptus dose measurements were carried out by means of three physical anthropomorphic phantoms, simulating pregnancy at 0, 3, and 6 months of gestation and thermoluminescence dosimetry (TLD) crystals. Results: The results consist of Monte Carlo-generated normalized conceptus dose coefficients for single scans across the four mathematical phantoms. These coefficients were defined as the conceptus dose contribution from a single scan divided by the CTDI free-in-air measured with identical scanning parameters. Data have been produced to take into account the effect of maternal body size and conceptus position variations on conceptus dose. Conceptus doses measured with TLD crystals showed a difference of up to 19% compared to those estimated by mathematical simulations. Conclusions: Estimation of conceptus doses from MDCT examinations of the trunk performed on pregnant patients during all stages of gestation can be made

  11. Using air bronchograms on multi-detector CT to predict the invasiveness of small lung adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu; Qiang, Jin Wei; Shen, Yan; Ye, Jian Ding; Zhang, Jie; Zhu, Lei

    2016-03-01

    To investigate the prevalence of multidetector CT (MDCT) air bronchograms and their value in predicting the invasiveness of lung adenocarcinomas. MDCT scans of 606 nodules in 582 patients with a lung adenocarcinoma less than 2cm in diameter confirmed by surgery and pathology were reviewed. Air bronchograms were classified into three patterns: type I, bronchus with intact lumen; type II, bronchus with dilated or tortuous lumen; and type III, bronchus with obstructed lumen. Air bronchograms were demonstrated on MDCT in 210 of 606 (34.7%) lung adenocarcinomas with 16.6% (35/211) preinvasive lesions (PL), 30.5% (50/164) minimally invasive adenocarcinoma (MIA), and 54.1% (125/231) invasive adenocarcinoma (IAC) (P=0.000); 18.3% (44/240) pure ground-glass nodules (GGNs), 44.2% (137/310) mixed GGNs, and 51.8% (29/56) solid nodules (P=0.000). Type I was slightly more common in MIA (36/164, 22.0%) than IAC (40/231, 17.3%) and PL (30/211, 14.2%) but without differences among them (P=0.147). Type II (PL: 5/211, 2.4%; MIA: 13/164, 7.9%; IAC: 53/231, 22.9%) and type III (PL: 0/211; MIA: 1/164, 0.6%; IAC: 32/231, 13.9%) were observed more frequently with increasing lung adenocarcinoma invasiveness (both P=0.000). The prevalence and patterns of air bronchograms on MDCT can predict the invasiveness of small lung adenocarcinomas. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Incidence of Venous Thromboembolism Using 64 Channel Multidetector Row Computed Tomography-Indirect Venography and Anti-Coagulation Therapy after Total Knee Arthroplasty in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Park, Kyung-Hyun; Cheon, Sang-Ho; Lee, Ji-Ho

    2012-01-01

    Purpose This study evaluated the incidence of a venous thromboembolism (VTE) after total knee arthroplasty (TKA) using multidetector row computed tomography-indirect venography (MDCT-indirect venography) and assessed the efficacy of anti-coagulation therapy. Materials and Methods We enrolled 118 patients with 126 cases of TKA. The average age of the patients was 68.4 years. We used 64 channel MDCT-indirect venography for the detection of VTE. We treated selectively proximal deep vein thrombosis (DVT) or pulmonary thromboembolism (PTE) cases according to the results of MDCT-indirect venography. We re-evaluated the change in VTE using follow-up MDCT-indirect venography after 3 months. Results We identified VTE in 35.7%. DVT only was identified in 22.2% including 8 cases of proximal DVT and 20 cases of distal DVT. PTE without DVT was identified in 4.8%, and combined DVT and PTE in 8.7%. All patients with PTE were asymptomatic, but 4 DVT patients had signs of leg swelling. After anti-coagulation therapy, 20 patients showed complete resolution in 16 cases, improvement in 3 cases and one case showed a new distal DVT. Conclusions The incidence of VTE after primary TKA was 35.7% in Korea. Furthermore, anti-coagulation therapy for proximal DVT and PTE patients may be a useful method for preventing the occurrence of a fatal PTE. PMID:22570848

  13. Pericardial fat amount is an independent risk factor of coronary artery stenosis assessed by multidetector-row computed tomography: the Korean Atherosclerosis Study 2.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae Hyuk; Yu, Sung Hoon; Choi, Sung Hee; Yoon, Ji Won; Kang, Seon Mee; Chun, Eun Ju; Choi, Sang Il; Shin, Hayley; Lee, Hong Kyu; Park, Kyong Soo; Jang, Hak Chul; Lim, Soo

    2011-05-01

    Pericardial fat surrounding the heart and coronary arteries might aggravate vessel wall inflammation and stimulate the progression of coronary atherosclerosis. However, there has been little comprehensive evaluation of the effects of pericardial fat on coronary artery disease (CAD). We investigated the relationship between pericardial fat volume and the severity of coronary artery stenosis assessed by computed tomography and angiography among patients with suspected CAD. Participants from the cohort of the Korean Atherosclerosis Study 2 (n = 402, mean age of 54 years, 57.0% men) underwent 64-slice multidetector-row computed tomography (MDCT) to assess pericardial fat amount, coronary artery calcium score (CACS), severity of coronary artery stenosis, and plaque characteristics. Patients with atherosclerotic lesion had significantly larger volume of pericardial fat than patients without atherosclerosis (308 ± 96 cm(3) vs. 251 ± 93 cm(3); P < 0.01). In a multivariate regression analysis adjusting for age, gender and BMI, subjects with more pericardial fat had a higher risk for significant (>50%) stenosed coronary vessels (odds ratio (OR) = 1.012; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.001-1.030; P = 0.017). This association remained after adjusting for hypertension, diabetes, smoking status, and lipid profiles (OR = 1.007; 95% CI 1.001-1.014; P = 0.042). In conclusion, an increased pericardial fat volume was an independent risk factor for stenotic CAD and could be helpful in assessing subclinical CADs.

  14. Costs and clinical outcomes after coronary multidetector CT angiography in patients without known coronary artery disease: comparison to myocardial perfusion SPECT.

    PubMed

    Min, James K; Kang, Ning; Shaw, Leslee J; Devereux, Richard B; Robinson, Matthew; Lin, Fay; Legorreta, Antonio P; Gilmore, Amanda

    2008-10-01

    To assess costs and clinical outcomes in individuals without known coronary artery disease (CAD) who underwent multidetector computed tomographic (CT) angiography compared with those in matched patients who underwent myocardial perfusion single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). Data were captured from a deidentified, HIPAA-compliant data warehouse. We examined 1-year CAD costs (additional diagnostic coronary testing, CAD hospitalization, and coronary procedural and revascularization costs) and clinical outcomes in individuals without known CAD who underwent multidetector CT (n = 1647) compared with those in a matched cohort of patients who underwent myocardial perfusion SPECT (n = 6588). Cox proportional hazards models were employed for clinical outcome measures, including CAD hospitalization, myocardial infarction, and angina. Adjusted CAD costs in the multidetector CT group were 25.9% lower than in the myocardial perfusion SPECT group, by an average of $1075 (95% confidence interval [CI]: $243, $2570) per patient. Those in the multidetector CT group were more likely to undergo downstream testing with myocardial perfusion SPECT (odds ratio, 6.65; 95% CI: 5.05, 8.75; P < .001), while those in the myocardial perfusion SPECT group were more likely to undergo downstream testing with invasive angiography (odds ratio, 6.25; 95% CI: 4.35, 9.09; P < .001). The multidetector CT group was less likely to undergo coronary revascularization (hazard ratio, 0.76; 95% CI: 0.75, 0.77; P < .001) than the myocardial perfusion SPECT group. There was no significant difference between multidetector CT and myocardial perfusion SPECT groups for rates of myocardial infarction (0.4% for both) or CAD hospitalization (0.7% vs 1.1%, respectively), while rates of angina were significantly lower in the multidetector CT group (4.3% vs 6.4%, P < .001). Individuals without known CAD who underwent multidetector CT as an initial diagnostic test, compared with those who underwent

  15. Optimal scan timing for artery-vein separation at whole-brain CT angiography using a 320-row MDCT volume scanner.

    PubMed

    Shirasaka, Takashi; Hiwatashi, Akio; Yamashita, Koji; Kondo, Masatoshi; Hamasaki, Hiroshi; Shimomiya, Yamato; Nakamura, Yasuhiko; Funama, Yoshinori; Honda, Hiroshi

    2017-02-01

    A 320-row multidetector CT (MDCT) is expected for a good artery-vein separation in terms of temporal resolution. However, a shortened scan duration may lead to insufficient vascular enhancement. We assessed the optimal scan timing for the artery-vein separation at whole-brain CT angiography (CTA) when bolus tracking was used at 320-row MDCT. We analyzed 60 patients, who underwent whole-brain four-dimensional CTA. Difference in CT attenuation between the internal carotid artery (ICA) and the superior sagittal sinus (Datt) was calculated in each phase. Using a visual evaluation score for the depiction of arteries and veins, we calculated the difference between the mean score for the intracranial arteries and the mean score for the veins (Dscore). We assessed the time at which the maximum Datt and Dscore were simultaneously observed. The maximum Datt was observed at 6.0 s and 8.0 s in the arterial-dominant phase and at 16.0 s and 18.0 s in the venous-dominant phase after the contrast media arrival time at the ICA (Taa). The maximum Dscore was observed at 6.0 s and 8.0 s in the arterial-dominant phase and at 16.0 s in the venous-dominant phase after the Taa. There were no statistically significant differences in Datt (p = 0.375) or Dscore (p = 0.139) between these scan timings. The optimal scan timing for artery-vein separation at whole-brain CTA was 6.0 s or 8.0 s for the arteries and 16.0 s for the veins after the Taa. Advances in knowledge: Optimal scan timing allowed us to visualize intracranial arteries or veins with minimal superimposition.

  16. Computed tomography dose assessment for a 160 mm wide, 320 detector row, cone beam CT scanner.

    PubMed

    Geleijns, J; Salvadó Artells, M; de Bruin, P W; Matter, R; Muramatsu, Y; McNitt-Gray, M F

    2009-05-21

    Computed tomography (CT) dosimetry should be adapted to the rapid developments in CT technology. Recently a 160 mm wide, 320 detector row, cone beam CT scanner that challenges the existing Computed Tomography Dose Index (CTDI) dosimetry paradigm was introduced. The purpose of this study was to assess dosimetric characteristics of this cone beam scanner, to study the appropriateness of existing CT dose metrics and to suggest a pragmatic approach for CT dosimetry for cone beam scanners. Dose measurements with a small Farmer-type ionization chamber and with 100 mm and 300 mm long pencil ionization chambers were performed free in air to characterize the cone beam. According to the most common dose metric in CT, namely CTDI, measurements were also performed in 150 mm and 350 mm long CT head and CT body dose phantoms with 100 mm and 300 mm long pencil ionization chambers, respectively. To explore effects that cannot be measured with ionization chambers, Monte Carlo (MC) simulations of the dose distribution in 150 mm, 350 mm and 700 mm long CT head and CT body phantoms were performed. To overcome inconsistencies in the definition of CTDI100 for the 160 mm wide cone beam CT scanner, doses were also expressed as the average absorbed dose within the pencil chamber (D100). Measurements free in air revealed excellent correspondence between CTDI300air and D100air, while CTDI100air substantially underestimates CTDI300air. Results of measurements in CT dose phantoms and corresponding MC simulations at centre and peripheral positions were weighted and revealed good agreement between CTDI300w, D100w and CTDI600w, while CTDI100w substantially underestimates CTDI300w. D100w provides a pragmatic metric for characterizing the dose of the 160 mm wide cone beam CT scanner. This quantity can be measured with the widely available 100 mm pencil ionization chamber within 150 mm long CT dose phantoms. CTDI300w measured in 350 mm long CT dose phantoms serves as an appropriate standard of

  17. Validity of blood flow measurement using 320 multi-detectors CT and first-pass distribution theory: a phantom study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jun; Yu, Xuefang; Xu, Shaopeng; Zhou, Kenneth J.

    2015-03-01

    To evaluate the feasibility of measuring the myocardial blood flow using 320 row detector CT by first-pass technique. Heart was simulated with a container that was filled with pipeline of 3mm diameter; coronary artery was simulated with a pipeline of 2 cm diameter and connected with the simulated heart. The simulated coronary artery was connected with a big container with 1500 ml saline and 150ml contrast agent. One pump linking with simulated heart will withdraw with a speed of 10 ml/min, 15 ml/min, 20 ml/min, 25 ml/min and 30 ml/min. First CT scan starts after 30 s of pumpback with certain speed. The second CT scan starts 5 s after first CT scans. CT images processed as follows: The second CT scan images subtract first CT scan images, calculate the increase of CT value of simulated heart and the CT value of the unit volume of simulated coronary artery and then to calculate the total inflow of myocardial blood flow. CT myocardial blood flows were calculated as: 0.94 ml/s, 2.09 ml/s, 2.74 ml/s, 4.18 ml/s, 4.86 ml/s. The correlation coefficient is 0.994 and r2 = 0.97. The method of measuring the myocardial blood flow using 320 row detector CT by 2 scans is feasible. It is possible to develop a new method for quantitatively and functional assessment of myocardial perfusion blood flow with less radiation does.

  18. Multidetector-row computed tomography for prosthetic heart valve dysfunction: is concomitant non-invasive coronary angiography possible before redo-surgery?

    PubMed

    Tanis, Wilco; Suchá, Dominika; Laufer, Ward; Habets, Jesse; van Herwerden, Lex A; Symersky, Petr; Chamuleau, Steven; Budde, Ricardo P J

    2015-06-01

    Retrospective ECG-gated multidetector-row computed tomography (MDCT) is increasingly used for the assessment of prosthetic heart valve (PHV) dysfunction, but is also hampered by PHV-related artefacts/cardiac arrhythmias. Furthermore, it is performed without nitroglycerine or heart rate correction. The purpose was to determine whether MDCT performed before potential redo-PHV surgery is feasible for concomitant coronary artery stenosis assessment and can replace invasive coronary angiography (CAG). PHV patients with CAG and MDCT were identified. Based on medical history, two groups were created: (I) patients with no known coronary artery disease (CAD), (II) patients with known CAD. All images were scored for the presence of significant (>50 %) stenosis. CAG was the reference test. Fifty-one patients were included. In group I (n = 38), MDCT accurately ruled out significant stenosis in 19/38 (50 %) patients, but could not replace CAG in the remaining 19/38 (50 %) patients due to non-diagnostic image quality (n = 16) or significant stenosis (n = 3) detection. In group II (n = 13), MDCT correctly found no patients without significant stenosis, requiring CAG imaging in all. MDCT assessed patency in 16/19 (84 %) grafts and detected a hostile anatomy in two. MDCT performed for PHV dysfunction assessment can replace CAG (100 % accurate) in approximately half of patients without previously known CAD. • Retrospective MDCT is increasingly used for prosthetic heart valve dysfunction assessment • In case of PHV reoperation, invasive coronary angiography is also required • MDCT can replace CAG in 50 % of patients without coronary artery disease • When conclusive for coronary assessment, MDCT stenosis rule out is highly accurate • Replacing CAG saves associated risks of distant embolization of thrombi or vegetations.

  19. [Reconstruction of coronary 64-multidetector-row computed tomography angiography in patients with atrial fibrillation: delete short RR intervals using electorocardiogram].

    PubMed

    Matsutani, Hideyuki; Sano, Tomonari; Kondo, Takeshi; Fujimoto, Shinichiro; Sekine, Takako; Arai, Takehiro; Morita, Hitomi; Takase, Shinichi

    2012-01-01

    The image qualities of coronary 64-multidetector-row computed tomography angiography (CCTA) in patients with atrial fibrillation (Afib) are often not enough. This study clarifies how to use electrocardiogram (ECG) -editing in Afib. We performed CCTA (Aquilion 64 with beam pitch: 0.125, 0.35 s/r) in 33 patients (M/F=24/9, age: 71±9 yr, mean heart rate: 71±12 bpm) with Afib. We injected 5 mg of verapamil into the vein when the mean HR was ≥80 bpm. First, we reconstructed images after deleting short RR (<800, 750, 700, 650, or 600). Second, we reconstructed images in 4 different methods: (1) end-systolic images with Phase Navi (automatically selecting an optimal phase) (ES-Navi), (2) Mid-diastolic images with Phase Navi (MD-Navi), (3) Mid-diastolic images reconstructed by the "R+absolute time method" [Edit-MD (R+)], and (4) Mid-diastolic images reconstructed by the "R-absolute time method" [Edit-MD (R-)]. We reconstructed 1 and 2 without ECG-editing, and 3 and 4 were reconstructed after ECG-editing without a data deficit. The quality of the images was classified into 3 ranks: no artifact (3), mild artifact (2), and severe artifact (1). The image quality point of CCTA, reconstructed after deleting RR<750, was similar to RR<800, and RR<750 was even higher than that after deleting HR<600, 650, or 700. The mean image quality point of CCTA that was reconstructed by Edit-MD (R-) or Edit-MD (R+) was significantly higher than ES-Navi or MD-Navi. The high image quality of CCTA could be reconstructed after deleting RR<750 in 76% or after deleting RR<800 in 70% of Afib. The reconstruction using Edit-MD (R-) or Edit-MD (R+) without a data deficit could provide a better quality CCTA than using PhaseNavi in Afib.

  20. Diagnostic Performance of Gadoxetic Acid-enhanced Liver MR Imaging versus Multidetector CT in the Detection of Dysplastic Nodules and Early Hepatocellular Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kim, Bo Ram; Lee, Jeong Min; Lee, Dong Ho; Yoon, Jeong Hee; Hur, Bo Yun; Suh, Kyung Suk; Yi, Nam-Joon; Lee, Kyung Boon; Han, Joon Koo

    2017-10-01

    Purpose To compare the diagnostic performance of gadoxetic acid-enhanced liver magnetic resonance (MR) imaging with that of contrast material-enhanced multidetector computed tomography (CT) in the detection of borderline hepatocellular nodules in patients with liver cirrhosis and to determine the Liver Imaging Reporting and Data System (LI-RADS) categories of these detected nodules. Materials and Methods The institutional review board approved this retrospective study and waived the informed consent requirement. Sixty-eight patients with pathologically proven dysplastic nodules (DNs) (low-grade DNs, n = 20; high-grade DNs, n = 17), early hepatocellular carcinomas (HCCs) (n = 42), or progressed HCCs (n = 33) underwent gadoxetic acid-enhanced MR imaging and multidetector CT. An additional 57 patients without any DNs or HCCs in the explanted livers were included as control subjects. Three radiologists independently graded the presence of liver nodules on a five-point confidence scale and assigned LI-RADS categories by using imaging findings. Jackknife alternative free-response receiver operating characteristics (JAFROC) software was used to compare the diagnostic accuracy of each modality in lesion detection. Results Reader-averaged figures of merit estimated with JAFROC software to detect hepatocellular nodules were 0.774 for multidetector CT and 0.842 for MR imaging (P = .002). Readers had significantly higher detection sensitivity for early HCCs with MR imaging than with multidetector CT (78.6% vs 52.4% [P = .001], 71.4% vs 50.0% [P = .011], and 73.8% vs 50.0% [P = .001], respectively). A high proportion of overall detected early HCCs at multidetector CT (59.4%) and MR imaging (72.3%) were categorized as LI-RADS category 4. Most early HCCs (76.2%) and high-grade DNs (82.4%) demonstrated hypointensity on hepatobiliary phase images. In total, 30 more LI-RADS category 4 early HCCs were identified with MR imaging than with multidetector CT across all readers

  1. Comparison of cerebral blood flow data obtained by computed tomography (CT) perfusion with that obtained by xenon CT using 320-row CT.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Satoshi; Tanizaki, Yoshio; Kimura, Hiroaki; Akaji, Kazunori; Kano, Tadashige; Suzuki, Kentaro; Takayama, Youhei; Kanzawa, Takao; Shidoh, Satoka; Nakazawa, Masaki; Yoshida, Kazunari; Mihara, Ban

    2015-03-01

    Cerebral blood flow (CBF) data obtained by computed tomography perfusion (CTP) imaging have been shown to be qualitative data rather than quantitative, in contrast with data obtained by other imaging methods, such as xenon CT (XeCT) imaging. Thus, interpatient comparisons of CBF values themselves obtained by CTP may be inaccurate. In this study, we have compared CBF ratios as well as CBF values obtained from CTP-CBF data to those obtained from XeCT-CBF data for the same patients to determine CTP-CBF parameters that can be used for interpatient comparisons. The data used in the present study were obtained as volume data using 320-row CT. The volume data were applied to an automated region of interest-determining software (3DSRT, version 3.5.2 ) and converted to 59 slices of 2 mm interval standardized images. In the present study, we reviewed 10 patients with occlusive cerebrovascular diseases (CVDs) undergoing both CTP and XeCT in the same period. Our study shows that ratios of CBF measurements, such as hemodynamic stress distribution (perforator-to-cortical flow ratio of middle cerebral artery [MCA] region) or the left/right ratio for the region of the MCA, calculated using CTP data have been shown to correlate well with the same ratios calculated using XeCT data. These results suggest that such CBF ratios could be useful for generating interpatient comparisons of CTP-CBF data obtained by 320-row CT among patients with occlusive CVD.

  2. 320-row CT renal perfusion imaging in patients with aortic dissection: A preliminary study

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Dongting; Liu, Jiayi; Wen, Zhaoying; Li, Yu; Sun, Zhonghua; Xu, Qin; Fan, Zhanming

    2017-01-01

    Objective To investigate the clinical value of renal perfusion imaging in patients with aortic dissection (AD) using 320-row computed tomography (CT), and to determine the relationship between renal CT perfusion imaging and various factors of aortic dissection. Methods Forty-three patients with AD who underwent 320-row CT renal perfusion before operation were prospectively enrolled in this study. Diagnosis of AD was confirmed by transthoracic echocardiography. Blood flow (BF) of bilateral renal perfusion was measured and analyzed. CT perfusion imaging signs of AD in relation to the type of AD, number of entry tears and the false lumen thrombus were observed and compared. Results The BF values of patients with type A AD were significantly lower than those of patients with type B AD (P = 0.004). No significant difference was found in the BF between different numbers of intimal tears (P = 0.288), but BF values were significantly higher in cases with a false lumen without thrombus and renal arteries arising from the true lumen than in those with thrombus (P = 0.036). The BF values measured between the true lumen, false lumen and overriding groups were different (P = 0.02), with the true lumen group having the highest. Also, the difference in BF values between true lumen and false lumen groups was statistically significant (P = 0.016), while no statistical significance was found in the other two groups (P > 0.05). The larger the size of intimal entry tears, the greater the BF values (P = 0.044). Conclusions This study shows a direct correlation between renal CT perfusion changes and AD, with the size, number of intimal tears, different types of AD, different renal artery origins and false lumen thrombosis, significantly affecting the perfusion values. PMID:28182709

  3. Cervical spine clearance in the traumatically injured patient: is multidetector CT scanning sufficient alone? Clinical article.

    PubMed

    Chew, Brandon G; Swartz, Christopher; Quigley, Matthew R; Altman, Daniel T; Daffner, Richard H; Wilberger, James E

    2013-11-01

    Clearance of the cervical spine in patients who have sustained trauma remains a contentious issue. Clinical examination alone is sufficient in neurologically intact patients without neck pain. Patients with neck pain or those with altered mental status or a depressed level of consciousness require further radiographic evaluation. However, no consensus exists as to the appropriate imaging modality. Some advocate multidetector CT (MDCT) scanning alone, but this has been criticized because MDCT is not sensitive in detecting ligamentous injuries that can often only be identified on MRI. Patients were identified retrospectively from a prospectively maintained database at a Level I trauma center. All patients admitted between January 2004 and June 2011 who had a cervical MDCT scan interpreted by a board-certified radiologist as being without evidence of acute traumatic injury and who also had a cervical MRI study obtained during the same hospital admission were included. Data collected included patient demographics, mechanism of injury, Glasgow Coma Scale score at the time of MRI, the indication for and findings on MRI, and the number, type, and indication for cervical spine procedures. A total of 1004 patients were reviewed, of whom 614 were male, with an overall mean age of 47 years. The indication for MRI was neck pain in 662 patients, altered mental status in 467, and neurological signs or symptoms in 157. The MRI studies were interpreted as normal in 645 patients, evidencing ligamentous injury alone in 125, and showing nonspecific degenerative changes in the remaining patients. Of the 125 patients with ligamentous injuries, 66 (52.8%) had documentation of clearance (29 clinical, 37 with flexion-extension radiographs). Another 32 patients were presumed to be self-cleared, bringing the follow-up rate to 82% (98 of 119). Five patients died prior to clearance, and 1 patient was transferred to another facility prior to clearance. Based on these data, the 95% confidence

  4. Superior CT coronary angiography image quality at lower radiation exposure with second generation 320-detector row CT in patients with elevated heart rate: a comparison with first generation 320-detector row CT

    PubMed Central

    Soh, Siang Y.; Ko, Brian S. H.; Cameron, James D.; Crossett, Marcus; Nasis, Arthur; Troupis, John; Meredith, Ian T.; Seneviratne, Sujith K.

    2014-01-01

    Background This study aims to compare the image quality of second generation versus first generation 320-computed tomography coronary angiography (CTCA) in patients with heart rate ≥65 bpm as it has not been specifically reported. Methods Consecutive patients who underwent CTCA using second-generation-320-detector-row-CT were prospectively enrolled. A total of 50 patients with elevated (≥65 bpm) heart rate and 50 patients with controlled (<65 bpm) heart rate were included. Age and gender matched patients who were scanned with the first-generation-320-detector-row-CT were retrospectively identified. Image quality in each coronary artery segment was assessed by two blinded CT angiographers using the five-point Likert scale. Results In the elevated heart rate cohorts, while there was no significant difference in heart rate during scan-acquisition (66 vs. 69 bpm, P=0.308), or body mass index (28.5 vs. 29.6, P=0.464), the second generation scanner was associated with better image quality (3.94±0.6 vs. 3.45±0.8, P=0.001), and with lower radiation (2.8 vs. 4.3 mSv, P=0.009). There was no difference in scan image quality for the controlled heart rate cohorts. Conclusions The second generation CT scanner provides better image quality at lower radiation dose in patients with elevated heart rate (≥65 bpm) compared to first generation CT scanner. PMID:25276615

  5. Automatic vs semi-automatic global cardiac function assessment using 64-row CT

    PubMed Central

    Greupner, J; Zimmermann, E; Hamm, B; Dewey, M

    2012-01-01

    Objective Global cardiac function assessment using multidetector CT (MDCT) is time-consuming. Therefore we sought to compare an automatic software tool with an established semi-automatic method. Methods A total of 36 patients underwent CT with 64×0.5 mm detector collimation, and global left ventricular function was subsequently assessed by two independent blinded readers using both an automatic region-growing-based software tool (with and without manual adjustment) and an established semi-automatic software tool. We also analysed automatic motion mapping to identify end-systole. Results The time needed for assessment using the semi-automatic approach (12:12±6:19 min) was reduced by 75–85% with the automatic software tool (unadjusted, 01:34±0:29 min, adjusted, 02:53±1:19 min; both p<0.001). There was good correlation (r=0.89; p<0.001) for the ejection fraction (EF) between the adjusted automatic (58.6±14.9%) and the semi-automatic (58.0±15.3%) approaches. Also the manually adjusted automatic approach led to significantly smaller limits of agreement than the unadjusted automatic approach for end-diastolic volume (±36.4 ml vs ±58.5 ml, p>0.05). Using motion mapping to automatically identify end-systole reduced analysis time by 95% compared with the semi-automatic approach, but showed inferior precision for EF and end-systolic volume. Conclusion Automatic function assessment using MDCT with manual adjustment shows good agreement with an established semi-automatic approach, while reducing the analysis by 75% to less than 3 min. This suggests that automatic CT function assessment with manual correction may be used for fast, comfortable and reliable evaluation of global left ventricular function. PMID:22045953

  6. High Resolution Multi-Detector CT Aided Tissue Analysis and Quantification of Lung Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Zavaletta, Vanessa A.; Bartholmai, Brian J.; Robb, Richard A

    2009-01-01

    Rational and Objectives Volumetric high-resolution scans can be acquired of the lungs with multi-detector CT (MDCT). Such scans have potential to facilitate useful visualization, characterization, and quantification of the extent of diffuse lung diseases, such as Usual Interstitial Pneumonitis or Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis (UIP/IPF). There is a need to objectify, standardize and improve the accuracy and repeatability of pulmonary disease characterization and quantification from such scans. This paper presents a novel texture analysis approach toward classification and quantification of various pathologies present in lungs with UIP/IPF. The approach integrates a texture matching method with histogram feature analysis. Materials and Methods Patients with moderate UIP/IPF were scanned on a Lightspeed 8-detector GE CT scanner (140kVp, 250mAs). Images were reconstructed with 1.25mm slice thickness in a high-frequency sparing algorithm (BONE) with 50% overlap and a 512 × 512 axial matrix, (0.625 mm3 voxels). Eighteen scans were used in this study. Each dataset is pre-processed which includes segmentation of the lungs and the broncho-vascular trees. Two types of analysis were performed, first an analysis of independent volume of interests (VOIs) and second an analysis of whole lung datasets. 1.) Fourteen of the eighteen scans were used to create a database of independent 15×15×15 cubic voxel VOIs. The VOIs were selected by experts as having greater than 70% of the defined class. The database was composed of the following: Honeycombing (# of VOIs 337), Reticular (130), Ground glass (148), Normal (240), and Emphysema (54). This database was used to develop our algorithm. Three progressively challenging classification experiments were designed to test our algorithm. All three experiments were performed using a 10-fold cross validation method for error estimation. Experiment 1 consisted of a two class discrimination: Normal and Abnormal. Experiment 2 consisted of a four

  7. Reduced Z-axis coverage multidetector CT angiography for suspected acute pulmonary embolism could decrease dose and maintain diagnostic accuracy.

    PubMed

    Kallen, Joshua A; Coughlin, Bret F; O'Loughlin, Michael T; Stein, Barry

    2010-01-01

    Multidetector computed tomographic angiography (MDCTA) is the method of choice for evaluation of suspected acute pulmonary embolism (PE) in most patients because it is accurate and widely available. The use of computed tomography, including MDCTA for PE, has risen dramatically over the last several years with an attendant rise in radiation exposure. Many methods currently employed to reduce radiation dose may affect image quality and potentially affect diagnostic accuracy. Reducing Z-axis coverage would decrease radiation dose without any effect on image quality. This study was performed to assess the effect on the accuracy of MDCTA for suspected acute PE if the Z-axis coverage was reduced to the anatomic range from the top of the aortic arch through the heart. Two hundred ninety-five examinations were performed on a 64-detector-row MDCT and interpreted as positive for PE from July 2005 to February 2008. When the anatomic range of these data sets were retrospectively reduced and reinterpreted for PE, no case was interpreted as negative for PE. The Z-axis coverage was reduced by 37%. In the interest of keeping radiation doses as low as reasonably achievable, further research in this area is warranted.

  8. Three-dimensional contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance venography for detection of renal vein thrombosis: comparison with multidetector CT venography.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Long Jiang; Wu, Xinsheng; Yang, Gui Fen; Tang, Chun Xiang; Luo, Song; Zhou, Chang Sheng; Ji, Xue Man; Lu, Guang Ming

    2013-12-01

    Renal vein thrombosis is not uncommon, however, there have been few reports on the diagnostic accuracy of three-dimensional contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance venography (3D-CE-MRV) in the detection of renal vein thrombosis (RVT). To evaluate the value of 3D-CE-MRV for detecting RVT with multidetector computed tomography (CT) venography as reference standard. Thirty-two patients with nephrotic syndrome underwent renal CT venography and gradient echo pulse sequence (FLASH 3D) 3D-CE-MRV in a clinical 3-T whole-body MR scanner for suspected RVT with time interval of 0-5 days. RVT was recorded on a per-patient and per-vessel (left renal vein, right renal vein, and inferior vena cava) basis. The diagnostic accuracy of 3D-CE-MRV for detection of RVT was calculated with CT venography as reference standard. Inter-reader agreement for RVT detection was evaluated using Kappa statistics. Of 32 patients, CT venography detected 22 vessels with thrombosis in 17 patients, including five in right renal veins, 14 in left renal veins, and three in inferior vena cava, while 15 patients had no RVT. 3D-CE-MRV detected 21 vessels (21/96, 21.9%) with thrombosis in 16 patients (6/32, 50%), including five in right renal veins, 13 in left renal veins, and three in inferior vena cava, while 16 patients (16/32, 50%) had no RVT. With CT venography as reference standard, the sensitivities and specificities of 3D-CE-MRV for RVT detection were 94.1%, 100%; 95.5%, 100% on a per-patient and a per-vessel basis, respectively. Excellent inter-reader agreement (Kappa value = 0.969, P < 0.001) was observed for RVT detection. 3D-CE-MRV has a high diagnostic accuracy in the detection of RVT, which is optimal alternative imaging modality in the detection of RVT.

  9. Estimating radiation dose to organs of patients undergoing conventional and novel multidetector CT exams using Monte Carlo simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angel, Erin

    Advances in Computed Tomography (CT) technology have led to an increase in the modality's diagnostic capabilities and therefore its utilization, which has in turn led to an increase in radiation exposure to the patient population. As a result, CT imaging currently constitutes approximately half of the collective exposure to ionizing radiation from medical procedures. In order to understand the radiation risk, it is necessary to estimate the radiation doses absorbed by patients undergoing CT imaging. The most widely accepted risk models are based on radiosensitive organ dose as opposed to whole body dose. In this research, radiosensitive organ dose was estimated using Monte Carlo based simulations incorporating detailed multidetector CT (MDCT) scanner models, specific scan protocols, and using patient models based on accurate patient anatomy and representing a range of patient sizes. Organ dose estimates were estimated for clinical MDCT exam protocols which pose a specific concern for radiosensitive organs or regions. These dose estimates include estimation of fetal dose for pregnant patients undergoing abdomen pelvis CT exams or undergoing exams to diagnose pulmonary embolism and venous thromboembolism. Breast and lung dose were estimated for patients undergoing coronary CTA imaging, conventional fixed tube current chest CT, and conventional tube current modulated (TCM) chest CT exams. The correlation of organ dose with patient size was quantified for pregnant patients undergoing abdomen/pelvis exams and for all breast and lung dose estimates presented. Novel dose reduction techniques were developed that incorporate organ location and are specifically designed to reduce close to radiosensitive organs during CT acquisition. A generalizable model was created for simulating conventional and novel attenuation-based TCM algorithms which can be used in simulations estimating organ dose for any patient model. The generalizable model is a significant contribution of this

  10. Monte Carlo simulations in multi-detector CT (MDCT) for two PET/CT scanner models using MASH and FASH adult phantoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belinato, W.; Santos, W. S.; Paschoal, C. M. M.; Souza, D. N.

    2015-06-01

    The combination of positron emission tomography (PET) and computed tomography (CT) has been extensively used in oncology for diagnosis and staging of tumors, radiotherapy planning and follow-up of patients with cancer, as well as in cardiology and neurology. This study determines by the Monte Carlo method the internal organ dose deposition for computational phantoms created by multidetector CT (MDCT) beams of two PET/CT devices operating with different parameters. The different MDCT beam parameters were largely related to the total filtration that provides a beam energetic change inside the gantry. This parameter was determined experimentally with the Accu-Gold Radcal measurement system. The experimental values of the total filtration were included in the simulations of two MCNPX code scenarios. The absorbed organ doses obtained in MASH and FASH phantoms indicate that bowtie filter geometry and the energy of the X-ray beam have significant influence on the results, although this influence can be compensated by adjusting other variables such as the tube current-time product (mAs) and pitch during PET/CT procedures.

  11. Renal stone assessment with dual-energy multidetector CT and advanced postprocessing techniques: improved characterization of renal stone composition--pilot study.

    PubMed

    Boll, Daniel T; Patil, Neil A; Paulson, Erik K; Merkle, Elmar M; Simmons, W Neal; Pierre, Sean A; Preminger, Glenn M

    2009-03-01

    To prospectively evaluate the capability of noninvasive, simultaneous dual-energy (DE) multidetector computed tomography (CT) to improve characterization of human renal calculi in an anthropomorphic DE renal phantom by introducing advanced postprocessing techniques, with ex vivo renal stone spectroscopy as the reference standard. Fifty renal calculi were assessed: Thirty stones were of pure crystalline composition (uric acid, cystine, struvite, calcium oxalate, calcium phosphate, brushite), and 20 were of polycrystalline composition. DE CT was performed with a 64-detector CT unit. A postprocessing algorithm (DECT(Slope)) was proposed as a pixel-by-pixel approach to generate Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine dataset gray-scale-encoding ratios of relative differences in attenuation values of low- and high-energy DE CT. Graphic analysis, in which clusters of equal composition were identified, was performed by sorting attenuation values of color composition-encoded calculi in an ascending sequence. Multivariate general linear model analysis was used to determine level of significance to differentiate composition on native and postprocessed DE CT images. Graphic analysis of native DE CT images was used to identify clusters for uric acid (453-629 HU for low-energy CT, 443-615 HU for high-energy CT), cystine (725-832 HU for low-energy CT, 513-747 HU for high-energy CT), and struvite (1337-1530 HU for low-energy CT, 1007-1100 HU for high-energy CT) stones; high-energy clusters showed attenuation value overlap. Polycrystalline calcium oxalate and calcium phosphate calculi were found throughout the entire spectrum, and dense brushite had attenuation values of more than 1500 HU for low-energy CT and more than 1100 HU for high-energy CT. The DE CT algorithm was used to generate specific identifiers for uric acid (77-80 U(Slope), one outlier), cystine (70-71 U(Slope)), struvite (56-60 U(Slope)), calcium oxalate and calcium phosphate (17-59 U(Slope)), and brushite

  12. Whole body 16-row multislice CT in emergency room: effects of different protocols on scanning time, image quality and radiation exposure.

    PubMed

    Fanucci, Ezio; Fiaschetti, Valeria; Rotili, Anna; Floris, Roberto; Simonetti, Giovanni

    2007-02-01

    The objective of this study was to compare two different scanning protocols in patients suspected to have multiple trauma using multidetector 16-row computed tomography (CT) to better define scanning time, imaging quality and radiation exposure. Forty-six patients, between March 2004 and March 2005, with suspected multiple trauma (cerebral, spine, chest, abdominal and pelvis) were evaluated with two different protocols: Protocol "A" 26 patients; Protocol "B" 20 patients. Protocol A consists of a single-pass continuous whole-body acquisition (from vertex to pubic symphysis), whereas Protocol B of conventional segmented acquisition with scanning of body segments individually. Both protocols were performed using a multidetector 16-rows CT (Light-Speed 16, General Electric Medical System, Milwaukee, WI, USA) with the same technical factors. Radiation dose was evaluated in two ways: computer tomography dose index (CTDI) = dose measured in central and peripheral region of the subjects as a direct result of a CT section acquisition of T millimeters thick (independent from the two protocols) and dose length product (DLP) = total dose deposited over the length of the acquisition (dependent from the two protocols). Image quality was rated according to the following scores: 1, excellent; 2, good; 3, satisfactory; 4, moderate and 5, poor. The results were compared using Wilcoxon's test to identify significant difference in terms of image quality, scanning time, radiation exposure and presence of artifacts, assuming significance at a p value of <0.05. In the single-pass scanning, DLP was 2.671 mGy x cm and a total scan time of 35 s. In whole-body protocols, we have seen artifacts due to arm adduction in thorax and less image quality in brain. In the conventional segmented study, DLP was 3.217 mGy x cm and a total scan time of 65 s; this protocol offered less extraction capabilities of off-axial on focused images of the entire spine, aorta, facial bones or hip without rescanning

  13. Diagnostic capability of gadoxetate disodium-enhanced liver MRI for diagnosis of hepatocellular carcinoma: comparison with multi-detector CT.

    PubMed

    Toyota, Naoyuki; Nakamura, Yuko; Hieda, Masashi; Akiyama, Naoko; Terada, Hiroaki; Matsuura, Noriaki; Nishiki, Masayo; Kono, Hirotaka; Kohno, Hiroshi; Irei, Toshimitsu; Yoshikawa, Yukinobu; Kuraoka, Kazuya; Taniyama, Kiyomi; Awai, Kazuo

    2013-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic capability of gadoxetate disodium (Gd-EOB)-MRI for the detection of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) compared with multidetector CT (MDCT). Fifty patients with 57 surgically proven HCCs who underwent Gd-EOB-MRI and MDCT from March 2008 to June 2011 were evaluated. Two observers evaluated MR and CT on a lesion-by-lesion basis. We analyzed sensitivity by grading on a 5-point scale, the degree of arterial enhancement and the differences in histological grades in the diffusion-weighted images (DWI). The results showed that the sensitivity of Gd-EOB-MRI was higher than that of MDCT especially for HCCs that were 1 cm in diameter or smaller. The hepatobiliary phase was useful for the detecting of small HCC. We had few cases in which it was difficult to judge HCC in the arterial enhancement between MRI and MDCT. In the diffusion-weighted image, well differentiated HCC tended to show a low signal intensity, and poorly differentiated HCC tended to show a high signal intensity. In moderately differentiated HCC's, the mean diameter of the high signal intensity group was larger than that of the low signal intensity group (24.5 mm vs. 15.8 mm). In conclusion, Gd-EOB-MRI tended to show higher sensitivity compared to MDCT in the detection of HCC.

  14. Evaluation of different small bowel contrast agents by multi - detector row CT

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yong-Ren; Yu, Xiao-Li; Peng, Zhi-Yi

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This study aims to evaluate the effects of different oral small bowel contrast agents towards the intestinal dilatation and intestinal wall structure exhibition by the abdominal multi - detector row CT (MDCT) examination. Methods: 80 patients were performed the whole abdominal CT examination, then randomly divided into four groups, with 20 patients in each group. 45 minutes before the CT examination, the patients were served with a total of 1800 ml pure water, pure milk, dilute lactulose solution and isotonic mannitol solution, respectively. Results: The images were blinded read by two experienced abdominal radiologists in the workstation, the cross-sectional diameters of duodenum, jejunum, proximal and terminal ends of ileum of each patient were measured, then the analysis of variance was performed to analyze the differences in the intestinal dilatation among the experimental groups. The scoring method was used to score the intestinal dilatation and intestinal structure exhibition. The diluted lactulose solution and 2.5% mannitol exhibited the best intestinal dilation degrees. Similarly, the diluted lactulose solution and 2.5% mannitol exhibited the highest scores in the entire small bowel dilatation degree and intestinal structure exhibition. Conclusions: 2.5% osmotic mannitol and the diluted lactulose solution enabled the full dilatation of small bowel, and could clearly exhibit the wall structure. PMID:26629131

  15. Reduced image noise at low-dose multidetector CT of the abdomen with prior image constrained compressed sensing algorithm.

    PubMed

    Lubner, Meghan G; Pickhardt, Perry J; Tang, Jie; Chen, Guang-Hong

    2011-07-01

    standard FBP low-dose multidetector CT abdominal images results in substantial noise reduction and improved image quality.

  16. Overbeaming and overlapping of volume-scan CT with tube current modulation in a 320-detector row CT scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Ying-Lan; Chen, Yan-Shi; Lai, Nan-Ku; Chuang, Keh-Shih; Tsai, Hui-Yu

    2014-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the performance of volume scan tube current modulation (VS-ATCM) with adaptive iterative dose reduction 3D (AIDR3D) technique in abdomen CT examinations. We scanned an elliptical cone-shaped phantom utilizing AIDR3D technique combined with VS-ATCM mode in a 320-detector row CT scanner. The image noise distributions with conventional filtered back-projction (FBP) technique and those with AIDR3D technique were compared. The radiation dose profile and tube current time product (mAs) in three noise levels of VS-ATCM modes were compared. The radiation beam profiles of five preset scan lengths were measured using Gafchromic film strips to assess the effects of overbeaming and everlapping. The results indicated that the image noises with AIDR3D technique was 13-74% lower than those in FBP technique. The mAs distributions can be a prediction for various abdominal sizes when undergoing a VS-ATCM mode scan. Patients can receive the radiation dose of overbeaming and overlapping during the VS-ATCM mode scans.

  17. Variants of the popliteal artery terminal branches as detected by multidetector ct angiography

    PubMed Central

    Oztekin, Pelin Seher; Ergun, Elif; Cıvgın, Esra; Yigit, Hasan; Kosar, Pınar Nercis

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate variants of the popliteal artery (PA) terminal branches with 64-multidetector computed tomographic angiography (64-MD CTA). Materials and Methods A total of 495 extremities (251 right, 244 left) of 253 patients undergoing a 64-MD CTA examination were included in the study. Of these, 242 extremities were evaluated bilaterally, whereas 11 were evaluated unilaterally. The terminal branching pattern of the PA was classified according to the classification scheme proposed by Kim; the distance between the medial tibial plateau and the origin of the anterior tibial artery (A) and the length of the tibioperoneal trunk (B) have been measured and recorded. Results In 459 cases (92.7%) branching of PA occurred distal to the knee joint (Type I); in 18 cases (2.8%) PA branching was superior to the knee joint (Type II); and hypoplasia of the PA branches was found in 27 cases (5.5%) (Type III). Among these types the most frequent branching patterns were Type IA (87.5%), Type IIIA (3.9%), and Type IB (3.8%). The ranges of A and B mean distances were 47.6 mm and 29.6 mm, respectively Conclusion Variations in popliteal artery terminal branching pattern occurred in 7.4% to 17.6% of patients. Pre-surgical detection of these variations with MD CTA may help to reduce the risk of iatrogenic arterial injury by enabling a better surgical treatment plan. PMID:28352741

  18. Ruling out coronary artery disease with noninvasive coronary multidetector CT angiography before noncoronary cardiovascular surgery.

    PubMed

    Catalán, Paz; Leta, Rubén; Hidalgo, Alberto; Montiel, José; Alomar, Xavier; Viladés, David; Barros, Antonio; Pujadas, Sandra; Carreras, Francesc; Padró, Josep M; Cinca, Juan; Pons-Lladó, Guillem

    2011-02-01

    To assess the usefulness of preoperative coronary computed tomographic (CT) angiography in the detection of coronary artery disease (CAD) in nonselected patients scheduled to undergo noncoronary cardiovascular surgery to avoid unnecessary invasive coronary angiography (ICA). The institutional review board approved the study protocol; informed consent was given. This prospective study involved 161 consecutive patients who underwent coronary calcium scoring and coronary CT angiography before undergoing noncoronary cardiovascular surgery. Seven patients were excluded because of contraindications to CT angiography. The major indication of noncoronary cardiovascular surgery was valvular heart disease (121 patients). Follow-up was performed at a median of 20 months to define ischemic events described as acute coronary syndrome or death secondary to acute coronary syndrome, arrhythmias, or cardiac failure. Multivariate analysis was performed to determine predictors of nondiagnostic coronary CT angiography. Kaplan-Meier analysis was performed to evaluate outcome at follow-up. Twenty-one patients did not undergo surgery, which left 133 patients as the study group. Atrial fibrillation was present in 45 of 133 patients. The interquartile range of the Agatston coronary calcium score was 0-471. Coronary CT angiography was diagnostic in 108 of 133 patients. Of these, 93 of 108 had no significant CAD (≤ 50% stenosis), and noncoronary cardiovascular surgery was performed in them without preoperative ICA. No patients in this group had postoperative ischemic events at follow-up. Coronary CT angiography was nondiagnostic in 25 of 133 patients who were referred for preoperative ICA. Multivariate analysis showed Agatston score to be the only independent predictor of nondiagnostic coronary CT angiography (odds ratio = 1.002; 95% confidence interval: 1.001, 1.003; P = .001). The best Agatston score cutoff for diagnostic coronary CT angiography was 579. In nonselected patients scheduled

  19. Multi-detector spiral CT study of the relationships between pulmonary ground-glass nodules and blood vessels.

    PubMed

    Gao, Feng; Li, Ming; Ge, Xiaojun; Zheng, Xiangpeng; Ren, Qingguo; Chen, Yan; Lv, Fangzhen; Hua, Yanqing

    2013-12-01

    To investigate the relationships between pulmonary ground-glass nodules (GGN) and blood vessels and their diagnostic values in differentiating GGNs. Multi-detector spiral CT imaging of 108 GGNs was retrospectively reviewed. The spatial relationships between GGNs and supplying blood vessels were categorized into four types: I, vessels passing by GGNs; II, intact vessels passing through GGNs; III, distorted, dilated or tortuous vessels seen within GGNs; IV, more complicated vasculature other than described above. Relationship types were correlated to pathologic and/or clinical findings of GGNs. Of 108 GGNs, 10 were benign, 24 preinvasive nodules and 74 adenocarcinomas that were pathologically proven. Types I, II, III and IV vascular relationships were observed in 9, 58, 21 and 20 GGNs, respectively. Type II relationship was the dominating relationship for each GGN group, but significant differences were shown among them. Correlation analysis showed strong correlation between invasive adenocarcinoma and type III and IV relationships. Subgroup analysis indicated that type III was more commonly seen in IAC with comparison to type IV more likely seen in MIA. Different GGNs have different relationships with vessels. Understanding and recognising characteristic GGN-vessel relationships may help identify which GGNs are more likely to be malignant.

  20. Volume Changes of Experimental Carotid Sidewall Aneurysms Due to Embolization with Liquid Embolic Agents: A Multidetector CT Angiography Study

    SciTech Connect

    Dudeck, O. Okuducu, A. F.; Jordan, O.; Tesmer, K.; Pech, M.; Weigang, E.; Ruefenacht, D. A.; Doelker, E.; Felix, R.

    2006-12-15

    Iodine-containing polyvinyl alcohol polymer (I-PVAL) is a novel precipitating liquid embolic that allows for artifact-free evaluation of CT angiography (CTA). As accurate aneurysm volumetry can be performed with multidetector CTA, we determined volumes of experimental aneurysms before, immediately after, and 4 weeks after embolization of 14 porcine experimental carotid sidewall aneurysms with this liquid embolic. An automated three-dimensional software measurement tool was used for volumetric analysis of volume-rendering CTA data. Furthermore, intra-aneurysmal pressure changes during liquid embolization were measured in four silicone aneurysms and potential polymer volume changes within 4 weeks were assessed in vitro. Liquid embolic injection was performed during temporary balloon occlusion of the aneurysm neck, resulting in a mean occlusion rate of 98.3%. Aneurysms enlarged significantly during embolization by 61.1 {+-} 28.9%, whereas a significant shrinkage of 5.6 {+-} 2.7% was observed within the follow-up period. Histologic analysis revealed an inflammatory foreign body reaction with partial polymer degradation. In silicone aneurysm models, intra-aneurysmal pressure remained unchanged during liquid embolic injection, whereas balloon inflation resulted in a mean pressure increase of 31.2 {+-} 0.7%. No polymer shrinkage was observed in vitro. The aneurysm enlargement noted was presumably due to pressure elevation after balloon inflation, which resulted in dilatation of the weak venous wall of the newly constructed aneurysm-another shortcoming of this experimental aneurysm model. The volume decrease after 4 weeks expressed partial polymer degradation.

  1. Can multidetector CT detect the site of gastrointestinal tract injury in trauma? – A retrospective study

    PubMed Central

    Panda, Ananya; Kumar, Atin; Gamanagatti, Shivanand; Das, Ranjita; Paliwal, Swati; Gupta, Amit; Kumar, Subodh

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE We aimed to assess the performance of computed tomography (CT) in localizing site of traumatic gastrointestinal tract (GIT) injury and determine the diagnostic value of CT signs in site localization. METHODS CT scans of 97 patients with surgically proven GIT or mesenteric injuries were retrospectively reviewed by radiologists blinded to surgical findings. Diagnosis of either GIT or mesenteric injuries was made. In patients with GIT injuries, site of injury and presence of CT signs such as focal bowel wall hyperenhancement, hypoenhancement, wall discontinuity, wall thickening, extramural air, intramural air, perivisceral infiltration, and active vascular contrast leak were evaluated. RESULTS Out of 97 patients, 90 had GIT injuries (70 single site injuries and 20 multiple site injuries) and seven had isolated mesenteric injury. The overall concordance between CT and operative findings for exact site localization was 67.8% (61/90), partial concordance rate was 11.1% (10/90), and discordance rate was 21.1% (19/90). For single site localization, concordance rate was 77.1% (54/70), discordance rate was 21.4% (15/70), and partial concordance rate was 1.4% (1/70). In multiple site injury, concordance rate for all sites of injury was 35% (7/20), partial concordance rate was 45% (9/20), and discordance rate was 20% (4/20). For upper GIT injuries, wall discontinuity was the most accurate sign for localization. For small bowel injury, intramural air and hyperenhancement were the most specific signs for site localization, while for large bowel injury, wall discontinuity and hypoenhancement were the most specific signs. CONCLUSION CT performs better in diagnosing small bowel injury compared with large bowel injury. CT can well predict the presence of multiple site injury but has limited performance in exact localization of all injury sites. PMID:27924777

  2. Clinical applications of the superior epigastric artery perforator (SEAP) flap: anatomical studies and preoperative perforator mapping with multidetector CT.

    PubMed

    Hamdi, Moustapha; Van Landuyt, Koenraad; Ulens, Sara; Van Hedent, Eddy; Roche, Nathalie; Monstrey, Stan

    2009-09-01

    Pedicled superior epigastric artery perforator (SEAP) flaps can be raised to cover challenging thoracic defects. We present an anatomical study based on multidetector computerized tomography (MDCT) scan findings of the SEA perforators in addition to the first reported clinical series of SEAP flaps in anterior chest wall reconstruction. (a) In the CT scan study, images of a group of 20 patients who underwent MDCT scan analysis were used to visualise bilaterally the location of musculocutaneous SEAP. X- and Y-axes were used as landmarks to localise the perforators. The X-axis is a horizontal line at the junction of sternum and xyphoid (JCX) and the Y-axis is at the midline. (b) In the clinical study, seven pedicled SEAP flaps were performed in another group of patients. MDCT images revealed totally 157 perforators with a mean of 7.85 perforators per patient. The dominant perforators (137 perforators) were mainly localised in an area between 1.5 and 6.5 cm from the X-axis on both sides and between 3 and 16 cm below the Y-axis. The calibre of these dominant perforators was judged as 'good' to 'very good' in 82.5% of the cases. The average dimension of the flap was 21.7x6.7 cm. All flaps were based on one perforator. Mean harvesting time was 110 min. There were no flap losses. Minor tip necrosis occurred in two flaps. One of them was treated with excision and primary closure. Our clinical experience indicates that the SEAP flap provides a novel and useful approach for reconstruction of anterior chest wall defects. CT-based imaging allows for anatomical assessment of the perforators of the superior epigastric artery (SEA).

  3. Dose performance of a 64-channel dual-source CT scanner.

    PubMed

    McCollough, Cynthia H; Primak, Andrew N; Saba, Osama; Bruder, Herbert; Stierstorfer, Karl; Raupach, Rainer; Suess, Christoph; Schmidt, Bernhard; Ohnesorge, Bernd M; Flohr, Thomas G

    2007-06-01

    To prospectively compare the dose performance of a 64-channel multi-detector row computed tomographic (CT) scanner and a 64-channel dual-source CT scanner from the same manufacturer. To minimize dose in the cardiac (dual-source) mode, the evaluated dual-source CT system uses a cardiac beam-shaping filter, three-dimensional adaptive noise reduction, heart rate-dependent pitch, and electrocardiographically based modulation of the tube current. Weighted CT dose index per 100 mAs was measured for the head, body, and cardiac beam-shaping filters. Kerma-length product was measured in the spiral cardiac mode at four pitch values and three electrocardiographic modulation temporal windows. Noise was measured in an anthropomorphic phantom. Data were compared with data from a 64-channel multi-detector row CT scanner. For the multi-detector row and dual-source CT systems, respectively, weighted CT dose index per 100 mAs was 14.2 and 12.2 mGy (head CT), 6.8 and 6.4 mGy (body CT), and 6.8 and 5.3 mGy (cardiac CT). In the spiral cardiac mode (no electrocardiographically based tube current modulation, 0.2 pitch), equivalent noise occurred at volume CT dose index values of 23.7 and 35.0 mGy (coronary artery calcium CT) and 58.9 and 61.2 mGy (coronary CT angiography) for multi-detector row CT and dual-source CT, respectively. The use of heart rate-dependent pitch values reduced volume CT dose index to 46.2 mGy (0.265 pitch), 34.0 mGy (0.36 pitch), and 26.6 mGy (0.46 pitch) compared with 61.2 mGy for 0.2 pitch. The use of electrocardiographically based tube current-modulation and temporal windows of 110, 210, and 310 msec further reduced volume CT dose index to 9.1-25.1 mGy, dependent on the heart rate. For electrocardiographically gated coronary CT angiography, image noise equivalent to that of multi-detector row CT can be achieved with dual-source CT at doses comparable to or up to a factor of two lower than the doses at multi-detector row CT, depending on heart rate of the patient

  4. Multidetector and three-dimensional CT evaluation of the patient with maxillofacial injury.

    PubMed

    Avery, Laura L; Susarla, Srinivas M; Novelline, Robert A

    2011-01-01

    Interpretation of images associated with the traumatically injured face is challenging. The complexity of facial anatomy, coupled with the superimposition of numerous bony structures on plain radiographs, poses specific obstacles to accurate interpretation of facial injury. Although plain radiographs can be helpful in cases of isolated injuries, CT is the most useful modality for evaluating facial injury. This article reviews facial anatomy as it pertains to traumatic injury, emphasizes the clinical findings associated with various types of facial injury, and simplifies the diagnosis of facial injury on CT. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. A retrospective comparison of smart prep and test bolus multi-detector CT pulmonary angiography protocols

    SciTech Connect

    Suckling, Tara; Smith, Tony; Reed, Warren

    2013-06-15

    Optimal arterial opacification is crucial in imaging the pulmonary arteries using computed tomography (CT). This poses the challenge of precisely timing data acquisition to coincide with the transit of the contrast bolus through the pulmonary vasculature. The aim of this quality assurance exercise was to investigate if a change in CT pulmonary angiography (CTPA) scanning protocol resulted in improved opacification of the pulmonary arteries. Comparison was made between the smart prep protocol (SPP) and the test bolus protocol (TBP) for opacification in the pulmonary trunk. A total of 160 CTPA examinations (80 using each protocol) performed between January 2010 and February 2011 were assessed retrospectively. CT attenuation coefficients were measured in Hounsfield Units (HU) using regions of interest at the level of the pulmonary trunk. The average pixel value, standard deviation (SD), maximum, and minimum were recorded. For each of these variables a mean value was then calculated and compared for these two CTPA protocols. Minimum opacification of 200 HU was achieved in 98% of the TBP sample but only 90% of the SPP sample. The average CT attenuation over the pulmonary trunk for the SPP was 329 (SD = ±21) HU, whereas for the TBP it was 396 (SD = ±22) HU (P = 0.0017). The TBP also recorded higher maximum (P = 0.0024) and minimum (P = 0.0039) levels of opacification. This study has found that a TBP resulted in significantly better opacification of the pulmonary trunk than the SPP.

  6. Automated characterization of normal and pathologic lung tissue by topological texture analysis of multidetector CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boehm, H. F.; Fink, C.; Becker, C.; Reiser, M.

    2007-03-01

    Reliable and accurate methods for objective quantitative assessment of parenchymal alterations in the lung are necessary for diagnosis, treatment and follow-up of pulmonary diseases. Two major types of alterations are pulmonary emphysema and fibrosis, emphysema being characterized by abnormal enlargement of the air spaces distal to the terminal, nonrespiratory bronchiole, accompanied by destructive changes of the alveolar walls. The main characteristic of fibrosis is coursening of the interstitial fibers and compaction of the pulmonary tissue. With the ability to display anatomy free from superimposing structures and greater visual clarity, Multi-Detector-CT has shown to be more sensitive than the chest radiograph in identifying alterations of lung parenchyma. In automated evaluation of pulmonary CT-scans, quantitative image processing techniques are applied for objective evaluation of the data. A number of methods have been proposed in the past, most of which utilize simple densitometric tissue features based on the mean X-ray attenuation coefficients expressed in terms of Hounsfield Units [HU]. Due to partial volume effects, most of the density-based methodologies tend to fail, namely in cases, where emphysema and fibrosis occur within narrow spatial limits. In this study, we propose a methodology based upon the topological assessment of graylevel distribution in the 3D image data of lung tissue which provides a way of improving quantitative CT evaluation. Results are compared to the more established density-based methods.

  7. [CT - diagnosis and differential diagnosis of inflammatory acute intestinal conditions].

    PubMed

    Wiesner, W

    2011-08-24

    Multidetector-row CT has shown over the past years that it is able to provide reliable diagnoses in various acute intestinal conditions. The presented article provides an overview of primary and secondary inflammatory acute intestinal pathologies and their differential diagnoses.

  8. Voxel-Based Sensitivity of Flat-Panel CT for the Detection of Intracranial Hemorrhage: Comparison to Multi-Detector CT

    PubMed Central

    Frölich, Andreas M.; Buhk, Jan-Hendrik; Fiehler, Jens; Kemmling, Andre

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Flat-panel CT (FPCT) allows cross-sectional parenchymal, vascular and perfusion imaging within the angiography suite, which could greatly facilitate acute stroke management. We hypothesized that FPCT offers equal diagnostic accuracy compared to multi-detector CT (MDCT) as a primary tool to exclude intracranial hemorrhage. Methods 22 patients with intracranial hematomas who had both MDCT and FPCT performed within 24 hours were retrospectively identified. Patients with visible change in hematoma size or configuration were excluded. Two raters independently segmented hemorrhagic lesions. Data sets and corresponding binary lesion maps were co-registered to compare hematoma volume. Diagnostic accuracy of FPCT to detect hemorrhage was calculated from voxel-wise analysis of lesion overlap compared to reference MDCT. Results Mean hematoma size was similar between MDCT (16.2±8.9 ml) and FPCT (16.1±8.6 ml), with near perfect correlation of hematoma sizes between modalities (ρ = 0.95, p<0.001). Sensitivity and specificity of FPCT to detect hemorrhagic voxels was 61.6% and 99.8% for intraventricular hematomas and 67.7% and 99.5% for all other intracranial hematomas. Conclusions In this small sample containing predominantly cases with subarachnoid hemorrhage, FPCT based assessment of hemorrhagic volume in brain yields acceptable accuracy compared to reference MDCT, albeit with a limited sensitivity on a voxel level. Further assessment and improvement of FPCT is necessary before it can be applied as a primary imaging modality to exclude intracranial hemorrhage in acute stroke patients. PMID:27806106

  9. Crossed Fused Renal Ectopia: Presentations on 99mTc-MAG3 Scan, 99mTc-DMSA SPECT, and Multidetector CT.

    PubMed

    Moon, Eun Ha; Kim, Min-Woo; Kim, Young Jun; Sun, In O

    2015-10-01

    Crossed renal ectopia is an uncommon developmental anomaly in which both kidneys are located on the same side of the body. The present case describes a 20-year-old man who underwent the military entrance physical examination. The ultrasound showed the right kidney in normal site with slightly increased size, but the left kidney was not identified. Tc-MAG3 scan showed a single kidney with 2 ureters, and the orifices of the ureters were connected at both sides of bladder. Tc-DMSA SPECT and contrast-enhanced multidetector CT were performed and revealed crossed fused renal ectopia.

  10. Computerized assessment of motion-contaminated calcified plaques in cardiac multidetector CT

    SciTech Connect

    King, Martin; Giger, Maryellen L.; Suzuki, Kenji; Bardo, Dianna M. E.; Greenberg, Brent; Lan Li; Pan Xiaochuan

    2007-12-15

    An automated method for evaluating the image quality of calcified plaques with respect to motion artifacts in noncontrast-enhanced cardiac computed tomography (CT) images is introduced. This method involves using linear regression (LR) and artificial neural network (ANN) regression models for predicting two patient-specific, region-of-interest-specific, reconstruction-specific and temporal phase-specific image quality indices. The first is a plaque motion index, which is derived from the actual trajectory of the calcified plaque and is represented on a continuous scale. The second is an assessability index, which reflects the degree to which a calcified plaque is affected by motion artifacts, and is represented on an ordinal five-point scale. Two sets of assessability indices were provided independently by two radiologists experienced in evaluating cardiac CT images. Inputs for the regression models were selected from 12 features characterizing the dynamic, morphological, and intensity-based properties of the calcified plaques. Whereas LR-velocity (LR-V) used only a single feature (three-dimensional velocity), the LR-multiple (LR-M) and ANN regression models used the same subset of these 12 features selected through stepwise regression. The regression models were parameterized and evaluated using a database of simulated calcified plaque images from the dynamic NCAT phantom involving nine heart rate/multi-sector gating combinations and 40 cardiac phases covering two cardiac cycles. Six calcified plaques were used for the plaque motion indices and three calcified plaques were used for both sets of assessability indices. In one configuration, images from the second cardiac cycle were used for feature selection and regression model parameterization, whereas images from the first cardiac cycle were used for testing. With this configuration, repeated measures concordance correlation coefficients (CCCs) and associated 95% confidence intervals for the LR-V, LR-M, and ANN

  11. Non-invasive Detection of Aortic and Coronary Atherosclerosis in Homozygous Familial Hypercholesterolemia by 64 Slice Multi-detector Row Computed Tomography Angiography

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia (HoFH) is a rare disorder characterized by the early onset of atherosclerosis, often at the ostia of coronary arteries. In this study we document for the first time that aortic and coronary atherosclerosis can be detected using 64 slice multiple detector-row ...

  12. Non-invasive detection of aortic and coronary atherosclerosis in homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia by 64 slice multi-detector row computed tomography angiography

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia (HoFH) is a rare disorder characterized by the early onset of atherosclerosis, often at the ostia of coronary arteries. In this study we document for the first time that aortic and coronary atherosclerosis can be detected using 64 slice multiple detector row ...

  13. Comparison of multidetector CT and endoscopic ultrasonography in malignant pancreatic mass lesions.

    PubMed

    Arabul, Mahmut; Karakus, Funda; Alper, Emrah; Kandemir, Altay; Celik, Mustafa; Karakus, Volkan; Yucel, Kamil; Unsal, Belkis

    2012-01-01

    Endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) has been shown to be superior to conventional CT in detecting and staging pancreatic cancer. We conducted a prospective trial to compare EUS and MDCT, in discriminating benign/malignant, in determining local and vascular invasion of a suspected pancreatic cancer and deciding its resectability. The study was performed at the Gastroenterology Department of Izmir Ataturk Training and Research Hospital, from June 2009 to June 2010, all patients with suspected pancreatic and periampullary tumors referred to our department were enrolled. A total of 56 patients were evaluated at the beginning. Five patients having distal CBD tumor (n=2), gallbladder tumor (n=1) and papillary tumor (n=2) were excluded from the study. Analysis was done for the remaining 51 patients. For the diagnosis of resectability/unresectability, EUS alone demonstrated a definite role in 4 (9%) of the 43 patients in confirming surgical and pathologic results and MDCT alone demonstrated a definite role in 6 (14%) of the 43 patients in confirming their results. An accurate diagnostic decision regarding resectability/unresectability was accomplished in 27 (63%) patients with EUS and MDCT. While MDCT is clinically quite effective, in terms of a correct resectability/unresectability decision, EUS should also be used.

  14. Improving Image Quality of On-Board Cone-Beam CT in Radiation Therapy Using Image Information Provided by Planning Multi-Detector CT: A Phantom Study

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ching-Ching; Chen, Fong-Lin; Lo, Yeh-Chi

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to improve the image quality of cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) mounted on the gantry of a linear accelerator used in radiation therapy based on the image information provided by planning multi-detector CT (MDCT). Methods MDCT-based shading correction for CBCT and virtual monochromatic CT (VMCT) synthesized using the dual-energy method were performed. In VMCT, the high-energy data were obtained from CBCT, while the low-energy data were obtained from MDCT. An electron density phantom was used to investigate the efficacy of shading correction and VMCT on improving the target detectability, Hounsfield unit (HU) accuracy and variation, which were quantified by calculating the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), the percent difference (%Diff) and the standard deviation of the CT numbers for tissue equivalent background material, respectively. Treatment plan studies for a chest phantom were conducted to investigate the effects of image quality improvement on dose planning. Results For the electron density phantom, the mean value of CNR was 17.84, 26.78 and 34.31 in CBCT, shading-corrected CBCT and VMCT, respectively. The mean value of %Diff was 152.67%, 11.93% and 7.66% in CBCT, shading-corrected CBCT and VMCT, respectively. The standard deviation within a uniform background of CBCT, shading-corrected CBCT and VMCT was 85, 23 and 15 HU, respectively. With regards to the chest phantom, the monitor unit (MU) difference between the treatment plan calculated using MDCT and those based on CBCT, shading corrected CBCT and VMCT was 6.32%, 1.05% and 0.94%, respectively. Conclusions Enhancement of image quality in on-board CBCT can contribute to daily patient setup and adaptive dose delivery, thus enabling higher confidence in patient treatment accuracy in radiation therapy. Based on our results, VMCT has the highest image quality, followed by the shading corrected CBCT and the original CBCT. The research results presented in this study should be

  15. Acute subarachnoid hemorrhage: using 64-slice multidetector CT angiography to "triage" patients' treatment.

    PubMed

    Agid, R; Lee, S K; Willinsky, R A; Farb, R I; terBrugge, K G

    2006-11-01

    To evaluate the clinical role of CT angiography (CTA) in patients with acute subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) for treatment decision-making. Consecutive patients with acute SAH had CTA using a 64-slice scanner for initial clinical decision-making. Image processing included multiplanar volume reformatted (MPVR) maximum intensity projections (MIP) and 3D volume-rendered reconstructions. CTAs were used for (1) evaluating the cause of SAH, and (2) triaging aneurysm-bearing patients to the more appropriate management, either surgical clipping or endovascular coiling. CTA findings were confirmed by neurosurgical exploration or catheter angiography (digital subtraction angiography, DSA). Successful coiling provided evidence that triaging to endovascular treatment was correct. Included in the study were 73 patients. CTA findings were confirmed by DSA or neurosurgical operation in 65 patients, and of these 65, 47 had aneurysmal SAH, 3 had vasculitis, 1 had arterial dissection and 14 had no underlying arterial abnormality. The cause of SAH was detected with CTA in 62 out of the 65 patients (95.4%, sensitivity 94%, specificity 100%). CTA revealed the aneurysm in 46 of 47 patients (98%, sensitivity 98%, specificity 100%, positive predictive value 100%, negative predictive value 82.3%), 1 of 3 vasculitides and 1 of 1 dissection. Of the 46 patients with aneurysm, 44 (95.7%) were referred for treatment based on CTA. In 2 patients (2 of 46, 4.4%) CTA was not informative enough to choose treatment requiring DSA. Of the 44 patients, 27 (61.4%) were referred to endovascular treatment and successful coiling was achieved in 25 (25 of 27, 92.6%). CTA using a 64-slice scanner is an accurate tool for detecting and characterizing aneurysms in acute SAH. CTA is useful in the decision process whether to coil or clip an aneurysm.

  16. Automatic exposure control in pediatric and adult multidetector CT examinations: A phantom study on dose reduction and image quality

    SciTech Connect

    Papadakis, Antonios E.; Perisinakis, Kostas; Damilakis, John

    2008-10-15

    The aim of this study was to assess the potential of a modern x,y,z modulation-based automatic exposure control system (AEC) for dose reduction in pediatric and adult multidetector CT (MDCT) imaging and evaluate the quality of the images obtained. Five physical anthropomorphic phantoms that simulate the average individual as neonate, 1-, 5-, 10-year old child, and adult were scanned with a MDCT scanner, equipped with a modern AEC system. Dose reduction (%DR) was calculated as the percentage difference of the mean modulated and the preset tube current-time product that is prescribed for standard head and body scan protocols. The effect of the tube potential and the orientation of the topogram acquisition on dose reduction were assessed. Image quality was evaluated on the basis of image noise and signal to noise ratio (SNR). The dose reduction values achieved in pediatric phantoms were remarkably lower than those achieved for the adult. The efficiency of the AEC is decreased at 80 kVp compared to higher tube potentials and for helical scans following an anterior posterior (AP-AEC) compared to a lateral (LAT-AEC) topogram acquisition. In AP-AEC scans, the dose reduction ranged between 4.7 and 34.7% for neonate, 15.4 and 30.9% for 1 year old, 3.1 and 26.7% for 5 years old, 1.2 and 58.7% for 10 years old, and 15.5 and 57.4% for adult. In LAT-AEC scans, the corresponding dose reduction ranged between 11.0 and 36.5%, 27.2 and 35.7%, 11.3 and 35.6%, 0.3 and 67.0%, and 15.0 and 61.7%, respectively. AP-AEC scans resulted in a 17.1% and 19.7% dose increase in the thorax of neonate and the pelvis of the 10-year old phantom, respectively. The variation in the measured noise among images obtained along the scanning z axis was lower in AEC activated compared to fixed milliamperes scans. However, image noise was significantly increased (P<.001) and SNR significantly decreased (P<.001) in most AEC activated compared to fixed milliamperes scans. In conclusion, AEC resulted in a (i

  17. Balancing Radiation and Contrast Media Dose in Single-Pass Abdominal Multidetector CT: Prospective Evaluation of Image Quality.

    PubMed

    Camera, Luigi; Romano, Federica; Liccardo, Immacolata; Liuzzi, Raffaele; Imbriaco, Massimo; Mainenti, Pier Paolo; Pizzuti, Laura Micol; Segreto, Sabrina; Maurea, Simone; Brunetti, Arturo

    2015-11-01

    As both contrast and radiation dose affect the quality of CT images, a constant image quality in abdominal contrast-enhanced multidetector computed tomography (CE-MDCT) could be obtained balancing radiation and contrast media dose according to the age of the patients. Seventy-two (38 Men; 34 women; aged 20-83 years) patients underwent a single-pass abdominal CE-MDCT. Patients were divided into three different age groups: A (20-44 years); B (45-65 years); and C (>65 years). For each group, a different noise index (NI) and contrast media dose (370 mgI/mL) was selected as follows: A (NI, 15; 2.5 mL/kg), B (NI, 12.5; 2 mL/kg), and C (NI, 10; 1.5 mL/kg). Radiation exposure was reported as dose-length product (DLP) in mGy × cm. For quantitative analysis, signal-to-noise (SNR) and contrast-to-noise (CNR) ratios were calculated for both the liver (L) and the abdominal aorta (A). Statistical analysis was performed with a one-way analysis of variance. Standard imaging criteria were used for qualitative analysis. Although peak hepatic enhancement was 152 ± 16, 128 ± 12, and 101 ± 14 Hounsfield units (P < .001) for groups A, B, and C, respectively, no significant differences were observed in the corresponding SNRL with 9.2 ± 1.4, 9.1 ± 1.2, and 9.2 ± 3. Radiation (mGy × cm) and contrast media dose (mL) administered were 476 ± 147 and 155 ± 27 for group A, 926 ± 291 and 130 ± 16 for group B, and 1981 ± 451 and 106 ± 15 for group C, respectively (P < .001). None of the studies was graded as poor or inadequate by both readers, and the prevalence-adjusted bias-adjusted kappa ranged between 0.48 and 0.93 for all but one criteria. A constant image quality in CE-MDCT can be obtained balancing radiation and contrast media dose administered to patients of different age. Copyright © 2015 AUR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Safe cervical spine clearance in adult obtunded blunt trauma patients on the basis of a normal multidetector CT scan--a meta-analysis and cohort study.

    PubMed

    Raza, Mushahid; Elkhodair, Samer; Zaheer, Asif; Yousaf, Sohail

    2013-11-01

    A true gold standard to rule out a significant cervical spine injury in subset of blunt trauma patients with altered sensorium is still to be agreed upon. The objective of this study is to determine whether in obtunded adult patients with blunt trauma, a clinically significant injury to the cervical spine be ruled out on the basis of a normal multidetector cervical spine computed tomography. Comprehensive database search was conducted to include all the prospective and retrospective studies on blunt trauma patients with altered sensorium undergoing cervical spine multidetector CT scan as core imaging modality to "clear" the cervical spine. The studies used two main gold standards, magnetic resonance imaging of the cervical spine and/or prolonged clinical follow-up. The data was extracted to report true positive, true negatives, false positives and false negatives. Meta-analysis of sensitivity, specificity, negative and positive predictive values was performed using Meta Analyst Beta 3.13 software. We also performed a retrospective investigation comparing a robust clinical follow-up and/or cervical spine MR findings in 53 obtunded blunt trauma patients, who previously had undergone a normal multidetector CT scan of the cervical spine reported by a radiologist. A total of 10 studies involving 1850 obtunded blunt trauma patients with initial cervical spine CT scan reported as normal were included in the final meta-analysis. The cumulative negative predictive value and specificity of cervical spine CT of the ten studies was 99.7% (99.4-99.9%, 95% confidence interval). The positive predictive value and sensitivity was 93.7% (84.0-97.7%, 95% confidence interval). In the retrospective review of our obtunded blunt trauma patients, none was later diagnosed to have significant cervical spine injury that required a change in clinical management. In a blunt trauma patient with altered sensorium, a normal cervical spine CT scan is conclusive to safely rule out a clinically

  19. SimDoseCT: dose reporting software based on Monte Carlo simulation for a 320 detector-row cone-beam CT scanner and ICRP computational adult phantoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cros, Maria; Joemai, Raoul M. S.; Geleijns, Jacob; Molina, Diego; Salvadó, Marçal

    2017-08-01

    This study aims to develop and test software for assessing and reporting doses for standard patients undergoing computed tomography (CT) examinations in a 320 detector-row cone-beam scanner. The software, called SimDoseCT, is based on the Monte Carlo (MC) simulation code, which was developed to calculate organ doses and effective doses in ICRP anthropomorphic adult reference computational phantoms for acquisitions with the Aquilion ONE CT scanner (Toshiba). MC simulation was validated by comparing CTDI measurements within standard CT dose phantoms with results from simulation under the same conditions. SimDoseCT consists of a graphical user interface connected to a MySQL database, which contains the look-up-tables that were generated with MC simulations for volumetric acquisitions at different scan positions along the phantom using any tube voltage, bow tie filter, focal spot and nine different beam widths. Two different methods were developed to estimate organ doses and effective doses from acquisitions using other available beam widths in the scanner. A correction factor was used to estimate doses in helical acquisitions. Hence, the user can select any available protocol in the Aquilion ONE scanner for a standard adult male or female and obtain the dose results through the software interface. Agreement within 9% between CTDI measurements and simulations allowed the validation of the MC program. Additionally, the algorithm for dose reporting in SimDoseCT was validated by comparing dose results from this tool with those obtained from MC simulations for three volumetric acquisitions (head, thorax and abdomen). The comparison was repeated using eight different collimations and also for another collimation in a helical abdomen examination. The results showed differences of 0.1 mSv or less for absolute dose in most organs and also in the effective dose calculation. The software provides a suitable tool for dose assessment in standard adult patients undergoing CT

  20. SimDoseCT: dose reporting software based on Monte Carlo simulation for a 320 detector-row cone-beam CT scanner and ICRP computational adult phantoms.

    PubMed

    Cros, Maria; Joemai, Raoul M S; Geleijns, Jacob; Molina, Diego; Salvadó, Marçal

    2017-07-17

    This study aims to develop and test software for assessing and reporting doses for standard patients undergoing computed tomography (CT) examinations in a 320 detector-row cone-beam scanner. The software, called SimDoseCT, is based on the Monte Carlo (MC) simulation code, which was developed to calculate organ doses and effective doses in ICRP anthropomorphic adult reference computational phantoms for acquisitions with the Aquilion ONE CT scanner (Toshiba). MC simulation was validated by comparing CTDI measurements within standard CT dose phantoms with results from simulation under the same conditions. SimDoseCT consists of a graphical user interface connected to a MySQL database, which contains the look-up-tables that were generated with MC simulations for volumetric acquisitions at different scan positions along the phantom using any tube voltage, bow tie filter, focal spot and nine different beam widths. Two different methods were developed to estimate organ doses and effective doses from acquisitions using other available beam widths in the scanner. A correction factor was used to estimate doses in helical acquisitions. Hence, the user can select any available protocol in the Aquilion ONE scanner for a standard adult male or female and obtain the dose results through the software interface. Agreement within 9% between CTDI measurements and simulations allowed the validation of the MC program. Additionally, the algorithm for dose reporting in SimDoseCT was validated by comparing dose results from this tool with those obtained from MC simulations for three volumetric acquisitions (head, thorax and abdomen). The comparison was repeated using eight different collimations and also for another collimation in a helical abdomen examination. The results showed differences of 0.1 mSv or less for absolute dose in most organs and also in the effective dose calculation. The software provides a suitable tool for dose assessment in standard adult patients undergoing CT

  1. State-of-the-art in CT hardware and scan modes for cardiovascular CT

    PubMed Central

    Halliburton, Sandra; Arbab-Zadeh, Armin; Dey, Damini; Einstein, Andrew J.; Gentry, Ralph; George, Richard T.; Gerber, Thomas; Mahesh, Mahadevappa; Weigold, Wm. Guy

    2013-01-01

    Multidetector row computed tomography (CT) allows noninvasive anatomic and functional imaging of the heart, great vessels, and the coronary arteries. In recent years, there have been several advances in CT hardware, which have expanded the clinical utility of CT for cardiovascular imaging; such advances are ongoing. This review article from the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) Basic and Emerging Sciences and Technology (BEST) Working Group summarizes the technical aspects of current state-of-the-art CT hardware and describes the scan modes this hardware supports for cardiovascular CT imaging. PMID:22551595

  2. State-of-the-art in CT hardware and scan modes for cardiovascular CT.

    PubMed

    Halliburton, Sandra; Arbab-Zadeh, Armin; Dey, Damini; Einstein, Andrew J; Gentry, Ralph; George, Richard T; Gerber, Thomas; Mahesh, Mahadevappa; Weigold, Wm Guy

    2012-01-01

    Multidetector row computed tomography (CT) allows noninvasive anatomic and functional imaging of the heart, great vessels, and coronary arteries. In recent years, there have been several advances in CT hardware, which have expanded the clinical utility of CT for cardiovascular imaging; such advances are ongoing. This review article from the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography Basic and Emerging Sciences and Technology Working Group summarizes the technical aspects of current state-of-the-art CT hardware and describes the scan modes this hardware supports for cardiovascular CT imaging.

  3. CT enterography.

    PubMed

    Zamboni, Giulia A; Raptopoulos, Vassilios

    2010-04-01

    Conventional radiologic and endoscopic evaluations of the small bowel are often limited by the length, caliber, and motility of the small bowel loops. The development of new multidetector-row CT scanners, with faster scan times and isotropic spatial resolution, allows high-resolution multiphasic and multiplanar assessment of the bowel, bowel wall, and lumen. CT Enterography (CTE) is a variant of routine abdominal scanning, geared toward more sustained bowel filling with oral contrast material, and the use of multiplanar images, that can enhance gastrointestinal (GI) tract imaging. This article examines the techniques and clinical applications of CTE in comparison with CT enteroclysis, focusing on Crohn disease, obscure GI bleeding, GI tumors, acute abdominal pain, and bowel obstruction. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Multidetector-Row Computed Tomography in the Evaluation of Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt Performed with Expanded-Polytetrafluoroethylene-Covered Stent-Graft

    SciTech Connect

    Fanelli, Fabrizio Bezzi, Mario; Bruni, Antonio; Corona, Mario; Boatta, Emanuele; Lucatelli, Pierleone; Passariello, Roberto

    2011-02-15

    We assessed, in a prospective study, the efficacy of multidetector spiral computed tomography (MDCT) in the evaluation of transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) patency in patients treated with the Viatorr (Gore, Flagstaff, AZ) expanded-polytetrafluoroethylene (e-PTFE)-covered stent-graft. Eighty patients who underwent TIPS procedure using the Viatorr self-expanding e-PTFE stent-graft were evaluated at follow-up of 1, 3, 6, and 12 months with clinical and laboratory tests as well as ultrasound-color Doppler (USCD) imaging. In case of varices, upper gastrointestinal endoscopy was also performed. In addition, the shunt was evaluated using MDCT at 6 and 12 months. In all cases of abnormal findings and discrepancy between MDCT and USCD, invasive control venography was performed. MDCT images were acquired before and after injection of intravenous contrast media on the axial plane and after three-dimensional reconstruction using different algorithms. MDCT was successfully performed in all patients. No artefacts correlated to the Viatorr stent-graft were observed. A missing correlation between UCSD and MDCT was noticed in 20 of 80 (25%) patients. Invasive control venography confirmed shunt patency in 16 (80%) cases and shunt malfunction in 4 (20%) cases. According to these data, MDCT sensitivity was 95.2%; specificity was 96.6%; and positive (PPV) and negative predictive values (NPV) were 90.9 and 98.2%, respectively. USCD sensitivity was 90%; specificity was 75%; and PPV and NPV were 54.5 and 95.7%, respectively. A high correlation (K value = 0.85) between MDCT and invasive control venography was observed. On the basis of these results, MDCT shows superior sensitivity and specificity compared with USCD in those patients in whom TIPS was performed with the Viatorr stent-graft. MDCT can be considered a valid tool in the follow-up of these patients.

  5. INCIDENTAL AND NONINCIDENTAL CANINE THYROID TUMORS ASSESSED BY MULTIDETECTOR ROW COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY: A SINGLE-CENTRE CROSS SECTIONAL STUDY IN 4520 DOGS.

    PubMed

    Bertolini, Giovanna; Drigo, Michele; Angeloni, Luca; Caldin, Marco

    2017-02-09

    Thyroid nodules are common in dogs and are increasingly likely to be detected with the increased use of advanced imaging modalities. An unsuspected, nonpalpable, asymptomatic lesion, defined as a thyroid incidentaloma, may be discovered on an imaging study unrelated to the thyroid gland. The objective of this single-center cross-sectional study was to assess the prevalence and computed tomography (CT) characteristics of incidental and nonincidental thyroid tumors in a large population of dogs, using prospective recruitment of patients undergoing CT examination for various reasons during the period of 2005-2015. Unilateral or bilateral thyroid masses were detected in 96/4520 dogs (prevalence, 2.12%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.70-2.54%). Seventy-nine (82.3%) lesions were malignant and 17 (17.7%) were benign. Masses were discovered incidentally in 34/96 dogs (overall prevalence of incidentaloma, 0.76%; 95% CI, 0.51-1.02), and 24 (70.6%) of these 34 masses were thyroid carcinomas. Among the CT variables assessed, mineralization, vascular invasion, and tissue invasion were detected only in malignant tumors. Intratumoral vascularization was significantly associated with the presence of thyroid malignancy (P < 0.001). Although incidental thyroid nodules in dogs are relatively rare, they are often malignant. Findings indicated that the neck should be thoroughly assessed in middle-aged and old patients undergoing body CT for various reasons. Thyroid nodules detected incidentally on CT should be sampled to avoid missing thyroid cancer.

  6. Validation of a paediatric thyroid phantom using different multidetector computed tomography models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alsabbagh, M.; Ng, L. Y.; Tajuddin, A. A.; Manap, M. A.; Zainon, R.

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the attenuation values of a fabricated paediatric thyroid phantom material using different MDCT models. A paediatric thyroid phantom was designed to mimic the shape and size of a paediatric patient with an age of 9 years using high- density Polyethylene as the phantom material. The fabricated phantom was scanned using two different multidetector CT scanners (16- and 128-row detectors). The CT numbers were evaluated and the mass attenuation coefficients (μ/ρ) of the phantom material were obtained at each applied energy from each scanner. The results were compared with the tables of the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). The CTs of 16- and 128-row detectors showed that the obtained attenuation values are very similar to the NIST's values. However, the CT of the 128-row detectors showed a slightly much closer match to the NIST's values. This refers to the type and quality of the electronic connections between the detectors. Furthermore, the type and number of detectors (16- and 128-detectors) could affect the details and quality of the output images. The results show that different multidetector CTs can be used to validate the phantom and determine the mass attenuation coefficients of its material.

  7. Pulmonary adenocarcinomas presenting as ground-glass opacities on multidetector CT: three-dimensional computer-assisted analysis of growth pattern and doubling time

    PubMed Central

    Borghesi, Andrea; Farina, Davide; Michelini, Silvia; Ferrari, Matteo; Benetti, Diego; Fisogni, Simona; Tironi, Andrea; Maroldi, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE We aimed to evaluate the growth pattern and doubling time (DT) of pulmonary adenocarcinomas exhibiting ground-glass opacities (GGOs) on multidetector computed tomography (CT). METHODS The growth pattern and DT of 22 pulmonary adenocarcinomas exhibiting GGOs were retrospectively analyzed using three-dimensional semiautomatic software. Analysis of each lesion was based on calculations of volume and mass changes and their respective DTs throughout CT follow-up. Three-dimensional segmentation was performed by a single radiologist on each CT scan. The same observer and another radiologist independently repeated the segmentation at the baseline and the last CT scan to determine the variability of the measurements. The relationships among DTs, histopathology, and initial CT features of the lesions were also analyzed. RESULTS Pulmonary adenocarcinomas presenting as GGOs exhibited different growth patterns: some lesions grew rapidly and some grew slowly, whereas others alternated between periods of growth, stability, or shrinkage. A significant increase in volume and mass that exceeded the coefficient of repeatability of interobserver variability was observed in 72.7% and 84.2% of GGOs, respectively. The volume-DTs and mass-DTs were heterogeneous throughout the follow-up CT scan (range, −4293 to 21928 and −3113 to 17020 days, respectively), and their intra- and interobserver variabilities were moderately high. The volume-DTs and mass-DTs were not correlated with the initial CT features of GGOs; however, they were significantly shorter in invasive adenocarcinomas (P = 0.002 and P = 0.001, respectively). CONCLUSION Pulmonary adenocarcinomas exhibiting GGOs show heterogeneous growth patterns with a trend toward a progressive increase in size. DTs may be useful for predicting tumor aggressiveness. PMID:27682741

  8. Differentiation of Malignant and Benign Incidental Breast Lesions Detected by Chest Multidetector-Row Computed Tomography: Added Value of Quantitative Enhancement Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yu-Pang; Hsu, Hsian-He; Ko, Kai-Hsiung; Chu, Chi-Ming; Chou, Yu-Ching; Chang, Wei-Chou; Chang, Tsun-Hou

    2016-01-01

    To retrospectively determine the association between breast lesion morphology and malignancy and to determine the optimal value of lesion enhancement (HU, Hounsfield units) to improve the diagnostic accuracy of breast cancer in patients with incidental breast lesions (IBLs). A total of 97 patients with 102 IBLs detected from July 2009 to December 2012 were enrolled in this study. Two radiologists analyzed CT images for the presence of malignancy based on the morphology of the lesions alone and in combination with an enhancement value (HU) analysis. There were 36 malignant and 66 benign IBLs. When the morphology and enhancement values were combined, the sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy were 92%, 97%, and 95%, respectively, for reader 1 and 89%, 94%, and 92%, respectively, for reader 2. The addition of HU values led to correct changes in the diagnosis; specifically, the accuracy of the diagnosis of reader 1 and reader 2 improved by 6.9% and 11.8%, respectively. The addition of the enhancement value (HU) to the CT morphology improved the diagnostic accuracy in the differentiation of malignant from benign IBLs by using the region of interest (ROI) to measure the HU within the most suspicious part of the lesion. PMID:27128524

  9. Whole brain CT perfusion deficits using 320-detector-row CT scanner in TIA patients are associated with ABCD2 score.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Bijal K; Mustafa, Ghulam; McMurtray, Aaron; Masud, Mohammed W; Gunukula, Sameer K; Kamal, Haris; Kandel, Amit; Beltagy, Abdelrahman; Li, Ping

    2014-01-01

    Transient ischemic attacks (TIA) are cerebral ischemic events without infarction. The uses of CT perfusion (CTP) techniques such as cerebral blood volume (CBV), time to peak (TTP), mean transit time (MTT) and cerebral blood flow (CBF) provide real time data about ischemia. It has been shown that CTP changes occur in less sensitive CTP scanners in patients with TIA. Larger detector row CTP (whole brain perfusion studies) may show that CTP abnormalities are more prevalent than previously noted. It is also unclear if these changes are associated with TIA severity. To demonstrate that TIA patients are associated with perfusion deficits using whole brain 320-detector-row CT perfusion, and to determine an association between ABCD2 score and perfusion deficit using whole brain perfusion. We retrospectively reviewed all TIA patients for CTP deficits from 2008-2010. Perfusion imaging was reviewed at admission; and it was determined if a perfusion deficit was present along with vascular territory involved. Of 364 TIA patients, 62 patients had CTP deficits. The largest group of patients had MCA territory involved with 48 of 62 patients (77.42%). The most common perfusion abnormality was increased TTP with 46 patients (74.19%). The ABCD2 score was reviewed in association with perfusion deficit. Increased age >60, severe hypertension (>180/100 mmHg), patients with speech abnormalities, and duration of symptoms >10 min were associated with a perfusion deficit but history of diabetes or minimal/moderate hypertension (140/90-179/99 mmHg) was not. There was no association between motor deficit and perfusion abnormality. Perfusion deficits are found in TIA patients using whole brain CTP and associated with components of the ABCD2 score.

  10. Evaluation of the relationship between extremity soft tissue sarcomas and adjacent major vessels using contrast-enhanced multidetector CT and three-dimensional volume-rendered CT angiography: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Li, YangKang; Zheng, Yu; Lin, JianBang; Cai, AiQun; Zhou, XiuGuo; Wei, XiaoLong; Cheng, Ying; Liu, GuoRui

    2013-10-01

    Accurate description of the relationship between extremity soft tissue sarcoma and the adjacent major vessels is crucial for successful surgery. In addition to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or in patients who cannot undergo MRI, two-dimensional (2D) postcontrast computed tomography (CT) images and three-dimensional (3D) volume-rendered CT angiography may be valuable alternative imaging techniques for preoperative evaluation of extremity sarcomas. To preoperatively assess extremity sarcomas using multidetector CT (MDCT), with emphasis on postcontrast MDCT images and 3D volume-rendered MDCT angiography in evaluating the relationship between tumors and adjacent major vessels. MDCT examinations were performed on 13 patients with non-metastatic extremity sarcomas. Conventional CT images and 3D volume-rendered CT angiography were evaluated, with focus on the relationship between tumors and adjacent major vessels. Kappa consistency statistics were performed with surgery serving as the reference standard. The relationship between sarcomas and adjacent vessels was described as one of three patterns: proximity, adhesion, and encasement. Proximity was seen in five cases on postcontrast CT images or in eight cases on volume-rendered images. Adhesion was seen in three cases on both postcontrast CT images and volume-rendered images. Encasement was seen in five cases on postcontrast CT images or in two cases on volume-rendered images. Compared to surgical results, postcontrast CT images had 100% sensitivity, 83.3% specificity, 87.5% positive predictive value, 100% negative predictive value, and 92.3% accuracy in the detection of vascular invasion (κ = 0.843, P = 0.002). 3D volume-rendered CT angiography had 71.4% sensitivity, 100% specificity, 100% positive predictive value, 75% negative predictive value, and 84.6% accuracy in the detection of vascular invasion (κ = 0.698, P = 0.008). On volume-rendered images, all cases with adhesion or encasement had arterial stenosis and

  11. Value of Virtual Colonoscopy with 64 Row CT in Evaluation of Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zaleska-Dorobisz, Urszula; Łasecki, Mateusz; Nienartowicz, Ewa; Pelak, Joanna; Słonina, Joanna; Olchowy, Cyprian; Ścieżka, Marek; Sąsiadek, Marek

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background Virtual colonoscopy (VC) enables three-dimensional view of walls and internal lumen of the colon as a result of reconstruction of multislice CT images. The role of VC in diagnosis of the colon abnormalities systematically increases, and in many medical centers all over the world is carried out as a screening test of patients with high risk of colorectal cancer. Material/Methods We analyzed results of virtual colonoscopy of 360 patients with clinical suspicion of colorectal cancer. Sensitivity and specificity of CT colonoscopy for detection of colon cancers and polyps were assessed. Results Results of our research have shown high diagnostic efficiency of CT colonoscopy in detection of focal lesions in large intestine of 10 mm or more diameter. Sensitivity was 85.7%, specificity 89.2%. Conclusions Virtual colonoscopy is noninvasive and well tolerated by patients imaging method, which permits for early detection of the large intestine lesions with specificity and sensitivity similar to classical colonoscopy in screening exams in patients suspected for colorectal cancer. Good preparation of the patients for the examination is very important for proper diagnosis and interpretation of this imaginge procedure. PMID:25302086

  12. Morphometric evaluation of subaxial cervical spine using multi-detector computerized tomography (MD-CT) scan: the consideration for cervical pedicle screws fixation.

    PubMed

    Chanplakorn, Pongsthorn; Kraiwattanapong, Chaiwat; Aroonjarattham, Kitti; Leelapattana, Pittavat; Keorochana, Gun; Jaovisidha, Suphaneewan; Wajanavisit, Wiwat

    2014-04-11

    Cervical pedicle screw (CPS) insertion is a technically demanding procedure. The quantitative understanding of cervical pedicle morphology, especially the narrowest part of cervical pedicle or isthmus, would minimize the risk of catastrophic damage to surrounding neurovascular structures and improve surgical outcome. The aim of this study was to investigate morphology and quantify cortical thickness of the cervical isthmus by using Multi-detector Computerized Tomography (MD-CT) scan. The cervical CT scans were performed in 74 patients (37 males and 37 females) with 1-mm slice thickness and then retro-reconstructed into sagittal and coronal planes to measure various cervical parameters as follows: outer pedicle width (OPW), inner pedicle width (IPW), outer pedicle height (OPH), inner pedicle height (IPH), pedicle cortical thickness, pedicle sagittal angle (PSA), and pedicle transverse angle (PTA). Total numbers of 740 pedicles were measured in this present study. The mean OPW and IPW significantly increased from C3 to C7 while the mean OPH and IPH of those showed non-significant difference between any measured levels. The medial-lateral cortical thickness was significantly smaller than the superior-inferior one. PTA in the upper cervical spine was significantly wider than the lower ones. The PSA changed from upward inclination at upper cervical spine to the downward inclination at lower cervical spine. This study has demonstrated that cervical vertebra has relatively small and narrow inner pedicle canal with thick outer pedicle cortex and also shows a variable in pedicle width and inconsistent transverse angle. To enhance the safety of CPS insertion, the entry point and trajectories should be determined individually by using preoperative MD-CT scan and the inner pedicle width should be a key parameter to determine the screw dimensions.

  13. Radiation dose assessment in a 320-detector-row CT scanner used in cardiac imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Goma, Carles; Ruiz, Agustin; Jornet, Nuria; Latorre, Artur; Pallerol, Rosa M.; Carrasco, Pablo; Eudaldo, Teresa; Ribas, Montserrat

    2011-03-15

    Purpose: In the present era of cone-beam CT scanners, the use of the standardized CTDI{sub 100} as a surrogate of the idealized CTDI is strongly discouraged and, consequently, so should be the use of the dose-length product (DLP) as an estimate of the total energy imparted to the patient. However, the DLP is still widely used as a reference quantity to normalize the effective dose for a given scan protocol mainly because the CTDI{sub 100} is an easy-to-measure quantity. The aim of this article is therefore to describe a method for radiation dose assessment in large cone-beam single axial scans, which leads to a straightforward estimation of the total energy imparted to the patient. The authors developed a method accessible to all medical physicists and easy to implement in clinical practice in an attempt to update the bridge between CT dosimetry and the estimation of the effective dose. Methods: The authors used commercially available material and a simple mathematical model. The method described herein is based on the dosimetry paradigm introduced by the AAPM Task Group 111. It consists of measuring the dose profiles at the center and the periphery of a long body phantom with a commercial solid-state detector. A weighted dose profile is then calculated from these measurements. To calculate the CT dosimetric quantities analytically, a Gaussian function was fitted to the dose profile data. Furthermore, the Gaussian model has the power to condense the z-axis information of the dose profile in two parameters: The single-scan central dose, f(0), and the width of the profile, {sigma}. To check the energy dependence of the solid-state detector, the authors compared the dose profiles to measurements made with a small volume ion chamber. To validate the overall method, the authors compared the CTDI{sub 100} calculated analytically to the measurement made with a 100 mm pencil ion chamber. Results: For the central and weighted dose profiles, the authors found a good

  14. Utility of virtual unenhanced images and split-bolus injection using spectral multidetector CT for the assessment of renal cell carcinoma conspicuity and radiation dose.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Liu, Lin; Zeng, Hong; Sun, Changjiang; Huang, Ning; Zhang, Mengchao

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the radiation dose and renal cell carcinoma conspicuity with virtual unenhanced images and split-bolus injection from spectral multidetector CT (MDCT). This prospective study was approved by the Ethics Committee, and informed consent was obtained. Ninety suspected patients of renal cell carcinoma diagnosed by abdominal ultrasonography and CEUS were randomly divided into two groups by a radiographer. Patients of the first group underwent spectral MDCT with virtual unenhanced imaging and split-bolus injection, while patients in the second group underwent conventional unenhanced as well as tri-phasic enhanced CT. Group A (split-bolus spectral MDCT group): The contrast material was administered at a dose of 1.5 mL/kg body weight at a flow rate of 4 mL/s, with a ratio of 7 to 5 before the CT scan with an interval of 60 seconds. Virtual unenhanced images were generated using a standard three-material decomposition algorithm, and the best mono-energy (keV) was calculated to show the tumour, renal artery and renal vein. Group B (conventional tri-phasic enhanced CT group): the contrast agent was injected with a dose of 1.5 mL/kg body weight at a flow rate of 4 mL/s. The corticomedullary phase scanning was performed once the arterial CT value reached 100 HU; the nephrographic phase was scanned 60 seconds later. And the excretory phase was scanned 5 min after onset of contrast injection. The LKR (lesion kidney ratio), CNR, and CT value of the corticomedullary and nephrographic phase were measured. The opacification of the renal collection system (including calices, infundibula and renal pelvis) was scored. The radiation dose was recorded. Statistical analysis was performed using Student's t-test, Fisher's exact test, the Mann-Whitney U-test, and k statistics. There were no statistically significant differences between the two groups in age, sex and body mass index (BMI), but there was significant difference in treatment methods

  15. The Role of Three-Dimensional Multidetector CT Gastrography in the Preoperative Imaging of Stomach Cancer: Emphasis on Detection and Localization of the Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jin Woong; Heo, Suk Hee; Lim, Hyo Soon; Lim, Nam Yeol; Park, Young Kyu; Jeong, Yong Yeon; Kang, Heoung Keun

    2015-01-01

    Multidetector CT (MDCT) gastrography has been regarded as a promising technique for the preoperative imaging of gastric cancer. It has the ability to produce various three-dimensional (3D) images. Because 3D reconstruction images are more effective and intuitive for recognizing abnormal changes in the gastric folds and subtle mucosal nodularity than two-dimensional images, 3D MDCT gastrography can enhance the detection rate of early gastric cancer, which, in turn, contributes to the improvement of the accuracy of preoperative tumor (T) staging. In addition, shaded surface display and tissue transition projection images provide a global view of the stomach, with the exact location of gastric cancer, which may replace the need for barium studies. In this article, we discuss technical factors in producing high-quality MDCT gastrographic images and present cases demonstrating the usefulness of MDCT gastrography for the detection and T staging of gastric cancer while emphasizing the significance of preoperative localization of gastric cancer in terms of surgical margin. PMID:25598676

  16. The "cluster of black pearls" sign of sarcoid lymphadenopathy: a new sign on thin-section contrast-enhanced multidetector CT.

    PubMed

    Venkata Ramanan, R; Pudhiavan, A; Venkataramanan, A

    2017-09-01

    To identify a specific diagnostic sign for sarcoid adenopathy on contrast-enhanced multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) based on nodal morphology. A prospective study was performed on 105 patients with 1654 nodes. Of this, 18 patients with sarcoidosis formed the study group. The control group consisted of the remaining 87 patients with other proven disease entities of metastatic adenocarcinoma, lymphoma, tuberculosis, and reactive adenopathy for comparison. CT examinations were undertaken using a 64-section helical mode in the arterial and venous phases with a 0.5-mm section thickness. The lymph nodes were evaluated for various morphological criteria and the presence of the "cluster of black pearls" (CBP) sign. The CBP sign was considered present when tiny round nodules each measuring 1-2 mm were seen distributed uniformly within the whole or part of the lymph node. The CBP sign had a significance of p<0.001, 83% sensitivity, 98% specificity, 91% positive predictive value, and 96% negative predictive value on a per node basis and a sensitivity of 100% on a per patient basis. The CBP sign is an accurate morphological sign differentiating sarcoid from other adenopathy. Copyright © 2017 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Comparison between blinded and partially blinded detection of gastric cancer with multidetector CT using surgery and endoscopic submucosal dissection as reference standards.

    PubMed

    Kim, H J; Lee, D H; Ko, Y T

    2010-08-01

    The aim of this study is to compare blinded with partially blinded detection of gastric cancer with multidetector (MD) CT by using surgery and endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) as reference standards. 44 patients with gastric cancer underwent MDCT with air as an oral contrast agent. Surgery was performed on 37 patients, ESD on six and surgery after ESD on one. To provide comparison cases of blinded evaluation, 38 MDCT examinations were added for cases where no focal gastric lesion was seen on endoscopy. Two radiologists, blinded to the presence, number and location of the tumours, evaluated axial and axial plus multiplanar reformation (MPR) images of 82 MDCT examinations with or without gastric cancer. For partially blinded evaluation, the same radiologists, blinded to the location and number of tumours, evaluated axial and axial plus MPR images of 44 MDCT examinations of gastric cancer. Differences in assessment were resolved by consensus. 45 gastric cancers were found in surgical and ESD specimens. Detection rates of gastric cancer from axial and axial plus MPR images during blinded evaluation and from axial and axial plus MPR images during partially blinded evaluation were 62% (28/45), 64% (29/45), 64% (29/45) and 71% (32/45), respectively. There was no statistical significance for the comparison between blinded and partially blinded detection rates of gastric cancer. The detection rate of gastric cancer with MDCT during blinded evaluation showed no specific difference compared with the detection rate of gastric cancer with MDCT during partially blinded evaluation.

  18. Multidetector CT coronary angiography for patient triage to invasive coronary angiography: Performance and cost in ambulatory patients with equivocal or suspected inaccurate noninvasive stress tests.

    PubMed

    Menon, Madhav; Lesser, John R; Hara, Hidehiko; Birkett, Richard; Knickelbine, Thomas; Longe, Terry; Flygenring, Bjorn; Henry, Jason; Schwartz, Robert

    2009-03-01

    Multidetector-CT angiography (MDCTA) differs from noninvasive stress tests by directly imaging coronary anatomy. The utility of MDCTA for invasive triage is undefined however. We evaluated MDCTA triage to invasive coronary angiography in outpatients with indeterminate or suspected inaccurate stress tests, and estimated cost savings by MDCTA in this role. Consecutive MDCTA patients were retrospectively compared with noninvasive stress tests if performed within 6 months of MDCTA. Twelve-month clinical follow up was obtained for patients not undergoing invasive angiography, and cost using MDCTA for triage to invasive coronary angiography was calculated. MDCTA was performed in 385 patients who had noninvasive stress testing. Stress tests include included treadmill (n = 37), stress echo (n = 178), and nuclear perfusion imaging (n = 170). Invasive angiography was performed in 57 (14.8%). MDCTA compared to CA showed positive and negative predictive values of 94%/100% respectively for lesions found by invasive QCA. Stress testing compared to MDCTA showed positive/negative predictive values of 100%/67% for treadmill exercise, 60%/54% for stress echo, and 59%/55% of nuclear perfusion examinations respectively. One year clinical follow up in 314 patients showed no coronary events in 98% (309) of patients. Triage to invasive angiography by MDCTA showed a 4-fold cost reduction. MDCTA shows excellent performance as a triage for invasive angiography in patients with stress tests that are equivocal or thought inaccurate. A negative CTA confers good 12-month prognosis. Substantial cost savings may accrue using MDCTA in this triage role.

  19. Scan time and patient dose for thoracic imaging in neonates and small children using axial volumetric 320-detector row CT compared to helical 64-, 32-, and 16- detector row CT acquisitions.

    PubMed

    Kroft, Lucia J M; Roelofs, Joost J H; Geleijns, Jacob

    2010-03-01

    Recently a 320-detector-row CT (MDCT) scanner has become available that allows axial volumetric scanning of a 16-cm-long range (50 cm field of view) in a single 0.35-s rotation. For imaging neonates and small children, volume scanning is potentially of great advantage as the entire scan range can be acquired in 0.35 s, which can reduce motion artefacts and may reduce the need for sedation in clinical CT imaging. Also, because there is no over-ranging associated with axial volumetric scanning, this may reduce patient radiation dose. To evaluate, by means of a phantom study, scan time and patient dose for thoracic imaging in neonates and small children by using axial cone-beam and helical fan-beam MDCT acquisitions. Paediatric imaging protocols were assessed for a 320-MDCT volumetric scanner (Aquilion ONE, Toshiba, Otawara, Japan). The 320-MDCT scanner allows for cone-beam acquisitions with coverage up to 160 mm, but it also allows for helical fan-beam acquisitions in 64-, 32-, or 16-MDCT modes. The acquisition configurations that were evaluated were 320 x 0.5 mm, 240 x 0.5 mm, and 160 x 0.5 mm for axial volumetric scanning, and 64 x 0.5 mm, 32 x 0.5 mm, and 16 x 0.5 mm for helical scanning. Dose assessment was performed for clinically relevant paediatric angiographic or chest/mediastinum acquisition protocols with tube voltages of 80 or 100 kVp and tube currents between 40 and 80 mA. Scan time was 0.35 s for 320-MDCT acquisitions, scan times varied between 1.9 s and 8.3 s for helical acquisitions. Dose savings varying between 18% and 40% were achieved with axial volumetric scanning as compared to helical scanning (for 320- versus 64-MDCT at 160 mm and 80 kVp, and for 320- versus 16-MDCT at 80 mm and 100 kVp, respectively). Statistically significant reduction in radiation dose was found for axial 320-MDCT volumetric scanning compared to helical 64-, 32-, and 16-MDCT scanning. Axial thoracic CT of neonates and small children with volumetric 320-MDCT can be performed

  20. Technical note: Electrocardiogram electrode repositioning for 320-row coronary CT angiography in patients with regular and recurrent premature ventricular contractions.

    PubMed

    Kondo, Takeshi; Matsutani, Hideyuki; Groarke, John; Takamura, Kazuhisa; Fujimoto, Shinichiro; Rybicki, Frank J; Kumamaru, Kanako K

    2014-01-01

    Arrhythmias can compromise image quality and increase radiation exposure during coronary CT angiography (CTA). However, premature ventricular contractions (PVCs) can occur in a predictable recurrent and regular pattern (ie, bigeminy, trigeminy, quadrigeminy) with post-PVC compensatory pauses. Electrocardiographic (ECG) electrode repositioning can achieve relative amplification of the R waves of PVCs compared with R waves of sinus beats. This technical note describes how simple ECG electrode repositioning, combined with an absolute-delay strategy, facilitated selective R waves of PVC ECG triggering of image acquisition in 6 patients with PVC bigeminy or quadrigeminy at the time of 320-row coronary CTA. All 6 studies were single heartbeat acquisition scans with excellent image quality and a median effective radiation dose of 2.9 mSv (interquartile range, 2.1-3.8 mSv). Standard ECG electrode positions used for 2 patients with PVC bigeminy undergoing coronary CTA were associated with an acquisition over 2 heartbeats and effective radiation doses of 6.8 and 10.3 mSv, respectively. In conclusion, ECG electrode repositioning combined with an absolute-delay strategy for regularly recurring PVCs, such as ventricular bigeminy, facilitates high image quality and lower radiation dose during coronary CTA. This simple and straightforward technique can be considered for all patients with regular and recurrent PVCs undergoing coronary CTA. Copyright © 2014 Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Technical Note: Evaluation of a 160-mm/256-row CT scanner for whole-heart quantitative myocardial perfusion imaging.

    PubMed

    So, Aaron; Imai, Yasuhiro; Nett, Brian; Jackson, John; Nett, Liz; Hsieh, Jiang; Wisenberg, Gerald; Teefy, Patrick; Yadegari, Andrew; Islam, Ali; Lee, Ting-Yim

    2016-08-01

    The authors investigated the performance of a recently introduced 160-mm/256-row CT system for low dose quantitative myocardial perfusion (MP) imaging of the whole heart. This platform is equipped with a gantry capable of rotating at 280 ms per full cycle, a second generation of adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASiR-V) to correct for image noise arising from low tube voltage potential/tube current dynamic scanning, and image reconstruction algorithms to tackle beam-hardening, cone-beam, and partial-scan effects. Phantom studies were performed to investigate the effectiveness of image noise and artifact reduction with a GE Healthcare Revolution CT system for three acquisition protocols used in quantitative CT MP imaging: 100, 120, and 140 kVp/25 mAs. The heart chambers of an anthropomorphic chest phantom were filled with iodinated contrast solution at different concentrations (contrast levels) to simulate the circulation of contrast through the heart in quantitative CT MP imaging. To evaluate beam-hardening correction, the phantom was scanned at each contrast level to measure the changes in CT number (in Hounsfield unit or HU) in the water-filled region surrounding the heart chambers with respect to baseline. To evaluate cone-beam artifact correction, differences in mean water HU between the central and peripheral slices were compared. Partial-scan artifact correction was evaluated from the fluctuation of mean water HU in successive partial scans. To evaluate image noise reduction, a small hollow region adjacent to the heart chambers was filled with diluted contrast, and contrast-to-noise ratio in the region before and after noise correction with ASiR-V was compared. The quality of MP maps acquired with the CT system was also evaluated in porcine CT MP studies. Myocardial infarct was induced in a farm pig from a transient occlusion of the distal left anterior descending (LAD) artery with a catheter-based interventional procedure. MP maps were generated

  2. Frequency and importance of small amount of isolated pelvic free fluid detected with multidetector CT in male patients with blunt trauma.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jinxing; Fulcher, Ann S; Wang, Deng-Bin; Turner, Mary A; Ha, Jonathan D; McCulloch, Madison; Kennedy, Robert M; Malhotra, Ajai K; Halvorsen, Robert A

    2010-09-01

    To retrospectively determine the frequency and importance of a small amount of isolated pelvic free fluid seen at multidetector computed tomography (CT) in male patients who have blunt trauma without an identifiable cause. Institutional review board approval was obtained, and the requirement for informed consent was waived for this HIPAA-compliant study. One thousand male patients with blunt trauma who underwent abdominopelvic CT at a level 1 trauma center between January 2004 and June 2006 were entered into this study. The CT images of the 1000 patients were reviewed independently by two abdominal radiologists. CT scan assessment included evaluation for presence or absence of pelvic free fluid, any traumatic or nontraumatic cause of the free fluid, pelvic free fluid attenuation and volume measurements, and determination of the location of pelvic free fluid. Interobserver agreement was determined with kappa statistics, and the Student t test was used to assess differences in the mean volume and mean attenuation of the pelvic free fluid in the patients with and those without injury. Pelvic free fluid was identified in 10.2% (102 of 1000) of patients. A small amount of isolated pelvic free fluid without any identifiable cause was identified in 4.8% (48 of 1000) of patients by reader 1 and in 5.0% (50 of 1000) of patients by reader 2 (kappa value, 0.76) and was located at or below the level of the third sacral vertebral body in all 49 patients with isolated pelvic free fluid. The mean volume and mean attenuation of the small amount of isolated pelvic free fluid were 2.3 mL +/- 1.5 (standard deviation) and 8.1 HU +/- 3.9, respectively. None of the patients in this group had an undiagnosed bowel and/or mesenteric injury. In male patients with blunt trauma, a small amount of isolated pelvic free fluid with attenuation equal to that of simple fluid and located in the deep region of the pelvis likely is not a sign of bowel and/or mesenteric injury. (c) RSNA, 2010.

  3. Estimating radiation doses from multidetector CT using Monte Carlo simulations: effects of different size voxelized patient models on magnitudes of organ and effective dose.

    PubMed

    DeMarco, J J; Cagnon, C H; Cody, D D; Stevens, D M; McCollough, C H; Zankl, M; Angel, E; McNitt-Gray, M F

    2007-05-07

    The purpose of this work is to examine the effects of patient size on radiation dose from CT scans. To perform these investigations, we used Monte Carlo simulation methods with detailed models of both patients and multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) scanners. A family of three-dimensional, voxelized patient models previously developed and validated by the GSF was implemented as input files using the Monte Carlo code MCNPX. These patient models represent a range of patient sizes and ages (8 weeks to 48 years) and have all radiosensitive organs previously identified and segmented, allowing the estimation of dose to any individual organ and calculation of patient effective dose. To estimate radiation dose, every voxel in each patient model was assigned both a specific organ index number and an elemental composition and mass density. Simulated CT scans of each voxelized patient model were performed using a previously developed MDCT source model that includes scanner specific spectra, including bowtie filter, scanner geometry and helical source path. The scan simulations in this work include a whole-body scan protocol and a thoracic CT scan protocol, each performed with fixed tube current. The whole-body scan simulation yielded a predictable decrease in effective dose as a function of increasing patient weight. Results from analysis of individual organs demonstrated similar trends, but with some individual variations. A comparison with a conventional dose estimation method using the ImPACT spreadsheet yielded an effective dose of 0.14 mSv mAs(-1) for the whole-body scan. This result is lower than the simulations on the voxelized model designated 'Irene' (0.15 mSv mAs(-1)) and higher than the models 'Donna' and 'Golem' (0.12 mSv mAs(-1)). For the thoracic scan protocol, the ImPACT spreadsheet estimates an effective dose of 0.037 mSv mAs(-1), which falls between the calculated values for Irene (0.042 mSv mAs(-1)) and Donna (0.031 mSv mAs(-1)) and is higher relative

  4. Investigation of sinonasal anatomy via low-dose multidetector CT examination in chronic rhinosinusitis patients with higher risk for perioperative complications.

    PubMed

    Fraczek, Marcin; Guzinski, Maciej; Morawska-Kochman, Monika; Krecicki, Tomasz

    2017-02-01

    The aim of the study was to compare visualisation of the surgically relevant anatomical structures via low- and standard-dose multidetector CT protocol in patients with chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) and higher risk for perioperative complications (i.e. presence of bronchial asthma, history of sinus surgery and advanced nasal polyposis). 135 adult CRS patients were divided randomly into standard-dose (120 kVp, 100 mAs) or low-dose CT groups (120 kVp, 45 mAs). The detectability of the vital anatomical structures (anterior ethmoid artery, optic nerve, cribriform plate and lamina papyracea) was scored using a five-point scale (from excellent to unacceptable) by a radiologist and sinus surgeon. Polyp sizes were quantified endoscopically according to the Lildholdt's scale (LS). Olfactory function was tested with the "Sniffin' Sticks" test. On the low-dose CT images, detectability ranged from 2.42 (better than poor) for cribriform plate among anosmic cases to 4.11 (better than good) for lamina papyracea in cases without nasal polyps. Identification of lamina papyracea on low-dose scans was significantly worse in each group and the same was the case with cribriform plates in patients with advanced polyposis and anosmia. Cribriform plates were the most poorly identified (between poor and average) among all the structures on low-dose images. Identification of anterior ethmoid artery (AEA) with reduced dose was insignificantly worse than with standard-dose examination. The AEA was scored as an average-defined structure and was the second weakest visualised. In conclusion, preoperatively, low-dose protocols may not sufficiently visualise the surgically relevant anatomical structures in patients with CRS and bronchial asthma, advanced nasal polyps (LS > 2) and history of sinus surgery. Low mAs value enables comparable detectability of sinonasal landmarks with standard-dose protocols in patients without analysed risk factors. In the context of planned surgery, the current

  5. Impact of iterative reconstruction on image quality and radiation dose in multidetector CT of large body size adults.

    PubMed

    Desai, Gaurav S; Uppot, Raul N; Yu, Elaine W; Kambadakone, Avinash R; Sahani, Dushyant V

    2012-08-01

    To compare image quality and radiation dose using Adaptive Statistical Iterative Reconstruction (ASiR) and Filtered Back Projection (FBP) in patients weighing ≥ 91 kg. In this Institution Review Board-approved retrospective study, single-phase contrast-enhanced abdominopelvic CT examinations of 100 adults weighing ≥ 91 kg (mean body weight: 107.6 ± 17.4 kg range: 91-181.9 kg) with (1) ASiR and (2) FBP were reviewed by two readers in a blinded fashion for subjective measures of image quality (using a subjective standardized numerical scale and objective noise) and for radiation exposure. Imaging parameters and radiation dose results of the two techniques were compared within weight and BMI sub-categories. All examinations were found to be of adequate quality. Both subjective (mean = 1.4 ± 0.5 vs. 1.6 ± 0.6, P < 0.05) and objective noise (13.0 ± 3.2 vs.19.5 ± 5.7, P < 0.0001) were lower with ASiR. Average radiation dose reduction of 31.5 % was achieved using ASiR (mean CTDIvol. ASiR: 13.5 ± 7.3 mGy; FBP: 19.7 ± 9.0 mGy, P < 0.0001). Other measures of image quality were comparable between the two techniques. Trends for all parameters were similar in patients across weight and BMI sub-categories. In obese individuals, abdominal CT images reconstructed using ASiR provide diagnostic images with reduced image noise at lower radiation dose. • CT images in obese adults are noisy, even with high radiation dose. • Newer iterative reconstruction techniques have theoretical advantages in obese patients. • Adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction should reduce image noise and radiation dose. • This has been proven in abdominopelvic CT images of obese patients.

  6. Development of adaptive noise reduction filter algorithm for pediatric body images in a multi-detector CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishimaru, Eiji; Ichikawa, Katsuhiro; Okita, Izumi; Ninomiya, Yuuji; Tomoshige, Yukihiro; Kurokawa, Takehiro; Ono, Yutaka; Nakamura, Yuko; Suzuki, Masayuki

    2008-03-01

    Recently, several kinds of post-processing image filters which reduce the noise of computed tomography (CT) images have been proposed. However, these image filters are mostly for adults. Because these are not very effective in small (< 20 cm) display fields of view (FOV), we cannot use them for pediatric body images (e.g., premature babies and infant children). We have developed a new noise reduction filter algorithm for pediatric body CT images. This algorithm is based on a 3D post-processing in which the output pixel values are calculated by nonlinear interpolation in z-directions on original volumetric-data-sets. This algorithm does not need the in-plane (axial plane) processing, so the spatial resolution does not change. From the phantom studies, our algorithm could reduce SD up to 40% without affecting the spatial resolution of x-y plane and z-axis, and improved the CNR up to 30%. This newly developed filter algorithm will be useful for the diagnosis and radiation dose reduction of the pediatric body CT images.

  7. The vascularized groin lymph node flap (VGLN): Anatomical study and flap planning using multi-detector CT scanner. The golden triangle for flap harvesting.

    PubMed

    Zeltzer, Assaf A; Anzarut, Alexander; Braeckmans, Delphine; Seidenstuecker, Katrin; Hendrickx, Benoit; Van Hedent, Eddy; Hamdi, Moustapha

    2017-09-01

    A growing number of surgeons perform lymph node transfers for the treatment of lymphedema. When harvesting a vascularized lymph node groin flap (VGLNF) one of the major concerns is the potential risk of iatrogenic lymphedema of the donor-site. This article helps understanding of the lymph node distribution of the groin in order to minimize this risk. Fifty consecutive patients undergoing abdominal mapping by multi-detector CT scanner were included and 100 groins analyzed. The groin was divided in three zones (of which zone II is the safe zone) and lymph nodes were counted and mapped with their distances to anatomic landmarks. Further node units were plotted and counted. The average age was 48 years. A mean number of nodes of 6.5/groin was found. In zone II, which is our zone of interest a mean of 3.1 nodes were counted with a mean size of 7.8 mm. In three patients no nodes were found in zone II. In five patients nodes were seen in zone II but were not sufficient in size or number to be considered a lymph node unit. On average the lymph node unit in zone II was found to be 48.3 mm from the pubic tubercle when projected on a line from the pubic tubercle to the anterior superior iliac spine, 16.0 mm caudal to this line, and 20.4 mm above the groin crease. On average the lymph node unit was a mean of 41.7 mm lateral to the SCIV-SIEV confluence. This study provides increased understanding of the lymphatic anatomy in zone II of the groin flap and suggests a refined technique for designing the VGLNF. As with any flap there is a degree of individual patient variability. However, having information on the most common anatomy and flap design is of great value. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Perihilar branching patterns of renal artery and extrarenal length of arterial branches and tumour-feeding arteries on multidetector CT angiography.

    PubMed

    Kang, W Y; Sung, D J; Park, B J; Kim, M J; Han, N Y; Cho, S B; Kang, C H; Kang, S H

    2013-03-01

    The purpose of our study was to assess the extrarenal length of renal arterial branches and tumour-feeding arteries on multidetector CT (MDCT) angiography, in addition to the perihilar branching patterns, with relevance to segmental artery clamping. MDCT angiograms of 64 patients with renal masses <4 cm were retrospectively reviewed by 2 radiologists. The perihilar branching patterns of the single main renal artery were assessed according to the number of pre-segmental and segmental arteries. The extrarenal lengths of segmental plus pre-segmental arteries and the tumour-feeding arteries, measured on volume-rendered images, were compared according to the vascular segmentation and the tumour location, respectively. In the 116 kidneys, 1 pre-segmental plus 5 segmental arteries (n=48) was the most common branching pattern. The mean extrarenal length of the inferior segmental plus pre-segmental arteries (33.05 mm) and the posterior segmental plus pre-segmental arteries (32.30 mm) was longer than any of the other segmental plus pre-segmental arteries (apical, 23.87 mm; superior, 26.80 mm; middle, 29.23 mm) (p<0.05). The mean extrarenal length of the lower pole tumour-feeding arteries (35.94 mm) was longer than those of the upper and mid-pole tumour-feeding arteries (24.95 mm, 29.62 mm), with significant difference between the lower and the upper pole tumour-feeding arteries (p<0.05). Tumours in the lower pole, supplied by the inferior or posterior segmental artery, may be more amenable to segmental artery clamping. MDCT angiography with volume rendering can demonstrate the extrarenal length of tumour-feeding arteries and may help in determining the accessibility for segmental artery clamping.

  9. Detection and quantification of coronary atherosclerotic plaque by 64-slice multidetector CT: a systematic head-to-head comparison with intravascular ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Papadopoulou, Stella-Lida; Neefjes, Lisan A; Schaap, Michiel; Li, Hui-Ling; Capuano, Ermanno; van der Giessen, Alina G; Schuurbiers, Johan C H; Gijsen, Frank J H; Dharampal, Anoeshka S; Nieman, Koen; van Geuns, Robert Jan; Mollet, Nico R; de Feyter, Pim J

    2011-11-01

    We evaluated the ability of 64-slice multidetector computed tomography (MDCT)-derived plaque parameters to detect and quantify coronary atherosclerosis, using intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) as the reference standard. In 32 patients, IVUS and 64-MDCT was performed. The MDCT and IVUS datasets of 44 coronary arteries were co-registered using a newly developed fusion technique and quantitative parameters were derived from both imaging modalities. The threshold of >0.5 mm of maximum wall thickness was used to establish plaque presence on MDCT and IVUS. We analyzed 1364 coregistered 1-mm coronary cross-sections and 255 segments of 5-mm length. Compared with IVUS, 64-MDCT enabled correct detection in 957 of 1109 cross-sections containing plaque (sensitivity 86%). In 180 of 255 cross-sections atherosclerosis was correctly excluded (specificity 71%). On the segmental level, MDCT detected 213 of 220 segments with any atherosclerotic plaque (sensitivity 96%), whereas the presence of any plaque was correctly ruled out in 28 of 32 segments (specificity 88%). Interobserver agreement for the detection of atherosclerotic cross-sections was moderate (Cohen's kappa coefficient K=0.51), but excellent for the atherosclerotic segments (K=1.0). Pearson's correlation coefficient for vessel plaque volumes measured by MDCT and IVUS was r=0.91 (p<0.001). Bland-Altman analysis showed a slight non-significant underestimation of any plaque volume by MDCT (p=0.5), with a trend to underestimate noncalcified and overestimate mixed/calcified plaque volumes (p=0.22 and p=0.87 respectively). MDCT is able to detect and quantify atherosclerotic plaque. Further improvement in CT resolution is necessary for more reliable assessment of very small and distal coronary plaques. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Coronary CT angiography using the second-generation 320-detector row CT: assessment of image quality and radiation dose in various heart rates compared with the first-generation scanner.

    PubMed

    Tomizawa, Nobuo; Maeda, Eriko; Akahane, Masaaki; Torigoe, Rumiko; Kiryu, Shigeru; Ohtomo, Kuni

    2013-10-01

    To assess the image quality and radiation dose reduction in various heart rates in coronary CT angiography using the second-generation 320-detector row CT compared with the first-generation CT. Ninety-six patients were retrospectively included. The first 48 patients underwent coronary CT angiography with the first-generation 320-detector row CT, while the last 48 patients underwent with the second-generation CT. Subjective image quality was graded using a 4-point scale (4, excellent; 1, unable to evaluate). Image noise and contrast-to-noise ratio were also analyzed. Subgroup analysis was performed based on the heart rate. The mean effective dose was derived from the dose length product multiplied by a conversion coefficient for the chest (κ = 0.014 mSv × mGy(-1) × cm(-1)). The overall subjective image quality score showed no significant difference (3.66 vs 3.69, respectively, p = 0.25). The image quality score of the second-generation group tended to be higher than that of the first-generation group in the 66- to 75-bpm subgroup (3.36 vs 3.53, respectively, p = 0.07). No significant difference was observed in image noise and contrast-to-noise ratio. The overall radiation dose reduced by 24 % (3.3 vs 2.5 mSv, respectively, p = 0.03), and the reduction was substantial in patients with higher heart rate (66- to 75-bpm, 4.3 vs 2.2 mSv, respectively, p = 0.009; >75 bpm, 8.2 vs 3.7 mSv, respectively, p = 0.005). The second-generation 320-detector row CT could maintain the image quality while reducing the radiation dose in coronary CT angiography. The dose reduction was larger in patients with higher heart rate.

  11. Exposure (mAs) optimisation of a multi-detector CT protocol for hepatic lesion detection: Are thinner slices better?

    PubMed

    Dobeli, Karen Leigh; Lewis, Sarah Jane; Meikle, Steven Richard; Thiele, David Lewis; Brennan, Patrick Christopher

    2014-04-01

    The purpose of this work was to determine the exposure-optimised slice thickness for hepatic lesion detection with CT. A phantom containing spheres (diameter 9.5, 4.8 and 2.4 mm) with CT density 10 HU below the background (50 HU) was scanned at 125, 100, 75 and 50 mAs. Data were reconstructed at 5-, 3- and 1-mm slice thicknesses. Noise, contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), area under the curve (AUC) as calculated using receiver operating characteristic analysis and sensitivity representing lesion detection were calculated and compared. Compared with the 125 mAs/5 mm slice thickness setting, significant reductions in AUC were found for 75 mAs (P < 0.01) and 50 mAs (P < 0.05) at 1- and 3-mm thicknesses, respectively; sensitivity for the 9.5-mm sphere was significantly reduced for 75 (P < 0.05) and 50 mAs (P < 0.01) at 1-mm thickness; sensitivity for the 4.8-mm sphere was significantly lower for 100, 75 and 50 mAs at all three slice thicknesses (P < 0.05). The 2.4-mm sphere was rarely detected. At each slice thickness, noise at 100, 75 and 50 mAs exposures was approximately 10, 30 and 50% higher, respectively, than that at 125 mAs exposure. CNRs decreased in an irregular manner with reductions in exposure and slice thickness. This study demonstrated no advantage to using slices below 5 mm thickness, and consequently thinner slices are not necessarily better. © 2013 The Authors. Journal of Medical Imaging and Radiation Oncology © 2013 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists.

  12. Patient radiation dose in prospectively gated axial CT coronary angiography and retrospectively gated helical technique with a 320-detector row CT scanner

    SciTech Connect

    Seguchi, Shigenobu; Aoyama, Takahiko; Koyama, Shuji; Fujii, Keisuke; Yamauchi-Kawaura, Chiyo

    2010-11-15

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate radiation dose to patients undergoing computed tomography coronary angiography (CTCA) for prospectively gated axial (PGA) technique and retrospectively gated helical (RGH) technique. Methods: Radiation doses were measured for a 320-detector row CT scanner (Toshiba Aquilion ONE) using small sized silicon-photodiode dosimeters, which were implanted at various tissue and organ positions within an anthropomorphic phantom for a standard Japanese adult male. Output signals from photodiode dosimeters were read out on a personal computer, from which organ and effective doses were computed according to guidelines published in the International Commission on Radiological Protection Publication 103. Results: Organs that received high doses were breast, followed by lung, esophagus, and liver. Breast doses obtained with PGA technique and a phase window width of 16% at a simulated heart rate of 60 beats per minute were 13 mGy compared to 53 mGy with RGH technique using electrocardiographically dependent dose modulation at the same phase window width as that in PGA technique. Effective doses obtained in this case were 4.7 and 20 mSv for the PGA and RGH techniques, respectively. Conversion factors of dose length product to the effective dose in PGA and RGH were 0.022 and 0.025 mSv mGy{sup -1} cm{sup -1} with a scan length of 140 mm. Conclusions: CTCA performed with PGA technique provided a substantial effective dose reduction, i.e., 70%-76%, compared to RGH technique using the dose modulation at the same phase windows as those in PGA technique. Though radiation doses in CTCA with RGH technique were the same level as, or some higher than, those in conventional coronary angiography (CCA), the use of PGA technique reduced organ and effective doses to levels less than CCA except for breast dose.

  13. Thin-section CT of lung without ECG gating: 64-detector row CT can markedly reduce cardiac motion artifact which can simulate lung lesions.

    PubMed

    Yanagawa, Masahiro; Tomiyama, Noriyuki; Sumikawa, Hiromitsu; Inoue, Atsuo; Daimon, Tadahisa; Honda, Osamu; Mihara, Naoki; Johkoh, Takeshi; Nakamura, Hironobu

    2009-01-01

    Motion artifacts, which can mimic thickened bronchial wall and the cystic appearance of bronchiectasis, constitute a potential pitfall in the diagnosis of interstitial or bronchial disease. Therefore, purpose of our study was to evaluate whether 64-detector row CT (64-MDCT) enables a reduction in respiratory or cardiac motion artifacts in the lung area on thin-section CT without ECG gating, and to examine the correlation between cardiac motion artifact and heart rate. Thirty-two patients with suspected diffuse lung disease, who underwent both 8- and 64-MDCT (gantry rotation time, 0.5 and 0.4s, respectively), were included. The heart rates of an additional 155 patients were measured (range, 48-126 beats per minute; mean, 76 beats per minute) immediately prior to 64-MDCT, and compared to the degree of cardiac motion artifact. Two independent observers evaluated the following artifacts on a monitor without the knowledge of relevant clinical information: (1) artifacts on 8- and 64-MDCT images with 1.25-mm thickness and those on 64-MDCT images with 0.625-mm thickness in 32 patients; and (2) artifacts on 64-MDCT images with 0.625-mm thickness in 155 patients. Interobserver agreement was good in evaluating artifacts on 8-MDCT images with 1.25-mm thickness (weighted Kappa test, kappa=0.61-0.71), and fair or poor in the other evaluations (kappa<0.31). Two observers stated that cardiac motion artifacts were more significant on 8-MDCT than on 64-MDCT in all 32 patients. Statistically significant differences were found at various checkpoints only in comparing artifacts between 8- and 64-MDCT for 1.25-mm thickness (Wilcoxon's signed-rank test, p<0.0017). Cardiac motion artifacts on 64-MDCT had no significant correlation with heart rate (Spearman's correlation coefficient by rank test). The high temporal resolution of 64-MDCT appears to reduce cardiac motion artifact that can affect thin-section scans of the lung parenchyma.

  14. [Added diagnostic benefit of 16-row whole-body spiral CT in patients with multiple trauma differentiated by region and injury severity according to the ATLS concept].

    PubMed

    Maurer, M H; Knopke, S; Schröder, R J

    2008-12-01

    To determine the added diagnostic benefit of using MS-CT in multiple trauma patients differentiated by severity of injury and affected body region. A retrospective analysis was performed of the 16-row whole-body spiral CT findings in 275 multiple trauma patients (73 % men, 27 % women; age 39.6 +/- 18.9 years) with regard to additional findings and new findings obtained with CT compared to the findings obtained by conventional projection radiography and abdominal ultrasound in the emergency room. The additional and new findings were differentiated by body region (head, face, chest, pelvis, abdomen, spine) and the degree of severity according to the three classes of injuries distinguished by the ATLS concept (class 1: simple injury, class 2: potentially life threatening, class 3: immediately life threatening). A total of 921 additional findings (= findings potentially relevant for further diagnosis and therapy in addition to the findings obtained by conventional radiography or ultrasound) were obtained by MS-CT in all patients. The distribution by number of patients and body region was as follows: 22 neck, 76 face, 125 chest, 112 abdomen, 50 pelvis, and 91 spine. Most additional findings were categorized as potentially life threatening (ATLS class 2). In addition, there were 439 completely new findings, involving the head in 128 patients (mostly ATLS class 3), the face in 18, the chest in 47, the abdomen in 26, and the spine in 9 patients. Most new findings involving the face, abdomen, and spine were ATLS class 2 injuries. Compared with conventional radiography and ultrasound in the emergency room, 16-row whole-body spiral CT yields numerous additional and new findings in different body regions in patients with multiple traumas. New findings primarily involved the head, and the additional findings involved the chest, pelvis, and spine. Most findings obtained with CT were potentially life threatening (ATLS class 2).

  15. Influence of 320-detector-row volume scanning and AAPM report 111 CT dosimetry metrics on size-specific dose estimate: a Monte Carlo study.

    PubMed

    Haba, Tomonobu; Koyama, Shuji; Kinomura, Yutaka; Ida, Yoshihiro; Kobayashi, Masanao

    2016-09-01

    The American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) task group 204 has recommended the use of size-dependent conversion factors to calculate size-specific dose estimate (SSDE) values from volume computed tomography dose index (CTDIvol) values. However, these conversion factors do not consider the effects of 320-detector-row volume computed tomography (CT) examinations or the new CT dosimetry metrics proposed by AAPM task group 111. This study aims to investigate the influence of these examinations and metrics on the conversion factors reported by AAPM task group 204, using Monte Carlo simulations. Simulations were performed modelling a Toshiba Aquilion ONE CT scanner, in order to compute dose values in water for cylindrical phantoms with 8-40-cm diameters at 2-cm intervals for each scanning parameter (tube voltage, bow-tie filter, longitudinal beam width). Then, the conversion factors were obtained by applying exponential regression analysis between the dose values for a given phantom diameter and the phantom diameter combined with various scanning parameters. The conversion factors for each scanning method (helical, axial, or volume scanning) and CT dosimetry method (i.e., the CTDI100 method or the AAPM task group 111 method) were in agreement with those reported by AAPM task group 204, within a percentage error of 14.2 % for phantom diameters ≥11.2 cm. The results obtained in this study indicate that the conversion factors previously presented by AAPM task group 204 can be used to provide appropriate SSDE values for 320-detector-row volume CT examinations and the CT dosimetry metrics proposed by the AAPM task group 111.

  16. Role of multidetector CT in the recognition of hyperdense middle cerebral artery sign (HMCAS) in patients with acute cerebral ischaemia: correlation with DWI-MRI sequences and clinical data.

    PubMed

    Romano, Andrea; Biraschi, Francesco; Tavanti, Francesca; Beccia, Mario; Dilisi, Filomena; Castrignanò, Antonella; Giuliani, Giorgia; Pierallini, Alberto; Fantozzi, Luigi Maria; Rasura, Maurizia; Bozzao, Alessandro

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this study was to verify the sensitivity and specificity of the hyperdense middle cerebral artery sign (HMCAS) obtained by multidetector computed tomography (CT) in predicting acute stroke, using diffusion-weighted (DW) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as a reference. The location of the HMCAS, the extension of the ischaemic lesion and its prognostic value were also assessed. The CT examinations of 654 patients with symptoms related to acute cerebral stroke were retrospectively reviewed. DW-MRI confirmed recent stroke in 175 patients. Two expert neuroradiologists analysed the CT examinations of these patients in four phases. Sensitivity, specificity and interobserver reliability was evaluated. Patients were divided into three groups according to the HMCAS site (M1-M2-M3) and the Alberta Stroke Program Early CT Score (ASPECTS) on DW-MRI was calculated. The ASPECTS average score was correlated with the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) and modified Rankin scale (mRS) at 3 months. In 41 patients, the presence of HMCAS was confirmed (71 % sensitivity; 100 % specificity; Interobserver reliability k, 84 %). An inverse correlation was found by comparing the ASPECTS and NIHSS scores (Rsq = -0.206). After logistic regression analysis, HMCAS was found to be independently associated with a poor outcome (mRS >2) at 3 months after adjusting for age, NIHSS on admission, risk factors and aetiology of stroke. Our study demonstrated that HMCAS obtained with multidetector CT can be detected in more than 70 % of patients with large acute ischaemic lesion and it is an unfavourable prognostic sign.

  17. Dynamic volume CT: the next revolution in clinical CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boedeker, Kirsten; Mather, Rich

    2008-08-01

    The need for table motion in multi-detector CT causes image volumes acquired for whole organ motion and perfusion studies to lack temporal uniformity. The next revolution in clinical CT, dynamic volume CT, mitigates this limitation by providing the ability to acquire an entire organ with isotropic resolution in a single gantry rotation with no table movement. The first dynamic volume CT scanner has recently been introduced and comprises 320 detector rows of 0.5mm channel thickness, covering 16cm of anatomy in one rotation of 0.35sec. This scanner offers many advancements in terms of temporal uniformity, reconstruction, and radiation dose. This system significantly reduces motion artifact and eliminates contrast phase differences within the volume. Because this scanner does not require helical acquisition for volumetric imaging, it delivers significantly less dose for applications such as CT coronary angiography exams as well as reduced dose in most other applications. Furthermore, by eliminating table motion, the need for complex interpolation methods that can distort cardiac images is removed. Image quality is not sacrificed compared with standard 64-row CT scanners, as demonstrated via low contrast, resolution, and accuracy measurements presented in this work. By capturing the entire brain in one rotation, brain perfusion, bone subtraction, and quantitative perfusion analysis are now possible with a single low dose exam. Dynamic volume CT offers to change the way medicine approaches stroke patients, myocardial perfusion studies, and imaging of other moving body parts such as the lung and joints.

  18. Diagnostic accuracy of three-dimensional contrast-enhanced MR angiography at 3-T for acute pulmonary embolism detection: comparison with multidetector CT angiography.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Long Jiang; Luo, Song; Yeh, Benjamin M; Zhou, Chang Sheng; Tang, Chun Xiang; Zhao, Yan'e; Li, Lin; Zheng, Ling; Huang, Wei; Lu, Guang Ming

    2013-10-12

    Three-dimensional contrast-enhanced MR pulmonary angiography (MRPA) is a suitable option for pulmonary embolism (PE) detection. However, there have been few reports on the diagnostic accuracy of MRPA for PE detection in a 3-T MR system. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of MRPA in a 3-T MR system to detect acute PE with multidetector CT pulmonary angiography (CTPA) as reference standard. Twenty-seven patients (18 males and 9 females, mean age 38.9±14.4 years) underwent both MRPA and CTPA within 3 days (range, 0-3 days) for evaluating PE. Pulmonary emboli in MRPA were independently analyzed on a per-patient and per-lobe basis by two radiologists. CTPA was regarded as reference standard, which was evaluated by another two radiologists in consensus. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), negative predictive value (NPV), and accuracy for PE detection were calculated. Weighted κ values were calculated to evaluate agreement between readers. Twenty-four patients had PE in 55 lung lobes in CTPA, while 3 patients had no PE detected. Readers 1 and 2 correctly detected 47 and 46 lung lobes having clots in 24 and 23 patients, corresponding to sensitivities, specificities, PPV, NPV, and accuracies of 100%, 100%, 100%, 100%, 100%; 100%, 66.7%, 96.0%, 100%, 96.4% on a per-patient basis and 85.5%, 100%, 100%, 90.9%, 94.1%; 83.6%, 93.7%, 90.2%, 89.2%, 89.6% on a per-lobe basis; respectively. Excellent inter-reader agreement (κ values=1.00 and 0.934; both P<0.001) were found for detecting PE on a per-patient and per-lobe analysis. Three-dimensional contrast-enhanced MRPA with a 3-T MR system is a suitable alternative modality to CTPA to detect PE on a per-patient basis based on this small cohort study. © 2013.

  19. Angular on-line tube current modulation in multidetector CT examinations of children and adults: The influence of different scanning parameters on dose reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Papadakis, Antonios E.; Perisinakis, Kostas; Damilakis, John

    2007-07-15

    The purpose of this study was to assess the potential of angular on-line tube current modulation on dose reduction in pediatric and adult patients undergoing multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) examinations. Five physical anthropomorphic phantoms that simulate the average individual as neonate, 1-year-old, 5-year-old, 10-year-old, and adult were employed in the current study. Phantoms were scanned with the use of on-line tube current modulation (TCM). Percent dose reduction (%DR) factors achieved by applying TCM, were determined for standard protocols used for head and neck, shoulder, thorax, thorax and abdomen, abdomen, abdomen and pelvis, pelvis, and whole body examinations. A preliminary study on the application of TCM in MDCT examinations of adult patients was performed to validate the results obtained in anthropomorphic phantoms. Dose reduction was estimated as the percentage difference of the modulated milliamperes for each scan and the preset milliamperes prescribed by the scan protocol. The dose reduction in children was found to be much lower than the corresponding reduction achieved for adults. For helical scans the %DR factors, ranged between 1.6% and 7.4% for the neonate, 2.9% and 8.7% for the 1-year old, 2% and 6% for the 5-year-old, 5% and 10.9% for the 10-year-old, and 10.4% and 20.7% for the adult individual. For sequential scans the corresponding %DR factors ranged between 1.3% and 6.7%, 4.5% and 11%, 4.2% and 6.6%, 6.4% and 12.3%, and 8.9% and 23.3%, respectively. Broader beam collimations are associated with decreased %DR factors, when other scanning parameters are held constant. TCM did not impair image noise. In adult patients, the %DR values were found to be in good agreement with the corresponding results obtained in the anthropomorphic adult phantom. In conclusion, on-line TCM may be considered as a valuable tool for reducing dose in routine CT examinations of pediatric and adult patients. However, the dose reduction achieved with TCM

  20. Screening for carotid injury in trauma patients: image quality of 16-detector-row computed tomography angiography.

    PubMed

    Borisch, I; Boehme, T; Butz, B; Hamer, O W; Feuerbach, S; Zorger, N

    2007-09-01

    The introduction of multidetector-row computed tomography (MDCT) has revolutionized the initial management of multiply injured patients. This technology has the potential to improve the imaging of traumatic vascular injuries. To evaluate the quality of multidetector-row computed tomography angiography (MDCTA) of the carotid arteries in the setting of a routine whole-body trauma scan. 87 trauma patients underwent a routine whole-body CT scan in a 16-detector-row scanner including an MDCTA with a reconstructed axial slice thickness of 3 mm. Images were reviewed by three experienced radiologists with emphasis on image quality. Contrast density, severity, and origin of artifacts and the occurrence of vessel lesions were assessed for different vessel segments. 3642 separate vessel segments were evaluated. Contrast density was rated good or sufficient for diagnosis in 99.8%. A total of 67.3% of vessel segments were free of artifacts, while 27.9% of vessel segments showed minor artifacts not impairing diagnostic evaluation. Clinically relevant artifacts obscuring a vessel segment occurred in 4.7% and were mostly caused by dental hardware. Four dissections of the internal carotid artery were diagnosed by all three radiologists. As a rapid screening test for blunt carotid artery injury, integration of MDCTA in the routine imaging workup of trauma patients utilizing a whole-body CT trauma scan is possible and practicable. Image quality is mostly sufficient for diagnosis, but impaired in a few cases by artifacts deriving primarily from dental hardware.

  1. New insights on COPD imaging via CT and MRI

    PubMed Central

    Sverzellati, N; Molinari, F; Pirronti, T; Bonomo, L; Spagnolo, P; Zompatori, M

    2007-01-01

    Multidetector-row computed tomography (MDCT) can be used to quantify morphological features and investigate structure/function relationship in COPD. This approach allows a phenotypical definition of COPD patients, and might improve our understanding of disease pathogenesis and suggest new therapeutical options. In recent years, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has also become potentially suitable for the assessment of ventilation, perfusion and respiratory mechanics. This review focuses on the established clinical applications of CT, and novel CT and MRI techniques, which may prove valuable in evaluating the structural and functional damage in COPD. PMID:18229568

  2. CT venography after knee replacement surgery: comparison of dual-energy CT-based monochromatic imaging and single-energy metal artifact reduction techniques on a 320-row CT scanner.

    PubMed

    Kidoh, Masafumi; Utsunomiya, Daisuke; Oda, Seitaro; Nakaura, Takeshi; Funama, Yoshinori; Yuki, Hideaki; Hirata, Kenichiro; Hatemura, Masahiro; Namimoto, Tomohiro; Yamashita, Yasuyuki

    2017-02-01

    An optimal metal artifact reduction (MAR) technique is needed for a reliable and accurate image-based diagnosis. Using a 320-row scanner, we compared the dual-energy computed tomography (CT)-based monochromatic and the single-energy metal artifact reduction (SEMAR) techniques for CT venography (CTV) to identify the better imaging method for diagnosing deep vein thrombosis (DVT) in patients who had undergone knee replacement surgery. Twenty-three consecutive patients with suspected DVT after unilateral knee replacement surgery underwent dual-energy CT (135/80 kVp). Monochromatic images of 35-135 keV were generated; the monochromatic image with the best signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the popliteal vein near the metal prosthesis were selected. The projection data of 80 kVp were reconstructed using MAR algorithm. The mean SNR ON MAR and the best SNR ON monochromatic images were compared. Two radiologists evaluated visualization of the metal artifacts on a four-point scale where 1 = extensive artifacts, 2 = strong artifacts, 3 = mild artifacts, and 4 = minimal artifacts. The mean SNR was significantly higher on the MAR than the monochromatic images (12.8 ± 4.7 versus 7.7 ± 5.1, P < 0.01) and the visual scores were significantly higher for MAR than monochromatic images (2.6 ± 0.8 versus 1.3 ± 0.4, P < 0.01). For CTV after knee replacement surgery, the MAR technique is superior to the monochromatic imaging technique.

  3. CT venography after knee replacement surgery: comparison of dual-energy CT-based monochromatic imaging and single-energy metal artifact reduction techniques on a 320-row CT scanner

    PubMed Central

    Utsunomiya, Daisuke; Oda, Seitaro; Nakaura, Takeshi; Funama, Yoshinori; Yuki, Hideaki; Hirata, Kenichiro; Hatemura, Masahiro; Namimoto, Tomohiro; Yamashita, Yasuyuki

    2017-01-01

    Background An optimal metal artifact reduction (MAR) technique is needed for a reliable and accurate image-based diagnosis. Purpose Using a 320-row scanner, we compared the dual-energy computed tomography (CT)-based monochromatic and the single-energy metal artifact reduction (SEMAR) techniques for CT venography (CTV) to identify the better imaging method for diagnosing deep vein thrombosis (DVT) in patients who had undergone knee replacement surgery. Material and Methods Twenty-three consecutive patients with suspected DVT after unilateral knee replacement surgery underwent dual-energy CT (135/80 kVp). Monochromatic images of 35–135 keV were generated; the monochromatic image with the best signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the popliteal vein near the metal prosthesis were selected. The projection data of 80 kVp were reconstructed using MAR algorithm. The mean SNR ON MAR and the best SNR ON monochromatic images were compared. Two radiologists evaluated visualization of the metal artifacts on a four-point scale where 1 = extensive artifacts, 2 = strong artifacts, 3 = mild artifacts, and 4 = minimal artifacts. Results The mean SNR was significantly higher on the MAR than the monochromatic images (12.8 ± 4.7 versus 7.7 ± 5.1, P < 0.01) and the visual scores were significantly higher for MAR than monochromatic images (2.6 ± 0.8 versus 1.3 ± 0.4, P < 0.01). Conclusion For CTV after knee replacement surgery, the MAR technique is superior to the monochromatic imaging technique. PMID:28321330

  4. A 64-slice multi-detector CT scan could evaluate the change of the left atrial appendage thrombi of the atrial fibrillation patient, which was reduced by warfarin therapy.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Hidekazu

    2011-08-19

    Curable cause of stroke is the left atrial appendage (LAA) thrombi of atrial fibrillation (AF) patients. Some AF patients have the LAA thrombi. It is very important to cure AF patients by warfarin. Transoesophageal echocardiography (TOE) is the usual clinical tool to detect the LAA thrombi. Recently, a 64-slice multi-detector CT (64-MDCT) scan enables us to display the LAA thrombi more easily than TOE. I reported a case that a 64-MDCT scan had been used successfully in displaying the change of the LAA thrombi reduced by warfarin therapy. The size of the LAA thrombi was reduced from 25.2 mm × 19.3 mm (figure 1) to 22.1 mm × 14.8 mm (figure 2) after the 3-month warfarin therapy. It was useful to estimate the LAA thrombi by a 64-MDCT scan to estimate LAA thrombi itself and the change of LAA thrombi to evaluate the effectiveness of warfarin therapy.

  5. [Valvular heart disease: multidetector computed tomography evaluation].

    PubMed

    Franco, A; Fernández-Pérez, G C; Tomás-Mallebrera, M; Badillo-Portugal, S; Orejas, M

    2014-01-01

    Heart valve disease is a clinical problem that has been studied with classical imaging techniques like echocardiography and MRI. Technological advances in CT make it possible to obtain static and dynamic images that enable not only a morphological but also a functional analysis in many cases. Although it is currently indicated only in patients with inconclusive findings at echocardiography and MRI or those in whom these techniques are contraindicated, multidetector CT makes it possible to diagnose stenosis or regurgitation through planimetry, to evaluate and quantify valvular calcium, and to show the functional repercussions of these phenomena on the rest of the structures of the heart. Given that multidetector CT is being increasingly used in the diagnosis of ischemic heart disease, we think it is interesting for radiologists to know its potential for the study of valvular disease. Copyright © 2011 SERAM. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  6. Radiation dose-reduction strategies for neuroradiology CT protocols.

    PubMed

    Smith, A B; Dillon, W P; Gould, R; Wintermark, M

    2007-10-01

    Within the past 2 decades, the number of CT examinations performed has increased almost 10-fold. This is in large part due to advances in multidetector-row CT technology, which now allows faster image acquisition and improved isotropic imaging. The increased use, along with multidetector technique, has led to a significantly increased radiation dose to the patient from CT studies. This places increased responsibility on the radiologist to ensure that CT examinations are indicated and that the "as low as reasonably achievable" concept is adhered to. Neuroradiologists are familiar with factors that affect patient dose such as pitch, milliamperes, kilovolt peak (kVp), collimation, but with increasing attention being given to dose reduction, they are looking for additional ways to further reduce the radiation associated with their CT protocols. In response to increasing concern, CT manufacturers have developed dose-reduction tools, such as dose modulation, in which the tube current is adjusted along with the CT acquisition, according to patient's attenuation. This review will describe the available techniques for reducing dose associated with neuroradiologic CT imaging protocols.

  7. Rowing Physiology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spinks, W. L.

    This review of the literature discusses and examines the methods used in physiological assessment of rowers, results of such assessments, and future directions emanating from research in the physiology of rowing. The first section discusses the energy demands of rowing, including the contribution of the energy system, anaerobic metabolism, and the…

  8. Flat-panel volume CT: fundamental principles, technology, and applications.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Rajiv; Cheung, Arnold C; Bartling, Soenke H; Lisauskas, Jennifer; Grasruck, Michael; Leidecker, Christianne; Schmidt, Bernhard; Flohr, Thomas; Brady, Thomas J

    2008-01-01

    Flat-panel volume computed tomography (CT) systems have an innovative design that allows coverage of a large volume per rotation, fluoroscopic and dynamic imaging, and high spatial resolution that permits visualization of complex human anatomy such as fine temporal bone structures and trabecular bone architecture. In simple terms, flat-panel volume CT scanners can be thought of as conventional multidetector CT scanners in which the detector rows have been replaced by an area detector. The flat-panel detector has wide z-axis coverage that enables imaging of entire organs in one axial acquisition. Its fluoroscopic and angiographic capabilities are useful for intraoperative and vascular applications. Furthermore, the high-volume coverage and continuous rotation of the detector may enable depiction of dynamic processes such as coronary blood flow and whole-brain perfusion. Other applications in which flat-panel volume CT may play a role include small-animal imaging, nondestructive testing in animal survival surgeries, and tissue-engineering experiments. Such versatility has led some to predict that flat-panel volume CT will gain importance in interventional and intraoperative applications, especially in specialties such as cardiac imaging, interventional neuroradiology, orthopedics, and otolaryngology. However, the contrast resolution of flat-panel volume CT is slightly inferior to that of multidetector CT, a higher radiation dose is needed to achieve a comparable signal-to-noise ratio, and a slower scintillator results in a longer scanning time.

  9. Submillisievert Median Radiation Dose for Coronary Angiography with a Second-Generation 320–Detector Row CT Scanner in 107 Consecutive Patients

    PubMed Central

    Shanbhag, Sujata M.; Arai, Andrew E.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To (a) use a new second-generation wide-volume 320–detector row computed tomographic (CT) scanner to explore optimization of radiation exposure in coronary CT angiography in an unselected and consecutive cohort of patients referred for clinical purposes and (b) compare estimated radiation exposure and image quality with that from a cohort of similar patients who underwent imaging with a previous first-generation CT system. Materials and Methods: The study was approved by the institutional review board, and all subjects provided written consent. Coronary CT angiography was performed in 107 consecutive patients with a new second-generation 320–detector row unit. Estimated radiation exposure and image quality were compared with those from 100 consecutive patients who underwent imaging with a previous first-generation scanner. Effective radiation dose was estimated by multiplying the dose-length product by an effective dose conversion factor of 0.014 mSv/mGy ⋅ cm and reported with size-specific dose estimates (SSDEs). Image quality was evaluated by two independent readers. Results: The mean age of the 107 patients was 55.4 years ± 12.0 (standard deviation); 57 patients (53.3%) were men. The median body mass index was 27.3 kg/m2 (range, 18.1–47.2 kg/m2); however, 71 patients (66.4%) were overweight, obese, or morbidly obese. A tube potential of 100 kV was used in 97 patients (90.6%), single-volume acquisition was used in 104 (97.2%), and prospective electrocardiographic gating was used in 106 (99.1%). The mean heart rate was 57.1 beats per minute ± 11.2 (range, 34–96 beats per minute), which enabled single-heartbeat scans in 100 patients (93.4%). The median radiation dose was 0.93 mSv (interquartile range [IQR], 0.58–1.74 mSv) with the second-generation unit and 2.67 mSv (IQR, 1.68–4.00 mSv) with the first-generation unit (P < .0001). The median SSDE was 6.0 mGy (IQR, 4.1–10.0 mGy) with the second-generation unit and 13.2 mGy (IQR, 10.2–18

  10. The effect of bolus viscosity on laryngeal closure in swallowing: kinematic analysis using 320-row area detector CT.

    PubMed

    Inamoto, Yoko; Saitoh, Eiichi; Okada, Sumiko; Kagaya, Hitoshi; Shibata, Seiko; Ota, Kikuo; Baba, Mikoto; Fujii, Naoko; Katada, Kazuhiro; Wattanapan, Pattra; Palmer, Jeffrey B

    2013-03-01

    The present study examined the effect of bolus viscosity on the onset of laryngeal closure (relative to hyoid elevation), the duration of laryngeal closure, and other key events of swallowing in ten healthy volunteers. All volunteers underwent 320-row area detector computed tomography swallow studies while swallowing 10 ml of honey-thick barium (5 % v/w) and thin barium (5 % v/w) in a 45° reclining position. Three-dimensional images of both consistencies were created in 29 phases at an interval of 0.10 s (100 ms) over a 2.90-s duration. The timing of the motions of the hyoid bone, soft palate, and epiglottis; the opening and closing of the laryngeal vestibule, true vocal cords (TVC), and pharyngoesophageal segment; and the bolus movement were measured and compared between the two consistencies. The result showed differing patterns of bolus movement for thin and thick liquids. With thin liquids, the bolus reached the hypopharynx earlier and stayed in the hypopharynx longer than with thick liquids. Among events of laryngeal closure, only the timing of TVC closure differed significantly between the two consistencies. With thin liquids, TVC closure started earlier and lasted longer than with thick liquids. This TVC movement could reflect a response to the faster flow of thin liquids. The results suggest that bolus viscosity alters the temporal characteristics of swallowing, especially closure of the TVC.

  11. Prospective evaluation of the influence of iterative reconstruction on the reproducibility of coronary calcium quantification in reduced radiation dose 320 detector row CT.

    PubMed

    Choi, Andrew D; Leifer, Eric S; Yu, Jeannie; Shanbhag, Sujata M; Bronson, Kathie; Arai, Andrew E; Chen, Marcus Y

    2016-01-01

    Coronary artery calcium (CAC) predicts coronary heart disease events and is important for individualized cardiac risk assessment. This report assesses the interscan variability of CT for coronary calcium quantification using image acquisition with standard and reduced radiation dose protocols and whether the use of reduced radiation dose acquisition with iterative reconstruction (IR; "reduced-dose/IR ") allows for similar image quality and reproducibility when compared to standard radiation dose acquisition with filtered back projection (FBP; "standard-dose/FBP") on 320-detector row computed tomography (320-CT). 200 consecutive patients (60 ± 9 years, 59% male) prospectively underwent two standard- and two reduced-dose acquisitions (800 total scans, 1600 reconstructions) using 320 slice CT and 120 kV tube voltage. Automated tube current modulation was used and for reduced-dose scans, prescribed tube current was lowered by 70%. Image noise and Agatston scores were determined and compared. Regarding stratification by Agatston score categories (0, 1-10, 11-100, 101-400, >400), reduced-dose/IR versus standard-dose/FBP had excellent agreement at 89% (95% CI: 86-92%) with kappa 0.86 (95% CI: 0.81-0.90). Standard-dose/FBP rescan agreement was 93% (95% CI: 89-96%) with kappa = 0.91 (95% CI: 0.86-0.95) while reduced-dose/IR rescan agreement was similar at 91% (95% CI: 87-94%) with kappa 0.88 (95% CI: 0.83-0.93). Image noise was significantly higher but clinically acceptable for reduced-dose/IR (18 Hounsfield Unit [HU] mean) compared to standard-dose/FBP (16 HU; p < 0.0001). Median radiation exposure was 74% lower for reduced- (0.37 mSv) versus standard-dose (1.4 mSv) acquisitions. Rescan agreement was excellent for reduced-dose image acquisition with iterative reconstruction and standard-dose acquisition with filtered back projection for the quantification of coronary calcium by CT. These methods make it possible to reduce radiation exposure by 74%. URL: https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct

  12. Time Efficiency and Diagnostic Accuracy of New Automated Myocardial Perfusion Analysis Software in 320-Row CT Cardiac Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Rief, Matthias; Stenzel, Fabian; Kranz, Anisha; Schlattmann, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Objective We aimed to evaluate the time efficiency and diagnostic accuracy of automated myocardial computed tomography perfusion (CTP) image analysis software. Materials and Methods 320-row CTP was performed in 30 patients, and analyses were conducted independently by three different blinded readers by the use of two recent software releases (version 4.6 and novel version 4.71GR001, Toshiba, Tokyo, Japan). Analysis times were compared, and automated epi- and endocardial contour detection was subjectively rated in five categories (excellent, good, fair, poor and very poor). As semi-quantitative perfusion parameters, myocardial attenuation and transmural perfusion ratio (TPR) were calculated for each myocardial segment and agreement was tested by using the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC). Conventional coronary angiography served as reference standard. Results The analysis time was significantly reduced with the novel automated software version as compared with the former release (Reader 1: 43:08 ± 11:39 min vs. 09:47 ± 04:51 min, Reader 2: 42:07 ± 06:44 min vs. 09:42 ± 02:50 min and Reader 3: 21:38 ± 3:44 min vs. 07:34 ± 02:12 min; p < 0.001 for all). Epi- and endocardial contour detection for the novel software was rated to be significantly better (p < 0.001) than with the former software. ICCs demonstrated strong agreement (≥ 0.75) for myocardial attenuation in 93% and for TPR in 82%. Diagnostic accuracy for the two software versions was not significantly different (p = 0.169) as compared with conventional coronary angiography. Conclusion The novel automated CTP analysis software offers enhanced time efficiency with an improvement by a factor of about four, while maintaining diagnostic accuracy. PMID:23323027

  13. Common carotid artery pseudoaneurysm after neck dissection: colour Doppler ultrasound and multidetector computed tomography findings.

    PubMed

    Flor, N; Sardanelli, F; Ghilardi, G; Tentori, A; Franceschelli, G; Felisati, G; Cornalba, G P

    2007-05-01

    Common carotid artery pseudoaneurysm is a rare disease, which has been previously unreported in association with neck dissection. We describe the Doppler ultrasound and multidetector computed tomography (CT) findings of a case of carotid pseudoaneurysm, one month after pharyngolaryngectomy with bilateral neck dissection. Multidetector CT confirmed the diagnosis made on the basis of Doppler ultrasound; the high image quality of axial and three-dimensional reconstructions avoided the need for pre-operative conventional angiography. In the presence of a pulsatile cervical mass after neck surgery, pseudoaneurysm of the carotid artery should be included in the differential diagnosis, and multidetector CT can be the sole pre-operative diagnostic imaging modality.

  14. Optimum CT reconstruction parameters for vascular and hepatocellular carcinoma models in a liver phantom with multi-level dynamic computed tomography with 64 detector rows: a basic study.

    PubMed

    Murotani, Kazuhiro; Kazuhiro, Murotani; Kawai, Nobuyuki; Sato, Morio; Minamiguchi, Hiroki; Nakai, Motoki; Sonomura, Tetsuo; Hosokawa, Seiki; Nishioku, Tadayoshi

    2013-07-01

    We quantified to clarify the optimum factors for CT image reconstruction of an enhanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) model in a liver phantom obtained by multi-level dynamic computed tomography (M-LDCT) with 64 detector rows. After M-LDCT scanning of a water phantom and an enhanced HCC model, we compared the standard deviation (SD, 1 ± SD), noise power spectrum (NPS) values, contrast-noise ratios (CNR), and the M-LDCT image among the reconstruction parameters, including the convolution kernel (FC11, FC13, and FC15), post-processing quantum filters (2D-Q00, 2D-Q01, and 2D-Q02) and slice thicknesses/slice intervals. The SD and NPS values were lowest with FC11 and 2D-Q02. The CNR values were highest with 2D-Q02. The M-LDCT image quality was highest with FC11 and 2D-Q02, and with slice thicknesses/slice intervals of 0.5 mm/0.5 mm and 0.5 mm/0.25 mm. The optimum factors were the FC11 convolution kernel, 2D-Q02 quantum filter, and 0.5 mm slice thickness/0.5 mm slice interval or less.

  15. Three-dimensional volume-rendered multidetector CT imaging of the posterior inferior pancreaticoduodenal artery: its anatomy and role in diagnosing extrapancreatic perineural invasion

    PubMed Central

    Giacomini, Craig; Brooke Jeffrey, R.; Willmann, Juergen K.; Olcott, Eric

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Extrapancreatic perineural spread in pancreatic adenocarcinoma contributes to poor outcomes, as it is known to be a major contributor to positive surgical margins and disease recurrence. However, current staging classifications have not yet taken extrapancreatic perineural spread into account. Four pathways of extrapancreatic perineural spread have been described that conveniently follow small defined arterial pathways. Small field of view three-dimensional (3D) volume-rendered multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) images allow visualization of small peripancreatic vessels and thus perineural invasion that may be associated with them. One such vessel, the posterior inferior pancreaticoduodenal artery (PIPDA), serves as a surrogate for extrapancreatic perineural spread by pancreatic adenocarcinoma arising in the uncinate process. This pictorial review presents the normal and variant anatomy of the PIPDA with 3D volume-rendered MDCT imaging, and emphasizes its role as a vascular landmark for the diagnosis of extrapancreatic perineural invasion from uncinate adenocarcinomas. Familiarity with the anatomy of PIPDA will allow accurate detection of extrapancreatic perineural spread by pancreatic adenocarcinoma involving the uncinate process, and may potentially have important staging implications as neoadjuvant therapy improves. PMID:24434918

  16. Rowing injuries.

    PubMed

    Rumball, Jane S; Lebrun, Constance M; Di Ciacca, Stephen R; Orlando, Karen

    2005-01-01

    Participation in the sport of rowing has been steadily increasing in recent decades, yet few studies address the specific injuries incurred. This article reviews the most common injuries described in the literature, including musculoskeletal problems in the lower back, ribs, shoulder, wrist and knee. A review of basic rowing physiology and equipment is included, along with a description of the mechanics of the rowing stroke. This information is necessary in order to make an accurate diagnosis and treatment protocol for these injuries, which are mainly chronic in nature. The most frequently injured region is the low back, mainly due to excessive hyperflexion and twisting, and can include specific injuries such as spondylolysis, sacroiliac joint dysfunction and disc herniation. Rib stress fractures account for the most time lost from on-water training and competition. Although theories abound for the mechanism of injury, the exact aetiology of rib stress fractures remains unknown. Other injuries discussed within, which are specific to ribs, include costochondritis, costovertebral joint subluxation and intercostal muscle strains. Shoulder pain is quite common in rowers and can be the result of overuse, poor technique, or tension in the upper body. Injuries concerning the forearm and wrist are also common, and can include exertional compartment syndrome, lateral epicondylitis, deQuervain's and intersection syndrome, and tenosynovitis of the wrist extensors. In the lower body, the major injuries reported include generalised patellofemoral pain due to abnormal patellar tracking, and iliotibial band friction syndrome. Lastly, dermatological issues, such as blisters and abrasions, and miscellaneous issues, such as environmental concerns and the female athlete triad, are also included in this article.Pathophysiology, mechanism of injury, assessment and management strategies are outlined in the text for each injury, with special attention given to ways to correct

  17. The development, validation and application of a multi-detector CT (MDCT) scanner model for assessing organ doses to the pregnant patient and the fetus using Monte Carlo simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, J.; Bednarz, B.; Caracappa, P. F.; Xu, X. G.

    2009-05-01

    The latest multiple-detector technologies have further increased the popularity of x-ray CT as a diagnostic imaging modality. There is a continuing need to assess the potential radiation risk associated with such rapidly evolving multi-detector CT (MDCT) modalities and scanning protocols. This need can be met by the use of CT source models that are integrated with patient computational phantoms for organ dose calculations. Based on this purpose, this work developed and validated an MDCT scanner using the Monte Carlo method, and meanwhile the pregnant patient phantoms were integrated into the MDCT scanner model for assessment of the dose to the fetus as well as doses to the organs or tissues of the pregnant patient phantom. A Monte Carlo code, MCNPX, was used to simulate the x-ray source including the energy spectrum, filter and scan trajectory. Detailed CT scanner components were specified using an iterative trial-and-error procedure for a GE LightSpeed CT scanner. The scanner model was validated by comparing simulated results against measured CTDI values and dose profiles reported in the literature. The source movement along the helical trajectory was simulated using the pitch of 0.9375 and 1.375, respectively. The validated scanner model was then integrated with phantoms of a pregnant patient in three different gestational periods to calculate organ doses. It was found that the dose to the fetus of the 3 month pregnant patient phantom was 0.13 mGy/100 mAs and 0.57 mGy/100 mAs from the chest and kidney scan, respectively. For the chest scan of the 6 month patient phantom and the 9 month patient phantom, the fetal doses were 0.21 mGy/100 mAs and 0.26 mGy/100 mAs, respectively. The paper also discusses how these fetal dose values can be used to evaluate imaging procedures and to assess risk using recommendations of the report from AAPM Task Group 36. This work demonstrates the ability of modeling and validating an MDCT scanner by the Monte Carlo method, as well as

  18. The development, validation and application of a multi-detector CT (MDCT) scanner model for assessing organ doses to the pregnant patient and the fetus using Monte Carlo simulations.

    PubMed

    Gu, J; Bednarz, B; Caracappa, P F; Xu, X G

    2009-05-07

    The latest multiple-detector technologies have further increased the popularity of x-ray CT as a diagnostic imaging modality. There is a continuing need to assess the potential radiation risk associated with such rapidly evolving multi-detector CT (MDCT) modalities and scanning protocols. This need can be met by the use of CT source models that are integrated with patient computational phantoms for organ dose calculations. Based on this purpose, this work developed and validated an MDCT scanner using the Monte Carlo method, and meanwhile the pregnant patient phantoms were integrated into the MDCT scanner model for assessment of the dose to the fetus as well as doses to the organs or tissues of the pregnant patient phantom. A Monte Carlo code, MCNPX, was used to simulate the x-ray source including the energy spectrum, filter and scan trajectory. Detailed CT scanner components were specified using an iterative trial-and-error procedure for a GE LightSpeed CT scanner. The scanner model was validated by comparing simulated results against measured CTDI values and dose profiles reported in the literature. The source movement along the helical trajectory was simulated using the pitch of 0.9375 and 1.375, respectively. The validated scanner model was then integrated with phantoms of a pregnant patient in three different gestational periods to calculate organ doses. It was found that the dose to the fetus of the 3 month pregnant patient phantom was 0.13 mGy/100 mAs and 0.57 mGy/100 mAs from the chest and kidney scan, respectively. For the chest scan of the 6 month patient phantom and the 9 month patient phantom, the fetal doses were 0.21 mGy/100 mAs and 0.26 mGy/100 mAs, respectively. The paper also discusses how these fetal dose values can be used to evaluate imaging procedures and to assess risk using recommendations of the report from AAPM Task Group 36. This work demonstrates the ability of modeling and validating an MDCT scanner by the Monte Carlo method, as well as

  19. The incidence of pulmonary embolism and deep vein thrombosis and their predictive risk factors after lower extremity arthroplasty: a retrospective analysis based on diagnosis using multidetector CT.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Yoshihisa; Nakatsuka, Hideki; Namba, Yoshifumi; Mitani, Shigeru; Yoshitake, Nami; Sugimoto, Etsuko; Hazama, Keita

    2015-04-01

    The true incidence of venous thromboembolism (VTE), including deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE) events, and the predictive risk factors are not well-defined in patients who undergo major lower extremity arthroplasty such as total hip arthroplasty (THA) or total or partial knee arthroplasty (TPKA). Using multidetector computed tomography (MDCT), pulmonary angiography (CTA), and MDCT venography (CTV), we investigated the prevalence of VTE and its predictive risk factors in patients for whom the guideline recommends prophylaxis. The electronic records of patients who underwent elective THA or TPKA at our institution from April 2010 through July 2013 were surveyed. We examined a total of 1,163 patient records for 986 patients who had undergone MDCT seven days after THA or TPKA. No PE-related deaths occurred in this study, though arterial embolization was needed for major bleeding in two cases. CTA-CTV revealed VTE in 51 (4.4 %) patients, PE in 20 (1.7 %), and DVT in 43 (3.3 %). Five of 51 patients had symptoms suggestive of DVT. In the logistic regression model, the type of surgery (TPKA > THA), patient age, and body mass index (BMI) were identified as predictive risk factors for VTE. This observational study showed that the overall incidence of VTE after THA and TPKA is 4.4 % in patients receiving recommended antithrombotic prophylaxis. TPKA is associated with a higher incidence of VTE than of THA, and greater BMI and older patient age are also independent risk factors.

  20. Multi-detector thoracic CT findings in cerebro-costo-mandibular syndrome: rib gaps and failure of costo-vertebral separation.

    PubMed

    Watson, Tom Anthony; Arthurs, Owen John; Muthialu, Nagarajan; Calder, Alistair Duncan

    2014-02-01

    Cerebro-costo-mandibular syndrome (CCMS) describes a triad of mandibular hypoplasia, brain dysfunction and posterior rib defects ("rib gaps"). We present the CT imaging for a 2-year-old girl with CCMS that highlights the rib gap defects and shows absent transverse processes with abnormal fusion of the ribs directly to the vertebral bodies. We argue that this is likely to relate to abnormal lateral sclerotome development in embryology, with the failure of normal costo-vertebral junctions compounding impaired thoracic function. The case also highlights the use of CT for specific indications in skeletal dysplasia.

  1. CT enterography with polyethylene glycol solution vs CT enteroclysis in small bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Minordi, L M; Vecchioli, A; Mirk, P; Bonomo, L

    2011-01-01

    Objective The aim of the study is to compare CT enterography with polyethylene glycol solution (PEG-CT) with CT enteroclysis (CT-E) in patients with suspected small bowel disease. Methods 145 patients underwent abdominal contrast-enhanced 16-row multidetector CT after administration of 2000 ml of PEG by mouth (n = 75) or after administration of 2000 ml of methylcellulose by nasojejunal tube (n = 70). Small bowel distension, luminal and extraluminal findings were evaluated and compared with small bowel follow-through examination in 60 patients, double contrast enema in 50, surgery in 25 and endoscopy in 35. Statistical evaluation was carried out by χ2 testing. For both techniques we have also calculated the effective dose and the equivalent dose in a standard patient. Results Crohn's disease was diagnosed in 64 patients, neoplasms in 16, adhesions in 6. Distension of the jejunum was better with CT-E than PEG-CT (p<0.05: statistically significant difference). No significant difference was present for others sites (p>0.05). Evaluation of pathological ileal loops was good with both techniques. The values of sensitivity, specificity and diagnostic accuracy were respectively 94%, 100% and 96% with CT-E, and 93%, 94% and 93% with PEG-CT. The effective dose for PEG-CT was less than the dose for the CT-E (34.7 mSv vs 39.91 mSv). Conclusion PEG-CT shows findings of Crohn's disease as well as CT-E does, although CT-E gives better bowel distension, especially in the jejunum, and has higher specificity than PEG-CT. PMID:20959377

  2. Imaging the pericardium: appearances on ECG-gated 64-detector row cardiac computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    O'Leary, S M; Williams, P L; Williams, M P; Edwards, A J; Roobottom, C A; Morgan-Hughes, G J; Manghat, N E

    2010-01-01

    Multidetector row computed tomography (MDCT) with its high spatial and temporal resolution has now become an established and complementary method for cardiac imaging. It can now be used reliably to exclude significant coronary artery disease and delineate complex coronary artery anomalies, and has become a valuable problem-solving tool. Our experience with MDCT imaging suggests that it is clinically useful for imaging the pericardium. It is important to be aware of the normal anatomy of the pericardium and not mistake normal variations for pathology. The pericardial recesses are visible in up to 44% of non-electrocardiogram (ECG)-gated MDCT images. Abnormalities of the pericardium can now be identified with increasing certainty on 64-detector row CT; they may be the key to diagnosis and therefore must not be overlooked. This educational review of the pericardium will cover different imaging techniques, with a significant emphasis on MDCT. We have a large research and clinical experience of ECG-gated cardiac CT and will demonstrate examples of pericardial recesses, their variations and a wide variety of pericardial abnormalities and systemic conditions affecting the pericardium. We give a brief relevant background of the conditions and reinforce the key imaging features. We aim to provide a pictorial demonstration of the wide variety of abnormalities of the pericardium and the pitfalls in the diagnosis of pericardial disease. PMID:20197434

  3. Multidetector computed tomography for acute pulmonary embolism.

    PubMed

    Stein, Paul D; Fowler, Sarah E; Goodman, Lawrence R; Gottschalk, Alexander; Hales, Charles A; Hull, Russell D; Leeper, Kenneth V; Popovich, John; Quinn, Deborah A; Sos, Thomas A; Sostman, H Dirk; Tapson, Victor F; Wakefield, Thomas W; Weg, John G; Woodard, Pamela K

    2006-06-01

    The accuracy of multidetector computed tomographic angiography (CTA) for the diagnosis of acute pulmonary embolism has not been determined conclusively. The Prospective Investigation of Pulmonary Embolism Diagnosis II trial was a prospective, multicenter investigation of the accuracy of multidetector CTA alone and combined with venous-phase imaging (CTA-CTV) for the diagnosis of acute pulmonary embolism. We used a composite reference test to confirm or rule out the diagnosis of pulmonary embolism. Among 824 patients with a reference diagnosis and a completed CT study, CTA was inconclusive in 51 because of poor image quality. Excluding such inconclusive studies, the sensitivity of CTA was 83 percent and the specificity was 96 percent. Positive predictive values were 96 percent with a concordantly high or low probability on clinical assessment, 92 percent with an intermediate probability on clinical assessment, and nondiagnostic if clinical probability was discordant. CTA-CTV was inconclusive in 87 of 824 patients because the image quality of either CTA or CTV was poor. The sensitivity of CTA-CTV for pulmonary embolism was 90 percent, and specificity was 95 percent. CTA-CTV was also nondiagnostic with a discordant clinical probability. In patients with suspected pulmonary embolism, multidetector CTA-CTV has a higher diagnostic sensitivity than does CTA alone, with similar specificity. The predictive value of either CTA or CTA-CTV is high with a concordant clinical assessment, but additional testing is necessary when the clinical probability is inconsistent with the imaging results. Copyright 2006 Massachusetts Medical Society.

  4. Multidetector computed tomography angiography of the abdomen.

    PubMed

    Güven, Koray; Acunaş, Bülent

    2004-10-01

    Multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) angiography has provided excellent opportunities for advancement of computed tomography (CT) technology and clinical applications. It has a wide range of applications in the abdomen including vascular pathologies either occlusive or aneurysmal; enables the radiologist to produce vascular mapping that clearly show tumor invasion of vasculature and the relationship of vessels to mass lesions. MDCTA can be used in preoperative planning for hepatic resection, preoperative evaluation and planning for liver transplantation. MDCTA can also provide extremely valuable information in the evaluation of ischemic bowel disease, active Crohn disease, the extent and location of collateral vessels in cirrhosis.

  5. Effect of Low Tube Voltage on Image Quality, Radiation Dose, and Low-Contrast Detectability at Abdominal Multidetector CT: Phantom Study

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Kun; Wang, Ling; Li, Rui; Lin, Jie; Zheng, Xiangwu; Cao, Guoquan

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. To investigate the effect of low tube voltage (80 kV) on image quality, radiation dose, and low-contrast detectability (LCD) at abdominal computed tomography (CT). Materials and Methods. A phantom containing low-contrast objects was scanned with a CT scanner at 80 and 120 kV, with tube current-time product settings at 150–650 mAs. The differences between image noise, contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), and scores of LCD obtained with 80 kV at 150–650 mAs and those obtained with 120 kV at 300 mAs were compared respectively. Results. The image noise substantially increased with low tube voltage. However, with identical dose, use of 80 kV resulted in higher CNR compared with CNR at 120 kV. There were no statistically significant difference in CNR and scores of LCD between 120 kV at 300 mAs and 80 kV at 550–650 mAs (P > 0.05). The relative dose delivered at 80 kV ranged from 58% at 550 mAs to 68% at 650 mAs. Conclusion. With a reduction of the tube voltage from 120 kV to 80 kV at abdominal CT, the radiation dose can be reduced by 32% to 42% without degradation of CNR and LCD. PMID:22619490

  6. Multiphase contrast-saline mixture injection with dual-flow in 64-row MDCT coronary CTA.

    PubMed

    Cao, Lizhen; Du, Xiangying; Li, Pengyu; Liu, Yaou; Li, Kuncheng

    2009-03-01

    To explore the feasibility of multiphase contrast-saline mixture with dual-flow injection technique for visualization of right ventricular (RV) cavity and interventricular septum (IVS) in 64-row multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) coronary angiography. Twenty-four patients underwent coronary CT angiography (CTA) imaging with 64-row MDCT. In twelve patients (group A), 60 ml contrast medium (CM) bolus was followed by 40 ml saline, and in the other twelve patients (group B), 50 ml CM bolus was followed by 50 ml contrast-saline mixture at 60:40 ratio. The CM, saline and contrast-saline mixture flow rate were all 5.0 ml/s. Two experienced radiologists measured the CT values of ascending aorta, descending aorta, pulmonary artery and RV, rated the uniformity of RV cavity, the visualization of coronary arteries and IVS independently. By Kappa test, agreement between the two radiologists was 0.93 and 0.86 concerning the CT value measurements and the grades of the three indexes, respectively. By t-test, the mean CT values of ascending aorta and descending aorta of the two groups had no statistical difference (t=1.459, P>0.05; t=1.619, P>0.05); while the mean CT values of pulmonary artery and RV cavity had statistical differences (t=8.316, P<0.05; t=10.372, P<0.05). By two-related rank sum test, according to the visualization of coronary arteries and the uniformity of RV cavity, there were no statistical differences (U=66.00, P>0.05; U=54.00, P>0.05); while according to the visualization of IVS, group B was better than group A (U=8.00, P<0.05). In coronary CTA, a contrast-saline mixture after CM bolus can provide clear visualization of RV and IVS and LV without impairing coronary CTA image.

  7. Dual-energy multidetector CT: how does it work, what can it tell us, and when can we use it in abdominopelvic imaging?

    PubMed

    Coursey, Courtney A; Nelson, Rendon C; Boll, Daniel T; Paulson, Erik K; Ho, Lisa M; Neville, Amy M; Marin, Daniele; Gupta, Rajan T; Schindera, Sebastian T

    2010-01-01

    Dual-energy CT provides information about how substances behave at different energies, the ability to generate virtual unenhanced datasets, and improved detection of iodine-containing substances on low-energy images. Knowing how a substance behaves at two different energies can provide information about tissue composition beyond that obtainable with single-energy techniques. The term K edge refers to the spike in attenuation that occurs at energy levels just greater than that of the K-shell binding because of the increased photoelectric absorption at these energy levels. K-edge values vary for each element, and they increase as the atomic number increases. The energy dependence of the photoelectric effect and the variability of K edges form the basis of dual-energy techniques, which may be used to detect substances such as iodine, calcium, and uric acid crystals. The closer the energy level used in imaging is to the K edge of a substance such as iodine, the more the substance attenuates. In the abdomen and pelvis, dual-energy CT may be used in the liver to increase conspicuity of hypervascular lesions; in the kidneys, to distinguish hyperattenuating cysts from enhancing renal masses and to characterize renal stone composition; in the adrenal glands, to characterize adrenal nodules; and in the pancreas, to differentiate between normal and abnormal parenchyma.

  8. The effect of z overscanning on radiation burden of pediatric patients undergoing head CT with multidetector scanners: A Monte Carlo study

    SciTech Connect

    Tzedakis, Antonis; Perisinakis, Kostas; Raissaki, Maria; Damilakis, John

    2006-07-15

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of z overscanning on eye lens dose and effective dose received by pediatric patients undergoing head CT examinations. A pediatric patient study was carried out to obtain the exposure parameters and data regarding the eye lens position with respect to imaged volume boundaries. This information was used to simulate CT exposures by Monte Carlo code. The Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP, version 4C2) radiation transport code and five mathematical anthropomorphic phantoms representing newborn, 1-, 5-, 10-, and 15-year-old patient, were employed in the current study. To estimate effective dose, the weighted computed tomography dose index was calculated by cylindrical polymethyl-methacrylate phantoms of 9.7, 13.1, 15.4, 16.1, and 16.9 cm in diameter representing the pediatric head of newborn, 1-, 5-, 10-, and 15-year-old individuals, respectively. The validity of the Monte Carlo calculated approach was verified by comparison with dose data obtained using physical pediatric anthropomorphic phantoms and thermoluminescence dosimetry. For all patients studied, the eye lenses were located in the region -1 to 3 cm from the first slice of the imaged volume. Doses from axial scans were always lower than those from corresponding helical examinations. The percentage differences in normalized eye lens absorbed dose between contiguous axial and helical examinations with pitch=1 were found to be up to 10.9%, when the eye lenses were located inside the region to be imaged. When the eye lenses were positioned 0-3 cm far from the first slice of region to be imaged, the normalized dose to the lens from contiguous axial examinations was up to 11 times lower than the corresponding values from helical mode with pitch=1. The effective dose from axial examinations was up to 24% lower than corresponding values from helical examinations with pitch=1. In conclusion, it is more dose efficient to use axial mode acquisition rather than helical scan

  9. Diagnostic performance of combined noninvasive coronary angiography and myocardial perfusion imaging using 320 row detector computed tomography: design and implementation of the CORE320 multicenter, multinational diagnostic study.

    PubMed

    Vavere, Andrea L; Simon, Gregory G; George, Richard T; Rochitte, Carlos E; Arai, Andrew E; Miller, Julie M; Di Carli, Marcello; Arbab-Zadeh, Armin; Zadeh, Armin A; Dewey, Marc; Niinuma, Hiroyuki; Laham, Roger; Rybicki, Frank J; Schuijf, Joanne D; Paul, Narinder; Hoe, John; Kuribyashi, Sachio; Sakuma, Hajime; Nomura, Cesar; Yaw, Tan Swee; Kofoed, Klaus F; Yoshioka, Kunihiro; Clouse, Melvin E; Brinker, Jeffrey; Cox, Christopher; Lima, Joao A C

    2011-01-01

    Multidetector coronary computed tomography angiography (CTA) is a promising modality for widespread clinical application because of its noninvasive nature and high diagnostic accuracy as found in previous studies using 64 to 320 simultaneous detector rows. It is, however, limited in its ability to detect myocardial ischemia. In this article, we describe the design of the CORE320 study ("Combined coronary atherosclerosis and myocardial perfusion evaluation using 320 detector row computed tomography"). This prospective, multicenter, multinational study is unique in that it is designed to assess the diagnostic performance of combined 320-row CTA and myocardial CT perfusion imaging (CTP) in comparison with the combination of invasive coronary angiography and single-photon emission computed tomography myocardial perfusion imaging (SPECT-MPI). The trial is being performed at 16 medical centers located in 8 countries worldwide. CT has the potential to assess both anatomy and physiology in a single imaging session. The co-primary aim of the CORE320 study is to define the per-patient diagnostic accuracy of the combination of coronary CTA and myocardial CTP to detect physiologically significant coronary artery disease compared with (1) the combination of conventional coronary angiography and SPECT-MPI and (2) conventional coronary angiography alone. If successful, the technology could revolutionize the management of patients with symptomatic CAD.

  10. Imaging the Parasinus Region with a Third-Generation Dual-Source CT and the Effect of Tin Filtration on Image Quality and Radiation Dose.

    PubMed

    Lell, M M; May, M S; Brand, M; Eller, A; Buder, T; Hofmann, E; Uder, M; Wuest, W

    2015-07-01

    CT is the imaging technique of choice in the evaluation of midface trauma or inflammatory disease. We performed a systematic evaluation of scan protocols to optimize image quality and radiation exposure on third-generation dual-source CT. CT protocols with different tube voltage (70-150 kV), current (25-300 reference mAs), prefiltration, pitch value, and rotation time were systematically evaluated. All images were reconstructed with iterative reconstruction (Advanced Modeled Iterative Reconstruction, level 2). To individually compare results with otherwise identical factors, we obtained all scans on a frozen human head. Conebeam CT was performed for image quality and dose comparison with multidetector row CT. Delineation of important anatomic structures and incidental pathologic conditions in the cadaver head was evaluated. One hundred kilovolts with tin prefiltration demonstrated the best compromise between dose and image quality. The most dose-effective combination for trauma imaging was Sn100 kV/250 mAs (volume CT dose index, 2.02 mGy), and for preoperative sinus surgery planning, Sn100 kV/150 mAs (volume CT dose index, 1.22 mGy). "Sn" indicates an additional prefiltration of the x-ray beam with a tin filter to constrict the energy spectrum. Exclusion of sinonasal disease was possible with even a lower dose by using Sn100 kV/25 mAs (volume CT dose index, 0.2 mGy). High image quality at very low dose levels can be achieved by using a Sn100-kV protocol with iterative reconstruction. The effective dose is comparable with that of conventional radiography, and the high image quality at even lower radiation exposure favors multidetector row CT over conebeam CT. © 2015 by American Journal of Neuroradiology.

  11. Multidetector CT of hepatic artery pathologies.

    PubMed

    Karaosmanoglu, D; Erol, B; Karcaaltincaba, M

    2012-01-01

    The hepatic artery can be involved by a variety of pathology and diseases.Today MDCT enables high quality imaging of the hepatic artery using axial, MIP and volume rendered images. We illustrate MDCT findings of anatomical variations, aneurysm, dilatation, dissection, arteriovenous fistula, thrombosis and stenosis. Aneurysms can be saccular, fusiform and multiple and may develop due to atherosclerosis, vasculitis, trauma and biopsy. Dilatation of hepatic artery can be seen in portal hypertension, Osler-Weber-Rendu disease and hemangiomatosis. Hepatic artery can be occluded after trauma and transplantation. Dissection develops due to atherosclerosis, Marfan and Ehler Danlos syndromes and during pregnancy. Arteriovenous fistula can be congenital and acquired. We conclude that various hepatic artery pathologies can be confidently diagnosed by MDCT.

  12. Cardiac Computed Tomography (Multidetector CT, or MDCT)

    MedlinePlus

    ... a Heart Attack Treatment of a Heart Attack Life After a Heart Attack Heart Failure About Heart Failure ... Non-invasive - Invasive • Treatment of a Heart Attack • Life After a Heart Attack • Heart Attack Tools & Resources • Support ...

  13. Follow-up of multicentric HCC according to the mRECIST criteria: role of 320-Row CT with semi-automatic 3D analysis software for evaluating the response to systemic therapy

    PubMed Central

    TELEGRAFO, M.; DILORENZO, G.; DI GIOVANNI, G.; CORNACCHIA, I.; STABILE IANORA, A.A.; ANGELELLI, G.; MOSCHETTA, M.

    2016-01-01

    Aim To evaluate the role of 320-detector row computed tomography (MDCT) with 3D analysis software in follow up of patients affected by multicentric hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) treated with systemic therapy by using modified response evaluation criteria in solid tumors (mRECIST). Patients and methods 38 patients affected by multicentric HCC underwent MDCT. All exams were performed before and after iodinate contrast material intravenous injection by using a 320-detection row CT device. CT images were analyzed by two radiologists using multi-planar reconstructions (MPR) in order to assess the response to systemic therapy according to mRECIST criteria: complete response (CR), partial response (PR), progressive disease (PD), stable disease (SD). 30 days later, the same two radiologists evaluated target lesion response to systemic therapy according to mRECIST criteria by using 3D analysis software. The difference between the two systems in assessing HCC response to therapy was assessed by the analysis of the variance (Anova Test). Interobserver agreement between the two radiologists by using MPR images and 3D analysis software was calculated by using Cohen’s Kappa test. Results PR occurred in 10/38 cases (26%), PD in 6/38 (16%), SD in 22/38 (58%). Anova Test showed no statistically significant difference between the two systems for assessing target lesion response to therapy (p >0.05). Inter-observer agreement (k) was respectively of 0.62 for MPR images measurements and 0.86 for 3D analysis ones. Conclusions 3D Analysis software provides a semiautomatic system for assessing target lesion response to therapy according to mRE-CIST criteria in patient affected by multifocal HCC treated with systemic therapy. The reliability of 3D analysis software makes it useful in the clinical practice. PMID:28098056

  14. Detection of hepatocellular carcinoma by Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced liver MRI: comparison with triple phase 64 detector row helical CT.

    PubMed

    Akai, Hiroyuki; Kiryu, Shigeru; Matsuda, Izuru; Satou, Jirou; Takao, Hidemasa; Tajima, Taku; Watanabe, Yasushi; Imamura, Hiroshi; Kokudo, Norihiro; Akahane, Masaaki; Ohtomo, Kuni

    2011-11-01

    To compare the diagnostic performance of Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced MRI with that of triple phase 64-MDCT in the detection of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Thirty-four patients with 52 surgically proven lesions underwent Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced MRI and triple phase 64-MDCT. Two observers independently evaluated MR and CT imaging on a lesion-by-lesion basis. Sensitivity, positive and negative predictive values and reproducibility were evaluated. The diagnostic accuracy of each modality was assessed with alternative-free response receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis. Both observers showed higher sensitivity in detecting lesions with MRI compared to CT, however, only the difference between the two imaging techniques for observer 2 was significant (P=0.034). For lesions 1cm or smaller, MRI and CT showed equal sensitivity (both 62.5%) with one observer, and MRI proved superior to CT with the other observer (MRI 75% vs. CT 56.3%), but the latter difference was not significant (P=0.083). The difference in positive and negative predictive value between the two imaging techniques for each observer was not significant (P>0.05). The areas under the ROC curve for each observer were 0.843 and 0.861 for MRI vs. 0.800 and 0.833 for CT and the differences were not significant. Reproducibility was higher using MRI for both observers, but the result was not significant (MRI 32/33 vs. CT 29/33, P=0.083). Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced MRI tended to show higher diagnostic accuracy, sensitivity and reproducibility compared to triple phase 64-MDCT in the detection of hepatocellular carcinoma, however statistical significance was not achieved. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Asbestos Surveillance Program Aachen (ASPA): initial results from baseline screening for lung cancer in asbestos-exposed high-risk individuals using low-dose multidetector-row CT.

    PubMed

    Das, Marco; Mühlenbruch, Georg; Mahnken, Andreas H; Hering, K G; Sirbu, H; Zschiesche, W; Knoll, Lars; Felten, Michael K; Kraus, Thomas; Günther, Rolf W; Wildberger, Joachim E

    2007-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the prevalence of lung cancer in a high-risk asbestos-exposed cohort using low-dose MDCT. Of a population of 5,389 former power-plant workers, 316 were characterized as individuals at highest risk for lung cancer according to a lung-cancer risk model including age, asbestos exposure and smoking habits. Of these 316, 187 (mean age: 66.6 years) individuals were included in a prospective trial. Mean asbestos exposure time was 29.65 years and 89% were smokers. Screening was performed on a 16-slice MDCT (Siemens) with low-dose technique (10/20 mAs(eff.); 1 mm/0.5 mm increment). In addition to soft copy PACS reading analysis on a workstation with a dedicated lung analysis software (LungCARE; Siemens) was performed. One strongly suspicious mass and eight cases of histologically proven lung cancer were found plus 491 additional pulmonary nodules (average volume: 40.72 ml, average diameter 4.62 mm). Asbestos-related changes (pleural plaques, fibrosis) were visible in 80 individuals. Lung cancer screening in this high-risk cohort showed a prevalence of lung cancer of 4.28% (8/187) at baseline screening with an additional large number of indeterminate pulmonary nodules. Low-dose MDCT proved to be feasible in this highly selected population.

  16. Precision of dosimetry-related measurements obtained on current multidetector computed tomography scanners

    SciTech Connect

    Mathieu, Kelsey B.; McNitt-Gray, Michael F.; Zhang, Di; Kim, Hyun J.; Cody, Dianna D.

    2010-08-15

    Purpose: Computed tomography (CT) intrascanner and interscanner variability has not been well characterized. Thus, the purpose of this study was to examine the within-run, between-run, and between-scanner precision of physical dosimetry-related measurements collected over the course of 1 yr on three different makes and models of multidetector row CT (MDCT) scanners. Methods: Physical measurements were collected using nine CT scanners (three scanners each of GE VCT, GE LightSpeed 16, and Siemens Sensation 64 CT). Measurements were made using various combinations of technical factors, including kVp, type of bowtie filter, and x-ray beam collimation, for several dosimetry-related quantities, including (a) free-in-air CT dose index (CTDI{sub 100,air}); (b) calculated half-value layers and quarter-value layers; and (c) weighted CT dose index (CTDI{sub w}) calculated from exposure measurements collected in both a 16 and 32 cm diameter CTDI phantom. Data collection was repeated at several different time intervals, ranging from seconds (for CTDI{sub 100,air} values) to weekly for 3 weeks and then quarterly or triannually for 1 yr. Precision of the data was quantified by the percent coefficient of variation (%CV). Results: The maximum relative precision error (maximum %CV value) across all dosimetry metrics, time periods, and scanners included in this study was 4.33%. The median observed %CV values for CTDI{sub 100,air} ranged from 0.05% to 0.19% over several seconds, 0.12%-0.52% over 1 week, and 0.58%-2.31% over 3-4 months. For CTDI{sub w} for a 16 and 32 cm CTDI phantom, respectively, the range of median %CVs was 0.38%-1.14% and 0.62%-1.23% in data gathered weekly for 3 weeks and 1.32%-2.79% and 0.84%-2.47% in data gathered quarterly or triannually for 1 yr. Conclusions: From a dosimetry perspective, the MDCT scanners tested in this study demonstrated a high degree of within-run, between-run, and between-scanner precision (with relative precision errors typically well

  17. Usefulness of multidetector spiral computed tomography according to age and gender for diagnosis of acute pulmonary embolism.

    PubMed

    Stein, Paul D; Beemath, Afzal; Quinn, Deborah A; Olson, Ronald E; Goodman, Lawrence R; Gottschalk, Alexander; Hales, Charles A; Hull, Russell D; Leeper, Kenneth V; Sostman, H Dirk; Weg, John G; Woodard, Pamela K

    2007-05-01

    Data from the Prospective Investigation of Pulmonary Embolism Diagnosis II (PIOPED II) were evaluated to test the hypothesis that the performance of multidetector computed tomographic (CT) pulmonary angiography and CT venography is independent of a patient's age and gender. In 773 patients with adequate CT pulmonary angiography and 737 patients with adequate CT pulmonary angiography and CT venography, the sensitivity and specificity for pulmonary embolism for groups of patients aged 18 to 59, 60 to 79, and 80 to 99 years did not differ to a statistically significant extent, nor were there significant differences according to gender. Overall, however, the specificity of CT pulmonary angiography was somewhat greater in women, but in men and women, it was > or =93%. In conclusion, the results indicate that multidetector CT pulmonary angiography and CT pulmonary angiography and CT venography may be used with various diagnostic strategies in adults of all ages and both genders.

  18. Row fault detection system

    DOEpatents

    Archer, Charles Jens; Pinnow, Kurt Walter; Ratterman, Joseph D.; Smith, Brian Edward

    2010-02-23

    An apparatus and program product check for nodal faults in a row of nodes by causing each node in the row to concurrently communicate with its adjacent neighbor nodes in the row. The communications are analyzed to determine a presence of a faulty node or connection.

  19. Row fault detection system

    DOEpatents

    Archer, Charles Jens; Pinnow, Kurt Walter; Ratterman, Joseph D.; Smith, Brian Edward

    2008-10-14

    An apparatus, program product and method checks for nodal faults in a row of nodes by causing each node in the row to concurrently communicate with its adjacent neighbor nodes in the row. The communications are analyzed to determine a presence of a faulty node or connection.

  20. Designing ROW Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freed, Alan D.

    1996-01-01

    There are many aspects to consider when designing a Rosenbrock-Wanner-Wolfbrandt (ROW) method for the numerical integration of ordinary differential equations (ODE's) solving initial value problems (IVP's). The process can be simplified by constructing ROW methods around good Runge-Kutta (RK) methods. The formulation of a new, simple, embedded, third-order, ROW method demonstrates this design approach.

  1. Row fault detection system

    DOEpatents

    Archer, Charles Jens [Rochester, MN; Pinnow, Kurt Walter [Rochester, MN; Ratterman, Joseph D [Rochester, MN; Smith, Brian Edward [Rochester, MN

    2012-02-07

    An apparatus, program product and method check for nodal faults in a row of nodes by causing each node in the row to concurrently communicate with its adjacent neighbor nodes in the row. The communications are analyzed to determine a presence of a faulty node or connection.

  2. The role of multidetector CT in the evaluation of the left atrium and pulmonary veins anatomy before and after radio-frequency catheter ablation for atrial fibrillation. Preliminary results and work in progress. Technical note.

    PubMed

    Centonze, Maurizio; Del Greco, Maurizio; Nollo, Giandomenico; Ravelli, Flavia; Marini, Massimiliano; Della Sala, Sabino Walter; Dalla Palma, Francesco

    2005-01-01

    Radio-frequency catheter ablation (RFCA) of the distal pulmonary veins is increasingly being used to treat recurrent or refractory atrial fibrillation that doesn't respond to pharmacologic therapy or cardioversion. Successful RFCA of atrial fibrillation depends on the pre-procedural understanding of the complex anatomy of the distal pulmonary veins and the left atrium. Aim of this paper is to describe the technical main features that characterise the multidetector helical computed tomography in the evaluation of this anatomic region before and after RFCA procedure. The 3D post-processing techniques useful for pre-RFCA planning are straightforward.

  3. Electrocardiographically gated 16-section CT of the thorax: cardiac motion suppression.

    PubMed

    Hofmann, Lars K; Zou, Kelly H; Costello, Philip; Schoepf, U Joseph

    2004-12-01

    Thirty patients underwent 16-section multi-detector row computed tomographic (CT) angiography of the thorax with retrospective electrocardiographic gating. Institutional review board approval was obtained for retrospective analysis of CT scan data and records; patient informed consent was not required. Images reconstructed at six different time points (0%, 20%, 40%, 50%, 60%, 80%) within the R-R interval on the electrocardiogram were analyzed by two radiologists for diagnostic quality, to identify suitable reconstruction intervals for optimal suppression of cardiac motion. Five regions of interest (left coronary artery, aortic root, ascending and descending aorta, pulmonary arteries) were evaluated. Best image quality was achieved by referencing image reconstruction to middiastole (50%-60%) for the left coronary artery, aortic root, and ascending aorta. The pulmonary arteries are best displayed during mid- to late diastole (80%). (c) RSNA, 2004

  4. Dipyridamole stress and rest transmural myocardial perfusion ratio evaluation by 64 detector-row computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Cury, Roberto C; Magalhães, Tiago A; Paladino, Antonio T; Shiozaki, Afonso A; Perini, Marcela; Senra, Tiago; Lemos, Pedro A; Cury, Ricardo C; Rochitte, Carlos E

    2011-01-01

    Myocardial stress CT perfusion (CTP) can detect myocardial ischemia. We evaluated the transmural perfusion ratio (TPR) of dipyridamole stress CTP to detect significant coronary stenosis (>70%) defined by quantitative invasive coronary angiography (ICA). Twenty-six patients (61.6 ± 8.0 years old; 14 males), without prior myocardial infarction, with positive single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT; <2 months) and clinical indication for ICA, underwent a customized multidetector-row CT (MDCT) protocol with rest/stress myocardial perfusion evaluation and coronary CT angiography. TPR was defined as mean subendocardial divided by mean subepicardial attenuation and quantified on rest and stress MDCT images. Abnormal TPR was defined as 2 SDs below the mean rest TPR. All 26 patients completed the CT protocol with no adverse events. Rest TPR was measured in all patients with a mean of 1.06 ± 0.11, and abnormal TPR was considered <0.85. For 6 patients with normal coronary arteries by ICA, the mean TPR of territories with a previous positive perfusion defect in SPECT was 1.02 ± 0.18 (95% CI, 0.86-1.18; n = 6), and mean TPR of territories without perfusion defect in SPECT was 1.03 ± 0.09 (95% CI, -0.95 to 1.11; n = 12; P = 0.83). Mean stress TPR in territories with positive SPECT and significant coronary artery disease by quantitative ICA was 0.71 ± 0.13 (95% CI, -0.64 to 0.77) and in the remote myocardial was 1.01 ± 0.09 (95% CI, -0.96 to 1.06; P < 0001). In these territories, a significant Pearson's correlation was observed (r = -0.74, P < 0.001). TPR has a good correlation with SPECT and ICA to detect significant coronary stenosis. Copyright © 2011 Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. INTERIOR SECOND FLOOR EAST END LOOKING WEST AT NORTH ROW ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR SECOND FLOOR- EAST END LOOKING WEST AT NORTH ROW OF MUSHROOM COLUMNS. - Colt Fire Arms Company, South Armory Building, 36-150 Huyshope Avenue, 17-170 Van Dyke Avenue, 49 Vredendale Avenue, Hartford, Hartford County, CT

  6. INTERIOR, SOUTH PART, CAMERA FACING SOUTHWEST. DOUBLE ROW OF CENTER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR, SOUTH PART, CAMERA FACING SOUTHWEST. DOUBLE ROW OF CENTER COLUMNS REFLECTS SOUTH PART'S RE-USE OF ANOTHER BUILDING'S STRUCTURAL FRAME. - New Haven Rail Yard, Work Equipment Shop, Vicinity of Cedar & Lamberton Streets, New Haven, New Haven County, CT

  7. 4. VIEW NORTHWEST, INTERIOR OF GATEHOUSE, SHOWING ROW OF GATE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. VIEW NORTHWEST, INTERIOR OF GATEHOUSE, SHOWING ROW OF GATE OPERATING MECHANISMS; HEIGHT OF STEMS INDICATES FOREGROUND GATE IS OPEN - Norwich Water Power Company, Headgates, West bank of Shetucket River opposite Fourteenth Street, Greenville section, Norwich, New London County, CT

  8. Quantification of coronary flow using dynamic angiography with 320-detector row CT and motion coherence image processing: Detection of ischemia for intermediate coronary stenosis.

    PubMed

    Nagao, Michinobu; Yamasaki, Yuzo; Kamitani, Takeshi; Kawanami, Satoshi; Sagiyama, Koji; Yamanouchi, Torahiko; Shimomiya, Yamato; Matoba, Tetsuya; Mukai, Yasushi; Odashiro, Keita; Baba, Shingo; Maruoka, Yasuhiro; Kitamura, Yoshiyuki; Nishie, Akihiro; Honda, Hiroshi

    2016-05-01

    Anatomical coronary stenosis is not always indicative of functional stenosis, particularly for intermediate coronary lesions. The purpose of this study is to propose a new method for quantifying coronary flow using dynamic CT angiography for the whole heart (heart-DCT) and investigate its ability for detecting ischemia from intermediate coronary stenosis. Participants comprised 36 patients with coronary artery disease who underwent heart-DCT using 320-detector CT with tube voltage of 80kV and myocardial perfusion scintigraphy (MPS). Heart-DCT was continuously performed at mid-diastole throughout 15-25 cardiac cycles with prospective ECG-gating after bolus injection of contrast media (12-24ml). Dynamic datasets were computed into 90-100 data sets by motion coherence image processing (MCIP). Next, time-density curves (TDCs) for coronary arteries with a diameter >3mm were automatically calculated for all phases using MCIP. On the basis of the maximum slope method, coronary flow index (CFI) was defined as the ratio of the maximum upslope of coronary artery attenuation to the upslope of ascending aorta attenuation on the TDC, and was used to quantify coronary flow. CFIs for the proximal and distal sites of coronary arteries with mild-to-moderate stenosis were calculated. Coronary territories were categorized as non-ischemic or ischemic by MPS. Receiver-operating-characteristic (ROC) analysis was performed to determine the optimal cutoff for CFI to detect ischemia. Distal CFI was significantly lower for ischemia (0.26±0.08) than for non-ischemia (0.50±0.17, p<0.0001). No significant difference in proximal CFI was seen between ischemia (0.55±0.23) and non-ischemia (0.62±0.24). ROC analysis revealed 0.39 as the optimal cutoff for distal CFI to detect ischemia, with C-statistics of 0.91, 100% sensitivity, and 75% specificity. This novel imaging technique allows coronary flow quantification using heart-DCT. Distal CFI can detect myocardial ischemia derived from

  9. The Impact of Different Levels of Adaptive Iterative Dose Reduction 3D on Image Quality of 320-Row Coronary CT Angiography: A Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Feger, Sarah; Rief, Matthias; Zimmermann, Elke; Martus, Peter; Schuijf, Joanne Désirée; Blobel, Jörg; Richter, Felicitas; Dewey, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was the systematic image quality evaluation of coronary CT angiography (CTA), reconstructed with the 3 different levels of adaptive iterative dose reduction (AIDR 3D) and compared to filtered back projection (FBP) with quantum denoising software (QDS). Methods Standard-dose CTA raw data of 30 patients with mean radiation dose of 3.2 ± 2.6 mSv were reconstructed using AIDR 3D mild, standard, strong and compared to FBP/QDS. Objective image quality comparison (signal, noise, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), contour sharpness) was performed using 21 measurement points per patient, including measurements in each coronary artery from proximal to distal. Results Objective image quality parameters improved with increasing levels of AIDR 3D. Noise was lowest in AIDR 3D strong (p≤0.001 at 20/21 measurement points; compared with FBP/QDS). Signal and contour sharpness analysis showed no significant difference between the reconstruction algorithms for most measurement points. Best coronary SNR and CNR were achieved with AIDR 3D strong. No loss of SNR or CNR in distal segments was seen with AIDR 3D as compared to FBP. Conclusions On standard-dose coronary CTA images, AIDR 3D strong showed higher objective image quality than FBP/QDS without reducing contour sharpness. Trial Registration Clinicaltrials.gov NCT00967876 PMID:25945924

  10. Biomechanics of Rowing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hase, Kazunori; Kaya, Motoshi; Yamazaki, Nobutoshi; Andrews, Brian J.; Zavatsky, Amy B.; Halliday, Suzanne E.

    Compared with the other exercise, such as walking and cycling, rowing was expected to have some fitness advantage, while there were some misgivings about the risk of injury. The objectives of this study were to quantify biomechanical characteristics of rowing for fitness and rehabilitation and to offer normative data for the prevention of injury and for determining effective exercise. An experiment was performed to collect the kinematic and kinetic data during rowing by experienced and non-experienced subjects. A three-dimensional whole-body musculo-skeletal model was used to calculate the biomechanical loads, such as the joint moments, the muscular tensions, the joint contact forces and the energy consumption. The results of this study indicate that rowing is an effective exercise for rehabilitation and fitness. However, the non-experienced rower should acquire considerable skill to obtain sufficient exercise. The rowing cadence should be decided according to the purpose of the exercise.

  11. 32. TYPICAL BRYANT ITEMS FROM THE 1930S; TOP ROW LEFT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    32. TYPICAL BRYANT ITEMS FROM THE 1930S; TOP ROW LEFT TO RIGHT: PORCELAIN CASED SWITCH, ROTARY SWITCH, SHORTING PLUG TO BYPASS FUSE; SECOND ROW: BRASS INCANDESCENT LAMP SURFACE RECEPTACLE, INCANDESCENT LAMPHOLDER WITH ADAPTER FOR GLASS GLOBE; THIRD ROW: PORCELAIN BASE ROTARY SWITCH, APPLIANCE BREAKER WITH COVER REMOVED, APPLIANCE BREAKER - Bryant Electric Company, 1421 State Street, Bridgeport, Fairfield County, CT

  12. Suicide on Death Row.

    PubMed

    Tartaro, Christine; Lester, David

    2016-11-01

    Despite the level of supervision of inmates on death row, their suicide rate is higher than both the male prison population in the United States and the population of males over the age of 14 in free society. This study presents suicide data for death row inmates from 1978 through 2010. For the years 1978 through 2010, suicide rates on death row were higher than that for the general population of males over the age of 15 and for state prisons for all but 2 years.

  13. Quadricuspid pulmonary valve in an adult patient identified by transthoracic echocardiography and multi-detector computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Jung, Soo-Yeon

    2015-01-01

    Quadricuspid pulmonary valve is a rare congenital heart disease. It is infrequently associated with significant clinical complications and tends to be clinically silent. Because of its benign nature, it has been diagnosed mainly post mortem. Its diagnosis by transthoracic echocardiography is very difficult because of the anatomical features. We describe a case of quadricuspid pulmonary valve diagnosed by transthoracic echocardiography and electrocardiography-gated multi-detector row computed tomography.

  14. Physics of rowing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boucher, Jean-Philippe; Labbe, Romain; Mouterde, Timothee; Clanet, Christophe

    2016-11-01

    Synchronization in rowing seems like a crucial condition for those who aim at winning top-level rowing races. However, in nature, one can observe animals with many legs, such as krill, swimming in a desynchronized manner which is nearly metachronal. From a physicist point of view, rowing by following a metachronal wave also seems like a great idea because, at high Reynolds number, the metachronal gait has one big advantage over the synchronized gait: it reduces the fluctuations of speed and thus the drag on the body. In this experimental study, we have built a scale model of a rowing boat to deal with the question of the effect of synchronization on the boat performance.

  15. Mechanical efficiency in rowing.

    PubMed

    Fukunaga, T; Matsuo, A; Yamamoto, K; Asami, T

    1986-01-01

    Five university oarsmen participated in a determination of mechanical efficiency when rowing in a tank. In the tank, water was circulated at 3 m X s-1 by a motor driven pump. The subjects rowed with the stepwise incremental loading, in which the intensity increased by 10% of the maximum force of rowing (maxFc) every 2 min. Power (WO) was calculated from the force applied to the oarlock pin (FC) and its angular displacement (theta H). Oxygen uptake and heart rate were measured every 30 s during rowing. Anaerobic threshold (AT) was determined from expired gas variables by Wasserman's method. AT of oarsmen was 74.6 +/- 6.01% as a percentage of VO2max. As the displacement of the handgrip in the stroke was independent of WO, the increment of WO was caused by the increase of both FC and stroke frequency. Gross efficiency without base-line correction (GE) increased with FC with low intensities of rowing. In the region of 124-182 W of WO GE was almost constant at 17.5%. Efficiency was 19.8 +/- 1.4%, with resting metabolism as base-line correction (net efficiency), and 27.5 +/- 2.9% when using the unloaded rowing as the base-line correction (work efficiency), and 22.8 +/- 2.2% when calculating the work rate as the base-line correction (delta efficiency).

  16. Analysis of the topological properties of the proximal femur on a regional scale: evaluation of multi-detector CT-scans for the assessment of biomechanical strength using local Minkowski functionals in 3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boehm, H. F.; Link, T. M.; Monetti, R. A.; Kuhn, V.; Eckstein, F.; Raeth, C. W.; Reiser, M.

    2006-03-01

    In our recent studies on the analysis of bone texture in the context of Osteoporosis, we could already demonstrate the great potential of the topological evaluation of bone architecture based on the Minkowski Functionals (MF) in 2D and 3D for the prediction of the mechanical strength of cubic bone specimens depicted by high resolution MRI. Other than before, we now assess the mechanical characteristics of whole hip bone specimens imaged by multi-detector computed tomography. Due to the specific properties of the imaging modality and the bone tissue in the proximal femur, this requires to introduce a new analysis method. The internal architecture of the hip is functionally highly specialized to withstand the complex pattern of external and internal forces associated with human gait. Since the direction, connectivity and distribution of the trabeculae changes considerably within narrow spatial limits it seems most reasonable to evaluate the femoral bone structure on a local scale. The Minkowski functionals are a set of morphological descriptors for the topological characterization of binarized, multi-dimensional, convex objects with respect to shape, structure, and the connectivity of their components. The MF are usually used as global descriptors and may react very sensitively to minor structural variations which presents a major limitation in a number of applications. The objective of this work is to assess the mechanical competence of whole hip bone specimens using parameters based on the MF. We introduce an algorithm that considers the local topological aspects of the bone architecture of the proximal femur allowing to identify regions within the bone that contribute more to the overall mechanical strength than others.

  17. [Exclusion of coronary artery disease using cardiac CT. What impact do CT results have on patient management?].

    PubMed

    Kadalie, Clemens Themba; Sternitzky, Reinhardt

    2011-05-01

    Rapid advancement of multidetector head computed tomography (MDCT) during the past 10 years has facilitated noninvasive evaluation of CAD (coronary artery disease). Since the introduction of 320-row technology, examination of the whole heart in a single heart beat with diagnostic quality has become feasible. Direct imaging of vessel morphology, a high sensitivity for CAD above 96%, and low requirements of patient compliance represent advantages over other imaging modalities, such as MRI (magnetic resonance imaging), scintigraphy, and echocardiography. In some cases radiation exposure can be reduced to an effective dose below 1 mSV.Current data suggest that cardiac CT represents a more effective diagnostic tool than treadmill testing in order to decide whether cardiac catheterization is indicated. Treadmill testing has been an integral procedure of cardiac examinations for decades, although sensitivity for detecting CAD is as low as 70%.Cardiac CT represents a rather new modality and is almost exclusively performed in diagnostic imaging centers. Innovative concepts in the evaluation of CAD including CT are expected. Some authors propose cardiac CT as a major diagnostic tool for the exclusion of CAD. MRI, scintigraphy, or echocardiography in combination with a stress test remain important procedures in order to evaluate the hemodynamic relevance of coronary artery stenosis. Treadmill testing prior to cardiac CT has become questionable.The future role of cardiac CT in CAD in "change of management" concepts is promising. In order to optimize decisions of patient management on the basis of a cardiac CT examinations, awareness of current data is mandatory for the referring clinician and the performing radiological department.

  18. Scottish Short Stone Rows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruggles, Clive L. N.

    Short stone rows received a good deal of attention during the 1980s and 1990s, at a time when archaeoastronomy in prehistoric Britain and Ireland was moving beyond reassessments of Alexander Thom's "megalithic observatories" by identifying coherent groups of similar monuments with clear orientation trends. Many such rows are found in western Scotland, with the main concentration in Argyll and the island of Mull. Systematic analyses of their orientations produced credible evidence of an awareness of the 18.6-year lunar node cycle, within a "primary-secondary" pattern whereby isolated rows were oriented close to moonrise or moonset at the southern major standstill limit, while others oriented in this way were accompanied by a second row oriented in a declination range that could be interpreted either as lunar or solar. A detailed investigation of the landscape situation of the sites in northern Mull, accompanied by excavations at two of the sites, suggested that they were deliberately placed in locations where critical moonsets would be seen against prominent distant landscape features, but where the distant horizon in most or all other directions was hidden from view. A lack of independent archaeological evidence may help to explain why archaeoastronomical investigations at short stone rows have never progressed beyond "data-driven" studies of orientations and landscape situation. Nonetheless, the work that was done at these sites raised important general methodological issues, and pioneered techniques, that remain relevant across archaeoastronomy today.

  19. Biomechanics of Rowing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hase, Kazunori; Andrews, Brian J.; Zavatsky, Amy B.; Halliday, Suzanne E.

    A new control model for the study of biomechanical simulation of human movement was investigated using rowing as an example. The objectives were to explore biological and mechanical alternatives to optimal control methods. The simulation methods included simple control mechanisms based on proportional and derivative (PD) control, consideration of a simple neural model, introduction of an inverse dynamics system for feedback, and computational adjustment of control parameters by using an evaluative criterion and optimization method. By using simulation, appropriate rowing motions were synthesized. The generated rowing motion was periodic, continuous, and adaptable so that the pattern was stable against the mechanical force and independent of the initial condition. We believe that the simulation model is not only practical as a computational research tool from a biomechanical-engineering viewpoint but also significant from the point of view of fundamental biological theories of movement.

  20. Photon intensity interferometry with multidetectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badalà, A.; Barbera, R.; Palmeri, A.; Pappalardo, G. S.; Riggi, F.; Russo, A. C.; Russo, G.; Turrisi, R.

    1994-12-01

    The technique of two-photon interferometry in heavy ion collisions at the intermediate energies is discussed and the importance of a new methodology, used in the treatment of the experimental data, is evidenced. For the first time, both the relative momentum, qrel, and the relative energy, q0, of the two correlated photons have been simultaneously used to extract the source size and lifetime of the emitting source. As an application, the performances of the BaF 2 ball of the MEDEA multidetector as a photon intensity interferometer have been evaluated. The response of such a detector to correlated pairs of photons has been studied through full GEANT3 simulations. The effects of the experimental filter on the photon correlation function have been investigated, and the noise, induced in the correlation signal by cosmic radiation, neutral pion decay, and γ-conversion, has also been estimated.

  1. Applied physiology of rowing.

    PubMed

    Hagerman, F C

    1984-01-01

    Elite oarsmen and oarswomen possess large body dimensions and show outstanding aerobic and anaerobic qualities. Oarsmen have VO2max values of 6.1 +/- 0.6 L/min and have incurred O2 debts of between 10 and 20 litres. The caloric expenditure of rowing estimated from the O2 cost of a 6-minute rowing ergometer exercise was calculated at 36 kcal/min, one of the highest energy costs so far reported for any predominantly aerobic-type sport. Aerobic and anaerobic calculations show that 70 to 75% of the energy necessary to row the standard 2000m distance for men is derived from aerobiosis while the remaining 25 to 30% is anaerobic. Women achieve VO2max values of 4.1 +/- 0.4 L/min and slightly lower anaerobic values than men. The relative 60 to 65% energy contribution of aerobic metabolism and 35 to 40% for anaerobiosis is not surprising since women compete at 1000m. Rowers also exhibit excellent isokinetic leg strength and power when compared with other elite athletes and oarswomen produced higher relative leg strength values than men when lean body mass is considered. Muscle fibre type distributions in oarsmen resemble those of distance runners while women tend to have a slightly higher proportion of fast-twitch fibres. An average power output of 390 +/- 13.6W was produced by oarsmen for 6 minutes of simulated rowing while women were able to develop 300 +/- 18.4 for 3 minutes of the same activity. Mechanical efficiency for rowing was calculated at 20 +/- 0.9%. Oarsmen also achieve very high ventilation volumes being able to average above 200 L/min BTPS for 6 minutes of simulated rowing; women ventilate 170 L/min BTPS for 3 minutes of this exercise. Excellent VO2/VE and O2 pulse values demonstrate outstanding cardiorespiratory efficiency. Both oarsmen and oarswomen utilise a unique physiological pattern of race pacing; they begin exertion with a vigorous sprint which places excessive demands on anaerobic metabolism followed by a severely high aerobic steady-state and then

  2. Are contrast media required for (68)Ga-DOTATOC PET/CT in patients with neuroendocrine tumours of the abdomen?

    PubMed

    Mayerhoefer, Marius E; Schuetz, Matthias; Magnaldi, Silvia; Weber, Michael; Trattnig, Siegfried; Karanikas, Georgios

    2012-04-01

    To determine the value of intravenous contrast medium in (68)Ga-DOTA-Phe(1)-Tyr(3)-octreotide - (68)Ga-DOTATOC - PET/CT for the detection of abdominal neuroendocrine tumours (NET). In fifty-five patients with known or suspected NETs of the abdomen PET/CT was performed on a 64-row multi-detector hybrid system. For PET, 150 MBq of (68)Ga-DOTATOC were injected intravenously. Full-dose unenhanced, and arterial- and venous-phase contrast-enhanced CT images were obtained. Unenhanced and contrast-enhanced PET/CT images were evaluated separately for the presence of NETs on a per-region basis, by two separate teams with different experience levels. On unenhanced PET/CT, sensitivity and specificity ranged from 89.3% (junior team) to 92% (senior team), and 99.1% (junior team) to 99.2% (senior team), respectively. On contrast-enhanced PET/CT, sensitivity and specificity ranged from 92.3% (junior team) to 98.5% (senior team), and 99.4% (junior team) to 99.5% (senior team), respectively. These increases in sensitivity and specificity, due to the use of contrast-enhanced images, were statistically significant (P < 0.05). Intravenous contrast medium only moderately, aleit significantly, improves the sensitivity of (68)Ga-DOTATOC PET/CT for the detection of abdominal NETs, and hardly affects specificity. Thus, while contrast enhancement is justified to achieve maximum sensitivity, unenhanced images may be sufficient for routine PET/CT in NET patients. Contrast media moderately improve the sensitivity of (68)Ga-DOTATOC PET/CT for neuroendocrine tumours. Contrast media hardly affect the specificity of (68)Ga-DOTATOC PET/CT for neuroendocrine tumours. Unenhanced PET/CT is sufficient for routine imaging of patients with neuroendocrine tumours.

  3. Effect of Radiation Dose Reduction and Reconstruction Algorithm on Image Noise, Contrast, Resolution, and Detectability of Subtle Hypoattenuating Liver Lesions at Multidetector CT: Filtered Back Projection versus a Commercial Model-based Iterative Reconstruction Algorithm.

    PubMed

    Solomon, Justin; Marin, Daniele; Roy Choudhury, Kingshuk; Patel, Bhavik; Samei, Ehsan

    2017-02-07

    Purpose To determine the effect of radiation dose and iterative reconstruction (IR) on noise, contrast, resolution, and observer-based detectability of subtle hypoattenuating liver lesions and to estimate the dose reduction potential of the IR algorithm in question. Materials and Methods This prospective, single-center, HIPAA-compliant study was approved by the institutional review board. A dual-source computed tomography (CT) system was used to reconstruct CT projection data from 21 patients into six radiation dose levels (12.5%, 25%, 37.5%, 50%, 75%, and 100%) on the basis of two CT acquisitions. A series of virtual liver lesions (five per patient, 105 total, lesion-to-liver prereconstruction contrast of -15 HU, 12-mm diameter) were inserted into the raw CT projection data and images were reconstructed with filtered back projection (FBP) (B31f kernel) and sinogram-affirmed IR (SAFIRE) (I31f-5 kernel). Image noise (pixel standard deviation), lesion contrast (after reconstruction), lesion boundary sharpness (average normalized gradient at lesion boundary), and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) were compared. Next, a two-alternative forced choice perception experiment was performed (16 readers [six radiologists, 10 medical physicists]). A linear mixed-effects statistical model was used to compare detection accuracy between FBP and SAFIRE and to estimate the radiation dose reduction potential of SAFIRE. Results Compared with FBP, SAFIRE reduced noise by a mean of 53% ± 5, lesion contrast by 12% ± 4, and lesion sharpness by 13% ± 10 but increased CNR by 89% ± 19. Detection accuracy was 2% higher on average with SAFIRE than with FBP (P = .03), which translated into an estimated radiation dose reduction potential (±95% confidence interval) of 16% ± 13. Conclusion SAFIRE increases detectability at a given radiation dose (approximately 2% increase in detection accuracy) and allows for imaging at reduced radiation dose (16% ± 13), while maintaining low

  4. [Two-dimensional and three-dimensional CT diagnosis of alimentary tract].

    PubMed

    Shiraga, N

    2001-10-01

    The recent development of multidetector-row CT(MDCT) has made it possible to obtain three-dimensional images of the alimentary tract that offer new diagnostic potential. In its two-dimensional diagnosis of the alimentary tract, MDCT has also changed the concept of the oral contrast agent. Before MDCT, we routinely used a positive contrast agent to distinguish the stomach and intestine from other organs and masses. The excellent slice profile acquired by MDCT can distinguish the alimentary tract and depict abnormal findings without the use of a positive contrast agent. With the use of an intravenous contrast medium, the alimentary tract itself, alimentary tumors, and inflammatory disease are well demarcated with water and air. Moreover, the combination of two-dimensional and three-dimensional diagnostic images makes it possible to detect and assess early gastric and colonic cancers as conventional gastroscopy and colonoscopy. Although the lack of texture information is one of the disadvantages of three-dimensional CT, three-dimensional CT diagnosis of the alimentary tract is less invasive and more objective than conventional studies. Advances in three-dimensional imaging with isotropic data sets will lead to the use of two-dimensional and three-dimensional CT diagnosis as one of the standard examinations of the alimentary tract.

  5. Rare bilateral C6 spondylolysis and spondylolisthesis in an adolescent athlete: evaluation with magnetic resonance imaging and multidetector computerized tomography.

    PubMed

    Amin, Mohammed F; Mollano, Anthony V; Weinstein, Stuart L; El-Khoury, George Y

    2006-10-01

    Case report. To show a rare case of cervical spondylolysis and spondylolisthesis secondary to bilateral stress fractures at the pedicle laminar junction of C6 in a 16-year-old athlete playing high school baseball. The patient presented with 3 months of neck pain and intermittent right arm radicular symptoms. Plain radiographs and multidetector computerized tomography (CT) of the cervical spines. Plain radiographs revealed loss of lower cervical lordosis. Multidetector CT indicated bilateral C6 spondylolysis. Magnetic resonance imaging showed bilateral marrow edema at the pedicle laminar junction of C6. Treatment included placing his neck in a Philadelphia collar for 6 weeks. Follow-up CT revealed progression of healing. Early diagnosis and appropriate management of these cases are important to promote healing.

  6. Airway remodeling measured by multidetector computed tomography is increased in severe asthma and correlates with pathology

    PubMed Central

    Aysola, Ravi S.; Hoffman, Eric A.; Gierada, David; Wenzel, Sally; Cook-Granroth, Janice; Tarsi, Jaime; Zheng, Jie; Schechtman, Kenneth B.; Ramkumar, Thiruvamoor P.; Cochran, Rebecca; E, Xueping; Christie, Chandrika; Newell, John; Fain, Sean; Altes, Talissa A.; Castro, Mario

    2010-01-01

    Background To prospectively apply an automated, quantitative 3-D approach to imaging and airway analysis to assess airway remodeling in asthma. Methods Using the Pulmonary Workstation (VIDA Diagnostics) that enables quantitative airway segment measurements of low-dose, thin section (0.625-1.25 mm) multidetector-row CT (MDCT), we compared airway wall thickness (WT) and area (WA) in 123 subjects participating in a prospective multicenter cohort study, NIH Severe Asthma Research Program (SARP): severe asthma (n=63), mild-moderate asthma (n=35), and normal (n=25). A subset of these subjects underwent fiberoptic bronchoscopy and endobronchial biopsies (n=32). WT and WA were corrected for total airway diameter and area - WT%, WA%. Results Subjects with severe asthma had significantly greater WT% than mild-moderate asthma and normals [17.2±1.5 v 16.5±1.6, p=0.014 and 16.3±1.2, p=0.031, respectively] and greater WA% compared to mild-moderate asthma and normal [56.6±2.9 v 54.7±3.3, p=.005 and 54.6±2.4, p=0.003, respectively]. Both WT% and WA% were inversely correlated with baseline FEV1% (r=-0.39, p<0.0001 and -0.40, p<0.0001, respectively) and positively correlated with response to bronchodilator (r=0.28, p=0.002 and r=0.35, p<0.0001, respectively). Airway epithelial thickness on biopsy correlated with WT% (r=0.47, p=0.007) and WA% (r=0.52, p=0.003). In the same individual, there is considerable regional heterogeneity in airway wall thickness. Conclusion Severe asthmatics have thicker airway walls on MDCT than mild asthmatics or normals, which correlates with pathologic measures of remodeling and the degree of airflow obstruction. MDCT may be a useful technique for assessing airway remodeling in asthma, but overlap among groups limits the diagnostic value in individual subjects. PMID:18641116

  7. Role of cardiac multidetector computed tomography beyond coronary angiography.

    PubMed

    Sato, Akira; Aonuma, Kazutaka

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) has become a useful noninvasive modality for anatomical imaging of coronary artery disease (CAD). Currently, the main clinical advantage of coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA) appears to be related to its high negative predictive value at low or intermediate pretest probability for CAD. With the development of technical aspects of MDCT, clinical practice and research are increasingly shifting toward defining the clinical implication of plaque morphology, myocardial perfusion, and patient outcomes. The presence of positive vessel remodeling, low-attenuation plaques, napkin-ring sign, or spotty calcification on CCTA could be useful information on high-risk vulnerable plaques. The napkin-ring sign, especially, showed higher accuracy for the detection of thin-cap fibroatheroma. Recently, it was reported that cardiac 3D single-photon emission tomography/CT fusion imaging, noninvasive fractional flow reserve computed from CT, and integrated CCTA and CT myocardial perfusion were associated with improved diagnostic accuracy for the detection of hemodynamically significant CAD. Furthermore, several randomized, large clinical trials have evaluated the clinical value of CCTA for chest pain triage in the emergency department or long-term reduction in death, myocardial infarction, or hospitalization for unstable angina. In this review we discuss the role of cardiac MDCT beyond coronary angiography, including a comparison with other currently available imaging modalities used to examine atherosclerotic plaque and myocardial perfusion.

  8. Multidetector calibration for mass spectrometers

    SciTech Connect

    Bayne, C.K.; Donohue, D.L.; Fiedler, R.

    1994-06-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency`s Safeguards Analytical Laboratory has performed calibration experiments to measure the different efficiencies among multi-Faraday detectors for a Finnigan-MAT 261 mass spectrometer. Two types of calibration experiments were performed: (1) peak-shift experiments and (2) peak-jump experiments. For peak-shift experiments, the ion intensities were measured for all isotopes of an element in different Faraday detectors. Repeated measurements were made by shifting the isotopes to various Faraday detectors. Two different peak-shifting schemes were used to measure plutonium (UK Pu5/92138) samples. For peak-jump experiments, ion intensities were measured in a reference Faraday detector for a single isotope and compared with those measured in the other Faraday detectors. Repeated measurements were made by switching back-and-forth between the reference Faraday detector and a selected Faraday detector. This switching procedure is repeated for all Faraday detectors. Peak-jump experiments were performed with replicate measurements of {sup 239}Pu, {sup 187}Re, and {sup 238}U. Detector efficiency factors were estimated for both peak-jump and peak-shift experiments using a flexible calibration model to statistically analyze both types of multidetector calibration experiments. Calculated detector efficiency factors were shown to depend on both the material analyzed and the experimental conditions. A single detector efficiency factor is not recommended for each detector that would be used to correct routine sample analyses. An alternative three-run peak-shift sample analysis should be considered. A statistical analysis of the data from this peak-shift experiment can adjust the isotopic ratio estimates for detector differences due to each sample analysis.

  9. Role of Computer Aided Diagnosis (CAD) in the detection of pulmonary nodules on 64 row multi detector computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Prakashini, K; Babu, Satish; Rajgopal, K V; Kokila, K Raja

    2016-01-01

    To determine the overall performance of an existing CAD algorithm with thin-section computed tomography (CT) in the detection of pulmonary nodules and to evaluate detection sensitivity at a varying range of nodule density, size, and location. A cross-sectional prospective study was conducted on 20 patients with 322 suspected nodules who underwent diagnostic chest imaging using 64-row multi-detector CT. The examinations were evaluated on reconstructed images of 1.4 mm thickness and 0.7 mm interval. Detection of pulmonary nodules, initially by a radiologist of 2 years experience (RAD) and later by CAD lung nodule software was assessed. Then, CAD nodule candidates were accepted or rejected accordingly. Detected nodules were classified based on their size, density, and location. The performance of the RAD and CAD system was compared with the gold standard that is true nodules confirmed by consensus of senior RAD and CAD together. The overall sensitivity and false-positive (FP) rate of CAD software was calculated. Of the 322 suspected nodules, 221 were classified as true nodules on the consensus of senior RAD and CAD together. Of the true nodules, the RAD detected 206 (93.2%) and 202 (91.4%) by the CAD. CAD and RAD together picked up more number of nodules than either CAD or RAD alone. Overall sensitivity for nodule detection with the CAD program was 91.4%, and FP detection per patient was 5.5%. The CAD showed comparatively higher sensitivity for nodules of size 4-10 mm (93.4%) and nodules in hilar (100%) and central (96.5%) location when compared to RAD's performance. CAD performance was high in detecting pulmonary nodules including the small size and low-density nodules. CAD even with relatively high FP rate, assists and improves RAD's performance as a second reader, especially for nodules located in the central and hilar region and for small nodules by saving RADs time.

  10. Rowing competitions and perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores, Alfinio; Bernhardt, Stephen A.; Shipman, Henry L.

    2015-02-01

    This paper is about integrating the use of graphing technology (specifically, GeoGebra) with principles of motion, principles of perspective, and the concept of vanishing points to model a dynamic event. Students were asked to analyse video images of a rowing competition filmed with a single camera positioned perpendicular to the race. The fixed position of the camera in such races makes it difficult to determine whether a scull closer to the camera is actually overtaking another, more distant scull. The paper illustrates how students in their first year at the university can integrate the use of technology, science, mathematics, and writing to solve a real world problem involving motion.

  11. Prospective study evaluating the relative sensitivity of 18F-NaF PET/CT for detecting skeletal metastases from renal cell carcinoma in comparison to multidetector CT and 99mTc-MDP bone scintigraphy, using an adaptive trial design

    PubMed Central

    Gerety, E. L.; Lawrence, E. M.; Wason, J.; Yan, H.; Hilborne, S.; Buscombe, J.; Cheow, H. K.; Shaw, A. S.; Bird, N.; Fife, K.; Heard, S.; Lomas, D. J.; Matakidou, A.; Soloviev, D.; Eisen, T.; Gallagher, F. A.

    2015-01-01

    Background The detection of occult bone metastases is a key factor in determining the management of patients with renal cell carcinoma (RCC), especially when curative surgery is considered. This prospective study assessed the sensitivity of 18F-labelled sodium fluoride in conjunction with positron emission tomography/computed tomography (18F-NaF PET/CT) for detecting RCC bone metastases, compared with conventional imaging by bone scintigraphy or CT. Patients and methods An adaptive two-stage trial design was utilized, which was stopped after the first stage due to statistical efficacy. Ten patients with stage IV RCC and bone metastases were imaged with 18F-NaF PET/CT and 99mTc-labelled methylene diphosphonate (99mTc-MDP) bone scintigraphy including pelvic single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). Images were reported independently by experienced radiologists and nuclear medicine physicians using a 5-point scoring system. Results Seventy-seven lesions were diagnosed as malignant: 100% were identified by 18F-NaF PET/CT, 46% by CT and 29% by bone scintigraphy/SPECT. Standard-of-care imaging with CT and bone scintigraphy identified 65% of the metastases reported by 18F-NaF PET/CT. On an individual patient basis, 18F-NaF PET/CT detected more RCC metastases than 99mTc-MDP bone scintigraphy/SPECT or CT alone (P = 0.007). The metabolic volumes, mean and maximum standardized uptake values (SUVmean and SUVmax) of the malignant lesions were significantly greater than those of the benign lesions (P < 0.001). Conclusions 18F-NaF PET/CT is significantly more sensitive at detecting RCC skeletal metastases than conventional bone scintigraphy or CT. The detection of occult bone metastases could greatly alter patient management, particularly in the context when standard-of-care imaging is negative for skeletal metastases. PMID:26202597

  12. Comparison of 4- and 64-slice CT scanning in the diagnosis of pulmonary embolism.

    PubMed

    Douma, Renée A; Hofstee, Herman M A; Schaefer-Prokop, Cornelia; van Waesberghe, Jan Hein T M; Lely, Rutger J; Kamphuisen, Pieter W; Gerdes, Victor E A; Kramer, Mark H H; Büller, Harry R

    2010-01-01

    With the introduction of multi-detector row CT (MDCT), sensitivity to diagnose pulmonary embolism (PE) has greatly improved. The use of newer generation CT-scans may lead to a higher prevalence and a different distribution of PE. We compared 64-slice with 4-slice MDCT regarding prevalence and distribution of PE, the number of inconclusive test results and inter-reader variability. CT-scans from a random sample of 110 consecutive patients who underwent 4-slice CT-scanning were compared with 64-slice CT-scans from 107 patients from a second cohort. Three radiologists independently reassessed all CT-scans. Consensus was reached in case of disagreement between the readers. Final diagnosis of PE was categorised as central, segmental or subsegmental by the thrombus' most proximal end. The prevalence of PE was 24% (26/110, 95% confidence interval [CI] 17-32%) and 22% (24/107, 16-31%) for the 4-slice and 64-slice cohort, respectively. The prevalence of isolated subsegmental emboli was 2/26 (7.7%; 2.1-24%) and 5/24 (21%; 9.2-41%), respectively (p=0.424). The number of inconclusive scans was 10% in both cohorts, mostly due to movement artefacts and suboptimal intravascular contrast, respectively. The inter-reader agreement between the three readers was 0.70 for the 4-slice scans and 0.68 for the 64-slice scans. Although absolute prevalence of PE was equal in both cohorts, there was a trend towards more subsegmental PE with 64-slice CT. In a multi-reader setting, the number of inconclusive examinations was higher than quoted for clinical management studies, indicating that the diagnosis of PE with MDCT could be less straightforward than assumed.

  13. CHIMERA Multidetector at Laboratori Nazionali del Sud

    SciTech Connect

    Aiello, S.; Anzalone, A.; Baldo, M.; Barna, R.; Campisi, M.g.; Cardella, G.; Cavallaro, Sl., Amico, V.D.; De Filippo, E.; DePasquale, D.; Femino, S.; Geraci, E.; Giustolisi, F.; Guazzoni, P.; Iacono-Manno, C.M.; Italiano, A.; Lanzalone, G.; Lanzano, G.; LoNigro, S.; Lombardo, U.; Manfredi, G.; Pagano, A.; Papa, M.; Pirrone, S.; Politi, G.; Porto, F.; Sambataro, S.; Sperduto, M.L.; Sutera, C.M.; Zetta, L.

    2000-12-31

    The installation of CHIMERA multidetector, designed in order to study central collisions in heavy ion reactions at intermediate energy, is going on at LNS and the first experiment with the forward part (688 telescopes) is running since May 1999. The aim of this contribution is to present the status of the project.

  14. Bladder trauma: multidetector computed tomography cystography.

    PubMed

    Ishak, Charbel; Kanth, Nalini

    2011-08-01

    Multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) cystography is rapidly becoming the most recommended study for evaluation of the bladder for suspected trauma. This article reviews the bladder trauma with emphasis on the application of MDCT cystography to traumatic bladder injuries using a pictorial essay based on images collected in our level I trauma center.

  15. Measures of rowing performance.

    PubMed

    Smith, T Brett; Hopkins, Will G

    2012-04-01

    Accurate measures of performance are important for assessing competitive athletes in practi~al and research settings. We present here a review of rowing performance measures, focusing on the errors in these measures and the implications for testing rowers. The yardstick for assessing error in a performance measure is the random variation (typical or standard error of measurement) in an elite athlete's competitive performance from race to race: ∼1.0% for time in 2000 m rowing events. There has been little research interest in on-water time trials for assessing rowing performance, owing to logistic difficulties and environmental perturbations in performance time with such tests. Mobile ergometry via instrumented oars or rowlocks should reduce these problems, but the associated errors have not yet been reported. Measurement of boat speed to monitor on-water training performance is common; one device based on global positioning system (GPS) technology contributes negligible extra random error (0.2%) in speed measured over 2000 m, but extra error is substantial (1-10%) with other GPS devices or with an impeller, especially over shorter distances. The problems with on-water testing have led to widespread use of the Concept II rowing ergometer. The standard error of the estimate of on-water 2000 m time predicted by 2000 m ergometer performance was 2.6% and 7.2% in two studies, reflecting different effects of skill, body mass and environment in on-water versus ergometer performance. However, well trained rowers have a typical error in performance time of only ∼0.5% between repeated 2000 m time trials on this ergometer, so such trials are suitable for tracking changes in physiological performance and factors affecting it. Many researchers have used the 2000 m ergometer performance time as a criterion to identify other predictors of rowing performance. Standard errors of the estimate vary widely between studies even for the same predictor, but the lowest

  16. Volume rendering versus maximum intensity projection in CT angiography: what works best, when, and why.

    PubMed

    Fishman, Elliot K; Ney, Derek R; Heath, David G; Corl, Frank M; Horton, Karen M; Johnson, Pamela T

    2006-01-01

    The introduction and widespread availability of 16-section multi-detector row computed tomographic (CT) technology and, more recently, 64-section scanners, has greatly advanced the role of CT angiography in clinical practice. CT angiography has become a key component of state-of-the-art imaging, with applications ranging from oncology (eg, staging of pancreatic or renal cancer) to classic vascular imaging (eg, evaluation of aortic aneurysms and renal artery stenoses) as well as newer techniques such as coronary artery imaging and peripheral runoff studies. With an average of 400-1000 images in each volume data set, three-dimensional postprocessing is crucial to volume visualization. Radiologists now have workstations that provide capabilities for evaluation of these data sets by using a range of software programs and processing tools. Although different systems have unique capabilities and functionality, all provide the options of volume rendering and maximum intensity projection for image display and analysis. These two postprocessing techniques have different advantages and disadvantages when used in clinical practice, and it is important that radiologists understand when and how each technique should be used. Copyright RSNA, 2006.

  17. Multidetector computed tomographic pulmonary angiography in patients with a high clinical probability of pulmonary embolism.

    PubMed

    Moores, L; Kline, J; Portillo, A K; Resano, S; Vicente, A; Arrieta, P; Corres, J; Tapson, V; Yusen, R D; Jiménez, D

    2016-01-01

    ESSENTIALS: When high probability of pulmonary embolism (PE), sensitivity of computed tomography (CT) is unclear. We investigated the sensitivity of multidetector CT among 134 patients with a high probability of PE. A normal CT alone may not safely exclude PE in patients with a high clinical pretest probability. In patients with no clear alternative diagnosis after CTPA, further testing should be strongly considered. Whether patients with a negative multidetector computed tomographic pulmonary angiography (CTPA) result and a high clinical pretest probability of pulmonary embolism (PE) should be further investigated is controversial. This was a prospective investigation of the sensitivity of multidetector CTPA among patients with a priori clinical assessment of a high probability of PE according to the Wells criteria. Among patients with a negative CTPA result, the diagnosis of PE required at least one of the following conditions: ventilation/perfusion lung scan showing a high probability of PE in a patient with no history of PE, abnormal findings on venous ultrasonography in a patient without previous deep vein thrombosis at that site, or the occurrence of venous thromboembolism (VTE) in a 3-month follow-up period after anticoagulation was withheld because of a negative multidetector CTPA result. We identified 498 patients with a priori clinical assessment of a high probability of PE and a completed CTPA study. CTPA excluded PE in 134 patients; in these patients, the pooled incidence of VTE was 5.2% (seven of 134 patients; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.5-9.0). Five patients had VTEs that were confirmed by an additional imaging test despite a negative CTPA result (five of 48 patients; 10.4%; 95% CI 1.8-19.1), and two patients had objectively confirmed VTEs that occurred during clinical follow-up of at least 3 months (two of 86 patients; 2.3%; 95% CI 0-5.5). None of the patients had a fatal PE during follow-up. A normal multidetector CTPA result alone may not safely

  18. The Demise of Skid Row.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siegal, Harvey A.; Inciardi, James A.

    1982-01-01

    Describes the history and evolution of the American skid row; analyzes the changes it has undergone, particularly in the face of urban renewal; and speculates on its future. Includes opinions of the inhabitants of skid row which were obtained from interviews. (MJL)

  19. The Demise of Skid Row.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siegal, Harvey A.; Inciardi, James A.

    1982-01-01

    Describes the history and evolution of the American skid row; analyzes the changes it has undergone, particularly in the face of urban renewal; and speculates on its future. Includes opinions of the inhabitants of skid row which were obtained from interviews. (MJL)

  20. Role of (68)Ga-DOTATATE PET/CT in patients with multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1).

    PubMed

    Lastoria, Secondo; Marciello, Francesca; Faggiano, Antongiulio; Aloj, Luigi; Caracò, Corradina; Aurilio, Michela; D'Ambrosio, Laura; Di Gennaro, Francesca; Ramundo, Valeria; Camera, Luigi; De Luca, Leonardo; Fonti, Rosa; Napolitano, Vincenzo; Colao, Annamaria

    2016-06-01

    Multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1) is a hereditary syndrome predisposing to many endocrine and neuroendocrine tumors (NET). Conventional imaging (CI) cannot provide satisfactory results for all the different types of MEN1-related tumors. Objective of this prospective observational study was to evaluate the role of (68)Ga-DOTATATE PET/CT in MEN1 compared to CI. Diagnostic performance of (68)Ga-DOTATATE PET/CT for the detection of NET was evaluated as well as the prognostic role of SUVmax. Eighteen patients with genetically confirmed MEN1 were evaluated by (68)Ga-DOTATATE PET/CT, endoscopic ultrasounds, multidetector-row computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and hormone/markers serum measurements. Four MEN1-related tumor sites (pancreas, pituitary, parathyroids, adrenals) were considered. Sensitivity and specificity of (68)Ga-DOTATATE PET/CT for the detection of NET were calculated. There was (68)Ga-DOTATATE PET/CT uptake in 11/11 patients with pancreatic lesions, in 9/12 with pituitary adenoma, in 5/15 with parathyroid enlargements, and in 5/7 with adrenal lesions. (68)Ga-DOTATATE PET/CT showed sensitivity and specificity of 100 and 100 % in pancreas, 75 and 83 % in pituitary, 28 and 100 % in parathyroids, and 62.5 and 100 % in adrenals, respectively. Compared with CI, no significant difference in sensitivity for pancreas, pituitary, and adrenals was found, while CI had a better sensitivity for parathyroids (p = 0.002). On the ROC analysis, progression of pancreatic lesions was significantly associated to SUVmax <12.3 (p < 0.05). (68)Ga-DOTATATE PET/CT is greatly helpful in the work-up of MEN1 providing a panoramic view of MEN1-related lesions. There is also a prognostic role of (68)Ga-PET in patients with MEN1-pancreatic lesions.

  1. Magnetic resonance imaging of pulmonary infection in immunocompromised children: comparison with multidetector computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Ozcan, H Nursun; Gormez, Ayşegul; Ozsurekci, Yasemin; Karakaya, Jale; Oguz, Berna; Unal, Sule; Cetin, Mualla; Ceyhan, Mehmet; Haliloglu, Mithat

    2017-02-01

    Computed tomography (CT) is commonly used to detect pulmonary infection in immunocompromised children. To compare MRI and multidetector CT findings of pulmonary abnormalities in immunocompromised children. Seventeen neutropaenic children (6 girls; ages 2-18 years) were included. Non-contrast-enhanced CT was performed with a 64-detector CT scanner. Axial and coronal non-enhanced thoracic MRI was performed using a 1.5-T scanner within 24 h of the CT examination (true fast imaging with steady-state free precession, fat-saturated T2-weighted turbo spin echo with motion correction, T2-weighted half-Fourier single-shot turbo spin echo [HASTE], fat-saturated T1-weighted spoiled gradient echo). Pulmonary abnormalities (nodules, consolidations, ground glass opacities, atelectasis, pleural effusion and lymph nodes) were evaluated and compared among MRI sequences and between MRI and CT. The relationship between MRI sequences and nodule sizes was examined by chi- square test. Of 256 CT lesions, 207 (81%, 95% confidence interval [CI] 76-85%) were detected at MRI. Of 202 CT-detected nodules, 157 (78%, 95% CI 71-83%) were seen at motion-corrected MRI. Of the 1-5-mm nodules, 69% were detected by motion-corrected T2-weighted MRI and 38% by HASTE MRI. Sensitivity of MRI (both axial fat-saturated T2-weighted turbo spin echo with variable phase encoding directions (BLADE) images and HASTE sequences) to detect pulmonary abnormalities is promising.

  2. Accessible or Inaccessible? Diagnostic Efficacy of CT-Guided Core Biopsies of Head and Neck Masses

    SciTech Connect

    Cunningham, Jane D. McCusker, Mark W.; Power, Sarah; PearlyTi, Joanna; Thornton, John; Brennan, Paul; Lee, Michael J.; O’Hare, Alan; Looby, Seamus

    2015-04-15

    PurposeTissue sampling of lesions in the head and neck is challenging due to complex regional anatomy and sometimes necessitates open surgical biopsy. However, many patients are poor surgical candidates due to comorbidity. Thus, we evaluated the use of CT guidance for establishing histopathological diagnosis of head and neck masses.MethodsAll consecutive patients (n = 22) who underwent CT-guided core biopsy of head or neck masses between April 2009 and August 2012 were retrospectively reviewed using the departmental CT interventional procedures database. The indication for each biopsy performed was to establish or exclude a diagnosis of neoplasia in patients with suspicious head or neck lesions found on clinical examination or imaging studies. Patients received conscious sedation and 18 G, semiautomated core needle biopsies were performed by experienced neuroradiologists using 16-slice multidetector row CT imaging guidance (Somatom Definition Siemens Medical Solutions, Germany). Histopathology results of each biopsy were analysed.ResultsSixteen of 22 biopsies that were performed (73 %) yielded a pathological diagnosis. Anatomic locations biopsied included: masticator (n = 7), parapharyngeal (n = 3), parotid (n = 3), carotid (n = 3), perivertebral (n = 3), pharyngeal (n = 2), and retropharyngeal (n = 1) spaces. Six biopsies (27 %) were nondiagnostic due to inadequate tissue sampling, particularly small biopsy sample size and failure to biopsy the true sampling site due to extensive necrosis. No major complications were encountered.ConclusionsThe use of CT guidance to perform core biopsies of head and neck masses is an effective means of establishing histopathological diagnosis and reduces the need for diagnostic open surgical biopsy and general anaesthesia.

  3. Louisiana farm discussion: 8 foot row spacing

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This year several tests in growers’ fields were used to compare traditional 6-foot row spacing to 8-foot row spacing. Cane is double-drilled in the wider row spacing. The wider row spacing would accommodate John Deere 3522 harvester. Field data indicate the sugarcane yields are very comparable in 8-...

  4. The right sided great vessels by cardiac multidetector computed tomography: normative reference values among healthy adults free of cardiopulmonary disease, hypertension, and obesity.

    PubMed

    Lin, Fay Y; Devereux, Richard B; Roman, Mary J; Meng, Joyce; Jow, Veronica M; Simprini, Lauren; Jacobs, Avrum; Weinsaft, Jonathan W; Shaw, Leslee J; Berman, Daniel S; Callister, Tracy Q; Min, James K

    2009-08-01

    We sought to derive normative reference values for the thoracic great vessels using multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) in a healthy normotensive non-obese population free of cardiovascular disease. Non-gated axial computed tomography (CT) of the chest has traditionally been used to evaluate normal great vessel anatomy for prognosis and management. However, non-gated axial chest CT cannot account for the obliquity, systolic expansion, and non-axial motion of the great vessels during the cardiac cycle and may misclassify patients as normal or abnormal for prognostic and management purposes. To date, normative reference values for double-oblique, short-axis great vessel diameters have not been established using current generation electrocardiogram (ECG)-gated 64-detector row MDCT. A total of 103 (43% women, age 51 +/- 14 years) consecutive normotensive, non-obese adults free of cardiopulmonary or great vessel structural disease, arrhythmias, or significant coronary artery disease were studied by MDCT. Individuals underwent examination for determination of end-diastolic (ED) pulmonary artery (PA) and superior vena cava (SVC) dimensions in double-oblique short axes for comparison with the ascending aorta and the right-sided cardiac chambers. For right sided great vessels, the 5th to 95th interval was 1.89-3.03 cm for ED PA diameter and 1.08-4.42 cm(2) for SVC cross-sectional area. The pulmonary artery to ascending aortic (PA-to-Ao) ratio was 0.66-1.13. In multivariate analysis, the PA was significantly associated with weight, whereas the PA-to-Ao ratio was inversely associated with age. Axial PA measurements were significantly higher and PA-to-Ao measurements significantly lower than corresponding short axis measurements (P = .04 and P < .001, respectively). This study establishes ECG-gated MDCT reference values for right-sided great vessel dimensions derived from a healthy population of individuals free of cardiovascular disease, hypertension, and obesity. The

  5. Visibility of sutures of the orbit and periorbital region using multidetector computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Gufler, Hubert; Preiß, Markus; Koesling, Sabrina

    2014-01-01

    Knowledge of cranial suture morphology is crucial in emergency medicine, forensic medicine, and maxillofacial reconstructive surgery. This study assessed the visibility of sutures of the orbit and periorbital region on multidetector computed tomography. Multidetector computed tomography scans of 200 patients (127 males, 73 females; mean age 51.3 years; range, 6-92 years) were evaluated retrospectively. The slice thicknesses varied from 0.5 to 1 mm, and the tube current from 25 to 370 mAs, depending on the CT indication. The visibility of sutures was estimated according to a 4-point scale from "not visible" to "well visible". The chi-squared test was used to test the association of the visibility of sutures with the slice thickness, tube current, and age of patients. Statistical significance was assumed at p < 0.05. Overall, best visibility was found for the sutura frontozygomatica (98%), sutura frontonasalis (88.5%), and sutura sphenozygomatica (71.5%), followed by the sutura zygomaticomaxillaris (65.8%), sutura temporozygomatica (41.8%), sutura frontomaxillaris (44.5%), and sutura sphenofrontalis (31%). Poor visibility was found for the sutura frontolacrimalis (16.8%) and sutura frontoethmoidalis (1.3%). The sutura ethmoidomaxillaris, sutura lacrimomaxillaris, and sutura ethmoidolacrimalis were not visible. Although the sutures of the superior, lateral, and inferior orbit are well visible, those of the medial orbit are poorly visible on CT scans.

  6. Visibility of Sutures of the Orbit and Periorbital Region Using Multidetector Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Preiß, Markus; Koesling, Sabrina

    2014-01-01

    Objective Knowledge of cranial suture morphology is crucial in emergency medicine, forensic medicine, and maxillofacial reconstructive surgery. This study assessed the visibility of sutures of the orbit and periorbital region on multidetector computed tomography. Materials and Methods Multidetector computed tomography scans of 200 patients (127 males, 73 females; mean age 51.3 years; range, 6-92 years) were evaluated retrospectively. The slice thicknesses varied from 0.5 to 1 mm, and the tube current from 25 to 370 mAs, depending on the CT indication. The visibility of sutures was estimated according to a 4-point scale from "not visible" to "well visible". The chi-squared test was used to test the association of the visibility of sutures with the slice thickness, tube current, and age of patients. Statistical significance was assumed at p < 0.05. Results Overall, best visibility was found for the sutura frontozygomatica (98%), sutura frontonasalis (88.5%), and sutura sphenozygomatica (71.5%), followed by the sutura zygomaticomaxillaris (65.8%), sutura temporozygomatica (41.8%), sutura frontomaxillaris (44.5%), and sutura sphenofrontalis (31%). Poor visibility was found for the sutura frontolacrimalis (16.8%) and sutura frontoethmoidalis (1.3%). The sutura ethmoidomaxillaris, sutura lacrimomaxillaris, and sutura ethmoidolacrimalis were not visible. Conclusion Although the sutures of the superior, lateral, and inferior orbit are well visible, those of the medial orbit are poorly visible on CT scans. PMID:25469093

  7. The combined evaluation of interim contrast-enhanced computerized tomography (CT) and FDG-PET/CT predicts the clinical outcomes and may impact on the therapeutic plans in patients with aggressive non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Yang, Deok-Hwan; Min, Jung-Joon; Jeong, Yong Yeon; Ahn, Jae-Sook; Kim, Yeo-Kyeoung; Cho, Sang-Hee; Chung, Ik-Joo; Bom, Hee-Seung; Kim, Hyeoung-Joon; Lee, Je-Jung

    2009-05-01

    We investigated the concomitant interim response of patients with aggressive non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) using multi-detector row computerized tomography (CT) and (18)F-fluoro-2-deoxy-D: -glucose-positron emission tomography (PET)/CT for prediction of clinical outcomes. One hundred six newly diagnosed patients with aggressive NHL were enrolled. Both the CT and PET/CT were serially performed at the time of diagnosis and after three to four cycles of chemotherapy (interim). The patients were categorized into four different responsive groups according to the interim PET/CT and CT: (1) complete metabolic response (CMR)-complete response unconfirmed (CRu), (2) CMR-partial response (PR), (3) partial metabolic response (PMR)-Cru, and (4) PMR-PR. Fifty-five patients with CMR-CRu, 20 patients with CMR-PR, seven patients with PMR-Cru, and 23 patients with PMR-PR were distributed. In addition, one patient experienced a disease progression. There was a significant difference in relapse rates between PET/CT-positive (67.3%) and PET/CT-negative patients (17.3%; P < 0.01). Also, there was a significant difference between patients with PMR-PR (32.0% and 26.1%) and CMR-CRu (89.3% and 80.0%) for 3-year overall survival (OS) and event-free survival (EFS), respectively. A multivariate analysis revealed that high international prognostic index (> or =3) at diagnosis, T-cell phenotype, and PMR-PR in interim PET/CT and CT were independent prognostic significances for OS. Moreover, bulky disease (>10 cm), T-cell phenotype, and PMR-PR showed significant associations for EFS. PMR-PR in interim response was the predictive prognostic determinant for both OS and EFS, with a hazard ratio of 3.93 (1.61-9.60) and 3.60 (1.62-7.98), respectively. The combined evaluation of interim PET/CT and CT was found to be a significant predictor of disease progression, OS, and EFS.

  8. Optimization of acquisition and contrast injection protocol for C-arm CT imaging in transcatheter aortic valve implantation: initial experience in a swine model.

    PubMed

    Numburi, Uma D; Kapadia, Samir R; Schoenhagen, Paul; Tuzcu, E Murat; von Roden, Martin; Halliburton, Sandra S

    2013-02-01

    To determine the optimal C-arm computed tomography (CT) protocol for transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) in swine. In 6 swine, C-arm CT was performed using 5-s ungated acquisition during sinus rhythm with aortic root (Method 1) or peripheral (Method 2) injection, and during rapid ventricular pacing with root injection (Method 3). Additionally, 24-s ECG-gated acquisitions were performed during sinus rhythm with root (Method 4) or peripheral (Method 5) injection. Aortic root enhancement, presence of artifacts and contrast volumes were compared for all methods. Aortic root measurements were also compared between C-arm CT and multidetector-row computed tomography (MDCT). The best C-arm CT image set was identified and used to predict optimal angiographic projection angles during TAVI; predictions were compared to those from MDCT. Methods 1, 3, 4, and 5 yielded sufficient root enhancement with mild or moderate artifacts and aortic annulus, sinotubular junction, and mid-ascending aorta diameters similar to MDCT. Ungated C-arm CT (Methods 1, 3) required less contrast than ECG-gated C-arm CT (Methods 4, 5). Method 3 was optimal yielding images with high attenuation, few artifacts (2.0), and root measurements similar to MDCT using minimal contrast (36 mL). Predicted angiographic projections from Method 3 were similar to MDCT. Ungated C-arm CT during rapid pacing with aortic root injection required minimal contrast, yielded high attenuation and few artifacts, and aortic root measurements and predicted angiographic planes similar to those from MDCT.

  9. [Review of pre- and post-treatment multidetector computed tomography findings in abdominal aortic aneurysms].

    PubMed

    Casula, E; Lonjedo, E; Cerverón, M J; Ruiz, A; Gómez, J

    2014-01-01

    The increase in the frequency of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) and the widely accepted use of endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) as a first-line treatment or as an alternative to conventional surgery make it necessary for radiologists to have thorough knowledge of the pre- and post-treatment findings. The high image quality provided by multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) enables CT angiography to play a fundamental role in the study of AAA and in planning treatment. The objective of this article is to review the cases of AAA in which CT angiography was the main imaging technique, so that radiologists will be able to detect the signs related to this disease, to diagnose it, to plan treatment, and to detect complications in the postoperative period.

  10. Diagnostic Yield of Multidetector Computed Tomography in Patients with Acute Spondylodiscitis.

    PubMed

    Rausch, Vanessa Hanna; Bannas, Peter; Schoen, Gerhard; Froelich, Andreas; Well, Lennart; Regier, Marc; Adam, Gerhard; Henes, Frank Oliver Gerhard

    2017-03-01

    Purpose To determine the value of multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) in patients with acute spondylodiscitis. Methods and Materials For data acquisition, we searched our radiological database for all patients who had undergone magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for suspected spondylodiscitis between 2007 and 2015 (n = 325). For further analyses, we included all patients (n = 67) who initially underwent MDCT prior to MRI. Overall accuracy, sensitivity, specificity and positive and negative predictive values were calculated for MDCT and, separately, for contrast-enhanced CT (CECT, n = 36) and for non-enhanced CT (NECT, n = 31). MRI together with clinical evaluation served as the standard of reference.

  11. Image quality and radiation reduction of 320-row area detector CT coronary angiography with optimal tube voltage selection and an automatic exposure control system: comparison with body mass index-adapted protocol.

    PubMed

    Lim, Jiyeon; Park, Eun-Ah; Lee, Whal; Shim, Hackjoon; Chung, Jin Wook

    2015-06-01

    To assess the image quality and radiation exposure of 320-row area detector computed tomography (320-ADCT) coronary angiography with optimal tube voltage selection with the guidance of an automatic exposure control system in comparison with a body mass index (BMI)-adapted protocol. Twenty-two patients (study group) underwent 320-ADCT coronary angiography using an automatic exposure control system with the target standard deviation value of 33 as the image quality index and the lowest possible tube voltage. For comparison, a sex- and BMI-matched group (control group, n = 22) using a BMI-adapted protocol was established. Images of both groups were reconstructed by an iterative reconstruction algorithm. For objective evaluation of the image quality, image noise, vessel density, signal to noise ratio (SNR), and contrast to noise ratio (CNR) were measured. Two blinded readers then subjectively graded the image quality using a four-point scale (1: nondiagnostic to 4: excellent). Radiation exposure was also measured. Although the study group tended to show higher image noise (14.1 ± 3.6 vs. 9.3 ± 2.2 HU, P = 0.111) and higher vessel density (665.5 ± 161 vs. 498 ± 143 HU, P = 0.430) than the control group, the differences were not significant. There was no significant difference between the two groups for SNR (52.5 ± 19.2 vs. 60.6 ± 21.8, P = 0.729), CNR (57.0 ± 19.8 vs. 67.8 ± 23.3, P = 0.531), or subjective image quality scores (3.47 ± 0.55 vs. 3.59 ± 0.56, P = 0.960). However, radiation exposure was significantly reduced by 42 % in the study group (1.9 ± 0.8 vs. 3.6 ± 0.4 mSv, P = 0.003). Optimal tube voltage selection with the guidance of an automatic exposure control system in 320-ADCT coronary angiography allows substantial radiation reduction without significant impairment of image quality, compared to the results obtained using a BMI-based protocol.

  12. Endoscopic ultrasound versus multidetector computed tomography in preoperative gastric cancer staging.

    PubMed

    Cimavilla Román, Marta; de la Serna Higuera, Carlos; Loza Vargas, Luz Andrea; Benito Fernández, César; Barrio Andrés, Jesús; Madrigal Rubiales, Beatriz; Fernández Pérez, Gabriel; Pérez-Miranda, Manuel

    2017-09-25

    Endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) is the gold standard technique in loco-regional staging of gastric adenocarcinoma (GAC). Nevertheless, the introduction of multidetector-row computed tomography (MDCT) allows accurate studies to be performed. To compare the diagnostic yield of EUS and MDCT in loco-regional preoperative staging of gastric adenocarcinoma. This was a retrospective and comparative study of all surgical patients with GAC and preoperative staging by EUS and 64-row MDCT. The results for each case were compared with the histological data. Seventy seven surgical patients with GAC were identified and forty two had a complete preoperative staging and were finally included in the study. With regard to overall accuracy of T staging, EUS was superior to MDCT (62% vs 50%). In a subanalysis of early stages (T1-T2) and advanced stages (T3-T4), accuracy and sensitivity (S) were higher for EUS than for MDTC (83.3% vs 64.29% and 84.4% vs 59.5% respectively), although this did not reach statistical significance. The overall accuracy and sensitivity of EUS for N staging was lower than that for MDCT, although neither comparison reached statistical significance (57% vs 64% and 29% vs 55%). EUS diagnostic yield is similar to new MDCT with regard to T and N preoperative staging of GAC. Nevertheless, both techniques should be considered as complementary until more extensive and randomized studies can confirm these results.

  13. Sixteen-row multislice computed tomography: basic concepts, protocols, and enhanced clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Cademartiri, Filippo; Luccichenti, Giacomo; van Der Lugt, Aad; Pavone, Paolo; Pattynama, Peter M; de Feyter, Pim J; Krestin, Gabriel P

    2004-02-01

    Since its introduction, spiral computed tomography (CT) technology underwent a continuous and fast technical and clinical development. In particular, spatial and temporal resolutions were constantly increased during the last decade. The main breakthrough for clinical application was the introduction of multislice technology, first with 2-row and 4-row equipment and more recently with 16-row scanners. A high-resolution sub-millimeter CT dataset can be acquired easily, although with an increased x-ray exposure for the patient. The high speed of the scan requires up-to-date and careful protocol optimization. Scanner technology and geometry affect image formation procedure and imaging protocols should be adapted accordingly. The technical foundations of spiral CT imaging and the main scan and reconstruction parameters are described in this article. Updated protocols and clinical examples of the latest applications are also discussed.

  14. Alcoholic Women on Skid Row.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Sandra C.

    1987-01-01

    Examined women (N=20) who were receiving alcoholism treatment in the skid-row area of Portland, Oregon. Women had histories of problem drinking and extensive treatment for alcoholism. Most had been married and had children. Despite transiency, the majority maintained contact with friends and relatives. Compared these women to New York City's…

  15. Integrated assessment of coronary anatomy and myocardial perfusion using a retractable SPECT camera combined with 64-slice CT: initial experience.

    PubMed

    Thilo, Christian; Schoepf, U Joseph; Gordon, Leonie; Chiaramida, Salvatore; Serguson, Jill; Costello, Philip

    2009-04-01

    We evaluated a prototype SPECT system integrated with multidetector row CT (MDCT) for obtaining complementary information on coronary anatomy and hemodynamic lesion significance. Twenty-five consecutive patients with known or suspected coronary artery disease (CAD) underwent routine SPECT myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI). All patients also underwent repeat MPI with a mobile SPECT unit which could be attached to a 64-slice MDCT system. Coronary CT angiography (cCTA) was performed without repositioning the patient. Investigational MPI was compared with routine MPI for detection of myocardial perfusion defects (PD). Two observers diagnosed presence or absence of CAD based on MPI alone, cCTA alone, and based on combined MPI and cCTA with fused image display. In 22/24 patients investigative MPI corresponded with routine MPI (r = 0.80). Stenosis >or= 50% at cCTA was detected in 6/24 patients. Six out of 24 patients had PD at regular MPI. Three of these six patients had no significant stenosis at cCTA. Three out of 19 patients with normal MPI studies had significant stenosis at cCTA. Our initial experience indicates that the integration of SPECT MPI with cCTA is technically feasible and enables the comprehensive evaluation of coronary artery anatomy and myocardial perfusion with a single instrumental setup.

  16. Role of Computer Aided Diagnosis (CAD) in the detection of pulmonary nodules on 64 row multi detector computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Prakashini, K; Babu, Satish; Rajgopal, KV; Kokila, K Raja

    2016-01-01

    Aims and Objectives: To determine the overall performance of an existing CAD algorithm with thin-section computed tomography (CT) in the detection of pulmonary nodules and to evaluate detection sensitivity at a varying range of nodule density, size, and location. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional prospective study was conducted on 20 patients with 322 suspected nodules who underwent diagnostic chest imaging using 64-row multi-detector CT. The examinations were evaluated on reconstructed images of 1.4 mm thickness and 0.7 mm interval. Detection of pulmonary nodules, initially by a radiologist of 2 years experience (RAD) and later by CAD lung nodule software was assessed. Then, CAD nodule candidates were accepted or rejected accordingly. Detected nodules were classified based on their size, density, and location. The performance of the RAD and CAD system was compared with the gold standard that is true nodules confirmed by consensus of senior RAD and CAD together. The overall sensitivity and false-positive (FP) rate of CAD software was calculated. Observations and Results: Of the 322 suspected nodules, 221 were classified as true nodules on the consensus of senior RAD and CAD together. Of the true nodules, the RAD detected 206 (93.2%) and 202 (91.4%) by the CAD. CAD and RAD together picked up more number of nodules than either CAD or RAD alone. Overall sensitivity for nodule detection with the CAD program was 91.4%, and FP detection per patient was 5.5%. The CAD showed comparatively higher sensitivity for nodules of size 4–10 mm (93.4%) and nodules in hilar (100%) and central (96.5%) location when compared to RAD's performance. Conclusion: CAD performance was high in detecting pulmonary nodules including the small size and low-density nodules. CAD even with relatively high FP rate, assists and improves RAD's performance as a second reader, especially for nodules located in the central and hilar region and for small nodules by saving RADs time. PMID:27578931

  17. Mechanical performance of aquatic rowing and flying.

    PubMed Central

    Walker, J A; Westneat, M W

    2000-01-01

    Aquatic flight, performed by rowing or flapping fins, wings or limbs, is a primary locomotor mechanism for many animals. We used a computer simulation to compare the mechanical performance of rowing and flapping appendages across a range of speeds. Flapping appendages proved to be more mechanically efficient than rowing appendages at all swimming speeds, suggesting that animals that frequently engage in locomotor behaviours that require energy conservation should employ a flapping stroke. The lower efficiency of rowing appendages across all speeds begs the question of why rowing occurs at all. One answer lies in the ability of rowing fins to generate more thrust than flapping fins during the power stroke. Large forces are necessary for manoeuvring behaviours such as accelerations, turning and braking, which suggests that rowing should be found in slow-swimming animals that frequently manoeuvre. The predictions of the model are supported by observed patterns of behavioural variation among rowing and flapping vertebrates. PMID:11052539

  18. Billet planting, 8-foot rows, residue updates

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Cultural practices are continually tested and upgraded to maximize sugarcane yield in Louisiana. Over the past 3 years extensive research went in to comparing the industry standard 6-foot row spacing to a wider, 8 foot row. Each 8 foot row was double drilled with seed canes that were 2-3 feet apart....

  19. Bilateral Second Carpal Row Duplication Associated with Multiple Epiphyseal Dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Cladiere-Nassif, Victoire; Delaroche, Caroline; Pottier, Edwige; Feron, Jean-Marc

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of a 75-year-old woman presenting a hitherto undescribed condition of bilateral second carpal row duplication. She was diagnosed in childhood with both Marfan and Ehlers-Danlos syndromes, with no clear evidence and no further medical follow-up. She presented throughout her life with various articular symptoms, which appeared to be compatible with a diagnosis of multiple epiphyseal dysplasia, and underwent several surgical procedures on her knees and hips. Most recently, she was reporting pain at the base of the fifth metacarpal bone of the left hand. X-ray images and computed tomography (CT) were obtained for exploration and showed a total second row duplication in both carpi, with a total number of 18 carpal bones in each wrist. PMID:26649258

  20. Dynamic multidetector computed tomography findings of hepatocellular carcinoma of hepatitis B virus-positive and -negative patients

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The objective of this study was to retrospectively investigate and compare multidetector computed tomography findings of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in hepatitis B virus (HBV)-positive and -negative patients. Methods Triphasic (arterial, portal venous, and delayed phases) dynamic multidetector computed tomography (CT) was performed in 83 patients with HCC, 48 of whom were HBV-positive. The diagnosis of HCC was established with typical CT imaging findings (68 patients) or histopathological evaluation (15 patients). Distribution of solitary, multiple, and diffuse HCC, portal/hepatic vein thrombosis, metastasis, and patients with high alpha-fetoprotein levels in the HBV-positive and -negative groups were compared using the Kolmogorov–Smirnov test. Lesion size, alpha-fetoprotein levels, arterial, portal, delayed enhancement, and washout of lesions were compared using the Student’s t-test. Results Hypervascular tumors were observed in 72 (87%) patients, and hypovascular tumors were found in 11 (13%) patients. The mean alpha-fetoprotein value of HBV-positive patients with HCC was significantly higher than the mean alpha-fetoprotein value of HBV-negative patients (P < 0.05). Portal/hepatic vein thrombosis and metastasis were more frequently observed in HBV-positive patients (P < 0.05). The frequencies of solitary, multiple, and diffuse lesions in HBV-positive and -negative patients were not significantly different (P > 0.05). The mean diameters, arterial, portal, and delayed phase attenuations, and washout of HCC were not significantly different (P > 0.05). Conclusions Multidetector CT imaging findings of HCC in HBV-positive and -negative patients are alike. Portal/hepatic vein thrombosis and metastasis are more frequently observed in HBV-positive patients. Alpha-fetoprotein levels are higher in HBV-positive patients. PMID:25608603

  1. [Visualization of pulmonary vein stenosis after radio frequency ablation for treatment of atrial fibrillation using multidetector computed tomography with retrospective gating].

    PubMed

    Trabold, T; Küttner, A; Heuschmid, M; Burgstahler, C; Mewis, C; Kopp, A F; Schröder, S; Kühlkamp, V; Claussen, C D

    2003-01-01

    With the number of radio frequency ablations (RFA) for treatment of chronic atrial fibrillation increasing, the diagnostic evaluation for RFA associated pulmonary vein stenosis is getting more important. This study investigates the feasibility of the visualization of pulmonary vein stenosis using non-invasive multidetector computed tomography. Twenty-eight patients were examined following RFA-treatment. A 4-slice (20 patients) and a 16-slice (8 patients) multidetector CT scanner (SOMATOM Volume Zoom and Sensation 16, Siemens, Forchheim, Germany) with retrospective gating was used to assess the pulmonary veins. Lesion severity was determined on a semi-quantitative scale (< 30 %, 30 - 50 %, > 50 %). CT was performed without any complications in all patients. Diagnostic image quality could be obtained in all examinations. The pulmonary veins showed lesions < 30 % in four patients, lesions of 30 -, 50 % in five patients and a stenosis > 50 % in one patient. Eighteen patients showed no lesions. Multidetector CT of the pulmonary veins seems to be able to visualize high-grade and low-grade lesions, but larger catheter-controlled studies are needed for further assessment of the diagnostic accuracy and clinical reliability of this noninvasive method.

  2. Four- and Eight-Channel Aortoiliac CT Angiography: A Comparative Study

    SciTech Connect

    Karcaaltincaba, Musturay Foley, Dennis

    2005-04-15

    Purpose. To compare performance parameters, contrast material load and radiation dose in a patient cohort having aortoiliac CT angiography using 4- and 8-channel multidetector CT (MDCT) systems. Methods. Eighteen patients with abdominal aortic aneurysms underwent initial 4-channel and follow-up 8-channel MDCT angiography. Both the 4- and 8-channel MDCT systems utilized a matrix detector of 16 x 1.25 mm rows. Scan coverage included the abdominal aorta and iliac arteries to the level of the proximal femoral arteries. For 4-channel MDCT, nominal slice thickness and beam pitch were 1.25 mm and 1.5, respectively, and for 8-channel MDCT they were 1.25 mm and 1.35 or 1.65 respectively. Scan duration, iodinated contrast material load and mean aortoiliac attenuation were compared retrospectively. Comparative radiation dose measurements for 4- and 8-channel MDCT were obtained using a multiple scan average dose technique on an abdominal phantom. Results. Compared with 4-channel MDCT, 8-channel MDCT aortoiliac angiography was performed with equivalent collimation, decreased contrast load (mean 45% decrease: 144 ml versus 83 ml of 300 mg iodine/ml contrast material) and decreased acquisition time (mean 51% shorter: 34.4 sec versus 16.9 sec) without a significant change in mean aortic enhancement (299 HU versus 300 HU, p > 0.05). Radiation dose was 2 rad for the 4-channel system and 2/1.5 rad for the 8-channel system at 1.35/1.65 pitch respectively. Conclusion. Compared with 4-channel MDCT, aortoiliac CT angiography with 8-channel MDCT produces equivalent z-axis resolution with decreased contrast load and acquisition time without increased radiation exposure.

  3. Morphometric analysis of sex differences in contemporary Japanese pelves using multidetector computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Torimitsu, Suguru; Makino, Yohsuke; Saitoh, Hisako; Sakuma, Ayaka; Ishii, Namiko; Yajima, Daisuke; Inokuchi, Go; Motomura, Ayumi; Chiba, Fumiko; Yamaguchi, Rutsuko; Hashimoto, Mari; Hoshioka, Yumi; Iwase, Hirotaro

    2015-12-01

    Sex estimation of decomposed or skeletal remains is clearly important in forensic contexts. Recently, contemporary population-specific data has been obtained using multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) scanning. The main purpose of this study was to investigate skeletal pelvic dimorphism in a contemporary Japanese forensic sample and to quantify the accuracy of sex estimation using various pelvic measurements obtained from three-dimensional (3D) CT images. This study used a total of 208 cadavers (104 males, 104 females) of which postmortem CT scanning and subsequent forensic autopsy were conducted between December 2011 and August 2014. Eleven measurements of each pelvis were obtained from 3D CT reconstructed images that extracted only bone data. The measurements were analyzed using descriptive statistics and discriminant function analyses. All except one measurement were dimorphic in terms of sex differences. Univariate discriminant function analyses using these measurements provided sex classification accuracy rates of 62.0-98.1%. The subpubic angle was found to contribute most significantly to accurate sex estimation. Multivariate discriminant functions yielded sex prediction accuracy rates of 63.9-98.1%. In conclusion, the pelvic measurements obtained from 3D CT images of a contemporary Japanese population successfully demonstrated sexual dimorphism and may be useful for the estimation of skeletal sex in the field of forensic anthropology.

  4. Diagnostic accuracy of intra-abdominal fluid collection characterization in the era of multidetector computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Allen, Brian C; Barnhart, Huiman; Bashir, Mustafa; Nieman, Christopher; Breault, Steven; Jaffe, Tracy A

    2012-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that with improved technology, the presence of abscess in a postoperative fluid collection may be prospectively made. This is an Institutional Review Board-approved, Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act-compliant retrospective review of computed tomography (CT)-guided intra-abdominal fluid collection drainages. The diagnostic CT scans of 95 consecutive patients performed on 16- and 64-multidetector CT (MDCT) were reviewed by four readers with varying abdominal imaging expertise. Readers were asked to determine fluid content, to document whether infection was present, and to rate reader confidence for infection. A fifth radiologist reviewed the collections for imaging characteristics. The gold standard for presence of infection was microbiological Gram stain and culture. The logistic regression model showed that both fluid collections containing gas or high attenuation fluid (average CT density 20 or greater Hounsfield units) are significant predictors of infection (P = 0.001). The average sensitivity over the four readers for determining presence of infection was 83.4 per cent and specificity was 39.3 per cent. Even in the era of MDCT, the ability to predict whether or not a fluid collection is infected or not, based on imaging findings alone, is limited. Presence of gas is a strong indicator of infection, but no imaging finding is characteristic of a sterile fluid collection.

  5. Hyaline cartilage thickness in radiographically normal cadaveric hips: comparison of spiral CT arthrographic and macroscopic measurements.

    PubMed

    Wyler, Annabelle; Bousson, Valérie; Bergot, Catherine; Polivka, Marc; Leveque, Eric; Vicaut, Eric; Laredo, Jean-Denis

    2007-02-01

    To assess spiral multidetector computed tomographic (CT) arthrography for the depiction of cartilage thickness in hips without cartilage loss, with evaluation of anatomic slices as the reference standard. Permission to perform imaging studies in cadaveric specimens of individuals who had willed their bodies to science was obtained from the institutional review board. Two independent observers measured the femoral and acetabular hyaline cartilage thickness of 12 radiographically normal cadaveric hips (from six women and five men; age range at death, 52-98 years; mean, 76.5 years) on spiral multidetector CT arthrographic reformations and on coronal anatomic slices. Regions of cartilage loss at gross or histologic examination were excluded. CT arthrographic and anatomic measurements in the coronal plane were compared by using Bland-Altman representation and a paired t test. Differences between mean cartilage thicknesses at the points of measurement were tested by means of analysis of variance. Interobserver and intraobserver reproducibilities were determined. At CT arthrography, mean cartilage thickness ranged from 0.32 to 2.53 mm on the femoral head and from 0.95 to 3.13 mm on the acetabulum. Observers underestimated cartilage thickness in the coronal plane by 0.30 mm +/- 0.52 (mean +/- standard error) at CT arthrography (P < .001) compared with the anatomic reference standard. Ninety-five percent of the differences between CT arthrography and anatomic values ranged from -1.34 to 0.74 mm. The difference between mean cartilage thicknesses at the different measurement points was significant for coronal spiral multidetector CT arthrography and anatomic measurement of the femoral head and acetabulum and for sagittal and transverse CT arthrography of the femoral head (P < .001). Changes in cartilage thickness from the periphery to the center of the joint ("gradients") were found by means of spiral multidetector CT arthrography and anatomic measurement. Spiral

  6. Effect of low-xenon and krypton supplementation on signal/noise of regional CT-based ventilation measurements.

    PubMed

    Chon, Deokiee; Beck, Kenneth C; Simon, Brett A; Shikata, Hidenori; Saba, Osama I; Hoffman, Eric A

    2007-04-01

    Xenon computed tomography (Xe-CT) is used to estimate regional ventilation by measuring regional attenuation changes over multiple breaths while rebreathing a constant Xe concentration ([Xe]). Xe-CT has potential human applications, although anesthetic properties limit [Xe] to multidetector row CT. Lungs were imaged by respiratory gating during washin of a 30%, 40%, 55% Xe, and a 30% Xe/30% Kr mixture. Using Kr avoids unwanted effects of Xe. Mean TCs, coefficients of variation (CV), and half confidence intervals (CI)/mean served as indexes of sensitivity to noise. Mean supine and prone TCs of three [Xe] values were not significantly different. Average CVs of TCs increased from 57% (55% Xe), 58% (40% Xe), and 73% (30% Xe) (P < 0.05: paired t-tests; 30% Xe vs. higher [Xe]). Monte Carlo simulation indicated a CV based on inherent image noise was 8% for 55% Xe and 17% for 30% Xe (P < 0.05). Adding 30% Kr to 30% Xe gave a washin signal equivalent to 40% Xe. Half CI/mean using the 30% Xe/30% Kr mixture was not significantly different from 55 and 40% Xe. Although average TCs were not affected by changes in [Xe], the higher CV and half CI/mean suggested reduced signal-to-noise ratio at the 30% [Xe]. The 30% Xe/30% Kr mixture was comparable to that of 40% Xe, providing an important agent for CT-based assessment of regional ventilation in humans.

  7. Effect of x-ray tube current on the accuracy of cerebral perfusion parameters obtained by CT perfusion studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murase, Kenya; Nanjo, Takafumi; Satoshi, Ii; Miyazaki, Shohei; Hirata, Masaaki; Sugawara, Yoshifumi; Kudo, Masayuki; Sasaki, Kousuke; Mochizuki, Teruhito

    2005-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of x-ray tube current on the accuracy of cerebral perfusion parameters obtained by CT perfusion studies using multi-detector row CT (MDCT). Following the standard CT perfusion study protocol, continuous (cine) scans (1 s/rotation × 60 s) consisting of four 5 mm thick contiguous slices were performed using an MDCT scanner with a tube voltage of 80 kVp and a tube current of 200 mA. We generated the simulated images with tube currents of 50 mA, 100 mA and 150 mA by adding the corresponding noise to the raw scan data of the original image acquired above using a noise simulation tool. From the original and simulated images, we generated the functional images of cerebral blood flow (CBF), cerebral blood volume (CBV) and mean transit time (MTT) in seven patients with cerebrovascular disease, and compared the correlation coefficients (CCs) between the perfusion parameter values obtained from the original and simulated images. The coefficients of variation (CVs) in the white matter were also compared. The CC values deteriorated with decreasing tube current. There was a significant difference between 50 mA and 100 mA for all perfusion parameters. The CV values increased with decreasing tube current. There were significant differences between 50 mA and 100 mA and between 100 mA and 150 mA for CBF. For CBV and MTT, there was also a significant difference between 150 mA and 200 mA. This study will be useful for understanding the effect of x-ray tube current on the accuracy of cerebral perfusion parameters obtained by CT perfusion studies using MDCT, and for selecting the tube current.

  8. Effect of x-ray tube current on the accuracy of cerebral perfusion parameters obtained by CT perfusion studies.

    PubMed

    Murase, Kenya; Nanjo, Takafumi; Ii, Satoshi; Miyazaki, Shohei; Hirata, Masaaki; Sugawara, Yoshifumi; Kudo, Masayuki; Sasaki, Kousuke; Mochizuki, Teruhito

    2005-11-07

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of x-ray tube current on the accuracy of cerebral perfusion parameters obtained by CT perfusion studies using multi-detector row CT (MDCT). Following the standard CT perfusion study protocol, continuous (cine) scans (1 s/rotation x 60 s) consisting of four 5 mm thick contiguous slices were performed using an MDCT scanner with a tube voltage of 80 kVp and a tube current of 200 mA. We generated the simulated images with tube currents of 50 mA, 100 mA and 150 mA by adding the corresponding noise to the raw scan data of the original image acquired above using a noise simulation tool. From the original and simulated images, we generated the functional images of cerebral blood flow (CBF), cerebral blood volume (CBV) and mean transit time (MTT) in seven patients with cerebrovascular disease, and compared the correlation coefficients (CCs) between the perfusion parameter values obtained from the original and simulated images. The coefficients of variation (CVs) in the white matter were also compared. The CC values deteriorated with decreasing tube current. There was a significant difference between 50 mA and 100 mA for all perfusion parameters. The CV values increased with decreasing tube current. There were significant differences between 50 mA and 100 mA and between 100 mA and 150 mA for CBF. For CBV and MTT, there was also a significant difference between 150 mA and 200 mA. This study will be useful for understanding the effect of x-ray tube current on the accuracy of cerebral perfusion parameters obtained by CT perfusion studies using MDCT, and for selecting the tube current.

  9. Intramural gastric abscess--preoperative diagnosis with CT.

    PubMed

    Asrani, Ashwin; Novelline, Robert; Abujudeh, Hani; Lawrason, James; Kaewlai, Rathachai

    2007-09-01

    Intramural gastric abscess is a rare condition representing a localized form of suppurative gastritis, which was described in the time of Galen. Cases are usually diagnosed either with a combination of imaging modalities such as upper gastrointestinal series, ultrasound, computed tomography (CT), and endoscopic ultrasound or in conjunction with endoscopy and laparotomy. The authors describe a case of intramural gastric abscess in which the diagnosis was made preoperatively using axial, coronal, and sagittal reformations obtained with multidetector CT.

  10. Radiation dose reduction with application of non-linear adaptive filters for abdominal CT

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Sarabjeet; Kalra, Mannudeep K; Sung, Mi Kim; Back, Anni; Blake, Michael A

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the effect of non-linear adaptive filters (NLAF) on abdominal computed tomography (CT) images acquired at different radiation dose levels. METHODS: Nineteen patients (mean age 61.6 ± 7.9 years, M:F = 8:11) gave informed consent for an Institutional Review Board approved prospective study involving acquisition of 4 additional image series (200, 150, 100, 50 mAs and 120 kVp) on a 64 slice multidetector row CT scanner over an identical 10 cm length in the abdomen. The CT images acquired at 150, 100 and 50 mAs were processed with the NLAF. Two radiologists reviewed unprocessed and processed images for image quality in a blinded randomized manner. CT dose index volume, dose length product, patient weight, transverse diameters, objective noise and CT numbers were recorded. Data were analyzed using Analysis of Variance and Wilcoxon signed rank test. RESULTS: Of the 31 lesions detected in abdominal CT images, 28 lesions were less than 1 cm in size. Subjective image noise was graded as unacceptable in unprocessed images at 50 and 100 mAs, and in NLAF processed images at 50 mAs only. In NLAF processed images, objective image noise was decreased by 21% (14.4 ± 4/18.2 ± 4.9) at 150 mAs, 28.3% (15.7 ± 5.6/21.9 ± 4) at 100 mAs and by 39.4% (18.8 ± 9/30.4 ± 9.2) at 50 mAs compared to unprocessed images acquired at respective radiation dose levels. At 100 mAs the visibility of smaller structures improved from suboptimal in unprocessed images to excellent in NLAF processed images, whereas diagnostic confidence was respectively improved from probably confident to fully confident. CONCLUSION: NLAF lowers image noise, improves the visibility of small structures and maintains lesion conspicuity at down to 100 mAs for abdominal CT. PMID:22328968

  11. Automatic detection of ureter lesions in CT urography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Exell, Trevor; Hadjiiski, Lubomir; Chan, Heang-Ping; Cha, Kenny H.; Caoili, Elaine M.; Cohan, Richard H.; Wei, Jun; Zhou, Chuan

    2016-03-01

    We are developing a CAD system for automated detection of ureter abnormalities in multi-detector row CT urography (CTU). Our CAD system consists of two stages. The first stage automatically tracks the ureter via the previously proposed COmbined Model-guided Path-finding Analysis and Segmentation System (COMPASS). The second stage consists of lesion enhancement filtering, adaptive thresholding, edge extraction, and noise removal. With IRB approval, 36 cases were collected from patient files, including 15 cases (17 ureters with 32 lesions) for training, and 10 abnormal cases (11 ureters with 17 lesions) and 11 normal cases (22 ureters) for testing. All lesions were identified by experienced radiologists on the CTU images and COMPASS was able to track the ureters in 100% of the cases. The average lesion size was 5.1 mm (range: 2.1 mm - 21.9 mm) for the training set and 6.1 mm (range: 2.0 mm - 18.9 mm) for the test set. The average conspicuity was 4.1 (range: 2 to 5) and 3.9 (range: 1 to 5) on a scale of 1 to 5 (5 very subtle), for the training and test sets, respectively. The system achieved 90.6% sensitivity at 2.41 (41/17) FPs/ureter for the training set and 70.6% sensitivity at 2 (44/22) FPs/normal ureter for the test set. These initial results demonstrate the feasibility of the CAD system to track the ureter and detect ureter cancer of medium conspicuity and relatively small sizes.

  12. CT angiography in the abdomen: a pictorial review and update.

    PubMed

    Liu, Peter S; Platt, Joel F

    2014-02-01

    The development of multidetector CT technology and helical scanning techniques has revolutionized the use of CT for primary diagnostic evaluation of the abdominal vasculature, particularly the arterial system. CT angiography has numerous benefits relative to conventional catheter angiography, and has largely replaced catheter-based techniques in many clinical algorithms. This pictorial review and update will cover important technical principles related to modern CT angiography (including contrast delivery and dose considerations), discuss relevant anatomy and variants, and illustrate numerous arterial conditions related to the abdominal aorta and branch vessels.

  13. YIELD AND GRADE OF VALENCIA PEANUT IN SINGLE ROW, TWIN ROW, AND DIAMOND PLANTING PATTERNS

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A study was conducted at Wayne Baker’s farm South of Clovis in 2006 to compare single row, twin row, and diamond planting patterns in Valencia peanut on 36 inch beds. The twin row and diamond pattern treatments were planted with an experimental planter developed at the USDA-ARS National Peanut Rese...

  14. : Light Interception in Single Row, Twin Row, and Diamond Planting Patterns of Valencia Peanut

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A field study was conducted on a growers farm South of Clovis, NM in 2006 to compare light interception and radiation use efficiency in single row, twin row, and diamond planted Valencia peanuts with line quantum sensors (Apogee instruments, Logan) installed across the crop row. Data were recorded ...

  15. Measurement of radiation dose in cerebral CT perfusion study.

    PubMed

    Hirata, Masaaki; Sugawara, Yoshifumi; Fukutomi, Yukimi; Oomoto, Kenji; Murase, Kenya; Miki, Hitoshi; Mochizuki, Teruhito

    2005-03-01

    To evaluate radiation dose in cerebral perfusion studies with a multi-detector row CT (MDCT) scanner on various voltage and current settings by using a human head phantom. Following the CT perfusion study protocol, continuous cine scans (1 sec/rotation x60 sec) consisting of four 5-mm-thick contiguous slices were performed three times at variable tube voltages of 80 kV, 100 kV, 120 kV, and 140 kV with the same tube current setting of 200 mA and on variable current settings of 50 mA, 100 mA, 150 mA, and 200 mA with the same tube voltage of 80 kV. Radiation doses were measured using a total of 41 theroluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) placed in the human head phantom. Thirty-six TLDs were inside and three were on the surface of the slice of the X-ray beam center, and two were placed on the surface 3 cm caudal assuming the lens position. Average radiation doses of surface, inside, and lens increased in proportion to the increases of tube voltage and tube current. The lowest inside dose was 87.6+/-15.3 mGy, and the lowest surface dose was 162.5+/-6.7 mGy at settings of 80 kV and 50 mA. The highest inside dose was 1,591.5+/-179.7 mGy, and the highest surface dose was 2,264.6+/-123.7 mGy at 140 kV-200 mA. At 80 kV-50 mA, the average radiation dose of lens was the lowest at 5.5+/-0.0 mGy. At 140 kV-200 mA the radiation dose of lens was the highest at 127.2+/-0.6 mGy. In cerebral CT perfusion study, radiation dose can vary considerably. Awareness of the patient's radiation dose is recommended.

  16. Assessment of regional ventilation and deformation using 4D-CT imaging for healthy human lungs during tidal breathing

    PubMed Central

    Jahani, Nariman; Choi, Jiwoong; Iyer, Krishna; Hoffman, Eric A.

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to assess regional ventilation, nonlinearity, and hysteresis of human lungs during dynamic breathing via image registration of four-dimensional computed tomography (4D-CT) scans. Six healthy adult humans were studied by spiral multidetector-row CT during controlled tidal breathing as well as during total lung capacity and functional residual capacity breath holds. Static images were utilized to contrast static vs. dynamic (deep vs. tidal) breathing. A rolling-seal piston system was employed to maintain consistent tidal breathing during 4D-CT spiral image acquisition, providing required between-breath consistency for physiologically meaningful reconstructed respiratory motion. Registration-derived variables including local air volume and anisotropic deformation index (ADI, an indicator of preferential deformation in response to local force) were employed to assess regional ventilation and lung deformation. Lobar distributions of air volume change during tidal breathing were correlated with those of deep breathing (R2 ≈ 0.84). Small discrepancies between tidal and deep breathing were shown to be likely due to different distributions of air volume change in the left and the right lungs. We also demonstrated an asymmetric characteristic of flow rate between inhalation and exhalation. With ADI, we were able to quantify nonlinearity and hysteresis of lung deformation that can only be captured in dynamic images. Nonlinearity quantified by ADI is greater during inhalation, and it is stronger in the lower lobes (P < 0.05). Lung hysteresis estimated by the difference of ADI between inhalation and exhalation is more significant in the right lungs than that in the left lungs. PMID:26316512

  17. Assessment of regional ventilation and deformation using 4D-CT imaging for healthy human lungs during tidal breathing.

    PubMed

    Jahani, Nariman; Choi, Sanghun; Choi, Jiwoong; Iyer, Krishna; Hoffman, Eric A; Lin, Ching-Long

    2015-11-15

    This study aims to assess regional ventilation, nonlinearity, and hysteresis of human lungs during dynamic breathing via image registration of four-dimensional computed tomography (4D-CT) scans. Six healthy adult humans were studied by spiral multidetector-row CT during controlled tidal breathing as well as during total lung capacity and functional residual capacity breath holds. Static images were utilized to contrast static vs. dynamic (deep vs. tidal) breathing. A rolling-seal piston system was employed to maintain consistent tidal breathing during 4D-CT spiral image acquisition, providing required between-breath consistency for physiologically meaningful reconstructed respiratory motion. Registration-derived variables including local air volume and anisotropic deformation index (ADI, an indicator of preferential deformation in response to local force) were employed to assess regional ventilation and lung deformation. Lobar distributions of air volume change during tidal breathing were correlated with those of deep breathing (R(2) ≈ 0.84). Small discrepancies between tidal and deep breathing were shown to be likely due to different distributions of air volume change in the left and the right lungs. We also demonstrated an asymmetric characteristic of flow rate between inhalation and exhalation. With ADI, we were able to quantify nonlinearity and hysteresis of lung deformation that can only be captured in dynamic images. Nonlinearity quantified by ADI is greater during inhalation, and it is stronger in the lower lobes (P < 0.05). Lung hysteresis estimated by the difference of ADI between inhalation and exhalation is more significant in the right lungs than that in the left lungs.

  18. Hyperdense middle cerebral artery sign in multidetector computed tomography: definition, occurrence, and reliability analysis.

    PubMed

    Abul-Kasim, Kasim; Selariu, Eufrozina; Brizzi, Marco; Petersson, Jesper

    2009-01-01

    The hyperdense middle cerebral artery sign (HMCAS) is one of the early changes seen on the computed tomography in acute ischemic stroke of MCA territory. To evaluate the reliability of subjective evaluation of HMCAS on CT performed at multidetector CT (MDCT) and evaluated in the Picture Archiving Communication Systems, to define objective criteria for HMCAS and to find out if there are any predictors for the occurrence of HMCAS. CTs of 121 consecutive patients (mean age of 70 years) treated with thrombolytic therapy were retrospectively evaluated by two neuroradiologists both subjectively and objectively with respect to HMCAS. HMCAS was subjectively found in 32% of study population. The interobserver and intraobserver agreement were substantial (K value of 0.69 and 0.80, respectively) and increased to almost perfect (K value of 0.86) when the reader provided with clinical information. The HMCAS was found twice as often in male patients. Patients with HMCAS were three years younger than those whose baseline CT did not show HMCAS. A 100% sensitivity achieved when objective criteria were defined as combination of MCA attenuation >or= 46 HU and MCA ratio > 1.2 (using oval ROIs) and MCA attenuation >or= 50 HU and MCA ratio of > 1.4 (using pixel sized ROIs). Performing CT examinations on MDCT and assessment of the images in PACS might have contributed to improvement of the reliability of evaluating HMCAS on CT by enabling an objective evaluation of this sign with measurements of attenuation value in the course of MCA using oval or pixel sized ROIs as well as estimation of MCA ratio.

  19. Managing patient dose in multi-detector computed tomography(MDCT). ICRP Publication 102.

    PubMed

    Valentin, J

    2007-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) technology has changed considerably in recent years with the introduction of increasing numbers of multiple detector arrays. There are several parameters specific to multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT) scanners that increase or decrease patient dose systematically compared to older single detector computed tomography (SDCT) scanners. This document briefly reviews the MDCT technology, radiation dose in MDCT, including differences from SDCT and factors that affect dose, radiation risks, and the responsibilities for patient dose management. The document recommends that users need to understand the relationship between patient dose and image quality and be aware that image quality in CT is often higher than that necessary for diagnostic confidence. Automatic exposure control (AEC) does not totally free the operator from selection of scan parameters, and awareness of individual systems is important. Scanning protocols cannot simply be transferred between scanners from different manufacturers and should be determined for each MDCT. If the image quality is appropriately specified by the user, and suited to the clinical task, there will be a reduction in patient dose for most patients. Understanding of some parameters is not intuitive and the selection of image quality parameter values in AEC systems is not straightforward. Examples of some clinical situation shave been included to demonstrate dose management, e.g. CT examinations of the chest, the heart for coronary calcium quantification and non-invasive coronary angiography, colonography, the urinary tract, children, pregnant patients, trauma cases, and CT guided interventions. CT is increasingly being used to replace conventional x-ray studies and it is important that patient dose is given careful consideration, particularly with repeated or multiple examinations.

  20. Is multidetector computed tomography comparable to magnetic resonance imaging for assessment of lumbar foraminal stenosis?

    PubMed

    Kang, Woo Young; Ahn, Joong Mo; Lee, Joon Woo; Lee, Eugene; Bae, Yun Jung; Seo, Jiwoon; Kim, Junghoon; Kang, Heung Sik

    2017-02-01

    Background Both multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are used for assessment of lumbar foraminal stenosis (LFS). Therefore, it is relevant to assess agreement between these imaging modalities. Purpose To determine intermodality, inter-, and intra-observer agreement for assessment of LFS on MDCT and MRI. Material and Methods A total of 120 foramina in 20 patients who visited our institution in January and February 2014 were evaluated by six radiologists with different levels of experience. Radiologists evaluated presence and severity of LFS on sagittal CT and MR images according to a previously published LFS grading system. Intermodality agreement was analyzed by using weighted kappa statistics, while inter- and intra-observer agreement were analyzed by using intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) and kappa statistics. Results Overall intermodality agreement was moderate to good (kappa, 0.478-0.765). In particular, two professors and one fellow tended to overestimate the degree of LFS on CT compared with MRI. For inter-observer agreement of all six observers, ICCs indicated excellent agreement for both CT (0.774) and MRI (0.771), while Fleiss' kappa values showed moderate agreement for CT (0.482) and MRI (0.575). There was better agreement between professors and fellows compared with residents. For intra-observer agreement, ICCs indicated excellent agreement, while kappa values showed good to excellent agreement for both CT and MRI. Conclusion MDCT was comparable to MRI for diagnosis and assessment of LFS, especially for experienced observers. However, there was a tendency to overestimate the degree of LFS on MDCT compared with MRI.

  1. Adrenal lesions: spectrum of imaging findings with emphasis on multi-detector computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Guerrisi, Antonino; Marin, Daniele; Baski, Mahbubeh; Guerrisi, Pietro; Capozza, Federica; Catalano, Carlo

    2013-01-01

    The adrenal gland is a common site of a large spectrum of abnormalities like primary tumors, hemorrhage, metastases, and enlargement of the gland from external hormonal stimulation. Most of these lesions represent nonfunctioning adrenal adenomas and thus warrant a conservative management. Multi-detector computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging are still considered highly specific and complementary techniques for the detection and characterization of adrenal abnormalities. Radiologist can establish a definitive diagnosis for most adrenal masses (i.e., carcinoma, hemorrhage) based on imaging alone. Imaging therefore can differentiate malignant lesions from those benign and avoid unnecessary aggressive management of benign lesions. The article gives an overview of the adrenal lesions and their imaging characteristics seen on CT and MR imaging.

  2. Mary Budd Rowe: A Storyteller of Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bianchini, Julie A.

    2008-01-01

    This article examines Mary Budd Rowe's groundbreaking and far-reaching contributions to science education. Rowe is best known for her research on wait-time: the idea that teachers can improve the quality and length of classroom discussions by waiting at least 3 s before and after student responses. Her wait-time research grew from and helped…

  3. On Row Rank Equal Column Rank

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khalili, Parviz

    2009-01-01

    We will prove a well-known theorem in Linear Algebra, that is, for any "m x n" matrix the dimension of row space and column space are the same. The proof is based on the subject of "elementary matrices" and "reduced row-echelon" form of a matrix.

  4. Rows=Wildlife Corridors: An Urban Resource.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Darrell D.

    1983-01-01

    Linear strips of land associated with highways, electrical transmission lines, gas/oil pipelines (called right-of-way or ROWs) are inhibited by a variety of wildlife and offer a unique opportunity to study the wildlife in the urban setting. Types of wildlife found in and importance of ROWs are discussed. (JN)

  5. On Row Rank Equal Column Rank

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khalili, Parviz

    2009-01-01

    We will prove a well-known theorem in Linear Algebra, that is, for any "m x n" matrix the dimension of row space and column space are the same. The proof is based on the subject of "elementary matrices" and "reduced row-echelon" form of a matrix.

  6. Multicenter Evaluation Of Coronary Dual-Source CT angiography in patients with intermediate Risk of Coronary Artery Stenoses (MEDIC): study design and rationale.

    PubMed

    Marwan, Mohamed; Hausleiter, Jörg; Abbara, Suhny; Hoffmann, Udo; Becker, Christoph; Ovrehus, Kristian; Ropers, Dieter; Bathina, Ravi; Berman, Dan; Anders, Katharina; Uder, Michael; Meave, Aloha; Alexánderson, Erick; Achenbach, Stephan

    2014-01-01

    The diagnostic performance of multidetector row CT to detect coronary artery stenosis has been evaluated in numerous single-center studies, with only limited data from large cohorts with low-to-intermediate likelihood of coronary disease and in multicenter trials. The Multicenter Evaluation of Coronary Dual-Source CT Angiography in Patients with Intermediate Risk of Coronary Artery Stenoses (MEDIC) trial determines the accuracy of dual-source CT (DSCT) to identify persons with at least 1 coronary artery stenosis among patients with low-to-intermediate pretest likelihood of disease. The MEDIC trial was designed as a prospective, multicenter, international trial to evaluate the diagnostic performance of DSCT for the detection of coronary artery stenosis compared with invasive coronary angiography. The study includes 8 sites in Germany, India, Mexico, the United States, and Denmark. The study population comprises patients referred for a diagnostic coronary angiogram because of suspected coronary artery disease with an intermediate pretest likelihood as determined by sex, age, and symptoms. All evaluations are performed by blinded core laboratory readers. The primary outcome of the MEDIC trial is the accuracy of DSCT to identify the presence of coronary artery stenoses with a luminal diameter narrowing of 50% or more on a per-vessel basis. Secondary outcome parameters include per-patient and per-segment diagnostic accuracy for 50% stenoses and accuracy to identify stenoses of 70% or more. Furthermore, secondary outcome parameters include the influence of heart rate, Agatston score, body weight, body mass index, image quality, and diagnostic confidence on the accuracy to detect coronary artery stenoses >50% on a per-vessel basis. The results of the MEDIC trial will assess the clinical utility of coronary CT angiography in the evaluation of patients with intermediate pretest likelihood of coronary artery disease. Copyright © 2014 Society of Cardiovascular Computed

  7. A Modular and Compact Multidetector System Based on Monolithic Telescopes

    SciTech Connect

    Figuera, P.; Cardella, G.; Di Pietro, A.; Papa, M.; Tian, W.; Amorini, F.; Musumarra, A.; Pappalardo, G.; Rizzo, F.; Tudisco, S.; Fallica, G.; Valvo, G.

    2004-02-27

    The characteristics of a new multidetector based on the use of Monolithic Silicon Telescopes are presented. Using suitable ion implantation techniques, the {delta}E and residual energy stages of the telescopes have been integrated on a single Si chip, obtaining a typical thickness for the {delta}E stage of the order of 2{mu}m.

  8. Galaxies with "rows": A new catalog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butenko, M. A.; Khoperskov, A. V.

    2017-07-01

    Galaxies with "rows" in Vorontsov-Velyaminov's terminology stand out among the variety of spiral galactic patterns. A characteristic feature of such objects is the sequence of straight-line segments that forms the spiral arm. In 2001 A. Chernin and co-authors published a catalog of such galaxies which includes 204 objects from the Palomar Atlas. In this paper, we supplement the catalog with 276 objects based on an analysis of all the galaxies from the New General Catalogue and Index Catalogue. The total number of NGC and IC galaxies with rows is 406, including the objects of Chernin et al. (2001). The use of more recent galaxy images allowed us to detect more "rows" on average, compared with the catalog of Chernin et al. When comparing the principal galaxy properties we found no significant differences between galaxies with rows and all S-typeNGC/IC galaxies.We discuss twomechanisms for the formation of polygonal structures based on numerical gas-dynamic and collisionless N-body calculations, which demonstrate that a spiral pattern with rows is a transient stage in the evolution of galaxies and a system with a powerful spiral structure can pass through this stage. The hypothesis of A. Chernin et al. (2001) that the occurrence frequency of interacting galaxies is twice higher among galaxies with rows is not confirmed for the combined set of 480 galaxies. The presence of a central stellar bar appears to be a favorable factor for the formation of a system of "rows".

  9. Anomalous origin of the left coronary artery from the pulmonary artery in children: diagnostic use of multidetector computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Shen, Quanli; Yao, Qiong; Hu, Xihong

    2016-09-01

    Anomalous origin of the left coronary artery from the pulmonary artery is a rare congenital anomaly. It is important to demonstrate the anomalous origin of the left coronary artery and its course before surgery. To explore the clinical diagnostic use of multidetector CT coronary angiography in detecting anomalous origin of the left coronary artery from the pulmonary artery in children. Nine children (2 boys, 7 girls) ages 2 months to 9 years with surgically confirmed anomalous origin of the left coronary artery from the pulmonary artery were studied. Clinical data, transthoracic echocardiography and CT coronary angiography images were retrospectively analyzed. Transthoracic echocardiography correctly diagnosed anomalous origin of the left coronary artery from the pulmonary artery in 7 of 9 patients (95% CI: 40-97%). CT coronary angiography revealed the anomalous origin of the left coronary artery in all children (95% CI: 66-100%). In a 4-year-old girl and a 9-year-old girl, CT coronary angiography showed dilation of the right coronary artery and collateral circulation between the right and the left coronary arteries. CT coronary angiography is a useful method to show the anomalous origin of the coronary artery in children with anomalous origin of the left coronary artery from the pulmonary artery, especially for patients in whom origin of the left coronary artery cannot be detected by transthoracic echocardiography.

  10. Mary Budd Rowe: a storyteller of science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianchini, Julie A.

    2008-12-01

    This article examines Mary Budd Rowe's groundbreaking and far-reaching contributions to science education. Rowe is best known for her research on wait-time: the idea that teachers can improve the quality and length of classroom discussions by waiting at least 3 s before and after student responses. Her wait-time research grew from and helped inform her staunch advocacy of science education as inquiry; Rowe saw wonder and excitement as central to the teaching and learning of science. She spent much of her professional life designing professional development experiences and innovative curriculum materials to help teachers, particularly elementary school teachers, enact inquiry in their classrooms.

  11. Memory hierarchy using row-based compression

    DOEpatents

    Loh, Gabriel H.; O'Connor, James M.

    2016-10-25

    A system includes a first memory and a device coupleable to the first memory. The device includes a second memory to cache data from the first memory. The second memory includes a plurality of rows, each row including a corresponding set of compressed data blocks of non-uniform sizes and a corresponding set of tag blocks. Each tag block represents a corresponding compressed data block of the row. The device further includes decompression logic to decompress data blocks accessed from the second memory. The device further includes compression logic to compress data blocks to be stored in the second memory.

  12. Advances of multidetector computed tomography in the characterization and staging of renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Tsili, Athina C; Argyropoulou, Maria I

    2015-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) accounts for approximately 90%-95% of kidney tumors. With the widespread use of cross-sectional imaging modalities, more than half of RCCs are detected incidentally, often diagnosed at an early stage. This may allow the planning of more conservative treatment strategies. Computed tomography (CT) is considered the examination of choice for the detection and staging of RCC. Multidetector CT (MDCT) with the improvement of spatial resolution and the ability to obtain multiphase imaging, multiplanar and three-dimensional reconstructions in any desired plane brought about further improvement in the evaluation of RCC. Differentiation of RCC from benign renal tumors based on MDCT features is improved. Tumor enhancement characteristics on MDCT have been found closely to correlate with the histologic subtype of RCC, the nuclear grade and the cytogenetic characteristics of clear cell RCC. Important information, including tumor size, localization, and organ involvement, presence and extent of venous thrombus, possible invasion of adjacent organs or lymph nodes, and presence of distant metastases are provided by MDCT examination. The preoperative evaluation of patients with RCC was improved by depicting the presence or absence of renal pseudocapsule and by assessing the possible neoplastic infiltration of the perirenal fat tissue and/or renal sinus fat compartment. PMID:26120380

  13. Role of Multidetector Computed Tomography for Evaluation of Living Kidney Donors

    PubMed Central

    Asghari, Baratali; Babaei, Mansour; Pakroshan, Bijan; Vaziriniya, Alireza; Babamahmoodi, Abdolreza

    2013-01-01

    Background Kidney transplantation from living donors has been increased recently. Preoperative evaluation of living donor is important to select the appropriate kidney for transplantation and to decrease donor surgical complications. Objectives The aim of this study was to compare the accuracy of the use of multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) to evaluate vascular anatomy in living kidney donors with traditional angiography. Patients and Methods A total number of 60 living kidney donors who underwent open surgical approach for transplantation were selected: Kidney anatomy of donors evaluated by CT angiography (group 1) or traditional angiographic examination (group 2). Renal vessels anatomy was compared with surgical findings in both groups. Results The accuracy for detecting number of main renal arteries were not different in both groups which were 96.7% in CT angiography group and 90% in traditional angiography group (P = 0.15). The accuracy for detection of main renal veins were 100% in group 1 and 96.7% in group 2 (P = 0.31). Conclusions MDCT has the same accuracy as traditional angiography to detect renal abnormalities in living kidney donors. PMID:24350084

  14. Assessment of acute thoracolumbar fractures: challenges in multidetector computed tomography and added value of emergency MRI.

    PubMed

    Pizones, Javier; Castillo, Ernesto

    2013-09-01

    Acute thoracolumbar fractures are commonly diagnosed by clinical symptoms and X-ray plain films. Computed tomography (CT) is used to assess vertebral body damage, posterior wall canal intrusion, and posterior column injury. Both of these imaging tools have helped to develop classifications systems that aid the clinician in differentiating stable versus unstable spinal injuries. Multidetector CT has become the standard of care in polytrauma patients. It provides superior evaluation of bony anatomy and has been reported to be more cost effective than X-ray plain films, particularly in the cervicothoracic junction and in thoracolumbar unstable burst fractures. One disadvantage might be the increase in radiation exposure. Another important limitation remains the inability to provide adequate assessment for ligamentous injury and spinal cord lesions. Disc and ligaments play an important role in fracture stability because the failure of the posterior tension band may lead to progressive kyphosis. The integrity of the posterior ligamentous complex has been included in recent fracture classification systems and treatment algorithms. MR imaging becomes essential for soft tissue injury assessment, especially when including T2-weighted sequences with fat suppression. MRI can now be considered key to accurate fracture classification, detection of occult and distant injuries, and as the basis for therapeutic decision making. It is therefore strongly recommended in the early assessment of spine trauma patients. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  15. Effect of row-to-row shading on the output of flat-plate south-facing photovoltaic arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Goswami, D.Y.; Hassan, A.Y.; Collis, J. ); Stefanakos, E.K. )

    1989-08-01

    When solar arrays (photovoltaic, thermal, etc.) are arranged in multiple rows of modules, all but the first row suffer reduction in (power) output, even when sufficient spacing between rows is provided. The reduction in output power occurs because the first row prevents some of the diffuse and reflected radiation from reaching the row directly behind it. This work presents estimates of the effect of shading on the amounts of solar radiation received by consecutive rows of flat-plate arrays.

  16. Evaluation of diagnostic utility of multidetector computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging in blunt pancreatic trauma: a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Panda, Ananya; Kumar, Atin; Gamanagatti, Shivanand; Bhalla, Ashu Seith; Sharma, Raju; Kumar, Subodh; Mishra, Biplab

    2015-04-01

    Blunt pancreatic trauma is an uncommon injury with high morbidity and mortality. Retrospective analyses of computed tomography (CT) performance report CT to have variable sensitivity in diagnosing pancreatic injury. Both a prospective analysis of multidetector CT (MDCT) performance and diagnostic utility of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in acute blunt pancreatic injury remain unexplored. To prospectively evaluate the utility of MDCT with MRI correlation in patients with blunt pancreatic trauma using intraoperative findings as the gold standard for analysis. The contrast-enhanced CT (CECT) scans of patients admitted with blunt abdominal trauma were prospectively evaluated for CT signs of pancreatic injury. Patients detected to have pancreatic injury on CT were assigned a CT grade of injury according to American Association for Surgery of Trauma classification. MRI was performed in patients not undergoing immediate laparotomy and MRI grade independent of CT grade was assigned. Surgical grade was taken as gold standard and accuracy of CT and MRI for grading pancreatic injury and pancreatic ductal injury (PDI) was calculated. A quantitative and qualitative comparison of MRI was also done with CT to determine the performance of MRI in acute pancreatic injury. Thirty out of 1198 patients with blunt trauma abdomen were detected to have pancreatic injury on CT, which was surgically confirmed in 24 patients. Seventeen underwent MRI and surgical correlation was available in 14 patients. CT and MRI correctly identified the grade of pancreatic injury in 91.7% (22/24) and 92.86% (13/14) patients, respectively. Both CT and MRI correctly identified PDI in 18/19 and 11/12 patients, respectively, with good inter-modality agreement of 88.9% (kappa value of 0.78). MRI also qualitatively added to the information provided by CT and increased diagnostic confidence in 58.8% of patients. MDCT performs well in grading pancreatic injury and evaluating pancreatic ductal injury. MRI is

  17. Low kV settings CT angiography (CTA) with low dose contrast medium volume protocol in the assessment of thoracic and abdominal aorta disease: a feasibility study

    PubMed Central

    Talei Franzesi, C; Fior, D; Bonaffini, P A; Minutolo, O; Sironi, S

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To assess the diagnostic quality of low dose (100 kV) CT angiography (CTA), by using ultra-low contrast medium volume (30 ml), for thoracic and abdominal aorta evaluation. Methods: 67 patients with thoracic or abdominal vascular disease underwent multidetector CT study using a 256 slice scanner, with low dose radiation protocol (automated tube current modulation, 100 kV) and low contrast medium volume (30 ml; 4 ml s−1). Density measurements were performed on ascending, arch, descending thoracic aorta, anonymous branch, abdominal aorta, and renal and common iliac arteries. Radiation dose exposure [dose–length product (DLP)] was calculated. A control group of 35 patients with thoracic or abdominal vascular disease were evaluated with standard CTA protocol (automated tube current modulation, 120 kV; contrast medium, 80 ml). Results: In all patients, we correctly visualized and evaluated main branches of the thoracic and abdominal aorta. No difference in density measurements was achieved between low tube voltage protocol (mean attenuation value of thoracic aorta, 304 HU; abdominal, 343 HU; renal arteries, 331 HU) and control group (mean attenuation value of thoracic aorta, 320 HU; abdominal, 339; renal arteries, 303 HU). Radiation dose exposure in low tube voltage protocol was significantly different between thoracic and abdominal low tube voltage studies (490 and 324 DLP, respectively) and the control group (thoracic DLP, 1032; abdomen, DLP 1078). Conclusion: Low-tube-voltage protocol may provide a diagnostic performance comparable with that of the standard protocol, decreasing radiation dose exposure and contrast material volume amount. Advances in knowledge: Low-tube-voltage-setting protocol combined with ultra-low contrast agent volume (30 ml), by using new multidetector-row CT scanners, represents a feasible diagnostic tool to significantly reduce the radiation dose delivered to patients and to preserve renal function

  18. [The clinical value of computer tomography (CT) of diagnostics of acute thorax pain--a literature review].

    PubMed

    Klimeczek, Piotr; Zaleska-Dorobisz, Urszula; Jagas, Jacek; Harań, Tomasz

    2013-01-01

    Conventional angiography of the coronary arteries is a standard in heart and coronary arteries diagnosis, sufficient to choose a treatment method. The introduction of 64-row multidetector computed tomography improved the imaging of coronary arteries by increasing its spatial and temporal resolution. It has been shown that the potential clinical value of CT angiography, including dual source computed tomography (DSCT), is based particularly on the exclusion of coronary artery disease and is now a recognized clinical indication in patients with equivocal stress test results. Detection of hemodynamically insignificant atherosclerotic plaques during CT angiography may be important from the clinical point of view. Rupture of those plaques is the reason of about 60% of acute coronary events. Myocardial infarction with ST-segment elevation is not an indication for CT angiography of the coronary arteries. Acute chest pain is the cause of approximately 6-8% of hospitalizations in the EU and the United States. According to the U.S. data about 50% of patients are admitted to a hospital for observation, and of those only 15% are finally diagnosed with acute coronary syndrome. On the other hand 2-5% of patients are incorrectly diagnosed and discharged home despite the occurrence of ACS. In spite of relatively frequent and easy to recognize symptoms, the subject literature states that diagnosis of more than 1/3 of patients with acute chest pain poses a considerable difficulty in the A&E departments. Problems with proper risk assessment and diagnosis of the disease result in unnecessary hospital admissions, implementation of expensive and often invasive diagnostic methods and generating costs borne by the health care system. There is a need to optimize the minimally invasive diagnostic methods, that allow reliable exclusion of coronary artery disease and acute coronary syndrome. In approximately 10 to 20% of all patients with chest pain neither ST segment elevation nor positive

  19. Congenital abnormalities of the ribs: evaluation with multidetector computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Davran, Ramazan; Bayarogullari, Hanifi; Atci, Nesrin; Kayali, Alperen; Ozturk, Fatma; Burakgazi, Gulen

    2017-02-01

    To evaluate congenital abnormalities of ribs using multidetector computed tomography. The retrospective study was conducted at Mustafa Kemal University Research Hospital, Hatay, Turkey and comprised data of patients aged 1-45 years who attended the Radiology Department for computed tomography of the thorax between January 2010 and July 2013. Multiplanar reconstructions, maximum intensity projections, and 3-dimensional images were acquired to investigate numerical and structural abnormalities of the ribs of the patients who underwent multidetector computed tomography for a variety of indications. The study comprised 650 patients. Of them, 231(35.5%) were female and 419(64.5%) male. The overall mean age was 20.9± 5.1years. However, data of 90(13.8%) patients was excluded from cervical rib evaluation and of 120(18.5%) from lumbar rib evaluation as these regions were out of the section because of the positioning. Finally, 560(86.5%) patients were included in the cervical rib evaluations, and 530(81.5%) in the lumbar rib evaluations. All the 650(100%) patients were included in the thoracic rib evaluations. Numerical abnormalities were observed in cervical ribs in 19(3.6%), in thoracic ribs in 1(0.15%) and in lumbar ribs in 7(1.3%) cases. The structural abnormalities were bifid rib in 44(6.7%) and fused type in 17(2.6%) cases. Multidetector computed tomography enabled evaluation of the thoracic cage as a whole.

  20. Developing Formulas by Skipping Rows in Pascal's Triangle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buonpastore, Robert J.; Osler, Thomas J.

    2007-01-01

    A table showing the first thirteen rows of Pascal's triangle, where the rows are, as usual numbered from 0 to 12 is presented. The entries in the table are called binomial coefficients. In this note, the authors systematically delete rows from Pascal's triangle and, by trial and error, try to find a formula that allows them to add new rows to the…

  1. Developing Formulas by Skipping Rows in Pascal's Triangle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buonpastore, Robert J.; Osler, Thomas J.

    2007-01-01

    A table showing the first thirteen rows of Pascal's triangle, where the rows are, as usual numbered from 0 to 12 is presented. The entries in the table are called binomial coefficients. In this note, the authors systematically delete rows from Pascal's triangle and, by trial and error, try to find a formula that allows them to add new rows to the…

  2. Comparison of Single Row, Twin Row, and Diamond Planting Patterns in Valencia Peanut

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Most Valencia peanuts are grown in single rows on 36 to 40 inch beds. Because of their bunch-type and erect growth habit, Valencia peanuts do not spread over the whole bed and have the opportunity to benefit from multiple row planting arrangements. This study was conducted at locations near Portal...

  3. Comparisons of single-row and twin-row soybean production in the Mid South

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A Maturity Group (MG) IV and MG V soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr] cultivar were planted in single-rows and twin-rows on 102 cm beds at 20, 30, 40, and 50 seeds m-2 in a Beulah fine sandy loam (coarse-loamy, mixed thermic Typic Dystrochrepts) in 2008, 2009, 2010 and Sharkey clay (Vertic Haplaquept) i...

  4. Optical RAM row access using WDM-enabled all-passive row/column decoders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papaioannou, Sotirios; Alexoudi, Theoni; Kanellos, George T.; Miliou, Amalia; Pleros, Nikos

    2014-03-01

    Towards achieving a functional RAM organization that reaps the advantages offered by optical technology, a complete set of optical peripheral modules, namely the Row (RD) and Column Decoder (CD) units, is required. In this perspective, we demonstrate an all-passive 2×4 optical RAM RD with row access operation and subsequent all-passive column decoding to control the access of WDM-formatted words in optical RAM rows. The 2×4 RD exploits a WDM-formatted 2-bit-long memory WordLine address along with its complementary value, all of them encoded on four different wavelengths and broadcasted to all RAM rows. The RD relies on an all-passive wavelength-selective filtering matrix (λ-matrix) that ensures a logical `0' output only at the selected RAM row. Subsequently, the RD output of each row drives the respective SOA-MZI-based Row Access Gate (AG) to grant/block the entry of the incoming data words to the whole memory row. In case of a selected row, the data word exits the row AG and enters the respective CD that relies on an allpassive wavelength-selective Arrayed Waveguide Grating (AWG) for decoding the word bits into their individual columns. Both RD and CD procedures are carried out without requiring any active devices, assuming that the memory address and data word bits as well as their inverted values will be available in their optical form by the CPU interface. Proof-of-concept experimental verification exploiting cascaded pairs of AWGs as the λ-matrix is demonstrated at 10Gb/s, providing error-free operation with a peak power penalty lower than 0.2dB for all optical word channels.

  5. Pushing the boundaries of diagnostic CT systems for high spatial resolution imaging tasks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruz-Bastida, Juan P.; Gomez-Cardona, Daniel; Garrett, John W.; Szczykutowicz, Timothy P.; Chen, Guang-Hong; Li, Ke

    2017-03-01

    In a previous work [Cruz-Bastida et al Med. Phys. 43, 2399 (2016)], the spatial resolution performance of a new High-Resolution (Hi-Res) multi-detector row CT (MDCT) scan mode and the associated High Definition (HD) reconstruction kernels was systematically characterized. The purpose of the present work was to study the noise properties of the Hi-Res scan mode and the joint impact of spatial resolution and noise characteristics on high contrast and high spatial resolution imaging tasks. Using a physical phantom and a diagnostic MDCT system, equipped with both Hi-Res and conventional scan modes, noise power spectrum (NPS) measurements were performed at 8 off-centered positions (0 to 14 cm with an increment of 2 cm) for 8 non-HD kernels and 7 HD kernels. An in vivo rabbit experiment was then performed to demonstrate the potential clinical value of the Hi-Res scan mode. Without the HD kernels, the Hi-Res scan mode preserved the shape of the NPS and slightly increased noise magnitude across all object positions. The combined use of the Hi-Res scan mode and HD kernels led to a greater noise increase and pushed the NPS towards higher frequencies, particularly for those edge-preserving or edge-enhancing HD kernels. Results of the in vivo rabbit study demonstrate important trade-offs between spatial resolution and noise characteristics. Overall, for a given high contrast and high spatial resolution imaging task (bronchi imaging), the benefit of spatial resolution improvement introduced by the Hi-Res scan mode outweighs the potential noise amplification, leading to better overall imaging performance for both centered and off-centered positions.

  6. Neutron camera employing row and column summations

    SciTech Connect

    Clonts, Lloyd G.; Diawara, Yacouba; Donahue, Jr, Cornelius; Montcalm, Christopher A.; Riedel, Richard A.; Visscher, Theodore

    2016-06-14

    For each photomultiplier tube in an Anger camera, an R.times.S array of preamplifiers is provided to detect electrons generated within the photomultiplier tube. The outputs of the preamplifiers are digitized to measure the magnitude of the signals from each preamplifier. For each photomultiplier tube, a corresponding summation circuitry including R row summation circuits and S column summation circuits numerically add the magnitudes of the signals from preamplifiers for each row and for each column to generate histograms. For a P.times.Q array of photomultiplier tubes, P.times.Q summation circuitries generate P.times.Q row histograms including R entries and P.times.Q column histograms including S entries. The total set of histograms include P.times.Q.times.(R+S) entries, which can be analyzed by a position calculation circuit to determine the locations of events (detection of a neutron).

  7. Yankee Rowe simulator core model validation

    SciTech Connect

    Napolitano, M.E.

    1990-01-01

    This paper presents the validation of the Yankee Rowe simulator core model. Link-Miles Simulation Corporation is developing the Yankee Rowe simulator and Yankee Atomic Electric Company is involved in input and benchmark data generation, as well as simulator validation. Core model validation by Yankee comprises three tasks: (1) careful generation of fuel reactivity characteristics (B constants); (2) nonintegrated core model testing; and (3) fully integrated core model testing. Simulator core model validation and verification is a multistage process involving input and benchmark data generation as well as interactive debugging. Core characteristics were brought within acceptable criteria by this process. This process was achieved through constant communication between Link-Miles and Yankee engineers. Based on this validation, the Yankee Rowe simulator core model is found to be acceptable for training purposes.

  8. Application of MPVR and TL-VR with 64-row MDCT in neonates with congenital EA and distal TEF.

    PubMed

    Wen, Yang; Peng, Yun; Zhai, Ren-You; Li, Ying-Zi

    2011-03-28

    To assess the application of multiple planar volume reconstruction (MPVR) and three-dimensional (3D) transparency lung volume rendering (TL-VR) with 64-row multidetector-row computed tomography (MDCT) in neonates with congenital esophageal atresia (EA) and distal tracheoesophageal fistula (TEF). Twenty neonates (17 boys, 3 girls) with EA and distal TEF at a mean age of 4.6 d (range 1-16 d) were enrolled in this study. A helical scan of 64-row MDCT was performed at the 64 mm × 0.625 mm collimation. EA and TEF were reconstructed with MPVR and TL-VR, respectively. Initial diagnosis of EA was made by chest radiography showing the inserted catheter in the proximal blind-ended esophageal pouch. Manifestations of MDCT images were compared with the findings at surgery. MDCT showed the proximal and distal esophageal pouches in 20 cases. No significant difference was observed in gaps between the proximal and distal esophageal pouches detected by MPVR and TL-VR. The lengths of gaps between the proximal and distal esophageal pouches detected by MPVR and TL-VR correlated well with the findings at surgery (R = 0.87, P < 0.001). The images of MPVR revealed the orifice of TEF in 13 cases, while TL-VR images showed the orifice of TEF in 4 cases. EA and distal TEF can be reconstructed using MPVR and TL-VR of 64-row MDCT, which is a noninvasive technique to demonstrate the distal esophageal pouches and inter-pouch distance in neonates with EA and distal TEF.

  9. Optimal Lateral Row Anchor Positioning in Posterior-Superior Transosseous Equivalent Rotator Cuff Repair

    PubMed Central

    Zumstein, Matthias A.; Raniga, Sumit; Labrinidis, Agatha; Eng, Kevin; Bain, Gregory I.; Moor, Beat K.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The optimal placement of suture anchors in transosseous-equivalent (TOE) double-row rotator cuff repair remains controversial. Purpose: A 3-dimensional (3D) high-resolution micro–computed tomography (micro-CT) histomorphometric analysis of cadaveric proximal humeral greater tuberosities (GTs) was performed to guide optimal positioning of lateral row anchors in posterior-superior (infraspinatus and supraspinatus) TOE rotator cuff repair. Study Design: Descriptive laboratory study. Methods: Thirteen fresh-frozen human cadaveric proximal humeri underwent micro-CT analysis. The histomorphometric parameters analyzed in the standardized volumes of interest included cortical thickness, bone volume, and trabecular properties. Results: Analysis of the cortical thickness of the lateral rows demonstrated that the entire inferior-most lateral row, 15 to 21 mm from the summit of the GT, had the thickest cortical bone (mean, 0.79 mm; P = .0001), with the anterior-most part of the GT, 15 to 21 mm below its summit, having the greatest cortical thickness of 1.02 mm (P = .008). There was a significantly greater bone volume (BV; posterior, 74.5 ± 27.4 mm3; middle, 55.8 ± 24.9 mm3; anterior, 56.9 ± 20.7 mm3; P = .001) and BV as a percentage of total tissue volume (BV/TV; posterior, 7.3% ± 2.7%, middle, 5.5% ± 2.4%; anterior, 5.6% ± 2.0%; P = .001) in the posterior third of the GT than in intermediate or anterior thirds. In terms of both BV and BV/TV, the juxta-articular medial row had the greatest value (BV, 87.3 ± 25.1 mm3; BV/TV, 8.6% ± 2.5%; P = .0001 for both) followed by the inferior-most lateral row 15 to 21 mm from the summit of the GT (BV, 62.0 ± 22.7 mm3; BV/TV, 6.1% ± 2.2%; P = .0001 for both). The juxta-articular medial row had the greatest value for both trabecular number (0.3 ± 0.06 mm–1; P = .0001) and thickness (0.3 ± 0.08 μm; P = .0001) with the lowest degree of trabecular separation (1.3 ± 0.4 μm; P = .0001). The structure model index

  10. Multidetector computed tomography analysis of benign and malignant nodules in patients with chronic lymphocytic thyroiditis.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Caisong; Liu, Wei; Yang, Jun; Yang, Jing; Shao, Kangwei; Yuan, Lixin; Chen, Hairong; Lu, Wei; Zhu, Ying

    2016-07-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare the multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) features of benign and malignant nodules in patients with chronic lymphocytic thyroiditis (CLT). MDCT findings, including the size, solid percentage, calcification, margin, capsule, anteroposterior-transverse diameter ratio as well as the mode and the degree of enhancement of 137 thyroid nodules in 127 CLT cases were retrospectively analyzed. Furthermore, the correlation between MDCT findings and pathological results combined with the CT perfusion imaging was analyzed for the differences between benign and malignant nodules. A total of 77.5% (31/40) of malignant nodules were completely solid, and 33% (32/97) of benign nodules were predominantly cystic. Compared with the benign nodules, micro-calcification and internal calcification were more frequently observed in the malignant nodules (P<0.05). MDCT features such as ill-defined margin, absence of capsule or incomplete capsule or homogeneous enhancement were more likely to be present in the malignant nodules (P<0.05). Nevertheless, no significant difference was observed in the enhancement degree at arterial or venous phase between benign and malignant nodules (P>0.05). MDCT features are useful in differentiating the benign and malignant nodules in CLT patients, and it may be essential for a radiologist to review the MDCT characteristics of nodules in the clinical practice.

  11. Fitz-Hugh-Curtis syndrome: CT findings of three cases.

    PubMed

    Cho, Hyeon Je; Kim, Ho Kyun; Suh, Jung Ho; Lee, Ghi Jai; Shim, Jae-Chan; Kim, Young Hwa

    2008-01-01

    Clinical manifestations and computed tomography (CT) findings of Fitz-Hugh-Curtis syndrome (FHCS) are relatively well stabilized as right upper quadrant abdominal pain and hepatic capsular enhancement because of perihepatitis associated with pelvic inflammatory disease caused by N. gonorrhoeae and C. trachomatis. We encountered three patients with serial FHCS associated with pelvic inflammatory disease, who visited the emergency room with right upper quadrant abdominal pain. Abdominal CT revealed hepatic capsular or pericapsular enhancement along the anterior surface of the liver on the arterial phase. Recently, multi-detector CT has evolved as the first-line imaging modality of acute abdomen at the emergency room; we reemphasized the importance of the CT findings of this syndrome for differential diagnosis of right upper quadrant abdominal pain in sexually active young women. Physicians at the emergency room acknowledge the syndrome and should perform dynamic abdominopelvic CT including the arterial phase.

  12. Cardiac MDCT in children: CT technology overview and interpretation.

    PubMed

    Goo, Hyun Woo

    2011-09-01

    Cardiac multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) for congenital heart disease is a useful, rapid, and noninvasive imaging technique bridging the gaps between echocardiography, cardiac catheterization, and cardiac MRI. Fast scan speed and greater anatomic coverage, combined with flexible ECG-synchronized scans and a low radiation dose, are critical for improving the image quality of cardiac MDCT and minimizing patient risk. Current MDCT techniques can accurately evaluate extracardiac great vessels, lungs, and airways, as well as coronary arteries and intracardiac structures. Radiologists who perform cardiac MDCT in children should be familiarized with optimal cardiac computed tomography (CT) scan techniques and characteristic cardiac CT scan imaging findings. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Hybrid imaging: integration of nuclear imaging and cardiac CT.

    PubMed

    Di Carli, Marcelo F

    2009-05-01

    The integration of nuclear medicine cameras with multidetector CT scanners provides a unique opportunity to delineate cardiac and vascular anatomic abnormalities and their physiologic consequences in a single setting. By revealing the burden of anatomic coronary artery disease and its physiologic significance, hybrid imaging can provide unique information that may improve noninvasive diagnosis, risk assessment, and management of coronary artery disease. By integrating the detailed anatomic information from CT with the high sensitivity of radionuclide imaging to evaluate targeted molecular and cellular abnormalities, hybrid imaging may play a key role in shaping the future of molecular diagnostics and therapeutics. This article reviews potential clinical applications of hybrid imaging in cardiovascular disease.

  14. Thoracic wall trauma—misdiagnosed lesions on radiographs and usefulness of ultrasound, multidetector computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    Facenda, Catherine; Vaz, Nuno; Castañeda, Edgar Augusto; del Amo, Montserrat; Garcia-Diez, Ana Isabel; Pomes, Jaime

    2017-01-01

    Blunt injuries to the chest wall are an important chapter on emergency room (ER) departments, being the third most common injuries in trauma patients which ominous complications could appear. This article describes different types of traumatic events affecting the chest wall, which maybe misdiagnosed with conventional X-ray. Special emphasis has been done in computed tomography (CT) and multidetector CT (MDCT) imaging. This technique is considered the “gold-standard” for those traumatic patients, due to its fast acquisition covering the whole area of interest in axial plane, reconstructing multiplanar (2D, 3D) volume-rendered images with a superb quality and angiographic CT capabilities for evaluating vascular damage. Complementary techniques such as ultrasonography (US) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) may improve the diagnostic accuracy due to its great capacity in visualising soft-tissue trauma (muscle-tendinous tears) and subtle fractures. All these imaging methods have an important role in quantifying the severity of chest wall trauma. The findings of this study have been exposed with cases of our archives in a didactic way. PMID:28932697

  15. Multidetector Computed Tomographic Angiography (MDCTA) for Penetrating Neck Injuries.

    PubMed

    Pasley, Jason; Berg, Regan J; Inaba, Kenji

    2012-07-01

    Evaluation of patients after penetrating neck injury has evolved over time. Previously, location of injury and symptoms were used to determine management. The contemporary management of penetrating neck injuries relies on physical examination. Patients with hard signs of vascular or aerodigestive tract injury require immediate operation, regardless of location of injury. Those with no signs can be observed. For the remainder with soft signs, multidetector computed tomographic angiography (MDCTA) is a highly sensitive and specific screening modality for evaluating the vasculature and aerodigestive structures in the neck. Utilizing MDCTA, the patient can be safely directed towards operative intervention, observation, or further investigation.

  16. Multidetector Computed Tomographic Angiography (MDCTA) for Penetrating Neck Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Pasley, Jason; Berg, Regan J.; Inaba, Kenji

    2012-01-01

    Evaluation of patients after penetrating neck injury has evolved over time. Previously, location of injury and symptoms were used to determine management. The contemporary management of penetrating neck injuries relies on physical examination. Patients with hard signs of vascular or aerodigestive tract injury require immediate operation, regardless of location of injury. Those with no signs can be observed. For the remainder with soft signs, multidetector computed tomographic angiography (MDCTA) is a highly sensitive and specific screening modality for evaluating the vasculature and aerodigestive structures in the neck. Utilizing MDCTA, the patient can be safely directed towards operative intervention, observation, or further investigation. PMID:23908840

  17. Multidetector computer tomography: evaluation of blunt chest trauma in adults.

    PubMed

    Palas, João; Matos, António P; Mascarenhas, Vasco; Herédia, Vasco; Ramalho, Miguel

    2014-01-01

    Imaging plays an essential part of chest trauma care. By definition, the employed imaging technique in the emergency setting should reach the correct diagnosis as fast as possible. In severe chest blunt trauma, multidetector computer tomography (MDCT) has become part of the initial workup, mainly due to its high sensitivity and diagnostic accuracy of the technique for the detection and characterization of thoracic injuries and also due to its wide availability in tertiary care centers. The aim of this paper is to review and illustrate a spectrum of characteristic MDCT findings of blunt traumatic injuries of the chest including the lungs, mediastinum, pleural space, and chest wall.

  18. Multidetector Computer Tomography: Evaluation of Blunt Chest Trauma in Adults

    PubMed Central

    Matos, António P.; Mascarenhas, Vasco; Herédia, Vasco

    2014-01-01

    Imaging plays an essential part of chest trauma care. By definition, the employed imaging technique in the emergency setting should reach the correct diagnosis as fast as possible. In severe chest blunt trauma, multidetector computer tomography (MDCT) has become part of the initial workup, mainly due to its high sensitivity and diagnostic accuracy of the technique for the detection and characterization of thoracic injuries and also due to its wide availability in tertiary care centers. The aim of this paper is to review and illustrate a spectrum of characteristic MDCT findings of blunt traumatic injuries of the chest including the lungs, mediastinum, pleural space, and chest wall. PMID:25295188

  19. Limitations of multidetector computed tomography angiography for the diagnosis of blunt cerebrovascular injury.

    PubMed

    Grandhi, Ramesh; Weiner, Gregory M; Agarwal, Nitin; Panczykowski, David M; Ares, William J; Rodriguez, Jesse S; Gelfond, Jonathan A; Myers, John G; Alarcon, Louis H; Okonkwo, David O; Jankowitz, Brian T

    2017-08-11

    OBJECTIVE Blunt cerebrovascular injuries (BCVIs) following trauma carry risk for morbidity and mortality. Since patients with BCVI are often asymptomatic at presentation and neurological sequelae often occur within 72 hours, timely diagnosis is essential. Multidetector CT angiography (CTA) has been shown to be a noninvasive, cost-effective, reliable means of screening; however, the false-positive rate of CTA in diagnosing patients with BCVI represents a key drawback. Therefore, the authors assessed the role of DSA in the screening of BCVI when utilizing CTA as the initial screening modality. METHODS The authors performed a retrospective analysis of patients who experienced BCVI between 2013 and 2015 at 2 Level I trauma centers. All patients underwent CTA screening for BCVI according to the updated Denver Screening Criteria. Patients who were diagnosed with BCVI on CTA underwent confirmatory digital subtraction angiography (DSA). Patient demographics, screening indication, BCVI grade on CTA and DSA, and laboratory values were collected. Comparison of false-positive rates stratified by BCVI grade on CTA was performed using the chi-square test. RESULTS A total of 140 patients (64% males, mean age 50 years) with 156 cerebrovascular blunt injuries to the carotid and/or vertebral arteries were identified. After comparison with DSA findings, CTA findings were incorrect in 61.5% of vessels studied, and the overall CTA false-positive rates were 47.4% of vessels studied and 47.9% of patients screened. The positive predictive value (PPV) for CTA was higher among worse BCVI subtypes on initial imaging (PPV 76% and 97%, for BCVI Grades II and IV, respectively) compared with Grade I injuries (PPV 30%, p < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS In the current series, multidetector CTA as a screening test for blunt cerebrovascular injury had a high-false positive rate, especially in patients with Grade I BCVI. Given a false-positive rate of 47.9% with an estimated average of 132 patients per year

  20. Blunt cerebrovascular injury screening with 64-channel multidetector computed tomography: more slices finally cut it.

    PubMed

    Paulus, Elena M; Fabian, Timothy C; Savage, Stephanie A; Zarzaur, Ben L; Botta, Vandana; Dutton, Wesley; Croce, Martin A

    2014-02-01

    Aggressive screening to diagnose blunt cerebrovascular injury (BCVI) results in early treatment, leading to improved outcomes and reduced stroke rates. While computed tomographic angiography (CTA) has been widely adopted for BCVI screening, evidence of its diagnostic sensitivity is marginal. Previous work from our institution using 32-channel multidetector CTA in 684 patients demonstrated an inadequate sensitivity of 51% (Ann Surg. 2011,253: 444-450). Digital subtraction angiography (DSA) continues to be the reference standard of diagnosis but has significant drawbacks of invasiveness and resource demands. There have been continued advances in CT technology, and this is the first report of an extensive experience with 64-channel multidetector CTA. Patients screened for BCVI using CTA and DSA (reference) at a Level 1 trauma center during the 12-month period ending in May 2012 were identified. Results of CTA and DSA, complications, and strokes were retrospectively reviewed and compared. A total of 594 patients met criteria for BCVI screening and underwent both CTA and DSA. One hundred twenty-eight patients (22% of those screened) had 163 injured vessels: 99 (61%) carotid artery injuries and 64 (39%) vertebral artery injuries. Sixty-four-channel CTA demonstrated an overall sensitivity per vessel of 68% and specificity of 92%. The 52 false-negative findings on CTA were composed of 34 carotid artery injuries and 18 vertebral artery injuries; 32 (62%) were Grade I injuries. Overall, positive predictive value was 36.2%, and negative predictive value was 97.5%. Six procedure-related complications (1%) occurred with DSA, including two iatrogenic dissections and one stroke. Sixty-four-channel CTA demonstrated a significantly improved sensitivity of 68% versus the 51% previously reported for the 32-channel CTA (p = 0.0075). Sixty-two percent of the false-negative findings occurred with low-grade injuries. Considering complications, cost, and resource demand associated with

  1. Performance evaluation of a 64-slice CT system with z-flying focal spot.

    PubMed

    Flohr, T; Stierstorfer, K; Raupach, R; Ulzheimer, S; Bruder, H

    2004-12-01

    The meanwhile established generation of 16-slice CT systems enables routine sub-millimeter imaging at short breath-hold times. Clinical progress in the development of multidetector row CT (MDCT) technology beyond 16 slices can more likely be expected from further improvement in spatial and temporal resolution rather than from a mere increase in the speed of volume coverage. We present an evaluation of a recently introduced 64-slice CT system (SOMATOM Sensation 64, Siemens AG, Forchheim, Germany), which uses a periodic motion of the focal spot in longitudinal direction (z-flying focal spot) to double the number of simultaneously acquired slices. This technique acquires 64 overlapping 0.6 mm slices per rotation. The sampling scheme corresponds to that of a 64 x 0.3 mm detector, with the goal of improved longitudinal resolution and reduced spiral artifacts. After an introduction to the detector design, we discuss the basics of z-flying focal spot technology (z-Sharp). We present phantom and specimen scans for performance evaluation. The measured full width at half maximum (FWHM) of the thinnest spiral slice is 0.65 mm. All spiral slice widths are almost independent of the pitch, with deviations of less than 0.1 mm from the nominal value. Using a high-resolution bar pattern phantom (CATPHAN, Phantom Laboratories, Salem, NY), the longitudinal resolution can be demonstrated to be up to 15 lp/cm at the isocenter independent of the pitch, corresponding to a bar diameter of 0.33 mm. Longitudinal resolution is only slightly degraded for off-center locations. At a distance of 100 mm from the isocenter, 14 lp/cm can be resolved in the z-direction, corresponding to a bar diameter of 0.36 mm. Spiral "windmill" artifacts presenting as hyper- and hypodense structures around osseous edges are effectively reduced by the z-flying focal spot technique. Cardiac scanning benefits from the short gantry rotation time of 0.33 s, providing up to 83 ms temporal resolution with 2-segment ECG

  2. Single-row repair versus double-row repair of full-thickness rotator cuff tears.

    PubMed

    Prasathaporn, Niti; Kuptniratsaikul, Somsak; Kongrukgreatiyos, Kitiphong

    2011-07-01

    The purpose of this meta-analysis was to assess whether there are differences in the outcomes between single-row and double-row rotator cuff repair. Using MEDLINE, SCOPUS, SCIRUS, CINAHL, and the Cochrane Library, as well as a hand search, we searched for articles comparing single-row and double-row rotator cuff repair that were published before September 2009. The controlled clinical studies that met the inclusion and exclusion criteria were assessed for quality of methodology. Two of the authors performed this review and assessment. Any disagreements were resolved by the third author. Three randomized controlled studies and two controlled clinical cohort studies were included in this meta-analysis. These studies were assessed as having a moderate to high level of evidence. The results showed that double-row repair improved tendon healing and provided greater external rotation but with significantly increased operative time. Furthermore, this study found that double-row repair decreased the recurrence rate. However, there were no statistically significant differences found in shoulder function as assessed by Constant score; American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) score; University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) score; Western Ontario Rotator Cuff (WORC) index; Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand (DASH) score; muscle strength; forward flexion; internal rotation; patient satisfaction; return to work; and adverse events. Despite the fact that double-row repair shows a significantly higher rate of tendon healing and greater external rotation than does single-row repair, there is no significant improvement in shoulder function, muscle strength, forward flexion, internal rotation, patient satisfaction, or return to work. Level II, meta-analysis of Level I and Level II studies. Copyright © 2011 Arthroscopy Association of North America. All rights reserved.

  3. Visualisation of passive middle ear implants by cone beam and multi-detector computed tomography: a comparative in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, T D; Kösling, S; Mlynski, R; Plontke, S K

    2016-12-01

    Modern passive middle ear titanium prostheses are filigree structures, resulting in poorer depiction on CT compared to prostheses used in the past. We compared the visibility of newer prostheses on cone beam CT (CBCT) to multi-detector CT (MDCT) with standard and lower dose in vitro, and analysed image noise and metal artefacts. Six different titanium middle ear prostheses (three partial and one total ossicular replacement prostheses, two stapes prostheses) were implanted twice in formalin-fixed head specimens-first correctly and then with displacement. Imaging was performed using standard CBCT and MDCT as well as MDCT with lower dose (36 single imaging investigations). Images were analysed with knowledge of the used types of middle ear prostheses, but blinded with respect to the positioning in the specific case. On all images the type of prostheses and their positions could be clearly recognized. Their identifiability including their details was rated as statistically significantly higher for all CBCT investigations than for MDCT. MDCT with lower dose showed the worst results. No statistical differences were found in image noise and metal artefacts. If available, CBCT should be preferred over MDCT in diagnostic evaluation of passive middle ear prostheses. • Middle ear prostheses became more filigree, leading to poorer visibility on CT. • High spatial resolution and paraxial reconstructions are necessary requirements for imaging evaluation. • CBCT and MDCT can identify type and positioning of titanium prostheses. • Metal artefacts play a minor part in filigree titanium prostheses. • Regarding visualisation of prostheses details, cone beam CT aids the evaluation.

  4. From the RSNA refresher courses: CT angiography: clinical applications in the abdomen.

    PubMed

    Fishman, E K

    2001-10-01

    The development of spiral computed tomography (CT) and subsequently multidetector CT has provided unparalleled opportunities for advancement of CT technology and clinical applications. One of the most influential developments has been CT angiography, which is the use of thin-section CT combined with postprocessing of imaging data by using a variety of three-dimensional reconstruction techniques to produce vascular maps that equal or exceed those provided by classic angiography in many applications. In the evaluation of pancreatic disease, the use of multidetector CT angiography enables the radiologist to produce vascular maps that clearly show tumor invasion of vasculature and the relationship of vessels to pancreatic masses. Anatomic areas for which the three-dimensional display is especially helpful include the confluence of the portal vein and the superior mesenteric vein and the more distal portions of the portal vein. Preliminary studies indicate that CT angiography may prove beneficial in the evaluation of ischemic bowel and active Crohn disease. CT angiography has proved extremely valuable for applications such as preoperative planning for hepatic resection, preoperative evaluation and planning for liver transplantation, pretreatment planning for patients considered for hepatic arterial infusion chemotherapy, and pretreatment evaluation of portal vein patency for a variety of reasons. CT angiography can also provide supplemental information in patients with cirrhosis, upper gastrointestinal tract bleeding due to varices, or primary extrahepatic neoplasms.

  5. Multidetector Computed Tomography for Congenital Anomalies of the Aortic Arch: Vascular Rings.

    PubMed

    García-Guereta, Luis; García-Cerro, Estefanía; Bret-Zurita, Montserrat

    2016-07-01

    The development of multidetector computed tomography has triggered a revolution in the study of the aorta and other large vessels and has replaced angiography in the diagnosis of congenital anomalies of the aortic arch, particularly vascular rings. The major advantage of multidetector computed tomography is that it permits clear 3-dimensional assessment of not only vascular structures, but also airway and esophageal compression. The current update aims to summarize the embryonic development of the aortic arch and the developmental anomalies leading to vascular ring formation and to discuss the current diagnostic and therapeutic role of multidetector computed tomography in this field.

  6. Vertebral and femoral bone mineral density and bone strength in prostate cancer patients assessed in phantomless PET/CT examinations.

    PubMed

    Schwaiger, Benedikt J; Kopperdahl, David L; Nardo, Lorenzo; Facchetti, Luca; Gersing, Alexandra S; Neumann, Jan; Lee, Kwang J; Keaveny, Tony M; Link, Thomas M

    2017-08-01

    Bone fracture risk assessed ancillary to positron emission tomography with computed tomography co-registration (PET/CT) could provide substantial clinical value to oncology patients with elevated fracture risk without introducing additional radiation dose. The purpose of our study was to investigate the feasibility of obtaining valid measurements of bone mineral density (BMD) and finite element analysis-derived bone strength of the hip and spine using PET/CT examinations of prostate cancer patients by comparing against values obtained using routine multidetector-row computed tomography (MDCT) scans-as validated in previous studies-as a reference standard. Men with prostate cancer (n=82, 71.6±8.3 years) underwent Fluorine-18 NaF PET/CT and routine MDCT within three months. Femoral neck and total hip areal BMD, vertebral trabecular BMD and femur and vertebral strength based on finite element analysis were assessed in 63 paired PET/CT and MDCT examinations using phantomless calibration and Biomechanical-CT analysis. Men with osteoporosis or fragile bone strength identified at either the hip or spine (vertebral trabecular BMD ≤80mg/cm(3), femoral neck or total hip T-score ≤-2.5, vertebral strength ≤6500N and femoral strength ≤3500N, respectively) were considered to be at high risk of fracture. PET/CT- versus MDCT-based BMD and strength measurements were compared using paired t-tests, linear regression and by generating Bland-Altman plots. Agreement in fracture-risk classification was assessed in a contingency table. All measurements from PET/CT versus MDCT were strongly correlated (R(2)=0.93-0.97; P<0.0001 for all). Mean differences for total hip areal BMD (0.001g/cm(2), 1.1%), femoral strength (-60N, 1.3%), vertebral trabecular BMD (2mg/cm(3), 2.6%) and vertebral strength (150N; 1.7%) measurements were not statistically significant (P>0.05 for all), whereas the mean difference in femoral neck areal BMD measurements was small but significant (-0.018g/cm(2); -2

  7. Extended abstract: Partial row projection methods

    SciTech Connect

    Bramley, R.; Lee, Y.

    1996-12-31

    Accelerated row projection (RP) algorithms for solving linear systems Ax = b are a class of iterative methods which in theory converge for any nonsingular matrix. RP methods are by definition ones that require finding the orthogonal projection of vectors onto the null space of block rows of the matrix. The Kaczmarz form, considered here because it has a better spectrum for iterative methods, has an iteration matrix that is the product of such projectors. Because straightforward Kaczmarz method converges slowly for practical problems, typically an outer CG acceleration is applied. Definiteness, symmetry, or localization of the eigenvalues, of the coefficient matrix is not required. In spite of this robustness, work has generally been limited to structured systems such as block tridiagonal matrices because unlike many iterative solvers, RP methods cannot be implemented by simply supplying a matrix-vector multiplication routine. Finding the orthogonal projection of vectors onto the null space of block rows of the matrix in practice requires accessing the actual entries in the matrix. This report introduces a new partial RP algorithm which retains advantages of the RP methods.

  8. Dual-Source CT Angiography of Peripheral Arterial Stents: In Vitro Evaluation of 22 Different Stent Types

    PubMed Central

    Köhler, Michael; Burg, Matthias C.; Bunck, Alexander C.; Heindel, Walter; Seifarth, Harald; Maintz, David

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. To test different peripheral arterial stents using four image reconstruction approaches with respect to lumen visualization, lumen attenuation and image noise in dual-source multidetector row CT (DSCT) in vitro. Methods and Materials. 22 stents (nitinol, steel, cobalt-alloy, tantalum, platinum alloy) were examined in a vessel phantom. All stents were imaged in axial orientation with standard parameters. Image reconstructions were obtained with four different convolution kernels. To evaluate visualization characteristics of the stent, the lumen diameter, intraluminal density and noise were measured. Results. The mean percentage of the visible stent lumen diameter from the nominal stent diameter was 74.5% ± 5.7 for the medium-sharp kernel, 72.8% ± 6.4 for the medium, 70.8% ± 6.4 for the medium-smooth and 67.6% ± 6.6 for the smooth kernel. Mean values of lumen attenuation were 299.7HU ± 127 (medium-sharp), 273.9HU ± 68 (medium), 270.7HU ± 53 (medium-smooth) and 265.8HU ± 43. Mean image noise was: 54.6 ± 6.3, 20.5 ± 1.7, 16.3 ± 1.7, 14.0 ± 2 respectively. Conclusion. Visible stent lumen diameter varies depending on stent type and scan parameters. Lumen diameter visibility increases with the sharpness of the reconstruction kernel. Smoother kernels provide more realistic density measurements inside the stent lumen and less image noise. PMID:22091369

  9. Dynamic CT perfusion imaging of the myocardium using a wide-detector scanner: a semiquantitative analysis in an animal model.

    PubMed

    Muenzel, Daniela; Noël, Peter B; Gramer, Bettina M; Leber, Vivian; Schneider, Armin; Leber, Alexander; Vembar, Mani; Fingerle, Alexander A; Rummeny, Ernst J; Huber, Armin

    2014-01-01

    Functional assessment of myocardial perfusion in computed tomography (CT) is a challenge. To evaluate CT dynamic myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) using a wide-detector scanner. Time to peak (TTP), peak enhancement (PE), upslope (US), and the area under the curve (AUC) were calculated in 12 pigs (256-slice multidetector CT scanner). The entire myocardium was covered by the scan volume. TTP was increased, and PE, US, and AUC were decreased in poststenotic myocardium. CT MPI with complete coverage of the myocardium is feasible, providing evaluation of the physiological significance of coronary artery stenosis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Petamenophis (Padiamenemipet), an Egyptian Child Mummy Protected for Eternity: Revelation by Multidetector Computed Tomography.

    PubMed

    Martina, Maria Cristina; Cesarani, Federico; Boano, Rosa; Fiore Marochetti, Elisa; Gandini, Giovanni

    2017-08-03

    The objective of our work was to report the most recent findings obtained with multidetector computed tomography of a child mummy from the Roman period (119-123 CE) housed at the Egyptian Museum in Turin, Italy. Multidetector computed tomography and postprocessing were applied to understand the embalming techniques, the nature of a foreign object, and anthropometrical values. The information was compared with that from other mummies that were buried in the same tomb, but today housed in different museums. New information regarding the embalming technique was revealed. Multidetector computed tomography allowed the identification of a knife-like metallic object, probably an amulet for the child's protection in the afterlife. Multidetector computed tomography and image postprocessing confirm their valuable role in noninvasive studies in ancient mummies and provided evidence of a unique cultural practice in the late history of Ancient Egypt such as placing a knife possibly as an amulet.

  11. Does the Degree of Perihepatitis Have Any Relevance to the Severity of the Manifestations of Pelvic Inflammatory Disease on Multidetector Computed Tomography?

    PubMed

    Kim, Ji Su; Kim, Hyun Cheol; Kim, Sang Won; Yang, Dal Mo; Rhee, Sun Jung; Shin, Jong Soo

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the relationship between the degree of perihepatitis and the severity of pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) on multidetector computed tomography (MDCT). A total of 177 women with PID who underwent biphasic abdominal computed tomography (CT) scans were enrolled. Two reviewers retrospectively reviewed the CT scans with consensus and subjectively categorized the severity of PID into 4 grades (normal, mild, moderate, and severe). Another reviewer independently assigned the extent (grades 0 to 4) and the depth (grades 0 to 4) of hepatic surface enhancement in terms of the degree of perihepatitis. Relationships between the degree of perihepatitis and the CT severity as well as each CT manifestation of PID were evaluated using the χ test or a cumulative logistic regression analysis. Of the 177 patients, 99 (55.9%) showed hepatic surface enhancement. The severity of PID on MDCT was significantly related with the degree of perihepatitis (all P < 0.001). Salpingitis, oophoritis, pelvic fat haziness, complicated ascites, and omental/mesenteric fat infiltration were significantly related with the degree of perihepatitis (all P < 0.05). Among these variables, omental/mesenteric fat infiltration (odds ratio = 10.9) and salpingitis (odds ratio = 6.0) were the CT manifestations that were most associated with the presence of perihepatitis in PID. The degree of perihepatitis seems to show a relationship with the severity of PID on MDCT. Omental/mesenteric fat infiltration and salpingitis can be strongly related with perihepatitis in PID.

  12. [The different manifestations of pulmonary aspergillosis: multidetector computed tomography findings].

    PubMed

    Koren Fernández, L; Alonso Charterina, S; Alcalá-Galiano Rubio, A; Sánchez Nistal, M A

    2014-01-01

    Pulmonary aspergillosis is a fungal infection usually caused by inhaling Aspergillus fumigatus spores. However, when we talk about aspergillosis, we normally refer to the spectrum of clinical and radiological findings that depend directly on the patient's immune status, on the prior existence of lung disease, and on the virulence of the infective organism. There are four types of pulmonary aspergillosis (aspergilloma, allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis, chronic necrotizing pulmonary aspergillosis, and invasive aspergillosis), and each type has its own distinct radiologic findings. We review the signs of pulmonary aspergillosis on multidetector computed tomography and we correlate them with patients' symptoms and immune responses. Likewise, we discuss the differential diagnoses. Copyright © 2013 SERAM. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  13. Multidetector computed tomography findings in deaths with severe burns.

    PubMed

    Levy, Angela D; Harcke, Howard T; Getz, John M; Mallak, Craig T

    2009-06-01

    This study compared autopsy with postmortem multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) findings in charred remains. Seventeen consecutive male subjects (mean age, 29.4 years) who perished in a fire-related event resulting in charred remains underwent total body MDCT immediately prior to routine autopsy that included serum carboxyhemoglobin measurement. MDCT showed all thermal tissue changes (skin and subcutaneous fat loss, skeletal muscle retraction, pugilistic attitude, cortical fractures, bone and organ destruction, thermal epidural hematoma, and thermal amputation) and established all fracture patterns that were lethal, but autopsy added the fire as a contributory cause of death when there was carboxyhemoglobin elevation. MDCT had limited value in determination of lethal vascular and visceral injuries. MDCT is an effective complement to autopsy in the setting of charred remains and may serve to augment a limited autopsy. This may be particularly useful in mass casualty scenarios.

  14. Multidetector computed tomography of temporomandibular joint: A road less travelled.

    PubMed

    Pahwa, Shivani; Bhalla, Ashu Seith; Roychaudhary, Ajoy; Bhutia, Ongkila

    2015-05-16

    This article reviews the imaging anatomy of temporomandibular joint (TMJ), describes the technique of multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT) of the TMJ, and describes in detail various osseous pathologic afflictions affecting the joint. Traumatic injuries affecting the mandibular condyle are most common, followed by joint ankylosis as a sequel to arthritis. The congenital anomalies are less frequent, hemifacial microsomia being the most commonly encountered anomaly involving the TMJ. Neoplastic afflictions of TMJ are distinctly uncommon, osteochondroma being one of the most common lesions. MDCT enables comprehensive evaluation of osseous afflictions of TMJ, and is a valuable tool for surgical planning. Sagittal, coronal and 3D reformatted images well depict osseous TMJ lesions, and their relationship to adjacent structures.

  15. Toroid cavity/coil NMR multi-detector

    DOEpatents

    Gerald, II, Rex E.; Meadows, Alexander D.; Gregar, Joseph S.; Rathke, Jerome W.

    2007-09-18

    An analytical device for rapid, non-invasive nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy of multiple samples using a single spectrometer is provided. A modified toroid cavity/coil detector (TCD), and methods for conducting the simultaneous acquisition of NMR data for multiple samples including a protocol for testing NMR multi-detectors are provided. One embodiment includes a plurality of LC resonant circuits including spatially separated toroid coil inductors, each toroid coil inductor enveloping its corresponding sample volume, and tuned to resonate at a predefined frequency using a variable capacitor. The toroid coil is formed into a loop, where both ends of the toroid coil are brought into coincidence. Another embodiment includes multiple micro Helmholtz coils arranged on a circular perimeter concentric with a central conductor of the toroid cavity.

  16. Enhanced security for multi-detector quantum random number generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marangon, Davide G.; Vallone, Giuseppe; Zanforlin, Ugo; Villoresi, Paolo

    2016-11-01

    Quantum random number generators (QRNG) represent an advanced solution for randomness generation, which is essential in every cryptographic application. In this context, integrated arrays of single-photon detectors have promising applications as QRNGs based on the spatial detection of photons. For the employment of QRNGs in cryptography, it is necessary to have efficient methods to evaluate the so-called quantum min-entropy that corresponds to the amount of the true extractable quantum randomness from the QRNG. Here, we present an efficient method that allows the estimation of the quantum min-entropy for a multi-detector QRNG. In particular, we consider a scenario in which an attacker can control the efficiency of the detectors and knows the emitted number of photons. Eventually, we apply the method to a QRNG with 103 detectors.

  17. Diagnostic accuracy of noninvasive coronary angiography with 320-detector row computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Nasis, Arthur; Leung, Michael C; Antonis, Paul R; Cameron, James D; Lehman, Sam J; Hope, Sarah A; Crossett, Marcus P; Troupis, John M; Meredith, Ian T; Seneviratne, Sujith K

    2010-11-15

    We sought to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of noninvasive coronary angiography using 320-detector row computed tomography, which provides 16-cm craniocaudal coverage in 350 ms and can image the entire coronary tree in a single heartbeat, representing a significant advance from previous-generation scanners. We evaluated 63 consecutive patients who underwent 320-detector row computed tomography and invasive coronary angiography for the investigation of suspected coronary artery disease. Patients with known coronary artery disease were excluded. Computed tomographic (CT) studies were assessed by 2 independent observers blinded to results of invasive coronary angiography. A single observer unaware of CT results assessed invasive coronary angiographic images quantitatively. All available coronary segments were included in the analysis, regardless of size or image quality. Lesions with >50% diameter stenoses were considered significant. Mean heart rate was 63 ± 7 beats/min, with 6 patients (10%) in atrial fibrillation during image acquisition. Thirty-three patients (52%) and 70 of 973 segments (7%) had significant coronary stenoses on invasive coronary angiogram. Seventeen segments (2%) were nondiagnostic on computed tomogram and were assumed to contain significant stenoses on an "intention-to-diagnose" analysis. Sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values of computed tomography for detecting significant stenoses were 94%, 87%, 88%, and 93%, respectively, by patient (n = 63), 89%, 95%, 82%, and 97%, respectively, by artery (n = 260), and 87%, 97%, 73%, and 99%, respectively, by segment (n = 973). In conclusion, noninvasive 320-detector row CT coronary angiography provides high diagnostic accuracy across all coronary segments, regardless of size, cardiac rhythm, or image quality.

  18. CT Scans

    MedlinePlus

    ... cross-sectional pictures of your body. Doctors use CT scans to look for Broken bones Cancers Blood clots Signs of heart disease Internal bleeding During a CT scan, you lie still on a table. The table ...

  19. Automated 3-dimensional aortic annular assessment by multidetector computed tomography in transcatheter aortic valve implantation.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Yusuke; Morice, Marie-Claude; Bouvier, Erik; Leong, Tora; Hayashida, Kentaro; Lefèvre, Thierry; Hovasse, Thomas; Romano, Mauro; Chevalier, Bernard; Donzeau-Gouge, Patrick; Farge, Arnaud; Cormier, Bertrand; Garot, Philippe

    2013-09-01

    This study sought to evaluate the accuracy, reproducibility, and predictive value for post-procedural aortic regurgitation (AR) of an automated multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) post-processing imaging software, 3mensio Valves (version 5.1.sp1, 3mensio Medical Imaging BV, the Netherlands), in the assessment of patients undergoing transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI). Accurate pre-operative aortic annulus measurements are crucial for patients undergoing TAVI. One hundred five patients undergoing MDCT screening before TAVI were evaluated. Aortic annular measurement was compared between automated 3mensio Valves software and manual data post-processing software on a dedicated workstation; we analyzed the discrimination value of annulus measurement for post-procedural AR in 44 recipients of a self-expanding valve. The automated 3mensio Valves software showed good concordance with manual MDCT measurements as demonstrated by Bland-Altman analysis. The automated software provided equally good reproducibility as manual measurement, especially for measurement of aortic annulus area (intraobserver intraclass correlation coefficients 0.98 vs. 0.97, interobserver 0.98 vs. 0.95). In 44 patients after implantation of a self-expanding valve, the valve diameter/CT-measured geometric mean annulus diameter ratio by automated 3mensio Valves software showed moderate and better discrimination ability in predicting post-procedural AR compared with manual measurement (p = 0.12, area under the curve 0.77, 95% confidence interval: 0.63 to 0.91, area under the curve 0.68, 95% confidence interval: 0.50 to 0.86, respectively). The automated 3mensio Valves software demonstrated reliable, reproducible aortic annulus measurement and better predictive value for post-procedural AR, suggesting important clinical implications for pre-operative assessment of patients undergoing TAVI. Copyright © 2013 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights

  20. Blade row interaction effects on flutter and forced response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buffum, Daniel H.

    1993-01-01

    In the flutter or forced response analysis of a turbomachine blade row, the blade row in question is commonly treated as if it is isolated from the neigboring blade rows. Disturbances created by vibrating blades are then free to propagate away from this blade row without being disturbed. In reality, neighboring blade rows will reflect some portion of this wave energy back toward the vibrating blades, causing additional unsteady forces on them. It is of fundamental importance to determine whether or not these reflected waves can have a significant effect on the aeroelastic stability or forced response of a blade row. Therefore, a procedure to calculate intra-blade-row unsteady aerodynamic interactions was developed which relies upon results available from isolated blade row unsteady aerodynamic analyses. In addition, an unsteady aerodynamic influence coefficient technique is used to obtain a model for the vibratory response in which the neighboring blade rows are also flexible. The flutter analysis shows that interaction effects can be destabilizing, and the forced response analysis shows that interaction effects can result in a significant increase in the resonant response of a blade row.

  1. Hand Replantation with Proximal Row Carpectomy

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Young-Keun; Lee, Hang-Ho; Park, Ji-Kang; Kim, Joo-Yong; Dhawan, Vikas

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to present our operative technique and postoperative results of the hand replantation with proximal row carpectomy in cases of complete amputation at the level of wrist joint. From May 2003 to April 2005, five patients suffered from complete amputation of the hand due to industrial trauma. Amputation level was radiocarpal joint in three cases and midcarpal joint in two cases. Three cases represented guillotine type and two cases with local crush type injuries. All were men and the mean age was 26.6 years. The mean follow-up period was 26.8 months. At the time of replantation, the wrist joint was stabilized with transarticular fixation using three to four Kirschner’s wires after performing proximal row carpectomy. Postoperatively, functional results such as muscle strength, range of motion of the wrist and fingers, and sensory recovery were assessed according to Chen’s criteria. Joint width and arthritic changes of the radio-capitate joint were evaluated with radiologic tools. According to Chen’s criteria, the overall results in five cases were classified as grade II. Intrinsic muscle power of hands was found to be grade 4. The mean grip and pinch powers were 41% and 45%, respectively, compared to contralateral hand. The mean arc of flexion–extension of wrist was 53°. Total mean active motion of fingers was 215 degrees. Static two-point discrimination of fingertip ranged from 8 to 13 mm. On the follow-up, computerized tomography showed well-preserved radio-capitate joint space without any arthritic changes. While performing hand replantation after amputation at the radiocarpal or midcarpal level, proximal row carpectomy is a useful procedure to preserve joint motion of the wrist in selected cases. PMID:18855073

  2. Multidetector CT and histological features of benign mesenchymoma of the infratemporal space: a rare case report

    PubMed Central

    Kelkar, CA; Desai, RS; Kambadakone, A; Shetty, SJ

    2013-01-01

    Benign mesenchymoma is a soft tissue neoplasm composed of an admixture of two or more benign mesenchymal components in addition to fibrous tissue. A rare case of benign mesenchymoma of the infratemporal space in a 14-year-old boy is presented. In this case report we discuss the salient imaging and histopathological features of this rare entity. PMID:22282510

  3. The jet ski open-book pelvic fracture: diagnosis with multidetector CT.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Andy; Rhea, James T; Novelline, Robert A

    2003-10-01

    A 10-year-old girl sustained a traumatic open-book pelvic fracture from a straddle injury in a jet ski accident. Plain films and computed tomography both demonstrated diastasis of the symphysis pubis and bilateral widening of the sacroiliac joints. The open-book fracture resulted from the patient's striking the steering column of the watercraft during a deceleration accident. The unusual cause of this injury is of clinical interest because with increasing popularity of personal watercraft and changes in the design of these vehicles, the incidence and prevalence of this type of injury may increase in the future.

  4. Multi-detector CT assessment in pulmonary hypertension: techniques, systematic approach to interpretation and key findings.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Gareth; Hoey, Edward T D; Reynolds, John H; Ganeshan, Arul; Ment, Jerome

    2015-06-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) may be suspected based on the clinical history, physical examination and electrocardiogram findings but imaging is usually central to confirming the diagnosis, establishing a cause and guiding therapy. The diagnostic pathway of PAH involves a variety of complimentary investigations of which computed tomography pulmonary angiography (CTPA) has established a central role both in helping identify an underlying cause for PAH and assessing resulting functional compromise. In particular CTPA is considered as the gold standard technique for the diagnosis of thromboembolic disease. This article reviews the CTPA evaluation in PAH, describing CTPA techniques, a systematic approach to interpretation and spectrum of key imaging findings.

  5. Neurologic applications of whole-brain volumetric multidetector computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Snyder, Kenneth V; Mokin, Maxim; Bates, Vernice E

    2014-02-01

    The introduction of computed tomography (CT) scanning in the 1970s revolutionized the way clinicians could diagnose and treat stroke. Subsequent advances in CT technology significantly reduced radiation dose, reduced metallic artifact, and achieved speeds that enable dynamic functional studies. The recent addition of whole-brain volumetric CT perfusion technology has given clinicians a powerful tool to assess parenchymal perfusion parameters as well as visualize dynamic changes in blood vessel flow throughout the brain during a single cardiac cycle. This article reviews clinical applications of volumetric multimodal CT that helped to guide and manage care.

  6. CT of Normal Developmental and Variant Anatomy of the Pediatric Skull: Distinguishing Trauma from Normality.

    PubMed

    Idriz, Sanjin; Patel, Jaymin H; Ameli Renani, Seyed; Allan, Rosemary; Vlahos, Ioannis

    2015-01-01

    The use of computed tomography (CT) in clinical practice has been increasing rapidly, with the number of CT examinations performed in adults and children rising by 10% per year in England. Because the radiology community strives to reduce the radiation dose associated with pediatric examinations, external factors, including guidelines for pediatric head injury, are raising expectations for use of cranial CT in the pediatric population. Thus, radiologists are increasingly likely to encounter pediatric head CT examinations in daily practice. The variable appearance of cranial sutures at different ages can be confusing for inexperienced readers of radiologic images. The evolution of multidetector CT with thin-section acquisition increases the clarity of some of these sutures, which may be misinterpreted as fractures. Familiarity with the normal anatomy of the pediatric skull, how it changes with age, and normal variants can assist in translating the increased resolution of multidetector CT into more accurate detection of fractures and confident determination of normality, thereby reducing prolonged hospitalization of children with normal developmental structures that have been misinterpreted as fractures. More important, the potential morbidity and mortality related to false-negative interpretation of fractures as normal sutures may be avoided. The authors describe the normal anatomy of all standard pediatric sutures, common variants, and sutural mimics, thereby providing an accurate and safe framework for CT evaluation of skull trauma in pediatric patients.

  7. Low-dose CT for quantitative analysis in acute respiratory distress syndrome

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-08-31

    few studies on pulmonary emphysema [22-24], that showed that quantification of hyperinflated tissue is not affected by a reduction of tube current...Pulmonary emphysema : radiation dose and section thickness at multidetector CT quantification--comparison with macroscopic and microscopic...pulmonary emphysema using a low-dose technique. Radiol Med 2002, 104:13-24. 24. Nishio M, Matsumoto S, Ohno Y, Sugihara N, Inokawa H, Yoshikawa T

  8. Quantitative assessment of lipiodol deposition after Chemoembolization: Comparison between cone-beam CT and multi-detector CT

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Rongxin; Geschwind, Jean-François; Wang, Zhijun; Tacher, Vania; Lin, MingDe

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the ability of cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) acquired directly after TACE to assess lipiodol deposition in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and compare it to unenhanced MDCT. Materials and methods Fifteen HCC patients were treated with conventional TACE, and CBCT was used to assess the lipiodol deposition directly after TACE. Unenhanced MDCT was performed 24 hours after TACE. Four patients were excluded because the margin of tumor or area of lipiodol deposition was not clear. The image enhancement density of the entire tumor (T) and liver parenchyma (L) was measured by ImageJ software, and tumor-to-liver contrast (TLC) was calculated. In addition, volumetric measurement of tumor and lipiodol was performed by semiautomatic 3D volume segmentation and compared using linear regression to evaluate consistency between two imaging modalities. Results The mean value of TLC on CBCT was not significantly different from that on MDCT (337.7±233.5 HU versus 283.0±152.1 HU, P=0.103). The average volume of the whole tumor and of only the lipiodol deposited regions, and the calculated average percentage of lipiodol retention on CBCT were not significantly different when compared to MDCT (tumor volume: 9.6±11.8 cm3 versus 10.8±14.2 cm3, P=0.142; lipiodol volume: 6.3±7.7 cm3 versus 7.0±8.1 cm3, P=0.214; percentage of lipiodol retention: 68.9%±24.0% versus 72.2%±23.1%, P=0.578). Additionally, there was a high correlation in the volume of tumor and lipiodol between CBCT and MDCT (R2=0.919 and 0.903, respectively). Conclusions The quantitative image enhancement and volume analyses demonstrate that CBCT is similar to MDCT in assessing the lipiodol deposition in HCC after TACE. PMID:24094672

  9. Modelling the deflection of rowing oar shafts.

    PubMed

    Laschowski, Brock; Hopkins, Cameron C; de Bruyn, John R; Nolte, Volker

    2017-03-01

    The deflection of rowing oar shafts subjected to a static load was investigated. Two sets of sculling oars of different design stiffness were tested at three different lengths from 2.66 to 2.70 m. Loads up to 201 N were applied to the blade end of the oar shafts, and deflections were measured at six positions along the length of the shafts. The experimental results were compared with theoretical predictions obtained by modelling the oar shafts as homogenous end-loaded cantilever beams. The results show that the oar shafts are not uniform, in contradiction to the assumed model, but rather are most compliant near the sleeves and up to 80% stiffer towards the blades. The effect of oar shaft stiffness and length on the deflection angle at the blade end of the oar shaft was at most 1.18 ± 0.01°. The measured variation of stiffness along the shaft has implications for boat propulsion and rowing performance.

  10. 97. VIEW OF CENTER OF INTERIOR ROW OF EQUIPMENT CABINETS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    97. VIEW OF CENTER OF INTERIOR ROW OF EQUIPMENT CABINETS ON SOUTH SIDE OF LANDLINE INSTRUMENTATION ROOM. THREE ADDITIONAL GOULD BRUSH CHART RECORDERS ARE IN THIS ROW (NOT VISIBLE IN PHOTOGRAPH) LOCATED IMMEDIATELY EAST (LEFT) OF THESE CABINETS. Another row of cabinets south of (behind) this one is not accessible for photography. - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, Launch Operations Building, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

  11. Metallic artifacts from internal scaphoid fracture fixation screws: comparison between C-arm flat-panel, cone-beam, and multidetector computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Finkenstaedt, Tim; Morsbach, Fabian; Calcagni, Maurizio; Vich, Magdalena; Pfirrmann, Christian W A; Alkadhi, Hatem; Runge, Val M; Andreisek, Gustav; Guggenberger, Roman

    2014-08-01

    The aim of this study was to compare image quality and extent of artifacts from scaphoid fracture fixation screws using different computed tomography (CT) modalities and radiation dose protocols. Imaging of 6 cadaveric wrists with artificial scaphoid fractures and different fixation screws was performed in 2 screw positions (45° and 90° orientation in relation to the x/y-axis) using multidetector CT (MDCT) and 2 flat-panel CT modalities, C-arm flat-panel CT (FPCT) and cone-beam CT (CBCT), the latter 2 with low and standard radiation dose protocols. Mean cartilage attenuation and metal artifact-induced absolute Hounsfield unit changes (= artifact extent) were measured. Two independent radiologists evaluated different image quality criteria using a 5-point Likert-scale. Interreader agreements (Cohen κ) were calculated. Mean absolute Hounsfield unit changes and quality