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Sample records for multidimensional phenotypic profiling

  1. Profile Analysis: Multidimensional Scaling Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ding, Cody S.

    2001-01-01

    Outlines an exploratory multidimensional scaling-based approach to profile analysis called Profile Analysis via Multidimensional Scaling (PAMS) (M. Davison, 1994). The PAMS model has the advantages of being applied to samples of any size easily, classifying persons on a continuum, and using person profile index for further hypothesis studies, but…

  2. Estimating Cognitive Profiles Using Profile Analysis via Multidimensional Scaling (PAMS).

    PubMed

    Kim, Se-Kang; Frisby, Craig L; Davison, Mark L

    2004-10-01

    Two of the most popular methods of profile analysis, cluster analysis and modal profile analysis, have limitations. First, neither technique is adequate when the sample size is large. Second, neither method will necessarily provide profile information in terms of both level and pattern. A new method of profile analysis, called Profile Analysis via Multidimensional Scaling (PAMS; Davison, 1996), is introduced to meet the challenge. PAMS extends the use of simple multidimensional scaling methods to identify latent profiles in a multi-test battery. Application of PAMS to profile analysis is described. The PAMS model is then used to identify latent profiles from a subgroup (N = 357) within the sample of the Woodcock-Johnson Psychoeducational Battery-Revised (WJ-R; McGrew, Werder, & Woodcock, 1991; Woodcock & Johnson, 1989), followed by a discussion of procedures for interpreting participants' observed score profiles from the latent PAMS profiles. Finally, advantages and limitations of the PAMS technique are discussed.

  3. Confirmatory Factor Analysis and Profile Analysis via Multidimensional Scaling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Se-Kang; Davison, Mark L.; Frisby, Craig L.

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes the Confirmatory Factor Analysis (CFA) parameterization of the Profile Analysis via Multidimensional Scaling (PAMS) model to demonstrate validation of profile pattern hypotheses derived from multidimensional scaling (MDS). Profile Analysis via Multidimensional Scaling (PAMS) is an exploratory method for identifying major…

  4. Confirmatory Factor Analysis and Profile Analysis via Multidimensional Scaling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Se-Kang; Davison, Mark L.; Frisby, Craig L.

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes the Confirmatory Factor Analysis (CFA) parameterization of the Profile Analysis via Multidimensional Scaling (PAMS) model to demonstrate validation of profile pattern hypotheses derived from multidimensional scaling (MDS). Profile Analysis via Multidimensional Scaling (PAMS) is an exploratory method for identifying major…

  5. Towards a multidimensional healthy ageing phenotype.

    PubMed

    Mount, Sarah; Lara, Jose; Schols, Annemie M W J; Mathers, John C

    2016-11-01

    There is great interest in developing tools to measure healthy ageing and to identify early stages of health impairment, which may guide the implementation of interventions to prevent or delay the development of disease, disability, and mortality. Here, we review the most recent developments directed to operationalize, and test, definitions of healthy ageing. There is lack of consensus about how to define healthy ageing and, unsurprisingly, diversity in the instruments for its measurement. However, progress is being made in describing and in devising tools to capture the healthy ageing phenotype. Attempts to measure healthy ageing have relied primarily on cross-sectional data collected in older people. More recent studies have assessed the healthy ageing phenotype using markers of multiple functional domains and have used longitudinal data to model the dynamics and trajectories of healthy ageing. Given the complexity of the ageing process, no single measure is able to predict the ageing trajectory. Current attempts to operationalize the healthy ageing phenotype have relied on markers and data from earlier cohort studies and are limited by the tools used to collect data in those studies. Such data are often unsuitable to detect early subtle declines in function and/or are inappropriate for use in younger old adults. Future studies employing more objective and novel markers of healthy ageing are likely to offer opportunities to define and operationalize the healthy ageing phenotype.

  6. Multidimensional Clinical Phenotyping of an Adult Cystic Fibrosis Patient Population

    PubMed Central

    Conrad, Douglas J.; Bailey, Barbara A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Cystic Fibrosis (CF) is a multi-systemic disease resulting from mutations in the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Regulator (CFTR) gene and has major manifestations in the sino-pulmonary, and gastro-intestinal tracts. Clinical phenotypes were generated using 26 common clinical variables to generate classes that overlapped quantiles of lung function and were based on multiple aspects of CF systemic disease. Methods The variables included age, gender, CFTR mutations, FEV1% predicted, FVC% predicted, height, weight, Brasfield chest xray score, pancreatic sufficiency status and clinical microbiology results. Complete datasets were compiled on 211 subjects. Phenotypes were identified using a proximity matrix generated by the unsupervised Random Forests algorithm and subsequent clustering by the Partitioning around Medoids (PAM) algorithm. The final phenotypic classes were then characterized and compared to a similar dataset obtained three years earlier. Findings Clinical phenotypes were identified using a clustering strategy that generated four and five phenotypes. Each strategy identified 1) a low lung health scores phenotype, 2) a younger, well-nourished, male-dominated class, 3) various high lung health score phenotypes that varied in terms of age, gender and nutritional status. This multidimensional clinical phenotyping strategy identified classes with expected microbiology results and low risk clinical phenotypes with pancreatic sufficiency. Interpretation This study demonstrated regional adult CF clinical phenotypes using non-parametric, continuous, ordinal and categorical data with a minimal amount of subjective data to identify clinically relevant phenotypes. These studies identified the relative stability of the phenotypes, demonstrated specific phenotypes consistent with published findings and identified others needing further study. PMID:25822311

  7. Multidimensional Neuropathic Pain Phenotypes after Spinal Cord Injury.

    PubMed

    Widerström-Noga, Eva; Felix, Elizabeth R; Adcock, James P; Escalona, Maydelis; Tibbett, Jacqueline

    2016-03-01

    Identifying clinical neuropathic pain phenotypes is a first step to better understand the underlying pain mechanisms after spinal cord injury (SCI). The primary purpose of the present study was to characterize multidimensional neuropathic pain phenotypes based on quantitative sensory testing (QST), pain intensity, and utilization of catastrophizing coping strategies. Thermal perception, thermal pain, and vibratory perception thresholds were assessed above and below the level of injury (LOI) in 101 persons with SCI and neuropathic pain, 18 persons with SCI and no neuropathic pain, and 50 able-bodied, pain-free controls. Cluster analysis of QST z-scores below the LOI, pain intensity ratings, and the Coping Strategies Questionnaire (CSQ) catastrophizing subscale scores in subjects with neuropathic pain resulted in two phenotypes: severe neuropathic pain (SNP) with greater pain intensity (7.39 ± 1.57) and thermal and vibratory sensitivity compared with the moderate neuropathic pain (MNP; 5.40 ± 1.43). A factor analysis including all CSQ subscales, the Neuropathic Pain Symptom Inventory (NPSI) total score, and thermal pain sensitivity above and below the LOI resulted in three factors: (1) adaptive pain coping including increasing activities, diverting attention, and reinterpreting pain sensations; (2) catastrophizing, neuropathic pain, and thermal sensitivity including greater NPSI total score, thermal pain sensitivity below the LOI, and catastrophizing; and (3) general pain sensitivity including greater thermal pain sensitivity above the LOI and lower catastrophizing. Our results suggest that neuropathic pain symptom severity post-SCI is significantly associated with residual spinothalamic tract function below the LOI and catastrophizing pain coping.

  8. Multidimensional profiles of health locus of control in Hispanic Americans

    PubMed Central

    Champagne, Brian R; Fox, Rina S; Mills, Sarah D; Sadler, Georgia Robins; Malcarne, Vanessa L

    2016-01-01

    Latent profile analysis identified health locus of control profiles among 436 Hispanic Americans who completed the Multidimensional Health Locus of Control scales. Results revealed four profiles: Internally Oriented-Weak, -Moderate, -Strong, and Externally Oriented. The profile groups were compared on sociocultural and demographic characteristics, health beliefs and behaviors, and physical and mental health outcomes. The Internally Oriented-Strong group had less cancer fatalism, religiosity, and equity health attributions, and more alcohol consumption than the other three groups; the Externally Oriented group had stronger equity health attributions and less alcohol consumption. Deriving multidimensional health locus of control profiles through latent profile analysis allows examination of the relationships of health locus of control subtypes to health variables. PMID:25855212

  9. Multidimensional profiles of health locus of control in Hispanic Americans.

    PubMed

    Champagne, Brian R; Fox, Rina S; Mills, Sarah D; Sadler, Georgia Robins; Malcarne, Vanessa L

    2016-10-01

    Latent profile analysis identified health locus of control profiles among 436 Hispanic Americans who completed the Multidimensional Health Locus of Control scales. Results revealed four profiles: Internally Oriented-Weak, -Moderate, -Strong, and Externally Oriented. The profile groups were compared on sociocultural and demographic characteristics, health beliefs and behaviors, and physical and mental health outcomes. The Internally Oriented-Strong group had less cancer fatalism, religiosity, and equity health attributions, and more alcohol consumption than the other three groups; the Externally Oriented group had stronger equity health attributions and less alcohol consumption. Deriving multidimensional health locus of control profiles through latent profile analysis allows examination of the relationships of health locus of control subtypes to health variables. © The Author(s) 2015.

  10. Multidimensional profiling of cell surface proteins and nuclear markers

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Ju; Chang, Hang; Andarawewa, Kumari; Yaswen, Paul; Helen Barcellos-Hoff, Mary; Parvin, Bahram

    2009-01-30

    Cell membrane proteins play an important role in tissue architecture and cell-cell communication. We hypothesize that segmentation and multidimensional characterization of the distribution of cell membrane proteins, on a cell-by-cell basis, enable improved classification of treatment groups and identify important characteristics that can otherwise be hidden. We have developed a series of computational steps to (i) delineate cell membrane protein signals and associate them with a specific nucleus; (ii) compute a coupled representation of the multiplexed DNA content with membrane proteins; (iii) rank computed features associated with such a multidimensional representation; (iv) visualize selected features for comparative evaluation through heatmaps; and (v) discriminate between treatment groups in an optimal fashion. The novelty of our method is in the segmentation of the membrane signal and the multidimensional representation of phenotypic signature on a cell-by-cell basis. To test the utility of this method, the proposed computational steps were applied to images of cells that have been irradiated with different radiation qualities in the presence and absence of other small molecules. These samples are labeled for their DNA content and E-cadherin membrane proteins. We demonstrate that multidimensional representations of cell-by-cell phenotypes improve predictive and visualization capabilities among different treatment groups, and identify hidden variables.

  11. Confirmatory Factor Analysis and Profile Analysis via Multidimensional Scaling.

    PubMed

    Kim, Se-Kang; Davison, Mark L; Frisby, Craig L

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes the Confirmatory Factor Analysis (CFA) parameterization of the Profile Analysis via Multidimensional Scaling (PAMS) model to demonstrate validation of profile pattern hypotheses derived from multidimensional scaling (MDS). Profile Analysis via Multidimensional Scaling (PAMS) is an exploratory method for identifying major profiles in a multi-subtest test battery. Major profile patterns are represented as dimensions extracted from a MDS analysis. PAMS represents an individual observed score as a linear combination of dimensions where the dimensions are the most typical profile patterns present in a population. While the PAMS approach was initially developed for exploratory purposes, its results can later be confirmed in a different sample by CFA. Since CFA is often used to verify results from an exploratory factor analysis, the present paper makes the connection between a factor model and the PAMS model, and then illustrates CFA with a simulated example (that was generated by the PAMS model) and at the same time with a real example. The real example demonstrates confirmation of PAMS exploratory results by using a different sample. Fit indexes can be used to indicate whether the CFA reparameterization as a confirmatory approach works for the PAMS exploratory results.

  12. Using Profile Analysis via Multidimensional Scaling (PAMS) to Identify Core Profiles from the WMS-III

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frisby, Craig L.; Kim, Se-Kang

    2008-01-01

    Profile Analysis via Multidimensional Scaling (PAMS) is a procedure for extracting latent core profiles in a multitest data set. The PAMS procedure offers several advantages compared with other profile analysis procedures. Most notably, PAMS estimates individual profile weights that reflect the degree to which an individual's observed profile…

  13. Using Profile Analysis via Multidimensional Scaling (PAMS) to Identify Core Profiles from the WMS-III

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frisby, Craig L.; Kim, Se-Kang

    2008-01-01

    Profile Analysis via Multidimensional Scaling (PAMS) is a procedure for extracting latent core profiles in a multitest data set. The PAMS procedure offers several advantages compared with other profile analysis procedures. Most notably, PAMS estimates individual profile weights that reflect the degree to which an individual's observed profile…

  14. Estimating Cognitive Profiles Using Profile Analysis via Multidimensional Scaling (PAMS)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Se-Kang; Frisby, Craig L.; Davison, Mark L.

    2004-01-01

    Two of the most popular methods of profile analysis, cluster analysis and modal profile analysis, have limitations. First, neither technique is adequate when the sample size is large. Second, neither method will necessarily provide profile information in terms of both level and pattern. A new method of profile analysis, called Profile Analysis via…

  15. Estimating Cognitive Profiles Using Profile Analysis via Multidimensional Scaling (PAMS)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Se-Kang; Frisby, Craig L.; Davison, Mark L.

    2004-01-01

    Two of the most popular methods of profile analysis, cluster analysis and modal profile analysis, have limitations. First, neither technique is adequate when the sample size is large. Second, neither method will necessarily provide profile information in terms of both level and pattern. A new method of profile analysis, called Profile Analysis via…

  16. Evaluating the Invariance of Cognitive Profile Patterns Derived from Profile Analysis via Multidimensional Scaling (PAMS): A Bootstrapping Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Se-Kang

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the current study is to validate the invariance of major profile patterns derived from multidimensional scaling (MDS) by bootstrapping. Profile Analysis via Multidimensional Scaling (PAMS) was employed to obtain profiles and bootstrapping was used to construct the sampling distributions of the profile coordinates and the empirical…

  17. Multidimensional Dyspnea Profile: an instrument for clinical and laboratory research

    PubMed Central

    O'Donnell, Carl R.; Guilfoyle, Tegan E.; Parshall, Mark B.; Schwartzstein, Richard M.; Meek, Paula M.; Gracely, Richard H.; Lansing, Robert W.

    2015-01-01

    There is growing awareness that dyspnoea, like pain, is a multidimensional experience, but measurement instruments have not kept pace. The Multidimensional Dyspnea Profile (MDP) assesses overall breathing discomfort, sensory qualities, and emotional responses in laboratory and clinical settings. Here we provide the MDP, review published evidence regarding its measurement properties and discuss its use and interpretation. The MDP assesses dyspnoea during a specific time or a particular activity (focus period) and is designed to examine individual items that are theoretically aligned with separate mechanisms. In contrast, other multidimensional dyspnoea scales assess recalled recent dyspnoea over a period of days using aggregate scores. Previous psychophysical and psychometric studies using the MDP show that: 1) subjects exposed to different laboratory stimuli could discriminate between air hunger and work/effort sensation, and found air hunger more unpleasant; 2) the MDP immediate unpleasantness scale (A1) was convergent with common dyspnoea scales; 3) in emergency department patients, two domains were distinguished (immediate perception, emotional response); 4) test–retest reliability over hours was high; 5) the instrument responded to opioid treatment of experimental dyspnoea and to clinical improvement; 6) convergent validity with common instruments was good; and 7) items responded differently from one another as predicted for multiple dimensions. PMID:25792641

  18. Evolution of cooperation in a multidimensional phenotype space.

    PubMed

    Kroumi, Dhaker; Lessard, Sabin

    2015-06-01

    The emergence of cooperation in populations of selfish individuals is a fascinating topic that has inspired much theoretical work. An important model to study cooperation is the phenotypic model, where individuals are characterized by phenotypic properties that are visible to others. The phenotype of an individual can be represented for instance by a vector x = (x1,…,xn), where x1,…,xn are integers. The population can be well mixed in the sense that everyone is equally likely to interact with everyone else, but the behavioral strategies of the individuals can depend on their distance in the phenotype space. A cooperator can choose to help other individuals exhibiting the same phenotype and defects otherwise. Cooperation is said to be favored by selection if it is more abundant than defection in the stationary state. This means that the average frequency of cooperators in the stationary state strictly exceeds 1/2. Antal et al. (2009c) found conditions that ensure that cooperation is more abundant than defection in a one-dimensional (i.e. n = 1) and an infinite-dimensional (i.e. n = ∞) phenotype space in the case of the Prisoner's Dilemma under weak selection. However, reality lies between these two limit cases. In this paper, we derive the corresponding condition in the case of a phenotype space of any finite dimension. This is done by applying a perturbation method to study a mutation-selection equilibrium under weak selection. This condition is obtained in the limit of a large population size by using the ancestral process. The best scenario for cooperation to be more likely to evolve is found to be a high population-scaled phenotype mutation rate, a low population-scaled strategy mutation rate and a high phenotype space dimension. The biological intuition is that a high population-scaled phenotype mutation rate reduces the quantity of interactions between cooperators and defectors, while a high population-scaled strategy mutation rate introduces newly

  19. Swedish translation and linguistic validation of the multidimensional dyspnoea profile

    PubMed Central

    Ekström, Magnus; Sundh, Josefin

    2016-01-01

    Background Dyspnoea, the feeling of breathing discomfort, consists of multiple dimensions that can vary in intensity, including the level of unpleasantness, qualities or descriptors of the sensation, emotional responses, and impact on function. No validated instrument for multidimensional measurement of dyspnoea is available in Swedish. The Multidimensional Dyspnea Profile (MDP) was recently developed to measure the unpleasantness, sensory qualities, and emotional responses of dyspnoea across diseases and settings. We aimed to take forward a Swedish version of the MDP. Methods Translation and linguistic validation of the MDP was conducted in collaboration with a specialised company in the field (Mapi, Lyon, France). The structured process involved forward and backward translations by two independent certified translators, input from an in-country linguistic consultant, the developers, and three respiratory physicians. Understandability and acceptability were evaluated through in-depth interviews with five patients with dyspnoea in accordance with international guidelines. Results and Conclusion A Swedish version of the MDP was obtained and linguistically validated. The MDP includes 11 rated items: the immediate unpleasantness of the sensation, the presence and intensity of five sensory qualities, and the intensity of five emotional responses to dyspnoea. The time period of measurement is specified by the user. The MDP is copyrighted by the developers but can be used free of charge in the context of non-funded academic research. Conclusion The MDP is the first instrument for measuring multiple dimensions of dyspnoea available in Swedish and should be validated across diseases and settings. Multidimensional measurement is essential for improved assessment and management of dyspnoea in research and clinical care. PMID:27834177

  20. Using Profile Analysis via Multidimensional Scaling (PAMS) to identify core profiles from the WMS-III.

    PubMed

    Frisby, Craig L; Kim, Se-Kang

    2008-03-01

    Profile Analysis via Multidimensional Scaling (PAMS) is a procedure for extracting latent core profiles in a multitest data set. The PAMS procedure offers several advantages compared with other profile analysis procedures. Most notably, PAMS estimates individual profile weights that reflect the degree to which an individual's observed profile approximates the shape and scatter of latent core profiles. The PAMS procedure was applied to index scores of nonreplicated participants from the standardization sample (N = 1,033) for the Wechsler Memory Scale--Third Edition (D. Tulsky, J. Zhu, & M. F. Ledbetter, 2002). PAMS extracted discrepant visual memory and auditory memory versus working memory core profiles for the complete 16- to 89-year-old sample and discrepant working memory and auditory memory versus working memory core profiles for the 75- to 89-year-old cohort. Implications for use of PAMS in future research are discussed.

  1. Bifactor Approach to Modeling Multidimensionality of Physical Self-Perception Profile

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chung, ChihMing; Liao, Xiaolan; Song, Hairong; Lee, Taehun

    2016-01-01

    The multi-dimensionality of Physical Self-Perception Profile (PSPP) has been acknowledged by the use of correlated-factor model and second-order model. In this study, the authors critically endorse the bifactor model, as a substitute to address the multi-dimensionality of PSPP. To cross-validate the models, analyses are conducted first in…

  2. Bifactor Approach to Modeling Multidimensionality of Physical Self-Perception Profile

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chung, ChihMing; Liao, Xiaolan; Song, Hairong; Lee, Taehun

    2016-01-01

    The multi-dimensionality of Physical Self-Perception Profile (PSPP) has been acknowledged by the use of correlated-factor model and second-order model. In this study, the authors critically endorse the bifactor model, as a substitute to address the multi-dimensionality of PSPP. To cross-validate the models, analyses are conducted first in…

  3. Multidimensional Profiling Platforms Reveal Metabolic Dysregulation caused by Organophosphorus Pesticides

    PubMed Central

    Medina-Cleghorn, Daniel; Heslin, Ann; Morris, Patrick J.; Mulvihill, Melinda M.; Nomura, Daniel K.

    2014-01-01

    We are environmentally exposed to countless synthetic chemicals on a daily basis with an increasing number of these chemical exposures linked to adverse health effects. However, our understanding of the (patho)physiological effects of these chemicals remains poorly understood, due in-part to a general lack of effort to systematically and comprehensively identify the direct interactions of environmental chemicals with biological macromolecules in mammalian systems in vivo. Here, we have used functional chemoproteomic and metabolomic platforms to broadly identify direct enzyme targets that are inhibited by widely used organophosphorus (OP) pesticides in vivo in mice and to determine metabolic alterations that are caused by these chemicals. We find that these pesticides directly inhibit over 20 serine hydrolases in vivo leading to widespread disruptions in lipid metabolism. Through identifying direct biological targets of OP pesticides, we show heretofore unrecognized modes of toxicity that may be associated with these agents and underscore the utility of utilizing multidimensional profiling approaches to obtain a more complete understanding of toxicities associated with environmental chemicals. PMID:24205821

  4. Multi-dimensional phenotyping: towards a new taxonomy for airway disease.

    PubMed

    Wardlaw, A J; Silverman, M; Siva, R; Pavord, I D; Green, R

    2005-10-01

    All the real knowledge which we possess, depends on methods by which we distinguish the similar from the dissimilar. The greater the number of natural distinctions this method comprehends the clearer becomes our idea of things. The more numerous the objects which employ our attention the more difficult it becomes to form such a method and the more necessary. Classification is a fundamental part of medicine. Diseases are often categorized according to pre-20th century descriptions and concepts of disease based on symptoms, signs and functional abnormalities rather than on underlying pathogenesis. Where the aetiology of disease has been revealed (for example in the infectious diseases) a more precise classification has become possible, but in the chronic inflammatory diseases, and in the inflammatory airway diseases in particular, where pathogenesis has been stubbornly difficult to elucidate, we still use broad descriptive terms such as asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, which defy precise definition because they encompass a wide spectrum of presentations and physiological and cellular abnormalities. It is our contention that these broad-brush terms have outlived their usefulness and that we should be looking to create a new taxonomy of airway disease-a taxonomy that more closely reflects the spectrum of phenotypes that are encompassed within the term airway inflammatory diseases, and that gives full recognition to late 20th and 21st century insights into the disordered physiology and cell biology that characterizes these conditions in the expectation that these will map more closely to both aetiology and response to treatment. Development of this taxonomy will require a much more complete and sophisticated correlation of the many variables that make up a condition than has been usual to employ in an approach that encompasses multi-dimensional phenotyping and uses complex statistical tools such as cluster analysis.

  5. Equivalence of kernel machine regression and kernel distance covariance for multidimensional phenotype association studies.

    PubMed

    Hua, Wen-Yu; Ghosh, Debashis

    2015-09-01

    Associating genetic markers with a multidimensional phenotype is an important yet challenging problem. In this work, we establish the equivalence between two popular methods: kernel-machine regression (KMR), and kernel distance covariance (KDC). KMR is a semiparametric regression framework that models covariate effects parametrically and genetic markers non-parametrically, while KDC represents a class of methods that include distance covariance (DC) and Hilbert-Schmidt independence criterion (HSIC), which are nonparametric tests of independence. We show that the equivalence between the score test of KMR and the KDC statistic under certain conditions can lead to a novel generalization of the KDC test that incorporates covariates. Our contributions are 3-fold: (1) establishing the equivalence between KMR and KDC; (2) showing that the principles of KMR can be applied to the interpretation of KDC; (3) the development of a broader class of KDC statistics, where the class members are statistics corresponding to different kernel combinations. Finally, we perform simulation studies and an analysis of real data from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) study. The ADNI study suggest that SNPs of FLJ16124 exhibit pairwise interaction effects that are strongly correlated to the changes of brain region volumes. © 2015, The International Biometric Society.

  6. Connecting synthetic chemistry decisions to cell and genome biology using small-molecule phenotypic profiling

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Bridget K.; Clemons, Paul A.

    2009-01-01

    Discovering small-molecule modulators for thousands of gene products requires multiple stages of biological testing, specificity evaluation, and chemical optimization. Many cellular profiling methods, including cellular sensitivity, gene-expression, and cellular imaging, have emerged as methods to assess the functional consequences of biological perturbations. Cellular profiling methods applied to small-molecule science provide opportunities to use complex phenotypic information to prioritize and optimize small-molecule structures simultaneously against multiple biological endpoints. As throughput increases and cost decreases for such technologies, we see an emerging paradigm of using more information earlier in probe- and drug-discovery efforts. Moreover, increasing access to public datasets makes possible the construction of “virtual” profiles of small-molecule performance, even when multiplexed measurements were not performed or when multidimensional profiling was not the original intent. We review some key conceptual advances in small-molecule phenotypic profiling, emphasizing connections to other information, such as protein-binding measurements, genetic perturbations, and cell states. We argue that to maximally leverage these measurements in probe and drug discovery requires a fundamental connection to synthetic chemistry, allowing the consequences of synthetic decisions to be described in terms of changes in small-molecule profiles. Mining such data in the context of chemical structure and synthesis strategies can inform decisions about chemistry procurement and library development, leading to optimal small-molecule screening collections. PMID:19825513

  7. Advances in Human B Cell Phenotypic Profiling

    PubMed Central

    Kaminski, Denise A.; Wei, Chungwen; Qian, Yu; Rosenberg, Alexander F.; Sanz, Ignacio

    2012-01-01

    To advance our understanding and treatment of disease, research immunologists have been called-upon to place more centralized emphasis on impactful human studies. Such endeavors will inevitably require large-scale study execution and data management regulation (“Big Biology”), necessitating standardized and reliable metrics of immune status and function. A well-known example setting this large-scale effort in-motion is identifying correlations between eventual disease outcome and T lymphocyte phenotype in large HIV-patient cohorts using multiparameter flow cytometry. However, infection, immunodeficiency, and autoimmunity are also characterized by correlative and functional contributions of B lymphocytes, which to-date have received much less attention in the human Big Biology enterprise. Here, we review progress in human B cell phenotyping, analysis, and bioinformatics tools that constitute valuable resources for the B cell research community to effectively join in this effort. PMID:23087687

  8. The Impact of Time Perspective Latent Profiles on College Drinking: A Multidimensional Approach

    PubMed Central

    Braitman, Abby L.; Henson, James M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Zimbardo and Boyd’s1 time perspective, or the temporal framework individuals use to process information, has been shown to predict health behaviors such as alcohol use. Previous studies supported the predictive validity of individual dimensions of time perspective, with some dimensions acting as protective factors and others as risk factors. However, some studies produced findings contrary to the general body of literature. In addition, time perspective is a multidimensional construct, and the combination of perspectives may be more predictive than individual dimensions in isolation; consequently, multidimensional profiles are a more accurate measure of individual differences and more appropriate for predicting health behaviors. Objectives The current study identified naturally occurring profiles of time perspective and examined their association with risky alcohol use. Methods Data were collected from a college student sample (n = 431, mean age = 20.41 years) using an online survey. Time perspective profiles were identified using latent profile analysis. Results Bootstrapped regression models identified a protective class that engaged in significantly less overall drinking (β = −0.254) as well as engaging in significantly less episodic high risk drinking (β = −0.274). There was also emerging evidence of a high risk time perspective profile that was linked to more overall drinking (β = 0.198) and engaging in more high risk drinking (β = 0.245), though these differences were not significant. Conclusions/Importance These findings support examining time perspective in a multidimensional framework rather than individual dimensions in isolation. Implications include identifying students most in need of interventions, and tailoring interventions to target temporal framing in decision-making. PMID:25607806

  9. Ameloblastoma Phenotypes Reflected in Distinct Transcriptome Profiles

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Shijia; Parker, Joel; Divaris, Kimon; Padilla, Ricardo; Murrah, Valerie; Wright, John Timothy

    2016-01-01

    Ameloblastoma is a locally invasive benign neoplasm derived from odontogenic epithelium and presents with diverse phenotypes yet to be characterized molecularly. High recurrence rates of 50–80% with conservative treatment in some sub-types warrants radical surgical resections resulting in high morbidity. The objective of the study was to characterize the transcriptome of ameloblastoma and identify relevant genes and molecular pathways using normal odontogenic tissue (human “dentome”) for comparison. Laser capture microdissection was used to obtain neoplastic epithelial tissue from 17 tumors which were examined using the Agilent 44 k whole genome microarray. Ameloblastoma separated into 2 distinct molecular clusters that were associated with pre-secretory ameloblast and odontoblast. Within the pre-secretory cluster, 9/10 of samples were of the follicular type while 6/7 of the samples in the odontoblast cluster were of the plexiform type (p < 0.05). Common pathways altered in both clusters included cell-cycle regulation, inflammatory and MAPkinase pathways, specifically known cancer-driving genes such as TP53 and members of the MAPkinase pathways. The pre-secretory ameloblast cluster exhibited higher activation of inflammatory pathways while the odontoblast cluster showed greater disturbances in transcription regulators. Our results are suggestive of underlying inter-tumor molecular heterogeneity of ameloblastoma sub-types and have implications for the use of tailored treatment. PMID:27491308

  10. An examination of obsessive-compulsive symptoms and dimensions using profile analysis via multidimensional scaling (PAMS).

    PubMed

    McKay, Dean; Kim, Se-Kang; Taylor, Steven; Abramowitz, Jonathan S; Tolin, David; Coles, Meredith; Timpano, Kiara R; Olatunji, Bunmi

    2014-05-01

    Contemporary cognitive models of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) emphasize the importance of various types of dysfunctional beliefs in contributing to OC symptoms, such as beliefs about excessive personal responsibility, perfectionism, and intolerance for uncertainty. The present study seeks to further our understanding of the role of these beliefs by identifying the common profiles of such beliefs, using profile analysis via multidimensional scaling (PAMS). In Study 1, a large student sample (N=4079) completed the 44-item obsessive beliefs questionnaire. One major profile, control of thoughts and perfectionism, was extracted. Study 2 examined profiles of the 87-item obsessive beliefs questionnaire in people with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD; n=398), other anxiety disorders (n=104), and a sample of undergraduate students (n=285). Inflated responsibility was a prominent subscale in the profiles of all three groups. Only control over thoughts was a unique subscale in the profile obtained for the OCD group, with this group having lower scores compared to the other groups. The results suggest that while inflated responsibility is a significant subscale in the profile of individuals with OCD, it is not a unique contributor; instead, control over thoughts is unique to OCD. The data, as well as recent research investigating obsessive beliefs, suggest the need to revise the contemporary cognitive model of OCD.

  11. Machine learning and computer vision approaches for phenotypic profiling.

    PubMed

    Grys, Ben T; Lo, Dara S; Sahin, Nil; Kraus, Oren Z; Morris, Quaid; Boone, Charles; Andrews, Brenda J

    2017-01-02

    With recent advances in high-throughput, automated microscopy, there has been an increased demand for effective computational strategies to analyze large-scale, image-based data. To this end, computer vision approaches have been applied to cell segmentation and feature extraction, whereas machine-learning approaches have been developed to aid in phenotypic classification and clustering of data acquired from biological images. Here, we provide an overview of the commonly used computer vision and machine-learning methods for generating and categorizing phenotypic profiles, highlighting the general biological utility of each approach. © 2017 Grys et al.

  12. Phenotypic profiling of ABC transporter coding genes in Myxococcus xanthus

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Jinyuan; Bradley, Michael D.; Friedman, Jannice; Welch, Roy D.

    2014-01-01

    Information about a gene sometimes can be deduced by examining the impact of its mutation on phenotype. However, the genome-scale utility of the method is limited because, for nearly all model organisms, the majority of mutations result in little or no observable phenotypic impact. The cause of this is often attributed to robustness or redundancy within the genome, but that is only one plausible hypothesis. We examined a standard set of phenotypic traits, and applied statistical methods commonly used in the study of natural variants to an engineered mutant strain collection representing disruptions in 180 of the 192 ABC transporters within the bacterium Myxococcus xanthus. These strains display continuous variation in their phenotypic distributions, with a small number of “outlier” strains at both phenotypic extremes, and the majority within a confidence interval about the mean that always includes wild type. Correlation analysis reveals substantial pleiotropy, indicating that the traits do not represent independent variables. The traits measured in this study co-cluster with expression profiles, thereby demonstrating that these changes in phenotype correspond to changes at the molecular level, and therefore can be indirectly connected to changes in the genome. However, the continuous distributions, the pleiotropy, and the placement of wild type always within the confidence interval all indicate that this standard set of M. xanthus phenotypic assays is measuring a narrow range of partially overlapping traits that do not directly reflect fitness. This is likely a significant cause of the observed small phenotypic impact from mutation, and is unrelated to robustness and redundancy. PMID:25101061

  13. Rapid electrochemical phenotypic profiling of antibiotic-resistant bacteria.

    PubMed

    Besant, Justin D; Sargent, Edward H; Kelley, Shana O

    2015-07-07

    Rapid phenotyping of bacteria to identify drug-resistant strains is an important capability for the treatment and management of infectious disease. At present, the rapid determination of antibiotic susceptibility is hindered by the requirement that, in existing devices, bacteria must be pre-cultured for 2-3 days to reach detectable levels. Here we report a novel electrochemical approach that achieves rapid readout of the antibiotic susceptibility profile of a bacterial infection within one hour. The electrochemical reduction of a redox-active molecule is monitored that reports on levels of metabolically-active bacteria. Bacteria are captured in miniaturized wells, incubated with antimicrobials and monitored for resistance. This electrochemical phenotyping approach is effective with clinically-relevant levels of bacteria, and provides results comparable to culture-based analysis. Results, however, are delivered on a much faster timescale, with resistance profiles available after a one hour incubation period.

  14. Development and Validation of the Multidimensional Health Profile, Part I: Psychosocial Functioning

    PubMed Central

    Ruehlman, Linda S.; Lanyon, Richard I.; Karoly, Paul

    2005-01-01

    This article describes the development and preliminary validation of the Multidimensional Health Profile, Part I: Psychosocial Functioning (MHP-P), a self-report screening instrument for use in mental health and primary care settings. The MHP-P assesses mental health, life stress, coping skills, and social resources. In Study 1, retest reliability, validity, social desirability response bias, and factor structure were examined in a national sample of men and women (N = 673). In Study 2, the effect of time frame on the retest reliability of the mental health scales was examined in a sample of male and female college students (N = 147). A national sample of men and women (N = 2,411) provided data for additional confirmatory factor analyses and norm development in Study 3. PMID:16429599

  15. Examining Work Ethic across Populations: A Comparison of the Multidimensional Work Ethic Profile across Three Diverse Cultures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woehr, David J.; Arciniega, Luis M.; Lim, Doo H.

    2007-01-01

    The authors examined the measurement equivalence of the Multidimensional Work Ethic Profile (MWEP) across the diverse cultures of Korea, Mexico, and the United States. Korean- and Spanish-language versions of the MWEP were developed and evaluated relative to the original English version of the measure. Confirmatory factor analytic results…

  16. Examining Work Ethic across Populations: A Comparison of the Multidimensional Work Ethic Profile across Three Diverse Cultures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woehr, David J.; Arciniega, Luis M.; Lim, Doo H.

    2007-01-01

    The authors examined the measurement equivalence of the Multidimensional Work Ethic Profile (MWEP) across the diverse cultures of Korea, Mexico, and the United States. Korean- and Spanish-language versions of the MWEP were developed and evaluated relative to the original English version of the measure. Confirmatory factor analytic results…

  17. Phenotype Microarray Profiling of Zymomonas mobilis ZM4

    SciTech Connect

    Bochner, Barry; Gomez, Vanessa; Ziman, michael; Yang, Shihui; Brown, Steven D

    2009-01-01

    In this study, we developed a Phenotype MicroArray{trademark} (PM) protocol to profile cellular phenotypes in Zymomonas mobilis, which included a standard set of nearly 2,000 assays for carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus and sulfur source utilization, nutrient stimulation, pH and osmotic stresses, and chemical sensitivities with 240 inhibitory chemicals. We observed two positive assays for C-source utilization (fructose and glucose) using the PM screen, which uses redox chemistry and cell respiration as a universal reporter to profile growth phenotypes in a high-throughput 96-well plate-based format. For nitrogen metabolism, the bacterium showed a positive test results for ammonia, aspartate, asparagine, glutamate, glutamine, and peptides. Z. mobilis appeared to use a diverse array of P-sources with two exceptions being pyrophosphate and tripolyphosphate. The assays suggested that Z. mobilis uses both inorganic and organic compounds as S-sources. No stimulation by nutrients was detected; however, there was evidence of partial inhibition by purines and pyrimidines, NAD, and deferoxamine. Z. mobilis was relatively resistant to acid pH, tolerating a pH down to about 4.0. It also tolerated phosphate, sulfate, and nitrate, but was rather sensitive to chloride and nitrite. Z. mobilis showed resistance to a large number of diverse chemicals that inhibit most bacteria. The information from PM analysis provides an overview of Z. mobilis physiology and a foundation for future comparisons of other wild-type and mutant Z. mobilis strains.

  18. Phenotype microarray profiling of Zymomonas mobilis ZM4.

    PubMed

    Bochner, Barry; Gomez, Vanessa; Ziman, Michael; Yang, Shihui; Brown, Steven D

    2010-05-01

    In this study, we developed a Phenotype MicroArray (PM) protocol to profile cellular phenotypes in Zymomonas mobilis, which included a standard set of nearly 2,000 assays for carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus and sulfur source utilization, nutrient stimulation, pH and osmotic stresses, and chemical sensitivities with 240 inhibitory chemicals. We observed two positive assays for C-source utilization (fructose and glucose) using the PM screen, which uses redox chemistry and cell respiration as a universal reporter to profile growth phenotypes in a high-throughput 96-well plate-based format. For nitrogen metabolism, the bacterium showed a positive test results for ammonia, aspartate, asparagine, glutamate, glutamine, and peptides. Z. mobilis appeared to use a diverse array of P-sources with two exceptions being pyrophosphate and tripolyphosphate. The assays suggested that Z. mobilis uses both inorganic and organic compounds as S-sources. No stimulation by nutrients was detected; however, there was evidence of partial inhibition by purines and pyrimidines, NAD, and deferoxamine. Z. mobilis was relatively resistant to acid pH, tolerating a pH down to about 4.0. It also tolerated phosphate, sulfate, and nitrate, but was rather sensitive to chloride and nitrite. Z. mobilis showed resistance to a large number of diverse chemicals that inhibit most bacteria. The information from PM analysis provides an overview of Z. mobilis physiology and a foundation for future comparisons of other wild-type and mutant Z. mobilis strains.

  19. [Breast cancer in Morocco: phenotypic profile of tumors].

    PubMed

    Khalil, Ahmadaye Ibrahim; Bendahhou, Karima; Mestaghanmi, Houriya; Saile, Rachid; Benider, Abdellatif

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer is most common in women and it is among the leading causes of cancer related deaths. The curability of this type of tumor is increasing thanks to screening programs and treatment advances which have certainly enhanced patient survival. But challenges remain, particularly in respect of phenotypic instability of cancer cells. The aim of this study was to analyse the phenotypic profile of breast cancer in patients treated at Mohammed VI Cancer Treatment Center over the years 2013-2014. We conducted a cross-sectional study over a two-year period, including the cases of breast cancer treated in our Center. Data were collected from patients medical records and analyzed using Epi Info software. 1277 patients were treated in our Center. 99.5% were females, mean age 50.20 ± 11.34 years. The most common histological type was invasive ductal carcinoma (80.7% of cases). It was diagnosed at an early stage (56,9%). The most common molecular phenotype was luminal A (41.4% of cases). Luminal B, HER2 and triple negatives occurred in 10.4%, 6.3%, 11.2% of cases respectively. The study of tumor phenotype in patients with breast cancer helps clinician make treatment choice and policy makers implement programs against this disease.

  20. Multidimensional analysis of particle size fractal characteristics in a farmland soil profile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Y. C.; Han, J. C.; Zhang, S. W.; Huang, Y. F.; Wang, H. Y.; Luo, L. T.; Zhang, W. H.

    2017-01-01

    Soil particle size distribution (PSD) is a basic soil property, closely related to soil erosion, soil moisture, and so on. The multidimensional fractal method has been proved to be a better description of soil PSD. By choosing the four fractal parameters of Δa, ΔaR/ΔaL, D1/D0 and, Δf(a)R/Δf(a)L, and using the multifractal spectrum, this paper analyzed one- and two-dimensional fractal characteristics of the soil profile (A, B, and C layers from top to bottom) PSD and their relationship on a field scale. The results showed that the PSD characteristics of different soil profiles were more heterogeneous in the east and west (WE) than the north and south (NS) in the study area, and the A layer soil PSD was the most uneven, with a larger degree of dispersion. With the soil layer depth, the soil PSD tended to be uniform. Regardless of one-dimensional or two-dimensional characteristics, the proportion of the low value of soil particle mass percent was relatively larger. The results of this study will not only provide a reference method for analyses of the fractal characteristics of soil PSD on a field scale, but also provide guidance in further understanding the soil structure and soil forming process.

  1. Genome-wide SNP Heritability of Nicotine Dependence as a Multidimensional Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Bidwell, LC; Palmer, RHC; Brick, L; McGeary, JE; Knopik, VS

    2016-01-01

    Background Heritability estimates from twin studies of the multi-faceted phenotype of nicotine dependence (ND) range from moderate to high (31–60%), but vary substantially based on the specific ND-related construct examined. The current study estimated the aggregate role of common genetic variants on key ND constructs. Methods Genomic Relatedness Restricted Maximum Likelihood (GREML) was used to decompose phenotypic variance across multiple ND indices using 796,125 polymorphisms from 2346 unrelated “lifetime ever smokers” of European ancestry. Measures included DSM-IV ND and FTND summary measures and constituent constructs (e.g. withdrawal severity, tolerance, heaviness of smoking, and time spent smoking). Exploratory (EFA) and confirmatory (CFA) factor models were used to describe the covariance structure across ND measures; resulting factor(s) were the subject(s) of GREML analyses. Results Factor models indicated highly correlated DSM-IV and FTND factors for ND (0.545 [95% CI: 0.50–0.60]) that could be represented as a higher-order factor (NIC DEP). Additive genetic influences on NIC DEP was 33% (S.E.= .14, p = .009). Post hoc analyses indicated moderate genetic effects on the DSM-IV (34% [S.E.= .14, p = .008]) and FTND factors (26% [SE .=.14, p = .032]), both of which were influenced by the same genetic effects, (rG-SNP = 1.00, S.E. = .09, p < .00001). Conclusions Overall, common SNPs accounted for a large proportion of the genetic influences on ND-related phenotypes that have been observed in twin studies. Genetic contributions across distinct ND scales were largely influenced by shared genetic factors. PMID:27052577

  2. Comparing Longitudinal Profile Patterns of Mathematics and Reading in Early Child Longitudinal Study, Kindergarten: The Profile Analysis via Multidimensional Scaling (PAMS) Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Se-Kang

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the study is to compare longitudinal patterns from Mathematics and Reading data from the direct child assessment of Early Child Longitudinal Study, Kindergarten (ECLS-K, US Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics 2006), utilizing Profile Analysis via Multidimensional Scaling (PAMS). PAMS has been used initially…

  3. A Phenotypic Profile of the Candida albicans Regulatory Network

    PubMed Central

    Homann, Oliver R.; Dea, Jeanselle; Noble, Suzanne M.; Johnson, Alexander D.

    2009-01-01

    Candida albicans is a normal resident of the gastrointestinal tract and also the most prevalent fungal pathogen of humans. It last shared a common ancestor with the model yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae over 300 million years ago. We describe a collection of 143 genetically matched strains of C. albicans, each of which has been deleted for a specific transcriptional regulator. This collection represents a large fraction of the non-essential transcription circuitry. A phenotypic profile for each mutant was developed using a screen of 55 growth conditions. The results identify the biological roles of many individual transcriptional regulators; for many, this work represents the first description of their functions. For example, a quarter of the strains showed altered colony formation, a phenotype reflecting transitions among yeast, pseudohyphal, and hyphal cell forms. These transitions, which have been closely linked to pathogenesis, have been extensively studied, yet our work nearly doubles the number of transcriptional regulators known to influence them. As a second example, nearly a quarter of the knockout strains affected sensitivity to commonly used antifungal drugs; although a few transcriptional regulators have previously been implicated in susceptibility to these drugs, our work indicates many additional mechanisms of sensitivity and resistance. Finally, our results inform how transcriptional networks evolve. Comparison with the existing S. cerevisiae data (supplemented by additional S. cerevisiae experiments reported here) allows the first systematic analysis of phenotypic conservation by orthologous transcriptional regulators over a large evolutionary distance. We find that, despite the many specific wiring changes documented between these species, the general phenotypes of orthologous transcriptional regulator knockouts are largely conserved. These observations support the idea that many wiring changes affect the detailed architecture of the circuit, but

  4. Assessing sub-clinical psychosis phenotypes in the general population--a multidimensional approach.

    PubMed

    Rössler, Wulf; Ajdacic-Gross, Vladeta; Müller, Mario; Rodgers, Stephanie; Haker, Helene; Hengartner, Michael P

    2015-02-01

    Several studies have demonstrated that expression of a psychosis phenotype can be observed below the threshold of its clinical detection. To date, however, no conceptual certainty has been reported for the validity and reliability of sub-clinical psychosis. Our main objectives were to assess the prevalence rates and severity of various psychosis symptoms in a representative community sample. Furthermore, we wanted to analyze which latent factors are depicted by several currently used psychosis questionnaires. We also examined how those latent factors for sub-clinical psychosis are linked to psychosocial factors, normal personality traits, and coping abilities related to chronic stress. Most of the eight subscales from the Paranoia Checklist and the Structured Interview for Assessing Perceptual Anomalies had a very similar type of distribution, i.e., an inverse Gaussian (Wald) distribution. This supported the notion of a continuity of psychotic symptoms, which we would expect to find for continuously distributed symptoms within the general population. Sub-clinical psychosis can be reduced to two different factors - one representing odd beliefs about the world and odd behavior, and the other one representing anomalous perceptions (such as hallucinations). Persons with odd beliefs and behavior are under greater burden and more susceptible to psychosocial risks than are persons with anomalous perceptions. These sub-clinical psychosis syndromes are also related to stable personality traits. In conclusion, we obtained strong support for the notion that there is no natural cut-off separating psychotic illness from good health. Sub-clinical psychosis of any kind is not trivial because it is associated with various types of social disability. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Extracting body image symptom dimensions among eating disorder patients: the Profile Analysis via Multidimensional Scaling (PAMS) approach.

    PubMed

    Olatunji, Bunmi O; Kim, Se-Kang; Wall, David

    2015-09-01

    The present study employs Profile Analysis via Multidimensional Scaling (PAMS), a procedure for extracting dimensions, in order to identify core eating disorder symptoms in a clinical sample. A large sample of patients with eating disorders (N=5193) presenting for treatment completed the Eating Disorders Inventory-2 (EDI-2; Garner, 1991), and PAMS was then employed to estimate individual profile weights that reflect the degree to which an individual's observed symptom profile approximates the pattern of the dimensions. The findings revealed three symptom dimensions: Body Thinness, Body Perfectionism, and Body Awareness. Subsequent analysis using individual level data illustrate that the PAMS profiles properly operate as prototypical profiles that encapsulate all individuals' response patterns. The implications of these dimensional findings for the assessment and diagnosis of eating disorders are discussed.

  6. Plasma exosome profiles from dairy cows with divergent fertility phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, M D; Scholz-Romero, K; Reed, S; Peiris, H N; Koh, Y Q; Meier, S; Walker, C G; Burke, C R; Roche, J R; Rice, G; Salomon, C

    2016-09-01

    Cell-to-cell communication in physiological and pathological conditions may be influenced by neighboring cells, distant tissues, or local environmental factors. Exosomes are specific subsets of extracellular vesicles that internalize and deliver their content to near and distant sites. Exosomes may play a role in the maternal-embryo crosstalk vital for the recognition and maintenance of a pregnancy; however, their role in dairy cow reproduction has not been established. This study aimed to characterize the exosome profile in the plasma of 2 strains of dairy cow with divergent fertility phenotypes. Plasma was obtained and characterized on the basis of genetic ancestry as fertile (FERT; <23% North American genetics, New Zealand Holstein-Friesian strain, n=8) or subfertile (SUBFERT; >92% North American genetics, North American Holstein-Friesian strain, n=8). Exosomes were isolated by differential and buoyant density centrifugation and characterized by size distribution (nanoparticle tracking analysis, NanoSight NS500, NanoSight Ltd., Amesbury, UK), the presence of CD63 (Western blot), and their morphology (electron microscopy). The total number of exosomes was determined by quantifying the immunoreactive CD63 (ExoELISA kit, System Biosciences), and the protein content established by mass spectrometry. Enriched exosome fractions were identified as cup-shape vesicles with diameters around 100 nm and positive for the CD63 marker. The concentration of exosomes was 50% greater in FERT cows. Mass spectrometry identified 104 and 117 proteins in FERT and SUBFERT cows, of which 23 and 36 were unique, respectively. Gene ontology analysis revealed enrichment for proteins involved in immunomodulatory processes and cell-to-cell communication. Although the role of exosomes in dairy cow reproduction remains to be elucidated, their quantification and content in models with divergent fertility phenotypes could provide novel information to support both physiological and genetic

  7. Transcriptional Profiling of Egg Allergy and Relationship to Disease Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Kosoy, Roman; Agashe, Charuta; Grishin, Alexander; Leung, Donald Y.; Wood, Robert A.; Sicherer, Scott H.; Jones, Stacie M.; Burks, A. Wesley; Davidson, Wendy F.; Lindblad, Robert W.; Dawson, Peter; Merad, Miriam; Kidd, Brian A.; Dudley, Joel T.; Sampson, Hugh A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Egg allergy is one of the most common food allergies of childhood. There is a lack of information on the immunologic basis of egg allergy beyond the role of IgE. Objective To use transcriptional profiling as a novel approach to uncover immunologic processes associated with different phenotypes of egg allergy. Methods Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were obtained from egg-allergic children who were defined as reactive (BER) or tolerant (BET) to baked egg, and from food allergic controls (AC) who were egg non-allergic. PBMCs were stimulated with egg white protein. Gene transcription was measured by microarray after 24 h, and cytokine secretion by multiplex assay after 5 days. Results The transcriptional response of PBMCs to egg protein differed between BER and BET versus AC subjects. Compared to the AC group, the BER group displayed increased expression of genes associated with allergic inflammation as well as corresponding increased secretion of IL-5, IL-9 and TNF-α. A similar pattern was observed for the BET group. Further similarities in gene expression patterns between BER and BET groups, as well as some important differences, were revealed using a novel Immune Annotation resource developed for this project. This approach identified several novel processes not previously associated with egg allergy, including positive associations with TLR4-stimulated myeloid cells and activated NK cells, and negative associations with an induced Treg signature. Further pathway analysis of differentially expressed genes comparing BER to BET subjects showed significant enrichment of IFN-α and IFN-γ response genes, as well as genes associated with virally-infected DCs. Conclusions Transcriptional profiling identified several novel pathways and processes that differed when comparing the response to egg allergen in BET, BER, and AC groups. We conclude that this approach is a useful hypothesis-generating mechanism to identify novel immune processes associated

  8. Unique DNA methylome profiles in CpG island methylator phenotype colon cancers

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yaomin; Hu, Bo; Choi, Ae-Jin; Gopalan, Banu; Lee, Byron H.; Kalady, Matthew F.; Church, James M.; Ting, Angela H.

    2012-01-01

    A subset of colorectal cancers was postulated to have the CpG island methylator phenotype (CIMP), a higher propensity for CpG island DNA methylation. The validity of CIMP, its molecular basis, and its prognostic value remain highly controversial. Using MBD-isolated genome sequencing, we mapped and compared genome-wide DNA methylation profiles of normal, non-CIMP, and CIMP colon specimens. Multidimensional scaling analysis revealed that each specimen could be clearly classified as normal, non-CIMP, and CIMP, thus signifying that these three groups have distinctly different global methylation patterns. We discovered 3780 sites in various genomic contexts that were hypermethylated in both non-CIMP and CIMP colon cancers when compared with normal colon. An additional 2026 sites were found to be hypermethylated in CIMP tumors only; and importantly, 80% of these sites were located in CpG islands. These data demonstrate on a genome-wide level that the additional hypermethylation seen in CIMP tumors occurs almost exclusively at CpG islands and support definitively that these tumors were appropriately named. When these sites were examined more closely, we found that 25% were adjacent to sites that were also hypermethylated in non-CIMP tumors. Thus, CIMP is also characterized by more extensive methylation of sites that are already prone to be hypermethylated in colon cancer. These observations indicate that CIMP tumors have specific defects in controlling both DNA methylation seeding and spreading and serve as an important first step in delineating molecular mechanisms that control these processes. PMID:21990380

  9. Heat Survival and Phenotype Microarray Profiling of Salmonella Typhimurium Mutants.

    PubMed

    Dawoud, Turki M; Khatiwara, Anita; Park, Si Hong; Davis, Morgan L; Baker, Christopher A; Ricke, Steven C; Kwon, Young Min

    2017-02-01

    Contamination of food products by pathogenic microorganisms continues to be a major public health and food industry concern. Non-typhoidal Salmonella species have led to numerous outbreaks associated with various foods. A wide variety of methods have been applied and introduced for treatment of fresh foods to eliminate pathogenic as well as spoilage microorganisms. Salmonella can become exposed to elevated temperatures while associated with hosts such as poultry. In addition, heat treatment is also applied at various stages of processing to retain the shelf life of food products. Despite this, these microorganisms may overcome exposure to such treatments through the efficient expression of stress response mechanisms and result in illness following consumption. Thermal stress induces a range of destructive exposures to bacterial cells such as protein damage and DNA damage caused by reactive oxygen species. In this study, we chose three genes (∆recD, ∆STM14_5307, and ∆aroD) associated with conditionally essential genes required for different aspects of optimal growth at 42 °C and evaluated the responses of wild type and mutant Salmonella Typhimurium strains to uncover potential mechanisms that may enable survival and resistance under thermal stress. The RecBCD complex that initiates repair of double-stranded DNA breaks through homologous recombination. STM14_5307 is a transcriptional regulator involved in stationary phase growth and inositol metabolism. The gene aroD is involved in metabolism and stationary phase growth. These strains were characterized via high throughput phenotypic profiling in response to two different growth temperatures (37 °C (human host temperature) and 42 °C (poultry host temperature)). The ∆aroD strain exhibited the highest sensitivity to the various temperatures followed by the ∆recD and ∆STM14_5307 strains, respectively. Achieving more understanding of the molecular mechanisms of heat survival may lead to the development

  10. Large-scale image-based screening and profiling of cellular phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Bougen-Zhukov, Nicola; Loh, Sheng Yang; Lee, Hwee Kuan; Loo, Lit-Hsin

    2017-02-01

    Cellular phenotypes are observable characteristics of cells resulting from the interactions of intrinsic and extrinsic chemical or biochemical factors. Image-based phenotypic screens under large numbers of basal or perturbed conditions can be used to study the influences of these factors on cellular phenotypes. Hundreds to thousands of phenotypic descriptors can also be quantified from the images of cells under each of these experimental conditions. Therefore, huge amounts of data can be generated, and the analysis of these data has become a major bottleneck in large-scale phenotypic screens. Here, we review current experimental and computational methods for large-scale image-based phenotypic screens. Our focus is on phenotypic profiling, a computational procedure for constructing quantitative and compact representations of cellular phenotypes based on the images collected in these screens. © 2016 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry.

  11. Large-scale Phenotypic Profiling of Gene Deletion Mutants in Candida glabrata

    PubMed Central

    Tscherner, Michael; Kuchler, Karl

    2016-01-01

    Here, we describe a method enabling the phenotypic profiling of genome-scale deletion collections of fungal mutants to detect phenotypes for various stress conditions. These stress conditions include among many others antifungal drug susceptibility, temperature-induced and osmotic as well as heavy metal or oxidative stress. The protocol was extensively used to phenotype a collection of gene deletion mutants in the human fungal pathogen Candida glabrata (C. glabrata) (Schwarzmüller et al., 2014). PMID:27774498

  12. Protein phosphorylation and expression profiling by Yin-yang multidimensional liquid chromatography (Yin-yang MDLC) mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Dai, Jie; Jin, Wen-Hai; Sheng, Quan-Hu; Shieh, Chia-Hui; Wu, Jia-Rui; Zeng, Rong

    2007-01-01

    A system which consisted of multidimensional liquid chromatography (Yin-yang MDLC) coupled with mass spectrometry was used for the identification of peptides and phosphopeptides. The multidimensional liquid chromatography combines the strong-cation exchange (SCX), strong-anion exchange (SAX), and reverse-phase methods for the separation. Protein digests were first loaded on an SCX column. The flow-through peptides from SCX were collected and further loaded on an SAX column. Both columns were eluted by offline pH steps, and the collected fractions were identified by reverse-phase liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. Comprehensive peptide identification was achieved by the Yin-yang MDLC-MS/MS for a 1 mg mouse liver. In total, 14 105 unique peptides were identified with high confidence, including 13 256 unmodified peptides and 849 phosphopeptides with 809 phosphorylated sites. The SCX and SAX in the Yin-Yang system displayed complementary features of binding and separation for peptides. When coupled with reverse-phase liquid chromatography mass spectrometry, the SAX-based method can detect more extremely acidic (pI < 4.0) and phosphorylated peptides, while the SCX-based method detects more relatively basic peptides (pI > 4.0). In total, 134 groups of phosphorylated peptide isoforms were obtained, with common peptide sequences but different phosphorylated states. This unbiased profiling of protein expression and phosphorylation provides a powerful approach to probe protein dynamics, without using any prefractionation and chemical derivation.

  13. Phenotype profile of a genetic mouse model for Muenke syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Koyama, Eiki; Agochukwu, Nneamaka B.; Bartlett, Scott P.; Muenke, Maximilian

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The Muenke syndrome mutation (FGFR3P250R), which was discovered 15 years ago, represents the single most common craniosynostosis mutation. Muenke syndrome is characterized by coronal suture synostosis, mid-face hypoplasia, subtle limb anomalies, and hearing loss. However, the spectrum of clinical presentation continues to expand. To better understand the pathophysiology of the Muenke syndrome, we present collective findings from several recent studies that have characterized a genetically equivalent mouse model for Muenke syndrome (FgfR3P244R) and compare them with human phenotypes. Conclusions FgfR3P244R mutant mice show premature fusion of facial sutures, premaxillary and/or zygomatic sutures, but rarely the coronal suture. The mice also lack the typical limb phenotype. On the other hand, the mutant mice display maxillary retrusion in association with a shortening of the anterior cranial base and a premature closure of intersphenoidal and spheno-occipital synchondroses, resembling human midface hypoplasia. In addition, sensorineural hearing loss is detected in all FgfR3P244R mutant mice as in the majority of Muenke syndrome patients. It is caused by a defect in the mechanism of cell fate determination in the organ of Corti. The mice also express phenotypes that have not been previously described in humans, such as reduced cortical bone thickness, hypoplastic trabecular bone, and defective temporomandibular joint structure. Therefore, the FgfR3P244R mouse provides an excellent opportunity to study disease mechanisms of some classical phenotypes of Muenke syndrome and to test novel therapeutic strategies. The mouse model can also be further explored to discover previously unreported yet potentially significant phenotypes of Muenke syndrome. PMID:22872265

  14. Bacterial profiling of soil using genus-specific markers and multidimensional scaling.

    PubMed

    Lenz, Erin J; Foran, David R

    2010-11-01

    Forensic identification of soil based on microbial DNA fingerprinting has met with mixed success, with research efforts rarely considering temporal variability or local heterogeneity in soil's microbial makeup. In the research presented, the nitrogen fixing bacteria rhizobia were specifically examined. Soils were collected monthly from five habitats for 1 year, and quarterly in each cardinal direction from the main collection site. When all habitats were compared simultaneously using Terminal Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism analysis of the rhizobial recA gene and multidimensional scaling, only two were differentiated over a year's time, however pairwise comparisons allowed four of five soils to be effectively differentiated. Adding in 10-foot distant soils as "questioned" samples correctly grouped them in 40-70% of cases, depending on restriction enzyme used. The results indicate that the technique has potential for forensic soil identification, although extensive anthropogenic manipulation of a soil makes such identification much more tentative.

  15. CEBPA-double-mutated acute myeloid leukemia displays a unique phenotypic profile: a reliable screening method and insight into biological features.

    PubMed

    Mannelli, Francesco; Ponziani, Vanessa; Bencini, Sara; Bonetti, Maria Ida; Benelli, Matteo; Cutini, Ilaria; Gianfaldoni, Giacomo; Scappini, Barbara; Pancani, Fabiana; Piccini, Matteo; Rondelli, Tommaso; Caporale, Roberto; Gelli, Anna Maria Grazia; Peruzzi, Benedetta; Chiarini, Marco; Borlenghi, Erika; Spinelli, Orietta; Giupponi, Damiano; Zanghì, Pamela; Bassan, Renato; Rambaldi, Alessandro; Rossi, Giuseppe; Bosi, Alberto

    2017-03-01

    Mutations in CCAAT/enhancer binding protein α (CEBPA) occur in 5-10% of cases of acute myeloid leukemia. CEBPA-double-mutated cases usually bear biallelic N- and C-terminal mutations and are associated with a favorable clinical outcome. Identification of CEBPA mutants is challenging because of the variety of mutations, intrinsic characteristics of the gene and technical issues. Several screening methods (fragment-length analysis, gene expression array) have been proposed especially for large-scale clinical use; although efficient, they are limited by specific concerns. We investigated the phenotypic profile of blast and maturing bone marrow cell compartments at diagnosis in 251 cases of acute myeloid leukemia. In this cohort, 16 (6.4%) patients had two CEBPA mutations, whereas ten (4.0%) had a single mutation. First, we highlighted that the CEBPA-double-mutated subset displays recurrent phenotypic abnormalities in all cell compartments. By mutational analysis after cell sorting, we demonstrated that this common phenotypic signature depends on CEBPA-double-mutated multi-lineage involvement. From a multidimensional study of phenotypic data, we developed a classifier including ten core and widely available parameters. The selected markers on blasts (CD34, CD117, CD7, CD15, CD65), neutrophil (SSC, CD64), monocytic (CD14, CD64) and erythroid (CD117) compartments were able to cluster CEBPA-double-mutated cases. In a validation set of 259 AML cases from three independent centers, our classifier showed excellent performance with 100% specificity and 100% sensitivity. We have, therefore, established a reliable screening method, based upon multidimensional analysis of widely available phenotypic parameters. This method provides early results and is suitable for large-scale detection of CEBPA-double-mutated status, allowing gene sequencing to be focused in selected cases. Copyright© Ferrata Storti Foundation.

  16. CEBPA–double-mutated acute myeloid leukemia displays a unique phenotypic profile: a reliable screening method and insight into biological features

    PubMed Central

    Mannelli, Francesco; Ponziani, Vanessa; Bencini, Sara; Bonetti, Maria Ida; Benelli, Matteo; Cutini, Ilaria; Gianfaldoni, Giacomo; Scappini, Barbara; Pancani, Fabiana; Piccini, Matteo; Rondelli, Tommaso; Caporale, Roberto; Gelli, Anna Maria Grazia; Peruzzi, Benedetta; Chiarini, Marco; Borlenghi, Erika; Spinelli, Orietta; Giupponi, Damiano; Zanghì, Pamela; Bassan, Renato; Rambaldi, Alessandro; Rossi, Giuseppe; Bosi, Alberto

    2017-01-01

    Mutations in CCAAT/enhancer binding protein α (CEBPA) occur in 5–10% of cases of acute myeloid leukemia. CEBPA-double-mutated cases usually bear biallelic N- and C-terminal mutations and are associated with a favorable clinical outcome. Identification of CEBPA mutants is challenging because of the variety of mutations, intrinsic characteristics of the gene and technical issues. Several screening methods (fragment-length analysis, gene expression array) have been proposed especially for large-scale clinical use; although efficient, they are limited by specific concerns. We investigated the phenotypic profile of blast and maturing bone marrow cell compartments at diagnosis in 251 cases of acute myeloid leukemia. In this cohort, 16 (6.4%) patients had two CEBPA mutations, whereas ten (4.0%) had a single mutation. First, we highlighted that the CEBPA-double-mutated subset displays recurrent phenotypic abnormalities in all cell compartments. By mutational analysis after cell sorting, we demonstrated that this common phenotypic signature depends on CEBPA-double-mutated multi-lineage involvement. From a multidimensional study of phenotypic data, we developed a classifier including ten core and widely available parameters. The selected markers on blasts (CD34, CD117, CD7, CD15, CD65), neutrophil (SSC, CD64), monocytic (CD14, CD64) and erythroid (CD117) compartments were able to cluster CEBPA-double-mutated cases. In a validation set of 259 AML cases from three independent centers, our classifier showed excellent performance with 100% specificity and 100% sensitivity. We have, therefore, established a reliable screening method, based upon multidimensional analysis of widely available phenotypic parameters. This method provides early results and is suitable for large-scale detection of CEBPA-double-mutated status, allowing gene sequencing to be focused in selected cases. PMID:28250006

  17. Multidimensional profiling of plasma lipoproteins by size exclusion chromatography followed by reverse-phase protein arrays

    PubMed Central

    Dernick, Gregor; Obermüller, Stefan; Mangold, Cyrill; Magg, Christine; Matile, Hugues; Gutmann, Oliver; von der Mark, Elisabeth; Handschin, Corinne; Maugeais, Cyrille; Niesor, Eric J.

    2011-01-01

    The composition of lipoproteins and the association of proteins with various particles are of much interest in the context of cardiovascular disease. Here, we describe a technique for the multidimensional analysis of lipoproteins and their associated apolipoproteins. Plasma is separated by size exclusion chromatography (SEC), and fractions are analyzed by reverse-phase arrays. SEC fractions are spotted on nitrocellulose slides and incubated with different antibodies against individual apolipoproteins or antibodies against various apolipoproteins. In this way, tens of analytes can be measured simultaneously in 100 μl of plasma from a single SEC separation. This methodology is particularly suited to simultaneous analysis of multiple proteins that may change their distribution to lipoproteins or alter their conformation, depending on factors that influence circulating lipoprotein size or composition. We observed changes in the distribution of exchangeable apolipoproteins following addition of recombinant apolipoproteins or interaction with exogenous compounds. While the cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP)-dependent formation of pre-β-HDL was inhibited by the CETP inhibitors torcetrapib and anacetrapib, it was not reduced by the CETP modulator dalcetrapib. This finding was elucidated using this technique. PMID:21971713

  18. Phenotypic and functional profiling of mouse intestinal antigen presenting cells

    PubMed Central

    Harusato, Akihito; Flannigan, Kyle L.; Geem, Duke; Denning, Timothy L.

    2015-01-01

    The microbiota that populates the mammalian intestine consists of hundreds of trillions of bacteria that are separated from underlying immune cells by a single layer of epithelial cells. The intestinal immune system effectively tolerates components of the microbiota that provide benefit to the host while remaining poised to eliminate those that are harmful. Antigen presenting cells, especially macrophages and dendritic cells, play important roles in maintaining intestinal homeostasis via their ability to orchestrate appropriate responses to the microbiota. Paramount to elucidating intestinal macrophage- and dendritic cell-mediated functions is the ability to effectively isolate and identify these cells from a complex cellular environment. In this review, we summarize methodology for the isolation and phenotypic characterization of macrophages and DCs from the mouse intestine and discuss how this may be useful for gaining insight into the mechanisms by which mucosal immune tolerance is maintained. PMID:25891794

  19. Metabolic syndrome and metabolic risk profile according to polycystic ovary syndrome phenotype.

    PubMed

    Bil, Enes; Dilbaz, Berna; Cirik, Derya Akdag; Ozelci, Runa; Ozkaya, Enis; Dilbaz, Serdar

    2016-07-01

    It is unknown which phenotype of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) has a greater metabolic risk and how to detect this risk. The aim of this study was therefore to compare the incidence of metabolic syndrome (MetS) and metabolic risk profile (MRP) for different phenotypes. A total of 100 consecutive newly diagnosed PCOS women in a tertiary referral hospital were recruited. Patients were classified into four phenotypes according to the Rotterdam criteria, on the presence of at least two of the three criteria hyperandrogenism (H), oligo/anovulation (O) and PCO appearance (P): phenotype A, H + O + P; phenotype B, H + O; phenotype C, H + P; phenotype D, O + P. Prevalence of MetS and MRP were compared among the four groups. Based on Natural Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III diagnostic criteria, MetS prevalence was higher in phenotypes A and B (29.6% and 34.5%) compared with the other phenotypes (10.0% and 8.3%; P < 0.001). Although the prevalence of obesity was similar, the number of patients with homeostatic model assessment insulin resistance index (HOMA-IR) >3.8 was significantly higher in androgenic PCOS phenotypes. After logistic regression analysis, visceral adiposity index (VAI) was the only independent predictor of MetS in PCOS (P = 0.002). VAI was also significantly higher in phenotype B, when compared with the others (P < 0.01). Phenotypes A and B had the highest risk of MetS among the four phenotypes, and VAI may be a predictor of metabolic risk in PCOS women. © 2016 Japan Society of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  20. Phenotypic Profiling of Antibiotic Response Signatures in Escherichia coli Using Raman Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Athamneh, A. I. M.; Alajlouni, R. A.; Wallace, R. S.; Seleem, M. N.

    2014-01-01

    Identifying the mechanism of action of new potential antibiotics is a necessary but time-consuming and costly process. Phenotypic profiling has been utilized effectively to facilitate the discovery of the mechanism of action and molecular targets of uncharacterized drugs. In this research, Raman spectroscopy was used to profile the phenotypic response of Escherichia coli to applied antibiotics. The use of Raman spectroscopy is advantageous because it is noninvasive, label free, and prone to automation, and its results can be obtained in real time. In this research, E. coli cultures were subjected to three times the MICs of 15 different antibiotics (representing five functional antibiotic classes) with known mechanisms of action for 30 min before being analyzed by Raman spectroscopy (using a 532-nm excitation wavelength). The resulting Raman spectra contained sufficient biochemical information to distinguish between profiles induced by individual antibiotics belonging to the same class. The collected spectral data were used to build a discriminant analysis model that identified the effects of unknown antibiotic compounds on the phenotype of E. coli cultures. Chemometric analysis showed the ability of Raman spectroscopy to predict the functional class of an unknown antibiotic and to identify individual antibiotics that elicit similar phenotypic responses. Results of this research demonstrate the power of Raman spectroscopy as a cellular phenotypic profiling methodology and its potential impact on antibiotic drug development research. PMID:24295982

  1. Phenotypic profiling of antibiotic response signatures in Escherichia coli using Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Athamneh, A I M; Alajlouni, R A; Wallace, R S; Seleem, M N; Senger, R S

    2014-01-01

    Identifying the mechanism of action of new potential antibiotics is a necessary but time-consuming and costly process. Phenotypic profiling has been utilized effectively to facilitate the discovery of the mechanism of action and molecular targets of uncharacterized drugs. In this research, Raman spectroscopy was used to profile the phenotypic response of Escherichia coli to applied antibiotics. The use of Raman spectroscopy is advantageous because it is noninvasive, label free, and prone to automation, and its results can be obtained in real time. In this research, E. coli cultures were subjected to three times the MICs of 15 different antibiotics (representing five functional antibiotic classes) with known mechanisms of action for 30 min before being analyzed by Raman spectroscopy (using a 532-nm excitation wavelength). The resulting Raman spectra contained sufficient biochemical information to distinguish between profiles induced by individual antibiotics belonging to the same class. The collected spectral data were used to build a discriminant analysis model that identified the effects of unknown antibiotic compounds on the phenotype of E. coli cultures. Chemometric analysis showed the ability of Raman spectroscopy to predict the functional class of an unknown antibiotic and to identify individual antibiotics that elicit similar phenotypic responses. Results of this research demonstrate the power of Raman spectroscopy as a cellular phenotypic profiling methodology and its potential impact on antibiotic drug development research.

  2. Adolescent Risk Behaviors: Studying Typical and Atypical Individuals via Multidimensional Scaling Profile Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dong, Yang; Ding, Cody

    2012-01-01

    Within the framework of problem behavior theory, the purpose of this study was to examine risk behavior profiles of typical and atypical adolescents and the differential outcomes of well-beings for these individuals in the United States. Based on the data from the survey of Health Behavior of School-Aged Children by World Health Organization,…

  3. Adolescent Risk Behaviors: Studying Typical and Atypical Individuals via Multidimensional Scaling Profile Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dong, Yang; Ding, Cody

    2012-01-01

    Within the framework of problem behavior theory, the purpose of this study was to examine risk behavior profiles of typical and atypical adolescents and the differential outcomes of well-beings for these individuals in the United States. Based on the data from the survey of Health Behavior of School-Aged Children by World Health Organization,…

  4. Data sources for in vivo molecular profiling of human phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Cardozo, Timothy; Gupta, Priyanka; Ni, Eric; Young, Lauren M; Tivon, Doreen; Felsovalyi, Klara

    2016-11-01

    Molecular profiling of human diseases has been approached at the genetic (DNA), expression (RNA), and proteomic (protein) levels. An important goal of these efforts is to map observed molecular patterns to specific, mechanistic organic entities, such as loci in the genome, individual RNA molecules or defined proteins or protein assemblies. Importantly, such maps have been historically approached in the more intuitive context of a theoretical individual cell, but diseases are better described in reality using an in vivo framework, namely a library of several tissue-specific maps. In this article, we review the existing data atlases that can be used for this purpose and identify critical gaps that could move the field forward from cellular to in vivo dimensions. WIREs Syst Biol Med 2016, 8:472-484. doi: 10.1002/wsbm.1354 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website.

  5. Different Phenotyping Approaches Lead to Dissimilar Biologic Profiles in Men With Chronic Fatigue After Radiation Therapy.

    PubMed

    Feng, Li Rebekah; Dickinson, Kristin; Kline, Neila; Saligan, Leorey N

    2016-12-01

    Cancer-related fatigue (CRF) persists months after treatment completion. Although a CRF biomarker has not yet been identified, validated self-report questionnaires are used to define and phenotype CRF in the discovery of potential biomarkers. The purposes of this study are to identify CRF subjects using three well-known CRF phenotyping approaches using validated self-report questionnaires and to compare the biologic profiles that are associated with each CRF phenotype. Fatigue in men with nonmetastatic prostate cancer receiving external beam radiation therapy was measured at baseline (T1), midpoint (T2), end point (T3), and one-year post-external beam radiation therapy (T4) using the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Fatigue (FACT-F) and Patient Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System-Fatigue. Chronic fatigue (CF) and nonfatigue subjects were grouped based on three commonly used phenotyping approaches: 1) T4 FACT-F <43; 2) T1-T4 decline in FACT-F score ≥3 points; 3) T4 Patient Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System-Fatigue T-score >50. Differential gene expressions using whole-genome microarray analysis were compared in each of the phenotyping criterion. The study enrolled 43 men, where 34%-38% had CF based on the three phenotyping approaches. Distinct gene expression patterns were observed between CF and nonfatigue subjects in each of the three CRF phenotyping approaches: 1) Approach 1 had the largest number of differentially expressed genes and 2) Approaches 2 and 3 had 40 and 21 differentially expressed genes between the fatigue groups, respectively. The variation in genetic profiles for CRF suggests that phenotypic profiling for CRF should be carefully considered because it directly influences biomarker discovery investigations. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. Multidimensional profiles of welfare and work dynamics: development, validation, and associations with child cognitive and mental health outcomes.

    PubMed

    Yoshikawa, H; Seidman, E

    2001-12-01

    This prospective longitudinal study addresses the research gap in the literature regarding multidimensional variation in welfare use and employment patterns, and relationships of such variation with parent earnings and child development outcomes. This study also aims to address the limitations of welfare dynamics studies that do not examine how multiple dimensions of welfare receipt and employment co-occur Cluster analysis was utilized, using monthly welfare and employment data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, to examine variation within the welfare population in their welfare and work patterns across the first 5 years of children's lives. Six cluster profiles of welfare and work dynamics were found: Short-Term, Short-Term Work Exit, Working Cyclers, Nonworking Cyclers, Cycle to Long-Term Exit, and Long-Term. The clusters were validated using mother's 6th-year earnings as the criterion. The clusters' associations with child development outcomes in the cognitive and mental health domains (at ages 6 and 7) were then explored. Work following short-term welfare use was associated with higher child reading scores than that following long-term use (a moderate-size effect). Cycling on and off welfare in the context of high levels of employment was associated with higher child internalizing symptoms than cycling accompanied by low levels of employment (a moderate-size effect). Implications for evaluation of TANF welfare-to-work policies are discussed.

  7. Multi-dimensional profiling of medical students' cognitive models about learning.

    PubMed

    Askell-Williams, Helen; Lawson, Michael J

    2006-02-01

    In current constructivist paradigms, learners' previous subject-matter knowledge, or cognitive models, provide the foundations for the construction of new knowledge. Learners' cognitive models about learning also mediate students' capacities to learn in their chosen topics of study. The diverse backgrounds of students entering medicine suggest that they might come to medical studies equipped with a wide variety of cognitive models about learning. Some current theories tend to reduce students' cognitions about learning to parsimonious representations, such as surface-deep approaches or mastery-performance goals. It is possible that such reduced representations underrepresent, or misrepresent, the complexity of students' cognitive models about learning. Good quality teaching needs to take account of learners' cognitive models, not just about subject matter, but also about learning. This study investigated the diversity and complexity of medical students' cognitive models about learning. A total of 7 graduate entry, clinical-year medical students volunteered for in-depth interviews about learning. NUD*IST text analysis software and correspondence analysis were employed to identify dimensions and to profile students' responses. The correspondence analysis identified a significant 4-dimensional solution that illustrates the contributions of multiple variables to students' cognitive models about learning. Individual profiles highlight diversity between participants. This study provides evidence that students' cognitive models about learning are complex and highly differentiated. Representations of what students know about learning need to take account of such complexity in order to inform instructional practice more adequately.

  8. Phenotypic and ionome profiling of Triticum aestivum x Aegilops tauschii introgression lines

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Eighty-four single homozygous introgressions of the Aegilops tauschii D-genome in the ‘Chinese Spring’ genetic background were used to study phenotypic and ionome profiles during two years of field experiments. An augmented design was used with a repeated check of a local bread wheat cultivar was im...

  9. A GIS-based Computational Tool for Multidimensional Flow Velocity by Acoustic Doppler Current Profilers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, D.; Winkler, M.; Muste, M.

    2015-06-01

    Acoustic Doppler Current Profilers (ADCPs) provide efficient and reliable flow measurements compared to other tools for characteristics of the riverine environments. In addition to originally targeted discharge measurements, ADCPs are increasingly utilized to assess river flow characteristics. The newly developed VMS (Velocity Mapping Software) aims at providing an efficient process for quality assurance, mapping velocity vectors for visualization and facilitating comparison with physical and numerical model results. VMS was designed to provide efficient and smooth work flows for processing groups of transects. The software allows the user to select group of files and subsequently to conduct statistical and graphical quality assurance on the files as a group or individually as appropriate. VMS also enables spatial averaging in horizontal and vertical plane for ADCP data in a single or multiple transects over the same or consecutive cross sections. The analysis results are displayed in numerical and graphical formats.

  10. Computational Models for Prediction of Yeast Strain Potential for Winemaking from Phenotypic Profiles

    PubMed Central

    Umek, Lan; Fonseca, Elza; Drumonde-Neves, João; Dequin, Sylvie; Zupan, Blaz; Schuller, Dorit

    2013-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains from diverse natural habitats harbour a vast amount of phenotypic diversity, driven by interactions between yeast and the respective environment. In grape juice fermentations, strains are exposed to a wide array of biotic and abiotic stressors, which may lead to strain selection and generate naturally arising strain diversity. Certain phenotypes are of particular interest for the winemaking industry and could be identified by screening of large number of different strains. The objective of the present work was to use data mining approaches to identify those phenotypic tests that are most useful to predict a strain's potential for winemaking. We have constituted a S. cerevisiae collection comprising 172 strains of worldwide geographical origins or technological applications. Their phenotype was screened by considering 30 physiological traits that are important from an oenological point of view. Growth in the presence of potassium bisulphite, growth at 40°C, and resistance to ethanol were mostly contributing to strain variability, as shown by the principal component analysis. In the hierarchical clustering of phenotypic profiles the strains isolated from the same wines and vineyards were scattered throughout all clusters, whereas commercial winemaking strains tended to co-cluster. Mann-Whitney test revealed significant associations between phenotypic results and strain's technological application or origin. Naïve Bayesian classifier identified 3 of the 30 phenotypic tests of growth in iprodion (0.05 mg/mL), cycloheximide (0.1 µg/mL) and potassium bisulphite (150 mg/mL) that provided most information for the assignment of a strain to the group of commercial strains. The probability of a strain to be assigned to this group was 27% using the entire phenotypic profile and increased to 95%, when only results from the three tests were considered. Results show the usefulness of computational approaches to simplify strain selection

  11. Computational models for prediction of yeast strain potential for winemaking from phenotypic profiles.

    PubMed

    Mendes, Inês; Franco-Duarte, Ricardo; Umek, Lan; Fonseca, Elza; Drumonde-Neves, João; Dequin, Sylvie; Zupan, Blaz; Schuller, Dorit

    2013-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains from diverse natural habitats harbour a vast amount of phenotypic diversity, driven by interactions between yeast and the respective environment. In grape juice fermentations, strains are exposed to a wide array of biotic and abiotic stressors, which may lead to strain selection and generate naturally arising strain diversity. Certain phenotypes are of particular interest for the winemaking industry and could be identified by screening of large number of different strains. The objective of the present work was to use data mining approaches to identify those phenotypic tests that are most useful to predict a strain's potential for winemaking. We have constituted a S. cerevisiae collection comprising 172 strains of worldwide geographical origins or technological applications. Their phenotype was screened by considering 30 physiological traits that are important from an oenological point of view. Growth in the presence of potassium bisulphite, growth at 40 °C, and resistance to ethanol were mostly contributing to strain variability, as shown by the principal component analysis. In the hierarchical clustering of phenotypic profiles the strains isolated from the same wines and vineyards were scattered throughout all clusters, whereas commercial winemaking strains tended to co-cluster. Mann-Whitney test revealed significant associations between phenotypic results and strain's technological application or origin. Naïve Bayesian classifier identified 3 of the 30 phenotypic tests of growth in iprodion (0.05 mg/mL), cycloheximide (0.1 µg/mL) and potassium bisulphite (150 mg/mL) that provided most information for the assignment of a strain to the group of commercial strains. The probability of a strain to be assigned to this group was 27% using the entire phenotypic profile and increased to 95%, when only results from the three tests were considered. Results show the usefulness of computational approaches to simplify strain selection

  12. Identification of intrinsic imaging phenotypes for breast cancer tumors: preliminary associations with gene expression profiles.

    PubMed

    Ashraf, Ahmed Bilal; Daye, Dania; Gavenonis, Sara; Mies, Carolyn; Feldman, Michael; Rosen, Mark; Kontos, Despina

    2014-08-01

    To present a method for identifying intrinsic imaging phenotypes in breast cancer tumors and to investigate their association with prognostic gene expression profiles. The authors retrospectively analyzed dynamic contrast material-enhanced (DCE) magnetic resonance (MR) images of the breast in 56 women (mean age, 55.6 years; age range, 37-74 years) diagnosed with estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer between 2005 and 2010. The study was approved by the institutional review board and compliant with HIPAA. The requirement to obtain informed consent was waived. Primary tumors were assayed with a validated gene expression assay that provides a score for the likelihood of recurrence. A multiparametric imaging phenotype vector was extracted for each tumor by using quantitative morphologic, kinetic, and spatial heterogeneity features. Multivariate linear regression was performed to test associations between DCE MR imaging features and recurrence likelihood. To identify intrinsic imaging phenotypes, hierarchical clustering was performed on the extracted feature vectors. Multivariate logistic regression was used to classify tumors at high versus low or medium risk of recurrence. To determine the additional value of intrinsic phenotypes, the phenotype category was tested as an additional variable. Receiver operating characteristic analysis and the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (Az) were used to assess classification performance. There was a moderate correlation (r = 0.71, R(2) = 0.50, P < .001) between DCE MR imaging features and the recurrence score. DCE MR imaging features were predictive of recurrence risk as determined by the surrogate assay, with an Az of 0.77 (P < .01). Four dominant imaging phenotypes were detected, with two including only low- and medium-risk tumors. When the phenotype category was used as an additional variable, the Az increased to 0.82 (P < .01). Intrinsic imaging phenotypes exist for breast cancer tumors and correlate

  13. Integrating phenotypic and expression profiles to map arsenic-response networks.

    PubMed

    Haugen, Astrid C; Kelley, Ryan; Collins, Jennifer B; Tucker, Charles J; Deng, Changchun; Afshari, Cynthia A; Brown, J Martin; Ideker, Trey; Van Houten, Bennett

    2004-01-01

    Arsenic is a nonmutagenic carcinogen affecting millions of people. The cellular impact of this metalloid in Saccharomyces cerevisiae was determined by profiling global gene expression and sensitivity phenotypes. These data were then mapped to a metabolic network composed of all known biochemical reactions in yeast, as well as the yeast network of 20,985 protein-protein/protein-DNA interactions. While the expression data unveiled no significant nodes in the metabolic network, the regulatory network revealed several important nodes as centers of arsenic-induced activity. The highest-scoring proteins included Fhl1, Msn2, Msn4, Yap1, Cad1 (Yap2), Pre1, Hsf1 and Met31. Contrary to the gene-expression analyses, the phenotypic-profiling data mapped to the metabolic network. The two significant metabolic networks unveiled were shikimate, and serine, threonine and glutamate biosynthesis. We also carried out transcriptional profiling of specific deletion strains, confirming that the transcription factors Yap1, Arr1 (Yap8), and Rpn4 strongly mediate the cell's adaptation to arsenic-induced stress but that Cad1 has negligible impact. By integrating phenotypic and transcriptional profiling and mapping the data onto the metabolic and regulatory networks, we have shown that arsenic is likely to channel sulfur into glutathione for detoxification, leads to indirect oxidative stress by depleting glutathione pools, and alters protein turnover via arsenation of sulfhydryl groups on proteins. Furthermore, we show that phenotypically sensitive pathways are upstream of differentially expressed ones, indicating that transcriptional and phenotypic profiling implicate distinct, but related, pathways.

  14. Integrating phenotypic and expression profiles to map arsenic-response networks

    PubMed Central

    Haugen, Astrid C; Kelley, Ryan; Collins, Jennifer B; Tucker, Charles J; Deng, Changchun; Afshari, Cynthia A; Brown, J Martin; Ideker, Trey; Van Houten, Bennett

    2004-01-01

    Background Arsenic is a nonmutagenic carcinogen affecting millions of people. The cellular impact of this metalloid in Saccharomyces cerevisiae was determined by profiling global gene expression and sensitivity phenotypes. These data were then mapped to a metabolic network composed of all known biochemical reactions in yeast, as well as the yeast network of 20,985 protein-protein/protein-DNA interactions. Results While the expression data unveiled no significant nodes in the metabolic network, the regulatory network revealed several important nodes as centers of arsenic-induced activity. The highest-scoring proteins included Fhl1, Msn2, Msn4, Yap1, Cad1 (Yap2), Pre1, Hsf1 and Met31. Contrary to the gene-expression analyses, the phenotypic-profiling data mapped to the metabolic network. The two significant metabolic networks unveiled were shikimate, and serine, threonine and glutamate biosynthesis. We also carried out transcriptional profiling of specific deletion strains, confirming that the transcription factors Yap1, Arr1 (Yap8), and Rpn4 strongly mediate the cell's adaptation to arsenic-induced stress but that Cad1 has negligible impact. Conclusions By integrating phenotypic and transcriptional profiling and mapping the data onto the metabolic and regulatory networks, we have shown that arsenic is likely to channel sulfur into glutathione for detoxification, leads to indirect oxidative stress by depleting glutathione pools, and alters protein turnover via arsenation of sulfhydryl groups on proteins. Furthermore, we show that phenotypically sensitive pathways are upstream of differentially expressed ones, indicating that transcriptional and phenotypic profiling implicate distinct, but related, pathways. PMID:15575969

  15. Active Learning Strategies for Phenotypic Profiling of High-Content Screens.

    PubMed

    Smith, Kevin; Horvath, Peter

    2014-06-01

    High-content screening is a powerful method to discover new drugs and carry out basic biological research. Increasingly, high-content screens have come to rely on supervised machine learning (SML) to perform automatic phenotypic classification as an essential step of the analysis. However, this comes at a cost, namely, the labeled examples required to train the predictive model. Classification performance increases with the number of labeled examples, and because labeling examples demands time from an expert, the training process represents a significant time investment. Active learning strategies attempt to overcome this bottleneck by presenting the most relevant examples to the annotator, thereby achieving high accuracy while minimizing the cost of obtaining labeled data. In this article, we investigate the impact of active learning on single-cell-based phenotype recognition, using data from three large-scale RNA interference high-content screens representing diverse phenotypic profiling problems. We consider several combinations of active learning strategies and popular SML methods. Our results show that active learning significantly reduces the time cost and can be used to reveal the same phenotypic targets identified using SML. We also identify combinations of active learning strategies and SML methods which perform better than others on the phenotypic profiling problems we studied. © 2014 Society for Laboratory Automation and Screening.

  16. Shade avoidance components and pathways in adult plants revealed by phenotypic profiling.

    PubMed

    Nozue, Kazunari; Tat, An V; Kumar Devisetty, Upendra; Robinson, Matthew; Mumbach, Maxwell R; Ichihashi, Yasunori; Lekkala, Saradadevi; Maloof, Julin N

    2015-04-01

    Shade from neighboring plants limits light for photosynthesis; as a consequence, plants have a variety of strategies to avoid canopy shade and compete with their neighbors for light. Collectively the response to foliar shade is called the shade avoidance syndrome (SAS). The SAS includes elongation of a variety of organs, acceleration of flowering time, and additional physiological responses, which are seen throughout the plant life cycle. However, current mechanistic knowledge is mainly limited to shade-induced elongation of seedlings. Here we use phenotypic profiling of seedling, leaf, and flowering time traits to untangle complex SAS networks. We used over-representation analysis (ORA) of shade-responsive genes, combined with previous annotation, to logically select 59 known and candidate novel mutants for phenotyping. Our analysis reveals shared and separate pathways for each shade avoidance response. In particular, auxin pathway components were required for shade avoidance responses in hypocotyl, petiole, and flowering time, whereas jasmonic acid pathway components were only required for petiole and flowering time responses. Our phenotypic profiling allowed discovery of seventeen novel shade avoidance mutants. Our results demonstrate that logical selection of mutants increased success of phenotypic profiling to dissect complex traits and discover novel components.

  17. Shade Avoidance Components and Pathways in Adult Plants Revealed by Phenotypic Profiling

    PubMed Central

    Nozue, Kazunari; Tat, An V.; Kumar Devisetty, Upendra; Robinson, Matthew; Mumbach, Maxwell R.; Ichihashi, Yasunori; Lekkala, Saradadevi; Maloof, Julin N.

    2015-01-01

    Shade from neighboring plants limits light for photosynthesis; as a consequence, plants have a variety of strategies to avoid canopy shade and compete with their neighbors for light. Collectively the response to foliar shade is called the shade avoidance syndrome (SAS). The SAS includes elongation of a variety of organs, acceleration of flowering time, and additional physiological responses, which are seen throughout the plant life cycle. However, current mechanistic knowledge is mainly limited to shade-induced elongation of seedlings. Here we use phenotypic profiling of seedling, leaf, and flowering time traits to untangle complex SAS networks. We used over-representation analysis (ORA) of shade-responsive genes, combined with previous annotation, to logically select 59 known and candidate novel mutants for phenotyping. Our analysis reveals shared and separate pathways for each shade avoidance response. In particular, auxin pathway components were required for shade avoidance responses in hypocotyl, petiole, and flowering time, whereas jasmonic acid pathway components were only required for petiole and flowering time responses. Our phenotypic profiling allowed discovery of seventeen novel shade avoidance mutants. Our results demonstrate that logical selection of mutants increased success of phenotypic profiling to dissect complex traits and discover novel components. PMID:25874869

  18. Multidimensional spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Zanni, Martin Thomas; Damrauer, Niels H.

    2010-07-20

    A multidimensional spectrometer for the infrared, visible, and ultraviolet regions of the electromagnetic spectrum, and a method for making multidimensional spectroscopic measurements in the infrared, visible, and ultraviolet regions of the electromagnetic spectrum. The multidimensional spectrometer facilitates measurements of inter- and intra-molecular interactions.

  19. Medulloepithelioma with peculiar clinical presentation, stem cell phenotype and aberrant DNA-methylation profile.

    PubMed

    Ozolek, John A; Cohen, Debra E; Kool, Marcel; Pfister, Stefan M; Korshunov, Andrey; Bukowinski, Andrew J; Davis, Amy W

    2015-01-01

    We present a 21-year-old male with a neck mass diagnosed as medulloepithelioma. Despite aggressive chemo- and radio-therapy, the tumor metastasized and proved fatal after seventeen months. The tumor demonstrated robust immunohistochemical expression of multiple markers of embryonic/neural stem cells and embryogenesis from the paraffin embedded tissue. The tumor, expressing LIN28A but negative for the 19q13.42 amplicon, also lacked the characteristic methylation profile for medulloepithelioma and other tumors with similar morphology. The expression of embryonic markers may explain its unresponsiveness to therapy and poor prognosis. Therapies targeted at embryonic cell phenotypes may hold the key for successfully treating cancers with embryonal phenotypes or tumors harboring cells with embryonal phenotypes.

  20. Combining label-free cell phenotypic profiling with computational approaches for novel drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Fang, Ye

    2015-04-01

    Drug discovery is a long and costly process. Innovations and paradigm shifts are essential for continuous improvement in the productivity of pharmaceutical R&D. The author reviews the progress of label-free cell phenotypic and computational approaches in early drug discovery since 2004 and proposes a novel paradigm, which combines both approaches. Label-free cell phenotypic profiling techniques offer an unprecedented and integrated approach to comprehend drug-target interactions in their native environments. However, these approaches have disadvantages associated with the lack of molecular details. Computational approaches, including ligand-, structure- and phenotype-based virtual screens, have become versatile tools in the early drug discovery process. However, these approaches mostly predict the binding of drug molecules to targets of interest and are limited to targets that are either well annotated for ligands or that are structurally resolved. Thus, combining label-free cell phenotypic profiling with computational approaches can provide a potential paradigm to accelerate novel drug discovery by taking advantages of the best of both approaches.

  1. Association of immunological cell profiles with specific clinical phenotypes of scleroderma disease.

    PubMed

    López-Cacho, José Manuel; Gallardo, Soledad; Posada, Manuel; Aguerri, Miriam; Calzada, David; Mayayo, Teodoro; González-Rodríguez, María Luisa; Rabasco, Antonio María; Lahoz, Carlos; Cárdaba, Blanca

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to search the correlation among immunological profiles and clinical phenotypes of scleroderma in well-characterized groups of scleroderma patients, comparing forty-nine scleroderma patients stratified according to specific clinical phenotypes with forty-nine healthy controls. Five immunological cell subpopulations (B, CD4(+) and CD8(+) T-cells, NK, and monocytes) and their respective stages of apoptosis and activation were analyzed by flow cytometry, in samples of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). Analyses of results were stratified according to disease stage, time since the diagnosis, and visceral damage (pulmonary fibrosis, pulmonary hypertension, and cardiac affliction) and by time of treatment with corticosteroids. An increase in the percentages of monocytes and a decrease in the B cells were mainly related to the disease progression. A general apoptosis decrease was found in all phenotypes studied, except in localized scleroderma. An increase of B and NK cells activation was found in patients diagnosed more than 10 years ago. Specific cell populations like monocytes, NK, and B cells were associated with the type of affected organ. This study shows how, in a heterogeneous disease, proper patient's stratification according to clinical phenotypes allows finding specific cellular profiles. Our data may lead to improvements in the knowledge of prognosis factors and to aid in the analysis of future specific therapies.

  2. Association of Immunological Cell Profiles with Specific Clinical Phenotypes of Scleroderma Disease

    PubMed Central

    Calzada, David; Mayayo, Teodoro; González-Rodríguez, María Luisa; Rabasco, Antonio María; Lahoz, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to search the correlation among immunological profiles and clinical phenotypes of scleroderma in well-characterized groups of scleroderma patients, comparing forty-nine scleroderma patients stratified according to specific clinical phenotypes with forty-nine healthy controls. Five immunological cell subpopulations (B, CD4+ and CD8+ T-cells, NK, and monocytes) and their respective stages of apoptosis and activation were analyzed by flow cytometry, in samples of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). Analyses of results were stratified according to disease stage, time since the diagnosis, and visceral damage (pulmonary fibrosis, pulmonary hypertension, and cardiac affliction) and by time of treatment with corticosteroids. An increase in the percentages of monocytes and a decrease in the B cells were mainly related to the disease progression. A general apoptosis decrease was found in all phenotypes studied, except in localized scleroderma. An increase of B and NK cells activation was found in patients diagnosed more than 10 years ago. Specific cell populations like monocytes, NK, and B cells were associated with the type of affected organ. This study shows how, in a heterogeneous disease, proper patient's stratification according to clinical phenotypes allows finding specific cellular profiles. Our data may lead to improvements in the knowledge of prognosis factors and to aid in the analysis of future specific therapies. PMID:24818126

  3. Pre-clinical cognitive phenotypes for Alzheimer's disease: a latent profile approach

    PubMed Central

    Hayden, Kathleen M.; Kuchibhatla, Maragatha; Romero, Heather R.; Plassman, Brenda L.; Burke, James R.; Browndyke, Jeffrey N.; Welsh-Bohmer, Kathleen A.

    2013-01-01

    Background Cognitive profiles for pre-clinical Alzheimer's disease (AD) can be used to identify groups of individuals at risk for disease and better characterize pre-clinical disease. Profiles or patterns of performance as pre-clinical phenotypes may be more useful than individual test scores or measures of global decline. Objective(s) The aim of this work is to evaluate patterns of cognitive performance in cognitively normal individuals to derive latent profiles associated with later onset of disease using a combination of factor analysis and latent profile analysis. Methods The National Alzheimer's Coordinating Centers collect data, including a battery of neuropsychological tests, from participants at 29 NIA funded Alzheimer's Disease Centers across the United States. Prior factor analyses of this battery demonstrated a four-factor structure comprising memory, attention, language, and executive function. Factor scores from these analyses were used in a latent profile approach to characterize cognition among a group of cognitively normal participants (n=3,911). Associations between latent profiles and disease outcomes an average of 3 years later were evaluated with multinomial regression models. Similar analyses were used to determine predictors of profile membership. Results Four groups were identified; each with distinct characteristics and significantly associated with later disease outcomes. Two groups were significantly associated with development of cognitive impairment. In post-hoc analyses, both the Trail Making Test Part B, and a contrast score (Delayed Recall - Trails B), significantly predicted group membership and later cognitive impairment. Conclusions Latent profile analysis is a useful method to evaluate patterns of cognition in large samples for the identification of preclinical AD phenotypes; however comparable results can be achieved with very sensitive tests and contrast scores. PMID:24080384

  4. Immune Neuroendocrine Phenotypes in Coturnix coturnix: Do Avian Species Show LEWIS/FISCHER-Like Profiles?

    PubMed Central

    Nazar, F. Nicolas; Barrios, Bibiana E.; Kaiser, Pete; Marin, Raul H.; Correa, Silvia G.

    2015-01-01

    Immunoneuroendocrinology studies have identified conserved communicational paths in birds and mammals, e.g. the Hypothalamus-Pituitary-Adrenal axis with anti-inflammatory activity mediated by glucocorticoids. Immune neuroendocrine phenotypes (INPs) have been proposed for mammals implying the categorization of a population in subgroups underlying divergent immune-neuroendocrine interactions. These phenotypes were studied in the context of the LEWIS/FISCHER paradigm (rats expressing high or low pro-inflammatory profiles, respectively). Although avian species have some common immunological mechanisms with mammals, they have also evolved some distinct strategies and, until now, it has not been studied whether birds may also share with mammals similar INPs. Based on corticosterone levels we determined the existence of two divergent groups in Coturnix coturnix that also differed in other immune-neuroendocrine responses. Quail with lowest corticosterone showed higher lymphoproliferative and antibody responses, interferon-γ and interleukin-1β mRNA expression levels and lower frequencies of leukocyte subpopulations distribution and interleukin-13 levels, than their higher corticosterone counterparts. Results suggest the existence of INPs in birds, comparable to mammalian LEWIS/FISCHER profiles, where basal corticosterone also underlies responses of comparable variables associated to the phenotypes. Concluding, INP may not be a mammalian distinct feature, leading to discuss whether these profiles represent a parallel phenomenon evolved in birds and mammals, or a common feature inherited from a reptilian ancestor millions of years ago. PMID:25793369

  5. Phenotypic Characterization of Retinoic Acid Differentiated SH-SY5Y Cells by Transcriptional Profiling

    PubMed Central

    Korecka, Joanna A.; van Kesteren, Ronald E.; Blaas, Eva; Spitzer, Sonia O.; Kamstra, Jorke H.; Smit, August B.; Swaab, Dick F.; Verhaagen, Joost; Bossers, Koen

    2013-01-01

    Multiple genetic and environmental factors play a role in the development and progression of Parkinson’s disease (PD). The main neuropathological hallmark of PD is the degeneration of dopaminergic (DAergic) neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta. To study genetic and molecular contributors to the disease process, there is a great need for readily accessible cells with prominent DAergic features that can be used for reproducible in vitro cellular screening. Here, we investigated the molecular phenotype of retinoic acid (RA) differentiated SH-SY5Y cells using genome wide transcriptional profiling combined with gene ontology, transcription factor and molecular pathway analysis. We demonstrated that RA induces a general neuronal differentiation program in SH-SY5Y cells and that these cells develop a predominantly mature DAergic-like neurotransmitter phenotype. This phenotype is characterized by increased dopamine levels together with a substantial suppression of other neurotransmitter phenotypes, such as those for noradrenaline, acetylcholine, glutamate, serotonin and histamine. In addition, we show that RA differentiated SH-SY5Y cells express the dopamine and noradrenalin neurotransmitter transporters that are responsible for uptake of MPP(+), a well known DAergic cell toxicant. MPP(+) treatment alters mitochondrial activity according to its proposed cytotoxic effect in DAergic neurons. Taken together, RA differentiated SH-SY5Y cells have a DAergic-like phenotype, and provide a good cellular screening tool to find novel genes or compounds that affect cytotoxic processes that are associated with PD. PMID:23724009

  6. Evaluation of drug toxicity profiles based on the phenotypes of ascidian Ciona intestinalis.

    PubMed

    Mizotani, Yuji; Itoh, Shun; Hotta, Kohji; Tashiro, Etsu; Oka, Kotaro; Imoto, Masaya

    2015-08-07

    In vivo toxicity evaluation using model organisms is an important step for the development of new drugs. Here, we report that Ciona intestinalis, a chordate invertebrate, is beneficial to drug toxicity evaluation for the following reasons: rapid embryonic and larval development, resemblance to vertebrates, ease of management, low cost, transparent body, and low risk of ethical issues. The dynamic phenotypic change of Ciona larvae during metamorphosis prompted us to examine the effect of cytotoxic drugs on its development by quantifying six toxicity endpoints: degenerated tail size, ampulla length, rotation of body axis, stomach size, heart rate, and body size. As a result, mitochondrial respiratory inhibitors, tubulin polymerization/depolymerization inhibitors, or DNA/RNA synthesis inhibitors showed distinct toxicity profiles against these six endpoints, but drugs with the same targets showed a similar toxicity profile in Ciona. Our results suggest Ciona is an effective animal model for profiling drug toxicity and exploring the mechanisms of drugs with unknown targets.

  7. Coping as Part of Motivational Resilience in School: A Multidimensional Measure of Families, Allocations, and Profiles of Academic Coping

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skinner, Ellen; Pitzer, Jennifer; Steele, Joel

    2013-01-01

    A study was designed to examine a multidimensional measure of children's coping in the academic domain as part of a larger model of motivational resilience. Using items tapping multiple ways of dealing with academic problems, including five adaptive ways (strategizing, help-seeking, comfort-seeking, self-encouragement, and commitment) and six…

  8. Metabolic profiles to define the genome: can we hear the phenotypes?

    PubMed Central

    Griffin, Julian L

    2004-01-01

    There is an increased reliance on genetically modified organisms as a functional genomic tool to elucidate the role of genes and their protein products. Despite this, many models do not express the expected phenotype thought to be associated with the gene or protein. There is thus an increased need to further define the phenotype resultant from a genetic modification to understand how the transcriptional or proteomic network may conspire to alter the expected phenotype. This is best typified by the description of the silent phenotype in genetic manipulations of yeast. High-resolution proton nuclear magnetic resonance ((1)H NMR) spectroscopy provides an ideal mechanism for the profiling of metabolites within biofluids, tissue extracts or, with recent advances, intact tissues. These metabolic datasets can be readily mined using a range of pattern recognition techniques, including hierarchical cluster analysis, principal components analysis, partial least squares and neural networks, with the combined approach being termed metabolomics. This review describes the application of NMR-based metabolomics or metabonomics to genetic and chemical interventions in a number of different species, demonstrating the versatility of such an approach, as well as suggesting how it may be integrated with other "omic" technologies. PMID:15306403

  9. Oral Colonization, Phenotypic, and Genotypic Profiles of Candida Species in Irradiated, Dentate, Xerostomic Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma Survivors

    PubMed Central

    Leung, W. Keung; Dassanayake, Ranil S.; Yau, Joyce Y. Y.; Jin, Li Jian; Yam, Wing Cheong; Samaranayake, Lakshman P.

    2000-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate oral yeast colonization and oral yeast strain diversity in irradiated (head and neck), dentate, xerostomic individuals. Subjects were recruited from a nasopharyngeal carcinoma clinic and were segregated into group A (age, <60 years [n = 25; average age ± standard deviation {SD}, 48 ± 6 years; average postirradiation time ± SD, 5 ± 5 years]) and group B (age, ≥60 years [n = 8; average age ± SD, 67 ± 4 years; average postirradiation time ± SD, 2 ± 2 years]) and were compared with age- and sex-matched healthy individuals in group C (age, <60 years [n = 20; average age ± SD, 44 ± 12 years] and group D (age, ≥60 years [n = 10; average age, 70 ± 3 years]). Selective culture of oral rinse samples was carried out to isolate, quantify, and speciate yeast recovery. All test subjects underwent a 3-month comprehensive oral and preventive care regimen plus topical antifungal therapy, if indicated. A total of 12 subjects from group A and 5 subjects from group B were recalled for reassessment of yeast colonization. Sequential (pre- and posttherapy) Candida isolate pairs from patients were phenotypically (all isolate pairs; biotyping and resistotyping profiles) and genotypically (Candida albicans isolate pairs only; electrophoretic karyotyping by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, restriction fragment length polymorphism [RFLP], and randomly amplified polymorphic DNA [RAPD] assays) evaluated. All isolates were Candida species. Irradiated individuals were found to have a significantly increased yeast carriage compared with the controls. The isolation rate of Candida posttherapy remained unchanged. A total of 9 of the 12 subjects in group A and 3 of the 5 subjects in group B harbored the same C. albicans or Candida tropicalis phenotype at recall. Varying degrees of congruence in the molecular profiles were observed when these sequential isolate pairs of C. albicans were analyzed by RFLP and RAPD assays. Variations in the

  10. Cancer RNA-Seq Nexus: a database of phenotype-specific transcriptome profiling in cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Jian-Rong; Sun, Chuan-Hu; Li, Wenyuan; Chao, Rou-Fang; Huang, Chieh-Chen; Zhou, Xianghong Jasmine; Liu, Chun-Chi

    2016-01-04

    The genome-wide transcriptome profiling of cancerous and normal tissue samples can provide insights into the molecular mechanisms of cancer initiation and progression. RNA Sequencing (RNA-Seq) is a revolutionary tool that has been used extensively in cancer research. However, no existing RNA-Seq database provides all of the following features: (i) large-scale and comprehensive data archives and analyses, including coding-transcript profiling, long non-coding RNA (lncRNA) profiling and coexpression networks; (ii) phenotype-oriented data organization and searching and (iii) the visualization of expression profiles, differential expression and regulatory networks. We have constructed the first public database that meets these criteria, the Cancer RNA-Seq Nexus (CRN, http://syslab4.nchu.edu.tw/CRN). CRN has a user-friendly web interface designed to facilitate cancer research and personalized medicine. It is an open resource for intuitive data exploration, providing coding-transcript/lncRNA expression profiles to support researchers generating new hypotheses in cancer research and personalized medicine.

  11. Phenotypic characteristics of adolescents with concave and convex facial profiles - The National Health Examination Survey.

    PubMed

    Hujoel, P P; Bollen, A-M; Yuen, K C J; Hujoel, I A

    2016-10-01

    It has been suggested that facial traits are informative on the inherited susceptibility to tuberculosis and obesity, two current global health issues. Our aim was to compare the phenotypic characteristics of adolescents with dental markers for a concave (n=420), a convex (n=978), and a straight (n=3542) facial profile in a nationally representative sample of United States adolescents. The results show that adolescents with a concave facial profile, when compared to a straight facial profile, had an increased waist-to-height ratio (Δ, 1.1 [95% CI 0.5-1.7], p<0.003) and an increased acne prevalence (OR, 1.5 [95% CI 1.2-1.9], p<0.001). Adolescents with a convex facial profile, when compared to a straight facial profile, had an increased prevalence of tuberculosis (OR, 4.3 [95% CI 1.4-13.1], p<0.02), increased ectomorphy (Δ, 0.3 [95% CI 0.2-0.4], p<0.0001), increased left-handedness (OR, 1.4 [95% CI 1.1-1.7], p<0.007), increased color-blindness (OR, 1.7 [95% CI 1.3-2.3], p<0.004), and rhesus ee phenotype (OR, 1.3 [95% CI 1.1-1.5], p<0.008). Adolescents with a concave facial profile, when compared to a convex profile, had increased mesomorphy (Δ, 1.3 [95% CI 1.1-1.5], p<0.0001), increased endomorphy (Δ, 0.5 [95% CI 0.4-0.6], p<0.0001), lower ectomorphy (Δ, 0.5 [95% CI 0.4-0.6], p<0.0001), and lower vocabulary test scores (Δ, 2.3 [95% CI 0.8-3.8], p<0.008). It is concluded that population-based survey data confirm that distinct facial features are associated with distinct somatotypes and distinct disease susceptibilities. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  12. Empirically Based Phenotypic Profiles of Children with Pervasive Developmental Disorders: Interpretation in the Light of the DSM-5

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greaves-Lord, Kirstin; Eussen, Mart L. J. M.; Verhulst, Frank C.; Minderaa, Ruud B.; Mandy, William; Hudziak, James J.; Steenhuis, Mark Peter; de Nijs, Pieter F.; Hartman, Catharina A.

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to contribute to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual (DSM) debates on the conceptualization of autism by investigating (1) whether empirically based distinct phenotypic profiles could be distinguished within a sample of mainly cognitively able children with pervasive developmental disorder (PDD), and (2) how profiles related to…

  13. Empirically Based Phenotypic Profiles of Children with Pervasive Developmental Disorders: Interpretation in the Light of the DSM-5

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greaves-Lord, Kirstin; Eussen, Mart L. J. M.; Verhulst, Frank C.; Minderaa, Ruud B.; Mandy, William; Hudziak, James J.; Steenhuis, Mark Peter; de Nijs, Pieter F.; Hartman, Catharina A.

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to contribute to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual (DSM) debates on the conceptualization of autism by investigating (1) whether empirically based distinct phenotypic profiles could be distinguished within a sample of mainly cognitively able children with pervasive developmental disorder (PDD), and (2) how profiles related to…

  14. Myoepithelial mRNA expression profiling reveals a common tumor-suppressor phenotype.

    PubMed

    Barsky, Sanford H

    2003-04-01

    A series of myoepithelial cell lines and xenografts derived from benign human myoepithelial tumors of diverse sources (salivary gland, breast, and lung) exhibit common mRNA expression profiles indicative of a tumor-suppressor phenotype. Previously established myoepithelial cell lines and xenografts (HMS-#; HMS-#X) were compared to nonmyoepithelial breast carcinoma cells (MDA-MB-231 and MDA-MB-468, and inflammatory breast carcinoma samples, IBCr, and IBCw), a normal mammary epithelial cell line (HMEC) and individual cases of human breast cancer (zcBT#T), and matched normal human breast tissues (zcBT#N) (overall samples = 22). The global gene expression profile (22,000 genes) of these individual samples was examined using Affymetrix Microarray Gene Chips and subsequently analyzed with both Affymetrix and DChip algorithms. The myoepithelial cell lines/xenografts were distinct and very different from the nonmyoepithelial breast carcinoma cells and the normal breast and breast tumor biopsies. Two hundred and seven specifically selected genes represented a subset of genes that distinguished (P < 0.05) all the myoepithelial cell lines/xenografts from all the other samples and which themselves exhibited hierarchical clustering. Further analysis of these genes revealed increased expression in genes belonging to the classes of extracellular matrix proteins, angiogenic inhibitors, and proteinase inhibitors and decreased expression belonging to the classes of angiogenic factors and proteinases. Developmental genes were also differentially expressed (either over or underexpressed). These studies confirm our previous impression that human myoepithelial cells express a distinct tumor-suppressor phenotype.

  15. Experimental Pain Phenotype Profiles in a Racially and Ethnically Diverse Sample of Healthy Adults

    PubMed Central

    Cruz-Almeida, Yenisel; Riley, Joseph L.; Fillingim, Roger B.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To examine patterns of interindividual variability in experimental pain responses emerging from multiple experimental pain measures in a racially/ethnically diverse sample of healthy adults and to examine the association between the derived phenotype profiles with demographic, psychological, and health-related measures. Methods Two hundred and ninety-one participants underwent heat, cold, pressure, and ischemic pain assessments, and completed several psychological and health-related assessments. The experimental pain measures were subjected to a principal component analysis and factor scores were used to compute Pain Sensitivity Index scores. The scores were subsequently submitted to a cluster analysis to identify patterns of pain sensitivity across experimental pain modalities. Results The sample was equally composed of non-Hispanic whites, African Americans, and Hispanic whites. Sensitivity scores were computed for heat pain, pressure pain, cold pain, ischemic pain, and temporal summation of heat pain. Five distinct clusters were characterized by high heat pain sensitivity, low ischemic pain sensitivity, low cold pain sensitivity, low pressure pain sensitivity, and high temporal summation. Cluster membership was significantly different by sex as well as somatic reactivity and catastrophizing, although cluster differences were most pronounced between the heat pain-sensitive individuals vs the cold pain-insensitive individuals. Conclusions Our findings highlight the importance of phenotyping individuals to account for interindividual differences in pain responses. Our findings also replicate previously reported pain phenotypes, which are not solely related to demographic, psychosocial, or health-related factors in our healthy participants. Future studies designed to elucidate the biological underpinnings of pain sensitivity profiles would be of substantial value. PMID:23889771

  16. Phenotypic Profiles of Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli Associated with Early Childhood Diarrhea in Rural Egypt

    PubMed Central

    Shaheen, Hind I.; Khalil, Sami B.; Rao, Malla R.; Elyazeed, Remon Abu; Wierzba, Thomas F.; Peruski, Leonard F.; Putnam, Shannon; Navarro, Armando; Morsy, Badria Z.; Cravioto, Alejandro; Clemens, John D.; Svennerholm, Ann-Mari; Savarino, Stephen J.

    2004-01-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) causes substantial diarrheal morbidity and mortality in young children in countries with limited resources. We determined the phenotypic profiles of 915 ETEC diarrheal isolates derived from Egyptian children under 3 years of age who participated in a 3-year population-based study. For each strain, we ascertained enterotoxin and colonization factor (CF) expression, the O:H serotype, and antimicrobial susceptibility. Sixty-one percent of the strains expressed heat-stable enterotoxin (ST) only, 26% expressed heat-labile enterotoxin (LT) alone, and 12% expressed both toxins. The most common CF phenotypes were colonization factor antigen I (CFA/I) (10%), coli surface antigen 6 (CS6) (9%), CS14 (6%), and CS1 plus CS3 (4%). Fifty-nine percent of the strains did not express any of the 12 CFs included in our test panel. Resistance of ETEC strains to ampicillin (63%), trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (52%), and tetracycline (43%) was common, while resistance to quinolone antibiotics was rarely detected. As for the distribution of observed serotypes, there was an unusually wide diversity of O antigens and H types represented among the 915 ETEC strains. The most commonly recognized composite ETEC phenotypes were ST CS14 O78:H18 (4%), ST (or LTST) CFA/I O128:H12 (3%), ST CS1+CS3 O6:H16 (2%), and ST CFA/I O153:H45 (1.5%). Temporal plots of diarrheal episodes associated with ETEC strains bearing common composite phenotypes were consistent with discrete community outbreaks either within a single or over successive warm seasons. These data suggest that a proportion of the disease that is endemic to young children in rural Egypt represents the confluence of small epidemics by clonally related ETEC strains that are transiently introduced or that persist in a community reservoir. PMID:15583286

  17. Phenotypic profiles of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli associated with early childhood diarrhea in rural Egypt.

    PubMed

    Shaheen, Hind I; Khalil, Sami B; Rao, Malla R; Abu Elyazeed, Remon; Wierzba, Thomas F; Peruski, Leonard F; Putnam, Shannon; Navarro, Armando; Morsy, Badria Z; Cravioto, Alejandro; Clemens, John D; Svennerholm, Ann-Mari; Savarino, Stephen J

    2004-12-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) causes substantial diarrheal morbidity and mortality in young children in countries with limited resources. We determined the phenotypic profiles of 915 ETEC diarrheal isolates derived from Egyptian children under 3 years of age who participated in a 3-year population-based study. For each strain, we ascertained enterotoxin and colonization factor (CF) expression, the O:H serotype, and antimicrobial susceptibility. Sixty-one percent of the strains expressed heat-stable enterotoxin (ST) only, 26% expressed heat-labile enterotoxin (LT) alone, and 12% expressed both toxins. The most common CF phenotypes were colonization factor antigen I (CFA/I) (10%), coli surface antigen 6 (CS6) (9%), CS14 (6%), and CS1 plus CS3 (4%). Fifty-nine percent of the strains did not express any of the 12 CFs included in our test panel. Resistance of ETEC strains to ampicillin (63%), trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (52%), and tetracycline (43%) was common, while resistance to quinolone antibiotics was rarely detected. As for the distribution of observed serotypes, there was an unusually wide diversity of O antigens and H types represented among the 915 ETEC strains. The most commonly recognized composite ETEC phenotypes were ST CS14 O78:H18 (4%), ST (or LTST) CFA/I O128:H12 (3%), ST CS1+CS3 O6:H16 (2%), and ST CFA/I O153:H45 (1.5%). Temporal plots of diarrheal episodes associated with ETEC strains bearing common composite phenotypes were consistent with discrete community outbreaks either within a single or over successive warm seasons. These data suggest that a proportion of the disease that is endemic to young children in rural Egypt represents the confluence of small epidemics by clonally related ETEC strains that are transiently introduced or that persist in a community reservoir.

  18. High-resolution phenotypic profiling defines genes essential for mycobacterial growth and cholesterol catabolism.

    PubMed

    Griffin, Jennifer E; Gawronski, Jeffrey D; Dejesus, Michael A; Ioerger, Thomas R; Akerley, Brian J; Sassetti, Christopher M

    2011-09-01

    The pathways that comprise cellular metabolism are highly interconnected, and alterations in individual enzymes can have far-reaching effects. As a result, global profiling methods that measure gene expression are of limited value in predicting how the loss of an individual function will affect the cell. In this work, we employed a new method of global phenotypic profiling to directly define the genes required for the growth of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. A combination of high-density mutagenesis and deep-sequencing was used to characterize the composition of complex mutant libraries exposed to different conditions. This allowed the unambiguous identification of the genes that are essential for Mtb to grow in vitro, and proved to be a significant improvement over previous approaches. To further explore functions that are required for persistence in the host, we defined the pathways necessary for the utilization of cholesterol, a critical carbon source during infection. Few of the genes we identified had previously been implicated in this adaptation by transcriptional profiling, and only a fraction were encoded in the chromosomal region known to encode sterol catabolic functions. These genes comprise an unexpectedly large percentage of those previously shown to be required for bacterial growth in mouse tissue. Thus, this single nutritional change accounts for a significant fraction of the adaption to the host. This work provides the most comprehensive genetic characterization of a sterol catabolic pathway to date, suggests putative roles for uncharacterized virulence genes, and precisely maps genes encoding potential drug targets.

  19. Phenotypic Variations in the Foliar Chemical Profile of Persea americana Mill. cv. Hass.

    PubMed

    García-Rodríguez, Yolanda Magdalena; Torres-Gurrola, Guadalupe; Meléndez-González, Claudio; Espinosa-García, Francisco J

    2016-12-01

    The Hass avocado tree Persea americana cv. Hass was derived from a single hybrid tree of P. americana var. drymifolia and P. americana var. guatemalensis, and it is propagated clonally by grafting. This cultivar is the most widely planted in the world but its profile of secondary metabolites has been studied rarely despite of its importance in plant protection. We illustrate the variability of the volatilome of mature leaves by describing the average chemical composition and the phenotypic variability found in 70 trees. Contrary to the uniformity expected in the Hass cultivar, high variability coefficients were found for most of the 36 detected foliar volatile compounds; furthermore we found six chemotypes grouping the foliar phenotypes of the sampled trees using hierarchical cluster analysis. About 48% of trees were grouped in one chemotype; five chemotypes grouped the remaining trees. The compounds that determined these chemotypes were: estragole, α-farnesene, β-caryophyllene, germacrene D, α-cubebene and eugenol. This striking variation in a cultivar propagated clonally is discussed in terms of somatic mutation.

  20. Genomic and phenotypic profiles of two Brazilian breast cancer cell lines derived from primary human tumors

    PubMed Central

    CORRÊA, NATÁSSIA C.R.; KUASNE, HELLEN; FARIA, JERUSA A.Q.A.; SEIXAS, CIÇA C.S.; SANTOS, IRIA G.D.; ABREU, FRANCINE B.; NONOGAKI, SUELY; ROCHA, RAFAEL M.; SILVA, GERLUZA APARECIDA BORGES; GOBBI, HELENICE; ROGATTO, SILVIA R.; GOES, ALFREDO M.; GOMES, DAWIDSON A.

    2013-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common type of cancer among women worldwide. Research using breast cancer cell lines derived from primary tumors may provide valuable additional knowledge regarding this type of cancer. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the phenotypic profiles of MACL-1 and MGSO-3, the only Brazilian breast cancer cell lines available for comparative studies. We evaluated the presence of hormone receptors, proliferation, differentiation and stem cell markers, using immunohistochemical staining of the primary tumor, cultured cells and xenografts implanted in immunodeficient mice. We also investigated the ability of the cell lines to form colonies and copy number alterations by array comparative genomic hybridization. Histopathological analysis showed that the invasive primary tumor from which the MACL-1 cell line was derived, was a luminal A subtype carcinoma, while the ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) that gave rise to the MGSO-3 cell line was a HER2 subtype tumor, both showing different proliferation levels. The cell lines and the tumor xenografts in mice preserved their high proliferative potential, but did not maintain the expression of the other markers assessed. This shift in expression may be due to the selection of an ‘establishment’ phenotype in vitro. Whole-genome DNA evaluation showed a large amount of copy number alterations (CNAs) in the two cell lines. These findings render MACL-1 and MGSO-3 the first characterized Brazilian breast cancer cell lines to be potentially used for comparative research. PMID:23404580

  1. Time series modeling of live-cell shape dynamics for image-based phenotypic profiling.

    PubMed

    Gordonov, Simon; Hwang, Mun Kyung; Wells, Alan; Gertler, Frank B; Lauffenburger, Douglas A; Bathe, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Live-cell imaging can be used to capture spatio-temporal aspects of cellular responses that are not accessible to fixed-cell imaging. As the use of live-cell imaging continues to increase, new computational procedures are needed to characterize and classify the temporal dynamics of individual cells. For this purpose, here we present the general experimental-computational framework SAPHIRE (Stochastic Annotation of Phenotypic Individual-cell Responses) to characterize phenotypic cellular responses from time series imaging datasets. Hidden Markov modeling is used to infer and annotate morphological state and state-switching properties from image-derived cell shape measurements. Time series modeling is performed on each cell individually, making the approach broadly useful for analyzing asynchronous cell populations. Two-color fluorescent cells simultaneously expressing actin and nuclear reporters enabled us to profile temporal changes in cell shape following pharmacological inhibition of cytoskeleton-regulatory signaling pathways. Results are compared with existing approaches conventionally applied to fixed-cell imaging datasets, and indicate that time series modeling captures heterogeneous dynamic cellular responses that can improve drug classification and offer additional important insight into mechanisms of drug action. The software is available at http://saphire-hcs.org.

  2. Integrated phenotypic and activity-based profiling links Ces3 to obesity and diabetes.

    PubMed

    Dominguez, Eduardo; Galmozzi, Andrea; Chang, Jae Won; Hsu, Ku-Lung; Pawlak, Joanna; Li, Weiwei; Godio, Cristina; Thomas, Jason; Partida, David; Niessen, Sherry; O'Brien, Paul E; Russell, Aaron P; Watt, Matthew J; Nomura, Daniel K; Cravatt, Benjamin F; Saez, Enrique

    2014-02-01

    Phenotypic screening is making a comeback in drug discovery as the maturation of chemical proteomics methods has facilitated target identification for bioactive small molecules. A limitation of these approaches is that time-consuming genetic methods or other means are often required to determine the biologically relevant target (or targets) from among multiple protein-compound interactions that are typically detected. Here, we have combined phenotypic screening of a directed small-molecule library with competitive activity-based protein profiling to map and functionally characterize the targets of screening hits. Using this approach, we identify carboxylesterase 3 (Ces3, also known as Ces1d) as a primary molecular target of bioactive compounds that promote lipid storage in adipocytes. We further show that Ces3 activity is markedly elevated during adipocyte differentiation. Treatment of two mouse models of obesity-diabetes with a Ces3 inhibitor ameliorates multiple features of metabolic syndrome, illustrating the power of the described strategy to accelerate the identification and pharmacologic validation of new therapeutic targets.

  3. Muscle transcriptomic profiles in pigs with divergent phenotypes for fatness traits

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Selection for increasing intramuscular fat content would definitively improve the palatability and juiciness of pig meat as well as the sensorial and organoleptic properties of cured products. However, evidences obtained in human and model organisms suggest that high levels of intramuscular fat might alter muscle lipid and carbohydrate metabolism. We have analysed this issue by determining the transcriptomic profiles of Duroc pigs with divergent phenotypes for 13 fatness traits. The strong aptitude of Duroc pigs to have high levels of intramuscular fat makes them a valuable model to analyse the mechanisms that regulate muscle lipid metabolism, an issue with evident implications in the elucidation of the genetic basis of human metabolic diseases such as obesity and insulin resistance. Results Muscle gene expression profiles of 68 Duroc pigs belonging to two groups (HIGH and LOW) with extreme phenotypes for lipid deposition and composition traits have been analysed. Microarray and quantitative PCR analysis showed that genes related to fatty acid uptake, lipogenesis and triacylglycerol synthesis were upregulated in the muscle tissue of HIGH pigs, which are fatter and have higher amounts of intramuscular fat than their LOW counterparts. Paradoxically, lipolytic genes also showed increased mRNA levels in the HIGH group suggesting the existence of a cycle where triacylglycerols are continuously synthesized and degraded. Several genes related to the insulin-signalling pathway, that is usually impaired in obese humans, were also upregulated. Finally, genes related to antigen-processing and presentation were downregulated in the HIGH group. Conclusion Our data suggest that selection for increasing intramuscular fat content in pigs would lead to a shift but not a disruption of the metabolic homeostasis of muscle cells. Future studies on the post-translational changes affecting protein activity or expression as well as information about protein location within the

  4. Insomnia Phenotypes Based on Objective Sleep Duration in Adolescents: Depression Risk and Differential Behavioral Profiles

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez-Mendoza, Julio; Calhoun, Susan L.; Vgontzas, Alexandros N.; Li, Yun; Gaines, Jordan; Liao, Duanping; Bixler, Edward O.

    2016-01-01

    Based on previous studies on the role of objective sleep duration in predicting morbidity in individuals with insomnia, we examined the role of objective sleep duration in differentiating behavioral profiles in adolescents with insomnia symptoms. Adolescents from the Penn State Child Cohort (n = 397, ages 12–23, 54.7% male) underwent a nine-hour polysomnography (PSG), clinical history, physical examination and psychometric testing, including the Child or Adult Behavior Checklist and Pediatric Behavior Scale. Insomnia symptoms were defined as a self-report of difficulty falling and/or staying asleep and objective “short” sleep duration as a PSG total sleep time ≤7 h. A significant interaction showed that objective short sleep duration modified the association of insomnia symptoms with internalizing problems. Consistently, adolescents with insomnia symptoms and short sleep duration were characterized by depression, rumination, mood dysregulation and social isolation, while adolescents with insomnia symptoms and normal sleep duration were characterized by rule-breaking and aggressive behaviors and, to a lesser extent, rumination. These findings indicate that objective sleep duration is useful in differentiating behavioral profiles among adolescents with insomnia symptoms. The insomnia with objective short sleep duration phenotype is associated with an increased risk of depression earlier in the lifespan than previously believed. PMID:27983580

  5. Behavioral phenotypes of genetic syndromes with intellectual disability: comparison of adaptive profiles.

    PubMed

    Di Nuovo, Santo; Buono, Serafino

    2011-10-30

    The study of distinctive and consistent behaviors in the most common genetic syndromes with intellectual disability is useful to explain abnormalities or associated psychiatric disorders. The behavioral phenotypes revealed outcomes totally or partially specific for each syndrome. The aim of our study was to compare similarities and differences in the adaptive profiles of the five most frequent genetic syndromes, i.e. Down syndrome, Williams syndrome, Angelman syndrome, Prader-Willi syndrome, and Fragile-X syndrome (fully mutated), taking into account the relation with chronological age and the overall IQ level. The research was carried out using the Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scale (beside the Wechsler Intelligence scales to obtain IQ) with a sample of 181 persons (107 males and 74 females) showing genetic syndromes and mental retardation. Syndrome-based groups were matched for chronological age and mental age (excluding the Angelman group, presenting with severe mental retardation). Similarities and differences in the adaptive profiles are described, relating them to IQs and maladaptive behaviors. The results might be useful in obtaining a global index of adjustment for the assessment of intellectual disability level as well as for educational guidance and rehabilitative plans. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Kinetic cellular phenotypic profiling: prediction, identification, and analysis of bioactive natural products.

    PubMed

    Fu, Huiying; Fu, Wenqing; Sun, Mingjiao; Shou, Qiyang; Zhai, Yunyan; Cheng, Hongqiang; Teng, Li; Mou, Xiaozhou; Li, Yanwei; Wan, Shuying; Zhang, Shanshan; Xu, Qinqin; Zhang, Xue; Wang, Jiucun; Zhu, Jenny; Wang, Xiaobo; Xu, Xiao; Lv, Guiyuan; Jin, Li; Guo, Wensheng; Ke, Yuehai

    2011-09-01

    Natural products have always been a major source of therapeutic agents; however, the development of traditional herbal products has been currently hampered by the lack of analytic methods suitable for both high-throughput screening and evaluating the mechanism of action. Cellular processes such as proliferation, apoptosis, and toxicity are well-orchestrated in real time. Monitoring these events and their perturbation by natural products can provide high-rich information about cell physiological relevancies being involved. Here, we report a novel cell-based phenotypic profiling strategy that uses electronic impedance readouts for real-time monitoring of cellular responses to traditional Chinese medicines (TCMs). The utility of this approach was used to screen natural herbs that have been historically documented to cure human diseases and that have been classified into seven clusters based on their mechanisms of action. The results suggest that herbal medicines with similar cellular mechanisms produce similar time/dose-dependent cell response profiles (TCRPs). By comparing the TCRPs produced by the Chinese medicinal Cordyceps sinensis with similar TCRPs of chemical compounds, we explored the potential use of herbal TCRPs for predicting cellular mechanisms of action, herbal authentications, and bioactive identification. Additionally, we further compared this novel TCRP technology with high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC)-based methods for herbal origin-tracing authentication and identification of bioactive ingredients. Together, our findings suggest that using TCRP as an alternative to existing spectroscopic techniques can allow us to analyze natural products in a more convenient and physiologically relevant manner.

  7. Relation of Childhood Obesity/Cardiometabolic Phenotypes to Adult Cardiometabolic Profile

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shengxu; Chen, Wei; Srinivasan, Sathanur R.; Xu, Jihua; Berenson, Gerald S.

    2012-01-01

    Not all obese adults have cardiometabolic abnormalities. It is unknown whether this is true in children and, if true, whether children who have metabolically healthy overweight/obesity (MHO) will also have favorable cardiometabolic profiles in adulthood. These aspects were examined in 1,098 individuals who participated as both children (aged 5–17 years) and adults (aged 24–43 years) in the Bogalusa Heart Study between 1997 and 2002 in Bogalusa, Louisiana. MHO was defined as being in the top body mass index quartile, while low density lipoprotein cholesterol, triglycerides, mean arterial pressure, and glucose were in the bottom 3 quartiles, and high density lipoprotein cholesterol was in the top 3 quartiles. Forty-six children (4.2%) had MHO, and they were more likely to retain MHO status in adulthood compared with children in other categories (P < 0.0001). Despite markedly increased obesity in childhood and in adulthood, these same MHO children and adults showed a cardiometabolic profile generally comparable to that of nonoverweight/obese children (P > 0.05 in most cases). Moreover, there was no difference in carotid intima-media thickness in adulthood between MHO children and nonoverweight/obese children. Further, carotid intima-media thickness in adulthood was lower in MHO children than in metabolically abnormal, overweight/obese children (P = 0.003). In conclusion, the MHO phenotype starts in childhood and continues into adulthood. PMID:23035138

  8. Mitochondria Biogenesis and Bioenergetics Gene Profiles in Isogenic Prostate Cells with Different Malignant Phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Burch, Tanya C.; Rhim, Johng S.

    2016-01-01

    Background. The most significant hallmarks of cancer are directly or indirectly linked to deregulated mitochondria. In this study, we sought to profile mitochondria associated genes in isogenic prostate cell lines with different tumorigenic phenotypes from the same patient. Results. Two isogenic human prostate cell lines RC77N/E (nonmalignant cells) and RC77T/E (malignant cells) were profiled for expression of mitochondrial biogenesis and energy metabolism genes by qRT-PCR using the Human Mitochondria and the Mitochondrial Energy Metabolism RT2 PCR arrays. Forty-seven genes were differentially regulated between the two cell lines. The interaction and regulatory networks of these genes were generated by Ingenuity Pathway Analysis. UCP2 was the most significantly upregulated gene in primary adenocarcinoma cells in the current study. The overexpression of UCP2 upon malignant transformation was further validated using human prostatectomy clinical specimens. Conclusions. This study demonstrates the overexpression of multiple genes that are involved in mitochondria biogenesis, bioenergetics, and modulation of apoptosis. These genes may play a role in malignant transformation and disease progression. The upregulation of some of these genes in clinical samples indicates that some of the differentially transcribed genes could be the potential targets for therapeutic interventions. PMID:27478826

  9. A Person-Centered Perspective on Multidimensional Perfectionism in Canadian and Chinese University Students: A Multigroup Latent Profile Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Martin M.; Saklofske, Donald H.; Yan, Gonggu; Sherry, Simon B.

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the generalizability of the tripartite model of perfectionism across Canadian and Chinese university students. Using latent profile analysis and indicators of perfectionistic strivings, perfectionistic concerns, and neuroticism in both groups, the authors derived a 3-profile solution: adaptive perfectionists, maladaptive…

  10. A Person-Centered Perspective on Multidimensional Perfectionism in Canadian and Chinese University Students: A Multigroup Latent Profile Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Martin M.; Saklofske, Donald H.; Yan, Gonggu; Sherry, Simon B.

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the generalizability of the tripartite model of perfectionism across Canadian and Chinese university students. Using latent profile analysis and indicators of perfectionistic strivings, perfectionistic concerns, and neuroticism in both groups, the authors derived a 3-profile solution: adaptive perfectionists, maladaptive…

  11. Human monocyte-derived macrophages are heterogenous: Proteomic profile of different phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Eligini, S; Brioschi, M; Fiorelli, S; Tremoli, E; Banfi, C; Colli, S

    2015-06-21

    Tissue macrophages play a key role in many aspects of human physiology and pathology. These cells are heterogeneous both in term of morphology and function. As an example, heterogeneity has been reported within the atherosclerotic lesions where distinct populations exert opposite functions driving plaque progression or stability. Tissue macrophages are not easily obtained and differentiated blood-derived monocytes are largely used as surrogate model. We previously reported that human macrophages spontaneously differentiated from adherent monocytes show two dominant subsets, distinct for morphology (spindle and round) and functions. The aim of this study was to evaluate the intracellular proteome of these two macrophage subsets by means of a microproteomic workflow properly set up to simultaneously identify and quantify proteins from a minimal number of morphotypically heterogeneous cells in culture. We report two distinct proteomic profiles that distinguish round from spindle macrophages. In particular, differential abundances were observed for proteins involved in membrane traffic regulation, lipid handling, efferocytosis, and protection against stress conditions. Results reinforce and extend previous data on the functional and antigenic profile of these macrophage phenotypes strengthening the suitability of our model to focus on macrophage heterogeneity. Tissue macrophages patrol homeostatic functions, immune surveillance, and resolution of inflammation. The spectrum of macrophage activation states is, therefore, wide and gives ground for the heterogeneity of these cells, documented in health and disease. This study provides knowledge of the distinct proteome that characterises the two dominant morphotypes (round and spindle) of human macrophages that, in our culture condition, are generated by spontaneous differentiation from blood-derived monocytes. Results extend previous data about the different antigenic, transcriptional, and functional profiles of these

  12. Local Context Finder (LCF) reveals multidimensional relationships among mRNA expression profiles of Arabidopsis responding to pathogen infection.

    PubMed

    Katagiri, Fumiaki; Glazebrook, Jane

    2003-09-16

    A major task in computational analysis of mRNA expression profiles is definition of relationships among profiles on the basis of similarities among them. This is generally achieved by pattern recognition in the distribution of data points representing each profile in a high-dimensional space. Some drawbacks of commonly used pattern recognition algorithms stem from their use of a globally linear space and/or limited degrees of freedom. A pattern recognition method called Local Context Finder (LCF) is described here. LCF uses nonlinear dimensionality reduction for pattern recognition. Then it builds a network of profiles based on the nonlinear dimensionality reduction results. LCF was used to analyze mRNA expression profiles of the plant host Arabidopsis interacting with the bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae. In one case, LCF revealed two dimensions essential to explain the effects of the NahG transgene and the ndr1 mutation on resistant and susceptible responses. In another case, plant mutants deficient in responses to pathogen infection were classified on the basis of LCF analysis of their profiles. The classification by LCF was consistent with the results of biological characterization of the mutants. Thus, LCF is a powerful method for extracting information from expression profile data.

  13. Robust Classification of Small-Molecule Mechanism of Action Using a Minimalist High-Content Microscopy Screen and Multidimensional Phenotypic Trajectory Analysis.

    PubMed

    Twarog, Nathaniel R; Low, Jonathan A; Currier, Duane G; Miller, Greg; Chen, Taosheng; Shelat, Anang A

    2016-01-01

    Phenotypic screening through high-content automated microscopy is a powerful tool for evaluating the mechanism of action of candidate therapeutics. Despite more than a decade of development, however, high content assays have yielded mixed results, identifying robust phenotypes in only a small subset of compound classes. This has led to a combinatorial explosion of assay techniques, analyzing cellular phenotypes across dozens of assays with hundreds of measurements. Here, using a minimalist three-stain assay and only 23 basic cellular measurements, we developed an analytical approach that leverages informative dimensions extracted by linear discriminant analysis to evaluate similarity between the phenotypic trajectories of different compounds in response to a range of doses. This method enabled us to visualize biologically-interpretable phenotypic tracks populated by compounds of similar mechanism of action, cluster compounds according to phenotypic similarity, and classify novel compounds by comparing them to phenotypically active exemplars. Hierarchical clustering applied to 154 compounds from over a dozen different mechanistic classes demonstrated tight agreement with published compound mechanism classification. Using 11 phenotypically active mechanism classes, classification was performed on all 154 compounds: 78% were correctly identified as belonging to one of the 11 exemplar classes or to a different unspecified class, with accuracy increasing to 89% when less phenotypically active compounds were excluded. Importantly, several apparent clustering and classification failures, including rigosertib and 5-fluoro-2'-deoxycytidine, instead revealed more complex mechanisms or off-target effects verified by more recent publications. These results show that a simple, easily replicated, minimalist high-content assay can reveal subtle variations in the cellular phenotype induced by compounds and can correctly predict mechanism of action, as long as the appropriate

  14. Robust Classification of Small-Molecule Mechanism of Action Using a Minimalist High-Content Microscopy Screen and Multidimensional Phenotypic Trajectory Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Twarog, Nathaniel R.; Low, Jonathan A.; Currier, Duane G.; Miller, Greg; Chen, Taosheng; Shelat, Anang A.

    2016-01-01

    Phenotypic screening through high-content automated microscopy is a powerful tool for evaluating the mechanism of action of candidate therapeutics. Despite more than a decade of development, however, high content assays have yielded mixed results, identifying robust phenotypes in only a small subset of compound classes. This has led to a combinatorial explosion of assay techniques, analyzing cellular phenotypes across dozens of assays with hundreds of measurements. Here, using a minimalist three-stain assay and only 23 basic cellular measurements, we developed an analytical approach that leverages informative dimensions extracted by linear discriminant analysis to evaluate similarity between the phenotypic trajectories of different compounds in response to a range of doses. This method enabled us to visualize biologically-interpretable phenotypic tracks populated by compounds of similar mechanism of action, cluster compounds according to phenotypic similarity, and classify novel compounds by comparing them to phenotypically active exemplars. Hierarchical clustering applied to 154 compounds from over a dozen different mechanistic classes demonstrated tight agreement with published compound mechanism classification. Using 11 phenotypically active mechanism classes, classification was performed on all 154 compounds: 78% were correctly identified as belonging to one of the 11 exemplar classes or to a different unspecified class, with accuracy increasing to 89% when less phenotypically active compounds were excluded. Importantly, several apparent clustering and classification failures, including rigosertib and 5-fluoro-2’-deoxycytidine, instead revealed more complex mechanisms or off-target effects verified by more recent publications. These results show that a simple, easily replicated, minimalist high-content assay can reveal subtle variations in the cellular phenotype induced by compounds and can correctly predict mechanism of action, as long as the appropriate

  15. Quantitative NMR Metabolite Profiling of Methicillin-Resistant and Methicillin-Susceptible Staphylococcus aureus Discriminates between Biofilm and Planktonic Phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Wound bioburden in the form of colonizing biofilms is a major contributor to nonhealing wounds. Staphylococcus aureus is a Gram-positive, facultative anaerobe commonly found in chronic wounds; however, much remains unknown about the basic physiology of this opportunistic pathogen, especially with regard to the biofilm phenotype. Transcriptomic and proteomic analysis of S. aureus biofilms have suggested that S. aureus biofilms exhibit an altered metabolic state relative to the planktonic phenotype. Herein, comparisons of extracellular and intracellular metabolite profiles detected by 1H NMR were conducted for methicillin-resistant (MRSA) and methicillin-susceptible (MSSA) S. aureus strains grown as biofilm and planktonic cultures. Principal component analysis distinguished the biofilm phenotype from the planktonic phenotype, and factor loadings analysis identified metabolites that contributed to the statistical separation of the biofilm from the planktonic phenotype, suggesting that key features distinguishing biofilm from planktonic growth include selective amino acid uptake, lipid catabolism, butanediol fermentation, and a shift in metabolism from energy production to assembly of cell-wall components and matrix deposition. These metabolite profiles provide a basis for the development of metabolite biomarkers that distinguish between biofilm and planktonic phenotypes in S. aureus and have the potential for improved diagnostic and therapeutic use in chronic wounds. PMID:24809402

  16. Multi-dimensional TOF-SIMS analysis for effective profiling of disease-related ions from the tissue surface.

    PubMed

    Park, Ji-Won; Jeong, Hyobin; Kang, Byeongsoo; Kim, Su Jin; Park, Sang Yoon; Kang, Sokbom; Kim, Hark Kyun; Choi, Joon Sig; Hwang, Daehee; Lee, Tae Geol

    2015-06-05

    Time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS) emerges as a promising tool to identify the ions (small molecules) indicative of disease states from the surface of patient tissues. In TOF-SIMS analysis, an enhanced ionization of surface molecules is critical to increase the number of detected ions. Several methods have been developed to enhance ionization capability. However, how these methods improve identification of disease-related ions has not been systematically explored. Here, we present a multi-dimensional SIMS (MD-SIMS) that combines conventional TOF-SIMS and metal-assisted SIMS (MetA-SIMS). Using this approach, we analyzed cancer and adjacent normal tissues first by TOF-SIMS and subsequently by MetA-SIMS. In total, TOF- and MetA-SIMS detected 632 and 959 ions, respectively. Among them, 426 were commonly detected by both methods, while 206 and 533 were detected uniquely by TOF- and MetA-SIMS, respectively. Of the 426 commonly detected ions, 250 increased in their intensities by MetA-SIMS, whereas 176 decreased. The integrated analysis of the ions detected by the two methods resulted in an increased number of discriminatory ions leading to an enhanced separation between cancer and normal tissues. Therefore, the results show that MD-SIMS can be a useful approach to provide a comprehensive list of discriminatory ions indicative of disease states.

  17. Multi-dimensional TOF-SIMS analysis for effective profiling of disease-related ions from the tissue surface

    PubMed Central

    Park, Ji-Won; Jeong, Hyobin; Kang, Byeongsoo; Kim, Su Jin; Park, Sang Yoon; Kang, Sokbom; Kim, Hark Kyun; Choi, Joon Sig; Hwang, Daehee; Lee, Tae Geol

    2015-01-01

    Time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS) emerges as a promising tool to identify the ions (small molecules) indicative of disease states from the surface of patient tissues. In TOF-SIMS analysis, an enhanced ionization of surface molecules is critical to increase the number of detected ions. Several methods have been developed to enhance ionization capability. However, how these methods improve identification of disease-related ions has not been systematically explored. Here, we present a multi-dimensional SIMS (MD-SIMS) that combines conventional TOF-SIMS and metal-assisted SIMS (MetA-SIMS). Using this approach, we analyzed cancer and adjacent normal tissues first by TOF-SIMS and subsequently by MetA-SIMS. In total, TOF- and MetA-SIMS detected 632 and 959 ions, respectively. Among them, 426 were commonly detected by both methods, while 206 and 533 were detected uniquely by TOF- and MetA-SIMS, respectively. Of the 426 commonly detected ions, 250 increased in their intensities by MetA-SIMS, whereas 176 decreased. The integrated analysis of the ions detected by the two methods resulted in an increased number of discriminatory ions leading to an enhanced separation between cancer and normal tissues. Therefore, the results show that MD-SIMS can be a useful approach to provide a comprehensive list of discriminatory ions indicative of disease states. PMID:26046669

  18. Multi-dimensional TOF-SIMS analysis for effective profiling of disease-related ions from the tissue surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Ji-Won; Jeong, Hyobin; Kang, Byeongsoo; Kim, Su Jin; Park, Sang Yoon; Kang, Sokbom; Kim, Hark Kyun; Choi, Joon Sig; Hwang, Daehee; Lee, Tae Geol

    2015-06-01

    Time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS) emerges as a promising tool to identify the ions (small molecules) indicative of disease states from the surface of patient tissues. In TOF-SIMS analysis, an enhanced ionization of surface molecules is critical to increase the number of detected ions. Several methods have been developed to enhance ionization capability. However, how these methods improve identification of disease-related ions has not been systematically explored. Here, we present a multi-dimensional SIMS (MD-SIMS) that combines conventional TOF-SIMS and metal-assisted SIMS (MetA-SIMS). Using this approach, we analyzed cancer and adjacent normal tissues first by TOF-SIMS and subsequently by MetA-SIMS. In total, TOF- and MetA-SIMS detected 632 and 959 ions, respectively. Among them, 426 were commonly detected by both methods, while 206 and 533 were detected uniquely by TOF- and MetA-SIMS, respectively. Of the 426 commonly detected ions, 250 increased in their intensities by MetA-SIMS, whereas 176 decreased. The integrated analysis of the ions detected by the two methods resulted in an increased number of discriminatory ions leading to an enhanced separation between cancer and normal tissues. Therefore, the results show that MD-SIMS can be a useful approach to provide a comprehensive list of discriminatory ions indicative of disease states.

  19. Metabolomics profiling in plasma samples from glioma patients correlates with tumor phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Hua; Heimberger, Amy B.; Lu, Zhimin; Wu, Xifeng; Hodges, Tiffany R.; Song, Renduo; Shen, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Background Tumor-based molecular biomarkers have redefined in the classification gliomas. However, the association of systemic metabolomics with glioma phenotype has not been explored yet. Methods In this study, we conducted two-step (discovery and validation) metabolomic profiling in plasma samples from 87 glioma patients. The metabolomics data were tested for correlation with glioma grade (high vs low), glioblastoma (GBM) versus malignant gliomas, and IDH mutation status. Results Five metabolites, namely uracil, arginine, lactate, cystamine, and ornithine, significantly differed between high- and low-grade glioma patients in both the discovery and validation cohorts. When the discovery and validation cohorts were combined, we identified 29 significant metabolites with 18 remaining significant after adjusting for multiple comparisons. Those 18 significant metabolites separated high- from low-grade glioma patients with 91.1% accuracy. In the pathway analysis, a total of 18 significantly metabolic pathways were identified. Similarly, we identified 2 and 6 metabolites that significantly differed between GBM and non-GBM, and IDH mutation positive and negative patients after multiple comparison adjusting. Those 6 significant metabolites separated IDH1 mutation positive from negative glioma patients with 94.4% accuracy. Three pathways were identified to be associated with IDH mutation status. Within arginine and proline metabolism, levels of intermediate metabolites in creatine pathway were all significantly lower in IDH mutation positive than in negative patients, suggesting an increased activity of creatine pathway in IDH mutation positive tumors. Conclusion Our findings identified metabolites and metabolic pathways that differentiated tumor phenotypes. These may be useful as host biomarker candidates to further help glioma molecular classification. PMID:26967252

  20. Correlation of Lactobacillus rhamnosus Genotypes and Carbohydrate Utilization Signatures Determined by Phenotype Profiling.

    PubMed

    Ceapa, Corina; Lambert, Jolanda; van Limpt, Kees; Wels, Michiel; Smokvina, Tamara; Knol, Jan; Kleerebezem, Michiel

    2015-08-15

    Lactobacillus rhamnosus is a bacterial species commonly colonizing the gastrointestinal (GI) tract of humans and also frequently used in food products. While some strains have been studied extensively, physiological variability among isolates of the species found in healthy humans or their diet is largely unexplored. The aim of this study was to characterize the diversity of carbohydrate utilization capabilities of human isolates and food-derived strains of L. rhamnosus in relation to their niche of isolation and genotype. We investigated the genotypic and phenotypic diversity of 25 out of 65 L. rhamnosus strains from various niches, mainly human feces and fermented dairy products. Genetic fingerprinting of the strains by amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) identified 11 distinct subgroups at 70% similarity and suggested niche enrichment within particular genetic clades. High-resolution carbohydrate utilization profiling (OmniLog) identified 14 carbon sources that could be used by all of the strains tested for growth, while the utilization of 58 carbon sources differed significantly between strains, enabling the stratification of L. rhamnosus strains into three metabolic clusters that partially correlate with the genotypic clades but appear uncorrelated with the strain's origin of isolation. Draft genome sequences of 8 strains were generated and employed in a gene-trait matching (GTM) analysis together with the publicly available genomes of L. rhamnosus GG (ATCC 53103) and HN001 for several carbohydrates that were distinct for the different metabolic clusters: l-rhamnose, cellobiose, l-sorbose, and α-methyl-d-glucoside. From the analysis, candidate genes were identified that correlate with l-sorbose and α-methyl-d-glucoside utilization, and the proposed function of these genes could be confirmed by heterologous expression in a strain lacking the genes. This study expands our insight into the phenotypic and genotypic diversity of the species L. rhamnosus

  1. Correlation of Lactobacillus rhamnosus Genotypes and Carbohydrate Utilization Signatures Determined by Phenotype Profiling

    PubMed Central

    Lambert, Jolanda; van Limpt, Kees; Wels, Michiel; Smokvina, Tamara; Knol, Jan; Kleerebezem, Michiel

    2015-01-01

    Lactobacillus rhamnosus is a bacterial species commonly colonizing the gastrointestinal (GI) tract of humans and also frequently used in food products. While some strains have been studied extensively, physiological variability among isolates of the species found in healthy humans or their diet is largely unexplored. The aim of this study was to characterize the diversity of carbohydrate utilization capabilities of human isolates and food-derived strains of L. rhamnosus in relation to their niche of isolation and genotype. We investigated the genotypic and phenotypic diversity of 25 out of 65 L. rhamnosus strains from various niches, mainly human feces and fermented dairy products. Genetic fingerprinting of the strains by amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) identified 11 distinct subgroups at 70% similarity and suggested niche enrichment within particular genetic clades. High-resolution carbohydrate utilization profiling (OmniLog) identified 14 carbon sources that could be used by all of the strains tested for growth, while the utilization of 58 carbon sources differed significantly between strains, enabling the stratification of L. rhamnosus strains into three metabolic clusters that partially correlate with the genotypic clades but appear uncorrelated with the strain's origin of isolation. Draft genome sequences of 8 strains were generated and employed in a gene-trait matching (GTM) analysis together with the publicly available genomes of L. rhamnosus GG (ATCC 53103) and HN001 for several carbohydrates that were distinct for the different metabolic clusters: l-rhamnose, cellobiose, l-sorbose, and α-methyl-d-glucoside. From the analysis, candidate genes were identified that correlate with l-sorbose and α-methyl-d-glucoside utilization, and the proposed function of these genes could be confirmed by heterologous expression in a strain lacking the genes. This study expands our insight into the phenotypic and genotypic diversity of the species L. rhamnosus

  2. Temporal expression profiling identifies pathways mediating effect of causal variant on phenotype.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Saumya; Radhakrishnan, Aparna; Raharja-Liu, Pandu; Lin, Gen; Steinmetz, Lars M; Gagneur, Julien; Sinha, Himanshu

    2015-06-01

    Even with identification of multiple causal genetic variants for common human diseases, understanding the molecular processes mediating the causal variants' effect on the disease remains a challenge. This understanding is crucial for the development of therapeutic strategies to prevent and treat disease. While static profiling of gene expression is primarily used to get insights into the biological bases of diseases, it makes differentiating the causative from the correlative effects difficult, as the dynamics of the underlying biological processes are not monitored. Using yeast as a model, we studied genome-wide gene expression dynamics in the presence of a causal variant as the sole genetic determinant, and performed allele-specific functional validation to delineate the causal effects of the genetic variant on the phenotype. Here, we characterized the precise genetic effects of a functional MKT1 allelic variant in sporulation efficiency variation. A mathematical model describing meiotic landmark events and conditional activation of MKT1 expression during sporulation specified an early meiotic role of this variant. By analyzing the early meiotic genome-wide transcriptional response, we demonstrate an MKT1-dependent role of novel modulators, namely, RTG1/3, regulators of mitochondrial retrograde signaling, and DAL82, regulator of nitrogen starvation, in additively effecting sporulation efficiency. In the presence of functional MKT1 allele, better respiration during early sporulation was observed, which was dependent on the mitochondrial retrograde regulator, RTG3. Furthermore, our approach showed that MKT1 contributes to sporulation independent of Puf3, an RNA-binding protein that steady-state transcription profiling studies have suggested to mediate MKT1-pleiotropic effects during mitotic growth. These results uncover interesting regulatory links between meiosis and mitochondrial retrograde signaling. In this study, we highlight the advantage of analyzing allele

  3. Correlation of Phenotypic Profiles Using Targeted Proteomics Identifies Mycobacterial Esx-1 Substrates

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The Esx/WXG-100 (ESAT-6/Wss) exporters are multiprotein complexes that promote protein translocation across the cytoplasmic membrane in a diverse range of pathogenic and nonpathogenic bacterial species. The Esx-1 (ESAT-6 System-1) system mediates virulence factor translocation in mycobacterial pathogens, including the human pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Although several genes have been associated with Esx-1-mediated transport and virulence, the contribution of individual Esx-1 genes to export is largely undefined. A unique aspect of Esx-1 export is that several substrates require each other for export/stability. We exploited substrate “codependency” to identify Esx-1 substrates. We simultaneously quantified changes in the levels of 13 Esx-1 proteins from both secreted and cytosolic protein fractions generated from 16 Esx-1-deficient Mycobacterium marinum strains in a single experiment using MRM/SRM targeted mass spectrometry. This expansion of measurable Esx-1 proteins allowed us to define statistical rules for assigning novel substrates using phenotypic profiles of known Esx-1 substrates. Using this approach, we identified three additional Esx-1 substrates encoded by the esx-1 region. Our studies begin to address how disruption of specific genes affects several proteins in the Esx-1 complex. Overall, our findings illuminate relationships between Esx-1 proteins and create a framework for the identification of secreted substrates applicable to other protein exporters and pathways. PMID:25106450

  4. Correlation of phenotypic profiles using targeted proteomics identifies mycobacterial esx-1 substrates.

    PubMed

    Champion, Matthew M; Williams, Emily A; Pinapati, Richard S; Champion, Patricia A DiGiuseppe

    2014-11-07

    The Esx/WXG-100 (ESAT-6/Wss) exporters are multiprotein complexes that promote protein translocation across the cytoplasmic membrane in a diverse range of pathogenic and nonpathogenic bacterial species. The Esx-1 (ESAT-6 System-1) system mediates virulence factor translocation in mycobacterial pathogens, including the human pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Although several genes have been associated with Esx-1-mediated transport and virulence, the contribution of individual Esx-1 genes to export is largely undefined. A unique aspect of Esx-1 export is that several substrates require each other for export/stability. We exploited substrate "codependency" to identify Esx-1 substrates. We simultaneously quantified changes in the levels of 13 Esx-1 proteins from both secreted and cytosolic protein fractions generated from 16 Esx-1-deficient Mycobacterium marinum strains in a single experiment using MRM/SRM targeted mass spectrometry. This expansion of measurable Esx-1 proteins allowed us to define statistical rules for assigning novel substrates using phenotypic profiles of known Esx-1 substrates. Using this approach, we identified three additional Esx-1 substrates encoded by the esx-1 region. Our studies begin to address how disruption of specific genes affects several proteins in the Esx-1 complex. Overall, our findings illuminate relationships between Esx-1 proteins and create a framework for the identification of secreted substrates applicable to other protein exporters and pathways.

  5. Label-free phenotypic profiling identified D-luciferin as a GPR35 agonist.

    PubMed

    Hu, Haibei; Deng, Huayun; Fang, Ye

    2012-01-01

    Fluorescent and luminescent probes are essential to both in vitro molecular assays and in vivo imaging techniques, and have been extensively used to measure biological function. However, little is known about the biological activity, thus potential interferences with the assay results, of these probe molecules. Here we show that D-luciferin, one of the most widely used bioluminescence substrates, is a partial agonist for G protein-coupled receptor-35 (GPR35). Label-free phenotypic profiling using dynamic mass redistribution (DMR) assays showed that D-luciferin led to a DMR signal in native HT-29 cells, whose characteristics are similar to those induced by known GPR35 agonists including zaprinast and pamoic acid. DMR assays further showed that D-luciferin is a partial agonist competitive to several known GPR35 agonists and antagonists. D-luciferin was found to cause the phosphorylation of ERK that was suppressed by known GPR35 antagonists, and also result in β-arrestin translocation signal but with low efficacy. These results not only suggest that D-luciferin is a partial agonist of GPR35, but also will evoke careful interpretation of biological data obtained using molecular and in vivo imaging assays when these probe molecules are used.

  6. Characterization of CADASIL among the Han Chinese in Taiwan: Distinct Genotypic and Phenotypic Profiles.

    PubMed

    Liao, Yi-Chu; Hsiao, Cheng-Tsung; Fuh, Jong-Ling; Chern, Chang-Ming; Lee, Wei-Ju; Guo, Yuh-Cherng; Wang, Shuu-Jiun; Lee, I-Hui; Liu, Yo-Tsen; Wang, Yen-Feng; Chang, Feng-Chi; Chang, Ming-Hung; Soong, Bing-Wen; Lee, Yi-Chung

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL) is originally featured with a strong clustering of mutations in NOTCH3 exons 3-6 and leukoencephalopathy with frequent anterior temporal pole involvement. The present study aims at characterizing the genotypic and phenotypic profiles of CADASIL in Taiwan. One hundred and twelve patients with CADASIL from 95 families of Chinese descents in Taiwan were identified by Sanger sequencing of exons 2 to 24 of NOTCH3. Twenty different mutations in NOTCH3 were uncovered, including 3 novel ones, and R544C in exon 11 was the most common mutation, accounting for 70.5% of the pedigrees. Haplotype analyses were conducted in 14 families harboring NOTCH3 R544C mutation and demonstrated a common haplotype linked to NOTCH3 R544C at loci D19S929 and D19S411. Comparing with CADASIL in most Caucasian populations, CADASIL in Taiwan has several distinct features, including less frequent anterior temporal involvement, older age at symptom onset, higher incidence of intracerebral hemorrhage, and rarer occurrence of migraine. Subgroup analyses revealed that the R544C mutation is associated with lower frequency of anterior temporal involvement, later age at onset and higher frequency of cognitive dysfunction. In conclusion, the present study broadens the spectrum of NOTCH3 mutations and provides additional insights for the clinical and molecular characteristics of CADASIL patients of Han-Chinese descents.

  7. Methotrexate modulates folate phenotype and inflammatory profile in EA.hy 926 cells.

    PubMed

    Summers, Carolyn M; Hammons, Andrea L; Arora, Jasbir; Zhang, Suhong; Jochems, Jeanine; Blair, Ian A; Whitehead, Alexander S

    2014-06-05

    EA.hy 926 cells grown under low folate conditions adopt a "pro-atherosclerotic" morphology and biochemical phenotype. Pharmacologically relevant doses of the antifolate drug methotrexate (MTX) were applied to EA.hy 926 cells maintained in normal (Hi) and low (Lo) folate culture media. Under both folate conditions, MTX caused inhibition of cell proliferation without significantly compromising metabolic activity. MTX treated Hi cells were depleted of folate derivatives, which were present in altered proportions relative to untreated cells. Transcript profiling using microarrays indicated that MTX treatment modified the transciptome in similar ways for both Hi and Lo cells. Many inflammation-related genes, most prominently those encoding C3 and IL-8, were up-regulated, whereas many genes involved in cell division were down-regulated. The results for C3 and IL-8 were confirmed by quantitative RT-PCR and ELISA. MTX appears to modify the inflammatory potential of EA.hy 926 cells such that its therapeutic properties may, at least under some conditions, be accompanied by the induction of a subset of gene products that promote and/or maintain comorbid pathologies.

  8. The Matchmaker Exchange API: automating patient matching through the exchange of structured phenotypic and genotypic profiles

    PubMed Central

    Buske, Orion J.; Schiettecatte, François; Hutton, Benjamin; Dumitriu, Sergiu; Misyura, Andriy; Huang, Lijia; Hartley, Taila; Girdea, Marta; Sobreira, Nara; Mungall, Chris; Brudno, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Despite the increasing prevalence of clinical sequencing, the difficulty of identifying additional affected families is a key obstacle to solving many rare diseases. There may only be a handful of similar patients worldwide, and their data may be stored in diverse clinical and research databases. Computational methods are necessary to enable finding similar patients across the growing number of patient repositories and registries. We present the Matchmaker Exchange Application Programming Interface (MME API), a protocol and data format for exchanging phenotype and genotype profiles to enable matchmaking among patient databases, facilitate the identification of additional cohorts, and increase the rate with which rare diseases can be researched and diagnosed. We designed the API to be straightforward and flexible in order to simplify its adoption on a large number of data types and workflows. We also provide a public test data set, curated from the literature, to facilitate implementation of the API and development of new matching algorithms. The initial version of the API has been successfully implemented by three members of the Matchmaker Exchange and was immediately able to reproduce previously-identified matches and generate several new leads currently being validated. The API is available at https://github.com/ga4gh/mme-apis. PMID:26255989

  9. Characterization of CADASIL among the Han Chinese in Taiwan: Distinct Genotypic and Phenotypic Profiles

    PubMed Central

    Fuh, Jong-Ling; Chern, Chang-Ming; Lee, Wei-Ju; Guo, Yuh-Cherng; Wang, Shuu-Jiun; Lee, I-Hui; Liu, Yo-Tsen; Wang, Yen-Feng; Chang, Feng-Chi; Chang, Ming-Hung; Soong, Bing-Wen; Lee, Yi-Chung

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL) is originally featured with a strong clustering of mutations in NOTCH3 exons 3–6 and leukoencephalopathy with frequent anterior temporal pole involvement. The present study aims at characterizing the genotypic and phenotypic profiles of CADASIL in Taiwan. One hundred and twelve patients with CADASIL from 95 families of Chinese descents in Taiwan were identified by Sanger sequencing of exons 2 to 24 of NOTCH3. Twenty different mutations in NOTCH3 were uncovered, including 3 novel ones, and R544C in exon 11 was the most common mutation, accounting for 70.5% of the pedigrees. Haplotype analyses were conducted in 14 families harboring NOTCH3 R544C mutation and demonstrated a common haplotype linked to NOTCH3 R544C at loci D19S929 and D19S411. Comparing with CADASIL in most Caucasian populations, CADASIL in Taiwan has several distinct features, including less frequent anterior temporal involvement, older age at symptom onset, higher incidence of intracerebral hemorrhage, and rarer occurrence of migraine. Subgroup analyses revealed that the R544C mutation is associated with lower frequency of anterior temporal involvement, later age at onset and higher frequency of cognitive dysfunction. In conclusion, the present study broadens the spectrum of NOTCH3 mutations and provides additional insights for the clinical and molecular characteristics of CADASIL patients of Han-Chinese descents. PMID:26308724

  10. Label-Free Phenotypic Profiling Identified D-Luciferin as a GPR35 Agonist

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Haibei; Deng, Huayun; Fang, Ye

    2012-01-01

    Fluorescent and luminescent probes are essential to both in vitro molecular assays and in vivo imaging techniques, and have been extensively used to measure biological function. However, little is known about the biological activity, thus potential interferences with the assay results, of these probe molecules. Here we show that D-luciferin, one of the most widely used bioluminescence substrates, is a partial agonist for G protein-coupled receptor-35 (GPR35). Label-free phenotypic profiling using dynamic mass redistribution (DMR) assays showed that D-luciferin led to a DMR signal in native HT-29 cells, whose characteristics are similar to those induced by known GPR35 agonists including zaprinast and pamoic acid. DMR assays further showed that D-luciferin is a partial agonist competitive to several known GPR35 agonists and antagonists. D-luciferin was found to cause the phosphorylation of ERK that was suppressed by known GPR35 antagonists, and also result in β-arrestin translocation signal but with low efficacy. These results not only suggest that D-luciferin is a partial agonist of GPR35, but also will evoke careful interpretation of biological data obtained using molecular and in vivo imaging assays when these probe molecules are used. PMID:22511974

  11. Toxin profile, antibiotic resistance, and phenotypic and molecular characterization of Bacillus cereus in Sunsik.

    PubMed

    Chon, Jung-Whan; Kim, Jong-Hyun; Lee, Sun-Jin; Hyeon, Ji-Yeon; Seo, Kun-Ho

    2012-10-01

    Sunsik, a ready-to-eat food in Korea, is comprised of various agricultural and marine products, and has been an important concern in Bacillus cereus food poisoning. The aim of this study was to investigate the toxin profiles, genotypic and phenotypic patterns as well as antibiotic resistance of B. cereus strains isolated from Sunsik. A subtyping method known as automated repetitive sequence-based PCR system (DiversiLab™) was used to assess the intraspecific biodiversity of these isolates. Thirty-five B. cereus strains were isolated from 100 commercial Sunsik samples, all of which harbored at least 1 enterotoxin gene. The detection rates of nheABC, hblCDA, cytK, and entFM enterotoxin gene among all isolates were 97%, 86%, 77%, and 100%, respectively. Most strains also produced corresponding enterotoxins such as HBL (83%) and NHE (94%). One strain (2.9%) carried the emetic toxin genes, including ces and EM1, and was positive for the HEp-2 cell emetic toxin assay. Most strains were positive for various biochemical tests such as salicin hydrolysis (86%), starch fermentation (89%), hemolysis (89%), motility test (100%) and lecithinase hydrolysis (89%). All isolates were susceptible to most antibiotics although they were highly resistant to β-lactam antibiotics. By using the automated rep-PCR system, all isolates were successfully differentiated, indicating the diversity of B. cereus strains present in Sunsik.

  12. Modeling tumor predisposing FH mutations in yeast: effects on fumarase activity, growth phenotype and gene expression profile.

    PubMed

    Kokko, Antti; Ylisaukko-Oja, Sanna S K; Kiuru, Maija; Takatalo, Maarit S; Salmikangas, Paula; Tuimala, Jarno; Arango, Diego; Karhu, Auli; Aaltonen, Lauri A; Jäntti, Jussi

    2006-03-15

    Heterozygous mutations in the fumarase (FH) gene cause the tumor predisposition syndrome hereditary leiomyomatosis and renal cell cancer (MIM 605839). While most families segregate a benign phenotype of multiple leiomyomas, others display a phenotype with early-onset renal cancer and leiomyosarcoma. Modifier genes may play a role in this, but an alternative explanation is simple genotype-phenotype association. FH mutations predisposing to cancer appear to be truncating or in fully conserved amino acids, suggesting that mutations severely affecting FH activity might predispose to malignancy. In the present study, we analyzed 2 conserved fumarase mutations in yeast. H153R has been described in 3 cancer predisposition families; whereas all 3 reported K187R families have displayed the benign phenotype. Examining H153R and K187R should clarify whether cancer-related FH mutations differ from their benign phenotype-associated counterparts. Yeast strains containing the 2 mutations, and knockout and wild type (WT) references, were created and the growth phenotypes studied on selected carbon sources to assess mitochondrial function. Additionally, Fum1 protein production and activity were measured, and the strains were subjected to transcriptional profiling. On nonfermentable lactate medium, the fumarase knockout strains did not grow, whereas the mutants showed no differences, as compared to WT yeast. Although both mutant strains produced fumarase, a considerable decrease in enzyme activity was seen in mutants with respect to WT. Transcription of the majority of Krebs cycle enzymes was downregulated in response to mutations in fumarase. In conclusion, both mutants displayed some, albeit greatly reduced, fumarase activity. This activity was sufficient to support normal growth on nonfermentable carbon source, unlike the deletion phenotype, demonstrating the significance of the residual activity. The findings support the hypothesis that modifier gene(s), rather than phenotype

  13. How can functional annotations be derived from profiles of phenotypic annotations?

    PubMed

    Serrano-Solano, Beatriz; Díaz Ramos, Antonio; Hériché, Jean-Karim; Ranea, Juan A G

    2017-02-10

    Loss-of-function phenotypes are widely used to infer gene function using the principle that similar phenotypes are indicative of similar functions. However, converting phenotypic to functional annotations requires careful interpretation of phenotypic descriptions and assessment of phenotypic similarity. Understanding how functions and phenotypes are linked will be crucial for the development of methods for the automatic conversion of gene loss-of-function phenotypes to gene functional annotations. We explored the relation between cellular phenotypes from RNAi-based screens in human cells and gene annotations of cellular functions as provided by the Gene Ontology (GO). Comparing different similarity measures, we found that information content-based measures of phenotypic similarity were the best at capturing gene functional similarity. However, phenotypic similarities did not map to the Gene Ontology organization of gene function but to functions defined as groups of GO terms with shared gene annotations. Our observations have implications for the use and interpretation of phenotypic similarities as a proxy for gene functions both in RNAi screen data analysis and curation and in the prediction of disease genes.

  14. Inherited erythromelalgia due to mutations in SCN9A: natural history, clinical phenotype and somatosensory profile.

    PubMed

    McDonnell, Aoibhinn; Schulman, Betsy; Ali, Zahid; Dib-Hajj, Sulayman D; Brock, Fiona; Cobain, Sonia; Mainka, Tina; Vollert, Jan; Tarabar, Sanela; Waxman, Stephen G

    2016-04-01

    Inherited erythromelalgia, the first human pain syndrome linked to voltage-gated sodium channels, is widely regarded as a genetic model of human pain. Because inherited erythromelalgia was linked to gain-of-function changes of sodium channel Na(v)1.7 only a decade ago, the literature has mainly consisted of reports of genetic and/or clinical characterization of individual patients. This paper describes the pattern of pain, natural history, somatosensory profile, psychosocial status and olfactory testing of 13 subjects with primary inherited erythromelalgia with mutations of SCN9A, the gene encoding Na(v)1.7. Subjects were clinically profiled using questionnaires, quantitative sensory testing and olfaction testing during the in-clinic phase of the study. In addition, a detailed pain phenotype for each subject was obtained over a 3-month period at home using diaries, enabling subjects to self-report pain attacks, potential triggers, duration and severity of pain. All subjects reported pain and heat in the extremities (usually feet and/or hands), with pain attacks triggered by heat or exercise and relieved mainly by non-pharmacological manoeuvres such as cooling. A large proportion of pain attacks (355/1099; 32%) did not involve a specific trigger. There was considerable variability in the number, duration and severity of pain attacks between subjects, even those carrying the same mutation within a family, and within individuals over the 12-13 week observation period. Most subjects (11/13) had pain between attacks. For these subjects, mean pain severity between pain attacks was usually lower than that during an attack. Olfaction testing using the Sniffin'T test did not demonstrate hyperosmia. One subject had evidence of orthostatic hypotension. Overall, there was a statistically significant correlation between total Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale scores (P= 0.005) and pain between attacks and for Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale Depression scores and pain

  15. Haptoglobin phenotype prevalence and cytokine profiles during Plasmodium falciparum infection in Dogon and Fulani ethnic groups living in Mali.

    PubMed

    Perdijk, Olaf; Arama, Charles; Giusti, Pablo; Maiga, Bakary; Troye-Blomberg, Marita; Dolo, Amagana; Doumbo, Ogobara; Persson, Jan-Olov; Boström, Stéphanie

    2013-11-25

    The Fulani are known to have a lower parasitaemia and less clinical episodes of malaria as compared to the Dogon sympatric ethnic group, living in Mali. Higher circulating malaria-specific antibody titers and increased pro-inflammatory cytokine levels have been shown in Fulani individuals. Several studies have tried to link haptoglobin (Hp) phenotypes with susceptibility to malaria, but without consensus. This study investigated the role of Hp phenotypes and cytokine levels in Dogon and Fulani during asymptomatic Plasmodium falciparum infection. Two different cohorts were combined in this study: a 2008 cohort with 77 children aged between two and ten years and a 2001 cohort, with 82 children and adults, aged between 11 and 68 years. Hp phenotypes in plasma were measured by Western Blot. Circulating levels of sCD163, IL-6, IL-10, IFN-γ and TNF were measured by ELISA. Multiple regression analysis was performed to associate Hp phenotypes with cytokine profiles. In addition, in vitro stimulation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) with Hp:Hb complexes was performed and cytokine release in corresponding supernatants were measured using cytometric bead array. The results revealed a higher Hp2-2 phenotype prevalence in the Fulani. The Hp2-2 phenotype was associated with a higher susceptibility to P. falciparum infection in Dogon, but not in Fulani. In concordance with previous studies, Fulani showed increased inflammatory mediators (IL-6, IFN-γ) and additionally also increased sCD163 levels compared to Dogon, irrespective of infection. Furthermore, infected individuals showed elevated sCD163 levels compared to uninfected individuals, in both Fulani and Dogon. Multiple regression analysis revealed that the Hp1-1 phenotype was associated with higher levels of TNF and IFN-γ, as compared to the Hp2-2 phenotype. In vitro stimulation of PBMCs with Hb:Hp1-1 complexes resulted in a pro-inflammatory cytokine profile, whilst stimulation with Hb:Hp2-2 complexes showed

  16. Haptoglobin phenotype prevalence and cytokine profiles during Plasmodium falciparum infection in Dogon and Fulani ethnic groups living in Mali

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The Fulani are known to have a lower parasitaemia and less clinical episodes of malaria as compared to the Dogon sympatric ethnic group, living in Mali. Higher circulating malaria-specific antibody titers and increased pro-inflammatory cytokine levels have been shown in Fulani individuals. Several studies have tried to link haptoglobin (Hp) phenotypes with susceptibility to malaria, but without consensus. This study investigated the role of Hp phenotypes and cytokine levels in Dogon and Fulani during asymptomatic Plasmodium falciparum infection. Methods Two different cohorts were combined in this study: a 2008 cohort with 77 children aged between two and ten years and a 2001 cohort, with 82 children and adults, aged between 11 and 68 years. Hp phenotypes in plasma were measured by Western Blot. Circulating levels of sCD163, IL-6, IL-10, IFN-γ and TNF were measured by ELISA. Multiple regression analysis was performed to associate Hp phenotypes with cytokine profiles. In addition, in vitro stimulation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) with Hp:Hb complexes was performed and cytokine release in corresponding supernatants were measured using cytometric bead array. Results The results revealed a higher Hp2-2 phenotype prevalence in the Fulani. The Hp2-2 phenotype was associated with a higher susceptibility to P. falciparum infection in Dogon, but not in Fulani. In concordance with previous studies, Fulani showed increased inflammatory mediators (IL-6, IFN-γ) and additionally also increased sCD163 levels compared to Dogon, irrespective of infection. Furthermore, infected individuals showed elevated sCD163 levels compared to uninfected individuals, in both Fulani and Dogon. Multiple regression analysis revealed that the Hp1-1 phenotype was associated with higher levels of TNF and IFN-γ, as compared to the Hp2-2 phenotype. In vitro stimulation of PBMCs with Hb:Hp1-1 complexes resulted in a pro-inflammatory cytokine profile, whilst stimulation with

  17. Phenotype profiling of primary testicular diffuse large B-cell lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Menter, Thomas; Ernst, Martina; Drachneris, Julius; Dirnhofer, Stephan; Barghorn, Andre; Went, Philip; Tzankov, Alexandar

    2014-06-01

    Primary testicular diffuse large B-cell lymphomas (tDLBCL) are rare neoplasms with few comprehensive studies conducted so far. We aimed to systematically characterize the phenotype of tDLBCL. Forty-five patients from three Swiss hospitals diagnosed with tDLBCL between 1972 and 2009 were reviewed and included in this study. A tissue microarray was assembled, and the protein expression profiles were assessed by immunohistochemistry and fluorescence in situ hybridization for the C-MYC locus. All tDLBCL expressed CD79a, followed by CD20 (98% of cases) and CD19 (93%). One case expressed the germ cell marker OCT4 and showed a rearrangement of C-MYC. Eighty-two per cent of cases showed active STAT signalling by expression of either pSTAT1 or pSTAT3 or both, but not pSTAT5. The p53 was overexpressed in 10% of cases, but p21 staining (∆p21/p53) did not suggest the presence of TP53 mutations. tDLBCL had a median MIB1 labelling index of 40%, and only 6% of cases appeared to have C-MYC rearrangements. Most cases were of the non-germinal centre type (77%), and showed as expected for this cell of origin B-cell lymphoma 2 (BCL2) rearrangements only in 4% and amplifications in 15% of cases, whereas BCL6 was rearranged in 48% of cases. CXCR4 was expressed in 52% of cases, and high CXCR4 expression was of prognostic significance for progression-free survival (p = 0.003). Because 84% of cases expressed nuclear p50, the canonical NF-κB signalling pathway seems to be active. Multimarker phenotyping is important for lineage determination of tDLBCL. Occasionally, tDLBCL can express germ cell markers like OCT4, and they have active STAT signalling mediated through pSTAT1 and pSTAT3 and active canonical NF-κB signalling. tDLBCL are of non-germinal centre/post-germinal centre cell origin and not hyperproliferative. TP53 mutations are unlikely, and C-MYC as well as BCL2 rearrangements are rare, whereas BCL6 is commonly rearranged. CXCR4 might prove to be the first protein

  18. Exploring the Lean Phenotype of Glutathione-Depleted Mice: Thiol, Amino Acid and Fatty Acid Profiles

    PubMed Central

    Elshorbagy, Amany K.; Jernerén, Fredrik; Scudamore, Cheryl L.; McMurray, Fiona; Cater, Heather; Hough, Tertius; Cox, Roger; Refsum, Helga

    2016-01-01

    Background Although reduced glutathione (rGSH) is decreased in obese mice and humans, block of GSH synthesis by buthionine sulfoximine (BSO) results in a lean, insulin-sensitive phenotype. Data is lacking about the effect of BSO on GSH precursors, cysteine and glutamate. Plasma total cysteine (tCys) is positively associated with stearoyl-coenzyme A desaturase (SCD) activity and adiposity in humans and animal models. Objective To explore the phenotype, amino acid and fatty acid profiles in BSO-treated mice. Design Male C3H/HeH mice aged 11 weeks were fed a high-fat diet with or without BSO in drinking water (30 mmol/L) for 8 weeks. Amino acid and fatty acid changes were assessed, as well as food consumption, energy expenditure, locomotor activity, body composition and liver vacuolation (steatosis). Results Despite higher food intake, BSO decreased particularly fat mass but also lean mass (both P<0.001), and prevented fatty liver vacuolation. Physical activity increased during the dark phase. BSO decreased plasma free fatty acids and enhanced insulin sensitivity. BSO did not alter liver rGSH, but decreased plasma total GSH (tGSH) and rGSH (by ~70%), and liver tGSH (by 82%). Glutamate accumulated in plasma and liver. Urine excretion of cysteine and its precursors was increased by BSO. tCys, rCys and cystine decreased in plasma (by 23–45%, P<0.001 for all), but were maintained in liver, at the expense of decreased taurine. Free and total plasma concentrations of the SCD products, oleic and palmitoleic acids were decreased (by 27–38%, P <0.001 for all). Conclusion Counterintuitively, block of GSH synthesis decreases circulating tCys, raising the question of whether the BSO-induced obesity-resistance is linked to cysteine depletion. Cysteine-supplementation of BSO-treated mice is warranted to dissect the effects of cysteine and GSH depletion on energy metabolism. PMID:27788147

  19. A Systematic Framework for Drug Repositioning from Integrated Omics and Drug Phenotype Profiles Using Pathway-Drug Network

    PubMed Central

    Jadamba, Erkhembayar

    2016-01-01

    Drug repositioning offers new clinical indications for old drugs. Recently, many computational approaches have been developed to repurpose marketed drugs in human diseases by mining various of biological data including disease expression profiles, pathways, drug phenotype expression profiles, and chemical structure data. However, despite encouraging results, a comprehensive and efficient computational drug repositioning approach is needed that includes the high-level integration of available resources. In this study, we propose a systematic framework employing experimental genomic knowledge and pharmaceutical knowledge to reposition drugs for a specific disease. Specifically, we first obtain experimental genomic knowledge from disease gene expression profiles and pharmaceutical knowledge from drug phenotype expression profiles and construct a pathway-drug network representing a priori known associations between drugs and pathways. To discover promising candidates for drug repositioning, we initialize node labels for the pathway-drug network using identified disease pathways and known drugs associated with the phenotype of interest and perform network propagation in a semisupervised manner. To evaluate our method, we conducted some experiments to reposition 1309 drugs based on four different breast cancer datasets and verified the results of promising candidate drugs for breast cancer by a two-step validation procedure. Consequently, our experimental results showed that the proposed framework is quite useful approach to discover promising candidates for breast cancer treatment. PMID:28127549

  20. A Systematic Framework for Drug Repositioning from Integrated Omics and Drug Phenotype Profiles Using Pathway-Drug Network.

    PubMed

    Jadamba, Erkhembayar; Shin, Miyoung

    2016-01-01

    Drug repositioning offers new clinical indications for old drugs. Recently, many computational approaches have been developed to repurpose marketed drugs in human diseases by mining various of biological data including disease expression profiles, pathways, drug phenotype expression profiles, and chemical structure data. However, despite encouraging results, a comprehensive and efficient computational drug repositioning approach is needed that includes the high-level integration of available resources. In this study, we propose a systematic framework employing experimental genomic knowledge and pharmaceutical knowledge to reposition drugs for a specific disease. Specifically, we first obtain experimental genomic knowledge from disease gene expression profiles and pharmaceutical knowledge from drug phenotype expression profiles and construct a pathway-drug network representing a priori known associations between drugs and pathways. To discover promising candidates for drug repositioning, we initialize node labels for the pathway-drug network using identified disease pathways and known drugs associated with the phenotype of interest and perform network propagation in a semisupervised manner. To evaluate our method, we conducted some experiments to reposition 1309 drugs based on four different breast cancer datasets and verified the results of promising candidate drugs for breast cancer by a two-step validation procedure. Consequently, our experimental results showed that the proposed framework is quite useful approach to discover promising candidates for breast cancer treatment.

  1. Peruvian Maca (Lepidium peruvianum): (II) Phytochemical Profiles of Four Prime Maca Phenotypes Grown in Two Geographically-Distant Locations

    PubMed Central

    O. Meissner, Henry; Mscisz, Alina; Piatkowska, Ewa; Baraniak, Marek; Mielcarek, Sebastian; Kedzia, Bogdan; Holderna-Kedzia, Elzbieta; Pisulewski, Pawel

    2016-01-01

    Peruvian Maca crops (Lepidium peruvianum), grown in two geographically-distant cultivation sites located at similar altitudes in the highlands of the Peruvian Andes (Junin at 4,200 m a.s.l. and Ancash 4,150 m a.s.l.), were used in the study. Four prime Maca phenotypes, distinguished by hypocotyl colours labelled as “Yellow”, “Purple”, “Red” and “Black” were selected to determine distribution in levels and corresponding ratios between individual Glucosinolates (Glucotropaeolin and m-methylglucotropaeolin) in an attempt to identify four Peruvian Maca phenotypes from analyses of powdered hypocotyls. There were highly significant differences (P<0.01) in hypocotyl weight/size of four Maca phenotypes harvested in two locations. The Junin crop represented a mostly “large” class (13.3 g) with “small” size hypocotyls (7.2 g), while a “small” class was predominant in Ancash (3.5 g). Powdered Yellow Maca showed significantly higher (P<0.001) microbial contamination than the other three, with Black Maca being the least infected. Only minor, statistically-confirmed differences were detected in nutritive characteristics between the four Maca phenotypes grown in Junin, however highly significant differences (P<0.01) in Glucosinolates existed between the Red and Black Maca grown in Junin and Ancash. Irrespective of the cultivation location, Red phenotypes showed the highest content of Total Glucosinolates, followed by Black and Purple, with the Yellow phenotype showing consistently lower levels. Highly significant P<0.01) differences determined in ratios of individual Glucosinolates between four Maca phenotypes grown in two locations, confirms an earlier assumption that sums of individual Glucosinolates, their ratios and profiles, may be feasible to explore in analytically identifying individual Maca phenotypes in pulverised marketed Maca products. PMID:27127450

  2. Peruvian Maca (Lepidium peruvianum): (II) Phytochemical Profiles of Four Prime Maca Phenotypes Grown in Two Geographically-Distant Locations.

    PubMed

    O Meissner, Henry; Mscisz, Alina; Piatkowska, Ewa; Baraniak, Marek; Mielcarek, Sebastian; Kedzia, Bogdan; Holderna-Kedzia, Elzbieta; Pisulewski, Pawel

    2016-03-01

    Peruvian Maca crops (Lepidium peruvianum), grown in two geographically-distant cultivation sites located at similar altitudes in the highlands of the Peruvian Andes (Junin at 4,200 m a.s.l. and Ancash 4,150 m a.s.l.), were used in the study. Four prime Maca phenotypes, distinguished by hypocotyl colours labelled as "Yellow", "Purple", "Red" and "Black" were selected to determine distribution in levels and corresponding ratios between individual Glucosinolates (Glucotropaeolin and m-methylglucotropaeolin) in an attempt to identify four Peruvian Maca phenotypes from analyses of powdered hypocotyls. There were highly significant differences (P<0.01) in hypocotyl weight/size of four Maca phenotypes harvested in two locations. The Junin crop represented a mostly "large" class (13.3 g) with "small" size hypocotyls (7.2 g), while a "small" class was predominant in Ancash (3.5 g). Powdered Yellow Maca showed significantly higher (P<0.001) microbial contamination than the other three, with Black Maca being the least infected. Only minor, statistically-confirmed differences were detected in nutritive characteristics between the four Maca phenotypes grown in Junin, however highly significant differences (P<0.01) in Glucosinolates existed between the Red and Black Maca grown in Junin and Ancash. Irrespective of the cultivation location, Red phenotypes showed the highest content of Total Glucosinolates, followed by Black and Purple, with the Yellow phenotype showing consistently lower levels. Highly significant P<0.01) differences determined in ratios of individual Glucosinolates between four Maca phenotypes grown in two locations, confirms an earlier assumption that sums of individual Glucosinolates, their ratios and profiles, may be feasible to explore in analytically identifying individual Maca phenotypes in pulverised marketed Maca products.

  3. MicroRNA expression profiling in children with different asthma phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Midyat, Levent; Gulen, Figen; Karaca, Emin; Ozkinay, Ferda; Tanac, Remziye; Demir, Esen; Cogulu, Ozgur; Aslan, Asli; Ozkinay, Cihangir; Onay, Huseyin; Atasever, Mesude

    2016-06-01

    An improved understanding of the molecular mechanisms in asthma through exploring the role of microRNAs may offer promise to reveal new approaches for primary prevention and identification of new therapeutic targets in childhood asthma. The primary goal of this study is to identify the microRNAs that play a role in the pathogenesis of asthma in pediatric age group. The secondary goal is to analyze these microRNAs according to the asthma phenotype, atopic status, and severity of the disease exacerbation. To our knowledge, this is the first research project in the literature which studies the relationship between microRNA expression and the severity of childhood asthma. One hundred children between 6 and 18 years old with a diagnosis of asthma, and 100 age-matched healthy children were enrolled in this study, and the analyses of microRNA expression profiles were performed in the Medical Genetics Laboratories of Ege University between November 2009 and June 2010. The expression of 10 microRNAs were shown to be higher in patients with more severe asthma, and the expression of these microRNAs were also found to be higher in patients who present with more severe acute asthma exacerbation symptoms (P < 0.001). Also, five microRNAs were found to be expressed more than twofold in allergic patients when compared to non-allergic participants (P <0.001). Asthma is one of the best examples of complex genetic diseases, and further studies, which will investigate the relationship between these microRNA's and their target genes, are needed to learn more about the specific roles of microRNAs in respiratory diseases. Pediatr Pulmonol. 2016;51:582-587. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Phenotypic profiling of keloid scars using FT-IR microspectroscopy reveals a unique spectral signature.

    PubMed

    Hollywood, Katherine A; Maatje, Marlies; Shadi, Iqbal T; Henderson, Alex; McGrouther, Duncan Angus; Goodacre, Royston; Bayat, Ardeshir

    2010-12-01

    Keloid disease (KD) is a quasineoplastic fibroproliferative tumour of unknown origin causing a progressive, recurrent dermal lesion. KD is not homogeneous in nature and shows phenotypic structural differences between its distinct peripheral margins compared to its centre. The keloid margin is often symptomatically more active with increased dermal cellularity, compared to a symptomatically dormant and hypocellular centre of lesion. The aim of this study was to delineate the morphological components of a keloid scar tissue by measuring the differences between various anatomical locations within the keloid tissue, such as the margin and the centre of the lesion compared to its surrounding normal skin using Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) microspectroscopy. FT-IR microspectroscopy is a technique that produces spectra with detailed molecular biochemical information inherent of the chemical structure. Chemical maps were constructed on extralesional cross sections taken from six keloid scars. H&E stained sections were used to confirm diagnosis of keloid and orientate the experimental cross sections prior to FT-IR. Spectral band assignment and principal components analysis were conducted. Distinct vibrational bands (100 spectra) were observed using FT-IR spectroscopy. Partial least squares discriminant analysis, with bootstrapping (10,000 analyses), identified whether a spectrum was from the keloid or normal tissue showing an average accuracy of 84.8%, precision of 80.4%, specificity of 76.2%, and sensitivity of 92.9%. FT-IR microspectroscopy showed significant differences in spectral profiles in keloid tissue in different anatomical locations within the cross section. We believe that this proof-of-concept study may help substantiate the use of FTIR spectroscopy in keloid diagnosis and prognosis.

  5. Senescence associated secretory phenotype profile from primary lung mice fibroblasts depends on the senescence induction stimuli.

    PubMed

    Maciel-Barón, L A; Morales-Rosales, S L; Aquino-Cruz, A A; Triana-Martínez, F; Galván-Arzate, S; Luna-López, A; González-Puertos, V Y; López-Díazguerrero, N E; Torres, C; Königsberg, Mina

    2016-02-01

    Cellular senescence is a multifactorial phenomenon of growth arrest and distorted function, which has been recognized as an important feature during tumor suppression mechanisms and a contributor to aging. Senescent cells have an altered secretion pattern called Senescence-Associated Secretory Phenotype (SASP) that comprises a complex mix of factors including cytokines, growth factors, chemokines, and matrix metalloproteinases. SASP has been related with local inflammation that leads to cellular transformation and neurodegenerative diseases. Various pathways for senescence induction have been proposed; the most studied is replicative senescence due to telomere attrition called replicative senescence (RS). However, senescence can be prematurely achieved when cells are exposed to diverse stimuli such as oxidative stress (stress-induced premature senescence, SIPS) or proteasome inhibition (proteasome inhibition-induced premature senescence, PIIPS). SASP has been characterized in RS and SIPS but not in PIIPS. Hence, our aim was to determine SASP components in primary lung fibroblasts obtained from CD-1 mice induced to senescence by PIIPS and compare them to RS and SIPS. Our results showed important variations in the 62 cytokines analyzed, while SIPS and RS showed an increase in the secretion of most cytokines, and in PIIPS only 13 were incremented. Variations in glutathione-redox balance were also observed in SIPS and RS, and not in PIIPS. All senescence types SASP displayed a pro-inflammatory profile and increased proliferation in L929 mice fibroblasts exposed to SASP. However, the behavior observed was not exactly the same, suggesting that the senescence induction pathway might encompass dissimilar responses in adjacent cells and promote different outcomes.

  6. Metabolomic and Gene Expression Profiles Exhibit Modular Genetic and Dietary Structure Linking Metabolic Syndrome Phenotypes in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Williams, Stephanie; Dew-Budd, Kelly; Davis, Kristen; Anderson, Julie; Bishop, Ruth; Freeman, Kenda; Davis, Dana; Bray, Katherine; Perkins, Lauren; Hubickey, Joana; Reed, Laura K

    2015-11-03

    Genetic and environmental factors influence complex disease in humans, such as metabolic syndrome, and Drosophila melanogaster serves as an excellent model in which to test these factors experimentally. Here we explore the modularity of endophenotypes with an in-depth reanalysis of a previous study by Reed et al. (2014), where we raised 20 wild-type genetic lines of Drosophila larvae on four diets and measured gross phenotypes of body weight, total sugar, and total triglycerides, as well as the endophenotypes of metabolomic and whole-genome expression profiles. We then perform new gene expression experiments to test for conservation of phenotype-expression correlations across different diets and populations. We find that transcript levels correlated with gross phenotypes were enriched for puparial adhesion, metamorphosis, and central energy metabolism functions. The specific metabolites L-DOPA and N-arachidonoyl dopamine make physiological links between the gross phenotypes across diets, whereas leucine and isoleucine thus exhibit genotype-by-diet interactions. Between diets, we find low conservation of the endophenotypes that correlate with the gross phenotypes. Through the follow-up expression study, we found that transcript-trait correlations are well conserved across populations raised on a familiar diet, but on a novel diet, the transcript-trait correlations are no longer conserved. Thus, physiological canalization of metabolic phenotypes breaks down in a novel environment exposing cryptic variation. We cannot predict the physiological basis of disease in a perturbing environment from profiles observed in the ancestral environment. This study demonstrates that variation for disease traits within a population is acquired through a multitude of physiological mechanisms, some of which transcend genetic and environmental influences, and others that are specific to an individual's genetic and environmental context. Copyright © 2015 Williams et al.

  7. Metabolomic and Gene Expression Profiles Exhibit Modular Genetic and Dietary Structure Linking Metabolic Syndrome Phenotypes in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Stephanie; Dew-Budd, Kelly; Davis, Kristen; Anderson, Julie; Bishop, Ruth; Freeman, Kenda; Davis, Dana; Bray, Katherine; Perkins, Lauren; Hubickey, Joana; Reed, Laura K.

    2015-01-01

    Genetic and environmental factors influence complex disease in humans, such as metabolic syndrome, and Drosophila melanogaster serves as an excellent model in which to test these factors experimentally. Here we explore the modularity of endophenotypes with an in-depth reanalysis of a previous study by Reed et al. (2014), where we raised 20 wild-type genetic lines of Drosophila larvae on four diets and measured gross phenotypes of body weight, total sugar, and total triglycerides, as well as the endophenotypes of metabolomic and whole-genome expression profiles. We then perform new gene expression experiments to test for conservation of phenotype-expression correlations across different diets and populations. We find that transcript levels correlated with gross phenotypes were enriched for puparial adhesion, metamorphosis, and central energy metabolism functions. The specific metabolites L-DOPA and N-arachidonoyl dopamine make physiological links between the gross phenotypes across diets, whereas leucine and isoleucine thus exhibit genotype-by-diet interactions. Between diets, we find low conservation of the endophenotypes that correlate with the gross phenotypes. Through the follow-up expression study, we found that transcript-trait correlations are well conserved across populations raised on a familiar diet, but on a novel diet, the transcript-trait correlations are no longer conserved. Thus, physiological canalization of metabolic phenotypes breaks down in a novel environment exposing cryptic variation. We cannot predict the physiological basis of disease in a perturbing environment from profiles observed in the ancestral environment. This study demonstrates that variation for disease traits within a population is acquired through a multitude of physiological mechanisms, some of which transcend genetic and environmental influences, and others that are specific to an individual’s genetic and environmental context. PMID:26530416

  8. Natural Variation in RPS2-Mediated Resistance among Arabidopsis Accessions: Correlation between Gene Expression Profiles and Phenotypic Responses[W

    PubMed Central

    Van Poecke, Remco M.P.; Sato, Masanao; Lenarz-Wyatt, Lisa; Weisberg, Sanford; Katagiri, Fumiaki

    2007-01-01

    Natural variation in gene expression (expression traits or e-traits) is increasingly used for the discovery of genes controlling traits. An important question is whether a particular e-trait is correlated with a phenotypic trait. Here, we examined the correlations between phenotypic traits and e-traits among 10 Arabidopsis thaliana accessions. We studied defense against Pseudomonas syringae pv tomato DC3000 (Pst), with a focus on resistance gene–mediated resistance triggered by the type III effector protein AvrRpt2. As phenotypic traits, we measured growth of the bacteria and extent of the hypersensitive response (HR) as measured by electrolyte leakage. Genetic variation among accessions affected growth of Pst both with (Pst avrRpt2) and without (Pst) the AvrRpt2 effector. Variation in HR was not correlated with variation in bacterial growth. We also collected gene expression profiles 6 h after mock and Pst avrRpt2 inoculation using a custom microarray. Clusters of genes whose expression levels are correlated with bacterial growth or electrolyte leakage were identified. Thus, we demonstrated that variation in gene expression profiles of Arabidopsis accessions collected at one time point under one experimental condition has the power to explain variation in phenotypic responses to pathogen attack. PMID:18083910

  9. Lipid mediator metabolic profiling demonstrates differences in eicosanoid patterns in two phenotypically distinct mast cell populations[S

    PubMed Central

    Lundström, Susanna L.; Saluja, Rohit; Adner, Mikael; Haeggström, Jesper Z.; Nilsson, Gunnar; Wheelock, Craig E.

    2013-01-01

    Mast cells are inflammatory cells that play key roles in health and disease. They are distributed in all tissues and appear in two main phenotypes, connective tissue and mucosal mast cells, with differing capacities to release inflammatory mediators. A metabolic profiling approach was used to obtain a more comprehensive understanding of the ability of mast cell phenotypes to produce eicosanoids and other lipid mediators. A total of 90 lipid mediators (oxylipins) were characterized using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS), representing the cyclooxygenase (COX), lipoxygenase (LO), and cytochrome P450 (CYP) metabolic pathways. In vitro-derived murine mucosal-like mast cells (MLMC) and connective tissue-like mast cells (CTLMC) exhibited distinct mRNA expression patterns of enzymes involved in oxylipin biosynthesis. Oxylipins produced by 5-LO and COX pathways were the predominant species in both phenotypes, with 5-LO products constituting 90 ± 2% of the CTLMCs compared with 58 ± 8% in the MLMCs. Multivariate analyses demonstrated that CTLMCs and MLMCs secrete differing oxylipin profiles at baseline and following calcium ionophore stimulation, evidencing specificity in both a time- and biosynthetic pathway-dependent manner. In addition to the COX-regulated prostaglandin PGD2 and 5-LO-regulated cysteinyl-leukotrienes (e.g., LTC4), several other mediators evidenced phenotype-specificity, which may have biological implications in mast cell-mediated regulation of inflammatory responses. PMID:23034214

  10. High-content analysis to leverage a robust phenotypic profiling approach to vascular modulation.

    PubMed

    Isherwood, Beverley J; Walls, Rebecca E; Roberts, Mark E; Houslay, Thomas M; Brave, Sandra R; Barry, Simon T; Carragher, Neil O

    2013-12-01

    Phenotypic screening seeks to identify substances that modulate phenotypes in a desired manner with the aim of progressing first-in-class agents. Successful campaigns require physiological relevance, robust screening, and an ability to deconvolute perturbed pathways. High-content analysis (HCA) is increasingly used in cell biology and offers one approach to prosecution of phenotypic screens, but challenges exist in exploitation where data generated are high volume and complex. We combine development of an organotypic model with novel HCA tools to map phenotypic responses to pharmacological perturbations. We describe implementation for angiogenesis, a process that has long been a focus for therapeutic intervention but has lacked robust models that recapitulate more completely mechanisms involved. The study used human primary endothelial cells in co-culture with stromal fibroblasts to model multiple aspects of angiogenic signaling: cell interactions, proliferation, migration, and differentiation. Multiple quantitative descriptors were derived from automated microscopy using custom-designed algorithms. Data were extracted using a bespoke informatics platform that integrates processing, statistics, and feature display into a streamlined workflow for building and interrogating fingerprints. Ninety compounds were characterized, defining mode of action by phenotype. Our approach for assessing phenotypic outcomes in complex assay models is robust and capable of supporting a range of phenotypic screens at scale.

  11. Profiling the extended phenotype of plant pathogens: Challenges in Bacterial Molecular Plant Pathology.

    PubMed

    Preston, Gail M

    2017-04-01

    One of the most fundamental questions in plant pathology is what determines whether a pathogen grows within a plant? This question is frequently studied in terms of the role of elicitors and pathogenicity factors in the triggering or overcoming of host defences. However, this focus fails to address the basic question of how the environment in host tissues acts to support or restrict pathogen growth. Efforts to understand this aspect of host-pathogen interactions are commonly confounded by several issues, including the complexity of the plant environment, the artificial nature of many experimental infection systems and the fact that the physiological properties of a pathogen growing in association with a plant can be very different from the properties of the pathogen in culture. It is also important to recognize that the phenotype and evolution of pathogen and host are inextricably linked through their interactions, such that the environment experienced by a pathogen within a host, and its phenotype within the host, is a product of both its interaction with its host and its evolutionary history, including its co-evolution with host plants. As the phenotypic properties of a pathogen within a host cannot be defined in isolation from the host, it may be appropriate to think of pathogens as having an 'extended phenotype' that is the product of their genotype, host interactions and population structure within the host environment. This article reflects on the challenge of defining and studying this extended phenotype, in relation to the questions posed below, and considers how knowledge of the phenotype of pathogens in the host environment could be used to improve disease control. What determines whether a pathogen grows within a plant? What aspects of pathogen biology should be considered in describing the extended phenotype of a pathogen within a host? How can we study the extended phenotype in ways that provide insights into the phenotypic properties of pathogens

  12. Multidimensional scaling

    PubMed Central

    Papesh, Megan H.; Goldinger, Stephen D.

    2012-01-01

    The concept of similarity, or a sense of "sameness" among things, is pivotal to theories in the cognitive sciences and beyond. Similarity, however, is a difficult thing to measure. Multidimensional scaling (MDS) is a tool by which researchers can obtain quantitative estimates of similarity among groups of items. More formally, MDS refers to a set of statistical techniques that are used to reduce the complexity of a data set, permitting visual appreciation of the underlying relational structures contained therein. The current paper provides an overview of MDS. We discuss key aspects of performing this technique, such as methods that can be used to collect similarity estimates, analytic techniques for treating proximity data, and various concerns regarding interpretation of the MDS output. MDS analyses of two novel data sets are also included, highlighting in step-by-step fashion how MDS is performed, and key issues that may arise during analysis. PMID:23359318

  13. Recycling Behavior: A Multidimensional Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meneses, Gonzalo Diaz; Palacio, Asuncion Beerli

    2005-01-01

    This work centers on the study of consumer recycling roles to examine the sociodemographic and psychographic profile of the distribution of recycling tasks and roles within the household. With this aim in mind, an empirical work was carried out, the results of which suggest that recycling behavior is multidimensional and comprises the undertaking…

  14. Recycling Behavior: A Multidimensional Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meneses, Gonzalo Diaz; Palacio, Asuncion Beerli

    2005-01-01

    This work centers on the study of consumer recycling roles to examine the sociodemographic and psychographic profile of the distribution of recycling tasks and roles within the household. With this aim in mind, an empirical work was carried out, the results of which suggest that recycling behavior is multidimensional and comprises the undertaking…

  15. Adverse selection? A multi-dimensional profile of people dispensed opioid analgesics for persistent non-cancer pain.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Kris D; Kemp, Anna; McLachlan, Andrew J; Blyth, Fiona

    2013-01-01

    This study investigates utilisation patterns for prescription opioid analgesics in the Australian community and how these are associated with a framework of individual-level factors related to healthcare use. Self-reported demographic and health information from participants in the 45 and Up Study cohort were linked to pharmaceutical claims from 2006-2009. Participants comprised 19,816 people with ≥1 opioid analgesic dispensing in the 12-months after recruitment to the cohort and 79,882 people not dispensed opioid analgesics. All participants were aged ≥45 years, were social security pharmaceutical beneficiaries, with no history of cancer. People dispensed opioid analgesics were classified as having acute (dispensing period <90 days), episodic (≥90 days and <3 'authority' prescriptions for increased quantity supply) or long-term treatment (≥90 days and ≥3 authority prescriptions). Of participants dispensed opioid analgesic 52% received acute treatment, 25% episodic treatment and 23% long-term treatment. People dispensed opioid analgesics long-term had an average of 14.9 opioid analgesic prescriptions/year from 2.0 doctors compared with 1.5 prescriptions from 1.1 doctors for people receiving acute treatment. People dispensed opioid analgesics reported more need-related factors such as poorer physical functioning and higher psychological distress. Long-term users were more likely to have access-related factors such as low-income and living outside major cities. After simultaneous adjustment, association with predisposing health factors and access diminished, but indicators of need such as osteoarthritis treatment, paracetamol use, and poor physical function were the strongest predictors for all opioid analgesic users. People dispensed opioid analgesics were in poorer health, reported higher levels of distress and poorer functioning than people not receiving opioid analgesics. Varying dispensing profiles were evident among people dispensed opioid analgesics

  16. Adverse Selection? A Multi-Dimensional Profile of People Dispensed Opioid Analgesics for Persistent Non-Cancer Pain

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, Kris D.; Kemp, Anna; McLachlan, Andrew J.; Blyth, Fiona

    2013-01-01

    Objectives This study investigates utilisation patterns for prescription opioid analgesics in the Australian community and how these are associated with a framework of individual-level factors related to healthcare use. Methods Self-reported demographic and health information from participants in the 45 and Up Study cohort were linked to pharmaceutical claims from 2006–2009. Participants comprised 19,816 people with ≥1 opioid analgesic dispensing in the 12-months after recruitment to the cohort and 79,882 people not dispensed opioid analgesics. All participants were aged ≥45 years, were social security pharmaceutical beneficiaries, with no history of cancer. People dispensed opioid analgesics were classified as having acute (dispensing period <90 days), episodic (≥90 days and <3 ‘authority’ prescriptions for increased quantity supply) or long-term treatment (≥90 days and ≥3 authority prescriptions). Results Of participants dispensed opioid analgesic 52% received acute treatment, 25% episodic treatment and 23% long-term treatment. People dispensed opioid analgesics long-term had an average of 14.9 opioid analgesic prescriptions/year from 2.0 doctors compared with 1.5 prescriptions from 1.1 doctors for people receiving acute treatment. People dispensed opioid analgesics reported more need-related factors such as poorer physical functioning and higher psychological distress. Long-term users were more likely to have access-related factors such as low-income and living outside major cities. After simultaneous adjustment, association with predisposing health factors and access diminished, but indicators of need such as osteoarthritis treatment, paracetamol use, and poor physical function were the strongest predictors for all opioid analgesic users. Conclusions People dispensed opioid analgesics were in poorer health, reported higher levels of distress and poorer functioning than people not receiving opioid analgesics. Varying dispensing profiles were

  17. Phenotypic profile of expanded NK cells in chronic lymphoproliferative disorders: a surrogate marker for NK-cell clonality.

    PubMed

    Bárcena, Paloma; Jara-Acevedo, María; Tabernero, María Dolores; López, Antonio; Sánchez, María Luz; García-Montero, Andrés C; Muñoz-García, Noemí; Vidriales, María Belén; Paiva, Artur; Lecrevisse, Quentin; Lima, Margarida; Langerak, Anton W; Böttcher, Sebastian; van Dongen, Jacques J M; Orfao, Alberto; Almeida, Julia

    2015-12-15

    Currently, the lack of a universal and specific marker of clonality hampers the diagnosis and classification of chronic expansions of natural killer (NK) cells. Here we investigated the utility of flow cytometric detection of aberrant/altered NK-cell phenotypes as a surrogate marker for clonality, in the diagnostic work-up of chronic lymphoproliferative disorders of NK cells (CLPD-NK). For this purpose, a large panel of markers was evaluated by multiparametric flow cytometry on peripheral blood (PB) CD56(low) NK cells from 60 patients, including 23 subjects with predefined clonal (n = 9) and polyclonal (n = 14) CD56(low) NK-cell expansions, and 37 with CLPD-NK of undetermined clonality; also, PB samples from 10 healthy adults were included. Clonality was established using the human androgen receptor (HUMARA) assay. Clonal NK cells were found to show decreased expression of CD7, CD11b and CD38, and higher CD2, CD94 and HLADR levels vs. normal NK cells, together with a restricted repertoire of expression of the CD158a, CD158b and CD161 killer-associated receptors. In turn, NK cells from both clonal and polyclonal CLPD-NK showed similar/overlapping phenotypic profiles, except for high and more homogeneous expression of CD94 and HLADR, which was restricted to clonal CLPD-NK. We conclude that the CD94(hi)/HLADR+ phenotypic profile proved to be a useful surrogate marker for NK-cell clonality.

  18. Phenotypic profile of expanded NK cells in chronic lymphoproliferative disorders: a surrogate marker for NK-cell clonality

    PubMed Central

    Bárcena, Paloma; Jara-Acevedo, María; Tabernero, María Dolores; López, Antonio; Sánchez, María Luz; García-Montero, Andrés C.; Muñoz-García, Noemí; Vidriales, María Belén; Paiva, Artur; Lecrevisse, Quentin; Lima, Margarida; Langerak, Anton W.; Böttcher, Sebastian; van Dongen, Jacques J.M.

    2015-01-01

    Currently, the lack of a universal and specific marker of clonality hampers the diagnosis and classification of chronic expansions of natural killer (NK) cells. Here we investigated the utility of flow cytometric detection of aberrant/altered NK-cell phenotypes as a surrogate marker for clonality, in the diagnostic work-up of chronic lymphoproliferative disorders of NK cells (CLPD-NK). For this purpose, a large panel of markers was evaluated by multiparametric flow cytometry on peripheral blood (PB) CD56low NK cells from 60 patients, including 23 subjects with predefined clonal (n = 9) and polyclonal (n = 14) CD56low NK-cell expansions, and 37 with CLPD-NK of undetermined clonality; also, PB samples from 10 healthy adults were included. Clonality was established using the human androgen receptor (HUMARA) assay. Clonal NK cells were found to show decreased expression of CD7, CD11b and CD38, and higher CD2, CD94 and HLADR levels vs. normal NK cells, together with a restricted repertoire of expression of the CD158a, CD158b and CD161 killer-associated receptors. In turn, NK cells from both clonal and polyclonal CLPD-NK showed similar/overlapping phenotypic profiles, except for high and more homogeneous expression of CD94 and HLADR, which was restricted to clonal CLPD-NK. We conclude that the CD94hi/HLADR+ phenotypic profile proved to be a useful surrogate marker for NK-cell clonality. PMID:26556869

  19. Multi-parametric profiling network based on gene expression and phenotype data: a novel approach to developmental neurotoxicity testing.

    PubMed

    Nagano, Reiko; Akanuma, Hiromi; Qin, Xian-Yang; Imanishi, Satoshi; Toyoshiba, Hiroyoshi; Yoshinaga, Jun; Ohsako, Seiichiroh; Sone, Hideko

    2012-01-01

    The establishment of more efficient approaches for developmental neurotoxicity testing (DNT) has been an emerging issue for children's environmental health. Here we describe a systematic approach for DNT using the neuronal differentiation of mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs) as a model of fetal programming. During embryoid body (EB) formation, mESCs were exposed to 12 chemicals for 24 h and then global gene expression profiling was performed using whole genome microarray analysis. Gene expression signatures for seven kinds of gene sets related to neuronal development and neuronal diseases were selected for further analysis. At the later stages of neuronal cell differentiation from EBs, neuronal phenotypic parameters were determined using a high-content image analyzer. Bayesian network analysis was then performed based on global gene expression and neuronal phenotypic data to generate comprehensive networks with a linkage between early events and later effects. Furthermore, the probability distribution values for the strength of the linkage between parameters in each network was calculated and then used in principal component analysis. The characterization of chemicals according to their neurotoxic potential reveals that the multi-parametric analysis based on phenotype and gene expression profiling during neuronal differentiation of mESCs can provide a useful tool to monitor fetal programming and to predict developmentally neurotoxic compounds.

  20. Latent profile analysis of healthy schizotypy within the extended psychosis phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Tabak, Naomi Tuchman; de Mamani, Amy Gina Weisman

    2014-01-01

    Converging evidence suggests that psychosis exists on a continuum, and that even mentally “healthy” individuals may experience subclinical psychotic experiences. However, little research has examined the subjective and psychological well-being of individuals in the putatively healthy end of the continuum. This study explored the latent profile structure of schizotypy in a non-clinical sample and compared subjective and psychological well-being across schizotypy profiles. Latent profile analysis was conducted on participants’ responses (N=420) to the Oxford-Liverpool Inventory of Feelings and Experiences. Six latent profiles emerged: Low Schizotypy, Average, High Schizotypy, High Unusual Experiences (UE), High Introvertive Anhedonia, and High Introvertive Anhedonia/Cognitive Disorganization. Individuals in the profile characterized by high UE without negative, disorganized or impulsive features tended to endorse similar levels of well-being as the Average and Low Schizotypy profiles. With some exceptions, all three profiles also demonstrated significantly greater subjective and psychological well-being when compared to negative/disorganized schizotypy profiles. The UE profile most closely aligns with previous conceptualizations of “healthy schizotypy.” Future research should investigate how individuals in this profile make sense of unusual or ambiguous experiences that may lead to distress in clinical populations. PMID:24001585

  1. Redefining phenotypes in eating disorders based on personality: a latent profile analysis.

    PubMed

    Krug, Isabel; Root, Tammy; Bulik, Cynthia; Granero, Roser; Penelo, Eva; Jiménez-Murcia, Susana; Fernández-Aranda, Fernando

    2011-08-15

    To conduct a latent profile analysis (LPA) in eating disorder (ED) patients using temperament and character (TCI-R) measures as indicators. 1312 ED patients including those with anorexia nervosa (AN), bulimia nervosa (BN) and EDNOS were assessed. The final LPA solution was validated using demographics, clinical variables, ED symptomatology (EDI-2) and impulsive behaviors. The best-fitting model consisted of a six-profile solution using the seven subscales of the TCI-R. These profiles were labeled: "self-focused", "inhibited", "average", "impulsive", "adaptive" and "maladaptive". Validation analyses indicated that the "inhibited" and "maladaptive" profiles generally presented with the highest values for ED symptomatology and impulsive behaviors. Whereas high levels of Harm Avoidance and low levels of Novelty Seeking and Persistence characterized the "inhibited" profile, the "maladaptive" profile presented with low levels of Reward Dependence, Self-Directedness and Cooperativeness. The most favorable results on the other hand were exhibited by the "adaptive" profile, characterized by high scores on Reward Dependence, Self-Directedness, Cooperativeness and low levels on Novelty Seeking. Finally, when our six-profile solution was compared with the DSM-IV ED diagnoses, significant differences among profiles and ED diagnoses were observed. Our study shows that ED patients can be meaningfully grouped according to temperament and character.

  2. Label-free cell phenotypic profiling decodes the composition and signaling of an endogenous ATP-sensitive potassium channel

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Haiyan; Wei, Ying; Deng, Huayun; Xiong, Qiaojie; Li, Min; Lahiri, Joydeep; Fang, Ye

    2014-01-01

    Current technologies for studying ion channels are fundamentally limited because of their inability to functionally link ion channel activity to cellular pathways. Herein, we report the use of label-free cell phenotypic profiling to decode the composition and signaling of an endogenous ATP-sensitive potassium ion channel (KATP) in HepG2C3A, a hepatocellular carcinoma cell line. Label-free cell phenotypic agonist profiling showed that pinacidil triggered characteristically similar dynamic mass redistribution (DMR) signals in A431, A549, HT29 and HepG2C3A, but not in HepG2 cells. Reverse transcriptase PCR, RNAi knockdown, and KATP blocker profiling showed that the pinacidil DMR is due to the activation of SUR2/Kir6.2 KATP channels in HepG2C3A cells. Kinase inhibition and RNAi knockdown showed that the pinacidil activated KATP channels trigger signaling through Rho kinase and Janus kinase-3, and cause actin remodeling. The results are the first demonstration of a label-free methodology to characterize the composition and signaling of an endogenous ATP-sensitive potassium ion channel. PMID:24816792

  3. The National Niemann-Pick Type C1 Disease Database: correlation of lipid profiles, mutations, and biochemical phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Garver, William S.; Jelinek, David; Meaney, F. John; Flynn, James; Pettit, Kathleen M.; Shepherd, Glen; Heidenreich, Randall A.; Vockley, Cate M. Walsh; Castro, Graciela; Francis, Gordon A.

    2010-01-01

    Niemann-Pick type C1 disease (NPC1) is an autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disorder characterized by neonatal jaundice, hepatosplenomegaly, and progressive neurodegeneration. The present study provides the lipid profiles, mutations, and corresponding associations with the biochemical phenotype obtained from NPC1 patients who participated in the National NPC1 Disease Database. Lipid profiles were obtained from 34 patients (39%) in the survey and demonstrated significantly reduced plasma LDL cholesterol (LDL-C) and increased plasma triglycerides in the majority of patients. Reduced plasma HDL cholesterol (HDL-C) was the most consistent lipoprotein abnormality found in male and female NPC1 patients across age groups and occurred independent of changes in plasma triglycerides. A subset of 19 patients for whom the biochemical severity of known NPC1 mutations could be correlated with their lipid profile showed a strong inverse correlation between plasma HDL-C and severity of the biochemical phenotype. Gene mutations were available for 52 patients (59%) in the survey, including 52 different mutations and five novel mutations (Y628C, P887L, I923V, A1151T, and 3741_3744delACTC). Together, these findings provide novel information regarding the plasma lipoprotein changes and mutations in NPC1 disease, and suggest plasma HDL-C represents a potential biomarker of NPC1 disease severity. PMID:19744920

  4. Multidimensional heritability analysis of neuroanatomical shape

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Tian; Reuter, Martin; Winkler, Anderson M.; Holmes, Avram J.; Lee, Phil H.; Tirrell, Lee S.; Roffman, Joshua L.; Buckner, Randy L.; Smoller, Jordan W.; Sabuncu, Mert R.

    2016-01-01

    In the dawning era of large-scale biomedical data, multidimensional phenotype vectors will play an increasing role in examining the genetic underpinnings of brain features, behaviour and disease. For example, shape measurements derived from brain MRI scans are multidimensional geometric descriptions of brain structure and provide an alternate class of phenotypes that remains largely unexplored in genetic studies. Here we extend the concept of heritability to multidimensional traits, and present the first comprehensive analysis of the heritability of neuroanatomical shape measurements across an ensemble of brain structures based on genome-wide SNP and MRI data from 1,320 unrelated, young and healthy individuals. We replicate our findings in an extended twin sample from the Human Connectome Project (HCP). Our results demonstrate that neuroanatomical shape can be significantly heritable, above and beyond volume, and can serve as a complementary phenotype to study the genetic determinants and clinical relevance of brain structure. PMID:27845344

  5. Phenotypic profiling of Raf inhibitors and mitochondrial toxicity in 3D tissue using biodynamic imaging.

    PubMed

    An, Ran; Merrill, Dan; Avramova, Larisa; Sturgis, Jennifer; Tsiper, Maria; Robinson, J Paul; Turek, John; Nolte, David D

    2014-04-01

    The existence of phenotypic differences in the drug responses of 3D tissue relative to 2D cell culture is a concern in high-content drug screening. Biodynamic imaging is an emerging technology that probes 3D tissue using short-coherence dynamic light scattering to measure the intracellular motions inside tissues in their natural microenvironments. The information content of biodynamic imaging is displayed through tissue dynamics spectroscopy (TDS) but has not previously been correlated against morphological image analysis of 2D cell culture. In this article, a set of mitochondria-affecting compounds (FCCP, valinomycin, nicardipine, ionomycin) and Raf kinase inhibitors (PLX4032, PLX4720, GDC, and sorafenib) are applied to multicellular tumor spheroids from two colon adenocarcinoma cell lines (HT-29 and DLD-1). These were screened by TDS and then compared against conventional image-based high-content analysis (HCA). The responses to the Raf inhibitors PLX4032 and PLX4720 are grouped separately by cell line, reflecting the Braf/Kras difference in these cell lines. There is a correlation between TDS and HCA phenotypic clustering for most cases, which demonstrates the ability of dynamic measurements to capture phenotypic responses to drugs. However, there are significant 2D versus 3D phenotypic differences exhibited by several of the drugs/cell lines.

  6. Phenotypic Profiling of Raf Inhibitors and Mitochondrial Toxicity in 3D Tissue Using Biodynamic Imaging

    PubMed Central

    An, Ran; Merrill, Dan; Avramova, Larisa; Sturgis, Jennifer; Tsiper, Maria; Robinson, J. Paul; Turek, John; Nolte, David D.

    2014-01-01

    The existence of phenotypic differences in the drug responses of 3D tissue relative to 2D cell culture is a concern in high-content drug screening. Biodynamic imaging is an emerging technology that probes 3D tissue using short-coherence dynamic light scattering to measure the intracellular motions inside tissues in their natural microenvironments. The information content of biodynamic imaging is displayed through tissue dynamics spectroscopy (TDS) but has not previously been correlated against morphological image analysis of 2D cell culture. In this article, a set of mitochondria-affecting compounds (FCCP, valinomycin, nicardipine, ionomycin) and Raf kinase inhibitors (PLX4032, PLX4720, GDC, and sorafenib) are applied to multicellular tumor spheroids from two colon adenocarcinoma cell lines (HT-29 and DLD-1). These were screened by TDS and then compared against conventional image-based high-content analysis (HCA). The responses to the Raf inhibitors PLX4032 and PLX4720 are grouped separately by cell line, reflecting the Braf/Kras difference in these cell lines. There is a correlation between TDS and HCA phenotypic clustering for most cases, which demonstrates the ability of dynamic measurements to capture phenotypic responses to drugs. However, there are significant 2D versus 3D phenotypic differences exhibited by several of the drugs/cell lines. PMID:24361645

  7. Adaptation of the Biolog Phenotype MicroArrayTM Technology to Profile the Obligate Anaerobe Geobacter metallireducens

    SciTech Connect

    Joyner, Dominique; Fortney, Julian; Chakraborty, Romy; Hazen, Terry

    2010-05-17

    The Biolog OmniLog? Phenotype MicroArray (PM) plate technology was successfully adapted to generate a select phenotypic profile of the strict anaerobe Geobacter metallireducens (G.m.). The profile generated for G.m. provides insight into the chemical sensitivity of the organism as well as some of its metabolic capabilities when grown with a basal medium containing acetate and Fe(III). The PM technology was developed for aerobic organisms. The reduction of a tetrazolium dye by the test organism represents metabolic activity on the array which is detected and measured by the OmniLog(R) system. We have previously adapted the technology for the anaerobic sulfate reducing bacterium Desulfovibrio vulgaris. In this work, we have taken the technology a step further by adapting it for the iron reducing obligate anaerobe Geobacter metallireducens. In an osmotic stress microarray it was determined that the organism has higher sensitivity to impermeable solutes 3-6percent KCl and 2-5percent NaNO3 that result in osmotic stress by osmosis to the cell than to permeable non-ionic solutes represented by 5-20percent ethylene glycol and 2-3percent urea. The osmotic stress microarray also includes an array of osmoprotectants and precursor molecules that were screened to identify substrates that would provide osmotic protection to NaCl stress. None of the substrates tested conferred resistance to elevated concentrations of salt. Verification studies in which G.m. was grown in defined medium amended with 100mM NaCl (MIC) and the common osmoprotectants betaine, glycine and proline supported the PM findings. Further verification was done by analysis of transcriptomic profiles of G.m. grown under 100mM NaCl stress that revealed up-regulation of genes related to degradation rather than accumulation of the above-mentioned osmoprotectants. The phenotypic profile, supported by additional analysis indicates that the accumulation of these osmoprotectants as a response to salt stress does not

  8. High-resolution phenotypic profiling of natural products-induced effects on the single-cell level

    PubMed Central

    Kremb, Stephan; Voolstra, Christian R.

    2017-01-01

    Natural products (NPs) are highly evolved molecules making them a valuable resource for new therapeutics. Here we demonstrate the usefulness of broad-spectrum phenotypic profiling of NP-induced perturbations on single cells with imaging-based High-Content Screening to inform on physiology, mechanisms-of-actions, and multi-level toxicity. Our technology platform aims at broad applicability using a comprehensive marker panel with standardized settings streamlined towards an easy implementation in laboratories dedicated to natural products research. PMID:28295057

  9. Genomic Profiles of Diversification and Genotype-Phenotype Association in Island Nematode Lineages.

    PubMed

    McGaughran, Angela; Rödelsperger, Christian; Grimm, Dominik G; Meyer, Jan M; Moreno, Eduardo; Morgan, Katy; Leaver, Mark; Serobyan, Vahan; Rakitsch, Barbara; Borgwardt, Karsten M; Sommer, Ralf J

    2016-09-01

    Understanding how new species form requires investigation of evolutionary forces that cause phenotypic and genotypic changes among populations. However, the mechanisms underlying speciation vary and little is known about whether genomes diversify in the same ways in parallel at the incipient scale. We address this using the nematode, Pristionchus pacificus, which resides at an interesting point on the speciation continuum (distinct evolutionary lineages without reproductive isolation), and inhabits heterogeneous environments subject to divergent environmental pressures. Using whole genome re-sequencing of 264 strains, we estimate FST to identify outlier regions of extraordinary differentiation (∼1.725 Mb of the 172.5 Mb genome). We find evidence for shared divergent genomic regions occurring at a higher frequency than expected by chance among populations of the same evolutionary lineage. We use allele frequency spectra to find that, among lineages, 53% of divergent regions are consistent with adaptive selection, whereas 24% and 23% of such regions suggest background selection and restricted gene flow, respectively. In contrast, among populations from the same lineage, similar proportions (34-48%) of divergent regions correspond to adaptive selection and restricted gene flow, whereas 13-22% suggest background selection. Because speciation often involves phenotypic and genomic divergence, we also evaluate phenotypic variation, focusing on pH tolerance, which we find is diverging in a manner corresponding to environmental differences among populations. Taking a genome-wide association approach, we functionally validate a significant genotype-phenotype association for this trait. Our results are consistent with P. pacificus undergoing heterogeneous genotypic and phenotypic diversification related to both evolutionary and environmental processes. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution

  10. Phenotype profiling of single gene deletion mutants of E. coli using Biolog technology.

    PubMed

    Tohsato, Yukako; Mori, Hirotada

    2008-01-01

    Phenotype MicroArray (PM) technology is high-throughput phenotyping system and is directly applicable to assay the effects of genetic changes in cells. In this study, we performed comprehensive PM analysis using single gene deletion mutants of central metabolic pathway and related genes. To elucidate the structure of central metabolic networks in Escherichia coli K-12, we focused 288 different PM conditions of carbon and nitrogen sources and performed bioinformatic analysis. For data processing, we employed noise reduction procedures. The distance between each of the mutants was defined by Manhattan distance and agglomerative Ward's hierarchical method was applied for clustering analysis. As a result, five clusters were revealed which represented to activate or repress cellular respiratory activities. Furthermore, the results might suggest that Glyceraldehyde-3P plays a key role as a molecular switch of central metabolic network.

  11. MTL genotypes, phenotypic switching, and susceptibility profiles of Candida parapsilosis species group compared to Lodderomyces elongisporus.

    PubMed

    Döğen, Aylin; Metin, Banu; Ilkit, Macit; de Hoog, G Sybren; Heitman, Joseph

    2017-01-01

    Reference isolates of Candida parapsilosis (n = 8), Candida metapsilosis (n = 6), Candida orthopsilosis (n = 7), and Lodderomyces elongisporus (n = 11) were analyzed to gain insight into their pathobiology and virulence mechanisms. Initial evaluation using BBL Chromagar Candida medium misidentified L. elongisporus isolates as C. albicans. Polymerase chain reaction analysis of isolate MTL idiomorphs revealed that all C. parapsilosis isolates were MTLa homozygous and no MTL α1, α2, a1, or a2 gene was detected in L. elongisporus isolates. For C. orthopsilosis, two isolates were MTLa homozygous and five were MTL-heterozygous. Similarly, one C. metapsilosis isolate was MTLα homozygous whereas five were MTL-heterozygous. Isolate phenotypic switching analysis revealed potential phenotypic switching in the MTLα homozygous C. metapsilosis isolate, resulting in concomitant elongated cell formation. Minimum inhibitory concentrations of fluconazole (FLC) and FK506, alone or in combination, were determined by checkerboard assay, with data analyzed using the fractional inhibitory concentration index model. Synergistic or additive effects of these compounds were commonly observed in C. parapsilosis and L. elongisporus isolates. No killer activity was observed in the studied isolates, as determined phenotypically. No significant difference in virulence was seen for the four species in a Galleria mellonella model (P > 0.05). In conclusion, our results demonstrated phenotypic switching of C. metapsilosis CBS 2315 and that FLC and FK506 represent a promising drug combination against C. parapsilosis and L. elongisporus. The findings of the present study contribute to our understanding of the biology, diagnosis, and new possible treatments of the C. parapsilosis species group and L. elongisporus.

  12. Phenotypic and genotypic profile of human tympanic membrane derived cultured cells.

    PubMed

    Redmond, Sharon L; Levin, Brett; Heel, Kathryn A; Atlas, Marcus D; Marano, Robert J

    2011-02-01

    The human tympanic membrane (hTM), known more commonly as the eardrum, is a thin, multi-layered membrane that is unique in the body as it is suspended in air. When perforated, the hTM's primary function of sound-pressure transmission is compromised. For the purposes of TM reconstruction, we investigated the phenotype and genotype of cultured primary cells derived from hTM tissue explants, compared to epithelial (HaCaT cells) and mesenchymal (human dermal fibroblasts (HDF)) reference cells. Epithelium-specific ets-1 (ESE-1), E-cadherin, keratinocyte growth factor-1 (KGF-1/FGF-7), keratinocyte growth factor-2 (KGF-2/FGF10), fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 (FGFR1), variants of fibroblast growth factor receptor 2 (FGFR2), fibroblast surface protein (FSP), and vimentin proteins were used to assess the phenotypes of all cultured cells. Wholemount and paraffin-embedded hTM tissues were stained with ESE-1 and E-cadherin proteins to establish normal epithelial-specific expression patterns within the epithelial layers. Immunofluorescent (IF) cell staining of hTM epithelial cells (hTMk) demonstrated co-expression of both epithelial- and mesenchymal-specific proteins. Flow cytometry (FCM) analysis further demonstrated co-expression of these epithelial and mesenchymal-specific proteins, indicating the subcultured hTMk cells possessed a transitional phenotype. Gene transcript analysis of hTMk cells by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) revealed a down regulation of ESE-1, E-cadherin, FGFR2, variant 1 and variant 2 (FGFR2v1 and FGFR2v2) between low and high passages, and up-regulation of KGF-1, KGF-2, and FGFR1. All results indicate a gradual shift in cell phenotype of hTMk-derived cells from epithelial to mesenchymal.

  13. Common Variable Immunodeficiency patients with a phenotypic profile of immunosenescence present with thrombocytopenia

    PubMed Central

    Stuchlý, Jan; Kanderová, Veronika; Vlková, Marcela; Heřmanová, Ivana; Slámová, Lucie; Pelák, Ondřej; Taraldsrud, Eli; Jílek, Dalibor; Králíčková, Pavlína; Fevang, Børre; Trková, Marie; Hrušák, Ondřej; Froňková, Eva; Šedivá, Anna; Litzman, Jiří; Kalina, Tomáš

    2017-01-01

    Common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) is a heterogeneous group of diseases. Our aim was to define sub-groups of CVID patients with similar phenotypes and clinical characteristics. Using eight-color flow cytometry, we analyzed both B- and T-cell phenotypes in a cohort of 88 CVID patients and 48 healthy donors. A hierarchical clustering of probability binning “bins” yielded a separate cluster of 22 CVID patients with an abnormal phenotype. We showed coordinated proportional changes in naïve CD4+ T-cells (decreased), intermediate CD27− CD28+ CD4+ T-cells (increased) and CD21low B-cells (increased) that were stable for over three years. Moreover, the lymphocytes’ immunophenotype in this patient cluster exhibited features of profound immunosenescence and chronic activation. Thrombocytopenia was only found in this cluster (36% of cases, manifested as Immune Thrombocytopenia (ITP) or Evans syndrome). Clinical complications more frequently found in these patients include lung fibrosis (in 59% of cases) and bronchiectasis (55%). The degree of severity of these symptoms corresponded to more deviation from normal levels with respect to CD21low B-cells, naïve CD4+ and CD27− CD28+ over three years. Moreover, th-cells. Next-generation sequencing did not reveal any common genetic background. We delineate a subgroup of CVID patients with activated and immunosenescent immunophenotype of lymphocytes and distinct set of clinical complications without common genetic background. PMID:28054583

  14. Comparison of phenotypic and genotypic profiles among caprine and ovine Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae strains.

    PubMed

    Maksimović, Z; De la Fe, C; Amores, J; Gómez-Martín, Á; Rifatbegović, M

    2017-02-18

    Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae (Movp) is considered to be one of the most important mycoplasmas causing respiratory disease in small ruminants. Most epidemiologic and characterisation studies have been conducted on strains collected from sheep. Information on the presence and characteristics of Movp in healthy and pneumonic goats is limited. Phenotypic or genotypic differences between sheep and goat isolates have never been studied. The objective of our study was to characterise and compare the similarities and differences between caprine and ovine Movp strains isolated from affected and asymptomatic animals in order to elucidate phenotypic and genotypic variability. Four different techniques were used on a set of 23 Movp isolates. These included SDS-PAGE, Western blotting, random amplified polymorphic DNA and the heat shock protein 70 gene sequence-based method. A high degree of phenotypic and genotypic heterogeneity among Movp strains was demonstrated in this study. Our results demonstrated differences between goat and sheep strains, revealing not only a link between strains and host ruminant species, but by geographical origin as well. However, the finding of immunodominant antigens of molecular masses 36, 38, 40 and 70 kDa (±3 kDa) in Movp isolates from sheep and goats foretells their potential use in the development of serological diagnostic tests and vaccines.

  15. Antibiotic resistance profiling and phenotyping of Aeromonas species isolated from aquatic sources.

    PubMed

    Odeyemi, Olumide A; Ahmad, Asmat

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate antibiotics resistance pattern and phenotyping of Aeromonas species isolated from different aquatic sources in Melaka, Malaysia. A total of 53 Aeromonas species were isolated from the following sources: sediment (n = 13), bivalve (n = 10), sea cucumber (n = 16) and sea water (n = 14) and resistance to 12 antibiotics - Tetracycline (30 μg), Kanamycin (30 μg), Oxytetracycline (30 μg), Ampicillin (10 μg), Streptomycin (10 μg), Gentamicin (10 μg), Sulphamethoxazole (25 μg), Nalixidic acid (30 μg), Trimethoprim (1.25 μg), Novobiocin (5 μg), Penicilin (10 μg) and Chloramphenicol (10 μg) was tested. The results obtained from this study reveal multi drug resistance pattern among the isolates. All the isolates were completely resistant to Ampicillin, Novobiocin, Sulphamethoxazole and Trimethoprim, respectively but susceptible to Tetracycline (100%), Kanamycin (5.7%), Gentamicin (5.7%) and Oxytetracycline (24.5%). Antibiotics phenotyping of the bacteria revealed 21 different phenotypes among the isolates.

  16. Gene Expression Profiling of B Cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia Reveals a Homogeneous Phenotype Related to Memory B Cells〉

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Ulf; Tu, Yuhai; Stolovitzky, Gustavo A.; Mattioli, Michela; Cattoretti, Giorgio; Husson, Hervé; Freedman, Arnold; Inghirami, Giorgio; Cro, Lilla; Baldini, Luca; Neri, Antonino; Califano, Andrea; Dalla-Favera, Riccardo

    2001-01-01

    B cell–derived chronic lymphocytic leukemia (B-CLL) represents a common malignancy whose cell derivation and pathogenesis are unknown. Recent studies have shown that >50% of CLLs display hypermutated immunoglobulin variable region (IgV) sequences and a more favorable prognosis, suggesting that they may represent a distinct subset of CLLs which have transited through germinal centers (GCs), the physiologic site of IgV hypermutation. To further investigate the phenotype of CLLs, their cellular derivation and their relationship to normal B cells, we have analyzed their gene expression profiles using oligonucleotide-based DNA chip microarrays representative of ∼12,000 genes. The results show that CLLs display a common and characteristic gene expression profile that is largely independent of their IgV genotype. Nevertheless, a restricted number of genes (<30) have been identified whose differential expression can distinguish IgV mutated versus unmutated cases and identify them in independent panels of cases. Comparison of CLL profiles with those of purified normal B cell subpopulations indicates that the common CLL profile is more related to memory B cells than to those derived from naive B cells, CD5+ B cells, and GC centroblasts and centrocytes. Finally, this analysis has identified a subset of genes specifically expressed by CLL cells of potential pathogenetic and clinical relevance. PMID:11733577

  17. Comparison of Gene Expression and Genome-Wide DNA Methylation Profiling between Phenotypically Normal Cloned Pigs and Conventionally Bred Controls

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shengting; Li, Jian; Lin, Lin; Nielsen, Anders Lade; Sørensen, Charlotte Brandt; Vajta, Gábor; Wang, Jun; Zhang, Xiuqing; Du, Yutao; Yang, Huanming; Bolund, Lars

    2011-01-01

    Animal breeding via Somatic Cell Nuclear Transfer (SCNT) has enormous potential in agriculture and biomedicine. However, concerns about whether SCNT animals are as healthy or epigenetically normal as conventionally bred ones are raised as the efficiency of cloning by SCNT is much lower than natural breeding or In-vitro fertilization (IVF). Thus, we have conducted a genome-wide gene expression and DNA methylation profiling between phenotypically normal cloned pigs and control pigs in two tissues (muscle and liver), using Affymetrix Porcine expression array as well as modified methylation-specific digital karyotyping (MMSDK) and Solexa sequencing technology. Typical tissue-specific differences with respect to both gene expression and DNA methylation were observed in muscle and liver from cloned as well as control pigs. Gene expression profiles were highly similar between cloned pigs and controls, though a small set of genes showed altered expression. Cloned pigs presented a more different pattern of DNA methylation in unique sequences in both tissues. Especially a small set of genomic sites had different DNA methylation status with a trend towards slightly increased methylation levels in cloned pigs. Molecular network analysis of the genes that contained such differential methylation loci revealed a significant network related to tissue development. In conclusion, our study showed that phenotypically normal cloned pigs were highly similar with normal breeding pigs in their gene expression, but moderate alteration in DNA methylation aspects still exists, especially in certain unique genomic regions. PMID:22022462

  18. Sensory ciliogenesis in Caenorhabditis elegans: assignment of IFT components into distinct modules based on transport and phenotypic profiles.

    PubMed

    Ou, Guangshuo; Koga, Makato; Blacque, Oliver E; Murayama, Takashi; Ohshima, Yasumi; Schafer, Jenny C; Li, Chunmei; Yoder, Bradley K; Leroux, Michel R; Scholey, Jonathan M

    2007-05-01

    Sensory cilium biogenesis within Caenorhabditis elegans neurons depends on the kinesin-2-dependent intraflagellar transport (IFT) of ciliary precursors associated with IFT particles to the axoneme tip. Here we analyzed the molecular organization of the IFT machinery by comparing the in vivo transport and phenotypic profiles of multiple proteins involved in IFT and ciliogenesis. Based on their motility in wild-type and bbs (Bardet-Biedl syndrome) mutants, IFT proteins were classified into groups with similar transport profiles that we refer to as "modules." We also analyzed the distribution and transport of fluorescent IFT particles in multiple known ciliary mutants and 49 new ciliary mutants. Most of the latter mutants were snip-SNP mapped and one, namely dyf-14(ks69), was cloned and found to encode a conserved protein essential for ciliogenesis. The products of these ciliogenesis genes could also be assigned to the aforementioned set of modules or to specific aspects of ciliogenesis, based on IFT particle dynamics and ciliary mutant phenotypes. Although binding assays would be required to confirm direct physical interactions, the results are consistent with the hypothesis that the C. elegans IFT machinery has a modular design, consisting of modules IFT-subcomplex A, IFT-subcomplex B, and a BBS protein complex, in addition to motor and cargo modules, with each module contributing to distinct functional aspects of IFT or ciliogenesis.

  19. Sensory Ciliogenesis in Caenorhabditis elegans: Assignment of IFT Components into Distinct Modules Based on Transport and Phenotypic Profiles

    PubMed Central

    Ou, Guangshuo; Koga, Makato; Blacque, Oliver E.; Murayama, Takashi; Ohshima, Yasumi; Schafer, Jenny C.; Li, Chunmei; Yoder, Bradley K.

    2007-01-01

    Sensory cilium biogenesis within Caenorhabditis elegans neurons depends on the kinesin-2–dependent intraflagellar transport (IFT) of ciliary precursors associated with IFT particles to the axoneme tip. Here we analyzed the molecular organization of the IFT machinery by comparing the in vivo transport and phenotypic profiles of multiple proteins involved in IFT and ciliogenesis. Based on their motility in wild-type and bbs (Bardet-Biedl syndrome) mutants, IFT proteins were classified into groups with similar transport profiles that we refer to as “modules.” We also analyzed the distribution and transport of fluorescent IFT particles in multiple known ciliary mutants and 49 new ciliary mutants. Most of the latter mutants were snip-SNP mapped and one, namely dyf-14(ks69), was cloned and found to encode a conserved protein essential for ciliogenesis. The products of these ciliogenesis genes could also be assigned to the aforementioned set of modules or to specific aspects of ciliogenesis, based on IFT particle dynamics and ciliary mutant phenotypes. Although binding assays would be required to confirm direct physical interactions, the results are consistent with the hypothesis that the C. elegans IFT machinery has a modular design, consisting of modules IFT-subcomplex A, IFT-subcomplex B, and a BBS protein complex, in addition to motor and cargo modules, with each module contributing to distinct functional aspects of IFT or ciliogenesis. PMID:17314406

  20. Metabolomic Profiles of Body Mass Index in the Framingham Heart Study Reveal Distinct Cardiometabolic Phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Ho, Jennifer E; Larson, Martin G; Ghorbani, Anahita; Cheng, Susan; Chen, Ming-Huei; Keyes, Michelle; Rhee, Eugene P; Clish, Clary B; Vasan, Ramachandran S; Gerszten, Robert E; Wang, Thomas J

    2016-01-01

    Although obesity and cardiometabolic traits commonly overlap, underlying pathways remain incompletely defined. The association of metabolite profiles across multiple cardiometabolic traits may lend insights into the interaction of obesity and metabolic health. We sought to investigate metabolic signatures of obesity and related cardiometabolic traits in the community using broad-based metabolomic profiling. We evaluated the association of 217 assayed metabolites and cross-sectional as well as longitudinal changes in cardiometabolic traits among 2,383 Framingham Offspring cohort participants. Body mass index (BMI) was associated with 69 of 217 metabolites (P<0.00023 for all), including aromatic (tyrosine, phenylalanine) and branched chain amino acids (valine, isoleucine, leucine). Additional metabolic pathways associated with BMI included the citric acid cycle (isocitrate, alpha-ketoglutarate, aconitate), the tryptophan pathway (kynurenine, kynurenic acid), and the urea cycle. There was considerable overlap in metabolite profiles between BMI, abdominal adiposity, insulin resistance [IR] and dyslipidemia, modest overlap of metabolite profiles between BMI and hyperglycemia, and little overlap with fasting glucose or elevated blood pressure. Metabolite profiles were associated with longitudinal changes in fasting glucose, but the involved metabolites (ornithine, 5-HIAA, aminoadipic acid, isoleucine, cotinine) were distinct from those associated with baseline glucose or other traits. Obesity status appeared to "modify" the association of 9 metabolites with IR. For example, bile acid metabolites were strongly associated with IR among obese but not lean individuals, whereas isoleucine had a stronger association with IR in lean individuals. In this large-scale metabolite profiling study, body mass index was associated with a broad range of metabolic alterations. Metabolite profiling highlighted considerable overlap with abdominal adiposity, insulin resistance, and

  1. Molecular and Biochemical Analysis of the Galactose Phenotype of Dairy Streptococcus thermophilus Strains Reveals Four Different Fermentation Profiles

    PubMed Central

    de Vin, Filip; Rådström, Peter; Herman, Lieve; De Vuyst, Luc

    2005-01-01

    Lactose-limited fermentations of 49 dairy Streptococcus thermophilus strains revealed four distinct fermentation profiles with respect to galactose consumption after lactose depletion. All the strains excreted galactose into the medium during growth on lactose, except for strain IMDOST40, which also displayed extremely high galactokinase (GalK) activity. Among this strain collection eight galactose-positive phenotypes sensu stricto were found and their fermentation characteristics and Leloir enzyme activities were measured. As the gal promoter seems to play an important role in the galactose phenotype, the galR-galK intergenic region was sequenced for all strains yielding eight different nucleotide sequences (NS1 to NS8). The gal promoter played an important role in the Gal-positive phenotype but did not determine it exclusively. Although GalT and GalE activities were detected for all Gal-positive strains, GalK activity could only be detected for two out of eight Gal-positive strains. This finding suggests that the other six S. thermophilus strains metabolize galactose via an alternative route. For each type of fermentation profile obtained, a representative strain was chosen and four complete Leloir gene clusters were sequenced. It turned out that Gal-positive strains contained more amino acid differences within their gal genes than Gal-negative strains. Finally, the biodiversity regarding lactose-galactose utilization among the different S. thermophilus strains used in this study was shown by RAPD-PCR. Five Gal-positive strains that contain nucleotide sequence NS2 in their galR-galK intergenic region were closely related. PMID:16000774

  2. Molecular and biochemical analysis of the galactose phenotype of dairy Streptococcus thermophilus strains reveals four different fermentation profiles.

    PubMed

    de Vin, Filip; Rådström, Peter; Herman, Lieve; De Vuyst, Luc

    2005-07-01

    Lactose-limited fermentations of 49 dairy Streptococcus thermophilus strains revealed four distinct fermentation profiles with respect to galactose consumption after lactose depletion. All the strains excreted galactose into the medium during growth on lactose, except for strain IMDOST40, which also displayed extremely high galactokinase (GalK) activity. Among this strain collection eight galactose-positive phenotypes sensu stricto were found and their fermentation characteristics and Leloir enzyme activities were measured. As the gal promoter seems to play an important role in the galactose phenotype, the galR-galK intergenic region was sequenced for all strains yielding eight different nucleotide sequences (NS1 to NS8). The gal promoter played an important role in the Gal-positive phenotype but did not determine it exclusively. Although GalT and GalE activities were detected for all Gal-positive strains, GalK activity could only be detected for two out of eight Gal-positive strains. This finding suggests that the other six S. thermophilus strains metabolize galactose via an alternative route. For each type of fermentation profile obtained, a representative strain was chosen and four complete Leloir gene clusters were sequenced. It turned out that Gal-positive strains contained more amino acid differences within their gal genes than Gal-negative strains. Finally, the biodiversity regarding lactose-galactose utilization among the different S. thermophilus strains used in this study was shown by RAPD-PCR. Five Gal-positive strains that contain nucleotide sequence NS2 in their galR-galK intergenic region were closely related.

  3. Phenotypic Space and Variation of Floral Scent Profiles during Late Flower Development in Antirrhinum

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Julia; Mühlemann, Joëlle K.; Ruiz-Hernández, Victoria; Dudareva, Natalia; Egea-Cortines, Marcos

    2016-01-01

    The genus Antirrhinum comprises about 28 species with a center of origin in the Iberian Peninsula. They show an important diversity of growing niches. We have performed a comprehensive analysis of scent profiles in eight wild species, Antirrhinum linkianum, A. tortuosum, A. cirrigherum, A. latifolium, A. meonanthum, A. braun-blanquetii, A. barrelieri, and A. graniticum. We used also two laboratory inbred lines A. majus, 165E and Sippe50. We identified 63 volatile organic compounds (VOCs) belonging to phenylpropanoids, benzenoids, mono- and sesquiterpenes, nitrogen-containing compounds, and aliphatic alcohols previously described in plants. Twenty-four VOCs were produced at levels higher than 2% of total VOC emission, while other VOCs were emitted in trace amounts. The absolute scent emission varied during flower maturation and species. The lowest emitting was A. meonanthum while A. tortuosum had the largest emissions. Species were clustered according to their scent profiles and the resulting dendrogram matched the current species phylogeny. However, two accessions, A. majus Sippe 50 and A. braun-blanquetii, showed development-specific changes in their VOC composition, suggesting a precise control and fine tuning of scent profiles. Cluster analysis of the different scent components failed to identify a specific synthesis pathway, indicating a key role of scent profiles as blends. There is considerable degree of chemodiversity in scent profiles in Antirrhinum. The specific developmental stage plays an important role in scent quantitative emissions. The relative robustness of the bouquets could be an adaptation to local pollinators. PMID:28066463

  4. Characteristic DNA methylation profiles in peripheral blood monocytes are associated with inflammatory phenotypes of asthma

    PubMed Central

    Gunawardhana, Lakshitha P; Gibson, Peter G; Simpson, Jodie L; Benton, Miles C; Lea, Rodney A; Baines, Katherine J

    2014-01-01

    Epigenetic changes including DNA methylation caused by environmental exposures may contribute to the heterogeneous inflammatory response in asthma. Here we investigate alterations in DNA methylation of purified blood monocytes that are associated with inflammatory phenotypes of asthma. Peripheral blood was collected from adults with eosinophilic asthma (EA; n = 21), paucigranulocytic asthma (PGA; n = 22), neutrophilic asthma (NA; n = 9), and healthy controls (n = 10). Blood monocytes were isolated using ficoll density gradient and immuno-magnetic cell separation. Bisulfite converted genomic DNA was hybridized to Illumina Infinium Methylation27 arrays and analyzed for differential methylation using R/Bioconductor packages; networks of gene interactions were identified using the STRING database. Compared with healthy controls, differentially methylated CpG loci were identified in EA (n = 413), PGA (n = 495), and NA (n = 89). We found that 223, 237, and 72 loci were significantly hypermethylated in EA, PGA, and NA, respectively. Nine genes were common to all three phenotypes and showed increased methylation in asthma. Three pathway networks were identified in EA, involved in purine metabolism, calcium signaling, and ECM-receptor interaction. In PGA, two networks were identified, involved in neuroactive ligand-receptor interaction and ubiquitin mediated proteolysis. In NA, one network was identified involving sFRP1 as a key node, over representing the Wnt signaling pathway. We have identified characteristic alterations in DNA methylation that are associated with inflammatory phenotypes of asthma and may contribute to the disease mechanisms. This network-based characterization may help in the development of epigenetic biomarkers and therapeutic targets for asthma. PMID:25147914

  5. Liver transcriptome profile in pigs with extreme phenotypes of intramuscular fatty acid composition

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background New advances in high-throughput technologies have allowed for the massive analysis of genomic data, providing new opportunities for the characterization of the transcriptome architectures. Recent studies in pigs have employed RNA-Seq to explore the transcriptome of different tissues in a reduced number of animals. The main goal of this study was the identification of differentially-expressed genes in the liver of Iberian x Landrace crossbred pigs showing extreme phenotypes for intramuscular fatty acid composition using RNA-Seq. Results The liver transcriptomes of two female groups (H and L) with phenotypically extreme intramuscular fatty acid composition were sequenced using RNA-Seq. A total of 146 and 180 unannotated protein-coding genes were identified in intergenic regions for the L and H groups, respectively. In addition, a range of 5.8 to 7.3% of repetitive elements was found, with SINEs being the most abundant elements. The expression in liver of 186 (L) and 270 (H) lncRNAs was also detected. The higher reproducibility of the RNA-Seq data was validated by RT-qPCR and porcine expression microarrays, therefore showing a strong correlation between RT-qPCR and RNA-Seq data (ranking from 0.79 to 0.96), as well as between microarrays and RNA-Seq (r=0.72). A differential expression analysis between H and L animals identified 55 genes differentially-expressed between groups. Pathways analysis revealed that these genes belong to biological functions, canonical pathways and three gene networks related to lipid and fatty acid metabolism. In concordance with the phenotypic classification, the pathways analysis inferred that linolenic and arachidonic acids metabolism was altered between extreme individuals. In addition, a connection was observed among the top three networks, hence suggesting that these genes are interconnected and play an important role in lipid and fatty acid metabolism. Conclusions In the present study RNA-Seq was used as a tool to explore

  6. Gene expression profiling reveals biological pathways responsible for phenotypic heterogeneity between UK and Sri Lankan oral squamous cell carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Saeed, Anas A; Sims, Andrew H; Prime, Stephen S; Paterson, Ian; Murray, Paul G; Lopes, Victor R

    2015-03-01

    It is well recognized that oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) cases from Asia that are associated with betel quid chewing are phenotypically distinct to those from Western countries that are predominantly caused by smoking/drinking, but the molecular basis of these differences are largely unknown. The aim of this study is to examine gene expression, related carcinogenic pathways and molecular processes that might be responsible for the phenotypic heterogeneity of OSCC between UK and Sri Lankan population groups. We have compared the gene expression profiles of OSCCs and normal oral mucosal tissues from both Sri Lankan and UK individuals using Affymetrix gene expression arrays. The generated data was interrogated using significance analysis of microarrays and Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA). The gene expression profiles of UK and Sri Lankan OSCC are similar in many respects to other oral cancer expression profiles reported in the literature and were mainly similar to each other. However, genes involved in tumor invasion, metastasis and recurrence were more obviously associated with UK tumors as opposed to those from Sri Lanka. The development of OSCCs in both UK and Sri Lankan populations appears largely mediated by similar biological pathways despite the differences related to race, ethnicity, lifestyle, and/or exposure to environmental carcinogens. However, IPA revealed a highly activated "Cell-mediated Immune Response" in Sri Lankan normal and tumor samples relative to UK cohorts. It seems likely, therefore, that any future attempts to personalize treatment for OSCC patients will need to be different in Western and Asian countries to reflect differences in gene expression and the immune status of the patients. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Development of a 3D Tissue Culture-Based High-Content Screening Platform That Uses Phenotypic Profiling to Discriminate Selective Inhibitors of Receptor Tyrosine Kinases.

    PubMed

    Booij, Tijmen H; Klop, Maarten J D; Yan, Kuan; Szántai-Kis, Csaba; Szokol, Balint; Orfi, Laszlo; van de Water, Bob; Keri, Gyorgy; Price, Leo S

    2016-10-01

    3D tissue cultures provide a more physiologically relevant context for the screening of compounds, compared with 2D cell cultures. Cells cultured in 3D hydrogels also show complex phenotypes, increasing the scope for phenotypic profiling. Here we describe a high-content screening platform that uses invasive human prostate cancer cells cultured in 3D in standard 384-well assay plates to study the activity of potential therapeutic small molecules and antibody biologics. Image analysis tools were developed to process 3D image data to measure over 800 phenotypic parameters. Multiparametric analysis was used to evaluate the effect of compounds on tissue morphology. We applied this screening platform to measure the activity and selectivity of inhibitors of the c-Met and epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinases in 3D cultured prostate carcinoma cells. c-Met and EGFR activity was quantified based on the phenotypic profiles induced by their respective ligands, hepatocyte growth factor and EGF. The screening method was applied to a novel collection of 80 putative inhibitors of c-Met and EGFR. Compounds were identified that induced phenotypic profiles indicative of selective inhibition of c-Met, EGFR, or bispecific inhibition of both targets. In conclusion, we describe a fully scalable high-content screening platform that uses phenotypic profiling to discriminate selective and nonselective (off-target) inhibitors in a physiologically relevant 3D cell culture setting.

  8. Development of a 3D Tissue Culture–Based High-Content Screening Platform That Uses Phenotypic Profiling to Discriminate Selective Inhibitors of Receptor Tyrosine Kinases

    PubMed Central

    Booij, Tijmen H.; Klop, Maarten J. D.; Yan, Kuan; Szántai-Kis, Csaba; Szokol, Balint; Orfi, Laszlo; van de Water, Bob; Keri, Gyorgy; Price, Leo S.

    2016-01-01

    3D tissue cultures provide a more physiologically relevant context for the screening of compounds, compared with 2D cell cultures. Cells cultured in 3D hydrogels also show complex phenotypes, increasing the scope for phenotypic profiling. Here we describe a high-content screening platform that uses invasive human prostate cancer cells cultured in 3D in standard 384-well assay plates to study the activity of potential therapeutic small molecules and antibody biologics. Image analysis tools were developed to process 3D image data to measure over 800 phenotypic parameters. Multiparametric analysis was used to evaluate the effect of compounds on tissue morphology. We applied this screening platform to measure the activity and selectivity of inhibitors of the c-Met and epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinases in 3D cultured prostate carcinoma cells. c-Met and EGFR activity was quantified based on the phenotypic profiles induced by their respective ligands, hepatocyte growth factor and EGF. The screening method was applied to a novel collection of 80 putative inhibitors of c-Met and EGFR. Compounds were identified that induced phenotypic profiles indicative of selective inhibition of c-Met, EGFR, or bispecific inhibition of both targets. In conclusion, we describe a fully scalable high-content screening platform that uses phenotypic profiling to discriminate selective and nonselective (off-target) inhibitors in a physiologically relevant 3D cell culture setting. PMID:27412535

  9. DNA methylation profiling reveals the presence of population-specific signatures correlating with phenotypic characteristics.

    PubMed

    Giri, Anil K; Bharadwaj, Soham; Banerjee, Priyanka; Chakraborty, Shraddha; Parekatt, Vaisak; Rajashekar, Donaka; Tomar, Abhishek; Ravindran, Aarthi; Basu, Analabha; Tandon, Nikhil; Bharadwaj, Dwaipayan

    2017-06-01

    Phenotypic characteristics are known to vary substantially among different ethnicities around the globe. These variations are mediated by number of stochastic events and cannot be attributed to genetic architecture alone. DNA methylation is a well-established mechanism that sculpts our epigenome influencing phenotypic variation including disease manifestation. Since DNA methylation is an important determinant for health issues of a population, it demands a thorough investigation of the natural differences in genome wide DNA methylation patterns across different ethnic groups. This study is based on comparative analyses of methylome from five different ethnicities with major focus on Indian subjects. The current study uses hierarchical clustering approaches, principal component analysis and locus specific differential methylation analysis on Illumina 450K methylation data to compare methylome of different ethnic subjects. Our data indicates that the variations in DNA methylation patterns of Indians are less among themselves compared to other global population. It empirically correlated with dietary, cultural and demographical divergences across different ethnic groups. Our work further suggests that Indians included in this study, despite their genetic similarity with the Caucasian population, are in close proximity with Japanese in terms of their methylation signatures.

  10. Phenotypic profiling of Scedosporium aurantiacum, an opportunistic pathogen colonizing human lungs.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Jashanpreet; Duan, Shu Yao; Vaas, Lea A I; Penesyan, Anahit; Meyer, Wieland; Paulsen, Ian T; Nevalainen, Helena

    2015-01-01

    Genotyping studies of Australian Scedosporium isolates have revealed the strong prevalence of a recently described species: Scedosporium aurantiacum. In addition to occurring in the environment, this fungus is also known to colonise the respiratory tracts of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. A high throughput Phenotype Microarray (PM) analysis using 94 assorted substrates (sugars, amino acids, hexose-acids and carboxylic acids) was carried out for four isolates exhibiting different levels of virulence, determined using a Galleria mellonella infection model. A significant difference was observed in the substrate utilisation patterns of strains displaying differential virulence. For example, certain sugars such as sucrose (saccharose) were utilised only by low virulence strains whereas some sugar derivatives such as D-turanose promoted respiration only in the more virulent strains. Strains with a higher level of virulence also displayed flexibility and metabolic adaptability at two different temperature conditions tested (28 and 37°C). Phenotype microarray data were integrated with the whole-genome sequence data of S. aurantiacum to reconstruct a pathway map for the metabolism of selected substrates to further elucidate differences between the strains.

  11. Culture supernatants of cervical cancer cells induce an M2 phenotypic profile in THP-1 macrophages.

    PubMed

    Pedraza-Brindis, Eliza Julia; Sánchez-Reyes, Karina; Hernández-Flores, Georgina; Bravo-Cuellar, Alejandro; Jave-Suárez, Luis Felipe; Aguilar-Lemarroy, Adriana; Gómez-Lomelí, Paulina; López-López, Brenda Anahí; Ortiz-Lazareno, Pablo Cesar

    2016-12-01

    Patients with cervical cancer (CxCa) typically present an infiltrate of tumor-associated macrophages, which is associated with a poor prognosis. We found that CxCa cell lines (HeLa, SiHa, and C-33A) secreted factors involved in regulating tumor growth including IL-6, IL-4, PDGFAA, HGF, VEGF, ANG-2, and TGF-β3. We assessed the effects of culture supernatants from these cell lines on macrophages derived from the THP-1 cell line. Macrophages treated with culture supernatants from CxCa cells developed an M2-like phenotype with expression of CD163, low nitric oxide release, and high secretion of IL-6, PDGFAA, HGF, ANG-2, and VEGF. The macrophages continued to produce PDGFAA, PDGFBB, and VEGF 48h after the CxCa cell culture supernatants were removed. The induction of M2 macrophages in vivo favors tumor growth, angiogenesis, tissue remodeling, and metastasis. These results demonstrated that factors secreted by CxCa cells induced a stable M2 phenotype in THP-1 macrophages. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Fibroblasts from phenotypically normal palmar fascia exhibit molecular profiles highly similar to fibroblasts from active disease in Dupuytren's Contracture

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Dupuytren's contracture (DC) is a fibroproliferative disorder characterized by the progressive development of a scar-like collagen-rich cord that affects the palmar fascia of the hand and leads to digital flexion contractures. DC is most commonly treated by surgical resection of the diseased tissue, but has a high reported recurrence rate ranging from 27% to 80%. We sought to determine if the transcriptomic profiles of fibroblasts derived from DC-affected palmar fascia, adjacent phenotypically normal palmar fascia, and non-DC palmar fascial tissues might provide mechanistic clues to understanding the puzzle of disease predisposition and recurrence in DC. Methods To achieve this, total RNA was obtained from fibroblasts derived from primary DC-affected palmar fascia, patient-matched unaffected palmar fascia, and palmar fascia from non-DC patients undergoing carpal tunnel release (6 patients in each group). These cells were grown on a type-1 collagen substrate (to better mimic their in vivo environments). Microarray analyses were subsequently performed using Illumina BeadChip arrays to compare the transcriptomic profiles of these three cell populations. Data were analyzed using Significance Analysis of Microarrays (SAM v3.02), hierarchical clustering, concordance mapping and Venn diagram. Results We found that the transcriptomic profiles of DC-disease fibroblasts and fibroblasts from unaffected fascia of DC patients exhibited a much greater overlap than fibroblasts derived from the palmar fascia of patients undergoing carpal tunnel release. Quantitative real time RT-PCR confirmed the differential expression of select genes validating the microarray data analyses. These data are consistent with the hypothesis that predisposition and recurrence in DC may stem, at least in part, from intrinsic similarities in the basal gene expression of diseased and phenotypically unaffected palmar fascia fibroblasts. These data also demonstrate that a collagen

  13. Short communication: Cytokine profiles from blood mononuclear cells of dairy cows classified with divergent immune response phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Martin, C E; Paibomesai, M A; Emam, S M; Gallienne, J; Hine, B C; Thompson-Crispi, K A; Mallard, B A

    2016-03-01

    Genetic selection for enhanced immune response has been shown to decrease disease occurrence in dairy cattle. Cows can be classified as high (H), average, or low responders based on antibody-mediated immune response (AMIR), predominated by type-2 cytokine production, and cell-mediated immune response (CMIR) through estimated breeding values for these traits. The purpose of this study was to identify in vitro tests that correlate with in vivo immune response phenotyping in dairy cattle. Blood mononuclear cells (BMC) isolated from cows classified as H-AMIR and H-CMIR through estimated breeding values for immune response traits were stimulated with concanavalin A (ConA; Sigma Aldrich, St. Louis, MO) and gene expression, cytokine production, and cell proliferation was determined at multiple time points. A repeated measures model, which included the effects of immune response group, parity, and stage of lactation, was used to compare differences between immune response phenotype groups. The H-AMIR cows produced more IL-4 protein than H-CMIR cows at 48 h; however, no difference in gene expression of type-2 transcription factor GATA3 or IL4 was noted. The BMC from H-CMIR cows had increased production of IFN-γ protein at 48, 72, and 96 h compared with H-AMIR animals. Further, H-CMIR cows had increased expression of the IFNG gene at 16, 24, and 48 h post-treatment with ConA, although expression of the type-1 transcription factor gene TBX21 did not differ between immune response groups. Although proliferation of BMC increased from 24 to 72 h after ConA stimulation, no differences were found between the immune response groups. Overall, stimulation of H-AMIR and H-CMIR bovine BMC with ConA resulted in distinct cytokine production profiles according to genetically defined groups. These distinct cytokine profiles could be used to define disease resistance phenotypes in dairy cows according to stimulation in vitro; however, other immune response phenotypes should be assessed.

  14. Microbial forensics: predicting phenotypic characteristics and environmental conditions from large-scale gene expression profiles.

    PubMed

    Kim, Minseung; Zorraquino, Violeta; Tagkopoulos, Ilias

    2015-03-01

    A tantalizing question in cellular physiology is whether the cellular state and environmental conditions can be inferred by the expression signature of an organism. To investigate this relationship, we created an extensive normalized gene expression compendium for the bacterium Escherichia coli that was further enriched with meta-information through an iterative learning procedure. We then constructed an ensemble method to predict environmental and cellular state, including strain, growth phase, medium, oxygen level, antibiotic and carbon source presence. Results show that gene expression is an excellent predictor of environmental structure, with multi-class ensemble models achieving balanced accuracy between 70.0% (±3.5%) to 98.3% (±2.3%) for the various characteristics. Interestingly, this performance can be significantly boosted when environmental and strain characteristics are simultaneously considered, as a composite classifier that captures the inter-dependencies of three characteristics (medium, phase and strain) achieved 10.6% (±1.0%) higher performance than any individual models. Contrary to expectations, only 59% of the top informative genes were also identified as differentially expressed under the respective conditions. Functional analysis of the respective genetic signatures implicates a wide spectrum of Gene Ontology terms and KEGG pathways with condition-specific information content, including iron transport, transferases, and enterobactin synthesis. Further experimental phenotypic-to-genotypic mapping that we conducted for knock-out mutants argues for the information content of top-ranked genes. This work demonstrates the degree at which genome-scale transcriptional information can be predictive of latent, heterogeneous and seemingly disparate phenotypic and environmental characteristics, with far-reaching applications.

  15. Expression Profiling of Cardiac Genes in Human Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy: Insight Into the Pathogenesis of Phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Do-Sun; Roberts, Robert; Marian, Ali J.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES The goal of this study was to identify genes upregulated in the heart in human patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). BACKGROUND Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is a genetic disease caused by mutations in contractile sarcomeric proteins. The molecular basis of diverse clinical and pathologic phenotypes in HCM remains unknown. METHODS We performed polymerase chain reaction-select complementary DNA subtraction between normal hearts and hearts with HCM and screened subtracted libraries by Southern blotting. We sequenced the differentially expressed clones and performed Northern blotting to detect increased expression levels. RESULTS We screened 288 independent clones, and 76 clones had less than twofold increase in the signal intensity and were considered upregulated. Sequence analysis identified 36 genes including those encoding the markers of pressure overload-induced (“secondary”) cardiac hypertrophy, cytoskeletal proteins, protein synthesis, redox system, ion channels and those with unknown function. Northern blotting confirmed increased expression of skeletal muscle alpha-actin (ACTA1), myosin light chain 2a (MLC2a), GTP-binding protein Gs-alpha subunit (GNAS1), NADH ubiquinone oxidoreductase (NDUFB10), voltage-dependent anion channel 1 (VDAC1), four-and-a-half LIM domain protein 1 (FHL1) (also known as SLIM1), sarcosin (SARCOSIN) and heat shock 70kD protein 8 (HSPA8) by less than twofold. Expression levels of ACTA1, MLC2a and GNAS1 were increased in six additional and FHL1 in four additional hearts with HCM. CONCLUSIONS A diverse array of genes is upregulated in the heart in human patients with HCM, which could account for the diversity of clinical and pathologic phenotypes. Markers of secondary hypertrophy are also upregulated, suggesting commonality of pathways involved in HCM and the acquired forms of cardiac hypertrophy. Elucidation of the role of differentially expressed genes in HCM could provide for new therapeutic targets. PMID

  16. Gene Expression Profiling of H9c2 Myoblast Differentiation towards a Cardiac-Like Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Branco, Ana F.; Pereira, Susana P.; Gonzalez, Susana; Gusev, Oleg; Rizvanov, Albert A.; Oliveira, Paulo J.

    2015-01-01

    H9c2 myoblasts are a cell model used as an alternative for cardiomyocytes. H9c2 cells have the ability to differentiate towards a cardiac phenotype when the media serum is reduced in the presence of all-trans-retinoic acid (RA), creating multinucleated cells with low proliferative capacity. In the present study, we performed for the first time a transcriptional analysis of the H9c2 cell line in two differentiation states, i.e. embryonic cells and differentiated cardiac-like cells. The results show that RA-induced H9c2 differentiation increased the expression of genes encoding for cardiac sarcomeric proteins such as troponin T, or calcium transporters and associated machinery, including SERCA2, ryanodine receptor and phospholamban as well as genes associated with mitochondrial energy production including respiratory chain complexes subunits, mitochondrial creatine kinase, carnitine palmitoyltransferase I and uncoupling proteins. Undifferentiated myoblasts showed increased gene expression of pro-survival proteins such as Bcl-2 as well as cell cycle-regulating proteins. The results indicate that the differentiation of H9c2 cells lead to an increase of transcripts and protein levels involved in calcium handling, glycolytic and mitochondrial metabolism, confirming that H9c2 cell differentiation induced by RA towards a more cardiac-like phenotype involves remodeled mitochondrial function. PI3K, PDK1 and p-CREB also appear to be involved on H9c2 differentiation. Furthermore, complex analysis of differently expressed transcripts revealed significant up-regulation of gene expression related to cardiac muscle contraction, dilated cardiomyopathy and other pathways specific for the cardiac tissue. Metabolic and gene expression remodeling impacts cell responses to different stimuli and determine how these cells are used for biochemical assays. PMID:26121149

  17. Stereomicroscopic 3D-pattern profiling of murine and human intestinal inflammation reveals unique structural phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez-Palacios, Alex; Kodani, Tomohiro; Kaydo, Lindsey; Pietropaoli, Davide; Corridoni, Daniele; Howell, Scott; Katz, Jeffry; Xin, Wei; Pizarro, Theresa T.; Cominelli, Fabio

    2015-01-01

    Histology is fundamental to assess two-dimensional intestinal inflammation; however, inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs) are often indistinguishable microscopically on the basis of mucosal biopsies. Here, we use stereomicroscopy (SM) to rapidly profile the entire intestinal topography and assess inflammation. We examine the mucosal surface of >700 mice (encompassing >16 strains and various IBD-models), create a profiling catalogue of 3D-stereomicroscopic abnormalities and demonstrate that mice with comparable histological scores display unique sub-clusters of 3D-structure-patterns of IBD pathology, which we call 3D-stereoenterotypes, and which are otherwise indiscernible histologically. We show that two ileal IBD-stereoenterotypes (‘cobblestones' versus ‘villous mini-aggregation') cluster separately within two distinct mouse lines of spontaneous ileitis, suggesting that host genetics drive unique and divergent inflammatory 3D-structural patterns in the gut. In humans, stereomicroscopy reveals ‘liquefaction' lesions and hierarchical fistulous complexes, enriched with clostridia/segmented filamentous bacteria, running under healthy mucosa in Crohn's disease. We suggest that stereomicroscopic (3D-SMAPgut) profiling can be easily implemented and enable the comprehensive study of inflammatory 3D structures, genetics and flora in IBD. PMID:26154811

  18. Shift in polyphenol profile and sublethal phenotype caused by silencing of anthocyanidin synthase in apple (Malus sp.).

    PubMed

    Szankowski, Iris; Flachowsky, Henryk; Li, Houhua; Halbwirth, Heidrun; Treutter, Dieter; Regos, Ionela; Hanke, Magda-Viola; Stich, Karl; Fischer, Thilo C

    2009-02-01

    We have investigated the consequences of blocking anthocyanin biosynthesis by silencing a key enzyme, anthocyanidin synthase, in transgenic plants of a red-leaved apple cultivar. This is complementary to a previous study of induction of anthocyanin biosynthesis by overexpressing a heterologous transcription factor. Analysis of these opposite phenotypes allows one to study anthocyanin functions in apple and to test the influence of the genetic manipulation on other, related metabolites. As expected, anthocyanin biosynthesis was almost completely blocked and this was accompanied by a shift in the profile of flavonoids and related polyphenols. Most interestingly, a rise in epicatechin was found. A severe reduction of viability by necrotic leaf lesions was also observed, suggesting an essential function of anthocyanins in apple.

  19. Phenotypic and allelic profile of ABO and Rhésus D blood group system among blood donor in Antananarivo.

    PubMed

    Randriamanantany, Z A; Rajaonatahina, D H; Razafimanantsoa, F E; Rasamindrakotroka, M T; Andriamahenina, R; Rasoarilalamanarivo, F B; Hanitriniala, S P; Herisoa, F R; Rasamindrakotroka, A; Rakoto Alson, O A

    2012-12-01

    This study assessed the phenotypic and allelic profiles of ABO and Rhesus D blood group system among first time blood donors at the National Centre of Blood Supply of Antananarivo. We collected through this retrospective study all data registered during 7 years of practice (from 2003 to 2009). Age and sex were analysed with the result of ABO and RhD screening. They were tested both with Beth Vincent and Simonin tests which were performed in a plate, by using commercial monoclonal antibody (Diaclone(®) et Eryclone(®)), and home-made red cells tests. The Rh D was performed with the same commercial kits. The frequencies of alleles were calculated by using Bernstein method. Data about 45,857 donors were obtained. A male predominance (80.46%) was found and most of our donors were aged <40 (74.92%). 98.90% of the donors were Rh D positive. Phenotypic distribution of each ABO antigen was, respectively, 22.61, 29.66, 6.13 and 41.60% for A, B, AB and O antigen. Allelic frequencies of A, B and O were 0.1559, 0.1987 and 0.6454. These results confirmed the fact that Madagascan population had admixed ethnic origin.

  20. Molecular and phenotypic profiling from the base to the crown in maritime pine wood-forming tissue.

    PubMed

    Paiva, Jorge A P; Garcés, Marcelo; Alves, Ana; Garnier-Géré, Pauline; Rodrigues, José Carlos; Lalanne, Céline; Porcon, Stéphane; Le Provost, Grégoire; Perez, Denilson da Silva; Brach, Jean; Frigerio, Jean-Marc; Claverol, Stéphane; Barré, Aurélien; Fevereiro, Pedro; Plomion, Christophe

    2008-01-01

    Environmental, developmental and genetic factors affect variation in wood properties at the chemical, anatomical and physical levels. Here, the phenotypic variation observed along the tree stem was explored and the hypothesis tested that this variation could be the result of the differential expression of genes/proteins during wood formation. Differentiating xylem samples of maritime pine (Pinus pinaster) were collected from the top (crown wood, CW) to the bottom (base wood, BW) of adult trees. These samples were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and analytical pyrolysis. Two main groups of samples, corresponding to CW and BW, could be distinguished from cell wall chemical composition. A genomic approach, combining large-scale production of expressed sequence tags (ESTs), gene expression profiling and quantitative proteomics analysis, allowed identification of 262 unigenes (out of 3512) and 231 proteins (out of 1372 spots) that were differentially expressed along the stem. A good relationship was found between functional categories from transcriptomic and proteomic data. A good fit between the molecular mechanisms involved in CW-BW formation and these two types of wood phenotypic differences was also observed. This work provides a list of candidate genes for wood properties that will be tested in forward genetics.

  1. Human Adult Stem Cells Maintain a Constant Phenotype Profile Irrespective of Their Origin, Basal Media, and Long Term Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Somasundaram, Indumathi; Mishra, Rashmi; Radhakrishnan, Harikrishnan; Sankaran, Rajkumar; Garikipati, Venkata Naga Srikanth

    2015-01-01

    The study aims to identify the phenotypic marker expressions of different human adult stem cells derived from, namely, bone marrow, subcutaneous fat, and omentum fat, cultured in different media, namely, DMEM-Low Glucose, Alpha-MEM, DMEM-F12 and DMEM-KO and under long term culture conditions (>P20). We characterized immunophenotype by using various hematopoietic, mesenchymal, endothelial markers, and cell adhesion molecules in the long term cultures (Passages-P1, P3, P5, P9, P12, P15, and P20.) Interestingly, data revealed similar marker expression profiles irrespective of source, basal media, and extensive culturing. This demonstrates that all adult stem cell sources mentioned in this study share similar phenotypic marker and all media seem appropriate for culturing these sources. However, a disparity was observed in the markers such as CD49d, CD54, CD117, CD29, and CD106, thereby warranting further research on these markers. Besides the aforesaid objective, it is understood from the study that immunophenotyping acts as a valuable tool to identify inherent property of each cell, thereby leading to a valuable cell based therapy. PMID:25688272

  2. From genotypes to phenotypes: classification of the tumour profiles for different variants of the cadherin adhesion pathway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramis-Conde, Ignacio; Drasdo, Dirk

    2012-06-01

    The E-cadherin adhesive profile expressed by a tumour is a characterization of the intracellular and intercellular protein interactions that control cell-cell adhesion. Within the intracellular proteins that determine the tumour adhesive profile, Src and PI3 are two essentials to initiate the formation of the E-cadherin adhesion complex. On the other hand, Src has also the capability of disrupting the β-catenin-E-cadherin complex and down-regulating cell-cell adhesion. In this paper, using a multi-scale mathematical model, we study the role of each of these proteins in the adhesive profile and invasive properties of the tumour. To do this, we create three versions of an intracellular model that explains the interplay between the proteins E-cadherin, β-catenin, Src and PI3; and we couple them to the strength of the cell-cell adhesion forces within an individual-cell-based model. The simulation results show how the tumour profile and its aggressive potential may change depending on the intrinsic characteristics of the protein pathways, and how these pathways may influence the early stages of cancer invasion. Our major findings may be summarized as follows. (1) Intermediate levels of Src synthesis rates generate the least invasive tumour phenotype. (2) Conclusions drawn from findings obtained from the intracellular molecular dynamics (here cadherin-catenin binding complexes) to the multi-cellular invasive potential of a tumour may be misleading or erroneous. The conclusions should be validated in a multi-cellular context on timescales relevant for population growth. (3) Monoclonal populations of more cohesive cells with otherwise equal properties tend to grow slower. (4) Less cohesive cells tend to outcompete more cohesive cells. (5) Less cohesive cells have a larger probability of invasion as migration forces can more easily outbalance cohesive forces.

  3. Phenotypic side effects prediction by optimizing correlation with chemical and target profiles of drugs.

    PubMed

    Kanji, Rakesh; Sharma, Abhinav; Bagler, Ganesh

    2015-11-01

    Despite technological progresses and improved understanding of biological systems, discovery of novel drugs is an inefficient, arduous and expensive process. Research and development cost of drugs is unreasonably high, largely attributed to the high attrition rate of candidate drugs due to adverse drug reactions. Computational methods for accurate prediction of drug side effects, rooted in empirical data of drugs, have the potential to enhance the efficacy of the drug discovery process. Identification of features critical for specifying side effects would facilitate efficient computational procedures for their prediction. We devised a generalized ordinary canonical correlation model for prediction of drug side effects based on their chemical properties as well as their target profiles. While the former is based on 2D and 3D chemical features, the latter enumerates a systems-level property of drugs. We find that the model incorporating chemical features outperforms that incorporating target profiles. Furthermore we identified the 2D and 3D chemical properties that yield best results, thereby implying their relevance in specifying adverse drug reactions.

  4. Distinct genetic profiles in colorectal tumors with or without the CpG island methylator phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Toyota, Minoru; Ohe-Toyota, Mutsumi; Ahuja, Nita; Issa, Jean-Pierre J.

    2000-01-01

    Colorectal cancers (CRCs) are characterized by multiple genetic (mutations) and epigenetic (CpG island methylation) alterations, but it is not known whether these evolve independently through stochastic processes. We have recently described a novel pathway termed CpG island methylator phenotype (CIMP) in CRC, which is characterized by the simultaneous methylation of multiple CpG islands, including several known genes, such as p16, hMLH1, and THBS1. We have now studied mutations in K-RAS, p53, DPC4, and TGFβRII in a panel of colorectal tumors with or without CIMP. We find that CIMP defines two groups of tumors with significantly different genetic lesions: frequent K-RAS mutations were found in CIMP+ CRCs (28/41, 68%) compared with CIMP− cases (14/47, 30%, P = 0.0005). By contrast, p53 mutations were found in 24% (10/41) of CIMP+ CRCs vs. 60% (30/46) of CIMP− cases (P = 0.002). Both of these differences were independent of microsatellite instability. These interactions between CIMP, K-RAS mutations, and p53 mutations were preserved in colorectal adenomas, suggesting that they occur early in carcinogenesis. The distinct combinations of epigenetic and genetic alterations in each group suggest that activation of oncogenes and inactivation of tumor suppressor genes is related to the underlying mechanism of generating molecular diversity in cancer, rather than simply accumulate stochastically during cancer development. PMID:10639144

  5. Phenotypic and metabolic profiling of colony morphology variants evolved from Pseudomonas fluorescens biofilms.

    PubMed

    Workentine, Matthew L; Harrison, Joe J; Weljie, Aalim M; Tran, Vy A; Stenroos, Pernilla U; Tremaroli, Valentina; Vogel, Hans J; Ceri, Howard; Turner, Raymond J

    2010-06-01

    Colony morphology variants isolated from natural and laboratory-grown biofilms represent subpopulations of biofilm cells that may be important for multiple aspects of the sessile lifestyle, from surface colonization to stress resistance. There are many genetic and environmental factors that determine the frequency at which colony morphology variants are recovered from biofilms. One of these factors involves an increased selection for variants in biofilms of Pseudomonas species bearing inactivating mutations in the global activator of cyanide biosynthesis/regulator of secondary metabolism (gac/rsm) signal transduction pathway. Here we characterize two distinct colony morphology variants isolated from biofilms of Pseudomonas fluorescens missing the gacS sensor kinase. These variants produced more biofilm cell mass, and in one case, this was likely due to overproduction of the exopolysaccharide cellulose. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) metabolomics revealed distinct metabolic changes for each of the two phenotypic variants, and these changes involved amino acids and metabolites produced through glutathione biochemistry. Some of these metabolites are hypothesized to play a role in redox and metal homeostasis, and corresponding to this, we show that biofilm populations grown from each of these variants had a different ability to survive when exposed to toxic doses of metal ions. These data suggest that colony morphology variants that evolve during growth of P. fluorescens as a biofilm may have distinct metabolic capacities that contribute to their individual abilities to withstand environmental stress.

  6. Whole blood gene expression profiles distinguish clinical phenotypes of venous thromboembolism☆

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Deborah A.; Suchindran, Sunil; Beckman, Michele G.; Hooper, W. Craig; Grant, Althea M.; Heit, John A.; Manco-Johnson, Marilyn; Moll, Stephan; Philipp, Claire S.; Kenney, Kristy; De Staercke, Christine; Pyle, Meredith E.; Chi, Jen-Tsan; Ortel, Thomas L.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Recurrent venous thromboembolism (VTE) occurs infrequently following a provoked event but occurs in up to 30% of individuals following an initial unprovoked event. There is limited understanding of the biological mechanisms that predispose patients to recurrent VTE. Objectives To identify whole blood gene expression profiles that distinguished patients with clinically distinct patterns of VTE. Patients/Methods We studied 107 patients with VTE separated into 3 groups: (1) ‘low-risk’ patients had one or more provoked VTE; (2) ‘moderate-risk’ patients had a single unprovoked VTE; (3) ‘high-risk’ patients had ≥2 unprovoked VTE. Each patient group was also compared to twenty-five individuals with no personal history of VTE. Total RNA from whole blood was isolated and hybridized to Illumina HT-12 V4 Beadchips to assay whole genome expression. Results Using class prediction analysis, we distinguished high-risk patients from low-risk patients and healthy controls with good receiver operating curve characteristics (AUC = 0.81 and 0.84, respectively). We also distinguished moderate-risk individuals and low-risk individuals from healthy controls with AUC’s of 0.69 and 0.80, respectively. Using differential expression analysis, we identified several genes previously implicated in thrombotic disorders by genetic analyses, including SELP, KLKB1, ANXA5, and CD46. Protein levels for several of the identified genes were not significantly different between the different groups. Conclusion Gene expression profiles are capable of distinguishing patients with different clinical presentations of VTE, and genes relevant to VTE risk are frequently differentially expressed in these comparisons. PMID:25684211

  7. Endocrine profile and phenotype-(epi)genotype correlation in Spanish patients with pseudohypoparathyroidism.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Rebollo, Eduardo; Lecumberri, Beatriz; Gaztambide, Sonia; Martinez-Indart, Lorea; Perez de Nanclares, Guiomar; Castaño, Luis

    2013-05-01

    Recent advances in genetics and epigenetics have revealed an overlap between molecular and clinical features of pseudohypoparathyroidism (PHP) subtypes, broadening the previous spectrum of PHP genotype-phenotype correlations and indicating limitations of the current classification of the disease. The aim of the study was to screen patients with clinical diagnoses of PHP type I or pseudo-PHP for underlying molecular defects and explore possible correlations between molecular findings and clinical features. We investigated the GNAS locus at the molecular level in 72 affected patients (46 women and 26 men) from 56 nonrelated families. Clinical data were obtained for 63 of these patients (38 women and 25 men). The molecular analysis showed that 35 patients carried structural mutations, 32 had loss of methylation, and 2 had a 2q37 deletion but did not reveal any (epi)mutation for 3 patients. Comparing these results and the clinical data, we observed that a younger age at diagnosis was associated with structural defects at the GNAS gene and epigenetic defects with a diagnosis later in life (9.19 ± 1.64 vs 24.57 ± 2.28 years, P < .0001). This first global review of PHP in Spain highlights the importance of a detailed clinical and genetic study of each patient and the integrated analysis of the findings from the two approaches. It may also help geneticists and clinicians to raise the suspicion of PHP earlier, reach more accurate diagnoses, and provide patients with PHP and their families with useful genetic information and counseling, thereby improving outcomes and quality of life.

  8. Influenza Virus Inactivation for Studies of Antigenicity and Phenotypic Neuraminidase Inhibitor Resistance Profiling

    PubMed Central

    Jonges, Marcel; Liu, Wai Ming; van der Vries, Erhard; Jacobi, Ronald; Pronk, Inge; Boog, Claire; Koopmans, Marion; Meijer, Adam; Soethout, Ernst

    2010-01-01

    Introduction of a new influenza virus in humans urges quick analysis of its virological and immunological characteristics to determine the impact on public health and to develop protective measures for the human population. At present, however, the necessity of executing pandemic influenza virus research under biosafety level 3 (BSL-3) high-containment conditions severely hampers timely characterization of such viruses. We tested heat, formalin, Triton X-100, and β-propiolactone treatments for their potencies in inactivating human influenza A(H3N2) and avian A(H7N3) viruses, as well as seasonal and pandemic A(H1N1) virus isolates, while allowing the specimens to retain their virological and immunological properties. Successful heat inactivation coincided with the loss of hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA) characteristics, and β-propiolactone inactivation reduced the hemagglutination titer and NA activity of the human influenza virus 10-fold or more. Although Triton X-100 treatment resulted in inconsistent HA activity, the NA activities in culture supernatants were enhanced consistently. Nonetheless, formalin treatment permitted the best retention of HA and NA properties. Triton X-100 treatment proved to be the easiest-to-use influenza virus inactivation protocol for application in combination with phenotypic NA inhibitor susceptibility assays, while formalin treatment preserved B-cell and T-cell epitope antigenicity, allowing the detection of both humoral and cellular immune responses. In conclusion, we demonstrated successful influenza virus characterization using formalin- and Triton X-100-inactivated virus samples. Application of these inactivation protocols limits work under BSL-3 conditions to virus culture, thus enabling more timely determination of public health impact and development of protective measures when a new influenza virus, e.g., pandemic A(H1N1)v virus, is introduced in humans. PMID:20089763

  9. Endometrial gene expression profile of pregnant sows with extreme phenotypes for reproductive efficiency

    PubMed Central

    Córdoba, S.; Balcells, I.; Castelló, A.; Ovilo, C.; Noguera, J. L.; Timoneda, O.; Sánchez, A.

    2015-01-01

    Prolificacy can directly impact porcine profitability, but large genetic variation and low heritability have been found regarding litter size among porcine breeds. To identify key differences in gene expression associated to swine reproductive efficiency, we performed a transcriptome analysis of sows’ endometrium from an Iberian x Meishan F2 population at day 30–32 of gestation, classified according to their estimated breeding value (EBV) as high (H, EBV > 0) and low (L, EBV < 0) prolificacy phenotypes. For each sample, mRNA and small RNA libraries were RNA-sequenced, identifying 141 genes and 10 miRNAs differentially expressed between H and L groups. We selected four miRNAs based on their role in reproduction, and five genes displaying the highest differences and a positive mapping into known reproductive QTLs for RT-qPCR validation on the whole extreme population. Significant differences were validated for genes: PTGS2 (p = 0.03; H/L ratio = 3.50), PTHLH (p = 0.03; H/L ratio = 3.69), MMP8 (p = 0.01; H/L ratio = 4.41) and SCNN1G (p = 0.04; H/L ratio = 3.42). Although selected miRNAs showed similar expression levels between H and L groups, significant correlation was found between the expression level of ssc-miR-133a (p < 0.01) and ssc-miR-92a (p < 0.01) and validated genes. These results provide a better understanding of the genetic architecture of prolificacy-related traits and embryo implantation failure in pigs. PMID:26435523

  10. Phenotypic heterogeneity, novel diagnostic markers, and target expression profiles in normal and neoplastic human mast cells.

    PubMed

    Valent, Peter; Cerny-Reiterer, Sabine; Herrmann, Harald; Mirkina, Irina; George, Tracy I; Sotlar, Karl; Sperr, Wolfgang R; Horny, Hans-Peter

    2010-09-01

    Mast cells (MC) are specialized immune cells that play a key role in anaphylactic reactions. Growth, differentiation, and function of these cells are regulated by a complex network of cytokines, surface receptors, signaling molecules, the microenvironment, and the genetic background. A number of previous and more recent data suggest that MC are heterogeneous in terms of cytokine-regulation, expression of cytoplasmic and cell surface antigens, and response to ligands. MC heterogeneity is often organ-specific and is considered to be related to MC plasticity, disease-associated factors, and the maturation stage of the cells. The stem cell factor (SCF) receptor KIT (CD117) is expressed on all types of MC independent of maturation and activation-status. In systemic mastocytosis (SM), KIT is often expressed in MC in a mutated and constitutively activated form. In these patients, MC aberrantly display CD2 and CD25, diagnostic markers of neoplastic MC in all SM variants. In advanced SM, MC co-express substantial amounts of CD30, whereas CD2 expression on MC may be decreased compared to indolent SM. Other surface molecules, such as CD63 or CD203c, are overexpressed on neoplastic MC in SM, and are further upregulated upon cross-linking of the IgE receptor. Some of the cell surface antigens expressed on MC or their progenitors may serve as therapeutic targets in the future. These targets include CD25, CD30, CD33, CD44, and CD117/KIT. The current article provides an overview on cell surface antigens and target receptors expressed by MC in physiologic and reactive tissues, and in patients with SM, with special reference to phenotypic heterogeneity and clinical implications.

  11. Phenotype profiling of patients with intellectual disability and copy number variations.

    PubMed

    Roselló, Mónica; Martínez, Francisco; Monfort, Sandra; Mayo, Sonia; Oltra, Silvestre; Orellana, Carmen

    2014-09-01

    Nowadays the microarray technology allows whole-genome analysis with a high resolution and performance for the genetic diagnosis in any patient with intellectual disability or autism spectrum disorder. However in the immediate future, with the development of massive sequencing systems for application at clinical diagnosis, it will be necessary to have clinical criteria to guide studies. To perform an exhaustive clinical definition of patients with pathogenic copy number variations in order to establish the clinical criteria most suggestive of this kind of genomic rearrangements. We designed and implemented a database to collect 190 different clinical variables (pregnancy, neonatal, facial dysmorphism, congenital anomalies, neurological features and family history) in a series of 246 patients, with developmental delay/intellectual disability. All cases were studied with array comparative genomic hybridization. We have found a pathogenic genomic imbalance in 73 patients. Frequency analysis of all clinical variables showed that growth disorder, abnormalities of hands, low-set ears and hypertelorism are the more frequent features among patients with genomic rearrangements. However other clinical features, such as genital abnormalities and aggressiveness, are more specifically associated with pathogenic copy number variations in spite of their low frequencies in the overall series, yielding higher statistical significance values than other traits. The genotype-phenotype comparison may be useful to set in the future the main clinical manifestations associated with deletions, duplications and unbalanced translocations. Theses analyses will improve the clinical indications and protocols to implement genomic arrays in the genetic study of patients with neurodevelopment disorders. Copyright © 2014 European Paediatric Neurology Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Evaluation of a 7-Gene Genetic Profile for Athletic Endurance Phenotype in Ironman Championship Triathletes.

    PubMed

    Grealy, Rebecca; Herruer, Jasper; Smith, Carl L E; Hiller, Doug; Haseler, Luke J; Griffiths, Lyn R

    2015-01-01

    Polygenic profiling has been proposed for elite endurance performance, using an additive model determining the proportion of optimal alleles in endurance athletes. To investigate this model's utility for elite triathletes, we genotyped seven polymorphisms previously associated with an endurance polygenic profile (ACE Ins/Del, ACTN3 Arg577Ter, AMPD1 Gln12Ter, CKMM 1170bp/985+185bp, HFE His63Asp, GDF8 Lys153Arg and PPARGC1A Gly482Ser) in a cohort of 196 elite athletes who participated in the 2008 Kona Ironman championship triathlon. Mean performance time (PT) was not significantly different in individual marker analysis. Age, sex, and continent of origin had a significant influence on PT and were adjusted for. Only the AMPD1 endurance-optimal Gln allele was found to be significantly associated with an improvement in PT (model p = 5.79 x 10-17, AMPD1 genotype p = 0.01). Individual genotypes were combined into a total genotype score (TGS); TGS distribution ranged from 28.6 to 92.9, concordant with prior studies in endurance athletes (mean±SD: 60.75±12.95). TGS distribution was shifted toward higher TGS in the top 10% of athletes, though the mean TGS was not significantly different (p = 0.164) and not significantly associated with PT even when adjusted for age, sex, and origin. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis determined that TGS alone could not significantly predict athlete finishing time with discriminating sensitivity and specificity for three outcomes (less than median PT, less than mean PT, or in the top 10%), though models with the age, sex, continent of origin, and either TGS or AMPD1 genotype could. These results suggest three things: that more sophisticated genetic models may be necessary to accurately predict athlete finishing time in endurance events; that non-genetic factors such as training are hugely influential and should be included in genetic analyses to prevent confounding; and that large collaborations may be necessary to obtain

  13. Evaluation of a 7-Gene Genetic Profile for Athletic Endurance Phenotype in Ironman Championship Triathletes

    PubMed Central

    Grealy, Rebecca; Herruer, Jasper; Smith, Carl L. E.; Hiller, Doug; Haseler, Luke J.; Griffiths, Lyn R.

    2015-01-01

    Polygenic profiling has been proposed for elite endurance performance, using an additive model determining the proportion of optimal alleles in endurance athletes. To investigate this model’s utility for elite triathletes, we genotyped seven polymorphisms previously associated with an endurance polygenic profile (ACE Ins/Del, ACTN3 Arg577Ter, AMPD1 Gln12Ter, CKMM 1170bp/985+185bp, HFE His63Asp, GDF8 Lys153Arg and PPARGC1A Gly482Ser) in a cohort of 196 elite athletes who participated in the 2008 Kona Ironman championship triathlon. Mean performance time (PT) was not significantly different in individual marker analysis. Age, sex, and continent of origin had a significant influence on PT and were adjusted for. Only the AMPD1 endurance-optimal Gln allele was found to be significantly associated with an improvement in PT (model p = 5.79 x 10−17, AMPD1 genotype p = 0.01). Individual genotypes were combined into a total genotype score (TGS); TGS distribution ranged from 28.6 to 92.9, concordant with prior studies in endurance athletes (mean±SD: 60.75±12.95). TGS distribution was shifted toward higher TGS in the top 10% of athletes, though the mean TGS was not significantly different (p = 0.164) and not significantly associated with PT even when adjusted for age, sex, and origin. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis determined that TGS alone could not significantly predict athlete finishing time with discriminating sensitivity and specificity for three outcomes (less than median PT, less than mean PT, or in the top 10%), though models with the age, sex, continent of origin, and either TGS or AMPD1 genotype could. These results suggest three things: that more sophisticated genetic models may be necessary to accurately predict athlete finishing time in endurance events; that non-genetic factors such as training are hugely influential and should be included in genetic analyses to prevent confounding; and that large collaborations may be necessary to obtain

  14. Characterisation of Phenotypic and Genotypic Antibiotic Resistance Profile of Enterococci from Cheeses in Turkey

    PubMed Central

    Yipel, Mustafa; Aslantaş, Özkan; Gündoğdu, Aycan

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of enterococci in cheese samples and to characterize their antimicrobial resistance profiles as well as the associated resistance genes. A total of 139 enterococci were isolated from 99 cheese samples, the isolates were identified as E. faecalis (61.2%), E. faecium (15.1%), E. gallinarum (12.9%), E. durans (5.0%), E. casseliflavis (2.9%) and E. avium (2.9%). The most frequent antimicrobial resistance observed in enterococci isolates was to lincomycin (88.5%), followed by kanamycin (84.2%), gentamycin (low level, 51.1%), rifampin (46.8%) and tetracycline (33.8%). Among the isolates, the frequencies of high level gentamycin and streptomycin resistant enterococci strains were 2.2% and 5.8%, respectively. Apart from the mentioned antibiotics, low levels of resistance to ciprofloxacin, erythromycin and chloramphenicol were found. Moreover no resistance was observed against penicillin and ampicillin. The antimicrobial resistance genes including tetM, tetL, ermB, cat, aph(3’)-IIIa, ant(6)-Ia and aac(6’)-Ieaph(2”)-Ia were found in enterococci from Turkish cheese samples. In the current study, we provided data for antibiotic resistance and the occurrence of resistance genes among enterococci. Regulatory and quality control programs for milk and other dairy products from farms to retail outlets has to be established and strengthened to monitor trends in antimicrobial resistance among emerging food borne pathogens in Turkey. PMID:27433106

  15. Predictive model for toluene degradation and microbial phenotypic profiles in flat plate vapor phase bioreactor

    SciTech Connect

    Mirpuri, R.; Sharp, W.; Villaverde, S.; Jones, W.; Lewandowski, Z.; Cunningham, A.

    1997-06-01

    A predictive model has been developed to describe degradation of toluene in a flat-plate vapor phase bioreactor (VPBR). The VPBR model incorporates kinetic, stoichiometric, injury, and irreversible loss coefficients from suspended culture studies for toluene degradation by P. putida 54G and measured values of Henry`s law constant and boundary layer thickness at the gas-liquid and liquid-biofilm interface. The model is used to estimate the performance of the reactor with respect to toluene degradation and to predict profiles of toluene concentration and bacterial physiological state within the biofilm. These results have been compared with experimentally determined values from a flat plate VPBR under electron acceptor and electron donor limiting conditions. The model accurately predicts toluene concentrations in the vapor phase and toluene degradation rate by adjusting only three parameters: biomass density and rates of death and endogenous decay. Qualitatively, the model also predicts gradients in the physiological state cells in the biofilm. This model provides a rational design for predicting an upper limit of toluene degradation capability in a VPBR and is currently being tested to assess applications for predicting performance of bench and pilot-scale column reactors.

  16. Phenotypic profiling and gene expression analyses for aromatic and volatile compounds in Chamoes (Cucumis melo).

    PubMed

    Lee, Jeongyeo; Kim, Min Keun; Hwang, Seung Hwan; Kim, Jungeun; Ahn, Jong Moon; Min, Sung Ran; Park, Sang Un; Lim, Soon Sung; Kim, HyeRan

    2014-05-01

    Gotgam chamoe (GgC), a native oriental melon in Korea, is known to possess the aroma of a dried persimmon, an agronomic relevance for melon breeding program. The volatile compounds and the transcript levels of aromatic compound genes in cultivar (Ohbokggul chamoe [OC]) and GgC were profiled. A total of 62 volatile compounds were identified and quantified. Twenty-eight volatile compounds were specific to either the OC or the GgC. The amounts of volatile alcohol, saturated hydrocarbon, and unsaturated hydrocarbon compounds were 2.2, 2.7, and 1.1 times higher in OC, respectively. The amounts of ketone volatiles were 1.2 times higher in GgC, whereas the total amounts of esters were similar. In the shikimate pathway, transcriptional patterns with the fruit parts were different between the two chamoes for CmDAHPS, CmDHD/SDH, and CmEPSPS. The expression levels of all six genes investigated, especially CmCS, were highest in the peel of both chamoes compared to the other parts. The transcript levels of the aromatic amino acid biosynthesis genes demonstrate that phenylalanine and tyrosine are present more in edible parts of the chamoe, while tryptophan may be accumulated low in the chamoe. In addition, phenylalanine and tryptophan are synthesized more in GgC than the OC.

  17. Transcriptome Profiling of the Goose (Anser cygnoides) Ovaries Identify Laying and Broodiness Phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yang; Tong, YiYu; Rong, GuangHui; Huang, ZhengYang; Zhang, Yang; Chang, GuoBing; Wu, XinSheng; Chen, GuoHong

    2013-01-01

    Background The geese have strong broodiness and poor egg performance. These characteristics are the key issues that hinder the goose industry development. Yet little is known about the mechanisms responsible for follicle development due to lack of genomic resources. Hence, studies based on high-throughput sequencing technologies are needed to produce a comprehensive and integrated genomic resource and to better understand the biological mechanisms of goose follicle development. Methodology/Principal Findings In this study, we performed de novo transcriptome assembly and gene expression analysis using short-read sequencing technology (Illumina). We obtained 67,315,996 short reads of 100 bp, which were assembled into 130,514 unique sequences by Trinity strategy (mean size = 753bp). Based on BLAST results with known proteins, these analyses identified 52,642 sequences with a cut-off E-value above 10−5. Assembled sequences were annotated with gene descriptions, gene ontology and clusters of orthologous group terms. In addition, we investigated the transcription changes during the goose laying/broodiness period using a tag-based digital gene expression (DGE) system. We obtained a sequencing depth of over 4.2 million tags per sample and identified a large number of genes associated with follicle development and reproductive biology including cholesterol side-chain cleavage enzyme gene and dopamine beta-hydroxylas gene. We confirm the altered expression levels of the two genes using quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR). Conclusions/Significance The obtained goose transcriptome and DGE profiling data provide comprehensive gene expression information at the transcriptional level that could promote better understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying follicle development and productivity. PMID:23405160

  18. Childhood-onset systemic lupus erythematosus in Singapore: clinical phenotypes, disease activity, damage, and autoantibody profiles.

    PubMed

    Tan, J H T; Hoh, S F; Win, M T M; Chan, Y H; Das, L; Arkachaisri, T

    2015-08-01

    Childhood-onset systemic lupus erythematosus (cSLE) is a multisystem autoimmune disease characterized by immune dysregulation affecting patients less than 18 years old. One-fifth of SLE cases are diagnosed during childhood. cSLE presents differently from adults and has a more severe and aggressive course. We describe the clinical and antibody profiles in our cSLE Singapore cohort. All cSLE patients who satisfied the 1997 American College of Rheumatology diagnostic criteria were captured in our lupus registry from January 2009 to January 2014. Data including demographic, cumulative clinical, serologic data, and damage indices were collected. Adjusted mean SLEDAI-2K (AMS) was used to summarize disease activity over multiple visits. Cluster analysis using non-hierarchical K-means procedure was performed on eight selected antibodies. The 64 patients (female:male ratio 5:1; Chinese 45.3%, Malay 28.1%, Indian 9.4%, and other races 17.2%) had a mean onset age of 11.5 years (range 2.1-16.7) and mean age at diagnosis was 11.9 years (range 2.6-18.0). Our study demonstrated differences in clinical manifestations for which hematologic involvement was the most common manifestation with less renal disease and uncommon neurologic manifestation as compared to other cSLE cohorts reported in our region. Antibody clusters were identified in our cohort but their clinical association/discrimination and outcome prediction required further validation study. Outcomes of our cohort in regard to disease activity after therapy and organ damages were comparable if not better to other cSLE cohorts elsewhere. Steroid-related damage, including symptomatic multifocal avascular necrosis and cataract, were not uncommon locally. Infection remains the major cause of death for the continent. Nevertheless, the five year survival rate of our cohort (98.4%) was high.

  19. Gene expression profile of normal and cancer-associated fibroblasts according to intratumoral inflammatory cells phenotype from breast cancer tissue.

    PubMed

    González, Lucía; Eiro, Noemi; Fernandez-Garcia, Belen; González, Luis O; Dominguez, Francisco; Vizoso, Francisco J

    2016-11-01

    The biological heterogeneity of breast cancer leads to the need for finding new approaches to understand the mechanisms implicated in breast cancer progression. The tumor stroma appears as a key in the progression of solid tumors towards a malignant phenotype. Cancer associated fibroblasts (CAFs) may orchestrate a functional "corrupted" stroma which in turn helps metastatic spread. In this study, we investigated by real-time PCR, the expression of 19 factors by normal breast-associated fibroblasts (NAFs) and CAFs, which were implicated in several actions promoting tumor growth, such as extracellular matrix remodeling, inflammation and invasion. Also, we explored the influence of inflammatory cells phenotypes (MMP11 status) and breast cancer cell lines (MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231) on the molecular profile of CAFs. If we consider that one of the major sources of CAFs are resident NAFs, the transition of NAFs into CAFs is associated with molecular changes involving the overexpression of some molecular factors of biological importance in tumor progression. In addition, the characterization of the tumor stroma regarding to the MMP11 status by MICs reflects a type of fibroblasts which contribute even more to tumor progression. Moreover, different patterns in the induction of the expression of factors by CAFs were observed, depending on the tumor cell line which they were co-cultured with. Furthermore, CAFs influence TGFβ expression in both cancer cell lines. Therefore, this study can help to a better characterization of tumor stroma in order to improve the prognostic evaluation, as well as to define the different populations of CAFs as potential therapeutic targets in breast cancer. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Wheat and rye genome confer specific phytohormone profile features and interplay under water stress in two phenotypes of triticale.

    PubMed

    Hura, Tomasz; Dziurka, Michał; Hura, Katarzyna; Ostrowska, Agnieszka; Dziurka, Kinga; Gadzinowska, Joanna

    2017-09-01

    The aim of the experiment was to determine phytohormone profile of triticale and quality-based relationships between the analyzed groups of phytohormones. The study involved two triticale phenotypes, a long-stemmed one and a semi-dwarf one with Dw1 gene, differing in mechanisms of acclimation to drought and controlled by wheat or rye genome. Water deficit in the leaves triggered a specific phytohormone response in both winter triticale phenotypes attributable to the dominance of wheat (semi-dwarf cultivar) or rye (long-stemmed cultivar) genome. Rye genome in long-stemmed triticale was responsible for specific increase (tillering: gibberellic acid; heading: N6-isopentenyladenine, trans-zeatin-9-riboside, cis-zeatin-9-riboside; flowering: N6-isopentenyladenine, indolebutyric acid, salicylic acid) or decrease (heading: trans-zeatin) in the content of some phytohormones. Wheat genome in semi-dwarf triticale controlled a specific increase in trans-zeatin content at heading and anthesis in gibberellin A1 during anthesis. The greatest number of changes in the phytohormone levels was observed in the generative phase. In both triticale types, the pool of investigated phytohormones was dominated by abscisic acid and gibberellins. The semi-dwarf cultivar with Dw1 gene was less sensitive to gibberellins and its mechanisms of acclimation to water stress were mainly ABA-dependent. An increase in ABA and gibberellins during drought and predominance of these hormones in the total pool of analyzed phytohormones indicated their equal share in drought acclimation mechanisms in long-stemmed cultivar. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. Phenotypic and Functional Profiling of CD4 T Cell Compartment in Distinct Populations of Healthy Adults with Different Antigenic Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Roetynck, Sophie; Olotu, Ally; Simam, Joan; Marsh, Kevin; Stockinger, Brigitta; Urban, Britta; Langhorne, Jean

    2013-01-01

    Background Multiparameter flow cytometry has revealed extensive phenotypic and functional heterogeneity of CD4 T cell responses in mice and humans, emphasizing the importance of assessing multiple aspects of the immune response in correlation with infection or vaccination outcome. The aim of this study was to establish and validate reliable and feasible flow cytometry assays, which will allow us to characterize CD4 T cell population in humans in field studies more fully. Methodology/Principal Findings We developed polychromatic flow cytometry antibody panels for immunophenotyping the major CD4 T cell subsets as well as broadly characterizing the functional profiles of the CD4 T cells in peripheral blood. We then validated these assays by conducting a pilot study comparing CD4 T cell responses in distinct populations of healthy adults living in either rural or urban Kenya. This study revealed that the expression profile of CD4 T cell activation and memory markers differed significantly between African and European donors but was similar amongst African individuals from either rural or urban areas. Adults from rural Kenya had, however, higher frequencies and greater polyfunctionality among cytokine producing CD4 T cells compared to both urban populations, particularly for “Th1” type of response. Finally, endemic exposure to malaria in rural Kenya may have influenced the expansion of few discrete CD4 T cell populations with specific functional signatures. Conclusion/Significance These findings suggest that environmentally driven T cell activation does not drive the dysfunction of CD4 T cells but is rather associated with greater magnitude and quality of CD4 T cell response, indicating that the level or type of microbial exposure and antigenic experience may influence and shape the functionality of CD4 T cell compartment. Our data confirm that it is possible and mandatory to assess multiple functional attributes of CD4 T cell response in the context of infection

  2. Metabolite profiling of Camellia sinensis by automated sequential, multidimensional gas chromatography/mass spectrometry reveals strong monsoon effects on tea constituents.

    PubMed

    Kowalsick, Amanda; Kfoury, Nicole; Robbat, Albert; Ahmed, Selena; Orians, Colin; Griffin, Timothy; Cash, Sean B; Stepp, John Richard

    2014-11-28

    Seasonal variation in tea (Camellia sinensis (L.) Kuntze; Theaceae) chemistry was investigated using automated sequential, multidimensional gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC-GC/MS). Metabolite libraries were produced for teas harvested from the Bulang Mountains in Yunnan, China before and after the onset of the East Asian Monsoon. A total of 201 spring and 196 monsoon metabolites were identified, with 169 common and 59 seasonally unique compounds. An additional 163 metabolites were detected but their identity could not be confirmed. Spectral deconvolution of GC/MS data was used to measure the relative concentrations in the teas. Within each family individual metabolite concentrations increased, decreased and stayed the same. The major constituents in both teas were linalool (28%), geraniol (13%), α-terpineol (10%), hotrienol (4%) and nerol (3%). This work provides the foundation to monitor seasonal variations of tea chemistry. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Phenotypic and transcriptional profiling in Entamoeba histolytica reveal costs to fitness and adaptive responses associated with metronidazole resistance

    PubMed Central

    Penuliar, Gil M.; Nakada-Tsukui, Kumiko; Nozaki, Tomoyoshi

    2015-01-01

    Antimicrobial chemotherapy is critical in the fight against infectious diseases caused by Entamoeba histolytica. Among the drugs available for the treatment of amebiasis, metronidazole (MTZ) is considered the drug of choice. Recently, in vitro studies have described MTZ resistance and the potential mechanisms involved. Costs to fitness and adaptive responses associated with resistance, however, have not been investigated. In this study we generated an HM-1 derived strain resistant to 12 μM MTZ (MTZR). We examined its phenotypic and transcriptional profile to determine the consequences and mRNA level changes associated with MTZ resistance. Our results indicated increased cell size and granularity, and decreased rates in cell division, adhesion, phagocytosis, cytopathogenicity, and glucose consumption. Transcriptome analysis revealed 142 differentially expressed genes in MTZR. In contrast to other MTZ resistant parasites, MTZR did not down-regulate pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase, but showed increased expression of genes for a hypothetical protein (HP1) and several iron-sulfur flavoproteins, and downregulation of genes for leucine-rich proteins. Fisher's exact test showed 24 significantly enriched GO terms in MTZR, and a 3-way comparison of modulated genes in MTZR against those of MTZR cultured without MTZ and HM-1 cultured with MTZ, showed that 88 genes were specific to MTZR. Overall, our findings suggested that MTZ resistance is associated with specific transcriptional changes and decreased parasite virulence. PMID:25999919

  4. Detailed characterization of multiple myeloma circulating tumor cells shows unique phenotypic, cytogenetic, functional, and circadian distribution profile.

    PubMed

    Paiva, Bruno; Paino, Teresa; Sayagues, Jose-Maria; Garayoa, Mercedes; San-Segundo, Laura; Martín, Montserrat; Mota, Ines; Sanchez, María-Luz; Bárcena, Paloma; Aires-Mejia, Irene; Corchete, Luis; Jimenez, Cristina; Garcia-Sanz, Ramon; Gutierrez, Norma C; Ocio, Enrique M; Mateos, Maria-Victoria; Vidriales, Maria-Belen; Orfao, Alberto; San Miguel, Jesús F

    2013-11-21

    Circulating myeloma tumor cells (CTCs) as defined by the presence of peripheral blood (PB) clonal plasma cells (PCs) are a powerful prognostic marker in multiple myeloma (MM). However, the biological features of CTCs and their pathophysiological role in MM remains unexplored. Here, we investigate the phenotypic, cytogenetic, and functional characteristics as well as the circadian distribution of CTCs vs paired bone marrow (BM) clonal PCs from MM patients. Our results show that CTCs typically represent a unique subpopulation of all BM clonal PCs, characterized by downregulation (P < .05) of integrins (CD11a/CD11c/CD29/CD49d/CD49e), adhesion (CD33/CD56/CD117/CD138), and activation molecules (CD28/CD38/CD81). Fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis of fluorescence-activated cell sorter-sorted CTCs also unraveled different cytogenetic profiles vs paired BM clonal PCs. Moreover, CTCs were mostly quiescent and associated with higher clonogenic potential when cocultured with BM stromal cells. Most interestingly, CTCs showed a circadian distribution which fluctuates in a similar pattern to that of CD34(+) cells, and opposite to stromal cell-derived factor 1 plasma levels and corresponding surface expression of CXC chemokine receptor 4 on clonal PCs, suggesting that in MM, CTCs may egress to PB to colonize/metastasize other sites in the BM during the patients' resting period.

  5. Proteomic and transcriptomic profiling of Staphylococcus aureus surface LPXTG-proteins: correlation with agr genotypes and adherence phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Ythier, Mathilde; Resch, Grégory; Waridel, Patrice; Panchaud, Alexandre; Gfeller, Aurélie; Majcherczyk, Paul; Quadroni, Manfredo; Moreillon, Philippe

    2012-11-01

    Staphylococcus aureus infections involve numerous adhesins and toxins, which expression depends on complex regulatory networks. Adhesins include a family of surface proteins covalently attached to the peptidoglycan via a conserved LPXTG motif. Here we determined the protein and mRNA expression of LPXTG-proteins of S. aureus Newman in time-course experiments, and their relation to fibrinogen adherence in vitro. Experiments were performed with mutants in the global accessory-gene regulator (agr), surface protein A (Spa), and fibrinogen-binding protein A (ClfA), as well as during growth in iron-rich or iron-poor media. Surface proteins were recovered by trypsin-shaving of live bacteria. Released peptides were analyzed by liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass-spectrometry. To unambiguously identify peptides unique to LPXTG-proteins, the analytical conditions were refined using a reference library of S. aureus LPXTG-proteins heterogeneously expressed in surrogate Lactococcus lactis. Transcriptomes were determined by microarrays. Sixteen of the 18 LPXTG-proteins present in S. aureus Newman were detected by proteomics. Nine LPXTG-proteins showed a bell-shape agr-like expression that was abrogated in agr-negative mutants including Spa, fibronectin-binding protein A (FnBPA), ClfA, iron-binding IsdA, and IsdB, immunomodulator SasH, functionally uncharacterized SasD, biofilm-related SasG and methicillin resistance-related FmtB. However, only Spa and SasH modified their proteomic and mRNA profiles in parallel in the parent and its agr- mutant, whereas all other LPXTG-proteins modified their proteomic profiles independently of their mRNA. Moreover, ClfA became highly transcribed and active in fibrinogen-adherence tests during late growth (24 h), whereas it remained poorly detected by proteomics. On the other hand, iron-regulated IsdA-B-C increased their protein expression by >10-times in iron-poor conditions. Thus, proteomic, transcriptomic, and adherence-phenotype

  6. Proteomic and Transcriptomic Profiling of Staphylococcus aureus Surface LPXTG-proteins: Correlation with agr Genotypes and Adherence Phenotypes*

    PubMed Central

    Ythier, Mathilde; Resch, Grégory; Waridel, Patrice; Panchaud, Alexandre; Gfeller, Aurélie; Majcherczyk, Paul; Quadroni, Manfredo; Moreillon, Philippe

    2012-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus infections involve numerous adhesins and toxins, which expression depends on complex regulatory networks. Adhesins include a family of surface proteins covalently attached to the peptidoglycan via a conserved LPXTG motif. Here we determined the protein and mRNA expression of LPXTG-proteins of S. aureus Newman in time-course experiments, and their relation to fibrinogen adherence in vitro. Experiments were performed with mutants in the global accessory-gene regulator (agr), surface protein A (Spa), and fibrinogen-binding protein A (ClfA), as well as during growth in iron-rich or iron-poor media. Surface proteins were recovered by trypsin-shaving of live bacteria. Released peptides were analyzed by liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass-spectrometry. To unambiguously identify peptides unique to LPXTG-proteins, the analytical conditions were refined using a reference library of S. aureus LPXTG-proteins heterogeneously expressed in surrogate Lactococcus lactis. Transcriptomes were determined by microarrays. Sixteen of the 18 LPXTG-proteins present in S. aureus Newman were detected by proteomics. Nine LPXTG-proteins showed a bell-shape agr-like expression that was abrogated in agr-negative mutants including Spa, fibronectin-binding protein A (FnBPA), ClfA, iron-binding IsdA, and IsdB, immunomodulator SasH, functionally uncharacterized SasD, biofilm-related SasG and methicillin resistance-related FmtB. However, only Spa and SasH modified their proteomic and mRNA profiles in parallel in the parent and its agr- mutant, whereas all other LPXTG-proteins modified their proteomic profiles independently of their mRNA. Moreover, ClfA became highly transcribed and active in fibrinogen-adherence tests during late growth (24 h), whereas it remained poorly detected by proteomics. On the other hand, iron-regulated IsdA-B-C increased their protein expression by >10-times in iron-poor conditions. Thus, proteomic, transcriptomic, and adherence-phenotype

  7. Comparative Proteomic Profiling of Divergent Phenotypes for Water Holding Capacity across the Post Mortem Ageing Period in Porcine Muscle Exudate

    PubMed Central

    Di Luca, Alessio; Hamill, Ruth M.; Mullen, Anne Maria; Slavov, Nikolai; Elia, Giuliano

    2016-01-01

    Two dimensional Difference Gel Electrophoresis (2-D DIGE) and mass spectrometry were applied to investigate the changes in metabolic proteins that occur over a seven day (day 1, 3 and 7) post mortem ageing period in porcine centrifugal exudate from divergent meat quality phenotypes. The objectives of the research were to enhance our understanding of the phenotype (water holding capacity) and search for biomarkers of this economically significant pork quality attribute. Major changes in protein abundance across nine phenotype-by-time conditions were observed. Proteomic patterns were dominated by post mortem ageing timepoint. Using a machine learning algorithm (l1-regularized logistic regression), a model was derived with the ability to discriminate between high drip and low drip phenotypes using a subset of 25 proteins with an accuracy of 63%. Models discriminating between divergent phenotypes with accuracy of 72% and 73% were also derived comparing respectively, high drip plus intermediate phenotype (considered as one phenotype) versus low drip and comparing low drip plus intermediate phenotype (considered as one phenotype) versus high drip. In all comparisons, the general classes of discriminatory proteins identified include metabolic enzymes, stress response, transport and structural proteins. In this research we have enhanced our understanding of the protein related processes underpinning this phenotype and provided strong data to work toward development of protein biomarkers for water holding capacity. PMID:26950297

  8. Gender differences in the T-cell profiles of the airways in COPD patients associated with clinical phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Forsslund, Helena; Yang, Mingxing; Mikko, Mikael; Karimi, Reza; Nyrén, Sven; Engvall, Benita; Grunewald, Johan; Merikallio, Heta; Kaarteenaho, Riitta; Wahlström, Jan; Wheelock, Åsa M; Sköld, C Magnus

    2017-01-01

    T lymphocytes are believed to play an important role in the pathogenesis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). How T cells are recruited to the lungs and contribute to the inflammatory process is largely unknown. COPD is a heterogeneous disease, and discriminating disease phenotypes based on distinct molecular and cellular pathways may provide new approaches for individualized diagnosis and therapies. Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) and blood samples were obtained from 40 never-smokers, 40 smokers with normal lung function, and 38 COPD patients. T-cell chemokine receptor expression was analyzed with flow cytometry, and soluble BAL cytokines and chemokines were measured using a cytokine multiplex assay. Correlations with gender and clinical characteristics including lung imaging were investigated using multivariate modeling. Th1/Tc1- and Th2/Tc2-associated soluble analytes and T-cell chemokine receptors were analyzed as cumulative Th1/Tc1 and Th2/Tc2 immune responses. A higher expression of chemokine receptor CCR5 on CD8+ T cells in BAL and higher percentage of CXCR3+CD8+ T cells in blood was found in female smokers with COPD compared to those without COPD. CCR5 expression on CD4+ and CD8+ T cells was lower in BAL from male smokers with COPD compared to those without COPD. Among female smokers with COPD, Th1/Tc1 immune response was linked to BAL macrophage numbers and goblet cell density, and Th2/Tc2 response was associated with the measures of emphysema on high-resolution computed tomography. The highly gender-dependent T-cell profile in COPD indicates different links between cellular events and clinical manifestations in females compared to males. Our findings may reveal mechanisms of importance for the difference in clinical course in female COPD patients compared to males. PMID:28053515

  9. Expression profiling of budding cells in colorectal cancer reveals an EMT-like phenotype and molecular subtype switching.

    PubMed

    De Smedt, Linde; Palmans, Sofie; Andel, Daan; Govaere, Olivier; Boeckx, Bram; Smeets, Dominiek; Galle, Eva; Wouters, Jasper; Barras, David; Suffiotti, Madeleine; Dekervel, Jeroen; Tousseyn, Thomas; De Hertogh, Gert; Prenen, Hans; Tejpar, Sabine; Lambrechts, Diether; Sagaert, Xavier

    2017-01-03

    Tumour budding, described as the presence of single cells or small clusters of up to five tumour cells at the invasive margin, is established as a prognostic marker in colorectal carcinoma. In the present study, we aimed to investigate the molecular signature of tumour budding cells and the corresponding tumour bulk. Tumour bulk and budding areas were microdissected and processed for RNA-sequencing. As little RNA was obtained from budding cells, a special low-input mRNA library preparation protocol was used. Gene expression profiles of budding as compared with tumour bulk were investigated for established EMT signatures, consensus molecular subtype (CMS), gene set enrichment and pathway analysis. A total of 296 genes were differentially expressed with an FDR <0.05 and a twofold change between tumour bulk and budding regions. Genes that were upregulated in the budding signature were mainly involved in cell migration and survival while downregulated genes were important for cell proliferation. Supervised clustering according to an established EMT gene signature categorised budding regions as EMT-positive, whereas tumour bulk was considered EMT-negative. Furthermore, a shift from CMS2 (epithelial) to CMS4 (mesenchymal) was observed as tumour cells transit from the tumour bulk to the budding regions. Tumour budding regions are characterised by a phenotype switch compared with the tumour bulk, involving the acquisition of migratory characteristics and a decrease in cell proliferation. In particular, most tumour budding signatures were EMT-positive and switched from an epithelial subtype (CMS2) in the tumour bulk to a mesenchymal subtype (CMS4) in budding cells.

  10. Phenotypic, antimicrobial susceptibility profile and virulence factors of Klebsiella pneumoniae isolated from buffalo and cow mastitic milk

    PubMed Central

    Osman, Kamelia M; Hassan, Hany M; Orabi, Ahmed; Abdelhafez, Ahmed S T

    2014-01-01

    Studies on the prevalence and virulence genes of Klebsiella mastitis pathogens in a buffalo population are undocumented. Also, the association of rmpA kfu, uge, magA, Aerobactin, K1 and K2 virulent factors with K. pneumoniae buffalo, and cow mastitis is unreported. The virulence of K. pneumoniae was evaluated through both phenotypic and molecular assays. In vivo virulence was assessed by the Vero cell cytotoxicity, suckling mouse assay and mice lethality test. Antimicrobial susceptibility was tested by disk diffusion method. The 45 K. pneumoniae isolates from buffalo (n = 10/232) and cow (n = 35/293) milk were isolated (45/525; 8.6%) and screened via PCR for seven virulence genes encoding uridine diphosphate galactose 4 epimerase encoding gene responsible for capsule and smooth lipopolysaccharide synthesis (uge), siderophores (kfu and aerobactin), protectines or invasins (rmpA and magA), and the capsule and hypermucoviscosity (K1 and K2). The most common virulence genes were rmpA, kfu, uge, and magA (77.8% each). Aerobactin and K1 genes were found at medium rates of 66.7% each and K2 (55.6%). The Vero cell cytotoxicity and LD (50) in mice were found in 100% of isolates. A multidrug resistance pattern was observed for 40% of the antimicrobials. The distribution of virulence profiles indicate a role of rmpA, kfu, uge, magA, Aerobactin, and K1 and K2 in pathogenicity of K. pneumoniae in udder infections and invasiveness, and constitutes a threat for vulnerable animals, even more if they are in combination with antibiotic resistance. PMID:24915048

  11. Expanding the phenotypic profile of Kleefstra syndrome: A female with low-average intelligence and childhood apraxia of speech.

    PubMed

    Samango-Sprouse, Carole; Lawson, Patrick; Sprouse, Courtney; Stapleton, Emily; Sadeghin, Teresa; Gropman, Andrea

    2016-05-01

    Kleefstra syndrome (KS) is a rare neurogenetic disorder most commonly caused by deletion in the 9q34.3 chromosomal region and is associated with intellectual disabilities, severe speech delay, and motor planning deficits. To our knowledge, this is the first patient (PQ, a 6-year-old female) with a 9q34.3 deletion who has near normal intelligence, and developmental dyspraxia with childhood apraxia of speech (CAS). At 6, the Wechsler Preschool and Primary Intelligence testing (WPPSI-III) revealed a Verbal IQ of 81 and Performance IQ of 79. The Beery Buktenica Test of Visual Motor Integration, 5th Edition (VMI) indicated severe visual motor deficits: VMI = 51; Visual Perception = 48; Motor Coordination < 45. On the Receptive One Word Picture Vocabulary Test-R (ROWPVT-R), she had standard scores of 96 and 99 in contrast to an Expressive One Word Picture Vocabulary-R (EOWPVT-R) standard scores of 73 and 82, revealing a discrepancy in vocabulary domains on both evaluations. Preschool Language Scale-4 (PLS-4) on PQ's first evaluation reveals a significant difference between auditory comprehension and expressive communication with standard scores of 78 and 57, respectively, further supporting the presence of CAS. This patient's near normal intelligence expands the phenotypic profile as well as the prognosis associated with KS. The identification of CAS in this patient provides a novel explanation for the previously reported speech delay and expressive language disorder. Further research is warranted on the impact of CAS on intelligence and behavioral outcome in KS. Therapeutic and prognostic implications are discussed. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. OFFgel-based multidimensional LC-MS/MS approach to the cataloguing of the human platelet proteome for an interactomic profile.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, Shibu; Gaspari, Marco; Della Corte, Anna; Bianchi, Patrizia; Crescente, Marilena; Cerletti, Chiara; Torella, Daniele; Indolfi, Ciro; de Gaetano, Giovanni; Donati, Maria Benedetta; Rotilio, Domenico; Cuda, Giovanni

    2011-03-01

    The proteome of quiescent human platelets was analyzed by a shotgun proteomics approach consisting of enzymatic digestion, peptide separation based on isoelectric point by the use of OFFgel fractionation and, finally, RP nanoscale chromatography coupled to MS/MS detection (nano-LC-MS/MS). OFFgel fractionation in the first dimension was effective in providing an additional dimension of separation, orthogonal to RP nano-LC, thus generating an off-line multidimensional separation platform that proved to be robust and easy to set up. The analysis identified 1373 proteins with high confidence (false discovery rate<0.25%). The core set of 1373 human platelet proteins was investigated by Ingenuity Pathway Analysis software from which ten canonical pathways and eight networks have been validated, to suggest that platelets behave either as inflammatory or immune cells, and plasma membrane and cytoskeleton proteins play a fundamental role in their function. Moreover, toxicity pathway in agreement with network analysis, supports the concept that platelet life span is governed by an apoptotic mechanism. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Multidimensional Liquid Chromatography Platform for Profiling Alterations of Clusterin N-Glycosylation in the Plasma of Patients with Renal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Tousi, Fateme; Bones, Jonathan; Iliopoulos, Othon; Hancock, William S.; Hincapie, Marina

    2012-01-01

    Identification of potential changes in the glycosylation of existing cancer biomarkers can result in a higher level of diagnostic sensitivity and specificity. Clusterin (Apolipoprotein J) has been implicated in renal cell carcinoma (RCC) and other types of malignancy as potential biomarker. In the present work, an automated multidimensional HPLC platform enabling high throughput affinity enrichment of clusterin from plasma samples was developed. Integrated with two dimensional gel electrophoresis, high purity clusterin in microgram quantities suitable for glycan characterization was isolated. The analytical platform was applied to study clusterin glycosylation in a small group of RCC patients before and after nephrectopy as a pilot study to evaluate the performance of the platform. A statistically significant decrease was observed in the levels of a bi-antennary digalactosyl disialylated (A2G2S(3)2) glycans while the levels of a core fucosylated bi-antennary digalactosyl disialylated glycan (FA2G2S(6)2) and a tri-antennary trigalactosyl disialylated glycan (A3G3S(6)2) were increased in the post-surgery plasma samples. PMID:22885037

  14. Phenotypic Transition as a Survival Strategy of Glioma

    PubMed Central

    ICHIKAWA, Tomotsugu; OTANI, Yoshihiro; KUROZUMI, Kazuhiko; DATE, Isao

    2016-01-01

    Malignant glioma is characterized by rapid proliferation, invasion into surrounding central nervous system tissues, and aberrant vascularization. There is increasing evidence that shows gliomas are more complex than previously thought, as each tumor comprises considerable intratumoral heterogeneity with mixtures of genetically and phenotypically distinct subclones. Heterogeneity within and across tumors is recognized as a critical factor that limits therapeutic progress for malignant glioma. Recent genotyping and expression profiling of gliomas has allowed for the creation of classification schemes that assign tumors to subtypes based on similarity to defined expression signatures. Also, malignant gliomas frequently shift their biological features upon recurrence and progression. The ability of glioma cells to resist adverse conditions such as hypoxia and metabolic stress is necessary for sustained tumor growth and strongly influences tumor behaviors. In general, glioma cells are in one of two phenotypic categories: higher proliferative activity with angiogenesis, or higher migratory activity with attenuated proliferative ability. Further, they switch phenotypic categories depending on the situation. To date, a multidimensional approach has been employed to clarify the mechanisms of phenotypic shift of glioma. Various molecular and signaling pathways are involved in phenotypic shifts of glioma, possibly with crosstalk between them. In this review, we discuss molecular and phenotypic heterogeneity of glioma cells and mechanisms of phenotypic shifts in regard to the glioma proliferation, angiogenesis, and invasion. A better understanding of the molecular mechanisms that underlie phenotypic shifts of glioma may provide new insights into targeted therapeutic strategies. PMID:27169497

  15. Phenotypic Transition as a Survival Strategy of Glioma.

    PubMed

    Ichikawa, Tomotsugu; Otani, Yoshihiro; Kurozumi, Kazuhiko; Date, Isao

    2016-07-15

    Malignant glioma is characterized by rapid proliferation, invasion into surrounding central nervous system tissues, and aberrant vascularization. There is increasing evidence that shows gliomas are more complex than previously thought, as each tumor comprises considerable intratumoral heterogeneity with mixtures of genetically and phenotypically distinct subclones. Heterogeneity within and across tumors is recognized as a critical factor that limits therapeutic progress for malignant glioma. Recent genotyping and expression profiling of gliomas has allowed for the creation of classification schemes that assign tumors to subtypes based on similarity to defined expression signatures. Also, malignant gliomas frequently shift their biological features upon recurrence and progression. The ability of glioma cells to resist adverse conditions such as hypoxia and metabolic stress is necessary for sustained tumor growth and strongly influences tumor behaviors. In general, glioma cells are in one of two phenotypic categories: higher proliferative activity with angiogenesis, or higher migratory activity with attenuated proliferative ability. Further, they switch phenotypic categories depending on the situation. To date, a multidimensional approach has been employed to clarify the mechanisms of phenotypic shift of glioma. Various molecular and signaling pathways are involved in phenotypic shifts of glioma, possibly with crosstalk between them. In this review, we discuss molecular and phenotypic heterogeneity of glioma cells and mechanisms of phenotypic shifts in regard to the glioma proliferation, angiogenesis, and invasion. A better understanding of the molecular mechanisms that underlie phenotypic shifts of glioma may provide new insights into targeted therapeutic strategies.

  16. Multidimensional chromatography in food analysis.

    PubMed

    Herrero, Miguel; Ibáñez, Elena; Cifuentes, Alejandro; Bernal, Jose

    2009-10-23

    In this work, the main developments and applications of multidimensional chromatographic techniques in food analysis are reviewed. Different aspects related to the existing couplings involving chromatographic techniques are examined. These couplings include multidimensional GC, multidimensional LC, multidimensional SFC as well as all their possible combinations. Main advantages and drawbacks of each coupling are critically discussed and their key applications in food analysis described.

  17. Multidimensional Risk Analysis: MRISK

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCollum, Raymond; Brown, Douglas; O'Shea, Sarah Beth; Reith, William; Rabulan, Jennifer; Melrose, Graeme

    2015-01-01

    Multidimensional Risk (MRISK) calculates the combined multidimensional score using Mahalanobis distance. MRISK accounts for covariance between consequence dimensions, which de-conflicts the interdependencies of consequence dimensions, providing a clearer depiction of risks. Additionally, in the event the dimensions are not correlated, Mahalanobis distance reduces to Euclidean distance normalized by the variance and, therefore, represents the most flexible and optimal method to combine dimensions. MRISK is currently being used in NASA's Environmentally Responsible Aviation (ERA) project o assess risk and prioritize scarce resources.

  18. Multidimensional profiling of CSF1R screening hits and inhibitors: assessing cellular activity, target residence time, and selectivity in a higher throughput way.

    PubMed

    Uitdehaag, Joost C M; Sünnen, Cecile M; van Doornmalen, Antoon M; de Rouw, Nikki; Oubrie, Arthur; Azevedo, Rita; Ziebell, Michael; Nickbarg, Elliott; Karstens, Willem-Jan; Ruygrok, Simone

    2011-10-01

    Over the past years, improvements in high-throughput screening (HTS) technology and compound libraries have resulted in a dramatic increase in the amounts of good-quality screening hits, and there is a growing need for follow-on hit profiling assays with medium throughput to further triage hits. Here the authors present such assays for the colony-stimulating factor 1 receptor (CSF1R, Fms), including tests for cellular activity and a homogeneous assay to measure affinity for inactive CSF1R. They also present a high-throughput assay to measure target residence time, which is based on competitive binding kinetics. To better fit k(off) rates, they present a modified mathematical model for competitive kinetics. In all assays, they profiled eight reference inhibitors (imatinib, sorafenib, sunitinib, tandutinib, dasatinib, GW2580, Ki20227, and J&J's pyrido[2,3-d]pyrimidin-5-one). Using the known biochemical selectivities of these inhibitors, which can be quantified using metrics such as the selectivity entropy, the authors have determined which assay readout best predicts hit selectivity. Their profiling shows surprisingly that imatinib has a preference for the active form of CSF1R and that Ki20227 has an unusually slow target dissociation rate. This confirms that follow-on hit profiling is essential to ensure that the best hits are selected for lead optimization.

  19. Computational Typologies of Multidimensional End-of-Primary-School Performance Profiles from an Educational Perspective of Large-Scale TIMSS and PIRLS Surveys

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Unlu, Ali; Schurig, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Recently, performance profiles in reading, mathematics and science were created using the data collectively available in the Trends in International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS) and the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study (PIRLS) 2011. In addition, a classification of children to the end of their primary school years was…

  20. The SSB-positive/SSA-negative antibody profile is not associated with key phenotypic features of Sjögren's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Baer, Alan N; McAdams DeMarco, Mara; Shiboski, Stephen C; Lam, Mi Y; Challacombe, Stephen; Daniels, Troy E; Dong, Yi; Greenspan, John S; Kirkham, Bruce W; Lanfranchi, Hector E; Schiødt, Morten; Srinivasan, Muthiah; Umehara, Hisanori; Vivino, Frederick B; Vollenweider, Cristina F; Zhao, Yan; Criswell, Lindsey A; Shiboski, Caroline H

    2015-08-01

    To determine whether the Sjögren's syndrome B (SSB)-positive/Sjögren's syndrome A (SSA)-negative antibody profile is associated with key phenotypic features of SS. Among registrants in the Sjögren's International Collaborative Clinical Alliance (SICCA) with possible or established SS, we compared anti-SSA/anti-SSB reactivity profiles against concurrent phenotypic features. We fitted logistic regression models to explore the association between anti-SSA/anti-SSB reactivity profile and each key SS phenotypic feature, controlling for potential confounders. Among 3297 participants, 2061 (63%) had negative anti-SSA/anti-SSB, 1162 (35%) had anti-SSA with or without anti-SSB, and 74 (2%) anti-SSB alone. Key SS phenotypic features were more prevalent and had measures indicative of greater disease activity in those participants with anti-SSA, either alone or with anti-SSB, than in those with anti-SSB alone or negative SSA/SSB serology. These between-group differences were highly significant and not explained by confounding by age, race/ethnicity or gender. Participants with anti-SSB alone were comparable to those with negative SSA/SSB serology in their association with these key phenotypic features. Among SICCA participants classified with SS on the basis of the American-European Consensus Group or American College of Rheumatology criteria, only 2% required the anti-SSB-alone test result to meet these criteria. The presence of anti-SSB, without anti-SSA antibodies, had no significant association with SS phenotypic features, relative to seronegative participants. The solitary presence of anti-SSB antibodies does not provide any more support than negative serology for the diagnosis of SS. This serological profile should thus be interpreted cautiously in clinical practice and potentially eliminated from future classification criteria. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  1. Identification of cis and trans-acting transcriptional regulators in chondroinduced fibroblasts from the pre-phenotypic gene expression profile.

    PubMed

    Yates, Karen E

    2006-08-01

    Cell differentiation is regulated via expression of successive sets of genes. In an in vitro model of chondrocyte differentiation, human dermal fibroblasts (hDFs) cultured in collagen sponges are induced to express cartilage matrix genes after 7 days' culture with demineralized bone powder (DBP). A shift in expression of many other genes occurs within 3 days, before chondroblast phenotypic genes are detectable. In this study, the pre-chondrogenic gene expression profile was used as a starting point to derive information on transcriptional regulation of chondrocyte differentiation induced by DBP. Putative cis regulatory elements were identified by comparing promoter regions from three genes that are highly upregulated in chondroinduced hDFs (BIGH3, COL1A2, and FN1) [Zhou, S., Glowacki, J., Yates, K.E, 2004. Comparison of TGF-beta/BMP pathways signaled by demineralized bone powder and BMP-2 in human dermal fibroblasts. J. Bone Min. Res. 19, 1732-1741] and whose products are known to interact in the matrix [Kim, J.E., et al., 2002. Molecular properties of wild-type and mutant betaIG-H3 proteins. Investig. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 43, 656-661]. The effect of DBP on nuclear protein binding to cis elements was measured with an array-based assay. Nuclear extracts from hDFs cultured in DBP/collagen sponges for 3 days showed increased binding to several cis elements belonging to the families that were identified by promoter analysis. Of note, those elements represented targets of both signal-activated and developmentally regulated transcription factors. Direct measurement of mRNAs showed increased gene expression of both types of transcription factors in chondroinduced hDFs, including NFKB2 (290% of control), RELA (160%), and GATA2 (190%). Moreover, DBP increased gene expression of chondrogenic transcription factors SOX9 (160% of control) and RUNX2 (180%). Immunoblot analysis showed that DBP increased both expression (200% of control) and phosphorylation (300%) of the Creb

  2. Metabolic parameters linked by Phenotype MicroArray to acid resistance profiles of poultry-associated Salmonella enterica

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Phenotype microarrays were analyzed for 51 datasets derived from Salmonella enterica. The top 4 serovars associated with poultry products and one associated with turkey, respectively Typhimurium, Enteritidis, Heidelberg, Infantis and Senftenberg, were represented. Datasets were clustered into two ...

  3. Genetic Polymorphisms and Phenotypic Profiles of Sulfadiazine-Resistant and Sensitive Toxoplasma gondii Isolates Obtained from Newborns with Congenital Toxoplasmosis in Minas Gerais, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Silva, Letícia Azevedo; Reis-Cunha, João Luís; Bartholomeu, Daniella Castanheira; Vítor, Ricardo Wagner Almeida

    2017-01-01

    Previous Toxoplasma gondii studies revealed that mutations in the dhps (dihydropteroate synthase) gene are associated with resistance to sulfonamides. Although Brazilian strains are genotypically different, very limited data are available regarding the susceptibility of strains obtained from human to sulfonamides. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of sulfadiazine (SDZ) against Brazilian isolates of T. gondii and verify whether isolates present polymorphisms in the dhps gene. We also investigated whether the virulence-phenotype and/or genotype were associated with the profile of susceptibility to SDZ. Five T. gondii isolates obtained from newborns with congenital toxoplasmosis were used to verify susceptibility. Mice were infected with 104 tachyzoites and orally treated with different doses of SDZ. The mortality curve was evaluated by the Log-rank test. The presence of polymorphisms in the dhps gene was verified using sequencing. A descriptive analysis for 11 Brazilian isolates was used to assess the association between susceptibility, genotype, and virulence-phenotype. Statistical analysis showed that TgCTBr03, 07, 08, and 16 isolates were susceptible to SDZ, whereas TgCTBr11 isolate presented a profile of resistance to SDZ. Nineteen polymorphisms were identified in dhps exons. Seven polymorphisms corresponded to non-synonymous mutations, with four being new mutations, described for the first time in this study. No association was found between the profile of susceptibility and the virulence-phenotype or genotype of the parasite. There is a high variability in the susceptibilities of Brazilian T. gondii strains to SDZ, with evidence of drug resistance. Despite the large number of polymorphisms identified, the profile of susceptibility to SDZ was not associated with any of the dhps variants identified in this study. Other genetic factors, not yet determined, may be associated with the resistance to SDZ; thus, further studies are needed as a basis

  4. Genetic Polymorphisms and Phenotypic Profiles of Sulfadiazine-Resistant and Sensitive Toxoplasma gondii Isolates Obtained from Newborns with Congenital Toxoplasmosis in Minas Gerais, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Letícia Azevedo; Reis-Cunha, João Luís; Bartholomeu, Daniella Castanheira; Vítor, Ricardo Wagner Almeida

    2017-01-01

    Background Previous Toxoplasma gondii studies revealed that mutations in the dhps (dihydropteroate synthase) gene are associated with resistance to sulfonamides. Although Brazilian strains are genotypically different, very limited data are available regarding the susceptibility of strains obtained from human to sulfonamides. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of sulfadiazine (SDZ) against Brazilian isolates of T. gondii and verify whether isolates present polymorphisms in the dhps gene. We also investigated whether the virulence-phenotype and/or genotype were associated with the profile of susceptibility to SDZ. Methods Five T. gondii isolates obtained from newborns with congenital toxoplasmosis were used to verify susceptibility. Mice were infected with 104 tachyzoites and orally treated with different doses of SDZ. The mortality curve was evaluated by the Log-rank test. The presence of polymorphisms in the dhps gene was verified using sequencing. A descriptive analysis for 11 Brazilian isolates was used to assess the association between susceptibility, genotype, and virulence-phenotype. Results Statistical analysis showed that TgCTBr03, 07, 08, and 16 isolates were susceptible to SDZ, whereas TgCTBr11 isolate presented a profile of resistance to SDZ. Nineteen polymorphisms were identified in dhps exons. Seven polymorphisms corresponded to non-synonymous mutations, with four being new mutations, described for the first time in this study. No association was found between the profile of susceptibility and the virulence-phenotype or genotype of the parasite. Conclusions There is a high variability in the susceptibilities of Brazilian T. gondii strains to SDZ, with evidence of drug resistance. Despite the large number of polymorphisms identified, the profile of susceptibility to SDZ was not associated with any of the dhps variants identified in this study. Other genetic factors, not yet determined, may be associated with the resistance to SDZ; thus

  5. Identification of Distinct Monocyte Phenotypes and Correlation with Circulating Cytokine Profiles in Acute Response to Spinal Cord Injury: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Wan; Vodovotz, Yoram; Kusturiss, Mary B.; Barclay, Derek; Greenwald, Karen; Boninger, Michael L.; Coen, Paul M.; Brienza, David; Sowa, Gwendolyn

    2014-01-01

    Background Macrophage infiltration to the injury site during the acute response to traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI) is not uniform. Macrophage phenotype has been characterized as either pro-inflammatory (M1) or anti-inflammatory (M2). Animal studies suggest that M1/M2 dominance at the site of injury relates to spontaneous recovery following SCI. Objective To investigate whether the phenotype of circulating macrophage precursors-monocytes (MOs), is altered in the acute phase of SCI and corresponds to circulating inflammatory cytokines. Study Design Prospective observational cohort study. Setting A single academic medical center in Pennsylvania, US. Patients A cohort of 27 complete or incomplete traumatic SCI subjects enrolled within 7 days post-SCI injury. Methods MO phenotype was defined within the first week post-SCI, using flow cytometry, and compared to historical uninjured controls. Concentrations of 25 cytokines/chemokines were assessed using Luminex in serial blood samples up to two weeks post-SCI. ANOVA was used to determine the correlations between the phenotypes and the cytokine profiles. Results Patients subsets were identified with either M1 dominant or M2 dominant circulating MOs distinct from the uninjured controls. The M1-dominant was associated with higher circulating levels of pro-inflammatory mediators IL-12p70 and IP-10, and lower levels of anti-inflammatory cytokines IL-10, IL-15 and IL-7, whereas the M2-dominant exhibited the opposite cytokine profiles with significantly higher IL-10 and IL-7. Conclusion In the acute phase after SCI, at comparable injury severity, subgroups of patients exhibit distinct M1/M2 MOs dominance and the phenotype is correlated with M1 or M2-specific cytokine/chemokine profiles. Though further studies are needed to determine how these observed phenotypic differences relate to functional recovery, our findings 1) provide the first evidence indicating the possible individual differences in the immune responses to the

  6. Numerical approaches for multidimensional simulations of stellar explosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ke-Jung; Heger, Alexander; Almgren, Ann S.

    2013-11-01

    We introduce numerical algorithms for initializing multidimensional simulations of stellar explosions with 1D stellar evolution models. The initial mapping from 1D profiles onto multidimensional grids can generate severe numerical artifacts, one of the most severe of which is the violation of conservation laws for physical quantities. We introduce a numerical scheme for mapping 1D spherically-symmetric data onto multidimensional meshes so that these physical quantities are conserved. We verify our scheme by porting a realistic 1D Lagrangian stellar profile to the new multidimensional Eulerian hydro code CASTRO. Our results show that all important features in the profiles are reproduced on the new grid and that conservation laws are enforced at all resolutions after mapping. We also introduce a numerical scheme for initializing multidimensional supernova simulations with realistic perturbations predicted by 1D stellar evolution models. Instead of seeding 3D stellar profiles with random perturbations, we imprint them with velocity perturbations that reproduce the Kolmogorov energy spectrum expected for highly turbulent convective regions in stars. Our models return Kolmogorov energy spectra and vortex structures like those in turbulent flows before the modes become nonlinear. Finally, we describe approaches to determining the resolution for simulations required to capture fluid instabilities and nuclear burning. Our algorithms are applicable to multidimensional simulations besides stellar explosions that range from astrophysics to cosmology.

  7. Multidimensional spectral load balancing

    SciTech Connect

    Hendrickson, B.; Leland, R.

    1993-01-01

    We describe an algorithm for the static load balancing of scientific computations that generalizes and improves upon spectral bisection. Through a novel use of multiple eigenvectors, our new spectral algorithm can divide a computation into 4 or 8 pieces at once. These multidimensional spectral partitioning algorithms generate balanced partitions that have lower communication overhead and are less expensive to compute than those produced by spectral bisection. In addition, they automatically work to minimize message contention on a hypercube or mesh architecture. These spectral partitions are further improved by a multidimensional generalization of the Kernighan-Lin graph partitioning algorithm. Results on several computational grids are given and compared with other popular methods.

  8. CD4+ T-Cell Profiles and Peripheral Blood Ex-Vivo Responses to T-Cell Directed Stimulation Delineate COPD Phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Mustimbo E P; Higgs, Brandon W; Brohawn, Philip; Pilataxi, Fernanda; Guo, Xiang; Kuziora, Michael; Bowler, Russell P; White, Wendy I

    2015-08-23

    The heterogeneous clinical phenotypes of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) challenge successful drug development. To identify COPD subgroups beyond clinical phenotypes, we interrogated blood immune cell profiles and ex-vivo responses of current and former smokers, with or without COPD, in the longitudinal COPD Genetic Epidemiology study (COPDGene) cohort. CD4+ and CD8+ T cells and monocytes were profiled by flow cytometry. Microarray analysis was performed on the RNA from the aforementioned isolated cells. T-cell directed whole blood ex-vivo stimulation was used to assess functional responses. Blood CD4+ T-cell transcript analysis distinguished patients with COPD from control smokers and also enriched for a subset of patients with COPD that had a history of exacerbations of the disease. Analogous analyses of CD8+ T cells and monocytes failed to discriminate patients with COPD from the control population. Patients with COPD had a diminished cytokine response, compared to control smokers, characterized by low levels of granulocyte-monocyte colony stimulation factor (GM-CSF), interferon gamma (IFN-ɣ), interleukin one-alpha (IL-1α), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) and tumor necrosis factor-beta (TNF-β) secreted in response to T-cell directed ex-vivo stimulation. This cytokine response associated with baseline disease severity (forced expiratory volume in 1 second [FEV1]% predicted), rapidly declining lung function, and emphysema. Our observations indicate that COPD phenotypes can be further differentiated based on blood CD4+ T-cell profiles and resultant immune responses, suggesting a role for these cells in COPD pathophysiology.

  9. Effects of a weight loss program on body composition and the metabolic profile in obese postmenopausal women displaying various obesity phenotypes: a MONET group study.

    PubMed

    Normandin, Eve; Doucet, Eric; Rabasa-Lhoret, Rémi; Brochu, Martin

    2015-07-01

    Obesity is a heterogeneous condition, since the metabolic profile may differ greatly from one individual to another. The objective of this study was to compare the effect of a 6-month diet-induced weight loss program on body composition and the metabolic profile in obese individuals displaying different obesity phenotypes. Secondary analyses were done on 129 obese (% body fat: 46% ± 4%) postmenopausal women (age: 57 ± 4 years). Outcome measures included body composition, body fat distribution, glucose homeostasis, fasting lipids, and blood pressure. Obesity phenotypes were determined based on lean body mass (LBM) index (LBMI = LBM/height(2)) and visceral fat (VF) accumulation, as follows: 1, lower VF and lower LBMI (n = 35); 2, lower VF and higher LBMI (n = 19); 3, higher VF and lower LBMI (n = 14); and 4, higher VF and higher LBMI (n = 61). All groups had significantly improved measures of body composition after the intervention (P < 0.0001). Greater decreases in LBM and LBMI were observed in the higher LBMI groups than in the lower LBMI groups (P < 0.0001). Similarly, decreases in VF were greater in the higher VF groups than in the lower VF groups (P < 0.05). Overall, fasting insulin levels and glucose disposal improved following the intervention, with higher LBMI groups showing a trend for greater improvements (P = 0.06 and 0.07, respectively). Overall, no difference was observed among the different obesity phenotypes regarding improvements in the metabolic profile in response to weight loss. Individuals displaying higher VF or higher LBMI at baseline experienced significantly greater decreases for these variables after the intervention.

  10. Genetic profiling of two phenotypically distinct outbred rats derived from a colony of the Zucker fatty rats maintained at Tokyo Medical University.

    PubMed

    Nakanishi, Satoshi; Kuramoto, Takashi; Kashiwazaki, Naomi; Yokoi, Norihide

    2017-05-03

    The Zucker fatty (ZF) rat is an outbred rat and a well-known model of obesity without diabetes, harboring a missense mutation (fatty, abbreviated as fa) in the leptin receptor gene (Lepr). Slc:Zucker (Slc:ZF) outbred rats exhibit obesity while Hos:ZFDM-Lepr(fa) (Hos:ZFDM) outbred rats exhibit obesity and type 2 diabetes. Both outbred rats have been derived from an outbred ZF rat colony maintained at Tokyo Medical University. So far, genetic profiles of these outbred rats remain unknown. Here, we applied a simple genotyping method using Ampdirect reagents and FTA cards (Amp-FTA) in combination with simple sequence length polymorphisms (SSLP) markers to determine genetic profiles of Slc:ZF and Hos:ZFDM rats. Among 27 SSLP marker loci, 24 loci (89%) were fixed for specific allele at each locus in Slc:ZF rats and 26 loci (96%) were fixed in Hos:ZFDM rats, respectively. This indicates the low genetic heterogeneity in both colonies of outbred rats. Nine loci (33%) showed different alleles between the two outbred rats, suggesting considerably different genetic profiles between the two outbred rats in spite of the same origin. Additional analysis using 72 SSLP markers further supported these results and clarified the profiles in detail. This study revealed that genetic profiles of the Slc:ZF and Hos:ZFDM outbred rats are different for about 30% of the SSLP marker loci, which is the underlying basis for the phenotypic difference between the two outbred rats.

  11. Global nutrient profiling by Phenotype MicroArrays: a tool complementing genomic and proteomic studies in conidial fungi*

    PubMed Central

    Atanasova, Lea; Druzhinina, Irina S.

    2010-01-01

    Conidial fungi or molds and mildews are widely used in modern biotechnology as producers of antibiotics and other secondary metabolites, industrially important enzymes, chemicals and food. They are also important pathogens of animals including humans and agricultural crops. These various applications and extremely versatile natural phenotypes have led to the constantly growing list of complete genomes which are now available. Functional genomics and proteomics widely exploit the genomic information to study the cell-wide impact of altered genes on the phenotype of an organism and its function. This allows for global analysis of the information flow from DNA to RNA to protein, but it is usually not sufficient for the description of the global phenotype of an organism. More recently, Phenotype MicroArray (PM) technology has been introduced as a tool to characterize the metabolism of a (wild) fungal strain or a mutant. In this article, we review the background of PM applications for fungi and the methodic requirements to obtain reliable results. We also report examples of the versatility of this tool. PMID:20205302

  12. Profiles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Macintosh, Henry G.

    An introduction to profiles is presented with examples provided to permit an overall appraisal of the potential of profiles, of the principles upon which they might be based, and of the problems that will have to be overcome if their potential is to be realized in practice. The larger scale examples of profiles discussed are the Scottish Pupil…

  13. Comparison of phenotypic and genotypic antimicrobial profiles in Eschericia coli and Salmonella enterica from the same dairy cattle farms

    PubMed Central

    Scaria, Joy; Warnick, Lorin D; Kaneene, John B.; May, Katherine; Teng, Ching-Hao; Chang, Yung-Fu

    2010-01-01

    Transmission of antimicrobial drug resistance from resistant bacteria to non-resistant strains is an important public health issue. In this study, we have examined the possibility of multiple resistance gene transfer between Escherichia coli and Salmonella in the natural setting. Bacteria isolated from calves concurrently shedding E. coli and Salmonella showed similar antimicrobial drug resistance patterns as measured by a broth dilution method. However, microarray analysis of the antibiotic resistance at the gene level revealed several differences in resistance gene profile. Resistance profiles of E. coli isolated from different farms were closer than the profile of E. coli and Salmonella isolated from the same farm. This shows that the chance of multiple resistance gene transfers between these species is unlikely. PMID:20688154

  14. Toward performance-diverse small-molecule libraries for cell-based phenotypic screening using multiplexed high-dimensional profiling

    PubMed Central

    Wawer, Mathias J.; Li, Kejie; Gustafsdottir, Sigrun M.; Ljosa, Vebjorn; Bodycombe, Nicole E.; Marton, Melissa A.; Sokolnicki, Katherine L.; Bray, Mark-Anthony; Kemp, Melissa M.; Winchester, Ellen; Taylor, Bradley; Grant, George B.; Hon, C. Suk-Yee; Duvall, Jeremy R.; Wilson, J. Anthony; Bittker, Joshua A.; Dančík, Vlado; Narayan, Rajiv; Subramanian, Aravind; Winckler, Wendy; Golub, Todd R.; Carpenter, Anne E.; Shamji, Alykhan F.; Schreiber, Stuart L.; Clemons, Paul A.

    2014-01-01

    High-throughput screening has become a mainstay of small-molecule probe and early drug discovery. The question of how to build and evolve efficient screening collections systematically for cell-based and biochemical screening is still unresolved. It is often assumed that chemical structure diversity leads to diverse biological performance of a library. Here, we confirm earlier results showing that this inference is not always valid and suggest instead using biological measurement diversity derived from multiplexed profiling in the construction of libraries with diverse assay performance patterns for cell-based screens. Rather than using results from tens or hundreds of completed assays, which is resource intensive and not easily extensible, we use high-dimensional image-based cell morphology and gene expression profiles. We piloted this approach using over 30,000 compounds. We show that small-molecule profiling can be used to select compound sets with high rates of activity and diverse biological performance. PMID:25024206

  15. Saccular Transcriptome Profiles of the Seasonal Breeding Plainfin Midshipman Fish (Porichthys notatus), a Teleost with Divergent Sexual Phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Faber-Hammond, Joshua; Samanta, Manoj P.; Whitchurch, Elizabeth A.; Manning, Dustin; Sisneros, Joseph A.; Coffin, Allison B.

    2015-01-01

    Acoustic communication is essential for the reproductive success of the plainfin midshipman fish (Porichthys notatus). During the breeding season, type I males use acoustic cues to advertise nest location to potential mates, creating an audible signal that attracts reproductive females. Type II (sneaker) males also likely use this social acoustic signal to find breeding pairs from which to steal fertilizations. Estrogen-induced changes in the auditory system of breeding females are thought to enhance neural encoding of the advertisement call, and recent anatomical data suggest the saccule (the main auditory end organ) as one possible target for this seasonal modulation. Here we describe saccular transcriptomes from all three sexual phenotypes (females, type I and II males) collected during the breeding season as a first step in understanding the mechanisms underlying sexual phenotype-specific and seasonal differences in auditory function. We used RNA-Seq on the Ion Torrent platform to create a combined transcriptome dataset containing over 79,000 assembled transcripts representing almost 9,000 unique annotated genes. These identified genes include several with known inner ear function and multiple steroid hormone receptors. Transcripts most closely matched to published genomes of nile tilapia and large yellow croaker, inconsistent with the phylogenetic relationship between these species but consistent with the importance of acoustic communication in their life-history strategies. We then compared the RNA-Seq results from the saccules of reproductive females with a separate transcriptome from the non-reproductive female phenotype and found over 700 differentially expressed transcripts, including members of the Wnt and Notch signaling pathways that mediate cell proliferation and hair cell addition in the inner ear. These data constitute a valuable resource for furthering our understanding of the molecular basis for peripheral auditory function as well as a range of

  16. Saccular Transcriptome Profiles of the Seasonal Breeding Plainfin Midshipman Fish (Porichthys notatus), a Teleost with Divergent Sexual Phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Faber-Hammond, Joshua; Samanta, Manoj P; Whitchurch, Elizabeth A; Manning, Dustin; Sisneros, Joseph A; Coffin, Allison B

    2015-01-01

    Acoustic communication is essential for the reproductive success of the plainfin midshipman fish (Porichthys notatus). During the breeding season, type I males use acoustic cues to advertise nest location to potential mates, creating an audible signal that attracts reproductive females. Type II (sneaker) males also likely use this social acoustic signal to find breeding pairs from which to steal fertilizations. Estrogen-induced changes in the auditory system of breeding females are thought to enhance neural encoding of the advertisement call, and recent anatomical data suggest the saccule (the main auditory end organ) as one possible target for this seasonal modulation. Here we describe saccular transcriptomes from all three sexual phenotypes (females, type I and II males) collected during the breeding season as a first step in understanding the mechanisms underlying sexual phenotype-specific and seasonal differences in auditory function. We used RNA-Seq on the Ion Torrent platform to create a combined transcriptome dataset containing over 79,000 assembled transcripts representing almost 9,000 unique annotated genes. These identified genes include several with known inner ear function and multiple steroid hormone receptors. Transcripts most closely matched to published genomes of nile tilapia and large yellow croaker, inconsistent with the phylogenetic relationship between these species but consistent with the importance of acoustic communication in their life-history strategies. We then compared the RNA-Seq results from the saccules of reproductive females with a separate transcriptome from the non-reproductive female phenotype and found over 700 differentially expressed transcripts, including members of the Wnt and Notch signaling pathways that mediate cell proliferation and hair cell addition in the inner ear. These data constitute a valuable resource for furthering our understanding of the molecular basis for peripheral auditory function as well as a range of

  17. Multidimensional capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Grochocki, Wojciech; Markuszewski, Michał J; Quirino, Joselito P

    2015-01-01

    Multidimensional separation where two or more orthogonal displacement mechanisms are combined is a promising approach to increase peak capacity in CE. The combinations allow dramatic improvement of analytical performance since the total peak capacity is given by a product of the peak capacities of all methods. The initial reports were concentrated on the construction of effective connections between capillaries for 2D analysis. Today, 2D and 3D CE systems are now able to separate real complex biological or environmental mixtures with good repeatability, improved resolution with minimal loss of sample. This review will present the developments in the field of multidimensional CE during the last 15 years. The endeavors in this specific field were on the development of interfaces, interface-free techniques including integrated separations, microdevices, and on-line sample concentration techniques to improve detection sensitivity.

  18. Multidimensional diffusion MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Topgaard, Daniel

    2017-02-01

    Principles from multidimensional NMR spectroscopy, and in particular solid-state NMR, have recently been transferred to the field of diffusion MRI, offering non-invasive characterization of heterogeneous anisotropic materials, such as the human brain, at an unprecedented level of detail. Here we revisit the basic physics of solid-state NMR and diffusion MRI to pinpoint the origin of the somewhat unexpected analogy between the two fields, and provide an overview of current diffusion MRI acquisition protocols and data analysis methods to quantify the composition of heterogeneous materials in terms of diffusion tensor distributions with size, shape, and orientation dimensions. While the most advanced methods allow estimation of the complete multidimensional distributions, simpler methods focus on various projections onto lower-dimensional spaces as well as determination of means and variances rather than actual distributions. Even the less advanced methods provide simple and intuitive scalar parameters that are directly related to microstructural features that can be observed in optical microscopy images, e.g. average cell eccentricity, variance of cell density, and orientational order - properties that are inextricably entangled in conventional diffusion MRI. Key to disentangling all these microstructural features is MRI signal acquisition combining isotropic and directional dimensions, just as in the field of multidimensional solid-state NMR from which most of the ideas for the new methods are derived.

  19. Appropriately differentiated ARPE-19 cells regain phenotype and gene expression profiles similar to those of native RPE cells

    PubMed Central

    Jaworski, Cynthia; Postnikova, Olga. A.; Kutty, R. Krishnan; Duncan, Todd; Tan, Li Xuan; Poliakov, Eugenia; Lakkaraju, Aparna; Redmond, T. Michael

    2017-01-01

    Purpose The RPE cell line ARPE-19 provides a dependable and widely used alternative to native RPE. However, replication of the native RPE phenotype becomes more difficult because these cells lose their specialized phenotype after multiple passages. Compounding this problem is the widespread use of ARPE-19 cells in an undifferentiated state to attempt to model RPE functions. We wished to determine whether suitable culture conditions and differentiation could restore the RPE-appropriate expression of genes and proteins to ARPE-19, along with a functional and morphological phenotype resembling native RPE. We compared the transcriptome of ARPE-19 cells kept in long-term culture with those of primary and other human RPE cells to assess the former’s inherent plasticity relative to the latter. Methods ARPE-19 cells at passages 9 to 12 grown in DMEM containing high glucose and pyruvate with 1% fetal bovine serum were differentiated for up to 4 months. Immunocytochemistry was performed on ARPE-19 cells grown on filters. Total RNA extracted from ARPE-19 cells cultured for either 4 days or 4 months was used for RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) analysis using a 2 × 50 bp paired end protocol. The RNA-Seq data were analyzed to identify the affected pathways and recognize shared ontological classification among differentially expressed genes. RPE-specific mRNAs and miRNAs were assessed with quantitative real-time (RT)–PCR, and proteins with western blotting. Results ARPE-19 cells grown for 4 months developed the classic native RPE phenotype with heavy pigmentation. RPE-expressed genes, including RPE65, RDH5, and RDH10, as well as miR-204/211, were greatly increased in the ARPE-19 cells maintained at confluence for 4 months. The RNA-Seq analysis provided a comprehensive view of the relative abundance and differential expression of the genes in the differentiated ARPE-19 cells. Of the 16,757 genes with detectable signals, nearly 1,681 genes were upregulated, and 1,629 genes were

  20. CDH23 Mutation and Phenotype Heterogeneity: A Profile of 107 Diverse Families with Usher Syndrome and Nonsyndromic Deafness

    PubMed Central

    Astuto, L. M.; Bork, J. M.; Weston, M. D.; Askew, J. W.; Fields, R. R.; Orten, D. J.; Ohliger, S. J.; Riazuddin, S.; Morell, R. J.; Khan, S.; Riazuddin, S.; Kremer, H.; van Hauwe, P.; Moller, C. G.; Cremers, C. W. R. J.; Ayuso, C.; Heckenlively, J. R.; Rohrschneider, K.; Spandau, U.; Greenberg, J.; Ramesar, R.; Reardon, W.; Bitoun, P.; Millan, J.; Legge, R.; Friedman, T. B.; Kimberling, W. J.

    2002-01-01

    Usher syndrome type I is characterized by congenital hearing loss, retinitis pigmentosa (RP), and variable vestibular areflexia. Usher syndrome type ID, one of seven Usher syndrome type I genetic localizations, have been mapped to a chromosomal interval that overlaps with a nonsyndromic-deafness localization, DFNB12. Mutations in CDH23, a gene that encodes a putative cell-adhesion protein with multiple cadherin-like domains, are responsible for both Usher syndrome and DFNB12 nonsyndromic deafness. Specific CDH23 mutational defects have been identified that differentiate these two phenotypes. Only missense mutations of CDH23 have been observed in families with nonsyndromic deafness, whereas nonsense, frameshift, splice-site, and missense mutations have been identified in families with Usher syndrome. In the present study, a panel of 69 probands with Usher syndrome and 38 probands with recessive nonsyndromic deafness were screened for the presence of mutations in the entire coding region of CDH23, by heteroduplex, single-strand conformation polymorphism, and direct sequence analyses. A total of 36 different CDH23 mutations were detected in 45 families; 33 of these mutations were novel, including 18 missense, 3 nonsense, 5 splicing defects, 5 microdeletions, and 2 insertions. A total of seven mutations were common to more than one family. Numerous exonic and intronic polymorphisms also were detected. Results of ophthalmologic examinations of the patients with nonsyndromic deafness have found asymptomatic RP–like manifestations, indicating that missense mutations may have a subtle effect in the retina. Furthermore, patients with mutations in CDH23 display a wide range of hearing loss and RP phenotypes, differing in severity, age at onset, type, and the presence or absence of vestibular areflexia. PMID:12075507

  1. Multidimensional entropy landscape of quantum criticality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grube, K.; Zaum, S.; Stockert, O.; Si, Q.; Löhneysen, H. V.

    2017-08-01

    The third law of thermodynamics states that the entropy of any system in equilibrium has to vanish at absolute zero temperature. At nonzero temperatures, on the other hand, matter is expected to accumulate entropy near a quantum critical point, where it undergoes a continuous transition from one ground state to another. Here, we determine, based on general thermodynamic principles, the spatial-dimensional profile of the entropy S near a quantum critical point and its steepest descent in the corresponding multidimensional stress space. We demonstrate this approach for the canonical quantum critical compound CeCu 6-xAux near its onset of antiferromagnetic order. We are able to link the directional stress dependence of S to the previously determined geometry of quantum critical fluctuations. Our demonstration of the multidimensional entropy landscape provides the foundation to understand how quantum criticality nucleates novel phases such as high-temperature superconductivity.

  2. Development of a three-dimensional multiscale agent-based tumor model: simulating gene-protein interaction profiles, cell phenotypes and multicellular patterns in brain cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Le; Athale, Chaitanya A; Deisboeck, Thomas S

    2007-01-07

    Experimental evidence suggests that epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-mediated activation of the signaling protein phospholipase Cgamma plays a critical role in a cancer cell's phenotypic decision to either proliferate or to migrate at a given point in time. Here, we present a novel three-dimensional multiscale agent-based model to simulate this cellular decision process in the context of a virtual brain tumor. Each tumor cell is equipped with an EGFR gene-protein interaction network module that also connects to a simplified cell cycle description. The simulation results show that over time proliferative and migratory cell populations not only oscillate but also directly impact the spatio-temporal expansion patterns of the entire cancer system. The percentage change in the concentration of the sub-cellular interaction network's molecular components fluctuates, and, for the 'proliferation-to-migration' switch we find that the phenotype triggering molecular profile to some degree varies as the tumor system grows and the microenvironment changes. We discuss potential implications of these findings for experimental and clinical cancer research.

  3. Phenotypically anchored transcriptome profiling of developmental exposure to the antimicrobial agent, triclosan, reveals hepatotoxicity in embryonic zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Haggard, Derik E; Noyes, Pamela D; Waters, Katrina M; Tanguay, Robert L

    2016-10-01

    Triclosan (TCS) is an antimicrobial agent commonly found in a variety of personal care products and cosmetics. TCS readily enters the environment through wastewater and is detected in human plasma, urine, and breast milk due to its widespread use. Studies have implicated TCS as a disruptor of thyroid and estrogen signaling; therefore, research examining the developmental effects of TCS is warranted. In this study, we used embryonic zebrafish to investigate the developmental toxicity and potential mechanism of action of TCS. Embryos were exposed to graded concentrations of TCS from 6 to 120hours post-fertilization (hpf) and the concentration where 80% of the animals had mortality or morbidity at 120hpf (EC80) was calculated. Transcriptomic profiling was conducted on embryos exposed to the EC80 (7.37μM). We identified a total of 922 significant differentially expressed transcripts (FDR adjusted P-value≤0.05; fold change ≥2). Pathway and gene ontology enrichment analyses identified biological networks and transcriptional hubs involving normal liver functioning, suggesting TCS may be hepatotoxic in zebrafish. Tissue-specific gene enrichment analysis further supported the role of the liver as a target organ for TCS toxicity. We also examined the in vitro bioactivity profile of TCS reported by the ToxCast screening program. TCS had a diverse bioactivity profile and was a hit in 217 of the 385 assay endpoints we identified. We observed similarities in gene expression and hepatic steatosis assays; however, hit data for TCS were more concordant with the hypothesized CAR/PXR activity of TCS from rodent and human in vitro studies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Phenotypic Profiling Reveals that Candida albicans Opaque Cells Represent a Metabolically Specialized Cell State Compared to Default White Cells.

    PubMed

    Ene, Iuliana V; Lohse, Matthew B; Vladu, Adrian V; Morschhäuser, Joachim; Johnson, Alexander D; Bennett, Richard J

    2016-11-22

    The white-opaque switch is a bistable, epigenetic transition affecting multiple traits in Candida albicans including mating, immunogenicity, and niche specificity. To compare how the two cell states respond to external cues, we examined the fitness, phenotypic switching, and filamentation properties of white cells and opaque cells under 1,440 different conditions at 25°C and 37°C. We demonstrate that white and opaque cells display striking differences in their integration of metabolic and thermal cues, so that the two states exhibit optimal fitness under distinct conditions. White cells were fitter than opaque cells under a wide range of environmental conditions, including growth at various pHs and in the presence of chemical stresses or antifungal drugs. This difference was exacerbated at 37°C, consistent with white cells being the default state of C. albicans in the mammalian host. In contrast, opaque cells showed greater fitness than white cells under select nutritional conditions, including growth on diverse peptides at 25°C. We further demonstrate that filamentation is significantly rewired between the two states, with white and opaque cells undergoing filamentous growth in response to distinct external cues. Genetic analysis was used to identify signaling pathways impacting the white-opaque transition both in vitro and in a murine model of commensal colonization, and three sugar sensing pathways are revealed as regulators of the switch. Together, these findings establish that white and opaque cells are programmed for differential integration of metabolic and thermal cues and that opaque cells represent a more metabolically specialized cell state than the default white state. Epigenetic transitions are an important mechanism by which microbes adapt to external stimuli. For Candida albicans, such transitions are crucial for adaptation to complex, fluctuating environments, and therefore contribute to its success as a human pathogen. The white-opaque switch

  5. mRNA and methylation profiling of radioresistant esophageal cancer cells: the involvement of Sall2 in acquired aggressive phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Judong; Wang, Wenjie; Tang, Yiting; Zhou, Dandan; Gao, Yi; Zhang, Qi; Zhou, Xifa; Zhu, Hui; Xing, Ligang; Yu, Jinming

    2017-01-01

    Esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) is one of the deadliest malignancies worldwide. Radiotherapy plays a critical role in the curative management of inoperable ESCC patients. However, radioresistance restricts the efficacy of radiotherapy for ESCC patients. The molecules involved in radioresistance remain largely unknown, and new approaches to sensitize cells to irradiation are in demand. Technical advances in analysis of mRNA and methylation have enabled the exploration of the etiology of diseases and have the potential to broaden our understanding of the molecular pathways of ESCC radioresistance. In this study, we constructed radioresistant TE-1 and Eca-109 cell lines (TE-1/R and Eca-109/R, respectively). The radioresistant cells showed an increased migration ability but reduced apoptosis and cisplatin sensitivity compared with their parent cells. mRNA and methylation profiling by microarray revealed 1192 preferentially expressed mRNAs and 8841 aberrantly methylated regions between TE-1/R and TE-1 cells. By integrating the mRNA and methylation profiles, we related the decreased expression of transcription factor Sall2 with a corresponding increase in its methylation in TE-1/R cells, indicating its involvement in radioresistance. Upregulation of Sall2 decreased the growth and migration advantage of radioresistant ESCC cells. Taken together, our present findings illustrate the mRNA and DNA methylation changes during the radioresistance of ESCC and the important role of Sall2 in esophageal cancer malignancy. PMID:28367244

  6. Metabolic profiling reveals a contribution of gut microbiota to fatty liver phenotype in insulin-resistant mice

    PubMed Central

    Dumas, Marc-Emmanuel; Barton, Richard H.; Toye, Ayo; Cloarec, Olivier; Blancher, Christine; Rothwell, Alice; Fearnside, Jane; Tatoud, Roger; Blanc, Véronique; Lindon, John C.; Mitchell, Steve C.; Holmes, Elaine; McCarthy, Mark I.; Scott, James; Gauguier, Dominique; Nicholson, Jeremy K.

    2006-01-01

    Here, we study the intricate relationship between gut microbiota and host cometabolic phenotypes associated with dietary-induced impaired glucose homeostasis and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) in a mouse strain (129S6) known to be susceptible to these disease traits, using plasma and urine metabotyping, achieved by 1H NMR spectroscopy. Multivariate statistical modeling of the spectra shows that the genetic predisposition of the 129S6 mouse to impaired glucose homeostasis and NAFLD is associated with disruptions of choline metabolism, i.e., low circulating levels of plasma phosphatidylcholine and high urinary excretion of methylamines (dimethylamine, trimethylamine, and trimethylamine-N-oxide), coprocessed by symbiotic gut microbiota and mammalian enzyme systems. Conversion of choline into methylamines by microbiota in strain 129S6 on a high-fat diet reduces the bioavailability of choline and mimics the effect of choline-deficient diets, causing NAFLD. These data also indicate that gut microbiota may play an active role in the development of insulin resistance. PMID:16895997

  7. tranSMART-XNAT Connector tranSMART-XNAT connector-image selection based on clinical phenotypes and genetic profiles.

    PubMed

    He, Sijin; Yong, May; Matthews, Paul M; Guo, Yike

    2017-03-01

    TranSMART has a wide range of functionalities for translational research and a large user community, but it does not support imaging data. In this context, imaging data typically includes 2D or 3D sets of magnitude data and metadata information. Imaging data may summarise complex feature descriptions in a less biased fashion than user defined plain texts and numeric numbers. Imaging data also is contextualised by other data sets and may be analysed jointly with other data that can explain features or their variation. Here we describe the tranSMART-XNAT Connector we have developed. This connector consists of components for data capture, organisation and analysis. Data capture is responsible for imaging capture either from PACS system or directly from an MRI scanner, or from raw data files. Data are organised in a similar fashion as tranSMART and are stored in a format that allows direct analysis within tranSMART. The connector enables selection and download of DICOM images and associated resources using subjects' clinical phenotypic and genotypic criteria. tranSMART-XNAT connector is written in Java/Groovy/Grails. It is maintained and available for download at https://github.com/sh107/transmart-xnat-connector.git. sijin@ebi.ac.uk.

  8. Equine Adipose-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells: Phenotype and Growth Characteristics, Gene Expression Profile and Differentiation Potentials

    PubMed Central

    Alipour, Faezeh; Parham, Abbas; Kazemi Mehrjerdi, Hossein; Dehghani, Hesam

    2015-01-01

    Objective Because of the therapeutic application of stem cells (SCs), isolation and characterization of different types of SCs, especially mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), have gained considerable attention in recent studies. Adipose tissue is an abundant and accessible source of MSCs which can be used for tissue engineering and in particular for treatment of musculoskeletal disorders. This study was aimed to isolate and culture equine adipose-derived MSCs (AT-MSCs) from little amounts of fat tissue samples and determine some of their biological characteristics. Materials and Methods In this descriptive study, only 3-5 grams of fat tissue were collected from three crossbred mares. Immediately, cells were isolated by mechanical means and enzymatic digestion and were cultured in optimized conditions until passage 3 (P3). The cells at P3 were evaluated for proliferative capacities, expression of specific markers, and osteogenic, chondrogenic and adipogenic differentiation potentials. Results Results showed that the isolated cells were plastic adherent with a fibroblast-like phenotype. AT-MSCs exhibited expression of mesenchymal cluster of differentiation (CD) markers (CD29, CD44 and CD90) and not major histocompatibility complex II (MHC-II) and CD34 (hematopoietic marker). Cellular differentiation assays demonstrated the chondrogenic, adipogenic and osteogenic potential of the isolated cells. Conclusion Taken together, our findings reveal that equine MSCs can be obtained easily from little amounts of fat tissue which can be used in the future for regenerative purposes in veterinary medicine. PMID:25685736

  9. Profiles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Arts, 1979

    1979-01-01

    Profiles seven Black, Native American, and Chicano artists and art teachers: Hale A. Woodruff, Allan Houser, Luis Jimenez, Betrand D. Phillips, James E. Pate, I, and Fernando Navarro. This article is part of a theme issue on multicultural art. (SJL)

  10. Profiles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Arts, 1979

    1979-01-01

    Profiles seven Black, Native American, and Chicano artists and art teachers: Hale A. Woodruff, Allan Houser, Luis Jimenez, Betrand D. Phillips, James E. Pate, I, and Fernando Navarro. This article is part of a theme issue on multicultural art. (SJL)

  11. Cervical Cancer Cell Supernatants Induce a Phenotypic Switch from U937-Derived Macrophage-Activated M1 State into M2-Like Suppressor Phenotype with Change in Toll-Like Receptor Profile

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Reyes, Karina; Bravo-Cuellar, Alejandro; Hernández-Flores, Georgina; Lerma-Díaz, José Manuel; Jave-Suárez, Luis Felipe; Gómez-Lomelí, Paulina; de Celis, Ruth; Aguilar-Lemarroy, Adriana; Domínguez-Rodríguez, Jorge Ramiro; Ortiz-Lazareno, Pablo Cesar

    2014-01-01

    Cervical cancer (CC) is the second most common cancer among women worldwide. Infection with human papillomavirus (HPV) is the main risk factor for developing CC. Macrophages are important immune effector cells; they can be differentiated into two phenotypes, identified as M1 (classically activated) and M2 (alternatively activated). Macrophage polarization exerts profound effects on the Toll-like receptor (TLR) profile. In this study, we evaluated whether the supernatant of human CC cells HeLa, SiHa, and C-33A induces a shift of M1 macrophage toward M2 macrophage in U937-derived macrophages. Results. The results showed that soluble factors secreted by CC cells induce a change in the immunophenotype of macrophages from macrophage M1 into macrophage M2. U937-derived macrophages M1 released proinflammatory cytokines and nitric oxide; however, when these cells were treated with the supernatant of CC cell lines, we observed a turnover of M1 toward M2. These cells increased CD163 and IL-10 expression. The expression of TLR-3, -7, and -9 is increased when the macrophages were treated with the supernatant of CC cells. Conclusions. Our result strongly suggests that CC cells may, through the secretion of soluble factors, induce a change of immunophenotype M1 into M2 macrophages. PMID:25309919

  12. Cervical cancer cell supernatants induce a phenotypic switch from U937-derived macrophage-activated M1 state into M2-like suppressor phenotype with change in Toll-like receptor profile.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Reyes, Karina; Bravo-Cuellar, Alejandro; Hernández-Flores, Georgina; Lerma-Díaz, José Manuel; Jave-Suárez, Luis Felipe; Gómez-Lomelí, Paulina; de Celis, Ruth; Aguilar-Lemarroy, Adriana; Domínguez-Rodríguez, Jorge Ramiro; Ortiz-Lazareno, Pablo Cesar

    2014-01-01

    Cervical cancer (CC) is the second most common cancer among women worldwide. Infection with human papillomavirus (HPV) is the main risk factor for developing CC. Macrophages are important immune effector cells; they can be differentiated into two phenotypes, identified as M1 (classically activated) and M2 (alternatively activated). Macrophage polarization exerts profound effects on the Toll-like receptor (TLR) profile. In this study, we evaluated whether the supernatant of human CC cells HeLa, SiHa, and C-33A induces a shift of M1 macrophage toward M2 macrophage in U937-derived macrophages. The results showed that soluble factors secreted by CC cells induce a change in the immunophenotype of macrophages from macrophage M1 into macrophage M2. U937-derived macrophages M1 released proinflammatory cytokines and nitric oxide; however, when these cells were treated with the supernatant of CC cell lines, we observed a turnover of M1 toward M2. These cells increased CD163 and IL-10 expression. The expression of TLR-3, -7, and -9 is increased when the macrophages were treated with the supernatant of CC cells. Our result strongly suggests that CC cells may, through the secretion of soluble factors, induce a change of immunophenotype M1 into M2 macrophages.

  13. Sex-Related Cognitive Profile in Autism Spectrum Disorders Diagnosed Late in Life: Implications for the Female Autistic Phenotype.

    PubMed

    Lehnhardt, Fritz-Georg; Falter, Christine Michaela; Gawronski, Astrid; Pfeiffer, Kathleen; Tepest, Ralf; Franklin, Jeremy; Vogeley, Kai

    2016-01-01

    Females with high-functioning ASD are known to camouflage their autistic symptoms better than their male counterparts, making them prone to being under-ascertained and delayed in diagnostic assessment. Thus far the underlying cognitive processes that enable such successful socio-communicative adaptation are not well understood. The current results show sex-related differences in the cognitive profile of ASD individuals, which were diagnosed late in life exclusively. Higher verbal abilities were found in males (n = 69) as opposed to higher processing speed and better executive functions in females with ASD (n = 38). Since both sexes remained unidentified during childhood and adolescence, these results are suggestive for sex-distinctive cognitive strategies as an alternative to typically-developed reciprocal social behavior and social mimicry in high functioning ASD.

  14. Phenotypes and gene expression profiles of Saccharopolyspora erythraea rifampicin-resistant (rif) mutants affected in erythromycin production

    PubMed Central

    Carata, Elisabetta; Peano, Clelia; Tredici, Salvatore M; Ferrari, Francesco; Talà, Adelfia; Corti, Giorgio; Bicciato, Silvio; De Bellis, Gianluca; Alifano, Pietro

    2009-01-01

    Background There is evidence from previous works that bacterial secondary metabolism may be stimulated by genetic manipulation of RNA polymerase (RNAP). In this study we have used rifampicin selection as a strategy to genetically improve the erythromycin producer Saccharopolyspora erythraea. Results Spontaneous rifampicin-resistant (rif) mutants were isolated from the parental strain NRRL2338 and two rif mutations mapping within rpoB, S444F and Q426R, were characterized. With respect to the parental strain, S444F mutants exhibited higher respiratory performance and up to four-fold higher final erythromycin yields; in contrast, Q426R mutants were slow-growing, developmental-defective and severely impaired in erythromycin production. DNA microarray analysis demonstrated that these rif mutations deeply changed the transcriptional profile of S. erythraea. The expression of genes coding for key enzymes of carbon (and energy) and nitrogen central metabolism was dramatically altered in turn affecting the flux of metabolites through erythromycin feeder pathways. In particular, the valine catabolic pathway that supplies propionyl-CoA for biosynthesis of the erythromycin precursor 6-deoxyerythronolide B was strongly up-regulated in the S444F mutants, while the expression of the biosynthetic gene cluster of erythromycin (ery) was not significantly affected. In contrast, the ery cluster was down-regulated (<2-fold) in the Q426R mutants. These strains also exhibited an impressive stimulation of the nitrogen regulon, which may contribute to lower erythromycin yields as erythromycin production was strongly inhibited by ammonium. Conclusion Rifampicin selection is a simple and reliable tool to investigate novel links between primary and secondary metabolism and morphological differentiation in S. erythraea and to improve erythromycin production. At the same time genome-wide analysis of expression profiles using DNA microarrays allowed information to be gained about the mechanisms

  15. Immune-metabolic profiling of anorexic patients reveals an anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory phenotype.

    PubMed

    Omodei, Daniela; Pucino, Valentina; Labruna, Giuseppe; Procaccini, Claudio; Galgani, Mario; Perna, Francesco; Pirozzi, Daniele; De Caprio, Carmela; Marone, Gianni; Fontana, Luigi; Contaldo, Franco; Pasanisi, Fabrizio; Matarese, Giuseppe; Sacchetti, Lucia

    2015-03-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) is an excessive form of calorie restriction (CR) associated with pathological weight loss and alterations of the immune system. However, AN patients seem to be protected from common viral infections. To investigate the metabolic and molecular adaptations induced by sustained extreme CR in the peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of patients with restrictive alimentary AN. Inflammatory cytokines and adipokines were measured in 15 young (age range, 15-24 years) AN female patients and 20 age-matched healthy controls. Isolated PBMCs were immunophenotyped by flow cytometry, and glycolysis and mitochondrial respiration were determined by measuring the extracellular acidification and oxygen consumption rate. Stress resistance to H2O2 and the antioxidant transcriptional profile of PBMCs and human fibroblasts incubated with sera from AN patients were also determined. Compared with controls, AN patients (BMI, 15.9±0.4 kg/m(2)) had significantly fewer leucocytes, lymphocytes and NK cells, lower serum concentrations of leptin, IGF-1 and sTNFR1, and higher levels of adiponectin, sCD40L and sICAM-1 (p<0.05). IL-1β, TNFα, and IL-6 produced by PBMC cultured with autologous serum for 48 h were significantly lower in AN patients than in controls (p<0.01). Moreover, glycolysis and mitochondrial respiration were lower, and the antioxidant transcriptional profile was higher in the PBMCs of AN patients. Fibroblasts cultured in serum from AN patients showed a 24% increase in resistance to H2O2 damage. Extreme CR in AN patients is associated with a reduction in several immune cell populations, but with higher antioxidant potential, stress resistance and an anti-inflammatory status. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Phenotypic Profiling Reveals that Candida albicans Opaque Cells Represent a Metabolically Specialized Cell State Compared to Default White Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ene, Iuliana V.; Lohse, Matthew B.; Vladu, Adrian V.; Morschhäuser, Joachim; Johnson, Alexander D.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The white-opaque switch is a bistable, epigenetic transition affecting multiple traits in Candida albicans including mating, immunogenicity, and niche specificity. To compare how the two cell states respond to external cues, we examined the fitness, phenotypic switching, and filamentation properties of white cells and opaque cells under 1,440 different conditions at 25°C and 37°C. We demonstrate that white and opaque cells display striking differences in their integration of metabolic and thermal cues, so that the two states exhibit optimal fitness under distinct conditions. White cells were fitter than opaque cells under a wide range of environmental conditions, including growth at various pHs and in the presence of chemical stresses or antifungal drugs. This difference was exacerbated at 37°C, consistent with white cells being the default state of C. albicans in the mammalian host. In contrast, opaque cells showed greater fitness than white cells under select nutritional conditions, including growth on diverse peptides at 25°C. We further demonstrate that filamentation is significantly rewired between the two states, with white and opaque cells undergoing filamentous growth in response to distinct external cues. Genetic analysis was used to identify signaling pathways impacting the white-opaque transition both in vitro and in a murine model of commensal colonization, and three sugar sensing pathways are revealed as regulators of the switch. Together, these findings establish that white and opaque cells are programmed for differential integration of metabolic and thermal cues and that opaque cells represent a more metabolically specialized cell state than the default white state. PMID:27879329

  17. Influence of blood pressure profile on frailty phenotype in community-dwelling elders in Brazil - FIBRA study.

    PubMed

    Fattori, A; Santimaria, M R; Alves, R M A; Guariento, M E; Neri, A L

    2013-01-01

    Frailty is a clinical condition associated with pathological aging and biological vulnerability. In the spectrum of events related to frailty, aging of the cardiocirculatory system and abnormalities in arterial blood pressure (BP) partly explain the changes in tissue perfusion and, potentially, the decrease in physiological reserves. This study investigated the relationship between BP levels, systemic arterial hypertension (SAH) and the frailty phenotype by analyzing frailty criteria in a cross-sectional model into the FIBRA network, a populational sample of community-dwelling elders in Southeastern Brazil. Study participants with ≥65 years were selected by probabilistic sampling of residents in the urban area of the municipality of Campinas (n=900). Considering frailty as a whole and the difference between genders, there was a greater proportion of frail or pre-frail individuals among women than men. Analysis of individual frailty criteria showed that weight loss and fatigue were more common among women (18.3% vs. 12.5%, p=0.034 and 22.5% vs. 11.9%, p<0.001, respectively). Comparison of individuals with or without SAH failed to reveal any differences related to frailty criteria. Nevertheless, averages of diastolic blood pressure (DBP) and mean arterial blood pressure values were lower among elderly individuals with reduced grip strength, physical activity and the frailty classification as a whole (OR 0.986, IC 0.975-0.997) (for every 1 mmHg reduction in MBP values, the likelihood of being frail increased 1.4%). Our findings corroborate the relationship between BP values and frailty in the elderly and contribute to an understanding of the pathophysiological mechanisms of the syndrome.

  18. Relation of genetic profile and novel circulating biomarkers with coronary plaque phenotype as determined by intravascular ultrasound: rationale and design of the ATHEROREMO-IVUS study.

    PubMed

    de Boer, Sanneke P M; Cheng, Jin M; Garcia-Garcia, Hector M; Oemrawsingh, Rohit M; van Geuns, Robert-Jan; Regar, Evelyn; Zijlstra, Felix; Laaksonen, Reijo; Halperin, Eran; Kleber, Marcus E; Koenig, Wolfgang; Boersma, Eric; Serruys, Patrick W

    2014-12-01

    The European Collaborative Project on Inflammation and Vascular Wall Remodeling in Atherosclerosis - Intravascular Ultrasound (ATHEROREMO-IVUS) study aims to investigate the relations of genetic profile and novel circulating biomarkers with coronary plaque phenotype and vulnerability as determined by intravascular ultrasound (IVUS). ATHEROREMO-IVUS is a prospective, observational cohort study of 846 patients with stable angina pectoris or acute coronary syndrome (ACS) who are referred for coronary angiography. Prior to the catheterisation procedure, blood samples are drawn for biomarker measurements and genetic analyses. During the catheterisation procedure, IVUS is performed in a non-culprit coronary artery. The primary endpoint is the presence of vulnerable plaque as determined by IVUS virtual histology. Secondary endpoints include the incidence of major adverse cardiac events during long-term follow-up. Results from ATHEROREMO-IVUS are expected to improve our knowledge of the role of genetic profile and circulating biomarkers in relation to the development of atherosclerosis and vulnerable plaques. Assessment and early validation of the prognostic value of novel biomarkers and intracoronary imaging techniques will be performed. (ClinicalTrials.gov number: NCT01789411).

  19. Multidimensional Potential Burgers Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boritchev, Alexandre

    2016-03-01

    We consider the multidimensional generalised stochastic Burgers equation in the space-periodic setting: partial {u}/partial t+(nabla f({u}) \\cdot nabla) {u}-ν Δ {u}= nabla η, quad t ≥ 0, {x} in{T}^d=({R}/ {Z})^d, under the assumption that u is a gradient. Here f is strongly convex and satisfies a growth condition, ν is small and positive, while η is a random forcing term, smooth in space and white in time. For solutions u of this equation, we study Sobolev norms of u averaged in time and in ensemble: each of these norms behaves as a given negative power of ν. These results yield sharp upper and lower bounds for natural analogues of quantities characterising the hydrodynamical turbulence, namely the averages of the increments and of the energy spectrum. These quantities behave as a power of the norm of the relevant parameter, which is respectively the separation ℓ in the physical space and the wavenumber k in the Fourier space. Our bounds do not depend on the initial condition and hold uniformly in {ν}. We generalise the results obtained for the one-dimensional case in [10], confirming the physical predictions in [4, 30]. Note that the form of the estimates does not depend on the dimension: the powers of {ν, |{{k}}|, ℓ} are the same in the one- and the multi-dimensional setting.

  20. Multidimensional visual statistical learning.

    PubMed

    Turk-Browne, Nicholas B; Isola, Phillip J; Scholl, Brian J; Treat, Teresa A

    2008-03-01

    Recent studies of visual statistical learning (VSL) have demonstrated that statistical regularities in sequences of visual stimuli can be automatically extracted, even without intent or awareness. Despite much work on this topic, however, several fundamental questions remain about the nature of VSL. In particular, previous experiments have not explored the underlying units over which VSL operates. In a sequence of colored shapes, for example, does VSL operate over each feature dimension independently, or over multidimensional objects in which color and shape are bound together? The studies reported here demonstrate that VSL can be both object-based and feature-based, in systematic ways based on how different feature dimensions covary. For example, when each shape covaried perfectly with a particular color, VSL was object-based: Observers expressed robust VSL for colored-shape sub-sequences at test but failed when the test items consisted of monochromatic shapes or color patches. When shape and color pairs were partially decoupled during learning, however, VSL operated over features: Observers expressed robust VSL when the feature dimensions were tested separately. These results suggest that VSL is object-based, but that sensitivity to feature correlations in multidimensional sequences (possibly another form of VSL) may in turn help define what counts as an object.

  1. Multidimensional sexual perfectionism.

    PubMed

    Stoeber, Joachim; Harvey, Laura N; Almeida, Isabel; Lyons, Emma

    2013-11-01

    Perfectionism is a multidimensional personality characteristic that can affect all areas of life. This article presents the first systematic investigation of multidimensional perfectionism in the domain of sexuality exploring the unique relationships that different forms of sexual perfectionism show with positive and negative aspects of sexuality. A sample of 272 university students (52 male, 220 female) completed measures of four forms of sexual perfectionism: self-oriented, partner-oriented, partner-prescribed, and socially prescribed. In addition, they completed measures of sexual esteem, sexual self-efficacy, sexual optimism, sex life satisfaction (capturing positive aspects of sexuality) and sexual problem self-blame, sexual anxiety, sexual depression, and negative sexual perfectionism cognitions during sex (capturing negative aspects). Results showed unique patterns of relationships for the four forms of sexual perfectionism, suggesting that partner-prescribed and socially prescribed sexual perfectionism are maladaptive forms of sexual perfectionism associated with negative aspects of sexuality whereas self-oriented and partner-oriented sexual perfectionism emerged as ambivalent forms associated with positive and negative aspects.

  2. Theta vocabulary II. Multidimensional case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kharchev, S.; Zabrodin, A.

    2016-06-01

    It is shown that the Jacobi and Riemann identities of degree four for the multidimensional theta functions as well as the Weierstrass identities emerge as algebraic consequences of the fundamental multidimensional binary identities connecting the theta functions with Riemann matrices τ and 2 τ.

  3. Multidimensional Perfectionism and the Self

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ward, Andrew M.; Ashby, Jeffrey S.

    2008-01-01

    This study examined multidimensional perfectionism and self-development. Two hundred seventy-one undergraduates completed a measure of multidimensional perfectionism and two Kohutian measures designed to measure aspects of self-development including social connectedness, social assurance, goal instability (idealization), and grandiosity. The…

  4. Multidimensional Perfectionism and the Self

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ward, Andrew M.; Ashby, Jeffrey S.

    2008-01-01

    This study examined multidimensional perfectionism and self-development. Two hundred seventy-one undergraduates completed a measure of multidimensional perfectionism and two Kohutian measures designed to measure aspects of self-development including social connectedness, social assurance, goal instability (idealization), and grandiosity. The…

  5. Multidimensional gene search with Genehopper

    PubMed Central

    Munz, Matthias; Tönnies, Sascha; Balke, Wolf-Tilo; Simon, Eric

    2015-01-01

    The high abundance of genetic information enables researchers to gain new insights from the comparison of human genes according to their similarities. However, existing tools that allow the exploration of such gene-to-gene relationships, apply each similarity independently. To make use of multidimensional scoring, we developed a new search engine named Genehopper. It can handle two query types: (i) the typical use case starts with a term-to-gene search, i.e. an optimized full-text search for an anchor gene of interest. The web-interface can handle one or more terms including gene symbols and identifiers of Ensembl, UniProt, EntrezGene and RefSeq. (ii) When the anchor gene is defined, the user can explore its neighborhood by a gene-to-gene search as the weighted sum of nine normalized gene similarities based on sequence homology, protein domains, mRNA expression profiles, Gene Ontology Annotation, gene symbols and other features. Each weight can be adjusted by the user, allowing flexible customization of the gene search. All implemented similarities have a low pairwise correlation (max r2 = 0.4) implying a low linear dependency, i.e. any change in a single weight has an effect on the ranking. Thus, we treated them as separate dimensions in the search space. Genehopper is freely available at http://genehopper.ifis.cs.tu-bs.de. PMID:25990726

  6. Multidimensional gene search with Genehopper.

    PubMed

    Munz, Matthias; Tönnies, Sascha; Balke, Wolf-Tilo; Simon, Eric

    2015-07-01

    The high abundance of genetic information enables researchers to gain new insights from the comparison of human genes according to their similarities. However, existing tools that allow the exploration of such gene-to-gene relationships, apply each similarity independently. To make use of multidimensional scoring, we developed a new search engine named Genehopper. It can handle two query types: (i) the typical use case starts with a term-to-gene search, i.e. an optimized full-text search for an anchor gene of interest. The web-interface can handle one or more terms including gene symbols and identifiers of Ensembl, UniProt, EntrezGene and RefSeq. (ii) When the anchor gene is defined, the user can explore its neighborhood by a gene-to-gene search as the weighted sum of nine normalized gene similarities based on sequence homology, protein domains, mRNA expression profiles, Gene Ontology Annotation, gene symbols and other features. Each weight can be adjusted by the user, allowing flexible customization of the gene search. All implemented similarities have a low pairwise correlation (max r(2) = 0.4) implying a low linear dependency, i.e. any change in a single weight has an effect on the ranking. Thus, we treated them as separate dimensions in the search space. Genehopper is freely available at http://genehopper.ifis.cs.tu-bs.de. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  7. Comparative phenotypic profile of subpopulations of peripheral blood leukocytes in European (Bos taurus taurus) and Zebu cattle (Bos taurus indicus).

    PubMed

    Macêdo, A A; Marciano, A P V; Rocha, L M; Alves-Júnior, J R F; Faria, A M C; Bittar, J F F; Araújo, M S S; Santos, R L; Martins-Filho, O A

    2013-12-19

    Differences in cellular and humoral immunity in Zebu (Bos taurus indicus) and European (B. taurus taurus) cattle breeds, which may be related to differences in resistance or susceptibility to infectious or parasitic diseases, are largely unknown. This study aimed to perform a comparative analysis of innate and adaptive immunity of European (including Holstein, Brown Swiss, and Hereford) and Zebu (including Gir, Nelore, and Guzera) breeds, by assessing their peripheral blood leukocyte profiles (i.e., monocytes, eosinophils, and lymphocytes, including CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells, and CD21(+) B cells). Higher frequencies of cells involved in innate immunity were observed in Zebu breeds, particularly monocytes and non-T and non-B cells (13.37 ± 0.9058 and 37.67 ± 1.55, respectively). This finding may contribute to the increased resistance of B. taurus indicus to certain infectious and parasitic diseases. Considering other leukocyte populations in the peripheral blood, among-breed variation was greater than differences between the two subspecies. This study will serve as a basis for further investigations regarding comparative immunology and resistance to infectious and parasitic diseases of cattle.

  8. Proteomic and Glycoproteomic Profilings Reveal That Post-translational Modifications of Toxins Contribute to Venom Phenotype in Snakes.

    PubMed

    Andrade-Silva, Débora; Zelanis, André; Kitano, Eduardo S; Junqueira-de-Azevedo, Inácio L M; Reis, Marcelo S; Lopes, Aline S; Serrano, Solange M T

    2016-08-05

    Snake venoms are biological weapon systems composed of secreted proteins and peptides that are used for immobilizing or killing prey. Although post-translational modifications are widely investigated because of their importance in many biological phenomena, we currently still have little understanding of how protein glycosylation impacts the variation and stability of venom proteomes. To address these issues, here we characterized the venom proteomes of seven Bothrops snakes using a shotgun proteomics strategy. Moreover, we compared the electrophoretic profiles of native and deglycosylated venoms and, in order to assess their subproteomes of glycoproteins, we identified the proteins with affinity for three lectins with different saccharide specificities and their putative glycosylation sites. As proteinases are abundant glycosylated toxins, we examined the effect of N-deglycosylation on their catalytic activities and show that the proteinases of the seven venoms were similarly affected by removal of N-glycans. Moreover, we prospected putative glycosylation sites of transcripts of a B. jararaca venom gland data set and detected toxin family related patterns of glycosylation. Based on our global analysis, we report that Bothrops venom proteomes and glycoproteomes contain a core of components that markedly define their composition, which is conserved upon evolution in parallel to other molecular markers that determine their phylogenetic classification.

  9. Plant body weight-induced secondary growth in Arabidopsis and its transcription phenotype revealed by whole-transcriptome profiling.

    PubMed

    Ko, Jae-Heung; Han, Kyung-Hwan; Park, Sunchung; Yang, Jaemo

    2004-06-01

    Wood is an important raw material and environmentally cost-effective renewable source of energy. However, the molecular biology of wood formation (i.e. secondary growth) is surprisingly understudied. A novel experimental system was employed to study the molecular regulation of secondary xylem formation in Arabidopsis. First, we demonstrate that the weight carried by the stem is a primary signal for the induction of cambium differentiation and the plant hormone, auxin, is a downstream carrier of the signal for this process. We used Arabidopsis whole-transcriptome (23 K) GeneChip analysis to examine gene expression profile changes in the inflorescent stems treated for wood formation by cultural manipulation or artificial weight application. Many of the genes up-regulated in wood-forming stems had auxin responsive cis-acting elements in their promoter region, indicating auxin-mediated regulation of secondary growth. We identified 700 genes that were differentially expressed during the transition from primary growth to secondary growth. More than 40% of the genes that were up-regulated (>5x) were associated with signal transduction and transcriptional regulation. Biological significance of these regulatory genes is discussed in light of the induction and development of secondary xylem.

  10. Burden, genotype and phenotype profiles of adult patients with sickle cell disease in Cape Town, South Africa.

    PubMed

    Pule, G D; Mnica, K; Joubert, M; Mowla, S; Novitsky, N; Wonkam, A

    2017-01-30

    An exponential increase in the number of sickle cell disease (SCD) patients in paediatric services in Cape Town, South Africa, has been reported. The trend in adult/adolescent services has not been investigated. To evaluate epidemiological trends of SCD and the profile of patients affected by SCD attending the Haematology Clinic at Groote Schuur Hospital (GSH), Cape Town. (i) A retrospective review of the number of SCD patients over the past 20 years; (ii) a cross-sectional analysis of clinical and haematological characteristics of SCD patients; and (iii) molecular analysis of the haemoglobin S mutation, the haplotype in the β-globin-like genes cluster, the 3.7 kb α-thalassaemia gene deletion and 19 selected single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with fetal haemoglobin (HbF) levels. From 1995 to 2016, 81 adolescent/adult patients with SCD were registered, mostly originating from other African countries (n=61, 75.3%). There was an increase of over 200% in new cases (n=47) during the last quarter of the two decades investigated. Data from 34 of 58 regular attendees (58.6%) were analysed. The mean age of the patients was 26.1 years (standard deviation (SD) 9.8), and 70.6% were male. With the exception of four patients with sickle/β-thalassaemia, all the patients had SCD (haemoglobin SS). The co-inheritance of a single 3.7 kb α-globin deletion was found in 42.3% of cases (n=11). The Bantu haplotype was the most observed (65.4% of chromosomes). Most HbF-promoting SNPs were not associated with variable levels of haematological indices. There is an increasing burden of adult SCD patients at GSH. National health and academic institutions need to adapt policies and healthcare professional training accordingly.

  11. MicroRNA-499 expression distinctively correlates to target genes sox6 and rod1 profiles to resolve the skeletal muscle phenotype in Nile tilapia.

    PubMed

    Nachtigall, Pedro G; Dias, Marcos C; Carvalho, Robson F; Martins, Cesar; Pinhal, Danillo

    2015-01-01

    A class of small non-coding RNAs, the microRNAs (miRNAs), has been shown to be essential for the regulation of specific cell pathways, including skeletal muscle development, maintenance and homeostasis in vertebrates. However, the relative contribution of miRNAs for determining the red and white muscle cell phenotypes is far from being fully comprehended. To better characterize the role of miRNA in skeletal muscle cell biology, we investigated muscle-specific miRNA (myomiR) signatures in Nile tilapia fish. Quantitative (RT-qPCR) and spatial (FISH) expression analyses revealed a highly differential expression (forty-four-fold) of miR-499 in red skeletal muscle compared to white skeletal muscle, whereas the remaining known myomiRs were equally expressed in both muscle cell types. Detailed examination of the miR-499 targets through bioinformatics led us to the sox6 and rod1 genes, which had low expression in red muscle cells according to RT-qPCR, FISH, and protein immunofluorescence profiling experiments. Interestingly, we verified that the high expression of miR-499 perfectly correlates with a low expression of sox6 and rod1 target genes, as verified by a distinctive predominance of mRNA destabilization and protein translational decay to these genes, respectively. Through a genome-wide comparative analysis of SOX6 and ROD1 protein domains and through an in silico gene regulatory network, we also demonstrate that both proteins are essentially similar in vertebrate genomes, suggesting their gene regulatory network may also be widely conserved. Overall, our data shed light on the potential regulation of targets by miR-499 associated with the slow-twitch muscle fiber type phenotype. Additionally the results provide novel insights into the evolutionary dynamics of miRNA and target genes enrolled in a putative constrained molecular pathway in the skeletal muscle cells of vertebrates.

  12. Transcriptional profiling identifies the long noncoding RNA plasmacytoma variant translocation (PVT1) as a novel regulator of the asthmatic phenotype in human airway smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Austin, Philip J; Tsitsiou, Eleni; Boardman, Charlotte; Jones, Simon W; Lindsay, Mark A; Adcock, Ian M; Chung, Kian Fan; Perry, Mark M

    2017-03-01

    The mechanism underlying nonsevere and severe asthma remains unclear, although it is commonly associated with increased airway smooth muscle (ASM) mass. Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) are known to be important in regulating healthy primary airway smooth muscle cells (ASMCs), whereas changed expression has been observed in CD8 T cells from patients with severe asthma. Primary ASMCs were isolated from healthy subjects (n = 9) and patients classified as having nonsevere (n = 9) or severe (n = 9) asthma. ASMCs were exposed to dexamethasone and FCS. mRNA and lncRNA expression was measured by using a microarray and quantitative real-time PCR. Bioinformatic analysis was used to examine relevant biological pathways. Finally, the lncRNA plasmacytoma variant translocation 1 (PVT1) was inhibited by transfection of primary ASMCs with small interfering RNAs, and the effect on ASMC phenotype was examined. The mRNA expression profile was significantly different between patient groups after exposure to dexamethasone and FCS, and these were associated with biological pathways that might be relevant to the pathogenesis of asthma, including cellular proliferation and pathways associated with glucocorticoid activity. We also observed a significant change in lncRNA expression, yet the expression of only one lncRNA (PVT1) is decreased in patients with corticosteroid-sensitive nonsevere asthma and increased in patients with corticosteroid-insensitive severe asthma. Subsequent targeting studies demonstrated the importance of this lncRNA in controlling both proliferation and IL-6 release in ASMCs from patients with severe asthma. lncRNAs are associated with the aberrant phenotype observed in ASMCs from asthmatic patients. Targeting PVT1 might be effective in reducing airway remodeling in asthmatic patients. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Phenotypical and functional profiles of natural killer cells exhibiting matrix metalloproteinase-mediated CD16 cleavage after anti-HIV antibody-dependent activation.

    PubMed

    Tang, C-C; Isitman, G; Bruneau, J; Tremblay, C; Bernard, N F; Kent, S J; Parsons, M S

    2015-08-01

    Natural killer (NK) cell-mediated antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) has been linked to protection from HIV infection and slower progression towards AIDS. However, antibody-dependent activation of NK cells results in phenotypical alterations similar to those observed on NK cells from individuals with progressive HIV infection. Activation of NK cells induces matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-mediated cleavage of cell surface CD16. In the present study we assessed the phenotype and functional profile of NK cells exhibiting post-activation MMP-mediated CD16 cleavage. We found that NK cells achieving the highest levels of activation during stimulation exhibit the most profound decreases in CD16 expression. Further, we observed that educated KIR3DL1(+) NK cells from human leucocyte antigen (HLA)-Bw4-carrying donors exhibit larger decreases in CD16 expression post-activation than the KIR3DL1(-) NK cell subset containing cells educated via other inhibitory receptor/ligand combinations and non-educated NK cells. Lastly, we assessed the ex-vivo expression of CD16 on educated KIR3DL1(+) NK cells and the KIR3DL1(-) NK cell subset from HLA-Bw4-carrying HIV-uninfected and HIV-infected donors. Suggestive of in-vivo activation of KIR3DL1(+) NK cells during HIV infection, CD16 expression was higher on KIR3DL1(+) than KIR3DL1(-) NK cells in uninfected donors but similar on both subsets in HIV-infected donors. These results are discussed in the context of how they may assist with understanding HIV disease progression and the design of immunotherapies that utilize antibody-dependent NK cell responses.

  14. Selective in situ protein expression profiles correlate with distinct phenotypes of basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma of the skin.

    PubMed

    Stelkovics, E; Kiszner, G; Meggyeshazi, N; Korom, I; Varga, E; Nemeth, I; Molnar, J; Marczinovits, I; Krenacs, T

    2013-07-01

    Non-melanoma skin cancer is the most common malignancy that shows increasing incidence due to our cumulative exposure to ultraviolet irradiation. Its major subtypes, basal cell carcinoma (BCC) and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) differ in pathobiology, phenotype and clinical behavior, which must be reflected at the molecular level. In this study, protein expression profiles of BCC and SCC were tested in tissue microarrays and correlated with that of actinic keratosis, Bowen's disease, seborrheic keratosis and normal epidermis by detecting 22 proteins involved in cell interactions, growth, cell cycle regulation or apoptosis. The significantly more reduced collagen XVII, CD44v6, pan-Desmoglein levels and more evident E-Cadherin delocalization in BCC compared to SCC correlated with the de novo dermal invasion of BCC against the progressive invasion from in situ lesions in SCC development. EGFR was also expressed at a significantly higher level in SCC than in BCC. The upregulated cell communication protein connexin43 in BCC could contribute to the protection of BCC from metastatic invasion. Elevated cell replication in BCC was underlined by the increased topoisomerase IIα and reduced p21(waf1) and p27(kip1) positive cells fractions compared to SCC. Compared to differentiated keratinocytes, caspase-8 and -9 were equally upregulated in skin carcinoma subtypes for either mediating apoptosis induction or immune escape of tumor cells. Hierarchical cluster analysis grouped SCC and actinic keratosis cases exclusively together in support of their common origin and malignant phenotype. BCC cases were also clustered fully together. Differentially expressed proteins reflect the distinct pathobiology of skin carcinoma subtypes and can serve as surrogate markers in doubtful cases.

  15. MicroRNA-499 Expression Distinctively Correlates to Target Genes sox6 and rod1 Profiles to Resolve the Skeletal Muscle Phenotype in Nile Tilapia

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho, Robson F.; Martins, Cesar; Pinhal, Danillo

    2015-01-01

    A class of small non-coding RNAs, the microRNAs (miRNAs), has been shown to be essential for the regulation of specific cell pathways, including skeletal muscle development, maintenance and homeostasis in vertebrates. However, the relative contribution of miRNAs for determining the red and white muscle cell phenotypes is far from being fully comprehended. To better characterize the role of miRNA in skeletal muscle cell biology, we investigated muscle-specific miRNA (myomiR) signatures in Nile tilapia fish. Quantitative (RT-qPCR) and spatial (FISH) expression analyses revealed a highly differential expression (forty-four-fold) of miR-499 in red skeletal muscle compared to white skeletal muscle, whereas the remaining known myomiRs were equally expressed in both muscle cell types. Detailed examination of the miR-499 targets through bioinformatics led us to the sox6 and rod1 genes, which had low expression in red muscle cells according to RT-qPCR, FISH, and protein immunofluorescence profiling experiments. Interestingly, we verified that the high expression of miR-499 perfectly correlates with a low expression of sox6 and rod1 target genes, as verified by a distinctive predominance of mRNA destabilization and protein translational decay to these genes, respectively. Through a genome-wide comparative analysis of SOX6 and ROD1 protein domains and through an in silico gene regulatory network, we also demonstrate that both proteins are essentially similar in vertebrate genomes, suggesting their gene regulatory network may also be widely conserved. Overall, our data shed light on the potential regulation of targets by miR-499 associated with the slow-twitch muscle fiber type phenotype. Additionally the results provide novel insights into the evolutionary dynamics of miRNA and target genes enrolled in a putative constrained molecular pathway in the skeletal muscle cells of vertebrates. PMID:25793727

  16. Suicide: a multidimensional malaise.

    PubMed

    Leenaars, A A

    1996-01-01

    No one really knows why human beings commit suicide. The goal of this paper is to provide a psychological point of view on the topic, among the many other perspectives that are needed. It addresses the question by providing a theory of suicide, arguing that it is theory that allows us to sort out the booming buzzing mess of experience (Wm. James). Suicide is a multi-dimensional malaise. Metaphorically speaking, it is an intrapsychic drama on an interpersonal stage. As sound theory must be empirically observable, the theory is next applied to research of suicide notes, studying such factors as age, sex, and method of suicide, cross-culture and cross-time. Next, because all theory must have clinical applicability, a clinical case study of Goethe's Werther is provided. Overall, it is concluded that we need to continue to develop models to understand the suicidal mind.

  17. Linear and Nonlinear Thinking: A Multidimensional Model and Measure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Groves, Kevin S.; Vance, Charles M.

    2015-01-01

    Building upon previously developed and more general dual-process models, this paper provides empirical support for a multidimensional thinking style construct comprised of linear thinking and multiple dimensions of nonlinear thinking. A self-report assessment instrument (Linear/Nonlinear Thinking Style Profile; LNTSP) is presented and…

  18. Deriving Stopping Rules for Multidimensional Computerized Adaptive Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Chun; Chang, Hua-Hua; Boughton, Keith A.

    2013-01-01

    Multidimensional computerized adaptive testing (MCAT) is able to provide a vector of ability estimates for each examinee, which could be used to provide a more informative profile of an examinee's performance. The current literature on MCAT focuses on the fixed-length tests, which can generate less accurate results for those examinees whose…

  19. Deriving Stopping Rules for Multidimensional Computerized Adaptive Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Chun; Chang, Hua-Hua; Boughton, Keith A.

    2013-01-01

    Multidimensional computerized adaptive testing (MCAT) is able to provide a vector of ability estimates for each examinee, which could be used to provide a more informative profile of an examinee's performance. The current literature on MCAT focuses on the fixed-length tests, which can generate less accurate results for those examinees whose…

  20. Linear and Nonlinear Thinking: A Multidimensional Model and Measure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Groves, Kevin S.; Vance, Charles M.

    2015-01-01

    Building upon previously developed and more general dual-process models, this paper provides empirical support for a multidimensional thinking style construct comprised of linear thinking and multiple dimensions of nonlinear thinking. A self-report assessment instrument (Linear/Nonlinear Thinking Style Profile; LNTSP) is presented and…

  1. Elevated paternal glucocorticoid exposure alters the small noncoding RNA profile in sperm and modifies anxiety and depressive phenotypes in the offspring

    PubMed Central

    Short, A K; Fennell, K A; Perreau, V M; Fox, A; O'Bryan, M K; Kim, J H; Bredy, T W; Pang, T Y; Hannan, A J

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have suggested that physiological and behavioral traits may be transgenerationally inherited through the paternal lineage, possibly via non-genomic signals derived from the sperm. To investigate how paternal stress might influence offspring behavioral phenotypes, a model of hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal (HPA) axis dysregulation was used. Male breeders were administered water supplemented with corticosterone (CORT) for 4 weeks before mating with untreated female mice. Female, but not male, F1 offspring of CORT-treated fathers displayed altered fear extinction at 2 weeks of age. Only male F1 offspring exhibited altered patterns of ultrasonic vocalization at postnatal day 3 and, as adults, showed decreased time in open on the elevated-plus maze and time in light on the light–dark apparatus, suggesting a hyperanxiety-like behavioral phenotype due to paternal CORT treatment. Interestingly, expression of the paternally imprinted gene Igf2 was increased in the hippocampus of F1 male offspring but downregulated in female offspring. Male and female F2 offspring displayed increased time spent in the open arm of the elevated-plus maze, suggesting lower levels of anxiety compared with control animals. Only male F2 offspring showed increased immobility time on the forced-swim test and increased latency to feed on the novelty-supressed feeding test, suggesting a depression-like phenotype in these animals. Collectively, these data provide evidence that paternal CORT treatment alters anxiety and depression-related behaviors across multiple generations. Analysis of the small RNA profile in sperm from CORT-treated males revealed marked effects on the expression of small noncoding RNAs. Sperm from CORT-treated males contained elevated levels of three microRNAs, miR-98, miR-144 and miR-190b, which are predicted to interact with multiple growth factors, including Igf2 and Bdnf. Sustained elevation of glucocorticoids is therefore involved in the transmission of

  2. Seten: A tool for systematic identification and comparison of processes, phenotypes and diseases associated with RNA-binding proteins from condition-specific CLIP-seq profiles.

    PubMed

    Budak, Gungor; Srivastava, Rajneesh; Janga, Sarath Chandra

    2017-03-23

    RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) control the regulation of gene expression in eukaryotic genomes at post-transcriptional level by binding to their cognate RNAs. Although several variants of CLIP (crosslinking and immunoprecipitation) protocols are currently available to study the global protein-RNA interaction landscape at single nucleotide resolution in a cell, currently there are very few tools which can facilitate understanding and dissecting the functional associations of RBPs from the resulting binding maps. Here, we present Seten, a web-based and a command line tool, which can identify and compare processes, phenotypes and diseases associated with RBPs from condition-specific CLIP-seq profiles. Seten uses BED files resulting from most peak calling algorithms which include scores reflecting the extent of binding of an RBP on the target transcript, to provide both traditional functional enrichment as well as gene set enrichment results for a number of gene set collections including BioCarta, KEGG, Reactome, Gene Ontology (GO), Human Phenotype Ontology (HPO) and MalaCards Disease Ontology for several organisms including fruit fly, human, mouse, rat, worm, and yeast. It also provides an option to dynamically compare the associated gene sets across datasets as bubble charts, to facilitate comparative analysis. Benchmarking of Seten using eCLIP data for IGF2BP1, SRSF7 and PTBP1 against their corresponding CRISPR RNA-seq in K562 cells as well as randomized negative controls, demonstrated that its gene set enrichment method outperforms functional enrichment, with scores significantly contributing to the discovery of true annotations. Comparative performance analysis using these CRISPR control datasets revealed significantly higher precision and comparable recall to that observed using ChIP-Enrich. Seten's web interface currently provides precomputed results for about 200 CLIP-seq datasets and both command line as well as web interfaces can be used to analyze CLIP

  3. Spectral multidimensional scaling

    PubMed Central

    Aflalo, Yonathan; Kimmel, Ron

    2013-01-01

    An important tool in information analysis is dimensionality reduction. There are various approaches for large data simplification by scaling its dimensions down that play a significant role in recognition and classification tasks. The efficiency of dimension reduction tools is measured in terms of memory and computational complexity, which are usually a function of the number of the given data points. Sparse local operators that involve substantially less than quadratic complexity at one end, and faithful multiscale models with quadratic cost at the other end, make the design of dimension reduction procedure a delicate balance between modeling accuracy and efficiency. Here, we combine the benefits of both and propose a low-dimensional multiscale modeling of the data, at a modest computational cost. The idea is to project the classical multidimensional scaling problem into the data spectral domain extracted from its Laplace–Beltrami operator. There, embedding into a small dimensional Euclidean space is accomplished while optimizing for a small number of coefficients. We provide a theoretical support and demonstrate that working in the natural eigenspace of the data, one could reduce the process complexity while maintaining the model fidelity. As examples, we efficiently canonize nonrigid shapes by embedding their intrinsic metric into , a method often used for matching and classifying almost isometric articulated objects. Finally, we demonstrate the method by exposing the style in which handwritten digits appear in a large collection of images. We also visualize clustering of digits by treating images as feature points that we map to a plane. PMID:24108352

  4. Multidimensional persistence in biomolecular data

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Kelin; Wei, Guo-Wei

    2015-01-01

    Persistent homology has emerged as a popular technique for the topological simplification of big data, including biomolecular data. Multidimensional persistence bears considerable promise to bridge the gap between geometry and topology. However, its practical and robust construction has been a challenge. We introduce two families of multidimensional persistence, namely pseudo-multidimensional persistence and multiscale multidimensional persistence. The former is generated via the repeated applications of persistent homology filtration to high dimensional data, such as results from molecular dynamics or partial differential equations. The latter is constructed via isotropic and anisotropic scales that create new simiplicial complexes and associated topological spaces. The utility, robustness and efficiency of the proposed topological methods are demonstrated via protein folding, protein flexibility analysis, the topological denoising of cryo-electron microscopy data, and the scale dependence of nano particles. Topological transition between partial folded and unfolded proteins has been observed in multidimensional persistence. The separation between noise topological signatures and molecular topological fingerprints is achieved by the Laplace-Beltrami flow. The multiscale multidimensional persistent homology reveals relative local features in Betti-0 invariants and the relatively global characteristics of Betti-1 and Betti-2 invariants. PMID:26032339

  5. TFII-I, a candidate gene for Williams syndrome cognitive profile: parallels between regional expression in mouse brain and human phenotype.

    PubMed

    Danoff, S K; Taylor, H E; Blackshaw, S; Desiderio, S

    2004-01-01

    The gene for TFII-I, a widely expressed transcription factor, has been localized to an interval of human chromosome 7q11.23 that is commonly deleted in Williams syndrome (WS). The clinical phenotype of WS includes elfin facies, infantile hypercalcemia, supravalvular aortic stenosis, hyperacusis and mental retardation. The WS cognitive profile (WSCP) is notable for the differential impairment of visual-spatial abilities with relative sparing of verbal-linguistic function. Fine mapping of individuals with WS has revealed a close association between deletion of TFII-I and the WSCP. To determine the plausibility of the hypothesis that hemizygous deletion of TFII-I contributes to the WSCP, we have examined the anatomic distribution of TFII-I RNA and protein isoforms in brains from adult and embryonic mice. Our studies show that early in development, TFII-I expression is widespread and nearly uniform throughout the brain. In adult brain, TFII-I protein is present exclusively in neurons. Highest levels of expression are observed in cerebellar Purkinje cells and in hippocampal interneurons. TFII-I immunoreactivity is distinct from that of the related protein, TFII-IRD1, which is also localized to the region of human chromosome 7 deleted in WS. The expression pattern of TFII-I in mouse brain parallels regions in human brain which have been shown to be anatomically and functionally altered in humans with WS. These observations are consistent with the hypothesis that deletion of the gene for TFII-I contributes to the cognitive impairments observed in WS.

  6. Relationship of inflammatory profile of elderly patients serum and senescence-associated secretory phenotype with human breast cancer cells proliferation: Role of IL6/IL8 ratio.

    PubMed

    Barajas-Gómez, Bertha Alicia; Rosas-Carrasco, Oscar; Morales-Rosales, Sandra Lisbeth; Pedraza Vázquez, Gibrán; González-Puertos, Viridiana Yazmín; Juárez-Cedillo, Teresa; García-Álvarez, Jorge Antonio; López-Diazguerrero, Norma Edith; Damián-Matsumura, Pablo; Königsberg, Mina; Luna-López, Armando

    2017-03-01

    Aging is considered a systemic, chronic and low-grade inflammatory state, called "inflammaging", which has been contemplated as a risk factor for cancer development and progression in the elderly population. Cellular senescence is a multifactorial phenomenon of growth arrest and distorted function, which has been recognized as a contributor to aging. Senescent cells have an altered secretion pattern called Senescent Associated Secretory Phenotype (SASP), that comprise a complex mix of factors including cytokines, growth factors, chemokines and matrix metalloproteinases among others. The SASP secreted by accumulated senescent cells during old age has been related to local inflammation that leads to cellular transformation and therefore may be supporting the inflammaging process. Here, we evaluated if the pro-inflammatory profile within the serum obtained from elderly patients (EPS) was able to induce cellular proliferation in the breast cancer transformed cell line (MCF-7), in a similar way to the proliferation stimulated by the SASP obtained from WI-38 primary cells prematurely induced to senescence by oxidative stress (SIPS). At the same time, the participation of IL-6/IL-8 ratio was determined. Our results showed that not all the EPS increased MCF-7 proliferation. However, there was an interesting relationship between IL-6 and IL-8 concentrations, when the IL-6 was higher than IL-8. Similar results were found with SASP from SIPS-WI-38 on the MCF-7 proliferation. Although it is known that those cytokines are fundamental factors to induce proliferation; the occurrence of other components in the cellular microenvironment is necessary to carry out this effect.

  7. Multidimensional persistence in biomolecular data.

    PubMed

    Xia, Kelin; Wei, Guo-Wei

    2015-07-30

    Persistent homology has emerged as a popular technique for the topological simplification of big data, including biomolecular data. Multidimensional persistence bears considerable promise to bridge the gap between geometry and topology. However, its practical and robust construction has been a challenge. We introduce two families of multidimensional persistence, namely pseudomultidimensional persistence and multiscale multidimensional persistence. The former is generated via the repeated applications of persistent homology filtration to high-dimensional data, such as results from molecular dynamics or partial differential equations. The latter is constructed via isotropic and anisotropic scales that create new simiplicial complexes and associated topological spaces. The utility, robustness, and efficiency of the proposed topological methods are demonstrated via protein folding, protein flexibility analysis, the topological denoising of cryoelectron microscopy data, and the scale dependence of nanoparticles. Topological transition between partial folded and unfolded proteins has been observed in multidimensional persistence. The separation between noise topological signatures and molecular topological fingerprints is achieved by the Laplace-Beltrami flow. The multiscale multidimensional persistent homology reveals relative local features in Betti-0 invariants and the relatively global characteristics of Betti-1 and Betti-2 invariants. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Phenotypic profile of dendritic and T cells in the lymph node of Balb/C mice with breast cancer submitted to dendritic cells immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    da Cunha, Alessandra; Antoniazi Michelin, Marcia; Cândido Murta, Eddie Fernando

    2016-09-01

    Breast cancer (BC) is the most common malignant neoplasm and the cause of death by cancer among women worldwide. Its development influenced by various mutations that occur in the tumor cell and by the immune system's status, which has a direct influence on the tumor microenvironment and, consequently, on interactions with non-tumor cells involved in the immunological response. Strategies using dendritic cells (DCs) or antigen-presenting cells (APCs), therapeutic mode, in cancer have been developed for some time. The proper interaction between DCs and T cells upon antigen presentation is of greatest importance for an antitumor immune response activation. Thus, various receptors on the surface of T cells must be able to recognize ligands that are located on the surface of APCs. However, little is known about the real behavior and interaction forms of CDs and T cells after vaccination. Due to the crucial importance of DCs in an effective anti-tumor immune response activation and the search for compliant results in inducing this response by immunotherapies with DCs, the phenotypic profile of DCs and T cells in lymph nodes obtained from female Balb/C mice with breast cancer induced by 4T1 cells and DCs treated with vaccines was investigated. We evaluated through flow cytometry based on the surface and intracellular molecules marking; as well as the presence of cytokines and chemokines, IL-2, IL-4, IL-10, IL-12, IFN-γ, TNF-α and TGF-β in the supernatant of the culture of Balb/C lymph nodes by ELISA. The results show that the vaccination with DCs, in the maturation parameters used in this study, was able to stimulate the secretion of cytokines such as IFN-γ and IL-12 and inhibit the secretion of TGF-β and IL-10 in nodal lymph infiltrates, as well as co-stimulatory activating (CD86) and adhesion molecules in DCs and T cells LFA-1/ICAM-1 and inhibit the secretion of CTLA-4 present in lymph nodes. Facts that led to aTh1 profile polarization, immuno competent in relation

  9. Phenotype Microarray Profiling of Staphylococcus aureus menD and hemB Mutants with the Small-Colony-Variant Phenotype†

    PubMed Central

    von Eiff, Christof; McNamara, Peter; Becker, Karsten; Bates, Donna; Lei, Xiang-He; Ziman, Michael; Bochner, Barry R.; Peters, Georg; Proctor, Richard A.

    2006-01-01

    Standard biochemical tests have revealed that hemin and menadione auxotrophic Staphylococcus aureus small-colony variants (SCVs) exhibit multiple phenotypic changes. To provide a more complete analysis of the SCV phenotype, two genetically defined mutants with a stable SCV phenotype were comprehensively tested. These mutants, generated via mutations in menD or hemB that yielded menadione and hemin auxotrophs, were subjected to phenotype microarray (PM) analysis of over 1,500 phenotypes (including utilization of different carbon, nitrogen, phosphate, and sulfur sources; growth stimulation or inhibition by amino acids and other nutrients, osmolytes, and metabolic inhibitors; and susceptibility to antibiotics). Compared to parent strain COL, the hemB mutant was defective in utilization of a variety of carbon sources, including Krebs cycle intermediates and compounds that ultimately generate ATP via electron transport. The phenotype of the menD mutant was similar to that of the hemB mutant, but the defects in carbon metabolism were more pronounced than those seen with the hemB mutant. In both mutant strains, hexose phosphates and other carbohydrates that provide ATP in the absence of electron transport stimulated growth. Other phenotypes of SCV mutants, such as hypersensitivity to sodium selenite, sodium tellurite, and sodium nitrite, were also uncovered by the PM analysis. Key results of the PM analysis were confirmed in independent growth studies and by using Etest strips for susceptibility testing. PM technology is a new and efficient technology for assessing cellular phenotypes in S. aureus. PMID:16385058

  10. Noncommutative accelerated multidimensional universe dominated by quintessence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Nabulsi, Ahmad Rami

    2010-04-01

    Noncommutative Geometry recently attracted growing interest of cosmologists, mainly after the greatest success of unifying the forces of nature into a single gravitational spectral action in a purely algebraic way, rather than as being an entirely new formalism. In the present work, we discuss a multidimensional Friedmann-Robertson-Walker flat universe in which the perfect fluid has a Gaussian profile in time and depends on a fundamental minimal length sqrt{θ} like ρ= ρ(0)exp (- t 2/4 θ) for some positive constant ρ(0). This special form is motivated by a more recent noncommutative inflationary cosmological model, which was found to be able to drive the universe through a bounce without the need of any scalar field. Furthermore, we conjecture that the generalized equation of state has the special form p= ω a m ρ- ρ,( ω, m)∈ℝ where a( t) is the scale factor. It was found that the expansion of the multidimensional universe accelerates in time and is dominated for very large time by quintessence. Many additional consequences are revealed and discussed in some detail.

  11. Multidimensional Learner Model In Intelligent Learning System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deliyska, B.; Rozeva, A.

    2009-11-01

    The learner model in an intelligent learning system (ILS) has to ensure the personalization (individualization) and the adaptability of e-learning in an online learner-centered environment. ILS is a distributed e-learning system whose modules can be independent and located in different nodes (servers) on the Web. This kind of e-learning is achieved through the resources of the Semantic Web and is designed and developed around a course, group of courses or specialty. An essential part of ILS is learner model database which contains structured data about learner profile and temporal status in the learning process of one or more courses. In the paper a learner model position in ILS is considered and a relational database is designed from learner's domain ontology. Multidimensional modeling agent for the source database is designed and resultant learner data cube is presented. Agent's modules are proposed with corresponding algorithms and procedures. Multidimensional (OLAP) analysis guidelines on the resultant learner module for designing dynamic learning strategy have been highlighted.

  12. A Multidimensional Partial Credit Model with Associated Item and Test Statistics: An Application to Mixed-Format Tests

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yao, Lihua; Schwarz, Richard D.

    2006-01-01

    Multidimensional item response theory (IRT) models have been proposed for better understanding the dimensional structure of data or to define diagnostic profiles of student learning. A compensatory multidimensional two-parameter partial credit model (M-2PPC) for constructed-response items is presented that is a generalization of those proposed to…

  13. A Multidimensional Partial Credit Model with Associated Item and Test Statistics: An Application to Mixed-Format Tests

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yao, Lihua; Schwarz, Richard D.

    2006-01-01

    Multidimensional item response theory (IRT) models have been proposed for better understanding the dimensional structure of data or to define diagnostic profiles of student learning. A compensatory multidimensional two-parameter partial credit model (M-2PPC) for constructed-response items is presented that is a generalization of those proposed to…

  14. Multidimensional peptide separations in proteomics.

    PubMed

    Link, Andrew J

    2002-12-01

    Multidimensional peptide separation will play an increasingly important role in the drive to identify and quantitate the proteome. By increasing the peak and load capacity, multidimensional approaches increase the number and dynamic range of peptides that can be analyzed in a complex biological organism. Separation methods using different physical properties of peptides have been combined with varying degrees of success. The ultimate goal is a rapid separation strategy that can be coupled with analytical methods, such as mass spectrometry, to provide comprehensive monitoring of the changing concentration, interactions, and structures of proteins in the proteome.

  15. On the Need for Multidimensional Stirling Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dyson, Rodger W.; Wilson, Scott D.; Tew, Roy C.; Demko, Rikako

    2005-01-01

    Given the cost and complication of simulating Stirling convertors, do we really need multidimensional modeling when one-dimensional capabilities exist? This paper provides a comprehensive description of when and why multidimensional simulation is needed.

  16. A log-linear multidimensional Rasch model for capture-recapture.

    PubMed

    Pelle, E; Hessen, D J; van der Heijden, P G M

    2016-02-20

    In this paper, a log-linear multidimensional Rasch model is proposed for capture-recapture analysis of registration data. In the model, heterogeneity of capture probabilities is taken into account, and registrations are viewed as dichotomously scored indicators of one or more latent variables that can account for correlations among registrations. It is shown how the probability of a generic capture profile is expressed under the log-linear multidimensional Rasch model and how the parameters of the traditional log-linear model are derived from those of the log-linear multidimensional Rasch model. Finally, an application of the model to neural tube defects data is presented.

  17. A Multidimensional Software Engineering Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barzilay, O.; Hazzan, O.; Yehudai, A.

    2009-01-01

    Software engineering (SE) is a multidimensional field that involves activities in various areas and disciplines, such as computer science, project management, and system engineering. Though modern SE curricula include designated courses that address these various subjects, an advanced summary course that synthesizes them is still missing. Such a…

  18. Multidimensional Perfectionism and Ego Defenses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dickinson, Wendy L.; Ashby, Jeffrey S.

    2005-01-01

    This study examined the relationship between multidimensional perfectionism and ego defense style among 130 college students. Cluster analysis results facilitated the identification of groups of adaptive perfectionists, maladaptive perfectionists, and non-perfectionists. The researchers found that identified maladaptive perfectionists used…

  19. Multidimensional Scaling of Video Surrogates.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodrum, Abby A.

    2001-01-01

    Four types of video surrogates were compared under two tasks. Multidimensional scaling was used to map dimensional dispersions of users' judgments of similarity between videos and surrogates. Congruence between these maps was used to evaluate representativeness of each surrogate type. Congruence was greater for image-based than for text-based…

  20. A Multidimensional Software Engineering Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barzilay, O.; Hazzan, O.; Yehudai, A.

    2009-01-01

    Software engineering (SE) is a multidimensional field that involves activities in various areas and disciplines, such as computer science, project management, and system engineering. Though modern SE curricula include designated courses that address these various subjects, an advanced summary course that synthesizes them is still missing. Such a…

  1. Multidimensional Perfectionism and Ego Defenses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dickinson, Wendy L.; Ashby, Jeffrey S.

    2005-01-01

    This study examined the relationship between multidimensional perfectionism and ego defense style among 130 college students. Cluster analysis results facilitated the identification of groups of adaptive perfectionists, maladaptive perfectionists, and non-perfectionists. The researchers found that identified maladaptive perfectionists used…

  2. Characterization of the Drug Resistance Profiles of Patients Infected with CRF07_BC Using Phenotypic Assay and Ultra-Deep Pyrosequencing.

    PubMed

    Huang, Szu-Wei; Li, Wei-You; Wang, Wen-Hung; Lin, Yu-Ting; Chou, Chih-Hung; Chen, Marcelo; Huang, Hsien-Da; Chen, Yen-Hsu; Lu, Po-Liang; Wang, Sheng-Fan; Oka, Shinichi; Chen, Yi-Ming Arthur

    2017-01-01

    The usefulness of ultra-deep pyrosequencing (UDPS) for the diagnosis of HIV-1 drug resistance (DR) remains to be determined. Previously, we reported an explosive outbreak of HIV-1 circulating recombinant form (CRF) 07_BC among injection drug users (IDUs) in Taiwan in 2004. The goal of this study was to characterize the DR of CRF07_BC strains using different assays including UDPS. Seven CRF07_BC isolates including 4 from early epidemic (collected in 2004-2005) and 3 from late epidemic (collected in 2008) were obtained from treatment-naïve patient's peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Viral RNA was extracted directly from patient's plasma or from cultural supernatant and the pol sequences were determined using RT-PCR sequencing or UDPS. For comparison, phenotypic drug susceptibility assay using MAGIC-5 cells (in-house phenotypic assay) and Antivirogram were performed. In-house phenotypic assay showed that all the early epidemic and none of the late epidemic CRF07_BC isolates were resistant to most protease inhibitors (PIs) (4.4-47.3 fold). Neither genotypic assay nor Antivirogram detected any DR mutations. UDPS showed that early epidemic isolates contained 0.01-0.08% of PI DR major mutations. Furthermore, the combinations of major and accessory PI DR mutations significantly correlated with the phenotypic DR. The in-house phenotypic assay is superior to other conventional phenotypic assays in the detection of DR variants with a frequency as low as 0.01%.

  3. Comparative Phenotypic and Molecular Genetic Profiling of Wild Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis Strains of the L. lactis subsp. lactis and L. lactis subsp. cremoris Genotypes, Isolated from Starter-Free Cheeses Made of Raw Milk▿

    PubMed Central

    Fernández, Elena; Alegría, Ángel; Delgado, Susana; Martín, M. Cruz; Mayo, Baltasar

    2011-01-01

    Twenty Lactococcus lactis strains with an L. lactis subsp. lactis phenotype isolated from five traditional cheeses made of raw milk with no added starters belonging to the L. lactis subsp. lactis and L. lactis subsp. cremoris genotypes (lactis and cremoris genotypes, respectively; 10 strains each) were subjected to a series of phenotypic and genetic typing methods, with the aims of determining their phylogenetic relationships and suitability as starters. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) analysis of intact genomes digested with SalI and SmaI proved that all strains were different except for three isolates of the cremoris genotype, which showed identical PFGE profiles. Multilocus sequence typing (MLST) analysis using internal sequences of seven loci (namely, atpA, rpoA, pheS, pepN, bcaT, pepX, and 16S rRNA gene) revealed considerable intergenotype nucleotide polymorphism, although deduced amino acid changes were scarce. Analysis of the MLST data for the present strains and others from other dairy and nondairy sources showed that all of them clustered into the cremoris or lactis genotype group, by using both independent and combined gene sequences. These two groups of strains also showed distinctive carbohydrate fermentation and enzyme activity profiles, with the strains in the cremoris group showing broader profiles. However, the profiles of resistance/susceptibility to 16 antibiotics were very similar, showing no atypical resistance, except for tetracycline resistance in three identical cremoris genotype isolates. The numbers and concentrations of volatile compounds produced in milk by the strains belonging to these two groups were clearly different, with the cremoris genotype strains producing higher concentrations of more branched-chain, derived compounds. Together, the present results support the idea that the lactis and cremoris genotypes of phenotypic Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis actually represent true subspecies. Some strains of the two subspecies

  4. A combined analysis of the Frost Multidimensional Perfectionism Scale (FMPS), Child and Adolescent Perfectionism Scale (CAPS), and Almost Perfect Scale-Revised (APS-R): Different perfectionist profiles in adolescent high school students.

    PubMed

    Sironic, Amanda; Reeve, Robert A

    2015-12-01

    To investigate differences and similarities in the dimensional constructs of the Frost Multidimensional Perfectionism Scale (FMPS; Frost, Marten, Lahart, & Rosenblate, 1990), Child and Adolescent Perfectionism Scale (CAPS; Flett, Hewitt, Boucher, Davidson, & Munro, 2000), and Almost Perfect Scale-Revised (APS-R; Slaney, Rice, Mobley, Trippi, & Ashby, 2001), 938 high school students completed the 3 perfectionism questionnaires, as well as the Depression Anxiety Stress Scales (DASS; Lovibond & Lovibond, 1995). Preliminary analyses revealed commonly observed factor structures for each perfectionism questionnaire. Exploratory factor analysis of item responses from the questionnaires (combined) yielded a 4-factor solution (factors were labeled High Personal Standards, Concerns, Doubts and Discrepancy, Externally Motivated Perfectionism, and Organization and Order). A latent class analysis of individuals' mean ratings on each of the 4 factors yielded a 6-class solution. Three of the 6 classes represented perfectionist subgroups (labeled adaptive perfectionist, externally motivated maladaptive perfectionist, and mixed maladaptive perfectionist), and 3 represented nonperfectionist subgroups (labeled nonperfectionist A, nonperfectionist B, and order and organization nonperfectionist). Each of the 6 subgroups was meaningfully associated with the DASS. Findings showed that 3 out of 10 students were classified as maladaptive perfectionists, and maladaptive perfectionists were more prevalent than adaptive perfectionists. In sum, it is evident that combined ratings from the FMPS, CAPS, and APS-R offer a meaningful characterization of perfectionism. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  5. Profiling functions of ectomycorrhizal diversity and root structuring in seedlings of Norway spruce (Picea abies) with fast- and slow-growing phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Velmala, Sannakajsa M; Rajala, Tiina; Heinonsalo, Jussi; Taylor, Andy F S; Pennanen, Taina

    2014-01-01

    We studied the role of taxonomical and functional ectomycorrhizal (ECM) fungal diversity in root formation and nutrient uptake by Norway spruce (Picea abies) seedlings with fast- and slow-growing phenotypes. Seedlings were grown with an increasing ECM fungal diversity gradient from one to four species and sampled before aboveground growth differences between the two phenotypes were apparent. ECM fungal colonization patterns were determined and functional diversity was assayed via measurements of potential enzyme activities of eight exoenzymes probably involved in nutrient mobilization. Phenotypes did not vary in their receptiveness to different ECM fungal species. However, seedlings of slow-growing phenotypes had higher fine-root density and thus more condensed root systems than fast-growing seedlings, but the potential enzyme activities of ectomycorrhizas did not differ qualitatively or quantitatively. ECM species richness increased host nutrient acquisition potential by diversifying the exoenzyme palette. Needle nitrogen content correlated positively with high chitinase activity of ectomycorrhizas. Rather than fast- and slow-growing phenotypes exhibiting differing receptiveness to ECM fungi, our results suggest that distinctions in fine-root structuring and in the belowground growth strategy already apparent at early stages of seedling development may explain later growth differences between fast- and slow-growing families.

  6. Bioimaging for quantitative phenotype analysis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Weiyang; Xia, Xian; Huang, Yi; Chen, Xingwei; Han, Jing-Dong J

    2016-06-01

    With the development of bio-imaging techniques, an increasing number of studies apply these techniques to generate a myriad of image data. Its applications range from quantification of cellular, tissue, organismal and behavioral phenotypes of model organisms, to human facial phenotypes. The bio-imaging approaches to automatically detect, quantify, and profile phenotypic changes related to specific biological questions open new doors to studying phenotype-genotype associations and to precisely evaluating molecular changes associated with quantitative phenotypes. Here, we review major applications of bioimage-based quantitative phenotype analysis. Specifically, we describe the biological questions and experimental needs addressable by these analyses, computational techniques and tools that are available in these contexts, and the new perspectives on phenotype-genotype association uncovered by such analyses.

  7. Characterization of the Drug Resistance Profiles of Patients Infected with CRF07_BC Using Phenotypic Assay and Ultra-Deep Pyrosequencing

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Szu-Wei; Li, Wei-You; Wang, Wen-Hung; Lin, Yu-Ting; Chou, Chih-Hung; Chen, Marcelo; Huang, Hsien-Da; Chen, Yen-Hsu; Lu, Po-Liang; Wang, Sheng-Fan; Oka, Shinichi; Chen, Yi-Ming Arthur

    2017-01-01

    The usefulness of ultra-deep pyrosequencing (UDPS) for the diagnosis of HIV-1 drug resistance (DR) remains to be determined. Previously, we reported an explosive outbreak of HIV-1 circulating recombinant form (CRF) 07_BC among injection drug users (IDUs) in Taiwan in 2004. The goal of this study was to characterize the DR of CRF07_BC strains using different assays including UDPS. Seven CRF07_BC isolates including 4 from early epidemic (collected in 2004–2005) and 3 from late epidemic (collected in 2008) were obtained from treatment-naïve patient’s peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Viral RNA was extracted directly from patient’s plasma or from cultural supernatant and the pol sequences were determined using RT-PCR sequencing or UDPS. For comparison, phenotypic drug susceptibility assay using MAGIC-5 cells (in-house phenotypic assay) and Antivirogram were performed. In-house phenotypic assay showed that all the early epidemic and none of the late epidemic CRF07_BC isolates were resistant to most protease inhibitors (PIs) (4.4–47.3 fold). Neither genotypic assay nor Antivirogram detected any DR mutations. UDPS showed that early epidemic isolates contained 0.01–0.08% of PI DR major mutations. Furthermore, the combinations of major and accessory PI DR mutations significantly correlated with the phenotypic DR. The in-house phenotypic assay is superior to other conventional phenotypic assays in the detection of DR variants with a frequency as low as 0.01%. PMID:28107423

  8. Deterministic multidimensional nonuniform gap sampling.

    PubMed

    Worley, Bradley; Powers, Robert

    2015-12-01

    Born from empirical observations in nonuniformly sampled multidimensional NMR data relating to gaps between sampled points, the Poisson-gap sampling method has enjoyed widespread use in biomolecular NMR. While the majority of nonuniform sampling schemes are fully randomly drawn from probability densities that vary over a Nyquist grid, the Poisson-gap scheme employs constrained random deviates to minimize the gaps between sampled grid points. We describe a deterministic gap sampling method, based on the average behavior of Poisson-gap sampling, which performs comparably to its random counterpart with the additional benefit of completely deterministic behavior. We also introduce a general algorithm for multidimensional nonuniform sampling based on a gap equation, and apply it to yield a deterministic sampling scheme that combines burst-mode sampling features with those of Poisson-gap schemes. Finally, we derive a relationship between stochastic gap equations and the expectation value of their sampling probability densities. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Multidimensional signatures in antimicrobial peptides

    PubMed Central

    Yount, Nannette Y.; Yeaman, Michael R.

    2004-01-01

    Conventional analyses distinguish between antimicrobial peptides by differences in amino acid sequence. Yet structural paradigms common to broader classes of these molecules have not been established. The current analyses examined the potential conservation of structural themes in antimicrobial peptides from evolutionarily diverse organisms. Using proteomics, an antimicrobial peptide signature was discovered to integrate stereospecific sequence patterns and a hallmark three-dimensional motif. This striking multidimensional signature is conserved among disulfide-containing antimicrobial peptides spanning biological kingdoms, and it transcends motifs previously limited to defined peptide subclasses. Experimental data validating this model enabled the identification of previously unrecognized antimicrobial activity in peptides of known identity. The multidimensional signature model provides a unifying structural theme in broad classes of antimicrobial peptides, will facilitate discovery of antimicrobial peptides as yet unknown, and offers insights into the evolution of molecular determinants in these and related host defense effector molecules. PMID:15118082

  10. Cuba: Multidimensional numerical integration library

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahn, Thomas

    2016-08-01

    The Cuba library offers four independent routines for multidimensional numerical integration: Vegas, Suave, Divonne, and Cuhre. The four algorithms work by very different methods, and can integrate vector integrands and have very similar Fortran, C/C++, and Mathematica interfaces. Their invocation is very similar, making it easy to cross-check by substituting one method by another. For further safeguarding, the output is supplemented by a chi-square probability which quantifies the reliability of the error estimate.

  11. Multidimensional bioseparation with modular microfluidics

    DOEpatents

    Chirica, Gabriela S.; Renzi, Ronald F.

    2013-08-27

    A multidimensional chemical separation and analysis system is described including a prototyping platform and modular microfluidic components capable of rapid and convenient assembly, alteration and disassembly of numerous candidate separation systems. Partial or total computer control of the separation system is possible. Single or multiple alternative processing trains can be tested, optimized and/or run in parallel. Examples related to the separation and analysis of human bodily fluids are given.

  12. Q&A: using Patch-seq to profile single cells.

    PubMed

    Cadwell, Cathryn R; Sandberg, Rickard; Jiang, Xiaolong; Tolias, Andreas S

    2017-07-06

    Individual neurons vary widely in terms of their gene expression, morphology, and electrophysiological properties. While many techniques exist to study single-cell variability along one or two of these dimensions, very few techniques can assess all three features for a single cell. We recently developed Patch-seq, which combines whole-cell patch clamp recording with single-cell RNA-sequencing and immunohistochemistry to comprehensively profile the transcriptomic, morphologic, and physiologic features of individual neurons. Patch-seq can be broadly applied to characterize cell types in complex tissues such as the nervous system, and to study the transcriptional signatures underlying the multidimensional phenotypes of single cells.

  13. Comprehensive multi-dimensional liquid chromatographic separation in biomedical and pharmaceutical analysis: a review.

    PubMed

    Dixon, Steven P; Pitfield, Ian D; Perrett, David

    2006-01-01

    'Multi-dimensional' liquid separations have a history almost as long as chromatography. In multi-dimensional chromatography the sample is subjected to more than one separation mechanism; each mechanism is considered an independent separation dimension. The separations can be carried out either offline via fraction collection, or directly coupled online. Early multi-dimensional separations using combinations of paper chromatography, electrophoresis and gels, in both planar and columnar modes are reviewed. Developments in HPLC have increased the number of measurable analytes in ever more complex matrices, and this has led to the concept of 'global metabolite profiling'. This review focuses on the theory and practice of modern 'comprehensive' multi-dimensional liquid chromatography when applied to biomedical and pharmaceutical analysis.

  14. Multidimensional self-perception: linkages to parental nurturance.

    PubMed

    Hopkins, H R; Klein, H A

    1993-12-01

    Childhood experiences are important for developing self-perception. The present study examined the relationship between parental nurturance and Harter's (1988) multidimensional domains of self-perception as well as gender differences in patterns of perceived nurturance. We had 207 college students complete the Neemann & Harter's Self-Perception Profile for College Students (1986) and Buri's Parental Nurturance Scale (1989). Both men and women saw their mothers as more nurturant than they saw their fathers. We found, consistent with previous findings, a positive relationship between parental nurturance and global self-worth. Nurturance also showed a positive relationship with several dimensions of self-perception. This research underscores the importance of nurturance in the development of self-esteem and the usefulness of a multidimensional construct of self-perception.

  15. Multidimensional (OLAP) Analysis for Designing Dynamic Learning Strategy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozeva, A.; Deliyska, B.

    2010-10-01

    Learning strategy in an intelligent learning system is generally elaborated on the basis of assessment of the following factors: learner's time for reaction, content of the learning object, amount of learning material in a learning object, learning object specification, e-learning medium and performance control. Current work proposes architecture for dynamic learning strategy design by implementing multidimensional analysis model of learning factors. The analysis model concerns on-line analytical processing (OLAP) of learner's data structured as multidimensional cube. Main components of the architecture are analysis agent for performing the OLAP operations on learner data cube, adaptation generator and knowledge selection agent for performing adaptive navigation in the learning object repository. The output of the analysis agent is involved in dynamic elaboration of learning strategy that fits best to learners profile and behavior. As a result an adaptive learning path for individual learner and for learner groups is generated.

  16. Using phenotype microarrays in the assessment of the antibiotic susceptibility profile of bacteria isolated from wastewater in on-site treatment facilities.

    PubMed

    Jałowiecki, Łukasz; Chojniak, Joanna; Dorgeloh, Elmar; Hegedusova, Berta; Ejhed, Helene; Magnér, Jörgen; Płaza, Grażyna

    2017-04-27

    The scope of the study was to apply Phenotype Biolog MicroArray (PM) technology to test the antibiotic sensitivity of the bacterial strains isolated from on-site wastewater treatment facilities. In the first step of the study, the percentage values of resistant bacteria from total heterotrophic bacteria growing on solid media supplemented with various antibiotics were determined. In the untreated wastewater, the average shares of kanamycin-, streptomycin-, and tetracycline-resistant bacteria were 53, 56, and 42%, respectively. Meanwhile, the shares of kanamycin-, streptomycin-, and tetracycline-resistant bacteria in the treated wastewater were 39, 33, and 29%, respectively. To evaluate the antibiotic susceptibility of the bacteria present in the wastewater, using the phenotype microarrays (PMs), the most common isolates from the treated wastewater were chosen: Serratia marcescens ss marcescens, Pseudomonas fluorescens, Stenotrophomonas maltophilia, Stenotrophomonas rhizophila, Microbacterium flavescens, Alcaligenes faecalis ss faecalis, Flavobacterium hydatis, Variovorax paradoxus, Acinetobacter johnsonii, and Aeromonas bestiarum. The strains were classified as multi-antibiotic-resistant bacteria. Most of them were resistant to more than 30 antibiotics from various chemical classes. Phenotype microarrays could be successfully used as an additional tool for evaluation of the multi-antibiotic resistance of environmental bacteria and in preliminary determination of the range of inhibition concentration.

  17. Advancing a multidimensional, developmental spectrum approach to preschool disruptive behavior.

    PubMed

    Wakschlag, Lauren S; Briggs-Gowan, Margaret J; Choi, Seung W; Nichols, Sara R; Kestler, Jacqueline; Burns, James L; Carter, Alice S; Henry, David

    2014-01-01

    Dimensional approaches are gaining scientific traction. However, their potential for elucidating developmental aspects of psychopathology has not been fully realized. The goal of this article is to apply a multidimensional, developmental framework to model the normal-abnormal spectrum of preschool disruptive behavior. The Multidimensional Assessment of Preschool Disruptive Behavior (MAP-DB), a novel measure, was used to model dimensional severity across developmental parameters theorized to distinguish the normative misbehavior of early childhood from clinically salient disruptive behavior. The 4 MAP-DB dimensions are Temper Loss, Noncompliance, Aggression, and Low Concern for Others. Parents of a diverse sample of 1,488 preschoolers completed the MAP-DB. Multidimensional item response theory (IRT) was used for dimensional modeling. The 4-dimensional, developmentally informed model demonstrated excellent fit. Its factor loadings did not differ across demographic subgroups. All dimensions provided good coverage of the abnormal end of the severity continuum, but only Temper Loss and Noncompliance provided good coverage of milder, normatively occurring behaviors. The developmental expectability and quality of behaviors distinguished normative from atypical behaviors. The point at which frequency of behaviors was atypical varied based on dimensional location for Temper Loss, Noncompliance, and Aggression. The MAP-DB provides an innovative method for operationalizing developmentally specified, dimensional phenotypes in early childhood. Establishing the validity of these dimensional phenotypes in relation to clinical outcomes, neurocognitive substrates, and etiologic pathways will be a crucial test of their clinical utility. Copyright © 2014 American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Multidimensionality in host manipulation mimicked by serotonin injection

    PubMed Central

    Perrot-Minnot, Marie-Jeanne; Sanchez-Thirion, Kevin; Cézilly, Frank

    2014-01-01

    Manipulative parasites often alter the phenotype of their hosts along multiple dimensions. ‘Multidimensionality’ in host manipulation could consist in the simultaneous alteration of several physiological pathways independently of one another, or proceed from the disruption of some key physiological parameter, followed by a cascade of effects. We compared multidimensionality in ‘host manipulation’ between two closely related amphipods, Gammarus fossarum and Gammarus pulex, naturally and experimentally infected with Pomphorhynchus laevis (Acanthocephala), respectively. To that end, we calculated in each host–parasite association the effect size of the difference between infected and uninfected individuals for six different traits (activity, phototaxis, geotaxis, attraction to conspecifics, refuge use and metabolic rate). The effects sizes were highly correlated between host–parasite associations, providing evidence for a relatively constant ‘infection syndrome’. Using the same methodology, we compared the extent of phenotypic alterations induced by an experimental injection of serotonin (5-HT) in uninfected G. pulex to that induced by experimental or natural infection with P. laevis. We observed a significant correlation between effect sizes across the six traits, indicating that injection with 5-HT can faithfully mimic the ‘infection syndrome’. This is, to our knowledge, the first experimental evidence that multidimensionality in host manipulation can proceed, at least partly, from the disruption of some major physiological mechanism. PMID:25339729

  19. Measures for a multidimensional multiverse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Hyeyoun

    2015-04-01

    We explore the phenomenological implications of generalizing the causal patch and fat geodesic measures to a multidimensional multiverse, where the vacua can have differing numbers of large dimensions. We consider a simple model in which the vacua are nucleated from a D -dimensional parent spacetime through dynamical compactification of the extra dimensions, and compute the geometric contribution to the probability distribution of observations within the multiverse for each measure. We then study how the shape of this probability distribution depends on the time scales for the existence of observers, for vacuum domination, and for curvature domination (tobs,tΛ , and tc, respectively.) In this work we restrict ourselves to bubbles with positive cosmological constant, Λ . We find that in the case of the causal patch cutoff, when the bubble universes have p +1 large spatial dimensions with p ≥2 , the shape of the probability distribution is such that we obtain the coincidence of time scales tobs˜tΛ˜tc . Moreover, the size of the cosmological constant is related to the size of the landscape. However, the exact shape of the probability distribution is different in the case p =2 , compared to p ≥3 . In the case of the fat geodesic measure, the result is even more robust: the shape of the probability distribution is the same for all p ≥2 , and we once again obtain the coincidence tobs˜tΛ˜tc . These results require only very mild conditions on the prior probability of the distribution of vacua in the landscape. Our work shows that the observed double coincidence of time scales is a robust prediction even when the multiverse is generalized to be multidimensional; that this coincidence is not a consequence of our particular Universe being (3 +1 )-dimensional; and that this observable cannot be used to preferentially select one measure over another in a multidimensional multiverse.

  20. Mechanics of multidimensional isolated horizons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korzynski, Mikolaj; Lewandowski, Jerzy; Pawlowski, Tomasz

    2005-06-01

    Recently, a multidimensional generalization of the isolated horizon framework has been proposed (Lewandowski and Pawlowski 2005 Class. Quantum Grav. 22 1573 98). Therein the geometric description was easily generalized to higher dimensions and the structure of the constraints induced by the Einstein equations was analysed. In particular, the geometric version of the zeroth law of black-hole thermodynamics was proved. In this work, we show how the IH mechanics can be formulated in a dimension-independent fashion and derive the first law of BH thermodynamics for arbitrarily dimensional IH. We also propose a definition of energy for non-rotating horizons.

  1. Cytomegalovirus infection modulates the phenotype and functional profile of the T-cell immune response to mycobacterial antigens in older life☆

    PubMed Central

    Terrazzini, Nadia; Bajwa, Martha; Vita, Serena; Thomas, David; Smith, Helen; Vescovini, Rosanna; Sansoni, Paolo; Kern, Florian

    2014-01-01

    Infection with Cytomegalovirus is associated with accelerated immunosenescence. Expansions of CMV-specific T cell responses have previously been demonstrated to affect the ability of T cells to respond to other infections. Most people above 60 years of age display M. tuberculosis-specific immunity because of vaccination, exposure, or both. T-cell responses can be assessed by measuring intracellular IFN-γ in vitro after tuberculin stimulation. Here we investigated tuberculin-specific CD4 T-cell responses in independently living healthy older people in the South of England using flow-cytometry. Individuals were investigated for tuberculin and CMV-specific T-cell immunity using in vitro antigen stimulation followed by intracellular staining for IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL2, as well as degranulation and CD154 upregulation. We also examined a control group of younger individuals (20–35 years of age). There was no significant difference between older and young people in regards to tuberculin responsiveness of CD4 T-cells; however, older people seemed to show more outliers. Increased responsiveness to tuberculin was significantly correlated to CMV responsiveness but not age. In older donors, the memory phenotype of tuberculin-induced T-cells was significantly skewed towards a more terminal differentiation phenotype in CMV-infected compared to uninfected individuals and the degree of skewing correlated quantitatively with the size of the CMV-specific CD4 T-cell response. This is a fundamental advance over previous reports of changes of the tuberculin-specific CD4 T-cell response with CMV serostatus. Our results show that how the immune system responds to CMV has a fundamental impact on the phenotype and function of the immune response to mycobacterial antigens in older life. PMID:24370373

  2. Phenotypic and genotypic profile of pyrethroid resistance in populations of the mosquito Aedes aegypti from Goiânia, Central West Brazil.

    PubMed

    Chapadense, Francesca Guaracyaba Garcia; Fernandes, Everton Kort Kamp; Lima, José Bento Pereira; Martins, Ademir Jesus; Silva, Luana Carrara; Rocha, Welington Tristão da; Santos, Adelair Helena Dos; Cravo, Pedro

    2015-01-01

    The mosquito Aedes aegypti has evolved resistance to pyrethroid insecticides. The present study evaluated Ae. aegypti from Goiânia for the resistant phenotype and for mutations associated with resistance. Insecticide dose-response bioassays were conducted on mosquitoes descended from field-collected eggs, and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was used to genotype 90 individuals at sites implicated in pyrethroid resistance. All mosquito populations displayed high levels of resistance to deltamethrin, as well as high frequencies of the 1016Ile kdr and 1534Cys kdrmutations. Aedes aegypti populations in the Goiânia area are highly resistant to deltamethrin, presumably due to high frequencies of kdr(knockdown-resistance) mutations.

  3. Bioactive Potential of Marine Macroalgae from the Central Red Sea (Saudi Arabia) Assessed by High-Throughput Imaging-Based Phenotypic Profiling.

    PubMed

    Kremb, Stephan; Müller, Constanze; Schmitt-Kopplin, Philippe; Voolstra, Christian R

    2017-03-20

    Marine algae represent an important source of novel natural products. While their bioactive potential has been studied to some extent, limited information is available on marine algae from the Red Sea. This study aimed at the broad discovery of new bioactivities from a collection of twelve macroalgal species from the Central Red Sea. We used imaging-based High-Content Screening (HCS) with a diverse spectrum of cellular markers for detailed cytological profiling of fractionated algal extracts. The cytological profiles for 3 out of 60 algal fractions clustered closely to reference inhibitors and showed strong inhibitory activities on the HIV-1 reverse transcriptase in a single-enzyme biochemical assay, validating the suggested biological target. Subsequent chemical profiling of the active fractions of two brown algal species by ultra-high resolution mass spectrometry (FT-ICR-MS) revealed possible candidate molecules. A database query of these molecules led us to groups of compounds with structural similarities, which are suggested to be responsible for the observed activity. Our work demonstrates the versatility and power of cytological profiling for the bioprospecting of unknown biological resources and highlights Red Sea algae as a source of bioactives that may serve as a starting point for further studies.

  4. Bioactive Potential of Marine Macroalgae from the Central Red Sea (Saudi Arabia) Assessed by High-Throughput Imaging-Based Phenotypic Profiling

    PubMed Central

    Kremb, Stephan; Müller, Constanze; Schmitt-Kopplin, Philippe; Voolstra, Christian R.

    2017-01-01

    Marine algae represent an important source of novel natural products. While their bioactive potential has been studied to some extent, limited information is available on marine algae from the Red Sea. This study aimed at the broad discovery of new bioactivities from a collection of twelve macroalgal species from the Central Red Sea. We used imaging-based High-Content Screening (HCS) with a diverse spectrum of cellular markers for detailed cytological profiling of fractionated algal extracts. The cytological profiles for 3 out of 60 algal fractions clustered closely to reference inhibitors and showed strong inhibitory activities on the HIV-1 reverse transcriptase in a single-enzyme biochemical assay, validating the suggested biological target. Subsequent chemical profiling of the active fractions of two brown algal species by ultra-high resolution mass spectrometry (FT-ICR-MS) revealed possible candidate molecules. A database query of these molecules led us to groups of compounds with structural similarities, which are suggested to be responsible for the observed activity. Our work demonstrates the versatility and power of cytological profiling for the bioprospecting of unknown biological resources and highlights Red Sea algae as a source of bioactives that may serve as a starting point for further studies. PMID:28335513

  5. Gene expression profiling and phenotype analyses of S. cerevisiae in response to changing copper reveals six genes with new roles in copper and iron metabolism.

    PubMed

    van Bakel, Harm; Strengman, Eric; Wijmenga, Cisca; Holstege, Frank C P

    2005-08-11

    Exhaustive microarray time course analyses of Saccharomyces cerevisiae during copper starvation and copper excess reveal new aspects of metal-induced gene regulation. Aside from identifying targets of established copper- and iron-responsive transcription factors, we find that genes encoding mitochondrial proteins are downregulated and that copper-independent iron transport genes are preferentially upregulated, both during prolonged copper deprivation. The experiments also suggest the presence of a small regulatory iron pool that links copper and iron responses. One hundred twenty-eight genes with putative roles in metal metabolism were further investigated by several systematic phenotype screens. Of the novel phenotypes uncovered, hsp12-Delta and arn1-Delta display increased sensitivity to copper, cyc1-Delta and crr1-Delta show resistance to high copper, vma13-Delta exhibits increased sensitivity to iron deprivation, and pep12-Delta results in reduced growth in high copper and low iron. Besides revealing new components of eukaryotic metal trafficking pathways, the results underscore the previously determined intimate links between iron and copper metabolism and mitochondrial and vacuolar function in metal trafficking. The analyses further suggest that copper starvation can specifically lead to downregulation of respiratory function to preserve iron and copper for other cellular processes.

  6. Gene Expression Profiling Differentiates Autism Case–Controls and Phenotypic Variants of Autism Spectrum Disorders: Evidence for Circadian Rhythm Dysfunction in Severe Autism

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Valerie W.; Sarachana, Tewarit; Kim, Kyung Soon; Nguyen, AnhThu; Kulkarni, Shreya; Steinberg, Mara E.; Luu, Truong; Lai, Yinglei; Lee, Norman H.

    2009-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are neurodevelopmental disorders characterized by delayed/abnormal language development, deficits in social interaction, repetitive behaviors and restricted interests. The heterogeneity in clinical presentation of ASD, likely due to different etiologies, complicates genetic/biological analyses of these disorders. DNA microarray analyses were conducted on 116 lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCL) from individuals with idiopathic autism who are divided into three phenotypic subgroups according to severity scores from the commonly used Autism Diagnostic Interview-Revised questionnaire and age-matched, nonautistic controls. Statistical analyses of gene expression data from control LCL against that of LCL from ASD probands identify genes for which expression levels are either quantitatively or qualitatively associated with phenotypic severity. Comparison of the significant differentially expressed genes from each subgroup relative to the control group reveals differentially expressed genes unique to each subgroup as well as genes in common across subgroups. Among the findings unique to the most severely affected ASD group are 15 genes that regulate circadian rhythm, which has been shown to have multiple effects on neurological as well as metabolic functions commonly dysregulated in autism. Among the genes common to all three subgroups of ASD are 20 novel genes mostly in putative noncoding regions, which appear to associate with androgen sensitivity and which may underlie the strong 4:1 bias toward affected males. PMID:19418574

  7. Phenotype, hormonal profile and genotype of subjects with partial androgen insensitivity syndrome: report of a family with four adult males and one child with disorder of sexual differentiation.

    PubMed

    Kulshreshtha, B; Philibert, P; Eunice, M; Audran, F; Paris, F; Khurana, M L; Ammini, A C; Charles, S

    2009-08-01

    There is little information on the molecular basis of intrafamilial and inter-familial phenotypic heterogeneity with the same androgen receptor (AR) mutation in patients with partial androgen insensitivity syndrome. A genetic analysis was performed in a large kindred with ambiguous genitalia and the genotype-phenotype correlations were analysed. The index case was brought for sex assignment. Family history revealed four other affected members who had hypospadias and varying degrees of virilisation. All the affected males had hemizygous mutations in the third exon of the AR gene (A596T). One was also found to have a heterozygous mutation in the fourth exon of the 5 alpha reductase type 2 gene (G196S). This affected male with double mutations was better virilised compared with the other affected members with a single mutation. The degree of virilisation correlated with serum testosterone levels. Gynaecomastia was not present in any of these subjects. It is concluded that the subject with dual gene defects also had higher levels of testosterone and pubertal virilsation. Testosterone levels possibly govern the degree of pubertal virilisation in subjects with A596T gene defects. It is not clear whether the better pubertal virilsation and higher testosterone are in any way causally related to the SRD5A2 gene defect.

  8. Robustness of Adaptive Testing to Multidimensionality.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weiss, David J.; Suhadolnik, Debra

    The present monte carlo simulation study was designed to examine the effects of multidimensionality during the administration of computerized adaptive testing (CAT). It was assumed that multidimensionality existed in the individuals to whom test items were being administered, i.e., that the correct or incorrect responses given by an individual…

  9. On Compensation in Multidimensional Response Modeling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van der Linden, Wim J.

    2012-01-01

    The issue of compensation in multidimensional response modeling is addressed. We show that multidimensional response models are compensatory in their ability parameters if and only if they are monotone. In addition, a minimal set of assumptions is presented under which the MLEs of the ability parameters are also compensatory. In a recent series of…

  10. Mouse phenotyping.

    PubMed

    Fuchs, Helmut; Gailus-Durner, Valérie; Adler, Thure; Aguilar-Pimentel, Juan Antonio; Becker, Lore; Calzada-Wack, Julia; Da Silva-Buttkus, Patricia; Neff, Frauke; Götz, Alexander; Hans, Wolfgang; Hölter, Sabine M; Horsch, Marion; Kastenmüller, Gabi; Kemter, Elisabeth; Lengger, Christoph; Maier, Holger; Matloka, Mikolaj; Möller, Gabriele; Naton, Beatrix; Prehn, Cornelia; Puk, Oliver; Rácz, Ildikó; Rathkolb, Birgit; Römisch-Margl, Werner; Rozman, Jan; Wang-Sattler, Rui; Schrewe, Anja; Stöger, Claudia; Tost, Monica; Adamski, Jerzy; Aigner, Bernhard; Beckers, Johannes; Behrendt, Heidrun; Busch, Dirk H; Esposito, Irene; Graw, Jochen; Illig, Thomas; Ivandic, Boris; Klingenspor, Martin; Klopstock, Thomas; Kremmer, Elisabeth; Mempel, Martin; Neschen, Susanne; Ollert, Markus; Schulz, Holger; Suhre, Karsten; Wolf, Eckhard; Wurst, Wolfgang; Zimmer, Andreas; Hrabě de Angelis, Martin

    2011-02-01

    Model organisms like the mouse are important tools to learn more about gene function in man. Within the last 20 years many mutant mouse lines have been generated by different methods such as ENU mutagenesis, constitutive and conditional knock-out approaches, knock-down, introduction of human genes, and knock-in techniques, thus creating models which mimic human conditions. Due to pleiotropic effects, one gene may have different functions in different organ systems or time points during development. Therefore mutant mouse lines have to be phenotyped comprehensively in a highly standardized manner to enable the detection of phenotypes which might otherwise remain hidden. The German Mouse Clinic (GMC) has been established at the Helmholtz Zentrum München as a phenotyping platform with open access to the scientific community (www.mousclinic.de; [1]). The GMC is a member of the EUMODIC consortium which created the European standard workflow EMPReSSslim for the systemic phenotyping of mouse models (http://www.eumodic.org/[2]). Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. An Introduction to Coherent Multidimensional Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Peter C

    2016-12-01

    Coherent multidimensional spectroscopy is a field that has drawn much attention as an optical analogue to multidimensional nuclear magnetic resonance imaging. Coherent multidimensional spectroscopic techniques produce spectra that show the magnitude of an optical signal as a function of two or more pulsed laser frequencies. Spectra can be collected in either the frequency or the time domain. In addition to improving resolution and overcoming spectral congestion, coherent multidimensional spectroscopy provides the ability to investigate and conduct studies based upon the relationship between different peaks. The purpose of this paper is to provide a general introduction to the area of coherent multidimensional spectroscopy, to provide a brief overview of current experimental approaches, and to discuss some emerging developments in this relatively young field.

  12. The influence of aging and estradiol to progesterone ratio on rat macrophage phenotypic profile and NO and TNF-α production.

    PubMed

    Dimitrijević, Mirjana; Stanojević, Stanislava; Kuštrimović, Nataša; Mitić, Katarina; Vujić, Vesna; Aleksić, Iva; Radojević, Katarina; Leposavić, Gordana

    2013-11-01

    The phenotype and function of tissue macrophages substantially depend on the cellular milieu and biological effector molecules, such as steroid hormones, to which they are exposed. Furthermore, in female rats, aging is associated with the altered macrophage functioning and the increased estrogen level is followed by a decrease in that of progesterone. Therefore, the present study aimed to investigate the influence of estradiol/progesterone balance on rat macrophage function and phenotype throughout whole adult lifespan. We ovariectomized rats at the late prepubertal age or at the very end of reproductive lifespan, and examined the expression of ED2 (CD163, a marker of mature resident macrophages related to secretion of inflammatory mediators) on peritoneal macrophages and their ability to produce TNF-α and NO upon LPS-stimulation at different age points. In addition, to delineate direct and indirect effects of estrogen, we assessed the in vitro influence of different concentrations of 17β-estradiol on LPS-induced macrophage TNF-α and NO production. Results showed that: (a) the low frequency of ED2(high) cells amongst peritoneal macrophages of aged rats was accompanied with the reduced TNF-α, but not NO production; (b) estradiol level gradually increased following ovariectomy; (c) macrophage ED2 expression and TNF-α production were dependent on estradiol/progesterone balance and they changed in the same direction; (d) changes in estradiol/progesterone balance differentially affected macrophages TNF-α and NO production; and (e) estradiol exerted pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory effects on macrophages in vivo and in vitro, respectively. Overall, our study discloses that estradiol/progesterone balance contributes to the fine-tuning of rat macrophage secretory capacity, and adds to a better understanding of the ovarian steroid hormone role in the regulation of macrophage function, and its significance for the age-associated changes in innate immunity.

  13. Multi-parametric profiling of renal cell, colorectal, and ovarian cancer identifies tumour-type-specific stroma phenotypes and a novel vascular biomarker.

    PubMed

    Corvigno, Sara; Frödin, Magnus; Wisman, G Bea A; Nijman, Hans W; Van der Zee, Ate Gj; Jirström, Karin; Nodin, Björn; Hrynchyk, Ina; Edler, David; Ragnhammar, Peter; Johansson, Martin; Dahlstrand, Hanna; Mezheyeuski, Artur; Östman, Arne

    2017-07-01

    A novel set of integrated procedures for quantification of fibroblast-rich stroma and vascular characteristics has recently been presented allowing discovery of novel perivascular and stromal biomarkers in colorectal, renal cell, and ovarian cancer. In the present study, data obtained through these procedures from clinically well-annotated collections of these three tumour types have been used to address two novel questions. First, data have been used to investigate if the three tumour types demonstrate significant differences regarding features such as vessel diameter, vessel density, and perivascular marker expression. Second, analyses of the cohorts have been used to explore the prognostic significance of a novel vascular metric, 'vessel distance inter-quartile range (IQR)' that describes intra-case heterogeneity regarding vessel distribution. The comparisons between the three tumour types demonstrated a set of significant differences. Vessel density of renal cell cancer was statistically significantly higher than in colorectal and ovarian cancer. Vessel diameter was statistically significantly higher in ovarian cancer. Concerning perivascular status, colorectal cancer displayed significantly higher levels of perivascular PDGFR-β expression than the other two tumour types. Intra-case heterogeneity of perivascular PDGFR-β expression was also higher in colorectal cancer. Notably, these fibroblast-dominated stroma phenotypes matched previously described experimental tumour stroma characteristics, which have been linked to differential sensitivity to anti-VEGF drugs. High 'vessel distance IQR' was significantly associated with poor survival in both renal cell cancer and colorectal cancer. In renal cell cancer, this characteristic also acted as an independent prognostic marker according to multivariate analyses including standard clinico-pathological characteristics. Explorative subset analyses indicated particularly strong prognostic significance of 'vessel

  14. Multidimensional Adaptation in MAS Organizations.

    PubMed

    Alberola, Juan M; Julian, Vicente; Garcia-Fornes, Ana

    2013-04-01

    Organization adaptation requires determining the consequences of applying changes not only in terms of the benefits provided but also measuring the adaptation costs as well as the impact that these changes have on all of the components of the organization. In this paper, we provide an approach for adaptation in multiagent systems based on a multidimensional transition deliberation mechanism (MTDM). This approach considers transitions in multiple dimensions and is aimed at obtaining the adaptation with the highest potential for improvement in utility based on the costs of adaptation. The approach provides an accurate measurement of the impact of the adaptation since it determines the organization that is to be transitioned to as well as the changes required to carry out this transition. We show an example of adaptation in a service provider network environment in order to demonstrate that the measurement of the adaptation consequences taken by the MTDM improves the organization performance more than the other approaches.

  15. Convergence and the multidimensional niche.

    PubMed

    Harmon, Luke J; Kolbe, Jason J; Cheverud, James M; Losos, Jonathan B

    2005-02-01

    Convergent evolution has played an important role in the development of the ecological niche concept. We investigated patterns of convergent and divergent evolution of Caribbean Anolis lizards. These lizards diversified independently on each of the islands of the Greater Antilles, producing the same set of habitat specialists on each island. Using a phylogenetic comparative framework, we examined patterns of morphological convergence in five functionally distinct sets of morphological characters: body size, body shape, head shape, lamella number, and sexual size dimorphism. We find evidence for convergence among members of the habitat specialist types for each of these five datasets. Furthermore, the patterns of convergence differ among at least four of the five datasets; habitat specialists that are similar for one set of characters are often greatly different for another. This suggests that the habitat specialist niches into which these anoles have evolved are multidimensional, involving several distinct and independent aspects of morphology.

  16. Physical Self-Concept in Adolescence: Generalizability of a Multidimensional, Hierarchical Model Across Gender and Grade

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hagger, Martin S.; Biddle, Stuart J. H.; John Wang, C. K.

    2005-01-01

    This study tests the generalizability of the factor pattern, structural parameters, and latent mean structure of a multidimensional, hierarchical model of physical self-concept in adolescents across gender and grade. A children's version of the Physical Self-Perception Profile (C-PSPP) was administered to seventh-, eighth- and ninth-grade high…

  17. Physical Self-Perceptions in Adolescence: Generalizability of a Hierarchical Multidimensional Model across Three Cultures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hagger, Martin S.; Biddle, Stuart J. H.; Chow, Edward W.; Stambulova, Natalia; Kavussanu, Maria

    2003-01-01

    Examined the generalizability of the form, structural parameters, and latent means of a hierarchical multidimensional model of physical self-perceptions in adolescents from three cultures. A children's version of the physical self-perception profile was administered to British, Hong Kong, and Russian students. Tests of cross-cultural…

  18. Minimal Models of Multidimensional Computations

    PubMed Central

    Fitzgerald, Jeffrey D.; Sincich, Lawrence C.; Sharpee, Tatyana O.

    2011-01-01

    The multidimensional computations performed by many biological systems are often characterized with limited information about the correlations between inputs and outputs. Given this limitation, our approach is to construct the maximum noise entropy response function of the system, leading to a closed-form and minimally biased model consistent with a given set of constraints on the input/output moments; the result is equivalent to conditional random field models from machine learning. For systems with binary outputs, such as neurons encoding sensory stimuli, the maximum noise entropy models are logistic functions whose arguments depend on the constraints. A constraint on the average output turns the binary maximum noise entropy models into minimum mutual information models, allowing for the calculation of the information content of the constraints and an information theoretic characterization of the system's computations. We use this approach to analyze the nonlinear input/output functions in macaque retina and thalamus; although these systems have been previously shown to be responsive to two input dimensions, the functional form of the response function in this reduced space had not been unambiguously identified. A second order model based on the logistic function is found to be both necessary and sufficient to accurately describe the neural responses to naturalistic stimuli, accounting for an average of 93% of the mutual information with a small number of parameters. Thus, despite the fact that the stimulus is highly non-Gaussian, the vast majority of the information in the neural responses is related to first and second order correlations. Our results suggest a principled and unbiased way to model multidimensional computations and determine the statistics of the inputs that are being encoded in the outputs. PMID:21455284

  19. Gene-expression profiling reveals distinct expression patterns for Classic versus Variant Merkel cell phenotypes and new classifier genes to distinguish Merkel cell from small-cell lung carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Van Gele, Mireille; Boyle, Glen M; Cook, Anthony L; Vandesompele, Jo; Boonefaes, Tom; Rottiers, Pieter; Van Roy, Nadine; De Paepe, Anne; Parsons, Peter G; Leonard, J Helen; Speleman, Frank

    2004-04-08

    Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC) is a rare aggressive skin tumor which shares histopathological and genetic features with small-cell lung carcinoma (SCLC), both are of neuroendocrine origin. Comparable to SCLC, MCC cell lines are classified into two different biochemical subgroups designated as 'Classic' and 'Variant'. With the aim to identify typical gene-expression signatures associated with these phenotypically different MCC cell lines subgroups and to search for differentially expressed genes between MCC and SCLC, we used cDNA arrays to profile 10 MCC cell lines and four SCLC cell lines. Using significance analysis of microarrays, we defined a set of 76 differentially expressed genes that allowed unequivocal identification of Classic and Variant MCC subgroups. We assume that the differential expression levels of some of these genes reflect, analogous to SCLC, the different biological and clinical properties of Classic and Variant MCC phenotypes. Therefore, they may serve as useful prognostic markers and potential targets for the development of new therapeutic interventions specific for each subgroup. Moreover, our analysis identified 17 powerful classifier genes capable of discriminating MCC from SCLC. Real-time quantitative RT-PCR analysis of these genes on 26 additional MCC and SCLC samples confirmed their diagnostic classification potential, opening opportunities for new investigations into these aggressive cancers.

  20. Phenotype markers and cytokine intracellular production by CD8+ gammadelta T lymphocytes do not support a regulatory T profile in Behçet's disease patients and healthy controls.

    PubMed

    Clemente, Antonio; Cambra, Ana; Munoz-Saá, Iván; Crespí, Catalina; Pallarés, Lucio; Juan, Antonio; Matamoros, Núria; Julià, Maria Rosa

    2010-04-08

    gammadelta T lymphocytes (GD) have been suggested as one of the causes of cytokine dysregulation that results in neutrophils hyperactivation in Behçet's disease (BD) patients. In addition, GD can provoke cytotoxic lesions in autoimmune diseases by interaction with MICA (MHC class I chain-related A) molecules, through NKG2D receptor on its surface. In contrast, the CD8+ subset of gammadelta T lymphocytes (GDCD8+) has been related to regulatory T activity. The aim of this study was to determine the phenotype and the intracellular cytokine profile in GD from peripheral blood, to discern if they were skewed to an effector or regulatory pattern in BD. We performed phenotype analysis, by three-colour flow cytometry, in 28 BD, 15 healthy controls (HC) and 14 patients with recurrent bucal ulcers (RBU). We studied intracellular cytokine production in 10 BD and 14 HC, after polyclonal stimulation. In addition, we analysed serum IL-15 and soluble MICA, by ELISA, in 27 BD, 21 HC and 40 rheumatoid arthritis patients. The hallmark in BD was a specific increase in CD8 expression by GD, and in GDCD8+ absolute numbers. Most of GDCD8+ presented CD8 alphaalpha homodimers and were negative for CD103, Foxp3 and CTLA-4. GDCD8+ and GDCD8- were high IFNgamma-, but poor IL-2, IL-10, TGFbeta and IL-4-producing cells, with no differences between BD and HC. NKG2D expression on CD8+ T cells, serum IL-15 and soluble MICA were not significantly increased in BD. Our results do not suggest a T regulatory profile for GDCD8+ neither in HC, nor in BD. We cannot rule out other suppression mechanisms or some heterogeneity within this subset that could contribute to regulatory function.

  1. Development of a Multidimensional Thinking Styles Scale Based on Theory of Mental Self-Government for Sixth Grade Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chaiyapornpattana, Niorn; Wongwanich, Suwimon

    2013-01-01

    This study designed 1) to develop a multidimensional thinking styles scale based on theory of mental self-government for sixth grade student 2) to investigate quality of the developed scale 3) to study profile of styles of sixth grade student and a relation of profile of styles of student in each dimension and background of gender and grade with…

  2. Multidimensional text classification for drug information.

    PubMed

    Lertnattee, Verayuth; Theeramunkong, Thanaruk

    2004-09-01

    This paper proposes a multidimensional model for classifying drug information text documents. The concept of multidimensional category model is introduced for representing classes. In contrast with traditional flat and hierarchical category models, the multidimensional category model classifies each document using multiple predefined sets of categories, where each set corresponds to a dimension. Since a multidimensional model can be converted to flat and hierarchical models, three classification approaches are possible, i.e., classifying directly based on the multidimensional model and classifying with the equivalent flat or hierarchical models. The efficiency of these three approaches is investigated using drug information collection with two different dimensions: 1) drug topics and 2) primary therapeutic classes. In the experiments, k-nearest neighbor, naive Bayes, and two centroid-based methods are selected as classifiers. The comparisons among three approaches of classification are done using two-way analysis of variance, followed by the Scheffé's test for post hoc comparison. The experimental results show that multidimensional-based classification performs better than the others, especially in the presence of a relatively small training set. As one application, a category-based search engine using the multidimensional category concept was developed to help users retrieve drug information.

  3. Exhaustive screening of the acid beta-glucosidase gene, by fluorescence-assisted mismatch analysis using universal primers: mutation profile and genotype/phenotype correlations in Gaucher disease.

    PubMed Central

    Germain, D P; Puech, J P; Caillaud, C; Kahn, A; Poenaru, L

    1998-01-01

    Gaucher disease (GD) is one of the most prevalent lysosomal storage disorders and one of the rare genetic diseases now accessible to therapy. Outside the Ashkenazi Jewish community, a high molecular diversity is observed, leaving approximately 30% of alleles undetected. Nevertheless, very few exhaustive methods have been developed for extensive gene screening of a large series of patients. Our approach for a complete search of mutations was the association of fluorescent chemical cleavage of mismatches with a universal strand-specific labeling system. The glucocerebrosidase (GBA) gene was scanned by use of a set of six amplicons, comprising 11 exons, all exon/intron boundaries, and the promoter region. By use of this screening strategy, the difficulties due to the existence of a highly homologous pseudogene were easily overcome, and both GD mutant alleles were identified in all 25 patients studied, thus attesting to a sensitivity that approaches 100%. A total of 18 different mutations and a new glucocerebrosidase haplotype were detected. The mutational spectrum included eight novel acid beta-glucosidase mutations: IVS2 G(+1)-->T, I119T, R170P, N188K, S237P, K303I, L324P, and A446P. These data further indicate the genetic heterogeneity of the lesions causing GD. Established genotype/phenotype correlations generally were confirmed, but notable disparities were disclosed in several cases, thus underlining the limitation in the prognostic value of genotyping. The observed influence of multifactorial control on this monogenic disease is discussed. PMID:9683600

  4. Comprehensive genomic and phenotypic metal resistance profile of Pseudomonas putida strain S13.1.2 isolated from a vineyard soil.

    PubMed

    Chong, Teik Min; Yin, Wai-Fong; Chen, Jian-Woon; Mondy, Samuel; Grandclément, Catherine; Faure, Denis; Dessaux, Yves; Chan, Kok-Gan

    2016-12-01

    Trace metals are required in many cellular processes in bacteria but also induce toxic effects to cells when present in excess. As such, various forms of adaptive responses towards extracellular trace metal ions are essential for the survival and fitness of bacteria in their environment. A soil Pseudomonas putida, strain S13.1.2 has been isolated from French vineyard soil samples, and shown to confer resistance to copper ions. Further investigation revealed a high capacity to tolerate elevated concentrations of various heavy metals including nickel, cobalt, cadmium, zinc and arsenic. The complete genome analysis was conducted using single-molecule real-time (SMRT) sequencing and the genome consisted in a single chromosome at the size of 6.6 Mb. Presence of operons and gene clusters such as cop, cus, czc, nik, and asc systems were detected and accounted for the observed resistance phenotypes. The unique features in terms of specificity and arrangements of some genetic determinants were also highlighted in the study. Our findings has provided insights into the adaptation of this strain to accumulation and persistence of copper and other heavy metals in vineyard soil environment.

  5. Analytical chemistry, multidimensional spectral signatures, and the future of coherent multidimensional spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, John C.

    2016-10-01

    Spectroscopy is a dominant measurement methodology because it resolves molecular level details over a wide concentration range. Its limitations, however, become challenged when applied to complex materials. Coherent multidimensional spectroscopy (CMDS) is the optical analogue of multidimensional NMR and like NMR, its multidimensionality promises to increase the spectral selectivity of vibrational and electronic spectroscopy. This article explores whether this promise can make CMDS a dominant spectroscopic method throughout the sciences. In order for CMDS to become a dominant methodology, it must create multidimensional spectral fingerprints that provide the selectivity required for probing complex samples. Pump-CMDS probe methods separate the pump's measurement of dynamics from a multidimensional and selective probe. Fully coherent CMDS methods are ideal multidimensional probes because they avoid relaxation effects, spectrally isolate the output signals, and provide unique and invariant spectral signatures using any combination of vibrational and electronic quantum states.

  6. The distinct gene expression profiles of chronic lymphocytic leukemia and multiple myeloma suggest different anti-apoptotic mechanisms but predict only some differences in phenotype.

    PubMed

    Zent, Clive S; Zhan, Fenghuang; Schichman, Steven A; Bumm, Klaus H W; Lin, Pei; Chen, James B; Shaughnessy, John D

    2003-09-01

    We compared gene expression in purified tumor cells from untreated patients with chronic lymphocytic (CLL) (n=24) and newly diagnosed multiple myeloma (MM) (n=29) using the Affymetrix HuGeneFL microarray with probes for approximately 6800 genes. Hierarchical clustering analysis showed that CLL and MM have distinct expression profiles (class prediction). Gene and protein expression (measured by flow cytometry) correlated well for CD19, CD20, CD23, and CD138 in CLL and MM, but not for immunoglobulin light chain, CD38 and CD79b in CLL, or CD45 and CD52 in MM. CLL and MM differentially expressed 18% of 130 apoptosis related genes, suggesting differences in mechanisms of cell survival.

  7. A method for analysis of phenotypic change for phenotypes described by high-dimensional data

    PubMed Central

    Collyer, M L; Sekora, D J; Adams, D C

    2015-01-01

    The analysis of phenotypic change is important for several evolutionary biology disciplines, including phenotypic plasticity, evolutionary developmental biology, morphological evolution, physiological evolution, evolutionary ecology and behavioral evolution. It is common for researchers in these disciplines to work with multivariate phenotypic data. When phenotypic variables exceed the number of research subjects—data called ‘high-dimensional data'—researchers are confronted with analytical challenges. Parametric tests that require high observation to variable ratios present a paradox for researchers, as eliminating variables potentially reduces effect sizes for comparative analyses, yet test statistics require more observations than variables. This problem is exacerbated with data that describe ‘multidimensional' phenotypes, whereby a description of phenotype requires high-dimensional data. For example, landmark-based geometric morphometric data use the Cartesian coordinates of (potentially) many anatomical landmarks to describe organismal shape. Collectively such shape variables describe organism shape, although the analysis of each variable, independently, offers little benefit for addressing biological questions. Here we present a nonparametric method of evaluating effect size that is not constrained by the number of phenotypic variables, and motivate its use with example analyses of phenotypic change using geometric morphometric data. Our examples contrast different characterizations of body shape for a desert fish species, associated with measuring and comparing sexual dimorphism between two populations. We demonstrate that using more phenotypic variables can increase effect sizes, and allow for stronger inferences. PMID:25204302

  8. Adulthood dietary exposure to a common pesticide leads to an obese-like phenotype and a diabetic profile in apoE3 mice.

    PubMed

    Peris-Sampedro, Fiona; Cabré, Maria; Basaure, Pia; Reverte, Ingrid; Domingo, José L; Teresa Colomina, Maria

    2015-10-01

    Increasing evidence links the widespread exposure to organophosphate (OP) pesticides to the global epidemics of type 2 diabetes and obesity. Our recent data highlighted gene×environment interactions: mice expressing the human apolipoprotein E3 (apoE3) isoform were more prone to develop obesity than those expressing apoE2 or apoE4 upon dietary challenge with chlorpyrifos (CPF), the most used OP worldwide. Thus, we aimed to further explore the contribution of the APOE3 genotype on the emergence of obesity and related metabolic dysfunctions upon subchronic exposure to CPF. Seven-month-old targeted replacement apoE3 and C57BL/6N male mice were orally exposed to CPF at 0 or 2mg/kg body weight/day for 8 consecutive weeks. We examined body weight status, food and water intake, lipid and glucose homeostasis, metabolic biomarkers concentrations, insulin levels and insulin resistance, and leptin and ghrelin profiles. CPF exposure generally increased food ingestion, glucose and total cholesterol concentrations, and tended to elevate acyl ghrelin levels. Nonetheless, excess weight gain and increased leptin levels were inherent to apoE3 mice. Moreover, the propensity towards a diabetic profile was markedly higher in these animals than in C57BL/6N, as they showed a higher homeostatic model assessment for insulin resistance index and higher insulin levels. Although both genotypes were metabolically affected by CPF, the results of the present investigation revealed that apoE3 mice were the most vulnerable to developing obesity and related disturbances following CPF administration through the diet. Since the APOE3 genotype is the most prevalent worldwide, current findings have particular implications for human health.

  9. MicroRNA Expression Profile Identifies High Grade, Non-Muscle-Invasive Bladder Tumors at Elevated Risk to Progress to an Invasive Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Lenherr, Sara M.; Tsai, Sheaumei; Silva Neto, Brasil; Sullivan, Travis B.; Cimmino, Cara B.; Logvinenko, Tanya; Gee, Jason; Huang, Wei; Libertino, John A.; Summerhayes, Ian C.; Rieger-Christ, Kimberly M.

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this study was to identify a panel of microRNAs (miRNAs) differentially expressed in high-grade non-muscle invasive (NMI; TaG3–T1G3) urothelial carcinoma that progress to muscle-invasive disease compared to those that remain non-muscle invasive, whether recurrence happens or not. Eighty-nine high-grade NMI urothelial carcinoma lesions were identified and total RNA was extracted from paraffin-embedded tissue. Patients were categorized as either having a non-muscle invasive lesion with no evidence of progression over a 3-year period or as having a similar lesion showing progression to muscle invasion over the same period. In addition, comparison of miRNA expression levels between patients with and without prior intravesical therapy was performed. Total RNA was pooled for microarray analysis in each group (non-progressors and progressors), and qRT-PCR of individual samples validated differential expression between non-progressive and progressive lesions. MiR-32-5p, -224-5p, and -412-3p were associated with cancer-specific survival. Downregulation of miR-203a-3p and miR-205-5p were significantly linked to progression in non-muscle invasive bladder tumors. These miRNAs include those implicated in epithelial mesenchymal transition, previously identified as members of a panel characterizing transition from the non-invasive to invasive phenotype in bladder tumors. Furthermore, we were able to identify specific miRNAs that are linked to postoperative outcome in patients with high grade NMI urothelial carcinoma of the bladder (UCB) that progressed to muscle-invasive (MI) disease. PMID:28218662

  10. Phenotypic, Functional, and Gene Expression Profiling of Peripheral CD45RA+ and CD45RO+ CD4+CD25+CD127(low) Treg Cells in Patients With Chronic Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Walter, Gina J; Fleskens, Veerle; Frederiksen, Klaus S; Rajasekhar, Megha; Menon, Bina; Gerwien, Jens G; Evans, Hayley G; Taams, Leonie S

    2016-01-01

    Conflicting evidence exists regarding the suppressive capacity of Treg cells in the peripheral blood (PB) of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The aim of this study was to determine whether Treg cells are intrinsically defective in RA. Using a range of assays on PB samples from patients with chronic RA and healthy controls, CD3+CD4+CD25+CD127(low) Treg cells from the CD45RO+ or CD45RA+ T cell compartments were analyzed for phenotype, cytokine expression (ex vivo and after in vitro stimulation), suppression of Teff cell proliferation and cytokine production, suppression of monocyte-derived cytokine/chemokine production, and gene expression profiles. No differences between RA patients and healthy controls were observed with regard to the frequency of Treg cells, ex vivo phenotype (CD4, CD25, CD127, CD39, or CD161), or proinflammatory cytokine profile (interleukin-17 [IL-17], interferon-γ [IFNγ], or tumor necrosis factor [TNF]). FoxP3 expression was slightly increased in Treg cells from RA patients. The ability of Treg cells to suppress the proliferation of T cells or the production of cytokines (IFNγ or TNF) upon coculture with autologous CD45RO+ Teff cells and monocytes was not significantly different between RA patients and healthy controls. In PB samples from some RA patients, CD45RO+ Treg cells showed an impaired ability to suppress the production of certain cytokines/chemokines (IL-1β, IL-1 receptor antagonist, IL-7, CCL3, or CCL4) by autologous lipopolysaccharide-activated monocytes. However, this was not observed in all patients, and other cytokines/chemokines (TNF, IL-6, IL-8, IL-12, IL-15, or CCL5) were generally suppressed. Finally, gene expression profiling of CD45RA+ or CD45RO+ Treg cells from the PB revealed no statistically significant differences between RA patients and healthy controls. Our findings indicate that there is no global defect in either CD45RO+ or CD45RA+ Treg cells in the PB of patients with chronic RA. © 2016 The Authors

  11. Memory CD8(+) T cells elicited by HIV-1 lipopeptide vaccines display similar phenotypic profiles but differences in term of magnitude and multifunctionality compared with FLU- or EBV-specific memory T cells in humans.

    PubMed

    Figueiredo, Suzanne; Charmeteau, Benedicte; Surenaud, Mathieu; Salmon, Dominique; Launay, Odile; Guillet, Jean-Gérard; Hosmalin, Anne; Gahery, Hanne

    2014-01-16

    Differentiation marker, multifunctionality and magnitude analyses of specific-CD8(+) memory T cells are crucial to improve development of HIV vaccines designed to generate cell-mediated immunity. Therefore, we fully characterized the HIV-specific CD8(+) T cell responses induced in volunteers vaccinated with HIV lipopeptide vaccines for phenotypic markers, tetramer staining, cytokine secretion, and cytotoxic activities. The frequency of ex vivo CD8(+) T cells elicited by lipopeptide vaccines is very rare and central-memory phenotype and functions of these cells were been shown to be important in AIDS immunity. So, we expanded them using specific peptides to compare the memory T cell responses induced in volunteers by HIV vaccines with responses to influenza (FLU) or Epstein Barr virus (EBV). By analyzing the differentiation state of IFN-γ-secreting CD8(+) T cells, we found a CCR7(-)CD45RA(-)CD28(+int)/CD28(-) profile (>85%) belonging to a subset of intermediate-differentiated effector T cells for HIV, FLU, and EBV. We then assessed the quality of the response by measuring various T cell functions. The percentage of single IFN-γ T cell producers in response to HIV was 62% of the total of secreting T cells compared with 35% for FLU and EBV, dual and triple (IFN-γ/IL-2/CD107a) T cell producers could also be detected but at lower levels (8% compared with 37%). Finally, HIV-specific T cells secreted IFN-γ and TNF-α, but not the dual combination like FLU- and EBV-specific T cells. Thus, we found that the functional profile and magnitude of expanded HIV-specific CD8(+) T precursors were more limited than those of to FLU- and EBV-specific CD8(+) T cells. These data show that CD8(+) T cells induced by these HIV vaccines have a similar differentiation profile to FLU and EBV CD8(+) T cells, but that the vaccine potency to induce multifunctional T cells needs to be increased in order to improve vaccination strategies. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Using Multidimensional Scaling for Curricular Goal Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leitzman, David F.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Reports research that utilized multidimensional scaling and related analytic procedures to validate the curricular goals of a graduate therapeutic recreation program. Data analysis includes the use of the two-dimensional KYST and PREFMAP spaces. (Author/JD)

  13. The Multidimensional Assessment of Interoceptive Awareness (MAIA)

    PubMed Central

    Mehling, Wolf E.; Price, Cynthia; Daubenmier, Jennifer J.; Acree, Mike; Bartmess, Elizabeth; Stewart, Anita

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes the development of a multidimensional self-report measure of interoceptive body awareness. The systematic mixed-methods process involved reviewing the current literature, specifying a multidimensional conceptual framework, evaluating prior instruments, developing items, and analyzing focus group responses to scale items by instructors and patients of body awareness-enhancing therapies. Following refinement by cognitive testing, items were field-tested in students and instructors of mind-body approaches. Final item selection was achieved by submitting the field test data to an iterative process using multiple validation methods, including exploratory cluster and confirmatory factor analyses, comparison between known groups, and correlations with established measures of related constructs. The resulting 32-item multidimensional instrument assesses eight concepts. The psychometric properties of these final scales suggest that the Multidimensional Assessment of Interoceptive Awareness (MAIA) may serve as a starting point for research and further collaborative refinement. PMID:23133619

  14. Subjective Geographic Distance: A Multidimensional Comparison

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lundberg, Ulf; Ekman, Gosta

    1973-01-01

    The interdistances between thirteen places situated in different parts of the world were estimated by 60 subjects. The estimates were analysed by Kruskal's multidimensional technique and, after a cosine transformation, by factor analysis. (Author)

  15. Tourette Syndrome: A Multidimensional Approach to Treatment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Donna J.

    1987-01-01

    Describes Tourette syndrome, a chronic, neurological disorder characterized by involuntary muscular movements, uncontrollable sounds, and inappropriate words. Notes that Tourette syndrome is frequently misunderstood and mistreated, presents symptoms, and suggests a multidimensional approach to treatment. (Author/NB)

  16. Multi-dimensional edge detection operators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Youn, Sungwook; Lee, Chulhee

    2014-05-01

    In remote sensing, modern sensors produce multi-dimensional images. For example, hyperspectral images contain hundreds of spectral images. In many image processing applications, segmentation is an important step. Traditionally, most image segmentation and edge detection methods have been developed for one-dimensional images. For multidimensional images, the output images of spectral band images are typically combined under certain rules or using decision fusions. In this paper, we proposed a new edge detection algorithm for multi-dimensional images using secondorder statistics. First, we reduce the dimension of input images using the principal component analysis. Then we applied multi-dimensional edge detection operators that utilize second-order statistics. Experimental results show promising results compared to conventional one-dimensional edge detectors such as Sobel filter.

  17. Mormons and Social Distance: A Multidimensional Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bunker, Gary L.; And Others

    1977-01-01

    Issues such as Mormon variation from general cultural ethnic attitudes and generalization from ecclesiastical norms to secular tolerance/intolerance are examined in light of multi-dimensional research. (Author/AM)

  18. Transcriptional Profiling in Experimental Visceral Leishmaniasis Reveals a Broad Splenic Inflammatory Environment that Conditions Macrophages toward a Disease-Promoting Phenotype.

    PubMed

    Kong, Fanping; Saldarriaga, Omar A; Spratt, Heidi; Osorio, E Yaneth; Travi, Bruno L; Luxon, Bruce A; Melby, Peter C

    2017-01-01

    Visceral Leishmaniasis (VL), caused by the intracellular protozoan Leishmania donovani, is characterized by relentlessly increasing visceral parasite replication, cachexia, massive splenomegaly, pancytopenia and ultimately death. Progressive disease is considered to be due to impaired effector T cell function and/or failure of macrophages to be activated to kill the intracellular parasite. In previous studies, we used the Syrian hamster (Mesocricetus auratus) as a model because it mimics the progressive nature of active human VL. We demonstrated previously that mixed expression of macrophage-activating (IFN-γ) and regulatory (IL-4, IL-10, IL-21) cytokines, parasite-induced expression of macrophage arginase 1 (Arg1), and decreased production of nitric oxide are key immunopathologic factors. Here we examined global changes in gene expression to define the splenic environment and phenotype of splenic macrophages during progressive VL. We used RNA sequencing coupled with de novo transcriptome assembly, because the Syrian hamster does not have a fully sequenced and annotated reference genome. Differentially expressed transcripts identified a highly inflammatory spleen environment with abundant expression of type I and type II interferon response genes. However, high IFN-γ expression was ineffective in directing exclusive M1 macrophage polarization, suppressing M2-associated gene expression, and restraining parasite replication and disease. While many IFN-inducible transcripts were upregulated in the infected spleen, fewer were induced in splenic macrophages in VL. Paradoxically, IFN-γ enhanced parasite growth and induced the counter-regulatory molecules Arg1, Ido1 and Irg1 in splenic macrophages. This was mediated, at least in part, through IFN-γ-induced activation of STAT3 and expression of IL-10, which suggests that splenic macrophages in VL are conditioned to respond to macrophage activation signals with a counter-regulatory response that is ineffective and even

  19. Transcriptional Profiling in Experimental Visceral Leishmaniasis Reveals a Broad Splenic Inflammatory Environment that Conditions Macrophages toward a Disease-Promoting Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Spratt, Heidi; Travi, Bruno L.; Luxon, Bruce A.

    2017-01-01

    Visceral Leishmaniasis (VL), caused by the intracellular protozoan Leishmania donovani, is characterized by relentlessly increasing visceral parasite replication, cachexia, massive splenomegaly, pancytopenia and ultimately death. Progressive disease is considered to be due to impaired effector T cell function and/or failure of macrophages to be activated to kill the intracellular parasite. In previous studies, we used the Syrian hamster (Mesocricetus auratus) as a model because it mimics the progressive nature of active human VL. We demonstrated previously that mixed expression of macrophage-activating (IFN-γ) and regulatory (IL-4, IL-10, IL-21) cytokines, parasite-induced expression of macrophage arginase 1 (Arg1), and decreased production of nitric oxide are key immunopathologic factors. Here we examined global changes in gene expression to define the splenic environment and phenotype of splenic macrophages during progressive VL. We used RNA sequencing coupled with de novo transcriptome assembly, because the Syrian hamster does not have a fully sequenced and annotated reference genome. Differentially expressed transcripts identified a highly inflammatory spleen environment with abundant expression of type I and type II interferon response genes. However, high IFN-γ expression was ineffective in directing exclusive M1 macrophage polarization, suppressing M2-associated gene expression, and restraining parasite replication and disease. While many IFN-inducible transcripts were upregulated in the infected spleen, fewer were induced in splenic macrophages in VL. Paradoxically, IFN-γ enhanced parasite growth and induced the counter-regulatory molecules Arg1, Ido1 and Irg1 in splenic macrophages. This was mediated, at least in part, through IFN-γ-induced activation of STAT3 and expression of IL-10, which suggests that splenic macrophages in VL are conditioned to respond to macrophage activation signals with a counter-regulatory response that is ineffective and even

  20. Multidimensional imaging using compressive Fresnel holography.

    PubMed

    Horisaki, Ryoichi; Tanida, Jun; Stern, Adrian; Javidi, Bahram

    2012-06-01

    We propose a generalized framework for single-shot acquisition of multidimensional objects using compressive Fresnel holography. A multidimensional object with spatial, spectral, and polarimetric information is propagated with the Fresnel diffraction, and the propagated signal of each channel is observed by an image sensor with randomly arranged optical elements for filtering. The object data are reconstructed using a compressive sensing algorithm. This scheme is verified with numerical experiments. The proposed framework can be applied to imageries for spectrum, polarization, and so on.

  1. Multidimensional Data Modeling for Business Process Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mansmann, Svetlana; Neumuth, Thomas; Scholl, Marc H.

    The emerging area of business process intelligence attempts to enhance the analytical capabilities of business process management systems by employing data warehousing and mining technologies. This paper presents an approach to re-engineering the business process modeling in conformity with the multidimensional data model. Since the business process and the multidimensional model are driven by rather different objectives and assumptions, there is no straightforward solution to converging these models.

  2. VH-1: Multidimensional ideal compressible hydrodynamics code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawley, John; Blondin, John; Lindahl, Greg; Lufkin, Eric

    2012-04-01

    VH-1 is a multidimensional ideal compressible hydrodynamics code written in FORTRAN for use on any computing platform, from desktop workstations to supercomputers. It uses a Lagrangian remap version of the Piecewise Parabolic Method developed by Paul Woodward and Phil Colella in their 1984 paper. VH-1 comes in a variety of versions, from a simple one-dimensional serial variant to a multi-dimensional version scalable to thousands of processors.

  3. Multidimensional stochastic approximation Monte Carlo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zablotskiy, Sergey V.; Ivanov, Victor A.; Paul, Wolfgang

    2016-06-01

    Stochastic Approximation Monte Carlo (SAMC) has been established as a mathematically founded powerful flat-histogram Monte Carlo method, used to determine the density of states, g (E ) , of a model system. We show here how it can be generalized for the determination of multidimensional probability distributions (or equivalently densities of states) of macroscopic or mesoscopic variables defined on the space of microstates of a statistical mechanical system. This establishes this method as a systematic way for coarse graining a model system, or, in other words, for performing a renormalization group step on a model. We discuss the formulation of the Kadanoff block spin transformation and the coarse-graining procedure for polymer models in this language. We also apply it to a standard case in the literature of two-dimensional densities of states, where two competing energetic effects are present g (E1,E2) . We show when and why care has to be exercised when obtaining the microcanonical density of states g (E1+E2) from g (E1,E2) .

  4. Multidimensional encoding of brain connectomes.

    PubMed

    Caiafa, Cesar F; Pestilli, Franco

    2017-09-13

    The ability to map brain networks in living individuals is fundamental in efforts to chart the relation between human behavior, health and disease. Advances in network neuroscience may benefit from developing new frameworks for mapping brain connectomes. We present a framework to encode structural brain connectomes and diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance (dMRI) data using multidimensional arrays. The framework integrates the relation between connectome nodes, edges, white matter fascicles and diffusion data. We demonstrate the utility of the framework for in vivo white matter mapping and anatomical computing by evaluating 1,490 connectomes, thirteen tractography methods, and three data sets. The framework dramatically reduces storage requirements for connectome evaluation methods, with up to 40x compression factors. Evaluation of multiple, diverse datasets demonstrates the importance of spatial resolution in dMRI. We measured large increases in connectome resolution as function of data spatial resolution (up to 52%). Moreover, we demonstrate that the framework allows performing anatomical manipulations on white matter tracts for statistical inference and to study the white matter geometrical organization. Finally, we provide open-source software implementing the method and data to reproduce the results.

  5. Multichannel and Multidimensional Bargmann Potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plekhanvov, E. B.; Suzko, A. S.; Zakhariev, B. N.

    The class of potential matrices for which coupled channel Schrödinger equations have exact solutions is presented. This is achieved due to degeneration of the kernel of the inverse-problem integral equation with respect to the channel indices, in addition to separability of its coordinate dependence. No attention has been paid before to this fact. Maybe therefore there was no satisfactory multichannel generalization of Bargmann potentials.Partially nonlocal Bargmann potentials for multidimensional and many-particle systems are constructed. Examples of new transparent potentials are given.Translated AbstractMehrkanal und multidimensionale Bargmann-PotentialePotentialmatrizen, für die die Mehrkanal-Schrödingergleichung exakt lösbar ist, werden angegeben. Die entsprechenden Schrödingergleichungen sind exakt lösbar dank der Entartung des Kerns der Integralgleichung des inversen Streuproblems hinsichtlich sowohl der Koordinatenabhängigkeit als auch der Kanalindizes. Dieser Sachverhalt war bisher nicht bemerkt worden. Es werden teilweise nichtlokale Potentiale für mehrdimensionale und Vielteilchen-Systeme konstruiert. Neue Beispiele von nichtreflektierden Potentialen werden angegeben.

  6. Vector fields in multidimensional cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meierovich, Boris E.

    2011-09-01

    Vector fields in the expanding Universe are considered within the multidimensional theory of general relativity. Vector fields in general relativity form a three-parametric variety. Our consideration includes the fields with a nonzero covariant divergence. Depending on the relations between the particular parameters and the symmetry of a problem, the vector fields can be longitudinal and/or transverse, ultrarelativistic (i.e. massless) or nonrelativistic (massive), and so on. The longitudinal and transverse vector fields are considered separately in detail in the background of the de Sitter cosmological metric. In most cases the field equations reduce to Bessel equations, and their temporal evolution is analyzed analytically. The energy-momentum tensor of the most simple zero-mass longitudinal vector fields enters the Einstein equations as an additive to the cosmological constant. In this case the de Sitter metric is the exact solution of the Einstein equations. Hence, the most simple zero-mass longitudinal vector field pretends to be an adequate tool for macroscopic description of dark energy as a source of the expansion of the Universe at a constant rate. The zero-mass vector field does not vanish in the process of expansion. On the contrary, massive fields vanish with time. Though their amplitude is falling down, the massive fields make the expansion accelerated.

  7. Multidimensionally encoded magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Lin, Fa-Hsuan

    2013-07-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) typically achieves spatial encoding by measuring the projection of a q-dimensional object over q-dimensional spatial bases created by linear spatial encoding magnetic fields (SEMs). Recently, imaging strategies using nonlinear SEMs have demonstrated potential advantages for reconstructing images with higher spatiotemporal resolution and reducing peripheral nerve stimulation. In practice, nonlinear SEMs and linear SEMs can be used jointly to further improve the image reconstruction performance. Here, we propose the multidimensionally encoded (MDE) MRI to map a q-dimensional object onto a p-dimensional encoding space where p > q. MDE MRI is a theoretical framework linking imaging strategies using linear and nonlinear SEMs. Using a system of eight surface SEM coils with an eight-channel radiofrequency coil array, we demonstrate the five-dimensional MDE MRI for a two-dimensional object as a further generalization of PatLoc imaging and O-space imaging. We also present a method of optimizing spatial bases in MDE MRI. Results show that MDE MRI with a higher dimensional encoding space can reconstruct images more efficiently and with a smaller reconstruction error when the k-space sampling distribution and the number of samples are controlled. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Multidimensional evaluation of managed relocation

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, David M.; Hellmann, Jessica J.; McLachlan, Jason S.; Sax, Dov F.; Schwartz, Mark W.; Gonzalez, Patrick; Brennan, E. Jean; Camacho, Alejandro; Root, Terry L.; Sala, Osvaldo E.; Schneider, Stephen H.; Ashe, Daniel M.; Clark, Jamie Rappaport; Early, Regan; Etterson, Julie R.; Fielder, E. Dwight; Gill, Jacquelyn L.; Minteer, Ben A.; Polasky, Stephen; Safford, Hugh D.; Thompson, Andrew R.; Vellend, Mark

    2009-01-01

    Managed relocation (MR) has rapidly emerged as a potential intervention strategy in the toolbox of biodiversity management under climate change. Previous authors have suggested that MR (also referred to as assisted colonization, assisted migration, or assisted translocation) could be a last-alternative option after interrogating a linear decision tree. We argue that numerous interacting and value-laden considerations demand a more inclusive strategy for evaluating MR. The pace of modern climate change demands decision making with imperfect information, and tools that elucidate this uncertainty and integrate scientific information and social values are urgently needed. We present a heuristic tool that incorporates both ecological and social criteria in a multidimensional decision-making framework. For visualization purposes, we collapse these criteria into 4 classes that can be depicted in graphical 2-D space. This framework offers a pragmatic approach for summarizing key dimensions of MR: capturing uncertainty in the evaluation criteria, creating transparency in the evaluation process, and recognizing the inherent tradeoffs that different stakeholders bring to evaluation of MR and its alternatives. PMID:19509337

  9. Differentiation of Shewanella putrefaciens and Shewanella alga on the basis of whole-cell protein profiles, ribotyping, phenotypic characterization, and 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis.

    PubMed

    Vogel, B F; Jørgensen, K; Christensen, H; Olsen, J E; Gram, L

    1997-06-01

    Seventy-six presumed Shewanella putrefaciens isolates from fish, oil drillings, and clinical specimens, the type strain of Shewanella putrefaciens (ATCC 8071), the type strain of Shewanella alga (IAM 14159), and the type strain of Shewanella hanedai (ATCC 33224) were compared by several typing methods. Numerical analysis of sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of whole-cell protein and ribotyping patterns showed that the strains were separated into two distinct clusters with 56% +/- 10% and 40% +/- 14% similarity for whole-cell protein profiling and ribotyping, respectively. One cluster consisted of 26 isolates with 52 to 55 mol% G + C and included 15 human isolates, mostly clinical specimens, 8 isolates from marine waters, and the type strain of S. alga. This homogeneous cluster of mesophilic, halotolerant strains was by all analyses identical to the recently defined species S. alga (U. Simidu et al., Int. J. Syst. Bacteriol, 40:331-336, 1990). Fifty-two typically psychrotolerant strains formed the other, more heterogeneous major cluster, with 43 to 47 mol% G + C. The type strain of S. putrefaciens was included in this group. The two groups were confirmed by 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis. It is concluded that the isolates must be considered two different species, S. alga and S. putrefaciens, and that most mesophilic isolates formerly identified as S. putrefaciens belong to S. alga. The ecological role and potential pathogenicity of S. alga can be evaluated only if the organism is correctly identified.

  10. Progress in multi-dimensional upwind differencing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanleer, Bram

    1992-01-01

    Multi-dimensional upwind-differencing schemes for the Euler equations are reviewed. On the basis of the first-order upwind scheme for a one-dimensional convection equation, the two approaches to upwind differencing are discussed: the fluctuation approach and the finite-volume approach. The usual extension of the finite-volume method to the multi-dimensional Euler equations is not entirely satisfactory, because the direction of wave propagation is always assumed to be normal to the cell faces. This leads to smearing of shock and shear waves when these are not grid-aligned. Multi-directional methods, in which upwind-biased fluxes are computed in a frame aligned with a dominant wave, overcome this problem, but at the expense of robustness. The same is true for the schemes incorporating a multi-dimensional wave model not based on multi-dimensional data but on an 'educated guess' of what they could be. The fluctuation approach offers the best possibilities for the development of genuinely multi-dimensional upwind schemes. Three building blocks are needed for such schemes: a wave model, a way to achieve conservation, and a compact convection scheme. Recent advances in each of these components are discussed; putting them all together is the present focus of a worldwide research effort. Some numerical results are presented, illustrating the potential of the new multi-dimensional schemes.

  11. Multidimensional Poverty and Child Survival in India

    PubMed Central

    Mohanty, Sanjay K.

    2011-01-01

    Background Though the concept of multidimensional poverty has been acknowledged cutting across the disciplines (among economists, public health professionals, development thinkers, social scientists, policy makers and international organizations) and included in the development agenda, its measurement and application are still limited. Objectives and Methodology Using unit data from the National Family and Health Survey 3, India, this paper measures poverty in multidimensional space and examine the linkages of multidimensional poverty with child survival. The multidimensional poverty is measured in the dimension of knowledge, health and wealth and the child survival is measured with respect to infant mortality and under-five mortality. Descriptive statistics, principal component analyses and the life table methods are used in the analyses. Results The estimates of multidimensional poverty are robust and the inter-state differentials are large. While infant mortality rate and under-five mortality rate are disproportionately higher among the abject poor compared to the non-poor, there are no significant differences in child survival among educationally, economically and health poor at the national level. State pattern in child survival among the education, economical and health poor are mixed. Conclusion Use of multidimensional poverty measures help to identify abject poor who are unlikely to come out of poverty trap. The child survival is significantly lower among abject poor compared to moderate poor and non-poor. We urge to popularize the concept of multiple deprivations in research and program so as to reduce poverty and inequality in the population. PMID:22046384

  12. Sparse Sampling Methods In Multidimensional NMR

    PubMed Central

    Mobli, Mehdi; Maciejewski, Mark W.; Schuyler, Adam D.; Stern, Alan S.; Hoch, Jeffrey C.

    2014-01-01

    Although the discrete Fourier transform played an enabling role in the development of modern NMR spectroscopy, it suffers from a well-known difficulty providing high-resolution spectra from short data records. In multidimensional NMR experiments, so-called indirect time dimensions are sampled parametrically, with each instance of evolution times along the indirect dimensions sampled via separate one-dimensional experiments. The time required to conduct multidimensional experiments is directly proportional to the number of indirect evolution times sampled. Despite remarkable advances in resolution with increasing magnetic field strength, multiple dimensions remain essential for resolving individual resonances in NMR spectra of biological macromolecues. Conventional Fourier-based methods of spectrum analysis limit the resolution that can be practically achieved in the indirect dimensions. Nonuniform or sparse data collection strategies, together with suitable non-Fourier methods of spectrum analysis, enable high-resolution multidimensional spectra to be obtained. Although some of these approaches were first employed in NMR more than two decades ago, it is only relatively recently that they have been widely adopted. Here we describe the current practice of sparse sampling methods and prospects for further development of the approach to improve resolution and sensitivity and shorten experiment time in multidimensional NMR. While sparse sampling is particularly promising for multidimensional NMR, the basic principles could apply to other forms of multidimensional spectroscopy. PMID:22481242

  13. Multidimensional poverty and child survival in India.

    PubMed

    Mohanty, Sanjay K

    2011-01-01

    Though the concept of multidimensional poverty has been acknowledged cutting across the disciplines (among economists, public health professionals, development thinkers, social scientists, policy makers and international organizations) and included in the development agenda, its measurement and application are still limited. OBJECTIVES AND METHODOLOGY: Using unit data from the National Family and Health Survey 3, India, this paper measures poverty in multidimensional space and examine the linkages of multidimensional poverty with child survival. The multidimensional poverty is measured in the dimension of knowledge, health and wealth and the child survival is measured with respect to infant mortality and under-five mortality. Descriptive statistics, principal component analyses and the life table methods are used in the analyses. The estimates of multidimensional poverty are robust and the inter-state differentials are large. While infant mortality rate and under-five mortality rate are disproportionately higher among the abject poor compared to the non-poor, there are no significant differences in child survival among educationally, economically and health poor at the national level. State pattern in child survival among the education, economical and health poor are mixed. Use of multidimensional poverty measures help to identify abject poor who are unlikely to come out of poverty trap. The child survival is significantly lower among abject poor compared to moderate poor and non-poor. We urge to popularize the concept of multiple deprivations in research and program so as to reduce poverty and inequality in the population.

  14. Automated genome-wide visual profiling of cellular proteins involved in HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Genovesio, Auguste; Kwon, Yong-Jun; Windisch, Marc P; Kim, Nam Youl; Choi, Seo Yeon; Kim, Hi Chul; Jung, Sungyong; Mammano, Fabrizio; Perrin, Virginie; Boese, Annette S; Casartelli, Nicoletta; Schwartz, Olivier; Nehrbass, Ulf; Emans, Neil

    2011-10-01

    Recent genome-wide RNAi screens have identified >842 human genes that affect the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) cycle. The list of genes implicated in infection differs between screens, and there is minimal overlap. A reason for this variance is the interdependence of HIV infection and host cell function, producing a multitude of indirect or pleiotropic cellular effects affecting the viral infection during RNAi screening. To overcome this, the authors devised a 15-dimensional phenotypic profile to define the viral infection block induced by CD4 silencing in HeLa cells. They demonstrate that this phenotypic profile excludes nonspecific, RNAi-based side effects and viral replication defects mediated by silencing of housekeeping genes. To achieve statistical robustness, the authors used automatically annotated RNAi arrays for seven independent genome-wide RNAi screens. This identified 56 host genes, which reliably reproduced CD4-like phenotypes upon HIV infection. The factors include 11 known HIV interactors and 45 factors previously not associated with HIV infection. As proof of concept, the authors confirmed that silencing of PAK1, Ku70, and RNAseH2A impaired HIV replication in Jurkat cells. In summary, multidimensional, visual profiling can identify genes required for HIV infection.

  15. Improved multidimensional semiclassical tunneling theory.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Albert F

    2013-12-12

    We show that the analytic multidimensional semiclassical tunneling formula of Miller et al. [Miller, W. H.; Hernandez, R.; Handy, N. C.; Jayatilaka, D.; Willets, A. Chem. Phys. Lett. 1990, 172, 62] is qualitatively incorrect for deep tunneling at energies well below the top of the barrier. The origin of this deficiency is that the formula uses an effective barrier weakly related to the true energetics but correctly adjusted to reproduce the harmonic description and anharmonic corrections of the reaction path at the saddle point as determined by second order vibrational perturbation theory. We present an analytic improved semiclassical formula that correctly includes energetic information and allows a qualitatively correct representation of deep tunneling. This is done by constructing a three segment composite Eckart potential that is continuous everywhere in both value and derivative. This composite potential has an analytic barrier penetration integral from which the semiclassical action can be derived and then used to define the semiclassical tunneling probability. The middle segment of the composite potential by itself is superior to the original formula of Miller et al. because it incorporates the asymmetry of the reaction barrier produced by the known reaction exoergicity. Comparison of the semiclassical and exact quantum tunneling probability for the pure Eckart potential suggests a simple threshold multiplicative factor to the improved formula to account for quantum effects very near threshold not represented by semiclassical theory. The deep tunneling limitations of the original formula are echoed in semiclassical high-energy descriptions of bound vibrational states perpendicular to the reaction path at the saddle point. However, typically ab initio energetic information is not available to correct it. The Supporting Information contains a Fortran code, test input, and test output that implements the improved semiclassical tunneling formula.

  16. Identifying neurocognitive phenotypes in autism.

    PubMed Central

    Tager-Flusberg, Helen; Joseph, Robert M

    2003-01-01

    Autism is a complex disorder that is heterogeneous both in its phenotypic expression and its etiology. The search for genes associated with autism and the neurobiological mechanisms that underlie its behavioural symptoms has been hampered by this heterogeneity. Recent studies indicate that within autism, there may be distinct subgroups that can be defined based on differences in neurocognitive profiles. This paper presents evidence for two kinds of subtypes in autism that are defined on the basis of language profiles and on the basis of cognitive profiles. The implications for genetic and neurobiological studies of these subgroups are discussed, with special reference to evidence relating these cognitive phenotypes to volumetric studies of brain size and organization in autism. PMID:12639328

  17. Multidimensional Assessment of Marital Satisfaction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snyder, Douglas K.

    1979-01-01

    Studies involving couples focused on the development of a Marital Satisfaction Inventory (MSI). Correlational analyses confirm that measures of communication are the best single predictors of global marital satisfaction. Profile analyses demonstrate the ability of the MSI to discriminate between couples in therapy and a matched control group.…

  18. Multidimensional energy operator for image processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maragos, Petros; Bovik, Alan C.; Quatieri, Thomas F.

    1992-11-01

    The 1-D nonlinear differential operator (Psi) (f) equals (f')2 - ff' has been recently introduced to signal processing and has been found very useful for estimating the parameters of sinusoids and the modulating signals of AM-FM signals. It is called an energy operator because it can track the energy of an oscillator source generating a sinusoidal signal. In this paper we introduce the multidimensional extension (Phi) (f) equals (parallel)DELf(parallel)2 - fDEL2f of the 1-D energy operator and briefly outline some of its applications to image processing. We discuss some interesting properties of the multidimensional operator and develop demodulation algorithms to estimate the amplitude envelope and instantaneous frequencies of 2-D spatially-varying AM-FM signals, which can model image texture. The attractive features of the multidimensional operator and the related amplitude/frequency demodulation algorithms are their simplicity, efficiency, and ability to track instantaneously- varying spatial modulation patterns.

  19. Resonance beyond frequency-matching: multidimensional resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhenyu; Li, Mingzhe; Wang, Ruifang

    2017-03-01

    Resonance, conventionally defined as the oscillation of a system when the temporal frequency of an external stimulus matches a natural frequency of the system, is important in both fundamental physics and applied disciplines. However, the spatial character of oscillation is not considered in this definition. We reveal the creation of spatial resonance when the stimulus matches the space pattern of a normal mode in an oscillating system. The complete resonance, which we call multidimensional resonance, should be a combination of both the temporal and the spatial resonance. We further elucidate that the spin wave produced by multidimensional resonance drives considerably faster reversal of the vortex core in a magnetic nanodisc. Multidimensional resonance provides insight into the nature of wave dynamics and opens the door to novel applications.

  20. RNA: State Memory and Mediator of Cellular Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Junhyong; Eberwine, James

    2010-01-01

    It has become increasingly clear that the genome is dynamic and exquisitely sensitive, changing expression patterns in response to age, environmental stimuli and pharmacological and physiological manipulations. Similarly, cellular phenotype, traditionally viewed as a stable end-state, should be viewed as versatile and changeable. The phenotype of a cell is better defined as a “homeostatic phenotype” implying plasticity resulting from a dynamically-changing yet characteristic pattern of gene/protein expression. A stable change in phenotype is the result of the movement of a cell between different multi-dimensional identity spaces. Here, we describe a key driver of this transition and the stabilizer of phenotype: the relative abundances of the cellular RNAs. We argue that the quantitative state of RNA can be likened to a state memory, that when transferred between cells, alters the phenotype in a predictable manner. PMID:20382532

  1. Preface: Special Topic on Multidimensional Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukamel, Shaul; Bakker, Huib J.

    2015-06-01

    Multidimensional signals are generated by subjecting molecules to sequences of short optical pulses and recording correlation plots related to the various controlled delay periods. These techniques which span all the way from the THz to the x-ray regimes provide qualitatively new structural and dynamical molecular information not available from conventional one-dimensional techniques. This issue surveys the recent experimental and theoretical progresses in this rapidly developing 20 year old field which illustrates the novel insights provided by multidimensional techniques into electronic and nuclear motions. It should serve as a valuable source for experts in the field and help introduce newcomers to this exciting and challenging branch of nonlinear spectroscopy.

  2. The Nature of Stable Insomnia Phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Pillai, Vivek; Roth, Thomas; Drake, Christopher L.

    2015-01-01

    Study Objectives: We examined the 1-y stability of four insomnia symptom profiles: sleep onset insomnia; sleep maintenance insomnia; combined onset and maintenance insomnia; and neither criterion (i.e., insomnia cases that do not meet quantitative thresholds for onset or maintenance problems). Insomnia cases that exhibited the same symptom profile over a 1-y period were considered to be phenotypes, and were compared in terms of clinical and demographic characteristics. Design: Longitudinal. Setting: Urban, community-based. Participants: Nine hundred fifty-four adults with Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition based current insomnia (46.6 ± 12.6 y; 69.4% female). Interventions: None. Measurements and results: At baseline, participants were divided into four symptom profile groups based on quantitative criteria. Follow-up assessment 1 y later revealed that approximately 60% of participants retained the same symptom profile, and were hence judged to be phenotypes. Stability varied significantly by phenotype, such that sleep onset insomnia (SOI) was the least stable (42%), whereas combined insomnia (CI) was the most stable (69%). Baseline symptom groups (cross-sectionally defined) differed significantly across various clinical indices, including daytime impairment, depression, and anxiety. Importantly, however, a comparison of stable phenotypes (longitudinally defined) did not reveal any differences in impairment or comorbid psychopathology. Another interesting finding was that whereas all other insomnia phenotypes showed evidence of an elevated wake drive both at night and during the day, the “neither criterion” phenotype did not; this latter phenotype exhibited significantly higher daytime sleepiness despite subthreshold onset and maintenance difficulties. Conclusions: By adopting a stringent, stability-based definition, this study offers timely and important data on the longitudinal trajectory of specific insomnia phenotypes. With

  3. Cattle phenotypes can disguise their maternal ancestry.

    PubMed

    Srirattana, Kanokwan; McCosker, Kieren; Schatz, Tim; St John, Justin C

    2017-06-26

    Cattle are bred for, amongst other factors, specific traits, including parasite resistance and adaptation to climate. However, the influence and inheritance of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) are not usually considered in breeding programmes. In this study, we analysed the mtDNA profiles of cattle from Victoria (VIC), southern Australia, which is a temperate climate, and the Northern Territory (NT), the northern part of Australia, which has a tropical climate, to determine if the mtDNA profiles of these cattle are indicative of breed and phenotype, and whether these profiles are appropriate for their environments. A phylogenetic tree of the full mtDNA sequences of different breeds of cattle, which were obtained from the NCBI database, showed that the mtDNA profiles of cattle do not always reflect their phenotype as some cattle with Bos taurus phenotypes had Bos indicus mtDNA, whilst some cattle with Bos indicus phenotypes had Bos taurus mtDNA. Using D-loop sequencing, we were able to contrast the phenotypes and mtDNA profiles from different species of cattle from the 2 distinct cattle breeding regions of Australia. We found that 67 of the 121 cattle with Bos indicus phenotypes from NT (55.4%) had Bos taurus mtDNA. In VIC, 92 of the 225 cattle with Bos taurus phenotypes (40.9%) possessed Bos indicus mtDNA. When focusing on oocytes from cattle with the Bos taurus phenotype in VIC, their respective oocytes with Bos indicus mtDNA had significantly lower levels of mtDNA copy number compared with oocytes possessing Bos taurus mtDNA (P < 0.01). However, embryos derived from oocytes with Bos indicus mtDNA had the same ability to develop to the blastocyst stage and the levels of mtDNA copy number in their blastocysts were similar to blastocysts derived from oocytes harbouring Bos taurus mtDNA. Nevertheless, oocytes originating from the Bos indicus phenotype exhibited lower developmental potential due to low mtDNA copy number when compared with oocytes from cattle with a Bos

  4. Quantification of Microbial Phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Martínez, Verónica S.; Krömer, Jens O.

    2016-01-01

    Metabolite profiling technologies have improved to generate close to quantitative metabolomics data, which can be employed to quantitatively describe the metabolic phenotype of an organism. Here, we review the current technologies available for quantitative metabolomics, present their advantages and drawbacks, and the current challenges to generate fully quantitative metabolomics data. Metabolomics data can be integrated into metabolic networks using thermodynamic principles to constrain the directionality of reactions. Here we explain how to estimate Gibbs energy under physiological conditions, including examples of the estimations, and the different methods for thermodynamics-based network analysis. The fundamentals of the methods and how to perform the analyses are described. Finally, an example applying quantitative metabolomics to a yeast model by 13C fluxomics and thermodynamics-based network analysis is presented. The example shows that (1) these two methods are complementary to each other; and (2) there is a need to take into account Gibbs energy errors. Better estimations of metabolic phenotypes will be obtained when further constraints are included in the analysis. PMID:27941694

  5. The Efficacy of Multidimensional Constraint Keys in Database Query Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cardwell, Leslie K.

    2012-01-01

    This work is intended to introduce a database design method to resolve the two-dimensional complexities inherent in the relational data model and its resulting performance challenges through abstract multidimensional constructs. A multidimensional constraint is derived and utilized to implement an indexed Multidimensional Key (MK) to abstract a…

  6. The Efficacy of Multidimensional Constraint Keys in Database Query Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cardwell, Leslie K.

    2012-01-01

    This work is intended to introduce a database design method to resolve the two-dimensional complexities inherent in the relational data model and its resulting performance challenges through abstract multidimensional constructs. A multidimensional constraint is derived and utilized to implement an indexed Multidimensional Key (MK) to abstract a…

  7. Characterization of a novel impurity in bulk drug of lisinopril by multidimensional NMR technique*

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Dan-Hua; Pei, Sai-Feng; Zhou, Ming-Hua; Sun, Cui-Rong; Pan, Yuan-Jiang

    2006-01-01

    During the routine impurity profile of lisinopril bulk drug by HPLC (high-performance liquid chromatography), a potential impurity was detected. Using multidimensional NMR (nuclear magnetic resonance) technique, the trace-level impurity was unambiguously identified to be 2-(-2-oxo-azocan-3-ylamino)-4-phenyl-butyric acid after isolation from lisinopril bulk drug by semi-preparative HPLC. Formation of the impurity was also discussed. To our knowledge, this is a novel impurity and not reported elsewhere. PMID:16532534

  8. Diagnose Test-Taker's Profile in Terms of Core Profile Patterns: Principal Component (PC) vs. Profile Analysis via MDS (PAMS) Approaches.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Se-Kang; Davison, Mark L.

    A study was conducted to examine how principal components analysis (PCA) and Profile Analysis via Multidimensional Scaling (PAMS) can be used to diagnose individuals observed score profiles in terms of core profile patterns identified by each method. The standardization sample from the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children, Third Edition…

  9. Multidimensional Scaling Applied to Linguistic Relationships.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Black, Paul

    1973-01-01

    As the several specific applications in this paper demonstrate, multidimensional scaling provides a long-needed means for investigating and describing spatial relationships among speech varieties. It is especially applicable to the relationships among varieties of a single language (or more properly, linguistic "cline"), which, as is…

  10. Career Success: Constructing a Multidimensional Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dries, Nicky; Pepermans, Roland; Carlier, Olivier

    2008-01-01

    A multidimensional model of career success was developed aiming to be more inclusive than existing models. In a first study, 22 managers were asked to tell the story of their careers. At the end of each interview, idiosyncratic career success "construct ladders" were constructed for each interviewee through an interactive process with the…

  11. DICON: interactive visual analysis of multidimensional clusters.

    PubMed

    Cao, Nan; Gotz, David; Sun, Jimeng; Qu, Huamin

    2011-12-01

    Clustering as a fundamental data analysis technique has been widely used in many analytic applications. However, it is often difficult for users to understand and evaluate multidimensional clustering results, especially the quality of clusters and their semantics. For large and complex data, high-level statistical information about the clusters is often needed for users to evaluate cluster quality while a detailed display of multidimensional attributes of the data is necessary to understand the meaning of clusters. In this paper, we introduce DICON, an icon-based cluster visualization that embeds statistical information into a multi-attribute display to facilitate cluster interpretation, evaluation, and comparison. We design a treemap-like icon to represent a multidimensional cluster, and the quality of the cluster can be conveniently evaluated with the embedded statistical information. We further develop a novel layout algorithm which can generate similar icons for similar clusters, making comparisons of clusters easier. User interaction and clutter reduction are integrated into the system to help users more effectively analyze and refine clustering results for large datasets. We demonstrate the power of DICON through a user study and a case study in the healthcare domain. Our evaluation shows the benefits of the technique, especially in support of complex multidimensional cluster analysis.

  12. A Multidimensional Construct of Self-Esteem

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norem-Hebeisen, Ardyth A.

    1976-01-01

    Evidence for construct validity of this multi-dimensional concept of self esteem includes the relative congruence of the factor structure with the theoretical construct, the stability of the structure when subjected to a series of empirical tests, increasingly positive self-referent responses with increasing age, willingness to become more…

  13. Multidimensional Treatment of Fear of Death.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoelter, Jon W.

    1979-01-01

    Presents a multidimensional conception of fear of death and provides subscales for measuring suggested dimensions (fear of the dying process, of the dead, of being destroyed, for significant others, of the unknown, of conscious death, for body after death, and of premature death). Evidence for construct validity is provided. (Author/BEF)

  14. Multidimensional Perspectives on Principal Leadership Effectiveness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beycioglu, Kadir, Ed.; Pashiardis, Petros, Ed.

    2015-01-01

    Exceptional management skills are crucial to success in educational environments. As school leaders, principals are expected to effectively supervise the school system while facing a multitude of issues and demands. "Multidimensional Perspectives on Principal Leadership Effectiveness" combines best practices and the latest approaches in…

  15. Multidimensional Treatment of Fear of Death.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoelter, Jon W.

    1979-01-01

    Presents a multidimensional conception of fear of death and provides subscales for measuring suggested dimensions (fear of the dying process, of the dead, of being destroyed, for significant others, of the unknown, of conscious death, for body after death, and of premature death). Evidence for construct validity is provided. (Author/BEF)

  16. Multidimensional neural growing networks and computer intelligence

    SciTech Connect

    Yashchenko, V.A.

    1995-03-01

    This paper examines information-computation processes in time and in space and some aspects of computer intelligence using multidimensional matrix neural growing networks. In particular, issues of object-oriented {open_quotes}thinking{close_quotes} of computers are considered.

  17. Multidimensional IRT Models for Composite Scores

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yen, Shu Jing; Walker, Leah

    2007-01-01

    Tests of English Language Proficiency are often designed such that each section of the test measures a single latent ability. For instance an English Proficiency Assessment might consist of sections measuring Speaking, Listening, and Reading ability. However, Overall English Proficiency and composite abilities are naturally multidimensional. This…

  18. Stability of Adolescents' Multidimensional Life Satisfaction Reports

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Antaramian, Susan P.; Huebner, E. Scott

    2009-01-01

    Eighty-four students were administered the Multidimensional Students' Life Satisfaction Scale (MSLSS) on three occasions, 1 year apart (Grades 8, 9, and 10). The 1-year stability coefficients ranged from 0.29 to 0.59, whereas the 2-year stability coefficients ranged from 0.41 to 0.59. MSLSS mean scores were consistent across administrations, with…

  19. A New Heterogeneous Multidimensional Unfolding Procedure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Park, Joonwook; Rajagopal, Priyali; DeSarbo, Wayne S.

    2012-01-01

    A variety of joint space multidimensional scaling (MDS) methods have been utilized for the spatial analysis of two- or three-way dominance data involving subjects' preferences, choices, considerations, intentions, etc. so as to provide a parsimonious spatial depiction of the underlying relevant dimensions, attributes, stimuli, and/or subjects'…

  20. Uncertainty of Comparative Judgments and Multidimensional Structure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sjoberg, Lennart

    1975-01-01

    An analysis of preferences with respect to silhouette drawings of nude females is presented. Systematic intransitivities were discovered. The dispersions of differences (comparatal dispersons) were shown to reflect the multidimensional structure of the stimuli, a finding expected on the basis of prior work. (Author)

  1. Multidimensional Screening as a Pharmacology Laboratory Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malone, Marvin H.; And Others

    1979-01-01

    A multidimensional pharmacodynamic screening experiment that addresses drug interaction is included in the pharmacology-toxicology laboratory experience of pharmacy students at the University of the Pacific. The student handout with directions for the procedure is reproduced, drug compounds tested are listed, and laboratory evaluation results are…

  2. Unidimensional Interpretations for Multidimensional Test Items

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kahraman, Nilufer

    2013-01-01

    This article considers potential problems that can arise in estimating a unidimensional item response theory (IRT) model when some test items are multidimensional (i.e., show a complex factorial structure). More specifically, this study examines (1) the consequences of model misfit on IRT item parameter estimates due to unintended minor item-level…

  3. Multidimensional Perspectives on Principal Leadership Effectiveness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beycioglu, Kadir, Ed.; Pashiardis, Petros, Ed.

    2015-01-01

    Exceptional management skills are crucial to success in educational environments. As school leaders, principals are expected to effectively supervise the school system while facing a multitude of issues and demands. "Multidimensional Perspectives on Principal Leadership Effectiveness" combines best practices and the latest approaches in…

  4. An Examination of Alternative Multidimensional Scaling Techniques

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Papazoglou, Sofia; Mylonas, Kostas

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to compare alternative multidimensional scaling (MDS) methods for constraining the stimuli on the circumference of a circle and on the surface of a sphere. Specifically, the existing MDS-T method for plotting the stimuli on the circumference of a circle is applied, and its extension is proposed for constraining the…

  5. Uncertainty of Comparative Judgments and Multidimensional Structure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sjoberg, Lennart

    1975-01-01

    An analysis of preferences with respect to silhouette drawings of nude females is presented. Systematic intransitivities were discovered. The dispersions of differences (comparatal dispersons) were shown to reflect the multidimensional structure of the stimuli, a finding expected on the basis of prior work. (Author)

  6. Multidimensional Tauberian theorems for generalized functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drozhzhinov, Yu N.

    2016-12-01

    This is a brief survey of multidimensional Tauberian theorems for generalized functions. Included are theorems of Hardy-Littlewood type, Tauberian and Abelian comparison theorems of Keldysh type, theorems of Wiener type, and Tauberian theorems for generalized functions with values in Banach spaces. Bibliography: 58 titles.

  7. CAMS: OLAPing Multidimensional Data Streams Efficiently

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuzzocrea, Alfredo

    In the context of data stream research, taming the multidimensionality of real-life data streams in order to efficiently support OLAP analysis/mining tasks is a critical challenge. Inspired by this fundamental motivation, in this paper we introduce CAMS (C ube-based A cquisition model for M ultidimensional S treams), a model for efficiently OLAPing multidimensional data streams. CAMS combines a set of data stream processing methodologies, namely (i) the OLAP dimension flattening process, which allows us to obtain dimensionality reduction of multidimensional data streams, and (ii) the OLAP stream aggregation scheme, which aggregates data stream readings according to an OLAP-hierarchy-based membership approach. We complete our analytical contribution by means of experimental assessment and analysis of both the efficiency and the scalability of OLAPing capabilities of CAMS on synthetic multidimensional data streams. Both analytical and experimental results clearly connote CAMS as an enabling component for next-generation Data Stream Management Systems.

  8. Multidimensional Human Dynamics in Mobile Phone Communications

    PubMed Central

    Quadri, Christian; Zignani, Matteo; Capra, Lorenzo; Gaito, Sabrina; Rossi, Gian Paolo

    2014-01-01

    In today's technology-assisted society, social interactions may be expressed through a variety of techno-communication channels, including online social networks, email and mobile phones (calls, text messages). Consequently, a clear grasp of human behavior through the diverse communication media is considered a key factor in understanding the formation of the today's information society. So far, all previous research on user communication behavior has focused on a sole communication activity. In this paper we move forward another step on this research path by performing a multidimensional study of human sociality as an expression of the use of mobile phones. The paper focuses on user temporal communication behavior in the interplay between the two complementary communication media, text messages and phone calls, that represent the bi-dimensional scenario of analysis. Our study provides a theoretical framework for analyzing multidimensional bursts as the most general burst category, that includes one-dimensional bursts as the simplest case, and offers empirical evidence of their nature by following the combined phone call/text message communication patterns of approximately one million people over three-month period. This quantitative approach enables the design of a generative model rooted in the three most significant features of the multidimensional burst - the number of dimensions, prevalence and interleaving degree - able to reproduce the main media usage attitude. The other findings of the paper include a novel multidimensional burst detection algorithm and an insight analysis of the human media selection process. PMID:25068479

  9. Multidimensional stochastic approximation using locally contractive functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawton, W. M.

    1975-01-01

    A Robbins-Monro type multidimensional stochastic approximation algorithm which converges in mean square and with probability one to the fixed point of a locally contractive regression function is developed. The algorithm is applied to obtain maximum likelihood estimates of the parameters for a mixture of multivariate normal distributions.

  10. A New Heterogeneous Multidimensional Unfolding Procedure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Park, Joonwook; Rajagopal, Priyali; DeSarbo, Wayne S.

    2012-01-01

    A variety of joint space multidimensional scaling (MDS) methods have been utilized for the spatial analysis of two- or three-way dominance data involving subjects' preferences, choices, considerations, intentions, etc. so as to provide a parsimonious spatial depiction of the underlying relevant dimensions, attributes, stimuli, and/or subjects'…

  11. A combined multidimensional scaling and hierarchical clustering view for the exploratory analysis of multidimensional data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craig, Paul; Roa-Seïler, Néna

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes a novel information visualization technique that combines multidimensional scaling and hierarchical clustering to support the exploratory analysis of multidimensional data. The technique displays the results of multidimensional scaling using a scatter plot where the proximity of any two items' representations is approximate to their similarity according to a Euclidean distance metric. The results of hierarchical clustering are overlaid onto this view by drawing smoothed outlines around each nested cluster. The difference in similarity between successive cluster combinations is used to colour code clusters and make stronger natural clusters more prominent in the display. When a cluster or group of items is selected, multidimensional scaling and hierarchical clustering are re-applied to a filtered subset of the data, and animation is used to smooth the transition between successive filtered views. As a case study we demonstrate the technique being used to analyse survey data relating to the appropriateness of different phrases to different emotionally charged situations.

  12. Examination of the Structure and Grade-Related Differentiation of Multidimensional Self-Concept Instruments for Children Using ESEM

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arens, A. Katrin; Morin, Alexandre J. S.

    2016-01-01

    This study is a substantive-methodological synergy in which exploratory structural equation modeling is applied to investigate the factor structure of multidimensional self-concept instruments. On the basis of a sample of German students (N = 1958) who completed the Self-Description Questionnaire I and the Self-Perception Profile for Children, the…

  13. Sex Differences in the Multidimensional Self-Concepts of African American Adolescents: The Mediating Role of Gender Identity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomson, Nicole Renick; Zand, Debra H.

    2007-01-01

    The present study investigates whether the gender identities of African American adolescents mediate sex differences found in their multidimensional self-concepts. The sample included 174 African American adolescents who completed the 21-item Children's Personal Attributes Questionnaire and the Self-Perception Profile for Adolescents. Results…

  14. Examination of the Structure and Grade-Related Differentiation of Multidimensional Self-Concept Instruments for Children Using ESEM

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arens, A. Katrin; Morin, Alexandre J. S.

    2016-01-01

    This study is a substantive-methodological synergy in which exploratory structural equation modeling is applied to investigate the factor structure of multidimensional self-concept instruments. On the basis of a sample of German students (N = 1958) who completed the Self-Description Questionnaire I and the Self-Perception Profile for Children, the…

  15. A field-grown transgenic tomato line expressing higher levels of polyamines reveals legume cover crop mulch-specific perturbations in fruit phenotype at the levels of metabolite profiles, gene expression, and agronomic characteristics.

    PubMed

    Neelam, Anil; Cassol, Tatiana; Mehta, Roshni A; Abdul-Baki, Aref A; Sobolev, Anatoli P; Goyal, Ravinder K; Abbott, Judith; Segre, Anna L; Handa, Avtar K; Mattoo, Autar K

    2008-01-01

    Genetic modification of crop plants to introduce desirable traits such as nutritional enhancement, disease and pest resistance, and enhanced crop productivity is increasingly seen as a promising technology for sustainable agriculture and boosting food production in the world. Independently, cultural practices that utilize alternative agriculture strategies including organic cultivation subscribe to sustainable agriculture by limiting chemical usage and reduced tillage. How the two together affect fruit metabolism or plant growth in the field or whether they are compatible has not yet been tested. Fruit-specific yeast S-adenosylmethionine decarboxylase (ySAMdc) line 579HO, and a control line 556AZ were grown in leguminous hairy vetch (Vicia villosa Roth) (HV) mulch and conventional black polyethylene (BP) mulch, and their fruit analysed. Significant genotypexmulch-dependent interactions on fruit phenotype were exemplified by differential profiles of 20 fruit metabolites such as amino acids, sugars, and organic acids. Expression patterns of the ySAMdc transgene, and tomato SAMdc, E8, PEPC, and ICDHc genes were compared between the two lines as a function of growth on either BP or HV mulch. HV mulch significantly stimulated the accumulation of asparagine, glutamate, glutamine, choline, and citrate concomitant with a decrease in glucose in the 556AZ fruits during ripening as compared to BP. It enables a metabolic system in tomato somewhat akin to the one in higher polyamine-accumulating transgenic fruit that have higher phytonutrient content. Finally, synergism was found between HV mulch and transgenic tomato in up-regulating N:C indicator genes PEPC and ICDHc in the fruit.

  16. A field-grown transgenic tomato line expressing higher levels of polyamines reveals legume cover crop mulch-specific perturbations in fruit phenotype at the levels of metabolite profiles, gene expression, and agronomic characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Neelam, Anil; Cassol, Tatiana; Mehta, Roshni A.; Abdul-Baki, Aref A.; Sobolev, Anatoli P.; Goyal, Ravinder K.; Abbott, Judith; Segre, Anna L.; Handa, Avtar K.; Mattoo, Autar K.

    2008-01-01

    Genetic modification of crop plants to introduce desirable traits such as nutritional enhancement, disease and pest resistance, and enhanced crop productivity is increasingly seen as a promising technology for sustainable agriculture and boosting food production in the world. Independently, cultural practices that utilize alternative agriculture strategies including organic cultivation subscribe to sustainable agriculture by limiting chemical usage and reduced tillage. How the two together affect fruit metabolism or plant growth in the field or whether they are compatible has not yet been tested. Fruit-specific yeast S-adenosylmethionine decarboxylase (ySAMdc) line 579HO, and a control line 556AZ were grown in leguminous hairy vetch (Vicia villosa Roth) (HV) mulch and conventional black polyethylene (BP) mulch, and their fruit analysed. Significant genotype×mulch-dependent interactions on fruit phenotype were exemplified by differential profiles of 20 fruit metabolites such as amino acids, sugars, and organic acids. Expression patterns of the ySAMdc transgene, and tomato SAMdc, E8, PEPC, and ICDHc genes were compared between the two lines as a function of growth on either BP or HV mulch. HV mulch significantly stimulated the accumulation of asparagine, glutamate, glutamine, choline, and citrate concomitant with a decrease in glucose in the 556AZ fruits during ripening as compared to BP. It enables a metabolic system in tomato somewhat akin to the one in higher polyamine-accumulating transgenic fruit that have higher phytonutrient content. Finally, synergism was found between HV mulch and transgenic tomato in up-regulating N:C indicator genes PEPC and ICDHc in the fruit. PMID:18469323

  17. The nature of stable insomnia phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Pillai, Vivek; Roth, Thomas; Drake, Christopher L

    2015-01-01

    We examined the 1-y stability of four insomnia symptom profiles: sleep onset insomnia; sleep maintenance insomnia; combined onset and maintenance insomnia; and neither criterion (i.e., insomnia cases that do not meet quantitative thresholds for onset or maintenance problems). Insomnia cases that exhibited the same symptom profile over a 1-y period were considered to be phenotypes, and were compared in terms of clinical and demographic characteristics. Longitudinal. Urban, community-based. Nine hundred fifty-four adults with Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition based current insomnia (46.6 ± 12.6 y; 69.4% female). None. At baseline, participants were divided into four symptom profile groups based on quantitative criteria. Follow-up assessment 1 y later revealed that approximately 60% of participants retained the same symptom profile, and were hence judged to be phenotypes. Stability varied significantly by phenotype, such that sleep onset insomnia (SOI) was the least stable (42%), whereas combined insomnia (CI) was the most stable (69%). Baseline symptom groups (cross-sectionally defined) differed significantly across various clinical indices, including daytime impairment, depression, and anxiety. Importantly, however, a comparison of stable phenotypes (longitudinally defined) did not reveal any differences in impairment or comorbid psychopathology. Another interesting finding was that whereas all other insomnia phenotypes showed evidence of an elevated wake drive both at night and during the day, the 'neither criterion' phenotype did not; this latter phenotype exhibited significantly higher daytime sleepiness despite subthreshold onset and maintenance difficulties. By adopting a stringent, stability-based definition, this study offers timely and important data on the longitudinal trajectory of specific insomnia phenotypes. With the exception of daytime sleepiness, few clinical differences are apparent across stable phenotypes.

  18. On the monotonicity of multidimensional finite difference schemes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovyrkina, O.; Ostapenko, V.

    2016-10-01

    The classical concept of monotonicity, introduced by Godunov for linear one-dimensional difference schemes, is extended to multidimensional case. Necessary and sufficient conditions of monotonicity are obtained for linear multidimensional difference schemes of first order. The constraints on the numerical viscosity are given that ensure the monotonicity of a difference scheme in the multidimensional case. It is proposed a modification of the second order multidimensional CABARET scheme that preserves the monotonicity of one-dimensional discrete solutions and, as a result, ensures higher smoothness in the computation of multidimensional discontinuous solutions. The results of two-dimensional test computations illustrating the advantages of the modified CABARET scheme are presented.

  19. Framework for analyzing ecological trait-based models in multidimensional niche spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biancalani, Tommaso; DeVille, Lee; Goldenfeld, Nigel

    2015-05-01

    We develop a theoretical framework for analyzing ecological models with a multidimensional niche space. Our approach relies on the fact that ecological niches are described by sequences of symbols, which allows us to include multiple phenotypic traits. Ecological drivers, such as competitive exclusion, are modeled by introducing the Hamming distance between two sequences. We show that a suitable transform diagonalizes the community interaction matrix of these models, making it possible to predict the conditions for niche differentiation and, close to the instability onset, the asymptotically long time population distributions of niches. We exemplify our method using the Lotka-Volterra equations with an exponential competition kernel.

  20. Multidimensional x-space magnetic particle imaging.

    PubMed

    Goodwill, Patrick W; Conolly, Steven M

    2011-09-01

    Magnetic particle imaging (MPI) is a promising new medical imaging tracer modality with potential applications in human angiography, cancer imaging, in vivo cell tracking, and inflammation imaging. Here we demonstrate both theoretically and experimentally that multidimensional MPI is a linear shift-invariant imaging system with an analytic point spread function. We also introduce a fast image reconstruction method that obtains the intrinsic MPI image with high signal-to-noise ratio via a simple gridding operation in x-space. We also demonstrate a method to reconstruct large field-of-view (FOV) images using partial FOV scanning, despite the loss of first harmonic image information due to direct feedthrough contamination. We conclude with the first experimental test of multidimensional x-space MPI.

  1. Multidimensional X-Space Magnetic Particle Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Conolly, Steven M.

    2012-01-01

    Magnetic particle imaging (MPI) is a promising new medical imaging tracer modality with potential applications in human angiography, cancer imaging, in vivo cell tracking, and inflammation imaging. Here we demonstrate both theoretically and experimentally that multidimensional MPI is a linear shift-in-variant imaging system with an analytic point spread function. We also introduce a fast image reconstruction method that obtains the intrinsic MPI image with high signal-to-noise ratio via a simple gridding operation in x-space. We also demonstrate a method to reconstruct large field-of-view (FOV) images using partial FOV scanning, despite the loss of first harmonic image information due to direct feedthrough contamination. We conclude with the first experimental test of multidimensional x-space MPI. PMID:21402508

  2. Visualization of Multidimensional Data in Nursing Science.

    PubMed

    Docherty, Sharron L; Vorderstrasse, Allison; Brandon, Debra; Johnson, Constance

    2016-10-18

    Nursing scientists have long been interested in complex, context-dependent questions addressing individual- and population-level challenges in health and illness. These critical questions require multilevel data (e.g., genetic, physiologic, biologic, behavioral, affective, and social). Advances in data-gathering methods have resulted in the collection of large sets of complex, multifaceted, and often non-comparable data. Scientific visualization is a powerful methodological tool for facilitating understanding of these multidimensional data sets. Our purpose is to demonstrate the utility of scientific visualization as a method for identifying associations, patterns, and trends in multidimensional data as exemplified in two studies. We describe a brief history of visual analysis, processes involved in scientific visualization, and opportunities and challenges in the use of visualization methods. Scientific visualization can play a crucial role in helping nurse scientists make sense of the structure and underlying patterns in their data to answer vital questions in the field.

  3. Effective Friedmann model from multidimensional cosmologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuk, A.

    2006-10-01

    We investigate the possibility of the construction of the conventional Friedmann cosmology for our observable Universe if the underlying theory is the multidimensional Kaluza-Klein model. We show that the effective Friedmann model obtained by dynamic compactification of the multidimensional model is faced with too strong variations in the fundamental constants. On the other hand, models with stable compactification of the internal space are free from this problem and also result in conventional four-dimensonal cosmological behaviour for our Universe. We prove a no-go theorem, which shows that stable compactification of the internal spaces is possible only if the equations of state in the external and internal spaces are properly adjusted to each other. With a proper choice of parameters (fine tuning), the effective cosmological constant in this model provides the late-time acceleration of the Universe.

  4. Elements Of Theory Of Multidimensional Complex Variables

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, E. Dale

    1993-01-01

    Two reports describe elements of theory of multidimensional complex variables, with emphasis on three dimensions. First report introduces general theory. Second, presents further developments in theory of analytic functions of single three-dimensional variable and applies theory to representation of ideal flows. Results of preliminary studies suggest analytic functions of new three-dimensional complex variables useful in numerous applications, including representing of three-dimensional flows and potentials.

  5. On the Need for Multidimensional Stirling Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dyson, Rodger; Wilson, Scott; Tew, Roy; Demko, Rikako

    2006-01-01

    Contents include the following: Dual opposed convertors. High efficiency. Low mass space power. One-dimensional analysis. Fast computation. Design optimizations are easily done. Need for multidimensional modeling. Axisymmetric simulation. Flow characteristics. Low mach number. Laminar, transitional, and turbulent flow. Conjugate heat transfer. Third order analysis. Recent whole engine modeling. Regenerator geometry. Turbulence modeling. Flat head heater not 1-D. Empirical coefficients needed. Experiment design. Flow distribution. Sensor placement. Calibration. Validation.

  6. Multidimensional incremental parsing for universal source coding.

    PubMed

    Bae, Soo Hyun; Juang, Biing-Hwang

    2008-10-01

    A multidimensional incremental parsing algorithm (MDIP) for multidimensional discrete sources, as a generalization of the Lempel-Ziv coding algorithm, is investigated. It consists of three essential component schemes, maximum decimation matching, hierarchical structure of multidimensional source coding, and dictionary augmentation. As a counterpart of the longest match search in the Lempel-Ziv algorithm, two classes of maximum decimation matching are studied. Also, an underlying behavior of the dictionary augmentation scheme for estimating the source statistics is examined. For an m-dimensional source, m augmentative patches are appended into the dictionary at each coding epoch, thus requiring the transmission of a substantial amount of information to the decoder. The property of the hierarchical structure of the source coding algorithm resolves this issue by successively incorporating lower dimensional coding procedures in the scheme. In regard to universal lossy source coders, we propose two distortion functions, the local average distortion and the local minimax distortion with a set of threshold levels for each source symbol. For performance evaluation, we implemented three image compression algorithms based upon the MDIP; one is lossless and the others are lossy. The lossless image compression algorithm does not perform better than the Lempel-Ziv-Welch coding, but experimentally shows efficiency in capturing the source structure. The two lossy image compression algorithms are implemented using the two distortion functions, respectively. The algorithm based on the local average distortion is efficient at minimizing the signal distortion, but the images by the one with the local minimax distortion have a good perceptual fidelity among other compression algorithms. Our insights inspire future research on feature extraction of multidimensional discrete sources.

  7. Progress in Multi-Dimensional Upwind Differencing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-09-01

    advances in each of these components are discussed; putting them all together is the present focus of a worldwide research effort. Some numerical results ...as 1983 by Phil Roe [1]. A study of discrete multi-dimensional wave models by Roe followed in 1985 (ICASE Report 85-18, also [21), but it took until...consider the numerical results shown in Figure :3 and 4, taken from [:34] and [35], respectively. In Figure 3a the exact and discrete Mach-number

  8. Applications of Multidimensional Wavelet Filtering in Geosciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuen, D. A.; Vincent, A. P.; Kido, M.

    2001-12-01

    Today we are facing a severe crisis of being flooded with huge amounts of data being generated by higher-resolution numerical simulations , laboratory instrumentions and satellite observations. Since there is no way one can visualize the full data set, we must extract essential features from the data-set. One way of addressing this problem is to use mathematical filters , such as multidimensional wavelets. We present imaging results in the geosciences based on using multidimensional Gaussian wavelets as a filter. This approach has been applied to a wide-range of problems, which span from the nanoscale in mineral surfaces imaged by atomic force microscopy to hundreds of kilometers in geoidal undulations determined from satellite orbits or small-scale plumes in high Rayleigh number convection. Besides decomposing the field under consideration into various scales , called a scalogram, we have also constructed two-dimensional maps, delineating the spatial distributions of the maximum of the wavelet transformed quantity E-max and the associated local wave-number. We have generalized the application of multidimensional wavelets to quantify in terms of a two-dimensional map the correlation C for two multidimensional fields A and B. We will show a simple 2D isotropic wavelet-like transform for a spherical surface. We have analyzed the transformed geoid data with a band-pass filter in the spherical harmonic domain and have shown the equivalency of the two representations. This spherical wavelet-like filter can be applied also to problems in planetary science, such as the surface topography and geoid of other planetary bodies, like Mars.

  9. Multidimensional reaction rate theory with anisotropic diffusion.

    PubMed

    Berezhkovskii, Alexander M; Szabo, Attila; Greives, Nicholas; Zhou, Huan-Xiang

    2014-11-28

    An analytical expression is derived for the rate constant that describes diffusive transitions between two deep wells of a multidimensional potential. The expression, in contrast to the Kramers-Langer formula for the rate constant, is valid even when the diffusion is highly anisotropic. Our approach is based on a variational principle for the reactive flux and uses a trial function for the splitting probability or commitor. The theoretical result is validated by Brownian dynamics simulations.

  10. Pathway Profiling in Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Suzanne T.; VanderVen, Brian C.; Sherman, David R.; Russell, David G.; Sampson, Nicole S.

    2011-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the bacterium that causes tuberculosis, imports and metabolizes host cholesterol during infection. This ability is important in the chronic phase of infection. Here we investigate the role of the intracellular growth operon (igr), which has previously been identified as having a cholesterol-sensitive phenotype in vitro and which is important for intracellular growth of the mycobacteria. We have employed isotopically labeled low density lipoproteins containing either [1,7,15,22,26-14C]cholesterol or [1,7,15,22,26-13C]cholesterol and high resolution LC/MS as tools to profile the cholesterol-derived metabolome of an igr operon-disrupted mutant (Δigr) of M. tuberculosis. A partially metabolized cholesterol species accumulated in the Δigr knock-out strain that was absent in the complemented and parental wild-type strains. Structural elucidation by multidimensional 1H and 13C NMR spectroscopy revealed the accumulated metabolite to be methyl 1β-(2′-propanoate)-3aα-H-4α-(3′-propanoic acid)-7aβ-methylhexahydro-5-indanone. Heterologously expressed and purified FadE28-FadE29, an acyl-CoA dehydrogenase encoded by the igr operon, catalyzes the dehydrogenation of 2′-propanoyl-CoA ester side chains in substrates with structures analogous to the characterized metabolite. Based on the structure of the isolated metabolite, enzyme activity, and bioinformatic annotations, we assign the primary function of the igr operon to be degradation of the 2′-propanoate side chain. Therefore, the igr operon is necessary to completely metabolize the side chain of cholesterol metabolites. PMID:22045806

  11. Trellis coding with multidimensional QAM signal sets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pietrobon, Steven S.; Costello, Daniel J.

    1993-01-01

    Trellis coding using multidimensional QAM signal sets is investigated. Finite-size 2D signal sets are presented that have minimum average energy, are 90-deg rotationally symmetric, and have from 16 to 1024 points. The best trellis codes using the finite 16-QAM signal set with two, four, six, and eight dimensions are found by computer search (the multidimensional signal set is constructed from the 2D signal set). The best moderate complexity trellis codes for infinite lattices with two, four, six, and eight dimensions are also found. The minimum free squared Euclidean distance and number of nearest neighbors for these codes were used as the selection criteria. Many of the multidimensional codes are fully rotationally invariant and give asymptotic coding gains up to 6.0 dB. From the infinite lattice codes, the best codes for transmitting J, J + 1/4, J + 1/3, J + 1/2, J + 2/3, and J + 3/4 bit/sym (J an integer) are presented.

  12. Incremental multidimensional scaling method for database visualization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basalaj, Wojciech

    1999-03-01

    A collection of entity descriptions may be conveniently represented by a set of tuples or a set of objects with appropriate attributes. The utility of relational and object databases is based on this premise. Methods of multivariate analysis can naturally be applied to such a representation. Multidimensional Scaling deserves particular attention because of its suitability for visualization. The advantage of using Multidimensional Scaling is its generality. Provided that one can judge or calculate the dissimilarity between any pair of data objects, this method can be applied. This makes it invariant to the number and types of object attributes. To take advantage of this method for visualizing large collections of data, however, its inherent computational complexity needs to be alleviated. This is particularly the case for least squares scaling, which involves numerical minimization of a loss function; on the other hand the technique gives better configurations than analytical classical scaling. Numerical optimization requires selection of a convergence criterion, i.e. deciding when to stop. A common solution is to stop after a predetermined number of iterations has been performed. Such an approach, while guaranteed to terminate, may prematurely abort the optimization. The incremental Multidimensional Scaling method presented here solves these problems. It uses cluster analysis techniques to assess the structural significance of groups of data objects. This creates an opportunity to ignore dissimilarities between closely associated objects, thus greatly reducing input size. To detect convergence it maintains a compact representation of all intermediate optimization results. This method has been applied to the analysis of database tables.

  13. Trellis coding with multidimensional QAM signal sets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pietrobon, Steven S.; Costello, Daniel J.

    1993-01-01

    Trellis coding using multidimensional QAM signal sets is investigated. Finite-size 2D signal sets are presented that have minimum average energy, are 90-deg rotationally symmetric, and have from 16 to 1024 points. The best trellis codes using the finite 16-QAM signal set with two, four, six, and eight dimensions are found by computer search (the multidimensional signal set is constructed from the 2D signal set). The best moderate complexity trellis codes for infinite lattices with two, four, six, and eight dimensions are also found. The minimum free squared Euclidean distance and number of nearest neighbors for these codes were used as the selection criteria. Many of the multidimensional codes are fully rotationally invariant and give asymptotic coding gains up to 6.0 dB. From the infinite lattice codes, the best codes for transmitting J, J + 1/4, J + 1/3, J + 1/2, J + 2/3, and J + 3/4 bit/sym (J an integer) are presented.

  14. Multidimensional Homophily in Friendship Networks1

    PubMed Central

    Block, Per; Grund, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Homophily – the tendency for individuals to associate with similar others – is one of the most persistent findings in social network analysis. Its importance is established along the lines of a multitude of sociologically relevant dimensions, e.g. sex, ethnicity and social class. Existing research, however, mostly focuses on one dimension at a time. But people are inherently multidimensional, have many attributes and are members of multiple groups. In this article, we explore such multidimensionality further in the context of network dynamics. Are friendship ties increasingly likely to emerge and persist when individuals have an increasing number of attributes in common? We analyze eleven friendship networks of adolescents, draw on stochastic actor-oriented network models and focus on the interaction of established homophily effects. Our results indicate that main effects for homophily on various dimensions are positive. At the same time, the interaction of these homophily effects is negative. There seems to be a diminishing effect for having more than one attribute in common. We conclude that studies of homophily and friendship formation need to address such multidimensionality further. PMID:25525503

  15. Relevance in the science classroom: A multidimensional analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartwell, Matthew F.

    While perceived relevance is considered a fundamental component of adaptive learning, the experience of relevance and its conceptual definition have not been well described. The mixed-methods research presented in this dissertation aimed to clarify the conceptual meaning of relevance by focusing on its phenomenological experience from the students' perspective. Following a critical literature review, I propose an identity-based model of perceived relevance that includes three components: a contextual target, an identity target, and a connection type, or lens. An empirical investigation of this model that consisted of two general phases was implemented in four 9th grade-biology classrooms. Participants in Phase 1 (N = 118) completed a series of four open-ended writing activities focused on eliciting perceived personal connections to academic content. Exploratory qualitative content analysis of a 25% random sample of the student responses was used to identify the main meaning-units of the proposed model as well as different dimensions of student relevance perceptions. These meaning-units and dimensions provided the basis for the construction of a conceptual mapping sentence capturing students' perceived relevance, which was then applied in a confirmatory analysis to all other student responses. Participants in Phase 2 (N = 139) completed a closed survey designed based on the mapping sentence to assess their perceived relevance of a biology unit. The survey also included scales assessing other domain-level motivational processes. Exploratory factor analysis and non-metric multidimensional scaling indicated a coherent conceptual structure, which included a primary interpretive relevance dimension. Comparison of the conceptual structure across various groups (randomly-split sample, gender, academic level, domain-general motivational profiles) provided support for its ubiquity and insight into variation in the experience of perceived relevance among students of different

  16. Phenotypic categorization of genetic skin diseases reveals new relations between phenotypes, genes and pathways

    PubMed Central

    Sadreyev, Ruslan I.; Feramisco, Jamison D.; Tsao, Hensin; Grishin, Nick V.

    2009-01-01

    Motivation: Systematic analysis of connection between proteins, their cellular function and phenotypic manifestations in disease is a central problem of biological and clinical research. The solution to this problem requires the development of new approaches to link the rapidly growing dataset of gene–disease associations with the many complex and overlapping phenotypes of human disease. Results: We analyze genetic skin disorders and suggest a manually designed set of elementary phenotypes whose combinations define diseases as points in a multidimensional space, providing a basis for phenotypic disease clustering. Placing the known gene–disease associations in the context of this space reveals new patterns that suggest previously unknown functional links between proteins, signaling pathways and disease phenotypes. For example, analysis of telangiectasias (spider vein diseases) reveals a previously unrecognized interplay between the TGF-β signaling pathway and pentose phosphate pathway. This interaction may mediate glucose-dependent regulation of TGF-β signaling, providing a clue to the known association between angiopathies and diabetes and implying new gene candidates for mutational analysis and drug targeting. Contact: grishin@chop.swmed.edu Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:19744994

  17. Bronchiectasis: Phenotyping a Complex Disease.

    PubMed

    Chalmers, James D

    2017-03-15

    Bronchiectasis is a long-neglected disease currently experiencing a surge in interest. It is a highly complex condition with numerous aetiologies, co-morbidities and a heterogeneous disease presentation and clinical course. The past few years have seen major advances in our understanding of the disease, primarily through large real-life cohort studies. The main outcomes of interest in bronchiectasis are symptoms, exacerbations, treatment response, disease progression and death. We are now more able to identify clearly the radiological, clinical, microbiological and inflammatory contributors to these outcomes. Over the past couple of years, multidimensional scoring systems such as the Bronchiectasis Severity Index have been introduced to predict disease severity and mortality. Although there are currently no licensed therapies for bronchiectasis, an increasing number of clinical trials are planned or ongoing. While this emerging evidence is awaited, bronchiectasis guidelines will continue to be informed largely by real-life evidence from observational studies and patient registries. Key developments in the bronchiectasis field include the establishment of international disease registries and characterisation of disease phenotypes using cluster analysis and biological data.

  18. Graphical Representation of Proximity Measures for Multidimensional Data: Classical and Metric Multidimensional Scaling.

    PubMed

    Zand, Martin S; Wang, Jiong; Hilchey, Shannon

    We describe the use of classical and metric multidimensional scaling methods for graphical representation of the proximity between collections of data consisting of cases characterized by multidimensional attributes. These methods can preserve metric differences between cases, while allowing for dimensional reduction and projection to two or three dimensions ideal for data exploration. We demonstrate these methods with three datasets for: (i) the immunological similarity of influenza proteins measured by a multidimensional assay; (ii) influenza protein sequence similarity; and (iii) reconstruction of airport-relative locations from paired proximity measurements. These examples highlight the use of proximity matrices, eigenvalues, eigenvectors, and linear and nonlinear mappings using numerical minimization methods. Some considerations and caveats for each method are also discussed, and compact Mathematica programs are provided.

  19. Multidimensional EMD-based edge detection and the application to GPR imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeng, Yih; Chen, Chih-Sung; Chen, Sung-Chih

    2017-04-01

    The edge detection is an effective approach in identifying object boundaries within a digital image. In recent years, it has been introduced to process geophysical data in the hope of enhancing the target boundary and improving the delineation of geological structures. However, most successful cases are applications to potential-field data. For GPR imaging, the edge detection is an emerging technique, and much effort is needed to make this method become an essential GPR data processing component. The major difficulty of applying edge detection to GPR data is that the GPR profile is orientation dependent, and a method successful in processing the digital image or potential-field data may not have the same achievement in GPR. Another concern for applying the edge detection is that the data must have acceptable signal-to-noise ratios, but the signal enhancement in GPR imaging has not been completely solved yet. In this study, we introduce a multidimensional EMD-based edge detection which can reduce the mentioned difficulties and improve the effect of edge detection. The proposed scheme suggests that the GPR data are pre-processed and reconstructed by using the multidimensional EMD to enhance the signal to noise ratio. This procedure is decisive because the adaptability of the EMD decomposition and the dyadic nature of the EMD components both allow the reconstructed data to have less noise and retain more signal than using conventional filters. In addition, the multidimensional EMD is efficient in identifying structure in different directions, which is suitable for processing orientation dependent data. Moreover, all the advantages gained in the multidimensional EMD do not rely on any prerequisite knowledge of the noise frequency band. After the multidimensional EMD process, we then apply the edge detection to the reconstructed data for the final interpretation. With the typical model study, the proposed scheme is also tested on the GPR data acquired in a buried hot

  20. Modelling mathematics problem solving item responses using a multidimensional IRT model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Margaret; Adams, Raymond

    2006-10-01

    This research examined students' responses to mathematics problem-solving tasks and applied a general multidimensional IRT model at the response category level. In doing so, cognitive processes were identified and modelled through item response modelling to extract more information than would be provided using conventional practices in scoring items. More specifically, the study consisted of two parts. The first part involved the development of a mathematics problem-solving framework that was theoretically grounded, drawing upon research in mathematics education and cognitive psychology. The framework was then used as the basis for item development. The second part of the research involved the analysis of the item response data. It was demonstrated that multidimensional IRT models were powerful tools for extracting information from a limited number of item responses. A problem-solving profile for each student could be constructed from the results of IRT scaling.

  1. Plant phenomics and the need for physiological phenotyping across scales to narrow the genotype-to-phenotype knowledge gap.

    PubMed

    Großkinsky, Dominik K; Svensgaard, Jesper; Christensen, Svend; Roitsch, Thomas

    2015-09-01

    Plants are affected by complex genome×environment×management interactions which determine phenotypic plasticity as a result of the variability of genetic components. Whereas great advances have been made in the cost-efficient and high-throughput analyses of genetic information and non-invasive phenotyping, the large-scale analyses of the underlying physiological mechanisms lag behind. The external phenotype is determined by the sum of the complex interactions of metabolic pathways and intracellular regulatory networks that is reflected in an internal, physiological, and biochemical phenotype. These various scales of dynamic physiological responses need to be considered, and genotyping and external phenotyping should be linked to the physiology at the cellular and tissue level. A high-dimensional physiological phenotyping across scales is needed that integrates the precise characterization of the internal phenotype into high-throughput phenotyping of whole plants and canopies. By this means, complex traits can be broken down into individual components of physiological traits. Since the higher resolution of physiological phenotyping by 'wet chemistry' is inherently limited in throughput, high-throughput non-invasive phenotyping needs to be validated and verified across scales to be used as proxy for the underlying processes. Armed with this interdisciplinary and multidimensional phenomics approach, plant physiology, non-invasive phenotyping, and functional genomics will complement each other, ultimately enabling the in silico assessment of responses under defined environments with advanced crop models. This will allow generation of robust physiological predictors also for complex traits to bridge the knowledge gap between genotype and phenotype for applications in breeding, precision farming, and basic research.

  2. Multidimensional Image Analysis for High Precision Radiation Therapy.

    PubMed

    Arimura, Hidetaka; Soufi, Mazen; Haekal, Mohammad

    2017-01-01

    High precision radiation therapy (HPRT) has been improved by utilizing conventional image engineering technologies. However, different frameworks are necessary for further improvement of HPRT. This review paper attempted to define the multidimensional image and what multidimensional image analysis is, which may be feasible for increasing the accuracy of HPRT. A number of researches in radiation therapy field have been introduced to understand the multidimensional image analysis. Multidimensional image analysis could greatly assist clinical staffs in radiation therapy planning, treatment, and prediction of treatment outcomes.

  3. Long-term phenotypic evolution of bacteria.

    PubMed

    Plata, Germán; Henry, Christopher S; Vitkup, Dennis

    2015-01-15

    For many decades comparative analyses of protein sequences and structures have been used to investigate fundamental principles of molecular evolution. In contrast, relatively little is known about the long-term evolution of species' phenotypic and genetic properties. This represents an important gap in our understanding of evolution, as exactly these proprieties play key roles in natural selection and adaptation to diverse environments. Here we perform a comparative analysis of bacterial growth and gene deletion phenotypes using hundreds of genome-scale metabolic models. Overall, bacterial phenotypic evolution can be described by a two-stage process with a rapid initial phenotypic diversification followed by a slow long-term exponential divergence. The observed average divergence trend, with approximately similar fractions of phenotypic properties changing per unit time, continues for billions of years. We experimentally confirm the predicted divergence trend using the phenotypic profiles of 40 diverse bacterial species across more than 60 growth conditions. Our analysis suggests that, at long evolutionary distances, gene essentiality is significantly more conserved than the ability to utilize different nutrients, while synthetic lethality is significantly less conserved. We also find that although a rapid phenotypic evolution is sometimes observed within the same species, a transition from high to low phenotypic similarity occurs primarily at the genus level.

  4. Construct continuity in the presence of multidimensionality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staniewska, Dorota

    Unidimensionality -- a condition, under which only one dominant construct is being measured by the test, is a fundamental assumption of most modern day psychometric models. However, some tests are multidimensional by design. A test, for instance, might measure physics, biology and chemistry subscales combined to measure a "general science" composite. The relative magnitudes of those subscales sometimes shift from administration to administration, which results in an altered composite. This study examined the conditions under which two different forms of a multidimensional test measure the same composite construct to a degree that allows them to be equated, i.e. used interchangeably. IRT true-score equating was used in a simulation study to assess the closeness of the scores on the forms. Conditions examined included the correlations between subscales, varying number of items per subscale form to form, and different subpopulation ability estimates on the subscales. Differences in the equating errors due to generating model (1PL or 3PL) were also examined. A way of calculating a unidimensional composite from a two-dimensional ability was devised and compared to the unidimensional composite obtained from Parscale. It was found that in general, the errors increase with decreasing correlation between traits and increased divergence of the two forms to be equated, with the later being the main predictor of the equating errors. However, the magnitude of those errors was small for the population as a whole especially when all examinee abilities are drawn from the same distribution. It was concluded that IRT true score equating is relatively robust to multidimensionality for the conditions examined, especially if the overall population score is desired. However, when accurate estimate of the equated score for individuals at the extremes of the population is needed, or whenever population abilities are drawn from more than one distribution, the unidimensional true score

  5. Nuclear Forensic Inferences Using Iterative Multidimensional Statistics

    SciTech Connect

    Robel, M; Kristo, M J; Heller, M A

    2009-06-09

    Nuclear forensics involves the analysis of interdicted nuclear material for specific material characteristics (referred to as 'signatures') that imply specific geographical locations, production processes, culprit intentions, etc. Predictive signatures rely on expert knowledge of physics, chemistry, and engineering to develop inferences from these material characteristics. Comparative signatures, on the other hand, rely on comparison of the material characteristics of the interdicted sample (the 'questioned sample' in FBI parlance) with those of a set of known samples. In the ideal case, the set of known samples would be a comprehensive nuclear forensics database, a database which does not currently exist. In fact, our ability to analyze interdicted samples and produce an extensive list of precise materials characteristics far exceeds our ability to interpret the results. Therefore, as we seek to develop the extensive databases necessary for nuclear forensics, we must also develop the methods necessary to produce the necessary inferences from comparison of our analytical results with these large, multidimensional sets of data. In the work reported here, we used a large, multidimensional dataset of results from quality control analyses of uranium ore concentrate (UOC, sometimes called 'yellowcake'). We have found that traditional multidimensional techniques, such as principal components analysis (PCA), are especially useful for understanding such datasets and drawing relevant conclusions. In particular, we have developed an iterative partial least squares-discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) procedure that has proven especially adept at identifying the production location of unknown UOC samples. By removing classes which fell far outside the initial decision boundary, and then rebuilding the PLS-DA model, we have consistently produced better and more definitive attributions than with a single pass classification approach. Performance of the iterative PLS-DA method

  6. Multidimensional voice analysis of reflux laryngitis patients.

    PubMed

    Pribuisienë, Rûta; Uloza, Virgilijus; Saferis, Viktoras

    2005-01-01

    The aim of the study was to analyze and quantify the voice characteristics of reflux laryngitis (RL) patients and to determine the most important voice tests and voice-quality parameters in the functional diagnostics of RL. The voices of 83 RL patients and 31 persons in the control group were evaluated. Vocal function was assessed using a multidimensional set of video laryngostroboscopic, perceptual, acoustic, aerodynamic and subjective measurements according to the protocol elaborated by the Committee on Phoniatrics of the European Laryngological Society. The mean values of the hoarseness visual analogue scale assessment and voice handicap index were significantly higher (P<0.05) in the group of RL patients as compared to the controls. Objective voice assessment revealed a significant increase in mean values of jitter, shimmer and normalized noise energy (NNE), along with a significant decrease in pitch range, maximum frequency, phonetogram area (S) and maximum phonation time (MPT) in RL patients, both in the male and female subgroups. According to the results of discriminant analysis, the NNE, MPT, S and intensity range were determined as an optimum set for functional diagnostics of RL. The derived function (equation) makes it possible to assign the person to the group of RL patients with an accuracy of 86.7%. The sensitivity and specificity of eight voice parameters were found to be higher than 50%. The results of the present study demonstrate a reduction of phonation capabilities and voice quality in RL patients. Multidimensional voice evaluation makes it possible to detect significant differences in mean values of perceptual, subjective and objective voice quality parameters between RL patients and controls groups. Therefore, multidimensional voice analysis is an important tool in the functional diagnostics of RL.

  7. Evolution of multidimensional flat anisotropic cosmological models

    SciTech Connect

    Beloborodov, A. ); Demianski, M. Nicolaus Copernicus Astronomical Center, Bartycka 18, 00-716 Warsaw International Center for Relativistic Astrophysics , Universita di Roma I, La Sapienza, Rome ); Ivanov, P.; Polnarev, A.G. )

    1993-07-15

    We study the dynamics of a flat multidimensional anisotropic cosmological model filled with an anisotropic fluidlike medium. By an appropriate choice of variables, the dynamical equations reduce to a two-dimensional dynamical system. We present a detailed analysis of the time evolution of this system and the conditions of the existence of spacetime singularities. We investigate the conditions under which violent, exponential, and power-law inflation is possible. We show that dimensional reduction cannot proceed by anti-inflation (rapid contraction of internal space). Our model indicates that it is very difficult to achieve dimensional reduction by classical means.

  8. A multidimensional representation model of geographic features

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Usery, E. Lynn; Timson, George; Coletti, Mark

    2016-01-28

    A multidimensional model of geographic features has been developed and implemented with data from The National Map of the U.S. Geological Survey. The model, programmed in C++ and implemented as a feature library, was tested with data from the National Hydrography Dataset demonstrating the capability to handle changes in feature attributes, such as increases in chlorine concentration in a stream, and feature geometry, such as the changing shoreline of barrier islands over time. Data can be entered directly, from a comma separated file, or features with attributes and relationships can be automatically populated in the model from data in the Spatial Data Transfer Standard format.

  9. Hypernetworks: Multidimensional relationships in multilevel systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, J. H.

    2016-09-01

    Networks provide a powerful way of modelling the dynamics of complex systems. Going beyond binary relations, embracing n-ary relations in network science can generalise many structures. This starts with hypergraphs and their Galois structures. Simplicial complexes generalise hypergraphs by adding orientation. Their multidimensional q-connectivity structure generalises connectivity in networks. Hypersimplices generalise simplices by making the relational structure explicit in the notation. This gives a new way of representing multilevel systems and their dynamics, leading to a new fragment-recombine operator to model the complex dynamics of interacting multilevel systems.

  10. Shock capturing schemes for multidimensional flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parpia, Ijaz H.

    1991-01-01

    Progress made in the development of a genuinely multidimensional finite volume algorithm for problems in inviscid gas dynamics is presented. The approach entails: (1) the reconstruction of flowfield data using a planar wave pattern in which the strengths and orientations of the component waves are derived independently of the mesh geometry; and (2) the development of a flux formula which provides a numerical approximation to the flux at a finite volume cell face during the passage of waves which are in general oblique to the face. Several algorithms are outlined, and the most recent developments are included. The results of several numerical cases are also included.

  11. Multidimensional world, inflation, and modern acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Bronnikov, K. A.; Rubin, S. G.; Svadkovsky, I. V.

    2010-04-15

    Starting from pure multidimensional gravity with curvature-nonlinear terms but no matter fields in the initial action, we obtain a cosmological model with two effective scalar fields related to the size of two extra factor spaces. The model includes both an early inflationary stage and that of modern accelerated expansion and satisfies the observational data. There are no small parameters; the effective inflaton mass depends on the initial conditions which explain its small value as compared to the Planck mass. At the modern stage, the size of extra dimensions slowly increases, therefore this model predicts drastic changes in the physical laws of our Universe in the remote future.

  12. Multidimensional world, inflation, and modern acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bronnikov, K. A.; Rubin, S. G.; Svadkovsky, I. V.

    2010-04-01

    Starting from pure multidimensional gravity with curvature-nonlinear terms but no matter fields in the initial action, we obtain a cosmological model with two effective scalar fields related to the size of two extra factor spaces. The model includes both an early inflationary stage and that of modern accelerated expansion and satisfies the observational data. There are no small parameters; the effective inflaton mass depends on the initial conditions which explain its small value as compared to the Planck mass. At the modern stage, the size of extra dimensions slowly increases, therefore this model predicts drastic changes in the physical laws of our Universe in the remote future.

  13. A Multidimensional Scaling Approach to Dimensionality Assessment for Measurement Instruments Modeled by Multidimensional Item Response Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Toro, Maritsa

    2011-01-01

    The statistical assessment of dimensionality provides evidence of the underlying constructs measured by a survey or test instrument. This study focuses on educational measurement, specifically tests comprised of items described as multidimensional. That is, items that require examinee proficiency in multiple content areas and/or multiple cognitive…

  14. A Multidimensional Scaling Approach to Dimensionality Assessment for Measurement Instruments Modeled by Multidimensional Item Response Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Toro, Maritsa

    2011-01-01

    The statistical assessment of dimensionality provides evidence of the underlying constructs measured by a survey or test instrument. This study focuses on educational measurement, specifically tests comprised of items described as multidimensional. That is, items that require examinee proficiency in multiple content areas and/or multiple cognitive…

  15. Serum Biochemical Phenotypes in the Domestic Dog.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yu-Mei; Hadox, Erin; Szladovits, Balazs; Garden, Oliver A

    2016-01-01

    The serum or plasma biochemical profile is essential in the diagnosis and monitoring of systemic disease in veterinary medicine, but current reference intervals typically take no account of breed-specific differences. Breed-specific hematological phenotypes have been documented in the domestic dog, but little has been published on serum biochemical phenotypes in this species. Serum biochemical profiles of dogs in which all measurements fell within the existing reference intervals were retrieved from a large veterinary database. Serum biochemical profiles from 3045 dogs were retrieved, of which 1495 had an accompanying normal glucose concentration. Sixty pure breeds plus a mixed breed control group were represented by at least 10 individuals. All analytes, except for sodium, chloride and glucose, showed variation with age. Total protein, globulin, potassium, chloride, creatinine, cholesterol, total bilirubin, ALT, CK, amylase, and lipase varied between sexes. Neutering status significantly impacted all analytes except albumin, sodium, calcium, urea, and glucose. Principal component analysis of serum biochemical data revealed 36 pure breeds with distinctive phenotypes. Furthermore, comparative analysis identified 23 breeds with significant differences from the mixed breed group in all biochemical analytes except urea and glucose. Eighteen breeds were identified by both principal component and comparative analysis. Tentative reference intervals were generated for breeds with a distinctive phenotype identified by comparative analysis and represented by at least 120 individuals. This is the first large-scale analysis of breed-specific serum biochemical phenotypes in the domestic dog and highlights potential genetic components of biochemical traits in this species.

  16. Serum Biochemical Phenotypes in the Domestic Dog

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Yu-Mei; Hadox, Erin; Szladovits, Balazs; Garden, Oliver A.

    2016-01-01

    The serum or plasma biochemical profile is essential in the dia